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Full text of "Transactions for the year ... of the Essex Agricultural Society of the County of Essex, in Massachusetts"

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 



s 

74 

E8E8 
1 901 -05 



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TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1901 



OF TIIK 



ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



(Organized 1818.) 



VOR TIIK 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 



IN MASSACHUSETTS. 



AND THE PREMIUM LIST FOR 1902. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS.: 

Nf.wcomu & Gauss, Printers. 
1901. 



^ 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF 
1 MSSACHUSETTS 



f,.\ i I. I 



JiHERST, MASS. 



\p "30 -ol? 



£^^f 



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-.0 5" 



EIGHTY-FIRST 

Annual Cattle Show and Fair. 



Owing to the inclemency of the weather and the 
national calamity that cast a gloom over the whole coun- 
try, the Fair this year was decidedly unsuccessful in a 
financial view. 

The exhibits on the grounds were fully up to the 
standard, and there has not been so good an exhibit of 
cattle for many years, if ever, as this year, and all very 
high bred stock. 

In the Hall the entries were large in every department 
except fruit, which, as every one expected, was dimin- 
ished, but what fruit there was was of a very superior 
quality. 

The street parade was a success and made a fine dis- 
play when we consider it had to be postponed one day, 
and many people that had intended to take part, owing to 
circumstances unavoidable, had to abandon the enterprise. 

The annual dinner of the society was served in the 
vestiy of the South church, Friday, with a large atten- 
<.lance. After dinner President Appleton called the 
assemblage to order, and called upon several gentlemen 
for remarks, among whom C H. Goulding, Esq., responded 
for the town of Peabody, Hon. John F. Hurley for the city 
of Salem, Hon. Samuel Cole foi- the city of Beverly, W. 
Scott Peters for the county of Essex, W. S. Nevins for 
the Press, Hon. A. P. Gardner, and others. 



30662 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the 
Peabody Institute, at Peabody, Sept. 18, 1901. President 
Appleton called the meeting to order at 9.35 o'clock. 

Upon motion of O. S. Butler, it was unanimously 
voted that Wm. E. Nason of West Newbury cast one bal- 
lot for the present officers of the society, as follows : 

FOR PRESIDENT. 

Francis H. Appleton, of Peabody. 

FOR VICE PRESIDENTS. 

J. J. H. Gregory, of Marblehead. 
H. G. Herrick, of Lawrence. 
Asa T. Newhall, of Lynn. 
Sherman Nelson, of Georgetown. 

FOR SECRETARY. 

John M. Danforth, of Lynnfield. 

Voted : — To indefinitely postpone the amendment to 
the constitution in relation to changing the time of hold- 
ing the annual meeting of the society. 

Voted : — To accept and adopt the amendment to the 
constitution, as recommended by a committee appointed 
in 1899, in relation to the method of choosing Trustees 
(namely, that the}^ be chosen at the annual meeting), the 
same to take effect in 1902. 

Voted: — That the Treasurer of the societ^s upon the 
approval of the President and Secretary, be authorized to 
hire money, if necessary, upon his note as Treasurer of 
the society, to meet any deficiency to pay the bills of the 
society or the premiums awarded. 

The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1901, are tabulated for comparison as follows : 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON SHOW GROUNDS. 



Class. 



Entries 
in 1901. 



Fat cattle, 5 

Bulls, 18 

Milch Cows, 24 

Herds of Milch Cows, 2 

Heifers, Pure Bred, 25 

Heifers, Grade, 18 

Working Oxen and Steers, 11 
Steers, 6 

Stallions, Farm and Draft, 1 

Stallions for Driving Purposes, 2 
Brood Mares, Farm and Draft, 1 
Brood Mares, Driving Purposes, 3 
Family Horses, 9 

Gents' Driving Horses, 4 

Pairs of Gents' Driving Horses, 2 
Ladies' Driving Horses, 2 

Fast Walking Horses, 2 

Pairs Fast Walking Horses, 
Single Farm Horses, 5 

Pairs Farm Horses, over 2400 

lbs., 4 

Pairs Farm Horses, less than 



From 
Different 
Places 
in 1901. 

3 

6 
4 
1 
4 
5 
2 

2 

1 

o 

1 

9 

8 

4 

2 
2 

2 



8 

3 



Entries 
in 1900. 

1 

11 

14 
3 

20 

21 



1 







4 

4 

6 




4 

3 

6 



From 

Different 

Places 

in 1900. 

1 

5 

5 

2 

4 

6 



1 







3 

3 

8 




2 

3 

4 



2400 lbs., 














Colts, Farm and Draft, 


. 1 


1 








Colts, Driving Purposes, 


2 


2 


4 


4 


Horses for Hurdle Jumping, 


12 


3 


9 


3 


Swine, Large Breeds, 


34 


4 


23 


3 


Swine, Small Breeds, 


9 


2 


8 


1 


Sheep, 


3 


1 


6 


1 


Poultry, 


243 


14 


259 


11 


Agricultural Implements, 


37 


7 


27 


4 


Carriages, 


7 


3 


8 


3 



EXHIBITS IN HALL. 





Entries 


From 
Different 


Entries 


From 
Different 


Class 


in 1901. 


Places 
in 1901. 


in 1900. 


Places 
in 1900, 


Dairy, 














Bread and Canned Fruit, 


34 


7 


40 


7 


Honey, 








1 


1 


Pears, 


91 


9 


111 


11 


Apples, 


103 


9 


114 


13 


Peaches, Grapes and Assorted 








Fruit, 


84 


11 


148 


14 


Plants, 


39 


5 


29 


5 


Flowers, 


206 


10 


109 


9 


Vegetables, 


216 


12 


253 


11 


Grain and Seed, 


22 


9 


22 


6 


Carpetings and Rugs, 


35 


6 


36 


7 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


45 


7 


65 


10 


Articles Manufdfrom Leather, 11 


4 


8 


4 


Manuf'res and GeneralMdse, 


., 9 


9 


17 


5 


Fancy Work, 


241 


1 ^ 

lo 


196 


10 


Works of Art, 


55 




220 


8 


Decorated China, 


46 


4 








Charcoal Work, Photos, etc. 


, 44 


i 








Work by Children under 12 


yrs. 








of age, 


15 


3 


43 


2 


Grange Exhibit, 


1 


1 


2 


2 




1297 


23 


1394 


25 



Grand total, 1783 entries from 28 of 34 cities and towns 
in Essex County, against 1837 entries from 30 cities and 
towns last year. Gloucester, Haverhill, Manchester, 
Merrimac, Nahant and Salisbury did not have exhibits 
this year. 

The entries were Amesbury, 30; Andover, 17 ; Beverly, 



179; Boxfoid, t)4 ; Danvers, 143 ; Essex, 11 ; Georgetown, 
2; Groveland, 7; Ipswich, 9: Lawrence, 19; Lynn, 142 
Lynnfield, 20; Maibleliead. 35; Methuen, 2: Middleton 
10 ; Newbury, 27 ; Newbury port, 10 ; North Andover, 57 
Peabody, 744; Rockport, 1: Rowley, 2: Salem, 194 
Saugus, 9; Swampscott, 5; Topsheld, 5; Wenham, 17 
West Newbury, 8. 



Reports of Committees. 
1901. 



The following premiums were awarded for live stock. 

FAT CATTLE. 

$8. First premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for pair 

fat oxen. 
$6. Second premium to David A. Carlton, No. Andover, 

for pair fat oxen. 
$6. First premium to Lewis Brown, Peabody, for fat 

cow. 
$4. Second premium to Lewis Brown, Peabody, for fat 

cow. 
Samuel T. Poor, Samuel B. George, Allen Smith — 
Committee. 



BULLS. 



$6. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey bull, "Rambler of Haddon." 
$6. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey bull, "Admiral Dewey." 
$4. Second premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, 

for Jersey bull, " Idas Prince of Merridale." 
$6. First premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 

Holstein bull, " Netherland de Kol." 
$3. First premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 

Guernsey bull, " Lord Emerson." 



112. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holsteiu bull, '' Earl Aggie de Kol," with 5 of his 

stock. 
$4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holsteiu bull, " Earl Aggie de Kol, 2nd." 
§3. First prenaium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein bull, '' Earl Fairfax de Kol." 
$3. First prenaium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Jersey bull, "Yelon's Sir Don." 
i4. First premium to George E. Kunhardt, No. Andover, 

for Jersey bull, '' Pogis 1st. of Harcourt." 
$4. First premium to Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire bull. 
$6. First premium to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for 

Swiss bull. 
$3. First premium to H. W. Evans, Amesbury, for 

Hereford bull. 
$8. Second premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for 

Hereford bull. 
Wesley B. Barton, Asa T. Newhall — Committee. 



MILCH COWS. 

•f8. Sweepstakes for the best cow of any age or breed, to 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, for Holstein cow, 

"Sophia Barto Fairfax." 
$7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Hjolstein cow, "Sophia Barto Fairfax." 
•17. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

best Holstein cow, " Betz Fairfax.'' 
$4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein cow, " Susie F. Shephard." 
$7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Holstein cow, " Spotty D." 
$7. First premium to James C. Pooi', No. Andover, for 

Grade Jersey and Devon cow, " Dinah." 



lO 



$5. Second premium for sweepstakes to Dr. M. L. Cham- 
berlain, Beverly, for Guernsey cow, " Diana of 
Spring Hill." 

$7. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Guernsey cow, " Diana of Spring Hill." 

$4. Second premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Guernsey cow, " Kitty of Wolf Rock." 

$7. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Jersey cow No. 17. 

17. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Ayrshire cow No. 64. 

$1. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 
Grade Guernsey cow. 

$4. Second premium to Samuel Buxton, Peabody, for 
Grade Jersey cow. 

$4. Second premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 
Jersey cow, " Lois B." 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

$10. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

herd of five Holstein cows. 
$8. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 
for herd of five Grade cows. 
Wesley B. Barton, Geo. L. Averill, E. A. Emerson, A. 
P. Russell — Committee. 

REPORT OF JAMES C. POOR ON HIS HERD OF MILCH COWS. 

Herd No. 1 — I enter for your consideration for herd 
of milch cows, the Holstein Fresian cow " Sophie Barto 
Fairfax," (6 yrs. old), calved Apr. 5, due May 12, 1902. 
From Sept. 26, 1900 to Feb. 1, 1901 she gave 3,250 lbs. 
milk. From Apr. 10 to Sept. 10, 1901, 5 mos., 5,700 lbs. 
Largest one day's milking, 63 lbs. 



II 



" Betz Fairfax," (6 yrs. old), due to calve 28th, milk 
record for last year, 9110 lbs. 

"Mechthilde 4th Pauline," calved Aug. IB, (6 yrs. old). 
From Jan. 1 to July 1, 5 mos., she gave 4,500 lbs. of milk. 
Is milking now 50 lbs. per day. 

"Lady Marian Fairfax," calved Aug. 5, (5 yrs. old). 
As a 4 yr. old, she gave 7,986 lbs. milk. 

"Betz Fairfax, 2nd," (5 yrs. old), calved Mar. 12, due 
Feb. 15. 6 mos, 6,300 lbs. milk. 

Herd No. 2— "Susie F. Shephard," (8 yrs. old), been 
in milk 2 years, due in June, 1902. Has given 10,850 lbs. 
milk in one year, from Sept, 1, 1900 to Sept. 1901. 

GRADE HOLSTEIN. 

" Overna," 8 yrs. old ; last calf Oct. 11, 1900 ; gave in 
10 mos., 8,985 lbs. milk. 

"Sadie," (6 yrs. old), calved Aug. 22; gave in 9 mos., 
in season of 1900-1901, 8,100 lbs. milk. 

" Spotty," (8 yrs. old), calved Mar. 21 ; due Feb. 6, 
1901 ; one year's milk, 9,239 lbs. ; best day's, 58 lbs. 

GRADE JERSEY AND DEVON. 

"Dinah," (6 yrs. old), due 20th; last year's milk, 
7,840 lbs. 

FEED AND CARE. 

The winter feed was hay, corn and oat fodder, and 8 to 
12 qts. grain per day ; two-fifths bran, two-fifths gluten or 
cobmeal, one-fifth cottonseed meal, fed and watered twice 
a day in the barn, carded and brushed once a day. From 
May 18 to Aug. 20, pasture, with 2 qts. gluten once a 
day. Since Aug. 20, feed corn fodder at night and Hun- 
garian in morning, and feeding some of the older cows 
4 qts. gluten and 1 qt. cottonseed meal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James C. Poor. 



12 



MILK RECORD OF DR. M. L. CHAMBERLAIN'S COWS FOR' 
THE MONTH OF JULY, 1901. 

GUERNSEYS. 



Name 

of 
Cow. 



Date. 

1 

2 

rj 

4 
5 
6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 

Total 

Per 
Cent. 



Dianna 

of 

Springhill. 


Kitty of 
Wolf 
Rock. 


Bonnie 

Briar Bush. 

3 yrs. old. 


Jersey 
No. 17. 


Lbs. Oz. 


Lbs. Oz. 


Lbs. Oz. 


Lbs, 


Oz. 


36 4 


12 12 


9 


29 


12 


40 8 


14 


8 


27 




37 4 


15 


10 


28 


6 


35 8 


13 


9 11 


27 


8 


37 8 


13 4 


9 13 


31 


5 


38 8 


14 


10 13 


28 




36 8 


15 


9 14 


29 


4 


37 4 


•14 4 


11 7 


26 


8 


39 10 


12 11 


10 8 


25 


4 


35 8 


13 8 


8 9 


26 


8 


37 4 


14 4 


10 6 


26 


4 


38 8 


14 4 


8 5 


27 


12 


35 4 


13 7 


8 8 


28 




37 4 


16 5 


10 


25 




37 4 


14 4 


11 8 


26 


12 


34 12 


15 12 


9 8 


27 


8 


37 8 


13 12 


10 


25 


8 


37 4 


15 4 


10 


29 


12 


35 8 


16 


11 8 


27 


8 


37 8 


15 


11 


33 




38 4 


15 12 


11 2 


27 


8 


36 4 


15 4 


11 6 


28 




35 4 


15 4 


11 4 


25 


8 


37 11 


15 8 


11 8 


31 




34 4 


15 12 


9 


28 


12 


3() 1 L 


16 


10 4 


29 




37 4 


14 


9 


27 


8 


33 5 


15 12 


10 2 


27 


4 


35 14 


15 8 


10 


26 


8 


37 12 


16 4 


11 


26 


4 


38 


16 4 


9 8 


27 


10 


965 


4.54 15 


299 


861 


5 


6 .'>-5 




6 2-5 






Calved May 12. 
Been milking 2 
yrs. continuously. 


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Ayrshire 


Holstein 


No. 


(U. 


No. 70. 


Lbs. 


Oz. 


Lbs. Oz. 


22 


8 


29 12 


23 


8 


27 


22 


8 


27 


22 


8 


27 8 


22 




30 


23 


12 


28 


25 


12 


29 4 


24 


4 


27 4 


22 


8 


25 8 


23 


8 


27 


23 




26 4 


22 


. 


27 12 


22 


8 


28 


21 


8 


25 


22 


12 


26 8 


23 




27 8 


21 


4 


25 8 


23 




29 12 


23 


12 


27 8 


23 




33 


22 


8 


27 8 


21 


8 


27 8 


24 




25 8 


22 




31 


23 


4 


28 S 


21 


12 


31 


21 


12 


28 4 


21 


12 


27 


22 


4 


26 4 


18 


4 


27 12 


22 




27 12 


699 


5 


863 


05 
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13 

HEIFERS— PURE BRED. 

-#4. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey heifer, "• Lady Palmer of Cherry Hill." 
$5. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey heifer, " Bonnie Brier Bush," in 

milk. 
i2. Second premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey heifer. 
$5. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, " Madam of St. Lambert," in 

milk. 
$2. Second premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, 2 yrs. old. 
f4. Fii'st premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, 1 year old. 
$4. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer. 
$4. First premium to Geo. E. Kunhardt, No. Andover, 

for Jersey heifer, " Hood Farm Alicia." 
$2. Second premium to E. W. Mood}^ No. Andover, for 

Jersey heifer, " Moody's Golden Grace." 
■$'2. Second premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jerse}^ heifer, " Moody's Golden Lass." 
•f4. F'irst premium to Frank VV. Stanley, Peabody, for 

Guernsey heifer. 
$0. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Zalma Fairfax Clothilde." 
•f 3. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Myra Netherland Paul.'' 
$4:. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Maid of Paul." 
$4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Zalm de Kol." 
#2. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein heifer, " Betz de Kol." 



12. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein heifer, " Marion de Kol." 



HEIFERS-GRADE. 

$5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Holstein and Guernsey, " Sadie 2nd." 
$i3. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Holstein and Jersey, " Ruth L." 
$4. First premium to Thomas W. Reilly, Saugus, for 

Grade Jersey and Durham. 
$2. Second premium to Frank W. Stanley, Peabody, for 

Grade Jersey and Ayrshire. 
$i. First premium to George H. Burns, Peabody, for 

Grade Holstein and Ayrshire. 
82. Second premium to L. J. Bordeaux, Danvers, for 

Grade Jersey. 
$2. Second premium to W. B. Verry, Danvers, for 

Grade Holstein and Ayrshire. 
$4. First premium to Geo. A. Collins, Salem, for Grade 

Jersey. 
Wesley B. Barton, Joseph F. Andrews, John Mudge — 
Committee. 



WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

$8. First premium to H. W. Evans, Amesbury, for pair 
Hereford Oxen. 

•16. Second premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for Her- 
eford Oxen. 

$10. Special premium to J. 0. Evans, Amesbury, for Col- 
lection of Cattle. 

$6. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Working Steers. 



15 

t^TEERS. 

f5. First premium to H. W. Evans, Amesbury, for Grade 

Hereford Steers. 
i-l. First premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for Grade 

Hereford Steers. 
$3. Second premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for 

Grade Hereford Steers. 
i2. Second premium to Francis O. Kimball, Danvers, 

for Holstein Steers. 
B. H. Farnham, Andrew Lane, Allen Smith — Committee. 



STALLIONS— FARM AND DRAFT. 

$8. First premium to W. G. Horton, Ipswich, for stal- 
lion " Fritz."' 



STALLIONS— FOR DRIVING. 

$8. First premium to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for black 

stallion, •' Midnight." 
$5. Second premium to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for 

chestnut stallion, " Alex'r McGregor. 



BROOD MARES— FARM AND DRAFT. 

18. First premium to Wm. Messervy, Hamilton, for roan 
mare and colt. 



BROOD MARES— FOR DRIVING. 

$8. First premium to W. G. Horton, Ipswich, for brood 

mare, " Empress." 
$5. Second premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for 

brood mare,*." Hera." 
Geo. M. Baker, O. S. Butler, Charles Sanders— Cow- 
mittee. 



i6 



FAMILY HORSES. 



■f6. First premium to H. H. Dempsey, Wenham, for 

chestnut horse, " Major." 
$4. Second premium to Sidney F. Swinerton, Danvers, 

for family mare. 



GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

-fl5. First premium to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for pair 

of mares. 
flO. Second premium to C. B. Cole, Wenham, for pair 

of black mares. 
•fl2. First premium to James O. Perry, Danvers, for 

single horse. 
19. Second premium to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for 

single horse. 



LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

-f 6. First premium to Mrs. Richard Newell, West New- 
bury. 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

i5. First premium to Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead, for 

black mare, " Nellie." 
#3. Second premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for 

mare " Hera." 
Geo. M. Baker, James C. Poor, H. H. Demse}^ Wm. 
R. Roundy — Committee. 



17 

SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

$6. First premium to B. W. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

bay mare, " Fan." 
$6. First premium to John S. Gates, Danvers. 

Wm. B. Carlton, W. H. Poor, F. W. Lyford— (7om- 
mittee. 



PAIRS OF FARM HORSES. 

f 8. First premium to W. A. Russell, No. Andover. 
1^5. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody. 

John H. Perkins, Geo. M. Roundy, Thos. E. Cox, D. 
D. Adams — Committee. 



COLTS FOR FARM AND DRAFT. 

$6. First premium to L. J. Bordeaux, Danvers, for mare, 
4 years old. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

$6. First premium to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for bay 
filly, 3 years old. 

$4. First premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for chest- 
nut filly, 2 years old. 

$4. First premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for stal- 
lion colt, 1 year old. 
Geo. M. Baker, Wm. Messerv}', D. D. Adams, Edwv 

Harrington — Committee. 



HURDLE JUMPING. 

$6. First premium to Myopia Hunt club, for "War- 
paint,*" 5 feet. 

$!4. Second premium to Myopia Hunt club, for 
"Methuen."' 



i8 



$6. First premium to G. S. Mansell, Hamilton, for 

" Rubicon." 
$4. Second premium to Mrs. T. W. Pierce, Topsfield, for 

'^Tornado." 
E. H. Dresel, D. P. Rogers, Dr. T. L. Jenkins — Oom- 
mittee. 



SWINE— LARGE BREEDS. 

$3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Grade 

Berkshire sow and pigs. 
$3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Chester 

white boar. 
$3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Chester 

white sow and pigs. 

15. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Chester 

weaned pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for O. I. C. 

W. sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for large 

Yorkshire boar. 
|5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for large 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Yorkshire 

weaned pigs. 

16. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

boar. 
15. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

sow and pigs. 
f5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

weaned pigs. 
15. First premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for O. 

I. C. boar. 
$5. First premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for O. 

I. C. weaned pigs. 



19 

|5. First premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for 

Grade Yorkshire boar. 
$5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Berkshire boar. 
$3. Second premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, 

for Berkshire sow. 
$5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Grade sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Yorkshire sow. 
$5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Chester sow. 
$o. First premium to J. J. Cari'oll & Co., Peabody, for 

Grade sow. 
$5. First premium to J. T. Cooper & Co., Peabody, for 

Jersey Red pigs. 
$3. Second premium to J. T. Cooper & Co., Peabody, 

for Berkshire boar. 
|5. First premium to J. T. Cooper & Co., Peabody, for 

Berkshire sow. 
13. Second premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire boar. 
3. Second [)remiura to Frank Perkins, Newbury, for 

Grade sow and pigs. 
J. W. Yeaton, John Barker, Wilbur F. Proctor — Com- 
mittee. 



SWINE— SMALL BREEDS. 

fS. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
$n. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for weaned 

pigs. 
•f5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire boar. 



20 



$3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
$3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for weaned 

pigs. 
i3. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 

sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Grade 

boar. 
B. P. Pike, David Pingree, Thomas E. Cox — Committee. 



SHEEP. 

$5. First premium to W. W. Phillips, Lynnfield, for 

Southdown buck. 
•13. Second premium to W. W. Phillips, Lynnfield, for 

Grade ewes. 
Richard Newell, N. Warren Moody, E. W. Moody — 
Oommittee. 



POULTRY. 

i2. First premium to Geo. A. Knights, Peabody, for pen 
Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Geo. A. Knights, Peabody, for pair 
Buff Wyandotte chicks. 

1. Second premium to Geo. A. Knights, Peabody, for 

pair Buff Wyandotte chicks. 

2. First premium to Geo. A. Knights, Peabody, for 

pair Buff Wyandotte fowls. 

1. Second premium to Geo. A. Knights, Peabody, for 

pair Buff Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to Maude M. Perkins, Newbury, for 

White Holland Turkey chicks. 
1. Second premium to Maude M. Perkins, Newbury, 
for White Holland Turkey chicks. 



21 



^2. First premium to Maude M. Perkins, Newbury, for 

White Holland turkeys, old. 
2. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Plymouth llock chicks. 
2. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair Buff 

Plymouth Rock fowls. 
1. Second premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 
1. Second premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

White Plymouth Rock chicks. 

1. Second premium to Roy W. Whipple, Hamilton, for 

Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 

2. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Dark Pl)^mouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Dark Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2. First premium to Fi-ed W. Holden, Beverly, for pen 

Light Brahma fowls. 

1. Second premium to F. Loring Holden, Beverly, for 

pair Black Langshan fowls. 

2. First premium to Wm. E. Siieen, Peabody, for pen 

S. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 

S. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to W. A. McGreggor, Beverly, for 

pair Silver Spangled Hamburgs. 
2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 

R. L Red chicks. 
2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pen Silver Laced Wyandotte chicks. 



22 



|2. First premium to Wm. B. Moore, Lynn, for pair 

White Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to Wm. B. Moore, Lynn, for pen 

White Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pen 

Black Langshan fowls. 
2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Black Langshan fowls. 
2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Black Langshan chicks. 

1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Black Langshan chicks. 

2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair French Houdan cViicks. 

1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair French Houdan chicks. 

2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pen 

French Houdan chicks. 
2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

white crested Polish fowls. 
2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Partridge Cochin fowls. 
1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair White Wyandotte fowls. 

1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair White Wyandotte chicks. 

2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Bronze turkeys. 
1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Black Cochin fowls. 
1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Black Cochin chicks. 

1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair White Cochin chicks. 

2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Buff Cochin chicks. «•. 



23 

|il. Second premium to Hany B. Graves, Peabody, for 
pair Black Red Game fowls. 

1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Black Red Game chicks. 

2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Golden Seabright fowls. 

1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Golden Seabright fowls. 

2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Golden Seabright chicks. 
2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pen 

Golden Seabright chicks. 
2. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pair White Plymouth Rock fowls. 

1. Second premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pair White Plymouth Rock fowls. 

2. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pen White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pen White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 

1. Second premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
.2. First premium to Arthur P. Spiller, Beverly, for 
pen Ancona fowls. 

2. Second premium to Arthur P. Spiller, Beverly, for 

pen Ancona chicks. 
2. First premium to Arthur P. Spiller, Beverly, for 

pair Ancona chicks. 
2. First premium to Roland P. Davis, Beverly, for pair 

China geese. 
2. First premium to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for pair 

R. I. Red chicks. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Beverly, for 

pen White Wj-andotte fowls. 



24 

$2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Beverly, for 

pair Wliite Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Beverly, for 

pen White Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Beverly, for 

pair White Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Joseph Sewall, Peabody, for pair 

Buff Laced Polish fowls. 
2. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for pen 

R. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for pair 

R. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 

1. Second premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for 

pair R. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 

2. First premium to T. L. D. Perkins, Peabody, for pen 

Black Langshan chicks. 
2. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Pl3^mouth Rock chicks. 

1. Second premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 

2. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2- First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to Charles E. Foster, Beverly, for 

pair Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pair R. C. 

R. L Red fowls. 
2. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pen R. C. 

R. I. Red fowls. 

1. Second premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pair R. 

C. R. L Red chicks. 

2. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pair 

S. C. R. L Red fowls. 



25 

f 1. Second premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pair S. 
C. R. I. Red chicks. 
2. First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair 
Light Brahma fowls. 

1. Second premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair 

Light Brahma fowls. 

2. First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverl}', for pair 

Light Brahma chicks. 
2 First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pen 
Light Brahma chicks. 

1. Second premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair 

Light Biahma chicks. 

2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen 

Houdan fowls. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 
Houdan fowls. 

1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 

2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

R. L Red chicks. 

1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Pekin ducks. 

2. First premium to Beth Woodbury, Beverly, for pair 

Silver Laced Seabright fowls. 
2. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Black Minorca chicks. 
2, First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Wyandotte chicks. 
1. Second premium to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for pair 

Black Game Bantams. 

1. Second premium to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for pail- 

Buff Cochin bantams. 

2. First premium to W. J. Roach, Peabody, for pair 

Golden Polish fowls. 
2. First premium to W. J. Roach, Peabody, for pair 
Golden Polish chicks. 



26 



t2. First premium to A. B. Sim, Peabody, for pair Pe- 
kin ducks. 
2. First premium to A. B. Sim, Peabody, for pair R. I- 
Red chicks. 

1. Second premium to A. B. Sim, Peabody, for pair R. 

I. Red chicks. 

2. First premium to Chester Clark, Beverly, for pair 

Seabright fowls. 
2. First premium to Frank Woodbury, 2d, Beverly, for 

pair Buff Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to J. L. Morse, 2d, Beverly, for pair 

R. I. Red chicks. 
2. First premium to A. McGregor, Beverly, for pair 

Silver Spangled Hamburg chicks. 
1. Second premium to A. G. Goldsmith, Beverly, for 

pair R. I. Red chicks. 

1. Second premium to A. G. Goldsmith, Beverly, for 

pair R. I. Red fowls. 

2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

Cochin Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair Black 

Red Game Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

Black Red Game Bantam fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair Par- 
tridge Cochin Bantam fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

Black Game Bantam fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

Game Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pen 

White Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pen 

Black Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pen 

Black Bantam fowls. 



27 

12. First premiiim to .J. F. Murphy, Salem, for peii^ 

Black Red Game Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pen. 

Light Brahma fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair. 

Japanese Silky fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

White Cochin Bantam fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

White Japanese Bantam fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

White Japanese Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

White Cochin Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

Black Red Game Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

Black Red Game Bantam fowls. ^ 

2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair Buff. 

Cochin fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

White Cochin fowls. ^ 

2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

Partridge Cochin fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair Red 

Pyle Bantam fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair Red 

Pyle Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair 

Brown Game Bantam fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair Sil- 
ver Duckwing Bantam fowls. 
2. First premium to J. F. Murphy, Salem, for pair Sil- 
ver Duckwing Bantam chicks. 
2. First premium to D wight Foster, Beverly, for peni 

Black Spanish fowls. 



28 



$2. First premium to Samuel Buxton, Peabody, for pair 
Bronze turkeys. 
2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 
Dominique fowls. 

1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Dominique fowls. 

2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

Dominique chicks. 
2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 
White Polish fowls. 

1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair White Polish fowls. 

2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair White Polish chicks. 
2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

Bearded Golden Polish fowls. 
1. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Plain Polish fowls. 

1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Plain Polish fowls. 

2. First premium to A. M. Swinerton, Danvers, for 

pair Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to A. M. Swinerton, Danvers, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

Wyandotte fowls. 

1. Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

Wyandotte chicks. 

1. Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 
Wyandotte chicks. 

-2. First premium to M. I. Perkins, Lynn, for pair Tou- 
louse geese. 

1. Second premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 
Toulouse geese. 



29 

^2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

Embdeii geese. 
1. Second premium to M. J. Cain, Lynntield, for pair 

Embden geese. 

1. Second premium to J. O. Jones, Peabody, for pair 

Buff Leghorn chicks.* 

2. First premium to T. L. D. Perkins, Peabody, for 

pen Black Minorca chicks. 
W. B. Atherton, Judge. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

$10. First premium to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for 
market wagon. 
10. Fii-st premium to S. D. Hinxman, No. Andover, for 

2 horse market wagon. 
10. First premium to S. D. Hinxman, No. Andover, for 

2 horse follower. 
10. Premium to W. J. Munroe, Lynnfield, for New Era 
ensilage cutter and carrier. 
5. Gratuity to Colcord Richardson Co., Danvers, for 

gasoline engine. 
2. Gratuity to Colcord Richardson Co., for stock water- 
ing device. 
2. Gratuity to Colcord Richardson Co., Danvers, for 

Am. harrows and cultivators. 
2. Gratuity to Colcord Richardson Co., Danvers, for 

Aspinwall corn and bean planter. 
8. and Diploma to Whitcomb, Carter Co., Beverly, 

for collection of implements. 
J.J.H. Gregory, Peter Holt, W. F. Kinsman — Committee. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURAL 

IMPLEMENTS. 

The exhibition of agricultural implements, though less 
in quantity, averaged better in quality than usual. There 



30 

were several excellent one and two-horse wagons on exhi- 
bition, all of them a credit to the firms from whose hands 
they came and well meriting a premium ; the work of dis- 
criminating between their merits was for the most part one 
of fine distinctions, into which the low hanging of the body 
of the vehicles entered with some weight — for experience 
has taught every farmer that in putting boxes or barrels 
of vegetables into the market wagon the last inches are 
the heaviest ones in the lift, and a reduction of these arith- 
metically decreases the outlay of strength needed almost 
geometrically. It is this fact, principally, that has made 
the low running platform wagon from the west so popular 
amonsf our eastern farmers. We were glad to see some 
improvement in our old friend, Kemp's manure spreader 
(the chairman, he had four of them), consisting of a 
wooden shield to protect the distributing apparatus when 
loading, and the driver's head from flying brickbats when 
spreading the load. After one of my men had received a 
bad blow from flying missiles I had a shield made to pro- 
tect him, and so wrote to the firm, who then got out the 
machine, to their wise profit it now appears. The new 
Kemp has another new improvement which throws it au- 
tomatically out of gear when the load is all spread. ^ It is 
now made of three sizes, holding 30, 40 and 50 bushels. 
The manure spreader in fining and in distributing the plant 
food evenly makes it more available for the crop and con- 
sequently produces results equal to those obtained from a 
larger body of manure applied in a coarser condition. The 
objection to it as a farm implement is, that unless handled 
with more care than the average farm hand is likely to 
invest in it, it is very likely to be injured in some part of 
its cog wheel gearing, where repairs are costly. Where 
farmers have run the machines themselves I have known 
them to last for years with but little outlay for repairs,and 
these mostly confined to the iron gear which holds the lugs. 
Messrs. Colcord & Richardson exhibited several inter- 



31 

-estiiig implements, among whicli the Abenaque gas engine 
•drew a gfreat deal of attention. Mr. C. informed us that 
it was a live horse power, weighed 1300 lbs., cost |!*275, 
and could be run at an outlay of one cent an hour for gas- 
oline. The Champion milk cooler, exhibited by the firm, 
cost from $1 to ilO. The stock watering device, by the 
use of which the animals have cleaner water, appeared to 
your committee worthy of special recognition. The As- 
pinwall corn and bean planter has made a good record for 
itself; its method of distributing the fertilizers so that they 
will not come in contact with the seed planted is a strong 
recommendation for it. Several of our seed planting ma- 
chines having fertilizer attachments, are weak just here ; 
either their fertilizer distributing spout is not strong 
enough to stand the rough usage of our stony New Eng- 
land soil, and so ai'e soon bent or broken, or they do not scat- 
ter their fertilizer or cover them sufficient to protect the 
seed planted from injury. This was the defect I found in 
the Aspinwall potato planter as formerly made. The 
price for the planter and fertilizer distributer is iSO. 
Breed's hand onion weeder, also exhibited by this firm, 
we have had occasion to speak a good word for before, 
drawn from personal experience of its merits. Any farmer 
who raises an acre of onions would soon get his money 
back in saving labor in that most costly of all farm work, 
hand weeding. We run it both ways of the rows before 
the onions break ground and some of my fellow farmers, 
whose soil is freer of stones, go farther than this, using it 
lengthways of the rows, even when the plants are 3 or 4 
inches high. The Green Mountain silo, exhibited by this 
firm, a cylindrical affair, to be built of either cypress, pine 
or spruce, is certainly worth attention, where the material 
of one'_ with a capacity of 95 tons can now be landed in 
Massachusetts already to be put together for $184. There 
is a prospect of a discount from these rates another season. 
Among the numerous articles exhibited by Messrs. 



32 

Whitcomb & Carter, to whom was awarded the pre- 
mium for largest collection of agricultural implements, 
was a "■ tree protector," made of strong wire strongly 
connected. It was efficient for trees up to 6 or more 
inches in diameter. The price was 75 cents. Mr. 
Holt, a member of our committee, was quite favorably- 
impressed with its good workmanship and low price. 
The lawn roller, exhibited by this firm, ran on ball 
bearings, weighed 260 lbs., and was sold at 113. Their 
dirt scraper, price $8, had the improvement of a pair of 
stout iron shoes along the bottom. Mr. Fuller had his 
usual exhibition of excellent weeding tools, the efficiency 
of which we can bear testimony to from personal experi- 
ence of their merits. He has taken the wise course, so 
fair for both parties, of carrying them from farm to farm 
in the growing season and allowing them to demonstrate 
in the farmers' hands by actual trial whether or not the}'- 
can help him efficiently in his annual warfare with the 
weeds. There is one tool, most important to the farmer, 
that we rarely see on exhibition at our Agricultural Fairs, 
that is the hoe. There is no tool in use on the farm in 
which there has been a greater improvement made by 
American ingenuity; with its narrow, thin steel blade, 
hung at the best angle on a well made ash handle (not 
white wood), it has apparently reached perfection. 

For the Committee, 

J. J. H. Gregory, 
Peter Holt. 



CARRIAGES. 

$13 Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for exhibit of 

three carriages. 
-flO. Gratuity to M. Plumstead, Lynn, for wire wheel 
pneumatic runabout. 
$2 Gratuity to L. B. Packard, Salem, for motor carriage. 
Richard Newell, S. D. Hood, B. P. V\\iq.— Committee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



GRANGES. 



#25. t'irst premium to Laurel Grange, West Newbury, 
for Exhibit. 
Sherman Nelson, Francis O. Perkins, J. J. Manning. — 
<Jommittee. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

#2.00 First premium to Mrs. J. R. Fuller, Danvers, for 

white bread. 
#2.00. First premium to Maggie Dunleavy, Peabody, for 

brown bread. 
#1.U0 Second premium to Maggie Dunleavy, Peabody, 

for white bread. 
#2.00. First premium to Maggie Dunleavy, Peabody, for 

graham bread. 
#1.00. Second premium to Mrs. Mary A. Noyes, Lynn, 

for oatmeal bread. 
#1.00 Second premium to Miss Cahill, Marblehead, for 
brown bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. J. Copp, Peabody, for white 

bread. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. A. J. Copp, Peabody, for cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. J. Gammon, Salem, for white 

bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. A. Smith, Salem, for Parker 
house rolls. 



34 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for wheat 

bread. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. J. R. Fuller, Danvers, for wheat 
bread. 
12.00. First premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 

for jelly, twenty-six varieties. 
•12.00. First premium to Mrs. O. E. Hardy, Peabody, 

for jelly. 
$1.00. Second premium to Mrs. B. P. Danforth, Peabody, 
for 12 tumblers jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. A. Smith, Salem, for 4 cans 
fruit. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. S. A. Stewart, Middleton, 
for dried apples. 
50. Gratuit}^ to Mrs. F. D. Hoag, Peabody, for pre- 
served peaches and pears. 
11.00. Gratuity to Mrs. H. W. O'Donnell, Peabody, for 
crab apple jelly. 
Mrs. W. S. Lee, Mrs. Alonzo Raddin, Miss Emma Brad- 
street, William F. Sawyer. — Committee. 



PEARS. 



$2. First premium to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for Bart- 

lett. 
fl. Second premium to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Bart- 

lett. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for 

Belle Lucrative. 
fl. Second premium to Sylvester Parrott, Lynn, for Belle 

Lucrative. 
$2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Bosc. 
$1. Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Duchess. 



35 

$2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Lawrence. 
$2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Vicar. 
'fl. Second premium to Allen Barr, Lawrence, for Bosc. 
$2. First premium to S. J. Barr, Lawrence, for Clairgeau. 
•12. Second premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, 

for d'Anjou. 
$1. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 
•f2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Duchess. 
$2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Seckel. 
$2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Howell. 
'fl. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Clapp's 

favorite. 
■•12. First premium to W. T. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Dana's Hovey. 
•'II. Second premium to A. W. Berry, Peabody, for SeckeL 
$2. First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Sheldon. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. C. C Farwell, Peabody, for 

Clairgeau. 
••$1. Second premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Cornice. 
•fL Second premium to Fred Carlton, Lynn, for Howell. 
•f 2. First premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Urban- 

iste. 
$2. First premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Comice. 
•fl. Second premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Washington. 
Peter M. Neal, B. F. Stanley, Henry Alley, John J. 
Gould. — Committee. 



APPLES. 

$2.00. First premium to Sidney F. Newman, Newbury^ 
for Roxbur}^ Russet. 



36 

$2.00. First premium to Henry Verry, Danvers, for Bald- 
win. 
•'|!2.00. First premium to Henry Verry, Danvers, for R. 

I. Greening. 
'$2.00. First premium to Henry Verry, Danvers, for Hub- 

bardston. 
$1.00. Second premium to Henry Verry, Danvers, for 

Mackintosh Red. 
•fl.OO. Gratuity to Mrs. M. J. Sim, Peabod}^ for 

Unknown. 
50. Gratuity to Michael Cody, Peabody, for King 

Tompkins. 
$1.00. Second premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 

Hunt's Russet. 
il.OO. Second premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 

Ladies Sweet. 
$2.00. First premium to F. D. Hoag, Peabody, for Ladies 

Sweet. 
$1.00. Gratuity to F. D. Hoag, Peabody, for 20 Ounce. 
$1.00. Gratuity to A. N. Welch, Peabody, for Graven- 
stein. 
$1.00. Gratuity to M. A. Noyes, Lynn, for Fall Harvey. 
$1.00. Gratuity to M. A. Noyes, Lynn, for Sweet. 
il.OO. Second premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for 

Baldwin. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. E. Reed, Peabody, for Hubbard 

ston. 
$2.00. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 

Snow. 
.50. Gratuity to L. S. Wilkins, Middleton, for Hunt's 

Russet. 
$1.50. First premium to C. A. Southwick, Peabody, for 

Wolf River. 
.50. Gratuity to George Dieble, Peabody, for Wealthy. 
$2.00. First premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 

King Tompkins. 



•12.00. First premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Wealthy. 
11.00. Second premium to Geo. VV. Richardson, Lynn, 

for Gravenstein. 
.50. Gratuity to (^eo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Bald- 
win. 
50. Gratuity to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for R. L 

Greening. 
!|L00. Second premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, 

for Danvers Sweet. 
fl.OO. Second premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, 

for King Tompkins, 
ill. .00. Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, 

for Hubbardston. 
$\M. Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, 

for Roxbury Russet. 
i^l.OO. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for 

Gravenstein. 
^LOO. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Sn.ow. 
.50. Gratuity to George F. Sanger, Peabody, for Drap 

d*Or. 
'tL50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. Lehane, Peabody, for Osgood's 

Favorite. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. H. Bodge, Peabody, for Queen's 

Choice. 
!S<2.00. Fiist premium to Lyman Osborn, Peabody, for 

Danvers Winter Sweet. 
fl.50. First premium to Lyman Osborn, Peabody, for 

Hyslop crab. 
-tl.OO. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

Porter. 
*2.00. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Grav- 
enstein. 
••^LoO. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Arctic. 
.50. Gratuity to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Northern Spy. 



3^ 

$2.00. First premium to George A. Waite, Danvers, for 

Hunt's Russet. 
fl.OO. First premium to Mrs. E. A. Radcliffe, Danvers,. 

for R. I. Greening, 
f 2.00. First preminm to B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, 
for Porter. 
J. W. Goodell, T. C. Tliurlow, Geo. F. Chadwick.— 
Committee. 



As chairman of the committee on apples for 1901 we 
would like to make a few comments and suggestions. Al- 
though this was an off year on apples generally through- 
out the county, the exhibit altogether was of good quality 
and we would call the attention of fruit growers to two 
displays of sweet apples of remarkable quality and attrac- 
tive appearance, one was a perfect facsimile of the Ladies 
Sweet, and was called such in the repoit but upon testing 
the second specimen we were persuaded that it was much 
earlier in ripening. 

The other was of green color and somewhat later in 
ripening, both very large and fair, and especially attractive 
to people who have personal knowledge of the lusciousness 
of a good baked sweet apple and of its healthful, nourish- 
ing qualities. 

We would urge upon the society the importance of im- 
proving the quality of their fruit. Labor is too expensive 
to be used in raising cider apples, or as a food product for 
cattle. Our land is too valuable to be cumbered with such 
trees, they are but as weeds compared to trees bearing 
good quality of salable fruit. The time has come when 
orchards are to be cultivated as a crop of corn or potatoes, 
and not left to shirk for themselves after being planted, 
and in this 20th century the selection of location best 
suited for any given fruit, and also what nourishing ele- 



39 

ments are necessary to the best development of the same are 
known. For a few years, while the yoang trees are growing', 
hoed crops maybe advantageously grown between the rows 
but when they begin to bear fruit all other crops should be 
abandoned. Trees may be set thirty feet apart and, if the 
situation is good, peaches planted between would not be 
detrimental as they would be out of the way by the time 
that the apple trees demanded the space. In such a case 
continuous cultivation and fertilization would be necessary 
but no other crop allowable. While growing the trees 
nitrogenous fertilizers would be most needed, but when 
the tiees begin to bear, more and more potash would be 
required. 

Judicious pruning should be attended to while the trees 
are growing, keeping them well down, the better to facili- 
tate the picking of fruit and guard against the damage by 
high winds, both on trees and fruit. 

All fruit growers should be good fighters, as the battle 
lasts throughout the year and spraying has become a neces- 
sity in order to grow fruit of desirable quality. The 
Bordeaux mixture has become the established remedy for 
most insect pests as well as fungous growths, with Paris 
green added. The latter being a mixture without any 
chemical action should be kept in agitation while in use. 

Spraying should be done on a still, clear day. If a shower 
should come soon after, your work would do little good. 
We would advise several applications to the trees each 
year. After the fruit is gathered a much stronger solution 
of copper could be used with benefit, even as strong as six 
pounds to fifty gallons of water. Then to make things 
doubly sure clean up all leaves and 7-iibbish and hum, be- 
ing careful to make small piles well away from the trees. 

Leaf mould is a valuable fertilizer when composted with 
sufficient lime to kill all insects and fungous growth at- 
tached to the same, but otherwise is a dangerous contin- 
gent. 



40 

Another tiling necessary to the raising of first class- 
fruit is thinning. This needs a good degree of moral courage 
but it pays, both in satisfaction and dollars and cents. 
Three bushels of first class fiuit is worth more than five 
bushels of second class and most likely if you take off 
early in July two-fifths of the fruit, you will at gathering 
time have niore bushels than you would have had if all 
were left on the trees. 

In some cases after trees have got into bearing condition, 
it is not convenient to continue cultivation of the ground 
with the plow and cultivator. In such cases it is better 
the orchard be pastured rather than mowed, and sheep are 
the only animak that should be allowed in the orchard. 
They keep down all weeds and brush and the grass closely 
cropped, while the fertilizer left is most valuable. Horses 
should seldom be allowed in the orchard and horned cattle 
never. 

Considering the numerous insect pests with whicli we 
have to deal, we should remember the valuable help of 
our feathered friends as insect destroyers. Some have 
divided the birds into grain eating and insect eating 
classes and others still as fruit destroyers. 

Now, I have been a careful observer of my friends the 
birds for three score years and ten, and have never seen the 
fowl or bird that did not devour more or less of the destruc- 
tive insects. 

The English sparrow, that most abused of all the bird 
tribe, I believe does a great deal more good than harm. 
They may spoil some blossoms and fruit, but on the other 
hand save us much by destroying pestiferous insects. 

We are becoming acquainted with one of the most troub- 
lesome insects that has come to our knowledge in years^ 
the brown tailed vnoth, literally stripping our pear trees in 
June and partially so again in August. 

In June the moth becomes abundant and at night gath- 



41 

ering around electric lights until tlie [)oles, ropes and 
trolley wires will be white with them. In the morning 
you will see the much hated EngUsh sparrow devouring 
them by hundreds and thousands and by noon will have 
them all cleared away and the ground around the poles 
will look as though there had been a snow storm from the 
multitude of white wings covering tlie ground. Then 
comes up the pointed question, What are you 'joing to do 
about it ? 

In answer we would say build homes to protect your 
birds and feed them in the winter. 

At this time of the year let the moth alone until you 
have a good, hot fire in the furnace. When the leaves 
have fallen from the trees you will observe, at the tips of 
the tall branches, a few leaves that appear to be tied on 
and coiled around the branch. These are the nests of the 
spring crop of caterpillars in large numbers but less than 
one-half inch long. Now take your long pole cutter and 
trim off every one of these leaf holding branches and feed 
your furnace with the same, being careful to pick up 
every branch cut off. 

J. W. GOODELL, 

Chairman of Committee o)i Apples. 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUIT. 

$3.00. First premium to H. C. Gardner, Peabod3% for 
Pocklington grapes. 

ifS.OO. First premium to C. A. Southwick, Peabody, for 
Earl 3^ Amber grapes. 

•liS.OO. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Moore's Diamond grapes. 

$1.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Cham- 
pion quince. 



42 

•f B.OO. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Niagara 
grapes. 

#3.00. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for basket 
assorted fruit. 

$3.00. First premium to W. T. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 
Delaware grapes. 

$3.00. First premium to D. W. Osborn, Peabody, for 
Concord grapes. 

$3.00. First premium to S. J. Barr, Lawrence, for Brigh- 
ton grapes. 

$3.00. First premium to S. J. Barker, Methueu, for 
Worden grapes. 

$3.00. First premium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for 
Moore's early grapes. 

$4.00. First premium to Mrs. G. W. Stickney, Beverly, 
for Black Hamburg grapes. 

$3.00. First premium to Henry Alley, Wenham, for 
Green Mountain grapes. 

$1.50. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for Green 
Mountain grapes. 

$1.50. Gratuity to J. W. Baston, Danvers, for Worden 
grapes. 

$7.00. First premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for 6 
varieties grapes. 

$2.00. First premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Magnum plums. 

$2.00. First premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Lom- 
bard plums. 

$2.00. First premium to W. E. Porter, Danvers, for Bur- 
bank plums. 

$2.00. First premium to W. E. Porter, Danvers, for 
Bailey plums. 

$2.00. Second premium to Frank Perkins, Newbury, for 
basket assorted fruit. 

$1.00. Gratuity to Maude M. Perkins, Newbury, for 
basket assorted fruit. 



43 

$2.00. First premium to S. M. Titcomb, West Newbury, 

for Old Mixon peaches. 
$2.00. First premium to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for 

yellow flesh peaches. 
12.00. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for Essex 

Co. seedling peach. 
fS.OO. First premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for orange 

quinces, 
-f 3.00. First premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 

Champion quinces. 
John J. Manning, W. B. Carlton, Jr., Sherman Nelson, 
T. J. King. — Committee. 



PLANTS. 

$1. First premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for 
gloxinias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. D. H. Southwick, Peabody, for 
cactus. 

f 2. First premium to Mrs'. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for 
native ferns. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. INL F. Gammell, Peabody, for be- 
gonias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. F. Gammell, Peabody, for flax 
begonia. 

.50. Gratuity to Ellen Gammell, Peabody, for lemon 
tree. 

.50. Gratuity to Ellen Gammell, Peabody, for trout be- 
gonia. 

.50. Gratuity to Gertrude Miller, Peabody, for vasilicos. 

.50. Gratuity to H. G. Parsons, Salem, for century plant. 

-.50. Gratuity to M. F. Walch, Peabody, for lemon plant. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Knowles, Peabody, for begonia. 

.50. Gratuity to Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for begonia. 

^50. Gratuity to Mrs. Frank Woodbury, Beverly, for 
rubber plant. 



44 

11. First premium to Geo. E. Hayes, Peabody, for Jeru- 
salem cherrj'- tree. 

•f I. First premium to Justus Jones, Peabody, for begonia. 

•fl. First premium to T. L. Brown, Salem, for begonia. 

i3. Second premium to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, for 
collection. 

$5. First premium to Mrs. J. W. Julyn, Salem, for col- 
lection. 

11. First premium to Mrs. J. W. Julyn, Salem, for be- 
gonias. 

il. First premium to Mrs. J. W. Julyn, Salem, for 
coleus. 

.50. Gratuity to. Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for silk 
tree. 

11. First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for- 
salvia. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for ar- 
butilon. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnliam, Peabody, for 
coleus. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for na- 
tive ferns. 

^1. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for be- 
gonias. 

II. First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
geraniums. 

$1. First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
cultivated flowers. 
Susan A. Bodge, Harry W. Munroe, Otis L. Kent. — 

Committee. 



FLOWERS. 

$3. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Gain, Lynn, for 100 va- 
rieties cut garden flowers. 



45 
i|2. First pieiniuni t(i Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for double 



geianiuui. 



$\. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for pair 
bouquets. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. (1. A. Gain, Lynn, for bouquet. 

il. First premium to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for annuals. 

.50. Gratuity to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for Drummond 
phlox. 

•fL First premium to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for zinnias. 

.50. Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for bouquet 
garden flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for asters. 

.50. Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for coxcombs. 

|il. Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for pompon 
dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 

.50. Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for zinnias. 

.50. Gratuity to Elva Trask, Peabody, for pair bouquets. 

.50. Gratuity to Elva Trask, Peabody, for collection 
asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Elva Trask, Peabody, for nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for pair 
bouquets. 

$[. First premium to Mrs. Horace Bushby, Dan vers, for 
bouquets. 

.50. Gratuity to H. Montgomery, Peabody, for bouquets. 

.50. Gratuity to J. M. Montgomery, Peabody, for nas- 
turtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Monies, Peabody, for bouquets. 

•ft First premium to Mrs. S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for 
basket wild flowers. 

•fl. First premium to Miss L B. Farnliam, Peabody, for 
garden flowers. 

$3. First premium to J. M, Ward & Co., Peabody, for 
floral design. 



46 

$2. Second premium to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, for 

floral design. 
11. First premium to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, for 

single geraniums. 
$1. First premium to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, for 

single geraniums. 
$1. First premium to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, for 

double geraniums. 
II. First premium to Mrs. R. E. Hayes, Peabody, for 

crescent. 
$1. First premium to Miss Susan Bodge, Peabody, for 

Japan lilies. 
.75. Gratuity to Edna Ingalls, Peabody, for dahlias. 
$1. First premium to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for 

hardy phlox. 
.50. Gi-atuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for single 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for mar- 
igolds. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for lark- 
spur. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for asters. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for asters. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

pansies. 
$1. First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

delphiniums. 
.50. Gratuity to Grace McDonald, Peabody, for pansies. 
•f 1. First premium to W. H. Syraonds, Marblehead, for 

dahlias. 
il. First premium to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

pompon dahlias. 
•11. First premium to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

collection dahlias. 
$1. First premium to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

single dahlias. 



47 

.75. Gratuity to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for cactus 

dahlias. 
.75. Gratuity to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for pompon 

dahlias. 
.75. Gratuity to Rufus' Flint, Salem, for large dahlias. 
fl. First premium to Rufus Flint, Salem, for single 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for large dahlias. 
il. First premium to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for cactus 

dahlias. 
^\. First premium to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for twelve 

bouquet dahlias. 
tl. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for display of 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. H. Cruff, Marblehead, for large 

dahlias. 
.75. Gratuity to Wm. H. Cruff, Marblehead, for dahlias. 
.75. Gratuity to Wm. H. Cruff, Marblehead, for dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Joshua Buxton, Peabody, for pom- 
pon dahlias. 
$1. Giatuity to H. J. Dewitt, Peabody, for dahlias. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. Mansfield, Peabody, for single 

dahlias. 
fl. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for dahlias. 
•1)1. First premium to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for 

dahlias. 
%l. Gratuity to Mrs. W. T. Strout, Peabody, for dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for single 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for dwarf mar- 
igolds. 
.75. Gratuity to H. M. Taggard, Salem, for dahlias. 
'11. First premium to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for double 

dahlias. 
.75. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for single 

dahlias. 



48 

.75. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for cannas. 

.75. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for garden 
liydraDgeas. 

.50. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for garden 
hydrangeas. 

.50. Gratuity to L. H. Newhall, Peabody, for zinnias. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. N. Jacobs, Peabody, for garden 
annuals. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. N. Jacobs, Peabody, for zinnias. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody' for annuals. 

$1. Fiist premium to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for 
coxcombs. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for Drum- 
mond phlox. 

SI. First premium to Mrs. M. L. Hooper, Marblehead, 
for marigolds. 

.75. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for African mari- 
golds. 

81. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for dwarf 
marigolds. 

.75. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for coxcombs. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for mari- 
golds. 

.75. Gratutity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 

.75. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for mari- 
golds. 

.50. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for zinnias. 

.50. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, fordianthus. 

$1. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for Drum- 
mond phlox. 

.75. Gratuit}^ to Frances Buckley, Peabody, for mari- 
golds. 

.75. Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for African 
marigolds. 



49 

.50. Gratuity to Louise Symes, Peabody, for dwarf mar- 
io'olds. • 

Ijl. Gratuity to J. N. Demeritt, Peabody, for display of 
coxcombs. 

.50. Gratuity to J. N. Demeritt, Peabod}^ for double 
asters. 

.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for cox- 
combs. 

.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for cox- 
combs. 

.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for zinnias. 

$1. First premium to George E. Ward, Beverly, for 
scabiosas. 

.50. Gratuity to George E. Ward, Beverly, for scabiosas. 

.60. Gratuity to George E. Ward, Beverly, for delphini- 
ums. 

.50, Gratuity to George E. Ward, Beverly, for snap 
drao-ons. 

.50. Gratuity to George E. Ward, Beverly, for sunflower. 

il. First premium to Mrs. John Barker, No. Andover, 
for sweet peas. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. John Barker, No. Andover, for 
nasturtiums. 

.75. Gratuity to Elsie Chandler, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, for 
nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Abbie W. Trask, Peabody, for roses. 

.75. Gratuity to E. P. Trask, Peabody, for hydrangeas. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. Burnham, Salem, for burgmansia. 

.75. Gratuity to Mildred A. Fader, Peabody, for helian- 
thus. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry A. Hale, Salem, for collec- 
tion of coleus. 

.75. Gratuity to Reta Briggs, Peabody, for hydrangeas. 



50 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Hayden, Peabody, for hy- 
drangeas. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss F. T. Dodge, Salem, for collection 
of salvia. 

.50. Gratuity to Louis W. Reed, Peabod3^, for dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Albert A. Reed, Peabody, for dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Nerbertine Reed, Peabody, for dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Charles J. Reed, Peabody, for dahlias. 

$1. Gratuity to Lida McDonald, Peabody, for Victoria 
aster. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Lizzie Whitman, Danvers, for nas- 
turtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to I. E. Hardy, Peabody, for bouquets. 

.50. Gratuity to George E. Hayes, Peabody, for zinnias. 
Ettore Tassinari, Mrs. N. E. Ladd, Mrs. T. C. Thurlow 

— Committee. 



VEGETABLES— FIRST CLASS. 

•$2. First premium to H. S. Stiles, Middleton, for white 

turnip. 
|i2. First premium to H. S. Stiles, Middleton, for purple 

top turnip. 
$2. First premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Danvers 

onions. 
$2. First premium to Edw. E. White, Peabody, for Green 

Mountain potatoes. 
fL Gratuity to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for enormous 

potatoes. 
i2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for mangel 

wurtzels. 
|L Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for pur- 
ple top turnip. 
$1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for flat 

white turnip. 



51 

$1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxfoid, for 
potatoes, Carman's No. 3. 

$2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for pota- 
toes, Pearl of Savoy. 

$1. Gratuity to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for potatoes. 
Lady Finger. 

.50. Gratuity to O. E. Hardy, Peabody, for Danvers 
onions. 

$1. Second premium to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for 
Eclipse beets. 

$1. Gratuity to A. S. Buxton, Peabody, for Dewing's 
beets. 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for pota- 
toes. Early Rose. 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for potatoes, 
Clark's No. 1. 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for pota- 
toes, Pearl of Savoy. 

$1. Gratuity to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for potatoes, Early 
Maine. 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for potatoes, 
Roberts' early. 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for pota- 
toes, New Queen. 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for potatoes, 
Carman's No. 3. 

-12. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for potatoes^ 
Rural Blush. 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for potatoe&v 
Rural New Yoiker. 

•f 2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for potatoes, 
Early Northern. 

$1. Second premium to H, L. Cole, Boxford, for pota- 
toes, Clark's No. 1. 

$1. Second premium to H. L. Cole, Boxford, for pota- 
toes, Roberts' Early. 



52 

fl. Second premium to H. L. Cole, Boxford, for pota- 
toes, Rural Blush. 

$2. First premium to Alvin Smith, Hamilton, for ruta 
bagas. 

$1. Second premium to C. R. Anderson, Boxford, for 
ruta bagas. 

$2. First premium to W. G. Dodd, Peabody, for parsnips. 

f 1. Second premium to W. G. Dodd, Peabody, for car- 
rots. 

.60. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for mangel 
wurtzels. 
. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
potatoes, Early Northern. 

fl. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for potatoes. 
Harvest. 

$2. First premium to O. F, Newhall, Peabody, for Ed- 
mands beets. 

$1. Second premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 
Danvers onions. 

$1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Ed- 
mands beets. 

$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for carrots, 
Long Orange. 

$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for onions, 
Yellow flat. 

$2. First premium, to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for potatoes. 
New Queen. 

$1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for pota- 
toes, Green Mountains. 

fl. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for par- 
snips. 

$2. First premiums to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Danvers carrots. 

.50. Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Yellow 
Globe onions. 



53 

$1. Second premium to J. W, Parkhuvst, Boxford, for 
Red onions. 

$1. Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Egyptian 
beets. 

$2. First premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for po- 
tatoes, Early Rose. 

$1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 
potatoes, Hebron. 

$2. First premium to Charles W. Paul, No. Andover, for 
potatoes, Hebron. 
F. A. Russell, James A. King, C. W. Webster — Com- 
mittee. 



VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

$1. Gratuity to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for yellow flesh 
melon. 

$1. Second premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 
celery. 

f2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Fottler's 
cabbage. 

SI. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Savoy 
cabbage. 

$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for S 
Mason cabbage. 

$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for tomatoes. 

12. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for celery.. 

111. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Bay- 
State squash. 

$2. First premium to C. A. Mason, Beverly, for Marrow- 
squash. 

$2. First premium to C. A. Mason, Beverly, for Nutmeg 
melon. 

$1. Second premium to Asa T. Newhall, Lynn, for Essex 
Hybrid squash. 



54 

$1. Second premium to A. W. Swineiton, Danvers, for 
Stone tomatoes. 

^1. Gratuity to A. W. Swinerton, Danvers, for Victor 
squash. 

$1. Second premium to A. W. Swinerton, Danvers, for 
Victor squash. 

f2. First premium to Wm. Bushby, Jr., Peabody, for 
Hybrid squash. 

$2, First premium to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for Deep- 
head cabbage. 

$2. First premium to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for sweet 
corn. 

$2. First premium to B. P. Danforth, Peabod}^ for Tur- 
ban squash. 

$2. Fiist premium to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for Stone 
tomatoes. 

$2. Gratuity to E. K. Jenkins, Andovei', for collection 
vegetables. 

fl. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for red 
cabbage. 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cauli- 
flower. 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for sweet 
corn. Early Essex. 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cran- 
berries. 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for water- 
melon. 

$2. First premium to C. R. Anderson, Boxford, for caul- 
iflower. 

$1. Second premium to C. R. Anderson, Boxford, for 
cranberries. 

$1. Second premium to H. L. Cole, Boxford, for Fottler's 
cabbage. 

$1. Second premium to H. L. Cole, Boxford, for All 
Seasons cabbage. 



55 

$2. First piemiuni to H. L. Cole, Boxford, for sweet corn. 

$1. Second premium to H. L. Cole, Boxford, for Deep- 
head cabbage. 

1=1. Second premium to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for 
Warren squash. 

dl. Second premium to E. W. Russell, Danvers, for 
Livingstone tomatoes. 

$2. Fiist premium to H. S. Stiles, Middleton, for water- 
melon. 

$2. First premium to W. J. Munroe, Lynnfield, for Liv- 
ingstone tomatoes. 

$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Savoy cabbage. 

$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for All 
Seasons cabbage. 

$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for red 
cabbage. 

12 First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Bay State squash. 

$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Victor squash. 

$1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Excelsior squash. 

Fred H. Dodge, for the Committee. 



C^RAIN AND SEED. 

$1. First premium to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for peck 

rye. 
$1. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for peck 

shelled corn. 
f4. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for field 

corn. 
fo. First premium to J. W. Yeaton, Georgetown, for 

field corn. 



56 

$3. Third premium to S. E. Emery, West Newbur}^ for 

field corn. 
$1. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for herbs. 

T. J. King, John J. Manning, W. B. Carlton, Jr. — 
Committee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AB^GHANS. 

.76. Gratuity to Mrs. David Warren, Lynn, for silk quilt. 
.76. Gratuity to Mrs. Lydia Foster, Danvers, for patch 

quilt. • 
.50. Gratuity to Mary A. Noyes, Lynn, for silk quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. D. Fox, Danvers, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Ethel Randall, Peabody, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary King, Peabody, for patch quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Chubbs, Peabody, for patch quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary J. Symonds, Salem, for silk quilt. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Miller, Peabody, for outline work. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. E. Grush, Salem, for silk quilt. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. T. Lander, Salem, for octa- 
gon quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. B. Derby, Salem, for patch quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. C. Clark, Peabody, for stitched 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. E. G. Nichols, Peabody, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. R. B. Lockwood, Peabody, for 

patch quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Abbie Sanger, Peabody, for sunrise 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. W. Damon, Danvers, for silk 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity for red and white quilt. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. A. C. Hardy, Salem, for silk 

quilt. 



57 

.50. Gratuity to Jennie Innis, Dan vers, for postal card 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H.Mears, Danvers, for silk quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. S. E. de Lara, Beverly, for silk 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Clarissa Mann, Lawrence, for outline 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. I. D. Pope, Danvers, for sunrise 

quilt. 
$3. First premium to Mrs. R. B. McKingsbury, Danvers,^ 

for silk quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to May Honeycomb, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for patch. 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mary A. Tapley, Danvers, for afghan. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Nancy P. Joy, Ipswich, for afghan. 
13. Gratuity to Edith Southwick, Peabody, for afghan. 

Mrs. Richard Newell, Mrs. D. B. Lord, Mrs. John Moul- 
ton — Committee, 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

f3. First premium to Mrs. Martha Pitts, Salem, for 

braided rug. 
$2. Second premium to Mrs. J. Arthur Trask, Peabody,. 

for braided rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Arthur Moses, Peabody, foi- braided 

rug. 
$3. First premium to Mrs. Monies, Peabody, for drawn 

rug. 
12. Second premium to Mrs. E. P. McDonald, Peabody,. 

for drawn rug. 



58 

$3. First premium to E. P. Kelly, Peabody, for felt rug. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. Nancy P. Joy, Ipswich, for 

knit rug. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary J. Robertson, Salem, for knit 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Emma J. Marvin, Salem for worsted 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary A. Cloon, Marblehead, for button 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Florence Griffin, Salem, for worsted rug. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Thomas Hall, Peabody, for husk 

rug. • 
Elizabeth P. Nichols, Sarah C. Quint, Mai'tha Raddin 
— Committee. 



ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

$3. Gratuity to J. A. Poor, Peabody, for round belting. 

$2. First premium to Alonzo Raddin, for display of shoes. 

Diploma to Almy, Bigelow & Washburn, Salem, for dis- 
play of shoes manufactured in Essex County. 

Diploma to Wm. G. Webber & Co., Salem, for display of 
shoes. 

Diplomat© Clark & Friend, Salem, for knickerbocker shoes. 

Diploma to E. W. Burtt Co., Lynn, for shoe polish. 

$2. Gratuity to F. H. Moreland & Co., Salem, for dis- 
play of shoes. 

$3. First premium to Charles McTernen, Danvers, for 
team harnesses. 

$3. First premium to Charles McTernen, Danvers, for 
carriage harness. 

$3. First premium to Charles McTernen, Danvers, for 
express harness. 
Otis Brown, Charles O. Warner, Perley P. King — Com- 
mittee. 



59 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHAN- 
DISE. 

Diploma to Dan vers Bleachery, Peabody, for sheets, towels, 
etc. 

12.00. Gratuity to R. G. Esty, Peabody, for Chinese 
Man of War. 

$2.00. Gratuity to Thomas B. Carroll, Peabody, for cloth 
and suitings. 

$2.00. Gratuity to Henry A. Hale, Jr., Salem, for yacht. 

12.00. Gratuity to Wm. F. Sawyer, Peabody, for design 
of plough. 

$1.50. Gratuity to John Purcell, Salem, for sewing ma- 
chine. 
.oO, Gratuity to H. A. Mooney, Salem, for collection 

of butterflies. 
.50. Gratuity to Osborn Palnxer, Peabody, for Ameri- 
can Navy. 
Otis Brown, I. E. B. Perkins, Daniel W. Osborn — Com- 
mittee. 



FANCY WORK. 

..50. Gratuity to E. H. Knight, Salem, for embroidery. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. V. Gunnia, Salem, for sofa 

pillow. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. N. Clark, Peabody, for Bat- 

tenburg. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. N. Clark, Peabody, for collar. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. N. Clark, Peabody, for hand- 
kerchief. 

-50. Gratuity to Mrs. M.Andrews, Danvers, for knit lace. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie Swan, Peabody, for hand- 
kerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Irene Pope, Danvers, for sofa 
pillow. 



6o 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Grace Pope, Danvers, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. B. Hobbs, Danvers, for table 
cloth, etc. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. R. Hathaway, Salem, for punch 
bowl piece. ■ " "' 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. E. Bradford, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. E. Bradford, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. E. Bradford, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

•50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. E. Bradford, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. E. Bradford, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Edith Wilkins, Salem, for lace collar. 

.50. Gratuity to Bertha Johnson, Salem, for lace jacket.. 

.50. Gratuity to Annie Wonson, Saugus, for crocheted 
flag. 

.50. Gratuity to Amy Peale, Danvers, for sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Georgia Hatch, Lawrence, for B pieces 
lace. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. C. Hardy, Salem, for Battenburg 
table cover. 

.f 1. Gratuity to Ada B. Angus, Salem, for shirt waist. 

.50. Gratuity to Ada B. Angus, Salem, for centerpiece. 

.50- Gratuity to Mrs. Charles O. Lear, Salem, for Duchess 
lace collar. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Spaulding, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Griffin, Peabody, for cro- 
cheted shawl. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Griffin, Peabody, for cro- 
cheted shawl. 



6i 



..50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. R. Durgin, Lynn, for center- 
piece. 

fl. Gratuity to Mr.s. Fred Mansfield, Peabody, for side- 
board scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Nellie Foley, Peabod}^ for sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. W. Creesy, Salem, for point 
lace collars. 

.50. Gratuity to Mary O'Brien, Peabody, for centerpiece. 

.50. Giatuity to Christina McCarth}'-, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. I. A. Cowdry, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. H. Kelly, Danvers, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Edie Southwick, Peabod}-, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. John Symonds, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. John S3'-monds, Peabody, for lunch 
cloth. 

.50. Gratuity to Maude Wilkins, Salem, for sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Charles Poor, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Nellie Cunningham, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. F. Houston, Newburyport, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. G. Burbeck, Peabody, for doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Jennie Tibbetts, Danvers, for worsted 
shawl. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Herman Barnete, Peabod}-, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Fred A. Coker, Salem, for sofa 
pillow. 

-.50. Gratuity to Mary E. Cody, Peabody, for sofa pillow 
and handkerchief. 



62 



.50. Gratuity to Katherine Donovan, Salem, for crocheted 
lace. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Eliza W. Besse, Peabody, for lace 
necktie. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for lace 
handkerchiefs. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Charles Kimball, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Gammell, Peabody, for 
sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Gammell, Peabody, for 
sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. R. B. McKingstry, Danvers, for 
point lace handkerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss A. M. Little, Newbury, for melon 
seed bag. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. G. Hubon, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. G. Hubon, Salem, for embroidery. 

.50. Gratuity to Alice C. J. Morse, Andover, for lace 
work. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. E. Keefe, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. E. Keefe, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.60, Gratuity to Mrs. George Raddin, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. G. Mears, Danvers, for vest 
front and collar. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Hobson, Georgetown, for 
Battenburg work. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. N. F. Houston, Newburyport, for 
handkerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. F. Houston, Newburyport, for 
table cover. 



63 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. F. Houston, Newburyport, for 

sofa pillow. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. F. Houston, Newburyport, for 

child's dress. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Caroline Mann, Lawrence, for pil- 
low sham. 
.50. Gratuity to Edith L. Downing, Salem, for picture 

frame. 
SI. Gratuity to Edith L. Downing, Salem, for table 

cover. 
.50. Gratuity to Edith L. Downing, Salem, for 2 doilies. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss S. E. Austin, Salem, for centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss S. E. Austin, Salem, for Mexican 

work. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss S. E. Austin, Salem, for Mexican 

work. 
.50. Gratuity to Marion Brown, Lynn, for undervests. 
.50. Gratuity to E. L. Orne, Peabody, for Battenburg 

jacket. 
$2. Gratuity to Mary Sias, Salem, for sideboard scarf. 
il. Gratuity to Lillian E. Story, Essex, for sideboard 

scarf. 
il. Gratuity to Lillian E. Story, Essex, for centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity to Lillian E. Story, Essex, for handkerchief. 
.50. Gratuity to Lillian E. Story, Essex, for tray cloth. 
.50. Giatuity to Lillian E. Story, Essex, for towel. 
.50. Gratuity to Lillian E. Story, Essex, for pillow case. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. T. F. Heath, Lynn, for handker- 
chief. 



64 

^0. Gratuity to Mrs. T. F. Heath, Lynn, for handker- 
chief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. M. Frost, Lynn, for handker- 
chief border. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Julia Cain, Lynn, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Lillj' Reynolds, Salem, for em- 
broidered frame. 

.50. Gratuity to Edith Brown, Salem, for Honiton collar. 

.50. Gratviity to Maggie Murray, Feabody, for center- 
piece. 
Mrs. John Barker, Mrs. Charles Poor, Adeline A. Little 

— Committee. 



WORKS OF ART AND OIL PAINTINGS. 

$1. Gratuity to E. C. Larrabee, Salem, for inlaid picture. 
12. Gratuity to E. C. Larrabee, Salem, for inlaid wood. 
i2. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Dan vers, for oil paintings. 
$1. Gratuity to Bess Blossom, Salem, for water colors. 
il. Gratuity to A. N. Dickey, Danvers, for water colors- 
fL Gratuity to Mrs. A. H, Manchester, Lynn, for oil 

painting. 
$2. Gratuity to Mrs. L. A. Morse, Salem, for water color. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. A. Morse, Salem, for Avater color. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. A. Morse, Salem, for water color. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. A. Morse, Salem, for water color. 
$2. Gratuity to H. M. Gonzales, Peabody, for water 

color. 
$1. Gratuity to H. M. Gonzales, Peabody, for water 

color. 
f2. Gratuity to Mrs. George Riddle, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 
Gratuity to Miss Alice Trask, Peabody, for water 

color. 



|1. Gratuity to Miss Alice Trask, Peabody, for water 
color. 

fl. Gratuity to Miss Alice Trask, Peabody, for water 
color. 

$2. Gratuity to Alice C. Morse, Andover, for water color. 

$1. Gratuity to Alice C. Morse, Andover, for water color. 

$2. Gratuity to Alice C. Morse, Andover, for miniature. 

$2. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Hale, Salem, for oil paint- 
ing. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Hale, Salem, for oil paint- 

$2. Gratuity to Eugenia Bennett, Lynn, for oil painting. 
$2. Gratuit}' to Eugenia Bennett, Lynn, for oil painting. 
$1. Gratuity to Eugenia Bennett, Lynn, for oil painting 
Mrs. D. P. Grosvenor, Miss Rose Plaisted, for the Com- 
mittee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

$2. Gratuity to Mrs. Manchester, Lynn, for fish marine 

view. 
SI. Gratuity to Mrs. Manchester, Lynn, for berry set. 
13. Second premium to Mrs. J. H. Symonds, Peabody, 

for collection china. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. J. H. Symonds, Peabody, 

for raised paste and gold plate. 
il. Gratuity to Mrs. J. H. Symonds, Peabody, for speci- 
men tea set. 
•12. First premium to Mrs. J. H. Symonds, Peabody, for 

vase. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, 

for jardiniere. 
/ $2. First premium to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, 

for plate. 



66 



$5. First premium to Miss Gertrude Copp, Lawience, 

for collection china. 
$2. First premium to Miss Gertrude Copp, Lawrence, 

for punch bowl. 
$1. Second premium to Miss Gertrude Copp, Lawrence, 

for vase. 
•$1. Second premium to Alice C. Morse, Andover, for 

jardiniere. 
il. Gratuity to Alice C. Morse, Andover. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. E. R. Bradford, Peabody, for vase. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. E. R. Bradford, Peabody, for cracker 

jar. 
•f 1. Gratuityto Mrs. E. R. Bradford, Peabody, for rose set. 

N. G. Kimball, E. A. Merrill, Harriet E. Pingree — 
Co77imittee. 



CHARCOAL WORK. 

.50. Gratuity to Lizzie Preston, Beverly Farms, for pen 

and ink work. 
il. Gratuity to Walter Stiles, Middleton, for pen and 

ink work. 
.50. Gratuit}^ to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for pen and ink 

work. 
.50. Gratuity to S. E. Potter, Marblehead, for wash 

drawing. 
il. Gratuity to Geo. A. Chandler, Salem, for photo- 
graphs. 
il. Gratuity to Elmer J. Gauss, Salem, for photographs. 
il. Gratuity to E. F. Turner, Salem, for architectural 

drawings. 
$2. Gratuity to P. S. Graves, Salem, for photographs. 
.50. Gratuity to Marjorie Woodbury, Beverly, for pen 

and ink work. 



67 

$2. Gratuity to Edith Robs, Peabody, for Japanese haad 

painting. 
-fl. Gratuity to Clara R. Cruffs, Marblehead, for pen and 

ink work. 
•oO. Gratuity to Clara R. Cruffs, Marblehead, for char- 
coal work. 
.50. Gratuity to Clara R. Cruffs, Marblehead, for char- 
coal work. 
$i. Gratuity to Ida B. Farnham, Peabody, for photos. 
fl. Giatuity to Ethelyn M. Mooney, Salem, for photos^ 
.f 2. Gratuity to C. E. Bradford, Peabody, for pyrography, 
.50. Gratuity to C. E. Bradford, Peabody, for plaque. 
.50. Gratuity to C. E. Bradford, Peabody, for collar box. 
Mrs. Isaac C. Day, Harriet F. Tenney, Sarah F. Frank- 
lin, E. M. Bateman — Committee. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

.50. To Marjorie Woodman, Beverly, doilies. 

.35. To Mary C. Powers, Salem, centerpiece. 

.25. To Annie W. Clark, Beverly, outline work. 

.25. To Bessie Newhall, Peabody, sofa pillow. 

.25. To Ethel Leach, Peabody, shawl. 

.25. To Alva Trask, Peabody, drawings. 

.25. To Ruby Page, Peabody, tray cloth. 

.25. To Ralph Page, Peabody, tray cloth. 

.25. To Eleanor Fr3'e, Peabody, drawing. 

.25. To Kate Kuhen, Peabody. 

$1. To Winnifred Merrill, Peabody, bread and cake. 

$1. To No. 6, 3 doilies. 

.40. To No. 8, table cloth. 

Mrs. J. W. Hudson, Mary A. Noyes — Committee. 



68 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON ROOT CROPS. 

The Committee on Root Crops make the following re- 
port : — 
To John H. George of Methuen, for his crop of 

onions, the first premium of $8 00 

To Daniel A. Carleton of No. Andover, for his crop 

of cabbages, the first premium of $8 00 

To Alvin Smith of Hamilton, for his crop of ruta 

baga turnips, the second premium of 15 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. B. Fellows, 
Frank Perkins, 

For the Committee. 

STATEMENT OF DANIEL A. CARLETON. 

To the Committee on Root Crops : 

G-entlemen : — The half acre of cabbages entered by me 
for premium were grown on land that had been in grass 
the past eight years. Twenty loads of cow manure per 
acre were spread on the sod last spring, and ploughed un- 
der about six inches deep. The ground was then har- 
rowed, and shallow furrows made three and a half feet 
apart. A half ton per acre of Cumberland superphosphate 
was strewn in the furrows and slightly covered. Three- 
fourths of a pound per acre of Deep Head Brunswick 
cabbage was sown in the furrows by machine. The seed 
coming up in narrow, straight rows, made the work of 
hoeing much less than it would have been had the seed 
been scattered by hand, as the field was filled with witch 
grass. The piece was cultivated and hoed three times. 
There are upon the half acre forty rows, averaging 115 
good sized, solid heads of cabbages, or 9200 cabbages per 
acre, standing about one and one-half feet apart in the 
rows. I call them worth three cents per head in the field 



69 

at the present time. I shall cut the heads off and remove 
them to the south side of a fence, setting stump down on 
the grass one deep, and cover with hay or leaves, and hold 
for higher price, feeding all cracked ones to cows. There 
is no crop better for making milk than cabbage, and if 
fed right after milking, there is no danger of affecting the 
taste of the milk. 

The cost of the crop per acre I make as follows : — 

Plowing and preparing land, ilO 00 

Seed and sowing, 3 00 

Cultivating and hoeing, 25 00 

20 loads manure, 40 00 

One-half ton superphosphate, 15 00 







193 00 


Cr. 






By 9200 cabbages, at 3 cts., 




$276 00 


Profit per acre. 


$183 00 


On half acre, 




91 50 


Respectfully submitted, 






Daniel 


A. 


Carleton 


No. Andover, Oct. 30, 1901. 







STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF ONIONS RAISED BY 
JOHN H. GEORGE, IN THE TOWN OF METHUEN, 1901. 

The crop of 1900 was potatoes. The manure used waS' 
four cords stable manure and one ton fertilizer per acre^ 
The soil is peat meadow. For the onion crop the land was 
prepared by ploughing in in the fall of four cords horsa 
manure mixed with night soil. The seed was yellow 
globe Danvers sowed six pounds per acre, sowed the 19th! 
of April. They were hoed four times, weeded three 
times, harvested by being cut out with wheel hoe, picked 
up into crates, and housed. 



The cost of the crop was eighty-two dollars for the 
half acre- The yield was three hundred and twenty 
bushels for the half acre, worth at the present time one 
dollar per bushel. 

Cost per acre, -f 164 00 

Yield per acre, 640 bush., 640 00 

Profit per acre, 476 00 

Or on the half acre, 238 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 
Methuen, Oct. 30, 1901. 

I hereby certify that I have measured the land on which 

the crop of onions which are offered for premium grew, 

and it contains one-half acre. 

Frank W. Gp:orge. 

statement of alvin smith. 

Dear Sir — The turnip field you looked at last week 
gave 204 bushels. It was tillage land, and was seeded 
down in 1889. I ploughed June 28th. Used four cords 
of stable manure in the drill. I sowed one pound of 
Shamrock July 2d in rows three and one-half feet apart. 
The financial statement is as follows : — 

Ploughing and harrowing, $5 00 

Four cords of manure, 20 00 

Seed and planting, 2 50 

Labor cultivating, 2 00 

Labor harvesting, 10 00 

Interest and tax on land, 2 00 



204 bushels turnips, at 50c. per bush.. 


141 50 

102 00 

41 50 


Profit on one-half acre, #60 50 

Respectfully, 

Alvin Smith. 
Wenham Depot, Mass. 



71 
REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SMALL FRUITS. 

Your committee received two entries of small fruits — 
one entiy of raspberries from Mr. John C. Day of Haver- 
hill, the otlier a crop of strawberries from Mr. Oscar 
Gowen of West Newbury. Mr. Day's raspberries showed 
an excellent growth of cane and berries, but he was de- 
prived some afterwards of picking on account of excessive 
rains so softening the berries that they were not market- 
able and dropped from the bushes. Mr. Day judges he 
would have had over six hundred boxes if it had not been 
for the excessive lains. 

The committee award him the first premium of $S. 

The committee visited Mr. Gowen's strawberries June 
21. The heat was almost unendurable, and the berries 
were very soft. We found a very even and thrifty growth 
of vines, the berries were large, sweet, and well shaped, 
but ripening very slowly, but there were plenty of green 
berries to follow. One ver}^ noticeable feature of the bed 
was the absence of weeds. Your Committee cheerfully 
recommend Mr. Gowen the first premium of $8. 

Edwin Bates, George M. Roundy — Oommittee. 



STATEMENT OF STRAWBERRIES GROWN BY OSCAR 
GOWEN OF WEST NEWBURY. 

The piece of land which I enter for premium contains 
125 rods, is a dark loam, clay subsoil. In 1899 was 
ploughed sod land and planted to cabbage, six cords of 
barnyard manure to the acre. In 1900 was manured at 
the late of eight cords to the acre and set to strawber- 
ries. 



72 



Cost of cultivating and marketing : — 




Setting plants, 


i2 00 


One-half dressing left, 


25 00 


Hoeing, 


12 00 


Covering, 


5 00 


3000 baskets, picking and marketing. 


105 00 




•fl49 20 


Cost per acre. 


190 98 


Receipts, 


422 40 


Profit, 


1331 42 


Respectfully, 






0. GOWEN 



West Newbury, Aug. 19, 1901. 
I certify that the land on which the crop of strawber- 
ries grew, entered for premium by Oscar Gowen, contains 
one hundred and twenty-five rods. 

Wm. Mekrill. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON GRAIN CROPS. 

To the Secretary of the Essex Agricultural Society : 

The Committee on Grain Crops report but two entries 
one of English hay, by Dr. M. L. Chamberlain of North 
Beverly, which was viewed by the committee June 29th. 
It was a very fine lot of grass, and we recommend that 
Mr. Chamberlain have the first premium of seven dollars. 

The second, of Indian corn, by Richard Jaques of 
Newbury, which was viewed by the committee Sept. 20th, 
was a fair crop, and we recommend that Mr. Jaques 
have the second premium of four dollars. 

Daniel D. Adams, J. A. Lamson, C. D. Ordway — Com- 
mittee. 



73 



STATEMENT. 

The crop grown in 1899 was Indian corn, in 1900 swee 
corn. Was manured with fertilizer in the hills, which 
are four feet apart each way. A horse, with cultivator, 
performed all the labor, no hoe being used. 

Reckoning 70 lbs. on the cob, equal to 

bush, shelled corn, there are 51 bush., 

at 70c., 135 70 

Stalks and husks, 15 00 







150 70 


Cost of ploughing and harrowing, 


5 00 




" " fertilizer, 


4 50 




" " seed, 


25 




'* " cultivation. 


4 GO 




" " harvesting, 


6 75 


$20 50 




$30 20 


Respectfully submitted. 








R. Jaques. 



Newburyport, Mass., Oct. 24, 1901. 

Mr. Richard Jaques. 

Dear Sir : — This is to certify that I have measured the 
patch of corn on the hill near the cemetery, and find that 
it contains one acre three rods and one hundred and 
twenty feet (1 acre 3 rods and 120 feet). 

Yours truly, 

John M. Bailey, Supt. Cem. 

STATEMENT OF M. L. CHAMBERLAIN. 

North Beverly, Mass., Aug. 18, 1901. 
D. D. Adams, Esq,, Ohairman Crop Committee, Neivhuryy 
Mass. 
Dear Sir : — I herewith give statement regarding hay 



74 

crop entered for premium. Ground was seeded to grass 
six years ago, by Mr. N. P." Proctor, owner of the farm at 
that time. Mr. Proctor informs me that before or after 
seeding no manure or commercial fertilizers were put on 
the land, in fact this particular lot was treated the worst 
of any he owned. Since purchasing the farm the land in 
question received no manure or fertilizer until the cur- 
rent year. In the month of April I had sown the follow- 
yig mixture of chemicals, six hundred pounds to the 
acre : Nitrate of soda, bone black, and muriate of potash. 
Grass was cut July 11, thoroughly dried, and put in the 
barn July 13. . Cost of harvesting the crop, including 
chemicals used, you will note as follows : 

Cost of chemicals, $8 27 

Applying chemicals, 50 

Harvesting the crop, - 5 00 

fl3 77 

Weight of hay, 13,575 lbs. — 6 tons, 1575 lbs. Valuing 
the crop stored in the barn at i20 per ton, amounts to 
il35.75. Deducting the cost of chemicals, harvesting, 
etc., leaves a balance of $121.98 for one acre. 
Yours very truly, 

M. L. Chamberlain, Competitor. 

Per R. M. Handy, Mgr. 



REPORT ON ESSAYS AND REPORTS. 

The Committee on Essays and Reports received two 

essays and one report and make the following awards. 

To Annie L. Rogers, West Newbury, for essay, second 

premium of $S 

To Dr. J. W. Goodell, Lynn, for committee's report on 

apples, second premium of 16 

N. M. Hawkes, J. M. Danforth, /or the Committee. 



WHAT IS THE IJEST PAYING CROP ON THE 

FARM? 

VVliose farm? Not yours, which may be of the stuff of 
wliich garden sass is made. Not your neighbor's, whose 
orchard land is the envy of the pas'ser-by ; nor yet the 
corn hind, nor the onion land, nor the berry land. Because 
the wise farmer learns on each of these farms what is his 
sure crop, and then keeps within his limitations. 

But the best crop for the average farmer, on the com- 
posite faim ? 

What is the crop that does not call for 3'ear8 of waiting, 
nor a fortune in starting ? What is the crop that is prac- 
tically independent of drouth or flood, early or late sea- 
sons, sandy or heavy soil, grass shortage, or orchard fail- 
ure ? Only one crop is sure in spite of these and a score 
of other vicissitudes of climate, market, or hired lielp. 
And this crop is poultry. 

Poultry pays I It even pays with slovenly methods ; 
but with care, system and perseverance, it is the crop of 
all others that never wholly fails, that pays dividends 
every year, and every month in the year. 

Drouths may threaten and materialize, but there is 
always water enough for the poultr}', if the keeper will 
but keep it ever in the pen, clean and fresh. Late springs 
retard, but never ruin ; early frosts nip, but not the well- 
housed pullets. 

There is never an over-production one year and barren- 
ness two years following. Potato rot and canker worm 
sound but as echoes to the poultry keeper. The pastures 
dry up and the maggot eats the onions; but surely and 
steadily the chicken crop comes to maturity, and the egg 
basket is filled, if the farmer attends to them. 

No royal road leads to success, and luck never chases 
after the man who turns his chicks loose in the summer 



76 

and expects them to wax fat on caterpillars and grass- 
hoppers. But patience, perseverance and pluck, added to 
hard work and common sense, will make a flock of poultry 
a joy to the owner, and fill his pocket-book beside. 

A few hens are best to start with. If one fails it is 
less expensive, and a season of success is worth dollars for 
future use. A profit of one dollar per hen is the least one 
should expect, fand a dollar and a quarter is a fair average. 

Last year I!made fl.oO per hen, which was better than 
usual, and probably due to a fine laying strain of Reds 
which I had just got into working order. The pullets 
began laying in October, and kept everlastingly at it till 
mid-summer. 

Hens must be fed first-class food, regardless of price. 
If one wants eggs he must feed for eggs from the shell. 
He must also feed regularly three times a day the year 
round. He must water regularly, keep the fowls as clean 
as possible, give green stuff when nature cannot supply it, 
animal meal nearly all the year, unless the range is laige, 
and oyster shells at all seasons. This is by no means 
pampering your poultry ; it is only the necessary sowing 
and cultivating for a successful harvest. 

I aim to keep my stock clean and healthy, without in- 
breeding for fine points, which so often means weakness, 
and disease. And from this stock I get healthy chicks 
hatched by the old-fashioned hen incubator. The chicks 
also are fed on the best growing and egg-building stuff the 
market affords. 

The farmer's wagon may not be hitched to a star, but 
he must throw a halter toward the egg basket if he ex- 
pects to make money with hens, and the care of the small- 
est chicks may mean future failure or success. 

An outlay of flOO in buildings and fencings and 150 in 
stock will bring in greater returns the first year and every 
year following than the same amount of money invested 



11 

ill almost any other farm scheme, because of its practical 
freedom from the ahead}' mentioned drawbacks of all 
other crops. 

It is a money crop, because there is always a fair de- 
mand for Q^^^ and poultry at a fair price. Indeed, there 
is an excellent market for eggs in November and Decem- 
ber at an unfair price — or so it seems to the buyer. And 
when one has learned to get a good q^^ yield in these 
months, he is not lucky, but capable. 

Sam Walter Foss amusingly depicts the man who has 
the hen fever, and who finally mortgages his farm to allay 
it. But prize-winners and fancy stock only made it burn 
the fiercer, and he died and left behind only the hens to 
scratch on his grave. 

Personally I do not advocate fancy poultry, unless one 
keeps hens for fun, and owns B. and M. stock. True, a 
few people make it profitable, but where one succeeds, 
twenty do not. But a flock of plain, common-sense hens, 
thoroughbred, if you will, but surely bred from healthy, 
fine-laying stock, raised for profit and kept for profit, with 
the same care, methods and treatment accorded any other 
farm crop, is, I am assured, the crop of all others for the 
discouraged farmer, who is yet hunting for the money 
crop to suit his farm. 

Annie L. Rogers. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TREADWELL 

FARM. 

Crops grown upon the farm this year are 17 tons of 
English hay, 10 tons of meadow hay, 10 tons of bedding 
hay, 5 tons of Japan millet, 10 tons of Hungarian millet, 
2 tons of oat fodder, 1 1-2 tons of lowen, 360 bushels po- 
tatoes, 8 bbls. squash, 5 bbls. apples. 



The silo was filled with about seventy tons of corn and 
Japan millet. From twenty to twenty-five cans of milk 
have been produced per day for the year. 

The experiment for this year has been interesting and 
valuable. The object of it was to show the practicability 
and profit of the use of commercial fertilizers in compari- 
son with common barn manure in the usual practice of the 
average farmer. 

The experiment consisted of an acre of potatoes. On 
one half was used one-half ton of Swift's high grade po- 
tato fertilizer, and on the other half was applied three 
and one-half cords of common barn manure, both sup- 
posed to be of about equal commercial value when spread 
on the land, all other conditions being the same. 

The part on which the fertilizer was used produced 137 
bush, marketable potatoes, of much superior quality to 
those grown on the manure, and 9 bush, second size, with 
7 bush, of small ones. The part where the manure was 
used produced 89 bush, marketable potatoes, 22 bush, 
second size, and 18 bush, small ones. The one, 154 bush, 
total ; the other, 129 bushels total, of much less value. 

This experiment, while not conducted with the exact 
precision, perhaps, as might be at our experiment station, 
yet sufficiently so to show that commercial fertilizers may 
be used with decided profit and advantage on the usual 
farm crops over that of barn manure. But, notwithstand- 
ing which, your committee would caution farmers against 
neglecting to make and save all the manure possible on 
the farm. We note with pleasure the general thrift and 
good conduct of the farm by Mr. Bradstreet. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin P. Ware, 

For the Committee. 



79 

REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have been nine new members added to the So- 
ciety since the last annual report, eight of whom became 
members by receiving premiums of seven dollars and up- 
wards, according to the rules of the Society, from different 
cities and towns, as follows : — 

Beverly, 2 North Andover, 2 

Danvers, 1 Peabody, 2 

Lynn, 1 Wenham, 1 



INSTITUTES. 

The Society held four Institutes the past year, on as 
many different days, both forenoon and afternoon, at 
which the following subjects were discussed by any of the 
audience who desired. 

The first Institute was held in City Hall, Beverly, Jan. 
11, the subject for the forenoon being " Small Fruits." 
Afternoon, " The Educational Value in Horticulture,'' by 
Prof. Fred W. Card of Kingston, R. I. The second In- 
stitute was held in Grange Hall, Andover, Feb. 1, subject 
for foi-enoon being " Farming Under Glass — Raising of 
Cucumbers, Lettuce and Tomatoes Under Glass." After- 
noon, "The Changes which have taken place in our 
Massachusetts soils, and their effect upon plant growth,' 
by Prof. George E. Stone of Amherst. 

The third Institute was held at Newbury Feb. 21, the 
subject for the forenoon being, " The Outlook for Com- 
mercial Fruit Growing in New England." Afternoon, 
" Orcharding for the Hill Farms of New England,'' by 
Mr. John W. Clark of North Hadley. 

The fourth Institute was held at Salem, March 15, the 
speaker being Hon. Benjamin P. Ware of Marblehead, 
both in the forenoon and afternoon, giving his " Observa- 
tions Abroad," as seen by him in his travels in foreign 
countries during the past year. 



8o 



REPORT ON THE ESSEX AGRICULTURAL 
SOCIETY, AT PEABODY, 1901. 

To the Board of Agriculture : — 

The Essex Agricultural Society held its eighty-first an- 
nual fair in Peabody, Sept. 17th, 18th and 20th. The 
programme for Thursday was continued to Friday. The 
fair was held under great disadvantages. Thursday being 
the day of the funeral of President McKinley and the other 
days of the fair being cloudy or rainy, it made it very dis- 
couraging to the officers and members of the Society hold- 
ing the fair under those circumstances. However, there 
was a most excellent exhibition on the grounds and in the 
Town Hall. 

The grounds of the Society are well adapted for cattle- 
show purposes, with a fine set of buildings to house the 
stock of every description, and a good quarter-mile track 
to test the speed of the horses. 

It would seem that the Essex Society is surely a pros- 
perous and up-to-date society in all that pertains to agri- 
cultural fairs. 

There was a good showing of cattle, all the stalls being 
filled with well-fed, fine-looking animals. 

Among the largest exhibitors were J. C. Poor of North 
Andover, who exhibited a herd of Holsteins, Dr. M. L. 
Chamberlain, with Jerseys, and J. C. Evans, with a string 
of Hereford oxen. 

The other breeds were well represented by some fine 
-animals. 

The exhibition of horses was very good, some well-bred 
trotting stock being shown. 

The poultry display was large and many birds of supe- 
rior merit were among the exhibit. Also in the building 
were Belgian hares, guinea pigs, rabbits, dogs, and other 
pets. 



8i 



The big tent was well filled with wagons, ploughs and 
other agricultural implements. There was a vaudeville 
show in front of the grand stand. It was said they gave 
a good perfoimance whenever the weather permitted. 

Aftei- looking over the exhibition on the grounds your 
delegate visited the Town Hall and found a large display 
of flowers, palms and potted plants, a remarkably good 
showing of apples and other fruits for the off year, and a 
creditable showing of vegetables containing all the differ- 
ent varieties. 

The household display was as good as usual. The quilts, 
rugs and mats, needle-work, embroidery, etc., illustrated 
what industrious and skilled hands will do. 

The exhibition in all its several departments was of high 
merit, was well arranged and deserved good weather and 
a large attendance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. Lewis Ellsworth, Inspector. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



The following is a list of members deceased, as returned 
to the Secretary, not heretofore reported. 

Burnham, S. A., Gloucester. Patch, Abraham, Danvers. 
Brown, Wm. A., Hamilton. Poole, Story D., Rockport. 
Bray, Humphrey, Rockport. Potter, William, Salem. 
Connelly, Stephen, Beverly. Phillips, Willard P., Salem. 
Dodge, George B., Wenham. Putnam, C. O., Hamilton. 
Dodge, Robert F., Wenham. Ricker, Richard W., Glouces- 
Frye, Charles C, Lynn. ter. 

Herrick, Gardner W., Glou- Richardson, James, Danvers. 
cester. Rogers, John S., Gloucester. 



82 



Junkins, Geo. S., Lawrence. Stanwood, Barnard, Glouces- 
Little, Nathaniel, Jr., New- ter. 

bury. Streeter, Gilbert L., Salem. 

Lackey, Andrew, Haverhill. Sturgiss, Russell, Manches- 
Lee, Allen, Manchester. ter. 

Lucy, Gideon R., Newbury. Sears, John A., Danvers. 
Morgan, Wm. B., Wenham. Taylor, George W.,Peabody. 
Moseley, Edw. A., Newbury- Tapley, George, Danvers. 

port. Webster, Nathaniel, Glouces- 

Marsh, S. E., Lynn. ter. 

Noyes, Edwin P., Newbury. Wetherill, M. L., Gloucester. 
Perkins, Wra. W., Newbury. White, Henry A., Danvers. 



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CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, 



Article 1.. There shall be a President, four Vice Pres- 
idents, a Secretary and a Treasurer, who shall be Trus- 
tees, ex-offi,cio, and one Trustee from each city and town 
in the county. The President, Vice Presidents, Secretary 
and one Trustee from each city and town in the county 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer by the Trustees annually at their meeting in 
November. Nominations for Trustees may be made by 
any member or members of the Society from the city or 
town from which he is to be elected for at least one week 
before said meeting to the Secretary, and he shall prepare 
ballots for the same. 

Akt. 2. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the So- 
ciety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at 
which all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at 
least shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the Trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Presidents shall be absent, 
the members present may appoint one from among them 
to preside at such meeting. 

Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting of the Society ; or whenever a 



85 

written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 
shall be made by any twelve members of the Society to 
the President and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon ; seven of whom, with the presiding officer, shall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The Trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society during the intervals of its meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the public, 
publish such communications, and offer such premiums in 
such form and value as they think proper (provided the pre- 
miums offered do not exceed the funds of the Society); and 
shall lay before the Society at each of its meetings a 
statement of their proceedings and of the communications 
made to them. 

Art. 7. The Secretary shall take minutes of all the 
votes and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books ; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustees shall direct. He 
shall write and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which shall be lodged with the Secretary, who shall make 
a fair record thereof. The Treasurer shall from time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have orders for from 
the Trustees; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, render a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of his duty in such 
sum as the Trustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 

Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed annually by 
the Trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 



86 

report to the Society ; and the same being accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretary in his books. 

Art. 10. In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary or of the 
Treasurer, the Trustees shall take charge of the official 
books, papers, and other effects belonging to the office 
that may be vacated, and give receipts for the same, 
which books, papers, etc., they may deliver to some person 
whom they may appoint to fill the office until the next 
meeting of the Society, at which time there shall be a new 
choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society by paying the sum of three dol- 
lars to inciease the permanent fund of the institution. 

Art. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture 
of our county, the same to be sacredly appropriated to 
that purpose. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the gospel who 
reside within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past Presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a mem- 
ber at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the ac- 
tion at the next annual meeting of the Society. 



•Members will receive from the Secretary a " certificate of membership." No 
tines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are entitled to vote in all its 
transactions, with free use of the Library and a copy of the printed " Transac- 
tions " each year. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

FOR I90J-I902. 



PRESIDENT. 

P^RANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead. 
HORATIO G. HERRICK, of Lawrence. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
SHERMAN NELSON, of Georgetown. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER. 

WILLIAM S. NICHOLS, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

BENJAMIN P. WARE, of Marblehead. 
OLIVER S. BUTLER, of Georgetown. 
GEORGE V. L. MEYER, of Hamilton. 



88 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TRUSTEES. 



J. P. Tattle, Amasbury John W. Shirley, Methuen 

Charles C. Blunt, Andover Geo. A. Currier, Middleton 
John W. Lovett, Beverly James H. Beal, Nahant 
Henry M. Killam, Boxford Frank Perkins, Newbury 
Alvah J. Bradstreet,Danvers B. F. Stanley, Newburyport 
Edward K. Lee, Essex Winfield S. Hughes, No. An- 

Samuel T. Poor, Georgetown dover 
Geo. M. Wonson, Gloucester N. M. Quint, Peabody 
Sam'l B. George, Groveland John J. Manning, Rockport 
Wm. Messervy, Hamilton Willard P. Smith, Rowley 
ArthurG.Whittier, Haverhill Charles Sanders, Salem 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich J. Q. Evans, Salisbury 
S. S. Lewis, Lawrence Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 

Edwin Bates, Lynn Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield Edw. E. Ferguson, Topsfield 
John H. Cheever,Manchester J. Kavanagh, Wenham 
Amos T. Alley, Marblehead J. R. Gordon, West Newbury 
Geo. W. Sargent, Merrimac 



List of Premiums Awarded igoi. 



FAT CATTLE. 



J. C. Evans, Amesbury, fat oxen, first premium, $8 00 
Daniel A. Carlton, No. Anclover, fat oxen, second 

premium, 6 00 

Lewis Brown, Peabody, fat cow, first premium, 6 00 

Lewis Brown, Peabody, fat cow, second premium, 4 00 

BULLS. 

Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Guernsey, first pre- 
mium, 6 00 
Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Jersey, first pre- 
mium, 6 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, second premium,4 00 
Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, Holstein, first premium, 6 00 
Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, Guernsey, first premium, 3 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first pre- 
mium, 12 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 3 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, 3 00 
George E. Kunhardt, No. Andover, Jersey, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 
Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, Ayrshire, first premium, 4 00 
John E. Herrick, Peabody, Swiss, first premium, 6 00 
H. W. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford, first premium, 3 00 
J. C. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford, second premium, 3 00 



90 



MILCH COWS. 

James C. Poor, No. Aiidover,Holstein,fiistpreinium,f8 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium,! 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 7 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andovor, Holstpin, second pre- 
mium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Grade Holstein, first 

premium, 7 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Grade Jersey, first pre- 
mium, 7 00 
Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Guernsey, second 

premium, 5 00 

Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Guernsey, first pre- 
mium, 7 00 
Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Guernsey, second 

premium, 4 00 

Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Jersey, first pre- 
mium, 7 00 
Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Ayrshire, first pre- 
mium, 7 00 
Harry B. Graves, Peabody, Grade Guernsey, first 

premium, 7 00 

Samuel Buxton, Peabody, Grade Jersey, second pre- 
mium, 4 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, second premium,4 00 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, 5 Holstein cows, first 

premium, 10 00 

James C Poor, No. Andover, 5 grade cows, second 

premium, 8 00 

HEIFERS. 

Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Guernsey, first prem., 4 00 
Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Guernsey, first prem., 5 00 



91 

Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Guernsey, second 

premium, $2 00 

Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Jersey, first prem., 5 00 
Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Jersey, second prem., 2 00 
Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Jersey, first prem., 4 00 
Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Jersey, first prem., -i 00 
■George E. Kunhardt, No. Andover, Jersey, first prem., 4 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, second premium, 2 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, second premium, 2 00 
Frank W. Stanley, Peabody, Guernsey, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 5 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second prem., 3 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second prem., 2 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second prem., 2 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, second 

premium, 3 00 

Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, grade Jersey, first prem., 4 00 
Frank W. Stanley, Peabody, grade Jersey, second 

premium, 2 00 

Oeorge H. Burns, Peabody, grade Holstein, first prem.,4 00 
L. J. Bordeaux, Danvers, grade Jersey, second prem., 2 00 
W. B.Verry, Danvers, grade Ayrshire, second prem., 2 00 
George A. Collins, Salem, grade Jersey, first prem., 4 00 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

H. W. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford, oxen, first prem., 8 00 

J. C. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford oxen, second prem., 6 00 
J. C. Evans, Amesbury, collection cattle, special 

premium, 10 GO 

Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, Holstein steers, first 

premium, 6 00 



92 



STEERS. 

H. W, Evans, Amesbury, grade Hereford, [iistprem.,f 5 00 
J. C, Evans, Amesbury, grade Hereford, first prem., 4 00 
J. C. Evans, Amesbury, grade Hereford, second prem., 3 00 
F. O. Kimball, Danvers, Holstein, second premium, 2 00 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

W. G. Horton, Ipswich, stallion "Fritz," first prem., 8 00 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING. 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, stallion " Midnight," first 

premium, 8 00 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, stallion " Alex. McGreggor," 

second premium, 5 00 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT. 

Wra. Messervy, Hamilton, roan mare, first premium, 8 00 

BROOD MARES FOR DRIVING. 

W. G. Horton, Ipswich, mare " Empress," first prem., 8 00 
W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, mare " Hera," second prem., 5 OO 

FAMILY HORSES. 

H. H. Demsey, Wenham, first premium, 6 00' 

Sidney F. Swinerton, Danvers, second premium, 4 00 

gents' driving HORSES. 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, pair mares, first premium, 15 00 
C. B. Cole, Wenham, pair mares, second premium, 10 00 
James O. Perry, Danvers, single horse, first prem., 12 00 
A. B. Forbes, Newbury, single horse, second prem., 9 00 

ladies' driving HORSES. 

Mrs. Richard Newell, West Newbury, first premium, 6 00 



93 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 



Benjamin P, Ware, Maiblehead, first premium, 
W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, second premium, 



SrNGLE FARM HORSES. 



$5 


00 


3 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


8 


00 


5 


00 



Benj. W. Farnham, No. Andover, first premium, 
John S. Gates, Danvers, first premium, 

PAIRS FARM HORSES. 

W. A. Russell, No. Andover, first premium, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, second premium, 

COLTS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

L. J. Bordeaux, Danvers, first premium, 6 00 

COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

-Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, first premium, 
W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, first premium, 
W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, first premium, 

HURDLE JUMPING. 

Myopia Hunt Club, Hamilton, first premium 

Myopia Hunt Club, Hamilton, second premium, 

G. S. Mansell, Hamilton, first piemium, 

Mrs. Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, second premium, 4 00 

SWINE, LARGE BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, gi-ade Berhshire sow, second 

premium, 3 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester white boar, second prem, 3 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester white sow and pigs, 

second premium, 3 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester weaned pigs, first prem., 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, O. I. C. W. sow and pigs, first 

premium, 5 00 



6 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 


6 


00 



94 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, first premium, $5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire sow and pigs, first 

premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire weaned pigs, first 

premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Cheshire boar, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Cheshire sow and pigs, first 

premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Cheshire weaned pigs, first 

premium, 5 00 

Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, O. I. C. boar, first prem., 5 00 
Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, O. I. weaned pigs, first 

premium, 5 00 

Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, grade boar, first prem., 5 00 
J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, Berkshire boar, first 

premium, 5 00 

J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, Berkshire sow, second 

premium, 3 00 

J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, grade sow and pigs first 

premium, 5 00 

J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, Yorkshire sow, first 

premium, 5 00 

J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, Chester sow, first prem., 5 00 
J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, grade sow, first prem., 5 00 
J. T. Cooper & Co., Peabody, Jersey Red pigs, first 

premium, 5 00 

J. T. Cooper &, Co., Peabody, Berkshire boar, second 

premium, 3 00 

J. T. Cooper & Co., Peabody, Berkshire sow, first 

premium, 5 00 

Thomas Mannix, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, second 

premium, 3 00 

Frank Perkins, Newbury, grade sow and pigs, second 

premium, 3 00 



95 



SWINE, SMALL BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, medium sow and pigs, first 

premium, $5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, medium weaned pigs, first prem., 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire sow and pigs, second 

premium, 3 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, weaned pigs, second premium, 3 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, sow and pigs, second premium, 3 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, grade boar, first premium, 5 00 



SHEEP. 

W. W. Phillips, Lynnfield, buck, first premium, 5 00 

W. W. Phillips, Lynnfield, grade ewes, second prem., 3 00 

OTHER AWARDS. 

Awarded by Committee on Poultry, 270 00 

" Agricultur'l Imp'ments, 59 00 
" Carriages, 25 00 

" Grange Exhibit, 25 00 

" Bread and Canned Fruit 21 00 
" Pears, 39 00 

" Apples, 52 50 

" Peaches, Grapes, etc., 71 50 
" Plants and Flowers, 93 00 
^' " " Vegetables, 131 50 

" Grain and Seed, 15 00 

" Counterpanes and Afgh. 24 75 
" Carpets and Rugs, 19 50 

" Manufs. from Leather, 16 00 
»' " " " Manufs. and Gen. Mdse. 10 50 

" Fancy Work, 51 00 

" Art Work, 79 00 

" Work by Children, 5 25 



ii 



RECAPITULATION. 





FARM STOCK. 




Awarded for Fat Cattle, 


124 00 




" Bulls, 


67 00 




' " Milch Cows, 


85 00 




' " Herds of Milch Cows, 


18 00 




' " Heifers, 


84 00 




' " Working Oxen and steers. 


30 00 




' " Steers, 


14 00 




' " Horses, 


177 00 




' " Swine, 


140 00 




" Sheep, 


8 00 




" Poultry, 


270 00 


FIELD AND EXPERIMENTAL 


CROPS. 


Awarded for Root Crops, 


21 00 


" " Fruit Crops, 


16 00 


( 


' " Grain Crops, 


11 00 



FARM AND GARDEN CROPS. 



Awarded for Grain and Seed, 15 00 

u Vegetables, 131 50 

« Fruits, 163 00 

" " Plants and Flowers, . 93 00 



$917 00 



— 148 00 



2 50 



97 



DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES. 



Awarded for Bread and Canned Fruit, |21 00 
Counterpanes and Afghans, 24 75 
Car})etings and Rugs, 19 50 

Articles Manf. from Leather, 16 0(( 



Manuf. and Gen. Mdse., 


10 50 


Fancy Woi'k, 


51 00 


Works of Art, 


79 00 


Children's Work, 


5 25 



$227 00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Awarded for Agricultural Implements, 
" " Carriages, 
" " Granges, 



59 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 



$109 00 



The amount of 11,703.50 was awarded to 398 individuals 
and firms in 27 different cities and towns as follows : — 



Amesbur}', 


178 


00 


Lynnfield, 


$37 00 


Andover, 


12 


25 


Marblehead, 


22 75 


Beverly, 


185 


00 


Methuen, 


14 00 


Boxford, 


59 


00 


Middleton, 


9 50 


Danvers, 


129 


50 


Newbury, 


58 50 


Essex, 


4 


00 


Newburyport, 


2 50 


Georgetown, 


5 


50 


North Andover, 


179 75 


Groveland, 


10 


00 


Peabody, 


505 40 


Hamilton, 


30 


00 


Salem, 


130 10 


Haverhill, 


8 


00 


Saugus, 


19 50 


Ipswich, 


34 


00 


Swampscott, 


1 50 


Lawrence, 


15 


50 


Topsfield, 


4 00 


Lynn, 


87 


25 


Wenham, 


19 00 




West Newbui 


y, 42 00 





9$ 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Receipts from admission to hall and grounds, $2,315 17 

Receipts from grounds for various purposes, 499 00 

Receipts for dinner tickets, 112 00 

Received from hall, 21 40 

Received from grand stand, 47 55 



Expenses of the fair, 



$2,995 12 
$3,506 35 



1902. 
PREMIUM LIST OF 



Essex Agricultural Society 

FOR THE 

EIGHTY-SECOND ANNUAL CATTLE SHOW AND FAIR. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The trustee of each town is instructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their 
duties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to 
the Exhibition the importance of entering their exhibits for 
the hall the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Committees> 
and at the meeting of the Society for filling vacanies in com- 
mittees on the first day of the Exhibition, making sure that 
the names proposed at those meetings are of persons who will 
serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the Fair 
Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the grounds, 
at one o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the exhibition, 
and there organize, take the books of entry, and proceed at- 
once to business. Committees in hall should take the books 
of entry from the Superintendent promptly after the entries, 
close. 

Full reports of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 



lOO 



Three members of any committee consisting of more than 
that number are authorized to act. 

li;^^No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 

The Diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of special merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures, fruits, vegetables 
in hall, and iiowers ; or any premium, unless the rules of the 
Society have been strictly complied with. Neither shall they 
award premiums or gratuities in excess of the amount appro- 
priated. 

No gratuity "is to be awarded of less than fifty cents, ex- 
cept on work by children, and none in that class less than 
twenty-live cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals blue, white and red printed pre- 
mium ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assis- 
tants on the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals 
or articles designating the grade of premium awarded each, 
and the name of the person to whom awarded, and especial 
care should be taken that the cards issued correspond with 
the awards in their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on ploughing and on 
animals and articles exhibited at the Show, must be delivered 
promptly to the Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

The Society offers liberal premiums for the best reports of 
committees ; and the chairmen of the several committees are 
requested to present to the Secretary a full report explanatory 
of the opinions of the committee on the matter referred to 
them, within two weeks after the awards are made at the 
Show, for publication in the Transactions.* 

Reports on farms, crops, etc., to be presented previous to 
the meeting of the Trustees in November. 

Any member of a committee tvlio cannot serve on the same 
is requested to give notice to the Secretary, hejore the shoic, so 
that the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a 
ticket of admission to the hall of exhibition on application to 
the Secretary. 



^Chairmen of committees wiU please notice this request. 



I 



lOI 



General Rules. 

Competitors are requested to carefully read the rules and 
■premium list before making entries. 

Claim (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 

All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person not a member of the Society, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, 
for which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase 
the funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium or gratuity is awarded or 
an agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
First National Bank, Salem, on and after the first Monday of 
November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day of 
April next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered as 
given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the several committees and adopted by the Soci- 
ety shall be final. Committees should see that the 2)remium- 
cards issued, correspond with the j9re/n.i?*?w.s and gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his in- 
tention to compete for the same ; and committees are instructed 
to award no premium unless the animal or article offered is 
worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall be entered in another class, except working 
oxen, working steers, (three year old steers may be entered 
for ploughing in a double team) and farm horses which may be 
entered for ploughing, horses for fast walking, and milch 
cows, which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premium must be owned by residents 
and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, in 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 



I02 



themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered ; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture. 

The Proof tha^t an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 

Standards adopted : — American Jersey C. C Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

The Committees will take notice that no premiian will be 
awarded unless the animals or objects are of a decidedly super- 
ior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
special merit, in all departments of the Fair. 



Cattle and other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals, whether teams for ploughing, or animals 
entered for premium or exhibition, will be fed during the Ex- 
hibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity, prevented 
from leaving, at the expense of the Society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense thereof, all of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with committee's report. 

For Pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $8, 6 

For Fat Cow, premiums, $6, 4 



I03 

BULLS. 

*Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or of any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Two years old and upwards, premiums, $6, 4 

Under two years old, for each breed, $4, 3 

One year old and under, for each breed, $3, 2 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREED. 

Eor the best bull of any age or breed, with five of his stock 
not less than one year old, quality and condition to be taken 
into account, and especially the adaptability of the animal to 
the agriculture of the county. Diploma and $8 

Note— Competitors are required to give a written statement of pedigree, and 
committees are requested to be particular in this respect, and return tliem to the 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantit}' and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $8, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Holstein, 
Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old and 
upwards, premiums for each breed, f T, 4 

For Native or Grade Cows, four years old and upwards, pre- 
miums, $7, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week 
from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $7, 4 

Note.— A written statement will be required of the age and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they dropped their last calf, and when they will next 
calre, the kind, quality and quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding, which statement is to be returned to the Secretary with 
Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to be 
exhibited at the Show, and a correct statement of manner of 
keeping and yield for one year preceding the Show, premiums. 

Diploma and $10, 8 

For the greatest produce of milk on any farm, in proportion 
to the number of cows producing it, not less than four, from 
April 1, 1896 to April 1, 1897, statement to be made of the 
exchanges made, manner, and expense of food, use made of 
milk, and such other facts as will illustrate the entire manage- 
ment, special regard being had to the mode in which the 
account is kept, premium, Diploma and $8 

Note.— The above mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 
Jan. 1st, preceding the Show. 



I04 

HEIFERS. 

FiKST Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, each, breed, $4, 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $4, 2 
Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old, premiums, $5, 3 
Two years old, that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, premiums, $4, 2 
One year old and under, and less than two, premiums, $4, 2 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than live years old, taking into view their size, 
power, and quality and training, premiums, $8. 6 

For pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $6, 4 

Note. — The Committee are re<iuired to consider the (luality and shape ef the 
cattle as well as their working capacity. The training of working oxen and 
steers will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containi ng a load weigh- 
ing two tons for oxen, and three thousand pounds for steers. m^^At the time 
of entry a certificate of the weight of the cattle must be filed with the Secretary. 

STEERS. 

For pair of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, $8, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft purposes, three year old, 
premiums, $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, nof 
less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account. Diploma and $8 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums. Diploma and $8, 5 



I05 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums. Diploma and $5, 3 

For best Stallion o£ any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than one year old, quality and condition taken into ac- 
count, Diploma and $8 

Note.— No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. .411 stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$8, 5 

BROOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Driving Purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums. 

Note.— No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all ap- 
parent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 
For Family Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

Note. — No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $8, 5 

LADIES' DRIVING HORSES, 

For Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For pairs of I;adies' Driving Horses, premiums, $8, 5 

GENTLEMEN'S SADDLE HORSES. 
Gentlemen to ride on track, premiums, $6, 4 

LADIES' SADDLE HORSES. 
Ladies to ride on track, premiums, $6, 4 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

For pairs of Fast Walking Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For single horses, $5, 3 



io6 



For pairs of farm horses with load of 4,000 lbs., premiums, 

$6,4 

For single farm horse, with load of 2000 lbs., premiums, 

$5, 3 

II^^The above to have trial on the track. 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1200 lbs. and over, premiums, 

$6,4 
For Farm Horses weighing less than 1200 lbs, premiums, 

$6,4 

Note.— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of the load to be used in trial, of Farm 
Horses is to be fixed upon by the committee of arrangements for drafting, the 
difference in the load for horses of 1,200 lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 lbs. 
to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pairs, 2,000. No obstruction shall 
be placed either before or behind the wheels in trials of Draft Horses of either 
class, but wheels shall be blocked behind to hold the load when a team stops go- 
ing up hill. 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING 2400 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses, weighing 2400 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, $8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2400 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2400 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 6 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 3 and 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding four-year-old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year-old Colts, premiums, $5, 3 

•COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premiums, 

$4,2 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 
COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOUR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four-year-old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three-year-old colts, premiums, $5, 3 



I07 

ONE AND TWO TEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premiums, 

U, 2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

N. B.— All the above classes the committee will act with the expert judge ex- 
■cept Fat Cattle, Working Oxen and Steers. 

HORSES FOR HURDLE JUMPING. 

For Horses jumping over four, I'our-foot hurdles, premiums, 

f 8, 6 
For high hurdle jumping, premiums, $8 

SWINE, LARGE BREEDS. 

Large Breeds, viz : Cheshire, Berkshire, Chester County 
Whites, Poland China, Large Yorkshire, and any other breed 
or grade, weighing more than 300 lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, J$5, 3 

For Breeding Sows, with their pigs by their side, premiums, 

$5,3 

For Litters of weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $5, 3 

SWINE.— SMALL BREEDS. 

Small breeds, such as Suffolk, Essex, Small Yorkshire, 
China, and any other breed or grade, weighing less than 300 
lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $5, 3 

For Breeding Sows, with their pigs by their side, premiums, 

$5, 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $5, 3 

SHEEP. 

For flocks of Sheep, not less than six ewes in number, each 
breed, premiums, f 5, 3 

For best Buck, premium, $5 

For lots of Lambs, not less than six ewes in number, be- 
tween four and twelve months old, premiums, $5, 3 

POULTRY. 

For pairs of Fowls, Light Brahmas, Dark Brahmas, Buff 
Cochins, Patridge Cochins, Black Cochins, White Cochins, 



io8 



Plymouth Rocks, White I'lyuiouth Rocks, Dominiques, White 
Leghorns, Brown Leghorns, Dominique Leghorns, Black 
Spanish, Hamburgs, Polish Games, Dorking, Black, White 
and Mottled Javas, Wyandottes, White Wandottes, Golden 
Wyandottes, Black and White Minorcas, Red Caps, Andalu- 
sias, Langbhangs, and other recognized varieties, each variety, 
premiums, f 2, 1 

To be used by the Committee in their discretion for collec- 
tions of Bantams, no person to receive more than ten dollars, 

$25.00 

For pairs of Chickens of above varieties, premiums, $2, 1 

For the best breeding pen of each variety of live females 
and male. Diploma and $1 

For the best pairs of Native Fowls, premiums, $2, 1 

Pairs can be exhibited in " breeding pens " by marking the 
competing female (with a ribbon or colored string), which, 
with the male will form the pair, 

For lots of Turkeys, and Alesbury, Rouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks, and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China aud African Geese, prem., $2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the discharge 
of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any specimen 
on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all claim he 
may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the " American >Standard of Excellence." 

Note.— No pair in a pen will receive a premium as a pair. 

STREET PARADE. 

Invitation is extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of the committee m 
charge in premiums or gratuities, $50 

HARROWS 

For the best Harrow exhibited, and its merits shown by 
actual test upon the ploughed ground, $6, 4 

NoTB.— Entry must be made with the Secretary before the day of the trial, with, 
description of the Harrow. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no ar- 
ticle offered in collection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium). Diploma and $8- 



lOq 

For implements that are deeaed worthy, the Committee 
may at their discretion award in gratuities not exceeding $40 

No ])remiuni or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Kake, Tedder, or otlier machine or implement, the 
merit of which can be known only by actual trial in the field ; 
but manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition 
and inspection. 

CARRIA(4ES. 

For carriages built in the county and exhibited by the 
manufacturer, Diploma, and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 



Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be espec- 
ially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued with 
the names, and sums awarded them, correspond with those in 
their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instruc- 
tions under heading of " Duties of Committee," *' General 
■Rules," '-'Premiums to be Awarded at the Show," see first 
pages, and under" Fruit," "Domestic Manufactures," and 
" Flowers." 

|;yAll Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manu- 
factures, must be the product of Essex County to be entitled 
to a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers fifty dollars to be divided in three pre- 
miums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex County, 
as follows: — Premiums, $20. 15, 10 

NoTic. — This exhibit includes all Fruit. Vegetables and Domestic Manufactures 
that are exhibited in any other department in Exhibition Hall. 

DAIRY, BREAD, CANNED FKUIT AND HONEY. 

For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making 
and management of the Butter, premiums, $5, 3 



no 



For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, $5, 3 

For White Bread made of Wheat Flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from Graham flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread entered for premiums to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collection of Preserved Fruits and 
Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, 

$2,1 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of pro- 
cess used and amount of labor and time required in preparing 
and drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on articles entered in this depart- 
ment, products of this County deemed worthy, $20 

First and second best Honey, not more than five nor less 
tliati three pounds in comb with one pound of same extracted 
made in the County, with statement signed of kind of bees and 
hive, and time of year when honey was made, premiums, 

$?, 2 



Fruit. 



All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clocR on the first day of the exhibition, and each exhib- 
itor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists 
of the varieties of each class of fruit, or to be filed when 
entry is made. (Committees are not authorized to make 
awards to those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a conspicuous manner hy the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors, with the names of 
fruit for which premiums are offered, all others of same class 
fruit to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place 



I II 



their several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated 
by such labels, or be considered by the committee as not com- 
peting for premiums. 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee) to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit. 

PEARS. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommeuded for cultivation in Essex County : Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Augouleme, Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckle, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Cornice, Howell and Clairgeau, each, premium, $2 

Doyenne d'Ete. Gifford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $1.50 

For best collection of Pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premium, $5 

In addition to the above are placed at the disposal of the 
committee, to be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 
each, $15 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County ; Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Red Russet, Ben Davis, 
Sutton Beauty, Hubbardston, Mackintosh Red, Porter, Pick- 
man Pippin, Roxbury Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Grav- 
enstein, Hunt Russet, Ladies' Sweet, Snow, Bailey Sweet, 
Wealthy, Sutton Beauty, premium for each, $2, 1 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early). 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

Nor best collection of Apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab 
Apple deemed worthy by the committee, $1.50 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 each, $15 



112 



PEACHES. GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

B'or best twelve specimens of Freestone, White Flesh, 
Yellow Flesh, Essex County Seedling, each, variety, $2 

For best collection of Peaches, premium, $3 

For the best twelve specimens of Champion, Lemon, or 
Orange Quinces, premium, $2 

For the best twelve specimens of Plums, five varieties to be 
selected by committee, each variety, premium, $2 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, Brigh- 
ton, Green Mountain, Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, Pock- 
lington, Niagara Grapes, each variety, premium, $3 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than ten pounds 
in all, premiums, $5, 4 

For best specimens of four bunches of Grapes varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

fl.50 

For basket of Assorted Fruits, premiums, $3, 2 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than 50 cents each, $20 



Plants and Flowers. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

1. All Plants and Flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or be- 
fore eleven o'clock on the first day of the Fair, and all such 
Plants and Flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of Plants and 
Flowers is designated in the schedule, there must be neither 
more nor less than that number or quantity of specimens 
shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article, only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is offered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for com- 
petition, but no variety can be duplicated. 



113 

4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens 
exhibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of 
superiority and worthy of such premium, not even if they are 
the only oues of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admitted 
in competition for another different premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, 
or in the case of Native Plants and Flowers, where such were 
found. 

7. All Plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood, or some other 
permanent and suitable substance, and so attached to same as 
to be easily seen. Flowers when specified to be named to 
comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in Pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symmetry and vigor of the specimens ; also Bouquets, Baskets, 
Design work, etc., must show taste, skill, and harmony in 
arrangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All flowers exhibited must be shown upon their own 
stem, flowers in "Design" work alone excepted; and this 
exception, if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account 
by the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The Committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or " Designs of merit " 
for which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together), exceed the amount, 
$100, limited by the Society for this department. 

11. No member of the Committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any case vote or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarily vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for Plants and Flowers, and General Rules of the So- 
ciety, and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhib- 
itors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 

PLANTS. 

Plants competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots. Native Plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 



114 

For collection Flowericg and Ornamental Foliage plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premiums, $5, 3 

For collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 6 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premiums, $1 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection of Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, ten varieties, 
premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 5 va- 
rieties, premium, $1 
For collection Calla Lilies, 5 specimens, premium, $1 
For specimen English Ivy, premium, $1 
For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly nam«d with botanic*l and common name, at least 60 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which to be a cross section, and neither to be more than four 
inches in length or diameter, premiums, $5, 3 

FLOWEKS. 

For collection Cut Flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For collection Cut Flowers, native, 100 specimeni, at least 
50 varieties, namtd, $3, 2 

For pair Bouquet*, for raaes, gretn-house flow«rs, pre- 
miums, $1, .50 



"5 

For pair of Hand Bouquets, green-house flowers, premiums, 

$1, .50 

For pair of Bouquets for vases, of native flowers, premiums, 

$1, .50 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, pre- 
miums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Green-bouse Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Native Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Garden Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For arrangement of Native Flowers and Autumn Leaves, 
premiums, $2, 1 

For Floral Designs, choice cultivated flowers, prem., $3, 2 

For Floral Designs, native flowers, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Japan Lilies, hardy, named, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Phlox, hardy perennial, named, prem., $2, 1 

For collections Pansies, at least 50 specimens neatly and 
artistically arranged, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Native and Introduced Weeds, with con- 
mon and botanical name attached, premiums, $2, 1 

For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six 
varieties, named, premium, $1 

For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, f 1 

For twelve Gladiolas (spikes), at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Japan Lilies, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $] 

For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox, hardy perennial, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem., $1 

For twenty-four Carnation Pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Verbenas, &t least six varieties, named,, 
premium, $1 

For twentj-four Roses, at leaat aix varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twenty-four Garden Annuals, at least twelre varieties, 
named, premium, $1 



ii6 



For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties, named,prem.,$l 
For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Double Truffaut's Peony flowered, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twelve Asters, Pompone, premium, $i 
For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, $1 
■ For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty -four Zinnias, double, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, African, in variety, prem., $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty-four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $1 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium, ^1 
For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, ^1 
For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Dianthus (double annual), in variety, prem., $1 
For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, $1 
For collection of Sweet Peas, premium, $1 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS ONE. 

Rules for fruit ajiply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens, Eclipse, Dewing, and 
Edmauds, premium, each variety, $2, 1 

Carrots — For best twelve, Short Top, Long Orange and 
Danvers Intermediate, premiums, each variety, f 2, 1 

For best twelve. Short Horn, Orange carrots, $2, 1 

Mangold Wurtzels — For best six specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Flat Turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top and 
White Flat, premiums, each variety, '^2, 1 

Ruta Bagas — Twelve specimens. For best Yellow and 
White, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Onions — Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow Flat 
and Red, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Clark's No. 1, Pearl of Savoy, Early Maine, Rob- 
erts Early, Carmans No. 3, Rural Blush, Rural New Yorker, 
Early Northern, premiums, each variety, $2. 1 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $15 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS TWO. 

Cabbages — For the best three specimens, Savoy, Fottler's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, each variety premiums, $2, 1 



117 

Cauliflower — For best three specimens, premiums, $2,1 
Celery — 'For best four roots, premiums, Ji>2, 1 

Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best. Early, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 
Fi)V best twelve ears in milk; Late, premiums, $2, 1 
Squashes — For best three specimens, Marrow, Turban, 
Warren Turban, Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, Bay 
State, Sibley, Butman, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
Melons — For best three specimens, ISTutmeg, Musk, Cassaba, 
Salmon Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For best two specimens Watermelons, premiums, $2, 1 
Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens. Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For exhibition tif greatest variety of Tomatoes, premiums, 

$2, 1 
Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premiums, ^2, 1 

For collections of Vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $30 
I^^iSTo competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums 
are offered for. 

CoUectiotis of Vegetables where premiums are offered for a number of varieties 
must be eutered aud placed, not less than three of a kind by themselves on the 
tables assigned for collections. No collection shall receive but one premium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to compete with speci- 
mens of the same variety i)laced elsewhere. Exhibitors of such collections, how- 
ever, are not prevented from exhibiting additional specimens of any variety with 
and in competition with like variety. All vegetables must be ei»tered in the 
name of the grower of them. 

Size of Vegetablcf!. Turnip Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions, 
2 1-2 to 4 inches in largest diameter; Potatoes to be of. good size for family use; 
Squashes to be pure and well ripened, Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premiums, $1 

For twenty-five ears of Field Corn, premiums, $5, 4, 3 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $6, 4 
All grain or seed must have been grown by the exhibitor in 
the County to receive a premium. 



Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 1 
o'clock on the first day of the Exhibition. Articles not thus 



ii8 



deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 
be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to the 
last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wrought Counterpanes having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $3, 2 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $25 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets, having regard to the quality and expense of the 
material, premiums, $3, 2 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the qual- 
ity of the work and expense of materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount not to exceed $20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For exhibit of Manufactured Leather and Skins, 

Society's Diploma 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 
Women's do., Children's do., each, premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each, prem., $3 

$25 are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium. Diploma of the Society 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $30 

FANCY WORK. 

Of Domestic Manufacture are not included in the above. 
At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity,$40 

OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity,$40 



119 

DECORATED CHINA. 

For best collection Decorated China, premiums, $5, 3 

For best individual specimen, premiums, $3, 2 

For Punch Bowl or set, premiums, $2, 1 

For Jardiniere or Fern dish, premiums, $2, 1 

For raised paste or gold, premiums, $2, 1 

For Vase, premiums, $2, 1 

For Tray, Plate, etc., premiums, $2, 1 

CHARCOAL, PEN AND INK WORK, PHOTOGRAPHS, 

ETC. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, 

f25 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, prem., f 2, 1 

At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $15 
not less than 25 cents in any one gratuity. 



List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 



FARMS. 

Competitors for this premium must give notice of their in- 
tention to the Secretary on or before June 15th, and the farms 
entered for premium will be viewed by the committee twice 
during the year. Crops growing on farms that are entered 
for premium, cannot be entered with another committee for 
separate premiums — except crop specimens exhibited at the 
fair. 

Any person desirous of having his farm inspected, loithout 
entering it for premium, msij msike application to the Secre- 
tary, and it will be viewed and reported upon by the commit- 
tee. 

For the best conducted and most improved farm, taking 
into view the entire management and cultivation, including 



I20 



lands, buildings, fences, orchards, crops, stock and all other 
appendages, with statements in detail, relating thereto, pre- 
mium, $20 

IMPROVING WET MEADOW AND SWAMP LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments relating to wet meadow or 
swamp lands, on not less than one acre, the course of manage- 
ment, and the produce, etc., for a period of two years at least, 
to be detailed, with a statement of all the incidental expenses, 
premiums, $10, 6 

Note.— The Committee is instructed to ascertain how many, if any, reclaimed 
swamps in this County have been abandoned or have returned to natural grasses. 
Persons knowing of such are requested to notify the Secretary or Committee. 

IMPROVING PASTURE AND WASTE LANDS. 

For best condi?cted experiments in renovating and improv- 
ing pasture land, other than .by ploughing, so as to add to 
their value for pasturage, with a statement of the same, pre- 
miums, $10, 6 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improv- 
ing waste lands, so as to add to their agricultural value, with 
statement of the same, premiums, $10, 6 

No premium to be awarded to any person for a repetition of 
an experiment in meadow, swamp or pasture lands, for which 
he has already received a premium. 

UNDER-DRAINING LAND. 

For best conducted experiments in under-draining land, 
regard being had to the variety of soil, sub-soil, and other 
local circumstances, premiums, $10, 6 

Note.— The same instructions under " Improving Wet Meadow and Swamp 
Lands " apply to this Committee. 

GRAINS AND OTHER CROPS. 

Claimants on Grain and Root Crops will be required to 
state the size of the piece of land when they enter, and. con- 
form to following rules : Entries of Grain Crops to be made 
on or before September 10th ; Root Crops on or before October 
10th ; giving ample time for the crops to be examined by the 
committee before harvesting. Statements to be made in con- 
formity with the following form must be forwarded to the 
Committee previous to November 1st. 

All calculations and figures given in reports of, and state- 



121 



merits of Crops, are to be made on the basis of an acre, results 
in all cases to be given at the rate per acre. 

In pursuance of authority delegated to the Board of Agri- 
culture b}'^ Chapter 24 of Acts 1862, Agricultural Societies 
receiving the bounty of the State are required to make use of 
the following form, and be governed by its conditions in the 
mode of ascertaining the amount of crops entered for .pre- 
mium. 

EssKx Agricultural Society. — Statement concerning a 

crop of , raised by Mr. , in the town of , 

, 1902. 

What was the crop of 1900 ? What manure was used and 
how much ? What was the crop of 1901 ? What manure 
was used and how much ? What is the nature of the soil ? 
When and how many times ploughed, and how deep? What 
other preparation for seed? Cost of ploughing and other 
preparation ? Amount of manure in loads of thirty bushels, 
and how applied ? 

Value of manure upon the ground ? How used ? What 
amount of Commercial Fertilizer used ? How used ? Value 
of same when applied ? When and how planted ? The 
amount and kind of seed ? Cost of seed and planting,? How 
cultivated and how many times ? Cost of cultivation includ- 
ing weeding and thinning ? Time and manner of harvesting? 
Cost of harvesting, including the storing and husking or. 
threshing ? Amount of crop, etc. Signed by , Competitor 

The committee to whom is intrusted the award of the 
premiums on field crops may award them according to their 
judgment, but for the purpose of furnishing accurate statistics 
for the benefit of agriculture, shall select certain of the crops 
and require the owners thereof to measure the land and weigh 
the crops accurately, giving to the committee a certiiicate of 
the same, and give all possible information thereon over their 
own signatures, and return the same to the Secretary of the 
Society, to be published in the annual transactions. 

In ascertaining the amount of crop any vessel may be used 
and the weight of its contents once, multiplied by the number 
of times it is filled by the crop. 

In measuring the land or weighing crops, any competent 
person may be employed, whether a sworn surveyor or not, 
and must give certificate. 

The certificate shall state the weight of all crops only in a 
merchantable state. 

In ascertaining the amount of a hay crop entered for pre- 
mium the measurement of the hay in the barn may be employed. 



60 lbs. 


to bush. 


62 " 


~i( 


66 " 


i( 


32 " 


<( 


48 " 


i( 


50 " 


a 


55 " 


K 


K7 " 


<( 



122 



BuLES OF Measure Pkactised and Adopted by the State 
BoABD OF Agriculture. 

Wheat, Potatoes, Sugar Beets, Ruta Bagas, 

Mangold Wurtzels, 
White Beans and Peas, 
Corn, Rye, 
Oats, 

Barley, Buckwheat, 
Cracked Corn, Corn and Rye, and other meal, 

except Oat, 
Parsnips, Carrots, 
Onions, 

1. For the best conducted experiments of Rye not less 
than twenty bushels to the acre, fifty-six lbs. to the bushel, on 
not less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

2. For best conducted experiments of Wheat, not less than 
thirty bushels to the acre, sixty lbs. to the bushel, on not less 
than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

3. For best conducted experiments of Oats, not less than 
fifty bushels to the acre, thirty-two lbs. to the bushel, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

4. For best conducted experiments of Barley, not less 
than forty bushels to the acre, forty-eight lbs. to the bushel, 
on not less than one acre, premiums, ^7, 4 

5. For best conducted experiments of Indian Corn, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

6. For largest quantity and best quality of English hay, 
on not less than one acre, regard being had to the mode and 
cost of cultivation, premiums, $7, 4 

7. For best yield of Field Beans, on not less than one-half 
acre, and not less than twenty-five bushels per acre, premi- 
ums, f 7, 4 

ROOT CROPS. 

1. For best conducted experiments in raising Carrots, fifty- 
five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

2. For best conducted experiments in raising Parsnips, 
fifty-five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 6 

3. For best conducted experiments in raising Beets, pre- 
miums, $8, 5 

4. For best conducted experiments in raising Ruta Bagas, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

6. For best conducted experiments in raising Mangold 
Wurtzels, sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 6 



123 

6. For best conducted experiments in raising Sugar Beets, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

7. For best conducted experiments in raising Onions, fifty- 
two pounds to the bushel, premiums, .^8, 5 

8. For best conducted experiments in raising Potatoes, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

9. For best conducted experiments in raising Cabbages, 
premiums, $8. 5 

10. For best conducted experiments in raising Squashes, 
premiums, $8, 5 

11. For best conducted experiments in raising Summer 
English turnips for the market, premiums, $8, 5 

Raised on not less than half an acre, and the quantity of 
crop to be ascertained by weight ; so far as practicable the 
crop to be free from dirt, without tops, and in a merchantable 
condition at the time of measurement. 

Claimants for premiums on Grain and Root Crops must 
forward statement to chairman of committee before Nov. \st. 

FOREST TREES. 

1. For plantation of either of the following species of 
forest trees, viz : White Oak, Yellow Oak, Locust, Birch, 
White Ash, Maple, Walnut or White Pine, Sweet Chestnut, 
not less than three years old, and not less than 500 trees, 
premiums, $10 

2. For plantation of not less than 100 trees, premium, $8 

3. For ornamental trees, ten or more set on any street, 
road or farm, and cared for five years, premium, $8 

CRANBERRIES. 

For best conducted experiment in the cultivation of the 
Cranberry, at least two summers, or not less than twenty rods 
of land, with written statement of the quantity and quality of 
the land, expense of planting, weeding and culture, and 
amount of crops produced. Premium to be paid in 1902 and 
1903, . f 10 

For best experiment do., on not less than ten rods of land, 
premium, $7 

STRAWBERRIES AND OTHER SMALL FRUITS. 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture, crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $7 

For best crop of currants, raspberries and blackberries, with 
statement as above, premium each, $7 



124 

LIBRARY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; B. P. Ware, Mar- 
blehead, J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 

TREADWELL FARM. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield ; Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; Sherman Nelson, 
Georgetown. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee^William S. Nichols, Salem ; Benj. P. Ware, 
Marblehead ; Lyman Osborne, Peabody. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Committee — F. H. Appleton, Peabody ; J. M. Danforth, 
Lynnfield Centre : 0. S. Butler, Georgetown ; Fred A. Rus- 
sell, Methuen. 

DELEGATES. 

From the Essex Agricultural Society to attend Exhibitions 
of Societies, Farmers' Clubs and Fruit Growers' Associations 
in Essex County, and report any information that shall seem 
valuable for publication. 

The Secretary to be notified of the time of holding their ex- 
hibition, who will notify the chairman of committee to assign 
delegate. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of crops, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Eighty-first Annual Cattle Show and Fair 3 

Report of Annual meeting 4 

Entries 5 

Report on Fat Cattle 8 

Report on Bulls 8 

Report on Milch Cows ". .9 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 10 

Statements 10 

Report on Heifers 13 

Report on Working Oxen 14 

Report on Steers 15 

Report on Stallions 15 

Report on Brood Mares 15 

Report on Family Horses 16 

Report on Gents' Driving Horses 16 

Report on Ladies' Driving Horses 16 

Report on Fast Walking Horses 16 

Report on Single Farm Horses 17 

Report on Pairs Farm Horses 17 

Report on Colts for Farm and Draft 17 

Report on Colts for Driving 17 

Report on Hurdle Jumping 17 

Report on Swine 18 

Report on Sheep 20 

Report on Poultry 20 

Report on Agricultural Implements 29 

Report on Carriages , 32 

Report on Granges 33 

Report on Bread and Canned Fruit 33 

Report on Pears 34 

Report on Apples 35 

Report on Peaches, Grapes and Assorted Fruit 41 

Report on Plants 43 

Report on Flowers 44 

Report on Vegetables 50 



126 



Report on Grain and Seed 55 

Report on Counterpanes and Afghans 56 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 57 

Report on Articles Manufactured from Leather 58 

Report on Manufactures and General Mdse 59 

Report on Fancy Work 59 

Report on Works of Art 64 

Report on Decorated China 65 

Report on Charcoal and Pen and Ink work 66 

Report on Work by Children 67 

Report of Committee on Root Crops 68 

Statements 68 

Report of Committee on Small Fruits 71 

Report of Committee on Grain Crops 72 

Statements 73 

Report on Essays and Reports 74 

Report of Committee on Treadwell Farm 77 

Report of New Members 79 

Farmers' Institutes 79 

Report of State Delegate 80 

In Memoriam 81 

Treasurer's Report 83 

Constitution 84 

Officers of the Society 87 

List of Premiums awarded 1901 89 

Recapitulation of Premiums 96 

Financial Statement 1901 Fair 98 

Premium List for 1902 99 



TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1902 



OF THE 



E^^EX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



{Organized ISIS.) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 



IN MASSACHUSETTS. 



AND THE PREMIUM LIST FOR 1903, 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS.: 

Newcomb & Gauss, Printers. 

1902. 



EIGHTY-SECOND 

Annual Cattle Show and FaiL 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the Pea- 
body Institute at Peabody, Sept. 17, 1902. President 
Appleton called the meeting to order at 9.40 o'clock. 

Upon the motion of O. S. Butler it was unanimously 
voted, that Daniel D. Adams of Newbury cast one ballot 
for President, four Vice Presidents and Secretary, as 
printed on the ballot for Officers of the Society for the 
ensuing year as follows : 

FOE. PRESIDENT. 

Francis H. Appleton of Peabody. 

FOR VICE PRESIDENTS. 

James J. H. Gregory of Marblehead. 
Horatio G. Herrick of Lawrence. 
Asa T. Newhall of Lynn. 
Sherman Nelson of Georgetown. 

FOR SECRETARY. 
John M. Dan forth of Lynnfield. 

Voted : — That the meeting take up the list of trustees 
and make any changes or amendments to the printed 
ballot that may be thought advisable. 



Voted : — That the Secretary cast one ballot as printed 
with the changes and amendments as adopted by meeting, 
for trustees for the ensuing year, and the following were 
elected : 

J. P. Little, Amesbury Geo. W. Sargent, Merrimac 

George L. Averill, Andover John W. Shirley, Methuen 
John W. Lovett, Beverly Geo. A. Currier, Middleton 
Henry M. Killam, Boxford Charles T. Lovering, Nahant 
Alvah J. Bradstreet, Danvers Daniel D. Adams, Newbury 
Edward K. Lee, Essex B. F. Stanley, Newburyport 

rSamuel T. Poor, Georgetown W. S. Hughes, No. Andover 
Oeo. M. Wonson, Gloucester N. M. Quint, Peabody 
Sam'l B. George, Groveland John J. Manning, Rockport 
Wm. Messervy, Hamilton Frank P. Todd, Rowley 
,A. G. Whittier, Haverhill Charles Sanders, Salem 
iAlonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich P. Albert True, Salisb U 
S. S. Lewis, Lawrence Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 

Edwin Bates, Lynn Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield E. E. Ferguson, Topsfield 
John H. Cheever,Manchester J. Kavanaugh, Wenham 
Amos P. Alley, Marblehead J. R. Gordon, West Newbury 

The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1902, are tabulated for comparison as follows : — 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON FAIR GR0I!NDS. 



Class. 


From 
Entries Different 
in 1902. Places 

in 1902. 


Entries 
in 1901. 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1901. 


Fat Cattle, 








5 


8 


Bulls, 


18 


8 


11 


5 


Milch Cows, 


22 


5 


24 


4 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


4 


2 


2 


1 


Heifers, Pure Breed, 


28 


6 


25 


4 


Heifers, Grade, 


23 


7 


18 


5 


Working Oxen and Steers, 


1 


1 


n 




m4 


Steers, 


I 


1 


6 





Stallions, Farm and Draft, 








1 


1 


Stallions, Driving Purposes, 


1 


1 




2 


Brood Mares, Farm and Draft, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Brood Mares, Driving Purposes 


1, 





B 


2 


Family Horses, 


o 


8 


9 


8 


Pairs of Gents' Driving Horses 








2 


2 


Ladies' Driving Horses, 


o 


-1 


9 




Gents' Saddle Horses, 


1 


1 








Ladies' Saddle Horses, 














Fast Walking Horses, 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Pairs of Fast Walking Horses, 


2 


2 








Pairs of Fast Walking Horses, 








< 


with load, 


2 


2 








Single Farm Horses, 


1 


1 


5 


3 


Pairs of Farm Horses, 




•J 


4 


3 


Colts, Farm Purposes, 








1 


1 


Colts, Driving Purposes, 


() 


4 


2 


2 


Horses for Hurdle Jumping, 


9 


1 


12 


o 


Pwine, Large Breeds, 


30 


4 


34 


4 


vine. Small Breeds, 


9 


•J 


9 


o 


bneep. 
Poultry, 



154 




9 


3 
248 


1 
11 


Agricultural Implements, 
Carriages 


24 
12 


5 

•9 


37 

7 


3 



EXHIBITS IN HALL. 



Class. 

Grange exhibit, 


Entries 
in 1902. 

2 


From 
Different 
Places 
in 1002. 

2 


Entries 
in 1901. 

1 


From 
Different 

Places 
in 1901. 

1 


Dairy, 


1 


1 








Bread and Canned Fruit, 


55 


7 


34 


7 


Honey, 














Pears, 


84 


8 


91 


9 


Apples, 


225 


17 


103 


9 


Peaches, Grapes and Assorted 










Fruit, 


126 


13 


84 


11 


Plants, 


39 


4 


39 


5 


Flowers, 


272 


11 


206 


10 


Vegetables, 


266 


15 


216 


12 


Grain and Seed, 


11 


4 


22 


9 


Carpetings and Rugs, 


38 


1 


35 


6 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


44 


9 


45 


7 


Articles Manuf'd from Leather 


•, 5 


2 


11 


4 


Manuf'res^and General Mdse., 


23 


5 


9 


2 


Fancy Work, 


170 


7 


241 


13 


OilTaintings and Water Colors, 67 


r 


55 


7 


Decorated "China, 


23 


5 


46 


4 


Charcoal Work, Photos etc. 


83 


6 


44 


7 



Work^by Children under twelve 

years of age, 14 4 15 



1538 25 1394 25 

Grand total, 1868 entries from 25 of 34 cities and towns 
in Essex County against 1783 entries from 28 cities and 
towns last year. Essex, Gloucester, Manchester, Merri- 
mac, Nahant, Newburyport and Salisbury, did not have 
exhibits this year. 

The entries were Amesbury, 3; Andover, 41 ; Beveily, 
161; Boxford, 90; Danvers, 147; Georgetown, 1 ; Grove- 



land, 2; Hiimilton, 21; Haverhill, 13; Ipswich, 6; Law- 
rence, 9; Lynn, 149; Lynnfield, 41; Marblehead, 24; 
Middleton, 12 ; Methuen, 2 ; Newbury, 6 ; North Andover, 
43; Peabody, 840 ; Rowley, 1 ; Salem, 189; Saugus, 10 ; 
Swarapscott, 7; Topstield, 2;^Wenham, 40; West New- 
bury, 8. 



Reports of Committees. 



BULLS. 



$6. First premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 

Holsteii; bull, "Louis Netherland de Kol." 
4. First premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 

Guernsey bull, " Lord Emerson," 
12. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Aja'shire bull, " Fitz Hugh,'' with 5 of his stock. 
6. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Ayrshire bull, "Fitz Hugh." 
3. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire bull calf. 
6. First premium to Dr. M. L, Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey bull, " Quincy." 

2. Second premium to Dr. M, L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey bull, ".Darnle3^'' 

3. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey bull, "Rambler of Cherry Hill."' 
6. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Jersey bull, " Brown Bessie's Son." 

3. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey bull, " Lord Hamilton." 

4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein bull, " Fairfax de Kol." 
3. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein bull calf, " Earl Aggie de Kol." 

2. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein bu/ calf. 

3. Second premium to W. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire bull. 



4. First premium to L. Holman, Salem, for Jersey bull. 

Wesley B. Barton, judge. B. F. Barnes, Samuel T. 
Poor — Committee. 



MILCH COWS. 

$1. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for best butter cow, to Guernsey cow, " Diana of 

Springhill." 
4. Second premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey cow, " Diana of Springhill." 
7. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey cow "Cousin Sue." 
7. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, for 

Jersey cow, No. 17. 
4. Second premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey cow, " Brandas Dairy Morrison." 

7. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Ayrshire cow. No. 460. 
4. Second premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Ayrshire cow, " Venus." 

8. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

best milch cow of any age or breed, Holstein cow, 

" Sophie Barto Fairfax." 
7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover for 

Holstein cow, " Sophia Barto Fairfax." 
4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 

for Holstein cow, " Methch. 4th Pauline." 
4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein cow " Betz Fairfax." 
7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Guernsey cow, " Sadie." 
7. First premium to W. B. Carlton, Danvers, for best 

grade Ayrshire cow. 



5. Second premium to W. B. Carlton, Danvers, for best 
milch cow of any age or breed, for grade Ayrshire 
cow. 

7. First premium to Everett D. Richards, Lynnfield, for 
Kerry cow. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

$10. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
herd of five Holstein cows. 
8. Second premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for herd of five Jersey cows. 
W. B. Barton, judge. Asa T. Newhall, Alvin Smith, 
Amos P. Alley — Committee. 

Herd No. 1. 

Committee on Herds of Milch Cows : — 

I enter for your consideration for herds of milch cows, 
the Holstein Fresian cows : " Sophie Barto Fairfax " 6 
yrs. old, calved September 10. From Oct. 1, 1901 to May 
1, 1902, 6 mos., she gave 5,600 lbs. milk. " Lady Marion 
Fairfax," 6 yrs. old, calved Sept. 9. As a 5 year old she 
gave 9,800 lbs. milk. " Methchtilde 4th Pauline," calved 
Aug. 12, 7 yrs. old, gave in season of 1901-2, 10,430 lbs. 
milk, is now giving 50 lbs. per day. " Betz Fairfax," 7 yrs. 
old, last calf Sept. 29, 1901. Due Mar. 28, 1903, gave 
11,500 lbs. milk in 11 mos. from Oct. 1, 1901. "Esther 
Shepard 2d," 8 yrs. old, calved May 24 ; season of 1901-02 
she gave 8,500 lbs. milk. 

FEED AND CARE. 

The winter feed was dry fodder consisting of oat and 
and corn fodder with first and second crop English hay, 
10 qts. grain, 4 of gluten, 2 of cotton seed meal and 4 qts. 
bran per day, fed and watered twice a day. In summer 



1 1 

tliey run to pasture and have had 2 qts. gluten meal per 
day, and for past two weeks have had feed of second crop 
hay once a day. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James C. Poor. 

statement of dr. m. l. chamberlain's herd of 

JERSEYS. 

Milk Record. 
B. T. Perfection, 7,200 lbs. in 12 mos. test 6% 

Brendas D;iiry Morrison, 9,500 " •' •' " " 6i 
No. 39, 8,600 '• " '• " "5 1-5 

Prince Rob's Lucile, 7,600' " " 6 

Madam of St. Lambert, 7,000 " ' 6 



HEIFERS— PURE BREED. 

i5. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Guernsey heifer, " Hernia of the Elms," in milk. 

4. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Guernsey heifer, " Lady Palmer of Cherry Hill." 

2. Second premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Bever- 
ly, for Guernsey heifer, " Lady Palmer's Chum." 

4. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, for 
Guernsey heifer, " Gipsies 3d Buttercup." 

4. .First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Guernsey heifer, " Lady Gray of Cherry Hill." 

5. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, " Patrian Ditt Minn," in milk. 
4. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, " Lady Gem of Brookline." 
4. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, " Cherry Hill Milia Ann Pogis." 
4. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, " Golden Cornelia." 



12 



5. First premium to Dr. M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for Ayrshire heifer, " Belle," in milk. 

4. First premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for Hol- 
stein heifer, " Betz Havergale."' 

4. First premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 
Holstein heifer, " Zalma de Kol." 

3. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Guernse}^ heifer. 

4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover for 

Holstein heifer, " Myra Fairfax Netherland." 
2. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Sophia Barto Zalma." 
2. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Maid of Paul." 
4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " My Netherland Paul." 
2. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, "Sophie de Kol." 
4. First premium to John F. Donahue, Peabody, for Hol- 
stein heifer. 
2. Second premium to L. Holman, Salem, for Jersey 

heifer. 
2. Second premium to Frank Stanley, Peabody, for 

Guernsey heifer. 



HEIFERS— GRADE. 

$4. First premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 

grade Holstein, " Rosetta." 
2. Second premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 

grade Holstein, " Louise." 
4. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

grade Ayrshire, " Ceres." 
2. Second premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

grade Ayrshire, " Pomono." 



13 



4. First premium to John H. Perkins, Lynnfield, for 

grade Holstein. 
4. First premium to John H. Perkins, Lynnfield, for 

grade Holstein. 
4. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

grade Guernsey, " Dinah." 
4. First premium to L. Holman, Salem, for grade Jersey. 
4. First premium to Frank Stanley, Peabody, for grade 

Ayrshire. 
4. First premium to L. J. Bordeaux, Danvers, for grade 

Jersey. 
2. Second premium to L. J. Bordeaux, Danvers, for 

grade Jersey. 

W. B. Barton, Judge; George L. Averill, Thomas E. 
Cox — Committee. 



WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

$8. First premium to Dr. M. L, Chamberlain, Beverly, 
for pair Holsteins. 



STEERS. 

$5. First premium to Francis O. Kimball, Danvers, for 
pair Holsteins. 

Abel Stickney, James P. Merridew — Committee. 



STALLIONS FOR DRIVING. 

$S. First premium to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for stallion 
" Alex'r McGreggor." 



BROOD MARES. 

■$o. Second premium to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for 
mare and colt. 
Geo. M. Barker, O. S. Butler — Committee. 



14 

FAMILY HORSES. 

$6. First premium to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for chest- 
nut mare, " Sylvetta."' 
4. Second premium to Henry J. Poor, Peabody, for bay 
mare. 



GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

$12. First premium to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for chest- 
nut horse. " Fenara." 
9. Second premium to John Meagher, Peabody, for 
brown hoise. 



LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

|6. First premium to Mrs. Frances O. Perkins, Lynn- 
field, for brown mare, " Duchess." 
4. Second premium to Mrs. Richard Newell, West New- 
bury, for chestnut horse, " Jim Wade." 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

$5. First premium to B. P. Ware, Marblehead, for single 

mare, " Nellie." 
6. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

pair farm horses. 
4. Second premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 

pair farm horses. 
6. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

pair farm horses with load. 
4. Second premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield, for 

pair farm horses with load. 
Geo. M. Baker, Peter Holt, Wm. Messervey— Committee. 



15 
SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

16. First premium to B. W. Farnham, No. Andover, for 
bay mare. 
George H. Gibney, N. P. Perkins, Isaac F. Knowlton 
— Committee. 



PAIRS OF FARM HORSES. 

$8. First premium to Thomas E. Cox, Lynnfield. 
5. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover. 
Wm. B. Carlton, David Pingree, F. A. Dodge, C. E. 
Hinklev — Committee. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

$(!. First premium to Josiah Fitz, -Ith, Lynn, for 4 year 
old filly. 
4. Second premium to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for 4 

year old gelding, " Theteria." 
4. First premium to Charles Sanders, Peabody, for bay 

stallion 2 years old. 
2. First premium to E. A. Wheelan, Beverly, for stal- 
lion colt, " Eraprol Wilkes." 
4. First premium to J. W. Trask, Beverly, for chestnut 
colt I year old. 
George M. Baker, Isaac F. Knowlton, W. S. Hughes — 
Committee. 



HURDLE JUMPING. 

^8. First premium to A. P. Gardner, Hamilton, for horse 

" Ambassador." 
4. Second premium to Myopia Hunt Club, for horse 

"Warpaint." 
6. First premium to A. P. Gardner, Hamilton, for high 

jump to horse " Ambassador." 



i6 

2, Second premium to Myopia Hunt Club, for high jump 
to horse " Warpaint." 
T. G. Frothingham, Dudley P. Rogers — Committee. 



SWINE— LARGE BREEDS. 

$5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Berkshire boar. 
3. Second premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Berkshire sow. 
5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Berkshire sow and pigs. 
3. Second premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

grade Chester sow. 
5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Cheshire sow. 
3. Second premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Cheshire sow and pigs. 
5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

weaned pigs. 
3. Second premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

grade sows. 
5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Yorkshire boar. 
5. First premium to J. H. McCarthy & Co., Peabody, 

for O. I. Chester sow. 
5. First premium to J. H. McCarthy & Co., Peabody, 

for O. I. Chester boar. 
3. Second premium to J. H. McCarthy & Co. , Peabody, 

for grade sow. 
5. First premium to J. H. McCarthy & Co., Peabody, 

for grade sow and pigs. 
5. First premium to J. H. McCarthy & Co., Peabody, 

for Mackey boar. 



17 

^5. First premium to J. H. McCarthy & Co., Peabody, 

for O. I. C. and Yorkshire sows. 
3. Second premium to J. H. McCarthy & Co., Peabody, 

for sow and pigs. 
5. First premium to J. H. McCarthy & Co., Peabody 

for Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
5. First premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for 0. 

I. Chester boar. 
5. First premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for 

grade Berkshire sow and pigs. 
5. First premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus,for grade 

sow and pigs. 
B. Second premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for 

grade sow and pigs. 
5. First premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for 

Chester boar. 
3. Second premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for 

grade Berkshire sow and pigs. 
3. Second premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for 

weaned pigs. 
5. First premium to M. L. Chamberlain, Beverly, for 

Poland China boar. 
3. Second premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

sow and pigs. 
3. Second premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

sow and pigs. 
3. Second premium to Whiteside, Danvers, for Berk- 
shire boar. 
John H. Perkins, John W. Lovett — for the Committee. 



SWINE— SMALL BREEDS. 

3. Second premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Yorkshire boar. 
5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

Yorkshire sow. 



i8 

P5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 2 

Yorkshire sows. 
5. First premium to J. J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

med. Yorkshire boar. 
3. Second premium to Thomas W. Reiley, Saugus, for 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
3. Second premium to J. T. Cooper, Peabody, for med 

sow and pigs. 
3. Second premium to J. T. Carroll, Peabody, for grade 

sow and pigs. 
5. First premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 

J. Kavanaugh, Andrew Lane, Allen Smith — Committee. 



POULTRY. 

|2. First premium to Lakeside poultry yards, Hamilton, 

for barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to Lakeside poultry yards, Hamilton, 

for barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pen buff Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair buff Wyandotte fowls. 

1. Second premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair buff Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 

brown Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to Wm. E, Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

brown Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 

brown Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

brown Leghorn fowls. 
1. Second premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

brown Leghorn chicks. 



19 

^2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 
S. L. Wyandotte chicks. 

1. Second premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. L. Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 

R. I. red fowls. 
2. Second premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pen 

light Brahma chicks. 
2. First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pen light 

Brahma fowls. 
2. First premium te Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair light 

Brahma chicks. 

1. Second premium to Otis Caswell, Beveily, for pair 

light Brahma chicks. 

2. First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair light 

Brahma fowls. 

1. Second premium to A. F. Thompson, Beverly, for 

pair old Pekin ducks. 

2. First premium to A. F. Thompson, Beverly, for pair 

young Pekin ducks. 
2. First premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for pen 
R. I. red chicks. 

1. Second premium to Victor M. Durgin, Salem, for 

pair buff Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to A. B. Sim, Peabody, for pair Pekin 

ducks. 
2. First premium to A. B. Sim, Peabody, for pair Part- 
ridge Wyandotte fowls. 

1. Second premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 

2. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen. 

R. I. red chicks. 



20 



|2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenlmm, for pair 

R. I. red fowls. 
2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for pair 

R. I. red chicks. 
2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 

S. C. Hamburg fowls. 
2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 

S. C. Hamburg chicks. 
•2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for pair 

S. C. Hamburg fowls. 
2. First premium to G. A. Addison, Wenham, for pair 

S. C. Hamburg chicks. 

1. Second premium to Wm. A. McGreggor, Beverly, 

for pair S. C. Hamburg fowls. 

2. First premium to Wra. A. McGreggor, Beverly, for 

pair Am. Dominique fowls. 

2. First premium to Wm. A. McGreggor, Beverly, for 
pair Am. Dominique chicks. 

2. First premium to Lawrence Perkins, Beverly, for pen 
white Leghorn chicks. 

2. First premium to Lawrence Perkins, Beverly, for 
pair white Leghorn fowls. 

2. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair sil- 
ver Wyandotte fowls. 

1. Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

silver Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pen sil- 

ver Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First preminm to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pair 
buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 

1. Second premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 

pair buff Plymouth Rocks. 

2. First premium to Josiah Fitz 4th, Lynn, for pair buff 

Leghorn fowls. 
1. Second premium to Josiah Fitz 4th, Lynn, for pair 
buff Leghorn fowls. 



21 

2. First premium to Josiah Fitz 4th, Lynn, for pair buff 
Leghorn chicks. 

1. Second premium to Josiah Fitz 4th, Lynn, for pair 

buff Leghorn chicks. 

2. First premium to Josiah Fitz 4th, Lynn, for pen buff 

Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to Ira S. Hickford, Lynn, for pen 

black Langshan fowls. 
2. First premium to Ira S. Hickford, Lynn, for pen 

black Langshan chicks. 
2. First premium to Joseph H. Sewell, Peabody, for 

pair buff Polish fowls. 
2. First premium to Loring Holden, Beverly, for pen 

black Cochin chicks. 
2. First premium to Loring Holden, Beverly, for pair 

black Cochin chicks. 

1. Second premium to Loring Ilolden, Beverly, for pair 

black Cochin chicks. 

2. First premium to Loring Holden, Beverly, for pair 

black Cochin fowls. 
2. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 
silver Wyandotte chicks. 

1. Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

silver Wyandotte chicks. 
4. Gratuity to Thomas E. Cox, Lynn field, for collection 
of Bantams. 

2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan chicks. 

1. Second premium to A. W, Tyler, Peabod}^ for pair 

Houdan chicks. 

2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen 

Houdan chicks. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 
8. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

collection of Bantams. 



22 

$2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 
black Langshan fowls. 
1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair black Langshan fowls. 
1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 
pair black Langshan chicks. 

1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair French Houdan fowls. 

2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pen 

French Houdan fowls. 
2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Bronze turkeys. 
2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Bronze turkey chicks. 

1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Bronze turkey chicks. 

2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

black Langshan chicks. 
5. Gratuity to Kimball Bros., Lynn, for collection Ban- 
tams. 

3. Gratuity to W. S. Flint, Danvers, for collection 

Bantams. 
2. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for pair 

R. L. brown Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for pair 

brown Leghorn chicks. 

1. Second premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for 

pair brown Leghorn chicks. 
[ 2. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for pen 
brown Leghorn chicks. 

2. First premium to F. O. Kimball, Danvers, for pair 

golden Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

dark Brahma fowls. 
2. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

dark Brahma chicks. 



23 



$1. Second premium to Cluiiles M. Poor, Peabody, for 

pair dark Brahma chicks. 
2. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

buff Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lj'nn, for pair R. C. 

R. I. red chicks. 
2. First premium to Fred W. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

black Minorca chicks. 

1. Second premium to Fred W. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

black Minorca chicks. 

2. First premium to Fred W. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

black Minorca fowls. 
2. First premium to Fred W. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to L. Holman, Salem, for pair white 

Leghorn fowls. 
1. Second premium to L. Holman, Salem, for pair white 

Leghorn fowls. 

1. Second premium to Osgood Bros., Peabody, for pair 

black Langshan fowls. 

2. First premium to Charles Robinson, Marblehead, for 

pair buff Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Wenham, for 

pen white Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbur}-, Wenham, for 

pen white Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Wenham, for 

pair white Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Wenham, for 

pair white Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. white Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to W. E. Dexter, Beverly, for pair 

R. C. R. I. red fowls. 
1. Second premium to W. E. Dexter, Beverly, for pair 

R. C. R. I. red fowls. 



24 

^1. Second premium to H. Burnham, Wenham, for pair 

light Brahma fowls. 
2. First premium to H. Burnham, Wenham, for pair 

Partridge Brahma fowls. 

1. Second premium to H. Burnham, Wenham, for pair 

Partridge Brahma fowls. 

2. First premium to H. Burnham, Wenham, for pen 

dark Cochin fowls. 
2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair old 

Toulouse geese. 
2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

young Toulouse geese. 
2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

Embden geese. 
L Second premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

Bronze turkeys. 
W. B. Atherton, judge. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

$8. Gratuity to J. Henry Nason, Boxford, dump cart. 
5. Gratuity to W. J, Munroe, Lynnfield, for gasoline 
engine. 
10. First premium to George D. Hooper, Danvers, for 

2 horse market wagon. 
10. First premium to George E. Daniels, Rowley, for 
two horse dump cart. 
8. Gratuity to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for market 

wagon. 
8. Gratuity to the Fuller Manuf. Co., Danvers, for col- 
lection of implements. 
5. Gratuity to Henry F. Bond, Lynnfield, for hay 
tedder. 

James J. H. Gregory — for the Committee. 



25 

CARRIAGES. 

$5. Gratuity to H. H. Pillsbury, Danvers, for partition 
front carryall. 
3. Gratuity to H. H. Pillsbury, Danvers, for cut under 
carryall, 

2. Gratuity to H. H. Pillsbury, Danvers, for open runa- 

bout. 
5. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for canopy 
surrey. 

3. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for Concord 

buggy. 
5. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for cut under 

runabout. 
2. Gratuity to M. P. Doane, Danvers, for Democrat 
wagon. 

S. D. Hood, Richard Newell, George E. Daniels — Com- 
mittee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



GRANGES. 



125. First premium to West Boxford Grange. 
15. Second premium to Laurel Grange of West New- 
bury. • 

Sherman Nelson, Mrs. Francis O. Perkins, Sarah H. 
Blunt — Committee. 



DAIRY. 



$5. First premium to Mrs. S. W. Knapp, Peabody, for 5 
lbs. butter. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

$2. First premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for 
collection of canned fruit. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. H. M. O'Donnell, Peabody, 
for collection of jelly. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. G. A. Smith, Salem, for 

variety of canned fruit. 

2. First premium to Mrs. O. E. Hardy, Peabody, for 

collection of jelly. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for collection 
of jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for fruit and 
mince meat. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. Mabel Whipple, Hamilton, for col- 
lection of fruits. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. P. J. Frye, Peabody, for variety 
of pickles. 



27 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Gage, Danvers, for canned 

vecfeta])les. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Gage, Danvers, for ginger- 
bread and sponge cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Childs, Peabody, for pickles. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Hayden, Peabody, for pickles. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. D. Hoag, Peabody, for jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. D. Iloag, Peabody, for canned 

fruit. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss S. E. Austin, Salem, for jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Frank Lord, Peabody, for dandelions. 
2. First premium to Mrs. Eliza A. Cnle, F'>oxford, for 
white bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Eliza A. Cole, Box ford, for graliana 
bread. 
2. First premium to Miss Maggie Dunleavy, Peabody, 

for srraham bread. 
1. Second premium to Miss Maggie Dunleavy, Peabody, 

for white bread. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Maggie Dunleavy, Peabody, for 
brown bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Maggie Dunleavy, Peabody, for 
doughnuts. 
1. Gratuity to Grace McDonald, Peabody, for bread and 

biscuit. 
1. Gratuity to Winnifred Merrill, Peabody, for bread 

and biscuit. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. J. R. Fuller, Danvers, for bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Etta McDonald, Peabody for bread . 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Gamwell, Peabody for cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Thomas McGhee, Salem, for cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss G. E. Bennett, Salem, for cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss J. R. Copp, Danvers, for cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss M. A. Noyes, Lynn, for bread. 

Henry Alley, John J. Gould, Mrs. George F. Sanger, 
Maria W. Osgood — Committee. 



28 

PEARS. 

$2.00 First premium to Mrs. Thomas Wilson, Peabody, 
for Belle Lucrative. 

2.00 First premium to Wm. T. Dole, Peabody, for 
Buerre d'Anjou. 

1.50 First premium to Wm. T. Dole, Peabody, for 
Buerre Diel. 

1.50 First premium to George E. Bartlett, Peabody, for 
Buerre Hardy. 

2.00 First premium to Mrs. Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, 
for Bartlett. 

2.00 First premium to J. M. Teele, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 

1.00 Gratuity to J. M. Teele, Lynn, for Dana's Hovey. 

2.00 First premium to J. H. Crosraan, Swampscott, for 
Urbaniste. 

2.00 First premium to J. H. Crosman, Swampscott, for 
Buerre Bosc. 

2.00 First premium to L. A. Moore, Peabody, for Seckel. 

2.00 First premium to Fred Carlton, Peabody, for How- 
ell. 

1.00 Gratuity to Fred Carlton, Peabody, for Sheldon. 

1.00 Gratuity to Fred Carlton, Peabody, for Seckel. 

2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Duchess. 

2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Law- 
rence. 

1.00 Gratuity to Fred Larrabee, Peabody, for Vicar. 

1.00 Gratuity to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Bosc. 

1.00 Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Law- 
rence. 

2.00 First premium to Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for 
Comice. 

2.00 First premium to Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for 
Vicar. 

2.00 First premium to W. F. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 
Dana's Hovey. 



29 

$2.00 First premium to G. W. Eaton, Peabody, for 

Clairgean. 
1.00 Gratuity to G. W. Eaton, Peabody, for Belle 

Lucrative. 
1.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for Bos- 

souck. 
2.00 First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Sheldon. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Duchess. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Clairgeau. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

d'Anjou. 
1.00 Gratuity to Miss E. R. Ward, Peabody, for Bart- 

lett. 

B. F. Stanley, T. J. Ring, Geo. C. Farrington — Com- 
mittee. 



APPLES. 

f 2.00 First premium to George Diebel, Peabody, for 

Baldwin, 
1.00 Second premium to A. D. Lewellyn, Wenham, for 

Baldwin. 
2.00 First premium to C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for Dan- 

vers Sweet. 
1.00 Second premium to E. P. Balcomb, Salem, for 

Danvers Sweet. 
2.00 First premium to J. F. Mudge, Danvers, for King 

Tompkins. 
1.00 Second premium to W. S. Hughes, No. Andover, 

for King Tompkins. 
1.00 Second premium to John A.Andrews, Boxford, for 

Red Russett. 



11.60 First premium to John A. Andrews, Boxford, for 

Maiden Blush. 
.50 Gratuity to John A. Andrews, Boxford, for August 

Sweet. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Graven- 
stein. 
.50 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Porter. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Snow. 

.50 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Larry. 
1.00 Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

Gravenstein. 
2.00 First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Porter. 
2.00 First premium to George A. Smith, Peabody, for 

Mcintosh Red. 
1.00 Second premium to Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for 

Mcintosh Red. 
2.00 First premium to Daniel Sheen, Peabody, for Hunt 

Russett. 
1,00 Second premium to S. B. George, Groveland, for 

Hunt Russett. 
2.00 First premium to W. A. Giles, Peabody, for 

Wealthy. 
1.00 Second premium to Mrs. Mary J. Sim, Peabody, 

for Wealthy. 
1.00 Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, 

for Roxbury Russett. 
2.00 First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

R. I. Greening. 
1.00 Second premium to W. P. Clark, Peabody, for 

Snow. 
1.00 Second premium to Geo. B. Austin, Boxford, for 

Porter. 
.50 Gratuity to Geo. B. Austin. Boxford, for Roxbury 

Russett. 
.50 Gratuity to Geo. B, Austin, Boxford, for Hubbard- 

ston. 



31 

fl.OO Second premium to Mrs. Mary A. Brown, Peabody, 
for R. I. Greening. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. E. Reed, Peabody, for 

Hubbardston. 
1.50 First premium to Wm. E. Reed, Peabody, for 

Hyslop Crab. 
1.00 Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Hubbardston. 
1.50 First premium to C. A. Southwick, Peabody, for 
Wolf River. 
.50 Gratuity to Alex'r Andrade, Peabody, for Wolf 
River. 
1.00 Gratuity to E, A. Denners, Salem, for Alexandria. 
.50 Gratuity to William Bushly, Peabody, for Yellow- 
Trans, Crab. 
.50 Gratuity to A. N. Welch, Peabody, for Margaret. 
.50 Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Presi- 
dent. 
.50 Gratuity to Geo. A. Knigbt, Peabody, for R. I. 
Greening. 
1.50 First premium to B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, 
for Northern Spy. 
.50 Gratuity to B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

Hyslop Crab. 
.50 Gratuity to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Wealthy. 
.50 Gratuity to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Graven- 
stein. 
1.00 Gratuity to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Col- 
lection. 
.50 Gratuity to F. H. Parker, Lynn, for Hyslop Crab. 
.50 Gratuity to Henry Berry, Dan vers, for King Tomp- 
kins. 
.50 Gratuity to A. E. Whipple, Hamilton, for Trans- 
cendent Crab. 
.50 Gratuity to George Pratt, Dan vers, for Gravenstein . 



32 

.50 Gratuity to A. A. Mason,Beveily, for N. Y. Green- 
ing. 
.50 Gratuity to R. K. Buxton, Peabody, for Baldwin. 

Geo. W. Chadwick, William K. Cole — Committee. 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

^2.00 First premium to James L. Hill, Salem, for Yellow- 
Flesh peach. 
2.00 First premium to W. J. Currier, Danvers, for Es- 
sex Co. peach. 
2.00 First premium to Charles H. Preston, Danvers, for 

old Mixon peach. 
2.00 First premium to W. H. Cruff, Marblehead, for 

Yellow flesh peach. 
1.00 Gratuity to A. N. Welch, Peabody, for Early 
Crawford peach. 
.75 Gratuity to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for Seedling 

peach. 
.75 Gratuity to B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

Yellow Flesh peach. 
.50 Gratuity to G. P. Pope, Danvers, for Early Craw- 
ford peach. 
.50 Gratuity to W. S. Hughes, No. Andover, for Yel- 
low Rare Ripe. 
1.00 Gratuity to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for Foster 

peach. 
1.00 Gratuity to F. C. Wiggin, Peabody, for Native 
peach. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. G. W. Stickney, Beverly, for 

Foster peach. 
.75 Gratuity to J. F. Foster, No. Andover, for Foster 

peach. 
.75 Gratuity to C. F. Austin, Boxford, for Elburton 
peach. 



03 



$1.50 Gratuity to S. B. George, Groveland, for Elburton 

peach. 
2.00 First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Early Crawford. 
1.50 First premium to J. H. Punchard, Marblehead, for 

Fiske grapes. 
3.00 First premium to Henry Alley, Wenham, for Green 

Mountain grapes. 
4.00 First premium to Mrs. G. W. Stickney, Beverly, 

for Black Hamburgs. 
8.00 First premium to S, G. Barker, Methuen, for 

Moore's early grapes. 
3.00 First premium to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for 

Worden grapes. 
1.00 Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for Niagara 

grapes. 
3.00 First premium to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for 

Brighton grapes. 
"2.00 Second premiun to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, 

for basket assorted fruit. 
8.00 First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Moore's Diamond grapes. 
1.50 Gratuit}" to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for basket 

assorted fruit. 
3.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for basket 

assorted fruit. 
1.50 First premium to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, foj. 

Delaware grapes. 
8.00 First premium to Bennett Halowell, Peabody, for 

Niagara grapes. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. Eliza J. Porter, Peabody. for 

Concord grapes. 
1 00 Gratuity to S. E. Knapp, Peabody, for Green 

Mountain grapes. 
1.00 Gratuity to N. C. Patterson, Peabody, for Green 

Mountain grapes. 



34 

fl.OO Gratuity to Wm. B. Foster, Beverl}', for Moore's 

Diamond grapes. 
1.00 Gratuity to W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for Moore's 

Early grapes. 
2.00 First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Lombard plum. 
2.00 First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, 

Magna Bonum plum. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Greely plum. 
2.00 First premium to W. E. Porter, Danvers, for Sat- 

suma plum. 
2.00 First premium to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Wickson plum. 
1.00 Gratuity to Charles H. Preston, Danvers, for 

Wickson plum.' 
1.00 Gratuity to J. F. Mudge, Danvers, for Wickson 

plum. 
1.00 Gratuity to F. D. Hoag, Peabody, for Green Gage 

plum. 
1.00 Gratuity to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Green Gage 

plum. 
.50 Gratuity to Moody Gilliatt, Salem, for Early 

Crawford peach. 
1.00 Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Cham- 
pion quince. 
3.00 First premium to Mrs. M. A. Brown, Peabody, 

for Orange quince. 
3.00 First premium to Mrs. Wright, Peabody, for 

Champion quince. 
1.00 Gratuity to A. W. Berry, Peabody, for Orange 

quince. 
A. B. Fellows, Edwin Bates, J. J. Manning, O. F. New- 
hall — Committee. 



35 



PLANTS. 

fl.OO First premium to J. G. Demeritt, Peabody, for 
collection of ornamental plants. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, 

for salvias. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, 

for collection of geraniums. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, 

for cole us. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, 

for collection of begonias. 
1.00 First premium to Miss I. B. Farnham, Peabody, for 

ferns. 
1.00 First premium to Miss I. B. Farnham, Peabody, 
for native ferns. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. G. A. Dreher, Danvers, for Rex 

begonias. 
.50 Gratuity to Geo. A. Knight, Peabody, for Jerusa- 
lem cherry tree. 
.50 Gratuity to Charles H. Lewis, Salem, lor Rex 

begonias. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. S. Goldthwaite, Peabody, for 

asparagus P. A. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Canie Stanley, Beverl}^, for 

elephant begonia. 
.60 Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

Rex begonia. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

abutilons. 
.50 Gratuity to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, f or salpiglossis 
.50 Gratuity to Miles Burke, Lynn, for sweet peas. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. L. Putnam, Peabody, for 

hydrangeas. 
.60 Gratuity to J. G. Demeritt, Peabody,for hydrangeas. 



36 

$ .50 Gratuity to Walter Beckett, Peabody, for hydran- 
geas. 
.50 Gratuity to Mildred Fader, Peabody, for double 

sunflower. 
.75 Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for pair of 

bouquets. 
.50 Gratuity to Augusta F. Daniels, Peabody, for pair 

of bouquets. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. G. A. Morrill, Salem, for anemones. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. G. W. Chandler, Andover, for 

collection of asters. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Mary L. Hooper, Marblehead, for 

sanvitatia. 
.50 Gratuity to Eliza McDonald, Peabody, for Japanese 

lantern. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. G. E. Hayes, Peabody, for zinnias. 
.50 Gratuity to Mabel Kehoe, Peabody, for double 

petunias. 
.50 Gratuity to Jennie Innis, Danvers, for col. zinnias. 
.50 Gratuity to F. L. Putnam, Peabody, for col. asters. 
1.00 Gratuity to F. L. Putnam, Peabody, for col. asters. 
.50 Gratuity, no name, for asters. 
.50 Gratuity to H. M. Taggart, Salem, for col. asters. 
.50 Gratuity to H. M. Taggart, Salem, for asters. 
.50 Gratuity to May Whipple, Salem, for Egyptian 

lotus. 
Ettore Tassinari, Peter J. Frye, C. H. Goulding, Sarah 
B. Herrick — Committee, 



FLOWERS. 

$3.00 First premium to E. F. Dvvyer & Son, Lynn, for 
100 vaiieties cultivated flowers. 
-3.00 First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 
5 varieties native flowers. 



11.00 First premium to E. F, Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 
12 varieties phlox. 
1.00 First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 

delphiniums. 
1.00 First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 

gladiolas. 
1.00 First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, for basket 

native flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 12 

garden annuals. 
2.00 Second premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for 100 

varieties cultivated flowers. 
2.00 First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for ger- 
aniums. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for single 

geraniums. 
2.00 First premium to Miles Burke, Lynn, for 50 

varieties native flowers. 
1.00 First premium to Miles Burke, Lynn, for pair 

bouquets. 
1.00 First premium to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

garden flowers. 
1.00 First premium to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

cannas. 
1.00 First premium to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

single petunias. 
.50 Gratuity to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for pair 

bouquets. 
.50 Second premium to Mrs. Carrie A. Roberts, Pea- 
body, for pair bouquets, 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie A. Roberts, Peabody, for 

phlox. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie A. Roberts, Peabody, for 

garden annuals. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Carrie A. Roberts, Peabody, 

for 1*2 asters. 



38 

^1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie A. Roberts, Peabody, for 

collection of asters. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Carrie A. Roberts, Peabody, 
for coxcombs. 
.60 Gratuity to Mrs. J. G. Demeritt, Peabody, for 

garden flowers. 
,60 Gratuity to Mrs. J. G. Demeritt, Peabody, for 

verbenas. 
.60 Gratuity to Mrs. J. G. Demeritt, Peabody, for 

victoria asters. 
.60 Gratuity to Mrs. J. G. Demeritt, Peabody, for 
coxcombs. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. B. H. Farnham, No. An- 
dover, for garden flowers. 
.60 Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

garden flowers. 
.60 Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
garden flowers. 
2.00 First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, 
for pansies. 
.60 Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

verbenas. 
.60 Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
double nasturtiums. 
1.00 Second premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, 
for geraniums. 
50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for native 

flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for garden 
flowers. 
1.00 First premium to Ida B. Farnham, Peabody, for 

garden flowers. 
2.00 First premium to Mrs. Esther Danforth, Peabody, 

for native flowers. 
1.00 Second premium to Mrs. Monies, Salem, for native 
flowers. 



39 

50. Gratuity to Mrs. Knowles, Peabody, for native 
flowers. 
3. First premium to Mrs. O. E. Hardy, Peabody, for 
floral design. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. O. E. Hardy, Peabody, for collec- 
tion of pansies. 
2. First premium to Eliza McDonald, Peabody, for 

Japan lilies. 
1. First premium to Grace McDonald, Peabody, for 24 
pansies. 

1. Second premium to Susan Bodge, Peabody, for Japan 

lilies. 

2. First premium to George Thurlow, West Newbury, 

for hardy phlox. 
1. Second premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for col- 
lection of pansies. 
.50. Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 24 pansies. 
1. First premium to J. H. Kimball, Peabody, for 24 
verbenas. 
.50. Gratuity to J. H. Kimball, Peabody, for double 

zinnias. 
.50. Gratuity to J. H. Kimball, Peabody, for marigolds. 
1. First premium to J. H. Kimball, Peabody, for scabio- 

sis. 
1. Gratuity to J. G. Basford, Peabody, for collection 

of dahlias. 
1. First premium to Nellie O'Brien, Peabody, for garden 

annuals. 
.50. Gratuity to Nellie O'Brien, Peabody, for double 
zinnias. 
1. First premium to G. E. Hayes, Peabody, for Victoria 
asters. 
.50. Gratuity to G. E. Hayes, Peabody, for 24 Victoria 

asters. 
.50. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for phlox 
drummondi. 



40 

.50. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for diantlius 
pink. 

.50, Gratuit}'^ to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for African 
marigolds. 
1. First premium to Mrs. B. F. Southwick, Peabody, for 
phlox druramondi. 

.50. Gratuity Mrs. F. L. Pitman, Peabody, for phox 
drummondi. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for phlox 
drummondi. 

.50. Gratuity "to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for Afri- 
can marigolds. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for scabi- 
osis. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 

salpiglossis. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Hattie Woodbury, Beverly, 
for nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Annie Reed, Peabody, for collection 
of nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for collection 
of nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. James A. King, Peabody, for col- 
lection of nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for collection 
of nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Raymond W. Skinner, Peabody, for 24 
pansies. 
1. First premium to Mrs. G. R. Underwood, Peabody, 

for zinnias. 
1. First premium to ]\Irs. I. M. Barker, Peabody, for 
marigolds. 

.50. Gratuity to Warren Wilson, Peabod}^ for marigolds. 



41 

.50. Gratuity to Buriiette Hallowell, Peabody, for single 
petunias. 
1. First premium to Burnette Hallowell, Peabody, for 
French maiigolds. 
.50. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for French mari- 
golds. 
1. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for pompon 

dahlias. 
1. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for 12 cactus 

dahlias. 
1, Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for collection 
of dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Louis Phaleu, Peabod}^ for single 

petunias. 
.50. Gratuity to Elsie M. Spence, Peabody, for mari- 
golds. 
1. First premium to Mrs. C. W. Gowen, West Newbury, 
for dianthus pink. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. R. E. Hager, Peabody, for dianthus 

pink. 
.50. Gratuity to the Misses Emery, West Newbur}^ for 
salpiglossis. 
1. First premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 
large dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for laige 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for cactus 
dahlias. 
1. Gratuity to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

single dahlias. 
1. Gratuity to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for col- 
lection of dahlias. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Burleigh, Haverhill, for large 

dahlias. 
1. First premium to Mrs. M. E. Burleigh, Haverhill, for 
pompon dahlias. 



42 

$1. Gratuity to Dwyer & Moore, Lynn, for 12 cactus 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Dwyer & Moore, Lynn, for pompon 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to W. D. Moore, Lynn, for pompon dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. H. Gruff, Marblehead, for large 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for large 

dahlias. 
1. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for bouquet 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for bouquet 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for bouquet 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Edna Ingalls, Peabody, for large dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mabel Thomas, Peabody, for collection 

of dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. A. Fowler, Peabody, for single 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. L. Mansfield, Saugus, for bouquet 

dahlias. 
Ettore Tassinari, Mrs. Richard Newell, Mary F. 
Herrick — Committee. 



VEGETABLES— FIRST CLASS. 

^2. First premium to Edward O'Rourke, Peabody, for 

Danvers onions. 
2. First premium to A. F. Lee, Beverly, for short horn 

carrot. 
1. Second premium to A. F. Lee, Beverly, for red 

onions. 
1. Second premium to A. F. Lee, Beverly, for nlangold 

wurtzels. 



43 

f 1. Second premium to Willis Dodd, Peabody, for pars- 
nips. 
2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
mangold wurtzels. 
.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, forDanvers 

carrots. 
.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for parsnips. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for red onions. 
.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for mangold 

wurtzels. 
.50, Gratuity to Walter L Chadwick, Boxford, for 
Danvers onions. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for white 

flat turnips. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for purple 

top turnips. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Pearl 
of Savoy potatoes. 

1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Early 

Rose potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to H. M, Killam, Boxford, for salsify. 
.50. Gratuity to W. B. Cottelle, Salem, for Danvers red 

onions. 
.50. Gratuity to C. S. Emmerton, Peabody, for Carman's 

No. 3 potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to A. W. Felt, Peabody, for mangold 

wurtzels. 

2. First premium to B. P. Ware, Marblehead, for yellow 

flat onions. 
.50. Gratuity to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for short horn 

carrots. 
.50. Gratuity to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for New Queen 

potatoes. 
1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Pearl 

of Savoy potatoes. 



44 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Clark's: 
No. 1 potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Beauty 

of Hebron potatoes. 

2. Kirst premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural N. 

Y. potatoes. 
2. I-'irst premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 

iilush potatoes. 
2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Roberts potatoes. 

1, Second piemium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Northern potatoes. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Maine potatoes. 
1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for white 
flat turnips. 

1. Second preminm to W. H. Anderson, Boxford, for 

New Queen potatoes. 

2. First premium to W. H. Anderson, Boxford, for 

Ruta Baga turnips. 
2. First premium to Frank A Woodbury, Beverly, for 

Danvers carrots. 
.60. Gratuity to Frank A. Woodbury, Beverly, for 

Yellow Globe onions. 
.50. Gratuity to P. Bushby, Peabody, for Danvers carrots. 

1. Second premium to Georcre Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Danvers yellow onions. 
.50. Gratuity to C. W. Paul, No, Andover, for Danvers 

Globe onions. 
.50. Gratuity to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for white turnips. 

2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Edmunds 

ijeets. 

1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for In- 

termediate Danvers carrots. 

2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Long, 

Orange carrots. 



45 

12. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Early 
Rose potatoes. 

2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for New 
Queen potatoes. 

2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Car- 
man's No. 3 potatoes. 

2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Early 
Northern potatoes. 

2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beveily, for parsnips. 
.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Green Moun- 
tain potatoes. 

1. Second premium to Henry L. Cole, Boxford, for 
Rural N. Y. potatoes. 

1. Second premium to Henry L. Cole, Boxford, for 
Rural Blush potatoes. 

1. Second premium to Henry L. Cole, Boxford, for Car- 

man's No. 3 potatoes. 

2. First premium to Henry L. Cole, Boxford, for Clark's 

No. 1 potatoes. 

1. Second premium to Henrv L. Cole, Boxford, for 

Early Roberts potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to Henry L. Cole, Boxford, for Beauty of 
Hebron potatoes. 

2. First premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Beauty of Hebron potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Early 

Rose potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Green 

Mountain potatoes. 
1. Second premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Purple Top turnips. 
.50. Gratuity to O. E. Landers. Danvers, for Carman's 

No. 3 potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to O. E. Landers, Danvers, for New Queen 

potatoes. 
E. A. Emerson, Fred H. Bates, E. K. Lee — Committee. 



46 

VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

$2. First premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 
Hubbard squash. 
1. Second premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 
Crosby corn. 

1. Second premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Earlv Essex corn. 

2. First premium to A. F. Lee, Beverly, for Marrow 

squash. 
.50. Gratuity to A. F. Lee, Beverly, for sugar pumpkins. 
2. First premium to Mrs. R. Buxton, Peabody, for 

sweet corn. 
2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

cauliflower. 
1. Second premium to W. P. Clark, Peabody, for 

straight neck squash. 

1. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Stone 

tomatoes. 

2. First premium to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for col- 

lection 10 varieties tomatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to Irvin R. Ward, Beverly, for pumpkins. 
1. Second premium to John H. Punchard, Marblehead, 
for scallop squash. 

1. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for citron melon. 
.50. Gratuity to Willis Dodd, Peabody, for All Seasons 

cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity to Franklin Larrabee, Peabody, for Plum 

tomatoes. 

2. First premium to Geo. B. Austin, Boxford, for Sum- 

mer squash. 
2. First premium to Geo. B. Austin, Boxford, for water- 
melons. 

.50. Gratuity to Geo. B. Austin, Boxford, for early cab- 
bage. 

.50. Gratuity to Dale Farm, No. Andover, for squash. 



47 

-fl. Second premium to F. A. Dodge, Beverly, for Warren 

squash. 
./)0. Gratuity to F. A. Dodge, Beverly, for cauliflower. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cranberries. 

1. Second premium to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 

cauliflower. 

3. Second premium to E. K. Jenkins, Andover, for col- 

lection vegetables. 

2. First premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for Paris 

celery. 

2. First premium to G. S. Mason, Topsfield, for musk 
melons. 

1. Second premium to W. B. Carlton, Dan vers, for 

musk melons. 

2. First premium to A. M. Swinerton, Danvers, for 

Victor squash. 

1. Second premium to A. M. Swinerton, Danvers, for 

Victor squash. 

2. First premium to A. M. Swinerton, Danvers, for 

Stone tomatoes. 
1. Second premium to H. C. Woodbury, Beverly, for 

Savoy cabbage. 
1. Second premium to H. C. Woodbury, Beverly, for 

red cabbage. 
1. Second premium to H. C. Woodbury, Beverly, for 

All Seasons cabbage. 
1. Second premium to H. A. Stiles, Middleton, for 

watermelons. 

1. Second premium to H. G. Goodrich, Peabody, for 

Hubbard squash. 

2. First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for All 

Seasons cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Stone 
tomatoes. 

4. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for collec- 

tion vegetables. 



48 

^1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for white 
celery. 

1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Mar- 

row squash. 

2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Essex 

Hybrid squash. 
2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Turban 

squash. 
2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Bay 
State squash. 
.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for drumhead cab- 
bage. 

1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Turban squash. 

2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

sweet corn. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Savoy cabbage. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for red 

cabbage. 
2. Fiist premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Fottler's cabbage. 
..50. Gratuity to C. W. Paul, No. Andover, for tomatoes. 

0. W. Webster, Walter E. Bates— Committee. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

$5. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for field 
corn. 

1. First premium to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for rye. 

2. First premium to John A. Andrew, Boxford, for pop 

corn. 
1. Second premium to W. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pop 
corn. 



49 

$1. First premium to H. A. Stiles, Middleton, for field 

beans. 

.50. Gratuity to Geo. A. Knight, Peabody, for Lima beans. 

1. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for col. herbs. 

1. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 25 ears 

field corn. 

.50. Gratuity to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for Goddard 

shell beans. 
.50. Gratuity to Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for rice pop 

corn. 
.50. Gratuity to Geo. B. Austin, Boxford, for rice pop 
corn. 
J. J. Manning, J. Frank Foster, B. H. Farnham — Com- 
mittee. 



ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

$2. First premium to Wm. G. Webber & Co., Salem, for 
ladies' shoes. 
2. First premium to F. H. Moreland, Salem, for ladies' 

and gents' shoes. 
2. First premium to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for ladies' 
and gents' shoes. 
Diploma to B. N. Moore & Son, for fancy leather. 
Diploma to F. W. Lord & Co., Peabody, for hand and 
machine sewed shoes. 

Edwin P. Perkins, Thomas Carroll, L. A. Mudge — Com- 
mittee. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Diploma to L. A. Roberts & Co., Danvers, for cream of 

chocolate. 
Diploma to Cook & Co., Danvers, for Royal Cereal Co.'s 

cooked food. 



50 

Diploma to Dr. C. A. Buxton, Salem, for operating lamp. 
Diploma to A. J. Hollingsworth, Peabody, for horseshoes. 
Diploma to T. B. Horton, Lynn, for milk jar opener and 

replacer. 
Diploma to Frank E. Vincent, Lynn, for Goldena soap, 
f 1. Gratuity to Warren F. Esty, Danvers, for electric car. 

1. Gratuity to Samuel Poeton, Peabody, for electric 

supplies. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Tassanari, Salem, for cocoon display. 
.50. Gratuity to Carrie A. Pierce, Salem, for cane from 

Barbadoes. 
.50 Gratuity to Robert Barron, Peabody, for mantle 

mirror. 

2. Gratuity to Putnam & Creesey, Beverly, for rubber 

footwear. 
1. Gratuity to J. A. Poor, Peabody, for round belting. 
.50. Gratuity to S. J. Erisian, Salem, for picture. 
1. Gratuity to J. J. Dunney, Peabody, for hose wagon. 

Edwin P. Perkins, Thomas Carroll, Effie Merrill, L. A. 
Mudge — Committee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

$3. First premium to S. S. Has well, Danvers, for silk 
quilt. 

2. Second premium to Mrs. F. B. Masury, Salem, for 
knit quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. James, Danvers, for silk quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. E. F. Mackintire, Salem, for quilt 
and shams. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary Thompson, Salem, for slum- 
ber robe. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. A. P. Odell, Salem, for patch quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. G. E. Moses, Lynn, for log cabin 
quilt. 



51 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Marsh, Lynn, for outline 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Ruth P. Stiles, Middleton, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to E. V. Terrio, Beverly, for afghan. * 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Blaney, Peabody, for afghan. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Donnell, Peabody, for crazy 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Melinda Gray, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
Mrs. D. P. Lord — for the Committee. 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

$2. First premium to Mrs. A. W. Proctor, Peabody, for 
braided rug. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. Joseph Poor, Andover, for 

drawn rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Joseph Poor, Andover, for drawn 
rug. 

2. First premium to Mrs. Fred Speare, Beverly, for 

drawn rug. 
1. Second premium to Mary M. Legro, Dan vers, for 

braided rug. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. A. J. Munroe, Lynn, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. B. Gray, Salem, for drawn in 

mat. 
.50. Gratuity to Margaret Grotts, Beverly, for button 

mat. 
.75. Gratuity to M. F. Higgiiis, Beverly, for drawn in 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to M. F. Higgins, Beverly, for drawn in rug. 
.50. Gratuity to S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for braided rug. 



52 

.50. Gratuity to S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for braided rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. A. Kirk, Danvers, for drawn rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. T. C. Newhall, Lynn, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to J. C. Stanley, Beverly, for knit rug. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Donnell, Peabody, for knit 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. John C. Glencross, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Charlotte G. Smith, Peabody, for 

button mat. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary C. Lockwood, Peabody, for 

knit silk mat. 
.75. Gratuity to Nettie Raddin, Peabody, for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Woodworth, Salem, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Woodworth, Salem, for 

drawn rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. R. Adams, Marblehead, for cut 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to W. A. Tenney, Peabody, for drawn rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Nellie Armstrong, Salem, for braid- 
ed rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Emma J. Marvin, Salem, for star mat. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Goodwin, Salem, for braided rug. 
S. F. Kittredge, Eva A. Perley, S. E. Quint— Commit- 
tee. 



FANCY WORK. 

11.00. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Buxton, Peabody, for 
curtains. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. A. Struthers, Lynn, for purse. 
.50. Gratuity to H. B. Wallis, Beverly, for crocheted 
mats. 



53 

$ .60. Gratuity to Mrs. L. C. Carpenter, Salem, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Elmira Farwell, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

50. Gratuity to Agna Alford, Lynn, for crocheted mats. 

50. Gratuity to Theresa McGrath, Peabody, for table 
cover. 
1.00. Gratuity to Susanna Mills, Peabody, for socks. 
1.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. P. Odell, Salem, for Mexican 
scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. T. Chase, Salem, for center- 
piece. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Ina P. Dunn, Lynn, for apron. 

.50. Gratuity to Grace Burnham, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Pendar, Peabody, for sweater. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. E. A. Fay, Dan vers, for lace 
collar. 

.50. Gratuity to A. D, Perkins, Salem, for baskets. 

.50. Gratuity to A. F. Perkins, Salem, for baskets. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. V. Emilio, Salem, for jacket. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. G. Davis, Salem, for lace yoke. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn, for lace 
handkerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to M. A. Holbrook, Salem, for pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Ella Gate, Peabody, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to E. G. Walden, Salem, for pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Florence Knowles, Lawrence, for 
doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Florence Knowles, Lawrence, for lace 
collar. 

.50. Gratuity to E. V. Terrio, Beverly, for pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to E. V. Terrio, Beverly, for table cover. 

.50. Gratuity to E. V. Terrio, Beverly, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to E. V. Terrio, Beverly, for four doilies. 



54 

$ .50. Gratuity to E. V. Terrio, Beverly, for doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Lillian Stevenson, Lynn, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. F. Hammond, Peabody, for 
lace jacket. 

.50. Gratuity to Maude D. Wilkins, Salem, for hand- 
kerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Jessie Woolley, Salem, for pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. T. Noyes, Lynn, for center- 
I)iece. 

.50. Gratuity to Lizzie Curtis, Peabody, for table 
cover. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mary McHugh, Lynn, for table cover. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss M. J. Tibbetts, Danvers, for 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss M. J. Tibbetts, Danvers, for 
table cover. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss M. J. Tibbetts, Danvers, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. C. Byers, Lynn, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mildred Foster, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Elma J. Porter, Peabody, for pillow. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Peabody, for 
hood and sweater. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for 

centerpiece. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for 

centerpiece. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 



55 

$ .50 Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. I. A. Cowdry, Peabody, for doily. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. George Raddin, Peabody, for 
handkerchiefs. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Shaw, Peabody, for table 
cover. 

.50 Gratuity to Lizzie F. Williams, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. H. E. Adams, Beverly, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Grace Crosby, Peabody, for lace collars. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Andrew Fitz, Salem, for scarf. 

.50 Gratuity to Ethel Hammond, Salem, for doilies. 
1.00 Gratuity to Eliza S. Austin, Salem, for 6 doilies. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. G. Burbeck, Salem, for lace 
collars. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. L. J. Thomas, Salem, for tray 
cloths. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. E. L. Reed, Lynn, for sofa pillow. 

.50 Gratuity to Nellie F. Donovan, Peabody, for pillow. 

.50 Gratuity to Alice M. Austin, Boxford, for 
crocheted mat. 

.50 Gratuity to Alice M. Austin, Boxford, for cro- 
cheted mat. 
1.50 Gratuity to Miss H. M. Nichols, Salem, for 12 
doilies. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Gonsalves, Ipswich, for 
centerpiece. 
1.50 Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Gonsalves, Ipswich, for 
centrepiece. 

.75 Gratuity to Mabel M. Kimball, Danvers, for foot- 
stool. 



56 

$ .50 Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. Gowing, Lynn, for paper 
flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Carr, Beverly, for bonnet. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. G. Pingree, Wenham, for 
table cover. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Cliadwick, Peabody, for rainbow- 
shawl. 
1.00 Gratuity to Eliza A. Linnehan, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. H. D. Hoag, Peabody, for pillow. 

Mrs. George S. Curtis, Rosaline Lee, Miss Helen J. 
Yeaton — Committee. 



OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

U- Gratuity to A. R. Roberts, Salem, for oil painting. 

2. Gratuity to L. E. Worthen, Haverhill, for oil paint- 
ing. 

2. Gratuity to L. E. Worthen, Haverhill, for oil paint- 
ing. 

2. Gratuity to L. E. Worthen, Haverhill, for oil paint- 
ing. 

2. Gratuity to L. E. Worthen, Haverhill, for oil paint- 
ing. 

1. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil painting. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. Chester W. Dennis, Lynn, for oil 

painting. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. Chester W. Dennis, Lynn, for oil 

painting. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. G. E. Bennett, Lynn, for oil paint- 

ing. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. F. Goodrich, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. C. F. Goodrich, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 



57 

12. Gratuity to Mrs. C. F. Goodrich, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 
2. Gratuity to Mrs. C. F. Goodrich, Beverly, for water 

color. 
2. Gratuity to A. K. Roberts, Salem, for water color. 
2. Gratuity to Alice Trask, Peabody, for water color. 
2. Gratuity to Alice Trask, Peabody, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Alice C. J. Morse, Andover, for water 

color. 

1. Gratuity to Alice C. J. Morse, Andover, for bric-a- 

brac. 

2. Gratuity to Sarah W. Symonds, Salem, for statuar3\ 
2. Gratuity to Sarah W. Symonds, Salem, for collection 

of statuary. 
2. Gratuity to E. C. Larrabee, Salem, for Mosaic work. 
2. Gratuity to E. C. Larrabee, Salem, for inlaid work. . 
2. Gratuity to Susan Dwyer, Salem, for water color. 
Mrs. Belle D. Hodgkins, Harriet F. Tenney, Mrs. N. G. 
Kimball — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

^5. First premium to Mrs. John H, Symonds, Peabody, 

for collection painted china. 
3. First premium to Mrs. John H. Symonds, Peabody, 

for jug. 
2. First premium to Mrs. John H. Symonds, Peabody, 

for punch bowl. 

2. First premium to Mrs. John H. Symonds, Peabody, 

for vase. 

3. Second premium to Gertrude Copp, Lawrence, for 

collection. 
2. First premium to Gertrude Copp, Lawrence, for plate. 
1. Second premium to Gertrude Copp, Lawrence, for 

vase. 



58 

fl. Second premium to Alice C. J. Morse, Audover, for 

punch bowl. 
2. First premium to Alice C. J. Morse, Andover, for 

paste and gold box. 
2. Second premium to Alice C. J. Morse, Andover, for 

individual specimen. 
1. First premium to A. K. Roberts, Salem, for tray. 

Mrs. D. P. Grosvenor, Miss Rose Plaisted, Miss Eliza- 
beth Bateman — Committee. 



CHARCOAL, PHOTOGRAPHS, PEN AND INK 

WORK. 

$1. Gratuity to Charles Goodrich, Lynn, for burnt panel. 

1. Gratuity to Charles Goodrich, Lynn, for burnt wood. 

.50. Gratuity to Charles Goodrich, Lynn, for burnt wood. 

1. Gratuity to E. A. Rushford, Salem, for pen and ink 

work. 
1. Gratuity to E. A. Rushford, Salem, for pen and ink 

work. 
1. Gratuity to Anna Callahan, Peabody, for crayon. 
1. Gratuity to Anna Callahan, Peabody, for crayon. 
1. Gratuity to Walter Stiles, Middleton, for pen and 

ink work. 
1. Gratuity to Walter Stiles, Middleton, for pen and 

ink work. 

.50. Gratuity to Clara B. Cruff, Marblehead, for charcoal 
work. 

,50. Gratuity to Clara B. Cruff, Marblehead, for pen and 

ink work. 
.50. Gratuity to Thomas W. Sheehan, Salem, for pen and 

ink work. 
,50. Gratuity to Edward Turner, Salem, for architectural 

drawings. 
1. Gratuity to Edward Turner, Salem, for architectural 

drawings. 



59 

$2. Gratuity to Ida Fainham, Peabody, for photos. 

.50. Gratuity to R. E. Hagar, Salem, for photos. 

.50. Gratuity to J. P. Tyraon, Salem, for pen and ink 

work. 
.50. Gratuity to Fred Goldthwaite, Peabody, for mechani- 
cal drawing. 
1. Gratuity to Abbie Woodbury, Salem, for pyrography. 
1. Gratuity to Howard E. Cousins, Salem, for mechani- 
cal drawing. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Biadford, Peabody, for py- 
rography table. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for pyrog- 
raphy serving tray. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for py- 
rography double frame. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for py- 
rography box. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for py- 
rography twine boxes. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for py- 
rography whisk broom case. 
1. Gratuity to Lewis Clark, Lynn, for photos. 
1. Gratuity to Lewis Clark, Lynn, for photos. 
.50. Gratuity to Ethelyn M. Moody, Salem, for photos. 
.50. Gratuity to Ethelyn M. Moody, Salem, for burnt 
wood. 
1. Gratuity to George A. Chandler, Salem, for photos. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

2. First premium to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for sewing. 
1. Second premium to Grace Harkins, Peabody, for 

quilt. 
,75. Gratuity to Charles E. Winchester, Peabody, for 

cover for sofa pillow. 



6o 

.75. Gratuity to Mary Sullivan, Peabody, for doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Lillian W. Calvert, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow and doilies. 

.50, Gratuity to Geraldine Hobbs, Danvers, for sofa pil- 
low and tray cloth. 

.50. Gratuity to Helen G. Lee, Peabody, for doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mabel E. Kimball, Peabody, for tray 
cloth. 

.50. Gratuity to Randolph A. Dodge, Wenham, for basket. 

.25. Gratuity to Gertrude Raymond, Salem, for embroid- 
ered mats. 

.25. Gratuity to Dorothy Palmer, Peabody, for doll. 

.25. Gratuity to Elizabeth Kennick, Peabody, for sofa pil- 
low. 

.25. Gratuity to Edna H. Eaton, Peabody, for doll. 

.25. Gratuity to Frances Tenney, Peabody, for kinder- 
garten book. 

Mrs. N. W. Torrey, Mrs. F. O. Perkins, Mrs. C. H. 
Goulding — Committee. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ROOT CROPS. 

The committee on Root Crops make the following 
report : — 

To Oscar Gowen of West Newbury for crop of 

potatoes, first premium, 18 00 

To Cornelius Moynihan of Newbury for a crop of 

ruta baga turnips, first premium, 8 00 

To Samuel Buxton of Peabody, for a crop of 

onions, first premium, 8 00 

To John H. George of Methuen for a crop of 

onions, second premium, 6 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. B. Fellows, for the Committee. 



6i 



STATEMENT BY OSCAR GOWEN TO THE COMMITTEE ON 

BOOT CROPS. 

The piece of potatoes which I enter for premium was 
phmted in gravelly soil with clay subsoil. In 1900 the land 
was sward and cut about one and one-half tons of hay to 
the acre. 

In 1901 it was ploughed and manured with about four 
cords of barnyard manure to the acre and 300 pounds of 
Reed's fertilizer in the hills. Planted to garden truck 
such as squashes, cabbages, turnips, etc. 

In 1902, it was manured with about six cords of barn- 
yard manure to the acre, with about 500 pounds of fertil- 
izer Avith a result of BOO baskets of potatoes to the acre. 
Planted the Ensign Bayley potatoes. I think if the rot 
had not affected them there would have been ten bushels 
more. I would also say that on the same piece of land I 
have a good stand of raspberry plants set this year. Also, 
if one third of the manure is left in the ground the profit 
would be $145 to the acre. 

Expeyise. 

Ploughing, $ 1 20 

Manure, 

Fertilizers, 

Cultivating, 

Harvesting, 

Seed, 

138 90 
Receipts. 

140 bushels marketable potatoes at 70c. $98 00 
10 " small potatoes at 30c. 3 00 



21 


00 


8 


00 


2 


60 


4 


00 


2 


20 



$101 00 



62 

Profit on half acre I 62 10 

" " one " 124 20 

Respectfully submitted, 

Oscar Gowen. 

West Newbury, Oct. 30, 1902. 

I certify that I measured one half acre of laud on which 
the potatoes grew and has been entered for a premium by 
Oscar Gowen. 

Wm. Merrill. 

statement of cornelius moynihan on crop of ruta 

baga turnips. 

The year 1900 and 1901 the land was in pasture. 1902, 
ploughed June 1st seven inches deep, harrowed. Soil a 
clay loam, put on four loads barnyard manure and 200 
pounds of fertilizer. Sowed fertilizer with corn planter. 
Sowed turnip seed, June 10, by hand in drills three and 
one half feet apart, and brushed with back of hoe. 



COST OF CROP. 




Four loads manure. 


18 00 


Fertilizer, 


3 00 


Ploughing and harrowing, 


5 00 


Seed and planting, 


2 00 


Cultivating, 


1 50 


Weeding and thinning. 


5 00 


Harvesting, 


8 00 



Cr. by 448 bushels ruta baga turnips. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cornelius Moynihan. 



63 

STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF ONIONS RAISED BY 
SAMUEL BUXTON OF PEABODY, 1902. 

In the year 1900 the land was in grass. Crop of 1901 
was cabbage and potatoes. Manured with three cords of 
cow manure. Soil was a medium native. 1902, ploughed 
once in spring eight inches deep, spread manure and har- 
rowed. Sowed 1000 pounds fertilizer broadcast. Sowed 
the seed May 28th. 

COST OF CROP. 

Ploughing, harrowing, etc. 

Manure, 

Fertilizer, 

3 lbs. seed, 

Hoeing and weeding, 

Harvesting, 



4 


00 


9 


00 


15 


00 


5 


25 


10 


00 


15 


00 



S58 00 



Cr. bv 528 bushels of onions. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Samuel Buxton. 

This is to certify that I measured the land on which Mr. 
Samuel Buxton's onions grew which are offered for pre- 
mium. It contains 23,844 square feet. 

Charles E. Barrett. 

statement of a CROP OF ONIONS RAISED BY JOHN H. 
GEORGE IN METHUEN, MASS., 1902. 

The crop of 1900 was potatoes manured with Stock- 
bridge Potato Fertilizer. The crop of 1901 was onions ; 
the crop of 1902 was onions, manured with stable manure 
ploughed in, eight cords on half acre, with about four 
cords light manure run on the land. The land is peat 
meadow. 



64 

The land was ploughed in the fall of 1901. In the 
spring the land was harrowed, brushed and dragged ; seed 
sown, six pounds per acre ; hoed five times, weeded three 
times, harvested by being cut up with a circular hoe, 
picked up into crates at once and placed in onion house. 
The seed sown was Danvers Yellow Globe. 

The product was 186 bushels, sold for 75 cents per bushel 
within a mile and a half of where they were raised. 

The account stands as follows : — 

Dr. 

To ploughing and preparing land^for seeding, 
manure, 

seed, sowing and weeding, 
harvesting, topping and marketing, 
interest and taxes on land, 
3 pounds seed, 

881 50 

Crop of onions Cr. by 180 bushels onions at 75 cts. 1360 00 
Profit on half acre $275.50, on acre, 551 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

Methuen, Mass., Oct., 1902. 
This may certify that I have measured the land on 
which the crop of onions grew which are entered by John 
H. George and it contains one half acre. 

Frank W. George. 



i 3 


00 


40 


00 


15 


00 


20 


00 




w 


00 


4 


50 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SMALL FRUITS. 

There were two entries of small fruits this year. Mr. 
J. Henry Nason of Boxford, entered a crop of strawberries 
and Mr. John C. Day of Bradford a crop of raspberries. 



65 

Your committee visited Mr. Nason's strawberries during 
the picking season and found an unusually heavy stand of 
fruit both ripe and green. Although past mid-season there 
was a very even and heavy stand of plants, yet the fruit 
attained good size, good shape, and was very firm. It was 
an exceptionally fine crop. 

The committee visited Mr. Day's crop of raspberries in 
August and report that it was the best crop of berries 
they ever had the opportunity to see grow on 65 square 
rods of land, he having picked 1127 qts. of raspberries 
from the same and we award to 

J. Henry Nason, of Boxford, first premium, $8. 

John C. Day of Bradford, first premium, $8. 



Edwin Bates, ( r^ •*-*. 
W. K. Cole, { Committee. 



STATEMENT OF J. HENRY NASON ON STRAWBERRY CROP. 

The piece of land which I enter contains 32 square rods. 
In 1900 it was planted to corn, manured at the rate of 10 
cords to the acre. In 1901, the same amount of manure 
and set to strawberry plants, Sample and Tennessee Pro- 
lific, no fertilizer used. 

Cost of cultivation and marketing. 

Setting plants, 1 50 

Hoeing and weeding, 16 00 

Covering, 5 00 

Picking and marketing, 50 64 



$72 14 
Receipts, 308 49 



Profit, $236 35 

Respectfully, 

J. Henry Nason. 



66 

This may certify that I have measured a strawberry bed 
for J. Henry Nason that contains thirty- two rods, equal 
to one-fifth of an acre. 

James H. Webster. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GRAIN CROPS. 

The Committee on Grain Crops had only one entry, 
that of a crop of oats b}' Cyrus D. Ordway of West New- 
bury. 

Tlie committee viewed the crop, August 12, and con- 
sidered it a very fine one and worthy of the society's pre. 
mium and award the first premium of $7. 

D. D. Adams, T. J. King — Committee. 

STATEMENT OF CROP. 

In 1900 this land was in grass. In 1901, it was ploughed 
ten inches deep, and harrowed; six cords of barnyard ma 
nure to the acre was spread broadcast and harrowed in and 
planted to corn. In 1902 it was ploughed seven inches 
deep, harrowed and sowed to oats, three bushels to the 
acre. Seed silver mine oats of my own raising, the soil 
was a clay loam. 



COST OF CROP. 




To ploughing and harrowing, 


$9 00 


" sowing and harrowing, 


3 00 


" seed oats. 


7 00 


" cutting and binding. 


- 10 00 


" drawing in, 


3 00 


" threshing and winnowing, 


10 00 



142 00 



67 

CR. BY CROP. 

By 135 bushels of oats at 40 cents, $54 00 

" li tons of straw at f9 per ton, 13 f>0 

Value of crop, 60 bushels per acre, <|6T 50 
Profit, 25 50 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. D. Ordway. 

I hereby certify that I have measured the land on which 
the oats entered for premium grew, and owned by Cyrus 
D. Ordway and it contained two acres and forty-five rods. 

John H. Ryan. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON CRAN- 
BERRY CROP. 

RocKPORT, Nov. 3, 1902. 

To the Trustees of the Essex Agricultural Society : — 

Your committee on cranberries make the following re- 
port. 

We have attended to our duties and visited the cran- 
berry bed of William H. Anderson, of West Boxford, and 
recommend that he be granted a premium of $7. 

Andrew Lane, Chairman. ., 
Oscar Gowen. 

statement concerning a cranberry bed situated 
in west boxford and owned by william h. 

anderson. 

This bed was made on a peat bog which was from three 
to ten feet deep, the surface to the depth of one foot was 
removed, and taken to the barn cellar, eventually paying 
the expense of its removal. The bog was then covered with 
three inches of sand at an expense of about sixty dollars 



68 

The vines were then set out in rows two feet apart, with 
six inches between each plant in each row, at an expense 
of about ten dollars. The cost of weeding during the two 
following seasons was nearly fifteen dollars. 

This bed bore its first crop in six years. 

Last year fifty bushels of cranberries were picked from 
it, and the present season the yield was thirty bushels only. 

W. H. Anderson. 

I hereby certify that I have measured the foregoing 
piece of land and it contains forty square rods. 

Frank H. Spofford. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON IMPROVING 
WET MEADOW AND SWAMP LAND. 

Your committee have visited the piece of reclaimed land 

offered by Mr. Chas. R. Anderson of Boxford and awarded 

him the first premium of ilO. 

Sherman Nelson, ) ^ ., , 
TT\ nt -KT l Committee. 

E. G. Nason, J 

STATEMENT OF CHAS. R. ANDERSON. 

The piece of improved wet meadow we enter for the 
society's premium contains about two acres. 

In the fall of 1899 began hauling on sand spreading it 
on an average of about six inches deep. The next spring 
harrowed the sand over so as to level it ; then seeded 
down to herdsgrass and red top. The season being hot 
and dry the grass didn't make a very good showing the 
first year. In the spring of 1901 it was top dressed with 
Swift's Lowell fertilizer, Animal brand, one-half ton ; there 
was about two tons of hay to the acre. In the spring 
of 1902 there was six bags of fertilizer used for top dress- 
ing, with about the same amount of hay as last year. The 



69 

total cost of improving this piece of wet meadow land for 
labor of men and team and material used would be an 
average of about $75.00 per acre. 

Br. 

Improving two acres of wet meadow land, $150 00 

Fertilizer used top dressing, 16 bags, at $1.50 per bag, 24 00 
Grass seed, 3 00 



$177 00 

Cr. 

By eight tons hay at $20 per ton, $160 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chas. R. Anderson. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON FOREST 

TREES. 

In response to an entry and invitation from Mr. Francis 
Randall Appleton the Committee on Forest Trees visited 
his plantation on Sept. 15, and make the following report : 

The trees were more than 500 in number, and when set 
out were about IS inches high, brought from a nursery. 

The laud was prepared by ploughing and harrowing, 
and the trees have been cultivated between the rows each 
year, and the owner will so continue this treatment as long 
as a horse can pass between the trees. The owner says 
that he believes no tree set out has died, and they all 
seemed to be in a flourishing condition. 

His efforts in these lines seem to deserve consideration, 
and the committee award the society's premium of a 
Diploma and $10. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Francis H. Appleton, John Robinson, David Pingree — 
Committee. 



70 

REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have been twelve new members added to the so- 
ciety since the last annual report, eleven of whom became 
members by receiving premiums of seven dollars and up- 
wards, according to the rules of the society, from different 
cities and towns as follows: — 

Beverly, 1 Peabody, 8 

Dan vers,. 1 West Newbury, 1 

Lynnfield, 1 



INSTITUTES. 

The society held three Institutes the past year, on as 
many different days, both forenoon and afternoon, at which 
the following subjects were discussed by any of the 
audience who desired. 

The first Institute was held at Beverly Jan. 10, the sub- 
ject for the forenoon being, "Production and sale of milk." 
Afternoon, " Seeds, How to propagate and get the best," 
by J. J. H. Gregory of Marblehead. 

The second Institute was held at Newbury, Jan. 31. 
Subject for the forenoon " Brown tail moth and how to 
control it ;" subject for afternoon, " Insects injurious to 
market gardening," by Prof. H. T. Fernald of the Agricul- 
tural College. 

The third Institute was held at Haverhill Feb. 21. 
Subjects, " Variations in the quality of milk and their 
causes," in the forenoon; afternoon, "Milk Adulterations 
and Laws," by George M. Whittaker of the Dairy 
Bureau. 



71 

REPORT OF THE STATE INSPECTOR FOR THE 

FAIR OF 1902. 

State Board of Agriculture : — 

Your Inspector visited the Essex County Fair at Pea- 
body, arriving there Wednesday forenoon, September 17, 
and found on arrival a successful fair in operation, and was 
warmly welcomed^^by President Appleton and Secretary 
Danforth and other members of the society. He was 
pleased with the exhibits, both in the hall and on the 
grounds. The show of cattle was fine, though I was told 
it was not up to^former years. There were some fine 
specimens of horses on exhibition. This is one of the few 
societies of the state that have no horse trotting, and still 
it seems to draw the crowd and have what seemed to me 
nearer an old fashioned Cattle Show than any I have had 
the pleasure of visiting. The next day there was a fine 
parade of farmers' teams with the products of the farm, 
and the merchants and trades were also well represented, 
adding very much to the occasion and no doubt increasing 
the attendance and receipts very much. The old society 
seems strong and has men of energy for its officers and 
members and appears in every way worthy of the bounty 
of the state. 

(Signed) Henry A. Turner, Inspector. 

NoRWELL, Nov., 1902. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



The following is a list of members deceased, as re- 
turned to the Secretary and not heretofore reported. 

Allen, Charles C, Lynn. Northend,William D., Salem. 
Avery, Mark B., Beverly. Noyes, David W., Methuen. 
Babson, Horatio, Gloucester. Ordway, C. K., West New- 
Blaney, Stephen, Peabody. bury. 



72 

Barrett, Chas. P., Gloucester. Osborne, A. C, Peabody. 
Bodwell, S. B., Lawrence. Plummer, Moses A., New- 
Butters, George A., Methuen. buryport. 
Buxton, Simon, Peabody. Potter, Edward P., Lynn. 
Clark, Erastus, Ipswich. Raymond, John W., Beverly. 

Cheever, Wm. J., No. Ando- Rollins, Jonas, Danvers. 

ver. Roundy, Wm. R., Lynnfield. 

Cody, James F., Peabody. Saltonstall, Robert, Beverly. 
Colburn, Geo. W., Lawrence. Scribner, Benjamin, Lynn. 
Currier, Eben B., Lawrence. Small, Henry, Lawreuce. 
Davis, Charles W., Peabody. Spofford, Sumner P., George- 
Dodge, Israel W., Beverly. town. 

Dresel, Ellis L., Beverly. Smith, William H.,Rockport. 
Fellows, Alfred, Danvers. Symonds, Fred'k, No. Ando- 
Friend, Seth, Beverly. ver. 

Garland, Joseph, Gloucester. Stowell, Joseph, Lawrence. 
Goodell, J. W., Lynn. Todd, J. Scott, Rowley. 

Haskell, Wm. H., Gloucester. Todd, John F., Rowley. 
Hathaway, Joseph B., Mar- Tompkins, N. S. S., Law- 

blehead. rence. 

Herrick, Joseph H., Beverly. Wiggin, Gilman P., Law- 
Hutchinson, H. R., Peabody. rence. 
Jones, L. H., Danvers. Whitman, F. A., Danvers. 

Jaques, Stephen A., New- Winslow, Aaron, Lynn. 

bury. Wilson, Abiel, No. Andover. 

Kerns, Charles, Danvers. Ware, Horace C, Salem. 
Manning, Robert, Salem. Willey, James L., Lynn. 

McNeil, William, Rockport. Woods, Charles W., New- 
Morrison, L. L., Danvers. bury. 



RECAPITULATION. 







FARM STOCK. 




Awarded for Bulls, 


167 00 


(( 


a 


Milch Cows, 


;89 00 


i( 


ii 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


18 00 


n 


u 


Heifers, 


112 00 


n 


a 


Working Oxen, 


8 00 


u 


C( 


Steers, 


5 00 


u 


(( 


Horses, 


138 00 


ii 


a 


Swine, 


148 00 


a 


u 


Poultry, 


198 00 



i783:00 



FIELD AND EXPERIMENTAL CROPS. 

Awarded for Root Crops, 
" " Fruit Crops, 
" " Grain Crops, 
" " Forest Trees, 
" " Reclaimed Wet Land, 



FARM AND GRAIN CROPS. 

Awarded for Grain and Seed, 14 00 

" " Vegetables, 143 00 

" " Fruits, 176 00 

" " Plants and Flowers, 113 00 



829 


00 


26 


00 


7 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 



182 00 



$446 00 



74 



DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES. 



Awarded for Dairy, $5 00 

" Bread and Canned Fruit, 26 00 
Counterpanes and Afghans, 13 25 
Carpetings and Rugs, 19 75 

Articles Man'fd from Leather, 6 00 



a 



(( 



(( 



u 



(; 



» 



(( 



(( 



a 



Manuf. and Gen. 
Fancv Work, 
Works of Art, 
Children's Work, 



Mdse. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Awarded for Agricultural Implements, 






" Carriages, 
" Granges, 



8 


60 


47 


00 


89 


00 


8 


25 


54 00 


25 


00 


40 


00 



$222 75 



1119 00 



The amount of -$1,652.75 was awarded to 411 individu- 
als and firms in 25 different cities and towns as fol- 
lows : — 



Amesbury, 


113 00 


Marblehead, 


$20 25 


Andover, 


37 25 


Methuen, 


8 00 


Beverly, 


239 25 


Middleton, 


4 50 


Boxford, 


125 25 


Newbury, 


38 00 


Dan vers. 


109 50 


North Andover, 


96 50 


Groveland, 


2 50 


Peabody, 


511 75 


Hamilton, 


25 50 


Rowley, 


10 00 


Haverhill, 


18 00 


Salem, 


72 .50 


Ipswich, 


2 25 


Saugus, 


32 50 


Lawrence, 


7 00 


Swampscott, 


4 00 


Lynn, 


92 75 


Topsfield, 


2 00 


Lynnfield, 


91 00 


Wenham, 


42 00 




West Newbury, 37 50 





75 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Receipts from admission to hall and grounds, f 3,177 85 

Receipts from grounds for various purposes, 502 00 

Receipts for dinner tickets, 144 00 

Received from grand stand, 99 15 

Received from hall, 13 00 

13,936 00 






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1— ( 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Article 1. There shall be a President, four Vice Pres- 
idents, a Secretary and a Treasurer, who shall be Trus- 
tees, ex-offi.cio, and one Trustee from each city and town 
in the county. The President, Vice Presidents, Secretary 
and one Trustee from each city and town in the county 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer by the Trustees annually at their meeting in 
November. Nominations for Trustees may be made by 
any member or members of the Society from the city or 
town from which he is to be elected for at least one week 
before said meeting to the Secretary, and he shall prepare 
ballots for the same. 

Art. 2. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the So- 
ciety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at 
which all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at 
least shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the Trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Presidents shall be absent, 
the members present may appoint one from among them 
to preside at such meeting. 

Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting of the Society ; or whenever a 
written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 
shall be made by any twelve members of the Society to 
the President and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 



78 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon ; seven of whom, with the presiding officer, shall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society during the intervals of its meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the public, 
publish such communications, and offer such premiums in 
such form and value as they think proper (provided the pre- 
miums offered do not exceed the funds of the Society) ; and 
shall lay before the Society at each of its meetings a 
statement of their proceedings and of the communications 
made to them. 

Art. 7. The Secretarv shall take minutes of all the 
votes and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustees shall direct. He 
shall write and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which shall be lodged with the Secretary, who shall make 
a fair record thereof. The Treasurer shall from time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have orders for from 
the Trustees ; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, render a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of his duty in such 
sum as the Trustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 

Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed annually by 
the trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 
report to the Society ; and the same being accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretary in his books. 



79 

Art. 10. In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary or of the 
Treasurer, the Trustees shall take charge of the official 
books, papers, and other effects belonging to the office 
that may be vacated, and give receipts for the same, 
which books, papers, etc., they may deliver to some person 
whom they may appoint to lill the office until the next 
meeting of the Society, at which time there shall be a new 
choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society by paying the sum of three dol- 
lars to increase the permanent fund of the institution. 

Art. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture 
of our county, the same to be sacredly appropriated to 
that purpose. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the gospel who 
reside within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past Presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a mem- 
ber at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the ac- 
tion at the next annual meeting of the Society. 



♦Members will receive from the Secretary a " certificate of membership." No 
tines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are entitled to vote in all its 
transactions, with free use of the Library and a copy of the printed "Transac- 
tions '' each year. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

FOR J902-I903. 



PRESIDENT. 

FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



VICE PRESIDENTS. 



JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead. 
HORATIO G. HERRICK, of Lawrence. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
SHERMAN NELSON, of Georgetown. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER. 

WILLIAM S. NICHOLS, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 



BENJAMIN P. WARE, of Marblehead. 
OLIVER S. BUTLER, of Georgetown. 
GEORGE V. L. MEYER, of Hamilton. 



8i 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICTTLTURE. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TRUSTEES. 



J. P. Little, Amesbury John W. Shirley, Methuen 

George L. A^'erill, Andover Geo. A. Currier, Middleton 
John W. Lovett, Beverly Chas. T. Lovering, Nahant 
Henry M. Killam, Boxford Daniel D. Adams, Newbury 
Alvah J. Bradstreet, DanversB. F. Stanley, Newburyport 
Edward K. Lee, Essex Winfield S. Hughes, No. An- 

Samuel T. Poor, Georgetown dover 
Geo. M. Wonson, Gloucester N. M. Quint, Peabody 
Sam"l B. George, Groveland John J. Manning, Rockport 
Wm. Messervy, Hamilton Frank Todd, Rowley 
ArthurG.Whittier,Haverhill Charles Sanders, Salem 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich P. Albert True, Salisbury 
S. S. Lewis, Lawrence Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 

Edwin Bates, Lynn Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield Edw. E. Ferguson, Topsfield 
John H.Cheever,Manchester J. Kavanagh, Wenham 
Amos P. Alley, Marblehead J. R. Gordon, West Newbury 
Geo. W. Sargent, Merrimac 



Members of Essex Agricultural Society. 



DECEMBER, 1902. 



Previous printed list was in 1900. If any errors are dis- 
covered in the following list, please report them to the Secre- 
tary. Trustees are requested to report deaths of members as 
soon as they occiir, when convenient. 



Cammet, Samuel 
Chesley, M. B. 
Currier, W. H. B. 
Davis, B. Lewis 
Feltch, Elbridge S. 
Gale, Edmund 
Goodwin, E. A. 



AMESBURY— 19. 

Hill, Albert C. 
Hollander, Lambert 
Huntington, B. F. 
Little, J. P. 
Lane, T. W. 
Mason, John J. 



Morrill, George T. 
Tuxbury, R. E. 
Tibbetts, William B. 
True, Eben 
Vining, William F. 
Wollard, R. E. 



Abbott, James J. 
Andrews, M. C. 
Averill, George L. 
Bailey, Moses A. 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Blunt, Charles C 
Blunt, Joseph H. 
Buchan, George 
Buchan, George W. 
Burnham, George L, 
Carter, Charles L. 
Chandler, Joshua H. 
Cheever, James 0. 



ANDOVER— 38. 

Cole, John N. 
Downing, Mrs. J. J. 
Fames, Plato 
Flint, John H. 
Foster, George W. 
Foster, George C. 
Foster, F. H. 
Gould, Milo H. 
Haywood, Henry A. 
Holt, E. F. 
Holt, Ballard 
Jenkins, John B. 
Jenkins, E. Kendall 



Johnson, Francis H. 
McLawlin, Henry 
Moor, J. Warren 
Poor, Joseph W. 
Playdon, Alfred G. 
Smith, John L. 
Smith, Peter D. 
Smith, Benjamin F. 
Smith, Joseph W. 
Thayer, Samuel 
Tucker, William 
Ripley, George 



83 



Abbott, Stephen A. 
Addison, G. A. 
Andrews, Joseph F. 
Appleton, Nathan D. 
Appleton, Edw. H. 
Bancroft. Robert H. 
Burnham, 0. B. 
Carter, John W. 
Caldwell, Charles E. 
Chamberlain, M. L. 
Clark, George 
Clark, Arthur E. 
Clark, Aug. N. 
Clark, Peter E. 
Cochrane, Alex'r 
Curtis, John S. 
Dalton, Charles H. 
Dan forth, E. F. 
Davenport, A. H. 
Dexter, Gordon 
Dexter, Philip 
Dodge, Andrew 
Dodge, Benjamin B. 
Dodge, Fred A. 
Dodge, Joshua S. 
Dodge, Forest C. 
Dodge, Lucius F. 
Dodge, Walter F. 
Elliot, John T. 
Endicott, Robert R. 



BEVERLY— 89. 

Foster, Issacher, jr. 
Foster, William B. 
Giles, Benj. V. 
Gardner, John L. 
Heaton, Robert C. 
Head, Charles 
Hill, Hugh 
Howse, Thomas W. 
Lee, Asa F. ; 
Larcom, Rufus 
Lawrence, C. A. 
Loring, Augustus P. 
Loring, Wm. Caleb 
Lothrop, Elmer A. 
Lovett, Francis S. 
Lovett, John W. 
Mason, Alfred A. 
Mason, George 
Mason, Charles A. 
Masters, James A. 
Mayo, Josiah 
McKean, Henry P. 
Mitchell, John E. 
Morgan, William C. 
Morse, John T. 
Moulton, Charles 
Munsey, John G. 
Murney, John M. 
Norwood, Francis 
Obear, Ezekiel F. 



Peabody, F. H. 
Perry, Albert 
Phillips, J. C. Mrs. 
Pickett, Charles 
Pierson, C. L. 
Pickman, D. L. 
Pope, Jasper 
Porter, Adoniram 
Preston, Ezra 
Raymond, John W. 
Sawyer, E. C. 
Schurman, Isaac 
Seabury, Frank 
Sohier, Wm. D. 
Stone, Samuel H. 
Swasey, E. 
Trask, J. G. 
Trafton, Darling F. 
Trask, E. F. 
Trask, Joseph W. 
Vittum, Albert 
Wallis, Joseph A. 
Webb, Alden 
Williams, Augustus 
Whitcomb, Austin 
Woodbury, L., jr. 
Woodbury, H. W. 
Woodbury, Rufus 
Woodbury, D., 2d 



BOXFORD— 20 

Anderson, Charles R. Chadwick, Walter I. Parkhurst, John W. 
Anderson, David A. Cole, Wm. Kimball Pearl, Edw. E. 



Austin, Charles F. 
Austin, George B. 
Barnes, B, S. 
Chadwick, Geo. W. 



84 

Cole, Warren M. 
Day, Isaac C. 
Killam, H. M. 
Nason, James H, 



Pearl, John M. 
Perley, Charles 
Wood, John T. 
Webster, James H. 



Chad wick, James W. Parkhurst, John 



Barton, J. Webb 
Batchelder, J. Q. A. 
Berry, Allen A. . 
Bordeaux, L. 
Bradstreet, Alvah J. 
Bradstreet, Elijah 
Bradstreet, William 
Brown, Walter H. 
Carlton, 0. Loring 
Carlton, Wm. B. 
Carlton, Wm. B., jr. 
Clark, N. J. 
Colcord, J. H. J. 
Day, Clarence 
Dodge, Francis 
Eaton, Winslow W. 
Endicott, Wm C. 
Evans, Sam'l A., jr. 
Fisher, Franklin W. 
Fuller, Solomon 
Harrigan, D. J. 
Hutchinson, W. P. 
Jacobs, Wm. A. 
Jackson, Eben 



DANVERS— 71. 

Kimball, Francis 0. 
Kimball, Joel 
Kirby, Patrick 
Learoyd, A. P. 
Legro, John C. P. 
Lyford, Francis W. 
Marston, Jacob 
McTiernan, Charles 
Mudge, Augustus 
Nichols, Andrew 
ISTewhall, Benj. E. 
Newhall, Henry 
O'Neal, T. H. 
Peabody, George H. 
Peabody, George A. 
Peart, William B. 
Perley, Dean A. 
Perley, Edward P. 
Perry, James 0. 
Perkins, Henry A. 
Perkins, Warren G. 
Perkins, M. Sumner 
Pettingill, David A. 
Pettingill, M. C. 



Pillsbury, H. H. 
Porter, J. Frank 
Preston, Charles H. 
Putnam, Otis F. 
Pratt, George 
Porter John W. 
Pope, Daniel P. 
Proctor, Nathan P. 
Roberts, Edmund C, 
Roberts, John F. 
Roberts, Oliver 
Rice, Chas. B. 
Sawyer. Samuel L. 
Swinerton, John 
Tapley, Gilbert A. 
Trask, Joseph W. 
Upton, Franklin 
Verry Augustus 
Verry, H. Otis 
Verry, Henry 
Weston, Mrs. L. P. 
Woodman, Edw. E. 
Whipple, John F. 



Andrews, Elias 
Burnham, Wash. 



ESSEX— 12. 

Cogswell, Charles B.Low, Herbert 
Haskell, David L. Low, Josiah 



85 



Burnhara, D. B. 
Choate, Rufus 



Haskell, George 
Lee, Eiward K. 



Lufkia, A. E. 
McDonald, Daniel 



GEORGETOWN— 25. 



Bateraan, A, P. 
Boardman, Moses N. 
Butler, Oliver S. 
Cartis, Samuel N. 
Hilliard, Henry, 
Hoyt, Martin L. 
Jackson, John L. 
James, George B. 
Byron, G. Ladd 



Marble, Nathaniel 
Nelson, Sherman 
Osgood, Stephen 
Perley, David E. 
Perkins, Edwin P. 
Pillsbury, J. 
Poor, Samuel T. 
Tenney, Gorham D. 



Tenney, INIilton S. 
Tenney, Moses 
Tenney, Orlando B. 
Towne, Alfred E. 
Tuck, John S. 
Weston, George S. 
Whitham, Chas. M. 
Yeaton, Winf red J. 



Babson, Osman 
Bennett, Charles 
Bradford, George R. 
Brown, Edward H. 
Burnham, A. M. 
Cole, Israel H. 
Conant, Thomas 
Cook, Benjamin F. 
Corliss, John 
Cronin, John 
Curtis, Samuel, jr. 
Dolliver, John S. 
Fears, Robert R. 
Ferguson, Thos. B. 
Griffin, Bennett 



GLOUCESTER— 43. 

Grover, Charles E. 
Haskell, H. C. L. 
Hawkes, E. C. 
Knowles, Thomas J. 
Lane, Andrew 
Lovett, John H. 
Low, David W. 
Marr, Chester, jp; 
Mayo, Israel C. 
Parsons, AV. Frank 
Patillo, Alexander 
Pew, William A. 
Phillips, N. H. 
Presson, David S. 



Presson, Alfred 
Price, Augustus E. 
Proctor, Joseph 0. 
Proctor, Wilbur F. 
Roberts, Joshua 
Rogers, Allan 
Rust, William P. 
Shepherd, Joseph C. 
Somes, John E. 
Story, Cyrus 
Wilson, John J. 
Wonson, F. G. 
Wonson, George M. 
Wonson, J. W. 



GROVELAND— 21. 



Balch, Charles T. George, Samuel B. Martiuo, Philip H. 
Balch, Thomas H. Harrington,Edward Pemberton, L. K. 



86 

Batclielder,Chas. C. Harriman, Moses H. Spofford, Renry H. 
Day, Randall B. Harriman, Abel S. Stacy, Edward M. 
Fegan, Henry C. Hopkinson, W. H. Stickney, Abel 
George, Edwin B. Ladd, Nathaniel E. Tenney, George H. 
George, Edwin H. Longfellow, N. Woodbury, Louis A. 



HAMILTON— 19. 

Agassiz, R. L. Gwinn, Charles S. Norwood, C. J. 

Dodge, Albert W. Knowlton, Franklin Potter, A. E. 
Dodge, Emerson P. Knowlton, Isaac F. Salford, Daniel E. 
Dodge, George R. Lovett, E. D. Smith, Alvin 

Gardner, A. P. Meyer, George v. L. Underbill, J. C. 

Garland, James A.jr. Messervey, Wm. Whipple, Em. A. 
Gibney, George H. 



Barnes, B. Frank 
Barnes, Chas. W. 
Barry, J. M. 
Bean, John A. 
Brickett, Barnard 
Butters, Charles 
Butrick, A. W. 
Cheever, H. W. 
Cogswell, Doane 
Cogswell, George 
Dewhurst, James 
Day, John C. 
Emerson, Albert 
Emerson, Charles B. 
Emerson, E. A. 
Farnsworth, J. H, 
Fellows, C. H. 
Franklin, Miss S. F. 



HAVERHILL— 85. 

Hopkinson, Sam. W. 
Hoyt, H. H. 
Howe, James 
Johnson, Laburton 
Johnson. Chas. G. 
Kimball, William B. 
Kimball, Byron G. 
Kimball, M. Tenney 
Kingsbury, John D. 
Knight, Albert A. 
Ladd, George W. 
McKee, William 
Little, J. G. S. 
Martin, George C. 
Merrill, James C 
Messerve, Wm. S. 
Moody, H. L. 
Moody, Wm. H. 



Porter, Dudley 
Quinby, T. W. 
Richards, F. G. 
Ridgeway, Jos. 
Rhodes, C. N. 
Russell, A. P. 
Sanders, Thomas 
Sprague, W. W. 
Swasey, H. K. 
Taylor, Martin 
Taylor, Oliver 
Tewksbury, John B. 
Thornton, William 
Towne, Herman W. 
Wadleigh, Levi C. 
Wales, Herbert E. 
Webster, Charles E. 
Webster, C. W. 



87 



Frost, Henry 
Gage, Edwin V. 
Gale, John E. 
Hanson, M. W. 
Haseltine, Amos, jr. 
Haseltine, John 
Hardy, George H. 
Hilton, William 
Hilton, Charles M. 
Hobson, John L. 



Morse, Leslie K. 
Nichols, John B. 
Nichols, J. B. 
Ordway, Alfred A. 
Osgood, William W. 
Peabody, Frank 
Peabody, Daniel 
Phillips, Frank'n G. 
Peters, Daniel 
Poore, F. W. 



Webster, Ebenezer 
Webster, Ira J. 
Webster, Frank S. 
Webster, E. F. 
Webster, Richard 
West, H. K. 
West, James F. 
White, James D. 
Whittier, Alvah 
Whittier, Arthur G. 
Wilson, Henry S. 



Abbott, Joseph D. 
Appleton,Francis R. 
Appleton, Daniel F. 
Baker, S. N. 
Bond, James W. 
Brown, Everett K. 
Brown, S. Albert 
Fall, Tristram B. 
Fellows, Alonzo B. 



IPSWICH.— 27. 

Gould, John J. 
Gould, Walter F. 
Grant, Joshua B. 
Green, George H. 
Hodgkins, August'e 
Hortou, Joseph 
Horton, William G. 
Kimball, Daniel 
Kinnear, James 



Kinsman, Joseph F. 
Kinsman, Willard F. 
Marshall, Joseph 
Perkins, Isaac E. B. 
Ross, Joseph 
Rutherford, Aaron A. 
Story, Alden 
Sweetser, Arthur L. 
Whittier, Maynard 



Allyn, Warren E. 
Ames, M. B, 
Austin, M. E. 
Ball, F. J. 
Bell, Charles U. 
Boehm, Adolph G. 
Breen, John 
Bruce, Alex'r B. 
Collins, Lewis P. 
Copp, Gertrude M. 



LAWRENCE— 62. 

French, A. J. 
Gile, William H. 
Griffin, Anson L. 
Hall, Dyer S. 
Herrick, H. G. 
Hills, George W. 
Hood, Gilbert E. 
Holt, Lewis G. 
Hubbard, Leavitt 
Jackson, Joseph 



Page, E. F. 
Parker, Walter E. 
Richardson, E. P. 
Riley, Henry 
Robinson, H. B. 
Ruht, Joseph 
Russell, George W. 
Ryan, Thomas F. 
Sargent, A. E. 
Saunders, Daniel 



S8 



Curran, Maurice K. 
DeCourcey, C. A. 
Drew, J. D. 
Dyer, Arthur W. 
rarrell, John 
Fay, John 
Finn, John L. 
Flynn, Edward 
Fitzgerald, Wm. 
Ford, George 
Ford, Patrick 



Jewett, Wm. S. 
Joyce, James W. 
Kittredge, G. H. 
Kline, George E. 
Lewis, S. S. 
McAllister, J. G. 
Mahoney, W. O. 
McCarthy, Patrick 
Moore, L. C. 
Norwood, John K. 
Oswald, William 



Saunders, Caleb 
Shattuck, Joseph 
Simpson, James K,. 
Smith, James B. 
Stanley, J. J. 
Sylvester, Wm. H. 
Tewksbury, R. H. 
Truell, Byron 
Victor, F. M. 
Webster, H. K. 



Aldrich, A. P. 
Allen, Walter B. 
Andrews, Randall 
Bates, Edwin 
Bates, Walter E. 
Bates, Fred H. 
Bates, Wallace 
Beckford, Ebenezer 
Berry, Henry N. 
Berry Benj. J. 
Bray, E. E. 
Breed, Henry H. 
Breed, Richard 
Butman, Joseph E. 
Butman Wm. W. 
Cain, Julia A. Mrs. 
Carlisle, J. W. 
Chase, L. H. 
Chase, Amos F. 
Clark, Joseph M. 
Cross, Alfred 
Croscup, James A. 
Cressey, John S. 



LYNN— 82. 

Harnden, Henry C. Newhall, Hiram L. 
Hawkes, Nathan M. Nichols, H. S. 
Heath, Henry A. Nichols,Otis 
Hopkins, Fred I. Nichols, Thomas P. 
Hovey, Rufus P. Norris, George, jr. 
Hutchinson, M. E. B.Pevear, H. A. 
Mrs. Plumstead, M. 

Ingalls, James W. Preble, J. H. 



Iresou, S. S. 
Jepson, Eli 
Joint, William H. 
Kimball, Rufus 
King, W. P. 
Knox, David 
Lamphier, Wm. C. 
Lewis, Jacob M. 
Mace, Frank W. 
Marsh, George E. 
May, Lyman A. 
McBrien, Richard 



Ramsdell, Chas. H. 
Richardson, Geo. W. 
Rogers, Ira D. 
Roney, Simon J. 
Rounds, Herbert L. 
Rowell, B. W. 
Sheehan, John 
Shorey, John L. 
Shorey, George L. 
Sawyer, J. A. J. 
Stone, Henry 
Teel, James M. 



McKenney, ;John H.Tyler, Thaddeus W. 
Merritt, Timothy Vickary, J. C. 
Mockett, Joseph E. Whipple, George H. 



89 

Dodge, Joseph D. Mower, M. V. B. 
Dwyer, Edward F. Nason, Daniel A. 
Farrar, Joseph E. Neal, Peter M. 
Fitz, Josiah 4th Newhall, Asa T. 
Goodwin, Joseph W.Newhall, G. A. 



Wilson, J. C. 
Winslow, G. W. 
Wilson, C. G. 
Warren, Mrs N. J. 



LYNNFIELD— 15. 

Cox, Thomas E. Mansfield, Andrew Perkins, J. Winslow 

Danforth, John M. Munroe, Harry W. Roundy, George M. 

Derby, Chas. H. Munroe, Wilbur J. Richards, Everett D. 

Gerry, Elbridge F. Newhall, Frank Smith, Henry E. 

Herrick, George E. Perkins, John H. Verne, B. P. 



MANCHESTER— 16. 

Allen, Wm. H. Curtis, C. A. Merriam, Arthur^M. 

Baker, John Cheever, Wm. M. Prince, Charles A. 

Boardman,T. DennieCoolidge,T. JeffersonRockwell, A. P. 
Burnham, John A. Friend, Daniel W. Rabardy, Julius F. 
Cheever, John H. Higginson, Henry Wigglesworth, Geo. 
Cotting, Charles E. 



MARBLEHEAD— 8. 

Alley, Amos P. Clough, A. W. Dennis, W, John 

Gregory, J. J. H. Paine, Thomas W. Ware, Benjamin P. 
Hathaway, Amos C. Cronin, Michael 



Adams, George 
Haskell, Wm. H. 
Hoyt, George W. 
Little, E. C. 



MERRIMAC— 10. 

Hopkins, S. C. Sargent, Bailey 

Riley, A. W. Sargent, Geo. W. 

Sargent, M. Perry Sargent, Walter H. 



90 



Bradley, George B. 
Buswell, Joseph E. 
Butters, W. H. 
Crosby, John S. 
Dwyer, Michael 
Emerson, Jacob, jr. 
George, John H. 
Goss, Chas. E, 
Hall, C. H. 



METHUEN— 26. 

How, Joseph S. 
Mann, C. W. 
Morrison, D, T. 
Pedlar, S. J. 
Phippen, G. S. 
Parker, James 0. 
Rogers, William M. 
Russell, Fred A. 
Sargent, S. G. 



Shirley, John W. 
Sawyer, Chas. M, 
Sleeper, Wm. C. 
Smith, Walter 
Swan, Leverett 
Thurlow, J. E. 
Tozier, C. L. 
Webster, Frank W. 



MIDDLETON— 9. 

Berry, William Phillips, B. Frank 

Currier, George A. Stiles, Farnum 
Peabody, A. W. Stiles, Hiram A. 



NAHANT— 12. 



Stewart, Mrs. S. A. 
Weston, Solomon W. 
Wilkins, George B. 



Beal, James H, 
Codman, Edw. W. 
Goodale, Byron 



Lodge, Henry Cabot Parker, E. Francis 
Lovering,Charles T. Parker, Arthur H. 
Merriam, P. Upham, George P. 



James, Geo. Abbott Otis, Herbert F. Whitney, George 



Adams, Charles E. 
Adams, Daniel D. 
Adams, George W. 
Adams, James K. 
Bray, George W. 
Coffin, William P. 
Dole, Nathaniel 
Forbes, A. B. 
Hale, Stephen P. 
Howard, Horatio M, 



NEWBURY -43. 

Jacques, William 
Kent, Edward 
Knight, Charles F. 
Little, Carleton 
Little, Edward F. 
Little, George 
Little, William 
Little, Wm. Burke 
Longfellow, Horace 
Lunt, Charles M. 



Noyes, Edward A. 
Noyes, Justin 
Noyes, James 
Noyes, Moses K. 
Perkins, Frank 
Perkins, Paul A. 
Pearson, Benj. jr. 
Plummer, Geo. H. 
Rogers, Abial 
Rolfe, John C 



91 



Illsley, Edwin 
Illsley, Paul M. 
Illsley, Joseph 
Jacques, Richard 



Lunt, C. A. Tenney, Henry L. 

Moody, Nath'l W. Tenny, Daniel G. 
Moynihan, Cornelius Toomey,Matthew H. 
Newman, Sidney F. 



Jacques,E,ichard T.jr.Noyes, Richard T. 



NEWBURYPORT— 37. 



Adams, Philip D. 
Adams, Rufus 
Allen, John W. 
Balch, John H. 
Bartlett, Chas. S. 
Bayley, Wm. H. 
Capers, Thomas 
Clements, C. E. ' 
Coleman, James C. 
Conley, Joseph J. 
Cook, T. N. 
Dodge, E. P. 
Hewett, C. C. 



Johnson, Wm. R. 
Kent, Otis L. 
Knights, George W. 
Lewis, Samuel W. 
Little, John G. 
Maguire, C. N. 
Marsh, Horace W. 
Mosely, Fred'k S. 
MoultoQ, Joseph 
Nelson, Charles W. 
Newhall, Asa T. 
Noyes, Isaac P. 
Ordway, A. D. 



Perley, R. M. 
Perkins, Charles 
Poore, George H. 
Rowe, D. T. 
Sargent, John W. 
Smith, Joseph B. 
Stanley, B. F. 
Stanley, J. C. 
Toppan, Edward S. 
Winkley, J. Otis 
Winkley, Paul T. jr. 



NO. ANDOVER— 40. 



Adams, Edward 
Barker, John 
Carlton, Daniel A. 
Carlton, Amos D. 
Davis, George G. 
Davis, George E. 
Dale. William J. 
Davitt, John 
Farnham, B. H. 
Farnham, Mrs. B. 
Farnham, J. L. 
Farnham, W. Benj. 
Fuller, Edward A. 



Foster, J. Frank 
Foster, Nathan 
Foster, Orrin 
Frye, Newton P. 
Fuller, Abijah P. 
Goodhue, Hiram P. 
Greene, E. W. 
Hayes, Walter H. 
Hinxman, G. D. 
Holt, Peter jr. 
Huges, Winfield S. 
Jenkins, Benj. F. 
Jenkins, Milon S. 



Johnson, Charles F. 
Kittredge,HannahE. 
Kunhardt, Geo. E. 
Loring, Geo. B. 
Manion, John 
Mathewson, George 
Moody, E. W. 
Poor, James C. 
Robinson, Ad'son M. 
Stevens, Moses T. 
Stevens, Oliver 
Wardwell, T. O. 
Wiley, John A 



92 



PEABODY— 154. 

Annis, Peter W. Hall, Benjamin G. 
Appleton,Francis H.Hamblett, E. B. 
Barrett, Edward P. Higgins, John E. 
Beckett, C. L. Harrington, H. A. 

Beckett, Walter H. Hills, Charles C. 
Blake, E. L. Hill, W. L. 

Bodge, Arthur P. Hill, Benjamin M. 
Bodge, Jacob G. Hinckley, C. E. 
Bodge, Henry Herrick, John E. 

Bodge, Freeman P, Holman, George L. 
Bodge, William H. Hooper, Charles H. 
Bradford, E. E. Mrs.Humphrey, B. B. 
Brown, Lewis Kimball, Eliza'th C, 

Brown, Rufus H. Kimball, Walter B, 
Brown, Otis Kelley, Elbridge G. 

Brown, R. S. King, George H. 

Burbeck, Joseph N. King, J. Augustus 
Bursley, Geo. A. King, D. Warren 
Bushby, Charles F. Knight, George A. 
Bushby, William Knowlton, Isaac P. 
Buxton, Henry V. Knapp, Samuel E. 
Carroll, J. J. Linuehan, James C. 

Carroll, Thomas Littlefield, S. S. 



Clark, George H. 
Clark, A. B. 
Clark, Wm. P. 
Colcord, J. L. 
Connor, John J. 
Cooper, J. T. 



Lyons, Thomas F. 
Lnmmus, Abraham 
Mackintosh, R. S. B 
Maunix, Thomas 
Mansfield, E. 
Mansfield, ArthurW. 



Crehore, Joseph S. McCarthy, J. H. 
Curtis, George S. McKeen, John D. 



Daley, William J. 
Distin, William 
Dodge, A. Taylor 
Dole, William T. 
Donnell, William 



Meagher, John 
Merrill, Amos 
Moore, Benj. K 
Morris, R. E. 
Moulton, John 



Pepper, George W. 
Parmenter, John W. 
Pierce, Thomas W. 
Poor, Charles M. 
Poor, Albert F. 
Porter Ernest J. 
Porter, Leonard E. 
Porter, Edward H. 
Preston, Levi 
Quint, Nicholas M. 
Quint, Hazen A. 
Ramsdell, M. A. 
Raddin, Alonzo 
Rellihan, Thomas J^ 
Reynolds, George 
Safford, 0. F. 
Sanger, George F. 
Sawyer, Wm. F. 
Shea, William A. 
Shannahan, John 
Shaw, Fred M, 
Sheen, William E. 
Simpkins, Charles 
Smith, Jesse H. 
Southwick, B. F. 
.Spaulding, George E.. 
Stanley, Frank W. 
Stevens, Jacob B. 
Stockwell, Harry E. 
Stone, Charles E. 
Stone, Charles 0. 
Symonds, J. H. Mrs. 
Taylor, Benj. H. 
Thomas, Elmer B. 
Trask, J. Arthur 
Twiss, Everett M. 



93 



Diirkee, Edwin A. 
Durkee, Elmer E. 
Emerfcoa, C. S. 
Elliot, Arthur 
Ellsworth, H. L. 
Farley, Charles B. 
Farwell, C. C. Mrs. 
Farrington, Geo. C. 
Farnhain, Frank E. 
Fellows, Wm. H. 
Foster, George M. 
Foster, H. K. 
Goodale, Jacob 0. 
Goulding, C H. 
Graves, Harry D. 
Grosvenor, D. P. 



IStunroe, W. Fred 
Mulcahey, M. T. 
Needhara, Geo. A. 
Newhall, F. L. 
Newhall, Orlando F. 
Nourse, Samuel W. 
Osborne, Daniel W. 
Osborne, J. Edward 
Osboru, Lyman E. 
Osborne, Kendall 
Osborne, Charles L. 
O'Connor, P. H. 
O'Shea, Thomas H. 
Osgood, Geo. Fred 
Osgood, William 



Tyler, A. W. 
Walcott, John G. 
Walker, Harry F. 
Ward, William N. 
Warner, Charles 0. 
Watkins, William 
Wells, A. E. 
Wheeler, Benj. S. 
Whidden, A. H. 
Whipple, Horace P. 
Whipple, C. H. 
Wiley, William F. 
Wilson,Thomas Mrs. 
Winchester, Went'th 
Wyman, Fred H. 



Appleton, Zeno A. 
Dodd, Stephen 
Grimes, Loring 
Lane, Andrew 
Lane, Horace 



ROCKPORT— 14. 

Low, Martha J. Mrs. Smith, Allen 
Manning, John J. Smith, William H. 
Manning, William N.Smith, Solomon 
Merridew, James P. Tufts, George W. 
Norwood, Gorham 



Bartlett, B. W. 
Blodgett, George B. 
Carlton, George F. 
Daniels, George E. 
Dodge, Paul A. 
Dodge, Phineas A. 
Dummer, Nath'l N. 



ROWLEY— 20. 

Hale, Clara A. 
Hale, Daniel H. 
Hale, Thaddeus 
Hale, Agnes H. 
Hale, T. P. 
Keyes, Eben S. 
Lambert, Mary G. 



Mighill, Charles P. 
O'Brien, Daniel 
Pike, John 
Smith, Willard P. 
Tenney, John H. 
Todd, Frank P. 



94 



Abbott, Nathaniel 
Ballard, Charles W. 
Bickerton, William 
Buxton, Charles 
Chase, George 
Clark, Charles S. 
Cooper, Charles S. 
Collins, Wm. F. M. 
Creesy, George W. 
Creamer, George G. 
Daland, John 
Dane, William A. 
Endicott, Wm. C 
Felt, John 
Felton, William S. 
Foster, Joseph C. 
Foster, Wm. J. 
Gardner, A. B. 
Hathaway, John 
Hale, Henry A. 



SALEM— 58. 

Horton, William A. 
Ives, John S. 
Julyn, J. M. Mrs. 
Jones, Samuel G. 
Knight, Edmund F. 
Lamson, Frederick 
Little, Philip 
Lord, William 
Merritt, David 
Morse, E. Henry 
Murphy, John T. 
Nichols, Wm. S. 
Perkins, E, R. 
Perkins, John W. 
Porter, Ellis H. 
Pingree, David 
Pickering, Benj. P. 
Rantoul, Robert S. 
Rogers, Dudley P. 



Robinson, John 
Reynolds, Henry E. 
Ropes, Willis H. 
Ropes, Charles F. 
Ropes, John C. 
Ropes, Reuben W. 
Sanders, Charles 
Sanders, Robert J. 
Shreve, 0. B. 
Spencer, Charles P. 
Swasey, John A. 
Tracey, Patrick 
Vaughn, Ira 
Whitmore, Wm. F. 
Waters, David P. 
Wheatland, George 
White, Frank W. 
Wyman, Isaac C. 
Wright, Frank V. 



Bartlett, Moses J. 
Dole, Edward G. 
Dow, George A. 
Eaton, John F. 
Evans, John Q. 
Getchell, N. Tracey 



SALISBURY— 16. 

Gilman, Samuel Pettengill, Wesley 
Greeley, Furmer H. Pettengill, John Q. A. 
Greenleaf , Wm. H. Smith, John F. 
Montgomery, John Thornton, Robert 
Mudge, John True, P. Albert 



Blodgett, J. W. 
Faxon, M. B. 
Hawkes, Samuel 
Hawkes, Lewis W. 



SAUGUS— 10. 

Hill, Alfred C. Penney, George H. 

Newhall, Herbert B.Reiley, Thomas J. 
Newhall, Joseph Whitehead, Joseph 



95 

SWAMPSCOTT— 4. 

Bates, William H. Pettingell, L. D. Pettingell, S. J. 
Crosman, J. H. 



Averill, George F. 
Bradstreet, Dudley- 
Ferguson, Edw. E. 
Foss, Robert 
Pike, Baxter P. 
Poole, Benjamin 



TOPSFIELD— 18. 

Hood, Salmon D. 
Lamson, J. Arthur 
Leach, Charles H. 
Towne, Frank H. 
Ward, Richard 
Wildes, Eugene L. 



Mason, Alphonso 
Nelson, D. Oscar 
Peabody, Charles J, 
Wilson, James 
Wilkins, Lyman S. 
Woodbury, Isaac M 



WENHAM— 14. 



Alley, Henry Dodge, George F. Pingree, David 

Batchelder,T.WilsonDodge, William P. Perkins, George A. 

Cole, Zachariah Hobbs, A. F. Perkins, Nath'l P. 

Day, Everett K. Hobbs, Henry Tilton, George H. 
Demsey, H. H. Kavanaugh, J. 



WEST NEWBURY— 42. 



Amend, Robert A. 
Bailey, Lawrence H, 
Bartlett, M. Walsh 
Boynton, Eben M. 
Brown, Leander F. 
Carr, George G. 
Chace, S. F. 
Connor, M. H. 
Connor, J. J. 
Emery, Samuel E. 
Evans, Charles M. 
Follansbee, B. A. 
Flook, George L. 
Goodridge, H. M. 



Gordon, J. R. 
Gowen, Mrs. C. W. 
Gowen, C W. 
Gowen, Oscar 
Jaques, Romulus 
King, T. J. 
Merrill, William 
Merrill, William E. 
Merrill, Henry 
Moody, Horace 
Moore, Alfred L. 
Nason, Ezekiel G. 
Nason, Henry F. 
Newell, Richard 



Ordway, Cyrus D. 
Ordway, Charles W. 
Pierce, George J. 
Pierce, Henry J. 
Poor, Fred H. 
Poor, George H. 
Poor, William H. 
Rogers, George C. 
Smith, Robert L. 
Stanwood, G. Miss 
Stultz, Frederick 
Thurlow, Thomas C 
Thurlow, William 
Titcomb, Silas M. C. 



1903 
PREMIUM LIST OF 



Essex Agricultural Society 

FOR THE 

EIGHTY-THIRD ANNUAL CATTLE SHOW AND FAIR. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The trustee of each town is instructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their 
duties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to 
the Exhibition the importance of entering their exhibits for 
the hall the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Committees, 
and making sure that the names proposed at those meetings 
are of persons who will serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the Fair 
Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the grounds, 
at twelve o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the exhibi- 
tion, and there organize, take the books of entry, and proceed 
at once to business. Committees in hall should take the books 
of entry from the Superintendent promptly after the entries 
close. 

Full reports of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 



97 

Three members of any committee consisting of more than 
that number are authorized to act. 

d^^No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 

The diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of special merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures, fruits, vegetables 
in hall, and flowers ; or any premium, unless the rules of the 
Society have been strictly complied with. Neither shall they 
award premiums or gratuities in excess of the amount appro- 
priated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents, ex- 
cept on work by children, and none in that class less than 
twenty-five cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals blue and red printed premium 
ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assistants on 
the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals or articles 
designating the grade of premium awarded each, and the name 
of the person to whom awarded, and especial care should be 
taken that the cards issued correspond with the awards in 
their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on animals and articles 
exhibited at the Show, must be delivered promptly to the 
Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

The Society offers liberal premiums for the best reports of 
committees ; and the chairman of the several committees are 
requested to present to the Secretary a full report explanatory 
of the opinions of the committee on the matter referred to 
them, within two weeks after the awards are made at the 
Show, for publication in the Transactions.* 

Reports on farms, crops, etc., to be presented previous to 
the meeting of the Trustees in November. 

Any member of a committee who cannot serve on the same 
is requested to give notice to the Secretary, before the show, so 
that the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a 
ticket of admission to the hall of exhibition on application to 
the Secretary. 



•Chairmen of committees will please notice this request. 



98 
General Rules. 

Competitors are requested to carefully read the rules and 
premium list before making entries. 

Claim (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 

All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person not a member of the Society, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, 
for which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase 
the funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium or gratuity is awarded or 
an agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
First National Bank, Salem, on and after the first Monday of 
November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day of 
May next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered as 
given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the several committees and adopted by the Soci- 
ety shall be final. Committees should see that the j[>re??imm 
cards issued, correspond with the premiums and gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his in- 
tention to compete for the same ; and committees are in- 
structed to award no premium unless the animal or article 
offered is worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall be entered in another class, except farm 
horses which may be entered for fast walking, and milch 
cows, which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premiums must be owned by residents 
and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 
themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 



99 

article offered ; and that no preminm will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture. 

The Proof tha.t an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders, and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 

Standard adopted : — American Jersey C. C. Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holsteiu 
Herd Book. 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

The Committees will take notice that no premium will be 
awarded unless the animals or objects are of a decidedly super 
ior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
special merit, in all departments of the Fair. 

In case of a deficiency in the receipts at the Fair in any 
year, the society reserves the right to reduce the premiums 
offered, pro rata, not to exceed one half the amount offered. 



Cattle and Other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals entered for premium or exhibition, will be fed 
during the Exhibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity, 
prevented from leaving, at the expense of the Society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense thereof, all of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with committee's report. 

For Pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $8, 6 

For Fat Cows, premiums, $6, 4 



lOO 



BULLS. 

*Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or of any other recognized breed, for each breed, 

Two years old and upwards, premiums, $8, 5 

Under two years old, for each breed, ^5, 4 

One year old and under, for each breed, $4, 3 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREED. 

For the best bull of any age or breed, with five of his stock 
not less than six months old, quality and condition to be taken 
into account, and especially the adaptability of the animal to 
the agriculture of the county. Diploma and $12 

Note.— Competitors are required to give a written statement of pedigree and 
committees are requested to be particular in this respect, and return them to the 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $8, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Holstein, 
Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old and 
upwards, premiums for each breed, $7, 4 

For Native or Grade Cows, four years old and upwards, pre- 
miums, $7, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week 
from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $7, 4 

Note.— A written statement will be required of the age and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they dropped their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, quality and quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding, which statement is to be returned to the Secretary with 
Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to be 
exhibited at the Show, and a correct statement of manner of 
keeping and yield for one year preceding the Show, premiums, 

Diploma and f 10, 8 

Note. — The above mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 
Jan. 1st, preceding the Show. 

HEIFERS. 

First Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 



lOI 



Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, each breed, $4, 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $4, 2 
Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old, premiums, $5, 3 
Two years old, that have never calved, premium, $4, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, premiums, $4, 2 
One year old and under, and less than two, premiums, ^4, 2 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, and quality and training, premiums, $8, 6 

For pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $6, 4 

Note.— The Committee are required to consider the quality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their working capacity. The training of working oxen and 
steers will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containing a load weigh- 
ing two tons for oxen," and three thousand pounds for steers. I^°"At the time 
of entry a certificate of the weight of the cattle must be filed with the Secretary 



STEERS. 

For pair of three old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, $8, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft purposes, three years old^ 
premiums, $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account, Diploma and $12 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums, Diploma and $8, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums. Diploma and $5, 3 



102 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than one year old, quality and condition taken into ac- 
count, Diploma and f 12 

Note.— No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
bave been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$8, 5 

BROOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Driving Purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums. 

Note.— No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all ap- 
parent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 
For Family Horses, premiums, $8, 6 

Note.— No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $10, 8 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $12, 9 

LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

For Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $10, 8 

For pairs of Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, f 12, 9 

GENTLEMEN'S SADDLE HORSES. 
Gentlemen to ride on track, premiums, $6, 4 

LADIES' SADDLE HORSES. 
Ladies to ride on track, premiums, $6, 4 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

For pairs of Fast Walking Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For single horses, $5, 3 



I03 

For pairs of farm horses with load of 4,000 lbs., premiums, 

$6,4 

For single farm horse, with load of 2000 lbs., premiums, 

$5, 3 

li:;^^The above to have trial on the track. 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1200 lbs. and over, premiums, 

$6, 4 

For Farm Horses weighing less than 1200 lbs. premiums, 

$6,4 

Note.— No horse will be allowed accept those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of the load to be used in trial of Farm 
Horses is to be fixed upon by the committee of arrangements for drafting, the 
difference in the load for horses of 1,200 lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 lbs, 
to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pairs, 2,000. No obstruction shall 
be placed either before or behind the wheels in trials of Draft Horses of either 
class, but wheels shall be blocked behind to hold the load when a team stops go- 
ing up hill. 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING 2400 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses, weighing 2400 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, $8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2400 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2400 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 3 AND 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding four-year-old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year-old Colts, premiums,! $5, 3 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premiums, 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 
COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOUR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four-year-old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three-year-old colts, premiums, $5, 3 



I04 



ONE AND TWO TEAKS OLD. 



For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premiums, 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

N. B. — All the above classes the committee will act with the expert judge ex- 
cept Fat Cattle, Working Oxen and Steers. 

HORSES FOR HURDLE JUMPING. 

For Horses jumping over four four-foot hurdles, premiums? 

$8. 6 
For high hurdle jumping, premiums, $8 

■ rSWINE, LARGE BREEDS. 

Large Breeds, viz : Cheshire, Berkshire, Chester County 
Whites, Poland China, Large Yorkshire, and any other breed 
or grade, weighing more than 300 lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $4, 2 

For Breeding Sows, with their pigs by their side, premiums, 

$4,2 

For Litters of weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $4, 2 

SWINE— SMALL BREEDS. 

Small breeds, such as Suffolk, Essex, Small Yorkshire, 
China, and any other breed or grade, weighing less than 300 
lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $4, 2 

For Breeding Sows, with their pigs by their side, premiums, 

$4, 2 

For Litters of weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $4, 2 

SHEEP. 

For flock of Sheep, not less than six ewes in number, each 
breed, premiums, $5, 3 

For best Buck, premium, $5 

For lots of Lambs, not less than six ewes in number, be- 
tween four and twelve months old, premiums, $5, 3 

ANGORA GOATS. 
For flocks of Angora Goats not less than six, prem., $5, 3 



I05 

POULTRY. 

For pairs of Fowls, Light Brahmas, Dark Brahmas, Buff 
Cochins, Partridge Cochins, Black Cochins, White Cochins, 
Plymouth Rocks, White Plymouth Rocks, Dominiques, White 
Leghorns, Brown Leghorns, Dominique Leghorns, Black 
Spanish, Hamburgs, Polish Games, Dorking, Black, White 
and Mottled Javas, Wyandottes, White Wyaudottes, Golden 
Wyandottes, Black and White Minorcas, Red Caps, Audalu- 
sias, Langshangs, and other recognized varieties, each variety, 
premiums, $2, 1 

To be used by the committee in their discretion for collec- 
tions of Bantams, no person to receive more than ten dollars, 

$25.00 

For pairs of chickens of above varieties, premiums, $2, 1 

For the best breeding pen of each variety of four females 
and male, premium, $2 

For the best pairs of Native Fowls, premiums, $2, 1 

For lots of Turkeys, and Alesbury, Rouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks, and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China and African Geese, prem., $2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the discharge 
of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any specimen 
on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all claim he 
may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the " American Standard of Excellence." 

Note. — No pair in a pen will receive a premium as a pair. 

STREET PARADE. 

Invitation is extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of the committee in 
charge in premiums or gratuities, $50 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no ar- 
ticle offered in collection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium), Diploma and $8 

Best market wagon. 

Best horse cart. 

Best ensilage cutter. 

Best fruit evaporator, with sample of work. 



io6 



To be awarded for the above in gratuities a sum not exceed- 
ing $40. 

For implements not specified above, the Committee may, at 
their discretion, award $25. 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Rake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the 
merit of which can be known only by actual trial in the field ; 
but manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition 
and inspection. 

CARRIAGES. 

For carriages built in the county, and exhibited by the 
manufacturer", Diploma and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 



Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be espec- 
ially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued with 
the names, and sums awarded them, correspond with those in 
their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instruc- 
tions under heading of " Duties of Committees," " General 
Rules," " Premiums to be awarded at the Show," see first 
pages, and under "Fruit," "Domestic Manufactures," and 
" Flowers." 

[[^"All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manu- 
factures, must be the product of Essex County to be entitled 
to a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers fifty dollars to be divided in three pre- 
miums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex County, 
as follows : — Premiums, $25, 15, 10 

Note.— This exhibit includes all Fruit, Vegetables and Domestic Manufactures 
that are exhibited in any other department in Exhibition Hall. 

DAIRY, BREAD, CANNED FRUIT AND HONEY. 

For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making 
and management of the Buttter, premiums, $5, 3 



I07 

For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, $5, 3 

For white bread made of Wheat flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from Graham flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread entered for premiums to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collection of Preserved Fruits and 
Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, $2,'jl 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of pro- 
cess used and amount of labor and time required in preparing 
and drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on articles entered in this depart- 
ment, products of this County deemed worthy, $20 

First and second best honey, not more than five nor less 
than three pounds in comb with one pound of same extracted 
made in the County, with statement signed of kind of bees and 
hive, and time of year when honey was made, premiums, 

$3,2 



Fruit. 

All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the first dav of the exhibition, and each exhibi- 
tor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists 
of the varieties of each class of fruit, or to be filed when 
entry is made. (Committees are not authorized to make 
awards to those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a conspicuous manner by the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors, with the names ^ of • 
fruit for which premiums are offered, all others of same class 
fruit to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place 
their several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated 
by such labels, or be considered by the committee as not com- 
peting for premiums. 



io8 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee) to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit. 

PEARS. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County: Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Angouleme, Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckel, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Comice, Howell and Clairgeau, each, premium, $2 

Doyenne d'Ete, Gifford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $L50 

For best collection of pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premium, $5 

In addition to the above are placed at the disposal of the 
committee, to be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 
each, $15 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the follovving varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County: Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Wolf River, Sutton 
Beauty, Hubbardston, Mackintosh Red, Porter, Pickman 
Pippin, Roxbury Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Gravenstein, 
Hunt Russet,^ Ladies' Sweet, Snow, Bailey Sweet, Wealthy, 
Sutton Beauty, premium for each, ^2, 1 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early). 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

For best collection of apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab 
apple deemed worthy by the committee, $1.50 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 each, $15 



109 

PEACHES, GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

Eor best twelve specimens of Freestone, white flesh, 
yellow flesh, Essex County seedling, each, variety, $2 

For best collection of peaches, premium, $3 

For the best twelve specimens of Champion, Lemon, or 
Orange Quinces, premium, $2 

For the best twelve specimens of plums, five varieties to be 
selected by committee, each variety, premium, $2 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, 
Brighton, Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, Pocklington, 
Niagara Grapes, each variety, premium, $3 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $4, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than ten pounds 
in all, premiums, $5, 4 

For best specimens of four bunches of grapes varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

11.50 

For basket of assorted fruits, premiums, $3, 2 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than 50 cents each, ijp20 



Plants and Flowers. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



1. All plants and flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or be- 
fore eleven o'clock on the first day of the fair, and all such 
plants and flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of plants and 
flowers is designated in the schedule, there must be neither 
more nor less than that number or quantity of specimens 
shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article, only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is offered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for com- 
petition, but no variety can be duplicated. 



no 



4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens 
exhibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of 
superiority and worthy of such premium, not even if they are 
the only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admitted 
in competition for another different premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation^ 
or in the case of native plants and flowers, where such were 
found. 

7. All plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood or some other 
permanent and suitable substance, and so attached to same as 
to be easily seen. Flowers when specified to be named to 
comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symmetry and vigor of the specimens ; also bouquets, baskets, 
design work, etc., must show taste, skill, and harmony in 
arrangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All flowers exhibited must be shown upon their own 
stem, flowers in "Design" work alone excepted ; and this 
exception, if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account 
by the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The Committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or " Designs of merit" 
for which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together) on plants and flowers 
exceed the amount, $125, limited by the Society for this 
department. 

11. No member of the committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any case vote, or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarily vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for plants and flowers, and General Rules of the Society, 
and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will be 
disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhibitors 
who have complied with said Rules, etc. 

Committee on plants and flowers will take notice. 



Ill 



PLANTS. 



Plants competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots, native plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 

For collection flowering and ornamental foliage plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premiums, $5, 3 

For collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection of Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 
For collection I3egonias, 5 specimens; 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, 
premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums^ fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 5 va- 
rieties, premiums, $1 
For collection Calla Lilies, 6 specimens, premium, $1 
For specimen English Ivy, premium, $1 
For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least 50 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which to be a cross section, and neither to be more than four 
inches in length or diameter, premiums, $5, 3 

FLOWERS. 

For collection cut flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties, named, $3, 2 



112 

For collection cut flowers, native, 100 specimens, at least 

50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For pair bouquets, for vases, green-house flowers, premiums, 

f 1, .50 
For pair of hand bouquets, green-house flowers, premiums, 

$1, .50 
For pair bouquets, for vases, of native flowers, premiums, 

$1, .50 
For pair of bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, pre- 
miums, ^1, -50 
For basket of green-house flowers, premiums, f 1, .50 
For basket of native flowers, premiums, f 1, .50 
For basket of garden flowers, premiums, $1, .50 
For arrangement of native flowers and autumn leaves, 
premiums, $2, 1 
For floral designs, choice cultivated flowers, prem., $3, 2 
For floral designs, native flowers, premiums, $2, 1 
For collections Japan Lilies, hardy, named, premiums, $2, 1 
For collections Phlox, hardy perennial, named, prem., $2, 1 
For collection Pansies, at least 50 specimens neatly and 
artistically arranged, premiums, $2, 1 
For collection of native and introduced weeds, with com- 
mon and botanical name attached, premiums, $2, 1 
For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 
For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six 
varieties, named, premium, $1 
For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 
For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 
For twelve Gladiolus (spikes), at least six varieties, named, 
premium, ^1 
For twelve Japan Lilies, at least six varieties, named. 



premium 



fl 



For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, ^1 

For twelve Phlox, hardy perennial, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, ^1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem., $1 

For twenty-four Car nation pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, ^1 

For twenty-four Verbenas, at least six varieties, named, 
premium. 



113 

For twenty-four Roses, at least six varieties, named, 

premium, $1 

For twenty-four garden annuals, at least twelve varieties, 

named, premium, $ 

For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties named, prem.jJ^ 
For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, $ 

For twelve Asters, Double Truffaut's Peony flowered, pre 

mium, $ 

For twelve Asters, Pompone, premium, $ 

For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, $ 
For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $ 
For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, $ 

For twenty-four Zinnias, double, in variety, premium, $ 
For twenty-four Marigolds, African, in variety, prem., $ 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre 

mium, $ 

For twenty-four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $ 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium, $ 

For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, $ 

For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $ 

For twelve Dianthus (double annual), in variety, prem., ^ 
For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, $ 

For collection of Sweet Peas, premium, $ 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS ONE. 

Mules for fruit apply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens. Eclipse, Dewing, and 
Edmands, premium, each variety, $2, 1 

Carrots — For best twelve, Short Top, Long Orange and 
Danvers Intermediate, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

For best twelve, Short Horn, Orange carrots, $2, 1 

Mangold Wurtzels — For best six specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Flat turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top and 
White Flat, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Ruta Bagas — Twelve specimens. For best Yellow and 
White, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Onions — Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow Flat 
and Red, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Clark's No. 1, Pearl of Savoy, Early Maine, Rob- 
erts Early, Carmans No. 3, Rural Blush, Rural New Yorker, 
Early Northern, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $15 



114 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS TWO. 

Cabbages — For the best three specimens, Savoy, Fottlei's 
Drumhead, StODe Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, each variety premiums, $2, 1 
Cauliflower — For best three specimens, premiums, $2, 1 
Celery — For best four roots, premiums, $2, 1 
Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best, Early, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 
For best twelve ears in milk, late, premiums, $2, 1 
Squashes — For best three specimens, Marrow, Turban, 
Warren Turban, Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, Bay 
State, Sibley, Butmaii, each variety premiums, $2, 1 
Melons — For best three specimens, Nutmeg, Musk, Cassaba, 
Salmon Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For best two specimens Watermelons, premiums, $2, 1 
Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens, Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premiums, 

$2, 1 
Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premiums, $2, 1 

For collection of Vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $30 
JC^No competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums 
are offered for. 

Collections of Vegetables where premiums are offered for a number of varieties 
must be entered and placed, not less than three of a kind by themselves on the 
tables assigned lor collections. No collection shall receive but one premium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to compete with speci- 
mens of the same variety placed elsewhere. Kxliibitors of such collections, how- 
ever, are not prevented from exhibiting additional S)>eciuiens of any variety with 
and in competition with like variety. All vegetable must be entered in the 
name of the grower of them. 

Size of Vegetables. Turnip Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions, 
21-a to 4 inches in largest diameter; Potatoes to be of good size for family use; 
Scjiuashes to be pure and well ripened, Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premiums, $1 

For twenty-live ears of Field Corn, premiums, $5, 4, 3 

For twenty five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, I 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $6,4 
All grain or seed must have been grown by the exhibitor in 
the County to receive a premium. 



115 
Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 1 
o'clock on the first day of the Exhibition. Articles not thus 
deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 
be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to the 
last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wrought Counterpanes having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $3, 2 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $25 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets, having regard to the quality and expense of the 
material, premiums, $3, 2 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the qual- 
ity of the work and expense of materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount not to exceed $20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For exhibit of Manufactured Leather and Skins, 

Society's Diploma 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 
Women's do., Children's do., each, premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each, prem., $3 

$25 are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium, Diploma of the Society 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $30 

FANCY WORK. 

Of Domestic Manufacture are not included in the above. 
At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, $40 



ii6 



OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLOBS. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, $40 

DECORATED CHINA. 

For best collection Decorated China, premiums, $5, 3 

For best individual specimen, premiums, $3, 2 

For Punch Bowl or set, premiums, $2, 1 

F©r Jardiniere or Fern dish, premiums, $2, 1 

For raised paste or gold, premiums, $2, 1 

For Vase, premiums, $2, 1 

For Tray, Plate, etc., premiums, $2, 1 

CHARCOAL, PEN AND INK WORK, PHOTOGRAPHS, 

ETC. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $25 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, prem., $2, 1 

At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $15 
not less than 25 cents in any one gratuity. 



List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 



SMALL FRUITS. 

For the best product of not less than twenty-five trees, 
taking into account (quantity and quality) of Peaches, Plums 
and Quinces, premium, ' $8 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture, crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $8 

For best crop of currants, raspberries, blackberries, and 
Gooseberries, with statement as above, premium each, 



117 

LIBRARY. 

Committee — Andrew N'icliols, Daiivers ; B. V. Ware, Mar- 
blehead ; J. M. Dauforth, Lyuutield. 

TREADWELL FARM. 

Committee — Beoj. P. Ware, Maiblehead ; S. U. Hood, 
Topstield ; Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; Sherman Nelson, 
Georgetown. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee — William S. Nichols, Salem ; Beuj. P. Ware, 
Marblehead ; Lyman Osborne, Peabody. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Committee — F. H. Appleton, Peabody; J. M. Dauforth, 
Lynnfield Centre ; 0. S. Butler, Georgetown. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, includinoj committees to judge of crops, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Annual Meeting, •) 

Entries 5 

Report on Bulls. ... 8 

Report on Milch Cows '^ 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 10 

Statements . . 10 

Report on Heifers 11 

Report on Working Oxen l-» 

Report on Steers 13 

Report on Stallions lo 

Report on Brood Mares IH 

Report on Family Horses 14 

Report on Gents' Driving Horses ... 14 

Report on Ladies' Driving Horses 11 

Report on Fast Walking Horses 14 

Report on Single Farm Horses 15 

Report on Pairs of Farm Horses 15 

Report on Colts 15 

Report on Hurdle Jumping 15 

Report on Swine 16 

Report on Poultry 18 

Report on Agricultural Implements 24 

Report on Carriages '. 25 

Report on Granges 26 

Report on Dairy 26 

Report on Bread and Canned Fruit 26 

Report on Pears 28 

Report on Apples 29 

Report on Peaches, Grapes and Assorted Fruit 82 

Report on Plants 35 

Report on Flowers 36 

Report on Vegetables 42 

Report on Grain and Seed 48 

Report on Articles Manufactured from Leather 49 

Report on Manufactures and General Mdse 49 



I20 



Keport on Counterpanes and Afghans 50 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 51 

Report on Fancy Work 52 

Report on Oil Paintings and Water Colors 56 

Report on Decorated China 57 

Report on Charcoal and Pen and Ink Work 58 

Report on Work by Children 59 

Report of Committee on Root Crops 60 

Statements 61 

Report of Committee on Small Fruits 64 

Statements 65 

Report of Committee on Grain Crops 68 

Statements 66 

Report of Committee on Cranberry crop 67 

Statement 67 

Report of Committee on Reclaiming Wet Land 68 

Statement 68 

Report of Committee on Forest Trees 69 

Report of New Members 70 

Institutes 70 

In Memoriam 71 

Recapitulation 73 

Financial Statement 75 

Treasurer's report 76 

Constitution of the Society 77 

Officers of the Society 80 

List of Members 82 

Premium List for 1903 96 



TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1903 



OF THE 



mi AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



(Organized z8i8) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 



And the Premium List for 1904. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS.: 
Newcomb & Gauss, Printers. 

1903. 



EIGHTY-THIRD 

Annual Cattle Show and Fain 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the Society was held in the Pea- 
body Institute, at Peabody, Sept. 24, 1903. 

President Appleton called the meeting to order at 9.40 
o'clock, A. M. 

Upon motion, the chair appointed a committee of three, 
consisting of David W. Low, James C. Poor, to receive 
and assort the votes for President, four Vice Presidents, 
and Secretary, for the ensuing year. 

After attending to their duties, they reported as fol- 
lows : 

Whole number of votes cast ... 26 

FOR PRESIDENT. 

Asa T. Newhall, of Lynn, had ... 1 

Francis H. Appleton of Peabody, had . 25 

FOR VICE PRESIDENTS. 

J. J. H. Gregory, of Marblehead, had . 26 

H. G. Herrick, of Lawrence, had . . 26 

Asa T. Newhall, of Lynn, had ... 26 

Sherman Nelson, of Georgetown, had . 26 



FOR SECRETARY. 

T. E. Farnham, of Peabody, had . . 1 

John M. Daiiforth, of Lynnfield, had . 23 

And the above receiving the highest number of votes were 
declared elected. 

After a revision of the printed ballot for trustees, it 
was voted that the Secretary cast one ballot as amended 
for trustees for the ensuing year, and the following were 
declared elected : 

J. p. Little, Amesbury, Geo. W. Sargent, Merrimac, 

Geo. L. Averill, Andover, John W. Shirley, Methuen, 
John W. Lovett, Beverly, Geo. A. Currier, Middleton, 
Henry M. Killam, Boxford, Byron Goodale, Nahant, 
J. Webb Barton, Danvers, Daniel D. Adams, Newbury, 
Elias Andrews, Essex, Rufus Adams, Newburyport, 

Sam'l T. Poor, Georgetown, W. S. Hughes, No. Andover, 
G. M. Wonson, Gloucester, N. M. Quint, Peabody, 
S. B. George, Groveland, John J. Manning, Rockport, 
I. F. Knowlton, Hamilton, Frank P. Todd, Rowley, 
Albert Emerson, Haverhill, Charles Sanders, Salem, 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich, Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus, 
S. S. Lewis, Lawrence, P. Albert True, Salisbury, 

Edwin Bates, Lynn, Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott, 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield, Edw. E. Ferguson, Topsfield, 
J. H. Cheever, Manchester, J. Kavanaugh, Wenham, 
Amos P. Alley, Marblehead, J. R. Gordon, W. Newbury. 

After remarks by several members, it was voted to 
adjourn. 

The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1903, are tabulated for comparison as follows : 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS E 


:tc., on fair grounds. 




Entries 
in 1903 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1903 


Entries 
in 1902 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1902 


Fat Cattle, 


3 


I 








Bulls, 


16 


6 


18 


8 


Milch Cows, 


19 


4 


25 


5 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


3 


2 


4 


•-> 


Heifers, Pure Breed, 


22 


5 


28 


6 


Heifers, Grade, 


14 


3 


23 


7 


Working Oxen and Steers, 








1 


1 


Steers, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Stallions, Driving Purposes, 








1 


1 


Brood Mares, Farm and Dra 


ft, 





1 


1 


Brood Mares,Driving Purposes, 1 


1 








Family -Horses, 


3 


3 


3 


3 


Pairs, Gents' Driving Horses 


. 1 


1 








Single Gents' Driving Horses, 5 


4 








Ladies' Driving Horses, 


1 


1 


3 


3 


Gents' Saddle Horses, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Ladies' Saddle Horses, 


1 


1 








Fast Walking Horses, 


4 


4 


1 


1 


Pairs of Fast Walking Horses, 1 


1 


2 


2 


Single Farm Horses, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Pairs Farm Horses, 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Colts, Driving Purposes, 


6 


3 


6 


4 


Horses for Hurdle Jumping, 


10 


1 


9 


1 


Swine, Large Breeds, 


43 


3 


30 


4 


Swine, Small Breeds, 


8 


2 


9 


2 


Sheep, 


3 


1 








Goats, 


3 


2 








Poultry, 


207 


11 


154 


9 


Agricultural Implements, 


20 


6 


24 


5 


Carriages, 


6 


2 


12 


2 



405 



lo 



356 



72 



6 



EXHIBITS IN HALL. 





Entries 
in 1903 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1903 


Entries 
in 1902 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1902 


Grange Exhibit, 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Dairy, 


o 


1 


1 


1 


Bread and Canned Fruit, 


64 


10 


55 


7 


Honey, 


2 


1 








Pears, 


125 


11 


84 


8 


Apples, 

Peaches, Grapes, and As- 


124 


11 


225 


17 


sorted Fruit, 


45 


8 


126 


13 


Plants, 


25 


3 


39 


4 


Flowers, 


282 


12 


72 


11 


Vegetables, 


199 


13 


266 


15 


Grain and Seed, 


10 


4 


11 


4 


Carpets and Rugs, 


28 


8 


44 


9 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


43 


8 


38 


7 


Articles M'n'f'd from Leather, 7 


4 


5 


2 


Manufactures and Gen. Mdse 


., 8 


6 


23 


5 


Fancy Work, 


168 


11 


170 


7 


Oil Paintings and Water 










Colors, 


60 


5 


67 


5 


Decorated China, 


39 


3 


23 


5 


Charcoal Work, Photos, etc. 


, 77 


6 


83 


6 


Work by Children Under 










12 Years of Age, 


28 


6 


14 


4 


1740 


29 


1868 


25 



Grand total, 1740 entries, from 29 of the 34 cities and 
towns in Essex County against 1868 entries from 25 cities 
and towns last year. Manchester, Merrimac, Nahant, 
Rockport and Salisbury, did not have exhibits this year. 

The entries were : Amesbury, 17 ; Andover, 26 ; Bev- 



erly, 147 ; Boxford, 73 ; Danvers, 136 ; Essex, 9 ; George- 
town, 1 ; Gloucester, 5 ; Groveland, 5 ; Hamilton, 17 ; 
Haverhill, 5 ; Ipswich, 20 ; Lawrence, 1 ; Lynn, 124 ; 
Lynnfield, 17 ; Marblehead, 16 ; Methuen, 3 ; Middleton, 
19 ; Newbury, 6 ; Newburyport, 1 ; North Andover, 39 ; 
Peabody, 774 ; Rowley, 8 ; Salem, 221 ; Saugus, 9 ; 
Swampscott, 15 ; Topsfield, 4 ; Wenham, 19; West New- 
bury, 3. 



Reports of Committees. 



FAT CATTLE. 

$6. First premium to Lewis Brown, Feabody, for fat cow. 
$4. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
fat cow. 
James C. Poor, Allen Smith, Andrew Mansfield — Com- 
mittee. 



BULLS. 



i8. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Bull, " Admiral Dewey." 
$4. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Bull, " Mr. Robin." 
$5. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Bull, "Dewey's Standard." 
$5. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Bull, " Hardwick Senator." 
$4. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers. for 

Guernsey Bull Calf, " Danvers Boy." 
$3. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Bull Calf, " Oneidar." 
$5. First premium to J. A. Roome, Peabody, for Ayrshire 

Bull, " Thomaas Lipton." 
$5. Second premium to Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire Bull. 
$8. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Bull, " Earl Shepherd de Kol." 



•f5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Bull, " Earl Fairfax de Kol." 
|!12. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Ayrshire Bull, "• F'itz Hugh," with 5 of his stock. 
$8. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Ayrshire Bull, "Fitz Hugh." 
il. Second premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Ayrshire Bull, '' Tewkesbury." 
$5. Second premium to Lyman Holden, Salem, for 

Jersey Bull. 
Wesley B. Barton, Samuel T. Poor — Committee. 



MILCH COWS. 

#7. First premium to Herbert Andrews, Essex, for Ayr- 
shire Cow '• Lady Rhosus." 
%1. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Cow, " Darling Robin." 
$4. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire Cow, " Lady Hurd." 
$8. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, " Betz Fairfax." 
%~. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, " Sophia Barto Fairfax." 
$\. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 

for Holstein Cow, " Mechthilde 4t.h Pauline." 
f7. First premium to James C, Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, " Sophia Barto, 2d." 
$7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Holstein Cow, " Sadie." 
$4. Second premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for 

Guernsey Cow. 
$4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Durham Cow, " Dinah" 



lO 

17. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Jersey Cow, " Felons Priscilla." 
$7. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

Grade Guernsey Cow, " Daisy." 
$4. Second premium to Harry B, Graves, Peabody, for 

Grade Guernsey Cow, " Kitty." 
Wesley B. Barton, Asa T. Newhall — Committee. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

$10. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Herd of Holstein Cows. 
$8. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Herd of Grade Cows. 
Wesley B. Barton, Asa T. Newhall — Committee. 

FOR HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 
HERD NO. 1. 

" Sophie Barto Fairfax " (7 yrs. old), last calf Sept. 10» 
1903. Due in Oct. Gave 14,000 lbs. milk in 11 mos. 

" Betz Fairfax " (8 yrs.), last calf April 3. Not breed. 
From April 10 to Sept. 10, 5 mos., has given 6750 lbs. 
milk. 

" Mechthilde 4th Pauline " (8 yrs. old), last calf Aug. 
12, 1902. Due in October. Gave 13,890 lbs. milk in 12 
mos. 

" Myra Fairfax Shepard " (6 yr. old), last calf Sept. 28, 
1902. Due in Jan., 1904. Has given 12,430 lbs. milk in 

11 mos. 

"Lady Marion Fairfax " (8 yrs. old), last calf Sept. 9, 
1902. Due in Jan., 1904. Has given 13,000 lbs. milk in 

12 mos. 

HERD NO. 2. 

" Nitalia Havergale " (8 yrs. old), last calf July 20, 
1902. Due in Feb., 1904. Has given 11,504 lbs. milk in 
12 mos. 



II 

" Zalma Fairfax Clothilde " (5 yrs. old), last calf June 
15. Not breed. Has given 3150 lbs. milk in 3 mos. 

"Maid of Pern" (3 yrs. old), last calf June 21. Not 
breed. Has given 2680 lbs. milk in 3 mos. 

"Dinah " (7 yrs. old), last calf June 21, 1902. Due in 
Jan. Has given 9335 lbs. milk in 12 mos. 

"Sadie " (8 yrs. old), last calf Oct 31, 1902. Due in 
Dec. Has given 8240 lbs. milk in 10 mos. 

FEED AND CARE. 

The "Winter feed of these cows has been dry fodder, 
consisting in part of English hay, 1st and 2d crops, with 
oat and pea hay, and corn fodder. The grain rations con- 
sist of 1 part of gluten feed, 2 parts bean and 1 part cot- 
ton seed meal, feeding 10 quarts per day at two feeds. 
Watered in barn twice a day. Carded and brushed once 
a day. In Summer, the cows are turned to pasture and 
the grain ration reduced one-half during the early part of 
the season, but the grain ration is increased as the pasture 
feed drys and shortens up, and green fodder is fed once a 
day at first, but about Aug. 15th, it is fed twice a day. 
Have been feeding Japanese Barn Yard Millit this season 
with very satisfactory results. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James C. Poor. 



HEIFERS— PURE BRED. 

First premium to Walter H. Brown, Dan vers, for 
Ayrshire heifer, 20 months old. 

$4. Second premium to Herbert Andrews, Essex, for 
Ayrshire heifer, "Chebacco." 

$5. First premium to Herbert Andrews, Essex, for Ayr- 
shire heifer, " Conomo." 



12 

$4. First Premium to Herbert Andrews, Essex, for Ayr- 
shire heifer, " Lady Mildred." 
$2. Second premium to Herbert Andrews, Essex, for 

Ayrshire heifer. 
$5. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Guernsey heifer, " Daisey," in milk. 
$4. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey heifer, " Topsfield's Rosie." 
$4. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey heifer, " Dewey's Polly." 
^2. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey heifer, " Dewey's Bonn di full." 
$4. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey heifer, " Dewey's Robin." 
$2. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

Guernsey heifer, " Spotty B." 
f4. First premium to J. H. Herliley, Peabody, for Jersey 

heifer. 
$2. Second premium to D. F. Donahue, Peabody, for 

Holstein heifer. 
$2. Second premium, to Lyman Holman, Salem, for Jer- 
sey heifer. 
$4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Jersey heifer, " Priscilla's Daisy." 
^4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Betz de Kol." 
First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Myra Netherland Paul." 
Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Maid of Paul." 
First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Belle Shepherd de Kol." 
First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Zalma de Kol." 
Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Maid of Paul 2d." 



13 

HEIFERS— GRADE. 

$4. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

grade Guernsey. 
12. Second premium to L. J. Bordeaux, Danvers, for 

grade Jersey. 
14. First premium to L. J. Bordeaux, Danvers, for grade 

Jersey. 
14. First premium no James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade Holstein. 
$4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, foi 

grade Holstein. 
14. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

grade Ayrshire. 
f4. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

grade Ayrshire. 
$2. Second premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

grade Ayrshire. 
$2. Second premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

grade Ayrshire. 
Wesley B. Barton, A. A. Rutherford, Isaac F. Knowl- 
ton — Committee. 



STEERS. 

$6. First premium to Francis O. Kimball, Danvers, for 
pair four year old steers. 
Amos Haseltine, J. F. Foster, Allen Smith — Committee. 



BROOD MARES. 

$8. First premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for brood 
mare " Hero," with colt, 4 months old. 
George M. Baker, O. S. Butler — Committee. 



14 



FAMILY HORSES. 



]. First premium to H. H. Demsey, Wenham, for horse 

" Charlie." 
I. Second premium to Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead, for 

mare, " Nellie." 



GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

^9. Second premium to Thomas Sanders, Haverhill, for 

pair of driving horses. 
$10. First premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for mare, 

" Hera Wilkes." 
Second premium to Arthur S. Flannigan, Lynnfield, 

for chestnut horse. 



LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

$10. First premium to Mrs. Frances O. Perkins, Lynn- 
field, for mare, " Duchess." 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

First premium to E. C. Kerans, Danvers, for Sorrel 
horse, "Don." 
$3. Second premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for 

mare, " Hero Wilkes." 
$6. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, fo 
pair of horses. 
Geo. M. Baker, O. S. Butler, II. H. Demsey — Committee. 



SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

). First premium to B. W. Farn.ham, No. Andover, for 
bay mare, " Fan." 



15 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES. 

$8. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

pair horses, weight 3,000 lbs. 
$8. First premium to J. Henry Nason, Boxford, for pair 

horses, weight 2,300 lbs. 
Wm. B. Carlton, A. B. Fellows, Andrew Lane, J. W. 
Yeaton — Committee. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

.f 5. First premium to H. H. Demsey, Wenham, for 3 year 
old colt, " Ruth Shed." 

^3. Second premium to J. W. Trask, Beverly, for 3 year 
old colt, " Duke." 

$4. First premium to J. W. Trask, Beverly, for 2 year 
old colt, " Duchess." 

f 2. Second premium to Edw. H. Langdon, Danvers, for 
2 year old colt, " May Red." 

•f4. First premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for year- 
ling colt, " Frank C." 
J. Henry Nason, Walter H. Hayes, J. Kavanaugh, Daniel 

D. Adams — Committee. 



HURDLE JUMPING. 

First premium to A. P. Gardner, Hamilton, for horse, 

" Ambassador." 
Second premium to Sturgis Lothrop, Hamilton, for mare, 

" Grandma." 
First premium to G. S. Mandell, Hamilton, for horse, 

" Warpaint." 
First premium to A. P. Gardner, Hamilton, for horse, 

" Ambassador," for high jump. 
T. G. Frothingham, Dudley Rogers — Committee. 



i6 



GENTLEMEN'S SADDLE HORSES. 

$6. First premium to E. C. Kerans, Danvers, for Bay- 
Horses. Chas. " Buford." 



LADIES' SADDLE HORSES. 

I. First premium to E. C. Kerans, Danvers, for Sorrel 

Horse " Don." 
O. S. Butler, for the Committee. 



SWINE— LARGE BREEDS. 

$4. First premium to Mrs. Nellie Galuecia, Feabody, for 

Cheshire sow and pigs. 
$2. Second premium to Mrs. Nellie Galuecia, Peabody, 

for Grade Cheshire sow and pigs. 
$4. First premium to Mrs. Nellie Galuecia, Peabody, for 

O. I. C. boar. 
i4. First premium to Mrs. Nellie Galuecia, Peabody, 

for grade Berkshire sow and pigs. 
i2 Second premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for 

grade York and Chester sow. 
i4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for grade 

Berkshire and York sow. 
$4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire boar. 
$4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for English 

Berkshire boar. 
$2. Second premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for Eng- 
lish Berkshire sow. 
i4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for English 

Berkshire sow. 
i4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for large 

Yorkshire sow. 



17 

$4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for Chester 

White sow. 
$2. Second premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for grade 

Yorkshire sow, 
$4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for litter of 

weaned pigs. 
$4. First premium to J . J. Carroll, Peabody, for grade 

Berkshire and York boar. 
$4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire sow. 
$4. First premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for Ches- 
ter white boar. 
$2. Second premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for 

Chester white sow. 
$2. Second premium K) J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for 

sow and pigs. 
14. First premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for 

Mackey sow. 
$4. First premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for York- 
shire boar. 
$2. Second premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for 

O. I. C. boar. 
•f2. Second premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for 

Berkshire boar. 
i4. First premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for 

Berkshire boar. 
$4. First premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody, for grade 

China sow. 
12. Second premium to J. H. McCarthy, Peabody for 

Cliester and Mackey shotes. 
$2. Second premium to Thomas Whiteside, Danvers, for 

grade Berkshire boar. 
•f4. First premium to G. A. Buzzell, Lynnfield, for 

weaned pigs. 
|!4. First premium to G. A. Buzzell, Lynnfield,' for sow 

and pigs. 



i8 

$2. Second premium to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for 
Yorkshire sow. 

$4. First premium to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for 
Yorkshire sow and pigs. 

$2. Second premium to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for Ches- 
ter white boar. 

$4. First premium to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for Ches- 
ter sow and pigs. 
N. P. Clark, W. F. Wolloff, S. H. Bailey, Wm. K. Cole, 

— Committee. 



SWINE— SMALL BREEDS. 

$2. Second premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire boar. 
f 4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire boar. 
$4. First premium to J. J. Carroll, Peabody for small 

Yorkshire sow. 
•$2. Second premium to William Kirby, Danvers, for 

small Yorkshire sow. 
Frank. P. Todd, Albert H. Knight, David Pingree, 
Francis O. Kimball — Committee. 



SHEEP. 

$5. First premium to Harry A. Larrabee, Peabody, for 

Saxon Rocky Mt. buck. 
$5. First premium to Clifford H. Larrabee, Peabody, for 

Southdown buck. 



GOATS. 

85. First premium to John B. Jenkins, Andover, flock of 

Angora goats. 
$1. Gratuity to Percy Hammond, Danvers, for male and 

female Goats. 
Wm. B. Carlton, A. M. Swinerton, Andrew Mansfield. 
— Committee. 



19 

POULTRY. 

$2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
^2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 
•f 2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for Pen 

S. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 

S. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 
I^l. Second premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
il. Second premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. A. L Verne, Lynnfield, for 

pen R. L Red chicks. 
•SI. Second premium to Mrs. A. I. Verne, Lynnfield, for 

pair R. I. Red chicks. 
'12. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 

S. C. R. I. Red chieks. 
$2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for pair 

S. C. R. I. Red chicks. 
-fl. Second premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. C. R. I. Red chicks. 
•$2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pen S. C. R. I. Red fowls. 
$2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. C. R. L Red fowls. 
$1. Second premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. C. R. I. Red fowls. 
$2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 

S. C. Hambuig fowls. 
'^2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. C. Hamburg fowls. 
$1. Second premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. C. Hamburg fowls. 



20 

12. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. C Hamburg chicks. 
$1. Second premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. C. Hamburg chicks. 
$2, First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair S. C. Hamburg chicks. 
$1. Second premium to Geo. A. Addison, Beverly, for 

pair S. L. Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

pair African Geese. 
fl. Second premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
12. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

Barred Ply. Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Pl3^ Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

White Ply. Rock fowls. 
$1. Second premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

White Ply. Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair Buff 

Ply. Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pen 

Dominique fowls. 
$1. Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pen 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
$2. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
f 2. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pen 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte chicks, 
$2 First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Anconda chicks. 
$1. Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Anconda chicks. 



21 

12. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Dominique chicks. 
i2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pen 

Black Langshan fowls. 
'f 2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Black Langshan fowls. 
$2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Black Langshan chicks. 
$2.'^ First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pen 

White Wyandotte fowls 
f LT Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair White Wyandotte fowls. 
il. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pen French Houdan fowls. 
82. Gratuity to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for collec- 
tion of Bantams. 
12. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pair 

Rouen ducks. 
$1.\ Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Rouen ducks. 
$2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Toulouse Geese. 
$2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pen of Turkeys. . 
$1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair of Turkeys. 
$2, First premium to G. Preston Pope, Danvers, for pair 

White Ply. Rock chicks. 
$1. Second premium to G. Preston Pope, Danvers, for 

pair White Ply. Rock chicks. 
12. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan chicks. 
II. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan chicks, 
$1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 



22 



12. First premium to A. W Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 
$2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen 

Houdan fowls. 
$2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen 

Houdan chicks. 
f2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Pitt Game chicks. 
$1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Pitt Game chicks. 
$2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

half-wild (lucks. 
il. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Mallard ducks. 
$2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

half-wild ducklings. 
$1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

half-wild ducklings. 
II. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

pair Pekin ducks. 
$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

S. B. Polish fowls. 
$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

S. B. Polish chicks. 
|2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

Golden Polish fowls. 
$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

Golden Polish chicks. 
$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

plain Polish chicks. 
II. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair plain Polish chicks. 
$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

White Polish chicks. 
$1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair White Polish chicks. 



23 

$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair white Polish fowls. 
$1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbur}'^, Amesbury, for 

pair white Polish fowls. 
$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

Am. Dominique chicks. 
•$1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Am. Dominique chicks. 
$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for pair 

white Muscovy ducks. 
$1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair white Muscovy ducks. 
$1. Second premium to Frank R. Cook, Danvers, for pair 

blue Georgia game. 
$2. First premium to S. W. Nichols, Beverly, for pair 

buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium to S. W. Nichols, Beverly, for pair 

Partridge Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for pen 

African geese. 
$1. Second premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for pair 

Decoy ducks. 
$2. First premium to Lewis R. Brown, Salem, for pen 

Buff Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2. First premium to Lewis R. Brown, Salem, for pair 

Buff Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2. First premium to Lewis R. Brown, Salem, for pair 

Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for pair 

Buff Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for pen Buff 

Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for pair Buff 

Leghorn chicks. 
$L Second premium to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for pair 

Buff Leghorn chicks. 



24 

$2. First premium to Arthur Thompson, Beverly, for 

pair old Pekin ducks. 
^2. First premium to Arthur Thompson, Beverly, for 

pair young Pekin ducks. 
$2. First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair 

Light Brahma fowls. 
^1. Second premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pen 

Light Brahma fowls. 
$1. Second premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair 

Light Brahma chicks. 
$\. Second premium to Fred W. Holden, Beverly, for 

pair light Brahma fowls, 
$2. First premium to Fred W. Holden, Beverly, for pair 

light Brahma fowls. 
$2. First premium to Fred W. Holden, Beverly, for pen 

light Brahma chicks. 
$2. First premium to Fred W. Holden, Beverly, for pair 

light Brahma chicks. 
$2. First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pen 

Black Cochin chicks. 
$2. First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pair 

Black Cochin chicks. 
$2. First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pair 

Black Cochin fowls. 
$2. First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. Second premium to Thomas Milligan, Saugus, for 

pair Light Brahma chicks. 
$2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pen 

Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. Second premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 

Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. Gratuity to Henry W. Cressey, Beverly, for collec- 
tion of Bantams. 
$1. Second premium to Albert Reed, Peabody, for pair 

Red leg Leghorn fowls. 



25 

^3. Gratuity to J. H. Sewell, Peabody, for collection of 

Bantams. 
^2. First premium to A. B. Sims, Peabody, for pair 

Partridge Wyandotte fowls. 
$2. First premium to A. B. Sims, Peabody, for pair Rose 

C. R. I. Red fowls. 
$1. Second premium to A. B. Sims, Peabody, for pair 

Pekin ducks. 
$2. First premium to A. B. Sims, Peabody, for pair 

Muscovey ducks. 
$1.T Second premium to E. Boles, Lynn, for pair S. C. 

Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$2. First premium to W. E. Dundon, Peabody, for pair 

White Wyandotte chicks. 
$3. Gratuity to F. J. Cassidy and T. O'Connell, Peabody, 

for collection of Pigeons. 
$1. Second premium to Gustave Dreher, Dan vers, for 

pair Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 
f2. First premium to F. W. Poor, Peabody, for pen 

Black Minorca fowls. 
$2. First premium to F. W. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Black Wyandotte chicks. 
#1. Second premium to F. W. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Black Wyandotte chicks. 
S2. First premium to F. W. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Black Minorca chicks. 
■$2.^]^ First premium to F. W. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Black Wyandotte fowls. 
^1.' Second premium to F. O. Kimball, Danvers, for pair 

White Wyandotte chicks. 
f 2. First premium to C. H. Buckley, Lynn, for pair S. 

C. White Leghorn chicks. 
$1.]^ Second premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 

pen Toulouse geese. 
$2. First premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for pen 

African Geese. 



26 

$2. First premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 

Decoy ducks. 
$1. Second premium to J. B. Whittaker, Peabody, for 

pair Black Langshan fowls. 
$1. Second premium to J. B. Whittaker, Peabody, for 

pair Black Langshan chicks. 
$2. First premium to James Meikolson, Lynn, for pair 

Decoy ducks. 
$2. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair S» 

Wyandotte fowls. 
$1. Second premium to J, C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair S. 

Wyandotte fowls. 
12. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair S- 

Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. Second j^remium to J. C. Jodrey, Dan vers,, for pair S. 

Wyandotte chicks. 
12. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pen S^ 

Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium to Chas. Robinson, Marblehead, for 

pair Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium to S. W. Nichols, Beverly, for pair 

Buff Wyandotte fowls. 
$2. First premium to S. W. Nichols, Beverly, for pair 

Partridge Wyandotte fowls. 
12. First premium to W. H. Burnham, Wenham, for pair 

Partridge Cochin fowls. 
$2. First premium to W. H. Burnham, Wenham, for pen 

Partridge Cochin fowls. 
$2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

Bronze turkeys. 
i2. First premiun to M. J. Cain, Lynnneld, for pair 

Toulouse geese. 
i2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

old Embden geese. 
$2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair young 

Embden geese. 



27 

$2. Gratuity to W. S. Nichols, Salem, for collection of 
Pigeons. 
W. B. Atherton, Judge; W. H. Palmer, Joseph M. Clark, 
Thomas P. Hale. — Committee. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

$5. Gratuity to W. J. Young Co., Peabody, for Gasoline 

Engine. 
5. Gratuity to A. F. Dodge, Peabody, for Light Express 

Wagon. 
5. Gratuity to J. H. Nason, Boxford, for low down Milk 

Wagon. 

4. Gratuity to J. H. Nason, Boxford, for Coal Wagon. 

5. Gratuity to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for Ambulance. 
10. Gratuity to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for Market 

Wagon. 

4. Gratuity to S. B. Hinxman, No. Andover, for Dump 

Cart. 

5. Gratuity to S. B. Hinxman, No. Andover, for Express 

Wagon. 
10. Gratuity to W. J. Munroe, Lynnfield, for Ensilage 

Cutter and Engine. 
10. Gratuity to Geo. E. Daniels, Rowley, for two Horee 

Cart. 
5. Gratuity to Geo. E. Daniels, Rowley, for Caravan. 

The exhibition of Agricultural implements was remarka- 
bly poor in the smaller handiraplements,indeed there was an 
utter deficiency of plows, harrows, hoes, shovels, spades and 
hand planters. The only attempt to cover the large area usu- 
ally devoted to these was, the little spot occupied, or used by 
the old gentleman's patch, with his sod cutter tools. We can 
account for the absence of Mr. Colcord, for years an exhibi- 
tor of the latest inventions in agricultural implements, and 



28 

always on hand to interest farmers in their strong points; 
but where was Mr. Fuller, with his own original inventions 
to which we have been happy to invite attention for many 
years past ? His inventions are an honor to the county, 
and this committee has always handled them in a broad, 
liberal way, in full sympathy with the spirit of the inven- 
tor. Messrs. Whitcomb and Carter have in former years 
exhibited very extensivel}^ and we would heartily welcome 
them again to their old place.— If in the future, by any 
accident, the entry of articles on exhibition has been omit, 
ted from the book handed the committee, I believe it will 
be a wise way to make such entries at the exhibition tent, 
in the committee's book, and call attention to the fact 
when returning it to the Secretary— This appears to me 
the shortest way out of an unpleasant dilemma, and one 
by which all interests will be properly protected and har- 
monized. 

The two most interesting exhibits were the " New Ameri- 
can Cultivator" and the " Blizzard Ensilage Cutter." 
This cultivator embodies a form much used by our brother 
farmers of the Maine region. We first came in contact 
with it about a dozen years ago, at the New York State 
Fair at Rochester, where we went with new agricultural 
implements as a special object. We purchased one at the 
time and have had it in our use ever since. Ours straddles 
the row, and the two halves are completely under the control 
of the man who walks behind, to be run as near the plant 
as he wills. We have used it principally for cabbage, but 
with the shields that come with it it is equally suitable for 
corn and like crops when very young and at any state of 
their growth, up to about 18 inches in height. The teeth 
are arranged to run deeper into the ground then are those 
of common cultivators. It has done good work with us 
and given satisfaction. The New American includes the 
same principal, but has several improvements and addi- 



29 

tional capacities added, for it is a harrow, a grass seed and 
grain sower, a potato planter and digger, and withal the 
driver rides, eontrolling the teeth when they straddle the 
run with his feet. By the use of a lever he can raise the 
teetii above the ground when turning at the ends of his 
rows. Price of machine and parts $65.00; manufactured at 
Detroit, Mich. 

We heard one criticism given of it as a harrow ; " It 
brings too much to the surface and clogs badly " Our 
own machine is not fitted for harrow uses. The Blizzard 
ensilage cutter appeared to be a strongly made machine, 
and among the dozen and more good points claimed for it 
were these that will especially interest these of our brother 
farmers who have silos to fill. It was claimed for it that 
when run by a 6-horse power gasoline engine it could 
blow the ensilage from 15 to 25 feet up into the silo, thus 
doing away with the necessity of a carrier ; by a single 
movement of a lever it could be cleared when clogged, and 
by the movement of another lever the action could be re- 
versed instantly, and possible injury from any foreign sub- 
stance be prevented. It had also a shredder attachment on 
the plates holding the knives. The Blizzard was exhibited 
by Mr. W. J. Monroe of Lynnfield. The gasoline engine 
has certainly come to stay, at least until Edison gets his 
stationary battery before the public under practical work- 
ing conditions. There were four of the gasoline engines 
on the grounds, three of which were designed for use on 
the farm, for sawing, cutting or grinding. Having some 
idea of purchasing one for our use we have recently re- 
ceived in answer to request, circulars and explanatory let- 
ters from every manufacturer who advertised them. 
The cheapest offered is from Montgomery Ward and Co., 
of Chicago, 111. It is a 2^ horse power, weight 500 lbs- 
and is priced at $98.50. They send circulars giving full 
descriptions. This is of sufficient power for pumping or 



churning, but for silo work one of just double that capaci- 
ty is needed. The Essex Stationary engines exhibited by 
W. J. Young Machine Co., of Lynn, were from 2 to 4 
horse power capacity; the price of the former being $125.00 
and of the latter $225.00. We note that in their circular 
they do not recommend either for use for ensilage. As 
possibly some of my brother farmers may be in want of a 
gasoline engine I will give the address of six of the firms 
from whom I have received circulars, Messrs. Turner & 
Schuarzenberg, Lawrence, Mass., Fairbanks Co., 38-44: 
Pearl St., Boston, Charter Gas Engine Co., Sterling, 111. 
Lunt, Moss & Co., 43 South Market St., Boston, and Chas. 
J. Jagu Co., 166-168 High St., Boston. The awards of the 
committee were as follows : — 

Best Market Wagon, Premium f 10.00 to Dole & Osgood. 

"' Horse Cart, '• " to Geo. E. Daniels- 

" Ensilage Cutter " " to W. J. Monroe. 

" Express Wagon, Gratutity $5.00 S. D. Hinsman. 

" One Horse Dump Cart, Gratuity 4.00 S. D. Hinsman. 

" Truck Coal Wagon, " " J. H. Nason. 

Ambulance, Gratuity $5.00 Dole and Osgood. 

Low down Milk Wagon, Gratuity $5.00, Dole and Osgood. 
Light Express Wagon " " A. T. Dodge. 

Gasoline Engine, Gratuity $5.00, W. J. Young Machine Co. 
Caravan " " Geo. E. Daniels. 



J. J. H. Gregory 
Chas. R. Anderson 



Committee 
on 



Chas. N. Maguire )■ a ■ u j 

TT, T I Agricultural 

I^RANK LyFORD r 7 

G.D. Hinsman J ^^P^^^'^'^'' 



31 
CARRIAGES. 

^2. Gratuity to M. P. Doane, Danvers, for Concord 

Buggy. 

$S. Gratuity to M. P. Doane, Danvers, for Beverly Dem- 
ocrat. 

t|3. Gratuity to M. P. Doane, Danvers, for solid seat 
Democrat. 

$6. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for Myopia 
Wagon. 

$1. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for top Stanhope. 

f-i. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for Runabout. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



GRANGES. 

$25. First premium to West Boxford Grange, for collec- 
tion. * 



DAIRY. 

II. Gratuity to Sarah W. Knapp, Peabody, for Butter. 



HONEY. 

f 2. First premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 5^ 

lbs. Honey. 
$1. Second premium to F. A. Brown, Ipswich, for 5 lbs. 

Honey. 

BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

$2.00. First premium to F. W. Mangold, Danvers, for- 

White Bread. 
$5.00. Special premium to Miss Annie Horsh, Rowley, 

for Bread from Glen Mills product. 
$2.50. Special premium to Miss M. E. Dwj^er, Salem, for 

Bread made from Glen Mills products. 
$1.00. Special premium to Rossette Waller, Peabody, for 

Bread made from Glen Mills products. 



00 



^1.00. First premium to Mrs. Etta McDonald, Peabody, 

for Oatmeal Bread, 
f 1.00. First premium to Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Peabody, 

for Cake, 
f 2.00. First premium to Miss M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for 

White Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Robert E. Eulind, Peabody, for 

Coffee Rolls. 
.50. Gratuity to Lida McDonald, Peabody, for Brown 

Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to unknown for Citron Cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for Fruit 

Cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Mary Copp, Danvers, for White 

Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Sarah E. Durgin, Lynn, for Flour and 

Rye Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Lulu Danforth, Peabody, for White 

Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. P. P. Pierce, Peabody, for 

Fruit Cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. John Casey, Peabody, for Oat- 
meal Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Gamwell, Peabody, for 

Doughnuts. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Gamwell, Peabody, for 

Citron Cake. 
.60. Gratuity to Ina M. Southwick, Peabody, for 

Sponge Cake. 
^2.00. First premium to Susan A. Stuart, Middleton, for 

Dried Apples. 
^2.00. First premium to Mrs. M. A. Townsend, Lynn, for 

27 varieties Canned Fruit. 
■$1.00. Second premium to Mrs. C. A. Goulding, Peabody, 

for 25 varieties Canned Fruit. 



34 

.t50. Gratuity to Mrs. Hardy Peabody, for 17 varieties 

Canned Fruit. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Hardy Peabody, for Pickles. 
.60. Gratuity to Chiistina Milligan, Saugus, for 

Canned Fruit. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Anderson, Boxford, for 

Canned Fruit. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Geo. A. Spaulding, Peabody, for 

Wild Plums. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for Jelly. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. G. A. Smith, Salem, for Crab 

Apple. Jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. W. Fiske, Salem, for Crab 

Apple Jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for Canned 

Fruit. 
Walter F. Gould, Henry Alley, George M. Wonson, 
Mrs. C. W. Gowen — Comvnittee. 



PEARS. 

$2.00. First premium to H. M. Osborn, Peabody, for 
Belle Lucrative. 
.50. Gratuity to H. M. Osborn, Peabody, for Vicar. 
$2.00. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Bosc. 
.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

d'Anjou. 
.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Clairgeau. 
.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Law- 
rence. 
.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Duchess. 
$2.00. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Duchess. 



35 

12.00. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Law- 
rence. 
$2.00. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Urba- 
niste. 

.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for SeckeL 

.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 

.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Clapp's Fa- 
vorite. 

.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bartlett. 

.50. Gratuity to C. E. Brown, Peabody, for Louis 
Bonne. 

.50. Gratuity to C. E. Brown, Peabody, for Louis 
Bonne. 

.50. Gratuity to Fred Lamson, Salem, for Bartlett. 

.50. Gratuity to James A. King, Peabody, for Sheldon. 

.50. Gratuity to Fred Carlton, Peabody, for Bosc. 

.50. Gratuity to Fred Carlton, Peabody, for Howell. 

.50. Gratuity to Fred Carlton, Peabody, for Seckel. 

.50. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for Urba- 
niste. 

.50. Gratuity to Lewis Phelan, Peabody, for Baitlett. 

.50. Gratuity to E. W. Osborn, Peabody, for Comice. 

.50. Gratuity to Horace S. George, Groveland, for 
Seckel. 

.6j0. Gratuity to F. D. Hoag, Peabody, for d'Anjou. 

.50. Gratuity to George W. Eaton, Peabody, for Clair- 
geau. 
$2.00. First premium to W. B. Osborn, Peabody, for 
Clairgeau. 

.50. Gratuity to Sylvester Parrott, Lynn, for Belle 
Lucrative. 

.50. Gratuity to W. R. Chase, Lynn, for Bosc. 
ILOO. Gratuity to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Dana's Hovey. 
$2.00. First premium to Geo. E. Farnham, Peabody, for 
d'Anjou. 



36 

12.00. First premium to H. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Vicar. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. H. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 
Sheldon. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 
Belle Lucrative. 
82.00. First premium to Mrs. L. W. Ropes, Peabody, 

for Comice. 
f 2.00. First premium to Mrs. L. W. Ropes, Peabody, for 

Howell. 
f2.00. First premium to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for 
Bartlett. 
Edward W. Green, S. B. George, Joseph E. Mockett — 
Committee. 



APPLES. 

$L0O Second premium to J. C. Porter, Peabody, for 

Wealthy. 
11.50 First premium to William Bushby, Peabody, for 
Alexander. 
.50 Gratuity to William Bushby, Apple for a name. 
$L50 First premium to Mrs. M. A. Saul, Salem, for 

Wolf River, 
f 1.50 First premium to Miss Emily Blaney, Peabody, for 
Crab Apple. 
.50 Gratuity to James A. King, Peabody, for Roxbury 

Russett. 
.50 Gratuity to Wm. McDonald, Peabody, for Roxbury 
Russett. 
f 1.00 Second premium to A. H, Lee, Beverly, for King 

of Tompkins. 
$2.00 First premium to Mrs. F. A. Winchester, Peabody, 

for Gravenstein. 
$1.50 First premium to John Bowen, Peabody, for Rus- 
sian Dutchess. 



37 

.50 Gratuity to A. H. Buxton, Peabody, for Snow. 
.50 Gratuity to Geo. L. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Dutchess. 
$2.00 First premium to Geo. L. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Wealthy. 
$2.00 First premium to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Bald- 
win. 
.50 Gratuity to Fred A. Dodge, Beverly, for Mackin- 
tosh Red. 
$1.00 Second premium to John A. Rand, Beverly, for 

Hubbardston. 
$2.00 First premium to H. A. Harrigan, Peabody, for 

Hubbardston. 
$1.50 First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Northern Spy. 
$1.00 Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, 
for Roxbury Russett. 
.50 Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Greening. 
$2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Snow. 
$1.00 Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for 
Gravenstein. 
.50 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Hubbardston. 
$1.00 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bismark. 
$1.00 Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for North- 
ern Spy. 
$L00 Second premium to W. S. Hughes, No. Andover, 
for Mackintosh Red. 
50. Gratuity to W. S. Hughes, No. Andover, for King 

Tompkins. 
.50 Gratuity to C. O. Peabody, for Danvers Sweet. 
.50 Gratuity to E. P. Balcomb, Salem, for Baldwin. 
.50 Gratuity to E. P. Balcomb, Salem, for Gravenstein. 
.50 Gratuity to Wm. P. Dole, Peabody, for White 
Jersey. 



3^ 

.50 Gratuity to Wm. P. Dole, Peabody, for Tompkins 
King. 
$2.00 First premium to Albert Tufts, Peabody, for 
Mackintosh Red. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Mary J. Sim, Peabody, for a 

name. 
.50 Gratuity to W. E. Kimball, Lynn, for Killam Hill. 
ill.OO Gratuity to W. E. Kimball, Lynn, for Fall Sweet. 
$1.00 Second premium to F. D. Hoag, Peabody, for 
Baldwin. 
.50 Gratuity to C. F. Austin, Boxford, for Northern 
Spy. . 
il.OO Gratuity to C. F. Austin, Boxford, for King 
Tompkins. 
.50 Gratuity to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Longfellow. 
$1.00 Second premium to A. N. Welch, Peabody, for 

Danvers Sweet. 
$2.00 First premium to Daniel H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Roxbury Russett. 
$2.00 First premium to Daniel H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Hunt's Russett. 
$2.00 First premium to Daniel H. Illsley, Newbury for 

R. I. Greening. 
$2.00 First premium to Daniel H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Pickman Pippin. 
$1.00 Second premium to D. A. Pettingill, Danvers, for 

Sutton Beauty. 
$1.00 Second premium to W. B. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Lady's Sweet. 
$1.00 Second premium to Mrs. Mary J, Sim, Peabody, 

for R. I. Greening. 
$1.00 Second premium to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Pick- 
man Pippin. 
$2.00 First premium to B. K. Farnham, No. Andover, 
for Porter. 



39 

.50 Gratuity to E. E. Ferguson, Topsfield, for Crab. 

.60 Gratuity to E. E. Ferguson, Topsfield, for 20 
Ounce. 
$1.00 Gratuity to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Arctic. 

Geo. W. Chadwick, Wm. K. Cole, Albert Emerson — 
Committee. 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUIT. 

$2.00 Gratuity to Mrs. G. W. Stickney, Beverly, for 
Black Hamburg Grapes. 

11.50 Gratuity to Nellie O'Brien, Peabody, for Lee's 
Early Grapes. 

$3.00 First premium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for Con- 
cord Grapes. 

$3.00 First premium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for Moores 
Early Grapes. 

$3.00 First premium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for 
Worden Grapes, 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Ethel Woodbury, Beverly, for 

Delaware Grapes. 
.50 Gratuity to Home for aged Women, Peabody, for 
Delaware Grapes. 

$3.00 First premium to John Moulton, Peabody, for 
Moores Diamond Grrpes. 

$3.00 First premium to N. S. Patterson, Peabody, for 
Green Mountain Grapes. 

$3.00 First premium to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for 
Niagara Grapes. 

$1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. J. A. Barrett, Peabody, for Mar- 
tha Grapes. 

$3.00 First premium to H. G. Briggs, Peabody, for 
Pocklington Grapes. 

$3.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, for Basket Assorted 
Fruit. 



40 

$2.00 Second premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Bas- 
ket Assorted Fruit. 
.50 Gratuity to J. Kennedy, Danvers, for Champion 

Quince. 
.50 Gratuity to Wm. T. Dole, Peabody, for Champion 

Quince. 
.50 Gratuity to A. H. Merrill, Peabody, for Orange 
Quince. 
il.OO Gratuity to Verry, Danvers, for Champion Quince. 
$3.00 First premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Orange 
Quince. 
•50 Gratuity to Mrs. Mary J. Sim, Peabody, for Orange 

Quince. 
.50 Gratuity to M. J. Gilman, Peabody for Orange 
Quince. 
$3.00 First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Champion Quince. 
.50 Gratuity to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for Champion 
Quince. 
$2.00 First premium Otis Brown, Peabody, for Lombard 

Plums. 
$2.00 First premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Brad- 

shaw Plums. 
$2.00 First premium to W. E. Porter, Danvers, for Cha- 

bot Plums. 
$1.00 Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Lom- 
bard Plums. 
.50 Gratuity to Ethan Allen, No. Andover, for Rare 

Ripe Peach. 
.50 Gratuity to E. G. Holt, Salem, for Blood Peach. 
$1.00 Gratuity to E. P. Balcomb, Salem, for Blood Peach. 
.50 Gratuity to F. C. Converse, Salem, for Blood 
Peach. 

Wilbur J. Munroe, J. E. Mockett, E. W. Greene, S. B. 
George. — Committee. 



41 



PLANTS. 

$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. H. II. Buxton, Peabody, for 
Maiden Blush ferns. 

81.00. Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for Stag- 
horn ferns. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. J. Muhe, Danvers, for Pine- 
apple plant. 

il.OO. Gratuity to Mrs. Daniel Goodrich, Peabody, for 
nasturtiums. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Gamwell, Peabody, for Maple- 
leaf begonia. 

11.00. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for Box 
begonia. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. L. Pratt, Peabody, for bego- 
nias. 

•SI. 00. Gratuity to Frank D. Hoag, Peabody,for amaryllis. 

fl.OO. Gratuity to Frank D. Hoag, Peabody, for fuchias. 

$1.00. Gratuity to M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for Vepleo- 
lepis bustoniend. 

$1.00. Gratuity to M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for Vep- 
leolepis Anna Foster. 

$1.00. Gratuity to M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for Vep- 
leolepsis Piersons. 
.50. Gratuity to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for ferns. 

$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. M. McCarthy, Peabody, for Lob- 
ster cactus. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss Mary Forness, Peabody, for 
Asparagus ferns. 

$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
begonias. 

$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
coleus. 

$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
ferns. 



42 

$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

geraniums. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

salvias. 
Mrs. N. E. Ladd, Mrs. Frank A. Mager, A. Shirley 
Ladd — Committee. 



FLOWERS. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for garden 
annuals. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for mari- 
golds. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for Drum- 
mond Phlox. 

•50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for Fall 
annuals. 

.50. Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for calendu- 
las. 

.50. Gratuity to Lizzie Newhall, Peabody, for chrysan- 
themums. 

.50. Gratuity to Lewis Phelan, Peabody, for marigolds. 

.50. Gratuity to Elsie Spence, Peabody, for marigolds. 

1. Gratuity to Sally Batchelder, Peabody, for mari- 

golds. 

.50. Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for mar- 
igolds. 

,50. Gratuity to Wm. Symonds, Marblehead, for 
dahlias. 

2. First premium to William Symonds, Marblehead, 

for collection 100 dahlias. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. J. Knowles, Peabody, 

for wild flowers. 
.50. Gratuity to Mabel Forness, Peabody, for boquets. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

geraniums. 



43 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
Garden flowers. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

pansies. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

pinks. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
nasturtiums. 
1. Gratuity to R. E. Hager, Peabody, for phlox. 
1. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 
.50. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for zinneas. 
1. Gratuity to Joseph Basford, Peabody, for dahlias. 
1. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for Garden 

flowers. 
1. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for cannas. 
1. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for pansies. 

1. Gratuity to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for petunias. 
.50. Gratuity to W, H. Beckett, Peabody, for double 

petunias. 

2. First premium to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

collection pansies. 
.50. Gratuity to A. H. Davenport, Beverly, for Cactus 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Jessie Pulsifer, Peabody, for garden 

flowers. 

3. First premium to L. A. Wentworth, Lynn, for 

native wild flowers. 
.75. Gratuity to Alice Elliott, Peabody, for collection 

cut flowers. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 

pansies. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 24 

varieties pansies. 
1. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 

asters. 



44 

.50. Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for calen- 
dulas. 

.50. Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for zinnias. 

.50. Gratuity to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for Cactus 
dahlias. 
1. First premium to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for 
gladiolas. 

.50. Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for garden 
boquet. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie A. Roberts, Peabody, for 
scabiosis. 

50. Gratuity to Herbert Buxton, Peabody, for flower- 
ing dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Herbert Buxton, Peabody, for collec- 
tion dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to K. W. Townsend, Lynn, for sweet 

peas. 
50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for 
garden annuals. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody^ 
for hardy phlox. 
Second premium to Walter E. Bates, Lynn, for 
delphineums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. L. N. Cone, Peabody, for star 
phlox. 

50, Gratuity to Lewis Phelan, Peabody for petunias. 

.60. Gratuity to F. L. Pitman, Peabodj^ for garden 
annuals. 

.75. Gratuity to F. L. Pitman, Peabody, for snap dragon. 
1. First premium to A. L. Pitman, Peabody, for garden 
annuals. 

.75. Gratuity to F. L. Pitman, Peabody, for white asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for hardy phlox. 

.50. Gratuity to G. R. Underwood, Peabody, for mari- 
golds. 



45 

1. Gratuity to G. R. Underwood, Peabody, for scabio- 

sis. 
1. Second premium to S. B. Putnam, Peabody, for col- 
lection pansies. 
.75. Gratuity to H. B. Munroe, Lynnfield, for boquet 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Amos Ingalls, 2d, Peabody, for boquet 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss M, E. Crane, Peabody, for calen- 
dulas. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. Moulton, Peabody, for garden 
annuals. 
1. First premium to J. H. Flint, Salem, for dahlias, 
1. Gratuity to J. H. Flint, Salem, for cactus dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, foi- dian- 
thus. 
1. First premium to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for 
zinnias. 
.75. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for mari- 
golds. 
1. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for cox- 
combs. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Raddin, Peabody, for pinks. 
.50. Gratuity to Ina Southwick, Peabody, for collection 
stocks. 
3. First premium to J. A. Cain, Lynn, for cut flowers. 
1. Gratuity to J. A. Cain, Lynn, for double geraniums. 
1. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for calendulas. 
.50. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for pansies. 
.50. Gratuity to S. O. Poor, Peabody, for cosmos. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary Whipple, Salem, for roses. 
.50. Gratuity to Annie Ravel, Beverly, for verbenas. 
.50. Gratuity to Annie Ravel, Beverly, for garden an- 
nuals. 
.50. Gratuity to Hazel Farnham, Peabody, for wild 
flowers. 



46 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. N. Symonds, Salem, for roses. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. N. Symonds, Salem, for begonias. 
50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Gowen, West Newbury, for 
calendulas. 

1. Gratuity to Edith Danforth, Peabody, for native 

flowers. 
,50. Gratuity to Esther Danforth, Peabody, for native 
flowers. 

2. First premium to Mrs. Benj. Danforth, Peabody, for 

floral design. 

3. First premium to Mrs. O. E. Hardy, Peabody, for 

floral design cut flowers. 
,60. Gratuity to Mrs. Harry Walker, Peabody, for nas- 
turtiums. 
1. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for dahlias. 
1. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for pompon 
dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for cactus dahlias. 
1. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for single dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to C. L. Wilkins, Middleton, for pansies. 
.50. Gratuity to H. G. Farwell, Peabody, for begonias. 
.50. Gratuity to Clinton M. Foster, Beverly, for garden 
boquet. 
1. First premium to Clinton M. Foster, Beverly, for 
dianthus. 

1. First premium to Clinton M. Foster, Beverly, for 

salphigtorsis. 
.50. Gratuity to J. N. Grovesnor, Swampscott, for dahlias. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. E. S. Trask, Dan vers, for begonias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. S. Trask, Danvers, for snap 

dragon. 

2. First premium to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, for 

garden phlox. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, for 
sweet peas. 



47 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. S. Trask, Danvers, for garden 
flowers. 
2. Second premium to Mrs. Benj. Danforth, Peabody, 
for floral desifjn cut flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. V. McCarthy, Peabody, for 
godets. 
1. Gratuity to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for snap dragons. 

.75. Gratuity to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for drummond 
phlox. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. E. Hoag, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 

O. F. Newhall, Mrs. John Barker, Mrs. Wm. H. Ander- 
son, Sarah B. Herrick — Committee. 



VEGETABLES— FIRST CLASS. 

2. First premium to A. T. Lee, Beverly, for Ruta Baga 
turnips. 

2. First premium to A. T. Lee, Beverly, for white tur- 
nips. 

1. Second premium to A. T. Lee, Beverly, for Ed- 
mund's beets. 

1. Second premium to A. T. Lee, Beverly, for Danvers 

onions. 

.50. Gratuity to Wm. B. Cottrell, Salem, for onions. 

.50. Gratuity to Walter Hawes, Peabody, for onions. 

.50. Gratuity to Edward E. White, Peabody, for onions. 

.50. Gratuity to Edward E. White, Peabody, for Ed- 
mund's beets. 

.50. Gratuity to Edward E. White, Peabody, for Green 
Mountain potatoes. 

.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Mangle Wurtzel. 

2. First premium to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for pota- 

toes, Queen. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for pota- 
toes. Pearl of Savoy. 



48 

2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for pota- 
toes, Early Rose. 

2. First premium to C. E. Smith & Son, Beverly, for 
Eclipse beets. 

2. First premium to C. E. Smith & Son, Beverly, for 
flat onions. 

2. First premium to N. P. Clark, Danvers, for parsnips. 
.50. Gratuity to Daniel H. Illsley, Newbury, for early 6 
weeks' potatoes. 

2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Ed- 
mund's beets. 

1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Early 

Rose potatoes. 

.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Beauty of 
Hebron potatoes. 

.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, B everl}^, for Carman's No. 
3 potatoes. 

.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Early North- 
ern potatoes. 

2. First premium to Chas. R. Anderson, Boxford, for 

Shamrock turnips. 
2. First premium to O. E. Hardy, Peabody, for red 
onions. 

1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Intermediate carrots. 
,50. Gratuity to David M. Little, Peabody, for Kohl 
Rabbi. 

2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Danvers onions. 

2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peobody, for 
Egyptian beets. 

1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peobody, for 
parsnips. 
.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Early Har- 
vest potatoes. 



49 

2. First premium to James Jarmyon, Peabody, for 
Dan vers carrot. 
.50. Gratuity to Levi Southwick, Peabody, for American 

Wouder potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to Levi Southwick, Peabody, for Boon po- 
tatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to Levi Southwick, Peabody, for Golden 

corn. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

carrots. 
2. First premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 
Hebron potatoes. 
.60. Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Green 
Mountain potatoes. 
1. Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Red 

onions. 
1. Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Egyptian 
beets. 

1. Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Purple 

Top turnips. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Maine potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Blush potatoes. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Roberts potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Clark's 
No. 1. potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Car- 
man's No. 3 potatoes. 
2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Dewings 

beets. 
50. Gratuity to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for white flat 

turnips. 
1. Gratuity to VV. K. Cole, Boxford, for turnips. 
C. W. Webster, H. M. Killam, D. W. O shorn— Committee 



50 

VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

.60. Gratuity to David M. Little, Peahody, for parsley. 

.50. Gratuity to David M. Little, Pe.ibody, for spinach. 

.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Masons 

squash. 

1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverlj', for War- 
ren squash. 

1. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Dunlaps 
squash. 
.50. Gratuity to Duikee Brothers, Peabody, for cauli- 
flower. 
.60. Gratuity to Robert G. Estes, Peabody, for gourds. 

1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 
sweet corn. 

1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 
tomatoes. 

1. Second premium to Lewis Southwick, Peabody, for 
All Seasons cabbage. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cauli- 

flower. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Butman 

squash. 
2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cranber- 
ries. 

1. Second premium to N. P. Clark, Danvers, for Victor 

squash. 

2. First premium to N. P. Clark, Danvers, for Bay 

State squash. 

2. First premium to N. P. Clark, Danvers, for Stone 
Mason cabbage. 

]. Second premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for cel- 
ery. 

1. Second premium to Albert Reed, Peabody, for cran- 
berries. 

1. Second premium to Fred A. Dodge, Beverly, for Sa- 
voy cabbage. 



51 

2. First premium to Fred A. Dodge, Beverly, for cauli- 
flower. 

1. Second premium to A. F, Lee, Beverly, for red cab- 

bage. 

2, First premium to A. F. Lee, Beverly, for Fottlers 

cabbage, 
2. First premium, to A. F. Lee, Beverly, for Boston 

Marrow squash. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

herbs. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, ^Peabody, for 

red cabbage. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, Savoy 

cabbage. 
1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Fottlers cabbage. 

1. Second premium to B. P. Danforth, ^Peabody, for 

Warren squash. 

2. First premium, to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for^ Victor 

squash. 
2. First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for All 

Seasons cabbage. 
2. First premium, to C. E.Smith, Rowley, for celery. 
2. First premium to G. F. Austin, Rowley, for Nutmeg 

melon. 
2. First premium to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for Warren 

squash. 
2. First premium to W. J, Munroe, Lynnfield, for Hub- 
bard squash. 
2. First premium to W. J. Munroe, Lynnfield, for Early 

Essex corn. 
2. First premium to Edward F. White, Peabody, fof 

tomatoes. 
2. First premium to Mrs. G. B. Wilson, Peabody, for 

tomatoes. 



52 

$3. First premium to W. J. Dale, No. Andover, for col. 
lection of vegetables. 
C. W. Webster, H.M. Killam,D. W. Oshorn— Committee. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

$5. First premium to J. W. Yeaton, Georgetown, for 

field corn. 
3. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for field 

corn. 
1. Second premium to G. F. Austin, Boxford, for pop 

corn. 

1. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for shelled 

corn. 

2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pop 

corn. 

1. Second premium to Lewis Southwick, Peabody, for 
white corn. 

1. First premium to A. A. Stiles, Middleton, for beans- 

1. First premium to A. A. Stiles, Middleton, for barley. 

1. First premium to A. A. Stiles, Middleton, for buck- 
wheat. 

' J. J. Manning, G. S. Phippen, Alonzo Raddin — Com- 
mittee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

$1. ..Gratuity to Fannie G. Haswell, Danvers, for silk 
quilt. 
1, Gratuity to Mrs. E. J. Porter, Peabody, for Afghan. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. William White, Salem, for quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. Sarah Murray, Beverly, for silk 

quilt. 

2. First premium to Mrs. Martha W. Dougherty, Dan- 

vers, for crochet quilt. 
1.. Gratuity to Mrs. W. J. Davvkins, Salem, for silk 
quilt. 



53 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. A. Frost, Salem, for silk quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. A. S. Dearborn, Salem, for patch- 
work quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. Gonsaless, Ipswich, for silk 
quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. M. B. Gray, Peabody, for patch- 
work quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Gertie Curtis, Peabody, for outline quilt. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. George C. Tarr, Beverly, for silk 

quilt. 

2. First premium to F. A. Pease, Salem, for outline 

quilt. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary A. Pratt, Peabody, for patch- 
work quilt. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Tufts, Middleton, for patch- 
work quilt. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Nellie Armstead, Salem, for patch- 
work quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. A. Glines, Beverly, for afghan. 

Harriet E. Pingree, Adeline A. Little, Nancy L. Whit- 
tier — Committee. 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

$3. First premium to Mrs. Gamble, Peabody, for drawn 

rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Gambell, Peabody, for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Gambell, Peabody, for drawn rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Nellie Armstead, Salem, for drawn 

rug. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. A. Stickney, Salem, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. K. A. Wilson, Peabody, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for braided 



rug. 



54 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for braided 



rug. 



.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Peter Reed, Dan vers, for drawn rug. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. Harriet Woodvvorth, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Harriet Wood worth, Peabody, for 
drawn rug. 

2. Second premium to Mrs. Goodwin, Salem, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. William Donnell, Peabody, for 

braided rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Gourdey, Peabody, for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Glencross, Peabody, for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. A. Doyle, Beverly, for knit rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for knit 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. W. Sweet, Peabody, for knit rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Grace Tenney, Peabody, for drawn 



rug. 



1. Gratuity to Mrs. Clara Carlton, Peabody, for woven 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Lillian Ober, Beverly, for fancy 

rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. G. B. Courtis, Swampscott, for 

button mat. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. G. B. Courtis, Swampscott, for 

fancy rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. B. Courtis, Swampscott, for 

fancy rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. G. Fox, Danvers, for drawn rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. P. Sanborn, Lawrence, for silk 

rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Sarah E. Woodman, Essex, for drawn 

rug. 
Mary F. Herrick, Mrs. A. Raddin, Mrs. John Moultou — 
Committee. 



55 

AUXrCLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

Diploma to Putnam & Cieesy, Beverly, for ball band rub- 
ber goods. 

f 3. First premium to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for col- 
lection of shoes. 

1. First premium to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for best 

pair shoes. 

2. Gratuity to Charles McTiernan, Danvers, for light 

harness. 

2. Gratuity to Charles McTiernan, Danvers, for double 

harness. 
Diploma to Lenox & Briggs, Haverhill, for colored 
morocco. 

3. Gratuity to Herbert Gardner, Peabody, for light har- 

ness. 
1. Gratuity to Joseph A. Poor, Peabody, for belting. 

Thomas Carroll, S. F. Kittredge, Otis Brown, Henry 
Hilliard, A. J. Bradstreet — Committee. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHAN- 
DISE. 

f 2. Gratuity to Glen Mills, Rowley, for cereals. 

1. and Diploma to John H. McDonald, Beverly, for horse 

shoes. 

2. Gratuity to Henry Hale, Salem, for model of 

schooner. 
1. Gratuity to George C. Curtis, Lynn, for night moths. 
1. Gratuity to H. Stockwell, Peabody, for urn. 
.50. Gratuity to Ernest J. Beckett, Danvers, for model of 
street car. 
Thomas Carroll, Henry Hilliard, Otis Brown, A. J. 
Bradstreet, S. F. Kittridge — Committee. 



56 

FANCY WORK. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. A. Besse, Peabody, for sofa 

pillow. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. H. A. Besse, Peabody, for lace 

work. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for sofa 

pillow. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for 

basketry. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss K. P. Abbott, Lynn, for pillow 

cover. 
.50. Gratuity to. Miss K. P. Abbott, Lynn, for pen and 

ink work. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss L. M. Carlton, Salem, for basketry. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. J. Porter, Peabody, for knitted 

shawl. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Kate P. Abbott, Lynn, for collec- 
tion of pen and ink work. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Peabody, for 

baskets. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Peabody, for 

leather bag. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss A. H. Berry, Peabody, for basketry. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Annie Monson, Saugus, for cro- 
cheted lace. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Christina Mulligan, Saugus, for 

crocheted lace. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss D. J. Pringle, Peabody, for bureau 

scarfs. 
.75. Gratuity to Mary A. JoU, Marblehead, for table 

mats. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss Alice C. Abbott, Danvers, for bead 

necklace. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Alice C. Abbott, Danvers, for bead 

purse. 



57 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Alice C. Abbott, Danvers, for bead 
belt. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Alice E. Hayes, Peabody, for drawn 
work. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss M. Lewis, Salem, for pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss J. Thompson, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. Gon8aless,Ipswich, for pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. Gonsaless, Ipswich, for bas- 
ketry. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Ethel L. Dodge, Beverly, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. William Leonard, Salem, for bead 
belt and fob. 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. William Leonard, Salem, for shirt 
waist. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. A. Butler, Salem, for piano 
scarf. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. W. N. Durgin, Lynn, for lunch 
set. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Elsie Spence, Peabody, for Mexican 
work. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. B. Chesley, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. B. Chesley, Peabody, for waist. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. H. P. Byron, Peabody, for muslin 
dress. 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Etta McDonald, Peabody, for 2 
pairs mittens. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn, for handker- 
chief. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn, for lace 
waist. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Delraa Herbert, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 



58 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Effiie L. McDonald, Beverly, for 
basketry. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry B. Wallis, Beverly, for 
crocheted centerpiece. 

.25. Gratuity to Clara E. Beckett, Peabody, for towel. 

.50. Giatuity to Mrs. W. H. Keyser, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuit}^ to Mrs. W. H. Kej^ser, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Keyser, Salem, for embroid- 
erv. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. M. Harvey, Peabody, for collars. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Marjorie Woodbury, Beverly, for 
basi<etry. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Florence Wallis, Beverly, for pil- 
low slips. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Florence Wallis, Beverly, for 
drawn work. 

.50. Gratuity to Katlierine Edmonds, Beverly, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. Gamble, Peabody, for mittens. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss H. Kerber, Lynn, for drawn work. 

.75. Gratuity to Miss Julia S. Cody, Salem, for table 
cover. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Alma Comlan, Beverly, for cro- 
cheted lace. 

.50. Gratuity to Maud D. Williams, Peabody, for cro- 
cheted mats. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Florence Howlett, Peabody, for 
pair of towels. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss B. H. Bodge, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Hannah Sherry, Peabody, for cro- 
cheted shawl. 

.50. Gratuity to Theresa McGrath, Peabody, for pillow. 



59 

.50. Gratuit}^ to Miss Susan Mills, Peabody, for 2 pairs 

wi'isters. 
^50. Gratuity to Miss Eva Dooling, Peabod3% for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss C. F. Lucas, Salein, for center 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Bradford, Peabody, for lunch 
set. 

.60. Gratuity to Miss Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for 
shirt waist. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for 
lunch set. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. A. Pease, Salera, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. Rodie, Peabody, for drawn work. 

.50. Gratuity to W. L. Eastman, Lynn, for handkerchief. 

.50. Giatuity to Mrs. George Raddin, Peabody, for col- 
lection of mats. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Kittredge, Peabody, for bead 
purse. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. N. Clark, Peabody, for bas- 
ketry. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss M. N. Appleton, Salem, for bas- 
ketry. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. G. Fox, Dan vers, for Batten- 
burg lace. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Cora Pope, Danvers, for doilies. 

.60. Gratuity to Mabel Johnson, Salem, for chain. 
L Gratuity to Mrs. A. L. Foster, Saugus, fdr under- 
wear. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss J. M. Smith, Danvers, for knitted 
socks. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Maud Russell, Peabody, for drawn 
work. 



6o 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for cen- 

piece. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. A. F. Conant, Salem, for bead 

purse and chain. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. N. E. Tufts, Middleton, for pillow- 
top. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. T. B. Masury, Salem, for embroid- 
ery. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. F. W. Spofford, Groveland, for 

bead chain. 
1. Gratuity to A. K. Roberts, Salem, for basketry. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. H. W. Gonsaless, Ipswich, for set 

of doilies. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss M. C. Woodbury, Beverly, for 

handkerchief. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. M. C. Woodbury, Beverly, for 

straw hat. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. G. K. Phillips, Marblehead, for 

table cover. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 

table cover. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 

centerpiece. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 

centeipiece. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 

lunch set. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 
lunch set. 
Mrs. E. C. Osborn, Mrs. Julia L. Cain, Mrs. G. F. New- 
man — Committee. 



OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

^1. Gratuity to Fred Cann, Salem, for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Berry, Peabody, for water color. 



6i 

1. Gratuity to Miss Berry, Peabody, for water color. 

1. Gratuity to Miss Beriy, Peabody, for oil painting. 

1. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil painting. 

1. Gratuity to Miss Susie Poor, Peabody, for oil paint- 

ing. 

2. Gratuity to Miss Ina Ware, Salem, for oil painting. 

1. Gratuity to Miss Ina Ware, Salem, for oil painting. 

2. Gratuity to Roger Buxton, Peabody, for oil painting. 
2. Gratuity to Roger Buxton, Peabody, for oil painting. 
2. Gratuity to Mrs. L. M. Morse, Salem, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. M. Morse, Salem, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. M. Morse, Salem, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. M. Morse, Salem, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Mis. C. W. Dennis, Lynn,for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn,for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn,for oil painting. 

1. Gratuity to Miss Alice Trask, Peabody, for water 

color. 

2. Gratuity to Lawrence B. Howard, Lynn, for oil 

painting. 
2. Gratuity to Miss C. S. Creesey, Gloucester, for oil 

painting. 
2. Gratuity to Miss C. S. Creesey, Gloucester, for oil 

painting. 
2. Gratuity to Miss C. S. Creesey, Gloucester, for oil 

painting. 
1. Gratuity to Ada B. D. GrifiQn, Gloucester, for oil 

painting. 
Miss E. Rose Plaisted, Mrs. Belle D. Hodgkins, Miss 
Harriet F, Tenney, Mrs. Wm. G. Pingree — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

$2. Gratuity to May McShane, Salem, for toilet set. 

1. Gratuity to May McShane, Salem, for berry set. 

2. First premium to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for 

punch set. 



62 

2. First premium to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for 
fern bowl. 

2. Second piemium to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for 

individual specimen. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for nut 

bowl. 

3. Second premium to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn, for 

collection. 

2. First premium to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn, for vases. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn, for 

punch bowl. 

2. First premium to Mrs. Charles Price, Salem, for 

cracker jar. 
5. First premium to Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, for 

collection. 
I. Second premium to Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, for 

raised paste or gold. 

3. First premium to Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, for 

individual specimen. 
1. Second premium to Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, for 
vase. 
Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Emma Bradstreet, Anna J. P. 
Perkins — Committee. 



CHARCOAL PHOTOGRAPHS AND PEN AND INK 

WORK. 

$2. Gratuity to E. C. Larrabee, Salem, for inlaid work. 
2. Gratuity to E. C. Larrabee, Salem, for golf player. 
2. Gi-atuity to G. W. Symonds, Salem, for sculpture. 
1. Gratuity to G. W. Symonds, Salem, for sculpture. 
1. Gratuity to Alice Berry, Peabody, for mechanical 
drawing. 
60. Gratuity to Fred Austin, Lynn, for burnt wood. 
1. Gratuity to Walter Stiles, Middleton, for wash 
drawing. 



63 

1. Gratuity to Walter Stiles, Middleton, for wash 

drawing. 
1. Gratuity to Walter Stiles, Middleton, for pastel. 
1. Gratuity to J. Williams, Peabody, for plaster novel- 
ties. 
1. Gratuity to R. Belanger, Salem, for charcoal drawing. 
.50. Gratuity to M. Woodbury, Beverly, for pyrography. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. Bradfoid, Peabody, for pyrography. 

1. Gratuity to Mis. Bradford, Peabody, for pyrography, 
.50. Gratuity to S. E. Dwyer, Salem, for pyrography. 
.50. Gratuity to S. E. Dwyer, Salem, for pyrography. 

2. Gratuity to C. F. Lucas, Salem, for collection of 
photographs. 

1. Gratuity to L. R. Clar , Lynn, for photographs. 
1. Gratuity to Anna L. Kelly, Lynn, for pyrography. 
1. Giatuity to Anna L. Kelly, Lynn, for pyrography. 
Eva M. Haselton, for the Committee. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

12 Fiist premium to Margaret McDonald, Beverly, for 
Basket. 
1. Second premium to Emma Williams, Peabody, for 
doily. 
.50. Gratuity to Helen Lee, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.50. Giatuity to Lucie Nelson, Peabody, for sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Arthur Woodbury, Beverly, for worsted 
mat. 

.50. Gratuity to Elizabeth Remick, Peabody, for shoul- 
der cape. 

.50. Gratuit}' to Charles A. Smith, Dan vers, for mittens. 

.50. Gratuity to Robert Townsend, Lynn, for scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Rachel Foster, Peabody, for doily. 

.35. Gratuity to Liez Townsend, Lynn, for belt. 

.35. Gratuity to Edna Wilkins, Beverly, for tidy. 



64 

li5. Gratuity to Mildred Fellows, Peabody, for flannel 
skirt. 

.85. Gratuity to Gertrude Reynolds, Salem, for tray 
cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Amy Hardy, Peabody, for doily. 

.25. Gratuity to Marion McBride, Peabody, for doily. 

.25. Gratuity to Louis M. Montgomery, Peabody, for 
towels. 

.25. Gratuity to Hazel Dodge, Beverly, for basket. 

.25. Gratuit}'- to Harold Dodge, Beverly, for basket. 

.25. Gratuity to Frances Tenny, Peabody, for kindergar- 
ten work. 

.25. Gratuity to Lucie Nelson, Peabody, for veil case. 

.25. Gratuity to Fred Sherry, Peabody, for table cover. 

.25. Gratuity to Marion Beckett, Peabody, for dust 
cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Catherine Mead, Peabody, for doily. 

.25. Gratuity to Mary Galuecia, Peabody, for tray cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Helen Cody, Peabody, for doily. 

Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Mrs. P. J. Frye, Mrs. N. J. War- 
ren . — Committee. 



SMALL FRUITS. 

The Committee on small fruits submit the following 
report. There was but one entry, that of John C. Day, for 
a crop of raspberries, which were very nne, the committee 
awarded him the first premium of $8. 

It is a lamentable fact that only one entry should be made 
when we have more than 150 acres in the county devoted 
to small fiuits. 

O. S. Butler, for the Committee. 

STATEMENT OF JOHN C. DAY. 

My " raspberry piece" contains about sixty-five (S>^^ 
square rods. 



65 

About half of it was set about nine (9) or ten (10) 
years ago and the rest about six years ago. 

I estimate use of land, cost of cultivating and trimming 
at twenty-five dollars ($25) for the year, the cost of pick- 
ing and marketing the season's crop at forty-five dollars 
($45) making expenses seventy dollars ($70) in all. 

We picked seven hundred and fifteen (715) quarts of 
berries which were worth this year 20 cents a quart making 
the value of the crop one hundred and forty-three dollars 
(1143). 

Respectfully yours, 

John C. Day. 
Per M. L. D. 



REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have been eighteen new members added to the 
society since the last annual report, fifteen of whom be- 
came members by receiving premiums of seven dollars 
and upwards, according to the rules of the society, from 
different cities and towns as follows: — 

3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 



Beverly 


3 Lynnfield 


Danvers 


2 Methuen 


Essex 


1 Newbury 


Gloucester 


1 Peabody 


Groveland 


1 Swampscott 


Lynn 


1 Salem 




INSTITUTES. 



The society held three Institutes the past year, on as 
many different days, both forenoon and afternoon, at which 
the following subjects were discussed by any of the audi- 
ence who desired. 



66 

The first Institute was held at Andover,'Jan. 23, the 
subject for the forenoon being, " The Phrenology of a 
farm, The characteristics of its owner judged by its physi- 
cal condition." Afternoon, " Tree culture from a finan- 
cial standpoint," Appeal for planting nut bearing trees. 
By Dr. H. G. Leslie of Amesbury. 

The second Institute was held at Beverly Feb. 13, 
Subject for the forenoon, " Growing protein for the dairy 
herd." Afternoon, " How may we conserve the natural 
fertility of the soil." By Prof. C. S. Phelps of the Conn. 
Agricultural College. 

The third Institute was held at Newbury, Feb. 27. 
Subject for forenoon, " Essential points in Milk produc- 
tion." Afternoon, " New Agriculture, or, a system of 
Farming for success." By Prof. J. W. Sanborn. 



REPORT OF THE STATE INSPECTOR FOR THE 

FAIR OF 1903. 

J. Lewis Ellsworth, Sec, 
State Board of Agriculture, 

State House, Boston, Mass. 

Dear Sir : 

Your Inspector attended the Essex County Fair held at 
Peabody, Sept. 22, 23 and 24, arriving in Salem in season 
to join the Floral Parade, Wednesday, the 22d. This was 
one of the features of that day and was certainly one of 
the finest parades ever seen in the state. There were over 
sixty entries and every team showed a great deal of taste 
and the parade was pronounced a success by everyone who 
saw it. The grounds are situated on high land and the 
attendance was very satisfactory to the management. 

Cattle. The exhibition of cattle included something 
over 100 head, mostly of the black and white breeds. 
There were some very nice animals and the new cattle 



67 

shed which was erected a short time ago was nearly full. 
The stock showed that it had received the best of care 
and the exhibition in this department was very fine. 

Horses. The exhibition of horses was not large, but 
what there were were mostly family horses. 

Sheep. The exhibition of sheep was very small, only 
two or three pens. 

Swine. The exhibition in this department was very 
large ; something over twenty pens and the exhibition was 
a credit to any society. 

Angora Goats. There were two large pens of very 
fine specimens, which attracted a great deal of attention. 

Poultry. The poultry building was well filled : it 
included nearly all the standard breeds of fowls as well as 
a very large exhibition of geese, ducks and turkeys. 

Flowers. The exhibition of flowers was very large 
and some very choice collections were exhibited, includ- 
ing several specimens of ferns, potted plants and cut flow- 
ers. 

Vegetables. This department was not large, but 
with the addition of a large Grange Exhibition, the room 
devoted to this department was well filled and the vege- 
tables shown were very fine. 

Leather Goods. This town being especially inter- 
■ested in leather, there were special premiums for articles 
manufactured from this material, which included har- 
nesses, shoes, etc. 

Fancy Articles. The entries in this class were very 
large and fine. 

Agricultural Implements. In a large tent w^s a 
very nice exhibition of agricultural tools, gasoline engines, 
etc. These were in operation and attracted a great deal 
of attention. 



68 

Carriages and Wagons. There was a very fine 
exhibit in this department, including both light and heavy 
delivery wagons, also private carriages. 

The grounds had a very neat appearance ; there was 
nothing that was immoral or illegal seen on the grounds. 
There was nothing to criticise, but the departments 
which your Inspector thought might be improved upon 
would be the horse and sheep departments, where the 
entries were not large. 

The fruit, flowers, vegetables and fancy articles were 
exhibited in the town hall, which is located only a short 
distance from the. grounds. Both are opened to visitors 
evenings, which adds very much to the revenue derived 
from the admission fees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) Walter D. Ross, Inspector. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Tho following is a list of members deceased as reported 
to the Secretary and not heretofore reported : 

Barnes, Benj. S., Boxford. Kimball, M. Tenney, Haver- 
Bartlett, B. W., Rowley. hill. 

Bradford, Geo. R., Gloucester. Lewis, Samuel W., Newbury- 
Chandler, Joshua H., Ando- port. 

ver. Moody, H. L., Haverhill. 

Cogswell, Geo., Haverhill. Messervy, Wm., Hamilton. 
Colcord, John L., Peabody. Nichols, John B., Haverhill. 
Cole, Zachariah, Wenham. Pedlar, S. J., Methuen. 
Curtis, C. A., Manchester. Pepper, Geo. W., Peabody. 
Dale, Wm. J., No. Andover. Perkins, E. R., Salem. 
Dodge, E. P., Newburyport. Ross, Joseph, Ipswich. 



69 

Donald, Daniel, Essex. Sargent, Walter H., Merri- 
Farley, Chas. B., Peabody. mac. 

Farwell, C. C, Mrs., Peabody. Tenney, Moses, Georgetown. 

Forbes, A. B., Newbury. Tuck, John S., Georgetown. 

Gage, Edwin V., Haverhill. Wadleigh, Levi C, Haver- 
George, John H., Methuen. hill. 

Hawkes, Samuel, Saugus. Wilson, James, Topsfield. 

Hopkins, S. C, Merrimac. White, James D., Haverhill. 
Hobbs, Amos, Wenham. 



RECAPITULATION. 







FARM STOCK. 




rde' 


d for Fat Cattle 


$ 10 00 




(( 


Bulls, ' 


81 00 




(( 


Milch Cows, 


77 00 




(( 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


18 00 




(( 


Heifers, 


102 00 




u 


Steers, 


6 00 




11 


Horses, 


125 00 




ii 


Swine, 


120 00 




li 


Sheep and Goats, 


16 00 




a 


Poultry, 


239 00 



FIELD AND EXPERIMENTAL CROPS. 

Awarded for Fruit, 18 00 

FARM AND GRAIN CROPS. 



$794 00 



Awarded for Grain and Seed, 


$ 16 00 


« " Vegetables, 


115 00 


" " Fruits, 


145 00 


" " Plants and Flowers, 


106 00 




1382 00 



71 



(( 



a 



DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES. 

Awarded for Dairy, $ 1 00 

" Bread and Canned Fruit, 33 50 
Counterpanes and Afghans 18 00 
Carpetings and Rugs, 21 25 

Articles Mnfd. from Leather 12 00 
Manufactures and Gen. Mdse. 7 50 
Fancy Work, 50 00 

Works of Art, 81 00 

Children's Work, 10 80 



(( 



C( 



(I 



$235 05 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Awarded for Granges, 125 00 

" " Agricultural Implements, 68 00 
Carriages, 25 00 



li 



$118 00 



The amount of $1535.30 was awarded to 415 individuals 
and firms in 27 different cities and towns as follows : 



Amesbury, 


$ 40 00 


Marblehead, 


$ 11 75 


Audover, 


55 25 


Methuen, 


9 00 


Beverly, 


100 35 


Middleton, 


10 00 


Boxford, 


81 50 


Newbury, 


8 50 


Danvers, 


172 50 


No. Andover, 


143 50 


Essex, 


24 75 


Peabody, 


515 00 


Georgetown, 


5 00 


Rowley, 


22 00 


Gloucester, 


7 00 


Salem, 


111 35 


Groveland, 


1 00 


Saugus, 


3 50 


Haverhill, 


17 00 


Swampscott, 


5 25 


Ipswich, 


34 50 


Topsfield, 


1 00 


Lawrence, 


75 


Wenhara, 


42 00 


Lynn, 


71 10 


West Newbury, 


2 50 


Lynnfield, 


51 25 







72 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Receipts from Admission to Hall and Grounds, 13046 14 

Receipts from Grounds for various purposes, 274 20 

Receipts from Dinner Tickets, 105 00 

Received from Grand Stand, 82 60 

Received from Hall, 10 00 

13517 94 



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CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Article 1. There shall be a President, four Vice Pres- 
idents, a Secretary, and a Treasurer, who shall be Trus- 
tees, ex-officio, and one Trustee from each city and town 
in the county. The President, Vice Presidents, Secretary 
and one Trustee from each city and town in the county 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer, by the Trustees annually at their meeting in 
November. Nomination for Trustees may be made by 
any member or members of the Society from the city or 
town from which he is to be elected for at least one week 
before said meeting to the Secretary, and he shall prepare 
ballots for the same. 

Art. 2. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the So- 
ciety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at 
which all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at 
least shall be necessray to constitute a quorm for the 
transaction of business. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the Trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Presidents shall be absent, 
the members present may appoint one from among them 
to preside at such meeting. 

Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting of the Society ; or whenever a 



75 

written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 
shall be made by any twelve members of the Society to 
the President and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon ; seven of whom, with the presiding oflQcer, shall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society during the intervals of its meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the public, 
publish such communications, and offer such premiums in 
such form and valuejas they think proper (provided the pre- 
miums offered do not exceed the funds of the Society); and 
shall lay before the Society at each of its meetings a 
statement of their proceedings and of the communications 
made to them. 

Art. 7. The Secretary shall take minutes of all the 
votes and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books ; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustee shall direct. He 
shall write and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which shall be lodged with the Secretary, who shall make 
a fair record thereof. The Treasurer shall from time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have orders for from 
the Trustees ; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, render a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of his duty in such 
sum as the trustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 

Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed annually by 



76 

the trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 
report to the Society ; and the same being accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretaries in his books. 

Art. 10. In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary or of the 
Treasurer, the Trustees shall take charge of the official 
books, papers, and other effects belonging to the office 
that may be vacated, and give receipts for the same, 
which books, papers, etc., they may deliver to some person 
whom they may appoint to fill the office until the next 
meeting of the Society, at which time there shall be a new 
choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society by paying the sum of three dol- 
lars to increase the permanent fund of the institution. 

Art. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture 
of our county, the same to be sacredly appropriated to 
that purpose. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the gospel who 
reside within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past Presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a mem- 
ber at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the ac- 
tion at the next annual meeting of the Society. 



♦Members will receive from the Secretary a " certificate of membership." No 
fines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are entitled to vote in all its 
transactions, with free use of the Library and a copy of the printed " Trans- 
actions " each year. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

FOR J903-J904. 



PRESIDENT. 

FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



VICE PRESIDENTS. 



JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead, 
HORATIO G. HERRICK, of Lawrence, 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn, 
SHERMAN NELSON, of Georgetown, 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER, 

WILLIAM S. NICHOLS, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

BENJAMIN P. WARE, of Marblehead, 
OLIVER S. BUTLER, of Georgetown, 
GEORGE V. L. MEYER, of Hamilton. 



78 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TRUSTEES. 

J. P. Little, Amesbury John W. Shirley, Methuen 
George L. Averill, Andover Geo. A. Currier, Middleton 

John W. Lovett, Beverly Chas. T. Lovering, Nahant 

Henry M. Killam, Boxford Daniel D. Adams, Newbury 

Alvah J. Bradstreet, Dan- Rufus Adams, Newburyport 

vers 

Elias Andrews, Essex Winfield S. Hughes, No. An- 

Samuel T. Poor, Georgetown dover 
' Geo. M. Wonson, Gloucester N. M. Quint, Peabody 
Sam'l B. George, Groveland John J. Manning, Rockport 
Isaac F. Knowlton, Hamilton Frank Todd, Rowley 
Albert Emerson, Haverhill Charles Sanders, Salem 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich P. Albert True, Salisbury 
S. S .Lewis, Lawrence Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 

Edwin Bates, Lynn Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield Edw. E. Ferguson, Topsfield 
John H. Cheever, Manches- J. Kavanagh, Wenham 

ter 
Amos P. Alley, Marblehead J. R. Gordon, West Newbury 
Geo. W. Sargent, Merrimac 



1904 
PREMIUM LIST OF 



Essex Agricultural Society 



FOR THE 



EIGHTY-FOURTH ANNUAL CATTLE SHOW AND FAIR. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The trustee of each town is instracted to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their 
duties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to 
the Exhibition the importance of entering their exhibits for 
the hall the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Commit- 
tees, and making sure that the names proposed at those meet- 
ings are of persons who will serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the 
Fair Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the 
grounds at twelve o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the 
exhibition, and there organize, take the books of entry, and 
proceed at once to business. Committees in hall should take 
the books of entry from the Superintendent promptly after the 
entries close. 

Pull reports of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be sierned by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 



8o 

Three members of any committee consisting of more than 
that number are authorized to act. 

(t^^No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 

The diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of special merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures, fruits, vegetables 
in hall, and flowers ; or any premium, unless the rules of the 
Society have been strictly complied with. Neither shall 
they award premiums or gratuities in excess of the amount 
appropriated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents, ex- 
cept on work by children, and none in that class less than 
twenty -five cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals blue and red printed premium 
ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assistants on 
the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals or arti- 
cles, designating the grade of premium awarded each, and 
the name of the person to whom awarded, and especial care 
should be taken that the cards issued correspond with the 
awards in their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on animals and articles 
exhibited at the Show, must be delivered promptly to the 
Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

Any member of a committee who cannot serve on the same is 
requested to give notice to the Secretary, before the show, so 
that the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a tick- 
et of admission to the hall of exhibition on application to the 
Secretary. 



General Rules. 

Competitors are requested to carefully read the rules and pre- 
mium list before making entries. 

Claim (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in. 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 



8i 

All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person not a memher of the Society, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, 
for which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase 
the funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium of gratuity is awarded or 
an agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
Salem Safe Deposit and Trust Co., Salem, on and after the 
first Monday of November. 

All premiums and gratuites awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day 
of May next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered 
as given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratu- 
ities made by the several committees and adopted by the So- 
ciety shall be final. Committees should see that the premium 
cards issued, correspond with the premi%ims and gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless 
he complies with the conditions on which the premiums are 
offered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his 
intention to compete for the same ; and committees are in- 
structed to award no premium unless the animal or article 
offered is worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall be entered in another class, except farm 
horses which may be entered for fast walking, and Milch 
Cows which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premiums must be owned by resi- 
dents and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 
themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered ; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture. 

The Proof that an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders, and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 

Standard adopted : — American Jersey C. C. Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



82 

Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

Tke committee ivill take notice that no premium will be 
awarded unless the animals or objects are of a decidedly super- 
ior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
special merit, iu all departments of the Fair. 

In case of a deficiency in the receipts at the Fair in any 
year, the society reserves the right to reduce the premiums 
offered, pro rata, not to exceed one-half the amount offered. 



Cattle and Other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals entered for premium or exhibition will be fed 
during the Exhibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity^ 
prevented from leaving, at the expense of the society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense thereof, all of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with committee's report. 

For Pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $7, 5 

For Fat Cows, premiums, $5, 3 

BULLS. 

■"■Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Two years old and upwards, premiums, $7, 5 

Under two years old, for each breed, $5, S 

One year old and under, for each breed, $3, 2 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREED. 

For the best bull of any age or breed, with five of his stock 
not less than six months old, quality and condition to be taken 



83 

into account, and especially the adaptibility of the animal to 
the agriculture of the county. Diploma and $10 

Note.— Competitors are required to give a written statement of petiigree and 
committees are requested to be particular in tliis respect, and return tliem totlie 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $7, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Holstein, 
Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old and 
upwards, premiums for each breed, $6, 4 

For Native or Grade Cows, four years old and upward, pre- 
miums, f 6, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week, 
from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $6, 4 

Note.— A written statement will be required of the age and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they dropped their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, quality and quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding, which statements is to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to 
be exhibited at the Show, and a correct statement of manner 
of keeping and yield for one year preceding the Show, pre- 
miums. Diploma and ^10, 8 

Note.— The above mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 
Jan. 1st, preceding the Show. 

HEIFERS. 

First Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, each breed, 

$3. 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $3, 2 

Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old, premiums, $0, 3 

Two years old, that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 

Less than two and more than one year old, premiums, $3, 2 
One year old and under, and less than two, premiums, $3, 2 



84 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, and quality and training, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $5, 4 

Note.— The Committee are required to consider the quality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their working capacity. The training of working oxen and 
steers will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containing a load weigh- 
ing two tons for oxen, and three thousand pounds for steers. (l^At the time 
of entry a certiticate of the weight of the cattle must be filed with the Secretary 

STEERS. 

For pair of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of'two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, $7, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft purposes, three years old, 
premiums, $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken 
into account, Diploma and $6 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums, Diploma and $7, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums, Diploma and $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than one year old, quality and condition taken into ac- 
count, Diploma and $6 

Note. — No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$7,5 



85 

BROOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

I 

For Brood Mares for Driving Purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, $7, 5 

Note.— No brood mare win be entitled to a premium unless free from all ap- 
parent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 
For Family Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

Note.— No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $10, 8 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums $12, 9 

LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

For Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $S, 6 

For pairs of Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $10, 8 

GENTLEMEN'S SADDLE HORSES. 
Gentlemen to ride on track, premiums, $6, 4 

LADIES' SADDLE HORSES. 

Ladies to ride on track, premiums, $6, 4 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

For pairs of Fast Walking Horses, premiums, f 5, 4 

For single horses, $4, 3 

For pairs of farm horses with load of 4,000 lbs., premiums, 

$5,4 

For single farm horse, with load of 2000 lbs., premiums, 

$4, 3. 

0;^*The above to have trial on the track. 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1200 lbs, and over, premiums, 

$6, 4 



86 

For Farm Horses weighing less thau 1200 lbs. premiums, 

$6 

Note— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of the load to be used in trial of 
Farm Horses is to be fixed upon by the committee of arrangments for drafting, 
the difference in the load for horses of 1,200 lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 
lbs. to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pairs, 2,000. No obstruction 
shall be placed either before or behind the wheels in trials of Draft Horses of 
either class, but wheels shall be blocked behind to hold the load when a team 
stops going up hill. 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING 2400 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses, weighing 2400 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, f 8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2400 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2400 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES 3 AND 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding four-year-old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year old Colts, premiums, $5, 3 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premiums, 

$4, 2 
For Stallion Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., f 4, 2 

COLTS, FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOUR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four-year-old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three-year-old colts, premiums, $5, 3 

ONE AND TWO YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premi- 
ums. $4, 2 
For Stallion, Gelding, or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

N. B.— All the above classes the committee will act with the expert judge ex- 
cept Fat Cattle, Working Oxen and Steers. 



87 

HORSES FOR HURDLE JUMPING. 

For Horses jumping over four-foot hurdles, premiums, 

$8, 6 
For high hurdle jumping, premiums, 8 

SWINE BOARS. 

For Berkshire, Cheshire, Chester, Essex, Poland China, 
Suffolk, Large Yorkshire, Small Yorkshire Boars, not less 
than one year old, premiums, $4, 2 

For Breeding Sow, and pigs by their side of the above 
breeds, with not less than five pigs, premiums, $4, 2 

For the best grade sow and pigs, premiums, $4, 2 

For Litters of weaned Pigs not less than eight weeks old, 
premiums, $4, 2 

Thoroughbred Swine shall show satisfactory proof that 
they are pure blood, otherwise they shall be considered Grade. 

SHEEP. 

For flock of Sheep, not less than six ewes in number, each 
breed, premiums, $5,3 

For best Buck, premium 4 

For lots of Lambs, not less than six ewes in number, be- 
tween four and twelve months old, premiums, $5, 3 

ANGORA GOATS. 
For flocks of Angora Goats not less than six, prem., $5, 3 

POULTRY. 

For pairs of Fowls, light Brahmas, Dark Brahmas, Buff 
Cochins, Partridge Cochins, Black Cochins, White Cochins, 
Plymouth Rocks, White Plymouth Rocks, Dominiques, White 
Leghorns, Brown Leghorns, Dominique Leghorns, Black 
Spanish, Hamburgs, Polish Games, Dorkings, Black, White 
and Mottled Javas, Wyandottes, White Wyandottes, Golden 
Wyandottes, Black and White Minorcas, Red Caps, Andalu- 
sias, Langshangs, and other recognized varieties, each variety, 
premiums, $2, 1 

To be used by the committee in their discreation for col- 
lections of Bantams, no person to receive more than five dol- 
lars, $20.00 

For pairs of chickens of above varieties, premiums, 2, 1 



88 

For the best breeding pen of each variety of four females 
and male, premium, $2 

For the best pairs of native Eowls, premiums, $2, 1 

For lots of turkeys, and Alesbury, Rouen, Oaouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks, and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China and African Geese, prem., $2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the dis- 
charge of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any 
specimen on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all 
claim he may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the " American Standard of Excellence." 

Note— No pair In a pen will receive a premium as a pair. 

• STREET PARADE. 

Invitation is extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of the committee 
in charge in premiums or gratuities. $50 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no ar- 
ticle offered in collection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium). Diploma and $8 

Best market wagon. 

Best horse cart. 

Best ensilage cutter. 

Best fruit evaporator, with sample vork. 

To be awarded for the above in gratuities a sum not ex- 
ceeding $30. 

For implements not specified above, the Committee may, 
at their discreation, award $25. 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Rake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the 
merit of which can be shown only by actual trial in the held; 
but manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition 
and inspection. 

CARRIAGES. 

For carriages built in the county, and exhibited by the 
manufacturer. Diploma and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



89 
In Exhibition Hall. 

Committees on articles exhibited in the ball should be es- 
pecially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued 
with the names, and sums awarded them, correspond with 
those in their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instruc- 
tions under heading of " Duties of Committees," " General 
Rules," " Premiums to be awarded at the Show," see first 
pages and under " Fruit," " Domestic Manufactures," and 
" Flowers." 

d^^All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manu- 
factures, must be the products of Essex County to be en- 
titled to a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers fifty dollars to be divided in three pre- 
miums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex County, 
as follows : — Premiums, $25, 15, 10 

Note— This exhibit includes all Fruit, Vegetables and Domestic Manufactures 
that are exhibited in any other department in Exhibition Hall. 

DAIRY, BREAD, CANNED FRUIT AND HONEY. 

For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making 
and management of the Butter, premiums, $4, 3 

For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, $4, 3 

For white bread made of Wheat Flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from Graham flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread entered for premiums to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collection of Preserved Fruits and 



90 

Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, 

$2,1 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of pro- 
cess used and amount of labor and time required in preparing 
and drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on articles entered in this depart- 
ment, products of this County deemed worthy, $20 

First and second best honey, not more than five nor less 
than three pounds in comb with one pound of same extracted 
made in the County, with statement signed of kind of bees 
and hive, and time of year when honey was made, premiums, 

$2,1 



Fruit. 



All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the first day of the exhibition, and each exhibi- 
tor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists 
of the varieties of each class of fruit, or to be filed when entry 
is made. (Committees are not authorized to make awards to 
those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a consjncuous maimer by the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors, with the names of 
fruit for which premiums are offered, all others of same class 
fruit to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place 
their several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated 
by such labels, or be considered by the committee as not com- 
peting for premiums. 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee), to give information in regard to the culture of their 
fruit. 

PEARS. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Bartlett, 



91 

r 

Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Angouleme, Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckel, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Coniice, Howell and Clairgeau, each, premium, ^2 

Doyenne d'Ete, Gifford and Olapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $1.50 

For best collection of pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premium, $3,2 

In addition to the above are placed at the disposal of the 
committee, to be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 
each, $15 



APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Wolf River, Sutton Beauty, 
Hubbardston, Mackintosh Red, Porter, Pickman Pippin, Rox- 
bury Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Gravenstein, Hunt Rus- 
set, Ladies' Sweet, Snow, Bailey Sweet, Wealthy, premium 
for each, $2, 1 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early). 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $L50 

For best collection of apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab 
apples deemed worthy by the committee, $L50 

in addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than f 1 each, $15 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

For best twelve specimens of Freestone, white flesh, yellow 
flesh, Essex County seedling, each, variehy, $2 

For best collection of peaches, premium, $3 

For the best twelve specimens of Champion, Lemon, or 
Orange Quinces, premium, $2 

For the best twelve specimens of plums, five varieties to be 
selected by committee, each variety, premium, $2 



92 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, 
Brighton, Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, Pocklington, 
Niagara Grapes, each variety, premium, $2 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than eight 
pounds in all, premiums, $5 

For best specimens of four bunches of grapes, varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

$1.50 

For basket of assorted fruits, premiums, $3, 2 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than SO cents each, $20 



Plants and Flowers. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



1. All plants and flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or be- 
fore eleven o'clock on the first day of the fair, and all such 
plants and flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of plants and 
flowers is designated in the schedule, there must be neitbfr 
more nor less than that number or quantity of specimens 
shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article, only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is offered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for com- 
petition, but no variety can be duplicated. 

4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens 
exhibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of 
superiority and worthy of such premium, not even if they 
are the only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

6. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admit- 
ted in competition for another different premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, or 
in the case of native plants and flowers, where such were 
found. 



93 

7. All plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood or some other 
permanent and suitable substauce, and so attached to same as 
to be easily seen. Flowers when specified to be named to 
comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symmetry and vigor of the specimens ; also bouquets, baskets 
design work, etc., must show taste, skill, and harmony in 
arrangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All dowers exhibited must be shown upon their own 
stem, flowers in '•' Design " work alone excepted ; and this 
exception, if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account 
by the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or " Designs of merit " 
for which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together) on plants and flowers 
exceed the amount, f 125, limited by the Society for this de- 
partments. 

11. ISTo member of the committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any case vote, or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an inte rest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarily vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be tilled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for plants and flowers, and General Rules of the Soci- 
ety, and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhib- 
itors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 

Committee on plants and flowers will take notice. 

PLANTS. 

Plants competing for these premiums must have been 
grown in pots, native plants expected, etc. See Rules. 

For collection flowering and ornamental foliage plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premiums, $^. 2 

For collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, ^1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 3 
varieties, premium, ^1 



94 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $L 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 



premium 



;i 



For collection of Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 
specimens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, premium^ I 
For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., ^1 
For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, . $1 
For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, 
premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., ^1 
For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Calla Lillies, 5 specimens, premium, $1 
For specimen, English Ivy, premium, $1 
For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least 50 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which to be a cross section, and neither to be more than four 
inches in length or diameter, premiums, $3, 2 

FLOWERS. 

For collection cut flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For collection cut flowers, native, 100 specimens, at least 
50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For pair bouquets for vases, of native flowers, premiums, 

$1, .50 

For pair of bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, pre- 
miums, $1, 50 

For basket of green-house flowers, premiums, $1, 50 

For basket of native flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For basket of garden flowers, premiums, $1, .60 



95 

For arraugement of native flowers and autumn leaves, 
premiums, $2, 1 

For floral designs, choice cultivated flowers, prem., $3,2 

For floral designs, native flowers, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Japan Lilies, hardy, named, premiums $2, 1 

For collections Phlox, hardy perennial, named, prem.. f 2, 1 

For collection Pausies, at least 50 specimens neatly and 
artistically arranged, premiums, f 2, 1 

For collection of native and introduced weeds, with common 
and botanical name attached, premiums, $2, 1 

For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six 
varieties, named, premium, $1 

For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Gladiolus (spikes), at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Japan Lilies, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premiums, $1 

For twelve Phlox, hardy, perennial, at least six varieties 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem., $1 

For twenty four Carnation pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Verbenas, at least six varieties,- named, 
premium, $1 

For twenty-four Roses, at least six varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $1 

For twenty-four garden annuals, at least twelve varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties named, pre- 
mium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Double Truffaut's Peony flowered, pre- 
mium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Pompone, premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, $1 

For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, $1 



96 

For twenty-four Zinnias, double, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, African, in variety, premium, 

$1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty-four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $1 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Dianthus (double annual), in variety, premium, 

$1 
For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, $1 

For collection of Sweet Peas, premium, $1 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS ONE. 

Rules for fruit apply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens. Eclipse, Dewing, and 
Edmands, premium, each variety, $2, 1 

Carrots — For best twelve, Short Top, Long Orange and 
Danvers Intermediate, premiums, each variety, f 2, 1 

For be.st twelve, Short Horn, Orange carrots, f 2, 1 

Mangold Wurtzels — For best six specimens, premiums, $2,1 

Flat turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top and 
White Flat, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Ruta Bagas — Twelve specimens. For best Yellow and 
White, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premiums, f 2, 1 

Onions — Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow 
Flat and Red, premiums, each variety, f 2, 1 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Clark's No. 1, Pearl of Savoy, Early Maine, Rob- 
erts Early, Carmans No. 3, Rural Blush, Rural New Yorker, 
Early Northern, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $20 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS TWO. 

Cabbages — For the best three specimens, Savoy, Fottler's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
Cauliflower — For best three specimens, premiums, $2, 1 
Celery — For best four roots, premiums, $2, 1 
Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best. Early, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 



97 

For best twelve ears in milk, late, premiums, $2, 1 

Squashes — For best three specimens, Marrow, Turban, 
Warren Turban, Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, Bay 
State, Sibley, Butman, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 

Melons — For best three specimens, Nutmeg, Musk, Cassaba, 
Salmon Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 

For best two specimens Watermelons, premiums, $2, 1 

Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens. Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 

For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premiums, 

$2, 1 

Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premiums, $2, 1 

For collection of Vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $30 

([^^Xo competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums 
are offered for. 

Collections of Vegetables where premiums are offered for a number of varieties 
must be entered and placed, not less than three of a kind by themselves on the 
tables assigned for collections. No collection shall receive but one premium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to compete with speci- 
mens of the same variety placed elsewhere. Exhibitors of such collections, how- 
ever, are not prevented from exhibiting additional specimens of any variety 
with and in competition with like variety. All vegetables must be entered iu the 
name of the grower of tbem. 

Size of Vegetables. Turnip, Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions 
2 1-2 to 4 inches in largest diameter; Potatoes to be of good size for family use; 
Squashes to be pure and well ripened, Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premiums, $1 

For twenty-five ears Field Corn, premiums, f 5, 4, 3 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $6, 4 
All grain or seed must have been grown by the exhibitor in 
the County to receive a premium. 



Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 
1 o'clock on the first day of the Exhibition. Articles not thus 
deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 



98 

be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to 
the last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wrought Counterpanes, having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $20 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets, having regard to the quality and expense of the 
material, premiums, $2, 1 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the quality 
of the work and expense of materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount not to exceed $20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For exhibit of Manufactured Leather and Skins, 

Society's Diploma. 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 
Women's do.. Children's do., each, premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each, premium, 

$3 

$20 are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium, Diploma of the Society. 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, 

$30 

FANCY WORK. 

Of Domestic Manufactures are not included in the above. 
At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in in any one gratuity. 



99 

OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, 

$40 

DECORATED CHINA. 

For best collection Decorated China, premiums, $5, 3 

For best individual specimen, premiums, $3, 2 

For Punch Bowl or set, premiums, $2, 1 

For Jardinere or Fern dish, premiums, $2, 1 

For raised paste or gold, premiums, $2, 1 

For Vase, premiums, $2, 1 

For Tray, Plate, etc., premiums, $2, 1 

CHARCOAL, PEN AND INK WORK, PHOTOGRAPHS, 

ETC. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, 

$25 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, prem., $2, 1 

At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $15 
not less than 25 cents in any one gratuity. 



List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 



SMALL FRUITS. 

For the best product of not less than twenty-five trees, 
taking into account quantity and quality of Peaches, Plums 
and Quinces, premium, $8 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture of crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $8 

For best crop of currants, raspberries, blackberries and 
Gooseberries, with statement as above, premium each, $8 



lOO 

LIBRAEY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; B. P. Ware, Mar- 
blehead ; J. M. Danforth, Lynntield. 

TREADWELL FARM. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield ; Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; Sherman Nelson, 
Georgetown. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee — Charles Sanders, Salem ; Benj. P. Ware, 
Marblehead ; Lyman Osborne, Peabody. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Committee — F. H. Appleton, Peabody ; J. M. Danforth, 
Lynnfield Centre; 0. S. Butler, Georgetown. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of corps, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Report of Annual Meeting. '. 3 

Entries 5 

Report ou Fat Cattle 8 

Report on Bulls 8 

Report on Milch Cows 9 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 10 

Statements 11 

Report on Heifers 11 

Report on Steers 13 

Report on Brood Mares 13 

Report on Family Horses 14 

Report on Gents' Driving Horses 14 

Report on Ladies' Driving Horses 14 

Report on Fast Walking Horses 14 

Report on Single Farm Horses 14 

Report on Pairs Farm Horses 15 

Report on Colts 15 

Report on Hurdle Jumping 15 

Report on Gents' Saddle Horses 16 

Report on Ladies' Saddle Horses 16 

Report on Swine 16 

Report on Sheep 18 

Report on Goats 18 

Report on Poultry 19 

Report on Agricultural Implements 27 

Report on Carriages 31 

Report on Dairy, Granges and Honey 32 

Reports on Bread and Canned Fruit 32 

Report on Pears 34 

Report on Apples 36 

Report on Peaches, Grapes and Assorted Fruit 39 

Report on Plants 41 

Report on Flowers 42 

Report on Vegetables 47 



I02 

Report on Grain and Seed 52 

Report on Counterpanes and Afghans 52 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 53 

Report on Articles Manufactured from Leather 55 

Report on Manufactures and General Mdse 55 

Report on Fancy Work 56 

Report on Oil Paintings and Water Colors 60 

Report on Decorated China . . 61 

Report on Charcoal, Photographs and Pen and Ink Work 62 

Report on Work by Children 63 

Report of Committee on Small Fruits 64 

Statement 64 

Report of New Members 65 

Institutes 65 

Report of the State Inspector 66 

In Memoriara 68 

Recapitulation 70 

Financial Statement 72 

Treasurer's Report 73 

Constitution of the Society 74 

OflScers of the Society 77 

Premium List for 1904 79 



TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1904. 



OF THE 



mU AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



(Organized 1818.) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 



And the Premium List of 190^. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS., 
Newcomb & Gauss, Printers. 

1904. 



EIGHTY-FOURTH. 

Annual Catde Show and Fair* 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the 
Peabody Institute at Peabody, Sept. 22, 1904. 

Vice President Sherman Nelson called the meeting to 
order at 9.45 o'clock A. M. 

A motion was made by Gen. F. H. Appleton and sec- 
onded by several others that Mr. Frederick A. Russell of 
Methuen be elected by acclamation as President of this 
Society for the ensuing year. And it was so voted and 
Mr. Russell was unanimously elected. 

Gen. Appleton escorted Mr. Russell to the chair who 
thanked the meeting for the honor conferred upon him and 
made some appropriate remarks. 

Upon motion of Mr. James C. Poor it was voted that 
the Secretary cast one of the printed ballots, there being 
but one ticket for four Vice Presidents and Secretary for 
the ensuing year. 

Voted — To take up the ballot for Trustees and go 

through the ticket, each town separately, and amend it, 

which was done, and it was voted — that the Secretary 

cast one ballot for the list of trustees, which was done, and 

the following ofiScers of the society were declared elected. 



PRESIDENT. 

Frederick A. Russell of Methuen. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

James J. H. Gregory of Marblehead. 
Asa P. Newhall of Lynn, 
Sherman Nelson of Georgetown. 
Ira J. Webster of Haverhill. 

SECRETARY. 

John M. Danforth of Lynnfield. 

The committee appointed by the trustees at their June 
meeting to submit resolutions on the death of Rev. Oliver 
S. Butler of Georgetown and Capt. H. G. Herrick of 
Lawrence made their report as follows, and it was ac- 
cepted and adopted and ordered to be printed in the 
Transactions. 

Capt. Horatio G. Herrick died April 18, 1903, in the 
seventy-ninth year of his age. Rev. Oliver Smith Butler 
died Dec. 27, 1903, having liyed to the age of seventy 
seven years. The fulness of time had come, although he 
had retained the dew of his youth, and the freshness of 
his heart, so his death seemed sudden and unexpected. 

Resolved — That we deeply deplore the loss of our as- 
sociates and friends who were for many years so closely 
and devotedly allied to the interests of this society, and 
the one having held the high honor of having been its 
President, and the other for many years its honored Vice 
President. That they gave cheerfully their best efforts 
to Education, Science and Agriculture, and majiifested an 
earnest desire to serve friends in want and to console them 
in seasons of aftliction. 

Resolved — That their presence in all assemblies contrib- 
uted a certain ideal charm. The glow of heart and intel 



lect made the air mild and genial about them. That their 
tactful wisdom and eloquence with unflagging zeal and faith 
carried an influence of rare power among their many friends. 

Resolved — That their memory is deeply engraved on 
the hearts of many who have shared in deep sorrow and 
have been partakers of their ministrations and love. That 
their death has caused a void, which many years of patient 
waiting will find unfilled. 

Resolved — That we extend our sympathy to their re- 
spective families in this hour of their affliction and grief. 

3n a^emotiam. 

OF REV. O. S. BUTLER. 

He has gone from our midst and we miss him, 

He was ever a counselor true, 
Ready to give of his service 

Whatever was needed to do. 

His cheer and his hearty rejoinder 

Won friends to him everywhere, 
And many the homes that delighted 

With him their best comfort to share. 

He sorrowed with those who were mourning, — 

His tenderness, who can forget? 
Ah ! many a heart that is aching 

Will long for his sympathy yet. 

His trust and his faith let us cherish 

For it entered within the veil, 
And God who is ruler forever 
Will never his children fail. 

Annie Stevens Perkins. 
Lynnfield Centre, Mass. 

Voted to adjourn. 

John M. Danforth, Secretary. 

The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1904 are tabulated for comparison as follows : 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON FAIR GROUNDS. 





Entries 
in 1904 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1904 


Entries 
in 1903 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1903 


Fat Cattle, 


2 


2 


3 


1 


Bulls, 


15 


5 


16 


8 


Milch Cows, 


25 


4 


19 


5 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


1 


1 


3 


2 


Heifers, Pure Breed, 


17 


3 




5 


Heifers, Grade, 


15 


4 


14 


3 


Working Oxeij and Steers, 


2 


2 








Steers, 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Stallions, Farm and Draft, 


1 


1 








Brood Mares, Farm and Draft, 1 


1 








Brood Mares, Driving Purposes 1 


1 


1 


1 


Family Horses, 


6 


4 


3 


3 


Pairs Gents' Driving Horses 


, 





1 


1 


Single Gents' Driving Horses, 6 


4 


5 


4 


Ladies' Driving Horses 


3 


3 


1 


1 


Fast Walking Horses, 


2 


2 


4 


4 


Pairs Fast Walking Horses, 








1 


1 


Single Farm Horses, 


1 


i 


1 


1 


Pairs Farm Horses, 


1 


1 


2 


1 


Colts, Farm and Draft, 


2 


1 








Colts, Driving Purposes, 


4 


8 


6 


3 


Horses for Hurdle Jumping, 


12 


2 


10 


1 


Swine, 


26 


2 


51 


3 


Sheep, 


3 


1 

J. 


3 


1 


Goats, 


1 


1 


3 


2 


Poultry, 


176 


11 


207 


11 


Agricultural Implements 


9 


5 


20 


6 


Carriages, 


5 


2 


6 


2 




339 


69 


403 


71 



EXHIBITS IN HALL. 





From 
Entries Different 
in 1904. Places 

in 1904. 


Entries 
in 1903. 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1903. 


Grange Exhibit, 


1 I 


1 


1 


Dairy, 





2 


1 


Bread and Canned Fruit, 


81 11 


64 


10 


Honey, 


1 1 


2 


1 


Pears, 


66 7 


125 


11 


Apples, 


177 16 


124 


11 


Peaches, Grapes, and As- 








sorted Fruit, 


89 11 


45 


8 


Plants, 


36 4 


25 


3 


Flowers, 


211 8 


282 


12 


Vegetables, 


238 12 


199 


13 


Grain and seed. 


17 5 


10 


4 


Carpets and Rugs, 


44 8 


28 


8 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


38 6 


43 


8 


Articles M'n'f'd from leathei 


•, 7 2 


7 


4 


Manufactures and Gen. Mdse. 6 6 


8 


6 


Fancy Work, 


249 12 


168 


11 


Oil Paintings and Water 








Colors, 


64 3 


60 


5 


Decorated China, 


36 5 


39 


3 


Charcoal Work, Photos, etc. 


55 7 


77 


6 


Work by children under 12 








years of age, 


25 3 


28 






1436 128 1337 131 



Grand total, 1775 entries, from 28 of the 34 cities and 
towns in Essex County against 1720 entries from 29 cities 
and towns last year. Georgetown, Merrimac, Nahant? 
Newburyport, Salisbury and West Newbury did not have 
exhibits this year. 

The entries were ; Amesbury, 20 ; Andover, 27 ; Bever- 



8 

ly, 118 ; Boxford, 111 ; Danvers, 130 ; Essex, 2 ; Glouces- 
ter, 3 ; Groveland, 1 ; Hamilton, 23 ; Haverhill, 17 ; Ips- 
wich, 7 ; Lawrence, 4 ; Lynn, 98 ; Lynnfield, 22 ; Manches- 
ter, 1 ; Marblehead, 17 ; Methuen, 10 ; Middleton, 27 ; New- 
bury, 21 ; North Andover, 59 ; Peabody, 712 ; Rockport, 
2 ; Rowley, 12 ; Salem, 260 ; Saugus, 13 ; Swampscott, 7 ; 
Topsfield, 14 ; Wenham, 37. 



Reports of Committees. 



FAT CATTLE. 

17. First premium to Daniel A. Carlton, North Andover 

for pair fat Oxen. 
$5. First premium to Lewis Brown, Peabody, for fat Cow. 
James C. Poor, James J. Abbott, James A. Roome — 
Committee. 



BULLS. 



$7. First premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, for 
Ayrshire Bull, " Pete." 

$6. First premium to T. W. Pierce, Topsfield, for Guern- 
sey Bull, No. 8662. 

$3. Second premium to T. W. Pierce, Topsfield, for Hol- 
stein Bull, No. 34,889. 

$3. Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire Bull. 
16. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Ayrshire Bull, " Duke,'' No. 7982. 
$7. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Bull, No. 8,821. 
$5. First premium to Charles W. Paul, No. Andover, for 

Ayrshire Bull, " Nimrod " No. 
i5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Bull, " Earl Fairfax de Kol," No. 31,075. 
i3. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Ho Istein Bull, " Count Pauline de Kol," No. 33,650. 



lO 



$5, First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Guernsey Bull, " Royal Boy," No. 9,026. 
$5. First premium to Danvers Asylum for Holstein Bull. 
R. M. Handy, Elias Andrews — Committee. 



MILCH COWS. 

$6. First premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for Ayr- 
shire Cow, " Rozell," No. 16,565. 
14. Second premium to Thomas W. Fierce, Topsfield, 

for Grade Holstein Cow, " My Queen." 
$4. Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire Cow. 
$6. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Cow, " Dolly Robin," No. 13,549. 
i4. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Cow, " Lady Harrington." 
$7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, " Mechthilde Pauline," No. 40,185. 
$6. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Cow, " Sadie B." 
f7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, "Sophie Barts Fairfax." 
$5. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, " Bess Fairfax.'' 
$5. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, "Bess Onedio Shepherd." 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

i. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Herd 5 Holstein Cows. 
R. M. Handy, Elias Andrews, George L. Averill — Com- 
mittee. 



II 



HEIFERS— PURE BREED. 

|4. First premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for Ayr- 
shire Heifer, " Daisy Gebic," No. 17,794. 

3. Second premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for 

Ayrshire Heifer, " Mary Lilac," No. 17,275. 

;2. jFirst premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for Ayr- 
shire Heifer, 3 months old. 

2. Second premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for 
Ayrshire Heifer, " Maud Orr, 2d," No. 19,338. 

4. First premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, for 

Jersey Heifer, " Betty." 

5. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire Heifer. 
4. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 
Ayrshire Heifer. 

4. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Heifer, " Danvers Rosie," No. 16,185. 

5. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Heifer, " Topsfield Rosie," No. 16,179. 

4. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Heifer, " Briar 2d, " No. 16, 182. 
2. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
Guernsey Heifer, " Dewey Robin," No. 16,183. 

5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Heifer, " Myra Louise de Kol," No. 68,119. 
2. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Heifer, 5 mos. old, " Grace Sheperd de 

Kol," No. 70,294. 
2. Second premium to Danvers Asylum for Holstein 

Heifer. 



HEIFERS— GRADE. 

First premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for 
Grade Ayrshire, " Getty." 



12 

$2. Second premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for 

Grade Ayrshire, " Rand." 
$5. First premium to Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, for 

Grade Ayrshire, " Lassie of the Hills." 
$2. Second premium to Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, 

for Grade Ayrshire, *' Gentle Lassie." 
$4. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Grade Ayrshire, " Princess." 
$2. Second premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Grade Ayrshire " Queenie." 
12. Second premium to George L. Averill, Andover, 

for Grade Ayrshire, " Pansy." 
$2. First premium to David M. Little, Peabody, for 

Grade Ayrshire, 7 mos. old. 
R. M. Handy, Milo H. Gould, Walter H. Usiyes— Com- 
mittee. 



WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

^7. First premium to Charles A. Hayes, Danvers, for 

Working Oxen. 
^■5. Second premium to Daniel A. Carlton, No. Andover, 

for Working Oxen. 



STEERS. 

$6. First premium to Charles A. Hayes, Danvers, for 

pair of steers. 
13. Second premium to John A. Jenkins, Andover, for 
twin steers, 9 mos. old. 
B. F. Barnes, Andrew Mansfield — Committee. 



STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

'. First premium to George A. Eaton, Peabody, for 
roan stallion. 



13 



BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT. 

^7. First premium to J. J. Whalley, Salem, for mare and 
colt 4 mos. old. 



BROOD MARES, FOR DRIVING. 

#7. First premium to Joseph W. Bolster, Peabody, for 
mare and colt 3 mos. old. 
Peter Holt, Charles N. Maguire, Amos P. Alley — Com- 
mittee. 



FAMILY HORSES. 

$7. First premium to Daniel W. Poor, Peabody, for dark 

brown mare, " Dollv P." 
$6. Second premium to C. F. Abbott, Andover, for bay 

mare. 



GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

$7. First premium to Wm. F. Wilkinson, Salem, for 

chestnut mare, " Daisy W." 
$5. Second premium to John T. Cooper, Peabody, for 

roan mare, "• Baby." 



LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

i7. First premium to Mrs. Frances O. Perkins, Lynnfield, 

for brown mare, " Duchess." 
i5. Second premium to Mrs. W. H. Brown, Danvers, for 

bay mare. 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for ba}' mare. 



14 

J. Second premium to A. C. Cummings, Hamilton, for 

brown mare. 
C. A. Playdon, Ira J. Webster, Fred I. Hopkins — Com- 
mittee. 



FARM HORSES. 

16. First premium to Benj. W. Farnham, No. Andover, 

for bay mare. 
i8. First premium to Nathan Foster, No. Andover, for 

pair of horses. 
S. H.Bailey, A. B. Fellows, D. D. Adams — Committee. 



COLTS FOR FARM AND DRAFT. 

$4. First premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for bay 

colt, 2 yrs. old. 
13. First premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for roan 

colt, 1 year old. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

$6. First premium to A. C. Cummings, Hamilton, for 4 

year old filly colt. 
15. First premium to Trask, Beverly, for 3 year old 

chestnut filly. 
$4. First premium to P. T. Nelson, Peabody, for 2 year 

old stallion colt. 
$3. First premium to P. T. Nelson, Peabody, for yearling 

colt. 
C. A. Playdon, Peter Holt, D. D. Adams, Amos P. 
Alley, C. M. Maguire — Committee. 



15 

HURDLE JUMPING. 

First premium to George S. Mandell, Hamilton, for 

horse, " Warpaint." 
Second premium to A. P. Gardner, Hamilton, for horse, 

"Ambassador.'' 



HIGH JUMP. 

First premium to A. P. Gardner, Hamilton, for horse, 

" Ambassador." 
Second premium to Mrs. Thomas Pierce, Topsfield, for 
horse, " Robt. Bruce." 
D. P. Rogers, F. W. Rogers, Thomas Sanders, 2nd — 
Committee. 



SPECIAL CLASS. 

$3. First premium to A. C. Beckford, Danvers, for Shet- 
land Pony. 



SWINE. 



U 



u 



u 



First premium to Geo. A. Buzzell, Lynn for Chester 

White sow and pigs. 
Second premium to Mrs. Nellie Galeucia, Peabody, 

for Chester white sow and pigs. 
First premium to Mrs. Nellie Galeucia, Peabody, for 

medium Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
First premium to Mrs. Nellie Galeucia, Peabody, for 

Berkshire sow and pigs. 
First premium to Mrs. Nellie Galeucia, Peabody, for 

0. I. C. boar. 
First premium to Geo. F. Hammond, Peabody, for 

Chester White boar. 



i6 

$2. Second premium to Geo. F. Hammond, Peabody, for 

Grade Chester sow and pigs. 
$2. Second premium to H. G. McCarthy, Peabody, for O. 

I. C. boar. 
$2. Second premium to H. G. McCarthy, Peabod}^ for 

O. I. C. sow. 
$4. First premium to H. G. McCarthy, Peabody. for 

Grade Berkshire sow and pigs. 
$4. First premium to H. G. McCarthy, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire boar. 
$4. First premium to H. G. McCarthy, Peabody, for six 

shotes, 4 mos. old. 
$2. Second premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire boar. 
$2. Second premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
W. T. Wolloff, J. F. Foster, Edward E. White— Com- 
mittee. 



GOATS. 

|'5. First premium to John B. Jenkins, Andover, for 
flock of Angora goats. 
E. K. Lee, Samuel Thayer — Committee. 



POULTRY. 

$2. First premium to Alonzo C. Pearson, Peabody, for 

pair R. I. Red chicks. 
$2. First premium to George A. Buzzell, Ljain, for pair 

Guinea fowls. 
$2. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
12. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pen 

Golden laced Wyandotte fowls. 



17 

$2. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 
Red Cap fowls. 
2. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair Red 
Cap chicks. 

1. Second premium to Miss Maud Benway, Salem, for 

pair Golden laced Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to Miss Maud Benway, Salem, for 

pair Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
1. Second premium to Miss Maud Benway, Salem, for 
pair Red Cap chicks. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. Carrie Crampsey, Beverly, 

for pair Turkeys. 

2. First premium to Mrs. Carrie Crampsey, Beverly, 

for pen frizzle chicks. 
2. First premium to Mrs. Carrie Crampsey, Beverly, for 

pen R. I. Red chicks. 
2. First premium to Mrs. Carrie Crampsey, Beverly, for 

pair R. I. Red chicks. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 

Brown Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

Brown Leghorn chicks. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 

Brown Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

Brown Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair American Dominique fowls. 

1. Second premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury,for 

pair American Dominique fowls. 

2. First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair American Dominique chicks. 
1. Second premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 
for pair American Dominique chicks. 



i8 

$2. First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
pair B. S. Polish fowls. 

1. Second premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair B. S. Polish fowls. 

2. First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair B. S. Polish chicks. 

1. Second premium to Rufus C, Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair B. S. Polish chicks. 

2. First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Golden Polish chicks. 
2. First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair plain Polish chicks. 
2. First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair White Polish fowls. 
2. First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair White Polish chicks. 

1. Second premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury^ 

for White Muscovy ducks. 

2. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

pair African Geese. 

1. Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

pair African geese. 

2. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

pen young African geese. 
2. First premium to Lawrence Perkins, Beverly, for pen 

S. C. White Leghorn fowls. 
1. Second premium to Lawrence Perkins, Beverly, for 

pair S. C. White Leghorn fowls. 
1.50 Gratuity to John S. Ives, Salem, for collection Red 

Game Bantams. 

1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 

2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen 
Houdan fowls. 



19 

^1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan chicks. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan chicks. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen 

Houdan chicks. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabod}^ for pair 

Irish Pitt Game fowls. 

1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Irish Pitt Game chicks. 

2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Irish Pitt Game chicks. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen, 

Irish Pitt Game chicks. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Black Red Clayburn fowls. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody for pen Black 

Red Clayburn fowls. 
2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair Vir- 
ginia blue chicks. 
2, First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Black Warhorse chicks. 
2. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

S. L. Wyandotte chicks. 

1. Second premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

pair S. L. Wj^andotte chicks. 

2. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers for pen 

S. L. Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 
S. L. Wyandotte fowls. 

1. Second premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

pair S. L. Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pen 

S. L. Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pair 
Black Cochin fowls. 



20 

i2. First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pen 

Black Cochin fowls. 
2. First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pen 

Black Cochin chicks. 
2. First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pair 

Black Cochin chicks. 
2. First premium to F. W. Holden, Beverly, for pea 

light Brahma fowls. 
1. Second premium to F. W. Holden, Beverly, for pair 

light Brahma fowls. 
1. Second premium to F. W. Holden, Beverly, for pen 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
1. Second premium to F. W. Holden, Beverly, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 

1. Second premium to F. W. Holden, Beverly, for pair 

light Brahma chicks. 

2. First premium to Josiah Fitz, J:th, Lynn, for S. C. 

Buff Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for pen S. 

C. Buff Leghorn fowls. 
2. First premium to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for pen S. 

C. Buff Leghorn chicks. 
5. Gratuity to J. H. Sewell, Peabody, for collection of 

Bantams. 
2. First premium to O. Caswell, Beverly, for pair light 

Brahma chicks. 

1. Second premium to 0. Caswell,Beverly,for pair light 

Brahma chicks. 

2. First premium to O. Caswell, Beverly, for pen light 

Brahma chicks. 
2. First premium to O. Caswell, Beverly, for pair light 

Brahma fowls. 
2. First premium to V. P. O'Keefe, Peabody, for pair 

white Pekin ducks. 
2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 

white Leofhorn fowls. 



21 

$2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 
white Leghorn chicks. 
1. Gratuity to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverlj'^, for collection 
of Bantams. 

1. Second premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

pair R. I. Red chicks. 

2. First premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for pair 

R. I. Red fowls. 

2. First premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for Afri- 
can geese. 

1. Second premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for Tou- 
louse geese. 

1. Second premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for 

Embden geese. 

2. First premium to H. G. Putnam, Danvers, for pair 

Martel An con a fowls. 
2. First premium to H. G. Putnam, Danvers, for pair 
Martel Ancona chicks. 

1. First premium to H. G. Putnam, Danvers, for pen 

Martel Ancona chicks. 

2. First premium to Roger W. Estes, Middleton, for pair 

Japanese silks. 

1. Gratuity to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for Seabright 

Bantam fowls. 

2. First premium to Gustave Decker, Danvers, for pair 

B. Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Wenhara, for 

pen Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Wenham, for 

pair Wyandotte chicks. 
2. First premium to Barnes & Woodbury, Wenham, for 

pen Wyandotte fowls. 
1.50 Gratuity to E. A. Dodge, Hamilton, for collection of 

Bantams. 
2. First premium to R. W. Whipple, Hamilton, for pair 

Buff Plymouth Rock fowls. 



22 

)1 . Second premium to R. W. Whipple, Hamilton, for 
pair brown Leghorn chicks. 

1. Second premium to R. W. Whipple, Hamilton, for 

pair brown Leghorn chicks. 

2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair Silver Hamburg fowls. 

1. Second premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pen Silver laced Wyandotte fowls. 

2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair Silver laced Wyandotte chicks. 

1. Second premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair Silver laced Wyandotte chicks. 

2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 

Silver Hamburg chicks. 
2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for pair 

Silver Hamburg fowls. 
2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for pen 

Golden Hamburg chicks. 
2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair Golden Hamburg chicks. 
2. First premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair Golden Hamburg chicks. 

1. Second premium to Geo. A. Addison, Wenham, for 

pair Golden Hamburg chicks. 

2. First premium to Daniel Fuller, Middleton, for pair 

Bronze turkeys. 
2. First premium to W. H. Burnham, Danvers, for pair 
Partridge Cochin fowls. 

1. Second premium to Elmer Durkee, Peabody, for pen 

Brahma fowls. 

2. First premium to John Gilman, Peabody, for pair 

black Langshan fowls. 
2. First premium to M. J, Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

Embden geese. 
2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

young Embden geese. 



23 

$2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 
Toulouse geese. 
2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 
young Toulouse geese. 

1. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

Muscovey ducks. 

2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

turkeys. 

1. Second premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pair 

young turkeys. 

2. First premium to Edgar Trask, Beverly, for pen 

buff Plymouth Rock fowls. 
2. First premium to Edgar Trask, Beverly, for pair buff 
Plymouth Rock fowls. 

1. Second premium to Edgar Trask, Beverly, for buff 

Plymouth Rock chicks. 

2. First premium to Edgar Trask, Beverly, for pair buff 

Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2. First premium to Edgar Trask, Beverly, for pair 
barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 

1. First premium to Edgar Trask, Beverly, for pair 

white Plymouth Rock chicks. 

2. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pair 

black Minorca chicks. 
2. Second premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pair 

black Minorca chicks. 
2. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pair 

black Minorca fowls. 
2. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pair 

black Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pair 

black Wyandotte chicks. 
1. Second premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pair 

white Wyandotte chicks. 
W. B. Atherton— Jwc^^g. 



24 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

$S. Gratuity to W. H. Sanderfill, Danvers, for Paige 

Woven Wire Fencing. 
8. Gratuity to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for Market 

Wagon. 
8. Gratuity to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for Grocer's 

Wagon. 
5. Gratuity to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for Express 

Wagon. 
5. Gratuity to J. H. Nason, Boxford, for low down 

Milk Wagon. 
8. and Diploma to Solomon Fuller, Danvers, for collection 

of Garden Tools. 
5. Gratuity to George E. Daniels, Rowley, for two 

horse Dump Cart. 
J. J. H. Gregory for the Committee. 



CARRIAGES. 

$15. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for collection 
of carriages. 
15. Gratuity to J. H. Nason, Boxford, for Concord 
Wagon . 
D. A. Perley, Albert E. Lufkin, C. R. Anderson — Com- 
mittee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



GRANGES. 



$25. First premium to West Boxford Grange for collec- 
tion. 
Sherman Nelson, D. A. Carlton, Mrs. Francis O. Per- 
kins — Committee. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

12. First premium to Mrs. E. F. Glines, Beverly, for 
White Bread. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. E. F. Glines, Beverly, for entire 

Wheat Bread. 
1. Second premium to Flora Chatterton, Peabody, for 

White Bread. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. Lynch, Peabody, for White 
Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to A. F. Glines, Beverly, for White 

Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for White Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Howitt, Peabody, for White 

Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Pierce Bell, Peabody, for White 

Bread. 
12. First premium to Mrs. J. R. Fuller, Dan vers, for 
Graham Bread. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. Hannah Sherry, Peabody, 
for Graham Bread. 



26 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. C. Foye, Peabody, for Graham 
Bread. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. F. Quimby, Wenham, for 
Rolled Oats. 

f 1. First premium to Mrs. J. B. Blood, Lynn, for Rye 
Bread. 

.50. Gratuity to Katlierine Enlind, Peabody, for Rye 
Bread. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Nickerson, Peabody, for 
Swedish Coffee Bread. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Charles Hutchinson, Peabody, 
for Brown Bread. 

.50. Gratuity to Helen Osgood, Peabody, for Brown 
Bread. 

$1. Gratuity to H. J. Briggs, Peabody, for Ribbon 

Cake. 
1. Gratuity to Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for Fruit Cake. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Peabody, for An- 
gel Cake. 

.50. Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for Sponge Cake. 

.50. Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for Chocolate 
Cake. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. C. Wiggin, Peabody, for 

Lemon Cake. 
50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. C. Wiggin, Peabody, for 
Doughnuts. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss H. Manney, Peabody, for Sponge 
Cake. 

$2. First premium to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for Pre- 
serves. 
1. Second premium to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for 
Jellies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. John Duffy, Peabody, for Jellies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Trask, Danvers, for Pre- 
serves. 



27 

^60. Gratuity to Walter Rosetta, Peabody, for Pre- 
serves. 
.50. Gratuity to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for Preserves. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Nickerson, Peabody for 

Preserves. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Glines, Beverly, for Preserves. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. Hoag, Peabody, for Preserves. 
Special premium offered by the Glen Mills Cereal Co., 

Rowley. 
$5. First premium to Mrs. M. A. Smith, Salem, for 
Entire Wheat Bread. 
3. Second premium to Mrs. E. F. Glines, Beverly, 

for Entire Wheat Bread. 
2. Third premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 

for Entire Wheat Bread. 
1. Fourth premium to Mrs. C. F. Dodge, Topsfield, 
for Entire Wheat Bread. 



HONEY. 

-$2. First premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 5 
pounds Honey. 
Henry Alley, George M. Wonson, Sarah P. Blunt, Mary 
P. Torrey — Committee. 



PEARS. 

First premium to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for 

Seckel. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. H. D. Farwell, Peabody, 

for Duchess. 
f 1. Gratuity to Mrs. H. D. Farwell, Peabody, for Bosc. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. D. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Clairgeau. 



28 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. D. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Sheldon. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. D. Farwell, Peabody, for Belle 

Lucrative. 
f 2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 
$2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bosc. 
12. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Lawrence. 
$2. First premium to Mabel Forness, Peabody, for 

Sheldon. 
.50. Gratuity to Mabel Forness, Peabody, for Lawrence. 
^2. First premium to Albert Tufts, Peabody, for 

Bartlett. 
12. First premium to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Dana's Hovey. 
.50. Gratuity to W. F. Dole, Peabody, for Buerre 

Superfine. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Frederick Wagner, Peabody, for 

Bosc. 
SI. Gratuity to George E. Bartlett, Peabody, for Buerre 

Hardy. 
.50. Gratuity to Frank Larrabee, Peabody, for Vicar. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for 

Bartlett. 
.50. Gratuity to Frank D. Hoag, Peabody, for Buerre 

Anjou. 
.50. Gratuity to E. F. Webster, Haverhill, for Howell. 

E. F. Webster, Henry M. Killam, Samuel B. George 
— Committee. 



APPLES. 

First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 
Hubbardston Nonesuch. 
11.50 First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 
Northern Spy. 



29 

$1. Second premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Baldwin. 
$1. Second premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Gravenstein, 
$2. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Mackintosh Red. 
$2. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Snow. 
$2. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

R, I. Greening. 
.50. Gratuity to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Green 

Sweet. 
$1.50 First premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Hyslop 

Crab. 
#1. Second premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for 

Hubbardston Nonesuch. 

1. Second premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for 

Wealthy. 
$1.50 First premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Arctic. 
$1. Gratuity to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Famense. 
$2. First premium to S. B. Putnam, Peabody, for 

Wealthy. 
$2. First premium to L. A. Moore, Peabody, for King 

of Tompkins. 
$1. Second premium to James A. King, Peabody, for 

Ben. 
,50. Gratuity to James A. King, Peabody, for Roxbury 

Russet. 
fl.50 First premium to Albert F. Tenney, Rowley, for 

Fanny. 
.50. Gratuity to Albert F. Tenney, Rowley, for Delaware. 
$1. Second premium to J. H. Tenney, Rowley, for 

Snow. 
$1. Second premium to Charles P. Austin, Boxford, for 

King of Tompkins. 



30 

$1. Second premium to George B. Austin, Boxford, for 

Roxbury Russet. 
.50. Gratuity to George B, Austin, Boxford, for Bedford 

Nonesuch. 
.50. Gratuity to George B. Austin, Boxford, for Tolman 

Sweet. 
.75. Gratuity to Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead, for Trans- 
parent Crab. 
.50. Gratuity to W. P. Dole, Peabody, for Hyslop Crab.. 
.50. Gratuity to W. P. Dole, Peabody, for Pickman 
Pippin. 
.50. Gratuity to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, forPick-^ 

man Pippin. 
.50. Gratuity to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Fanny» 
.50. Gratuity to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 20' 

ounce. 
.50. Gratuity to George Diebel, Peabody, for Wealthy. 
.50. Gratuity to John H. Perkins, Lynnfield, for Ben. 
$ 1. Second premium to Daniel A. Carlton, No. Ando- 
ver, for Mackintosh Red. 
2. First premium to E. P. Balcom, Salem, for Danvers 
Sweet. 
.50. Gratuity to E. P. Balcom, Salem, for Baldwin. 
.50. Gratuity to E. P. Balcom, Salem, for Gravenstein. 
$ 1. Second premium to David Little, Newbury, for 
Dan vers Sweet. 
1. Second premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for R. 
I. Greening. 

1. Second premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Hunt's Russet. 

2. First premium to D. H, Illsley, Newbury, for Pick- 

man Pippin. 
2. First premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for Rox- 
bury Russet. 
.50. Gratuity to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for Baldwin. 



31 

$2. First premium to C. A. Southwick, Peabody, for 
Wolf River. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. W. A. Gile, Peabody, for 

Wolf River. 

.50. Gratuity to Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for Mackin- 
tosh Red. 

.50. Gratuity to Daniel H. Felton, Peabody, for None- 
such. 

.50. Gratuity to Carl Goodwin, Peabody, for Rolf. 

.50. Gratuity to Arthur Obear, Beverly, for Alexander. 

.75. Gratuity to Albert Tufts, Peabody, for Rolf. 
$ 1. Gratuity to L. S. Wilkins, Middleton, for Maiden 
Blush. 

2. First premium to E. F. Webster, Haverhill, for 

Sutton Beauty. 
.50. Gratuity to E. F. Webster, Haverhill, for Haas. 
.50. Gratuity to A. N. Welch, Peabody, for Margaret. 
.50. Gratuity to Samuel B. George, Groveland, for 
Hunt's Russet. 
$ 1. Second premium to D. A. Pettingill, Danvers, for 
Sutton Beauty. 
2. First premium to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for 

Baldwin. 
2. First premium to B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

Porter. 
2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Gravenstein. 
1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Grav- 
enstein. 
.50. Gratuity to Albert A. Dodge, Hamilton, for Snow. 
Geo. W. Chadwick, Albert Emerson, J. Webb Barton — 
Committee. 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

$2. First premium to Rena Brown, Peabody, for White 
flesh Peach. 



32 

$2. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for Essex Co. 
Seedling. 

2. First premium to F. H. Cameron, Beverly, for Craw- 
ford Peach. 

1. Gratuity to F. H. Cameron, Beverly, for Foster 
Peach. 

1. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Early 
Crawford Peach. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. George R. Lord, Salem, for White 

flesh Peach. 

2. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bsk. 

Assorted Fruit. 

1. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Niagara Grapes. 

2. First premium to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for Tellen- 

burg Plums. 
2. First premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Lombard Plums. 
1. Gratuity to Grace Jackman, Peabody, for Japanese 

Plums. 
1. Gratuity to Frank D. Hoag, Peabody, for Green 

Gage Plums. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. H. G. Farwell, Peabody, for Brad- 

shaw Plums. 

2. First premium to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for Con- 

cord Grapes. 

2. First premium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for Word- 
en's Seedling Grapes. 

2. First premium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for Moore's 
Early Grapes. 

2, First premium to H. G. Briggs, Peabody, for Pock 
lington Grapes. 

2. First premium to Henry Alley, Wenham, for Green 
Mountain Grapes. 

2. First premium to Mrs. A. Raddin, Peabody, for 
Moore's Diamond Grapes. 



33 

■$1. Gratuity to C. M. Poor, Peabody, for Moore's Dia- 
mond Grapes. 
2. First premium to Mrs. Fred Wagner, Peabody, for 

Niagara Grapes. 
2. Gratuity to A. H. Merrill, Pe abody, for collection 6 

varieties Grapes. 
2. Second premium to Luther Woodbury, Beverly, for 
Hamburg Grapes. 
Wm. B. Foster, Charles A. Sawyer, Lyman P. Osborn, 
— Committee. 



PLANTS. 

First premium to Mrs. H. Farnhara, Peabody, for 

coll. begonias. 
1. First premium to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, for 

coll. geraniums. 
1. First premium to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, for 

coll. coleus. 
1. First premium to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, for 

coll. ferns. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, for Rex 

begonias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Farnhara, Peabody, for abutolon. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, for coll. 

salvia. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. Pratt, Peabody, for King and 

Queen fern. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Alice Reed, Peabody, for Jerusa- 
lem Cheriy tree. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss Annie Bushby, Peabody, for 

maiden hair fern. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Elizabeth Cosgrove, Peabody, for 

sweet geranium. 



34 

$.50. Gratuity to Albert Tufts, Peabody, for lobster 
cactus. 

.50. Gratuity to Irene Masterson, Peabody, for flower- 
ing maple. 

.75. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody, for 
begonias. 

.50. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody, for 
coll. snap dragon. 

.75. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody for coll. 
petunias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody for stag 
horn fern. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for rab- 
bit foot fern. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for cocoa 

palm. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Andrew Wiggin, Peabody, for 
horge carnoga. 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Andrew Wiggin, Peabody for 

begonia. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. A. Trask, Peabody for maranto. 

.50. Gratuity to A. E. Johnson, Peabody, for Jerusalem 
cherry tree. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for 
Australian fern. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary Whittaker, Peabody, for 
begonia. 

,50. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary Whittaker, Peabody, for cal- 
ceolaria. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. Brennan, Salem, for Japan lilly. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. H. O'Hara, Salem, for gerani- 
um. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss L. B. Young, Saugus, for Califor- 
nia cedar. 
Ettore Tassinari, O. F. Newhall, Sarah B. Herrlck — 
Committee. 



35 

FLOWERS. 

S3. First premium to Miss Amy Buxton, Peabody, for 
coll. wild flowers, 50 varieties. 

.50. Gratuity to Elsie M. Chandler, Peabody, for coll. 
nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Elizabeth Moxley, Peabody, for coll. 
zinneas. 

.50. Gratuity to Elizabeth Moxley, Peabody, for coll. 
asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Sallie Batchelder, Peabody, for sweet 
peas. 

.50. Gratuity to Sallie Batchelder, Peabody, for 24 
marigolds. 

.50. Second premium to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, 
for basket flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody for pansies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, for scabiosas. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, for phlox 
drummond. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Farnham, Peabody, for bou- 
quet dbl. nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Hayden, Peabody, for hy- 
drangeas. 

il. Second premium to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for 
coll. hardy phlox. 
1. First premium to Mildred O. Fader, Peal)ody for 
pansies. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. B. Putnam, Peabody, for basket 
flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. B. Putnam, Peabody, for coll. 

aster. 
SI. Second premium to Mrs. Morris, Peabody, for bou- 
quet of wild flowers. 
1. First premium to Harry Walker, Peabody, for 
nasturtiums. 



36 

$1. First premium to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 
African marigolds. 
1. First premium to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 

phlox drummond. 
1. First premium to Mrs- C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 

garden annuals. 
1. First premium to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 
French marigolds. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for coll. 

cosmos. 
.50. Gratuity to Nancy J. Moulton, Peabody, for gar- 
den annuals. 
II. Gratuity to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for nas- 
turtiums. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Walter Osborn, Peabody, for coll. 
sweet peas. 
1.50. Gratuity to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for display of 
dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Jenkins, Andover, for cox- 
combs. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Jenkins, Andover, for dian- 

thus. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Jenkins, Andover, for sal- 

piglossis. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Jenkins, Andover, for dou- 
ble phlox. 
$1. First premium to Miss S. F. Jenkins, Andover, for 
zinneas. 
1. First premium to Miss S. F. Jenkins, Andover, for 

coll. sweet peas. 
1. First premium to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for 

bouquet native flowers. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. Andrew Jacobs, Peabody, for zin- 
neas. 



37 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. G. Kaddin, Peabody, for coll. 
rose petunias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Horace Merrill, Peabody, for 
brugraansia. 

.hO. Gratuity to Miss Alice Bartlett, Peabody. for hardy 
asters. 

.70. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for coll. coxcombs. 

.50. Gratuity to J. H.Parker, for LjmnjSalpiglossis. 

.50. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for zinneas. 

.50. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for single petunias. 

•II. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for African mari- 
golds. 

.50. Gratuity to Alva Trask, Beverly, for coll. sweet 
peas. 

.50. Gratuity to Alva Trask, Beverly, for garden an- 
nuals. 

.50. Gratuity to Kate R. Walker, Peabody, for coll. nas- 
turtiums. 
Gratuity to Mrs. Bert Dorr, Peabody for mari- 
golds. 

.50. Second premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, 

for garden bouquets. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for Afri- 
can marigolds. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 

scabiosas. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 

salpiglossis. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 
dianthus. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beve rly, for gar 
den annuals. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for ver 
benas. 

.50. Gratuity to Annie Reynolds, Peabod3% for coll. cox 
combs. 



38 



$1. First premium to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for 
verbenas. 

,50. Gratuity to Mrs. Decatur, Peabod}^ for bouquet 
wild flowers. 

$1. First premium to Dollie M. Farnham, No. Andover, 
for basket native flowers. 
2. First premium to Dollie M. Farnham, No. Andover, 
for collection wild flowers. 

.60. Gratuity to Alice F. Rea, No. Andover, for zin- 
neas. 

$1. First premium to Mary Whipple, Salem, for lark- 
spur. 

.50. Gratuity to Mary Whipple, Salem, for coll. poppies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mary Whipple, Salem, for single dah- 
lias. 

$1. Gratuity to Wm. Armstrong, Peabody, for aura- 
tium. 

.50. Gratuity to John Gilman, Peabody, for tuberous be- 
gonias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Dodge, Salem, for dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity lo Mrs. C. W. Dodge, Salem, for coll. dah- 
lias. 

f 1. Second premium to Mabel Danforth, Peabody, for 
floral design native flowers. 
2. First premium to Mabel Danforth, Peabody, for 

design garden flowers. 
2. First premium to Esther Danforth, Peabody, for 
autumn leaves and native flowers. 

2. First premium to M. L. Danforth, Peabody, for 

American pansies. 
.50. Gratuity to Edith Danforth, Peabody, for basket 

native flowers. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. O. E. Hardy, Peabody, for 

design garden flowers. 
.50. Gratuity to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for zinneas. 



39- 

.50. Gratuity to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for stocks in va- 
riety. 

.50. Gratuity to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for coxcombs. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. F. L. Putnam, Peabody, for coll. 
asters. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. F.L. Putnam, Peabody, for garden 
annuals. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. Rackliffe, Danvers, for nastur- 
tiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Gaffroy,Salera, for bouquet garden 
flowers. 

$1. First premium to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody, 
for basket garden flowers. 
1. First premium to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody, 

for double petunias. 
1. First premium to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody, 

for single petunias. 
1. First premium to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody, 

for cannas. 
1. First premium to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody, 
for bouquet garden flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett & Co., Peabody, for 
coll. pansies. 

$2. First premium to E. F. Dwyer, Lynn, for coll. 
phlox. 
1. First premium to E. F. Dwyer, Lynn, for gladiolas. 
1. First premium to E. F. Dwyer, Lynn, for coll. 
gladiolas. 

.50. Gratuity to Frederick Lamson, Salem, for coll. gar- 
den flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. Rhodes, Peabody, for bouquet 
garden flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to Master Reed, Peabody, for bouquet wild 
flowers. 

fl. First premium to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for 
coxcombs. 



40 

.50. Gratuity to Helen A. Allen, Peabody, for coll. wild 
flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to Lizzie Newhall, Peabody, for asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Lizzie Newhall, Peabody, for asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Lizzie Newhall, Peabody, for asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Mildred Sim, Peabody, for coll. nastur- 
tiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Helen Lee, Peabody, for petunias. 

$1. Gratuity to Margaret Bruine, Peabody, for gera- 
niums. 

.50. Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for petu- 
nias. 

.50. Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for double 
phlox. 

.50. Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for dian- 
thus. 

.50. Gratuitj' to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for pair 
bouquets. 

.50. Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for m-iri- 
golds. 

.50. Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for hardy 
annuals. 

.75. Gratuity to Grace M. Tenny, Peabody, for bouquet 
wild flowers. 

$1. First premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, 
for 12 large dahlias. 
1. First premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, 

for 12 single dahlias. 
1. First premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, 
for 12 pompon dahlias. 

1.50 Gratuity to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 
coll. dahlias. 

1.50 Gratuity to Josepli Basford, Peabody, for coll. 
dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. L. Arvedson, Peabody for 
crocus. 



41 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. L. Arvedson, Peabody, for 
garden flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. L. Arvedson, Peabody, for 
coll. celosia. 

fl. Gratuity to Miss Stickney, Peabody, for 12 gera- 
niums. 

.50. Gratuity to Hazel Farnbam, Peabody, for pair 
bouquets. 

^'l. Gratuity to Elsie Spencer, Peabody, for mari- 
golds. 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Hattie Woodbury, Beverly, for 
basket native flowers. 

12. First premium to Mrs. Hattie Woodbury, Beverly, 
for arrangement of native flowers. 
1. Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pansies. 
1. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for Vic- 
toria asters. 
1. Second premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 
coll. pansies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Harrie, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 

.50. Gratuity to H. A. Briggs, Peabody, for pansies. 

11 . Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 24 verbenas. 
1. First premium to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for cal- 
endulas. 

.50. Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for bouquet 
garden flowers. 

11. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for cox- 
combs. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for 

bouquet of asters. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for 12 
asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for 
verbenas. 



42 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Albert Barker, Peabody, for Afri- 
can marigolds. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss E. F. Trask, Danvers, for gerani- 
ums. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss E. F. Trask, Danvers, for tuberous 

begonias. 
Ettore Tassinari, O. F. Newhall, Sarah B. Herrick — 
Committee. 



VEGETABLES— FIRST CLASS. 

|2. First premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Edmands beets. 
1. Second premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, 

for red onions. 
.50 Gratuity to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Egyptian beets. 
$1. Second premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, 

for Early Rose potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Green Mountain potatoes. 
$2. First premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

purple top turnips. 
1. Second premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, 

for Danvers onions. 
.60. Gratuity to G. A. Perkins, Wenham, for Danvers 

onions. 
$2. First premium to G. A. Perkins, Wenham, for yel- 
low flat onions. 

1. Second premium to G. A. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Edmands beets. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Roberts potatoes. 
1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Queen 
potatoes. 



43 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxforcl, for Hebron 
potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W.K. Cole, Boxford, for Clark's 

No. 1 potatoes. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Maine potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Car- 
man's No. 3 potatoes. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 

Blush potatoes. 
2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 
N. Y. potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Northern potatoes. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for ruta 

baga turnips. 
.50. Gratuity to David M. Little, Peabody, for scarlet 

horn carrot. 
$1. Second premium to H. S. Cole, Boxford, for Early 
Maine potatoes. 
2. First premium to H. S. Cole, Boxford, for Carman's 

No. 3 potatoes. 
1. Second premium to H. S. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 
Blush potatoes. 

1. Second premium to H. S. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 

N. Y. potatoes. 

2. First premium to H. S. Cole, Boxford, for New 

Queen potatoes. 
1. Second premium to H. S. Cole, Boxford, for Early 
Roberts potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to T. McDonald, Danvers, for parsnips. 
.50. Gratuity to T. McDonald', Danvers, for carrots. 
f I. Second premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Dan- 
vers carrots. 
1. Second premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for pars- 
nips. 



44 

$ 2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for mangel- 
wurtzels. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for red onions. 
.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for white onions. 
-f 2, First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Danvers carrots. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

parsnips. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Danvers globe onions. 

1. Gratuity to , Peabody, for Green Moun- 

tain potatoes. 

2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Early 

Rose potatoes. 
1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 
Pearl of Savoy potatoes. 

1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for pur- 

ple top turnips. 

2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for white 

flat turnips. 
.50. Gratuity to Joseph Bushby, Danvers, for French 

onions. 
.50. Gratuity to Joseph Bushby, Danvers, for Banana 

potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to Joseph Bushby, Danvers for 

ruta baga turnips. 

1. Second premium to Joseph Bushby, Danvers, for 

Eclipse beets. 

2. First premium to H. H. & L. E. Buxton, Peabody, 

for Early Northern potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for egg tur 

nips. 
fl. Second premium to E. W. Paul, No. Andover, for 

Hebron potatoes. 
John H. Tennejs E. A. Emerson, D. H. Illsley — Com- 
mittee. 



45 

VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

$2. First premium to W. J. Munroe, Lynnfield, for Es- 
sex sweet corn. 

2. First premium to W. J. Munroe, Lynnfield, for 
sweet corn. 

2. First premium to W. J. Munroe, Lynnfield, for Es- 
sex hybrid squash. 

1. Second premium to Fred Baxter, Methuen for cit- 

ron melon. 

2. First premium to George D. Hooper, Danvers, for 

all seasons cabbage. 
1. Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
cauliflower. 

1. Gratuity to John Gilman, Peabodj', for assorted 

squash. 

2. First premium to John Gilman, Peabody, for turban 

squash. 

1. Second premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Stone 

Mason cabbage. 

2. First premium to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for War- 

ren squash. 
1. Gratuity to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for tree 
tomato. 

.50. Gratuity to Nathan Foster, No. Andover, for blue- 
berries. 

$2. First premium to Geoige Reynolds, Peabodj', for 
Fottler's cabbage. 

1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Victor squash. 

2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Bay State squash. 
2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Marblehead squash. 
1. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Stone 

tomato. 



46 

il. Second premium to James A. King, Peabody, for 
turban squash. 
2. First premium to George B. Austin, Boxford, for 

red cabbage. 
1. Gratuity to Joseph Bushby, Danvers, for Hubbard 
squash. 

1. Second premium to W. H. Anderson, Boxford, for 

cranberries. 

2. First premium to Charles P. Vaughn, Peabody, for 

celery. 

2. First premium to Benj. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 
Victor squash. 

2. First premium to Benj. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 
Drumhead cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity to Benj. P. Danforth, Peabody, for Victor 

squash. 
$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Fot- 
tler's cabbage. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Savoy 
cabbage. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cauli- 
flower. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cran- 
berries. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Butman 
squash. 

1. Gratuity to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for tomatoes. 

1. Second premium to C. W. Paul, No. Andover, for 

Hybrid squash. 

2. First premium to C. W. Paul, No. Andover, for 

Stone tomatoes. 
1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

tomatoes. 
1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Bay State squash. 



47 

$2. First premium to George A. Perkins, Wenham, for 
turban squash. 
1. Gratuity to George A. Perkins, Wenham, for red 

cabbage. 
1. Second premium to George A. Perkins, Wenham, 
for all seasons cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity to Peter Cotter, Salem, for Brunswick 

cabbage. 
$2. First premium to George B. Austin, Boxford, for 

Marrow squash. 
.50. Gratuity to Alonzo W. Tyler, Peabody, for Golden 
Queen tomatoes. 
Frederick A. Russell, Winfield S. Hughes, J. Henry 
Nason. — Committee. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

$2. First premium to Fred Baxter, Methuen, for 25 ears 

red pop corn. 
4. First premium to Hiram A. Stiles, Middleton, for 

25 ears field corn. 
1. First premium to Hiram A. Stiles, Middleton, for 

peck white beans. 
3. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 25 

ears field corn. 

1. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for peck 

shelled corn. 

2. Third premium to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for 

25 ears field corn. 
Wilbur J. Munroe, John J. Manning, Henry Stone 
— Committee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

12. First premium to Mrs. Fred George, Danvers, for 
Mexican work. 



48 

^1. Second premium to Mrs. C. H. Buckley, Salem, for 

crocheted quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss Annie Vaughn, Middleton, for 

crocheted quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Clara Allen, Peabody, for silk 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. M. Phelps, Peabody, for knit 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to H. P. Lord, Salem, for silk puff. 
.75. Gratuity to Mary J. Cleary, Salem, for knit quilt. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. Etta Lamont, Beverly, for out- 
line quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Etta Lamont, Beverly, for patch 

quilt. 
.75, Gratuity to Mrs. A. Dearborn, Salem, for patch 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. M. Wood, Lawrence, for silk 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. M. Wood, Lawrence, for patch 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Lydia Foster, Danvers, for patch 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. M. Foye, Peabody, for wool quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Ann Driney, Salem, for silk quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to L. A. Frost, Salem, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. D. Gray, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
-.75. Gratuity to Dolly Hammond, Danvers, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. P. Wilson, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. P. Wilson, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
-.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. M. Speare, Beverly, for patch 

quilt. 



49 

$ 1. Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Keyser, Salem, for afghan. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. F. H. Chadbourn, Salem, for af- 
ghan. 
Mrs. Alice O. Poor, Mrs. M. Emily Lee, Mrs. Mary E. 
Bodge — Committee. 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

$2. First premium to Annie Raddin, Peabody, for 
drawn rug. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. H. Rhodes, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Elizabeth Grant, Peabody, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. F. Stacey, Salem, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Flora Chatterton, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Flora Chatterton, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. G. Homer, Peabody, for carpet 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Alfred N. Speare, Beverly, for 

drawn rug. 

2. First premium to Mrs. W. S. Nason, Rockport, for 

lambs tongue rug. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. G. B. Courtis, Swampscott, 

for button rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. H. Woodman, Salem, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Belle Robson, Salem, for drawn 

rug. 
50. Gratuity to Peter Reed, Dan vers, for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Stephen Woodworth, Beverly, for 

drawn rug. 



50 

$.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Stephen Woodworth, Beverly, 
for drawn rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. E. Woodman, Essex, for drawn 
rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. E. Woodman, Essex, for drawn 
rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. L. Messenger, Marblehead, for 
drawn rug. 

.75. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for knit 
rug. 

2. First premium to Mrs. J. H. Hubbard, Salem, for 

braided rug. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, 
for braided rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for braided 
rug. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. H. N. Goodwin, Salem, for braid- 
ed rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. N. Goodwin, Salem, for braid- 
ed rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. R. Little, Salem, for drawn rug. 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. J. A. Trask, Salem, for drawn rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. K. A. Wilson, Salem, for drawn 
rug. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. George Knight, Danvers, for silk 
rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. Peters, Salem, for silk rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. William Donnell, Peabody, for 
braided rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Smith, Salem, for drawn 
rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Arthur Proctor,Peabody,for braided rug. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. F. Cassino, Peabody, for braid- 
ed rug. 
Miss Mary F. Herrick, Mrs. A. Josephine Webster, Mrs. 
J. L. Cain. — Committee. 



51 

LEATHER AND ARTICLES MANUFACTURED 

FROM SAME. 

Diploma to the A. C. Lawrence Leather Co., Peabody, for 
exhibit of patent leather, colored sheep and fan- 
cy leathers. 

Diploma to the National Calfskin Co., Peabody, for ex- 
hibit of chrome calf, ooze calf, fancy colors, luxe 
leather, &c. 

Diploma to B. N. Moore & Son, Peabody, for exhibit of 
colored goat book leather, fancy colors. 

Diploma to James Barry, Peabody, for exhibit of book 
leather, colored goat and fancy leathers. 

Diploma to Cass & Daley, Salem, for exhibit of shoes. 
13. First premium to T. F. Hutchinson, Peabody, for 
heavy harnesses. 
2. Gratuity to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for exhibit of 

shoes and rubbers. 
Thomas Carroll, Henry Hilliard, S. F. Kittredge— Cow- 

mittee. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MDSE. 

.f2. Gratuity to John Baker, Manchester, for horse 

lawn shoe. 
.50. Gratuity to B. F. Patch, Wenham, for merry go 

round. 
.25. Gratuity to Arthur G. Gray, Peabody, for parchesi 
board. 
1. Gratuity to George S. Curtis, Lynn, for moths and 

butterflies. 
1. Gratuity to F. G. Bannister, Salem, for barque. 
.50. Gratuity to Warren H. Butler,Danvers,for schooner. 
Thomas Carroll, Henry Hilliard, S. F. Kittredge— Cow- 
mittee. 



52 

FANCY WORK. 

$.50. Gratuity to Miss Belle Dodge, Beverly, for raffia 
baskets. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Belle Dodge, Beverly, for hats. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Belle Dodge, Beverly, for bead 
belt and chain. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Herman Randall, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Bertha M. Bennett, Lynn, for 3 
sofa tops. 

.75. Gratuity to Frank R. Gorham, Peabody, for 2 raf- 
fia hats. 

.60. Gratuity to Mary E. McCarthy, Lynn, for table 
cover. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Stephen Woodworth, Peabody, 
for woven stockings. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Lucy A. Prescott, No. Andover, 
for table cover. 

.75. Gratuity to Lizzie Foote, Salem, for pillow cases. 

.50. Gratuity to N. L. Owen, Beverly, for sofa pillow. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. E. L. Austin, Salem, for embroid- 
ered collars. 

.75. Gratuity to Miss Maggie Gormly, Salem, for em. 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Bertha M. Hunt, Lynn, for lace jacket. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Jennie Bell, Salem, for Batten- 
burg collar. 

50. Gratuity to Mrs. Elmer P. Davis, Lynn, for sofa pil- 
low. 

50. Gratuity to Mrs. James Sherry, Peabody, for cro- 
cheted shawl. 

.50. Gratuity to Bertha Johnson, Peabod}', for knit edg- 
ing. 

.50. Gratuity to Annie Low, Peabody, for emb. collar 
and cuffs. 



53 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Sarah P. Bassett, Salem, for cro- 
cheted tidy. 

.50. Gratuity to Mary Flynn, Peabody, for sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss A. Matthews, Andover, for cen. 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. O. Bushby, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Raddin, Peabody, for 
handkerchiefs. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. Andrew Fitz, Salem, for center- 

piece. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. T. D. Raymond, Beverly, for cen- 

terpiece. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. Messenger, Marblehead, for 

pillow cases. 
.60. Gratuity to Mrs.Gonsalars, Ipswich, for centerpiece. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. J. F. CoUester, Salem, for Honi- 

ton lace centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. P. Woodbury, Beverly, for 

emb. centerpiece. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Peabody, for 

baby's sweater. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. Warren F. Putnam, Salem, for 

original work. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Warren F. Putnam, Salem, for 

dolls. 
50. Gratuity to Mrs. Sarah B. Whipple, Peabody, for 

raffia hat. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Margaret Doyle, Peabody, for 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity to L. M. Sanderson, Peabody, for shirt 

and pillow case. 

2. Gratuity to L. M. Sanderson, Peabody, for lace 

pocket. 
50. Gratuity to L. M. Sanderson, Peabody, forchocheted 
shawl. 



54 

1.75. Gratuity to Mabel Bullard, Danvers, for Mexican 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Eliza M. Besse, Peabody, for 

doily. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Lucy Quiraby, Wenham, for col- 
lars. 
1.50. Gratuity to Miss Nason, Salem, for centerpiece. 
1.50. Gratuity to Miss Abbott, Lynn, for pen and ink 

work. 
.50. Gratuity to Flora Chatterton, Peabody, for 2 pairs 

mittens. 
1.50. Gratuity to Susie Baker, Ipswich, for side board 

scarf. 
.50. Gratuity to Elsie Cameron, Beverly, for basket. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss Thacher, Peabody, for pointed 

lace. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Hartwell, Beverly, for 

aprons. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. William Sillars, Danvers, for sofa 

pillows. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. R. M. Dickinson, Danvers, for 

handkerchief. 
.50. Gratuity to Marion Cole, Peabody, for basket. 
.50. Gratuity to Mildred Nason, Salem, for basket. 
.50. Gratuity to Grace Woodbury, Salem, for basket. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Helen Ober, Beverly, for reed 

basket. 
Mrs. D. B. Lord, Mrs. A. B. Fellows — Committee, 



OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

$1. Gratuity to A. A. Cole, Marblehead, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Margeret Kinnear, Salem, for picture 

frame. 
1. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil painting. 



55 

$2. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil painting. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. John Eaton, Salem, for water color. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. John Eaton, Salera, for oil painting. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. Edna Stillman, Salem, for water 

color. 
2. Gratuity to Kate Abbott, Lynn, for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for water 

color. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for water 

color. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for water 

color. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for water 

color. 

1. Gratuity to Willie F. Knight, Saugus, for map. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. R. M. Lord, Salem, for water color. 
2. Gratuity to Mrs. R. M. Lord, Salem, for water color. 
2. Gratuity to Mrs. R. M. Lord, Salem, for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to Annie Dickey, Danvers, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Susie O. Poor, Peabody, for oil 

painting. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Trask, Peabody, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Trask, Peabod}'-, for water color. 

1. Gratuity to Miss Trask, Peabody, for water color. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn, for oil paint- 

ing. 
2. Gratuity to Mrs. C. F. Goodrich, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 
2. Gratuity to Mrs. C. F. Goodrich, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. Thomas Stafford, Rockport, for oil 

painting. 
1. Gratuity to Lillian Whipple, Salem, for water color. 
E. Rose Plaisted, Mrs. M. A. Pingree, Mrs. Belle D. 
Hodgkins — Committee. 



56 

DECORATED CHINA. 

$5. First premium to Mrs. C. W. Dennis, Lynn, for col- 
lection. 
3. Second premium to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for 
collection. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for 

jug- 
3. First premium to Miss Lucy B. Hood, Salem, for in- 
dividual specimen. 

2. First premium to Miss Lucy B. Hood, Salem, for jar- 

dinere. 

1. Second premium to Miss Lucy B. Hood, Salem, for 

vase. 

2. Second premium to Mrs. C. H. Cash, Lynn, for indi- 

vidual specimen. 

2. First premium to Mrs. C. H. Cash, Lynn, for punch 
bowl. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. Frank E. Lummus, Pea- 
body, for punch bowl. 

1. First premium to Mrs. Frank E. Lummus, Peabody, 

for panels. 

2. First premium to Miss Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, 

for vase. 
2. First premium to Miss Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, 

for raised paste. 
2. Second premium to Mrs. George Mason, Peabody, 

for raised paste. 
1. First premium to Mrs. George Mason, Peabody, for 

nut dish. 
1. First premium to Margaret Kinnear, Salem, for hat 

and belt pin. 
Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Mrs. John 
Moulton — Committee. 



57 

CHARCOAL PHOTOGRAPHS AND PEN AND INK 

WORK. 

$1. Gratuity to Miss Lucy B. Hood, Salem, for burnt 
wood. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. Roger Buxton, Peabody, for pen 
and ink work. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. Roger Buxton, Peabody, for burnt 

wood. 

2. Gratuity to Walter Stiles, Middle ton, for plaster work. 
1. Gratuity to Willie Knight, Saugus, for glove box. 

1. Gratuity to Willie Knight, Saugus, for burnt wood. 

1. Gratuity to Carrie F. Lucas, Salem, for coll. of photos. 

1. Gratuity to Theresa Kelly, Salem, for charcoal work. 

1. Gratuity to W. F. Gerry, Lynnfield, for mechanical 

drawing. 

2. Gratuity to Sarah W. Symonds, Salem, for sculpture. 
2. Gratuity to Sarah W. Symonds, Salem, for sculpture. 
2. Gratuit}' to Annie B. Newman, Gloucester, for panel 

sketches. 
2. Gratuity to Annie B. Newman, Gloucester, for panel 

sketches. 
1. Gratuity to D. C. Fitz, Salem, for pen and ink work. 
1. Gratuity to J. J. Pitts, Beverly, for charcoal work. 

Mrs. Belle D. Hodgkins, Mrs. Olivia K. Anderson — 
Committee. 



WORK BY CHH^DREN. 

$2. First premium to Mildred Bettenger, Peabody, for 

3 doilies. 
1. Second premium to Louise Montgomery, Peabody, 

for doll's outfit, sewing. 
.60. Gratuity to Theresa Burreby, Peabody, for holly 

doily. 
.50. Gratuity to Helen G. Lee, Peabody, for doily. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary Mulcahy, Peabody, for sofa pillow. 



58 

.50. Gratuity to Mary Sweeney, Peabody, for covered 

chair and crash. 
.50. Gratuity to Inez Townsend, Lynn, for collar. 
.25. Gratuity to Robert Townsend, Lynn, for collar. 

.25. Gratuity to Amy F. Hardy, Peabody, for doll's shoes 
and pillow. 

.35. Gratuity to Margaret O'Connor, Peabody, for em- 
broidered pillow. 

.20. Gratuity to Katherine Meade, Peabody, for sampler. 

.25. Gratuity to Helen Kimball, Peabody, for tray cloth 
and mat. 

.25. Gratuity to Joseph Berry, Peabody, for tray cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Cyrus Tenney, Peabody, for sofa pillow. 

.25. Gratuity to Francis Tenney, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.25. Gratuity to Susie O'Connor, Peabody, for embroid- 
ered sofa pillow. 

.25. Gratuity to Lizzie Keenan, Peabody, for sofa pillow 
cover. 

.25. Gratuity to Marion Beckett, Peabody, for doily. 

.25. Gratuity to Hannah Harrigan, Peabody, for sampler. 

.25. Gratuity to Josephine Kennedy, Lynn, for bureau 
scarf. 

.25. Gratuity to Marion McBride, Peabody, for table 
cover. 

.25. Gratuity to Genevieve R. Knapp, Peabody, for bead 
chain. 

.25. Gratuity to Bertha Foye, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Mrs. N. J. Warren, Mrs. J. W. 

Perkins — Committee. 



SMALL FRUITS. 

The committee on small fruits submit the following re- 
port. There was but one entry, that of George A. Rea, of 
North Andover, for a crop of strawberries which were very 



59 

fine, and all things considered one of the best crops they 
ever saw. The berries were large size, ver}'' even in color, 
on strong healthy vines, and we award hira the first pre- 
mium of $7. 

STATEMENT OF GEORGE A. REA. 

The piece of land entered for premium contains twenty- 
nine square rods. In 1902 it produced a large crop of 
strawberries. As soon as the crop was off a heavy dress- 
ing of manure was plowed under and the land planted to 
fodder corn yielding a fine crop. In the spring of 1903, 
another dressing of manure was put on and the land set to 
strawberry plants, varieties, Sample and Tennessee. The 
cost of setting plants and care of them, exact account not 
being kept, was about .... $25 00 

Picking and marketing, .... 56 25 



Total cost, $81 25 

Received for berries, . . . . . 132 50 



Profit, $51 25 

George A. Re a. 
John M. Danforth, Winfield S. Hughes — Committee. 



REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have been fourteen new members added to the 
society since the last annual report, thirteen of whom be- 
came members by receiving premiums of seven dollars and 
upwards, according to the rules of the society, from differ- 
ent cities and towns as follows : — 

Beverly 2 Peabody 6 

Dan vers 1 Salem I 

Hamilton 1 Topsfield 1 

No. Andover , 2 



6o 

INSTITUTES. 

The society held three Institutes the past year, on as 
many different days, both forenoon and afternoon, at 
which the following subjects were discussed by any of the 
audience who desired. 

The first Institute was held at Haverhill, Jan. 15th, the 
subject for the forenoon being, " Doing one's best, as ap- 
plied to Dairying." "Clean Milk." Afternoon, "Agri- 
cultural Education." " Farm Homes." By P. M. 
Harwood, Gen. Agent of the Dairy Bureau. 

The second Institute was held at Beverly, Feb. 5th. 
Subject for the forenoon, "Market Gardening," "Small 
Fruits and Vegetables." Afternoon, " Growing and Ex- 
hibiting Vegetables." By H. R. Kinney of Worcester. 

The third Institute was held at Newbury, Feb. 19th. 
Subject for the forenoon, "Mixed Farming, Its advan- 
tages." Afternoon, " Patron's Fire Insurance, How it 
benefits the Farmer." By C. D. Richardson of West 
Brookfield. 



REPORT OF THE STATE INSPECTOR FOR THE 

FAIR OF 1904. 

Worcester, Mass., Nov. 25, 1904. 

The fair of the Essex Agricultural Society, was held at 
Peabody, September 20, 21 and 22, 1904. I had the 
pleasure of inspecting this fair. It was held along some- 
what different lines than most agricultural fairs, in the 
fact that there was no horse trotting. The exhibit of 
cattle was good, but a very small showing in other lines of 
domestic animals. The display of fruit, flowers and fancy 
articles was held at the town hall and it was one of the 
best I have ever seen. The exhibition of fancy leathers, 
one of the leading industries of the town, was considered 



6i 

by many as the finest ever held in this country. One at- 
tractive feature of the fair was hurdle jumping. Although 
not quite so free from objectionable features as it might 
have been, the fair as a whole was a credit to the man- 
agement. 

Respectfully submitted, 
(Signed) W. C. Jewett, Inspector. 



62 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Andrews, Randall, Lynn. Longfellow, Horace F., New- 
Appleton, Daniel F., Ipswich. bury. 
Breed, Henry H., Lynn. Mayo, Israel C, Gloucester. 
Butler, O. S., Georgetown. Mason, Alphonso, Topsfield. 
Burnham, D. B., Essex. Moody, Nathl. W., Newbury. 

Clark, William P., Peabody. Mudge, Augustus, Danvers. 
Dodge, Emerson P., Hamil- Moulton, Joseph, Newbury- 

ton. port. 

Farnsworth, J. H.,Haverhill. Newman, Sidney F., New- 
Friend, Daniel W., Manches- bury. 

ter. Nichols, Otis, Lynn. 

Farnham, J. L.,No.Andover. Noyes, Moses K., Newbury. 
Harnden, Henry C, Lynn. Noyes, Isaac P.. Newbury- 
Haskell, George, Essex. port. 
Haskell, William H., Merri- Pike, John, Rowley. 

mac. Porter, John W., Danvers. 

Hathaway, Amos, Marble- Proctor, Joseph O., Glouces- 

head. ter. 

Herrick, H. G., Lawrence. Proctor, William F., Glou- 
Hood, Gilbert E., Lawrence. cester. 

Illsley, Joseph, Newbury. Roberts, Joshua, Gloucester. 
Ingalls, James W., Lynn. Sargent, George W., Merri- 
Knights, George W., New- mac. 

buryport. Smith, William H., Rockport. 

Knowles, Thomas J., Glou- Teel, James M., Lynn. 

cester. Toomey, Matthew, Newbury. 

Lane, Andrew, Gloucester. Webster, Richard, HaverhilL 
Lovett, John H., Gloucester. 
Little, John G., Newbury- 

port. 



RECAPITULATION. 



rde 


d for Fat Cattle, 


$ 12 00 






Bulls, 


55 00 






Milch Cows, 


54 00 






Herds of Milch Cows, 


8 00 






Heifers, 


71 00 






Working Oxen, 


12 00 






Steers, 


9 00 






Horses, 


106 00 






Swine, 


44 00 






Sheep and Goats, 


5 00 






Poultry, 


223 00 



1599 00 



FIELD AND EXPERIMENTAL CROPS. 



Awarded for Strawberry crop, 



17 00 



FARM AND GRAIN CROPS. 



Awarded for Grain and Seed, 


i 13 00 


" " Vegetables, 


122 00 


'* Fruits, 


125 00 


" " Plants and Flowers, 


126 25 



IS86 25 



64 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

Awarded for Bread and Canned Fruit, $26 00 
Honey, 2 00 

Counterpanes and Afghans, 17 75 
Carpetings and Rugs, 28 00 

Articles Manuf. from leather, 5 00 
Manufrs. and Gen. Mdse., 5 25 
Fancy Work, 38 00 

Works of Art, 84 00 

Children's Work, 9 85 



(( 



(( 



u 



MISCELLANEOUS. 




warded for Granges, 


$25 00 


" " Agricultural Implements, 


37 00 


" " Carriages, 


20 00 



$210 85 



182 00 



The amount of $1285.10 was awarded to 459 individuals 
and firms in 28 different cities and towns as follows . — 



Amesbury, 


$ 21 


00 


Manchester, 


$ 2 00 


Andover, 


36 


00 


Marblehead, 


7 75 


Beverly, 


93 


25 


Methuen, 


7 00 


Boxford, 


99 


50 


Middleton, 


12 75 


Danvers, 


142 


25 


Newbury, 


6 50 


Essex, 


1 


00 


No. Andover, 


141 00 


Gloucester, 


4 


00 


Peabody, 


432 10 


Groveland, 




50 


Rockport, 


3 00 


Hamilton, 


17 


00 


Rowley, 


8 00 


Haverhill, 


15 


00 


Salem, 


105 75 


Ipswich, 


9 


50 


Saugus, 


8 50 


Lawrence, 


1 


50 


Swampscott, 


1 00 


Lynn, 


50 


25 


Topsfield, 


20 00 


Lynnfield, 


27 


00 


Wenham, 


26 00 



65 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Receipts from admission to Hall and Grounds, 
Receipts from Grounds for various purposes, 
Receipts from dinner tickets, 
Receipts from Grand stand, 
Receipts from Hall, 



$2778 39 


502 


50 


124 


00 


58 


40 


8 


00 



$3471 29 



66 



05 



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of 

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CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOQETY. 



Article 1. There shall be a President, four Vice Pres- 
idents, a Secretary, and a Treasurer, who shall be Trus- 
tees, ex-officio, and one Trustee from each city and town 
in the county. The President, Vice Presidents, Secretary 
and one Trustee from each city and town in the county 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer, by the Trustees annually at their meeting in 
November. Nomination for Trustees may be made by 
any member or members of the Society from the city or 
town from which he is to be elected for at least one week 
before said meeting to the Secretary, and he shall prepare 
ballots for the same. 

Art. 2. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the So- 
ciety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at 
which all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at 
least shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the Trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Presidents shall be absent, 
the members present may appoint one from among them 
to preside at such meeting. 

Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting of the Society ; or whenever a 
written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 



68 

shall be made by any twelve members of the Society to 
the President and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon ; seven of whom, with the presiding officer, shall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society during the intervals of its meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the public, 
publish such communications and offer such premiums in 
such form andvalue as they think proper (provided the pre- 
miums offered do not exceed the funds of the Society); and 
shall lay before the Society at each of its meetings a 
statement of their proceedings and of the communications 
made to them. 

Art. 7. The Secretary shall take minutes of all the 
votes and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books ; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustee shall direct. He 
shall write and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which shall be lodged with the Secretary, who shall make 
a fair record thereof. The Treasurer shall from time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have orders for from 
the Trustees ; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, render a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of his duty in such 
sum as the trustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 

Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed annually by 
the trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 



69 

report to the Society ; and the same being accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretary in his books. 

Art. 10. In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary or of the 
Treasurer, the Trustees shall take charge of the official 
books, papers, and other effects belonging to the office 
that may be vacated, and give receipts for the same, which 
books, papers, etc., they may deliver to some person 
whom they may appoint to fill the office until the next 
meeting of the Society, at which time there shall be a new 
choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society by paying the sum of three dol- 
lars to increase the permanent fund of the institution. 

Art. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture 
of our county, the same to be sacredly appropriated to 
that purpose. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the gospel who 
reside within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past Presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a mem- 
ber at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the ac- 
tion at the next annual meeting of the Society. 



•Members will receive from the Secretary a " certificate of membership." No 
fines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are entitled to vote in all its 
transactions, with free use of the Library and a copy of the printed '• Transac- 
tions " each year. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

For J904-J905. 



PRESIDENT. 

FREDERICK A. RUSSELL, of Methuen. 



VICE PRESIDENTS. 

JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
SHERMAN NELSON, of Georgetown. 
IRA J. WEBSTER, of Haverhill. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER. 

WILLIAM S. NICHOLS, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

BENJAMIN p. WARE, of Marblehead. 
GEORGE V. L. MEYER, of Hamilton. 
FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



71 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TRUSTEES. 



John J. Mason, Araesbury George W. Hoyt, Merrimac 
George L. Averill, Andover John W. Shirley, Methuen 
John W. Lovett, Beverly Geo. A. Currier, Middleton 
Henry M. Killam, Boxford Chas. T. Lovering, Nahant 
Charles H. Preston, Danvers Frank Perkins, Newbury 
Elias Andrews, Essex Rufus Adams, Newburyport 

Samuel T. Poor, Georgetown Winfield S. Hughes, No. An- 
Geo. M. Wonson, Gloucester dover 
Sam'l B. George, Groveland N. M. Quint, Pea})ody 
Isaac F. Knowlton, Hamilton John J. Manning, Rockport 
Albert Emerson, Haverhill Frank Todd, Rowley 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich Charles Sanders, Salem 
S. S. Lewis, Lawrence George A. Dow, Salisbury 

Edwin Bates, Lynn Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott 
John H. Cheever, Manches- Charles J. Peabody,Topsfield 

ter J. Kavanagh, Wenham 

Amos P. Alley, Marblehead J. R. Gordon, West Newbury 



Members of Essex Agricultural Society. 



DECEMBER, 1904. 



Previous printed list was in 1902. If any errors are dis- 
covered in the following list, please report them to the Secre- 
tary. Trustees are requested to report deaths of members as 
soon as they occur, when convenient. 



Cammet, Samuel 
Chesley, M. B. 
Davis, B. Lewis 
Feltch, Eldridge S. 
Gale, Edmund 
Goodwin, E. A. 
Hill, Albert C. 



AMESBURY— 19. 

Hollander,Lambert Sargent M. Perry 

Huntington, B. F. Tuibury, R. E. 

Little, J. P. Tibbett8,WilliamB. 

Lane, T. W. True, Eben 

Mason, John J. Vining, William F. 

Morrill, George T. Wollard, R. E. 



Abbott, James J. 
Andrews, M. C. 
Averill, George L. 
Bailey, Moses A. 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Blunt, Charles C. 
Blunt, Joseph H. 
Buchan, George 
Buchan, George W. 
Burnham, George L. 
Carter, Charles L. 
Cheever, James 0. 
Johnson, Francis H. 



ANDOVER— 38. 

McLawlin, Henry 
Moor, J. Warren 
Cole, John N. 
Downing,Mrs. J. J. 
Eames, Plato 
Flint, John H. 
Foster, George W. 
Foster, George C. 
Foster, F. H. 
Gould, Milo H. 
HaywoodjHenry A. 
Ripley, George 
Holt, E. F. 



Holt, Ballard 
Jenkins, John B. 
Jenkins, E. Kendall 
Noyes, Henry P. 
Poor, Joseph W. 
Playdon, Alfred G. 
Smith, John L. 
Smith, Peter D. 
Smith, Benjamin F. 
Smith, Joseph W. 
Thayer, Samuel 
Tucker, William 



73 



Abbott, Stephen A. 

Addison, G. A. 

Andrews, Joseph F. 

Appleton, Nathan D. 

Appleton, Edw. H. 

Bancroft, Robert H. 

Burnham, 0. B. 
-f- Carter, John W. 

Caldwell, Charles E. 

Caswell, 0. 

Chamberlain, M. L. 

Clark, George 

Clark, Arthur E. 
-f^ Clark, Aug. K ^ 

Clark, Peter E. 

Cochrane, Alex'r 

Cramprey, Carrie Mrs. 

Curtis, John S. 

Dalton, Charles H. 
f-Danforth, E. F. 

Davenport, A. H. 
-/-Dexter, Gordon 

Dexter, Philip 

Dodge, Andrew 

Dodge, Benjamin B. 

Dodge, Fred A. 

Dodge, Joshua S. 

Dodge, Forest C. 

Dodge, Lucius F. 

Dodge, Walter F. 
-fEUiott, John T. 



BEVERLY— 94. 

Endicott, Robert R. 
Foster, Isaacher, jr. 
Foster, William B. 
Giles, Benj. V. 
Gardner, John L. 
Heaton, Robert C. 
Head, Charles 
Hill, Hugh 
Holden, Fred W. 
Holden, Loren 
Howse, Thomas W. 
Lee, Asa F. 
Larcom, Rufus 
■Lawrence, C. A. 
Loring, Augustus P 
Loring, Wm. Caleb 
Lothrop, Elmer A. 
Lovett, Francis S. 
Lovett, John W. 
Mason, Alfred A. 
Mason, George 
Mason, Charles A. 
Masters, James A. 
Mayo, Josiah 
McKean, Henry P. 
Mitchell, John E. 
Morgan, William C. 
Morse, John T. 
Moulton, Charles 
Munsey, John G. 
Murney, John M. 
Nichols, S. W. 



Norwood, Francis 
Obear, Ezekiel F.-A 
Peabody, F. H. 
Perry Albert — -/ 
Phillips, J. C. Mrs. 
Pickett, Charles 
Pierson, C. L. 
Pickman, D. L. 
Pope, Jasper 
Porter, Adoniram -~) 
Preston, Ezra 
Raymond, John W,"— r 
Sawyer, E. C. 
Schurman, Isaac 
.Seabury, Frank 
Sohier, Wm. D. 
Stone, Samuel H. 
Swasey, E. — j- 

Trask, J. G. --A 
Trafton, Darling F. 
Trask, E. F. 
Trask, Joseph W. 
Vittum, Albert 
Wallis, Joseph A. 
Webb, Alden 
Williams, Augustus 
Whitcomb, Austin 
Woodbury, L., jr. 
Woodbury, H. W. 
Woodbury, Rufus —j- 
Woodbury, D., 2d 



BOXFORD— 19. 



Anderson, Charles R. Chadwick, Walter I. Parkhurst^ John W. 
Anderson, David A. Cole, Wm. Kimball Pearl, Edw. E. 



74 



Austin, George B. Day, Isaac C. 
Chadwick, Geo. W. Killam, H. M. 
Chadwick, James W. Nason, James H. 
Chadwick, Walter I. Parkhurst, John 



Pearl, John M. 
Perley, Charles 
Wood, John T. 
Webster, James H 



Amend, Eobert A. 
Barton, J. Webb 
Batchelder, J. Q. A. 
Berry, Allen A. 
Bordeaux, L. 
Bradstreet, Alvah J. 
Bradstreet, Elijah 
Bradstreet, William 
Carlton, 0. Loring 
Carlton, Wm. B. 
Carlton, Wm. B., jr. 
Christopher, Wm. P. 
Clark, N. J. 
Colcord, J. H. J. 
Day, Clarence 
Dempsey, L. P. 
Doane, M. P. 
Dodge, Francis 
Eaton, Winslow W. 
Endicott, Wm. C. 
Evans, Sam'l A. Jr. 
Fellows, Alfred 
Fisher, Franklin W. 
Fuller, Solomon 
Hood, Joseph E. 
Hayes, Charles A. 
Hutchinson, W. P. 



Pillsbury, H. H. 
Porter, J. Frank 
Preston, Charles H, 
Putnam, Otis F. 



DANVEKS— 81. 

Jacobs, Wm. A. 
Jackson, Eben 
Jones, L. H. 
Kerns, E. C. 
Kimball, Francis O.Pratt, George 
Kimball, Joel Pope, Daniel P. 

Learoyd, A. P. Proctor, Nathan P. 
Legro, John C. P. Richardson, James 
Lyfotd, Francis W.Roberts, Edmund C. 
Marston, Jacob Roberts, John F. 
Morrison, L. L. Roberts, Oliver 
Nichols, Andrew Rollins, Jonas 
Newhall, Benj. E. Rice, Chas. B. 
Newhall, Henry Sawyer, Samuel L. 
O'Neal, T. H. Schurman, Isaac 

Page, Charles W. Sears, John A. 
Patch, Abraham Swinerton, John 
Peabody, George H.Tapley, Gilbert A. 
Peabody, George A.Trask, Joseph W. 
Perley, Dean A. Verry, Augustus 
Perley, Edward P. Verry, H. Otis 
Perry, James 0. Verry, Henry 
Perkins, Warren G. Weston, Mrs. L. P. 
Perkins, William P.White, Henry A. 
Perkins, M. SumnerWoodman, Edw. E. 
Pettingill, David A.Whipple, John F. 
Pettingill, M. C. Whitman, F. A. 



Andrews, Elias 
Andrews, Herbert 
Burnhani, Wash. 
Choate, Rufus 



75 

ESSEX— 10. 

Cogswell,Charles B. Low, Herbert 
Haskell, David L. Low, Josiah 
Lee, Edward K. Lufkin, A. E. 



GEORGETOWN— 22 



Bateman, A. P. 
Boardman, Moses N. 
Curtis, Samuel K. 
Hilliard, Henry 
Hoyt, Martin L. 
Jackson, John L. 
James, George B. 
Marble, Nathaniel 



Nelson, Sherman Tenney, Gorham D. 
Osgood, Stephen Tenney, Milton S. 
Perley, David E. Tenney, Orlando B. 
Perkins, Edwin P. Towne, Alfred E. 
Pillsbury, J. Weston, George S. 

Poor, Samuel T. Whitham, Chas. M. 
Spofford, Sumner P.Yeaton, Winfred J. 



Babson, Horatio 
Babson, Osman 
Barrett, Charles P. 
Bennett, Charles 
Brown, Edward H. 
Burnham, A. M. 
Burnham, S. A. 
Cole, Israel H. 
Conant, Thomas 
Cook, Benjamin F. 
Corliss, John 
Cronin, John 
Curtis, Samuel, Jr. 
Dolliver, John S. 
Fears, Robert R. 
Ferguson, Thos. B. 



GLOUCESTER— 47 

Garland, Joseph 
Griffin, Bennett 
Grover, Charles E. 
Haskell, H. C. L. 
Haskell,WilliamH. 
Haskell, Sidney F. 
Hawkes, E. C. 
HerrickjGarduerW, 
Low, David W. 
Marr, Chester, jr. 
Parsons, W. Frank 
Patillo, Alexander 
Pew, William A. 
Phillips, N. H. 
Presson, David S. 
Presson, Alfred 



Price, Augustus E. 
Ricker, Richard W. 
Rogers, Allan 
Rogers, John S. 
Rust, William P. 
Shepherd, Joseph C. 
Somes, John E. 
.Stan wood, Barnard 
Story, Cyrus 
Webster, Nathaniel 
Wetherell, M. L. 
Wilson, John J. 
Wonson, F. G. 
Wonson, George M. 
Wonson, J. W. 



76 



Balch, Charles T. 
Balch, Thomas H. 
Batchelder, Chas. C. 
Day, Eandall B. 
Fegan, Henry C, 
George, Edwin B. 
George, Edwin H. 
George, Samuel B. 



GROVEL AND— 24. 

Harrington,EdwardMartino, Philip H» 
Harriman, Moses H.Pemberton L. K. 
Harriman, Abel S. Rowe, D. T. 
Hopkinson, W, H. Spofford, Henry H. 
Kennett, Henry K. Stacy, Edward M. 
Ladd, Nathaniel E.Stickney, Abel 
Longfellow, N. Tenney, George H» 
Merrill Henry Woodbury, Louis A 



Agassiz, R. L. 
Cummings, A. C. 
Dodge, Albert W. 
Dodge, George R. 
Gardner, A. P, 
Garland, James A. 



HAMILTON— 18. 



Gibney, George H. Norwood, C. J. 
Gwinn, Charles S. Potter, A. E. 
Knowlton,Franklin Safford, Daniel E. 
Knowlton, Isaac F. Smith, Alvin 
Lovett, E. D. Underbill, J. C. 

jr. Meyer, George v.L. Whipple, Em. E. 



Barnes, B. Frank 
Barnes, Chas. W. 
Barry, J. M. 
Bean, John A. 
Brown, Leander F. 
Butters, Charles 
Butrick, A. W. 
Cheever, H. W. 
Cogswell, Doane 
Dewhurst, James 
Day, John C. 
Emerson, Albert 
Emerson, Charles B. 
Emerson, E. A. 
Fellows, C. H. 



HAVERHILL— 75. 

Hopkinson, Sam.W.Quinby, T. W. 
Hoyt, H. H. Richards, F. G. 

Howe, James Ridgeway, Jos. 

Johnson, Laburton Rhodes, C. N. 
Johnson, Chas. G. Russell, A. P. 
Kimball, William B.Sanders, Thomas 
Kimball, Byron G. Sprague, W. W. 
Kingsbury,John D.Swasey, H. K. 
Knight, Albert A. Taylor, Martin 
Ladd, George W. Taylor, Oliver 
McKee, William Tewksbury,John B. 
Martin, George C. Thornton, William 
Merrill, James C. Towne, Hermon W. 
Messerve, Wm. S. Wales, Herbert E. 
Moody, Wm. H. Webster, Charles E. 



11 



Erauklin, Miss S. F. 
Frost, Henry- 
Gale, John E. 
Hanson, M. W. 
Haseltine, Amos, jr. 
Hazeltine, John 
Hardy, George H. 
Hilton, William 
Hilton, Charles M. 
Hobson, John L. 



Morse, Leslie K. Webster, C. W. 
Nichols, J. B. Webster, Ebenezer 

Ordway, Alfred A. Webster, Ira J. 
OsgoodjWilliam W.Webster, Frank S. 
Peabody, Frank Webster, E. F. 
Peabody, Daniel West, H. K. 
Phillips, Frank'n G West, James F. 
Peters, Daniel Whittier, Alvah 

Poore, F. W. Whittier, Arthur G. 

Porter, Dudley Wilson, Henry S. 



Abbott, Joseph D, 
Appleton, Francis R. 
Baker, S. N. 
Bond, James W. 
Brown, Everett K. 
Brown, S. Albert 
Fall, Tristram B. 
Fellows, Alonzo B. 
Gould John J. 



IPSWICH— 25. 

Gould, Walter F. Kinsman, Joseph F. 
Grant, Joshua B, Kinsman, WillardF. 
Green, George H. Marshall, Joseph 
Hodgkins, August'ePerkins, Isaac E.B. 
Horton, Joseph Rutherford,AaronA. 
Horton, William G.Story, Aid en 
Kimball, Daniel Sweester, Arthur L. 
Kinnear, James Whittier, Maynard 



AUyn, Warren E. 
Ames, M. B. 
Austin, M. E. 
Ball, F. J. 
Bell, Charles U. 
Boehm, Adolph G. 
Breen, John 
Bruce, Alex'r R. 
€ollins, Lewis P. 
Copp, Gertrude M. 
Gurran, Maurice K. 



LAWRENCE— 61. 

Ford, Patrick 
iFrench, A. J. 
Gile, William H. 
Griffin, Anson L. 
Hall, Dwver S. 
Hills, George W. 
Holt, Lewis G. 
Hubbard, Leavitt 
Jackson, Joseph 
Jewett, Wm, S. 
Joyce, James W. 



Page, E. F.>4. 
Parker, Walter E. 
Richardson, E. P. 
Riley, Henry 
Robinson, H. B. 
Ruht, Joseph 
Russell, George W. 
Ryan, Thomas F. 
Sargent, A. E. 
Saunders, Daniel 
Saunders, Caleb 



78 



DeCourcy, C. A. 
Drew, J. D. 
Dyer, Arthur W. 
Evans, Charles M, 
Farrell, John 
Fay, John 
Finn, John L. 
Flynn, Edward 
Fitzgerald, Wm. 
Ford, George 



Aldrich, A. P. 
Allen, Charles 
Allen, Walter B. 
Bates, Edwin 
Bates, Walter E. 
Bates, Fred H. 
Bates, Wallace 
Beckford, Ebenezer 
Berry, Henry N. 
Berry, Benj. J. 
Bray, E. E. 
Breed, Richard 
Butman, Joseph E. 
Butman, Wm. W. 
Buzzell, George A. 
Cain, Julia A. Mrs. 
Carlisle, J. W. 
Chase, L. H. 
Chase, Amos F. 
Clark, Joseph M. 
Cross, Alfred 
Croscup, James A. 
Cressey, John S. 
Dennis, C. W. Mrs. 



Kittredge, G. H. 
Kline, George E. 
Lewis, S. S. 
McAllister, J. G. 
Mahoney, W. 0. 
McCarthy, Patrick 
Moore, L. C. 
Norwood, John K. 
Oswald, William 



Shattuck, Joseph 
Simpson, James R. 
Smith, J. B. 
Stanley, J. J. 
Sylvester, Wm. H. 
Tewksbury, R. H. 
Truell, Byron 
Vietor, F. M. 
Webster, H. K. 



LYNN— 88. 

Good win, JosephW. 
Hawkes,NathanM. 
Heath, HenryA. 
Hill, E. L. 
Hopkins, Fred I. 
Hovey, Rufus P. 
Hutchinson,M.E.B. 

Mrs. 
Ireson, S. S. 
Jepson, Eli 
Joint, William H. 
Kimball, Rufus 
King, W. P. 
Lamphier,JosephC. 
Lewis, Jacob M. 
Mace, Frank W. 
Marsh, George E. 
Marsh, S. E. 
May, Lyman A. 
McBrien, Richard 
McKenney,JohnH. 
Merritt, Timothy 
Mockett, Joseph E. 
Mower, M. V. B. 



Nichols, H. S. 
Nichols, Thomas P. 
Norris, George, jr. 
Oliver, John E. 
Pevear, H. A. 
Potter, Edward P. 
Preble, J. H. 
Ramsdell, Chas. H. 
Richards, Edw. A. 
Richardson, Geo. W. 
Rogers, Ira D. 
Roney, Simon J. 
Rounds, Herbert L. 
Rowell, B. W. 
Scribner, Benj. 
Sheehan, John 
Shorey, John L. 
Shorey, George L. 
Sawyer, J. A. J. 
Stone, Henry 
Tyler, Thaddeus W. 
Vickary, J. C. 
Whipple, Geo. H. 
Willey, James L. 



79 



Dodge, Joseph D. 
Dwyer, Edward F. 
Farrar, Joseph E. 
Fitz, Josiah 4th 
Fry, Charles C. 
Goodell, J. W. 



Mudge, John 
Nason, Daniel A. 
Neal, Peter M. 
Newhall, Asa T. 
Kewhall, G. A. 
Newhall, Hiram L. 



Wilson, J. C. 
Win slow, Aaron 
Winslow, G. W. 
Wilson, C. G. 
Warren, Mrs. N. J. 



Cain, M. J. 
Cox, Thomas E. 
Danforth, John M. 
Derby, Charles H, 
Gerry, Elbridge F. 
Herrick, George E. 



LYNNFIELD— 16. 

Mansfield, Andrew Perkins, F. 0. Mrs. 
Munroe, Harry W. Perkins, J. Winslow 
Munroe, Wilbur J. Romidy, George M. 
Newhall Frank Smith, Henry E. 
Perkins, John H. Verne, B. P. 



MANCHESTER— 14. 

Allen, Wm. H. Cotting, Charles E. Prince, Charles A. 

Baker, John Cheever, Wm. M. Rockwell, A. P, 

Boardman, T. Dennie Coolidge,T. Jeffer'n Rabardy, Julius F. 
Burnham, John A. Higginson, Henry Wigglesworth, Geo. 
Cheever, John H. Merriam,Arthur M. 



Alley, Amos P. 
Gregory, J. J. H. 
Clough, A. W. 



MARBLEHEAD— 7. 

Paine, Thomas W. Dennis, W. John 
Cronin, Michael Ware, Benjamin P. 



Hoyt, George W. 
Little, E. C. 



MERRIMAC— 4. 

Riley, A. W. Sargent, Bailey 



8o 



Barker, S. J. 
Bradley, George B. 
Buswell, Joseph E. 
Butters, W. H. 
Crosby, John S. 
Dwyer, Michael 
Emerson, Jacob, jr. 
Goss, Chas. E. 
Hall, C. H. 



Berry, William 
Currier, George A. 
Peabody, A. W. 
Phillips, B. Frank 



Beal, James H. 
Codman, Edw. W. 
Goodale, Byron 



METHUEN— 25. 

How, Joseph S. 
Mann, C. W. 
Morrison, D. T. 
Phippen, G. S. 
Parker, James 0. 
Eogers, William M. 
Kussell, Ered A. 
Sargent, S. G. 



Shirley, John W. 
Sawyer, Chas. M. 
Sleeper, Wm. C. 
Smith, Walter 
Swan, Leverett^^ 
Thurlow, J. E. 
Tozier, C. L. 
Webster, Erank W. 



MIDDLETON— 10. 



Stiles, Earnum Weston, SolomanW. 
Stiles, Hiram A. Wilkins, George B. 
Stewart, Mrs. 8. A. Wilkius, Lyman S. 



NAHANT— 12. 

Lodge,Henry Cabot Parker, E. Erancis 
LoveringjCharlesT. Parker, Arthur H. 
Merriam, F. Upham, George P. 



James, Geo. Abbott Otis, Herbert E. Whitney, George 



Adams, Charles E. 
Adams, Daniel D. 
Adams, George W. 
Adams, James K. 
Bray, George W. 
Coffin, William P. 
Dole, Nathaniel 
Hale, Stephen P. 
Howard, Horatio M. 
Illsley, Edwin 
Hlsey, Daniel H. 
Illsley, Paul M. 
Jacques, Richard 



NEWBURY— 38. 

Jacques, Rich.T. jr, 
Jacques, William 
Kent, Edward 
Knight, Charles F. 
Little, Carleton 
Little, Edward F. 
Little, George 
Little, William 
Little, Wm. Burke 
Lunt, Charles M. 
Lunt, C. A. 
Moynihan, C. 
Nelson, D. Oscar 



Noyes, Richard T. 
Noyes, Edward A. 
Noyes, Justin 
Noyes, James 
Perkins, Frank 
Perkins, Paul A. 
Pearson, Benj. jr. 
Plummer, Geo. H. 
Rogers, Abial 
Rolfe, John C. 
Tenney, Henry L. 
Tenny, Daniel G. 



8i 



NEWBURYPORT— 36. 



Adams, Philip D, 
Adams, Rufiis 
Allen, John W. 
Balch, John H. 
Bartlett, Chas. S. 
Bay ley, Wm. H. 
Capers, Thomas 
Clements, C. E. 
Coleman, James C. 
Conley, Joseph J. 
Cook, T. N. 
Hewett, C. C. 



Johnson, Wm. R. 
Kent, Otis L. 
Knights,GeorgeW. 
Little, John G. 
Maguire, C. N. 
Marsh, Horace W. 
Moseley,Edward A 
Mosely, Fred'k S. 
Moulton, Joseph 
Nelson, Charles W. 
Newhall, Asa T. 
Noyes, Isaac P. 



Ordway, A. D. 
Perley, R. M. 
Perkins, Charles 
Plummer, Moses A. 
Poore, George H. 
Sargent, John W. 
Smith, Joseph B. 
Stanley, B. F. 
Stanley, J. C. 
Toppan, Edward S. 
Winkley, J. Otis 
Winkley, PaulT.jr. 



Adams, Edward 
Barker, John 
Carlton, Daniel A. 
Carlton, Amos D. 
Davis, George G. 
Davis, George E. 
Davitt, John 
Parnham, B. H. 
Farnham, Mrs. B. 
Farnham, W. Benj. 
Fuller, Edward A. 
Foster, J. Frank 
Foster, Nathan 



NO. ANDOVER— 39. 

Foster, Orrin 
Frye, Newton P. 
Fuller, Abijah P. 
Gage, N. A. * 
Goodhue, Hiram P 
Greene, E. W. 
Hayes, Walter H, 
Hinxman, G. D. 
Holt, Peter 
Huges, Winfield S. 
Jenkins, Benj. F. 
Jenkins, Milon S. 
Johnson, Charles F 



Kittredge, H. E. 
Kunhardt, Geo. E. 
Loring, Geo. B. 
Manion, John 
Mathewson, George 
Moody, E. W. 
Paul, C. W. 
Poor, James C. 
Robinson, Ad'sonM. 
Stevens, Moses T. 
Stevens, Oliver 
Wardwell, T. 0. 
.Wiley, John A. 



PEABODY— 158. 

Annis, Peter W. Hamblett, E. B. Pierce, Thomas W. 

Appleton, Francis H. Higgins, John E. Poor, F. W. 

Barrett, Edward P. Harrington, H. A. Poor, Henry 

Beckett, C. L. Hills, Charles C. Poor, Daniel W. 



82 



Beckett, Walter H. 
Blake, E. L. 
Bodge, Arthur P. 
Bodge, Jacob G. 
Bodge, Henry 
Bodge, Freeman P. 
Bodge, William H. 
Bolster, Joseph 
Bradfort, E. E. Mrs. 
Brown, Lewis, 
Brown, Rufus H. 
Brown, Otis " 
Brown, R. S. 
Brown, Daniel 
Burbeck, Joseph N. 
Bursley, Geo. A. 
Bushby, Charles F. 
Bushby, William 
Buxton, Henry V. 
Carroll, J. J. 
Carroll, Thomas 
Clark, George H. 
Clark, A. B. 
Connor, John J. 
Cooper, J, T. 
Crehore, Joseph S. 
Curtis, George, Si 
Daley, William J, 
Distin, William 
Dodge, A. Taylor 
Dole, William T. 
Donnell, William 
Durkee, Edwin A. 
Durkee, Elmer E. 
Eaton, George A. 
Elliot, Arthur 
Ellsworth, H. L. 



Hill, W. L. 
Hill, Benjamin M 
Hinckley, C. E. 
Herri ck, John E. 
Holman, George L. 
Hooper,Charles H. 
Humphrey, B. B. 
Kimball,Eliza'th C. 
Kimball, Walter B. 
Kelley, Elbridge G. 
King, George H. 
King, J. Augustus 
King, D. Warren 
Knight, George A. 
Knowlton, Isaac P, 
Knapp, Samuel E. 
Linnehan, James C. 
Littlefield, S. S. 
Lyons, Thomas F. 
Lummus, Abraham 
Mackintosh,R.S.B. 
Mannix, Thomas 
Mansfield, E. 
Mansfield, A. W. 
McCarthy, J. H. 
McGlone, J. J. 
McKeen, John D. 
Meagher, John 
Merrill, Amos 
Moore, Benj. N. 
Morris, R. E. 
Moulton, John 
Munroe, W. Fred 
Mulcahey, M. T. 
Needham, Geo. A. 
Nelson, P. T. 
Newhall, F. L. 



Poor, Charles M. 
Poor, Albert F. 
Porter, Ernest J. 
Porter, Leonard E. 
Porter, Edward H. 
Preston, Levi 
Quint, Nicholas M. 
Quint, Hazen A. 
Ramsdell, M. A. 
Raddin, Alonzo 
RellihaUjThomas J. 
Reynolds, George 
Safford, 0. F. 
Sanger, George F. 
.Sawyer, Wm. F. 
Shea, William A. 
Shannahan, John 
Shaw, Fred M. 
Sheen, William E. 
Simpkins, Charles 
Smith, Jessie H. 
Southwick, B. F. 
SpauldingjGeorgeE. 
Stanley, Frank W. 
Stevens, Jacob B. 
Stockwell, Harry E. 
Stone, Charles E. 
Stone, Charles 0. 
Symonds,«r.H. Mrs. 
Taylor, Benj. H. 
Thomas, Elmer B. 
Trask, J. Arthur 
Twiss, Everett M. 
Tyler, A. W. 
Walcott, John G. 
Walker, Harry F. 
Ward, William N. 



Emerton, C. S. 
Farrington, Geo. C. 
Favnham, Frank E. 
Fellows, Wm. H. 
Foster, George M. 
Foster, H. K. 
Galeucia, Nellie Mrs, 
Goodale, Jacob O. 
Goulding, C. H. 
Graves, Harry D. 
Grosvenor, D. P. 
Hall, Benjamin G. 



S3 



Newhall,OrlandoF. Warner, Charles 0. 
Nourse,Samuel W. Watkins, William 
Osborne,DanielW. Wells, A. E. 
Osborne, J. Edward Wheeler, Benj. S. 
Osborne, Lyman E. Whidden, A. H. 
Osborne, Kendall Whipple, Horace P. 
Osborne, Charles L. Whipple, C. H. 
O'Connor, P. H. Wiley, William F. 
0' Shea, Thomas H. Wilson, Tho. Mrs. 
Osgood, Geo. Fred Winchester, Wen'th 
Osgood, William Wyman, Fred H. 
Parmenter,John W. 



Appleton, Zena A. 
Dodd, Stephen 
Grimes, Loring 
Lane, Andrew 
Lane, Horace 



EOCKPORT— 13. 

Low,Martha J.Mrs. 
Manning, John J. 
Manning, WilliamN. 
Merridew James P. 



Norwood, Gorham 
Smith, Allen 
Smith, Solomon 
Tufts, George W. 



ROWLEY— 17. 

Blodgett, George B. Hale, Clara A. 

Carlton, George F. Hale, Daniel H. 

Daniels, George E. Hale, Agnes H. 

Dodge, Paul A. Hale, T. P. 

Dodge, Phineas A. Keyes, Eben S. 

Dummer, Nath'l N. Lambert, Mary G. 



Mighill, Charles P. 
O'Brien, Daniel 
Smith, Williard P. 
Tenney, John H. 
Todd, Frank P. 



SALEM— 59. 

Abbott, Nathaniel Ives, John S. Reynolds, Henry E. 

Ballard, Charles W. Julyn, J. M. Mrs. Ropes, Willis H. 
Batchelder, L. F. Mrs. Jones, Samuel G. Ropes, Charles F. 
Bickerton, William Knight, Edmund F. Ropes, John C. 



84 



Benway, L. N. 
Buxton, Charles 
Chase, George, 
Cooper, Charles A. 
Cressy, George W. 
Creamer, George G. 
Daland, John 
Dane, William A. 
Endicott, Wm. C. 
Felt, John 
Foster, Joseph C. 
Foster, Wm. J. 
Gardner, A. B. 
Hathaway, John 
Hale, Henry A. 
Horton, William A. 



Lamson , Frederick 
Little, Philip 
Lord, William 
Manning, Robert 
Merritt, David 
Morse, E. Henry 
Murphy, John T. 
Nichols, Wm. S. 
Perkins, John W. 
Porter, Ellis H. 
Potter, William 
Pingree, David 
Pickering, Benj. P. 
Eantoul, Robert S. 
Rogers, Dudley P. 
Robinson, John 



Ropes, Reuben W. 
Sanders, Charles 
Sanders, Robert J. 
Shreve, 0. B. 
Spencer, Charles P. 
Swasey, John A. 
Tracey, Patrick 
Vaughn, Ira 
Ware, Horace C. 
Whitmore, Wm. F. 
Waters, David P. 
Wheatland, George 
White, Frank W. 
Wyman, Isaac C. 
Wright, Frank V. 



Bartlett, Moses J. 
Dole Edward G. 
Dow, George A. 
Eaton, John F. 
Evans, John Q. 



SALISBURY— 14. 

Getchell, N. Tracey Pettengill, J. Q. A. 
Gilman, Samuel Smith, John F. 
Greeley,Furmer H. Thornton, Robert 
Greenleaf, Wm. H. True, P. Albert 
Pettengill, Wesley 



Blodgett, J. W. 
Hawkes, Lewis W. 
Hill, Alfred C. 



SAUGUS-8. 

Newhall,HerbertB. Reiley, Thomas J. 
Newhall, Joseph Whitehead, Joseph 
Penney, George H. 



Bates, William H. 
Crosman, J. H. 



SWAMP SCOTT— 5. 

Easterbrook, A. F. Pettingell, S. J. 
Pettingell, L. D. 



Averill, George F. 
Bradstreet, Dudley 
Ferguson, Edw. E. 
Foss, Robert 
Pierce, Thomas W. 
Pike, Baxter P. 



85 
TOPSFIELD— 16. 

Poole, Benjamin Ward, Richard 
Hood, Salmon D. Wildes, Eugene L. 
Lamson, J. Arthur Nelson, D. Oscar 
Leach, Charles H. Peabody, Charles J. 
Towne, Frank H. Woodbury, Isaac M. 



WENHAM— 14. 

Alley, Henry Dodge, George B. Morgan, William B. 

Batchelder, T, Wilson Dodge, George F. Pingree, David 
Day, Everett K. Dodge, William P. Perkins, Nath'l P. 

Demsey, H. H, Hobbs, Henry Tilton, George H. 

Dodge, Robert F. Kavanaugh, J. 



WEST NEWBURY— 35. 



Bailey, Lawrence H. 
Bartlett, M. Walsh 
Boynton, Eben M. 
Carr, George G. 
Chace, S. F. 
Connor, M. H. 
Connor, J. J. 
Emery, Samuel E. 
Flook, George L. 
Goodridge, H. M. 
Gordon, J. R. 
Gowen, Mrs. C. W. 



Gowen, Oscar Pierce, George J. 

Jaques, Romulus Pierce, Henry J. 
King, T. J. Poor, Fred H. 

Merrill, William Poor, George H. 
Merrill, William E. Poor, William H. 
Moody, Horace Rogers, George C. 



Moore, Alfred L. 
Nason, Ezekiel G. 
Nason, Henry F. 
Newell, Richard 



Smith , Robert L. 
Stanwood, G. Miss 
Stultz, Frederick 
Thurlow, Thomas C. 



Ordway, Cyrus D. Titcomb, Silas M. C. 
Ordway, Charles W. 



1905 
PREMIUM LIST OF 

Essex Agricultural Society 

FOR THE 

EIGHTY-FIFTH ANNUAL CATTLE SHOW AND FAIR. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The trustee of each town is instructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their 
duties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to 
the Exhibition the importance of entering their exhibits for 
the hall the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Commit- 
tees, and making sure that the names proposed at those meet- 
ings are of persons who will serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the 
Fair Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the 
grounds at twelve o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the 
exhibition, and there organize, take the books of entry, and 
proceed at once to business. Committees in hall should take 
the books of entry from the Superintendent promptly after the 
entries close. 

Full reports of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 



87 

Three members of any committee consisting of more than 
that number are authorized to act. 

li;;^^No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 

The diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of special merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures, fruits, vegetables 
in hall, and flowers ; or any premium, unless the rules of the 
Society have been strictly complied with. Neither shall 
they award premiums or gratuities in excess of the amount 
appropriated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents, except 
on work by the children, and none in that class less than 
twenty-five cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals blue and red printed premium 
ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assistants on 
the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals or arti- 
cles, designating the grade of premium awarded each, and 
the name of the person to whom awarded, and especial care 
should be taken that the cards issued correspond with the 
awards in their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on animals and articles 
exhibited at the Show, must be delivered promptly to the 
Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

Any tnember of a committee who cannot serve on the same is 
requested to give notice to the Secretary, before the shotv, so 
that the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a tick- 
et of admission to the grounds and hall of exhibition on 
application to the Secretary. 



General Rules. 

Competitors are requested to carefidlij read the rules and pre- 
mium list before making entries. 

Claim (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 



88 

All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person 7iot a member of the Society, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, 
for which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase 
the funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium of gratuity is awarded or 
an agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
Salem Safe Deposit and Trust Co., Salem, on and after the 
first Monday of November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day 
of May next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered as 
given to increase the funds of the Society, 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the several committees and adopted by the So- 
ciety shall be final. Committees shall see that the premium, 
cards issued, correspond ivith the premiiims and gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his 
intention to compete for the same ; and committees are in- 
structed to award no premium unless the animal or article 
offered is worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall be entered in another class, except farm 
horses which may be entered for fast walking, and Milch 
Cows which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premiums must be owned by residents 
and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 
themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered ; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Fure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture. 

The Proof that an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders, and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 



89 

Standard adopted : — American Jersey C. C. Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

The covimittee will take notice that no premium will be 
awarded unless the animals or objects are of a decidedly super- 
ior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
special merit, in all departments of the Fair. 

In the case of a deficiency in the receipts at the Fair in any 
year, the society reserves the right to reduce the premiums 
offered, pro rata, not to exceed one- half the amount offered. 



Cattle and Other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals entered for premium or exhibition will be fed 
during the Exhibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity, 
prevented from leaving, at the expense of the society. 

^AT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense thereof, all of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with committee's report. 

For pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $7, 5 

For Fat Cows, premiums, $5, 3 

BULLS. 

♦Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Three years old and upwards, premiums, $7", 5 

Under three years old, for each breed, $5, 3 

One year old and under, for each breed, $3, 2 



90 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREED. 

For the best bull of any age or breed, with five of his stock 
not less than six months old, quality andcondition to be taken 
into account, and especially the adaptibility of the animal to 
the agriculture of the county. Diploma and $10 

Note. — Competitors are required to give a written statement of pedigree and 
committees are requested to be particular in this respect, and return them to the 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $7, 5 

Milch Cows,' Ayshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old 
and upwards, premiums for each breed, $6, 4 

For the best Native or Grade Cow, four years old and up- 
ward, premiums, $6, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week, 

from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $6, 4. 

Note.— A written statement will be required of the age and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they dropped their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, quality and quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding, which statement is to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to 
be exhibited at the Show, and a correct statement of manner 
of keeping and yield for one year preceding the Show, pre- 
miums, Diploma and $8, 6 

Note. — The above mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
irith Committee's report. Tl - . - 

Jan. l8t, preceding the Show. 



with Committee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 



HEIFERS. 

First Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, each breed, $3, 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $2, 1 
Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old. premiums, $5, 3 
Two years old, that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, premiums, $3, 2 
One year old and under, and less than two, premiums, $2, 1 



91 

WOKKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, and quality and training, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $5, 4 

Note.— The Committee are required to consider the quality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their working capacity. The training of working oxen and 
steers will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containing a load weigh- 
ing two tons for oxen, and three thousand pounds for steers. S^~At the time of 
entry a certificate of the weight of the cattle must be filed with the Secretary. 

STEERS. 

For pair of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, $7, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft purposes, three years old, 
premiums, $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account. Diploma and $6 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums. Diploma and $7, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums. Diploma and $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than one year old, quality and condition taken into ac- 
count. Diploma and $6 

Note.— No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$7,5 



92 

BROOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Driving Purposes, with their foal not 

more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, $7, 5- 

Note. — No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all ap- 
parent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 

For Family Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

Note.— No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $9, 6 

LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

For Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $9, 6 

GENTLEMEN'S SADDLE HORSES. 
Gentlemen to ride on track, premiums, $5, 3 

LADIES' SADDLE HORSES. 
Ladies to ride on track, premiums, $5, 3 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

For pairs of Fast Walking Horses, premiums, $5, 4 

For single horses, $4, 3 

For pairs of farm horses with load of 4,000 lbs., premiums^ 

15,4 
For single farm horse, with load of 2000 lbs., premiums, 

$4,3 
|^"The above to have trial on the track. 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1,200 lbs. and over, premiums, 

_ $6,4 
For Farm Horses weighing less than 1200 lbs. premiums, 

$6,4 

Note.— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of the load to be used in trial of 
Farm Horses is to be fixed upon by the committee of arraugements for drafting, 
the difference in the load for horses of 1,200 lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 
lbs. to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pairs, 2,000. No obstruction 
shall be placed either before or behind the wheels in trials of Draft Horses of 
either class, but wheels shall be blocked behind to hold the load when a team 
stops going up hill. 



93 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING 2400 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses, weighing 2400 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note) , premiums, $8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2400 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2400 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES 3 AND 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding four-year-old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year old Colts, premiums, $5, 3 

€OLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year- old colts, premiums, 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $3, 2 

COLTS, FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOUR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four-year-old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three- year-old colts, premiums, $5, 3 

ONE AND TWO YEARS OLD. 

For stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premi- 
ums, $4, 2 
For Stallion, Gelding, or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $3, 2 

N. B.— In all the above classes the committee will act with the expert judge 
■except Fat Cattle, Working Oxen and Steers. 

HORSES FOR HURDLE JUMPING. 

For Horses jumping over four-foot hurdles, premiums, 

$8, 6 
For high hurdle jumping, premium, 8 

SWINE BOARS. 

For Berkshire, Cheshire, Chester, Essex, Poland China, 
Suffolk, Large Yorkshire, Small Yorkshire Boars, not less 
than one year old, premiums, $4, 2 



94 

For Breeding Sows, and pigs by their side of the above 
breeds, with not less than five pigs, premiums, $4, 2 

For the best grade sow and pigs, premiums, $4, 2 

For Litters of weaned Pigs not less than eight weeks old^ 
premiums, $4, 2 

Thoroughbred Swine shall show satisfactory proof that 
they are pure blood, otherwise they shall be considered Grade. 

SHEEP. 

For flock of Sheep, not less than six ewes in number, each, 
breed, premiums, $5, 3 

For best Buck, premium 4 

For lots of Lambs, not less than six ewes in number, be- 
tween four and twelve months old, premiums, $5, 3 

ANGORA GOATS. 

For flocks of Angora Goats not less than six, prem., $5, 3 

POULTRY. 

For pairs of Fowls, light Brahmas, Dark Brahmas, Buff 
Cochins, Partridge Cochins, Black Cochins, White Cochins^ 
Plymouth Rocks, White Plymouth Rocks, Dominiques, White 
Leghorns, Brown Leghorns, Dominique Leghorns, Black 
Spanish, Hamburgs, Polish Games, Dorkings, Black, White 
and Mottled Javas, Wyandottes, White Wyandottes, Golden 
Wyandottes, Black and White Minorcas, Red Caps, Andalu- 
sias, Langshangs, and other recognized varieties, each variety, 
premiums, $2, 1 

To be used by the committee in their discretion for col- 
lections of Bantams, no person to receive more than five dol- 
lars, $20.00- 

For pairs of chickens of above varieties, premiums, 2, 1 

For the best breeding pen of each variety of four females 
and male, premium, $2 

For the best pairs of native Fowls, premiums, $2, 1 

For lots of turkeys, and Alesbury, Rouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks, and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China and African Geese, prem., $2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the dis- 
charge of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any 
specimen on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all 
claim he may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the "American Standard of Excellence." 

Note.— No pair in a pen will receive a premium as a pair. 



95 

STREET PARADE. 

Invitation is extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of the committee in 
charge in premiums or gratuities. $50 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no ar- 
ticle offered in collection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium), Diploma and $8 

Best market wagon. 

Best horse cart. 

Best ensilage cutter. 

Best fruit evaporator, with sample work. 

To be awarded for the above in gratuities a sum not ex- 
ceeding $30. 

For implements not specified above, the Committee may, 
at their discretion, award $25. 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Rake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the 
merit of which can be shown only by actual trial in the field ; 
but manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition 
and inspection. 

CARRIAGES. 

For carriages built in the county, and exhibited by the 
manufacturer. Diploma and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 

Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be es- 
pecially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued 
with the names, and sums awarded them, correspond with 
those in their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be govered by instruc- 
tions under heading of " Duties of Committees," " General 
Rules," " Premiums to be awarded at the Show," see first 
pages and under "Fruit," "Domestic Manufactures," and 
" Flowers." 

(i:^='All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manu- 
factures, must be the products of Essex County to be en- 
titled to a premium or gratuity. 



9b 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers fifty dollars to be divided in three pre- 
miums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex County, 
as follows : — Premiums, $25, 15, 10 

Note.— This exhibit includes all Fruit, Vegetables and Domestic Manufactures 
that are exhibited in any other department in Exhibition Hall. 

DAIRY, BREAD, CANNED FRUIT AND HONEY. 

For specimens "of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with .a full account of the process of making 
and manageme^t of the Butter, premiums, $4, 3 

For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, $4, 3 

For white bread made of AVheat Flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from Graham flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread entered for premiums to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collections of Preserved Fruits and 
Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, 

$2, 1 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of pro- 
cess used and amount of labor and time required in preparing 
and drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on articles entered in this depart- 
ment, products of this County deemed worthy, $15 

First and second best honey, not more than five nor less 
than three pounds in comb with one pound of same extracted, 
made in the County, with statement signed of kind of bees 
and hive, and time of year when honey was made, premiums, 

$2,1 



97 
Fruit. 

All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the first clay of the exhibition, and each exhibi- 
tor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists 
of the varieties of each class of fruit, or to be filed when entry 
is made. (Committees are not authorized to make awards to 
those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a consplcuo^is manner by the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors, with the names of 
fruit for which premiums are oifered, all others of same class 
fruit to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place 
their several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated 
by such labels, or be considered by the committee as not com- 
peting for premiums. 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee), to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit. 

PEARS. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Angouleme, Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckel, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Cornice, Howell and Clairgeau, each, premium, $2 

Doyenne d'Ete, .Gifford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $1.50 

For best collection of pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premium, $3, 2 

In addition to the above are placed at the disposal of the 
committee, to be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 
each, $12 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County: Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Wolf River, Sutton Beauty, 
Hubbardson, Mackintosh Red, Porter, Pickman Pippin, Rox- 
bury Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Gravenstein, Hunt Rus- 



98 

set, Ladies' Sweet, Snow, Bailey Sweet, Wealthy, premium 
for each, f 2, 1 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early.) 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

For best collection of apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab 
apples, deemed worthy by the committee, $1.50 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 each, $15 

PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

For best twelve specimens of Freestone, white flesh, yellow 
flesh, Essex County seedling, each variety, $2 

For best collection of peaches, premium, $3 

For the best twelve specimens of Champion, Lemon, or 
Orange Quinces, premium, $2 

For the best twelve specimens of plums, five varieties to be 
selected by committee, each variety, premium, $2 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, 
Brighton, Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, Pocklington, 
Niagara Grapes, each variety, premium, $2 

For Gold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than eight 
pounds in all, premiums, $5 

For best specimens of four bunches of grapes, varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

$150 

For basket of assorted fruits, premiums, $3, 2 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than 50 cents each, $20 



Plants and Flowers. 



RUIiES AKD REGULATIONS. 



1. All plants and flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or be- 
fore eleven o'clock on the first day of the fair, and all such 
plants and flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 



99 

except native plants and flowers and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of plants and 
flowers is designated in the schedule, there must be neither 
more nor less than that number or quantity of specimens shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article, only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is offered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited, for com- 
petition, but no variety can be duplicated. 

4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens 
exhibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of 
superiority and worthy of such premium, not even if they 
are the only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admit- 
ted in competition for another diiferent premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, or 
in the case of native plants and flowers, where such were found. 

7. All plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood or some 
other permanent and suitable substance, and so attached to 
same as to be easily seen. Flowers when specifled to be 
named to comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symmetry and vigor of the specimens; also bouquets, baskets, 
design work, etc., must show taste, skill, and harmony in 
arrangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All flowers exhibited must be shown upon their own 
stem, flowers in " Design " word alone excepted ; and this 
exception, if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account 
by the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or " Designs of merit " 
for which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together) on plants and flowers 
exceed the amount, $125, limited by the Society for this de- 
partment. 

11. No member of the committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any case vote, or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 



lOO 

shall temporarily vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for plants and flowers, and General Rules of the Socie- 
ty, and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhib- 
itors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 

Committee on plants and flowers will take notice, 

PLANTS. 

Plants competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots, native plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 

For collection flowering and ornamental foliage plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premiums, $3, 2 

For collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, w3 
varieties, premium, 1 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection of Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., f 1 

For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., $1 

For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, prem., $1 

For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem.,$l 

For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, . $1 

For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, $1 

For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 

For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Calla Lillies, 5 specimens, premium, $1 

For specimen English Ivy, premium, $1 



lOI 

For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and. the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least 50 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which to be a cross section, and neither to be more than four 
inches in length or diameter, premiums, $3, 2 

FLOWERS. 

For collection cut flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For collection cut flowers, native, 100 specimens, at least 
50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For pair bouquets for vases, of native flowers, premiums, 

$1, .50 

For pair of bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, prem., 

$1, .50 

For basket of green-house flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For basket of native flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For basket of garden flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For arrangement of native flowers and autumn leaves, 
premiums, $2, 1 

For floral designs, choice cultivated flowers, prem., $3, 2 

For floral designs, native flowers, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Japan Lillies, hardy, named, premiums $2, 1 

For collections Phlox, hardy perennial, named, prem., $2, 1 

For collection Pansies, at least 50 specimens neatly and 
artistically arranged, premiums, $2, 1 

For collection of native and introduced weeds, with com- 
mon and botanical name attached, premiums, $2, 1 

For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six 
varieties, named, premium, $1 

For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Gladiolus (spikes), at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Japan Lillies, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 



102 

For twelve Phlox, hardy, perennial, at least six varieties 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prera., $1 
For twenty- four Carnation pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twenty-four verbenas, at least six varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty-four Roses, at least six varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty-four garden annuals, at least twelve varieties, 
named, premium, $1 
For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties named, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, $1 
For twelve Asters, Double Truffaut's Peony flowered, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twelve Asters, Pompom, premium, $1 
For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Zinnias, doixble, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, African, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty-four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $1 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium. $1 
For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Dianthus (double annual), in variety, nremium, 

^ $1 

For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, $1 

For collection of Sweet Peas, premium, $1 

VECxETABLES.— CLASS ONE. 

Rules for fruit (ipply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens, Eclipse, Dewing, and 
Edmands, premium, each variety, $2, 1 

Carrots — For best twelve, Short Top, Long Orange and 
Danvers Intermediate, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

For best twelve, Short Horn, Orange carrots, $2, 1 

Mangold AVurtzels — For best six specimens, premiums, $2,1 

Flat turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top and 
White Flat, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Ruta Bagas— Twelve specimens. For best Yellow and 
White, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 



I03 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Onions — Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow 
Flat and Red, premiums, eacli variety, $2, 1 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beautv 
of Hebron, Clark's No. 1, Pearl of Savoy, Early Maine, Rob- 
erts Early, Carmans No. 3, Rural Blush, Rural New Yorker, 
Early Northern, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $15 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS TWO. 

Cabbages — For the best three specimens. Savoy, Fottler's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea 
sons, Deep Head, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 

Cauliflower — For best three specimens, premiums, $2, 1 
Celery — For best four roots, premiums, $2, 1 

Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best, Early, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 
For best twelve ears in milk, late, premiums, $2, 1 
Squashes — For best three specimens, Marrow, Turban, 
Warren Turban, Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, Bay 
State, Sibley, Butman, each variety, premiums, f 2, 1 
Melons — For best three specimens, Nutmeg, Musk, Cassaba, 
Salmon Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For best two specimens Watermelons, premiums, $2, 1 
Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens. Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premiums, 

$2, 1 
Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premiums, ^2, 1 

For collection of Vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorius, $15 
^^^No competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums 
are offered for. 

Collections of Veijetahles where premiums are offered for a number of varieties 
must be entered and placed, not less than three of a kind by themselves on the 
tables assigned for collections. No collection shall receive but one premium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to compete with speci- 
mens of the same variety placed elsewhere. Exhibitors of such collections, how- 
ever, are not prevented from exhibiting additional specimens of any variety 
with and in competition with like variety. All vegetables must be entefed'.in the 
name of the grower of them. 

Size of Vegetables. Turnip, Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions 
2 1-2 to 4 inches in largest diameter; Potatoes to be of good size for family use; 
Squashes to be pure and well ripened, Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 



I04 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premium, $1 

For twenty-five ears Field Corn, premiums, $4, 3, 2 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $4, 2 
All grain or seed must have been grown hy the exhibitor in 
the County to receive a premium. 



Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors" must deposit their articles at the Hall before 
1 o'clock on the first day of the Exhibition. Articles not thus 
deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 
be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to 
the last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wrought Counterpanes, having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $20 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets, having regard to the quality and expense of the 
material, premiums, $2, 1 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the quality 
of the work and expense of materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount not to exceed $20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For exhibit of Manufactured Leather and Skins, 

Society's Diploma. 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 

Women's do., Children's do., each, premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each, premium, 

$3 



105 

$20 are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium. Diploma of the Society. 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, 

$25 

FANCY WORK 

Of Domestic Manufacture are not included in the above. 
At the disposal of the committee in this department, to b 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, 

$40 

OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, 

$40 

DECORATED CHINA. 

For best collection Decorated China, premiums, $5, 3 
For best individual specimen, premiums, ^ $3, 2 

For Punch Bowl or set, premiums, $2, 1 

For Jardinere or Fern dish, premiums, $2, 1 

For raised paste or gold, premiums, $2, 1 

For Vase, premiums, $2, 1 

For Tray, Plate, etc., premivims, $2, 1 

CHARCOAL, PEN AND INK WORK, PHOTOGRAPHS 

ETC. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, 

$20 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, prem., $2, 1 

At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $15 
not less than 25 cents in any one gratuity. 



io6 

List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 



SMALL FRUITS. 

For the best product of not less than twenty-five trees, 
taking into account quantity and quality of Peaches, Plums 
and Quinces, premium, $8 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture of crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $7 

For best crop of currants, raspberries, blackberries and 
Gooseberries, with statement as above, premium each, $7 

LIBRAEY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; B. P. Ware, Mar- 
blehead ; J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 

TEEADWELL FAEM. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield ; Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; Sherman Nelson, 
Georgetown. 

AUDI TOES. 

Committee — Charles Sanders, Salem ; Benj. P. Ware, 
Marblehead ; Lyman Osborne, Peabody. 

FAEMEES' INSTITUTES. 

Committee — Frederick A. Russell, Methuen ; J. M. Dan- 
forth, Lynnfield Center ; Sherman Nelson, Georgetown. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of corps, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of tlie arrangements for the Fair are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Report of Annual Meeting 3 

Entries 6 

Report on Fat Cattle 9 

Report on Bulls 9 

Report on Milch Cows 10 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 10 

Report on Heifers 11 

Report on Working Oxen 12 

Report on Steers 12 

Report on Stallions 12 

Report on Brood Mares 13 

Report on Family Horses 13 

Report on Gents' Driving Horses 13 

Report on Ladies' Driving Horses 13 

Report on Fast Walking Horses 13 

Report on Single Farm Horses 14 

Report on Pairs Farm Horses 14 

Report on Colts 14 

Report on Hurdle Jumping : 15 

Report on Swine • ■ 15 

Report on Goats 16 

Report on Poultry 16 

Report on Agricultural Implements 24 

Report on Carriages 24 

Report on Dairy, Granges and Honey 25 

Reports on Bread and Canned Fruit 25 

Report on Pears 27 

Report on Apples 28 

Report on Peaches, Grapes and Assorted Fruit 31 

Report on Plants 33 

Report on Flowers 35 

Report on Vegetables , 42 

Report on Grain and Seed 47 

Report on Counterpanes and Afghans 47 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 49 

Report on Articles Manufactured from Leather 51 



io8 



Page 

Report on Manufactures and General Mdse 51 

Report on Fancy Work 52 

Report on Oil Paintings and Water Colors 54 

Report on Decorated China 56 

Report on Charcoal, Photographs and Pen and Ink Work 57 

Report on Work by Children 57 

Report of Committee on Small Fruits 5& 

Statement 59 

Report of New Members 59 

Institutes 60 

Report of the State Inspector 60 

In Memoriam 62 

Recapitulation .63 

Financial Statement 65 

Treasurer's Report 66 

Constitution of the Society 67 

Officers of the Society 70 

Members of the Society 72 

Premium List for 1904 86 



TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1905 



OF THE 



ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



{Organised 1818.) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX 



And the Premium List of 1906. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



^ 



SALEM, MASS., 

Newcomb & Gauss, Printers. 

1905. 



EIGHTY-FIFTH 

Annual Cattle Show and Fair* 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the 
Peabody Institute at Peabody, Sept. 21, 1905. 

President Frederick A. Russell called the meeting to 
order at 9.40 o'clock A. M. 

On motion of James C. Poor of No. Andover that a 
committee of three be appointed by the chair to receive, 
assort and count the votes for President, four Vice-Presi- 
dents and Secretary for the ensuing year, the chair ap- 
pointed James C. Poor of No. Andover, J. W. Shirley 
of Methuen and Alvah J. Bradstreet of Danvers. 

The committee reported as follows : whole number of 
votes cast 23 all of which were : — 

Foe, President. 
Frederick A. Russell of Methuen. 

For Vice-Presidents. 

James J. H. Gregory of Marblehead. 
Asa T. Newhall of Lynn. 
Sherman Nelson of Georgetown. 
Ira J. Webster of Haverhill. 



For Secretary. 
John M. Danforth of Lynnfield. 

Voted — To take up the list nominated for Trustees and 
go through the ticket, each town separately, and amend it, 
which was done, and it was voted — that the Secretary cast 
one ballot for the list of trustees, which was done, and the 
following trustees were elected. 

John J. MaSon, Amesbury George W. Hoyt, Merrimac 
George L. Averill, Andover John W, Shirley, Methuen 
John W. Lovett, Beverly Walter H. Brown, Middleton 
Wm. Kimball Cole, Boxford Henry Cabot Lodge, Nahant 
Charles H. Preston, Danvers Frank Perkins, Newbury 
Elias Andrews, Essex Rufus Adams, Newburyport 

Samuel T. Poor, Georgetown W. S. Hughes, No. Andover 
Geo. M. Wonson, Gloucester Orlando F. Newhall, Peabody 
Saml. B. George, Groveland John J. Manning, Rockport 
Isaac F. Knowlton, Hamilton Frank P. Todd, Rowley 
B. Frank Barnes, Haverhill George W. Cressy, Salem 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich George A. Dow, Salisbury 
Chas. E. Wingate, Lawrence Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 
Edwin Bates, Lynn Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield Charles J. Peabody, Topsfield 
John H. Cheever, Manchester J. Kavanaugh, Wenham 
Amos P. Alley, Marblehead Rich. Newell, West Newbury 

Voted — That the trustees at their meeting in November 
revise the premium list as in their judgment may seem 
wise. 

Voted — On motion of Mr. Newhall of Peabody, that the 
Essex Agricultural Society extend a vote of thanks to the 
Merchants Association and to the Merchants of Salem, also 



to Maj. John E. Spencer, the Chief Marshal, for the inter- 
est they have taken in the Society and for what they have 
done to help make the fair a success. 

Voted at 10.45 to adjourn. 

John M. Danforth, Secretary. 

The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1905 and tabulated for comparison as follows: 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON FAIR GROUNDS. 



Entries 
in 1905 


From 
Different 

Places 
in 1905 


Entries 
in 1904 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1904 


Fat Cattle, 


1 


1 


2 


1 


Bulls, 


19 


5 


15 


5 


Milch Cows, 


26 


7 


25 


4 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Heifers, Pure Breed, 


19 


5 


17 


3 


Heifers, Grade, 


24 


5 


15 


4 


Working Oxen and Steers, 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Steers, 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Stallions, Farm and Draft, 








1 


1 


Stallions for Driving, 


1 


1 








Brood Mares, Farm and Draft, 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Brood Mares for Driving, 


3 


2 


1 


1 


Family Horses, 


3 


2 


6 


4 


Pairs Gents' Driving Horses, 


1 


1 








Single Gents' Driving Horses, 


6 


4 


6 


4 


Ladies' Driving Horses, 


1 


1 


3 


3 


Fast Walking Horses, 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Single Farm Horses, 


3 


2 


1 


1 


Pairs Farm Horses, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Colts, Farm and Draft, 


6 


2 


2 


1 


Colts for Driving, 


2 


2 


4 


3 


Horses for Hurdle Jumping, 


9 


1 


12 


2 


Swine, 


28 


3 


26 


2 


Sheep, 


1 


1 


3 


1 


Goats, 


3 


2 


1 


1 


Poultry, 


150 


7 


176 


11 


Agricultural Implements, 


19 


4 


9 


5 


Carriages, 


4 


1 


5 


2 



EXHIBITS IN HALL. 



Entries : 
in 1905 


From 
Different 
Places 
in 1905 


Entries 
in 1904 


From 
Different 
Placet 
in 1904 


Grange Exhibits, 








1 


1 


Dairy, 


1 


1 








Bread and Canned Fruit, 


74 


10 


81 


11 


Honey, 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Pears, 


39 


5 


66 


7 


Apples, 


86 


11 


177 


16 


Peaches, Grapes, and As- 


• 








sorted Fruit, 


87 


11 


89 


11 


Plants, 


20 


2 


36 


4 


Flowers, 


201 


8 


211 


8 


Vegetables, 


170 


12 


238 


12 


Grain and Seed, 


2 


2 


17 


5 


Carpets and Rugs, 


27 


7 


44 


8 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


17 


7 


83 


6 


Articles Man'f d from Leather, 


2 


2 


7 


2 


Manufactures and Gen. Mdse. 


4 


3 


6 


6 


Fancy Work, 


159 


9 


249 


12 


Oil Paintings and Water 










Colors, 


34 


7 


64 


3 


Decorated China, 


31 


4 


36 


5 


Charcoal Work, Photos, &c. 


73 


5 


55 


7 


Work by Children under 12 










years of age, 


22 


5 


25 


3 



Grand total of 1370 entries from 26 of the 34 cities and 
towns in Essex County against 1775 entries from 28 cities 
and towns last year. Essex, Georgetown, Gloucester, 
Lawrence, Merrimac, Nahant, Rockport and Salisbury did 
not have exhibits this year. 



8 



The entries were : Amesbury, 14 ; Andover, 20 ; 
Beverly, 99 ; Boxford, 54 ; Danvers, 109 ; Groveland, 2 ; 
Hamilton, 5 ; Haverhill, 3 ; Ipswich, 14 ; Lynn, 102 ; 
Lynnfield, 10; Manchester, 2; Marblehead, 37; Methuen, 
5 ; Middleton, 9 ; Newbury, 6 ; Newburyport, 1 ; No. 
Andover, 38; Peabody, 653; Rowley, 8; Salem, 159; 
Saugus, 9 ; Swampscott, 3 ; Topsfield, 2 ; Wenham, 5 ; 
West Newbury, 1 . 



REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 



FAT CATTLE. 

•15.00 First premium to Lewis Browii, Peabody, for Fat 
Cow. 
James C. Poor, James J. Abbott, Andrew Mansfield — 
Committee. 



BULLS. 



7.00 First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Bull, " Hardwick Senator," No. 8821. 
2.00 Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Bull, " Plymouth Mainstay," No. 

10,355. 
5.00 First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire Bull, " Domino D.," No. 9081. 
5.00 Second premium to E. E. Stanyan, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire Bull, " Tewkesbury," No. 8406. 
3.00 Second premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, 

for Ayrshire Bull, " Prmce of Essex," No. 9494. 
7.00 First premium to W. P. Wakefield, Danvers, for 

Ayrshire Bull, " Brown Douglass." 
3.00 Second premium to John A. Jenkms, Andover, for 

Jersey Bull. 
7.00 First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstem Bull, " Earl Aggie De Kol 2d," No. 

31,075. 



lO 



00 and Diploma to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstein Bull, " Earl Aggie De Kol 2d " with 

7 of his get. 
7.00 First premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, for 

Jersey Bull, "Brown Bessie's Son 3d," No. 

58,348. 
5.00 First premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, for 

Jersey Bull, Bessie's Son, " Ramaposo," No. 

69,507. 
5.00 First premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, for 

Jersey Bull, Bessie's Ramaposo 2d. 
3.00 First premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, for 

Guernsey Bull, " Hernudo Quincy of Cherry 

Hill," No. 10,019. 
S. H. Reed, S. H. Bailey, Henry E. Kennett — Committee. 



MILCH COWS. 

6.00 First premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, 
for Ayrshire Cow, " Rozelle," No. 16,565. 

4.00 Second premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, 
for Ayrshire Cow, " Curlie of Whitehill," No. 
18,224. 

7.00 First premium to E. E. Stanyan, Danvers, for 

Grade Ayrshire Cow. 
6.00 First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Cow, " Darling Robin," No. 13,547. 
4.00 Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, 

for Guernsey Cow, " Polly of Topsfield," No. 

13,546. 
6.00 First premium to L. B. Walton, Peabody, for Grade 

Ayrshire Cow. 
4.00 Second premium to James H. Ryan, Lynn, for 

Grade Jersey Cow. 



II 



$6.00 First premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for Grade 

Holstein Cow. 
4.00 Second premium to J. J McGlone, Peabody, for 

Grade Ayrshire Cow. 
6.00 First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstein Cow, " Thiera " 2d, No. 61,645. 
6.00 First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstein Cow, " Irene Tiroma," No. 51,165. 
6.00 First premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, for 

Jersey Cow, "Pedro's Honey Clover," No. 

162,941. 
6.00 First premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, for 

Jersey Cow, " Jeannette." 
4.00 Second premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, 

for Jersey Cow, " Beauty of Aide," No. 158,650. 
6.00 First premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, for 
Grade Guernsey Cow, No. 57. 
S. H. Reed — Judge. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

8.00 First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 
for Herd of 5 Holstein Cows. 

6.00 Second premium to James C. Poor, North Ando- 
ver, for 5 Holstein Cows. 
S. H. Reed — Judge. 



HEIFERS— PURE BREED. 

5.00 First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 
for Holstein Heifer, " Thyrsa de Kol." 

3.00 First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 
for Holstein Heifer, " Aggie Tirania de Kol," No. 

76,827. 



12 



'fS.OO Second preiuiura to James C. Poor, North An-. 

clover, for Holstien Heifer, " Jacobo de Kol." 
2.00 Second premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstein Heifer, " Louise Aggie Netherland 

de KoV No. 76,063. 
4.00 First premium to Cherry Hill Farm, Beverly, for 

Jersey Heifer, " Brown Bessie of Cherry Hill," 

No. 164,736. 
5.00 First premium to Walter H. Brown, Dan vers, for 

Ayrshire Heifer, " Queen Daisy," No. 18,508. 
2.00 Second' premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvei's, 

for Ayrshire Heifer, '' Daisy Fox," No. 19,580. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey Heifer, "Miss Hard wick," No. 18,454. 
3.00 First premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, for 

Ayrshire Heifer, " Maud Orr 2d," No. 19,338. 
2.00 First premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, for 

Ayrshire Heifer, " White Daisy." 
1.00 Second premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, 

for Ayrshire Heifer, " Nancy Z 3d." 
1.00 Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, 

for Guernsey Heifer, 6 mos. old. 
2.00 Second premium to John A. Jenkins, Andover, for 

Jersey Heifer. 



HEIFERS— GRADE. 

2.00 First premium to Mrs. W. H. Salisbury, North 

Andover, for grade Jersey. 
1.00 Second premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, 

for grade Ayrshire. 
2.00 First premium to P. F.McCarsley, Marblehead, for 

grade Jersey and Ayrshire. 
2.00 First premium to Percy Hammond, Danvers, for 

grade. 



13 

$2.00 First premium to James H. Ryan, Lynn, for grade 

Jersey. 
2.00 Second premium to H. Goldthwaite, Marblebead, 

for grade Jersey and Holstein. 
1.00 Second premium to L. B. Walton, Peabody, for 

grade Ayrshire. 
2.00 Second premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for 

grade Guernsey. 
3.00 First premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for 

grade Ayrshire. 
2.00 First premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for 

grade Aj^rshire. 
4.00 First premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for 

grade Ayrshire. 
2.00 Second premium to W. P. Wakefield, Danvers, for 

grade Ayrshire. 
S. H. Reed, Judge. 



WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

7.00 First premium to C. A. Hayes, Danvers, for pair 

working oxen. 
5.00 First premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, for 
pair working steers. 



STEERS. 

4.00 First premium to John A. Jenkins, Andover, for 
pair twin steers. 
J. Frank Foster, B. Frank Barnes — Committee. 



STAELIONS FOR DRIVING. 

7.00 First premium to Charles Sanders, for stallion. 
" Osceola." 



14 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT. 

$7.00 First premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for mare 
and colt. 
5.00 Second premium to E. O'Neil, Danvers, for mare 
and colt, 3 weeks old. 



BROOD MARES FOR DRIVING. 

7.00 First premium to H. C. Cummings, Hamilton, for 

mare, " Ruth Shedd." 
5.00 Second premium to Charles Sanders, Salem, for 

mare "Miss Hammars." 
C. H. Playdon, Judge. 



FAMILY HORSES. 

7.00 First premium to E. B. Newhall, Saugus, for bay 

mare. 
5.00 Second premium to H. W. Poor, Peabody, for black 

mare, "Dolly." 



GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

6.00 Second premium to Charles Sanders, Salem, for pair 

of horses. 
7.00 First premium to W. R. M. Tortat, Peabody, for 

bay horse. 
5.00 Second premium to A. Wilder Pollard, Clifton, for 

black mare, " Maggie Mitchell." 



LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

7.00 First premium to Mrs. Annie Little, Peabody, for 
gray horse. 



15 

FAST WALKING HOKSES. 

$4.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for bay mare. 
C. H. Playdon, Peter Holt, J. Kavanaugh — Committee. 



PAIRS FARM HORSES. 

8.00 First premium to Wm. Maynard, Middleton, for 
pair horses, 2,800 lbs. 
John W. Lovett, Fred A. Dodge, Isaac F. Knowlton — 

Committee. ' 



SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

6.00 First premium to B. W. Farnham, North Andover, 

for bay horse, 1,100 lbs. 
6.00 First premium to B. H. Farnham, North Andover, 

for black mare, " Topsy," 1,250 lbs. 
4.00 Second premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for 

black mare, 1,300 lbs. 
A. B. Fellows, J. H. Perkins, W. S. Hughes — Com- 
mittee. 



COLTS FOR FARM AND DRAFT. 

5.00 First premium to George A. Eaton, Peabody, for 

roan colt, 3 yrs. old. 
3.00 Second premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for 

bay colt, 3 yrs. old. 
4.00 First premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for 

black colt, 2 yrs. old. 
8.00 Second premium to J. J. McGlone, Peabody, for 

bay colt, 2 yrs. old. 



i6 



COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

$3.00 First premium to Joseph Bolster, Peabody, for 2 
year old colt. 
3.00 First premium, to F. W. Parshall, Topsfield, for 2 
year old colt. 
C. H. Playdon, Charles McTiernan, J. Henry Nason — 
Committee. 



SPECIAL CLASS. 

4.00 First premium to A. C. Beckford, Danvers, for 
Shetland pony. 



HURDLE JUMPING. 

First premium to H. P. McKean, Hamilton, for horse 

" Buster Brown." 
Second premium to George S. Mandell, Hamilton, for 

horse, "Warpaint." 



HIGH JUMP. 

First premium to George S. Mandell, Hamilton, for horse, 

"Warpamt." , ■ 

Second premium to H. P. McKean, Hamilton, for horse, 
' " Buster Brown." 



SWINE. 



4.00 First premium to E. E. Stanyan, Danvers, for litter 

of pigs 3 mos. old. 
2.00 Second premium to Forest Valley Farm, Peabody, 

for Berkshire boar. 



$^4.00 First premium to Forest Valley Farm, Peabody, 

for O. I. C. boar. 
4.00 First premium to Forest Valley Farm, Peabody, 

for Chester sow. 
4.00 First premium to Forest Valley Farm, Peabody, 

for sow and pigs. 
2.00 Secoud premium to Forest Valley Farm, Peabody, 

for Berkshire boar. 
2.00 Second premium to Forest Valley Farm, Peabody, 

for weaned pigs. 
4.00 First premium to Forest Valley Farm, Peabody, 

for weaned pigs. 
4.00 First premium to Forest Valley Farm, Peabody^ 

for shotes. 
2.00 Second premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

O. I. C. white pigs. 
2.00 Second premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

sow and pigs. 
4.00 First premium to City Farm, Salem, for Berkshire 

sow and ten pigs. 
4.00 First premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire boar. 
4.00 First premium to Thomas Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire sow. 
4.00 First premium to Danvers Hospital, forTamworth 

boar. 
4.00 First premium to Danvers Hospital, for Tamworth 

sow and pigs. 
2.00 Second premium to Danvers Hospital, for sow and 

pigs. 
2.00 Second premium to Danvers Hospital, for York- 
shire sow. 
VVm. T. Wolloff, Charles M. Witham— Committee. 



i8 

SHEEP. 

.00 First premium to Town Farm, Peabody, for pair of 
Sheep. 



GOATS.. 

5.00 First premium to John B. Jenkins, Andover, for 

pair of Angora Goats. 
3.00 Second premium to John B. Jenkins, Andover, for 
pair of Angora Goats. 
.75 Gratuity to Joseph Cashman, Danvers, for Cuban 

Goat. 
John W. Shirley for the Committee. 



POULTRY. 

2.00 First premium to L. N. Ben way, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
2.00 First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
2.00 First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte Chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Black Wyandotte Chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pen 

Black Wyandotte Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Red cap fowls. 



19 

'12.00 First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Red Cap fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte fowls, 
2.00 First premium to Maurice A. Ramsdell, Peabody, 

for pair R. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Maurice A. Ramsdell, Peabody, 

for pair R. C. Brown Leghorn Chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to Maurice A. Ramsdell, Peabody 

for pair R. C. Brown Leghorn Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Maurice A. Ramsdell, Peabody, 

for pen R. C. Brown Leghorn Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair bearded Silver polish fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair bearded Silver polish fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair bearded Silver polish Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair Dominique fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair Dominique fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair Dominique Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair White Polish fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Rufus C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for pair Brown China Geese. 
2.00 First premium to George H. Homer, Peabody, for 

pen native fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Walter H. BroAvn, Danvers, for 

pair African Geese. 
1.00 Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, 

for pair Pekin Ducks. 



20 



$2.00 First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

pair R. I. Red fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, 

for pair R. I. Red Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

pen R. I. Red Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

pair Partridge Wyandotte fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Walter H. BroA\^i, Danvers, for 

pair S. C. White Leghorn fowls, 
2.00 First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

pair S. C. White Leghorn Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 

S. C. Brown Leghorn Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 

S. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pair S. C. Brown Leghorn Chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pair S. C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
• 1.00 Second premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pair S. C- Brown Leghorn Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin A. Varney, Peabody, for 

pair S. C. Black Minorca Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Chas. F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for pair White Wyandotte Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Chas. F. Thompson, Lynnfield. 

for pair S. C. R. L Red Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Chas. F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for pair R. C. White Leghorn Chicks. 
2.00 Gratutity to Edw. W. Boynton, Peabody, for col- 
lection Pigeons. 



21 



$1.00 Gratuity to H. A. Larrabee, Peabody, for collec- 
tion Pigeons. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Brown pitt game fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for 

pair Black pitt game fowls. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Clayborn pitt game fowls. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Irish Muff game fowls. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Southern Grey game fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for 

pair Black pitt game chicks. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Irish Muff game Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Southern gray game chicks. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tjder, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for 

pair Houdan fowls. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

black breasted pitt game chicks. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

black breasted pitt game fowls. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen 

black breasted pitt game chicks. 
2.00 First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

A. O. V. pitt game fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for 

pair white Embden Geese. 



22 



$2.00 First premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for pair 

Toulouse Geese. 
1.00 Second premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for 

pair African Geese. 
2.00 First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

white Ply. Rock fowls. 
2.00 First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

white Ply. Kock Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

white. Ply. Rock Chi(;ks. 
2.00 First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Ply. Rock Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

Buff Ply. Rock Chicks. 
2.00 First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

Buff Ply. Rock Chicks. 
2.00 Blrst premium to J. II. Flint, Salem, for pen black 

Langshan chicks. 
2.00 First pren\ium to J. H. Flint, Salem, for pair black 

Langshan chicks. 
2.00 First premium to J. H. Flint, Salem, for pair black 

Langshan fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to Forrest Valley Farm, Pea- 
body, for pair Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to Forrest Valley Farm, Pea- 
body, for pen Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for 

pen Black Cochin fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Loren Holden, Beverly, for pair 

Black Cochin fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Loren Holden, Beverlj^, for pair 

Black Cochin chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Fred W. Holden, Beverly, for 

pen light Brahma fowls. 



23 

5<2.00 First premium to Fred W. Holden, Beverly, for 

pair light Brahma fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Fred W. Holden, Beverly, for 

pair light Brahma chicks. 
2.00 First premium to E. E. Durkee, Feabody, for pair 

young Pekin Ducks. 
1.00 Second premium to E. E. Durkee, Feabody, for pen 

light Brahma chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to E. E. Durkee, Feabody, for pair 

light Brahma chicks. 
2.00 First premium to J. F. Murphy, Feabody, for pair 

R. I. red chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to J. F. Murphy, Feabody, for 

pen R. I. red chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to J. F. Murphy, Feabody, for 

pen buif Cochin chicks, 
1.00 Second premium to J. F. Murphy, Feabody, for 

pair white Plymouth Rock chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to J. F. Murphy, Peabody, for 

pair young Toulouse geese. 
. 75 Gratuity to J. F. Murphy, Peabody, for Collection 

of Bantams. 
2.00 First premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

pair R. I. red fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, 

for pair R. I. red fowls. . 
1.00 Gratuity to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for col- 
lection of Bantams. 
2.00 First premium to E. F. Merrow, Salem, for pair 

patridge Cochin chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to E, F. Merrow, Salem, for pair 

Dominique chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to E. F. Merrow, Salem, for pair 

Patridsre Cochin chicks. 



24 

$2.00 First premium to Edward Durkee, Peabody, for 

pair S. S. Hamburg fowls. 
2.00 First premium to Edward Durkee, Peabody, for 

pair S. S. Hamburg chicks. 
2.00 First premi am to J. C. Jodrey, Dan vers, for pair 

Silver Wyandotte fowls. 
2.00 First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Dan vers, for pen 

Silver Wyandotte fowls. 
1.00 Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

pair Silver Wyandotte fowls. 
2.00 First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pen 

Silver Wyandotte chicks. 
2.00 First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

Silver Wyandotte chicks. 
2.00 First premium to L. Perkins, Beverly, for pen S. 

C. white Leghorn chicks. 
1.00 Second premium to L. Perkins, Beverly, for pair 

S. C. white Leghorn chicks. 
2.00 First premium to Thomas Sanders 2d, Salem, for 

pair Cuban game chicks. 
2.00 Gratuity to J. B. Holmes, Lynn, for collection of 

Bantams. 
2.00 First premium to J. Bolster, Peabody, for pen 

Silver penciled Ham burgs. 
.25 Gratuity to H. J. Donavan, Peabody, for Fantail 

pigeons. 
W. B. Atherton, Judge. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

6.00 First premium to J. A. Roome, Peabody, for light 

express wagon. 
6.00 First premium to J. H. Nason, Boxford, for 2 

horse dump cart. 



25 

13.00 Second premium to George E. Daniels, Rowley, 
for 2 Horse dump cart. 

3.00 First premium to George E. Daniels, Rowley, for 
one horse pung. 

3.00 Second premium to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for 
express wagon. 

2.00 Gratuity to Solomon Fuller, Danvers, for agricul- 
tural implements. 

4.00 Gratuity to W. H. Vanderbilt, Danvers, for exhibit 
of Page Win fencing, gates &c. 
James C. Poor, John Barker — Committee. 



CARRIAGES. 

10.00 Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for collec- 
tion of four carriages. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

12.00 First premium to Hem-ietta L. Dixon, Lynn, for 

white bread. 
2.00 First premium to Hannah Sherry, Peabody, for 

graham bread. 
1.00 Second premium to Mrs. A. F. Glines, Beverly, 

for entire wheat bread. 
1.00 Second premium to Minnie McCarthy, Peabody, 

for white bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Henrietta Dixon, Lynn, for pan of 

Biscuit. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Goulding, Peabody, for 

white bread. 
.50 (Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Goulding, Peabody, for 

oat meal bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Hannah Dwyer, Salem, for white 

bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for brown 

bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for white 

bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for entire 

wheat bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for choco- 
late cake. 
.50 Gratuity to Susie Childs, Peabody, for brown 

bread 



27 

$ .50 Gratuity to Sarah E. Durgin, Lynn, for rye and 

flour bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Andrews, Danvers, for white 

bread. 
.50 Gratuity to A. Day, Hamilton, for white bread. 
.50 Gratuity to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for white bread. 
.50 Gratuity to M. E. Dwyer Salem, for jelly. 
.50 Gratuity to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for pickles. 
.50 Gratuity to Ruth Munroe, Peabody, for sponge 

cake. 
.50 Gratuity to Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for fruit cake. 
.50 Gratuity to Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for jelly. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. R. E. Smith, Peabody, for sponge 

cake. 
.50 Gratuity to Grace Jackson, Peabody, for preserves. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Fred Glines, Beverly, for pre- 
serves and jelly. 
.50 Gratuity to A. E. Austin, Salem, for jelly. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. B. Parker, Salem, for jelly. 
2.00 First premium to M. A. Townsend, Lynn, for 

canned fruit. 
1.00 Second premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 

for canned fruit. 
4.00 First premium to Mrs. W. S. Peterson, Topsfield, 

for 5 lbs. butter. 



HONEY. 

2.00 First premium to Walter H. Gould, Ipswich. 
1.00 Second premium to Miss S. J. C. Needham, Pea- 
body. 
Henry Alley, George M. Wonson, Carrie B. Wonson — 

Committee. 



28 



FEARS. 

$2.00 First premium to E. W. Berry, Peabody, for Vicar. 
.50 Gratuity to E. W. Berry, Peabody, for Seckel. 
2.00 First premium to John W. Kimball, Peabody, for 

Seckel. 
2. 00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bartlett. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Buerre 

Bosc. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Burre 

Aujou. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Sheldon- 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Howell. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Lawrence. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Duchess. 
3.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for collection. 

.50 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Seckel. 
1.00 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Louis Bonne. 
1.00 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Clapp's 

Favorite. 
2.00 First premium, to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Dana's Hovey. 
2.00 First premium to Sylvester Parrott, Lynn, for 

Belle Lucrative. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. W. L. Ropes, Salem, for Boussack. 
.50 Gratuity to Luther Woodbury, Beverly, for Belle 

Lucrative. 
.50 Gratuity to C. P. Parker, Salem, for Seckel. 
.50 Gratuity to W. F. Dole, Peabody, for Superfine. 
A. A. Hixon, Judge. 



APPLES. 

2.00 First premium to Lyman Osborn, Peabody, for 
Danvers Sweet 



29 

■12.00 First premium to P. M. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Baldwin. 
2.00 First premium to P. M. Illsley, Newbury, for Rox- 

bury Russett. 
].00 Gratuity to C. P. Parker, Salem, for Transparent 

Crab. 
1.50 First premium to M. A. Townsend, Lynn, for 

Northern Spy. 
1.00 Second i)remium to Louis Karil}', Peabody, for 

Wolf River. 
1.50 First premium to Kate Cram, Peabody, for Hyslop 

Crab. 
2.00 First premium to W. E. Reid, Peabody, for Hul)- 

bardston. 
.50 Gratuity to W. E. Reid, Peabody, for Arctic. 
.50 Gratuity to W. E. Reid, Peabody, for Hyslop Crab. 
2.00 First premium to C. A. Southwick, Peabody, for 

Wolf River. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Graven. 

stein. 
L50 First premium to W. F. Dole, Peabody, for New 

York Pippin. 
1.00 Second premium to W. F. Dole, Peabody, for 

Tompkins' King. 
1.00 Second premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

R, I. Greeninof. 
1.00 Second premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Roxbur}^ Russett. 
2.00 First premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Hunt's Russett. 
2.00 First premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Pickman Pippen. 
1.00 Second premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for 

Dan vers Sweet. 



30 

$1.50 First premium to S. H. Baily, Andover, for Yel- 
low Belleflower. 

1.00 Second premium to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for 
Snow. 

1.00 Second premium to J. W. Martin, Peabody, for 
Hunt's Russett. ' 

1.00 Second premium to Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for 
Mackintosh Red. 

2.00 First premium to B. H. Farnham, North Andover, 
for Porter. 
.50 Gratuity to B. H. Farnham, North Andover, for 
Northern Spy. 

1.00 Second premium to Elmer Durkee, Peabody, for 
Baldwin. 

1.00 Second premium to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Pick- 
man Pippin. 

1.00 Second premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
Porter. 

1.00 Second premium to Annie M. Stevens, North An- 
dover, for Gravenstein. 

2.00 First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 
Mackintosh Red. 

2.00 First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 
R. I. Greening. 

2.00 First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 
Snow. 
.50 Gratuity to Andrew J. Wiggin, Peabody, for 

Nodhead. 
.50 Gratuity to Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead, for Drap 

de Or. 
A. A. Hixon — Judge. 



31 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUIT. 

B2.00 First premium to V. Putnam, Peabody, for Essex 

Co. Seedling Peaches. 
2.00 First premium to S. M. Titcomb, West Newbury, 

for old Mixon Peaches. 
2.00 First premium to S. B. George, Groveland, for 

Elburta Peaches. 
2.00 First premium to Charles B. Derby, Peabody, for 

Early Crawford Peaches. 
.50 Gratuity to P. M. lUsley, Newbury, for Elberta 

Peaches. 
.50 Gratuity to A. U. Welch, Peabody, for Crawford 

Peaches. 
.50 (jrratuity to Luther Woodbury, Beverly, for Seed- 
ling Peaches. 
.50 Gratuity to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for Foster 

Peaches. 
.50 Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for Essex Co. 

Seedling Peaches. 
2.00 First premium to Helen Gardner, Peabody, for 

Pocklington Grapes. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Niagara 

Grapes. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Brighton 

Grapes. 
1.50 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for McPike 

Grapes. 
5.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for collec- 
tion of Grapes. 
3.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for basket 

assorted fruit. 
2.00 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Grand 

Duke Plums. 



32 



$ .50 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Moore's Dia- 
mond Grapes. 
2.00 First premium to M. C. Tyler, Peabody, for Con- 
cord Grapes. 
2.00 First premium to Henry A. Hanson, Peabody, for 

Moore's Diamond Grapes. 
2.00 First premium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for 

Word en Grapes. 
2.00 First premium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for 

Moore's Early Grapes. 
.50 Gratuity to Irving A. Patterson, Peabody, for 

Niagara Grapes. 
.50 Gratuity to Henry A. Briggs, Peabody, for Pock- 

lington Grapes. 
.50 Gratuit}^ to J. H. Kimball, Peabody, for Moore's 

Diamond Grapes. 
.50 Gratuity to Clinton Foster, Beverl}-, for Moore's 

Diamond Grapes. 
2.00 First premium to Helen Wright, Peabody, for 

Orange Quince. 
2.00 First premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 

Champion Quince. 
1.00 Gratuity to Frank W. Southwick, Peabody, for 

Pear Quince. 
2.00 First premium to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Lombard Plums. 
2.00 First premium to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Nickson Plums. 
2.00 First premium, to R. W. Ropes, Salem, forFellen- 

burff Plums. 
2.00 First premium to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for Brad- 

shaw Plums. 
A. A. Hixon — Judge. 



33 

PLANTS. 

15.00 First premium to Mrs. J. C. Rogers, Peabody, for: 

collection of ornamental plants. 

1.00 First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for coll. 

of coleus. 

1.00 First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for coll. 

of fuchias. 

1.00 Gratuity to Wm C. Conlin, Peabody, for rubber 

plant. 

.50 Gratuity to Wm. C. Conlin, Peabody, for shamrock. 

.50 Gratuity to Esther Z. Lovelace, Peabody, for 

lemon plant. 

.25 Gratuity to Elene Masterson, Peabody, for sedum 
plant. 

.25 Gratuity to Nathan Masterson, Peabody, for 
arbutilon. 

.25 Gratuity to Elene Masterson, Peabody, for begonia. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Thomas Nelson, Peabody, for 
rabbitsfoot fern. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Bowman, Peabody, for balsamina. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Feeney, Peabody, for dianthus. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. Stanley, Beverly, for rex 
begonia. 

.50 Gratuity to Ferris F. Smith, Peabody, for Jeru- 
salem cherry tree. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for co- 
cos wedellims. 

.25 Gratuity to Alfred Baker, Peabody, for sea sponge 
and moss. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Abbie G. Horner, Peabody, for 

king and queen fern. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Fred Wagner, Peabody, for rex 
begonia. 

Edw. E. Woodman, Mrs. A. A. Hixon, Mrs. Henrietta 

Dixon — Comrnittee. 



34 

FLOWERS. 

$1.00 First premium to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for 24 pe- 
tunias. 
1.00 First premium to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for 24 
scabiosis. 
.75 Gratuity to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for 24 snap drag- 
ons. 
.75 Gratuity to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for 24 zinnias. 
.50 Gratuity to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for 24 pansies. 
• .75 Gratuity to Amelia Ropes, Salem, for coxcombs. 
1.00 First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 

12 cannas. 
1.00 First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 12 

double petunias. 
2.00 First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for col- 
lection 50 pansies. 
1.00 First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 24 

carnations. 
1.00 First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 
basket garden flowers. 
.75 Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 24 pansies. 
.50 Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for boquet 

garden flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody,^ for snap 

dragon. 
.75 Gratuity to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for 12 dahlias. 
.75 Gratuity to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for collection 
dahlias. 
2.00 First premium to S. B. Whipple, Peabodj'^, for 

Japan lillies. 
1.00 Gratuity to Elizabeth Moxley, Peabody, for 24 
zinnias. 
.50 Gratuity to Sarah Moxley, Peabody, for 12 calen- 
dulas. 



35 

$1 .00 Gratuity to Ethel Tyler, Peabody, for scarlet salvia. 

.50 Gratuity to G. M. Ingalls, Peabody, for montbretia, 

1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 24 

marigolds. 
■1.00 First premium to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody for 

24 dwarf marigolds. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 

24 garden annuals. 
1.00 Second premium to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 

hardy phlox. 
1.00 Gratuity to Frances Stickney, Peabody for 12 
geraniums. 
.50 Gratuity to Rena Legro, Peabody, for boquet 

garden flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Perley K. Kelly, Peabody, for 12 asters. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. F. E. Wilson, Peabody, for 
12 nasturtiums. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. F. E. Wilson, Peabody, for gar- 
den annuals. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Walter Osborn, Peabody, for 

garden annuals. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Walter Osborn, Peabody, for 

Nicotine Santerae. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. N. Moulton, Peabody, for 

Mexican fire plant. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. J. N. Moulton, Peabody, for 24 

garden annuals. 
.50 Gratuity to Ida Barker, Peabody, for 24 marigolds. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for 
24 dwarf marigolds. 
1.00 First premium to Miss Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, 
for phlox drummondii. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. A. L. Arvedson, Peabody, for 
fall crocus. 



36 

I .50 Gratuity to Arthur Peabody, for asters. 
' .75 Gratuity to Weutworth Winchester, Peabody, for 

Japan lillies. 
.50 Gratuity to Abbie W. Trask, Peabody, for bachel- 
or buttons. 
.75 Gratuity to Abbie W. Trask, Peabody, for boquet 

wild flowers. 
1.00 Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for 12 pompon 

dahlias. 
1.00 First premium to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for 12 

single dahlias. 
1.00 Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for 12 cactus 

dahlias. 
.75 Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for 12 large 

dahlias. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. George A. Morrill, Salem, for 

Anemones. 
1.00 Second premium to Walter G. Martin, Peabody, 

for boquet wild flowers. 
2.00 First premium to Mrs. B. P. Danforth, Peabody, 

for design cut flowers. 
2.00 First premium to Mrs. B. P. Danforth, Peabody, 

for cross of wild flowers. 
1.00 Second premium to Esther Danforth, Peabody, for 

basket wild flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Edith Danforth, Peabody, for basket 

wild flowers. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, 

for Delphiniums. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 

12 Dianthus. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 

12 Calendulas. 



37 

$1.00 First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, 
for 12 salpiglosis. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for col- 
lection verbenas. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 12 
scabiosis. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for pair 
boquets. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Mary Smith, Salem, for 12 nas- 
turtiums. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Mary Smith, Salem, for collection 
nasturtiums. 
1.00 First premium to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for 
24 verbenas. 

.50 Gratuity to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for 24 mar- 
igolds. 
3. 00 First premium to DoUie M. Farnham, North An- 

dover, for collection of wild flowers. 
1.00 Gratuity to Dollie M. Farnham, North Andover, 
for basket of flowers. 

,50 Gratuity to Dollie M. Farnham, North Andover, 
for pair boquets. 

.60 Gratuity to Dollie M. Farnham, North Andover, 
for 12 nasturtimns. ^ 

.50 Gratuity to Rena Decatur, Peabody, for collection 
of cosmos. 

.50 Gratuity to Rena Decatur, Peabody, for floral 
design. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. B. Decatur, Peabody, for 
native flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Abbie G. Horner, Peabody, for 
native flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Annie Lawrence, Lynn, for basket of 
flowers. 



38 

$1.00 Gratuity to Annie Lawrence, Lynn, for collection 
of lillies. 
2.00 Second premium to Robert Townsend, Lynn, for 
garden flowers. 
.75 Gratuity to R. W. Townsend, Lynn, for 24 single 
petunias. 
1.00 Gratuity to R. W. Townsend, Lynn, for dwarf 
victoria asters. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. A. N. Jacobs, Peabody, for 24 

garden annuals. 
.75 Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 24 marigolds. 
,50 Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for collection of 

asters. 
.75 Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 24 dwarf mar- 
igolds. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Ada M. Bumham, Beverly, for 
hydranga. 
1.00 Gratuity to Marion Remons, Salem, for tuberous 
begonia. 
.50 Gratuity to Helen G. Lee, Peabody, for 12 calen- 
dulas. 
2.00 First premium to Margaret Buvine, Peabody, for 
12 geraniums. 
.75 Gratuity to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for coll. 
gladiolas. 
2.00 First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 

perennial phlox. 
1.00 First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 

12 phlox. 
3.00 First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 
collection garden flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Mabel Forness, Peabody, for coll. of 
dahlias. 



39 

P .75 Gratuity to Lizzie H. Newhall, Peabody, for 

branching asters. 
1.00 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for bouquets 
garden flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 12 calen- 
dulas. 
.50 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 12 

dianthus. 
.50 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 12 

nasturtiums. 
.75 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 24 

zinnias. 
.75 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for collection 

asters. 
.75 Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for 12 
phlox drummondii. 
1.00 Gratuity to Burnett f Hallo well, Peabody, for 12 
calendulas. 
.75 Gratuity to Burnett Hallowell, Peabody, for 24 
garden annuals. 
1.00 First premium to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

12 flowerinof dahlias. 
1.00 First premium to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

collection of dahlias. 
1.00 First premium to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

12 pompon dahlias. 
1.00 Gratuity to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for coll. 
dahlias. 
.75 Gratuity to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead for 12 

cactus dahlias. 
.50 Gratuity to Mary Phelan, Peabody, for 24 African 
marigolds. 
1 00 Gratuity to Mrs. Joseph Basford, Peabody, for 
collection of phlox. 



40 

^ .60 Gratuity to Mrs. Joseph Basford, Peabody, for 

basket wild flowers. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. Joseph Basford, Peabody, for 

collection dahlias. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mildred A. Fader, Peabody, for pair 
bouquets. 
.59 Gratuity to Jennie Whitman, Peabody, for collec- 
tion of pansies. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. George Green, Peabody, for 24 

pansies. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. George Green, Peabody, for 
collection pansies. 
1.00 Gratuity to Clara A. Southwick, Peabody for wild 

flowers. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. A. Southwick, Peabody, 
for autumn leaves. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Hattie Woodbury, Beverly, for 

basket wild flowers. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Hattie Woodbury, Beverly, for 
cross of wild flowers. 
1.00 First premium to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, 
for 12 asters. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, for 2 

bouquets of asters. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, for 24 

verbenas. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, for 24 

marigolds. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, for 

display of coxcombs. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs L. B. Hood, Peabody, for collec- 
tion of Asters. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. L. B. Hood, Peabody, for nas- 
turtiums. 



41 

^ .50 Gratuity to Laura C. Brooks, Peabody, for collec- 
tion salvia. 
.75 Gratuity to Laura C. Brooks, Peabody, for 12 giant 

asters. 
.60 Gratuity to John H. Kimball, Peabody, for pair 
bouquets. 
1.00 First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 24 

zinnias. 
1.00 First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 24 

pansies. 
1.00 Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for collection 
pansies. 
.60 Gratuity to Emily Giles, Peabody, for French mar- 
igolds. 
Ettori Tassanari, O. F. Newhall, Mrs. John Barker — 
Committee. 



VEGETABLES— FIRST CLASS. 

2.00 First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for man- 
gold wurtzels. 
2.00 First premium to Arthur W. Felt, Peabody, for 

red globe onions. 
2.00 First premium to D. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 

Edmands beets. 
1.00 Second premium to T. F. McDonald, Peabody, for 

parsnips. 
1.00 Second premium to T. F. McDonald, Peabody, for 

Edmands beets. 
2.00 Gratuity to Dale Hill Farm, Rowley, for collection 

of onions. 
2.00 First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for early 

rose potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

early Northern potatoes. 



42 

$2.00 First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

Hebron potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

Clark's No. 1 potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Pearl 

of Savoy potatoes. 
1.00 Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

Carmens No. 3 potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

Rural N. Y. potatoes. 
1.00 Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

New Queen potatoes. 
1.00 Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

white flat turnips. 
1.00 Second premium to Arttiur Easterbrook, Swamp- 

scott, for Ruta Baga turnips. 
1.00 Second premium to T. P. Killam, Boxford, for 

early northern potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to T. P. Killam, Boxford, for New 

Queen potatoes. 
1.00 Second premium to Geo. A. Reynolds, Peabody, 

for Danvers carrot. 
1.00 Second premium to Geo. A. Reynolds, Peabody, 

for Danvers onion. 
1.00 First premium to Charles Reynolds, Peabody, for 

red onions. 
2.00 First premium to Charles Reynolds, Peabody, for 

parsnips. 
2.00 First premium to Town Farm, Peabody, for 

Eclipse beets. 
1.00 Second premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

early rose potatoes. 
2.00 F'irst premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

early Maine potatoes. 



43 

$1.00 Second premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

Rural N. Y. potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

rural Blush potatoes. 
1.00 Second premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

Clark's No. 1 potatoes. 
1.00 Second premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

Pearl of Savoy Potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

Carman's No. 3 potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

early Roberts potatoes. 
2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for Ruta 

Baga turnips. 
1.00 Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, 

for Ruta Baga turnips. 
2.00 First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for white 

flat turnips. 
2.00 First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pur- 
ple top turnips. 



VEGETABLES- CLASS TWO. 

2.00 First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for early 
Brunswick cabbage. 

1.00 Second premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Sa- 
voy cabbage. 

1.00 Second premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for 
red Drumhead cabbage. 

2.00 First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Mar- 
row squash. 

2.00 First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Tur- 
ban squash. 

1.00 Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for green 
flesh melons. 



44 

^ .50 Gratuity to G. F. Stanley, Beverly, for Citron 

melon. 
1.00 Second premium to F. L. Stickney, Peabody, for 

Marrow Squash. 
2.00 First premium to O.F.Newhall, Peabody, for celery. 
1.00 Second premium to Charles Reed, Peabody, for 

cranberries. 
1.00 Gratuity to George D. Hooper, Danvers, for New 

Volga cabbage. 
1.00 Second premium to George D. Hooper, Danvers, 

for all seasons cabbage. 
2.00 First premium to Arthur Easterbrook, Swampscott, 

for Hubbard squash. 
2.00 First premium to John Galeucia, Peabody, for 

Golden Hubbard squash. 
2.00 First premium to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 

Victor squash. 
2.00 First premium to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 

Stone tomatoes. 
1.00 Gratuity to Alexander D. Solomon, Peabody, for 

Martquin Probos. 
1.00 Second premium to E. E. White, Peabody, for 

Victor squash. 
1.00 Gratuity to E. E. White, Peabody, for New Volga 

cabbage. 
2.00 First premium to E. E. White, Peabody, for Liv- 
ingston tomatoes. 
1.00 Second premium to E. E. White, Peabody, for 

Jewell tomatoes. 
.50 Gratuity to E. E. White, Peabody, for cucumbers. 
2.00 First premium to Geo. A. Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Bay State squash. 
2.00 First premium to Geo. A. Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Savoy cabbage. 



45 

$1.00 Second premium to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for 
Turban squash. 

2.00 First premium to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for Nut- 
meg melon. 

1.00 Second premium to Charles RejTiolds, Peabody, for 
Stone tomatoes. 

1.00 Gratuity to George B. Nash, Peabody, for mush- 
rooms. 

4.00 First premium to Town Farm, Peabody, for collec- 
tion vegetables. 

2.00 First premium to N. P. Perkms, Wenham, for all 
seasons cabbage. 

2.00 First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for red 
cabbao^e. 

1.00 Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 
sweet corn. 

1.00 Second premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
Fottler's cabbage. 

2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
deephead cabbage. 

1.00 Gratuity to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for cauli- 
flower. 

2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
sweet corn. 

2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
Stowell's evergreen corn. 

2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for Mar- 
blehead squash. 

2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for But- 
man squash. 

2.00 First premium to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
cranberries. 

2.00 First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
cauliflower. 



46 

$3.00 Second premium to Turner Hill Farm, Rowley, 
for collection vegetables. 
2.00 First premium to J. W. Nichols, Danvers, for 

Cole's early melons. 
2.00 First premium to J. W. Nichols, Danvers, for mush- 
melons. 
1.00 Second premium to J. Breshanan, Peabody, for 

Hubbard squash. 
1.00 Second premium to John W. Shirley, Methuen, for 
celery. 
.50 Gratuity to Robert G. Estes, Peabody, for gourds. 
A. A. Hixon — Judge. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

4.00 First premium to Charles W. Nelson, Newbury- 
port, for 25 ears seed corn. 
Sherman Nelson for the committee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

2.00 First premium to Mrs. M. F. Clair, Peabody, for 

counterpane. 
1.00 Second premium to Mrs. Alice Dearborn, Salem, 

for counterpane. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. Adeline A. Lufkin, Beverly, for 

counterpane. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. Robert J. Sim, Peabody, for 
afghan. 
.50 Gratuity to M. J. Taylor, Salem, for crochet 

afghan. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. William Allen, Andover, for silk 

quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Michael McCarthy, Peabody, for 
silk quilt. 



47 

$ .50 Gratuity to Mrs. Joseph Addison, Wenhara, for 

patcli quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss A. E. Rogers, Beverly, for out- 
line quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to. Mrs. Eliza J. Porter, Peabody, for silk 

quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. S. Ogden, Danvers, for wool 

patch quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Sarah E. Mason, Peabody, for 

patch quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. S. Perkins, Lynn, for patch 

quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Arthur Morse, Salem, for silk 

quilt. 

Mrs. George H. Perkins, Mrs. E. G. Carlton, Mrs. C. A. 
Williams. — Committee. 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

2.00 First premium to Mrs. E. Crane, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
1.00 Second premium to Mrs. F. W. Carlton, Peabody, 
for braided rug. 
. 50 Gratuity to Grace Macdonald, Beverly, for braided 
rug. 
[ y.50 Gratuity to Flora Chatterson, Peabody, for braided 
rug. 
1.00 Gratuity to No. 14 Osborn st., Salem, for 2 braid- 
ed, 1 knit rugs. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Atwater, Salem, 2 drawn rugs. 
. 75 Gratuity to Mrs. John Nolan, Peabody, for 2 silk 

ruofs. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Nolan's friend for drawn rug. 



48 

$ .75 Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for 

knitted rug. 
.75 Gratuity to Miss Smith, Hamilton, for knitted rug. 
.75 Gratuity to Miss S. P. Bassett, Salem, for drawn rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. William Donnell, Peabody, for 

braided rug. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. S. B. Wilson, Peabody, for 2 

braided rugs. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs.S.Wilson, Peabody, for braided rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Geo. L. Peabody, Salem, for 

braided rug. 
50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Folsom, Peabody, for 

braided rug. 
1.25 Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. Goodman, Salem, for 2 

braided rugs. 
3.00 Gratuity to Mrs. Joseph Poor, Andover, for 4 

drawn rugs. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Isaiah Bangs, North Andover, for 

drawn rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Kose, Marblehead, for drawn rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Susan Stewart, Middleton, for 

drawn rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Jane McGlauflin, Beverly, for 

knitted rug. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. E. A. Doyle, Beverly, for 2 silk 

rugs. 
Mrs. George L. Averill, Mrs. Julia A. Cain, Mrs. G. S. 
Perkins. — Committee. 



LEATHER AND ARTICLES MANUFACTURED 

FROM SAME. 

Diploma to the Broadley Leather Co., Salem, for ladies' 
shoes and ladies' vests manufactured from hair 
calf. 



49 

^.00 Gratuity to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for ladies 

shoes. 
1.00 Gratuity to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for men's 

shoes. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MDSE. 

Diploma to John Baker, Manchester, for case of horses' 
shoes. 
.50 Gratuity to Frank Winchester, Peabody, for tool 

chest. 
.75 Gratuity to Amos Falls, Lynnfield, for mallett, etc. 
Thomas Carroll, E. A. Emerson, Henry Hilliard. — 
Committee. 



FANCY WORK. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Gardner, Salem, for crochet 
shawl. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Lucy Reynolds, Peabody, for 
table square. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Matilda R. Nason, Salem, for 
carriage robe. 

.75 Gratuity to A. Austin, Swampscott, for octagon 
centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Annie S. Scher, Salem, for Mex- 
ican work. 

.25 Gratuity to Sarah T. Russell, Salem, for mats. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. C. Frazier, L}Tin, for knitted 
mittens. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Martha Clark, Beverly, for center- 
piece. 

.50 Gratuity to Flora Chatterson, Peabody, for. knitted 
gloves. 



50 

9 .76 Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for 
3 baskets. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss E. A. South wick, Salem, for 
centerpiece. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for 3 
baskets. 

.75 Gratuity to Miss M. S. Andrews, Salem, for 1-2 
dozen doilies. 

.75 Gratuity to Miss M. S. Andrews, Salem, for em- 
broidery. 

.25 Gratuity to Miss|Ada Cole, Marblehead, for basket. 

i 50 Gratuity to Annie Bushby, Peabody, for emb. 
shirt-waist, 

,50 Gratuity to Mrs. M. Stoddard, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. Alfred Larcom, Beverly, for 
beaded necklace. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Brown, Danvers, for lunch 
centerpiece. 

.25 Gratuity to Miss E. M, Fitz, Salem, for emb. 
towels. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss E. M. Fitz, Salem, for stencil work. 

,50 Gratuity to Miss Madaline Curtis, Salem, for Mt. 
Mellice work. 

.25 Gratuity to M. McEllenney, Peabody, for emb. 
centerpiece. 
1.00 Gratuity to M. McEllenney, Peabody, for shirt- 
waist. 

.25 Gratuity to^Mrs.Margaret Jones, Peabody, for emb. 
Centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Edith Gammon, Peabody, for 
Hardenger square. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Edith Gammon, Peabody, for 
Hardenger waist. 



51 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Lucy M. Milton, Dan vers, for 
centerpiece. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. W. N. Durgin, Lynn, for towel. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. R. N. Durgin, Lynn, for emb. 
waist. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss B. Durgin, Lynn, for shirt waist. 

.25 Gratuity to Miss Lizzie Kelley, Peabody, for cro- 
chet doily. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Messenger, Marblehead, for table 
square. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Frank Boyle, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece and scarf. 

50 Gratuity to Mrs. G. H. Gary, Lynn, for Mexican 
work. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. N. A. Worcester, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Bradstreet, Dan vers, for lace cen- 
terpiece. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Brown, Danvers, for doily. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Hartwell, Peabody, for lace 
edging. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. A. W. Powers, Salem, for knit- 
ted shawl. 

.50 Gratuity to Susanna Mills, Peabody, for knitted 
socks. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. P. A. Leavitt, Beverly, for smok- 
ing jacket. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. J. Taylor, Salem, for shawl strap. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. F. T. Dodge, Salem, for set of 
doilies. 

.25 Gratuity to Jennie Whitman, Peabody, for opera 

bag. 
25 Gratuity to Mrs. Edith Mozer, Salem, for seaweed 
portieres. 



52 

$ .25 Gratuity to James Sillars, IT. S. N. for sofa pillow. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss L. A. Stickney, Salem, for netted 
tidy. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. F. A. Forbes, Lynn, for lunch set. 

.25 Gratuity to Susie H. Baker, Ipswich, foremb. cen- 
terpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Alfred Larcom, Beverly, for sofa pillow. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. Pinder, Peabody, for hair-pin 
work. 

.25 Gratuity to M. A. Pendergast, Peabody, for school 
work. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. A. W. Berry, Peabody, for knit- 
ted doll. 

.25 Gratuity to Lizzie Anderson, Peabody, for doll. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. C. Frazier, Lynn, for baby jacket. 

.25 Gratuity to Estelle Whiting, Lynn, for apron. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. G. Chandler, Lynn, for corn 
portieres. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. W. P. Twiss, Peabody, for dra- 
pery. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. Irving H. Dyer, Beverly, for sofa 
pillow. 

.25 Gratuity to Alfred Balser, Peabody, for sofa pil- 
low. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. G. Davis, Beverly, for raffia 
hat. 

.25 Gratuity to Miss M. J. Taylor, Salem, for tatting 
collar. 

.25 Gratuity to Harriet L. Dixon, Lynn, for knitted 
ruffle. 
1.00 Gratuity to Miss E. S. Austin, Salem, for collar sets. 

.25 Gratuity to Maria Trask, Peabody, for doilies. 

.25 Gratuity to Miss F. B. Aldrich, Lynn, for emb. 
waist. 



53 

$ .25 Gratuity to Mrs. W. E. Crocker, Salem, for cen- 
terpiece.. 

, 25 Gratuity to Rena Brown, Peabody, for emb. cen- 
terpiece. 

.25 Gratuity to Ella E. Belyea, Peabody, for lace collar. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. C. Frazier, Lynn, for centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Gertrude Cole, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50 Gratuit}^ to Lizzie Kelley, Peabody, for Honitan 
hdkf. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. M. B. Blake, Danvers, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. G. H. Carey, Lynn, for batten- 
burg. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. S. Moon, Danvers, for embroid- 
ery. 

.25 Gratuity to Miss Jennie Law, Lynnfield, for em- 
broidery. 

.25 Gratuity to Mary Osgood, Peabody, for sideboard 
cover. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. O'Brien, Peabody, for crochet 
collar. 

.25 Gratuity to Mrs. Andrew Fitz, Salem, for Har- 
danger sett. 

.25 Gratuity to Lizzie Kelley, Peabody, for handker- 
chief. 

Mrs. W. L. Williams, Mrs. J. W. Perkins, Mrs. A. A. 
Little — Committee. 



OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. John D. Eaton, Salem, for oil 

painting. 
.50 Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil painting. 



54 

^ .50 Gratuity to A, A. Cole, Marblehead. for water 
color. 
.50 Gratuity to A. A. Cole, Marblehead, for water 

color. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. L. Bell, Marblehead, for water 

color. 

.50 Gratuity to Rena Brown, Peabody, for water color. 

.50 Gratuity to Rena Brown, Peabody, for water color. 

.50 Gratuity to Alice Trask, Peabody, for water color. 

1.00 Gratuity to Alice Frank, Peabody, for water color. 

1.00 Gratuity to Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, for water 

color. 

Mrs. Hall, Miss S. F. Franklin, H. C. Allen — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

5.00 Gratuity to Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, for coll. 
2.00 Gratuity to Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, for punch 

bowl. 
1.00 Gratuity to Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, for raised 

paste. 
3.00 Gratuity to Lucy M. Hood, Salem, for collection. 
2.00 Gratuity to Lucy M. Hood, Salem, for fern dish. 
2.00 Gratuity to Lucy M. Hood, Salem, for raised 

paste and gold. 
3.00 Gratuity to Lucy M. Hood, Salem, for individual 

specimen. 
2.00 Gratuity to Alice Merrill, Peabody, for vase. 
1.00 Gratuity to Annie M. Parmenter, Peabody, for 

vase. 
1.00 Gratuity to Bertlia Plielan, Salem, for fruit dish. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. J. C. Barney, Lynn, for salad 

bowl. 
2.00 Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Cash, Lynn, for individual 

specimen. 



55 

$2.00 Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Cash, Lynn, for tray. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Cash, Lynn, for plate. 
Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Mrs. John Moulton, Mrs. T. E. 
Wilson — Committee. 



CHARCOAL PHOTOGRAPHS AND PEN AND INK 

WORK. 

1.00 Gratuity to Rachael Belinger, Salem, for charcoal 
work. 
.50 Gratuity to Teresa Kelley, Salem, for charcoal 
work. 
2.00 Gratuity to Fred Hagar, Peabody, for colored 
photos. 
.50 Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for colored 
photos. 
1.00 Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for postal cards. 
.50 Gratuity to Timothy GriflBn, Salem, for pen and 

ink work. 
.50 Gratuity to Roger Buxton, Peabody, for pen and 

ink work. 
.50 Gratuity to Roger Buxton, Peabody, for postal 
cards. 
1.00 Gratuity to D. C. Fitz, Salem, for pen and ink 
work. 
.50 Gratuity to D. C. Fitz, Salem, for mechanical 
drawing. 
2.00 Gratuity to Miss C. Rose, Marblehead, for pen and 
ink work. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss C. Rose, Marblehead, for pen and 

ink work. 
2.00 Gratuity to S. W. Symonds, Salem, for cast of Con- 
cord Bridge. 



56 

$1.00 Gratuity to S. W. Symonds, Salem, for cast of 

Page house. 
50 Gratuity to S, W. Symonds, Salem, for cast of 

stone at Lexington Green. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. W. S. Perry, Salem, for pyrogra- 

phy tray. 
.50 Gratuity to E. E. Larrabee, Salem, for inlaid wood. 
.50 Gratuity to Willis F. Knights, Saugus, for book 

rack. 
.50 Gratuity to Willis F. Knights, Saugus, for tray. 
.50 Gratuity to Lucy Hood, Salem, for frame. 
1.00 Gratuity to Mrs. L. G. Hawkes, Saugus, for pyrog- 

raphy. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. L. G. Hawkes, Saugus, for box. 
.50 Gratuity to Walter N. Stiles, for plaster casts. 
1.00 Gratuity to Alfred Baker, Peabody, for pressed 

moss. 
.50 Gratuity to Thomas Sheehan, Peabody, for crayon. 
Mrs. Hall, Miss S. F. Franklin, H. C. AWqh— Com- 
mittee. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

2.00 First premium to Ruth Munroe, Peabody, for 

jacket, etc. 
1.00 Second premium to Margaret Macdonald, Beverly, 

for basket and hats.' 
.25 Gratuity to Irving Baker, Manchester, for doily. 
. 25 ■ Gratuity to Ruth Batchelder, Peabody, for tray 

cloth. 
.25 Gratuity to Lucy N. Sullivan, Peabody, for 

sampler. 
25 Gratuity to Marjorie Munroe, Peabody, for sofa 

pillow. 



57 

$ .25 Gratuity to Catherine McCarthy, Peabody, for 

sampler. 
.25 Gratuity to Maria McBride, Peabody, for sofa 

pillow. 
.25 Gratuity to Eleanor Hallowell, Peabody, for tray 

cloth. 
.25 Gratuity to Susie O'Connor, Peabody, for sampler. 
.25 Gratuity to Margaret O'Connor, Peabody, for 

laundry bag. 
.25 Gratuity to Marion Ellis, Peabody, for pillow 

cases. 
.50 Gratuity to Mabel N. Curtis, Lynn, for doll and 

trouseau. 
.35 Gratuity to Marion L. Beckett, Peabody, for sofa 

pillow. 
.50 Gratuity to Louise McKenzie, Peabody, for doll. 
.25 Gratuity to N. M. Hamilton, Salem, for collars. 
.25 Gratuity to Elizabeth Manning, Peabody, for 

sampler. 
.25 Gratuity to Margaret Barry, Peabody, for sampler, 
.25 Gratuity to Alicia Barry, Peabody, for sampler. 
50 Gratuity to Raymond F. Cole, Peabody, for quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Elfrida Johnson, Peabody, for drawn 

work. 
.35 Gratuity to Inez Townsend, Peabody, for pillow 

cover. 
Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Mrs. W. W. Tuttle, Mrs. C. S. 
Oso^ood — Committee. 



REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have been six new members added to the society 
since the last annual report, five of whom became mem- 
bers by receiving a premium of seven dollars and upwards 



58 

according to the rules of the society, from difterent cities 
and towns as follows : — 

Andover 2 Peabody 1 

Danvers 1 Salem 2 



INSTITUTES. 

The society held four Institutes the past year, on as 
many different days, both forenoon and afternoon, at 
which the following subjects were discussed by any of the 
audience who desired. 

The first Institute was held in Parker Hall, Newbury 
Friday, Jan. 6th, the subject for the forenoon being, 
" Browntail and Gypsey Moths." Afternoon, " Common 
Insect Pests," by Prof. A. H. Kirtland. 

The second Institute was held at Grange Hall, Andover, 
Friday, Jan. 20th, Subject, for forenoon, " Odds and ends, 
or how to make money." Afternoon, " Farmers vs. Edu- 
cation," by Hon. Merrick A. Morse. 

The third Institute was held at Pealiody, Jan. 27th. 
Subject for the forenoon being, " Browntail and Gypsey 
Moths." Afternoon, "Common Insect Pests," by Prof- 
A. H. Kirtland. 

The fourth Institute was held in Grange Hall, Haverhill, 
Friday, March 24th. Subject for forenoon, " The Silo re- 
deeming abandoned Farms." Afternoon, " Yankee Gump- 
tion : How developed," by Sumner H. Reed. 



REPORT OF THE STATE INSPECTOR. 

Hon. J. Lewis Ellsworth, Secretary State Board of 
Agriculture : — 

As the Inspector assigned to the Essex Agricultural So- 
ciety, I wish to say that I attended the society's fair at 



59 

Peabody, Mass., on Sept. 20th, 1905, and report as fol- 
lows. I found a society well worthy of recognition from 
the State and representing the principles of agriculture. 
The grounds, although not enclosed, are nicely located and 
the society itself shows progression and held an up to date 
fair. The exhibit of cattle while not large was extra 
good. The horses, poultry and swine made an exhibit 
large in each class and of extra quality. The hall exhibit 
deserves great praise. The fruit and vegetables on exhibi- 
tion were first class in every particular. It appeared to 
your Inspector that the officers of the society worked in 
harmony to make the society the success it is. 
Respectfully submitted, 
(Signed) Sajviuel B. Taft, Inspector. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE TREAD WELL 

FARM. 

The wooden fences about the yard and buildings in- 
cluding the cow yard and several gates had become so 
dilapidated that the committee decided that a new fence 
was an absolute necessity. They have therefore caused to 
be built a new substantial one, and have authorized the 
cutting down of many fruit and other trees that were once 
useful and ornamental but that have become partially de- 
cayed and no longer desirable. 

The Browntail and Gypsey Moths have to some extent 
infested the trees on the farm, in common with other sec- 
tions of the county, and on notice of the Selectmen of 
Topsfield, the committee met and after examination 
thought that it would be economy to have the town abide 
by the statute of last winter, than to employ inexperienced 
men. Mr. Luther D. Stanwood "is still a tenant of the 



6o 



farm, furnishes the following statement of the crops of the 
year and the experiment of an ensilage crop. 

ToPSFiELD, Nov. 25, '05. 

Benj. p. Ware :■ — 

Dear Sir : — The following is a list of crops raised on- 
Tread well Farm, year of 1905. 
Hay and fodder, 35 tons. 
Apples, 73 barrels. 

Ensilage corn experiment : — 

Ploughing 5 acres, pair horses, one man 2 1-2 days. 
Harrow three times. 

Leaming corn 2 1-2 bush. $1.25 per bush. 
Horse, two men running planter, 8 hrs. 
Cultivated four times, one man and horse. 
30 cords manure used. 
Corn was cut with harvester at $3 per acre. 
Four men, two days, $2 per day ; two double teams and 
man $4, two days filling silo. 

One man and engine, two days, $5 per day. 
Estimated about 75 tons. 
Not less than 20 head of live stock been kept. 

Yours respectfully, 

L. D. Stanwood. 

The stock of cattle appear in good condition with sani- 
tary care. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin P. Ware, Chairman. 



6i 



IN ME MORI AM. 

The following is a list of members deceased as returned 
to the Secretary, not heretofore reported. 

Abbott, Nathaniel, Salem. Page, E. F., Lawrence. 
Bradstreet, Wm., Danvers. Patch, Abraham, Danvers. 
Bateman, A. P., George- Pettingill, D. A., Danvers. 

town. Pickering, Benj. P., Salem. 

Bariy, J. M., Haverhill. Porter, Dudley, Haverhill. 

Beal, James H., Nahant. Parker, E. Francis, Nahant. 

Ballard, Charles W., Salem. Ropes, John C, Salem. 
Buxton, Charles, Salem. Ruht, Joseph, Lawrence. 
Clark, Augustus N., Beverly. Sears, John A., Danvers. 
Dexter, Gordon, Beverly. Sanders, Robert J., Salem. 
Drew, J. D. Lawrence. Spofford, Sumner, George- 

Feltch, Elbridge S., Ames- town. 

bury. Stevens, Oliver, North An- 

Fellows, Alfred, Danvers. dover. 

Foster, William J., Salem. Stan wood, Barnard, Glou- 
Goodell, Byron, Nahant. cester. 

Hayward, Henry A., An- Swan, Leverett, Methuen. 

dover. Tibbetts, Wm. B., Amesbury. 

Hood, Joseph E., Danvers. Upham, George P., Nahant. 
Herrick, Gardner, W., Glou- Ware, Horace C, Salem. 

cester. Webster, Nathaniel, Glouces- 

Horton, Joseph, Ipswich. ter. 

Hathaway, John, Salem. West, James F., Haverhill. 
Jones, L. H., Danvers. White, Henry A., Danvers. 

Kerns, E. C, Danvers. Whitney, George, Nahant. 

Moore, L. C, Lawrence. Wiley, John A., North An- 
Manning, Robert, Salem. dover. 

Osgood, George F., Peabody. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Awarded for Fat Cattle, $ 6 00 



(( 


(( 


Bulls, 


69 00 


u 


(( 


Milch Cows, 


81 00 


a 


;( 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


14 00 


i< 


(( 


Heifers, 


60 00 


(( 


a 


Working Oxen, 


12 00 


(( 


u 


Steers, 


4 00 


(( 


(( 


Horses, 


121 00 


'\ 


u 


Swine, 


58 00 


(( 


(( 


Sheep and Goats, 


13 75 


(( 


(( 


Poultry, 


181 00 



$618 75 



FARM AND GRAIN CROPS. 



Awarded for Grain and Seed, 


$ 4 00 


" " Vegetables, 


128 60 


« « Fruits, 


127 50 


" '' Plants and Flowers, 


126 00 




$386 00 



u 



DOMESTIC DEPAKTMENT, 

Awarded for Dairy, 1$ 4 00 

" " Bread and Canned Fruit, 20 50 

" " Honey, 3 00 

Counterpanes and Afghans, 10 00 

Carpetings and Rugs, 19 25 

Articles Manuf. from Leather, 2 00 

Manufactures and Gen. Mdse.,1 25 

" Fancy Work, 33 00 

•' Works of Art, 54 00 

" Children's Work, 9 20 



(( 



it 



$156 20 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Awarded for Agricultural Implements, |25 00 
" Carriages, 10 00 



u 



135 00 



The amount of $1,195.95 was awarded to 388 individu- 
als and firms in 26 cities and towns as follows : 



Amesbury, 


124 00 


Methuen, 


15 50 


Andover, 


32 35 


Middleton, 


9 00 


Beverly, 


95 50 


Newbury, 


11 50 


Boxford, 


52 00 


Newburyport, 


4 00 


Danvers, 


142 75 


North Andover, 


104 00 


Groveland, 


2 00 


Peabody, 


445 20 


Hamilton, 


8 25 


Rowley, 


8 00 


Haverhill, 


6 00 


Salem, 


91 75 


Ipswich, 


5 25 


Saugus, 


9 50 


Lynn, 


90 40 


Swampscott, 


3 75 


Lynnfield, 


11 00 


Topsfield, 


7 00 


Manchester, 


25 


Wenham, 


5 00 


Marblehead, 


19 50 


West Newbury, 


2 00 



64 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Receipts for admission to Hall and Grounds, 
Receipts from Grounds for various purposes, 
Receipts for dinner tickets, 
Receipts from Grand stand, 
Receipts from Hall, 



$2,337 


35 


354 


00 


79 


00 


57 


60 


25 


00 


$2,852 


95 



65 






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CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Aeticle 1. There shall be a President, four Vice Pres- 
idents, a Secretary, and a Treasurer, who shall be Trus- 
tees, ex-officio, and one Trustee from each city and town 
in the county. The President, Vice Presidents, Secretary 
and one Trustee from each city and town in the county 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer, by the Trustees annually at their meeting in 
November. Nomination for Trustees may be made by 
any member or members of the Society from the city or 
town from which he is to be elected for at least one week 
before said meeting to the Secretary, and he shall prepare 
ballots for the same. 

Art. 2. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the So- 
ciety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at 
which all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at 
least shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the Trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Presidents shall be absent, 
the members present may appoint one from among them 
to preside at such meeting. 

Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting of the Society ; or whenever a 



67 

written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 
shall be made by any twelve members of the Society to 
the President and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon ; seven of whom, with the presiding officer, shall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society during the intervals of its meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the public, 
publish such communications and offer such premiums in 
such form and value as they think proper (provided the pre- 
miums offered do not exceed the funds of the Society); and 
shall lay before the Society at eacli of its meetings a 
statement of their proceedings and of the communications 
made to them. 

Art. 7. The Secretary shall take minutes of all the 
votes and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books ; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustees shall direct. He 
shall write and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which shall be lodged with the Secretary; who shall make 
a fair record thereof. The Treasurer shall from time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have orders for from 
the Trustees ; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, render a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of duty in such 
sum as the trustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 



68 

Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed amiually by 
the trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 
report to the Society ; and the same bemg accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretary in his books. 

Art. 10. In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary or of the 
Treasurer, the Trustees shall take charo;e of the official 
books, papers, and other effects belonging to the office 
that may be vacated, and give receipts for the same, which 
books, papers, etc., they may deliver to some person whom 
they may appoint to fill the office until the next meeting 
of the Society, at which time there shall be a new choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society by paying the sum of three dol- 
lars to increase the permanent fund of the institution. 

Art. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture 
pf our county, the same to be sacredly appropriated to 
that purpose. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the gospel who 
reside within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a mem- 
ber at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the ac- 
tion at the next annual meeting of the Society. 



♦Members will receive from the Secretary a certificate of membership. No 
fines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are entitled to vote in all its 
transactions, with free use of the Library and a copy of the printed Transac- 
tions each year. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

For 1 905-1 906. 



PRESIDENT. 

FEEDERICK A. RUSSELL, of Metlmen. 



VICE PRESIDENTS. 

JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marbleheacl. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
SHERMAN NELSON, of Georgetown. 
IRA J. WEBSTER, of Haverhill. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER. 

WILLIAM S. NICHOLS, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 



BENJAMIN P. WARE, of Marblehead. 
GEORGE V. L. MEYER, of Hamilton. 
FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



70 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynntield. 



TRUSTEES. 



John J. Mason, Amesbnry George W. Hoyt, Merrimac 
George L. Averill, Andover John W. Shirley, Methuen 
John W. Lovett, Bev^erly Walter H. Brown, Middleton 
Wm. Kimball Cole, Boxford Henry Cabot Lodge, Nahant 
Charles H. Preston, Danvers Frank Perkins, Newbury 
Elias Andrews, Essex Rufus Adams, Newburyport 

Samuel T. Poor, Georgetown Winfield S. Hughes, No. An- 
Geo. M. Wonson, Gloucester dover 

Sam'l B. George, Groveland Orlando F. Newhall, Peabody 
Isaac F. Knowlton, Hamilton John J. Manning, Rockport 
B. Frank Barnes, Haverhill Frank Todd, Rowley 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich George W. Crossey, Salem 
Chas. E. Wingate, Lawrence George A. Dow, Salisbury 
Edwin Bates, Lynn. Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 

John H. Perkins, Lynntield Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott 
John H. Cheever, Manches- Charles J. Peabody, Topsfield 

ter J. Kavanagh, Wenham 

Amos P. Alley, Marblehead Richard Newell, W. Newbury 



J906 
PREMIUM LIST OF 

Essex Agricultural Society 

FOR THE 

Eighty-fifth Annual Cattle Show and Fair* 



Duties of Trustees. 



The trustee of each town is instructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their 
duties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to 
the Exhibition the importance of entering their exhibits for 
the hall the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Committees, 
and making sure that the names proposed at those meetings 
are of persons who will serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the 
Fair Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the 
grounds at twelve o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the 
exhibition, and there organize, take the books of entry, and 
proceed at once to business. Committees in hall should take 
the books of entry from the Superintendent promptly after the 
entries close. 

Full reports "of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 



72 

A majority of any committee are authorized to act. 

():;^='No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 

The diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of special merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except Ihe 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures in hall, and flowers ; 
or any premium, unless the rules of the Society have been 
strictly complied with. Neither shall they award premiums 
or gratuities in excess of the amount appropriated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents, except 
on work by the children, and none in that class less than 
twenty-five cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals blue and red printed premium 
ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assistants on 
the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals or arti- 
cles, designating the grade of premium awarded each, and the 
name of the person to whom aAvarded, and especial care should 
be taken that the cards issued correspond with the awards in 
their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on animals and articles 
exhibited at the Show, must be delivered promptly to the 
Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

Any member of a committee who cannot serve on the same is 
requested to give notice to the Secretary, before the show, so that 
the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a ticket 
of admission to the grounds and hall of exhibition on applica- 
tion to the Secretary. 



General Rules. 

Com2)etitors are requested to carefully read the rules and pre- 
Tnlum list before making entries. 

Claim (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, mi;st be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 



73 

All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person not a viember of the SocAetij, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, for 
which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase the 
funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium of gratuity is awarded or an 
agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at Sa- 
lem Safe Deposit and Trust Co., Salem, on and after the first 
Monday of November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day of 
May next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered as 
given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the several committees and adopted by the Soci- 
ety shall be final. Committees shall see that the premium 
cards issued, corresjjond with the premiums and gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his 
intention to compete for the same ; and committees are in- 
structed to award no premium unless the animal or article 
offered is worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall be entered in another class, except farm 
horses which may be entered for fast walking, and Milch 
Cows which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premiums must be owned by residents 
and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 
themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered ; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture. 

The Proof that an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders, and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 



74 

Standard adopted : — American Jersey C. C. Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

The Committee will take notice that no premium will be 
awarded unless the animals or objects are of a decidedly super- 
ior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
special merit, in all departments of the Fair. 

In the case of a deficiency in the receipts at the Fair in any 
year, the society reserves the right to reduce the premiums 
offered, pro rata, not to exceed one-half the amount offered. 



Cattle and Other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition , except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals entered for premium or exhibition will be fed 
during the Exhibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity, 
prevented from leaving, at the expense of the society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense^thereof, all of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with Committee's report. 

For pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $7, 5 

For Fat Cows, premiums, $5, 3 

BULLS. 

* Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Three years old and upwards, premiums, $7, 6 

Under three years old, for each breed, $5, 3 

One year old and under, for each breed, $3, 2 



75 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREE1>. 

For the best bull of any age of either of the above breeds 
with five of his stock not less than six months old, quality and 
condition to be taken into account, and especially the adapti- 
bility of the animal to the agriculture of the county. 

Diploma and $10 

NOTE.— Competitors are required to give a written statement of pedigree and 
committees are requested to be particular in this respect and return them to the 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $7, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, SliDit Horn, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old 
and upwards, premiums for each breed, $6, 4 

For the best Native or Grade Cow, 'four years old and up- 
ward, premiums, $6, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week, 
from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $6, 4 

NOTE.— A written statement will be required of the age and breed of all Milch 
« ;ow8 entered, and time they dropiied their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, quality and quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding, which statement is to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For h'.-rds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to 
be exl ri:ited at the Show of either of the above breeds and a 
correofc statement of manner of keeping and yield for one year 
preceeding the Show, premiums. Diploma and $8, 6 

NOTK.— The above mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
wltii C (remittee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 
Jan. 1-it, preceding the Show. 

HEIFERS. 

First Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon,' Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 

Less than two and more than one year old, each breed, $3, U 



76 

One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $2, 1 
Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old, premiums, $5, 3 

Two years old, that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, premiums, $3, 2 
One year old and under, and less than two, premiums, $2, 1 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, and quality and training, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $5, 4 

NOTE.— The Committee are required to consider the quality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their working capacity. The training of working oxen and 
steers will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containing a load weigh- 
ing two tons lor oxen, and three thousand pounds for steers. ([g^At the time of 
entry a certificate of the weight of the cattle must be filled with the Secretary. 

STEERS. 

For pair of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, $7, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft purposes, three years old, 
premiums, $5, 3 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums, Diploma and $7, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums, Diploma and $5, 3 

NOTE.— No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$7, 5 



17 

BROOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Driving purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, $7, 5 

Note— No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all appar- 
ent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES 
For Family Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

Note— No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $9, 6 

LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

For Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $9, 6 

GENTLEMEN'S SADDLE HORSES. 
Gentlemen to ride on track, premiums, $5, 3 

LADIES' SADDLE HORSES. 
Ladies to ride on track, premiums, $5, 3 

FAST WALKING HORSES^ 

For pairs of Fast Walking Horses, premiums, [$5, 4 

For single horses, °if !j$4, 3 

For pairs of farm horses with load of 4,000 lbs., premiums, 

($5, 4 
For single farm horse, with load of 2,000 lbs., premiums, 

$4,3 
li^^The above to have trial on the track. 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1,200 lbs. and over, premiums, 

_ $6,4 
For Farm Horses weighing less than 1,200 lbs. premiums, 

$6,4 

Note— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weig^ht of the load to be used in trial of Farm 
Horses is to be fixed upon by the committee of arrangements for drafting, the 
difference in the load for horses of 1,'200 lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 lbs. 
to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pairs, 2,000. No obstruction shall 
be placed either before or behind the wheels iu trials of Draft Horses of either 
class, but wheels shall be blocked behind to hold the load when a team stops go- 
ing up hill. 



78 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES WEIGHING 2400 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses, weighing 2400 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, $8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2400 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2400 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES 3 AND 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding four-year-old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year-old Colts, premiums, $5, 3 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premiums 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $3, 2 

COLTS, FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOUR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four-year-old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three-year-old colts, premiums, $5, 3 

ONE AND TWO YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, premiums, 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $3, 2 

N. B.— In all the above classes the eommittee will act with the expert judge 
except Fat Cattle, Working Oxen and Steers. 

HORSES FOR HURDLE JUMPING. 

For Horses jumping over four-foot hurdles, premiums, $8, 6 
For high hurdle-jumping, premium, 8 

SWINE, BOARS. 

For Berkshire, Cheshire, Chester, Essex, Poland China, 
Suffolk, Large Yorkshire, Small Yorkshire Boars, not less 
than one year old, premiums, $4, 2 

For Breeding Sows, and pigs by their side of the above 

creeds with not less than five i^igs, premiums, $4, 2 

For the best grade sow and pigs, premiums, $4, 2 



79 

For Litters of weaned Pigs not less than eight weeks old> 
premiums, $4, 2 

Thoroughbred Swine shall show satisfactory proof that 
they are pure blood, otherwise they shall be considered Grade. 

SHEEP. 

For flock of Sheep, not less than six ewes in number, each 
breed, premiums, $5, 3 

For best Buck, premium, 4 

For lots of Lambs, not less than six ewes in number, be- 
tween four and twelve months old, premiums, $5, 3 

ANGOEA GOATS. 

For flocks of Angora Goats not less than six, prem., $5, 3 

POULTRY. 

For the best Cockerel, best Hen, Cockerel and Pullet, of all 
recognized breeds, each variety. Premium for each, $1, .50 

To be used by the committee in their discretion for collec- 
tions of Bantams, no person to receive more than five dollars, 

$15 

For the best breeding pen of each variety of four females 
and male, premium. $2, 1 

For lots of turkeys, and Alesbury, Eouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks, and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China, and African Geese, prem., $2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the discharge 
of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any specimen 
on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all claim he 
may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the "American Standard of Excellence." 

Note. — No pair in a pen will receive a premium as a pair. 

STREET PARADE. 

Invitation is extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of the committee in 
charge in premiums or gratuities. $50 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no 
article offered in collection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium), Diploma and $8 



8o 



Best market wagon. 

Best horse cart. 

Best ensilage cutter. 

Best fruit evaporator with sample work. 

To be awarded for the above in gratuities a sum not exceed- 
ing $30. 

For implements not specified above, the Committee may, at 
their discretion, award $20. 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Kake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the merit 
of which can be shown only by actual trial in the field ; but 
manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition and 
inspection. 

CAERIAGES. 

For carriages built in the county, and exhibited by the 
manufacturer, Diploma and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 

Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be espe- 
cially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued with 
the names and sums awarded them, correspond with these in 
their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instructions 
under heading of "Duties of Committees," " General Rules," 
" Premiums to be awarded at the Show," see first pages and 
under "Fruit," "Domestic Manufactures," and "Flowers." 

[i;^=All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manufac- 
tures, must be the products of Essex County to be entitled to 
a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers one hundred dollars to be divided in 
three premiums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex 
County, as follows : — Premiums, $50, 30, 20 

Note.— This Exhibit includes all Fruit, Vegetables and Domestic Manufactures 
that are exhibited in any other department in Exhibition Hall. 

DAIRY, BREAD, CANNED FRUIT AND HONEY. 

For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making 
and management of the Butter, premiums, $4, 3 



8i 



For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, $4, 3 

For white bread made of Wheat Flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from Graham Flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread entered for premiums to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collections of Preserved Fruits 
and Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, $2, 1 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of process 
used and amount of labor and time required in preparing and 
drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on articles entered in this depart- 
ment, products of this County deemed worthy, $10 

First and second best honey, not more than five nor less 
than three pounds in comb with one pound of same extracted, 
made in the County, with statement signed of kind of bees and 
hive, and time of year when honey was made, premiums, $2, 1 



Fruit. 



All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the first day of the exhibition, and each exhibi- 
tor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists of 
the varieties of each class of fruit, or to be filed when entry 
is made. (Committees are not authorized to make awards to 
those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a consjjicuous manner by the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors^ with the names of fruit 
for which premiums are offered, all others of same class fruit 
to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place their 
several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated by such 
labels, or be considered by the committee as not competing 
for premiums. 



82 



Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee), to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit, 

PEAES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Angouleme, Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckel, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Comice, Howell and Clairgeau, each, premiums, $2, 1, .50 

Doyenne d'Ete, Gilford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early) , are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $1.50 

For best collection of pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Wolf River, Sutton Beauty, 
Hubbardson, Mackintosh Red, Porter, Pickman Pippin, Rox- 
bury Russett, Rhode Island Greening, Gravenstein, Hunt Rus- 
set, Ladies' Sweet, Snow, Bailey Sweet, Wealthy, premium 
for each, $2, 1, .50 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early.) 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

For best collection of apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab ap- 
ples deemed worthy by the committee, $1.50, 75 

PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

For best twelve specimens of Freestone, white flesh, yellow 

flesh, Essex County seedling, each variety, $2, 1, .50 

For best collection of peaches, premium, $3 



83 

For the best twelve specimens of Champion, Lemon, or 
Orange Quinces, premium, $2, 1, .50 

For the best twelve specimens of plums, five varieties to be 
selected by committee, each variety, premium, $2, 1, .50 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, 
Brighton, Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, Pocklington, 
Niagara Grapes, each variety, premium, $2, 1, .50 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than eight 
pounds in all, premiums, $5 

For best specimens of four bunches of grapes, varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

$1.50 

For basket of assorted fruits, premiums, $3, 2 



Plants and Flowers. 

KULES AND REGULATIONS. 

1. All plants and flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or be- 
fore eleven o'clock on the first day of the fair, and all such 
plants and flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of plants and 
flowers is designated in the schedule, there must be neither 
more not less than that number or quantity of specimens 
shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article,^ only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is ofi'ered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for com- 
petition but no variety can be duplicated. 

4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens 
exhibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of 
superiority and worthy of such premium, not, even if they 
are the only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admit- 
ted in competition for another different premium. 



84 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, or 
in the case of native plants and flowers, where such were 
found. 

7. All plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood or some 
other permanent and suitable substance, and so attached to 
same as to be easily seen. Flowers when specified to be 
named to comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symmetry and vigor of the specimens ; also bouquets, baskets, 
design work, etc., must show taste, skill, and harmony in 
arrangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All flowers exhibited must be shown upon their oivn 
stem, flowers in " Design " word alone excepted; and this 
exception, if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account 
by the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or "Designs of merit " 
for which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together) on plants and flowers 
exceed the amount, $125, limited by the Society for this de- 
partment. 

11. No member of the committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuties shall in any case vote, or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarilij vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for plants and flowers, and General Rules of the Socie- 
ty, and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhib- 
itors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 

Committee on plants and flowers will take notice, 

PLANTS. 

Plants competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots, native plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 

For collection flowering and ornamental foliage plants , at 
least 25 specimens, premium, $3, 2 



85 

For collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties', 
premium, $1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 3 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection of Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, prem., .tl>l 
For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, 
premium, $ I 
For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $2 
For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., f 1 
For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 5 va- 
rieties, premium, $2 
For collection Calla Lillies, 5 specimens, premium, $1 
For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least 50 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which is to be a cross section, and neither to be more than 
four inches in length or diameter, premiums, $S, 2 

FLOWERS. 

For collection cut flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 

least 50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For collection cut flowers, native, 100 specimens, at least 50 

varieties, named, $3, 2 

For pair bouquets for vases, of native flowers, premiums, 

$1, 50 
For pair of bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, prems., 

11, .50 



86 



For basket of green -house flowers, premiums, $2, 1 

For basket of native flowers, premiums, $1, 50 

For basket of garden flowers, premiums, f I, .50 

Eor arrangement of native flowers and autumn leaves, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 
For floral designs, choice cultivated flowers, prems., ^3, 2 
For floral designs, native flowers, premiums, $3,2 
For collection Pansies, at least 50 specimens neatly and ar- 
tistically arranged, premiums, $2, 1 
For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premiums, $1, .50 
For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six va- 
rieties, named, premiums, $1, *50 
For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premiums, $1, .50 
For Cactus Dahlias, premiums, $1, .50 
For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 
For twelve Gladiolus (spikes), at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $ I 
For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premiums, $1, .50 
For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premiums, $1, .50 
For twelve Phlox, hardy, perennial, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 
For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem., $1 
For twenty-four Carnation pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $L 
For twenty-four verbenas, at least six varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty-four Roses, at least six varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty- four garden annuals, at least twelve varieties, 
named, premium, $1 
For twelve Calendula.s, at least two varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, $1 
For twelve Branching Asters, premium, $1 
For twelve Asters, Pompon, premium, $1 
For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, f L 
For twenty-four Zinnias, double, in variety, premium^, $1 



^7 

For twenty-four Mai'igolds, African, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty -four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $1 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Dianthus (double annual), in variety, premium, 

$1 
For collection of Snapdragon, premium, $1 

For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, $1 

For collection of Sweet Peas, premium, $1 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS ONE. 

Rules for fruit apply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens, Crosby Egyptian, and 
Edmands, premium, each variety, $2, 1 

Carrots — For best twelve. Long Orange and Dan vers, pre- 
miums, each variety, $2, 1 

For best twelve. Short Horn, Orange Carrots, $2, 1 

Mangold Wurtzels — For best six specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Flat turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top, 
White Flat, White Egg and Purple Top Globe, premiums, 
each variety, $2, 1 

Ruta Bagas — Twelve specimens. For best Yellow and 
White, premiums, each variety, $2,1 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Onions — Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow 
Flat and Red, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Robert's Early, Early Harvest, Green Mountain, 
Irish (Nobler, Good Times, Early Northern, premiums, each 
variety, $2, 1 

For collection of above Vegetables, not less than three of a 
kind, premiums, $4,3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $10 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS TWO. 

Cabbages — For the best three specimens, Savoy, Fottler's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, Jersey Wakefield, Danish Bald Head, each 
variety, premiums, . $2, 1 



88 



Cauliflower — For best three specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Celery — For best four roots, Paris Golden, Boston Market, 
Giant Pascal, Bleached, premiums, $2, 1 

Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best, Early, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 

For best twelve ears in milk, late, premiums, $2, 1 

Squashes — For best three specimens, Marrow, Warren 
Turban, Hubbard, Golden Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hy- 
brid, Bay State, Sibley, Butman, Victor, each variety, premi- 
ums, $2, 1 

^^ ' ns — For best three specimens, Nutmeg, Musk, Cassaba, 
Sai n Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 

For best two specimens Watermelons, premiums, $1, .50 

Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens, Bound Flat and 
Bound Spherical, each variety, premiums, $1, .50 

For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premiums 

$2, 1 

Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premiums, $2, 1 

For collection of Vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $10 

II^^No competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums 
are offered for. 

Collections of Ver/etables, where premiums are offered for a number of varieties, 
must be entered and placed, not less than three of a kind by themselves on the 
tables assig;ned for collections. No collection shall receive but one premium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to compete with speci- 
mens of the same variety placed elsewhere. Exhibitors of such collections, how- 
ever, are not prevented from exhibiting additional specimens of any variety 
with and in competition with like variety. All vegetables must be entered in the 
name of the grower of them. 

Size of Vegetables. Turnip, Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions 
2 1-2 to 4 inches in largest diameter ; Potatoes to be of good size for family use ; 
Squashes to be pure and well ripened, Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 



GKAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Bye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premium, $1 

For twenty-five ears Field Corn, premiums, $4, 3, 2 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $4, 2 
All grain or seed vmist have been groivn by the exhibitor in 
the County to receive a premium. 



89 - 
Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 
1 o'clock on the first clay of the Exhibition. Articles not thus 
deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 
be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to 
the last exhibition of the Society. 

COUKTERFANES AND AEGHANS. 

Eor Wrought Counterpanes, having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $20 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets having regard to the quality and expense of the 
material, premiums, $2, 1 

Eor Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the quali- 
ty of the work and expense of materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount not to exceed $20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For exhibit of Manufactured Leather and Skins, 

Society's Diploma, 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 

Women's do., Children's do., each premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each premium, 

$3 

$20 are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Bobts and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium, Diploma of the Society 

T^IANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, 

$25 



90 

FANCY WORK. 

Of Domestic Manufacture are not included, in the above. 
At the disposal of the committee in this department, to 
be awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, 

$40 

OIL PAIXTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, 

DECORATED CHINA. 

For best collection Decorated China, premiums, $5, 3 

For best individual specimen, premiums, $3, 2 

For Punch Bowl or set, premiums, , $2, 1 

For Fern dish, premiums, $2, 1 

For raised paste or gold, premiums, $2, 1 

For Vase, premiums, $2, 1 

For Tray, Plate, etc., premiums, $2, 1 
At disposal of the committee for anything meritorious. $5 

CHARCOAL, PEN AND INK WORK, PHOTOGRAPHS, 

ETC. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2, in any one gratuity, 

$20 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, prems., $2, 1 

At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $15 
not less than 25 cents in any one gratuity. 



91 



List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November* 



SMALL FRUITS. 

Fox the best product of not less than twenty-five trees, 
taking into account quantity and quality of Peaches, Plums 
and Quinces, premium, $8 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture of crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $7 

For best crop of currants, raspberries, blackberries and 
Gooseberries, with statement as above, premium each, $7 ■ 

LIBRARY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; B. P. Ware, Mar- 
blehead ; J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 

TREADWELL FARM. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield ; Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; Sherman Nelson, 
Georgetown. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee — Charles Sanders, Salem ; Benj. P. Ware, 
Marblehead ; Lyman Osborne, Peabody. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Committee — Frederick A. Russell, Methuen ; J. M. Dan- 
forth, Lynnfield Center; Sherman Nelson, Georgetown. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of crops, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Report of Annual Meeting 3 

Entries 6 

Report on Fat Cattle 9 

Report on Bulls • • • ■ 9 

Report on Milch Cows 10 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 11 

Report on Heifers 11 

Report on Working Oxen 13 

Report on Steers 13 

Report on Stallions , 13 

Report on Brood Mares 14 

Report on Family Horses 14 

Report on Gents' Driving Horses 14 

Report on Ladies' Driving Horses 14 

Report on Fast Walking Horses 15 

Report on Single Farm Horses 15 

Report on Fairs Farm Horses 15 

Report on Colts 15 

Report on Hurdle Jumping 16 

Report on Swine 16 

Report on Sheep 18 

Report on Goats 18 

Report on Poultry 18 

Report on Agricultural Implements 24 

Report on Carriages 25 

Report on Honey 27 

Reports on Bread and Canned Fruit 26 

Report on Pears 28 

Report on Apples 28 

Report on Peaches, Grapes and Assorted Fruit 31 

Report on Plants 33 

Report on Flowers 34 

Report on Vegetables 41 

Report on Grain and Seed 46 



94 



Page 

Keport on Counterpanes and Afghans 46 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 47 

Report on Arcticles Manufactured from Leather 48 

Report on Manufactures and General Mdse 49 

Report on Fancy Work 49 

Report on Oil Paintings and Water Colors 53 

Report on Decorated China 54 

Report on Charcoal, Photographs and Pen and Ink Work 55 

Report on Work by Children 56 

Report of New Members 57 

Institutes 58 

Report of the State Inspector 58 

Report of Committee on the Treadwell Farm 59 

In Memoriam 61 

Recapitulation 62 

Financial Statement 64 

Treasurer's Report 65 

Constitution of the Society 67 

Officers of the Society 70 

Premium List for 1904 86 

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