(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Trade Tokens Issued in the Seventeenth Century in England, Wales, and Ireland"

This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 



at |http : //books . google . com/ 



S'2J.^ 





Digitized by 



Google 



\ \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



GUARANTEE. 



Zvabc UoRend isdueb in tbe Se^enteentb Century. 

TAis work is issued in Two Volumes by subscription^ and the 
edition is limited to Two Hundred and Fifty copies only of this 
size, of which this copy is No./.u/., 



Se^^ecme^!2M/o^ 



-^ Editor. 

N.B, — Fifty copies only have been printed on large paper. 



Digitized by 



Google 



N 



"grade "©oifectts 



ISSUED IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



TRADE TOKENS 

Sddueb in tbe Seventeentb Centura 

IN 

ENGLAND, WALES, AND IRELAND, 
BY CORPORATIONS, MERCHANTS, TRADESMEN, Etc. 



Jl ^cm anb 9Ut>isc5 9^i^ion of ^lUiam ilofinc's 9^orfi« 

BY ^^^ 

GEORGE C. WILLIAMSON, 

FJ(. HIST. SOC, 

^.^.5*., F^.S.t P.C.H,S,t Mtmb, Num. Soe., Land., Corrtpondin^ Mtmh, SociiU ProMfoise 

d$ Nu$m$matique et d Archiolotit^ Hon, Corr, Memb, Amtruan Numismatic and 

A rckttoiogical Society , and ojNumUtmatic and A nttqnmrittn Sodtty qf MonttttU, 

etc, etc, 

WITH THB ASSISTANCE OP SOME OP THE PRINCIPAL COLLECTORS OP TOKENS 
IN THB UNITED KINGDOM AS EDITORS OP THEIR RESPECTIVE COUNTIES. 



ILLUSTRATED BY NUMEROUS PLATES AND WOODCUTS, AND CONTAINING 

NOTES OF FAMILY, HERALDIC, AND TOPOGRAPHICAL INtEREST 

RESPECTING THE VARIOUS ISSUERS OF THE TOKENS. 



VOL, I. 

■ * 

LONDON : 
ELLIOT STOCK, 62, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C 

1889. 



Digitized by 



Google 



"7^^; ; . -J 
Pi>"Lit;ri;f\\f ,j 

87622 \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



TO 



i 



THE PRESIDENT, VICE-PRESIDENT, 
THE COUNCIL AND MEMBERS 

OF 

THE NUMISMATIC SOCIETY OF LONDON, 

THIS VOLUME 

IS, 

IVITH EVERY EXPRESSION OF RESPECT, 

VERY CORDIALLY DEDICATED. 






) 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Contente of IPoI. 5. 



PAGR 

Preface ....... xi 

Introduction . . . xix 

Bedfordshire ...... i 

Berkshire . . . . . 15 

Plate of Berkshire Tokens . . . -4^ 

Buckinghamshire ..... 43 

Cambridgeshire . . . . . -57 

Cheshire ....... 80 

Plate of Cheshire Tokens . . . .92 

Cornwall. . . . . . -93' 

Cumberland . . . . . . .111 

Derbyshire . . . . . . 115 

Devonshire . . . . . . .129 

Dorsetshire . . . . . .163 

Plate of Dorset Town Pieces . . . 200" 

Plate of Two Dorset and One Essex Token . 200 

Durham . . . .201 

ESSEK ....... 207 

Gloucestershire . . . . . . 237 

Hampshire ...... 255 

Herefordshire . . -275 

Hertfordshire (Illustrated by Woodcuts) . . 293 



Digitized by 



Google 



CONTENTS. 



Huntingdonshire 

Kent ...... 

Plate of Kent Tokens 
Lancashire ..... 

Plate of Warrington Tokens 
Leicestershire . * . . 

Lincolnshire ... 

Three Plates of Lincolnshire Tokens 
London . , . . . 

One Block of a Pottery Bottle 

Three Plates of London Tokens 



333 
3A» 

392 

393 
416 

417 
428 

506 

505 
509 
S04 



Digitized by 



Google 



preface* 



The Editor in presenting these pages to his many kind subscribers 
desires to make a few remarks as to the reason for the book being 
produced, and the manner and arrangement of its construction. 

In 1858, the well-known work on tokens of the seventeenth 
century was issued by the veteran collector, William Boyne, and, 
being the first important work on the subject, was gladly welcomed 
by collectors. Since that time, in almost every county fresh informa- 
tion as to its tokens has been obtained, and in most counties some 
printed literature on the subject has been issued. This literature has 
usually taken the form of a paper in the proceedings of the county 
Archaeological Society, or has occasionally been a pamphlet issued by 
some local antiquary for private circulation. Comparison with the 
actual tokens, or with specimens in better condition than those in 
Boyne's cabinet, revealed many mistakes in his descriptions, and 
some hundreds of printer's errors were discovered in a very close 
examination of his original MSS. From time to time fresh tokens 
were being discovered, and topographical and genealogical and varied 
information obtained as to their issuers throughout the country. The 
time at length seemed ripe for a fresh edition of the book and a gather^ 
ing together of the diffuse information into a more accurate work. Mr. 
Boyne, at his advanced age, declined to undertake the task, but most 
kindly disposed of his entire collection of tokens, together with his 
manuscripts, letters, and books on the subject, with his copyright, to 
the present Editor. From a boy upwards the Editor had been 
strongly interested in tokens, and desirous at a future time of carry- 
ing out a work of this character, and finding, therefore, the original 
author unequal to the task, he was inclined to accept it It was 
desired to give information as to the striking of the tokens, and their 
use, value, and necessity. The dulness of a mere catalogue was to 
be avoided, while careful notice of all known varieties of the tokens 



Digitized by 



Google 



xii PREFACE. 

differing one from the other in even the smallest particulars must be 
taken, and it was believed that the work would form a most valuable 
adjunct to county topography, and be of the highest importance to 
the student of local manners and customs, and of village life and 
lore. Much tractate information was gathered together in 1883 and 
1884, and on March 9, 1885, a circular-letter was issued to token- 
collectors throughout the kingdom, inviting expression of opinion. 
The circular pointed out that the work could only be properly done 
by what Mr. A. R. Ropes, in his paper to the Royal Historical 
Society, June 17, 1886, calls "co-operative production," the labour 
being divided by sub-editors, who take in hand each their own 
county. 

To this circular (a copy of which is appended) a most generous 
response was received. Offers of aid and assistance and gifts of 
information and pamphlets poured in on all sides. The leading 
collectors in each county generously offered to collect information of 
all kinds, and to be responsible for the editing of their county, and 
the replies received were couched in the kindest and most con- 
siderate terms. On July 20, 1885, a second circular-letter was 
issued to all who replied to the first, in which a decision to issue the 
book was contained, and a rough estimate of its cost included. 
The Editor had now very carefully weighed the question, and knowing 
from experience how interesting the work would be, had decided 
upon throwing himself upon the generous aid of all collectors, 
and endeavouring to complete the work in his evening leisure. It 
was taken up purely as a hobby of pleasure, and without any hope of 
profit, simply in the trust that, aided by the hearty co-operation of 
numismatists, he might cover the cost of production. The circular 
stated that the book had been estimated to produce 896 pages, but 
by the overwhelming amount of information that has been coming in 
ever since, this estimate has been more than doubled. It was 
promised that a limited edition only should be issued by subscription, 
and the book not re-issued ; and the Editor asked for the loan or gift 
of any annotated works on the subject, tracts, books, or pamphlets. 

The following clause also appeared in this circular : 

May I assure all co-workers that their laborious work will be to the fullest 
extent recognised ? All will be treated as co-editors in the undertaking, and this 
fact will be clearly denoted in the work, as in truth many of them will contribute 
the larger bulk of the work, and deserve the praise of all subscribers to it, far 
more than my own work of compilation will deserve. 

It is for purposes of this full recognition that this preface is 
mainly written. A more willing, cordial, and pleasant body of 



Digitized by 



Google 



PREFACE. xiii 

helpers no editor could possibly have possessed. The duty of the 
Editor has been to receive all information, and distribute it round 
under the various counties. 

Much has been copied out from annotated copies (many most 
considerately lent) and pamphlets, and very much general informa- 
tion, and many hundreds of new descriptions have been sent out; but 
the special information contained in the notes, and which gives to the 
book its especial value, is mainly the result of diligent search and 
arduous labour on the part of the county co-editors. Sources of in- 
formation and methods of obtaining it have frequently been pointed 
out by the Editor, circulars issued to all the clergy throughout the land, 
and to mayors, corporation, parish, and guild officers. Parish registers, 
muniments of families, corporation and guild records, gravestones, 
churches, university records, conveyances, wills, visitations, and the 
documents of the British Museum, Record Office and many local 
museums have been laid under requisition in order to furnish all 
possible information as to the family, life, business, character, arms, 
history, death, and burial of the issuers who circulated these 
memorials of a past age. Amanuenses have been employed at the 
British Museum, Bodleian Library, Biblioth^que National, Record 
Office, and several foreign and local county museums ; but the careful 
searching and diligent obtaining of the dainty bits of information has 
fallen mainly to the lot of the county helpers, and most admirably 
have they done their worL 

It is hardly possible to recognise the aid that each has done, but to 

the following numismatists very special gratitude is due, and their 

names are classified under the counties for which their aid has been 

specially given : 

Bedfordshire J. H. Blundbll, Esq., Memb. Num. Soc, Lond. 

Berkshire Major B. Lowsley, Memb. Num. Soc., Lond. 

Cambridge ... .,. Rev. W. G. Searle, M.A. 

Cheshire and Lancashire... Nathan Heywood, Esq., S.S.C., Memb. Num. 

Soc, Lond. 

Cornwall ... R. N. Worth, Esq., Memb. Num. Soc., Lond. 

Devonshire, Hampshire, 
and Siaffordshire ... Henry S. Gill, Esq., J.P., Memb. Num. Soc, 

Lond. 

DorseUhire J. S. Udal, Esq., F. R. Hist. Soc. 

Essex C W. Stainsfield, Esq., M.A. 

Gloucester Rev. B. H. Blacker, M.A., and Sir John 

Maclean, F.S.A., etc 
Hereford, Monmouth, 
Shropshire, and Wales J. W. Lloyd, Esq. 

Hertford .: R. T. Andrews, Esq., Memb. Num. Soc, Lond. 

Huntingdon W. Emery, Esq., Rev. J. L A. Cooper, M.A. 

Kent L. Clements, Esq., Rev. T. S. Frampton» M.A., 

F. E. Whelan, Esq., and the late Rev. T. 

Hamblin Smith. 



Digitized by 



Google 



xiv PREFACE, 

Leicester T. Young, Esq., Memb. Phar. Soc, Lond. 

Lincoln and Rutland ... Justin Simpson, Esq. 

London G. E. Hodgkin, Esq^ 

Norfolk and Suffolk ... E. Skinner, Esq. 
Northamptonshire ... C. Dack, Esq. 

Nottingham The late J. Toplis, Esq., Memb. Num. Soc., Lond. 

Oxford E. B. Nicholson, Esq., and W. W. Wootton, Esq. 

Somerset Wm. Bidgood, Esq., Memb. Soms. Archse. Soc. 

Sussex Kev. E. B. Ellman, M.A., F. E. Sawyer, Esq.y 

F.S. A., and E. H. Willetf, Esq., F.S.A. 

Warwick W. H. Taylor, Esq., Memb. Num. Soc, Lond. 

Westmoreland C Nicholson, Esq., F.S.A. 

Wiltshire W. Cunnington, Esq., and H. P. Blackmore, 

Esq., M.D., Memb. Num. Soc., Lond. 

Worcester W. A. Cotton, Esq., Memb. Num. Soc., Lond. 

Yorkshire C. E. Fewster, Esq., Memb. Num. Soc., Lond. 

Ireland Rev. Canon Hay man and Rev. Canon Grainger, 

D.D., Aquilla Smith, Esq., M.D., M.R.LA«» 

Hon. Memb. Num. Soc., Lond., R. Day, Esq.,. 

W. Fraser, Esq., W, J. Gillespie, Esq., Memb. 

Num. Soc, Lond., and J. Davis White, Esq. 

In the case of London the work has been particularly heavy, and 
the names of Mr. J. Eliot Hodgkin, F.S.A., and his son, Mr. 
G. £. Hodgkin, must be specially mentioned as having taken almost 
entire responsibility for their enonnou? task, and carried their labours 
to a most successful issue ; and in the case of Ireland, Dr. Aquilla 
Smith most generously placed at the disposal of the Editor all the 
information he had been collecting on the subject during a long 
useful and honoured lifetime. 

Beside these names a very dear friend, the late well-known 
antiquary, Mr. Llewellynn Jewitt, F.S.A., took the warmest interest in 
the book, and had undertaken to contribute the counties of Derby 
and Stafford, and to help in every possible way, and would have 
carried out his intention but for his unexpected illness and eventual 
decease in 1886. 

The invaluable aid and advice of Mr. C. Roach Smith, F.S.A., Mr. 
H. Wickham, Mr. G. E. Pritchett, F.S.A., Mr. C T. Gatty, F.S.A., 
Mr. Jos. Clark, F.S.A., Mr. R. F. D. Palgrave, C.B., and very many 
other Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries and members of the learned 
societies have been received in the compilation of the work, and are 
most gratefully acknowledged, and thanks are warmly tendered to the 
hundreds of correspondents, from San Francisco to Japan, and from 
Northern Sweden to South Australia, for descriptions of new tokens, 
corrections of errors, and choice bits of information as to issuers and 
their past history and family pedigree. Much encouragement was 
obtained from the kindly words of the President of the Society of 
Antiquaries, John Evans, Esq., D.C.L., LL.D., Treasurer R.S., Presi- 



Digitized by 



Google 



PREFACE. XV 

d^rtt Numismatic Society, who thus referred to theivork, and whose 
aid has been most cordially granted to its production. He stated : 

" I am glad ta see that one of our members, Mr. G. C. Williamson, of Guild- 
ford, has It in contemplation to issue either a supplement to Boyne or a revised 
edition of his work. I trust that his appeal to the numerous collectors throughout 
the country has been met in such a manner as to encourage him' to undertake the 
task. .These memorials of a bygone generation of traders, though not of the 
highest numismatic interest, throw much light on the manners and customs of the 
time, and to the local historian are of great value and interest." — Anniversary 
Address to Num. Soc,, June, 18, 1885. 

And again : 

** I may take this opportunity of remarking that the comprehensive work on 
seventeenth century tokens undertaken by Mr. Williamson is now making rapid 
progress, and that he has found able coadjutors in most of the English counties. 

** In some, however, aid is still required, and I hope that among our members 
there may be found those ready and aole to render it. 

'* In many collections, no doubt, there are accumulations of seventeenth century 
tokens, extensive or otherwise, that their owners have not had the time or, perhaps, 
the inclination thoroughly to examine. 

" If now they can be induced to take the task in hand, and communicate their 
unpublished varieties to Mr. Williamson, his work will be rendered more com- 
plete, and therefore more valuable to numismatists." — Anniversary Address ta 
Num, Soc.f June 17, 1886. 

It remains to notice the illustrations of the book, and to acknow- 
ledge the courtesy of many collectors in presenting plates and cuts to 
illustrate their portions of the book. It was hoped that the work 
might have been also issued in county divisions, and this hope was 
expressed in a third circular-letter issued in January, 1886; but it was 
found that very many subscribers strongly objected to this issue, and 
also that, while the counties separately would have, doubtless, sold 
well within their respective geographical limits, yet their sale would 
have most seriously curtailed the subscription to the entire book, 
and this plan was therefore reluctantly abandoned. Each county 
has, however, been printed complete in itself, possessing its own 
title-page and preface, and while this has somewhat largely increased 
the size of the book, yet it was felt to be important for interleaving, 
or for any collector to extract his own county separately, and it is 
hoped that the method will give general satisfaction. To every item 
and every note the Editor has given personal attention, although the 
co-editors are responsible for the accuracy of the information ; errors 
have been corrected from the original edition, and the utmost care 
exercised in typography. It cannot, however, be pretended that the 
work is perfect, more especially as new varieties are being constantly 
discovered. It is hoped that collectors will take the will for the 
deed, be assured that every care has been taken, and accept the 
imperfections as unintentional, and forgive them. 



Digitized by 



Google 



xvi PREFACE. 

The second volume will contain a list of subscribers, together with 
the following indexes and a detailed summary of the tokens contained 
in the entire work, their counties, character, and number. 

The indexes will be : 



1. Index of Counties. 

2. Index of Places. 

3. Index of Surnames. 

4. Index of Christian Names. 

5. Index of Initials in the Field. 



6. Index of Devices and Anns. 

7. Index of Merchant-marks. 

8. Index of Shapes. 

9. Index of Values. 

10. Index of Peculiarities. 



And it is trusted that by the aid of these indexes no collector will be 
unable to decipher any token in however poor a condition it appears 
at first to be. The possibility of only reading a very small portion of 
the legend has persuaded the Editor very firmly of the importance of 
every possible aid being given by an exhaustive series of indexes. 

The requirement of such a book has been largely felt among 
numismatists, genealogists, and antiquaries, and it is the Editor's 
hope that the present issue will supply the need. 

To the compiler of family records and pedigrees, the workers 
in folk-lore, the local antiquarian and county archaeologists, it will 
prove a mine of information and a most valuable book of reference. 
The student of heraldry will find in its pages numerous coats-of- 
arms of families, cities, towns, abbeys, traders, etc., of great interest 
But to the collector of tokens it is believed it will be an absolute vade 
mecum, the sine qu& non of his library, and the indispensable treatise 
in all his researches and collections. 

The book being so intended to be the standard work on the 
subject, every possible care has been taken to insure its accuracy in 
all respects, hence the very long and, to many subscribers, tedious 
delay since the first announcement of its publication; and for this 
delay the Editor's weak state of health since the commencement of 
the task must be held very largely responsible. 

The work is now respectfully offered to the subscribers with the 
best wishes of the Editor, and with his hope that those who peruse 
its contents will derive as much pleasure therefrom as has fallen to 
the lot of his helpers and himself in compiling the following pages. 



DUNSTANBEORH, GuiLDFORD, 
August 26, 1889. 



Digitized by 



Google 



\CoPy of Circular referred to on p, xii.] 

-"'boynes work on seventeenth century 

tokens:' 



DUNSTANBEORH, GuiLDFORD, 

March 9, 1885. 

Dear Sir, 

May I be flavoured with your opinion as to the advisability of 
the issue of a supplement to this work, or of a second edition of it ? 
The study and collection of tokens having so much increased lately, 
there is a very constant demand for copies of this work, which, 
although far behind our present information on the subject, yet 
remains the standard and almost the only good book on the subject 
As you are probably aware, almost every county (with, I believe, but 
one exception) has its collector, who in most cases has studied to 
obtain a valuable amount of information on early issuers and other 
matters relating to the county topography. In many cases the result 
of these collectors' labours has been printed in pamphlet or brochure 
form, and for the most part for private circulation only. I think you 
will agree with me, that if these various works could be gathered into 
one volume, it would form one of the highest interest, and would 
command a great demand among numismatists and antiquaries. The 
compilation would, of course, be a matter of some time, but I should 
like to know if you would be willing to become a part editor in such 
a book. 

As I hold the copyright of Boyne's work, together with his papers, 
pamphlets, and original annotated work, I should be prepared, if 
supported by other collectors, to undertake the compilation either of 
a supplement or revised edition of his work, and upon this question 
I beg the favour of your advice. I would suggest : 

(a) That each county collector should contribute information as 

b 



Digitized by 



Google 



xviii TRADE TOKENS, 

to his county, and be responsible, as far as responsibility can be 
assumed, for its accuracy. 

(d) That the work be brought out by subscription, and each sub- 
editor guarantee a certain number of copies, in addition to a certain 
number of free copies received as his personal right. 

(c) That it be printed on both large and small paper, and if pos- 
sible with a few copies on vellum, and that each copy be numbered 
and signed, to limit the issue and enhance the value of the worL 

(d) As to its embracing eighteenth and nineteenth century tokens, 
and silver tokens, I should like your opinion, as this point is in my 
mind somewhat doubtful. 

(e) The name and style of each sub-editor or contributor should 
be fully stated in the work, that each may receive due honour for his 
arduous labours. 

In conclusion, I think such a work would supply a long-felt want, 
and would be gladly subscribed for by county authorities as well as 
by those interested in numismatics. I propose issuing this circular 
to those whom I know have given special counties their special atten- 
tion, and printing eventually, in similar form to this, the replies I 
have the honour of receiving, that as workers together in this branch 
of numismatics, we may be in each other's confidence, and obtain 
each other's views upon such an important matter. 

Awaiting with pleasure the result of your opinion on this subject, 
I am, dear sir. 

Yours very faithfully, 

George C. Williamson. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Jntrobuction* 



Traders* tokens formed an illegal " money of necessity," and were 
issued in England, Wales, and Ireland in the seventeenth century. 
They were the small change of the period, and were extremely useful 
to the people who issued and used them. They would never have 
been issued but for the indifference of a Government to a public 
need, and their issue forms a remarkable instance of a people supply- 
ing their own needs by an illegal issue of coinage, and in this way 
forcing a legislature to comply with demands and requests at once 
just and imperative. 

Tokens are essentially democratic ; they were issued by the people, 
and it is of the people that they speak. They record, with few ex- 
ceptions, the names of no monarchs; they speak of no wars or 
events of great Parliamentary importance ; they were not issued by 
Governments or Cabinets, nor by Peers or Members of Parliament, 
but by the unknown and small traders of well-nigh every village and 
town in the country, and by officials such as Mayors, Portreeves, 
Chamberlains, Overseers, and Churchwardens in boroughs, villages, 
and districts, as well as in larger towns, parishes, and hundreds. 
The reason of their issue was to supply a public need, and when that 
need had been recognised by the Government and steps taken to 
supply it, the issue of tokens ceased, and they passed from the ex- 
change of the shop and the market into the cabinets of the numis- 
matist. The issue commenced in 1648 and only extended to 1679, 
so that the entire series forms one very short chapter of thirty years 
in the history of that most troublous of times in our country's history, 
that immediately following the execution of King Charles I. The want 
of small change had, however, been seriously felt in England for a 
long time preceding their issue. It had been considered beneath 
the dignity of the sovereign to issue coins of any metal baser than 

b—2 



Digitized by 



Google 



XX INTRODUCTION. 

silver, and owing to the increased value of silver the unit of currency 
had become more and more minute in size and consequently incon- 
venient for use. The counters struck at Niimberg became current 
for reckoning in England about 1328, but were forbidden currency 
by statute in 1335. In 1404 the first mention of tokens that is 
known occurred (as was pointed out by Dr. Evans) in a petition from 
the Commons to the King to make some remedy in the mischief 
among poor people occasioned by the want of small coinage and by 
their use of foreign money and tokens of lead. These lead tokens 
were issued in great abundance ; they are referred to by Erasmus as 
of common currency, but it is very seldom they bear the name of 
either issuer or place of issue. Elizabeth issued patterns for a regal 
coinage in copper, but the matter went no further, and no current 
coins appear ever to have been issued by the Queen in the baser 
metals. Her Majesty, however, did grant permission to the city of 
Bristol to strike tokens to be current in that city and ten miles around. 
The date of the license is not exactly known, but it must have been 
towards the close of the sixteenth century, for on May 12, 1594, the 
Mayor and Aldermen were required to call in all the private tokens 
(presumably of lead) that had been issued without authority, and it 
was ordered that none that had been issued without license from the 
Mayor should be current in the city. These Elizabethan tokens bear 
on the obverse C.B. (Civitas Bristol), and on the reverse the city 
arms, and are very rude in their execution. The license appears to 
have continued to apply to that city, as in the seventeenth century 
but one private person in Bristol issued his token ; the city continuing 
to issue tokens year by year of similar character and style and with 
similar device to those issued by license of the Queen. 

A copper coinage was contemplated by the Commonwealth Govern- 
ment, and patterns were struck both in copper and pewter, but no 
authorized issue of them ever took place, and beyond the royal 
tokens, known as Harringtons, and referred to later on, no attempt 
was made to supply the great national want of the period. Extracts 
from the State papers of the time show us that the subject was often 
considered in the Councils of State, as, for instance : 

1649, May 30. — Council of State. The business of farthing tokens 
is to be considered to-morrow. 

1650, Aug, 9. — A decision arrived at. Farthings ougAf to be issued. 
They should be struck by the Mint and be of full value. 

1 65 1, Aug. 10. — A lengthy report was presented to the Council of 
State by Thomas Voilet, from which it .may suffice here to make a 



Digitized by 



Google 



INTRODUCTION. xxi 

few extracts. The report commences by stating that money is the 
public means to set a price upon all things between man and man, 
and experience hath sufficiently proved in all ages that small money 
is so needful to the poorer sort that all nations have endeavoured to 
have it. It continues to recommend small pieces as ministering of 
frugality, whereupon men can have a fiarthing's worth and are not 
constrained to buy more of anything than they stand in need of, their 
feeding being from hand to mouth ; it recommends it on the ground 
of charity, saying that many are deprived of alms for want of farthings 
and half-£arthings, for many would give a farthing who are not dis- 
posed to give a penny or twopence, or to lose time in staying to 
change money whereby they may contract a noisome smell or the 
disease of the poor. 

It then refers to the imperial money of Rome constantly being 
ploughed up in men's grounds, and to the copper money of the Con- 
tinent, especially Sweden, and goes into some elaborate details of 
great interest as to the profit to be derived by the Government from 
making such farthings of tin and copper, and as to the appointment 
of special treasurers and officers to see to this new issue. 

In 1652 a further discussion as to the engines for minting metal 
took place, and then constant references* occur as to the issue of 
tradesmen's tokens and corporation pieces, complaints against the 
issues and proposals to stop the issue ; but nothing was finally done 
until 1672, when a Royal proclamation was issuedt for making cur- 
rent his Majesty's fiarthings and halfpence of copper, and forbidding 
of all others to be used. 

• See page xxxviiL, for these extracts from State Papers in extenso, 

t *• By the King. A Proclamation for making currant His Majestie*s Farthings 

and Ha^'Pence of Copper^ and forbidding all others to be used, 

"Charles R. 

" Whereas of late years several Persons and Corporations, upon pretence that 

there wanted small moneys to be currant in low and ordinary payments amongst 

the poorer sort, have presumed to cause certain pieces of Brass, Copper, and other 

Base Metals to be stamped with their private stamps ; and then imposed those 

pieces upon our poor subjects for Pence, Halfpence, or Farthings, as the makers 

thereof were pleased to call them, whereby our subjects have been greatly 

defrauded, and our Rojral authoritv and the laws of our kingdom violated : And 

whereas We, for the prevention of'^the like abuses for the time to come, did not 

only direct a severe prosecution of the offenders, but did likewise command the 

o6icers of our Mint to cause many thousands of pounds of good sterling silver to 

be coined into single pence and twopences, that so there might be good money 

currant among the poorest of our subjects, and fitted for their smaller traffic and 

commerce ; hoping by one or both these means, to have totally suppressed the 

unlawful practices of these offenders ; since which time we have found by txperi- 

CDce, that the mischief hath still encreased, partljr by having our small silver 

money bought in and hoarded up, that so there nught be a scarcity thertof in 



Digitized by 



Google 



xxii INTRODUCTION. 

This proclamation was universally obeyed throughout England, 
Scotland, and Wales, except (as far as can be found out) in the city 
of Chester, which continued to issue its tokens until 1674, a course 
which resulted in legal proceedings being taken against the city by 
the Crown. The issuers petitioned Sir William Williams, the then 
member and Speaker of the House of Commons, who interceded 
with the law officers of the Crown, and proceedings were stayed on 
condition of the offenders complying with the provisions of the Act.* 
The same state of affairs appears to have alsp existed in Norfolk, and 
the city of Norwich petitioned the Crown, and a pardon was granted 
and the tokens were then called in by public bellman. 

The issue of tokens in Ireland continued until 1679. They were 
struck in copper, brass, and bronze, and occasionally in lead, but the 
majority are in copper, and were issued of three denominations — 
penny, halfpenny, and farthing. They are generally circular, but 
some of them are square, heart-shaped, diamond-shaped, and octago- 
nal, and this is more often the case with those issued by corporations 
and towns. The execution of them is frequently pleasing in character 
and style, but is never of any exceptional artistic merit The en- 
common payments : but chiefly for the vast gain and profit which these stampers 
make to themselves, and for which they choose to run any hazards of law, rath^ 
than quit the hopes of their private lucre : we therefore taking the premises into 
our princely consideration, and believing that our subjects would not easily be 
wrought upon to accept the Farthings and Halfpence of these private stampers, if 
there were not some kind of necessity for such small coynes to be made for 
publique use, which cannot well be done in silver, nor safely in any other mettal, 
unless the intrinsick value of the coyn be equal, or near to that value for which it 
is made currant ; have thought fit, by advice of our Privy Council, to cause certain 
farthings and halfpence of copper to be stamped at our Mint, according to such form 
and with such impression as we have directed : and we have given special chaxse 
to our officers there, that they cause such halfpence and farthings so to be coynea, 
to contain as much copper in weight, as shall be of the true intrinsick value and 
worth of a halfpenny or farthing respectively, the charges of coyning and uttering 
beine onely deducted. And we do further by this our Royal Proclamation declare, 
publish, and authorize the said halfpence and farthings of copper so cojrned and 
to be coyned, to be currant money ; and that the same, from and after this 
instant i6th day of August, shall pass and be received in all pa}'ments, bai^ins, 
and exchanges to be had or made between our subjects, which shall be under the 
value of sixpence, and not otherwise, nor in any other manner. And if any 
person or persons, bodies politique or corporate, shall after the first day of 
September next, presume to make, vend, or utter any pence, halfpence and 
farthings, or other pieces of brass, copper, or other base mettal, other than the 
halfpence and farthings by this our Royal Proclamation authorized and allowed, 
or mall offer to counterfeit any of our halfpence or farthings, we shall hold all 
such offenders utterly inexcusable, and shall cause their contempt of our lam-s and 
government to be chastised with exemplary severity. 

" Given at our Court of Whitehall, the 1 6th day of August, in the 24th year of 
our reign, 1672. 

" God save the King !" 

* Heywood's " Tokens of Cheshire," p. 66. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



INTRODUCTION. xxiu 

gravers for the mints, especially Rawlins, who under the Common- 
wealth fell into great poverty, and from having designed the regal 
coins and seals was glad to be employed upon these tokens, are in 
some instances the authors of the designs, and these are then 
distinguished by the initial of the artist's name. In many cases it 
would appear that local artists were employed, and that they travelled 
on from town to town, something in the manner of the ancient 
Anglo-Saxon moneyers, designing tokens for the various villages and 
towns through which they passed. There is a similarity of design, 
both in style, lettering, and device, and a correspondence of mint- 
marks in the tokens of many adjacent places, which appears to point 
to some such manner of working, and in many towns the dies are 
still preserved, and traditions of the place of mintage. Many were, 
however, struck in London, and consequently names of both issuers 
and places incorrectly spelt. Taken as a whole series they are homely 
and quaint, wanting in beauty, but not without a curious domestic 
art of their own, and the inscriptions and devices upon them throw 
some interesting side-lights upon the folk-lore, manners, habits, and 
customs of that period of thirty years. 

They usually bear on one side the name of the issuer, and on the 
other the place of issue ; and in the field some device having refer- 
ence to the issuer's trade on one side, and the issuer's initials, 
together generally with that of his wife, on the other. It must be 
borne in mind, in referring to them, that no direct light of any 
startling character is afforded by this series ; but as the history of a 
nation is greatly made up of the domestic life of its people, and as 
the life of the village tells us of the life of the town, and so of that 
of the country, these tokens may be found to the student of history 
not unworthy of more attention than they have at present received. 

Evelyn, of " Sylva " reputation, wrote as follows respecting them : 

"The tokens which every tavern and tippling-house in the days of anarchy 
amongst us presumed to stamp and utter for immediate exchange as they were 
passable through the neighbourhood, which, though seldom reaching further than 
the next street or two, may happily in after-time come to exercise and busie the 
learned critic what they should signify, and fill whole volumes with their con- 
jectures.** 

This prophecy has been fulfilled in our day, and it is these tokens 
that form the subject of this work. Incidentally they give us some 
information as to the trade and prosperity of the towns of their 
issue, and as to the relative importance of such towns. 

The fiaict that eighty-three traders in Exeter issued tokens, thirty- 
two in High Wycombe, sixty RotherHithe, forty Bury St. Edmunds, 



Digitized by 



Google 



xxiT INTRODUCTION. 

and twenty the tiny village of Oundle in Northamptonshire, and 
twenty in Durham ; while but fourteen were struck in Manchester, 
eleven Liverpool, two Brighton, and one each in Clapham, Sunder- 
land, Gateshead, Stockton, Oldham, Burnley, and Bury, is not 
without interest, as the comparative size and character and import- 
ance of these places has so much varied since 1648. 

The local government of the places appears to have much varied. 
In Guildford the churchwarden's initials appear on the town-piece. 
In Chard the name of the Portreeve ; in Gloucester and Lincoln, the 
Maior ; Wootten, Maior and Aldermen ; Southampton and Romsey, 
The Corporation ; in Hereford, The Sword Bearer ; St Neots and 
St Ives, Grantham and Boston, The Overseers; Ilchester, The 
Bailiffs ; Taunton, The Constables ; while in other towns they were 
issued by the High Bailiff, Chamberlain, and Treasurer. All this 
variety gives us some interesting information upon the peculiarities of 
local and municipal government in those days, and the high position 
then occupied in some towns by such officials as churchwardens, 
overseers, and sword-bearer, who in later times fill quite subordinate 
positions. The main idea and reason for their issue was, in very 
many cases, kept well in view — namely, that of being of essential 
service to the poorer residents — and it is of interest to read on the 
tokens of Andover, "Remember the Poore," **For the poore," 
*'Help o* Andover for the poore*s benefit" At Croyland, "The 
poore's halfpenny " ; at Southwold, " For the poore*s advantage " ; at 
Tamworth, "For change and charitie"; and in very many places 
such legends as, " To be changed by the Overseers for the poor," 
" By the Overseers for the use of the poor," and so on. 

In the troublous Stuart times, while the shadow of internecine and 

civil war overshadowed the land, and poverty abounded, and while 

the memory of the great monasteries and of their relief still existed, 

and the harm from their abolition still remained, the number of poor 

was very great, and the value to them of this semi-illegal minor 

currency must have been very high. The promise mentioned on one 

of the last inscriptions, as to changing the tokens, occurred on very 

many, and in one case occurs in rhyming form : 

" When you please 
I'll change these.*' 

It is also put, " Will be changed," " To be changed," " For change," 
and in other ways ; but whether expressed or not, it waS always 
implied, and the issuers of the tokens were morally bound to change 
them, if desired, for regal and authorized coin. Traders used to keep 



Digitized by 



Google 



INTRODUCTION. toy 

boxes with numerous partitions, into which to divide off the tokens 
of different counties, and mention occasionally occurs in Corporation 
records of Mr. So-and-so, from such a town, having changed so 
much money into town tokens, or so many town tokens into coin of 
the realm. It is presumed that something in the same way as local 
bank-notes have passed freely from hand to hand where the private 
banks were known and their integrity accepted, so these tokens in 
their immediate districts were willingly accepted, but as to whether 
in more distant parts of the country, where their issuers were unknown, 
they still were taken, it is hardly possible to say. 

While, however, southern tokens are often dug up or found in 
houses in the North, it is comparatively seldom that tokens of York- 
shire, Lancashire, or Cheshire, or of the more northern counties, are 
found South, and in most cases, with but few exceptions, hoards of 
these tokens consist of those of the county in which they are found, 
and of those in its immediate neighbourhood. To this the exception 
of Surrey must be made, as Surrey tokens have been found in almost 
every county in the kingdom — a proof of the commercial importance 
of the county in those days. A somewhat striking peculiarity of these 
tokens is the very constant use in the field of the obverse of the 
arms of the great trading Companies of London, more especially 
those of the Grocers' and Mercers* Companies. There is hardly a 
trading guild bearing arms that is not represented on this series of 
tokens, although naturally some occur very much more frequently 
than others. 

We find portions of the arms of the twelve great companies : Mercers*, 
Grocers', Drapers*, Fishmongers', Goldsmiths', Skinners', Merchant 
Taylors', Haberdashers', Salters', Ironmongers', Vintners', Cloth- 
workers' ; also of those of the Apothecaries', Armourers', Bakers', 
Barbers', Basketmakers', Blacksmiths', Bowyers', Brewers', Broderers*, 
Builders', Cardmakers*, Carpenters', Clockmakers', Coachmakers', 
Combmakers', Cooks', Coopers', Cordwainers', Curriers', Cutlers', 
Distillers', Dyers,' Fanmakers', Farriers', Feltmakers', Fletchers', 
Founders', Framework Knitters', Fruiterers', Gardiners', Girdlers', 
Glaziers', Glass-sellers,' Glovers', Gold and Silver Wire Drawers', 
Gunsmiths', Hatband-makers', Homers', Innholders', Joiners', 
Leathersellers', Longbow String-makers', Loriners', Masons', Musi- 
cians', Needle-makers', Painters', Parish Clerks', Patten-makers', 
Paviors', Pewterers', Pinners', Plaisterers', Plumbers', Poulterers', 
Saddlers', Scriveners', Shipwrights', Silkmen's, Silkweavers', Soap- 
makers', Spectacle-makers', Starchmakers', Stationers', Surgeons', 



Digitized by 



Google 



xxvi INTRODUCTION. 

Tallow and Wax Chandlers', Tinplate-workers', Tobacco Pipe-makers', 
Turners*, Tylers*, Upholders', Watermen's, Weavers', Wheelwrights', 
Woolmongers', and Woolmen's, also of the Merchants of the Staple, 
Merchant Adventurers', and Shearmen's. 

It is evident that use of these coats-of-arms as signs of trade was 
very frequent ; in many towns every token bears the arms of some 
trade, and probably used the coat armour as its sign. In some 
towns, research in Corporation and Guild records has revealed the 
fact of a close relationship, alliance, and, to some extent, obedience, 
existing between those of a trade in a town forming that Guild, and 
what was evidently looked upon, to some extent, as headquarters in 
London. It is impossible to say to what extent this intimate con- 
nection existed ; it is referred to but seldom in Guild records, and 
then only briefly as though well known ; but it is clear that the 
trades largely and extensively used the armorial bearings of the 
Company, formed themselves into local Guilds for the management 
and restriction of their own trade, and to a certain extent owned and 
recognised a sort of allegiance due to the London Company. The 
enormous prevalence of Grocers' over every other trade shows the 
leading business to be then, as now, in villages, the grocery store or 
village shop, as still often termed. In many cases the Apothecaries 
term themselves 'Pothecaries, omitting the prefix A, and some trades, 
such as Terbaccermen (sic), Ratkillers, Postmaster, Packhorse-man, 
Carrier, Oatmeal-makers, and Tollmen, Slater, Tanner, etc., who 
never appear to have been incorporated, appear without any sign or 
arms. Those issued by the Tolemen (sic) of Stilton and Doncaster 
have an especial interest, as the first Turnpike Road Act was of 
1663, and so toll bars had been only just established, and were 
probably farmed by these enterprising token-issuing tollmen. 

The entire question of signs is one that might well be considered, 
abounding as it does in many curious details. The great bulk of 
London tokens bear devices which were evidently used as signs, and 
were referred to in the inscriprion as such. Take, for instance, "The 
Dog and Duck," "The Prince Morris," "Windmill," "Nag's Head," 
"Raven," "Turk's Head," "3 and 3," "Mitre," "Swan," and "King," 
and many others, some, of course, having reference to the trade 
carried on, and, in some instances, being a detached portion of the 
trade arms, as the "Virgin" from the Mercers' Arms, the "Mer- 
maid " from the Apothecaries', the " Three Crowns," or the " Three 
Tuns," from Skinners' or Vintners', and " Adam and Eve " from 
the Fruiterers' Arms; but in most cases merely being signs, and 



Digitized by 



Google 



INTRODUCTION. xxvii 

haying no intimate connection with the trader using them or his 
trade. 

Local trades find a reference on these tokens : lace in Buckingham- 
shire, and wool in Surrey ; gloves in Leicester ; needles in Chichester ; 
say or bay, a kind of fine serge, at Colchester ; and lace at Sl Neots, 
receiving mention and device ; and on tokens of Sherborne appear a 
representation of a plain band or stock, the manufacture of which 
was at one time a staple industry in Sherborne, and first said to have 
been introduced there. These stocks were sometimes sent on to 
Saffron Walden to be dyed yellow, and worn by the fashionable gallants 
of the court of Charles II. that colour, and supported by a Pickadill. 

On a token of Ashburton the teasel (Dipsacus Fullonum) is shown, 
and has clear reference to the process of preparing cloth carried on 
in that district, and to the cultivation of the teasel plant. 

On very many Norfolk tokens the issuers style themselves Wor 
stead Weavers, showing the trade prevailing at that time in Northern 
Norfolk. Not a single Cornish token, however, has any reference to 
the leading industry, mining, or to mines. In Cornwall there is 
another striking peculiarity, and that is, that out of only one hundred 
or so tokens, more than a fourth have family armorial bearings upon 
them, showing the extent to which the old Cornish families were 
engaged in local commerce. The same peculiarity appears in the 
city of Chester; the bulk of the issuers in that city being entitled to 
style themselves Armiger. 

Bearing in mind that the issue of these tokens spreads over the 
entire period of the Commonwealth, it is instructive to notice the 
display of loyalty from the trading middle class of the county. In 
Durham, for example, scarcely a token appears without the words 
" God save the King," or without the device of the " King's head 
crowned /' and this device, and that of the crown, king's arms, royal 
oak, Duke of York, and other such loyal symbols appear on the 
tokens of the United Kingdom to an enormous extent, and far before 
any other similar devices. The arras of the Commonwealth, or any 
reference to it, do not appear a dozen times in many thousand tokens. 
Before leaving the question of arms it is interesting to notice the 
names, as issuers of tokens, of many of the old and renowned families 
of the present day. The Winstanleys, of Eddystone renown, in 
Saffron Walden; the Wilberforces of Yorkshire; the Hobsons of 
Spalding; Unwins of Essex; and Penhelicks and Penhaluricks of 
Cornwall ; and the Bunyans, important from a literary point of view. 
Indeed, in very many instances, family genealogy and research as to 



Digitized by 



Google 



xxviu INTRODUCTION. 

ancestry have been greatly aided by clues given and suggestions 
gathered from the seventeenth century tokens. The title " Gent.," 
and the title " Quondam Esq"," appear on the tokens, but not that 
of " Mister," save in Ireland, and as a rule no prefix or suffix denoting 
style is given. In Ireland the tokeners are termed merchant or mar- 
chant, irrespective of the nature of their trade ; and that word is on 
the majority of Irish tokens, but is very rare on English ones. Issuers 
in some cases style themselves Aldermen ; and in one instance, that 
of Newbury, the token is issued by the Rector, and bears a Bible as 
device. Solitary instances also occur of the use of the words Gaffer 
and Gammer. 

But one Christian name appears to be the invariable rule ; although 
from records it appears that some issuers had more than one surname 
and were so distinguished, as, for instance, in Kent, Smith alias 
Peffcock, and Williams alias Walder. 

It would appear in some instances that persons having occupation 
in I^ondon and residence in the 'country issued two varying tokens, 
one giving his trade, as, for example, that of a wool-stapler in London, 
who also issued a token without the name of his trade in Essex, 
where he resided, and where he was probably not desirous of adver- 
tising the fact of his being a trader. The present favourite expression 
of being " something in the City " was evidently not without its 
counterpart idea, even in 1650. 

Many tokens bear strange devices, termed merchants' marks, in 
some cases composed of initial letters combined into monograms ; 
in others of figures similarly used ; and in others mere mathematical 
signs or geometric figures. It is, however, very curious to notice in 
some cases, more especially in one remarkable case in Colchester, 
that the merchant's mark was borne in a shield as coat-armour, sur- 
mounted by the family crest ; and this instance may possibly give us 
a clue to the origin of some of the peculiar bearings and devices in 
some coats-of-arms. Marks of difference between elder and cadet 
branches, by means of transverse lines, are also formed on some of 
these merchants' marks. The arms of the City of London form a 
rather favourite device in some districts. Many of the devices are of 
interest as giving examples of the humour of the issuers ; that bright- 
ness and merriment that was at one time a significant feature in this 
country, and gave it the name of Merry England. Such names as 
Legg, Key, Salmon, Tower, Anchor, Coates, etc., were generally 
accompanied by the representation of the familiar object, forming a 
pun or rebus on the name. The device of a bolt in a tun, a hare in 



Digitized by 



Google 



INTRODUCTION. xxix 

a bottle, a Holy Thorn on a hill, were used to typify such names as 
Bolton, Harbottle, and ThomhilL A tokener named Godleman gives 
an olive tree, in evident allusion to David's mention in the Psalms that 
a godly man shall be like an olive tree. The old name for a sickle 
C' snead ") appears to have suggested a pun, as a sickle appears on the 
token of a Robert Snead. A humorous idea in the mind of one issuer 
led him to put two heavy-looking faces upon his token, and, with an 
evident reference to the unfortunate person possessing the token, the 
inscription, "Wee 3 Loggerheads be." Another adopted a similar idea, 
giving a kind of donkey's head to the face, and the remark, " Wee 
area." 

Representations of articles of domestic use occur often on the 
tokens, and are depicted of quaint and curious shape, and styled 
by their early and unusual names; thus a three-legged pot on 
one is called a crock; gloves of very great length, more like the 
present gants de SuMe, are on the tokens of a mercer in Suffolk, 
calling himself the glover; an odd-looking tub appears on some 
tokens of St Ives in which two women are washing. Quaint-shaped 
pestles and mortars, and very pretty keys, appear on some tokens ; 
and tobacco-pipes of the short squat shape common to the period, 
also inkhoms and the leathern jugs known as blackjacks. 

An occasional reference also occurs to well-known characters of 
tne period, as Jack o* Newbury, a well-known and successful clothier, 
and Will Somers, the jester to King Henry VHI. 

A curious picture of one phase of the domestic life is seen in one 
token issued by ten poor men in the King's Bench, and by Marshal- 
sea tokens, which indicates in a somewhat lurid light the hard times in 
which imprisonment for debt, often for life, was in force. 

Rhyming inscriptions abo point to something of the same kind of 
coarse humour : 

** Although but brass yet let me pass." 

'* Welcome you be to trade with me.'* 

** When you please, 1*11 change these." 

•• Take these that will, 1*11 change them still." 

** To supply the poore*s need is charity indeed." 

and upon a square token, "Square derJing is best" A strange in- 
scription is, " Send me to the mercer at Gnoshall ; God grant peace." 
Another somewhat strange inscription is, " Touch not mine anointed, 
and doe my prophets no harm," and has evident reference to a loyal 
expression as to the terrible event of 1649, and is issued in that year. 



Digitized by 



Google 



XXX INTRODUCTION. 

A token of Exeter reads : 

•* Mary Moore 1651= Exeter. 
Drink ye all of this = A commtmion-cup,*' 

and may either have reference to the issuer's opinion as to the prac- 
tice of the Roman Church in refusing the cup to the laity ; or it may 
be that in some Exeter churches the practice prevalent amongst 
Presbyterians may have been existing, that of requiring a token to be 
given up by each communicant, to prove their presence ; and Mary 
Moore thus had a double object in view in striking and issuing her 
token. 

The question of spelling in the seventeenth century must claim a 
little attention. It was, to say ihe leasts erratic and peculiar, and the 
illiterate character of the issuers is well shown by the strange spelling. 
The word Peterborough, for example, is spelt ten different ways in 
only twenty-five tokens ; one issuer exercising considerable ingenuity, 
and spelling it Peeterbovrowgh. The simple word Dorking is 
spelt in five ways; and Guildford in seven; while such peculiar 
names as Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Higham Ferrars, Monastereven, Chol- 
mondeley, and Enniskillen, are, of course, marvels of remarkable 
spelling. A phonetic character is, however, to be noticed in almost 
all the peculiar spelling. 

The name Fumeaux, always pronounced Furnace, in Devon, is so 
spelt; and Ottery St. Mary reads Awtry, in exact correspondence 
with local pronunciation. Honiton reads Huniton ; Dorking, Darkin ; 
Luton, Lewton ; Taunton, Tanton ; Somerset, Summerset ; and 
Silverton, Silferton ; and the county of Essex, sx ; and Amdell for 
Arundell. Penny generally is spelt peny, the old spelUng still re- 
tained in our Book of Common Prayer. 

The earlier names for many towns are used on the tokens, as 
Smithwick, for Falmouth ; Mount Paladore and Shaston for Shaftes- 
bury ; and Salop for Shrewsbury ; Redriff for Rotherhithe ; and the 
frequent occurrence in this country of the same name to various 
places, as, for instance, Henley, Newport, Millbrook, Stratton, and 
the St Ives and St Neots in both Cornwall and Hunts, somewhat 
increase the difficulty of knowing to which town the token belongs. 
With that characteristic John Bullism of the Englishman, but few 
issuers condescended to more definitely state their place of issue; 
and as in the case of Newport there are at least twenty towns of the 
same name, the difficulty of correctly placing the tokens is consider- 
able. 

The letters J and U never appear on the tokens, their place is 



Digitized by 



Google 



INTRODUCTION. xxxi 

filled by I and V ; and on one token on which the entire alphabet 
appears, together with the figures of a schoolmaster and an abacus, 
these two letters are absent. The word " the " is constandy abbrevi- 
ated to " Ye." Conjoint letters are another of the peculiarities of the 
spelling, and show the prevalent use of such ligatures in English at 
that date .js . iB . x . hc . m. . kl and other letters are constantly 
found conjoined in the l^ends, and were also used (as before referred 
to) as merchant marks and monograms. 

In some instances an interesting light is thrown upon the buildings 
and streets of the place of issue. Tokens issued at Buttis Gate and 
North Gate, Colchester, preserve the names of those ancient gate- 
ways ; Olevant Stair and Redriff Wall the memory of the Elephant 
landing-steps and the Rotherhithe WaU ; and on a token of Bideford, 
the old beacon on the bridge, long since removed, is depicted. In 
very many cases reference is made to gateways, streets, paths, and 
buildings long since demolished, and to those who lived in and near 
them. A token of Rayleigh bears a bull and a ring in its mouth, and 
probably was struck at the inn standing on what is now termed Bull 
Yard, a name without much meaning until a ring and stump a few 
years since were dug up on the spot, and it was then seen that the 
token represented a bull being baited, and that this amusement was 
carried on in that yard. Names of patron-saints now seldom heard 
of are also preserved on these tokens, as St Alkmund and St. 
Sidwell. The prevalence of coffee-houses is referred to, many tokens 
being struck at these houses and bearing a hand pouring out coffee, 
and in some cases a kind of urn or samovar. Their sign was 
generally that of a Turk's head or Morat, and on one token are the 
words, " Coffee, Tobacco, Sherbet, Tea, and Chocolate, in Exchange 
Alley, London." A West-country token was struck at the Pack 
Horse Inn and bears a pack saddle on it, and it has been the means 
of identifying the portion of bridlepath or pack-saddle road in a 
village about which there was some doubt, but the inn that was 
situated near it having been proved by the token to have once borne 
the name of Pack Horse, the position of the road was fixed. The 
persistence of local names is another subject upon which the tokens 
give some information of value, and their use in tracing ancestry has 
already been noticed. No names are so persistent in the village life 
as those of the old inns, and tokens bearing their signs and names in 
country villages are often of great interest from the inns or at least 
their signs still remaining. In many cases the village inn derived its 
sign from a portion of the coat armour of the landed proprietor, as, for 



Digitized by 



Google 



xxxu INTRODUCTION. 

instance, the "Spread Eagle" of Midhurst, close to the magnificent seat 
of the Montagues, Cowdray Park, and the "Cats" or "Leopards" often 
met with in villages near which the Dorset family had property. Even 
when the family have long since passed from that district the village 
sign remains the same, and proves the one little connection between 
the coat from which it is taken and the property surrounding the inn. 
Many inns named on tokens, and which were at the time good and 
well-known posting-houses, still remain ; and the " White Hart " at 
Harford Bridge, " Phoenix " at Harley Row, " Anchor " at Liphook, 
" Fountain " at Portsmouth, and " Bell " at Romsey — all in Hampshire 
— besides those already named in Sussex, are only examples of many 
scores of cases in which the present day and the old token tell the 
same tale, although it is to be feared that the measure of business 
done by many of these houses is very different now to what it was. 

Tokens issued by inns have an additional interest from the fact 
that they are often referred to by the gossipy old chronicler Samuel 
Pepys, and in many cases the hosts of the inns where he stopped were 
the identical issuers of the tokens. To take but one instance, 
pointed out by Mr. Andrews : 

Two tokens of Bishop's Stortford bear the name of the " Reindeer" 
inn, and the name and initials of a Mr. and Mrs. Aysworth, and thus 
Pepys speaks, October 7, 1667 : " Before night we came to Bishops 
Stortford, where Lowther and his friend did meet us again and 
carried us to the * Raynedeere,' where Mrs. Aysworth, who lived 
heretofore at Cambridge, and whom I knew better than they think 
for, do live. It was the woman that amongst other things was great, 
with my cousin Baruston of Cottenham, and did use to sing to him, 
and did teach me, * Full 40 times over,' a very lewd song — a woman 
they are well acquainted with, and is here what she was at Cambridge. 
But there was so much tearing company in the house that we could 
not see the Landlady, so I had no opportunity of renewing my old 
acquaintance with her." Lord Braybrook, in a note on this entry, 
gives us the information that this woman was a noted procuress, 
banished from Cambridge for her evil courses, and who then settled at 
Bishop's Stortford. 

The Journal of Pepys abounds in information relative to many of 
the inns of that time and to their hosts, and in many instances thefe 
is an identity between those named by him as keeping the inns and 
the issuers of the tokens. 

Another author of a far less pleasing character must be noted in 
connection with thb branch of the subject, the unknown author of the 



Digitized by 



Google 



INTRODUCTION, xxxiii 

"Journal of Drunken Bamaby." He also refers to many of the 

country inns which can be indentified by their tokens. He mentions 

the " Mother Redcap " at Holloway, the " George " at Wakefield, and 

the " Bull " at Rotherham, and others, and thereby adds his quota of 

interest to the old inn issuing its token in his time. Barnaby in one 

case refers to giving away a token in the following words : 

Thence to Harrington, be it spoken. 
For Name-sake I gave a token 
To a Beggar that did crave it 
And as cheerfully receive it : 
More he need't not me importune, 
For *twas th' utmost of my fortune. 

But it is clear that he refers to the regal farthing of James I., issued 
under a patent secured by Lord Harrington in 1613, which coins, 
weighing only six grains each, and being so badly struck, and on such 
thin, breakable metal, were universally refused, and, although a large 
fortune was made by the Harrington family, they were execrated by 
the people for forcing this coinage upon them. 

Shakespeare's reference to the " Boar's Head " at Eastcheap, which 
was frequented by Falstaff, Bardolph, Pistol, and others, and Ben 
Jonson's reference to the " Devil and Dunstan," near Temple Bar, 
and to the " Cock," afterwards made notorious by Tennyson, must not 
be forgotten, as all these inns issued their tokens. 

Reference is also made by Sir William Dugdale in his Diary to 
tavern tokens, and to many of the London and country inns which 
issued them, and to their acceptance and currency, while a relation of the 
poetical and political Edmund Waller is amongst the issuers. The re- 
lative prosperity of some traders is shown by their issuing more than 
one series of tokens, and in some cases both halfpenny and farthing 
tokens. Some men year by year issued tokens bearing following 
dates, in many cases of new device, requiring the cutting of new dies 
and the incurring of no small expense. 

After marriage very often a fresh token is issued. In Saffron 
Walden, two grocers, both issuers, one evidently a widow, married, 
and issued a new token bearing the new initials. They were evidently 
grocers of importance, as the town records show heavy bills paid to 
them for goods for the mayor's dinners. 

A Devonshire grocer issued tokens for four villages, Tawton, Chag- 
ford, Moreton, and Zeal, and it is evident from that fact the spirit of 
trade enterprise, prompting to having four distinct businesses, was 
not wanting in the villages of Devon in 1650. Grocers and mercers, 
in fact, in this county and that of Dorset, abound, and constitute 

c 



Digitized by 



Google 



xxxiv INTRODUCTION, 

the bulk of the issuers ; but it is curious that many men styling them- 
selves mercers use the grocers' arms on the token, so that evidently 
they carried on both trades. In St. Ives an issuer refers to his busi- 
ness at Ramsey, and in Tewkesbury it is interesting to see tokens 
issued by four different firms, each token bearing the name of both 
partners in the firm. Partnerships in Tewkesbury were evidently 
popular and 'successful. 

It is not, however, so/efy on their own account, or intrinsically, that 
we claim historical value for these little mementoes of the seventeenth 
century, but for a further reason — that the work of correctly placing 
them to the counties and towns in which they were issued, and of pre- 
paring for the collector correct lists of the tokens of his county, leads 
inevitably to sources of information being tapped from which impor- 
tant and interesting historical evidence often flows. The merr 
necessity in towns of similar name of searching parish and corporation 
records to identify the issuer with the place of issue, and to explain 
the often puzzling and curious devices used by the issuers, has led to 
obtaining many notes respecting the life and history of the issuers ; 
and when to this the ardent collector brings a fervent archaeological 
spirit and determines that the history of the man who issued this 
token shall be found out and laid clear before him, a great bulk of 
information on the domestic life in England about 1650 is obtained 

For instance, in Essex a very large number of tokens were issued 
by the people known as Friends, and even now, in such towns as 
Dunmow, Saffron Walden, and Braintree, the number of successful 
resident Friends is far in excess of the average. Reference to the 
works on the persecution of the Friends gives much infomiation on 
the terrible troubles undergone for religion's sake by this much- 
persecuted sect, and in many instances identifies many of these issuers 
as Friends, proves the accuracy of the initials on the reverse by giving 
the names of the wives, and shows the trades in which they engaged 
and the measure of prosperity that attended them. 

Again, the memorial of a tokener of King's Lynn is found in his 
gift of two folio service books for the altar of St. Margaret's Church, 
and, although the token terms him a mercer, it is evident from his 
gift and the inscription accompanying it that the sale and purchase of 
books was also carried on by him. 

The name of Hovell — rather important at the present time — also 
appears on another Lynn token, and researches give the same name 
to the then member. Sir William Hovell, and to the mayor, giving us 
the note that this important family carried on trade in the town while 



Digitized by 



Google 



INTRODUCTION. xxxv 

one of its members sat in the House and another as chief magistrate. 
One issuer is proved to have sold his possessions and become a 
trooper in the Commonwealth army. Another issuer originally 
possessed Foulsham Hall, Norfolk, and sold it to the Atthill family, 
who have been resident in one parish for upwards of four-and-a-half 
centuries, and who also issued tokens. Another was a poor boy and 
a town apprentice, but eventually rose to prosperity and became 
mayor of the town that had originally befriended him, and issued his 
token. One man you find as receiving five shillings for being an 
informer against a stranger for travelling on a fast day. Another 
styles himself on his token proudly, " Freeman of England ;" and 
the decease of a third is recorded amongst the list of those who were 
" buried in woollen." 

A Plymouth draper having a rather unusual device is found to be 
one mentioned in the account of the siege as " tarring capes for the 
centinels," and was evidently, therefore, the progenitor in that part of 
the country of a species of waterproofing. 

Many whose trades and history are comparatively unknown have 
come down with importance to the present day as the founders of 
local charities, often now of great value. Four brothers in Essex 
issuing tokens were contributors to the extent of ^£^1,350 at the 
surrender of Colchester, and must evidently have been men of un- 
usually large substance. Edward Owner, of Yarmouth, who describes 
himself as a grocer on his token, endowed the Children's Hospital in 
that town with ;;£'i,5oo. He was Member for the town in 1620-25, 
1639, and 1640, with Miles Corbett the Regicide, and was one of 
those who opposed Ship Money. A Brighton issuer married the 
captain of the vessel in which King Charles escaped from England, 
and another was the original tenant of the " Old Ship Inn," still re- 
maining. The initials of one issuer, marked on his token in a some- 
what unusual way, are to be found carved in the wall of the church in 
Surrey near where he is said to have lived, in this same strange 
manner ; and the initials of another issuer, and the coat armour he 
bore on his token, are found on an earthenware jug dug up near the 
village in Norfolk in which he resided. One issuer is proved to have 
been a searcher for the Grocers* Company, to find out adulterated 
goods and to prove short weight ; and another applies to the mayor 
to be allowed to punish a man for disobeying the laws of the Merchant 
Taylors as to being a journeyman. One proclaims himself a Non- 
conformist by refusing to take the oath of supremacy ; another is 
sued and fined for neglecting to take up his freedom in his native 

r— 2 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



XXX vi INTROD UCTION. 

town ; a third, turned out of the town for setting up in trade not being 
free of the town ; and a fourth is the bellman, going round by order 
of the mayor to cry that none do refuse to receive the tokens — /us 
owHf of course^ amongst the number ; and another is fined seven 
shillings for profanely swearing seven oaths, and the money is paid to 
the churchwardens. One man issues a token while unmarried, and 
the following year another with his wife*s initials, but the parish 
register proves he was not legally married for three years after his 
second token was issued ; another marries twice, and puts the initials 
of both wives on his later token, while a third puts " Issued by me," 
and gives no name or initials. Not a single issuer at Wells, however, 
gives a wife's initials, and surmise conjectures if all the leading 
traders in that city were bachelors. An issuer at Kendal was the 
inventor of the green woollen material known as " Kendal green," 
and referred to both by Shakespeare and Dryden, and bears as his 
token the teasel and wool hook, and on the reverse .the wool comb ; 
his token represented his trade, and his trade made him his name 
and fortune. The 'Company of Shearmen of Kendal issued their 
token, and on it we find the cropper's shears, then the important 
implements of the trade for cropping cloth ; and, on the token issued 
in the same town by the Mercers, we find the wool hooks and 
spindles that, at a later date, were adopted as the Borough arms, but 
here appear as the arms of the local guild of mercers. On a Marl- 
borough token we find a clasped book and the name of John Ham- 
mond, and in the town records occurs this touching entry: — "The 
Royalists took Marlboro' in 1642, and for 3 hours fed a fire with 
Hammond's books ;" and further on, in Hammond's writing, " I have 
but little left ; I have saved not above J[,Z worth of all my goods and 
books ; my children are crying to go home, and I tell them we have 
no home to go to. God help me ! what shall I do ?" 

A token of Glastonbury, bearing a representation of the Holy 
Thorn, illustrates local religious tradition, and many bearing an eagle 
and child, in Lancashire, refer to a popular story that was eventually 
taken as the motif for the crest of the Stanley family. Another 
popular story, " The Babes in the Wood," is illustrated on a token of 
Liverpool ; while religious emblems, such as the bleeding heart, lamb 
and flag, dove and olive branch, etc., testify to the religious feeling of 
the issuers. The Christian names found on the tokens afford some 
evidence of the religious feeling of the time. The Puritan desire to 
adopt biblical names is very clearly shown. To take one county, 
issuing not one hundred tokens — the names Timothy, Jehoshaphat, 
Solomon, Moses, Martha, Mary, Simon, Jonas, Joseph, Andrewi 



Digitized by 



Google 



INTRODUCTION. xxxvii 

Peter, John, Paul, Philip, Daniel, Nathanael, Abraham, Isaac, 
Jonathan, Elias, Samuel, Hannah, Eleazar, and Baruch are found 
among those of the issuers. One man in Somerset quarters the 
implements of his trade as a brushmaker : the boring instrument, the 
pigs for the bristles, and the bristles themselves, together with his 
own hand, and forms quite a respectable coat-of-arms, besides in- 
forming us that in such a small village as South Petherton the industry 
of brushmaking was carried on. An issuer of the name of Treagle, in 
Taunton, bearing an open book, has been identified as the same man 
mentioned on the title-page of some Civil War publications entitled 
" Man's Wrath and God's Praise," being sermons preached in Taunton, 
printed at the Marigold in St. PauFs Churchyard, and sold by George 
Treagle in Taunton. This man appears to have been the earliest 
bookseller known in Somerset The staple trade of Wellington, in 
Somerset, is clearly denoted by the shears and woolpacks appearing 
on many of the tokens, and it is significant of the persistence of 
industries that the same style of work is still the most important one 
in the town. Very many tokens, especially in Devon, were issued by 
widows or single women, and in some cases the issuers announce this 
fact upon their tokens quite boldly. 

Examples might be brought forward without number illustrative of 
the special point one desires to put forward, namely, the value of the 
tokens as incentives to further careful research into county and local 
topography and history, and, as such, aids of considerable importance 
to the painstaking student. 

It is, perhaps, to be feared that in direct information the tokens 
have but little valuable news to tell us, but it is claimed for them that 
in glimpses and side views of village and municipal life they are of 
interest They give us certain ideas about these traders of a past age, 
of their families and descent, their habits and business, their pros- 
perity and failure, their humour and religion, loyalty and enterprise, 
prison life and home life, education and government, that but few 
other records can equally well inform us upon ; they speak of a public 
necessity, and of the people remedying it themselves while the 
Government argued and theorized ; they tell of an independent spirit 
both in men and corporations ; they speak loudly of the prosperity of 
the seventeenth-century trader and of the existence and importance 
of local trades and local industries, and they lead us to search deeper 
and closer into the history, life, and times of these village shop-keepers 
and village Hampdens who had so important a share in making 
our country and its history, and in preparing it to fill the position 
of high responsibility and paramount dignity that it now holds. 



Digitized by 



Google 



EXTRACTS FROM STATE PAPERS HA VING 

REFERENCE TO TOKENS AND THE NECESSITY 

FOR SMALL CHANGE. 



1649, May 30. — Council of State. 

" The business of the farthing tokens to be considered to-morrow.*' 
(In the proceedings of the next meeting of the Council of State no 
reference to the subject appears.) 

1650, May. 

" Answer of Sir John Harvey to Mr. Voilet's four papers respecting 
bullion and coin. 

" To the third paper, as to farthings, I think it both good for trade 
and for the poor to have them, but they should be of full value, 
whether made of tin or copper, and I would have it treason to make 
them anywhere but in the Mint ; query whether there might not be 
sufficient tin obtained from the State's mines to pay for their make, 
and of such a weight that no person could undertake it without 
loss." 

1 65 1, Aug. 9. — Council of State. 

" Mr. Scott added to the Mint Committee, and the proposition for 
making farthings referred to the said Committee ; Mr. Frost to attend 
them." 

165 1, Aug. 10. 

" Reasons submitted by Thomas Voilet to the Mint Committee to 
prove the necessity of making farthing tokens, and half-farthings 
either of copper or tin, at such a full value that they should not be 
counterfeited abroad or at home, there being no advantage to be 
made of them but for payment of workmanship : 

I. "Money is the public means to set a price upon all things be- 
tween man and man, and experience has sufficiently proved in all 
ages that small money is so needful to the poorer sort that all nations 
have endeavoured to have it. Such small money was formerly com- 
nuxed by some nations with silver to answer its true value ; but it 



Digitized by 



Google 



EXTRACTS FROM STATE PAPERS. xxxU 

was subsequently determined by some of them to make it merely of 
copper, for the following reasons : viz., thai a grain or two of silver, 
being commixed with copper, was waste of silver, as the refining of 
it out of copper cost as much as the silver commixed therewith, and 
the colour of the copper being red, the commixture was not known 
upon sight 

2. " There is therefore a reason in my first proposition for making 
farthings of fine rose copper or of tin, without silver, for the accom- 
modation of all sorts of people who buy or sell small wares ; for that 
change being divided and subdivided, gives occasion that victuals 
and all sorts of small ware are divided, and accordingly proportioned, 
whereby the buyer receives a great commodity to have something for 
the least piece of coin, and the seller finds that light gains often 
make a heavy purse. 

3. " A plentiful supply of small pieces ministers means of frugality, 
whereupon men can have a farthing's worth, and are not constrained 
to buy more of anything than they stand in need of, their feeding 
being from hand to mouth. 

4. " Many aged and impotent poor, and others that would work 
and cannot get employment, are deprived of many alms for want of 
farthings and half-farthings ; for many would give a farthing or half- 
farthing who are not disposed to give a penny or twopence, or to lose 
time in staying to change money, * whereby they may contract a 
noisome smell or the disease of the poor.' 

5 " Copper monies have been used in all ag^s, as may be seen to 
this day in the Roman antiquities, both before and since Christ's 
time, in the Commonwealth of Athens, and that famous copper at 
Corinth held in such esteem now amongst antiquaries. When I was 
a goldsmith, I used to have great quantities of antiquities, which for 
the njost part had been ploughed up in men's grounds, and had lain 
here in England ever since the time of the Romans. At this day 
copper money goes in France, Flanders, Holland, Rome, Venice, 
Geneva, Milan, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and all Germany, and 
they make their copper money of such value that many merchants 
have bought thousands of pounds of it in Sweden, to sell to our 
braziers to make kettles in England, and have made a better return 
than the bringing of silver, gold, or other commodities to the country. 
Farthings may be made of tin, at so full a value that the pewterer 
cannot sell you new pewter cheaper than the farthings can be made ; 
but to avoid adulteration with lead or counterfeiting or clipping 
farthings, there must be an act making it treason or felony at the 
least. 

6. " If you make farthings of tin, and have them justly assayed, 



Digitized by 



Google 



xl EXTRACTS FROM STATE PAPERS. 

and give them a full value, to be issued out at i5d. or i6d. to the 
lb. avoirdupois, then you make use of your own native commodity, 
and it will give employment to many of our own miners and tinners, 
will be a merchandise to be carried out at that value, and you will 
keep in the stock of the nation, which will be in some proportion 
expended in buying copper in Sweden, if you make farthings of 
copper. 

7. " A surveyor will be necessary to keep an account for the State, 
to see the metal assayed, and that the farthings are justly assized, 
and for that place I desire the fee of id. the lb. for all farthings that 
shall be made for the Commonwealth and Ireland, or such a salary 
as you may think fit ; and every three months I will give an account 
to the Council of State of the quantity of farthings and half-farthings 
made, the goodness of the metal, both copper and tin, the remains 
of what are not changed, and the names of those who took them, so 
that the State may know the quantities made. 

8. " If objectors would have pence, halfpence, farthings, and half- 
farthings made with silver, I know by experience that almost all 
such are lost, as being of so little bulk, and being put with other coin, 
they slip between, and the silver generally comes to nothing ; the 
inconveniency of putting silver in copper is shown in my first propo- 
sition. 

9. " My proposition for regulating the manufacture of farthings 
is to make the standard 84 pieces, with a liberty of sheer of two 
pieces, but not to exceed 86 pieces nor under 84 pieces of copper, 
which will weigh 16 oz. avoirdupois, and which pieces, containing the 
weight and number impressed, shall be delivered out for aid. the lb., 
to all that shall require them at the Tower ; half-farthings to be 
200 to 204 pieces to the lb., and sold for 2s. id. the lb. 

10. " If the State make the farthings of tin, that can be done at 1 5d. 
the lb., and be cut into 60 to 62 pieces ; and half farthings 144 to 146 
pieces, to be delivered out at is. 6d. the lb. ; a pound of copper 
farthings can be made for 4d., and the half-farthings for 8d., the 
State finding the copper; the tin for farthings for 4d. the lb., and 
the half-farthirrgsi for 6d., the Slate not being at any charge for 
tools, either for making or keeping them in repair. There will 
be id. charge per lb. weight for keeping a surveyor and assay- 
master to keep an account of the whole business ; and I desire 
that employment. The workman could not afford to make the 
copper farthings under is. 8d. the pound, and 2s. per pound for 
the half-farthings ; is. 3d. per lb. for the tin farthings, and is. 6d. for 
the half-farthings, and the id. for charge upon every pound weight ; 
for as the State gets nothing, the thing should bear its own charge. 



Digitized by 



Google 



EXTRACTS FROM STATE PAPERS. xU 

and by this way we may have small change, which will be a great 
relief to all sorts of people that trade in small wares. 

II. "Some restrictions may be appointed for passing farthings, 
such as that they are not to go in payment upon bills of exchange, 
bonds, public accounts to the State, nor for rents ; that no man shall 
be compelled to take them in payment above 6d., nor aiiy labouring 
man or chapman above that sum in farthings for payment of labour ; 
and that it shall be left free to all, according to their necessity for 
change, to come and fetch their farthings at the Tower or other 
appointed place, and an Act of Parliament should be passed, making 
it a felony to clip or counterfeit any of such coin.** 

1 65 1, Nov. 18. 

"Proposals to the Mint Committee for coining brass or copper 
farthings, there being sensible loss for want of them, in buying and 
selling, chiefly to the poor; and chandlers of London and West- 
minster minting farthings themselves ; to prevent this, 

" That eight farthings pass for a penny, but so large that 9 or 10 are 
worth a penny to the braziers, so that their size will prevent their 
being carried away ; no man being compelled to take more than 16 
in one payment." 

1652, May — 

" * A paper about engines to mint withal.' On 14 March, 1649-50, 
Rich. Johnson, John Corbet, Wm. Taverner and David Rainage, 
moneyers of the Mint in the Tower, seized tools belonging to Reeves 
in White Cross Street, used in making copper farthings unlicenced, 
which if made at all, should be done in the Tower. 

'* A year ago such tools were taken from Reeves, with stamps for 
halfcrowns, and a contract between him and another in London for 
making thousands of rix dollars * and pieces of eight, for which con- 
tract Reeves received jC^o. 

" If such tools are kept by private persons, it will be impossible to 
prevent counterfeiting. In France it is death to anyone to keep such 
tools, and it should be the same here." 

1652, Nov. 30. — Council of State. 

•• The Mint Committee to consider the proposition of Col. Downes 
for farthing tokens for the use of Chichester." 

1653-4, March 16.— Council. 

" Order on Col. Jones' Report from the Mint Committee, that the 
several petitions and proposals concerning farthings be laid aside." 

1660, May. — Petition. 

" William Garrett, citizen of London. For permission to serve the 
King in the office of the farthing tokens, by which, on small disburse- 
• A silver coin of Germany and other Continental States, worth about 4s, 6d. 



Digitized by 



Google 



xlii EXTRACTS FROM STATE PAPERS. 

ments for tools, he hopes to bring a good annual profit to His Majesty, 
and greatly lo relieve the poor in trading. Has sustained irreparable 
losses by his constant loyalty." 

1660, Oct. 6. 

" Proposition by Sir Wm. Parkhurst, that to meet the necessity for 
small money, and to obviate the inconvenience of tradesmen's tokens, 
and of the frequent practice of coining — which has become so com- 
mon that the implements are openly sold — copper farthings be coined 
of full intrinsic value, which will prevent the Dutch dealing in them, 
he a convenience for petty traders, and encourage charity. An officer 
should be appointed and paid by His Majesty to supply the same to 
the traders, and in a few years the city and most country towns would 
be supplied." 

1660, Nov. — Petition. 

" Henry Howard. For a grant for 18 years of the office of farthing 
tokens, granted in 1635 to his father, Henry Earl of Arundel, and the 
late Sir Fras. Crane, ot which his father purchased Crane's moiety, in 
1639, for ;^6,ooo ; and had a new grant for 21 years, but in 1642 the 
Parliament sequestered the profits, whereby he lost the residue of his 
term." 

1660, Nov. — Petition. 

" George Monck and James Powell a/ias Paul. For a license to 
make brass or copper farthing tokens for those who wish to have them 
engraved with their names and dwellings, in order that the presses for 
that work may not be used for coining ; also for power to suppress 
other engines or tools made for that purpose." 

1660, Nov. 

" Petition from Major Erasmus Purling. For perusal of his pro- 
positions relative to his inventions in metals and minerals, His* 
Majesty having sole power of regulating the coinage. Annexing^ 
I. Proposals to supply ;^4oo,ooo worth of farthings^ to be given from 
the office at 21s, for 2 ox., the moiety to be for the Kingy who may have 
^100,000 worth advanced.^^ 

166 1, June 5. 

** Sir Henry Slingsby to the King. Represents that as to farthings. 
His Majesty has the undoubted prerogative of coining them : prays 
that no coinage may be allowed save in the Mint, and under govern- 
ment inspection ; that as to making farthings of some base metal, tin 
would be the best, but the easiness of working it, and its ready inter- 
mixture with lead, makes it open to coiners, and if that were attempted 
to be prevented by raising the price of tin, His Majesty having ilie 
pre-emption thereof, foreigners would buy their tin in Germany or 
elsewhere, to the injury 01 the owners of tin, and of the Turkey Corn- 



Digitized by 



Google 



EXTRACTS FROM STATE PAPERS, xUii 

pany whose trade is chiefly in it ; brass is objectionable on account 
of the smell ; copper is the fittest metal ; a contract should be made 
with Sweden for supply thereof, and then it should be coined and 
issued at so little increase of price as to make counterfeiting dis- 
advantageous. To avoid danger of a glut, the Mint should be 
always ready to exchange farthings for silver money, if requested, 
and should forbear to make more than demanded : moneys made of 
mixed metals would be expensive, and would not answer. As to 
small silver moneys, the charge of coinage in lesser pieces being 
greater in proportion than larger, he suggests that coins of pence, 
5 farthings, three half-pence, 7 farthings, &c., be made, so as to 
obtain change without use of silver pieces smaller than a penny." 

1665 (?). — Petitions. 

'* John Harwar and others to the King and Council. Possess large 
quantities of brass and copper tokens, pence, half-pence and farthings, 
which the owners now refuse to receive back, saying they are 
exempted therefrom by His Majesty's pardon of such offenders. 
Request some means of redress to prevent their utter ruin." 

1667, Jan. 4. 

" Order at general meeting of the Fishing Company approving the 
proposals of Sir £dw. Ford, and the petition grounded thereon, and 
appointing a committee to present the same to the King, and to pre- 
pare arguments in its favour, and attend the Council to speak in its 
defence. Annexing, 

" I. Petition of the Governor and Company of the Royal Fishing to 
the King, for a grant of the sole power of coining and issuing farthings, 
not to be counterfeited, according to a proposition made by Sir Edw, Ford, 
he giving security to prevent the export of gold and silver by importation 
of counterfeit farthings ; to hinder prejudice to the people, by taking back 
farthings at same rate ; to give 21s, worth of farthings for 20s. silver, 
and 5^. out of every 20s, to the Fishing Company. 

" II. Statement of the inconvenience and losses resulting from the 
issue of tradesmen's tokens, especially in the late contagion and fire, and 
yet that the profits of them are such that they are made, in spite of an 
order to the contrary.^' 



Digitized by 



Google 



DESCRIPTION OF A COINING PRESS FOR TOKEJNS 
IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



In the Gentleman^s Magazine^ November, 1757, there is a description 
of a press used for coining halfpenny tokens which were issued in the 
Borough of Chesterfield, in Derbyshire, by Mr. Edward Wood, an 
apothecary : 

** The press consisted of four pieces of good oak, not less than four inches 
thick, and very strongly dove-tailed together. In the upper cross-piece was 
fastened an iron box with a female screw, through which there passed a stout iroa 
screw of an inch or more diameter, to the bottom of which was fixed one of the 
dies ; whilst the other was received into a square hole made in the bottom cross> 
piece, where it lay very steady as in a proper bed. The screw was wrought by 
hand, in the manner of a capstan, by means of four handles affixed to the top of 
it, of about nine inches long each. And thus, after the copper was reduced to a 
proper thickness, shorn to a size, and commodiously rounded, many hundreds 
of halfpence might be coined, by two persons, in a very short time, by a man we 
will suppose to ply the screw, and a woman or a boy to put on and take off the 
pieces. And yet I assure you, sir, these Chesterfield halfpennies were extremely 
well-struck. 

" Signed S. P. [Samuel Pecge.]" 

The press and dies were found in the house of the grandson of 
Edward Wood, who issued the following token : 

O. EDWARD . WOOD = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R. In . Chesterfield . His . Halfe . Penny (in four lines). 



Digitized by 



Google 



3Be6for6ebire. 



Number of Tokens issued 107 

Number of Towns, etc, issuing Tokens . . .38 

Town Pieces issued at Biggleswade, Langford 2 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 



Jos. HiGHT Blundell, Esq., 

Stanstead, Caterham. 



Digitized by 



Google 



ioogle 



Traders' Tokens 

ISSUED IN 

THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



ENGLAND. 



The tokens of this county consist of halfpennies and farthings, which range from 
1652 to 1 67 1. There are Town-pieces of Biggleswade and Lansford. Many of 
the Bedford notes were originally compiled by Admiral Smyth, F.S.A., and 
have been largely added to. The list of places issuing tokens is increased in this 
edition by the following names: Clifton, Cardington, Cople, Goldington, Henlow, 
Kempston, Oakley, Silsoe, Stevington, and Upper Dean, and forty-two new tokens 
in all are added to the county, while very many corrections of misprints and errors 
in the first edition have been made. Many of the notes on the issuers are of 
unusual interest. 

^ AMPTHILL. 

1. O, THOMAS . HARVYE = T . M . H 

R, OF . AMPTHILL . l666 = T . M . H \ 

The following entry exists in the parish register : 

Thomas the sonn of Tho Harvey was baptized the same tyme as the other 
two wase which is the 27 aprill 1663. 

2. O, lOHN . IMPIEIL . DRES = I . A . I 

R, SER . IN . AMPTELL . 1663 = 1 . A . I \ 

BARTON IN THE CLAY. 

3. O. WILLIAM . HOPKINS = HIS HALFE PENY 

R, BARTON . IN . THE . CLAY = W . E . H \ 

BEDFORD. 

4. O. PAVLL . BAMFORTH = P . E . B 

R, IN . BEDFORD . 1665 = P . E . B J 

The Bamforths of Bedford were highly respectable ; and on the registers '* Mr.** 
is always prefixed to their name. They left several legacies to the poor of the 
boroogfa, which are still enjoyed ; but the family has disappeared since about 1725, 

I — 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



4 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

one of the last dying rector of Little Barford, in 1720. Paul, the son of Aldemum 
Robert Bamforth, seems to have been an able citizen : since we find that he was 
chamberlain of tlie corporation in 1661 and 1666, bailiff in 1663 and 1669^ 
and mayor in 1681, two years after his brother William had served in the same 
capacity. 
A Sir Thomas Bamfor was vicar of Cople in 1521. 

5. O. ANTHONY . BOVLTON . IN = The Grocers' Anns. 

J^. BEDFORD . GROCER . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. A . S . B ^ 

The Boultons have utterly vanished, those now in Bedford being unconnected 
with the token-issuer. The registers show that Anthony baptized his son by the 
same Christian name in 1662, which is about the sum of what we gather as to his 
private life. His public career must be considered useful, since he wa^ long on the 
common council, served as chamberlain in 1673, ^iiff iQ i675> ^^^ ^^ twice 
mayor, namely, in the years 1680 and 169a 

6. A variety reads of in place of in. 

7. O. lOHN . CLARKE = Crossed keys. 

/^. OF . BEDFORD = I . S . C \ 

The Cross Keys inn still exists, though under a doom of demolition. The 
landlord came into Bedford from the respectable stock at Sandy ; he had a 
son baptized Robert in 1662, whose descendants disappeared from the town 
about 1733. 

The Clarkes supplied several common councillors and municipal officers, hut 
none ever attained to the mayoralty. 

8. O. THOMAS . COX =1664 

J^. IN . BEDFORD = T . I . C J 

The Coxes do not seem to have been of much consideration ; Thomas did not 
serve in any corF>orate capacity, yet he must have been a burgess, otherwise the 
municipal regulations, which were then strictly enforced, would have prevented 
him from exercising his calling. The heir of Thomas, also Thomas, a bricklayer 
of repute, married in the very year in which this token was smitten, and was elected 
a freeman of the borough in the seventeenth year of Charles II. About the com* 
mencement of the last century, a bit of an accident happened to the representative 
of the family honours, who was a mighty destroyer of game. Compelled to take in 
a reef, he worked ** Tom Coxe's traverse," shifted his berth, and sought smooth 
water in Oxford, where his descendants are still traceable. The name is common 
in the county, both among the yeomen and peasantry, but those who bear it in the 
town are of comparatively recent arrival. 

9. O, WILLIAM . FALDO = W . A . F 

Ji. IN , BEDFORD . 1659 = W . A . F J 

Faldo b the name of a numerous and ancient Bedfordshire family. In Mauldea 
Church, where Richard Faldo was interred in 1576, there are two monuments 
bearing the family arms, three bucks' heads caboshed, crest three arrows passing 
through a ducal coronet, one in pale, two in saltire. See Fisher's ** Bedfordshire 
Collections," nos. 15 and 16, fol. 1812-36. 

William, the issuer of the token, was a man of substance. He became chamber- 
lain of the corporation in 1648, bailiff in 165 1, and mayor in 1652. He was re- 
elected to the chair in 1664, but died during his period of office, and was buried in 
St. Mary's Church, where also Ann his widow was carried in less than two months 
after. In 1687, the son and nephew of William Faldo were both dismissed from 
the station of aldermen, by the royal mandate of James II. ; but they were 
shortly afterwards restored by William III., and Faldo /i/s was mayor in 1697 
and 1711. 

There are two brasses in Biddenden Church to members of the family, which 
had evidently very considerable properly at Okley, Clapham, Maulden, and 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEDFORDSHIRE. 5 

Goldin^on. On October 8, 1657, John Faldo bequeathed land and some ;f 3,000 
to Wilham Faldo, son of the issuer of the token, who appears to have belonged to 
this branch of the lamily. The pedigrees are fully set out in the visitations of 1634. 
See ** Harleian Society Publications, * vol. xix. 

The family flourished till about 1759, but they dwindled till the last representa- 
tive became a shaver! This poor but honest body was a burgess of 1746, and 
heir-at-law to the manor farm at Harrowden, near Bedford, now possessed by 
Mr. Whitbread. He plied hard in several vocations, dropping to leeward on each 
tack, till he struck to Necessity, and bore up for a barber^ shop, wherein the 
lineal descendant of all the Faldos took chapmen by the nose till 1800, when the 
race and himself became defunct. But even m these reduced circumstances, he had 
to endure further buffets from fortune ; for, waxing old, he was barber-ously sup- 
planted by one Symes, which gave rise to the distich : 

•*0 how we are changed in these modem times, 
We leave poor old Faldo to lather with Symes !*' 

The name has been vemacularized to Faulder, and still exists in Bedford, though 
not of this kin. 

10. O. ROBERT . FARMAN . BAKER = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

jR. IN . BEDFORD . 1667 =HIS HALF PENY. R . E . F J 

The family of Farman or Fairman, for the registers use both spellings, was of 
considerable respectability, and even opulence ; but they have been long gathered 
to the vault of the Capulets. Robert was the son of William Farman, had a son 
and daughter, and buried his wife Elizabeth in the year this token was stamped. 
He was some years in the common council, served as chamberhun in 1681, and as 
bailiff in 1685. On the 2nd of September, 1695, he was elected mayor, but de- 
clined the chair under the plea of age, infirmities, incapacity, and non-residence. 
The representation was attended to, and he was excused from serving, after 
** paying all expenses." He had previously resigned his business to a son, and 
hauled his wind into a " villa." 

11. O, ROBERT . F1TTZHVGH = R . M . F 

i?. IN . BEDFORD- 1654 J 

The Fitzhughs were formerly in high consideration, both in the town and its 
▼idnity : they bore for arms, ermine on a chief gules, three martlets or; Robert 
Fitzhugh was a man evidently in high esteem ; he was chamberlain in 1647, bailiff 
in 1653, and mayor in 1656. 

William Fitzhugh, of Bushmead Priory, in the county, was in receipt of a pen- 
sion of 40s. in the second and third of Philip and Mary. 

12. O. HENRY . FITTZHVGH = 1655 

/^. IN . BEDFORD = 1655 i 

Henry was a brother of Robert Fitzhugh, and was elected mayor in 1649. 
The family entirely disappeared about the commencement of the eighteenth 
century ; the name has recently been revived by a party from Northamptonshire, 
who claim no affinity with the Bedford branch. That the Fitzhughs were considered 
most respectable, is evident from the distinctive *' Mr.'' being prefix^l to them in 
the registers and records. 

13. O, HENRY . FITTZHVGH = 1655 

jR. IN . BRDFOD= 1655 i 

14. O. HVGH . HOLTON = A frying pan. h . h 

^. IN . BEDFORD . 1 666 = HIS HALF PENY J 

There is little mention of the Holtons ; and they have long since disappeared. 
Neither Hugh nor any of his family gained any corporate honours ; yet he must 
have been respectable, for it seems he was able to befriend John Bunyan during 
his imprisonment on Bedford Bridge. There can be little doubt that the author of 



Digitized by 



Google 



6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

the " Pilgrim^s Progress *' had many warm friends in the town, or it is unlik^ 
that such strong intercessions would have been made in his behalf as were used by 
the worthy Bishop of Lincohi. 

15. O. WILLIAM . ISAAC =1666 

/^. OF . BEDFORD = W . M . I J 

This family has long disappeared. William Isaac was early enrolled amoc^ 
the councillors of the corporation, and served the office of chamberlain in 1673 ^^^ 
1675, and bailiff in 1674, 1676, and 1681. The mandate by which King James 
dismissed the two Faldos, as before mentioned, directed that his Majest^r s trusty 
and well-beloved William Isaac be elected mayor of Bedford. He, however, 
waited on William of Orange with the warm congratulations of the corporation on 
his arrival. This act of homage was duly appreciated, insomuch that a mandatory 
letter arrived from the new king for again electing him. The family toddled 
along in business, but with a leewardly course ; the only corporate honour attained 
by the descendants of William was the bailiffs mace, in 171S. One i>ersoQ only 
remained master of the name in 1729, and he, being master of nothing else, bag- 
piped his mizzen, put his helm a-weaiher, and went right before it, leaving *• not a 
wreck behind." 

16. O, PHILLIP . NicHOLLES = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. IN . BEDFORD . 1659 = P . S . N J 

17. O. THOMAS. PARE = Three cloves. 

-^. OF . BEDFORD . 1656 = T . E . P i 

This familv originally came from Hitchin ; Thomas was many years one of the 
common councU, and served as chamberlain in 1653. After the squalls which 
agitated the magnates of Bedford, at the Revolution of 1688, there were rulers 
who knew not Pare ; so Thomas, junior, Abigail, his sister, and some smaller 
Pares, repaired to the habitat of their kindred in Hertfordshire. There has not 
been a freeman or resident of the name in Bedford for upwards of * century. 

18. O, lOHN . PAVLiN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . BEDFORD . 1654 = 1 . D . P J 

The Paulins were residents in Bedford for a considerable period ; their name fre- 
quently occurs during the reigns of the second Charles and James. There are none 
now either in the town or county, and they seemed to have hauled their wind 10 
other berths, or died off, about 171a John was of great respecubilily, as is 
evident from the registry of his family, though we find little more than the marriage 
of his sister Rebecka with Walter Faldo, the baptism of his son and three 
daughters, and the death of Elizabeth, one of the daughters, and his wife " JDoug- 
lasse." He was bailiff in the years 1669, 1673, 1677, and 1686 ; and was mayor 
in 1693. A bailiff of Bedford was not the " bound " shoulder-tapper of Doc and 
Roe notoriety, but a municipal officer of trust and consideration. 1 wo were elected 
annually, who were jointly considered as sheriff of the borough. 

19. O. RALPH . SMYTH . LiNNEN = R . s . s. Between two flowers 

with entwined stems. 

jR. DRAPER . IN . BEDFORD = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1668 

The Smyths liear a proverbially popular name in all parts of Europe ; and it is 
certain they mustered in great force in Bedford. Ralph was long in the conunoa 
council, chamberlain in 1671, baiUff in 1672 and 1674, and mayor in 1676 and 1692. 
There is little more to be learnt of him than that he was well connected, and left 
children ; but though the town is never without loU of Smyths, no lineal descend- 
ants of Ralph are known to exist. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEDFORDSHIRE. 7 

20. O, lOHN . WALLER . AT . THE . BLEW = A boar. 

I^, BORE . IN . BEDFORD . l668 = HlS HALFE PENY. I . M . W J 
The Blue Boar, an ina formerly of note, no longer exists ; '* the oldest inhabitant " 
recollects nothing of its locality. John Waller was a man of much respectability, 
though he boasted no corporate honours. Thomas, his father, was a grocer ; 
served the office of mayor in 1630, and his uncle, William, was one of the justices 
of the peace of Bedford in 1632. John Waller's mother was desirous of becoming 
a sister of the congregation of which Bunyan was afterwards pastor, and a minute 
appears in the record book that *' Miss Wallers desire was considered, but the 
cnurch not being satisfied in her, did appoint Brother Harrington to go to her and 
to deale closely with her about the work of grace in her souU.*' This was on the 
24th of the second month, 1656, but after being thus spoken with she was advised 
to ** yet waite " before walking in fellowship. She wrestled with Satan and after- 
wards got in. The last of the lineage died an apothecary about fifty years ago, and 
is still remembered as a wag who by a stroke of humour broke an alarming quinsy, 
which threatened the valuable life of a gentleman still living in Bedford. The 
family came originally from Hertfordshire, and it is reasonable to suppose that 
mine host of the "blew bore" was a connection of the poetical and political 
Edmund Waller. 

BIGGLESWADE. 

21. O. A . BIGILSWORTH . HALF . PENY = A cripplC. 

i?. CHAiNGD . BY . THE . OVERSEERS = A spinning-whecl. 
{Heart-shape,) \ 

22. O, lOHN . BODDiNGTON . 1 669 = I . K . a Between two flowers 

with entwined stems 

R, IN . BIGLESWADE . DRAPER = HIS HALFE PENNY J^ 

23. C?. lOHN . BRAY . AT . Y" . SWAN = A swan statant 

R, IN . BIGLES . WARD . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. I . S . B \ 
In a subsidy levied in 4th Car. I., Edward Bray was assessed 205. for land and 
paid 8s., and Morris Bray 60s. for land. In the Hearth Tax of 1676, Elizabeth 
Bray, widow, is assessed 2s. with the words, ** Noe distress to be taken." 

24. O, WILLIAM . PARNELL = A demi-virgin crowned. 

R. IN . BIGELESWORTH = W . E . P \ 

25. O, THOMAS . TOMPKINS = A dove volant. 

R, IN . BIGLESWORTH = T . A . T \ 

BLUNHAM. 

26. O, GEORGE . FARR . 1 666 = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . BLVNHAM = G . F \ 

CARDINGTON. 

27. O. WILLIAM . WILLMOT = W . W 

R, OF . CARDINGTON . 64 = W . W \ 

This family was evidently long established here, as entries exist in the parish 
registers extending back to the early part of the century. The following, amongst 
others: 

22 May, 1643. Willmus filius Thomge Willmot et Joannae uxor Baptizat. 
26 Aug., 1654. William Willcmot and EUzabeth Caret was maried. 
14 July, 1662. William Willemot ye sonne of William Willemot bap. 



Digitized by 



Google 



S TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



CLIFTON. 

28. O. lOHN . SAMM=The Drapers' Arms. 

i?. OF . CLIFTON . 1664 = 1 . H . S \ 

This fiimlly appears to have been of some local standing. John Sanun, son of 
the above, was overseer for the poor in 168S-1703, and another son, Michael, was 
several times churchwarden, 1078 to 1683. In a list of collections of Cliftoa 
appear the foUovring carious entries : Michael Samm gave one shilling for re- 
demption of captives in Algeria, 1670^ and 4d. for fires in St. Martin's in the Fields, 
London, 1673 > '^ again one shilling in 1680, for captives in Algeria and the 
Turkish dominions, and in 1682, is. for distressed French Protestants. John Samm 
also gave 6d. for a fire in Wapping Hamlet The name still exists in the 
county. 

CLOPHILL 

29. O. lOHN . CARTER = A roll of tobacco. 

^. IN . CLOPHILL . 1666 = 1 . S . C { 

COPLE. 

30. O, lOSEPH . LAKE . i668 = A man working at a forge and 

smoking. 

J^, GROCER. OF . COPELL = HIS HALF PENY i 

31. O. lOSEPH . LAKE . i668 = A man working at a forge and 

smoking. 

J^, GROCER = HIS HALF PENY ^ 

This has no town name, but the obverse is evidently from the same die as Na 30. 

CRANFIELD. 

32. O, lOHN . BANDY . i668 = A pair of scales. 

^. OF . CRANFEiLD = Three roses entwined and nowed between 
I . B \ 

33. O. ELING . LEBATT . HER = HALF PENY 

J^. OF . CRANFEILD = A pair of scales. i 

34. O. RICHARD . YOVNG = R . A . Y 

^. IN . CRANFEILD . 1670 = A pair of scales. ^ 

DUNSTABLE. 

35. O, THOMAS . BARRET . CARRIER ~ A packhorse pannier. 

^. IN . DVNSTABLE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY i 

36. O. EDWARD . CHESTER . BAKER . IN = 1667. Between two 

roses. 
H. DVNSTABLE . HIS . HALF . PENY = E . E . c Between two 
roses entwined and nowed. ^ 

37. O. DANIELL . FINCH « Merchant Taylors' Arms 

H. IN . DVNSTABLE 1668. = HIS | HALF | PENY. | D . S . F (in 

four lines). ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEDFORDSHIRE, 9 

38. a DANiELL . FINCH == Merchant Taylors* Arms. 

Ji, IN . DVNSTABLE . i668=Two flowcrs entwined and nowed 
between d . s . f \ 

39. O. DANIELL . FOSSEY = A greyhound running away with a hare, 

between two pipes crossed and a tobacco-rolL 

R, OF . DVNSTABLE . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY. D . E . F ^ 

40. O. WILLIAM . FOSSEY = A swan statant. 

R, IN . DVNSTABLE . 1 667 = Three roses entwined and nowed 
between w . f \ 

41. O. EDWARD . TiPLADY . OF=The Grocers' Arms. 

R. DVNSTABLE . HIS . HALF . PENY = E . M . T. Between tWO 

flowers entwined and nowed. \ 

In a subsidy, 12 Car. II., Sara Tiplady paid 2s. at the Red Lion in this town. 
Charles L slept here 27 August, 1645. 

42. O. lOHN . WHITLEY =» Drapers' Arms. 

R. IN . DVNSTABLE = I . M . W \ 

43. O. NATHANiELL . wiMPEW = A hart lodged. 

R. IN . DVNSTABLE . HIS i=» A mitre over n . i . w 

EATON BRAY. 

44. O. WALTER . RICHARDS . OF = Arms of France; three fleurs- 

de-lys. 

R. EATON . IN . BEDFORDSHEIR = HIS HALF PENY \ 

ELSTOW. 

45. O. ROBERT. H0LDST0CK=HIS HALFE PENNY 

R. OF . ELSTOW . l668 = R . A . H \ 

GOLDINGTON. 

46. O. GILBERT . ASHLEY . HIS . HALF . PENY=l668 

R. IN . GOLDINGTON =0 . I . A. Between two flowers en- 
twined, i 

47. O. GILBERT . ASHLEY . HIS . HALFE . PENY « 1 668 

R. IN . GOLDINGTON . ROVND-G . I . A. Between four stars. | 

GREAT BARFORD. 

48. O. EDMVND . WARD . OF= A bull passant 

R. GREAT. BARFORD. l668 = HlS HALF PENY J 

In Great Barford register appear the following entries : 

" Edmund Ward chosen Parish Register for the towne of Barford is sworn and 
approved by us this 15 Novem., 1653. 

^' Edmund Ward the elder buned Nov. 8, 1682. 

** Edmund, son of Edmund Ward, buried Feb. 5, 1699. 

« Edmund Ward, gent., buried May 15, 1712. 

" Edmund Ward, buried July 15, 17 14. (No service read,)** 

[Note by the Vicar.— This looks like a survival of the principles of the old 
registrar, who was, no doubt, a Nonconformist.] 

£• W.*s tombstone, much defaced, is still existing. 



Digitized by 



Google 



lo TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

49. O, LEONARD . MILLS . AT= A hoFSC and cart 

I^. BVRFORD . WAGONNER = L . M 1 669. \ 

This token was found at Bedford, which is in the hundred of Borford. 

HAROLD. 

50. O. lOHN . BLETSOE^HIS HALF PENY 

J^, IN. HARROLD . i668 = A flowcr with three blossoms be- 
tween I . B. \ 

HENLOW. 

51. O. THOMAS . VNDERWOOD=l668 

I^, IN . HENLOW = T . E . V { 

52. O. THOMAS . VNDERWOOD= 1668 

^. IN . HENLO = I . E . V J 

HOCKLIFFE. 

53. O, WILLIAM . covERLEE . IN = The Coopers' Arms. 

J^. HOCKLEY . HOLE . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . E . C J 

54. O. GEORGE . HALL . AT . MOTHER = A buSt of MothCT Redcap 
i?. RED . CAPS . IN . HOCKLEY . HOLE = G . M . H. 

55. O. ANN . TRAVER . AT . THE=A flying horse. I 

i?. IN . HOCKLEY . HOLE . i667=The Coopers' Arms. | 

" To Hocklayhole as I approached, " Thence to Dunstable, all about me ; 
Scylla*s balmy cell I broached. Mice within, and Thieves without me; 

Darke as th' cave of Pluto's station, But no fear affrights deep drinkers. 
Or Lavema's habitation ; There I tost it with my Sk inkers ; 

Quaffing there while I could stand-o. Not a drop of wit remained 
Madder grew I than Orlando. Which the bottle had not drainecL** 

Bamaby 5 Journal, 

** There was a noted house of entertainment near Clerkenwell Green, L«ondoii, 
called Hockley-in-the-Hole, celebrated for bear and bull-baitings, and for prixe- 
fighting betwixt women as well as men." — Cunningham^ s London, 

HOUGHTON REGIS. 

56. O, lOSEPH . COLEMAN . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY 

R, OF . DVNSTABELL . HOVGHTON = I . E . c Between two 
flowers, the stems entwined and nowed. | 

57. A variety dated 1668. 

HUSBORN CRAWLEY. 

58. O, EDMVND . GREENE . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENNY 

R, OF . HVSBORNE . CRAWLEY = E . F . G \ 

KEMPSTON. 

59. O, SAMVEL . PERSON = S . E . P 

R. IN . KEMSON . 1664 = S . E . P 4 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEDFORDSHIRE. ii 

LANGFORD. 

60. O. CHANGED . BY . Y« . OVERSEERS . OF = LANG | FORD (in tWO 

lines). 

R. LANGFORD . IN . Y« . COVNTY . OF . BED = HALFE PENNY. 
1668 i 

61. O, CHANGED . BY . Y« . OVERSEERS . OF = LANG | FORD. 

R. LANGFORD . IN . Y« . COVNT . OF . BED = HALFE. PENNY. 
1668 ^ 

From a different die to the other, bolder and better workmanship, and with 
difTerent ornaments. 

LEIGHTON BUZZARD. 

62. O, BENEDICT . COLES = A pair of scales. 

R, IN . LAYTON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. B . A . C J 

63. O. ISAAC . DANNELL = HIS HALF PENY 

R, IN . LEIGHTON . 1 66 7 =T WO pipcs and a roll of tobacco. ^ 

64. O. WILLIAM . GVRNEY = A dOVe. 

R. AT . LAYTON . BVZ = TALOW CHANDLER. J 

65. O, WALTER . RICHARDS . OF = Three fleurs-de-lys. 

R. LATON . IN . BEDFORDSHEIR=HIS HALF PENY ^ 

66. O. lOSEPH . SEAYRE . LINEN = 1 663 

R, DRAPER . IN . LAIGHTON = I . M . S \ 

LIDLINGTON. 

67. O, lOHN . DAWBORNE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF. LIDLINGTON. l668 = HIS HALF PENY ^ 

68. O. lOHN . DAWBORNE = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, OF . LIDLINGTON = I . E . D \ 

69. O. lOHN . PEARCE . OF = An article of dress. 

R. LITLINGTON . l668 = HIS HALF PENY J 

LUTON. 

70. O. RICH . HOPKINS . AT . RED = A lion rampant. 

R. IN . LEWTON . 1666 = R . H \ 

The old Red Lion was an inn of some importance in coaching days. It has 
been rebuilt within living memory. The spelling of the town name represents 
phonetically the still very common local pronunciation. 

ji. O. ABRAHAM . PEETER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . LVTON . 1653 = A . p. Between a cinque foil. \ 

72. A variety has a p between five lozenges, and in execution and 
ornamentation is entirely different to No. 70. 

73. O. lOHN . ROWLEY . IN= 1657 

R. LVTON . BEDFORDSH = I . R . I J 



Digitized by 



Google 



12 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

MILLBROOK. 

74. O. RICHARD . NORRis = A Hon rampant. 

jff. IN . MILLBROOKE . 1671 = R.A.N J 

75. O. GREGORY . DOWLiNGE = Mercers' Arms. 

jff. OF . MILLBROOKE . l666 = G . D J 

MILTON ERNEST. 

76. O. HENRY . SAVAGE . OF . MILTON = A plough. 

-Af. EARNEST . HIS . HALFE . PENY=H . E . S. BetweCD tWO 

flowers with stems entwined and nowed. J 

OAKLEY. 

77. O. lOHN . FOWLKR . OF . OKLEY = Cross keys. 

I^. x668 . HIS . HALF . PENNY = Two flowers with stems en- 
twined and nowed between i . s . f I 
The name and type of this token are so thoroughly Bedfordshire that it is txans- 
ferred to that county from Bucks. 

PAVENHAM. 

78. O. WILLIAM . ASHTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. of. PAVENHAM. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY | 

POTTON. 

79. O. RICHARD . ATKINSON -A Stag tripping. 

I^. OF . POTTON . 1661 =R . K . A J 

N.B. — The o in Atkinson is very small 
See also under Eynesbury, Hunts, a token of Andrew Selby, Potton. 

80. O. HVGH . CONNY . OF . POiTON = Three rabbits. 

jff. HIS . HALFE . PENNY = H . C. 1 666 ^ 

81. O. lOHN . HARPER. OF=l657 

J?. POTTON . IN . MIDLESX = I . H J 

There is no town of this name in Middlesex, and the token is believed to be one 
of Bedfordshire. 

82. O. HENRY . RVGELEY . IN . 1 666 = St. George and the dragon. 
I^. POTTON . HIS . HALFE . PENNY = H . R. Betweeu three 

flowers, the stems entwined and nowed J 

83. O. RICHARD . THORNEY = Three sugar-loaves. 

I^. IN . POTTON . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY J 

SHEFFORD. 

84. O. lOSEPH . BOVLSTRED = The Grocers* Arms. 

-^. IN . SHEFORD . 1667 = I . A . B i 

85. O. lOSEPH . CROCKER . OF . 1 670 = The Drapers' Arms. 

J?. SHEFFORD . LINEN . DRAPER = A HALF PENY. 1 . E . C | 



Digitized by 



Google 



BEDFORDSHIRE. 13 

86. O. lOSEPH . FOSE = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^, IN . SHEFORDE = The Mercers' Arms. \ 

87. O. WILLIAM . GROVES = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . SHEFFORD= 1666. 

88. A variety of above reads on the obverse sheffeield, and 
appears to be a curious blundering confusion with the more im- 
portant town in Yorkshire. 

89. O. ISAAC . SHEPPARD = I . s conjoined. 

^. IN . SHEFOKD . 1664 = 1 . E . S ^ 

SHILLINGTON. 

90. O. FRANCES . CARTER = F . C. 1656 

R. AT.SHEDLiNTON. iN = BED | FORD | SHIR (in three lines). J 

91. O. lONATHAN . CARTER. OF = HIS HALFE PENY 

^. SHITLINGTON . 1667 = 1 . c With three roses entwined. J 

SILSOE. 

92. O. RICHARD . DAVIS = The Mercers' Arms. 

J?. AT . SVLSOE . 1668 = R . A . D J 

STEVINGTON. 

93. O. RALPH . HARviE = A double-headed eagle displayed. 

/^. IN . STEVENTON = R . S . H. 1657 J 

This name was common in Stevington seventeenth centuiy registers. Ralph 
Hanrie appears to have had two *'sonnes" of the same name, baptized 1668 and 
1670, and to have buried his first wife in 1668. The following token probably gives 
the initial of his second wife's name. 

94. O. RALPH . HARVIE = A pair of scales. 

k, IN . STERENTON = R . R . H ^d. ^ 

95. O. EDWARD . READE . OF = A pair of scales. 

i?. STEVENTON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY ^ 

The issuer appears to have been a glover, and to have twice married : Rebecca, 
who died 1657, and Mary Carter, whom he married October ii, 1659. Very 
curiously he also, like Ralph Harvie, appears to have had two sons of his own 
name, one by each wife, bom respectively October 11, 1654, and January 9, 
i66a 

TURVEY. 

96. O. GEORGE . BABINGTON = HIS HALF PENNY 

J?. IN . TVRVEY . 1667=0. B. Between a flower of three 
blossoms with entwined stem. ^ 

97. O, lOHN . wooDiN = A pair of scales. 

^. IN . TVRVIE = I . D . W J 



Digitized by 



Google 



14 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



UPPER DEAN. 

90. O. ROBERT . DAI =1667. 

I^. IN . VPPER . DEANE = R . D. 

99. O. ROBERT . DAY = R . A . D. 

I^, OF , DEANE . 1668 = HIS . HALFE . PENNY. 

WILDEN. 

100. O. THOMAS . SPRINGE . OF = The Groccrs' Arms, t . s 

^. WILDEN. GROCER . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY 

WOBURN. 

Id. O, FRANCIS . COLLMAN = HIS HALFE PENY 
I^. IN . WOOBVRNE . 1667 = F . S . C 

102. O. RICH . GASLEY . IN . ovBVRN = The DrapcFs' Arras. 

/^, HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l666 = R . A . G 

103. O, THOMAS . HILL . OF = A pair of scales. 

^. WOOBVRNE . 1666 = T . A . H 

104. O, lONATHAN . KINGHAM . IN = A wheel. 

/^. WOBORNE . MIL . HIS . HALF . PENY = A mill-rind. 

105. A variety has the mill-rind between i k. 

106. O, NATHANIEL. LAWSON = The Drapers* Arms. 

J^. OF . WOOBOVRNE . 1664 = N . E . L 

107. O. FRANCIS . SEAGRE = Three crowns on the royal oak. 

J?. IN . WOOBVRNE . 1667= HIS HALFE PENNY 



Digitized by 



Google 



Berftebire- 



Number of Tokens issued 189 

Number of Towns, etc, issuing Tokens . . .22 

Town Pieces issued at Newbury. 



Sub-Editor and Collaboratevr : 

Major B. Lowsley, R.E., 

Hampstead Norreys, Berks. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



In the present List of Berkshire Seventeenth Century Tokens, 189 
Tokens have been described, as against 137 in the former edition 
of Boyne. Three then included in the Berkshire List ascribed to 
Steventon are now omitted, it having been clearly proved that 
these were issued from Steventon, Bedfordshire. — [ Vide note under 
Steventon.] 

Of the fifty-five Tokens now added, eighteen have been previously 
described in the work entitled " The Seventeenth Century Tokens in 
the British Museum not desbribed in Boyne," by Messrs. C. F. 
Keary, M.A., and Warwick Wroth, published by Rollin and Feuardent, 
London, in 1885. 

The remaining thirty-seven Tokens now introduced have not, as far 
as I am aware, been before described. 

Corrections or additions in the descriptions of twenty of the 
Tokens given in the last edition of Boyne have been made. 

Tokens which were not included in the former edition of Boyne 
have ♦ prefixed to the description; those with the description 
amended have t prefixed ; and those which were previously noted in 
the above-mentioned work by Messrs. C. F. Keary and Warwick 
Wroth are marked M. 

In addition to the three Steventon tokens which have been 
omitted, there are two which appear also not to belong to Berkshire, 
viz., the farthing of Thomas Smith of Abington, and the farthing 
of Thomas Yovnge of Newbvrye. These are, however, for the pre- 
sent left in their places, with notes respecting them. 

The earliest date on any Berkshire Token appears to be 1652, 
and the latest date 1670. 

The only townpiece is the farthing of Newbury, of which there 
were five varieties issued in the same year. — \^Vide notes under 
Newbury Tokens.] 

There are no pence. 

There are thirty-one halfpennies. Of these two are heart-shaped, 
viz., that of Richard Fowler of Faringdon, and that of Hvgh Cham- 
pion, of Reading. One halfpenny, viz., that of John Gosse, of 
Winder, is octagonal. All besides these are circular. 

There are 158 farthings. All of these are of the usual shape, 
except that issued by Thomas Cowslade, of Newbury, which is convex 
on the obverse, and concave on the reverse. 

Tokens appear to have been sparingly issued in Berkshire, and 
none appear to be now commonly met with^ except, perhaps, the 



Digitized by 



Dy Google 



i8 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Newbury Town tokens, the token of Edmund Stone, of Maidenhead, 
and that of William Masmore, of Wantage. 

The numbers of tokens, or varieties of tokens, issued from Berk- 
shire towns and villages are : 

READING = 63 

WANTAGE =19 

WALLINGF0RD=I5 



WOKINGHAM 


= 


14 


NEWBURY 


=5 


13 


WINDSOR 


= 


12 


ABINGDON 


=: 


II 


FARINGDON 


= 


II 


HUNGERFORD 


= 


5 


MAIDENHEAD 


= 


5 


BLEWBURV 


= 


4 


LAMBOURN 


= 


4 


HAGBOURN 


= 


3 


SONNING 


=s 


2 


BUCKLEBURV 


=s 




COOKHAM 


= 




COXWELL 


= 




HARWELL 


= 




ILSLEV 


= 




LONGCOTT 


=» 




LONGWORTH 


= 




WINKFIELD 


ss 





Of the above-named places the following are now for the first time 
noted as having tokens issued from them : Bucklebury, Cookham, 
Little Coxwell, Sonning, and Winkfield. 

B. LOWSLEY, 

Major, Royal Engineers. 
Hampstead Norreys, Berks. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 19 



ABINGDON. 

Id the Abingdon series of tokens we have five halfpennies and six £Etf things. 
The name of the town is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

5 times ABINGTON. 

4 times abingdon. 

I time ABBINGTON. 

I time ABiNDON. 

Mr. A. E. Preston, of Abingdon, informs me that all the names of the issuers 
are recorded in MSS. connected with the history of the borough, although few 
descendants are, he thinks, now to be found in the neighbourhood. 

None of the Abingdon tokens, with the exception, perhaps, of those issued by 
Richard Ely and William Stevenson, are commonly met with. 

1. O, ROBERT . BLACKALLER = The Mercer's Arms. 

J?. OF . ABINGDON . MERCER = HIS . HALF . PENY | 

Robert Blackaller was master of Christ's Hospital 1673, 1693, and 1707. 
He was mayor of Abingdon 1680^ 1692, and 1697. 

2. t*"^. ROBERT . LiFORD . OF = Spcctacles and scissors 

J?. ABBINGTON . MILLINER = A comb and a fish hook ^ 

The name of liford is still found in the neighbourhood. 

3. O. RICHARD . ELY = A lamb 

J?. LAMB . IN . ABINDON » R . E \ 

Richard Ely, probably son of the above, was master of Christ's Hospital 1701, 
1706, 1715, 1724, 1726, and 1729. 

Also mayor of Abingdon in 1707. 

He was builder of a founUin called the *' Castle Well," still existing in Ock 
Street. 

These tokens are more frequently met with than others in the Abingdon series. 

4. O. THOMAS . GEAGLE . AT . THE = Three w T . G. 

J?. BRIDWELL . IN . ABINGDON = HIS . HALF . PENY ^ 

5. O. lOHN . HALL . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . ABINGDON . 1 667 = HIS HALF PENY. I . B . H i 

6. O. THO . HARTWELL . OF . ABINGDON = A Uon passant gar- 

dant ^ 

jff. THO . HARTWELL . OF . HIGHWORTH = A CrOWn J J 

7. O, HENRY . MEALES . IN= 1657 

k. ABINGTON . BAKER -H . M J 

8. O. SARAH . PLEYDELL = The Merccrs' Arms. 

^. OF . ABINGTON . 1 667 = HER HALFE PENNY . S . P J 

(PI. I, Fig. I.) 
The Pleydells of Coleshill were a good family. 
The name of the aboTe issuer of a token does not appear in the pedigree. 

2 — 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



20 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

9. iO. THOMAS . SMITH . 58 = T . M . S 

jff. ABiNGTON . GROCER = A ship and a crescent i 

Mr. H. S. Gill, of Tiverton, Devon, informs me that " This token has been 
assigned, by the Rev. W. G. Searle, Vicar of Hockin^on, near Cambridge, to the 
vill^e of ABINGTON, Cambridgeshire, where he states it has been found.*' 

10. O. WILLIAM . STEVENSON = The Grocers* Arms. 

jff. IN . ABINGTON . GROCER = W . M . S. \ 

A rather common token. There are different dies. 

11. O. lOHN . WELLS . 0F = A man making candles. 

jff. ABINGTON . 1667 = I . W | 

BLEWBURY. 

Of the Blewbury tokens there are three farthings and one halfpenny. 
The name of the village is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

3 times BLEWBERY 
I time BLEWBEREY 

The names Lewendon and Stanton are not now found in the parish, though 
the former name is not infrequently found in adjoining parishes. 

12. *0. lOHN . LEWENDON = Grocers' Arms. 

jff. IN . BLEWBERY = I . A . L ^ 

This token is very rare. 

13. *0. GEORGE , STANTON = G . s . E. The Mcrcers' Arms. 

/^, BLEWBERY . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY ^ 

It will be seen that three different tokens, all with the Mercers' Anns, were 
issued by George Stanton, who was doubtless the main shopkeeper in the village. 

14. O. GEORGE . STANTON = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. IN . BLEWBEREY . 1665=0 . E . S J 

(PI. I, Fig. 2.) 

This is the type most commonly met with. 

15. *0. GEORGE. STANTON = Mercers' Arms. 

jff. IN . BLEWBERY = G . S. ^ 

A rare type. 

BUCKLEBURY. 

There is one farthing issued from the village of Bucklebury. In the former 
edition of Boyne this Bucklebury token was erroneously noted as No. 355 of the 
London series, being entered under the parish of Bucklersbury. The issue of it 
from the parish of Bucklebury, in Berkshire, cannot, however, admit of doubt. I 
have in my collection one which came from Bucklebury, and the Vicar of Buckle- 
bury, the Rev. T. W. Watts, informs me that he finds in his parish register an 
entry of the marriage of John Morecock with Jane Knappe, dated 25th August, 
1645. 

16. *0. lOHN * MOORECOCK ♦ = A legging, or a similar garment ; 

or perhaps a last, or a neat^s tongue. 

I^. IN . BVCKELBERY . 1666 *=I*I*M* J 

(PI. I, Fig. 3.) 
This family did not remain long in the parish. The entry of marriage as above 
noted is the only one ; there is no subsequent record of either baptism or burial 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 21 



COOKHAM. 



There is but one token issued from Cookham, in Berkshire, viz., a halfpenny 
by Martha Spot in 1668. 

The Rey. R. W. Rogers, Vicar of Cookham, £iyoiirs me with the following 
interesting note respecting the King's Arms Inn, etc : 

** There is a King's Arms Inn here, which must at least date back to 1660 or so, 
if not older than that date. It has a picture of Charles II. in one of the rooins, 
which, though a daub as far as art is concerned, is doubtless contemporary with 
his reign. The other old inn is the Bell and Dragon, which name doubtless 
belongs to the same period. 

** I never saw nor heard of such a token as you describe existing here ; indeed, I 
was surprised to hear that they existed seven or ei^ht years after the Restoration, 
as 1668 implies. I cannot find the name of Spot m the register, but the ink is so 
£aded and the parchment so yellow that it might well be there, and yet not be now 
l^ble. 

" The first register book of Cookham begins with the Act of Uniformity in 1661 
and 1662, about. 

** Messrs. Naile, Reid and Co., brewers, Windsor, are the owners of the King's 
Arms Inn. They might have title-deeds going back to 1668, in which something 
about it might be found." 

17. *0, MARTHA . SPOT . AT . Y* . KINGS . HEA^^c King's Head 

crowned r 

-^. IN . COOKHAM . IN . BERKSHIRE * = HER HALFE PENNY. 

1668. (In four lines.) J 

I have taken the description of this token from the specimen in the collection of 
J. Eliot Hodgkin, Esq., of Richmond, Surrey, which is in perfect preservation. 
This token is extremely rare ; it is not in the B. M. 

COXWELL. 

There is but one £urthing token issued from Little Coxwell, this village being 
described on the token as litle . coxall . parva. 

18. *0. lOHN . HARVEY . iN = Arms. 

R. LITLE . COXALL . PARVA = I . A . H \ 

FARINGDON. 

In the Faringdon series there are two halfpennies, one of which is heart-shaped, 
and nine farthings. 
The name of me town is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

5 times FARRINGDON. 

3 times faringdon. 

2 times [including a variety] farindon. 

I time FARINGTON. 

Mr. Walter Haines, of Faringdon, has kindly favoured me with notes respecting 
the issuers. He also gives me the following infurraation regarding the ** Port ** of 
Faringdon : 

*• The town is cut in half by a stream ; one half is called Port, the other West- 
brook (obviously west of the brook). Port is, I imagine, that part of the town 
which lay within the ports or gates of the walls. This part of the town contains 
the Church, Market-place, and Town-hall, and is probably co-extensive with the 
old Saxon town, Westbrook being a mere modem excrescence of about the fifteenth 
or sixteenth century." 

The extracts of payments are from the accounts of the charity founded by Sir 
Henry Unton in 1591 for the benefit of the inhabitants of the port of Faringdon, 
Berks. 



Digitized by 



Google 



22 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

19. O. lOHN . BARRETT = A man making candles. 

J?. IN . FARINGDON . 1656 = 1 . H , B J 

The following is an extract from the " Unton Accounts " : 
** 1647. Itm pd John Barrett for five bushells of lime used in repairacon of the 
port well 5s." 

20. *0. lOHN , BARRETT = I . M . B 

R. IN. FARRINGDON=l662 J 

21. O. PHILLIP . coLLYER = The Ironmongers* Arms. 

R, FARRINGDON = P . E . C \ 

There is an extract from the '' Unton Accounts " : 

" 1642. Pd Jonas Butler and Phillipp CoUyer pt of one weeks contribuoon for 
the Port for the Lord Crafard £2 7s. 9d." 

And another : 

*' 1649-52. Pd Phillip CoUyar for a revings bill and a naile to the geate of the 
sands." 

In addition to the many notes, also in the " Unton Accounts," relatire to the 
immediate ancestors of Phillip CoUyer, it should be mentioned that the name 
lamly appears in local records, and is still to be found in these parts. 

From a tablet in the church at Great Cox well : The Revd David Collier charged 
certain Lands in the Hamlet of Little Coxwell with the payment of 8 Bushels 
of Barley yearly on 29th Septer for teaching 2 poor children of this parish to read, 
write and cast accounts for ever. The Payment latterly made in money has been 
estimated by the Churchwardens on the average price of Barley at Faringdon 
Market." 

In the year 1601 and subsequently we find entries in the '* Unton Accounts ** of 
moneys paid to a Collyer for keeping the " Towne Armor " in proper order. This 
service was principally performed by one Toby Collyer, to whose name stand many 
items. 

22. O. THOMAS . COWLEY = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . FARRINGDON . S7 = T . M . C \ 

23. O. RICHARD . FOWLER . OF . FARRINGDON . R . A . F. (In fivC 

lines.) 
R. HIS. HALF. PENNY. 1 669 = A pair of stays. {Heart-shape,) \ 

(PL I, Fig. 4.) 

From the " Unton Accounts " we have : 

" 1648. Pd unto Richard ffowlr his charges for conveying of a theefe to gaile 
apprehended in the Port." 

24. O. RICHARD . FOWLER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . FARINDON . 1663 = R . A . F \ 

25. A variety has the date 1657, and the initials r . i . f \ 

26. O. EDWARD . GOLDINGE»HIS HALFE PENY. E . A . G 

R, OF . FARINGDON . 1668 = The Barber-Surgeons' Arms. \ 

Extract from the *< Unton Accounts" : 

*' 1633. Item payd to Golding of highworth for three yards and a quarter of 
broade cloth to make a ffunerall cloth ^ij. ijs. iijd." 

27. *0. THOMAS . SHEPARD = A bell. 

R, IN . FARINGDON . 68 = T . A . S i 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 23 

a8. O. EDWARD . STEVENS . IN = The GroccTS* Arms. 

IL FARINGTON . 1652 = E . A . S J 

His ancestors are named in the " Unton Account Books '' : 

** 1601. For a keye and box to David Colliare and Wm. Stevens xd.** 

29. O, SYMON . TVRNER . IN . 1 667 = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. FARRINGDON . MERCER = S . M . T i 

Extracts from the " Unton Accounts " : 
•* 1601. More for the beadles cote to Symon Turner, v* ij*". 
** 1625. It. paid by Symon Turner, xiij» iiij**. 

" 1650. Bill of charges allowed for defending the suite in Chancerie comenced 
by Symon Turner against the fTeoffees or brotherhood of the porte of fiOuringdon" 

HAGBOURN. 

There are three varieties of the farthing issued at Hagboum by Thomas 
Humfrey. On these farthings the name of the village is variously spelt : 

HAGBORN. 

HAGBORNE. 

HAGBVRNE. 

Perhaps no Berkshire family of any degree is so fully represented in the 
neighbourhood from which an ancestor issued tokens as the family of Humfrey. 
There are numerous entries in the Parish Registers of Hagboum, Blewbury, 
Upton, etc, in some cases commencinpr from the tune the Registers be^, and the 
Humfreys still own lands in these parishes. 

30. t*"^. THOMAS . HVMFREY . OF = Mercers' Arms, 

J?. HAGBORN . IN . BARKS = T . A . IL i 

(PL I, Fig. 5.) 

31. *0. THO . HVMFREY . OF = The Merccrs' Arms. 

J^. HAGBORNE . IN . BARKS = T . A . H. ^ 

32. *^0, THO . HVMFERY . AT=Mercers' Arms. 

I^. HAGBVRNE . IN . BARKS = T . A . H. J 

HARWELL. 

There is but one token issued from Harwell, viz., a farthing, by John Hanson, 
dated 1666. 

33. O. lOHN . HANSON . IN = A fuU-blown rose. 

J?. HARWELL . BERKS . l666 = I . A . H J 

The Rev. S. M. Smith, Vicar of Harwell, has kindly given me the following 
information respecting the Hanson family, as taken from the Harwell Parish 
Register: 

*' 1666. Baptized Anne Hanson daughter of John and Anne the eight day of 
January. 

" 1667. Baptized Mary Hanson the daughter of John and Anne the xxij 
day of February." 

There are also three entries of baptisms of daughters, named respectively 
Hannah, Margaret, and Martha, the last named being dated 1673. 

The Vicar says : ** I looked back many years, but l666 appeared to be the first 
entry." 



Digitized by 



Google 



24 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



HUNGERFORD. 

Of the tokens issued in Hungerford, one is a halfpenny, and four are £uthii^s. 
The name of the town is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

3 times hvngerford. 

I time HUNGERFORD. 
I time HVNGER . FORD. 

The Rev. J. B. Anstice, Vicar of Hungerford, has kindly furnished me with 
extracts from the Parish Register. 
Specimens of the Hungerford tokens are rarely met with. 

34. O, WILLIAM . BELL^ . VINTNER , AT , THE . BEAR (in foUT HnCS). 

^. At . Hungtrford . His . Half . Penny . 1668 (in five linesX \ 

(PL I, Fig. 6.) 
The Bear Inn still exists. 
The Bell family has now no descendants in Hungerford. 

35. O, lOHN . BVTLER = The Tallow-chandlcrs* Arms. 

R. IN . HVNGERFORD = I . E . B } 

Tohn Butler was churchwarden in 1651. 

Mo one of the name now in Hungerford except a labourer. 

36. O, lOHN . LVCAS = A rose. 

R, IN . HVNGERFORD = I . L \ 

This was a brother of Jehosaphat Lucas. [See notes under Timothie Lvcas 
token.] He was an uncompromising Royalist, and was engaged in Penruddock's 
rising in Salisbury in 1665. He was taken and beheaded at Salisbury the same 
year, behaving himself with the greatest stedfastness and courage. This tokeo, 
which has no date, must have been issued prior to the year 1665. 

37. \0, TIMOTHIE. Lvcvs = Three cloves. 

R, IN . HVNGERFORD = T . F . L \ 

The following are extracts from the Parish Register : 

" Timothy Lucas, churchwarden, 165a 

" Timothy Lucas, Senior, Gentleman, buried Octer 3, 1668. 

"Timothy Lucas, buried Janv 17th, 1676." 

The following notes respecting the Hungerford Horns may be of interest 
here: 

In a large chest, with three locks, is preserved an ancient bugle horn, said to 
have been given l^ John of Gaunt, when he granted the right of fishery. It is 
of brass, about 18 mches in length ; on one side is the folloi^-ing mutilated 
termination of an inscription in black letter: Actel ; on the other side, the word 
Hungerford, In the Town Hall is another horn of brass of more modem date, 
of the same size and shape, which is blown annually on the second Tuesday after 
Easter at the HockHde Courts to call the tenants of the manor together. It has 
the following inscription, in the common Roman Letter, with the date 1634 : 

JOHN A GAUNT DID GIVE AND GRANT THE REALL OF FISHING TO 
HUNGERFORD TOWNE FROM ELDREN STUB TO IRISH STIL EXCEPTING 
SOM SEVERAL MIL POUND. 

JEHOSPHAT LUCAS WAS CONSTABLE. 

38. O, lOSEPH . BARE = A chandler. 

R. IN . HVNGER . FORD = 1 . S \ 

There is an entry in the Parish Register that " Thomas Saycr the Hatter" was 
buried June 24, 1693. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 25 

Mr. Walter Money, F.S.A., informs me there were several families of this name, 
but the Joseph Sayer was Rector of Newbury from 1663 to 1675. Francis Sayer, 
his fother, was Rector of Yattendon. 

The Vicar of Hungerford writes : '* There is no one of this name now in 
Hongerford." 

ILSLEY. 

The only issue from Ilsley is a halfpenny by Richard Weston. It is a very rare 
token. 

39. O. RICHARD . WESTON . AT . 1669 = A man holding a pair of 

scales. 

^. ILSLEY . IN . BARKSHEIRE = HIS HALF PENY J 

There appears no entry in the Parish Register of the name Weston. The Rev. 
T. G. Eames, Rector of West Ilsley, and the Rev. J. R. Terry, Rector of East 
ilsley, have kindly had search made, but can find no record. I find, however, 
that there was a family of considerable local influence of this name in Newbury in 
the 17th century. They were clothmakers, or ** clothiers," as more usually called. 
Philip Weston was of Bassock Combe, Winterboume, Berks. 

LAMBOURN. 

From Lamboum there were issued two halfpennies and two farthings. 

Id all cases the name was spelt lam borne. 

The Rev. J. Edgell, Vicar of Lamboum, kindly allowed search to be made in 
the Parish Registers. 

I am indebted to Mr. R. H. Keable, of Upper Lamboum, for searching out the 
extracts, and furnishing me with other information. 

In a letter he says : 

'* I cannot find out from anyone now living here anything that will lead me to 
think there are any descendants of the Knightons living here. I believe there 
are now some of the name of Farmer, lalx>urers, but, if I may judge bv the 
Reeisters, those of the 17th century stock appear to have gone away or died out, 
both families. I could not find any entry alter 1752, or hear anything else from 
any old people I asked." 

40. *0, lOHN . FARMER . AT . THE . RED = A lion passant regardant. 

R. LYON . IN . LAMBORNE. 1665 = HIS . HALF . PENY ^ 

The following are extracts from the Parish Register : 

•* 1641. Sept*' 17th. Buried, Richard, son of John Farmer. 
" 1641. Sept« I7ih. Buried, Anne, wife of John Farmer. 
•* 1726. Sepi«' 29th. Buried, Frances, the wife of Robert Farmer. 
" 1736. Nov« 17th. Buried, Robert Farmer. 
•• 1654. Febnr 6th. Married, Benjamin Early and Elizabeth Farmer. 
•* 1654. Febn^ 6th. Married, John Farmer and Joan Jains, otherwise Hazell. 
" I7i9-2a Fcbnr 2Sth. Mamed, Robert Farmer and Mary Bowsher. 
•• 1665. July 13th. Baptized, John, the sonne of John and Anne Farmer. 
•* 1665. Nov*' 28th. Baptized, Robert, the sonne of Robert and Frances 
Fanner. 

•* 1702. June 3rd. Baptized, William, y« sonne of William and Elizabeth Farmer." 

In the Parish Account-books there is an entry in the year 1672 that ;£'20 was 
secured by the bond of John Farmer and Robert Newman. 

As regards the Red Lion Inn, there is a Red Lion Inn still standing, but it has 
not the appearance of being more than 90 or 100 years old. It is therefore 
probably an inn rebuilt to replace the Red Lion Inn of the 17th century. 



Digitized by 



Google 



26 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

41. **^0, HENRY . KNIGHTON . IN = A CrOWn. 

-/?. LAMBORNE . 1652 = H . C . K i 

The following are extracts from the Parish Registers : 

** 1628. Febn^ 4th. Buried, John Knighton of Lamborne. 

** 1695. Jan'y 13th. Buried, William Knighton. 

** 1702. June 12th. Buried, Richard Knighton of ye towne. 

" 1719. Sept« 7th. Buried, John, son of Richard and Eliz. Knighton. 

" 1742. July 2nd. Buried, Anne, wife of William Knighton. 

'* 1752. April 9tb. Buried, Elizabeth Knighton. 

" 1648. Augst 13th. Baptized, Luce, the daughter of Henry and Christian 
Knighton. 

" 165a March i6th. Baptized, Elizabeth, the daughter of Henry and Christian 
Knighton. 

** 1676. June 29th. Baptized, Anne, y« daughter of Henry and Anne Knighton. 

•* 1677. June 6th. Baptized, Thomas, the sonne of Henry and Anne Knighton. 

"i68a Nov« 8th. Baptized, Frances, y« daughter of Henry and Anne 
Knighton. 

" 1683. March 3rd. Baptized, Anne, y* daughter of Henry and Anne Knighton. 

•* 169a June 8th. Baptized, Christian, daughter of Henry and Anne Knighton. 

" 1719. Aug« 23rd. Baptized, John, the son of Richard and Eliz. Knighton." 

From the Parish Books it appears that Henry Knighton was churchwarden 
n 1674. 

42. **^0. HENRY . KNIGHTON . IN = A CrOWn. 

-/?. LAMBORNE . 1665 =H . C . K J 

43. \^0. HENRY . KNIGHTON . OF . l666 = A CrOWn. 

I^. LAMBORNE . HIS HALF PENY = H . C . K J 

(PL I, Fig. 7.) 
This token is more commonly met with than others of Lamboum, but none are 
common. 
The ON of " Knighton '* in this token are conjoined thus : " CN." 

LONGCOTT. 

There was but one token, a halfpenny, issued from Longcott. The name of the 
village is thereon spelt longcvtt. 
This token is very rarely met with. 

44. O. ALBERT . WILLIAMS . MERCER = The MerCCFS* ArCDS. 

/^. IN . LONGCVrr . 1671 =A J° TOKEN . A . A . W J 

This name is still common in the neighbourhood. 

As far as can be ascertained, the family of the issuer of this token is now repre- 
sented by a descendant living at Elms Down, near Lambourn. 

LONGWORTH. 

There is but one token, a farthing, issued from Longworth. It is rare. 

45. O, THOMAS . MORRIS . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. LONGWORTH . GROCER = T . M J 

The Rev. J. R. Ilingworth, Rector of Longworth, after searching the Registers, 
favours me with the following note : 

" I find that Thomas Morris appears in the Register as having two or three chil- 
dren baptized at intervals, between 1650 and 1660, but that the name occurs neither 
before nor after that period — rather a curious fact, as almost all the other 
names which occur continue to do so for some length of time, and many even to the 
present day. But this vanished completely, so that I should suppose him to have 
been some stranger temporarily resident in the place." 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE, 27 

MAIDENHEAD. 

In the Maidenhead series of tokens there are one halfjpenny and four farthings. 
The name of the town is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

3 times MAYDENHEAD. 
I time MAYDENHAD. 
I time MAIDEN . HEAD. 

I have not been able to give extracts from the Parish Registers. 

The Rev. W. Alfred HilX Vicar of St. Mary's, Maidenhead, favours me with the 
following note : 

" St. Mary's was not constituted an ecclesiastical parish until March, 1875. It 
had previously been but an endowed chapel, and we have no ancient registers. 

" The old chapel stood in the centre of the main street, partly in the parish of 
Bray and partly in the parish of Cookham, and was removed to its present site 
under the provisions of a special Act of Parliament" 

46. O. WILLIAM . BATTES. = The Mercers' Arms. 

-/?. OF. MAYDENHAD . l659 = W . G . B \ 

47. *0. ROBERT . BENNETT = A human bust 

/^. OF. MAYDENHEAD = R. B J 

The name is still found in the neighbourhood. 

48. O. lOHN . CHERRY = A cheny tree. 

J^. OF . MAYDENHEAD = I . C { 

This was probably a member of the family of Cherry at Shottesbroke. A rare 
token. 



49. O. EDMOND . STONE = The Mercers' Arms. 

(PL I, Fig 8 



^. OF . MAYDENHEAD = E . S i 

_ •) 
The name is still found in the neighbourhood. 
This tokea is amongst the most common in the Berkshire series. 

50. O. lOSEPH . TAYLOR . 1 669 = A Still. 

J^. IN . MAIDEN . HEAD = HIS . HALF . PENY J 

The name is common in the neighbourhood. 

NEWBURY. 

There were no halfoence issued from Newbury ; thirteen farthings were issued, 
amongst these being five varieties of the town farthing. The Cowslade farthing is 
convex. 

The name of the town is spelt, 

6 times newbery. 
4 times NEWBRY. 
I time NEWBVRY. 

I time NEWBERRY. 
I time NEWBVRYE. 
Mr. H. J. Reid, F.S.A, in sending me a specimen of the convex Cowslade 
£uthing, points out that the device is not a lion, as described in the former edition 
of Boyne, but that it is an animal ** An/Urgd,** 

My brother, Mr. L. Lowsley, of Hampstead Norreys, has given me a consider- 
able number of the Newbury Borough farthmgs. I have made careful comparison. 



Digitized by 



Google 



28 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

with the result that it is found there are five varieties. The number of dies appears 
to have been very large, for nearly all the tokens compared were from different 
ones. 

Concerning this Newbury token Mr. Walter Money, F.S.A., author of the 
" History of Newbury," writes to me : 

** The brass farthings issued by the Newbury Corporation in 1657 were very 
numerous, as the municipal body, as trustees of a great number of charities, with a 
considerable rental, and no end of small doles, must have required a good deal of 
this necessary small change. All the farthings stamped with the sign of the Castle 
(the borough arms) on one side, and B.N. on the other, were officially issaed by 
the Corporation, who undertook, if they were 'cried down,' to pay in silver the 
same amount as they were put out for. The difference in the dies probably arose 
from the coins having been struck for the Corporation by different persons, or 
tradesmen, who adopted a little variation in the * design.' The name is also indifiRu-- 
ently spelt, as you know, at that period. No one was permitted to issue these 
Borough tokens but the Corporation. There was no restriction as to tradespteople 
issuing their own farthings or tokens, beyond the requirement that the metal or 
material used, whether lead, pewter, or brass, should of itself fully represent the 
value of the farthing, under a penalty of forfeiting the whole of them, and a fine of 
20s. I think you will find the Borough farthings were all brass. 

•* All our Corporation records have either been appropriated or lost, exceptiiig 
one or two volumes of Court Leet Records, etc. Even the Minute Books of the 
Council, up to the last four or five years, have gone." 

51. O. tBOROVGH . OF . NEWBRY = A castlc, the battlements having 

fhreg raised portions. 

J^. IN . COVNTY . OF . BERKS = 1 65 7 .B.N. (BOFOUgh of New- 

bury.) J 

The Cabtle shown in this token is narrow and lofty, and the battlements are c€ 
greater height than in other varieties ; the doorway of the Castle also is narrow and 
high ; the masonry is shown as of a coarse description. 

52. *A variety with /our raised portions to the battlements of the 

tower. J 

The line of the battlements, as shown on the token, is sometimes curved. The 
gateway of the Castle is small and low ; the masonry is extremely neat and even. 
This is, perhaps, the variety most frequently met with. 

(PI. I, Fig. 9.) 

53. *A variety with the spelling cwnty. J 

This is not uncommon. The W is formed as if it might be intended that O is 
conjoined with V. 

54. *A variety with /vg raised portions to the battlements of the 

tower. ^ 

The line of battlements is somewhat less curved than in the two last named 
varieties. The Castle is broad, the gateway small, and the masonry neatly and 
evenly marked. 

55. *"There is also a variety of the Newbury Town token, with the 

spelling of the town newbery. I have only seen the 
spelling thus on the token with battlements, as No. S i. ;J 
It is extremely rare. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 29 

56. fO. THOMAS . cowsLADE = A bcast somcwhat like a lion, 

antlered, rampant 

J^. GROCER . IN . NEWBERY = T . C . C \ 

This token is convex on the obverse, and concave on the reverse. 

Thomas Cowslade was mayor of Newbury in 1665 and 1669. He was a man qf 
much local influence, first living in the town of Newbury, where he carried on his 
business of grocer, but afterwai^s of Donnington Priory. 

Richard Cowslade, a member of this family, was founder of the Cowslade 
Charity School, and was a considerable benefactor to the church. 

The family of Cowslade has, as regards direct descent, been many years extinct, 
but there is still a collateral branch living at Reading. 

There b a monument in Newbury Church to Richard Cowslade, gent., setting 
forth his benefactions. He was a member of the Newbury Corporation. He 
died 31st January, 17 18, in his 77th year. 

57. O, WILLIAM . HARRISON = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . NEWBERY . 1657 = W . S . H J 

58. O, lOHN . HILL = A skull. 

J^. OF . NEWBVRY = I . S . H \ 

59. O. lOHN . NAisH . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, NEWBERY . GROCER . 1652 = 1 .S.N J 

John Naish was churchwarden of Newbury in 1659. 

60. O. lONAS . NORAWAY . iVNiOR = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. GROCER . IN . NEWBERRY = I . S . N \ 

Jonas Noraway was churchwarden of Newbury in 1670. His name is spelt 
•• Jonas Narraway " in the churchwardens' books. 

61. O. lOSEPH . SAYER . RECTOR = A CaStle. 

jK. of . NEWBERY = A Bible. i 

Joseph Saver was rector of Newbury from 1663 to 1675. Vide also token issued 

by Sare of Hungerford. 

Respecting this token, Mr. H. S. Gill, of Tiverton, remarks : 

" I think the device ought to be called a clasped book, and not a Bible ; it may 

have been a Prayer Book." 

Mr. Walter Money, F.S.A, writes : 

" The token struck for Joseph Sayer, the rector of Newbury, is rare. I think it 
very probable that his predecessor, Benjamin Woodbridge, also had tokens struck, 
for I find this entry in the churchwardens' book of 1658 : * Pd. James Foster for 
300 tokens for Mr. Woodbridge.* See Hist, of Newbury, p. iii. The compilers 
of this work have made a most comic mistake over this entry, thinking they were 
' tokens ' of respect I have never heard of any bearing the name of Wood- 
bridge, but it does not follow they were not struck.'* 

62. *0, lOHN . SPENCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN . NEWBERY = I . S J 

63. O. THOMAS . YOVNGE = The Mercers* Arms. 

J^, IVNIER . IN . NEWBVRYE = HIS . FARTHINGE J 

I have inserted this token as it is given in the former edition of Boyne. Mr. H. 
S. Gill, of Tiverton, Devon, has, however, pointed out to me that the description 
is almost identical with that ^iven by Boyne for a token of Newport in Shropshire, 
No. 42 of the Shropshire series ; moreover, in the British Museum supplementary 



Digitized by 



Google 



30 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

list, published by C. F. Keary and Warwick Wroth, probably the same token b 
again ascribed to Newport, in Shropshire, as No. 372 of that list 

I have met with no specimen of this token found at Newbury, Berkshire, and am 
inclined to think, therefore, that it belongs either to Newport, in Shropshire, or 
possibly to Newport in Essex. 

Mr. H. S. GiU writes : 

'" Tokens by Thomas Runham, Na 41, Shropshire, of the late edition of Boyne, 
and 371 of the above-mentioned British Museum list, undoubtedly belong to New- 
port, county Essex, three having been found in that small village. A firieod of 
mine living near has a specimen. I have seen one, and the word ' penny ' on rev. 
PSNY, another misprint of Boyne's first edition." 

The token, therefore, may belong to Newport, Shropshire, or Newport, Essex, 
but probably does not belong to Newbury, Berk^ire. 

READING. 

In the Reading series of tokens there are four halfpennies, one of wfaidi is 
heart shaped, and fiAy-nine farthings. 
The name of the town is variously spelt by the issuers as follows : 

37 times READING. 

10 times REDING. 
6 times readinge. 
6 times redding. 
2 times readine. 
I time redden. 
I time redin. 

None of the Reading tokens, with the exception, perhaps, of the fiuthing of 
William Malthus, are at all commonly met with. 

I much regret that the information regarding the families is so very scanty, b«t 
it is most difficult to obtain reliable or extensive information in a case where a large 
town consists of sundrv parishes. 

The Rev. J. M. Guilding, M.A., Vicar of St. LAwrence, Reading, when kindly 
trying to assist me, writes : 

'* This town consisted of three ancient parishes, and, therefore, to verify all the 
names given in your list by consulting the registers of the respective parishes 
would bS impossible." 

Dr. Joseph Stevens, of Reading, favours me with the following interesting 
account of a recent find of 17th century tokens in that town : 

** There were 26 tokens in all found in the foundations of the ' Old Bull ' Inn, 
and 23 of them were placed in my hand as taken from under the bricks in a comer 
of the building ; and I am doubtful of only one of these — a * cripple-farthing of 
Andover, Remember the Poor ' — the rest were all similar as regaros the condition 
they were in (covered with a green patination). I examined Uie comer, and the 
brickwork, and there was a small hollow (cup-shaped) in which they were found. 
I was on the spot within ten minutes of their being discovered, and so obtained 
some coarse brown ware, thickly glazed, of about the same period, from close by. 

" List of 23 tokens found in left hand corner, on entering foundations of * Old 
Bull ' Inn, Broad Street, comer of Cross Street, November 17th, 1885 : 
I WILLIAM L0VEGR0VE= 1664. ' 

I Illegible. 

1 cripple-farthing, andover. 

2 THOS. grape. WOKINGHAM, 
I WILLIAM TAYLOR. 

I WILLIAM BVRLY. 
I ROBERT CREED. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 31 

I RICHARD BROWNE. 
I SOL . BARNARD. 
I FRANCES BROWN. 
I EDWARD PINNILL. 
I MARY BLOWER. 
I ROBERT SMART. 

I THOS. MACHiN (Apothecary). 

I ROBERT PIDGION. 
^ I FRANCIS TASSELL. 

I lAMES BLVNT. 

I lOHN HARRISON. 
" They are €U I farthings, 

*' The above are 22 ; the 23rd I mention separately, as being a rather remarkable 
farthing to find under the circumstances, thus : 

BicKONSFiELD= THOMAS COCKLE. Represented by a cock. 

" Bovne gives, I see, perhaps the same coin (the only one for beaconsfield), 
bot spells the word beckbnsfield, and gives no emblem. 

" Frobably the contributors of the tokens were friends of the owner of the Bull 
or of the builder at the time." 

64. O. RICHARD . BAGLY = A man making candles. 

H. IN . READING = R . B 

A Richard Ba^ly was a seat-holder in the "North lie" in St. Laurence 
Churcht Reading, m 1607. 

65. t"^. SOLOMON . BARNARD = A rabbit 

^. IN . REDING . 1653 = S . E . B 
The name is still found in the neighbourhood. 

66. O. MARY. BLOWER = The Grocers* Arms. 

li, OF . REDING . 1652 = M . B 
The name still exists. 

67. O. lAMES . BLVNT . AT . BLACK = A hotse. 
H. IN . READING . l666 = I . E . B 

The Black Horse Inn is still existing. 

68. O. HENRY . BOAD . IN = The King's Arms. 

R. READING . 1664 = H . A. B 
The King's Arms Inn is no longer standing. 

69. *0. EDWARD. BOWLAND = A WOOlpack. 

H. IN . READING . 1666 = E . E . B 

7a O. FRANCES . BROWN = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. IN . REDIN . BAKER = F . K . B 

71. *^0. lOHN . BROWNE . AT . 3 = Three fishes. 

H. IN . READINE = I . C . B 

72. O, RICHARD . BROWNE = The Bakers' Arms. 

H. BAKER . OF . REDING= R . A . B 



Digitized by 



Google 



32 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

73. O. WILLIAM . BVRLy = A hand holding a glove. 

/^, IN . READING . 1655 = W . E . B 
The name still exists. 

74. O. THOMAS . BYE . 0F= A mill cramp. 

J^, READING . MEALMAN = T . L . B. A Sack of flour. 

75. *0. WILLIAM . CASTELL = A CaStlC. 

J^, OF . REDING . 1666 = W. C 

76. O. HVGH . CHAMPION . LINEN . DRAPR = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^. IN . READING . HIS . HARTY . DVBBLE . TOKEN . 1 669. (Il 

six lines.) 

{Heart shape. 
The name exists in the neighbourhood. 

77. *^0, WILLIAM . CHAMPE = R . A . M 

R, IN . READiNGE = Mcrccrs' Arms. 

78. t"^' WILLIAM . CHAMPE= 1658. 

R. IN . READINGE = W . T . C 

79. O, RICHARD . COTTAM . 1669 = A Still. 

R, OF. REDING . DISTILLER = HIS . HALF . PENY 

80. O. ROBERT . CREED = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . READING . 1655 = R . C 
The name still exists. 

81. t^. NICHOLAS . EDWARDS = Upper part of a dog or lion. 

R, IN . READING . 1667 = N . E . and a Merchant's mark. 

82. *0, WILL . GAND . GROC** = A dog with chain. 

R, IN . REDDING = W . M . G 

83. O, ALCE . GILL . wiDDOW = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

R, IN . READING. l666 = A . G 

84. ^O. RICHARD. HELLows = Crossed stockings. 

R, IN . READING . 1656 = R . M . H 

85. O. lOHN . HARRISON . 1 666 = A candlestick. 

R. LIVEING . IN . READING = I . M . H 
John Harrison was mayor of Reading in 1647. 

86. O. lOHN . HARViE = A pair of tailors' shears. 

R, IN . READING = I . M . H 

87. O. HENRY . HEAD . IN = A ploUgh. 
R, READING . 1652 = H . C . H 

The name is found in the neighbourhood. 

88. O, WILLIAM . lAMES = A castle. 

R. IN . READING . 1664 = W .A.I 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE, 33 

89. O, THO . KING. 1VNI0R = A crown 

J^. IN . READING . l666 = T . K J 

The name still exists. 

90. O. MARTHA. KNIGHT. IN =1669. 

-/?. READING . LIN . DRAPR = M . K J 

The name is still found in the neighbourhood. 

97. O. MOSES . LAMB « A pair of shears. 

R IN . REDDEN. l658a=M. R . L J 

The name is still found. 

92. O. RICHARD. LEVENS = The Cord wainers' Arms. 

jR. IN. REDDING = R.M. L J 

93. O, lOHN . LOADER . IN = A ship. 

^. READING . CHANDLER = I . L \ 

94. *0, WILLIAM . LOVEGROVE=« A TOlI Of cloth. 

J^. IN . READING . 1664 = W • E . L J 

Still a well-known name in the neighbourhood. 

95. O. THO . MACHiN . APOTHE = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

/^. GARY. IN . READING = T . M . M J 

The name is still found. 

96. O, WILLIAM . MALTHVS^W . M 

J^, IN. READINGE 31658. ^ 

(PI. I, Fig. 10.) 

Dr. Joseph Stevens, of Reading, favours me with the following notes : 

" The family of Malthus was of considerable note in Reading during the i6th, I7th» 
and 1 8th centuries. It is now extinct. Members of this family were benefactors 
to the Reading Blue Coat School, which was formerly in Silver Street, but now is 
esUblished in the Bath Road. 

" It was founded by Richard Aid worth in 1656. The funds were increased in 
1666 by Sir Thos. Rich, of Sonning. 

" In 1696 Mr. John Hall became a benefactor by a rent-charge on lands at 
Englefield. 

'* In 1720 Mr. John West provided for the maintenance and education of 6'poor 
bo3rs, apprenticing them, etc. 

*• In 1723 Mr. Malthus left £gi yearly for the education and snpport of * 10 
green coat boys* Man, in his ' History of Reading,' says ii, but thinks this number 
may be incorrect. 

'* And, in 17S6, Mr. John Leggatt left the sum of £^0 towards the support of 
the School 

*' The boys are well taught, many of the higher tradesmen in Reading having 
been educated there. 

" The bojTs wear long frocks or coats, with breeches and yellow stockings — 
no cap." 

97. O. CLEMENT . MARLOW . AT = A bcll. 

R. THE . BELL . IN . REDING = C . G . M \ 

The " Bell Inn*' is still standing in Church Street The name " Marlow*' is 
still found in the neighbourhood. 

3 



Digitized by 



Google 



34 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

98. *0. DANIELL . MARTEN = D . E . M 
jR, OF . REDDING =165 2. 



99. O. DANIELL . MARTIN = D . E . M 

J^, IN . REDING . GARDNER = 1653. \ 

Still a common name. 

100. O. lOH . MiLESON = A mortar and pestle. 

Ji. IN . REDING = I . I . M } 

The name " Milson " is still found in the neighbourhood. 

loi. O. HVMPHREY . MILLS = The Drapers* Arms. 

^. DRAPER . IN . READING = H . M J 

The name still exists in the neighbourhood. 

102. O, lOHN . PAicE . AT . THE = An angel. 

J^. IN . REDDING . l666 = I . E . P J 

The "Angel" is still standing in Broad Street. 

The name '* Paice " is still found in the neighbourhood. 

103. *0, lOHN . PETERS . AT = A tree. 

^. THE . COCK . IN . REDING = A COCk. 
The •* Cock " is still standing in Minster Street. 

104. O. THOMAS .PHiPPS = A chandler. 

i?. OF . REDDING . 1652 =T . E . P 

105. O, lOHN. PHiPS= The Tallow-chandlers' Arms. 

^. OF . READING . 1655 = I . E . P 

106. O. ROBERT . PIDGION = R . E . P 
I^. IN. READING =1663. 

The name b still found. 

107. O. THOMAS . piNECK = A mermaid 

J^, IN . KEADING = T. A . P 
The name is still found. 

108. *0, EDWARD. PINNILL=l665. 

J^, IN . READING = E . A . P 

109. *A variety reads pinneld. 
no. O. NICHOLAS . PRINCE = The Prince of Wales's feathers. 

J^, IN . READING . GROCER = N . A. P 

111. O, lOHN . REMNANT . IN = A hammer. 

jR. READINGE. 1669 = 1 . M . R 

112. O, ROBERT . SMART = A roll of bread (?) 

^. IN . READING = R A . S 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE, 35 

113. O. lOELL . STEVENS = The Grocers' Anns. 

^. IN . READING . 1652 = I . D . S 
Still a well-known name in the neighbourhood. 

114. O, lOSEPH . STOCKWELL = A shuttlC. 
^. OF . READING = I . E . S 

115. O. RICHARD . STOCKWELL=The Saltcrs* Arms. 

J^. IN . READING . 1656 = R . £ . S 

116. *0. lOHN . SWIFT . AT . THE=» A RoSC. 

J^. ROSE . IN . READING= I . A . S 
The '* Rose'* is still standing in Minster Street. 

117. O. FRANCIS . TASSELL= Head of Charles II. crowned. 

-/?. IN . READINE . 1663 = F . E . T 

1x8. O. WILLIAM . TAYLOR = St George and the dragon. 

^. IN . REDING . 1658 = W . M . T 
The " George and Dragon " is still standing in the King's Road. 

119. O. REYNOLD . THORNBROVGH = A bulFs head. 

-/?. VINTNER . IN . REDDING »R . T 
The *' Bull's Head " is still standing in Broad Street. 

120. O. lOHN. THORP . AT . THE . GOALE=»The King's Arms 

crowned. 

J^. IN . READING . 1665 = HIS . HALF . PENY 

121. O. THOMAS . vNDERwooD = A chirurgeon's instrument (?) 

J^. IN . READINGE . l666 = T . M . V 

122. O, HENRY . WHiTELL = A woman making cheese. 

J^, IN . READING . 1656 = H . I . W 

123. *0. lOHN . WILDER . THE = A pelican and young. 

/^. ELDER . IN . READING^ I . A . W 
A well-known name in the neighbourhood. 

124* O. lOHN . WILDER . THE = I .T . W 
J^. YOVNGER . IN . READING = 1652 

125. •"d?. lOHN . WILDER . Y" . ELDE* = A pelicau. 

w 
^. IN . READING . 1 663 = — milled in a circle. 

126. O. THOMAS . wiNCKELLS= Three stars. 

^. IN . READINGE . BAKER = T • A . W 



3—2 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



36 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



SONNING. 

There were two 17th century tokens issued from the village of Sonnin^, near 
Reading. These are very rare. Neither was noted in the late edition of Baynt, 
nor is there a specimen of either in the British Museum. The name is spelt 

SVNNING. 

127. *0. THOMAS . BALL = A pair of scales within a frame. 

J^. IN . SVNNING ^T . B within a circle. } 

The Yen. Archdeacon Pott, writing from Sonning Vicarage, says : 
*' I have searched the Registers here from about the years 1660 to 1680, and 

find entries of the names of ' Thomas Ball ' and ' Hugh Ball,' but only bare entries 

of the names of their families, nothing else of special note." 

128. *0, FRANCIS : FIELDER . OF = A SUgaT loaf. 

/?. SVNNING . TOWNE . 1664 = F . F J 

There is no entry at all of the name of " Fielder " in the parish registers at the 
period when this token was issued. 
The name, however, is still met with in neighbouring parishes. 

STEVENTON. 

In the late edition of Boyne, tokens of Ralph Harvie and Edward Reade were 
erroneously ascribed to Steventon in Berkshire. 

Mr. Blundell, writing from Hemel Hempstead, informs roe — 

** As you have surmised correctly, the tokens of ' Reade ' and ' Harvie * belong, 
I think, undoubtedly, to Steventon, Beds. I had this impression for many years 
and recently, by the kindness of the Vicar, I have sufficient evidence from the 
registers to quite establish the fact." 

The Rev. F. Theobald, Vicar of Steventon, Berks, favours me with the fol- 
lowing : 

** I cannot find the names of Ralph Harvie and Edward Reade in the paiish 
registers between the years 1650 and 1670." 

No Steventon tokens are therefore included in this Berkshire List 

WALLINGFORD. 

In the Wallineford series of tokens we have five half-pennies and ten farthings. 
The name of the tovm is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

12 times WALLINGFORD. 
2 times WALLINGFORDE. 
I time WALLING . FORDE. 

Mr. J. Kirby Hedges, of Wallingford Castle, and Mr. W. R. Davies, of 0«r 
thorpe House, Wallin^ord, have kindly favoured me with information, which is 
inserted after the descnptions of tokens. 

Except where otherwise stated, the families of issuers have either died oat or 
disappeared from the neighbourhood. 

129. +d?. lOHN . ANGiER . IRON = The Ironmongers' Anns. 

-/?. MONGER . IN . WALINGFOR° = I . A . 1 669 i 

In 1 68 1 William Angier (who was then a burgess of the borough) and his sister 
built and endowed an almshouse at Wallingford, still standing. 
The name, spelt ** Anger," is still found in the neighbourhood. 
This token is rarely met with. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 37 

130. O. lAMES . ANSLOW . AT . y" . GEORG = St. Gcorgc and the 

dragon. 

a. IN . WALLINGFORD . 1 669 =» HIS . HALFE . PENNY . I . A . A ^ 
The " Geoige Ian" is stUl standing. 

131. O. ANTHONY . BOVLTER = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . WALLINGFORD = A . B . 1664 i 

132. O. lOHN . BVCKLAND = A chandlcr at work. 

-/?. IN . WALLINGFORD = I . M . B J 

He was Mayor of Wallingford in 1690, 1695, and 1699. 
The family has died out 

133. fO. PHILIP . ELDRED . APOTHiCARY = Arms of the Eldred 

family, on a bend raguly, tluree bezants. 

^. OF . WALLINGFORD . 59 = P . A . E J 

This token is met with more frequently than other Wallingford tokens, but it is 
generally in very poor condition. Moreover, specimens have come to me from 
distant counties. It was a token, therefore, probably much circulated. 

134. O, WILLIAM . ELIOT . AT . THE = HIS . HALFE . PENY 

J^. IN. WALLINGFORD. 1 669 = Elephant with castle on its 
back. ^ 

The " Elephant and Castle *' no longer exists. 

135. fO, ION . GOODWIN . DRAPE* = Arms of the Goodwin fiamily ; 

a lion rampant between thrte Jkurs-de-fys. \ 

R. IN . WALLINGFORDE- I . O 
Mr. W. R. Davies, of Overthorpe House, Wallingford, informs me that the 
draper's business carried on by John Goodwin is now conducted by Messrs. Field 
and Hawkins. 

136. O, ANN . HALL . 0F = Arms ; two chevrons, on the upper one 

a crescent for a difference. 

R. WALLING . FORDE . 1652 = A . A . H \ 

The name " Hall " is still common in the neighbourhood. 

137. O, SAMVELL . PEARCE = St. George and the dragon. 

R, OF . WALLINGFORD = S . A . P \ 

The " St. George and Dragon ** has disappeared. 
The name " PeaKe '* still exists in the neighbourhood. 

138. O. THO . PHiPs . OF = Arms of London; outside, three doves. 

R, WALLINGFORD = T . S . P. 1664 \ 

139. O. WILLIAM . POLHAMPTON = Three castles; two and one. 

R. OF . WALLINGFORD . l668 = HIS . HALF . PENY . W . P 

(PL I, Fig. II. 

140. O, WILLIAM . QVELCH . OF = A roll of cloth. 

R. WALLINGFORD . BERKSH = HIS . HALF . PENY, 1 669 J 

141. O. THOMAS . RVSDEN = Three sugar-loaves. 

R, IN . WALUNGFORDE = T . A . R \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



38 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

142. O, RICHARD . WHITE . oF = A mermaid. 

^. WALLINGFORD . 1669 = HIS . HALFE . PENNY J 

The name " White " is still found in the neighbourhood. 
A public -house called the " Mermaid '* was discontinued as such in the year 
1883 onlv. 
The old " Mermaid '* has now become a florist's shop. 

143. *0, siLLVANUS . WIGGINS . Y^ = A lamb. 

i?. IN . WALLINGFORD . 69 = S . A . W } 

In 1709 Silvanus Wi^ns was a member of the Corporation, and is described is 
Silvanus Wiggins the Elder, of the house formerly known by the name of the 
" Bell,'* and then of the " Lamb." 

The " Lamb Hotel " is still going. 

WANTAGE. 

In the Wantage series of tokens there are described three halfpennies and six- 
teen farthings. 
The name of the town is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

14 times WANTAGE 
2 times WANTING 

I time woNTAGE 

I time WANTINGE 
I time WANTIDGE 

Mr. Walter L. Nash, of the Ham, Wantage, has favoured me with informatioo 
respecting the issuers of Wantage tokens. 

144. *0, WILLIAM . ALDW0RTH = 2 kcyS CrOSSCd. 

J^, OF . WANTAGE . 1652 = W . A J 

In 1659 this William Aid worth was a churchwarden. 

In 1643 there was a Thomas Aldworth, a shoemaker in Wantage ; in 1656 be is 
noted as a governor of the town-lands. There are descendants of the name still 
living in Wantage. 

There is a family of this name of long standing in the county. 

This token is struck on extremely thin metal, which may account for its rarity 
now. It is not in the British Museum. 

145. O. lOHN. BEALLE^I. B 

^. IN . WANTAGE = A foU of tobacco. 1 

146. i^O. lOHN . CLEMENT = The Grocers* Arms. 

Ji. IN . WONTAGE = I . C { 

The Gements are of yeoman stock. They have at various times been church- 
wardens and governors of the town-lands. In 1664 a Robert Qement wms a 
bailie of the Hundred of Wanting. Direct descendants still live in Wantage. 

147. *0. lOHN . COLEMAN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. ON . WANTAGE = I . C J 

148. O. wiLUAM . CVLLY . 1 660 = The ApothecaHes' Arms. 

i?. IN . WANTAGE = W . I . C 

In 1663 thb William Cully was a churchwarden. 
There appear to be no descendants now in Wantage. 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 39 

149. O. THOMAS . GROVE = T . M . G 

H. AT . Y^ . IN . WANTIDGE = A CrOWn. \ 

His name occurs in 1663 as living in a house belonging to Jeflfery Maseroore. 

150. *d?. DANiELL. HOWES = Three pigeons. 

H. IN . WANTAGE = D . G . H \ 

This Daniel Howes kept the " Three Pigeons Inn " in Wantage. The old sign- 
board, with three pigeons carved in relief, still exists. A direct descendant, 
Daniel Howes, sadler, lives in Wantage. 
In 1672 William Howse was churchwarden. 

151. O, lOHN . HVNSDON = The Weavers' Arms. 

li. IN . WANTAGE . 1667 = I . E . H \ 

152. O. THO . HVRDMAN . AT . THE = A bear passant with chain. 

R. BEARS . IN . WANTAGE = T . I . H \ 

The *' Bear Inn " is still the principal inn at Wantage ; it was so also in the 
seventeenth century. 

153. **• O. GEORGE . KERBY . AT . Y^ . BEARE= A bear and chain. 

JR. AT . WANTING . 1669 = HIS • HALFE . PENY J 

154. O. WILLIAM . MASMORE = The Grocers' Arms. 

JR. IN . WANTAGE . 1653 = W . M \ 

In 1656 William Mazemore was elected a governor of the town lands. 
This token is one of the most common in the Berkshire series. 

155. *A variety of the above dated 1657. \ 

156. *^0. lEFFERY . MASMORE = llie Grocers' Arms. 

a. IN . WANTAGE . 1663 = 1 . M \ 

In 1660 Teffery Masemore was a churchwarden. 
In 1657 he signed churchwardens' accounts as a parishioner. 
In 1693 a Jeffery Masemore was governor of town lands. None of the name 
are now in Wantage, 

157. *0. EDWARD . PENER = A fleur-de-lis, or a merchant's mark. 

I^. OF . WANTAGE . 1654 = E . P \ 

In 1660 a John Pener was churchwarden. 

158. t**^. lOHN . SEYMOR . AT . GOLD = A lion rampant 

JR. IN . WANTING . MERC» = I . M . S \ 

159. t"^. RICHARD . STAMP = A fleur-de-Hs. 

R. IN . WANTAGE . 1669 = HIS . HALF . PENY . R . A . S J 
A Berenberg Stamp is mentioned in a Wantage deed in 1753. 

160. ^O. lOHN . WEBB . iN=:A Hon passant 

JR. WANTAGE . 1667 = 1 . E . W \ 

In a deed dated 1677, Thomas Webb, gentleman, of Charlton, is mentioned. 

Thomas Webb, yeoman, is mentioned in a deed dated 165a 

There is some reason for thinking that John Webb, issuer of the token, was a 

grocer. 

In 1603 there was a Gregory Webb, town bailiff, who administered the funds of 

the governors of the town lands. A descendant of the Webbs who were in 

Wantage in the seventeenth century is at present living in the town. 



Digitized by 



Google 



40 TRADERS' TOKENS OF TtlE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
i6i. *0, lOHN . WHiTFEiLD . 0F= Arms two bendlets. 

J^. WANTAGE . MEARCER = I . W J 

(PL I, Fig. 12.) 

162. *0. MICHAELL . WILLIAMS « HIS . HALFE . PENY (in foUT UnCS 

across the field), 
i?. OF . WANTiNGE . DiER . 1669 = The Dyers' Arms. J 

WINDSOR. 

In the Windsor series of tokens there are two halfpennies, one of which is 
octagonal, and ten farthings. 

The name of the town is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

5 times WINDSOR 
3 times wiNsoR 
2 times NEW Windsor 
2 times NEW winsor 

None of the Windsor tokens are commonly met with. 

Major R. R. Holmes, F.S.A., of the Royal Library, Wuklsor Castle, has 
favoured me with notes. 

163. O. THOMAS . ADAMES = T . I . A 

^. AT . WINDSOR . 1 65 2 = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. J 

164. t^.*SAMVALL . BANAT = A banneret bestriding a fallen king. 

J^, in . WINSOR . 1657 = A man operating on a woman's 
corns. \ 

Thus described in the ** Catalogue of Tokens "^belonging to the Society of Anti- 
quaries of Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

165. O. MOSES . BRVCH . IN . i666«=Arms; a chevron between 

three mullets. 

J?. WINDSOR . APOTHECARY = M . B \ 

166. O. AT . THE . CHECKER = Checkers. 

I^, IN . NEW . WINSOR = W . E . C I 

The "Checkers Inn" was in Peascod Street, at the corner of the Oxford, 00 
the site of the present " Duke's Head." 

167. O^ WILL . CAMPION . IN . PEASECOD = A horse. 

J^, STREET . IN . NEW . WINDSOR . 1 669 = HIS . HALF . PENY J 

168. O, H AMMAN . FARNHAD = The Bakers' Arms. 

J^. IN . WINSOR . 1657 = H . E . F J 

169. *0. lOHN . FINCH . IN = Three finches. 

J^, NEW . WINSOR = I . E . F { 

170. O. lOHN . GOSSE^. MAVLSTER . iN = Crossed malt-shovels. 

J^. PEASCOD . STREET . IN . NEW . WINDSOR . HIS . HALFE . 

PENNY . 1669. (In seven lines across the field. 
Octagonal.) i 

(PI. 1, Fig. 13.") 



Digitized by 



Google 



BERKSHIRE. 41 

171. O. FRANCIS . HILL . i666 = Ao arrow. 

J? DRAPER . IN ; WINDSOR = F . A . H i 

172. O, GEORGE . PENNINGTON = A mermaid. 

J^. IN . WINDSOR . 1656 = . C . P i 

173. *0. DANIELL . QVARTERMAN . AT = A garter. 

/^. THE . GAR1*ER . IN . WINSOR = D . E . Q J 

The ** Garter " is in existence as the " White Hart," the license of which to this 

day is taken out as the " Hart and Garter." It was formerly two taverns ; the 

left hand of the present gateway was the ** Garter ;" the room on this side of the 

gate is called the " Garter." 

The Quartermans are still in existence in the neighbourhood. 

174. O. lOHN . WYRON = A fish-hook. 

/^. IN . WINDSOR . 1653 = 1 . M . W J 



WINKFIELD. 

There was one farthing issued Irom Winkfield, the name of the village being 
spelt thereon "Winkfeild." 

This token is rare ; it was not noted in the former edition of Boyne, nor is it in 
the British Museum. 

175. *0. THOMAS . TEELING = A FOU of tobaCCO. 

H. IN . wiNKFEiLD . 69 = 3 Foscs OH a Stalk betwcen T . T J 

The Rev. J. Daubeny, writing from Winkfield Vicarage, says : 
'* The name ' Teeling ' is quite unknown in this parish to the oldest of our 
inhabitants." 

WOKINGHAM. 

In the Wokingham series of tokens there are two halfpennies and twelve 
farthings. 
The name of the town is spelt by the issuers as follows : 

6 times wokingham. 
4 times ockingham. 

2 times WOCKINGHAM. 
I time OKINGHAM. 
I time OAKINGHAM. 

The Rev. J. T. Brown, of St Paul's Rectory, Wokingham, in fevouring me with 
some notes, says : 

'* The municipal records of the date of the tokens are destroyed, or, at all events, 
they have disappeared for years, and there are no entries of the names in the 
registers of the Parish Church." 

None of the Wokingham tokens are common, except, perhaps, those issued by 
Thomas Grape and Richard Larance. 

176. O, IN . OCKINGHAM = W . A 

uff. IN . OCKINGHAM = W . A J 

177. O. WILL .ANDARSON = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^, IN . OCKINGHAM = W . A { 



Digitized by 



Google 



42 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

178. O, SIMON . BANISTER . AT . THE = St Gcorge and the 

dragon. 

J^. IN . OCKINGHAM . 1 668 = HIS . HALF. PENY i 

There is an ancient Finchhampstead family of this name. 

One Richard Banister is mentioned about 1648 as a Wokingham poacher in 
Windsor Great Park. 
The *' St George and Dragon Inn " has disappeared. 

179. O. lOHN . CLEMENTS = A pitcher. 

J^. IN . WOKINGHAM = I . M . C J 

180. *0. lOHN . CLEMENTS = A pitcher. 

Ji. IN . WOKINGHAM = HIS . HALF . PENY J 

i8i, fO. THOMAS . GRAPE = A Hon rampant 

J^. IN . WOKINGHAM . 1667 =T . D . G { 

The letter '* P " in the name on this token is often indistinctly formed, so as 
almost to appear like the letter ** Y." 
This token, with its variety next following, is rather common. 

182. *0. THOMAS. GRAPE = A lion rampant 

J^. IN . WOKINGHAM . l668 = T . D. G i 

(PL I, Fig. 14.) 

183. ♦A variety has no date. It is rare. i 

184. O. RtCHARD . LARANCE = A wheatsheaf. 

^. OKINGHAM = R . A . L J 

A name of very long standine in Wokingham. 
This is the most common of the Wokingiiam tokens. 

185. *^0, THOMAS . MAY = A man making candles. 

I^, IN . OAKINGHAM = T. M \ 

The last of this family died in 18S6. He was farmers* churchwarden, etc. The 
family had lived in Wokingham for 250 ^ears. 
The specimen of this token in the British Museum collection has heen silvered. 

186. O. GEORGE . ROBINS . iN = A bull lying down. 

^. WOKINGHAM . MERCER = G . R } 

The Rev. W. Goodchild, of Wellington College, Wokingham, writes : 
" George Rohins* bull must most likely have something to do with the Woking- 
ham bull-ring. Perhaps the shop was near it." 

187. O. RICHARD . SMITH = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. IN . OCKINGHAM = R . S { 

188. O, RICHARD . SMITH = A chandlcr. 

uff. IN . WOCKINGHAM = R . A . S { 

189. *0. ANTHONY. SPEER = Arms, 2 chcvrons between 3 cross 

crosslets. 

i?. IN . WOCKINGHAM = A . E . S \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



Plate L 




Rlcwblrn. 



ABINGDON. 



BUCKLCBURY. 





HaoboOrn. 




HUNGBRFORO. 



Lambourn. 





Maidemusad. 



NSWBURY. 



/^^.. 




THtt PCATf OP BflRMNIIIt TOKtNt 
•BOfOATCO TO NIM 




PRCtKNTio BY Major B. LowtLtv, 

NORRKVt. BCRKt.. IS ReSMOTf WLLY 

Bv Twi Editor. 30QIC 



Digitized by 



Google 



Bucftingbamsbtre- 

Number of Tokens issued . . . . • 179 

Number of Places issuing Tokens . . . .37 

Town Pieces issued ..... None. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Bucliindbamabire. 



The Editor regrets that he has been unable to find any collector specially 
interesting himself in the tokens of Buckinghamshire, and he has consequently 
been unable to obtain any notes on the issuers. The county has never yet had the 
benefit of systematic research as to its tokens, and no new places of issue have 
been heard of by the Editor since the first edition. A number of corrections have 
been made, and the addenda includes about 40 new tokens and varieties. 
There were no pennies nor town pieces issued in the county. 

AMERSHAM. 

1. O. ANDREW . BVRROWES . OF = The Clothworkers* Arms. 

R. AMMARSHAM . HIS . HALF . PENY = A . F . B. 1 665 \ 

2. O, lOHN . COOKE . IN - A unicoro standing. 

R. AMERSHAM . l666 = I . M . C \ 

3. O, FRANCIS . LANE . OF = F . L (conjoined). 

R. AMERSHAM . 1666 » F . G . L 

4. O. ELIZABETH . RVTT . IN = A shuttle. 

R. AMERSAME . HER . HALF . PENY-E . R. 1 668 \ 

5. O. WILLIAM . STATHAM = W . B . S 

R. IN • AMERSAM = 1653 \ 

6. O. RICHARD . WEBB . AT . AMARSHAM^A hand holding a 

chopper over a leaC 

R, IN . BVCKINGHAM . SHEIRE . 66»R . S . W. ^ \ 

AYLESBURY. 

7. O, lOHN . BELL -The Mercers' Arms. 

R, IN . AILSBVRY . 1659 = I . H . B 

8. O. WILLIAM . BURGHS . IN = A Turk's head. 

R. AYLESBVRY . 1670 = HIS • HALF . PENY 

9. O, RICHARD . BVTLER = A CrOWn. R . B 

R, OF . AYLESBVRY . l666 = R . S . B \ 

10. O. GYLES . CHILDE . IN = The Merccrs* Arms. 

R, IN . ALSBVRY . MERCER = G . D . C \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



46 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

11. O. EDWARD . COPE = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^. OF . ALEISBVRY = E . D . C 

12. O. AT . Y^ . king's . HEAD . IN = Head of Henry VIII. 

/^, AILLSBVREY . 1657 = W . E . D 

There are 2 varieties of this token with different mint-marks, one a star, and the 
other a rose, or fleur-de-lis, 

13. O. ALEXANDER . TROTT . 1 669= The Grocers' Arms. 

jR. GROCER . IN . AYELSVRY (? AYELSBURY) = HIS . HALFE 
PENNY . AAT 

14. O, lOSEPH . FREER . MARCER = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. IN . ALESBVRY . 1652 = I . M . F 

15. O. lOHN . HILL . OF . ALESBVRY = A chandler. 

J^. TALLOW . CHANDLER . 1665 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

16. O. THOMAS . HILL . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

H. ALESBVRY . MERCER = T . R . H 

17. O. THOMAS . STRATFORD = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
/^. IN . ALISBVRY . 1667 =T . M . S 

18. O. FRANCIS . WETHERED = The Merccrs* Arms. 

I^. IN . ALSBVRY . DRAPER = F • W. 1660 

BEACONSFIELD. 

19. O. AT . BECKENSFEILD . IN = T . I . C 
J^. BVCKINGHAMSHIRE = T . I .C 

20. O. lOHN . FOSLET . OF = A lamb and flag. 

J^. BECKONSFEILD . 1 666 = HIS HALF PENY (in 3 Unes). 

21. ^. HENRY . TRIPP . i668 = A stick of candles. 

J^. OF . BECKONESFEILD = HIS HALF PENY. H . A . T 

22. O. THOMAS . COCKE = A COCk. 
J^. IN . BICKONSFIELD = T . K . C 

23. O. IN . BECKONSFEILD = I . M . G 

J^. IN . BVCKINGHAMSHIRE=l6s8. B 

24. O. WILLIAM . WILLIS . i668 = A bull. 

J^. AT . BECKINGSFEILD = HIS HALF PENY. W . E . W 

BRILL. 

25. O. THOMAS . CATER . 1667 = T . E . C 

J^. IN . BRILL . IN . BVCKS = HIS HALF PENY. 

26. O. WILLIAM . GOLDAR = The Mercers' Arms. 

^. MERSER . IN . BRILL = W . A . G 



Digitized by 



Google 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 47 

27. O, AT . THE . HALFE= 1 . H 

^. MONE . IN . BRILL = Half-moon. I 

28. O. ATTHE . HALFE = i . H and 2 half-moons. 
J^. MONE . IN . BRILL = A crcsccnt mooti. 

29. O, ELiz . SCARLETT . OF . BRILL = The Groccrs* Anns. 

^. BVXES . 1669 = HER HALF PENNY. E . S J 

BUCKINGHAM. 

30. O, ELIZABETH . CRAWLEY =1668. HER OB[o1us]. 

J^. OF . bvckingham = An ostrich. J 

31. O. WILLIAM . ALTON . DRAPER = TwO bclls. 

^. IN . BUCKINGHAM . 1663 = W . E . A ^ 

32. O. lOHN . HARTLEE = A heart. 

J^, IN . BVCKINGEHAME=I . H J 

33. A variety is dated 1650. 

34. A variety reads on O. hartley, on J^, bvckinggam. 

i.H. 1666. 

35. O, lOHN. HARTLEY . IVNIOR=l66s 

i?. OF . BVCKINGHAM = I . H J 

36. O. lOHN . RENNALS . 1 668 = A lace. I . E . R 

H. OF . BVCKINGHAM = HIS HALFE PENNY ^ 

37. O, PETER . REYNOLDES = A lace. 

iP. OF . BVCKINGHAM . 58 = P . F . R J 

38. O, GEORGE . ROBINS . IN = A paschal lamb couchant 

J^. BVCKINGHAM . MERCER = G . R J 

CHALFONT. 

39. O. lOHN . BENNETT . AT . THE = A greyhound current. 

i.o. B ^ 

I^. IN . ST . PETERS . CHALFONT = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1 668 

40. O, lARVicE . GOOD . IN . ST = A greyhound. 

J^, PEETERS . SHALFORT = I . M . G ^ 

41. O, Edward, White, 1664 (in three lines across the field). 
Ji, IN . ST . PETERS . CHALFONT = Crossed keys. \ 

CHESHAM. 

42. O, Richard . Amond , R . d . a (in three lines). 

R, IN . CHESHAM . 1664 = The Cloth workers' Arms. \ 

43. O, WILLIAM . CHiLDE . OF = The Brewers' Arms. 

R, CHESHAM . BREWER = W . M . C \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



48 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

44. O, WILLIAM . GNOME = w . s . G betwecQ a pair of open 

shears. 

J^. OF . CHESHAM . 1671 =HIS ^ i 

45. O, RISE . DAVIS . 1671 =HIS J 

J?. IN . CHESHAM = R . E . D I 

46. O, ABRAHAM . GARRAWAY = TwO pipeS CrOSSCd. 
^. IN . CHESHAM . 1671 = A . M . G 

47. O. lOHN . GROVER = I . I . G 
J^, OF . CHESHAM = 1655 

48. O. lAMES . lOYSE . 0F= 1658 
J^ CHASS . HAM . 58 = 1 . M . I 

49. O. Thomas . Hall . fds , Half . Petty (in 3 lines). A roll of 

tobacco. 
R, Mercer . of . Chesham = The Grocers' Arms. {Heart- 
shape,) 

50. O, SAMVEL . TRECHER . MERCER . 1 665 = The Mcrccrs* Arms. 

R. OF . CHESHAM . HIS , HALF . PENY = S . I . T 

51. O. SAMVELL . TRECHER = S . G . T 
R, OF . CHESHAM . 1653 = 8 . G . T 

52. O. lOHN . TYLER . IN = The Apothccaries' Arms. 

R, CHESHAM . 1665 = I . A . T 

53. O. RICHARD . WARE = R . P . W 
R. OF. CHASSHAM=l6S3 

54. O. Thomas . 5 . Chessham . 1668 (in four lines script). 

R, Wee . are . 3 = Two loggerheads = ZTw Half Peny (in five 
lines octagonal). 



This inscription is remarkable, and reminds one of the picture of two donkeys 
freauently seen in shop- windows in the present day, with the inscription, ' When 
shall we three meet again ?* The issuer was evidently of a humorous turn of mind. 



EDLESBOROUGH. 

55. O, DANIELL . FINCH . l666=»HIS HALF PENY 
R, IN . EDLESBORO = D . S . F 



EMBERTON. 

56. O. lOHN . PEiRCESON = A pair of scales. 

R, IN . EMERTON^ 1 668 J 

57. O, ANTHONY . SCADDWELL (OR SCALD WELL J. S. S.) = A pair of 

scales. 

R, IN . EMBERTON . 1663 (or 1665 ?) = A . A . S J 



Digitized by 



Google 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 49 

ETON. 

58. O, THOMAS . BRIDGES = A man making candles. 

i?. OF . EATON . 1669 :== HIS HALF PKNY. T . B. | 

59. O. THOMAS . C0LUNGS==A fleur-de-Us. 

J^, IN . EATON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY, J 

6a O. RICHARD . ROBINSON = Two pipes crossed. 

i?. IN . EATON . 1666 » R . A . R. i 

61. O. lOHN . SMITH . AT . Yb^I . A . S. A COCk. 

J?. IN . EATON . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

62. 0. lOHN . SMITH . AT . YE = A COCk. 

J^. IN . EATON . 1668 « HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

FENNY STRATFORD. 

63. O, ROBERT . HONNOR . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. FENISTRATFORD . 1655 «R . L . H. ^ 

64. O, ROBERT . HONNOR . 67 =R . L . H. 

i?. IN . FENNE . STRATFORD = R . L . H. i 

65. O. WILLIAM . INNS . IN = w I conjoined. 

I^. FENNISTRAT . FORD . 1651 a=W . A . L J 

66. O. lOHN . SMALBONS . IN = A hat. 1656. 

/^. FENNEY . STRATFORD = I . E . S. J 

HADDENHAM. 

67. O. lOHN . MOREFELD . OF = A man walking. 

J?. HADENHAM . CARRIER » I . M. \ 

HITCHENDEN. 

68. O. FRANCIS . BARNABY , OF = Three tuns (The Vintners' Arms). 

J^. HUCHINDON . GROCER = F . A . R J 

691 A variety reads on reverse f . a . r. 

7a (7. FRANCIS . BARNABY . OF = Three tuns. 

J^. HVCHINDON . GROCERY HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

HORWOOD. 

71. O. HENRY . FEiLDEN . i668 = An acom. 

J^. IN . HORWOOD . MAGNA = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

72. O. lOHN . CARTER . 0F = A pair of scales. 

i?. GREAT . HORWOOD . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

73. O. HVGH . wiLLEATT . IN . LITTLE = A rose crowned. 

jR. HORWOOD . HIS . HALF . PENY = H . A . W. jf 

74. O. FRANCIS . WOODCOCK = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

R. IN . GREAT . HORWOOD = HIS HALF PENY. F . E . W. J 

4 



Digitized by 



Google 



50 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

75. O. FRANCIS . WOODCOCK = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

Ji, IN . GREAT . HORWOOD = F . E . W. i 

IVER. 

76. O. NICHOLAS . MERViN = The BakcTs' Arms. 

J^. IN . IVER . BAKER = N . E . M. J 

IVINGHOE. 

77. O, ROBERT . BARNES . iN = A pair of scales. 

J^, IVINGGOE . MERCER = R . S . B. J 

78. O. HENRY . BVTLER . OF = The Bakers' Arms. 

J^. IVINGHOE . BAKER . 67 = HIS HALFE PENV. i 

79. A variety reads ivingoe. 

LAVENDON. 

80. O. EDMOND . BALTSWELL = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

^. IN . LAVENDON . BVCKE = E . A . B. J 

LECKHAMPSTEAD. 

81. O. ABRAHAM . TAYLOR . AT . Y« = A COck. 

^. COCK . IN . LECKHAMSTED = HIS HALF PENY. 1669. § 

LITTLE BRICKHILL. 

82. O. CHARLES . LORD . IN = A man making candles. 

J^. LITTLE . BRICK . HILL = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1 669. | 

MARLOW. 

83. O, ALICE . BOVLES . OF . GREAT = The Queen's head crowned. 

i?. MARLOW . HER . HALF . PENY = A . B. § 

This has evidently been altered from the following token of Alice Parker ; traces 
of the old letters are discernible. 

84. O. ALICE . PARKER . OF . GREAT = The Queen's head crowned. 

I^. MARLOW . HER . HALF . PENY = A . P. i 

85. O, STEPHEN . HARRIS . OF = A pair of scales. 

J^, GREAT . MARLOW = S . D . H. J 

86. A variety is dated 1669. 

87. O. THOMAS . LANE . 0F= 1666. 

J?. CREATE . MARLOW = T . L. J 

88. O. PETER . RIVERS . OF = Unknown arms. 

J^, CREATE . MARLOW . 1667 = P . A . R. | 

89. O. THO . SMITH . IN = The Gunmakers* Arms. 

J^, GREAT . MARLO = T . I . S. \ 

90. O. SILVESTER . WIDMERE = A griffin. 

^. OF . GREAT . MARLOW = S . K . W. J 



Digitized by 



Google 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 51 



MORSLEY. 

91. O. HENRY . PITMAN . OF . l668 = A shuttlC. 

I^. MORSLEY . SILK . WEAVER = HER HALFE PENNY. 

The error in the sese is remarkable ; it may mean that the wife was a partner in 
the weaving business. 

NEWPORT PAGNELL. 
93. O. WILLIAM . BREDEN » A pair of scales. 

J?. OF . NEWPORT . PAGNELL = W . E . B, 

93. O. lOHN. BVRGis . 1668 = A pair of scales. 

/^. IN . NEWPORT . PAGNEL= I . S . B. 

94. O. losiAS . CHAPMAN = A pair of scales. 

J^. IN . NEWPORT . PAGNELL = I . C. 

95. O. lOHN . CHILD . 0F = A pair of scales. 

^. NEWPORT . PAGNELL = I . R . C. 

96. O, John . Child . His , Halfe . Penny. 
R. IN . NEWPORT . 1667 = Roll of tobacco and 2 pipes (lead) 

97. O, EDWARD . COOPER . OF = A pair of scales, e . f . c. 
R, NEWPORT . PAGNELL = ^/V Holfe Peny, 

98. O. EDWARD . COOPER . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, NEWPORT . PANNELL = E . C. 1667. 

99. O, lOHN . DAVIS . OF = The Drapers' Arms. 

R. NEWPORT . PAGNALL = I . I . D. 

IOC. O, RICHARD . HOOTON . OF=R . E . H. 
R. NEWPORT . PANNELL = R . E . H. 

loi. O. SAMVELL . LAMBERT = A pair of scales. 

R. IN . NEWPORT . PAGNELL = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

I03. O. lOHN . NORMAN . IN » A pair of scales. 

R. NEWPORT . PAGNELL = I . N. 

103. O. lOHN . NORMAN . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . NEW PORT= I .E.N. 

104. O. THOMAS . PERROTT= A heart. 

R. IN . NEWPORT . PANNELL = T . E . P. 

105. O, NEWPORT . PANNELL = W . F . S. 

R. BvcKiNGHAMSHiRE = A pair of scales. 

NORTH CRAWLEY. 
io6. O. NICHOLAS . STEELE . OF = A pair of scales. 

R. NORTH . CRAWLEY = N . M . S. 

OLNEY. 
107. O. lOHN . AMPS s A pair of scales. 

R. IN . OLNEY . 1662 = I . R . A. 

4—2 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



$1 TRADERS* TOKENS OP THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

1 08. O. ROBERT . ASPRAY» A pair of scales. 

jR. OF . OLNEY . 1662 = R . M . A. J 

There are three varieties of this token, difiering only in minute detafls. 

109. O. IAMBS . BRIERLY»I . M . B. 

J^, OF . OLNEY . 1658 = A pair of scales. i 

no. O. MOSES . FREEMAN =: A pair of scales. 

i?. OF . OLNEV . 1668 -=M . E . F. J 

111. O. iohn . gayKes» A pair of scales. 

J?, in . OLNEY . 1652 = I . S . G. J 

112. O. lOSEPH . SCRIVENER = A pair of scales. 

/^. IN . OLNEY . l568 = I . E . S. J 

PRINCE'S RISBOROUGH, 

113. O. EDWARD . BARNABY . 1665 =» HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^, OF . PRINCES . RISBOROVGH = E . W . B. ^ 

114. O. EDWARD . BARNABY . OF = Detrited. 

J?. PRINCES . RISBOROVGH » E . W . B. 

115. O. THOMAS . HEADEACH . 1669 = A fleur-de-Us. (Square.) 

R. IN . PRINSES . RISBROW . HIS . HALF . PENNY . T . F . H 

(in six lines). ^ 

SHERRINGTON. 

116. O, EDWARD . BRlrNELL = E . A . B. . 

R, OF . SHiRRiNTON = A pair of scales. \ 

STEEPLE CLAYDON. 

117. O. WILLIAM . NORMAN . OF » HIS HALF PENY. 

R, STEPELL . CLADON . l668 = W .I.N. \ 

STEWKLEY. 

118. O. THOMAS . COLES = The Grocers* Anns. 

R, IN . STEWTLY . l667*HIS HALF PENV. \ 

STONY STRATFORD. 

119. O. FRANCIS . ANDERTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . STONIE . STRTFORD = F . A. \ 

120. O. ROBERT . ANDERTON = Three cloves. 

R, OF . STONI . STRATFORD = R . M . A. \ 

121. O, IOHN . BOTRiLL . IN -The Cordwaincrs* Arms. 

R, STONI . STRATFORD s I . A . a \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 53 

122. O. HUGH . BLATSO . IN -The Drapers* Arms. 

R. STONY . STRATFORD = H . M . R \ 

123. O. THOMAS . BVRGis = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. STONY . STRATFORD = T . A . B. 1657. \ 

124. O. CHRiSTOPH . CLIFTON- A pot of Hlies. 

R, IN . STONEY . STRATFORD = C . I . C. \ 

125. O, MATHEW. FINALL = A phoenix. 

R. IN . STONY . STRATFORD = ^F . F. \ 

126. O. THOMAS . FORFEIT . IN . STONY = A griffia 

R. STRATFORD . HIS . HALFE . PENY = T . A . F. J 

127. O, HENRY. HONNOR= 1664. 

R. IN . STONEY . STRATFORD = HIS HALF PENY. J 

128. O. WILLIAM . MARSHALL . 0F = A Uon rampant 

R. STONIE . STRATFORD = W . M . M. \ 

129. O. FRANCIS . PENN . OF = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, STONISTRATFORD = F . P. \ 

130. O. lOHN . PENN . AT . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, STONY . STRATFORD = I . M . P. J 

131. O, WILLIAM . SMITH. l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. OF . STONY . STRATFORD = W . E . S. J 

132. O, RICHARD . VEASEY . IN = A lion rampant. 

R. STONIE . STRATFORD = R . E . V. 

SWANBOURNE. 

133. O. lOHN . BAVIN . IN = A dove with an olive branch. 

R, SWANBORNE . 1652 = I . B. \ 

THORNBOROUGH. 

134. O, EDWARD . PVRSSELL=E . P. 1 668. 

R. OP . THORNBOROVGH = HIS HALFE PENY. } 

TINGEWICK. 

135. O, GEORGE . DRVRY=HIS HALF PENY. G . M . D. 

R. TiNGEiCKE. 1 669 = The Mercers* Arms. \ 

136. O, lOHN . DVRRANT = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . TiNGWicK = A fleur-de-lis. 16 — 68. J 

WADDESDON. 

137. O, RICHARD . SVTHEREY«=R .M.S. 

R. IN . WADSDON . CARRIER = R . M . S, 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



54 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

WARRINGTON. 

138. O. THOMAS. NORRis = A pair of scales. 

i?. OF . WARRINDEN . l668 = T .M.N. J 

WENDOVER. 

139. O, GEORGE. BROWN. CHAPMAN = The Haberdashcrs' Arms. 

i?. OF . WENDOVER . HIS . HALF . PENY = G . A . B. J 

140. O, lOHN . DVNCOMBE = A hat with feather. 

i?. IN . WENDOVER . 1664 = 1 . E . D. { 

141. O, FRANCIS . FVNGE=F . E . F. 

i?. OF . WINDOVER . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

142. O. RALPH . HILL . iN = A rose. 

i?. WENDOVER . 1655 = R . E . H.* i 

143. O. GABRiELL . PRENTICE = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^, IN . WENDOVER . 1664 = . A . P. J 

144. O. THOMAS . STOKINS = T . P . S. 

i?. AT . WENDOVER . l656 = T . P . S. \ 

WINSLOW. 

145. O, MATHEW . BISHOP = Three boars' heads, each pierced with 

an arrow. 

I^. IN . WINSLOW . 1666 = M . D . B. J 

146. O, MATHEW . BISHOP = Three boars' heads, as the last 

i?. IN . WINSLOW = M . D . B. i 

147. O. lOHN . CRAWLY . AND . 10 . DiMOCK = A hand holding a 

chopper over a leaf. 

I^. OF . WINSLOW . 1 666 = THEIR HALFE PENNY. ^ 

The chopper i3 very like the blade of a straw-cutting machine, and the leaf simUju 
to what is intended for a tobacco-leaf on other tokens. Were these men manufac- 
turers of tobacco ? (See a similar device on the Amersham token of Richard 
Webb, andT. R., of Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire.) 

148. O, lOHN . FORREST . OF . WINSLOW = The Bakcrs' Arms. 
I^, HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 666 = I . M . F and a knot 

149. O. WILLIAM . GILES = A hat. 

I^, OF . WINSLOW . 1666 = W . M , G. J 

There are two sizes of this token. 

150. O. WILLIAM . GYLES = A hat. 

i?. OF . WINSLOW = W . M . G. J 

151. O. THOMAS . GODWYN = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

i?. OF . WINSLOW = T . I . G. J 

152. O. DANIELL . SAYER = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^. IN . WINSLON = D . S. J 



Digitized by 



Google 



BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 55 

S^ O. THOMAS . SBCALLBONES = A hat 

i?. OF . WINSLOW = T . A . S. \ 

54. O. lOHN . WATTS . 64 = I . K . W. 

/^. IN . WINSLOW* HIS HALFE PENY. J 

WYCOMBE. 

55. O. THOMAS. ATKINES = HIS HALF PENY. 

i?. OF . WICKHAM . l668 = T . E . A. ^ 

56. O. THOMAS . BATES = The Princc of Wales's feathers. 

i?. IN . WICKHAM . 1661 =T . B. i 

57. O, THOMAS . BVTTERFEILD = A wheatsheat 

J^. IN . WICKHAM = HIS HALFE PENY. i 

58. A variety reads t . b in the field of reverse. 

59. O. THO . BVTTERFiELD = A wheatsheaf 

J^. IN . WICKHAM =T . B. \ 

60. O, THO . DiMARSH . OF = A sugar-loa£ 

I^. HIGH . WICKHAM . l668 = T . A . D. J 

61. O. WILLIAM . FISHER = The Cloth workers' Arms. 

i?. IN . WIKCOMBE . 1652 =W . A . F. i 

62. O. ROBERT . FRIER = A fuU-blown rose. 

i?. IN . HIE . WICKHAM = R . F. 

63. O. lEREMiAH . GRAY . IN = A swan with a chain. 

jR. HEY . WICKIAM . 1652 = I . M . G. \ 

The swan is the arms of the Borough of High Wycombe. 

64. O. lOHN . HARDING . IN = I . M . H. 

J^. GREAT . WICKOMBE= I . M . H. \ 

65. O. THOMAS. HARDING =1668. 

i?. IN . HIGH . WICKHAM =T . E . H. 

66. O. FRANSIS . INGEBY . IN = 1 666. 

J^. WICKVM . PARRISH = F . L i 

67. O. lOHN . ivsoN . AT . THE = Checkers. 

J^. IN . HIGH . WICKHAM . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. I.M.I. ^ 

68. O. THOMAS . LEECH . 1667 = A lion rampant. 

I^. IN . WEST . W1CKC0MBE= HIS HALFE PENNY. T . A . L. ^ 

69. O. RICH . LVCAS . OF . WICKHAM = R . D . L. 167O. 

/^. RATHER . DEAD . TIEN . DISLOYAL = A lion rampant i 

70. A variety has no reverse. 

71. O. RICHARD . LVCAS » A lion rampant 

i?. IN . WICKHAM . 1653 »R . D . L. i 

172. O. lOHN . MORRIS . 1666 = A Stick of candles. 

/^, IN . WICKHAM . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . M. ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



$6 TRADERS' TOKENS OP THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

173. O, lOHN . MORRIS s= A Stick of candlef. 

^. IN . wicKHAM . 1666 = 1 . M and a flower. I 

174. O, RICHARD . PREIST = R . E . P. 1662. 

i?. IN . HIGH . WICKHAM « A CTOWD. } 

175. O. ALEXANDER . PARKH AM s A greyhound. 

i?. AT . WICKHAM . l666» A . K . P. J 

176. O. ALEXANDER . PARHAM = A greyhound. 

J^. AT . WICKHAM . l668 = A . K . P. J 

177. O. lOHN . ROWELL . IN . HiG" = The Joiners* Arms 

i?. WICKHAM . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. I . M . R. } 

178. O. ROBERT . WHITTON = A Stag. 

i?, OF . GREAT . WICKHAM = R . K . W. J 

179. O, EDWARD. WINCH . OF . wiccoMBE « Arms of the Winch 

family ; on a fess three crosses patonce, on a canton 
five fleurs-de-lis. 

I^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l666 = E . P . W. | 

The manner of spelling names on the tokens is so various, that it is quite im- 
possible, without an intimate knowledge of the locality, and searching the parish 
roisters, to place all the pieces with certainty. Wickham is an example. 

The tokens here descnbed do not all belong to High or Chipping Wycombe ; 
The name of Wickham is to be found in seven counties, and under these dream- 
stances it has been thought better to appropriate the whole to the largest town. 
See a token placed to Essex, as the name of the county is upon it 

Notes on the Tokens of Buckinghamshire. 

Two places of issue, Lavendon and Morsley, are added to those named by 
Boyne. The earliest date is 1652, and the latest 1669. The arms of the follow- 
ing trading companies appear on the tokens : mercers, cloth-workers, drapers, 
grocers, brewers, apothecaries, vintners, haberdashers, bakers, gunmakers, oord- 
wainers, and tanners. One of the tokens. No. 96, was struck in 1^ ; another, 170, 
has no reverse. Of No. 149 there are two sizes, one smaller than the usual fiirthing 
tokens. No. 115 is square in shape; No. 49 is heart-shaped, and the remainder 
are, as usual, circular. The use of the word obolus, which has become a slai^ 
term, is unusual, and occurs in an abbreviated form on No. 31. It is interesting to 
find the well-known manufacture of lace at Buckingham, referred to on Nos. 36 
and 37 

Several of the tokeners are particular in referring to the county, as well as the 
town, of issue. The following Nos. expressly refer the place of issue to Bucking- 
hami^ire, Nos. 6, 19, 23, 25, 29, So, and 105. It is a somewhat curious circum- 
stance how many of the places of issue have double names. Fenny Stratlbrd, 
Great Horwood, St. Peter^s Chalfont, Little Brickhill, Great Mariow, Newport 
Pagnell, North Crawley, Prince's Risborough, Steeple Claydon, Stony Stratford, 
H^h Wycombe, and Great Wycombe — twelve out of thirty-seven places of issue. 

The issue of two tokens by carriers at Haddenhara and Waddesden is unusual, 
this calling being but seldom represented on tokens. 

It is thought that the trade of tobacco-manufacturers is referred to in tokens 
Nos. 6 and 147. The latter is interesting also as being a partnership token. The 
spelling is singularly various. In the tokens of Stony Stratford the name of the 
town is spelt m six ways, Amersham in five ways, Aylesbury in seven ways, Fenny 
Stratford in three ways, and Wycombe in six ways. There are no pennies nor 
town-pieces issued in this county. 

G. C W. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Cambribgesbire* 

Number of Tokens issued 214 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 47 

Town Piece issued at Littleport. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 

Rev. W. G. Searle, M.A., 
Cambridge. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



The dates on the tokens of this county extend from 1651 (No. 40) 
to 1671 (No. 168). Of these years, 1657 and 1667 were the most 
prolific, nearly one quarter (29) of the whole number of tokens (214) 
bearing the latter date. 

A catalogue of Cambridgeshire tokens, by Charles Cardale Bab- 
ington, M.A., was published in the Communications of the Cam- 
bridge Antiquarian Society, vol L, pp. 15-28 [1851]. Charles H. 
Cooper, esq., Coroner of Cambridge, prints a list of tokens of the 
town of Cambridge, compiled by Mr. Bowtell (MS. Bowtell, iiL 
647-652), about the year 18 10, in his " Annals of Cambridge," vol. iiL 
[1845J, pp. 541-543. He likewise sent to Mr. Boyne a few additions, 
as did also Samuel Smith, esq., of Wisbech, with some interesting 
notes. 

There are also articles in the " East Anglian," vol. ii., pp. 349, 
367 ; vol iiL, pp. 2, 39, by Justin Simpson ; vol iiL, p. 47, by C. 
Golding; vol. iiL, p. 11 (notes by C. Golding, and another cor- 
respondent). See also MS. Cole xxxiL 163, 192 [Brit. Mus.]. 

The above and other materials the Rev. W. G. Searle, M.A 
used in his pamphlet, "The Coins, Tokens, and Medals of the 
Town, County, and University of Cambridge," published by the 
Cambridge Antiquarian Society in 187 1. 

•* Thence to Cambridge, where the Muses 
Haunt the Vine-bush, as their use is ; 
Like sparks up a chimney warming, 
Or flyes near a dunghill swarming. 
In a ring they did enclose me, 
Vowing they would never lose me. 
*Bout midnight for drinke I call, sir, 
As I had drunk nought at all, sir ; 
But all this did little shame me. 
Tipsy went I, tipsy came I ; 
Grounds, greenes, groves, are wet and homely, 
But the schollers woud'rous comely." 

Bamabu^sJournaL 



Digitized by 



Google 



6o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



CAMBRIDGE TOKENS WHOSE MM. IS NOT A MULLET ON 
BOTH SIDES. 

Doubtful Mullet and rose 

13. James Anderson. 63. John Marston. 
61. John Lowry. 

50. Thomas Powell. 

N MM Heraldic rose of six leaves. 

47. WiLUAM Gorham. ^5- William Bassett. 

34. Rl Cooke. 
Rose of five leaves, 35. Jqhn Craske. 

14. Nicholas Apthorpe. 56. Francis Jerman. 
16-7. John Bird. 57. Stephen Johnson. 

19. Jonathan Browne. 71-3. Thomas Powell 

82. Will. Waterson 80. Benjamin Spence. 



TRADES WHOSE ARMS ARE GIVEN ON THE CAMBRIDGESHIRE 

TOKENS. 

Bakers. Leather-Sellers. 

Fishmongers. Merchant-Tailors. 

Grocers. Mercers. 

Haberdashers. Tallow-Chandlkrs. 

DATES OF CAMBRIDGESHIRE TOKENS. 

1 65 1. E F y at the Mitre Inn. 

1652. Wm. Bryan; Edw. Clark; John Ewin; John Newtor. 
T653. Edward Challis ; Francis Challis; John Sparkes. 
1654. Edw. Clark (Cole). Cornelius Fuller, Ely; Hovkll 

JoANES, Soham. 

1656. Peter Collins. Hy. Meales, Abington ; John Readi^ Ely; 

Rob. Neale, March; John Clement, Sutton; Wm. 
Burten, Swavesey. 

1657. John Lowry (?); Will. Waterson. St. Apthorpe, Gsib- 

lingay ; John Bitiin, Linton ; Thos. Harrison, March ; 
"Ockington"; Wm. Waite, Newmarket; Nath. Stearhe, 
Soham ; John Buckhurst, Samuel Seeley, Sutton. 

1658. Owen Mayfield. John Fades, Whittlesey; Hekry 

Tunard, Wisbech; Nicholas Mallabar, Ely; Thos. 
Smith, Abington ; Howell Jones, Soham. 

1659. Joseph Tifford. Ralph Skittar, Ely; Stephen Apthorpe, 

Gamlinghay; Wm. Bryant, Newmarket; Thos. Dawsox, 
Swaffham. 

1660. Rob. Harwood; Hy. Raper. Ro. Denton, Swaflfham. 

1661. Wm. Turkington, Ely. 

1662. Wm. Gotobed, Ely ; Hy. " Tinard," Wisbech. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 6i 

1663. Joseph Linsey; Francis Russell. Thos. Porter, Ely; 

Hy. Tunard, Wisbech. 

1664. Thos. Fellsted. Thos. Lensley, Ely; Rob. Moody, 

Isleham; Thos. Trowell, Soham; Saml. Vincent, Wm. 
BoYCE, James Broonles, Thos. Nurish, Upwell; Ri. 
Harrison, and John Moyes, Wisbeclu 

1665. Sam, Long; Thos. Powell {Bawteli). John Bellamy, 

Wisbech. 

1666. Jos. Heath ; Thos. Powell. Hugh Conny, CaxtoD ; John 

Weatherhead, Ely; St. Apthorpe, Gamlingay; Wm. 
Reade, Isleham ; John Ingram, March ; Mary Kent, 
Soham ; John Turner, Wilbraham ; John Finch, 
Wisbech. 

1667. John Bird ; John Chaplin ; John Craske ; John Dod ; 

Francis Hampson; James Hawke; Franus Jerman; 
James Potter; Thos. Powell; Sarah Pleydell, Wm. 
Wells, Thos. Bring, Chatteris ; Roa Little, Charles 
Seale, Croydon; Hy. Austin, Wm. Chevill, John 
Knowls, Ely ; John Badcock, Fordham ; Jos. Hervie, 
Gamlingay; John North, Hinxton; Eliz. Allen, Isle- 
ham ; Rob. Halls, Rob. Moore, Linton ; Thos. Harrison, 
March; Hy. Francis, Newmarket; Jeffrey Willison, 
Newton; Rob. Ives, Whittlesey; John Bellamy, Ant. 
Rachell, Wisbech. 

1668. Thos. Ewen ; John Perke ; Benj. Spence. Ro. Millard, 

Caxton ; Ph. Chambers, Cottenham ; Hy. Johnson, 

Croydon ; Ro. Adams, Doddington ; LrrrLEPORT ; John 

Pearce, Littlington ; Thos. Robinson, Upwell ; Thos. 

Davie, Whittlesey ; Hy. Coldwell, Wisbech. 
1669* Wm. Bassett; Ri. Cooke; St. Johnson. John Johnson, 

Doddingtoo ; Thos. Harrison, Tho& Towers, March ; 

Wm. Briant, Walter Poulter, Newmarket; John 

NoRRis, Willingham. 
167a John Frohock; Wm. Smith. Thos. Coape, Wm. Smith, 

Chatteris; Chr. Challice, Histon; Ro. Adams, John 

Saunders, March. 
167 1. Rob. Crow, Soham. 

EXTREME DATES. 
1 65 1. "At the Miter in Cambridge." 
1671. RoBT. Crow, of Soham. 



Digitized by 



Google 



62 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



ABINGTON. 

The tokens attributed to this yfllage b^r Prof. Babington are given to AbinfAa ] 
Berkshire by Boyne. Those here given nave the name *' Abiogton." 

1. O. THOMAS . SMITH . 58 {t.e, 1658) = In the field t . m . s 

i?. ABINGTON . GROCER « A ship. \ 

This token was found in the adjoining parish of Hinxton, Cambridgeflhire. 

2. O. ROBERT . LiFORD . OF = Spcctacles and scissors. 

/^. ABBiNGTON . MILLINER » A comb. MM. on both sides a 
mullet. } 

3. O. HENRY . MEALES . IN = In the field 1657. 

^. ABINGTON . BAKER = In the field H . M. \ 

4. O. SARAH . PLEYDELL = The Mercers' Arms. 

i?. OF . ABINGTON . 1667 = In three lines her halfe pekky 
below s . p J 

5. O. WILLIAM . STEVENSON = The Grocers' Arms. 1 
J^. IN . ABINGTON . GROCER = In the field W . H . s. J 

6. O. lOHN . WELLS . OF = A man making candles. 

J^. ABINGTON . 1667 = In the field i . w. J 

ARRINGTON. 

7. O, HENRY . ATKINS . AT . THE = A four-pointed direction-post 

or turnstile. 
jR, AT. ARRINGTON. BRIDGE = In three lines his | half | pent. 
MM. a heraldic rose of six leaves. | 

BOURNK 

The halfpenny token of William Birridge, mercer, 1664, of Boarae, is grrea 
with others to Bourn, Lincolnshire, by Boyne. 

BRINKLEY. 

8. O. JOHN (mullet) growse = The Tallow-chandler's Arms. 

i?. IN (mullet) BRiNCKLEY = In field i . m . g. MM. a 
mullet. i 

BURWELL. 

9. O. OLLivER . HARLiE = The Habcrdashers' Arms. 

X. IN . BURWELL = In field o . M . H. MM. a mullet. } 

CAMBRIDGE 

10. O. IAMBS . ALDERS = A lion rampant ; no inner circle. 

J^. IN . CAMBRIDGE == In the field i . a. MM. a mullet } 

James Alders of Trinity Parish was one of the bailiffs of the CorpoimtioQ 
1653-1657. He was appointed common councilman in 1662 (Cooper, jlmm. 
iiL 463). 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 63 

11. O. RICHARD . ALLEN . ROSE = A Tudor rose. 

JR. TAVBRNE . IN . CAMBRIDGE In the field R . I . A. MM. 
on both sides a mullet. I 

Richard Allen first occupied the Rose Inn in 1653. He was appointed common 
councilman in 1662. 

The letters of this token vary much in size. 

12. A variety with the MM. (mullet) only on the obverse. 

13. O. lAMES . ANDERSONS A llon rampant 

jR. IN. CAMBRIDGE = (Bowtell) \ 

14. O. NICHOLAS . APTHORP = A globe on a stand; no inner 

circle. 
R. IN • CAMBRIDGE =■ In the field n . a. MM. on both sides ; 
a rose of five leaves. J 

Nicholas Apthorpe was appointed common coundlman in 1685. 

15. O. WILL. BASSETT . MERCER = In three lines: his | halfe I 

PENNY. MM. on both sides ; a rose of six leaves. 
R, IN . CAMBRIDGE . 1669 = In the field w . k • b ^ 

16. O, JOHN . BIRD . 1667 = The Merchant Tailors' Arms. 

R, OF . CAMBRIDGE = In the field 1667. MM. on both sides; 
a rose of dyQ leaves. \ 

The arms are a royal tent between two robes, on chief a lion passant. Thi> 
token bears the date on both sides. 

17. Cole mentions one of John Bird, 1667, bearing a fess between 
three birds. 

18. O. JOHN . BLACKLY . BAKER « The Bakers' Arms; no inner 

circle. 
R. IN . CAMBRIDGE » In the field i . a . b. MM. on both 
sides ; a mullet \ 

The arms are a balance between three garbes, on a chief barry wavy of four. 
John Blackly was of Trinity Parish. 

19. O. JONATHAN . BROWNE -The Grocers* Arms. 

R. IN (rose) Cambridge (rose) = In the field 10 . i . b in 
monogram. MM. on both sides; a rose of five leaves. \ 

20. O. WILL . BRYAN . IN . CAM BRi DG = Three cloves. 

R. CONFECTIONER . 1652 = In the field w . h . b. MM. on 
both sides ; a mullet \ 

William Bryan was mayor in 1650 and 1657. He was displaced from being 
alderman in 1662 (Cooper, Ann, iii. 503). He died 169a 

21. O. I . B . VNQER . THE . ROASE = The Bakers' Arms. 

R, IN . CAMBRIDGE : = In the field i . e . b. MM. on both 

sides ; a mullet. \ 

The letters on the obverse are much smaller than those on the reverse. 

A Mr. Bryan died at the Rose Inn in 1652, and his widow was succeeded by 

Rich. Allen in 1653. ^^ ^470 ^^ tenement was the endowment of a fellowship 

at Queens' College ; it was sdflerwards called St. Paul's Hostel. The college sold 

it in 1529, and it subsequently became an inn (W. G. Searle Hist, of Queens* 

College). The Rose was the starting-point of the London stage coad from 

1655. Rose crescent now occupies the site of its yard. 



Digitized by 



Google 



64 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

22. O. EDWARD . cHALUS :=sThe Haberdashers' Arms. 

/^. IN . CAMBRiDG . 1663. = In the field e . c MM. a 
mullet. \ 

The arms are bony nebul^ of 4, a lion passant gardant on a bend dexter. 

23. O. EDWARD . CHALLis: = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

^. IN . CAMBRIDG (two muUets) — In the field e . c (larger). 
MM. on both sides a mullet { 

24. O, FRANCIS . CHALLis = A broche of 5 candles. 

J^. IN . CAMBRIDGE . 1 653:^ In the field f . c. MM on 

on both sides a mallet \ 

Francis Challis was elected alderman in 1655, but refused the office (Cooper, 

Ann., iii. 463}. In this token the inscription on the reverse b^;ins at the bottom. 

25. O. lOHN . CHAPLYN = A broche of 8 candles ; no inner circle. 
/^. IN . CAMBRIDGE = In the field i . m . a MM. a 

mullet. \ 

26. A variety has the bar of the broche ending between the o and 
the H of JOHN, instead of touching the o. 

27. O. lOHN . CHAPLYN = A broche of 7 candles (inner circle). 
H. IN . CAMBRIDGE . 1667 = In ^^ ^^^^ I . M . c. MM. a 

mullet. i 

He was common councilman till 1685 (Cooper, Ann., iii. 605). 

28. O. ED . CLARK . HABERDASHER = The Habcrdashers' Arms. 
J^. IN . CAMBRIDGE . 1 652 = In the field e . a . c MM. a 

mullet i 

The arms are not quite correcti being Seme of roandlets (instead of bemg barrf 
, nebulae), per bend dexter a lion passant gardant. 

2^ A variety of the same date has for the roundlets tears, thus 
coming nearer to the true representation of the arms. 

30. Cole mentions one of Ed. Clarke of the date 1654. 

31. Bowtell and Cole describe one of Ed. Clark with the legend 
as in No. 28, but with the date 1664, and the arms correctly. given. 

32. O. peter . COLLINS • IN = A hand holding a glove; no inner 

circle. 
^. CAMBRIDGE . X656 =* In the field w . m. MM a 
mullet { 

The initials do not correspond with the name of the issuer. 
Peter Collins was one of the commissioners nominated to raise the monthly tax 
of jf 945 towards the maintenance of the Spanish war and other neceisaiy service 
of the Uommonwealth. 

33. A variety of the same date has larger letters, and the wrist of 
the hand over the letters col instead of over the letters olu. 

34. O. RICHARD . cooKE . AT . PEASE » In three lines: his | 

HALFE I PENV. 

J^. HILL. IN . CAMBRIDG • 1669a A talbot passant MM. a 
rose of six leaves. i 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 6$ 

35. O. lOHN . CRASKE . OF : = The Grocers' Arms. 

A". CAMBRIDGE . 1 667 : = In three lines his | half | peny. 
Below I . A . c MM. a rose of six leaves. J 

The arms are argent, a chevron between nine cloves, in groups of three, sable. 

36. O. THOMAS . DARRANT = A griffin passant ; no inner circle. 
jR. IN . CAMBRIDGE = In the field t . m . d. MM. a mullet J 

37. O. lOHN . DOD . AT . THE . RED , HART = A hart lodged j over 

its back 1667. 
/^. AND . ANTELOP . IN . CAM BR IDG = An antelope passant, and 
under it his ^. MM on both sides a mullet. ^ 

The Red Hart Inn was in Petty Cury, on the site of the new buildings belonging 
to Corpus Christ! College. 

38. O, lOHN . EwiN . IN = A man dipping candles; no inner 

circle. 
^. CAMBRiDG . 1652 = In the field i . a . e. MM. a 
mullet. \ 

John Ewin was elected alderman in 1655, but refused the office. He was 
mayor in 1659-60, and proclaimed King Charles II. on ii May (Cooper, Ann,, 
iii. 463. 478). 

39. O, THOMAS . EWIN (rose) IN (rose) = A man with widespread 

whiskers dipping candles. 
/^. CAMBRIDGE . i668 = In three lines his | half | peny, 
and below t . e . £. MM. a mullet. | 

Thomas Ewin was mayor in 1679, 1690, and 1699. 

40. O, AT . THE . MITER . IN = A mitre ; no inner circle. 

/^, CAMBRIDGE . 1651 = In the field b . e . f. MM. a 
mullet. \ 

Cooper, Ann,, iii. 265 : ** The Mitre Tavern in Trumpington Street, in St. 
Edwaitl's Parish, now the private dwelling of Mr. Parish, surgeon " (Bowteii), 

This house stood where the church of St. John Zachary formerly stood, which 
was pulled down to make way for King's College (Blomefield, Collect, Cantab, 
312). It was on the site of King's College screen, south of the gateway. 

41. O, GEORGE. fellsted = Two pcstles in a mortar; no inner 

circle. 
K. IN . CAMBRIDGE . = In the field o . a . f. MM. a mullet \ 
George Fellsted was dbplaced from bting councilman in 1662. 

42. O, THOMAS . FELSTED . = The Bakcrs' Arms ; no inner circle. 
B. IN . CAMBRIDG . 1664= In the field t . d . f. MM. a 

mulkt \ 

43. 0, THOMAS . FENN = A woolpack ; no inner circle. 

R, OF . CAMBRIDGE » In the field t . f. MM. a mullet. \ 

44. O, lOHN . FINCH . MAR : = In the field i . f. 

R, KET . PLACE . CAMBRi = In the field I . F. MM. a 
mullet i 

Probably on the site of the shop (late) of Messrs. Hurrell and Beales, iron> 
mongers. 

5 



Digitized by 



Google 



66 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

45. O. THO . FOX . AT . THE . BLACK = A bull ; HO inner circle. 
J^. BVLL . IN . CAMBRIDGE = In the field T . F. MM. a 

mullet. J 

Thomas Fox, born near Halifax, Yorkshire, removed to Cambridge, where be 
died 1673. By his second marriage with Joan, dau. of — Gadd, of Stow, 
Cambridgeshire, he had issue Thomas Fox, junr., bom 1641, who married Anne, 
dau. of Rowland Simpson, alderman, and sometime mayor of Cambridge ( Vtsitc- 
tions of Cambridgeshire^ 1684). The token probably belongs to the elder Thomas 
Fox. The younger was mayor in 1680, 1694, and 1707, and died 1 710. 
The Black Bull is now the Bull near St. Catharine's College. 

46. O. lOHN . FROHOCK •:• = A shield of arms ; no inner circle. 
R. IN . CAMBRiDG . 1670 = In the field i . m . f. MM. a 

mullet \ 

He yras displaced from being councilman in 1662. He lived in Little St. Mary's 
Parish. A John Frohock was mayor in 1703. 

The arms are on a chevron between three leopards* faces ; as many trefoils. 

47. O. In five lines will : | gorham | of . camb | grocer. 

w . M . G. 

R. (No legend.) A shield of arms; a fess, on which a 

martlet, between three matches ; crest, on a ducal coronet 

a lamp of three branches. No MM. \ 

The arms of Leete, of Kingston, Cambridgeshire, differing in having three in 

place of two matches, and the martlet on the &ss. 

48. O. FRANCIS . HAMPSON = "Two tobacco-pipes lying trans- 

versely upon a grate" {Bowtell\ or, Two pipes and a 
tobacco-roll ; no inner circle. 
R, IN . CAMBRIDGE (rose) = In the field 1667. MM. on both 
sides, a mullet. \ 

49. O, ROBKRT . HARWOOD = In the field r . c . h. 

R, IN . CAMBRIDGE . i66o = In the field r . c . h. MM. a 
mullet. \ 

Cole gives the name as Richard Harwood. 

50. O, lAMES . HAWKE (rose) = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . CAMBRIDG = In the field i . m . h. MM. a mullet. \ 

51. O, iames . HAWKE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . CAMBRIDG . 1667 = In the field i . m . h. MNL a 
mullet \ 

52. O, loSEPH . HEATH . OF = A shield of arms. 

R, CAMBRIDGE . 1666 = In the field i . h . h. MM. a mullet. \ 
Joseph Heath was appointed common councilman by the new charter of 1685 
(Cooper, Ann,y iii. 603). 

The arms are per chevron, in chief two mullets, in base a heathcock. 

53. O. RICHARD . HODGKINE = A boot. 

R. IN . CASTLE . STREET = In the field R . B . H. \ 

This was dug up in the Castle yard at Cambridge in 1802, according to Bowtell 
{Babingion), Boyne gives it to Castle Street, Southwark. 

54. O, ELizEBETH . HOGHTON = In the field E (rose) h. 

R, IN . CAMBRIDGE = In the field e (rose) h. MM. a 
mullet \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 67 

55. O. EDWARD. JENNINGS = A bfoche of 5 candlcs ; no inner 

circle. 
J^. OF . CAMBRIDGE = In the field e . i. MM. a mullet J 

56. O. FRANCIS (rose) ierman (rose) = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. OF . CAMBRIDGE . 1667 = In three lines his: | halfe | 
PENNY. MM. a rose of six leaves. i 

Francis Jermin was treasurer in 1662-63, and mayor in 1678, 1696, and 1697. 

57. O, STEPHEN . lOHNSON . 0F = A hart or unicorn. 

/^. CAMBRiDG . 1669 = In the field s . a . l MM. a rose of 
six leaves. J 

58. O. loSEPH (rose) linsev: (rose)==A two-headed eagle dis- 

played. 
^. IN (rose) CAMBRIDGE. 1663 = In three lines his | half | 
PENV. MM. a mullet. ^ 

He died in 1665 (Blomefield, Co/Zec/. Cantab,, 61). 

59. A variety with the same inscription and device in all respects, 
except that there is an e at the end of half on the reverse, and the 
whole is worse executed, ^ 

60. O, SAMVELL . LONG . AT . THE = A pOt of UHeS. 

^. LILLY . POT . IN . CAMBRIDGE = In the field, in two lines 
s . L I 1665. MM. a mullet. \ 

Samuel Long was appointed councilman in 1688. 

61. " lOHN . LOWRY . OF . CAMBRIDG . HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1657 . 

encircling a bust of his patron, Oliver Cromwell This 
token is rather singular, being struck in cameo — that is to 
say, the letters, etc., are indented, instead of intaglio, or 
cut in relief, as coins are in general " (JBowtell). \ 

"John Lowry is said to have issued a halfpenny in 1657. I have never roet 
with it, and doubt its existence. There were a few halfpennies issued before the 
Restoration, but they are scarce " {Boyne). "John Lowry was mayor in 1644, and 
M. P. for Cambridge in 1658. He was displaced from being alderman in 1662 *' 
(Cooper, Ann,, iil 472, 503). 

62. O, CHRiSTOFER . MAiES = A broche of 5 candles. 

R, IN . CAMBRIDGE = In the field c . m. MM. a mullet \ 

*• Christopher Maves was elected alderman in 1655, but refused the office. He 
was displaced from being councilman in 1662" (Cooper, Ann,, iii. 463, 503). He 
lived in St Sepulchre's Parish. 

63. O. lOHN . MARSTON . IN . TRVMP = A hand issuing out of 

clouds and pouring coffee out of a coffee-pot into a cup 
on a table, three other cups by the side. MM. a 
mullet. 
R, INGTON . STREET . CAMBR = In three lines his | halfe | 
PENNY. MM. a rose. \ 

5—2 



Digitized by 



Google 



6S TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

64. O, OWEN . MAYFIELD = A itiitre ; no inner circle. 

/^. IN . CAMBRiDG. 1 658 = In the field o . s . m. MM. a 
mullet I 

** Owen May field was a vintner, and lived at the Mitre Ion (see No. 32). He 
was mayor in 1672. He died in 1686, aged 59 years, and ¥ras buried in St. 
Edward's Church, Cambridge " (Blomefield, Co//ec/. , 82). ** His will is in MS. 
Baker, xxxviL, p. 451 ff. " (Cooper, Ann., iiL 515, 517). 

65. O. lOHN . NEwi'ON . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, CAMBRIDG . 1652 = In the field i . a . n. MM. a 
mullet. I 

^'John Newton was ti'ea&iirer of the town in 1657" (Cooper, Ann,, iiL 466). 

66. O. lOHN . NiCKLES . AT . BLEW = An anchor. 

/^. MARKET . HILL . CAMBRIDGE In the field I.I.N. MM. 

a mullet. { 

The Blue Anchor was behind the Town Hall, where the town clerk's offices now 
are. 

67. O. lOHN (rose) pecke (rose) 1668 = The Bakers' Arms. 

-^. OF (rose) CAMBRIDGE (rose, rose) = In three lines his | 
HALF I PENY j below I . M . P. MM. a mullet ^ 

68. O. SANDis . PEYTON . =^ Shield of arms and crest ; no inner 

circle; no MM. 
i?. IN . CAMBRIDGE (rose)= In the field s . m . P. MM. a mullet J 

" Sandis Peyton died in 1682, and was buried in St. Benedict's Church. He 
belonged to the family of the Peytons of Isleham " (Blomefield, Coi/ect,, 47). 

The arms on this token are : On a cross engrailed a mullet, a bordure billotte ; 
those of the Peyton family are sa. a cross engrailed or, in the second quarter a 
mullet or. The crest is a griffin sejant, on a helmet. 

69. O. iames . POTTER = In the field 1667. 

^. IN . CAMBRIDG = In the field i . e . p. MM. a mullet } 

70. "THOMAS . POWELL . IN . CAMBRIDGE . HIS . HALFPENY . 

T . e . P. 1665. Sign a bunch of grapes" {Bowteli). \ 

71. O, THOMAS . POWELL . IN = Checkers, or rolls of bread 

K, CAMBRIDGE . 1666 ^ In three lines his | half | peny; 
below T . E . p. MM. a rose of six leaves. \ 

72. A variety reads 1666 : 

73. V. THOMAS . POWELL . IN = Checkers. 

R. CAMBRIDGE . 1667 = In three lines his | half | peny; 
below T . e . p. MM. a rose of six leaves. \ 

74. O, HENERY . RAPER . IN = In the field H . M . R. 

J^. CAMBRIDG . GROCER = A sugar-loaf ; no inner circle. MM. 
a mullet \ 

75. O. HENERY . RAPER . IN = In the field. H . M. R. 

j^. IN . CAMBRIDGE . i66o = A pair of shears; no inner 
circle. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBklDGESHIRE. 69 

76. O, FRANCIS . RvssELL ; «= Arms of the Russell family ; a lion 

rampant within a bordure; crest a demi-goat; no inner 
circle. 
A'. CAMBRIDGE : 1663 = In the field f . a . r. MM. a 
mullet. \ 

Of the Russells of Chippenham, Cambridgeshire. 

77. O. HENERY . SMITH = The Habcrdashers' Arms. 

R, IN . CAMBRIDGE => In the field h . m . s. MM. a mullet \ 

78. O. WILLIAM (rose) smith (rose, rose) = The Leaihersellers' 

Arms. 
R, IN . CAMBRIDGE. 1 670 = In three lines his | half | peny; 
below w . E . s. MM. a mullet \ 

The arms are three stags regardant tripping. 

79. O, lOHN . SPARKES . BAKER = The Bakers' Arms; no inner 

circle. 
R. IN . CAMBRIDGE . 1653 = In the field i . m . s. MM. a 
mullet i 

80. O. BENJAMIN . SPENCE . 1668 = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. of . CAMBRIDGE . CHANDLER = In three lines : his | half | 
PENY. MM. a rose of six leaves. ^ 

8x. O. lOSEPH . tifford . IN =» Three cloves. 

R, CAMBRIDGE . 1659 = In the field i (rose) t. MM. a mullet \ 

82. O, WILL . WATERSON . 0F = In the field, in two lines w . w | 

1657. 

R. CAMBRIDG . CARYER = In the field E . w. MM. ♦ \ 

" Waterson is meniioned in a letter of John Sirype" (Cooper, Ann,,, iii. 504). 

83. O. wiLiAM . WELLS . 3 . TVNS = Three tuns. 

R. TAVERN . IN . CAMBRIDG = In the field w . s . w. MM. 
a mullet \ 

William Wells was appointed alderman in 1662, and was mayor in that year. 
"A famous tavern on the Market Hill, near St. Edward's churchyard. Part of 
it is still an ale-house, with the same sign " (Cooper, Ann.^ iii. 476 n, 1845). 

84. O, PHILLIP . WILLIAMS = The Bakcrs* Arms ; no inner circle. 
R, OF . CAMBRIDGE = In the field p . m . w. MM. a 

mullet i 

Philip Williams was treasurer of the town in 1658, and mayor in 1669. He 
had been a follower of the prophet Ludowick Muggleton, but conformed to the 
Established Church. 

CAXTON. 

85. O, HVGH . coNNY . OF . CAXTON & ELswoRTH = Three conies, 

or rabbits. 
R, HIS . HALFE . PENY = In the field, in two lines h . c | 
1666. i 

86. O, ROBERT . MILLARD . BAKER == A pie CrUSt 

R, OF (rose) caxson (rose) 1668 (rose) = In three lines his | 
HALFE I PENNY. MM. a heraldic rose of six leaves. ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



70 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

CHATTERIS. 

87. O. THOMAS . COAPE . AT . THE = A gate. 

I^, AT . CHAITRIS . FERREY = In foUF linCS HIS | HALF \ 
PENY I 1670. J 

88. O. THOMAS . DRiNG . OF . CHATERis = In three lines his | 

HALF I PENY. 
J^. IN . THE . ISLE . OF . ELY . 1667 = In field T . I . D. MM- 

a rose of five leaves. J 

89. O, WILLIAM . SMITH . OF = A cooper making a cask. 

^. CHATRis (rose) I (rose) 6 (rose) 7 (rose) o = In three lines 
HIS I HALFE I PENNY. MM. on both sidcs a rose. J 

CHESTERTON. 

90. O. WILLIAM . LIMBER = A hart trippant. 

^. IN . CHESTERTON (rose) = In the field w . d . l. MM. a 
rose of five leaves. J 

COTTENHAM. 

91. O, PHILIP . CHAMBERS = In three lines his | half | peny. 

R. IN . COTTENHAM . i668 = A wild man with a club over his 
shoulder. No initials. MM. a heraldic rose of six leaves. | 

CROYDON. 

92. O, lOHN . HELPFEiLD = A man making candles. 

I^, OF . CROYDON = In the field i . m . h. J 

93. O. lOHN . lOHNSON = A spade. 

^. IN. CROYDEN. i668 = In three lines his | half | peny. ^ 

94. O. ROBERT . LiiTLE . AT . THE = Three tuns. 

jR. IN . CROYDON . 1667 = In three lines his | half | peny. ^ 

95. O. CHARLES . AND . MARGERY = In tWO HneS HALF | PENY. 

^. SEALE . IN . CROYDEN . 1667 = In the field C . M . s. I 

Some of these may possibly belong to Cambridgeshire. They are all giTeo by 
Boyne (old edition) to Croydon, in Surrey, a much larger place. 

DODDINGTON. 

96. ROBERT . ADAMS . 1 668 = In three lines his | half | peny. 
J?. OF (rose) DOODiNGTON = In field r . a. MM. a mullet. J 

97. O, ROBERT . ADAM^ . OF . MARCH = In the field R . A. 

jR, AND . DODDINGTON . 1670 = A broche of X candles. J 

Robert Adams was a Quaker ; on the 25th of the nth month in 1660, he was 
one of twenty-seven persons committed to Cambridge Castle for being present at a 
Friends* meeting. 

98. O. lOHN . lOHNSON = A windmill. 

/^, OF . DODDINGTON . 1 669 = In three lines his | half | 
PENY. No initials. MM. on both sides heraldic rose. ^ 
There are many places called Doddington. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 71 



ELSWORTH. 



99. O. HVGH . CONNY . OF . CAXTON & ELSWORTH = ThrCC COnicS, 

or rabbits. 
^. HIS . HALFE . PENY = In the field, in two lines h . c | 
1666. i 

ELTISLEY. 

100. O. ISAAC . DES ==A shield of arms; no inner circle. 

Ji. OF . ELTESLEY . i6... = In the field i . e . d. MM. a 
muUet {SV. G. 5.) \ 

ELY. 

loi. O. henry . AVSTiN . IN = A shuttle. 

R, ELY . weaver . 1667 = In the field h . a. \ 

102. O, THOMAS . CHADRTON . AT = A SWan. 

R, THE . WHITE . SWAN . IN . ELY = In the field T . A . c. 
MM. on both sides a mullet. \ 

103. O. WILLIAM . CHEWiLL = The Merchant Taylors' Arms. 

K, IN . ELEY . 1667 = In the field w . s . c MM. on both 
sides a mullet. \ 

104. O. LVKE (mullet) CROCKSON (mullet) = A broche of 7 candles. 
R. IN (mullet) ELEY (mullet) = In the field l . s . c MM. 

on both sides mullet. \ 

105. O. coRNELivs : FVLLER = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

R, IN . ELY . 1654 = In the field c . f. MM. a mullet. \ 

106. There is another of the same person and date, with the name 
spelled coRNLLVS, and the arms incorrectly engraved, so as to appear 
to be Seme of roundlets, per bend dexter a lion passant gardant. 

107. O, JOHN . GAYER . OF = The Fishmongers' Arms; no inner 

circle. 
R. ELY . NER . wiTCHFORD = In the field I . A . G. MM. a 
mullet. \ 

108. O, WILLIAM . GOTOBED = The Skinners' Arms ; no inner 

circle. 
R, IN . ELEY . 1662 = In the field w. g. MM. a rose of 
^st, leaves. \ 

109. O, lOHN . KNOWLS . AT . THE = A ship ; no inner circle. 

R, IN (rose) ELY (rose) 1667 (rose) = In the field i . a . K. 
MM. rose. \ 

no. O, THOMAS . LENSLEY = A pic CrUSt ? 

R. IN . ELEY . 1664 = In the field t . a . l. \ 

III. O. WILLIAM . LETTEN = A crowncd rose ; no inner circle. 
R, AT . ROSE . & CROWN . IN ELY = In the field w . k . l. 
MM. a rose of five leaves. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



72 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

112. O. NICHOLAS . MALLABAR = A WOOlpack. 

J^. AT . ELLY . 1658 = In the field n . m. MM. on both sides 
a mullet. ^ 

113. Variety with inner circle. 

114. O. WILLIAM . MARSH = A pair of scales. 

J^. GROCER . OF . Ei,Y = In the field w . m. J 

115. O. THOMAS . PORTER = The GrocersV Arms. 

A IN . ELY . 1663... = In the field t . p. MM. on bodi 
sides a mullet. ^ 

116. O, JOHN . READE . IN . ELY = The Fishmongers' Anns ; no 

inner circle. 
J^. GROCER . 1656 = In the field i . r. MM. a mullet. J 

These arms are a form of those of the Fishmoogers' Company ; they are : Three 
fishes in pale, in chief three of stockfish saltires. 

.117., Gbv. and rev. the same, but of different dies, the words ely 
and lOHN being close to the mullet mint-mark. 

The Reades of Ely were Quakers. In 1664 four of the Reades were committed 
to Ely -gaol for refusing to take the oath of allegiance, and, when brought before 
the magistrates, said, " We could not for conscience' sake, being the Lord's firee 
men." George Reade was again committed in 1663 for refusing the oath, and 
remained prisoner some monthis. Richard Reade, in 1663, suffered a distress oi a 
large brass kettle, said to be worth £^ ^s* ^> ^^^ refusing to bear anns in the 
county militia. 

118. O, RALPH . SKiTTAR = The Groccrs' Arms ; no inner circle. 
jR. IN . ELY . 1659 = In the field r . m . s. MM. a 

mullet. J 

119. O. WILLIAM . TANNER = An irregular star of six rays, or, in 

brewers' parlance, a " sparger " — a vessel with two or 
more pierced arms, used for distributing "liquor" ovei 
malt or grains in the mash-tub, by swinging round on 
a centre pin. 
^. IN . ELY . BREWER = In the field w . M . T. MM. a 
mullet. ' J 

120. O. WILLIAM : TvcKiNTON = A broche of 8 candles. 

^. IN . ELY . CHANDLER = In the field w . T. MM. on both 
sides a mullet ^ 

121. O. WILL . TVRKiNTON : (rosc) = A brochc of 8 candles. 

R, : OF . ELY*. 1661 (rose) = In the field w . t. MM. a 
rose of five leaves. J 

122. O, WILLIAM . WAGSTAFE = The Fishmongers' Arms; no inner 

circle. 
^. MERCER . OF . ELiE=In the field lozengy of Vs, forming 
a cypher consisting of 2 W — one inverted crossing the 
other, making the initials of the issuer, W. W. ; no 
inner circle. MM. on both sides a mullet. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 73 

123. A variety of the same date has the t in the field level with 
the E of ELY instead of with the dot before ely. 

134. O. WILLIAM . wagstafe = Arms of the Wagstaff family in a 
heart-shaped shield : two bends raguly, in chief an 
escallop shell ; no inner circle. 
J?, mercer . OF . elie= Device as last MM. a mullet. J 

125. O, lOHN . weatherhead = The Bakers' Arms. 

J^. IN . ELY . BAKER . 1 666 = In the field i . r . w. MM. a 
mullet. \ 

FORDHAM. 

126. O. JOHN . BADCOCK = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. IN . FORDHAM . 1667 = In the field i . a MM. on both 
sides a mullet \ 

By Boyne attribated to Fordham, Norfolk. 

GAMLINGAY. 

127. O. STEPHEN . APTHORPE = The Grocers* Arms. 

Ji. OF . GAMLiNGHAM = In two lines s . A I 1657. i 

128. O, STEPHEN . APTHORPE = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF : GAMLiNGHAY = In two Hnes s . A I 1659. MM. a 
mullet i 

129. O. STEPHEN . APTHORPE = The Groccrs' Arms. 

/^. OF. GAMLiNGAM: = In two lines s . a | 1666. MM. a 
mullet J 

13a O. lOSEPH . HARviE IN . 1667 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. GAMLINGAY . HIS . HALF . PENY = In the field I . M . H 

and a lover's knot. MM. on both sides a large rose of 
six leaves. i 

Of this token there are two different sizes. 



HADDENHAM. 

131. O, JOHN . MOREFELD . OF . = A man walking; no inner 

circle, nor MM. 
J?. HADENHAM . CARRIER = In the field I . M. MM. a 
mullet i 

By Bojne attributed to Haddenham, Bucks. 

HINXTON. 

132. O. lOHN . NORTH . 1 667 = The Grocers' Arms between i and n. 
^. IN . HiNSSTON = In three lines his | half | peny. MM. 

on both sides a mullet ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



74 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

HISTON. 

133. O, CHRiSTOP : CHALLiCE = A flcecc Suspended; below 167a 
/i, OF . HISTON <• =ln the field c . c MM. a small 

rose. i 

HOCKINGTON. 

134. O, ocKiNGTON . 1657-^ In the field i . m . a 

jR. HIS I HALFE I PENNY = In three lines across the field. J 
This is an early date for a halfpenny. 

H. S. Gill, 17th Century Tokens (Num, CAr,, N.S., vol xvi., 1876, p. 256), 
claims this token for Okehampton, Devon, which is locally called Ockington. 

135. Variety with halfe | peny in two lines. 

136. Variety dated 1658. 

ICKLETON. 

137. O, GEORGE . FORDHAM = The field blank. 

Ji. ICKLTON . CAMBRiDGSH = In the field G . f. mm. an 
both sides a mullet. { 

138. O, GEORGE fordham = A wheatsheaf. 

J^. lETLETON IN ESSEX (stc) = In the field G . f. I 

ISLEHAM. 

139. O. ROBERT (rose) MOODEY (rose) = The Mercers* Arms; no 

inner circle. 
^. IN (rose) ISELEHAM (rose) 1664 = In the field r . g . m. 
MM. on both sides a mullet | 

140. O. WILLIAM . READE . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. lESLEHAM . 1666 = In the field w . e . r. \ 

141. O, ELIZABETH . ALLEN = Arms checky. 

jR. IN . ISLEHAM . 1667 = In the field e . a. J 

LINTON. 

142. O. lOHN . BiTTiN . OF = A grifiin rampant ; no inner circle. 
^. LINTON . 1657 (:: ;:) = AgriflSn rampant; no inner circle. 

MM. a mullet. | 

143. O, ROBERT . HALLS . 1667 = A pair of scales. MM. a lar^ge 

rose of six leaves. 
R, IN . LINTON . CAMBRIDGSH = In three lines his | halfe | 
PENY. MM. a mullet. | 

144. O. lOHN . HARVY . OF = A broche of 6 candles; no inner 

circle. 
^. LINTON . CHANDLER = In the field I . s . H. MM. a 
mullet. ^ 

145. O. ROBERT MOORE = The Grocers* Arms. 

/^. OF LYNTON . 1 667 = In the field r . m. J 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 75 

LITTLEPORT. 

146. O. Y? OVERSEERS . OF . Y? POOR = In the field 1668. 

/^. LITTLE . PORT . ILE . OF ELY = A key OF frying-pan (?). 
MM. on both sides a small rose. ^ 

This is the only town-piece belonging to Cambridgeshire. 

LITTLINGTON. 

147. O. lOHN . PEARCE . OF = An article of dress. 

J?. LiTHNGTON . i668 = In three lines his | half | peny. J 
By Boyne given to Lidlington, Bedfordshire, or to Littlington, Sussex. 



MANEA. 

148. O. JOHN . SANDERS . OF . MANEY = In three lines his | ^ | 

PENY. 

li. IN . y" . ISLE . OF . ELEY .1671 = In the field i . m. MM. 
a small rose. ^ 

The initials do not correspond with his name ; they are on the central line, and 
are hemmed in by a large rose of six leaves and two small roses, both above and 
below. 

MARCH. 

149. O. ROBERT . ADAMS . OF . MARCH = In field R . A. 

iP. AND . DODiNGTON 1670 = A broche of candles. \ 

150. O. THOMAS . HARRYSON . IN = In the field T . M . H. 

/^. MARCH.HABERDASHER^ In the field 1657. MM. a mullet. ^ 

151. O. THOMAS. HAORisoN = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

if. OF MORCH 1667 = In the field t . m . h. ^ 

152. O, THOMAS. HARRISON = In three lines his | half | peny. 
i?. OF . MAiRCH . 1669 = In the field t . m . h. ^ 

153. O. lOHN . iNGROM . OF MARCH = In the field 1666. 

^. IN . THE . ISLE . OF . ELY = In the field I . I. MM. a 
small rose of hye leaves. ^ 

154. O. ROBERT . NEALE . IN = The Grocer*s Arms; no inner 

circle. 
^. MARCH . GROCER. 1656 = In the field r . n. MM. a 
mullet. ^ 

155. O, THOMAS . TOWERS = A tower. 

^. IN . MARCH . 1669 = In three lines his | half | peny. 
MM. on both sides a heraldic rose. i 



Digitized by 



Google 



76 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

NEWMARKET. 

The tokens bearing the name of this town are placed by Boyne among the 
Suffolk tokens ; however, as one of the two parisnes of Newmarket is in this 
county, and the portion of Suffolk in which the other parish stands is surrounded 
by Cambridgeshire, they are all placed here. 

156. O, WILLIAM . BRYANT = The Groccrs* Arms. 

^. OF . NEWMARKET 1659 = In the field w . M . a MM. 
on both sides a mullet. \ 

The Bryant family are still found at Newmarket (Boyne). 

157. O. WILLIAM . BRiANT.iN = In three lines HIS | half ) peny. 
^. NEWMARKET . 1669 = In the field w . m . b. ^ 

158. O, HENRY . FRANCIS . AT . THE 2 . KINGS = A Still between 

two kings, crowned, standing, holding sceptres. 
J?. AND STILL IN NEW MARKET 67 = In three Unes HIS I 

HALFE I PENY. BeloW H . E . F. h 

Placed by Boyne at Clare Market, Ix}ndon. 

159. O. AT THE 3 TUNS = Three tuns. 

J^, IN NEWMARKET = In the field I . H. J 

160. -O, JOHN HENDERSON AT THE = A ship. 

li. SHiPP IN NEWMARKET = In three lines his | half | peny. | 

161. O. ROBERT MYNN AT y" GOLDEN = An anchor and R . M. 
/^. ANCHOR IN NEWMARKET = In three lines his | halfe | 

PENNY. i 

T62. O. WALTER . pouLTER . AT . THE = Queen*s head. 

^. IN . NEW MARKET . IN SUFFOLK = In four lineS HIS | 

HALFE I PENNY 1 1 669. MM. on both sides a small rose, i 

163. A variety reads ponlter on the obverse, and has on reverse 
w . p in place of the date. 

164. O, THOMAS . PRATT = A ship. 

^. IN . NEWMARKETT=In field T . E . P. J 

165. O, will. WAiTE . IN . = A Stick of candles. 1657. 

J^. NEW . MARKET!' = In the field w . w. \ 

As CUre Market, London, is called New Market on the tokens, it is doubtful 
whether all the above belong to this town. (See also Boyne, London, Clare 
Market, Nos. 513 and 518.) 

NEWTON. 

166. O, lEFFERY . wiLLisoN = A roll of tobacco and two pipes. 
^. IN . NEWTON . 1667 = In three lines his | halfe | penny. J 

By Boyne given to Newton, Lancashire. 

OVER. 

167. O. THOMAS. SKINNER = Three hammers — two and one; no 

inner circle. 
J^, MERCER. . IN . OVER = In the field x . s. MM a 
mullet (^K a 5.). J 

There is a place called Over also in Cheshire. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE, 77 



ROYSTON. 



Although a small part of this parish lies in Cambridgeshire, yet the town itself 
lies in Hertfordshire. 

SOHAM. 

i6S. O, ROB . CROW . OF . SOHAM . BAKER. = In three lines 

A I HALFE I PENY. 

J^. iN^ CAMBRiDGSHEAR . 1671= The Balccrs' Arms. MM. 
a large rose of six leaves. ^ 

169. O, Same inscription = A lion rampant, r . p . c. 

-^. Same. J 

These are the latest dated tokens of this county. 

170. O. THOMAS . TROWELL = A broche of candles. 

^. IN . SOHAM . 1664 = In the field t . m . t. \ 

171. O. HOVELL. lOANES . = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . SOHAM . 1654 = In the field h . f . i. MM. a 
mullet. J 

172. As No. 153, only 1658. J 

173. O. NATHANiELL . STEARNE . = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF SOHAM . 1667 = In the field n . o . s. ^ 

SOHAM AND HORNSWELL (HENINGSWELL, SUFFOLK). 

174. O. MARY . KENT . OF . SOHAM = In the field M . K. 

^. lOHN . KENT. OF . HORNSWELL= In the field, in two lines 
1 . K I 1666. MM. on both sides a mullet. ^ 

STANTON. 

175. O. STEPHEN . HOVELL = In the field S . H . H. 
J^, OF . STANTON . GROCER = The Groccrs' Arms. 

This token, l>y Boyne given to Norfolk, might possibly belong to Cambridge* 
shire. The name Hovell is a Cambridgeshire name. 

SUTTON. 

176. O. lOHN . CLEMENT = Three tuns ; no inner circle. 

^. IN . svTTON . 1656= In the field i . c MM. a mullet. \ 
Found at Suiton, Cambridgeshire (^. G, S.). 

177. O. lOHN . BVRKHVRST = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^, OF . svnoN . 1657 = In the field i . b. \ 

178. O. SAMUEL . SEELEY = The Gfocers* Arms. 

J^, OF . svnoN , 1657 = In the field s . s. {Small size) J 
These three tokens are given by Boyne to Sutton, in Surrey. He considers 
that ** from the date and style all belong to the same place, and to a southern 
county." 



Digitized by 



Google 



78 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

SWAFFHAM. 

179. O, ROBERT . DENTON . OF= A brochc of 5 candlcs. 

^. swAFHAM . 1660 = In the field r . a . d. MM. on both 
sides a mullet. J 

It is not improbable that this token, although found near Cambridge, nuij ha^ 
been issued at Swaffham, Norfolk, to which town it is ascribed by Boync 

180. O, THOMAS . DAWSON = Crossed keys. 

J^. IN SWAFFHAM 1659 = In the field t . s . d, \ 

181. O. lOHN . HOOKER = In the field i . h. 

/^. OF SWAFFHAM = In the field i . h. \ 

, These last two are given by Boyne to Swaffham, Norfolk. 

SWAFFHAM BULBECK. 

182. O. WILLIAM . COE . OF = A woolpack. 

^. SWAFFHAM . BULBECK = In the field w . c MM. on both 
sides a mullet. | 

SWAVESEY. 

183. O, WILLIAM . BVRTEN = In the field W . S . R 

jR, AT . swASEY . 1656 = In the field w . s . a MM. a 
mullet. I 

William and Sarah Burton were married 19 Nov., 1642, at Swavesey^ 

THORNEY. 

184. O, EDWARD . TAYLOR . . = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. IN . THORNEY . ABBY = In the field E . T. MM. a 

mullet. { 

UPWELL. 

185. O, SAMUEL . VINCENT = The Mercers* Arms; no inner cirdc. 
^. IN vpwELL . 1664 = In the field s . v. MM. a mallet \ 

186. O. WILLIAM BOYCE = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

^. IN VPWELL . 1664 = In the field w . s . r \ 

187. O. lAMES . BRONLES = The Brewers* Arms. 

J^. IN VPWELL . 1664 = In the field i . i . b. MM. on berth 
sides a mullet } 

188. O. THOMAS . NVRiSH = A crown. 

/^. IN . VPWELL 1664 = In the field t . a . n. ^ 

189. O. THOMAS . ROBINSON = The Crossed Keys. 

jR. IN . VPWELL. 1668 = In three lines his | half | pent: 
beneath t . a . r. i 

Upwell is also partly in Norfolk, and the last two tokens are given by Boyne tS 
that county. 

WEST WRATTING. 

190. O. EDWARD . CRANDFiELD = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. WESTE . RATiNGE = In the field E . D . c J 



Digitized by 



Google 



CAMBRIDGESHIRE. 79 

WHITTLESEY. 

191. O. THOMAS . DAVIE. i668 = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. OF (rose) wiiTLESEY (rose) = In three lines his | half | 
PENNY ; below t . e . d. MM. a large rose of five 
leaves. ^ 

192. O. THOMAS . DAVIE . OF = In the field w . d. 

^. wiTTLESEV . 1 668 = In the field w . d. J 

193- O. JOHN . EADES = The Bakers' Arms. 

J^. OF . WHinxESEV . 1657 = In the field i.e. J 

194. O. ROBERT . IVES . 1667 = A woolcomb. 

J^. OF . WHITTLESEY = In the field r . i . l MM. a 
mullet \ 

195. O. ROBERT . IVES = A woolcomb incorrecdy drawn; no inner 

circle. 
J^. OF . WHITTLESEY •••= In the field r . i . l MM. a 
mullet ^ 

196. O. sil[vester] . IVES = A woolcomb. 

/^, IN . WH[iTTLESEY] = In the field s . e . i. I 

197. O. GEORGE . LAMBE = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. OF . WHITELLSEY = In field G . L. \ 

198. O, WILLIAM . SEARLE . = The Groccrs* Arms. 

J^. OF . WHITTLESEY = In the field w . s. MM. a mullet i 

WILBRAHAM (LITTLE). 

199. O, JOHN . TVRNER . IN = In the field 1666. 

/^. LITTLE . wiLBRAM = In the field I . s . T. MM. a 
mullet ^ 

WILLINGHAM. 

200. O. lOHN . NORRis . 1669 = In three lines his | half | peny. 
/^. in WILLINGHAM = In the field i . a . n. 

WISBECH. 

On 20 Nov., 16^8, "the Town Halife (Richard Harrison, grocer— sec No. 187) 
is ordered to lay oute five or ten pounds in farthings at London, having them made 
with the towne armes upon them." On 28 Feb., 1669, it was ordered **that the 
Tonne Ballif and Mr. Richard Harrison dose lay oute twenty pound in halfpennys 
withe thes moito upon one side—* A wisbkach halfr peny,' and on the other 
side the effiges of the towne seale wilh the date of the year." These townpieces 
are not known to exist ; it is very probable that they were never struck (Boyne). 

201. O. lOHN , BELLAMY = The Gfocers* Arms. 

^. IN . wiSBiCH . 1665. == In t^c field i . i , b. MM. on both 
sides a mullet. ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



8o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

202. O, lOHN . BELLAMY . 1667 = The Gfocers* Arms. 

iV. OF . wiSBiCH . GROCER : = In three lines his | halfe | 
penny; below i . i . b. MM. on both sides a 
large rose of six leaves. ^ 

203. O, lOHN . BELLAMY = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. IN . WISBICH . 1667 = In the field i . i . a MM. on both 
sides a mullet. I 

<'He was town bailiff in 1682. The family still remains at Wisbeach'^ 
{Bcyfie), 

204. O. HENRY . COLDWELL . 1 668 = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

MM. a large rose of five leaves. 
J?. IN . wiSBiDG . HABADASHER = In three lines his | half | 
PENY. No MM. ^ 

William Cold well was Vicar of Wisbeach 165 1-1702. 

205. Also without the date. \ 

206. O, JOHN . FINCH . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. WISBECH . 1666 =. In the field i . f. J 

207. O, lOHN (mullet) FINCH (mullet, mullet) = The Grocers' Arms. 
^. OF (mullet) WISBECH (mullet, mullet) = In the field i . f. 

MM. on both sides a mullet. ^ 

208. O. RICHARD . HARRISON = The Haberdashers* Arms; no 

inner circle. 
J^. OF . WISBICH . 1664 » In the field r . h. MM. a 
mullet ^ 

209. O, JOHN . MOYES . 1664 = The Grocers* Arms; no inner 

circle. 
^. IN . WISBECH = In field i . e . bi. MM. a mullet J 

2X0. O. ANTHONY . RACHELL = A COg whcel. 

J^. IN . wisBECHE . 1667 = In the field a . e . r. J 

211. O. HENRY . TVNARD . OF = The Bakers' Arms. 

jR, wiSBiTCH . 1657 = In the field h . i . t. J 

212. O, HENRY . TiNARD (wV) OF = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. WISBITCH . 1662 = In the field h . i t. \ 

213. O, HENRY TVNARD . OF = The Bakers' Arms. MM. a rose. 
^. WISBITCH . 1663 = In the field h . i . t. MM. a mullet \ 

WITCHFORD. 
(Sec John Gayer, of ** Ely, near Witchford.") 

WOOD DITTON. 

214. O, KiMwooD (rose) Norton (rose) of = A windmill. 

j^. wooDDiTTON (fose) 1670 = In three lines his | half | 
PENY. MM. on both sides a rose. ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



Cbeebtre- 



Number of Tokens issued 7S 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 10 

Town Pieces issued None. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur . 



Nathan Heywood, Esq., S.S.C, 

Aucklands, Fallowfield, 

Manchester. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Cbcfibirc. 

Tokens were issued in Cheshire at a much later date than most 
other counties, the earliest being after the Restoration ; and none 
were issued by any of the towns in their corporate or other capacity. 

This series, though small in number, is remarkable for the large 
proportion of pennies — ^a characteristic of the tokens of the neigh- 
bouring counties of the Principality of Wales. 

It appears that the Cheshire issuers continued to circulate their 
previously issued tokens, despite the prohibitory proclamation ; for 
in 1674 Government proceedings were commenced against the 
offenders. They thereupon memorialised Sir William Williams, 
then Member for Chester, and afterwards Speaker of the House of 
Commons, who interceded with the law officers of the Crown, and 
had proceedings stayed on condition that the offenders at once con- 
formed to the law. 

Some of the legends on the tokens of this county are curious. 
Thomas Cotton of Middlewich has on a heart-shape token, " althovgh 
BVT BRASS, YET LET ME PASS." Fraucis Swindcll of Macclesfield has 
on a square token, " sqvare dealinge is best." Sam Endon of 
the same town has " welcom vov be to trade w^h me." Punning 
devices are also found ; we have the following examples: John Salmon 
of Chester, three salmon hauriant ; and William Snead of Chester, a 
snead or scythe. Loyal sentiments also appear : Richard Briscoe of 
Chester has the Royal Oak crowned ; Thomas Baker of Chester, a 
lion rampant ; Ralph Burrows of Chester, a crown; and Ralph Leigh 
of Knutsford, a lion rampant 

Crests or family arms are sometimes displayed ; Samuel Elcocke of 
Chester, Will Hewitt of Chester, Robert Radford of Chester, John 
Salmon of Chester, William Snead of Chester, Peter Stringer of 
Chester, John Travers of Chester, Richard Cotton of Congleton, and 
Elizabeth Price of Nantwich, have each the crest or arms of their 
family represented on their respective tokens. 

The arms of the City of Chester are represented on the tokens 
issued by Robert Hewitt of Chester, James Knowsley of Chester, 
and Thomas Simpson of Chester. The arms of the City of London 
arc represented on the token issued by John Andrews of Stockport 
The arms of the Incorporated Trade Companies or Guilds of the 
City of London, of some part thereof, are also extensively exhibited ; 
we have the following examples : The Bakers' on the token issued 
by Nathenel Beard of Middiewich ; the Butchers' on the token issued 
by Robbart Wihither of Chester; the Feltmakers* on the token 

6—3 



Digitized by 



Google 



84 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

issued by Thomas Welch of Congleton ; the Grocers' on the tokens 
issued by Roger Brereton of Chester, Robert Hewitt of Chester, 
Richard Eaton of Congleton. James Johnson of Knutsford, Francis 
Swindell of Macclesfield, and John Andrews of Stockport ; the 
Haberdashers' on the token issued by John Salmon of Chester ; the 
Innholders' on the tokens issued by Robert Fletcher, William Harvey, 
and Richard Mynshall of Chester ; the Ironmongers' on the tokens 
issued by Ralph Hocknell of Chester, Henry Williams of Chester, 
and Thomas Jackson of Nantwich ; the Mercers' on the tokens 
issued by Philip Antrobus of Knutsford, Nathaniell Poole of Maccles- 
field, Edward Wood of Macclesfield, George B of Nantwich, 

Daniel Jackson of Nantwich, Margaret Nicholson of Stockport, Ralph 
and Elizabeth Nicholson of Stockport ; and the Tallowchandlers' on 
the token issued by James Hutchinson of Chester. 

Nathan Heywoor 

Aucklands, Fallowfield, 
Near Manchester. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CHESHIRE. 8s 



AUDLEM. 

1. O, THOMAS . BATEMAN . OF = T. I . B. 167O. 

^. AVDLEM . IN . CHESHEIRE= HIS PENNY. I 

Bateman's will was proved in the Consistory Court, Chester, in May, 1683. 

2. O. ROBERT . BIRCHALL . IN = R . R 

^. AVDLEM . IN . CHEASHEIR = HIS . PENNY . 1669. 

BRAMHALL. 

3. O, lOHN . BROWNE = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

JR. IN . BRAMHALL . 1669==! . a ^ 

John Browne died intestate ; letters of administration were granted to his 
representatives at the Chester Wills Office in June, 1699. 

CHESTER. 

4. O, THOMAS . BAKER . POST = A Hon rampant. 

R, MASTER . OF . CHESTER = HIS . HALFE . PENY. ^ 

Thomas Baker was Sheriff of Chester in 1676 ; he died the following year, and 
his will was proved at Chester. 

5. O, NATH . BASSNET. 1668 . HIS = l'^ 

H, APOTHiCARY . IN . CHESTER = A mortar and pestle. i 

Bassnet's will was proved in June, 1699. His name immediately follows that of 
John Browne, of Bramhall, just mentioned, in the Wills Index at the Chester 
Registry Office. 

6. O. SARAH . BENNET . AT . Y^ 3= Three tuns. 

R. TVNNS . IN . CHESTER . 1 668 «= HER . HALF . PENY. ^ 

7. O. ROGER . BRERETON = The Grocers* Arms. 

H. IN . CHESTER. l666 = HIS. HALF . PENY. J 

8. O, RICHARD . BRISCOE = The Royal Oak Crowned. 

jR, IN . CHESTER . l670«HlS . PENNY. I 

9. O. RALPH . BVRROVGHS = A CrOWn. 

R. OF . CHESTER . l670=«R . B . I*^ I 

Ralph Burroughs was Sheriff of Chester in 1679, and died an alderman in 1687. 
His father, Randle Burrowes (or Burroughs), also served the office of sheriff in 
1656. 

10. O. WILLIAM . CRVE=(detrited). 

JR. IN . CHESTER . 1 668 = HIS . PENNY. I 

11. O. ANNE . EARLE = HER . PENNY. 

R, IN . CHESTER . 1 668s A . E . divided by a merchant's mark, i 



Digitized by 



Google 



86 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

12. O. SAMVEL. ELCOCKE . IN = Arms of the Elcocke family; i 

saltire between four cocks. 
jR. CHESTER . HIS . PENY . 1669 = A phocnix in flames. i 

Samuel Elcocke was probably a younger son of Elcocke of Poole, whose arms 
are on the token. It was a common occurrence in those days for younger sods of 
the principal Cheshire families to settle in Chester as merchants and tradesmen. 
Samuel Elcocke's name appears on the roll for the collection of the poll tax in 1666. 

13. O, ROBERT . FLETCHER . AT . Y^ = A CfCSCCnt mOOn 

jR. HALF . MOON . IN . CHESTER = HIS l'' I 

Robert Fletcher was Sheriff of Chester in ' 1678, and died the following jrear. 
He was son of Alderman Robert Fletcher, whose signature appears to an ordo- of 
Assembly for providing all necessary fortifications at Chester prior to the celebrated 
siege of 1644-6. The Fletchers were connected with the municipality of Chester 
for more than three hundred years. 

14. O. WILLIAM . HARVEY . AT . Y^ = An ostrich, with a horseshoe 

in its mouth. 

^. STARR . IN . CHESTER . 69 = A Star 1° I 

William Harvey was Mayor of Chester in 1678. His father, Robert Harvey, 
mayor in 1639, was one of the six gallant citizens who refused to sign the articles 
of surrender when the city capitulated to the Parliament, in 1646. He afterwards 
founded six almshouses in St. Olave's parish. 

15. O. SAMVELL . HEATH . IN = S . H . 1670. 

J^, CHESTER . CONFECTIONER = HIS . PENY . {Heart-shape). I 
Samuel Heath was sworn in a member of the reorganized corporation of 1698. 
His will was proved at Chester in November, 1708. 

16. O, AN . APOTHECARY = THOMAS . HEATH. 

R* AT . CHESTER . 1667 =HIS . PENNY. 1 

Thomas Heath, probably father of the last-named, was Sheriff of Chester in 
165a His will was proved in November, 1690. 

17. O, ROBERT. HEWiTi' = Arms of the City of Chester, three 

garbs. 
E, HIS . HALF . PENY . 1 667 = The Grocers' Anns. \ 

There is no mention of the place of issue on this token, but it has the Arms of 
the City of Chester. Robert Hewitt was Sheriff of Chester in i68a. He was 
assessed for the poll tax in 1666. 

18. O. WILL . HEWITT. OF . CHESTER = A chcvron between three 

owls : — crest, on a helmet, mantled, a bird [an owl ?]. 

R, HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 667 = W . H. \ 

19. O, RALPH . HOCKNELL . 1 666 = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R. IN . CHESTER . HIS . HALF . PENY = R . M . H. \ 

Third son of John Hocknell (or HockenhuU), of Prenton, Cheshire, by his wife 
Dorothy, daughter of John Hancock, of Blacksley, co. Northampton. His will 
was proved at Chester in May, 1679. 

20. O. lOHN . HOVGH . AT . THE = A SWan. 

R, OF . CHESTER . l666 = HIS . HALF. PENY. \ 

It appears from the Wills Register at Chester that Hough's children were placed 
in ward at hb death, and an allowance made for their tuition in November, 1674. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CHESHIRE. 87 

21. O, I AMES . HVTCHiNSON = Three doves (part of the Tallow- 

chandlers' Arms). 

J^. OF . CHESTER . 1669 = 1 . H . 1° I 

The will of James Hutchinson, of Chester, ironmonger, was proved there in 
1692. 

22. O. IN . CHESTER . IN . NORTHGAT = NATHA^ lOLLIE HIS l" 

J^. STREET . AT Y° . PHEASANT . 68 = A pheasant. I 

A younger son of Major James Jollie, of Droylesden, Lancashire. Nathan was 
brother in half blood to Elizabeth Hall, afterwards the wife of Adam Martindale, 
the celebrated Nonconformist divine, whose life is printed in Vol. IV. of the 
Chelham Sodetjr's publications. His will was proved at Chester, January, 171 1. 

23. O. CADWALADER . lONES . 1669 = 1'' 

jR. IRONMONGER . IN . CHESTER = C . I. I 

24. O. lAMES . KNOWSLEY = Arms of the City of Chester ; three 

garbs. 

^. OF . CHESTER . 1667 = HIS . HALFE . PENNY. J 

Sergeant-at-Mace in the mayoralty of William Edwards in 1646. Letters of 
administration were granted for his effects in August, 1689. The mint-mark ou 
both sides of this token is an anchor. 

25. O. PETER . LEE . OF . THE = A ram*s head 

Ji. ciTTYE. OF. cHEST*^ = p L cotijoined. i 

Peter Lee, whose name is sometimes spelled Leigh, was a wealthy grocer and 

Mayor of Chester in 1656. He was fined ;^i,ooo for visiting the celebrated 

William Prynne at his lodgings in Chester, Prynne being then on his way to 

Carnarvon. 

26. O, THOMAS. MINSHVLL = HIS . PENNY. 

jR. IN . CHESTER . l666 = T . M. I 

27. O. RICH . MYNSHALL = A Star and crescent 

^. OF . CHESTER = R . M. ^ 

28. O, LEWIS . PERRY = Two hands joined. 

jR. OF . CHESTER . i669 = L . p . & I (for the value). i 

This name is unknown in the Chester annals, but in 1692 Hugh Perry, dyer, of 
Dublin, probably a brother of Lewis, died at Chester, and his will was proved 
there. 

29. O. HIS . PENNY . 1668 . IN = ROBERT . RADFORD . R . M. 

jR. BRIDGE . STREETE . IN . CHESTER = Arms; fretty, a chief i° i 
Robert Radford's will was proved in June, 1707. 

30. O. SAM . RADFORD . IN . Y^ . BRIDGE = Crest, a demi-dragon, 

pierced with a lance. 

J^, STREETE . IN . CHESTER . l668 = HIS . PENNY . S . R. I 

Brother of Robert Radford. A son of one of these Radfords married a sister of 
the renowned Matthew Henry. 

31. O, ROB . RIDGE . IN . CHESTER = A ship. 

jR. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l666 = R . F . R. ^ 

Jonathan Ridge, Alderman of Chester, was member for the city in 1659, the 
last year of the Commonwealth. 



Digitized by 



Google 



88 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

32. O. THOMAS . ROBINSON = An anchoT dividing t . R. ' 

J^. OF . CHESTER . 1669 = HIS . PENNY. I 

33. O. lOHN . SALMON . OF . CHESTER = Arms, three fishes hauri- 

ant, a crescent for a difference, impaling a double- 
headed eagle displayed within a border. 
J^. HIS . PENNY . 1667= The Haberdashers' Arms. i 

Sir WiUiam Dugdale, in his diary, November 3rd, 1668, has this minute : "John 
Salmon, of Chester, maketh brass pence with armes upon them (three salmons) to 
disclayme him." Salmon's will was proved in February, 1687. 

34. O. THOMAS . SIMPSON = Arms of the City of Chester ; three 

garbs dimidiated, impaling three lions passant gardaot. 

J^. OF . CHESTER . 1667 . HIS . HALFE . PENNY. (Mint-mark 

on both sides, an anchor.) | 

Thomas Simpson was Sheriff of Chester in 1669, and Mayor in 1673. Bishop 

Cartwright dined with him at his house, in company with Baron Jenner, August 

3rd, 1687. Simpson, during his mayoralty, rebuilt a portion of the present walls 

of Chester. 

35. O. WILLIAM . SNEAD = A snead and scythe. 

jR, OF . CHESTER . l668 = HIS . PENNY . W . S. 1 

36. O, PETER . STRINGER. = Arms of the Stringer family ; per 

chevron, in chief two eagles displayed, in base a fleur- 
de-lys. 

J^, OF . CHESTER . 1667 = HIS . PENNY. I 

Peter Stringer married Alice, daughter of Randal Holmes, the celebrated 
Cheshire antiquary, and died in 1704. The Stringers were long and honourably 
connected with the city. 

37. O. lOHN . TRAVERS. = Arms of the Travers family ; a chevron 

between three boars' heads, a mullet on the chevron 
for a difference. 

J^. IN . CHESTER . 1663 = 1 . T. 1 

Bishop Cartwright records in his diary, March 1687, that he ** supped with Col. 
Roger Whitley (a celebrated Cheshire Royalist), Mr. Travers being one of the 
party.'* 

38. O, HENRY . WILLIAMS = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

I^. IN . CHESTER . 1 667 = HIS 1° I 

39. O. HENRY . WILLIAMS = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J?. IN . CHESTER = 1° I 

40. O, ROBBART . wiHiTHER . IN . 1 66... = The Butchcrs* Arms. 

J^. IN . CHESTER . HIS . HALFE . PENY . R . 1 . W. i 

This :oken is heart -shape. 

41. O. LEWIS . WILLIAMS = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

J^, IN . CHESTER . 1667 = L . W. ^ 

Randal Holmes dedicated the ninth chapter of his "Academy of Armor)','* 

Book 1, to Lewis Williams and Robert Fletcher, previously mentioned. From 

this curious heraldic work we learn that they both resided in Bridge Street, 

Chester, and were members of the Common Council. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CHESHIRE. 89 



CONGLETON. 

42. O. RICHARD . COTTON = Arms of the Cotton family; a chevron, 

between three cotton-hanks, a crescent for a difference. 

Ji. or . CONGLETON 1667 = HIS . HALF . PENY. ^ 

Mr. Cotton was a justice of the peace for Congleton in 1669, and mayor of the 
borough in 167 1. lie was probably a grandson of Edward Cotton, Esq., of 
Cotton, CO. Chester. 

43. O, RICHARD . EATON" The Gfoccrs* Arms. 

R. IN . CONGLETON . l666 = HlS . HALF . PENY. J 

44. O. lOHN . GLOVER . 1 667 [in three lines]. 

R, IN . CONGLETON. = HIS . HALF . PENY . I . G. J 

45. O. THOMAS . WELCH = The Feltmakers* Arms. 

R, IN . CONLETON x=T . A . W. \ 

46. O. THOMAS . WELSH . i666 = The Feltmakers* Arms. 

R. IN . CONGLETON = HIS . HALF . PENY J 

Welch's will was administered at the Chester Wills Court in June, 1700. 

KNUTSFORD. 

47. O. PHILLIP . ANTROBVs = The Mercers' Anns. 

R. IN . KNVTSFORD . 1671 =A . HALF . PENY . TOKEN. \ 

Philip Antrobus was a freeholder in Aston, Cheshire, in 1 662. The Antrobus 
family is one of great antiquity in the County of Chester. 

48. O. lAMES . I0HNS0N = The Grocers* Arms (octagonal). 

R. IN . KNVTSFORD . HIS . HALF. PENNY. 1668 [in six UnCs]. \ 

49. O. RICHARD . LEIGH . OF = A lion rampant 

R. KNUTSFORD . MERCER = R . C . L. \ 

50. O, lAMES. swiNTON .IN. KNVTSFORD [in fourlines] (octagonal). 
R. HIS . HALFE. PENNY . 1667 [in four lines]. J 

James Swinton*s will was proved in February, 167a 

MACCLESFIELD. 

51. O, SAM . ENDON . IN . MACKLESFEILD = HIS . HALF. PENY • 

167I 

R, WELCOM . Yov . BE . TO . TRADE . w^" ME. = A man Smok- 
ing between a roll of tobacco and pair of scales. \ 
Endon's will was registered at Chester, September, 1679. 

52. O. SAMVEL . LEAH. 

R. OF . MACKLESFILD = S . I . L. 

Samuel Leah was an Alderman and one of the original capital Burgesses of 
Macclesfield, and named as such in the charter of Charles II. to that Borough in 
1685. He died about three years after that event. 



Digitized by 



Google 



90 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

53. O, NATHANiELL . POOLE. i668 = The MerccTs' Arms [hcan- 

shape]. 

J^. N . P . MACCLESFIELD . i° [in foUF linCs]. J 

N. Poole's will was proved at Chester in 1672. 

54. O. FRANXIS . SWINDELL . OF . MACKELSFILD . HIS . HAIFK . 

PENNY [in six lines]. 

J^. SQVARE . DEALiNGE . IS BEST . 1 669 [in four Unes] (this 

token is square, and the field ornamented on both 

sides with cloves and fleur-de-lys). i 

55. O. lOHN . TOWERix)N = A black boy smoking, with a roll of 

tobacco under his arm. 

^. MACKLESFILD. = I . T. \ 

56. O. EDWARD . WOOD . MERCER . IN = HIS . HALF . PENY 

J^, MACKSFiELD . IN . CHESSHEIR = The Mcrcers' Arms. J 
Edward Wood died intestate in 1678-9. 

MIDDLEWICH. 

57. O. NATHENEL . BEARD . CHANDLER = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

J^. OF . MiDELwiCH . IN . CHESHER = A pair of scales. \ 

58. O, THOMAS . COTTON . OF . MIDDLEWICH . HIS . HALF • PENT 

[in six lines]. 

jR. ALTHOVGH . BVT . BRASS . YET . LET . ME . PASS . 1 669 [in 

five lines] (heart-shape). J 

In 1674 Thomas Cotton, mercer, was one of the capital Burgesses of Congletoo, 
probal)ly brother of Richard Cotton, who issued a token at Congleton. 

NANTWICH. 

59. O. RICHARD . BICKERTON . IN . NAMPTWICH [in foUf Uoes]. 

J^, HIS . HALF . PENY . R . B . 1666 [in four Imes]. J 

He was a brewer by trade, and died in 1669. 

60. O. GEORGE . B =The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. IN . NAMPTWICHE =G . B . I . E. \ 

61. O. THOMAS . BROMHALL . IN . NAMPTWICH [in four Iines]. 

J^. HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1 665 . T . E . B. [in four Unes]. J 

* Thomas Bromhall, mercer, according to a rate-book for 1691, appears to hare 
lived at the comer of High Town, where Hospital Street and Pillory Street divetge, 
at that time called " Pye Comer." Thomas Bromhall was buried on 31st January, 
1700-1. 

62. O, William . Cappur . his . halfe . penny, [in four lines]. 

jR. IN . NAMPTWICH . i666 = A ship. J 

* Probably William Cappur kept the Ship Inn. The following entries relatii^ 
to the family are in the Parish Registers : — 

* This note has been kindly supplied by James Hall, Esq., Willaston, near 
Nantwich. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CHESHIRE, 91 

" 1736. Aug. 4. Jacob, son of Ralph Cappur, Innholder [baptd.] 

•* 1753. Sept. 16. James, son of Ralph Cappur, Cheesefactor [baptd.] 

** 17^0. Aug. 17. George Cappur, Cheesefactor, and Lydia Maddocks [married] 

by licence." 

'• 1785. Nov. 27. George, son of George Cappur, Cheesefactor, and Lydia his 

wife." [bapf*.] 

*' 1790. Oct. 19. Ralph, son of George Cappur, Cheesefactor, and Lydia his 

wife, bom." 

63. O. William . Crossley . his . halfe . penny [in four lines]. 

J^. IN . NAMPTWicH . 1 666. = A ship. i 

64. O. DANiELL . lACKSON. = The Mcrccrs' Arms (octagonal). 

Ji. IN . NAMPTWICH. = HIS . 1° 1 669. I 

65. O. THOMAS . lACKSON. = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

J^. IN . NAMPTWICH . 1 666. = HIS . HALF . PENY. J 

66. O. EUZABETH . PRICE . IN. = Arms of the Price family ; a 

chevron embattled between three spear-heads. 

J^, NAMPTWICH . 1666. = HER . HALF . PENY. ^ 

• The Prices had been resident in the toium for at least a century previous to 1666. 
Mr^ Elizabeth Price, the last of the family, was buried at Nantwich on the 27th 
February, 1691-2. 

67. O. lOHN . TENCH . l666 = I . M . T. 

J^. IN . NAMPTWICH. = HIS . HALF . PENY. ^ 

68. O. lOHN . TENCH . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

J?. IN . NAMPTWICH . 1665 = I . M . T. J 

• John Tench was a tanner ; he married "Mrs. Mary Demock, after publication 
three sererale Markett days in Namptwich Markett,'' on the 6th of March, 1653-4 ; 
and was buried at Nantwich, on the 14th November, 1675. 

The Tench family had been respectable residents in Nantwich as early as I545« 
and occur in the Parish Registers as " dyers," ** tanners," " mercers," " gentlemen," 
etc The last mentions of the family as follows : 

"John Tench, Attorney, buried in the Church, 5th Feb., 1756.** 

•• Miss Mary Tench [buried] 2 Dec, 1780." 

"Thomas Tench [buried] 5 May, 1783. 

69. O. lAMES . WILSON . 1666. =HIS . HALF . PENY. 

^. IN . NAMPTWICH. = I . A . W. ^ 

• James Wilson, silk stocking weaver, was buried on the 19th December, 1699. 



SANDBACH. 

70. O. lONAH . BOWYER. 

J?. OF . SANDBACH . 1667. =HIS . HALFE . PENY. ^ 

This Token, and the one of Samuel Leah, of Macclesfield, are copied from 
Ormerod's " Cheshire." Letters of administration were granted for Jonah 
bowyer's effects after hii decease in 1700. 

* This note has been kindly supplied by James Hall, Esq., Willaston, near 
Nantwich. 



Digitized by 



Google 



92 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



STOCKPORT. 

7 I. O. HENRY . ANDERVE. = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

/^. IN . STOCKPORT. = H . M . A . 1 667. 1 

72. O. lOHN . ANDREWS . IN. = The Groccrs' Arms, i . e . a. 

/^, STOCKPORT . HIS . HALF . PENY. = AnUS of the Cit}' ♦ t 

London. I 

73. O. lOHN . BROOK . 1670. = HIS HALF PENY. 

i?. NEERE . STOCKPORT. = I . B. I 

74. O, WALTER . COATES. = A horsc caparisoncd. 

i?. IN . STOCKPORT . 1 667. = HIS . HALF . PENY. \ 

75. O, lOHN . HVLME . IN. = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

/^, STOCKPORT . 1666. =1 . H. t 

76. O, FRANCIS . NEWTON. = HIS . HALFE . PENY. 

^. IN . STOCKPORT . 1 669. = F . E . N. i 

Francis Newton's will was proved in 1674, at Manchester, then, and until ibc 
present half-century, a suffragan office to the Chester Wills Court. 

77. O. MARGARET . NICHOLSON. = The Mercers* Arms. 

J^, OF . STOCKPORT . 1 667. = HER . HALF . PENY. I 

78. O. RALPH . AND . ELiz . NICHOLSON. = The Mercers' Anns. 

J^, OF . STOCKPORT . 1667. == THEIR . HALFE . PENY. i 

The Nicholson family were intimately connected with Stockport and its vidnity 
for a long series of years. 

79. O. THOMAS . SMITH. = HIS . HALFE . PENNY. 

/^. IN . STOCKPORT . l666. = T . I . S. \ 

The will of Thomas Smith was registered at Chester in 1682. 



Digitized by 



Google 



rtate II. 





Chutxk. 



Chester 





KMCTTSPOaO. 



KNUTSPORr>. 













Macclcskield. 







^a: 



MiDDLBWICH. 



Naxtwicii. 



Naktwich. 



Tni« Plats op Onssnins Tokini 

e«^ 8.8.O.. MtMSCN O^ THt 
OP FaIXOWSPISLO. MANOHStTtS. If 
■V THt 




Stockpokt. 



PNtStNTSD ■¥ NATNAN HSVWOOO. 

Numismatic •ooistv o^ London. 

ftt§PSOTPUU.V DtOlOATtD TO HIM 



Editon. 

Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Cornwall 



Number of Tokens issued 107 

Number OF Towns ISSUING Tokens 31 

Town Pieces issued Nonk. 



Sub-Editor and Collaboraieur : 

R. N. Worth, Esq., F.G.S., etc., 
Seaton Avenue, 

Plymouth. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Cornwall 

In the original edition of this work Cornwall appeared as one of the 
least prolific of token-issuing counties, Cumberland, Monmouth, 
Northumberland, Rutland, and Westmoreland alone being credited 
with fewer examples. Further investigation has, however, proved 
that Cornwall is entitled to a more prominent place, and that, instead 
of the 41 tokens given to it in 1858, it had over 100. We are 
obliged, however, to be somewhat cautious here, for it unfortunately 
happens that no county in England affords so many opportunities for 
misidentification. Not only do its St. Ives and St. Neot clash with 
the Huntingdonshire towns of the same name, but Falmouth, under 
its ancient appellation of Smethwick, has been confused with Smeth- 
wick in Staffordshire ; and it has its Newport, Millbrook, and Stratton. 
indistinguishable in themselves from many other towns and villages 
similarly called. It has been thought advisable in the compilation of 
this series to include all the tokens which may by possibility be 
Cornish ; and hence, among the 107 enumerated there are 9 that may 
be r^arded as doubtful Some of these, however, do really belong 
to the county, though the positive evidence is defective ; and the 
issue of Cornwall in any case cannot be put below 105 tokens and 
varieties. Of the additional 67 tokens, 20 were given by Mr. Boyne 
under other counties; the remainder were unknown to him. One 
token which he had attributed to Cornwall, the penny of Richard 
Preece, of Porthelly, has to be disclaimed. There was a Porthilly in 
Cornwall, near Mevagissey, and another near Padstow ; but the most 
diligent researches have failed to trace the name of Preece in either 
locality. As Preece is a Welsh name, and Porthelly is a reasonable 
phonetic approach to Pwllheli, in all probability this token belongs to 
Wales. 

There are several peculiarities in the Cornish issue. In the first 
place, there are no town pieces ; in the second, an unusually large 
proportion— over a fourth — bear the arms of the issuers, showing 
the extent to which old families engaged in commercial pursuits ; in 
the third, not one of the coins has any reference to the ancient local 
industry of mining. No less than 32, however, bear the arms of the 
old incorporated companies of mercers, grocers, haberdashers, 
salters, chandlers, vintners, and apothecaries, the first-named largely 
predominating. Some of the devices are, no doubt, intended to 
represent the signs of the houses of the issuers ; but this can hardly 
be the case with the " sheep in a fold " of Newport, the " ferry-boat " 
of Saltash, the " post-boy " of Truro, and it certainly was not with 
the " three men round a globe " of Scilly. 



Digitized by 



Google 



96 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

With one exception, a heart-shaped token, issued by George Whit- 
ford, of Liskeard, all the Cornish tokens known are circular. They 
are nearly all farthings, only lo of the 107 being halfpence. Allow- 
ing for those which are merely varieties, there were 96 issuers, and 
of these only two were women. If the double initials are to be 
regarded as conclusive evidence that the men issuing them were 
unmarried, more than half the issuers must have been bachelors at 
the time the coins appeared. Just a third bear triple initials, and 
a few afford no evidence either one way or the other. The earliest 
date is 1651 ; the latest, 167 1. 

Treating East and West lx)oe, and Launceston and Newport, as in 
fact what they were and are topographically, each a single community, 
tokens were issued in 31 towns and villages in the county. Of these 
Callington, Ludgvan, Millbrook, Penare, St. Austell, St Ives, and 
Stratton do not appear in Mr. Boyne's list. 

It is difficult to understand why some other places of greater 
relative importance than several recorded are unrepresented ; and it 
is quite possible that additions may yet have to be made for Bossiney, 
Camelford, Grampound, St. Germans, and Wadebridge. 

The largest number of undoubted Cornish tokens was issued at 
Truro — ten varieties by nine issuers. Next comes Liskeard with 
eight, but of these three are varieties. Penryn, with eight tokens 
and seven issuers, really, therefore, takes second place. Falmouth 
has seven tokens, but one of them is a variety. Helston has six, 
and the Looes the same number. St. Ives has nine assigned to 
it, all by different issuers, but some of them are doubtful, though the 
total is quite in accord with the importance of the place. Launceston 
and Newport have eight between them, but here, again, some doubt 
exists. No fewer than 14 towns are represented by single tokens 
or issuers— Callington, Kilkhampton, Ludgvan, Marazion, Millbrook, 
Padstow, Penare, Probus, Scilly, St. Agnes, St. Austell, St. Mawes, 
Stratton, and Tregony. 

R. N. Worth. 

Seaton Avenue, 
Plymouth. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CORNWALL, 97 



BODMIN. 

1. O. lOHN . HARRIS = Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . BODMAN = I . A . H. J 

Issaed by John Harris, buried at Bodmin as '* John Harris, gent./* Feb., 167^. 
His wife, Ann, was buried in April, 1673. 

2. O. RICHARD . MANATON = Upon a bend three mullets pierced, 

differenced with a crescent Crest, a demi-unicorn ram- 
pant 
J^, OF. BODMAN. 1664=: R . p . M between three mullets, a 
crescent in middle. i 

Richard Manaton was Mayor of Bodmin in 1668. The arms on the obverse are 
those of his family. They held a good position in the county. 

3. O. THOMAS. WILLS = Three lions passant gardant within en- 

grailed border. 

J^, IN . BODMYN = T . F . W. \ 

In the list of tokens in the British Museum, not found in the previous edition of 
Boyne, one is given which answers this description in every particular, except that 
the name is Wilds. This is probably an error. Wilds is not a local name, and 
Wills is. Moreover, the arms are evidently intended for those of the Wills family 
— Wills of Landrake bearing ** three wyvems passant within an engrailed border 
bezanty." Branches are found in several other parishes. Richard Wills addressed 
Latin verses to Burleigh from Botus Fleming in 1585, and Digory was living there 
in 1619. John Wills was Rector of Lanteglos-by-Camelford, near Bodmin, 
1655-62 ; there was another John Wills at Gorran a little later ; Thomas Wills, of 
St. Issey, was resident at Truro in 1740 ; and the name also occurs at Bodmin 
itself about the same time. 

CALLINGTON. 

4. O. lOHN . WILLS . OF = A man making candles. 

^. CALLINGTON . 1667 = 1 . W. J 

4*. A variety 1657. Tistet MS. (?). 
See note on Thomas Wills, of Bodmin. 

FALMOUTH. 

A good deal of confusion in assigning the Falmouth tokens has arisen from the 
fact that the original name of Falmouth toTtm was Smithwick, or Smithicke (there 
are several variations of spelling), and that it was not called Falmouth definitely 
until its incorporation by Royal Charter, in 1661, though the name Falmouth 
occurs much earlier for the lotality. Overlooking this has caused unquestionable 
Cornish tokens to be assigned to Smethwick, in Staffordshire. The old name was 
evidently current in the locality some time after it had been officially changed. 

5. O, THOMAS . HOLDEN = A fesse between two chevrons ermine. 

^. OF . FALMOVIH . l668 = T . A . H. J 

There is said to be a variety without the date, but its existence is doubtful. The 
date has been given also as 1658. The arms are those of the Holden family. 
The issuer was one of the first burgesses nominated by Charles II. in his charter. 

7 



Digitized by 



Google 



98 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

6. O. RICHARD . LOBB = Three boars* heads. 

J^. OF . FALMOVTH . 1655 = Three trefoils. \ 

The arms (if the device is heraldic) do not appear to be those of the issuer. 
Richard Lobb was High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1652, and M.P. for St. Mi^ads. 
in the same county, in 1659. It is probable that he was the issuer, for a ooanec- 
tion with Falmouth seems indicated by the fact of his being in correspondeooe 
with Edward Winslow, of Falmouth, New England, in 165 1. 

7. O. NICHOLAS . KEATE = Three cats in a shield. 

^. OF . SMITHICKE = N . K. J 

The arms are the canting coat of Keate, of Bosworgey, St. Columb, where tbe 

i.«suer was baptized in 1628. A relative, John Kete, was a grocer in Corcot 

Garden. Nicholas Keate was a merchant, and, like Holden, was one of the fin: 

burgesses nominate of Falmouth. 

8. O. BENiAMiN . PENDER = A chevron between three Cornish 

choughs. 

/^. OF . FALMOVTH . 1664 = 8 . A . P. J 

9. O. BENIAMIN . PYNDER = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^, IN . SMYTHICK . 1 665 = B . P. \ 

The last token was assigned by Mr. Boyne to Smethwick, Stafford, but both n 
and its predecessor undoubtedly belong to CornwalL The Pender family are sr JI 
settled in the vicinity of Falmouth, at Budock Vean, in Constantine. Benjamr 
Pender's wife was named Anne, and died in 1665. A later Benjamin Pender, wfe • 
died in 1812, was agent for the Government packets at Falmouth. The ams <c 
No. 8 are not those borne by the Pender family, but those of Code, Cowlii^. 
Tregoss, and other Cornish families, differenced by the tincture. 

10. O. HENRY . PENiELL . AT . y" = Seven Stars. 

J^. IN . FALMOVTH . l666 = H .M.P. 1 

There is still a Seven Stars at Falmouth, and the sign, of course referring to iJ>« 
Pleiades, is not uncommon throughout the West of England. 

11. O. MicHAELL . RvssELL = Three escallops. 

J^. IN . SMITHICKE = M . A . R. j 

Unquestionably a Falmouth token. Michael Russell was one of the first aide 
men named in the charter of Charles IL It is said that he was a French refn^ : 
and he was living at Bideford, in his 86ih year, in 1705. Michael Russell, m |^3r5iciu. 
was Mayor of Truro in 1736. The arms assigned to Russell, of Falmouth, arc » 
chevron between three escallops ; and the latter charge forms part of tbe coat o. 
the Russells, Dukes of Bedford. 

FOWEY. 

12. O, lOHN . GOODALL = I . G. 

J^, IN . FOWYE=l657. \ 

The issuer is mentioned by Hals, who was engaged in writing a htstofj d 
Cornwall in the latter part of the seventeenth century, as one of the chief inhabi- 
tants of P'owey. He died November, 1684, aged 65. His mother was EUzibei 
Coryton, and his descendants sul)sequently removed to Crocadon, in St. Mdhca. 
and took the name of Coryton. They are now the Corytons of Pentillie. 

13. O, lOHN . MAiOR = A shield of arms. 

^. OF . FOYE . 1667 = 1 . M . M. \ 

This issuer is also named by Hals as a leading inhabitant of the town. Tbe 

name of the family is now commonly spelt Magor, in CornwalL John Goodr^ 

above, married Mary, daughter of Peter Major, and her son, Peter, was the first u» 

take the name and arms of Coryton. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CORNWALL, 99 

14. O. PETER . TOLLER = P . T. 

J^. IN . FOWEY= 1660. \ 

The Tollers were connected with the Treffrys, and from them, by a marriage with 
a sUtcr of the last heir male of the Treffry family, the present Treffrys of Place, 
descend. Peter Toller, merchant, was buried in Fowey Church, February, 1667. A 
Mr. Toller is mentioned by Hals as one of the leading inhabitants, but this was 
probably William, who died January, 25, 1684, aged 76. On Peter Toller's monu- 
ment it is said that he, 

*' A marchant, swiAly to his port is com." 

HELSTON. 
IS' O, ROBERT . COCKE = A griffin rampant. 

J^, OF . HELSTON . l666 = R . C. \ 

The Cockes were a notable family of Helston. Two of them, Robert and John, 

were members of the Helston Corporation at the Visitation of 1620. The griffin 

is not the bearing of the name, and may have been either a sign or a fancy device. 

16. O. WILLIAM . PENHALVRICK = W . P. 

R, or . HELSTON . 1667 =W . P. i 

This family took name from the estate of Penhalurick, in the adjoining parish of 
Stithians. A William Penhalurick was one of the Corporation in 1620. Wann 
Penhalurick, a member of this family, who died in 1535, was Vicar of Wendron and 
Stithians, and renounced the Pope's supremacy shortly before his death. He was 
painted by Holbein, and has a brass in Wendron Church. William Penhaluricke, 
of Helston, had a pass to go to Scilly and Jersey from Robert Bennett, '* Mount 
Garrison," 1648. He was probably the issuer. 

17. O, lOHN . PENHELICK = Three butterflies volant, two and one. 

J^. IN . HELSTON . l666 = I . M . P. J 

The arms are those of Penhellick of Penhellick, in St. Clements, Truro, a 

younger branch of which settled at Helston. Alexander Penhelick was returned 

for the borough in 1576, and another Alexander in 1660; John Penhelick, the 

issuer, had a son bom in 1659, who became Vicar of Gulval. 

18. O. HENRY . PENHELLICK = Arms as above (?). 

^. IN . HELSTON . 1659 = H . P. J 

The family pedigree does not give a Henry living at this date, but a Humphry. 

19. O, PETER . PRISKE . OF= 1668. 

J^. HELLSTON . CORNWEL = P . P. J 

This family takes name from Priske, in the adjacent parish of Mullion. 
Members still reside in Helston. 

20. O, RICHARD . ROGERS = The Mercefs' Arms. 

jR, OF . HELSTON . l668 = R . T . R. J 

Rogers has long been, and still is, a very frequent name at Helston, and is 
borne by families apparently unconnected in various ranks of life. The issuer was 
probably of the Rogerses of Skewis, in Crowan, one of whom, Henry, was a 
pewterer in Helston in the next generation, and sustained two ** sieges" in 
defence of what he considered his rights to the family estate in 1734 and 1735, 
killing five of his assailants, and having to be dislodged by soldiers and cannon ! 

KILKHAMPTON. 

21. O. lOHN . covRTis . 1667 = 1 . c conjoined. 

I^. OF. KILKHAMPTON = IN CORNWALL. ^ 

John Courtis, mercer, of Kilkhampton, died in 1705, at the age of 65, and is 
commemorated by a stately monument in Kilkhampton Church. He was probably 
the issuer. 

7-2 

DigitizecC^ ^ /i 4» ^ 



lOO TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



LAUNCESTON. 

22. O. DEGORY . BEWES . OF. SANT = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J^. STEPHENS . LANCESTON » D . a \ 

23. O. THOMAS . BfcWES = Three Castles. 

i?. IN . LANCESTON . 59 = T . a 4 

The issuers of the two preceding tokens were members of the family of 6ewes» now 
represented by the Rev. T. A. Bewes, of Plynionth. Thomas Bewcs is described 
as " Rent." on the monument of his daughter, Chesten, wife of William Stokes. 
He was Mayor of Launceston in 1663, and again in 1673, i68(\ 1687, and 1694 ; 
while John Bewes, who also held the office several times, was first elected in 1682. 
St. Stephens, though now part of Launceston Parliamentary Borough, until 1832 
comprised the independent borough of Newport, for which see/^x/. The castles are 
not the arms of Bewes, but are probably intended for those of Launceston. 

24. O. ossoLD . KiNGDON = The Chandlers' Arms. 

J^. OF . LAUNCESTON = . K. \ 

25. O. RICH . KiNGDOME » The Haberdashers' Anns. 

^. OF . LANCESTON = R . K. j 

Though the name is spelt differently, the issuers of these two tokens belonged to 
the same family — the Kingdons of Trehunsey, in Quethiock, and Trenowth, in 6l 
Cleer. 

Oswald Kingdon was a gentleman of large fortune, who owned a great part of 
the land within the borough. He was three times mayor — l66i, 1670, 1677 — an 
office which his father, Oswald, had held before him. His son, Richaird Kingdon, 
•carried on business in Launceston and Boscastle, where he owned many ships. He 
was also three times mayor. A daughter of Richard Kingdon married Langford 
Frost, from whom descends the family of Frost now living in Launceston and 
Saltash. 

There is an entry in the Launceston borough records in 1643-4 of a dairo of 
William Noble, '*2 li. of shott to make tookens, and for stamping them, is. 6d." 
Whatever these tokens may have been, none of ihem seem to be preserved. 

LISKEARD. 

26. O. BENiAMiN . CHAPMAN = The Mercers* Arms. 

^. IN . LISCARD = B . C \ 

27. O. BENIAMIN . CHAPMAN = A rOSe. 

Ji. IN . USCARD = B . C. J 

28. O. BENIAMIN . CHAPMAN = The Mercers' Amis. 

i?. OF . LISKARD . l666sB . C. ] 

29. O, lOHN . CHAPMAN = I . C. 

i?. IN . LISCARD si . a ] 

The Chapmans were of great weight in Liskeard. Benjamin Chapman (the 
only Cornisti issuer to whom three varieties are assigned), son of Edward Chap- 
man, Mayor of Liskeard in 1620, was a Puritan. He became mayor in 1654, and 
in 1660 was presented by the Grand Jury, with his younger brother, ** lonathan 
Chapman, merchant, deceased " (mayor in 1649, 1653, 1657), and others, far 
taking ** upon themselves to be Mayors and Magistrates of the borough, not being 
thereunto lawfully elected." John Chapman was another brother, and was com- 
milted to Launceston Gaul in 1663 for attending a Quakers' meeting at Liskeard. 
A Mrs. Chapman (widow of Jonathan ?) sold powder in the same year to the 
Corporation. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CORNWALL. loi 

3a O, losEPH . cxoAKE-The Grocers' Anns. 

-/?. OF . LISCARD = I . M . a J 

31. O. loSEPH . CLOAKE = The Grocers* Arms. 

I^. OF . LISCARD . 1664 = 1 . M . C } 

Cloake, probably represented in part also by Clogg, is a well-known name in the 
'^unty, and is still to be found in the neighbourhood. Henry Cloake was a free 
mrgess of the adjacent town of East Looe in 162a Hugh Cloake, buried at 
Vf aradon in 1680, published, in 1685, '* A Call from Sin to Holiness of Life." 

32. O. RICHARD . KEMP . 60 = Three fleurs-de-lis. 

J^, IN . LISSCARD = R . K. J 

Kemp b a name of very old standing in Liskeard ; a charity was founded by one 
[ohn Kempe there. William Kempe was a superior burgess in 1588. Peter 
Kempe was town sergeant for several years prior to 1662. The Kempes were 
•ettl^ at Lavethan, Blisland, in the seventeenth century. Mrs. Bray, the well- 
cnown authoress, recently deceased, was a descendant of the Cornish Kempes. 

33. O. GEORGE . WHITFORDE . IN = HIS HALF PENY. G . W. 

/^, LISKEARD . IN . coRNEWAL= Arms, a chevron between 
three woolcombs (? detrited) in shield 
This token is remarkable for being heart-shaped, and is the largest issued in 
the county. George Whitford was a Quaker, and was imprisoned in 166^ for being 
n the house of Thomas Mounce, Quaker, during prayer-time on Sunday, Jan. 13 ; 
md Elizabeth Whitford, probably a relative, was the chief mover in the erection 
r>f the meetinghouse of the Friends at Liskeard in 1688-9. The arms are not 
aussigned to the name, and they may be intended for those of one of the companies, 
as they are somewhat uncertain. 

LOOE. 

Under this head we include both East and West Looe, which, though two 
boroughs down to 1832, are in reality one town. Only one of the Looe tokens 
distinguishes to which division the issuer belonged. 

34. O. WILLIAM . AMBROSE = A dolphin. 

/^. IN . LOOE . 1664 = W . A. i 

Ambrose was a " capital burgess of East Looe, and in 1654 signed the indenture 
of return, as member for the Looes, of Anthony Rous ; and in 1658 those of John 
Kendall and John Buller.*' At the former election the two boroughs were united. 

35. O, lOHN . CHANDLER = I . C. 

^. IN . LOOE = I . a \ 

36. O. PEETER . COADE = The Mercers' Arms. 

/^, OF . LOWE . 1666 = P . C J 

There is said to be a variety reading Looe. 

Peter Goad's name b also attached, like Ambrose's, but as a simple burgess, to 
indentures of return to Parliament for the boroughs in 1654 and 1058. William 
Code sat for East Looe in 164a Peter appears to have been a member of the 
family of Coode of Menheniot, an adjacent parish. 

37. O, ELIZABETH . HENDRA = Thrce-masted ship with sail 

J^. OF . LOWE . 1 668 = E . H. J 

The Hendras are a very old family of the adjacent town of Liskeard. If the 
ship is intended to represent the borough arms, this issuer also belonged to East 
Looe. 



Digitized by 



Google 



I02 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

38. O. BENiAMiN . OBEN = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

J^. IN . LOOE . 1656 = B . O. 
This family gave mayors to East Looe. 

39. O. RICHARD . STADGELL = An atichor. 

J^. IN . EAST . LOOE . 1669 = R . S. \ 

Rich Scadgell, senr., and Richard Scadgell, junr., with other members of the 
family, were appointed free burgesses of East Looe under the charter of James 11. 
in 1685. A Richard Scagell paid for the freedom of Liskeard as born without the 
borough in 1604*5 > ^"^ ^^ ^^^ i° ^^^ probability an ancestor of the issuer. Petfrr 
Scadgell, merchant, was Mayor of Plymouth, 167 1-2. The name has been lost 10 
the locality. 

LOSTWITHIEL. 

40. O. lOHN . ALLiN . 1664 = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. OF . LESTITHELL = I . A. I 

John Allen was a cardmaker, and became connected with Liskeard in 167a 
removing thither from Lostwithiel in 1698, or soon afterwards, and being mayor of 
the latter town in 1701 and 1707. Allen, the author of the " History of Liskcarrl/' 
was his descendant; and Ralph Allen, the original of Fielding's AUworthy, vas 
probably related. Ralph was born at St. Blazey, near Lostwithiel, in 1693. 

41. O. RICHARD . WEBER = 1 65 8. 

J^. OF . LESTITHELL = R . W. \ 

42. O, RICHARD . WEBBER = 1664. 

^. OF . LESTITHELL =R . W. \ 

LUDGVAN. 

43. O. RICHARD . SCADDAM=l666. 

H. IN . LUGVAN = R . S. J 

This issuer, Richard Scaddan, married Joan Cossen, both being described as of 
Penzance, which Ludgvan adjoins, at Stowford, in Devon, October, 1647. In April, 
1661, Julian, daughter of Richard Scaddan, of Ludgvan, married John MichrIL 
The name is spelt several ways in the parish registers, but apparently always with 
a final n. 

MARAZION. 

44. O. THOMAS . COREY =1668. 

J^, IN . MARAZION = T . P . C. J 

Cory is a well-known Cornish name. 

MEVAGISSEY. 

45. O. lOHN . KEAGLE = A fleur-de-Hs. 

/f. IN . MERAGYZEY . 1664 = 1 . B . K. J 

A William Keagley issued a token in Exeter in the same year with the device of 
the fleur-de-lis ; and William Keagle, of Mevagissey, was admitted attorney in 
1729. The family were settled, therefore, in this place, and there can hardly be 
a doubt that the Exeter issuer was someway connected. 

46. O. lAMES . BONYTHON = Three fleurs-de-lis, one and two. 

J^, OF . MAVEGISIE . 1651 = I . B . M. | 

The device is evidently intended to be connected with the Bonython arms, which 
are Arg. a chev. between three fleurs-de-lis sable. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CORNWALL. 103 

MILLBROOK. 
47. O. RICHARD . NORRis = A lion rampant. 

/^, IN . MILLBROOKE . 1671 =R . A . N. | 

There is nothing about this token to indicate to which of the somewhat 
numerous Millbrooks it belongs. The Cornish Millbrook was, however, a place of 
considerable importance at this date, far more so indeed than many recognised 
towns which undoubtedly did issue tokens. Moreover, Norris is a name still con- 
nected with East Cornwall. William Norris, head-master of Eton, 1636, was 
bom in the neighbouring town of Looe. 



NEWPORT. 

like St. Ives and St. Neot, this is a very difficult town to deal with, as there are 
so many Newports to which tokens bearing that name may be assigned. Though 
a suburb of Launceston down to 1832, the Cornish Newport was a Parliamentary 
borough, and in the seventeenth century was of some importance. The tokens 
which follow are believed to be unquestionably Cornish, while in all probability 
others might be claimed. 

48. O. lOHN . KERTON . OF . NEWPORT = Three sheep in a fold 

J^. IN . CORNWELL . l688 = HIS HALF PENY. I . I . K. J 

49. O. lOHN . KERTON . OF . NVE = Three sheep in a fold. 

^. PORT . IN . CORNWELL = I . I . K. J 

The ''Sufferings of the Quakers" states that *'Kerton, like so many of the 
trading class of that day, was a Quaker. John Kerton, having been prisoner some 
time before, for refusing to take the oath of a constable, and on that account 
brought to the sessions, was then ensnared with the oath of allegiance, and 
re-committed. '' 

50. O. lOHN . NORMAN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . NEWPORT = I . E.N. ^ 

The presumption in favour of this coin being Cornish mainly rests upon the 
name of the issuer, which is common in the district. All efforts to trace him 
have, however, failed. 

51* CP. WILLIAM . ROWE = A beehive. 

-A*. APPOTHECARIE = W . M . R. J 

The beehive is the arms of a branch of the Rowe family, and this token may 
be as:»ociated with the Cornish Newport in the fact that Rowe is not only a 
common name in the district, but has long been directly connected with the 
town. Richard Rowe was churchwarden of St. Thomas, Launceston, in 1630; 
Nicholas Rowe occurs in 1632 ; Henry Rowe, a leper, in 1648; and John Rowe 
in 1652 ; but the name does not reach the local mayoralty until 1772, in the 
person of William Rowe. 

PADSTOW. 

52. O, PETER . SWYMMER= 1668. 

J^, IN . PADSTOWE = P . G . S. i 

Robert Swimmer, the last Prior of St. Germans, died Rector of Minster, a 
parish on the north coast of Cornwall, not far from Padstowe. The name is so un- 
uml dtet time {% probably, some connection. 




Digitized by 



Google 



I04 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

PENARE. 

53. O. FRANCES . OSGOOD . IN = An angel. 

i?. PENAYR . CORNWALL = F . V . O. J 

There is more than one Penare in Cornwall ; but the one here intended is 
probably a small hamlet, in the parish of Gorran, which appears in former days to 
nave been of more importance than it is now. The triple initials show that 
Frances really stands for Francis, and that this token was issued by a man. 
Unless Osgood can be identified with Hosegood, a frequent surname in the neigh- 
bourhood of Crediton, it has altogether disappeared from the West. Penare is 
also given as Peneyr and Penyer. 

PENRYN. 

54. O. MICHAEL . cooDE =^ Armorial bearings. 

J^. OF . PENRIN . 1667 = M . C. \ 

The arms are probably those of the Coode family of Menheniot — a chevron 

between three cocks. A branch of the Coodes settled at Penryn. Michael Coode 

was living in 1673. Benjamin Coode, surgeon, of Penryn, died February 19, 1700, 

aged 56. 

55. O. MicHAELL . COODE = Three doves (?). 

/^. OF . PENRIN . 1669 = M . C. \ 

By same issuer as preceding. 

56. O. I AMES . KEMPE = The Salters* Arms. 

J^. OF . PENRYN . 1668 = 1 . K. ^ 

Kemp's monument is in St. Gluvias Church, St. Gluvias being the parish in 
which Penryn is situated. He died in April, 171 1, aged 74. He is mentioned by 
Hals as one of the chief inhabitants of the town, and is described on his monu- 
ment as " armiger." 

57. (9. lOHN . PEARCE = The Haberdashers* Arms. 

I^. OF . PENRYN . 1666 = 1 . P. J 

Pearce in its variations is still a common name in the county ; a variety is said 
to read Peirce. 

58. O. ANDREW . RIDER = A bell. 

^. IN . PENRYN . 1664 = A . C . R. ^ 

Sent to prison as a Quaker. 
This name is now usually spelt R/dcr, but the form with an 1 still occurs. 

59. O. THOMAS . SPRY. 1667 = Two bars, chevron in chief, im- 

paling on a bend engrailed three fleurs-de-lis. 
J^. OF . PENRIN . CORNWELL = T . s Conjoined. J 

The first coat is that of the Spry family, of Cutcrew, in St. Germans ; the coat 
impaled that of Melhuish, though possibly intended for Pender, of Falmouth, in 
which the bend is not engrailed, but per bend azure and gules. The issuer was in 
all prol>ability a member of the younger branch of the Spry family, settled for 
several descents at Place, in Anthony-in-Roseland, on the south side of Falmouth 
harbour. 

60. O. VRSVLA . SPVRR=l668. 

J^. IN . PENRYN = V . S. J 

Ursula, relict of Henry Spoure, died in May, 1678, and was buried at St. 
Gluvias. Her husband was connected with the now extinct family of Spoure of 
Trebartha. '^ 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



CORNWALL. 105 

61. O. THOMAS. WORTH =» A double-headed eagle. 

R. IN . CORN WELL . 1665 =T . W. i 

There is no question that the issuer of this token belonged to the county of 
Cornwall, and also to Penr3m. The Worths, of Penr^, were a younger branch of 
the ancient family of Worth of Worth, in Devonshire, and bore the same arms 
— a two-headed eagle displayed. William Worth, merchant, of Penryn, died in 
January, 1689, and was buricKl at St. Gluvias. His son, John, was sheriff of the 
county in 1690 and 1 71 1, and in 1703 bought Tremough. 

Several examples of this token have occurred in the neighbourhood ; and at 
Madron Church is a monument to John Tremenheere, merc^mt, erected in 1701 
by his widow, *' Sybella, daughter of Thomas Worth, of Penryn, gent." 

PENZANCE. 

62. O, RALPH . BEARD = A mullet 

I^. IN . PENZANCE . 1667 = A niuUet. \ 

There is a record that Ralph Beard had a seat in Penzance Church in 1674. He 
was married, for entries of the baptism and burial of his children occur in the 
registers of Madron, the mother parish of Penzance. 

63. O. lOHN . BLVNT = Three lions rampant regardant, two and one. 

^. IN . PENZANCE . 1665 = I . I . B. \ 

He married in 1653, and his wife's name was Joan. 

64. O, lOHN . CLEVERDON = The Merccrs* Arms. 

R, OF . PENZANCE = I . C. \ 

The issuer was a merchant, and was buried at Madron, near Penzance, the 
mother church, July 28, 1667. 

65. O. ANTHONY. GVBBS = A fleur-de-lis. 

R, IN . PENZANCE . 1 667 = A . G. \ 

Anthony Gubbs was Mayor of Penzance in 1656, and subsequently. He was 
bom in 1625, his father being described as **gent." in the register. He married, 
in January, 165^, Ann Keigwin. 

66. O, p . L . IN . PENZANCE = Head of the Baptist on charger. 
R. No legend = In base a castle, chief a falcon and crescent. \ 

The arms on the obverse are those of Penzance borough. Those on the 
reverse are clearly intended for the bearings of Lanyon of Lanyon, in Madron, 
and identify the issuer with Philip Lanyon, Mayor of Penzance in 1650. His 
wife, Asnes, died in 1660^ having been married in 1644. He also is described as 
** gent' Philip Lanyon married Mary £d wards in February, i68| ; but this was 
probably another bearer of the name. 

67. O, lOHN . TREVETHAN = A griffin segreant between three 

fleurs-de-lis. 

R, IN . PENZANCE . 63 = I . T. \ 

The arms are those of the Trevithem family. In the Madron registers John 
Trerethan is described as merchant. 

PROBUS. 

68. O, lOHN . LOOGER« A cross. 

R. IN . PROBUS . 1668 = 1 . L. \ 

Nathaniel Loggar was Mayor of Bodmin 1661, 1670, 1681 ; and there is no 
doabt that the issuer belonged to the same family. The name Luggar continues. 



Digitized by 



Google 



io6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

REDRUTH. 

69. O. ANTHONY . COCKE = Three cocks. 

^. OF . REDRVTH . l666 = A . C i 

70. O. ANTHONY . COCKE = Three cocks in escutcheon. 

J^, OF . REDRVTH . l666 = A . M . C. \ 

These tokens are by the same issuer, who evidently either married, or became a 
widower, in the year of their issue. The probability is that he married, as he did 
not die until thirty-four years afterwards. Tne small flagon of the communion 
service of Redruth Parish Church is inscribed, " This was the gift of Mr. Anthony 
Cocke to the parish of Redruth, in Cornwall. Obyt. ii« Mart. 1700." 

Hals mentions him as one of the chief inhabitants of the town. The Royal 
Institution of Cornwall has 88 of these tokens of both varieties, unused, the gift 
of the late Mr. J. J. Rogers, of Penrose, Helston. The three cocks are the arms 
of the Cockes, of Madron, Helston, South Petherwin, and Endellion. 

71. O. STEPHEN . HARRIS . IN = The Merccrs' Arms. 

j^. REDRVTH . IN . CORNWAL = S . I . H. J 

Stephen Harris, of Redruth, gent., junr., was appointed Assistant Stannator in 
the Stannary Parliament of 171a 

SALTASH. 

72. O, lOHN . FOSTER . 0F = An anchor. 

/^, SALTE . ASH . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

It is a very singular fact that all the Saltash tokens, so far as known, are half- 
pence. This appears to point to something peculiar in the conditions under which 
they were issued. 

73. O. CHRISTOPHER . STEPHENS . IN = A boat with passengers. 
jR, Saltaish \ His \ \ 1667 in three lines across the field \ 

Was not Stephens the ferryman ? The ferry at Saltash was anciently one of 
great importance, and apparently of emolument. It was granted by Edward the 
Black Prince, in 1348, to one of his followers in consideration of his services, and 
his disfigurement by the loss of an eye in battle, and at present belongs to the Cor- 
poration of the town, recently reformed. 

74. O, PETER . STEPHENS . OF . 1 667= A ship. 

R, SALTASH . IN . CORNWELL = HIS HALF-PENY. J 

This issuer and the last were probably related, but nothing appears to be known 
concerning them. 

75. O. THOMAS . swETNAM . IN = The Vihtncrs* Arms. 

R, Saltaish \ 1669 | His \ \ in four lines across the field \ 

SCILLY. 

76. O, THOMAS . EKiNES . IN . y" . iLAND = Three men around a 

globe. 
R, OF . SILLY . HIS . HALF-PENY = T . E and a merchant's 

mark. I 

Thomas Ekins was a considerable merchant, the first steward of the Godolphm 
family, once lessees of Scilly, who resided on the islands. Having obuined a 
long lease of St. Martin's for himself, he encouraged settlement thereon. He likewise 
built a tower there for a day mark, which still stands. Over the door is a stoite 
inscribed " TE. 1683." The device on the obverse is that of the "World's End," 
which, as Mr. Boyne remarked, was peculiarly appropriate to a token issued far 
beyond the Land's-End in the Scillian archipelago. 



Digitized by 



Google 



CORNWALL, 107 



ST. AGNES. 



77. O. EDWARD . NEWSAM = On a fcssc bctwecn a star in chief and 

globe in base, three saltires. 
/^. ST. . AGNES . 1666 = A bust of the saint, half-face. J 

The aims are no doubt intended for those of the Newsam family, one branch of 
which bears three cross crosslets on a fesse, and another three crosses patonce. 

ST. AUSTELL. 

78. O. lOHN . TREFRY . Or = l . T. 

J^. ST. . AVSTELL= 1 66 2. \ 

79. O. lOHN . TREFRY . OF = The Merccrs' Arms. 

jR. ST. . AVSTELL= 1669. \ 

The issuer was a member of the ancient family of Treffry of Place, Fowey. 
John Treflfry, of Treffry, head of the family, M.P. for Fowey, died in 1658. There 
was a John Treffry who was baptized at St. Kew in 1608, and the date of whose 
death is unknown, who may have been the issuer. His wife was not, however, 
buried until 1672, and at Fowey. 

ST. COLUMB. 

80. O. lOHN . OXNAM = The Mercers' Arms. 

^. IN . ST. . CVLLAME . 1664 = 1 . O. \ 

The Oxenhams are an old Devonshire family, with whom the Cornish Oxnams 
are probably connected. An Oxnam was sheriff of the county in 18 10, and the 
name has continued in the vicinity of St. Columb to the present day. 

81. O. RICHARD . EDWARDS = Mercers' Arms. 

J^. IN . ST. . CVLLOM . 1663 = R . E. 

ST. IVES. 

In the first edition of this work every token dated St. Ives was credited to St. 
Ives, Huntingdon, whereas the Cornish St. Ives was formerly quite as impor- 
unt a community. Twenty-four out of the 64 tokens described for Huntingdon- 
shire were given to the eastern St. Ives against nine onlv to Huntingdon — a 
proportion that was clearlv incorrect. Moreover, while in the other towns of the 
county halfpence predommated, in St. Ives the characteristics of the western 
county were seen in the preponderance of farthings. After careful investigation, 
it now seems probable that something like three-fourths of the St. Ives tokens can 
be correctly divided between the two rival claimants; but there are so many doubt- 
fuls left that St. Ives still remains the great crux of the Cornish numismatologist. 
Those to which a doubt seems to attach are cla>sed in the following list. We do 
not, however, include the halfpenny and farthing issued m 1 669 by the Overseers 
of St. Ives, the device on which has been variously interpreted "two women 
washing in a tub," or ** packing fish." No other town-pieces are claimed for 
Cornwall, and these tokens have never been found in that county, while they do 
occur in Hunts. 

82. O, HENRY . coRDALL = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

J^, IN . ST. . IVES . 1658 = H . E . C. \ 

This token seems unquestionably Cornish, though nothing is known of the 

isi^uer. Cardell is distinctively a Cornish name, and there are Cardells yet in St. 

Erth, close to St. Ives. The change of the ** o " to the ** a,'* or of the ''a" to 

the ** o," is nothing uncommon in connection with either namesK>r tokens. 



Digitized by 



Google 



83. 


0. 
R. 


84. 


0. 
R. 


8S- 


0. 
R. 


86. 


0. 
R. 



io8 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

WILLIAM . HARRISON = W . H. 

OF . ST. . IVES = 1657. i 

lAMES . HEATON = HIS HALF-PENY. 

OF . ST. . IVES = I . H. i 

lOHN . HICKMAN . OF = The Saltcrs' Arms. 

ST. . IVES . 1660 = 1 . E . H. I 

lOHN . HICKMAN . ivNiOR = The Salters* Arms. 

IN . ST. . IVES . 1668 = HIS HALF-PENY. ^ 

The issuers of the two last tokens were, of course, father and soiu The device 
and the name seem to concur to give them to Cornwall Hicks is a name of very 
common occurrence ; and Hickman was formerly in use in West Cornwall, bat is 
now represented by Higman. Mr. Hickman was one of the chief inhabitants of 
Truro m the time of Hals. 

87. O. lOHN . HVTCHlNS=l667. 

Jd, OF . ST. IVES = I . H. i 

88. O. RICHARD . HVTCHiNS = Three roses. 

Jd. OF . ST. IVES . 1666 = R . W . H. J 

Hutchins and Hitchens are well-known local names. John Hutchins, the issuer 
of No. 87, was nominated one of the inferior burgesses of the town in a chjirter 
granted by Charles I. No. 88 is classed as Cornish in the Bodleian. 

89. O. lOHN . KING = Two swords crossed. 

/^. IN . S. IVES . 1667 = I . K. i 

King is an old county name. It occurs at Penzance early in the seventeenth 
century. John King, afterwards Rector of Chelsea, was bom at St Columb in 
1652. 

90. O. lONATHAN . READ . IN = The Haberdashcrs' Arms, 

^. IN . SAINT . IVES = I . R . R. { 

Read is a very old West -country family. The name was very common in the 

neighbourhood in the seventeenth century, and still flourishes in West ComwaU. 
Among the other St. Ives tokens which it once seemed possible to identify with 

the Cornish town are those of Andrews, Browne, Hallsey, and Stocker. Each of 

these names occurs in the locality, and the two latter seemed to have special daims. 

They arc now given up to Hunts. 

ST. MAWES. 

91. O, WILL. KNAPTON . ATS. MAWES = The VinUiers' Arms. 

^. IN . CORNWALL . l666 = W .S.N. J 

The substitution of **n" for "k" on the reverse was probably a phonetic blander. 

ST. NEOT. 

It is very difficult to decide to which St. Neot, that in Cornwall or that in Honting- 
don, the first of these tokens belongs, and it is probably wisest here, also, to claim 
the doubtful one for each place until the point is settled, if that ever happens. 

92. O, THOMAS . HANCOCKE = A frying-pan. t . h. 

I^. OF . SAINT . NEOTS . 1 667 = HIS HALF-PENY. \ 

Hancock has long been, and still continues, a very common name in the locality ; 
and a family of Hancock was settled at St. Germans early in the seventeenth 
century. Edward Hancock, of Menheniot, was the first to make George Fox 
welcome in Cornwall in 1655. John Hancock, however, occurs in the fire-heaitb 
returns for Hunts, viSth Charles II. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



CORNWALL. 109 

93. O. WALTER . HODGE . OF . ST. «A shuttlc 

Ji. NEOT . IN . CORNEWALL = W . E . H. J 

This is another common local name. 

STRATTON. 

94. O. lOHN . CANN = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. OF . STRATTON . 1652 =1 . C. \ 

This coin was assigned by Mr. Boyne to Stratton, in Wilts ; but the Cornish 
Stratton was a more important place. Cann is a common local name; and, 
moreover, the token has been found in the neighbourhood. A priori, it would be 
difficult to understand Kilkhampton having a token, while its more important 
ancient neighbour, Stratton, went without 

TREGONY. 

95. O, HENRY . SLADE = H . I . S. 

R. IN . TREGONY . 58 = The Grocers' Arms. \ 

This issuer either subsequently removed to Truro, or had an establishment in 
both places. 

TRURO. 

96. O, HENERY . BVRGAS = A blazing star. 

R, IN . TREWROW . 1657 = H . A . B. \ 

Burgas stands for Surges, or Burgess, a noteworthy family of Truro in tht; 

seventeenth century. Twoof its members belonged to the Corporation in 1620. Henry 

Burgess was son of Thomas Burgess, Mayor of Truro in 1620, and member for the 

borough in 1603-11 and 1624-5. He was baptized March, 1607. 

97. O. ANDREW . CROCKER =1608. 

R, IN . TRVRO = A . C \ 

Probably one of the Crockers of St. Agnes, near Truro, a branch of the old 
Devonshire family celebrated in the couplet : 

** Crocker, Cruwys, and Coplestone, 
When the Conqueror came, were all at home." 

98. O, RICHARD . FREEMAN =» The Mercers' Arms. 

R, OF . TRVRO . 1667 = R . M . F. \ 

99. O, WILLIAM . JACKMAN = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

R, OF . TRVRO . 1666 = W .1.1. \ 

100. O. MATHEW . ROWETT = The Mercers' Arms (?). 

R, OF . TRURO . 1 668 = M . A . R. ^ 

A prominent member of the Corporation. 

101. O, HENRY . SLADE = H .1.8. 
R. OF . TRVRO . 1660 = H . S. 

102. O. HENRY . SLADE=H .1.8. 

R, OF . TRURO = 1663. I 

yide Tregony. 

103. O. WILUAM . SMITH = A ship. 
R. IN . TRVRVW = W . S. 

A ship forms part of the arms of Truro. 



Digitized by 



Google 



no TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

104. O, THOMAS . TREwiLLOw = Three owls. 

7?. IN . TREWROW . 1667 = Ditto. \ 

The owls are the arms of the Trewollas of Trewolla, who once occupied a 
leading position in the town. Thomas Trewolla, of Truro, son of JcAn 
Trewolla, of Truro, by his will, proved in 1697, left his lands to his broiher, 
William Trewolla, of Gwennap. 

105. O, SAMVELL . WEALE = A pOSt-boy. 

j^. IN . TRVROE . 1663 = 8 . F . W. \ 

Job Weale, Vicar of St. Minver, was buried in 1675. 

It is rather remarkable that this town, which had the largest number of issoos, 
should be less distinctively Cornish in the names than any other. This seems to 
point to a large settlement from outside the county, in what was really its chief 
centre. 

UNKNOWN LOCALITIES. 

106. O, IN . CORNWELL = T . R. 

J^. MERCER . 1667 = Mercers* Arms. J 

This token has been found in the county, but it is impossible to trace the i 



107. O, wiLLiELMUS . TiNGCOMBE = detrited. 

^. ECCE . SIGNUM . 1659 = A CROSS MOLINE. | 

The Teigncombes, or Tingcombes, are distinctively a Cornish family of repute, 
and are found in many localities in the county. Mr. Tyncombe is mentioned by 
Hals as one of the chief inhabitants of Fowey ; and the name occurs, amoog 
other places, at Liskeard, Truro, St. Stephens-by-Saltash, in the church aod io 
business. There is no doubt as to this token being Cornish. 



Digitized by 



Google 



(Tumberlanb, 



Number of Tokens issued 5 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 3 

Town Pieces issued at ... . Cockermouth. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



(tumberlanb^ 

Of this county there are only tokens of Broughton, Cockermouth, 
and Kirklinton. It is the smallest series of any English county. 

In Snelling's list of towns which issued tokens, are Carlisle and 
Whitehaven, which I have never met with. Unfortunately, Snelling 
has committed so many errors, that he is no authority. Care should 
be taken not to confound the Caerleon token of WUliam Meredith, 
which reads Carline, with Carlisle. 

From the large number of Scotch Bodies found in the Northern 
counties, they no doubt formed the principal small change, as the 
tokens of Northumberland and Westmoreland are also few in 
number. 

BROUGHTON. 

1. O. lOHN . LAMPLVGH = A castle. 

R. BROVGHTON . COAL . PITTS = HIS . HALF . PENY. (OctagOnoi,) 

COCKERMOUTH. 

2. ^. I . AM . FOR . A . PVBLIQVE . GOOD = A . B. 

R. IN . COCKERMOVTH . 64 = A . B. \ 

3. O, COCKERMOTH = LEO . SCOTT. 

R. I . AM . FOR . BETTER . CHENG = L . K . S. \ 

'* Leonard Scott and Cattern Capl^ were lawfully married, loth day of June, 
1656." — Cockermouth Marriage Register, 

4. O, THOMAS . WATSON . 64 = St George and the dragon. 

R, IN . COCKERMOVTH = T . I . W. i 



KIRKLINTON. 

5. O. THOMAS. BARRETT = A WOOlpack. 
R. OF . KIRKUNTON . l666 = T . M . B. 



8 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



Digitized by 



Google 



2)erbi28bire- 



Number of Tokens issued 24 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 33 

Town Pieces issued None. 



3—2 

Google 



Digitized by 



Digitized by 



Google 



In the original edition, much use was made of the catalogues 
issued by the late Wm. Henry Brockett, Esq., of Gateshead, and 
assistance from the late Thomas Bateman, Esq., of Lomberdale 
House, Youlgrave, and the late Llewellyn Jewitt, Esq., F.S.A., of 
Derby, was also fully recognised. The editor of this edition most 
thankfully recognises the invaluable aid given him in the work by his 
esteemed and much-lamented friend, Mr. Jewitt, who, after assisting 
Mr. Boyne in the first edition, most willingly offered his aid in making 
the second edition more interesting by notes on the issuers. This 
work of compiling these notes, though commenced, was never half 
completed, as the sudden decease of Mr. Jewitt deprived antiquarian 
science of one of its most devoted followers, and every youthful 
helper in the field of archaeology of a generous friend. To the editor 
the loss was irreparable, no other person possessing equal knowledge 
of the county ; and the editor tenders his very hearty thanks to 
Henry S. Gill, Esq., J.P., of Tiverton, who kindly consented to look 
over the county, and make addenda and corrigenda from his accumu- 
lated store of information on tokens. The name of Brampton is the 
only one added to the places of issue, many corrections of the first 
edition are made, and, inclusive of varieties, the addition of twenty- 
four tokens. 

The editor has not ventured to add any notes to those given by the 
late Mr. Jewitt, feeling that a sacred respect for his interrupted work 
is the best tribute to his memory. 



ALFRETON. 

1. O. CORNELIAS. LAVNDER = The Mercers* Arms. 

R. IN . ALLFRBTON . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

2. O. ROBERT . WRIGHT (in two lines). A beehive. (Heart-shape.) 
R. OF . ALFRETON . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1 668 (in five lines). \ 



ALSOP. 



3. O, WILLIAM . BRION. 
R, OF . ALSOP. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ii8 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



ASHBOURN. 

4. O. HENRY . ADAMS . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. OF . ASHBOVRNE . CHANDLER = A flower between H . A. i 

5. O. lOHN I ATKINS . MER | CER . IN | ASHBVRNE (in foUF linCS). 

J?. HIS I HALF . PENY | I • A | 1 667 (in four Hnes). i 

6. O. THOMAS . BAGVLEY. 

J?. IN . ASHBVRNE = HIS HALF PENNY. I 

From a tablet in Ashbourn Church it appears that Thomas Baguley was a 
merchant. 

7. O. WILUAM . BRVNT = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . ASHBORNE . 1671 = W . R ^ 

8. O. WILLIAM . FROGGATT = ArmS. 

^. IN . ASHBVRNE. 1 664 = HIS HALF PENNY. i 

9. O. CHARLES . HOLME . OF . i666 = A lion rampant. 

J?. ASHBOVRNE . HIS . HALF . PENY = c . H (divided by a 
flower). 

10. O. lOHN . MARRATT=HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . ASHBVRNE . 1671 = 1 . M (divided by a flower, etc). 

11. O. DANIELL . MORLEY = HIS HALF PENY. 
/?. IN . ASHBORNE . 1669 = D . M. 

12. O, WILLIAM . owsBORN£ = A coachman, whip in hand, driving 

a coach and pair. 

^. IN . ASHBVRNE .71 = HIS HALF PENY. 

13. O. lOSEPH . SHERWINN . OF = 1 666. 

J?. ASHBOVRN . PEWTERER = HIS HALF PENY. A 

14. O. MARIE . SLEIGH = The Mercers' Arms. 

Ji. IN . ASHBORNE = HER HALF PENY. h 

15. O, lOHN . VALENTINE = The Cutlers* Arms. 

J?. OF . ASHBVRNE . l668 = I . M . Y. 

16. O. RICHARD . WATSON = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

J?. IN . ASHBVRNE . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 



ASHFORD. 

17. O. ROBERT . BIRDS . OF . ASHFORD = R * B. 167I. 

/^. Within a large wreath, his ♦ i^ ♦ 
See the tokens of Ashford, in Kent, which are numerous. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DERBYSHIRE. 119 



BAKEWELL. 

18. O. lOHN . DICKENS . OF = An arm holding a covered cup, 

R. BACKWELL. 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

19. O. THOMES . CRAMMER . OF = Mercers' Arms. 

R. BACKWELL . DARBYSHERE = T . M . G. ^ 

The family of Grammer is now extinct Their property was sold at the begin- 
ning of the present century. 

20. O. THOMAS GRAMMAR » Mercers' Arms. 

R. BACKWELL . DERBYSHIRE = T . M . G. i 

21. O. THOMAS . GRAYMER = The Mercers* Arms. (Square,) 

R, IN . BACKWELL . 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 



BASLOW. 

22. O. SAMVEL . PALMER = HIS HALFE PENY. 
R, OF . BARSLOE . 1667 = S . P. 

BELPER. 

23. O. lOSEPH . CLARKE . AT = A CrOWa 

R. BELPER . LANE . END = I . C \ 

24. O. lAMES . lACKSON . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. BELPER . HIS . HALF . PENNY = I . R . L | 

BIRCHOVER. 

25. O, HVMPHREY . SMITH . IN = H . E . S. 

R. BIRCHOVER . DARBY . SHEIR = HIS 1°. 1671. I 

BOLSOVER. 

26. O, lOHN . AKERS . HIS . HALF . PENY = A bunch of grapes. 

R, OF . BVLSOVER = I . M . A. J 

27. O. RICHARD . sovTHwoRTH = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, IN . BOVLSOVER . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

28. O* RICHARD . sovTHwoRTH = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . BOLTSOVER = R . S. i 



BONSALL. 

«$» £>. ICOnf . BALME . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 

jJL OT % BONSALL . BVTCHER = The Butchers' Arms. 




Digitized by 



Google 



120 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

30. O. lOHN . DVDLEY = The Groccrs* Arms. 

J?. OF . B0VNSALL = 1 . D. \ 

31. O, HENRY . HiLLE . OF = A knife and chopper. 

/^. BONSALL. BVTCHER . 1671 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

' BRAILSFORD. 

32. O. WILLIAM . WEBB . OF = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

J^. BRELSFORTH . 1 671= HIS HALF PENY. W . W. i 

BRAMPTON. 

33. O. lOHN . DEARE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

J?. IN . BRAMPTON = I . E . D. \ 

34. ^. p . c . M, and a knot filling the field. 

/^. OF . BRANTON . 1671 = A pair of scissors. It is suggested 
that these initials refer to Peak Coal Mines. { 

35. O, THOMAS . SMITH = HIS HALF PENY. 

J?. OF . BRAMPTON = T.. s conjoined. i 



BRASSINGTON. 
36. O, DANiELL. BAGSHAW = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

jR. IN . BRASSINGTON . 1663 = . B. 



CASTLETON. 

37. O, ROBERT . THORNHILL . IN , CASSLTON = HIS HALF PENY, 

J?. (No legend.) A bull standing under a tree. ^ 

38. O. ROB . THORNHILL . IN . CASSLTON = HIS | HALF | PENY. 

^. (No legend.) A bull standing under a tree. i 



CHAPEL-EN-LE-FRITH. 

39. O. NICHOLAS . SMITH = 16 An anvil 71. 

^. IN . CHAPPELL . FRITH = N . s | HIS | J | (in three lines). I 



CHESTERFIELD. 

40. O. RICHARD . CLARKE . AT . THE = HIS HALF PENY. R . A . C 
/^. ANQELL . IN . CHESTERFEILD » An angel. i 

41. O. RICHARD . CLARKE . AT . THE= R . A . C 

J?. ANGELL . CHESTERFEILD = An angel. J 



Digitized by 



Google 



. DERBYSHIRE. 121 

42. O, IAMBS . DVTTON . IN» A Uon rampant. 

jR. CHESTERFEILD . 1 666 => HIS . HALF . PENY. i 

43. O. SAMVEL . INMAH . IN « The Groccrs' Arms. 

^. CHESTERFEILD . 1667^ HIS . HALFE . PENY. | 

44. A variety reads his | halfe | peny. | 

45. O. wiLUAM . millnesb The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. in . CHESTERFEILD . 1 667 » HIS . HALF . PENY. ^ 

46. O. THOMAS . RADFORD . IN =The Haberdashers' Arms. 

/?. CHESTERFEILD . l666 = HIS . HALF . PENY. | 

47. O. EDWARD . WOOD . APOTHECARY = The Apothecaries* Arms. 
-A*. In . Chesterfeild . His . Halfe . Penny (in four lines). \ 

48. O. RICHARD . WOOD = Three sportsmen and a dog. 

R^ OF . CHESTERFEILD = R . W. \ 

Vide Reliq., irol i¥., page 167. 

CRICH. 

49. O. THOMAS . LOWE = 

K. OF . CRICHE . BVTCHER . 1669= \ 

DERBY. 

50. O, RICHARD . BAKEWELL . OF . DARBY « HIS HALF PENY. 1666. 

R. GOOD . MORROW . VALINTINE = Two dovcs billing. \ 

51. O, lOHN . BANCRAFT = Nine rolls of bread. 

R. IN . DARBY . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

Probftblj of the same family as the celebrated poet of that Pfrio^t Thomas 
Bancroft, who was bora at Swarkeston, and was author of "Two Bookes of 
Epigrammes." 

52. O, THOBfAS. BEEBYE = Tallow Chandlers' Arms. 

R, IN . DARBY . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

55. O. GEORGE . BLAGRAVE . i668 = Hand with sceptre. 

R, IN . DARBY . HIS . HALF . PENY = A CrOWn. \ 

54. O, ANN . BLOODWORTH . OF. DARBY = The Cordwainers' Arms. 

R, CORDWAINERS . ARMES . 1669^ HER HALF PENY. \ 

55. O, ANNE . BLOODWORTH . IN . DARBY = The Cordwainers' 

Arms. 

R. SHOEMAKERS . ARBISS . l669«>HER | HALFE | PENY(8Cript). \ 

56. O. THOMAS . BROOKS = A hat and feather. 

R, IN . DARBY . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. , \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



122 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

57. O. RICHARD . coRDiN = The Vintners' Arms. 

J?. IN .DARBY. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. | 

Henry Coidin occurs as one of the capital burgesses of Derby in the chaiter of 
Charles II. The family are still resident in Derby. 

58. O. HENRY . CORDEN . IN . DERBY = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR, GOD . SAVE . THE . KiNG = Bust of Chailes IL I 

59. O, WILLIAM . DAWSON = The Dyeis' Anns. 

J^. DIER . IN . DARBY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

60. O, EDWARD . DENTY = The MerccTs' Anns. 

^. IN . DARBY . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

61. O. NATHANIEL . DOVGHTY = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

jR. MERCER . IN . DARBY . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. | 

62. O, lOHN . DVNNiDGE = The GroccTs' Arms. 

J^. IN . DERBY . 1663 = I . D . D. \ 

63. O. lOHN . DVNNiDGE . ivNiOR = The Groceis' Anns. 

J?. IN . DARBY . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. } 

John Dunnidge was Mayor of Derby in 1660 and 1684. He is one of the 
aldermen named in the charter of 1682, granted by Charles II. on the sozrender of 
the town's charter. 

64. O. ROBERT . FEARBROTHER = HIS HALF PENY. 

j^. IN . DERBY .1.6.6. 9 = The Tallowchandlers' Arms, i 

65. O, lOHN . FERGVSON. 

/^. IN . DARBY . 1666 -HIS HALF PENY. I 

66. O, WILLIAM . FREIRSON = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^. IN . DERBY . 1668 = DERBY . W . F. J 

67. A variety is dated 1664. 

68. O. SAMVELL . FLECHER = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. IN . DARBY = S . F . 1666. i 

69. O. HENRY . HAYWARD . IN . DARBY = The King's Head 

crowned. 
/?. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1665 = H . H between roses. i 

70. O. lOHN . HODGKiNSON . APOTHEC = The Apothecarics* Arms. 

/^. IN . DARBY . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . H . 1670. 

yi. O. HENRY . HOLMES = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

J?. IN . DARBY . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

T2, O. HENRY. HOLMES = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . DARBY . 1 666 « The Apothecaries' Arms without a 
shield. 
Henry Holmes occurs as one of the' capital burgesses in the Charter of 

Charles II. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DERBYSHIRE. 1 23 

73. O. RICH . KNOWLES . WCX5LL . PACKER = A WOOlpacIc 

E, IN . DERBY . A HALF . PENY = R . K. 167I. \ 

74. O. RICHARD . LISTER . i666 = A horse. 

R, RICHARD . PIGGEN . IN . DARBY = THEIR HALF PENNY. ^ 
" Richard Lister, son of Anthony Lister, gentleman, and Anne, his wife, are 
named in an inscription in St. Alkmund's Church."— .Sim/j^. 

75. A variety reads halfe and is dated 1667. 

76. O. ROBERT . LiCHFORD = The Saddlers* Arms. 

jR, IN . DARBY . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

77. A variety is dated 1667. 

78. O, THOMAS. LOCKH ART =1668. 

E. SHOEMAKER . AT . DARBY = HIS HALF PENY. J 

79. O. THOMAS . LOCKHAR . 1 668 = A shoe. 

R. SHOOEMAKER . AT . DARBY = HIS | HALFE | PENNY | T . L. 

So. O. lOSEPH . MOORE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R. IN . DERBY . 1667 = DERBY. I . M. ^ 

81. A variety is dated 1665. 

82. O. HENRY . MORE = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . DERBY . 1668 = H . E . M. \ 

83. O. THOMAS . MORE = A device. 

R, HIS . HALFPENY = IN . DERBIE. J 

84. O. TOVCH.NOT. MINE . ANOINTED = WILL | lAM | NEWC | OME 

(in four lines). 

R. DOE . MY . PROPHETS . NOE . HARME = DARBY. I.W.N. 

85. O, TOVCH . NOT . MINE . ANNOINTED = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. DOE . MY . PROPHETS . NOE . HARME = DARBY. W.N. J 

86. O. LVKE I NEYLD | IN . DARBY | 1 667 (in four Unes). A harp. 

{Octagonal.) 
R. MORAT = A Turk's head ^ 

87. O, WILLIAM . NvcoMBE = Arms of Derby. 

R. IN . DARBYE . 1657 = W .M.N. J 

88. O. Between the letters mo and rat, a Turk's head. 

R. HIS . HALFPENY . IN . DERBY (in four Hnes). {Octagonal,) ^ 

89. O. WILLIAM . NVCOME = A hart lodged. 

R. IN . DARBYE . 1657 = W .M.N. J 

90. O. lAMES . PALMER = A flower. 

R, HIS . HALFPENNY . IN . DERBIE = 1667. ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



124 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

91. O. B£NiAMiN . SMEDLEY . AT = The Cordwainers' Arms. - 

J?. IN . DARBY . 1 664 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

92. O. GEORGE . SOWTHER = HIS HALF PENNY. 

iP. IN . DERBY . 1667 = G .M.S. { 

93. O, THOMAS . STRONG = HIS HALF PEN\% 

J^. IN . DARBY . l666 = T . S. I 

DORE. 

94. O, ROBERT . VNWEN . IN = A hammer arid pincers. 

J?. DORE . IN . DARBYS . SHEIR = R . ^ . V. I 

DRONFIELD. 

95. O. lOHN . BATE. 1666= Arms. 

J?. OF . DRONFELD = HIS HALE PENNY. \ 

96. O. HENRY . BLYTH . IN = The Apothccaries* Arms. 

j^. DRANFEILD . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. i 



DUFFIELD. 

97. O, lOHN . MALYN . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

iP. DVFFIELD . NEAR . DARBY «= I . K . M. 1 669. J 

Malyn was probably the village baker. A family of that name, till within & 
last few years, lived in the same house for some generationsi and still carried oo^ 
old baking business. 

98. O, DOROTHY . ROSSiNGTON . IN = A griffin's bead. \ 

R. DVFFEILD . NEARE . DERBY = HER HALF PENY. 1669. 

(See B.M., Na 69.) 

ECKINGTON. 

99. O. HENRY. HASLEHVRST = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . ECKINGTON = H . H. 1667. \ 

100. O. HENRY . HASLEHVRST=«IS | HALFE ] PENNY. 
jR. OF . ECKINGTON = 1665. 

1 01. O. HENRY . SALE . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENY. H . S. 

R. IN . ECKINGTON . 1669 = The Mercers* Arms. I 

HARTINGTON. 

102. O. THOMAS . BATEMAN . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . HARTINGTON = Arms. \ 

" William Bateman, of Hertyndon, in the county of Derby, served on a jvn 
there, 4th Richard II., as is recorded in the earliest court-roll of the maiSor extaai. 
preserved in the archives of the Duchy of Lancaster. There is no evidence of h^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



DERBYSHIRE. 



125 



being possessed of any property in Hartington ; bat we find his (supposed) son, 
John Bateman, of the same place, at a court held 25th March, 1439, was admitted 
to a honse and 10 acres and i rood of land. These are the earliest notices of the 
name I have met with, and from the latter we have the pedigrees of both the 
branches of the iamily at present existing, one of which is represented by Hugh 
Willoughby Bateman, Esq., of Camber well House, 'Wiltshire, and the other by 
m3rself. I cannot m^e out to whom the token is to be attributed, as there were 
three Thomas Batemans living at Hartington in 1670, namely : 

"I, Thomas Bateman, baptized 17th \lay, 1621.1^1 r*i.^ j* j a ^^ .^^^ 

-2. Thomas Bateman;baptized 2ilh Sept , 1625./^°^ ^^*^*^ ^'^ ^P"^' "^77- 

"3. Thomas Bateman, baptized 2nd August, 1646, and buried nth May, 171 3. 

The latter, my ancestor, is described as a yeoman, and from his will does not seem 

to have been ei^aged in other than agricultural business." — T» Bateman, Esg»y 

of Lomberdak House, . 

HICHAM. 

103. O. lOHN I LOWE . OF | HIEGHAM | BVTCHER | 1 669 (in fivC 

lines). 
R. HIS . HALF I PENNY = The Butcheis' Arms. (Heart-shape). ^ 
Lowe is a common name in Derbyshire. 

104. O. EDWARD . PARKES =: A huntsman and hound. 

R. IN . HICHAM = £ . A . P. \ 

It is doubtful whether these belong to Derbyshire. There is a parish of this 
name in Kent, and in other counties. 



HIGH PEAK. 

105. O, HIGH . PEAKE . COLE MINES = The ShallcTOSS Arms. 

R, IN . DARDY . SHBiRE = The Shallcross Crest. ^ 

*'This token was probably issued by Richard Shallcross, a member of the 

ancient family of Shallcross, of Shallcross. His father, John Shallcross, was 

Sheriff of Derbyshire in 1638, and his son, John, filled the same office in 1686."— 

T. Bateman, 

MELBOURNE. 

106. O, NATHAN. SMEDLEY. IN = HIS HALFEPENY. 

R. MELLBORNE . MERCER = N . P . S. A 



REPTON. 

107. O. MATTHEW . WILKINSON « A crown. 

R. OF . REPTON . 1 67 1 = HIS HALFPENY. ^ 

" Matthew Wilkinson was buried at Repton, November 5, 1680, and, at different 
periods, several others of that name. They were formerly a family of considerable 
property in this parish, but now extinct.*' — Gent. Mag. for October, 1791. 

RISLEY. 

108. O. MARY . EARLE = Three tobacco-pipes. 

R. OF . RYSLEY . l668 = HER HALFE PENNY. l 



Digitized by 



Google 



126 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



STONY MIDDLETON. 
109. O, DENNIS . RAGG = Three uncertain objects. 

J^. STONI . MIDELTON = HIS HALFEPENY. 1670. 



TIDESWELL. 
no. O, EDWARD. ASHE = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. IN. TIDSWALL. 1667= HIS HALF PENY. \ 

111. O. Wiliiam . Ashe . in . Tidswall . 1670 (in four lines). 

(Square,) 
R. His . Halfe . Peny . w . a = In three lines. \ 

112. O. ROBERT. BAGSHAW = HIS HALFEPENNY. 

R. IN . TIDSWALL . 1667 = R . S . B. \ 

113. O. GERVASE. GENT . OF . TIDSWELL = HIS HALFE ^PENNV. 

R, Arms and crest of the Gent family ; ermine^ on a chief, 
indented, two eagles, di<%played; crest, out of ducal 
coronet, a demi-eagle, displayed. \ 

114. O. RICHARD. MIDDLETON = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. IN . TYDSWALL . 1669 = A cross saltire. \ 

WINSTER. 

115. O. RALPH . BOWERS = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . WINSTER 1666 = R . E . R 

WIRKSWORTH. 

116. O, lOHN . BOOTH = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. IN . WIRKSWORTH = I . B. \ 

117. O. lOHN . BVXTON . DYER . IN = The Dyers' Arms. 

R. WIRKSWORTH . HIS . HALFPENY = I . B. \ 

118. O. ELEAZOR . COATS = Arms, a shield frett^, with a lioo 

rampant on a sinister canton. 

R. IN . WORKSWORTH = E . C. \ 

119. O. PETER . covLBORN . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. wiRKESWiRTH . HIS . HAL . PENY = A true lover's knot 
between p . c. \ 

120. O. RICHARD , HEAPE = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, IN . WIRKSWORTH = R . H. \ 

121. O. ANTHONY . KEMPE . IN = The Royal Arms, 

R, WIRKSWORTH . l666 = A . K. 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



DERBYSHIRE. 127 



122. O. Name illegible = The Mercers* Arms. 

IC. IN . WIRKSWORTH = HER HALF PENY. 

123. O, THOMAS . WIGLEY = T . W. 

^. OF . WIRKSWORTH = The Grocers' Arms. 



YOULGRAVE. 
124. O, ROBERT . BIRDS = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . YOULGRAVE = R . R J 

The family of Birds was of considerable standing about two centuries ago, and still 
remains settled in the same village, although the descendants are but working men. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Devonshire. 



Number of Tokens issued 368 

Number of Towns issuing Tokens 61 

Town Pieces issued at Ashburton, Axminster, Bideford, 
Dartmouth, Moreton-Hampstead, Torrington. 



Sub-Editor and Collahorateur : 

Henry S. Gill, Esq., J.P., 

Tiverton, 

S. Devon. 



Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



Digitized by 



Google 



So far as can be ascertained, up to this time, there were 368 different 
tokens issued in Devon ; some of the counties near London had a larger 
number, but none of the more remote ones, Yorkshire alone excepted, 
had so many. Exeter furnished eighty-three, or nearly one>fourth of 
the whole, and this fact is a proof that our Western Metropolis was 
then in. a flourishing condition. It may be interesting to compare our 
old city at that time with one of the largest centres of provincial 
population at the present day, namely, Liverpool, which had but 
eleven issuers of local tokens ; thus showing what two centuries have 
effected in altering their relative size and importance. The loss of 
the great staple tiade of this county since then may have retarded the 
growth of Exeter, but Liverpool has certainly gone ahead with mar- 
vellous rapidity. Plymouth stands next to Exeter in the number of 
tokens issued — she sent out forty-three ; then comes Tiverton with 
twenty-six varieties, of which seven were halfpennies, whilst Exeter 
had but one halfpenny. Our other towns were much below in point 
of numbers, as will be seen by the list 

The following is a detailed list of the Devonshire series, including 
all the recent additions (which have never yet appeared in print), to- 
gether with the names of the issuers. 

Many of these were large employers of manual labour, such as 
makers of serges and woollen goods, then called " clothiers,'* who 
doubtless used the tokens in payment of wages ; others were enter* 
prising tradesmen, innkeepers, &c, and a goodly number were of the 
gentler sex, including five at Plymouth, carrying on their respective 
occupations, and eight in Exeter who had these coins struck; probably 
strong-minded widows,* who were endeavouring by honest industry 
to support and bring up their fatherless children, as sensible English 
matrons still do. Such persons always did, and always will, find 
friends to help them. One was named "Judeth Hatchley," who 
lived "neare East Gate." Another, "Ann Powle, without West 
Gate." Another, "Elinor Roope, in St. Sidwell parish;" "Grace 
Searelle, in South Gate Streete," and four others. 

Some of the tokens were not dated, perhaps from the want of space. 
They generally bore the name and initials of the person for whom 
they were struck ; and when that of a male issuer had three initials, 
the second was that of his wife. It may here be noted that of all the 
seventeenth-century tokens coined, no person, male or female, appears 
on them with more than one Christian name — a custom much de- 

* A female itsuer of Colebrook has ** Widow Hombs ** on her farthing (No. 45). 

9—2 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



132 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

parted from in these days ;* but, as if to make up the deficiency, it 
was not uncommon in that and the previous century for a man to 
have two surnames. We have an instance in one of the former 
bishops of this diocese, who was named "John Harman, alias 
Voisey ;" and at Tiverton there were two gentlemen whose double 
surnames have been handed down to us— one, a nephew of good old 
Peter Blundell, " Robert Comin, alias Chilcot," who founded the 
English free school there ; the other, " Richard Hill, a/ias Spurway,*' 
was the first Mayor of Tiverton. Other names with an alias occur 
in the old parish register of that borough about the same time. 
When a second surname was thus affixed, the additional ones were 
adopted permanently by the two Tiverton families, the descendants 
of both Chilcot and Spurway retaining those names only. The 
English free school is still called ''Chilcot's School," and of the 
Spurway family, so well known to the older inhabitants, two became 
rectors of Clare and Pitt Portions in Tiverton. 

The tokens were often issued by the ruling authorities of a city or 
borough, and are then called " town-pieces." In Devonshire such 
were coined and circulated by Ashburton, Axminster, Bideford, 
Dartmouth, Moreton-Hampstead, and Torrington. The Ashburton 
token has on obverse, " an . ayshburton . halfe . penny . 1670." 
On reverse, as is usual with town-pieces, there are the arms of the 
borough. The Axminster one has on obverse, " a . farthing . for 
AXMiSTER '* (sic) ; reverse, ** and . no . other . place." Bideford and 
Dartmouth had each a halfpenny, as well as a farthing token. More- 
tonhampstead had two varieties, both halfpennies. On each is the 
legend, " for . y° . benefit . of . y^ . poore." Both are dated 
(1670), and one has on obverse, " y" . 8 . men . & . feeffees . of . 
moreton.*' The eight men were the wardens and sidesmen of the 
parish church. 

The token for Aveton Gifford is spelt " Awton GifFord ;" one for 
Bradninch has on it "Bradnedge," and Lympstone is spelt "Limson," 
all as now pronounced in each locality. 

On the six Collumpton tokens the town is spelt four different ways, 
and not one of them is right. It is rather strange the orthography of 
this town is not yet fixed. The post-office authorities stamp all their 
letters " Cullompton /" the county magistrates and their clerk, at the 
divisional petty sessions, always spell it in the same way ; so do the 
inhabitants generally ; whilst in Johnston's Gazetteer^ in the Ciergy 
Listf and in Boyne*s work, the first two vowels change places, and it 
is spelt " Collumpton:' 

In some counties the tokens were made of various shapes ; not only 
circular, but octagonal, square, diamond, and heartshape. In Devon- 
shire they were all round. The square and diamond-shaped tokens 
are very rare. 

* Camden, in his Remairus concerning Britain^ p. 49, remarKs : " Two Chris- 
tian names are rare in England, and I only remember now his Majesty, who 
was named Charles James, as the Prince, his son, Henry Frederic ; and among 
private men, Thomas Maria Wingiield and Sir Thomas Posthumus Hobby.*' 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 133 

The Incorporated Trades* Companies were well represented in 
this county, as we have the arms of no less than seventeen of them 
amongst our tokens ; viz., those of the Apothecaries, Barber-Surgeons, 
Blacksmiths, Cloth workers. Coopers, Cordwainers, Drapers, Glaziers, 
Grocers, Haberdashers, Ironmongers, Mercers, Pewterers, Salters, 
Tallow Chandlers, Vintners, and Weavers. A few of our issuers 
exhibit their own armorial bearings for a device ; namely, Nathaniel 
Symons, of Barnstaple ; Thomas Potter, of Modbury ; William Fum- 
eaux, of Newton Abbott ; John Shebbeare, of Okehampton ; John 
Cooke, Roger Oliver, and William Tom, all of Plymouth; and 
Thomas Dayman, of Tiverton. 

The following had what are called "punning devices" on their 
tokens, being mostly a poor rebus on their names : Henry Ball, of 
Bampton, had three balls (see No. 14) ; Edward Burd, of Colyton, had 
one of the feathered tribe on his ; James Daggery, North Tawton, had 
a dagger ; William Diaman, Tiverton, had three diamonds ; Samuel 
Badcock, Southmolton, and James Cockey, Totnes, had each 
what our American cousins call a rooster; John Crosse, Totnes, 
had a cross; and Ralph Harbottle, Torrington, had the rebus of 
a bottle on a hare. It will be seen by some of the tokens that 
fashion as well as history " repeats itself." Jacob Irish, Crediton, 
and Henry Tanner, Honiton, have each a man's low-crowned 
hat, with a feather ; and we know that some fast young men nowa- 
days wear feathers in their hats. Another issuer gives a boot, with 
the same absurdly high heel as is worn by the ladies at the present 
time. 

We have in our series the signs of many inns and public-houses 
represented; viz., the Angel, Bear, Bell, Castle, Cock, Dolphin, 
Dragon, Globe, Goat, Hart, Hoop, Lion, Mermaid, St George and 
Dragon, Ship, Star, Sun, Tankard, Three Cranes, Three Stags, Turk's 
Head, White (?) Ball, and Wild Boar ; and it is a proof of their antiquity, 
as well as their vitality, that several signs which appeared on our tokens 
two hundred years ago are still in existence. Inter alia^ we have yet, at 
Appledore, the Ship (on No. 3 token) ; at Barnstaple, the Castle and 
the Star (Nos. 19, 20) ; at Dartmouth, the Globe (No. 74) ; at Exeter, 
the Turk's Head (No. 89) ; and the Sun (No. 123, which gave its 
naine to the street it is situated in) ; at Kingsbridge, the George (No. 
190) ; at Ottery St. Mary, the Golden Lion (No. 222) ; at Plymouth, 
the Ship (No. 228), the Four Castles (Nos. 253 and 258), the Golden 
Fleece (No. 264) ; and at Thorverton, the Dolphin (No. 301). 

But it was not only inns that had signs in those days. We know 
by our old books that printers of the period had them, and these coins 
inform us that many other tradesmen mounted a sign. There are three 
instances in our county series ; viz., Benjamin Massey, of Colyton, 
mercer, had an anchor ; John Guy, of Colebrook, chandler, displayed 
a cock ; Nicholas Cole, of Plymouth, mercer, had a rose. In London 
tradesmen's signs were very frequent I have a token in my collection 
of ** John Radbvme, Grocer, at y* Soldier in St John Street." 

None of our farthings, except the Axminster, Bideford, and Dart- 



Digitized by 



Google 



134 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

mouth town- pieces, had their value impressed upon them ; but every 
halfpenny had, the latter part of the word being spelt generally with 
one n; and it is rather remarkable the same antiquated style of 
spelling is still retained in all our Books of Common Prayer printed 
at the Oxford University Press, even to the latest editions, since the 
new lectionary was introduced. The word pmy occurs in the gospels 
for Septuagesima Sunday, the fourth Sunday in Lent, and the twenty- 
third Sunday after Trinity ; but in the various editions of the New 
Testament issued from the same press the modem form of penny b 
adopted. 

Some of the legends on the tokens of other counties are curious ; 
but only a few on our own deserve special notice* Three of the 
Exeter ones have on them, " For necessary change " (vide Nob. S^ 
134, and 135). A curious unpublished halfpenny of Edward Broad, 
South molton, in my collection, has this quaint rhyme — 

" When you please, 
He chainge these." 

Many of those who struck tokens at Exeter, Plymouth, and Tivcr- 
ton filled important public offices, as will be seen by the list There 
were " men of mark " too in other counties amongst the issuers. 
" Joseph Sayer " states he was " Rector of Newbery " (Newbury) ;* 
"Anthony Williamson," of Liverpool, was "Alderman;" Henry 
Chapman (residence not given) styles himself " qvondam Esquire." 
Perhaps he acquired that title during the Commonwealth, and was 
deprived of it at the Restoration ; but we cannot verify this conjecture, 
as his token is not dated. The letters J and U are never found on 
any of the tokens, but I and V always supply their places ; thus each 
of the latter serves for two letters, and therefore is sometimes a vowel, 
sometimes a consonant. A curious mediaeval token in my collection 
has the alphabet of the period on one side ; but J and U are both 
wanting. On the obverse is a quaint figure of a schoolmaster sitting 
at a table, with an abacus and counters before him. 

We do not know how far our tokens circulated out of their own 
locality, but probably, like the five-pound notes of a private banker 
in the present day, they would pass as money in any neighbouring 
place where their owners were known ; for, unlike the patent farthings 
of Charles I., they could always be converted into cash by applying 
to the issuer. 

Tokens of several surrounding places have been found in Exeter,t 
and recently a CoUumpton farthing was dug up in Tiverton church- 
yard. 

* This worthy had fAf Bible for a device on the reverse of his token, 
t See Captain Short's ColUctanea curiosa Aniiqua Duum^nia, p. 8a 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 135 



APPLEDORE. 

1. O, PHILLIP . COMMON = A harp. 

^. OF . APELLDORE . (16)64 = P . C J 

2. O, PHILLIP . COMMON = A harp. 

^. OF . APELLDORE . (l6)68 = P . H . C \ 

Fron this addition to the initials, it appears that P. c. had married since his 
Brst tcken was sent out. 

3. O. THO . GRIBLE= A ship. 

I^. OF APELLDORE = T . G J 

The above three tokens were assigned by Mr. Boyne to Appledore, Co. Kent ; 
but C)mman and Gribble being both Devonshire names, I have included them in 
oar Cmnty Series. 



ASHBURTON. 

\. (?. AN . AYSHBURTON . HALFE . PENNY . 167O (in six lines). 

J^. (No legend) = A church, sun, crescent, a teasel, and a 
saldre (the arms of Ashburton). ^ 

He Ashburton town-piece bears on it {inUr alia) a fuller's teasel, Dipsacus 
Fuhnum. 

Tiis plant was introduced into the arms of the old borough because the 
maafiBu:ture of woollen cloth was the staple trade of Ashburton for several 
centries, and the teasel has alwajrs been used for raising the nap on the surface 
of coth, as no mechanical contrivance has yet been found to equal it for that 
pupose. Part of the old trade lingers yet in Ashburton, the manufacture of 
setfes being still extensively carried on there. 

^he Church was probably represented in the arms as being the most important 
bn.ding in the town, and the saltire because it is dedicated to St. Andrew. The 
so^ in splendour and the cresent moon are said to refer to the metallurgy of the 
dtoict, although sold and silver, of which those two heavenly bodies were 
fomerly the symbols, are only to b« found there in infinitesimal quantities. 

5. O. WALTER . FVRNACE . OF = HIS HALFE PENNY 

R, ASHBURTON. i668 = WF conjoined \ 

This token, recently found at Chagford, was probably issued by a member 
/ the Fumeaux family, always pronounced Furnace, who carried on the woollen 
rade here for many generations. 

6. O. ROBERT . IEFRY = R .G.I 

R, OF . ASHBURTON , l668 = HIS . HALFEPENNY \ 

7. A variety of No. 6 has the Queen's head in place of R . g . i \ 

8. 0. MOSES . TOZER = M . T 

R. IN . ASHBERTON = M . T \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



136 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



AVETON GIFFORD. 
9. O. THOMAS . MARTIN = 1659 between two hearts. 

J^. OF . AWTON . GIFFORD = T . S . M 1 

This village is still thus locally pronounced. 

AXMINSTER. 

10. O. A . FARTHING . FOR . AXMISTER = A pot of liUeS, 

R. AND . NO . OTHER . PLACE = T . W j 

11. O, WILL . BLATCHFORD = A leathern bottle. 

R. OF . AXMISTER = W . B I 

12. O. THOMAS . WHiTTY . IN = A stick of candles and apqs 

under. 

i?. AXMINSTER . MERCER = T . D . W \ 

BAMPTON. 

13. O. HENRY . BALL . IN = The Clothworkers' Arms. 

jR, BAMPTON . 1666 = H . E . B 1 

14. O. HENRY . BALL = H . H . B 

R. IN . BAMPTON = Three Balls. i 

15. O. lOHN . BALL = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF , BAMPTON . 1652 = I . B \ 

16. O. DANiELL . GLAS . IN . BAMPTON = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

R. IN . DEVONSHEIRE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY \ 

17. O. WILLIAM . YEANDEL = The Cordwainers' Arms. 

R. OF . BAMPTON . 1669 = HIS . HALF . PENY. W . A . Y t 

BARNSTAPLE. 

18. O. lONAS . HAVWKWELL = The Weavers* Arms. 

R, OF . BARNSTABLE . (l6)68 = I . K . H 

19. O, WILLIAM . HILL . IN = A castle. 

J?. BARNISTABLE . 1656 = W . H 

20. O. PHILIP . SOMERS . 0F = A Star. 

R. BARNSTAPLE . 1662 = P . G . S I 



21. O, NATHANIEL . SYMONS . 1657 = The family arms. 

R. IN . BARNESTAPLE=HALFE PENNY (in tWO lines) 2 

The Arms of this old Devonshire family are thus described in Visitatit* ^ 
1620, p. 280 : " Per fess sable and argent, a pale coimterchanged, three tid«» 
slipped of the second." 



of 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 137 

22. O, NATHANIEL . SYMONS = A trefoil. 

^. BARNESTAPLE . l657=N . S \ 

23. O, lOHN . WEBBER . 0F = A tankard. 

I^. BARNESTABLE . i666 = I . w coojoined, large, and filling the 
field i 

24. O. RICHARD . WEBER . IN = A Castle. 

J^. BARNSTABLE . 1669 = HIS . HALFE PENV. J 

25. <9. RICHARD . WEBER . IN = The Pewterers' Arms. 

J^, BARNESTABLE . 1 667 = R . w and a flower (between theun) I 

BIDEFORD. 

26. O. THE . ARMEs . OF . BIDEFORD = A ship Under a bridge. 

I^, A . BIDEFORD . FARTHING = B . C . 1659 \ 

B. C. stands for Bideford Corporation. 

27. O. THE . ARMES . OF . BIDEFORD = A ship Under a bridge. 

J^. A . BIDEFORD . HALFE . PENY = B . C . 1670. J 

The Bideford town-pieces are described as having for device on obverse ** a 
ship under a bridge ;" but they both have also a frame for a beacon light over 
the centre arch of the bridge, and both have on the reverse, under the dates, a 
small R, showing they were engraved by Thomas Rawlins, the same artist whose 
initial appears on most of the Corporation pieces of Bristol, of the Mayor of 
Oxford, Luke Nourse of Gloucester, and some others. 

The beacon frame points to earlier times than the dates of the tokens, but it 
might be remaining over the bridge — built in the fourteenth century — when 
Rawlins engraved his dies, as there is one still preserved on the top of Hadley 
Church, near Bamet, the shape of which is very similar to the one shown in the 
engraving of the Bideford farthing. It is singular that this farthing town-piece is 
quite as laige, and somewhat heavier, than the halfpenny town-piece issued in 1670, 
or eleven years later. The farthing weighs i J dwt., or 42 grains, the halfpenny 
four grains less. Evidently the Corporate authorities were dissatisfied with the 
small profits arising from the earlier issue. 

28. O. HENRY . BRAYERLE = H. B 

^. OF . BIDDEFORD= 1663 J 

29. O. GEORGE . DAVIS . OF = The Barber-Surgeons' Arms. 

I^, BIDEFORD. 1668 = G . D ^ 

30. O. losiAS . ELLIOT . OF = A double triangle (in shield) 

J?. BIDEFORD . IN . DEVON = I . E { 

31. O. THOMAS . LEACH = T . L 

^. OF . BIDDEFORD= 1 65 7 | 



BISHOP'S TEIGNTON. 

32. O, lOHN . GRANTE . 1670 = HIS HALF PENV 
^. OF . BISHOPS . STANTON = I . E . G 



Digitized by 



Google 



138 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



BOVEY TRACEY. 

33. O. WILLIAM . PERiAM = An axe with handle. 

J? IN . BOVEY . TRACY = W . A . P } 

The Periams are an ancient and noted family in the annals of Exeter, and soee 
respectable members of it are still residing in the county. 

BRADNINCH. 

34. O. THOMAS . PEARCE . OF = T p conjoined. 

J^. BRADNINCH . MERCE'^= 1658 { 

35. O, HENRY . RICHARDS = HIS HALF . PENY 

J^. IN . BRADNEDGE . 1 666 = The CordwaiDers* Anns. I 

BRIDGETOWN (near Totnes). 

36. O. WILLIAM , BRADFORD . AT . THE = A wild boar. 

J^. IN*. BRIDGTOWN . HIS . HAL . PENY = W . E . B J 

37. O, lAMES . CHED . OF = A hand. 

A BRIDGTOWN . 1659 = 1 . M . C \ 

CHULMLEIGH. 

38. O. lOHN . BOWRING . OF = HIS HALFE PENY. I . M . B 

J?. CHULMLEIGH . 1670 = A WOOlcomb. i 

The issuer of this token was an ancestor of the late Sir John Bownng^ and )ls 
coin is an interesting memento of the woollen trade formerly carried on in tias 
county. 

39. O. ALICE . MOORE . OF = A bell. 

J^. CHVLMELEY . l668 = HER HALF PENY i 



40. O. HUMFREY . MORGAN = Pair o( large scissors. 

I^, IN . CHVLMLEY = H M 1 658. 

41. O. lAMES . SHEPHARD . 1669 = A malt shovcI. 

^. IN . CHVLMLY . MALSTER=HIS HALFE PENNY 



COLEBROOK. 

42. O, THOMAS . BVRC0MBE = A hart. 

I^, IN . COLEBROOKE = T . D . B 4 

43. O. lOHN . FORiSE . AT . Y^ = A bear passant 

J?. IN . COVLBROVGH . 1667 = I . S . F } 

44. O, lOHN . GVY . CHANDLER = A COCk. 

J?. IN . COVLBROKE . 1652 = 1 . B . G J 

45. O. WIDOW . HOMES . AT, Y^ = A ball 

J^. BALL . IN . COALBRVCK = S . H J 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 139 

46. O. lOHN . HOSEV . AT . THE = An angel. 

A ANGELL . IN . COLEBROOK = I . I . H 

47. O. SAMVELL. MILLS = A turkey. 

jR. IN . COLEBROOKE . (16)57 =S . M . M 

48. O. EDMVND . SLOCOMBE = Three stags. 

R. IN . COLEBROOKE . 1653 = E . D . S 

Probably these do not all belong to Devonshire, as there is a Colnbrook in 
Backs, formerly called Colebrook, 

COLLUMPTON. 

49. O. WALTER . CHALLS . OF = A rOSC. 
^. CVLLVMSTON . 1651 =W . S . C 

50. O, TRVSTRAM . CLARKE = A woman makmg candles. 

J^. IN . C0LL01ilT0N = T . A . C 

51. O. lOHN . HARRIS . IN = HIS . HALFE PENNY 

J^, CVLLEBTTON . 1666 = I . M . H and a flower 
53. O. HENRY . HOPPING . CARRIER . iN = A pack-horse. 1666 

J?, CVLLVMPTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = H . D . H 

53. O. lOHN . MUDFORD . 1667 = A WOOlpack. 
J^. IN . CVLLVMPTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . M . M 

54. O. WILLIAM . SKINNER = Three fleurs-delys. 

i?. OF . CVLLVMSTON = W . S . S 
This was erroneously placed to Culmstock by Bo]me, P. 51., Na 51. 



COLYTON. 

55. O, EDWARD . BVRD . 0F = A bird. 1657 

J?, CVLLITON . DEVON = E . M . B 

56. O. BENiAMiN . MASSEY = An anchor in a heart 
jR. OF . cvLLrroN . mercer = b . m 

57. O. IN . COLATEN . 1659 = N . E . P 

J?. (No legend) = A rose within a border. 
From the initials, this was doubtless N. Parkman's. 

58. O. NATHANIEL . PARKMAN = A fuU-blown rOSe. 
J?. IN . CVLLETON . l666 = N . E . P 

59. O. NATHANIEL . PARKMAN = A full-blown rOSe. 
J^. IN . CVLLITON . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY 

60. O. NANIELL . SWHATEET = An anchor. 

J^. OF CVLLITON . 1657 = N . S 



Digitized by 



Google 



140 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



CREDITON. 

6 1. O. NICHOLAS . BODLEY = A pair of scales. 

J^. OF . CREDITON . l668 = N . H . B \ 

62. 0» WILLIAM . DANIELL = A sheep. 

J^. IN CREADITON . 1664 = W . M . D j 

63. O. lONATHAN . FRYER = Arms ill shield 

-/?. OF . CREDITON . l668 = I . T. F } 

This token is thus described in a MS. list of old coins in the library of ti» 
Numismatic Society, London ; and a specimen was recently shown to the coxitoc 
of the Exeter Museum which exactly corresponded to the above description of iL 

64. O, lACOB . IRISH . 0F = A hat and feather. 

^. CREDITON . ROB(e) TAILDER = HIS HALF PENY I 

65. O. lOHN . KNIGHT = A shuttle. 

J^. IN . CREDITON . 1665 = I . S . K { 

66. O, lOSEPH . MEDLTON = A full-blown rose. 

I^. OF . CREDDYTON = I . M , 1 667. \ 

67. O. GILBERT. NICOALS . 1665 = A paiL 

/^, OF . CREDITON . IN . SANDFORD = G .M.N I 

G. N. issued another farthing in 1660, at Sandford, a village neftr Creditac. 
See No. 277. 

CULMSTOCK. 

68. O. lOHN . DAVY . OF = A merchant's mark. 

I^. CVLMESTOCK , DEVON = I . M . D { 

69. O, EDWARD . LANE . IN = A WOolpaclc. 

J^. CVLLVMSTOCKE . 1654= E . F . L J 

70. O, RICHARD . SHVTT = R . S 

J^, OF. CVLMESTOCK =1654 J 

71. O. lOHN . sovTHWOOD = The Mercers' Arms 

J^, OF . CVLMSTOCK . 1657 = 1 . I . S } 

DARTMOUTH. 

72. O. A . DARTMOVTH . HALFE . PENY = (In five Hnes aCTOSS the 

field). 
^. A King with sceptre, seated in an antique ship. \ 

73. O. A . DARTMOVTH . FARTHING (In five lines across the fidd)- 
^. Same device as the last. | 

74. O. ROBERT . BIFFEN = A globe. 

/^. IN . DARTMOVTH . 1663 = R . B . B J 

75. O. HENR,Y . BVRD . 1664 = A rose with stem. 

J^. IN . DARl-MOVTH = H . S . B i 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 141 

76. O. PHILLIP. GARY = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

R. IN . DARTMOVTH . 1663 = ? . C 

77. O. HENRY . HVNT= 1669 
R, OF . DARTMOVTH = H . D . H 

78. O. EDMVN . IEFFRIE = E .E.I 
R. IN. DARTMOVTH =1657 

79. O. EDMOND . IEFFRIE = E . A . I 
R, OF . DARTMOVTH . l668»:E .A.I 

80. O, THOMAZIN . siKES = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . DARTMOVTH . 1652 = T . S 

81. O. ELIZABETH . WIKS = E . W 

R, AT DART MOTH (in three lines). 
DODBROOKE. 

83. O. WILLIAM . MASKELL= 1666 

R. (No legend.) An ancient galley (filling the field). \ 

This issuer was buried in his parish church, in the aisle of which is a stone slab 

with an inscription to his memory. I am indebted to Miss Fox*s excellent volume 

on "Kinesbndge and its Surroundings'' for a description of the above token, 

which is the only one yet found at Dodbrooke. 

EXETER. 

83. O, HENRY . AXWORTH . FOR = EXON 
R. NECESARY . CHAING = XTER 

84. O, lOHN . BAKER = An Indian with bow and arrow. 

R. IN . EXON . 1663 = I . V . B 
John Baker was Steward of Exeter in 1669. 

85. O, FRANCIS . BASS (DETRITED) 
R, IN . EXON . 1665 = F . C . B 

86. O. lOHN . BENNET = I . S . B 
R. OF . EXON = I . S . B 1657 

87. O, WILLIAM . BENNET = EXON 
R. OF . EXON . l668 = W . T . B 

88. O. ABISHA . BROCAS . IN = EXON 
R, BOOKSELLER = A book. 

Abisha Brocas was Steward of the Corporation in 1672. 

89. O. ACHIER . BROCAS = A Turk's head. 
R. IN . EXON . 1607 = A coffee-pot. 

90. O, A variety of No. 86 is spelt achior 

R. Is dated 1669, and the coffee-pot is held by a hand with 
arm issuing out of clouds ; it is larger than No. 86. 



Digitized by 



Google 



142 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

91. O, lOHN . BVRELL . GROCER = I , B 

/^, IN , EXON . 1671 = 1671 J 

Burell was Sheriff of the City in 1692, and Mayor 1698. 

92. O. STEPHEN . BVRTON = S . B 

i?. IN . EXON =1659 \ 

93. O. RALPH . BVRiGN . VINT = The Vintncrs* Arms. 

i?. NER . NEW , INN . EXON = R , B \ 

94. O, SAMVELL . CALLE = A man smoking. 

i?. GOVLDSMITH . IN . EXON = A COVCrcd CUp. \ 

Samuel Calle was Steward of the Corporation in 1667. 

95. O. lOHN CANTER = A flcur-de-lys. 

i?. IN . EXON , 1666 = 1 . C \ 

96. O. 1 . CHALWELL= 1660. 

i?. IN . EXON = I . C . \ 

97. 0» lOHN . CHALLWELL=l662 

i?. IN . EXON = I . C J 

Probably the same issuer as the preceding, although spelt differently, 
John Chalwell was Steward of the Corporation in 1670. lie was Sheriff in 
1682, Alderman in 1684, and Mayor iii 1701. 

98. O. lOHN . COGAN . IN . (16)64 = EXON 

i?. AT . ST . martin's . GATE = I . B . C \ 

99. O. lOHN . coLLiBEER = The Wcavers' Arms. 

i?. IN . EXON . 1666 = 1 . A . C \ 

100. O, WILL . COPLESTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^. IN . EXON . 1668 . = w p c conjoined. | 

1 01. O. lOHN . DAGGE = A Hon passant gardant. 

i?. OF . EXON . 1653 = I . A . D \ 

102. O, lOHN . DANNIEL . OF = EXON 

J^, EXON = 1664 } 

103. O. lOHN . DVNNiNG = A man smoking. 

^. OF . EXON . 1668 = I . S . D { 

104. O, THOMAS . FORWARD =s Three keys. 

/^, OF . EXON . 1668 = T . E , F ' J 

105. O. ROBERT . FOSTER = A shuttle. 

J^. OF. EXON . 1668 = R . M . F j 

Robert Foster was Steward of the Corporation, 1 686. 

106. O. RICHARD. FREKE = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN . EXETER . 1659 = R . M . F J 

107. O. THOMAS . GILBERT = T . G 

i?. OF , THE . CITY , OF . EXON = 1 666 | 

108. O, ANDREW . GLANFiELD = A man making candles. 

/^. OF . EXON . 1668 = A . I . G 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 143 

109. O, THO • GLOYNE . iROMON = The Ironmongers' Arms, 

^. CER, IN . EXCETER . l657 = T. G { 

no. O. RICHARD . GOSWELL = R . G 

^. IN . EXON . l668 = EXON \ 

111. O. WILLIAM , GRAViTT = A heart 

i?. AT , SIDWELL . IN . EXON = W , E . G i 

112. O. AT • THE . CITTY . OF = I • S • H 

i?, EXETER • 1658 = A bell. i 

113. O. ELIZABETH. HAKENS= 1663 

li, IN . EXETER = E . H i 

It is probable this may be a corruption of Hawkins, which is a common Devon- 
shire name. This hitherto unknown token was presented to the writer by a 
gentleman of Guildford, who cannot remember how or when it came into his 
possessbn. It is the only specimen known to exist. 

114. O. IVDETH . HATCHLEY . IN = I . H 

i?. EXON . NEARE . EASTGATE = I . H \ 

115. O, lOSEPH . HELLIOR=l666. 

Ji. OF . EXON = I . S . H \ 

116. O. EDWARD . HICKMAN = The Ironmongers* Anns. 

I^. IN . EXETER . 1659 = E . H J 

He was Steward of the Corporation in 1670. 

117. O. MiCHAELL . HIDE . IN . EXON = A boolc and harp. 

H, BOOKESELLER . 1670 = M . H ^ 

118. O. THOMAS . HiTCHE = A roll of tobacco. 

I^. ON . EXBRIDGE = T . E . H ^ 

The Tillage of Exebridge, to which Mr. Boyne assigned this token, is but a 
small hamlet, belonging to the parish of Morebath, with scarcely a shop in it ; 
whilst it is well known that before the present bridge at Exeter was built, m 1770^ 
the previous one had houses upon it, overhanging the river ; and from the word 
•• cm " Exbridge, used by " Thomas Hitche," I beheve this token certainly belongs 
to the old city. 

119. O. MARTIN . HOPKINS = A man holding pair of scales. 

/^, IN , EXON . 1666 = M . A . H J 

Of this family was Ezekiel Hopkins, Bishop of Londonderry, who was 
a native of Sandford, near Crediton. 

120. O. HENRY . HVGH = H . H 

^. OF . EXON= 1662. \ 

121. O, ROGGER . HVMPHREY = R . H 

li. IN . EXON . 1663 = P surmounted by a crown. \ 

122. O, PHILLIP . IERMAN== 1668 

I^, GROCER . IN = EXON J 

123. O. THOMAS . iONES = A man smoking. 

i?. OF . EXETER , 1669 = EXON \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



144 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

124. O, WILLIAM . lOHNS . AT = The sun. 

J^, THE . SUNN . IN . EXON = W . P . I \ 

125. O, WILLIAM . iOHNS = The sun. 

^. IN . EXON . 1670 = W . I . P { 

126. O, WILLIAM . KEAGLEY = A fleurdc-lys. 

i?. IN . EXON . 1664 = W . M . K } 

127. O, lOHN . LEDGiNGHAM = Two V*s, ODC inverted on the other. 
^. OF . EXON . 1660 = 1 . L conjoined. \ 

128. O, MARY . LissoN = A full-blown rose. 

^. IN . EXON . 1661 = M . L J 

129. O, RICHARD . LVNN = A COmb. 

J^, IN . EXON . 1664 = R . L i 

1 30. O, lOHN . MABAR = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN . EXON . 1663 = I . R . M. J 

131. O. lOHN . MATHEW . = 1662 

J^, IN . EXON = I . M } 

132. O. WILLIAM . MAY = A lantern. 

I^. IN . EXON =1663 \ 

133. O, lOSEPH . MAVDiT = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . EXETER . 1657 = 1 . M conjoined. J 

1^4. O. MARY . MOORE . 1 651= EXON 

Ji, DRINK . YEE . ALL . OF . THIS = A communion cup. 

This is a curious leaden token, i size. It has been found to be a sacraiBcs* 
token, struck for ihe use of the communicants of St. Mary Major, Exeter. Tki* 
church was formerly called " Mary Moore," also " Mary the Moor " (see Dr 
Oliver's ** History ot Exeter," p. 121), which Mr. W. Cotton suggests may hut 
been a corruption of St. Maric-la-M^re. At that date Exeter H-as m the hAods dl 
the Puritans, and as the Presbyterians had then the ascendancy, it is prrofaaKf 
their form of worship was adopted at St. Mary Major. In the Prcsbyterias 
Church it has always been the rule, even down to the present time, that no penac 
shall be permitted to partake of the sacrament who does not bring with him cr 
her a metallic check, previously procured from the church officers, which is gna 
up to the elders when the communicants stay to take the Sacrament; and doabtk»^ 
this interesting token was one of those so used at the sacred ordinance in 165 1. 

135. O. MARIE . MOVNTjOY = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

^. IN . EXON . 1666 = M . M \ 

136. O. NECIESSARY . CHANGE = P-P joined. 

J^, IN . EXON . 167 1 (In three lines across the field). \ 

137. O. y" . RED . LYON . NEAR . EXON = A lion rampant 

J^, FOR . NESSESARY . CHANGE = Jd. i 

This is the only halfpenny known to have been issued in Exeter. 

138. O. THOMAS . PAFFORD = The Merccrs' Arms. 

J^. OF . EXON . 1668 = T . L . P 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 



US 



139. O. AMBROSE . PAIGE. 1658 = A castle. 

/^. OF. EXON . 1658 «XON 

140. A variety of No. 137 is dated f666 on both sides, instead of 

1658; in other respects it is like No. 137. 
This token is now in the Ro3ral Albert Museum. 

141. O. CHRISTOPHER . PAINE =1666 
/^, OF . EXON . DYER = C . P 

142. O, HENERY . PALMER = EXON 

/^. EXiSTER = A dagger erect. 

143. O. lOHN . PALLMER . IN = The MerceTs' Arms. 

J^. EXON . MERCER . 1667 = 1 , M . P 

144. O. lOHN . PEARCE«The Haberdashers' Arms. 
A. IN . EXON . 1663 = 1 . P 

145. O. lOSEPH . PEARCE=l666 
£. OF . EXON = I . P 

146. O. WILL . PEARCE . iVNiOR = A fleur-dc-lys. 

^. OF EXON . 1668 = W . M . P 

147. O, ROBERT . PENN . 1658 = A stick of candles. 

J^, CHANDLER . IN • EXETER «= R . E . P 

148. O, lOSIAS . PERRY . 1666 = EXON. 
/^, IN . y" . COVNTY . OF . DEVON = I . P 

149. O. ANTHONY . POTTER = A pair of scalcs. 

i?. IN . EXON . 1664 = A . P 

150. O. GRACE . POTTLE = G . P 
li. OF . EXON . 1665 = G . P 

151. O. ANN . POMTLE . wiTHOVT- A three-leggcd pot.* 

i?. WEST . GATE . IN . EXON = 1 666 

152. O. lOHN . PYM = A griffin's head to the left, 

i?. OF . EXON . 1668 = 1 . S . P 
We lemm from Izacke's " Memorials of Exeter " (pp. 162, 184, 186) that John 
Pjrm, Merchant, was Steward of the Citv in 1653 ; that by an order of Privy 
Council, in the third year of James II., 1687, he was appointed one of the Cbnunon 
Council, and in 1688 he was made receiver of the Corporation funds. 

153. O. lASPER . RADCLIFF = A CaStlC. 
^. OF . EXON . 1659*1 . M . R 

154. O, NICHOLAS . REDWOOD = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

/^, OF . EXON . 1651 = N . R 

155. O, ELINOR . ROOPE. IN ==1669 
J^. ST. SIDWELL . PARRISH = EXON 



* This culinary vessel, locallv called a crock (of the same shape as it was 200 
years ago), is still generally used on open hearth fires in Devon. 

10 



Digitized by 



Google 



146 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

156. O. lOHN . RVSSELL=I . G . R 

-^. IN . EXON . 1669 = (In three lines across the field) 

157. O. lOHN . SAVNDERS = The Blacksmiths' Arms. 

i?. OF . EXON . 1668 = 1 . S 

158. O, NICHOLAS. SAVORY = N . S 
i?. IN 1663 = EXON 

159. O. GRACE . SEARELLE . IN SOVTH = G . S 
/^. GATE . STREETE . IN . EXON = G . S 

160. O. JAMES . SLADE = The Cloth workers' Arms. 

J?. OF . EXON . 1666 = 1.3 
James Slade was SheriiT of the City in 1666. 

161.^^. lOHN . SLADE=l658 

I^, OF . EXETER = I . S j 

162. O, RICHARD . TAMLING = A Hott rampant. 

^. IN . EXON . 1666 = R . T } 

163. O. THOMAS . TEMPLER = Two lighted candles. 

I^. OF . EXON . 1668 = T . I . T 

164. O. lOHN TREWMAN = Three wool bags. 

li. OF . EXON . 1668 = 1 . T 

165. O, AT THE MAiREMAiD = w . w (interlaced) 
J^. IN . EXON . 1666 = A mermaid. 

166. O, THOMAS . WHITE =1659 
li, IN . EXON . 1659 = T . W 

167. O. RICHARD . wiNBALL = A stick of candles. 

i?. IN . EXETER . 1659 = The Tallow Chandlers' Arms. 

168. O. WILLIAM • WILLIAMS ^ A lion rampant. 

i?. IN . EXON = W . A . W ' 

Recently found in Topsham. 

w 

169. O. WILLIAM. woLLMAN = A roll of tobacco 

w 
J^. OF . EXON . 1669 = A stiqjc of candles. 

170. ^. A variety of No. 158 reads 1668, and under the candles i 

a dipping trough. 
This is in my collection. 

EXMOUTH. 

171. O. THOMAS . LAiGH (unknown) 
A OF EXMOVTH (unknown). 

I can get do tidings about this token. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 147 



HALBERTON. 
172. O. SIMON. HVSSEY. i667, =Clothworkers* Arms, 

li. OF . HALBERTON . IN . DEV (on). = S . D . H J 

In the Church Register of his parish is this entry, " Simon Hnssey and Dorithy 
Osmond were marri^ the 6th daie of July, 1659. The name of the issuer still 
exists in the village. The token was found in Tiverton. 



HARTLAND. 



173. O. lOHN . RANDELL = A shuttle. 

^. OF . HARTLAND . (16)64 = 1 . R 



HATHERLEIGH. 



174. O, lOHN.GIDLEY. =1665 

li. OF . HATHERLEIGH = I . A . G J 

The late Town Clerk of Exeter, so well known and respected, was, I presume, 
one of the descendants of this ancient Devonshire family. The token was kindly 
presented to me by Mr. F. Goulding, of Pl3rmouth. 



HEMYOCK. 



175. O. ROBERT. SELLECKE = A hom. 
^. OF . HEMYOCKE = R . S 



HOLSWORTHY. 

176. O. HENRY. CAD. 1667 = An anchor. 

/^. OF . HOLSWORTHY = H . A . C J 

177. O. GEORGE . HINGSTON = 1669 

I^. OF HOLSWORTHY = G . A . H J 

HONITON. 

178. O, THOMAS . ASH . 1664 = The Salters* Arms. 

i?. IN HONYTON = T . B • A J 

179. O. DANIEL . CLEEVELAN? = A lion rampant. 

/^. OF . HONITON = D . M . C J 

180. O. WILLIAM . DARBY = The ApothecaHes' Arms. 

^. IN . HONITON . 1663 = W . D J 

This token, in good preservation, is in the Ro3ral Albert Museum at Exeter. 

181. O. lOHN . HALL =1663 

It IN . HONYTON = I . R • H J 



Digitized by 



Google 



148 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

182. O. lOHN . HALLS1667 

i?. IN . HONVTON = I . R . H J 

John Hall iasaed a token in 1663 (see No. 176), and when four yean aftetwaids 
his stock became exhausted , he sent out a fresh issue ; hot it is evident he made 
the same die serve, only altering the date of the year. I have both dates io my 
collection. 

183. O. THOMAS . HVMPHRYS = A lion rampant. 

k, OF . HVNITON . 1668 =-T . A . H \ 

184. O, GEORGE. HVMPHREYE = A horse. 

i?. IN . HVNITON . 1666 = G . I . H \ 

185. O. lOHN MINIFIED I . I . M 
Ji. OF . HONITON = I . I . M 

186. O. RICHARD . NORTHCOT = R . N 
A OF . HONVTON . MERCER »= 1 666. 

There is another Northcol at Plymouth. — (See No. 349^) 

187. O. SAMVEL . powNiNG«= A Uon passant gardant 

i?. IN . HONITON . 1 663 = S . A « P 

188. O. lOHN . RICHARDS . OF>=I . M . R 
^. HONITON . MARCHANT= 1 65 7 

189. ^. A variety of 182 has the date 1663. 

190. O. ROGER . SACHELL . IN = R . E . S 
^, HONITON . 1657 = R . E . S 

191. O. ORLANDO . SEARLE = A pafr of sheais. 

i?. OF . HONITON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY O . A . S 

192. O. HENRY . TANNER = A hat and feather. 

li. IN . HONITON . 1664 sH . E . T 



IVYBRIDGE. 

193. O, AT . THE , GOAT . 1657 = A gOftt. 

i?. AT . IVEY . BRIDGE = A . B . M } 

It is possible this may be a London token, as I am informed there was an Ivy- 
bridge m the Metropolb. 

KENTON. 

194. O, lOHN . WHITROE = I . W 

jR. IN . KENTON = 1654 J 

This token vras recently found in Kenton, near Exeter. Mr. Boyne errooeooslj 
assigned it to Kineton, Co. Warwick. 

KINGSBRIDGE. 

195. O. I AMES . BOWEN = The Mercers' Arms. 

i?. IN . KINGS . BRIDGE=I . T . B i 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 149 

196. O. NATH. FRANCKLiN« Mercers' Arms. 

-/?. OF . KiNGSBRiDGE = w conjoined. i 

197. O. EDWARD . HAYMAN = St Gcorge and Dragon. 

-/?. IN . KINGS . BRIDGE . (16)59 = E . I . H i 

198. O. THOMAS . HVNT = St Georgc and Dragon. 

^. IN . KINGSBRIDGE = T . S . H 

199. O. HEAD . OF . THE . MAVDEN = The Mercers' Arms, 

J^. KINGS . BRIDG . 1657 = I . M . H. i 

The angular legend on the obverse of this token, which ii, I believe, quite 
anique, evidently refers to the device. The Mercers' Arms ; viz., the host of the 
Virgin Mary, crowned, hair dishevelled, issuing from clouds. 

200. O. lOHN . TRIPE . 1659 = A ship. 

Ii. IN . KINGS . BRIDGE = I . C . T i 

This token beloi^ to Mr. W. Gill, of Tavistock. The Tripe family is still to 
he found in South Devon. 

KINGSWEAR. 

201. O, lAMES . BUTLER . OF = A Still. 

^. KINGS . WYRE . IN . DEVON = I . K . B i 



LYMPSTONE. 

802. O. lOHN . REED . IN . THE= 1 666 

IL PARISH . OF . LIMSON = I . E . R { 

It b still pronounced Limson by the natives, 

MODBURY. 

203. O, lONATHAN . ELLE= A full-faced bust with pointed beard, 
i?. OF . MODBVRY . 1 662 = A roll of tobacco. J 

When this issue was exhausted, the following, two years later, was sent out 

204. O. lONATHAN . ELLE = A hat. 

Ji, OF . MODBVRY . 1664 = A roU of tobacco. J 

205. 0» Legend and device as on No. 195. 

£. OF . MODBVRY . i668 = i£ (filling the field, probably 
meaning i . h . e) \ 

206. O, THOMAS . POTTELL = Arms, a chevron between three heads 

couped. 

i?. OF . MODBVRY . l668 = T . M . P J 

207. O. N . s«=R . s = s . R. (in three lines across field). 

-/?. MODBV RY (in two lines). The Mercers' Arms. (J size) 

This inay have been issued by a firm of t^ee drapers, or the second pair of 
initials may have been those of the wife of N. S., the head of the firm of two 
partners ; but- it is not now known what their names were. 



Digitized by 



Google 



150 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



MORETON HAMPSTEAD. 

208. O. Y^ . 8 . MEN . & . FEEFFEES = OF MORTON 1670 

i 

^. FOR . Y" . BENEFIT . OF . Y^ . POOR = A church. I 

209. O. AN . HALFPENY . FOR . Y^ , BENEFIT = A chUFCh. 

i?. OF . Y° . POORE . OF . MORETON = HEM . PSTED . 1670 (In 

three lines). J 

210. O, THOMAS . AISH = HIS . HALF-PENY 

^. IN . MORTON . 1666 = T . S . A J- 

211. O. lOHN . NEWTON = A man making candles, i . m . n 

li. IN . MORTON . 1667 = HIS HALF-PENY I 

As there are other Mortons in England, the two last may belong elsewhere ; 
but both Ash and Newton are Devon^ire names. 

212. O. lOHN . TUCKER . 1 668 = A pair of scissors. 

^. OF . MOORTON . HAMSTED = HIS HALFE . PENNY . I . I . T J 

NEWTON ABBOT. 

213. O. WM . FVRNEAVX . OF . NEWTON = The family Arms. 

i?. ABBOTT . IN . DEVONSHEIR = HIS HALF PENY J 

214. O. ELIZABETH . MANINGE . l668 = OF . NEWTON . ABBETT 

i?. IN . THE . COUNTY . OF . DEVON . HER . HALFE PENNY . 

E . M 4 

215. O. lOHN . MANINGE . OF « HIS HALFE PENY 

i?. NEWTON . ABOT . 1669 = I . E . M and a flower. h 

216. A variety of this, smaller, reads half, etc* ^ 

NEWTON BUSHEL. 

217. O. RICHARD . REYNELL = The Merccrs' Arms. 

li, OF . NEWTON . BUSHELL = R . R i 



OKEHAMPTON. 

218. O. CHRISTOPHER . DREWE = C . D 

^. OF . OKEHAMPTON = The Mcrcers* Arms. J 

219. 0» HESTER . GEYRE . OF = H , G 

A OKHAMPTON . 1652 = H . G J 

220. O. THOMAS . lANES . IN = A pair of scales. 

i?. OAK . HAMTON . l666 = T . I . M J 

* For a large variety of this Jd. see MS. additions, No. 345. 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



DEVONSHIRE. 151 

221. O. THOMAS . MiNss . 1667= A pair of scales J d . t . m 

I^. IN . OAKHAMPTON = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

222. O. WILLIAM . PINGSTON . 0F = A Woolpack. 

i?. OCKHAMTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . P ^ 

223. O. lOHN . SHEBBEARE = Arms of the family. 

^. IN . OKEHAMPTON . 1667 = HIS . HALF . PENY ^ 

224. O. lOHN . SHEBBER - The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. IN . OKHAMTON = I . S \ 

This is probably the same issuer as No. 223, although spelt dtflferently. 

225. O. FRANCIS . SQVIRE . op=>A roU of tobacco and a pipe. 

I^» OKEHAMPTON . MERCER = HIS HALF . PENY . F . G . S ^ 

226. O. OCKINGTON . 1657 = 1 . M . G 

I^, HALFE . PENY (in two Hnes across the field). J 

A variety of this token is ascribed by Mr. Bojme to Oakinfton, Cambridge- 
shire ; but as " Ockington " is the old local name for Okdiampton, I have 
ascribed it to the latter town. The name thus spelt may still be seen on one of 
the old milestones. It is an early date for a halfpenny, which were mostly struck 
after 1660. 

ORESTON. 

227. O. WILLIAM . AND . ARTHVR = A man. 

^. COLLINGS . OF . ORSON = W . A . C J 

This token, which is in the Museum of the Royal Institution, Truro, was 

issned at Oreston, an old populous hamlet in the pansh of Plymstock, near Ply« 

moath. The place is still locally pronounced as it is spelt in the phonetic style on 

the coin. 

OTTERY ST. MARY. 

228. O, RICHARD . CORNISH = A woolpack. 

li. OF . OTTRY . ST . MARIES = R . R . C J 

229. O, HANNYBALL . FOLLET = A Uon rampant. 

/^, IN . OTTERY . ST . MARY = H . B . F . 1666 J 

230. O. RICHARD . HVLL . 1 666 = A woolpack. 

^. IN . OTTERY . ST . MAREY = R . E . H J 

231. O. AT . THE . RED . LION . IN = A lion rampant 

/^. AVTRY . S . MARY . 1656. I . E . M \ 

The issuer's names are unknown. (For Nathaniel Sweet of Avtry token see 
No. 236). The token is in my collection. 

232. O, HENERY . MARCKER, IN = H . I . M 

J^, OTTERY . S^ . MAREY, 1667 = HIS HALF PENY | 

This token was kindly presented to the writer by P. O. Hutchinson, Esq., of 
Sicbnoath. 

233. O. lOHN . MOSSE • 5 roses, etc — A lion rampant 

^. AVTRY . S^ . MARY . 1664 = 1 . E . M. J 

This probably was issued by the same issuer as 231, the initials being identical 



Digitized by 



Google 



152 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

234. 0» RICHARD . NESBiTT= Device Dot Stated. 

j?. IN . OTTERY . ST . MARY = R .R.N. \ 

From a MS. list of tokens in the Library of the London Numismatic Society. 

235. O. THOMAS . OSMOND = A double-hcaded eagle. 

^. IN . OTTERY , ST . MARY = T . D . O i 

236. O. NATHANIELL , SWEET = A man smoklng. 

^. OF . AVTRY 1658 = N . M . S \ 

This token is assigned by Boyne to Austrey, Ca Warwick ; but I belicre it 

belongs to Ottenr St. Mary, still locally pronounced ylu^fy. Sec No. 22a, wtet 

the town is spelt avtry (s . mary). Another token by Nathaniell Sweet wi$ 

issued at Colyton, only a few miles from Ottery. See ante. No. 6a 

237. O, RICHARD . TEAPE . 0F= 1666 

^. S . MARY . AVTERY = R . M . T i 

PLYMOUTH. 

238. O. ABRAHAM . APPELBEE = A ship in I'ull Sail, 

i?. OF . PLYMOTH . l666 = A . M . A i 

239. O. MARY . BAKER =166 7 

i?. IN . PLYMOVTH = M . B i 

240. O, MAXEMILLIAN . BOVSH. = A trefoil. 

H. IN . PLYMOVTH . 1658 = Three cinquefoils pierced. \ 

The above was bought by Mr. R. N. Worth, F.G.S., of Plymouth, at a coxiockf 

shop in London, and kindly lent for description. 

Boush was prolmbly a foreigner. There were several living in the town at the 

time, and carrying on business by permission (purchased) of the Corporation. 

241. O. ELIZABETH . BYLAND = The Coopers* Arms. 

Ji. OF . PLYMOUTH . 1667 = E . B | 

242. O, HENRY . CLARKE = A HoD rampant 

Ji, OF . PLIMOVTH . 1667 = H . M . C { 

243. O. NICHOLAS . coLE=s A full-blown rose. 

/^. OF . PLYMOVTH . 1665 = N . C .\ 

Nicholas Cole was one of the Society of Friends, and suffered much on thst 
account. In 1660 he was taken out of a meeting at Plymouth with others by 
eight constables and before the Mayor, when, because he refused to take the oaUi 
of allegiance, he was sent to prison at Exeter. Again, in 1662, he was sent to the 
County Gaol '*for being at a conventicle, and holdmg it unlawful to swcftr is 
any case." He with others lay there till the next sessions. In 1663 he was fined I2<i. 
for absence from public worship ; and because he refused to pay, goods worth 6s. 
were taken away. In 1664 N. C. opened bis shop after the soldiers bad bees 
sent to close it, for which he was taken before the Mayor, when, rather than giv« 
sureties for his good behaviour, he was committed to prison, and remained tneit 
for thirteen days. He died in 1674. ^i^ trade was a mercer. 

244. O. lOHN . COOKE = Arms, a chevron between three pears. 

^. IN . PLYMOVTH = I . M . C \ 

John Cooke was a merchant. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 153 

245. O. HENRY . DAVIS = HIS . HALF . PENNY 

i?. PLYMOVTH . 1669 = H . D J 

246. O. BENIAMAN . DVNNING = A Castle. 

li, IN . PLYMOTH . 1666 = B . D { 

247. O. MARGRET . EATON = The Apothecarics' Arms. 

^. IN . PLIMOVTH . 1665 = M . E \ 

Christopher Eaton is mentioned as an apothecary in the accounts of the siege of 

Plymouth, and as being paid for his professional services. Probably Margaret was 

his widow. The siege lasted, with intervals, from the autumn of 1642 to the spring 

of 1646. 

248. O. GRACE . ELLIOTT = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

I^. OF . PLYMOVTH = G . E J 

249. O. IVDITH . FORD =1669 

H. OF . PLYMOVTH = I . F i 

250. O. EDWARD . GEFFERY = The arms of Plymouth. 

J?. IN . PLYMOTH . l664 = E . E . G J 

We learn firom Mr. R. N. Worth's "History of Plymouth " that a William 
Geffery was mayor of the borough in 1657-58. He may have been the father or 
brother of the issuer. The token is in the Exeter Museum. 

251. O. lOACHiM . CEVERS = A castle. 

A OF . PLYMOVTH . 1656 = I . A . G ^ 

This man was a vintner. 

252. O. RALPH . GORDGE (stc) ^Thrte gurges. 

H. IN . PLYMOVTH = R . M . G \ 

This token belongs to Mr. W. Gill, of Tavistock, who gave me the description. 
The three gurges (whirlpools) used as arms of the family were no doubt intended 
as a rebus on £eir name of Gorges. 

253. O. RICHARD. HAMLYN = A buDch of grapes, with leaf and 

tendril 

i?. IN . PLYMOVTH . 1659 = R . P . H J 

I am indebted for the description of this token to Mr. Robert Baker, formerly of 
Plymouth, now of Limerick, in whose possession it is. 

254. O. CHRISTOPHER . HATCH = A SWan. 

Ji. OF . PLYMOVTH . 1658 = C . R • H J 

255. O, MICHAEL . HOOKE . GROCER = The GroceTs' Arms. 

/^. IN . PLYMOVTH . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY J 

256. O, lAMES . IRIESH . AT . Y^ . 3 = Thrce fish-hooks. 

I^. OF . PLYMOVTH . 1667 = 1 , E . I i 

257. O. lAMES . lACKSON . AT . THE = The SUn. 

Ji, SVNN . IN . PLYMOVTH . 165 £ = I . G . I J 

258. O. WM. M0VNTSTEPHENS=l67O 

Ji. OF . PLYMOVTH = W . P . M J 

This issuer was not a freeman of the borough, and in the year this token was 

issued paid the Corporation for leate to open his shop windows the four years 

preceding — ^none but freemen having the right to carry on trade in the town 

without consent of the Corporation. 



Digitized by 



Google 



154 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

259. O. SAMVELL . NORTHCOTT = S . N 

i?. POSTMA . IN . PLYMOVTH= 1653 J 

S. N. was Mayor of the Borough in 1658, and we learn from Worth's " History 
of Pljrmouth " that he establish«i a post-house for letters ; the word ** Postma " 
on the token is evidently an abridgment of Postmcuter, Mr. Worth farther 
informs us he was a sufferer for conscience' sake. During his mayoralty he was 
required to give currency in church to a proclamation issued by Parliament. He 
refused from scruples of piety, and was immediately sent for to London, and 
imprisoned. This untoward af&ir ended in his ruin. (** History of Pljmioath,'' 
P* X33-) It is probable the celebrated historical painter, Tames Northcote^ R.A., 
was one of this family. He was bom at Pljrmouth in 1746, and his father was a 
watchmaker. 

260. O. 'ROGER . OLIVER . 1663 = Arms, a chevron between three 

trees. 

R, IN . PLYMOl H . MERCER = R . O \ 

261. O, EDWARD . PATESON = The Drapers' Arms. 

R, IN . PLYMOVTH = E . A . P j 

Exlward Patteson is mentioned in the siege accounts as selling cloth to the 
Committee of Defence, and (with Thomas Dalkeinge) as '* making and tarreinge 
capes for ye centinells at ye outworks." This is interesting as an early mention oi 
a rude kind of waterproofing. 

262. O. lOHN . PAYNE = A pelican feeding its young. 

R. IN . PLYMOVTH . 1656 = 1 . P ] 

263. O. SIMON . PAYNTER = Four castlcs (Arms of Plymouth). 

R. PLYMOVTH . 1657 =S . A . P \ 

264. O. RICHARD . PERRY . 1658 = A man making candles. 

R. IN . PLYMOVTH = R . D . P \ 

265. O. THOMAS . PHiLLiPPS = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. IN . PLYMOTH («^r) = T . M . P 
The wife's name was Miriam. — (R.N.W.) 

266. O, losiAS . PiCKES = An anchor with cable. 

R. PLYMOVTH . 1657 = 1 . E . P 

267. O. HENRY . PIKE . AT . THE . THREE = Three Craues. 
R, CRANES . IN , PLYMOVTH = H . p coujoined 

268. O. THO . PIKE . AT . Y^ . 4 = The Arms of Plymouth. 

R. CASTLES . IN . PLYMOTH = T . P . 1 65 7 

269. O, THOMAS . POWELL = A roll of tobacco. 

R. PLYMOTH . 1669 = T . I . P 

270. O, WILLIAM . REEPE= 1666 
R. OF . PLYMOVTH = W . I . R 

B. 173- ( 

G. 260. ( William Reepe was a grocer ; when he died his widow continned tm 
business, but had to pay the Corporation for leave to open her shop windows, a^ 
was the custom then.--(R. N. W.) 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 1$$ 

271. O. WILLIAM . TOM . GROCER = AiTOs of the Tom family.* 

i?. IN . PLIMOVTH . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY . W . T J 

272. O. WILLIAM . TOMS = Family arms as above. 

J^. IN . PLYMOVTH . 1663 = W . T J 

In W. T.'s, i issued in 1667, the s m name is left out. 

273. O. ADAM . TVRTLY = The Grocers' Aims. 

J^, IN . PLYMOTH = A . T J 

274. O. WILLIAM . WARREN = A flcCCe 

J^. IN . PLYMOVTH . 1656 = W . I . W J 

275. J^. A variety has no date. Initials w . w J 
Warren was a vintner. One of these tokens was issued when he was a widower. 

He gave the site of Charles Church, at Plymouth, and had in return conveyed to 
him by the Mayor and Corporation a place of sepulture for himself and family in 
the churchyara, and a pew wherein to hear the word of God preached in the 
church. 

276. O, WILLIAM . WEEKS — A clasped book. 

J^. IN . PLYMOVTH . 1659 = W . S . W J 

Weeks was a stationer, and supplied goods to the Corporation. He was probably 
the William Weekes who was Mayor in 1674-5. 

277. O. lOHN . WILLIAMS = An Open book. 

J^, IN . PLYMOVTH . STATIONER = I . W J 

Proposed transfer of token to Devonshire. 

In p. 438 of Boyne, under Sutton (Co. Surrey), we have this 
description : 

278. O, SAMVEL . SEELEY = The Grocers' Arms. 

H, OF . SVTTON . 1657 = S . S . ^ ^ 

There are about fifty Buttons in England, and Mr. Boyne (p. 438, No. 181) says 
this is •* placed to Surrey without any authority." Now we learn from Mr. Worth's 
•• History of Pljrmouth ' that in the middle of the seventeenth century the Seeleys 
were a leading Plymouth family, and gave several mayors to the borough. More- 
over, Sutton is the old name of Plymouth, whilst the name is still retained in 
Sutton Harbour, and in one of the ecclesiastical districts of the town, Sutton-on' 
Pl3rm. Therefore I coincide with Mr. Worth's opinion, that we may fairly claim 
this token as one of Plymouth. 

ST. THOMAS. 

279. O. DAVID . HARTE . 0F = A workshop and three men at work 

in front of it 
/^, ST . THOMAS . 1666 = A wool-comb. i 

280. O, DAVID . HART . ST = EXON 

jR. THOMAS . NEERE = EXON { 

281. O, WILLIAM . SNOW . OF . ST = EXON 

i?. THOMAS . NEAR . EXETER = A pair of scales. i 

282. O. A variety has date 1671 in the field over exon \ 

* Three bucks' heads couped ; crest, a Cornish chough. W. T. was Mayor of 
the Town in 1677.78. 



Digitized by 



Google 



156 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



SALCOMBE. 

283. O, THOMAS . COLLMAN = The GlazicTs' Arms. 

jR. OF . SALCOMBE = T . c . and two small roses. J 

284. O. FRANCIS . FORD . OF = A dolphin. 

^. SALCOMBE . l6S9 = F . E . F \ 

SAMPFORD PEVEREL. 

285. 0» lOHN . STONE . IN . 1670 = HIS HALFE PENNY 

J^. SAMPFORD . PEVERELL=1 . M . S ^ 

SANDFORD. 

286. O, WILLIAM . MANLY = W . I . M 

^. OF . SANFORD = W . I . M \ 

287. O, GILBERT. NICOALLS = A shuttle. 

J^. IN . SANDFORD . l66o = G .M.N \ 

SHEEPWASH. 

288. O* BARTHOLOMEW . VENTON = B . E . V 

^. IN . SHEEPWASH . l668 = HIS . HALFE . PENNY \ 

SILVERTON. 

289. O. HENRY . WALTER . IN . i666 = A horse passant 

J^. SILVERTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = H . W i 

290. O. SILFERTON=l66o 

^, DEVONSHIRE = I . Y \ 

The spelling of this token exactly represents the present pronnnciadoo of ^ 
name of the town, especially by its poorer inhabitants. 

SIDBURY (Near Sidmouth). 

291. O. M . p . IN . siDBVRY = The sun in splendour. 
J^. IN . devonsheire = An eagle displayed. 

SOUTHMOLTON. 

292. O, iohn anthoney=i667 

^. OF . sovTH . MOVLTON = I . A . and merchant's marL i 

293. O. SAMVELL . BADCOCK =^ A COCk. 

i?. IN . SOVTH . MOVLTON = S . B \ 

294. O. RICHARD . BOWDEN = A Stocking and two annulets. 

/^. OF . SOVTH . MOVLTON . (16)69 = R . E . B J 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 157 

295. O. RICHARD . BOWDEN . 1669 = A Stocking, etc., as No. 267. 
^. OF . sovTH . MOVLTON = R . E . B . and Ornamental knot. \ 

296. O. ED . BROAD . sovTHMOLTON = The Meicers' Arms in shield 

^. WHEN . YOU . PLEASE . ILE . CHAINGE . THESE = ^ | 

A very rare and curious unpublished token, with the legend on reverse in a 
[louble circle. 

297. O. EDWARD . BROAD = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^. IN . SOVTH . MOVLTON >= E . M . B \ 

Is now in the writer's collection. 

298. O. WILLIAM . DOWNES . 0F= A bell. 

J^. SOVTH . MOVLTON . 1652 = W . E . D | 

299. O. HENRY , lESS . i668 = Two shuttles. 

J^, OF . SOVTH . MOVLTON = HIS . HALF . PENY .H.C.I. J 

300. O. HENRY , lESS . i668 = Two shuttles. 

iP. OF . SOVTH . MOVLTON = H . C . I 

301. O. THOMAS . LAKE . i668 = A horse saddled and bridled. 

iP. OF . SOVTH . MOVLTON = T . M . L | 

302. O. CHRISTOPHER . MAY . iN = A fleur-de-lys. 

J^, SOVTH . MOVLTON . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENNY C . E . M | 

303. O. CHRISTOPHER . MAY = A fleur-dc-lys. 

^. OF . SOVTH . MOVLTON = C . E . M 
This undated id. is a variety of above. 



TAVISTOCK. 

304. O. DAVID . CONDY . OF . 1669 = The Clothworkers* Arms. 

I^. TAVESTOCKE . IN , DEVON = D . C J 

305. O. RICHARD • HVCHiNGs . IN . = The Grocers' Arms. 

iP. TAVISTOCK . IN . DEVON . =R . H . 1666 i 



TAWTON (NORTH). 
306. O. lAMES . DAGGARYs A dagger. I D. 

Jt IN . NORTH . TAWTON = I . E . D 



TAWTON (SOUTH). 

307. O. lOHN . LETHBRIDGE . OF SOVTH = I . M . L 

A TAWTON . CHAGFORD . AND . MORETON = HIS HALFE PENNY ^ 

Probahly the same man who issued the Zeal ^d. ; if so, he had shops in four 
villages. They are all in the same locality. 



Digitized by 



Google 



158 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



TEIGNMOUTH. 

308. O. THOMAS. IORDAN = T. I 

J^. OF . TING . MOVTH . 1654 = T . I ; 

THORNCOMBE. 

309. O. ROGER . BRiANT . OF = Pair of sheoTs. 

J^, THORNECVM . I757 = R . B 5 

310. O. SAMVELL . STAPLE = A pair of scales. 

J^. OF . THORNCOMBE . (l6)68 = S . E . S % 

The parish of Thorncombe, formerly a detached part of Devon, was i1V4tH tc 
Dorsetsnire by Act of Parliament in 1842; but as this list represents a state of 
things two hundred years ago, I have thought it right to retain tnese tokens in oc 
County Series. 

THORVERTON. 

311. O, lOHN . THOMAS = A dolphin. 

J^. IN . THARVERTON = I . W . T 1 



TIVERTON. 

312. O. THOMAS . ALLDREAD = The Clothworkcrs' Arms. 

^. OF . TIVERTON . 1667 = HIS . HALF . PENY. * 

313. O, FRANCIS . BELLAMY = A fleece 

J^, OF . TIVERTON . 1664 = F . B \ 

314. O. RICHARD. BELLAMY — A flceCC. 

^. OF . TIVERTON . 1661 — R . H . B \ 

315. O. lAMES . CLARKE = HIS . HALF PENY 

J^. IN , TIVERTON . 1666 = I . E . C i 

I . C. was Churchwarden of Tiverton in 1653. The office of ChurchwardGi a 
an important one at Tiverton, and it is generally occupied by men of good kxal 
standing. In addition to the ordinary duties connected with it, the Charchwtrdei 
of that borough is legal custodian and manager of several important charitMS. 

316. O. THOMAS. DAYMAN = The family arms. 

J^. OF . TIVERTON (16)58 = T . A . D 

The arms are, gules, three fusils conjoined in fess argent, in a shield. Tk 
fusil, an elongated lozenge (derived from French /usSe, a spindle full of yam), naj 
have been selected as their arms for a double reason — first, to show their occupt- 
tion of woollen manufacturers ; second, as a rebus on their original name of 
Diamond. This person s name is spelt Deyman in the old Parish Register. 

317. O. WILLIAM . DAYMAN = Arms as last 

^. IN TIVERTON . l666 = HIS . HALF PENY ^ 

W. D. was Churchwarden in 1666, and was a clothier. 

318. O. WILLIAM . DAYMAN = Three diamonds (two and oneX 

J^, BARRINTON TIVERTO" = W . A . D i 

Harrington is one of the old streets of the town. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. 159 

319. O. WILLIAM . DiAMAN = Three diamonds (two and one). 

^. IN . TIVERTON . 1664 = W . A . D J 

From the device on the O. and the initials on the J^. being like the preceding 
»ne, it is likely this token was issued by the same person. 

320. O. THOMAS . FOWLER = The Mercers' Anns. 

^. IN . TIVERTON . 1652 =T . F J 

He was acting Churchwarden in 1647, and Mayor of the Borough in 1665. 

321. O. ROGER . FROST . IN . TIVERTON = R . R . F 

J^, His . ffalfo . Penny (Script in three lines) = A shuttle. ^ 
We learn by the old Register his wife's name was Ruth. 

322. O. lOHN . GODDARD . 0F= 1657 

J^, TIVERTON . DEvoNSH** = I . G conjoined. J 

J. G. was acting Churchwarden in 1641. He was also one of the Trustees of 

ChUcott*s Charity, and his autograph appears in their old account-book. He 

died in 1663, and it is recorded on his tomb that he was ** some time Maior of 

this Borough.*' 

323. O. FRANCIS HOW 1659 = A cloth brush. (?) 

J^. IN . TWERTON = F . A . H ^ 

His death b recorded in the old Church Register, June 5th, 1667. 

324. O. GREGORY . MAVRV = Three moor cocks. 

J^. IN . TIVERTON . 1667=0 . S . M J 

It is probable the moor fowl was a punning device referring to the name of the 
issaer, pronounced Moorey. We learn from the old Church Register that he was 
a clothier, and that his wife's Christian name was Sidwell. 

325. O. MICHAELL . OTWAV = M . W . O 

^. IN . TIVERTON . l666 = HIS HALF . PENY | 

Wc learn from the Parish Register that he was a clothier. His name is spelt 
there **Oatway.'' 

326. O. lOHN . PATEE=l66l 

^. IN . TIVERTON = I . P J 

327. O. lOHN . PATY . OF = A COCk. 

P, TIVERTON . 1664= HIS . HALFE . PENNY ^ 

There is little doubt this was the same man who issued the farthing. The 
name is still to be met with in the town, but is now spelt Patey. The former 
(B. 206) is a much rarer token than this unpublished halfpenny. 

328. O. THOMAS , SAMFORD = A fleur-de-lys. 

J^. IN . TIVERTON = T . A . S J 

He was acting Churchwarden in 1669. His name is spelt Sampford by the 
local historian, Martin Dunsford. 

329. O. AQViLA SKINNER = Three fleurs-de-lys. 

J^. OF . TIVERTON . 1651 = A . C. S J 

330. P. A variety from another die reads, tyverton ^ 
A. S. was a Mercer, and was Churchwarden in 1637. There is a singular 

letter, still preserved, from the Lord Lieutenant of Devon, to Thomas Fowler, 
Esq., Mayor of Tiverton, dated Exon, March 15th, 1655, giving orders that Aquila 
Skinner and four others (named) should be turned out of the Corporation, as 
** Enemies to the Commonwealth,*' and that five others (named) should take Uieir 
places, and if any of thepersons named dorefuseto3deld obedience hereunto, then you 
are to give me an account thereof that I may take an effectual course for the same. 

(Signed) Desborough. 



Digitized by 



Google 



l6o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

331. O. RICH . STRANG AR . TALLOW = A mail making candles. 

J^. CHANLER . IN . TIVERTON = R . P . S J 

332. O. lOHN . VPCOTT=l657 

J^. OF . TIVERTON = I . V \ 

He was Churchwarden in 1645. The family afterwards removed to CdlumptoD, 
and took their trade of clothiers with them. 

333. O. WILLIAM . WARREN . 0F = W . T . W 

J?. TIVERTON . MERCER . l666 = HIS . HALF . PENY \ 

The old Register informs us that his wife's name was Thomasin. 

334. O. THOMAS . WEBBER . IN = A diamond 

J^. TIVERTON . 1666 = T . K . W \ 

We leam from the Church Register that he was a clothier. 

335. O, THOMAS . WHiCHAR = A diamond. 

J^. OF . TIVERTON , 57 = T . K . w. Mint mBikyJleur-de-iison 
each side. i 

This rare and hitherto unpublished token, recently acquired by the writer, was 
dug up some years ago in a garden at Tiverton. 

336. O. RICHARD . WOOD =1663 

I^, IN . TIVERTON = R . E W \ 

He was Churchwarden in 167a 

337. O, AT . THE . RED . LION = A lion rampant. 

I^. IN . TIVRTON (sic) 1657 =T . I \ 

The name of the issuer represented by the initials r. i. is not now known. 

TOPSHAM. 

338. O. SVSAN . DRAKE . OF = A WyveiTl. 

I^. TOPSHAM . IN . COVn(ty) , DEVON »S . D J 

Probably S. D. was a collateral branch of the celebrated Drake family of thb 
county, whose arms were argent, a wyvem, with wings displayed, gules. 

339. O. ROBERT NEwcoMBE = A fleur-dc-lys. 

^. OF • TOPSHAM . 1668 = R .S.N j 

340. O. PETER . TRAPNELL . 0F= 1 668 

J?, TOPSHAM . MERCER = P . D . T 1 



TORRINGTON. 

341. O. GREAT . TORRINGTON . 1 668 (in four lines). 

J^. A fleur-de-lys issuing from water. (The Arms of the 
Borough.) I 

342. O. ARTHVRE AVRE OF = Arms in a shield. 

I^. CREATE . TORINGTON = A . A . A \ 

This belongs to a gentleman of Bideford, who kindly lent it to the writer for 

description. In the " Visitation " book is a pedigree of the Ayre family, signed 

Arthur Avre, spelt as by the issuer, but the arms described there do not corre* 

spond with those on the token. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DEVONSHIRE. l6l 

343. O, ANTHONY DENIS IN = A stick of candles. 

A GREAT , TORINGETON = HIS HALFE PENY TOKEN J 

344. O. lAMES . GLOYNE . 1669 = A pack-horse. 

/^. IN . GREAT . TORRINGTON = HIS . HALF . PENY | 

345. O. RALPH . HARBOTTLE . iN = A bottlc on a hare. 

/^. GREAT . TORINGTON = G . E . H \ 

346. O. THo' . POWELL . IN . GREAT. = The Merccrs' Arras. 

^. TORINGTON . MERCER . 7I. =T , E . P. \ 

347. O. GEORGE TITHERLY= 1666 

^. IN . GREAT . TORINGTON = G , D . T J 

348. 0» Richard . Tucker . of (script, in three lines). 

R. Great . Terrington . 1668 (script, in three lines). \ 



TOTNES. 

349. O, I AMES . COCKEY = A COCk. 

R, OF . TOTNES . 1668 = I . E . C \ 

350. O. EDMOND . CORBYN = A cavalicr's hat 

R, OF . TOTTNES . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY, E . S . C \ 

351. O, lOHN CROSSE = A cross. 

R, IN . TOTNES . 1669 = HIS . HALF . PENY \ 

352. O, MARY . FAR WELL = Arms in shield; viz., a chevron be- 

tween three escallop shells. 

R, OF . TOTTONES . 1 658 = M . F 

353. O, PETER GAiLARD = The Barber-Surgeons' Arms. 

R. IN . TOTNES . 1657 = P . E . G \ 

354. O. lEAMS . MARTYN . OF = I . M 

R, TOTNESS . IN . DEVON . I . M \ 

355. R. A variety is dated 1653 (under i . m). \ 

356. O, WILL . RVMBELLO = The Weavers' Arms. 

R, IN . TOTTNESS = W . I . R \ 

357. O. lOHN . RENNELL . OF = A hoop. 

R, TOl'NES . IN . DEVON = VINTNER \ 

358. O. PETOLOMvs . SAMPSON = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. OF . TOTTONES = P . S \ 

359. O. PETER . WILLIAMS = The Haberdasher's Arms. 

R. OF . TOTNES = P . T . W \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



i62 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



UFFCULME. 

360. O, ROBERT . BATT . OF =« The Clothworkers* Arms. 

^. VFCVLME . DEVON . 167I = HIS HALFE PENNY \ 

361. O, ION ... AN . BERELD = HIS . HALFEPENY. 

/^. OF . VFCVLME . 167I =1 . M . B \ 

362. O. HVMPHREY . BOWDEN . OF = The Clothworkers* Arms. 

J^, VFCVLME . DEVON . l668 = HIS HALF PENV ). 

363. O. HVMPHREY . BOWDEN = The Same. 

^. OF . VFCVLME . DEVON = H . E . B J 

364. O, lOHN . DYER . 0F= 1658 

I^. VFCOMB . IN . DEVON = I . M . D \ 

365. O. FRANCIS . PRATT =1666 

^. IN VFCVLME= F . E . P \ 

This unpublished token was kindly presented to me by the late Mr. H. Chmtie, 
London. 

UPLYME. 

366. O, lOHN . LIDDON . 1667 = A mop. 

/^, IN . VPLYME IN DEVON = I . M . L J 

367. 0. A variety reads " Lidon," and is not nearly so rare a<! 

No. 336. 1 

ZEAL. 

368. O. lOHN . LETHBRIDGE = Three wheat-sheaves in a row. 

^. OF . SOVTH . ZEALE = HALF PENY (in tWO lines) i 



Digitized by 



Google 



2)oreetebire- 



Number of Tokens issued 224 

Number of Places issuing Tokens .... 30 

Town Pieces issued at Blandford, Dorchester, Lyme 

Regis, Poole, Shaftesbury, Sherborne, Weymouth, and 

Wimborne. 



Sub-Editor and Collaborateur : 



J. S. Udal, Esq., F. R. Hist. Soc. 
(Of the Inner Temple), 

The Manor House, 

Symondsbury, 

Bridport. 

II — 2 

Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Boractabire* 

"The tokens of this county are principally farthings ; the halfpennies 
are very few in number, and there are no pennies." 

Such is the statement of Boyne in his work upon "Seventeenth 
CJentury Tokens" (1858). Dorset, however, is unusually rich in the 
number of " town-pieces " ; the boroughs that issued tokens in their 
corporate capacity being Blandford, Dorchester, Lyme Regis, 
Poole, Shaftesbury, Sherborne, Weymouth, and Wimbome — this 
last being of the value of a halfpenny. With the exception of the 
adjoining county of Somerset, which has thirteen, Dorset contains a 
laxger number of town-pieces than any other county in England. 
These town-farthings vary somewhat in size, but are generally as large 
as the halfpennies of private traders. There is, however, in the 
I >orset County Museum at Dorchester, a variety of the Dorchester 
town-piece, of the size of an ordinary farthing token, only much 
thicker. (No. 57, /^J/.) It is the only one I have ever met with, 
and I should imagine it to be very scarce. There were several pairs 
of dies used in striking the Dorchester town-pieces, but, with this 
exception, they were all about the usual size. 

The town-pieces all bear the same date, 1669, with the exception 
of Poole, which is dated 1667 ; thus showing that the corporations 
did not follow the example of the private issuers for many years. To 
Poole, therefore, belongs the honour of being by two years the first of 
the corporate towns in providing for the needs of the town in the way 
of small and "necessary change." That such a course was not 
decided upon without grave consideration, may be gathered from the 
entries in the minutes contained in the public records of the various 
corporations, which authorized the issue and the quantity of these 
town-farthings. These orders, where known, will be found more par- 
ticularly dealt with under the various corporate towns in the body of 
the work. 

The boroughs generally do not appear to have troubled themselves 
very much about the issue of tokens by private individuals, and in 
only one instance can I find any notice taken of any such issue. 
This was in the case of Lawrence Righton, of Dorchester, who had 
issued a halfjpenny token, and an entry occurs in the borough 
minutes, referring directly to his token, and which I have given at 
length in the description of the token. (No. TS^post) 

To Blandford, however, must be accorded the distinction of having 
issued corporation farthings in 1623, if we may judge from an entry 



Digitized by 



Google 



i66 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

in Mrs. Farquharson's M.S. Memoranda^ mentioned by Hutchins in 
his " History of Dorset " (vol. i., p. 221). If tliis be so, the farthings 
alluded to there must have been issued under the patent granted fc^ 
King James I. to John, Baron Harington (see note under Blandfoni 
post\ and had nothing to do with the voluntary issue of town-pieces 
by the corporation six-and-forty years later, which only are the subject 
of our enquiry now. 

The earliest date on any Dorset token is 1650, that of Richard 
OUiver, of Poole, who is run very close by John Feisher, of Evershot, 
and Zanchy Harvyn, of Milton Abbas, both dated 165 1. It is some- 
what unfortunate that I have not in my own collection, nor have I 
ever myself met with any of these three unusually early ones for 
Dorset, and must, therefore, rely for the correctness of their dates upon 
Boyne's accuracy alone. The latest date is 1671, borne by Eldward 
Tizard, of Poole, just one year later than the tokens of Robert Ekins 
and Thomas Flory, both of Wimbome, which are dated 1670. 

The great majority of the tokens, it will be seen, are dated at a 
period subsequent to the restoration of Charles II. ; and whether it 
can be considered as a sign of any want of attachment to the House 
of Stuart or not, it is a curious fact that not one of them bears the 
name of Charles, and only two the name of James — James Budd 
and James Studley, both of Weymouth. 

Though some, no doubt, of the Dorset tokens afford specimens of 
originality in design and execution, the great bulk does not appear to 
differ much from their fellows in other counties ; consisting princi- 
pally of private issues by tradesmen, with their own names, their 
initials, and those of their wives, their private marks and signs, and 
the arms of such of the great civic companies as would tend to show 
the various callings of the issuers. Of these last the Grocers' Arms 
head the list by a large majority, appearing some two dozen times, 
with the Mercers' next, with about half that quantity. These two 
callings seem to be far in excess of any of the others, clearly denoting 
what were the most common and popular trades amongst Dorset folk 
at that time ; whilst there are some half-dozen instances of what may 
be termed tavern-signs. 

The instances where the issuers have borne their private arms are 
rare, being only met with in the tokens of Edward Harvey of Corfe 
Castle, Simon Eyre of Dorchester, Christopher Ware of Shaftesbury, 
John Whetcombe of Sherborne, and Robert Ekins of Wimbome. 
The trades of the various issuers, if we may judge from the symbols 
adopted, represent almost every imaginable calling, from that of a 
chandler to that of a warden of the King's School at Sherborne, in the 
person of John Whetcombe of that town. 

There are a few individual peculiarities existing in some of the 
tokens that are perhaps worth mentioning here. For instance, in 
that of Thomas Bagg, of Bridport, the name of the issuer, instead of 
being in the form of the usual legend round the inner edge of the 
token, is in three straight lines across the field. This is the only 
token in Dorset so treated. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 167 

Another unusual treatment appears in that of John Pitman, of 
Sherborne, in which the name of the county is given, instead of, or 
without the addition of, that of any town or place in it This, again, 
is the only one so described. There are two or three instances in 
which the usual practice of placing the initial of the surname over 
those of the Christian names of the husband and wife has been 
departed from, ^^., those of John Swetnam of Melcombe Regis, 
William Molby of Sherborne, and James Cane of Stalbridge. These 
are the only ones that I am aware of in which this has been done. 

The first person who would appear to have made a collection of 
Dorset tokens (at least, of those that have now come into public 
hands) was the late Dr. Browne Willis, F.S.A, the eminent antiquary, 
who was bom at Blandford, in 1682, and died in 1760. He presented 
his collection of coins in 1741 to the University of Oxford, and 
amongst them his Dorset and other tokens. They are now in the 
Bodleian Library, where I have myself inspected them; but the 
Dorset ones do not consist of more than about thirty specimens, if I 
remember rightly. Then there is the national collection in the British 
Museum ; but at the time I first went to see them, some two or three 
years ago, they were practically inaccessible to those interested in the 
tokens of any particular county, owing to their being arranged solely 
in alphabetical order under the names of the issuers instead of 
picuts. 

Surely the value and charm of such a collection lies not in the 
number of tokens issued by persons of any particular surname all 
over England, but in the living interest the people of any particular 
county or town take in these quaint evidences of a bygone age, and 
in the topographical associations that cling to the names of so many 
of these old issuers. Mr. R. S. Poole, the courteous head of the coin 
department, however, saw at once the necessity for a more useful, if 
not a more scientific, arrangement of the large mass of tokens under 
his care, and proceeded without delay to put that arrangement into 
action ; so that, within a few months after my first visit to the British 
Museum, I was able to thoroughly inspect those of the county of 
Dorset -a county which, coming early in the alphabet, was amongst 
the first to be re-arranged. Long before this, no doubt, every other 
county has been similarly dealt with. Another outcome of this re- 
arrangement was the issue in 1885 by the Museum authorities of a 
separate publication, containing a list of all the seventeenth century 
tokens in the British Museum not already described in Boyne's work. 

Whilst I am on the subject of our national collection of tokens, I 
hope I may be pardoned when I say that I think it is a great pity 
that wider powers should not be given to those having the care and 
superintendence of our coin departments in dealing with private 
collectors and others wishing to exchange or purchase duplicates from 
them. I understand that it is the practice for them to be allowed to 
accumulate, and then to be sold wholesale to the dealers. The 
authorities are not allowed to exchange or sell privately as occasion 
offers. I could more than once have offered a very liberal exchange 



Digitized by 



Google 



I68 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

of duplicates with public authorities, but have been met with the 
above rule. It needs very little determination to infer what a con- 
siderable advantage would result to our public collections were this 
rule a little relaxed, and a little more latitude in this respect allowed 
to the heads of these departments. 

I understand that, as far as the Bodleian collection is concerned, 
an attempt has been recently made to pass a new statute to that 
effect, though as yet without success. It is to be hoped that those 
having authority over the disposition of our public collections will be 
led to deal more liberally with the coin-collecting section of the 
public ; it will assuredly be as much to the ultimate advantage of the 
national depositories themselves, as it will be a decided boon to 
private collectors. 

The principal authorities for Dorset tokens beyond the British 
Museum and the Bodleian collections, are the three plates in the 
introduction to the first volume of the third and last edition of 
Hutchins's " Histor}' of Dorset," and the list of tokens that also 
appears therein. 

With regard to the former, the first two plates were presented by 
Dr. Cuming, F.S.A., to whom Hutchins was greatly indebted for his 
assistance in bringing out the first publication of his work in 1774. 
Two of the tokens, however, there described are wrongly classed 
amongst those of Dorset, namely, that of William Lodge, of Bean, 
and that of George Reeve, of Milton. It is clear that the first- 
named should be Bedale^ co. Yorks, and is so assigned by Bope. 
With regard to the latter, there might be more reason to doubt ; but 
as the only Milton in Dorset of sufficient importance to have issued 
tokens was Milton Abbas, and as the full name appears on ail the 
tokens known to have been issued there, I think Boyne was again 
right in assigning it to Milton, near Gravesend, co. Kent, which was 
a town of some importance at that time. With regard to the list of 
tokens given in the last edition of Hutchins, though a more recent 
authority than Dr. Cuming's plates, it is drawn up so carelessly that 
no less than eighty mistakes or omissions have been corrected or filled 
in by myself in my own copy of Hutchins ! 

Beyond the materials to be obtained from public sources, the late 
Mr. Boyne must have relied largely upon information afforded to him 
by private collectors and friends. He had besides a very fine collec- 
tion of his own, and on the dispersal of that collection some few 
years ago, I was enabled, through the kind offices of Mr. G. C. 
Williamson, our editor, to secure those that he had belonging to the 
county of Dorset. This naturally gave a great impetus to my own 
collection, with the result that I was able to present the Dorset 
County Museum at Dorchester with close upon fifty of my duplicates 
that were new to it 

An instance of the greater interest that is now taken in these old 
tokens of the seventeenth century, and in the people who issued 
them — and that a new edition of Boyne's work may not unfairly be 
called for — may be shown by the fact that, whereas in Dorsetshire 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 169 

alone, Boyne recorded the existence of only 141 tokens in 1858, I 
have been enabled, by adding new ones and fresh varieties of those 
already existing, to increase that number to 224, an addition of more 
than one-third. 

I have thought it advisable, in describing each token, to state the 
source whence I acquired the knowledge of its existence, in order 
that everyone may have a chance of verifying my statements, or 
possibly may obtain an inspection of the tokens for themselves. 
With this object, I have marked with an asterisk every token in my 
own collection, and where a token does not come within this category, 
or is not to be found in Boyne's own book, I have placed the initials 
of the public institution or private individual in whose collection it is, 
or who has been my authority for its admission in the present edition. 

I append a short table of references : 

* In the author's collection. 

B.M. British Museum. 

B.L. Bodleian Library. 

D.C.M. Dorset County Museum, at Dorchester. 

H.S.G. Mr. H. S. Gill, of Tiverton, co. Devon. 

L.C. Mr. L. Clements, of London. 

N.H. Mr. Nathan Hey wood, of Manchester. 

W.B.B. Mr. W. Bowles Barrett, of Weymouth. 

E.F.H. Mr. E. F. House, of Blandford. 

In conclusion, I beg to thank most heartily all those who hav^ so 
kindly assisted me in my work. My thanks are particularly due to 
the heads of the coin departments in the British Museum and the 
Bodleian Library ; to Mr. H. J. Moule, curator of the Dorset County 
Museum ; to Mr. W. Bowles Barrett, of Weymouth ; to Mr. H. S. 
Gill, of Tiverton ; to Mr. Thomas Wainwright, of Barnstaple ; as well 
as to those gentlemen who, through the kind offices of our editor, 
have supplied me from time to time with notes ; and lastly, but not 
least, to those clerg)' who have either, ofttimes at the cost of con- 
siderable trouble and inconvenience to themselves, made searches 
for me in their parish registers, or have courteously placed the 
registers themselves at my disposal. In fact, to one and all, who 
have given me help in an undertaking, in which, laborious though it 
may have been, the labour has been that of love — love for the work in 
which I have been engaged, and for the county which I represent 

J. S. Udal. 

The Manor House, 

Symondsbury, Bridport. 



Digitized by 



Google 



170 TRADERS' TOKENS QF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



ABBOTSBURY. 

1. *0, lOHN . BAiLY = A hand holding a dagger. 

^. IN . ABBOTS . BVRY = I . E . B. } 

In the parish register occurs the following entry : 

"John Baily and Grace Harvey were married nth Aug., 1673.** From ti» 
wife s initial given above it seems rather doubtful whether this entry coald haw 
any allusion to the issuer of the token, unless, perhaps, he had married again. 

2. *0, SAMVELL . MILLER = TwO pistols CrOSScd. 

^. IN . ABBOTS . BVREY = S . M. \ 



BEAMINSTER. 

The ancient registers of this town were, as Hutchins in his ** History and 
Antiquities of the County of Dorset " says, destroyed in the fire of 1684, from 
which time the present registers begin ; but ihere are a few isolated entries 
preserved of the old parchment skins. 

3. *0. HENRY . BRAYNE = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

A\ OF . BEMESTER . l657 = H . B. \ 

4. *0, WILLIAM . CONWAYE = A WOOl-COmb. 

jR. OF . BEMISTER . 1667 =W . C. \ 

The name of Conway occurs from time to time in the register, and on 171^ 
November, 1708, occurs the burial of " Mary, wife of William Conway." 

There is a monument in the church to various members of the family, one oc' 
whom died so recently as 1854. 

5. *0, LANCELOT . COX = A skull picrccd by an arrow. 

R, OF . BEAMISTER . 1667 = L . C. \ 

On 4th June, 1689, occurs the burial of " Mary, wife of Launcelott Cox." 

6. O. ROBERT . HALLET . MERCER = A Hon rampant. 

jR, IN . BEAMISTER . 1667 = R . H. \ 

On 27th April, 1705, occurs the burial of " Peter, son of Robert Hallctt," and 
on the 7th September, 17 18, " Robert Hallett and Judith Conway were married.'^ 

7. *(7. LANCELOTT . KEATE = Two hands holding some instnimem 

(gridiron or curry-comb). 

/f. OF . BEMINSTER . 1 668 = L . K. { 

The name of Keate is interesting in connection with Beaminster, in conseqneoce 
of a member of that family having had an old Bible, in which was recorded the 
particulars of the sufferings of the inhabitants of the town during the great fire 
that broke out there in April, 1644, during the occupation of the place by Prioce 
Maurice and his army at the time of the Civil War. 

This book, about 1790, came into the possession of Mr. Samuel Cox, a member 
of a family well known in Beaminster at the present day. (Hatdmis. 
3rd ed, ii., 119.) 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 171 

HERE REGIS. 

8. *0. THOMAS . SPEARE = T . s COD joined. 

^. OF . BEEARE . REGES = T . S COnjOined. J 

On 7th April, 1626, occurs the marriage of *' Thomas Spere and Christian 
Woods (vid.)." 

On I5ih November, 1671, the burial of ** Thomas Speare, of Andaerston " 
(AndersoD, formerly part of Bere Regis, but now a distinct parish). 

The- family of Sp^re has been resident in the parish for three centuries or 
more, and, until recently, were yeomen farmers in Bere Regis, and their house on 
Rye Hill is still occupied by a descendant bearing the name of Thomas Speare. 

I may here mention that Hutchins, in his plates of Dorest tokens (in the intro- 
duction to vol. i. of his history), gives one of William Lodge, of Beare. This is, 
however, a mistake for Bedale^ co. Yorks ; and the token is correctly given as a 
Yorkshire one by Boyne (ed. 1858), p. 498, No. 13. 

BLANDFORD. 

9. *0, THE I BVRROVGH | OF . BLAND | FORD . THEI | RE . CORPO | 

RATION (in six lines). 

R. FAR I THING | FOR . THE | VSE . OF . Y^ | POORE | 1 669 (in 

six lines). \ 

I have thought it advisable to show the ending of each line by vertical columns, 
which I have also adopted in describing the town-pieces of Sherborne, Wey- 
mouth, and Wimborne. 

The parish registers do not date further back than 1735, having, no doubt, 
perished in the great fire that devastated BUndford on 4th June, 1 731, by which 
nearly the whole of the town was burnt to the ground. (For a detailed account of 
this fire see the Rev. Malachi Blake's ** Account of Blandford Fire," published in 

1735) 

The present raster begins with the entry of the names of those who were 
burned in the fire, and only twelve individuals are named, reckoning a woman 
(who, I should imagine, from the manner of the entry, to have been in child-bed) 
and her daughter as separate individuals. (See note to Hutchins, i. 217.) 

In Mrs. Farquharson*s MS. Memoranda quoted by Hutchins (i. 221) I find an 
entry alluding to the town farthings : 

'* 1623. This year the corporation accounted for farthings belonging to this 
town." 

If the date is correctly given, and, coming between an entry in 1617 and 
another in 162C, there seems no reason to doubt it, this entry must refer to the 
farthings issuea under the patent granted by King James I. to John Stanhope, 
Baron Harington, whereby he delegated to him his prerogative of striking copper 
money for a money consideration, the patent being granted for farthuigs only. 

Again, in 1673, the following entry : 

'* The corporation farthings was returned in to the value of ^2 18s., and placed 
in the council-house." 

This no doubt, was the result of the royal proclamation issued in 1672, whereby 
the further circulation of these tokens was put an end to. 

10. *0, THOMAS . BRIDLE = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, IN . BLANDFORD . 1659 = T . M . B. \ 

11. *0. RICHARD . EABRIS = A CfOWn. R . S . E. 

R, IN . BLANFORD . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

In a list of tradesmen's tokens given in the introduction to the last edition 

of Hutchins's " Dorset," there would appear to be a variety spelt blandford, 

r and dated 1663, but this is so full of inaccuracies that, not having met with this 

variety firom any other source, I can only suppose that it is a mistaken reading of 

the above token« 



Digitized by 



Google 



172 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

12. •(9. HENRY . FORREST = St. Gcorgc and the dragon. 

/^, IN . BLANDFORD . 1 663 = H . F. \ 

13. [£, R JI.'\ O. lOHN . GOVLD . AT . THE = A CtOWD. 

R, CROWNE . IN . BLANDFORD = I . G. \ 

14. *0. THOMAS . GOVLD = A Hon rampant 

R, IN . BLANDFORD . i664 = T . R . G conjoined. \ 

1 5. \JI, S, G,'\ A variety has for reverse at . the . lvon = t , r . c 

conjoined. 

16. *0. nicho . govldesbvrgh= 1663. 

R. IN . BLANDFORD = N . G. t 

17. *0. iohn . MEW = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, in . BLANFORD . 1655 = 1 . M. \ 

18. *0. WILLIAM . M1NCK = W. M. 

R, IN . BLANDFORD = W . M . 1657. \ 

19. Hutchins, in his plate, gives a variety spelt miinck with in on 
obverse, and dated 1654 on reverse with only w . m in centre oi 
each side. 

In Hutchins's list is given one similar to the last, spelt munck, and dated 1664^ 
but this is, doubtless, only a misreading from the plate. 

William Munck was Bailiff of the borough of filandford in the year 1657. (S«e 
list of Bailiffs given in Hutchins, i. 218.) In the parish register of Bridpoct, oq 
20th July, 1654, occurs the marriage of "William Minck, of Blandford, aod 
Elizabeth Bull, W°, of Bridpori." 

20. *0. IOHN . PAIGE . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, BLANDFORD . 1656 = 1 . T . P. | 

21. [N, Zr.] A variety reads page. 

22. *0. WALLTER . RIDIOVT = W. R. 

R, IN . BLANDFORD . 1662 = W . R. \ 

23. *A variety is dated 1652. 

Walter Ridiout was Bailifl of the boroueh of Blandford for the years 1643 a»i 
1654. Somewhere about the year 1690 Walter Hideout gave £1$^ the ioterest cf 
which was to buy wheat for the poor of the parish when the price shuuld cxceeu 
5s. a bushel, vested in the bailiff and burgesses. The dividends form part of ibe 
Christmas distribution by the bailiff, and no doubt since the Municipal Corpon- 
tions Act, by the mayor. In December, 1835, there was a balance 01 £6 3s. ii^i 
in the hands of the corporation on account of this charity. (See Uosvdt i 
" Civil Division of Dorset," ed. 1833, and the ** Report of the CommissiooeisKc 
Enquiring Concerning Charities" [County of Dorset], 1815, et seq,) 

24. *0, DANIEL . SHEPHEARD . = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

R, IN . BLANDFORD . = D . M . S. \ 

25. *0. EDWARD . SPEED = An angel. 

R. OF . BLANDFORD = E . A . S. \ 

26. *0, WILLIAM . STAVNER . iN = A pair of scales. 

R, BLANDFORD . GROCER = W . S. \ 

27. [Z. C] A variety reads stoyner. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 173 

28. *0. WILLIAM . WARE . OF = A ncck-band with two tassels. 

J^. BLANDFORD . l668 = W . E . W. J 

The name of Ware occurs in the cori>oration account-book in connection with a 
fund called Graiis-moneyy said to have been given by Dr. Highmore, Mr. Ware, 
&nd others, to be lent out in small sums to poor tradesmen without interest Some 
portion of the original money having been lost, it was resolved, in 1690, to put out 
jC^S ^^ ^^^ remainder at interest. The smalliiess of the sum has precluded its 
l^ing applied according to the supposed intention of the donor, and the dividends 
axe now included in the bailifiTs (now mayor's) Christmas donation. (See Charity 
£nquiry Commissioners' Report, supra,) 

29. \^ff, S, G.] O, WILL . woLFEREYES . = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . BLANDFORD . = W . W. \ 

In the *• Heraldic Visitation of Dorset " for 1623, lately issued by the Harleian 
Society, occurs the name of William Woolfries, who was fourteen years old at the 
time of the Visitation, and was son and heir of Henry Woolfries, of Marsh, which 
is now a farm situated near Bloxworth, in the same hundred as Blandford St. Mary, 
and where is a large ancient brick house, probably built by the Woolfreys, its 
former owners. (Hutchins, i. 181.) 

BRIDPORT. 

30. *0. RiCH^ . BAGG . MERGE* = R . B between two stars of five 

points. 
R. OF . BRIDPORT. 1 657= A Stocking between two stars of 
five points. \ 

31. ♦A variety from a different die has two squares of four dots, 
instead of the two stars on the obverse. 

The name of Bagg occurs in the parish registers (which be^n in 1600) amongst 
the earliest entriesTror in 1601 we find the baptism of " Richard, son' of John 
Bag." The name still exists in the town. 

32. *0, THOMAS . BAGG . T . B (in three lines across the field). 

R. OF . BRIDPORT = The Grocers' Arms. \ 

This is the only token in Dorset that gives the inscription in such an unusual way 
as appears on the obverse. 

Thomas Bagg was one of the two bailiffs of the borough of Bridport for the first, 
fourth, and eleventh years of Charles I., as appears from the list of bailiffs of 
the borough given in Hutchins (ii. 9), collected from an ancient volume now in 
the corporation archives, called the Dome-book ^ dating from the time of Richard II. 
From tlie Dome-book we find that Thomas Bagg was also constable in 161 7 and 
1 6 18, and cofferer (1.^., treasurer to the borough) in 1623, 1624, and 1627. 

In the year 1604 the baptism of " Thomas, son of Thomas Bag," occurs in the 
register, and in 1632 ** Thomas, son of Richard Bag." 

The following extract, relating in all probability to the issuers of these tokens, 
from *' A declaration of the sufferings of the people of God, who are now in prison, 
called Quakers, and delivered to Thomas Bamfield, then Speaker of the Psirlia- 
roent on the 6th day of the 2nd month, 1659," is of considerable interest : 

** In Dorchester goale. Lore Bag, the wife of Richard Bag, and her son, 
Thomas Bag, and three of her daughters, Sarah, Mary, and Abigail Bag, all of one 
town, living in Brideport, and of one family, were, by Nicholas Sampson and 
Robert Prince, Bayleffs, far coming from a meeting about a bow-shot from the place 
were they dwelled, committed to prison, pretending they committed them as being - 
wanderers, and because they would not give them 2s. 6d. a- piece [? ' 6ned 2s. 6d. 
each and costs ^], and after were called to sessions, where Thomas Bag was 
fir.ed by the Recorder 13s. 4d. because he wore his hat in the Court; and 
because for conscience sake, knowing they had broke no law, could not give them 



Digitized by 



Google 



174 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

2S. 6d. a-piece far coming from the meeting, and 13s. 4d. for Thomas Bagg vcsr- 
ing of his hat, were all sent back to prison again, where they have been few- sxteta 
weeks, and still remains prisoners, Lore Bag being above three score years owd, 
and her husband, Richard Bag, a mercer, driving a trade ; so his whole fiamDj s 
taken from him to their great loss and hindrance." 

33. *0, ROB . BiSHOPP = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

J^, OF . BRIDPORT = R . a \ 

Robert Bishop was one of the bailiffs of the borough for the years 1668, 1671, 
1678, and 1683, and cofferer in 1667. 

The name occurs in the register on loth October, 1654, when " NathanieD, tbc 
sonn of Robert Bishopp, was buried." 

34. *0, WILLIAM . BVLL = A bulFs head. 

^. IN . BRIDPORT = W . B. \ 

35. *A variety has will . on obverse, and w , e . b in the centre 
of reverse. 

From the Dome-book we find that William Bull was Imiliff in the years 1677, 
1682, 1696, 1700, 1705, and 1 712, and cofferer in the years 1679, and 16S1. It 
is very probable that the ofRce in these later years was filled by his son, as we fsrA 
in the register the names of several children of William Bull, one entry, on aoci 
February, 1660, giving the baptism of " William, the son of William BuIL" 

On 2nd March, 1682, the name of William Bull appears in the register as ow 
of the two bailiffs, with two overseers, in a list of six men and two women, whkb 
latter were no doubt the recipients of the eight coats which were the subject 
of the Pitfield Charity, and were distributed every 2nd March. (For full de^ 
of this charity see the Charity Enquiry Commissioners* Report, suprcL) 

36. {B. MJ] O, WILLIAM . BVRTE = A columbioe ; part of the 

Cooks* Arms. 

R, IN . BRIDPORTE . l66o = W . S . B. } 

In Boyne's work this had been spelt bvrtt, but as I have never met with or 
heard of the token so spelt of this date, and there is in the British Museum oee 
spelt as I have here given it, I am inclined to believe that Boyne was mistakes, 
notwithstanding that it is engraved in Hutchins*s plate as bvrtt, and that ibe 
authorities of the British Museum treat the one given above as a variety in tbeJ 
newly-compiled list (1885) of " Seventeenth Century Tokens in the British Mnseaa 
not Described in Boyne " (No. 89). 

37. *A variety is dated 1669. 

38. There is, I am informed, in the Warrington Museum, a variety 
spelt BVRTT, and dated 1669. 

The names of several children of William Burt appear in the register from the 
years 1658 to 1679, and on 8th April, 1680, " Mr. William Burt was buried." H:i 
name also occurs as one of the bailiffs of the borough for the years 1669 and 1675. 
On 2nd March, 1681 , the name of William Burte appears in the register as one of two 
overseers, with the signatures of two bailiffs, to the signatures of six men and tvo 
women, doubtless the recipients of the Pitfield Charity. (See note to No. 35,) Thii 
could hardly have been, however, the issuer of the token, but more probaby ibe 
William Burte who, on 23rd January, 1671, married Joane Warren, and was bailifi^ 
in the years 1692, 1704, 1707, and 171a 

39. *0, THOMAS . DASSELL = A bull passant. 

R, OF . BRIDPORT . l669 = T . D. \ 

From the Dome-book we find that Thomas Dassell was constable in 1668. 
On 26th September, 1655, "Thomas Dossell and Eylanor Bishopp were 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 175 

married,'* as appears by the register, which contains the names of several children 
of Thomas ** Dossell*' from i6iS4 to 1673 ; and on 22nd October, 1697, " Thomas 
I>osseU was buried," 

40. *0. BEN . DEVENiSH = A roll of tobacco. 

Ji. OF . BRIDPORT = B . M . D. J 

41. *0. FRANCIS. HASTINGS = A bulfs head 

J^, OF . BRIDPORT . 1657 = F . H. J 

Francis Hastings was one of the bailiffs of the borough in 1664. 
The name appears only to have occurred once in the register about this period, 
and is contained in the following entry : 

'* The sonn of Frances Hastings was buried the 12 day of May, 1664." 

42. ♦(9. EDWARD . piLLEN . OF = A uiiicom passant. 

Jd. BRIDPORT. 1668 = E. P. J 

The following entry in the register is the only one I can find in reference to the 
issuer of this token : 

•* Edward Pillen was buried i Dec., 1675." 

43. *0. DANYELL . TAYLOR = A pcstlc and THOrtaT. 

^. IN . BRIDPORT . 1666 = D . T. J 

From the Dome-book it appears that Daniel Taylor was overseer in i68a 

The entries relative to him in the register are but meagre, and consist of the 
following : 

•'Joseph, the sonn of Danell Taylar," was baptized i6th January, 1695, ^^^ * 
daughter the following year. 

Daniel Taylor, who was a Quaker, by deed dated 28th August, 1696, gave a 
house, called the Quakers' Almshouse, in trust for the use of such poor persons of 
the borough of Bridport to dwell in as should be appointed by the tnistees and 
their successors. 

The same Daniel Taylor by deed dated 31st December, 1708, granted to trustees 
a house, called the Bull Inn, in East Street, the income of which was to support a 
Free school at Bridport, the number of scholars to be twelve of the poor inhabi- 
tants there, or so many as the clear annual produce of the premises should exceed 
or fall short of /'12. 

The Bull Inn still exists in East Street as the principal hotel in Bridport 

(For fuller particulars of these two charities see the Charity Conmiissioners* 
Report before alluded to. ) 

Daniel Taylor was buried in the Friends' Burial Ground, situate in South Street, 
which he appears to have given to the society. The place still exists as a walled 
enclosure, but has long been disused for burials. 

Li)on a large stone, let into the wall over the gateway, is cut in Roman capitals 
the following inscription : 

Friends Burial Ground 

Given by Daniel Taylor of Bridport. 

He died the 7th and was buried in this ground the 12th day of 9^ M<> 1 7 14 

aged 73 years." 

In the year 17 18 there was published in London a curious little volume, called 
" The Remains of Daniel Taylor," which contained various testimonials to his 
worth, in verse and otherwise, by certain of his friends, and also a selection from 
his own letters to the quarterly meetings of the Society. 



Digitized by 



Google 



176 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

BROADWINSOR- 

44. *0. ALICE . lONEs . AT = A sugar-loaf. 

Ji. BROADWINSOR , 1667= A . I. \ 

The name of Jones occurs but seldom in the parish register during the seven- 
teenth century. 

On 22nd September, 1622, occurs the baptism of "Alice f. John Jones;'' on 
13th October, 1643, ^^^ baptism of ** Alice fil. Rhesi Jones;" and on 4th July, 
1687, the burial of " Widow Alice Jones." 

This Rhesus (or Rice) Jones was no doubt the loyal host of the old George Inn 
at Broad winsor who entertained King Charles II. during the eventful night of the 
23rd September, 165 1, when he stayed there after his abortive attempt to escape to 
France by way of Charmouth. The subject of this token may possibly have been 
Alice No. I, and was in all probability the widow of Rice Jones himself, and the 
mother of Alice No. 2, as there appear to be no other entries of the name in the 
register. 

CERNE ABBAS. 

45. *0. lOHN . RANDOLL = The Groccfs' Arms. 

/?. OF . CERNE . ABBIS = 1 . R. | 

There does not appear to be any entry in the parish register that would identify 
the issuer of this token, but in the *' Accompt of Burialls in WoUen Anno Domi, 
1699," we find the following entry ; 

** Nov. 20 Johannes RandoU sep. An affid. made y' 22 day Novem." 

There is a similar entry of the same name on a detached leaf, from which the 
date is missing, but which, from internal evidence, would appear to be about the 
year J683. 

In the year 1679 ^^ Act of Parliament was passed (30 Car. II., c 3), intituled, 
"An Act for burying in Woollen," and was intended ** for the lessening the impor- 
tation of linen from beyond the seas, and the encouragement of the woollen and 
paper manufactures of this Kingdom." An affidavit was to be brought within 
eight days of the burial under a penalty of £$ that the deceased was not buried in 
linen. 

This, no doubt, was the " affid. '* mentioned above. (See Bum's " History of 
Parish Registers," ed. 1862.) This law has now been repealed by 54 Geo. III., 
c. 108. 

In allusion to the above Act may be cited four lines which occur at the end of 
the second register in the parish church of St. Mary, Bridport, in a hand of the 
last century : 

** Death's compared to sleep, the bed's the grave, 
Which bed all mortall men will ham ; 
They lye in woollen only, as 'tis meet 
When lodging's cold to lye withdUt the street." 

CHALBURY. 

46. *0. ROBERT . BROOKES = A man making candles. 

/i, OF . CH.\LBVRY . 1 665 = R . B. \ 

The register in this parish does not begin practically until 1702, there being but 
an old vellum sheet, with a few entries upon it, dating from 1695. 

CORFE CASTLE. 

47. O. EDWARD . HARVEY = The Arms of the Harvey £amily; a 

chevron between three trefoils. 
i?. OF . CORFE . CASTLE = E . H dividing 1657. I 

On 24th January, 1665, the register gives the baptism of " Edward Haniy the 
sonn of William Haruy and Mobell his wife," but this, of course, is not early enough 
to refer to the issuer of this token. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 177 

4.8. *(9. EDWARD . KEYNELL= 1666. 

/^. OF . CORFE . CASTLE = E . E . K. \ 

Tlie name of Keynell, or Koynell, occurs from time to time in the register, which 
apparently aflfords nothing whereby to identify the issuer of this token. 

49. [M If,] A variety reads kennell. 

50. O, RICHARD . painter = A man holding a wool-comb. 

/^. OF . CROFE . CASTLE . l666 = R . S . P. i 



CRANBORNE. 

51. *0, ROBERT . ALNER . IN = The Drapers' Arms. 

jR. CRANBORNE . i669 = R . A. Two cloves. i 

52. *0, NICHOLAS . BARNES = The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. IN . CRANBORNE . 1659 = N . B between two stars of five 
points. J 

DORCHESTER. 

53. *0, A . DORCHESTER . FARTHING = H . D. 1 669. 

J^, THE . ARMES . OF . DORCHESTE*. On a castle of five 
towers, the Royal Arms, a rose on each of the front 
towers. J 

54. *A variety from a different die. 

55. * Another variety from a different die. 

These two varieties differ but slightly from No. 53 and from each other ; the 
difference consisting mainly in the thickness and shape of the letters, and in certain 
details of the towers. 

56. * Another variety from a different die, in which the final r on 
the reverse, which on the others is not half the size of the rest of the 
letters, is more nearly approaching an uniform size. The figures of 
the date, too, are more curved, and longer. 

57. [D, CM,] Another variety from a different and much 
smaller die is in the County Museum at Dorchester, about the size of 
an ordinary farthing token, only much thicker, whereas all the pre- 
ceding are as large as the halfpennies of private traders. 

The initials H.D. may be intended, as Bojme savs, for Alexander H^vi- 
land, who was Mayor of Qorchester in 1669, when the token was issued, as no one 
with such initials appears in the minutes contained in the municipal archives of the 
borough at that time ; at the same time, I cannot accept such an unusual solution 
without considerable hesitation. He was elected Mayor on October 4, 1669, ad<^ 
together with J. Haviland, signed the Protestant Address to King Charles II. in 
i&u He was also one of the bailiffs of the borough for the years 1665, 1673, and 
1 69 1. The order for the token is contained in the following entry in the 
minotes: 

" J. Seward maio Feb. y« 5, 1668 '* (old style) [and seven others]. " It is ordered 
mnd desired y* Mr. Jasper Samwayes one of this Company doe speedily procuer 
Twenty pounds in copper Farthings for y« beniffet of y pore of this Borough and 



Digitized by 



Google 



178 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

that y« Towne armes be engraven on one side, and H) on y^ other syde, and on y* 
side where y« Towne Armes are to be ingraven Round, y* armes of Dorchester, 
and on y*' other side where K> be, Dorchester Farthing, and under id y* date of 
y« Lord." 

58. *0. THOMAS . ALLEN = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

^. OF . DORCHESTER = T . A. J 

59. ♦A variety has a diflferent rendering of the Mercers* Arms, 
surrounded by a plain circle instead of a dotted one, as in the last 

The name of Thomas Allen occurs more than once in the parish registers of 
St. Peter's (which commence in 1653), and on 12th December, 1695, "Mr. Thomas 
Alen " was buried. 

Thomas Allen signed the " Constitutions " in 1646 ; also the Protestant Address 
to Charles IL in 1681. 

The " Constitutions " were the code of bye-laws of the " Company of Freemen ** 
of the borough. They are engrossed on a large skin of parchment, which is written 
all over, back and all, with signatures of persons giving in their adhesion to the 
bye-laws through a long course of years. The co-ordinate corporations (L), Mayor, 
Bailiffs, and Capital Burgesses, and (ii.), Governor, Assistants, and Common 
Council of the Freemen, were established by a Charter of Charles I. The power 
of the latter corporation was exerted in preventing anyone, not having the freedom 
of the borough, from exercising any trade or handicraft there. 

60. *0. THOMAS . APPLEGAT . AT . Y* = A CrOWn. 

/^. CROWN . IN . DORCHESTER . 69 = HIS HALFE PENY. 
T. E . A. i 

61. *0. WILLIAM . BROCK = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . DORCHESTER = W . a | 

62. *0. lOHN . CARDROw = The Drapers' Arms. 

/?. IN . DORCHESTER = I . c conjoined. \ 

There are several entries relating to the children of John Cardro, or Cardrow, in 
the register of St. Peter's, and one or two of the name in that of Holy TriDity. 

John Cardrow signs the "Constitutions" in 1651. His name also appears ia 
J. Churchill's agreement to an award on 25th August, 167a 

63. [B, M.] O, EDWARD . CHEAPMAN . = A roll of tobacco. 

^. OF . DORCHESTER . l668 = E . C 

In the new British Museum list (No. 90) the object in the centre of obverse is 
described as a roll of c/otA. 

Edward Cheapman signed the *' Constitutions** in 1651. 

64. *0. RICHARD . CHENEY = The Groccrs* Arms. 

/^. IN . DORCHESTER . l666 = R . C. \ 

65. ♦A variety has for reverse in . dorchestor . 1659 = r . c. 

Richard Cheney signed the " Constitutions " in 1658. 

The baptism of a son of Richard Cheney is entered in St. Peter's register is 
1658, and of another in 1661, and on 30th October, 1670, occurs the buiial oc 
*• Sarah, the wife of Mr. Richard Chaney." 

66. *0, DORCHESTER . 1667 = SIMON . EYRE. 

^. Three quatrefoil leaves and a boot, filling the field. ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE, 179 

67. *A variety from a different and rather smaller die has the boot 
shorter and thicker, and the figures of the date longer and thinner. 

The device on the reverse is no doubt intended for a representation of the 
armorial bearings of a branch of the family of Eyre, for which see £dmondson*s 
•• Complete Body of Heraldry," ed. 1780. 

Simon Ejrre, son of Rob. Eyre, of Osmington, yeoman, was apprenticed 
apothecary, 1659. 

In St. Peter s register appear several entries relative to children of " Simon 
Ejrris," and on 21st November, 1672, occurs the burial of what appears to read, 
•* Mis. Simon Eyris and her son Simon Eyris." 

Hutchins (ii. 397) says that some years ago there was picked up in the school 
garden of Holy Trinity, Dorchester, a signet-ring with ** Simon Eyre *' on it, and 
round it, ** Dorchester, 1657," and, indeed, he assigns that date to the above token 
in his plate. 

68. *0, RICH . FELLOWS . IN = Three sugar-loaves. 

/?. DORCHESTER . l666 = R . S . F. J 

69. *0, THO . GOVLD . IN . DORCHESTER = An omament for a may- 

pole? 
J^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1667= A merchant's mark com- 
posed of G . R and 4. I 

Thomas Gould signed the " Constitutions " (apparently) in 1679. The Goulds 
lived at Gould's Frome, Stafford, near Dorchester. 

The name occurs frequently in the parish registers, both of St. Peter's, and of 
Holy Trinity, Dorchester ; among the burials of the former for 1675 beine the 
quaint entry of ** old Tames Gould, esq. ;" and among those of the latter parish, on 
14th January, 1669, that of '* Thomas Gould Sen'." 

70. *0, THOMAS . HALL . IN = A Castle. 

Ji. DORCHESTER. 1656 = The Grocers* Arms. i 

71. *A variety from a different die and smaller type. 

72. •Another variety is dated 1666. 

Thomas Hall was one of the two bailiffs of the borough in 1667. 

In St. Peter's register on 8th November, 1655, occurs the following entry : 
** Mr. Thomas Hall and Mrs. Elizabeth Row of Melcome were married in Mel- 
come." Is not this an unusual instance of the entry of a marriage in the register of 
a parish in which the ceremony did not take place ? 

In succeeding years there are also entries relative to several children of Thomas 
Hall, and the burial on 12th August, 1685, of *' Elizabeth, the wife of Mr. Thomas 
Hall," followed on the 20th September, 1692, by the burial of " Mr. Thomas 
HaU" himself. 

73. *0, WILLIAM . MAVCOCK = The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. IN . DORCHESTER . l658 = W . M. J 

74. [iV! If,] A variety is dated 1666. 

In the register of Holy Trinity occur the names of several children of William 
Maycock, and on 17th April, 1663, the burial of William Maycoclc 

This last entry would seem to show that the variety of this token, dated 1666, 
must have been issued by another William Maycock than he to whom the register 
refers. 

12 — 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



i8o TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

75. *0. LAWRENCE . RiGHTON = The Ironmongers* Arms. 

/^, OF . DORCHESTER . l669 = L . R. i 

The only entry of the name that I can find in the registers is in that of Holy 
Trinity, on nth August 1657, containing the marriage of Lawrence Righton and 
Dorothy Smith. 

Lawrence Righton had a lease of a " standing " in 1624. He was a constable 
in 1634, and gave ten shillings towards enlarging the Shire Hall in 1638. He was 
also one of the two bailiffs of the borough in 1661. 

The following entry in the minutes is interesting, as referring directly to this 
token : 

"Jos. Seward, maio* Feb. y« 5, 1668." (Seven other names.) "Mr. Lawrence 
Righton havein^ a Certaine Brasse Coine w^^ he passeth for halfe pence, there 
being noe such inscription on them, promiseth in case they be put downe or doe 
not passe, will retake them att y' same rate he now passeth them, being halfe 
pence. 

(Signed) Lawrence Righton." 

76. [W.B.B,] O. lOHN . ROY . 1 660 = The Upholsterers' or 

Weavers* Arms (?). 

R, IN . DORCHESTER . = I . R. \ 

The name of Rob {sic) Roy curiously enough appears in the municipal archives 
in the year 1637. 

77. *0, lASPER . SAMWAYS . i668 = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . DORCHESTER . GROCER = HIS HALF PENY. 1 . S Con- 
joined. J 

78. [H. S. C] A variety is dated 1666, and reads penny on 
reverse. 

79. *0. lASPER . SAMWAYS . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. DORCHESTER . GROCER = I . s conjoined. 1668. \ 

Jasper Samways was one of the two bailiffs of the borough in 1671, and was 
mayor in 1674. *' Mr. Samwayes'* attended council meetings, and in 1670 (when 
those present began to sign their own names) *' Jasp. Samwaies " duly appears. 

The register of St. Peter's contains several entries relative to the children of 
Jasper Samwayes from 1655 to 1669. 

80. *0, PHILLIP . STANSBiE = The Salters* Arms. 

Jd. OF . DORCHESTER . 1667 = p . s conjoined. i 

This token is described by Boyne as J, but I have never met with one in that foriD. 

81. *0, PHILLIP . STANSBiE = The Salters* Arms. 

/?. OF . DORCHESTER . 68 = p . s conjoined. \ 

82. *0, PHILLIP . STANSBiE = The Salters* Arms. 

/?. IN . DORCHESTER = p . s conjoined. J 

83. •A variety from a different die, in which the circle round the 
shield on the obverse is a dotted one, instead of a plain one as in 
the last. 

84. ♦Another variety from a different die, in which both the circle 
round the monogram on the reverse and that round the shield 
on the obverse are dotted or twisted. The ^toile also over the 
monogram differs in shape and size in each variety. 

Philip Stansbte was one of the two bailiffs of the borough for the years 1655 and 
1660, and was mayor in 1657. He signed the " Constitutions " in 1637, and the 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. i8i 

niinutes of a council meeting on 3rd September, 167a He resigned his position 
as •* Principal Burgess " in 1677. 

The register of Holy Trinity contains several entries relative to the children of 
Pliillip Stansbie, and on 22nd November, 1686, occurs the burial of ** Mr. Philip 
Stansby." 

85. [py, B, i9.] O. SAMVELL. WILLIAMS = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, IN . DORCHESTER . 1658 = 8 . H . W. \ 

Saaiuel Williams was a juror " de magn^ inquisitione '* in 1682. 

T*he name frequently occurs in the register of St. Peter's, and in that of Holy 
Xrinity are entries relative to children of Samuel Williams from 1653 ^^ 1659, 

N.B. — There is in the Dorset County Museum, at Dorchester, a penny token, 
wKich is said to have been found in the neighbourhood, having on the obverse 
GIDEON . HAYNE . and in the centre the arms of the Hayne family (on a fess 
three bezants, in chief a greyhound courant, the tinctures not being decipherable) ; 
and on the reverse marchant . in . trin . and in the centre G . I . H . and i^* 
l>elow. On the strength of this I was about to include this one among the tokens 
of the town of Dorchester, taking trin . to refer to Holy Trinity parish, notwith- 
standiog the suspiciously Irish nature of the word march ant, because Uie family 
of Hajme exists in the immediate neighbourhood of Dorchester at the present 
tiiiie,and the very name of the issuer of this token occurs in the " Heraldic Visitation 
of the County of Dorset" for 1623 as being five years of age at that time, and the son 
and heir of Morgan Hayne, of Dorchester. The arms there given, too, are no 
doabt the same as those on the token— argent on a fess gules three plates ; in 
chief a greyhound courant azure. I find, however, that Boyne has assigned this 
token to Trim^ co. Meath, in Ireland (see No. 561, p. 573, cd. 1858), and no 
doabt rightly so, as I understand that it is by no means an uncommon token 
there, and that members of the Hayne family are yet to be found in co. Meath, 
their ancestor having no doubt migrated from Dorchester in the seventeenth 
century. But though an Irish token, it has, for the reasons above stated, a strong 
Dorset connection, which must plead as an excuse for this note. 

EVERSHOT. 

86. O, lOHN . FEISHER . 1651 =The Mercers* Arms. 

R. OF . EVERSHOT . MERCER = 1 . F. \ 

87. \Hutchins?^ A variety is dated 1658. 

88. Another variety of this date in the Bodleian Library (Browne 
Willis collection) reads " ffisher." 

The registers of this parish do not go so far back as the middle of the seven- 
teenth century. 

FRAMPTON. 

89. *0, lOHN . MAVNARD . MERCER = HIS . HALFE . PENV. 

R. OF . FRAMPTON . 1667 = 1 . M with a flower between the 
letters. \ 

Though the parish registers begin in 1562, the name of John Maynard is 
apparently not to be found in them. 

HALSTOCK. 

90. [Z. C] O, WILLIAM . CLARKE . IN = A pack-hoTse saddled. 

R, HALSTOCKE . DORSETSHIR = W . G . C. \ 

In connection with the device of a pack-horse upon this token, it may be 

interesting to mention that near to " Chapel Close " (a field near the top of the 

hill, north of the church at Halstock) can be traced, east and west along the high 

ground, the old '* Pack-saddle road " from London to Exeter. (Hutchins iv. 465.) 



Digitized by 



Google 



i82 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
LYME REGIS. 

91. *0. A . FARTHING . OF . LYME . RS = L . R. 1 669. 

J^. THE . ARMES . OF . LYME . RS = Arms ; wavy, within an 
engrailed border, on a chief a lion passant gardant. \ 

92. *A variety in which the obverse is struck from a different die. 

93. *Another variety from a different and smaller die. 

94. [JV, H.] Another variety reads res on the obverse. 

From Roberts's " Social History of the Southern Counties " (cd. 1856, pp. 203- 
204, where are given engravings of the three tokens belonging to Lyme Reg:is) it 
appears that " the Corporation of Lyme ordered a barrel of Town ifarthings in 1669, 
fourteen years after Amyell Hart had issued his token, and a second barrel six 
months after. Both barrels of ffarthings cost £4$ 8s. 3d.* A profit of;^8 is 
acknowledged to have been realized, or 17 J per cent., in the mayor's accounts." 
And Mr. Roberts goes on to say, quoting from Sydenham's " History of Poole " 
(ed. 1839), that the Corporation of Poole exceeded this rate of profit. They laid 
out ;f 10, and realized just cent, per cent. (See note to No. 109, post.) 

N.B. — There is an amusing error in the new list publish«i by the British 
Museum authorities, in which this token is given there (No. 306) as belonging to 
Z^/wf Regis, CO. Norfolk, and as one quite new to Boyne ! 

95* In the possession of Mr. A. Palmer, of Lyme Regis, is a token of the 
ordinary farthing size, made apparently of lead or pewter, inscribed on oru side only : 
*' LYME . 1653," and ** R . s in centre between two roses (?), with similar flowers 
filling up the legend. This curious token (which Mr. Palmer kindly submitted 
for my inspection) was discovered during recent repairs to the old parish church, 
and is probably unique. It is the only token in Dorset made of white metal that 
I am aware of, and may have been struck as a proof. 

96. *0. AMVELL . HART = A heart. 

J^, OF . LYME . 1655 = A pot of lilies or roses. \ 

97. ^A variety reads ammiel on obverse, and is dated 1668. 

98. [N. If,] Another variety of this date reads ammvell. 
Amyell, or Amiel, Hart was a merchant in the borough, and Mayor of Lyme 

Regis in the years 1660, 167 1, and 1687. [See the list of mayors given in 
Roberts's " History and Antiquities of the Borough of Lyme Regis " (ed. 1834, 

I. 381), and in Hutchins (ii. 48), extracted from the leets roll, hustings-book, and 

ists of the corporation.] 

99. *0. ABRAHAM . PITTS . OF = A ship. 

^. LYME . REGIS . 1657 = A . p with a plant or flower between 
the letters. \ 

MAIDEN NEWTON. 

100. *0, DRAPER . 1N = R . B. 
Ii, MAIDE . NEWTON = R , B. I 



E; 



MELCOMBE REGIS. 

lOI. *0, THOMAS . HIDE . IN =» A ship. 

^. MELY . REGIS . WAYMOVTH = T . H. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 183 

102. *A variety reads waymoth on reverse. 

Thomas Hyde was a merchant in and Mayor of Weymouth and Melcorobe Regis 
in 1662, 1676, and 1680. In Hutchins (ii. 436) " Mr. Bailiffe Hide ** is mentioned 
as being present at a hall held 23rd January, 1666. On the nth February, 170^, 
Joho llhome, one of the constables, reported him for saying that the ** Just-asses 
were not at home"— IVey mouth Town Council Records. (See No. i^ypost.) 

The name of " Mr. Hyde "appears as one of the Town Council present on the 14th 
September, 1685, when the order was given for the fallows to be erected at Green- 
hill for the purpose of canying out the precept from the Sheriff, ordering the 
execution of twelve persons who had been sentenced to be hanged by ** Judge 
Jeflfrcys," and the due disposal of their corpses. 

The manner in which the quarters and heads of the unfortunate victims were 
disposed of is shown in the ghastly list, taken from the minutes, given in the 
•• L)escriptive Catalogue of Weymouth and Melcombe R^s Borough Records," 
edited by H. J. Moule in 1883, p. 85. 

Thomas Hyde was buried in Melcombe Regis Churchyard on 2nd September, 
1 702. 

(For further notices of him, see Mr. Moule*s Catalogue, class iii. 126, 135 ; vL 
117; vii. 53.) [See/<>j/, No. 199.] 

103. *0. GEORGE . PLEY . IN . 1656 = . p conjoined. 

R. WAVMOVTH . AND . MELCOM = A ship. \ 

George Pley was a merchant, residing at the south-east end of East Street, near the 
Quay. There were two George Pleys about this time, and it is uncertain which of 
them issued the token. One George Pley is described as " Capt". George Pley ;' 
the other as ** Gea Pley the younger,*' probably a son of Captain George Pley. The 
latter was mayor in 1659, and George Pley, the younger, in 1666. One or Uie 
other was also mayor in 165 1 and 1670. (See list of mayors given in Hutchins 
ii. 438.) In 1674 Captain George Pley entertained " my Lord Chief Justice and 
Judge,'* for which he was paid by the town £z 15s. 

C^rge Pley (Capt". ?) was married at Melcombe Regis Church to Constance 
Wise on 2nd June, 1635. 

George Pley (younger ?) was buried in Melcombe Regis Churchyard on 28th 
March, 1690. (For further particulars see Mr. Moule's Catalogue iii 120, 138, 
and Hutchins, ii. 436.) 

104. *0. lOHN . SWETNAM . OF . = I . A . S. 

R. MELCONB . DRAPER . = I . A . S. \ 

105. [Z. C] A variety reads melcon on reverse. 

Boyne (ed. 1858, p. 421, No. 188) gives this as a Suffolk token, under Melton. 

John Swetman {sic) was Mayor of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis in 1652, and 
at a ball held on Monday, the 23rd January, 1666, the name of ** Mr. Swetnam " 
appears as one of those present (Hutchins ii. 436, 438). 

K.B.— This token affords an instance in which the usual way of placinfi; the 
initial of the surnames over that of the Christian names of the husband and wife 
has been departed from. 

MILTON ABBAS. 

106. ♦O. GEORGE . CLEEVE . IN = The Drapers' Arms. 

R. MILLTON . ABBV . 1669 = . C \ 

107. *0, ZANCHY . HARWN . OF = The Grocers' Arms 

R. ABBV . MILTON . 1651 =Z . H. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



i84 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

POOLE. 

1 08. *0. FOR . THE . MAIOR . OF . Y* . TOWN«Arms of the 

borough; a dolphin, the base wavy, in chief three 
escallops. 
J^, AND . covNTY . OF . POOLE = 1667 between two ^toDes 
of six points. i 

109. *A variety from a different die, in which the ^toile of six 
points in the legend on the reverse is replaced by a mullet of five 
points. 

The following order relative to this token appears in the Corporation books of 
the borough, and was agreed upon at a common hall, held 22nd August, 1667, and 
is here given in the abridged form adopted by Boyne : 

"August 22nd, 1667. Moses Durell, Mayor, disbursed the sum of Ten poonds 
for copper money, with the stamp of the Town Arms on them, and the inscription 
' For the Mayor of the Town and County of Poole,' and received in fiurthings (four 
to the penny) nineteen pounds four shillings, to be passed in exchange betwixt 
man and man as current money, until it shall be prohibited by his Majesty's order. 
If not prohibited, the Mayor shall transfer to his successor the sum of nine pounds 
four shillings in current monies or the same farthings." 

This order is given at greater length in Hutchins (i. 14), in which appear the 
pames of Peter Hall, Mayor, and eleven others as being present. The order is also 
mentioned in Sydenham s " History of Poole " (ed. 1839, pp. 135, 136). Accordixig 
to the list of Mayors, however, given in Hutchins (L 33), Peter Hall was mayor in 
1655 and 1664, and Robert Cleeve in 1667. See note to No. 94, aHtt. 

The arms on the token do not quite represent the full armorial bearings of the 
Corporation of Poole, which are : barr}*ot eight, sable and vert, over all a dolphin 
naiant argent ; on a chief of the third, three escallops of the first. 

These arms were confirmed in 1579 by Robert Cooke, Clarencieux, and are 
allusive to the maritime situation of the town, and its patron saint, St. James, whose 
symbol was the scallop-shell (Hutchins i. 21). 

The registers of St. James's — the parish church of Poole — date from the earliest 
period, namely, 15^8 ; but the first volume containing those up to the year 1653, 
IS in such a condition from age, damp, and, it is said, fire, that it is practicaliy 
indecipherable, and is now kept in a tin case, being consequently of no value for 
reference. 

The next volume, on vellum, dating from 1653, is in capital preservation, and 
commences in a handwriting of unusual excellence for that period. 

110. *0. CONSTANTINE . BEAVMONT = C . R . B. ^ 

I^. IN . POOLE = 1667. J 

The register gives the marriage of *' Constantine Beumont and Rachel Blandd ** 
on 31st July, 1602. 

111. *0. SAMVELL . BRAMBLE = 1666. 

/^. IN . POOLE = S . S . a { 

On 24th March, 1663, appears the burial of " Samuel Brambell ;" but from the 
date this entry cannot refer to the issuer of the token, though it may be that of his 
father. 

On 30th March, 1676, appears the burial of *' Susan Brembell," who may well 
have been the wife of the issuer. 

112. *0. ROBERT . CLEVES = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. MERCER . IN . POOLE » R . C. i 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 185 

113. *A variety from a different die, in which the words are rather 
wider apart, and the asterisk is placed more immediately over the 
shield on the obverse. 

Robert Cleeves was Mavor of Poole in 1658 and 1667, and was one of those 
present at the common hall on 22nd August, 1667, when the issue of the town- 
piece was a^eed upon. (See note to No. 109. ) 

On 7th May, 1658, and 13th November, 1663, respectively, occurs the birth of a 
daughter of ** Mr. Robert Cleeves and of Mary his wife," and on 24th March, 1673, 
appears the burial of ** Mr. Robert Cleeves Marchant.'* 

1 14. O. MOSES . DVRELL = M . I . D. 

I^. OF . POOLE = 1666. i 

A token which reads ** dvrel " and m . s . D on obverse is given in Hutchins's 
list of tokens (L Ixxv.), but the list is so full of inaccuracies that it would not be 
safe to consider it as a variety. 

Moses Durell was mayor in 1653, 1666, and 1678, and his name occurs in a deed 
dated 8th and 9th October, 1690, as sole surviving trustee of a certain rent-charge 
of jCiSf payable to the corporation, and which he conveys by this deed to new 
trtistees. 

This rent-chaige is still received by the corporation (Hutchins, i. 62). 

The register gives an instance of the birth of a child during a mayor's year of 
oiBce, for on the 8th February, 1654, occurs the following entry : 

** David Durell son of the Wor'^ Moses Durell (now maior) and Toane his 
wife." 

The name of Durell still exists in the town. 

115. *0, AT . THE . GEORGE . IN . POOLE=I . A . H. 

/^, HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1666 = St Gcorge and the dragon. | 

116. *0. ELIZABETH . MiLLEDGE = A hart passant 

-^. IN . POOLE . 1666 = E . M. i 

On 28th June, 1668, occurs the burial of " Elizabeth Melledg." The name of 
Milledge still exists in the town. 

117. *0, WILUAM . MINTV = W . M. 

Ji, OF . POOLE . MERCER = 1657. J 

There would seem to have been about this time two persons of the name of 
William Minty, either of whom might well have been the issuer of the token, as 
the register gives a William Minty who, on 7th April, 1655, married Esther Hily, 
and on 30th September, 1676, a William Minty, who married Elizabeth Turbervil. 
From the circumstance that on 30th September, 1676, '* Hester Minty was 
^ried,** it might be supposed that it was the same man contracting a second mar- 
riage after the death of his first wife, were it not for the fact that another entry gives 
the burial of ** William Mintye " on 31st October, 1677. The register also records 
the birth of a *' William Minty son of William Minty and Hester his wife " on 
2nd March, 1656, so that it is very probable that the two entries of marriage given 
above may refer to father and son. 

118. *0. MiCHAELL . OKE . AT . y" . OKE = An oak trec. 

^. TREE . IN . POOLE . DORSET = HIS HALFE PENY. 1 668. ^ 
Boyne was wrong in giving it as *'the" on obverse, and in spelling it as 

•* PENNY '* on reverse. 

The present token is given as a variety in the British Museum catalogue 

(No. 94). 

On 17th April, 1668 (a year which, if we may judge from the reeister, was un- 

otfually conducive to infant mortality, especially in the summer months), occurs the 

burial of ** Tone Oake—a maide,*' and on 21st September, 1670, appears the burial 

of*«MichaeUOake." 



Digitized by 



Google 



i86 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

119. O. GEORGE . OLLiVE . 1665 = A Stick of candles. 

/?. IN . POOLE . CHANDLER = G . O. J 

1 20. [B, M,] A variety having a lobster and a stick of candles in 
the centre of obverse and " g . a . o " in the centre of reverse is in 
the British Museum collection, but it does not appear in their new 
list of unpublished tokens. 

121. [JV. B. B.] Another variety reads "oleive" on obverse, 
and " G . A . o " on reverse. 

On 30th November, 1857, appears the birth of "John Ollive son of George 
OUive and of Ann his wife " (no doubt the ** G . A . o " of the token), ** and of a 
son William on 7th September, 1669." 

On 1 6th December, 1685, occurs the burial of "Ann Oileffe wife of Georj;. 
Oleffe." 

The name of George Olive existed for some time in the town, as we 6nd that the 
mayor of the borough for the year 1778 bore that name. 

122. O. RICHARD . OLLivER = The Grocers* Arms. 

Jd, OF . POOLE . 1650 = R . O. J 

There are one or two entries in the register relating to the name of Oliver, one 

of which records the burial of " Richard Oliver, a child," on 5th May, 167 1. 

possibly a child of the issuer of the token. 
The name still exists in the town. 

123. *0, GEORGE. PHILLIPS = A dolphin. 

^. OF . POOL . 1653 = . A . P. J 

The name occurs in the register, though I have not been able to identify the 
issuer of this token, and it still exists in the town at the present time. 

124. *0. lOHN . ROGERS =1668. 

Jd. IN . POOLE = I . R. { 

This was a name of some antiquity in Poole, for we find that John Rogers 
was mayor of the borough in 1572 and 1583. (See list of mayors in Sydenham's 
"History of Poole.") 

On 17th October, 1662, the register records the marriage of John Rogers and 
Margaret Woodroufe (?), and on 2nd October, 1673, ^he marriage of John Rogers 
and Alese Baker, either of whom might have been the issuer of the token. In 
addition, I find the burial of a John Rogers on 22nd November, 1661, and on 20th 
December, 1676, "Alice Rogers was buried." 
The name still exists in Poole. 

125. *0, DENNIS. SMITH = A stocking. 

-^. IN . POOLL . 1663 = A ship. \ 

Dennis Smith was Mayor of Poole in 1701 (Sydenham's "History of Poole," 

p. 238), but probably was not the issuer of this token, but " the sonne of Dennis 

and Elizabeth Smith," whose birth is recorded 9th June, 1661 (Dennis Smith having 

been married to Elizabeth Browne on 7th March, 1654). 
There also occurs an entry of a marriage of Dennis Smith and Ann Seller on 

loth February, 1657. The issuer of this token was probably " Dennis Smith, 

Sen','* who was buried 15th February, 1685. 

126. *0. RICH . SMITH . IN . POLL = A SWOrd CfCCt 

/?. A . FREEMAN . EINGLAND = R . S. J 

The reverse bears a very unusual inscription. 

There would appear from the register to be two claimants to this token — Richard 
Smith, who had a son, Thomas, bom to him and ** Hanna,'* his wife, on 20th 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE, 187 

Vpril, 1655, and Richard Smith, who, on 9th September, 1673, on^Lrried Elizabeth 
^Vild. On 14th October, 1670, occurs the burial of " Hana " Smith. The two 
^icliards were buried respectively on the 25th February, 1672, and 8th May, 1676. 

X27. *0. STEPHEN . STREETE . = 1657. 

^. IN . POOLE . MERCER . = S . S. { 

Stephen Streete was Mayor of Poole in 1665, and had been nominated for that 
>ffice in 1662 by the Commissioners under the Act for regulating corporations, 
>ut their nomination was rejected by the corporation (Sydenham's " History of 
r*oolc,** p. 237, note). 

tie was one of those present at the common hall, held on 22nd August, 1667, 
vlien the order for the town-piece was given, as before stated. (See note to No. 
[09.) The name of Street occurs in the regbter, but I have not been able to 
dentify any entry with the issuer of this token, and it exists in the town at the 
>resent day. 

128. O. EDWARD . TIZARD . 1 671= HIS J TOKEN. 

Ji. CHANDLER . OF . POOLE = A mail making candles. ^ 

Thb date was given as 165 1 in Bojme, but on the authority of one now in the 
Oorset County Museum, and from the fact of never having met with one of the 
earlier date, I am inclined to think that Boyne was in error. . 

129. A variety which reads "tizzerd," and is dated 1651, is 
given in Hutchins's list of tokens. 

130. [E. F. H.] O. EDWARD . TIZARD = A man making candles. 

Ji. IN . POOLE . 1665 = E . E . T. J 

The register on 4th Tunc, 1664, records the birth of "George, son of Edward 
and Elizimeth Tirjsard, and also that of a daughter, Mary, on 12th September, 
1668. 

PURBECK. 

131. *0. EDWARD . ABBOTT . = A human leg. 

J^. IN . PVRBICK . 1667 = HIS . HALF . PENY. 

SHAFTESBURY. 

132. *0. A . SHAFTSBVRIE . FARTHING = MOVNT PALADORE. 

/^. SHAFTSBVRIE . ARMS . 1669 = Arms; a bird on a tree, at 
the side a lion rampant ^ 

•* Mount Paladore " is the presumed British name of Shaftesbury, from pcUadr^ 
which, in Welsh, signifies the shaft of a spear or pillar. Michael Drayton makes 
it the name of the hill, not of the town : 

** And boast my birth from great Cadwallader, 
From old Caer-Septon, in Mount Pallador." 

(Heroic Epist, Owen Tudor to Queen Catherine.) [See Hutchins, iii. I.] 

The late Rev. W. Barnes ("the Dorset poet") in the glossary to the last edition of 
his •• Poems in the Dorset Dialect," published in 1879, says that ** Paladore " is 
the traditional name of Shaftesbury— the British Ctur-Paladr, said by British history 
to have been founded by Hhun Paladr-bras^ ** Khun, of the stout spear" — and he 
alludes to it in his poem of " Shaftesbury Feair," commencing : 
" When hillbome Paladore did show." 

The arms on the reverse of the token appear on the Corporation Seal for 
warrants dated 1570, an engraving of which is given in Hutchins (iii. 17). Also a 
slightly different rendering of them appears, together with other arms, on the 



Digitized by 



Google 



i8S TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

circular top of one of the two iron maces belonging to the Corporation, an 
engraving of which is also given on p. 15. No explanation is given of these 
somewhat curious armorial bearings. 

The parish registers do not commence uniil 1695, which accounts for the paucity 
of the information to be obtained concerning the issuers of the following tokeos. 

133. *0, THOMAS . BALL . IN = A shuttlc. 

Ji, SHASBVREY . l667=T . A . B. \ 

134. *0. THOMAS . BRicKSEY . HIS = A hat and feathers. 

J^. HALFPENNY . OF . SHASTON = T . E . B. | 

135. [B. M.] A variety which reads "bricksie" is in the British 
Museum collection, but it does not appear in their new list of un- 
published tokens. It is so engraved in Hutchins's plate. 

136. *0. EDWARD . BVRD = A lion rampant. 

jR, OF . SHASTON = E . M . B. J 

137. *0. lOSEPH . BYLES = A variety of the Tallowchandlers' 

Arms. 

^. IN . SHASTON = I . S . B. J 

138. *0. lOHN . CALL . AT . THE = The King's or Royal .\rnas. 

Jd, IN . SHASTON . 1 668 = A curry-comb, i . m . c. J 

139. *0, lOHN . COLE = The Mercers* Arms. 

J^. IN . SHASTON = 1.0. J 

140. *0, WILLIAM . DAMPNY = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^, OF . SHASBVRY . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . M . D. | 

141. [If, S. G.] O. EDWARD . FORD = A Hon rampant. 

J^, IN . SHASTON = E . M . F. 

142. [B. M.] O. NATHANIEL . FORDE . 0F = A hat. 

J^, SHASTON . FELTMAKER = N . F. \ 

143. *0. THOMAS. HACKNY = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . SHASTON . 1665 = T . H. J 

144. *0, HENRY . HVMBER . AT . THE = A bell. 

J^. BELL . IN . SHASTBERY = H . H. J 

145. *0. PETER . KING . iVNiOR = The Mercers' Arms. 

Ji, IN . SHASTON . 1657 = P . M . K. J 

146. ♦A variety has the " r " of " ivnior " smaller than the rest of 
the letters. 

Hutchins gives this variety as spelt " shastonk . " on reverse. 

147. * Another variety with the small " r " differs mainly from the 
last in the size of the initial letters on the reverse. 

Peter King was elected Mayor of Shaftesbury in 165 1, and was fined ;f 10 agree- 
able to charter for refusing to serve, lie was also mayor in 1655, 1661, and 1666. 
Peter King, junior, was mayor in 1688 and 1690, and "Peter Kinff" again in 
1703. (See list of mayors of the borough in Hutchins, iii. 15, taken from tolls of 
court-leet, minute-books, etc.) 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE, 189 

148. *0. lOHN . LEGGB . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R, SHASTON . 1658 = 1 . S . L, J 

149. *0, THOMAS . MASTERS . IN = The Gfocers* Arms. 

^. SHASTON . GROCER . 68 = T . M with a flower between the 
letters. i 

150. [HuUhins^s list] O. william . mathew . = A sheep. 

^. IN . SHASTON . 1667 =W . M. J 

151. *0. RICHARD . prittell = A pack-horsc. 

I^. OF . SHASTON . DORSETT=R . M . P. \ 

Richard Prittle was Mayor of Shaftesbury in 1659. 

152. *0. RICHARD . SOPP= A leg. 

I^. OF . SHASTON . 1 665 = R . S. \ 

The name of Sopp is still known in Shaftesbury. 

153. *0. CHRISTOFER . WARE = Arms; six crosslets, three, two, 

and one. 
/^, SHASTON . IN . DORSET = A merchant's mark composed 
of c . w and 4. J 

Chnstopher Weare was Mayor of Shaftesbury in 1630 and 1650. 

154. [Hi S. G.] O. ALEXANDER . WEEKES . AT . Y^ = Rose and 

Crown. 

^. IN . SHASTON . HIS . HALF . PENNY = A . W. \ 

SHERBORNE. 

155. *0. SHERBORN | FARTHING | FOR . THE | POOR | 1 669. (In 

five lines.) 
^. (No legend.) A mitre. \ 

The mitre 00 the reverse is no doubt in commemoration of Sherborne having 
been formerly a very important bishopric — the see dating from the commencement of 
the eighth century — the first bishop being St. Aldhelm, and the last, Herman, 
chaplain to Edward the Confessor. 

The parish registers of St. Mary's majg^nificent abbey church date from the 
earliest period ; and these, beautifully written in Latin, on vellum, are in a very 
fine state of preservation. The first entry is dated 1st November, 1538, the year 
before the last Abbot of Sherborne, John Barnstaple, surrendered his abbey to the 
CommissioDers at the Dissolution of the Monasteries. 

156. O, ROBERT . ALFORD = A rose and crown. 

R, OF . SHERBORNE = R . M . A. \ 

I should have thought that Boyne had misspelt the name of the town were it not 
that it is so spelt in Hutchins's plate. 

157. *A variety is spelt "sherbone." It is also given in the new 
Brid^ Museum list (No. 95). 

The register contains the burial of John Alford " y" sonne of Robert," on 
20ih November, 1676, and the burial of " Robert Alford ux *' on 25th August,/*^ 
1684. 

158. *0, lOHN . BVSHR0D. = A Hon rampant. j 

R, OF . SHERBVRNE . 1668 = HIS . HALFE . PENY. \ I 

The register contains the burial of John Bushrod on nth July, 1686. ^^v 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



190 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

159. *0. GEORG . C0NNiNGT0N = The Princc of Wales's feathers. 

J^. OF . SHERBOVRNE = G . D . C \ 

160. *A variety is spelt "conington." 

George Connington, by will bearing date 9th August, 1698, and proved in the 
Prerogative Court, devised his lands in Sherborne called Four Pitts, to his grand- 
child, Robert White, and his heirs, paying thence for ever yearly one annuity of 
20s. on Michaelmas Day to the churchwardens and overseers of the poor of the 
parish of Sherborne, for the time being, to be by them laid out in bread, in six- 
penny loaves, on St. Thomas's Day, yearly, and given to forty poor persons, men 
and women, such as should not have weekly relief, in the said parish, if should be 
such to be found, but if not to such as should have relief, at the discretion of the 
officers for the time being. And he directed that they should keep and give a lis* 
yearly of the persons' names to whom the bread should be given, and receive the 
approbation of the master and brethren of the almshouse in Sherborne. 

The field upon which this sum is charged still bears the name of Four Pitts. 
It adjoins the town of Sherborne, and is now the property of Walter Pride,* bv 
whom the payment is made. (See the " Report of the Commissioners for inquiring 
concerning Charities, p. 130 ;" and the Abstract of Returns of Charitable I>onatioa< 
in BoswelTs "Civil Division of Dorset," p. 73.) 

In an inventory of the goods belonging to the parish church, taken in 172 1, 
appears the following entry : 

" One silver salver, given by George Corrington" (? Connington) "deceased, in 
1699." (Hutchins, iv. 259.) 

The register contains the entries of several children of George Cooingtoo, from 
the years 1654 to 1658. 

161. *0. THOMAS . cooper. {Wit?iout a detHce.) 

R. OF . SHERBORNE . 1 667. ( Without a devia,) \ 

The register contains the baptism of two children of Thomas and Elizabeth 
Cooper in the years 1674 and 1677. 

162. *0. GVSTAVVS . HORNE . MERCER = G . S . H. 

R, IN . SHERBORNE . DORSET . 1667 = HIS HALFE PKNY. i 

The name of Gustavus Home, as one of the churchwardens, appeared on the 
tenor bell of the parish church when it was recast in 1670, and is embodied in the 
following inscription : 

•* Gustavus Home, Walter Pride, churchwardens. This bell was new cast by 
me, Thomas Purdey, October the 20th, 1670. 

" By Wolsey's gift I measure time for all, 
To mirth, to griefe, to church, I serve to call. — G. H." 

This bell, called Great Tom, after its donor. Cardinal Wolsey (who was once 
rector of Limington, about eight miles from Sherborne), and weighing fifty-two 
cwt. and twenty-three lbs., was said to have been the smallest of five bells for 
merly belonging to the cathedral of Toumay, and distributed by him to the cathe- 
thrals of York, Oxford, Lincoln, and Exeter, together with Sherborne Abbey. It 
cracked again in the year 1858, and was silent for seven years, but was again suc- 
cessfully recast in 1866. (Hutchins, iv. 247.) 

The register contains the entries of several children of Gustavus and Sarah Home, 
from the years 1664 to 1676, and on the 13th October, 1696, the burial of ** Gus- 
tavus Home, widower." 

163. *0, WILLIAM . MOLBY . AT Y"=« A CrOWn. 

R, CROWN . IN . SHERBORN = W. M . G. \ 

This is an unusual way of placing the initial of the surname. 

* The name of Walter Pride, as one of the churchwardens, appeared on the tenor 
bell of the parish church when it was recast in 1670. The name of Pride is of 
frequent occurrence in the register. (See note to No. 162.) 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 191 

164. [Hutchins,'] A variety has " athe" for " y«" on the obverse. 

165. *0. SHERBORN = A hart lodged. 

R, WELCOM = W . R . O. i 

166. *0. RICHARD . 0LDES = The Merccrs' Arms. 

R, IN . SHERBORNE = R . O. \ 

The register contains two entries of the name of *' Richard Oldis, y« son of 
William and Rebekah," but at too late a date to refer to the issuer of this token. 

167. *0. lOHN . PiTEMAN = Two pistols in fess. 

R. IN . SHERBORNE . 58 = 1 . I . P. \ 

168. [Hutchins.] A variety has "s" instead of a date on the 
reverse. 

169. *0, lOH . PITMAN . FOR . DORSET = Two pistols crossed. 

R, AND . SOMERSETSHIRE . 59 = 1 . I . P. J 

There are several entries of the name of Pitman in the register, and on i6th June, 
1697, occurs the burial of "John Pitman, widower.** This is the only token in 
Doreet that gives the name of the county instead of, or without that of, any town 
or place in it. 

170. *0. CHRISTOPHER . PORT = A plain band, with band-strings 

pendant. 

R, OF . SHEREBORNE . 1669 = . A . P. \ 

Randal Holmes, in his " Storehouse of Armory and Blazon/* says : " This is 
an ornament for the neck, which is of the finest white Linen cloth, as Flaxen, Hol- 
land, Lawn, etc., made by the art of the Seamster, and Washed and Starched, 
Slickened* and Smoothed by the care of the Laundress. In the beginning of the 
reign of Charles the First, Yellow bands were much used, which were Dyed with 
Safron, and supported round the neck b^ a Pickadill." 

The register contains the following curious entry of the baptism, on i8th February, 
1683, of '* Joseph Port, sonne of Christofer and Abigail, when be was about 21 or 
22 yeare old.*' 

171. [HuUhins^s list] O. richard . povnsfoot .=A castle with 

two towers. 

R, IN . SHERBORNE . = R . E . P. 1667. \ 

The register contains the baptism of " Richard Pounsfoot, y« sonne of Richard 
and Elinor," on 28th Augtist, 1664, and the burial of the same on 12th December, 
in the same year. 

172. [A M,] O, WILLIAM . RiDEOVT. {JVo dei'tce,) 

R, OF . SHERBOVRNE . 1 666. {No devtcc,) \ 

This is given as No. 96 in the new British Museum list. 
The name occurs frequently in the parish register. 

173. *^. AT . SHERBORNE . IN = A dolphin on the water. 

R, DORSETT . SHIRE . 57 = H . R. \ 

174. A variety without a date is given in Hutchins's plate. 

* Slicken <- to smooth. (See Halliwell*s '* Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial 
Words.") 



Digitized by 



Google 



192 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 
175' *0. lOHN . SHERLOCK = An hour-glass. 

Ji. IN . SHERBORNE . l666 = I . S. \ 

There are several entries in the register relating to John and Christian, and John 
and Elizabeth, Sherlock, from the years 1665 10*1683. 

176. *0, BENiAMiN . SNOOKE = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

J^. IN . SHERBOVRNE . 1664 = B . S. J 

The register contains the baptism of " John Snooke, the sonne of Benjamine 
and Ann/' on nth August, 1674, and the baptism of a daughter, Ann, on 
13th August, 1675. 

177. *0, lOH . STVCKiE . GLOVER = A ram's head on a shield. 

^. IN . SHERBORN . 1659 = 1 . S. \ 

The register contains the burial of "John Stuckey, vol," on 23rd October, 
1674. 

178. [Ifu/cAtns.] O, lOHN . WARMAN . OF = A merchant's mark 

like an 8 of twisted cord. 

J^. SHEREBORNE . 1669 = 1 . A . W. J 

The register contains the marriage of John Warman and Ann Liford on 19th 
August, 1668, and the baptism of a daughter, Ann, on 17th June, in the following 
year. 

179. O, lOHN . WATS =1666. 

J^, IN . SHERBORN = I . A . W. J 

The register contains entries of the baptism of two daughters of " John and Alee 
Watts" in the years 1664 and 1668, and of the three following burials : "John 
Watts, junr., a married man," on i6th September, 1673; "John Watts, senr., 
ux," on 19th January, 1680 ; and "John Watts, ux," on i8th May, 1694. 

180. *0, lOHN . WHETCOMBE = The Arms of the Whetcombe 

family ; paly, three eagles displayed. 

jR. IN . SHERBVRNE . 1657 = 1 . W. J 

The Whetcombes were an ancient family in Sherborne ; their name occurs in 
the parish register in 1 558, and there are several entries of the families of John 
Whetcombe, John and Frances Whetcombe, and John and Hannah Whetcombe, 
from the years 1653 to 1669, and on 23rd December, 1695, occurs the burial of 
"John Whetcombe, son of John, Gent.*' 

On a stone let into the wall of the old library of the King's School in the town 
(now used as the housekeeper's room) is cut the following inscription in Roman 
capitals : 

"John Whetcombe the elder, warden, 1670.'* 

Instances of the name occur in the inventory of goods before mentioned (see note 
to No. 160). ** One herse cloth bought for 40s., given by Robert Whetcombe, 
deceased ;'* and again, " one black pulpit cloth, given by Mr. John Whetcombe, 
sen., deceased." 

In a subsidy roll of the year 1661 occur the names of John Whetcombe, jan^ 
gent., in Newland Borough, and John Whetcombe, sen., gent., in Abbot's fee. 

Dr. John Whetcombe, Bishop of Clonfert, in Ireland, 1 741, was of this family ; 
and another member of the family, by name Simon, by will dated 23rd August, 
1 721, gave £s^ ^^ money, to be lent without interest, in small sums, to poor trades- 
men, inhabitants of Sherborne, £s each. (See list of charities in Boswell's *' Civil 
Division of Dorset.") 

181. *0, iSACK . WILLIAMS = A mortar and pestle. 

^. AT . SHERBORNE . 1 664 s I . W. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 193 

182. [B. Af.] A variety is dated 1658 (Na 97 in British Museum 
new list). 

183. * Another variety is dated 1666. 

STALBRIDGE. 

184. *0. I AMES . CANE . 1 666 = A glove. 

^. OF . STALBRIDGE = I . K . C J 

This token affords an unusual instance of the initial of the surname being placed 
l^/07v that of the two Christian names. 

185. *0. THOMAS. SNOOKE = A fleur-de-lys, 

J?. OF . STALBRIDG . 1658 = T . K . S. ^ 

The name of Snook still exists in Stalbridge. 

STOWBOROUGH. 

186. O. NICHOLAS . NORTHOVER = N . N. 

I^. IN . ST080RRY= 1657. ^ 

Stowborough is a tithing of Wareham, and as aU the old registers of the parishes 
of Wareham were destroyed in the fire of 1762, we cannot expect to bnd any 
reference to the issuer of this token, though the name of Northover still exists 
amongst the poorer classes. 

STURMINSTER NEWTON. 

187. *0. HENRY . CROSSE . OF 1664 = H . C 

^. STVRMISTER . IN . NEWTON = H . C J 

The parish registers only commence in 168 1, the reason being no doubt the only 
too common one of the destruction of the early roisters by fire, as we find that in 
1 68 1 there was a brief for a fire here. 

188. *0. ROBERT . PORTER = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

^. IN . STVRMISTER . NEWTON = R . F . P. J 

THORNCOMBK 

Thomcombe was formerly in the hundred of Axminster and county of Devon, 
but was transferred by Act of Parliament in 1842 to the hundred of Hawkchurch, 
io the county of Dorset. In Boyne's work (1858) it appears under Devon (t^).* 

189. [If, S. G.] O, ROGER . BRiANT . OF .=A pair of cropper*s 

shears. 

R, THORNECVM . 1657 . = R . B. \ 

The parish raster contains the following entries : " Daniel, son of Roger 

Bryant and Alice, his wife, bom July 19, 1657 f and again, •* Phcebe, daughter of 

Roger Bryant, bom May 27, 1658/* 

U is somewhat curious that the wife's initial does not appear on the token, as at 

the time the token was issued Roger Briant would appear to have been married. 

* In consequence of the recommendation of the Boundary Commissioners under 
the Local Government Act, 1888, it is anticipated that Thomcombe will now 
either be given back to Devon or transferred to Somerset ! 



Digitized by 



Google 



194 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
190. *0, SAMVELL . STAPLE = A pair of scales. 

A, OF . THORNECOMBE . 68 == S . E . S. \ 

[Transferred from Devon, Boyne t%.] 

The register contains the marriage of Samuel Staple and Alice Hills on 24ih 
November, 1675, and of Samuel Staple and Hannah Knight on 7th May, 1680, 
but neither of these wives' Christian names would seem to agree with the initial 00 
the token. 

WAREHAM. 

The registers of St. Martin's parish began in 1540, those of Holy Trinity in 
1587, those of St. Mary's in 1594, but were all destroyed in the fire of 1762. 
(Hutchins, i. loi, et seq,) 



191. [ff. 5. 6^.] O, WILLIAM . CLEEVES . = W . C 

R, OF . WAREHAM . 1655 = W . C 

192. *0, HENRY . HARBIN = H . H. 



R» IN . WARHAM = l657. \ 

In the pedigree of Gigger, given in Hutchins (i. 122), Henry Harbin, of Ware- 
ham, mercer, married Mary Daccombe in 1665. Henry Harbin, late of London, 
merchant, by will dated 19th July, 1703, gave to the Corporation of Wareham 
;^200 to purchase land to the value of ^ 10 per annum for a person to instruct the 
poor children of the town in the English tongue, and the interest of £$0 to be 
added if the principal was not sufficient. (Hutchins, L 89.) 

At the west end of St. Peter's Church was a brick tower, built about 1700 by 
Henry Harbin, of London, merchant. The premises were nearly destroyed ic 
the fire of 1762 (i. 109). 

In the list of mayors since the charter of Queen Anne, given by Hutchins (i. 83., 
occurs the name of Henry Harbin for the years 1746 and 1749, and amongst the 
burials in the register of St Mary's Church for the year 1750 occurs the name of 
Henry Harbin, Mayor (i. 117). 

The old silver mace belonging to the Mayor and Corporation of Wareham, beais 
the inscription, " H. H., Mayor, 161 5," engraved on its base. These are believed 
to be the mitials of Henry Harbin. 

193. *0, ANTHONY . TREW = A . T. 

R, OF . WAREHAM = A . T. } 

Anthony Trew was Mavor of Wareham in 1721, and the name occurs again fur 

the years 1726, 1733, 1736, 1740, 1743, and 1747. In the south aisle of St. Mar>^ 

Church there is a marble monument erected in memory of Anthony Trew, geiit., 

who died 20th September, 1 771, aged 80. 

I learn from a member of the family that there was an Anthony Trew, who vca 
Dom in 1689, and died in 1726, who may well have been the son of the issuer cf 
the token ; and also that an Anthony Trew, a descendant of the family, is &i.l! 
living at Dorchester. The name of Anthony must have been a favourite one, for 
I have been informed that one of that name has recently been at Wareham 
collecting tokens of the above issuer, and claiming to be the sixth Anthony Ivtv 
in descent from him 1 
The name also occurs more than once under Poole. 

WEYMOUTH. 

194. *0. A I WEYMOVTH | FARTHING | FOR . THE | POOR | 1669 

(in six lines). 

R, Arms of Weymouth ; an antique three-masted ship, on 

the hull an escutcheon, per fess in chief three chevrons, 

in base three lions passant gardant \ 

In the British Museum new list (No. 98) this is given as unpublished, the 

authorities being misled no doubt by the printer's error, that caused *' Y' " to 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE, 195 

appear .io Bojne's book, whereas his MS., I am informed, distinctly reads 
•'THE.** The following extract was there given from the Corporation books 
of Weymouth under date 6th November, 1669 : 

" that the deputy Maior be pleased to lay out Ten pounds in farthings for the 
Town's use, with the inscription, * A Weymouth farthing for the Poor, with the 
Town Arms." 

Mr. Moule, in his *' Catalogue of the Weymouth and Melcombe Regis Borough 
Records, ed. 1883 (v. 62, p. 144), gives the following note relative to the issuing 
of ibis token: 

** Order to lay out jfio on minting farthings * for the Towne's use and profitt for 
the poore,* the * superscription 'to be * a W. ffarthing ' on one side, and on the 
other * ffor the poore,* with the Town's Arms. Nov. 5, 1669." 

In Ellis's " History of Antiquities of Weymouth" (cd. 1829) occurs the follow- 
ing extract, in greater detail, from the corporation records, fol. 328 : 

** Att a full Hall held on Friday, the fifth daye of Novembre, 1669, 21 Car. H. 
R^s, Also )rt ys agreede uppon, Thatt Mister Deputie Maior bee pleased to laie 
outt Tenn pounds in fTarthyngcs, for the Townes use and profitt of the Poore, the 
superscription on the one side to be ' A Waymouth Ffarthyng,' and on the other 
syde, *For the Poore,* with the Towne Armes." 

Mr. Ellis adds that they must also have issued another, having on the obverse 
*• A Weymouth Farthing for the Poor, 1669," and on the reverse "The Town 
Arms." He is not right in his supposition, however, for there was only one town- 
piece issued, and that in the form here given, the specific instructions of the Cor- 
poration simply not having been carried out. 

195. *0. BARTHOLOMEW . BEERE = The Grocers* Arms. 

/^. IN . WAYMOVTH . 1658 = 3 . S . B. J 

Mr. Ellis, in his " Antiouities of Weymouth," describes this token as that of 
** Bartholomew and Sarah Beer, in Melcomb, 1665,'* and I should feel inclined to 
consider this as an unpublished token of Melcombe Regis, but that the descrip- 
tions on the plate of tokens that he gives in his work are by no means to be relied 
upon for their accuracy. 

196. Mr. Ellis gives a variety spelt "beer" on the obverse, and 
dated 1668 on the reverse, with " b . b" in the centre. 

197. *0, lOHN . BEERE = nie Groccrs' Arms. 

J^, IN . WAYMOVTH = I . I . B. \ 

Several of the Beere family were Nonconformists, and there are descendants of 
them still residing at Weymouth. 

198. *0. lAMES . BVDD . OF . WAYMOVTH = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . DORCETT . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . I . a 1666. J 

James Bodd built the bridge across Weymouth Harbour, for which, in 1673, he 
was paid jf 100. He was a Quaker, and on 9th July, 1665, he and ten others were 
convicted of being present at an unlawful conventicle, and was fined 3s. On the 
6th June, in the K>Ilowing year, he was a second time convicted of the same 
offence, and was committed to the Town Gaol for three months and one day. — 
Town Council Records, 

199. *0, THOMAS . HIDE = A ship. 

R, IN . WAYMOVTH . l664 = T . H. \ 

See note to No. loi, ante, 

200. *0, lOH . HODDER . = A TOSe. 

R, IN . WAYMOVTH = I . H. \ 

John Hodder lived opposite the old Town Hall in Melcombe Regis. He was 
one of the '* Malignants in office/* against whom a protestation by divers towns- 

13—2 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



196 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

men was presented 2ist September, 1648, as "exempted** by Parliament from 
voting for any "Corporall townes." — Tcwn Ctntncil Records, 

John Hodder, son of Edward Hodder, was admitted to freedom 23rd September, 
1632 (Hutcbins, ii. 452), and was one of those present at a hall held on the 23rd 
January, 1666 (p. 436). He was buried in Melcombe Regis Churchyard on the 
9th May, 1668. 

201. *0. WILLIAM . POOKE = W. P, 

R, IN . WAYMOVTH = The Grocers' Arms. \ 

This is given as an unpublished token in the new British Museum list, misled 
no doubt by its being spelt " poore " in Boyne. There is a list of Weymoath 
tokens given in Hutchins (ii. 432), in which occurs the follovdng : 

" William Farre in Weymouth, 1664 — Grocers* Arms." 

This I mif^ht have considered an unpublished Weymouth token, but from the 
general inaccuracy of this list I can only take it to be intended for that of William 
Pooke. 

The name of William Pooke occurs in the parish register of St. James's, Poole. 

202. *0. FRANCIS . REED = The Groccrs* Arms. 

jR, IN . WAYMOVTH = F . R. \ 

203. *0. FRANCIS . REED . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

E, IN . WAYMOVTH . 1669 = HIS . HALF . PENY. i 

204. *0, lOHN . SENIOR . OF = The Mercers' Arms. 

a, WAYMOVTH = I . R . S. \ 

205. *0, lOHN . SENIOR . 1663 = A fleur-de-lys. 

R, OF . WAYMOVTH = I . R . S. \ 

The name of John Senior appears in the list given by Hutchins (ii. 451) of tho^ 
who were found to be Freemen of the borough by fine on the xoth December, 
1617. 

"John Senior, son-in-law unto John Small, Town Gierke of this towne,'* paid 
£$ for his admission as a Freeman, which was given to Small, *' in respect of his 
long service done unto this towne." — T<nvn Council Records. 

An entry of a minute relating to him in connection with the breach of the rale 
as to Sunday observance is to be found in Mr. Moule's Catalogue (iii 115) sufri. 

206. *0. lAMES . STVDLEY = A wheatsheaf. 

R. IN . WAYMOVTH . 1664 = A merchant's mark composed 
of an s inside a heart, with a 4 above. \ 

In connection with the name of James Studley the following singular entry oocar> 
in the Taum Cotmcil Records^ taken from Mr. Moule's Catalogue (p. 144). 
*' Memoranda : 

"Nov. 13, 1663. Spee's Chronicle^ distrained for Capt. J. Arthur's town rent, 
was ' sould by a peece of wax candle ' to Mr. J. Studley for 29s. He also took 
Thames Well from the borough at 2s. per annum (Tems Well, Greenhill.) "' 

The following local note from the Western Antiquary {ji. 122) in reference to the 
old-fashioned custom of **sale by inch of candle " may be interesting : 

" The practice of letting by inch of candle prevailed in various parts of the West 
of England up to half a dozen years ago, and may still be carried out in some 
parts of it now. At the annual letting of the parifli meadow of Broadway, near 
Weymouth, in February or March of 1873, an inch of candle was placed on the 
edge of a knife (a pin or peg would have answered the purpose), and lighted by 
one of the parish officers. The biddings were taken down by one of the parish 
officers, ana the chance of taking the meadow was open to all while the candle was 
burning ; the last bidder before the candle went out being declared the incoming 
tenant." 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 197 

207. O. THOMAS . TVNSTALL = A sbip, 

^. OF . WAYMOVTH == T . A . T. J 

208. ♦A variety has for reverse " in . wavmovth . 1667 = t . a . t." 

WIMBORNE. 

209. *0. FOR I THE . VSE | OF . THE | POORE . OF | WIMBORN' | 

1 669 (in six lines). 
^. THEIR . HALF. PENNY = Two women Washing in a tub. ^ 

Wimborne was the only place in Dorset that Issued a townpiece of the value of 
a half* penny. 

I have not been able to discover any local reason for the device of the two 
washerwomen on the reverse. 

The early reqiisters of this parish, which commence in 1635, and which appear 
to run at times m a very curious order of sequence, are in a very dilapidated con- 
dition, the parchment leaves being only too frequently absolutely indecipherable 
ffx>m damp and moth, and sometimes apparently from too much acidity or other 
detriment in the ink, the letters having eaten into the skins. Though now no doubt 
in proper keeping, they must at one time have afforded a strong contrast to the 
watchful care which has made the ponderous tomes, still chained to their shelves 
in one of the towers, the unique and interesting library it is at the present day. 

210. *0, lOHN . ANSTEV . OF = The Mercers- Arms. 

^. WIMBORNE . MERCER = I . A. J 

From the very interesting Churchwardens' accounts, ranging from 1475 to 1700, 
in the possession of the Minster authorities, the following extract for the year 
1666 is given by Hutchins (iii. 265) : 

"William Frampton zn^ John Ansty^ churchwardens etc., with the assistance 
of the parishioners, etc, did m the seaventeenth year of the reign of King Charles the 
Second erect and sett up by Robert Hayward, of the citty of Bath, co. Somerset, 
organ master, a pa3rre of organs in the church of Wimboume Minster aforesayd, 
by Indenture dated the tenth of September, and the sixteenth year of the reign of 
King Charles the Second, a.d. 1664. 
The following extract appears in the parish register : 
••July 2nd, 1668. 

*' Then received by the order of Dr. Jones, officiall of Wimborne' 
Minster, Uom John Ansty^ formerly one of the Church- 
Wardens of the said parish, the summe of one pound 
eighteen shillings five pence and three farthings. Wee say 
received ut supra 

Per vos, 
•• Ri. Gillingham, 
** Tho. Ansty, 
••Guli. Raven." 
In the register, too, is recorded the burial, on the 8th July, 17 1 3, of "John 
Ansty, gent., ye elder," and on 6ih November, 17 19, that of ** Mary Ansty, 
widow." 

Of the same family in all probability was Thomas Ansty (one of the above 
signatories), who, as one of the ministers, was buried in the church in 1668. 
(Hutchins, iii. 223, who also similarly records the burial of the other two signa- 
tories in 1680 and 1683 respectively. ) 

211. *0. WILLIAM . BATEN = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, OF . WIMBORNE = W . M . B. \ 

In the register, on i8th May, 1656, occurs the baptism of '* William Batten, son 
of William,'^ and on 29th July, 1662, the burial of ** Mary Batten, wife of William 
Batten-" 



;f s. d. 
01 18 o 



Digitized by 



Google 



iq8 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

212. O, lEFFERY . BVDDEN . OF = 1 666. 

J^, WIMBORNE . WEAVER = I . A . B. ; 

The name occurs from time to time in the register, and still exists in the tovc 

213. O. WILLIAM . CATTEN = W . C. 

J^, OF . WIMBORNE . l666 = W . C \ 

214. *0. PETER . COX . OF . i667 = Three hats. 

I^. WINBORN . FELTMAKER = HIS HALFE PENNY. I 

The register contains the marriage of Peter Cox and Marv Willis 00 6th Mi^, 
1673. 



215. *0. DAVID . DEANE = D . B . D. 

jR. IN . WINBORNEV=i657. \ 

216. ♦A variety from a different die is dated 1668. 

217. Another variety is given in a plate of Wimbome seals and 
tokens in Hutchins (iii. 225) spelt " wimborne" and with " d . e. d 
on the obverse. 

218. *0, lOHN . DEANE . OF= 1666. 

J^. wimborne = i . m . d. } 

The name of Deane occurs from time to time in the register, and still ezitfs 
in the town. 

219. *0. WILL . easton . LiNNE** — A shuttle. 

JR. WEAVER . IN . WINBORN = w . E divided by a flowencf 

plant. ) 

The register contains the marriage of William Easton and Mary Batten 00 tie 
23rd (?) November, 1676 ; on the 31st July, 17 19, the burial of William Eastern : 
and on the 29th September, 1719, that of " Mary, wife of Mr. William Ejistoa" 

220. [JV. H,] O. ROBERTE . EKINS . OF . = Athis within a shield: 

a bend fuzilly between two daggers erect. 
^. wimbvrne . 1670 . = R . I . E and an interlaced 
flower. 

The register contains the marriage of Robert Ekins and Jane Powell on 1st BCiy. 
1664, and on the 29th December, 1680, the burial of ** Robert Ekins, gent.'* h 
ihe margin of this latter entry appeared the letters *' afif.," alluding no doobt to tk 
fact that an affidavit had been made in accordance with the law passed for the pro- 
tection of our woollen industries, which directed that no person should be buried la 
linen, under the penalty of a fine. (See note to No. 45.) 

221. *0, lOHN . FARRE . OF= A glove. 

7?. WINBORNE . GLOVER = I . F. { 

222. *0, THOMAS . FLORY . 1670 = T . F divided by a flowering 

plant. 

^. IN . WINBVRNE = HIS HALFE PENV. ^ 

The name occurs from time to time in the register as " Flury," or ** Flurry. 



Digitized by 



Google 



DORSETSHIRE. 199 

223. *0, lOHN . KING . OF = A horse drawing a waggon. 

J?. wiMBORNE . 1669 = 1 . I . K and ^ underneath. | 

This is given in the new British Musenm list (No. 100) as an unpublished token, 
wing no doubt to the fact Uiat in his work Boyne had omitted to describe the i 
n the reverse. 

The register contains the burial of John King on i6th November, 1678 ; and in 
le month of October, 1677, occurs the marriage of John King and Ann Holway, 
lough from the wife's initial given above, this entry would hardly appear to refer 
3 the issuer of this token, unless he had married again. 



WOOL. 
224. [M Hi] O. MIL . WEBSTER . AT . THE . = A hart couchanL 

^. WHITE . HART . IN . WOOLL = M . A . W. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Flaie III 




Bland KORo. 




Smaftssburt. 




DORCKBftTCR. 




Shbrborni. 





LTMs-KBcrs. 



Wbvmoi/th. 





Poole. 



WlMBORMB. 



This ^latc or Oommtinibb Town 
4.W. F.R. Hmt. 8oc.. 

BBBMOrruiXV DIOIOATBO TO 




PlIOBt. PBBtrNTBD BY 4. •. UOAL, 

Tnb Inhbb TflMrcB. London, ib 

NIM BY TNB EOITOB. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Plate III. 




Blawdkoro. 




DOMCHXftTBIl. 





Shaftbsburt. 



LTin-RxGis. 




Shbrkorni 




Weymoi/th. 





Poole. 



WlMBORMB. 



Tmi« Platc or DoRMTtniKt Town 
m&^ 4.P. F.R. Hi«T. Soc.. 

KSMROTrUIXV DtDIOATtD TO 




Pitott. rattffNTto vr 4. t. UoAu, 

TMt iNNtK T«ll«.t. LONDON. It 

NiM ov TNt Editor. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Plate in 





Blawdkoro. 



Shaftbsburt. 





DOMCHBftTBIl. 



Shbrkorni. 





LTm-Rxcrs. 



Weymoi/th. 





Poole. 



WlMBORMB. 



Tmi« Platc or DoMiTtniKt Town 
Kt^ J.P. r.n. Hmr. Soc.. 

MMROTruiXV DtOIOATBO TO 




PitOBt. mBtffNTBD BY 4. •. UOAL. 

Tnb Innbr TBMm.B, London, it 

MIM BY TNB EDITOR. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Plate IK 





RtmttBNTAflONt or Two LlAD ToKtNt OW DONtlTtNIRt. PRCMNTffD tV J. 8. UOAC. EtQ.. 

4 P . F.R. Hirr. 8oc^ op tmi Inncii TaMPLi. London. 




RlMAMNTATION or TMt BtMX TOJCtN OW GOLOXCtTKN. Not. 109 AND I84»KINDCY PRCttNTtD 

•Y O. W. STAiNtrttLO. BtQ.. or TorrtNHAM. 



Digitized by 



Google 



H)urbam. 



Number of Tokens issued 51 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 9 

Town Pieces issued None. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



2)urbam. 

The tokens of this county, like those of all the other northern counties, 
are not numerous ; they are chiefly remarkable for their display of 
lo)ralty, few pieces being without some mark of royalty on them. 
Sunderland and Gateshead had each only one tradesman who issued 
his token ; Stockton two ; whilst the city of Durham had eighteen, 
and Barnard Castle nina The comparative importance of these 
towns has now much changed. 

The privately printed catalogue of Durham and Northumberland 
Tokens, by William Henry Brockett, Esq., Gateshead (octavo, 1851), 
has materially assisted in the formation of the present list. 

BARNARD CASTLE. 

1. O. MiCHAELL . ALDERSON . IN = The King's head crowned 

R. BARNARD . CASTELL . 1666. HIS HALF PENY. M . A . A. \ 

2. O. MICAELL . ALDERSON . IN = BARNARD CASTELL. 
R, GOD . SAVE . THE . KING = A crOWn. 

3. O. THOMAS . BVLL . 1 666 = The King's head crowned.' 

R. IN . BARNARD . CASTLE = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

4. O. CHRISTOPHER . BVRFEY = IN BARNERD CASTELL. 

R. GOD . SAVE . THE . KING = The King's head crowned. \ 

5. O. lOHN . GOLIGHTLY . IN = BERNARD CASTLE. 

R. GOD . SAVE . THE . KiNGE = The King's head crowned. ^ 

6. O, lOHN . GOLIGHTLY = The King's head crowned. 

R. IN . BARNARD . CASTELL = I . D . G. 

7. O. WILL . HVTCHINSON . IN = BARNARD CASTELL. 

R, GOD . SAVE . THE . KING = The King's head crowned. \ 

8. O. ANTHONY . MARKENDAiLE = The King's head crowned. 

R. IN . BARNARD . CASTELL = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

9. O, ANTHONY . MARKENDAiLL = Three fleurs-dc-lys. 

R. IN . BARNARD . CASTELL = A . M. \ 

10. O. CHRISTOPHER. PINKNEY . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, BARNARD . CASTELL . l666 = A CrOWn. C . E . P. i 



Digitized by 



Google 



204 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

11. O. GEORGE. SANDERSON. 1 665 = IN BARNARD CASTLE. 

jff. GOD . SAVE . THE . KING = The King's head crowned. J 

12. O. MATTHIAS . sowERBY = The King's head crowned 

/^, IN . BARNARD . CASTLE. l666 = HlS HALFE PENY. § 

13. O. MATHIAS . sowERBY = The King's head crowned. 

I^. IN . BARNARD . CASTELL = M . S. J 

14. (7. MATHIAS . sowERBY=» A fiill-blown Tosc on a Stalk. 

I^. IN . BARNARD . CASTELL = M . S. J 

BILLINGHAM. 

15. O. RICHARD . CHAPMAN = The Mercers' Arms. 

/^. IN . BILLINGHAM . 66 = King's head crowned. J 

The Chapmans were ancient freeholders in Billingham, now a village, but 
formerly a more important place than Stockton. 

BISHOP AUCKLAND. 

16. O. WILLIAM . CRADOCK = Arms ; a chevron between three 

garbs. 

J^. IN . AVCKLAND . l666 = W .E.G. J 

17. O, MICHAELL . STOBBART = IN B^** AVCKLAND. 

li. GOD . SAVE . THE . KING = The King's head crowned. J 

DARLINGTON. 

18. O. ROBERT . coARSON = The King's head crowned. 

J^. IN . DARLINGTON . 1 666 = A roU of tobacco. \ 

Coarson is called a " tobackoman "in the register of 1658, and a merchaDt in 
that of 1667. 

19. O. MICHAELL . MiDDLETON . OF = The King's head crowned 

/^. DARLINGTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = A crOWn. i 

Michael Middleton was a weaver, and bought a new Manchester loom of the 
parish. It had been obtained for an unsuccessful attempt to establish an inkle or 
tape manufactory, pursuant to the provisions of Poor Howden's Charity. 

20. Another similar to the last, but a smaller coin. J 

21. O. RICHARD . scAiFE = The King's head crowned. 

J^, IN . DARLINGTON . 1 666 = The Grocers* Arms. { 

Scaife was a grocer, a freeholder, and a *' recusant" in religion. 

22. O. HENRY . SHAW . 1667 = The King's head crowned. 
J^. IN . DARLINGTON = A roU of tobacco. 

Apparently there was a Merchants' Company in Darlington, which prevented all 
persons trading there who had not served a seven years* apprenticeship. Henry 
Shaw not having served such apprenticeship, had a special license granted him, in 
1661, to trade there, by the Bishop of Durham, " being informed that Shaw was a 
free Boroughman of Darlington, where he and his ancestors had sold groceries and 
other wares, that he was of good fame amongst his neiglibours, and had no otber 
trade to support his wife and many children, having only one small house in 
Darlington." 



Digitized by 



Google 



-■ . JH.SOWET 



•"^ ^ »C^ 









l^. 



al y 



• 359 
None. 



/ 




Digitized by 



Google 



206 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

38. O. NIC . RICHARDSON = A rose and crown. 

J^. IN . DVRHAM . 1661 =N . R. } 

39. O, WILLIAM . ROPER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . DVRHAM = W . R. \ 

40. O, GEORGE . SHIERS = A Stat of eight rays. 

J^. IN . DVRHAM . 1666 ~G . E . S. { 

41. O. lOHN . STOKELD . 1 66 1 = The Mercers* Arms. 

I^. MERCER . IN . DVRHAM = I . M . S. \ 

42. O. WILLIAM . WILKINSON = Three fleurs-de-lys. 

J^, IN . DVRHAM . 1661 = W . W. j 

43. A variety reads wilkeson. 

44. O. Another similar from different dies. } 

45. A variety reads wilkenson. 



GATESHEAD. 

46. O, lOHN . BEDFORD = Arms ; a goat's head erased. 

/^. IN . GATESHEAD = I . A . B. \ 

The Goat's head is a rebus on the name of the Town ; the same arms are m 
the vestry chair, made in 1666, and still preserved in the vestry. 

Mr. Bedford, who was a draper, was one of the " Four and Twenty of Gates- 
head," nominated by the Protector in 1658, in place of the former boidy, ejected 
for profanity and divers other crimes. 

HARTLEPOOL. 

47. O. ROGER . DOBSON . 1662 = A hart passant 

J^, IN . HARTLEPOOLE = R . E . D. } 

Mayor of Hartlepool in 1662, and for several other years. He was buried the 
3rd of January, 1668. 

STOCKTON. 



48. O, ROBERT . lAKSON == IN . STOKTON. 

^. GOD . SAVE . YE . KING = The King's head crowned- } 
Mayor of Stockton several times between 1664 and 1692 inclusive. 

49. O, lOHN . WELLS . 1 666 = IN . STOKTON. 

^. GOD . SAVE . THE . KING = The King's head crowned. \ 

50. O, IN . STOKTON . l666 = IOHV . WELS. 

J^, GOD . SAVE . YE . KING = The King's head crowned. I 
John Wells was Mayor of Stockton in 1713 and 1714. 

SUNDERLAND. 

51. O, WILLIAM . FAWCET = W . A . F. 

^. IN. svNDERLAND = A lion rampant; the arms of Fawce: 
of. Boldon. I 



Digitized by 



Google 



fiescf. 



Number of Tokens issued 359 

Number of Places issuing Tokens ... -85 

Town Pieces issued None. 



Sub-Editor and CoUaborateur : 



C. W. Stainsfield, Esq., 

Tottenham. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



The Essex tokens are numerous, and nearly three-fourths of them are 
farthings. Colchester, at this time an important manufacturing town, 
Tumbhes seventy-one varieties, which are the most common in the 
series ; amongst them are several mysterious merchants* marks. 
There are no Town-pieces. 

It is curious to note that in two instances the name of the county 
is abbreviated sx, but the spelling is, as a rule, esex, or our own 
accepted spelling, essex. There are, however, two instances where 
the issuer has gone out of his way to spell the name of his county, 
thus — ESAXES and exssex. 

In instances where a token is mentioned as being in a particular 
collection, it is the only specimen known. 



C. W. Stainsfield. 



Tottenham. 



AVELEY. 



I. O, ELIZABETH . VAVGH AN = her HALF PENV. 

R. OF . AVLEV . IN . ESSEX = E . V. 1669. i 

BARDFIELD. 

2. O. ROBERT . BowYER . OF =« Checkers. 

R, BARDFEILD . ESSEX = R . F . B. \ 

3. O. FRANCES . MAY . HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1669 (>^ ^^C HneS 

across the field). 

R, IN . BARDFIELD . ESSEX = A Stag. ^ 

4. O. lONN . NOONE . IN . GREAT = A bunch of flowers, 

R. BARDFEILD . IN . ESSEX = 1 . M . N. 



BARKING. 

5. O. THOMAS . AMES = A man making candles. 

R, IN . BARKING = T . M . A. \ 

6. O, RICHARD . BRITTEN = 

R, IN . BARKING = \ 

From incomplete description given by Boyne to Goiding. 

14 



Digitized by 



Google 



2IO TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

7. O. NICKLES . CLER . BAKER = N . R . C. 
J?. IN . BARKING . 1650 = N . R . C. 

8. O. ROBERT . DVKE = An anchor. r . s . u 

J^. IN . BARKING. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 
In the collection of Thomas Bird, of Romford. 

9. O, THE . HAND . AND . BOWLE = A hand holding a ball. 

J^, IN . BARKING . 1650 = D . A . G. 

10. O. AT . THE . COALE . YARD = Arms ; thfcc battle-axes. 

/^. IN . BARKIN = R . L. 
See a similar token issued by the same person in Nightii^le Lane, LondoiL 

1 1. O. WILLIAM . MARTIN . AT = A ship. 

^. THE . KEY . AT . BARKING = W . P.M. 

12. O. THOMAS . MORE . IN = A pair of scales. 

^. BARKIN . BAKER . l66o = T .A.M. 

13. O, WILLIAM . REECA = IN FISHER STREET. 
J^. IN . BARKIN . 1665 = W . V . R. 

14. O, THOMAS . WEST = T . A . W. 
^. IN . BARKING = T . A . W. 

15. O. THOMAS . WEST. MEALMAN = T . A . W. 

i?. IN . BARKING . AND . CHANDLER = T . A . W. 



BILLERICAY. 

16. O, lOSEPH . FiSHPOOLE . 0F = A woolpack. 

^. BILLREKEY . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 1 669. 

It has been remarked that in the Church of Great Burstead, in this county, 
which Billericay was a hamlet, a monument existed to Joseph Fisbpoole, gent 
who died 13th December, 1659. Doubtless, as surmised, this was the father of the 
issuer of this token. Joseph Fisbpoole, the issuer, probably died in December, 1695* 
and his will dated loth December, 1695, ^'^^ proven on the 8th January, 1696. H( 
describes himself as of Billericay, co. Essex, gent, but the testator's will cletrl; 
denotes that he was a woolman, or woolstapler. 

17. O. MILES. HACKLViTT . 1 666 = Three tobacco-pipes. 

/^. IN . BILREKEY . IN . ESSEX « HIS HALFE PENNY. 

18. O. EDWARD . RHETT = A sugar-loaf. 

H, IN . BILREKEY . IN . ESEX^E . E . R. 

19. O. ABRAHAM . THRESHER . OF = Three fleurs-de-lis. 

H. BILLERICAY . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 

20. O, SAMVELL. WAYTE= A fleur-de-lis. 

J?. OF . BILL£REK£Y = S . H . W. 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX, 



BLACKMORE. 



21. O. ROBERT . PEACHEY . OF = A SUgar-loaf. 
J^. BLACKMORE . IN . ESSEX = R . P. 



BLACK NOTLEY. 
22. O, lOHN . ATTEWELL . 1670 = Three stags* heads couped 

^. IN . BLACKNOTLR . IN . ESEX = HIS HALF PENY. I . I . A. 



BOCKING. 

23. O. ABRAHAM . ANSELL = A pair of scales and a wheatsheaf. 

^. OF . BOOKING . BAKER = A. M . A. 

24. O. HENREY . ARDLEY . AT = A man making candles. 

^. BOOKING . IN . ESSEX = H . A. 1652. 

25. O, lOSEPH . BOOSEY . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. BOCKING . IN . ESSEX = I . B. 

26. O. NATHANIELL . BOOSEY = N . H . B. 

/^, OF . BOCKING . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 

27. O, lOHN . DAWEDATE = A WOOlpack. 
li. IN . BOCKING . 1666 = 1 . S . D. 

28. O. ABRAHAM . MANSELL = A pair of scales and wheatshea£ 

J^. OF . BOOKING . BAKER = A . A . M. 

29. O, THOMAS . MERILL = T . M. 

^. IN . BOCKING . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

30. O. RICHARD . WADE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 
/^. IN . BOCKING . IN . ESSEX = R . H . W. 



BRAINTREK 

31. O. lOHN . ALLEN . IN = A soldier. 

-^. BRANTRY . IN . ESAXES . 1657 = I . G . A. 

32. O. lOHN . ALLEN . IN = A soldier. 

^. BRANTRE . IN . ESEX = I . G . A. 

33. O. TVRNE . A . PENNY = A soldier. 

^. BRANTRE . IN . £SEX = I . G . A. 

34. O. losEPH . BOTT . OF = A woolpack. 

J?. BRAYNTREY . IN . ESSEX = I . M . a 

35. O, ROBERT . CRANE . OF = A stick of candlcs. 

A BRAYNTRY . IN . ESSEX = R . C 

14— t 



Digitized by 



Google 



212 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

36. O. lOHN . HVNWiCKE = A sugar-loaf. 

i?. IN . BRAINTREE=T.H (united) 

37. O. WILLIAM . MARTIN OF=Two tobaccO'pipes crossed. 

J?. BRAYNTRY . IN . ESSEX - W . M. 

38. O. THOMAS . MIRRILLS . 1670 = A laSt 

J?. OF . BRAINTREY . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 

39. O. WILLIAM . OSBORNE OF = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. BRAYNTRY . BAKER = W . M . O. 

40. O. PEETER . PEARCCE = A shcphcrd and dog. 

J?. IN . BRAINTREE = P . P. 

41. O. PETER . PEERS . 0F = A shcphcrd and dog. 

^. BRAINTREY . 1670 = P . P. 

42. O. HENRY . THORNBACK . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 
li, BRAINTRY . IN . ESSEX . l668 = H . M . T. 

43. O. WILLIAM . VNGLE . 1667 = HIS DVBBLE TOKEN. 
/^. OF . BRANTREY . IN . ESSEX = W . S . V. 1 667. 

BRENTWOOD. 

44. O, THOMAS . ABROOKE » A Stag couchant. 

J?. IN . BRENTWOOD = T . A. 

45. O, FRANCIS . ALEYN . AT . THE = An angcL 
J?. ANGELL . IN . BRENTWOOD = F . M . A. 

46. O, lOHN . BETES . IN . 1669 = A sugar-loaf with a clove on it 

Ji. BRONTE . WOOD . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 

47. O, lOHN . RAYMENT . 1669 = A ^io^ rampant 

^. OF . BRENTWOOD . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. I . B . R. 

48. O, lOHN . RHETT. 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

J?. IN . BRENTWOOD . IN . ESSEX =» I . E . R (a fOW Or String 

of candles). 
In the collection of Thomas Bird, of Romford. 

BROOKE STREET. 

Brooke Street, near Brentwood, was one of the great thoroughfares leading oat 
of London at this period. 

49. O, ROBERT . SHEPHERD . AT . WHIT = A lioH rampant. 

J^. IN. BROOKE. STREET. l668 = HIS | HALF | PENY | R.K.S. 1 

BUMPSTEAD. 
(See Steeple Bumpstead, No. 299.) 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 



213 



CHELMSFORD. 

50. O, FRANCIS . ARWAKER = Afins ; a chevron between three 

cotton-hanks. 

/^. or . CHELMESFORD = F . A. 

51. {7. FRANCIS . ARWAKER = Arms as last. 

i?. OF . CHERNESFORD = F . A. 1660. 

52. O. lOHN . BASTABLE . 1 65 7= Three sugar-loaves. 

^. OF . CHELMSFORD . GROCER = I . H . B. 

53. O. NATHNIALL . BOWND = N . B. 

^. OF . CHELMSFORD = Arms ; three fleurs-de-lis. 

54. O. HENRY . coRDALL . 1658 = A hand holding a glove. 

H. OF . CHELMSFORD = H . C. 

55. (7. HENRY I CORDALL | OF | CHELMS | FORD | 1 668 (in six 

lines). 
i?. HIS HALF I PENNY (in two lines). The Clothworkers' 
Arms. 

This token is heart-shaped, and in the collection of Mr. R. T. Andrews, of 
HcitiQnl. 

56. O. MARY . CVRTIS . 1667 = HER HALFE PENNY. 
J?. OF . CHELMSFORD = M . C. 

57. O. SAMVELL . CVRTIS = A savage with a club. 

/^, IN . CHELNSFORD . 64 = S . C. 

58. O. WILLIAM . HARMAN = Three tuns. 

-^. OF . CHELMESFORD . 1657 = W . M . H. 

59. O. THO . HAVEN . LOCKSMITH = Three keys. 
^. IN . CHELMSFORD . 1 669 = THOMAS HAVEN in monogram. 

60. O, THO . HAVEN . LOCKSMITH = Three keys in pale. 

^. IN . CHELMSFORD . 1669== HIS HALF PENY. 

61. O. WILLIAM . HVCHENSON« A rabbit. 

^. IN . CHELMSFORD »W . H. 

62. O. RICHARD . IAMES=l666. 
i?. IN . CHELMESFORD = R . G . I. 

63. O. GEORGE . iEFFRiES«The Groccrs' Anns. 

i?. OF . CHELMSFORD . 1656 = . M . I. 

64. O. THOMAS . losLiN . IN = Three cloves. 

J^. CHENSFORDE . GROCER = T . I. 

65. O. GBORG . KNiGHTSBRiDG = Arms ; a bend of three hearts. 

^. IN , CHELMSFORD . 1652 = . A . K. 



Digitized by 



Google 



214 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

66. O. lOHN . BiARSH . IN = I . A . M. 

R, CHELMSFORD . 1657 = The Grocers' Anns. 

67. O. PETER . ROBINSON . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, CHELMSFORD . GROCER = P . M . R. 

68. O. lOHN . TVRNER . AT . THE . WHITE = A hOTSe. 

R, HORSE . IN . CHELMSFORD . 1667 = HIS HALFE PEJWfY. 

69. O. SAMVELL . WHEELY = A hammer. 

R. OF . CHELMSFORD . l666 = S . M . W. 

70. O. lOHN . WILKINSVN . OF = HIS HALFE PENY. I . S . W. 

R. CHELMSFORD . 1669 = The Bakers' Arms. 

71. O. LAWRANCE . WILKINSON = TwQ men carrying a barreL 
R. IN . CHELMSFORD . 1 667 = The Bakers* Arms. 

72. O, lOHN . WRIGHT = The Grocerb* Arms. 

R. OF . CHELMESFORD = I . L . W. 

CHIPPING ONGAR. 

73. O. lACOB . ARCHER . IN = The Clothworkers' Arms. 

R. CHIPPING . ONGER . 57 = I . M . A. 

CLAVERING. 

74. O. EDWARD . PAMPHELON = Illegible. 

R, LIVEING . AT . CLAVRING = HIS TOKEN. 
In the collection of Mr. Thomas Bixd, of Romford. 

COGGESHALL. 

75. O. THOMAS . BECKwiTH . IN = The Tallowchandlcrs' Arm& 

R, COGGESHALL . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. T . A . R 

76. O. HENRY . BENYAN OF = A griffin holding a key. 

R, COGGESHAL . IN . ESEXn=H . R 

77. O. SAMVEL . COX . OF = A hand holding a pen. 

R. COGGESHLL . IN . ESSEX = S . C 

78. O. lOHN . DiGBY = A fleur-de-lis. 

R, COGSALL . GROCER = I . D. 

79. O, THOMAS . GVYON . IN = A TOSe. 
R. COGGESHALL . 1667 =T . G. 

80. O, WILLIAM . GVYON . 1670 — A flcur-de-Us. 

R, IN . COGGESHALL . IN . ESEX — HIS HALF PENY. W . R . a 

81. O. lOHN . LARK . OF = St George and the dragon. 

R, COGGESHALL . 1 667 = I . M . L. 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 215 

82. O. FRANCIS . LAY . AT . THE = A SWan. 

J^. IN . COXHALL . THIS . FOR = HALF A PENY. F . D . I« ^ 

lliis token was placed by Boyne to Coxall, in Herefordshire. Francis Lay, at 
be Swan, died here (in Essex) in 1678. 

33. O. MOSES . LOVE . SLAY = A shuttlc 

J?. MAKER . OF . COGGSHALL = M . L. \ 

84. O, ROBERT . PVRCAS = The Gfocers* Arms. 

J^, IN . COGGESHALL = R . A . P. \ 

85. O. BENiAMiN . SAMSON = Samson Standing, with a robe over 

his shoulder and loins, holding a jawbone in one 
hand 

J?. IN . COGGESHALL . 166$ = B . E . S. ^ 

86. O, EDMOND . SPICER = A sugar-loaf. 

li. IN . COGGESHALL = A merchant's mark or device, known as 
Bowen's knot ^ 

87. O. AMBROS* . svTTON = Crest ; on a cushion a greyhound's head, 

with a coronet on its neck. 

J^. IN . COGGESHALL . 1665 = A . S . S. i 

COLCHESTER. 

88. O. lOHN . ADLYN = I . E . E. 

H. IN . COVLCHESTER = I . E . E. J 

Thb token was issued by John Ediyn. The initials show that the name was 
incorrectly spelt ; an entirely new die was then cut for the obverse. (See No. 
112.) 

89. O, ROBERT . ADSON . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^. IN . COLCHESTER = The King's head crowned. ^ 

90. O. WILLIAM . ALLDRED = A unicom rampant. 

H. IN . COLCHESTER = W . M . A. J 

91. O, MiCHAELL . ARNOLD = A mermaid. 

li. IN . COLCHESTER = M . A. J 

92. O. NATHANIEL . BARKER — A man making candles. 

Ji. IN . COLCHESTER . 1669 = N . L . B. \ 

93. O. CHRISTOPHER . BAYLES = A sugar-loaf. 

/^. IN . COLCHESTER = C . M . B. \ 

94. O, THO . BAYLES . GROCER = A sugarloa£ 

li. IN . COVLCHESTER = T . B. J 

On the 20th of ist month (January), 1660, Thomas Bailes was committed for 
refusing the oaths of allegiance and supremacy. On the 1st of loth month 
(November), 1663, Thomas Bailes was committed to prison, with others, for being 
at a Friends' meeting in Colchester. Thomas Bayie, or Bayles, was a Quaker, 
and wrote several works in testimony of his fiith in 1675, 1677, 1699, and 1714. 



Digitized by 



Google 



2i6 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

In his " Relation of Man's Return oat of a Sore Captivitxe,*' he styies fanxl 
*• Written by one of Zyon's Travellors, Th. Bayles." He also wrote a tesdaacy 
concerning Giles Bamardiston, 1680. His last work was a *' Serious Readiof »a^ 
Comfort of Holy Scripture," 1714. He died 9th of 4th month (Jnne), 1717, «F^ 
95- 

95. O. lOHN . BEACON =1667. 

^. IN . COLCHESTER = I . B. \ 

96. O. MATHEW . BONNEY = The BakcFs' Arms. 

J^. IN . COLCHESTER . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

97. O. RICHARD . BOYSE . 0F = A Hon rampant. 

J^. COLCHESTER. l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

98. O. THOMAS . BVRGES . EST = The MerccFs* Anns. 

^. STREET . COVLCHESTER = T . a 1 

99. O. RICHARD . BVSH = A vEse of flowcrs. 

/^. IN . COLCHESTER = R . B. { 

100. O, PAVL . CANNAM = A WOOlpack. 

H, IN . COLCHESTER = P . M . C. { 

101. O. THOMAS . CARTER =1667. 

H. IN . COLCHESTER = T . C. \ 

102. O. FRANCIS . CLARK = A heart. 

^. OF . COLCHESTER . l66o = F . C. j 

103. A variety reads clarke on obverse, and 1658 on reverse. 

104. O. RICHARD . COCKE = A COck. 

J?. IN . COLCHESTER . 58 = R . A . C j 

105. A variety is without date, and has the name spelled coce- i 

106. O, WILLIAM . COFELL= 1658 (? 1668). 

Ji, OF . COVLCHESTER = W . C. \ 

107. O. ISAAC . coLMAN . GROCR = The Apothecaries' Anns. 

J^. IN . COLCHESTER . 1 667 = 1 . C } 

108. O. lOHN . COVENEY=l657. 

J^. IN . COLCHESTER «= I . C. t 

109. A variety is dated 1663. i 

no. O. lOHN . DEBERT . i666 = The Clothworkers* Arms. 

J?. IN . COLCHESTER = I . D . B (in One line). * 



in. O. lOHN . DEBART . 1667 = The Clothworkers* Arms. 

^. IN . COVLCHESTER = I . D . B (in one line). t 

112. O. lOHN . EDLYN = A fleur-de-lis. 

^. IN . COVLCHESTER = I . E . E. \ 

113. A variety reads adlyn and i . e . e on obverse. 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



ESSEX. aiy 

114. O. WILUAM . FERRIS t= 1665. 

^. IN . COLCHESTER = W. M . F. i 

There are two varieties of this token, both of the same date, varying only in the 
nint-marks. 

115. O. ANDR . FORMANTEL«A.F conjoined. 
/^, IVNIOR . OF . COLCHESTER = 1 662. 

116. O. ANDR . FORM ANTEL» A. F conjoined. 
J^, IVNIOR . OF . COLCHESTER = A . F. 

There are two varieties of this token, one with small roses, and the other with 
imal) dots around the A . F in the field. 

A. Formantle was Mayor of Colchester in 1667. 

117. O, RICHARD GREENE = IN EASTS STRET. 
J^, IN . COVLCHESTER = R . M . G. 

118. O. WILLIAM . HARTLEY = An angeL 

/^. IN . COLCHESTER = W . B . H. 

119. O, THOMAS . HOWORD= 167a 
J^. IN . COLCHESTER = T . E . H. 

T3a A variety reads Howard. 

121. O, THOMAS . KILDERB£E= 1666. 
J?. IN . COVLCHESTER = T . M . K. 

122. O. lOHN . KING . GROCER = A roll of tobaCCO. 
J^. IN . COVLDCHESTER «= I . A . K. 

123. O. HENRY . LAMBE . 0F = A bird With two wings expanded. 
J^. COLCHESTER . 1655 = H.L conjoincd. 

124. A variety is dated 1663. 
Henry Lamb was Mayor of Colchester in 1669. 

125. O, lOHN . LAMBE . 1656 = A Star. 

li. OF . covLCHESTER = i.L conjoined. 

1 26. A variety is without date on obverse. 

127. O. THO . LAMBE . AT . BVTTis = Holy lamb couchant. 

J?. GATE . IN . COVLCHESTER = T.L COnjoined. 1654. 

128. O, ABRA . LANGLEY . IVNR . IN = A CrOWn. 1667. 
I^. COLCHESTER . BAY . MAKR = A . A . L. 

129. O, MARTIN . LANGLEY . IN . EAST = A COCkatrice. 
li, STREET . IN . COVLCHESTER = M . E . L. 

130. O, lOHN . LAWRENCE =1662. 
J^, OF . COLCHESTER «= I . L. 

131. O. NATHANIELL . LAWRENCE = N.L COnjoined. 

I^. OF . COLCHESTER = N.L Conjoined. 

There is another variety of this from a different die, the letters being smaller and 
the dots around the initials are more numerous. 

Nathaniel Lawrence was mayor in 1672, 1679, and 1683. 



Digitized by 



Google 



2l8 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

132. O. THO . LVMKiN . OF . COLCHESTER = A merchant's marL 

^. IN . TRENETY . PARRISH = T . L. \ 

133. O. lOHN . MiLBANCK . iN = A double-headed eagle displayed 

I^, COLCHESTER . 1655 = 1 . M. } 

John Milbank was mayor in 1661 and 1688. 

134. 0» lACOB . MILLER = I . M . M. 

^. IN . COLCHESTER = 1662. { 

135. O. WILLIAM . MOORE . BAYS = W . I. 

R, MAKER . IN . COLCHESTER = W . M . M. ] 

136. A variety has a star for m . m. 

The w . I on the obverse is probably a merchant-mark, as there are two lines 
through the body of the i, and the correct initials of husband and wife appear on 
the reverse. The token is very common, and three dies were used of the same 
type, but varying in details. 

William Moore was mayor in 1663, 1664, i^TOi i^if '^^ 1^94- 

137. O. ELiAS . moortier = A fleur-de-lis. 

-^. IN . COLCHESTER == E . S . M. \ 

138. A variety has a shuttle, instead of a fleur-de-lis, in field on 

obverse. \ 

139. O. THOMAS . PEEKE . WYRE= A dog with chain, passaut. 

J^. STREET . IN . coLCHSTR = T . p conjoined. \ 

Three distinct dies were used in the issue of this token ; they are all of the same 
type, and vary in details only. 

140. O, PETER . PELLE . 1669 = BAY MAKER. P . P. 

H. IN . COLCHESTER = A merchant's mark. \ 

141.* O. lOHN . PRINCETT . IN . EAST = I . P. 

J^. STREET . IN . COLCHESTER = I . P. [ 

142. O, lOHN . RAYNER = IN ST PETERS. 

J?. IN . COLCHESTER = I . M . R. 1 

John Rayner was mayor 167 1 and 1678. 

143. O, THOMAS . RENOLDS . IN = T. R. 

J?. COLCHESTER . BAY . MAKER = T . R. i 

There is a variety of this with small stars where the dots are placed, and a star 
instead of a dot between the initials. 

144. O. RICHARD . RICH = A lion rampant. 

JR. OF . COLCHESTER . 1656 = R.R coiijoined. \ 

145. O. lACOB . RINGER . 1670 = A merchant's mark. 

i?. IN . COVLCHESTER . BAYMAKR= HIS HALF PENY. I . D . R. J 

146. O, ALEX. SATTERTHWAiTE^The Arms of Colchcstcr J two 

staves ragul^e, one in pale, surmounted of another in 
fesse, between two ducal coronets in chief, the bottom 
part of the staff" en filed with a coronet 

/^. IN . COLCHESTER. l668 = HIS HALF PENY. k 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 219 

147. O. lOHN . SCOLDEN . 1670 = BAY MAKER. 

R, OF . COLCHESTER = I . S . S. i 

148. O, lOHN . SEWELL . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . COLCHESTER . 1653 = 1 . S. J 

149. A variety is dated 1667. i 

150. O, NATHANIEL . STRICKSON = N . A . S. 

R, IN . COLCHSTER . 1658 = N . A . S. i 

151. O. NATHANIEL . STRiCKSTON (the ON conjoined) = N . A . s in 

field, no inner circle. 
R. IN . COLCHESTER . 1658 = N . A . s in field, no inner 
circle. \ 

152. O. DANiELL. STVD . BAKER = The Bakers' Arms. 

H, IN . COVLLTCHISTER = D . A . S. ^ 

153. O. G . T = Merchant's mark in a shield and crest. 

i?. IN . COLCHESTER . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

154. C?. I . T = Merchant's mark in a shield and crest 
R. Same as preceding (No. 153). 

This is a curious example of a merchant's mark being used as a coat-of-arms, 
wiib the addition of a crest. Boyne is doubtless correct in assuming that Giles 
Toyspell was the issuer of one of the above halfpennies, and as evidence he points 
to the fact of the farthing token, having the device of a swan, which is the same as 
the crest on the halfpenny. 

The I . T token varies slightly in the merchant's mark by wanting two cross 
strokes through the centre, but the reverse is struck from the same die as the 
G . T token. It may, therefore, fairly be assumed that the i . T token was 
issued by James Tayspell, and that James Tayspell and Giles Toyspell were 
brothers 

Monumental memorials exist in the parochial churchyards of St Martin, 
bt Maiy the Virgin, and St Leonard to the Tayspells, and the name is variously 
spelt Tayspell, "fiiyspill, and Toyspell. The family of Tayspill, of Colchester, 
was one of considerable commercial eminence in the seventeenth century. There 
appears to have been four brothers of the name, alien bom, probably in Flanders, 
of whom the eldest was Francis, bom circa 1591, living in 1650 ; George, bora 
cirea i6oo^ of Botolphs, Colchester, also living in 1650; Charles and DanieL 
These four brothers, or some of them, were engaged in the Bay, or Say, manufac- 
ture, then so common in Colchester ; and we find that they contributed between 
them no less than £i,ZZS '^^ ^^^ surrender of Colchester, showing them to have 
been men of considerable wealth. The second son of (}eorge Tayspill was Jacob, 
lirin^ 1673, who appears to be identical with James, who issued the Northgate 
faithmg and the i . t halfpenny. The third son of George was Giles, born circa 
1636, who issued the G . T halfpenny and the Giles Toyspell farthing. He 
joined the early Quakers, who suffered terrible persecution in Colchester, and died 
in 1706, aged 70, and was buried in the Moore Lane Quaker burial-ground. He 
Hurried iQizabeth Palmer, and had issue six sons and four daughters, and has 
immcroQS descendants still living, who are members of the Society of Friends. 
Elizabeth Tayspill, urolMibly the last member of the family bearing the name of 
TaysjHll, was recently living in London. 

The two cross strokes through the stem of the merchant's mark are probably 
indicative of the elder brother, or the second brother. 



Digitized by 



Google 



220 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

155. O, I . T . MARTIN LANK == Merchant's mark (same as No. 153). 
J?. Same as Nos. 153 and 154. k 

The words martin lane extend exactly half way round the token, the final e 
in lane being crowded into the swan's head ; it is evidently an after-additioo to the 
same token. 

156. O. lAMES . TAYSPELL . NORTH = I . T. 

J?. GATE . IN . COLCHESTER = I . T. } 

157. O, GILES . TOYSPELL . OF = A SWan. 

^. COVLCHESTER . l666 = G.T. J 

158. O, ABRAHAM . VOLL=aA . A . V. 

J^, IN . COVLCHESTER . i668 = A merchant's mark. J 

159. A variety has the initials (a . a . v) on both obverse and re- 

verse. (No merchant's mark.) } 

160. O. lACOB . VOL . BAY . MAKER = A merchant's mark or device. 

li. IN . COLCHESTER = I . R . V. ] 

161. O. lONAS . WHALE . BAKER = The Bakers' Arms. 

li. IN . COLCHESTER = I . S . W. 4 

162. O. lOHN . wiNNOCK . OF = A fleur-de-Hs.' 

J^. COLCHESTER. 1670^ HIS HALF PENY. i 

DEDHAM. 

163. O. NATHANIELL . BACKLER = N . B. 

^. DEDHAM . EXSSEX == D . D. } 

164. O. lOSEPH . GLESON = A horse passant 

J?. OF . DEDHAM . 1664 = 1 . G conjoined i 

165. 0» SAMVELL . SALTER . IN = A horse galloping. 

J?. DEDHAM . ESSEX . 1656 = 8 . S. i 

DUNMOW. 

166. O, THOMAS . BVRGES . 1 669— A woolpack and packing-stafid 

-^. OF . DVNMOW . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. I 

167. O. EDWARD . KEATCHENER = Crossed keys. 
J^. OF . DVNMOW . LOKSMiTH = A monogram. 

EPPING. 

168. O. GEORGE I DEY . 1 668 (in two lines) = St. George and the 

dragon. 
H. IN . EPPING I HIS . HALF | PENNY | G . R | D (in five Unes; 
Heart-shaped. i 

169. O, FRANCIS . FVRRiLL . AT = WHIT. A horse passant 

^. IN . EPPIN . 1667 = F . S . F. I 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 321 

70. O. MATHEW . GRACE . OF . EPiNG « A Hon rampant (The 

aims of the Grace family.) 
/^. IN . ESSEX . SKINNER 1667 = The Skinners* Arms. J 

71. O, RICHARD . graygooseb A man making candles. 

J^. CHANDLER . IN . EPPING = R . M . G. \ 

72. O. lOHN . LOE . SHOP = 1667. 

li, KEEPER . IN . EPPING =» I . M . L. ^ 

72tf. O, HENRY. PRISE. IN =1667. 

J?. EPPIN . BRASIER = H>. \ 

73. O, GEORGE . SMITH = A man making candles. 

^. IN . EPPIN . 1667 = . P . S. { 

74. O. NIMPHAS . STACE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . EPPING =1656. J 

1 the collection of Tliomas Bird, of Romford. 

75. O. WILL . TODD . BLACKSMITH = The Blacksmiths* Arms. 

I^. OF . EPPING . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY . 1668. J 

FELSTED. 
[76. O. HENRY . BIGG . 0F = A mortar and pestle. 

^. FELSTEAD . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

177. O, THOMAS . BRiBRiST = The king's head crowned. 

/^, OF . FELSTED . IN . ESEX = T . B. J 

FINCHINGFIELD. 

178. O. ANDREW . FVLLER = A Star of eight points. 

-A*. IN . FiNCHiNGFEiLD = A . F conjoined. J 

179. O. WIL . GREENE . AT . YE = A bell. 

J^, IN . FINCHINGFILD « W . D . G. J 

180. O, WILL I GREENE | HIS HALF | PENNY (in fOUr lines). 

^. IN . FiNCHiNFiLD . 1667 = A Hon rampant, crowned, 
w . D . G. I 

This token is in the collection of Mr. R. T. Andrews, of Hertford. 

FOXEARTH. 

181. 0. THO . BRINKWELLOR«l657. 

A*. FOXEARTH IN . ESSEX = T B | 57 (in tWO HnCS). J 

GOOD EASTER. 

182. 0. lOHN . LICHFIELD = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . GOOD . ESTER . 1658 = 1 . L. 



Digitized by 



Google 



222 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



GREAT CHESTERFORD. 

183. O. lOHN . HOWSDEN = HIS . DOVBLE . TOKEN. 

li, GREAT . CHESTERFORD = I . E . H 1670. t 

183a. A variety has on obverse iohn . howsden = in . his . dvs:£ 

TOKEN. 

184. O. BENIAMIN . ORWELL = 1667. 

jR, OF . GREAT . CHESTERFORD = B . M . a J 

GREAT EASTON. 

185. O, EDWARD . MOARE = Three cloves. (The Grocers' Am<i 
J^. IN . GREAT . EASTON = E . M conjoinecL ; 

GREAT SAMPFORD. 

186. O, WILLIAM . HEWES = W . H. 

J^. AT . SAMFORD . IN . ESSEX = W . H. * 

HALSTEAD. 

187. O. ELIZABETH . CHAPMAN = E . C. 
^. OF . HALSTED . IN . ESSEX = E . C 

188. O. IOHN . FINCH . HIS . HAL . PENY = A malt-shoveL 

^. IN . HALSTED . IN . ESSEX = A bird. J 

189. O. IOHN . FORES = Head of Charles II. crowned. 

^. OF . HALSTBD . IN . ESSEX = I . F. \ 

190. O. NATHAN . HECKFORD = N . H COnjoined. 

J?. OF . HALSTED . IN . Essx = N . H conjoined. 

191. O, WILLIAM . NEWMAN = A stick of candles. 

J?. OF . HALSTED . IN . ESSEX = W . N. j 

192. O, ROWLAND . SATH . OF= 1669. 

J^, HALSTED . IN . ESSEX = R . B . S. i 

193. O. NATHANIELL . WADE = N . W. 

J?. OF . HALSTED . IN . ESSEX = N . W. i 

HARLOW. 

194. O. SAMVELL . VOVNG . AT = HAR | LOW (in tWO Unes). 

J^. AND . IOHN . HVCHIN . IN = ESEX. \ 

HARWICH. 

195. O* IOHN . ATKINSON . i666 = An hour-glass surmounted bf 

a skull. 

J^. OF . HARWICH . IN . ESSEX = I . V . A. t 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 



223 



196. O. THOMAS . BRADSHAWE = The Apothecories' Arms. 

/^. IN . HARWICH . 1667 =T . B. 

197. O. ANDREW . DEBNAM . AT=«The Fishmongers* Arms. 

/^. HARWICH . IN . ESSEX = A . M . D. 

198. O, WILLIAM . HVBERT = A pair of scales. 

^. OF . HARWICH . 1664 =aW . E . H. 

199. O. lOHN . ROLFE=I . E . R. 
jR. OF . HARWICH = 1666. 

20a O, lOHN . SMITH . 0F = A pair of scales. 

/^. HARWICH . IN . ESSEX = I . E . S. 

201. O, lOHN . VANDEWALL = A pair of scales. 

J^, IN . HARWICH . 1652 = I . M . W. 

John Vandewall was the second son of Phillip Vandewall, and Sarah his wife, 
e settled at Harwich as a baker, and died in 1657, leaving issue by Mary, his 
ife, three sons. Having joined the early Quakers, the mother and her sons 
ipcar to have suffered considerable persecution. The descendants of John Van- 
rwall were very numerous, and several attained considerable commercial eminence, 
id were well-known members of the Society of Friends. TTie last of the family 
airing the name was Phillip Vandewall, of White's Row, Whitechapel, who died 
1861 without issue. 



HATFIELD BROADOAK. 



202. O. w . M . SPILTIMB3R = A tree. 

J?. HATFILD . BROAD . OACE = W . S. 1658. 

203. O, w . M . SPLITIMBER = A tree. 

^. HATFILD . BROAD . OAKE = W . S. 1 668. 



HEDINGHAM (CASTLE). 

204. O. THOMAS . FIRMIN . OF = A Castlc. 
/^. HIDDINGHAM . CASTLE = T . F. 

In the collection of J. Eliot Hodgkin, E^., of Richmond, Surrey. 

205. O, THOMAS . HEWES . OF = A CaStlc. 
J^. HEDINGHAM . CASTLE = T . H. 

206. O, CLEMENT . PASK . OF = The Mercers* Arms. 

^. CASTELL . HENINHAME = C . P. 

207. O, lOHN . VNwiN . OF = A woolpack. 

Ji. HEDINGHAM . CASTELL = I . V. 

208. O. ROBERT . WALFORD . 0F = A WOOlpaclc. 
IL CASTIL . HENINGHAM = R . W. 



Digitized by 



Google 



224 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

HEDINGHAM (SIBLE). 

209. O. WILLIAM . CANT . 1667 = The Clothworkcrs* Anns. 

^. IN . HEDINGHAM . SIBLEY = W . E . C \ 

210. O. lOHN . KING . IN = I . I . K. 

^. HEDINGHAM . SIBLY= 1668. J 

211. 0» THOMAS. PLVME . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . HEDINGHAM . SIBL = T . M . P. t 

HENHAM. 

212. O. ROBERT . HALLS . 1667 = A pair of scales. 

^. OF . HENHAM . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALFE PENNY. t 

HORNCHURCH. 

213. O, lOSHVA. BVRLE . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^» HORNCHVRCH . l668 = I . R . B. : 

214. O, WILLIAM . HALLWAY = A lion rampant 

J^» OF . HORNCHVRCH . 1 671= HIS HALF PENV. J 

ILFORD. 

215. O. WILLIAM . KEMPETON = A sugar-loaf. 

^. IN . CREATE . ILLFORD = W . K. ; 

2x6. O. GEORGE . TAYLOR = An angel. 

^. IN . ILFORD . 1665 =G . I . T. ; 

INGATESTONE. 

217. O, lOHN . AND .THOMAS . BARKER . THEIR . HALFE . PD"» 

(in seven lines). 

J^. OF . INGATSTONE . l668 = I . T . B. * 

218. O. GEORGE . EVANES = A dove holding an olive-branch. 

J^, IN . INGATESTONE = G .I.E. j 

219. There is a variety of this token with initials on rcfent 

c . M . E. 

220. O. GEORGE . EVANES = A dovc holding an olive-branch. 

^. IN . INGATE . STONE . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY- : 

KELVEDON. 

221. O. lOHN . HANCE . OF = A bundle of yarn. 

^. KELVEDON . CLOTHER= I . I . H. 1 669. J 

222. O. RICHARD . SIDEY . OF = A SUgar-loaf. R . S . S. 

jR, KELVEDON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. t 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 225 



LEIGH. 



223. O. GEORGE. KING = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . LEIGH . 1668 = Three tobacco rolls. | 

This token was misplaced by Boyne to Leigh, in Lancashire. - George King was 
mercer in Leigh, and a tombstone at one time existed, thus inscribed, ** Here 
eth the body of George King, mercer, of Leigh, who died January loth, 1690, 
L 54. And Sarah Kmg, his daughter, January 15th, 1687, and Ahce King, his 
ife, December 26th, 16^. ** 

224. O, lOSEPH . LAMB = A lamb couchant 

-^. OF . LEE . 1664 = 1 . B . L. i 

This token was placed by Boyne to Lee, in Kent, but it is unquestionably an 
ssex token. Joseph Lamb was a tenant of the manor in 1626, and his son was 
robably the issuer of the token. The family settled in Leigh as shipwrip[hts and 
lipHrarpenters. Isaac Lamb, a distiller (son of Abraham Lamb), died here 
1 1752. 

225. O, AT . THE . ANCHOR = An anchor. 

I^. IN . LEE . 1664 = R . I . S. 

This is undoubtedly the token of Robert Sayer, and Joan, his wife, shopkeepers 
: that date. Joan Sayer survived her husband, and died in 1689. 

226. O. THOMAS . WALL i666 = A pair of scissors or shears. 

/^. IN . LEE . IN . ESSEX = T . A . W. \ 



LEYTONSTONE. 

227. O. lOHN . EVANS . AT . THE = A man and dog. 

J^. IN . LEYTENSTONE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

228. O, John I Unwin . at \ Lay ton \ Stone (in four lines). 

R, HIS I HALF . PENY = An ardhcr shooting at a stag (octa- 
gonal). 

MALDON. 

229. O. lOHN . HARRISON . IN = The Groccrs* Arms. 

R. MALDEN . IN . ESSEX = I . H. \ 

230. O. PHILLIP . RALLiNG . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, MALDEN . IN . ESSEX = P . A . R. \ 

231. O, lAMEs. ROBiENT. IN = The Grocers' Aims. 

R. MAVLDEN . IN . ESSEX = I . R. \ 

232. O, MATHiAS . TOMPKINS = St George and Dragon. 

R, AT . MALDEN . 1667 = M . S . T. \ 

MANEVVDEN. 

233. O* THOMAS . BVLL . 1669 = The Barbcr-Surgeons' Arms. 

R. OF . MAMVDINE = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

15 



Digitized by 



Google 



226 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

MANNINGTREE. 

234. O. HENRY . CARTER . CHYRVRGEON »= The Barber-SuigeoDs 
Arms. 

^. IN . MANITREE . 1669 = HIS HALF PSNY. H . G . C i 

235: O. lERVEMY . ERDS = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

J^. OF . MANINGTRE . IN . ESEX = I . E. 1653. { 

236. O, THEOPHiLvs . HARVEY = The Royal Arms. 

^. IN . MANITREE . 1669 = T R H and 4 conjoined. I 

MOUI^HAM. 

237. O. THOMAS . lOYCE . OFs A wooden pail. 

jR, MOVLSHAM . 1666 = T. I. J 

238. O. lOHN . LITTLE . 1 666 = A woman spinning. 

J^, IN . MOVLSHEM = I . L. J 

239. O, wiLLM . SWEETING = A wheelbarrow. 

^. IN . MOVSOM • 1665 «W . S . S. J 

MUCH BADDOW. 

240. O. lOHN . LANGSTON . AT . THE = HIS HALFE PENV. 

I^. WHIT . HORSE . IN . MVCHBODDbW = A horSC. I 

MUCH CLAFTON. 
(This town is undoubtedly Great Clacton.) 

241. O. WILL . ANGER . OF . MVCHs A unicom passant 

/^. CLAFTON . IN . ESEX = W . A. 1 654. J 

242. O, WILLIAM . MVNT . 0F= 1664. 

J^. MVCH . CLAFTON . ESEX = W . M . M. J 

NEWPORT POND. 

242a. O. FRANCIS . HVCHERSON . OF = 1 668. 

^. NEWPORT . POND . IN . ESSEX = F . H. 

Thb token is large, and evidently a halfpenny. The following tokeo, of tbe 
same size, and issued the next year, has the value stated upon it 

243. *0. FRANCIS . HVCHERSON . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. NEWPORT . POND . IN . ESSEX = F . H. 1669. | 

244. O. THOMAS . HVCHERSON = T . A . H. 

jR. IN . NEWPORT =1658. I 

245. O. THOMAS . RVNHAM . AT . V" = A bull. 

I^. IN . NEWPORT . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. } 

This token was placed by Boyne to Newport, in Shropshire. Three have bees 
found in this parish, and two more in the neighbourhood. 

In Poor Robin's " Perambulation from the Town of Saffron Walden to Loodoo. 
performed this month of July, 1678," after calling at Sparrow's-end : 
**To Newport-pond, my course I next way bent. 
And in at the sign of the Black Bull went" 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 337 

Cole, in his MSS. in the British Museum, mentions it as the " Red Bull," but 
e periods of their visits were distant, and the bull may have altered its colour. 
>or Robin, 1678, says it was kept by a widow : 

*' Young, fresh and fair, of a most pregnant wit." 
As the name of this widow is not mentioned, it is only left to conjecture who she 
IS, The refi;ister of the church of Newport records : '* Elizabeth, the Bastard 
lughter of Thomas Runham, of the Bull, m Newport, In keeper, begotten of the 
tdy of Jane Whiterode, which child to be provided and brought up by the said 
tiomas Runham, and was baptized at his house, the 9th of December, 1669, by 
e, Thos. Clendon, curate here." 

The Bull orchard still remains, but the Bull Inn has long since disappeared ; old 
x>ple say their grandparents remember the gay glass in its windows. 

246. O, HENRY . WOODLEY= 1657. 

J^. AT . NEWPORT . POND = H . W. i 



PEBMARSH. 

247. O. WILLIAM . SEWELL . OF =1667. 

I^. PEBMARSH . IN . ESSEX = W .1.8. 



PENTLOW. 

248. O. ABRAHAM . DAKING = A Stag COUChant. 
^. IN . PENTELOW . ESSEX = A . M . D. 



PLAISTOW. 

249. O. lOHN . CORIE . OF = I . M . C 

^. PLAISTOW . MEALMAN= 1 65 7. J 

250. O. AT . THE . DOGS . HEAD . IN = A dog eating out of a pot. 

J^. THE . POTT . IN . PLASTOW = I . M . F. J 

251. O. lOHN . PHILLIPS . AT . THE = A dog cating out of a flesh- 

pot. 

J^. IN . PLAISTOW . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. I . M . P. J 

252. O. THOMAS . POLLARD . AT . THE = A ship. 

J^. IN . PLAISTOWE . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

PLESHEY. 

253. O. HVMFREY . SARiENT . OF = Crest ; a hand holding atilting- 

spear. 
J^, PLESHEY . IN . ESSEX . 59 = Aims ; a bar between three 
crosses fitch^ 



PURFLEET. 

254. O. SAMVEL . IRONS . AT . PVRFLET = HIS HALFE PENY. 1669. 

^. Linukill^K lime kiln. \ 

15—2 



Digitized by 



Google 



•22& TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



QUENDON. 

255. O. IN . QYENDON . STREET = The King's bust crowned, 

J^. HIS . HALF . PENY . 1699 = H . E . R 1 

This token was originally placed by Bojrne to London. 

256. O, WILLIAM . wiNSTANLEY = The Drapers' AiTOS. 

jR, OF . QVENDEN . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. t 

, The Winstanleys were a Saffron Walden family, of which the distinpsKAec 
bmaonent was Henr>' Winstanlcy, the celebrated builder of the first EddysicK 
lighthouse. The family are entirely extinct, the last being a wholesale cbcmiss 
London. 

RAYLEIGH. 

257. O, REBECCA . BARNES = A buU with a ring in his nose. 

^. OF . RAYLEE = R . B. } 

This is no doubt a tavern token. The Bull Inn existed for many yean. Ed 
baiting took place in the mead at the back of this inn, and not man j years *g9 ^ 
ring and stump of the post were dug up in the field. The site of the iim b Be* 
occupied by a large private house, but the lane at the back is still kiK>wn as m 
Lane. 

RIDGWELL. 

258. O, lOHN . nevill'. of=i668. 

I^. RIDGWELL . IN . ESSEX = I . I . N. ; 



ROCHFORD. 

259. O. lOHN . HARVEY = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

I^, OF . ROCHFOORD . i668 = Part of the Butchers' Anns. 

260. O, ROBERT . HAWDEN = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^. IN . ROCHFORD = R . I . H. 



ROMFORD. 

261. O. RICHARD. CHARVELL=HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . RVMFORD . i668 = A ram's head, r . c. '* 

262. O. FRANCIS . DiLKE = An angel. 

J^, IN I ROMFORD | HIS HALF | PENNY | 1668 (in five IlEO. 

(Square.) ? 

263. O. lOHN . i5FFRSON = The sun in splendour. 

R. AT . ROMFORD . 1657 = 1 . A . L ; 

264. O. MicHEALL . MARKEM = The Bakers' Arms. 

H, IN . ROMFORD . 1655 = M . D . M. * 

265. O, AT . THE . CROWNE = A crown. 

Ji, IN . RVMFORD . 1651 = W . M . M. ; 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. . ; 229 

266. O. lOHN . PARKER = A sugar-loaf. 

J^, OF . ROMFORD . 1669 = HIS HALF P£NNY. I.E.?. ^ 

267. O, I AMES . SCOTT . 1668 = A sugar-loaf. 

i?. IN. RVMFORD = HIS HALF PENY. J 

26S. O. GEORGE . siLKE . AT . THE = An angel. 

A ANGELL . IN . RVMFORD = G . E . S. J 

269. O. THOMAS . STEEVENS = A sugar-loaf. 

I^. OF . ROMFORD . 1651 = H s conjoined. i 

Three distinct dies were used for this token, but they arc all of the same type, 
and Taiy only in details. 

27a O. Will I Wiliis I His I ffalf\ Penny \ 1667 (in six lines). 
i?. Rumford . W . IV=^A hammer and pincers crossed. J 

SAFFRON WALDEN. 

The notes relating to the issuers of the tokens of this town have been kindly 
furnished by Joseph Clarke, Esq., F.S.A, of Saffron Walden. 

271. O, NATHANIELL . CATTLIN . OF= A shuttlc. 

i?. SAFRON . WALDEN . l668 = ftlS HALFE PENY, J 

In Cole's MSS. in the British Museum, mention is made of the family of 
Catlyn long settled there. The issuer of the token was evidently a weaver. In 
1702, Thomas Catlin was fined £2 for refusing the office of alderman ; later on, 
the family carried on the carrjdng trade, and the two last members of it were for a 
5hort time bankers, amassing considerable wealth. They retired, and were alder^ 
men for a lengthened period ; the last Nathaniel dying a few years since, the nam^ 
became extinct. During the time between 1800 and 1826 different members of the 
family filled the office of mayor seven times. 

272. O. RICHARD . KENTISH = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

R. IN . SAFFRON . WALDEN = R . K. ^ 

273. O. RICHARD . KENTISH = Head of a black boy. 

R, IN . SAFFRON . WALDEN = R . K. ^ 

Black Boy, sign of an inn so named. It is several times mentioned in the 
corpcwation and churchwardens' books of the time as being the place where they 
riccasionally held their festivities. The head has been csdled crowned, but it is 
more like a turbaned head, and doubtless is meant for that of a black boy. It is 
beautifully executed in low relief. As neither of these tokens have any date, they 
may not have belonged to the same person, or the mercer may have merged into 
the pnblican, or the publican into the mercer, as the two initials on the reverse are 
alike on both, without a third. They may have been issued by the same man, 
cvideotly a bachelor. 

Extract from the Mayor's book. Saffron Walden, 1682, May 27th : 
'* Spent at the Black-boy with the Chamberlains, when we assiessed fines on the 
(,>uakefs, 4S. 6d." 

274. O. SAMVELL . LEADER =» Two tobacco-pipes. 

jR. OF . SAFRON . WALDEN = 1653. J 

As his name frequently occurs among the churchwardens* books, he must have 
been an active man. He was one of the earliest on record who filled the highest 
r**fice of the borough, which was only held for one year. He was treasurer in 
1662, and again in 1670, and in 1680 he was fined £$ for refusing to serve the 
Office. 



Digitized by 



Google 



S30 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

275. O. WILLIAM . LEADER . 1 668 = T WO pipcs cfossed 

i?. IN . SAFORN . WALDING = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The issuer of this token does not appear to have filled the chief office of 
treasurer of the borough more than once. The principal positions in the town 
were occupied by him and Samuel Leader during many years, as such records as 
have escaped destruction amply show. The following extract bears testimony to 
his charitable disposition : 

" The guift of Mr. William Leader bein^ the 4th \ns disposed of to the poore 
at 2 several times by William Leader now living." 

Four pounds, a large sum in those days. By his will he directed land to be 
purchased to be employed for the relief of the poor of the town of Safiron 
Walden, to be distributed in bread the first Sunday in clean Lent, and the Friday 
after Trinity Sunday. This is called " Leader's Charity/* and was duly adminis^ 
tered in the Consistory Court of the Church by members of the Corporation, untfl 
the charity was amalgamated with others, the poor having become so well off, they 
did not care for bread. 

276. O. ANN . MATHEWS . IN = The Groccrs' Anns. 

I^. SAFFORN . WALDEN . 1656 = A . M. \ 

The widow of a schoolmaster, after whose death commenced bosiness on her 
own account. — See John Potter. 

277. O, THOMAS . MEHEW . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. SAFFORN . WALLDIN = T . M. 1658. J 

Thomas Mayhew (Mehew) during the disturbed times of the Commonwealth 

and the Restoration, was in and out of office more than once ; he had been 

treasurer, but an extract from the Corporation election-book, 1662, 2nd Charles IL, 

gives us : 

"William leader, Thomas Runham, the elder, and Thomas Mayhew were 

{illegally) displaced from the body corporate for refusing to take the oath of 

supremacy.*' 
lienry Leader took the oath. Thomas Mayhew must afterwards have had the 

ban removed, as in 1665 he was one of the chamberlains, and in 1680 was 

treasurer. 

278. O. THOMAS. PATMER==HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. OF . SAFFRON . WALDEN = The Drapers' Arms. 
He was one of the two chamberlains of the town in 1676, and tieasoier, the 
chief officer, in 1682. 

279. O. lOHN . POTTER = A hart couchant. i , a . p. 

JR, SAFFORN . WALDEN . l656 = A . M. 
This reverse is that of Anne Mathews, without the slightest alteration, as the 
very crowded date testifies. John Potter was chamberlain in 1670, and treasurer 
in 1679. He was the landlord of the White Hart (now the Hoops), then the moss 
popular inn in the town. He married the widow of a schoolmaster, who had com- 
menced as a grocer on her own account, neither of them giving up their occupa- 
tions on marriage ; as may be seen by their amal^mated tokens, they carried 00 
their respective callings cpiljointly. There is a bill extant for groceries supplied 
to the Corporation by J9hn Potter alone. 

280. O. EDWARD . TOMPSON= 1655. 

J^» IN . SAFFRON . WALDEN = E . K . T. \ 

281. 0. EDWARD .\TOMSON= 1659. 

I^. IN . SAFROiN . WALDEN = E . K . T. J 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 

282. O. WILLIAM . WIU)MAN . IN^TwO fishCS. 
^. SAFFRON . WALLDING= 1656. 

W«s duunberlain in 1661. 

283. O. WILLIAM . WILDMAN = TW0 fishcS, 
^. OF . SAFFRON , WALDEN= 1667. 

Son of the above. Was treasurer in 1674. 



231 

i 

i 



ST. OSYTH. 

284. O. WILLIAM . CLARKE = The Grocers' Arms. 
^. IN . OZED . i659 = w . p . c. 

285. O. lOHN . GVNFEiLD = The Drapers' Arms. 

/^. OF . ST. . OSETH . 1665 = 1.0. 

286. 0. RICHARD . STANLY =»R . S. 

^. AT . ST. . OSETH . $8 = A tree. 



SOUTH BENFLEET. 
287. O. WALUAM . THOMPSON . OF = The Blacksmiths" Arms. 

J^, SOVTH . BENFLEET . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 



SOUTH MINSTER. 

288. O. ANNE . ELLiES . i668 = Three crowns. 

jR. OF . SOVTHMENSTER = A . E. { 

289. O. EUZABETH . lEFFBRYs A double-headed eagle. 

^. OF . SIVTHMINSTER = E . I. i 

290. O. wiLUAM . LONE = The Drapers' Arms. 

/^. OF . SOVTHMINSTER«W . L. { 



SPRINGFIELD. 
291. O, lASPER . EVE . OF . 1669 = The Fruiterers' Arms. 

li, SPRINGFILD . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 



STEBBING. 

292. O. BARGE . ALLEN . AT . THE = Three hats. 

^. AT . STEBBING . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

293. O. RICHARD . SAYER . AT = A hat 

I^. STEBBING . IN . ESSEX . l668 = HlS HALFE PENNY. 



Digitized by 



Google 



232 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

294. O. RICH. . BOWYER = R . B. 

J^. IN . STEBINGE=R . B. 1 

This token is in lead, and in the Saffron Walden Museum ; it is small and thick, 
and exactly like one of Thaxted (Joseph Smith). The towns being but a few 
miles apart, they may have been by the same fabricator. 

295. O, RICHARD . SAYER . AT = A hat 

^. STEBBING . IN . ESSEX . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. i 



STANSTED MOUNTFITCHET. 

296. O. ROBERT . BRADLY . MEALMAN = A Uon. 

^. AT . Y= . LION . IN . STANSTED = HIS HALF PENY. I 

In the Saffron Walden Museum. 

297. O. BENIAMIN . GIFING = B . M . G. 

J^. IN . STANSTED . l666 = MOVNT | FITCH | AT (in thlW 

lines). J 

The last of the name were sadlers, about forty years ago. 

298. O. GEORGE . PERRIN . AT . Y» . BELL = HIS HALF PENY. 

1669. 
-^. IN . STANSTEAD . MOVNT . FITCHETT = A bell. t 

The Bell still exists. 
Poor Robin (Robert Winstanley) says, in 1678 : 

" There at the Bell, at my old friend's, George Perrin, 
We drank and tippled like unto a herring — 
For there is ale, and stale beer strong and mighty." 

STEEPLE BUMPSTEAD. 

299. O. MARTIN . DIKE . IN = Drapers* Arms. 

J^. BVMESTED . 1657 = M . D. i 

STISTED. 

300. O. lAMES . BONVM . 1 666 — A pair of shears. 

J^. IN . STISTED . IN . ESSEX = I . B . B. J 

301. O. lAMES . BONVM . 1670 = A pair of shears. 

^. IN . STISTED . IN . ESSEX = THIS ] FOR . HALF | A | PENNY 

(in four lines). | 

302. O. WILLIAM . FOVLSVM = W . F. 

i?. OF . STYSTED . IN . ESSEX = 1657. \ 

STOCK. 

303. O, GILBERT . GARRARD = A fleUT-de-Us. 

J^. IN . STOCKE . l66o = G • A . G. . i 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. 233 

304. O. EDWARD . SOMES = A fleur-dc-lis. 

J^. IN . STOCK . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. E . M . S. J 

305. O. ROWLAND . SADLER . OF = Three pipes. 

/i. STOCKE . IN . ESSEX . 1 669 = HIS HALF PENNY. R . M . S. J 

STRATFORD. 

306. O. ABELL . BONO . AT . Y" . WHITE = A SWaD. 

jR, IN . STRATFORD = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

307. O. lOHN . CANDLER = A swan. 

J^. IN . STRATFORD = I . C i 

308. O. THOMAS . JOLEY . IN = A hand holding a dirk. 

J^, STRATFORD. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

309. O, lOHN . EASON=l657. 

I(. AT . STRATFORD = I . A . E. J 

TAKELEY. 

310. O. SAM YELL . TAYLER . OF = A pair of scales. 

I^. TAKLY . IN . ESSEX . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. S . T. J 

TERLING. 

311. O. THOMAS . TAR VENER = A bull. 

^. IN . TARLING . 1658 = T . E . T. J 

THAXTED. 

312. O. LAMES . CAMPE . OF = The Drapers' Arms. 

-^. THACKSTED . 1670 = 1 . M . C. i 

313. O. 1670 I lOHN I HAVERS OF | THAXSTED | HIS HALFJ PENNY 

(in script, in six lines across the field). 
J?. I . A . H. A Saracen's head. i 

314. O. WILL . MASON . AT . THE = A bclL 

^. IN . THAXTED . 1662 = W . M . M. } 

315. O. WILLIAM . P.VRCHAS = A Still. 

JR. IN . THAXTED . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

316. O. lOSEPTH . SMITH = A man making candles. 

/i. OF . THAXTED . 1652 = I . I . S. \ 

317. O. lOSEPH . SMITH = I . S. 

/^. .IN . THAXTED = I . S. J 

This is a iaithiDg token in lead, and no other specimen is known. It was nn- 
oabtedly issued by the Joseph Smith who issued the preceding token. It was 
)nnerly in the possession ot Mr. J. S. Smallfieldi and is now in the collection of 
liomas Bird, of Romford. 



Digitized by 



Google 



234 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

318. O, NATHANiELL . SMITH ==Two swords crossecL 

J^. IN . THACKSTKED»=K . N . S. i 

319. O. GEORGE . STVBBiNG=i6 | 56 (a funnel dividing the 

figures^ 

^. THAXSTED . ESSEX = G . A . S. i 

This token is in lead, and in the Safiron Walden Museum. 

320. O. GEORGE . STVBBING» 1669. 

J^. THAXSTEED . IN . ESSEX = G . A . S, \ 

THORPK 

321. O. GEORGE . NICHOLSON = The GroccTs' Arms. 

^. OF . THORPE . IN . ESSEX »G . N surmounted bjT a 
crown. I 

322. O. lOH . SMITH . IN . THORP » A man making candles. 

J^. IN . ESEX . CHANDLER = I . S . S. | 

TOLLESBURY. 

323. O. WILLIAM . LVCKEN . 68» A Stag. 

^. IN . TOLLSBVRY . IN . ESEX = W . E . L. J 

TOLLESHUNT DARCY. 

324. O. GEORGE . NICHOLSON = The Grocers' Anns. 

I^. IN . TOLSHON . DACEY . sx. = G . N. An escallop shell. 

TOPPESFIELD. 

325. 0. lOSEPH . W0LF0RD = The Mercers' Arms. 

H. TAPSFEILD . ESEX . 1 659*1 . W. \ 

WALTHAM. 

326. O. ROBERT . NOBLE . AT = The GroceTS* Arms. 

^. WALTHAM . 1657 = R .M.N. J 

WALTHAM abbey! 

327. O. WILLIAM . DEANE . AT . THE = The King's Arms. 

^. AT . WALTHAM . ABBEY . 1 668 s HIS HALFK PENNY. 
W . S . D. ^ 

328. O. lOHN . HODGES . GROCER = The Gfocers' Arms. 

J?. IN . WALTHAM . ABBY . 1 668 » HIS HALF PEMY. 1 • H. | 

329. O, lOHN . HODGES = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. AT . WALTHAM . ABBY = I . I . H. J 



Digitized by 



Google 



ESSEX. a^ 

330. O, lOHN . HODGis . QF = A stick of candlcs. 

H. WALTHAM . ABBY . 1666 = 1 . I . H. { 

331. O, MiHiLL . ROBINSON . IN = The Grocers' Anni 

J?. WALTHAM . ABBIE = M . S . R. { 

332. O. THOMAS I TYLAR | HIS | HALF | PENNY (in fivC linCS). 

J?. OF I WALTHAM | ABBY | 166& (uk foui Uaes). {Muirt' 
shaped.) \ 

H^ ft THOMAS . WARRiN= Three pipes in a triangle. 

R. OF . WALTHAM . ABBY . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. T . S . W. \ 

334. Q. HENRY . WEB . AT = The Drapers' Arms. 

R. WALTHAM . ABBEY = H . F . W. \ 

WALTHAM (GREAT>, 

335. O. lOHN . POOLE . GROCERY I . P. 1667. 

R. IN . WALTHAM . MAGNEY = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 



WALTHAM (LITTLE). 
336. O. lOHN . GOODEVE. 1 668 = The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. OF . LITTELL . WALTON = HIS HALF PENY. I . G. 



WEST HAM. 

337. O. THOMAS . BAiLY . AT . TH£»A savage with club and 

dog. 

R. IN . WESTHAM . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

338. O. GABRIEL. BREWER = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . WESTHAM . i668 = A dolphin. (Octagonal.) \ 

339. O. THOMAS . COPLEY . AT . YE . VNICORN = A UniCOm. 

R. IN . WEST . HAM . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. T . S . C. \ 

340. O. lOANE. COYDE . 1 667 = The Royal Arms (without sup- 

porters). 

R. IN . WEST . HAM = HER HALF FENY.. \ 

341. O. EDWARD . EDWARDS . 1667 = E . E and merchant's mark. 

R. IN . WESTEHAM . CHANDLER = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

342. O. THOMAS . SIMES . IN . WESTHAM . 1 668 (script). 

R. WEE . ARE . 3 = HIS HALF PENY. Two loggerhcads. \ 

WETHERSFIELD. 

343. O. THOMAS . LivERMER=The king's head aowncd. 

R. OF . WEATHERSFEILD = T . E . L. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



236 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



WIVENHOK 

344. O. lOHN . PARKER . AT . THE = A bird holding a sceptre. 

J^. FALKEN . AT . WEVENHOE * I . M . P. 

WICKHAM 

345. O. LAWRENCE . BROWN . IVNIOR = A hand. 

I^. AT . WICKHAM . IN . ESSEX = HIS HALF PENY. 1669. i 

In the parish register of Wickham Bishop's the following entries oocor : 
" Burials. Anno Dom. 167a Laurence Browne, the sonn of Laurence Bron^ 
was buried Jan. 8. Browne, the wife of Laurence Browne, Senr., was \xsd 
Jan. 22. Anno Dom. 1675. Laurence Browne, the (father, wms bniied m tk 
middle Aly neere the font, March the tenth." 

WITHAM. 

346. O. ROB . BARWELL . IN . WITHAM = A merchant's mariL 

J?. IN . ESSEX . CLOTHYER = R . M . a t 

347. O. lOHN . FREEBVRNE = A rose cTOwned (no inner circle) 

J^. IVNIOR . IN . WITHAM = I . F. 1667. i 

348. O. THOMAS . GARDENER = T . E . G. 

^. OF . WITHAM . IN . ESEx = A woolpack. : 

349. O. lOHN . HOWLETT . OF = The Cordwainers' Arms. 

J^» WITHVM . IN . ESSEX . 1667 =1 . E . H. * 

350. O. lOHN . lACKSON . OF . WITHAM = A fleur-de-lIs. 

^. IN . ESSEX . CLOTHIER . 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. I - A . L * 

351. O. GEORGE. ROBINSON = A StilL 

^. IN . WITHAM . 1669 = . D . R. t 

352. O, RICHARD. SWINBORNE=HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . WITHAM . 1668 = A hart lodged. * 

353. O. SAMVELL . WALL=» A double-headcd eagle displayed 

I^, IN . WITHAM . 1653 = 8 . F . W. t 

WOODHAM MORTIMER. 

354. O. RALPH . coKER . IN = A swan. 

J^. WOODHAM ^ MORTIM*^ = R . A . C , 

WRITTLE. 

355. O. DANIELL . LENORD = D . E . L. 

^. OF. RFTTLE . t668 = HIS HALF PENY. j 

YELDHAM. 

356. O. THOMAS . BvcHER = The Bakers' Arms. 

^. IN . LITTLE . YELDAM«=T . B. 1 



vGoogle 



(Sloucestersbite* 

UMBER OF Tokens issued 226 

UMBER OF Places issuing Tokens 42 

QWN Pieces issued at Bristol, Cirencester, Gloucester, 
Gloucestershire Hundred, Tetbury, Thornbury, 

AND WoTTON-UNDER-EdGE. 



Digitized by 



Google 



(Blouccetcrebirc* 

The tokens of Gloucestershire are a particularly interesting series, 
and it is a matter of considerable regret to the editor that suitable 
notes on the issuers have never been compiled. There is a good 
collection in the museum of the local antiquarian society, and the 
editor is much indebted to the Rev. B. H. Blacker, M.A., editor of 
" Gloucestershire Notes and Queries," for information as to it, and 
to new tokens of the county. Thanks are also cordially tendered to 
Sir John Maclean, F.S.A., and to Henry S. Gill, Esq., J.P., for 
assistance kindly rendered as to this county ; and much use has been 
made of that most valuable periodical alluded to above, more 
especially to vol. iii., pp. 284-86, and to a privately printed book, a 
copy of which is in the library of the Society of Antiquaries, entitled 
" Collectanea Gloucesleriana " (London, W. Nicol, 1842, 8vo). The 
number of pieces issued in the county by cities, towns, etc., in their 
corporate capacity is unusually large, and were issued at Bristol, 
Cirencester, Gloucester, Gloucestershire Hundred, Tetbury, Thorn- 
bury, and Wotton-under-£dge. The early Bristol tokens possess a 
unique character, having been issued by special permission of Queen 
Elizabeth, and although not accurately tokens of the seventeenth 
century, were doubtless the forerunners of the unauthorized issue 
which so rapidly spread over the entire country. In that capacity 
the leaden, diamond-shape and circular tokens of Bristol (Nos. 10, 
21 and 22) are inserted in this work 

A striking feature of the tokens of this county is that no less than 
twelve are of unusually large size, and were probably all the work of 
the same engraver, Rawlins, or of others who copied his style ; one 
is diamond-shape, and four are octagonal, and one heart-shape — in 
all eighteen, differing in size or shape from the usual character. The 
tokens used by partners in one firm at Northleach and Tewkesbury 
are also of especial interest, and in the latter town it is evident that 
the idea adopted by one firm was speedily copied by two others. 
The merchants' marks are numerous on the tokens, and one strange 
feature occurs on several in which, while the issuer styles himself a 
mercer, he uses on his tokens the arms of the Grocers' Company. 
It b probable his business embraced the two trade& 

To the first edition, inclusive of varieties, sixty-one tokens have 
been added, and the names of Frampton, Hawkesbury, Lower 
Gitting, Starton, and Stroud have been added to the places of issue. 
One private token of Bristol has been discovered, and is inserted, and 
its position in that respect is unique among so many corporate pieces. 

Tokens issued by parishes and hundred[s appear in this series, and 
are of very rare occurrence. 



Digitized by 



Google 



240 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



AWRE. 

1. O. ROBERT . DOVER . OF . THE = A vinC. 
J^. PARISH . OF . AWRE . 1652 = R . E . D. 

2. O. ROBERT . DOVER . OF . THE = R . E . D. 

J^. VINE . IN . THE . PR . OF . AWRE . 1652 = A vine. \ 

BARTON HUNDRED. 

3. O. THO . WATKiNS . OF . BARTON = The Tallowchandlers' Anns. 

J^, HVNDRED . IN . GLOSTERSHIRE = T . W. 1668. \ 

BERKELEY. 

4. O. lOHN . SMITH . MERCER = HIS HALF PENV. 

/^, IN . BARKLEY . 1 669 = The Mercers* Arms. J 

BISLEY. 

5. O. EDWARD . ALDRiDGE . OF = A pair of scales. 

^. BISLEY . CHANDLER . 1670 = E . A. \ 

BLOCKLEY. 

6. O, THOMAS . WARNER = A pair of cropper's shears. 

J^. OF . BLOCKLEY . 1657 =T . V . W. J 

BOURTON-ON-THE-WATER. 

7. O. RICHARD . BOSWELL . 1669 = R . M . B. 

J^, OF . BOVRTON . ON . Y° . WATER = HIS HALF PENV. i 

8. O. EDWARD . LVMLY . BAKER = The Bakers' Arms. 

J^. IN . BVRTON . ON . THE . WATER = HIS HALF PENV. 1 669. J 

9. A variety is spelt lamly. 

BRISTOL. 

10. O. BRISTOL . FARTHING . IS91« 

^. Ship issuing from a castle = c . B. (Square, LeadS) 
This rare token, which was purchased in 1880 of Webster, bears every sign <rf 
genuineness, and is here referred to as, though not of the seventeenth ccmoiy, 
probably the forerunner of the town-pieces described below. This piece maty ka^ 
been struck as a pattern only. 

11. O, A . BRISTOLL . FARTHING = C . R 

R. A ship issuing from a castle. \ 

This is without the circle within the legend, whilst all the followini; have the 
inner circle. 



Digitized by 



Google 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 241 

12. O. A . BRISTOLL . FARTHING = C . B. 1653. fielow is a Small 

R, the initial of Ratlins the engraver. 
J^. THE . ARMES . OF . BRISTOLL = Arms of Bristol. i 

13. A variety reads Bristol. 

14. A variety omits the small r. 

15. A variety is cast, not struck. 

16. Another similar, dated 1660, without the small r. \ 

1 7. Another similar, with the small r. 

18. Another similar, dated 1662, with the engraver's initial \ 

1 9. Another similar, without the initial 

20. Another similar, dated 1670, without the engraver's initial \ 
This U also known, struck as a very thick token, and larger than the above. 

21. O. {No legend,) A ship issuing from a castle; the Arms of 

Bristol, 
-ff . c . b [Ci vitas Bristol.] (Diamond-shape.) J 

22. A variety has the arms reversed and enclosed in a shield, and is 

circular. 

" This city had a licence from Queen Elizabeth to make farthing tokens, which 
were struck in copi>eri with a ship on one side, and C . B on the other, signifying 
Ci vitas Bristol. These were current at Bristol and ten miles about." — MeUynisLex 
Afertatoria^ p* 194* 

We do not know the date of this license ; but on the 12th of May, 1594, a letter 
was sent to the Mayor and Aldermen of Bristol, requiring them to call in all the 
private tokens which had been uttered by divers persons without any authority ; 
and that none should make the same without license from the mayor. 

" In 1609, two of the King's servants petitioned James I. for licence to stamp 
Earthing tokens for the cities of Bristol and Gloucester, as Bristol had received 
aathority from Queen Elizabeth to stamp farthing tokens in copper, which authority 
ceased upon his Majesty's coming to the throne. * — Ruding, 

There can be little doubt that this token is the one described above. Having 
been issued in the reign of Elizabeth, it must be considered as the earliest 
English token, and it was the only coin of this kind sanctioned by the State 
before the eighteenth century. It is a scarce piece. Probably Nos. 10 and 1 1 
may also belong to Elizabeth s reign ; and Nos. 12, 18, and 20 are the commonest 
tokens of the whole series. 

From the circumstance of but one private person having issued a brass token at 
Bristol, the old license of Elizabeth may have been considered to have been in 
force, though dormant for many years ; on no other account is it easy to under- 
stand why such a large city had but one, all other cities having an abundant 
variety. 

23. O. THOMAS . RicRAFT . IN . WINE = A merchant's mark, and a 
sheaf of arrows. 

R, STREETE . IN . BRISTOLL = T . R. \ 



CAMPDEN. 

24. O, WILLIAM . COLTMAN . HIS . HALF . PENY . W . C 

R, IN . CAMDiN . 1667 = The Mercers' Arms. 

16 



Digitized by 



Google 



242 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

25. O, lOHN . DiCKiNS = Arms. 

/^. IN . CAMPDEN . 1657 = 1 . D. 

26. O. GEORGE . FREEMAN = Three cloves. 

li, IN . CAMPDEN = G . M . F. 

27. O. lOHN . MOSELEY = The Mercers' Anns. 

J^. IN . CAMPDEN . 1657 = I . S . M. 

28. A variety reads mosely. 

29. O, THOMAS . perry . MERCER = A sugar-loaf. 

J^. IN . CAMPDEN . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. T . P. 

30. O. VALENTIN . SMITH = A wheatsheaf. 

li, OF . CAMPDEN . 1651 = V . D . S. 

31. O. WILLIAM . YEATE . MERCER = The king's head crowned 

J^. IN . CAMDEN . 1666 = HIS HALFE PENY. 

32. O, WILLIAM . YEATE = Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN . CAMBDE". MERCE* = W. M . Y. 



CHARLTON KINGS. 
33. O* THOMAS . ashmeade = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. IN . CHARLTON . KINGS = T . E . A. 



CHELTENHAM. 

34. O. SAMVEL . ARROWSMITH = ArmS. 

i?. IN . CHELTENHAM . 1663 = 8 . M . A. 

35. O, NICHOLAS . ASHMEADE = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^, OF . CHELTENHAM = N . A . A. 

36. O. THOMAS . HVMPHERis . OF ^ Three birds on a wheatsbet 

Ji, CHELTENHAM . BAKER . 1 669 = HIS HALFE PENY. T. M. & ! 

37. O. IN . CHELTENHAM . 1652= R . M . L 

J^, TALLOW . CHANDLER = A man making candles. 

38. O, EDWARD . lONSON = The Mercers* Arms. j 

li, IN . CHELTENHAM = E . M . I. \ 

39. A variety has no inner circle, and reads iohnson. 

40. O. IOHN . mason . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^. IN . CHELTENHAM . 1667 = I . M. I 

41. O. THOMAS . MASON . 1 669 = The Arms of the Mason to^' 

a double-headed lion rampant. 

li. IN . CHILTENHAM = HIS HALF PENY. T . M . SL ' 



Digitized by 



Google 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 243 



CHIPPING SODBURY. 
42. O. STEPHEN . SMITH . 1669 = A Hon rampant. 

^. OF . CHIPEN . SADBVRY = HIS FARTHING. /afj€ \ 



CIRENCESTER. 

43. a Detrited. 

A. CIRENCESTER = A**. 
This is much detrited. 

44. O, CIRENCESTER . FARTHING . 1668 (in four lines across the 

field). 
J^. (No Ugend,) A phoenix in the flames. large \ 

45. O. OBADiAH . ARROWSMiTH . i668 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, MERCER . IN . CIRENCESTER . HIS . HALF . PENY (in five Uncs). 

(Heart-shaped.) ^ 

This man was burned 26th September, 1697. 

46. O. ANTHONY . CHANCE = A . C 

R, MERCER . IN . CIRENCESTER = A . C. \ 

47. O. WILLIAM . CONSTABLE = W . C 

R. OF . CIRENCESTER . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

48. O. WILLIAM . CONSTABLE . OF . CIRENCESTER (in four Hlies). 

R, HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 669 (in fouT Unes). (Octagona/.) J 

49. A variety has the legend on the obverse in script. 

50. O. WILLIAM . CONSTABLE = W . C. 

R. MERCER . IN . CIRENCESTER = W . C. { 

51. O, THOMAS . EDWARDS = A military boot. 

R. OF . CIRENCESTER = T . M . F- \ 

52. O, EDMVND . FEREBY = E . E . F. 
R. OF . CIRENCESTRR = E . E . F. 

53. O, GEORGE . FEREBEE = Arms ; a chevron between three 

leopards' heads, erased. 
R, IN . CIRENCESTER = G F conjoined. 1666. \ 

54. O. EDMVND . FREEMAN . IN = The Groccrs* Arms. 

R, CIRENCESTER . 1665 = E . M . F. \ 

55. A variety reads 1655. 

56. O. ELIZABETH . KEMBLE = The Metcers' Arms. 

R, OF . CIRENCESTER . 1657 = E . K. \ 

57. O. BRYAN . MYLLS = B . E . .M 

R, IN . CYRENCESTER= 1657. \ 

16 — 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



244 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

58. O. 10 . NELMES . GROCER = The Gfocers' Arms. 

/^. IN . CIRENCESTER = I .M.N. 1668. \ 

59. O. RALPH . OLIVER = R . O. 

J^, IN . CIRENCESTER = 1664. \ 

60. O. REBEKVH . OSBORNE = R . O. 

A. OF . CIRENCESTER = Three cloves. 

61. O. THOMAS . osBVRNE = Three cloves. 

J^. IN . CIRENCESTER = T . R . O. 

62. O. THOMAS . PERRY = Three doves ; part of Tallowchanifje 

Arms. 

J^. IN . CIRENCESTER = T . A . P. 

63. A variety reads cirencisiter. 

64. O. WILLIAM . PETTY . OF = A StilL 

Ji. SIRENCISTER . 1667 = W . I . P. i 

6$. O. CALEB . SELFE . l666 = C . S. 

Ji. IN . CYRENCSTER = A rose crowned. J 

This man was burned 27th May, 167 1. 

66. O. ISAAC . SMALL = I . s and a merchant's mark. 

J^, IN . CIRENCESTER = Same as the obverse. ! 

67. O. EDWARD . TAYLER . OF = E . R . T. 
J^, CIRENCESTER = E . R . T. 

68. O. RALPH . wiLLETT = R . w and a merchant's mark. 
J^. IN . CIRENCESTER = Same as the obverse. 



CLIFTON. 
69. O. lOHN . SAMM = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^, OF . CLIFTON . 1664 = 1 . H . S. 



CUCKOLD'S BROOK. 
70. O, THOMAS . PILL . OF . cvcKOLDS = Clothworkcrs* Arms. 

/^. BROOKE . GLOCESHIRE = T . D . P. 



DURSLEY. 

71. O, WILLIAM . PARTRIDGE = A bird. 
J^. OF . DVRSLY . MERCER = W . E . P. 

72. O. SAMVELL . SIMONS = A man making candles. 

J^. IN . DVRSLEY . 1667 = S . E . S. 



Digitized by 



Google 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 24S 

73. O. lOHN . WA1TKINS = A Star. 

^. IN . DVRSLEY= 1 . A . W. ^ 

74. O. OBEDiAH . WEBB = A flecce. 

A MERCER . OF . DVRSLY = O . E . W. ^ 



EDGEWORTH. 
75. O. MicHAELL . SHEPARD== A man making candles. 

jR. IN . EDGWORTH . 64 = R . E . D (stc). 



FRAMPTON. 

76. O. lOHN . MAYNARD . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

jR. OF . FRAMPTON . 1667 = I . M and a flower. 



GLOUCESTER. 

77. O. LVKE . NOVRSE. MAioR . i6s7 = c . G. (City of Gloucester.) 

A small R; the initial of Thomas Rawlins, the engraver, 

under the letter c. large J 

li, FOR . NECESSARY . CHANGE = Arms of the City of Gloucester ; 

three chevrons between ten torteaux. 

Luke Nourse died 25th April, 1673, agecl 89 years, and is buried in St Michaers 

Choich, Cornhill, London. His son issued a remarkable token in Bishopsgate 

Street. 

78. A variety omits the small r, and is evidently struck from a 

different die. 

79. Another variety has the small r under the letter g, and on 

the reverse a star or mullet after the words for and 
NECESSARY, the abovc (No. 77) having a dot only. 

80. O. A . GLOCESTER . FARTHING = The Arms of Gloucester. 

R. THOMAS . PRICE . MAIOR . 1669 = . G. /a/3?Jf \ 

81. O. A . GLOVCESTE*^ . FARTHING = C . G. 1 669. 

-/?. THE . ARMES . OF . GLOvcESTER = The Arms of Gloucester. 

large { 

82. O, MATHIAS . BOWER =1666. 

7?. IN . GLOSESTER = M B COUJoiued. i 

83. O, AT . THE . NEGS . SHEAD = A uag's head. 

R. IN . GLOSTER . 1654 = I . A . C ^ 

84. O, RICHARD . CHANDLER = A pack-saddle. 

R. SADLER . IN . GLOCESTER = R . C i 

85. 0. RICHARD . COCKES = A COCk. 

R. IN . GLOCESTER . 1652 = R . S . C 



Digitized by 



Google 



246 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

86. O, RICHARD . COCKES . IN = A COck. 
I^. GLOSICSTER . 1652 = R . S . C. 

87. O. DANiELL . COLLINS = Arms ; a griffin rampant. Crest; a 

demi-griffin holding a hatchet 

^. MERCER . IN . GLOSTER = D . B . C } 

88. O. THOMAS . COOKE . IN = A man making candles. 

J^. GLOVSTER . CHANDLER = T . M . C J 

89. O. lOH . DONNE . OF . THE » A postman on horseback, blow- 

ing his horn. 

J^. CIT . OF . GLOCESTER = I . D. \ 

90. O. THOMAS . GOODWIN = Unknown. 
J^. GLOCESTER = Unknown. 

91. O. lOHN . HOBSON. MERCAR = I . I . H. 
J^. IN . GLOVCESTER . 1652 = 1 . I . H. 

92. O. HENORY . KNOWLES = A flcsh-pOt. 

J^. OF . GLOCESTER = H . K. J 

93. A variety reads henry. 

94. O. NICHOLAS . LANE. APOTH = The ApothecaHes' Arnis. 

J^. IN . GLOCESTER . 1656 = N . L. \ 

95. O, GILES . LYE . CHANDLER = G . H . L. 

li, IN . GLOVSTER = G . H . L. J 

96. O. THOMAS . MOOR = A head. 

J^. CHANDLER . GLOCESTER. 

97. O. lOHN . PVRLENT = The Coopers* Arms. 

J^. IN . GLOSTER . 1653 = 1 . P. | 

98. O. lOHN . PVRLETT= The Coopers* Arms. 

li, IN . GLOSTER . 1653 = 1 . R . P. } 

99. O. THE . ROOSE . AND . CROWNE = A rose crowncd. 

J^, IN . GLOSTER . 1654 = W. I . P. ^ 

100. O. WALTER . TAYNTON = The Groccrs' Arms. 

/^, IN . GLOSTER . 1651 = W . E . T. J 

1 01. O. AT . THE . RAEN . TAVERNE = A raven. 

J^. IN . GLOCESTER . 1650 = W . A . W. J 

102. O. NATHANiELL . WEBB = The Brcwers' Arms. 

Ji. OF . GLOVCTER . BROVER = N . M . W. ^ 

103. A variety reads WEEa 



Digitized by 



Google 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 247 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE HUNDRED. 

104. O. FOR . NECESSARY . CHAING . IN = T . L. 1669. 

R, GLOCESTER . SHEIRE . HVNDRED = A CaStlc Of ihreC 

towers. \ 

HAMPTON ROAD. 

105. O. IN . HAMPTON . ROAD = T . C 

R, IN . GLOVCESTER . SH1ERE = T . C. ^ 

106. A variety reads glovestershere. 

107. O. MILES . ROBERTS . OF = A chaodler. 

R. HAMTON . ROADE . l664«=M . S . R. \ 

108. O. NATHANIELL . SKERTON = N . H . S. 1670. 

R. AT . Y° . IN . HAMPTON . ROAD = The king's head crowned. 

C . R. \ 

109. A variety on obverse reads n s, and is a farthing. 

70 

no. O. NATHANIELL . vovNG = Sl George and the dragon. 

R, OF . HAMTON . ROAD = N . V. 1668. J 

Query, is Hampton Road now called Minchinhampton ? 



HAWKESBURY. 
III. O, THOMAS . WALKER . AT . THE= A horse pranclng. 

R, HORSE . IN . HAWKSBVRY = T . W. 1 65 7. 



KEMPSFORD. 
112. O. lOHN . MASLiN . 1669 = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

R. OF . KEMSFORD = HIS HALF PENY. I . M . M. {OctagOnai.) ^ 



LECHLADE. 
113. O. RALPH . LANGLEY . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, LETCHLADE. 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. R . L. {Octagonai.) \ 

ti^lO. THOMAS . SMITH = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, OF . LEACHLADE = T . E . S. f 



LOWER GITTING. 

IIS- O. ANTHONY . FREEMAN = A crown. 
R. IN . LOWER . GVYTING = A . M . F. 



Digitized by 



Google 



248 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



MARSHFIELD. 

1 16. O. WILLAM . HOSEE . IN = W . M . H. 

J^, MARSH . FEILD . 1651 = W . M . H. i 

117. O, MATTHEW . MEADE . IN = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

J^. MARSHFIELD . 1669 = M . M . M. i 

1 18. O. ELIAS . OSBORNE . IN = E . M . O. 
/^. MARSHFIELD . MERCER = 1651. 

119. O, ELIAS . OSBORNE = The Drapers* Arms. 

J^. IN . MARSHFIELD = E . O. 1664. i 



1 20. O. ELIAS . OSBORNE . MERCER = E . M . O. 
J^, IN . MARSHFIELD = 1 664. 

12 c. A variety of above reads osbvrn. 

122. O. THOMAS . water FORD = Grocers* Arms. 

J^, OF . MARSHFIELD . 1667 =T . M . W. 

MITCHELL DEAN. 

123. O. THO . GARRAWAY . IN = The Grocers* Axms. 

J^, MICHELL . DEANE = T .E.G. i 

124. A variety reads midhell . dene, and is very rare. 

125. O, THOMAS . GAR WAY . 1 66 7 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . MICHELL . DEANE=HIS HALF PENY. T . A . G. f 

126. O, EDWARD . MORSE . OF = A merchant's mark, formed of the 

letttrs E A M and 4. 

li. MICHELL . DEANE . CLOTHIER = HIS HALF PENNY. j 

127. O. lOHN . NASH . MERCER = Mercers' Arms. 

Ji. OF . MICHELDEN . 1669 = 1 .E.N. 

128. A variety is dated 1656. 

129. O, WALTER. RVDG . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

li. OF . MICHELL . DEANE = W . M . R. I 

130. O, THOMAS WALLYN . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, IN . MICHELL . DEANE = T . P . W. i 



MORETON-IN-THE-MARSH. 

131. O, RICH . ALBERT . OF . MORTON = R . A. 

J^. HENMARSH . 1666 = A Stick of candles. } 

132. O, ROWLAND . FREEMAN . MERGE*' = Grocers' Anns. 

J^, OF . MOVRTON . IN . MARSH = R . E . F. { 



Digitized by 



Google 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE, 249 



NEWENT. 



133. O. THOMAS . MASTER = A dolphin. 

J^. OF . NEWANT . 1653 =T . S . M. 

134. O. WILLIAM . NELME . OF = The Groccrs' Aims. 

J^, NEWANT . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. W.H.N. 



NEWNHAM. 

135. O. lAMES . lEFRYES . IN = A full-blown fose. 

^. NEVNHAM . GLOSTERSHIRE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. 
I . A . S. i 

136. O. STEPHEN . WILLCOCKS . OF = The Cutlers' Arms, s . s . w. 

J^, NEVNHAM . GLOSTERSHEIR = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1 667. ^ 

137. O. STEPHEN . wiLCOCKS . OF = The Cutlcrs* Arms.. 

J^. NEWNHAM . GLOSTERSHEER = S . S . W. J 

138. A variety reads nevnham. 



NORTHLEACH. 

139. O. RICHARD . BVTLER . AND . WILL = The Bakers' Arms. 

J^. NEALE . OF. NORTH . LEACH . 70 = THEIR HALF PENY. | 

140. O, THOMAS . PAGE = A falcon. 

jR, IN . NORTH . LEETCH = T . M . P. \ 

141. A variety reads norlege. 

142. O. EDWARD . SMITH . IN = E . A . S. 

J^. NORLEACH . 165I =E . A . S. J 

143. O. WILLIAM • sovcH = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. IN . NORTH . LEACH = W . H . S. { 

144. O. WILLIAM . STONE . 1669 = A crown. {Octagonal.) 

R. OF . NORTH . LEECH . HIS . HALFE . PENNY (in six UnCS). I 



PAINSWICK. 

145. O. ROBERT . SIMONS = A man making candles. 

R. IN . PAINSWICKE = R . H . S. ] 

146. O, ROB . SIMONS . 1667= A man making candles. 

R. IN . PAYNSWICKE = R . H . S. 

147. O. GILES . SMITH . 1664 = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . PAYNSWICK = G . A . S. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



250 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

148. A variety reads paynsswicke. 

149. Another reads payneswicke. 

1 50. Another similar, paynsswick. 

STANLEY ST. LEONARD. 

151. O. RICHARD . ELLIOT = The Cordwainers* Arms. 

i?. IN . LEONARD . STANLY =R . E. 



STARTON. 
152. O. EDWARD . CAGWORTH = The Blacksmiths* Arms. 

!R. IN . STARTON . 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. E . P . C 



STOW. 

153. O. THOMAS . BROASG ROVE = The Apothecaries* Arms. 

I^. IN . STOW . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. T . E . B. \ 

154. O, FRANCIS . Dix = A crown. 

I^. OF . STOWE . 1666 = F . A . D. \ 

155. 6>. THOMAS . GIBBS = A fleur-de-lis. 

-^. OF . STOWE . 1658 = T. A . G.*, J 

156. O, lOHN . KEECH . i666 = The King's Arms. 

/^. LIVING . AT . STOWE = I . H . K. 

157. O, WILLIAM . MINCE = The Mercers' Arms. 

/^. IN . STOWE . 1656 = W . A.M. J 

158. O. HAZELWOOD . WELLS = Grocers' Arms. 

li. OF . STOW = H . S . W. J 

These are placed to Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire, as it is the largest town 
bearing the exceedingly common name of Stow. 



STROUD. 

159. O, SAMVELL. BVBB = Atree. 

Ji, OF . STROWDE . 1664^ 1664. \ 

160. O, WILLIAM . HOPTON = Within an inner circle three crosses 

crosslet fitchee. 

^. OF . STROWD = W . H. 

161. A variety has on the obverse three cloves. 

162. O, RICHARD . WAKE = A man making candles. 

/^. IN . STROWDE . 1664 = R . W. 



Digitized by 



Google 



GLO UCESTERSHIRE. 



251 



TETBURY. 

163. O. THIS . FARTHING . IS . OWND = lN TETBVRY. 1 669. 

/^, Y* . ARMES . OF . THAT . bvrrovg" = The arms of Tetbury ; 
two dolphins. /argg \ 

164. O. THIS . FARTHING . WIL . BE. OWND = IN TETBVRY. 

^. y" . ARMES . OF . THAT . bvrrovg" = The orms of Tet- 



165. A 



166. 


0. 




R. 


167. 


0. 
R. 


I6& 


0. 




R. 


169. 


0. 
R. 


170. 


0. 
R. 



bury, 
variety is said to read on the reverse this. 
06ADIAH . ARROWSMITH = The Haberdashers* Arms. 

IN . TEDBVRY . BAYLEF = . A . A. 

lOHN . STEPHENS = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

IN . TEDBVRY . 1664 = 1 . L . S. 

ANTIPAS . SWINNERT0N = A WOOlpack. 
OF . TEDBVRY . WOLLMAN = A . M . S, 

ANTIPAS . SWINERTON = A WOOlpaclc 
OF . TETBVRY . WOLLMAN = A . M . S. 



SAMVELL . TEAKLE = S . E . 
CLOTHIER . IN . TEDBVRY = 



T. 

S . E . T. 



i 
i 

i 
i 



171. 
172. 

173- 
174. 

»75- 
176. 

177. 
178. 



TEWKESBURY. 

O. LAWRENCE . AMBREY = A pair of shears. 

J^. OF . TEWKESBVRY = L . A. 

O. CHRISTOPHER . ATKINSON = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^, IN . TEWXBVRY . GLO . SHEIRE = C . A. 

O. ELINOR . ATKINSON = A rOSe. 

^. OF . TEWXBVRY . GLOS . SHR = E . A. 

O, THOMAS . ATKINSON . 1 667 = A leg. 

J^, TEWKSBVRY . GLOTSHEIR = HIS HALF PENNY. 

O. THOMAS . BRIAN . 1667 = A ship. 

-^. IN . TEWKESBVRY = HIS HALF PENY. T . P . B. 

O. SAMVELL . CANNER . IN = A tankard. 

IL TEWKESBVRY . PEWTERER = S . C 

O. WILLIAM . HAiDON = A horse shoe. 

I^. OF . TEWKSBVRY = W . E . H. 

O. HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1662 = WILLIAM HALE. 

J^. THE . TOWNE . OF . TEWKSBVRY = W . P . H. 



1667. 



Digitized by 



Google 



252 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

79. O. WILLIAM . HATTON = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^, IN . TEWKESBVRY . 63«W. I . H. { 

80. O. PHILUP . HEYWARD. l668«HIS HALF PENY. 
J^. OF . TEWXSBVRY . MERCER = P . H. i 

81. O. SAMVEL . HOLLAND . AND . ROBERT . PORTER . R . P . P . LV 
J^. TEWKSBVRY . THEIR . PENNIES ^S . M . H. I 

82. O, SAM . HOLLAND . AND . ROB*^ . PORTER = R . P . P. 
li, IN . TEWKESBVRY . THIER . J PENIEY = S . M . H. J 

83. O, THOMAS . lEANES = A CEStle, 
J^, IN . TEWXSBVRY . 1 669 « HIS HALFE PENY. i 

84. A variety reads tewxsberry. 

85. O. SAMVEL . lEYNES = A castle. 

J^, IN . TEVXBVRY . 1669 « HIS HALF PENY. i 

86. O. THOMAS . JEYNES . OF -HIS HALFE PENY. 
J^. TEWKESBVRY. 1 669 » A CaStle. i 

87. O. SAMVELL . lEENES « A glove. 
J^, OF . TEWKESBERY =« S . M . I. | 

88. O. FRANCS . lEFFERis = A chcese-knife. 

J^. IN . TWEXBVRY . 1652 = F .A.I. j 

89. O. DANiELL . KEMBLE . IN = The Drapers' Arms, d . a . c. 

J^. IN . TEWKSBVRY . l666 = HIS HALFE PENY. i 

90. O. EDWARD . LAiGHT = A Hon rampant. 

Ji, OF . TEWKSBVRY . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. K.B.I. , 

91. O, NICHOLAS . MEARSON=-The Blacksmiihs' Arms. 

li. OF . TEWKESBERY . 1659 = N . S . M. ; 

92. O, lOHN . MiLLiNGTON = Grocers* Arms. 

/^, OF . TWEXBVRIE= I . M . P. \ 

93. O. SAMVEL . MOSSE = Holy lamb couchant. 

^. OF . TEWXBVRY . 1653^ S . M . M. J 

94. A variety reads samwell . most. 

95. O. SAM . moss . & . THO . CLARKE . OF = S . M . M. 1664. 
I^, TEWXBVRY . THEIR . HALF . PENY = T . H . C 1664. i 

96. O. lOHN . ovLEF = A dove with olive-branch. 

li. IN . l'WEXBVRIE = I . S . O. j 

The device is a pun on the issuer's name. 

97. O. THOMAS . PALMER = An Opened book. 

J^. IN . TEWXBVRY = T . M . P. } 

98. O. lOHN . PEiRCE . IN « A roU of bread. 

li, TEWXBVRY . 1654 = 1 . M . P. I 



Digitized by 



Google 



i 



GLOUCESTERSHIRE. 253 

199. O. RICH . PENNELL . & . THO . NVTT = THEIR HALFE PENY. 
1668. 

JR. GLOVERS . IN . TEWKESBVRY = T . N. The Lcathersellers* 
Arms. R . p. \ 

2CX). O. lOSEPH . SHEENE . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . TEWKSBVRY = I . H . S. \ 

201. O. SAMVELL . SMYTH = HIS HALFE PENY. 

JR. IN . TEVXSBVRY . 1666 = S . S. J 

202. O. NICH . STAIGHT . TEWXBVRY = N . M . S. 

R. opiFERQVE . PER . ORBEM . DicoR = The Apothecories' 
Arms. \ 

203. O. NICHOLAS . STAIGHT = The Apothecarics* Arms. 

R. IN . TEWCKESBVRY = N . M . & \ 

204. O. TEWXBVRY . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. GLOCESTER . SHEIRE . 1 666 = E . W. ^ 

205. O. PERCEVALL . WRIGHT = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. DANIEL . KEMBLE . TEWKSBVRY = P . W. D . K. 
The many peculiar ways of spelling the name of the town are worthy of notice. 

THORNBURY. 

206. O. A . THORNBVRY . FARTHING =B . T (BorOUgh of Thom- 

bury). 1670. 
R. IN . GLOVCESTER . SHEIRE = A barrel, with flames pro- 
ceeding from it, and a knot large \ 

WICKWAR. 

207. O. GEORGE . HOART . AT . 1 669 = A Hon rampant. 

R. WECKEWOR . IN . COM . GLOSTR = HIS FARTHING. i 



WINCHCOMB. 

208. O. CLE . DARKS . HALF . PENY . 1 67 2 = WINCHCOMB. 

R. REMEMBER . THE . POOR = A glove. \ 

209. O. DAVIDE . HARVY . HIS . HALF . PENY = A shoulder of 

mutton. 
R. IN . WINCHCOMB . D . A . H (in four lines). \ 

210. O. WILLIAM . HOWLET . IN = W . H . H. 

R, WINCHCOMB . 1662 = A pot (?) \ 

211. O. WILLIAM . iOANES = The Armourers* Arms. 

R. OF . WINCHCOMBE = W . K . I. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



254 TRADERS TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

212. O, WILLIAM . iONES = The Armourers' Amis. 

J^, AT . WINCOMBE . l666 = W . L 

213. O, NICHOLAS. PEARSON = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . WINCHCOMBE . 1670 = N . M . P. I 

214. O. GEORGE . SKiNER . IN = A man making candles. 

J^. IN . WINCHCOMBE . 1663 = . E . S. J 

215. A variety has the date 1657. i 

216. Another variety is dated 1666. \ 

217. O, GEORGE . SKINNER . IN = A man making candles. 

^. IN . WINCHCOM . 1657 =G . E . S. 

218. A variety reads skimer. 

219. O, WILLIAM . STEPHENS = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . WINCHCOMBE . 1671 =W . D . S. J \ 



WOODCHESTER. 

220. O. ANDREW , ROGERS . IN . WOOD = A . R. 167a 

^. CHESTER . IN . GLOSTER . SHEIR = HIS FARTHING. /oTgC \ 

221. O. DANIELL . VEAT£S = A man making candles. 

J^. IN . WOODCHESTER = D . V. J 



WOTTON-UNDER-EDGE. 

222. O. THIS . FARTHING . WILL . BE . OWNED = /« IVotfOM FmJff 

edge. 

R. BV . THE . MAIOR . AND . ALDERMEN = A WOOlpacL 1 66, 

223. O. W". BROWN. HIS. FARTHING = IN .WOTTON.VNDER. ED-.t- 
R. BV . THE . MAIOR . AND . ALDERMEN = A WOOlpack. l66c 

224. O. LAZARVS . KEMPP . IN = The Apothecarics' Arms. 

R. WOOTTEN . VNDER . HED = L . M . K. ; 

225. O* AT . THE . MAREMAiD . iN = A mermaid. 

R, WOTTON . VNDEREGE = I . M . S. 

226. O, DANIELL . STODARD . IN = A fleeCC. D . S . S^ 

R. WOTTON. VNDRIDGE . 1667= HIS HALF PENY. * 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ibampsbire. 



Number of Tokens issued 238 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 45 

Town Pieces issued at Alton, Andover, Newport, Rom- 
SEY, Southampton, Winchester. 



Digitized by 



Google 



l)amp0birc* 

The Editor desires to acknowledge most gratefully the valuable aid 
given in the compilation of this county by Henry S. Gill, Esq., J.P., 
of Tiverton, who most kindly placed his store of information at 
bis disposal. The information given 'in Mr. Gill's pamphlet on 
the tokens of Hants he most kindly presented for the use of the 
Editor, and supplemented his aid with very many new descriptions 
noted since the issue of his pamphlet. Inclusive of varieties, upwards 
of one hundred new descriptions have been added to those in the 
first edition, and the following places issuing tokens added to those 
previously known : Crondall, East Meon, Emsworth, Hartford 
Bridge, Hartley Row, Havant, Hook, Hurstbourne, and Niton. 
There are tokens issued by six places in their corporate capacity, 
!>., Alton, Andover, Newport, Romsey, Southampton, and Win- 
chester, and those of Andover are unusually interesting. 

Several of the places which issued tokens have considerably altered 
since the seventeenth century, and such places as Liphook, Hartford 
Bridge, Hartley Row, and Lymington — places of importance, with 
flourishing posting-houses in the old coaching days, are now nothing 
more than villages. 

The county would well repay careful investigation, and if search 
were made in parish registers, and municipal archives by someone 
on the spot, many notes as to issuers might easily be obtained. 
Distance has alone prevented the Editor pursuing many such investi- 
gations as to the old-fashioned and most interesting county of South- 
ampton. 

ALRESFORD. 

1. O, lARVAS . ABiN . AT . THE = St. George and the dragon. 

I . A. 
R. IN . ALRESFORD . 1 666 = HIS HALF PENV. \ 

2. O. lERVAS . ABIN . AT . THE = St. Gcorge and the dragon. 

R, GEORGE . IN . ALRESFORD . 1 667 = HIS HALF PENNY. 
1 . A . A. ^ 

3. O, lAMES . WITHERS . 0F = A man making candles. 

R. ALRESFORD . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . I . W. \ 

4* ^. lA . WITHERS . ALRESFORD ^ A man making candles. 

R. TALLOW . CHANDLER = I . I . W. \ 

17 



Digitized by 



Google 



258 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



ALTON. * 

5. O. OF . ALTON . IN = I . H and T . B in two lines. 

J^. HAMPSHIER . 1652 = W . W . T. \ 

6. A variety has . 1 . h and l . l on the obverse. x 

7. Another, similar to the last, is dated 1666. \ 

8. Another similar is dated 1663. 5 

9. O, THOMAS .BRAIM AN = T . B. 

J?. ALTON . IN . HAMSHIRE = H . B. 

ID. O. ANDREW . SARGENT = A pack-horse. 

J^. MILLER . IN . ALTON = A . P . S. \ 

ANDOVER. 

11. O, REMEMBER . THE . POORE = A cripple. 

^. ANDEVER . 1658 = A cripple. 
This is a very rare token. 

12. O, FOR . THE . POORE = A Cripple. 

J^, ANDOVER. 1666 = A cripple. ; 

13. O, HELP . o . ANDEVER . 1 666 = A Hon under a tree; :bc 

arms of Andover. 

J^, FOR . V° POORES . BENEFIT = A Cripple. J 

14. Another, similar to the last, without i and smaller. ; 
This token is struck both in brass and copper. 

15. O, ROBERT . BIRD . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^, ANDOVER. GROCER = R . R 

16. O. BENiAMiN . BRADBORNE = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. OF . ANDOVER . GROCER = B . M . B. 
Bradborne was a member of the Corporation, and signed the return of me^i*^ 
in 1660. When Dr. Calamy visited Andover and preached there, he was thegtr-] 
of a Mr. Bradband, a substantial shopkeeper. Some old documents of '^ 
.Congregational isls show that a Mr. Bradborne l)elon£ed to that body ; mod d 
doubt the issuer of this token was the person referred to by Dr. Calamy. >« 
** Calamy's Life and Times " for an interesting and racy account of this visiL 

17. O, RICHARD . BLAKE . OF . ANDivER = The Merccrs* Arms. 

J^, MERCER . HIS . HALF . PENNY = R . B. \ 

Either the person named in Queen Eh'zabeth's charier to the IxMrou^ or hi*'** 
Several of the family were members of the Corporation. 

18. O, NVCOM . COKETT= 1 666. 

/^, IN . ANDOVER = N . F . C. | 

19. O. WILLIAM . CORNELIUS = A glove. 
J^, IN . ANDOVER . HAMSHER = W . M . C 



Digitized by 



Google 



HAMPSHIRE. 259 

20. O, WILLIAM . GOLD . OF = The Mcrccrs' Anns. 

R. ANDOVER . IN . HAMSHIRE = W . M . G. \ 

21. O. ROBERT. MiLLETT = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . ANDOVER = R . M. \ 

22. O. THOMAS . OLIVES . OF = T . O. 

R, ANDOVER . CHANDLER =1656. \ 

23. O. WILLIAM . ORAM . IVN(ior) = A glovC. 

R. IN . ANDOVER . HAMSHER = W . M . O. \ 

24. 0. THOMAS . PAINE . 0F = A mail making candles. 

R. ANDOVER . IN . HAMSHIR = T . B . P. \ 

25. O, lOHN . SEAGROVE = The Grocers' Arms 

R, IN . ANDOVER = I . B . S. \ 

A member of the G>rporation ; he signed the return of members in i680| 1^84, 
t688, and 1689. 

26. O, lOHN . STANIFORD . 1666 = A WOOlpaclc. 

R. CLOTHIER . OF . ANDOVER = I .1.8. \ 

Staniford was a bur(;ess of Andover ; he signed the returns in 1672, 1677, and 
1678. He was bailiff in 1684. This is the only token i^^ued by the clothiers, who 
It that time carried on a flourishing trade in the borough. 

27. O. WILLIAM . swEETAPLE = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. OF . ANDOVER . 1655 = W . A . S. \ 

28. O, Anthony . Tatnell (in two lines across the field) a . a . t. 
R, OF . ANDEVER . i666 = A fish. \ 

29. O, ABRAHAM . WALLER = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, OF . ANDOVER . 1655 = A . E . W. \ 

30. O. WILLIAM . WALLER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, OF . ANDOVER . 1665 = W . D . W. \ 

These descriptions of the Andover tokens, and the notes on them, were kindly 
ommunicated by the late Mr. Samuel Shaw, of that town. 

BASINGSTOKE. 

31. O, HENRY BARFFOOT . IN =^ A Hon rampant. 

R, BASINGSTOAKE . 1669 = H . S . B. \ 

This issuer was mayor in 1679, 1680, and 1696, and churchwarden in 1670. 

32. O, ROBERT . BLVNDEN = A rabbit. 

R, IN . BASINGSTOKE = R . K . B. \ 

The Blundens were a wealthy and independent family in the town in the 
evcnteenth century. Several of the name repeatedly held the office of mayor, and 
me of the same name as the issuer in 1706, 1 721, and 1731. 

33. O. lOHN . COLEMAN . THE . ELDER = A bird. 

R, OF . BASSINGSTONE . 1652 = I . I . C \ 

17 — 2 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



I 



260 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

34. O. lOHN . COLEMAN . THE . ELDER = A bird. 

J?. OF . BASSING . STOKE . 1652 = I . I . C. J 

Henry BarfToot (see No. 31) and John Coleman were joint churchwardens of Sl 

Michael's, Basingstoke, in 1670, and their names appear in that capacity on the 

then new tenor bell. John Coleman was mayor 1655, 1665, 1673, and 1680, and 

was buried at Basingstoke 25th March, 1681. 

35. O. SAMUEL. KiCHENER = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

^. OF . BASINGSTOKE = S . M . K. ] 

36. O. loSEPH . MANSFIELD . GROCER = A sword and helmet 

J^. BASING I STOAK | HIS | HARTY | DVBBLE | TOKEN . 1669 j 

(in six lines). (Heart-shape,) \ 

37. O, BARNARD . REEVE = An angcl holding a scroll. 

R, OF . BASINGSTOKE = B . M . R. \ 

38. O, BARNARD . REVE = An angel holding a scroll 

R, OF . BASING . STOKE= B . M . R. \ 

39. O. BARNARD . REVE = An angel with arms across its breast 

R. IN . BAZINGSTOKE = B . M . R. \ 

Barnard Reve was one of the wardens of the Guild of the Holy Ghost in 1653. 
The Angel Inn still exists in the town. 

40. O, THOMAS . SPIARS . i669 = Two shuttles. 

R, OF. BASINGSTOAKE=HIS HALF PENY. ] 

41. O. lOHN . TRIMMER . OF = A bust ? 

R, BASINGSTOAKE . 1670 = 1 . M . T. \ 



42. O, lOHN . WATTS . IVNOR = A man making candles. 

R, OF . BASINGSTOCK = I . M . W. 



43. O. GEORGE . WHITE = A mortar and pestle. 

R, IN . BASINGSTOAKE = G . W. \ 

John White, apothecary, son of Hugh White, apothecary, died ist October. 
1736, a<;ed 81, and is buried at Basingstoke. The issuer was probably of the same 
family. 

BISHOP'S WALTHAM. 

44. O. I AMES . BLLAKLLEV . 1 666 = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, IN . BISHOPS . WALLTON = HIS HALF PENY. I . B. \ 

45. O, lAMES . BRAFEL . OF = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, BISHOPS . WALLTOM . MERCER = I . B. * 

46. O, THOMAS . PENFORD . i666 = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, IN . BISHOPS . WALLTON = HIS HALF PENY. T . P. \ 

BLACKWATER (Parish of Yately). 

47. O. lOHN. WRIGHT. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . BLACKWATER = I . W. • 



Digitized by 



Google 



HAMPSHIRE. 



261 



BRADING. 
48. 0. THOMAS . MAYLE . OF . BRAiDiNGE » The Bokers* Arms. 

Ji, Y" . ISLE . OF . WIGHT . 1670 = HALF PENNY. T . R . M. J 



CASTLE HOULD (Parish of Carisbrooke). 

49. 0. EDWARD . KNIGHT . IN = A Castle. 
jR, CASEL . HOVLD . ISLE . OF . WITE = E . K. 

50. 0, lEAMES . SMITH . IN = A castle. 

R CASTILL . HOLD . NEWPORT = I . E . S. 

This parish embraces the old castle of Carisbrooke and part of the High Street 
* Newport. 

CHRISTCHURCH. 

51. O. HVMFARY . RICHARDS = HIS HALF PENY. H . E . R. 

^. NEAR . CHRIST . CHVRCH = A bridge of three arches. 

52. O. HENRY . RiCHMAN = A pair of cropper's shears. 

J?. OF . CHRISTCHVRCH . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

53. O, HENRY . RODGERS . AT = The King's Arms. 

J^. CHRISTCHVRCH. 1670 = HALF PENY. 

54. O. lOHN . WELCHMAN . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

J^, CHRIST . CHVRCH = I . W. 



COWES. 

lOSEPH . BARTON = HIS HALF PENY. 
IN . WEST . COWES = THE KINGS ARMS. 



55- 


0. 


56. 


0. 


57- 


0. 
JR. 


58- 


0. 


59- 


0. 
R. 



THO . BRADFEILD . IN . WEST= 1 666. 
COWES . IN . y" . ILE . OF . WIGHT = T . 

PETER . COVRTNELL . 67 = P . S . C 
IN . Y" . WEST . COWES = P . S . C. 

DANIELL . GILES . 0F= 1667. 
THE . WEST . COWES = D . B . G. 

ROBERT . MOORE . WEST = A StilL 
COWES . ISLE . OF . WIGHT = R . M. 



S . a 



CRONDALL (near Farnham). 
60. O. CRVNDOL . IN a Drapers' Arms in a shield 

R. HAMPHIREeE . A . P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



262 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



EAST MEON. 

6 1. O. lOHN . wiTCOMBE . AT. Y'^ = An angel. 

J?. IN . EASTE . MEANE . 66 = I . M . W. 
This old village gives its name to the hundred in which it is situated, anddeiires 
it from the old inhabitants of the county. 

EMSWORTH. 

62. O. THOMAS . WHEELER = Mercers' Arms. 

J?, IN . EMSWORTH . 1667 =T . R . W. \ 

FAREHAM. 

63. O. WILLIAM . DiDLESFOLD = MerccFs* Arms. 

J^. OF . FARAM . 1658 = W . D. { 

64. O, WILLIAM . DiDDLESFOLD = Mercers* Arms. 

^. OF . FARAM . MERCER = W , D. { 

The name is locally pronounced in the phonetic form used .on these tokens. 

FARNBOROUGH. 

65. O, lOHN . SMITH . AT . THE = The King's head crowned. 

jR, IN . FARNBUROH . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

FORDINGBRIDGE. 

66. O. SAMVEL . HARRIS = A shuttle (?). 

jR, IN . FORDINGBRIDGE = S . H. \ 

FRESHWATER. 

67. O, SAM . BARTON . AT . FRESH = The Mercers' Arms. 

^. WATER . IN . ISLE . OF . WIGHT = HIS HALF PENY. (l6)68. ^ 

GOSPORT. 

6S, O. NICHOLAS . BRADWAY = N . A . B. 

J?. OF. GOSPORTE=l665. i 

69. O. lOHN . BRAMLEV . AT . Y^ . RED = A lioH rampant. 

^. LYON . IN. GOSPORT . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. i 

70. O, ANNE . GRAINGER . IN = HER HALFE PENY. 

J^. GOSPORTE . 1667 = A . G. t 

71. O. WILL . HUNT . BAKER = Two rolls of bread. 

J?. IN . GOSPERT . 1668 = W . A . H. 4 

72. O. STEPHEN . LOCK = Two keys crossed. 

J?. OF . GOSPART . 1667 = S . D , L. i 



Digitized by 



Google 



HAMPSHIRE. 263 

73. O. lOHN . MORGAN . AT . Y" . ROYALL= A ship in full Sail. 

J^. SOVERAIGN . IN . GOSPORTE . 1667 = HIS HAFE PENY. 
I . S . M. ^ 

74. O, ELIZABETH . SEYMOR- An anchor. E . S. 

^. OF . GODSPORT . IN . HAMPSHIRE (filling the field). i 

HAMBLEDON. 

75. O, lOHN . LANE. 1669 = A horse-shoe. 

J^. IN . HAMELDON = I . M . L. J J 

76. O. RICHARD . STENT =1665. 

J^. AT . HAMBLEDON = R . M . S. \ 

There are so many Hambledons, that it is doubtful whether these tokens are 
correctly placed to Hampshire ; but a reference to the parish registers might solve 
the question. 

HARTFORD BRIDGE. 

77. O. THOMAS . RAWLENGSON . AT . Y* = A hart lodged. 

^. W . H . AT . HARTFORD . BRIDGE = HIS HALF PENNY. T . E . R. 
This White Hart Inn still exisU. 

HARTLEY ROW. 

78. O. THOMAS . ivsTiCE = St Gcorge and the dragon. 

R. OF . HARTLY . ROW = T . M . I. J 

79. O, ROBERT . RANGE . IN = Arms ; a chevron between two 

crosses botonn^e. 

/^. HARTLEY . ROE = R . R. J 

80. O. lAMES . SMITH . AT . Y^ . FENIX = A phoenlx. 

^. AT . HARTLE . ROE = HIS HALFE PENY. I . E . S. J 

The Phoenix Inn, which originally was an important stopping-place for the 
coach between London and Salisbury, still exists in this quaint little village. 

HAVANT. 

81. O. THOMAS . HiLDRVP . 0F = A man making candles. 

/^. HAVANT . TALOW . CHAND = T . M . H. \ 

82. O. THOMAS . YOVNG = T . M . Y. 

^. OF . HANANT . l653 = T . M . Y. i 

HOOK. 

83. O. ANN . ATKINSON . AT . THE = A raven. 

J?. BLACK . RAVEN . IN . HOOCK = HER HALF PENY. h 



Digitized by 



Google 



a64 TRADERS* TOKEN!: 



84. O. ROBERT . MVN 
^. IN . HVSBONE . 



85. O. NICHOLAS . GF 

dove. 

J^. OF . KINGS . CI 



86. O, LIPHOOK . IN = 
iV. HAMPSHIER = ] 

This inn has been one of gi 

87. O, HENRY . CHin 
iV. LIPRVCK . IN . 



88. O, BARTHOLOMEW 
R. IN . LIMII . NO' 

89. O. lOHN . BARWIC 
R. IN . LIMINGTOI 

90. O, THOMAS . GLE\ 
R, IN . LEIMINGTC 

91. O. THOMAS . GLE\ 
R. IN . LEAMINGT< 

92. O, BARTHOLOMEW 
R, IN . LIMINGTOI 

The issuer was mayor in 16 
There are two distinct vari< 
the inner circles. 

93. O. lOHN . HARMO( 
jR, IN . LIMINGTOI 

94. O. PHINEHAS . WF 
R. IN . LIMMINGTC 

The issuer was mayor in 16 



ijS* O. nm 




Google 



HAMPSHIRE. 26s 

96. O. NEWPORT . IN . THE . ISLE . OF , WIGHT . 1 664 (in fivC UnCs). 

J^. {No legend,) A ship in full sail. \ 

A variety of this token is an eighth of an inch wider and seven grains heavier 
than No. 95, and may have passed as a halfpenny. 

97. O. ANN . BARFORD . IN = The Stationcrs' Arms. 

R, NEWPORT . ISLE . OF . WITE = A . a 

98. O. STEPHEN . BARTON . OF . NEWPORT = S . E . B. 
R. IN . THE . ISLE . OF . WIGHT . 1664=3 HIS HALFE PENY. 

99. O. RICHARD . DORE=R . D. 
R. OF . NEWPORT = 1654. 

ICO. O. lOHN . EDWARDS . OF . NEWPORT = HIS HALFE PENY. 
R, IN . Y« . ISLE . OF . WHIGHT . l668 = I . M . E. 

101. O, lOSEPH . FOSTER . NEW =165 7. 
R, PORT . ILE . OF . WIGHT= I . M . F, 

102. O. lOSEPH . FOSTER . IN . NEWPORT = HIS HALF PENY. 1669, 

R. IN . THE . ISLE . OF . WIGHT = I . M . F and a flower. 

103. O. WILL . HANNAM . NEW = Tallowchandleis* Arms. 

R. PORT . ISLE . WITE = W . H. 

104. O. WILLIAM . HAPGOOD = St. Gcorge and the Dragoa 

R. NEWPORT . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

105. O. lOHN . E . HORE . NEW = Detrited. 

R, PORT . ISLE . OF . WIGHT = I . E . H. 

106. O. THOMAS . iyNNiNGE = A pot of lilies. 

R, OF . NEWPORTE . l654 = T . I. 

107. O, lOHN . IOLIFFE = I . E . L 
R. IN . NEWPORT . 1665 = 1 . E . L 

108. O. EDWARD . KNIGHT . IN = A Castle. 
R. NEWPORT . ISLE . OF . WITE = E . K. 

109. O. ARTHER. LEGG. 1656 = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, OF . NEWPORT = A . I . L. 

lie. O. ANTHONY . MAYNARD = The Apothecaries' Arras. 

R. IN . NEWPORT = A . E . M. 

111. O, lOHN . HOOKE . NEWPORT = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . THE . ISLE . OF . WIGHT = I . E . H. 

112. O. BLIZ . MAYNARD . NEW = E . Bf. 
R. PORT . ILE . WITE=iE . M. 

113. A variety reads of . wite. 

114. O, CUTHBERT . MILLS . NEARE»C . E . M . 1670. 
R, NEWPORT . Y . ISLE . OF . WIGHT" HIS HALF PENY. 



Digitized by 



Google 



266 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
I J. O. w . NEWLAND . OF . NEWPORT = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . ILLE . OF . WEIGHT = W .G.N. 

1 6. O, FRANCIS . SEARLE . OF . NEWPORTE = The Brcwers* Arms. 
^. Y« . ISLE . OF . Wight . 1670 =* half penny, f . i . & J 

17. O, lOHN . THORNTON = A thornbush. 

J^. in . NEWPORT= I . E . T. 

18. O, lOSEPH . WHITHEAD . IN= 1664. 
J^, NEWPORT , ILE . OF . WITE = I . K . W. { 

NITON. 

19. O. THOMAS . BRAIMAN = T . B. 
J?. NITON . IN . HAMSHIRE = H . B. 

20. O. PHILLIP . POVND = The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. OF . NITON . 1654 = P . K . p. } 

ODIHAM. 

21. O. FRANCIS . BAKER . OF = The Drapers' Arms. 

^. ODIAM . IN . HAMPSHIRE = F . S . B. 4 

22. O. EDWARD . MANNERiNG = The Grocers' Anns. 

/^, OF . ODIHAM . 1656 = E . E . M. 

23. O. ROBERT . MAY = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

J^, IN . ODIHAM . 1653 = R .A.M. 

24. O. ROBERT . MAY = HIS HALF PENY. R . A . M. 

J^, IN . ODiH.\M . 1669 = Mercers' Arms. 

25. O. lOHN . SPIER = 1668. 
J^. OF . ODIHAM = I . A . S. 

26. O, lOHN . SPIER = A shovel. 

jR. OF . ODIVM . 1665 = I . A . S. 



OVERTON. 

27. O. lOHN . PVRDVE . AT . YE. WHITE = A heart lodged. 

J^. HARTE . IN . OVERTON . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. I . I . P- J 

28. O, WILLIAM . SPEER = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

J^, OF . OVERTON . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

L29. O. WILLIAM . SPIER = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

J?. OF. OVERTON . 1670 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

This token was found in Hampshire, and is no doubt correctly placed, tfaoogh the 
name is to be found in other counties. 

PETERSFIELD. 
130. O. lOHN . HORSENAiLE= A pair of Stays, i . s. h. 

J^, IN . PETERSFIELD . 1 668. HIS HALFE PENY. ! 



Digitized by 



Google 



HAMPSHIRE. 267 

131. O. THOMAS . lAQVES . AT . THE = A hart lodged. 

^. PETERSFEILD = T . I. 

132. O. THOMAS . lAQVES . AT . THE = A hart lodged. 

^. HARTE . IN , PETERSFELD = T . I. 

133. O. lOHN . WALKER . OF = I . M • W. 
J?. PETERSFEILD . l668 = HIS HALFE PENY. 

PORTSMOUTH. 

134. O, lOHN . AYLWARD = A row of candlcs and a dipping-case. 

jR. IN . PORTSMOVTH = 1 . M . A. 

135. O. lOHN . BALLARD = I . A . B. 

J^. IN . POVRCHMO\nrH= 1653. 

136. O, ELIZABETH . BissELL = Three anchors. 

J^. IN . PORTSMOVTH . 1657 = E . W . B, 
This is curious in having only the initial of the husband's name, and that not 
placed first. 

137. O' CHRISTO . BRVNCICER = A bell. 
^. IN . PORTCHMOVTH = C . M . B. 

138. O. CHRISTEFER . BRVNKER = A belL 
/^. IN . PORTCHMOVTH = C . M . R 

139. O, ALEXANDER . CARTER = Pair of scales and a wheatsheaf. 

^. IN . PORTSMOVTH* A . K . C 

140. O, PHILLIP . ELMES = Two compasses. 

J^. IN . PORTSMOVTH = P . I . E. 

141. O. WILLIAM . ENGLISH = A paschal lamb. 

J^, IN . PORTSMOVTH . 1667 = W . I . E. 

142. O. RICHARD . FAVLKONER = The King's head crowned 

{Octagonal.) 

R, IN . PORTCH . MOVTH . [l6]58 . HIS HALF PENNY (in fivC 

lines). 

143. O. RICHARD . FAVLCONER = The King*s head crowned. 

R. IN . PORTCH . MOVTH . 68 . HIS HALF PENNY. R ! A . 

(in five lines). (Octagonal.) 

144. O. EDWARD . FLOOD = A crescent and star. 

R, IN . PORTSMOVTH = E . A . F. 

145. O, ROBERT . HARFORD = A hand holding a pen. 

R. IN . PORTSMOVTH . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

146. O. ROBERT . HAWCKES = The Blacksmiths' Arms. 

R, IN . PORTSMOVTH =iR . F . H. 

147. O. HENRY . IENNER = H . S . L 
R. OF . PORCHMOVTH . 1656 = H .S.I. 



Digitized by 



Google 



a68 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

148. A variety reads portsmovth. 

149. O. THO . JELLIT . AT . WHIT = A hart couchaot. 

J?. OF . PORTSMOVTH =sT. E . I. 

150. O. I AMES . LOCK =1667. 
J?. IN . PORTSMOVTH » I . M . L. 

151. O. lOHN . KENT . AT . NEPTVNS =» NcptUDc in a car drawn by 

sea-horses. 

J?. COVRT . AT . PORTCHMOVTH , 1670 = HALF PENY. (Ode- 

gonai.) 

152. O, FRANCIS . LVCAS . 0F = A ship. 
R. PORTCHMOVTH . l666 = F . L. 

153. O, RICHARD. MARKS = HIS HALF PENY. 1671. 

R, OF . PORTCHMOVTH = A fishing-boat. 

154. O. lOHN . PATTEN . OF= 1667. 
R. PORTSMOVTH = I . A . P. 

155. O. THOMAS . PARKES = A dolphin. 

R. OF . PORTSMOVTH =T . E . P. 

156. O, EDWARD . PEARSE . AT . Y^ . HVLKE = A ship'S hulk. 
R, IN . PORTCHMOVTH . 1 667 = HIS HALF PENY. E . M. P. 

157. O, NICHOLAS . PEIRSON = N . S . P. 

R, IN . PORTSMOVTH . 1653 = N . S . P. 

158. O. NICHOLAS . PEIRSON = N . E . P. 

R. IN . PORTSMOVTH . l666 = N . E . P. 
The above issuer may have married again since issuing the token in 1653. 

159. O. RICHARD . PRIEST = A squirrel. 

R. IN . PORTESMOVTH = R . I . P. 

160. O, PAVL . RICHARDS = P . E . R. 
R, IN . PORTSMOVTH =1656. 

161. O. WILLIAM . SMEDMORE . AT = THE . FOVNTAIN. 
R. PORTCHMOVTH. 1670 = HALF PENY. 

162. A variety reads smedore. 
This inn is now "The Soldiers* Institute." 

163. O, RICHARD . THOMAS . ON . THE = A Stag COUChant 
R. POINTE . OF . PORTSMOVTH = R . I . T. 

164. O, WALTER . THVRMAN = A roU of tobaCCO, 
R. OF . PORTSMOVTH . 60 = W . I . T. 

165. O, ROBERTS . TIPPETS . IN = The Barber-Surgeons' Arms. 

R. PORTSMOVTH . 1 666 = R . E . T. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HAMPSHIRE. 269 

166. O. RICHARD . WHITE = R . M . W. 

/^. OF. PORTSMOVTH=l656. J 

167. O. THOMAS . WILSON . AT . THE = A plumc of feathers. 

/^, VPON . YE . POINT . IN . PORl*SMOVTH = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

RINGWOOD. 

168. O. RICHARD . BELBiN . i668 = A sugar-loaf. R . M . B. 

/^. IN . RINGWOOD = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

169. O. THOMAS . BLANCH = A Fose and crown, 

/^. IN . RINGWOOD = T . B. J 

170. O. TRISTRAM . TviGES . OF = A chevron between 3 cross 

crosslets. 

/^. RINGWOOD . 1666 = T . G . T. J 

ROMSEY. 

171. O. SET . FORTH . BY . TIE . CORPORATION . OF . YE . TOWNE 

OF . ROMSEY (in seven lines). 

/^. ^ . TOKENS . FOR . Y^ . BENEFIT . OF . Y" . POO* = A pOFt- 

cuUis. 1669. 

172. O' SET . FORTH . BY . THE . CORPORATION . OF . TOWNE . OF 

ROMSEY (in six lines). 

/^. FOR . YE . BENEFIT . OF . THE . POORE = A portCUlHs. 
1669. 

173. O. lOHN . HACKE . AT . THE = A bell. I . I . H. 
^. IN. RVMSEY . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

174. O. ISAAC . KNIGHT = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^, IN . RVMSEY . 1664 = I . F . K. 

175. O, WILLIAM . KNIGHT . OF = The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. RVMSEY . IN . HAMSHEIRE = W . A . K. 

176. O. lOHN . MOVNTAYNE = A man making candles. 

^. OF . RVMSEY = I . F . M. 

177. O. lOHN . PUCKRIDGE . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
/^. OF . RVMSY . IN . HAMPSHEIRE = I . M . P. 

178. O, CLEMENT . WARREN = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

/^. IN . RVMSY . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. C . I . W. 

179. O. EDMVND . YONGE = Three crowns. 

/^, IN . RVMSEY . 1664 = E . A . Y. 

180. O. EDMVND . YiNGE = Three crowns. 

/^. IN . RVMSEY. 1664 = E . A . Y. 



Digitized by 



Google 



270 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

RYDE. 

181. O, NICHOLAS . OAKLEY . IN= 1664. 

J^. RIDE . ISLE . OF . WITE = N . M . O. J 

182. O. WILLIAM . PHILLIPS . AT . RIDE = The Vintncrs' Arms. 

J^, IN . THE . ISLE . OF . WIGHT . 67= HIS HALF PENY. 
W . E . P. i 

SOAKE (a DIVISION OF Winchester). 

183. O. NATHANiELL . ROBBERTS . IN = The Tallowcbandlers' 

Arms. 

J^, YE . SOAKE . NEAR . WINTON = HIS HALFE PENY. 1668. h 

SOUTHAMPTON. 

184. O. THE . CORPORATION . OF . SOVTHAMPTONS . HALF . PENY 

(in seven lines). 
/?. {No legend.) Arms of Southampton; per fess, three 
roses. i 

185. O, THE . CORPORATION . OF . SOVTHAMTONS . FARTHING (in 

seven lines). 
R. {No legend,) The Arms of Southampton. \ 

186. O. ANTHONY . BARROW = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN . SOVTHAMPTON = A . B. } 

187. O, CHRISTOPHER . BELL = Arms; a chevron between three 

birds. 

R, IN . SOVTHAMPTON = C . B. 

188. O, WILLIAM . BOWER . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. SOVTHAMPTON . l666 = W . C . B. 

189. O. RICHARD . coRNELLius = R . c and six stars. 
R, IN . SOVTHAMPTON . i66o = A barrel. 

190. O. SAMVELL . DOWNES = HIS HALFE PENY. 

R. OF . SOVTHAMPTON . i668 = The Bakers' Arms. \ 

191. O, GEORGE . FREEMAN . AT . YE . WHIT = A horse ambling. 

R. IN . SOVTHAMPTON . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENY. i 

192. O. lOHN . GOTER . IN = Three stars. 
R, SOVTHAMPTON = Three roses. 

193. O. WILLIAM . lOLLiFE . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, OF . SOVTHAMPTON . l666 = W . I . L 

194. O, WILLIAM . LOLLIFE . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. SOVTH . HAMPTON = W . L, 

It is possible that the last two tokens are by the same issuer, with the initials 0/ 
the surname altered in error. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HAMPSHIRE. 271 

195. O, CORNELIVS . MACHAM = HIS HALF PENY. 

/?. IN . sovTHAMPTON . 1667 = The Groccrs' Arms. 

196. O, CORNELIVS . MACHAM = The Gtocers' Arms. 

/^. IN . SOVTHAMPTON . 1664 = . M. 

197. A variety has c. m in the field of the reverse. 

198. O. WILLIAM . MACHAM = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . SOVTHAMPTON = W . M. 

199. O. HENRY . MILLER . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. SOVTHAMPTON . 1664 = H . M . M. 

200. O. HENRY . NORBORNE . IN . SOVTHAMP = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

1668. 

J^, H . A . N = Arms of the Norborne family ; ermine a fess 
nebulae ; on a canton, a ducal coronet. 

201. O, lOSEPH . SMITH = The Mercers* Arms. 

^. IN . SOVTHAMPTON = I . S. 

202. O. lACOB . WARD . OF = A pair of scales. 

/^. SOVTHAMPTON = I . W. 

TITCHFIELD. 

203. O, WILLIAM . HACK . AT . THE = St George and the dragon. 

J^, IN . TICHFEILD . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. W . E . H. 

204. O, WILLI . HOVGHTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . TICHFEILD . 1652 = w . H between two roses. 

205. O. HENRY . RAY = Pair of scissors open. 

^. OF . TICHFEILD = H . E . R. 

WALLOP. 

206. O. HVGH . CHiTTY . OF . WALLOP = A pair of shcars. 

J^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 666 = H . C 

WEST MEON. 

207. O, lOHN . FOSTER . IN = A saltire. i . i . f. 

J^, WESTMEAN . 1670= HIS HALF PENY. 

WHITCHURCH. 

208. O. ALLEN . HARPER = The Groccrs' Arras. 

^. IN . WHITTCHVRCH=A . I . H. 

209. O. lOHN . PEARCE = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. OF . WHITCHVRCH = I . M . P. 

210. O. EDWARD . WAiGHT = The Grocers* Arms. 

/^. IN . WHITCHVRCH . 1667 = E . I . W. 



Digitized by 



Google 



272 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
WINCHESTER. 

211. O. A I WINCHES I TER . HALF | PENNY | 1 669 (in five lioCS). 

-^. c . w [City of Winchester]. Arms of Winchester; fi^ 
castles in sallire, the central castle having alioopissani 
gardant on each side. 

212. O. A I WINCHES I TER . FAR j THING i 1 669 (in fivC lillCS). 

^. c . w = The arms of the city in a shield. 

213. O, WILLIAM . BVTLER . OF = The Groccrs' Arms. 

^. WINCHESTER . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. W. I . E 

214. O, WILLIAM . BVTLER . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. WINCHESl-ER . 1657 =W .I.E. 

215. O. lOHN . CLEER . OF . WINCHESTER = The Grocers* Anns. 

^. GROCER . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . C. 

216. O. PETER . CROSS . 1 667 = The Grocers* Arms. 

i?. IN . WINTON . GROCER = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

217. A variety reads peny. 

2x8. O, THOMAS . FARMER = A pair of scalcs. 

J^, IN . WINTON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. T . A . F. 

219. O, MICH AELL . FITCH AT = Crossed swords. 

/^, IN . WINTON . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. M . I . F. 

220. O. WILL . FLETCHER . ivN . AT = The Grocers* Anns. 

i?. KINGS . GATE . IN . WINTON = W . M . F. 

221. O, lOHN . LAMPARD = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. OF . WINCHESTER = I . M . L. 

^22. O. ROBERT. MiCHiLL = The Grocers* Arms. 

^. IN . WINCHESTER = R . S . M. 

223. O, WILLIAM . OVER . AT = The Groccrs* Arms. 

J^. EAST . GATE . AT . WINTON = W . M . O. 

224. O, WILLIAM . OVER . AT . YE = W . M . O. 

/?. EAST . GATE . AT . WINTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

225. O. GODSON . PENTON . OF = HIS HALFE PENY. 
^. WINCHESTER . 1667 =G .P.P. 

226. O, NICHOLAS. PVRDVE = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. IN . WINCHESTER = N . K . P. 

227. O. lOHN . PVRDOVE . OF . WINTON = IronmongCTS* Arros. 

i?. HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1667 = I . P. 

228. O. ROBERT . STEELE . GROCER = The GrOCCIs' AtTOS. 
i?. IN . WINTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = R . S. 1667. 



lOOS. 



HAMPSHIRE, 273 

229. O, WILLIAM . TAYLOR = The Groccrs' Arms. 

/^. IN . WINCHESTER . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

230. O. WILLIAM . TAYLOR = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. IN . WINCHESTER = W . R . T. J 

231. O. ROBERT . wicHiLL = The Groccrs* Arms. 

^. IN . WINCHESTER = R . S . M. J 

The following is a copy of the City Proclamation as to the issue of tokens, and is 
transcribed by permission from the city archives : 

** 7 Sept., 1669. Whereas div'se p'sons have of late in sev'^all places taken upon 
them to coyne, or cause to be coyned, ereat numbers of brass halfe-pence and 
fiarthings, and to vent them to the King^s subjects, whereby this Citty as well as 
other places dothe exceedingly abound with the sayde Ilalfe-pence and ffarthings, 
w^ doth already, and iff not tymely p'vented, will dayly more and more bringe 
great damage to the Inhabitants of this Citty, for by reason of the death of some 
of those persons w^^ sett forth those halfpence and ffarthings, and that others of them 
doe remove theyr dwellings, or abscond themselves, many of those halfepence and 
ffarthings will not passe from man to man, soe that those p'sons in whose hands 
they doe remain, must needs suffer damage therebye. And also many of those 
halfe-pence and flarthings are brought from townes farr remote from this place, and 
with whom this Citty hath no comerce or trade, by reason of all vr^ our Inhabi- 
tants are putt to great trouble in takeing moneys for theyr wares, and do dayly 
receive damage therebye. Now that these growing inconveniences may be 
redressed in tyme, and such small changeing money be provided, that noe man for 
the future may lose in receiving the same : It is att this Assembly agreed upon, 
an 1 accordingly ordayned, that a convenient number of brasse Halfe-pence and 
ffarthings shall be provided by the Citty out of the comon stocke thereof, with such 
a stampe upon them as they may be publiquely known to be the moneys belonging 
to the Citty, and that these halfe-pence and ffarthings thus provided (and noe 
others) shall currently passe in this Citty, and that noe man may suffer damage 
by taking these halfe-pence and ffarthings thus sett forth. It is by this Assembly 
agree* 1 upon, that this Citty shall exchange all such halfe-pence and ffarthings 
for current money of England, when any p'son shall give convenient notice soe 
to doe. And it is further agreed u|K>n and ordayned, that from and after the 
first day of November next ensueing, noe other half-pence or ffarthings shall 
currently passe in this Citty but such as be sett forth as aforesayd. And it is 
also agreed upon at this Assembly, That such persons who are members of this 
Corporacion shall receive reasonable satisfaction for any losse they shall sustain 
by calling in such halfe-pence and ffarthings aforesayd. And is also agreed upon, that 
yf any benefitt arise by setting forth the sayd halfpence and farthings. It shall be 
ym ployed for the use and benefitt of the poore. And if any person within this 
Citty shall after the tyme aforsayd, vent or offer in payment any Halfe-pence or 
ffirthings other than such as shall be stamped with the aforesayd stampe of this 
Citty, every p'son soe offend inee shall for every such offense forfeite the su^i of 
fi^-ve shillings to the use of the Chamber of this Citty to be levyed by distresse, 
and sale of the goods of the offender." 

232. O. DOROTHY . WINTER . IN . KINGS = A pOt of liUcS. D . W. 
i?. GATE . STREET . WINCHESTER = HER HALFE PENNY. 1 667. ^ 

233. O. ANTHONY . WISEMAN = A . M . W. 

J^. DRAPER . IN . W1NT0N= 1657. * J 

YARMOUTH (Isle of Wight). 

234. O. lOHN . PRICE . AT . YARMOVTH = HALF PENY. 

/^. IN . V** . ISLE . OF . wit;HT . 1670 = A greyhound. i 

18 



Digitized by 



Google 



274 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

235. O. lOHN . PRICE . vARMOVTH = St. Geoigc and the diagoo. 

^. ISLE . OF . WITE = I . P. \ 

236. O. lOHN . PRICE . YARMOVTH = St. Gcorgc and the dragon. 

J^. IN . THE . ISLE . OF . WITE = I . P. J 

237. O. WILL . HIDE . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . B . H. 
^. IN . SOVTH . YARMOVTH . 1667 = A ship. 

The issuer was an alderman of the borough, and there is a slab to his loetDory in 
the pavement of the parish church dated SSi March, 1679. 

YATELEY. 

238. O] lAMES . LECH = The Butchers' Arms. 

A IN . YATLY . 1670 = 1 . H . L. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



IDereforbsbire. 

NxmBKR or Tokens issued 73 

Number or Places issuing Tokens g 

Town piece issued at Hereford. 



Sub-Editor and CoiiaboraUur : 

James W. Lloyd, Esq., 
Kington. 



18—2 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



Digitized by 



Google 



l)crcfor^0birc• 

In the former edition of this work, Mr. Boyne described forty-one 
tokens as belonging to Herefordshire, one of which was misplaced 
and is now inserted in its proper county of Essex. Two tokens were 
also placed to other counties, which are now removed to their proper 
habitat, as proved by the occurrence of the issuers' names in the parish 
registers of the towns to which they are now assigned, viz., Kington and 
Ledbury. The total number now claimed for the county is seventy- 
three, consisting of twenty-three farthings, forty-nine (?) halfpennies, 
and one doubtful penny. Of these two are heart-shaped, two square, 
one octagonal, the remainder round. The tokens issued by Kington 
tradesmen are interesting as being the only ones in the series bearing 
mottoes intended to impress upon their customers their character for 
honesty and " square-dealing " — vide Nos. 39 and 46. 

James W. Lloyd. 

Kington. 

BROMYARD. 

1. O. lOHN . 6AMKHAM = A buU's head. 

R. OF . BRAM : VARD= I . F . B. 

2. O, lOHN . BAVNHAM = Crest of the Baynham family, a bull's 

head couped. 

R, OF . BRAM : YARD = I . F . B. \ 

3. A variety from different dies of larger size. 

These are by the same issuer, the die-sinker having evidently had to cut a second 
obverse die in consequence of his error in spelling the name in the first instance. 

The issuer of this token belonged to a family of importance and position in the 
town, but I have been unable to discover what trade he followed. The bull's 
head on obverse is the crest of the Baynhams, who bear Gul. a chevron arg. be- 
tween two ball's heads in chief caboshed or, and one in base arg. The names of 
John Baynham and his brother Anthony appear as two of the free burgesses to a 
form of election of a roaster to the Free Grammar School, dated June 27, 1661. — 
Doncamb's " Collections towards the History and Antiquities of the County of 
Hereford," 1812, vol. iL, pp. 77-8. 

In the chancel of Bromyard Church is a marble tablet, with the arms of the 
family and the following inscription : 

** In this chancel were interred the bodies of John Baynham, Esquier, June 4, 
1636, aged 7a Elizabeth, his wife, Feby 12, 1655, aged 66. Edward Baynham, 
ddest son and heire, Jann 10, 1652, aged 42. Mary, his wife, June 16, i65<^ aged 
3a John Baynham :* 6 : son, May 24, 1671, aged 52. Frances, his wife : July i<^ 
1683. Anthony Baynham, died Janua 23, '98- 

* The issuer of the token. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



278 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

John Baynham, gent, was assessed for ii fire>hearths in Bromjmid, iS 
Charles II., 1666. 

Hearth-money was a tax established by 13 and 14 Car. IL, c. 10, whereby a 
hereditary revenue of 2s. for every hearth or chimney in all houses paying church 
and poor rates was granted to the King. It was abolished upon tne Revolatioa 
by the I W. and M., st. i, c. 10. 

HEREFORD. 

4. O, HEREFORD . ciTTY . ARMES = Arms of the city with date 

1662 above the shield. 
/^, HEN . lONES . SWORD BERER = A sword crcct, bctwecn 

H.I. i 

A woodcut of this token is given in Price's '* Historical Account of the City of 
Hereford," 1796, p. 64. 

5. Same as No. 2, but from different dies. i 

6. A variety dated 1663. J 

7. O. HEREFORD . ARMES. = Arms of the city, 1662. 

jR, H . lONES . SWORD BERER = A sword erect between h . i. } 
The arms of the city as shown on these tokens are gules, three lions passa&t 

gardant argent, with the augmentation granted by King Charles in 1645, ^^ ^^ 

cognition of its loyalty, viz., on a border azure ten saltiers or Scottish crosis 

argent. 

In the roll of the heatth-tax for the city of Hereford for 1664, Henry Jones, 

elover, was assessed for two, and Henry Jones, sword-bearer, for one hearth, both 

in Bysters Ward. 

8. O. WILLIAM . BARNES = w . B between two roses, in a lozenge of 

dots, the points of the lozenge reaching through inner 
circle to outer circle of dots. 
^. IN . HEREFORDE . 1661 =oh. a rose below, in a lozenge. ^ 

9. O. WILLIAM. BARNES^ 1666. 

^. IN . HEREFORD = W . B. i 

A Mr. William Barnes was one of the prisoners " of quality " taken at the final 
siege of Hereford, in December, 1645. 
William Barnes was assessed for one fire-hearth in Bysters Ward. 
The following entries appear in the registers of the parish of All Saints : 

1 69 1. Eliz. Barnes was Buryed ye first of March. 

1692. William Barnes was buryed ye 21 of July. 

10. O. HIS . HALFE . PENEY= ROGER . BOVLCOT. 

i?. OF . THE . CITTY . OF . HEREFORD = A fleur-de-llS. J 

11. O. ROGER . BOVLCOT = A fleur-de-Us. 

I^. OF. HEREFORD = R. B. i 

Roger Boulcot, who died October 10, 1680^ and was interred within the prectncti 

of Hereford Cathedral, left a charity to the poor of the city as follows, from " Aa 

alphabetical abstract of all the charities and benefactions given to this city c-f 

Hereford, collected by Ja. Lane, Town Cler., Anno DnL 171 1 : 

" Boulcott Roger his gift by will of his House in Bye Street called the Scalding 
House to ye Poor of ye Hospitall in Bewail Street to be equally divided between 
ym by ye Mayor and Justices at ye rent days or within 10 days after. Yearly rent 
508 at Lsimmas and Candlemas. 
He was also a benefactor to the library of vicars' choral in the cathed r aL 



Digitized by 



Google 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 279 

Roger Boalcot was assessed for two fire-bearths in Wigmarsh Ward 14 Car. II. 

The following inscription occurs on a stone in the pavement of the bishop's 
:]oiftter of the cathedral : 

" Here licth the body of Mr. Roger Boulcott, of this City, Mercer, one of the 
Common Council of the same City, who departed the loth day of October, 16S0." 

•* Also the body of Theodosia, the wife of Mr. Richard Witherstone, she being 
:he eldest daughter of Robert Mynors, of Treago, Esq., deceased, and formerly 
ihe wife of the above R(^er Boulcott, who was interred 6th day of December, 
1700. She had nine children living at her death." — " Monumental Inscriptions of 
Hereford Cathedral," p. 21. 

In the registers of " All Saints " are the following entries relating to the Boulcott 
family : 

1674. Henry, the sonne of Roger Boulcott, gent., and Theadotia, his wife, was 
baptized the 29th of March. Wm. Allen, vicar ; Mr. Roger Boulcott and John 
Sajidford, churchwardens, 1674. 

1675. Theadotia, the daughter of Mr. Roger Boulcott, and Theadotia, his wife, 
was baptized the 8th of June. 

1676. Mary, the wife of Joseph Boulcott, was buryed the nine and twentieth of 
March. 

1677. Elizabeth, the daughter of Mr. Roger Boulcott, and Theadotia, his wife, 
was baptized the thirteenth of May. 

1678. Thomas, ye son of Mr. Roger Boulcott, and Theadosia, his wife, was 
baptized the xxth of July. 

1678. Joseph Boulcott, buried ye 28th of November. 

1680. Mary, the daughter of Mr. Roger Boulcott, and Theadosia, his wife, was 
baptized the i6th of September. 

1680. Mr. Roger Boulcott was buried the i8th October. 

In St. Peter*s register : 

September 28th, 1680, was buried Mary, the daughter of Mr. Roger Boulcott 

12. O. THOMAS . ELLTON . 1 666 = The Weavers' Arms. 

J^, OF . THE . CITTY . OF . HEREFORD = HIS HALF PENY. J 

In the roll of assessment of the Hearth Tax on the inhabitants of the county, 
14 Car. XL, "Thomas Ellton, St. Owen's Ward, hath in his house 3 " (hearths). 

Thomas Ellton was probably of the family of Eltons of Ledbury, one of whom 
was Archdeacon of Hereford, and founded certain fellowships at Brasenose Col- 
lege, Oxford. 

The name does not appear in the registers of either of the city churches which I 
have been permitted to examine. 

13. O. THO . HANCOX . IN . HEREFORD = A boolc. 

^. CITTY. BOOKESELLER . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY. ^ 

The name does not appear in the Hearth Tax Roll. 
In the register of St. Peter's is a single entry relating to this issuer, viz. : 
1681. February 19th, baptized William, the son of Thomas Hancox, and Pene- 
lope, his wife. 

14. O, I . H . OF . HEREFORD = A rOSC. 

J^, THE . MERCERS . ARMES = The Mercers* Arms. J 

15. O, lOHN . HILL . HEREFORD = ^° in an oval. 

^. HIS . HALFE . PENEY . 57 = ^° in EH OVal. ^ 

16. A variety from different dies. i 
John Hill was mayor of this city in 1659, and appears to have carried on business 

in Ross as well as Hereford, as a token of same type was issued there in 1666. 

A John Hill was assessed for one fire-hearth in St. Owen's Ward and in Wye- 
bridge Ward, "Jno. Hill hath in his house 5, and in a voide house in same 
ward 2'* (hearths). 



Digitized by 



Google 



28o TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

The name of John Hill appears in the list of benefactors to the cathedral librarj. 
In the registers of St. Nicholas Church is the following interesting entry : 
"Buryed the loth day of June, 1670, Mr. John Hill, alderman of this dinr, 

whose happiness it was in his tyme of mayoralty to p'clamyme (xrr) King Charles 

ye Second King of England." 

17. O. GILES . HOVLDER = The Leathcrsellers' Anns. 1668. 

\R. GLOVER . IN I HERRIFOR | CITTY . HIS | HALFE | PENT (in 

five lines). i 

This interesting heart-sha]>ed token is one of the rarest of the Herefordshire 

series, the only notice of it that has come under my observation being in a MS. 

list of drawings of tokens belonging to the late Thomas Bird, Esq., clerk of tbe 

peace of the county. Two specimens have recently come into the writer's 

possession. 

The name Houlder does not appear in the Heajrth Rolls, and the only instao.^ 

of the occurrence of the name in any contemporary records that I have met «ith 

is in the following entry in the registers of All Saints : 
1697. Mary Houlder was Buryed January 8th. 

18. O. EDMOND . HvcK = A rosc and crown. 

^. OF . HEREFORD = E . M . H. \ 

This name is not in the Hearth Rolls. In the registers of St. Peter's is the 
following entry : 

1682. Nov. 9th, baptized Edmund, the son of Wm. Huck, and Margery, his wife. 

19. O, THOMAS . HVTCHINS = An anchor. 1668. 

jR. GLOVER . IN I HEREFORD | CIITV . HIS | HALFE | PENY (in 

five lines). (Heart-shaped.) \ 

It is curious that the only two heart-shaped tokens in the Herefordshire series 
were both issued by glovers. 

Thomas Hutchins was assessed for two fire-hearths in Weybridge Ward, and 
Anthony Hutchins also for two in same ward. 

In the registers of St. Nicholas is the following entrv : 

1667. Bapt. ff ranees, the daughter of Thomas Hutchins, and Margery, his wife, 
December the 15th. 

20. O, BARNABY . lENKiNS . OF . THE = The Leathcrsellcrs* Anns. 

R, CITTY . OF . HEREFORD . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

A Francis Jenkins was assessed for 6 fire-hearths in Wigmarsh Ward, u 
Car. II. ; but Barnaby Jenkins's name does not appear. 

21. O. lOHN . LANE . IN . HEREFORD » A horse. 

E, HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1661 =1 . L within a heart. I 

John Lane was buried within the cathedral precincts, the following inscriptico 

bemg recorded on a stone in centre of cloister area, 1859 : 
" Here lyeth the body of John Lane, of this city, gent., who dyed the i6th day 

of January, Anno D.ni 1687. 
*'John Lane, buried January 17th, 1687." — ''Monumental Inscriptions»'' p. 46. 

22. O. THOMAS . MATHEWS = 0b. 

R, IN . HEREFORD . 1661 =T . M. \ 

23. A variety from different dies. \ 
Thomas Matthews was mayor in 1677, and was assessed for two fire-hearths m 

Bysters Ward, 16 and 17 Chas. II. 
Thomas Mathews signed the registers of St. Peter's in 168 1 as churchwarden. 

24. O, ROGER . MORGAN = A fleur-dc-lis. 

R, IN I HERE I FORD | R . M (in four Hncs). {Octa^mai,) \ 
The following appears in St. Peter's Register : 



Digitized by 



Google 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 281 

1685. Ap the 21, married Roger Morgan, of this parish, and Eleanor Skipp, of 
the parish of St. John Bap. 
R. Morgan signed the register of St. Peter's in 1680 as churchwarden. 

25. O. lOHN . MOSS = A fleece. 

/^. OF . HERRIFORD = I . I . M. J 

A Jno. Morse was assessed for four fire-hearths in Weybridge Ward, 16 and 17 
Chas. II. 

26. O. THOMAS . POWELL = Scven Stars. 

J^, IN . HEREFORD. 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The issuer of this token was probably an innkeeper. The sign of the Seven 
Stars still exists in the city. 

27. O. HVGH . RODD . HIS . HALFE . PENNY = Arms of the city. 

^. IN . HEREFORD = An elcphanc with castle on its back. | 
Boyne describes a token, No. 12 in his list, hvgh low., which is no doubt 
intended for the above, as it corresponds in all respects except the name, which 
is one that does not occur in any records of the period. 

28. O. HVGH . RODD = Shield with the arms of the city. 

J^. OF . HERIF0RD = An elephant with castle. J 

Hugh Rodd was mayor in 1666 and part of 1673. 

29. O. lOHN . RODD . 1670 = A cavalier's hat. 
jR. . . . . (?) {Square). 

A specimen of this imperfectly-described token was exhibited in the local 
museum held in the Shire Hall in connection with the meeting of the Cambrian 
^rchseological Association in 1867. 

Hugh and John Rodd were brothers (sons of Hugh Rodd, of Wegnall, parish of 
Prcsteign), and belonged to the Rodds, of The Rodd, a family seated there as far 
imck as the fifteenth century. A younger branch of this family became owners of 
:he Foxley estates in this county, which descended through an heiress to the 
incestors of the late Sir Robert Price, Bart., M.P. for the county. Hugh and 
fohn Rodd were mercers, and the former was assessed for six fire-hearths in Eigne 
VV'ard, 16 and 17 Chas. II., the latter, also in Eigne Ward, for two fire-hearths, 
[4 Car. II. James Rodd, Esq. (probably an elder brother), was also assessed for 
sight fire-hearths in St. Owen's Ward and four in Wye Bridge Ward. 

The following entries appear in the registers of the different city parishes, viz. : 

St. Owen's. 
1679. Jany. 20, was baptized Anne, the daughter of Mr. Hugh Rodd and Anne, 
lis wife. 

All Saints'. 
167 1. Charles, the Sonne of Mr. Hugh Rodd and Anne, his wife, was baptized 
he 12 of June. 

1 67 1. Anne, the daughter of Mr. John Rodd and ffrances, his wife, was 
)aptiz. : 19 December. 

1673. Thomas, ye Son of Mr. John Rodd and his wife, was Baptized ye 20th 
lay of December. 

1674. Lewis, the Sonne of Hugh Rodd, Esq., Mayor, and Anne, his wife, was 
>aptized the 9th of July. 

1675. James, the Sonne of Mr. John Rodd and ffrances, his wife, was baptized 
he 7th of November. 

1677. Thomas, the sonne of Mr. John Rodd and ffrances, his wife, was baptized 
he xvth of January. 

1678. Jame*5, ye son of Mr. Hugh Rod and Ann, his wife, was baptized ye 14th 
»f Apnll 1678 and 1679, John Rodd, Churchwarden. 

1679. James, sonne of Mr. John Rodd, buryed the 22nd of August. 

168 1. James, the son of Mr. John Rodd and ffrances, his wife, was baptized 
he 14 of'^ AprilL 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



2&2 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

1 69 1. Madam Rodd was burycd ye 13th of March. 

1698. Elizabeth, the daughter of Thomas Rodd and Elizabeth, his wife, was 
Baptized the 7ih of AprilL 

The following inscription, formerly on a gravestone on south side of the Bishop's 
cloister, probably refers to the issuer of No. 29 : 

'* Here lyeth the body of John Rodd, Gent., of the Parish of Marden, who 
departed this life July 1 5, Anno Dom. 1699. CEtatis suce 68." — Rawlmson's ** Hist. 
and Ant. of the City of Hereford.'* 

I have recently met with the following quaint advertisement in the London 
Gazette of September 20, 1686, in which the name of one of these issuers is men- 
tioned : 

'* Lost or Stolen near Marden, in the county of Hereford, a bright bay mare, 4 
years old, with a white fleck on his forehead, black Mane, her Tail dockt« some 
white specks on the saddle-place, about 13 hands highe. Whoever gives Notice 
of the said Mare unto Mr. John Whiteing at the Crown in Lawrence Lane, 
London, or to Mr. Hugh Rodd, Mercer in Hereford, shall have 40s. reward.*' 

30. O, SAMVELL . SAVNDERS . IN = The Ironmongers* Arms. 

R, THE . CITTY . OF . HERIFORD = HIS HALF .PENY. \ 

In the registers of All Saints' are the following entries relating to this family : 
1669. Mary, the daughter of Samuell Saunders and Elizabeth, his wife, was 

baptized ye 22nd of January. 

1672. John, Sonne of Samuell Saunders and Elizabeth, his wife, was baptized 

the xxiiird of January. 

1675. Samuell, the sonne of Samuell Saunders and Elizabeth, his wife, was 

baptized ye i6ih of March. 

1677. James, the sonne of Mr. Samuel Saunders and Elizabeth, his wife, was 

baptized the iii. of November. 

1683. Elizabeth, the dauehter of Mr. Samuell Saunders and Elizabeth, his wife. 

was baptized the third of May. 

1687. Saroll. Saunders and Ann Knowles were married ye 3rd of July. 

1688. Thomas, the sonne of Samuell Saunders and Anne, his wife, was baptized 
the 27th of December. 

1689. Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. Samuell Saunders, buryed ye joth a^ 
September. 

The following inscription was formerly on a gravestone in the area of the Bishop's 
Cloister : 

*' Here lieth the body of Samuel Saunders, of this city, ironmonger, who 
deceased the 12th day of March, 1700, in the 58th year of his age.'* 

" Come here, my friend, and cast an eye. 
Then go thy w.«y, prepare to die ; 
Learn here thy l^ooro, and know thou must 
One day like me be turned to dust." 

—Rawlinson's *' Hist, and Ant. of the City of Hereford." 

31. O. THOMAS . SEABORNE = The arms of the city without shield. 

R, IN . HEREFORD . l652=T . S. \ 

This is the earliest of the Herefordshire tokens. 

The following interesting entry is found in the registers of St. Peter's, in the city 
of Hereford : 

** I, Thomas Seaborne, one of the Justices of the Peace for the city of Hereford, 
well knowing that Mr. Wm. Voyle was duly chosen Parish Minister of Peicr's 
Parish within the said city upon the twenty-second day of September, 1653, d^« 
approve of him so to be and nave sworne him to deal honnestly in the said otBce. 
U a «/.— Thos. Seaborne." 

Thomas Seaborne was mayor in 1649 and part of 1648, and was asessed for two 
fire-hearths in Wigmarsh Ward, 14 Car. II., and for one in Wyebridgc Ward, 16 
and 17 Car. II. 

In All Saints' register the following entries occur : 

1669. Thomas, the sonne of Thomas Seaborne and Elizabeth, his wife, was 
baptized ye loth of March. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 283 

1672. Haonah, daughter of Mr. Thomas Seaborne and Elizabeth, his wife, was 
baptized 4ih of June. 

169a ifrancis Seaborn was Buried ye 21th of April. Mrs. Ann Seaborn was 
Buried ye 8tb of January. 

1697. Thomas, the sonne of Thomas Seaborne and Elizabeth, his wife, was 
baptized Oct. 17. 

In St. Nicholas* register : 

1674. Bapt. John, ye sonne of Thomas Seaborne and Elizabeth, his wife, 
22 November. 

1678. Ye 1 2th of July, Baptized Sammuell, the sonne of Thomas Seaborne and 
Elizabeth, his wife. 

1679. Buried, the 2nd of July, Sammuell, the sonne of Thomas Seaborne and 
Elizabeth, his wife. 

1680. Married. Daniell Jeffries and Francis Seaborne were married Mar. 3rd. 

32. O. LYSON . THOMAS . IN . HEREFORD . 1 668. 

R, =HIS HALF PENY. J 

A specimen of this token was exhibited with No. 29 at the local museum, 1867. 

We shall be glad to learn in whose possession these two pieces now are, and 10 obtain 

complete descriptions of them. 

l.yson Thomas was assessed for two fire^hearths in Eigne Ward, 16 and 17 

Car. II. 

In All Saints' register : 

1683. Mr. Lyson Thomas was buried the 8th of September. 

33. O, ROBERT . WATTS . OF = A lion rampant 

R, HEREFORD. CITTY . 1667 = HIS HALF PENNY. \ 

Tlie issuer was probably an innkeeper. 

On a stone formerly in centre of Cloister area of the cathedral was the following 
inscription : 

** Here lyeth the body of Anne Watts, wife of Robert Watts, carrier, of this 
city, who deceased December the 2— (?), 16-6." 

34. O, HERIFORD . SILK . WEAVER = WILL . WELCH . IN. 

R, HIS . HALF . PENEY . 1663 = The Weavers* Afms. ^ 

" Attendance on Divine service was a duty strictly enforced after the Reforma- 
tion, and made obligatory by various statutes. Persons absenting themselves from 
church for more than a month were liable to a penalty of twenty pounds, or a fine 
of one shilling for each Sunday of non>attendance without a reasonable excuse. 
At a Court of Frankpledge, held in this city, 1686, * the grand inquest presented 
John Fye, gentleman, Blanche, his wife, Agnes Brott, spinster, and her sister 
Prudence, William Welsh, silk weaver, with many others, for that being above the 
age uf sixteen, they had not repaired to their several parish churches and remained 
there during the time of Divine service for the space of one month.' '* — ^Johnson's 
•* Ancient Customs of the City of Hereford.** 
In St. Peter's registers is the following : 

1684. J any. 21, buried William Welch. 
St. Nicholas : 

i6q& December the 15 was buried Alis Welsh, wid. 

KINGTON. 

35. O. lOHN . BREYNTON . 1667 = A bell between i . b. 

R. MERCER . IN . KINGTON = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

The following entries from the registers of Kington relate to the family of this 
issuer, viz. : 

1669. April 10. Anne, ye daughter of Mr. John Braynton, was buried in ye 
church. 

Hay 26. Margarett, ye daughter of John Breynton, was baptized. 



Digitized by 



Google 



284 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

36. O. FRANCIS . DAviES . 1 665= The Drapers* Arms. 

I^. OF. KINGTON . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

Francis Da vies was assessed for two fire-hearths. 

There was another tradesman named Francis Davies, a glover, living in Kingtoo 
at this time. 

The following entries in the parish register refer to the family of the issuer of 
above token : 

1668. April 4. Cassandra, ye daughter of Mr. Francis Davies by Cassandra, his 
wife, was baptized. 

1672. November 12. Francis, ye son of Francis Davies, Mercer, was baptized. 

1673. December 26. Margarett, ye daughter of Francb Davies, was bapttred. 
1692. April 23. Francis Davies, ye Mercer, was bnried. 

1699. July 21. Cassandra Davies, widow, was buried in ye chanceL 
Cassandra Davies, daui;hter of Francis Davies, who died January 18, 1 748,aiid «r>s 
buried in the chancel at Kington, by deed dated March 27, 1744, duly enrolled io 
the High Court of Chancery, pursuant to the late Statute of Mortmaine, seill«-d 
and directed the payment of ;^5 to be distributed by the vicar, churchwardens, and 
overseers of this parish, to the most ancient, indigent, and necessitous parishioners 
thereof, upon March 26 yearly, as a perpetual charity, payable out of an estate 
and lands called "The Broken Bank,*' in the parish of Gladestry, co. Radnor. 

37. O. EDWARD . GRONNOvs = The Mercers' Arms. 

I^. OF . KINGTON . 1670= HIS HALFE PENNY. E . E . G. | 

38. O. EDWARD . GRONNOvs = A pair of gloves. 

J^. OF . KINGTON = E . E . G. J 

39. O, lAMES I GRONNONS | MERCER . IN | KINGTON | HIS . HALF | 

PENNY (in six lines). 

^. I I DOE . AS I I . WOVLD | BE . DONE | BY | 1669 (iQ six lines). | 

In the roll of assessment of the Hearth Tax on the inhabitants of this countr. 
14 Car. II. (1661 and 2) : " Edward Gronnouse hath in his house ffowcr 6re- 
hearths." 

The Gronnous family were connected with the neighbouring town of Presteigrt^ 
CO. Radnor, where a Joseph Gronnous, a grocer, issued a token. See Wales ior 
description of this piece and extracts from the registers of that parish of numerous 
entries relating to the family, by means of which it is interesting to trace the 
eradual growth of this peculiar name into the more euphonious one of ** Green- 
house," a name still existing in the district among families descended from these 
issuers. 

The following are from Kington registers : 

1669. April 6. Elizabeth, ye daughter of Mr. Edward Gronous, was baried. 
1669. August (?). Mr. James Gronous and Dorcas Hergest were marrie<l. 

1669. October (?). Mary, ye daughter of Edward Gronous, was baptized. 

1670. October 2. Dorcas, ye wife of James Gronous, was Buryed in ye 
chauncell. 

1670. March 5. James Gronous and Mary Bull were marryed by License. 

167 1. December 14. Mary and Martha, ye daughters of James Gronous, were 
Baptized. 

ibyi. June 30. Sarah, ye daughter of Edward Gronous was baptized. 

1672. December (?). Anne, ye daughter of James Gronous, was baptized. 

1673. March 31. Mary, ye daughter of James Gronous, was Buryed in Hergest 
Chancell. 

1674. November 8. James, ye Posthumous son of James Gronotis, deceased, by 
Mary, his wife, was baptized. 

1674. January 3. Anne, ye daughter of Edward Gronous by Elizabeth, his 
wife, was baptized. 

1675. November 9. Anthony, ye Son of Edward Gronous by Elizabeth, his 
wife, was buryed in ye chancell. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HEREFORDSHIRE, 285 

1676. April 6. Edward, ye son of Edward Gronous by Elizabeth, his wife, was 
baptized. 

1676. June 21. Edward, ye son of Edward Gronous by Elizabeth, his wife, 
buryed in ye chancell. 

1676. October 2a Mary, ye daui^hter of Joseph Gronous by Anne, his wife, 
was baptized. 

1677. October 7. Hugh, ye son of Edward Gronous by Elizabeth, his wife, was 
Baptized. 

1678. November 21. James, ye son of Joseph Gronous by Anne, hb wife, was 
Baptized. 

1684. August 30. James, ye son of Joseph Gronous by Anne, his wife, was 
Buryed in ye Church. 

1685. June 24. Richard, ye son of Joseph Gronous by Anne, his wife, was 
Buryed in ye Church. 

1686. May 2a Charles Morgan and Anne Gronous, of Norton, were marryed 
mrith License. 

1686. July 2a Athanasius Watkins and Margarett Gronous were marryed with 
License. 

1 686. August 23. Margarett, ye daughter of Joseph Gronous and Anne, his 
wife, was Buryed in ye church. 

Margarett, ye daughter of ye above-named Joseph and Anne, was Baptized. 

December lOi Joseph Gronous was buryed in ye church. 

1690. March 27. Elizabeth, ye wife of Edward Gronous, was buryed in ye 
chancell. 

1693. June II. Giles Lloyd and Mary Gronous were married with License. 

40. O. lAMES . LLOYD . MAESSER = The Mcrcers* Arms. 

J^. IN . KINGTON . 1660 = 1 . M . L \ 

41. O. lAMES . LLOYD . 1664 = 1 . M . L 

R, OF . KINGTON . MERCER = HIS HALF PENY. J 

James Lloyd was assessed for three fire-hearths 14 Car. II. (1661-2). 
The name of James Lloyd appears as a witness to an indenture of lease of 
lands at Hergest, dated August 3, 1657, between the visitors and feoffees, appointed 
u ndcr the will of Dame Margaret Hawkins, for the management of the Free 
Grammar School, founded by her in Kington, on the one part, and John Hergest, 
of West Hergest, gent., of the other part. 

In the year 1675 J^nies Lloyd was appointed one of the trustees to carry out the 
provisions contained in the will of John Walker, who in 1626 gave by deed 
certain houses and lands* to be leased out and the produce employed according to 
the will of his brother Henry Walker, for the distribution of bread and com to the 
poor of Kington. — Parry's ** History of Kington," p. i8l. 

One James Lloyd, of Kington (probably the issuer of this token), was Higli 
Sheriff of the County of Radnor in 1673. 

In the recently published facsimile account of the official progress of his Grace 
Henry, the first Duke of Beaufort (Lord President of the Council in Wales, anl 
Lord Warden of the Marches), through Wales in 1684, occurs the following: : 
" Teusday, August 5, 1684, his Grace parted from thence (Presteign) for Breck- 
nockshire, and passed through KiNETON in the County of Hereford, where a 
banqueit was prepared and presented him by a loyall person of the Town— Lloyd 
Gent, one of his Ma**«* Justices of the Peace there ; his Grace alighted not, but 
having eat and drank marched on." 

The following entries from the registers relate to this issuer : 

1667. August (?). Marabella, ye daughter of Mr. James Lloyd, by m'triss Mary, 
his wife, was baptized. 

1669. August 12. Elinor, ye daughter of Mr. James Lloyd, was buryed. 

167 1. June 18. Rees Prees and Elinor Lloyd, ye Banns being published, were 
marryed. 

• This property is described as being bound on the west part by lands of 
^ichclas Voare. — See No. 45 for description of a token issued by Nicholas Voare, 
ironmonger. 



Digitized by 



Google 



286 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

March 19. Mary, ye wife of Mr. James Lloyd, was buried. 
1685. April 7. Elizabeth, ye daughter of James Lloyd by £lizabetb, his vis. 
was baptized. 

42. O. lOHN . ROWDON . i664 = Anns of the Rowdon family. 

I^. IN . KINGTON . MERCER = HIS HALFE PENNY. i 

The issuer of this token was a member of a family of that name, seated u 
Rowdon, near Bromyard, since the thirteenth century. The Rowdoos were as 
nected by marriage with many aristocratic families of this and the adjoioag 
counties, and were distinguished for their attachment to royalty. One Sir Tb>cB£s 
Rowdon, of Northleach, entertained King Charles at his house in 1643, ^°^ ^^"^ 
at Newbury at the head of a troop of horse which he had raised. The father ci 
John Rowdon settled at Welson, in the adjoining parish of Eardisleyy and ha& sc£ 
was born there December 2, 1641. 

The name does not appear in the Kington registers. The arms are qnartal;, 
I and 4 Sable, a Griffin segreant, or {/Rowdon) ; 2, or six martlets, 3, 2, afrd i. 
gules (L€ Alaigne) ; 3, Vert, on a bend coiised or, three stags' heads r ^>«^f>»*< 
gules {Heiyon), 

See Robinson's " Mansions and Manors of Herefordshire " for a pedigree of ib; 
Rowdoii family from the reign of Edward III. to the present generation. 

It is interesting to note that this is the third instance in the Herefordshire seris 
of token-issuers of members of families of aristocratic connection being eoga^s 
trade, viz., Boulcot and the two Rodds, of Hereford. 

43. O. ANTHONY . SEARCH = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R, IN . KINGTON . MERCER = A . M . S. \ 

Anthony Search also issued a token at Tenbury, co. Worcester, i^hich see. 

In the roll of the Hearth Tax for 14 Car. II. (1662), a Margarett Search, vi«iM, 
hath in her house six fire-hearths, and again Margarett Search, widow, hath in b«r 
house fTower 6re-hearths, showing she occupied two goodly-sized hooses. T^ 
may have been the mother of the issuer Anthony. 

In the Register Book of the names of all such, both schoolmasters and sdidsv 
as have been admitted to the free school in Kington, in the county of Herefwi 
founded by Lady Margaret Hawkins for the year 1654, the name of Antha^ 
Search appears, al«o those of Thomas and William Search, as free scholari, tb£ 
proving the above Anthony to have been a native of the town. 

A careful search in the parish registers of Kington only results in the fbUofria; 
entries relating to this family, viz. : 

167a October 25. Margarett Search, widdow, was buryed in ye chaoncdL 

1676. October 7. Alice Search, a youne mayd, was buried in ye church. 

I am informed by the Rev. T. Ayscougn Smith, Vicar of Tenbury, who kittEy 
searched his registers, that the name does not occur there. 

44. O, RALPH . TVRFORD . OF . 1 668 = The Apothecaries' AnxB. 

J^, KEINGHTON* . APOTHECARY = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

The following entries are found in the registers : 
1669. June 30. Elizabeth, ye wife of Mr. Ralph Turford was buryed. 
December 12. Elizabeth, ye daughter of Ralph Turford was buryed. 
February 3. Ralph Turford and Kalherine Baskervile were married with lioeace. 
167a December 24. Katherine, ye daughter of Ralph Turford was bapdxed. 
1684. January 29. Thomas Havard and Martha Turford, of Old Radnor, vet 
married with licence. 

45. O. NICHOLAS . voRE = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R, IN . KEINGHTON . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. % 

* The spelling of names and places on these tokens varies considerabhr, tk 
Herefordshire series affording ample evidence, for instance, Bram^mrd for arcm- 

Crd, Hereford spelt in four different ways, Kington and Leominster in tktc 
(dbury and Ross in two. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HEREFORDSHIRE, 2S7 

46. O. RICHARD I VOARE . OF | KINGHTON | IRONMON | GER . HIS | 

HALF PENY (in six Uncs). 
J^. The Ironmongers' Arms between 1668. sqvare| dealing 
below. {A square token,) ^ 

The latter token is very rare, only one specimen being known, which is in the 
British Maseum. In the first edition it was incorrectly described and assigned to 
Kingston-on-Thames, but through the courtesy of R. S. Poole, Esq., of the British 
Museum, who favoured me with a cast of the token, I am enabled to claim 
it for the Herefordshire series, Boyne having mistaken the " H " for •* s *' in 
KINGHTUN. The following records in the register of Kington confirm the fact; 
moreover, Richard Voare was assessed for three fire-hearths in Kington, 14 Car. II. 
(1661-2) : 

1669. November 27. Richard, ye son Nicholas Voar, was Baptized. 

1672. January 12. Nicholas, ye son of Nicholas Voare, was Baptized. 

March 15. Ales, ye wife of Richard Voare, was buried. 

1676. June 8. Hanna, ye daughter of Nicholas Voare by Katherine, his wife, was 
Baptized. 

1677. January 31. Hannah, ye daughterof Nicholas Voar by Katherine, his wife, 
was buried in ye church. 

April 28. Richard Voare, an Ironmonger, was buried. 

i6iS2. Septemt}er 18. Anne, ye daughter of Nicholas Voare by Katherine, his 
wife, was Siaptized. 

1686. July 2. Nicholas Voar, Ironmonger, was Buryed in ye ch^irch. 

1695. December 4. Anne, ye daughter of Richard Voar, by Anne, his wife, was 
Baptized. 

December 9. Richard, ye son of Richard Voar, was buried in ye church. 

1698. May 23. Mary, ye daughter of Richard Voar, by Ann, his wife, was 
Baptized. 

170a September 27. Catherine, ye daughter of Richard Voar, Ironmonger, by 
Anne, his wife, was Baptized. 

1707. October 16. Richard Voar was Buried in ye church. 

17 1 2. January 28. Nicholas Voar was Buried in ye church. 

1713. May 16. Catherine Voar, widow, was Buried in ye Church. 

1714. January 13. Anne Voar, widow, was Buried in ye church. 

1722. April 15. Richani Tombs and Catherine Voar were married by Licence. 
1726. April 12. Richard, ye son of Richard Tombs, by Catherine, his wife, was 
Baptized. 

LEDBURY. 

47. O. WILLIAM . BERROW = The Groccrs' Arms. 

A OF . LEDBVRY = W . E . B. \ 

The registers afford the following : 
Marriage. 1642. Wm. Berrow Elizth. Wilde. 
Baptism. 1643. Wm., son of Wm. and Elizth. Berrow. 

„ 1646. Sarah, dau. cjf Wm. and Elizth. Berrow. 

„ 1650. Thomas, son of Thomas and Elizth. Berrow. 
Burial 1652. Thos. Berrow Mercer. 

Baptism. 1 668. Sarah, dau. Wm. and Elizth. Berrow Mercer. 
1669. Wm., son Mr. Wm. and Elizth. Berrow Mercer. 
1672. Elizth., dau. Mr. Wm. and Elizth. Berrow. 

1674. Charles, son of Wm. and Elizth. Berrow. 

1675. Judith, dau. of Wm. and Elizth. Berrow. 
Burial 1696. Mr. Wm. Berrow. 

48. O, WILLIAM . BROWNE = Part of the Glaziers' Arms without 

shield. 

R. OF . LEDBVRY = W . I . B. \ 

William Browne was a«sessed for three fire-hearths. 

The registers do not appear to furnish any records of this issuer. 



Digitized by 



Google 



2S8 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

49. O. RICHARD. COX = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. IN . LEDBVRY . 1667 =R . A . C \ 

Richard Cox was assessed for four fire-hearths in New Street. 

Ledbury Registers. 
Baptism. 1633. Richard, son of Richard and Susan Coxe. 

,, 1634. Richard, son of Thomas and Ann Cox. 
Married. 1642. Rd. Cox, gent.» Ann Had. 
Baptism. 1 65 1. Ann, daur. of Richard and Ann Cox, clothier. 
Buried. 165 1. Ann, wife of Rd. Cox, gent. 
Baptism. 1653-4. Francis, son of Richard Cox, gent. 
Birth. i6s$. Elizabeth, daur. of Richard and Ann Cox, gent. 
Burial. 1656. Ann, dr. of Richard Cox, gent 
Baptism. 1657. Mary, dar. of Richard and Ann Cox, gent 
Burial. 1659. J no., son of Richard Cox, gent 
Baptism. 1661. Margaret, daur. Mr. Richard and Ann Cox. 

„ 1662. Ann, daur. Richard and Ann Cox, clothier. 

„ 1664. Francis, son Mr. Richard and Ann Cox. 

„ 1667. John, son Mr. Richard and Ann Cox. 

Burial. 1667. Ann, wife of Mr. Rd. Cox. 
„ 1667. Mr. Richard Cox, junr. 
„ 1669. Mr. Richard Cox, clothier. 

50. O. WILLIAM . MATHEWES = An eartheo jar. 

^. IN . LEDBURY . 1653 = W . M . M. \ 

This token is in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. 
William Mathewes was assessed for four fire-hearths. 
Burial. 1686. Mary, daur. of Mr. Wm. Mathews. 

„ 1706. Mary, wife of Mr. Wm. Mathews. 

„ 1708. Mr. Wm. Mathews, senr. 

„ 17 1 2. Sarah, wife of Mr. Wm. Mathews. 

„ 1 7 1 2. M r. Wm. Mathews. 

51. O. WILLIAM . HOOPER . 1667 = The Weaveis' Arms. 

-^. THO . PAGE . THEIR . J PENY = IN | LVD | BVRV. *. 

The Hearth Tax Rolls furnish following : 

14 Car. II. (1662). Thos. Page, 3. William Whooper. 2. 

16 Car. II. (1664). Wm. Hooper, Southend Street, i. 

17 Car. n.. Lady Day (1665). Wm. Hooper, 2. Thos. Page, Sostbee 
Street, 3. 

17 Car. II., Michs. Day. Thos. Page, 3. Ledbuiy fibren. 
Thos. Hooper, 9. 

17 Car. II. (1666). Thos. Page, 5. Wm. Hooper, late of Southend Street, l 
Ledbury fibren. 

The name of William Hooper does not occur on the registers. The foOowi-^ 
relate to Page : 
Baptism. 1641. Tohn, son of Thos. and Elinor Page. 
„ 1645. Thos., son of Thos. Page. 

„ 1648. Judith, daur. of Thos. and Elinor Page. 

Marriage. 166S. Thos. Page, Tone Gamer. 
Burial. 1680. Elianor, wife of Thos. Page, senr. 
,, 1682. Thomas Page, junr. 

52. O, REIGHNALD . RANDOLPH = The Blacksmiths* Anns. 

jR, IN . LEDBVRY . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

Reighnald Randolph's name does not appear either on the Hearth Tax R^hor: 
the parish registers. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 289 

53. O, 10 . STONE . OF . LEDBVRY" A sugar-loaf. 

/^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY = I . H . S. ^ 

John Stone was assessed for 6ve fire-hearths. 

54. O. SAMVELL . WILSON ■= IN . LED . BVRY. 

I^. lOHN . WHITE . 1663 -THER HALF PENY. ^ 

Samnel Wilson was assessed for seven fire-hearths, and John White for two. 
The registers afford the following : 

Baptism. 16697a Alice, daur. Mr. Samuel and Katherine Wilson. 
BuriaL 1670. Alice, daur. of Mr. Samuel Wilson. 



LEOMINSTER. 

55. O, ELIZABETH . BEDFORD s A sugar-loaf. 

^. IN . LEMSTER . 1667 = HER HALFE PENNY. E . R | 

56. O, lEROMY . CLARKE = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

^. IN . LEMSTER . 1663 = I , T . C \ 

Jeromy Clarke was bailiff of the borough in 1675, and assessed for one fire-hearth 
in High Street Ward. 

The following extracts from the parish registers of Leominster relate to the 
various issuers and their families : 

James, the son of Jeremiah Clarke, and Thomason, hb wife, was baptized the 
Srst day Aprill, 1662. The sonne of Mr. Jeremiah Clarke was buried the nth 
September, 1662. 

1663. Judeih, the daur. of Jeremiah Clarke and Thomason, his wife, was baptized 
he loth May. 

1666. Joyce, the daughter of Jeremia Clarke, was baptized the 26th dav. . . 
1670. Jereroias, the son of Jeremias Clarke, mercer, and Thomason, his wife, 

1^03 baptized the twenty-seventh day. 

1673. Mary and Elianor, the daughters of Mr. Jeremy Clarke, and ThomasoUi 
lis wife, were baptized the xxth day of February. 

57. O. WILLIAM . CLENT . BOOK= 1666. 

^. SELLER . IN . LEOMINSTER -^ W . E . C { 

William Clent was assessed for three fire-hearths in High Street Ward. 

1667. Mary, the daughter of William Clent and Elizabeth, his wife, was baptized 
be 29th day of March. 

1668. Elizabeth Clent was buried the 27th day of AprilL 

58. O. SAMPSON . EDWARDES . OF -The Bakers' Arms. 

/^. LEOMINSTER . HIS . HALPENY = S . K . E. 1668. J 

Sampson Edwardes was Bailiff of the Borough, 1679. Neither the Hearth Tax 
Loll nor the parish registers afford any information about this issuer. 

59. O, THOMAS. FOORDE = The Mcrccrs' Arms. 

I^. IN . LEOMINSTER = T . S . F. { 

Tbomas Foorde was Bailiff in 1646, and assessed for four fire-hearths in High 
trect Ward, 17 Car. XL 

165^ Elizabeth, the daughter of Thomas ffoord, gent., and Sara, his wife, was 
orn the tenth day of July, 1653, and baptized the — day of the same. 

1656. Isaac, the sonn of Thomas ffoord, cent., and Sara, his wife, was borne the 
renty* third dair of July, and baptized the last day of the same. 

16^ Ann, the daughter of Thomas ffoord, gent, and Sara, his wife, was borne 
le Bhb day of May, and baptized the sixteenth of the same. 

19 



Digitized by 



Google 



290 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENJEENTH CENTURY, 

1665. A prill. Elizabeth fToard was buried the 20th. 
1665. May. Elizabeth ffoard, spinster, was buried the 20th day. 
1668. Anne, the daughter of Thomas fToord, gent., was buried the 30th daj c 
May. 

60. O, THO . HARDWiCK . ivNiOR . IN = A halt lodged. 

^. LEOMINSTER . HIS . HALF . PENY = T . H with an interlaced 
flower between. [ 

Tho. Hardwicke was Bailiff in 1661, and was assessed for three fire-hearths -t^ 
Crosse and Pinsley Ward. 
1662. John Hardwicke was buried the 23rd August. 

61. O. lOHN . NAiSH . GLOVER = The Glovers* Arms. 

J^, IN . LEOMINSTER . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENY. I.M.N. \ 
John Naish was assessed for two fire-hearths in Nethermarsh Ward, 17 Car. IL 
*' 1663. Ffrancis, the sonne of John Nashe, and Mary, his wife, was bapti2». 
the 23rd ApriU." 

62. O. FRAN . PERSE . LEMSTER . i666 = The Mercers' Anns. 

/^. FOR . NECESSARY . CHANGE = HIS HALFE PENY. ? 

Fran Perse, Bailiffin 1669, was assessed for four fire-hearths in High Street Ward. 
17 Car. n. 

" Francis Perse of Leominster in the county of Herefford Mercer and Man 
Shoter of Leominster afore>aid in the county aforesaid spincer were three scTcrai 
Lords dayes published in the Parish Church of Leominster aforesaid Accordic^ 
unto a late Acte of Parliament and were married by Edward Hay Esq. Justice ^ 
the Peace within the aforesaid Borough the Twenty and Eighth day of Octotr 
1655." 

63. O. NATHANIELL . SMITH = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

I^. OF . LEOMISTER . 1667 =N .M.S. \ 

Natha. Smyth assessed for two fire-hearths in High Street Ward. 

Nathaniel Smith was a Quaker, and being heavily fined for having meetings x' 
his house, engaged counsel, and brought forward his appeal at Quarter Ses>»tv 
1670. His case was argued in Court, and the jury returned a verdict in his &>cct 
The Court absolutely refused to accept the verdict of the jury, and sent tbcm «c' 
again. Six times over that jury returned with the same verdict, and six times over 
were they sent back by the Court at Hereford, who refused to accept their rerdki 
The jury, however, continued stedfast in their decision, and their verdict wa5 r 
length recorded, the Court at the same time directing the officers to empaixl 
another jury. The Court also sent one of its officers to prison for procuring a cor^ 
of the King's Proclamation, at the request of the jury. Though the verdict hi- 
been recorded, the so-called justices afterwards persuaded one of the jury, mor^ 
timid than the rest, to say that he had not consented to the decision, and on tha- 
pretext they sent out the jury a seventh time with such threats that, bdng oven vc^ 
by the Court, against their own consciences they at last produced a contrary verdid. 
and Nathaniel Smith had to pay the- cost of the trial as well as the previous fine. 

Six years later he was again seized and thrust into the county gaol for refusing : 
take the Oath of Allegiance. 

64. O. lOHN . STEAD = A shield. 

^. IN . LEOMINSTER = A shield. 
From a description in Townsend*s '* History of Leominster," p. 146 : 
John Steade, Bailiff in 1663, was assessed for four fire-hearths in Hi|*b Strec. 
Ward, 17 Car. H. He was a solicitor and the first town clerk of the borough, ap- 
was deputed by the Bailiff and Burgesses to proceed to London to superintend the 
arrangements preliminary to the renewal of their charter by Charles IL in 1605. 
His charges to the Corporation on this occasion amounted to the goodly sum c: 
£12$ I OS., and on his return to Leominster the Bailiff and Burgesses awaited ki> 



Digitized by 



Google 



HEREFORDSHIRE. 291 

arriv^ from Worcester, at the end of Etnam Street, and accompanied him, sitting 
on horseback, and carrying the charter opened on his breast, in full civic pro- 
cession, with the maces and macebearers, to the Market Cross, where they publicly 
drank the King's health amidst the cheers and congratulations of the inhabitants. 

-Townsend's Hist, pp. 138-9. 

Moorcomt, in the parish of Pembridge, the residence of the late Rev. James 
Davies, was the property of a John Stead in the seventeenth century, held by him 
in right of his wife, who was a Vaughan. He was buried at Dilwyn, 14th April, 
1662, and may have been the father of the Bailiff of Leominster. 

It was a curious circumstance for a solicitor to have issued a token, but it may 
have been a townpiece issued by Stead in his capacity of bailiff. The token is not 
fully described by Townsend, and possibly the examination of a specimen may 
clear the matter up. 

The following entries from the registers of the parish refer to this issuer : 

165a Rowland, the sonne of John Steade and Johan, his wife, was baptised the 
scaventh day of January. 

1655. John, the sonne of John Steade, gentn., and Joan, his wife, was baptised 
the idch day of June. 

1658. Edmund, the sonne of Mr. John Steade, and Joan, his wife, was baptised 
the sixth day of October. 

1662. Francis, the sonne of John Steade, gent., and Joan, his wife, was baptized 
the twentie seaventh daie of Aprill. 

1674. Joan, the wife of John Steade, Town Clarke of this Burrough, was buried 
the xxviith day. 

PEMBRIDGE. 

65. O. THOMAS . BENGOVGH = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . PEMBRIDGE . 1665 = T . P . B. ^ 

The Bengoughs were considerable landowners in Pembridge at this period, and 
I am informed their descendants still hold property there. A Thomas Bengough 
was churchwarden in 1678, as shown by an inscription on the outer doors of the 
north porch of the church. 

The registers of Pembridge give the following entries : 

1662. Umes, son of Thomas and Phyllis Bengough, baptized. 

1664. Thomas, son of Thomas and Phyllis Bengough, tMiptized. 

ROSS. 

66. O. lAMEs . FISHER . OF . ROSSE = The Mcrccrs' Arras. 

R. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l666 = I . F. J 

James Fisher was assessed for two fire-hearths, 14 Car. II. 
The register of Ross, which commences in 167 1, gives the following : 
167 1. July 16. James, ye son of James Fisher, and Susan, his wife, was 
iApiized. 

1675. ^cb. 19. Susanna, ye wife of James Fisher, was buried. 

67. O. lOHN . HILL . OF . ROSS = ^ in an oval between six stars. 
R. HIS . HALFE . PENEY . 66 = I . H in an oval. \ 

Same type as John Hill's token issued at Hereford 1657, and probably by same 

i<".ucr. 

68. O. lOHN . HILL . OF = I . E . H. 

R. ROSS . MERCER = I . E . H. J 

John Hill was assessed for three fire-hearths, 14 Car. II. 

1673. SepL 29. Joyce, the daughter of John Hill, was buried. 

1674. Aug. 15. Alice, ye daughter of John Hill, and Joyce, his wife, was 
I'^ptized. 

19 2 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



J92 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



1676. be 



ein. 29. John Hin Tayler was buried, 
ec. 16. Panl, ye son of Tohii Hill, and Joyce, his wife, was bapL 
It is doubtful if these entries relate to the issaer of the token, the initial ktts «f 
the wife's name being E. 

69. O. THOMAS . MERRICK (?) 

J?. (?) = HIS PENNY. 1680. I 

This incomplete description is taken from " The continnatioo of Dmaoib'i 

Collections tovnurds the History and Antiquities of the Cocmty €j€ Heicfori,' 

▼ol. iiL, by William Henry Cooke, Esq., M.A., Q.C, F.S.A. If correct 

described, this is specially interestine as the only Fenny m the Herefordshire sen 

Thomas Merrick, also James and Walter, his brothers, were Quakers, and voe 

arrested on May 10, 1657, in the name of Oliver Cromwdl, as they were ftng 

along the high road from Ross to a meeting at King's Chapel (now King's dfkl 

One of the party was put into the stocks, but being liberated after socne time, tkf 

proceeded to their meeting, and while preaching they were attacked by the nob 

with dogs and staves, and used so unmercifully that one of the party was dissbki 

In 1658 the three brothers were arrested for burying their own mother in tbe 

Friends burying-ground at King's Chapel and committed for triaL 

70. O. lOHN . TAYLOR . CHANDLER = A man dipping candles. 

/i. IN . ROSSE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. I . T . T. i 

In former edition Boyne describes a specimen of this token dated 1666. 

71. O. THOBCAS . TAYLOR = T . E . T. 

J^. OF . ROSS = T . E . T. 1656. \ 

This token is in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. 

Thomas Taylor was assessed for six hre-hearths, 17 Car. II. 

The following entries from Ross registers relate to the Taylors : 

1673. April 13. Thos., son of Wm. Tavler and Joan, his wife, bapt. 

1673. ^c^ 6* Elinor, ye daughter of Rich. Tayler, and Eliz., his wife, v% 
bapt. 

1673. Feb. 28. Ursula, ye daughter of Thos. Tayler, and Ursula, his wit 
was baptizd. 

1673. March 14. John Tayler was buried. 
Aug. 12. Eliz. Tayler was buried. 

1674. Sept. 20. Jonas, the son of Jonas Tayler, and Eliz., his wife, was bspL 

1675. Oct. 19. Eliz., ye daughter of George Tayler, and Eliz., his wife, was \*?^ 
Oct. 27. Debora, ye daughter of Thos. Tayler, and Ursula, his wife, «s> 

baptized. 

1676. Sept 9. Elizabeth, ^e daughter of Richd. Tayler, and Ann, his wife; bSft 
Feb. 6. Samuel, son of William Tayler, and Elinor, his wife, was baptisd. 

WEOBLEY. 

72. O. lAMES . CLARKE . MERCER = Three nibbits. 

J^, IN . WEBLEY . 1659 = 1 . C. l 

73. O. RICHARD . CLARK . MERCER = A Hand holding a bird. 

J?. IN . WEBLEY . HIS . HALF . PENY = R . C. 1667. : 

The Rev. J. S. Crook, vicar of Weobley, informs me he is unable to find At 
name of Clarke in the registers at this period. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ibertforbsbire. 

FiTMBER OF Tokens issued 226 

[umber of Places issuing Tokens 50 

•own Pieces issued None. 



N.B.— J. £. Cussans, Esq., the author of the *' History of Hertfordshire,*' has 
indiv allowed the use of some stereo copies of his woodcuts (as taken from that 
ork) to illustrate a few of the tokens in the following pages. Hearty thanks are 
erel^ accorded to him for the same. 



luihEditor and Collaborateur : 

R. T. Andrews, Esq., Memb. Num. Soc, Lond., etc., 

25, Castle Street, Hertford 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



t)crtfor&0birc* 

ASHWELL. 

In Domesday Book "Escewelle" was originally a borough with fourteen bur- 
gesses. It was a British settlement, and has an entrenched camp, called " Arbury 
Bonks," about one mile south-west. It is also supposed to have been a Roman 
town or station, called Magrovinium. At the time of the Conquest it was called 
'* Asceuvelle " and " Escuvelle " ; in 1241, Assewell ; in 1420, Assewelle, in the 
churchwardens' accounts of St. Michaers Church, Bishops Stortford ; and in the 
Mfventeenth century, Ashewelle, Aescewell, and Ashewell. British and Roman 
c(»ins have been found, but the following are all the seventeenth century tokens 
recorded by Mr. Boyne. 

1. *0. VALENTINE . LEE . AT . y" = A whcatsHeaf. 

I^, IN . ASHWELL . 1669 = V . G . U (3) J 

This name survives in the persons of Walter Lee, a tailor, and Thomas Lee a 
fanner ; but whether descendants or not of the issuer, I have been unable to ascer- 
tain. Valentine Lee may also have been a farmer. There is one inn in existence, 
called the Bushel and Strike, which has, at least, as much connection with a 
wheauheaf as a wheatsheaf has with a farmer. The register of burials dates from 
1678. 

2. *0. THOMAS . MACKBRis = A Stick of (7) candles. 

Ji. IN . ASHWELL . 1665 =T . E . M. (3) J 

3. *0. lOHN . SELL . ivNiOR . IN = The Groccrs' Anns. 

J?. ASHWELL . COVNT . HART = I . A . S. (2) J 




In a stone in the floor of St Mary's Church, Ashwell, are several matrices, from 
which the brasses have been removed. The only one remaining gives the follow- 
ing : 

** Here lyeth ye body of John Sell, late of Ashwell, in ye county of Hartford, 
Mercer, who dep*** this life ye 26 of May, A® 1618, abovte ye 55 yeare of his age." 

" Aske how he liv'd, and thou shalt know his end : 
He dyed to God a laint, to poore a frdnd." 

This John Sell was most likely the father of the token-issuer. He, by will 
dated May 24, 16 1 8, devised to certain feoffees For the bene6t of the poor of Ashwell, 
2^ acres of land lying on Forty-foot Hill. A portion of this has since been lost, 
and there now remains but i acre and 3 roods. 

The name of "Sale"— probably a corruption of Sell by broad pronunciation — 
>unriTes in John Sale, a farmer, and a Mrs. Sale, who kept the before-mentioned 
Bushel and Strike ; and there were many of the name at and about Ashwell and 
lUnxworth (two miles north). 

Throughout Hertfordshire * signifies the token is in the sub-editor's possession. 
„ „ (o) to (6) -degree of rarity. 



Digitized by 



Google 



296 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



BALDOCK 

Is on the great north road at its intersection with the Icknield way — an old Roman 
road, which passes through Dunstable, Baldock, and Royston. The name of the 
town has been very variously spelt — thus, in 1139, 4 Stephen, it was Baodac and 
Baudocke ; in 8 John, Balduc ; in the Bishops Stortford parish accounts, 1540, 
Baldok, Baudoc, Baudok, Baldoc, Bauldocke. Although it received its pfcaent 
designation in 1216, yet on the seventeenth century tokens which follow it is 
spelt nz other ways than before mentioned. The register commences in 1558. 

4. *0. EDWARD . CRAFFTES = The King's head crowned. 

J?. IN . BALDVCK . 1670 = E . M . C. (2) 1 

There are several memorials in the churchyard of SL Mary to the fiumiliei of 

Craft, which has been an old name for many generations, but appears to have died 

out oif the district. 
This inn is not now in existence. 

5. *0. 10 . CROWCH . CHANDLER = I . C 

I^. IN . BAWLDOCRE . 1658 = 1 . C, (4) { 

Chauncy's '* History of Hertfordshire," p. 432, says that ** The manor of Ber- 
wick (Barwick), in the parish of Standon (about 14 miles from Baldock), was sold 
to a John Crouch,- who was born there in the time of Henry VIII., and then to 
John Crouch, his son, bom about 1 5 19. From these descended the Crouches of 
Comeybury. The first son of probably the last-mentioned John was bom there, 
and John Crouch sold Corneybury to a Thomas Nuce." 

Eficabeth. daughter of John Crouch, of Corneybuiy, then Mrs. Elkabcth 
Freman, by her will, dated April 13, 1633, gave ;f 100 to the Mercers' Compaay 
for interest to be paid to the poor of Brent Pelham (p. 284) ; and "John Crood^ 
of Alswick, gave £$ per annum, payable out of 5 Tenements in Layston, to 12 
poor people in Buntingford, 20th Septr., 7 Car. I. (1632)." — Chauncy's " Hbtorv 
of Hertfordshire," p. 202. 

The token-issuer was very likely a descendant of this John Crouch, of Alswick. 
and Edward Crouch, of Royston, was perhaps a relative. (See Royston, p. 323. \ 

6. *0, PHILLIP . DEERF = The TallowcHandlers' Arms. 

I^. OF . BALLDOCK = A stick of (7) candles. p . d. (2) { 

This name is probably an error, and should be written Deere. 

7. *0. lOHN . GODFREYE = I .E.G. 

I^. OF . BALDOCKE. GROCER =1652. (l) \ 

This man had probably removed from Royston (about eight miles), as there are 
several memorials in Royston churchyard to the family of Godfrey. (See Noa. 163 
and 164, who might have been relatives also.) 

8. *0. EDWARD . HIGHLY: 

J^. IN . BOLDOCK . 1652 = E . S . H. (o) \ 




9. *0, lOHN . IZARD = I . E . L 

/?. OF . BALDOCK = I . E . L (l) i 

James Izzard was a baker in the Pembroke Road, but it is not known if be is a 
descendant of the token-issuer. This name occurs frequently in the register of 
Baldock. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 297 

10. *0. WILLIAM . KENNETH St George and the Dragoa 

R. OF . BALDOCKE . 1658 = W . I . K. (l) \ 

This token has the forelegs of Ihe horse extended, an annulet for the mint mark, 
nd no inner circle. 

1 1. A variety has also no inner circle, the forelegs of the horse are 

drawn under the body, and it has a star for the mint mark. 




The "George** is still in existence, (o) The Kennets are gone hence. 

12. O. TIMOTHY . MARLEY . AT . THE = A horSC. 

R, HORSE. IN. BALDOCK . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. T . M. 

(4) J 

13. O. WILLIAM . SEAMER* 1672. 

R OF . BALDOCK . 1672 = W . L . S. (5) i 

It is probable that this name has either been a bad spelling of " Seymour," or 
* Seymour '* has been an improvement (?) upon it« 

"Edward Seymour was created Earl of Hertford 18 Octr., 1537 ; Baron on 
5 Feby., 1547 ; and on the i6ih made Duke of Somerset ; and married Catherine, 
laughter of Sir Wm. FilloU, of Woodland, Dorset"— Chauncy's " History of 
lenfordshire." 

Sir Wm. Seymour was Marquis of Hertford in 1640, and Lord Lieutenant of 
3evon. 

14. *0, RICHARD . SHEPHERD = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . BALDOCK . 1665 = R . M . S. (l) \ 

15. *A variety differs in the size of the inner circle and the size 

and position of the figures of the date. 

16. *0. WILL . WARRE . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . BOWLDOAKE = W . A . W. (o) } 

BARKWAY. 

In Anglo-Saxon times this place was called *' Bergwant*' Later on, Domesday 
Book gives " Berchewei.'* In 1270, it was written ** Berkway " ; and on old maps 
>f the county of Herts "Barkcway" and ** Barkewaye." It is thirty-five miles 
Tom London, on the Cambridge road, and, though on a highway much used, 
rarellers and others did not suy there. Two tokens only are at present known. 
rhe register dates from 1538. 

17. *(?. lOHN . KENT . IN = 1667. 

R. BARKWAY . GROCER = I . S . K. (3) \ 

iS. ♦C?. THOMAS . RAVENS . OF "The Grocers' Arms. 

R. BARKWAY . CHANDLER «T . G . R. (3) J 

Tlic following eitrmct is taken from the register of All Saints parish, Hertford : 



Digitized by 



Google 



^98 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

*' Sept. 8th, 165 1. Thomas Raven, of Bark way, and Grace DaoieU, of tbis 
parish, ' married,' and this confirms the initial . G . on the reverse as being that of 
the wife." 

Thomas Ravis, Bishop of London, was Lord of the Liberty of Bishops Stortford 
in 1607. 

BARLEY. 

Domesday Book g:ives "Berlai," afterwards "Bergley," and in the 5 Hen.Vin. 
''Barly." One token only is known. The register of St. Margaret dates firom 
1559. 

19. O. OLD . PHAROH = A HALF PENY. 

-^. IN . BARLEY . 1670 = A SWan. (5) i 

This token is singular, as it seems to have the surname first ; and though quiu 
correct, appears to be a pun. 

A William Pharoe was one of the assistants or common councHmcn of the 
borough of St. Albans in 1586, and probably a relative of the above issuer. 

BARNET. 

The four places yet noted are situate in the extreme north of the county. Thi-> 
lies in the extreme south, close to the border of Middlesex, and is now a popaloc> 
and rising place. It was written ** Bergnet " in Anglo-Saxon times ; ** Bcroet '' 
in 1 100 ; and later it is called High Chipping or Market Bamet, and is near the 
site of the battle fought on Easter Sunday in 147 1 (to which it gives its name), 
and near the old Roman road from London to St. Albans. 

20. *0. WILLIAM . BARNES = A roU of tobacco and two pipes. 

I^. OF . BARNETT = W . S . B. J. (3) | 

This man was most probably a tobacconist He gave £i towards the repair of 
the parish church of St. John the Baptist in 1683, as recorded in the vestiy-book^ 
of that time. 

The registers are not early enough to give any information, commencing with 
burials and marriages in 1678, and baptisms 1705. 

21. *0, PEETER . BLACKWELL . AT . Y^=HIS HALFE PENY. 

^. ANTELOPE . IN . BARNET . ( 1 6)66 = An antelopc chained. 

(l) P . A . B. i 

Peter Blackwell's signature appears with those of several other parishioocis at 
the foot of an account of parish expenses, examined and passed in Vestry, bdd 
April 4, 1665. He was churchwarden in. 1681. He gave £^ towards the repair 
of^the church in 1683, and was buried January 15, 1684-5. His son Peter was 
buried in 1679. 

The " Hoop " and the " Leather Breeches " stood side by side on the north side 
of the parish church, and were pulled down about 1 780. It is not now knovn 
where the " Antelope " stood, but Francis, the tapster, gave five shillings towmrdv 
the repairs of the church in 1683. 

The name of Blackwell is recorded in Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire." 
vol. ii., p. 4^9, in connection with the Manor of Bushey, and there are sevenl 
monuments m Bushey Church to their memories — the token-issuer may have been 
an offshoot of these. Barnet and Bushey are seven miles apart. 

Mary, the daughter of a Samuel Blackwell, of Watford (probably another 
branch), married William Paine. 

22. *0. PEETER . BLACKWELL. AT. THE = HIS HALFE PENY. 

^. ANTELOPE. IN . BARNET . i668»An ontelope chained. 

(l) P . A . B. ^ 

This issuer evidently had a good business, shown by his requiring another issue 
so soon after the other. No farthings of his have yet come to light. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 299 

23. *0, lOANE . BVLL . IN . BARNETT = A pair of scales. 

R, HER . HALFE . PENNY . 1 667 = I . B. (3) J 




24. O, lOANE . BVLL . IN . BARNETT = A pair of scales. 

R. HER . HALFE . PENNY . 1 668= I . B. (5) | 

25. *0, lAMES . BVRGES = The'Drapers' Arms. 

R, IN . BARNETT = I . S . B. (3) \ 

This has no inner circle on the obverse. 

He was one of the auditors of the parish accounts on April 11, 1659, and April 
»4, 1663, was churchwarden in 1665, and evidently rather an active man in parish 
1 flairs. 

26. *A variety, differing only from No. 25 in the mint-marks. \ 

Coniel. Burges, D.D., was Vicar of Watford in 1629. 
This also has no inner circle on the obvei'se. 

27. *0, WILLIAM . PRESTWOOD ."^AT . Y^ = A mermaid, w . e . p. 

R, MERMAYDE . IN . BARNETT = ^.f haife peny (in three 
lines). (4) \ 

28. *(7. lOHN . ROTHERHAM = A stick of (6) candles. 

R, IN . BARNAT . 1655 = 1 . R. (l) \ 

29. *0, lOHN . ROTHERHAM == A stick of (5) caodles. 

R, IN . BARNAT . 1655 = 1 . R. (l) \ 

30. *0, lOHN . ROTHERHAM = A stick of (5) candles. 

R. IN . BARNAT . 1653 = With larger initials and different 
ornaments, (i) \ 

31. O. lOHN . ROTHERA = A Stick of (5) candles. 

R. IN . BARNAT . 1653 = 1 . R. (5) \ 

This is in the British Museum. 

The issuer did a i^ood trade, and required many different issues of tokens. He 
ilso signed the parish accounts of April 24, 16^3, and attended many vestry 
meetings with Burgess, Blackwell, Stonard, and others ; but it appears that he did 
not agree with his fellow-parishioners as to the repair of the parish church, as it 
is recorded in the vestry minutes that he gave nothing towards it. He could not 
have been poor, but had great influence, as he was elected a governor of Queen 
Elizabeth's School in Bamet on July 18, 165 1, and continued until 1665. He 
died before 168S. 

A " Thomas " Rotherham's name appears in 1673 ; probably a son of the above. 

32. ♦^. AT . THE . HOOPE . IN = A hoop. 

R. BARNET . 1651 =N . A . S. (3) \ 

I have not been able to trace the owner of these initials, the issuer of the 
token. 

Of the inns mentioned in the vestry minutes, the tenants of which gave some- 
thing to the parish church repairs, were the Antelope, Falcon, Mitre, White 
Hart, Old Crown, and the Lion. This last (as I am informed) stood near the 
bottom of the hill on which the town is built, and not on the present site of the 



Digitized by 



Google 



300 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Red LioD, also a noted coaching-house. The Mennaid is mentioned on Prestvood's 
token, but no record is left of where it stood. 

33. *0. SAMVELL . STONARD = Thc Drapers' Arms. 

/^, OF . BARNETT . l668 = S . S. (3) { 

This issuer's name appears as auditing the parish accounts in 1672 and 1674. 

He was elected churchwarden in 1682. He gave £$ towards the repairs of the 

parish church in 1683, and in the parish account for 1 691 there is a record of a 

tnll being paid him for providing twenty-one poor persons with clothes. 

34. *0. SAM^^ . WILKINSON . AT . THE = A flcur-de-lys. 

jR. FLOWER . DE . LVCE . IN . BARNET = S . W . J. (4) i 

He gave los. towards the repairs of the parish church in 1683. 

BENNINGTON. 

Anglo-Saxon : Terra petra de Valongies, " Belinton ;" Domesday Book gives 
" Belintone ;*' a Quo Warranto of 6th Edward I. gives " Benintone," " Benigntoor 
and *' Benington* in 1285— anciently a residence of the Kings of Mercia. Bertulph 
held a Parliamentary Council here about 850. The register of St Peter's Chniich 
dates from 1538. 

35. O. lASON . GOVLD . OF . BVNINGDON (in four Unes across the 

field). 
^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY 1670 (in four Unes across the field). I 
Transferred here from Kent, Boyne, No. 26, p. 123, there being no place in tbit 
county which may be indicated by this name. Bennington, in Herts, was origtnaUj 
a market town, and a fair is held there. 

BERKHAMPSTEAD. 

Amongst fifty different spellings of the name of this place occur the following j 
Berghhamstedt and Birchebamsled, from Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire T 
Berchehamstede, from Domesday Book ; and also Berkhamsted St. Peter's. The 
register dates from 1538. 

36. *0, WILLIAM . BABB . 1667 = W . K . B. 

^. IN . BARKHAMSTED = HIS HALF PENY. (3) I 

He was one of the chief burgesses of Berkhampstead in 1662. 

37. *0, lOHN . CARVELL . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^. IN . BARKHAMSTED = I . M . C (3) t 

38. *0. WILLIAM . PRESTON = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

^. AT . BARKHAMSTED . l668 = W . I . P. (5) I 

This issuer bought the manor of Childwick Bury, Herts, about 1666. 

39. *0, lOHN . SEELING . OF = I . E . S. 

/^. BARKHAM . STEED=l655. (3) J 

BISHOPS STORTFORD. 

Domesday Book calls this place Storteford. Starteford, Stortfford; and Stone- 
forde by Cussans' '* History of Hertfordshire," with the date of the last named 154^ 
Bishops Stortford churchwardens* accounts, St. Michael's, gives StortflToQidc ic 
1549 ; Bishop Sufford, Pepys' Diary, 1667 ; and ten other different methods of 
spelling upon fourteen tokens. 

40. *0. EDWARD . AYNS WORTH = A reindeer. 

^. IN . BISHOP . STARFORD == HIS HALFPENY. (l) ^ 

Edward Aynsworth was highway surveyor for the years 1663-1607. 
John Aynsworth held the same post in 1686. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 30* 

41. *0. Y* . RAINE . DEARE . IN = A deer chained. No innercircle. 

J?. BISHOP . STARTFORD = E . E . A. (2) J 

TheM two tokens are believed to be by the same issuer, as according to 
the records of St. Hichaers Parish Church, Bishops Stortford (extracted by Mr. 
J. L. Glasscock, jun.), Mrs. Aynsworth kept the Reindeer. It is there recorded, 
p. 78, in the account of the church rent due March 25, 1 681, "Of Mrs. Ayns- 
wonh's house, 6d. ;'* and among the lease rents of the same date, ** Pd. Mrs. 
Aynsworth's Bill for Bread and Wine, £2 3s. 5d." Again, May ii, 1684, " Payd 
to M'*^ Aynsworth for a bottle of wyne, when Mr. Cooper pretcht, 2s." February 
21, 1685-6, *' Payd to Mrs. Aynsworth for a bottle of wyne, when Dr. Goodman 
pretcht, 3S. ;" and a note by Mr. Glasscock, at p. 108 of his book, says : '* This 
Mrs. Aynsworth was the notorious ' Betty Aynsworth,' landlady of the Reindeer 
Inn, which stood at the comer of the High Street, on the site now occupied " (1882) 
**by the house of Mr. Robert Cole.*' Samuel Pepys also writes as follows in his 
Diary : ** 1667, Octr. 7. ..." So we to Enfield . . . and before night came to 
Bishop Stafford, where Lowther and his friend did meet us again, and carried us to 
the Rayne-deere, where Mrs. Aynsworth, who lived heretofore at Cambridge, and 
whom I knew better than they think for, do live. It was the woman that, among 
other things, was great with my cozen Barnston, of Cottenham, and did use to 
>ing to him, and did teach me, ' full forty times over,' a very lewd song ; a woman 
they are well acquainted with, and is here what she was at Cambridge . . . but 
there was so much tearing company in the house that we could not see the land- 
lady, so that I had no opportunity of renewing my old acquaintance with her.*' 
*' 1668, May 23rd. Up by four o clock. ... I with my boy Tom . . . away to 
Bishops Staflbrd. Dined and changed horses and coach at Mrs. Aynsworth*s ; but 
I tocHL no knowledge of her. ... I hear Mrs. Aynsworth is going to live at 
London ; but I believe will be mistaken in it, for it will be found better for her to 
t>e chief where she is than to have little to do at London." Lord Braybrooke, in a 
note 00 the foreeoing, says : ** Elizabeth Aynsworth here mentioned was a noted 
procnresB at Cambridge, banished from that town by the University authorities for 
her evil courses. She subsequently kept the Reindeer Inn at Bishops Stortford, at 
which the Vice-Chancelior and some of the heads of the colleges had occasion to 
Hiecp, on their way to London, and were nobly entertained, their supper being 
served off plate. The next morning their hostess refused any charge, saying that 
^he was still indebted to the Vice-Chancellor, who, by driving her out of Cam- 
bridge, had made her fortune." No tradition of this woman has been preserved 
at Bishops Stortford ; but it appears from the register of that parish that she was 
Suried there 22nd of March, 1685-6. It is recorded in the * History of Essex,' pp. 
111-130^ 8va, 1770^ and in a pamphlet in the British Museum, entitled * Boteler*s 
Case,* that she was implicated in the murder of Capt. Wood, a Hertfordshire 
{gentleman, at Manuden, in Essex, and for which offence a person named Boteler 
vkos executed at Chelmsford loth Sept., 1667, and that Mrs. Aynsworth, tried at 
the same time as an accessory before the fact, was acquitted for want of evidence, 
though on her way to the jail she endeavoured to throw herself into the river, but 
was prevented.*' 

A tablet in Thortey Church, two miles south-west, records the death of Ann, 
danghter of Sir Rowland Aynsworth, in 173a 

42. *0. ANN . BRiTTAiN . OF . BISHOP = Two kcys crossed. 

/^, STARFORD . SOVTH . STREET = HER HALF PENY. (Ocfa- 

gonaL) (3) \ 




Digitized by 



Google 



302 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

43. *0. ANN . BRiTTAiNE . OF . BISHOP ==Two kcys crossed 

^. STARFORD . IN . SOVTH . STREET = HER HALF PENY. 1 669. 

(Octagonal,) (3) J 

These are the first of the octagonal tokens of the county. The issuer appcsn tr. 
have had sufficient trade to require more than one issue. 

A daughter of John and Ann Britten was horn July 17, 1653. 

In the church rentals before-quoted, Robert Bretton held a messuage in South 
Street in 1520, paying id. per year ; and in 1642, Richard Bretten lived in Basbovr 
Lane, and paid 4d. towards the church clerk's wages and Communion silver. 

The Brittains or Brittens were somewhat numerous about the date of the token. 
The register, dating from 1 56 1, gives: "August 24, 1624, Maury Brittayne, 
daughter of Richard, buried. August 31, 1632, Martha, daughter, buried. 
Richard, son of Richard Britten, baptized January 19, 1668-9. Richard Britten 
married to Elizabeth Haroshire, of Fyfield, in Essex, June 29, 166S. John 
Britten, a bricklayer, lately married, buried January 3, 1682-3 ; he married Susar 
Hartler on October 31, 1682." 

44. *0, WILL . CHANDLER . AT = W . C. 

R, STORTFORD (in two lines). Above is the bust of a 
bishop. (3) \ 

This is a rebus, and, with the following token, no doubt alluded to the name ot 
the place, and to the fact of its having been bestowed by William the Conqaerof 
upon Maurice, Bishop of London, and his successors about A.D. 1066. 

The name of Chandler occurs frequently in the parish register down to the 
present century. 

Thomas Chaundeler was a churchwarden the 5th year of Edward VI. (1552). 

William Chandler, a shoemaker, married Margaret , and was overseer of 

the poor in 1662 ; he died October 10, 1691, and his wife July 27, 1666. Thry 
had four children at least, viz., Thomas, who died March 31, 1663 ; Jane, August 3, 
and Margaret, August 7th, 1666, both of which died of the plague which raged 
here from July to October in that year, and which took off many members r/ 
several families of the token-issuers ; and Henry, who died March ii, 1675. 

There was also another William Chandler, who married Mary , and haa 

a daughter, who was buried September 30, 1636, and a daughter Margaret. 
August 14, 1653. 

In 161 1, a Robert Chandler, being excommunicated, was buried in a plac^ 
appointed for excommunicants. Robert Chandler was a gardener in 1638, and wa« 
buried in that year. 

In 1660, Francis Chandler was ejected from Theydun Mount, in Essex, and 
became a Nonconformist. In 1662 he went to London, and in 1666 removed to 
Bishops Stortford, and died, in the prime of his life, June 18, 1667. 

A George Chandler was overseer in 1658 ; constable in 1663. His son, George, 
was a tanner by trade, and churchwarden in 1698. The father died in 1667, an. 
lost a daughter, Dorcas, by the plague, September ii, 1666. 

There was also John Chandler, a cordwainer, and Anne, his wife ; a Joan ar-- 
George, children of a Thomas Chandler ; and old Edward Chandler and Deri^ 
his wife. This Edward Chandler held Low Meade in 1625, paying 4d. per year. 

George Chandler had a house and yard in South Stieetin i6iSo,paying4d. per jrear. 

In 1^2, Robert Chandler had a house on lea^e in Water Lane, and paid 40. 
church rent, and £1 per year. He died the same year, and his widow helt 
Scxten's Mead and land in Hockerel field for £1 10?. per year. 

John Chandler, sen., in 1642, paid 4d. to the church for a house and yard ; an ^ 
in 1692 a widow Chandler lived in a tenement called the Round House, situate « n 
the Poultry Hill, aiias Leather Market. 

William Chandler paid £i los. per year for a house to the churchwardens in l6Sr 

45. *^. HVMPHREY . DIXON . OF = The Groccrs* Arms. 

R. BISHOP. sTARTFORD = HD (conjoined) and a crosier . J. . 

1667. (3) 
This issuer appears to have been a busy man, for in 1656 the churchwardcr s 
accounts give an item ** payd to Humfrey Dixon for the booke on the 30th of I ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 303 

cember, los." He was churchwarden in 1661-2, constable in 1664, overseer in 
1669, surveyor for the highways in 1672-3, overseer again in 1679, ^"^ was present 
at a Vestry meeting to order the setting up of the chimes ; and again in 1683. In 
1688 be hired '^3 chambers and 3 stalls at the Market House for 3 pounds ;" and 
in 1 69 1 his bill for £4 3s. 4d. for repairs at the market-hall chambers was allowed. 

He married Frances , who died May 4, 1687. They had three children: 

Httmfirey, bap«- Sept'* 1653; James, who died December 14, 1670; and Rebecca, 
Inined June 27, 167 1. He lived at a house in High Street, now occupied by 
Messrs. Slater & Sons, Woollen drajiers. 

46. *0. EDWARD . GARDNER . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

/^. BiSHOPSTAFORD . 1 668 = A woolpaclc. (l) J 

47. O. EDWARD . GARDNER . IN = HIS HALF PKNY. i 
J^, BESHOPSTAFORD . 1668 = A WOOlpack. (4) 

This 15 in the British Museum. 

48. Another variety struck only on the obverse side. (6) 

This is believed to have been produced as given in the note on Skid more, 
Rickmanswoith, p. 322. 

The issuer is described as a comber in the register, and this agrees with the 
reverse of his token. 

The churchwardens* accounts give on December 10, 1684, ** V^ Edward Gardner 
for his sons reading and singing the psalmes 3 quarters of a ycire, 15^.," but I 
think these were the sons of that Edward Gardner that married Sarah — and who 
had two sons— viz., Robert, bap*- on October 3, 1690, and William, August 12, 
1692. 

The token-issuer married 6rst Mary — secondly Anne. — They had several 
children :— Mary, on January 13, 167 1 ; Edward, December 9, 1672; William, 
November 2, 1677, who died in 1678 ; Elizabeth, born July 6, 1683, and died in 
16S4 ; and Sarah, bom June 21, 1685. 

Jeremiah Gardner was overseer in 1664-5, constable in 1669-70, and in 1679 
attended a Vestry meeting respecting the setting up of the chimes, and held 
** Knights" (a field) in 1681, for which he paid icWl 

49. *0. RICHARD . ciNN . i666 = A half-oioon. 

I^. AT . BISHOPS . STARFORD = R . G and six stars. (i) I 

The sign of the " Half-Moon " is still in existence in North Street. 

lie married Elizabeth Jones on October 10, 1667, and the only other entries in 
the parish register are : 

6 Jany.,1668. Mary, the daughter of Richard Ginn, Baptised. Aquila, son (?) of 
Phillip Ginne, bap^-, 19 Sep., 1669. 

19 Jany., 1669. Elizabeth, daughter of Phillip Ginn, a Tailor, buried 26 Augt., 
1684, and Phillip Ginn himself 5 days afterwards. 

Richard Ginn, the token-issuer, was buried Augt. 22, 1670. 

50. *0, FRANCES . MATHVS . IN = F . M. 

/^. BISHOPS . STARFORD = F . M. (2) J 

51. *A variety has a full-blown rose on obverse in place of initials. 
Thu was an old name in the town, for I find it mentioned in the churchwardens' 

accounts for 1571 : 

** P^ to Francis Mathewe and his man for 4 dayes worke, and to henry Mathewe 
and his man 12 dayes worke in why ting the churche 17' 8<*." 

He was buried on November 30, 1&75, his wife Sarah January 30, 1674, and 
their daughter Constance November 21, 1673. 

52. *0. FRANCIS , MATHVS . IN = A rOSe. 

/?. As No. 51. 
•• Ffr. Matbew " was living in North Street in 1642. (** Records," p. 146.) 
There were besides, George, John, Theophilus, Edward, and William Mathew, 

or Matbewes, contemporary with the token -issuer, and it is known where some of 

them lived also. 



Digitized by 



Google 



304 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 
53. *0. GEORGE . PATTESON = A castle (no inner circle). 

J^. IN . BISHOPSTARFORD = G . P. (3) 




William the Conqueror built here " Watymore Castle." The above token may 
allude to it. It is called " Waymer Castle" on an old map of HerU by Richard 
Blome, •* Waytford Castle" in the index to the map, and " Waytmore Castle'* or. 
an old map in Cook's " British Travellers* Guide " (about 1800), p. 38. 

George Patterson married Mary Kent, October 4, 1665. They had Rachd, wh > 
died of the plague September 24, 1666, and Elizabeth October 11, 1666, from the 
same cause. The issuer was a gardener, and his wife Mary, also dying of the 
plague October 10, 1666, he married again, Penelope Grout, January 14, 1667, 
who died August 16, 1680 ; and again, July 26, 1681, Susan Hill, a widow. He 
was buried, June 18, 1690. 

The castle on this token might also have reference to '* The Castle " which wo^ 
the sign of a public-house in the fish market, and which was in the tenure of 
Henry Wallis in 1680. (•* Records,'* p. 78). 

54. O. JOHN . READ . OF = Two kcys crossed 

J^. BISHOP. STARTFORD = HIS HALF PENY. {OctO^OnoL) (4) \ 

Whether this issuer followed or preceded Ann Brittain at the ** Crossed Keys^ 
or the keys were an allusion to the bishop's keys and the form df the token to hi^ 
seal, is not known. 

Bishop (Richard) Bonner is said to have lodged in the town in a house nowoocs- 
pied by Mr. Chaplin (1882), a harness-maker, adjoining the Post Office. 

A John Read, prolmbly a son of the token-issuer, held a piece of groand sostli 
of a messuage or tenement near Tanter Hill in 1692 ; and also a shopp, newir 
built, near the High Street and the river, and adjoining what was fomeriy the 
"Green Dragon." 

In 1647, the churchwardens " Paid I j. to George Read for taking down the ol-i 
Pewe and enlarging the old desk." He lived in Wyndhill, in 1642, and paid 4d. 
per year for the use of the church. 

A William Read held a piece of land ** in a comon field, called Comon Dovne.** 
He paid id. per year to the church. He may have been a bellfounder, as the chnrcb 
wardens paid him 5s. for a bell for the bellman in 1677. He lived in Basbowe Lane, 
and was churchwarden in 1657, overseer 1668-69, and surveyor for the highwar> 
in 1674. He held the market-house in 1673, ^^^ P*>d /"j per year rent. 

John Read was a clockmaker, and was overseer of the poor in 1674. A rdative 
of his, also a John Reed, died April 16, 1640. 

55. *0. SIMON . RVTLAND . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. BISHOPSTORFORD = S . T . R. (3) \ 

This issuer was churchwarden at the parish church with Thomas Barnard in the 
years 1684 and 1685, and with Edward Bayford in 1686 and 1687. He waft over- 
seer in 1671 with William Mills. His pedigree is as follows : 
Simon Rutland (grocer), 
died Feb. 16, 1704, aged 89; 
married 
Thomasin ; 
died June 28, 1683, 
aged 50. 

Had five sons and one daughter. 

May 24, 1659. June 6, i66a Jan. 1667. Dec. 2^ 1668. 

Simon; died Jacob; died Aug. 6, Mary. John; died Mar. 19 

May 23, 1682. 1666, of plague. 1669. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 305 

On September 20, 1686, there is a note in the churchwardens* accounts : ** Re- 
ceived of Mr. Simon Rutland, Churchwarden, £0 19s. od. for Bread and wyne. 
(Signed) John Aynsworth." And in 1688, May 26, "payd Mr. Rutland for 
Cloath to cover the clock, 3s." Also his name appears in a list of subscribers a 
second time towards building the Stortford school and library about 1699, but 
there is no date upon it 

56. A variety reads sto*ford. 

In the church is a tablet to the memory of Simon Rutland, the son of the token- 
issuer, which has a long epitaph in Latin. He was a B.A. of Cambridge and 
Doctor of Medicine. He died at Brentwood of small-pox whilst endeavouring to 
relieve the distresses of others, and was brought to his native place and buried in 
the church. 

In the floor of the north aisle is a slab to Thomasin Rutland, the wife of Simon, 
sen., and mother of Simon, jun., **who also lyeth near this place." She died 
June 28, 1683, in the 50th year of her age. She had " 5 Sonns and i Daughter." 

57. *0. lOHN . SMITH . 1667 = A man smoking. 

J^. OF . BISHOP . STARTFORD = HIS HALF PENY. (3) ^ 

This, though one of the most common surnames in existence, is only twice men- 
tioned in the Bishops Stortford registers between 161 1 and 1 7 12, viz., "Mary, 
daughter of John Smith, buried June 2nd, 1639," who may have been a sister of 
the token -issuer, and William Smith, church clerk, buried December i, 1670, who 
was most likely the one that lived in Fish Row or Potter's Cross in 1642. 

In 5 Edward VI. (1552), Thomas Chaundeler and John Smyth were church- 
wardens, and were obliged to sell the church goods for necessary repairs of the 
charch. John Smyth tought '*3 vestments and 2 obis for Ss." Another John 
Smyth, in the reign of Edward IV. or Richard III., held a tenement in North 
Street at is. per year. 

58. *0. WILLIAM . WESTWOOD . OF = w . w. (in monogram) J 

I^. BISHOP . STRATFORD . GROCR = Three sugar-loaves. 1667. 

(3)i 

In 1542 is this note in the churchwardens' accounts : " Item, the sepulcher sold 
to Th. Westwood for vj." 

In 1643, a Wv. (? Willy) Westwood lived in Wyndhill, and gave 4d. towards 
the church clerk's wages and communion*silver ; and in the church registers are 
the following: 

<.ieorge Westwood married Elizabeth Turner October 25, 1664. 

Mary, daughter of George Westwood, was buried, having died of the plague, 
September 3, 1666. 

John Westwood, son of George Westwood, was baptized May 29, 1670. 

KUen Westwood, widow, buried November 7, 1678. 

< George Westwood, an old man, buried September 24, 1681. 

William Westwood, a single man and a tailor, was buried November 12, 1681. 

Sarah W*estwood, widow, buried August 6, 1683. 



BRAUGHING. 

Branghing is about seven miles north-west of Bishops Stortford, and was called 
I-^fccking, Anglo-Saxon; Brachinges^ Domesday Book; Bracking^ Henry III. 
41227); Braivyne^ 6 Edward I. (1 277); Brcukings/ord, Chauncys "History of 
Hertfordshire," page 440; Brwking^ Chauncy's "History of Hertfordshire," 
; rs.^'c 7 ; Brawgkingt Bishops Stortford churchwardens' accounts, 1484 ; Brcnvyng, 
f ;:^hops Stortford churchwardens* accounts, 1504 ; Braugivyn ; Brawgkin^ Cussans' 
•• liistory of Hertfordshire" ; Braughing^ King Henry VI II. The register dates 
fr«>fii 1563. 

20 



Digitized by 



Google 



306 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



59. *0. WILLIAM , R0ws0N»Keys in saltire, w . r. 

^. OF . BRAVGHiN . i668 = Tobacco-pipes in saldre, m . r. 

(4)i 
Whether "W.R." had a partner "M.R.," or the "M." aUndes to the wifc'l 

Christian name is not known. 
This token was placed by Boyne to Sussex, but there is no place of that name 

anywhere except in Herts, to which there is no doubt it belongs. 

BRENT PELHAM. 

Called *'Peleham" in Domesday Book ; "Burnt Pelham" on an old map of 
Herts ; and " Brunt Pelham " on a monument in Clothall Church, Herts. The 
register dates from 1 538. 

60. O. Ralph . Wheeier . at . Brvnt . Pe/Aam = Two panniers 

(in three lines). 
R. His . ffalfe . Peny . R . A . W (in four lines. 

{Octagonal,) (4) \ 
This issuer was one of a large family, as given by the register as follows : 



Elizabeth, Eliza, 
Oct. 7, May 30, 

1610, i6q2, 

mar. mar. mar. 

R. Bones. W. Larke. J. Devell. 



Ann, Thomas 

Oct 6, {fUioi Snelling) 
1603, 



had 



Ralph, the token-issuer 
(alias Snelling) 



June 20, 
1653, 
Mary. 



May 8, 

John ; 

mar. 

Sept. 19, 

1702, 

Elizabeth Harrot. 



Sept. 20k 

1657, 
Elizabeth. 



M^S. 

1663. 

Thomas. 



Nov. 19, 

1666, 

Dorothy. 



Nov. 22, 

1659. 
Jane. 



I I I I 

June 24, Jan. 6, Dec. 6, Dec 20. 
1662, 1666, 1669, 1671, 

Bridget. Margaret. Mary, Henry, 

died 
Dec. 16, 1669. 
There was also a Richard Wheeler. 
Oct 4, 1702, 
mar. 
Elizabeth Jennings 

had 



had 

I 

Aug. 9, 

1691, 

Ridph. 



Mai. 2- 

1693- 
John. 



Aug. 24, 1703, 
Richard. 



Nov. II, 1705, 
Elizabeth. 



I I I 

Oct 7, 1711, April 20, 1715, Feb. 11, 171:. 
Thomas, Anne. James. 

died 
Oct 13, 1711. 
And, though so numerous, yet by dispersion and death there are none of the 
family of Wheeler left in the parish. 

BUNTINGFORD. 

This place is conjoined with Layston. It was called *' Buningford,'* and in :.^ r 
churchwardens' accounts of Bishops Stortford in 1549 '' Bowntyngfourde.** T>-^ 
register dates from 1600. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE, 307 

61. *0. MARY . BATSFORD . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. BVNTiNGFORD . 1 667 = 1/B Conjoined. (3) i 

62. O. lAMES . CAMPE . DRAPER = The Drapers' Arms. 

Jd. IN . BVNTINGFORD = I . M . C (4) J 

63. *0. THOMAS. EDRiDGE = The Haberdashers' Anns. 

J^. OF . BVNTINGFORD = T . E. (3) J 

64. *0. MARY . EDWARDS . 1669 = A bell. 

/^. IN. BVNINGFORD = HER HALF PENY. (2) | 

The Bell Inn is still in existence at Buntingford. 

65. O. WILLIAM . FERRIS . OF = A sheep. 

J^. BVNTINGFORD. 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. (4) i 

66. *0. WILLIAM . FERRIS . 1669 = A WOOlpaclc. 

/^, OF. BVNTINGFORD = HIS HALF PENY. (l) J 

Showing that this man had sufficient trade to require at least two issues of tokens. 

67. *0. ADAM . lovRY . 1664 = Keys in saltire. 

Id. IN . BVNTINGFORD = HIS HALF PENY. A . I . L 

{Octagonal.) (2) \ 

68. O, ADAM . lOVRY . i669 = Keys in saltire. 

Ji, IN . BVNTINGFORD = HIS HALF PENY. A.I.I. 

(Octagonal.) (4) \ 

69. O. EDMON . LYON . IN = 1 666. 

R. BVNTINGFORD = E . A . L. (2) \ 

This token has a star for its mint-mark, and is also ornamented with stars in the 
6eld of the reverse. 

70. *Another issue of this token has the same legends on obverse 

and reverse, but the mint-mark and ornaments are a full- 
blown rose. 

7 I. O. ANDREW . WOOTTON . TALLOW . CHANDLER = HIS HALF PENY 

(in six lines). 
J^. IN . BVNTINGFORD . 1 669 = A . M . w. {Hcart-shaped.) (4) \ 

BUSHEY. 

72. *0. RALPH . FEiLD . IN . BVSHEE = Three tobacco-pipes. 

R. HIS . HALFE . PENY . 1669 = A wine-cup. (3) \ 

The name of Field is still known thereabouts. 

73. *0. WILL . LITCHFIELD . OF . BVSHEY = A Uon rampant, hold- 

ing an arrow. A 

R. lOHN . PILE . OF . BVSHEY = A malt-shoveL 1669. (2) | 




74. O. WILL . LITCHFELD . OF . BVSHEY = As abovC. 

R. lOHN . PILE . OF . BVSHEY = As abovC. (3) \ 

These men were evidently partners in trade. It is singular that none of the 
issuers' names occur in the parish registers before 1700. The place is called 
^ Bissei " in Domesday Book. 

D^fffeeT* Google 



3o8 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

CHESHUNT. 

Called " Cestrehvnt " in Domesday Book ; " Cesthont/' 24 Henry III. {1240V 
and ** Chcston" in Chauncy*s " History of Hertfordshire," vol. ii., p. 445. It is 
divided into three wards, called Waltham Cross, Cheshunt Street, and Woodsidc 
Wards. The register dates from 1559. 

75. *0. lAMES . BVLL = A bull. 

/^. IN . CHESHVNT . 1 666 » I . B. (3) [ 

Alice Bull, probably a daughter of the above, was buried January 19, 165 

76. *0, RICHARD . FEILDING = R . E . F. 

^. IN . CHESSON . STREETE= 1659. (5) { 

77. *0, SAM . GOODAKER . HIS . J . PENY = ArmS of the City 01 

London. 

/^, IN . CHEST I HVNT . IN | HARFORD | SHEIRE | 1 668 (in 

five lines). (Heart-shaped.) (3) \ 

It is very likely that this issuer was an offshoot of the family of Dackers* Dacrev 
or D' Acres, and that, as it is known that in 1307 William Testa, the Pope's legate, 
was called by some '* Mala " Testa, so this man might well have had an adjectivt 
appended to his name by common practice, on account of his goodness, and which 
in course of time became Goodaker. 

A note in the Antiquary for October, 1885, p. 137, gives : 

" * Robin Day ' ( — Robin Good fellow, Roger Bontemps) may be compaired with 
Daniel Day, 'surnamed the Good Day,' of legends of Hainault fair, mixing u^ 
fact and myth." Fairlop fair, in Hainault Forest, Essex, owed its origin to the 
eccentricity of one Daniel Day, commonly called Good Day, who about 1720 «u 
wont to invite his friends to dine with him the first Friday in July on beans aa*! 
bacon under the Fairlop oak. On this circumstance becoming known, the pabU 
were attracted, and the fair began about 1725, and was held for many years oa 
July 2, and till his death he never failed to supply several sacks of beans and a pn 
portionate quantity of bacon from the hollow trunk. He was buried in Barkmg 
churchyard, in a coffin made from one of its limbs, in 1767, aged 84. 

Sir Thomas Dacres, Knight, and Thomas Dacres, Esq., were sheriffs for the 
county in 1614. (Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire," p. 48.) " The Manors ^.'i 
St. Andrew and Le Motte, in Cheshunt parish, were granted by King Henry VIII. 
to Thomas Denny, whose son, John, sold them to George Dacres, who left a soo. 
Thomas, who was knighted by James I. in 1614. These manors then descended :u 
Thomas, his son, whose son, Thomas, was knighted by Charles I., and who w»> 
knight of the shire in his third Parliament ; he also had a son, Thomas, who wa> 
knighted by Charles II. The Manor of Cheshunt Rectory was sold by Anthoo) 
Denny to George Dacres, from whom Thomas Dacres had it, and conveyed it toHeorx 
Atkins in the reign of James I. The family of Dacres is descended from those id 
the county of Westmoreland." (Chauncy's ** History of Hertfordshire," p. 5S5.1 

There are many memorials in Cheshunt church to the family of Dacres. 

78. *0, THOMAS. MEDLicorr = A wheatsheaf. 

R, IN . CHESTHVNT . l664 = T . B . M. (3) ' 

79. *(?. John , Teckoe , His . Halfpeny (in four lines). 

R. IN . CHESHVNT . 1669 = The King's head crowned. (3) \ 

This is a variety of Boyne's, No. 134, p. 116, by which the issuer is shown to ha\e 
had a shop also in Waltham Cross, about one and a half miles south. 

This name has evidently been corrupted from Tooke, which was known i' 
Wormley, one mile north ot Cheshunt, where a charity for the poor b given under \\ r 
will of Thomas Tooke in 167a This man appears to have lived at a place cai^V. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 309 

^ Popes/' and he erected a small seat in Wormley parish, called *' Farnebeds." 
[Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire," p. 572.) 

" The family of Tookes held the Manor of Wormley, part of which lands did lie 
in Cheshunt, and were confirmed to the church at Waltham (Abbey) by King 
Richard." 

* * Walter Tooke, of Popes, in Bishop's Hatfield, had eight sons and four daughters . 
Ralph succeeded, and afterwards his brothers, George and Thomas." (Chauncy*5 
'• History of Hertfordshire,*' p. 573.) 

In the church we find that Anna Tooke, wife of George Tooke, of Popes, died 
December 9, 1642. (Chauncy*s ** History of Hertfordshire," p. 573.) 

Elizabeth Dacre, daughter of Sir Thomas Dacre, married John Tooke, Esq'., 
of Wormley, who had a son, John. (Chauncy's "History of Hertfordshu-e," 
p. 586.) 

In Essendon parish church are memorials to the following members of this 
family : 

William Tooke, late of Popes, Auditor of the Court of Wards and Liveries, 
ob. December 4, 1558. 

Ralph Tooke, son of Walter Tooke, son of William Tooke, all of Popes, in the 
parish of Bishop's Hatfield, ob. December 22nd, 1635. 

William Tooke, second son of William Tooke, ob. February 12, 161 1. 

Jane Tooke, wife of Ralph Tooke, ob. December 8, 1648. 

Christopher Tooke, fourth son of William Tooke, ob. August 19th, 1630. 

" James Tooke, of Hertford, Auditor of the Court of Wards and Liveries, ob. 
November 21, 1655 ; Dorothy, his wife, ob. November 28, 1655, and had twenty 
children — Edward, Christopher, Mary, Charles, Ralph, Phillip, John,** etc. 
(Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire," p. 546.) This John was most likely the 
token -issuer. 

None of the name are left in Cheshunt or the neighbourhood. 

80. *0. lOHN . WRIGHT . OF = I . I . W. 

R, CHESVNT . 1660 = A Stick of (5) candles. (3) \ 

CHIPPERFIELD. 

An old map of Herts gives ** Chepperfeild ** ; and in the 6th year of Edward IV. 
(1466) it was called "Chippervile.*^ 

81. *0, THOMAS . BIGG . 1669 = The Weavers' Anns. 

R. OF . CHIPERFEILD = HIS HALF PENY. T . M . B. (3) \ 

EASTWICK. 

82< O. lOH . CRAMPHORN . AT Y^ = A Vine. 

R. NEER . EASTWICK . 1662 = 1 . M . C. (5) \ 

This place is called in Domesday Book " Estewicke ;** Eastwyk in 1461, and 
Eastwike in an old map of Herts. The register dates from 1630. It is a place not 
recorded by Boyne as having a token-issuer. 

FURNEAUX PELHAM. 

The churchwardens* accounts for the year 1692 of St. Michael's, Bishops Stort- 
ford, call this place Ffvrnix Pelham ; an old map of Herts gives Fvmix Pelham ; 
and in 1272 it was spelt Ferneux Pelham. Tht register dates from 1538, and 
there is a record at the church of a visitation in 1297. 

83. *0. FELIX. CALVERD = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, OF . FVRNEXT . PELHAM = F . C. L 1668. (3) ^ 

The accepted reading of the initials of this token would give F . c . I . the 
wife's initial being plac^ at the top, contrary to the usual practice, which places 
the initial of the surname there. 

The family of Calvert or Calverd is very ancient, as b also its connection with 



Digitized by 



Google 



3IO TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Furneaux Pelham, occupying Furneaux Pelham Hall at the present time. Their 
arms are as follows : 

Arms of Calvert. 
Paly of six or and sable, *k bend countercharged. 
Crest. 
Out of a ducal coronet or, two spear -heads countercharged. 
— Calverd, Minister of Andover, Hants, descended from the Calverts of 
Lancashire. ■- 

Felix Calverd, of Little Hadhani, 1 ( Susan (or Elizabeth), daughter of 
CO. Herts, born Aug. i8, 1596 ; > - < —(Pestle ?), of Colchester, 
buried May 18, 1674. ) ( co. Essex, living 1673. 

Three daughters. 
(Qutterbuck's " History of Hertfordshire," vol. iii., pp. 182-3.) 
In Braughing Church, HertSy is an inscription as follows : 
'* Here Seth the body of George Benn, gent., and Sarah, his wife, who was 
daughter of Felix Calvert, of Hadham Parva, Esqr. He died Octr. 5th, 1687, 
aged 42. She died June 3rd, 1706, aged 67." 

This is most likely one of the daughters above-named. 

Felix Calvert purchased the manor of Furneaux Pelham in 1677, and also the 
manors of Beaches and Grays in Brent Pelham from the children of Adam Wad- 
ington, who had bought them about 164a 

Felix Calvert, 

mar. 

Joane, 

and had 



Oct 4, 1653, Mar. 4, 1655, Dec 12, 1658, Nov. 4, 1667, 

Susan. Mary. Felix. William. 

Chauncy's "History of Hertfordshire," p. 287, gives: "Ed. Cason by deed, 
i6th Oct., 1677, sold the manor-house of Fumeux Pelham and all oUier his 
estate in this parish to Felix Calvert, of Brent Pelham." 

Again, Salmon in his "History" says : "Felix Calvert, of Pelham, bought a 
moiety of the manor of Aldbury Hall from Thomas Bowyer about 1676, and soW 
his moiety to Sir John Brograve, of Hamels (sheriff in 1664), in 1689, which 
descended to his brother, Sir Thomas Brograve, after whose death Felix Calvert, 
the nephew of the above Felix Calvert, purchased the whole manor about 1728, 
but without the lands." 

This Felix Calvert died December 5, 1749, aged 82, and had a brother William, 
whose wife. Honour Calvert, died January 31, 1724, aged 53. 

Elizabeth Calvard married George Clay October 25, 1670. 

Peter Calverd died October ii, 1698. 

84. O. THOMAS . PHIPPE . IN = T . P. 1 67 1. 

I^, FVRNISH . PELLVM = HIS TOKEN. (5) J 

Thomas Phippe, 

mar. 

Joane, 

and had 



r I " " "I I 

Feb. 12, 1649, Mar. 20, 1651, Nov. 10, 1653, May I9b 1657, 

Margaret Thomas. Mary. Joane, 

mar. 

May 22, 168Q, 

Ed. S*velL 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 



31 « 



HATFIELD. 

HeifetU^ Domesday Book; Heat hf eld, Henry I. (1154); Haihfeld, Henry I. 
(1134) ; Heathfield, and Bishofs HaiJUld, Chauncy's "History of Hertfordshire." 
Register dating from 1653. 

85. *0. ROBERT . BARNARD . AT . THE = St. Gcorgc and the Dragon. 

R, GEORGE . AT . HATFEILD . l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. (2) \ 




There is no trace left of this inn in the town, and the only entry of this name in 
the register is the death of Mary, daughter of Robert Barnard, June 26, 1662. 

86. *0, lOSEPH . FAIRCLOTH = A bell. 

R. IN . HATFEILD = I . F. (2) \ 

This name appears to have been a common one hereabouts in the seventeenth 
century, as there are many records of it in the registers and elsewhere. 

Joseph Faircloth married Mary , and they had six children, viz., Joseph, 

September 21, 1662; Sarah, March 13, 1664; Richard, January 22, 1666; Mary, 
September 31 {su\ 1667, and who died January 18, 1672 ; Thomas, January 7, 
1670 ; and Grace, January 3, 1673. Of this branch the register gives no further record. 

87. *0. THOMAS. faireclot" = The Grocers' Arms. 
R, in . hatfeilde = t . e . f. (3) } 




It appears by the parish register that there were at least five individuals of this 
name living nearly at the same time. One of them had the following children : 

viz., Thomas Richard, Christopher, and William. Thomas married Mary , 

about 1652, and had children, viz., Joseph, Elizabeth, Thomas, John, and Peter ; 
William married Judith Leech on May 17, 1692. Another Thomas married Eliza- 

:>clh , also about 1652, and had Thomas, December 12, 1653, who died 

February 20^ 1655, and Ruth in April, 1663, who died August 26, 1678. 

There are records of the deaths of several named Thomas in 1662, 1670, and 
1678, so that it is impossible to say which was the token-issuer. 

In the parish register of St. Andrew, Hertford, there is an entry of the baptism 
of Thomas Faircloth, son of Peter and Elizabeth Faircloth, December 2, 1722. 
This may be the Peter named above. 

On a headstone which formerly stood in the Brockett Chapel of Hatfield 
Church, but now on the south side, outside, is an inscription to " Daniel, son of 
Richard Fairecloth, died Nov. ist, 1688, aged 52." 

88. *0. lOHN . scEVBY = A tree. 

R, IN. HATFEILD = I . S. (3) \ 

89. *0, lOHN . scRVBY . i666 = A tree. 

R. IN . HATFEILD = I . S . S. (4) \ 

This is a second issue after his marriage, about 1666 ; but neither of this 
marriage or of the issuer's name is there any entry in the register at all before 
I oSo. This name also occurs at Royston, Herts. 

90. *0, THOMAS . SERIN . AT . Y^ = Chequers (18). 

R, IN . HATFIELD . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. T . E . S. (3) \ 
Neither this sign nor the name is now to be found in the town, nor does the name 



Digitized by 



Google 



312 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

occur in the register. The Chequers fonnerly stood at the angle of the High 
Street and the Hertford Road — see the note under the next token. 

91. *0. ELIZABETH . SELwooD = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

J^. IN . BISHOPS . HATFKILD = E . S. (4) J 

This token was found in a drain dose to the front of the house occupied by 

Messrs. Hankin, drapers ; which house, with the adjoining one, formerly formed 

that which was known as the "Chequers." 

Of the Selwoods, Elizabeth is only mentioned in the register by her death. 
The £unily appears to have come from Essendon, four miles east of Hatfieki 
Elenor, a widow, of Essendon, is mentioned as dying on March 3, 1675. She 

had a son, Matthias, bom August 21, 1664. 
A William Selwood died April 20, 1664. 
John* son of John Selwood, was born September 17, 1669, and Elizabeth, thr 

token-issuer, died October 27, 1675. 

92. *0, lOHN . THOMAS . AT . THE . HOLY = A lamb and flag. 

/^. LAMB . IN . HATFEILD . l666=HIS HALFE PENNY. (3) \ 

John Thomas married Mary , about 1667, and had children, Mary» January }, 

1668; Ann, August S, 1668, who died June 4, 1669 ; John, bom Septonber 18, 1670 

HEMEL HEMPSTEAD. 
Also called Hamelhamsted and Hamelamstede in Domesday Book ; Hcankarnstti 
HemsUdy and Hemelhamsted, in Chauncy's "History of Hertfordshire.** Tb- 
register dates from 1550. 

93. *0. AT . HEMLY . IN . 1658 = H . A. 

R. HEMSTEED . 1658 = Two hands crowned. (5) \ 

94. *0. WILLIAM . CLIFTON . AT = A hand holding a pen. 

R. HEMELHEMSTED . 1 669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. W . M , C (3) ^ 

95. *0. WILLIAM . GLADMAN = A fox and duck. 

R. AT . HEMPSTED . HIS = HALF PENY. (2) k 

This token has no inner circles on either obverse or reverse. 

96. A variety has a star for the mint-mark, and larger initials on levers? 

97. *0. NICOLAS . KING = N .O.K. 

R. OF . HEMPSTEED . 1653 = N • G . K. (3) J 




98. *0, lOHN . NORRIS . AT . THE = A SWan. 

R. IN . HEMPSTED . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I.M.N. (3) 
The sign of the Swan is still in existence at Hemel Hempstead. 

99. *0. lOHN . ROLPH . IN . l668= A bull. 

R, HEMELL . HEMPSTEED = HIS HALF PENY. (3) 
100. *0. THOMAS . TVRNEY . 1664== HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . HEMELL . HEMPSTEED = T . T and a lily. (2) 




The names of King, Norris, Rolph, and Tumey still survive about the to«n. 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 3IJ 

HERTFORD. 

This — the ca|ntal town of the county— was, in the time of Edward the Confessor^ 
called Htortford and Htrotford ; and Chauncy's "History of Hertfordshire" 
gives Heru^ord and Hartford, The registers of the only two remaining parish 
charches date from 1559 and 1560 respectively. 

loi. *0. EMERRE. BRADLE . (i6)68 = A wheatsheaf. 

R, BAKER . IN . HARTFORD =E . B. (4) \ 

The name of Bradley, Bradlee, or Beadle, occurs but little in the archives of the 
borough. In 1685 Widow Bradlee was summoned at the Sessions for her brew- 
house chimney being very dangerous to the neighbourhood. 

It is not found in the registers until some time in the eighteenth century : 

In 1645, Leonard Bradley held a butcher's stall, and in 1658 Benjamin Bradley 
was elected an assistant burgess or town councillor, and was constable in the 
following year. 

The name was also written " Beadle.'* 

102. *0. lOSSPH . BROWNE = The Grocers* Arras. 

R, IN . HARTFOD . GROCER = I . E . B. (3) \ 

In 1638, "Joseph Brown paid 22d. on a rate made in All Saints Parish for the 
setting up of the Buttcs, dressin|;e of the Towne Armes, Drainage of the Comons, 
Kepairinge of Cowebridge, cuttmge and cleansinge the Ryvers, and other Coraon 
charges. He was elected an assistant or common councilman in 1639, and a 
chief burgess or alderman in 1641, in which office he acted until 1645, when he 
refused to take the protestation or covenant, and was therefore discharged from the 
office of a chief burgess of the borough ; but in 1660 he laid claim to his right to 
\yt one of the chief bui^^esses of the borough, and Mr. Mayor ordered the record 
to be searched, " whereby it did appear he was disburgessed for refusing to take the 
protestiition and covenant in the year 1645, but the Court not finding it sufficient 
cause, did allow him into his fornaer place of a chief burgess of this borough, to 
act with them in that office." Mr. John Pritchard resigned office for him, and on 
October 3 he was chosen mayor. He was steward of the manor of Hertford 
Castle, and farmed the tolls, which were let to the Corporation, who paid him in 
1646, for the Earl of Salisbury, £2 6s, 8d. In 1647 he had leave of the Cor- 
poration to make a vault under the east end of the town-house for himself, and to 
pay 2S. per year rent for it. In 1650 he paid I2d. in a rate for the building of a 
bridge in the town called Cowbridge ; but in 1652, his rent being in arrear, he 
was proceeded against, and paid it. I find he held a piece of waste of the Cor- 
poration in Church Lane at 6d. per year, and paid rates (is. 6d.) for a '*shoppe " of 
his in 1675, ^ ^^ possession of Mr. Haines. In 1650 a lease was executed from 
** Lord Salisbury to Joseph Browne, of the Toll of Hertford Bridge for 21 years^ 
»t jf3 per year.'* In 1664, "John Wells, of St. Andrew, was apprenticed to 
Joseph Browne, Bailiff of the Manor and Castle of Hertford, for the Earl of Salis- 
bury." In 167 1 his wife held the same vault under the town-house ; but in i686» 
Mr. Pickering was allowed to have the stall Joseph Browne formerly had. His 
son John was a cordwainer, and was made free in 1676. He was evidently largely 
connected, having many relatives in and alx>ut Hertford. He was most likely the 
son of Oliver Browne, who married Elizabeth Barton in 1592. He married in 
1628, and had a son John in 1629, and two daughters. His ancestors had been in 
Hertford at least since 1564. 

Dr. Jonathan Browne was Dean of Hereford and Rector of Hertingfordbury, a 
village a mile west of Hertford, to which living he was instituted on May 15, 1630,. 
and which is recorded on a slab in the floor of the chancel of that church. He 
died in December, 1643. ^^ S^^^ ;f 5^ ^^ beautify and repair the church of Al> 
Saints, Hertford. 

John Browne, the son of this token-issuer, married Elizabeth Cel on 

August 24, 1653. 

There was also another John Browne, a merchant of London, who died intestate 
about 1628, and left ;^300 to the poor of Hertford under the Prerogative Courts 



Digitized by 



Google 



314 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

with which was bought a messuage called the Chequer Inn, in Fore Street, and a 
cottage in Castle Street, Hertford. 

In 162 1, Christopher Browne and Ed mound Browne were among those wbc 
swore to the truth of the particular bounds of the borough of Hertford before Johs 
Norden, deputy to Sir Richard Smith, Knt., surveyor to King Charles. This Ed- 
mound {sic) Browne held the manors of Bailey Hall and the Priory, both inHertforc. 

103. O. WILLIAM . CARTER = The Grocers* Arms. 

/^. GROCER . IN . HARTFORD = W . C (5) ] 




This man was an assistant burgess in 1652, and the register gives : Dorothy, 
daughter of William and Elizabeth Carter, baptized November 3, 1661. 

Another William Carter, or Nicholson a/ias Carter, was assistant to the hail." 
and chief burgesses, 31 Eliz., November 26, 1589. 

Abraham Carter, most likely a son of the issuer, was justice of the peace ic 
1683, whilst serving the office of alderman 

William Carter, who had been apprenticed to Joseph Browne, was made fre« oT 
the borough by the request of his master and true servitude, October 22, 1645 
He was one of those who lent money to the Corporation towards lowering of !' - 
turnpikes or locks on the river in 1659, and was one of those removed in 166: 
from the Council for not taking the oath according to Act of Parliament. 

104. O, lOHN . KINO . GROCER = I . S . K. 

^. IN . HARTFORD . 1652 = 1 . S . K. (5) ] 

This token-issuer was one of a very numerous race in and about the town. H ' 
father, Thomas King, a pedlar, married Jane Cribes, October 2S, 1600, vrh<i«c 
other children were : — Margaret, who died in 161 8 ; Martha, bom in 1616 ; EIiix 
beth, bom and died in 1630; Thomas, bom in 1608; and George in 1613—^^ 
also married Susanna Web about 1642, and had children : Martha, Septembei 3. 
1644; Susanna, September 26, 1646; Elizabeth, January 10, 1648; Man. 
February 2, 1650; Liddiah {sic), January 18, 1652; John, April 15, 165s; l' - 

Sarah, 19, 1657. This John King was constable in 1646 and 1647, and a:. 

assistant burgess in 1648. He was apprenticed in 1624 to William Turner, tr i 
made a freeman in 1640, and with others of the Corporation in 1655 was ordeii': 
to take men to keep the river navigable ; and in 1657 the Corporation orderc : 
that '* John King, grocer, should have liberty to build across the river from the es '. 
of the Glove and Dolphin orchard into Little Hartham, the width of the sa-: r 
being 24 feet, ranging with the Malthouse then building, and in length 4 foot, u\^^ 
the waste of the land of Little Hartham, for the better securing the foundation ' 
the said building, paying therefor 20s. fine, and to have a lease of the premises fcr 
99 years at is. 6d. per year, provided the said building over the river be h :.'- 
enough for any barge to pass under." In 1663 he appears to have lived r 
Butcherly Green. His son was apprenticed to Abram Rutt, and was made fret c 
1666, which son in 1682 is descrioed as a tallow-chandler. He lent various surr* 
of money to the Corporation in 1658 and 1659 for divers purposes, and he «»^ 
removed from the Corporation in 1662 with others for refusing to take the oath 

There was also a family of John and Margery King, whose children were :— 
Mary in 1654 ; Sarah, 1655 ; Anne, 1656 ; Judith, 1657 ; and John, 1662, 

The registers of St. Andrew also give : Tt^omas King married Mary Even-i 'a 
1631. George King married Ann Nell in 1631. John King married Judy B<>- Ic 
in 1632, and their son, Oliver, married Elizabeth Reynolds in 1656. Robert Ki:: 
married Mary Andrews in 1642. William King married Anne Broach in 1666. 

And several others, all of whom greatly perpetuated the race. Nevertheless, r 
this time (1888) there is no direct descendant left of them in the town. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 315 

105. O. THOMAS . LOWE = The Drapers' Arms. 

/?. IN. HARFORDE . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. (5) A 




This issuer is described in the borough papers in 1648 as "a milliner." In 1667 
he ia called "a foreigner," and was made free on payment of ;f 3. In 1679 he was 
an assistant, and served on the jury at Petty Sessions, and with many others 
^gned a petition to the Crown to increase the size of the borough, and also one to 
the Corporation that they would not make foreigners free of the borough. He is 
also described as a small tradesman. 

106. *0, THOMAS . PRAT = The Chcquers (12) 

R. IN . HERTFORD = T . M . P. (3) \ 

No inner circle on obverse. 

Thomas, the son of Thomas Pratt and Mary his wife, was born January 17, 
1653 ; Margarett, August 25, 1655, who died early; Johp, October 28, 1657 ; 
Thomas, October 23, 1660, who was baptized November 1, 1661 ; another Mar- 
p^ti, November 14, 1665. The token-issuer was assistant burgess in 1662, chief 
burgess in 1667, and mayor of the town in 1669. 

In 1634, the town records give : " P** to Pratt and Andrews for pulling down and 
I ringing home the house in the Stant, 2s." In 1650 he paid " I2d. in the rate for 
the building of Cow Bridge ;" and in 1656 "it was agreed between the Mayor and 
Mr. Pratt, tenant of the Checker, that ii shall be lawful for him, within 2 months, 
to take oflTand carrie awaye the House called the Cockpit, standing on his back- 
side," and he is also to receive his ten pounds lent by him to the Corporation ; but 
in 1665 this had not been done, and the order was altered that he might have the 
^aid house for his ;f lo due to him. In 1667 " the Corporation let the Chequer Inn 
to Thomas Pratt, Innholder, and I piece of meadow in the King's Mead, contain- 
ing I acre, and called the Chequer Acre, for 61 years, at £\^ per year, except that 
part of the house which was sold to him with certain other covenants. In 1663 
'here was "p<» to Tho*- Pratt and Ro. Stadderd for a 3 months' Tax for the Toll 
')f the Market and Fee farme, 8s. 3d." In 1677 he received £i lis. "for the 
4 ucking Stoole, and nails, and staples," and **for 2 posts for the bounds of the 
« v^rporatioD, los.'* 

107. *0, ABRAHAM . RVTT = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R. OF . HARTFORD . 1 666 = A . M . R. (3) \ 

This man was elected an assistant burgess in 1646 in the room of John Danyell, 
^«ing 28 yean old. He had married Martha Lilly on September 30, 1643. His 
sither s name was John Rutt, who died in 1602, and his mother's maiden name 
Catherine Waker. He had four other brothers and four sisters. His grandfather's 
rome was also John Rutt, who died in 1586, and who also had five sisters and one 
•roiher. Abraham was apprenticed in 1624, and made a freeman in 1643. He 
'jok the freeman's oath, and had a copy of his freedom delivered to him under 
'he town seal. He was elected a constable in 1644 and 1645, ^"^ ^^^ ^ "scru- 
Tator strata," or viewer of the streets, or highway surveyor, in 1647. He held 
>' roe grass under the Corporation in 1655, as 9s. was found to be due for it. In 
I' 59 be lent £l to the Mayor for the lowering of the turnpikes or locks on the 
^!>cr ; and in 1660, his brother John having deceased, he took his " Messuage and 
'^neroent in Butcherly green for 12 years on l^ase, and to keep in tenantable 
repair, to take care of his children." This he gave up in 1673 ^' ^he end of the lease. 
In 1661 it was ordered that "John King and Abraham Rutt, or any careful persons 
as they shall appoint, have power to oversee the work of repair of the Turnpikes, 
-cd cleansing of the River, and the taking of Tolls for 3 years ;" and in 1662 these 
two, with W. Carter and others, were removed from the Council for not taking the 
'aih of supremacy according to Act of Parliament. 



Digitized by 



Google 



3i6 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
io8. *0. GEORGE . SEELY . OF = The Gfocers* Arms. 

I^, HARFORD. 1652=0.8. (5) ; 

This token was found in 1885 in digging some foundations near Fore Street. 

This issuer's son was apprenticed in 1624, and in 1625 his father was rated t ■ 
the poor in is. 6d. In 1049 he was summoned to take up his freedom on pajmer. 
of 205. He refused, as he owned he was not bound by indenture, and it «^- 
ordered that his shop windows should be shut till he paid the same. He, nev<r- - 
theless, kept on, for in 1656 he was again summoned for setting up and not be:-^^ 
made free, but was discharged, and was elected an alderman in 1662, and may. 
in 1664, and his son had his freedom in 1674 as the eldest son of a bmgcss. 

109. *0. ROB . STADDER . AT . THE = A swan chained. 

J^. SWAN . IN . HERTFORD = R . S . S. (5) \ 

Robert Stothard was elected serjeant-at-mace in 1666 as follows: ** March yoer 
1666. Robert Stoddart was elected Sergeant upon y^ death of Edward Nonis, ar 
swome before y^ Mayor according to y* charter y* s*' dav, as alsoe tooke the oa** 
of Allegiance and supremacy, and yS order and declaration, by y* late act set i^r" 
(against transubstaniiation)." He filled the offices of flesh-looker and ricwcr ' 
the streets, and a collector of the assize-rate, as it is recorded that he ^'p^ 
£3 1 8s. to the Mayor, part of 2 Assize rates made in Mr. Laurence's tinnc," ar 
most likely kept an inn, as it also says, " spent at R^ Stothards at the Clerkship* 
the Market, i8s. 6d.** He may have been the one indicated in the register a- 
follows : " Margrett, bom of Robert Stothard and Ann his wife, July 12th, I65i. 
If so, the wife must have died and he married again, as there is also this en:r« 
" Robert, bom of Robert and Sary Stader, Deer. 1 8th, 1665," and this agrees « 
the wife's initial on the token. 

The sign alluded to was most likely the Black Swan, as the premises exter . 
from West Street to the River Lea, on which now — as, no doubt, then — pleav^n, 
boats are kept ; and although, at that time, this house was outside the boroj.- 
boundary, yet the borough magistrates allowed the license and took cognizance - 
all offences committed there. 

HITCHIN. 
Called ffiz amongst the Baronies of England in Domesday Book ; Hu-^ - 
1087 to 1 189 ; Hychen in a record of 14 Richard H. (1391) ; and HU(k^ HU 
Portmaftt and Hitchin forrein in Chauncy's "History of Hertfordshire." 

no. *0, lOSEPH . BAKER = I . E . B, 

R, IN . HITCHING . 1663 = 1 . E. a (1) \ 

John Baker was Vicar of Offley (three miles west) in 1657. 

111. *0, EDWARD . COOKE = E . A . C 

R, OF . HITCHING = E . A . C. (3) 4 

112. A variety has a different mint-mark on the reverse. 

113. O. FRANCIS . CROVT . IN = F . E . C. 

R, AN . S . HITCHIN . 1657 = F . E . C. (5) \ 

In the churchyard of St. Mary, Hitchin, there are many memoriab to the Crv ^ « 
or Crofts. 

114. *0, W . DRAGE . OF . HITCHIN . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R, opiFERQ^ . PER . ORBEM . DicoR = The Apothccanc* 
Arms, (o) ' 

The token-issuer was a well-known man in his day, and an author ; he wx- s 
a work as follows : "A Physical Nosonomy ; or, A New and True Descrip; - 
of the Law of God, called Nature in the Body of Man" (in two pa: . 
415 pages), and ** Daimonomageia ; A small Treatise of Sicknesses and Discj^ > 
from Witchcraft" (43 pages). "Faithfully collected from ancient and moa<^r 
writers, and partly experimental by William Drage, Practitioner in Physick .. 
Hitchin, in Hartfordshire/* (London: Quarto, 1^5.) 

Both works are bound together, and were re-issued with a dtflferent title-page a 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 



317 



'5- 



S. The latter work is very curious ; it is paged, and was probably to be bad 
irately, as the author sa3rs it is *' useful to others besides Physicians, in that it 
futes Atheistical, Saddudstical, and Sceptical Principles and Imaginations." 
his motto belon|;s to the Apothecaries' Company. The issuer's name is still 
wn about Hitchm and Hatneld. 

*0. FRAN . FEILD . IN . BANCRO=l667. 
R, FT . STREET . IN . HITCHIN = F . F. (2) \ 

liis token is curious in having a word divided between obverse and reverse, and 
letters c R are conjoined. 

[i6. *0. WILLIAM . FVLLER = A man making candles. 

IN . HITCHIN = >^A . F. (3) \ 

THOMAS . HAYWARD = HIS HALF PENY. 

IN . HITCHEN . 1667 =T . A . H. (3) ^ 

THOMAS . HEALEY= 1659. 
IN . HITCHIN = T . L. H. (l) \ 



tl7. 



118. 



R. 

♦a 

i?. 

*0. 
R, 




119. *0, DAN . HVRST . OF . HiCHiNG = A man standing with a sieve. 

R. OATEMEALEM AKER = D . A . H. (3) \ 

3n February 12, 1608, a royal commission was issued to value trees and coppices 
the King's manors of Hitch in, and it was found that there were eleven loads 
timber and firewood upon the land held by Daniell Hvrst, a copyholder of the 
nor. 

rhe name of Hvrst was common at Hitchin in 165a Robert, Tohn, William, 
niel ; and in 17 18, Gravely, John, William, Richard, and others. Richard 
rrste was a soldier in 1591. 

120. *0, ANDREW . LANGLY . AT . y" = TwO SUgar-loaVCS. 

R. AT . HITCHIN . 1667= A . M . L. (3) \ 

Abel Langly was a soldier in 1591. John Langley, of Langley, Esq., could dis- 
id £\o per annum on freehold land above reprizes in the time of Henry VI. 
^2). (Chaancy's " History of Hertfordshire.' ) 

121. *0, ISAAC . ROYSE . BREWER = The Brewcrs' Anns. 

R, IN . HITCHIN . 1656 = 1 . R. (3) \ 




122. '^O. lOHN . RVGELEY = Rugeley Arms; a chevron between 
three roses. 

R, OF. HITCHIN . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. (l) \ 




This house has been alterei to the Raddiffe Arms. 



Digitized by 



Google 



3i8 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
123. *0. lOHN . THORNTON = A sugar-loaf. 

JR, IN . HITCHEN . 1664 = 1 . A . T. (2) J 




This has no inner circle on the obverse. 

A Chrislofer Thornton was Rector of Knebworth in 1629. 

124. *0, MARY . TRiSTTRAM = Three hats. 

JR. IN . HITCHING . 1666 = M . T. (o) ; 

The royal commission in the footnote to Dan. Hvrst, of Hitchin, valoed timK' 
on three acres of land, freehold of the brotherhood (which was suppressed ' 
Henry VIII.), at fifteen loads ; and on land held by Thomas Tristnun, seven lo&cL. 
Tlus name was of frequent occurrence. 

125. *0. HENRY . WARNER = A Stick of (7) candles. 

I^. IN . HITCHIN . 1664 = H . S . W. (l) ^ 

In a document setting forth the survey of the value of the manor of Hitdun i- 
1650, it is mentioned that there is a Court Baron and Lcete belonging to the sai'" 
manor, kept in one of the stalls within the market-place belonging to the lord - * 
the manor, next unto the house of Henry Warner, the elder. A William Warner 
was a soldier in 1591. 

HODDESDON. 

126. O, lOHN . CLARKE . AT . THE = Two brewcrs carrying a barrel 

^. IN . HODSDON . HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 668 (in six lines ' 
{OctagonaL) (5) [ 

This name is well known in and about Hoddesdon. 

127. *0. ABRAHAM . DixE = The Groccrs* Arms. 

R, OF . HODSDON . 1665 = A . M . D. (4) \ 

128. *0. MARTHA . GIBBS . AT . THE= A bulL 

R. IN . HODGESDEN . HARTFORDS = HER HALF PENY. (4) I 
The Bull Inn is still in existence at Hoddesdon. 

129. *0, Mat hew . Harold . meale . man (in four lines). 

R. In . Hodgesdon = M . M . H (in two lines). (5) \ 

This token was found at Hertford. 

130. O. WILLIAM . PEDLEY = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

R. OF . HODESDEN = HIS HALFE PENY. (3) \ 

131. O. WILLIAM . PEDLEY = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

R. OF . HODESDEN . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. (3) \ 

This token is in the British Museum. The issuer required more than one isscc 
to meet the demands of his business. 

HUNSDON. 

This is a new place in the county for a token ; it is mentioned in I>oiiiesda> 
Book as " Honesdone ;" and " Honsdon " on a plate of Hunsdon Hoose, in 
Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire," p. 39a 

*' John Spencer, Knight of the Bath, at the coronation of Charles I., inherit«\i 
Honsdon and sold it to William Willoughby, who sold it in 167 1 to Mathew Blvck.' 
(Chauncy's ** History of Hertfordshire, p. 390.) 

132. *0, MARGRET . WHORELY = A sugar-loaf between m . w. 

R. OF . HVNDSDONE . IN . = HER . FORD . SHEER (in three 

lines). (5) ; 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 319 



KIMPTON. 

Written •* Kaminton " and " Kamintone " in Domesday Book. " Kineton " in 
Anglo-Saxon times. Kymeton, Henry VL, 1422, Herald's Office, G. 17, fol. 6, 7 ; 
and Kempton, on an old map of Herts. The church register dates from 1559. 

133. O. WILLIAM . SHORTOR = The Bakers' Arms. 

/?. OF . KIMTON . 1668 = W . S. (5) { 

KING'S LANGLEY. 
The register of this place dates from 1682. 

134. O. CHRISTO . BVCKVK = C . M . B. 

J^. IN . KINGS . LANGLEY = 1656. (4) { 

135. O. CHRISTO . BVCKCVK = C . M . B. 

J^. IN . KINGS . LANGLEY =1656. (4) j 

This variety is in the British Museum ; it has no inner circle upon either 
obverse or reverse. 

Lady Morrison gave £2 per annum out of a house, late " Bvckoks," in this 
parish (Salmon's "History of Hertfordshire"); where Mr. Bvckoke lived. 
(Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire," p. 471. 

The family of Buckoak still exists at ling's Langley. See another issuer of this 
name at Watford. 

136. *0. I AMES . GOODWIN . AT . THE = A TOSe CFowned. 

^. IN . KINGS . LANGLEY . l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
I.F.G. (3) 1 

This agn is still in existence, but the name of the token-issuer has disappeared. 
A Philip Goodwin was vicar of Watford, three miles north-west, somewhere 
between December, 16x8, and June, 1661. 

LEMSFORD MILLS. 
This is a small place north-west of Hatfield. 

137. O. lOSEPH . HARDHAM . OF=I . M . H. 

^. LIMSFORD . MILL. l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. (4) ^ 

This is placed by Boyne amongst his uncertain tokens, but as I have found 
the following entry in the Hatfield Church Register, I believe it to belong to 
Herts: 

Jeremiah Hardum, of North Mimms, married Hannah Harrow, of Hatfield, 
November 10, 1 691 ; this may have been a descendant of the token-issuer, as 
North Mimms is onlv about three miles south-south-west of HatBeld. The 
register of St. Maiy s, Welwyn, gives Joseph, the son of Josiah and Mary 
Hardham, baptized July 23, 1656. 

There are several memorials in Hatfield churchyard belonging to finmilies of 
this name, 

LITTLE HADHAM. 

138. *0. FELIX . coLVART = Anns of Calvert. 

/?. IN . LITTLE . HADDON = F . C. (3) ^ 

See the notes under Fumeaux Pelham, which is only four miles north. 



Digitized by 



Google 



320 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

LITTLE MUNDEN, 

Or Mundane parva, of Chauncy's ** History," and Little Midden, in the ws'un 
of All Saints, Hertford. The register dates from 1623. 

139. *0, ANNE . KEiMTON . OF = A monkey dressed as a womsa 

/^, LITTLE . MONDEIN . 65 = A Stick of (5) caildJlS 
A . K. (3) I 

The obverse has no inner circle. 

MARKYATE STREET, or MARKET STREET. 

On the extreme border of the county, five miles south-east of Dmstsbc. 
Bedfordshire. 

140. *0. RICHARD . BARNES = The Merccrs' Arms. 

J^. OF M ARKETTSTREET = R . B. ; 

141. *0. THOMAS . DEARMOR= 1666. 

JR. IN . MARKET . STREET = T . M . D. 
These tokens are placed by Boyne to Market Street, Westminster (jl 365 
but the absence of this name on these tokens induces me to transfer tlMs 
Herts, more especially as every token of Market Place, Westminster, 1^ ; ' 
specially mentioned. Daniel Dearmor, of Stotfold, Beds, and Henry Detr^^ 
of IppoUitts, Herts, occur in the register of voters for the Hitchin division of ife* 
in the 1885, General Election. Both these places are within a few miles of Urv 
yate Street. 

MUCH HADHAM. 

142. *0. ELIZABETH . COLEMAN = The Drapers* Anns. 

J^. AT . MVCH . HADAM = E . C. (3) J 

143. *0. ELIZABETH . COLEMAN = The Drapers' Anns. 

JR. AT . MUCH . HADAM = E . C (4) , ; 

144. *0. THO . DONCASTER . AT . WHIT = A liOH. 

I^. IN . MVCH . HADHAM . l666 = T . A . D. (4) ; 

The register dates from 1559. 

NORTHAW, OR NORTHALL. 

145. *0. WILLIAM . ASHBY . AT = HIS HALFE PENY. 

JR. NORTHHALL . l668 = W . A . A. i 

The register of this place was destroyed by fire with the church in iSftx ^ ' 
dated from 1564. It was called "Northawe" in 1093, "Northall" hf Ckamo 
in his " History of Hertfordshire,** and as upon the token, in the All Saints rqpcff 
at Hertford. The place in Middlesex is called Northolt, so that tbe tofcea s 
scarcely likely to belong there. 

PIRTON. I 

Domesday Book calls this place " Peritone." It was spelt " Ptriton** ia tk i 
I John (1 199) in the "Mon. Anglo Antiq, of War,** fol. 229 ; •* Petetoae ni ' 
Perton *' by Chauncy ; and " Puriton '* in the 36th year of Henry VI U. (1545V | 

These tokens have been hitherto placed to Purton, in Wilts, but are be&ved t- ' 
belong to Herts ; it is three miles north-west of Hitchin, and they have bee 
found there. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE, 32I 

146. O. RICHARD . CHESTER « A CFOSS. 

/?. IN . PYRTON . 1658 = R . P . C (3) i 

147. *0. lOHN . FARMER = I . E . K A fOll of tobaCCO. 

J^. OF . PYRTON . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. (3) ^ 

148. O. lOHN . FARMAR . 1656== A roll of tobacco. 

I^. IN . PYRTON = The Grocers' Arms. (3) • J 

149. O. RICHARD . FOSTER = A cross. 

/?. IN . PYRTON = R . E . F. (3) i 

150. O. EDWARD . SAVNDERS = The GroccFs' Arms. 

^. IN . PYRTON = E . S. (3) ^ 

PUCKERIDGE. 

Or Pakiicfae, as written in the churchwardens' accounts of Bishops Stortford in 
1519. 

151. *0. George . Benn^o . b and a rose between. 

R. Puck . ridg^ s . b and crossed pipes between. (3) \ 

152. *0, Arthur . Brayne^K . b and a rose between. 

R, Puck ridg= s . b and crossed pipes between. (3) \ 

It is singular that these two issuers should have adopted exactly the same type of 
token, and that the wife's initials on the reverse of each should be the same. They 
may have been related by marriage, and used the same reverse die for cheapness. 

153. O. GEORGE . ROGERS = G . R and roscs. 

R. PvcKRiDG = Two pipes crossed and two cloYes. (5) \ 

This has no inner circle. 

This token b similar to the two last in having two pipes crossed. It may have 
been that each were churchwardens in their time, and this one a grocer also ; if 
so, they must have been of Standon parish, as Puckeridge is therein situate. See 
also the reverse of Henry Hicks, of Standon. 

REDBOURN. 

Hatthew Paris, in his *' De Villa Abbate," fol. 45, calls this place ** Redbume ;'' 
ind in 1 100 it was " Redbnrn." 

154. *C7. lOHN . HALSEY . AT . y" . BLACK = HIS HALFE PENIE. 

R, LYON . IN . REDBOYRN = A lloD rampant. (3) ^ 




This inn is still in existence. 

Sir John Halsey, son of William, grandson and heir of Robert Halsey, died in 

g^o, fifty-five years old, and had sons — the sixth Necton, and the seventh Thomas, 
e token-issuer may have been related. 

155. *0. lAMES . HANNELL» A WOOlpack. I . K . H. 

R. OF. REDBVRNE . 1669-^ HIS HALF PENY. 

{Heartshaped.) (3) \ 

156. *0. lOH . TYLER . 0F = A pair of scales. 

R. REDBOVRN£«I . A . T. (3) \ 

21 



Digitized by 



Google 



322 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

RICKMANSWORTH. 

The following are some of the spellings of the name of this place : Richemerf- 
word, Domesday Book; A'ickmaresworth, Henry I. (lioo); Rickmeravmtk, 
19 Henry I. (11 19); Richmeresworih^ Henry IL (1154); Rykewteresvmtt, 
Henry III. (1216); Ryckmeareswearth, 6 Edward I. (1272); Rykemenwtrtk, 
Henry VI. (1422) ; Rtchmanstt*arth^ 4 Edward VI. (1551) ; Rukmerranrtk, oo 
monument in church (1610) ; Rickmerenveard^ Rickmereswearth^ and Ryckimart 
worde, Chauncy's '* History of Hertfordshire." 

The register dates from 1571. 

157- *0, lOHN . SKiDMORE . i666 = The Mercers' Arms. 

R. IN. RICKMANSWORTH = HIS HALF PENY. (l) \ 

No inner circle on obrerse. 

This name survives in the persons of Mr. Thomas Emmott Skidmore, of High 
lands, Croxley Green, Rickmansworth, and Mr. Joseph Skidmore, of Mill End. 

Mr. Joseph Skidmore, of Mill End, has two upp«r or obverse dies, by whid 
John Skidmore*s tokens were struck. These came to him by will, in which be va» 
also directed to leave them to his eldest son, and they are in the hands of trustees far 
that purpose. These dies are believed to be one of the only three sets in ezistenoe. 
The Skidmores were a large family with many branches. The token-issacr t&> 
a son of Henry Skidmore. 

John Skidmore, Henry Skidmore, 

married married 

Mary , Prudence Dewy, 

who died Nov. 22, 1658. 

Aug. 9. 1700, at I 

Chorley Wood. 

had had 



II I I 

John ; Elizabeth ; Prudence ; Snsanna. 

died died Nov. 17, 1659. May 15, i66<x 

May 4, 16S4. July 13, 1682. 

There were also a Henry Skidmore, who married Mary Ansell February 25, i6t*. 
but he died before 1684, as she is described as a widow, buried May 2 of thatyei- 

Another Henry Skidmore married Sarah , and had Sarah, September i 

1657. Abraham Skidmore married Ann , and had Abraro, April 13, t66r. 

the father dying September 13, 1689, and the brother June 25, 1671 ; aDd seven 
others. 

158. *A similar inscription, but from another die. (i) 

In the first-named token the sinister point of the shield touches the second b i: 
the date, and the dexter point is between the o and h of John. The ahidd is i 
wide one, whereas in the variety the sinister point of the shield touches the Ia$t r 
of the date, and the dexter point touches the o in John, and the shield is narrowv: 
but as the reverses of each are precisely similar in all respects, it might be tha- 
but one lower die was made to the two>mentioned obverse dies ; and this is al> 
most likely, as the reverse of the wide shield token is much more worn than tha: c 
the other, whereas the obverses are of the same degree of preservation ; and v 
the wide shield tokens may also be the Uter struck of the two, although both arr 
dated 1666. Yet it does not necessarily follow that both were stivck in tiu 
year. 

159. This is another with the obverse only. (4) 

Mr. Thomas Emmott Skidmore informed me that some of John Skidmore- 
tokens are only struck on one side ; and the reason given is that, apoa :' * 
suppression of these tokens by the then Government, the lower dies were take 
away ; nevertheless, the people occasionally used the upper dies after that tucc 
j(See the token of Edward Gardner, of Bishops Stortforo, alsa) 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 323 



ROYSTON. 

160. *0. THOMAS. BILL ==1664. 

i?. IN . ROYSTON = T . B. (3) 1 

This issuer was no doubt related to the Bills, of Ashwell, five miles west, the 
Ian of whom, James Bill, died about 1634, and the Manor of Ashwell was sold for 
the benefit of the daughters. 

161. *0. EDWARD . CROVCH = A stick of (7) condles. 

/^. IN . ROYSTON = E . A . C. (3) J 

See note under Crouch, of Baldock. 

This token has a star for mint-mark, and seven long candles. 

162. A variety has a rose for mint-mark, and seven short candles. 
165. *0, RICHARD . GODFREE = A man making candles. * 

^. IN . ROVSTON = R . E . G. (2) , J 

There are several memorials of this family in Royston churchyard ; relatives 
were also at Baldock (see an/e), 

164. *0. THOMAS . GODFREY = A sugar-loaf. 

^. OF . ROYSTON . CHANDLER = T . G. (3) ^ 

165. *0. lAMES . PARTRiCH . OF = A mitre. 

i?. ROOYSTON . VINTNER = I . C . P. (2) } 

No inner circle on obverse. 

166. This is similar to No. 165 ; but the mitre is smaller, and in a 

different position with respect to the mint-mark. ] 

This issuer had evidently a large business to require so many issues of tokens. 

On the south side of Hatfield Church are memorials as follows : 

William Partridge, son of Arthur, ob. October 6, 1687, in 17 y'- 

Arthur, Son of Arthur, ob. March 13, 1690, aged 27. 

William Partridge .... 1687. 

These were most likely relatives of this issuer. 

167. *0, lAMES. PARTRICH . OF = A mitre. 

i?. ROVSTON . 1668 = 1 . C . p. (3) I 

168. *0. BENiAMiN . scRVBiE = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . ROYSTON . GROCER = B . E , S. (3) } 

This name also occurs at Hatfield, as well as in the churchyard of Royston. 

169. O. lAMES . SWAN . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. ROISTON . GROCERY I . S. (5) J 

1 70. *0. WILLIAM • WIND « A voided cross on shield, with sword in 

sinister upper quarter. (Arms of the City of London.) 

jR. OF . ROYSTON . 1657. = W . E . W. (3) J 

No ioncr circle on obvene. 

21 — 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



324 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

ST. ALBANS. 

Uronamium ; Car,, Afufticipium, Ptolemy ; Veroiam, A.D. 293 ; Ver9iamim9m^ 
Verulamium, Roman name ; Alhaneston^ Chauncy, vol. it, p. 215. 

The Abbey registers were recovered from a hay-loft March 19, 1880^ and date 
from 1558. That of St Stephen's dates from 1560 ; St. Michael's from 1643 ; 
St. Peter's from 1558. 

171, *0. RALPH . BRADBVRY = The Groccrs' Arms. 

i?. OF . SAINT . ALBONS= R . £ . B. (3) \ 

This has no inner circle on the reverse. 
The Abbey registers give : 

Ralph Bradboiy, 

mar. 

Elizabeth — . 

had 



Son, Ralph, Maria, Charics, 

May 15, 1650. Dec. 6, 1654. April 15, i66a Sept i(\ 1676W 

Buried 
Aug. 5, 1666. 
Tliere was a Hugh Bradbury and Elizabeth, his wife, who had a daugfater^ Ami, 
April 12, 1646 ; and Ann, the wife of another Hugh Bradbury, bnrfed Mmy 3, 
1652. 

James Bradbury was an assistant burgess in 1685. He married Ealin or 
Ellen April 17, 1677. He was probably a relative of the token-if 



172. *(9. EDWARD . CAMFIELDsE . E . C 

R. IN . SAINT . ALBONS= 1656. (l) \ 

173. *A variety from a different die has roses in place of stars in 

the exergue of the reverse. (2) 

Edward Camfield married Elizabeth Parkens June 6, 1643. There were also a 

John Camfield, who married Elizabeth Marshall June 30, 1647 ; ^<1 NicfaoUv 

who married April 5, 1656. 
This name occurs commonly in the register of the parish church of Hatfieki, 

five miles off, and is perpetuated in a house called Cambeid Place, near Esse»doiv» 

three miles further east. 

174. *0, John . Complin . S*- . Albans . Backer (in four lines)w 

R, His . Halfepeny (in two lines) = A pair of scales and a 
wheatsheaf. {Octagonal.) (4) 
The name of Complin was in existence as late as 1870 at Hatfield, bat does not 
occur in the St. Albans registers. 

175. O, John . Cowlee . in . 5'* . Albans . Backer (in four lines). 
R, His . Hal/e . Feny (in two lines) » Scales and wheatsheaf. 

{Octagonal,) (5) i 

This is in the British Museum. 

John Cowley was an assistant burgess of the borough of St. Albans in 1677 and 
1678. He married Anna Branden January 6, 1657-8, who died Tune 20, 1671. 

Thomas Cowley was mayor in 1628, 1639, 1650, and 1661, and Thomas Cowley, 
jun., was mayor in 1660, 1672, 1688. The first-named died, whilst alderman. 
February 18, 1672-3. 

Walter Cowley married Mary Carpenter June 3, 1666. 

There are very numerous entries of the deaths of individuals of this name in the 
registers from 1662 to 1678. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE, 3«S 

176b *0, RICHARD . FINCH » A SWail. 

/^. OF . S^ . ALBANS . l666 = R . U . F. (3) J 

The Swan Inn is still in existence. 

177. *0. HENRY . GLADMAN . AT . THE = St. GeoFgc and the 

Dragon. 

I^. IN . S^ . ALBANS . l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. (l) J 

In the register of Rickmansworth Church is an entry : 

An intention of marriage between Henry Gladman, of St Albans, baker, son 
of Ralph Gladman, of St. Albans, and Mary Twitchet, of Rickmansworth, on 
May 27, Jone 3 and 10^ 1655, and was consummated soon after. 

Ralph GUdman was mayor of St. Albans in 1652, and signed the register 
book on September 9, 1653. 

The Gladmans were evidently a large family, having several branches. The 
register mentions : 

Sarah Gladman, married to John Morrice, June 23, 1659. 

Ralph Gladman, married Lizzie Wmdsford May 23, 1678. 

Jeremiah, married Grace Young October 10, 1685. 

Genvid Gladman was buried November 14, 1675. 

Mr. Gladman (? Ralph), buried June 26, 1678 ; Martha, August 29, 1666 ; John, 
July 7, 1669 5 Maria, December 30, 1657 ; and Anne, June 23, 1660. 

Nazariah Gladman, M.A, was Vicar of Ridge from February 15, 1609, to 
September 21, 1618. 

The George is still a laige and flourishing inn at St. Albans* 

178. *0. THOMAS . NASH . 1669 = An Indian holding a spear. 

I^. OF . S^ , ALBANS = HIS HALFE PENNY. T.D.N. (3) ^ 

There is a public-house called the St. Giristopher ; whether this is meant by 
the Indian on the token or not is not known. 

179. *0. lOHN . TISDALLE = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, IN . s^. ALBANS . 1667 = 1 . E . T. and a flower. (3) ^ 

This Issuer was assistant burgess or councillor in 1677, and he or his son was 
alderman in 1689, and mayor in 1693. 

The register of the Abbey gives : Sar^h, buried October 6, 1660 ; Elizabeth, 
November 27, 1662 ; Thomas, September 15, 1667 ; Anne, November i, 1669 ; 
Sarah, November 25, 1676 ; Elizabeth, November 5, 1677 ; and Mary, March 28, 
1677-8. 

SAWBRIDGEWORTH. 

The spelling of the name of this place has been exceedingly varied, amongst 
others : Sabrtxtevwrdef Domesday Book ; Sabricstworth^ Anglo-Saxon and 
5 Stephen (1140); Sabrightesword^ 2 Richard I. {\\ffo) \ SoMceworthy ]<Aai 
(1199); Sabrichertuorthf 26 Henry IV. (1281); SaybrUhesworth, 26 Henry IV. 
(1281); Sabridgewarth, 22 Richard H. (1399) ; Sabrysford, Richard III. ; SaJbrys- 
worthy Richard III.; Sabbesford^ Henry VI. (1422); Sabbisford^ churchwardens' 
accounts. Bishops Stortford (1489) ; Sabrisford^ Henry VII. (1485) ; Sabysford, 
churchwardens' accounts. Bishops Stortford (1515) ; Sabndworth^ churchwardens' 
accounts, Bishops Stortford (1579) ; Sahrichworth^ 13 Elizabeth (1571) ; Sabs- 
worthy old map of Herts ; and Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire," p. 32, 
gives : ** Richard Scrope, gent.. Job Leventhorpe, Esq., and John Giauncy, Esq., 
of Sabbesford, anciently written Sabysford." The church register dates from 
1558. 

180. *^. lOHN . GOODAKER = Chequers. (12) 

R, AT . SABES . KEYE= I . E . G. (4) \ 

This name occurring in the Cheshunt list of tokens, and the name of the place 

being much like Sawbridgeworth with its various spellings, I have thought it 



Digitized by 



Google 



3^6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

would be very likely that this is a Herts token, though placed by Mr. Bopt '« 
the uncertain list 

1 8 1. O, lEREMIAH . HERNE = HIS HALF PENY. 

Ji. IN . SABRIDGWORTH = I . E . H. 1 669. (4) . 

Chauncy (p. 342) says that ** Sir William Heron married EKxabcth, iter 1 
John de Say, and was summoned to Parliament in November, 1393, by the c:< 
of Lord Say. His nephew succeeded him, and in 1523 Sir William Saydiviiei 
his inheritance between his daughters, and Saysbury pa^ed to the Eari of Eaa 

The token-issuer is most likely an oflBihoot of this family. 

182. O. THOMAS . KING . i669 = Swords in saltire. 

^. IN . SABRIDGWORTH = T . F . K. (4) i 



SHENLEY. 

Scenlai, Senlai, Domesday Book ; Senley^ Chauncy*s "History of Hcxtlr 
shire," vol. ii., p. 449. 

183. *0, lOHN . CLARKE . AT = A heart 

R, SHENLY . BERRY . l666 = I . A . C (3) \ 

In this token a particular house is mentioned. 

A John Clarke was Mayor of St. Albans (five miles north) in 1592. J^ 
Clarke, jun., in 1609 and 1619, <^<^ ^^^ probably the father of the token-is 

184. O, lOSEPH . INNS = I . E . L 
R. OF . SHENLEY . 1670 = 1 . E . L (4) 



STANDON. 
(Called also "Standone," "Stanelow," and "Staundon" in 1422.) 

185. O. THOMAS . DANiELL = The Groccrs' Aims. 

R, IN . STANDON . 1656=* T . M . D. (4) * 

1 86. *0, Henry . Hicks (in two lines with a shoe between them). 'J' 

R, H . Stan don . h (in three lines with crossed p*?^ 
between). * 

See the tokens of Puckeridge for similar reverses and the note upon then. 

STEVENAGE. 

Stcvtnhaught^ Anglo-Saxon ; Stigenace^ Domesday Book ; Sttvenkxtk^ U ^- 
ward L (1286) ; i^tevenach^ on a patent of Edward VI. to Nicholas Ridley, Bbi«fl 
of London (1547); iitivenach, Edward. VL (1547); Strvenedgt^ Ouurocy's ** Hi- 
tory of Hertfordshire." The register dates from 1538. 

187. ♦^. THOMAS . FLETCHER — A pair of scales. 

R. IN . STEEVENEGE= 1668. (2) ♦ 

The Fletchers were evidently men of note in Stevenage in their tioe. ] 
find that William Fletcher was one of the trustees under the will of Stephen Hfr 
lard, dated November 20th, 17 Henry VII. (1502), of one croft, cnUed Glewfl* 
etc., for the use of the poor of Stevenage. 

George Fletcher, sen., was appointed constable, April 19, 1652. 

Geoige Fletcher, jun., was appointed overseer, April 15, 1672. 

Cornelius Fletcher and Robert Fletcher were appointed overseers, April 1. 1*^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 327 

Robert having held that office in 1666 ; and that George Fletcher, sen. and jun. 
and Robert Fletcher were chargeable for King's carriages in 1678, 
John Fletcher was surveyor for the highways in 1663. 

188. *0, PETER . LANGTHORNE = The Blacksmiths* Arms. 

J^, IN . STEAVENIDG . l666 = P . E . L. (2) | 

This has no inner circle on the obverse. 

Benjamin Langhome was appointed churchwarden April 6, 1656 ; and William 
Langhorn, surveyor for the highways, with John Fletcher, April 20, 1663. 

"Thomas Chapman, by will dated 8th March, 19 Car. II. (1667), devised a 
messuage and tenement in Stevenage to Peter Langthorne, the elder, and Eliza- 
beth, his wife, for 10 years, and the remainder to Peter Langthorne, his son, upon 
trusty to pay £S per annum to buy Cloaih and Bread for the poor of Stevenage, 
Ashwell, St Paul's Walden, and Norton" (Chauncy's ** History of Hertford- 
shire," p. 107^). 




189. *0, Henry . Baines (in two lines). 

R, IN . STEVENIG . 1667 = H . A . B. (4) \ 

190. *0. ROBERT . SMITH . 0F = A man making candles. 

R, STEVENIDGE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. (2) \ 

191. *^. ROBERT . SMITH . 1667 = A man making candles. 

R, OF . STEAVENIDG = ^ , 5 and a flower. (2) \ 

A man of this name signed the vestry-book as constable on May 30, 1646. 

A book called "Notes upon Stevenage and Baldock," published at St Albans 
about 1881, in speaking of the Pest-house, says that "In 1794 lohn Smith, tallow- 
chandler, was api)ointe<l as looker over the poor, to keep them clean and decent, 
and to do well by them, and to keep them to church every Sabbath-day, for ten 
poands per year." This was probably a descendant of the token-issuer. 

STOCKING PELHAM. 

192. O. THOMAS , WHEELER . AT . Y^ = A hart lodged. 

R. IN . STOAKE . IN . PELHAM . 6S = Ifis Holft Penny, 

T . M . W. (4) \ 

There can be no error in putting this in Herts any more than John Hubbard to 

StoaJke in Norfolk, both l)eing so plainly though peculiarly descnl)ed. 
This issuer was no doubt related to the Wheeler of Brent Pelham (see No. 60), 

as Stocking, Brent and Furneaux Pelham are at the apices of a triangle, with sides 

of i^, i^, and 2 miles only respectively. 
It is called " Stocken Pellam " in an old map of Herts, and the register dates 

from 1695. 

THERFIELD. 

This place is three miles south-west of Royston, and has been variously written : 
— Thirefeld^ by Etheric, Bishop of Shcrbourne (980) ; Thvrrevfelde, in Domesday 
Book; Terefeld, 6 Edward I. (1278); Thurreweld, Thetfeld, TherfHld, and 
Tkirefeld by Chauncy in his " History of Hertfordshire." 

193. O. WILLIAM . HARE . OF = A greyhound. 

R, THARFEILD . BY . ROYSTO** = W . S . H. (4) \ 

Did the issuer intend to be satirical ? hares and greyhounds are not unfrequently 
seen together. Hie register dates from 156a 



Digitized by 



Google 



328 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CESjm 

TRING. 

Domesday Book calls this place Trtvnge and Tredvn^^ and it vas ife : 
TVevngxn 1066 ; 1550 is the date of the register of the church. 

194. ♦^e WILLIAM . AXTELL^HIS HALF PENV. 

R, OF . TRING . 1668 = A rose crowned. (4) 

"Johan Axstyll was one of the Bonhommes (xjV) of the mo- 

Berkhampstead (dissolved by Henry VIII.), where Edward I. held a 
in 1 291, and the 19th of his reign" (Chauncy's '* History of Hertfordsbirt 

William Axteli was a chief burgess of the borough of Great BeridiaBpEa 
1628, and common clerk in 1639. 

In the church of St. Mary's, at Great Berkhampstead, is the Iblloviog 093^ 
" Henry Axtill, a rich man, starved himself, and w^s haried here Apr. Ut^ 
I Car. I." 

Great Berkhampstead is only five miles south-east of Triog. 

195. O, NORRiA . coocKE = The Mercers' Arms. 

R, OF . TRINGE . 1657 = N . C (5) 




196. *0, WILLIAM . S0MNER = Thc Bokers' Arms. 

R, AT . TRINGE = W . M . S. (3) 

WADESMILL. 
(Two miles north of Ware.) 

197. *0. EDWARD . LAWRENCE . AT . Y^ = A tUrtlStlle. 

R, AT . WARDS . MILL . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. (l) 
In the Ware parish register is an entry which confirms the name oC this pli'' 
given on the token : "John Daniel, son of Robert and Catherine DaiM ^"^^ 
•Wards Mill,* Deer. 23rd, 1665, but baptized by Mr. Waugh, vicar." 

198. Another is known, struck on obverse only. (5) 

See note to Skidmore, Rickmansworth. 

One of the sayings of the county is that " Ware and Wadesmill arc ««* '' 
London " (Cussans*^ ** History of Hertfordshire "). 

WALKERN. 

199. *0, THOMAS . CHAPMAN = The Grocers' Anns. 

R, IN . WALKERN . 1667 = T . M . C. (3) ' 

No inner circle on obverse. _. 

Mary Chapman, widow of Thomas Chapman, died April 12, 1683— tke *** 
issuer must have died earlier. 

There were several others named Thomas Chapman and a Daniel ^^fij 
about this time, and there is a memorial brass to ** William ChapmsOt ^ ^ 
dasher, of London, and Ann, his wife," in the church. 

The register dates from 1680. 

WALTHAM CROSS. 
(This is one of the Wards of Cheshunt.) 

200. *0, THO . UDERDALL . IN . WALTHAM . »Ji = A ^ 

T. E . L. . 

R, IN . HARTFORDSHEIRE . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. (3) * 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 3^9 

201. O. ROBERT . NOBLE . AT = The Groccrs* Arms. 

J?. WALTHAM . 1657 = R .M.N. (5) J 

202. *0. John Teckae His . Ilalfe Peny (in four lines). 

J?. IN . WALTHAM . ►J^ . HARFORDSH = The name in mono- 
gram. (5) \ 
See note under Cheshunt for this issuer. 

In Bishops Stortford Church is a monument to a '* Thomas Tooke, who died 
Apr. 13th, 1 713, Kilii natu maxima of Johannis Tooke, and Susanna, his wife.'* 

WARE. 

" Thence to Ware, where raazie Amwell 
Mildly cuts the southern Chanell ; 
Rivers streaming, banks resounding, 
Middleion with wealth abounding/' 

** Mightily did these delight me ; 
O I wished them Aqua vitse 1 
Thence to Wademill, where I rest me 
For a pot, for I was thirstie." 

Bamabee^s Journal. 

203. *0. PEETER . BOWES = P . E . B. 

R. OF . WARE . 1653 = ? . E . B. (3) \ 

The raster gives the following children of Peter and Elizabeth Bowes : — 

Thomas, baptized October 26, 1654 ; Mane, December 10, 1656 ; Samuel, May 18, 

1659 ; Henry, May 20, 1661 ; and Stephen, March 4, 1662. The issuer is stated 

to have been a chandler. 

204. *0. lOHN . GOTHERIDGE=I .E.G. 

R, GROCER . IN . WARE = I . E . G. (3) \ 

John Gotheridge was a chandler also, and by Elizat>eth, his wife, had : — William, 

baptized December 24, 1653 ; John, April 16, 1655 ; Henry, April 19, 1657 ; 

Elizabeth, December 30^ 1659; Thomas, bom and not baptized, January 19, 

1 661 ; and Martha, also not baptized, July 10, 1663. 

205- O, RICHARD . GUTTERiDGE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. GROCER . IN . WARE = R . E . G. (4) \ 

I think this issuer must soon have left his native place, perhaps on account of 

there being so many of the name and trade there. He does not occur through all 

the register. 

Henry Gutteridge (perhaps a brother), a collar-maker, in 16S8, gave to trustees 

two acres of copyhold land for bread for the poor of Standon on the Sundays after 

All Saints and Candlemas. 
Elizabeth Gothridge, most likely a sister of John, Richard, Thomas, and Henr^, 

married Isaac Bumapps on March 9, 1662. This man is frequently mentioned m 

the vestry books of St. Andrew, Hertford, and was evidently an influential man 

in his time. 

206. *0. THOMAS . GUTTERDGE = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. GROCER . IN . WARE = T . R . G. (2) \ 

This issuer, with Rose, his wife, is also described in the register as a chandler. 
They had William, baptized May i, 1654 ; Elizabeth, June 18, 1655, and these 
two no doubt died young, as on December 15, 1656, they had another William 
baptized, and Elizabeth December 4, 1657. There was much mortality about this 
time from some particular plague or sickness. 

There was another Thomas Gutteridge, whose wife, Elizabeth, had John, born 
April I5« 1654, baptized March 26, 1609, with his younger sister, Elizabeth, bom 
in 1661 ; Thomas, Mary, and Ann, bom 1657, 1665, and 1667, also baptized in 1669. 
Robert, 1671 ; several other brandies existed to at least 1730, but the name has en- 
tirely died pot some years since at Ware, but is known at Hertford, two miles west. 



Digitized by 



Google 



33b TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

207. *0. HENRY . HARTE = A Saracen's head. 

J^. IN . WARE . 1667 = H . I . H. (3) { 

The Saracen's Head is a large and flourishing inn in Ware. Tlie ccMMated 

great bed was here until sold to the proprietor of the Rye House about 1879b 
'* The Saracen's Head, at Ware, and two cow leasoms in Amwell, of the ycarW 

value of ;f 18, were given to the poor of Ware " (Chauncy). 

208. *0. lONATHAN . iOHNSON = The CordwaincTs' Anns. 

jR, IN . WARE . 1666 = 1 . I. (3) ; 

This issuer was a shoemaker, and by his wife, Francis {tic), had a son, Thonu.^ 
baptized January, 1656, and Jonathan January 15, 1658. 

Another Jonathan Johnson married Elizabeth Clarke, of Ware pariah, Jnly ^ 
1660, and had children — Thomas, April 8, 1661, and James, August, 1663. It i> 
a common name at Ware. 

209. *0. AT . THE . BRIDGE . FOOT = E . A . P. 

jR. IN . WARE . GROCER = E . A . P. (4) 4 

Edward Packer, a grocer, and Ann, his wife, are stated by the register to baTc 
lived near or at the bridge. They had a son, Edward, November 39, 1659, an-: 
Ann, March ii, 1661. This man was most likely the token-issuer. 

210. O, GEORG . KILBEY . IN . WARE = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR, AT . THE . COACH . AND . HORSES = A COach and twn 

horses. (5) i 

The register gives George Kilbee and Ann, his wife, had a son, George, 

November 23, 1664 ; Ann, December, 1665 ; William, October, 1667 ; Sasan« 

September, 1668 ; and Phillip, March, 1670. 
The old times of stage-coaches being long past, the sign has degenerated tct 

the Waggon and Horses. 

2X1. ^'O, THOMAS . WALKER = A griffin. 

jR. IN . WARE . 1665 =T . A . W. (3) | 

WATFORD. 

Called Wadeford, in 1432 ; Wetford, Saxon ; Kayshoe and Kaishob 1278; a£ ^ 
Caishoe, because in Cashio Hundred. The register dates from 1582. 

212. *0. GEORGE . BROCKETT . AT . Y« = A SWan. 

jR, IN. WATTFORD. I.6.6.8. = HISHALFEPENY. G.S.B, (3) | 
In Wheathampstead Church is a monument with inscription : 
" Here lieth interred the body of Mary Brockett, wife of John Brocket, oi 

Whethampstead . . . and had issue by him six sons and two daughters — Geor^. 

Thomas, Mary, John, William, Elizabeth Banister, Henry, and Edward. She die^f 

AnnoDom. 1669, aged 73 years." Edward married Ethel Chall. ... He die- 

January 9, 1669, aged 64. 

Sir John Brockett was a member of the first Parliament for Herts in the sccor. 

year of Mary (1533). William Brockett was M.P. also in the second and ihir- 

year of Philip and Mary, and John Brockett in the fourteenth year of Elizabc-h 

(Chauncy 's ** History of Hertfordshire,*' p. 36.) 
Thomas Brocket, of Wheathampstead, gent., "could dispend ;£'io per aoiram ir 

freehold lands above Reprizes in the time of Henry VI. " (Channcy's •* Histon 

of Hertfordshire," p. 32.) 

Edward Brockett, of Hatfield, was sheriff in 1547 ; John in 1566 and 1581 

An Edward Brockett was Rector of Graveley and Chisfield, in Herts, in 1613. Th.- 

token-issuer was very probably an offshoot of these. 
Brockett Hall, near Hatfield, was the seat of the Brockett family. 

213. *0. WILLIAM . BVCKOKE = A hat 

jR. OF. WATFORD. 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. (4) I 

See the notes to the issuer, the same name, at King's Langley, Not. 134 mud 13^ 
King's Langley is only five miles north of Watford. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HERTFORDSHIRE. 33 1 

214. *0, EDWARD . EWER . IN . WATFORDE — A glove. 

R, HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l666 = E . M . E. (3) J 

Henry Bore, Esq., of the Middle Temple, was Steward of St. Albans 
November 19, 1617. 

Thomas Ewer de Lea in 1625 was called upon to lend ;f 20 to King C^iarles I. 

Henry Ewer was Recorder of the Borough of Great Berkhamjpstead ih 1644. 

The sessions of the peace for the liberty of St. Albans had been usually held 
in the great room over the gateway of the monastery, which belonged to them in 
part, and continued to be held there until 1 651, at which time Sir John Wittewrage, 
or, as Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire," p. 49, has it, " Sir John Whitwrong, 
Bart.," of Harpenden, Knight, who was sheriff in 1658, W. Lemon, of Northaw, 
sheriff in 1635 and 1676, Henry Ewer, of Watford, John King, of St Albans 
borough, Allen Cox, of Beaumonts, and John Marsh, of Shenley, justices of the 
peace for the liberty, purchased the other part of the gatehouse of Geoffrey Ellis 
aod Grif&ntittS Phillips, of Gloucester, Esqrs., to whom it belonged, and by 
mdentnre dated July 17 of the same year covenanted with the mayor and bureesses 
that the whole of the gatehouse should be converted into a gaol or house of cor- 
rection, and always us«i as such. 

In St. Mary's Church, Watford, were monuments or stones to the following : 

Henry Ewer, gent., only son of Henry Ewer, of the Lea, of this parish, ob. 
Janoaiy 31, 1653. 

Henry Ewer, son of the above, ob. December 22, 1664. 

Hnmi^irey Ewer, second son of the above-named Henry, ob. February 3, 1666. 

Henry Ewer the elder, ob. October 24, 1657, aged 77. 

Elixabeth Ewer, only daughter of Henry Ewer the younger, ob. August 28, 
1647, aged 5 years. 

James Ewer, son of Henry, oK August I, 1650. 

The second wife of Sir Edward Tumor, Knight, Lord Chief Baron, who died 
at Bedford during the assizes, March 4, 1675, was Mary, daughter and heiress of 
Henry Ewer, of South Mimms, widow of William Ashton, of Tingreth, co. 
Bedford. No issue. (Bigland's ** Parochial Registers," p. 29.) 

Rickmansworth parish register gives : " Roger, son of Thomas and Alice Ewer, 
bapt<^ March 26th, 1669. George, son of same, Deer. 29th, 1666." 

No doubt the token-issuer was related to all of the above. 

215. ♦^. FRANCIS . HILL = A rOSC. 

R, IN . WATFORD = F . H. (3) \ 

216. *^. T . I ARM AN . IN . WATFORD . i = A doVC with olivC- 

branch, t . a . i. 1669. 
R, I . BVRGES . IN . WATFORD . J = A dovc with olivc-branch. 

I . M . B. 1669. (3) i 

This is a very curious token. It appears that either the obverse dies of each man 
were uken by the person who cast the tokens and used in mistake for the obverse 
aod reverse dies of either issuer, or that these two men (Jarman and Bvrges) were 
partners in trade, which is the more likely from their adopting the same emblem, 
-a dove." 

See another token of Burges at Bamct (No. 25). Bamet is ten miles east of 
Watford. 

217. *0. lOHN . LEMON « A roll of tobacco. 

R, IN . WATTFORD = I . S . L. (3) \ 

See William Leman, of Northaw, mentioned under No. 214. 
This has no inner circle on obverse. 

218. *0. lOHN . MORSE . OF . WATTFORD = TW0 UlicS with a 

skeleton holding an hour-glass and dart. 

R. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1 666. I . I . M. (3) J 

219. *0, lOHN . NEALE . IN . WATFORD = A Stlck of (s) CandlCS. 

R. TALLOW . CHANDLER . 1664 = 1 . H . N. i J 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



332 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



of 

1 



220. *0. lOHN . & . lONATHON . NEWMAN = A lioD rampsuiL 

jR. TALLOW . CHANDLER . WATFORD = | above a Stkk 

(7) candles. (5) 
Most likely these men were partners in trade. 

22i,rO. CAP . ROCKE . AT . THE = A Stag couchant 

■7?. IN . WAT . FORD . 1649 = A . M . R. (4) J 

222. O, GEORG . SMEANTH = HIS HALFE PENY. 

J^. IN . WATFORD . i668"=A man smoking and a roll ci 
tobacco under his left arm. g . s. (3) 1 

223. *0. THO . & . GEORGE . SMITH = THEIR HALFE PENY. 

jR, IN . WATFORD . 1 668 = A man smoking and a roll of 
tobacco under his left arm. t . g . s. (3) f 

It appears likely that George Smeanth and George Smith were one and tl^ 
same person, and that the die-sinker, having made a mistake in the first-named, 
added a " T " in the reverse die, and made it serve for the partners, and niade a 
new obverse die. I have been unable to inspect the register of the chorch. or 
proof to the contrary might have been found, viz., that they were two distinct pcnofts. 
and, if this was the case, even then the same reverse die could have been used, a& 
in the case of Nos. 151 and 152. 

224. *0. wiLUAM . WHiTTAKER=«Thc Mcrccrs' Arms. 

MERCER . IN . WATFORD . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PEIH. 
W . H . W. (3) t 



♦a 




WHEATHAMPSTEAD. 

Called Waiamestede in Domesday Book ; IVachamstede on a **Quo Wamoto," 
6 Edward I. (1278); Whethttmstede and Whethamsted on monuments in the 
church. The register dates from 1690. 

*0. I AMES . GREEN* . 1 659 = The Grocers' Arms. 



225. 



R, IN . WHEATHAMSTEAD 




I 



WORMLEY. 

A continuation of Hoddesdon and Broxboume towards Cheshnnt and 
called Wermelai in Domesday Book ; Wormlow^ 20 Edward III. (1347) ; He 
Uy^ Chauncy's " History of Hertfordshire." 

226. ♦C?. HENRY . SPARKS = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . WORMLY . 1665 = H . A . S. (4) \ 

In Broxboume Church is a memorial to "Ann Sparke, ob. July 4tb, 16761, agea 
7 mo*- '* (Chauncy). The register of St. Andrew, Hertford, gives : •* Mrs. Maiv 
Sparkes, of Broxboume, was buried Augt. 26th, 1 68 1.** In Bishops Stortfbrd 
Church is a memorial, which reads : *' Petrus Marcus Sparckivs, Phil et Medic. 
Doctor., obiit 1673, die xxiiii Septemb'., aetatis 67.** These are very Kkeiy 
relatives of the token-issuer. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ibuntingbonsbtre. 

MBER OF Tokens issued 73 

rMBER OF Places issuing Tokens 18 

WN Pieces issued at St. Ives and St, Neots. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



1)untingbon0bire. 

The Editor is indebted to Wm. Emery, Esq., of The Bank, St 
Neots, for much assistance given in the correction of this county, 
and to the esteemed sub-editor for Cornwall, R. N. Worth, Esq., for 
diligent research as to the proper habitat of the St lyes and St. 
Neots tokens. Many corrections from the first edition have been 
made, and but two new places of issue — Fenny Stanton and Glatton 
— have been dkcovered, although some twenty new tokens and 
varieties have been added to this small county. It is still a difficult 
matter to determine (he county to which the St Ives and St Neots 
tokens belong, but they have been arranged as far as can at present 
be determined. The prevalence of double places of issue in this 
county is unusual. There are tokens of Ramsey and Chatteris (27), 
St Ives and Ramsey (32), Infield and St Ives (43), Eynesbury and 
Poten (7). Probably the traders issuing them were successful men, 
with more than one house of business. There is one partnership token 
(46), W. and J. Perret Three St Ives issuers and one at Somersham 
give the name of the county, and at least four issuers bear family 
arms. The town pieces of St Ives and St Neots are particularly 
interesting, and from their legend appear to have been specially 
issued ioi the benefit of the female poor of the places of issue. 



ALCONBURY WESTON. 

1. O. THOMAS . ACHVRCH . OF = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
i?. ARCVMBVRY . CUM . WESVM = T . A . A. 



BUCKDEN. 

2. O. WILLIAM. REEVE* HIS HALFE PENNY, 
i?. OF . BVGDEN . 1667 = W . M • R. 

CATWORTH. 

3. O. lOHN . TALBOTT = I . T. 

i?. OF . CATWORTH . 1 668 — HIS HALF PENY. 



Digitized by 



Google 



336 TRADERS TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

ELTON. 

4. O. lOHN . MARCH . AT . y" = A crown. 

R. IN . ELTON . IVEN . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. 
The family of March still reside in the district " iven " means " JUNC ' 

EYNESBURY. 

5. O. HENERY . ASHLEY = H . A . A. 

/^. IN . EYNSBVRY= 1 668. \ 

6. O. ROBERT . BVLL . OF = A horsc's head bridled. 

jR. EANSBERY . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

A family named Bull still reside at the Nag's Head, Eynesbuir* 

7. O. ANDREW . SELBY . OF . i668 = A fleur-de-Hs. 

/^. EYNSBVREY . AND . POTEN = HIS HALF PENY. } 

FENNY STANTON. 

8. 0» TOBIAS . HARDMEAT = A hlVC. 

^. IN . FENEY . STANTON = HIS HALF PENY. j 

GLATTON. 

9. O. lOHN . SAMM = Cordwainers' Arms. 

jR. OF . GLATTON . 1664 = 1 . H . S. 

GODMANCHESTER. 

10. O, HENRY . BECK . 1669 = H . K . B. A SUgaT-lOttf. 

jR. AT . GODMANCESTER = HIS HALF PENY. 1 

11. O, ROBERT . CARLES . iN = Grocers' Arms. 

J?. GODMANCHESl'ER = R . C. J 

1 2. O, SAMVELL . CONNYE . OF = A COClc 

^. GODMANCHESTER = S . C. 1 

13. O, lOHN . SKEGGS . i668 = A double-headed eagle displayed 

jR. OF . GODMANCHESTER = HIS HALF PENY. I . S. \ 

14. O. WILLIAM . WRIGHT . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. OF . GODMANCHESTER = W . M . W. i 

HUNTINGDON. 



15. O. MARY . CHAMBERS = A CTOWn. 
jR, IN . HVNTINGTON . 57 = M . C. 

16. O. RICHARD. KNIGHT = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
jR, OF . HVNTINGTON . 1667 = R . M . K. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HUNTINGDONSHIRE. 337 

17. O. WILLIAM . LAMBE . AT . THE » Three crowns on the royal 

oaL 

J?. IN . HVNTINGTON . 1668:= HIS HALF PENY. 

18. O. IN . HVNTINGTON =T . P. 
jR. GROCER . 1658 = R . H. 

19. O. ROBERT . RABIE . IN>=R . P . R. 
J?. HVNTINGTON . DRAPER = 1653. 

KIMBOLTON. 

20. O. lOSIAH . KING » 1656. 
i?. OF . KIMBOLTON = I . A . K. 

21. O. lOHN . woLLASTON = Three cloves (the Grocers' Arms). 

J^. IN . KIMBOLTON = I . W, 

OFFORD CLUNY. 

22. O. lOHN . BRADLEY == St. George and the dragon. 

J^. IN . OFFORD . CLVNY = I . K . B. 

23. O, lOHN . BRADLY . OF = St. Gcorge and the dragon. 

J?. OFFORD . CLVNY . l66o = I . K . R 

RAMSEY. 

24. O. lOHN . BECKE . OF . RAMSEY = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. GROCER . HIS . HALF . PENY. = I . M . B. 

25. O, MILES . BERRiFFE = The Haberdashcrs' Arms. 

J?. IN . RAMSEY . 1666 »M . B. 

26. O. THE . GEORGE = W . S . F. 

J?. IN . RAMSEY = St. George and the dragon. 

27. O. lOHN . FRENCH . OF . 1669 = The Drapers' Arms. 

J?. RAMSEY . AND . CHATTERIS = HIS HALF PENY. 

28. O. lAMES . lARMAN == An arrow between i . i. 

J?. OF . RAMSEY . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENY. 

29. O. lAMES . iARMAN==An arrow-head. 

^. IN . RAMSEY . 1663=^1 . L 

30. O, lAMES . SHARPE = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . RAMSEY =^ I . S. 

31. O, WILLIAM . SHARPE = W . F . S. 
^. IN . RAMSEY . 1666 « HIS HALF PENY. 

32. O. lOHN . wiLLiAMES . 1 668= A plough. 

J^. OF . ST . IVES . AND . RAMSEY = HIS HALF PENY. TwO pipeS 

crossed. 

22 



Digitized by 



Google 



338 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



ST. IVES. 

33. O. The . Overseers . Halfe . Peny .of.St. Ives . 1669 (in five 

lines). 
J?. POOR . WOMEN = Two women washing in a tub. \ 

34. O. The . Overseers . Farthing , of , St . Ives . 1669 (in five 

lines). 
R. POOR . WOMEN = Two women washing in a tub. } 

35. O. THOMAS . ANDREWS = A buU. 

J?. OF . SAINT . IVES . 1663 = T . E . A. } 

36. O, THOMAS . BERRiFFE = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

R, OF . SAINT . IVES = T . M . B. \ 

37. O. ARON . BROWNE = An anchor. 

JR. OF . ST . IVES . 1659 = A . B. \ 

38. O, THOMAS . FILLBEE . OF . ST. = A CrOWn. 

JR, IVES . HIS . HALF . PENV = T . R . F. \ 

39. O. HEN . GOODFELLOW = Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . SAINT . IVES = H . M . between mullets. i 

40. O, EDWARD . HALLSEV = The Salters' Arms. 

R, IN . ST . IVES . 1663 = E . H. i 

41. O. EDWARD . HALLSEY = A sugar-loaf. 

R, OF . ST . IVES . 1667 = E . I . H. \ 

42. O. lOHN . IBBOTT = The Salters' Arms. 

R. OF . ST . IVES . 1663 = I . M . I. i 

43. O, THO . lOHNSON . OF . iNFEiLD^ A rose and crown. 

R, AND . ST . IVES . HIS . HALF . PENY = Arms J on a chevrtr. 
between three birds, as many swans. 

44. O, WILL. NOTTINGHAM = W . N. 

R. IN . ST . IVES = 1663. 4 

A variety of this token from a different die is known. 

45. O. ROBERT . PAIGE . OF = The Tallowchaudlers' Arms 

R. SAINT . IVES . 1663 = R . I . P. 

46. O. WILLIAM . AND . IOB = A bull. 

R. PERRET . IN . S . IVES = W . I . P. 4 

47. O, MARTIN . PRATT . IN . s . IVES = An angel. M . s . p. 

R, COVNTY . OF . HVNTINGTON = HIS | HALFE | PENNY (in ihrct 

lines). 

48. O, EDWARD . RABIE . IN . ST . IVES = A CrOWn. 

R. COVNTY . OF . HVNTINGTON = Three tuns. 



Digitized by 



Google 



HUNTINGDONSHIRE. 339 

49. O. lONATHAN . READ = The Habcrdashers' Arms. 

J^. IN . SAINT . IVES = I . R . R. 

50. O, THOMAS . REwsE . IN . s^ . IVES = St. Gcorgc and the 

dragon. 

^. COVNTY . OF . HVNTINGTON = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

51. O, THOMAS . STOCKER . OF . ST = A dolphin. 

jR, IVES . HIS . HALF . PEN Y = T . M . S. ^ 

ST. NEOTS. 

52. O. THE . OVERSEERS . OF = THEIR HALFE PENY. 

J^, THE . TOWNE . OF . ST . BEDS = Two womcn Seated, making 
lace. } 

53. A variety has on the reverse, the . towne . of . st . neots = 

Two women seated, making lace. ^ 

54. O, THOMAS . ANNis . OF = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

^. SAINT . NEOTTS . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. | 

This token has been dug up in St. Neots, Hunts, upon premises belonging to 
r. Emery on the north side of the Market Square in 185 1, and Gorham*s History 
ites it was also found in 181 8. 

55. O, ROBERT. DOM AN . 1 664 = The Drapers' Arms. 

jR. IN . S^ . NEOTS . DRAPER = R . E . D. { 

56. O. Detrited. 

J?. SAINT . NEITS = M 

57. O. THOMAS . HANCOCKE = A frying-pan. t . h. 

-A*. OF . SAINT . NEOTS . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

This token was dug up in this town in 1887 by Mr. George Abraham Baker. 

58. O. lOHN . HATLY . BAKER = HIS HALFPENY. 

jR. IN . ST . NEOTES . i668==Nine rolls, or rolls of bread 
lozengly. ^ 

59. O. lOHN . HATLEY . IN = A sword in bend sinister between 

two etoiles. J 

J^. SAINT . NEOTS = M (monogram). 

60. O, lOHN . NEWMAN = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . S^ . NEOTS = I . M . N. J 

61. O. THOMAS . NEWMAN = The Mercers' Arms. 

jR, IN . S*^ . NEOTS . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. T.E.N. J 

62. O. lOB . PERRETT . i666 = The Salters' Arms. 

^. AT . SAINT . NEEDS = 1 . M . P. \ 

SAVVTRY. 

63. O. ROBERT . MiCHELL = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

A OF. SAWTRY . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

22 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



340 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



SOMERSHAM. 

64. O. NATHANIELL . DREW . AT . THE« A bull 

^. IN . SVMERSHAM . IN . HVNT . SH = HIS HALF PENT. 

65. O. RICH . KILLINGLY . AT . Y" . GREAT = A bull. R . K. 
J?. BVLL . OF . SVMERSHAM . 1 67 1 « HIS HALF PKIfT. 

66. O. lOHN . SMITH . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 

J?. OF . SVMERSHAM = A man chopping a log of wood. 



STILTON. 

67. O. lOHN . EVERELL = A sugar-loaf. 

J^. OF . STILTON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. I . E . t J 

68. O. WILLIAM. FLOWER = TOLEM AN. W. F. 

J^. OF. STILTONE. l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. } 

This token, and another, of William Hall, of Doncaster, are the 011I7 isstiKa 
of tokens issued by tollmen. They are interesting from the fact that toll-ban vot 
established just at this period ; the first Turnpike Road Bill having been passed a 
1663. The almost impttssable state of the roads rendered such a measure necoir* 
A journey of two hundred miles at that time was thought to have been a rap«i ok 
if accomplished within a week. 

69. O. RICHARD . GiNN = The ButchcFS* Arms. 

J?. IN . STILTON . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY. R . M . a i 

These are found in both brass and copper. 

70. O, Thomas . Ba// , his . Half, Peny, 1669 (script). 

R, At . Stilton (two lines, script) = An angel. (OctagomaL) 

71. O, lOHN . METHERINGHAM . AT . Y" = A globe OH a Stand 
R, GLOBE . IN . STILTON . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENY. I . M . M. \ 

72. O. Thomas I Warde . his \ Halfpenny \ 1669 | (script, in £* 

lines). 
R, Stilton (script) and above it an angel. 



WOOD HURST. 

73. O, WILLIAM I BVRGIS | HIS . HALF | PENNY (in four linCS). 

R, IN I wooDHVST I i6b8. w . s . B (all across the field). 



Digitized by 



Google 



HUNTINGDONSHIRE. 341 

The following extracts referring to the token-issuers of this coonty are taken 
rom a '*Duphcate or copy of certain returns (since last returns) concerning 
lumber of fire-hearths and stoves in the countv of Huntingdonshire exhibited to 
i.M. Justices at next General Sessions holden at Huntingdon on Tuesday, 
5 Jan., i8 Car. II.," in the Record Office, and numbered to correspond with the 
okens: 

BUCKDBN. 

Na 2. A Robert Reeves was assessed for 5, and Rayment R. for 4. 

Great Catworth. 
No. 3. John Talbott, 5. 

GODMANCHBSTBR. 

Na 14. Nicholas Wright, 3 ; John W., 2. 

Huntingdon. 
Na 17. William Lamb, senr., 4, empty. Richard Amnsby, owner ; Chas. L., 5. 
Na 19. Robert Rabie, 3. 

KiMBOLTON. 

Na 2a Josiah King, gent, 6, fallen down since Ladyday, 1663. 
Na 21. John Wollaston, gent, 3. 

St. Ives. 
Na 35. Thomas Andrews, 5, now John Bond. 
No. 36. Thomas Berriffe, 5 ; I a smith's forge, now Edw. Wallis. 
No, 37. Aaron Browne, 4 ; Thos. B., I. 
No. 4a Edward Hallsey, 6. 

No. 42. John Ilbott, 5, and as owner of the houses occupied by Thos. Cooke 
Lud Thos. Bright he is a>sessed for 2 more. 
Na 43. John Johnson, junr., I, now John Randall. 
Na 44. Thos. Nottingham, i ; not worth (himseU) 20s. per ann. 
No. 45. Robert Page, gent., 6. 
No. 48. Edward Rabie, 13. 
Na 51. Thos. Stocker, 3 ; now Thos. Ilatt Richard Stocker, 2. 

Ramsey. 
Na 25. A Michael Berriffe, I ; not worth 208. p. a. John B., of Keiston, 
^t., charged for 2 ; empty, 2 years. Mr. Sawyer of . . . ., owner. 
Na 28. lames Jermyn, 3 ; i returned too many. 
Na 3a Willm. Sharpe, 8 ; returned 2 too many. 

Offord Cluny. 
No. 22. John Bradley, now Samuel Meager, 4. 

St. Neots. 
No. 55. Robert Dolman, 5. 
Na 57. John Hancock e, gent, 2. 
No. 60. John Newman, jun., 4. 
Na 62. Job Perrelt, 3. 

Sawtry. 
Na 63. Robert Michell, 2 ; George M., 4, empty. Lord Devonshire, owner. 
Augustine M., i, pulled down. 

Somersham. 
Na 65. Richard Killingly, 5. 
Na 66. A Rowland Smith was assessed for 3, and Thos. S. for 2. 

Stilton. 
Na 69. Thot. and Gea Ginn, 2 each, and Richd. Gyny, 6, i too many. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



•Rent. 



Number of Tokens issued . 

NUBCBER OF places ISSUING TOKENS 

Town Pieces issued at Dover. 



Sub-Editor and Collabarateur : 



595 
103 



Luther Clements, Esq., 

Peckham Rye, Surrey. 



Digitized by 



Google 



-1 



Digitized by 



Google 



Itent 

The tokens issued in this county during the seventeenth century 
must have numbered over 600 varieties, of which 595 are here enu- 
merated, issued in 103 towns and villages. 

Mr. Boyne, in 1858, published a list of 486 tokens from ninety-six 
places. 

Of the towns not mentioned in the former list, there are twelve, 
viz., Biddenden, Brenchley, Farnborough, Kemsing, Larkfield, Lewis- 
ham, Milton-nextSittingbourne, Ryarsh, Sheerness, Willesborough, 
and Woterenbury. 

The following towns have (for reasons stated at the end of list) 
been omitted : Bonington, Hurst, Lee, Poulton, South, and some 
tokens wrongly placed under Appledore, Dover, Stoke, and Strood, 
thirteen in all. 

Of the current value of the tokens there was only one penny, the 
remainder being halfpence and farthings, of which one is square, five 
heartshape, and ten octagonal, the rest being round. 

The circulation of Kentish tokens commenced by the issue of 
one at Deptford in 1648, and during the next year, 1649, six were 
issued in places as far distant from each other as Deptford and Dover, 
and in villages as small as Eltham. They were continued in all 
parts of the county until the year 1672, when they were suppressed 
by royal proclamation. 

The corporation of Dover was the only one which issued tokens 
for the use of the poor. All classes of persons seem to have issued 
tokens ; we have them from the aristocracy represented by James 
Herbert, son of the Earl of Pembroke, Shurland ; Sir Charles Sedley, 
Honychild, Sir John Cobham, Rochester, down to John Ellis, the 
corn-backer or carrier of Faversham, and Poare Ned, of the same 
town. Twenty-eight were issued by women. 

Of the devices on the tokens there are a great variety, the roost 
prominent being : a crown under a rainbow, a lion and sun, heads of 
the King, Queen, and Duke of York; a flying horse, hen and 
chickens, a frying-pan, etc. Many also have arms denoting the tcades 
of the issuers — brewers, grocers, mercers, bakers, blacksmiths, etc., 
also private or family arms, and a few which are uncertain, though 
incomplete, descriptions. 

I cannot finish this pceface without thanking the following gentle- 
men for the kind assistance they have rendered me : Rev. T. S. 



Digitized by 



Google 



346 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

Frampton, Sevenoaks ; F. Whelan, Esq., London ; W. S. Smith, Esq., 
Belvedere ; and others. 

For notes on the East-Kent tokens I am indebted to H. W. Rolfe, 
Esq., late of Sandwich, who, in 1862-3-4, communicated a series oi 
papers to the Numismatic Society. 

I have been able to correct the reading of no less than fifty-four, 
as described by Mr. Boyne, and can vouch for the correctness « 
nearly all the tokens, having a collection of over 430 myself, and 1 
have seen many others in various collections. 

Luther Clements 

130, Peckham Rye. 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 



347 



APPLEDORE. 

1. O. lOHN . BOVRNE . 1669 = Arms of France and England quar- 

terly, crowned. 

^. OF. APPLEDORE = I . S . B. HIS DOVBLE TOKEN. 

ASHFORD. 

2. O. lAMES . BASSETT = St. Geofgc and the dragon. 

J^. IN . ASHFORD . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 
The George Inn is still in Ashford. 

3. O. FRANCES . BAYLEF . AT . THE = A buU. 
J^, PYD . BVLL . IN . ASHFORD = F . I . B. 



4. O. WILLIAM . BOTTiNG . 1 669 = A malt-shovel. 

J^. OF . ASHFORD . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. 



W . S . B. 



5. O. BENiAMiN . BOWYER = The Haberdashers* Anns. 

J^. IN . ASHFORD . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. 

6. O, lAMES . CHITTENDEN = A drinking-pot. I . m . c. 

/^. OF . ASHFORD . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

7. O. THOMAS . CLERXE . AT . Y= . PYD = A bull. 
J^, BVLL . IN . ASHFORD . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. T . E . C. 

8. O, lOHN . DENN . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 
A OF . ASHFORD = I . M . D. 

9. O, THOMAS . FENNER . AT = The Grocers* Arms. 

A ASHFORD . IN . KENT . [l6]S7 =T . M . F. 

10. O, THOMAS. FLINT =1664. 
J?. IN . ASHFORD = T . S . F. 

1 1. O. WILLIAM . OSBORNE = The Groccrs' Arms. 

^. OF . ASHFORD . 1663 = W .P.O. 

Richard Osborne, Esquire, of Ashford, was the father of Sir Edward Osborne, 
ord Mayor of London, in the twenty-fifth year of Queen Elizabeth. 

12. O, THOMAS. REDFEiLD = Checkers. 

^. OF . ASHFORD . IN . KENT. T . A . R. 

13. A variety reads rudfeild. 

The Qieqners Inn was pulled down many years since ; it stood on the north-east 
ie of the church. 

14. O. MARY. STEED = HER HALF PENY. 
^. IN . ASHFORDEsM . S. 1 669. 

15. O. ROBERT . WAGE . l668 = R . M . W. 
/^. OF . ASHFORD . IN . KENT » HIS HALF PENY. 



Digitized by 



Google 



J 



348 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

1 6. O. ROBERT . WALBE . 0F = A pair of shears (octagonal). 

J^. ASHFORD . IN . KENT . 69 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

17. O. HEN . WISE . HIS . HALF . PENY = The Groccrs* Anns. 

J^. IN . ASHFORD . 1664 = H . E . W. \ 

18. O. SAMVELL . WOOD . i666 = A Saraccn's head. 

J^. AT . ASHFORD . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. f 

The Saracen's Head is still the principal inn of the town. 

AYLESFORD. 

19. O. RICHARD . HOCKLEY . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. ALSFORD . GROCER . 1652 =R . H. } 

20. O. EDMON . SMITH . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. ALSFORD . IN . KENT = E . M . S. i 

BENENDEN. 

21. O. RICHARD . GRANT . OF = The Gfoccrs' Arms. 

J?. BENENDEN . IN . KENT = R . M . G. \ 

BEXLEY. 

22. O. lOHN . THORNDELL . IN . BECKSLEY^ An OX and axe. 

J?. IN . KENT . HIS . HALFE . PENY « I . S . T. 1667. } 

BIDDENDEN. 

23. O. RICHARD . FOSTER . i668 = A Uon rampant. 

/^, IN . BIDDENDEN . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENNY. J 

24. O. RICH . FOSTER . OF . BIDDENDEN = A llon rampant 

J?. IN . KENT . HIS . HALFE . PENY = R . I . F. The firSt tTO 

letters conjoined. 

25. O, ALEXANDER. HOMESBY=HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^. IN . BIDDENDEN . IN . KENT = A . H . H. } 

26. O. ALIXANDER . HOLMSBY-1658. 

J?. OF . BEDDENDEN . IN . KENT = A . H. { 

27. O. ALEXANDER. LINDRIDGE = HIS HALF PENY. 

J?. OF . BIDDENDEN . 1671 = A . M . L. ■ J 

28. O. THOMAS . SCEELLES = A ship. 

J?. IN . BIDDENDEN . l666 = T .M.S. \ 

BRASTED. 

29. O. WILLIAM . LINES =1666. 

J?. BRE3TED . IN . KENT = W . M . L. t 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 34^ 

BRENCHLEY. 
;o O. WILLIAM . wooDGAT = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^. OF . BRENCHLY . 1654 = W . M . W. \ 

\1, O. WILLIAM . WOODGAT= 1659. 

J^. OF . BRENCHLY . 1654 = W . M . W. \ 

"his is a singular token, having two dates. William Woodgate must have got 
rt of his 1054 farthings, and in 1659 used the old reverse die for his new 
sns. 
"his token is in the sub-editor's collection. 

J 2. O, WILLIAM . WOODGATE . 1 664 (in thrcc lines). 

A IN . BRENCHLEY = W . M . W. \ 

53. O. WILLIAM . WOODGATE . 1667 (in three lines). 

R, IN. BRENCHLEY = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

have not heard of another man issuing four tokens. All these were unknown 
^r. Bojne. 

BROMLEY. 

34. O. THOMAS . GHOST . AT . THE = A hart lodged. 

I^. IN . BROMLY . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

35. O. ROBERT . KiNGE . iN = Two keys crossed. 

li. BROMLEY . IN . KENT = R . M . K. \ 

36. O. MiCHAELL . (lee . Y° . wHi'i^E ?) = A hart lodged. 

J^. IN . BRVMLEY . 1664 = M . E . L. \ 

rhe White Hart is still standing ; it is a large inn, and appears to have been 
ch used in the old coaching days. 

37. O. lOHN . PERCivALL . OF . 1667 = A roU of tobacco. 

R. BRVMLEY . HIS . HALF . PENY = 1 . E . P. ^ 

38. O. WILLIAM . WALDRON . OF . BRVMLY = A man making 

candles. 

R, IN . KENT . HIS . HALF . PENNY = W . A . W. ^ 

BROOKLAND. 

39. O, lOHN . EVE . AT . 1671 =The Grocers' Arms. 

R, BROOKLINE . GROCER = I . K . E. J. J 

40. O. lOHN . EVE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . BROOKLAND = I . K . F, \ 

41. O. lOHN . HARRISON . BRUCKLAND (In four lines). 

R. Agoat = i . H. J 

CANTERBURY. 

42. O, THO . BAKER . CHEESMONGR = A hand holding a pair of 

scales. 

R, OF . CANTERBVRY . 1 667 = HIS DVBBLE TOAKEN. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



350 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

43. O. FRANCIS . BANiCK = A whcatshcaf. 

^. IN . CANTERBVRY = F . M . B. \ 

44. O. THOMAS . BEST . COOPER = The Vintncrs' Arms. 

J^, IN . CANTERBVRYE . 1650 = T . M . a { 

45. O, THO . BVLLOCK . AT . THE . BVLL = A bull's head. 

J?. HEAD . IN . CANTERBVRY = T . B. \ 

46. O. THOMAS . BVRDEN . OF = A vasc of flowers. 

J?. CANTERBVRY . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. T . V . B. I 

47. O, lOHN . CARDON . IN = A roll of bread. 

J^, CANTERBVRY . 1656 = 1 . D . C. J 

48. O. HENRY . CARPENTER = 1667. 

R, IN . CANTERBVRY = HIS HALF PENY. J 

49. O. HENREY . CARPENTER = 1 658. 

J^, IN . CANTERBERY = H . S . C. \ 

50. O. lAMES . CHEEVER = A hand holding a pair of shears. 

J?. IN . CANTERBVRY . 1663 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

51. O. lAMES . CHEEVER = A hand holding a pair of shears. 

J?. IN . CANTERBVRY [l6]57 =1 . C. \ 

52. Another is dated [16J62. i 

53. O. EDWARD . CRAYFORD . IN = A black boy smoking. 

J?. CANTERBVRY . GROCER = E . B . C. • 

54. O, THO . ENFIELD . IN . MERCERY = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J?. LANE . IN . CANTERBVRY . 1 666= HIS HALF PENY. : 

55. O. THOMAS . ENFIELD . IN . MERCERY = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J?. LANE . IN . CANTERBVRY . l666 = T . S . E. } 

Thomas Enfield was mayor of Canterbury in 1674. 

56. O, ANTHONY . FAGG . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . CANTERBVRY = A . M . F. } 

57. O. THOMAS . FEiLD . IN = A Saracen's head 

J?. CANTERBVRY . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. 5 

58. O, EDWARD . FRAY . IN = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

J?. CANTERBVRY. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. E . S . F. l 

59. O, THOMAS . HVTTEN . PEVTERER = The Pcwterers' Arms. 

J?. I.N . CANTERBERY . 1 669 = A griffin. 1d. {Octagonai.) \ 
This token is interesting, it being the only penny in the whole Kent series. 

60. O, THOMAS . IENINGES = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, OF . CANTERBVRY . 1 669 = A man smoking and makin: 
candles. t 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



KENT. 351 

61. O. THOMAS . lENiNGS . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, CANTERBVRY . GROCER = T . B . I. \ 

62. O. AT . THE . SHIP . IN = A ship. 

I^. CANTERBERY . l653 = M . S . K. \ 

63. O. FRANCIS . MAPLiSDEN = A bunch of hops. 

R. IN . CANTERBVRY . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

64. O, FRANCIS . MAPELSDAN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . CANTERBVRY . i666 = A bunch of hops. i 

Francis Maplisden was Mayor of Canterbury in 1668. 

65. O. WALTER . MAPLISDEN = A dovc with an olive-branch. 

R. IN . CANTERBVRY = W . S . M. \ 

66. O, JEREMIAH . MASTERSON . AT = Checkers. {Octagonal,) 

R. IN . CANTERBERRY . HIS . HALF . PENNY. I . M . M (in 

seven lines). ^ 

The Chequers Inn is the most interesting house in Canterbury ; it is also known 

by the name of Chaucer's Inn, it having been the lodging place of Chaucer and 

his troop of pilgrims when visiting the shrine of St. Thomas k. Becket in the 

caihelral. 

In 1475 Edward IV. entertained at the Chequers the Earl of Essex, treasurer of 

England, and many noblemen and gentlemen. 

67. O. THOMAS . MAYNE . GROCER = A Still. 

R. IN . CANTERBVRY . 1664 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

68. O. THO . MAYNE . GROCER = A Still. 

R, IN . CANTERBVRY . 1654 = T . M . M. \ 

69. O, THOMAS . OCKMAN = The arms of the Ockham family ; a 

fesse between three crescents, t . o. 

R, IN . CANTERBVRY = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

70. O. THOMAS . OCKMAN = The Ockham Arms, t . o. 

R. IN . CANTERBVRY = T . E . O. 
Thomas Ockman was Mayor of Canterbury in 1658 and again in 1665. 

71. O. THE . SARisoNS . HEAD = A Saracen's head. 

R. IN . CANTERBVRY . 1653 = 1 . M . P. 

72. O. AT . THE . MAIRMAYD = A mermaid. 

R, IN . CANTERBVRY = D . M . R. 
The old inn is now called the Music Hall Tavern. 

73. O. AT . THE . 3 . MARRENORS = Three seamcn standing. 

R. IN . CANTERBERY = T . M . S. 

74. O. loSEPH . SHERWOOD . IN = A woolpack. 

R, CANTERBVRY . GROCER = I . A . S. 

75. O. lOHN . SIMPSON = A lion rampant. 

R, IN . CANTERBVRY , 1653 = 1 . I . S. 
John Simpson was Mayor of Canterbury in 1667. 



Digitized by 



Google 



352 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

76. O. RICHARD . SMITH = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . CANTERBVRY = R . £ . S. \ 

77. O, SIBB . SMITH . NEER»=S . S. 

R, WEST . GATE . CANTERB = S . & \ 

78. A variety reads canterbvry. \ 

79. O. WILL . TERREY . AT . THE = A globe. 

R, GLOBE . IN . CANTERBVRYE = W . E . T. \ 

80. O. AT . THE . 3 . KINGS = The three magL 

R, IN . CANTERBRY = E . A . W. \ 

81. A variety has = e . m . w. % 

82. O, RICHARD . WHITE . BARBER = A COmb. 

R. IN . CANTERBVRY . l656«R . A . W. \ 

83. O. lARViSE , wiLLMATT = A horse. 

R, IN. CANTERBVRY. 1 664 » HIS HALF PENY. \ 

84. A variety reads his halfe peny. * 



CHARING. 



i 



85. O. THOMAS , CHAPMAN . AT . y" . RED = A llOn. 
R, AT . CHERING . HOTH . HIS . ^ . PENY = T . F . C 1666. 

86. O. ALLEXANDER . HART . IN = The Grocefs' Arms, a . h. 

R. CHARING . IN . KENT . GROCER == HIS HALF PENY. 1667. .* 

87. O. lOHN . MORS . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, CHARING . IN . KENT . 1651 =1 . M . M. | 

CHATHAM. 

88. O, lOHN . ADAMS . GVNER « A cannon mounted. 

R, IN . CHATHAM . 1657 = I . S . A. \ 

89. O. FRANCIS . BRETT = A COmb. 

R, IN . CHATHAM . l666» F . S . B. \ 

90. O. RICHARD . CRESWELL= 1666. 

R. MEALMAN . IN . CHATHAM = R . H . C. | 

91. O. ROBERT . DIER . OF = HIS HALF PENY. R . I . D, 

R, CHATHAM . IN . KENT = A catherine-wheel. 

92. O. WILLIAM . HARDIN . IN = Arms ; three fishes. 

R. CHATTHAM . IN . KENT = W . A . H. ^ 

93. O. lOSHVA . HOLLAND = A cask. 

R, IN . CHATHAM . l668«I . M . H. : 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 353 

%, O, lOHN . lEFFERY = I . E . I. 

jR, IN . CHATTHAM = A checse-knife. 
5. O, RICHARD . lEN . HIS . HALF=> A horseshoe. 

JR. PENNY . OF . CHETHAM . l668 = R .E.I. 

S. O. RICHARD . lENNMAN = A bugle-hom. 

Ji. IN . CHATTHAM = R . P . I. 
tavern called the Trampet is still standing in High Street 

7. O. WALTER. lONES . AT . v" . NAGS . HED = A DEg's head and 

bunch of grapes, w . 1 . i. 

H. TAVERNE. IN . CHATHAM = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667. 

8. O, AT . THE . GLOBE . IN = A globe. 
Ji. CHATHAM . 1662 =W , S . I. 

9. A variety is dated 1667. 
he Globe is now one of the principal hotels in Chatham. 

00. O. lOHN . KNIGHT = A crown. 

R. IN . CHATHAM = I . O . K. 

01. O. SAM YELL . MABBOR = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . CHATAME . 1657=8 . S . M. 

02. O. lOHN . MARVELL = A frying-pan. 

R, IN . CHATHAM . l666 = I . D . M. 

103. O. RICHARD . MATHEWS = The Merchant-tailors' Arms. 

R. OF . CHATHAM . IN . KENT = R . M . M. 

[04. O. WALTER . RAMSDEN = A cannon mounted. 
R. LiVEiNG . AT . CHATTAM = An anchor. 

105. O, AT . THE . GLODE . IN = A globe. 
R, CHATHAM . 1657 =T. M . S. 

106. O. FRANCIS . SANDERS = The Merchant-tailors' Anns. 

R. IN . CHATHAM = F . A . S. 

107. O, ROBERT . SMITH . AT . YE . OLD = The King's Arms. 

R, KINGS . ARMES . 167I = IN . CHATHAM. J. 

\ variety reads : 

108. O, ROBERT . SMITH . AT . Yb . OLD = The King's Arms. 

R, IN . CHATHAM . 1671 =HIS HALF PENY. R . I . S. 

109. O. lOHN . TiHVRST . BREWER = The Brewers' Arms. 
R. IN . CHATTAM . 1 666 = A Star with small star on one of 

the points, i . t. 

no. 0. lOSEPH . WYMSHVRST = The Merchant-tailors* Arms. 

R, IN . CHATHAM . 1656 = I . M . W. 

1 1 1. A variety has the reverse, in . chattvm = i . m . w. 

The names of Jeffery, Saunders, and Smith are still to be met with in Chatham. 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



354 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

CHILHAM. 

112. O, lOHN . COLEMAN . 1 664 = Arms J a chevron between three 

fleurs-de-lis. 

jR. IN . CHILLOM . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The name of Coleman is still common in Chilham. 

113. O. lAMES . ODDEN . 1664 = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. IN . CHILLOM . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. § 

114. O. lAMES . ODDEN . 1659 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. IN . CHILLOM . IN . KENT = I . O. ] 

115. O. WILLIAM . PLVMERssThe Grocers' Arms. 

^. OF . CHILHAM . IN . KENT = W . P. A 

COWDEN. 

116. O. I AM . lEA . . . TALLOW » A Stick of caiidles on a crescent 

moon, surrounded by seven stars. 

J?. CHAN . IN . COVDEANE = I .M.I. \ 

117. O. lOHN . OSBORNE = 1663. 

^. COWDEANE . MERCER = I . M . O. | 

CRANBROOK. 

118. O. lOHN . AVERY . OF = Three doves. 

^. CRANBROOKE . MERCER = I . F . A. \ 

The following are extracts from the church register : 

1656. October 2. A consent of marriage was published betweene John Avery, 
of Salehurste, in the county of Sussex, mercer, son of Thomas Avery, of Westfidi 
in the said county, yeoman, and Frances Turke, of Cranbrooke, in the couotj oi 
Kent, spinster, daughter of Theophilus Turke, of Tenterden, in the said county, 
joyner ; were married. 

Thoi Plvmer. 

The reisgters of burials are : 

1678. November 7. John Avery. 

1687. June 14. Frances Avery, vid (va). 

119. O. THOMAS . BUTTERREY . OF== A man making candles. 

J?. CRANBROOKE . MERCER = T. M. B. 1 666. J 

120. O. THOMAS . DANIEL . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

^. CRANBROCKE . IN . KENT = T . D. { 

The following are from the church registers : 

Marriages. — 1626. November 16. Thomas Daniell et Alice Monke. 
Buryalles. — 1658. September 7. Alis Monck, wife of Thomas Daniell, of Crac- 
brooke Towne, mercer, and daughter of Jeffery Monck, sawyer. 
1677. November 7. Thomas Daniell. 
And only five days after : 

1677. November 12. Sarah, wife of Thomas Daniell. 
Thomas Daniell was churchwarden of Cranbrook in 1660 and also in 1664. 

121. O. RICH . FRANCKWELL = King's head with crown anu 

sceptre. 

J^. IN . CRAMBROOKE . [l6]S7 =R . E . F. J 

The following are from the church registers : 

Births.~i653. February 13. Richard Frankwell, son of Richard FiankwcU 
vintner, and Elizabeth Adams, his wife. 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 355 

Baryalles. — 1653. May 6. Richard Frankwell, puer. 

Births.— 1656. July 13. Walter Frank well, son of Richard Frank well, vintner, 
and of Elizabeth Adams, his wife. 

Births.— 1660. June 3. Elizabeth Frank well, daughter of Richard Frank well, 
at the King's Heaid, vintner, and of Elizabeth Adams, uxor. 

Baryalles.— 1662. July 17. Elizabeth Franckwell, wife of Richard Frankwell, 
and daughter of John Adams, of Chatton, innholder. 

The next extract not only records a fatal accident at the King's Head, temp» 
Elizabeth, but proves that the house derived its name from a Tudor king : 

Buryailes.— 1599. October 18. William Bettes, of Hide (Hy the), brooke his 
necke by a fall down a payer of stayers at the Kinge's Head. 

1667. September 30. A stranger that died at the King's Head. 

This very old house is no longer a tavern, but is still well known, and is now a 
draper's shop. An excellent open spring which up to the present day supplies all 
the lower part of the town with water, is called King's Head Well, and was the 
property of that house. 

122. O, THOMAS. MANDY=l666. 

R. IN . CRANBROOKE = T . R . M. \ 

Thomas Mandy contributed 6d. towards the thirty thousand pounds required to 
recover English captives out of Turkish slavery. 

From the register : 

Buriall.— 1679. October 28. Thomas Mandy. 

'* An affidavit was brought me 4th of November with a certificate that the said 
Thomas was buried in Woolen under the hands of SamL Boys." 

123. O. ROBERT . MARCH . OF = R .CM. 

R. CRANBROCH . MERCER = 1657. \ 

The name of Robert March does not occur in the parish registers, but there are 
several entries with the same surname. 

Alexander, William, and Thomas March were sidesmen and overseers between 
the years 1617 and 1638. 

124. O. PETER . MASTER . MERCER = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. CRANBROOCK . IN . KENT = P .A.M. \ 

Among the parish registers only one is found containing the name of Master : 
Marriages. — 1665. June ^. A consent of marriage was published betweene 
Stephen South, of the parish of Saynt Mildred, in the city of Canterbury, cloth- 
worker ; and Katherine Master, of Cranbrook, spinster, daughter of Peter Master, 
of this parish, mercer ; were married before Thomas Plumer, Esquire, one of the 
justices of the peace of this county. 

125. O, THOMAS . MVN . DRAPER = The Drapers' Arms. 

R. OF . CRANBROOCK . IN . KENT = T . M . M. large \ 

This was a large family in Cranbrook ; they filled the offices of sidesmen, over- 
<«eers, and surveyors, and followed the trades of butchers, mercers, drapers, and 
broad -weavers. 

Of twenty-five entries of this family on the church registers three only appear to 
relate to the issuer of the token : 

Buryalles. — 1 691. March 27. Thomas Mann. 

„ 1 691. July 23. Frances, daughter of Mary Mann. 

„ 1695. October 10. Mary Mann, widd. 

126. O. lOHN . PARTON . IN . CRAN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, BROOK . IN . KENT . 1669 = I . D . P. J 

The following entries occur in the parish registers : 

Births. — 1665. October 27. Mary, daughter of John Parton, and Dorothy, his 
wife. 

1673. May 26. Dorothy, daughter of John Parton, and Dorothy, his wife. 

23—2 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



3S6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

And another daughter, Elizabeth, was baptized November 9^ 1667. 
Buryalles. — 1676. August 24. John Parton. 

127. O, WILLIAM . WACHER . IN = Three sugar-loaves. 

J^, CRANBROOK . IN . KENT = W . M . W. J 

The issuer of this token was twice committed to Maidsione gaol for inteimpting 
church services, and during his second imprisonment died there, after a confinement 
of ten weeks. 

128. O. MARY . wiLUS . 1669 = The Pewterers' Arms. 

J?. OF . CRANBROOCK == HER HALK PENY. I . M . W. § 

Marriage. — 1661. September 16. John Willis, of Goudhurst, in the ooonty of 
Kent, clothier, son of William Willis, of Tunbridge, husbandman, and Mary 
Merriam, of Goudhurst, in the county aforesaid, spinster, daughter of Tbomas 
Merriam, of Goudhurst, in the county of Kent, husbandman, were maiyed by 
William Goodrich, minister of Cranbrook parish — Goodrich was Presbyterian 
minister in the church during the Commonwealth. 

Buryall. — 1678. August 13. Mary Willis, widow. 

(We are indebted to William Tarbutt, Esq., of Cranbrook, for the whole of the 
notes on tokens of this town.) 

CRUNDALE. 

129. O. EDWARD . PECK = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^. OF . CRVNDEN . 1 667 = E . P. J 

DARTFORD. 

130. O. ROBERT . CAPON . i668 = The Tallowchandlers' Anns. 

J^. IN . DARTFORD . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. R . I . C. i 

There is no mention of Robert Capon in the registers, but the following entry 
occurs : Ann Capon was buried August 3, 1688. 

131. O. NiCHOLLAS . CHAMBERS = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, IN . DARTFORD . 1664 = N . M . C { 

His memorial in the north aisle of Dartford Church reads as follows : 
NichoUas Chambers, late of this parish, gent., dyed nth October, in the year of 

our Lord 1685. 
On, April 26, 1677, he was one who signed the churchwardens* accounts, and io 

several subsequent years. In 1685 was churchwarden, and died during his T«ir 

of office. 

132. O. THOMAS . GILL . OFs= A hand holding scissors. 

^. DARTFORD . l659 = T . A . G. \ 

He was a tailor and cloth-merchant. During the Commonwealth and after the 
Restoration he filled some important positions in parish matters in Dartford. Id 
1652 he was me of the overseers. In 1660 was made one of the trustees of the 
grammar school. In 1662 was surveyor of highwa}'s. and in 1667 one of th^- 
churchwardens. 

In the churchwardens' accounts for the year 1660 there occurs the foUowio^ 
entry : Pd. Thomas Gill for lining the pulpit-cloth 6s. lod. He died in September, 
1667, whibt churchwarden. 

133. O. ROBERT . GLOVER . OF = A bull. 

J^. DARTFORD . IN . KENT = R . I . G. \ 

He was a vintner, and his name occurs ;n a deed or lease dated 1660^ under «h:ch 

himself and nineteen other inhabitants of Dartford hold some church lands. In all 

probability Robert Glover kept the old Bull at Dartford, an ancient inn, still ciw 

ing, and a noted house in the old coaching days. 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 357 

134- O. WILLIAM . HVISH = A cock. 

/^, DERTFORD . IN . KENT = W . A . H. J 

He was one who signed the churchwardens' accounts on " May, ye i8th, 1663, 
for ye year ending Lady-day," and was churchwarden in 1679. 

135. O. ISAAC. MANNING. 1664 = Arms of the Manning family ; a 

cross fiory between four trefoils. 

^. OF . DARTFORD . IN . KENT == HIS FARTHING. large \ 

The only entry in the Dartford register relating to this issuer is as follows : 
A child of Isaac Manning buried 20th August, 1666. 

136. O. THO . MORLEY . AT . y" . HORSHO = A horSC-ShoC. 

J?. AT . DARFORD . IN . KENT = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

137. O. HENRY . PEiRCE . OF = A sugar-loaf. 

^. DERTFORD . IN . KENT = H . P. \ 

1 38. A variety has on the reverse the initials h • m . p. J 
He was a grocer, and one of thofie who signed the churchwardens* accounts in 

1679. In 1680 and in 1681 he was one of the churchwardens. 

139. O, WILLIAM . PHiLLiPES = A Stick of candles within a crescent. 

/^. IN . DARTFORD . IN . KENT = W . S . P. i 

140. O. EDWARD . ROSE . OF = A full-blown rose. 

A, DARFORD . IN . KENT= E . M . R. i 

He was a yeoman, and is so described in the deed which he, in conjunction with 
Robert Glover and others, signed in i66a 

141. O. REBECKA . SMITH = R . S. 

/^. IN . DERFORDE = The Butchcrs* Arms. J 

142. O. THOMAS . SMITH = A crown. 

^. DERTFORD . IN . KENT = T .M.S. I 

143. O, ROBERT . TAYLOR = A falcon. 

J^. IN . DARTFORD . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

(The notes on the issuers of Dartford tokens were kindly contributed from paro- 
chial pApers, etc., by H. W. Smith, Esq., of Belvedere.) 

DEAL. 

144. O, THOMAS . BROTHERS = A pair of scales. 

/^. OF . DEALE . 1664 = T . A . B. i 

145. O, WILLIAM. BROTHERS = HIS HALF PENY. 

J?. IN . DEALE . 1669 = A ship. i 

146. O, ANN . CAVTEREL = A pair of scales. 

/?. OF . DEALE . 1669 = HER HALF PENY. J 

147. O. lOHN . CLARKE » A man and still 

J^. IN . DEALE . 1659 = 1 . M . C. i 

148. O, lAMES . cosTON » I . E . c and a heart. 

/^. OF . DEALL . 1653 = 1 . E . c and a heart. \ 

149. A variety reads deale. 



Digitized by 



Google 



358 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

150. O. WILLIAM . covLSON = An eagle and child. 

jR. IN . DEALL . 1659 = W .I.e. i 

151. O. AT . THE . DOLPHlNE = A dolphin. 

^. IN . DEALE . 1658 = T . F. \ 

This tavern is not remembered in Deal ; it was evidently situated in the street 
now called Dolphin Street 

152. O, TIMOTHY . GARDNER = Arms; a chevron ermine between 

three griffins' heads; impaling, a chevron ermine 
between three demi-lions. 

I^, IN . DEALE . 1666 = T . S . G. \ 

153. O, lOHN . LOBDELL . IN . DEALE = A pair of scissors. 

J^. HIS . HALF . PENY . 1669 = 1 . I . L. i 

154. O. THOMAS . PARKSOEN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

I^. IN . DELL . 1658 = T. R . p. ] 

155. O, lOHN . PEARS . iN = A heart. 

/?. DEALE . 1663=8 1 . I . p. ; 

156. O. lOHN . PiTT0CK = A hand. 

/^. IN . DEALL . 1656 = 1 . E . p. \ 

157. O, WILLIAM . PiTTOCKE . IN = D . Y. Bust of the Duke oi 

York. 

J?. DEALE . HIS . HALFE . PENNY = W . P. 1668. i 

158. O, MOYSES . POTTER . AT = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

J?. DEALE . IN . KENT= M . P. 

159. O. THOMAS . POTTER = The Groccrs' Arms. 

/^, IN . DEALE . 1663 = T . M . P. 

160. O. RICHARD . STVTLY = R .M.S. 
J^. IN . DELL . 1653 = R .M.S. 

161. O, PETER . VNDERWOOD = A man making candles. 

J^. IN . LOWER . DEALL = P . E . V. 

162. O, lOHN . WATTS . 0F = A fleece. 

^. DEALE . 1664 = 1 . M . W. 
The names of Brothers and Pittock are still to be fonnd in Deal. 

DEPTFORD. 

163. O, lOHN . ANDREWS -= A globe. 

J^. IN . DEDFORD . 1655 = 1 . I . A. I 

164. O, WILLIAM . ARCHER = An archer. 

J?. IN. DEPTFORD. 1665 = HIS HALFE PENY. 1 

165. O. THOMAS . BRiOND . IN = The Bakers' Arms. 

J?. DEPTHFORD . 1665 = T , R . B. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 3S9 

66. O, GREGORY . BVMPSTED = A Catherine-wheel. 

-^. IN . DEPTFORD . 1656 «G . E . B. 

67. O. THOMAS . CHILD . IN >=: A sugar-loaf. 

H. DEPTFORD . CHANDLER = T .B.C. 

68. O. ROGER . CLARKE . AT . THE « HIS HALF PENY. 
^. ROYAL . OAKE . IN . DEPFORD = R . E . C. 

69. O, WILLIAM . CRICH = HIS HALF PENY. 

-^. IN . DEPTFORD = The Grocers' Arms. 
o. O. WILLIAM . CRICH = The Grocers' Arms. 

jR. IN . DEPTFORD = W . S . C 1663. 

T. O. lOHN . CROVCH . 1658 = A wheatsheaf. 

-^. IN . DEPTFORD = I . A . C. 

2. O. WILLAM . DRING = W . V . D. 
-^. IN . DEPTFORD . 1651 = W . V . D. 

3. O, MARGERY. FVRZER»l667. 
-^. IN . DEDFORD = HIR HALF PENY. 

4. O, GEORGE . GORHAM = G . A . G in moDogram. 

i?. IN . DEPTFORD . 1665 =HIS HALF PENY. 

5. O. GEORGE . GORHAM»l664. 

H, IN . DEDFORD = G . A . G in monogTaro. 

6. O. lOHN . HODGES . AT . THE = Three goats' heads. 

-^. 3 . GOAT . HEAD . IN . DEPFORD = I . H. 

7. O. lOHN . HODGES . IN «= I . B . H. 
i?. LOWER . DEDFORD » I . B . H. 

8. O. lOHN . HOMES . AT . THE = A large ball. 

I^. BALL . IN . DEPTFORD = I . S . H. 

9. O. lOHN . HORLOK . AT . THE = A Hon rampant. 

H. RED . LYON . IN . DEPFORD = I . H. 

80. O. RICHARD . lEFRY . IN = R . S . L 
li. DEPl'FORD . MEALLMAN = R . S . I. 

81. O. MATHEW . lEssoN . AT . THE = A Uon rampant. 

i?. WHIT . LYON . IN . DEPFORD = M . I. 

82. O, lOHN . KERBEY = HIS HALF PENY. 

i?. IN . DEPTFORDE = A sugar-loaf. 

83. O, AT . THE . KINGS . HEAD = Head of James I., crowned. 

i?. IN . DEPTFORD . 1648 s N . D . L. 

84. Another, similar, dated 1649. 
The King's Head is still standing in Church Street. 



Digitized by 



Google 



36o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

185. O. lOHN . LINES . 1 668 = The Weavers* Anns. 

a. IN . DEPTHFORD = I . C . L. J 

186. O. RICHARD . MANSFEILDs HIS HALFE PENY. 
li, IN . DEADFORD . 1665 = R . M. 

187. O. ANTHONY . MATHEWS . AT . Y* = A Toll Of tobacCO. 
H. IN . DETFORD . 1659 = A . M . M. 

188. O. PETER . PEMELL = A CaStle. 

^. AT . DEPTFORD . l666 = P . M . P. 

189. O. AT . THE . KINGS . HEAD = Head of James L, crowncc 

H. IN . DEPTHFORD . 1657 = M . A . R. 

190. O. lOHN . SMITH = HIS HALF PENY. 

-^. IN . DEPTHFORD = The Weavers* Arms. 

191. O. WILLIAM . STONE = W . A . S. 

^. IN . DEPTFORD . 1652 = W . A . S. j 

192. O. EDWARD . SWALLOW = A talbot passant 

li, IN . LOER . DEPTFORD = E . A . S. 1656. j 

193 A variety is dated 1658. 

194. O. lOHN . WALLIS . AT . THE . BLEW = A wild boar. 

I^. BORE . IN . DEDFORD . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PE5T1I 
I . M . W. 

Admiral Smyth, in his list of Bedfordshire tokens, erroneously (hb sftame 
being a very poor one) places this token to Bedford. 

It really belongs to Deptford, and is literally as here described. — ^W. Bot>l 

195. O. lAMES . WAITERS. IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

I^, DEPTFORD . MEALMAN = A pair of SCalcS. \ 

196. O. ISAAC . WELCH = A lioii rampant in a shield. 

^. IN . DEPTFORD . 1664 = 1 . E . W. 1 

DIMCHURCH. 

197. O. ANDREW . CLIFFORD . BLACK = An anviL 

^. SMITH . IN . DIMCHVRCH . KENT = HIS HALF PBtt 
A . S . C. i 

From the Dimchurch registers we learn that Andrew Qifford manned Sad 
Hoad, a widow, April 14, 1670, and that he was buried November 18, 1672. 

DOVER. 

198. O. FOR . THE . POORE . OF . DOVER = St Martin OQ hoc» 

back, dividing his cloak with a beggar, who is ftdk>«ii^ 
him. 
^. A . HALFE . PENNY . i668a Arms of Dover ; thiee 
lions, impaling three demi-hulks. 



Digitized by 



Googk 



KENT. 361 

199. O. DOVER . FARTHING . [i6]68 = Arms of Dover. 

R. (No legend.) St. Martin and a beggar. \ 

St. Martin io the Roman Catholic times was patron-saint of Dover, and the 
church of St Martin-le- Grand the mother-church. Amongst its other privileges 
was that of beginning service before all the other churches and chapels in the 
district The church was destroyed at the time of the Reformation. Dover Fair 
is still called St. Martin's Fair. 

The same device as on the tokens appears on the borough counter-seal, which 
dates as far back as the year 1305. This has been describ^ by Browne Willis as 
"a highwayman robbing a man on foot." The obverse side of the seal has an 
antique ship with sail furled, a forecastle, poop, and round-top all embattled ; a 
steersman at the helm, two men on the forecastle blowing horns, another climbing 
up the shrouds, two below at a rope ; a flag at the stern charged with the port 
arms. It is an admirable specimen of engraving for the period. 

The following minutes are from the corporation records of Dover, 1667 and 
t668 : 

It is ordered and decreed that a certain quantity of farthings and halfpence be 
provided and stamped by the corporation, for the use of the overseers of the poor 
and others ; and to be stamped in a manner and form as shall be advised and 
directed by Mr. Mayor, Mr. John Colder, Mr. George West, Mr. John Carlisle, 
Mr. William Pepper, Mr. John Matson, Mr. Richard Barley, jurats ; the chamber- 
lains for the time being Warren Hugeson, and Bartholomew Anderson ; or as any 
five or more of them shall think fit, vpon the account of this corporation. 

Examined, 

Alexander Wellarde, 

Common Clerke. 
Dover. At a common assembly holden the 30th day of March, 1668 : 
Whereas according to a late decree, there is provided and put into the chamber- 
bins' hands the value of xxxij. lb., or thereabouts, in farthings and halfpence, for 
the vse of the corporation ; it is thought fit and so ordered that the chamberlains 
do, upon all occasions, exchange so many of them, as hath or shall, at any time 
hereafter, be delivered out to any person or persons whatsoever of the said town 
and port. 

Examined, 

Alexander Wellarde, 

Common Clerk. 

200. O. DAVID . ADAMSON = An anchor. 

R. IN . DOVER . 1657 = . M . A. \ 

201. O. AT . THE . SKOCH . ARMES = An unicom. 

R. IN . DOVER . 1658 = I . A . B. \ 

202. O. lOHN . BRIAN = I . S . B. 

R. IN . DOVER . 1652 = I . s . a \ 

203. O. AT . THE . QVEENE . OF = Her bust, full-faced. 

R. BOHEMIA . IN . DOVER = I . M . C. J 

204. O. AT . THE . GEORGE = St. George and the dragon. 

R. IN . DOVER . 1652 = I . E . C \ 

205. O. EDWARD . CHAMBERS = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . DOVER . 1649 = E . E . C } 

206. O. lANE . COLLER » I . C 

R. IN . DOVER = I . C \ 

207. O. RICHARD . COOKE . IN = A shovel. R . C. 

R. DOVER. SEIGNIOR = HIS HALFE PENV. 1 669. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



362 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

208. O, RICHARD . cvLLEN = The Grocets' Arms. 

R, GROCER . IN . DOVER . 1656 = R . F . c. A mcrdttri 

mark. \ 

Richard CuIIen, by will, in 1696, gave a house and land, the yearlj iaccm^ ^ 

be distributed every Sunday evening to twenty poor widows of St MjLry*s» De« 

He likewise gave another small cottage, the rent of it to be distribated in br»: 

209. O. AT . THE . LEOPOVLDvs = The Emperor's bust, isii 

crown. 

R. IN . DOVER . 1651=0. M . D. \ 

210. O. A variety reads leopvldvs. 

211. O. AT . THE . LEOPVLDVS = The Emperor^s busL 

R, IN . DOVER . 1666 = G . M . F. | 

212. O, MARTHA . FFORD = M . F. 

R, IN . DOVAR . 1659 =»M . F. | 

213. O. THOMAS . FIDO . AT . THE = The Mercers' Anns. 

R, MAYDEN . HEAD . IN . DOVER = T . M . F. j 

214. O, ROBART . GALLANT . AT . THE = A horse pntacing. 

R. WHITE . HORSE . IN . DOVER = R . G. 
The White Horse Inn is still standing. 

215. O. KATHEREN . GARDNER = DOVER. K . G. 
R, IN . DOVER . CHANLER . 1667 = HER HALFE PEKNT. 

2X6. O, KATHEREN . GARDNER = DOVER. K . G. 
R, IN . DOVER . 1667= CHANLER. 

217. O. THOMAS . GREEN . OF . DOVER = A fuU-bloWD rOSC. 
R, HIS . HALFE . PENNY . l666 = T . M . G. 

218. O. lOHN . HALL =1666. 
R. IN . DOVER = I . R . H. 

219. O. lOHN . HAYNES . BAKER = The Bakers' Arms. 

R, IN . DOVER . 1655 = I . E . H. 

220. O, I AMES . HOMARD = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. BAKER . IN . DOVER = I . E . H. 

221. O, wiLLiAN . KEYLOCKE = The Goldsmiths' Arms. 

R. IN . DOVER . 1667 =W . M . K. 

222. O, PINES. KITE = The Bakers' Arms. 

R. IN . DOVER . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. P . M . K. 

223. O, THo . KITE . iN = A boat rigged. 

R, DOVER . 1656 = T . M . K. 

224. O. AT . THE . FRENCH = The Arms of Frauce, crowned 

R, ARMES . IN . DOVER = D . M . N. 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 



363 



25. O. lOHN . PARKER = Three doves. 

H. AT . THJE . PRERE . IN . DOVER = 1 . P. 

26. O. SAMVEL . PARTRICH = S . M . P. 
I^. MILLENER . OF . DOVER-S . M . P. 

27. O. THOMAS . PiEARCB . ivNiOR = The Tallowchandlers' Arras. 

H. OF . DOVER . 1 669 -HIS DVBBLE TOKEN. 

28. O. ROGER . ROGERS = A gteyhound. 

i?. IN . DOVER . 1665 = R . F . R. 

29. O, SUSAN . SHARNALL = S . S. 
jR, OF . DOVER . 1656 = S . S. 

30. O. THOMAS . SHARNAL= 1658. 
J^. IN . DOVER = T . E . S. 

31. O, THOMAS . STIVEDAV = T . I . S. 
iff. IN . DOVER . 1653 = T . I . S. 

32. O. SARAH . swEETLAND = A pair of scales. 

^. IN . DOVER . 1658 = 8 . S. 

33. O, SAMVELL . TAVENOR = Arms of the Tavenor family 

argent, a bend lozengy, sable ; in sinister chief, i 
torteau. 

H. OF . DOVER . l669 = S . S . T. HIS HALF PENV. 

34. O, lOHN . THOMAS = Three horse-shoes. 

H. GROCER . IN . DOVER = I . A .T. 

35. O. WILLIAM . TiLLiT = The Coopers' Arms. 

J^. IN . DOVER = W . M . T. 

56. A variety is dated 1662 on reverse. 

57. O. MARY . TVRK . 1659 = The Grocets' Arms. 

/^. IN . DOVER . GROSER = M . T. 

j8. O. wiL . WARDEN . AT . THE . HORS = A horse prancing. 

^. AND . HORS . SHOOE . IN . DOVER = W . M . W. A horse 

shoe. 
\g. O, WILL . WELLARD . AT = A full-blown rose. 

/d. THE . COCK . IN . DOVER = W . A . W. 

^o. O. ROBERT . wooDGREEN = A full-blown rose. 

jR. IN . DOVER . 1666 = R . E . W. 

|.I. O. ROBART . WOODGREENsR . E . W. 
jR. OF . DOVER . 1658 = R . E . W. 

e following names are still to be found in Dover : Collier, Cooke, Cnllen, 
ener, Green, Hall, Kite, and Tavenor. 



Digitized by 



Google 



364 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



EASTCHURCH. 

242. O. RICHARD . EAGLESTON = The Blacksmiths' Arms. 

jR. IN . KASTCHVRCH . 1 665 = HIS HALFE PENY. t 

243. O. WILL . MANYARINGE . OF . EST . CHVRCH = D . Y, Bust d 

the Duke of York. 

i?. IN . Y« . ILE . OF . SHEPWAY . HABERDASHER = HIS H.Ui 
PENY. I 

244. A variety reads manyringe. 

EDENBRIDGE. 

245. O. rob . ALCHORNE . WIL . ABLET . AT = THER HALF PEXV. 
I^. EATON . BRIDG . IN . KENT . MERCERS ^^ The MeiceT' 

Arms. 

246. O. KATHERINE . HVBERD . 0F = A CfOWD. 

-^. EATTON . BRIDGE . IN . KENT = HER HALFE PENY. 

ELHAM. 

247. O. WILLIAM . PARTRIDGE = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. OF . ELEHAM . HIS . J = W . P. 

248. O. WILLIAM . PARTRiDG = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. OF . ELHAM = W . P. 

249. O, RICHARD , SYMONs . OF = The Grocers* Anns. 

^. ELHAM . IN . KENT . GROCER = R .M.S. 1 664. 

ELTHAM. 

250. O. lOHN . BLANDEN . 0F = A measure. 

^. ELLTHAM . MALTMAN »= I . I . B. 

251. O. RICHARD . GREENE . IN = The Carpenters' Arms. 

i?. ELTHOM . IN . KENT . 1667 =R . I . a 
The Green family is still at Eltham. 

252. O, THE . CASTELL . TAVERNE = A Castle. 
i?. IN . ELTHAM . 1649 = N . T . M. 

The old house is still standing in almost its original state. 

ERITH. 

253. O, ROBERT . DVTTON . 1667 =R . M . D. 

J^. OF . ERITH . IN . KENT = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

254. O. THOMAS . lOHNSONsT . I . L 
F. OF . EARETH . 1656 = T . 1 . L 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT, 365 

255. O. BRYAN . RVSSELL, OF =167 1. 

/^. KRITH . IN . KENT= B . M . R. \ 

256. O, FRANCIS . TAYLOR = A cFOwn and fleur-de-lis. 

/^. TVRNSTYLE . ERITH = F . A . T. \ 

257. O. COVLLVERWELL = C . M . T. 

H. TOLLVER . AT . ERITH = C . M . T. \ 

258. O. ROB . TOY . 1666 = A hen and chickens. 

i?. IN . EARRIFE == R . S . T. \ 

259. O. AT . THE . COCKE = A COCk. 

/^. IN . EREFE= R . K . W. \ 

EYNESFORD. 
260L O. lOHN . BECKET . 1658 . OF = The Groccrs' Arms. 

i?. AINESFORD . IN . KENT= I . E . B. \ 

FARNBOROUGH. 

261. O. WILLIAM . BEST . AT . THE = St. George and dragon. 

^. IN . FARNBOROGH . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

FARNINGHAM. 

262. a HENRY . POVND . 1658 . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

A FARINGHAM . IN . KENT = H . P. \ 

FAVERSHAM. 

263. O. GEORGE . ALLEN . i666 = A horse-shoe. 

-^. IN . FEAVERSHAM = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

George Allen was Mayor of Faversham in 1680. 

264. O. lOHN . BEALE . MERCER = The Mcrccrs* Arms. 

i?. IN . FEYERSHAM . 1 649 = The Grocers' Arms. ^ 

265. A variety reads bele. ^ 

266. O. WILLIAM . BVCK . i669» A Stag standing. 

i?. IN . FEYERSHAM = HIS HALF PENY. J 

The bearen of this name were a considerable family in Faversham ; bat they are 
it to be found among the present inhabitants. 

267. O. PHILLIP , BVTLER = A crown under a rainbow. 

J^. OF . FEYERSHAM . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1 669 (in five lines). 

(Sguare.) J 

The wife of Philip Butler was buried in Faversham Church, 1676. 

268. O. AT . THE . QVEENE . ARMES = Arms; France and England 

quarterly. 

i?. IN . FAVERSHAM . 1651 » R . £ . C \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



366 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTUBl. 

269. O, lOHN . CLEARE . l666 = A CFOWn. 

i?. OF . FEAVERSHAM = HIS HALF PENY. | 

270. O. lOHN . ELLIS . BACKER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

i?. IN . FEYERSVM . 1667 = A wheatsheaf. | 

Jacobs, in his *' History of Faversham, 1774," mentions that tokens ivcci^ 
by the common porters deputy, the backer (or carrier) of com £h»n the qav 1 
the vessels in the creek. 

271. O, ROBERT . HOGBEN = The Vintners' Anns. 

/^, IN . FEVERSHAM = HIS HALF PENY. | 

The Three Tuns, one of the oldest taverns in Faversham, is still staiMfia( ^ 
the name of Hogben is common among the present inhabitants. 

272. O, wiLUAM . KNIGHT . 1666 = The Grocers' Anns. w. i. i 

^. IN . FEAVERSHAM = HIS HALF PENY. 

273. O. lAMES . MARCH . 1 669 = The Grocers* Axms^ 

^. IN . FEVERSHAM . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PEKY. l.A.K 

274. O. POARE . NED. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 
A. IN . FEVERSHAM . IN . KENT = A tree. 

Ned was probably a gardener ; indicated by his device, a tree — the chan "* 
— stUl extensively cultivated in this part of the country. 

275. O. lOHN . PIEARCE . IN . FEVERSHAM . 1667 (in five lises 

^. HIS . HALF . PENNY = A dolphin. {OctagoHoL) 

The old house in Preston Street is still named The Dolphin, and naks a * 
second tavern in Faversham. 

276. O. ROBERT. PRESTON = HIS HALF PENY. 
I^. IN . FEVRSHAM . 1664 = THE QVEENS ARMES. 

The Queen's Arms had a distinguished, though unwilling visitoc, io ^ .^ 
1688, when James IL was intercepted in his endeavour to leave the coastrr. - 
was brought into Faversham by some sailors of the town. 

277. (9. FRANCIS . WATERMAN = The MerccTs' Arms, 

R, IN . FAVESHAM = F . S . W. 

He was mayor in 1665 and again in 1681. 

Sarah, wife of Francis Waterman, was buried in Faversbtm Church, r6o(. - 
Francis himself in 1707. 

FOLKESTONE. 

278. O. EDWARD. FRANKLIN = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, OF . FOVLSTON , IN . KENT=E. E . F. [l6]70. 

A variety reads : 

279. O. EDWARD. FRANKLING = HIS HALF PENY. 
R. OF . FOVLTON . IN . KENT=E . E . F. 

FOOrS CRAY. 

280. O. lOHN . MOORE . AT . THE = A griffin's head. 

R. IN . FVTSCRAY . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 

281. O, MiCHAELL . PITMAN = The Brewfrs' Anns. 

R, FOOTES . CRAY . IN . KENT = M . E . P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 367 



GILLINGHAM. 

82. O. WILLIAM . COLES . HALF . PENY = The CarpentcTS* Arms. 

^. AT . GILINGAME . FOORT . 1669 = A malt-shoVcL ^ 

GODMERSHAM. 

83. O. ROBERT . OAKLEY . OF = HIS HALF PENV. 

/^. GODMASHAM . IN . KENT = The Groccrs' Arms. A 



GOUDHURST. 

84. O. lOHN . AVSTEN . OF = The Merceis' Arms. 

/f. GOVTHERST . MERCER = I . B . A. J 

85. O, WILLIAM . MAYNARD . OF = 1 664. 

/^. GOODHVRST . IN . KENT . MERC = W , M . M. \ 

86. O, s . H . s. STEPHEN . STRINGER = 1661 (in fivc Hiies aCFOSS 

the field). 
/^. OF . GOWDHAST . IN . KENT = An anchor with s on it, to 
the left II. I 

87. O, s . H . s = STEPHEN . STRINGER . 1661 (in five Hnes). 

/^. GOWDHAST. IN . KENT = An anchor with s on it, to the 
left I. i 

ephen .Stringer placed the value on his tokens, 11 representing two, and i, one 
ling* 

GRAVESEND. 

88. O. lOHN . BiDDLE = A Pope's head. 

-^. IN . GRAVESEND . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

89. O. MARGRET . BIRD = A hen and chickens. 

^. AT . GRAVESEND . 1657 = M . a \ 

argaret Bird was probably widow of a publican of Gravesend, whose tavern 
another was pulled down by order of the Council of State, in 1649 ; by reason 
mach injury was done the Commonwealth by illegally shipping gold and silver, 
conveying away and receiving letters of dangerous consequence to and from 
fected persons, from these taverns. 

90. O, THOMAS . BOONE = A roll of tobacco. 

jR. IN . GRAVESEND = T . M . B. j 

91. O. Matthew . Butler . in . Gravesend (in four lines), 

R. His . halfe . peny . 1668 . M . d . b. {Octagonal.) \ 

92. O. lOHN . CHEESMAN . AT . THE = The sun in splendour. 

R, SVN . IN . GRAVESEND = I . E . C \ 

93. C?. THOMAS . CLARKE . AT . BORES = A boar's head. 

R. HAD . IN . GRAVESEND=>T . M . C \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



368 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTUBY. 

294. O. wiLUAM . CROVCH = A hand holding a bird. 

I^. IN . GRAVSEND . 1658 = W . C. 

295. O. ROBERT . DAY . SHOPKEPER = A pair of sdsSOTl. 
I^. IN . GRAVESEND . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

Robert Day was a Quaker. He was imprisoned in Maidstone gaol ob warn 
of his religious opinions. 

296. O. THOMAS . HILL . GROCER = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, OF . GRAVESEND = T . S . H. 

297. O, lOHN . MAY . 1 666 = A man with a staff carrying anota 

njan (Friar Tuck and Little John ?). 

I^. IN . GRAVESEND = I . A . M. \ 

298. O, MARCK . MEDHOVST . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. GRAVESEND . MERCER = M . M . M. i 

299. O. WILLIAM . OLIVER . AT = A cannon mounted. 

i?. IN . GRAVESEND = W . M . O. ; 

300. O, AT . THE . MAREMAID . IN = A mermaid. 

jR, GRAVESEND . 1655 = 1 . D . P. 

301. O. lACOB . PARSON = Two hands joined. 

R, IN . GRAVESEND . 165I =1 . E . P. 

302. A variety has the name spelled parsson. 

Jacob Parson was Mayor of Gravesend in 1656, and again in 166S. 

303. O. lOHN . PIKE . AT . BLACK = An anchof. 

i?. ANKER . IN . GRAVESEND = I . M . P. J 

304. O. lOHN . REDDELL = An anchor. 

i?. IN . GRAVESEND = I . E . R. * 

305. O, lOHN . REDDELL «= The King's head crowned. 

I^, IN . GRAVESEND = I . E . R. 

John Reddell was Mayor in 1660, during the year of the restoratioo of Chnfe^ 
When the King's arms were painted and set up in the town hall, hb oasK «* 
painted on the frame, where it remains. 

306. O, AT . THE . swANE = A swan. 

^. IN . GRAVESEND = A . M . W. 

307. O. THOMAS . WARREN = Three rabbits. 

R, IN . GRAVESEND . 1671 =T . I . W. 

308. O, lOHN . WATSON = A heart pierced with an arrow. 

J^, IN . GRAWSEND . 1653 = 1 . K . W. i 

He was mayor in 1660, and again in 167a 

309. O. lOHN . WETSON = A roll of tobacco. 

R, IN . GRAVES . END = I , K . W. 

310. O, THOMAS , WOOD .OF =T . E . w and a heart 
R. GRAVSEND . 1657 =T . E . w and a heart 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 360 

GREENHITHE. 

311. O. WILLIAM . CHATTWiN = The Tallowchandlcrs' Arms. 

R. OF . GREENEHIVE . KENT = W . C 

312. O. RICHARD . SMITH = A goat's head and shoemaker's knife. 

R. IN . GREENEHIVE . KENT=R . S . S. \ 

GREENWICH. 

313. O, THOMAS . ANDREY . GREENWICH . 1 668 . T . iE (in five HnCS 

R, HIS . HALFE . PENNY = The Joiners' Arips. (OctagonaL) 

314. O, AT . THE . GEORGE = St. Georgfe and thfe dragon. 

R. IN . GREENWICH »= E . B. 

3 15. A variety reads greenewich. 

316. Another variety reads GRENEWicH. 

317. Another reads gorge on obverse, and grenewich on 

reverse. 

318. O. EDWARD . bartlett = A hart lodged. 

R, IN . GREENWICH = E . M . R 

319. O, HENREY . BEDBERY . ROSE = A rOSe. 
R, IN . EAST . GREENWICH = H . R . B. 

320. O, WILLIAM . CLEARE = A wheatsheaf. 

R, OF . GREENEWICH = W . M . C 

321. O, THOMAS. coLTON = The Merccrs' Arms. 

R, IN. GREENWICH. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

322. O. WILLIAM . DisKETT = A roll of tobacco. 

R. IN . GRENWICH . 1659 = W . S . D. 

;^2S- ^' ALEX . DRIVER . SILK = Arms. 

R, THROSTER . IN . GRINWICH = A . A . D. 

324. O. ADAM . EDGHELL . AT . Y" . 3 = Three fleurs-dc-lis. 

R. IN .GREENWICH . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENY. 

325. O. lOHN ELLIS = A sugar-loaf. 

R. IN . GRENEWICH = I . H . E. 

326. O, THOMAS . FOSTER . AT . THE = A nag's head. 

R, IN . GREENWICH . 1 667 = HIS HALF PENY. T . E . F. 

327. O. HENRY . GiPPES =i A pot of lilies. 

R. AT . GRINWICH \ l668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 



328. O, ROBERT . GIRDIS . IN . Y" . OVLD = R . M . G. * 

R, BEARE . YARD . IN . GREENWICH = HIS HALF PENY. 



24 

Google 



Digitized by 



370 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

329. O. WILLIAM . LEE . IN . GRiNwicH = The Brcwcis' Ann& 

i?. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . t666. W . F . L. i 

330. O. RICHARD . milington = The Ironmongers' Anus. 

J^. GREENWICH . IRONMONGER = 1 663. \ 

331. O. AT . THE . BARE . TAVERNS » A bear With chain. 

^. IN . GREENWICH . 1650 = E . E . P. \ 

332. O. ROBERT . POLADAYE . AT . THE = A StilL 

i?. IN . GREENWICH . 1 667 = HIS HALF PENY. R . M . P. t 

333. O. HVGH . PVDEFOVRD . AT . THE = A hOfSe. 

^. WHITE . HORSE . IN . GREENWICH =■ HIS HALFE PENKY. i 

334. O, AT . THE . SHIP . TAVERNE^ A sWp. 

H. IN . GREENWIG . 1649 = 8 . A . S. \ 

335* O. GEORGE . SAXBEE . IN = G . S . S. 

R. GREEN WEECH . 1650 = . S . S. \ 

336. O, lOHN . SHALLCROS . IN = A unicom. 

J^. EAST . GREENEWICH » I . E . S. j 

337. O. CHRISTOPHER . SKAYF = AT THE STIL. 

I^. IN . GRINWICH = A Still. I 

338. O. THOMAS . TVDER . IN = A unicom. 

/^. GREENWITCH = T . A . T. j 

339. O. RICHARD . TVSTEN . AT . y" = A dragon passant 

-^. IN . GREENWICH . 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENY. R . E . T. i 

340. O, lOHN . WARRELL . AT . THE . SHIP » A ship in fuU Sail. 
I^. TAVERNE . IN . GREENWICH . [l6]69 = HIS HALF PEK^ 

I . A . W. •. 

341. O, lOHN . WARRELL . THE = A ship. 

li. TAVERNE . IN . GREENWICH = I . A . W. \ 

The Ship is still one of the principal hotels in Greenwich. 



GROOMBRIDGE. 

342. O, RICH . cvNSTABLE . MERCER = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

jR. IN . GROOME . BRIDG . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. [ 

343. A variety is dated 1666. • 

344. O. RICO . CONSTABLE . MERCR . i668«Mercers' Anns. 

(Heart-shape,) 
i?. R . c . GROOM . BRIDG . P . (in four lines across tbe 
field). I 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 371 

HADLOW. 

345. O. John . Baieman . his . halfe , peny (in four lines). 

R. IN . HADLOW . IN . KENT = A gTcyhound. \ 

An old inn at Hadlow still bears this sign ; and the name of John Bateman 
appears in one of the church registers. 

HARRIETSHAM. 

346. O, ROBRT . HOVENDEN . IN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. HARYisoM . IN . KENT = R . I . s, the last two letters con- 
joined. \ 

HARTY. 

347. O. lOHN . GORGE . IN . HARTY = A man Fowlng a boat 

R. IN . THE . ILE . OF . SHEPY = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

HAWKHURST. 

348. O. ARTHUR . GIBBONS = A gate. A . M . G. 

R. IN . HAWCKHERST. 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

349. O. lOHN . LATTER . BVCHER = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. OF . HAWKHVRST . IN . KENT = I . E . L. \ 

350. O, THOMAS . MERCER . CLOTHIER = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R. OF . HAWKHERST . IN . KENT = T .A.M. \ 

351. O* WALTER . QVAiFE = An Uncertain device (a kind of arch). 

R, IN . HAWKHERST = HIS HALF PENY. W . E . Q. \ 

HIGH HALDEN. 

352. O. lOHN . COOKE. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . HIGH . HALDEN = A Uon rampant. \ 

HOLLINGBOURN. 

353- O. GEORGE . HARRISON = G . F . H. \, 

R. IN . HOLLiNGBVRNE^ A windmill. \ 

HONYCHILD (parish of Hope, All Saints). 

354. O. the . MANNOR . OF = c . s conjoincd (Charles Sedley). 

R. HONYCHILD . 1672 = A goat's head, the Sedley crest \ 
Sir Charles Sedley, Bart., who issued this token in the last year they were 
allowed to circulate, shortly afterwards sold the manor of Honychild, distant one 
mile and a half from New Romney, in consequence of the injury he had done 
his esUte by debauchery at the dissolute Court of Charles II. He was grandson 
of Sir William Sedley, the munificent founder of the Sedleian Lecture of Natural 
Philosophy at Oxford, and son of Sir John Sedley, of Aylesford. Sir Charles sat 

24 — 3 



Digitized by 



Google 



372 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

in the Long Parliament after the Restoration, and in three successive Paxliiments» 
as well as during the reign of James II., whose attempts on the Constitution he 
vigorously withstood. He was active in bringing about the Revolution, which 
was the more extraordinary, as he had received favours from James II. The 
King, however, had taken a fancy to Catherine, the daughter of Sir Cfaarics, 
whom he had made his mistress, creating her Countess of Dorchester. This 
honour greatly shocked Sir Charles, as, however debauched himself, he could ixH 
bear his daughter's dishonour. On being asked the cause of his conduct, he wittily 
remarked, ** That as the King had made his daughter a countess, his gratitude 
compelled him to make the King's daughter a queen." Sir Charles lived many 
years after the Revolution, in the full possession of his wit and humour, dyine ^ 
an advanced age. His works, which were of a licentious character, were published 
in two volumes, octavo. 

HYTHE. 

355. O, WILLIAM . ADCOCK . IN =165 7. 

^. HEATH . IN . KENT . [l6]57 = W . E . A. } 

356. O. FARDINANDO . BASSET =F . M . R 

jR, IN . HiTHE . 1658 = A hart lodged. i 

The White Hart in High Street is still standing. 

357. O. 10" . BASSETT . HIS . HALF . PENY=I . T . B. 1670. 

I^. IN . HYTH . IN . KENT = The Groccrs' Arms. i 

358. O, PETER . iOHNSON = The Bakcrs' Arms. 

/^. OF . THE . PORT . OF . HID = P . L J 

359. O, GVY . LANGDON . 1659 = The Groccrs* Arms. 

I^. IN . HETH = G . E . L. \ 

360. O, DAVID . MARCH = A fleece. 

i?. IN . HYTHE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. D . I . M, i 

361. O. PETER . MARSH . 1672 = Arms. 

^. OF . HYTHE . IN . KENT == HIS HALF PENY. I 



IGTHAM. 

362. O, Henry . Greene . His . Halfe . Penny (in four lines). 

R. IN . IGHTHAM . IN . KENT = St Gcorge and the dragon. 1 

363. a lOHN . WAGGHORNE = The Mercers* Arms. 

i?. IN . ITHAM . 1666 = 1 . M . W. I 

364. O, WILLIAM . WHITE = The Mercers* Arms. 

R, OF . ITHAM . IN . KENT = W . W. \ 



KEMSING. 

365. O, SAMUELL . PERSON = S . E . P. 
R. IN . KEMSON . 1664 = 8 . E . P. 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 373 

KINGSTONE. 

366. O, THOMAS . EDMONDES = Arms : quarterly, ist, three lions pas- 

sant gardant ; 2nd, three fleurs-de-lis ; 3rd, a lion ram- 
pant ; and 4th, a crescent 

R. IN . KING . STOE . = l650 = T . M . E. \ 

There is a doubt about the correct placing of this token. 

LARKFIELD. 

367. O. lOHN . PACKE . AT . THE = The Blacksmiths' Arms. 

R. IN . LARCKFIELD. IN, KENT = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

LAMBERHURST. 

368. O. RICHARD . FRANCES = Arms ; three chevrons. Crest, a 

greyhound. 

R. OF . LAMBVRHVRST . l669»R . A . F. HIS HALF PENV. | 

LEEDS. 

369. O. NATHANiELL . BENSON = The Groccrs' Arms, 

R. OF . LEEDS . IN . KENT= N . F . B. \ 

LENHAM. 

370. O. THO . AVSTEN . GROCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. OF . LENHAM . IN . KENT = T . A . A. \ 

371. O. lOHN . DEEDE= A bear chained, with a dog baiting it. 

R. IN . LENHAM . 1664 = 1 . I . D. \ 

An old inn at Lenham still displays the sign of the Dog and Bear. 

372. O. THOMAS . FORDE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, IN. LENHAM. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

373. O. lOHN LAKE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . LENHAM . 1667 = I . E . L. \ 

LEWISHAM. 

374. O. lOHN . FREEMAN . AT . WHIT = A bcar with chain. i . i . f. 

R. IN . LEWSAM . 1665 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

LYDD. 

375. O. THOMAS . ED£RiCK£ = St. George and dragon. 

R. OP . LIDD . 1657 =T . E. \ 

376. O. WILUAM . SVDELL. OF -HIS HALF PENY. 

R. LIDD . IN . KENT . 1669 = W . F . S. J 



Digitized by 



Google 



374 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

377. O. WILLIAM . svDELL= Three cloves. 

jR. IN . LIDD . 1662 =W . S. \ 

From the letters w . s we learn that the issuer was a bachelor in 1662, and from 
the letters w . f . s on the halfpenny of 1669 that he had married in that interval ; 
also that his wife's Christian name commenced with F. The Church registers do not 
record this event ; but in the register of marriages, only two short year^after the 
issue of his halfpenny, is : 

167 1. William Sudell, Esq., bayliff of Lydd, married Ann Knight, widdow. 

In the list of burials : 

1676. January. Mrs. Sudell, the wife of William Sudell, juratt 

There is no entry relating to the burial of William Sudell. 

378. O. THO . WATERS . OF . LID . OR = T . W. 

jR. APELDORE . IN . KENT = T . W. \ 

379. A variety has the initials w . t. \ 



MAIDSTONE. 

380. O, THOMAS . BOND . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

/?. MAYDSTONE . IN . KENT = T . L . B Conjoined. 1666. } 

381. O. ROB. BROOKE. IRONMONGER = HIS HALF PENV. 

jR. IN . MAIDSTONE . 1670 = R . W . B. i 

He was mayor in 1670, the same year he issued his halfpenny. 

382. O. ROBERT . HEATH . OF == The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. MAYDSTONE . GROCER = R . H. J 

383. O. lOHN . HOAD . IN = A windmilL 

i?. MEADSTONE . 1657 = 1 . H. \ 

384. O. GERVis . MAPLiSDEN . OF =» Arms ', a cross patt6e fitch^e. 

^. MAIDESTONE . MERCER = HIS HALF PENY. i 

He was mayor more than once. 

385. O. lAMES . RVSE . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

/?. MEYDSTONE . IN . KENT = I . R. \ 

386. O, THOMAS . swiNOKE = Three men with astronomical instru- 

ments, standing round a globe. (This device is in 
tended for the sign of the " World's End.") 

^. IN . MAIDSTONE = T . K . S. \ 

A Thomas Swinnock was mayor in 1638. 

387. O. lONATHAN . TROVGHTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

/?. IN . MAIDSTON . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 



388. O. lONATHAN . TROVGHTON = The Grocers' Arms. 

jR. IN . MAIDSTON . l668 = I . M . T. J 

He was mayor during the Commonwealth. 

389. O. RICHARD . WALKER = The Groccrs' Arms. 

jR. OF MAIDSTON . GROCER = R . W. 1 658. | 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 375 

390. O, THOMAS . WALL . 1667 =The SaltcTs* Anns. 

R. MAIDSTONE . HALFE . PENNY (in four llnes across the 
field). i 

391. O, RALPH . WARDE . IN = A CaStle. 

J^ MAIDESTONE. l656 = R.E W. \ 

392. O. lOHN . WATSON . AT . THE= A bell. 

j^. IN . MAIDSTON . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

393. O. ELIZABETH . WEBB = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. OF . MAIDSTONE . GROCER = E . W. 

394. O, WILLIAM . WEB . MERCER = The Groccrs* Arms. 

jff. IN . MAIDSTON . 1649 = W . E . B. 

395. O. STEVEN . WEEKS . OF = The WcEvers' Arms. 

/?. MAIDSTONE . WEAVER = S . A . W. 

396. O. WALTER . WEEKES . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . MAIDSTONE . WEAVER = Weavers* Arms. {Heart- 
shape.) 

397. O. RICHARD . wicKiNG = The Grocers* Arms. 

j^. IN . BCAIDSTONE . GROCER <= R . E . W. 

398. O. LAMES . woLBALL=The Grocers* Arms. 

R. OF . MAYDSTONE . 1664 = 1 . W. 

399. A variety reads wolboll. 



MALLING. 

400. O. FRANCIS. CHAMBERS = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . WEST . MALING = F . E . C 

401. O. RICH . CHAMBERS . 0F = A fleur-de-Us. 

R. TOWNE . MAVLING . 1667 = R . M . C. 

402. O. SAMVEL . FRENCH . OF . TOWN = 1 668. 
R. MALUNG . IN . KENT = S . I . F. 

403. O. THOMAS . HILLS . l668 = HIS HALF PENY. 
R. IN . TOVN . MAWLING . IN . KENT = T . I . H. 



MARGATE. 

404. O. GEORGE . FREIND . AT MARGRETT = Three pipeS. 
R. IN . THE . ILE . OF . THANETT = G . M . F. 

405. O. STEVEN . GREEDIER = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. Of . MARGET . IN . THANNET = The Fishmongers' Arms. 



Digitized by 



Google 



376 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

406. O. CHRESTON . HOVDGBEN = A trade or merchant's mark. 

H. OF . MARGET . IN . KENT = C . H. } 

407. O. loSEPH . lEWELL . 1669 = A cheesc-knife, 

^. IN . MARGITl' • IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. I . E . L \ 

408. O, RICHARD . LANGLEV = The Tallowchandlers' Arms, 

/?. AT . MARGET . IN . KENT = HIS HALFE PENY. 1^-67. 1 

409. A variety reads in . tenit. 

410. O, ioseph . MACKRiTH . 0F = A sugar-loaf. 

/?. MARGERET . IN . KENT = I . I . M. j 

411. O. SARAH . RBADE . OF = A ship. 

jR. MARGIT . IN . CENT = S . R. | 

412. O. WILLIAM . SAVAGE = The Grocers* Arms. 

jR. OF . MARGET . IN . KENT = W. S. i 

413. O. lOHN . SKINNER . 1670 = A boat with sail. 

jR. IN . MARGITT . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. t 

MILTON-NEXT-GRAVESEND. 

There are three Miltons in Kent, one near Canterbury (a very small placeX tv 
next Gravesend, and the other near Sittingbourne. Of the first we have no prod 
that any tokens were issued there. Of the second several tokens read next Gnve- i 
end, and the church registers of the last mention the names of several issuers ; that 
have been placed under the heading Milton-next-Sittingbourne, to which town tk^ 
belong. 

414. O, WILLIAM . BALDWIN = HIS HALF PENV. 

jff. IN . MiLLTON . 1667 = Two fleurs-de-Us. (Jfeari-shaft.) j 

415. O. RICHARD . BUNCE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, OF . MILTON . l668 = HIS HALF PENV. i 

416. O, GEORGE . HEAD . OF MILTON = A ship in fllll Sail. 

R. NEXT . GRAVESEND . 1660 = HIS HALF PENY. G . M . H. t 

417. O, lOHN . lONEs . IN . MILTON = A cross patt6e. 

j^. NEERE . GRAVESEND = 1 . M . L \ 

418. O, WILLIAM . KEMSTER = Two bunches of grapes. 

R, OF . MILLTON . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENV. {Htttrt^^t) \ 
William Kemster*s name o^curer in the af^essment of Milton .1 

the parishioners, in 1687. 

419. O, WALTER , MINN - The Bakers' Arms, 

R. IN . MILTON . t666 = VV , N, | 

Ninn was Mayor of Grave.se tid in 1679^ and nfiain b 1 6^ 

420. O, GEORGE . OLLKVER . IN^A SUgarlOflf^ 

R, MILTON . NEXT . GKESEND^G . A • O { 

He was mayor in 16S0. 



KENT. 



377 



421. O. EDWARD . PASHLOWE = A full-blown TOSC. 
H. IN . MILLION . 1656 = E . P. 

lie was Mayor of Gravesend and Milton in 1653. 

422. O. wiLUAM . READE , IN . MILTON =: The Pcwtcrers* Arms, 

/?. NEERE. GRAVESEND. l666 = HlS HALF PENY. 

423. O. WILL . READ . IN . MILTON = The Pewtercrs' Arms. 

H. NEAR . GRAVESEND = W . M . R. 

424. O, lAMES . RICHMOND . OF = The Glaziefs' Arms. 

/?. MILTON . IN . KENT . l666==HIS HALF PENY. 

425. O. ANTHONY . siFFLET . IN = A large ball. 

-/?. MILTON . NEXT . GRAVSEN° = A . A . S. 

426. O. lOHN . SMITH . OF . MILTON = A bird. 
/^, NEERE . GRAVESEND = I . E . S. 

427. O. ARTHVR . WHITE . AT . THE = An angel. 

/?. MILTON . NERE . GRAVESEND = A . M . W. 
White was mayor in 1658. 



MILTON-NEXT-SITTINGBOURNE. 

428. O, WILLIAM . ALLEN = The Bakers* Arms. 

^. IN . MILLTEN . 1658 = W . P . A. 

429. O. WILLIAM . BissY . IN = The Grocers* Arms. 

-/?. MILLTON . MERCER = W . I . B. 

430. A variety reads willam, etc. 

431. O. CHENY . BOVRNE . OF = A sugar-loaf. 

H. MILTON . IN . KENT = C . F . B. 

432. O. WILLIAM . covALL . IN = The Brcwers' Arms, 

/?. MELTON . IN . KENT . 1659 = W . M . C. 

433. A variety is dated 1664. 

434. O. RICHARD . HENMAN = A talbot. 
A. OF . MILTON . IN . k'" = R . S . H. 

435. O. GEORGE . REEVE = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. OF . MILTON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. G . R. 
Sereral of these names are on the church registers. 



i 
i 



MINSTER. 

436. O, lOHN . DYER a HIS HALF PENY. 

H. OF . MINSTER . IN . KENT = A sugar-loaf. 



Digitized by 



Google 



378 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



NEWINGTON. 

437. O, THOMAS . BOORN . GROCER = The Groccrs* Arms. 

/?. AT . NEWINGTON . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. 1669. i 

438. O. WILLIAM . STANiNOVGH . OF = The McrcCTs* Anxis. 

/?. NEWINGTON . IN . KENT . MERCER = HIS HALF F0T. 

1669. i 

NORTHFLEET. 

439. O. THOMAS . HVMFRE . iN = A bcehive. 

jR. NORTH . FLEETE . IN . KENT = T . H . E (in onc line, wbii 
is very unusual for initial letters). j 

440. O. ROBERT . PEACOCKE . AT = A CTOWn. 

/^, IN . NORTHFLEET. 1670 = HIS HALF PKNY. i 

ORPINGTON. 

441. O, lAMES . WHITE . IN . 1669 = The Blacksmiths* Arms. 

/?. ORPINGTON . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. I . M . W. J 

442. O, lAMES . WHITE . IN = The Blaclcsmiths' Arms. 

J^, ORPINGTON . IN . KENT = I . M . W. \ 

OTFORD. ' 

443. O. WILL . PHILLIPS . MERCER = The King's head crowned 

jR, IN . OTFORD . 1 668 = HIS HALF PENY. : 

PENSHURST. 

444. O, HENRY . CONSTABLE . OF = A CrOWn. 

i?. PENHVRST . IN . KENT . MERCER = HIS* HALF PIT 
1667. ! 

445. A variety is dated 1669. 

446. O. MARTEN . PYKE . OF = A fleur-de-Hs. 

j^. PENSHVRST . MERCER = M . A . P. ; 

PLUCKLEY. 

447. O, EDWARD . GOODING . OF = The Groccrs' Ann& 

i?. PLVCKLEY . IN . KENT . l663 = E . A . a 

QUEENBOROUGH. 

448. O, HVMPHRY . ATWEEKE . AT . Y* = A CrOWD. 

jR, IN . QVEENBOROVGH . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

449. O. PETER . KEN . OF . QUEEN = A full-blown FOSe. 

/^. BOROUGH . IN . KENT — P . K. 1 665. ; 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 379 

450. O. THOMAS . NORRINGTON . IN = A ship in full Sail. 

^. QVINBOROVGH . IN . KENT = HIS HALFE PENNY. 
T.M.N. i 

451. O. RICHARD . FOLEY . OF = The Groccrs* Arms. 

-/?. QVEINBOROVGH . l666»HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

RAMSGATE. 

452. O. RICHARD . LANGLEY^ A man making candles. 

/?. OF . RAMSGATE . 1657 = R . P . L. J 

453. O. CLEMENT . MARCH . AT- A chcesc-knife. 1658. 

jR. ROMANSGAT . IN . THANET=C , M . M. i 

454. O. HEN . NOLDRED . IN . ROMANS = Three logs o( wood (?). 

/?. GET . IN . Y" . ISLE . OF . TENNET = HIS HALF PENY. J 

RIVER HEAD or RITHERHEAD (Parish of Sevenoaks). 

455. O. AT . THE . OKEN . TRE . 1653 = R . S. 

/?. AT . RETHERED . IN . KENT = An oak-tree. J 

ROCHESTER. 

456. O. GEORGE . ALLiNGTo'* = The King's head. 

jR. of . ROCHESTER = G . A. \ 

The King's Head Inn is still standing in High Street, and has been known by 
this sign for over 350 years. 

457. O. STEPHEN . BONNET . IN = The Joiners* Arms. 

/?. ROCHESTER . EAS^GATE = S . A . B. ^ 

458. O. ART . BROOKER . AT . THE = A CrOWn. 

jR. CROWNE . IN . ROCHESTER = A . M . B. J 

The Crown Inn is situated in High Street. There has been a house with this 
sign on the same spot for upwards of 500 years. 

459. O. WILLIAM . BVRGES=l669. 

^. OF . ROCHESTER = W . M . B. J 

46©. O. WILLIAM . CAMPiAN = Two swords crossed 

/?. IN . ROCHESTER . 1658 = W . F . C \ 

461. O, ROBERT. CART =1668. 

/?. OF . ROCHESTER = R . S . C ^ 

462. O. ROBERT . CHVRCHELL = The Merchant-Taylors* Arms. 

jR. IN . ROCHESTER . 1669 = R . I . C \ 

463. O. ALICE . COBHAM = The Arms of the Cobham family ; on a 

chevron three crescents. 
/?. IN . ROCHESTER . 1651 «Crest of the Cobham family ; a 
hind's head within a mural crown, a . c. ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



38o TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
464. A variety is without a . c on reverse. \ 

: 465. O, s . lOHN . COBHAM . i666 = The Cobham Arms. 

^. IN . ROCHESTER = Cobham crest, i . c \ 

466. O, EDWARD . HARRISON = A hand holding scissors. 

I^. IN . ROCHESTER . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. ; 

467. O. RICHARD . HVTCHESON = Three doves. 

i?. IN . ROCHESTER = R . F . H. 4 

468. O, lOHN . KENNON = A nag's head. 

jR. OF . ROCHESTER = I . K. 
The Nag*s Head is still a well-known house in the town. 

469. O, ROBERT . LEAKE = ArmS. 

i?. OF . ROCHESTER . 1656 = R . E . L. 4 

470. O. ANTHONYE. LOVELL . AT . THE = FuU-face of Henry VIII 

J^. KINGS . HEAD . IN . ROCHES «s A . L. 

471. O. ANTHONY . LOVELL = Bust of Quecn Elizabeth. 

jR, IN . ROCHESTER . 1657 = A . A . L. \ 

472. O, ROBERT . MicHELL = Two compasses crossed 

i?. OF . ROCHESTER = R . R . M. 4 

473. A variety reads roch aster. « , 

474. O. RICHARD . NEWBERY = A black-jack. I 

/?, OF . ROCHESTER . l666 = R .M.N. * 

475. O. THOMAS . PALMER = A Still. 

/?. IN . ROCHESTER = T . E . P. « 

476. O. EDWARD . SHELLEY = The Queen of Bohemians heai 

crowned. 

i?. OF . ROCHESTER . CVRY = E . F . S. * 

477. O, SAMVELL . STOWE . THE = The Prince of Wales's feathers 

R. POST . OF . ROCHESTER = S . E . S. i 

478. O, lOSEPH . TRAY ERS = Tobacco-roll and four pipes. 

i?. IN . ROCHESTER . l666 = I . G . T. 4 

479. O. WILLIAM . VANDALL . IN = A Uon couchant and suo. 

/?. ROCHESTER . HIS . HALF . PfcNY = W . I . V. 167I. : 

480. O, GILBERT . YOVNG . GROCR = A bell, 

i?. IN . ROCHESTER . 1664 = . S . Y. 4 

The names of Palmer and Young are still to be found in Rochester. 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 381 



ROLVENDEN. 

I. O. lOHN . PEMBALL . [l6]58 = I . M . P. 

R. ROLVENDEN . CHVRCH = A vicw of the chufch. \ 

ROMNEY. 
\2. O. RICHARD . BAKER = The Grocers* Arms. 

R, IN . NEW RVMNEY = R . M . B. \ 

\ was Mayor of New Romoey in 1650 and 1655. The church registers of the 
commence with the entry of his marriage : 
tptias solennes . . . etc. A<* 1662. 
chardus Baker et Amisia Mundus, Vidva Jan. 28^<*. 

le register of deaths records that in 1665 Richard Baker was boicnried May ij. 
\ must have been married twice, 
s son Richard, who was eight times mayor of the town, died in 1725, aged 74. 

53. O. ISAAC . RVTTON . AT . Y^ . GEORG = St. Gcoige and 
dragon. 

R, IN . NEW . RVMNAY . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

RYARSH. 

J4. O, EDW . WALSINGHAM . 68 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . RYARSH . IN . KENT = A haiTOW. \ 

ST. MARY CRAY. 
$5. O. ANN . MANiNG . IN . s = A boy holding a pipe. 

R. MAREY . CRAY . IN . KENT = A . M. 1658. \ 

\6. A variety is dated 1665. 

ic Black Boy is the leading hotel in St. Mary Cray. 

57. O. EDWARD . SPURLING . OF = A mounted cannon. 

R, S . MARY . CRAY . IN . KENT = E . A . S. \ 

SANDHURST. 

58. O, lOHN . OWEN . HIS . HALF . PENY . OF = Three crowns on 

the royal oak. 
R. SANDHVRST . IN . KENT = o. 1 669. {Heart -shape.) J 

SANDWICH. 

R. or » SANDWICH = R . S p V. \ 

tt ASiNE . AlKlKS * WIDOW = A carnation flower. 

A or . SAHTDWICH . 1667 = A . A. \ 

/^ * , .. . tvSTrK = I , A. 

kCll • 1656 = 1 . A. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



382 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTVri 

492. O. GEORGE . BVRFORD = The Grocers' Anns. 

jR. OF. SANDWICH . l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

493. O. lOHN . CASBE = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. IN . SANDWICH = A fleur-de-lis. 
A tavern in Sandwich still bears this sign. 

494. O. RICHARD . CLARKE = The Princc of Wales's feathos 

jR. IN . SANDWICH . 1656 = R . A . C 

495. O, lOHN . COVCHMAN = I . E . C. 
/?. IN . SANDWICH . 1656 = 1 . E . C. 

496. O, RICHARD . CRISP = Two swords crossed. 

/?. IN . SANDWICH = R . C. 

497. O, lOSEPTH . DOE = HIS HALF PENY. 1 

^. OF . SANDWICH = A man making candles. I 

498. O. HENRY . FVRNICE . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. SANDWICH = The Arms of the Town of Sandwid . f 
pale three demi-lions passant gardant, coDJobedl 
pale with as many demi-hulks of ships. 

499. O, HENRY . FVRNICE . IN = SANDWICH. I 

^. {No Ugend,) The Arms of Sandwich as before. • I 
Henry Furnese was a sergeant of dragoons, and married Ann, daughter d ^ 
Andrew Gosfright, one of the jurats of Sandwich. Upon his maniJige he s^*^ 
in the town as a grocer and tallowchandler, in a small house on the vest ^^ 
the fish market, in which their son, afterwards Sir Henry Furnese, w ^^'^ 
lliis house was pulled down in 1786, and the ground formed part of tk si? 
the Rose Inn. He was admitted a freeman of the corporation, DeccBbef ' 
1657, and died June 12, 1672, in the forty-third year of his age. 

500. O. THOMAS . KINGSFORD = HIS HALF PENY. 
JR. OF . SANDWHICH = POST MASTER. 

1569. A common post for carriage of letters appointed. 

1661. The mayor and jurats solicit the Duke of York for a oootifleJp 
the privilege of a foot post, to cany money and goods to and firam S>s^' 
Deal, and London, according to ancient custom, notwithstanding the ^ ' 
Parliament for creating the post-office.—** Annals of Sandwich." 

501. O, DANILL . PICHLEY=D . S . P. 

JR, IN . SANDWICH . 1656 = D . S . P. 

502. O, lOHN . REVELL = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . SANDWICH = A bell. 

1669. The King, Duke of York, Prince Rupert, and the Eail of Sm^ 
came to town, and the mayor presented his majesty with a glass of sad. ^' ^ 
Bell Tavern door, which his majesty drank on horsehack. — ** Anntls of Si^ 
wich." 

The Bell is now the principal inn. 

503. O, lAMFis . R0IJINS = ^ Arms, 

R, IN . SANDWICH , 1655 - I , R. I 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 383 

>4. O, RALPH . ROBINS = A boat with rigging. 

/?. IN . SANDWICH . 1655 = R . S . R. \ 

>5. A variety reads ralfh, etc 

>6. O. DAVID . ROGERS = A bunch of grapes. 

R. IN . SANDWICH = D . I . R. \ 

yj. O. THOMAS . SANDVM = His HALF PENY. A spade and hoe 
crossed. 
jR. IN . SANDWICH . 1667 = T . s. A tree. J 

38. O. lOHN . VANDEBROVCK = A merchant's mark. 

jR. IN . SANDWICH . 1656 = I . D . B . V. J 

le device on obverse is known in heraldry as *' Lacy's Knot.*' 

09. O. THOMAS . vovxG . i666 = A roll of tobacco. 

/?. IN . SANDWICH . IN . KENT = T . M . V. J 

SEVENOAKS. 
I o. O, WILLIAM . ALLEN . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

/i. SEAVENOCKS . IN . KENT = W . A. J 

11. O. NICHOLAS . BROOKSED = A pistol. N . M . B. 

jR. IN . THE . SEVEN . OAKES = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

12. O. RICHARD . CRONKE . 1658 = The Merchant-Tailors' 

Arms. 

-A*. AT . SEAVEN . OAKES . KENT = R . M . C \ 

13. O. DANIELL , DAVES . 1 668 = A bell. 

/?. IN . SEVENOAKS . IN . KENT = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

14. O. DANIEL . DAVIS . 1 666 = CHEESMONGER. 

/?. IN . SEAVEN . OAKS . IN . KENT = D . D . D. J 

15. O. THOMAS . GREEN . OF . 1 668 = The Merccrs' Arms. 

jR. SEAVENOKS . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. T . G. ^ 

16. O. THOMAS . GREENE . OF = The Mercers* Arms. 

I^. SEVENOAKES . IN . KENT = T . G. \ 

117. O. NATH"-. OWEN . OF . SEAVEN . OAKES . MERCER (in fivC 

lines). 
^. His . HALFE . PENNY . 1 669 . N . E . o (in six Unes). 
(Octagonal,) ^ 

athaniel Owen was committed to Maidstone Gaol for refusing to bear arms as 
Idier. 

;i8. O. lOHN . THORNTON . 65=A bull. 

R. IN . SEAVEN . OAKES = I . T. J 

;i9. O. WILL . WALL . AT . SEAVENOAKS = Three sugar-loaves. 

R. IN . KENT . HIS . HALFE . PENY = W . M , W. 1668. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



L 



384 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

520. O, WILLIAM . WALL . IN = Three sugar-loaves. 

jR, SENOCKE . IN . KENT = W. W. 1 666. } 

521. O. THOMAS . W1CKENDEN= 1666. 

I^, SEVEN . OAKES , IN . KENT = T . I . W. | 

SHEERNESS. 

522. O. RICHARD. lONES . SVTLER = HIS HALF PENY. 

jR. OF . SHIRNESS . 1667= R . I. i 

SHURLAND. 

523. O. SHURLAND . IN . KENT . SHEPPIE = The CTCSt of tbc Hsr 

bert family ; a wyvern. 
/?. (No legend,) The arms of Herbert; three lioos ie 
pant ; impaling spiller, a cross between four muUeti 

James Herbert, sixth son of Philip, fourth Earl of Pembroke and MontgaBffL 
and Baron Herbert of Shurland, married Jane, daughter of Sir Robert Spflk^.^ 
Laleham, county of Middlesex. Their arms are impaled on the token issaec t 
Shurland, which is in the parish of Eastcheap, in the Isle of Sheppey ; the waeet 
of Shurland appears to have been settled on James Herbert on his marria^ ^ 
was knight of the shire for Oxford. His name appears as a subscriber to Hu^- 
•* History of Kent,'* in 1709. 

SITTINGBOURN. 

524. O. lOHN . MiLWAY. IN . SITTING = Three doves. 

/^. BORNE . NEXT . THE . CROWN = I . M . M. 1 

525. O, THOMAS . PEARCE . 1667 = The Ironmongers' Anns. 

jR. IN . SITTINBORNE . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. T . P COB^ 

joined. 

526. A variety is dated 1669. [ 

527. O. WILLIAM » WEBB * AT , THE = St Gcorge and dragon. 

A^ IN . .^ITTIXGnORN . 1670= HiS HALF P£NV, 

SMARDER 

528. O. THOMAS . HiNCKLV . IN = A ga!e* 

^, SMERDEN * IN • KENT * 1669 = OlS BALf P«>^ 
T . S . H. 

SNAVR 



529. O. THOM i^ilMHpM^HSbE ^ A fl^urHic-lk. 



i3o* 



■ 



I 



KENT. 3«5 

STOKE. 

531. O. WILLIAM . GILBART = A SUgOT-loaf. 
^. AT . STOAKE . IN . KENT = W . G. \ 

STROOD. 

532. O. HENRY . ALLEN . AT . TH£ = A bull'S head. 
R. CASTEL . IN . STROOD = A castle. 

533. O. EDWARD . BERBLOCKE = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . STROVD . IN . KENT = E . M . a 

534. O, Robert . Caverdale . at . Stroud (in three lines). 
/?. His . Halfe . Peny , 1668 . R . h . c (in four lines). 

535- O, PHILLIP . EWER . OF = P . E. 
R. STROOD . IN . KENT= 1652. 

536. A variety has the date 1666. 

537. O. HENNERE . FIGGETT=H . M . F. 
JR. OF . STROOD . IN . KENT= 1654. 

538. O. ANTH . LOVELL . IN . STROVD = An angel 

R. NEERE . ROCHESTER = A . S . L. 68. 

539. O. CONSTANCE . WALSALL = A bird. 
R. IN . STROVD . IN . KENT = A StilL 

540. O. CONSTANT . WALSALL = A Still. 
R. OF . STRVDE . IN . KENT = C . W. 1 666. 

541. A variety reads : 

R, IN . STRVD . 1667 = w . c. 

STURREY. 

542. O. THOMAS . iHONSON = The Grocers' Arms. 
R. AT . STOOWRV . i65o = T . I. A fleur-de-lis. 

543. A variety has the name corrected to iohnson. 

544. O, WILLIAM . PICARD . OF = W . E . P 

R. STVRREY . IN . KENT . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

SUTTON-AT-HONE. 

545. a lOHN . CHILD . OF . svTioN = Three wheatsheaves. 

R. AT . HONE . IN . KENT . 1 667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. \ 

SUTTON VALENCE. 

Salloo Valence is the name of the parish ; the village is sometimes called Town 
Suttoo. 

546. O. lOHN . BVRKHVEST = The Grocers* Arms. 

R. OF . SVTTON . 1657 = I . B. \ 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



386 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

547. O. lOHN , CLEMENT = Three tuns. 

H. IN . SVTTON . 1656 = 1 . C. J 

548. O. AT . THE . KINGS . HEAD = Full-facc of Henry Vlll. 

jR, IN . TOVN . SOVTTON = R . G. \ 

549. O. ISAAC . HVNTi' . OF = A Uon rampant. 

jR, TOWNE . SVTTON . 1671 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

TENTERDEN. 

550. O, lOHN . CHVRCH . IN . TANTERDENE . 1668 (in SIX linCS) 

jR. HIS . HALF . PENY = The Butchers' Anns. (Octagonal.) ._ 

551. O. lAMEs . MEAD . 1667 = An angel. 

jR, IN . TENTARDEN = HIS HALF PENY. 

552. O, lOHN . READER . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

I^. TENTERDEN . IN . KENT = I . R. t 

553. A variety reads : 

/?. TENTERDEN . IN . SVSSEX = I . R. i 

Tenterden is on the borders of Sussex. 

TUNBRIDGE. 

554. O. WILLIAM . FREEMAN . HIS . HALF . PENNY (in fOUr lint>l 

jR. IN . TVNBRiDGE . 1 667 = A roll of tobacco. W . E . F. , 

555. O. WILLIAM . OVEREY . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 
jR. TVNNBRIDG . IN . KENT = W. O. 1 669. 

556. O. Stephen . Putland . his . \ . 1666 (in four lines). 

^. IN . TVNBRIDGE = S . A . P. 

557. O. I.E. STRETFEiLD . MERCERS = The Skinners' Arms. 

jR, IN . REATHERF . & . TVNBRIDGE = I . E . S. \ 

558. O, ROBERT . WALiCE = The Butchers' Arms. 

jR. OF . TVNBRIDGE =R . W. i 

559. O. RICHARD . WOOD . HIS . HALF . PENNY (in four linCS). 

jR. IN . TVNBRiDG . IN . KENT . 1 668 (in four lines). 

560. O, RICHARD . WOOD = R . W. 

jR. OF . TVNBRIDGE = 1652. i 

561. O. RICHARD . WOOD . OF = A rosc. 

i?. TVNBRIDGE . IN . KENT = R . K . W. » 

WATERINBURY. 

562. O. lOHN . CAREY . GROSER == 1 669. 

J^. OF . WOTERENBVRY . KENT » I . C. * 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 3«7 

WESTERHAM. 

563. O, SAMVELL . DALLING . OF = S . A . D. 

R. WESTERHAM . IN . KENT= 1 653. \ 

564. A variety reads dailling. 

565. Another variety has the date 1664 \ 

566. O. ANTHONY . SAXBEY . OF = A man making candles. 

JR. WESTERHAM . IN . KENT = A . A . S. \ 

WESTGATE (a part of Canterbury). 

567. O. lOHN . WRAIGHTE = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R. IN . WESTEGATE . i668 = i . R . w conjoined. \ 

WILLESBOROUGH. 

568. O. FRANCIS . BARTHOLOMEW = 

R. WILLESBOROVGH = HIS HALF PENNY. J 

WINGHAM. 

569. O. lOHN . SOLLEY . IN = A Uon rampant 

R. WINGHAM . IN . KENT = I . P . S. J 

VVOODCHURCH. 
57a O, THO . BRiSENDEN . OF = The Butchers* Arms. 

R. WOODCHVRCH . IN . KENT = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

WOOLWICH. 

571. O. SARAH . BOWYER . OF . wooLLwiCH = A cannon mounted 

R. HER . HALFE . PENNY . 1667 =S . B. ^ 

572. O. AT . THE . BARBERS . POLE = A pair of scales. 

R. IN . WOOLEDGE . 1656 = W . I . F. \ 

573. O. lOHN . LADBROOKE=I . A . L. 

R. IN. WOOLLEDGE . 1 666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

574. O. LODwiCK . POOLE . IN = The Carpenters' Arms. 

R. WOOLLWICH . 1650 = L . E . p. \ 

^jjj, ft AT , THE . STATES . ARMES== A harp. 

W~ R, IN , WOOLEDGE . t656 = E . S. \ 



bj76. O. RICHARD . SCOTT . 1 666 = The Carpenters' Arms. 

R, IN . WOOLWICH = R . M . S. \ 

tAKE * TAMPSELL . IN < WOOLLWICH = The Joiners* Arms. 

. HALFK p PKNNV . 1667 = 1 . T. \ 

WATEms==HER HALFE PENNY. 

%WICH . 1667 =D . W. \ 

25—2 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 




388 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



WROTHAM. 

579. O. CHARLES . ALLFR£Y = A boar's head. 

i?. OF . WROTHAM = C . A. J 

580. O. THOMAS . CAVERLEY = The Mcrchant-Tailors' Anns. 

I^, IN . ROOTHAM . l666«T . C. \ 

Thomas Caverley's name occurs frequeotly in one of the church registcn. 



WYE. 

581. O, MARIE . ALLEN = M . A. 

/^. IN . WYE . 1666 = HER HALF PENY. 

582. O. THOMAS . ALLEN . AT . THE = A Saraccn's head 

/?. SARASANS . HEAD . IN . WIE = T . R . A. 

583. O. lOHN . covLTER = The Grocers' Arms. 

/?. GROCER . IN . WYE . 1652 « I . S . C. 



584. O, THOMAS . DAN . WEAVER = A snake coiled. 

H. IN . WYE . 1652 =T . M . D. ] 

585. O. RICHARD . WHITTINGHAM . IN . WYE . 1667 (in five UnCS). 

i?. HIS . } . PENY = A winged horse. {Octagonal.) \ 

586. O. RICHARD . WHITTINGHAM = R . F . W. 

^. AT . THE . FLYING . HORSE = IN . WYE. \ 

This inn is still in Wye. It is the oldest and formerly the principal inn of tbe 
interesting old town of Wye. 

YALDING. 

587. O. DANIELL . CHILTENTEN . AT . YALDING . IN . KENT . 1668 

(in five lines). 
R, HIS . HALFE . PENY . D . A . c (in five lines)L \ 

588. A variety reads Chittenden. 

589. O, GABRIEL . covcHMAN = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, OF . YALDING . IN . KENT = G . C. 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT. 3«9 

TOKENS STRUCK IN LEAD. 

OP THESE WE HAVE : 

CANTERBURY. 

590. O. THO . MAYNE. 

R. The Grocers' Anns. 16(42?) 
SANDWICH. 

591. O. W . B. 

R. A bird in a shield. 

592. C7. R . R (Ralph Robins). 
R, A sailing-boat. 

593. O, w. A merchant's mark over. 
R, A pelican feeding its young. 

The Pelican Tavern has long ceased to hold a place in the street to which it has 
left a name. 

In a list of quit rents of lands, etc., belonging to St. Peter's Church, Sandwich, 
collected between the years 1646 and 1 66 1, there is : 

1646. The Widow White for house in the High Streete, 3s. 4d., formerly the 
Three Mariners, now the Pelican. 

The letter " w " on the obverse favours the idea that this token was issued by 
the Widow White. 



TRANSFERS. 

The following tokens belonging to Kent were wrongly assigned by 
Mr. Boyne : 

SUTTON. 

Farthings of John Burkhurst and John Clement placed to Sutton 
in Surrey, Nos. 179 and 180. These tokens are frequently to be 
met with in the neighbourhood of the Kentish Sutton. 

WROTHAM. 

Farthing of Thomas Caverley. Mr. Boyne reads this token 
BOOTHAM, and places it to Yorkshire, No. 347 ; but his descrip- 
tion b not correct, the token reading rootham, the name of the 
town being spelt as pronounced. 



TOKENS WHICH MAY BELONG TO KENT, 

Most of the following are assigned by Mr. Boyne to other counties, 
but there is a great probability that some, if not all, belong to Kentish 
towns : 

HICHAM (Derbyshire, No. 80). 

SX>WA&0 . PARKES. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



390 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
STONE (Staffordshire, Nos. 52, 53 and 54). 

lOHN . WHITT ACRES . 1 664. 1 

lOHN . WHITACRES . 1 667. l 

RICHARD . WHITMORE . 1667. | 

WICKHAM (Buckinghamshire, Nos. 117, 118, 119 and 129). 

THOMAS . ATKINES . 1 668. 
THOMAS . BATES . 1661. 
THOMAS . BVTTERFIELD. 
THO . BVTTERFIELD. 
lOHN . MORRIS . 1666. 
lOHN . MORRIS . 1666. 

The following tokens placed under Kent by Mr. Boyne do not 
belong to the county : 

APPLEDORK Boyne, Nos. 2, 3 and 4. 
PHILLIP . COMMAN . (16)64 . ( 1 6)68 (two Varieties). 

THO . GRIBLE. 

These belong to Appledore in Devonshire, the names are commor 
in that part of the country. 

BONINGTON. Boyne, No. 26. 

lASON . GOVLD . 1670. ^ 

This token reads bvningdon. 

Mr. Boyne in his MSB. and other papers relating to tokens which I 
have, states that it belongs to bovingdon, in Hertfordshire. On 
account of this I have omitted it from Kent 

DOVER. Boyne, No. 182. 

T . D . K . THE BLEW . ANKER. 

Mr. Boyne gives two descriptions of this token : Kent, No. 182, 
and LONDON, 2,551 — ^the latter being correct. 

HURST. Boyne, No. 294. 

lAMES . MATHEW . 1667. \ 

This token belongs to Hurstpierpoint, in Sussex. Two specimens 
were found in the churchyard there. 

LEE. Boyne, No. 305. 

lOSEPH . LAMB . 1 664. ^ 

This belongs to Leigh, Essex. 

The following is from the " Transactions of the Essex Archaeological 
Society," vol. ii., part iv. : 

Joseph Lamb occurs as a tenant of the Manor of L.eigh in 1626 (this was pro- 
bably ue father of the issuer). The family settled in Leigh for some yttn, Joox- 
Lamb, a shipwrieht, arrived at considerable opulence. 

Abraham Lamb was a ship carpenter, and his son, Isaac Lamb, a distiller, Sti 
here in 1752. 



Digitized by 



Google 



KENT, 391 

POULTON. Boyne, No. 370. 

EDWARD . FRANKLING. J 

This token reads fovlton and not povlton. It has therefore been 
laced to Folkestone. 

SOUTH. Boyne, Nos. 435 and 436. 

RICHARD . BVRTON . 1 668. i 

SAMVELL . THOROLD . 1 668. J 

These belong to South Town, known as South Yarmouth, Suffolk, 
here is no place called South in the county of Kent. 

STOKK Boyne, No. 439- 

lOHN . HVBBARD. \ 

This was incorrectly described by Mr. Boyne. The reverse reads 
roAKE . NORF. It therefore belongs to Stoke, in Norfolk. 

STROOD. Boyne, Nos. 446, 447 and 449. 
WILLIAM . HOPTON . 1 665 (two Varieties). 

RICHARD . WAKE . 1 664. 

These belong to Stroud, in Gloucestershire, as does an unpublished 
irthing of Samuel Bubb. 




Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Plate V. 





APPIuKOORB. 



Caictbrburt. 




rTIO*»Jj^ 



CuiTBmBUllT. 




CANT£RBUMY. 





DOVBR. 



HOLLINGBOURMC. 




HomrcHiLD. 





IGHTHAM 




MlLTOV. 



Sbvbiioabs. 






.iff^^IEIXwM 


fl!^?ij'^n 


\^\~%itw 



TUMBRIOOB. 






1^1 



Wyb. 



ThiI KaTB op KBMT TOKBMt ^ftftlNTBO BY J. CUOT HODBKHI. IBQ« F.8.A^ OP RlONMOMO* 
OH-ThaMCS. 8UIIIICV. It RMPIOTPUU.V OBOIOATIO TO NIM JV TH8 KOfTOft. . 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



Digitized by 



Google 



Plate r. 





Applboorb. 



Caictbrburt. 





CAJmSBURT. 



CANT£RBVMY. 





DOVBR. 



HOLLINGBOURMC. 




HomrcHiLD. 








Ightham 




MiLTOII. 



Sbvbiioabs. 




TUMBRIOOB. 






^1 



Wyb. 



TNta Kats op Kbnt Tokim ^mtiNno by 4, Eliot Hodbkiw. Ktq« F.8.Am op Rionmomo- 

OH-THAMCt. 8UIIIICV. It RatPIOTPUIXV OBOIOATIB TO NIM JV TH8 ^^^TOm. 1 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 



Digitized by 



Google 



Xancasbire- 



Number of Tokens issued 145 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 41 

Town Piece issued at Tarleton. 



Sub- Editor and Collaborateur : 

Nathan Heywood, Esq., S.S.C., 

Memb. Num. Soc, Lond., 

Fallowfield, Manchester. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Xanca6bire« 

Whilst the Cheshire series of tokens possesses a large proportion 
of pennies, this adjoining county is remarkable for the paucity of 
their issue. 

Amongst the Lancashire series punning devices are not uncom- 
monly found. We have the following examples : James Bolton, of 
Blackburn, a bolt through a tun ; Robert Moss, of Bolton, a bolt 
in a tun : James Norris, of Bolton, a bolt in a tun ; Thomas Cuttler, 
of Clitheroe, a sword ; Robert Tallbot, of Clitheroe, a talbot passant ; 
and James Archer, of Preston, an archer. Loyal sentiments also 
appear. Hugh Cooper, of Chorley, has " god save the king," and 
for a device the rose and crown ; Charles Rodgers, of Leigh, the 
royal oak crowned ; John Lord, of Haslingden, a unicorn ; Thomas 
Greene, of Lancaster, John Greenwood, of Lancaster, and Samuell 
Rathbome, of Liverpool, a lion rampant, the same device being part 
of the arms of the Duchy of Lancaster ; Lawrence Nuttall, of 
Oldham, a crown ; and John Butterworth, of Rochdale, a queen's 
head crowned ; Edward Borron, of Warrington, a crown ; and Eliza- 
beth Woolley, of Warrington, the Prince of Wales's crest. 

Religious emblems are often met with. James Wolstenholme, of 
Chorley, has the device of the bleeding heart ; John Crampton, of 
" LANCASHIRE," two kcys in saltire ; John Lawson, of Lancaster, the 
lamb and flag ; John Wall, of Prescot, the dove and olive-branch. 
The emblem of the lamb and flag is also represented on the tokens 
issued by Joseph Bolton, of Preston, John Kellet and Thomas Woley, 
of Preston; Christopher Nowell, of Preston, and Rich, and John 
Sumpner, of Preston, the same emblem being the arms of the borough 
of Preston ; Thomas Pigott, of Warrington, and Richard Worral, of 
Warrington, a pot of lilies ; William Varley, of Whalley, the bleeding 
heart ; and Robert Winstanley, of Wigan, the dove and olive-branch. 

The church at Ormskirk is represented on the token issued by 
William Haydock, of Ormskirk, and the embattled bridge at War- 
rington on the token issued by Thomas Casson, of Warrington ; the 
legend of the babes in the wood is represented on the heart-shape 
token issued by Roger Gorsuch, of Liverpool. 

The tradition of the eagle and child is represented on the tokens 
of William Prockter, of Lancaster ; James Hamar, of Rochdale ; and 
William Jackson, of Holland. 

Monograms are met with on the tokens of Benjamin Walker, of 
Ashton-under-Lyne ; William Boardman, of Halliwell ; Jefrey Woods, 



Digitized by 



Google 



396 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

of Kirkham ; Mary Davis, of Kirkham ; John Charleton, of Man- 
chester ; and Richard Hunt, of Manchester. 

Crests or family arms are sometimes displayed. James Bolton, of 
Blackburn ; Rob. Dicconson, of Chorley ; William Dweryhowse, of 
Liverpool ; John Dichfield, of Warrington ; Jerard Bankes, of Wigan ; 
Thomas Cooper, of Wigan ; and Mathew Markland, of Wigan, have 
each the crest or arms of their family represented on their respeaive 
tokens. The arms of the city of London are represented on the 
token issued by Andrew- Bury, of Manchester. 

The arms of the incorporated trade companies, or guilds of the 
city of London, or some part thereof, are also extensively exhibited 
We have the following examples : the Apothecaries' on the tokens 
issued by Richard Howarth, of Blackburn ; John Mashter, of Lan- 
caster j John Pemberton, of Liverpool ; Andrew Bury, of Manchester ; 
John Charleton, of Manchester ; John Cadman, of Preston ; Thomas 
Pigott, of Warrington; and Gilbert Barrow, of Wigan. The 
Armourers' on the octagonal-shape token issued by William Laith- 
waite, of Wigan. The Bakers' on the tokens issued by James Hard- 
greaves, of Haslingden ; Joshua Crosbie, of Ormskirk ; and Jane 
Murray and Jo. Pickering, of Warrington. The Cordwainers' on the 
token issued by Thomas Wasley, of Chorley. The Drapers' on the 
tokens issued by John Townley, of Clitheroe ; Thomas Alcocke, of 
Crosby ; Edward Williamson, of Liverpool ; Thomas Farrar, of Orms- 
kirk ; James Smith, of Poulton ; and Bruen Sixsmith, of Warrington 
The Grocers' on the tokens issued by Edmund Robinson, of Cli- 
theroe ; Mary Davis, of Kirkham ; Thomas Johnson, of Liverpool ; 
Emary Oldfeild, of Manchester; Samuell Winter, of Manchester; 
Thomas Crosbie, of Ormskirk ; Joseph Bolton, of Preston ; Roger 
Haddock and John Ravald, of Preston ; John Kellet and Thomas 
Woley, of Preston ; John Shield, of Preston ; Rich, and John 
Sumpner, of Preston ; Joshua Strengfellow, of Rochdale ; Thomas 
Wrexham, of Warrington ; and Robert Markland, of Wigan. The 
Innholders' on the token issued by James Scholes, of Chaddertoo. 
The Mercers' on the tokens issued by Benjamin Walker, of Ashton- 
under-lyne; James Brindle, of Blackburn; Lawrence Townley, of 
Burnley ; and Mathew Deane, of Prescot. The Tallowchandlers' oo 
the tokens issued by John Goulding, of Ashton-under-Lyne ; John 
Doson, of Heaton ; John Wall, of Prescot ; Mathew Markland, of 
Wigan ; and Robert Winstanley, of Wigan. The Weavers' on the 
token issued by Robert Martlers, of Rochdale. The Woolmen on 
the tokens is^ed by Richard Higson, of I^igh, and Adam Twaite, 
of Chowbent. The only town token in this series was issued at 
Tarleton. 

Nathan HEVwooa 

Manchester. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LANCASHIRE, 397 



ASHTON-UNDER-LYNK 

T. O. GEORGE . BARDSLAYE . l669 = G . E . B. 

I^. IN . ASHTON . VNDER . LINE = HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

2. O. lONATHAN . BVTTERWORTH == HIS HALFE PENNY. 

/^, IN . ASHTON . VNDER . LINE = I . A . B. | 

3. O. lOHN . GOVLDiNG = The Tallowchandlers' Arms. 

/^. IN . ASHTON.. 1669 = 1 . G. J 

4. O. lOHN . AND . MARY . HEYWOOD = THEIR HALF PENY. 

/^. IN . ASHTON . 1667 = 1 .M . H. J 

The following entry is found in the Rev. Mr. Oliver Heywood's " Vellum-book 
ikith one Clasp ^: 

"674. Mr. John Hey wood, of Ashton parish under line, buryed June 3, 1 691, 
aged 6a" 

5. O. BENiAMiN . WALKER . MERCER = The Mercers* Arms. 

^. OF . ASHETON . VNDER . LINE = His name in monogram. I 

BLACKBURN. 

6. O. lAMES . BOLTON . i666 = A bolt through a tun. 

A IN . BLACKEBORNE = HIS HALF PENY. J 

7. O. lAMES . BOLTON . i666 = A bolt through a tun. 

J?. IN . BLACKEBORNE = A bolt through a tun. J 

Probably brother of John Bolton, of Brookhouse, parish clerk of Blackburn 
(who died in 168S). But there was another James Bolton living in the latter years 
of the seventeenth century, who was a son of the parish clerk of Blackburn, bom 
in 1668, and brother of Giles Bolton, of Blackburn, mercer. The second James 
Bolton named might, however, be too young to have issued these tokens. The 
device of an arrow or bolt piercing the bung of a tun is the rebus of the family 
name of Bolton.* 

8. O. I AMES . BRiNDLE . i666 = The Mercers' Arms. 

Id. OF. BLACKEBORNE » HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

9. O. lAMES . BRINDLE . OF = i° and the Mercers' Arms. 

Id. BLACKBVRNE . 1667 = The Mercers' Arms. ^ 

10. O, RICHARD . HAWORTH = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

J?. OF. BLACKBORNE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

Richard Haworth, of Blackburn, apothecary, died iu 1694, and was buried 
October 5. By his first wife he had sons Thomas and John. He married, secondly, 
Febmary 22, 1681, Jennet Bentley, and had issue, Peter, bom 1682 ; Henry, born 
1689 ; Richard, bom 1691 ; and Grace, bora 1685. October 29, 1694, letters of 
tuition and curation were granted to Handle Fielden, of Great Harwood, mercer, 
of the persons and estate of Peter Haworth, aged twelve years ; Grace, aged 9 ; . 
Henry, aged 5 ; and Richard, aged 3, children of Richard Haworth, of Blackburn, 
apothecary, deceased.* 

* This note has been kindly supplied by W. A. Abram, £sq., J. P., Blackburn. 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



398 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

11. O, ANTHONY . WELLS . IN = A pcstle and mortar. 

I^. BLACKBVRNE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I 

BOLTON. 

12. O. lAMES , MOLLiN£X = Two pipes and a roll of tobacca 

J^. OF . BOVLTN . 165 I = I . F . M. i 

13. O, Robert . Moss . of , Bolton, 

R, HIS . HALF . PENNY = A bolt in a tun. I 

14. O. Robert . Norris . of , Bolton = 1667. 

R, HIS . HALF . PENY = A bolt in a tun. \ 

Mr. Robert Norris was a sidesman of Bolton parish church in 1699 and 1704. 
during the vicariate of the Rev. Peter Haddon.* ^ 

15. O, MARY . ROBERTS =1666. 

R, OF . BOLTON = M . R. \ 

16. O, WILLIAM . SMALLSHAWE=: i^ Two pipcs crossed and a 

roll of tobacco. 

R, OF . BOVLTON . IN . LANCASHEIR = W . E . S. I 

Mr. William Smallshawe was a churchwarden of the Bolton parish church ir 
1707, and a sidesman in 1 71 5, during the vicariate of the Rev. Peter Haddoo.* 
Extracts from the Bolton parish church registers : 

Mrs. Mary Smallshaw, Great Bolton, widow, buried December 25, 178a. 
Mr. William Smallshaw, Great Bolton, junior, buried October 5, 1742-3. 
Ann, daughter of William and Mary Smallshaw, Great Bolton, baptized July 17. 

i7"-3- 

Ann, wife of Mr. William Smallshaw, of Great Bolton, buried Norcmber % 
171617. 

William, son of William and Mary Smallshaw, Great Bolton, bora Janoaiy 19, 
baptized February I, 1 72 1-2. 

Dorothy, daughter of William and Mary Smallshaw, Great Bolton, bapciud 
April 28, 1724-5. 

William Smallshaw, Great Bolton, buried December 12, 1726-7. 

BURNLEY. 

17. O, LAWRENCE. fowNLEY = The Mcrccrs* Arms. 

R, OF . BVRNLEY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

The Burnley halfpenny token was found in 1 88 1 by a workman while preparing; 
a piece of ground for paving, opposite the old church gates in Burnley, the site lu<i 
just been cleared of the ancient gabled houses, the market cross, and public stocks^ 
The token is of brass, very thin, and is about three-quarters of an inch in diameter. 
It is in a capital state of preservation, owin^ probably to its exclusion from the air : 
the inscription is very legible, except a portion of the figure on the shield. On the 
obverse is the inscription Lawrence town ley ; in the centre or field, sannounted 
b^ a dotted circle, is a shield bearing the arms of the Mercers' Company ; a demi* 
virgin, couped below the shoulders, issuing from clouds, vested, arowoed ^th an 
Eastern crown, her hair dishevelled, and wreathed round the temples with rose^ ; 
all within an orle of clouds. In the Burnley token the orle is absent. On the re- 
verse the inscription is of bvrnley, 1669, and in an inner dotted circle, His hau 
PENY. The issuer was probably one of the Townley family, of Barnside, near 
Colne, and Carr Hall, in Marsden, who inherited extensive estates with Soke Corn 



* This note has been kindly supplied by Jas. C. Scholes, Esq., Bolton. 

y Google 



Digitized by' 



LANCASHIRE. 399 

Mills, in the neigfaboorhood of Burnley. We are indebted to Mr. William Wad- 
dingtOQ, market superintendent of Burnley, for the above description and the 
loan of the accompanying block. 




BURY. 
1 8. O. SAMVELL . WARINGE . 1 667 = A man on horseback. 

i?. HIS . HALFE . PENNY = S . W. J 

In the Northouram register of the Rev. Oliver Heywood and the Rev. F. 
Dickinson, are the following entries : 

Mr. Saml. Waring, of Bury, buried his wife about July 20 [1705]. 

Mr. SamL Wareing, of Bury, and Mrs. Elsther Crompton, of Old Hall, near Stand 
of Pilkington, married August [17 10]. 

Mr. Saml. Wareing, of Bury, in Lancashire, died June 25, of a few hours' sick- 
ness [1717]. 

Mrs. Wareine, of Wakefield, died April 14, bur. the same day [1739]. 

Mr. Samuel Wareing, of Bury, died December [1742]. 

Miss , dr. of me late Mr. Samll. Warioge, of Bury, Lancashire, bur. 

September 9 [1743]- 

Miss , dr. of the said Mr. Wareing, died also September ii [1743]. 

CHADDERTON. 

19. O. lAMES . SCHOLES . 1671 =HIS HALF PENY. I . M . S. 

i?. IN . CHADDERTON . NEARE . MANCHESTER. = A Star. | 

A star of eight points is the crest of the Innholders' Arms. 

CHORLEY. 

20. O, THOMAS . ALLANSON = Two pipcs and a roll of tobacco. 

^. IN . CHORLEY . 1653= T . B . A. J 

2 1. O. HVGH . COOPER . OF . CHORLEY = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

/^. GOD . SAVE . THE . KING . 1667 = A Fosc and crown. J 

22. O. ROB . DiccoNSON . OF . CHORLEY = Three battle-axes (two 

and one). 

^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1667 = R . M . D. | 

The Dicconsons were seated at Wrightin^on. One Barbara Dicconson, of 
Wrightington, was on June 15, 1 731, married to John Towneley, of Cornsay 
House, and of Towiieley. Some of the others married into the families of Ffar- 
rington, of Shawe Hall, and Walmesley, of Sholley, all in the county of 
Lancaster. 

23. O. THOMAS . WASLEY = The Cofdwainers* Arms. 

I^, IN . CHORLEY . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. A 



Digitized by 



Google 



400 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
24 O. lAMES . woLST£NHOLME = A heart.pieiced with two arrows. 

JR, OF . CHORLEY . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. I . E . W. { 

CHOWBENT. 

25. O. ADAM . TWAITE = A WOOlpack. 

J^. IN . CHOWBENT = HIS PENNY. I 

The bale of wool is part of the aims of the Company of Woolmen. 

CLITHEROE. 

26. O, ARiHVR . ASHTON = A roU of tobacco and two pipes 

crossed. 

^. IN . CUTHEROW = A . A. \ 

27. O. THOMAS . CVTTLER = A SWOrd. 

^. OF. CLITHEROW . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. 1 

28. O. EDMVND . ROBINSON = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^, OF . CLITHROE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

29. O, ROBERT . TALLBOTT = A talbot paSSEUt 

/^. OF . CLITHEROW . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. I 

This issuer was the son of John Talbott, of Roshton, near Blackburn, geotlenun. 
Robert Tallbott married Isabel Lawson, of Clitheroe. He had a son nuaed 
George Talbott, who was a burgess of Preston at the guild of 1682.* 

30. O. lOHN . TOWNLEY . IN = The Drapers* Arms. 

JR. CLITHEROWE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

John Townley was a younger son of Henry Townley, of Duttoa, gentleman. 
He was bom in 1637, and married Catherine, daughter of Mr. William Guy, of 
York. He had a daughter, Anne.* 

COLNE. 

31. O. lOHN . BLAKEY = HIS HALFE PENY. 

I^. IN . covLNE . 1667 = A merchant's mark (the Bowen's 
knot). I 

The Blakeys of Blakey were a very old fa mil v of lesser gentry on the Lancashire 
border, near Colne. One of them, John Blakey, of Colne, died on Angnst 24. 
1657, as stated on his gravestone in Colne churchyard. Perhaps a son of his, of 
Lanehead, near Colne, gentleman ; and this might be the John Blakey who issued 
this token. His only child and heiress was Alice Blakey, who married, first, 
Henry Lonsdale, of High Riley, in Accrington ; secondly, Thomas Parker, Esq^ 
of Alkencoats, near Colne (her eldest son, Robert, by her second husband, va^ 
bom in 1720), and died in 1737. Alice Blakey would be bom about 1675-85, anJ 
if her father, John Blakey, was the token-issuer under notice, his coin was issuci 
whilst he was still a young man. In the diary of Ralph Thoresly, the Leeds anti 
quary, occurs, on September i, 1702, an entry made when Thoresly was at Colne : 
" I was at a loss for Mr. Blakey (who married my old friend, Mr. Breaidifie's 
daughter), who were inquiring for me at Leeds ; when I was for them at Co\n; 
but Mr. Tatham, the minister [of Colne] gave me satisfoction in many thiogs.** 

• This note has been kindly supplied by W. A. Abram, Esq., J. P., Bkckbora. 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



LANCASHIRE. 401 

In the general records of deaths of persons of note, etc., all over this district in 171 7, 
occurs this item : 

Mr. John Blackey, of Coin, in Lancashire, died of a palsie, buried June 20. 
Another Mr. Blackey, of Coin, buried June 29, 1724.* 

CROSBY. 

32. O. THOMAS . ALCOCKE = The Drapers' Arms. 

/^, OF. CROSBY. 1667 « HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

Thomas Alcocke was a bailiff of Liverpool in 1663 (see note to the token issued 
by Thomas Johnson, of Liverpool). 

GARSTANG. 

33. O. WILL . LANCASTER = A stick of condles. 

^. IN . GARSTANG . 1663 = W . L. \ 

For another token of Garstang and Preston, issued by John Cadman, see 
description under Preston. 

HALLIWELL. 

34. O, WILLIAM . BOARDMAN = w . E . B (the w E in monogram). 

/^. IN . HALLIWELL = 1666. J 

35. O. IN . HALLIWELL . 1652 = W . A . B. 

J?. NERE . SMiTHiLLES = An Indian smoking. \ 

The ancient mansion of the Bartons at Halliwell is called Smithell*8 Hall. 

HALTON. 

36. O. NICHOLAS . TOKiN = An anchor. 

J^. IN . HALTON = N . A . T. J 

HASLINGDEN. 

37. O, lAMES . HARDGREAVES = A pair of scales. I . A . H. 

J?. OF . HASLINGDIN . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

;iS, O. lOHN . LORD . 1668 = 1 . E . L and a unicorn. 

I^. OF . HASLINGDEN = HIS HALF PENY. J 

HEATON. 
39. O. lOHN . DosoN . OF . HEATON = I . M . D and three doves. 

/^, NEBRE . MANCHESTER = HIS HALFE PENNY. J 

The three doves are part of the Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

HOLLAND. 
4a O. WILLIAM . lACKsoN . OF . 1667 = An eagle and child 

-Af. HOLLAND . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . L J 

William Boyne, Es<}., F.S.A., has placed this token to Holland, in Lincolnshire ; 
but it is now thought it belongs to Lancashire. The device of the eagle and child 
is found on other Lancashire tokens (see William Proctor, Lancaster, and James 
Hamar, Rochdale). The eagle and child is the crest of the Stanleys, Earls of 
Dertiy. 

* This note has been kindly supplied by W. A. Abram, Esq., J. P., Blackburn. 

26 



Digitized by 



Google 



402 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



HUYTON. 

41. O. THOMAS . HODGSON = The Groccrs' Arms. 

/?. IN . HVYTON . 1666 B HIS HALF PENY. | 

KIRBY. 

42. O. lOHN . DENT . OF . KIRBY = A tree and two small fioweis 
J?. HIS . HALF . PENY . 1667= A bunch of grapes and rmt- 

leaves. \ 

KIRKHAM. 

43. O. MARY . DAVIS . 1 67 1 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. IN . KERKHAM«M . D ^ (the M D in monogram). I 

44. O. lEFREY . WOODS = I . o . w (the o w in monogram). 

J?. IN . KERKHAM = l670 J. i 

LANCASTER. 

45. O. lOHN . CRAMPTON = Two keys in saltire. 

^. IN. LANCASHIRE. 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

46. O. THOMAS . GREENE . IN = T . E . G. 

J^. LANCESTER . TOWNE = A lion rampant j 

*' In 1660, on the 20th of 11 mo., at a Quaker's meeting, the justices, with a par? 

of soldiers, some with swords drawn and pistols cockt, others with moikeis mi 

lighted matches, took away all the men they found there and committed them » 

the castle prison.'* Thomas Greene was among the number. 

47. O. lOHN . GREENWOOD = A lion rampant 

J?. IN . LANCKSTER = I .G. J 

48. O. lOHN . HODGSON = A female figure. 

A IN . LANCASTER = 1 . H. • 

49. O, lOHN . LAWSON = I . M . L. 

^. IN . LANCASTER = A lamb carrying a flag. i 

John Lawson was a member of the Society of Friends, or, as genenDy caBo. 
Quakers. In the year 1652, for preaching in the Steeple-house Yard (the cteci 
yard was so designated by them), at Malpas, he was set in the stocks for foorhois 
and imprisoned at the county gaol for twenty-three weeks. In 1654, lor speaks; 
in a steeple-house at Lancaster, he was at the Assizes fined £20^ and for noo-pcf 
ment was imprisoned for a year. Again, on the 20th of the eleventh nrwnth, 166a 
for meeting together, he was taken to the castle prison and committed for nhsac 
the oath tendered to him in court. " Accusations against John Lawson, of Ltf 
caster, by him answered," is the title of a tract printed for him in quarto, 1655. 

50. O, lOHN . MASHTER = The Apothecaries' Arms. 

J^. OF . LANCASTER . l668 = HlS HALF PENY. ♦ 

51. O, WILLIAM . PROCKTER = An eagle and child. 

J^. IN . LANCASTER . 167I =W . E . P. I^ I 

52. O, WILLIAM . PROCKTER = An eagle and child. 

J^, IN . LANCASTER . 1670 = W . E . P. J ♦ 



Digitized by 



Google 



LANCASHIRE. 403 



LEIGH. 



53. O, RICHARD . HIGSON = A WOOlpack. 
J?. IN . LEIGH . 1666 = R . E . H. 

54. O, CHARLES . RODGERS . OF = The Royal Oak, whereon are 

three crowns. 

jR. LEAH . HIS . HALFE . PENNY — C . R. 1 668. J 

The royal oak, the Boscobel oak-tree and three crowns, implying the diadems of 
the three kingdoms, England, Scotland, and Ireland. 

LITTLE LEVER. 
55 O. RICHARD . HEwooD . iN = A ragged staff. 

jR, LITELL . LEVER . 1652 = R . A . H. J 

Richard Hey wood was the son of Oliver Hey wood, of Little Lever, bjr his wife, 
Alice Hutton, of Breightmet, in the parish of Bolton, and was born at Little Lever 
m 1596. He was a freeholder, and was largely engaged in commerce. He was 
twice married, first to Alice Critchlaw, of Longworth, in the parish of Bolton, and 
secondly, to Margaret Brereton. He had a numerous family, the particulars "of 
which are brought down to a recent date in Foster's " Lancashire Pedigrees." 

During the taking of Bolton by Prince Rupert's array, his library, which had 
been removed from his dwelling-house by one of his daughters for safety, was un- 
fortunately lost. 

He died much respected, and in the diary of his son, the Rev. Oliver Heywood, 
B. A., for the year 1677, is the following entry : 

'* At last God hath put an end to the long and afflicted days of my dear, tender- 
hearted father ; he died March i, aged about 82. I may say of him as is recorded 
of Abraham, that ' he gave up the Ghost and died in a good old age, an old man 
full of years ; and was gathered unto his people ': and as Isaac and Ishmael buried 
him in a cave, so my dear brother and I buried our beloved father. O my soul, 
hast thou not some tears to shed at the funeral of a father ? Nature binds thee to 
&ome workings of affection, and grace helps to regulate them. Thou hast parted 
with a father, and is this nothing ? God would not have such a providence pass 
without observation and improvement. Thou hast buried a father that provided 
food and raiment for thee in thy younger days, a father that was at great care and 
charge for thy education, both in the best schools of the neighbourhood and at the 
university ; but all this was small compared with the inward and anxious workings 
of his heart for thee, which thou didst never so feelingly know till thou hast of late 
felt the same towards thy own. O what instructions, exhortations, and admoni- 
tions didst thou receive from him ! What prayers did he put up for thee, and 
what grief did he feel at thy failings ! What jealousy he had of me when he came 
to visit me at Cambridge ! What charge did he leave with my tutor concerning 
me, and how gladly did he welcome any hopes of my well-doing ! What solicitude 
he had concerning my settlement ! and though he had been at a great expense in 
my education, yet how fearful was he lest I should enter the ministry unfit ! 
This induced him to make provision for my residence in Mr. Angier's family ; 
l>at Providence called me to this place. Even then he did not leave me, but 
followed me with his counsels and prayers to his dying day. O what a father ! 
Few have the like 1 Though I can truly say, I have studied to requite him, and 
though nothing I could do for him too much in his straits, yet I have fallen far 
short of a full recompense. He had a tender love for me, and I hope the remem- 
brance of it will not be quickly worn away from my mind. My gracious Lord also 
hath not left me comfortless concerning my dear, deceased father. Blessed be 
God that his hoary head was found in the ways of righteousness, and that we have 
good reasons for hope that he sleeps in Jesus, and will have a happy resurrection ; 
and what can we desire more? O Lord, raise up a succession of God-fearing wor- 
shippers ; and as thou hast been my father's God, and my God, and the God of 
my dear companion now at rest, so continue to be my God and guide to death, and 

26—2 



Digitized by 



Google 



404 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

be the God of my children, and children's children, even to a thousand genera- 
tions." 
The following is a copy of the inscription on his tombstone : 
" Here lyeth the body of Richard Heywood, of Little Lever ; who had followed 
the Lord sixty-four years in Christian profession and practice through varioos cod- 
ditions : at last fell asleep, March i, 1676^7, in the 8ist year of his age. 'There 
let the weary be at rest 

PEDIGREE OF RICHARD HEYWOOD. 
Peter, 1164. Robert. Peter, 1234. William, 1266. 



Richard, 1302. 



Robert. 



Robert. 



Nicholas, 1358. 



^enray, i 



I 



398. 



Peter, i4ia=j=Margaret TunnaclifFe. 



Roger. 



James. 



Isabel Robert, i456.YElizabeth 

Peter, 1485. 



Nicholas. 



Nicholas. 



I I 

James. Nicholas. 



GcSnj. 



Robert, 1507. 



I 
Peter, 1540. 



I 
Geffray. 



Thomas. 

I 
John, time of Ed. VI. 

Oliver. 



56. a 

William 
during the 

57. O. 
JR. 

Thomas 
during the 

58. a 

59. o. 



Richard, of Little Lever. 

LIVERPOOL. 

PETER . ATHERTON = A SUgat-loaf. 

OF. UVERPOOLE. l668 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

Williamson and Peter Atherton were the bailiffii of Liverpool in 1673. 
mayoralty of James Jerrom. 

GEORGE . BENNETT . IN = A ship. 

LIVERPOOLE . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

Preeson and George Bennett were the bailiffs of Liverpool in 1665, 

mayoralty of Michael Tarleton. 

CHARLES . CHRISTIAN = A CaStle. 

GROCER . IN . LIVERPOOLE = HIS PENNY. 1669. i 

ADDAM . CRVMPTON = A . C. 

IN . LEVERPOOLs 1 65 7. 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



LANCASHIRE. 405 

60. O. RICHARD . CRVMPTON»Hope Seated on an anchor. 

^. OF . LIVERPOOLE . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

61. O. WILLIAM . DWERYH0WSE = H1S PENNY. 

J?. IN . LIVERPOOLE . 1670== Arms in a shield; three buckles, 
two and one. i 

62. O. ROGER . GORSVCH . MERCER = The babes in the wood 

jR, IN . LEVERPOOLE . 1672 = HIS PENY. I 

This token is heart-shape. 

63. O. RALPH . HALL= 1661. 

J?. OF . LIVERPOOLE = R . E . H. i 

64. O. THOMAS . iOHNSON = The Groccrs' Arms. 

jR. IN . UVERPOOLE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

The issuer of this token became a councilman in 1659. 

Thomas Johnson and Thomas Alcock were bailiffs of Liverpool in 1663, daring 
the mayoralty of Peter Lurtin. Thomas Johnson was mayor in 1670, and was 
the fiftther of Sir Thomas Johnson, afterwards M.P. for Liverpool, who is said to 
have died in America. 

65. O. lOHN . PEMBERTON = The Apothccaries* Arms. 

J?. IN . LIVERPOOLE . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

Geo. Marsh and John Pemberton were the bailiffs of Liverpool in 1660^ during 

the mayoralty of Alexander Green. John Pemberton built the first house erected 

in Moor Street. In the " Moore Rental," published by the Chetham Societv, he 

is described as "John Pemberton the apothecary, a base ill-contrived fellow.' 

66. O. SAMVELL . RATHBORNE = A lion rampant 

^. IN . LIVERPOOLE . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

The present William Rathbone (1880) is the sixth in direct descent of a line of 

LirerpooX merchants, all bearing the same Christian name. One of them, known 

as •* honest William," brought the first shipload of cotton into Liverpool The 

house, Greenbank, in the outskirts of Liverpool, has been inhabited by three 

fenerations of the family. They are nearly related to the Reynolds, to whom 
Iristol owed so much.* 

67. O. EDWARD . WILLIAMSON . OF = The Drapers* Arms. 

^. LIVERPOOLE . ALDERMAN « HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

Edward Williamson was Mayor of Liverpool in 1663 ; his will was administered 
at Chester in October, 1687. Williamson Square and Williamson Street, in 
Liverpool, are called after him. 

MANCHESTER. 

6S. O. lOHN . ABRAHAM = HIS HALFE PENY. 

^. IN . MANCHESTER » I . R . A. ^ 

John Abraham was a Quaker, and was baptized at Warrington on May 17, 1629. 
For attending a meetmg was taken before a justice on the 27th of the eleventh 
month, f 660, and in 166 1 and on the i6th of the fourth month, on a refusal to take 
the oath of aHegiance, was sent to Lancaster Gaol. 

He resided at Etchells,near Stockport, until hisdeath on 28th May, 1681. He was 
tmried at the Friends* burial-ground, Deansgate, Manchester, the remains of which 

" * This note was kindly communicated by the late J. S. Smallfield, Esq., London. 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



406 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

were removed to the new cemetery at Ashton-on-Mersey, and his meniorial-stosie. 
An account of him is given in the British Friend newspaper, published at Glas- 
gow, for 30th August, 1845. He was a minister in the Society of Friends, and 
travelled in Ireland and Scotland. The marriage of his daughter Mary is there 
briefly mentioned. She married Edward Chetham, of Chetham and Nathorsi, 
barrister-at-law, great-nephew of Humphrey Chetham, the founder of the Collet*; 
at Manchester. Their only son Edward, of Castleton, near Kochdale, barrister-a:- 
law, died unmarried in 1769. Their two daughters became co-heiresses of tbf 
Chetham estates. The elder daughter, Alice, married Adam Bland, a grandsoo o: 
Sir Thomas Bland, of Kippax Park, Yorkshire. Humphrey Chetham s estates it 
Clayton Hall, Turton Tower, etc, became her property, and amongst her de 
scendants through the co-heiresses of Bland and Greene was the late Right Hon. >i: 
H. Bartle Frere, Baronet. The younger daughter, Mary, who inherited Broogbtoc 
Hall, Smedley Hall, etc., married Sam. Clowes, of Ridgefield, afterwards 
Chadwick, lastly of Smedley. From them descends the present S. W. Clo^o. 
Esq., of Broughton Hall and Woodhouse Eaves, M.P., etc. Mary and Edwai. 
Chetham were married by Newcome, and a mention of it occurs in Newcomc » 
diary (see Chetham Society's Publications). She and her mother Rachel remaioc 
in the Church, while John Abraham and his only son Daniel attached themsdvca 
to the Society of Fnends, and suffered for their convictions. Daniel married 
Rachel, seventh daughter of Thomas Fell, of Swarthmoor Hall, near Ulverstoc 
Vice-Chancellor of the County Palatine of Lancaster, Chancellor of the Dud:}. 
Judge of Chester and North Wales, M.P. for Lancaster, Lord of the Manor o: 
Ulverston, etc He died in 1658, and his wife Margaret, daughter of John AsLe«. 
of Marsh Grange, married, secondly, George Fox, the founder of the Societj i 
Friends, and died in 1702. Daniel Abraham purchased Swarthmoor Hall fn." 
Judge Fells' heirs, and his descendants resided there until 1759.^ 

t69. O, HENRY. BARLOW. 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R, IN . MANCHESTER = H . B. 1 

Henry Barlow was a chapman, and was buried August 21, 1668. Hb vx 
Henry married Susanna Pollett. 

t70. O, GEORGE. BOOTH. 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. 

R, IN . MANCHESTER = G . I . R \ 

March 27, 1653. Elizabeth, daughter of George Booth, of Manchester, gro&^r 
was baptized at the Collegiate Church — as was another daughter, Mary, in 1650 
(month and day not given). 

George Booth was a grocer, and was buried on January 28, 1666-7. 

In 1069, April 16, George Booth, Manchester, pensioner, probably a soc / 
George Booth, grocer, appears amongst the list of admissions to Jesos Colle^;. 
Cambridge. 

The following is a copy of the inscription upon Mr. Booth's gravestone, «i '' 
was found some years ago in excavating a foundation in Great Ancoats Strtr. 
Manchester, and is now in the possession of James Beard, Esq., The Grac^ 
Levenshulme : 

Here resteth the body of Geoige Booth of Manchester, grosser, who was brrif^ 
the 28 Janvary, Anno Domini 1666. 

* This note has been kindly supplied by Miss Emma C. Abraham, of Grasses 
dale Park, near Liverpool. 

f This issuer signed the protestation of 164 1-2, to which the author c 
'<Hudibras" refers: 

" Did they not next compel the nation 
To take and break the Protestation ? 
To swear, and after to recant. 
The solemn leage and covenant ? 
To take th' engagement, and disclaim it. 
Enforced by those who first did frame it ?" 

XL, iu IS3-8, 



Digitized by 



Google 



LANCASHIRE. 407 

Isabd, wife to George Booth, baried April 24, 1693. 

Also George Booth, M'* of Arts and Minister, son of the said George, buried 
dsLTch 4, 1678. 

Mary his daughter, buried July 2, 1723. 

Nathaniel Ward, buried April 14, 1767, aged 67 years. 

The first inscription is quite different in the character of the lettering to the 
thers, being done in large capitals, and is as dbtinct as if cut yesterday.* 

§71. O. WILLIAM . BOWKER = HIS HALF PENY. 

-/?. IN . MANCHESTER = W . B. 1 665. J 

William Bowker, grocer, was buried at the parish church, Manchester, on 
une 27, 1677. His son, William, was buried December 15th, i68at 

72. O. ANDREW . BVRY . OF . MANCHESTER = The Apothecarics' 
Arms. 
/^. HIS . PENY .1671 = Arms of the City of London. i 

This issuer married Martha, seventh daughter of Peter Heywood, of the Isle of 
Vfan. This Peter was the nephew of " Powder-plot (Peter) Heywood," of Hey- 
irood, who took the lantern (now in the Bodleian Library) from Guido Vaux 
irhen he attempted to blow up the Parliament House. 

§73. O. lOHN . CHARLETON = The Apothecarics* Anns. 
J^, IN . MANCHESTER = I . c (the I c in monogram). 

John Charleton, the father of the issuer of .this token, was the brother-in-law of 
Richard Johnson, fellow of Christ College, and was imprisoned with Mrs. Johnson, 
because he would not confess where Mr. Johnson had conveyed his books and 
papers. 

Mr. Charleton, senr., was of the MuUgate in 1647 ; he was junior constable of 
Nf anchester, and died February 9, 1662-3. 

John Charieton, junr., died in 1705.$ 

74. O. lONATHAN . EATON = HIS HALFE PENY. 

^. IN . MANCHESTER . 1667 = 1 . E. J 

§75. O. RICHARD . HVNT . 1669 = His name in monogram. 

J^. OF . MANCHESTER = HIS HALF PENY. J 

Richard Hunt was an innkeeper in 1640-4. On November 18, 1639, he married, 
by license, Mary Butler ; he was a juror in 1641, and in 1645 ^ member of the 
CommonwoUth committee.^ 

§76. O, ISAAC. MOSSE . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

/?. IN . MANCHESTER = I . M . M. J 

Isaac Moss was a member of the Society of Friends. He married a daughter of 
Samuel Watson, of Knight- Stainforth, in Yorkshire, one of the early Quakers, 
who, after a life of persecution, died at Chester, September 20, 1706, and was 
buried there, aged 88 years. His wife, Mary Moss, died on November 29, 1692. 

The mother of Mary Moss was the Brst corpse interred at the Meeting-house 
Yard in Lancaster.^ 

§77. O, lOHN . NEILD . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. 

/?. IN . MANCHESTER = I . N. J 



• This note has been kindly supplied by the kte J. E. Bailey, Esq., Manchester, 
t This note has been kindly supplied by John Owen, Esq., Stockport. 
i This note has been kindly supplied by the late J. E. Bailey, Esq., Manchester. 
I This issuer signed the protestation of 1641-2. 



Digitized by 



Google 



4o8 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 
78. O. EMARY . OLDFEiLD « The Grocers' Anns. 

J?. OF . MANCHESTER = E . O. J 

This tradesman was a member of a family settled in Manchester, nearly all th« 
male members of which (in the same generation and in several later generatioss) 
were woollen drapers. 

He was the younger of the two sons of John Oldfield (of Rotherham) lod 
Isabella his wife, the latter being the daughter of William Emery, of Sheffieti, 
gent., who was, during the reigns of Elizabeth and James L, a steward or coa 
hdential agent to the Right Hon. Gilbert, Earl of Shrewsbury, K.G. (son of iht 
famous custodian of Mary Queen of Scots). Mr. Emery Oldneld dearly derived 
his Christian name from the surname of this his grandfather, under whose will he 
was a legatee. Mr. Oldfield^s paternal ancestors, for at least two generations, were 
Yorkshire freeholders. 

The elder brother, John, who, probably in company with Emery 01d6«M 
migrated into Manchester out of Yorkshire shortly before 1650, became a verr 
prosperous and wealthy Manchester tradesman (woollen draper), having been 
fortunate in securing the hand of Mary Booth, a grand-daughter of the eminent 
Humphrey Booth, founder of Trinity Church, Salford. 

Emery Oldfield married on March 27, 1656, at Prestwich church, near Man 
Chester, Ann, daughter of Robert Gartside, of Prestwich. A son was bom of xiis 
marriage in 1657, the register entry of the baptism in the Manchester CoUcgiate 
Church being as follows : 1658, January 2, Emerie, son of Emerie OuldBeli 
On the 17th of the same month this boy was buried at the latter church, he being 
described in the burial as " Emerie, son of Amery Huldfield. 

On August 13, 1692, there was buried at the Collegiate Church, Amery Oldfieli. 
of Manchester ; and on October 5, 1709, a Mr. Amery Oldfield — the latter Yx'xsi 
undoubtedly the Mr. Oldfield the issuer of this token, who was alive in i6(m 
when his wife, Ann, died and was buried at the Manchester CoUcgiate Church.* 

179. O. THOMAS. P0DM0RE = HIS HALFE PENY. 

J^. OF. MANCHESTER = T . P. 1 666. i 

Thomas Podmore lived near the Market Stidd in 1644. He was an ancestor at 
the peruke-maker, who became the friend of Dr. Deacon, and the author of " The 
Layman's Apology for returning to Primitive Christianity," 1747. 

t8o. O, lOHN . RYLANDS . IN = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. MANCHESTER . l666 = I . M . R. I 

81. O, lOHN . AND . MARTHA . RYLANDS = THEIR HALFE PENNY. 
^. IN . MANCHESTER . 1667 = I . M . R. J 

John Rylands was the son of Francis Rylands, market-looker for fish and flesh. 

82. O. lOSEPH . VIGOR . 1663 = 1 . D . V. 

J^, IN . MANCHESTER = HIS HALF PENY. i 

Joseph Vigor, probably a son of the issuer, was buried on April $, 1733, and 
two of his children in 1727 and 1728. The widow of Joseph Vigor (the yoan|rf) 
married John Dickens, apothecary. Allen Vigor, attorney, a son of the last-named. 
Joseph Vigor married Mrs. Mary Croston, of Whittle, at Leyland, on July 20, 
1740. In 1749 Abigail Vigor was married. They are all buried in one grare m 
the Ely Chapel, north side of the Derby Chapel, m the Cathedral, Manchester. 

83. O. SAMVELL . WINTER = The Groccrs' Arms. 
I^. IN . MANCHESTER = s . w and an anchor. 

A warm friend of Newcome, the Nonconformist divine, who records bis boriil 
in June, 1662, in his Diary. 

* This note has been kindly supplied by C. T. Tallent-Bateman, Esq., M.u- 
Chester, from original sources hitherto unpublished, 
t This issuer signed the protestation of 1641-2. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LANCASHIRE. 409 



MILNROW. 

84. O. RICHARD. MILNE = An hour-glass. 

J^. OF . MILNROW . 1 67 1 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

The Milne family have long resided in the neighbourhood of Milnrow. A 
icluund Milne, probablv an ancestor of the issuer, held land in Milnrow in the 
ne of Henry vIIL, which bis grandfather had held. Richard Milne the issuer 
ats baptized at Rochdale February i, 1645-6, and buried there January 10, 1702-3. 
is descendants are Richard Milnes Redhead, Esq., and Oswald Milne, Esq., 
rznerly of Manchester. For a pedigree of the family, see Rev. Canon Raine's 
Lancashire MSS.,** vol. xxxi., p. 125.* 

85. O. GEORGE . SLATER = A shoe-SOle. 

J^, IN . MILNEROW . HIS . HALF . PENY = G . I . S. ^ 

NEWTON. 

S6. O. WILLIAM . WILLIAMSON . OF = HIS PENNY. 1667. 

-/?. NEWTON . NEAR . MANCHESTER = W . W. I 

87. O, WILUAM . WILLIAMSON . OF = HIS HALF PENY. 1669. 

J^. NEWTON . NEAR . MANCHESTER = W . W. ^ 

William Williamson of Newton was buried on the 9th November, anno dom. 
180 ; his wife, Elizabeth, was buried on August 15, 1677. Mary Partington 
rife to John Partington), eldest daughter to William Williamson, of Newton, 
mtleman, died on January 25, 1672. The following is a copy of the inscription 
1 William Williamson's tombstone : " Here restheth the body of William 
/^illiamson of Neuton, was buried the 9 day of November anno dom. 1689. "f 

88. O. lEFFERY . wiLLisoN = Two pipcs and a roll of tobacco. 

-/?. IN . NEWTON . 1667 = HIS HALFE PENNY. I . I . W. J 

OLDHAM. 

89. O. LAWRANCE . NVTTALL = A CroWn. 

^. OF . OLDHAM . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. L.A.N. ^ 

ORMSKIRK. 

90. O. lOHN . BERRY. l667»HIS HALF PENY. 

/^, IN . ORMESKIRKE = I . A . a ^ 

91. O, lOSHVA . CROSBIE . OF = A pair of scales. 

jR. ORMSKIRKE . HIS . HALPENY = I . C. 1 668. J 

9a. O, THOMAS . CROSBIE . OF . i666 = The Grocers' Arms. 

-/?. ORMSKIRKE . HIS . HALF . PENY = T . C J 

93. O. THOMAS . FARRAR . OF . i666 = The Drapers' Ajms. 

jR. ORMSKIRKE . HIS . HALF . PENY = T . E . F. ^ 

94. O. WILLIAM. HAYDOCK = A church. 

^. OF . ORMSKIRK . 1671 = HIS . I^ I 



• This note has been kindly supplied by Lieut.-Col. Fishwick, Rochdale. 
f This note has been kindly supplied by John Owen, Esq., Stockport. 



Digitized by 



Google 



410 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

95. O. AMBROSE. IACKSON = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. IN . ORMSKIRKE . 1667 = A . I. I 

POULTON. 

96. O. lAMES . SMITH = The Drapers' Anns. 

JR, IN . POVLTON . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. I 

" Tames Smith, in 1660, at the sessions, was sent to gaol for relbsing the oath 
of allegiance, although he had suflfered five months* imprisonment pferknisly.''— 
Besse's " Sufferings of Quakers." 

PRESCOT. 

97. O. MATHEW . DEANE = The Merccrs' Arms. 

jR, IN . PRASCOT . 1669 = HIS ^^^F PENY. i 

98. O, lOHN . WALL = The dove and olive-branch. 

J^, OF . PRESCOT . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. I 

PRESTON. 

99. O, lAMES . ARCHER ^ An archer with bow and arrow. 

J^, OF . PRESTON . 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

100. O. lOSEPH . BOLTON . OF = A lamb carrying a flag. 

I^. PREs" . AMONDERNES = The Grocers' Arms. \ 

Tosephus Bolton was admitted a burgess of Preston b^ court roll, on payment of 
a nne o( £3 los. 6d. before 1662 ; was a guild burgess ra that year with two sods, 
Giles and Edward. In 1652, Joseph Bolton was an alderman of the guild, and thca 
five sons were entered — Giles, Edward, Samuel, Joseph and James. This Josepii 
Bolton was apparently one of the Blackburn Boltons, several others of whom sub- 
sequently settled as traders in Preston. He was elected an alderman of Prestos 
on October 23, 1676, and died before August 20, 1683.* 

loi. O. lOHN . CADMAN . OF = The Apothecaries' Anns. 

jR, PRESTON . AND . GARSTANG = HIS HALF PENNY. l668w i 
Before the guild merchant of 1662, Johannes Cadman, apothecarius, had beca 
admitted a burgess of Preston by court roll, on payment of a fine of £$ los. He 
was enrolled at that guild, and twenty years later, John Cadman, son of John, 
deceased, was enrolled an im burgess ot Preston at the guild of 1682. John 
Cadman would, it is likely, be a kinsman of William Cadman, of the City d 
London, stationer, who in regard of the late sad accident of fire (the great fire of 
London in 1666), which had stopped his trade there, was, on October i, i66d, 
admitted by the mayor and council of Preston to inhabit and trade as a statior.cr 
in that borough for a term of two years. John Cadman displayed zeal in defence 
of the privilege of the trading companies of Preston in a contest with a Dumber of 
traders from the Blackburn district who sought a market for their wares in Prestoc. 
This was about 1670-80.* 

102. O. ROGER . HADDOCK. . & . lOHN . RAVALD = The GfOceTs'Anns. 

J^, OF . PRESTON . THEIR . PENNY = R . H and I . R and 1^ in 

a knot. I 

Before 1662, Roger Haddock was admitted by court roll a burgess of Preston— 
" Rogerus Haddock, servt. to Mr. Richd. Sumpner, if he serve out his tyme " — a*^' 
paid £3 as fine. Roger Haydock was an imburgess of the guild of 1662. He 
was a councilman of the guild of 1682. He died before November 2, 1691. 

John Revald was between 1662 and 1682 admitted by court roll a burgess <^' 
Preston on payment of £2 fine, and at the guild of 1682 John Revald was enrolled 
as an imburgess, and with him his two sons, Robert and Richard. John Reval ^ 
eldest son of Robert Revald, was elected a councilman of Preston on March 14. 

* This note has been kindly supplied by W. A. Abram, Esq., J. P., of Bbckborc 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



LANCASHIRE. 411 

1701-2 ; was accordingly a councilman of the guild of 1702, and died before 
April 14, 17 12. Later members of this family were burgesses at the guild of 1722, 
and Mr. John Ravald, gent., was elected one of the council November 17, 1729. 
John Ravald, ijent., was elected alderman July 17, 1739 ; was Mayor of Preston in 
>739-40b »nd died on July 17, 1741.* 

103. O. lOHN . KELLET . THOMAS . woLEY = The Groccrs' Aitns. 
^. IN . PRESTON . THEIR . HALF . PENY = c . p and a lamb 
carrying a flag. ^ 

Whalley is the proper spelling of this surname. At the Preston guild of 1662, 
Thomas Whalley, grocer, was an imburgess. He had previously been admitted by 
court roll on payment of £$ 5s. as fine. He was dead before 1682, when William, 
James, Thomas, and John Whalley, sons of Thomas, deceased, were enrolled as 
guild barge 



104. O. CHRISTOPHER . NOWELL = A lamb Carrying a flag. 

^. OF. PRESTON . 1672 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

Christopher Nowell was a townsman of note in his day, sometime before 1662. 
Christopherus Nowell was admitted by court roll a burgess of Preston, 
paying a fine of £^ los. At a guild merchant of 1662 he was entered and sworn 
as a guild buigess, together with his son Thomas. He was probably the same 
person with Chri<^topher Nowell, third son of Christopher Nowell, of Little 
Mearley, near Clitheroe, who died in 1628, and brother of William Nowell, of 
Little Mearley, living in 1661. On August 2, 1672, Mr. Christopher Nowell was 
elected a councilman of Preston. He was elected alderman subsequently, and in 
16S2 he was an alderman of the guild. He had other two sons enrolled, 
" Thomas Filius Christopheri, an alderman guilde," and John, brother of Thomas. 

On May 13, 1685, the town council of Preston ordered " that Christofer Nowell 
be desired to procure a box for putting in the new charter, and that he also 
toke care to read the same to Mr. Mallory, at London," etc. 

July II, 1 701. *'Mr. Christopher Nowell, having now some considerable time 
been an inhabitant of Leyland, was, at his own request discharged from the 
council " of Preston. 

Members of Mr. Christopher NowelFs family were still seated at Leyland in 
1722.* 

105. O. lOHN . SHIELD = The Grocers' Arms. 

/^. IN . PRESTON . 1664 = 1 . S. i 

106. O, RICHARD . svMPNER = The Grocers' Arms. 

J^. IN . PRESl'ON = R . S. 1 

107. O. RICH . AND . lOHN . svMPNER . OF » A lamb Carrying a 

flag. 
J?. PRESTON . THEIR . HALF . PENY = The Grocers* Arms. J 

Richard Snmpner was one of an old Preston family — the Sumpners, Somp- 
ners, or Samners. Richard Sumpner was one of the sons of John Sumpner, 
of Preston, entered with the father at the guild of 1642. In 1662, Richard 
Sumpner appears as a guild burgess, and enters three sons—John, James, and 
Alexander. Roger Haddock (see his token) was his servant and apprentice. At 
the guild of 1682, three generations of this family are enroUevI together — Richard 
Sumpner, gent., John Sumpner, grocer, his son, and John Sumpner, his (John's) 
son. Richard Sumpner's brother, Mr. Thomas Sumpner, was an alderman of 
Preston, and steward of the guild of 1662. In the "Palatine Note- Book" of 
December, 1884, there is an abstract of a deed dated August 17, 1641, to which 
Richard Sumpner, of Preston, grocer, was a party. Richard Sumpner must there- 

* This note has been kindly supplied by W. A. Abram, Esq., J. P., Blackburn. 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



412 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

fore have been an aged man in 1682, when he was yet living, but whoe bii too, 
John, there described as grocer, has doubtless succeeded to the businen fin» wU^ 
the father had retired/ 

RISLEY. 

108. O. MARY . EARLE = Three tobacco-pipes. 

J^. OF . RYSLEY . l668 = HER . HALFE . PENNY. \ 

William Boyne, Esq., F.S.A., has placed this token to Derbyshire, but it is 
now thought it belongs to Lancashire, as Earle is a local name, and a spedDcn 
has been found in the neighbourhood. 

ROCHDALK 

109. O, JOHN . BVTTER WORTH = Bust of the Queeii of Bohemia 

crowned. 

II. OF . RATHDELL . 1 662 = 1 . B. } 

There were several persons of this name living in the neighboariiood, it is there- 
fore impossible to identify the issuer of this token. 

no. O, I AMES . HAMAR . OF = An eagle and child. 

I^, RATCHDALL . 1655 = 1 . H. \ 

There were several persons of this name living in the neighbourhood, it is that- 
fore impossible to identify the issuer of this token. 

111. O. RICHARD. KENION = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^. OF . RACHDALL . l666 = R . K. 4 

112. O, RICHARD. KENION = HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, OF . RACHDALL . 1667 =R . I . K. } 

113. O. ROBERT . MARTLERS = The Weavers' Arms. 

II, IN . RATCHDALL . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. 4 

114. O. losvA . STRENGFELLOw = The Groccrs' Arms. 

^. IN . ROCHDALE = I . S. } 

The Strengfellows appear to have come from the neighbourhood of War- 
rington. Robert Strengfellow, mercer, of Rochdale, purchased from Edward 
Taylor, of Gladwich, yeoman, a messuage in 167a The premises wert is 
Hopkinfold, and about the sale a bill of complaint was filed in the Duchy Cotut 
on December 21, 1671.! 

SHAW. 

115. O, I AMES . CHETHAM . OF . SHAW = A talbot passant 

^. FEILD . NEERE . ROCHDALE = HIS HALF PENY. I . M . C. I 

TARLETON. 

116. O. TARLETON . TOWNE . HALPENIES = A boat 1669. 

I^. A church. J 

TURTON. 

117. O. AT . WOMORSLE . CHAPEL = W . A . W. 

J^. IN . TVRTON= 1652. } 

* This note has been kindly supplied by W. A. Abram, Esq., J.P., Bhckbam. 
t This note has been kindly supplied by Lieut-Col. Fishwick, Rochdale. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LANCASHIRE. 413 



WARRINGTON. 

118. O. lOSHVA . ABRAHAM = I . M . A and a roll of cloth. 

^. IN . WARRINGTON . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

Joshua Abraham was a churchwarden in 1670. 

He was a Salter by trade, and was baptized at Warrington on 28th March, 1624. 
He was buried on loth August, 16S0. His will, dated 7th August, 16S0, was 
proved at Chester on 12th September, 1682. His widow was buried at Warring- 
ton on December i8th, 1696. Rebecca, eldest daughter of Joshua Abraham, was 
thrice married. First, to Gerald Winstanley, of Liverpool, apothecary ; secondly, 
to Mr. Ainger, of Warrington (?) ; and, thirdly, to the Rev. Nathaniel Heywood, 
of Ormskirk. Rebecca is mentioned in her mother's will, dated 1692, as "my 
daughter Rebecca, now wife of Nathaniel Hey wood, of Ormskirk, clerke." John 
Abraham, of Manchester, was a brother of this issuer. They were sons of Richard 
Abraham, of Warrington, merchant, then called grocer, t.e», a dealer in gross.* 

119. O. EDWARD . BORRON • OF . 1 667 = A buU statant 

i?. WARRINGTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = A CrOWIL ^ 

120. O. EDWARD . BORRON . OF . i668 = A buU Statant. 

^. WARRINGTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = A CrOWn. J 

Edward Borron was buried at Warrington on December 24, 1676. ' 

Extracts from the Warrington parish church register : 
Baptisms. 1634. April 2a Artnur, son to Arthur Borron. 
9f 1635. Mayr 19. Jane, dau. to Arthur Borron. 
9, 1637. April 9. Edward, son to Arthur Borron. 
,, 1638. November 3a Bridget, dau. to Mr. Arthur Borron. 
«, 1 64 1. July 9. Peter, son to Mr. Arthur Borron. 
Burials. 1642. June 5. Peter, son to Mr. Arthur Borron. 

The Borrons of Warrington entered a pedigree in 1665, beginning with " Paul 
Burron, of Rowleston, co. Stafford," whose son " Arthur Burron, of Warrington, 
obi drca 1656," leaving with other issue, by his wife ** Elizabeth, dau. of John 
Barnes, of Warrington," Arthur Borron, son and heir, and Edward Borron 
(bom 1637, died 1676). Pedigrees of this family will be found in Sir William 
Drydale*s "Visitation of Lancashire " (Chetham Society, voL Ixxxiv., p. 65), and 
in Dr. Howard's " Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica," vol i. (new series), 
p. 354, where the account of the family is brought down to the present representa- 
tive, who resides in Scotland. A younger branch of the family settled at Dids- 
bury and Withington, near Manchester, and are now represented in one line by 
R. A. Harington, Esq., of Wigan.t 

131. O. THOMAS . CASSON . IN => An embattled bridge of five 
arches. 

J?. WARRINGTON. 1667= HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

Thomas Casson appears in a list of benefactors to the Warrington Blue-coat 
School in i68a He was buried at Warrington on January 19, 1684-5. 

122. O, John Dichfield His Half Penny. 

H. IN . WARRINGTON . 1669 = Arms in a shield ; three boars 
passant. 

123. O, SAMVELL. LEECH = Axms. 

JR. IN . WARRINGTON . 1 666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. S . M . L. i 

Samuel I^eech was a churchwarden in 1669. Marie, daughter of Mr. Samud 

Leech* woollen-draper was buried at Warrington February 24, 1681-2. Mrs. 

Mary Leech, wife to Mr. Samuel Leech, senior, was buried there April 21, 1694. 

* This note has been supplied by Miss Emma C. Abraham, Grassendale Park, 
LiveipooL 
t This note has been kindly supplied by J. P. Rylands, Esq., Birkenhead. 



Digitized by 



Google 



414 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

He was baried there September 13, 1695. Mr. Samuel Leech's house vis 
licensed in 1672 for a Presoyterian meeting-place.* 

124. O. WILLIAM . MORETON = A TOll of cloth. 

J^. OF . WARRINGTON . 1 666 = HIS HALF PENY. W . N . M. i 
Mrs. Marie Morton, widow, buried December 18, 1696. 

125. O. lANE . MVRRY . & . lO . PICKERING = THERE HALFE PENT. 

J^, OF . WARRINGTON . i668 = A pair of scales. t 

126. O. I . p and T . B. 

J^. THEIR . HALF . PENY . 1667 = IN . WARRINGTON. J 

James Peake, woollen-draper, was buried in 1676. 

127. O. MATTHEW . PAGE . OF . WARRINGTON = A ship. 

J?. HIS . PENNY . 1672 = A dolphin. 1 

Matthew Page was a churchwarden in 1676 and 1695. 

128. O. THOMAS . piGOTT . OF = The Apothecarics' AiTOS. 

J^. WARRINGTON . HIS . HAL . PENY = A pOt Of lillCS. J 

129. O. WILLIAM . scHOFiELD = w . A . s and a sugar-loaC 

^. OF . WARRINGTON . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

130. O. BRVEN . sixsMiTH = The Drapers' Arms. 

/^. OF . WARRINGTON . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. B . E . S. t 
Bryan Sixsmith was a Quaker. In 1676 he issued a tract, "The Unskilfil 
Skirmisher Rebuked for Blasphemy." In 1679 a quarto tract, *'A Tesdmcny 
Concerning the Life and Death of William Sixsmith. His son, Bryan Sixsmith. 
died at Warrington on the 13th of the tenth month, 1679, and was buhed 1: 
Penketh. The testimony is also printed in " Piety Promoted," by John Tornkkv 
London, 1759, p. 109. 

131. O. lERiMY . SMETHVRST = A man holding a spade. 

jR. IN . WARINGTON . 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. I . E . S. I 
Jeremiah Smethurst was a churchwarden in 1665 and 1679. Frands, his wife, 
was buried at Warrington August 16, 1684, and he was buried there March n, 
I695-6.* 

132. O. ELIZABETH . WOOLLEY = HER HALF PENY. 

^. IN . WARRINGTON . 1 667 = The coronet and plume. I 

1 33. O. RICHARD . WORRALL = A pOt of HUeS. 

^. OF . WARRINGTON . l666=sHIS HALF PENY. R . E . W. i 

134. O, THOMAS . WREXHAM = The Grocers' Anns. 

I^. IN . WARRINGTON . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. T. M.W. i 

WEST HOUGHTON. 

135. O. AT . DASEY . HILLOCKE = H . D . M. 

J^. IN . WEST . HOVGHTON= 1652. \ 

WHALLEY 

136. 0» WILLIAM . CLAYTON . OF = A pair of hart's horns. 

jR. WHALEY . MERCER . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. * 

In all probability the same person with one William ClaytoOv of HarvK>>. 

Chepelry, which adjoins Whalley, whose name occurs in 1684. The Harvv>-* 

Claytons, a rather numerous class, were several of them chapmen at that penoi.^ 

* This note has been kindly supplied by J. P. Earwaker, Esq.» Abeigde 

t This note has been kindly supplied by W. A. Abram, Esq., J.P., Bladcbcrr. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LANCASHIRE, 



415 



'37. O. WILLIAM . VARLEY = A heart pierced with two arrows. 

^. IN . WHALLEY . 1671 -HIS ^. 



138. 



WIGAN. 

O. GERARD . BANKES = Arms, a quarterly fleur-de-lis. 

^. IN . WIGAN . 1652 = Anns, three escalop shells. ^ 

The Bankes family were seated at Winstanley Hall. The arms of this hmily 
e : sable, a plain cross or, between four fleur-de-lis, argent and a canton of the 
cood. 

GILBERT . BARROW . OF = The Apothecarfes* Arms. 

WIGAN . HIS . HALF . PENY = G . E . B. 1 669. | 

THOMAS . COOPER = The crest of the Cooper family ; a 
cock's head erased, from the mouth a forked tongue is 
issuing. 

OF . WIGGAN . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. 

WILLIAM . LAiTHWAiTE = The Armourers' Arms. 

IN . WIGAN . HIS . HALF . PENNY . 1 668. 



139- 



140. 



141, 



a 
o, 

o. 



This token is octagonal in shape. 
142, O. ROBERT . MARKLAND = The Grocers' Arms. 






143- 



R. 

O. 
R. 

O. 



OF. WIGG... . 1655 = R . K . M. 

MATHEw . MARKLAND = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 



IN . WIGGON . 1664 = M . G . M. \ 

144. U. MATHEW . MARKLAND . 1 666 = The arms of the Mark- 

land family ; a chevron between three martlets. 
R, OF . WIGAN . HIS . HALF . PENY = The crcst of the Mark- 
land family ; a lion's head erased. \ 
The Marklands were a well-known family at Wigan, and Ralph Markland, of 
Vig^o Woodhouses, entered a pedigree of five generations at the ** Visitation of 
^ncashire " in 1664. A John Markland, of Wigan, married July 19, 171 2, Ellen 
i^ntwistle of Wigan. He had a numerous family, many of whom resided in Man* 
hester. 

145. O. ROBERT . WINSTANLEY = The dove and olive-branch. 

R. OF . WIGAN . 1652 = R . I . W. \ 



INDEX TO LANCASHIRE ISSUERS* NAMES. 



ohn Abraham ..Manchester. 

bftbua Abraham Warrington. 

Phomas Alcocke Crosby. 

ames Archer Preston. 

^eter Atherton Liverpool. 

^omas AUanson Chorley. 

Arthur Ashton Clitheroe. 

Gerard Bankes Wigan. 

leorge Bardslaye Ashton. 

penry Barlow Manchester. 

Albert Barrow Wigan. 

3eorge Bennett Liverpool. 

i>hn Berry Ormskirk. 



John Blakey Colne. 

James Bolton Blackburn. 

Joseph Bolton Preston. 

W. A B Halliwell. 

William Boardman „ 

George Booth Manchester. 

Edward Borron Warrington. 

William Bowker Manchester. 

James Brindle Blackburn. 

Andrew Bury Manchester. 

John Butterworth Rochdale. 

Jonathan Butterworth... Ashton. 
John Cadman Preston. 



Digitized by 



Google 



4l6 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



Thomas Casson Warrington. 

John Charleton Manchester. 

James Chetham Shaw. 

Charles Christian Liverpool. 

William Clayton Whalley. 

Hugh Cooper Chorley. 

Thomas Cooper Wigan. 

John Crampton Lancaster. 

Joshua Crosbie Ormskirk. 

Thomas Crosbie „ 

Addam Crumpton Liverpool 

Richard Crumpton „ 

Thomas Cuttler Clitheroe. 

Mary Davis Kirkham. 

Mathew Deane Prescot 

John Dent Kirby. 

Rob. Dicconson Chorley. 

John Dichfield Warrington. 

John Doson Heaton. 

William D weryhowse . . . Liverpool. 

Mary Earle Rysley. 

Jonathan Eaton Manchester. 

James Farrar Ormskirk. 

Roger Gorsuch Liverpool 

Thomas Greene Lancaster. 

John Greenwood „ 

John Goulding Ashton. 

Ralph Hall Liverpool. 

James Hamar Rochdale. 

James Hardgreaves Haslingden. 

Richard Haworth Blackburn. 

Roger Haydock and 

John Ravald Preston. 

William Haydock Ormskirk. 

Richard Hewood Little Lever. 

John and Mary Hey- 

wood Ashton. 

Richard Higson Leigh. 

John Hodgson Lancaster. 

Thomas Hodgson Huyton. 

Richard Hunt Manchester. 

Ambrose Jackson Ormskirk. 

William ] ackson Holland. 

Thomas Joh nson Liverpool. 

John Kellet, Thomas 

Woley Preston. 

Richard Kenion Rochdale. 

William Laithwaite Wigan. 

Will. Lancaster GarsUng. 

John Lawson Lancaster. 

Samuell Leech Warrington. 

John Lord Haslingden. 

H. D. M WestHoughton. 

Mathew Markland Wigan. 

Robert Markland „ 

Robert Martlers Rochdale. 

John Mashter Lancaster. 

Richard Milne Rochdale. 



James Mollinex Bolton. 

William Moreton Warrington. 

Robert Moss Bolton. 

Isaac Mosse Manchester. 

Jane Murry and Jo. 

Pickering Warrington. 

John Neild Manchester. 

Robert Norris Bolton. 

Christopher Nowell Preston. 

Lawrence Nuttall Oldham. 

Emary Oldfeild Manchester. 

L P. and T. B. Warrington. 

Matthew Page „ 

John Pemberton Liverpool 

Thomas Pigott Warrington. 

Thomas Pod more Manchester. 

William Prockter Lancaster. 

Samuell Rathbome Liverpool 

Mary Roberts Bolton. 

Edmund Robinson Clitheroe. 

Charles Rodgers Leigh. 

John Rylands ManchesteL 

John & Martha Rylands „ 

William Schofield Warrington. 

James Scholes Chaddcrtoo. 

John Shield Preston. 

Bnien Sixsmith Warrington. 

Geoiger Sluter Milnrow. 

William Smallshawe ...Bolton. 

Jerimy Smethurst Warrington, 
ames Smith Poulton. 

Josua Strengfellow Rochdale. 

Richard Sumpner Preston. 

Rich. & John Sumpner „ 

Robert Tallbott Clitheroe. 

Tarieton Town Tarleton. 

Nicholas Tokin Halton. 

John Townley Clitheroe. 

Lawrence Townley Burnley. 

Adam Twaite Chowboit 

WUliamVarley Whalley. 

Joseph Vigor Manchester. 

W. A.W TurtwL 

Benjamin Walker Ashton. 

John Wall Prescot 

Samuell Waringe Bury. 

Thomas Wasley Chorley. 

Anthony Wells Blackburn. 

Edward Williamson ...Liverpool 
William Williamson ...Newton. 

Jeffery Willison , 

Samuell Winter Manchester. 

Robert Winstanley Wigan. 

James Wolstenholme ...Chorley. 

Jefrey Woods Kirkham. 

Elizabeth Woolley Warrington. 

Richard Worrall 

Thomas Wrexham ., 



Digitized by 



Google 



Plate ri 



















TmI« KaTI or ToitENt MIMNTtO •▼ TNK TRUtTICS Or THf WAIIIIIN«T0N MUMUM 

msrccrruLLT okoioatio to thim av thk Eoitor. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



Xeicestersbire* 

Number or Tokens issued 105 

Number of Places issuing Tokens 23 

Town Pieces issued None. 



Sub-Editor and Coliabaraieur : 



Joseph Young, Esq., 

16, Gallowtree Gate, 

Leicester. 



Digitized by 



27 

Google 



Xeice0ter0bfre. 

The tokens of this county are halfpennies and farthings, which are 
dated from 1651 to 167 1 ; there are no town pieces. Twenty-six 
of them are engraved in Nichol's " History of Leicestershire" (voL iv., 
pL xTxiii., page 428); thirty-eight are illustrated (on page 124) in 
Throsby's "History and Antiquities of Leicester" (1791), and two 
dozen in a pamphlet published by the Leicestershire Architectural 
and Archaeological Society of a paper read in 1857 by Mr. Thos. 
North on the " Tradesmen's Tokens issued in Leicestershire in the 
Seventeenth Century." 

APPLEBY. 

A faxthiag tokeQ reading william . smith . in . applebyb (misprinted by 
Boyne applbbie) 1669, was attributed to the Leicestershire village of that name 
by Mr. North in his description of " Leicestershire Seventeenth Century Tokens '* 
in 1857, and hence subsequently introduced by Boyne into his 1858 edition under 
Leicestershire. 

It has, however, been proved to have been issued by a William Smith, of 
Appleby (the county town of Westmoreland), who was Mayor of that borough in 
the years 1667 and 1673. 

For a similar reason, the Christopher Birkbecke, Appleby, halfpenny, illus- 
trated (No. I) by Throsby, is now inserted under Westmoreland. 

ASHBY-DE-LA-ZOUCH. 

1. O. lOHN . ALLATT . OF = The Dycrs' Arms. 

a. ASHBY. DAL . ZOVCH . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. {OctagonaL) \ 
(sNorth, Na22.) 

2. O^ lAMES . cowPER . IN = A mill-rind. 

H. ASHBY . DE . LA . ZOVCH = I . C. \ 

3. O. lAMES . FARMER . 1671 =A HALF PENV. 

R, IN . ASHBY . DEL . LA . ZOVCH = The Mcrccrs' Arms. | 

Boyne's former edition, copied from North's 1857 List gives the reverse as 
IS . ASHBY . DELL . ZOVCH ; but the token, formerly Boyne^ own (now in the 
writer's possession), clearly reads as now quoted : 

3A. O. JAMES . FARMER . l666 = A Stag. 

R. OF . ASHBY . DE . LA . ZOVCH = I . F. \ 

4. O. DAVID . KING . IN = The Mcrccrs' Arms (?). 

R. ASHBY . DE . LA . ZOVCH = D . K. \ 

For tome unknown reason this farthing was omitted by Boyne in 1858, although 
be copied from North's List of the previous year in which it was duly catalogued. 

27 — 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



420 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

5. O. READE = A lion rampant. 

Ji. ASHBY . DE . LA . ZOVCH . 1653 = G . T. . i 

6. O. GEORGE . SEGRANE = A lion rampant 

JR. ASHBY . DE . LA . ZOVCH = G . S. { 

7. O, HVGH . SHERWOOD = The Grocers' Arms. 

jR. IN . ASHBY . 1656 = H . S. I 

8. O. JOSEPH . SHERWOOD = The Mercers' Arms. 

^. IN . ASHBY . 1655 = A bull's head. J 

This and the former token are attributed to Ashby-de-la-Zonch (althoi^ read- 
ing simply ASHBY), because there is direct evidence that the Sherwoods were free- 
holders in this market town in the year 163a 

9. O. FRANCIS . siKES . AT . Y* . RED = A lion rampant. 

jR. IN . ASHBY . DALY . ZOVCH = HIS HALF PENY. 1 669. i 

A Mr. Henry Sikes (possibly a member of thb family), an apothecary ir: 
London, bom in Ashby-de-la-Zouch, gave ;£'i40 for the use of the poor of b^ 
native town for ever. 

10. O. SAM YELL . NOVLDEN . in = SL Gcorge and the dragon. 

Ji. ASHBY . DELA . ZOVCH . 1667= HIS HALFE PENNY. / 

BAGWORTH. 

A farthing was catalogued by North in 1857 as reading THO . boss . in . ba<^- 
WORTH (No. 15 on his plate of illustrations), and subsequently inserted by Boyrc 
in his 1858 edition as No. 10, Leicestershire, from a very poor token now in the 
L«eicester Museum, although the place of that name in Leicestershire was bardy ;n 
existence in the seventeenth century. 

A careful scrutiny by the writer now enables him to place it in Warwickshire as 
it reads : 

O. THO . BOSS —The Grocers* Arms. 

^. IN . TAMWORTH-(?) H . B. 

BELTON. 

11. O. WILLIAM . BARRADELL = A bell. 

JR. OF . BELTON . 1671 = A HALF PENY. | 

(North's illustrations, No. 21.) 

Although there are said to be five Boltons in England the above is usoz.' *. 
ascribed to Leicestershire, it having been formerly a market-town of some impc:.- 
ance, and still holds its annual horse and cattle fair. 

BILLESDON. 

12. O. HVMPHREY . PARTRIDGE = The Tallowchandlers' Anns. 

^. IN . BILLSDEN . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. f 

13. O. HENRY . SANDERSON- A man making candles. 

JR. IN . BILLSDEN . 1 669 = HIS HALF PENY. f 

(=Throsby, No. 2.) 

The above two halfpennies were erroneously catalogued by Boyne in his liars- ^' 
edition under willbsden, in Middlesex, as Nos. 178 and 179 respectivL;> 



Digitized by 



Google 



LEICESTERSHIRE. 421 

althoQgh the Sanderson halfpenny had already appeared in the Leicestershire 
portion of his work (No. 12). 

That they each clearly read billsdbn (and not willsden) is evident from the 
excellent specimens in the writer's collection. 

BOWDEN. 

14. O. RICHARD . BRONSON==R . B. 

JR. IN . BOWDEN . 1658 = A pack-horse. J 

Great Bowden is in Leicestershire, and Little Bowden in Northamptonshire. 
They are adjoining parishes, separated by the River Welland. 
(— Throsby, No. 4.) 

BURROW. 

15. O. lOHN . SHAW = The Mercers' Arins(?). 

JR. OF . BVRROW = I . S. 1664. I 

This place, now called Burrough*on-the-Hill, may belong to some other county. 

BURTON OVERY. 

16. O. RALPH . COLEMAN . OF=«Cross patonce on a shield. 

J^. BVRTON . NERE . HARBORO = R . C. \ 

This hitherto unknown specimen (presented to the writer by his friend, the late 
John TopUs, Esq., Nottingham) is in unusually fine condition ; but why Burton 
(or, as it is now called, Burton-Overy) should be stated to be "near (Market-) 
Harboro," eight and a half miles distant, and not near Leicester, between seven 
and eight miles, it is dif&cult to explain. 

The Ck>leman family are still landowners in the parish, and tablets to their 
memoxy exist in the parish church. 

CHURCH LANGTON. 

17. O. WILL . ELWOOD . IN . CHVRCH= 1669. A trOWCl. 

/^. LANGTON . HIS . HALF . PENY = A stick of candles. \ 

EASTON MAGNA. 

18. O. EDWARD . MOARE = Three cloves. 

/^. IN . GREAT . EASON = E . M (in monogram). ^ 

This may possibly belong to another county. 

HALLATON. 

19. O. lOHN . ELLIS . 0F = A horse saddled and bridled. 

i?. HALLKRTON . 1667 == I . M . E. ^ 

(=Thro6by, Na 6.) 

30. O. EDWARD . GOODMAY . OF » Three cloves; the Grocers' 
Arms. 

i?. HALONGTON . LEST . SHIR = E . A . G. J 

(—Throsby, No. 7.) 

In 16 II, Henry Goodman held lands here ; and in 1630^ the Goodmans were 
freeholders. 



Digitized by 



Google 



432 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 



HINCKLEY. 

21. O. WILLIAM . BENTLEY = ArmS. 

/^. OF . HINCKLEY = W. E . a \ 

22. O. ROBERT . BLOOR . AT . THE = A CTOWa 

J^. CROWNE . IN . HINCKLEY . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

(-Throsby, No. 14.) 

23. O. lOSEPH . CAVE. MERCER = The Grocers' Arms. 

JR. IN . HINCKLEY . l666 = HlS HALF PENY. I 

{-Throsby, No. 13.) 

24. O. lOSEPH . CAVE = The Grocers* Arms. 

J^. IN . HINCKLEY = I . E . C. % 

25. O. THOMAS . DAVELL . IN = A bear. 

^. HINCKLEY . IRONMONGER = HIS HALF PENY. T . R . D- I 

26. O. THOMAS . DAVENPORT = Lion rampant 

J^. MERCER . OF . HINCKLY = T . D . D. } 

The fragment of this token in Leicester Museum, as noted by North, had the 
inscription so broken, and the device so worn away, as to be only initially di»- 
cernible, and hence was omitted altogether by Boyne in his former edition. 

The specimen in the writer's possession enables him now to supply what has 
hitherto been wanting. 

27. O. NATHANIEL. GILLBERT = HIS HALF PENY. 

^. AT . HINCKLEY . 1671= St. Gcorge and dragon. {Octa- 
gonal.) \ 

(-Throsby, No. 14.) 

28. O, Nathanl . Gilbert . at , the , George (in four lines). 

R, In . Hinckley . His . Half , Peny . 1672 (in five lines). 

(= Throsby, No. 15.) 

29. O. WILLIAM . ILIFFE = W . D . I. 

R, IN . HINCKLEY = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

30. O. WILUAM . ILIFFE = W . D . I. 

R, IN . HINCKLEY = 1662. \ 

<= Throsby, Na 12 ; North, No. 17.) 



LEICESTER. 

31. O, NATHANIELL . BAKER = An angel. 

R, IN . LESTER . 1667 = N . B conjoined. \ 

(-Nichols, No. 9; North, No. 5.) 

The Angel Inn, which has long since disappeared, formerly stood between the 
Cheapside and Gallowtree Gate, on the site now occupied by a firm of dnpcfs. 

32. O. lOHN . BROWNE = A man making candles. 

R. OF. LEICESTER. 1669 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

(= Nichols, No. 12, who incorrectly engraves the reverse his hafe pbnt.) 



Digitized by 



Google 



LEICESTERSHIRE. 



423 



33. O, lOHN . coLSON . OF . LEICESTER = A hound Carrying off a 

hare. 

J^. BAKER . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . C J 

(-Nichols, No. 16.) 

Bojme's fonner edition incorrectly described the field on the obverse to be "A 
fox carrying off a goose." 

34. O. DAVID . DEAKiNS . 1 65 7= The Balcers* Arms. 

Id. BAKER . IN . LESTER = D . D. 
( = Nichols, No. 3 ; Throsby, No. 18 ; North, No. 2.) 



35. A variety, dated 1664. 



large 
Din frc 



legend runs from the lower part of the coin from left to right. 
(-Nichols, No. 4 ; Throsby, No. 19.) 

36. O. FRANCIS . ELUOT=F . W . E. 
^. IN . LEICESTER . 165S = F . W . E. 

(= Nichols, No. I ; Throsby, No. 16.) 

37. O. lOHN . GOODALL . iN = A hand holding a glove. 

i?. LEICESTER . 1 666 — I . S . G. 
( — Nichols, Na 5 ; Throsby, No. 20 ; North, No. 3.) 

38. O. DANIELL . HEGGS . IN . 1 667 == A Unicom. 
Jd. LEICESTER . HIS . HALF . PENY = D . S . H. 

(—Nichols, Na la) 

39. O. lANE . LASH . IN . LEICESTER = The King's Arms. 

Jd. HER . HALFE . PENY . 1669 = 1 . L. 

(-Nichols, Na 13 ; North, Na 7.) 

The boose known as the King's Arms formerly stood in the Swine Market 
(now High Street), upon ground at present occupied by Messrs. Watts and Sons' 
Wine Vaults. 

40. O. lAMES . LEE . IN = The Mercers' Arms. 

Id. LEICESTER . l656<=^I . A . L. 
(-Nichols, No. 2 ; Throsby, No. 17 ; North, No. I.) 

41. O. lOHN . MASON . IN . [l6]62 = A CTOWn 
Id, LECSTER . BAKER = I . E . M. 

(-Nichols, No. 17.) 

42. O. MARY . MOVNTNEY = A CrOWn. 
Id. OF . LECESITER = M . M. 

(-Nichols, No. 18.) 

The Crown Inn formerly stood in the Swine Market (now called High Street). 

43. O. RICHARD . NOONE=The Groccrs* Arms. 

Id. OF . LEICESTER-R .A.N. 
( = Nichols, No. 19; North, Na 8.) 

44. O. AT . THE . RED . LYON = A Hon rampant. 

Id. IN . LESTER . TOWNE = W . I . N. 

(-Nichols, Na 20 ; Throsby, No. 32 ; North, No. 9.) 

The initiak w . i . N are assigned by the late Mr. North to William Newton 



Digitized by 



Google 



424 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

(and perhaps Jane, his wife), the said William Newton, as appears by the Que 
berlain's accounts of the borough of Leicester for 1659-60, being an innkeeper of 
note at that period. 

45. O. THO . OVERINGE . LEICESTR = T . A . O. 

JR. VIVE . LA . ROY = A crown. \ 

(-Nichols, No. 21.) 

Thomas Overing was Mayor of Leicester in 1669. 

46. O. ROBERT . PAGE . IN . LEICESTER = St. Geoige aod the 

dragon. 

I^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1666 = R . E . P. i 

(-Nichols, No. 6 ; Throsby, No. 21.) 

The George formerly stood in the angle of Friar Lane and Hotel Street, go tbe 
site now occupied by a medical dispensary. 

47. O, lANE . PALLMER = A half-length figure. 

^. IN . LECESITER = I . P. } 

( = Nichols. No. 22 ; Throsby, No. 34 ; North, No. la) 

The figure on the obverse of this token is variously ascribed to : The Meioeis' 
Arms, the Maiden's Head (a tavern sign), the Queen's bust holding a scepcn. 
etc. ; the writer's opinion, formed from a careful scrutiny of an excellent speamec 
of the token being, that it is a half-length figure of some long-haired Parius 
soldier or Roundhotd of the Commonwealth. 

48. O. lOHN . PARES . IN . LEICESTER = A hart lodged. 

^. HIS . HALF . PENY . 1666 = 1 . M . P. i 

(= Nichols, No. 7 ; Throsby, Na 22 ; North, No. 4,) 
Great numbers of this token must have been struck, as it is still tbe most plenti- 
ful of the Leicestershire series. 

49. O. EDWARD . READ . OF . LEICESTER = A hart Standing. 

^. HIS . HALFE . PENNY . 1666 = E . M . R. i 

(-Nichols, Na 8.) 

Edwarde Roade, as he is styled in the chamberlain's accounts of the bocoosb of 
Leicester, 1663-4-5-6, was an occasional purveyor of beer to the Town Hall daring 
those years. 

The animal represented on the obverse is considered by some to be an antdope : 
but the fiircate or forked termination of its horns precludes that possibility. 

50. O. WILLIAM. SAViDGE=A wheatsheaf. 

^. IN . LEICESTER . 1670 = HIS HALF PENY. 5 

(= Nichols, No. 14.) 

51. O. NICHOLAS . SMITH . BREWER « A barrel 

J^. IN. LiCESTER . i672 = N s (detrited). i 

(=Nichols, No. 15.) , 

This Nicholas Smith paid the Corporation of Leicester one shilling and vxxoct 

per annum for rent of land in Hign (Cross) Street, uid a shop near the Somh 

Gates. 

52. O. WILLIAM . SPENCER . IN»=HIS HALF PENY. 

^. LEICESTER . BVTCHER^^The Butchers' Arms. k 

(-Nichols, No. 23 ; Throsby, No. 35 ; North, No. 11.) 

53. O. THOMAS . STVRGES=The MeTcers' Arms. 

J^. MERCER . IN . LEICESTER »T .M.S. I 

(-Nichok, No. 24 ; Throsby, illua., No. 36.) 



Digitized by 



Google 



LEICESTERSHIRE, 425 

54. O. SAMVELL . wiLLSON = The BakcFs' Arms. 

i?. IN . LESTER . BAKER = S . R . W. \ 

(-Nichols, No. 26.) 

55. O. WILL . WOOD . IN . LEICESTER = The Cordwainets' Arms. 

R. HIS . HALF . PENY . 1667 =W . A . W. \ 

(= Nichols, No. II ; North, No. 6.) 

56. O, RICHARD . wooDROFFE = The Merccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . LESTER . MERCER - R . M . W. \ 

( = Nichols,No. 25.) 

LOUGHBOROUGH. 

57. O, MATHEW . ALLAiN = The IronmoDgers' Arms. 

R. OF . LOVGHBOROW = M . A . A. \ 

(-North's lUus., No. sa) 

58. O. MATHEW . ALLAM » M . A. 

R. IN . LOVGHBOROW = M . A. J 

S9* O, lOHN . ALLEN . NEERE . THE = A CrOSS, 

R. IN . LOVGHBROVGH = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

(=North, No. 12.) 

A variety is stated to have the field of the reverse *' 1 . A . " instead of as 
above. 

60. O. ROBERT . BUNNYS . IN = Sl George and the dragon. 

R. LOVGHBVROVGH . i666 = Vbtners' Arms (and below \). \ 
Robert Bonnjrs was bridgeroaster in 1661. The former edition of Boyne incor- 
rectly gave this as i ; and North's lUus., No. 19, has the value erroneously engraved 
as c . T reversed. 

61. O. lOHN . COOPER » HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . LOVGHBROVGH = The Apothecarics' Arms. \ 

62. O. HENRY . FLOWER . IN = A malt-shovel. 

R. LOVGHBORROW. 1669 s: H . I . F. \ 

63. O. lOHN . FOWLER . OF = The Groccrs' Arms. 

R. LOVGHBORROW » I . K . F. \ 

64. O. lOHN . FOWLER . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. LOVGHBOROVGH . 1665 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

65. O. wiLUAM . SADLER = The Arms of France. 

R. IN . LOVGHBORRO^W .M.S. 

66. O, HENRY . SOMERVILE . AT . Y^ » H . M . S. 

R, CASTLE . IN . LOVGHBOROVGH = HIS HALF PENY. i 

67. O. THOMAS . STORER . AGAINST = THE,. CROSS. T . A . S. 

R. IN . LOVGHBOROVGH »= HIS HALF PENY. \ 

68. O. HENRY . TROWER . IN« A hand holding a bakei's peel. 

R. LOVGHBORROW . 1669== HIS HALF PENY. H . I . T. ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



426 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

69. O, lOHN . VARNAM ~ A wheatsheaf. 

/^, IN . LOVGHBOROW = I . V. i 

70. O. lOHN 1 665 — The Mercers' Arms. 

Ji, IN . LOVGHBVRROW=HIS HALF PENY. \ 

LUTTERWORTH. 

71. O. PETER . MACKCARN£S = P .A.M. 

R, IN . LETERWORTH . MERCER . 1657. J 

72. 0» PETER . MACKCARNES == P .A.M. 

^. IN . LETTERWORTH = l662. } 

73. O. EDWARD . REVELL==St. Geofge and the dragon. 

^. IN . LVTTERWORTH = E . R. J 

74. O. IN . COVENTRY . SOVTHAM = H . E . W. 

^. RVGBY . LVTTERWORTH = DYER. 1 666. \ 

As three out of the four places enumerated in this very uncommon token are io 
Warwickshire! it might be included in that county as well as, if not instead oC 
Leicestershire. 

MARKET BOSWORTH. 

75. O. HVGH . ADCOCK . AT . THE = A buU's head 

JR, IN . MARKET . BOSWORTH = HIS HALF PENY. H . E . A. I 
(=Throsby, No. 3 ; North, No. 16.) 

76. O, RICHARD . TOMPSON . MERCER ^^R . I . T. 

^. IN . MARKET . BOSWORTH = HIS HALF PENY. i 

(=North'sIllus., No. 13,) 

MARKET HARBOROUGH. 

77. O. ROBERT . BASS . 1 668 . AT» A hart standing. 

^. MARKETT . HARBOROVGH = HIS HALF PENY. {Beart- 

sAafie.) \ 

78. O, ANN . GOTT . 1658 = A stocking. 

JR. IN . HARBOWROVGH = A . G. \ 

(=Throsby's Illus., Na 9.) 

79. O. AvsTiN . HARPER = The Gfocers' Arms, 

J^. OF . HARBROWE = A . H. J 

(=Throsby, No. 11, where the Christian name is incorrectly engnted as 

AVGVSTINE.) 

80. O. THOMAS . HEYRICKE . OF«T . H. 1 668. 

J^. HARBOROW . HIS . HALF . PENY = T . H. J 

81. O. THOMAS . HORTON = The Drapers' Arms. 

^. IN . HARBOROWEsT . H. \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



LEICESTERSHIRE, 427 

Sa. O. THO . LANGDEL . 0F = A haclclc 

Ji. MARKET . HARBOROVGH = FLAX DRESSER. 

83. O. ELIZABETH . LYNG = A mortar and pestle. 

R. IN . HARBROW^E . L. 
( =Throtby, Na loj.) 

84. O. FRANCES . REEVES =» A swan. 
Ji. IN.HARBOROW. 1667 = HER HALF PENY. 

( =Thro8by, No. la) 

85. O, AT . THE . SWANN = A swan. 

-^. IN . HARBROVGH . 1651 = H . F . S. 
(=Throsby, No. 8.) 

86. O. HENRY . SMITH » A belL 

H. HARBOROVGH — H . S. 

87. O. wiLUAM . THOMPSON . IN = A clasped book. 

J^. MARKETT . HARBOROVGH = W . R . T. 
'William Thompson was a bookseller and stationer in Market Harboro* in 1661 
»r in that year he published Goddard's " Miscellanea," etc 
(=Thro8by, No. iii.) 

88. O. WILLIAM . THOMPSON . IN » A clasped book. 

R, HARBROVGH . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . R . T. 

89. O. WILLIAM . TOMPSON = An Open book. 

R. IN . HARBROVGH . 1653 = W . R . T. 

90. O. THOMAS . wiLSHERE = A roU of tobacco. 

R. IN . HARB0R0W==T . M . W. SnUlll 



MEDBOURN. 
91. C7. GEORGE . ALMONDK= A man Standing. 

A". IN . MEDBVRN . l667«G . E . A. 



MELTON MOWBRAY. 

92. O. ROBERT . BEATSON . AT . y" = Three pack-horses, 

R, IN . MELTON . MOBERY = R . E . a 

93. O. lOHN . BROWN . CHAVNDLER = A stick of candles. I . A . B. 

R. IN . MELTON . MOWBRAY -HIS HALF PENY. 1 668. \ 

94. O. ARTHVR . CLOVDSLY = A stick of candles. 

R. IN . MELTON . l664»A . B . C 
(North's nins., No. 24.) 

95. O. THOMAS . CLOWDESLEY = T . S . C 
R. OF . MELTON . MOWBRAY . 1 668 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 



Digitized by 



Google 



428 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

96. O. HENRY . CRODDYN . IN «= A CTOss moline on a shield 

i?. MELTON . MOBERYE^H . A . C. 

The issuer of this token died Januazy 3, 1699-1700, and was buried in the noith 
aisle of Melton Church. 

97. O. EDWARD . STOKES . IN = The Grocers' Arms. 

i?. MELTON . MOWBRAY = E . R . S. i 

98. O. ROGER . WAITE . i666 = Three bugle-horns, r . r . w. 

i?. IN . MELTON . MOWBRAY = HIS HALF PENY. i 

"Three bugle-horns stringed sable** are the familv arms of the Waites or 
Waytes, of Keythorpe, in this county, who was receiver for Charles I. in Warwick- 
shire and Leicestershire. 
(North's lUus., Na 23.) 

MOUNTSORREL. 

99. O, RALPH . BOSSE . 1 667 = The Drapers' Arms. 

^. OF . MOVNT . SORRILL=HIS HALFE PENNY. R • B. i 

100. O, lONAS . DAVIS . 1665 = The Grocers' Arms. 

J?. IN . MOVNT . SORELL = HIS HALF PENY. J 

loi. O. loSEPH . LOVETT . OF = A roU of tobacco. 

7?. MOVNT. SORILL . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

SADDINGTON. 
102. O. lONATHAN . TAYLCOT=Two pipes crossed. 

^. OF . SADINGTON . CHANDLER = HIS HALF PENY. i 



SHEEPSHED. 

103. O. lOSEPH . BRVXBY . OF = A sheep's head. 

J?. SHEEPSHED. 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. i 

WALTHAM-ON-THE-WOLDS. 

104. O. HENRY. DARCKER = HIS HALFE PENY. 

i?. IN . WALTHAM . l666 = H . D. J 

105. O. HENRY . DARKER . l668==H . D. 

J?. In . Waltham . His . Halfe . Penny (in four lines). } 

(= North, No. 18, where it is correctly drawn as circular, although in the text 
it is described as being octagonal) 



Digitized by 



Google 



Xtncolnsbire, 



Number of Tokens issued 270 

Number or Places issuing Tokens 52 

Town pieces issued at Boston, Crowland, Grantham, 
Lincoln, Louth, Spalding, Stamford. 



Sub-Editor and Collaboratmr . 



Justin Simpson, Esq., 

St. Martin's, Stamford. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



XincoIn6bire. 



ALFORD. 

1. O, WILLIAM . GARY . MERCE'^ = The Merccrs' Arms. 

R. IN . ALFORD . 1659 = W . C. \ 

2. O. THOMAS . HARRISON = A griffin's head. 

R, MERCER . IN . ALFORD = T . H. \ 

3. O. WILLIAM . RODSBi£ = The Ironmongers' Arms. 

R, IN . ALFOARD = R and a cross. \ 

The R and a cross on the reverse is probably a device, more generally known 
under the appellation of " merchants' marks," the origin of which may be traced 
to a period when the trader, lacking the pride of ancestry, had not the privilege of 
bearing heraldic emblazonment, and therefore devised some pictorial enrichment 
of his name, conjointly with some religiously expressed notions of the time. 
Ecclesiastics, as well as merchants, entertained the same predilections, and their 
badges, when life had ceased, served, early in the sixteenth centary, if not before, 
to decorate the monumental brass that marked their sepulture, or enriched the 
stained glass windows of the sanctuary ; so in the ** Vision of Piers Plowman," 
printed in 1550, 4to., the lines are fully illustrative : 

" Wvde wyndowes shynen with shapen sheldes, 
With merkes of merchants ymediled betwene." 
Favine, in his '* Theatre of Honour," printed in 161 5, folio, in reference to this sub- 
ject, observes : ** The honour of bearing shields, that is to say, armes, belongeth to 
none but noblemen by extraction, or by calling, or creation ; and it is not an hundred 
years since such as were not of noble condition were punished with great fines and 
amercements, if they but attempted to bear any. To them it was permitted to have 
only markes or notes of those trades and professions which they used ; as a tailor 
to have his shears ; a cutler a knife ; a shearman his cloth-shears ; a mason his 
trowell, the compasse, or square ; and so of others. Merchants, for their more 
honour, might beare the tirst letters of their names and surnames enterlaced with a 
crosse ; as is to be seen in many ancient epitaphs, and as yet to this day upon their 
packes or burthens of merchandises. All these were called but markes ; they were 
not permitted to have shields, but targets only, hollow at the chief and flanlu, like 
them which are ^ven to villages at the feast of the saint, their patron, to manifest 
they were not shields." 

4. O. WILLIAM . scoRTRETH = Three doves. 

R. IN . ALFORD . 1667 = W . S. \ 

Geom Scortreth, probably the father of William, is referred to in an indenture 
dated Abruaiy 12, 1636, as one of the governors of the Alford Grammar School, 
by which certain property at Saleby, in this counW, was conveyed for the 
bene6t of the school by one of its governors, George Justice. In the will of the 
said George Justice, dated July 1 1, 1647, George Scortreth is again alluded to as 
one of the governors. 



Digitized by 



Google 



432 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

A Mr. Scortreth, of Lincoln (aiiery, if any relation), was appointed and con- 
stituted one of the commissioners by the ordinance for the ejecting of scandalous, 
ignorant, and insufficient ministers and schoolmasters, ordered by his h^ghtwKs the 
Lord Protector and the Council, Tuesday, August 19, 1654. 

ANCASTER. 

5. O. lOHN . DARE . 63 = A ram trippant 

i?. OF . ANCASTER = I . D. \ 

This issuer was assessed to the hearth-tax in Ancaster in 1671. 

6. O. lOHN . scHOCHEY = A fleur-dc-Us. 

/^, OF . ANCASTER . 1 664 = GroceTs' Arms. \ 

AUBOURN. 

7. O. FRANCIS . STRONG = HIS HALFE PENY. 



7?. OF . AWBORNE . 1 699 = F . S. 



i 



8. O. EDWARD . wiiTS = A shuttle. 

/?. IN . AVBORNE . l666 = E . W. J 

Auboum, or Aubome, is an extensive village and parish, indnding part of Had 
dington, in the mid-division of this county. The Rev. F. M. WiUan, the vica: 
of the parish, in reply to my letter of inquiry, courteously informs me that the 
name of the issuer is not to be found in the register of his parish, whkb, I 
believe, does not commence before 1702, the earlier one being lost In the 
absence of a second initial letter on the reverse of the token it is dear he vis 
unmarried, and probably died before the date of the commencement of the present 
register. 

BARROW-ONHUMBER. 

9. O. BRIAN . covERDAiLL . IN = A fishing-boat with sail 

/?. BARROW . VPPON . HUMBER = HIS HALF PENY. i 

BARTON-ON-HUMBER. 

10. O. GEORGE. BROWN = A Stag. 

J^. OF . BARTON . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENY. \ 

The father of the issuer of this token was undoubtedly mine hoct of the Sta^. => 
we find among the miscellaneous entries in the churchwardens' books of St Mvy s^ 
this entry : 

1640. For our clerk's supper, at Edward Brown's drinking, is. 

A George Browne, as churchwarden of St. Mary's, in 1622, signs his name \o : 
terrier in the register at Lincoln relating to the vicarage of Barton. On the ocr^. 
side of St. Mary's Church was a chantry, the chaplain of which, in the acx:: 
Henry VIIL, was John Brown, and from 1689 to 1705 Nicholson Brown was vicar 
of this church. 

I am indebted to the Rev. Geo. Hogarth for the very interesting extracts relat.v: 
to the issuers of the tradesmen's tokens of this place from the registers of St. Man'< 
parish : 

1607. George Browne and Caroline Ling were married the second day of Jooc 

1619. George Browne, the son of Henry Browne, was christened thie 17th dar 
of November. 

1621. George Browne, the son of Edward and .... was chnstened the 191^ 
day of December. 

1645. Oeorge Browne and Mary Dickers were married on the 17th day of Jgik. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 433 

1644. George Brcwne, the son of Ralph Browne, and Catherine, his wife, was 
christened the 20th day of January. 

1645. Edward Browne, the son of Ralph Brown, and Catherine, his wife, Was 
christened the 19th day of March. 

165 1. Miriam, the daughter of Ralph Brown, and Catherine, his wife, was 
christened the 4th of May. 

1652. George, the son of George Browne, and Marie, his wife, was baptised the 
loth of February. 

1656. Richard, the son of George Brown, and Mary, his wtfe, was buried the 
22nd day of March. 

11. O, GEORGE . KIDSON . AT . THE = A SWan. 

jff. IN . BARTON . VPON . HVMBER = HIS HALF PENY. | 

This issuer is nanled also with the others in the old town book as holding 
property in the town. 

The parish register of St. Mary supplies the following entries : 

1660. Elizabeth, the daughter of George Kidson, and Elizabeth, his wife, was 
christened the 20th day of December. 

1669. John, the son of George Kidson, and Elizabeth, his wife, was bom the 
eighth day and christened the 15th day of August. 

1665. Thomas, the son of George Kidson, was buried the 17th day of April. 
1668. George Kidson, innkeeper, was buried the 24th day of January. 

1 70 1. George Kidson was buried April 19. 

Swans were anciently considered as the king's game. Edward IV. ordained that 
no one whose income was less than five marks should possess a swan, and imprison- 
ment to anyone who dared to touch their eggs.* The marks of the several owners, 
known as swan-marks, were on their beaks ; that of the king's was called the double 
nick ; and the sign of the royal swan, or swan with two nicks, was perverted into 
the *• swan with two necks." 

12. O. HVGH . LONG . l6... = A ship. 

i?. OF . BARTON = HIS HALFE PENY. | 

13. (9. RICHARD . wooRE = The Groccrs* Arms. 

jR. OF . BARTON . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENY. J 

The parish register of St. Mary supplies me with the following entries : 

1600. Ja Woore was buried the 30th day of May. 

1 7 10. Susanna, daughter of Richard Woore, and Anne, his wife, baptized 
October I. 

1704. Richard Woore was buried October 8, mercer. 

He is described here as a mercer ; either he found the grocery business not 
answering his expectations or else he had gone into the mercery line, or probably 
combined the two under the higher sounding name of mercer. 

St. Peter's register supplies the following : 

1666. Richard Woower and Susana Wilkinson were married the 14th day of June. 

1666. Robert Wooer, of Gunthorpe, husbandman, and Jane Dalby, were 
married May 27. 

1667. John, the son of Richard Wower, and Susana, his wife, was christened 
the i^h day of January. 

The Gunthorpe gentleman was probably Richard's brother. 

BOLINGBROKE. 

14. O. lOHN . GARTHWAiT = The Groccrs' Arms. 

jR. OF . BVLLINGBROOK = I . G. J 

The Rev. E. S. Bosanquet, of Old Bolingbroke, kindly informs me that he has 
searched the parish register between 1649 and 1672, that there is a gap in the 
register between 1642 and 1657. Among the burials he found this entry 

1673. Mr. Jo. Garth wait, bur. Jan. 22. 

28 



Digitized by 



Google 



434 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

The late Admiral Smyth thus humorously describes a grocer of this period : 
" In country places a grocer comprehended a most extensive dealer in haudirare, 
gingerbread, bobbins, laces, haberdashery, mousetraps, curling-tongs, candles, soap, 
bacon, pickles, and every variety of grocery ; besides which they sold small ocfi.z< 
for money changing. Tea, the staple by which grocers now make gross fortnB<»« 
had not then obtained its footing ; for this lymph must then have been beyond the 
means of most sippers, seeing that in 1666 a pound of tea cost sixty shilling ; acu 
money was then at a far higher value than in the present century. Their more 
ancient name was pepperers, from the drugs and spices which they sold, a hrar ± 
which was mostly abstracted from them, not long before the epoch of the tokens 
by a seceding party, who were incorporated by James I., under the designation v> 
apothecaries." 

In the Mercurius Publicus^ March 12-19, 1662, is the following advertiscxnen: : 
" At the coffee-house, in Exchange Alley, is sold by retail the right cofiee-powdr: 
from 4s. to 5s. per pounds as in goodness : that pounded in the mortar at 3s. u-y 
pound, also that termed the right Turkic Berry, well garbled, at 3s. per poaod, *J; 
ungarbled for less ; that termed the East India Berry at 20d. per pound, «~/^i 
directions gratis how to make and use the same. Likewise, there you may h:I^c 
Tobacco, Verinas and Virginia, Chocolatta, the ordinary pound-boxes at 2s. /«"- 
pound ; and Sherbets (made in Turkic) of Leomons, Roses, and Violets perfumed . 
and Tea according to its goodness, from 6s. to 60s. per pound. For all of wb::r. 
if any gentleman shall write or send, they shall be sure of the best as they shi ! 
order; and to avoid deceit, warranted under the House seal, viz., Morat Uc 
Great." 

BOSTON. 

15. O. \ , BOSTON . HALF . PENY . TO . BE = The Anns of the 

town of Boston ; three ducal coronets in pale. 
R. CHAINGED . BY . Y^ . ovERSEPS = On a woolpack a rair- 
couchant. [ 

In the Boston corporate books, October 4, 1667, is this entry : 

Mathew Browne ordered to send for ;£'20 of brass or copper halfpence to be nu^^e 

use of, and to be current in the borough. 
The arms of the borough of Boston as allowed and confirmed December i, t>^>s. 

by Robt. Cook, Clarencieux, are sable, three ducal coronets in pale, or. Crcr^u 

on a woolpack, a ram couchant, or. Supporters, two mermaids, ppr.» dncai 

crowned, or. 

16. O. ROBERT . ATKYN = The MerccFS* Arms. 

7?. OF . BOSTON . 1 656 = Three cloves. \ 

Robert Atkin was Mayor in 1659. In the list of contributors to the free ar. 
voluntary gift to King Charles II., in the tl irteenth year of his reign, I ts 
Mr. John and Mr. Robert Atkin each contribut..ig ^^3. 

17. O. lOHN . BROWNE = 1 666. 

R, IN . BOSTON = I B (conjoined) a. ] 

The widespread family of the Brownes lived here as thickly as they do in 2 
parts of the realm. A George Brown, doctor of theology, and provincial oC d- 
Augustine order in England, was a member of the Corpus Christi Guild of Bos:t r. 
temp, Henry VIII. Thomas Brown was a justice of the peace for the pares : 
Holland, and his name occurs in a subsidy granted in 1547. According to in- 
corporate records. Dr. Brown took to London in 1588 the charter to show to rb: 
Lord of Canterbury, concerning the punishment of lewd and lasdvions liver- 
The doctor was a learned civilian, and elected January 22, 15S0-1, the first jui.r: 
of the Admiralty Court. Anthony Brown was one of the ushers of the Gimmsu: 
School in 1595. In the reign of Elizabeth, Thomas Brown and twelve other per 
sons, inhabitants of Fishtott, held lands therein, for which they paid quit rcc:^ 
amounting to £2 17s. 9id. In the Leverton overseers' accounts, sub. 1593^ isth^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 435 

item : *' Paid to William Brown for the education of Edward Elrocke for four 
years 405." In an assessment for the county of Lincoln in the reign of James I., 
Thomas Brown, of Boston, was assessed ^^20. Mr. Thomas Brown, probably son 
of the latter, of Boston, was allowed to compound for his estate as a Royalist to the 
Commonwealth rulers for the sum of;f 200 in 1648. This Thomas Brown was the 
same delinquent spoken of in the long and curious letter in the British Museum 
written by Joseph Hull, one of the messengers or collectors of the fines, and 
addressed to his employers, dated Freiston, September 14, 1648 : 

*' There was so little business to be done at Boston, that no committee oi 
sequestration sale there ; Mr. Thomas Welbye, an alderman of Boston, appears to 
have been the principal agent of the Parliament, and Thomas Brown and George 
Thorold (he h^ to pay ^330), two of the principal delinquents, complained very 
bitterly of his exactions. Many members of the committee made large fortunes, 
and some never made any returns to the Parliament." 

John Brown was Mayor of Boston in 1631, Samuel Brown in 1673, Matthew 
Brown in 1674, and John Brown in 1688. 

In the parish register is this entry : 

1681. Thomas Brown, slain by a beer-cart, bur. March 26. 

In 1621, according to two State papers in the Record office, I find one Abraham 
Browne examined as a witness in an affair which caused the interference of the 
Privy Council, and led to a commission of inquiry. The subject which these 
papers referred to was a supposed act of treason and disloyalty to the Crown by 
the cutting of the crosses from the King's arms upon the mace belonging to the 
Mayor and Corporation, and usually carried before that body on Sundays and 
other festival days when they attended divine worship in the parish church ; and 
information having been given by one Davye Lewis to the Lords of the Privy 
Council, a commission was issued to Mr. Anthony Irby, one of the Masters in 
Chancery, and to Mr. Leonard Bawtree, Serjeant-at-Law, bearing date the 23rd 
day of March, 1621. Although the loyalty of the mayor and the inhabitants was 
clearly vindicated. Government was far from satisfied, especially as it was stated 
by the informant Lewis, that the witnesses had been tampered with by the mayor, 
and also by the commissioner. Accordingly, a second commission to the King's 
.Solicitor^General, dated May 18, in the same year, authorizing them to examine 
into the case and report thereupon. The result of this investigation was the same 
as the first, creditable to the loyalty of the mayor and of the inhabitants generally. 
It may be stated that one principal reason which led the Government to be so sen- 
sitive was owing to the supposition that the state of feeling in Boston was greatly 
infloenced by the Puritan spirit of the times. Another party who was said to be 
mixed up in the affair was one John Jenkinson, clerk and sexton of Boston. 
Probably thb individual may have been a member of the same family as the issuer 
of Na 27. 

In a subsidy, 42 Eliz., Thos. Brown, E^., and Joseph Brown, gent., of Boston, 
were assessed for land, Uie former at £6, and the latter £j. 

18. O. ROBERT . BVSTORD = The Bakci's Arms. 

J^. IN . BOSTON . 1657 = R . E . B. I 

Mr. Bqyne, in his list, has the name of this issuer spelt Busford, but on the coin 
it is clearly Bustord, and is so given in the plate of Boston tokens in Mr. Thomp- 
son's admirable history of that town, and from which I have unsparingly taken 
extracts. 

In the Corporation records of Boston, quoted by Thompson, p. 159, I find in 
1569, the bakers and brewers had a license granted them **to be a commonaltie 
of themselves for their maintenance and good order." In 156 1, one Richard 
Robynson was fined 20s. for selling light bread ; "he, being one of the Common 
Council, for his courses was put out of the hall." In 1635, the bakers petitioned 
for a charter ; the petition was not granted, since, in 1638, they *' desired some 
order to be made by the House for the better ordering of the trade. The town 
clerk and recorder were directed to prepare a draft of some fitting orders, which 
the House will consider." 

There is not any record of further proceedings. 

28—2 

Digitized by CjOOQ IC 



436 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, 

19. O. CHRISTOPHER . coxAL = The Ironmongers' Anns. 

^. OF . BOSTON = C . D . C. \ 

In the list of contributors to the free and voluntary gift to Charles 11^ previo«vS 

alluded to, I find the name of Charles Coxal is put down for a small unouci. 

Among the inhabitants of Frieston who came forward on the same occasion, 1 bn : 

a Thomas Coxal contributing the liberal sum of los. 

20. A variety reads on the reverse in . boston • 1666 = c . d . c \ 

21. O. WILLIAM . EDWARDS = A Still. 

J^, IN . BOSTON = W . M . E. \ 

A Thomas Edwards, of Boston, probably a relative, was refused the freedom r 
the Corporation of Boston, to which he had a right, because he and othen refuse: 
to take an oath. 

22. O. THOMAS . ETHERINGTON= 1664. 

J^, IN . BOSTON = T . M . E. J 

23. O. MERRiAM . FRANCIS = The Bricklayers* Arms. 

J^, IN . BOSSTO . 1668 = HIS HALFE PENY. M . D . F. I 

24. O. BARRON . HAiRE . cha" = The Tallowchandlers* Arms. 

Ji. LER . IN . BOSTON . 1656 = 8 . M . H. \ 

25. A variety has on field of reverse b . n . h. ^ 

26. O. WILLIAM . HOBSON = Arms of the Hobson family ; a cinque 

foil, a chief cheeky. 

jR. IN . BOSTON . BREWER = W . M . H. * 

The arms of Hobson, of Spalding, as given by Burke in his "General AnDOorv.' 
are sable, a cinquefoil ermine, a chief chequey, or arid az. Crest, a pantbc: ^ 
head, erased, and guard, ppr. issuing fire from the mouth and ears, gorged with • 
collar, chequey, or and az. As the towns of Spalding and Boston are not m^-r.' 
than fifteen or sixteen miles apart, William was probably a member of the Sjt^ ^ 
ing family of Hobson. In the subsidy roll of 1642 the name of Hobson is leer 
among those of other residents of Benington. A Thomas Hobson held a mf^v- > 
and 14^ acres of land in Frieston, the rent of which, ^^3, was, by an tnt^c^ 
ture dated November 22, 32 of Eliz., given to certain trustees by Kck:^ 
Manners, Esq., for the benefit of the poor of Boston. According to the CoiporV.e 
records, the brewers in 1547 were ordered to sell good ale for i|d. the gal]. - 
double beer ijd. the gallon, and single beer id. the gallon. In 1552 small 3 . 
was sold at three gallons for a penny, " till malt rise in price ;" and good ak 2 . 
the gallon. In 1558 the brewers were to sell double beer at 2od. the firkin. *- 
single beer for idd. In 1575 certain persons were appointed ale-tunners to :- ' 
the ale and beer before it was sold. Brewers, before they " tunne their ale r ^ 
beer, to send for the ale-tunners to taste the same to see that it is good wholcsoa- 
drink :'* prices to be regulated according to the price of malt If the latter or.'f 
was put into force at the present day, it might be attended with results highly ^ - 
vantageous to the general community. Candidates for the office of ale-tunztvi 
their name would certainly be Legion ! We have not in our Stamford series ■ 
token issued by a brewer, yet the conscript fathers of the early CorpocationeDftcic 
some very wholesome regulations for the guidance of the brewerSj which may r 
perhaps, be out of place to insert here. As far back as the reign of ** HIaff K ' . 
rial," an ale-taster was annually appointed, whose business was to taste the ^ 
brewed in the town for sale, a task of so delicate a charaaer that I may, in per:\ ■ 
candour, declare that it was one which was conducted on principles of the atmi ^ 
impartiality. In the course of time business looked up, and two were then j 
pomted. Richard Koyce (decidedly a pluralist, holding in additioa the offices 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 437 

sergeant-at-mace and registrar of births, marriages and deaths for the five parishes 
of Stamford from 1653 to the end of the Protectorate of Cromwell), ale-taster, by 
an Older of the august assembly, October 27, 1653, had a salary of los. per annum 
awarded him as long as he held that office ; and Geo. Voker, a predecessor in 
office, was, on October Z4, 1624, "ordered to be paid iiijd. a quarter in somer, 
and ijd. in winter." The Municipal Reform Act, without any regard to vested or 
ancient customs, swept the office out of the books. November 9, 1557, it was 
enacted by the Hall, " Ytt is ordeynyd that ev'y Bruer shall send for the ale- 
tasters, ^or 6ne of them att the least, before they tunne the ale out of their dore, 
upon payn of vjs. viijd. for ev'y bruying." 

1561. At a Common Hall, held October 28, 'IJtm itt is ordeynd and agreed by 
the Alderman and comburgesses, and the holl comonie in this hall asembled, that 
no Bmer shall sell ale above the p'ce of iijs. the docen, and the tjfpler (seller) to 
sell a quart for a pennye, and none to sell otherwyes upon payn of every defalt to 
fforfitt vjs. viijd. Ilm itt is agreed and ordeyned by the alderman and combur- 
gesses with the consent of the comons in this hall assembled that no Bruer shall 
sell any ale above the pr'ce of iijs. vjd. the dozen, and the typler shall sell one pint 
and di (demi, i.^ ., halt) for a pennye, and not otherwise, uppon payn of every Bruer 
to forfitt every tyme iij^. vjs. viijd., and all such dismyssed for occupying any more, 
and every typler shall forfitt for every offence xx's. Itm itt is also agreed and 
ordeyned by the lyke consent that yf any Bruer do refuse to sell after the rate 
abovesaid, and so to geve over ther bruying onelesse it be by suffycyent warning to 
be geven to the alderman or his successor for the tyme beyng, that is to say one 
half yeeres' wamyng, that then ev'y typler receyvyng any ale of any suche Bruer 
after ther gevyng over, and before the newly fcufying (frauncefying) or admytting 
of them to breu agayn, shall forfitt for ev'y tyme iij's. iiijd. 

*" 1565-6. February 15. Item, It is agreed and concluded by the Ald'man and 
comburgesses, with the consent of the holl comons in thys hall assembled that the 
Bruers shall sell ale after ijs. vjd. a dozen, and the typlers shall sell after iijd. a 
gallooe.** 

"1566. April 10. M^ that the Bruers shall sell ther ale to the typlers after two 
shillinge the galllone, and the typlers shall sell the same after twopence halfpence 
the gallon, and ther pynte for jd.*' 

On September 30, 1574, the hall decreed that the fine of a Bruer "for ev'y 
moonthes occupienge before ffreedome should be vj's. viijd., and for enfranchise- 
ment xxs." 

At a hall held October 3, 16 18, the prices were raised for absolute freedom to 
vj^, xiijs. iiijd. At the same hall Fishers and Scriveners are bracketed together, 
their fine being fixed at iij". vj's. viijd., a classification somewhat appropriate. The 
same peculiarity is observable in both enactments. 

27. O. THOMAS . IENKINS0N = A hammer and two horseshoes. 

/?. IN . BOSTON . 1666 = T . M . L i 

A William Jenkinson was Mayor of Boston in 1604 and 1619. His son William, 
Alderman of Boston, by will dated October 18, 1642, gave to his heir-at-law nine 
and a half acres of pasture ground, lying in the Broadfield Lane, on the west side 
of the haven of Boston, in two several pastures, chargeable with a yearly payment 
of j^ia He devised ;f 2 per annum, part of the said annuity, to the poor people 
of Burley ; £2 to the poor of Otley, £i to the poor of Halton, and the remaimng 
£$ to the poor people of Boston, to be distributed against every Christmas, by the 
appointment of the mayor and alderman for the time being. In the account- book 
of the parish constable of Leverton, sub. 1626, is the entry of £1 paid to Jenkin- 
son, of Boston, for eight muskets. In the Boston parish register is a certificate 
dated March 22, 1603, granted to Mr. Timothy Tenkinson, testifying that his 
daughter Ann was never touched before for the king s evil. This was granted in 
consequence of the proclamation of January 9, 1683, appointing the times at which 
the touch should be administered, and all persons repairing to Court for this pur- 
(M>se were re<}uired to bring with them certificates under the hands and seals of the 
officiating minister and churchwardens, testifying that they have not, at any time 
before* been touched by his Majesty for the cure of their disease. Between 1660 



Digitized by 



Google 



438 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

and i682» no fewer than 92,107 persons were touched for this disease. — ^Thomp- 
son's " Boston," p. 758. 

According to extracts from the Corporate records, given at p. 159 in Thompson's 
"History of Boston," second edition, it was on January 13, 1581, agreed "thut 
the Smyths, Armourers, Ferrors (farriers), Braziers, and Cutlers and Saddlen shdl 
have a Corporation of themselves." In 1598, the smiths, farriers, braziers, and 
cutlers had an ordinance granted to them, ** allowing them to form a separate 
fellowship or company." The arms of the Company of Farriers are argent, 3 horse- 
shoes, sable. These arms are said to be derived from Hy. de Ferrars, a Normis, 
who came to England with William the Conqueror in the capacity of Master of 
the Horse, or chief farrier, who bore for arms argent, 6 horseshoes pierced sable, 
3, 2, and X. He died at the siege of Acre, in 1091. 

William Jenkinson, of Boston, in a subsidy 42 Eliz., had goods assessed at £}. 

28. O. THOMAS . MESSAM = A plough. 

^. IN . BOSTON . 1659 ~T . M . M. { 

Probably Thomas Messam was landlord of the Plough. Property belonging tu 
the Boston Grammar School, near to that belonging to the heirs of Richer: 
Messam, was alienated by deed of conveyance dated January 10, 4 Jamc*> U 
to Jasper Hicks, who was the erection bailiff and mayor, subject to a fee farm rrct 
of 45s. 

29. O. lOHN . MOORE . OF . BOSTON = A CrOwn. 

/^, HIS . HALFE PENNY = I . S . M. i 

The issuer was probably mine host of the Crown. 

In 1586, the Crown, the Red Lion, the Sword, and Saracen's Head, wcrt 
licensed to sell beer brewed out of the town. In 1 590, no ale or beer brcwei ;: 
Lincoln, Lynn, or London, to be sold except at the Crown, the Red Lion, the 
Green (grey) hound, the Saracen's Head, and the Sword, and three indivi'iui.> 
mentioned by name. In 1^68, no person who is appointed a tipler (a seller 0: 
ale) shall sell, in or out of his house, any country ale or beer other than such as ^^ 
appointed by the Corporation. In 1651, all innkeepers required to purchase the r 
freedom. In 1652, sessions dinners at the White Hart and the Crown cost>£'i345. 
and the Lady -day dinner, ;f7 19s. id. — Corporate Records. 

30. O. THOMAS . NICHOLSON . ROPE = A COil Of ropC. 

J^. MAKER . OF. BOSTON . l666 = T .M.N. } 

31. O. ROBERT . PARKER = The Cutlcrs* Arms. 

J^, CVTLOR . IN . BOSTON = R . E . P. * 

32. O, THOMAS . PARRiSH = The Blacksmiths' Anns. 

7?. IN . BOSTON . 1667 =T . H . p. J 

A John Parish was Mayor of Boston in 1748 and 1759, and an Edward Vnr^l 
in 1761. The Is^tter, about the year 1765, bequeathed to the Trustees of Laucb 
ton's Charity the sum of £2$, and £$0 to the Blue-Coat School. The former, 
in 1774, on the enlargement of the churchyard, gave for that purpose a puLii: 
house called the Ostrich, and several messuages and shops adjoining, upon lit 
condition that the Corporation would give the old gaol and two shops which thei 
stood on the south side of the churchyard. John Parish, of Fishtoft, in t6^i. 
was one of the seventeen contributors who presented to Charles II. the sum >*t 
£3 15s. 4d. 

33. O, THOMAS . PEARSON = An angel. 

J^, IN . BOSTON . 1663 = T . A . P. [ 

34. A variety has on the obverse a bodice or pair of stays, open. ] 
A Thomas Pearson was an usher in the Grammar School in 1598. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE, 439 

35. O. HENRY . PEARSON = A ram trippant. 

R, IN TON . 1666 = HIS HALF PENY. H . M . P. J 

This coin was in the collection of Mr. Golding, and although ...ton is autte 
decipherable, I have given this town the benefit of the doubt, especially as there 
u*as in Wide Bargate, in 1564, a large public-house called the Ram. 

36. O. SAMVEL . SKELTON = The Grocers* Arms. 

/?. IN . BOSTON = S . S. J 

A William Skellon was an under-master of the Louth Free Grammar School 
ia 164 1. A Samuel Skelton was a Nonconformist minister of this county, who 
went to America in 1629, and was one of the first ministers of Salem, Massa- 
chusetts. He died August 2, 1634, and the issuer of the above token was probably 
a member of the same family. From 1616 to 1618 one Thomas Skelton, M.A., 
was master of the Free School, Boston. 

According to the " Calendar of State Papers, Dbm. Ser.," I find John Williams, 
Bishop of Lincoln, July 22, 1622, informing Dr. Farmery, his chancellor, that he 
is to dte before the Consistory Court such of the clergy of the Archdeaconry of 
Lincoln who refuse to pay the benevolence due to the King, and to remonstrate 
with them on their undutiful and graceless conduct. If any continue refractory 
after that, they are to be sent to the Archbishop of Canterbury and him. 
Accordingly, in the following month, Farmerv reported to the Bishop that he had 
cited Mr. Flear, of Leasingham and Cranwell, who was rich but backward, and 
had also been guilty of simony ; Dr. Umphrey, Vicar of Pmchbeck, worth ;if 100 
a year ; George Skelton, of Coningsby, worth ;f 200 a vear ; and James Lening, 
of Belton-on-Hemingby, worth ;f 240 a year. Many others were suspended from 
office for neither appearing nor sending any excuse. 

37. O, GEORGE . WALKER = A Stocking. 

^. IN . BOSTON . 1667 = G . W. J 

Taylor the water-poet, in his "Navy of Land Ships,*' while describing the 
Fellowship, notices her lading being " bootes, spurres, shooes, pantofHes, slippers, 
galloshes, gammoshoes, and such things as by art or nature are coupled and made 
fellowes." Boots were universally worn by fashionable men, and others, in imita- 
tion of them. Spurs, also, were worn, whether on horseback or on foot ; the 
pra€:tice, in fact, became so prevalent, that, in the last Parliament of Elizabeth, 
the Speaker directed the Commons to come to the House without spurs. 

38. A variety has no date. ^ 

BOURNE. 

39. O. WILLIAM . BiRRiDGE = The Mcrcers' Arms. 

i?. OF . BOVRNE . MERCER . 64 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

40. O. WILLIAM. HALE =1667. 

jR. OF . BOVRNE . 1667 =W A . H. \ 

41. O, lOSEPH . LAKE . i668 = A man smoking a pipe. 

jff. GROCER . IN . BVRNE=HIS HALFE PENNY. ^ 

Mr. Lake was a tobacconist as well as a grocer, and dealt " in the Indian 
weed." Our Puritan ancestors a few years previous to the issuing of this token 
sought lolace amid the perplexities of a long debate in the House of Commons by 
a recurrence to the pipe ; a homely, though, for the place, a somewhat inelegant 
luxury. Among the standing regulations which emanated from that body of 
senaton about the middle of the seventeenth century, it was "ordered that no 



Digitized by 



Google 



440 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

member of the House do presume to smoke tobacco in the gallery or at tk&^ 
of the House sitting as committees." Taylor, \he water-poet, in his adam^ 
" Exploits of Nicholas Wood, the Great Eater of Kent," observes, " Evtrjoat^ 
particular quahties to themselves, and disonant from others; some h've bjsaak 
as tobacconists, knights of the vapour, gentlemen of the wbiffe, esquires of i^ 
pipe, gallants in fumo." 

Among the uncertain coins described by Mr. Boyne in his list of Tradesse- 
Tokens, is the following one which may have been issued by Mr. Lake fi • 
variety, but is inserted under Bedfordshire : 

O. lOSEPH . LAKE . 1668-" A man at work, smoking. 

^. GROCER -HIS HALF PENY. 

42. O. CHARLES . LEEps . OF = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^, BORNE . MERCER— C . K . L. I 

43. O, WILL . QVENiNGBROWH = The Mercers' Arms. 

7?. OF . BOWERN . 1656 = W . A . Q. t 

Thomas Quinborough, mercer, probably the father of the issuer of this lok* * 
alluded to in a deed of feoffment, dated October 22, 1631, by which cotain P*; 
perty in Bourne was given by William Fisher, gent., for the benefit of the po« 3 
Bourne, and of the parishes of St. George and All Saints, Stamford. Heis^ 
referred to again in the will of William TroUope, Esq. (father of the first bareof 
dated November 16, 1636, by which he bequeathed certain monejrs for the poft* 
of erecting a school and almshouses at Bourne. 

The following extracts relative to this family are from the parish registds 4 
Bourn : 

1653. October 7. Anne, dau. of James Quiningborough, bapt ; bar. Aags 
28, 1698. 

1 66 1. Elizabeth, dau. of Jo. Queningbrou, bapt. May 3a 

1662. Mary, dau. of James Queningbrou, bapt. May 26. 

1669. Susanna, y« daught' of Jo. Queningbrou, bapt. February 3 ; httr.J«fi 
following.* 

BRIGG. 

44. O, lOHN . BEALEY = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

J^. AT . BRIGG . 1667 = I . E . B. : 



45- 


0, 


PEETER . METCALFE = 1 666. 

IN . BKICG^HIS HALF PKKV, 






t ' 


46. 


0. 


WILLIAM , MILTON^ The Grocefs' Arms, 

m , BRIGGE^W . M. 






(' 


47- 


a 


RICHARD . STALLARD = An SUIgeL 
OF . MRICO . 1659 = R , S* 






{ 


48. 


0. 


ROBERT , TROWAN = HIS HALF PEKY* 

IN , BKiG . 1668 = A rose. 




t 


m 


Ue&pecting the iFr!>uers of tokens in this Io>vti, Ihe tftilfiw in thr 
do not afford nic much in format ion, as ihe old buok w^ bunil 




IP* 

1 


' 1583^ 
jngborow, 
Kjchnrd Qi 
i-egialer* 


Jan*; QuimnljofTow, bur. xxVj. of Novrmb*', *^* 
buried Match S. — Sl MSchncl*5 parls^t 
net D borough and Mary ftfilmaii* mar. Nl^ 


'3 








Digitized by Google M 


1 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 44f 

followiog entries after that time have been courteously forwarded to me by the 
Rev. J. R. West, Vicar of Wrawby-cum-Brigg, who also informs me that a 
Roman Catholic family of the name of Metcalf resided at Brigg up to thirty years 
skffo (now living at Lincoln), and a family of the name of Trover, or Trowan, have 
also lived there till within a few years ago. 

1 7 14. Thomas, son of William and Mary Medcalf, bur. 

1 7 16. Jane, dau. of Mr. Wm. and Jane Medcalf, bapt. 

1718. Apl. 27, Peter, son of Mr. Wm. and Jane Medcalff, bur. 

1 7 19. Peter, son of Mr. Wm. and Jane Medcalf^ bapt. 

1 7 17. Mary, daux. of Jill and Mary Trower, bapt. 



BURGH. 
49. O. THOMAS . CRACROFi' = A fleur-de-lis. 

J^. MERCER . IN BVRGH . 66. J 

The family of Cracroft is met with in this county at an early period. In the 
books of admission of membership of the Boston Guild of Corpus Christi, I find a 
Thonoas Craycrofte was admitted a member of that society between the years 
1400 and 1404. Robert Cracroft, of Lindsey, merchant, was also admitted 
between the years 1427 and 1440. He probably paid the fine of 44s. 4d., the 
entrance fee for membership, in accordance with the decision of a vestry of the 
said guild by the aldermen and brethren, November 18, 1426, in which it was 
decided that for the future any sister or brother were to pay previous to becoming 
a member. The first name in the book of admission to freemen of the borough of 
Boston, commencing November 2, 1559, is that of Mr. Rt. Cracroft, who paid on 
admission xxs. In the extracts from the churchwardens' accounts of the parish 
of Addelthorpe, a village about four miles from Burgh, where the family princi- 
pally resided, given in Oldfield's ** History of Wainfleet," meml^ers of them are 
r«iferred to, and which I have transcribed here : " Itm. payde u° t° Wyllm. Cray- 
crofte for the rente of y« kyrke platte ij. vd. A.D. 1555. Detts owyng u" t° Ardyll- 
thorpe. Itm. Mr. Ihon Craycrofte for lying in y* cherche & legacy unpayde. 
Itm. the said Ihon Craycrofte for twoe gyllde shepe unpayde.'* In neither instances 
are any suras given. Protasia, daughter of Thomas Quadring, of Irby, by his first 
wife, Margaret, daughter of Thos. Dymocke, of North Carlton, was baptized at 
Burgh in 1547, and was afterwards married tu Robt. Craycroft, of Fulnetby and 
Buf^h, an ancestor of the issuer of the token. In 157 1, Francis Craycroft, gent, 
possessed at his death a manor in Winthorpe (another village about four miles 
from Burgh). In Beaton Church is a brass tablet to Richard Bolle, Esq., of 
Haugh, who died February 6, 1 590-1, one of whose daughters, Anne, was married 
tu Leonard Craycroft, gent. Charles, the son and heir of Richard Bolle, died 
in 1590, during the life of his father, leaving issue by his first wife, Anne, a 
daughter, Pretafer, who married Rt. Cracroft, of Burgh, Fulnetby, and Friskney. 
Her mother married secondly Bartholomew Armine, Esq. (descended from Wm. 
de Armyne, Master of the Rolls in 13 1 7, Keeper of the Great Seal during the 
sickness of the Bishop of Norwich, the Chancellor, 1323, Bishop of Norwich, 
1325, and who died March 27, 1336. The arms of the family are erm., a saltire 
engr. gules, and on a chief of the same a lion passant or. Crest — on a hill, vert, 
an ermine trippant argent), of Osgotby, Sheriff of the County, 28 Eliz. and ob. 
40 Eliz. Ann Armine died August 18, 1616, and by her will, dated May 23, 1615, 
dcvi»ed her estates to Thomas Cracroft, son to the above Robert and Pretafer ; 
Thomas, by his wife Anne, had issue one son, George ; who at the time of his 
death, in 1637, was possessed of a manor at Friskney, valued at 20s., ten acres 
of which was toft ground, held of the King as parcel of the dissolved Priory by the 
annual rent of fourteen bushels of salt, and the remainder held of James Frampton, 
Esq.« and of the manor of Friskney, by fealiv and 23s. rent ; also three messuages 
(valued at £s 17s. od.), one cottage, and 140 acres of land in Burgh ; two cottages 
and 200 acres of land in Bratoft and Gunby ; and 140 acres of land and 2s. 4d. 
icnt iu Leake ; he left issue by Elizabeth, sister of Sir Charles Bolle (arms--az. 
out of three cups or, as many boars' heads couped ar.), Charles, his heir ; William 



Digitized by 



Google 



442 TRADERS* TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



Robert, and five daughters. John Holden, of Burgh, by his will dated Ifvdi 14. 
1503, bequeathed certain property to the parish church of Burgh, for the main- 
tenance of a priest to do duty and to sing for the soul of the founder, his funiU. 
and all benefactors and good doers for ninety-nine years. The property was maUe 
over to eight trustees for the good of the church and other charitable uses tbeie k: 
ever, one of whom was Thomas Cracroft, of Burgh, gent. The parish register k< 
Burgh contains about a hundred entries or more to the Cracroft family between the 
years 1542 and 1723. The issuer, Thomas, was baptized February 7, 1640-1, as 
the son of Thomas and Pretaza Cracroft. This Christian name singularly oca:": 
in the family, sometimes as " Prothasie,'* or " Protasie," " Pretasie," and even 
" Tace." Thomas appears to have always resided at Burgh. He marrie: 
January i, 1667-8, Margaret Auton ; they had several children, and he himRlf 
was buried as * * Thomas Cracroft, mercer, according to the register, December 24, 
1675* The Rev. £. S. Sanderson, vicar, kindly forwarded me the following 
extract from the parish register, recording the birth of Thomas Cracroft's first-born : 
" 1667, Emmanuel Cracroft, the son of Mr. Thomas Cracroft and Margaret h-^ 
wife, was baptized October the 5th." A Charles Cracroft was warden of ibe 
borough of Louth in 1675 ^^^ i^^f* ^^^ & Robert Cracroft in 1736, 1744, arl 
1752. I meet with one of the family at Stamford. At a meeting of the hi.l 
March 2, 1674-5, "John Cracroft, apothecary, because he scrv<* seaven jare^ 
app'ntlce to Wm. Stroud was admitted to scott & lott & swome." I do not i^^ 
meet with his name in the books, probably he returned to his kindred. A 
pedigree of the family of the issuer of the above described token (who was the 
younger son of a younger son) I have given here, compiled by the late Co!o!:d 
Joseph L. Chester. The name of the issuer's first-bom is Samuel in pedigree, 
and m the communication I received from the vicar he is named Emmanuel. 



Robert Cracroft,= 
of Cracroft Hall, in 
the parish of Hogs- 
thorpe, CO. Lincoln 
—living 1424-33. 



^Margaret, dau. and 
heir of William 
Rathby, of Hors- 
ington, CO. Lincoln. 



r 



I 



John Cracroft,=pMargaret, living Other 



of Cracroft Hall, afore- 
said. Will, as of Hogs- 
thorpe, Gent., dated Feb. 
8, 1489-90, proved April 9, 
1490, at Lincoln. 



1490. 



Arms : Per fess ver 
and gules on a ben. 
dancettee argeri, 
three ravens sable. 

[These are the ann^ 
in the VisitatioD t^ 
1634, but in moden 
records the ravet 
are blazoned max!- 
lets.] 



William Cracroft,=j=Margaret, dau. of Other issue. 



of Cracroft Hnll, aforesaid. 
Died Wednesday next after 
the Feast of St. Hugh, 
2 Henry VHL, a.d. 1509. 
Inq. p. m. at Alford, April 
22, 1 5 10. 



William Topcliffe. 
Married attte 1484. 



Thomas Cracroft,=T=. 
living 1553. I 



Other issue. 



William Cracroft,^ 
Buried at Burgh, co. Lin- 
coln, Sept. 26, 1557. 



^Elizabeth Howson, 
married at Burgh, 
CO. Lincoln, Jan. 
30, 1 54 1 -2. 



Other issue. 



'Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 



443 



I 2nd husband. 
Robert Cracroft,=f=Prothesa, daughter of Thos.=Myles Ashton, of 

Quadring, of Irby, CO. Lincoln, Ashton, co. Lan- 

by Margaret, daughter of Thos. caster. 

Dymock, and heir to her Living 1592. 
mother. Baptized at Burgh 
Sept. 12, 1547. 



of Buigh, CO. Lincoln. Bap 
tized there May 13, 1544, 
and buried there Nov. 21, 
»575- Will dated 19th, 
and proved at Lincoln 
Nov. 30. 1575. 



Thomas Cracroft,= 
of BuTgfa, son and heir. 
Baptized at Burgh October 
23, 1569. Died Feb. 10, 
1616-7. Will dated Aug. 
22, 1614, and proved at 
Lincoln March 13, 1616-7. 



2nd husband. 
=Anne, daughter of=Christopher Pal- 
Charles Johnson, of mer, tne elder, 
Wainfleet, co. Lin- of Burgh. Will 
coin; living June 23, dated June 23, 
1645. 1645, and proved 

April 13, 1646. 



Other 
issue. 



John 
of Burgh, CO. Lincoln. 
Baptized there Oct. 29, 
1606. Will dated Nov. 26, 
1656, and proved at Lin- 
coln, May 14, 1661. 



Cracroft,=p Prothesa, living Numerous 

1656. other issue. 



Ma^aret,^ThomasCracroft,=FMargaret Anton, 



1st wife, 
boned at 
Burgh, 
Oct. 5, 
1667. 



3rd son. Baptized 
at Burgh, Feb. 7, 
i640-i,andbur'd 
there as a " Mer- 
cer," Dec. 24, 
1675. 



married at Burgh, 
Jan. I, 1667-8. 
2nd wife. 



Numerous 
other issue. 



Anne. 

Baptized at Burgh, Nov. 
18, J 668, and buried there 
Dec. 26 following. 



Samuel Cracroft. 
Baptized at Burgh 
Oct. 5. 1667, and 
buried there Feb. 
20, X667-8. 

In the Hearth Tax of 23 Charles II., Mrs. Cracrofte, of Spalding, is set down 
for four. 

In 3 Chas. I. Rt. Cracroft, Esq., had land at Wliisby, in this county, assessed 

BURTON-UPON-STATHER. 

50. O. THOMAS . LOWTHER . IN = Three tuns. 

Jd. BVRTON . VPON . STATHER= 1 665. \ 

Tbis token was exhibited at a meeting of the Society of Antiquaries, June 14, 
i866> by Edw. Peacock, Esq., F.S.A. 

CAISTOR. 

51. O, lOHN . LATHORP^The Grocers' Arms. 

Jd. OF. CASTER. 1668 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

52. O. WILLIAM . HANSON . 0F= A fleur-dc-Hs. 

JR. CAISTER . HIS . HALF . PENY = W . F . H. 1 668. i 



Digitized by 



Google 



J 



444 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 



CONINGSBY. 
53. O. lOHN . LVPTON = The Bakers' Arms. 

jR. OF . CVNSBY . 1663 = I . A . L. J 

Coningsby is a considerable village on the banks of the river Bane, about a^\\ 
miles from Horncastle. In Domesday Book it is called Cuninge&bi ; in Hciir^ 
" Lincolnshire Church Notes " he notices monuments on which the name is sptl: 
" Cunningsby," so, clearly, Cunsby is a local corruption of Couingsby. 



CORBY, 
54. O. THOMAS . COLLINGWOOD . OF = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. CORBY . HIS . HALF . PENY . 1667 =T . K . C. i 

The late E. Pretty, Esq., F.S. A., of Northampton, in his list of the tokens y: 
that county, in a paper contributed by him in the Midland Counties Hist-^n zl 
Collector in 1856, he claims this token for Corby, Northants. I wrote a lettc 
at the time pointing out the claims of the Lincolndure Corby, which was ackno» 
ledged by him. Bpyne, in his list, still assigns it to the fonner county, and, in 
support, inserts a letter from the Rev. J. H. Hill, F.S. A., then, and late rector i 
Cranoe, in which he says: "Corby, in Northamptonshire, is now the laif^ 
parish of that name. It was, and is, the Hundred Town of a large and impoitiT' 
district of that county ; there is still preserved there a charter granted in the Mntr 
of Edward I. for destroying wolves. A curious custom is still practised once .' 
twenty years of stopping all persons passing through the parish and demanding « 
toll, which, if not complied with, subjected them to the unpleasant necesfd-y •: 
being placed in the stocks, and carried on a pole round the parish. On this ceic 
brated day the boundaries of the village are also beaten. The name of CoKi e 
wood is not found in the parish at the present day, but is in the adjoining pansh i^' 
Cottingham." 

Although Mr. Hill has brought strong evidence forward in favour of the North 
amptonshire Corby, I still retain my conviction that the token was issued ^.t 
Thomas Collingwood, of Corby, a small market between Stamford and Granthax. 
There is now a family of that name resident in the place, and there always h:^^ 
been in the memory of that very veracious authority, ydeped " the oldest inhiL .• 
tant." M^ application for information to set the matter at rest by reference loihi 
parish register, was met with a demand of a fee of 3s. 7d. for each extract* a 6p:r: 
that prevents one from being able to clear up matters of doubt as to a proper \it:. 
tifying of these interesting class of coins, has also the effect of stopping hterir 
inquiries, for, in the event of there being many entries, it comes rather expensive. 

1 7 16. John Styles and Mary Collingwood, both of Corby, Lincolnshire, jnar. \f\ 
license, July 3. — All Saints' Stamford parish register. 

In the Stamford Mercury of October 24, 1884, is recorded the death, on the S:^ 
of Frances (Fanny) Collingwood, aged 78. The family still resides here. 



CLAYPOLK 

55. O. NATH . HOLT . OF . CLAY . POOLE = HIS HALF PENV. 

J^, FAYRE . PLAY . 1664 = GIVE AND TAKE. \ 

The Rev. Chas. P. Plumptre, rector of Claypole, in answer to my letter 't 
inquiry, most courteously looxed his parish register over for me, and forwards 
the following extracts from the burials : 

1674. April 15, Nathaniell Holt, gent. 

1675. June 19, Susanna Holt, widow. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE, 445 



CROWLAND. 

56. O. THE . POORE'S . HALFEPKNY . OF . CROYLAND . 1670 (in six 

lines). 
R. The Arms of the Abbey ; three knives in pale, three whips 
in fesse. ^ 

These arms are quarterly, I and 4 gu. ; 3 knives erect in fesse an, handles or ; 
2 and 3, az. 3 scoaiges erect in fesse, or, with 3 lashes to each. They bear evi- 
dent allusion to the traditionary life of St. Guthlac, whose flagellum was said to be 
endowed with marvellous virtue. 

57. O. WALLTER . BIRD = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. OF . CROWLAND = w . a 1 668. ^ 

1667-8. Walter Bird and ffrancis Manninge, mar. March 12. — West Deeping 
parish register. 

58. O. WILLIAM. BROWNE = HIS HALF PENY. 

R. IN . CROWLAND . l666 = W . B. \ 

William Browne, of Crowland, was a Quaker. On the 30th of the ^rd month, 
1 664. he was committed for not attending to hear service at the pansh church. 
James Browne, probably of the same family, who died in 1684, gave by deed 
of surrender, for charitable use, ii^ acres of land unto the poor of Crowland 
for ever, and appointed feoffees to dispose of the rent yearly on St. James' Day. 

In the Hearth-tax of 23 Charles II. (1671), William Browne, of Crowland, is 
charged for one, and one new built. 

59. O, ELIZABETH . COLLS = E . C 

R. OF . CROWLAND = 1664. \ 

There are two sizes of this token. 

60. O, lAMES . HAMPSON = I . E . H. 

R. OF. CROYLAND. l666 = HIS HALF PENY. A 

61. A variety has the Grocers' Anns in place of the initials. 

62. O, ROBERT . LOCKET = The Grocers' Arms. 

R. IN . CROWLAND = R . L. i 



DEEPING. 
63. O. AMBROSE . BIRD . OF = The Grocers' Arms. 

R, MARKET . DEEPING = A . B. \ 

In St. Mary's register, Stamford : 

A Xtopher Burde took up his freedom Sept. 10, 1 6 14. 

1617. Margerie Burde, daughter of Mr. John Burde, bapt. the xxij of Aug. 

1617. Margerie Bird, daughter of Mr. John Bird, bapt. Oct. 23. 

In All Saints' reeister, Stamford, are the following entries : 

1668. Edward Harrington and Catherine Burd, mar. April 8. 

1621. Henry, son of Henry Birde, genL, bapt. May 19, bur. 20th. 

1622. Henry Clarke and Mary Birde, mar. July 10. 
1622. Bridget, dau. of John Birde, bapt. May 25. 
1662-3. Thomas, son of John Byrde, bur. Jan. 21. 

In the hall books of the Stamford Corporation is the following entry : 

1693. Oct. 3. At this hall itt is ordered and agreed upon y^ Mr. Bird, grocer, 

pajring twenty pounds, in a month next ensuing, for y« use of y* Corporation of 

Stamrord, shall be admitted to be ffree of the same. 



Digitized by 



Google 



446 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

I found in the registers of Ketton, Rutland, the foUovring entry : 

1604. Anna Birde, bur. y* die Aprilis. 

In those of Easton the following : 

1605-6. Edmundus Corkere 6 Winefrida Birde, mar. ii« February. 

1613. Jhon Barkworth and Margery Birde, mar. the last of March. 

1587. Francis Byrde, bur. Oct. i. 

Edmund Corker, above-named, filled the office of postmaster of Stamford. He 
paid xs., and took up his freedom June 30, 1602 ; elected a capital boigess Ir 
August, 1607 ; chamberlain, 1608-9 ; a comburgess, Nov. 3, 1613 ; and alderm^. 
of the borough in 1616-17 and 1628-9. On October 25, 162$, he and Mr. R*. 
Whatton are " joyned with the alderman (Henry Death) to set the price of victual- 
accordinge to the forme of the statute." At a meeting of the hall, Jooe 16, loju. 
he and William Anthony were " ordered to go to Edenham with the trained baD^ r. 
Wednesday, the 8th of next moneth, to see if any defect, and for their better orier 
inge." In 1631 he was one of the collectors of the tax known as the 15th for lit 
parish of St. Mary, Stamford. 

64. O. THOMAS . BIRD = A man making candles. 

^. OF . DEEPING . 1664 = T . B. J 

65. O. WILLIAM . BOWMAN = The Groccrs' Arms. 

J^. IN . DEEPING . l664 = W . B. j 

66. O. THOMAS . CHAMBERS . HIS . HALF . PENY (in foUF Uncs). 

J^. OF . WEST . DEEPING . 1 668 (in three lines). (J/ear 
shape.) A rose under the date. i 

67. O. GEORGE . FRENCH = The Drapers' Arms. 

J^, IN . MARKET . DEPEiNG = A pair of scales. I 

68. A variety, according to the valuable MSS. of the late Mark 
Cephas Tutet, F.S.A. (now in the possession of Chas. Goldin^ Esq.). 
has the name of the place spelt deeping. \ 

Market, East, and West Deeping are three places aU within a mile of each oth? . 
The Rev. Gilbert V. Heathcote, rector, in reply to my letter of inquiry, kin . 
searched his parish register, commencing with tne earliest, 1654, to the year i;^ 
but could find no mention of the name of Chambers, of West Deeping. I iu- 
since looked it over with the same result. 

DONNINGTON. 

69. O. RICHARD . greenhill = A grasshopper. 

I^, in . DONINGTON . 1663 = HIS • ^ALF . PENY. R , G COT. 

joined. 

The device of a grasshopper may be intended as a play upon the name of tr . 
issuer. It is a frequent sign among grocers, who adopted it m a supposed comp ' 
ment to Sir Thomas Gresham, founder of the Royal Exchange, the vane of v.^' 
edifice being also a grasshopper. Sir Thomas, however, was a mercer, and no* - 
grocer. The grasshopper was the original family crest of the Gieshams. -' ' 
appears on the seab of James Gresham, great-grandfather of Sir Thomas, af^^vr- 
to letters addressed by him from London to Sir John Paston, in 1449 and vuj 
years. 

70. O. HENRY . carr . OF = The Mercers' Arms, 

i?. DVNINTON . 1657 = H . C i 

71. O. THOMAS . pell . OF = The Mercers' Arms. 

Id, DVNINTON . l664 = T . P. J 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 447 



EPWORTH. 

72. O, RICHARD . PARNELL . OF . EPWORTH = R . E . P. 

J^. IN , THE ISLE . OF . AXHOLME = CheqUCrS. J 

Several of the Parnells were members of the Society of Quakers, and were 
sufTerers for their adherence to their tenets. Richard Parnell, of Epworth, 
for 3^., demanded by the priest for smoak penny, had taken from him, about 
Midsummer, 1659, goods worth thirteen shillings. William Parnell, of Epworth, 
on the 25th of the sixth month, 1664, was committed to prison upon writ de excom- 
munitato capiendo for not coming to the parish church and hearing divine service 
there. James Parnell, between 1654 and 1675, issued about fourteen different 
works, some of which were translated into French, German, and Dutch ; "he 
dyed a prisoner under the hand of a persecuting generation in Colchester Castle 
in 1676/' 

73. ^. ROBERT . WRIGHT . OF . EPWORTH . IN . THE (in fivC linCS). 
R. ISLE . OF . HAXIE . HIS . HALF . PENY . 1 669 (in fivC linCS). 

{ffeari-skape,) i 

Among the sufferers by the great fire which happened here on the 28th and 29th 
days of February, 1743*4) which in about three hours destroyed sixty-two dwelling- 
houses, together with barns, stables, and other outhouses, the loss being estimat^ 
^t ;^5>32<^ 2S. 9d., was Richard Wright, labourer, who lost goods to the amount of 
£S IIS. 8d. Among the names of the freeholders from the Isle of Axholm, who 
voted at Lincoln, February 12, 1722*3, in the great contest between Sir Nevile 
Hickman, Bart., and Robert Vyner, Esq. (the latter gaining the election by 178 
votes, owing, it is said, to Sir Nevile being charged with being a Jacobite, and 
drinking the health of the Pretender on his knees, a charge which he denied), is 
that of Robert Wright, of Bawtry, who voted for the baronet. 

74- O. lOHN . MARSHALL . OF . EPWOR^" . HIS HALF PENY. 

J^, IN . THE . ISLE . OF . AXON . 1668 = I . M . M. j^ 

75. A variety has the isle spelled ile. 

One having the Isle spelt as above was exhibited at a meeting of the Society of 
Antiquaries by £. Peacock, Esq., F.S.A., June 14, 1866. Among those who were 
able to live without help, and openly renounced all claim upon the contributions 
collected in behalf of the sufferers by the great fire alluded to above, was Jos. Mar- 
shall, merchant. 

76. O, THOMAS . THORPE = The MerccFs' Arms. 

R. IN . EPWORTH . 1664 = T . T. \ 

Mr. Thorpe's requiring a fresh stock, the first having become exhausted, I find 
lim issuing another in 1067, which specimens are very rare. 

77. O, THOMAS . THORPE. OF EPWORTH = HIS HALFE PENNY. 

R. THAT . GOES . TOOE . AND . FROE= 1667. i 

FALKINGHAM. 

78. O. lOHN . BissiLL . OF . FAVLKE==The Ironmongers* Arms. 

A INGHAM . HIS . HALF . PENY = I . E . B. \ 

The following entries respecting the issuer and his family from the register of 

the parish have been most obligingly forwarded to me, with others, by the Rev. F. 

\V. fi. Courtier, of Falkingham : 

1662. October y« iQih, Elizabeth, the daughter of John Bissill and Elizabeth, 

his wife, was baptized. 



Digitized by 



Google 



448 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

1665. April 5. John, the son of John Bissill and Elizabeth, his wife, wasbaptu^'. 

1667. June 2* Samuel, the son of John Bissill and Elizabeth, his wife, wa^ 
baptized. 

1668. March 19. Samuel, the son of John and Elizabeth Bissill, was buried. 

1669. November 19. Jeremiah, the son of John Bissill and Elizabeth, hisu... 
was baptized. 

1674. August 31. Mary, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Bissill, his wif:. 
was baptized. 

79. O. lOHN . MiCHiLL . AT . THE . 3 = In a shield, three pigeons 

J^. PIDGENS . IN . FALKiNGHAM = HIS HALFE PENY. 1669. ; 

For the loan of this coin and also of No. 99 for the purpose of eograni^ I or 
indebted to the courtesy of Mr. Rt. Sandall, of Rippingale. 

I am enabled to append the following extracts from the parish regu^eis rela:.-: 
to the issuer's family : 

1668. October 5. Thomas, the son of John Michill, and Christian, his t t 
was baried. 

1672. July 23. Christian, the daughter of John and Christian Midiell, vi. 
baptized. 

1675. March 24. SamuuU, the sonn of John and Christian Michell, his vr'" 
was baptized. 

1675. Maij 22. SamuuU, the sonne of John and Christian MichuU, his vr:>. 
was buried. 

1676. Ducem. 6. Mary, the daughter of John and Christian Michell, his vJ . 
was baptized. 

1679. Ju"c 20* Elizabeth, the daughter of John and Christian Michell, ' • 

wife, was baptized. 

1683. October I. Thomas, the son of John and Christin Michil, was bftpti:?:- 
1683. October 23. Thomas, the son of John and Christin Michil, was burie 
1685. Maij 6. Elizabeth, the daughtur of John Michill, and Christen, htsm^r 

was baptized. 

1694. Maij 16. Christian, the wiffe of John Michil, was buried. 

1695. March 18. John Michel and Elizabeth Behemi was married. 

1699. Maij 14. Beniaman Sutton, of Loughborough, Lestershire, chandler, 1. 
Christian Michel, were married. 

80. O. RICH . QV1NGBR0W= 1656. 

/^, OF . FAVLKINGHAM = R . K . Q. 

Richard Queningborough signs his name in the register book as churcfawar * 
in 1642, and Richard, his son, in 1664. John Queningbrowh in 1656 and Kr 
and Matthew Queningbrowh places his autograph in the book as such in lo/ 
It is evident from the initial letters on the reverse of the token that at the tint 
was issued he had married again. From the registers I learn the Chri< 
name of his wife was Faith, and that she died February ii, 1651-2. Katrin <j. 
ingbrow, widow, probably his second wife, died March i, 1655-6. Acconlinc 
the registers this family mustered here in strong numbers, such as are met « 
from 1 641 to the year 1703 I have given : 

1641. March 28. Matthewe, y« sonne of Richard and Faith Quiningborou^ 
was baptized. 

1647. May 13. Elizab., y« daughter of Richard and Faith Quningborowc, « 
baptized. 

1648. September 3. Anne, y^ daught' of Richard and Faith QuiningboroL,,. 
was baptized. 

165a January 20. Sarah, y« daughf of Richard and Faith Quiniogbor u^^'. 
was baptized. 

1650. June 23. Sarah, y* daughf of Richard and of Faith Quiningborow; 
was buryed. 

165 1. February 8. John, y« son of Richard and of Faith Quiningborougb, «- 
baptized. 

1 65 1. February 11. Faith, y« wife of Richard Quiningborough, was boiyed. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 449 

»56. February 7. Richard Queningbrowh, sonne of Richard and Faith, was 
:- 'ed. 

; i$6, February 9. Ann, daughter to the said Richard and Faith Quenigbrowh. 
i$S. January 5. John, the son of Richard Queningbrowh and ffayth, his wife, 
"' burycd. 

iyo. July $. Richard Quiningbrow, mercer, was buryed. 
»77. June 10. John Queningbrough and Mariana Page, both of this parish, 
^; married. 
" »78. June 29. Jane, the daughtur of John and Mariana Qunningbrough, hb 

, was baptized. 
'•; 978. December 25. Elizabeth Queningbrough was buried. 

>79. June 20. Thomas Queninborough, mercer, was buried. 

182. January 22. Mariana, daughter to John and Mariana Queningbrough, hb 

, was baptised. 

>82. October 9. Maryana, the daughtur of John and Maryana Queningbrow, 
- buried. 

iSTi. August 19. Alge, the daughter of John and Maryana Quenenboreh, was 
, :utd. 

>85. April 12. Elizabeth, y^ daughtur of John Qunningbrowh and Mary 
^ Mf his wife, was baptized. 

>85. Elizabeth, the daughtur of John Queningbrow and Maryana hb wiffe, 
baptized. 

:86. March i. Ms. Katrin Quningbrow, widdow, was buried. 

S86. June 2a Maryanah,. the daughter of John Queningboroow and 

▼anah, hb wife, was baptized. 

>87. June 19. Elizabutn, the daughter of John Quiningborrow and Marianna, 

viflTe, was baptized. 

iSy. July 8. Maryanah, y* daughter of John Queningbrow and Maryanah, 

wife, was buried. 

SB8. September 2. Ann, the daughter of John Queningborow and Maryanah, 

wiffe, was baptized. 

389. August 18. John, y« sonn* of John Queningborrow, gent., and Maryanah, 

wiScy was baptized ; same day was John Quiningborrow, gent, buried. 

S91. January 15. Matthew Queningborrow, singel person, and Maryana 

roingborrow, both of this parish, was maried. 

392. June 28. Mary, y« daughtur of Matthew Queningborrow and of Mary- 

3, hb wiflfe, was baptized. 

S93. July 4. Mary, the daughtur of Matthew Queningborrow and of Mary- 

h, hb wiffe, was buried. 

S93. November 7. Mar^rana, y« daughtur of Mathew Qunningborrow and of 

-yana, hb wiffe, was baptized. 

596. April 3. Matthew, the son of Matthew Qunningborrow and of 

rianah, his wiffe, was baptized. 

697. November 16. Marianah, the daughter of Matthew Queningbonow and 
laiyanah, hb wiffe, was buried. 

698. April 6. Maryanah, the wife of Matthew Queninaborrow, was buried. 

699. August 2. Ailse Queningborrow was buried. 

701. March 18. An Queninghborrow, single woman, was buried. 
703. March 10. Mathew Queningborrow, draper, was buried. 
rom the many different ways, slightly at variance with the present mode of 
iing names of places and persons, it ceases to be a matter of any surprise to us 
m we meet with such gross blunders committed by the die-sinkers of these tokens 
re do. Peterboro*, for instance, has nineteen tokens, on which the name of the 
:e IS spelt in ten different ways. In sinking the die for one the sinker must 
e been a genius of a very inventive turn of mind, as he has spelt Peterborough 
yJ^^CticrhovTowgh ! 



^ variety reads qvsngbrow. 



29 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 




450 TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

GAINSBOROUGH. 

82. O. lOHN . ALSTROP . SENIOR = A rosc and crown. 

/^. OF . GAINSBOROW . l666 = HIS HALFE PENNY. 3 

83. A variety reads on obverse aistrop. : 

84. O, RICHARD . barber . MERCER = The Apothecarics' Aim 
I^. His . ffalfe . Peny . in . Gainsbrough . i668. r . b (insa 

lines). j 

In the constable's account for this borough we find the following entry. «^ 
probably refers to a member of the family of the token issuer : 

1733. April 25. The constables to poste and raile ihe footway from Fr. Ba*f ' 
close at the towns end (and afterwards said 10 be from Tinker's Bridge) ts -i^ 
turnpike over against ship-yard. 

85. O, MATTHEW . COATES . l666 = A ship. 

R, IN . GAINSBROVGH = HIS HALFE PENNY. j 

86. (?. ROBERT. DvcKER . 1666 = Tallowchandlers' Atois 

R. IN . GAINSBROVGH = HIS HALF PENY. 

87. O, WILLIAM . GARLAND . OF = HIS HALFE PENNY. 1667. 
R, GAINSBROVGH . & . AT . EPWORTH = W . G. 

In the Stamford Mercury for Thursday, January 14, and January 21, 1724-S'' 
the following advertisements relative to one of the same family as the tssocri^^ 
token : 

"All persons indebted to Robert Turner and Robert Garland, both of G^ 
borough, in the County of Lincoln, co-partners and Distillers, are beieby dessl 
to pay their resoective debts to Mr. Thomas Fox and Mr. Thomas Mortosi^ 
of Gainsborough aforesaid, who are lawfully empowered to collect and nsest- 
same, otherwise they will be prosecuted as the law directs." 

** A new well-built messuage or tenement, three stories high, having tkeesc*-' 
rooms on a floor, besides closets, and a large commodious shop, next »e saeft * 
for any wholesale or retail trader, situate near the Market-place, in Gaii^iaraC-J 
in the County of Lincoln, now in the possession of Mr. Robert Garland, togdiA 
with a very good yard, garden, stable, brew-house, wash-house, and s«*enl ^ 
large convenient out-houses, with good chambers over them, adjoining to tfe * 
messuage, as also common and pasture for one horse or cow in Gainsbora^>n 
Common, to be sold and entered on at Lady-day next. Enquire of Mr. Aiei 
Lugg, of Gainsborough aforesaid." 

88. O, NATHANIEL. GRAY = N . G. 

R. AT . GAYNSBOROVGH = A Stag trippant 

I am inclined to think Nathaniel Gray was the host of the White Hail b " 
Mercury for Thursday, July 23, 1724, is this advertisement : 

" On Wednesday, the 19th day of August, ten guineas will be nm for oe =1 
North Marsh, near Gainsborough, in Lincolnshire, by any horse, ooare, ot pt^l 
that never started for money, bridle and saddle ; to run 12 miles at three fcft 
On Thursday, the 20th, twenty guineas will be run for on the same cosae, bf '> 
horse, &c., that never won above 20 guineas at one time in money or plsie.c*' 
ing 10 stone with bridle and saddle, to run 12 miles at three heats. And, on Fb3 j 
the 2ist, will he run for, on the same course, ten guineas, by galloways not eaos^i 
14 hands high, to carry 9 stone with bridle and saddle, to allow weight for in^- ! 
run 12 miles at three heats. The horses, &c, that enter, for each of the ten gv*"^' I 
pay one guinea entrance, if no contributor ; if a contributor, half againea. Thefc^ 
&C., for the twenty guineas, to pay two guineas entrance, if no cootribsiar; ** 
contributor, one guinea. To be shewn and entered at the White Hait, in Q^ 
borough, on Saturday, the 15th day of August, between the hoars of 4 «£ T " 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 451 

the afternoon, before the Clerk of the Race, and to be kept at such houses only as 
sobscribe ten shillings or upwards, and no less than 3 horses, &c., to start for the 
two last prizes. N.B. — ^There will be cock-fighting each morning at the White 
Hart, where there will be an ordinary provided.'* 
The White Hart is still in existence at Gainsborough. 

89. O, lOSEPH . HODKINS = A ship. 

J^, OF . GAINSBOROVGH . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

The Court Leet Jury of this town not only provided the necessary means for 
suppressing fires, but were not unmindful of the method by which such a desirable 
end was likely to be attained, as the following entry will ^ow : 

" FebL 29, 1659. Mem. That Joseph Hodgkin hath given to Thomas Sayes los., 
for beer drunk at the fire when Taylor's house was burned." 

Mr. Hodgkin was one of the constables for 1643, according to the authority 
above quoted, and was out of purse ;£'i2 12s. 2d. At this period Gainsborough 
was one of the headquarters of the Royalists. He was one of the governors of the 
Grammar School in 167 1. 

90. O, THOMAS . lOHNSON . OF = The Mcrccrs* Arms. 

J^, GAINSBROVGH . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. J 

A Thomas Johnson, probably the issuer of this token, was entrusted, in 1679, 
with certain sums of money to be set apart to accumulate for the purpose of build- 
ing houses for the poor, the Leet Jury's attention having been at this period drawn 
to the necessity for such erections. I have appended the memorandum from the 
books of the court : 

*• 16 Dec., 1679. We have received of Mr. Edward Dobson 40s,, and of Mr. 
Robert Scrooby £'^ which sums lay dead in their hands. Also of W. Ward 20s., 
and of Samuel Nagoss 8s., and is. 8d. of Mr. Popple well, altogether £6 9s. 8d. ; 
which sum is put into the foreman's hands by consent of the Jury, in hopes that in 
a short time there may be as much money raised as will build some houses for the 
poor to live in, and for better satisfaction, the foreman has promised to pay 
Lawful interest for the above money till the next Leet Court Jury, and then to 
pay it into their hands. Witness ray hand, Thomas Johnson." 

A John Johnson, joyner, was one of the towne churchwardens in 1690. 

91. O, SAMVELL . PARKER . MERCER = The Mcrccrs' Axms. 

R. IN . GAINSBROVGH . l666 = HIS HALF PENY. \ 

92. O. lOHN . SMITH . 1 666 = The Haberdashers' Arms. 

R. IN . GAINSBOROW = HIS HALF PENY. ^ 

John Smith, the issuer of the above described token, was the same benevolent 
individual who, by will dated April 13, 1679, directed his executors, Richard 
Torksey and his wife Elizabeth, *' to convey to certain trustees one close of oasture 
land, lying in Owston parish, in this county, containing by estimation 10 acres, 
called the Seggy close, abutting upon a common lane south, and the Carr west, to 
the use of the poor of Gainsburgh for ever, so that the rents and profits thereof 
should be distributed yearly, upon every 21st day of December, every year, by 
them, or the survivors of them, m monies, to the most needful poor in Gainsburgh, 
that had many children, so far as it would extend, to give los. a piece ; and if 
there should not be so many such poor in Gainsburgh, then to the most needful 
poor there. And that the trustees, or the survivor of them, should have power in 
such conveyance, to appoint and choose other honest and fit persons, by writings 
under their hands and seals, to make distribution of the rents and profits of the 
said close. And that such person, so chosen and appointed, should have the same 
power, by their writing under their hands and seals, to choose other fit persons 
after them, to see to the distribution of the rents aforesaid : and so to be conveyed 
on from one generation to another. And if any of them should fail to make choice 
of fit persons to make distribution, then the churchwardens and overseers for the 
town of Gainsburgh, as they become elected, should have power to distribute the 
same to such poor as before directed." 

On the south side of the church, about the middle of the south-west entrance, is 

Digitized by LjOOQ IC 



45« TRADERS' TOKENS OF THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

a tomb, very much defaced, and nearly illegible, " In memory of John Smiib, 

Stat, of this town, buried here in the year 1679, who by will directed a dose is 
wston ]>arish, called Seggy close, to be conveyed to trustees, for the use of iht 
poor of Gainsborough, for ever. This tombstone to their benefactor was erected 
at the parish expense in the year 177a*' 

93. O, BRYANTT . WALKER = A pack-hofse and load. 

J^. IN . GAINSBROVGH . 1667 = HIS HALF PENY. k 

In 1646, a John Walker, probably father of Bryant, was one of the town Frar k 
pled|[es. It was formerly the custom in Gainsborough that no person coold taxc 
up his residence in the town until notice had been given to the Frank pledges, as. 1 
security been offered that the person should not become chargeable to the pansh. 
The following extracts will show the intention of the office, and also that it wi^ 
formerly, at least, far from being a nominal one : 

" Mem., the 12th Nov. 1646. Delivered by John Walker and Nicholas Bnrt< c. 
Frank pledges for the last year into the hands of Saville Wharton and Thomas 
Moore fifty-three bonds, being Frank pledges for this year aforesaid, for ibe 
discharge of the town of Gainsborough for incomers, according to a payne made. 

" May 1 2th, 1647. The Frank plages were bound to deliver to their several 
successors a list of such persons as come inta the towne in their several yeares, z-1 
having not given security to discbarge the towne, in order that the landlords migl: 
be amerce'*. 

** 15th July, 1656. The Lady Bridget Hickman was ordered to he fined los. irr 
having brought a person and his family into the town without giving security to 
the Frank pledges ; the Burgrave to pay it out of the estreets." 

'* 1684. The jury laid in payne, y' noe person shall let a house to any fonvr.tr 
which is likely to become chargeable to the towne, but the landlord or some oth:' 
person shall give bond to the towne, the Frank pledges giving notice to the lam: 
lord, if he will not observe, but bring them into the towne, any such peiSQii v- 
doing shall pay the sum of 39s. to the collectoi-s towards the use of the poore ; an * 
if the Frank pledges shall n^lecl their office, notice being given to the jury, sh. 
pay as much as the Court wifi order." 

William Walker was one of the constables of the town in 1643, and, acoord:i z 
to the Jury Book, ** wee find that Willm. Walker hath disburst more than he hat:: 
received ^24 15s. lod." 

GLENTHAM. 

94. O. THOMAS . iOHNSON = The BakcFs' Arms. 

I^. OF . GLENTHAM . 1669 = HIS HALFE PENNY. .* 

GRANTHAM. 

95. O. A . HALFE . PENY . TO . BE . exchaing'' := Anns of the 

borough of Grantham ; cheeky of five rows, 3, 2,3, 2, i. 

J^, BY . Y" . OVERSEERS . OF . Y* . POORE = GRANTHAM . 1 667. ) 

The arms of Grantham, as allowed and confirmed by the Heralds at thc.r 

Visitation in 2562, are cheque or and azure, a bordure sable charged with vcr^i- • 

of trefoils, slipped argent. By reference to the records of the Corporation, whicr 

is here given, we learn the reason of their being issued : 

" Dec 20, 1667. Thomas Short, Alderman. Whereas, Mr. Alderman this f*.v. 
acquainted the court that several corporations have set forth brass halfpence w.t). 
the towns arms on them, for the benefit of the poor of the said towns, and that .: 
might be very advantageous to the Corporation to do likewise, and desired t^t 
court to take the same into their consideration. Whereupon the same court orde'^ 
that the present Chamberlain do send to London for brass half-pence, with i: c 
chequer on the one side, and Grantham and the year of our Loni on the other 
side. And to be written about the rim, ' To be exchanged by the Oveiseeis ^ 
the Poor,' and that the same may be obtained as soon as may be." 
No brass tokens are known ; such as I have met with are of copper. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LINCOLNSHIRE. 453 

96. A variety is from a different die, and has larger letters and is 
cheeky of six rows, 3, 2, 3, 2, 3, 2. ^ 

97. Another variety is cheeky of seven rows, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 2. § 

98. O. ZACHARY . AXTON= 1664. 

^. IN . GRANTHAM = Z . A. ^ 

99. O, WILLIAM . CTJVRK£ = A double-headed eagle displayed. 

J^. OF . GRANTHAM = W . K . C J 

In 1611 and 1621, Ralph Clarke, senr., was alderman of the borough; and in 
1725 and 1740, another Ralph Clarke, senr., was mayor. In the list of contri- 
butors to the organ erected in 1736 in the parish church, we find the names of 
M r. Ralph Clarke, who contributed five guineas, and Robert Clarke, 5s. In the 
list of subscribers to the bells of the church in 1775, we find Mr. Charles Clarke 
giving a guinea, Mr. William Clarke half-a-guinea, and Mrs. Clarke 5s. 3d. 

In Grantham Church is, or was, a monument to the memory of Ralph Clarke, 
surgeon and apothecary, who died November 5, 1764, under which is a black 
tablet to Mr. Charles Clarke (son of the latter), who, by his will dated April 9, 
I795t gsive unto trustees therein named the sum of ^^250 in trust, to pay the 
interest thereof towards the relief of a class of fatherless children or widows, being 
inhabtUnts of this town, who might have seen better days, yearly for ever, by 
weekly or other payments, in such parts and proportions as his said trustees should 
think proper. He also gave to the alderman and two senior comburgesses of this 
borough the sum of £$00 upon trust, that they themselves and their successors did 
for ever apply the interest thereof in the ornamenting and beautifying the parish 
church of Grantham i