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Full text of "Town Topics (Princeton), Oct. 10, 1984"








Planning Board Grants Approval to Otfice 
Buildings and Housing Development 3 

Stockade Fencing Protecting Greenholm 
Area to be Restored 9 

When Princeton Bank & Trust Opened in 
1834, the Town Had 1 10 Residents... .24 

Contest tor Borough Council May Also Be 
A Mt. Laurel Referendum 1B 

Moliere's "The School tor Wives" Boasts 
A Superb Cast in McCarter Opener 2B 

Princeton Defense Reverts to its Old Ways 
In 32-30 Loss to Brown 15B 




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VOL. XXXIX, NO. 30 



Wednesday, October 1 0, 1 984 



25* at All Newsstands 



Borough Says No 
To Mt. Laurel Suit 

Princeton Borough will 
not join other muncipalities, 
including Princeton 

Township, in asking the 
federal courts to overturn 
the New Jersey State 
Supreme Court Mt. Laurel II 
decision. 

The bid to join the suit, 
which came in a letter from 
County Executive Bill 
Mathesius, was supported 
only by Dick Woodbridge, 
the lone Republican on 
Council. 

During the debate, the two 
attorneys on Council — 
Jane Terpstra and Dick 
Woodbridge — engaged in a 
bit of legal sparring. 

Mrs. Terpstra said that Mt. 
Laurel relates to zoning and 
land use, and these are 
issues in which the federal 
courts have not intervened. 
She noted that, within the 
past week, the United States 
Supreme Court had refused 
to hear a similar case of a 
community on Long Island 
because it involved zoning, 
something that is 
designated to states. 

"I am not confident that 
the Supreme Court wouldn't 
take a different tack on this 
Issue," responded Mr. 
Woodbridge. He added that 

Continued on Next Pago 



| The King's Colors i 

4 Don 't Fly for Long j 

? When does an awning ? 

? become a structure? | 

s And what if that struc- § 

5 ture invades the historic § 
bright of way of the King's § 
§ Highway? 4 

6 Forced to joust every & 
^, week with Mt. Laurel I 
", suits, sewers, strangu- & 

lating Route 1 traffic, a 1 
| weary Mayor and Coun- | 

cil might turn with relief ? 

to consider what Mayor ? 
' Barbara Sigmund term- ? 
' ed, planting her tongue ? 
' firmly in cheek, "these § 

philosophical ques- § 

tions." s 

Continued on Page 20 % 



Bacteria Count in Harry's Brook No Lower 
Despite Extensive Work on Sewer Lines 



"We're at our wits' end. 
We don't know the answer. 
We did a lot of work, and the 
counts are still high." 

The speaker is J.B. Smith, 
chairman of the Sewer 
Operating Committee, but it 
could also be Patrick 
Hansen, health officer, 
Princeton Borough and 
Township. Both are 
frustrated by the fact that 
the extensive repair work to 
the Princeton sewer lines, 
particularly in the area of 
Spring Street-Vandeventer 
Avenue which was thought 
to be the source of the prob- 



Center for Theological Inquiry 
Opens Headquarters on Stockton 



Princeton's newest in- 
stitution, the Center for 
Theological Inquiry, was for- 
mally opened Tuesday after- 
noon, when its new research 
and administrative head- 
quarters at 50 Stockton 
Street was dedicated. 

As conceived by its 
founder, James I. McCord, 
who retired last year as 
president of Princeton 
Theological Seminary, the 
Center will be to theological 
investigation what the In- 
stitute for Advanced Study 
is to scientific inquiry. Dr. 



McCord is chancellor of the 
Center and chairman of its 
board of trustees. 

Established late in 1978 
as an educational institution 
without students, the Center 
is autonomous, ecumenical 
and non-denominational. It 
selects and supports 10-12 
scholars, young post- 
doctoral students as well as 
established professors, as 
full-time resident members 
for periods ranging from one 
semester to three years. 

Continued on Page 26 



lem, have not brought down 
the high total coliform or 
fecal coliform counts in 
Harry's Brook and the storm 
sewer line feeding into the 
brook. 

"Nothing has changed 
since May," Mr. Hansen 
reports dolefully. "We had 
hoped that once the repair 
work was done the counts 
would drop. But that did not 
pan out." 

Concerned, as is Mr. 
Smith, with the continuing 
public health hazard of 
bacteria counts that even in 
dry weather are at the top of 
the particular measurement 
scale used, Mr. Hansen has 
asked for help from the state 
Department of Environmen- 
tal Protection. He will be 
reporting on this develop- 
ment this Wednesday night 
at a joint meeting of 
Borough Council and 
Township Committee. The 
second "sewer summit" — 
which is actually the fourth 
public meeting on the state 
of the sewers — will be held 
in Borough Hall, starting at 8 
p.m. 

The agenda also includes 
reports from Martin Dor- 
ward, general manager of 
the sanitary sewer system, 



on overflows. Mr. Dorward 
will also talk about different 
programs for investigating 
and repairing problems still 
existing in the sewer system 
within the next five years. 

The last sewer summit 
was on May 10, just before 
the Spring Street work was 
completed. On June 14, full 
of hope, Mr. Hansen's men 
took water samples, as they 
had been doing over much of 
the previous year, at dif- 
ferent spots along the 
troublesome stream and in 
the storm sewer lines. The 
counts were "still quite 
high," Mr. Hansen reports, 
but he thought it might be 
too soon after the repairs for 
results to show up. 

However, counts in July 
and August were just as 
high or even higher in some 
places. The one positive 
note, he says, is that the far- 
ther away from Harrison 
Street toward Lake Carnegie 
the samples are taken the 
better are the results. 

Most discouraging of all 
is the fact that the most re- 
cent count on September 24, 
taken on a dry sunny day 
after two weeks of little or 
no rain, was again high. 
"You would think that 

Continued on Page 20 




ID THE BAND PLAYED ON: The Princeton University Band, long a subject of 
Jurtt'oversy among alumni and the University administration, reached a new 
high or low (depending on your point ot view) when members, male and female, 



dropped their pants during halftime at the Brown game last Saturday in Palmer 
Stadium. The gesuture, according to the band, was to salute Its student sup- 
porters. Reactions among the crowd of 1 1 ,000 were mixed. ,b<x »,m..,c» m , 




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ilnutnil.npicH 


INDEX 




(ISSN 0191 TOM) 


Art 


12B 




Business 

Calendar of the Week 


24 
15 


Published Every W«*»M4«v 


ThrMtfhout the Yw 


Classified Ads 


28-48 
. 13B 




OoneloC Sfuer! 




4B 


19(4 1«1 




8B 


Dan D Coyle 


Mailbox 


...14 


1916 I97J 




6B 






JOB 


Founding Editors 


Obituaries 


...28 




People in the News.... 


.22 


OoruldC Stua" III 


Religion 


...27 


Editor end Publisher 




15B 




Theatres 


2B 


Myrn* Beers* 


Topics of the Town 


3 


Predion (t Eehmeder Sr 


Youth Calendar 


4 


6«rb«r*L Johnson 







"prospective need " It is this 
figure that reflects the pro- 
blems in data gathering that 
must be solved before the 
Borough can get a handle on 
how many units it must build 
The figure also does not take 
into account the amount of 
developable vacant land 

The vote against joining the 
federal suit challenging Mt. 
Laurel came after a discus- 
sion of the Borough's current 
response to Mt. Laurel — The 
Homeownership Group's 
lease /purchase program to 
construct low and moderate 
income housing 



Gayle A Weaver 
Advertuino Meneger 

Pam Goldberg 

Adver tiling ffcpr etenlellv 

Lynn Koch 
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Herbert McAneny 
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Helen Sthwarti 
Susan Trowbridge 

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VOL xxxix NO 30 



1 h lob ■hi.; 



Mt. Laurel Suit 

Conllnnod Irom Pago t 

the New Jersey Supreme 
Court had been "cutting 
unusual ground" and that the 
Ninth Circuit had had 23 
reversals out of 2fi canes. 

"My personal guess is that 
we have a third of u chance of 
success." 

The Council wos unanimous, 
however, in agreeing that the 
1,469 "fair share" housing 
units thut the Borough would 
have to come up with based on 
the Warren Township metho- 
dology is an "Alice-in 
Wonderland figure," 



Challenge to Figures. 
J Borough resident Ronald 
"We would have to can- Nielsen had challenged the in- 
nibalize parks and parking t*rest rate figures in the plan, 
spaces," said Mr. Wood- stating that a higher-than- 
bridge. "Our immediate pro- expected interest rate on the 
blem is getting these numbers short-term tax-free revenue 
down," said Councilman John bond and a lower than- 
Huntoon. expected interest rate on in- 

Borough Attorney Walter vestment would cause 
Bliss agreed that the number Princeton property owners to 
is universally recognized as bear the burden of any loss. 
being inflated Gerald Doherty of The 

Homeownership Group 

"Princeton Borough has assured Mr Nielsen that if 
been assigned all sorts of there is any default, it will not 
employment growth that has affect property owners in 
not taken place here," he said Princeton. He added that 
The numbers used in the default is highly unlikely 
Warren County methodology because of the desirability and 
are based on data for high value of property in 
unemployment insurance Princeton, 
statistics kept by the State Mr. Nielsen had also ques- 
Labor and Industry Depart- tioned the use of reserves, ask- 
ment It is believed that this ing that if the reserves are in 
data attributes to the Borough vested, how can they be used 
a large number of jobs that ac- as actual reserves if problems 
tually exist outside its develop? 
borders This is because the 

Borough's zip code is widely The Homeownership Group 
shared throughout neighbor- responded that it does not plan 
ing municipalities to use reserve funds because 

the builder who is eventually 
Also, if there is a statistical selected will be required to 
question as to where to post a performance bond and 
allocate! a job, it is placed guarantee a maximum cost of 
within the core municipality, construction, 
the "hole in the doughnut." Again, Mr Doherty and 

The 1,469 figure breaks Mayor Sigmund reiterated 
down into three p;irts The 'hat the program will not go 
first, "indigenous need," Into effect until all the 
relates to the number of defec numbers are in place, 
live housing units within the 

Borough This figure is 86. Former Councilman 

The second figure, "present Charles Cornforth came for- 

need," is the Borough's share ward for the second time in a 

of the needs of the overburden- month to argue against 

ed central core city - in our Borough actions to comply 

case, Trenton. This number is with Mt. Laurel. 

BO. He said that people might 

conclude that there is no 

It is the balance - 1,333 units adverse effect on the taxpayer 

that fits into the cotegory of from The Homeownership 



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Group plan. "This interpreta- 
tion would be a disservice." 

He spoke specifically about 
the increase in taxes that, he 
said, would result from an in- 
crease in school population 
generated by the new housing. 

"There is no obligation on 
the part of the Borough to do 
any construction," said Mr 
Cornforth. 

In her response. Mayor Sig- 
mund said that Mr. Cornforth 
could be talking about any 
new program to add housing 
units. "As far as tax implica- 
tions are concerned in the 
Homeownership program, the 
building program in and of 
itself will not impact on the 
tax situation." 

She added that by taking a 
positive step such as this, "we 
are not only taking affir- 
mative action, but we are 
precluding those who want to 
break our zoning and bring in 
the kind of density we do not 
want to support." 

— Myrna K. Bearse 

BANDS AND BEER 

At Octoberfest. Plainsboro 
mayor Barbara Wright will 
tap the first keg at the opening 
ceremonies of Princeton 
Meadows' Third Annual 
Octoberfest, scheduled for 
Saturday, October 13, from 1 
to 7:30 at the Princeton 
Meadows Shopping Center on 
Plainsboro Road. 

The Octoberfest will feature 
two bands, dancers, festive 
food and drink. For children 
Ihere will be a petting zoo, 
pony cart rides, balloon hats, 
and a pumpkin painting 
contest. The festivities will 
end at dusk with a fireworks 
display 



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JUST A SAMPLING. John Witherspoon Middle School students display some of 
the recycled, nearly new sports equipment that will be available at the Community 
Sports Sale on Saturday, October 13, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Princeton Day 
School hockey rink. Students are, top left to right, Mark Glogoff, Matt Kelley and 
Ken Haag, and, bottom left to right, Dan Noon, Jessica Godfrey, and Jody Klinge- 
biel. 



TOPICS 

Of The Town 



APPROVALS GRANTED 

By Planning Board. The 

Planning Board has granted 
final approval to Springlands 
for its proposed development 
of the Russell estate between 
Edgerstoune Road and Route 
206. 

Final approval was also 
granted October 2 to the John 
E. Wiltshier Corp. for two of- 
fice buildings connected by an 
atrium at the corner of Poor 
Farm Road and Bunn Drive 
extended. Permission was 
denied, however, to Perna's to 
erect a free-standing sign with 
a listing of tenants at 830 State 
Road. 

The Springlands applica- 
tion, first heard by the Plan- 
nng Board in the early spring, 
was the subject of an appeal to 
Township Committee by 
Edgerstoune residents who 




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were worried about traffic 
through their area. A com- 
promise was reached limiting 
the number of houses having 
access to Edgerstoune and 
placing barriers in a roadway 
through the development that 
would permit access by 
emergency vehicles only. 

The diversion of a small 
stream to the other side of 
Bunn Road occupied Planning 
Board members for a good 
hour before final approval was 
granted the Wiltshier Corp. 
Edwin Huttar of the Flood 
Control Committee said that 
the natural stream bed is a 
better means for containing 
runoff than a man-made ditch 
and warned that diverted 
streams have a way of return- 
ing to the original bed 



Upon learning that it was 
not possible to waive some of 
the parking requirements to 
keep the stream running 
through the property. Plan- 
ning Board member Margen 
Penick voted against ap- 
proval. She said moving the 
stream was "poor public 
policy" and the lot was "over- 
designed — too big a building, 
requiring too much parking " 
Photos of the stream produced 
by the applicant showed the 



stream to be no more than 12 
inches across and barely mov- 
ing even after rainfall. 

A desire to be consistent, 
and to avoid a law suit 
threatened by an earlier appli- 
cant who was not granted a 
variance for a free-standing 
sign with a tenant roster, pro- 
mpted the Planning Board to 
deny the Perna application. 
Mr. Perna's attorney had 
pointed out that there were 
several such free-standing 
signs in the vicinity of his 
building, but the Planning 
Board held firm, voting 6-3, 
with two abstentions, not to 
grant the variance. 

In other business, the Plan- 
ning Board endorsed County 
Executive Bill Mathesius's 
suggestion of a Mercer County 
Planning Council. Borough 
Council has also endorsed this 
suggestion; Township Com- 
mittee has held off, waiting to 
see just how much "home 
rule" Mercer municipalities 
would give up to the new entity 
— which is not to be confused 
with the Mercer County Plan- 
ning Board 



IF YOU LIKE TOWN TOPICS, the best 
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PRINCETON YOUTH CALENDAR 

GRADES Ml 

Saturday. October 13 ■ "Why a Women's College", a free 
Symposium for high school junior and senior girls at Educa- 
tional Testing Service. Rosedale Road, from 9:00 am to I 
p m Representatives from over 30 women's colleges will be 
pnMnl For information call 924-9678 or 921-6697. 

Monday, October 15 Free Platform Tennis Clinic, for 
beginners from 7:30 p.m to 9:00 p.m. at the Community 
Park Courts To register call the Princeton Recreation 
Department at 921-9480 before October 12 

Thursday. October 18 - "So you Want to Practice Law" ■ 
7:30 p.m., Princeton YWCA An evening with (wo 
distinguished women lawyers to discuss career oppor- 
tunities open to the holder of a law degree Open to high 
school seniors For information contact I-iz Adams at 
924-5571 

Grades M 

<;irl Seoul Registration ■ Sign up to be a Junior Cadette (iirl 
Scout Call 924-5857 

II you hove an event to announce, obtain an appropriate torm at your 
school or at the Princeton Recreation Department Items must be 
submitted to the Recreation Deportment by 3 00 pm on Thursdeys 
ol the week preceding publication 



Topics of the Town 



JEWELRY 18 MISSING 

From Park Place Home. 
Jewelry worth $5,1:1(1, id 
eluding two |M-iii-l ii' < Icjacei 
valued at $2,50(1 and $1 ,000, has 
Ix-i'ii tolen from a Park Place 
home while the victim was 
away. 

Police Bald lli.M the home 
was entered without any sign 
id force between Septembei 18 
.mil 1 iciober fi when (he thefl 
was dlacovarad Tin- lewelry 

was tuken from 11 bedroom 
dresser drawer Other 
missing items ranged in value 
from $200 to $300, police 1 aid 

A $65 parka was shoplifted 
Thursday afternoon from II 
(iross & Co mi Palmer 

Square The suspect, B black 

male 111 Ins [Ill's, ll 1, I ,11 

ixiuiuis, wearing n gray sull 
with .1 he, was pursued from 
the store by an employee 

When I'll Victor I- asanrll.i 

responded to a 1 -m call foi 
aid, he and the employee 
began a search of the area 
The BUSpeCl was soon seen liy 
the officer peeking from 
behind a in Ick wall .it Palmer 
lions the corner ol Bayard 

l.ane anil Nassau Slieel As 

tin- officer approached, the 

suspect ran lo Ihe rear ol the 
property, and I'M Fasanolla 
radioed for assislamr 



MODERN BUSHMAN 

Has No Clothes On. 
Township police reported the 
third incident of lewdness in 
three weeks 

While a Halsey Street 
resident was walking home 
shortly before five Thursday, 
cutting through the old PDS 
athletic field near the 
Broadmead Swim Club, she 
saw a man with no clothes on 
standing in a bush. 

She notified police who 
searched the area without 
success The suspect was 
described as fair-skinned, 
medium built. From the 
limited descripton, Capt Jack 
Petrone commented that it 
was hard to tell if it was the 
same person involved in two 
previous incidents who had 
exposed himself to runners in 
the Jadwin Gym Faculty 
Road area 



WAS TRICK STOLEN? 

Investigation Continues. 
Motor vehicle charges are 
pending, and a police in- 
vestigation by Ptl John 
Clausen is continuing, into the 
apparent theft of a tractor 
trailerfrom West Windsor 

Police first checked out the 
truck when they found it 
parked at noon Sunday on 
Dodds Lane with its motor 
running and loaded with fill 
dirt A computer check 
revealed it had been stolen 
September 10 from West 
Windsor 

When the driver. John Ft 
Stonaker, 26, of Lawrenceville 
could not produce proper 
identification for the truck, he 
was charged with receiving 
stolen property Capt. Jack 
Petrone reported that the 
trailer truck appeared to have 

Continued on Next Pa^e 




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A tfroundskwpcr reveaJcd 
thai the busJmcI had jumped 

over a Ugh fence and escaped 
The parka was not recovered 

i here was an attempt 
Sunday lo break into the car of 
a New Brunswick resident 
while ii was parked between 
12:45 and 2 in the afternoon in 
,i [ol on Muiir.h mi eel 

Police report that there was 
evidence a screwdriver had 
been used to try to force the 
locks of both doors on the 
i' i longer side, severely 
damaKinH Ihe locks. No entry 
was gained, however, 

GENERAL ALARM SOUNDS 

l m Studio Fire. A general 
alarm was sounded Sunday at 
fi:4ri p.m. for a fire ih.it 
Hr.iioyed ;i detached studio- 
garage .it the home of Donald 
\\ ATOM, 270 Wendover 
Drive When police arrived, 
Ihe studio was fully engulfed 

in flamee 

According lo police, Mr 
ATOM had been in the studio, 
which Is healed by a kiln, 
eai llei and had lefi al r> 30 
When In- wile looked out the 
window ai 6 i.> she saw the 
flames andeallcd police 

i ii amen an Ived and ex 
tlngulshed ihe blaze but not 
before the studio suffered 
extensive damage Police said 

Ihe cause ol Ihi- hie is under 

investigation. 





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Topics of the Town 

Continued Horn Page 4 

been quickly spray painted to 
cover up the original color. He 
identified the owner of the 
truck as Interstate Wrecking 
Company of Springfield, N.J. 

Stonaker was later released 
in 10 percent of $5,000 bail, 
pending the completion of the 
police investigation. 

Two Are Charged. A 

suspicious car check on Stuart 
Road by Township police last 
week has led to charges 
j against the two occupants. 
II David E. Pizzolato, 29, and 
Jonald E. Pizzolato, 24. both 
of Raritan. have been each 
charged with possession of 
under 25 grams of marijuana, 
possession of a controlled 
dangerous substance (speed) 
and having an open container 
of alcohol in a vehicle. 

Their car was first observed 
by Ptl. Anthony Gaylord last 
week on Stuart Road and he 
stopped it on the Great Road 
near Princeton Day School. 
His subsequent investigation 
led to the charges. Both 
suspects were later released 
and are scheduled to be heard 
in Township Court October 30. 



McGOVERN TO SPEAK 
At Arms Conference. 

Senator George McGovern 
will speak Sunday evening at 8 
at Nassau Presbyterian 
Church. The occasion is the 
fifth annual teaching con- 
ference on the arms race spon- 
sored by the Coalition for 
I Nuclear Disarmament. 
The theme of this year's 
,^ one-day event is "Election '84 : 
V?.dt Price the Arms Race''" 
Starting at 2 p.m. Sunday, 
speakers will address the 
economic and political im- 
plications of the nuclear arms 
race. 

The conference will open 
with an interfaith service for 
peace at the Princeton Univer- 
sity Chapel at 11 a.m. with the 
Rev. Dr. Ronald J. Sider, pro- 
fessor of theology at the 
Eastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary in Philadelphia, 
preaching. Moving to Nassau 
Presbyterian Church, the con- 
ference will continue with a 
talk at 2 by Seymour Melman, 
professor of industrial 
engineering at Columbia 
University. Dr. Melman will 
speak on "The Politics and 
Economics of Reversing the 
f Arms Race." 

\dt Harold Willens, author of 

The Trimtab Factor: How 
Business Executives Can Help 
Solve the Nuclear Weapons 
Crisis, will follow Prof. 
Melman. His topic is "Cor- 
porate Responsibility in a 
Nuclear Age." Small group 
workshops will follow these 
talks. 

After a dinner for par- 
Mcipants (preregistration is 
required), the conference will 
onclude with the address by 
Senator McGovern. In this 
election year, the Coalition for 
Nuclear Disarmament had 
hoped to provide a forum for 
bipartisan discussion and 
debate on the issue. Con- 
gressman James Courter of 
the 12th District was invited to 
debate Peter Bearse. 
Democratic candidate for the 
iith District, and Republicans 
of national stature were in- 
vited to appear with Senator 
I McGovern. 

Mr. Courter declined, as did 
her Republicans. The 
Coalition asked the Reagan- 
Bush Re-election Campaign to 
send a representative, but this 
invitation was also declined. 
according to a Coalition press 
release. 

The conference registration 
fee is $7. $6 for Coalition 
members and $4 for senior 
citizens and students. For 
those planning to attend only- 
senator McGovern s .address. 




POLICE CHARGE TWO 
With Driving While 
Intoxicated. Township police 
last week charged two area 
residents with driving while 
intoxicated. 

Forty-eight-year-old Joseph 
L Ligos of Roebling was 
stopped on Kingston Road 
near Poe at 1:02 Friday 
morning after Ptl. John Seeley 
Jr. had observed his car 
traveling partially on the 
shoulder of the roadway and 
weaving at a slow rate of 
speed. Mr. Ligos was given 
balance and coordination tests 
at the scene and taken to 
headquarters where he was 
given further balance tests. 

He was charged with 
refusing to take a 
Breathalyzer test and driving 
while intoxicaed. 



George McGovern 

the fee will be $2. Registration 
tables at the N 
Presbyterian Church will be 
open at 1. 

For further information call H^rontown Road 
the Coalition at 924-5022. 



Thomas A. Herrick, 21, 
"^ Bradley Court, Kingston, was 
charged with DWI Saturday- 
night, after an accident on 
Police 



report Mr. Herrick ran off the 
road and struck a tree. Ptl. 
Renn Kaminski observed the 
driver had slurred speech and 
watery eyes and detected an 
odor of alcohol. He was taken 
to Princeton Medical Center 
for treatment of cuts and 
lacerations and chest pains. A 
blood sample was also taken. 

Mr. Herrick was later 
charged with drunken driving, 
leaving the scene of an ac- 
cident and careless driving. 
He is scheduled to appear in 
court October 16. 



CHILD RUNS INTO CAR 

On Maple Street. A five- 
year-old tot. Max Wright of 15 
Jefferson Road, was injured 
Saturday when he darted out 
from in front of a parked van 
into the path of a Township 
patrol car. He was taken by 
ambulance to Princeton 
Medical Center where he was 
treated for a fractured left 



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• wardrobe coordination 

Identify your season, and color coordinate 

your wardrobe colors and make-up to your 

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Thursday, Oct. 18, 10 am -9 pm 

Free demonstration hours: 

* 12 noon • 2 pm • 7 pm 

Come m and talk to Sharon Lawson. a professional 

consultant Private consultations are available 

by appointment only (Visa, M/C accepted) 



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with this coupon 

A TANNER' Factory Store 

The Marketplace • Rts. 27 & 518 • Princeton 
1201) 821-5768 




• Topics of the Town 

Continued Mm Pifl* 5 

'. clavicle, abrasions of the right 
rfoot and elbow and a smal' 
; laceration inside his mouth. 
i The driver. John W. 
! Hammond. 48. of 90 Clearview 
; Avenue, told Borough Sgt. 
'Ronald Holliday that he 
' braked and swerved to his left 
j when he saw the child dart 
| into his path The youth hit the 

■ nght front fender of the car 
i and bounced back 

: Two witnesses were David 
[ Cromwell in the front seat of 
•the patrol car and Richard 
[Wright, the father of the 

■ victim, who was sitting in the 
! driver's seat of the van parked 
■in front of 17 Maple. There 
E were no charges. 

<i 

i Three-Car Collision. Two 

scars suffered extensive 

■damage in a three-car 

{collision Thursday afternoon 

:at the intersection of Spruce 

"and Chestnut Streets One of 

the drivers, Melissa G Bailey, 

37, 9 Patton Avenue, was 

treated at the Medical Center 

for injuries to her left knee 

and face 

According to police, a 
Lincoln Continental operated 
by Julie R Chytrowski, 52, 53 
Surrey Drive, Belle Mead, 
traveling on Spruce, failed to 
stop for the Chestnut Street 
stop sign. It continued inlo the 
intersection and struck Ms 
Bailey's Rabbit on the right 
front, pushing it into a third 
car driven by Garrett M. 
Heher, 57 Elm Road, which 
was slowing on Chestnut to 
make a left turn onto Spruce 

Ms Chytrowski claimed 
afterwards that her brakes did 
not work, but a check by Ptl 
Michael Taylor, the in 
vestigaling officer, and Sgt. 
Gerald Patterson uncovered 
no brake delect She was 
issued summonses for a stop 
sign violation and driving an 
unsafe vciiK I' 




TROOPER'S BODV FOUND 

In New York's Bail River A 

12 day Intensive search for the 

body of a murdered New York 



JOINING HANDS to symbolize volunteer teamwork lor the United Way-Red Cross 
campaign of the Princeton area communities are, left to right, Mark Gordon, ad- 
ministrator of Princeton Borough; Don Matthews, deputy mayor of Montgomery 
Township; Albert Hanson, assistant campaign chairman and regional vice presi- 
dent of McGraw-Hill; Barbara Slgmund, mayor of Princeton Borough; and Winthrop 
Pike, mayor of Princeton Township. Mayor Slgmund is leading the government 
division oMhe camp aign. 

State Trooper ended early last 
week when police divers found 
his body in his 1983 Dodge 
Aries sedan which had been 
submerged 25 feel in the Hell's 

(..lIcM'l lM.ll Cjl llir !....! KlVCl 

The body was positively 
identified, through finger- 
prints and dental records, as 
Richard H Snyder, a 37-year- 
Old Slate Trooper who had 
been assigned to the bureau of 
criminal investigation unit in 
Middletown.N.Y. 

Snyder had been allegedly 
shot to death Sept 20 by 
Edward M. Esposito, 39, a 
former Princeton Township 
resident He had been shot, 
police said. in the 
Mamakating, N.Y. home of 
Esposlto's former wife, 
Jeanne Sanchi 

Esposito hanged himself 
lliree (lavs lain t i a tree on 

a farm of! E adore] i Htj Road 
in Hopewell Township 
Snyder's body was found 
wrapped in a green cai pel In 

the trunk ol Ins cur 



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OPEN SUNDAY 
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TRENTONHOME (609)771-9280 

rABRICS 




1661 N. Olden Ave. • Trenton, NJ 

(Hex: to Colonial Cadillac) 
^2L£i!y_H-l Wednesday 4 Tnursday till 9 



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The Sweater Company 



for men and for women 



GRAND OPENING, THURS., OCT. 11 

182 Nassau St. Princeton, NJ 08540 (609)683-4198 

across from Thomas Sweet' 



Store hours: 



Mim Fri.~9:30lo9:00 



Sal 'i mi, 1 1, mi 



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■ Choose from our Vast Selection. 

■ Save with our Exceptional Prices. 

■ Delight in our Lifetime Refund Policy. 

Cheerfully given for any mm om garment 
purchased at The Su •cuter ( 'umpan) 

Other Locations 

Jet 27—518 Market Place Shopping Center. Princeton. N.I 08540, (201 1 297-8440 For Men 

Rt. 34 Market Place Shopping Center. Matatvan. NJ 07741 1201 ) 566- 1070 For Men. 



• Topics of the Totcn 

_ Conllnuao from PaQ* p 

• In the same area where the 
- trooper's car was found, New 
-York City police harbor 
5 divers, assisted by the U.S. 
§ Coast Guard Auxiliary boats, 
galso located a 1974 Lincoln 
oMark IV Inside were the 
vskeletel remains and clothing 
3 of a man identified as Robert 
JFVatello, 49, of Morris County, 
i who u as murdered in 1979. 
u Esposito was a suspect in 
'the Fratello slaying, too, 
-according to the New York 
J State Police 

2 

£ On Friday, New York 
J Governor Mario Cuomo and 
Jan estimated 1.600 law en- 
Jforcement officers attended 




^ , n h U^honl n>T erSnyder ^" A „ L, ^ WE ™" 00: ' Pr.nc.lon Day School 
ten-year veteran and the ?"t?hl S , u " n " e °° °onson and Sandl Smith put 
;r of two children. Snyder £? eh ^ ,he ' n< " P, i9ces °' "Prlscllla the Killer 



A 
►father 



Whale,' 



(is the only state tropper killed "I 11 " 8 ; " "-foot door puzzle. Children can put 
cin the line of duty this year Pr 8cMl8 ,0 98» h er themselves at the PDS lower school 
•■Also attending his funeral »c | «nc» show on Saturday. Show times at 1 and 3:30 
service in Our Lady of P m - ln t he "riool auditorium, The Great Road. 

members of" The Roval ?« ano i°,« i8, • !*" P»*«" his the front entrance of Epstein's 

c\n™dia„ Mounted Police " ££JL AI,ve Show ' aM abou < '" 'he Princeton Shopping 

wiwies Center Inside her locked car 



WHALES ARE FOCUS T J'" J " 111 he puppets, 



were articles of clothing — 
. sweaters, blouses, skirts. 

Of PDS Science Show Killer multim « ii a presentation and jacket - in a blue garment 
Whales and all kinds of whales l i; ' r,l<l l>-"i"ry learning for all bag and an English Shop bag. 
are the topic this Saturday in T allcnd Tickets are $5 at When she returned 90 
the first of three Saturday '!"' door Admission Includes minutes later, police said that 
Science Shows for young J, snow . plus games, someone by unknown means 
children to be held a t monstral '" ns and hands-on had entered her car and taken 
Princeton Day School experiments at the workshops theclothing valued at $1,022. 

The Science Shows are spon- between shows. A Princeton resident lost 

sored by the lower school, further information call clothing and cosmetics valued 

kindergarten through fourth j 92 ' l- ' i7n ". e«' 219. at $230 when someone entered 

grade, at PDS slim. in,» .,,,. her car which was parked last 

at 1 and3:30intheaudilonuiii wl ' t ' k in a lot on lower 

of the school on The Great THEFT REPORT I 'mversity Place and removed 

Road O/.zic Tollefson of Clothing Is Token. Last a khaki tote bag. The car had 
Hunterdon County, on actor, weak, B Rlverilde Drive heen parked overnight 
former teacher and resident parked her car near 



Princeton Shopping Center 

North Harrison St. 

(609) 924-9640 

SUNDAY NIGHT SPECIAL! 

Live classical music 
with dinner 

Dinner: Tues.-Thurs. & Sunday 6-9 p.m 
Fri., Sat. 6-10 p.m. 



Continued on Next Page 



Appetizer* 

Broiled Mussel* with Fennel Butter 

and Almoin I-, $6.50 

Fresh Oyster* Baked In Spinach 

Leaves, Oyster Butter 

Sauce S8.95 

Mousse of Sweet Red Peppers, 

Toasted Herb Bread $5.25 

Soups of the Day from $2.95 

Fresh Oysters or Llttleneck Clams 

on Half-Shell. Mignonette 

Sum «■ 

Goat Cheese and Sun Dried 

Tomato Salad 
Market Salad. Dijon 

Vinaigrette 
SfiaJll with Brandy and 

Hazelnuts 



$695 



$5.95 



$475 



$7.50 



LAST DAY TO ORDER 

One of Our Famous Fresh 
Turkeys for Thanksgiving 



SATURDAY, NOV. 10 



10 to 25 lbs. 

Corn fed ... raised for Toto's Market. 

The best turkeys available. That's why we 

keep selling more and more every year. 



A PRINCETON TRADITION: TURKEYS & TOTO'S MARKET 



TOTO'S MARKET 

74 Witherspoon St. 924-0768 

The Finest in Food for Your Table Since 1912' 

MON. & TUES. - 8:00 A.M.-5:30 P.M. 
THUrtS. & FRI. - 8:00 A.M. -6:30 P.M. 
WED. & SAT. - 8:00 A.M.-1 :00 P.M. 






Dinner Menu 

Main Courses 

Herb Marinated Sea Scallops. 

Orange Sauce S17.50 

Lamb Rack with Tarragon 

Butter Sauce $18.50 

Grilled Salmon Steak. Lemon 

Sabayon Sauce $17.95 

Mesquite Grilled Loin Veal Chops, 

Green Peppercorn Mustard 

Sauce $18.95 

Maryland Deviled Crabcakes. 

Jalapeno Jelly Mayonnaise $16.75 
Lime Broiled Breast of Chicken. 

Lemon Compote $13.95 

Sauleed Garlic Shrimp. Spanish 

Style $18.25 



Beverages 

Espresso $1.95 Capuccino $2.25 

Aged Colombian Coffee $1.75 

Assorted Fancy Teas Pot $2.25 

Water Process Decaffeinated Italian 

Roast Coffee $1.95 

Glass of Milk $ .90 

Iced Tea $1.50 Iced Coffee $1.95 

Perrier Small $1.25 Large $3.25 

Moussy$1.45 Coke $1.25 

Chamay French Sparkling Apple 

Oder $1.50 

Knudsen Fruit Juices $1.45 

Desserts & Pastries 

Wine Corkage Fee $2 per bottle 

No pipe or cigar smoking, please 

Minimum per person $1 5 



■i . I ■ r 



/^v>* 



Sunday Brunch 

Choice of: 
Seasonal Fruit 
Melon In Season 
Knudsen Fruit Juices or Fresh Orange Juice 

Choice of: 

Quiches of the Day. Green Salad 

Charcuterle Assortment of Pates 

Smoked Salmon Plate 

Torla of Crepes. Black Forest Ham and Cheese 

Omelets: Black Forest Ham with Brie 
Tomato and Mixed Cheeses 
Potato. Mushroom. Onion and Gruyere 

Cheeses and Fruits 

Assorted Breads and Croissants 

Beverages: 
Water Process Decaffeinated Italian Roast Coffee 
Aged Colombian Coffee 
Assorted Fancy Teas. Pot 
Espresso. Capucdno $.75 extra 
Iced Tea. Coffee or Decaffeinated Coffee 
Perrier. Moussy. Coke, Milk 

Price Fixe: $9.95 per person (not Including 
tax or gratuity) 



Sunday Branch: 11 a.m. - 2 p.aa. 




■af 



___. 



ALL TREATS - 
NO TRICKS AT... 

Featuring This Week 

(Thursday afternoon through Sunday) 



INDIA HOUSE 

LAMB CURRY 

BRAISED CORNISH GAME 

HENS with wild rice stuffing 




And. of course, soups, salads, 
cheeses and desserts to 
complete your menus. 



La Cuisine 



V__. 



A Carry Out Shop 

On the Patio 1S3C Nassau Street 
Tue.-Sal. »-T: Sun. s^o 921-768; 




Luncheon Menu 
Appetizers 

Market Salad, Dijon Vinaigrette $3 95 

Fresh Oysters or Little Neck Clams on Half-Shell. 

Mignonette Sauce M 50 

Fresh Jersey Tomato Salad. Bufala Mozzarella 
s andB f" $4.25 

SoupsoftheDay from $2.75 

Sandwiches 

S R^o ° nk S '? k ° n F ' Cnch BrMd - L^"- Tomato. 
T.,,1 r?,*^ Horseradis " Mayonnaise $7.50 

'arragon Chicken on Croissant or 
French Bread „ „ 5 

S Mu5r alm0 r n Cro,Man ' °' Fre "C" Bread. 
Ton^, To ChMS€ wHh S"M°n S . Lettuce. 
Tomato and Red Onion $8 .50 

Main Courses 

Fresh Oyster Stew tfi ^ 

' Mussels Marintere %f. 

£j?d S,UKed AvOCado ' "*">* Broiled. 

Tomato Tar, with Mushrooms. Pe.ro and Fe... " ^ 

F ^r thshrtmpsB '^""' 

Beverage* $7.50 

Desaerta & Pastries 
I -ocheon: Tnea.-Frl. Noon - 2:30 p.m. 



Topics of the Town 

Continued from Page 8 

A unlocked car parked in the 
Library Place driveway of its 
owner yielded a radar 
detector valued at S245 — 
taken between early Saturday 
afternoon and 9 the next 
morning 

A knapsack of a Chatham 
resident was stolen from the 
south lawn of Princeton High 
School Saturday night. Police 
found some of its contents 
strewn about Franklin 
Avenue, but $11 in cash, a 
calculator, jacket, Bible and 
^notebook with a combined 
value of $126 are missing. 

The owner had been with a 
group of people on the south 
lawn of Princeton High 
School, waiting for a ride in a 
van. When she boarded the 
van, the victim left her 
knapsack behind and it was 
gone when she returned at 
10:30. 



Two Bikes and a Moped. 
Two bicycles and a moped 
were on the list of stolen items 
in the police docket. 

The moped, a blue 1983 
Motobecane valued at $450, 
was taken during the weekend 
from a Randall Road garage, 
and in another Township theft 
a black 10-speed Peugeot 
Grand Sport bicycle worth 
$250 was stolen some time last 
week from an open garage on 
Riverside Drive. 

Borough police report a 
student's bike was stolen 
Thursday from the east side of 
Princeton High School. The 
bike, a Raleigh model valued 
at $100, was unlocked, police 
said. 



SAFE RIDES ORGANIZES 
In Montgomery Township. 

Montgomery Safe Rides will 



Please Fence Us In 

Residents of Greenholm will be getting back the stockade 
fence that had bordered their property for 16 years. It had 
been replaced by shrubs and plants — an idea that must 
have looked good on the drawing board but, say the 
residents, just hasn't worked out. 

According to Greenholm representative Yota Switzgable, 
the plants are dying, the shrubbery doesn't keep the 
pedestrians out, and the bushes get trampled "And it looks 
terrible." 

The fence, at a cost of about $3,000. will be installed along 
Chambers Street. It will replace the shrubbery, which cost 
$8,000 and which requires constant maintenance. 

Borough Council also agreed that, at the appropriate 
time, it will remove several traffic meters on Hulfish Street 
to provide a loading zone for Collins Development. 

It also agreed to state officially that it would not exercise 
its right of eminent domain to infringe on Greenholm pro- 
perty if the traffic plan submitted by Collins proves unsuc- 
cessful. 

However, Council noted that such a resolution would be 
binding only on current Council. 



HOME DECOR 

Curtains, Draperies 
Bedspreads. Lamp Shades 

Princeton Shopping Cenler 

921-7296 



run 

NORDICRAFT 



f 



Safeguard 



924-2465 

48 Main St., Kingston 



introduce its program to 
Montgomery High School 
students this Friday. 
Organized by and for teens, 
the Safe Rides goal is to 
prevent alcohol related 
automobile accidents in the 
township. 

After viewing the movie 
"Stop and Think," the concept 
of Safe Rides will be explained 
by steering committee 
members Liz Van Cleve and 
Chris Michaels. Modeled after 
the Princeton Safe Rides 
which is beginning its third 
year with 162 student mem- 
bers, the Montgomery 
program will have student 
patrols to provide emergency 
driving service on Friday and 
Saturday nights from 10 p.m. 
to2a.m. 

It will be explained that 
although the service is free 
and confidential, when a 
student calls he must use his 
real name for insurance 
purposes. It will be em- 
phasized that the rider will be 



taken home and cannot be 
taken to another party. If an 
individual is drunk to the point 
of incapacitation, he or she 
would not be taken home 
without first calling to see that 
a parent is home. 

The Program is affiliated 
with the Boy Scouts of 
America and is supported by 
MADD, Mothers Against 
Drunk Driving. Each par- 
ticipant will attend three 
training sessions in con- 
junction with local police, first 
aid and rescue squad, and a 
local counseling agency for 
drug and alcohol abuse. 

Training will also include 
use of telephones and CB 
radios, communication skills, 
role playing, crisis in- 
tervention and referrals to 
other service agencies. 
Additionally, participants will 
be required to attend a 
monthly meeting to hear 
speakers and address the 

Continued on Next Page 



G f^ 



c fo\>* 



<r 



ALCOHOLISM 
UPDATE 



Did you know that: 



People who control their drinking have 
a drinking problem. 

THE GABRIELSEN GROUP 

Specialists in Alcoholism 
ana Alcohol-related problems 



609-737-8070 



65 So. Main St. Pennington, N.J. 



Ricchard's 

Shoes for the Discriminating 



&m\ 
&& 



It's Rockport Walk Week. 

Walk for the health of it. 

Walking has been found to be one of the best ways to make yourself feel better 
and become more physically fit. 

But before this can happen, you need the shoe designed especially) 
for walking. RocSports.'' The exclusive Rockport Walk Support 
System" makes RocSports the perfect shoe to walk in. No other 
shoe can provide both the great looks of a casual shoe and the 
nltimate in lightweight comfort and support. 
Get comfortable and you may get lucky. With a free I 
Sony' Walkman: ' 
When you try on a pair 
of RocSports this week, 
you'll also get a chance to 
win something that will make 
walking even more comfortable. 
The original Sony Walkman. 
So step into a pair of RocSports 
And give yourself a more comfort 
able, healthier outlook on life. 





Rockport 

M105 IN <XMFUn A 



150 Nassau Street 
Princeton, N.J. 924-6785 



Mon-Fri 9-6 

Thur 9-8 — Sal 9-5 



We have the Country look, 
as well as the Contemporary 



stoneware 

boskets 

quilts 

candles 



wooden toys 
dried flowers 

lamps 
fabric animals 



and a large selection of 
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358 Nassau 

Princeton 

924-2066 

Daily 10- 5:00 



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" „p... OCI 3' 



ll 



"""""'SCOW* 
P"« Oct 3i 



I 
I 
I 



IS'/. OFF 

ANY ROLL OF KODAK 
OR FUJI FILM 

wl ,„ inn coupon only 



I 
I 
I 
I 



I 

I 
I 
I 



I ^tessERsT I 

iC °OPOM V « ■ 



LrnrJsssgL 




6 S Tulane St. 
Pnnceton, N.J. 

683-5118 

Mon.-Sat. 9-6 




Baskets. 
Baskets. 
Baskets. 



Fruit Baskets • Cheese Baskets 
Gift Baskets • Flower Baskets 



HONORED BY PLANNED PARENTHOOD. Mr. and Mrs. William Scholdo. Library 
| Place, receive the first Sanger Circle Award, which was established by the Plan- 
o ned Parenthood Association ol the Mercer Area's board of trustees to recognize 
*" distinguished benefactors. Sandra L. Ewell, right. Planned Parenthood's presi- 

dent, presen ted the award. 

. _ Suzanne Layman, 36-14 Quail Program for Women Looking 

loptcs of tht> town Ridge, Plglnsboro, Nichols for Work at the Princeton 



Continued From Pagov 

problem of drinking 
drinking and driving 



and Carole McGlincy, 104 YWCA on Saturday, October 
. first Avenue, Highlslown, all 13, 

"0 — n_t~l t . V 



on October I; Miss Greberding, vice 

Timothy and Renee Hare, president, sales, Nassau 

51 A E. Railroad Avenue, Broadcasting Company, came 

Jamesburg, Brian and Denise to the radio station in 1980 

Mine cos its Erb. 50 Princeton Arms East, '™m a variety of com- 

' East Windsor, Thomas and munications positions in New 

Irene March, 35 Madison 

Drive, Plainsboro, Stuart and 



Funds are needed to cover 

expenses 

gasoline, ma 

publicity and purchase of 

equipment. So far, the 

response of the business „ 

community has been very c y ntn| a Helfgott, El Lincoln 

positive, with a major Lane ' Da y'on, all on October 

donation from Townc Wine 2; 

and Liquor of Rocky Hill Jorge and Maria DeMaeedo, 

An Adult Community 'College Road, Damianot and 
Awareness Meeting Is planned Patri cia Depinto, 104 Exton- 
for October 16, 8 p.m. at the vlllc Road ' Yardville, Clifford 
Harlingen Church, Belle and Ph'Hipa Rhone, 68 Leigh 
Mead Adult volunteers are Avc nue, all on October 3; and 
needed for Friday and Christopher and Mary Ellen 
Saturday night duty and to Aland, on October 4. 
serve on the Adult Advisory Sons "ere born to Arthur 
Committee For further In- and Nancy Longmate, 6 
formation phone Nancy Heathwood, Hamilton Square, 



And for your Fall entertaining 
Sliced, Sherry Glazed Boneless Hams 

Order one todayl 



COX'S 

180 Nassau Street • Princeton, N.J. • (609) 683-1807 
Monday through Saturday 6:45 am - 7 pm: Sunday 6:45 am - 2 pm 



England 
The YWCA Adult Depart 



Young, 466 1061 
Holofcener, 359-4363 



.lull. i September z8, Vito and Mary 
Lynn Rossi, 50 Tee Ar Place, 
September 29; George and 
Lucero Mcjia, 336 Glenn 
TWIN BOYS HORN Avenue. Lawrcnceville. 

At Medical (enter. Twin """""I a " d O'ana Rcdnor, 
boys were born on October 4 at 15 ' North Bellevue Avenue, 



the Princeton Medical Center '-"ORhorne, 
to Bernard and Deborah Member 30; 



both 
Raymond and 



Hagedorn of 536 Gropp h W £ nn """"Roer. H» 
Avenue, Trenton. McKnight Avenue, 

Daughters were Imrn last Ja meshurg, October 1; 
week to John and Curolee Mll 'hael and Barbara Kren 
Baucrle, PO Box 123 clckl ' M0 (-| IPPer Drive, 
Flagtown and Nobuo and <)ocan c ">'' Paul and Patricia 
Carole Ogawa, 15 Lawnsidc No J" 1 ' 23 Virginia Street. Ken 
Drive, Lawrenceville, both on d "" Park ' Bramslav and 
September 28; James and u '" nt> KrsQr ' m Kast Ward - 
Daryl Wood, 576 Parkway H'Kntstown, Ralph and (ilen 
Avenue. Trenton, David and "" Aufrichtig. Route 27 Box 
Elaine Bright, 1401 y,,,,,! M ''- J'*" and Nanette Septak, 
Ridge. IMainslmro, Sepleml>et l( " ' I! "* 21I "V Cranbury, all 
2|| on October 2 

Thomas and Kathleen 
Braun, II Gerard Avenue 

Yard! Etoberl and Judith JOB DAY SATURDAV 

Matqla, 4 Monroe Court, Kevin X1 lu ' v J °an E. Ger- 
and Louise Kenny, J49 Possum berdtng, one of the 15 1984 
Hollow, Jamesburg Princeton YWCA Tribute to 

September 30; George and Women and Induatrj TWIN) 
Laura Sciurrotla Hu\ :tt;n honnnvs. will give the kick off 
Pennington, funis ami s l"tvh .11 ,lnl>lia\ . ,1 Practical 



%&bfwvst-'s£tTMistvu h 




Support America's Independent Brewers 
The Alchemist & Barrister The tradition continues 

ruboptn I,,,,,, II: JO-1 00 dm Mm. -Sit.. 

II Noon-8:10 pm S«n. 

Bar mrnu wr, f J until midnight Man -Sal. 

28 WmVnpoon Slreri. TnnoHon 

(ne»l to Pjlmrr Sqiurrl 42|.SS<ts 




FRUIT 
BASKETS 



PRODUCE 



5 lbs. Red Bliss 
Potatoes 99</bag 
Snow White 
Mushrooms 99*/lb. 
Golden Ripe 
Bananas 3 lbs. /$1. 00 
Sweet Green 
Seedless Grapes 79*/lb. 
Jersey Spinach 69«/lb. 
Pascal Celery 69«/stalk 
Sweet Eating 
Canteloupe 99« ea. 
Jersey Tangy 
Scallions 3/$1.00 
Granny Smith 
Apples 69'/lb. 
Green Bartlett 

Pears 69«/lb. 

Hawaiian 
Pineapples cleaned 

6 cored $2.49 ea. 
Halloween 

Pumpkins 15«/lb. 

Indian 

Corn $1.50/bunch 
Scrumpy Apple 
Cider $1.99/gal. 




*(>X k)l\ NASSAU 
fyJj® SEAFOOD EAST 



Fresh Atlantic 
Hake $1.99/lb. 

"Special" 

Crabmeat $8.95/lb. 
Maine Mussels 99«/lb. 
Fresh Halibut 
Steaks $5.99 

FRESH 
LIVE LOBSTERS 



&•* / G m ,. 




• Hanging 
Baskets 

• European 
Gardens 



Toscama 
Bilancio 
P O Box 825 
RD 4 

Princeton, N J 
08540 
Fall Mums $3.99 
2 gallon pot 

Long Stemmed Roses 

S6.99/dozen 




PINEAPPLES 

PEELED 

& CORED 



COUNTRY 
=MEATS 



All Aged 
Western Prime Beef 

Whole Beef 

Filet Mignon 7-9 lb. avg. 

$4.99/lb. 

cut & wrapped to order 

Sliced Italian style 

from leg Veal Cutlet 

$6.99/lb. 



10% off 
any freezer order 



DELI ITEMS 

Boarshead Imported 

Boiled Ham $2.99/ 1 /2 lb. 

Jarlsberg 

Swiss Cheese $1.89/V 2 lb. 

Try our homemade salads, 

quiches, soup made 

fresh dally. 

Catering tor alt occasions 



Phone:921-7811 



ROUTE 27 
KINGSTON, N.J. 
Phone: 924-1830 



HOURS: 

Mon.-Thurs. 10 am -6 pm 
Friday 10 am -7 pm 
Saturday 10 am -6 pm 




Sunday Swims Scheduled 

The YWCA Sunday 
Swims will resume on 

October 7. The hour from 1- 
2 p m will be reserved for 
persons who are disabled 
or over 60 with special 
needs. Two physical 
therapists will be in the 
pool and there will be 
assistants for wheelchairs 
dressing and other speciai 
needs. Family swim will be 
from 2-4 p.m. 

The admission fee will be 
$2 for members. $3 for non- 
members, $5 for a family of 
a member. YMCA mem- 
bership will be accepted 
during this pilot project. 
For further information 
call the YWCA office. 924- 
5571. 



Topics of the Town 

Continued from Page 10 

ment's TWIN Program is 
presenting Job Day as part of 
its outreach to the greater 
Princeton community. The 
TWIN Program was 
established to honor out- 
standing women in executive, 
managerial, and professional 
roles in business and industry; 
and to recognize corporations 
for establishing progressive 
personnel policies and for 
providing opportunities for 
advancement for women in 
industry. 

Job Day will provide in- 
formation about all kinds of 

_^ork — clerical and office 
work, administrative work, 
research, writing, artistic, 
and analytical work. Infor- 
mation on how to find work wil 
be available in the workshops 
and the Job Fair. Job Fair New Jersey is the sponsor of 
participants will meet with 'his event, believed to be the 
representatives from 20 first of its kind in New Jersey 
national companies and in- to feature exclusively the 
stitution including Johnson works of senior craftspersons. 
and Johnson, Educational The Presbyterian Homes is a 
Testing Service, Merck and non-profit interdenomin- 
Company, United Jersey ational provider of housing 
Banks, and Princeton and nursing care facilities for 
University who will talk about older persons in New Jersey, 
the types of jobs in their and is based in Princeton, 
companies and requirements 

of those jobs. The show will feature the 

Job Day registration in- works of 50 crafters from New 
formation and forms are Jersey as well as from Pen- 
available at the YWCA office, nsylvania, Virginia, Maryland 

and Delaware. Exhibitors 

were selected by a panel of 
CRAFT SHOW PLANNED judges and will keep all 
Work of Seniors. The first proceeds from the sale of their 
annual Senior Crafters Show, items, 
an exhibition and sale of a The types of craftwork for 
wide range of goods hand- sale will include hand sewn, 
crafted by senior craftsmen, quilted, knitted, and smocked 
will take place on Saturday, children's and adults' gar- 
October 20, at the Stuart ments. An assortment of 
Country Day School, Stuart handspun and woven gar- 
Road, ments also will be available. 

r yrhe craft show will run from Christmas items will range 
10 am to 5 p.m. There will be from handcrafted wreaths and 
no admission charge. Door ornaments to cross stitched 
prizes donated by the crafters and hand hooked decorations, 
will be awarded. Hand made teddy bears. 

The Presbyterian Homes of fcr&e"$ vSe 



available. Handcrafted doJl 
houses and miniature fur- 
niture will also be for sale. 

Hand carved soapstone 
sculptures will be sold in 
addition to hand carved 
wooden birds. Other wood- 
crafted items include trays, 
boxes and hanging cabinets. 

A wide variety of hand- 
painted art objects and hand- 
wrought brass, pewter and 
silver decorative items and 
wall hangings will be for sale. 
Other diverse items will in- 
clude hand made fishing rods, 
walking canes and model sail 
ships 

A chocolate making 
demonstration will be ac- 
companied by an exhibition of 
stumpwork. This detailed 
embroidery form depicts 
intricate scenes of 17th- 
century life. 

NEW STARTING POINT 
For CROP Walk. This year's 
CROP Walk for Hunger will 

take place Sunday, October 21, 
and it will begin and end at the 
Princeton Shopping Center, 
instead of at Palmer Square. 
The Princeton High School 
Jazz Band wil] send the 
walkers off on a quick step, 
and there will be entertain- 
ment to salute them as they 
return. From 3:30 p. m until 6. 
there will be dancers, bands, 
orchestras, jugglers, and 
mimes performing for the 
community as well as for 
those who walk the mini-mile 
designed for the elderly and 
the very young and those who 
complete the 10-mile route 
through all of Princeton's 
neighborhoods. 

Borough Mayor Barbara 
Sigmund and Township Mayor 
Winthrop Pike, honorary co- 
chairs of the CROP Walk for 
Hunger, will kick-off the walk 
at 1 p.m. Afterwards, all 
walkers will receive a Cer- 
tificate of Appreciation and a 

Continued on Next Page 



FRESH APPLE 
DUMPLINGS 

Filled with butter 
& cinnamon 



^ 



vr 



VILLAGE BAKERY 

2 Gordon Ave. 896-0036 Lawrenceville 
? V Best to order ahead. ^H^- 



MICHELE'S 

FAMOUS NY STYI.K DBJ 

RESTAURANT 

Rated one ot the best 
...TRENTON TIME! 



I" 



^M$9v, 



dmmx 




Buy 3 aMp (Erer \ f/?ee 




Buy i auo mt 3 fizee y ~p 



»my t cinu mi $ t-Kee . y r 



LiMiTeProOrie noufoti Pen. cno<wr coHfJOnteaR. . c,oooTn*.\y 



Our peuc/ous FLavoRS* 



O R<35P0eRRy 
D aLMoAJP 



DaPRKOT 

QcneovaK 
a H.3M 



* Bakfp f B£<M eveftyoay >n our own kitch&j 





Coffee -5"o* a cup | 

eacH oay a DifienenT | 
aouumej- coffee. 




PrfONe:683-i3H 

35 PaLrneR 5<3uaf?e we$r- pRiMreTov 



Heovy duty while vinyl cocted steel shelving cut to 

order while you won ot no charge 

1 2 deep per foot reg $2 75 Sole 12 20 
16" deep per foot reg 53 25 Sole i 2 60 

Come to our Closet Clinic on Sot.. Oct. 13 ond Sun.. Oct. 14 

and let our staff help you solve your storage problems. All we 

need ore your closet measurements and at no charge 

we con help you GET ORGANIZED 



■ THE POTTERY 

barn 



We're back at... 

The Marketplace • Route 27 

Princeton, N.J. • 297-6020 



j§|§ Princeton Caterers 
m l Market & Bakery ^J§» 



Have you visited our new market? 

Get Acquainted Specials 

Friday • Saturday • Sunday 
Ail COffee beanS (including decaffeinated) 10% Off 

Deluxe Brie $2.99 per pound 

Bel Paese $5.99 per pound 

Jarlsberg $3.99 per pound 

Just Roasted Beef $5.29 per pound if I 

Sherry-Glazed Ham $4.99 per pound 



Dinners To Take Away 

In addilion to our'daily menu, there are always barbe- 
qued ribs, freshly roasted turkey, whole chickens and a 
glorious array ol salads 

We. of course, will be delighted to prepare special items 
on request Dinners include either appetizer, soup or green 
salad, entree, vegetable and bread and butter. 

Stop in for our October Menu 



Come in and taste cider from 
France, California and, of course, New Jersey! 

Call ahead <609> 924-0685 

and we will have your order ready for pick-up or delivery 
830 State Road (Route 206 N) • Princeton, New Jersey 




I A RECEPTION for those Interested In Princeton Township politics has been set lor 
„ Sunday, October 14, at the Battle Road home of former Ambassador to New 
^Zealand, Anne C. Martindell. Former State Senator Stephen B. Wiley, likely can- 
didate for Governor In 1 985, will speak at the gathering, which will raise funds for 
'Democratic Township Committee candidates Howard S. Ende and Janet A. Mit- 
jchell. Planning the event are, from left, David Qoldfarb, Ende & Mitchell Campaign 
^Treasurer, candidate Mitchell, Christopher Tarr, Campaign Chairman, candidate 

Ende, and Pam Enslin, Schedule Coordinator. Those who would like to attend 

should call Mrs. Enslin at 924-1459. 



Topics ofthv Town 

Continued Com Page II 

Golden Bandaid as an award 
A complimentary massage 
will he provided bj the 
Princeton Massage Group 
from (he Nautilus )■ iim- 

i entei and gifts will be given 
to the representatives <>f each 
organization in the walk who 
have collected the most 
money for hunger. 
Shopping Center res- 



taurants wUl be open and will 
contribute pari of the tab paid 
by hungry and thirsty walkers 
to I ROP 

Proceeds from the Walk will 
be divided, 25 percent going to 
l M-riiun to he disbursed by 
Trenton Kcumenical Area 
Ministry 'TKAMt and the re- 
maining 75 percent to be sent 
to the Sahel area in Africa 

which is experiencing a 
widespread and devastating 
drought 



CROP not only provides 
food for the hungry but also 
teaches people to he self- 
sufficient by initiating and en- 
couraging projects in 
agriculture, reforestation and 
conservation 

Information about this 
year's CROP Walk is 
available al schools and chur- 
ches, and by calling John 
Coonrod, recruitment chair- 
man, at 924-7015 



fall is... 




Ns 



delightful 
designer clothing 
and accessories 

our prices make 
the difference 



#1 designers (809)896-1121 

2«7« rt. 1, UwranOMtllt, n.|. rn-th 10-6; fr 10-7 
nioiwoni) •*! 10-5:30 




CATERING 

for every occasion. 

Large Enough To Serve You 

Small Enough To Care 

Calatlng Conaultanti: Lou *■ Fran Lotllo 



Store-Cooked, All Natural 

TURKEY BREAST 

$1.99 1 /2 lb. 

BAKED ZITI 

Ready To Eat 

$1.99 lb. 




BARBECUED CHICKENS 

Home Cooked 

Specialties 

Fresh-Baked 

Breads 

Served Daily 



CHILD ABUSE IS TOPIC 

of Open Forum. Amy Yatz- 
kan, director of the Communi- 
ty Guidance Center of Mercer 
County, will speak on protec- 
ting children from child abuse 
at an open forum sponsored by 
the Children's Center of the 
Princeton YMCA. The forum 
will be held Thursday, Oc- 
tober 11, at 7:30 pm at the 
Johnson Park School, 
Rosedale Road. 

Jan Gill, director of the 
center, will also speak. Her 
topic will be the respon- 
sibilities of a child care profes- 
sional in the training and 
supervision of staff. 

All concerned and in- 
terested persons are invited to 
I attend. The Children's Center 
will be open and staff will be 

I present to care for children 
during the meeting. 
Anyone planning to attend 
• should contact the Children's 
I Center, especially If child care 
lis needed For additional in- 
J formation, call The Children's 

(Center .d 924-9637. or the YM- 
CA at 924-4497. 
WOMEN'S COL1 l». is 
(s\ mpotlum Subject. The 
Women's College Symposium 
is sponsoring iLs third biennial 
i conference on "Why a 
I Women's College,'' Saturday, 
October 13, from 9 a.m. to 2 
p.m. at ETS. 

I The program is designed to 
Increase the awareness of 
high school juniors and 
seniors and guidance 
counselors about the range of 
1 academic and social 
possibilities offered by 
women's colleges and of the 
achievements of their 
graduates Students will also 
have opportunities to meet 
with representatives from the 
more than 30 women's col- 
leges attending the con- 
ference 



HOT FOOD 
TOGO I 

Gourmet Deli & Caterersi 

236 Nassau Street » 

Far Ftikr Sarvfc* CM Your Orctor 1 

921-0438 

Mon-Frl 74S-84S pm; 

Sll W pm | 



\\ \ 1 



*4*k» 



Tioiun mot 

306 Alexander Rd. 
924-1840 

f oi that personal touch 
in tlowei design 



The program will begin with 
a panel of four speakers The 
panelists and their topics are 
Nancy J Weiss. Department 
of History, Princeton Univer- 
sity. The Case for Women's 
Colleges "; Abisola Gallagher, 
assistant dean of students. 
Douglass College. "Personal 
Growth at Women s 
Colleges". Amy Vance, pro- 
gram officer. Human Rights 
and Governance Division. 
Ford Foundation. "From a 
Women's College to a Career 
World", and Helen B OBan- 
non. senior vice president. 
University of Pennsylvania. 
"Putting It All Together," 

The panel will be chaired by 
Barbara B Wolfe, staff con- 
sultant for program planning 
at ETS 

Following the panel, there 
will be seven workshops on 
topics ranging from "Financ- 
ing a Private Women's Col- 
lege Education" through "On 
Campus Now: The Student 
View" to "Women in the Cor- 
porate World .'■ Each 

Continued on Page 16 




Sink your teeth into some 

HALLOWEEN POPS! 

Dumpkins»witches^qhosts 



pumpKins* wuui ici-^M' "joi 

jVjrcMAM ft Oft . 



"^V 179 Nassau St. 



%c* 






924-7222 

"Enjoy it on the patio!" 



Ice Cream 

M-Th S Sun: 12-11 
Frl a Sat: 12-12 





Gourmet seafood 
made easy. 



i 



We take hours to prepare fresh gourmet 
seafood you carry out in minutes. 

Nassau Street Seafood Company is ready when you are with ready 
to-eat gourmet delights We offer golden fried Maryland crab cakes, 
broiled swordfish steak, broiled flounder stuffed with crab meat, 
chilled t almon and sole pate, cool lobster or neptune salad, heat'n eat 
crab au gratin, mussels marinara and paella, and much, much more 

For gourmet seafood made easy, call 92 1 -0620 

256 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ Mon -Thurs9-7 30. Fri 9-8, Sat 9-6 
"5 minute courtesy parking in front of store 





Halloween Pumpkins 



Thousands of Pumpkins - all Shapes and Sizes 

(or visit our Pumpkin Patch - pick your own) 




Appl e uJT7 n y™ sap ' Jona,han • Red De » cio "s • w 

Macintosh • Golden Delicious • Crab Apple • Empire 

Pears Bartlett • Seckel • Bosc 

Fall Favorites Mums . Corn Stalks . Indian Corn . Gourds 

Vegetables 



Store open Honoay-Fng-ay 9 . 7: Stlurd , y 4 ^^ ag 



THE APPLE FARM — Pick Ynur Own 

Red Delicious . r,n,^/rLY'! r ' CK Y0Ur UW " 



Red Dehctous . _ Golden Dehcous . Stayman Winesap • Emp,re 
Van Kirk Roari . |ggydg 9 am . 5 pm 



* 







MNM IKCTtJC 



Supermarket 



"For Friendly Service, Quality and Value." 

172 NASSAU ST., PRINCETON 

STORI HOURS : Mon i u *i . W*o » Sol I a m III 6 p m • Thuri lam in s p m • f rl t a m in 9 p " 



- : 




With Thighs 

Perdue 



Chicken Legs 



lb 



89* 



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U.S.DA Choice Beel Center Cut 

Chuck j-sa 
Steaks ««) 

Fresh Any Single Pkg 

Ground 
Chuck 



.n 



Of 



Center Cut RibCui tifiolhicn * inm Priced Higher 

Pork $ 17 « 

Chops 

USD A C^ceB«<!cmif>jr T ,e.i 

Chuck Roast 

USD A Choice Beel 

Shoulder Steak 

Smokeo Horn Majh s lowerSail fultyCooked 

wale' AaaedC'vO cllo 

Shank Portion ir * 139 

Smoked Ham Mash s lower Soli fully Cooked 

b $ l 6 » 



JY 9 

$]3 




Fuinttute Ono 

Pledge Polish 

in Juice Chunk SliredoiOushed 

Dole Pineapple 

Deer Park 

Spring Water 

Extra Long Gram 

Carolinia Rice 

Plain 

4-C Bread Crumbs 

Save More 

Libby Pumpkin 

Save More 

Glad Lawn Bags 



Progresso Sauce 

Ocean Sd'ov Cianaopre D'ir>* c 

CranGrape Drink 



00' 

can rw 
bti I 



S.79* 

pkg yy 



24 oz 
can 

29 oz 
can 



HEALTH & GOURMET 



lOm 
box 



$]09 

99* 

$J79 



SUPER DAIRY 



Bite-Sizeimp Irom England 

Carr's Crackers 

Stoned Wheal Thin 

Crackers 

C8iB Red or Clear 

Consomme Medrilene 

Danish 

Butter Cookies 



99* 



box 

10 02 oo« 

pkg ▼▼ 

13oz< 
can 

16 oz 



SJ59 

$]69 



Premium Pack 

Tropicana 
Orange Juice 



BAKERY VALUES 



1 . gat 
ctn 



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99 



Asst Flavors 

New Country 
Yogurt 






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Foodtown Asst vanet.es 

Cottage Cheese 

Mountain High 

Plain Yogurt 

Philadelphia 

Soft Cream Cheese 

Foodlown Whole MUh or PO't Skim 

Mozzarella 

freocn Omof o< wiin Ganic 1 He'Di 

Alouette Cheese 

Kratt 

Velveeta Slices 

foodrown (Jandom Weight imported 

Gouda or Edam 

r- 



;99 c 



Foodtown Cuts 

Rye Bread 

Foodtown Corn or 

Bran Muffins 

Foodtown 

Raisin Bread 

Foodtown 

Apple Pie 



16 oz 69* 



pkg 

13 oz 
pkg ol 6 



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39 



i6ozsil9 
loot I 

22oz$|39 
pkg I 



quart A A« 
cont TrTr 

12oz.$l«» 
cont T I 

16oz<»J29 
pkg ** 

4oz$j39 

pkg* I 

l6oz$»>19 
pkg '»i 



SEAFOOD VALUES 



,*3 7 



Fresh 

Swordfish Steaks 

Fresh 

Halibut Steaks 

Fresh Silver 

Salmon Steaks 

2-4 oz 

Flounder Fillet 

Fresh 

Hake Fillet 




DAVIDSON COUPON 



Real 

HELLMANN'S 
MAYONNAISE 



i— n i— ■ 



99 



32 ox- 
Jar 

WTTH TWS COUTOM AND AN ADPfnOHAl %? SO Ot MOt! PUBCHASI •» 
cbdtao twh »WI*. cloa*w«* purcftatet or aKo^oac &*jr«rov*t ^cy- 
pw«9rowl<«OoTia»o^^p*-marir»^n^9c'. 7. W.l.Mffort+coueon. 
#e*«duHio»M* HO. 1 




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London 
Broil 



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69 



USD*. Grode A 5/7 lb. ovg 

Perdue 
Oven Stutter 

79* 



Fresh Any Single Pkg 

Ground Round 

Shonk Portion 

Fresh Ham 

Butt Portion 

Fresh Ham 

Perdue with Ribs 

Chicken Breast 

Perdue 

Chicken Wings 

Boneless U.S.DA. Choice Beel 

Chuck Roast 

Shoulder 

Pork Chops 

Lom End 

Pork Chops 

End* Center Cu'Chooi 9 ll Chop* 

Pork Chop Combo 

Fresh Center Cut 

Ham Steak 

Rib End Pork Loin Country Style 

Spare Ribs 



,b 5 i 89 
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b*l 6 ' 

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b*l 39 

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Chicken ot the Sea In Oil or Woter 

Solid White Tuna 



99" 



AsjI Afti & Flowers or Decor. 119 Sheet 

Scott Towels 



[umbo 
roll 



69 



Col lee 

Sanka Instant 

Lysol Cleaner 

Basin, Tub & Tile 

Dow 

Saran Wrap 

lev Point 

Pink Salmon 

Utile Bits Semi-Sweet 

Nestle Morsels 

Minced or Chopped 

Gorton's Clams 

5 oz Kitchen Refill 

Dixie Cups 



17oz< 

pll 



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<$|29 

50IIS109 
roll I 

15 oz$199 

can I 

12oz$009 

pkg ** 

6 can'99 C 
SJ39 



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No. 4543 | 



Prices ertective Mon Oct 8 thru Sot Oct 13, l°8d Not responsible for typographical errors We reserve the right to limit auantities 



MAILBOX 



But let us not forget that ourselves, to determine U we 
ea^h pro e^t had to overcome are conducing our affairs ,n a 
much town resistance, and proper manner, 
zoning barriers that had been 
in place for many years Ml. n , s now painfully (and 



In summary. I have con- 
cluded that the growing maze 
of public interest (and intra- 
governmenli lawsuits are an 
unbearable and deliberate 
burden upon the citizenry, 



Laurel is just a tool, albeit a expensively) clear that an who Dear the costs of the 



crude one, that tries to redress alternative procedure 

unfair zoning The tool may required There must be a 

seem invasive to home rule, quicker and lower cost 

but the zoning barriers it alternative to the cancer of 



Mi laurel Misinterpreted. 
To the Editor of Town Topics 

The Mt Laurel decision is means to topple have become p ro t ra cted and extensive 
being misinterpreted by each increasingly resistant to litigation. It probably lies in 
of our two distinguished local change something like an arbitration 

papers in a way that is To bring suit in the Federal syslem , n which the facts, 
misleading the reading public, courts at this time wouldbe a ralner tna n legal ob- 

One says (September 28) the costly delaying action Time fuseatjons, are considered A 
"Mt. Laurel ruling charges and money are two com- Ilna | decision can then be 
each municipality to provide a modilies that are too precious q U , c kiy, and equitably, ren- 
fair share of low- and to squander If pressure is U) ,j ere( ] We must all be pain- 
moderate-income housing be applied, and protest made, (u) | y aware that the present 
locally" The other says it should be better directed to S y Sle m isonly of benefit to the 
(October 3) "the Mt. Laurel our State legislators and nigh pr i c ed "legal gun- 
decision, which mandates Governor We need from them s ij n g er s," who offer results 
municipalities in growth areas a new growth map. and fair base( j up0 n their merits, 
to construct low and moderate share numbers that make ra ther than the merits of the 307 wendover Drive 
income housing" sense, as well as funds to help dispute 
the municipalities do what 

Wrong in both cases they have been directed to do 

The Supreme Court of New by the Court 
Jersey did not say that any Let's get on with the work 
municipality must actually we have before us - not 
provide housing In the section scurrying around yet again to 
headed "Defining the Mt another court, this time on the 
Laurel Obligation," the court Federal level, being profligate 
said "if the Municipality has with the taxpayers' money 
in fact provided a realistic and delaying what we should 
opportunity lor the con- be doing in an enlightened 
structlon (emphasis mine) of community 



lawyers' interminable (and 
lucrative) disputations I 
respectfully urge that we 
consider (figuratively) Will 
Shakespeare's advice 
regarding lawyers At the 
very least, we must restrain 
their unjustified and glut- 
tonous abuses of the public 
purse The present time, with 
the confluence of local and 
national elections, and the 
emerging Mt. Laurel fiasco, is 
a propitious moment to seek 
corrective reforms, and to 
prevent further abuses on a 
wider scale. 

SHELDON THALER 



When it comes to 
oirfares, who is the 
biggest penny-pincher 
in town? 

Super savers, super cooch. Peanut fares. 
You name it. We just cant wall to 
save you big bucks on the big brand 
name airlines. Come conquer inflation 
with us. "Ask Mr. Foster" today. 

Ask Mr. Foster 

Over 30 million satisfied customers 
Since 1888 

41 Wltherspoon Street • 921-3350 



Ki I H •13 1 « ■ 






its fair share of low and 
moderate income housing, it 
has met the Mt. Laurel 
obligation." 



LAURA GOLDFELD 

Housing Committee Chair 

league of Women Voters 

of the Princeton Area 



What could be clearer? | ns en»lllvlty or Ignorance. 
What could be more t u, c Editor of Town Topics: 



unequivocal? The require- 
ment Is for a realistic 
opportunity for construction: 
It is not a mandate to con- 
struct. 

The Borough's plan to 
construct houBlng at a cost 
(repaid by private tenant 



As a long term patron and 
ticket holder to the McCarter 
Theatre Drama Series, I was 
quite upset to learn that the 
opening night for the first play 
of the year occurs on October 
5,1984 

This is the evening of Yom 



mortgages in three years) of Kippur, the holiest night of the 

13,700,000 if 60 units or year for all Jews When I went 

$6,876,000 if llOunits isclearly to tne box office to complain 

not mandated by the Mt an d exchange my tickets, I 

Laurel declBlon. wa8 t |d "Oh well, don't 

CHARLES CORNFORTH worrv wc have also managed 

71 Westcolt Road to schedule a performance on 

Easter, which will create 

Friends and Foes. problems for Christians also. " 

To the Editor of Town Topics: This scheduling reflects 

I read with considerable either Inscnsitlvlty or 

puzzlement the Mayor and ignorance, neither of which 



Ixides well for the forthcoming 
McCarter Drama Series. In 
one stroke of scheduling, they 
have managed to offend just 
about everybody. 
STANLEY K. ROSENBERG 



Democratic Council can 
didates reaction to the latest 
Allan Mallach Mt. Laurel 11 
"obligation" estimates. 
Frankly, I wonder why they 
were shocked. 

Throughout the Mayors 253 Witherspoon Street 
Affordable Housing Com- 
mittee deliberations, par 
tis;iiis of lhe mayor touted the 
Mullach-Nolan report ad 
nauseam despite (lie many 
doubts raised within lhe 
eommilU'c as to the report's 
validity. 



Tax Dollars and Lawsuits. 

To Ihr Editor 11I Town Topics: 

i am writing to focus a! 
tention upon a growing 
problem area lit Princeton, 
mui our state mid nation, This 
problem is topically 
Illustrated by the rash ol 
Similarly wo on committee ij^ulta emanating from the 

wore pushed to adopt a plan to M , \ Mm .\ divisions 

install the Witherspoon ivinceton is considering the 

Jackson Development (01 ,,,. lh ,„„ 1 „, „„, nul ,,alil„-s" 

poration as the low Income requesl tor s wo.000 fund to 
housing Czar for the Borough ,. X| ,i,„,. ., ,,, K;ll opposition to 

Today, the Witherspoon „„. ,.,.,.,. ,„ M , Laurel 
Jackson Corporation Is suing division A subsequent legal 
the Borough, and Allan effort would probably result in 
Mallach is suggesting we ., pl oli ailed legal battle with 
accept some of the highest , ,.,| |,, Ra | ,. V p,.„,|,iur«s ap 
population densities this side Broaching the million dollar 
of Macao! f eve] 1 s t,onglv resent being 

Its getting increasingly taxed for this nurpost 
hard to tell the difference 



between the Mayor's friends 
and the Borough's foes. 

THOMAS O MEEHAN 
49 Palmer Square West 

Housing Suit Is Wrong. 
To the Editor of Town Topics : 
The Mount Laurel decision 
has understandably caused a 
great deal of frustration, 
confusion, and just plain 



A second, and more in- 
furiating aspect of this 
escapade, would result when 
our state is laci'd with the 
prestigious "hired gun" of the 
legal profession that we 
choose to fund for this effort 
The state would then marshall 
its legal resources and allies 
for a comparably expensive 
defense of their position, and 
TOnBteraation"all"ovef'thii res " u in a " additional ex- 
state. All municipalities seem PenditOre ol my taxes on their 



to be reeling from its im 
plications. 

Princeton, to its honor, has 
been a leader in the way 
communities can provide 
affordable housing Through 
our Housing Authority and the 
community wide non-profit 
group. PCH. Inc. we have 
managed to build some low 
and moderate income 
housing- 



behalf. This ludicrous 
scenario results in our 
citizenry bearing the double 
cost of 1 effectively ' suing 



?! 



Our classics sale. 

Here it is. Our classics sale where you'll find a choice selection on some of our best, 
and best-selling, modem classic styles. So come in now through November 4 and save. 




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headboard, storage drawer, mattress Double bed as 
shown $575 reg. $640 Comp savings on other sizes 



Our elegantly simple tuxedo sofa Covered in a rich 
natural herringbone Special order fabnes available at 
higher pnees As shown $549 reg $599 







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A Workbench exclusive white la 
from I inland with genii 
styling 271 >h n 111 w> 22 .1 J 
: ,r »;2doorcabim-t$179 



er storage modules 
ons and sophisticated 
»er cabmet $199 



The classic chair in beech, black, or walnut with cane or 
upholstered seat and back More than fifty upholstered 
fabnes Cane side chair $39; cane arm chair $49; 
upholstered side chair $69; upholstered arm chair $79. 








(tin l1.is.su book< .ison im ,..n, ui tv.ik wruvrs oi white 
Iftcquei In oak ot teak wide low bookcase $79 reg $89. 
wide tall bookcase $99 reg 5 1 V. narrow tall bookcase 
$89 i.n 5**9 double doors $46 ng $50; single door 
$25n.*g $30 Similar savings In white 



Storage in oak or teak Shown are only some of the many 
coordinated pieces Wide tall unit with drop front, 4 drawers, 
extra shell $347.75 reg $392 50, narrow tall unit with 
record divider $168 reg $190. narrow tall unit with single 
door, 4 drawers, extra shelf $271 .50 reg $302 50 



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' I 



CALENDAR 

Of The Week 



Wednesday. October 10 
2 p.m.. "The Mikado"; 
Bucks County Playhouse, New 
Hope. Pa., also at 8:30- Also 
Thursday at 2 and 8 ; 30. Friday 
at 8:30. Saturday at 5 and 9, 
Sunday at 6. 

5 p.m.: Borough Housing 
Authority; Borough Hall 

7 30 p.m . : Environmental 
Resign Review Committee; 

valley Road. 

8 p.m.: Joint Borough Coun- 
ci! Township Committee 
meeting on sewers; Borough 
Hal! 

8 p.m Ramona King's 
"Steal Away"; Crossroads 
Theatre Company, 320 
Memorial Parkway. New 
Brunswick, Also on Thursday 
and Friday at 8. Saturday at 4 
and 8:30, and Sunday at 3. 

8pm: The Canadian Brass, 
Music-at-McCarter ; Mc- 
Carter Theatre 

8 p.m.; Public Lecture, 
The Physics of Everyday Af- 
fairs," K.C. Cole, columnist; 
Woodrow Wilson School. 

Thursday. October II 
7:30 p.m.: Open Forum. 
"Child Abuse, a Community 
Response." Amy Yatzkari; 
Princeton YMCA's Children's 
Center Preschool, Rosedale 
Road 

7:30 p.m : Special Planning 
Board meeting on affordable 
housing ordinance and traffic 
circulation; Valley Road 
Building. 
>^8_j).m,: Poetry reading by 
Pablo Medina, James Haba 
and Penelope Schott; Arts 
Council, 102 Witherspoon 
Street 
8 p.m.: Moliere's "The 
►! for Wives," McCarter 
re Company; McCarter 
tre. Also Friday and 
'day at 8, Sunday at 2:30 



Scfij 

The 
Thj 
SaR 
and 8 

if p.m.: Joint Princeton 
Sewer Operating Committee; 
Borough Hall. 

Friday, October 12 

8 a.m. -11 a.m.: French 
Market fall flower sale, the 
Garden Club of Princeton, 
mini-park opposite TOWN 
TOPICS, Nassau and Mercer 
Streets. 

7:30 p.m.: World Folkdance 
Cooperative, instruction 
followed by requests at 9, 
Room 01, 185 Nassau Street. 
f 8 p.m.: Princeton Squares 
Mainstream Plus Square 
Dance; Community Park 
School. 

8 p.m.: Opening Night, 
"Angel in a Pawnshop"; Off- 
Broad Street Theatre. Also 
Saturday. 

8 p.m,: Rutgers Jazz 
Ensemble with George Cole- 
man, saxophonist; Nicholas 
Music Center, Douglass Col- 
lege, New Brunswick. 

Saturday. October 13 

8: 30 a.m.-l p.m.: Job Day, a 
Practical Program for 
Women Looking for Work; 
Princeton YWCA. 

9 a.m.-l p.m.: Symposium, 
"Why a Women's College''"; 
Educational Testing Service. 

9 a.m. -4 p.m.: Crafts Fair; 
Main Street, Kingston. Rain 
date Sunday. 

10 a.m. -4 p.m.: Sports Sale. 
Princeton Day School Hockey 
Rink. 

10 a.m. -4 p.m. : Doll, 
v Dollhouse and Miniature Show 
^nd Sale; Steinert High 
School, Hamilton Square. 

5 p.m. -8 p.m.: "Ail You Can 
Eat" Roast Pork Dinner, 
Griggstown Fire Company ; 
Canal Road Firehouse. 

8 p.m.: Portland String 
Quartet; Kelsey Theatre, 
West Windsor Campus, 
Mercer County Community 
College. 

8 p.m : Princeton Scottish 
Country Dancers . Murray- 
Dodge. 



Sunday, October 14 

7 a.m.-l p.m : Pancake 
Breakfast. Lions Club of 
Plainsboro; Plainsboro Fire 
House 

11 a.m.: Interfaith Service 
for Peace, Dr. Ronald J. 
Sider, preaching; Princeton 
University Chapel Sponsored 
by Coalition for Nuclear 
Disarmament. 

1 p.m.: Registration for 
Conference, "Election '84: 
What Price the Arms Race?" 
Nassau Presbyterian Church 
Speakers include Seymour 
Melman at 2, Harold Willens 
at 3; 15. and George McGovern 
at 8. Sponsored by Coalition 
for Nuclear Disarmament. 

1 p.m. -7 p.m.: Roast Beef 
Dinner, Princeton Junction 
Volunteer Fire Co.; 952 Alex- 
ander Road. 

4 p.m Princeton Society of 
Musical Amateurs. Haydn. 
"The Seasons," J. Merrill 
Knapp. conductor; Unitarian 
Church. 

Monday, October 15 

8 p.m.: Alicia de Larrocha, 
pianist, Music-at-McCarter; 
McCarter Theatre. 

8 p.m.: Township Commit- 
tee; Valley Road Building 

Tuesday. October IK 
7:30 p.m.: International 
Folk Dancing, Princeton Folk 
Dance Group; Riverside 
School. Instruction followed 
by request dancing from 
8:30-10. 

8 p.m. : Joint Commission on 
Civil Rights; Borough Hall. 

Wednesday October 17 
10:30 a.m.: Readings Over 
Coffee, Rumer Godden's "The 
Dragon of Og," Prof. Donald 
Ecroyd, Temple University; 
Princeton Public Library. 

1:30-3 p.m.: Pumpkin Sale; 
Community Park School. 

2 p.m.: Musical, "Pippin". 
Bucks County Playhouse, New 
Hope. Pa., also at 8:30. Also 
Thursday at 2 and R: 30, Friday 
at 8:30, Saturday at 5 and 9. 
Sunday at 6. 

: 30 p.m.: Gordon Myers, 
baritone, in "Songs That 
Tickle"; Princeton Public 
Library 

8 p.m : Landon Jones 
author of "Great Expecta- 
tions: America and the Baby 
Boom Generation"; Princeton 
High School. 



Thursday. October 18 
8 p.m.: Moliere's "The 
School for Wives." McCarter 
Theatre Company; McCarter 
Theatre. Also Friday at 8. 
Saturday at 4: 30 and 9. Sundav 
at 2:30 

8 p.m.: Drama. "Angel in a 
Pawnshop"; Off-Broad Street 
Theatre Also Friday and 
Saturday 

8 p.m ; Piano Recital. 
Dalton Baldwin; Bristol 
Chapel. Westminster Choir 
College 

Friday, October 19 

8 a.m. -11 a.m.: French 
Market fall flower sale, the 
Garden Club of Princeton; 
mini-park opposite TOWN 
TOPICS, Nassau and Mercer 
Streets 

VI 30 p m Museum Break 
Talks, "Cezanne: Paintings. 
Watercolors, Drawings and 
Prints from the Henry and 
Rose Pearlman Foundation 
and the Collection of Mrs. 
Rose Pearlman," Harriet 
Senie, associate director, 
Princeton University Art 
Museum. 

7:30 p.m.: World Folkdance 
Cooperative, instruction 
followed by requests at 9; 
Room 01. 185 Nassau Street 

8 p.m.: Portland String 
Quartet; Kelsey Theatre. 
West Windsor Campus. 
Mercer County Community 
College. 

8:30 p.m.: Princeton 
University Orchestra. 
Mordechai Sheinkman, con- 
ductor; University Chapel. 

Saturday, October 20 
10 a.m. -4 p.m.: Annual Fall 

Crafts Festival; Unitarian 

Universalist Church at 

Washington Crossing, 
10 a.m. -4:30 p.m.: Stamp, 

Coin and Postcard Show . 

Ramada Inn of Princeton, Rt. 

1. 

10 a.m. -5 p.m.: Senior 
Crafters Show; Stuart School. 
Sponsored by:, Presbyterian 
Homes. 

11 a.m.: Museum Talks for 
Children, "Cezanne and His 
Art." Hope Scherck, museum 
docent; Princeton University 
Art Museum. 

8 p.m.: Princeton Scottish 
Country Dancers; Murray- 
Dodge^ 

SOMETHING old or new to sell? Try a 
TOWN TOPICS classified Call «J 1200 

today 



How does your bank treat you? I 




"Right now.our money market accounts arepaying 

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rule fin tored bi'i f«/ oj money and inflation oj < ourse 

U i>.m balance falls below tJ.VH>.al anytime during the tmmlh. 

you forfeit alt interest and in fai I we will charge you a penalty for keeping 

less than the minimum amount" 



AmeriFederal thinks there's a better way Were the newest, 
brightest, hardest-working bank in town. 

Now open in the Quakerbridge Executive Center 
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Friday 9 am -4 pm 
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20% off 

Our Entire Selection 



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Saturday Only 







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Mon Sat 9:00-6:30 
Thurj to 8:30 







I.andun V Jones Jr. 



£ Topics <>f the Town 



Continued Irom Page 12 



t- workshop wiU be rc-n 
thai participants maj attend 

at k-asl two 

For further inform. ii 
92 1-6697 or 924-0339. 

The Women's College Sym- 
posium is composed of 
representatives from six 
women's colleges: Barnard, 
Bryn Mnwr. Douglass, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith and Wellesle) 
The program is free and open 
to the public. 

in BPEAK ATPHS 

For Friends of Library. 

I.. union Y. Jones ,lr , ex 
ecutive editor of Money 
magazine and a Princeton 
raaldent, will speak Wednes 
day, October 17, at 8 p.m. at 
the Princeton Hik'i School 
Library Mis talk is sponsored 
by the Friends of I'llS 
Library 

Mr, .Jones is acting manag 
ing editor of Money magazine 
for a year, while the preaenl 
managing editor is on a tern 
porary assignment with Time 
Inc. A graduate of Princeton 
University, he came to Time 
lnc in 1966 as an editorial 
trainee Ha was appolntad s 
contributing ediior ol Jtae 
magazine In 196(1 and wrote 
the education section, among 
others. From 1969 lo 1974 he 
was the editor of the Princeton 

Alumni Weekly 

He joined the stall of I 'en 
pie, also published by Time 
Inc., shortly after the 
magazine begun in 1974 He 
was appointed senior editor of 
People in 1978 and assistant 
managing editor in 19112 He is 
the author of Great F.xpecla 
tlons. America and tin- Baby 
Boom Generation, published 
by Coward-McCann in 1980 
The book was a selection of 
several book clubs, including 
the Book-of the Month Club, 
and was nominated for an 
American Book Award 



OKTOBF.RF EST SET 
At Shopping Center. The 
Princeton Shopping Center 
Merchants Association will 
present its second annual 
Oktoberfest Saturday from 11 
to 5. 

Featured will be traditional 
German-style entertainment 
and foods Hans Kraft and His 
Bavarian Band will play 
German favorites, ac- 
companying pairs of German 
dancers in ethnic costumes 
Carl Mittelhammer will play 
his zither as well. 

German foods will be 
available for sale, and the 
Princeton Lions Club will 
provide beer as a club 
promotion. German sausage 
will be prepared by Bon 
Appetit. the gourmet food 
store Princeton Bagels and 
Pastries will sell German 
cakes, such as German 
chocolate cake and Black 
Forest cake. 

The shopping center Mer- 
chants Association invites the 

continues on Next Page 



..."AND BABY MAKES THREE" 

Your marriage can survive your toddlers! 

An afternoon workshop with 

JENNIFER HANSON MSW, ACSW, LCSW 

Nassau Inn, Princeton: Saturday, Nov. 3rd 

Fee: $20 per person, $25 couple 

CALL (201) 297-4299 




=5 



Dog (Itzculntll) from Veracruz 

When you 
travel 
call... 

Mike Edwards 
18 S. Main St • Lambertville, N.J (609) 397-8222 



Marsh & Co. 

168 Nassau 924-4000 

Montgomery Cenler 
924-7123 



Thompson Land 

195 Nassdu Street 
Princeton, N.J. 
121-7655 



ACaCDode 

DOUTIOUE 

1 5 Wicherspoon Sree- 
Princeton N J 



Princeton 
Psychological Associates 

14 Vandevenler Avenue, Princeton, N J 

announces 
on 8-week series for women 

"Women and Relationships" 

led by Dr. Sharon R. Powell 6 Selden Dunbar Wick M.S. 5. 
12 noon - 1 :30 p.m. every Wednesday 
For more information beginning October 1 7, 1 984 Enrollmen , 



call 609-683-41 80 



is limited 



Good News! 
Dansk Overstock Sale 

Save up to 50% on selected items from every 

major collection . . . China, Flatware, Teak, Glass, 

Plastic, Cookware and Cutlery. 

Lowest prices of the year on selected China and Flatware 

patterns! (Some firsts, seconds, and discontinued.) 

Now $12.95 to $17.95 per placesetting. 

(Comparable Value up to $45.00.) 

Special Savings Offer. Present this ad and receive a 

beautiful Dansk design worth $18.95 or more for only $6! 

Offer expires Oct. 21 , 1984. Limit one per customer. 

Bad News! 
Only 8 Days 

October 13-21. Hurry in for Best Selection. 









DANSK 
FACTORYOUTLET 



I li-iiiiii»tnii. NJ 
Routes 202 & 31 
(201) 782-7077 
Open Seven Days, 
9:30 to 6 



I-ancaster, PA 

2233 Lincoln Highway E 

Route 30 

(717) 2<W-277I 

Mou rhurs, Sal 9:30 to 6 

III l > (O s> 

Sun 10 10 6 



Ml. Kisco, NY 

14 S. Moger Ave 

CJI4I 6oo"-6616 ' 

Mon-Wed, 

Fri & Sal 9:30 lo 6 

Thurv 9;3o to 8 

Sun 11:30 to 5:30 




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Route 13 

Beaver Brook Plaza 
(3 Miles S. of 
Wilmington Airport) 
(302) 322-0777 
Mon-Thurs, Sal 9:30 to 6 
Fn 9:30 to 9 
-,Sun,Uo 



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A Scientific Approach 
to Better SAT Scores 



VW iieil: Sunday evenings starting 
Oct 21, Tuesday evenings starting Oct. 23, 
( Each preparatory course runs 6 weeks- 
one 3- hour session each week ) 

MOW: First a pre test is given to each 
student to determine areas of need Then 
under the direction of fully certified 
teachers, the latest in accelerated learning 
techniques are combined with well-estab- 
lished SAT preparatory procedures As a 
result each student in the program will face 
the testing situation with greaterconfldence. 
and will be prepared to come away with 
better scores 

Wliere: The classrooms of Educational 
Consulting Services. 20 Nassau St 
Princeton. NJ 08540 

HOW Much: Tuition for each 6- week 

SAT Prep Program, including pretest, is 
S 150 00 ( The Pre Test Evaluation is offered 
at a separate S25 00 fee, and can be applied 
toward full tuition for the program at any 
time ) 

CALL (609 ) 683-4967 now 

to insure your choice of course date 



Next Exam Date 



Call for Starting 
Times of Future 
Review Courses 



SAT 
Exam Dates 

December 1. 1984 
January 26. 1985 
March 23, 1985 
( SAT ONLY i 
May 4. 1985 
June 1. 1985 



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Topics of the Town 

Continued from Page 16 

public to enjoy this free event 
and discover the variety of 
shopping available at the 
center. The rain date is the 
following Saturday, October 
20 For further details, call 
921-6234. 



A DOZEN ARE FINED 

In Borough Court. Twelve 
area residents were fined 
Monday in Borough traffic 
court by Judge Russell A. 
Annich Jr. 

Two were fined for driving 
while intoxicated. Michael E. 
Yates. 33 Clay Street, paid 
S615 in fines and was sen- 
tenced to 30 days community 
service. His license was 
revoked for two years. James 
A. Gibson. 47 Castle Howard 
Court, was fined $365 and lost 
his license for six months. 

Fined $60 each for speeding 
were Charles L. Fefferman. 
234 Clover Lane; Minerva C. 
Santiago, 25 Fieldston Road; 
John M. Duncan, 7 Pine 
Street; Katherine H. Book, 54 
Hodge Road. Kwong T. Chung, 
283 Westcott Blvd., Pen- 
nington, paid $75 and Eleftheri 
Fikaris, 205 Nassau Street, 
paid $70. 

Also, Lourdes V. Ferrer. 17 
Shirley Lane. Lawrenceville, 
$60, red light; John W. 
Davidson, 110 Bayard Lane, 
$60, stop sign, and Stanley 
Corngold. 20 Erdman Avenue, 
and Dino L. D'Angelo, 178 
Linden Lane, each $20, no 
license or registration in 
possession. 

In Township traffic court 
last week, Roberta Brokaw, 
4674 Province Line Road, was 
fined $365 and had her license 
revoked for six months for 
drunken driving. 

Two were fined $65 each for 
moving violations: Valentin 
Bargmann, 87 S. Stanworth, 
stop sign, and Barry A. Davis, 
110 Herrontown Road, 
careless driving and another 
$65 for failure to report an 
accident. 

In Borough criminal court 
last week, Jacqueline Coogan, 
381 Mercer Road, was fined 
$265 and had her license 
suspended for six months for 
driving while intoxicated. 

Christopher Marrow, 121 
Birch Street, was fined $40 
each on two charges of theft, 
placed on six months 
probation, received a 30-day 
suspended sentence to the 
Mercer County Workhouse 
from Judge Annich and was 
ordered to pay $70 restitution 
to the police. 

Barbara Beagles, 98 Birch 
Street, was fined a total of $30 
on three separate charges of 
improper behavior and sen- 
tenced to ten days community 
service. Charged with 
criminal mischief, Robin L. 
Everett, 224 Forrestal 
Apartments, was fined $50 and 
received a 30-day suspended 
sentence to the Workhouse. 
She was ordered to make a 
restitution of $75. 

Suburban Transit Corp., 92 
Nassau Street, was fined $40 in 
violation of a Borough or- 
dinance for failing to obtain an 
amusement permit for a game 
machine. 

Stephen Jones. 21 Park Hill 
Terrace, and Brian Castell, 
2507 Hunters Glen, Plain- 
sboro, were each fined $50 as 
minors in possession of 
alcohol 

Failure to license their dogs. 
a Borough ordinance 
violation, cost John DeGrazia, 
16 Linden Lane, and Michele 
Hochman, 34 Cedar Lane, $25 
each. 



HEADQL ARTERS OPENS 
For Democrats. A 

Witherspoon Street storefront 
has opened as headquarters 
for volunteers who want to 
help Democratic candidates in 



federal, state ana local races. 
Located at 32 Witherspoon 
Street, the Princeton 
Democratic Headquarters has 
already hosted gatherings for 
Ted Mondale, the son of 
Presidential candidate Walter 
Mondale. and Peter Bearse, 
Congressional candidate in 
the 12th district. Senator Bill 
Bradley will visit the store- 
front on Tuesday, October 16. 
at 7 p.m. 

Headquarters hours are 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. The telephone 
numbers are 921-0108 and 921- 
0109. 

Volunteers are welcome to 
stop by and help with can- 
vassing, mailing, phone calls 
and other organizational 
tasks. Mrs. Nancy DiMeglio is 
headquarters coordinator. 



ACTOR TO READ 
For Legal Fund Benefit. 

Ossie Davis, actor and writer, 
will give readings at the an- 
nual benefit for The 

Continued on Nem Page 



THEROWlDM.MSKlT 

Brighten your Surroundings 

with a new wreath or 

dried arrangements from 

The Flower Market 



Specials of the Week 

Cockscomb 75« per stem 



Be on the lookout - Tulips are coming 



Stop in after work 

We're open until 6 p.m. 

Mon-Wed, 6:30 Thurs & Fn 

26V2 Witherspoon Street 
(609) 683-4008 

On the brick walk between 
Palmer Square and Witherspoon Street 







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savings bank 



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hardest-working bank in town' 

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day of withdrawal 

• Interest compounded daily 



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(Minimum balance drops to 
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•FSLIC insured to $100,000 



Rate for entire month of October 



interest 



annual 
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10.52% 



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In addition we offer high yields 
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Come in today, or call for 
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JJ 




7 Topics of the Town 

2 Conltnu«J froin Pa0« 17 

"■ trinceton Committee of the 

5 NAACP Legal Defense Fund 

c The event will be held Sunday. 

£ October 21, from 5 to 7 in the 

p. garden dining room of the In- 

u stitute for Advanced Study. 

° NAACP Legal Defense Fund 

5 (LDF) has been for 43 years 

g the principal legal agency to 

w secure constitutional rights 

o for minorities, particularly 

5 blacks Mr. Davis, a long-time 
r supporter of LDF, starred on 

^ Broadway in A Raisin in the 

_- Sun. Green Pastures and Anna 

O Lueasta. He was both author 

uj of Purfie Victorious and its 

2 star on stage and screen. 

5 

°". Among the motion pictures 

o he has directed are Cotton 

£ Comes to Harlem and Kongi's GRANT FROM HISTORICAL SOCIETY: Princeton 

° Harvest His television credits Township Mayor Winthrop S. Pike, left, receives 

z include roles in King, for $3,500 check from Frederick M. English, president, 

* which he won an Emmy and Nancy R. Clark, director, of the Historical Society 

»- nomination, and Roots The for Improvement of the Princeton Turning Basin at the 
Next Generation With his d&R Canal. The grant will be used for historical survey 
wife, he was co-host and co- r archaeological work to precede dredging planned 

producer of the series with f or the his toric waterway. 

Ossie and Ruby and is 

scheduled to appear in two Harold I<ogan, co-chairmen; benefit reception, send a $20 
episodes of Bill Moyers' Aand members, Mrs. Francis per person tax-deductible con- 
Waik Through the 20th Cen Boyer, Barbara Broad, Mrs. tribution to the Legal Defense 
tury Among his published Frank Bryant, Mrs Lester Fund, c/o Mrs Edward Gib- 
works are Curtain Call andChandler, Mrs. Theodore L. son, 47 Locust Lane, Princeton 
plays about the youngCross, Henry Drewry, Fannie 08540 For further information 
Frederick Douglas and the lifeand James Floyd, Martha call 924-0656 or 921-3733. 
of Langston Hughes Hartmann; 

Mr Davis will be introduced Also, Jacqueline Johnson, c-biuii is uncus 

by Julius L. Chambers, Dorothy Kat/., Mrs Archibald ',£„'. ™ 

director-counsel of LDF at its Kerr, Ann King, Mrs. Arthur '" V „ y ui , k 8 ' u 
headquarters in New York CI- Lewis, Harold Logan, the Rev Princeton Public Library will 
ty. Mr Chambers was LDFs David H, McAlpin Jr., Janet continue its series of Readings 
first legal intern and has since Mitchell, Franklin Moore, Oyer coitee Wednesday, oc- 
handled a number of Impor Wardcll Moore, Elisabeth "*** ''• »' 10 ??„ . , 
tant civil rights cases. Morgan. Mrs Marston Morse, m "°\ Donald Ecroyd 01 

Mrs Thornton Pcnfield. Mrs Temple University s Speech 
The Princeton Committee Albert Price, Judy and Ralph Department has selected 
for LDF sponsors an annual Schoenstein, Andrea Sehutz, Rumer Godden s The Dragon 
fundraislng event for the work Ellen and Frederick Seiler, 0/ Og. a witty and poetic story 
of the national organization Mrs William Selden, Datus drawn from an pld legend of 
and provides an educational Smith, William Stackpole. the Scottish Lowlands^ 
program for Princeton High William P Starr Jr., Patricia , Everyone is invited to the 
School students The commit- and Howard Taylor, Mrs (ree program, sponsored by 
tee consists of Mrs Douglas Howard Waxwood. and the Friends of the Princeton 

Delanoy, honorary eh nan Katharine H Weaver Public Library. Refreshments 

Mrs. Edward Gibson and Mrs |.,„ reMrvatloni to Mm- will precede the reading. 



For... 
SOUND. 



...SENSIBLE... 

...SENSITIVE 

GOVERNMENT 




Jane Tefpstra is an incumbent 
councilwoman, who is serving 
ably as police commissioner 
and liaison to several major 
governmental boards and com- 
missions An attorney, Jane is 
the first woman president-elect 
q\ the Mercer County Bar 
Association 



Marvin Reed is communica- 
tions director (or the New 
Jersey Education Association, 
specializing in community rela- 
tions and governmental lobby- 
ing Currently co-chair ol the 
Borough Tax Study Commis- 
sion Marv is personnel chair 
tor the Trenton/Hopewell 
Valley Family Service Associa- 
tion 



Mildred Trotman is a 
businesswoman who currently 
serves as chairwoman ol 
Princeton's Joint Civil Rights 
Commission For many years 
Jane served as an officer of the 
Parent-Teacher Organization 
(PTO) of the Princeton 
Regional school system and 
head of its Title I Advisory 
Committee 



\ 






"We need to keep an active Borough government that takes the lead in preser- 
ving historic areas, securing highway bypasses, extending public transporta- 
tion, developing recreation and other public spaces, and stabilizing our tax 
base. We can't let other municipalities enjoy all the ratables while we in the 
area's core end up with all the problems." 



JANE 
TERPSTRA 



MARVIN 
REED 

Democrats 

for 

Princeton Borough Council 

paid lor by 

PBINCrrON BOROUGH DEMOCRATIC CAMPAIGN 

P O Boi 481, Princeton. N.J 08542 

David Goldfarb, treasurer 



MILDRED 
TROTMAN 



* 



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924-7123 



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Nassau Savings 

Alolja Prize 
JSweepstaRes 




You can win! From October 1 through 27 
we are celebrating the introduction of 24-hour 
banking with our Aloha Prize Sweepstakes. 
During the first three weeks each office will 
award 10 weekly cash prizes. At the end of the 
fourth week, October 31st, there will be a 
drawing to determine the lucky winners of our 
fabulous Hawaiian trip for 2, and 46 name- 
brand merchandise prizes including a Sharp 
video camera and cassette recorder, Commo- 
dore '64 computer system, Sharp 19" color 
TV, Sony home stereo - and more! 

Our new Treasurer automatic teller machines 
let you withdraw cash, deposit, transfer funds 
and make loan payments - 24 hours a day, 365 
days a year! And when traveling, you can obtain 
cash wherever you see The Treasurer sign. It's 
now at hundreds of locations throughout New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania - and in the near 
future many other states. 

If you have an IBC, Super IBC checking or 
Money-Maker account at Nassau Savings, 
The Treasurer card is yours automatically. If 
you don't, we invite you to visit any convenient 
Nassau Savings office to see how easy it is to 
qualify for the many personal benefits of 24- 
hour banking - free of charges or fees. 
Remember, the more you use your Treasurer 
card the greater your chances to win. Aloha! 

You need not have a Treasurer card to enter the Sweep- 
stakes Official Sweepstakes rules and regulations are avail- 
able at all Nassau Savings offices 



Jtfassau 
Pavings 



The more you use your Treasurer " card 
the greater your chances to win! 




Nassau Savings and Loan Association 

188 Nassau Street • Princeton • 924-4498 

44 Hightstown Rd. • Princeton Jet- • 799-1500 

Montgomery Shopping Ctr, • Rt. 206 • 921-1080 

Mon, - Thurs. 9 to 4, Fri. to 6, Sat. to noon 

Member FSLIC • Your Savings Insured to $100,000 



Burger King 

ConllnuM from Page 1 



niund was quick to add that 
she wanted to stress that the 

Con 1( n uM from P»g» . ownef has flgreed in private 

2 The issue: the about-to-open conversation to cooperate 
o Burger King on Nassau Stret w ith the Borough 
~ and its awning Sharp-eyed Ah, that all issues could be 
£ residents may have noticed a settled so quickly and so 
O brightly -colored awning last amicably. 
o week over the Burger King 
° window which seemed to 

> disappear overnight Why was Topics of the Town 
a it taken down? conimuid from p. . >« 

w "Because I asked that it be 

g taken down," explained '»'<» (i CHARGES FOLLOW 
!£ Mayor Sigmund There was a Motor Vehicle Stops. Two 
. technicality, she stated, which motor vehicle stops by 
i involved the positioning of the Borough police have ended in 
. Burger King logo, but, drug charges against the 
g basically, the Mayor con- drivers 

£ tinued, it was those colors Rocco A. Luongo, 38, of 
o The lurid standard yellow Philadelphia was stopped 
| and red that proclaims the Monday morning for speeding 
o. Burger King wherever he on Mercer Street by Ptl. 
«" reigns." Dennis McManimon running 

y radar He was charged with 

o The owner had agreed, possession of under 25 grams 

2 Mayor Sigmund reports, not to oi marijuana when the officer 

J use those colors, but he did not found a marijuana cigarette in 

£ know the agreement extended tne car and a plastic baggie 

to the awning "Wehada vcrv f,(,| "' v ''' 1 '" conlam marijuana 

pleasant discussion and he vegetation, and with driving 

agreed to take it down ' whllc on a revoked list. 

Furthermore, Mayor Sig- '' u °ngo was released and is 

mund said that the contre- scheduled to appear in court 

t.-n.ps over the awning un- n( ' xl Wednesday 

covered that it was not simply 

an awning, but a "structure" A car turning from 
attached to the building and Washington Road onto Nassau 
covered with canvas. Street at high speed and with 

no lights on led to its being 
When a structure intrudes stopped early Sunday morning 
into the right of way of Nassau on Nassau near Bayard Lane 
Street (also the historic King's When Ptl Mark Stillitano 
Highway with its own built-in observed a hashish pipe on the 
restrictions) it is subject, floor of the car, he questioned 
Mayor Sigmund said t« "p. the driver, Carl Weichert, 20, 
proval of Mayji and Council, of Livingston. Weichert 
The owner, she said, will be handed over the pipe and 
formally ; nformed of that some marijuana in a knap- 
necessity, sack to the officer 

Lest the "awning Incident" He was arrested, taken to 
escalate into a full-blown headquarters, charged with 
cause celebre, Mayor SIg- poiMiian and later released. 



Driver and Passenger 
Charged. Still another car stop 
last week of a car weaving 
from lane to lane on Nassau 
Street resulted in charges 
against the driver and a 
passenger The charges 
flowed after Ptl. Ralph 
Terracciano detected an odor 
of marijuana, noticed a 
package of rolling papers in 
the ash tray commonly used to 
roll a roach, and found a bottle 
of brandy in the glove com- 
partment A computer crime 
check also revealed that a 
license plate found inside the 
car had been stolen from a car 
in Trenton. 

An inventory of the driver's 
possessions uncovered a 
Princeton University 
student's ID card which had 
been stolen from the victim in 
theTowerClub 

The driver. Samuel Aragona 
Jr , L9, of Trenton, was 
charged with possession of 
marijuana, possession of 
alcohol and possession of 
stolen property 

When his passenger, Miguel 
A. Martinez, 19, of Trenton, 
told police he did not have a 
driver's license, hewasdriven 
to police headquarters by Sgt 
William Clark There a check 
with the National Crime 
Information Center revealed 
that Martinez was wanted on a 
warrant from Trenton police 
for failing to appear in court 
on a controlled dangerous 
substance charge He was 
arrested and held for the 
Trenton Police. 

Aragona was released, 
pending his court appearance 
hereon November 7. 




Service Department Open 
Thursday Evenings & Saturdays 

255 Nassau St., Princeton • 924-5454 



MISCHIEF & PROFANITY 

Two Juveniles Charged. 

Two 17-year old Lawrence 
Township juveniles have been 
charged with criminal 
mischief and harassment 
following an incident last 
week ,ii the I iiitanan Church 
on Cherry Hill Road. 

According to police, the two, 
riding around in a car, were 
seen by witnesses to throw 
objects at the church building 
and parked cars Thursday 
evening around 10:45 Police 
Bald they were also shouting 
profanities. 

Provided with a descrip- 
tion by the witnesses, 



police later stopped the 
suspects' car at the Somerset 
Farms store on Route 206 At 
first the two denied being near 
the church but when they were 
later identified by witnesses. 
they admitted, police said, to 
being in the area. 

The vouths were turned over 
to Juvenile Officer Peter 
Savalli for processing and 
later released to their parents 

Sewers 

Continued f'om Page 1 

because of the dry weather 
and the lower flow that the 
counts would be down. Unfor- 
tunatelv the hypothesis 
doesn't hold.'' Mr Hansen 
remarks 

What is •high''" The per- 
missible maximum for 
natural bathing or fishing 
waters is a fecal coliform 
count of 200. Mr Hansen gives 
three figures for each place 
sampled total coliform. fecal 
coliform and fecal strep. At 
Harrison Street, where 
Harry's Brook emerges, for 
instance, the September total 
coliform was 24,000 plus, the 
fecal coliform 24,000 plus, and 
fecal strep 2,400. 

At Harriet Street, the mid- 
dle number drops to 9,200 but 
the other two counts remain 
the same. By Overbrook 
Bridge the three counts have 
dropped to 700, 330 and 920, 
respectively. For Harry's 
Brook at Lake Carnegie, 
where dilution is a factor, the 
counts show 230, 130 and 350, 
respectively. 

"This wouldn't be a problem 
if the storms were to go into a 
treatment plant," Mr. Hansen 
remarks, but since they go in- 

Contmueflon Ne*t Page 



Fall Planting Is for 
THE BIRDS 



Birds, like people, enjoy 
AMBLESIDE'S trees and 
shrubs for colorful berries 
and foliage, and for shelter 
from cold winter winds. 



Hollies - Firethorn 
Crabapples _. 
and 
many more 



Give the Birds and 
Yourself a treat: 
plant now 




PS. While you're at it. add some of 
AMBLESIDE'S feeders filled with wild hird seed. 

Rare Plants • Distinctive Landscaping 

HMBLESIDE 

(^) Gardens & Nursery (^ 

Route 206 • Belle Mead, N.J. • (201) 359-8388 

^ Closed Mondays 




SAVE 20% 

on Kodak photogreeting 
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Cards or prints made from 

your favorite color prints, color 

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921-8500 

36 UnKranrry Ptee 



Open Mon-Sat 
9 00-5:30 
Tnuts to 8 30 



Th« Prtr»o»ton Unlvarvlty ttor« Is q tlw tor Ivryort* 




This Columbus Holiday, 
discover Icelandic bargains. 

Come to Landau's V2 price 

Columbus Week Sale on discontinued 

Icelandic Woolens. 

off T pr I hplM tl S ff,! U H r c ay ' ? ctob /r r *?• L a nda u's Columbus Week Sale will 
■ ,rw£ h onl d f ont J nued Icelandic Wool sweaters, jackets, coats, 
scanes. blankets, and accessories at '-.price' 

ihewprmX,? !,^', W ? rld of . bargains onlcelandic Woolens. They're 
guaranteed it g beautiful woolens in the world. Landau's 



& 



LANDAu\ 

, l.nUKOTOII.fU Jr 



It's worth the trip. 



Sale Hours: Wednesday, Oct. 10 through Saturday. Oct. 13 
Open 9:30 am - 5:00 pm 



114 Nassau Street 
Princeton M 08542 



Across from the University 
609-924-3494 



Bacteria Count 

Continued from Preceding Page 

(o a stream it is a violation of 
the state code." He has sought 
the opinion of experts as to 
whether the situation is to be 
expected in a suburban setting 
and finds the answer is that 
they are "much higher than 
normal ." "We don't know the 
answer," he reports. 

High Counts Disturbing. To 

Mr. Smith, the persistent high 
counts are equally disturbing, 
"more alarming than over- 
-Slowing manholes," although 
he does not want to minimize 
the unpleasantness for af- 
fected residents of that situa- 
tion either "We ( the SOC > did 
a lot of work. At Spring and 
Vandeventer, where one crew 
member said there had been a 
problem in the past, we went 
in and repaired everything 
that was bad. 

"Thinking there might be 
wrong connections, we did dye 



teste at every house in the 
area and are positive there is 
no mis-hookup in that area. If 
there is something still 
broken, we don't know where 
it is. 

"Coliform is not just with 
humans," Mr. Smith con- 
tinues, "it is also with rats, 
mice, squirrels, possums We 
don't know. We hope the state 
can come in and find 
something The meeting 
Wednesday will be to review 
all that." 

The meeting will also 
discuss alternatives for fur- 
ther sewer repair. A year ago, 
with additional monies from 
Borough and Township, the 
SOC hired Martin Dorward 
and a crew of two to complete 
the infiltration and inflow 
work specified in the Brokaw 
Report. In the spring, George 
Olexa resigned as Borough 
Engineer and Sanitary 
Engineer to the SOC to take 
another post, leaving Mr. Dor- 



ward with day to day manage- 
ment of the sewer system in 
addition to the I and I work. 

One alternative, Mr. Smith 
suggests, is to hire an 
engineer to do what Mr Dor- 
ward was doing — survey the 
trunk lines and make 
necessary repairs. But the 
problem may not be confined 
to the trunk lines in the streets 
— it may also be in the lateral 
lines connecting individual 
properties to the trunk line. 
Unlike the public sewer lines 
under the street, these laterals 
are the responsibility of the in- 
dividual property owner. 

Get the Job Done. The cry of 

sewer activists like Dwight O 
North (now being picked up by 
candidates for Township Com- 
mittee) is to "hire an outside 
firm and get the job done." 
Some work is already under 
contract to outside experts, 
Mr. Smith notes. The Van 
Note-Harvey firm will shortly 
begin a house-to-house visual 




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Nierstierner Gutes Domtal 750 mi 
Kroever Nacktarsch 750ml 
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Announcing the Grand Opening of I 

Princeton Nautilus 




5,000 Wines 
Large Cordial, Liquor Selection 

85 Imported Beers - 
5,000 cases cold beer to go 

All prices include NJ sales tax! 
Weekly Liquor, Wine & Beer Specials 

•Gourmet foods 
•Large cheese selection 
• Large, delectable sandwiches 
•Schaller & Weber products 



GlsworTh's 



Purveyor of tine wines & spirits 
since 1949 

Princeton-Hightstown Road 
(609) 799-0530 

(1 st left over bridge from Princeton) 
Mon.-Fri. 9-9; Sat 9-8 1 



TANNING 
CENTER 

The club's most exciting new addition is com- 
ing soon. It's the Silver Tanning Center and it's 
the most advanced solution to the sun yet! 
The Silver System works like a sophisticated 
sunscreen only better! Sunscreens block the 
burn but can't stop the 
damage! Silver 
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For the perfect fan, 
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o A group of songs by Olga^ 1 " 3 * 165 



The Summer Arts Institute, 
a pre-professional arts pro- 
gram for exceptionally 
talented teenagers, offers 
classes in writing, visual arts. 
theater, dance, vocal and in- 
strumental music for students 
entering ninth through 12th 



. Gorelli of Pennington was 

5 featured at a recent meeting r " a H V ' n 
o ni th« d^„«„.„_ ««.._:- „, .. L 6 Goraon 



narrower, son of 
Harrower of 
S ?h« JZ " ? ,us,c J Clu K b Hopewell, has been named lo 
ISlhJT P er, ° rmed "J the Dean's List at Hobart Col- 
1 m!™? ^ ga "' M n ? r ' an ?lege. Geneva. NY. for the 

^ ConiifiuwO on Neil P»g, 

x Airman Jeffrey M. D Qr t or j a Pnunt 
o Gorlscak, son of Michael and B<"-ierid VsUUMI 

JjJ Judith GoriSCak of Pen- ConunuM I'Om Pi«c«ling (■«• 

z nington. has graduated from inspection of down spouts, 

£ the U.S. Air Force jet engine b ase ment floor drains, sump 

M - mechanic course at Chanute pumps for improper connec- 

yAir Force Base, III He also tion ,„ the scwcr svstem 

§ earned credits toward an AM 6 000 5lruc tures, 

<- associate degree through the Borough and Township, will 

| Community College of the Air ^ surveye d, Mr Smith said, 

o^orce. and some smoke testing will 

be conducted. He refers to an 

Amy King of Princeton cap- EPA study that notes that in 16 

tured second place in the municipalities studied, 60 per- 

women's open division (ages cent of the I and I problems 

20-29) of the seventh annual were attributable to private 

Mazola Corn Oil-YMCA laterals and connections. 

Shape-Up Run held in New T hc Van Note Harvey 

York's Central Park. Ms King surv( , v win n „, find defective 

covered the I0K (6 2 milel laterals, Mr Smith warns, nor 

course in 40 17 wM | lt , |nd undc rground 

footing drains around the 

Two Princeton residents perimeter of the house that 

recently completed an Inten- are connected illegally to the 

sive five-week program at the sanitary sewer. "Those are 

New Jersey School of the Arts' going to have lo be found and 

Summer Arts Institute. disconnected," he says. 

They are. Jasmine Griffin, "The big problem is going to 
daughter of Peter and Robin be thc private laterals, 
Lucas, 16 Park Place, a stu- because it may cost a 
dent at Princeton High householder $1,000 to discon- 
School; and Vanessa Carr, nect a fooling drain, maybe 
daughter of Ruth T Alegria, $2,500 to replace a lateral A 
914 Lawrencevillc Road, a stu lot of people aren'l going lo 
denl al the Hun School have lhal money" Some 



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method of stretching 
payments over a period of 
time will have to be found, he 
thinks 

Mayor Winthrop Pike is 
known to favor an ordinance 
that requires inspection for 
faulty connections at the time 
a property cha nges ha nds 
The cost of the necessary 
repair could be made a part of 
the sale price Both Borough 
and Township may ask their 
attorneys to draw up identical 
ordinances for each 
municipality. 

Another alternative is to 
hire an engineering firm to 
survey the parts of the system 
where the worst overflow pro- 
blems exist. Two needed 
surveys that come to Mr. 
Smith's mind are upstream of 
the manhole on Snowden Lane 
and Roliingmead and 
upstream of manhole 25B at 
Elm Road and Mountain 
Avenue, or the Mountain 
Brook trunk. This would cover 
one-third of the system, he 
says, but for defects only, not 
repairs 

To those critics who would 
"bond the whole thing and get 
the job done," Mr, Smith says, 
"Until we have the studies 
run, we won't know what it is 
going to cost." More than one 
half of the 100 miles of sewer 
line under Princeton's streets 
are eight-inch terra cotta pipe, 
each one two feet long. 

"Think of all those joints," 
he says He is afraid the cost 
might be "big numbers — 
close lo $10 million" and he 
knows what bonding that will 
do to the tax rate, "I'm trying 
to keep costs down," he adds, 
—Barbara L. Johnson 



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u 



BALANCE BOROUGH COUNCIL 

ELECT 






> 



Archle Frederick Bob 

REID WOODBRIDGE COOK 

Where we stand: 

1 The Mount Laurel housing decision is not etched in stone. We should take all possi- 
Die steps to oppose it 

2 We favor use of the Borough's limited tax resources to upgrade streets and facilities 
rather than lo construct additional high density housing projects 

3. Return bi-partisan non-political government to Princeton Borough Council has been 
controlled by Democrats for 13 years; currently they hold a 5-1 margin 

hapZ!$° r 3nd C ° UnC " h3Ve 3 duty "° pro,ect ,he B °™9 h ""Payer, Why isn't it 

VOTE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 



* 



Paid toe by ReouDlican Association ot Pr 



ncelon PO Rn» itn r k* _ 

oo» Ml G Adnance. Treasurer 



People in the News 

Continued liom Preceding Page 

Navy Midshipman Geoffrey 
C. Carroll, son of James A 
Carrol] of Trenton and Anne C 
Carroll. 19 Bank Street, has 
completed one week of 
training in Pearl Harbor, 
Hawaii, with the Submarine 
Force US Pacific Fleet. 



Airman Jeffrey M. 
Corislak, son of Michael and 
Judith Gorislak, 113 Drum- 
mond Drive, Pennington, has 
f graduated from the U.S. Air 
Force jet engine mechanic 
course at Chanute Air Force 
Base. 111. 

Stanley A. Corngold. 

professor of German and 
Comparative Literature at 
Princeton University, has 
been elected vice-president of 
the Kafka Society of North 
America and incumbent to the 
presidency in 1986. 

Prof Corngold is a Kafka 
scholar, author of "The 
Commentators' Despair," a 
study of Kafka's 

"Metamorphosis," and his 
own translation and edition of 
"The Metamorphosis." He 
has recently lectured on 
Kafka at Budapest. Hong 
Kong and at the Modern 
Language Association's 
celebration in New York of the 
centenary of Kafka's birth 
Columbia University Press 
will publish next year his new 
book, "The Fate of the Self. "a 
study of seven German 
writers, which will include 
new material on Kafka. 




Michael Aron, 289 Western 
Way, senior correspondent for 
New Jersey's public television 
network, is now serving as 
senior producer of "Front 
Page New Jersey," a weekly 
news and public affairs show 
airing Fridays at 8:30 p.m. 
with 11:30 a.m. Sunday 
rebroadcasts Taking an in 
depth look at the previous 
week's headline stories, Mr. 
Aron interviews newsmakers 
for perspective and analysis of 
current public issues. 

Mr. Aron recently co- 
produced, wrote and narrated 
"Breaking Up Is Hard To Do," 
a New Jersey network 
documentary on the corporate 
divestiture of AT&T 

Several Princeton area 
residents are among some 
1,500 Semifinalists named in 
the 21st annual National 
Achievement Scholarship Pro- 
gram for Outstanding Negro 
Students. 

They are Claudia A. Simms, 
a senior at Princeton Day 
School; Megan C. Maxwell of 
Stuart Country Day School; 
Emmett R. Mohamoud of 
West Windsor-Plainsboro 
High School, and Kevin A. 
Brooks of Hopewell Valley 
- Central High School 



Stephen J. Mahony, son of 
Loe H and Marion J Mahony 
of Hopewell, has completed 
training in fundamental 
military skills at the Army 
ROTC basic camp at Fort 
Knox. Ky He plans to enter 
the ROTC program at Valley 
Forge Military Academy, 
"ayne. Pa. 



Tim Faranetta. 

Washington Street, Rocky 
Hill, the number one runner on 
the Moravian College men's 
cross-country team for the 
past three years, has been 
named a tri-captain of the 
squad, which competes in the 
Middle Atlantic Conference 
He is a graduate of Mont- 
gomery High School, where he 
also was seeded number one 
and ran on the track team. 

Mr. Faranetta represented 
the college in the 1982 Boston 
Marathon and is within sight 
of Moravian's 4.9-mile home 
course record of 26:33. His 
best time has been 26:47. 




Robert F. LeMassena Jr., 
son of Robert F. and Judith L 
LeMassena of Hopewell, has 
been promoted in the U.S. 
Army to the rank of sergeant. 
He is an infantryman with the 
82nd Airborne Division at Fort 
Bragg, N.C. 



Amy A. Schulman. 124 
Snowden Lane, has recently 
left for a year's program of 
work and study on a kibbutz in 
Israel. She will participate in 
Habonin-Dror's 34th annual 
workshop, based at Kibbutz 
Gesher Haziv, north of Haifa. 

Ms, Schulman, a January 
1984 graduate of Princeton 
High School, was the head of 
the Delaware Valley Regional 
Council of Habonim-Dror, a 
national Zionist youth group. 



CHILD ABUSE 

A COMMUNITY RESPONSE 

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OPEN FORUM, OCTOBER 11, 7:30 PM 

JOHNSON PARK SCHOOL • ROSEDALE ROAD 




& 



"If you really care about the Princeton environment, 
you have to fight to protect it." 

That's how Gail Firestone (left) and Tom Poole, Township Committee candidates, feel about it. And they're 
doing something about it. Gail, as Deputy Mayor and Township Committee Member, acts to defend the en- 
vironment with her sump pump ordinance and continued opposition to the use of sensitive environmental 
areas for high density Mt. Laurel developments. Tom began working years ago to protect Princeton's environ- 
ment as President of the Friends of the Princeton Wildlife Refuge, now continues as liaison from the Regional 
Planning Board to the Environmental Commission. Keep Princeton a good place to live. Vote for experience 
and leadership on November 6. 

Keep Them Working For You 

GAIL FIRESTONE AND TOM POOLE 

For Princeton Township jpommittee 



Paid for bv The Republican Assn. of Princeton. George Adriancd 



Bo»381.^»Eincclon, N.J. 08542 



BUSINESS 






- 150TH ANNIVERSARY si:i 
> By Princeton Banl 

-Princeton's first bank is 
5 celebrating its 150th anniver- 
3 sarv this vear. 
c On October 13, 1834, at 9 
u am the bank opened its doors 

* in what was the predecessor to 
■» the Nassau Inn on Nassau 
^Street In addition to the presi- 
c'denl, Robert Voorhees, the 

- bank had a total of three 
" employees By Thursday of its 
E first week in business, 

1 deposits amounted to $10,404 
j 

• In the early days of banking, 
3 it was not unusual for a bank 
" to choose an inn or hotel in the 
t center of town for its office 

2 Called The College Inn 
originally, it eventually 
became known as Nassau Inn 
Demolished in 1937 to make 
way for Palmer Square, the 
inn was rebuilt and 
memorabilia from the original 
1756 building may be seen in 
the tap room of today's 
Nassau Inn, 

In 1834 when the bank first 
opened, Princeton borough 
had been chartered for 21 
years. About no people lived 
in the town, not counting 
students, and there were 
about 185 houses The 
Delaware and Rantan Canal 
was completed that year, and 
within three years a railroad 
along the canal bank would be 
ready for use. 

Known at various limes as 
Princeton National Bank and 
as Princeton Bank and Trust, 
Princeton's first bank oc- 
cupied the building at the cor- 
ner of Nassau and Bank Street 
from 1676 until 1964 when it 
moved to a new bank and of 
fice building erected as part of 
Palmer Square 

Active in governmental 
financing during the Civil 
War, the bank was also active 
in promoting the sale of Libel 
ty Bonds during World War I. 
Princeton Bank was included 
In the first group of state 
banks to become affiliated 
with the Federal Reserve 
System when the system came 
into being in 1913. 

In 1933, when many banks 
failed, Princeton Bank and 
Trust was able to reopen im- 
mediately after the national 
"bank holiday" because of its 
sound condition By 1934, 
assets had increased to $4.3 
million. 

The bank experienced ltd 
greatest growth in the last r>o 
years. Expansion began in 
1938 with the acquisilion ol 
Princeton Savings Bank, 
followed in 1956 with the addi- 
tion of Hopewell National 
Bank In 1971 an agrennenl 
was reached with American 
National Bank and Trust of 
New Jersey, headquartered in 
Morristown, to form the bank 
holding company now known 
as Horizon Bancorp. 

The affiliation and more re- 
cent acquisitions, including 
the Mid-Jersey National Bank 
in 1978 and the Fellowship 
Bank in 1981 , have given 
Princeton Bank participation 
in an organization with a 
state-wide presence. Current- 
ly the fourth largest holding 
company in the state, Horizon 
Bancorps's assets total $2.6 
billion Princeton Bank has 18 
branch offices and plans three 
more in the coming year 
Assets are $400 million. 

The public is invited to join 
the anniversary celebration 
by participating in a drawing 
for special prizes to be award- 
ed monthly during October, 
November and December. On 
the last Friday of these 
months a drawing wUl be held 
in each branch office to award 



a Trivial Pursuit game, a 
framed walercolor and a pair 
of plush bears. 

Coffee will also be served on 
these Fridays A grand prize 
drawing will be held on 
December 31 for a weekend 
cruise foiMwo on the Queen 
Elizabeth II 

CONSTRICTION OKA! ED 
For More Office Buildings. 
The four one-story office 
buildings in phase II of the 
Linpro Company's office 
center at Princeton Meadows 
m Plainsboro are 75 percent 
leased, and construction plans 
are underway for additional 
buildings in the third phase 

According to Ronald Willis. 
director of commercial leas- 
ing at Princeton Meadows, 
Linpro expects that the re- 
maining 11,000 square feet of 
office space in phase two will 
be 100 percent leased this 
month. Construction approval 
has been granted for phase 
three, which will consist of 
four additional buildings, 
totalling 44,000 square feet of 
office space 

The four office buildings in 
phase two feature private en- 
trances and restrooms, solid 
core doors and acoustical ceil- 
ings, and energy-effirieni 
heating and air-conditioning 
systems. Suites range in size 
from 700 to 11,000 square feet. 

Tenants include Computer 
Synergy, Ducey Chemical, 
Meadows Medical Associates, 
Executive Marketing 

Alliance, Metro Business 
Systems, Cosmopolitan Care 
Corporation, Colonial Mort- 
gage and the Stanton Corpora- 
tion. 

OFFICE BUILDINGS SET 

In u.-..i Windsor. Con- 
struction of a $24 million office 
research park off Clarksville 
Road, West Windsor, is 
scheduled to begin this month 
The buildings will be of 
Scandinavian design. 

Called the International 
(Corporate ('enter at Prince- 
ton, the complex is being 
developed by John E Wilt 
shier Corp., the U.S. sub- 
sidiary of the John E Wilt 
shier Group, Ltd , London and 
Canterbury, England, one of 
the oldest privately owned 
construction companies in I he 
U.K. 

The two story building will 
provide 180,000 square feet of 
modular office floor space. 
They will be steel structures 
with grayish-white Glasweld 
[uriel .uling and glass spine 
skylights over the corridors 

Architect for the Center is 
the Hillier Group of Princeton. 
The Princeton office of 
the Danish firm of Friis and 
M o It k e , a w a r d - w i n n i n g 
designers of Scanticon, are 
design 'onsultnnts Financing 
is by the Abacus Group of 
Chicago and east coast sale 
and leasing is being handled 
by Helmsley-Spear, lnc . 
Princeton office. 

Fnsl occupant of the 
International Corporate 
('enter next year will be 
Gillespie Advertising, Inc., a 
Princeton-based advertising, 
marketing and public 
relations company. 

MANAGER NAMED 

For Consumer Loans. Linda 
G. Blackwell has been named 
manager of the Consumer 
Lending Division at Nassau 
Savings and Loan. The new 
division has been created as 
an additional service for 
Nassau Savings customers 
Initially personal, auto and 
home equity loans will be 
offered and. in the near future, 
a full range of consumer-loan 
products will also be 
available. 

Mrs. Blackwell was recently 
appointed to the Consumer 
Lending Committee of the 
New Jersey Savings League. 
Prior to joining Nassau 
Savings she was with the 





Linda G. Blackwell 

Northwestern Bank of North 
Carolina and United Jersey 
Bank, N.A. of Princeton and 
Elizabeth, where she served 
as assistant manager and 
credit manager of the 
Installment Loan Depart- 
ment 

NEW PRESIDENT NAMED 

For Biotechnology Com- 
pany. Cytogen Corporation 
has announced the ap- 
pointment of Ronald J. 
Benner, Ph.D., as president, 
chief executive officer and a 
director of the board 

Dr Brenner succeeds 
Stephen D. Chubb, who is 
leaving the company to join 
Johnston Associates, the 
venture capital firm which 
founded and is one of the 
largest shareholders in 
Cytogen Mr. Chubb will 
continue as a member of 
Cytogen's board of directors. 

Dr. Brenner comes to 
Cytogen from Johnson & 
Johnson where he most 
recently held the position of 
vice president, corporate 
external research. He started 



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Business in Princeton 

u ed from Preceding Page 

his career with McNeil 
Laboratories of J&J in 1958 as 
a pharmaceutical chemist, 
advancing to president of 
McNeil, and then to Company 
Group Chairman with 
responsibility for McNeil 
Laboratories and Ortho 
Pharmaceuticals. 

Robert Johnston of Prince- 
ton is chairman of Cytogen 
and president of Johnston 
Associates. Cytogen Cor- 
poration is a privately-held 
biotechnology company which 
has developed a method of 
linking drugs and diagnostic 
agents to monoclonal an- 
tibodies. This linkage 
technology has broad ap- 
plication and is being 
developed for use in drug 
delivery for the treatment of 
cancer and for diagnostic 
devices, blood purification 
systems and medical imaging. 

The company is located in 
the Forrestal Center on Route 
1. 



PERSONNEL NOTES 

Jack Halberstadt, president 
of Halberstadt Financial Con- 
sultants, Inc., 195 Nassau 
Street, recently participated 
in the 1984 International 
Association for Financial 
Planning (IAFP) Expanding 
Horizons Convention and Ex- 
position held in Atlanta. Mr, 
Halberstadt is a member of 
the Central New Jersey 
chapter of the IAFP. 





Guenter Nitschel 

Guenter Nitschel, 105 
Palmer Road, Hopewell, 
marked his 25th service an- 
niversary with Siemens 
Research and Technology 
Laboratories in Princeton. 

In a formal ceremony, Mr, 
Nitschel, assistant director of 
R&D Administration, was 
presented with a 25-year ser- 
vice award by Dr. Karl H. 
Zaininger, executive vice 
president, Siemens Corporate 
Research and Support, Inc. 



K. Evan Gray of Ridgeview 
Road has been named to the 
board of Nassau Savings and 
Loan Association. 

Mr. Gray is president and 
chief operating officer of Ad- 
vanced Data Management in 



K. Evan Gray 

Kingston. He also has been 
associated with leading 
technology firms including 
Aeronautical Research 
Associates of Princeton. 

A graduate of Princeton 
University where he received 
his B.S.E. and M.S.E., Mr. 
Gray was also a Guggenheim 
Fellow. He has been active in 
area community service and 
is a former vestryman of All 
Saints' Church and former 
chairman of the board for 
Trinity Counseling Service. 



PERSONNEL NOTES 

Princeton Theological 
Seminary has appointed 
Frederick Lansill as director 
of financial aid and associate 
business manager. 

Mr. Lansill has a B.A. in 
economics from Bethany 
College in West Virginia and 
has done graduate work in law 
at the University of Buffalo 
and the University of 
California at Los Angeles. 

He comes to Princeton from 
the west coast where he was 
vice president for sales and 
marketing with Western 
Contract in San Jose and San 
Francisco from 1982 to 1984. 
He previously worked in 
management for the James 
Hill Company and the 
Wholesale Office Company, 
both in California. 



Robert G. Easton , of Prince- 
ton, has been promoted to 
president and chief operating 
officer at Commodities 



Corporation. He is a member 
of the company's 

management policy com- 
mittee and has senior 
management responsibility 
for all of the company's 
trading, marketing, financial 
and administrative activities 
Before joining Commodities 
Corporation in 1979. Mr. 
Easton was assistant 
executive director of the 
American Bar Association. 
Prior to that, he was president 
of Farrington Manufacturing 
Company, Springfield, Va., 
makers of data processing and 
data imprinting equipment. 

Mr. Easton graduated from 
Princeton University, class of 
1958, magna cum laude, with a 
B.S. degree in chemical 
engineering. He received his 
MBA from Columbia 
University, where he was a 
member of the Beta Gamma 
Sigma Honorary Society, and 
his J.D. degree from 
Georgetown University Law 
School, where he was elected 
to the Law Journal. 





Robert G. Easton 



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Constance Mantarro 

Constance Mantarro of 

Princeton has been promoted 
to the officer position of 
assistant secretary, branch 
manager, of Franklin State's 
Kingston branch. She will be 
responsible for administration 
of branch personnel, new 
business development and 
overall branch profitability. 

Ms. Mantarro is a graduate 
of Hope College, Holland, 
Mich., and has completed 
American Institute of banking 
courses . 



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Friday 10 30-000 

Saturday 1000-7 00 

Sunday - 1200-500 

VIDEO RENTALS 

Pofl He^ Pjie S3 95 .id* 

era S'9 96 ja» 



FnictM. Eluakdk. Weeftrieja. MM. CraatM. liana, fejiaeat «ert» lerrea. UMpSeW. Sail Part 






S Center 

_ Continued From Pap* 1 

5 Dr. McCord feels that "the 
c ever widening gulf between 

* faith and reason, religion and 
u modern science — a gulf that 
c is mirrored in the isolation of 
fcthe theologian within the 
c university and the larger in- 
tellectual world — must be 
oclosed." The Center expects to 
2 pursue a two-fold goal of ex- 
gplormg the guiding principles 
£of both faith and reason and to 

.foster "fresh thinking" on a 
"ihost of problems facing 
Z religion. 

* The new research and ad- 
ministrative headquarters is 
can imposing two-story brick 
^structure at 50 Stockton 
a Street Designed in a classical 
«mode by Michael Erdman. a 
oPrinceton resident and ar- 
chitect with a Philadelphia 
ifirm, the building cost $1.6 
Smillion It has been named 
^Henry Robinson Luce Hall for 

the founder and longtime 
publisher of Time magazine 

The building is the most visi- 
ble part of an $18 million cam- 
paign to support the research 
of members, to build 
townhouses in which members 
will live, to sponsor two inter- 
disciplinary symposiums a 
year, and to endow 
maintenance and operating 
expenses To date, some $5 



million has been raised 
toward that goal, including a 
$1.5 million challenge grant 
from the Henry Luce Founda- 
tion. 

Henry R Luce III, son of the 
magazine publisher and presi- 
dent of that foundation, spoke 
on "The Faith of Henry R 
Luce" as one of the par- 
ticipants in Tuesday's dedica- 
tion ceremony Thomas F 
Torrance, Professor of Chris- 
tian Dogmatics, Emeritus, at 
New College, Edinburgh, gave 
the dedication address Dr. 
Torrance, awarded Great Bri- 
tain's Templeton Prize five 
years ago for "progress in 
religion," spoke on "Theology 
and Science: In the Founda- 
tions of Knowledge." 

Other participants included 
Eugene Carson Blake, former 
general secretary of the World 
Council of Churches; William 
Scheide of Library Place, 
musicologist, and Thomas F. 
Gillespie, Dr McCord's suc- 
cessor as president of 
Princeton Seminary Mr 
Scheide and Dr Gillespie are 
both on the board of trustees of 
the Center, as is Mr Luce. 

Dr. Torrance is a member of 
the advisory committee which 
also includes James F Arm- 
strong, professor of Old Testa- 
ment Language and Exegesis, 
Princeton Seminary; Hugh T 
Kerr, Professor of Systematic 



Theology, Emeritus. 

Princeton Seminary; Paul 
Ramsey, professor of religion, 
emeritus, Princeton Universi- 
ty, and John Turkevich. pro- 
fessor of chemistry, emeritus. 
Princeton University, among 
others 

Prof. Ramsey is among 
those selected to be a member 
of the Center, as is James E 
Loder, professor of the 
philosophy of Christian Edu- 
cation at Princeton Seminary 

Dr. McCord believes the 
Center will play "a didactic 
and exploratory role in trying 
to bring theology up to date in 
terms of the revolution taking 
place in 20th century science . " 
Calling attention to the 
dualism that has separated 
faith and knowledge, he sug- 
gests that a "unitary view will 
save us from the widespread 
scepticism that has tended to 
characterize modern 

society." 

He adds, "Our hope is that 
the ideas generated (at the 
Center) will have a broad in- 
fluence, setting off a chain 
reaction of creative responses 
and developments elsewhere 
— in effect, fueling the 
theological renaissance that is 
already on the horizon " 

—Barbara L. Johnson 



PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT 
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MERRILL LYNCH 

PRESENTS 
FINANCIAL DISCUSSIONS 



A meeting will be held on Thursday, October 18 
at 7:30 P.M. in the Merrill Lynch Conference 
Center at 194 Nassau Street, Princeton. N.J. 



The topic on Thursday evening, October 18, 
will be "A PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLAN 
FOR YOUR FUTURE - HOW TO BEGIN. " 

Discussion will include IRA's, Zero Coupons. 
Tax-Free Bonds, Stocks. Mutual Funds and Tax 
Shelters. Coffee and danish will be served and 
there will be a question and answer period. 

Please contact Audrey Gould at 609- 924-7600. 

Pre-registration is required and there will be 
limited seating. 



Queen Size Platform Bed in Teak 

(Also available in Rosewood, Oak or Walnut) 




Headboard with night tables, double dresser and 
gent's chest 

$2,999. 



Jl^ 






The 

Princeton 
Viking 






fine Scandinavian Furniture 
For the Home and Office 

(609) 924-9624 
Montgomery Shopping Center, Route 206, Rocky Hill, N J 

M9 ^ugs-Fu 1 0-6. WaH W tm-yiq 9-3C> S* J Q^j &,n 1 ?-S ' 

!2 .' 



RELIGION 



PRISON CHAPLAIN DIE 

At Mt. Pisgah Church. The 

men of Mt. Pisgah A.M.E 
Church, 170 Witherspoon 
Street, will celebrate their an- 
nual Men's Day on Sunday at 
the U a.m. service. Dr. 
Frederick Stevens will be the 
speaker, and the service will 
be a culmination of various ac- 
tivities sponsored by the men 
during the past year. 

Dr. Stevens is a native of 
Youngstown, Ohio, who taught 
music in the New York public 
schools. He holds a master's 
degree from Rutgers 
University and received his 
doctorate in music ad- 
ministration from Carnegie- 
Mellon University in Pitts- 
burgh. A former participant in 
the Trenton Ecumenical Area 
Ministry (T.E.A.M.), he is 
currently a senior at Prince- 
ton Theological Seminary and 
an intern as chaplain at 
Trenton State Prison. 



PREACHER NAMED 

For Interfaith Peace Ser- 
vice. The Rev. Dr. Ronald J. 
Sider will preach at an Inter- 
faith Service for Peace Sun- 
day, October 14, at 11 at the 
Princeton University Chapel. 
Dr Sider will preach on "An 
Evangelical Witness for 
Shalom," He is professor of 
theology at the Eastern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary in 
Philadelphia and co-author of 
j**^. the book. Nuclear Holocaust 
and Christian Hope 

Following the chapel ser- 
vice, the conference will 
reconvene at Nassau 
Presbyerian Church at 2 when 
Seymour Melman, professor 
of industrial engineering at 
Columbia University, will 
speak on "The Politics and 
Economics of Reversing the 
Arms Race." Harold Willens, 

■ a Southern California 
businessman and author of 

I "The Trimtab Factor," will 
speak on "Corporate Respon- 
sibility in a Nuclear Age)' 
Conference registration is 

I $7, $6 for Coalition members, 
and $4 for senior citizens and 
students For further inforrna- 

I tion call the Coalition for 
Nuclear Disarment at 

I 924-5022, 




Frederick Stevens 

INVESTITURE PLANNED 

For Methodist Bishop. In a 

special service in Princeton 
University Chapel, Bishop 
Neil L. Irons will be formally 
welcomed to his office as head 
of New Jersey Methodists. 

Some 2,000 people are ex- 
pected to attend the service 
Friday at 10:30 a.m., in- 
cluding vested clergy from the 
Methodist and other 
denominations. Bishop Irons, 
a native of West Virginia , 
replaced Bishop C. Dale White 
as spiritual and temporal head 
of some 150,000 New Jersey 
Methodists on September 1, 
following his election in July, 



Bishop Irons served in his 
native West Virginia as a 
district superintendent and 
pastor. A Hebrew scholar, he 
holds a doctor of philosophy 
degree from Vanderbilt 
Univerity and a master of 
divinity degree from United 
Theological Seminary. 

Admission to the service is 
by ticket only; tickets are 
available through pastors of 
local United Methodist chur- 
ches The New Jersey Area 
episcopal office to which 
Bishop Irons has recently 
moved is in Pennington on the 
campus of the Pennington 
School 



eH 




•6 



a\ 



1974 
25 LANGUAGES 

Native teachers and trans- 
lators Instruction for children 
and adults All levels Intensive 
courses for travelers and 
business people Tutoring 
Translations 

Call (609) 924-2252 




Dr. Ronald J. Sider 



Bubs 



Holland bulbs give your 
garden bright, beautiful 
flowers from late 
winter 'til June 





CROCUS • HYACINTHS 
TULIPS • DAFFODILS 



OPEN 7 DAYS 



PRINCETON HARDWARE 



""Won Shopping C«nt*r 



THE JEWISH WOMAN 
Topic of Poetry Heading. 
Merle Feld and Susan Reiman 
will give a poetry reading Fri- 
day at 8:45 in the Hillel 
Reading room. Murray Dodge 
Hall on the Princeton Univer- 
sity campus The reading is 
sponsored by B'nai B'rith 
Hillel Foundation. 

"Job's Wife Speaks" is the 
title of the poetry reading; the 
poems will concern them- 
selves with the contemporary 
situation of the Jewish 



NICARAGUA IS TOPIC 

Of Meeting. Witness for 
Peace, a national grass-roots 
organization committed to a 
philosophy of non- violent 
direct action in Nicaragua, 
will present a "citizens' hear- 
ing" Saturday at Trinity 
Church 

The forum, one of 40 such 
hearings on Nicaragua nation- 
wide, will be held from 1 :30 to 
4:30 p.m. Speakers will in- 
clude New Jersey residents 
who have traveled to the coun- 
try as delegates of the Witness 
for Peace; Tomas Tellez. ex- 
ecutive secretary of the Bap- 
tist Convention in Nicaragua, 
and others speaking on what 
they have witnessed of 
destruction, violence and suf- 
fering in that country. 

PRE-SCHOOLERS INVITED 

To Sukkot Parties. Pre- 
schoolers will celebrate the 
Jewish holiday of Sukkot 
during parties scheduled next 
week at the Jewish Center, 457 
Nassau Street 

On Tuesday, October 16, the 
Jewish Center's Women's 
Division will sponsor a holiday 
picnic for youngsters and 
parents at noon in the center's 
sukkah, a temporary struc- 
ture erected by observant 
Jews all over the world in 
honor of the harvest festival. 

Dr. Shoshana Silberman, 
principal of the center's 
Hebrew school, will tell 
Sukkot stories and lead songs. 
Parents will bring a packed 
lunch for their children. 
Evelyn Grossman and Lea 
Grossman are co-chairmen 
for the picnic. Reservations 
are required. Call the center 
at 921-0100. 

Dr. Silberman will also 
provide a program of songs 
and stories for the center's 
nursery school students on 
Monday, October 15, as each 
class visits the sukkah during 
the school day for their snack. 

FLEA MARKET READY 

At All Saints'. All Saints' 
Church will hold its ninth 
annual flea market on 
Saturday, October 13, from 9 
to 4, rain or shine, at the 
church, located off Terhune 
Road, 

Lenox and Wedgwood, 
silver hollow ware, fine linens, 
glass, and paintings will be 
offered for sale. In addition, 
dealers from central New 
Jersey will feature antiques 
and handicrafts. 

Besides rooms full of 
collectibles and attic finds, 
there will be tables of fresh 
jams, jellies and pickles, 
home-made breads and cakes, 
and frozen gourmet foods. 
Hard and soft cover books at 
bargain prices, dried flowers, 
and other crafts will be sold, 

A special feature this year 
will be an extensive plant 
table Strolling musicians will 
entertain bargain hunters and 
a homemade lunch will be 
served. 

Proceeds benefit area 
outreach programs, including 
Crawford House and the Hub 
for emotionally disturbed 
adults. 



BULLETIN NOTES 

Princeton Jewish Singles 
will sponsor a financial 
seminar on Sunday at 8 at the 
Jewish Center, 457 Nassau 
Street, Admission is $3. For 



more information call 
448-0512 

Choral Evensong will be 
sung Sunday at 4:30 by (he 
choir of men, boys and girls at 
Trinity Church. 33 Mercer 
Street. 

Irene Willis will be the ac- 
companist on the organ 
Before the service there will 
be a recital of medieval music 
on authentic instruments by 
the Trio Francesca Caccini. 
led by Katherine Rohrer. 



John T. Cannizzaro of the 
Religious Science Center in 
Belle Mead will give a talk on 
psychic phenomena Sunday at 
11 at the Montgomery 
Township First Aid Squad 
Building. Harlingen Road, 
Belle Mead. The talk will 
center on psychic phenomena 
in relation to the science of the 
mind. 

For information call (201) 
874-3222. 



WP9& ww >'j& sw/sjk/ /ws s*y sm/ **/ my /my 

8 College Men & Women 

Here is an opportunity 
% to be involved in 

| Thoroughbred Racing and Breeding 

% We have a share open in a young thoroughbred 
| mare by a big stakes winner and in foal to a big 
8 stakes winner that won over $1 75,000 racing 
1 Cost of share, $750; stabling cost, $65 per month 
§ All costs tax deductible. Will show the record 

books Racing is getting bigger and better all the 

time. 

Reliable manager - 21 years at same residence 
handles all details Come see the mare 

Reply giving telephone number to 

Manager, Rainbow Farm 
Medford, New Jersey 08055 



1 




QOk)fb 



urn/tun t? accessories 



2152 Route 206 • Belle Mead. N.J, • (201) 874-8383 

Open Monday-Saturday 10-6. Thursday 10-9 




OBITUARIES 



Charles J. Young, of 78 
Stockton Street, a retired RCA 
Laboratories scientist, died 
October 2 at Princeton 
Medical Center after a long 
illness He was 84. 

Mr. Young was associate 
director of the Acoustical and 
Electromechanical Research 
Laboratory when he retired 
from RCA Laboratories in 
1965 Among the major 
developments to which he con- 
tributed were the early 
transmission of text and pic- 
tures over long distances, 
widely used in the newspaper 
and news magazine field, and daughter, Mrs Esther Y Con- 
the invention of the Electrofax stable of Cambridge, Mass , 
copying process. The system two brothers. Philip and 
was subsequently licensed by Richard Young, and a sister. 
RCA to several photocopier Mrs Josephine Y Case, all of 




The service was scheduled Princeton, a sister. Alice J 
to take place this Wednesday mnenofe* town. Pi a. four 
at 11 at the First Reformed grandchildren and two great- 
Church of Rocky Hill, the Rev grandchildren. 



Ruth W Fries, pastor, of- 
ficiating Bunal will follow in 
Rocky Hill Cemetery under 
the direction of the Kimble 
Funeral Home Memorial con- 
tributioas may be made to the 
Rocky Hill First Aid and 
Rescue Squad, Rocky Hill, 
N.J. 08553 



The service was held at the 
Mather-Hodge Funeral Home, 
the Rev A Orley Swartzen- 
truber, rector of All Saints' 
Church, officiating. Burial 
was in Riverview Cemetery'. 
Trenton 



Charles J, Young 



manufacturers 

Born in Cambridge. Mass . 
he was a son of Owen D. 
Young, a founder and first 
board chairman of tin- RCA 
Corporation During World 
War I, Mr Young«erved with 

the American Red Cross Am 



Van Hornesville, 18 grand- 
children and two great- 
grandsons 
The service was private. 



Kulh I. Rohn. owner of the 
Nassau Shoe Tree on Palmer 
Square, died October 7 in 
Mercer Medical Center 

Mrs. Rohn was a resident of 
Morrisville for almost 50 
years before moving to 
Princeton She was a member 
of the Morrisville Women's 
Club and the First 
Presbyterian Church of Mor- 
risville 

Wife of the late Martin E 
Rohn, she is survived by a 
daughter, Jane R Tobish of 
Princeton; a sister, Rosalie 
Wishart of Altoona, Pa , three 
grandsons. Christopher 
TobiSh Of Wnghtstown. Pa., 
Jonathan Tobish of 
Lawrenceville and Brock 
Tobish "I Princeton; and two 
great grandchildren 

These) i Ice wai held at Hut- 
cheson Memorial Chapel ol 
the Flrsl I ibyterian Church 



Virginia Winlworth of New 

1 ark I itj died Octobei i in 
lev, I ork Hospital she was 

the daughter of Mrs Thomas 
bulanceCorps in Italy He was ,.. Wentworth of Ouj Lad ol 
graduated from Harvard R] „„.,.,„„ an d the late Mr 
University in 182] and subse «/ en t WO rlh 

quently took postgraduate Born in Philadelphia, where ol Burial was in 

work in electrical engineering h , ,. ( , educated at the Bryn Ewing Cemetery 
at the Harvard Engineering Maw] Scn00 | .,,„. B u en ded 
School .smith College with the I las 

A sell laughl arcbltecl he ul ,,,,, she wol u ,| at 
designed a country office and b|t>n|n . |„ IU ,,,, S IM New 

several homes He also Hew Vo[k , lls , , ., ,.,,i k as 

ins own airplane h Mi (l , ,.,,,,., wll ,, 

Young was. i recipients the p u £i|, nor j 



Modern Pioneer Award ol the 
National Association "I 
Manufai turen foi dii 

i. ,i achievemenl In the 
field ol si lence and Invention 



II., in W, Vaughn ol Alex- 

andei H I 't"'' 1 Octobei I al 

the Merwick Unil ol Princeton 
Medical Center. 

Born in Trenton, Mr, 
Vaughn had been a lifelong 
Pi Inceton residenl He was 



in 1962, together with 

Harold (' Oreig, he received 

the Kosar Memorial Award p^uVcVLine Roid 

from (he Society of 



In addition ti> hei mother, 

■■""" '" ivu " ( " , ^,';;,w!;;;h •«»■■« *«» rca 

,,' i . Laboratories for 25 years 
before retiring In 1975 He was 
an Army veteran of World 



Capl Thomas i- 
of Washington, D.C 

Mrs Carleton Piet 

I i ol Dai len, C i , and 

Mrs Wentworth Thompi I 



War II anil was well known in 
Princeton for his care and con- 
cern for the poor and han- 
dicapped. 




Marv Hlgglns Hughes, 96, ol 

Rocky Hill, died October 7 at 
home 
A lifelong resident of the 



Survivors include his wife, 
Lillian B Vaughn; four 
brothers, Robert, Edward and 
John Vaughn and Carroll 
Napier, all of Trenton; and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Mass of Christian Burial 



A graveside service was 
Photographic Scientists and hl .| n in() |dSt David's Church. 
Engineers for their joint W(lvnc |,„ 
development of Ihe Electrofax ' ' 
process. He held more than 65 
patents in the field of fae 
similie transmission and ap- 
plications of electronics to 
graphic arts 

lie was a Fellow of the In 
stitute of Electrical and Klcc ltock y lllN area ' Mrs Hughes was celebrated at St. Paul's 
tronics Engineers B life was a longtime member of the church wilh entombment in 
member of Ihe Academy of First Reformed Church of Franklin Memorial Park 
Natural Sciences of Rocky Hill Mausoleum. 

Philadelphia, a member of Wife Of the late Fred D 
Sigma Xi and the Harvard Hughes, she is survived by 
Club of New York City At his hut daughters. Evelyn Petty. 

death he was president ;oi the ^JffSvmSlIukS H °^ e » Townsh ">' died ° c " 
Community Corp of Van aiu <"«"''"« Van SC ™CK,ana , ()Der 6 at ner home after a 
Hornesville. NY, where he '»■ ^d J. Hughes all of , m m 

Montgomery Township; a lengmy uiness 

sister, Viola Hubert of Mor- u »° r n >n Trenton, Mrs Short 

ristown; two brothers, Wilbur ""d lived in the Princeton 

, Hlgglns of Kingston and Ran- nrea for "« past 55 years. She 

01 dolph H.ggins of New «?» active in Uie Princeton 

Brunswick; 18 grandchildren Chapter of the American Red 



had a home 

Survivors include his wife 
Esther Christensen Young 
two sons, John P. 
Philadelphia and Niels 
Young of Piedmonl. Cal ; a and'^great "grandchildren !"' Cross during World War II 




| Plumbing 
El Service 

3* J Ca,,s 

H>«tl -UU plus tax 

"Represents 15 mins. travel time plus 

30 mins. on the job. 

Each additional 15 mins. $7.00 

(Equals $28.00 per hr.) 

Heating 6 Air Conditioning Service 
Work Rate S38 00 per hour 

REDDING'S 

PLUMBING and HEATING 

234 Nassau Street v \jcagja£HH 424-0166 

■OTTgf Fiep!re< JDne 1 1985 



Daughter of the late Mr. and 
Mrs William W Trout and 
mother of the late Mary Short 
Mellor, she is survived by her 
husband William F. Short; a 
son. W Fred Short Jr of 



MAKE A SPECIAL APPEARANCE 



Earn tlie attention you deserve in Selb/s most sophisticated 

pump Sleek, striking and fashionable an 

eye-catching favorite for Fall 

selby 

Accessorize with coordinate Selby handbag 




In Black, Brown, Navy $56. Matching Bag $35 










t 



In Black, Wine, Taupe $55. Matching Bag $39. 




In Navy, Brown $55. Matching Bag $29. 
Open Thursday Evenings Til 8 



140 Nassau Street 



924-1952 



Major Credit Cards Accepted 



BEST * 
CATCH 





i^^ewld 



and Shellfish 

is at 
DOCKSIDE OF PRINCETON 
Princeton Shopping Center 

924-0072 



A 



PRINCETON STBINC """TET „ 0USE T0 SHA „ E; j^, 

-i.-.r all .'^niit «umK f ««lr j 



serenades all joyous events Classical 
waities and rags for weddings, oar 
mitivahs and parlies We add a note of 
orace to every occasion Barbara Sue 
While 16091683 5566 9 16 1 OT 



setting on rolling acreage. S minutes to 
Princeton Den. garage, low rem 
Available Immediately (609)924 6300 
9-5-31 



JO YEAR OLD MALE seeking any full 
WANTED TO BUY: StalforasMre china time employment Hard worker 
and figures. Any quantity or condition Willing to learn Call anytime Lonnie 
WJt0 « (609)6952575 



SAME 
DAY 

SHIRT 

SERVICE 

WASH-O-MAT 

259 Nassau St. 

Behind 
Viking Furn. 

921-9785 



i ROOMS FOR RENT: (Unfurnished* 
Central Princeton, use of house, kit 
chen. IVi baths. Olus parking Quiet. 
considerate people only with goo: 
references 934 4710evening$ 



GARAGE SALE Saturday. October 13. 
9 to 3 Two family sale Chairs, rugs, 

some antiques and nice things tor 
everyone 349 Walnut Lane. Princeton 
No early birds, please! 



| SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31 Join the 

Princeton CROP Walk Rela* after 
your walk with tree post walk en- 
tertainment 



j FOR SALE: Modular walnut and black 
bedroom, good condition Purchased 
Nassau Inferiors Single bed. 5 & 3 
drawer chests, desk, chair Also, spring 
and mattress sets, one 39", one 30" Otf 
white hand knotted Indian rug, tnngeo, 
6x11 Elegant French end tables 
Ormu'u. inlay, kidney shaped, marble 
topped, brass gallery Petite siie short 
mink lackef, nearly new Call 931 89*1 



Good Household - China - Glass - Jewelry 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

The Sienkiewcz's (Fla. bound) & others 

8 Cannon Dr., Hamilton Square, N.J. 

Olf Klockner Rd., 3 blocks East past Mercervllle Rd. 
to Gary Dr., left to Cannon 

THURS., OCT. 18-9 AM 

(Rain Date - Next Day) 

Beautiful 5 pc. cherry, 7 pc. canopy white provincial & 
other bedroom sets; Victorian washstand; French 
needlepoint armchair; club chairs; cedar chest; dinette; 
lovely china; large china spice set; nice glass; gold 
jewelry; Interesting bric-a-brac, etc.! Rotary mower, 
electric edger, shears, snow blower, etc.! Good Addi- 
tions! 

Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 
Trenton, N.J. 609-393-4848 



PRINCETON SMALL ANIMAL 
RESCUE LEAGUE 

SAVE 

WEEKDAYS TO CLAIM OR ADOPT A 
PET, CALL MRS GRAVES, 8 * P M , 
SATURDAY 8 II AM. FOR AN AP 
POINTMENT Nights and weekends, 
report lost or found or injured animals to 
the police 

Report lost and found pets 
within a twenty-four hour period 



Male Siberian Husky 8 months old, 
blue eyes, has papers, mcepet 

Female tri color Terrier type pup. * 
months old, medium hair 

Male black LaD, good with children, 
about 50 lbs 

Male Irish Setter Border Collie lype, 
10 months old 

Altered male Collie type, tan and 
white, semi-long hair, good witn 
Children 

Male Collie Husky type, gold color, 
long hair, about 30 lbs. 

Male Afghan, i years old. very gentle, 
lawn color 

Female spayed Shepherd Malamute. 3 
years old. good with children and 
obedient 

Male large Shepherd Lab type, 10 
months old, housebroken, good with 
Children 

Female one year old tri color dog, 
short haired, mixed breed 

Male Lab Wem-iaraner type, 3 years 
old, short haired, good with children 

Four Dachshund type pups, 3 months 
old 

Call us about our female spayed, 
altered male cats and kittens 



Moore Street, Princeton 

Three bedroom house within steps of 
Nassau Street Living room, dining 
room, kitchen, 3 lull baths OH street 
parking, totally redone home Available 
immediately SHOO per month 

Princeton I wo bedroom country home on 
Ant Lucas Road Living room with 
fireplace Eat in kitchen Available 
Novemberlst S7S0per month 

Firestone Real Estate 

149 Nassau Street 

Princeton, N.J. 

4609) 934-2233 



CHILD CARE DONE in my Princeton MOVING SALE: J bedr< 



i sett, Of 



mom Call Polly chests and desks White provincial 
bedroom set. custom mahogany kit 

^_^_ m ^^_^^_ chen cabinets, Cedo system walnut 
bookshelves 1W high x 8 ft. long 
Bathroom fixtures, and custom double 
vanity, pmg pong and pool tables (609) 
883 3783 or (609)934 I ISO 



OARAOE SALE Saturday «*d fond*/. 
October 13 and '< from 10 10 J Ci«th*s. 
sues 8 to w. a«<gner i»e*i* Mop*c), 
lamps, other household ■t«m». • Ivy 
Glen Lane. Lawrenc*v(H». 



HOUSE FOR RENT: Central Princeton. 
3 story. J bedroom, living room, dining 
room, kitchen, large yard, low rent 
(609)934 3040 9 5 31 



ONE BEOROOM APARTMENT for rent 
IF YOU LIKE TOWN TOPICS, the best witn eat In kitchen, study living room 
way to show your appreciation is to in Riverside. Princeton Call 483 1693 

mention it to our advertisers 



HOUSESITTINO SITUATION MOMd 
Protect your home and property i 
provide good care for /our animals 
Many mr\ experience caring for 
Princeton homes Phone 896 13»l or «' 
9047 



I 

9 



STORE FRONT 

Heart of Princeton, 20 Nassau St. ... 

1 ,000 square feet of prime store space. 2 large display windows, | 
built-in oak shelving, wall-to-wall carpeting. 

Call 921-9574 Call 924-7027 I 



BABYSITTING IN MY HOME 
Experienced Nice play area Hot 
lunches Princeton Junction area 609 
799-9054 No infants 



Cherry Valley Road 



Tulane Farm 




For Sale by Owner 

200 year old farm house oh approximately 2 acres, pool, barn, 3 bedrooms. 3 
baths, 4 fireplaces, wide pine floors Call 924-6558. 



HARDY FALL BLOOMING ^^"-f , 

MUMS 

IN BUD AND BLOOM 
Reg $3 49 $2.29 5 for $10 



October 10-17 



PUMPKINS 

Large, sugar 

and 

painted 




Cut Flowers and Arrangements 
tor all occasions 



INDOOR BLOOMING PLANTS 

Kalanchoes • Reiger Begonias 

Browallia • Persian Violets • Jerusalem Cherries 

and Mums 

It's Time To Decorate For Fall 

Indian Corn • Strawflowers and other 

dry materials • Decorated and plain 

grapevine and straw wreaths 

Ceramic Jack-O-Lanterns (3 sizes ) 

SALE ON HOUSE PLANTS 

_ (non blooming) 

Flowers by wire anywhere m Ine U S or Canada 

PERNA'S 

PLANT AND FLOWER SHOP 

_1B9 W ashington Rd. • V; mile east of fit. 1 • 45 2-1383 
Mon-Fri 6:30-5: Sal 8:30-4. Sun 10-2 i^tt 



Wytoir 



Peyton Associates • Realtors 

Princeton 609-921-1 550 
Pennington 609-737-9550 




EVEN MORE VALUE! 



This outstanding Princeton Township one-story house has been reduced in price to make it 
even more affordable for you. Have a look and let us present your offer right away. There are 
enormous living and dining areas, a panelled family room with fireplace. 3 big bedrooms and a 
great deal more than we can show you. Don't miss it - call today Asking $21 5,000 



PRINCETON 

343 Nassau Street 



PENNINGTON 
1 34 South Main Street 




HIGH SPEED 

XEROX DUPLICATING 

—While You Wait- 
Small & Large Jobs 

COLONIAL HERITAGE PRINTERS 

66 Witherspoon St. • 921-1350 

Across from Princeton Medical Center) 
Free Store -Front Parking 



EXPERT TYPIST WANTS TYPING 
Boom, term papers. dissertations. 
correspondence 90 wpm. moderate 
rates Ooes wore processing Strong 
editing and English background Call 
home W9 6S3 072S Work 313 a07 1777 
10 10 2t 



PLANTS ft TREES: Wholesaler selling 
fall inventory of quality landscape sue 
plants Birch, flowering cherry, craBS. 
purple plums, willows. I lift. Pine* 8'. 
azalea, luniper, rhodo's. holly, etc Call 
101 JWMtS, days 10 10 St 



PRINCETON CROP WALK for Hunger 
Sunday. October II. I9W Contact your 
recruiter for more information or call 
recruiter chairperson, John Coonrod at 
12*7015. 



or shir 



AGE 60 AND OVER? 

Long term nursing home 

insurance available 

Most existing health problems covered 

For information please write or call 

Paul S. Bunkin 

Continental Casualty Co, 

P.O. Box 728 

Turnersvllle, N.J. 08012 

609-228-1355 



1 



JOHN ANDERSON is busier than a hive 
of beest Yesterday Peducah. today 
Philadelphia, tomorrow Peoria, 
possiDly Princeton if we prevail For 

da*, time, and piece, keep watching 
Town Topics 



MARITASCANTINA 



OARAGE SALE, 
Saturday. October 13. 10 3 pm leO 

Guyot Avenue, Princeton (across from 
High School Fieidi Antique tea cart, 
metal clothes cabinet, lawn cart, porch 
furniture, electric heaters, housewares 



REMEMBER JOHN ANDERSON four 
years ago? What a bashl Hopefully 
Princeton is getting him back iust 
before the election No firm date Keep 
watching Town Topics for details 



CLOTHES DRYER, electric, La 
Kenmore. HO volts, almond color New | 

apartment sue, 1375 883 »44 



PRINCETON 80RO: Walk to town 
Sunny room, bath, kitchen privileges 
References requested Non smoking 
professional 683 5726. 



FEMALE SEEKING EMPLOYMENT 

as housekeeper Close to busline Ask 
for Maggie Call (609) 695 1575 



PLUMBING 
REPAIRS 

Done After 5 P.M. 

For Your Convenience 

Call 

Bruce W. Jefterson 

921-7236 

N.J. License 7084 




CARETAKERS 

Mamed couple will exchange 
responsible caretakmg for 
tenancy or long-term housesit- 
ting. References available. 
Please contact : 

|ean 6 Marun Fisher 

609 921-3569 <h> 

896-5115 <»> 



KREN 



TYPEWRITER 
SERVICE 



SALES • SERVICE 
RENTALS 

New & Used IBM and OL YMPIA 
Ribbons for all makes 

(609) 924-81 63 
172 Alexander • Princeton 



ti 




NEW VILLAGE HOMES - On a private cul-de-sac in a woodsy setting, 5 new homes have 
been designed by leading architect Steven DeRochi. Mellow outside and contemporary 
inside they are in perfect harmony with the gracious and historic Village of Lawrenceville 

From $250,000 



Realtor 



t..*L- 



WHO COULD ASK FOR ANYTHING MORE! Great family location - 
children can walk to schools, pools, and tennis courts. 4 bedroom 
colonial, warm and charming Princeton $196,900 

LARGE ONE-STORY CONTEMPORARY IN PRINCETON 4 

bedrooms. 2 baths. eat-In kitchen, family room with fireplace, din- 
ing room, large living room with free-standing-fireplace and 
skylight, den or office. $1 57,900 



ONLY $124,900 - A beautiful 3 bedroom, 2'/ 2 bath executive col- 
onial In desirable Plalnsboro. Family room with fireplace, 2 car 
garage, fenced yard A pleasure to see, and a bargain 



WARM AND INVITING this rambling 1 00 year old farmhouse in 
Rocky Hill en|oys a view of the Millstone River Added bonus 
possible 3 lot subdivision $275,000 

HOPEWELL FIND! In a neighborhood of mature trees and rolling 
lawns Living and dining rooms with bay windows Family room 
with fireplace Finished basement. 3 bedrooms. 2 baths ranch, 

$158,900 

NEW LISTING - Desirable Abey Drive in Pennington, Smashing 
contemporary with lots of special extras including three decks and 
a fireplace in the loft 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, and 2 powder 




rooms. 



$275,000 



CHEERFUL AND COMFORTABLE 3 or 4 bedroom. 2V4 bath home 
on lovely quiet street in East Windsor Family room, den (or 4th 
BR), central air. garage and basement, and a pretty back yard for 
summer entertaining $144,500 

Linda Carnevale 

Aniuta Blanc 

Pat Alspach 

Nancy Armstrong 

Lenore Barlsh 

Laraine Bender 

Sue Benef ield 

Elaine Ellerstein 

Lois Fee 

Roslynn Greenberg 

Vivian Snowman 

Vonnie Hueston 



PRINCETON RIVERSIDE AREA charm on a lovely private lot, with 
large shade trees and beautiful mature plantings, 3 bedrooms, 2Vi 
baths, living room with fireplace, separate dining room. Attractive 
P rj ce. $245,000 



PRINCETON CONTEMPORARIES designed and built just for you 
by Russell Baltzei 9 have been sold - only 4 are left, so call now! 

From $350,000 

SOPHISTICATION AND ELEGANCE on 10 wooded acres. Get 
away from it all. If you've longed for a home that might be written 
about in the N.Y. Times, then you owe it to yourself to investigate 
this 5 bedroom. 3 bath architect-designed contemporary $250,000 

HISTORIC GRIGGSTOWN - 3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch on 1 VS acres 
Living room with fireplace, decorator kitchen and more $1 22,000 



PROVINCE HILL CONTEMPORARY - A delight to see and a delight 
to show. Luxurious and beautifully decorated Huge living room 
and library $287,000 



IMPOSSIBLE BUT TRUE - Five bedroom South Brunswick Col- 
onial Luxurious master bedroom and bath with Jacuzzi and Italian 
tile floors. In-ground Sylvan pool, fireplace, central air lovelv 
carpeting Only ^^ 

PRINCETON TOWNSHIP offers you this exciting 2 story home 4 
bedrooms. 2U baths, full stone wall fireplace in The .ami room 2 
^garage. ,ove,y heated mground pool and Jacuzzi, a'nd much 

$272,500 



Princeton Crossroads Realty Inc 

342 Nassau Sheet (Corner Harrison) • Princeton • Park in our lot* 
CALL ANYTIME 609-924-4677 



Carolyn Hills 
Anne Hoffmann 
Adrienne Koss 
Nira Lavid 
Nettie Martmelli 
Marta Kissh 
Laura Procaccino 
Elaine Schuman 
Hazel Stix 



JULIUS H. GROSS, inc. 

Professional Interior & Exterior 
Painting & Paperhanging 

A Princeton Business 
for Over 25 Years 

Call 924-1474 for a Free Estimate 
and Prompt Service 



E. BAMDURJAN & SON 

Established I'U.i 



Rug Cleaning & Repairing 




Nationally Advertised Broadloom Carpets 
New and Used Oriental Rugs • Rug Cleaning . Repairing 

6B3 State Road 
Princeton, N.J. 

PLANT HOURS Mon-Fn 8 am lo 5 pm 



924-0720 

Closed Saturday 




FIREWOOD FOR SALE: Seasoned, 
selected hardwoods Spill, delivered 
and stacked By the full cord, J135 and 
hall cord, $47 » Call Jim. «4 3470.9-36 



YARO WORK * PAINTING: Graduate 
student with landscaping experience 
available tor all yard work, Interior and 
exterior painting, repairs and pool 
maintenance Juit call 397 8173 and 
consider ltdone 9 36 It 



ANTIQUE QUILTS ft LACE, Glass 
Stoneware, silver. Rugs Baskets at SPANISH LESSONS by nativ 
Full House Antiques, 33 Main Street * 83 ,WS 
Kingston 934 4040 




LAMP SHADES: Lamp mounting and 
lamp repairs Nassau Interiors. 163 
Nassau St tut 



FRENCH LESSONS: Beginners, 
intermediate. Advanced Fall term 
Native teacher (609)9310493 9 S 31 



APARTMENT TO RENT: Attractive m 
town two bedroom apartment with 
large eal in kitchen, lireplace. built in 
bookcase Garage Available Dec 1st 

S700 plus utilities 934 3399. 



MATURE WOMAN would like to take 
care of an elderly person Wednesday 
and Thursday Will do errands, shop 
ping, cook light meals Experienced 
Call 931 4415., 934 S339 



TUTORING: Help your child succeed 
this year in school Experienced 
elementary teacher will tutor your 
child In your home Call (609) 6 83 1983 

io io at 



BMW 3301. 1981, silver with black 
Raccaro seats, sports package, tog, air, 
luxury group, alarm system, wind 
screen, sunroof, AM-FAA, cruise con 
trol, 3 new snows, garaged, dealer 
serviced, original owner, like new In 
and out Best offer Jay, (301) 334-6301 
orDick (3011 4393056 10-10- 3t 



DRIVEWAYS, asphalt and stone 
Estimates at your convenience 301 797 
9301 Local Princeton tIMI 



INTERIOR DESIGN: A practical ap 
proach Consultation, shopping ex 
pedltions and money saving tips You 
deserve a beautiful home Call Mltii 
(609)931 4663 



180 SKIS WANTEO: Bindings optional 
In good condition Call 934 4304 
evenings 



BARTENDER, PRIVATE PARTIES. 13 
years experience Quality service 
Gary 1609)734 0218 10-3 31 



SPECIALIZING IN HOME WINDOW 
AND STORM WINDOW CLEANING 
inside and out S3 SO each Free 
estimate, fully insured All work 
guaranteed 393 3113. a a tf 



KM-' 



ESTATE 



SALES ASSOCIATES: 



LIGHT 



Karl Light • Broker 

Realtors 247 Nassau St. (609)924-382? 



Constance Brauer 
Friederike Coor 
Marcy Crimmins 
Cornelia Dielhenn 
Paola Greenfeld 



Zoran Kovclc 
Derry Light 
Stuart Minton 
Edward Moshey 
James Schwartz 



LANDSCAPING 
MAGIC... 

Watch us make it happen! 




1 



Consulting 
Designing 

Installation 

Maintenance 924-9821 



924-5770 



etersorrs 

NURSFO* 

LANDSCAPES & INTERIORSCAPES 

Commercial • Industrial • Residential 

Established 1939 

Charles E. Peterson, Jr., President 

3730 Lawrenceville Rd. • Princeton NJ 
Daily 9 - 6 Sat. & Sun. 9-5 




LB 

REAL ton 



Princeton Real Estate Group 
Multiple Listing Service 



^^ 




^^^^s^^mmms^s, 



PRIME HAMILTON LOCATION 

A lovely colonial featuring 4 bedrooms. 2Vz baths, living room, formal 
dining room, eat-in kitchen and adjacent family room with full width brick 
fireplace. Many nice extras include two fully finished basement rooms, 
oversize 2 car garage, central air conditioning and a partially wooded 
yard Reduced Now $11 9,900 



^"S 



A PRETTY PLACE TO CALL HOME! 

on over IVi acres in a rural section of Princeton Township, and close by 
a babbling brook, we present a beautifully kept ranch. Living room with 
energy efficient heatolator fireplace, large step-down dining room, ex- 
cellent kitchen with Quaker Maid cabinets and pleasant breakfast area 
Three bedrooms, den or fourth bedroom and 1 'A baths A real plus is the 
separate auxiliary building — with large studio, office or recreation room, 
kitchenette and its own heating system 

A REAL BUY at Reduced Price $1 78,500 





THE WILLIAMSBURG at ROSSMOOR, a roomy detached townhouse 
condominium featuring living and dining rooms, den with fireplace, 
Florida room. 2 bedrooms and 2V4 baths Double garage with workshop 
storage area Community pool, golf, tennis, entertainment hall. Like-new 
condition with wall to wall carpeting, washer, dryer, refrigerator, range, 
and dishwasher Included in the sale price, * 1 44,000 



SOLIDLY BUILT AND BUILT TO LAST 

an early "Salzman" home on highly desirable Crestview Drive, just 
minutes from Downtown Princeton, Customized for its present and 
original owners, it nestles under towering oaks on one and a half acres - 
but offers as well an area of sunlit lawn 

The five bedroom, four bath house offers perfect separation for family 
and guests - with maid's room (or teen-agers) on a lower level. Living 
room and panelled library with built in cupboards and bookshelves 
(perhaps the coziest room) both have fireplaces. 

Plaster walls, central air conditioning, attic fan and extras too 
numerous to mention But above all, wonderful spacious bedrooms, 
storage and closet areas. This is definitely a house to see $395,000 

A TOUCH OF CLASS 

in a stunning residence on six plus wooded acres. Formal entry court 
with miniature fruit and espaliered trees, imposing 2 story stucco home in 
a neo-classic design. It offers lovely, light soaring open spaces that make 
up the living, dining and kitchen Air conditioned and energy conserving 
4 bedrooms, 3 baths, separate office or guest house 5450.000 



■■ 



I 



h£ 



a 



Rosemary Blair 
Barbara P. Broad 
Thornton S. Field 



f" O ^ K. T" O K_T 

REAL ESTATE 

Anne S Stockton, smA-e/ 

32 CHAMBERS STREET 

PRINCETON. N.J. 08540 

16091924-1416 

Cornelia W. Reeder 
Clotilde S. Treves 
Polly Woodbridge 




PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 

Lake Carnegie on a beautifully landscaped lot and 
quiet cul-de-sac within walking distance of River- 
side School. Custom built 24 years ago and 
designed to give beautiful views ol the lake from 
every room. Four bedrooms, 2Vi baths, spacious 
living room with fireplace and door to terrace, din- 
ing room, kitchen wilh windowed breakfast area, 
family room, enlosed porch and large greenhouse. 
Two car garage Central air $450,000 




MONTGOMERY TWP. 

On just under one acre, close to Bedens Brook 
Club A well-built Cape-Cod with greal potential. 

$160,000 




West Windsor 

House for many seasons and uses - skating and 
fishing from back yard and jogging or walking 
along the canal A two bedroom ground door wing 
with separate heat and kitchen, suitable (or in- 
laws, married children or prolessional - owner - of- 
fices. Main house has a large living room with 
fireplace and door to open covered porch, sitting 
room, dining room, modern kitchen. 2nd floor 
master suite - very large bedroom with bay win- 
dow, dressing room, sewing room and new bath 
Three large bedrooms and 2nd bath Full base- 
ment, tenced rear yard, separate garage 

$350,000 




LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP 



Country Colonial built 1 929 or '30 - Lots of charm, 
4 bedrooms. 3Vi baths. Owner financing available 
to qualified buyer. $225,000 



OMNI TRAVEL 



Mon Thufl »6. Sat.»5 
Op**> Frt.f-t 



Pnne«ton Sriopp-no C«ni«r 
W4.U0O 



BEAUTIFUL SPACIOUS one oeOfOom 
apt Exau'*'*e view, pr.vate garden, 
one mile Irorr. downtown Pr.nceton 
JB50 M S787 



FOR SALE Coucn. Tnayer Cogom ot 

ncn Drown oetge geometric pattern. 

JIS0 Approximately «0 yards brown 

■ inagwwcarpetandpad.SlSO Ml'305 



?! 



T 



N.C. JEFFERSON 

PLUMBING— HEATING 

CONTRACTOR 
Service When ll's Needed 
CHERRY VALLEY RD 
Tel. 924-3624 



HOUSE FOB RENT K.ngston Ground . 
level of duple". °ne Bedroom, large 
living room, remodeled Kitchen. 
basement. «S0 plus I7 5 irl.lttiw oer 
month Available Nov 1,19*4 799 6300 
10 10 V 



NEED MONEY (0' tne holidays'* We 
buy oia ana antique furniture, crocus, 
basket*, quilts, etc One piece or entire 
contents Call 924 01*7 or (20D329 3"' 
10 10 tf 



PIANO INSTRUCTION 

All Level l 

MARVINA ROSEN 

((Ml «4-*l0* 



BEAUTIFUL SWEET TEMPERED 
Standard Poodle pups, AKC Excellent 
health, show quality Can «i 3575 after 



CSOB3! 



o 



.^ ■ 



r.M. 



flfc •'*•»*< 



FOR RENT Princeton Borough — cozy 
3 room apartment Modern and tm 
maculate Available now I'll per 
month plus inexpensive uillltiev n* 
47io,8 np.m. 



THREE LARGE. DIFFERENT cat 
color prints bv Keane, beautifully 
framed 1.5 wooded acres, secluded 
934 0269 Wanted Hungarian iewelry, 
fancy sheet music cabinet Ballroom. 



FIREWOOD FOR SALE: Seasoned, 
.elected hardwoods Split, delivered 
,nd stacked By the full cord. H3S and 
,alfcordS47» Call Jim, 924 3470 9 2* 



tennis lessons 



10 3 41 



BEAUTIFUL ENGLISH SETTERS for 
sale White and tan One male, one 
female, 2 years old One puppy, 6 
months Cell after 6 pm 301 621 7160 9 
19 4t 



UNFURNISHED HOUSE for rent 
Princeton Township * bedrooms. 2'; 
batns. near Lake Carnegie December I 
or January 1 through May 31 «00 per 
month plus utilities References «1 
3095 after 7 pm 10 3 5t 



1974 DODGE DART: Runs Many usable 
parts, needs windshield Best offer Cal 
297 1796 



$142,500 

RANCH TYPE HOME. 5 bedrooms. 2 baths, 

study, living room with dining area, kitchen/family ^ 

area. Separate laundry. On quiet street, large lot, M 

near Princeton schools and shopping area. 



e 



Looking tor Encittmanlt 

We will entertain and enlighten you I 

the privacy p' vour own home 

Home Link CPrnmunlce-tions offers 

wide variefy of cable TV programmln 

for discerning viewers 

Find out what you've been missing. 

Cf.lltt.4f74 



Winifred Bricklcy 

Licensed Real Estate Broker 
609-924-7474 



8 

ft 

.0 



FRUIT BASKETS 

AND 
GIFT BASKETS 

We Deliver 

COX'S 

1I0NASSAUSTREET 

613 1107 



BERNIE'S 

PAPER I PAPERHANOINO 

Inferior Exterior Quality work at 
reasonable rates References Call 448 
Wi9 lor free estimate 



APPLES: PICK YOUR OWN at the 
Apple Farm on Van Kirk Road, 
Lawrence Township Fun for the whole 
family Tours and groups bv ap 
polntment. 924 2310. 8 29 61 



FOR SALE Two 275 gallon fuel oil 
tanks. Noar new condition Best offer 
Call 921 2650,9 5. 



BARK MULCH, STONE, soli and wood 
chips Call Tree Care, Inc. 201 297 9300 
Local Princeton » <! 6t 



GARAGE NEEDED: Must be near 
Vandrvcnter Avenue, Princeton 
Plea*«Callv24 37 47 1 75 tl 



ALL AIRPORTS TAXI: Comfortable] 

transportation from your door to ana 
from all airports Tel 921 7339 8 l tf 



WE BUY USED BOOKS, alt subjects, 
but pay batter for literature, history, 
art. children's, theology, and 
philosophy Good condition a must Call 
Mlcawber Books. 108 Nassau Street. 
Princeton 921 B454 



RENDALL-COOK 



& COMPANY 



REALTORS 

350 ALEXANDER STREET PRINCETON 
609-924-0322 




ALL LOOK ALIKES ARE NOT 

Consider this spacious two bedroom condominium at 
Queenston Common. In addition to the normal luxurious 
space, there are two attractively finished basement rooms 
for that unexpected overflow of weekend guests. Behind the 
living room is a cozy, private deck overlooking the brook. 
Consider also included are - Levolor blinds, draperies, fuel 
saving thermostat, alarm system and much more. 

Offered for $184,000 




KOPP'S CYCLE 

Esl '891 

43 Wltherspoon St. 

Princeton, N.J. 

924-1052 

(next to the library) 



NEW LISTING IN "THE VILLAGE" - Always popular three 
bedroom, two bath model, in excellent condition. Good liv- 
ing areas, nice bedrooms, full basement. 

Offered for $84,000 



i 



■'.l.'.l.'.l. ' .l. ' . l . i .l. ' . i .i. i .'. i i i. i . i . i . i . i . i . i .m. i . i . i . i . i . i . i . i . i . i . i . i . i . i . iiiiiTi . i . i . i . i . i . i . i 







STEWARDSON-DOUGHERTY 

T{eal Estate -Associates, Incorporated 

366 Nassau Street, Princeton, S\eiv Jersey 08540 

Thane: 609-92 1 -7784 

COMPLETE RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL SERVICE 




COUNTRY COTTAGE 



Located in Hillsborough Township approximately 7V 2 miles northeast of 
Princeton, this sturdily built country house is sited on almost thirteen 
wooded acres providing lots of privacy. The interior has been recently 
renovated and contains on the first floor a panelled living room with 
fireplace, separate dining room, modern kitchen and bath and a 
bedroom. Upstairs a large light all purpose room with dormers and built- 
in bunk. Large attached two-car garage $1 25,000 




HEATHCOTE FARM 

For Sale - One of the most desirable of the four condominium units in this 
unique converted mansion near Kingston Apartment A consists of two 
large high-ceilinged living rooms, both with fireplaces, spacious 
bedroom with adjoining study or dressing area, contemporary kitchen 
with adjoining laundry area. Full new bath, plus powder room. Outside, 
fenced court yard and lovely raised terrace overlook sweeping lawns 
and 50 acres of never to be built on State conservation land Individual 
heating and air conditioning Swimming pool and five acres of exquisite 
grounds. All within walking distance of New York buses and Kingston, 

$212,500 




ROLLING HILL ROAD 



Near the entrance to the Bedens Brook Club this most attractive architect 
designed Contemporary blends perfectly with its sloping, wooded site. 
The exterior with its pagoda like roof, large "L" shaped deck and large 
glass areas has an oriental flavor. Inside on the first level there are living 
and dining room with 1 5 foot ceilings, a dramatic two-way floor to ceil- 
ing fireplace, contemporary kitchen, two bedrooms and two baths On 
the second level there is a galley study with balcony overlooking the liv- 
ing and dining rooms. On the lower level there is a third bedroom and 
bath. Many extra features including a zen garden, central air, central 
vacuum system alarm system, and some furniture Available now 

$375,000 




VAN DYKE ROAD 

An Historic Colonial privately situated on almost three high acres yet 
located in the Snowden Lane area of Princeton Township just three to 
five minutes from schools, shopping and recreation. Built about 1800 in 
the Federal style the floor plan includes a through center hall, well pro- 
portioned square living room, a study or family room with adjoining 
screen porch, dining room with chair rail and antique corner cupboard, 
modern kitchen with adjoining breakfast room, and separate laundry 
Upstairs five bedrooms, three baths, plus two renovatable bedrooms 
plus bath on third. Five fireplaces, antique panelling and moldings, wide 
pine floors. Sweeping lawns, lovely shade trees, stone terraces. 

$445,000 




Robert E. Dougherty, Broker 
REALTORS 

William E Stewardson 11935-1972) 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY 



On Moore Street just a step off Nassau, attractive multi-use building. 
Design and decorator shop with office and showroom on the first floor 
and a three room and bath apartment on the second floor. Central air 
conditioning Off street parking and one-car garage $1 95,000 



READY SOON 

BY A QUALITY LOCAL BUILDER - TWO NEW ATTRACTIVE 
COLONIALS IN THE TOWNSHIPS WESTERN SECTION 

On a quiet private road off Ridgevlew Road a new Thompson Colonial is 
now almost complete Still time to choose some colors, etc Gracious en- 
try hall with slate floor; living room with bay window; separate dining 
room; panelled study with fireplace; top of the line kitchen adjoins a fami- 
ly room with cathedral ceiling and beams and brick fireplace; powder 
room and separate laundry room Many colonial touches such as fine 
moldings, panelling, and chair rails in the living areas Upstairs lour 
spacious bedrooms and three baths Two-car garage with drive-through 
portico Can be occupied in six weeks $425,000 

Near Great Road on Heather Lane a new colonial with loads of living 
space. Entry hall, living room and study both with fireplace; separate din- 
ing room; huge family room 21 x 25. kitchen with ample breakfast area 
Powder room and laundry Upstairs four bedrooms - the master bedroom 
is large - 14 x 20. and two baths Huge outdoor deck Still can choose 
colors, tiles, etc $410 000 

Donna Reichard 
.I.B. Smith 
Emma Wirtz 



Claire Burns 

Graham Brush Betsy Stewardson Ford 

Anne Cresson Georgia Graham 

Sharon Davidson Anne V. Gallagher 



Pam Harris 
Cathy Johnson 
Toby Laughlin 
Sylvia Nesbitt 



Valerie Young !" I 

Mary S W en ™ J 

r.i-i'-iiY-n'riZV 



uuuuuu 



^uUUUU UUUUUUULILJLIUUUUUUUUUUUIJUUUUUUUUUU mJULJUU 

Firestone °Real Estate 

169 Nassau Street, Princeton REALTORS (609) 924-2222 § 

GIVE YOUR HOME THE FIRESTONE ADVANTAGE! 




Vol It PRIVATE WORLD IN PRINCETON JUST TIIK WAV vol WANT IT. 

This very elegant Princeton Colonial offers a special surprise: a spectacular in- 
door pool complex in a private wooded setting surrounded by spacious decks, 
overlooking the woods and highlighted by skylights. Let us tell you more. 

1498,000 




i.l ORIOI S WOODED SE1 MM. .11 8T A FEW MINUTES 1 ROM Ml ( IRTER 
rHEATRE in one ol Princeton's mosl desirabh western Bection 

nelgl hoods wi offei a lovely Williamsburg Capi So delightful foj enlei 

tainiiig with a spacious living room French doon screened porch and secluded 
brldt patio Wonderful layoutl NOWPRICED w 1350,000 




LEAVE YOl It. H U I 1 I I It M THE CO! Vl'RY IIOl SK .Youwon I need the 
car for this wonderful Princeton Colonial in a walk everywhere location Im 
maculate, well cared for. with lots of love lavished throughout Sparkling with 
special features we'd love to show vou. „,, .,„, 




rTTjr*^— — »-■— r«J[-l | 



WOODROW WILSON liked Tudors and so will you when vou see this New 
Princeton Tudor about to be built close to town and schools Inside is a 24 foot 
living room with picture window, a formal dining room with bay window, an 
eat-in-kitchen with a breakfast area and a good sue family room with til , . 
Upstairs are four bedrooms and two baths including a master suite Located on 
a treed lot, mature setting, and close to town l2"5.ooo 




OUR NEW EST LISTING IS SITUATED IN HISTORIC PRINCETON, close to 
the Governor's mansion and Marquand Park. It's a lovely colonial on two acres 
with professional landscaping and beautiful gardens. There are fireplaces in 
both the living room and family room while the kitchen has its own breakfast 
room Five bedrooms in all plus a finished basement Our last listing here had 
an offer and acceptance within days, so call Firestone for a special preview. 

SS25.000 




' III I I 




DELIGHTFUL CKANBim COUNTRYSIDE! Only a few minutes from 
Princeton, the Turnpike, yet just outside one of New Jersey's most charming 
small towns This gracious two-story colonial is a wonderful place to raise your 
family. Living room with sunny picture window, family room with raised 
hearth fireplace, rear deck with a country view. siin.sou 



I'ltlNl ETON LOT -2.3 wooded acres, exclusive area, all utilities. $12 




PRINCETON ADDRESS: CAREFREE CONDOMINIUM LIVING around a 
dramatic center atrium Forrestal Village in Plainsboro means freedom of 
lifestyle for you! Really have the time to enjoy the historic and cultural delights 

11 wr^™£??? arCa Ugl "' air> ' llVing areas ' ,nree ^drooms and a 
den PRICED TO SELL! fl ^ m 




^SS^S^SSS^SgZSSSS^ '77 and - 

pletely so.dou, The townhouses are no longer a a la Kta!S?"h """" 
very special individual residences for vo.fr ™U ! : o builder na s two 
townhouses. these two c^nSu^Xlu^efu^r^^ 
more private setting Ask us when your dream home £X reidvl "'V 
appointment onlv an ■* readv (or you By 

S195.0O0 



ALL AREA LISTINGS ARE AVAILABLE THROIT.H Ol R FRIENDLY. PROFESSION XL \SSOn it^ 
WE HAVE MANY HOMES IN Ml PRICE RANGES FOR VOL R CONSIDERATION 
PI T IS TO WORK TO FIND VOL THE HOUSE OF VOL R DREAMS' 



Ton 



nnnnn Qrn n ^ n n n n n n n R n n ,_, n ^^ f - 1 r-ir-.r-,^^„ r - lrir -,„„„ - 

'r-inrinr-ir-.~~ '"""nn r f 



IBAUMLEY 
NURSERY 




580 Route 27 
Princeton 

(201)821-6819 

indway bei Kingston 
Shop Rite and 
Marketplace Mali) 

PEAT MOSS 
WOOD CHIPS 
OAK BARRELS 



GBC Binding Systems 

Therm-A-Bind Systems 

Photo ID Systems 

Lammators 

Custom 3 Ring Binders 

Custom Report Covers 

Call 

Bud Somers 

Sales Representative 

Mercer County 

(201)696-3600" 



DOIT YOURSELF 

LEGAL KITS 

Divorce, Wills. Bankruptcy. Separation. 
Incorporation, Name Change 

201 782 5540 
ANYTIME 



FARRINGTON'5 MUSIC 

LESSONS 

SALES 
RENTALS 
REPAIRS 



CfS> Walter B. 

Jiowe,n 

Insurers • Realtors 
Established 1885 

1000 Herrontown Rd. 

Princeton 

609-924-0095 



F0RER PHARMACY 

160 Wltherspoon St. 

Pharmaceuticals 
Orthopedic Supplies 

921-7287 



R.F. JOHNSON 




Electrical Contractor 


O 


and Flxitue ttmmiwnm 


$ 


20 Tular* SI «*-0M6 
Open Mo- 


3 

73 



Kale's: 



Landscape Sarvica 
Nursery and 
I Garden Center 
133 Carter Rd, Princeton. 921 9248 



PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 

BRAND NEW PRICE for this 9 rooms. 2'/j baths, 
heated in-ground-pool & Jacuzzi & lots more 
Quick occupancy. $272,500 

ASSOCIATES REALTY 
OF PRINCETON 

162 NASSAU STREET 

PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08542 

(609) 924-6501 



Ifilin 



NO CABINETS: Come see our 

metal tiling cabinets for off ice or home 

Grey, tan, olive, 2 or 4 drawer Also 

typing tables Hinkson's, SI Nassau 

I Street 



(WORK WANTED: Moving and hauling 
Yards, attics and cellars cleaned 
Concrete work done Call anytime! 3M 
Q1«. hum 



MEN'S ALTERATIONS on clothing by 
expert tailor either purchased here or 
elsewhere Princeton Clothing Co. 17 
Witherspoon St., Princeton 924-0704 



SEWING ALTERATIONS: Ladles and 
children's clothing made to order, AM 
work done at a reasonable rate 
Evenings (609) 924 3099 8-15-21 



Oritur 



21 



CARNEGIE REALTY, Inc. 

Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated 

PRINCETON CIRCLE AT RT. 1 
921-6177 452-2188 




PRINCETON - Delightful ranch one block from 
Nassau St. and the University. Walk to churches 
and schools Well constructed. Full basement, 
fireplace and garage. Air conditioning. $135,000 




■■BH 

PRINCETON ADDRESS - Beautiful setting on 
quiet residential street within walking to Junction 
train Screened porch, fireplace, garage. Excellent 
West Windsor Schools. $139,900 

PRINCETON-QUEENSTOWN COMMONS - 

Townhouse - Two Story, 4/5 bedroom spacious 
unit - the largest model in the complex Formal din- 
ln 9 room, kitchen with breakfast area and menu- 
Planning desk, extra-large living room with 
''replace Many, many closets for storage, plus a 
casement. $219,000 



RENTAL 

NEW CONDO - All appliances, fireplace. 2 
bedrooms, laundry S775/mo. 



BILL'S HOUSE PAINTING: Clean 
quality work. Interior, exterior 
References available 443 8959 l-4-9t 



"A^' SPACE ' CE, *TI)«L NASSAU 
STREET recently decorated, low rent, 
available now. telephone and recep- 
tionist service. 9244300 



ROOFING): All types ol roots Inew or 
repairs), leaders, gutters, cblmney 
Hashing. Fast service Work guaran 
teed Over 30 years In business. Belle 
Mead Rooting Local call from Prince- 
ton. 201 3S9S99S 4. 18 . M 



GUTTERTALK: CLean gutters, check 
roof and chimney standard one story. 
S40 7 story. 145 Repairs extra, 921 1 135. 



FIREWOOD FOR SALE: Seasoned, 
selected hardwoods. Split, delivered 
and stacked Bv the full cord, S135 and 
half cord, S67 SO. Call Jim, 924 3470.9 Is 
31 



ASKABOUTOUR 

REALESTATE 

SCHOOL 



Weichert 

"VOUB FULL SERVICE METROPOLITAN REALTOR' 





PRINCETON TOWNSHIP - "Convenient to schools, community pool 4 playing 
fields." Well maintained Pearson built home with lovely backyard fit enclosed 
porch. Four bedrooms including a large master suite and full bath; second 
bathroom; living room with fireplace, formal dining room and kitchen with 
solid wood cabinets. 1142,000 

PR-8855 Princeton Office 

609-921-1900 



Princeton Office 609-921-1900 
Offices Open 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 



Weichert 

Realtors 



SM Offices Throughout the 

Metropolitan Area 



\ A STEWARDSON-DOl'GHERTY 



T{eal Estate -Associates, Incorporated 
j66 Nassau Street, Princeton, .°\V<x> Jersey 08540 § 
Thone: 609-92 i-y/84 





CHERRY VALLEY ROAD 

So Clean & Neat, it squeaks 1 This country ranch house on its own private 2.6 acres can be very 
versatile This attractive house contains a living room with fireplace, a stepdown dining room 
15x21. convenient kitchen with breakfast area, separate study or office plus three spacious 
bedrooms and one and one half baths. Radiant floor heating. Separate finished building 30 x 33 
with a kitchenette and its own heat, perfect for a studio, office or recreation room. Fairly priced 
at $178,500 



WHO'S WHO 



DEPENDABLE 



Consumer 
Service? 

The local business people listed below are all Consumer Bureau 
Registered, which means they have not even one valid* un- 
satisfied customer complaint in Consumer Bureau's files By adver- 
deoistfp*' tlSln 9 on ,nese "Who*s Who" pages, they help finance Consumer 
-armooi Bureau's continuing consumer information and assistance service 
amimmmSm and tnev cordially invite your patronage 




o * Advertising - Outdoor: 

Z ' C MAXWELL CO. 396-8121 Since 1604 

O NMd w« Say Morel PO Box 1200, 

K Trenton 08606 

Z 

* •Air Freight & Express: 

*• AIR X We •hip enylhlnfi any tire A 
weight, anywherel 3670 Quakert>ridg« 
Rd. Tren SM-1&33 



• Carpenters: 

GEILS, DONALD Carpentry, home 
pairs smell elterationa, eddlllor 
201 369-7571 



• Carpet Cleaning: 



AAAR* Carpal A Upholstery Uaanlng 
Servk* Inc. Free Eatlmetes Princeton 
Area 083-4757 



• Air Conditioning: 

SERVtCI KINO Air Cond A Hei 
Fra« estimate* Call anyllme ( 



• Carpet Dealers: 

LOTH FLOORS A CE1L1NQS Karaatan. 

liio*i"* L*e. other* 206 Sanhitan Or 
ir„ aajajji 



-4704 ""• — 



•Atom) Systems: 

ADT MCURITY SYSTEMS Fire, 
Burglar Hold-up, Cloeed Circuit TV. 
cmnvcl i rsdtl 229 Lawrence Ad. 
Trenton 896-1144 



• Antique Olrs, Auctioneers: 

LESTER A ROBERT 8LATOFF, Inc 

Auctioneers Daalara Appraisers, 
Lecturers, Antiques, Households, 
Ealalaa, Silver, Jewelry, China, 
Glass, Bought & Bold, 777 Waal 
Stale, Trenton, 38*4848 



• Caterers: 

ANOELONIS Catering 
party facilities for ov 
WTiltehoree Mercrvl Rd . 



Banquet A 
>r 600 1445 

Hamilton So 



• Ceramk Tile: 

ARlf.8 TILE IMC 

PO Box 11247 

Vardvllle.NJ 69&.BB77 
TERRA COTTA Handmada ceramic (flat 

Horn Mexico 8 Europe Hamilton Av, 

Hopewell 466-1229 



• Gourmet Shops & Foods: 

FIDDLER'S CREEK FARM Country smoh 
ed bacon, turkeys & capons Mall Order 
RD I.TltuaviMa 7370685 (local) 

INDIA DISCOUNT STORE We sell plate 
Chios 14 90 lb, 122 50 5 lbs. salted cash, 
ewa 15 50 lb, end shelled almonds 12 50 
lb 3001 R1 77, Franklin PW 201 821 7775 

• Hardware Stores: 

LUCAR Paint, hdwra, tools, plumbing 
8 elec auppl, houswrs Open avea Pin 
Hlaln Ftd , Prn Jncln (local call) 799- 
0599 

PRINCETON HARDWARE Everything for 
Home A Garden, paint, hswrs, window 
snadee, toola, plumbing, alec suppl 
Prn Shop Ctr 924-5156 

• Heating Contractors: 

WM 0. LOWE HTO S AIR CON 

Hopewell, 486-3705 
NASSAU OIL Selaa I Service 

800 Stale Rd . Ptn 924 3530 




JOSEPHINE WEBB, Executive Director of Consumer Bureau, broadcasting a Consumer Bureau an- 
nouncement Mrs Webb personally investigates consumer complaints received by Consumer Bureau 
and in most cases she is able lo resolve them to the satisfaction of all concerned. (For what happens to 
unresolved consumer complaints, see below.) 



• Lightning Rods: 



• Patios * Decks 

PINEAPPLE DECK BUILDERS 
Designers 8 builders. Pm 924-0641 



• Limousine Service: 



• Antiques: 

KINOSTON ANTIQUES Fine Jewelh 
Antiques 43 Meln, Kingston 924-Ojj 
8 924 3923 

REN'S ANTIQUES Specialising In silver, 
china 8 glass lamps, lOya 8 banka 8 
Important collectors Itema Member Inl 
Soc ol Appraisers 14 8 State St, New 
town, Pa 215-968-5511 



• Appliance Repair: 

f AIBHILLS APPLIANCE SERVICE 

Serving Merr.or Cty Serv. most mnkon 
393 3072 

• Auto Body Repair Shops; 

BODY SHOP By Harold Williams 

Specializing In f-ibnrglnes, Corvette 
All rJomoalTc 8 foreign oara, Rio 206, 
Prn 9218685 
8UDMAN FRAME 8 ALIGNMENT, INC 
12-1B Industry CI Tin 8820088 



• Cleaning, Home & Office: 

JAMES STREETER Res A Comm clean 
K Ing Snow plowing 393-4438 

• Cleaning & Pressing: 

CRAFT CLEANERS Shin Cleaning ft 
Drapery Cleaning 225 Naasau, Prince 
ton 924-3242 

• Clothing • Furniture: 

10,000 aq II of clothing, furnllure brie 
ebracolc SALVATION ARMY THRIFT 
STORE 436 Mulberry St, Trn 599 



• HI-FI. Stereo Sales 
& Service 

ABSOLUTE SOUND 

3 Spring Street, Princeton 683-0210 800-882 9797 
HAL'S CUSTOM SOUND ■ For quality ~ 

and service Rle 1 A Taxes Av, 

Lawrnvl 683-6338 (local call) 

• Hospital Beds: Equipment: 

DELCRE8T MEDICAL PRODUCTS Hosplt 
al equipment for the home 2100 Notllng. 



CROWN LIMOUSINE SERVICE 

Serving the Princeton Area 4484389 
EMBASSY LIMOUSINE 201-329-2309 

Dependable, economical A personal 

Servlnp Ihe Princeton Area 
WILLIAMS CAR HIRE SERVICE Cadillac 

Stretch llmos A Rolls Royce llmos. 



• Shoe Repair Shops: 

JOHN'S SHOE SHOP Eapert repairs Ol 
shoos, inci orthopedic A slhietlc shoas 

18 Tulana, Pm 924-559* 

NASSAU SHOE REPAIR Orthopedic work 
__, _ . Athletic shoes rep'd Shoe dyeing 180 

• PlinO Dealers: Nassau |reart Prn 9217552 

HOLDERS PIANOS * ORGANS, Int. ~~ 
Hunterdon Shop Ctr, Rte 202, Flem- 
ington (30 mln from Pm.) 201-782 • SurQJCal SllpptV A Equip. 

Dealers: 

AMBEST 

39 George Dye Rd Ham Sq 586-9542 
1674 Pennington Rd Ewlng 882-3702. 



luipnwi 

> Way. Hamltn Twp 586-1679 

• Insulation Contractors: 

WILLIAMSON Conatructlon. 



• Micro Computer - Retail: 

ENTRE COMPUTER Specializing In com 
putera for business IBM, DEC, Compai 
Grid. TeleVldeo 47 Stats Rd. Prn 68 



• Copying; Duplicating: 

A W REPROGRAPHICS Trn blanch 

' *l I '."' N ( ililmi ft, kh.' BfXXI 



• Delicatessens: 

THE VILLAGE STORE Cold cuts, 



• Auto Dealers 



', barbecued chickens Plalnsboro «• lam Mart 
Pltlniboh) "iMi'./it wjtjwuiuii. 



• Motorcycles & Mopeds: 

Esllmetn'RuBonabieVrlcVs^vilsV CYCLESMfTH BMW INC. Rt 130 (1 ml 
S* ~ i — i n Ti nor,n of Dayton Ford) S Brna 201-297- 

• Interior Oecoratlng: 7400 

KATE M. OAYOOS A.8.I.D. R..ldenh.l A ^^fiX^S™ 1 

Commercial Inlerlor Design 737-1010. ™ n u e ■ wwJiea 

NASSAU INTERIORS Residential A Busl- _ . , „ ^, 

noss 162 Nassau St Princeton 924-2561 • MOVffig & StOTSge: 

ANCHOR MOVING A STORAGE Agents 
for Mayllower. Let our family move 
youi lamlly 127 Fernwood Av Trn. 
298-7877 

BOHREN'S Moving A Storage. Local 
A long distance moving A Storage 
United Van Lines Auth Agt Princeton 
452 2200 



• Plumbing & Heating 
Contractors: 

JOHN C. NIX Plumbing. Heating A Air •Swimming POOl Repairs: 
Conditioning License No 6032 921- WILLIAMSON POOL SERVICE Speclal- 

1433 ning in concrete swimming pool repairs 

PJ.M PLUMBING A HEATING CONTR. 337 Witherspoon. Princeton 921 1184 

Residential rpis A renovations Free 

estimates 24 hr serv 13 Tall Timbers 

Drive, Pin 921 1394 License No 6694 
REDDING S PLUMBING A HEATING 



• Tire Dealers: 

NEMES 



Plumbing, htg A air cond License No JOSEPH J. NEMES A SONS B F 
5300 234 Nassau St Prn 924-0 166 Goodrlch-DunJop-Piefelll-Mlchelln, 

All sizes. Amer A toielgn cars Rims 

available Rte 206. Prn 924-4177 
• Printers: PRINCETON AMOCO. Firestone tires 

tor American, compact A Foreign Cars. 

Princeton Shopping Ctr 921-6682 



• Interiors; Carpets: 

INTERIOR APPLICATIONS INC. Carpet, 
sheet vinyl, cellngs drapes, upholstery 
lowrtShp, VII Rt 31 Pngtn. 883 



^Transmissions: 



■ ■ ie 166 1331 



Service 

no 1425 

7 miles 



AUDI A PORSCHE Seles I 

Holbert's Poracha Audi, 

Easlon Rd , Warrington, Pt 

Irom New Hopo 215 343 2690 
AUDI PORSCHE Auth Sales A Service, Need a 

QUAKERBRIDGE PORSCHE *' 

Route 1, Pin 452 9400 
CATHCART PONTIAC 

1620 N Olden Av, Trenton 392-51 1 1 
DATSUN Sales A Service SOLOMON 

OATSUN Rle 130, Hlghlstown 448 

1310 
COLONIAL CADILLAC, INC. 

1686 N Olden Av Trn 883-3500 
HAMILTON Chrysler Plymouth 

Auth Sales A Sorvlce Plymouth, 

Chrysler, Imperial 1240 Route 33, 

Hamilton Square 486-2011 

iECp JEEP Sales, service, petit. 

accessories REDNOR A RAINEAR. Inc 

2638 Bo Broad, Trenton 8881800 
SPORTS A SPECIALIST CARS, INC 

Mercer County's only euth SAAB 

dealer 164 1 N Olden Av , Trn 882 7000 



Electrical Contractors: 



MARK PRATICO DISCOUNT JEWELERS • Muft 6TS 
2901 Bruna Pk Rt 1 Plaza. Law 683-6908 
880 Plalnsboro Rd, Plsinsboio 275-0018 



HAHN Lie No 44 19 

mi. mi. a, 1)N tha« NCi •Karate Instruction 

. .«od a good electrician for any size »« _ ""»"«""""• his 

AUDI, olecliloel lob? Free est (local) 468 p "'NCETON SCHOOL OF TANO SOO DO 
1313 Bl 27, Kingston 683-1744 



MIGHTY MUFFLER CTR. 
aVmerly Seoul Mu'tler Ctr.) Dlv ol J.J. 
Nemes A Sons, Inc Mufflers for Foreign 
A Amerlcsn cars 100 percent guarantee 
Rte 206, Pin 021-0031. 



AAA REPROGRAPHICS OMset printing, 
camera stals Fast service A competi- 
tive prices 262 Alexander St Prn, 924- 
6100 

LDH PRINTING UNLIMITED 
Complele Printing Service 924-4664 
Olfsel Printing - Fast Service - Color LEE MYLES Free Check 11. Free 
Printing. Typeseltlng, Bond Copies, Towing, Coasl to Coast Warranty,, 
Rubbei Slamps. Notary Service. llOt Foreign S Domestic 859 US H*y 130, 
Stale RO iU S 206) Bldg B, Prn, East Windsor 448-0300 

REPLICA Lowest prices, immediate ser- ■■ — 

vice Offset printing A Xerox. 10 So 

Tula^around corner from Annex) Pm #Trave | AgenCIOS: 

SPRUCE PRINTING CO. Typesetting. AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVEL 

Graphic design 530 Spruce SI Trn. Don't Leave Home Wilhout Us 



396-4591 



• Exterminators: 

COOPER PEST CONTROL Graduate 
t nioiniiloglst All peels oilortnlnattKl 
(local colli 798 1300. 



• Kitchen Cabinets. 

KAPRI KITCHEN, Inc, Profsnl, design A 
Installation 3212 South Broad Tren 
(15 mln from Prn ) 585-8150 
MILLNER LUMBER CO. Dlstr HAA! 
lichen cablnols; paneling 600 Afllsan 
on 393-4204 



• Office Furniture & Equip 
Dealers: 

HINKSON'S Complele line of office furn- 
iture A supplies 82 Nassau, Princeton 
924-0112 

STATE SALES OFFICE EOUIPMENT New 
A Used office furniture bought A sold 
694 S Broad. Tren 392-8066 



• Pumps & Well Drilling: 

SAMUEL STOTHOFF CO. INC 

Rt 31. Fleminglon 201-782-2116, 

• Records & Tapes: 

PRINCETON RECORD EXCHANOE 

Bought, sold, traded New. used, disc 
20 Nassau St Prn 021 -0881 



10 Nassau Street 

Princeton 921-8600 

Ash Mr. Fostsr Travel Services (For- 
merly Welcome Aboard) Never 3 service 
lee. Mon - Frl 85 30 41 Witherspoon 
Prn 921-3350 

DELUXE TRAVEL BUREAU, INC. Person 
allzed travel service 219 Nassau 
Prn 924-6270 

HALE TRAVEL INC. 2160 Route 206 
Belle Mead 201-6745454. 

KULLER TRAVEL CO. 
Complete travel arrangements 
109 Nassau Street, Princeton. 924-2550 



• Feed Stores: 

ROSEDALE MILLS All klnda of lead 
lor animals A pals; farm supplies 
274 Alo.nnder SI , Pin 024-0134 



• Auto Parts Dealers: 

TRENTON AUTO PARTS Hundreds of 
thouaanda of new, rebuilt and used 
aulo parla for anything on wheels 
687 Southard St .Tien 39452B1 

• Auto Repairs & Service: 

AAMCO TRANSMISSIONS Free tow 



► Florists: 



• Kitchens 

WILLIAMSON CONSTRUCTION CO 
Doalgna A Installations F 

esllmales 337 Witherspoon Prn" 
921 1184 

• Landscaping Contractors: 

DOERLER LANDSCAPES Landscape 
Designing Shade Trees, lences, patios 
2281 Brunswick Pike. Lincvl 896-3300 



• Organ Dealers: 

NOLDE'S PIANOS A ORGANS, Inc 
Hunterdon Shop Ctr, Rte 202. Fleming- 
ton (30 mm Irom Prn) 201-782 5400 



• Floor Covering Contractors: 

ILE DISCOUNT CTR Vinyls, Ceiamica 

S'B« n ^C;afeafr^ 1 * ,a •La""- Garden & Farm 
Supp. & Equip; Repairs: 



• Painting: 

JULIUS H GROSS INC 25 years 

professional painting 024-1474 
WILLIAMSON COMPANY Free estimates 
Low Prices Princeton, 021-1184 



• Restaurants: •Tree Service: 

THE ALCHEMIST A BARRISTER Lunch H «'<ll n fl'» Tree Removal A Land Clearing 
eons, Dinner, Cocktails Open 7 dava Free estimates, insured Front end 
28 Witherspoon, Pm 924-5555 loader A wood chipper service 883-5899 

HERITAGE RESTAURANT at Princeton JAM ES IRISH TREE EXPERTS Reslden- 
Hollday Inn Rt 1 Open 7 am inpu ,lal " eft . shrub A hedge maintenance 
4522442 ^ amiopm pnnceton 924-3470 

LA BONNE AUBERQE Vlllaoe 2 SHEARER Tree Surgeons. Eslab 1930 
New Hope, Pa 215-8622462 Professional tree care Phil Alspach 

PARFAIT HOUSE Featuring our own Ice P'OP 206 Wash Rd , Prn 924-2800 



• Painting & Paper Hanging 

DANNY-S PAINTINQ - - 



LARINI'S SERVICE CENTER 24 hr lowing 
272 Alexander St Prn 024-8553 

RAJTURNEY MOTOR CO. 
348 Rt 1. Mon Jet 201 297-1990 



• Boat Sales & Service: 

LENTINE MARINE Hwy 31, 
Remington 201-782-2077 

• Book Stores: 

HICAW8ER BOOKS Libraries bought A 
sold New. used Ararabooka Also open 
Sun. 11-1 106 Nassa u, Prn 921-8484 

• Building Contractors: 

EDWARO BUCCI BUILDERS, INC. Cus 

torn builder Ott 924-0908 Home 882 

4691 
H. A SNEDEKER'S SONS. INC. 

Euclid Ave, Kingston 924 5099 
NICK MAURO A SON. BUILDERS. INC 

Custom homes, additions alterations 

tile. 924-2830 
WILLIAMSON Construction Free 

Estimates Reasonable Prices 921 1184 



• Food Markets: 

THE VILLAGE STORE Plalnsboro 
Plalnsboro 799*578 {local call) 

• Fuel Oil & Oil Burners: 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Fuel 
plmbg, htng, all cond A eneigy aud 
16 Gordon Av, Lmcvl 896-0141 

NASSAU OIL Sales A Service 
SOO Slat e Rd , Prn 924 3530 

• Furniture Dealers: 

QASIOR'S FURNITURE A ACCESSORIES 
2152 Rle 208. Belle Mead 201-874-8383 

(local call) 



SIMPLICITY Lawn Garden A Snow Equk 
men! Irom 3v» to 20 ho Gamnim* "assure Washing 
service center JOSEPH J NEMES - QR0SS - J"""* H. 
SONS, Rle 206. Prn 924-4177 



Exterl 

ured Free estimates Water 
Washing 921 7835 

Inlerlor A Exterior 
""^' . p *P* f hanging Decorellng 



Havvn Maintenance: 



LAWN BARBER 201-2977770 Mainten- 
ance A cultivation specialists Indus 
trial, commercial A estate care 



cc.^r'S'i' Ro ' cl ' Wncelon'mi'i'iM 
6*88 p «""l"0 & Decorating 921 

1). RICH Painting A Rooting Free est 
fully insured Inter, sxlar 15 yrs exp 
Sr citizen d isc 882 7738 evenings 



cream, Lawrence Shoo Ctr Lrnevl 
PEACOCK INN Lunch DmnerCocktalls 
New Adult Cocklail Bar 20 BMrd Um 

Oust oil Nassau), Prlncato^rnoT 



• Rooling Contractors: 

CHRISTENSEN ROOFING New shingle 
roofs, chimney A flashing repairs <R4 
Caner Rd Prn 921 1277 A 024-7737. 



• Tree Surgeons: 

"HEPJER TREE SERVICE. N.J. 

Certified Tree Expert Spraying, tree 

al. pruning, shrub care; 

" disease control 



A Stump i 

cabling, 
insured. Pengln 



'37 9 



■-unci no. rrn y^l \in 5 924-7737 xBx ■ 1 _. 

cooper a shafer, inc. Est i93o •Vacuum Cleaner Dealers 

New roots A repairs Fully '— J *" 

63 Moran Ave , Prn 924 2063 
WILLIAMSON Roofing. New roofs and al 
repairs Slate, tar. melal. shingle 
new single ply 921 1164 



• Paints & Wall Coverings: 
Retail: 

Complele lighting services sales A WINDSOR Paiwt a Diet. uui» 

rx^%^^^'- M ' M < x rJT« .ass. i, Sfa £i n< 



• Lighting Fixtures 

CAPITOL LIGHTING - WATCHUNO 

Compl»r 



murea *"EBICAN SEWINQ 1 VACUUM CTR 
Pfn Shop Clf, 92122Q5 

a Water Conditioning- 

• Sewing Machine Dealers: ^T, r. 

amekican sewino > vacuum ctr. •waterproofing Contractors 

Pnawp CI.. 981.2806, OMDEN STATE WATERPROOFING 

— Free Esllmales 800-242-8720 



• Furniture Unpainted: 

:RNEY'S UNFINISHED FURNITURE Over 
5.000 pieces ol unpainted turiture' 
104 Mercer Mall, Rte 1 and Quaker 
Bridge Rd Lawrncvl 452-8404 



• Building Materials 
& Lumber 

1ELLE MEAD Lumber, Inc. For service A 
quality' Serving Princeton area Readme 
Biva Bel Md [local call] 201 359-5121 
3ROVER LUMBER CO. EverylfTng to, 
Builders A Homeowners 194 Ale>an 
dtr, Prn 924-0041 

IEATH LUMBER CO. Conyilete Home- 
Building Center Delivery Service 1580- 
N Olden Av Trn 392-1166 



• Garage Doors: 
Sales & Service 

FILLER. WILLIAM Repairs A new In 
stailatlonl Automatic door openers ser 
viced A installed Pr Junci 799-2193 

• Garbage & Trash Removal: 

HIQOINS 1 spoil I Service. Resdmi 
comrcl, indatrl Metal containers 1 lo 
40 cu yds Conslrcin A Demolln Debus 
121 Laurel Ave , Kingston 9218470 



• Glass; Auto & Home: 

HILLSaORQUftH GLASS 00. INC 
j^SAPt 206 Soioe^tsfia-A- 



OUR PROMISE TO PRINCETON CONSUMERS: 

^SfL, ' F Y ° U HAVE * C0MPLAINT gainst any local busmess firm just 
can 924-6223 and a Consumer Bureau representative will respond and in 
vestigate; then, 

O"* IF CONSUMER BUREAUS ALL-CONSUMER PANEL AGREES WITH 
YOU. Ihe business firm involved has only two choices: either satisfy vour 
complaint promptly or lose its Consumer Bureau Registration 

d ^^ ° 0N ' TSTAYMA D at any business firm- until vou first Qivernn«,,m=, 
^Bureau a chance to help stra.ghten matters out Caff (609° 924.8223 Fan* -Z 
,.of any day or night and a Cqnsumer BuN-ao representative will gamtaactof 

There is no charge 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



[oo 

VOUR LOCAL CONSUMER 
INFORMATION BANK 

ESTABLISHED 1967 
PO Box 4« . 

924-8223 



Medical Insurance Problems? 

Do you need assistance filling out and filing for Medicare 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield or Major Medical insurance 
benefits 7 Are you uncertain how much you owe your doc- 
tors and other medical suppliers 7 Let us assist you by 
straightening out your medical accour s and getting your 
medical insurance claims filed We cut through the 
Red-Tape 

insuranc^assislance 

ANN JOHNSON (609) 466-2944 JULIE ABERGER 
P BOX 208 HOPEWELL. NEW JERSEY 08525 



Foam CuttoanySlie 

Foam Mattresses In Stock 
Shredded Foam 
Pillow Inserts 

Free Quote -Mi-W 10 

' 5 Daily. Sat 4 

CAPITAL BEDDING COMPANY 

U S Hwy 130 I?' ; miles south 

of Hightsfown 

Between Yardviiie & Bordentown 



DOERLER LANDSCAPES 
Landscape Architects 

A Contractors 

Professional Ground* 

Maintenance 

Lawrenceville 
609-896-3300 



Attic Full of Treasures 
Good Antiques ■ Nice Household 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

Slackwood Firehouse - Trenton, N.J. 
Vi mi. No. Trenton Circle oft US 1 

TUES., OCT. 16-9 A.M. 

Nice 1810 hutch cupboard; cherry 6 leg dining & iSOOPem- 
broKe tables; Empire & Vict, wash stands; solas, chairs, 
end tables; dining & bedrooms; porch furniture; mirrors; 
Etc.! - Fine set "Rutledge" Lenox tor 10 plus old Lenox; 
Waterlord, cut, lots old glass & china; collectors brlc-a- 
brac; old lamps; good primitives; sexton; compass; sterling 
coftee set & flatware for 6; jewelry; linens; Etc.! Full Quality 
Sale! (Just in ■ 75 old Hummels!) 

Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 
Trenton, N.J. 609-393-4848 



ARTISTIC HAIRDRESSERS 

ah chases of beauty services from head 
to toe Walk in service and by ap 
DOintmeni 



42 Withers poor) street 
924-417 S 






interior 
design 

studio 



2935 ftt 1 Lowrenceville 



(609) 696-2062 



OFFICE SPACE 
AVAILABLE 

Prestigious 

Palmer Square 



924-0011 



Call: J.E. Berner 

Broker Cooperation 



FRAME IT NOW 



EYE FOR ART 
6 Spring St 



PRINCETON^ One bedroom apartment 
available Oct 1 S635 plus utilities 921 
1048. 9 n it 



FLY TO NANTUCKET in e seat cabin 
class IFR twin sharing expenses with 
Airline Transport Pilot multi engine 
Might instructor sua to about S210 
person (609)921 3847 9 26 4t 



SMALL APARTMENT WANTED m 

Princeton by retired woman. Please 
Call 921 2463 




OFFICE SPACE 
RESEARCH PARK 

1101 State ttoad, Princeton, l\ J 

Starting at $7. 75 per square fat net, net 
Areas up to 30,00 square feet 



427,000 square feet in Park 
Occupied by approximately 50 Tenants 

Princeton Mailing Address 
and Phone Number 

CALL: Research Park 
609-924-6551 



WHOWANTS PRINCETON 
CUSTOMERS? 

iome business firms do and some don't 
fhese days. How to find the ones thai do? 
1400 of them, both out of town and local. 
offer their services through the 
classified pages of your Princeton 
Community Phone Book 



GOOOTIME CHARLEY'S 

Lunch Mon thru Frl 

Dinner 1 days a week 

Music every night 

Banquet and Meeting Rooms 

40 Main St , Kingston 924 7400 



RUBBER STAMPS 

School or college address. 

Home, business up code 

Rubber stamps o' all kinds and 

sizes made to your order at 

Hlnkson's 

82 Nassau 



ASK ABOUT OUR 

REAL ESTATE 
SCHOOL 



Weichert 



ASKABOUTOUR 
EQUITY ADVANCE (■» 
PROGRAM =- 




OPEN HOUSE 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1-5 PM 
PLAINSBORO - In the Brittany 3 bedroom, 2*4 bath townhouse. End unit with 
finished loft. Central air, fireplace in family room. Near tennis court. Call to- 
day. $129,900 
Princeton Office 609-92 1 - 1 900 
Directions : Plainsboro Rd. to George Davison Rd., first left after entrance. 



Princeton Office 609-921-1900 
Offices Open 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 



Weichert 
Realtors 



MOfnctt' 



A ranch in the country Mam floor has living room, dining room, Kitchen, den & family room + 3 
bedrooms Basement has recreation room, bar, office, kitchen & full bafh 4 car garage with 
studio Hopewell Township 




Well done older house in Hopewell Village Bay window for dining, brick palio & long porches for 
entertaining 4 bedrooms $119,000. 




If you are interested in a colonial style house, comparison shopping will put this one in the Best 
Buy" category In the exclusive Elm Ridge Park section of Hopewell Township 4 bedrooms. 
ZVk baths & really special at S265.000. 




Look at this buy' A modern 2 story with 3 bedrooms, * study, 2% baths, fireplace, builHns. 
screen porch, designer kitchen, breakfast area in bay window, panelled game room etc . etc. In a 
nice neighborhood Convenient to the state building m Trenton Can you resist at $92,500 

Audrey Short, Inc. 

163 Nassau si«-«m. Princeton, \.J. 08542 

1(609) 921-9222 

The Results Rsople 




REALTY WORLD 



^ 



ES 



Call Toll Free 
1 -800-641 -3486 Ext 100 



, Ow-xo A Ows'^ 



^^M^^ 



J 



i< 



J PRINCETON 

-CENTER. INC 



44 Pnnc«toi>HigMstown Rd 
Princeton Jet, N.J. 



FOOTWORKS 

24 Witherspoon Street 

Princeton, NJ 

924-6259 



KROESEN REALTY Inc. 

45 West Broad Street 

Hopewell, New Jersey 08525 

(609) 466-1224 




HOPEWELL BORO - Owner ready, willing and 
able to sell this very comfortable 3 BR. 1 V? bath 
house The yard is lovely for children, lots of trees 
There is a very large front porch to enjoy the 
breezes and even a playhouse in the back yard. 
Asking $119,000 

WE HAVE A TWO-PERSON RENTAL - Very nice 
5 room, in Hopewell. Call Tor details. 




HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP - Not everyone is suited 
for this kind of mini estate, but for the right party, it 
has 2 ponds, Stony Brook (stocked), a 3 BR home, 
garage and a large utility building (quite pretty) 
There are over 500 newly planted spruce trees. 
It's quite a placet Asking $250,000 



OVERHEAD OARAOC DOORS 
*l«ctrlc operator* Factory to you. Over 
tha counter or full wrvlca. pirn and 
rtpalri Call for lre« information- •£» 
•71-49I0. Rl«g« DOC, W«t New Road. 
Monmout* Junction l*l*H 



BUILDING REPAIRS: ROOU (Metal. 
Shingle. SUte. Tar). Chimneyi. Gut 
teri. Spoutv Fleihlnfl, Wall*. Walk*. 
Pallos. Garage*. Porch**, Step*. 
Driveway*. Pence*. Hauling. 
Demolition, Carpentry. Painting, 
Caulking. Giaiing, Slueco M*»onry, 
Pointing Patching, inspection*. 
Violation* Guaranteed and injured 
CellW HIS 3 3" 



ROBERT C.WHITLEY II 

Fine Antlqua 
Furniture and Sliver 

Appraltel*. cataloguing. photo 
documentation, retloretlon lervlce* 

Located In Soiebury, Pa. 

Smln from New Hope 

Showroom open Tue* Sat 



CalUIS-W-MH 



I ftuv ALL KINDS of old thing* China, 
bra**, brlc a brae, linen*, painting*. 
•liver and furniture 931 7*69 BB lit 



Mattreti Factory Outlet 

lnner*prlng. loam, and latex 

30",3J",34",*B", twin. lull, queen 

king *iie*. odd iliet aval 'able 

Serta, Therapedic 
Spnngwall Chiropractic 

Free Delivery Old bedding removed 
Ph: 2f|.p*10 

CAPITAL BEDOINO COMPANY 

U.J.Hwy. 130 

Bet. Yerdvllleand Bordentown 



PIANO TUNING 

Reglitered Craftiman 

Piano Technician* Guild Inc 

HUM 

Ragulatlng Repairing 

Robert H Halllat 
Since 1951 



STUDENT MOVERS 
EXPERIENCED 



All Type* Furniture 
Local or Long Dlitance 
"Reaionable Rate*" 

No Job Too Small 
Call Kirk, ©09 394 6475 
or Don, 609 393 J3*0 



RENDALL-COOK 

& COMPANY 

REALTORS 

350 ALEXANDER STREET PRINCETON 
K0!>-!)24-0322 ^^^ 






>/^3k;.-.,, : 



-MfL'sL-: ' 



•" - ft, 



PRETTY TOWNSHIP COLONIAL 

Four bedroom two and one-halt bath charmer in apple pie 
order. Beautiful, large living room with fireplace, pretty din- 
ing room, new kitchen, spacious family room, finished base- 
ment, two car garage and loads of extras. Great buy at only 

$219,000 

MONTGOMERY - Pretty, eclectic cape on a super two acre 
setting. Four bedrooms, two baths, great living areas and a 
wonderful terrace. Must be seen to be appreciated. Now on- 
ly $199,000 




20 North Main St, Pennington. NJ 

cm fda all ooasoib *jw tea 

'37-OS45 *vSat 10-S31. 



o 



Wm. B. May Co., Inc. 

Real Estate 

'cr^c p N.I 0855/ 609^97-1907 . 



ESTABLISHED 1MB 



WILLIAM MILLER 

GARAGE DOOR 

SALES b SERVICE 

• REPAIRS 

• INSTALLATIONS 

• AUTOMATIC OPENERS 

Free Estimates 

799-2193 



rSWLLMAN FURNITURE 

Used furniture, chests, dressers, 
unfinished bookcases, etc 
J SPECIAL OF THE WEEK: Matching 

' chest, dresser and night stand; Octagon 
■ shaped coffee table. 

212 Alexander St., Princeton 

Mon-Frl 9^5; Sat 9 1 924*1 881 J 

OFFICE SPACE 



Heart of Princeton — 20 Nassau Street 

Luxury double and single office suites, overlooking Nassau Street and 
University campus Large office of 3,200 s-uare feet available, all newly 
decorated in a completely renovated, elevator building in the very center of 
Princeton. $10 per sq. ft. and up. Reserved parking in the newly built 

Broke' cooperation Call 921 -9574 or 924-7027^ 



B HILTON © 

REALTY CO. OF PRINCE TON, I XC. 

Wi- 



ld I 

\i\um 



'■■■■■" 



CHARMING 2 STORY IN CRANBURY - A wooded setting surrounds this 
3 bedroom, 2 bath, energy efficient home. Private one acre lot with 
mature trees, two car detached garage and glass enclosed sun-porch! 

$123,500 



TWO STORY 3 BEDROOM HOME - Contains a living room, dining room, 
modern kitchen, sun-porch and good basement. Aluminum siding and 2 
car detached garage $99,500 

WHAT A SETTING FOR THIS BEAUTIFUL 5 BEDROOM COLONIAL on 

Robin Drive, a cul-de-sac street in Montgomery Twp , under 1 minutes 
to Princeton. 1 V4 acre wooded lot. Additional den or maids' quarters. 

$263,500 

PRIME LOCATION FOR OFFICE OR STORE. Brick building on a Vi 

acre Route 31 , -Pennington Road, Hopewell Twp. $1 49 000 

COMMERCIAL LOT on Route 130. East Windsor Twp. 3 8 acres with 
250 ft. frontage zoned for highway business. 

IN TOWN OFFICE SUITE, 2nd floor on Witherspoon Street $500 per 
month plus electric. Heat included. Available immediately 

RENTALS: HOUSES AND APARTMENTS 
Mercer County MLS 
Princeton Real Estate Group 
Affiliated Independent Broker 
(Nationwide Referral Service) 



921-6060 

194 Nassau Street 

Hilton Bldg., 2nd floor 



EVENINGS & WEEKENDS CALL: 



William Schuessler - 921-8963 
Harvey Rude - 201-359-5327 
Asa Mowery - 395-1671 



Emma King - 799-1694 
Danielle Alford - 448-8794 
Dan Galvano- 896-9146 



UNFURNISHED: 

Five 'o sin bedroom farmhouse in 
Gfiggstown Available Immediately 
S900 per month plus utilitles. 

Four oedroom Contemporary in Prm 

ceton Available immediately for ap 
prommatelv 5 months. $1000 per month 
pi U s utilities 

Two bedroom conoominium .n p--,n 
ceton Available immediately No 
no c>ets Si, 550 per month in 
ciuoes utilities and condo fee 

SEMI-FURNISHEO: 

oom apartment .n Princeton 
I immediately. No Children, nc. 
pets SA50 per month plus utilities 

Sfewardson- Dougherty 

Real Estate Associates 

366 Nassau Street 

Princeton, N.J 

(60»l«t-77ea 



WASHINGTON, DC (Suburban 
Maryland). Former Princeton couple, 
approaching retirement, interested in 
trading residence, appro* S260.000 
value, tor centrally located Princeton 
residence approx S160.000 value Eight 
room, custom built, all electric, brick 
house with attached double garage is on 
wooded one plus acre tot six miles north 
of Gaithersburg Principals only 
Information call (301)977 0123 



evenings 



9 19 it 



SNOW REMOVAL residenti 
commercial Call (101)297 9300 



MOVINGT 

NEEDATRUCK' 
CALL HUB TRUCK RENTAL 

It RouteNo. I, Lawrenceville. N j 

Across from Lafayette Radio 

BB3-4400 



VACATION AT HILTON HEAD 
island. S.C. 2 bedroom condo, sleeps 
so Pool, tennis, walk to beach Many 
e«tras. S200 to S399 per week 609-924 
8315 



FILING CABINETSi Come and see our 
metal cabinets for office or home 

Grey, tan, olive, 2 or 4 drawer Also 
typing tables Hinkson's, 82 Nassau 

1 12 Tf 



HAHN 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTING 

609-466-1313 N.J. License N. 4411 

(Talent & Equipment 
Plus 

Reasonable Price) 

Equals 

SATISFIEDCUSTOMER 

Always a free written estimate 

for any siie electrical job 



WE BUY USED BOOKS all sublects, but 

pay better for literature, history, art, 
children's, theology, and philosophy 
Good condition a must. Call Mlcawber 
Books. 108 Nassau Street, Princeton 
921 8454 



ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Of Prince 
ton For immediate help with a 
drinking problem, call 609 924 7593 For 

information, write Princeton P O. Box 
538 Meetings every night In Princeton 
or surrounding area. 



ROOFING 

SHEETMETALWORK 

J.C. EISENMANN&CO 

All Types of Rooting 
(Including hot roofing) 
Free Estimates Given 
All Work Guaranteed 
466 1228 



.'RINCETON BORO: Walk 
^'everything from this super three 
. bedroom, 2W bath townhouse, Kitchen, 
dining room, living room with 
fireplace, family room and laundry 
plus two car garage and garden patloi 
Available Immediately. S)500 plus 
Utilities 609-934-8156. 9-26-3T 



WE RESEARCH FACTS, LOCATE 
publications, organize books, arrange 

files — and competently handle all 
kinds of Information and library 
related projects for business or In 
dividuals. Let an experienced research 
consultant freelance librarian save 
time while providing professional 
expertise Elaine S Friedman (609) 
9343793. 



THESIS AND MANUSCRIPT TYPING 

Dissertations 

Turablan, MLA, APA, Campbell 

Foreign language typing 

Including Greek 

Correcting Selectrlc II 

(14type styles) 

30 years experience 

GERALDINE DICICCO 

■M-0DM 



RENT A BACKHOE, bulldozer or brush 
chipper. 301-397-9301. Local Princeton. 



CLASSIC GUITAR LESSONS: Harold 
Morris, Concert Recording Artist, 
Student of Segovia, 26 years teacher, 
Horace Mann School. Sarah Lawrence 
College. Princeton Adult School, 
Teacher of Jose Feliclano, Author 
Schlrmer Books on Early Music and 
Other publications. (609)921 8660 9-13 6T 



WAS^S^^^^SSS^SMJSS* SSSSSWSSJ7& 



NOW RENTING 
PRINCETON ARMS! 

Luxury Apartments 
1 and 2 Bedrooms 

From $490 Per Month 

Features: 

Wall-to-Wall carpeting over 
concrete in 2nd floor apts. 
All utilities except Electric 
Individually controlled heat 
Two air conditioners 
Private entrance 
Walk-in closets 
Individual balconies 
Storage rooms within apt. 
Laundry Rooms 
Superintendent on site. 

Open Mon.-Fri. 
9 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 
Saturday, 9-1 p.m. 

609-448-4801 

i Rd . tu*fl HfW •" O* 1 



Peyton Associates • Realtors 

Princeton 609-921-1550 
Pennington 609-737-9550 




LEST WE DECEIVE YOU 



You'll probably never see this view, but it's the other side of the tirst house built at "The Glen." 
All of the houses at "The Glen" are much bigger than they look from the front. This deliberately 
understated approach leads to surprise and excitement when you get inside Come on over and 
have a look Prices start at $338,000 

"The Glen" is located just off Mountain Avenue near the Great Road in Princeton's western 
section. 



n 



PRINCETON 

343 Nassau Street 



PENNINGTON 
134 South Main Street 



tuC N.I Callaway" 

*»- -r+~ RPAI FQTATF V 



REAL ESTATE 



4 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08540 
921 1050 







m 



OLD ORCHARD LANE 

New Listing 

Contemporary townhouse in Princeton Township with many distinct differences. Only twelve 
units clustered on nine acres, with much of the land in wooded, open space, this townhouse has 
the advantage of being an end unit bordering a wooded area Just two years young, it offers 
spacious light-filled living areas, two bedrooms, 2Vi baths, finished basement, two car garage 
and numerous custom features $220,000 



FITTING 
REALTY 

New Hope. PA 
(215) 862-9122 



CREATIVE DRAPERIES 

Upholstering 
Slipcovers 

50 Louis St. 

New Brunswick 08901 

2018287144 



HOUSEMATE WANTCO to share 
c«ntraiiy located Princeton duplex with 
I current occupants JUS month plus 
utilities Availaoie Immediately Wl 
l?», flamuntil midnight Keeptryinfl 



FOR SALE: LatQt philoOendron plant 
WO New queen siie metal bed frame 
(never been used) 135 Black and 
Decker circular saw Call W< 6543 



SUPER THREE BEDROOM duplex 
Walking distance to town and campus 
1950 per month by owner Call Mr% 
WallackorMrs Marshall 911 1SSO 



DESIRABLE ROOM FOR RENT: Near 
campus Non smoker References For 
detaiis.calltt* *a* 



DID YOU KNOW? 

That We Clean Some of 
The Most Unusual Things? 




FRENCH DRY CLEANING 

TUIANE STREET PRINCETON, Hi OIMO 



NORTH LAWRENCE: Van Kirk Road 
ott Carter Road 9 rooms plus Vh bath 
home on i 19 acres lot with • Princeton 
address Fireplace, ? car parage, 
baseboard heating system and 
basement Sailers wanl an offer on this 
9 year old home Tremendous value but 
home needs tome work Asking 11 39,000 
and of le rs are encouraged For details, 
call Contl Realty and Mortgage 
Company Realtors, (609) Ml 4004 



PIANO LESSONS in your home 
Experienced. certified teacher 
Masters degree in performance Mrs 
Greenwood Call 931 169S 10 10 3t 



WEST WINDSOR unfurn t bdrm apt 
Windsor Mills immaculate condition 
eeautifui view Immediate occupancy 
1550 

LAWRENCE TWP unlurn 3 bdrm 
ranch convenient location 11000 per 

mo 

PRINCETON BOROUGH Western 
seel Two bdrm contemporary within 
walking distance erf Palmer Sq Very 
quiet dead end street Flexible term 
Furn or unlurn H5O0 

Stockton Real Estate 

n Chamber* Strastf 

Princeton, N.J. 

MMM-14IJ 



CARPENTRY 

BUI LDINO* REMODELING 



ROOMMATE WANTED Sunny. 

comloriabie room Clean, quiet street 
In Princeton Share kitchen and bath 
Ofl street parking (ISO month plus hell 
utilities One month security 609 934 
6099 evenings 



•FABRICS 

•DRAPERIES 

•SLIPCOVERS 

•FURNITURE 
REPAIRS 

DEWEY'S 

Upholstery Shop 

33 Station Drive 
Princeton Junction 

799-1778 



1*75 VW DASHER WAGON: ec, FM 
needs work Asking 1995 Can be seen at 
Hans Klmm Small Cars, South Brun 
swlek (5 mllos north ol Prlncaton 
Circle). 10 3 31 



HOUSE FOR RENT. Pennington 3 
bedroom ranch. 1 car garage, huge 
living room, leisure dining room, 
fireplace, kitchen, pantry, utility room, 
central air, quiet Microwave, dish 
wo*her, wood burning stove, automatic 
gsrage doors, rotary high gain TV 
antenna, walk In closet. Available 
November 1 Mi a month 1609) 737 
9676, (?») 960 7579 10 10 It 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

• Custom Decks 1 Additions 

• Basement, Garage a. Attic Con 

• versions 

• Rotted Wood Exterior Repair* 

• Interior Alterations 8, Repair* 

• Built InBookcasesd Cabinets 

No |Ob too large or small Excellent 
rates and service Excellent local 
references "It you want It done right" 
call Ron Volt. 453 0333 



1979 MUSTANG; 7 door sedan, sporty 
black, small gold stripe, low mileage, 
7 8 V A cylinder, automatic tran 
smisslon, power steering, power disc 
brakes. AM FM stereo, new tires Oays 
701 797 9515, evenings 609 934 5205 10 3 
It 



FLOOR SANDING. STAINING 
ftREFINISHING 



Hardwood Floors installed 



PRINCETON: Two bedroom apartment 
available Oct i 1650 plus utilities 931 
1043 ' ?« » 



BEST FLOOR CO 
934-4197 





(Cambribcu? 
^Isiatrs 



Classic Colonial Homes 

in Beautiful Montgomery Twp. 

By "Rick" Grosso 




ASK ABOUT OUR 

REAL EST ATE 

SCHOOL 



Weichert 

™ _^ . 7^^~...~r- ..rro/lon. ITAM OPAI TOR" 



ASH ABOUT OUR -^ 

EQUITY ADVANCE Q 

PROGRAM «=■ 



YOUR FULL SERVICE METROPOLITAN REALTOR 




PRINCETON TOWNSHIP - 3 bedroom. 2 bath ranch on Province Line Road 

Trees and quiet neighborhood. Call today "n« 5 °! 

PR-f.836 PrmcetonOff.ee 

609-921-1900 



Princeton Office 609-921-1900 
Offices Open 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 



Weichert 
Realtors 



84 Offices Throughout the 
Metropolitan Area 




Gloria Nilson 



Homeline 






OPEN HOUSE 

Sat. & Sun., October 8 & 9 - 1 pin - 4 pin 

MONTGOMERY'S NEWEST COMMUNITY of eleven 
quality-built elegant homes ideally located on full acre 
lots. Cambridge Estates is not only an outstanding place to 
live but an exceptional value for those who buy right now 
during the construction phase. Call our Belle Mead Office 
todav for more information on these distinctive homes. 
THREE HOUSES ARE READY NOW. Prices start at 
$189,900. 

Directions: Route 206 to Gnggstown Road, right on Harlmgen Road. 

JOHN! 



^HENDERSON 

REALTORS^-' 

Rout* Ml. 6.M. Maid. New J.- .. v 01502 

(201) 874-5191 



i\( 



INTEREST DOWN - COST UP 

Are you waiting until interest rates drop before you buy a home? Do you think 
that this will save you money? The home you have your eye on will cost you more 
in monthly payments two years from now • even if the interest rate drops one per- 
cent 

For example, take a home that costs $80,000. With a 20% down-payment and 
financed with a 25 year. 14% mortgage, the monthly payment would be $770.56. But 
two years from now, if the price rose at 8% per year, the now $80,000 home would 
likely cost $93,312. If the interest rate decreased to 13%, not only would the down 
payment be $2,662 more, but the monthly payment would increase to $842.05. If the 
interest rate stayed at 14% the payment would come to $898.79. 

So, it's obvious that the overall value of the home - not the interest rate - makes 
the biggest impact on your monthly payment. Since there is no indication of pro- 
perty values decreasing, the moral of the story is - Buy now or pay more later. 



Gloria 
Nilson 

REALTORS 

■ "ANY SIZE HOUSE & GARDEN UNDER THE SUN" — 

Serving Central New Jersey 

Call today lor your free brochure that sports a 

current listing of area homes, Community Capsules, 

Commuting Facts, School System Sizes and 

SAT Scores, and other pertinent data for 

Atlantic Highlands- Avon- Brielle-Colts Neck-Cranbury-Oeal 

East Windsor-Ealontown-Engiishtown-Fair Haven- Freehold 

Holmdei.Hopewell.Jackson.Law.ence.Li.tleS.lver.Manalapan.Marlboro.Matawan 

MiddleWwn (OaK Hill, L,ncrott).Monmo u th Beach.Montgomery.Pennington.Piarnstoro 

Princeton-Rumson-SeaGirt-Shrewsbury-Spring Lake-Tmton Falls-West 

Long Branch-West Windsor and more. 

Five Convenient Locations to Serve You: 



^- — ' 



230 Nassau Street 

Princeton 

(609) 921-2600 

31 West Main Street 

Holmdel 
(201)946-3200 



340 Route 35 

Middletown 

(201) 747-5600 



600 Route 35 

Shrewsbury 

(201)842-6009 

Route 9 & Craig Road 

Manaiapan 

(201) 536-8200 



• '.M.KCM.K kl '.( k. 
Virginia High Sascha Rizzo 

Ginger Lennon 
Ann Love 
Yota Switzgable 
Marlene Delviscio 



M ,K( ,k< ,K(,K( ,K« .Kl .&< ,KI iM .K( .K( ,KGK( .K( .KC .KGKGKGKGKGKt .K( .KGkGKGKC ,K(,KC .K( ,K( ,Kf ,KGKGKGKGkGk( .KGKl ,t. ; 



Joan Lechner 
Lee Spellman 
Lorraine Tarns 
Amelia Voorsanger 




JR. 



LOYELY ESTABLISHED NEIGHBORHOOD 
Western Section - privacy - mature plan- 
tings, shade trees, and yet very convenient 
to town. These are just the beginnings of the 
amenities this property has to offer. Foyer, 
living room with fireplace, dining room, 
large efficient kitchen, expanded panelled 
family room with fireplace, powder room, 
sunroom, plus a large sitting room master 
suite with fireplace complete the first floor. 
Three family bedrooms and two baths on 
the second floor, beautiful patio with barbe- 
que, and central air conditioning make this 
an ideal house for entertaining - three 
season sunroom. Realistically priced at 

$325,000 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP 
New colonial under construction. Two 
story, foyer, living room, large dining 
room, family room with beam ceiling, wet 
bar, and fireplace, country kitchen, 
bedroom and full bath on first floor. Master 
bedroom suite with whirlpool tub plus 2 ad- 
ditional bedrooms and bath. Amenities in- 
clude thermopane windows, Jennaire cook 
top, central air conditioning, and a treed lot. 

$310,000 




/" 



SUPERIOR LOCATION 
Large ranch house of California redwood on 
lovely secluded lot in Western Section. Pool 
in woodland setting. Large country kitchen 
with fireplace. Four bedrooms and two 
baths. Lower level has two bedrooms, for 
kids or in-laws. $299,000 

MOVE IN CONDITION 

Excellent neighborhood, heavily wooded lot 
on quiet street, yet most convenient to shop- 
ping and downtown Princeton. Foyer, living 
room, dining room, family room with cor- 
ner fireplace, children's playroom or 5th 
bedroom with *■> bath. Modern kitchen with 
built-in pantry, desk, and island cooking 
Center. Master bedroom with bath, plus a 
den/bedroom and second full bath on first 
foor. Two bedrooms and third bath on se- 
cond floor. Large storage space with ample 
room for a dormer and/or future expansion. 
Lower level has a playroom plus wine cellar 
an <l good workshop area. Central air condi- 
tioning. $229,000 




NEW LISTINGS OF THE WEEK 




Walk to schools and shopping. Living room, 
dining room, kitchen and porch on main 
level. Three bedrooms, and one and a half 
baths. Lower level has family room and 
laundry. Amenities include a half acre with 
mature plantings in Princeton and 



realistically priced at 



$150,000 
1 




Ranch house on one plus acre in Mon- 
tgomery Township. Living room with 
fireplace, dining room, eat-in country kit- 
chen, den, three bedrooms, two full baths, 
and a screened porch. There is a full base- 
ment and beautiful trees, in lovely country 
setting. $200,000 



HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 
A uniquely designed house/contemporary 
barn style with skylights, hand hewn 
beams, cathedral ceilings and deck. Foyer, 
living room with step down fireplace pit. 
library, dining room with built-ins, country 
kitchen, family room with wood burning 
stove, bedroom and full bath on main level. 
The skylighted upper level master suite has 
a study, dressing room, bath and sunken 
tub. A multi use lower level for guests and 
children consists of second living room with 
greenhouse, sitting room. 3 bedrooms, 2 
baths, darkroom and kitchen. This property 
is located on a ridge in Hopewell Township. 
Ideal for the artist or writer. Excellent 
owner financing to qualified buyer for quick 
sale. Owner transferred. $288,000 



Established retail business - excellent 
Nassau Street location. Gift shop, fabrics 
and jewelry. Call for particulars. 



RENTALS 

PRINCETON BOROUGH 

Two bedroom, two bath condo. Living/din- 
ing room. $1400/month 

MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP 

Kingsway Commons 2 story condo available 
Oct. 15th. Three bedrooms, 2' 2 baths. 

$900/ month 



5 Ser 4 e Rizzo Q.R.I., C.R.B. 
Licensed Real Estate Broker 
New Jerse> nd Pennsylvania 

Member Mercer County Multiple Listing Service 
Member Princeton Real Estate Group 




AN EXCELLENT BUY 
An Elm Ridge Park colonial on a heavily 
wooded lot - very private. Foyer, living 
room with fireplace, dining room, family 
room, step down study with built-in cabinets 
and shelves, powder room and eat-in kit- 
chen complete first floor. Master bedroom 
and bath plus three additional corner 
bedrooms and bath on second floor. Fully 
finished game room in lower level. Central- 
ly air conditioned, plus a brick patio. AN 
EXCELLENT BUY AT $239,500 



hii-imH ■ 



OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT 
Ideal office space - 711 sq. ft. 
$14 sq. ft. plus utilities 

EDGE OF PRINCETON 
Two story colonial townhouse condominium 
in Montgomery Township near Rocky Hill. 
Entry, living room, powder room with laun- 
dry, family room with wood-burning 
fireplace and sliding doors opening onto 
deck overlooking wooded area and stream. 
All electric kitchen with dining area. 
Upstairs there are two smaller bedrooms 
and very large master suite, two full baths, 
pull-down stairs to attic with very large 
storage space, electric heat pump and cen- 
tral air conditioning, attached utility shed. 

$130,000 




IMMACULATE COLONIAL 
In Montgomery Township bordered by a 
brook and close to golfing and other recrea- 
tional facilities. Foyer, living room with 
fireplace, dining room, extra large country 
kitchen, family room with fireplace, laun- 
dry room and powder room complete the 
first floor. Large master bedroom with bath 
plus four additional bedrooms and bath on 
second floor. Full basement, two porches 
and all in move-in condition. Realistically 
priced at $165,000 



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• HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES: Hoover 

Svacvum US. U" BW TV iBosnell S3S: 
IWs IBM electric typewriter I» Call 
— 4S 3tM lant'jMWWi:' (evening*) 
^ Ash tor Steve 



£ FOR RENT: Cha 

O 



bedroom 
icnt, combined living-dining 
room, country kitchen Wooded setting, 
biking distinct of Nasteu Street 

Woman only 1510 per month plui 
utilities Contact 931 6000. after 6. 934 
067 S- 



q double BED: Solid walnut frame, 
Ui used only in guest room and In excellent 
j condition SIM CallttJ-0771 



QUEST apartment: Quiet area. 5 
minutes to Princeton Separate Irom 
residence Kitchen, living bedroom, tile 
battt. Nicely furnished Available now 
for several months Suitable for 
business executive. Rem, 1600 In 
eluding utilities (609) 19* 1S6I 











Schwlnn 

New and Used Bicycles 

Salts, Service 

Parts and Repairs 




,EnTRe^ T ^ 




KOPP'S CYCLE 

o wimerspoon street 

W4-10JJ 


For the most in personal computing. 

47 State Rd. • (Route 206) Princeton • 609-683-4141 



1 



Designer Handbags...-, JT^^tei • fragrances 

I s, f\ d.sclnj ? IMPRESSIONS 

GALt¥Hi(EGS| \ OFPR-NCETON 

Mercer Ma" • Lawfenceville/ (Vg Nassau Street e921-1541^ 



PAVING AND LANDSCAPIHO 
SERVICE 

COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL 

Driveway Sealing 

Septic Systems & Bach Hoe Work 

Sod and Top Soil 

Pat lot 

FELIX v PIBONE 
CalitW m I7JJ 



IflJ HONDA ACCORO i door, 
automatic: a c. cruise, excellent con 
dltlon, vtry reliable Asking SB, 100 
Evenings after 6 pm, CA09> 7V 313? 



ATTRACTIVE OFFICE or study for 
sublet Short term, renewable lease 
Furnished, one parking space, center 
Princeton Borough, icned business 
References Telephone Mrs Gardner 
609974 1933 10 1011 



COTTAGE FOR RENT Princeton 
Township, 3 rooms, kitchen and bath, 
unfurnished S6B1 per month plus 
utilities. Lease Uta ot yard, pool and 
tennis court included Call (609) 934 
1475. 10 18 3) 



ORIENTAL RUGS Carpet and scatter 
slies from Iran, Turkey, etc Pile and 
lletweoves Large range of prices. 931 
0154 10 10 41, 



Find Your 
HALLOWEEN COSTUME 
atTHEOUTOROWNSHOP 
114 NASSAU ST., UPSTAIRS 



PRINCETON TELEPHONE 

ANSWERING SERVICE 

24 hours a day or business hours 

We can answer your phone, or 

you can receivecalli on our phone 

Mall service Office Space Beepers 

Answering telephones over IS years 

974-3040 



LANDSCAPINO 

by Martin Blackman 

Creative Designs 

Reasonable Rales 

Call evenings 301 674 317? 

(Local call from Princeton) 



PRINCE CHEVROLET 

TheAIINtwChtvrolet 

OK USEOCARS 

ROUTE 106 

974-33J0 

opp the airport 



JUILLIARD MA welcomes beginning 
piano and French horn students. SIB per 
hour Call Duncan, 734 0073evenlngs 9 



ST. MAARTEN VILLAS: Dutch Side, 3 
bedrooms, sleep* 6 easily Full kitchen, 
two baths, pool, beautiful view ol ocoan, 
Jacuul, tennis, fully equipped In 
eluding color TV Air fare S7B0 round 
trip. !?0I ) 439 3056 after Bpm 9 19 51 



TREE SPRAY, PRUNING, stump 
removal and liquid loading. Call Tree 
Cere, Inc 301 ?97 9300 Local Prln 
ctton. 9 I? flt 



SURICK'S ANTIQUES: Now reopened 
In Jimmy Hall's Auction Center Fine 
furniture and antiques 3640 Not 
fingham Way, Hamilton Square Open 
Weds through Sat. 890 8319 or 974 1143 

YARD SALE: Friday and Saturday, 
Oct 13 and 13 1? Falrvltw Avenue. 
Ponns Nock. West Windsor 9am to 4 
P m 



PRINCETON: Newly renovated 
apartments on Charlton Street 
overlooking Princeton University 
Lower apartment: kitchen, paneled 
living room, bedroom, bath, basement, 
washer Si dryer. SBS0 month plus 
utilities Upper apartment kitchen, 
living bedroom, bath, loft, washer & 

, dryer. 1750 month plus utilities 
Parking In rear Available im 
medlatoly 971 B6B7 or 799 6300 10 10 3t 



Peyton Associates • Realtors 

Princeton 609-921-1 550 
Pennington 609-737-9550 




MORE DREAMS 

This property is more of what dreams are made of than "honky tonk and gadgets." While it is 
true that the luxurious swimming pool has its own spa. this house will interest someone who 
loves character and charm and the uniqueness that comes from the evolution of an old house. 
There are lots of living rooms and lots of bedrooms, several fireplaces. There is even a two- 
bedroom rental or guest cottage All on 5Vi magnificent acres Offered in Hopewell Township 
at $465,000 



PRINCETON 

343 Nassau Street 



PENNINGTON 
134 South Main Street 




RICHARD A 




CORPORATION 

REALTORS 



WE COVER THE 

AREA, THE 

COUNTRY AND 

THEWORLDTO 

FIND YOU A HOME 




A BIT OF LOCAL HISTORY Authentic New Jersey colonial owned and oc- 
cupied by several generations of the same family since about 1865 Properly 
also includes a small apartment, three car garage, a small barn and 3 plus 
acres with views of rolling farmland Montgomery Twp Seller will provide a 
ONE YEAR HOME WARRANTY. I195.0O0 



£tT„V' S y NG " PH1 "> CE I° N Four bedroom multi-level on nicely landscaped 
lot Lou. of room inside and out Slate entry foyer, newly panelled den beautiful 
flagstone patio. A home with great potential ,, 59 ™ 



164 Nassau street WEIDEL • PRINCETON (609 

17 Offices • New Jersey • Pennsylvania tt— H_>™_* t _. - 

— — — _ ______ *^** Town and Country Specialists Since 1915 



♦* 






N.T. Callaway 

REM F^TATF J Cathy Googha 

CC3 I A I t Barbara Rose Hare 

m 



Judy McCaughan 
Wllla Slackpole 
Eleanor Young 
Charlotte McLaughlin 
Pat Cahlll 
Linda Hoff 
Ned Scudder 

n 



Mary Grasso 

Sarah Almgren 

Casey vonSeldeneck 

Steve Schragger, Comm. Oept 

Carrie Kaye 

Olanne Bleacher, Mgmt. Oept. 

Tim Foster, Comm. Dept. 

Pete Callaway, Broker 



4 NASSAU STREET PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08540 
921-1050 




PROVINCE LINE ROAD 

On three plus beautiful acres in the western Township, this interesting 
house has a choice of style description as well as room arrangement. 
Whether called a contemporary or a rambling one floor house, the nine 
rooms covering approximately 4400 square feet offer spacious living 
areas, including a step-down living room with fireplace and one full wall 
of windows, four bedrooms and four baths for a growing family. Or - liv- 
ing quarters for a smaller family and a separate apartment. Special 
features include panelling and siding of douglas fir, a healed greenhouse, 
circular driveway and extensive landscaping. $340,000 




STOCKTON STREET 

George Washington may not have slept here but he could have since the 
original house was built on the King's Highway in Princeton in 1765. 
Carefully restored, a wing has been added on each side preserving the 
classic lines of this traditional Colonial The center hall opens to the ter- 
race and garden with seclusion provided by the surrounding park Char- 
ming living room and library, both with antique mantels on the fireplaces, 
screened porch, formal dining room and children's room with large win- 
dows overlooking the garden, modern kitchen and powder room on first 
floor. Four delightful bedrooms with quaint stenciling. Laundry and two 
and one-half baths on second. $348,000 




BALCORT DRIVE 

So near - it's just a few minutes from town. So far - it enjoys the serenity 
of the countryside. This sparkling white colonial, big and beautiful, is 
perfect for a growing family. Inviting center hall with flagstone floor, 
powder room, gracious living room with fireplace, formal dining room, 
modern eat-in kitchen, den or office, family room with second fireplace 
opening to deck overlooking nature's landscaping of tall trees and 
boulders Four bedrooms and two baths on second floor Full basement 
and two car garage $290,000 

Princeton 

SOTHEBY 
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MUITIPIC LISTING SIRVICf 

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MAGNOLIA LANE 



This huge panelled room can appropriately be called a family room as it 
offers ample space for dining, dancing and many other family activities 
For summer enjoyment, a glass wall opens to a large terrace and a spec- 
tacular garden with a profusion of flowers. For winter enjoyment, a 
crackling fire in the massive brick fireplace will add to the pleasure from 
the view of the secluded garden. Living room with second fireplace, din- 
ing room, modern kitchen, screened porch, greenhouse, three bedrooms 
and two baths. $179,500 




CONSTITUTION HILL 



Once a large Princeton estate with the master house appropriately called 
the Morgan Mansion Now the Mansion retains its elegance but is sharing 
its gracious rooms, formal gardens and spacious grounds with a limited 
number of fortunate people. Handsome one, two and three bedroom 
brick houses with garages are available with flexible floor plans, con- 
dominium ownership. From $258,000 




WEST SHORE DRIVE 



A gentle hill overlooking sweeping lawns with evergreens and specimen 
trees providing seclusion is a location befitting this exceptional one floor 
house. Long, low and lovely the soft tones of the roof and shutters blend 
with those of the brick construction. The inviting foyer with its cove ceil- 
ing gives promise of the attractive rooms which offer pleasant living with 
the touch of luxury Gracious living room with fireplace, formal dining 
room, modern kitchen with brick enclosed cooking units with dining area, 
spacious family room with fireplace, four plus bedrooms, 2Vi baths. 

$315,000 



Area Representative 

P \RKE BERNET 
REALTY CORPORATION 



FREE PARKING BEHIND BUILIHNG 



• CANOE. 16' aluminum Low« with »c 

S^*sscnes UWO four times 1300 M*ni 
_ Setrwirtn ID *OM<d birvcltv 70" frame 
10 3 It 



■ GREATER PRINCETON SINGLES 

j Community, our (irst monthly meeting 

) was a great success! Join other smgie 

- professional and business people al our 
* nexl monthly meeting Holiday inn. Rf 
' I, Princeton Sunday. October 14, 58 

- pm SS with cash bar Program and 
j social hour Join active programs in 
j tneater, sports discussion, support. 
j bi-'dge and book groups, play readings. 
E trivial pursuit Call (609> 97* 9*03. 43a 

\ ooio io 3 ;t 



HELPWANTEO 

PART TIME 

we need someone to help out on Wed 
nesday from 9 30a m to approximately 
130 pm Mainly assisting with 
unloading newspapers tno addressing 
and preparing papers for mailing Some 
heavy lifting involved and some light 
cleaning After? X. 3 bundles of papers 
have to be delivered to nearby apart 
ments (appro* I hour) Carhelptul 



PRINCETON AREA Custom designed, 
owner built 1800 sq It., 1 story 
executive type home on I acre lot with 
underground utilities including large 
Vermont slate loyer Living room, 
dining room, complete modern kitchen 
with snack bar, adjacent to IS' family 
room, i bedrooms 1'? deluxe 
bathrooms, cable ready TV and 
telephone, extra closets and attic 
Space, lull basement, 1st floor laundry, 
oversned 1 car garage Many extras 
including bum -n vac ana stereo 
system, a c Brokers iriting |ust ex 
plred Reduced to 1185.000 Cell 409 97* 
8544 10 3 31 



CHELSEA CRIMPERS 
14 Spring Street, Princeton. N J 

<*w> m-ic* 

Tues iThurs 9( 

Wed & Fr, -it 

Sat 9 4 30 

distinctive hairstyling 
for men and women 



i Halloween Make-uoj 
f and Party Goods i 

J JORDAN'S GIFT SHOP/, 
i Gifts • Cards • Candy { 
/ Princeton Shopping Canter '$ 
{ 924^161 ff 



L .....-■--..;-■ 



beckandcall 

the ossistance group of princeton 
call (609) 924-7651 



TOWN TOPICS 
914-1300 



FIREWOOD 101 197. im 



CELLO PAESOLD half sue IW Ger 
man. new <n 1974). excellent condition 
and unusually fine tone, includes 
Schroeder Brain wood bow and soil 
case List prices for cello and bow S950 
and Sl4i respectively i will sell both lor 
S500 Call 451 4917 days or BS1 3396 
evenings 10-3 31 



PRINCETON HOUSE FOR RENT ■ 
bedrooms, 1 baths duplex on wither 

spoon Street Walking distance to ROOM FOR RENT Central Nassau 

University S570 plus utilities Lease Street, on busline Low rent Singles 

required Available Immediately (409) couples students okay Free utilities 

931 I7l3aftcr6pm 10 3 31 Large.bright i609i 934 1040 9 5 3t 



REVERIELANOSCAPING 

RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL 

Lawns established, renovated Fencing 
Trees and Shrubs planted * trimmed 
R R.Tiework Patios 

Total Landscaping Service 



Hahn Electrical Contracting 

Have an electrical engineer 
solve your electrical needs 



Industrial/Commercial 

. ■ ' Tince 

■ ■ 

design 



Residential 

• Complete Wiring Service 

easod ipa i\ 

• AddmonaiOui'ev- 



Princeton/Skillman 609-466-1313 



\* 






Adlerman, Click & Co. 




For All Area Listings 

Realtors" and Insurors 

(609)924-0401 i:,>, ,>., , VJ (609)586-1020 

Members Princeton Real Estate Group, Multiple Listing Service World Wide Relocation Service 



OUR COMPETENT STAFF CAN SHOW YOU EVERY and ANY PROPERTY IN THE AREA 



Joan Alpert 
Dan Faccini 
Milton Sadovsky 
Esther Pogrebm 
Roger Craig 
Joan LoPrinzi 



Edyce Rosenthale 
Elaine Haiberstadt 
Edna Arons 
Alice Ufland 
Nanette Craig 
Joseph LoPrinzi 




BUSINESS. OFFICE OR RESIDENTIAL ■ PRINCETON BOROI 2-3 story 
dwelling oonilatfng of 4 B/R'i, l ! bathi (may '■"'•ilv be expanded to 2). very large 
room* downstairs, plus a modern en I -In- kite hen w/ washer, refrigerator & stove all in 
excellent condition. Many spacious ( Insets plus room for expansion. Full clean base- 
ment. Room for 6 plus cars. $229,900 
BASK IN LUXURY! If you like to entertain In style, but have too many respon- 
sibilities to be bothered with maintenance chores, this Is for you. We urge you to look 
at this elegant 3 B/R Townhouse with Its large open dining and living room, spacious 
family room, ultra kltrhen. central air. deck, basement. & closets galore! Pool and 
tennis facilities are but steps away Best of all the price of this like-new Forrestal 
Townhouse is only $142 500 

EWING TOWNSHIP I *< .<ll.ni itarter home priced to sell! Beautifully maintained 
3 B/R Cape with I uatom built large deck in park-like yard ■ new kitchen - on quiet. 
well maintained street. $66,500 

DETACHED RANCH - ROOSEVEL 1"- 3 or 4 B R home on i acre. Living room 
u raised hearth fireplace, modernized kin hen w lg, eat-in area. 1% baths, laundry 
room. $72,900 

ROOSEVELI -2 or 3 B/R home on # arte lot backing up to Green A. res I.R. D, R 
large eat-in kitchen, 2 full baths, central air. lovely parquet and ceramic tile floon 
Also, there is a separate home studio with kitchenette and bath Ideal for u ru.r .it mm 




3 B/R CAPE on W acre treed lot in Franklin Twp.. Princeton address. A-l condition - 
must be seen to be appreciated!! $89, 900 

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP - 2 FAMILY HOME on 1 plus acre. 1st floor has 
LVR. sun parlor. 2 B/R's. bath & large eat-in kitchen. 2nd fl. has L/K. Den or B/R. 
family B/i t & full bath. Outside is a 48' x 28" garage and shop. $87,500 




12 PLUS/MINUS ACRES • Hopewell Township. 



$82,000 
JUST LISTED -83 plus , ., inns .mi. s Millstone Township $4,200 turr 

8 PLUS ACRE LOT- Millstone Township. $55,000 

MAY WE SHOW YOU why this 1 ' I acres on Route One Is a best buy? Only 

J250.000 
15.2 ACRES with 3 B/R House - Zoned R-3. West Windsor Township - Princeton 
address. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ■ Montgomery Township. Princeton Address High 
traffic area. Colonial home with apartment. ° rooms. 4 B/R'a In main home pins 1 
B/R apartment. Approximately 1 acre - all utilities. 5350,000 

INDUSTRIAL ■ 23 ACRES NEAR EXIT 8 N.J. TPKE. mldwav NY & Phlla. All 
utilities. Warehouses & other buildings. Priced right to close eatatel 

5 PLUS ACRES ZONED COMMERCIAL on Route 27 across from The Market 
Place. Perfect for shopping center, bank, restaurant, or professional offices. Call for 
details. 

MINI SHOPPING CENTER IN HAMILTON Less than 2 years old. this center 
contains 3 stores of approximately 1.100 sq. ft. each. Tenants pay own utilities, tn 
eluding water & sewer. Approximately 3.000 people within 1 mile radius (apartment 
complex.) Owner will consider financing to qualified buyer. $395,000 

GREAT OrPORTUNITYI Thriving meat market and dell in Hlghtstoun shopping 
center. Owners retiring and are willing to sell business and equipment. Ideal location 
and totally set up for new owner Don't miss this opportunity! $90,000 

SMALL BUSINESS FOR SALE - $25.000 00. Owner selling dressmaking and 
alteration business including 3 sewing machines. 2 counters, several racks. Central 
location in Princeton. 



blnation of charming 250 year old 5 room home in apple pie condition and a retail 
■tore plus large work buildings. Yesterday's charm, todays amenities 

COMMERCIAL AND LAND 

SITE FOR DISTRIBUTION CENTER - Zoned General Commercial ■ Exit 8 of N J 

Turnpike. 

WEST WINDSOR ACREAGE - 48 plus minus acres • just listed. Excellent location. 

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL USE with Invisibility make this a unique of- 
Kring. Just over the Princeton line in Historic Kingston. 

BUSINESS FOR SALE - PRINCETON RESTAURANT - Super opportunity for 
experienced person. Newly decorated: seats 80: pnme location. Sorry no phone In- 
formation- call for appointment. Price - * 75 qqq 

RENTALS 

HICHTSTOWN ■ 2nd floor space in center ol town. 1 .460 sq. ft. $ 790.80/mo. 

WINDSOR MILL CONDO- 2 BR's. s/i?n/™ 1 

aoDU/mo. plus utll. 



* SPECIAL OhhtH TO CLOSE OUT SECTION /" 

MILLSTONE HEIGHTS 

New Custom Home Develnnm.n. 

2 VERY SPACIOUS MODELS OnIy^TS LEFT 

From $134 900 

FOR A LIMITED TIME. FIREPLACE IN FAMII V nn™ 
INCLUDED AT NO ADDmONALcSsT 
30 YEAR CONVENT.ONAL MORTGAGE Xo^O.NTS 
to qualified buyer. «"«■* 

Treed 1 acre to 4 acre lots ,„ lovely country senm, h M1Ustone Twp 

MODEL PHONE (201) 446-1990 
OFFICE PHONE fino off .Alffi 



/' 



PHILIP PLUMBING 
SERVICE 

Once a Customei 

Always a Fn 

609-443-3345 



FULLER BRUSHES 

BEN. D. MARUCA 

175 Redwood Ave 

Tel 888-1254 
Trenlon. N J 08610 



Are You Selling? Are You Insuring? 
Furniture •China • Glass ' 
Art Objects • Silver • Jewelry 



Lester 

AND 

Robert 



SIM 



Attend 
Auctions 



AUCTIONEER 

Antique Dealer.* Appraiser 

777 W. State St. 393-4848 Trenton, N.J. 



^S 



[ JOHN HOUGHTON 



REALTOR 




CHARMING CAPE COD located on 
Dorann Ave. in Princeton Twp. Living 
room - Dining room combination, kit- 
chen, 4 bedrooms, 1' 2 baths, 1 car 
garage, 70 x 150 lot. A desirable home in a 
convenient location. $138,500 




THIS CUSTOM BUILT HOME is located 
in West Windsor Twp. It features a living 
room with fireplace, separate dining 
room with corner cupboards, fully equip- 
ped kitchen with large adjoining enclosed 
porch with brick hearth, pine panelled 
family room with wet bar and fireplace, 
3-4 bedrooms, 2' 2 baths. An ideal home 
for the active family. $150,000 

OFFICE SPACE - Prime location on 
•fV9«£au Street, Princeton. 2000 sq. ft. or 
991 sq. ft. One suite divided into offices 
2nd area large work area and enclosed 
area. $14.50 per sq. ft. plusutil. 

John H. Houghton, Licensed Real Estate Brcjk.-r 

228 Alexander Slreel iSou'.h Entrance' 

Princeton. New Jersey 08540 



LB 



[609)924-1001 

AMPLE FREE PARKING 



TOWN TOPICS 
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 

$3.00 for 25 words, per in- 
sertion, 5 cents for each ad- 
ditional word. Box number 
ads 50 cents extra. Pay- 
ment of ad within six days 
after publication saves 50 
cents billing charge. 

Cancellations must be 
made by 5 p.m. Monday: 
reorders by 5 p.m. Tues- 
day, the week of publica- 
tion. 

Ads may be called in, 
924-2200, mailed to P.O. 
Box 664, Princeton, or 
brought to the Town Topics 
office, 4 Mercer Street, 




DESK FOR SALE: Large, sturdy, wood 
with Two drawers Best offer (409) 896 
9379, 



DANCE TICKETS Paul Taylor at 
AAcCarter Want to exchange two on 
Nov 20 lor two on Nov 19 Seats wv. 
Wit 466 2057 after S 



FOR SALE: Whirlpool portable washer. 
$85, 4x7 mirror $125, large Quantity 
half paneling, $20 tweed Haitian cotton 
double spread, SS0, 20 shutters with 
matching Inserts, S25 443 3384 



STEREO SYSTEM FOR SALE: Nlkho 
receiver, 8SR turntable, Studio Design 
speakers lall 3 5 years Old) Call 452 
31B4 (days), 9217127 (evenings) Ask 
tor Steve 



GARAGE SALE: Saturday and Sunday. 
October 13 14, 9 to 5 24 Hawthorne 
Avenue, Princeton Furniture, (sec 
tional sota, dropleaf and occasional 
tables, chairs, desk, bunk bed set. 
maple chests and night stands, war 
drobel Lawn furniture, power mower, 
edger, garden toots, sewing machine, | 
kitchen stuff, linens, collectibles. 



GARAGE SALE: Bargains, bargains, 
bargains! Prices very low tor quick 
sale 174 Independence Drive. Pnn 
ceton. Saturday and Sunday, October 13 
and 14, 9am to 4 pm. 



PRINCETON DUPLEX for rent 3 
bedrooms, living room, dining room, 1 
kitchen Close to Nassau Street 609 924 
B034. 10 10 21 



BRAND NEW DURBIN racQuet tor sale 
Gut strings $120 Call Barnaby after B 
pm 896 3843 10-10 2t 



'84 SAAB TURBO, 3 door, 5 speed 
cruise. 3,850 miles. 8 months factory 
warranty. SI 4. 500 '82 VW Sclrocco, air, 
32,000 miles, 5 year extended warranty, 
S7.250. (201)249 9785. 10 10-31 



RUMMAGE SALE 

Princeton United Melhodist Chui 
Nassau 8. vandeventer, Thurs. Oct 25, 9 
5, Fri Oct 26, 9 3 After noon on Fi 
Clothing St a bag, others 'j price. 



plainsboro Remodeled, spacious, 
one bedroom apartment Washer 
dryer No pets children Available Nov. 
15 799 7789 evenings 10 3 2t 



FOR SALE: Sola bed. queen size, 
leather like rust colored fabric Fits 
any decor Less than year old S250 Call 
921 2726 10 3 2t 



ANTIQUE WIDE FLOORING- Rare 
"pumpkin pine" boards, beautiful 
grain, long lengths and wide widths (up 
to IS ■ j (201)647 3885 10 1 3t 



housESitting position wanted byl 
responsible woman visiting Professor,' 
February lo mid June, 1985, Must be. 
near Princeton campus Call (609) 924 I 
7653 10 3 31 



FOR RENT. PRINCETON: Furnished 
Western Borough duplex, one half block 
to town November 1st to January 31st 
II5O0 monthly Call Glnne 9210023 or 
924 0322 10-3-21 



19 FOOT WESTINGHOUSE frost free. 
SI75 GE portable pot scrubber dish 
washer, 1125 924 8496 after 5 10 3 7t 



ATTENTION FUND RAISERS and 
housewives: Save time, money and 
energy with Super Cleaning Cloth A 
wonderful easy off cloth can make 
cleaning much easier Call Angela 609 
924 2336. 4 10 pm 10 3 2t 



1967 BEECH QUEEN AIR for sale Good 
corporate aircraft Thorough June 
annual, radar, two PNIOl's and Sperry 
Compass systems, 8 seats, refreshment 
cenfer 559,000 609 921 3W7 10331 



AFGHAN HOUND PUPS Superb 
temperament, championship stock but 
reasonably priced, AKC reg Phone 
I70D647 3845 10 3 31 




57 SYCAMORE LANE, 
MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP 



3 

Z 




This one-of-a-kind IVi story Dutch Colonial on wooded lot in prestigious 
neighborhood - minutes from Princeton and shopping - offering 5 bedrooms, 
4' 2 baths, 16 x 22 family room w/fircplace, formal dining room. This most ver- 
satile home planned for family living and gracious entertaining offers an extra 
bonus - fully finished lower level ideal for in-laws or au pair 
DON'T MISS THIS ONE! Offered at $205,000 




NEW IN MONTGOMERY 

WILLIAMSBURG ESTATES Charming home on 1 # acre offering spacious 
family room w/fireplace, 4 bedrooms, (master bedroom with Jacuzzi) 2' 2 
baths, formal living room and dining room, 2 car garage. ..still time to pick your 
colors. CALL TODAY AT201-874-5191 Offered for $159,900 




CATSKILL COURT IN MONTGOMERY 



MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP : A four bedroom colonial, well located on a cul de 
sac, excellent floor plan for family living, cozy family room with fireplace, sun- 
porch with thermopane windows and adjoining deck. Good Value. $163,900 




SUPER CONTEMPORARY 

SUPER PRICE 

GREAT COMMUTING! 

OWNER SAYS SELL! Where can you find over 3,000 square feet of modern liv- 
ing space on a beautiful wooded lot for less than $200,000'' HERE IT IS. On Old 
Georgetown Road, with a Princeton mailing address too! A fabulous floor plan, 
a delightful master bedroom suite with deck and balcony on the second floor 
Flexible first floor rooms can be used for bedrooms, office, etc Deluxe 
bathrooms, two story fireplace in living room, lots of closets, huge basement. 

NOW $187,500 



JII1IN I 



CHENDERgON 



/v 



REALTORS 



BELLE MEAD 

Route 206. Belle Mead. NJ 08502 



(20118-4-5191 



GOVERNMENT JOBS: Thousand* Of 

- "ust o* filled immediately 

. .11 716 8»J TWO, Ext, 



PART TIME CASHIER: Tuesday, 

1 Tbur*oay «nfl PfO*V. J to « pw. 

'pro 6 or I too c*n mosjo 

for information 



Employment Opportunities 
in the Princeton Area 



PREP COOKS COOKS: part •■me ans 
lull t.me Pos<tionj avtacie (or e* 
pereneed o*»P tooMi or anyone In 
teresied in food and eager to i*a'^ 
Apply a' Greenime. 179 Nasseu Street, 
before 1 1 a m or atfer ip m 



SEEKING HOUSEKEEPER on Friday 
8 hour day SSO Pr.nceton °i«3se cat 
*0e 466 1038 on Tnurvjay October 11 
oerween 8 ant) 1 pm 



PART OR PULL TIME PAINTER 
Flexible scheOuie Require neat ar»o 
• •a* wo'i habits honesty ano 
reliability E«cetipnt ca* for rIo.nl 

person Wi 47 JO evenings 



ELDERLY GENTLEMAN, i.ving alone, 
wants houseboid personal assistant 
eiltter as live in single or married 
couple or as live away single person 
with ftours negotiable Conveniently 
located, room and bath tor live m in 
other case, duties cover ordinary 
livmg assistance Transportation. 
shopping and errands, preparing 
simple dinners, trash disposal and 
laundry Some help as needed for 
bandages and prescribed therapy, LADY 
winter clothing, etc Reply to Bo* V 46. 
c o Town Topics with your 
qualifications and experience giving 
your address and telephone number 10 

3-at 



BOOKKEEPfNG HELP 4toShour%per 
MflK posting charges, receivables, 
sending statements Presently non 
computer ollice Telephone days W4 
9340 



PART TIME POSITION mime specially 
shop Experience desirable Call lor 
appointment « 1-6059 10 10 fl 



DENTAL ASSISTANT Competent, 
mature, car ng. experienced Excellent 
opportunity bene!* program, no 
evenings, salary open Please call 974 
1861 



CHILD CARE WANTED for infant son 
while we work Preferably in our home 

Monday through Friday, 8 5 Must be 
slightly flexible References required 
Salary negotiable Can 93 1 861* 10 10 Jt 



PHYSICAL EOUCATION I 

STRUCTOR Pr.nceton YWCA, 10 — 

PE degree flSS | STAN T bookkeeper: 



PART TIME SALES arid -linage men! FRENCH INSTRUCTOR .villlng to work 
position .-.'■■■ ' T *° at ^ (f . . . . .. , 

terioons a week ano seme Saturdays v a» r o Tow.i Topics '0 3 2t | 

60S 911 27SS 



Tie to Barbara Daun 
Princeton YWCA, Paul Robeson Place, 

Pnrxeton. UJ ttSao 103 31 



Flexible hours, central Prm 
ceton Old firm, good job 924 304C 1C 1 J 



, 

CASHIER NEEDED Monday through j 

Frioay ii 'o 5 Apply at Greentine i 
Diner I7» Nassau Street before il .im 

or alter 2 pm 10 3 31 ' 



WANTED: Preler retired 



railroad station 799 0450 



10 10 21 



• GERMAN TECHNICAL THAN 
) SLATOR: Freelance, part lime Reply 
> to Box V 45, c o Town Topics 10 3 71 



business or executive type person 

Socially inclined, sophisticated, to act KITCHEN HELP: II am lo 3 pm shift 
as representative to Racehorse Princeton Junction location, near 
Manager Light paper worn from ner 
own home Please reply giving family 
status end telephone number to 
Manager, Rainbow Farm, Medlord, act NOW: Bright, aggressive goal 
New Jersey 0805S 10 10 3t oriented person required for non profit 

_^__^^^^^^_^^_^^^_^^^_ fund raising Excellent commission and 
evening hours Call Martin Hiison, 451 
3616, 10 10 21 



HELPWANTED 



PARTTIME 



REAL ESTATE MANAGER Gloria 
Nllson Realtors Is opening several 
offices mine Princeton area if you ere 
Interested in a challenging and 
rewarding career with one of New 
jersey's llneit residential real estate 
brokers, contact Mr Klot for con 
lldential interview (609)921 2600 10 10 



We need someone fo help out on wed 

nesday Irom 9 30 am to approximately 

7 30pm Mainly assist Ing with unloading 

newspapers and addrosslng and 

preparing papers for mailing Some HEALTH CARE IN HOME 

heavy lilting involved and some light 

cleaning. Alter 2 30, 3 bundles ol papers 

have to be delivered to nearby apart 

menls (appro* I hour) Car helpful 



Monday 

ugh Fridays lor elderly woman 

invalid Training, experience and 

relerences required W4-0J7J after 



PART TIME, RESPONSIBLE persons 
needed to be "on call" for challenging 
diversified work, to include typing, 
deliveries In your area Call 800 872 
4960 



WAITRESS WAITER: II am to 3 pm 
shut Princeton Junction location, near 
railroad station 799 0450 10)0 71 



TfiWN ri.l-ir '. 



FULL TIME LIQUOR STORE Wine 
knowledge necessary Tuesday through 
Saturday wllh some nights Involved 
Call 799 O530lor Information 10 1 7f 



U & Postal Service 
'.!■■ ri Ml NT 01 i <WHI RSHIP 

MANAdlMf NT AND ' IHf in '. DON 

. i riy 39 USC 308SJ 
Narno ol Publl 

PubliC-nlier, NO I'l'il "'M. 
Dalo of Filing W7TIM 



SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR: Per 

manent, part lime, days, evenings, 
small Nassau Street office 924 2040 



10 3 21 CLERK, EXPERIENCED, for diver 
sified office duties Good typing skills, 
knowledge of and Interest In figures, 
tiling and simple bookkeeping required 
Civil Service position Must be self 
starter and capable of working In 
dependently Local resident preferred 
3 month probationary period Good 
salary and benefits Call (809) 924 3448 
lor appointment Equal Opportunity 
Employer 10 3 2t 



■ ■ ■ .■ 

P •Ion r. 

'. ■ ■ 
Publlahai mi: 

I Blu I 

NJ 08541 m 

Men di ■■ 

Stuart, in 13 P* 
Ni OB! 41 I ' 
Avonue Dobba 
Coy lo land* ( 



I •"" 



Mi,.,.' . 
.' .111.' 



„,,, WAITERS WAITRESSES for 



Ihlff Call Rober1osW4 9640 



flatting Aooraai ol 

I'Mjll illlol I rl 

■ Road i 1 "'" "i"" 



WANTED: Adults, ages 40 to 65. to take 
part in experiment on normal memory 
functioning Earn S7 50 plus tran 
Sportatlon costs Please phone 452 4474 
day or evening for inlormatlon 10 3 21 



i Iffl III A 111 41 



14 ,"'-1 i 
N'ii pvei 



ritfH) r,| nl . 






roil! 



n. ■ 
14 400 
Actual ni. copion of Single lisua Published 

A li-iiii N [....■ !■! n fold I i 

lion 1 Salai ihromi' 

lltMl -I".. in-'. .I'll! || .11.- I ■:■•!. 

■ . . . 

.'Ml I' I I".ImI>i I'v mini . iiirmi m 

olher means, uampioi i ompiin • 

■ 

. 

'■1 '.| ,1 .lllr 1 H] 

■■'■ -' M"l I ■ V .I',."- ■ 

■.I 

Ibovg no . o i find pleli i ■"■ ultl 

l '■ 1,111 



LAB ASSISTANT 
PSYCHOLOGY 



Lab Assisioni duties roquli 
Degroe in Science Some etpenenco in 
human o> pen menial pay Otology holplui 
Pimiliirlty wltn data uwlytli ianova. 

) iinOVor programming oupailenco Ol 
knowlfdfl Ipful Full lima position 

OVOlloblO lOf oppiinirimliilv 1 Vim' 

■ 

Mil in inn PR1NI l TON UNIVERSITY, 
PGRSONNEI 8EHVH E8 CUO mam 
. PRINCETON, N J 0B544 

i . ii AAI 



CASHIER : Full time, with knowledge ol 
accounts receivable Also mailing list 
Monday fhrough Saturday, 9 to 5 wllh 
day oil during the week Call 799 0530 
lor inlormatlon ' n 3 3 ' 



Bamberger's Quakerbridge 
Has A FASHION STORY To Tell 

That Could Mean An Exciting 
Career Opportunity For You... 

II you enjoy fashion, have a flair for pulling looks together, and most important- 
ly, would enjoy helping others select the right wardrobe for a certain lifestyle, 
join us for a FASHION CAREER NIGHT, at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday. Oct. 1 6. at the 
Restaurant in our Quakerbridge Store 

Our store line and divisional executives will be on hand to preview the most re- 
cent FASHION LOOKS from Better Sportswear, Dresses, Shoes, and Ac- 
cessories. In addition, the many new career opportunities in fashion consulting 
and personalized sales will be presented. 

Our QUAKERBRIDGE store has become a FASHION GALLERY with contem- 
porary and classic looks from Clubhouse. Pacesetter, and Signature looks for 
the woman who wants to make a distinct fashion statement or sample the best 
of designers like ANNE KLEIN, RALPH LAUREN, and CALVIN KLEIN. 
With so much to choose from and accessorize, our fashion forward customers 
would welcome expertise and personal assistance from somebody like you. 
If you currently work in a fashion or sales capacity, and are looking for a new 
challenge in an exciting environment, or if you have the right fashion instincts, 
and would love the chance to turn your talents into a successful career, then 
call NOW 609-799-8000, ext. 21 3 or 243, to reserve a place for you at our 
fashion career night. We are an equal opportunity employer M/F. 



bembetyx/ 



PRINCETON 

REGIONAL SCHOOLS 

Seeks 

HOMt BOUND 
INSTRUCTORS 

To provide Instruction a 
needs arise, at students homo 
tor students temporarily unablo 
lo attend school Applicants 
must be certified In N J 
Especially needed ate people 
certified In: 

MATH, SCIENCE 

<esp CHEMISTRY AND 

PHYSICS), SPECIAL EDUC, 

and FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

(FRENCH. SPANISH and 

ITALIAN) 

Contacf Sfudenf Services 
Office for application form 

PRINCETON 

REGIONAL SCHOOLS 

25 Valley Road 

Prlncaton. N.J. 08540 

(6091 924-5600. axl. 225 

Equal Op Attirmatn* Action fmetoy.r 



PART TIME 

SECRETARY 

AFTERNOON SCHEDULE 
MONDAY TO FRIDAY 

HosponjHbilltles include rvai 

niNfjiiiy Willor in typing i oporto, cor 

rcspondonc i« Itl A i'i 

houm por woe* 

■ ' >n UNIVERSI 

PI i PRINl f rON U i 08544 PtoBH 



OFFICE 
ASSISTANT 

Development Office 



■ ■ i . ■. . . 

foundation rattan 

■ ■ 
gests Improvement* in foundation inlor- 
mallon iouich and ntpo 
Prepaid* and updaltt sophlilicatsd 
'•■Mich rtpcii. using • numb* of 
■•'""j BH 'il'i.in "vii.>i 
nowapapon and business publications 

E»f*li»nl communication *nd m riling 
•Kills, oignnlfalionai aN'K i 
with dtfidllnoi under minimum tupafvi- 
won. dutiotion in handling tsnailtva and 
'"I malum all required 
Oomonalraied typing skills reQuired 

Please appfy ai PWNCETCW UWVEB& 

. . i 

Plgu I 



Looking for a Career? 

Do you sometimes feel thai your ambitions are undirected 7 
Professional assistance can be helpful This office provides a 
counseling service mat includes 

• Testing of interests and aptitudes 

■ Realistic information on 600 careers 

• Personal Counseling 

• Resume preparation 

For more information, call 921-8638 
Anna Willingham, MA., M.S.W 

20 Nassau Street, Princeton 











i 



FROM HENDERSON...THE LISTING PEOPLE! 




ELM RIDGE PARK, WE LOVE YOU! 

Such a super neighborhood lots of play areas, lots of wonderful neighbors, 
great schools, pretty streets private yards ..and now a wonderful resale op- 
portunity for some lucky famUy! A spacious colonial beautifully decorated with 
all the amenities one would expect PLUS a deck overlooking the little brook Ut- 
terly charming. Please call Angie Clancy for all the details. Asking: $310,000 




LIKE TO GET YOUR HANDS DIRTY? 

NINETY ONE ACRES with a typical New Jersey farm house ... lots of 

pastures, two barns, dog kennel, orchards and then some! All close to major 
roadways ... perfect for access to horse shows or farm markets' Get back to 
your roots with this marvelous property. $215,000 




A VERY SPECIAL HOUSE 
AT A VERY SPECIAL PRICE! 

Hard to find such a super situation in Princeton these days! Here is a perfect 
house for two or more generations to share ... three levels of privacy and every 
gracious amenity All on one of the area's most beautiful lots almost four 
acres with trees and brook AND JUST a short jog to Palmer Square! Please 
hurry to see this before next week's Open House. $285,000 





THE SUNRISE TAVERN IS NOW 
STONE RIDGE FARM! 

This is everyone's dream listing ... a stone house dating from 1792 with a new 
clapboard wing that brought modern baths, an unbelievably beautiful country 
kitchen, formal living room with fireplace and total family living to complete 
this idyllic picture. A five-stall, three-story barn, studio rooms, fenced 
pastures, inground pool all on 25 acres with the most spectacular view of the 
Amwell Valley anywhere! (Hopewell, N.J. address) Please call Peggy Hender- 
son for the details (There's more land, too, if you'd like it.) 




SHEER PERFECTION IN CRANBURY! 



Four years old - quality construction custom colonial ranch house available for 
the first time This IMMACULATE house offers three bedrooms, two and one- 
half batJis, family room with fireplace, tiled foyer, wall-to-wall carpeting, 
random-pegged floor in the dining room, marvelous kitchen, two patios and 
lovely lot. A MUST SEE $245,000 




NO MORE AN UGLY DUCKLING! 



Yes., thanks to the charm and flair of its European owner, this brick and frame 
contemporary has been transformed into a very beautiful swan! Cool colors, 
sleek lines, lush carpeting, handsome floors, and attractive windows highlight 
the easy floor plan. 3/4 bedrooms, 3Vi baths, living/dining room with built-in 
bookcase wall unit, step-down, richly panelled family room with brick 
fireplace, kitchen with breakfast room, and loads of storage! Central air. two- 
car garage, basement, brick patio and the prettiest yard around ... all in 
EDGERSTOUNE, near the Hun School. Call to see it, please. $260,000 



PENNINGTON 
Rt. 31 & W.Delaware Ave. 

(609) 737-3980 



JOHN! 



^HENDERSON 

» ET A I TflDC VJ 



l\( 



REALTORS 



PRINCETON 

33 Witherspoon Street 
(609) 921-9300 




We are proud to present another Henderson Landmark 




COLFAX 



AT BEDENS BROOK 




•n 

■ 



' ■ 



1 



i>. j i T \ M 1 O I 3 | 3 



Jt, 



» 



YOU CAN MOVE INTO THIS MAGNIFICENT 
COLFAX HOUSE IN TIME FOR THANKSGIVING 



Well known Ofeo builder, Robert Adolph. Is Just completing this splen- 
did closslc to "sit Just tight" on one of the loveliest lots ot COLFAX. In 
fact, the lot Is ot the very top overlooking the five acre pork In the 
center of COLFAX with all Its privacy ond serenity. 

This very minute the house Is being finished by the prestigious firm 
Greenwich Estates, builder of many outstanding homes In the 
Princeton areo. And the house should be ready for occupancy In two 
ot three weeks. 

This particular blend of traditional design with classic details ond 
materials contains a beoutlfully proportioned 38' living room with o 
dramatic brick faced fireplace, enormous family/living areas with 
over-sized foyers and hallways for gracious living. Four bedrooms and 
three full baths plus an expanded powder room are Included. A 
library ond second fireplace are here. too. A 3-car garage, of course. 

It Is not too lote to moke minor modifications ond selections to suit 
your own tastes ond lifestyle. Out hurry. 



Call your nearest Henderson office for the exclusive details of this 
classic. Plans are on exhibit right now. Or bring your own plans for 
other available lots ot COLFAX. And please, do it soon. There ore only 
13 lots remaining. 

At COLFAX you'll find o lovely very private cul-de-sac lined with Nor- 
way Maples and Belgium Block curbs winding its way upwards for 
perhaps the most spectacular views. Each building lot has been 
carefully delineated with rows of flowering dogwoods for beauty and 
privacy. Absolutely perfect to create your own private world. 

The nome Is COLFAX. And COLFAX may well be the most beautiful 
place to live in the Princeton oreo. Yet COLFAX is only minutes from 
downtown Princeton. COLFAX is reolly port of the Princeton lifestyle. 

Over 18 ocres of rolling hillside have been dedicated as "Green 
Acres" to remain untouched In perpetuity for the exclusive use of the 
COLFAX community. If you re considering Princeton os o place to live 
ond prosper, you really must poy a visit to COLFAX! 



Public Open House: Saturday b Sunday, 1-4 



0«r»cmyu From PrwK*lon Fm# C**r* HI Ooma Lit or From mvftforffi «cxrf» 206 fo fltxiW $1$ Wst. %flo* Pmvnc* 

Cr»rr* \<V> Po*d fUgni or Pn*nc* Li* Ro&a »<}W or fio* Lrv «a*d nt an flo*v *« flort ^ «*• fo Coffu flaw on 

«C h# Boml to CoMmt ngfit 



JOHN I 



Belle Mead 

Route 206 

(201)874-5191 



l\( 



^HENDERSON 

REALTORS^-* 
:;:; Witherspoon Street, Princeton, Now Jersej 08542 • (609) 921-9300 



Pennington 
Route 31 

737-3980 



Marvin Reed and Mildred 
Trotman — square off on Mt. 
Laurel on straight party lines. 



Borough Council Contest May Also Be Viewed 
As Party Referendum on Mt. Laurel Strategies 

Borough voters will have the which claims it can build this politicization of a municipality 
opportunity to fill three seats housing on a break-even basis, where patience and listening 
on Council in November. And, But it won't happen. Studies at have been bywords." 
given the positions of the six Rutgers show that low income The Democrats disagree, 
candidates, this election housing built by towns re- Mrs. Terpstra says flatly that 
might also be viewed as a quires deep subsidies." no one on the ticket is under 

referendum on Mt. Laurel Mrs. Terpstra is an attorney the control of Barbara Sig- 

The candidates — Repub- and president-elect of the mund. "You can tell where we 
licans Bob Cook, Archie Reid Mercer Bar Association. She are and where we are going by 
and Fred Woodbridge and is a former director of the what we have done in the past 
Democrats Jane Terpstra, Legal Aid Society of Trenton, and how we have stood on 
She feels that the Borough issues." She adds that she has 
should act quickly on Mt. seen support, cooperation, and 
Laurel to avoid a solution im- bipartisanship on the current 
posed from the outside. "If we Council. 

do nothing we will have a 

builders' remedy imposed on Marvin Reed is public rela- 
us. The builders are in it for tions manager for the New 
the profit and the builders" Jersey Education Association 
remedy is a way of their mak- in Trenton and co-chair of the 
ing profit by throwing out Princeton Borough Tax Study 
crumbs. Commission. He is a trustee of 

the Trenton-Hopewell Family 

An account executive with Service Association and head 

Tucker, Anthony & R.L. Day, of the board of trustees of the 
and a member of the Borough New Jersey Coalition for Fair 
Affordable Housing Commit- Broadcasting, 
tee, Fred Woodbridge sug- He feels that Council must 
gests some possibilities that seriously consider the tax im- 
might please the courts if the pact of each decision. "With 
Borough were to be shown to my knowledge of taxes and 
have a Mt. Laurel obligation, property tax reform I would 

make it my particular respon- 

He believes that an or- sibility on Council to watch tax 

dinance revision in Borough impact carefully." 

zoning and building codes 

would add to the housing stock Fred Woodbridge also ex- 
without raising taxes. "If the pressed concern about taxes 
Borough gets into the housing 
business it will force people's 
The 1983 Mt. Laurel II deci- property taxes up and we'll 



I UU MANNS 

-* , __-■.,-,•,/ J Jiwwi' 
20 Witherspoon St. 

Princeton, N.J. 

(609) 924-0735 

Monday -Saturday 10-6 
Friday evenings til 8 






Patti E. Hart, MSW 

Psychotherapy 

Children • Adolescents • Adults 
Step-Families and Adoption 

For More Information Call 

609-921-2756 

Princeton, N.J. 



1 




Ready for Halloween 



Plain and fancy masks ( Victorian and 

cat designs) • Halloween invitations 

and cards • Pumpkin baskets 

Bat mobiles 



Bob Cook 



People are not driven out 

Continued on Pane 20B 




Find out about our special Halloween 
event to "scare the mouse." 

Grand prize winner receives tickets to 
Shoestring Players compliments of McCarter Theatre 



Just in Lisa Blrnbach's College Book 
as featured In Time Magazine 

The 
Country Mouse 

84 Nassau Street • Princeton, N.J. • 921-2755 

Monday through Saturday 9 am-6 pm. Sundays noon-4 om 



sion mandates municipalities 
in growth areas to provide a 
realistic opportunity for the 
construction of their fair share 
of low and moderate income 
housing, 
v The Republicans say that 
Princeton Borough has no 
such obligation. The 
Democrats believe the 
Borough not only has this 
obligation, but that it has 
moral, legal, and strategic 
weight behind it. 

The Democrats are opposed 
to joining neighboring 
municipalities in a federal suit 
against Mt Laurel. The 
Republicans favor the suit. 

Bob Cook, president of Ad- 
miralty Holdings Company 
and a former marketing and 
investment executive, is run- 
ning against Jane Terpstra for 




Fred Woodbridge 



a one-year term. Ms_ Terpstra en(J wjth a town of subsidiz . 
had been appointed to Counci e(J , ower jncome houses and 
when Democrat Barbara Hill upper inC ome housing " 
resigned. 

The other candidates are Moral and Lega i obligation. 
running for three-year terms mdre6 Trotman cited the 
They will replace Dick mora , and , , ob i igation t0 
Macgi . who is retiring from ° h_,.i_. 

Council and Peter Bearse, P^.de affordable hous,^ 
who is a candidate for United She also noted that there are a 
States Congress in the 12th S°? ™ mber ° f ^UZ 
ivetHct viding services in Princeton 

M Cook believes that, who cant afford to live here, 
since Mt Laurel figures relate such - teachers, policemen, 



CHOCOLATIER 
NEUHAUS 



to growth of population and 
jobs, and in both cases there is 
no significant growth in the ~t<L 
Borough, the criteria don t ap- 
ply. 



and firemen. 
Mrs. Trotman, the ad- 
manager of a 
condominium community in 
Hillsborough and chair of the 
Princeton Joint Civil Rights 
He says that no builder will Commission, feels that the 
come into the Borough on a Borough should at 1 east try to 
Mt Laurel site. "Economics P r ° vl<ie housing for th f e P™; 
are such that they can't build P'e and give them a choice of 
low income housing. It will whether they want to live in 
have to be left to the Borough, Princeton or not. 

Archie Reid — not to be con- 
K fused with opponent Marvin 
^?<Reed of the same name but 
different spelling — brings to 
the ballot a unique combina- 
tion of skills. He is a land use 
attorney, a farmer (president 
of Reid Blueberry Farm) and 
a producer (Backstage 
Breaks Theatricals! 

He and his fellow 
Republicans want to "end one- 
party control of Council and 
return bi-partisan, non- 
political government to 
Princeton." 

Politicization of Council? "1 
have seen little about my op- 
ponents." he said. "I suspect 
they are close political allies 
of the mayor and they will con- 
tinue to support her policies in 
lockstep This will continue 





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Superb Cast Energizes a Fast and Furious 
"School for Wives" in the McCarter Opener 




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WHICH RIPIUH • Ft! IIHUHMNT. 



INNOCENCE QUESTIONED: Ashley Gardner as Agnes registers dismay under 
questioning by Richard Rlsso as her lecherous guardian Arnolphe In the McCarter 
Theatre production ol Mollere's "The School tor Wives." Directed by Nagle 
Jackson, the artful French comedy will play through October 21. <c»iwo<v.ew 



Few opectaclei are more 
amusing (o observe on stage 
than the psychological suifej 
inR of a character tough 
enough to survive it and mean 
enough to deserve II 

When the suffering is con- 
veyed by a face, voice and 
body as extraordinarily ex 



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.MINI SS STUDIOi: 



pressivo as those of Robert 
Risso, the result is spec- 
tacularly, soul -sat isfyingly 
funny Those words pretty 
well describe the McCarter 
Theatre Company's season- 
opening production of "The 
School for Wives," 

When Moliere wrote this 
comedy in the early 1660s he 
had recently married a prelty 
actress much younger than 
himself, and the central role of 
Arnolphe, played by Risso, 
has the poignant true ring of 
self caricature. 

Rich, middle-aged Arnolphe 
is one of those men, not 
unknown even today, who 
can't trust or abide a free- 
st.'inding female with brains 



ing madly into it 

All this having taken place 
before the play begins, it must 
be revealed in conversations 

Continued on Next Page 



Mitt h Foresi 
Forest Jewelers 
ZONassau Stroei 

Princeton, N] 08540 

1 ;im ver y pleased to announce that on Satui 
daVi ( )i tobei 1 1 from noon to i pm, wc w ill be 
having an cx< lusive slv wing 61 the works 61 
Whitney Bom. rhis talented young jewelci has 
won numerous awards, including the Dc Beers 
the ( Cultured Pearl Assot iation and the Plati 
num Awards. I .i^ works feature streamlined 
geometric shapes in M ki gold with diamond 
accents and are truly contemporai \ classics, 

I ome see the works ol this rising young 
talent Saturday, Octobei 13 from noon to 
S pm. We'll aKo Ix- serving Jdu ious seafood 
hors d'ouevres catered by Nassau Street 
Seafood t ompany. 

I'm looking forward to seeing you 
Sincerely, 



News of The 

THEATRES 



^,-U ^^ 



Mitch Forest 



F©resl r 
Jeweler^ 

issau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 
(609)924-1363 




hut can't resist a pretty, 
young, reclining one. 

\ iti.inK Pagt. Determined 

lo cnjo\ the pleasures nt mar 
riage without thebacktalkand 
cuckoldry he sees other 
husbands enduring, Arnolphe 
cleverly adopts a four-year- 
Old girl, Agnes, and puts her in 
a convent He waits 13 years to 
remove and marry her, confi- 
dent she is not only sexually 
innocent but generally ig- 
norant: a lovely blank page on 
which he can write whatever 
his goatish imagination dic- 
tates, satisfied she will never 
oppose or betray him 

As the comedy opens, his 
17-year old beauty is se- 
questered in a handsome stone 
town house, presumably in 
Paris, waiting for him to 
return from a trip and arrange 
tbe marriage. But Arnolphe 
has made two mistakes 

U He has left her m the 
charge of two fiendishly inept 
and greedy servants, 

2) The town house has a 
street-side balcony, whereon 
Agnes is spotted by a beautiful 
young man, Horace, who falls 
in love on sight and makes 
contact with her by bribing the 
servants 

Uneducated Agnes may be, 
but knowing nothing about 
love does not prevent her fall- 



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STRffT 

THEATRE 

Hopewell. N.J. 



ANGEL IN A 
PAWNSHOP 

Starts Friday, October 12 
Through November 17 



Thursdays, Fridays & Saturdays 

Dessert at 7, Curtain at 8 PM 
OPEN THUR., FRI. AND SAT. NITES 

$11.75 per ticket 

Including dessert and theater 



Box Office 
Information 



6094662766 
609466-2762 



McCARTER $? THEATRE 

Center for the Perfomlng Arts • 91 University Place • Princeton, New Jersey 08540 




Moliere's 



the Q&cboolfor Q^Pives 

^ translated by Richard Wilbur 
directed by Nagle Jackson 

A romantic, rambunctious theatrical romp, sparkling with the poetic 
language and love of life for which the French are justly famous See the 
fair Agnes liberated from her voracious guardian, witness masterful style 
and wit as only Moliere can fashion them — all amid the opulent decor, 
sumptuous costumes, music and action which will fill the McCarter 
stage a la francaisei 

October 3 through October 21 

For information and easy-charge call: 

(609) 452-5200 

Ticket price range: S7 50 to S 19 50 

Discounts available for groups of 20 or more Call (609) 452-6133 

for complete information. 

Tickets also available at H Gross and Co Outfitters. One Palmer Square 



News of the Theatres 

Continued Irom preceding Page 

between Arnolphe and two old 
friends, Chrysalde, and the 
young lover himself, who 
doesn't suspect Arnolphe of 
being Agnes's imprisoner. But 
this hefty dose of exposition is 
so witty and amusing in 
Richard Wilbur's rhyming 
translation, and in the actors' 
delivery, that one can easily 
endure it until the action 
begins. Once begun it is fast 
and furious. 

Nagle Jackson, McCarter 
Artistic Director, has directed 
■ — one might say choreograph- 
p* ed — this "School" to make 
every instant intensely and 
convincingly alive. Wildly far- 
cical at times, as when Ar- 
nolphe demonstrates to his 
two demented servants how to 
beat off young Horace when he 
makes his anticipated noctur- 
nal up-ladder invasion of 
Agnes's bedroom, the play 
never loses its literateness 
and its classiness. 

Star-Making Role. Arnolphe 
is a star-making role and 
Risso, known to McCarterites 
for his Ahab in "Moby Dick 
Rehearsed" and his Ghost of 
Christmas Present in "A 
Christmas Carol," carries it to 
starry heights. His every mo- 
ment on stage, whether speak- 
ing or listening or flouncing or 
merely somehow emanating 
pain, is feelingful and 
hilarious; and he is seldom off 
stage. 

The rest of the cast is 
superb. 

Ashley Gardner is pretty 
and innocent-seeming as 
Agnes, whose mind and spirit 
have miraculously survived 
y her guardian's campaign to 
starve them. Making a soft- 
spoken character audible in 
McCarter's further reaches is 
a problem that has stumped 
more experienced actors. 
When Ms. Gardner has solved 
it she will be perfect. 

Judith K. Hart and Nat War- 
ren are a three-ring circus of 
clowning as the two servants; 
Robert Lanchester is, as 
always, rock-soiid as the 
cynical Chrysalde who 
believes cuckoldry "can be 
lived with," given the alter- 
natives. 

Dan Diggles plays Horace, 
the irrepressible swain, with 
an almost feminine fop- 
pishness that at first is 
somewhat off-putting; but one 
quickly realizes that this is the 
only way Horace can be 
played and ends up liking and 
f rooting for him. 

Fine in minor roles are 
Francis P. Bilancio as Agnes's 
long-misplaced father, Enri- 
que, who returns from 
America in the nick of time 
wearing a lavish Indian 
costume straight out of 
Ziegfeld or a Triangle 
kickline; Jay Doyle (welcome 
back) as Horace's father; and 
Mark A. Brown and Dane Cruz 



as "valets du theatre" who 
open the acts with a ritual 
stage-thumping that adds one 
more touch of glitter to a 
brilliant evening. 

The single setting by Robert 
Perdziola — the street and one 
side of Agnes's balconied 
bedroom — is elegant and 
opulent right down to its three 
symbolic bird-cages, and is 
yet in its way economical: 
showy but not show-offy. The 
same can be said of Elizabeth 
Covey's costumes: highly 
decorative but not distracting 
— except for that crazy Indian 
headdress that has a life of its 
own. Richard Moore's lighting 
is, as usual, flawless. 

It is hard to imagine a finer 
production of a marvelously 
funny play. 

—William McCleery 

AUDITIONS PLANNED 
For 'Lion in Winter.' 

Theatre Intime will hold 
auditions for its December 
production of "The Lion in 
Winter" on October 14 and 15. 
The play, written by James 
Goldman and directed by 
Michelle Mclntyre, features 
roles for men, ages 15-55. and 
roles for women, ages 18-50. 

Set at Christmastime in the 
year 1183, "The Lion in 
Winter" centers around the 
political and personal 
struggles of Henry II as he 
strives to maintain both 
kingdom and home. He meets 
formidable opposition in his 
queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine, 
and their three power-hungry 
sons. The historical tone of the 
play is offset by the author's 
use of 20th century language 
in a 12th century setting, thus 
providing a balance of light 
moments with the continuing 
struggle for power. 

Auditions will take place on 
Sunday, October 14, 1:30 - 
5:30, and on Monday, October 
15, 7 - 10. Theatre Intime is 
located on the Princeton 
University campus in Murray- 
Dodge Hall, across from the 
University Chapel. For more 
information call 683-5642, or 
call Theatre Intime at 452- 
4950. 



THEATRE PARTIES SET 
As Westminster Benefit. 

Westminster Choir College 
Associates has reserved 
Wednesday matinee seats for 
the Royal Shakespeare Com- 
pany's productions of Cyrano 
de Bergerac on November 7 
and Much Ado About Nothing 
on December 5. Both are at 
the Gershwin Theatre in 
Manhattan. 

Marion B. Cullen, president 
of the Associates, is arranging 
the two theatre parties. Buses 
will depart from the Princeton 
Shopping Center near 
Epstein's at 10 a.m. for both 
events. The price is $45 each 
performance, including a $10 
contribution to the Choir Col- 
lege, for orchestra seats and 
transportation. Lunch will be 
up to the individuals. 



For information and tickets 
call Mrs. Cullen at 924-1180. 

MEMBERSHIP DRIVE SET 
By McCarter Associates. 
"Act for McCarter!" will be 
the request of McCarter 
Theatre during the upcoming 
McCarter Associates 

membership drive, beginning 
Monday, October 15. 

The telephone campaign 
will run for six weeks. The 
goal is to raise $20,000 for the 
ongoing operation of Mc- 
Carter and to expand the 
membership of the 
Associates. Campaign 
workers will be calling people 
who are not current McCarter 
donors. 

The membership drive is 
not to be confused with Mc- 
Carter's Capital Campaign. 
Alison Harris, McCarter's 
managing director, stresses 

Continued on Next Page 



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CURRENT CINEMA 

Shows and Times Suhiect to Change Without Notice 
GARDEN THEATRE. 921-0263: Theatre I, Places in the 
Heart (PG I. Wed & Thurs 7:20.9 25, Fri 4 Sat 5:30 -45. 
10. matinee Sat. 1. Sun, 1:05, 3:10. S:£ 7:20. 9:25. 
Mon-Thurs 7:20. 9:25, matinee Wed 1; Theatre II. A 
Soldier's Slory <PG), Wed k Thurs 7:25. 9:30; Frr & : Sat. 

5 45 8. 10, matinee Sat. 1; Sun 1:10. 3:15. 5:20, 7:25. 9:30. 
Mon-Thurs 7 25. 9:30. matinee Wed. 1 
MONTGOMERY THEATRE. 924-7444: Theatre I The 
Bostonians. daily 7. 9:15; with early show Saturday at 4:45 
and early shows Sunday at 2:30 and 4:45. Theatre II. 
Careful. He Might Hear You. daily 7:15, 9:30, with early 
show Saturday at 5 and at 2:45 and 5 on Sunday. 

PRINCE THEATRE. 452-2278: Theatre I, Woman in Red 
(PG13I, Wed & Thurs .7:30. 9:15. starts Friday. Amadeus 
IPC) Fri & Sat 7. 10, matinee Sat. 1; Sun, 1, 3:50. 6:40, 
9 30 'Mon -Thurs. 8; Theatre II. Tightrope <R>, Wed 4 
Thurs 7:15, 9:25; starts Friday, Romancing the Stone 
<PG) Fri 4 Sat 6. 8, 10, matinee Sat 1; Sun 1:45, 3:45, 

6 45 '7 45 9:45; Mon-Thurs. 7:30, 9:30; Theatre III. 
Revenge of the Nerds (R), Wed 4 Thurs 7:30, 9:15; starts 
Friday House by the Cemetery (Rl. Fri 4 Sat 6:30, 8:15. 
10, matinee Sat. 1; Sun. 2:30. 4:15, 6, 7:45, 9:30; 
Mon-Thurs. 7:30, 9:15, 

MERCER MALL THEATRE. 452-2868: Cinema I 
(ihostbusters (PG), daily 1, 3:10, 5:20, 7:40, 10; Cinema II, 
Irreconcilable Differences (PGI, daily 1, 3:10, 5:20. 7:40. 
10; Cinema III, Impulse (R), daily 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 
9:30. 

AMC QUAKERBRIDGE FOUR THEATRES. 799-9331: 
Theatre I Purple Rain (R); Theatre II. The Evil Men Do 
(Rl Wed 4 Thurs , starts Friday, Ninja 3: The Domina- 
tion' ( R ) , Theatre III, The Wild Life ( R ) ; Theatre IV, All of 
Me (PG) ; call theatre for times of all listings. 

LAWRENCE ERIC THEATRES. 882-9494: Eric I, Karate 
Kid (PG). Wed 4 Thurs 7:20, 9:35; Fri 4 Sat 5:30. 7:45. 
10; matinee Sat. 1; Sun. 1, 3:15. 5:20, 7:30. 9:40; 
Mon Thurs 7 20. 9:35; matinee Wed, 1 ; Eric II. Teachers 
(Ri Wed 4 Thurs 7:20, 9:30; Fri 4 Sat. 6. 8. 10; matinee 
Sat. 1; Sun, 1:05, 3:10, 5:15, 7:20, 9:30; Mon-Thurs. 7:20, 
9:30; matinee Wed. 1. 

OTHER: Movies-at-McCarter at Kresge Auditorium. 
SllkwoodlRl. Wed. October 10, at 7: 15, 9:30; Gregory's Girl 
IPC). Fri. 4 Sat, October 19 4 20,7:30,9:15. 



$8hunan$j 



157 Witherspoon Street 
Princeton, N.J. 

609-921-0950 • 609-921-6959 

FAST FOOD & CATERING 

TAKE OUT ONLY 

1:17 Selection! 
Specializing in Hunan & 
Szechuan Chinese Food 

Che! Formerly with Papula Restaurant 
in Trenton. Now serving Princeton area. 



ALSO BUFFET LUNCH $2.85 
Changes Dally 



Open Mon-Tliurs 11-8:30; Fri A Sal 11-10 P.M 
Closed Sunday • Parking Across Street 




Irdhly$8.95 

jWjff for a ful course 

SUPER 
SAVER 



JVcuw of the Theatres 

Coniinuod from Preceding Page 

that the two fund-raising ac- 
tivities are completely 
separate. While the Capital 
Campaign is an ongoing pro- 
ject to raise $4 million for 
renovation of McCarler, the 
"Act for McCarter" drive will 
attempt to raise $20,000 in the 
relatively short period of six 
weeks, 

Ms Harris is concerned that 
the more visible renovation 
campaign will divert attention 
from the chronic problem of 
the ongoing daily expenses of 
running a theatre. "People 
tend to forget that every year 
McCarter struggles to cover 
basic operating expenses — 
only 65 percent from ticket 
sales and 35 percent from con- 
tributions — and that in- 
dividual donations are crucial 
to our existence," she says. 

Those who make donations 
to the "Act for McCarter" 
campagin will also become 
members of McCarter 
Associates As Associates they 
will be invited to lectures and 
seminars conducted by Ar- 
tistic Director Nagle Jackson 
and will receive special invita- 
tions to performance benefits 
and receptions McCarter 
Associates also have the op- 
portunity to go on I^ondon 
theatre and music tours con- 
ducted each spring 

This year a bus trip is plan- 
ned to attend a performance of 
the Royal Shakespeare Com- 
party's Cyrano dc Bcrgerac, 



Choose trom an ever changing 
variety of tempting entrees Super 

Saver Dinner includes: Soup du Jour, Charley's 

Salad. Choice of Special Super Saver Entree. 

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Reservaiions sugge^' Not valid 
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Hopewell. N.J. 609-466-0110 



with Derek Jacobi In 
November a dinner dance en- 
titled "The Play's the Thing" 
is planned. All donations are 
tax-deductible. 



SPACE AGE MUSICAL 

For Youth at Museum. 
Theatre for the Young, an 
annual series at the New 
Jersey State Museum, will 
open its 11th season with 
"Starblast," Sunday, October 
14. Performances are 
scheduled for 1 and 3 p.m. and 
admission is $5. 

"Starblast" is a space age 
musical with fast-pacedll 
choreography to a medley of:' 
musical styles. 

The musical was conceived, 
written and directed by Barry 
Harman who has won Emmy 
Awards writing for "The 
Carol Burnett Show" and "All 
in the Family." Call 292-7780 
for information. 

MIME TO PERFORM 
For Children. The mime 
Bob Berky will appear at Uie 
Kelsey Theatre, on the West 
Windsor campus of Mercer 
County Community College, 
on Sunday, October 21 at 
12:30and3p.m 

Berky's show. "Enter the 
Clown." is the second event in 
the Kelsey Kids Children's 
Series and is co-sponsored bv 
the West Windsor Campus 
Student Activities Board 

Berky is talented not only as 
a mime and a clown, but also 
as a stand-up comic Instead 



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23 Withersooon SI 
Princeton • 924-0750 

M 9 30-9. Tu-Sal 9:30-9 30 
Sun 12-5 



CHORAL CONCERT SET 
By Pro Music a. The Prince- 
ton Pro Musica. conducted by 
Frances F. Slade, will present 
its opening concert of the 1984- 
85 season on Sunday, October 
21, at 3 p.m. at the War 
Memorial Auditorium in 
Trenton. 

The 100-voice chorus and 
professional 34-member or- 
chestra will perform the 
Schubert Mass in G and the 
Mass in C Minor, K 427 by 
Mozart. Soloists will be Judith 
Nicosia, soprano; Madeline 
Rivera, soprano; Thomas 
Faracco, tenor; and John 
Woodard. bass In addition. 
Miss Rivera will sing 
"Exsultate jubilate." K. 165 
by Mozart. 
Ms. Nicosia will be retur- 




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She is a member of the faculty players, most of whom per- 
at Westminster Choir College formed last year, and a few 
and Rutgers University, and 




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sings in major concert halls 
across the country. Winner of 
the 1981 Montreal Inter- 
national Voice Competition, 
Ms. Nicosia has performed 
under Robert Shaw in Han- 
del's "Messiah," and the Bach 
B Minor Mass, and with David 
Randolph's Masterworks 
Chorus at Carnegie and Avery 
Fisher Halls. 

Madeline Rivera, soprano, 
was the 1984 winner of the 
Metropolitan Opera National 
Council Audition, District of 
New Jersey. She was also a 
finalist in the 1983 Joy of 
Singing Competition in New 
York. A graduate of West- 
minster Choir College and a 
student of the American 
Institute of Musical Studies in 
Graz, Austria, she has sung 
major roles with the Brooklyn 

[ Lyric Opera and the Spoleto 

! Music Festival. 



Continued on Next Page 



MINI ISI 

1 '''NASSAU S1PE6 1 . 



I ISI I 

PRINCETON 



YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO 

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Pub ope n from 1 1 : 10-1 00 am Mon -Sit., 

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Bar menu served until midnight Mon -Sat 

28 Witherspoon Street, Pnnceton 

(ne»l to Palmer Squarel 924-5555 



Tenor Thomas Faracco is a 
J member of the voice faculty at 
J Westminster Choir College 
j Trained at Westminster, and 
J Indiana University, Mr. 
J Faracco has appeared with 
[ such groups as the St. Louis 
I Symphony Orchestra, the 
I Marlboro Music Festival, and 
I the Cincinnati Opera in roles 
I ranging from Ferrando in 
I "Cosi fan tutte" to the male 
I chorus in "The Rape of the 
I Lucretia." 

I John Woodard, bass, has 
had several leading roles with 
Princeton Opera Association 
and the Gilbert and Sullivan 
Society. Currently a soloist at 
All Saints' Church, Mr. 
Woodard attended the 
Academy of Vocal Arts in 
Philadelphia. 

The Princeton Pro Musica 
is now in its sixth season of 
performances of major works 
of the classical choral 
literature. Funding has been 
made available in part by the 
New Jersey State Council on 
the Arts. Department of State, 
For subscription rates and 
other ticket information, call 
683-5122. 





clearly the tasteful 

alternative. An elcgani meal in the Continental 
■style awaits you tonight at I lyaa Regencj Princeton 

i"i .i special occasion A welcome mid 
weelt reward \ well-deserved night out <>l the 
house Dine surrounded by green trees, sparkling 
fountains and gracious attendants who make 
youi satisfaction cheii personal concern 
Foi reservations this evening, dial 
609/987-1234. 

" "'WISH 

VI >l WIKI 
I II Hi 

Hyatt Regency0Princeton 



s 



NEW LOCATION SET 

For First Orchestra Con- 
cert. The Princeton Univer- 
sity Orchestra, under the 
direction of Mordechai 
Sheinkman, will give its 
opening concert on Friday, 
October 19, at 8:30 p.m The 
concert will be in the Prince- 
ton University Chapel instead 
of Alexander Hall, where the 
orchestra concerts are nor- 
mally held. 

Mordechai Sheinkman, who 
replaces Michael Pratt as 
conductor, is no stranger to 
Princeton, having conducted 
the Orchestra from 1972 to 
1974 Educated in the US and 
Germany, Mr Sheinkman has 
been active as a composer, 
conductor, pianist and 
teacher He has toured Europe 
as a soloist and has had works 
performed by the Berlin 
Philharmonic, the Cologne 
radio, and Radio Zurich. 

The Princeton University 



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WAYS TO STRENGTHEN 
TREES TO WITHSTAND 
HIGH WIND STORMS 
with Sam DeTuro 

Woodwinds 
Associates 

Shade trees arouna a nouse 
absorb the first and worst 
shock when a hurricane, tor- 
nado, or other violent storm 
hits Houses protected by trees 
often sutler less damage than 
those on treeless sites 
But whether the trees will be 
shattered or toppled over by 
furious high winds depends in 
large degree upon how well 
they are anchored and how 
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One hurricane already this 
season has threatened the East 
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owners can alleviate the 
danger of storm damage to 
their trees. Simply do this 

1 Thin out the crowns to 
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winds can pass through tho 
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limbs Space the branches and 
shorten longer, heavier limbs 

3 Cable and brace weak crot- 
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develop stronger, deeper root 
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I 5 Look lor decayed areas Pro- 
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Music in Princeton 

Continued f'om PrecMlno Pafl« 

members of the Princeton 
community. For its program, 
the Orchestra will perform 
Haydn's Symphony No. 103 in 
E Flat Major and Schubert's 
Symphony No 9 < "Big" C 
Major). 

The Orchestra's December 
concert will be held in the new 
Richardson Auditorium in 
Alexander Hall, with two 
performances on December 14 
and 15 All Orchestra concerts 
are free of charge. 



FOLK SINGER DUE 
For Concert at YMCA. The 

Princeton Folk Music Society 
will feature Peter Bellamy in 
a concert of traditional music 
on Friday, October 19, at 8 
p m at the VMCA on Paul 
Robeson Place 

Peter Bellamy is one of the 
most influential individuals to 
have sprung from the Folk 
Revival. The son of a Norfolk 
farm foreman, he cut short his 
.iiiMms ;,t art college to em- 
bark on a career as a 
professional singer Mr. 
Bellamy came to immediate 
prominence U lead voice in 
The Young Tradition, a trio 
Specializing in harmony 
arrangements of traditional 

' OI>t". 

Since going solo in l%9 he 
h;iv, .i|i|»i-;irr<l .ill nvei I he 
world, and he has made 
numerous LPs, both of 
traditional songs and of his 
own Bettings of the poems of 
Rudyard Kipling Bridging the 
worlds of 'folk' and 'serious' 
music, his original ballad- 
opera "The Traasports" has 
received great acclaim, both 
as a double LP featuring 
English revivalist performers 
and in its numerous stage 
productions in Britain and 
Kurupe 

Admission is $s lor adults, $4 
foi .indents and Society 




Monteverdi, Randal! 
Thompson. Davies and Ives 
will complete the program. 

The second concert will 
begin at 8:30 p.m. in the 
Chapel Betsy Dwyer and 
Marie Miller will each conduct 
short programs of sacred 
music for choir. Works will 
include the Daniel Pinkham 
"Wedding Cantata," "Singet 
den Herren" by Johann 
Pachelbel, and "Make a 
Joyful Noise Unto the Lord," 
by William Mathias. 

The Westminter Master- 
singers is the choral 
organization that was 
organized to give student 
conductors an opportunity to 
perform and to help choir 
members expand repertoire. 



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Peter Bellamy 

members, $2 for children and 
senior citizens. There are no 
advance sales. Memberships 
are available at the door For 
further information, call 924- 
9143 



CHAMBER MUSIC SET 
Al Choir College. An 

evening of chamber music will 
be presented on Friday. 
October 12, at 8:30 p.m. in 
Wesfminster's Bristol Chapel 
The recital will feature pianist 
Stephen Peet, a cellist and a 
flautist. Admission is free and 
open to the public. 

The program will include 
Mozart, Quintet for Piano and 
Woodwinds in E flat major; 
Mendelssohn, Trio in D minor, 
Op. 49; and a Rachmaninoff 
cello sonata. 

Pianist Stephen Peet is 
presenting the chamber 
recital in partial fulfillment of 
a master of music degree in 
piano accompanying and 
coaching at Westminster 
Choir College, A graduate of 
SUNY, Potsdam, he also 
attended the Crane School of 
Music. He was the organ 
accompanist and president of 
the Olympic Choir for the 1980 
Winter Olympics in Lake 
Placid 

For information, call 921- 

7100. 



FREE CHORAL CONCERT 

At Choir College. The West 
minster Choir College 
Mastersingers will perform 
double choral concerts on 
Mund;i> October 15, at 7 and 
B:30p.m In Bristol Chapel. 

The first concert will be led 
bj Allen 11 Simon, a graduate 
student in the conducting 
program Accompanists will 
include Patricia Cawley, 
organ; Claire Holland, 
violoncello. Maria Zengion, 
harpsichord; and Elizabeth 
Zumbaeh, piano 

The program will feature a 
Choral work composed by the 
conductor during the summer 
of iy«4 and will open with 
Vivaldi's "Magnificat." 
"Qua t re motets sur des 
themes gregoriens" by 
Maurice Durufle and works b'v 



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The 



montgomery center 
r.nceton shopping cenier 



Dr. Leon C. Nurock 

Optometrist 

84 Nassau St. 
Princeton 

For an appointment 
call 924-0918 



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Urooe 

Sftow*. Curtains & Bain 

Accessories. Gills 
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921-2460 



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Rocky Hill, 924-38*4 



PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS 

Monday, October 22, 1984 • 8:00 P.M. 
McCARTER THEATRE 

(452-5200) 

TICKETS: $13.00 $10.50 

STUDENT RUSH: $6.00 (day of concert) 



mint 

mm OUAKTIST 



Joseph Genualdi. Violinist 
Bayla Keyes. Violinist 
Steven Ansell. Violist 
Michael Reynolds. Cellist 







Suddenly, the word for New Jersey 
isn't "suburb." It's "superb!" 

The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra. 



62nd Season 

Trenton Series 

at the Trenton War Memorial Auditorium 

Saturday evenings at 8:30. 




George Minihan. conductor 
Miriam Fried, violin 
Oct. 20 

Maxim Shostakovich, conductot 
Rudolph FlrMti.ny. piano 
Nov. 3 

Kenneth Schermerhoni, conductor 
Victoria de lo. Angele*. soprano 
Feb. 16 

Henry Lewi., conductor 
March 16 

George Man.h.n. conductor 
Bella Davidovich, piano 
May 4 



WAGNER Overture to "Die Meistersinger" 
BARTOK Miraculous Mandarin Suite 
BEETHOVEN Violin Concerto 

STRAVINSKY Firebird - complete 
BRAHMS Piano Concerto No. 2 

GLUCK "Orfeo ed Euridice" selections 

RAVEL Scheherazade 

Spanish Zarzuelas 

MOZART Symphony No. 41. "Jupiter" 

SCHUMANN Symphony No. 1. "Spring" 
additional works to be announced 

STRAVINSKY Song of the Nightingale 
CHOPIN Piano Concerto No. 2 
BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3. "Eroica" 



For a brochure or charge orders call toll free (800) 63 1-3407 



For information about the Princeton/Mercer Chapter of 

The New Jersey Symphony Orchestra League 

call membership chairmen Janet Hating 921-2381 

or Julie Boynton 466-2569 






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visa rnastercharge 



Music in Princeton 

OnllniiBrt rrnm PrawsvllrtQ p afle 

VIOLINIST TO PLAY 

With New Jersey Sym- 
phony. The New Jersey 
Symphony Orchestra's 62n'd 
season will open in this area 
on Saturday evening. October 
20. at the War Memorial in 
Trenton. 

The 8:30 performance, with 
the Symphony's associate 
conductor George Manahan 
on the podium, features soloist 
Miriam Fried in the 
Beethoven Violin Concerto in 
D Major, Op. 61. The program 
will also include Wagner's 
Prelude to "Die Meister- 
singer" and Bartok's rarely 
performed "Miraculous 
Mandarin Suite." 

Miriam Fried, a citizen of 
Israel, first gained in- 
ternational recognition as a 
winner of the Paganini 
International Competition in 
1968. Her numerous per- 
formances with the Chicago 
Symphony, the Boston 




C^Jhe Friends of Music at Princeton 



Miriam Fried 

Vienna Symphony, the London 
Symphony, and many others, 
have established her as one of 
the major violinists of our 
time. 

In addition to performances 
with major orchestras and 



Symphony! the Cleveland """"a's in all the major music 



Orchestra, the New York 
Philharmonic, the 

Philadelphia Orchestra, the 



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THE LOUIS CLARK VANUXEM PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES 

presents 

DONNA J. HARAWAY 



Professor in History of Biology 

and Feminist Theory 

University of California at Santa Cruz 

Wednesday, October 17, 1984 

8:00 p.m. 

Kresge Auditorium 

Frick Chemistry Building 

"FROM TEDDY BEAR PATRIARCHY 

TO GENDER UNDER STRESS: 

A POLITICAL HISTORY 

OF PRIMATE BEHAVIOR STUDIES" 



Protessor Haraway has written ground-breaking works on The 
history ol biology and primate studies, as well as on science, 
technology and lemmtst theory Her publications include a 
book on developmental biology and articles on Jane Goodall, 
animal sociology and political theory, sociobiology, and human 
engineering 

Sponsored by the Princeton university 

Public Lecture Committee 
and The Program in Women's Studies 

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC 
FREE OF CHARGE 



centers in the United States 
and Europe, Miss Fried is well 
known for her violin and piano 
recitals with pianist Garrick 
Ohlsson. In 1982 she began 
recording in Europe the 
complete Bach Sonatas and 
Partitas for solo violin. 

Associate Conductor 
Manahan also serves as music 
director of New York City 
Opera's national company and 
of Opera-Omaha. Appearing 
for the past four seasons with 
the Santa Fe Opera, Mr. 
Manahan is a member of the 
conducting faculty of the 
Manhattan School of music 
and has been active in the 
performance of contemporary 
music. 

For concert, subscription or 
individual ticket information, 
call toll-free (8001 631-3407. 
Individual tickets range in 
price from $16 50 to $5 for 
students and seniors. 

To learn about the many 
educational and social events 
surrounding NJSO concerts, 
contact the symphony's 
Princeton-Mercer Chapter 
membership chairmen Janet 
Haring, 921-2381, or Julie 
Boynton, 466-2569. 

News of the Theatres 

Continued liom Page 46 

of practicing the art ot pan- 
tomime in its traditional form, 
he fuses the expressiveness of 
a down with the abstraction of 
mime to create a con- 
temporary blend of ancient 
art. 

Formerly a member of the 
Celebration Mime Theatre, he 
has directed the Academy of 
Antic Arts and has toured 
Israel, Hong Kong, Australia, 
Mexico, Europe, Canada and 
the United States. He has 
received a fellowship from the 
National Endowment for the 
Arts, and he has won both an 
Off-Broadway Obie Award 
and an Edinburgh Mime 
Festival award. 

Tickets are $4 for adults and 
$2 for children 12 and under, 
senior citizens, and MCCC 
students and alumni with 
valid ID Tickets may be 
reserved on MasterCard or 
VISA at 5864695. 



PLAY FOR CHILDREN 
At State Museum. The 
Sunshine Players will present 
"The Prince Who Wouldn't 
Talk" at the New Jersey State 
Museum Saturday, October 
13, at 11 am and 1 pm 
Admission is free 

The story concerns a King 
and Queen whose son will not 
talk and their efforts to get 
him to talk Three wizards 
trying to make the prince talk 
produce a fun-filled 45-minute 
show There is a lesson to be 
learned and even the audience 
gets into the act at the end of 
the play. 

The Sunshine Players, a 

Trenton area non-profit group. 

introduces young audiences to 

the entertainment value of 

I live theatre 



Beth Wiemann, Clarinet 

Martin Butler, Piano 

|olin McGrosso, Vin/ni 



\\ hi ks ol 

Milton Babbitt, Ross Bauer, Martin Bulla 

Edward c one M.t\ Reget 



Sunday, Octobci 21 |om 

! 00 p in 




Woorwortb ( entci 
Admission Free 



liiUn m.ition (. nil,, ii Dili,, oiHt r,J ",7ir 




Princeton University Orchestra 

Mordechai Sheinkman, Conductor 



cS 



Haydn — Symphony No. 103 in E 1 ' Major 
Schubert — Symphony No. 9 ("Big" C Major) 



Princeton University Chapel 

Friday, October 19, 1984 

8:30 p m. 

Admission Free 






PRINCETON SOCIETY 
OF MUSICAL AMATEURS 

First Session ol the 1984-85 Season 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1984 at 4 P.M. 
At the Unitarian Church 

HAYDN -- THE SEASONS 

Conductor - J. Merrill Knapp 

Soloists: 
Anne Ackley, soprano Frederick Urrey, tenor 

Allen Crowell, bass 

MUSICAL AMATEURS meet to sing lor their own pleasure great works in the 
choral literature Usually an orchestra is assembled to accompany the amateur 
chorus, and soloists are arranged for as the works require The sessions are 
always conducted by professional conductors. These meetings are not perfor- 
mances 

THOSE ATTENDING PARTICIPA TE IN CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA 

Membership single $10. couple $15 
Single Admission: $2.50; Students: Free 

For further Information 
call Mrs Michael Ramus. 609 924-4266 



Date 1984-85 Schedule 

Nov. 1 1 Mendelssohn - Ell/ah 

Dec. 2 Handel - Messiah 

Jan. 20 Gilbert & Sullivan - lolanthe 

Fab. 1 7 Verdi - Requiem 

Mar. 1 7 Stravinsky - Symphony ol Psalms 

Schubert - Mass in G 

Apr. 14 Mozart - Requiem 



Conductor 

Francas Slada 
J. Merrill Knapp 
Robert Jonas 
John Bene lot 
Allen Crowell 

Joseph Flummertett 

■ as o e r . 



— 

Engagements 

and Weddings 



ENGAGEMENTS 

Schonheiter-Lukens. Karen 
: Schonheiter, daughter of Mr. 
■ and Mrs George E Schon- 
! heiier Jr of Whitehouse Sta- 
! tion. to John Lukens III, son of 
; Mr. and Mrs. John Lukens Jr 
; of Wycombe, Pa. 

Miss Schonheiter is the 
: granddaughter of Mrs. Ray- 
! mond E. Rudy of Princeton 
[ and the late Mr Raymond E 
I Rudy, organist and choir- 
; master pt Trinity Episcopal 
; Church in Princeton for over 
! 40 years. 

i She is a graduate of Hunter- 
; don Central High School and is 



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Route 31 Penninglon 

Leo S Brummel R P 

Dally 9lo9. Sal 9 lo 5 30 

Sunday 9 10 1 

Phone 7370900 



employed by Fiddlers Elbow 
Country Club in Bcdminster 
Mr Lukens is a graduate of 
Central Bucks East High 
School He is employed by 
Golf Cars. Inc , in Fountain- 
Mile. Pa 

A June. 1985, wedding is 
planned. 



Kachmar-DIFoggio. Mary 
Ann Kachmar. daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs John P 
Kachmar Jr of Lawrence- 
ville, to Louis G DiFoggio, 
son of Mr and Mrs Louis G. 
DiFoggio of Ewing Township 

A graduate of Lawrence 
High School and the National 
School of Health and 
Technology. Miss Kachmar is 
employed by Channel Home 
Center. 

Mr DiFoggio is a graduate 
of Notre Dame High School 
and Is currently attending 
Mercer County Community 
College He is employed by 
Mlllncr Lumber Company 
and, part-time, by Toys R Us. 

The couple plan an August 
wedding. 




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interior Desioirier Arr Consultant 

Complete Decorating Services 
Hourty Consultation """""J™ 

Residential • Commercial 



AND BABY MAKES THREE... 
HANDLING THE HOLIDAY HASSLES 
ASSERTIVENESS II 

Fall workshop series with 

JENNIFER HANSON MSW, ACSW, LCSW 

CALL (201) 297-4299 FOR BROCHURE 



Mrs. David S. Aldrlch 




HARDY GARDEN 

MUMS 

Daisies • Spldors < Bullons • Docorallve Pompoms 
Reg $3 49 $2.29 each 5 for $10 



Oclofc-er 10-17 




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Tulips 30-eech 10 for $3.50 

Daffodils ■;■•• i, 10 for $5.99 

Hyacinths '.»<..,„ i, 10 for $5.99 

Crocus/Grape Hyacinths 20' each 1 for $1 .80 



Sale on House Plants 

(non-blooming) 



MAZUR NURSERY 

265 B akers Basin Rd. • Lawrencevllle • 587-9150 

MonFrl 9-6, Set 9-4, Sun M-4 





|[ 63 Prlnc 



CHRISTMAS SPECIAL 

(Until November 1, 1984) 

20% OFF of SITTING FEE 

Call now lor appointment 
(609) 466-2222 

BARBARA LEWIS RUSSO 
Princeton Ave. • Hopewell. NJ 



WEDDINGS 

Aldrlch-Dyckman. Jennifer 
L, Dyckman, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs. Francis H. Dyckman 
Jr. of Skillman and Point 
O'Woods, N.Y., to David S. Al- 
drich, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Stirling Aldrich of Wheaton, 
III.; October 6 at Trinity 
Church in Princeton; the Rev, 
John Crocker Jr. officiating, 

Mrs, Aldrich, a graduate of 
Sluart Country Day School 
and Princeton University, is 
an editorial assistant with 
Crown Publishers, Inc., in 
New York. 

Mr, Aldrich, a graduate of 
Princeton University and the 
New York University 
Graduate School of Business 
Administration, is a senior ac- 
countant with Coopers & 
Lybrand in New York. 

Read-Brown. Hilary M, 
Brown, daughter of Mrs. 
Gerald Breese, Cleveland 
Lane, and Mr, Newell Brown 
of Boulder, Colorado, to 
Charles H. Read, son of Mr. 
and Mrs Robert O Read of 
Pittsburgh and Little Comp- 
ton, R.I ; September 8 at Six 
Mile Run Reformed Church in 
Franklin Park, the Rev. 
Eugene Speckman officiating. 

The bride, who will retain 
her name, attended Princeton 
Day School, Milton Academy 



and Princeton University. She 
is a graphic designer and a 
graduate student in political 

Continued on Next Page 



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• Stretch Limousines Equipped with Bar, Color T.V., V.C.R. 

• To All Airports, Atlantic City Casinos, New York City 
Museums, Theaters, Shopping Tours 

• Special Rates for Weddings & Corporate 
Accounts 



Ricchard's 

Shoes for the Discriminating 



Wright Arch Preserver 

Trunk Show and Sale for Men 

Saturday, October 13th 

Come to Ricchard's Shoe Store for a special premier 

presentation on Saturday, October 1 3th. Mr. Arthur Schwed, 

Wright Arch Preserver factory representative will be on hand 

with samples of every style, including the new handsewn 

and casual styles. Don't miss this opportunity to see the complete 

line and SAVE on your Wright Arch Preserver shoe wardrobe. 

15% Off Regular Prices 

(Only on Wrighl Arch Preserver Shoes and Boots) 

Come in and enter our drawing to win a 
pair of Wright Arch Preservers 

Saturday, October 13th, 9 am - 5 pm 



150 Nassau Street 
Princeton. N.J. -924-6785 



Mon-Fri 9-6 
ThJMS^Satj)^ 



■/-•". 





Drop by.. 

You'll be 

glad 
you did! 



W« hove a 
wonderful collection 

of 
NEW BRAND-NAME 

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Open Mod Sal 10-5 
M C It VISA 



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K'e h, s hlv recommend the finely craped, 
durable porcelain dispensers for our 
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Distributors of Mt. Vallev Watpr Pernor a „w * 

auey waier, Pemer and Asante sparkling waters 

Bottled in 5 gallon glass or handy 2% gallon dispensers. 

Complete chemical analysis available. 

Pure Spring Water Company — 924-7SS7 






Weddings 



Continued (rom Preceding Page 

science at Rutgers University. 

Mr. Read graduated from 
St. Paul's School in Concord. 
N.H., and Princeton Universi- 
ty. He is an executive of 
Eyecue, a graphic design and 
consulting firm 

The couple will live in 
Somerset. 



Neuwirth-Julia. Maritza 
Julia, daughter of Mrs. Salud 
Garcia of Hartford, Conn., and 
Rafael Julia of Rio Piedras, 
•m Puerto Rico, to Peter 
Neuwirth, son of Dr. and Mrs. 
Lee P. Neuwirth of Balsam 
Lane; July 7 at the Wesleyan 
University Chapel, Middle- 
town, Conn., Judge Allan 
Smith officiating. 

The bride, a graduate of 
Wesleyan University, is an 
account executive at Dillon 
and Mendoza and Associados 
in Newport Beach, Calif. 

Mr. Neuwirth, an alumnus 
of The Lawrenceville School, 
graduated from Harvard 
University. A consulting 
actuary, he is employed by 
Hewitt Associates in Newport 
Beach. 

The couple live in Mission 
Viejo, Calif. 

Edwards-Potter. Karen M. 
Potter, daughter of Mrs. Mary 
F. Potter of Trenton and the 
late Charles H. Potter, to 
Howard R. Edwards, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Ed- 
wards Jr. of Princeton; at 
Westminster Presbyterian 
Church, the Rev. Kenneth 
Sloan and the Rev. Kenneth 
Applegate officiating. 

The bride graduated from 

***^*Douglass College and is a 

group claims supervisor for 

Mutual Benefit Life Insurance 

Co. in Newark. 

Her husband, a graduate of 
Trenton State College with a 
B.S. degree in business ad- 
ministration, is business 
manager for Trenton 
Emergency Medical Services. 

After a honeymoon in Great 
Britain, the couple are living 
in the Mercerville area. 

Novak-Burrows. Betty Bur- 
rows, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Floyd N. Sullens of 
Princeton, to William L. 
Novak Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. 




Pair English Silver 

SALT SPOONS 
London, Ca. 1825 



59 Palmer Square West 
924-2026 




Mrs. Peter Neuwirth 
William L. Novak Sr. of Tren- England School of Law, is an 
ton; at Christ Presbyterian attorney with the New Jersey 
Church. Administrative Office of the 

Mrs. Novak graduated from Courts. 
Princeton High School and is a After a wedding trip to Cape 
secretary with Educational Cod, the couple are living in 
Testing Service. Her husband, Hamilton Square, 
a graduate of Steinert High 
School, is employed by Novak 
Landscaping and Excavating 
of Trenton. 

The couple spent their 
honeymoon in Virginia and 
West Viriginia and are living 
in Trenton. 



Barry-Leary. Jasmin 
Leary, daughter of Mrs. 
Thekla Leary of Princeton, to 
Michael L. Barry, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward J. Barry Jr 
of Lawrenceville; September 
8 at the Unitarian Church of 
Princeton, the Rev. Dr Ed 
ward J. Frost and the Rev 
Dennis Apoldite officiating. 

The couple are graduates of 
Fairleigh Dickinson Universi- 
ty. Mrs. Barry is a secretary 
at Applied Data Research, 
Inc., in Princeton. Her hus- 
band, a graduate of the New 



Interior Design by Saums. 

Custom 




Window Treatments 
Upholstery 
Slipcovers 
Carpeting 
Wallpapers 
Vinyl Floors 
Window Shades 
Levolor Blinds 



Vertical Blinds 
Shutters 
Solar Shades 
Window Quilt 
Furniture 
Design Service 
Paper Hanger 
Painter 



Complete Installations 

Eileen B. Saums - Assoc. A.S.I. D. 
INTERIOR DESIGNER 

609-46MM79 
75 Princeton Avenue, Hopewell. N.J 



SAUMS 




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peppi's 

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924-1200or924-0600 



In 



Inventory Clearance 

LANE BEDROOM SUITE - Contemporary 
In Pecan and Oak. Reg $ 2400 NOW *999." 

LANE BEDROOM SUITE - Contemporary 
White Almond Lacquer. Reg '2995 NOW $ 999." 

LANE BEDROOM SUITE - 18th Century 
In Mahogany. Reg '3400 NOW $ 1995. 00 



Assorted Sofas, Chairs, Occasional Pieces 
and Lamps at Similar Discounts. 




SALE ENDS SAT., OCTOBER 20 

The Rug & Furniture Mart 

and 

Ivy Manor Showrooms 

"Beautiful Things For Gracious Living" 
Princeton Shopping Center 

Princeton. N.J. 921 -91 00 - 921 -9292 



! SUSAN 
i GREENE 



handbags attaches 

and luggage at to* 

discount prices 

Marketplace Mall 

Rie. 27 • Princeton » 297-62" 



IT'S NEW 
TO US 



• ■ 



938 




ffilNCETON DECORATING SHOP 



14 Moore Slreel 
924-1670 




i#t*^^^T'iJ2. 



7: 

Add some 
sparkle to your 

life. 

To your jewel toned 
wardrobe add the 
appropriate jewels 
Victorian and period 
jewelry, trom modest 
to magnlflcenl 

DOROTHY H. OPPENHEIM 

KINGSTON ANTIQUES 

43 Main St.. Kingston. N J 
924-0332 — shop 

924-3923-home 



FLOWKKS ARE H N 
At Princeton Shop. A 
background in painting and 
drawing, a flair for design and 
a passion for flowers led 
Phyllis Hamel to her now- 
thriving business. The 
Princeton Flower Shop, 
located at 306 Alexander 
Street, is now in its third year. 
Mrs. Hamel had been working 
out of her home for several 
years prior to opening the full- 
service floral shop which she 
views as "more fun than 
work " 

The fun not only includes 
working with beautiful 
flowers, which she orders 
from Holland all year long, 
but with people in town, many 
of whom are her personal 
friends I>ocation and conve- 
nience ure key to the Prince- 
ton Flower Shop's success, she 
feels Parking is no problem 
here and personalized service 
is the owner's highest priority. 

As entertaining moves in- 
doors and the glories of sum- 
mer gardens begin to fade, 
there is nothing that gives 
one's home more of a lift than 
a lovely bouquet or basket of 
flowers Mrs Hamel's shop is 
full of an assortment of 
unusually handsome imported 
baskets and ceramics 
awaiting her creative hands 
Her arrangements can be seen 
all over town in homes or in 
the several businesses which 
she regularly services. Her 
commercial work includes 
many jobs at Scanticon, the 
Hyatt Regency, and the 



g SHOP ,^-~ -.'•«{! 




Man tailored, 
but feminine. 

Matching skirt, 
tool 




limit (rem Around 

TOWNSHIP LINE ROAD • BELLE MEAD 

/Use 206 N , turn right before railroad bridge) 
Mori-Sat 10-5 
(201 ) 359-8260 Thurs eve til 8 30 





SAVOUR OF SUMMER: Phyllis Hamel, owner of the 
Princeton Flower Shop will bring summer's flowers in- 
doors with her lovely arrangements and baskets done 
In the European, natural style. Full party services in- 
cluding tents, tablecloths and lighting, as well as 
floral s ervices are offered by the shop. 

Nassau Inn where she lee- and Christmas It would be 
tured this week to the Prince- wise to give her plenty of time 
ton Lioness Club The Univer- to order the most unusual 
sily ranks among Princeton flowers Holland has to offer. 
Flower Shop's special ac- Hundreds of choices are 
counts. available upon request. 

Princeton Flower Shop will 

Party Planning. Full scale participate in the Morven 
party planning service is a Holiday beginning in 
large portion of Mrs Hamel's December Hours are from 
growing enterprise. Coor- Monday through Friday 9 to 5 
dinating a wedding right down and on Saturdays from 10 to 2, 
to who follows whom during or by appointment, 
the wedding march, in addi- 
tion to all of the floral ar- VIKING SAILS IN 
rangements required to make t Montgomery Center. 
it beautiful, tents, lighting, j erTy arK j R U thie Miller have 
and colorful linens to comple- fulfilled a dream Combining 
ment the flowers are all ser- thejr respective talents as a 
vices offered here Trellises to businessman and an interior 
cover unsightly poles with designer, they have opened 
gorgeous flowers are one of Princeton Viking, Inc., a new 
her specialties furniture shop in the Mont 

"People are becoming more gomery shopping Center 
flower oriented, perhaps rj nre ]ated to Viking Fur 
because fresh flowers are now njturc w hich closed in Prince 
available all year long," ex- ton last sumrne r, except 
plains Mrs. Hamel whose through friendship with the 
taste in flower arranging is f orrn er owners, Marty and 



^altK d6*otfu*M 



All Kinds ol Repairs 
on Fine Jewelry 



145 Witherspoon Street 
Princeton. N J 




<THE MARKET PLACE 

...the area's finest 
off price outlet mall. 



Route 27 



Princeton 




imilar to what is referred to 



Mary Bratman, the Millers 



as the European style - a had been sea rching for 
natural airy look Mrs Hamel busjness where t hey could 
and her two assistants. Bar- work together Two of their 
bara Delafield and Dindy La three children, Jeff, 19, and 
Tourette, achieve the loose Ellen an nth grader work 
natural look in all of their ar- w j tn tn em 
rangements, even the fall .. We are having the best 
wreaths Hecorated with dried tjme; jt - s a baU People have 
flowers, a lovely hostess gift, been s0 njce and receptlve t0 
Silk arrangements for ex- 
ecutive suites and reception 
areas in offices can be rented 
and changed seasonally. 

Floral arrangements which 
can be delivered, begin at $15 
Baskets filled with fall flowers 
may start at $22.50. Many 
customers drop in after work 
to buy a single stem for a lov- 
ed one. Fragrant freesia, 
alstromeria, gerber daisies, 
tulips, roses, orchids, and 
rubrum lilies, to mention a 
few, are available in the shop 

The Princeton Flower Shop 
will wire flowers all over the 
country Its familiar name 
alone has brought a con- 
siderable amount of business 
from different parts of the 
country 

Holidays are a special time 
for Mrs Hamel. Her 
customers are so pleased with 
her creations that orders are 
already in for Thanksgiving 

■OLD CLOCKS" 
REPAIRED 



L FACIALS, 
MANICURES-PEDICURES 



Looking for quality nail and 

skin care? You don't have to go to 

the City any more... 

We are the specialist and 
we are right here in Princeton. 

European Studio lor Tolal Nail & Skin Care 




?R 



Viennese Facials and 

Cosmetics 

European Manicure 

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Sculptured Nails 

Unique Nail Art 

Face & Body Waxing 

Individual Eye Lashes 

Make-Up ^~f^ 

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Call for appointment • (609) 924-4910 
812 State Rd. (Rt. 206) Princeton 
(3 miles north ol Nassau St.) 





Call lor Appointment 

609-921-7015 

Princeton, N.J. 



^ DON'T START 

Ml another DIET 

W*F TILL YOU CHECK WITH 

DIET CENTER! 




I LOST 75 POUNDS 

IN JUST 24 WEEKS! 

ow I tan I pass a mirror or a store window without 
stopp.n, ,„ |„„u a, mvsell and | llUe „ ha , , „ e „ 
wnole nr« me' Mv lamik and Inends ar* so proud ol 
™ l > °"" ,> " nd ""■ ""lire outlooU on hie is great' I 
T7 "V, ""■ " ' V ,n *°K""s,ng beiause 1 know 
what 11 ,s like lolruo lose weight. ,„ tail and In blame 
mysell In, „ N„ u | knovv lha , on lhp f m 

'nvbndt. ran Inse we.ght, and Diet Center has the 
right program' 

MoaU Smith 
YOU CAN DO IT TOO! 

AND WELL TEACH YOU 
HOW TO KEEP IT OFF! 



ttSSagjgtSSfc 



, DIET 

Renter 



& 



Princeton Shopping Center 
North Hamson Si 
Pnnceton. N.J 
(609) 924-3377 



Belle Mead 

Rt. 206 South 

(Across from the Red Barn) 

(201)874-6050 




1 


THE store Icr 





line used clothing 


H 


since 1944 


n 


»1« N4SSAU ST 


o 


MON 12-5 


TUE-SAT 10-5 


z 


OUIGhuWN i>HOP__J 



Nassau Hobby 
and Crafts 

142 Nassau Street 
924-2739 



NASSAU 

MIOI. KKIMII! 



Expert Workmanship 

Since 1928 

180 Nassau St. (rean 

921-75S2 



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navy. red. black & while 

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$260 




, w 173 Nassau St. 
I 921-0554 

Hrs.: M-Sal 10-6 



VIKING VENTURE: Ruthle and Jerry Miller, seen here 
with their three children, Richard, Ellen and Jeff have 
opened Princeton Viking, Inc., a new furniture store in 
the Montgomery Shopping Center, unrelated to the 
former Viking Furniture of Nassau Street, but selling 
many of the same top quality Scandinavian contem- 
porary lines. 

It's New to Us 

Continued Irom Preceding Page 



us. They were worried when 
Viking closed and said, "We 
didn't know where to go,' " ex- 
plains Mr Miller, an engineer 
and hospital administrator by represent 
training. 

This is the Millers' first joint 
venture, although Ruthie 
Miller has excellent contacts 
in the furniture and interior 
design business after free- 
lancing for several years out 
of their East Windsor home. 

"We canvassed all over 
looking for the right location 
and the demographics pointed 




WALLCOVERING 

CUSTOM 

WINDOW TREATMENTS 35% OFF 
FLOOR COVERINGS 10% OFF 

VILLAGE PAINT 
AND WALLPAPER 

Village Shopper • Rt. 206 • Rocky Hill • 921-7120 

Open Thursday evenings until 8 




LaVake 
requests the pleasure of 

assisting you 

in the selection of your 

Wedding Invitations 

and 

Social Stationery 

featuring fine papers 

by 

Crane 



^ Nassau Street Princeton. New Jerse> 08340 
(609) 924-0624 



here. It was almost chemistry, 
everything just came together 
for us, but in particular we 
are appreciative of the Brat- 
mans who have been wonder- 
ful to us," says Mr, Miller. 
Princeton Viking, Inc. will 
more than 30 
manufacturers, mostly 
Danish but some Swedish and 
Norwegian, with furniture for 
the home and office. 

"Marty virtually took us by 
the hand in Denmark at the 
furniture show last May. He 
introduced us to all his con- 
tacts, showed us what he had 
marketed sucessfully here, 
launched us on our way and 
said, 'Go to it,' " explains Mr- 
Miller. "I then ordered five 
showrooms of furniture." The 
new shop is clearly well- 
stocked with thousands of 
handsome dining room, living 
room, bedroom and computer 
furnishings. Brand names will 
seem familiar to shoppers who 
were acquainted with Viking 
Furniture. 



Old Favorites. OJ wall 
systems in several shining 
woods; Westnofa bedroom 
furniture; H.P. Hansen 
sideboards and dining tables; 
gorgeous leather furniture by 
Ekornes of Norway ; and Ben- 
dixen marble-topped dining 
tables of Denmark are among 
the pieces on display. A 
26-cubic-meter container full 
of still more pieces was due 
October 8. 

There are some familiar 
faces at Princeton Viking, Inc 
as well as furniture. Claudio 
de Baggis and Paul Romaine 
also worked for the Bratmans. 
"We like the continuity with 
Viking and hope to succeed in 
serving their clients as well as 
they did," says Mr. Miller, 
who is clearly enjoying 
himself. 



Ruthie Miller plans to offer 
full interior design services to 
the commercial and private 
clients including the selection 
of fabrics and textures as well 
as placement and choice of 
furniture. 

"We will go to the home or 
office, see the space, and help 
people to choose the right 
piece Many clients have dif- 
ficulty with spatial dif- 
ferences. They find it hard to 
visualize how a piece will 
look," explains Mrs. Miller, 
who has done a considerable 
amount of work in offices in 
Philadelphia 

The award-winning Bruno 
Mathsson chairs by Dux, the 
Stressless chair and the Bionic 
chair are not to be missed 
here The shop also carries its 
own line of computer fur- 
niture Hours are from 10 to 6 
on Monday, Tuesday and Fri- 
day, from 10 to 9:30 on 
Wednesday and Thursday, 
from 10 to 5 on Saturdays, and 
from noon to 5 on Sundays. 

—Susan Trowbridge 



NOW - Fresh Donuts 
Available Every Morning 



Also hot coffee, tea 
■ or hot chocolate to go. 



Toto's Market ... Setting Traditions 
Since 1912! 

TOTO'S MARKET 

74 Witherspoon St. 924-0768 

Mon., Tues.. Thurs. & Fri. 8-5:30; Wed. & Sat. 8-1 




THE CHRISTMAS 
DIAMOND COMPETITION 

Grand Prize - One Carat Diamond- Flawless 

(fuzzier c 7\b. 4 

In unguents and ointments, 
in salts and in pills, 
it was thought to relieve 
any number of ills, 
and been spa wnedfrom the sun, 
when rays pierced the earth, 
to grow to a classic measure 
of worth. 

For this puzzler, 

the light you should readily see, 

if you simply ponder the elementary. 



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OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM 

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State 


7ln 


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Additional Rules & Entry Forms Available at LaVake Jewelers 




Diamond Merchants Since 1877 
54 Nassau Street, Palmer Square, Princeton, New Jersey 09542 

Call Toll Ffee 1-800-2250652 New Jersey 609-924-0624 



/ 



PRINCETON 
ART ASSOCIATION 

45 Stockton St 
Princeton 
921-9173 




Artist 

Needs Pointing 

Studio 

921-2063 



,guild gallery^ 



in the montgomery center • rocky hill 

(609) 921-8292 



miii Luillcry 
OM FRAMING 

PN ^^ON 




WIND WAVES - Near collages of handmade Japanese paper, fiber and other 
materials use texture and surface to create echoes of nature forms In the current 
display at Squibb Gallery. ___ 




Fin. Gold 

■nd 

Handcrilttd Jtwalry 

32 Main St., Kingston 

924-4040 M" 



Shop 




. > _ || Giillcfy/I filming 

Hopewell Wa n Design 

Frame "We take your art i 
to heart" 



the unusual collection, 
described as "translucent 
drawings," is a combination 
of textured surface, nuance of 
silhouette and the illusion of 
movement created by the 
juxtaposition of white on white 
and the opposition of visual 
UNUSUAL PAPER WORKS elements - translucent 
At Squibb Gallery. In "Wind versus opaque, smooth 
Waves," the display of working against rough, and 
paperworks by Caroline shiny contrasting with dull. 
, Grccnwald that opened at the Using sections of hand cast 
Squibb Gallery last week, white paper, the artist creates 
there is no color and essen-near-m'n'ma 1 collages by 
tinllv nn imagery. Instead, enclosing threads, fur or other 
substances within layers of 
delicate Japanese papers. She 
arranges her materials so that 
they function in the manner of 
calligraphic elements with 
much the same impact as the 
wind and waves from which 
the exhibit draws its name. 



Turner-Russo 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

Portraits • Weddings • Commercial • Annual Reports 

Interiors • Exteriors 

Collections • AnllQues • Fine Art 

r(609) 466-2222 
DARDARA LEWIS RUSSO ^ 

63 Princeton Ave. • Hopewell. NJ 06525 




IN an old trunk, or in the attic, 01 
•ticked away in a drawer, ii a package ol old 
and faded photographs . . Grandma, Grand- 
pa, Aunt Emma . . . Mothei and Dad, 
". e can ropy and restore them to the heirloom 
value they deserve! . . . Bring them in today! 
You will he amazed at what can he done. 



Helen's Jfinc 9rtsf, 3nc. 

Custom Framing • Restoring • Paintings 

Prints • Decorative Accessories 

Appraisals • Gifts 



PRINCETON. NJ 

73 Palm*, Squor. W 

(609) 924-0740 



MORRISVIUE, PA 
Sio Ook Shopping C»nl 



1213J 293-4749 



The artist describes the 
paper as being "like the air, 
itself," a quality that is 
evident in the combinations of 
layered and laminated 
arrangements of paper and 
fiber that she refers to as 
"drawings." And, while 
drawings are not the term we 
would use to describe these 
works, they do, indeed, echo 
nature forms in their con- 
struction and their affect. 
Overlaid thread and fluid, 
often repeated, shapes are 
used to create tensions bet- 
ween static forms. In the more 
sculptural works — enormous 
linear forms — their in- 
teraction with surrounding 
spaces intensifies the sense of 
controlled movement. 

This collection was com- 
pleted afer an 18-month stay in 
Japan, and, as such, 
demonstrates a striking 
kinship with Japanese 
esthetics. And, like the 
Japanese art which spawned 
them, these quiet works 
require as much con- 
templation and thought as 
they do observation in order to 
enjoy them well . 

Watercolors at AT&T For 
devotees of realism, the 
collection of paintings by Pat 
Stark at the AT&T Corporate 
Education Center is a must 
see The same is true for those 
who appreciate skillful 
watercolor painting The 
display of still life and 
figurative works happily 
demonstrates that water- 
colors don't have to be gim- 
micky or overworked to be 
effective and that realism. 
even when it's steeped in 
tradition, needn't be dull. 

To begin with, the artist 
shows great respect for the 
demanding medium. Color is 
clear, clean and, if anything, 
understated — commendable 
to say the least The white of 
the paper is allowed to do its 
job ; to offer contrast with rich 
hues and to heighten the 
translucent effects which are 
the most important aspect of 
watercolor painting. 



What is more, subjects are 
treated with serious concern. 
Stark's attention to detail is 
impressive. Even more im- 
portant, her responsiveness to 
the rich blends of pigment that 
exist within true color and the 
capacity to lay color over 
color that is inherent in the 
medium is evident throughout 
the display. Skin tones — 
complex mixtures of rosy hues 
— seem to glow with life; 
flower studies, sufficiently 
detailed to compete with early 
botanical illustration, also 
function as sensitive rainbow 
impressions of their volup- 
tuous subjects. 

Robert Harvey's sculpture, 
substantial pieces in marble, 
bronze and iron, offers 
pleasant contrast with the 
lightness of Stark's paintings 
A larger than larger than life 
rooster makes an attractive 
and entertaining subject for 

Continued on Page 14B 



^j%0M 




PHONE: (24-2300 



No Question, 

For the Finest Qualify Framing 
We're the Answer! 

uAtrU/liam^OdA/an/atC' . . . 



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Clubs and 
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Hibben Road are. The 
Chemical Applications of 
Raman Spectroscopy and In- 



FIND DRIVE I'NDERW A\ 
By Recording for the Blind. 
The Princeton Unit of Record- 
ing for the Blind has 
designated October as its fund 
raising month. 

Mrs Philip Nelson, fund 
chairman, and Mrs. William 
Boyd, unit chairman, have an- 
>- n nounced a goal of $67,039 for 
, this year's drive. Ninety-eight 
percent of the annual budget 
goes directly to help visually 
handicapped students at all 
grade levels The unit has 
more than 220 volunteers, 
ranging in age from 20 to 80, 
who contributed 21,674 hours _ 
last year in producing cas- ___„ ■•^■^•^•^■^•^•^•^•^•^•^•^•^■••••••TeTeTi 

settes from books needed by SEEKING FUNDS: Princeton Unit Recording (or the 
bund students Blind board members, Barbara Martin, Josie.Dellen- 

baugh (front) and Elmer Alport go over card files of 

The Princeton unit served prospective supporters. The Princeton Unit has 
641 students last year A few of designated October as the month to achieve Its 
the textbook titles currently budgeted $67,000 income. 

being read at the studio at 36A " 

at Barbara Trelstad's home, director of admissions at 
35 Westcott Road at 7:45. It Mount Holyoke. 
"""«" spectroscopy ana in- w '" include a talk by Peter High school juniors and 
traduction to Modern Liquid Buxbaum of the law firm of seniors and their parents and 
Chromatography, as well as Stearns, Herbert and counselors are invited to at- 
Chemistry: A Modern Course. Weinroth. He has served as tend. Ms. Seely will also 
Funds raised by the municipal attorney for several discuss student life at Mount 
Princeton Unit help students townships, including Holyoke and answer questions 
achieve an education which Lawrence, which has recently about the college, 
will enable them to become negotiated an out-of-court For further information call 
self-supporting citizens. Con- settlement for its "fair share" Ellen Petrone at 924-1721 

tributions to Recording for the ma ndate 

Blind are deductible for in- Bot h uni 's will bring The p r ; nrPl „ n .„„,, 
come tax purposes and may members up to date on af- Alumnae Ch,h n f v 
be sent to the Princeton Unit fordabl « housing plans in the k ™ ram J »ii „i kT 
Princeton municipalities. Sd^y on Tu f/af " 

A There is an ongoing need at October 16, at 7:30 pm at the 

■<■ he unit for volunteers to per- The Soroptimist Inter- home of Ann Sprow in Prince 
form a variety of functions in national will hold a dinner ton. Kappas living in Prince- 
addition to the transcribing of meeting at the Nassau Inn on ton and other nearby com 
books. Mrs. Anne Young, ex- Tuesday, October 16, at 6:30. munities are invited to attend 
ecutive director of the unit, is Guest speaker will be David L Refreshments will be served 
interested in hearing from Holmes, executive director of and a fireside slide presen- 
anyone who can give a few 'he Eden Programs, which tation from the KKG Heritage 
hours a week. Call her at serve adults and children with Museum will be shown 
921-6534 for further informa- autism. For Iurtner information, or 

tlon to arrange transportation, 

The Homebased Business contact Sally Turner at 737- 
The Mercer Alliance for the Association will meet at the 248", or Helen Stafford at 924- 
Mentally III will meet Mon- Lawrenceville branch of the 3605. 
day. October 15, at 145 MercerCounty Library, Route 
Witherspoon Street at 7-30 ' anci Darrah Lane, on 

P-m. Dr. J. Randall Nichols Mond ay. October 15, at 7:30 The Amat <"ur Astronomers 
pastoral counselor with the p m Tne to P ic of the meeting Asso ^ation of Princeton has 
Trinity Counseling Service of wi " be how t0 cnoose and use scneduled P"°lic observing 
Princeton, will speak the appropriate professionals sess ' on s °n October 12. 19 and 

The meeting is open to the for a home-based business. 2 ° Thev wl " ** held at the 
public and further information An yone interested or active in f. ubs . observatory in 
can be obtained by calling 3 home-based business i s Washington Crossing State 
799-1399 or 924-6468 encouraged toattend. Park 

The group will also hold a For reservations or infor- 



The Central Chapter of The 
American Jewish Committee 

will meet Tuesday, October 
16, at the home of Rose 
Levenson in Lawrenceville. 

Jeffrey Fogel. executive 
director of the New Jersey 
American Civil Liberties 
Union, will discuss the 
relationship of religion and 
politics. 

Continued on Next Page 



FALL IS HERE 

• Sweaters 

• Jackets 

• Gloves 

Reasonable Prices 



PRINCETON ARMY-NAVY 

^AVl Witherspoon St. » 924-0994 




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ine group win also hold a " "' '^ovations or inior- 
, n luncheon networking meeting mation call the New Jersey 
a for well-established business state Planetarium at 292-6333. 



The League of Womet. 

Voters of the Princeton area 

will hold two units on Tuesday own ers on Wednesday, 

October 16, entitled "Update Oct ober 17. For further in- The Trenton Chapter of the 

on Housing." formation, call 298-6925 Professional Secretaries In- 

The morning unit, meeting ternational will meet Thurs- 

at Evelyn Geddes' home at 229 The Mount Holyoke Club toy. October n, at 6:15 p.m. 
Mercer Street at 9:30, will will sponsor a college ad- at the Glendale Inn in Trenton, 
include a discussion of pend- missions seminar on the Rick Walsh, director of confin- 
ing legislation on Mt Laurel subject of the application u,n 6 education, Mercer Coun- 
lssues and "fair shares" essay on Monday, October 15, ^ Community College, will 
apportionment by Steve Frakt from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the s P eak on " The Changing Work 
of State Senator Stockman's home of Ellen Petrone, 279 Environment. " 
legislative committee. Western Way. Speaker will be For reservations, call 

1 he evening unit will meet Marjorie Seely assistant kabella Kay at 883-3300. 



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During his 28 years as a masseur - 25 in the 
military hospital on the Italian island of Ischia 
and 3 in private practice here in the Princeton 
area - Mr. DiMeglio mastered the European 
technique of massage which stresses the use of 
the masseur's fingers. The fingers, being the 
most sensitive part of the hand, enable Mr 
DiMeglio to feel exactly what your needs are and 
adjust your massage to fulfill your specific needs 
You leave feeling more than refreshed and relax- 
ed. You leave feeling great! 

Come in today for a free consultation. Full and 
partial massages are available 



Princeton Total Health Massage Center 

133 Washinglon Street • Rocky Hill, New Jersey 08553 

i one flight above Peppi Custom Hair Design) 

(609) 924-0600 
People who speak Italian call: '609) 924-4151 









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The Perfect Sham.,H/cut, Bl./Dry $1 8.00 

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Route 1, So. Brunswick r_"„;i 222 HI. 22 w.. Grtffht^W 
(opp. Flagpost Inn) ^" ~ "•' (across Item Arlriui*M 

(201)297-2626 k*j| (201)968-3096 



5 \rt in Princeton 

• Continued from P»o» ^B 

S Study in iron and steel A 

*". smail hippopotamus, albeit 

2 realistic to the nth degree, is 

£ executed with wit and a 

» sympathetic eye that tran- 

h siate the lumbering creature 

g into an appealing form. 



Printmakers at ETS 
Advisor's Choice I, the work of 
five printmakers selected by 
advisors to the Printmaking 
Council of New Jersey, is an 
able demonstration of the 
contemporary graphics 
product; a mixture of pithy 
symbols and virtuoso displays 
of technique that are so 
popular today. Unusual and 
frequently puzzling com- 
binations of imagery are 
combined with words and 
musical notation, 

photographic details in often 
interesting and varied ways. 

A playful dialogue between 
similar images presented in 
different forms characterizes 
the work of Rosemarie Ber 
nardi. In the Principles of 
Oriental Painting, for 
example, sea shells are 
rendered in line, photoimage, 
and a cartoon of Botticelli's 
Venus A different sort of 
menial tease can be found in 
Alastair Noble's work — even 
the titles are a challenge here 
Type and pseudo type figure 
heavily in prints such as 
"Locating the Zero Point" and 
in another work in which 
writing and almost-writing 
interact in not-quite mirror 
images Anthony Gomy goes 
even further with the use of 
exotic, handmade paper 
which, In some cases, is 
printed on both sides of the 
page and then folded for even 
more complex combinations 
of expertly developed sym- 
bolic forms. 

The exceptions in the 
collection are a series of more 
conventional lithographic 
landscapes by Roger Savage 
and several examples of 
photogravure by Diane Hunt 
— rocky landscapes in which 
only the plate mark reveals 
that these arc prints rather 
than photos. 

—Helen Schwartz 



I UHIUIS 

Kunriy Bender will exhibit 
Paintings on Paper at Itnplri 
Graphics Company, G21 Alex 
ander Road, from October I 
through October 31. 

Two exhibitions are shedul 
ed to open at the New Jersey 
Stale Museum in Trenton on 
October 19 



The first is a collection of oil 
paintings by Andrea Belag. 
and the second is entitled, 
"Statements in Slab by Sy 
Shames: A survey, 

1965-1984." 

Ms. Belag. a resident of 
Hoboken, received three New 
York Studio Merit scholar- 
ships and a grant from the 
Hudson County Division of 
Cultural and Heritage Affairs 
She also received a fellowship 
grant from the New Jersey 
State Council on the Arts. 

Mr. Shames, co-owner of a 
pottery studio in Morristown, 
has participated in exhibitions 
at Bergen Community 
Museum, the Morris Museum 
of Arts and Sciences, Mont- 
clair State College, the 
Newark Museum, Glassboro 
State College, Trenton State 
College and Caldwell College 

The exhibitions, part of the 
Museum's New Jersey Artist 
Series, will continue through 
November 25 



An exhibition entitled "Four 
Women Artists" will open with 
a free public reception on 
Wednesday, October 10, from 
r> to 7 p.m., at the Library 
(ijilhry on Mercer County 
Community College's West 
Windsor Campus. The artists 
included Valerie Bowe, 
Suzan Cook, Linda Pochesci 
and Liz Roszel have all been 
visual arts students at MCCC 
and they will show work in 
four media. 

The exhibit will continue 
through November 7. Gallery 
hours are 8 am to 10 p.m., 
Mondays through Thursdays; 
8 a.m, to 5 p.m. Fridays; and 
10 .i hi to 4 p.m. Saturdays. 
For information call Randal 
Salcwski, MCCC curator, at 
NMM800 



Clubs <fe Organizations 

Continual) liom Prseo'lino Page 

Hie Better lleurlng Society 
«f Central New Jersey will 
meet Monday, October 15, at 
7:30 p.m. at the Mcrwick Unit 
of the Medical Center of 
Princeton Laurie Latspuka of 
the New Jersey Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation will 
speak. 

The organization helps 
hard-of-hcaring persons, their 
families und friends, by 
providing information about 
hearing loss and how to cope 
with it. For information call 
822-796fl, 



The Women's College Club 

will meet Monday. October 15 
at 8 p.m. at All Saints' Church 
on Van Dyke Road. Barton 
Kreuzer will narrate a slide 
presentation entitled 
"Through India and Nepal by 
Air. Pedicab. Sedan Chair and 
Elephant." 

Members who would like to 
join Mr and Mrs Kreuzer for 
dinner at the Nassau Club 
preceding the meeting may 
make reservations by calling 
Gerry Bowers at 921-9334 or 
Elly de Boer at 921-1380 before 
Friday, October 12. 



The Central Jersey Group of 
the Sierra Club will meet 
Wednesday, October 10, at 8 
p.m. in Guyot Hall, Room 220 
on the Princeton University 
campus. The topic of the 
meeting will be "The 1984 
Elections — What They Mean 
for the Environment." 

A representative of the 
League of Conservation 
Voters will describe how the 
two presidential and local 
congressional candidates 
differ on the subject of en- 
vironmental issues. In ad- 
dition, the meeting will outline 
how to become involved in the 
upcoming elections. 

Many of the nation's largest 
environmental groups have 
backed a presidential can- 
didate for the first time 
because of the damage they 
feel President Reagan's ad- 
ministration has caused to 
environmental protection. 

The meeting is free and the 
public is encouraged to attend. 
Refreshments will be served 
prior to the meeting. 



Participating organizations 
include the YWCA. the Prince- 
ton Historical Society, Recor- 
ding for the Blind, the 
Backstage Players, and the 
League of Women Voters 

The club is open to any 
newcomer who has lived for 
less than three years within a 
15-mile radius of Princeton. 

The YWCA nursery will be 
available for children ages 
one through five during the 
meeting. For reservations or 
to obtain further information 
about the club, call the YWCA 
at 924-5571. 



mCHAEL L ROSENTH\L. M S.W.. ED.D. 
Personal Problem. Career and Educational Counseling 
Individuals and Small Groups 
Pennington Professional Center 

65 S Main SI.. Bldg. A. Suite 23 (609) 737-2236 

Penniiwlon. New Jersey 08531 By Appointment 



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Appraisal Services 

For an authoritative and 

up-to-date assessment of your fine 

jewelry' and silver . . . 

Let LaY'ake's registered jewelers 

provide a complete mitten 

description ... whether for a 

single piece or an entire 

collection. 

Members of the American Gem Society 

Jewelers and Silversmiths Since 1877 

54 Nassau Street Princeton, New Jersey 08542 

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Thu'.d.y .nd Friday E. Mtln«, Until 830 PM 



W * « * x J p JH JJi W. 91 M 11 Jt JUL lit .ihliT 



Curtis K. Carlson 

The Princeton Chapter of 
Sigma XI scientific research 
society will meet Wednesday, 
October 17, at 8 at RCA 
Laboratories. Curtis J 
Carlson, director, Information 
Systems Research 

Laboratory, will speak on the 
topic, "Evaluating the 
Perceptual Performance of 
Imaging Systems." Dr 
Carlson joined RCA 
Laboratories in 1973 and 
formerly was head of image 
quality and human perception 
research 

The program is open to the 
public 

The Mercer County chapter 
of Mothers Against Drunk 
Drivers (MADD> will meet 
Wednesday, October 10, at 
7 30pm at the Lawreneeville 
Branch of the Mercer County 
Library 

Speaker will be Bill Hayes of 
Hie Slate Office of Highway 
Safety Members of the Ewing 
Township Police Department 
will also take part in the 
program. 

The public is invited For 
more information, call Terry 
Corvino at 771-9486 



The Princeton Newcomers 
Club will meet Thursday. Oc- 
tober II, at noon at the 
Princeton YWCA The pro- 
gram will feature a presenta- 
tion of volunteer organizations 
and their role in the communi- 



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Defense Goes Out to Lunch, Princeton Down to Defeat; 
Will It Come Back against Winless Columbia Saturday? 



IHE\I< KB 



Regardless of what you 
think of Frank Navarro's 
coaching abilities, you had to 
feel sorry for the man, facing 
a room full of reporters after 
Princeton "s 32-30 loss to 
Brown last Saturday. 

The Tigers' defense, the 
toast of the town, after two 
superlative performances 
against Cornell and Bucknell, 
had fallen apart and Navarro 
j^had to come up with an ex- 
planation. It was all too 
familiar. 

"The defense didn't tackle 
and it didn't pursue, there 
were major breakdowns," he 
began. "We got started too 
late with too little, and got 
outplayed the first three 
quarters." 

"We were not as sharp as 
the last two weeks, our mental 




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preparation was lacking this THIS BEAR TURNED THE TIGERS INTO PUSSYCATS: Brown tailback Jamie Potkul 



shredded Princeton's new-look defense for 138 yards last Saturday, helping the 
Bruins to a 32-30 upset victory. 




linebacker Anthony Di Tom- 
maso confirmed the lack of 
mental preparation. "We 
came in flat," he said. "The 
normal level of intensity 
wasn't here. We might have 
been a little overconfident. ' ' 
It couldn't have been plea- Face( j w jt n a better than 
sant for Navarro to have to even c h a nce of extending its 
unearth those time-worn rec ord to 3-0, and matching 
phrases, used so many times p e nn's 2-0 league mark, the 
thepasttwoseasonstoexplatn Ti g ers instead took a giant 
so many similar defeats. Sure- s t e p backward, 
ly, they had been permanently ' 

laid to rest by a new ag- W hat Happens Now? Six 
gressive attitude and a revis- wee |< s ag0 it sa id here that 
ed defensive concept. Princeton had the material to 

. i It certainly wasn't pleasant win tne Ivy title, but that the 
to watch a Brown offense, that Tj gers were also capable of 
-had not accomplished much in f a |ii n g flat on their collective 
its first two games, gain huge r aces and finishing with 
chunks of yardage on the another subpar record, 
ground and through the air for Nothing has changed, 
three quarters. The penetra- perhaps, this will be just a 
tmn. the pressure on the one-time downfall, in an other- 
«quarterback, the tight pass wise fine season; or does it 
defense, were virtually non- pre sage another march to 
existent. The tackling was mediocrity? This team has the 
often shoddy talent to pull off the first op- 

tion, but only if it goes into 
It's hard to believe a team every game prepared to use it 
that has had such modest ac- to the fullest, 
complishments, and a history T h e big games against Har- 
of losing games it should not vard and p enn i ie a head, and 
have, could become the least one | oss has not eliminated the 
bit overconfident. B u t orange and Black from the ti- 

Sports Fans! 

I BET YOU 
DIDNT 
KNOW 

STURHAHN, DICKENSON & BERNARD 





Of ALL the quar- 
terbacks in the history 
of the National Football 
League, which one do 
you think holds the 
record for completing 
the most passes in one 
season? ... The all-time 
record is held by Dan 
Fouts of San Diego ... He 
set it when he completed 
360 passes in 1981 — and 
no other quarterback 
has ever topped that. 
+ + + 

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Here's the story of one 
'he most incredible 
pennant-winning teams 
"> big league baseball 



history — the 1935 Cubs 
The only 

mathematical chance 
they had to win the 
pennant that year was 
to win 21 STRAIGHT 
GAMES in September 
— and they did! ...Their 
sensational September 
streak carried them to 
first place and the 
World Series. 
+ + + 
Here's a football 
oddity ... Surprisingly, 
the National Football 
League once had TWO 
teams with the SAME 
nickname If you look 
at the NFL standings for 
the 1925 season, you'll 
see that two teams in 
the league that year 
were the Cleveland 
Bulldogs and the Canton 
Bulldogs 

+ + + 



Sturhahn, Dickenson 
& Bernard 

INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 
14 Nassau St. • 921-6880 
i * K *■*• >mt>ati >j« >«k saec »k >»*•»« aKW< > 



% 



_^^ fBob Matthows photo) 

tie chase. It's been 14 years snap from center prevented 
since any team (Dartmouth another field goal. 
7-Otfinished undefeated in 

league play. The Princeton offense, 

which finally got in high gear 

If nothing else, the loss to in the fourth period, could not 
Brown has eliminated the keep pace. Quarterback Doug 
possibility that Princeton will Butler ended with impressive 
head for New York this Satur- stats, 24 of 48 for 393 yards, but 
day for a 1:30 game against four interceptions (not all of 
Columbia full of over- them his fault) four or five 
confidence. Two years ago dropped passes, and some 
that fate befell the Tigers, and poor passes of his own, did not 
they lost 35-14 to a Lion team make for a consistent attack, 
that beat no one else that fall. It also had to play most of 

The Light Blue again is the game without the services 
winless so far this season, of offensive guard and co- 
opening with losses at home to captain Chal Taylor, who 
Harvard and Lafayette. Last sprained his knee in the first 
weekend, the Lions were half, and will be out at least 
blown out of Franklin Field, the next two games. 
35-7, by Penn, Brown led 13-10 at the half, 
on the strength of one first 

With the graduation of period touchdown and two se- 
quarterback John Witkowski cond period field goals. The 
and two of his three fine last field goal was set up when 
receivers, Columbia figured to the Tigers could not cover 
have problems with its of- sophomore Rob DiGiacomo's 
fense, while a veteran defen- 51-yard punt well enough, 
sive unit expected to perform Brown's Kiernon Bigby 
better than previous years. returned it 61 yards to the 

After the first three games, Princeton 29. 
the offense has come along Butler and Derek Graham 
faster than expected, but the connected on a 23-yard 
defense has yet to jell. Har- touchdown pass, and Mike 
vard, like Penn, scored 35 Miskovsky booted a 40-yard 
points, Lafayette, 23. field goal, both in the second 

Junior Henry Santos has quarter, 
taken over for Witkowski and 
performed well hitting on 40 

passes in 72 attempts for 536 The Bruins opened the third 
yards and 4 touchdowns. His period by 8*»ng 73 vards in 
favorite target is senior tight just six plays to open a 20-10 
end Dan Upperco who has lead. The Tigers matched this 
caught 15 passes for 267 yards, with a 70-yard drive of their 

The Light Blue have a better own in nine plays, but had no 
than average runner in senior immediate answer for two 
Darryl Mitchell, who has gain- more Brown TD's later in the 
ed 107 yards in 38 carries, cominued on Nexi Paoe 

They also have a brand ,1HW ^^S^|flJ|^J*l 

concrete stadium, replacing 

the old wooden stands in 

Baker Field, a homecoming 

day scheduled, and a fierce 

desire to beat Princeton more 

than anyone else on the 
■ schedule. 

After the loss to Brown, the 

Tigers should have more than 

enough incentive of their own 
j Another upset here, and no 
! one is going to care about the 
| reasons. 

I BRUINS DESERVE CREDIT 
For Their Victory. All the 
I talk about the Princeton 
!" defense should not over- 
| shadow the fact, that the 
• Brown offense played a very 
fine game, executing their 

i plays with precision 
Tailback Jamie Potkul gain- 

j ed 138 yards in 28 carries, run- 

\ ning a toss sweep play again 

j and again for big yardage 

! When Princeton finally began 

[ to stop him, it was too late. 

: Quarterback Steve Ket- 

i tleberger completed 17 out of 

: 30 passes for 251 yards to com- 
plement Potkul 's running The 
visitors' attack was unstop- 
pable in the second and third 
quarters, scoring on six of 
seven possessions Only a poor 



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LVwWAW^V.^WrVW ^ h 







IVY LEAGUE FOOTBALL 












Last Saturday's Results 












Brown 32 Princeton 30 












Army 33 Harvard 11 












Bucknell 10 Cornell 7 












Holy Cross 30 Dartmouth 20 










Penn 35 Columbia 7 












Yale 41 Morgan State 












Ivy 


Overall 






W 


L T Pel W 


L 


T 


Pel 




? 


1000 3 








1.000 


Brown 


? 


1 000 2 


1 





667 


Harvard 


1 


1 000 1 


2 







Princeton 


1 


1 500 2 


1 







Cornell 





1 .000 


3 







Dartmouth 


1 000 


3 







Yale 


n 


1 000 1 


2 







Columbia 





2 000 
This Saturday's Games 


3 





.000 






Princeton al Columbia at 1 30 










Cornell al Harvard 












Dartmouth at Yale 












Penn at Brown 









Sports in Princeton 

ConimuM I'om Prnr r-jnig Page 

period, The winners entered 
the final quarter, ahead 32 17 



Reverting to an old script, 
tin orange and Black came 
alive on both offense and 
defense in the final < i>'M 
minutes, only to fall two points 
short at the end. The come- 
back was ignited by Graham 
who, with some splendid 
moves, turned an ordinary 
10-15 yard sideline pass com- 
pletion into a 51-yard 
touchdown romp. 



Two-Point Try Fails. A suc- 
cessful two-point conversion 
attempt was crucial here, but 
the Tigers came up empty- 
handed, when Butler's toss to 
Graham on a slant-in was in- 
tercepted. Princeton 
desperately needs more inven- 
tive two-point attempts. 

Aided by a 45-yard pass 
from Butler to Mark Dexter, 
Princeton scored again four 
minutes later, but still trailed 
by two points and needed to 
get the ball back Navarro 
elected to go for an on-side 
kick, a questionable call with 
3:16 to play and all time outs 
remaining, but it failed to go 

Hi' 1 H'tjun eii III yards and 



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TRUEBLUE 




Brown had the ball on the 
Princeton 45. 

The Princeton defense had 
come up with the big play in 
the first two games, but there 
was none forthcoming this 
time Twice on third and long 
Brown retained possession by 
dumping short passes off to its 
fullback, with no Tiger player 
anywhere near him. 

Princeton's full -speed 
defense had run out of gas 

— Jeb Stuart 

[MIS MI'S RAMS, 2-1 
In Field Hockey. Aside from 
a 7-0 victory over Peddie, the 
largest winning margin for the 
Princeton High field hockey 
team this fall has been two 
goals. Last week was no ex- 
ception, as the Little Tigers 
were pressed to beat an upset- 
minded Hightstown team. 2-1. 
in overtime. 

A year ago, Hightstown had 
upset a highly-favored PHS 
team by same 2-1 margin, and 
Little Tiger coach Joyce Jones 
remembered: "This year's 
game was a carbon copy of 
last year — except we won." 

The LittleTigers, winners of 
six of their first seven games, 
will be active this week They 
will entertain Monroe 
Thursday and Ewing Friday 
in back-to-back games 
starting at 3:45 and be at 
Hamilton Monday They were 
also scheduled to play Steinert 
earlier this week. 

In the upcoming Mercer 
County tournament, the 
second-seeded Little Tigers 
drew an opening round bye 
and will play the winner of No. 
Id West Windsor vs. No. 7 
Steinert in the opening round 
next Saturday. Top-seeded 
Hopewell Valley and third- 
seeded Notre Dame also drew 
byes in the preliminary round. 

The first half of the 
Hightstown game was 
scoreless but the home team 
Rams broke the drought one 
minute into the second half on 
an unassisted goal by Allison 
Czarnecki. Seven minutes 
later Michelle Cumberbatch 
tied it on her score assisted by 
SueLofgren. 

The first ten-minute 
overtime was scoreless. Two 
minutes into the second, 
senior Kim Perna ended 
Hightstown's upset hopes 
when she scored on an assist 
from Cumberbatch. 

Princeton enjoyed an 18-8 
edge on shots on goal as Ram 
goalie Anne Vandermark 
came up with 16 saves Caylyn 
TobinhadtwoforPHS. 



RE-EVALUATION NEEDED 
Sa\s Hun Grid Coach. What 
can you say after your team 
has been pounded 35-14 to 
remain winless after three 
games'? 

Not much. Hun football 
coach Bill Quirk found himself 
in the unenviable position last 
week of having run out of 
options, after Academy of 
New Church rolled over the 
Ineffective Raiders "It was a 
bad game all around for 
everybody said Quirk. "The 
only thing positive 1 can say is 
we finally scored " Hun did 
manage to get on the board 
twice in the final period on a 
14-yard pass from quar- 
terback Bob Salasko to Tim 
O'Gorman and on a one-yard 
plunge by fullback Seth 
Wheat on but that came after 
the visiting Quakers already 
owned a 35-0 lead. 




WORTH THE PRICE OF ADMISSION: Flanker Derek Graham had another of his 
electrifying pass receptions against Brown, turning a 10*15 yard gain into a 
51 -yard touchdown run with his elusive style. ( $ a nGu a m a wtptioto) 

"We are going to have a "They are a traditionally scrape tooth and nail for any 

serious evaluation of our of- tough team," said Quirk of wins from now on." 

fense and entire personnel. We Blair. "They're not as big as Asked if the team's morale 

need some readjustments in j n past years but football is a was down as a result ° f "- ne 

our offense, "said Quirk. big tradition with Blair and we poor start, Quirk replied that 

Ahead for Hun is a 2 p.m. always have a tough game he was sure the players were 

contest Saturday against Blair with them. We don't." added d ° w n after Friday's per- 

Academy in Blairstown Blair Quirk, "have an easy game f° 

is all even this season, having left on the schedule, 

defeated Dunellen High "Any 'easy' games we were 

School, lost to Wyoming hoping for were in the first 

Seminary and tied Admiral three. We're going to have to 
Farragut 



"It's our job as coaches to 
get 'em back up," Quirk ad- 
ded. "We still have five games 
left and we still have a chance 
for a winning season ." 



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Winless, Disorganized Princeton High Football Team Faces 
Another Diffic ult Battle against Hightstown Away S aturday 

Princeton High footba 
coach Bill Cirullo said that he 
was not pleased And who can 
blame him? Princeton's 27-18 
loss to Hamilton Friday was 
not a pretty sight. 

"You saw a team who did 
not respond," fumed Cirullo. 
"As a team we played poorly; 
we need to reorganize our 
special teams. For the third 
straight week we lost to a 
team that we should have 
beaten. This team needs to 

spond. to get hungry, to find 

t what the game 
about." 

What made the outcome so 
frustrating for Cirullo is that 
PHS had a 6-0 lead when the 
game was only 10 seconds old 
Then when it lost the lead to 
Hamilton, first at 7-6 ani 
again at 14-12, it came back 
both times to take the lead 
again. And still PHS couldn't 
hold it. 

In the second half, with the 
game on the line and PHS 

trying to overcome a three- A HULSMAN HURRAH: Princeton High end Gavin Hulsman Is about to score on 
point lead, the Little Tigers this 48-yard pass play In the second period to give the Little Tigers an 1 8-1 4 lead 
could not contain the straight- pHS yielded a pair of TDs In the second half, however, and went down to a 
ahead, no-frills ground game frustrating 27-18 loss — Its third without a win. 

of the Hornets. — 

gallop When Hamilton con- Crawford and his teammates 







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smelled it now. The key: stay 
on the ground and run right at 
the PHS line between its two 
tackles, Crawford wanted the 
ball on every play and Festa 
was content to hand it off to 
him. 
Nine times in the ensuing 



"When you're losing by verted the extra point, the 
three points and you allow Hornets led 7-6 and Prince- 
simple power plays to beat ton's early lead had lasted a 
you, that tells you little over six minutes. 

something," said Cirullo. "I 

didn't see a tremendous The Little Tigers, who were 
amount of fire out there." to draw Cirullo's ire for not 

And the mistakes — costly responding, did respond on 

errors — continue. "There are this occasion with a 79-yard drive Crawford lugged the 

problems in communication; drive that featured a nice run ball, jumping over the PHS 

plays going in are not the by Scott Fisher and a 24-yard line from the one as time ran 

plays being run," Cirullo pass from Freddie Young to out on the scoreboard clock, 

stated, When a lineman goes Billy Scott, Facing a fourth- His performance against PHS 

and-three for the TD seven placed Crawford in sixth place 

plays later. Young hit Shawn among the leading rushers in 

Hutchins in the end zone with the county with 244 yards and 

65 seconds left to play in the 5.1 average, 

initial period. Again The Hornet squad was 

Hulsman's PAT attempt was jubilant at the game's end; the 

wide. Little Tiger squad quiet and 

Now it was Hamilton's turn, subdued. It was the most 

The Hornets mounted their disappointing loss of the 

first drive, traveling 65 yards season by a good measure 

in 14 plays, quarterback Mike The PHS field does not have 

Festa scoring standing up on a lights. If it did they would be 

two-yard keeper. The extra burning long into the night 

point by Darrin Ambrose gave during this week's practice 



; down field on a pass play (that 
'"particular lapse wiped out a 

38-yard gain) that's brutal. 

That makes a nightmare for a 

coach 
"Sure, mistakes hurt us. 

Here I am telling you the same 

things again, things I thought 

we had corrected." 



Where do the winless, 
disorganized Little Tigers go 
from here? "Back to the 
practice field," continued 
Cirullo. "We have six games 
left and I still think we can be 
a good football team." 

At the same time, Cirullo 
indicated in no uncertain 
terms that his patience had 
worn thin. "We're going to 
make a few changes," he 
promised for next week's 
game with Hightstown. That 




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the visitors a 14-12 lead. 

Three plays later following 
the return kickoff , PHS, which 
had been held to one TD and a 
field goal in its first two 



HUN BOOTERS LOSE 
To Princeton Day School. In 

its only game last week, the 
Hun School soccer team 



games, had its third TD and d ^ „ 2 ., decision , riva , 

Ilia loaH QffQin 111. 19 Thd _ . rl _ _ . 



the lead again, 18-12 The 
payoff play was a little flare 
pass to Hulsman, who raced 48 



Princeton Day School, 
evening Hun's record at 3-3-2. 
All the scoring took place in 



will be played Saturday at 1:30 yards down the sideline after the f irst perio( j Chris Mackin 
being sprung loose on a block scored for Hun while the 



at Hightstown 
^_, Hightstown ripped winless 
McCorristin, 34-6, in its last 
start for a 2-1 record. Another 
tough game for PHS? "A very 
tough game," agreed Cirullo. 
"We could play McCorristin 
and it would be a tough game 
theway we're going." 

Early Momentum. You 

can't begin a football game in 
more dramatic fashion than 
the way PHS grabbed a 6-0 
lead against visiting 
Hamilton. 

Princeton's opening kickoff 
was gathered in by Hamilton's 
Tyrone Gore who was hit 
around his own 30. The ball 
squirted loose and sophomore 
linebacker Tim Rumer picked 
» off in midair and ran it back 
or a 6-0 lead after ten ticks on 
the clock. Gavin Hulsman's 
extra point effort was wide 

Two plays later Princeton's 
« ar ly momentum climbed 
»*ard early blowout when 
Hamilton fumbled and 
Hulsman recovered on the 
JLsL ™* 30 Seven plays later, 
-raced with a fourth-and-ten. 

hi l !f d a field goal " was 
blocked by Ham.lton defen- 

sive end Dave Deinhardt and 
Picked up by KarUon 

Lrawford Crawford, who was 
to be a craw in the Little 
''gers throats all afternoon 
'" • J rds and lhr ee TDs). 
ra^E up tne loose bal1 and 
ff.M " P the middle of the 
" e 'a en route to a 78-vard 



by Dominic Tracey 

The third period was 
scoreless. It ended with 
Hamilton driving and 
threatening to regain the lead 



Panthers' Sal Fier scored his 
Uth and 12th goals of the 
season in the game for PDS. 

After a ten-day break, Hun 
was scheduled to resume 



On a fourth and one from the agajnst B]ajr Academy this 
PHS 10, the Little Tigers held week and wi|1 p , ay George 
- a big play for the defense Sclm)l here Sa[urday at 3:30 
which was having trouble and Pennington Scno ol away 
stopping Hamilton's straight- 
ahead power 

In two plays PHS back Rob 
Bosley gained nine and a half 
yards. Needing less than a 
yard, Young was pulled down 
on a sweep and PHS had to 
give up the ball again. Cirullo 
was livid. "I said quarterback 
sneak, not quarterback on the 
corner." he shouted in 
disbelief from the sidelines 

The final period was all 
Hamilton — aided by some 
more costly PHS mistakes. 
After an exchange of punts, 
PHS was forced to punt again. 
In a bizarre play. Crawford 
fielded the punt, dropped it, 
picked it up and ran into the 
back of his own player, Gore, 
bounced off. threaded his way 
through the middle of the PHS 
defense, cut and followed his 
blockers down the sidelines 
and simply outran the 
remaining Little Tigers 
defenders. The play covered 
62 yards. It also gave 
Hamilton the lead again, 21-18. 

Hamilton re | a '"S d 
possession on its 48 when PHS 
was forced to punt again. 



on Tuesday morning at 10. 

MIKE'S WINS FIRST 

In Soccer League. Mike's 
Tavern of Princeton defeated 
Muscle Magic, 6-4, last week 
for its first victory in the 
Mercer County Women's 
Unlimited Soccer League. In 
other action, league-leading 
Joe's Mill Hill defeated 
Princeton Caterers, 5-1, and 
Princeton Nautilus dropped a 
3-1 decision to Hibernians. 

Mike's will oppose Prince- 
ton Caterers at noon Sunday at 
Mercer County Park in its 
next start. 

Once again Cindy Lombardo 
paced Mike's offense, scoring 
four goals in the victory over 
Muscle Magic Also scoring 
lor Mike's were Celia 
DiPolvere and Nancy Balmer- 
Csira. Sue Zaga, Lisa Surtees 
and Sallie Toscano assisted on 
three of Lombardo's goals. 

Mike's coach Bob Smyth 
was pleased with his team's 
performance. "Our offense is 
starting to come together and 
our defense is getting stronger 
every week," said Smyth 



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Loss to Pennington Doesn't Dim PDS's Future 




S HEINS AND HAYNES ON THE MOVE: Greg Heins and David Haynes both came up with big plays In Princeton 
Day's drive lor Its only touchdown In the second quarter against Pennington. Helns (left) caught a 33-yard 
pass Irom quarterback Tim Howard, and a couple of plays later Haynes went around the Panthers' left end for 
good yardage. fpnowt oyaai rrauis i 

In a battle of equals, the eluding two sacks; Eric ByJin, 
abilities of just one player can seven tackles, one sack; and 
sometimes be enough to tip Greg Heins, 10 tackles from 
the balance in his favor his safety position 

The Princeton Day football The PDS offense had its 
team proved itself the equal of share of success, too, moving 
Pennington last Friday in the ball against (he best 
almost every respect, except defense it will face all season, 
the score The Panthers losl Afler Picaricllo had scored 
14.7. from the one, capping a 
53-yard drive in the first 

The difference was the Ked period to put the home team 
Raiders' superb quarterback up, 7-0, the Panther attack 
Pat Picaricllo. An aroused got rolling 
PDS defense stopped just 

about evcrylhing Pennington Passing Effective. Knowing 
iried in four quarters of play, it had to pass to open up the 
but Picaricllo found his way Raiders' defense, PDS clicked 
into the end zone twice to pro- on a 33-yard loss from Howard 
vide the margin of victory to Heins on its next series. 

On paper, there was a large That gave it a first down deep 
disparity between the Iwo In Penninglon territory 
schools. The undefeated After David Haynes had 
Raiders had whipped three op- gained good yardage on the 
portents by large margins, ground. Bill Noonan and 
while PDS was slowly gaining Haynes connected on a 
momentum with its 2-1 mark. 15-yard touchdown pass, with 
The Raiders were also a much Haynes making a one-handed 
heavier team. calch in the end zone. 

Tom Foster's extra point 

But on the field, the Blue made it 7-7 with 10:38 left in 
and While's determinolion the second period 
closed this gap almost mine 



ly Coach Jim Walker praised 
his team's defensive sffort, 
citing several players Eric 
Hovanec, 11 tackles; Tim 
Howard, nine tackles. 111 



PDS threatened to take the 

lead 111 the third period when a 
perfect 32-yard pass from 
Howard to Bylin brought it a 
first down on the Pennington 





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20. The Raiders' defense stif- 
fened here, and PDS turned 
the ball over when a fourth 
down pass to Bylin fell in- 
complete. 

Harassed all afternoon by 
the blitzing Panthers, 
Picariello was at his best at 
this point, moving his team 80 
yards for the winning 
touchdown. He eluded the PDS 
rush long enough to complete 
a couple of long passes, and 
then provided the coup de 
grace with a beautiful 14-yard 
run Apparently stopped with 
nowhere to go around the left 
side, he cut back against the 
flow of tacklers, and ran un- 
touched into the end zone. 

PDS did not quit, however, 
mounting a fourth quarter 
drive that again brought the 
ball within 20 yards of the ty- 
ing touchdown with 1:55 re- 
maining on the clock. Two 
running plays gained little, a 
third pass play was in- 
complete, and Noonan's 
screen pass to McConaughy 
resulted in a three-yard loss. 

Noonan and Howard com- 
bined for nine completions in 
17 attempts for 90 yards, the 
best passing PDS has had to 



Spttrts in Princeton 

Continued from Preceding Page 

PHS ON A ROLL 

In Girls Soccer. All in all, it 
was a good week for the 
Princeton High girls soccer 
team. 

Yes, it began with a 2-1 loss 
to undefeated Notre Dame but 
coach Ed Beachams Little 
Tigers rebounded with a 2-1 
victory the next day against 
Hightstown and then routed 
McCorristin, 8-0, on Friday. 
As a result, PHS has a 6-3 
record, trails Lawrence (6-1- 
1) by one point in the Valley 
Division in the CVC and is 
seeded third (behind Notre 
Dame and Hamilton) in the 
Mercer County tournament. 

PHS will oppose a strong 
Ewing team (8-1) at home 
Friday at 3:45 and will be at 
Hamilton (6-2-1) on Monday. 
It was also scheduled to play 
another big school, Steinert, 
earlier this week. 

"I think we have a shot at 
them.'" said Beacham this 
work "Normally we don't, 
but I guess you could Bay we 
have a chance against 
anybody this year." 

Only eight teams have 
elected to take part in the 
Mercer County Tournament 
itns year PHS. seeded third. 
will oppose sixth-seeded 
Pennington School next 
Saturday, the 20th. at Mercer 
Park m the opening round 

Scoring shoes On. "We bad 
our scoring shoes on that 

day. agreed Beacham after 
PHS rolled over visiting 
McCorristin. Booie Lockwood 



date. Haynes got 65 yards on 
the ground, McConaughy, 34; 
PDS totaled 116. Pennington 
had 195 on the ground and 54 
through the air. 

The loss dropped the Pan- 
thers to 1-2 in the Prep 
League, and 2-2 overall, but it 
just might be their last. If PDS 
plays with the same gusto 
against its next four op- 
ponents, (George, Wardlaw, 
Pingry and Morristown) it 
stands a good chance of 
finishing 6-2. 

George is next this Saturday 
in another road trip for the 
Panthers. The Newtown, Pa. 
school is 1-2 so far this season. 
Its latest loss came Friday to 
Chestnut Hill, 34-12. Antineo 
Merritt was George's one 
bright spot, gaining 163 yards 
in 15 carries. 

Now, back in early 
September, PDS had little 
trouble beating Chestnut Hill 
in a scrimmage, but Walker, 
like most coaches, doesn't put 
much stake in comparative 
scores. As PDS demonstrated 
last Friday, a determined 
team can make pre-game 
comparisons meaningless. 

— Jeb Stuart 



continued her scoring tear 
with three goals, giving her 13 
for the season and a third- 
place tie with Lawrence's 
Dianne Frascella for in- 
dividual honors. (West 
Windsor's Cindy Lombardo is 
first with 24 goals.) 

Fiona Little also added 
three goals — her sixth, 
seventh and eighth — and 
Jenny Howarth and Hillary 
Jones also scored for the Little 
Tigers. 

Although outshot, 33-17, PHS 
made its two second-period 
goals stand out behind the 
goaltending of Laura Nathan 
for its 2-1 victory over Hights- 
town. Little scored the game's 
first goal on an assist from 
Lockwood who then added 
what was to be the winning 
goal. 

Beacham had predicted 
PHS would upset Notre Dame 
because his team has always 
played well against the Irish 
Despite being outshot, 49-12, 
the Little Tigers were still in 
the game; the score was tied 
at 1 as the final period began. 

"We had our shots when the 
score was tied; we just didn't 
put the ball in," recounted 
Beacham "We just ran out of 

XD scored the winning goal 
at 11 13 in the final period 
when Bridget Corrado con- 
verted a pass from Judy 
DiMemmo Little had tied the 
score with an unassisted goal 
in the second period 

Nathan had another sen- 
sational game in front of the 
net for PHS with 36 saves 



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TWO FEET IN SEARCH OF A BALL: Princeton Day's Michelle Sternberg and a 
Montgomery High defender reached the ball at the same point In second quarter 
action last week. Sternberg was around the ball most of the game, and scored 
twice in the Panthers' 5-4 victory. iB»ramt,i,Km 

Sports in Princeton PDS tied the score some PHS will play eighth-seeded 

con»„„.d i„. P ,.c«,n» Page *ree minutes later on a penal- Lawrence at Lawrence 

ty kick by Sal Fier. Then at the at 3:45 on Thursday, the last 

15-minute mark. Fier got the day the preliminary round 

PDS GIRLS WIN A PAIR game winner, assisted by must be completed. 

In Soccer. Suddenly, things Lynch Hunt. Fier has 13 goals — - — 

are looking up for the in seven games. We payed well against 

Princeton Day girls' soccer After a game scheduled to McCorristin, said Mackey, 

team be played this past Tuesday who commented that the Little 

Losers in their first five against Pingry, the team will Tigers had looked very 

games this season the Pan- meet Marie Katzenbach sluggish two days earlier 

thers won twice last week to School in the opening round of against Higiitstown. 

raise their record to 2-5. 'he Mercer County Tourna- Tim Mains opened the 

There's more tough sailing ment. PDS, which shared the scoring early ge ting the Iron 

ahead however Thev nlav title a year ago with Mikes only goal 50 seconds 

P ngry ttET WedSay" at LawrenceviV is seeded fifth, into .the fire, period But Nick 

k«Jr. -,-* ti,„„j,„ one Gruhn tied it in the second 

muT face pow^ NoSe Idle last week in ,„. with his fifth goal of the season 

Dame in he opening ound of terscholastic competition, the or . an « aist from A an , A, en^ 

the Mercer County Tourna- Field Hockey team will Pnnceton J*™ took the lead 

ment. ND is the top seed: the resume play against Hun this "S" hlS 

Panthers are rated eighth Wednesday at home Thurs- ' 13u mark m the third period, 

Panthers are rated eighth. ^ ^ ^ ^ TomFoltiny getting the assist, 

Princeton Dav broke its los- round in the county tourna- and Gruhr is sixth goal of the 
in S las" Wednesday ment, meeting Ewing. The "1 hj i, ;econ Isleft ,n the 
with a 5-4 triumph over Blue Devils are seeded ninth, ^c^,^ "ntered the 
visitine Montaomerv Each PDS, eighth, and the winner ™cu>mstin nad entered the 
ream n s g cored inTe^quane'r geU the^ubious distinction of SgT'.WefSviWeaTed 
but PDS tallied twice, n these- playing top-ranked Hopewell Se n " e and^wing'fndUed 

s*nnrt t r\ milra IVlu rliffararifa VHllP\ . . . ., ~ . 

twice in its previous four 
starts. 



NEW GOLF PRO NAMED 

At Springdale Club. Peter 
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at Springdale Goif Club for 30 
years, has been named head 
professional to succeed James 
Hultgren 

Mr. Hultgren resigned to 
accept a position with the 
Commonwealth Marketing 
Group. Gulf Shores, Alabama. 
a resort real estate company 
specializing in condominiums, 
hotels, private homes and 
apartment complexes 

Since the founding of 
Springdale in 1895, the club 
has had only five 
professionals. Mr. Consoli will 
be the sixth. A native Prince- 
tonian, Mr. Consoli received 
his Professional Golf 
Association card in 1964 and 
also served as assistant pro at 
Yeamans Hall, Charleston, 
S.C. for several years. 

TENNIS TITLE DEFENDED 

By Princeton High. The 

undefeated Princeton High 

Continued Horn Preceding Page 



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cond to make the difference 

Michelle Sternberg and 
Karen Callaway both scored 

twice for PDS, and Kim WE NEEDED THAT PHS had begun the week 

Reinhart added a single tally PH s Booters Top with a 7-0 loss to unbeaten 
On Friday, PDS kept rolling McCorristin. "We needed that Notre Dame for its worst 
with a 1-0 victory over George w j n very badly," commented shellacking of the season. The 
School in Newtown. Callaway Princeton High soccer coach Irish outshot PHS, 52-9 and 
provided the only goal of the Becky Mackey, after PHS put the game away with four 
contest midway through the defeated McCorristin, 3-1, fourth-period goals, 
first half. Melissa Trend Friday, ending a winless "They certainly outplayed 
registered her first shutout of streak of five games. us but we held our own until 
the season, making nine saves Following losses to Hights- the end of the third period 
in the process. PDS had 20 t ow n and Notre Dame last when the score was 3-0," 
shots on goal, but only one got wee k. the Little Tigers are 3-5- recalled Mackey "They kept 
by George's Madeline Alison, i. the pressure on us — they 

Next the Little Tigers will move the ball so well - that 
The boys' soccer team saw play Ewing and Hamilton, two they forced us to make 
action just once last week, and long-time county powers who mistakes." Mike Hun- 
raised its mark to 3-3-1, with a are struggling this season, ninghake, who bore the brunt 
2-1 win over visiting Hun. All PHS will entertain Ewing (3- of tne Irish's 52-shot on- 
the scoring came in the first 6) Friday at 3:45 and visit s i a ught was credited with 21 
period, with the Raiders tak- Hamilton (1-6-2) on Monday. saves 

ing a 1-0 lead on an unassisted In the Mercer County Mackey had hoped the Little 
tallv bv Chris Mackin. Tournament, ninth-seeded Tigers would bounce back 

from the ND loss against 
Hightstown but they didn't, 
she said. "We were still down; 
it was a very sluggish game." 
The Rams took a 3-0 lead at 
halftimeand won a 4-1 victory. 
Princeton's lone score came in 
the third on a header by 
Matthew Mack assisted by 
Elliott. 




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43 Witherspoon Street • Princeton 
(609)924-1052 




Usedtfa 



1984 Lincoln 
4-Door 




air 17 624 $«Q QQ|- 

conditioning miles | J.JjJ 

The original list price on this car is $23,000 



1983 Mercury 
Grand Marquis 
4-Door 

1983 Ford F-350 
High Cube Van 

1983 Lincoln 
Mark VI 2-Door 

1982 Grand 

Marquis 

2-Door 

1 982 Ford Escort 
Station Wagon 

1981 Cadillac 
El Dorado 
2-Door 

1981 Olds 
Cutlass Supreme 
Brougham 4-Dr. 

1981 Capri 
Hatchback 

1980 Chevrolet 
Malibu Classic 
4-Door Wagon 

1977 Chevrolet 
Caprice Station 
Wagon 

1979 Olds 
Cutlass Supreme 
2-Door 



8 cylinder 
Automatic 

8 cylinder 
Std. Shift 

8 cylinder 
Automatic 



8 cylinder 
Automatic 



air 
conditioning 

air 
conditioning 

air 
conditioning 



air 
conditioning 



31.920 $ 
miles 



9695 

'8995 
"-♦15,595 

'7995 



53.000 
miles 



miles 



51 ,000 
miles 



4 cylinder air .Moon 

Automatic conditioning miles 



$ 



8 cylinder 
Automatic 



6 cylinder 
automatic 



6 cylinder 
Automatic 



6 cylinder 
automatic 



8 cylinder 
Automatic 



8 cylinder 
automatic 



air 
conditioning 



air 
conditioning 



air 
conditioning 



air 
conditioning 



air 

conditioning 



conditioning 



70.475 $ 
miles 



49,973 $ 

miles 



62,000 
miles 



61.767 
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67,200 
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5495 
8995 
6995 
'5495 



'4695 
'2995 



59.900 $ 
miles 



4895 



NASSAU-CONOVER 
MOTOR COMPANY 

Route 206 & Cherry Valley Rd., Princeton ♦ 921-6400 



Peter Consoli 






Borough Contest 



; of their homes because their 
- homes have gone up in value. 
"Z What does push people out of 
uj town is the tax rate." 
o Bob Cook said that by ad- 
£ ding to the housing stock the 
o Borough would have to add to 
>-" the police department, roads 
a would wear out at a faster rate 
J3 with heavier traffic, and the 
g sewers would be overburden- 
ju ed with more connections. 
. "Any increase in the tax 
-» burden should definitely be 
z applied to the infrastructure " 

z 

o 

£ Better Balance? According 
o to Marvin Reed, the 
£ Democratic ticket offers bet- 
o. ter balance for what is needed 
w on Council. He notes that Jane 
^ Terpstra is an attorney who 
o can supply extra legal advice 
z in addition to that provided by 
: Council President Dick Wood- 





Mildred I Mil 111,111 

businessmen tend to be more 
practical about things." 

Mr. Woodbridge also 
believes that the backgrounds 
of the Republican candidates 
will be useful in Council: Bob 
Cook's in real estate, Archie 
Reid. a land use attorney, and 
his own, which includes a 
degree as a transportation 
engineer. 

— Mm n.i K. Bearse 

This is the first of two articles 
on the Princeton Borough 
Council campaign. The second 
will appear later this month 

Sports in Princeton 



third singles in straight sets in 
both rounds. 

PHS will play Princeton 
Day School again this Wed- 
nesday in a regualr season 
match, Ewing on Friday and 
Hamilton on Monday. There 
isn't one opponent left on the 
schedule that the Little Tigers 
haven't already defeated this 
season. 

"I always like to think we 
can beat everybody locally," 
said Humes, "but we still have 
to play West Windsor again 
and Hopewell on its home 
court." 

First Loss for Pirates. 

Earlier in this most successful 
of weeks, PHS defeated 
previously unbeaten West 
Windsor, 3-2. The victory was 
sweet for the Little Tigers who 
lost twice to WW last year in 
compiling an 18-3 record. 

PHS combined a 6-1, 6-0 win 
by Usiskin over Dolly Chugh 
and a sweep in doubles play 
for its victory. Ellis and 
Pickens won in three sets, 6-1, 
4-6, 6-4, while Bradford and 
Pinneo triumphed, 6-2, 7-5. 
Bailey and Gorman each lost 
in straight sets in singles play 
to Louise Martin and Carmen 
Hsu. 



Marvin Reed 



bridge and Borough Attorney 
Walter Bliss. 

Mildred Trotman, he said, 
offers a special kind of view 
that is very much needed on 
Council because of the 
neighborhood she lives in and 
the people she can represent. 
In addition, her profession in- 
volves working with 
everyone's problems for the 
good of the entire community. 

"And I have 30 years of 
working in Trenton with state 
government, school budgets, 
taxes, and tax reform issues. 
While Barbara Sigmund has 
her connections into state and 
federal agencies, I have a 
whole set of connections of my 
own that I think would add to 
that and give us even more 
balance as the council works 
together. 

According to Fred Wood- 
bridge, "This year, as opposed 
to the past, we have a cam- 
paign based on issues, not per- 




Archie Reid 

sonahties. There is a basic dif- 
ference in philosophy between 
our ticket and theirs. 

He adds that all six can- 
didates are qualified to serve 
and all have good back- 
grounds and good education. 
However, he notes that all 
three Republicans are 
businessmen. "and 



School girls tennis team (8-0) 
successfully defended its 
Mercer County championship 
title last week when it edged 
town rival Princeton Day 
School, 3-2, in the cham- 
pionship finals. 

Princeton had advanced to 
the final round with a 4-1 
victory over Hopewell in the 
semis, while PDS, ranked 
10th, was upsetting fourth- 
ranked West Windsor, 3-2. In 
the preliminary round, PHS 
defeated Peddie and PDS 
stopped Steinert, both by 4-1 
scores. 

PHS coach Bill Humes saw 
Cindy Bailey's 6-1, 6-3 victory 
in the second singles over the 
Panthers' Stacey Feldman as 
the key match in the victory 
over PDS. When both teams 
split the doubles match, 
Bailey's victory gave PHS a 2- 
1 lead and Princeton's top 
player, Irene Usiskin, then 
clinched the outcome with a 
victory in first singles. 

PHS won the first point 
when its first doubles of Gail 
Ellis and Sara Pickens 
defeated Lisa Taitsman and 
Maya Birmingham, 6-3, 6-3. 
Princeton's Lulu Bradford 
and Nell Pinneo dropped the 
second doubles, however, 6-3, 
6-4, to Tracy Needle and Heidi 
Pochner as the match evened. 
That put the pressure on 
Bailey, a junior, who had been 
the lone loser for PHS in semi 
and preliminary rounds. 

Perhaps the best match was 
the battle between Usiskin and 
Rachel Stark of PDS which 
followed. Usiskin, a seasoned 
tournament player, won the 
first set, 6-1, and had PHS one 
set away from victory when 
she jumped to a 5-1 lead in the 
second set. But Stark, who 
Humes described as "a very 
nice player," surprised 
Usiskin by capturing the next 
five games to take a 6-5 lead. 
Usiskin regained her com- 
posure She won the next 
game to force a tiebreaker 
which she won 7-3. 

Princeton Day's second 
point came in the second 
singles, another hard-fought 
struggle Eleanor Gorman of 
PHS won the first set in a tie 
breaker but then fell to Alexa 
Richman who swept 12 of the 
next 15 games for a 6-7. 6-0, 6-3 
victory 

Usiskin won both her 
matches in the semi and 
preliminary rounds by 6-0. 6-0 
scores Gorman also won at 



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