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Full text of "Transactions for the year ... of the Essex Agricultural Society of the County of Essex, in Massachusetts"

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TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1906 



Essex Agricultural Society 



(Organized 1818.) 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



vnd the Premium List of 1907. 

And revised list of members. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS. 

Newcomb & Gauss, Printers. 

1906. 






or 



CHAPEL 



EIGHTY-SIXTH 

Annual Cattle Show and Fair- 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the 
Peabody Institute at Peabody, Sept. 20, 1906. 

President Frederick A. Russell called the meeting to 
order at 9.45 o'clock A. M. 

On motion of Elias Andrews of Essex it was voted to 
proceed to ballot for all the officers of the society on one 
ballot except the trustees. 

It was voted that the President appoint a committee of 
three to receive, assort and count the votes. 

The chair appointed Mr. Preston of Danvers, Mr. An- 
drews of Essex, and Mr. Barnes of Haverhill. 

Result of the Ballot. 

FOR PRESIDENT. 

Frederick A. Russell of Methuen had 17 votes 

FOR. VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

James J. H. Gregory of Marblehead had 17 

Asa T. Newhall of Lynn 17 

Sherman Nelson of Georgetown had 17 

Ira J. Webster of Haverhill had 17 



FOR SECRETARY. 

John M. Danforth of Lynnfield had 17 

and the above were declared elected. 

Voted — To proceed to the election of trustees and to 
take up each town separately, and the following persons 
were declared elected 

John J. Mason, Amesbury George W. Hoyt, Merrimac 
George L. Averill, Andover John W. Shirley, Methuen 
John W. Lovitt, Beverly Walter H. Brown, Middleton 
John Parkhurst, Boxford Henry Cabot Lodge, Nahant 
Charles H. Preston, Danvers Frank Perkins, Newbury 
Elias Andrews, Essex Paul T. Winkley Newburyport 

Saml. T. Poor, Georgetown W. S. Hughes, No. Andover 
Geo. M. Wonson, Gloucester Orlando F. Newliall Peabody 
Saml. B. George, Groveland John J. Manning, Rockport 
Isaac F. Knowlton, HamiltonFrank P. Todd, Rowley 
B. Frank Barnes, Haverhill George W. Cressy, Salem 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich George A. Dow, Salisbury 
Chas. E. Wingate, Lawrence Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 
Edwin Bates, Lynn Win. H. Bates, Swampscott 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield Charles J. Peabody, Topsfield 
John H. Cheever, Manchester J. Kavanaugh, Wenham 
Amos P. Alley, Marblehead Richard Newell, West Newbury. 

The report of the committee chosen at the June meet- 
ing of the trustees to prepare suitable notice to be spread 
upon the records of the society, of its late President Ben- 
jamin P. Ware was presented and read by the secretary 
and accepted and adopted by a rising vote. 

After some discussion of matters of interest to the soci- 
ety the meeting disolved. 

John M. Danforth, Secretaty. 

The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1906, and tabulated for comparison as follows: — 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON FAIR GROUNDS. 





Entries 
in 1906. 


From 
Different 
Places 
in 1906. 


Entries 
in 1905. 


From 
Different 

Places 
in 1905. 


Fat Cattle 








1 


1 


Bulls 


7 


3 


19 


5 


Milch Cows 


15 


3 


26 


7 


Herds of Milch Cows 


1 


1 


2 


1 


Heifers, Pure Breed 


16 


4 


19 


5 


Heifers, Grade 


2 


2 


24 


5 


Working Oxen and Steers 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Steers 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Stallions. Farm and Drafts 














Stallions for Driving 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Brood Mares, Farm and Draft 2 


1 


2 


2 


Brood Mares for Driving 


1 


1 


3 


2 


Family Horses 


2 


1 


3 


2 


Pairs Gents' Driving Horses 





1 


1 


Single Gents' Driving Horses 5 


2 


6 


4 


Ladies' Driving Horses 


3 


3 


1 


1 


Fast Walking Horses 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Single Farm Horses 


2 


1 


3 


2 


Pairs Farm Horses 








1 


1 


Colts, Farm and Draft 


1 


1 


6 


2 


Colts for Driving 


6 


3 


2 


2 


Horses for Hurdle Jumping 


■ 15 


1 


9 


1 


Swine 


9 


1 


28 


3 


Sheep 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Goats 


3 


2 


3 


2 


Poultry 


285 


10 


150 


7 


Agricultural Implements 


6 


3 


19 


4 


Carriages 


5 


2 


4 


1 



EXHIBITS IN HALL. 





Entries 
in 1906. 


From 
Different 
Places 
in 1906. 


Entries 
in 1905. 


From 
Different 
Places 
in 1905. 


Grange Exhibits 














Dairy 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Bread and Canned Fruit 


39 


8 


74 


10 


Honey 


2 


2 


2 


2 


Pears 


59 


8 


39 


5 


Apples 


130 


16 


86 


11 


Peaches, Grapes,\and As- 










sorted Fruit 


102 


12 


87 


11 


Plants 


27 


3 


20 


2 


Flowers 


245 


9 


201 


8 


Vegetables 


224 


14 


170 


12 


Grain and Seed 


14 


6 


2 


2 


Carpets and Rugs 


24 


4 


27 


7 


Counterpanes and Afghans 


40 


6 


17 


7 


Articles M'n'f'd from Leathe 


ir 2 


1 


2 


2 


Manufactures and Gen. Mdse. 2 


2 


4 


3 


Fancy Work 


101 


12 


159 


9 


Oil Paintings and Water 










Colors 


57 


9 


34 


7 


Decorated China 


33 


5 


31 


4 


Charcoal Work, Photos, &c. 


64 


8 


73 


5 


Work by children under 12 










years of age 


31 


3 


22 


5 



Grand total of 1524 entries from 27 of the 34 cities and 
towns in Essex County against 1370 from 26 cities and 
towns last year. Gloucester, Manchester, Merrimac, Me- 
thuen, Nahant, Rockport and Salisbury did not have ex- 
hibits this year. 

The entries were: Amesbury, 4; Andover, 30; Beverly, 
103; Boxford, 51; Danvers, 116; Essex, 3; Georgetown, 1; 



Groveland, 6; Hamilton, 11; Haverhill, 19; Ipswich, 5; 
Lawrence, 1; Lynn, 131; Lynnfield, 25; Marblehead, 29; 
Middleton, 24; Newbury, 21; Newburyport, 1; No. Andover, 
51; Peabody, 655; Rowley, 2; 'Salem, 196; Saugus, 12; 
Swampscott, IB; Topsfield, 1; Wenham, 10; West New- 
bury, 3. 



Reports of Committees. 



BULLS. 



First premium to N. A. Gage, North Andover, for 
Ayrshire Bull, "Silver King of Greenfield," No. 
8817. 

5. Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Dan vers, for 
Ayrshire Bull, "Domino D,"No. 9081. 
10. First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, for 
Holstein Bull, " Earl Aggie de Kol, 2d," with five 
of his stock. 

7. First premium to Win. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
Guernsey Bull, " Hardwick Senator," No. 8821. 

5. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
Guernsey Bull, " Plymouth Mainstay," No. 10,555. 

7. First premium to John A. Jenkins, Andover, for Jer- 
sey Bull. 

3. First premium to John A. Perkins, Andover, for 
Jersey Bull calf, 3 mos. old. 
S. H. Reed, B. F. Barnes, Warren M. Cole — Committee. 



MILCH COWS. 

£6. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 
Ayrshire Cow, " Queen Daisy," No. 8508. 

6. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
Guernsey Cow, "Polly of Topsfield," No. 13546. 

4. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
Guernsey Cow, " Topsfield's Rosie," No. 16179. 



56. First premium to L. B. Walton, Peabody, for Grade 

Ayrshire Cow. 
6. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, " Betz Fairfax." 
4. Second premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for 

Ayrshire Cow, " Crosby of Whitehill," No. 14974. 
6. First premium, to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for 

Grade Guernsey Cow. 
4. Second premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover for 

Grade Guernsey Cow. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

3. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Herd of Holstein Cows. 
S. H. Reed, S. H. Bailey, Frank P. Todd, E. A. Emer- 
son — Committee. 



HEIFERS— PURE BREED. 

•S4. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 
Ayrshire Heifer, " Daisy Fox," No. 19980. 

3. Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 
Ayrshire Heifer, " Aphelia Fox." 

3. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
Guernsey Heifer, " Rosie Hardwick," No. 18,686. 

2. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
Guernsey Heifer, Miss Hardwick, No. 18,454. 

2. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 
Guernsey Heifer, 1 yr. old. 

2. First premium to John A. Jenkins, Andover, for Jer- 
sey Heifer. 

2- First premium to John A. Jenkins, Andover, for 
Guernsey Heifer. 



IO 

|5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Heifer, "Grace Shephard De Kol," No. 

70294. 
3. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Heifer, " Therisa Netherland De Kol, " 

No. 70270. 
3. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Heifer, " Grace Fairfax Aggie De Kol," 

No. 76065. 
3. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Heifer, Jacobs De Kol Shephard. 
2. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Heifer. 

1. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Heifer Calf. 

2. Second premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for 

Ayrshire Heifer, » Maud Orr~, 2d," No. 19338. 

3. First premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for Ayr- 

shire Heifer, " Daisy Gebic 2d." 
2. First premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for Ayr- 
shire Heifer Calf. 
2. First premium to N. A. Gage, No. Andover, for 
Grade Heifer. 
S. H. Reed, S. H. Bailey, Frank P. Todd — Committee. 



WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

)7. P^irst premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

pair Holstein Oxen. 
5. Second premium to John A. Jenkins, Andover, for 

pair Oxen. 
1. First premium to John A. Jenkins, Andover, pair 

Steers 2 1-2 yrs. old. 
J. Frank Foster, Nathl. P. Perkins — Committee. 



1 1 



STALLIONS FOR DRIVING. 

First premium to F. A. Parshall, Topsfield, for 3 year 
old Stallion, ''Dreamworld." 



BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT. 

£7. First premium to James A. Roome, Peabody, for Mare 

and Colt 3 months old. 
5. Second premium to James A. Roome, Peabody, for 

Mare and Colt 4 months old. 



BROOD MARES, FOR DRIVING. 

17. First premium to George A. Buzzell, Lynn, for Mare 
and Colt 2 months old. 
C. H. Playdon, E. D. Lovett, J. Kavanaugh — Committee. 



FAMILY HORSES. 

$1. First premium to Henry C. Poor, Peabody, for Black 
Mare, " Dolly." 
5. Second premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for 
Black Horse. 



GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

17. First premium to A. B. Gardner, Salem, for Chestnut 
Gelding, " License." 
5. Second premium to J. A. Croscup, Lynn, for Bay 
Horse, " Red Oak." 



LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

17. First premium to Mrs. Fannie B. Libbey, Wenham, 

for Mare, " Lady." 
5. Second premium to Dollie M. Farnham, No. Andover, 
for Mare, " Nellie." 



12 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

H. First premium to E. Bates, Lynn, for Bay Mare. 

3. Second premium to H. O. Southwick, Peabody, for 
White Horse. 
Peter Holt, John H. Perkins, C. H. Playdon — Commit- 
tee. 



SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

I>6. First premium to B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

Mare, " Topsey," 1225 lbs. 
6. First premium to B. W. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

mare, Fan, 1050 lbs. 
A. B. Fellows, for the Committee. 



COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES. 

First premium to E. E. O'Neil, Danvers, for yearling 

Colt. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

I>5. First premium to Wm. Lacroix, Lynn, for Bay Mare, 

" Sally March " 3 years old. 
6. First premium to Wm. Lacroix, Lynn, for Bay Geld, 

" Prospect Boy," 4 yrs. old. 
4. First premium to Wm. Lacroix, Lynn, for Roan Colt, 

" Coniston," 2 yrs. old. 
3. Second premium to A. B. Gardner, Salem, for Bay 

Geld, " Decoration " 2 yrs. old. 

2. Second premium to A. B. Gardner, Salem, for Chest- 

nut filley, " Aldene G." 1 year old. 

3. First premium to A. C. Cummings, Hamilton filley, 

Audubon 1 yr. old. 
C. H. Playdon, Walter H. Hayes, J. Henry Nason, 
George L. Averill — Committee. 



13 

HURDLE JUMPING. 

.2. First premium to D. M. Waller, Hamilton, for 

Horse, " Virginia Hunt." 
I. Second premium to George S. Mandell, Hamilton, for 

Horse, " Locust leaf." 
George S. Mandell, D. M. Waller — Committee. 



HORSES, SPECIAL CLASS. 

First premium to A. Courtney Beckford,^Danvers, 
for Shetland Pony. 



SWINE. 

>4. First premium to Thomas J. Mannix, Peabody, for 

Berkshire Shotes. 
2. Second premium to Thomas J. Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire Sow. 
2. Second premium to Thomas J. Mannix, Peabody, for 

Berkshire Boar. 
2. Second premium to Thomas J. Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire Shotes. 
4. First premium to Thomas J. Mannix, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire Sow. 
4. First premium to Forrest Valley Farm, Peabody for 

Berkshire Boar. 
4. First premium to Forrest Valley Farm, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire Sow & Pigs. 
4. First premium to Forrest Valley Farm, Peabody, for 

Jersey Red Sow and Pigs. 
William T. Wolloff, J. W. Yeaton, B. W. Farnham— 
Committee. 



14 

SHEEP AND GOATS. 

H. First premium to Town Farm, Peabody, for Pen of 

Sheep. 
4. First premium to Town Farm, Peabody, for Pen of 

Lambs. 
1. Gratuity to Bernice E. Poor, Peabody, for Angora 

Goat. 
Charles J. Peabody, John J.Gould — Committee. 



POULTRY. 

•fl. First premium to Horace Bushby, Dan vers, for 

Black Minorca pullet. 
1. Second premium to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for 

Pen Black Minorca chicks. 
1. First premium to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for 

Black Minorca cock. 
.50 Second premium to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for 

Cornish Indian Game hen. 
.50 Second premium to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for 

Cornish Indian Game pullet. 
.50 Second premium to Alonzo Pearson, Peabody, for 

S. C. R. I. Red cockerel. 
.50 Second premium to Alonzo Pearson, Peabody, for 

S. C. R. I. Red pullet. 
.50 Second premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for 

R. C. Brown Leghorn cock. 

1. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for R. C. 

Brown Leghorn hen. 

2. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for pen 

R. C. Brown Leghorn chicks. 
.50 Second premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for 
R. C. Brown Leghorn hen. 



15 

$1. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for R. 
C. Brown Leghorn cockerel. 

1. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for R. 

C. Brown Leghorn pullet. 
.50 Second premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody,- for 
R. C. Brown Leghorn pullet. 

2. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for Pen 

White Leghorn fowls. 

1. First premium to M. A. Ramsdell, Peabody, for 

White Leghorn cockerel. 

2. First premium to Mrs. L. E. Pulsifer, Peabody, for 

Pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
1. First premium to Mrs. L. E. Pulsifer, Peabody, for 

White Plymouth Rock pullet. 
.50 Second premium to Mrs. L. E. Pulsifer, Peabody, for 

White Plymouth Rock pullet. 
1. First premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for R. 

C. R. I. Red cock. 
.50 Second premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

R. C. R. I. Red hen. 
1. First premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

R. C. R. I. Red cockerel. 
1. First premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

R. C. R. I. Red pullet. 
.50 Second premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

R. C. R. I. Red pullet. 
.50 Second premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

R. C. R. J. cockerel. 
1. Gratuity to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for Coll. 

bantams. 
1. First premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for S. C. 

White Leghorn cockerel. 
1 . First premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for S. C. 

White Leghorn pullet. 



i6 

%.l Second premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for 
S. C. White Leghorn puller. 

1. Gratuity to A. F. Thompson, Beverly, for Coll. 
pigeons. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Clay- 
born (Tame eoek. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Irish 
Muff cock. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Irish 
Muff hen. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Irish 
Muff cockerel. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Irish 
Muff pullet. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Black 
Warhorse hen. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Black 
Red Game ben. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for South- 
ern Gray hen. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for South- 
ern Gray cockerel. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Essex 
Blue Game hen. 

1. First premium to A. \V. Tyler, Peabocly, for Essex 
Blue Game cockerel. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Essex 
Blue Game pullet. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Domi- 
nique Game cockerel. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Red 
Pvle Game cockerel. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Brown 
Red Game cockerel. 



i7 

fcl. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Black 
Brown Red Game cockerel. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Pea body, for Domi- 
nique Spangled cockerel. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Clay- 
born Game cockerel. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabod}', for Clay- 
born Game pullet. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Domi- 
nique Game cock. 

1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabod}', for South- 

ern Gray cock. 

2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Pen 

Dominique Spangled chicks. 
1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Black 

Red Game cockerel. 
1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Black 

Red Game pullet. 
.50 Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Black 

Red Game pullet. 
1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabod}', for South- 
ern Gray pullet. 
1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Brown 

Red Game pullet. 
1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for B. B. 

Red Game hen. 
1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Brown 

Red Game cock. 
1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Brown 

Red Game cockerel. 
1. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Brown 

Red Game pullet. 
1. First premium to John Jones, Middleton, for Par- 
dge Wyandotte cock. 



i8 

$1. First premium to John Jones, Middleton, for Par- 
tridge Wyandotte hen. 
.50 Second premium to John Jones, Middleton, for Par- 
tridge Wyandotte hen. 

1. First premium to John Jones, Middleton, for S. C. 

White Leghorn cock. 
.50 Second premium to John Jones, Middleton, for S. C. 
White Leghorn hen. 

2. First premium to John Jones, Middleton, for Pen 

S. C. White Leghorn fowls. 
1. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

S. C. R. I. Red hen. 
.50 Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

S. C. R. I. Red hen. 
.50 Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

S. C. R. I. Red cockerel. 
1. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Buff Cochin cock. 
.50 Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Buff Cochin cock. 
1. First premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Buff Cochin hen. 
.50 Second premium to Walter H. Brown, Danvers, for 

Buff Cochin hen. 
.50 Second premium to Edwin A. Varney, Peabody, for 

S. C. Brown Leghorn cock. 

1. First premium to Edwin A. Varney, Peabody, for 

S. C. Brown Leghorn pullet. 

2. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, tor Pen 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
1. Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Pen 

Golden Wyandotte fowls. 
1. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Golden 

Wyandotte cock. 



19 

t>l. First premium to L. N. Ben way, Salem, for Golden 

Wyandotte hen. 
.50 Second premium to L. N. Ben way, Salem, for Gold- 
en Wyandotte hen. 
2. First premium to L. N. Ben way, Salem, for Pen 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
1. Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Pen 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
1. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Golden 

Wyandotte cockerel. 
.50 Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Golden 

Wyandotte cockerel. 
1. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Golden 

Wyandotte pullet. 
.50 Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Golden 

Wyandotte pullet. 
1. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for White 

Wyandotte cock. 
.50 Second premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Buff 

Wyandotte hen. 
1. First premium to L. N. Benway, Salem, for Houdan 

hen. 
.50 Second premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

Light Brahma cock. 
.50 Second premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

Light Brahma hen. 
1. First premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

Light Brahma cockerel. 

1. First premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

Light Brahma pullet. 

2. First premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

Pen Light Brahma fowls. 
2. First premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 
pair Pekin Ducks. 



20 

$2. First premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

pair Pekin Ducklings. 
2. First premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for pair 

Toulouse Geese. 
2. First premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for pair 

White Embden Geese. 
2. First premium to Daniel Brown, Peabody, for pair 

African Geese. 
.7.") Gratuity to J. L. Canon, Wenham, for Coll. Buff 

Cochin bantams. 

1. Second premium to Horace C. Brennan, Salem, for 

pair African Geese. 

2. First premium to Horace C. Brennan, Salem, for 

pair African Goslings. 
1. Second premium to James Herlihy, Peabody, for 
S. S. Hamburg fowls. 

1. First premium to James White, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin pullet. 
.50 Second premium to James White, Peabody, for Buff 
Cochin pullet. 

2. First premium to E. A. Merrow, Salem, for Pen 

Partridge Cochin chicks. 
2. First premium to E. A. Merrow, Salem, for Pen 

Partridge Cochin fowls. 
1. First premium to E. A. Merrow, Salem, for Partridge 

Cochin pullet. 
1. First premium to E. A. Merrow, Salem, for Partridge 

Cochin cock. 
1. First premium to E. A. Merrow, Salem, for Partridge 

Cochin hen. 
.50 Second premium to E. A. Merrow, Salem, for Par- 
tridge Cochin hen. 
1. First premium to E. A. Merrow, Salem, for Partridge 

Cochin cockerel. 



21 



$2. First premium to C. A Darland, Peabody for pen 

W. Leghorn chicks. 
.25 Gratuity to S. H. Smith, Peabody, for W. C. ban- 
tams. 
.50 Second premium to J. H. Ware, Peabody, for B. 

Plymouth Rock pullet. 
1. First premium to G. W. LeCain, Peabody, for C. I. 

game cock. 
1. First premium to G. W. LeCain, Peabody, for C. I. 

game hen. 
1. First premium to G. W. LeCain, Peabody, for C. I. 

game cockerel. 
1. First premium to G. W. LeCain, Peabody, for C. I. 

game pullet. 
.50 Second premium to G. W. LeCain, Peabody, forC- 1. 

game pullet. 
.50 Gratuity to G. W. LeCain, Peabody, for collection 

bantams. 
1. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for white Wyandotte hen. 
.50 Second premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for white Wyandotte hen. 

1. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for white Wyandotte cockerel. 

2. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for pair white Wyandotte chicks. 
1. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for R. C. R. I. red hen. 
.50 Second premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for R. C. R. I. red cock. 
.50 Second premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for G. C. R. I red hen. 
1. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for G. C. R. I. cockerel. 



22 



$2. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for pen G. C. R. I. Red fowls. 
1. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 
for G. C. R. I. Red cock. 

1. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for R. C. white Leghorn hen. 
.50 Second premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 
for R. C. white Leghorn ben. 

2. First premium to Charles F. Thompson, Lynnfield, 

for pen R. C. white Leghorn chicks. 
2.50 Gratuity to William Merrill, West Newbury, for 

collection of Rabbits. 
2. First premium to E. L. Lovett, Beverly, for pen G. 

C. R. I. Red chicks. 
1 . First premium to E. L. Lovett, Beverly, for G. C. R. 

I. Red pullet. 
1. First premium to Howard Trask, Peabody, for pair 

Pekin ducks. 
1. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for Buff 

Wyandotte cock. 
1. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for Buff 

Wyandotte hen. 
% First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for pen 

black Minorca chicks. 
50. Second premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for black 

Minorca cock. 
50. Second premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for black 

Minorca Pullet. 
50. Second premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for black 

Minorca hen. 
1. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for black 

Minorca cock. 
1. First premium to Henry Poor, Peabody, for Buff 

Wyandotte cockerel. 



23 

Ssl. First premium to Heniy Poor, Peabody, for Buff 
Wyandotte pullet. 

.25 Gratuity to H. J. Donovan, Peabody, for collection 
Pigeons. 

1. Gratuity to J. F. McMannus, Danvers, for collection 
Bantams. 

1. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for Buff Ply- 
mouth Rock pullet. 

1. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for barred 

Plymouth Rock pullet. 

2. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 

1. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for Barred 

Plymouth Rock cockerel. 

2. First premium to George H. Eaton, Peabody, for pen 

Guinea fowl. 

1. First premium to R. C. Snyder, Salem, for white Ply- 

mouth Rock cockerel. 
.50 Second premium to R. C. Snyder, Salem, for white 
Plymouth Rock cockerel. 

2. First premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pen Brown Leghorn fowls. 

1. Second premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pen Brown Leghorn fowls. 

2. First premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pen Brown Leghorn chicks. 
1. Second premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pen Brown Leghorn chicks. 
1. First premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn hen. 
.50 Second premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn hen. 
1. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn Cock. 



24 

|1. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn Cockerel. 
.50 Second Premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn Cockerel. 
.50 Second premium ^to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn Pullet. 
2. First premium to David Little, Newbury, for pen 

Rouen Ducks. 

1. First premium to David Little, Newbury, for pair 

Indian Runners. 

2. First premium to H. G. Little, Newbury, for pen 

Cayuga Ducks. 

1. Gratuity to M. E. Little, Newbury, for collection of 

Bantams. 

2. First premium to James H. Turner, Salem, for pen 

Black Langshans. 
1. First premium to James H. Turner, Salem, for 

black Langshan hen. 
1. First premium to James H. Turner, Salem, for black 

Langshan cock. 
1. First premium to James H. Turner, Salem, for black 

Langshan cockerel. 
1. First premium to James H. Turner, Salem, for black 

Langshan pullet. 
.50 Second premium to James H. Turner, Salem, for 

black Langshan pullet. 

3. Gratuity to Joseph H. Sewall, Peabody, for collec- 

tion bantams. 
1. Gratuity to H. G. Larrabee, Peabody, for collection 

of pigeons. 
1. First premium to H. O. Southwick, Peabody, for S. 

C. white Wyandotte fowls. 
50 Second premium to H. O. Southwick, Peabody, for 

S. C. white Wyandotte fowl. 



25 

$.50 Second premium to H. O. Southwick, Peabody, for 
S. C. white Wyandotte cockerel. 
1. First premium to W. H. Burnham, Wenham, for S. C 
light Brahma fowl. 

1. First premium to W. H. Burnham, Wenham, for S. C. 

light Brahma chicks. 

2. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Dan vers, for pen 

Silver Wyandotte fowls. 
2. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pen 

Silver Wyandotte chicks. 
1. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte cock. 
50. Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, Tor Silver 

Wyandotte cock. 
1. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte hen. 
.50 Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte hen. 
1. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte cockerel. 
.50 Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte cockerel. 
1. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte pullet. 
.50 Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte pullet. 

1. First premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Colum- 

bian Wyandotte pullet. 
.50 Second premium to J. C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 
Columbian Wyandotte pullet. 

2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pen 

Embden geese. 
1. Second premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for pen 
Toulouse geese. 



26 



$1. First premium to Warren Goodale, Dan vers, for 
Mottled Ancona cock. 
1. First premium to Warren Goodale, Danvers, for 

Mottled Ancona hen. 
.50 Second premium to Warren Goodale, Danvers, for 
Mottled Ancona hen. 
W. B. Atherton — Judge. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

$5. First premium to George E. Daniels, Rowley, for two 

horse Tip Cart. 
3. First premium to George E. Daniels, Rowley, for 

Horse Sled Gear. 
5. Gratuity to W. H. H. Ozen for Manure Spreader. 

3. Gratuity to Turner & Schwarzenburg, Lawrence, for 

Gasoline Engine. 

4. Gratuity to W. H. Vanderiest, Danvers, for Wire 

Fencing. 

5. Gratuity to J. Prince, Peabody, for Hot Air Engine. 
Elias Andrews, Isaac F. Knowlton, Wm. B. Carlton — 

Committee. 



CARRIAGES. 

5. Gratuity to Tweed Carriage Co., Peabody, for Ex- 
press Wagon. 

5. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for Stanhope 
B "ggy. 

5. Gratuity to T.W.Lane, Amesbury, for English Surrey. 

5. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for Concord 
Wagon. 

5. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for Democrat 
Wagon. 

5. Gratuity to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for Laundry 
Wagon. 

Joel Kimball, James A. Roome — Committee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



DAIRY. 



$4. First premium to Mrs. Harriet Rhodes, Peabody, for 
Butter. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

$1. Gratuity to. William J. Dalury, Peabody, for Assorted 

Bread. 
2. First premium to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for White 

Bread. 
2. First premium to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for 54 tum- 
blers Jelly. 
1. First premium to M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for preserved 

Pickles. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for White 

Bread. 
1. First premium to A. Bertha Glines, Beverly, for 

entire Wheat Bread. 
1. First premium to A. M. Nash, Peabody, for Oatmeal 

Bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. P. McDonald, Peabody, for Oat 

Meal Bread. 
1. First premium to Mrs. James M. Dixon, Lynn, for 

Brown Bread. 
.50 Gratuity to R. M. Barker, North Andover, for Brown 

Bread. 
.50 Gratuity to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for Sponge 

Cake. 



28 



1. Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for Sponge Cake. 
.50 Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for Chocolate Cake. 
.50 Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for Mocha Cake. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Frances Grovesnor, Peabody, for 

Mocha Cake. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Frances Grovesnor, Peabody, for 6 
tumblers Jelly. 

2. First premium to C. V. Barnaby, Middleton, for 

Dried Apples. 
.50 Gratuity to George W. Trask, Peabody, for Birthday 

Cake. 
.2 First premium to Mrs. F. W. Townsend, Lynn, for 

Canned Fruit. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. F. W. Townsend, Lynn, for 

Jellies. 
.50 Gratuity to S. A. Page, Middleton, for canned Rasp- 
berries. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. B. E. Goodridge, Peabody, for 

Canned Beans. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. E. J. Porter, Peabody, for Pickled 

Beets 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Eaton, Peabody, for Pickles. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Lefavour, Beverly, for Canned Fruit. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Hayden, Peabody, for Catsup. 
.50 Gratuity to Grace Jackman, Peabody, for Jelly and 

Preserves. 



HONEY. 



$2. First premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 
5 lbs. 
1. Second premium to S. Noble Brooks, Haverhill, for 
5 lbs. 
Mrs. Lucy A. Sanger, Mrs. Anna S. Cole, Mrs. Susan 
A. Stewart — Committee. 



2 9 



PEARS. 

i>2. First premium to L. Davis, Peabody, for Beurre 

Clairgeau. 
1. Second premium to E. W. Putnam, Peabody, for 

Seckel. 

1. Second premium to A. W. Berry, Peabody, for Vicar. 

2. First premium to A. W. Berry, Peabody, for Seckel. 
.50 Gratuity to Francis Stickney, Peabody, for Sheldon. 
2. First premium to C. A. Southwick, Peabody, for 

Bartlett. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bosc. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Anjou. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Duchess. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Lawrence. 

2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Sheldon. 

1. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for de Congress. 

3. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Collection. 

2. First premium to S. Parrott, Lynn, for Belle Lucra- 

tive. 

1. Second premium to S. Parrott, Lynn, for Bosc. 

.50 Gratuity to C. E. Wilson, Peabody, for Belle Lu- 
crative. 

1. Second premium to W. C. Kimball, Peabody, for 

Bartlett. 

2. First premium to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Dana's Hovey. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. A. Raddin, Peabody, for 

Sheldon. 
.50 Gratuity to George Barker, Swampscott, for Bartlett. 

2. First premium to Walter B. Allen, Lynn, for 

Urbaniste. 
1. Second premium to Walter B. Allen, Lynn, for Belle 
Lucrative. 



3Q 

1.50 Gratuity to Walter B. Allen, Lynn, for Flemish 

Beauty. 
.50 Gratuity to Walter B. Allen, Lynn, for Seckel. 
2. First premium to Chester Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Vicar. 
.50 Gratuity to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Vicar. 
A. A. Hixon — Judge. 



APPLES. 

£2. First premium to P. M. Illsley, Newbury, for Bald- 
win. 
2. First premium to P. M. Illsley, Newbury, for Rox- 

bury Russet. 
2. First premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for Hunt's 

Russet. 
1. Second premium to D. H. Illsley, Newbury, for R. 

I. Greening. 
1. Second premium to I). H. Illsley, Newbury, for Rox- 

bury Russet. 
1.50 First premium to Airs. Bert Dow, Peabody, for 

Transcendant Crab. 
.50 Gratuity to Thomas H. Sawyer, Peabody, for Rox- 

bury Russet. 
.50 Gratuity to E. W. Putnam, Peabody, for Wealthy. 
1. Second premium to E. P. Balcomb, Salem, forGrav- 

enstein. 
.50 Gratuity to E. P. Balcomb, Salem, for Dan vers Sweet. 

1. Second premium to E. P. Balcomb, Salem, for Bald- 

win. 

2. First premium to C. A. Southwick, Peabody, for 

Wolf River. 
1. Second premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Porter. 



3i 

S.50 Gratuity to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Wealthy. 

1. Second premium to Walter B. Osborn, Peabody, for. 

Ladies Sweet. 

2. First premium to Laura Bodge, Peabody, for Tomp- 

kins King. 

1. Gratuity to H. W. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 20 oz. 

Pippin. 

2. First premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Hub- 

bardston. 

.50 Gratuity to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Baldwin. 

.50 Gratuity to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Arctic. 

.75 Second premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Hy- 
slop Crab. 

.50 Gratuity to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Wolf River. 

2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Graven- 
stein. 

2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Wealthy. 
.50 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Porter. 

1. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Hub- 
bardston. 

3. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Collection. 
1. Gratuity to R. W. Townsend, Lynn, for Northern 

Spy. 

1. Gratuity to William Vella, Lynn, for Seedling. 

.50 Gratuity to Helen A. Wright, Peabody, for Graven- 
stein. 

1. Gratuity to W. E. Kimball, Lynn, for Pound Sweet. 

.50 Gratuity to W. E. Kimball, Lynn, for Fall Harvey. 

1. Second premium to L. A. Moore, Peabody, for 
Tompkins King. 

.50 Gratuity to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for Hunt's 
Russet. 

1. Second premium to S. B. George, Groveland, for 
Hunt's Russet. 



32 

$1. Second premium to Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for 
Mackintosh Red. 

1. Gratuity to Frederic Wagner, Peabody, for Yellow 

Belle Flower. 
.50 Gratuity to Francis Stickney, Peabody, for Ben 
Davis. 

2. First premium to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for 

Porter. 
2. First premium to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Pickman 

Pippin. 
1. Second premium to Ellsworth Barnaby, Middleton, 

for Wolf River. 
.50 Gratuity to C. A. Hobbs, Hamilton, for Tompkins 

Kino-. 

1. Second premium to C. A. Hobbs, Hamilton, for 

Snow. 
.50 Gratuity to M. Cody, Peabody, for Tompkins King. 

2. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Mackintosh Red. 
2. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Snow. 
2. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

R. I. Greening. 
2. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Ladies Sweet. 
.50 Gratuity to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Hubbard- 

ston. 
.50 Gratuity to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Shaker. 
2. First premium to Wm. B. Carleton, Danvers, for 

Dan vers Sweet. 
.50 Gratuity to Wra. B. Carlton, Danvers, for Killam 

hill. 
A. A. Hixon — Judge. 



33 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUIT. 

|2. First premium to Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott, for 
Crawford Peach. 

2. First premium to Mrs. Andrew Fitz, Salem, for old 
Mixon Peach. 

2. First premium to A. W. Felt, Peabody, for White 
flesh Peach. 

2. First premium to Luther Woodbury, Beverly, for 
Essex County Seedling Peach. 

1. Second premium to W. J. Currier, Danvers, for Es- 
sex County Seedling Peach. 

1. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for Essex County 
Seedling Peach. 

1. Second premium to S. M. Titcomb, West Newbury, 

for old Mtxon Peach. 

.50 Gratuity to Willard C. Chase, Swampscott, for Craw- 
ford Peach. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. E. A. Steele, Peabody, for Essex 
County Seedling Peach. 

.50 Gratuity to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for White flesh 
Peach. 

2. First premium to George W. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Concord Grapes. 

1. Second premium to Geo. L. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Concord Grapes. 

2. First premium to E. C. Poor, Peabody, for Moore's 

Diamond Grapes. 
2. First premium to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Brighton 

Grapes. 
2. First premium to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Pockling- 

ton Grapes. 
1. Second premium to C. A. South wick, Peabody, for 

Pocklington Grapes. 



34 

$1. Second premium to W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for 
Moore's Diamond Grapes. 
.50 Gratuity to W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for Moore's 
Early Grapes. 

1. Second premium to D. W. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Moore's Early Grapes. 
.50 Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Concord Grapes. 

2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Worden 

Grapes. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Niagara 

Grapes. 
1.50 First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Campbell's 

Early Grapes. 
5. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Coll. of 

Grapes. 
.50 Gratuity to Fred H. Bates, Lynn, for Pocklington 

Grapes. 

1. Second premium to W. H. Bates, Swampscott, for 

Niagara Grapes. 
.50 Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Moore's 
Diamond Grapes. 

2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Grand 

Duke Plums. 
2. First premium to R. W. Ropes, Salem, for Fellen- 

burg Plums. 
2. First premium to Orville Burbeck, Peabody, for 

Weaver Plums. 
2. First premium to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Lombard Plums. 
2. First premium to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Monarch Plums. 
1. Second premium to W. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Grand Duke Plums. 



35 

$1. Second premium to P. M. Illsley, Newbury, for 
Lombard Plums. 
1. Second premium to S. B. George, Groveland, for 
Elberta Plums. 
A. A. Hixon — Judge. 



PLANTS. 

$5. First premium to Mrs. J. C. Rogers, Peabody, for 
collection. 

1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for collec- 
tion of Flowering and Ornamental Plants. 

1. First premium to C. L. Becket, Peabody, for coll. 
Ferns. 

1. First premium to C. L. Becket, Peabody, for coll. 
Begonias. 

1. First premium to C. L. Becket, Peabody, for colL 
Coleus. 

1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for coll. 
Dbl. Geraniums. 

1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for coll. 
Fancy Geraniums. 

1. First premium to C. L.Beckett, Peabody, for coll. 
Dbl. Petunias. 

1. First premium to Mrs. S. Foster, Danvers, for Rex 
Begonias. 

1. First premium to Burnette Hallowell, Peabody, for 
Begonias. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. W. E. Smith, Peabody, for Be- 
gonias. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Mary Bendall, Peabody, for Jeru- 
salem Cherry Tree. 
.50 Gratuity to Irene Masterson, Peabody, for Flower- 
ing Maple. 



36 

.50 Gratuity to Frank Croughwell, Peabocty, for Patience 

Plant! 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Lyman Osborn, Peabody, for 

Partridge Cactus. 
..50 Gratuity to Albert Tufts, Peabody, for Lobster 

Cactus. 
.50 Gratuity to Joseph Kingston, Peabody, for English 

Ivy. 
.50 Gratuity to Francis Stickney, Peabody, for Achirne- 

nis Plant. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. B. Nash, Peabody, for Aspara- 
gus Fern. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. N. Moulton, Peabody, for 

Heterophylia. 
.50 Gratuity to Horace Bodge, Peabody, for Mexican 

Fire Plant. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. M. A. Townsend, Lynn, forColeus. 
Harry W. Munroe, Adeline A. Little, Henrietta L. 
Dixon — Committee. 



FLOWERS. 

$3. First premium to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for 
Cultivated Flowers. 
1. First premium to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for 
24 African Marigolds. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for .24 
Garden Annuals. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for 12 Nas- 
turtiums. 
1. First premium to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for 
two Bouquets Garden Flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Roberts, Peabody, for 24 
Verbenas. 



37 

II. First premium to West School Garden, Peabody, for 
Bouquets Garden Flowers. 

1. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for coll. 

Pansies. 

.50 Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for coll. Nas- 
turtiums. 

.50 Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 24 Pansies. 
3. First premium to R. W. Townsend, Lynn, for 100 
specimens cut Native Flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to M. A. Townsend, Lynn, for 12 Gera- 
niums. 

2. First premium to Robert Townsend, Lynn, for 100 

specimens Cultivated Flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for 24 Hardy 
Phlox. 

.50 Gratuity to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for coll. Hy- 
drangeas. 

.50 Gratuity to Charles J. Reed, Peabody, for pair 
Bouquets. 

.50 Gratuity to Lucy B. Hood, Salem, for coll. Nastur- 
tiums. 

.50 Gratuity to Lucy B. Hood, Salem, for coll. Branch- 
ing Asters. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. J. A. Hood, Salem, for pair Bouquets. 
1. First premium to Mrs. James Simpson, Salem, for 

12 Nasturtiums. 
1. First premium to Mrs. James Simpson, Salem, for 
24 Garden Annuals. 

.50 Gratuity to Margaret Beirne, Peabody, for 12 double 
Geraniums. 
1. First premium to Margaret Burke, Peabody, for coll. 
Coxcombs. 

.50 Gratuity to Lizzie Newhall, Peabody, for coll. 
Petunias. 



3« 

.50 Gratuity to Lizzie H. Newhall, Peabody, for 12 Nas- 
turtiums. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 24 Gar- 
den Annuals. 

.65 Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 24 Dwarf 
French Marigolds. 

.50 Gratuity to Margaret Conners, Peabody, for coll. 
Nasturtiums. 

.25 Gratuity to Helen Connors, Peabody, for coll. Pansies. 

.25 Gratuity to Alice E. Trask, Peabody, for Bouquet 
Nasturtiums. 
2. First premium to Priscilla Pratt, Peabody, for Bou- 
quet Native Flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Marion Taylor, Peabody, for 12 Nastur- 
tiums. 

.50 Gratuity to Ethel Taylor, Peabody, for coll. Salvia. 

.50 Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for 24 Afri- 
can Marigolds. 
1. Gratuity to Sarah F. Jenkins, Andover, for 12 Dian- 
thus. 

.50 Gratuity to S. B. Putnam, Peabody, for Japanese 
Lilies. 

.50 Gratuity to Ralph Richardson, Peabody, for 24 Zin- 
neas. 

1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for basket 

Garden Flowers. 

2. First premium so C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for coll. 

Pansies. 
1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 12 

double Geraniums. 
1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 24 

Carnation Pinks. 
1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 12 

Cannas . 



39 

,50 Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 24 Pansies. 
.50 Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 12 Petunias. 
.50 Gratuity to Bessie E. Newhall, Peabody, for 12 Nas- 
turtiums. 
.50 Gratuity to Mabel A. Forness, Peabody, for 12 Pom- 
pon Dahlias. 
.50 Gratuity to Mabel A. Forness, Peabody, for Bouquet 
Pompon Dahlias. 
1. First premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

large flowering Dahlias. 
1. First premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

12 single Dahlias. 
1. First premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 

12 Pompon Dahlias. 
1. First premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 
12 Cactus Dahlias. 
1.50 Gratuity to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for coll. 
Dahlias. 
1. First premium to Mrs. G. H. Green, Peabody, for 24 

Pansies. 
1. First premium to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for coll. 

Asters. 
1. First premium to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 24 

Zinneas. 
1. First premium to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 12 

Dianthus. 
1. First premium to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 12 
Phlox Drummond. 
.75 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 24 Carna- 
tion Pinks. 
.50 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 12 Nastur- 
tiums. 
.50 Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for 24 Ver- 
benas. 



40 

,50 Gratuity to John Gilman, Peabody, for 12 Nastur- 
tiums. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. P. A. Snyder, Peabody, for 25 
Phlox Drummond. 

.50 Gratuity to Walter Woodbury, Beverly, for 12 Nas- 
turtiums. 
1. First premium to Francis Stickney, Peabody, for 
basket Native Flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Annie Fitzpatrick, Peabody, for coll. 
Asters. 

.50 Gratuity to Arthur L. Brown, Marblehead, for 12 
Cactus Dahlias. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Lizzie Taylor, Peabody, for Cosmos. 

.50 Gratuity to A. L. Arvedson, Peabody, for 12 Gera- 
niums. 
1. First premium to N. Allen Lindsey, Marblehead, for 
coll. Coxcombs. 

1.50 Gratuity to N. Allen Lindsey, Marblehead, for dis- 
play of Dahlias. 

.50 Gratuity to N. Allen Lindsey, Marblehead, for 12 
Cactus Dahlias. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. G. H. Green, Peabody, for Bouquet 
Pansies. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. G. H. Green, Peabody, for Scabiosis. 

.50 Gratuity to Herbert Flint, Salem, for large flowering 
Dahlias. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. William Harrie, Peabody, for 12 
Nasturtiums. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 24 
African Marigolds. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 12 
Calendulas. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 
12 Scabiosis. 



4i 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 12 
Dianthus. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 

12 Salpiglosis. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 
24 Verbenas. 

.50 Gratuity to Gertie S. Johnson, Peabody, for 12 
Branching Asters. 
3. First premium to Mrs. B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 

design garden flowers. 
3. First premium to Esther Danforth, Peabody, for 
design native flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to Edith Danforth, Peabody, for basket 
native flowers. 

.50 Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 24 African Mar- 
igolds. 
1. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 24 Calen- 
dulas. 

.75 Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 24 crusted zin- 
neas. 

.50 Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 12 Scabiosas. 
1. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 24 French 
Marigolds. 

.50 Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 12 Nasturtiums. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. P. Moulton, Peabody, for bo- 
quet hydrangea. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. J. P. Moulton, Peabody, for 24 
garden annuals. 

.50 Gratuity to Marion Staten, Salem, for boquet hy- 
drangeas. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. M. A. Punchard, Danvers, for 
Feathered coxcombs. 

.75 Second premium to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for 12 
single dahlias. 



42 

.75 Second premium to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for 12 

Catcus dahlias. 
.50 Second premium to Carlton School, Salem, for bas- 
ket flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Marion and Alice Rea, North Andover, 

for Phlox Drummond. 
.50 Gratuity to Marion and Alice Rea, North Andover, 

for 24 African marigolds. 
1. First premium to Mrs. Frederick Goff, Andover, for 

coll. Pansies. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Frederick Goff, Andover. for 24 

Pansies. 
.50 Gratuity to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for 12 Pompon 

dahlias. 

1. First premium to Dorothy Farnham, North Andover, 

for coll. sweet peas. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. B. H. Farnham, North Andover, 
for coll. sweet peas. 

2. First premium to Dollie W. Farnham, North Ando- 

ver, for coll. native flowers. 
1. Gratuity to Dollie W. Farnham, North Andover, for 

design native flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Dollie W. Farnham, North Andover, for 

boquets native flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Dollie W. Farnham, North Andover, for 

basket native flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. S. Southwick, Peabody, for 12 

Nasturtiums. 
.50 Gratuity to M. B. Smith, Salem, for 12 Nasturtiums. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss S. O. Poor, Peabody, for coll. 

asters. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. Poor, Peabody, for 12 Nas- 
turtiums. 
1. First premium to 197 (no names), Peabody. 



43 



.50 Gratuity to W. H. Cruff, Marblehead, for 12 

flowering dahlias. 
.50 Gratuity to W. H. Cruff, Marblehead, for 12 Catcus 

dahlias. 
.50 Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for boquet of salvia. 
.50 Gratuity to F. N. Worthen, Groveland, for 12 pom- 
pon dahlias. 
.50 Gratuity to Annie Reynolds, Peabody, for coll. 

Snapdragon. 
.75 Second premium to Frank Reynolds, Peabody, for 
24 zinneas. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. Thomas Cummings, Peabo- 
dy, for boquet native flowers. 
1. First premium to W. E. Bates, Lynn, for 12 Delphin- 
iums. 
1. First premium to R. E. Ropes, Salem, for 24 Petu- 
nias. 
.50 Gratuity to R. E. Ropes, Salem, for 12 Nasturtiums. 
.50 Gratuity to R. E. Ropes, Salem, for 12 Salpiglosis. 
1. First premium to R. E. Ropes, Salem, for coll. Snap- 
dragon. 
.75 Gratuity to R. E. Ropes, Salem, for coll. coxcomb. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Mary Whipple, Salem, for coll. 
Snapdragon. 
1. First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 12 

Gladiolas. 
1. First premium to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for 12 
Hardy phlox. 

1. Gratuity to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for coll. 

hardy phlox. 

2. Gratuity to E. F. Dwyer & Son, Lynn, for coll. cut 

flowers. 
.50 Gratuity to M. E. Crane, Peabody, for dwarf mari- 
golds. 



44 

.50 Gratuity to M. E. Crane, Peabody, for 12 scabiosis. 

.50 Gratuity to M. E. Crane, Peabody, for double del- 
phiniums. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. L. W. Thatcher, Peabody, for 
Aralia Norwegian Shrub. 
Ettori Tassinari, O. F. Newhall, Mrs. T. E. Wilson* 

Mrs. E. M. Poor, Mrs. John Barker — Committee. 



VEGETABLES— FIRST CLASS. 

!l. Second premium to R. W. Townsend, Lynn, for 

Early Rose Potatoes. 
1. Second premium to H. H. & L. S. Buxton, Peabody, 

for Danvers Onion. 

1. Second premium to T. P. Killam, Boxford, for Green 

Mountain Potatoes. 

2. First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Red 

Onions 
2. First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Marigold 

Wurtzels. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Early 

Rose Potatoes. 

1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

Beauty of Hebron Potatoes. 

2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Clark's 

No. 1 Potatoes. 
1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Pearl 
of Savoy Potatoes. 

1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for New 

Queen Potatoes. 

2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Ro- 

berts Early Potatoes. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Rural 
Blush Potatoes. 



45 

$2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Rural 

N. Y. Potatoes. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Early 

Northern Potatoes. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for white 

flat Turnips. 
2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for purple 

top Turnips. 
.50 Gratuity to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for purple top 

Globe Turnips. 

1. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for French 

Carrots. 

2. First premium to W. F. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Edmunds' Beets. 
2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Beauty 

of Hebron Potatoes. 
2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for New 

Queen Potatoes. 
2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Irish 

Cobbler Potatoes. 
1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Northern Potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Clarke's 

No. 1 Potatoes. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Pearl of 

Savoy Potatoes. 
2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Green 

Mountain Potatoes. 
1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 

N. Y. Potatoes. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rob- 

erts' Early Potatoes. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Carmer 

No. 3 Potatoes. 



4 6 

1*2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Eclipse 

Beets. 
1. Second premium to D. E. Cummings, Peabody, for 

Mangold Wurtzels. 
1. Second premium to Joseph Bushby, Danvers, for 

Carrots. 

1. Second premium to G. A. Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Edmunds' Beets. 

2. First premium to G. A. Reynolds, Peabody, for Dan- 

vers Carrots. 

2. First premium to G. A. Reynolds, Peabody, for Yel- 
low Globe Onions. 

2. First premium to G. A. Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Parsnips. 

1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Red 
Onions. 

1. Second premium so M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for Purple 
Top Turnips. 

1. Second premium to M. J. Cain, Lynnfield, for White 
Turnips. 



VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

$2. First premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Sweet 

Corn, Quincy Market. 
.50 Gratuity to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Sugar Pump- 
kins. 
2. First premium to J. Bresnahan, Peabody, for Tur- 
ban Squash. 
1. Second premium to J. Bresnahan, Peabody, for To- 
matoes. 
.50 Gratuity to J. Bresnahan, Peabody, for Pumpkins. 
1. Second premium to Frank L. Stickney, Peabody, for 
Stone Mason Cabbage. 



47 

.50 Gratuity to Frank L. Stickney, Peabody, for Sugar 
Pumpkins. 
1. Second premium to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for 
Nutmeg Melons. 

1. Second premium to J. W. Goodale, Danvers, for 

Rocky Ford Melons. 

2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Cauliflower. 
2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Tip Top 

Melon. 
1. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Cream 

Melon. 
1. Gratuity to H. H. & L. E. Buxton, Peabody, for 

Citron Melon. 

1. Gratuity to Edw. W. Longley, Salem, for Gourds. 

2. First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Bruns- 

wick Cabbage. 
2. First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Savoy 

Cabbage. 
2. First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Red Cab- 
bage. 
2. First premium to Asa F. Lee, Beverly, for Marrow 

Squash. 
.50 Gratuity to Florence Killam, Boxford, for Crookneck 

Squash. 
2. First premium to Orlando F. Newhall, Peabody, for 

Paris Golden Celery. 
1. Second premium to Orlando F. Newhall, Peabody, 

for Giant Peppers. 
1. Gratuity to Orlando F. Newhall, Peabody, for Egg 

Plant. 
1. Second premium to S. B. Decatur, Marblehead, for 

Marblehead Squash. 



48 

$1. Second premium to S. B. Decatur, Marblehead, for 
Stone Tomatoes. 

1. Second premium to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 

Stone Tomatoes. 

2. First premium to B.'P. Danforth, Peabody, for Vic- 

tor Squash. 
1. Second premium to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 
Hubbard Squash. 

1. Gratuity to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for Volga 

Cabbage. 

2. First premium to A. F. Easterbrook, Swampscott, for 

Hubbard Squash. 

2. First premium to E. E. White, Peabody, for Living- 
stone Tomatoes, 

2. First premium to E. E. White, Peabody, for Miller's 
Cream Melons. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Cauli- 

flower. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Cran- 

berries. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Water- 
melons. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Turban 
Squash. 

1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Savoy 

Cabbage. 

2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Stone 

Mason Cabbage. 
1. Second premium to Daniel Cummings, Peabody, for 

All Seasons' Cabbage. 
_. First premium to J. B. Nolan, Peabody, for All 

Seasons' Cabbage. 
1. Second premium to C. A. Hobbs, Hamilton, for 

Golden Sweet Corn. 



49 

$1. Second premium to Joseph Bushby, Danvers, for 

Early Essex Sweet Corn. 
2. First premium to George H. Horner, Peabody, for 

Marblehead Squash. 
2. First premium to Charles Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Evergreen Sweet Corn. 
1. Second premium to Geo. A. Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Warren Squash. 
1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Brunswick Cabbage. 
1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Red Cabbage. 

1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Sweet Corn. 

2. First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Stone 

Tomatoes. 
4. First premium to Town Farm, Peabody, for collec- 
tion Vegetables. 

1. Second premium to Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 

Victor Squash. 

2. First premium to Wm. B. Carlton, Jr., Danvers, for 

Warren Turban Squash. 
.50 Gratuity to John Espinola, Peabody, for Gourds. 
A. A. Hixon — Judge. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

11. First premium to A. B. Fellows, Ipswich, for Yellow 

Eye Beans. 
1. First premium to W. J. Cam, Lynnfield, f or Goddard 

Beans. 
4 First premium to C. W. Nelson, Newburyport, for 25 

ears Field Corn. 



5o 

&3. Second premium to Chester Killam, Boxford, for 25 

ears Field Corn. 
2. Third premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 25 

ears Field Corn. 
2. First premium to J. Webb Barton, Danvers, for Rice 

Pop Corn. 
John Barker, Geo. W. Chad wick — Committee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

$ 2. First premium to Mrs. W. H. Kyser, Salem, for 

Crochet Quilt. 
2. First premium to Mrs. W. H. Kyser, Salem, for Silk 

Afghan. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Kyser, Salem, for Crochet 

Afghan. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Kyser, Salem, for Silk Knit 

Afghan. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. Mary G. Cook, Salem, for 

Crib Quilt. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. Frank H. Edgerly, Pea- 
body, for Crochet Afghan. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Jennie Titus, Marblehead, for Hand 

Woven Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Harriet A. Goldthwaite, Lynn, for Silk 

Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. James McDermott, Peabody, for 

Knit Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Flora L. Danforth, Middleton, for 

Crochet Afghan. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Parradise, Beverly, for Knit 

Afghan. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. K. A. Wilson, Peabody, for Patch 

Quilt. 



5i 

.75 Gratuity to M. E. Palmer, Salem, for Patch Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to M. E. Palmer, Salem, for Blaise Pair. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. E. Porter, Peabody, for Silk Quilt. ' 
.50 Gratuity to Miss M. E. Dwyer, Salem, for Crochet 

Afghan. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for Patch 

Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for Patch 

Quilt. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for Patch 

Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Annie Wilson, Peabody, for Patch 

Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Annie Wilson, Peabody, for Silk 

Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. W. F. Clair, Peabody, for Crochet 

Quilt, 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. B. E. Goodridge, Peabody, for 

Patch Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Belle G. Sheridan, Salem, for Crib 

Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Ellen Flynn, Peabody, for Patch Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to E. W. Sprague, Peabody, for Silk Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to E. W. Sprague, Peabody, for Silk Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Sarah G. Mason, Peabody, for Silk Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Sophia Holmes, Peabody, for Patch 

Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to A. S. Buxton, Peabody, for Patch Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. F. P. Gilgon, Salem, for Silk Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. W. E. Tufts, Middleton, for^Fancy 

Quilt. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. W. E. Tufts, Middleton, for^Patch 

Quilt. 



52 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Maggie Duggan, Peabody, for Silk 
Quilt. 
Mrs. Charles A. Williams, Mrs. George A. Perkins — 
Committee. 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

$2. First premium to Mrs. Arthur Proctor, Salem, for 
Drawn ftug. 

1. Second premium to Mrs. Ray Collins, Beverly, for 

Drawn Rug. 

2. First premium to Mrs. H. M. Goodman, Salem, for 

Braided Rug. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for 

Braided Rug. 
.25 Gratuity to Mrs. J. M. Patten, Beverly, for Burlap 

Rug. 
.25 Gratuity to Mrs. W. S. Foss. Peabody, for Braided 

Rug. 
.25 Gratuity to Mrs. John Cassino, Peabody, for Braided 

Rug. 
.25 Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Parker, Peabody, for Braided 

Rug. 
.25 Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Parker, Peabody, for Braided 

Rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Donnell, Peabody, for Braided 

Rug. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for Braided 

Rug. 
.25 Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Beckett, Peabody, for Braided 

Rug. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. John Crean,Peabody,for Drawn Rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. K. H. Wilson, Peabody, for Braided 

Rug. 



53 

1.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Jennie Tutus, Marblehead, for 
three hand-drawn Rugs. 
1. Gratuity to Susan H. Howard, Peabody, for three 
Drawn Rugs. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Cu Hough, Salem, for Drawn Rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Cullough, Salem, for Drawn Rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Cullough, Salem, for Drawn Rug. 
.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Cullough, Salem, for Drawn Rug. 
Mrs. George L. Averill, Mrs. Julia A. Cain — Committee. 



LEATHER AND ARTICLES MANUFACTURED 
FROM SAME. 

$3. First premium to B. W. Moore & Son, Peabody, for 
Exhibit of Leather. 
2. First premium to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for dis- 
play of Shoes. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MDSE. 

$2. Gratuity to C. A. Clark, Lynn, for Collection of In- 
sects, Beneficial and Injurious to Essex County. 
Thomas Carrol, Henry Hillaine, Albert Emerson — Com- 
mittee. 



FANCY WORK. 

$1. Gratuity to Miss I. F. Verne, Lynnfield Centre, for 
Centerpiece. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. C. F. Clifton, Salem, for embroi- 
dered Centerpiece. 

.75 Gratuity to Miss A. A. Cole, Marblehead, for Basket. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Harry Wilkins, Danvers, for Cen- 
terpiece. 



54 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. L. W. Lovelace, Danvers, for Pil- 
low slips. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Flora Danforth, Middleton, for 
Pillows. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Flora Danforth, Middleton, for 
Crochet Jackets. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. J.L. Parradise, Beverly, for Chemise. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Helen Osgood, Peabody, for Shirt 
Waist. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Hartwell, Beverly, for Knit 
Edging. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. W. J. Carlton, Beverly, for 3 
Aprons. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. H. W. Downing, Beverly, for Knit 
Sweater. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Felkins, Salem, for Collar and Cuff 
Set. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Louise Hogan, Salem, for oil. of 
Drawn work. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Edith L. Fletcher, Middleton, for 
Centerpiece. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. M. J. Pattee, Beverly, for Center- 
piece. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. M. J. Pattee, Beverly, for 2 Otto- 

mans. 
.50 Gratuity to Miss Annie Sainio, Peabody, for thread 

work. 
.50 Gratuity to Mary Sweeney, Peabody, for Sofa Pillow. 
.75 Gratuity to Mrs. H. O. Richardson, Haverhill, for 

Corset Cover. 
.25 Gratuity to Wm. P. Knight, Saugus, for Sachet. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. M. Davey, Salem, for Limerick Lace. 
1. Gratuity to Miss Louisa Hood, Salem, for Knitted 

Shawl. 



55 

.75 Gratuity to Miss Lucas, Salem, for Centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Anna Scher, Salem, for Centerpiece. . 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Anna Scher, Salem, for Doily. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Edw. Cassidy, Peabody, for Ice 
Wool Shawl. 

.75 Gratuity to Miss C. C. Murphy, Salem, for Sofa Pil- 
, i lows. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Edw. H. Merrill, Peabody, for Cor- 
set Cover. 

.50 Gratuity to Hannah C. Crean, Peabody, for Table- 
cover. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Stoddard, Peabody, for Center- 
pieces. 

. 25 Gratuity to Miss Frances Lyons, Peabody, for Hand- 
kerchief Case. 

. 75 Gratuity to Miss Edith Brown, Peabody, for Shirt 
Waist Set. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. F. Lindburg, Peabody, for 2 Table 
Covers. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. F. Lindburg, Peabody, for Skirt. 

.50: Gratuity to Mrs. B. E. Goodridge, Peabody, for 
Knitted Centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. A.M. Nash, Peabody, for Table Mats. 

.75 Gratuity to Miss Susie H. Baker, Ipswich, for Ash 
Tray. 

.75 Gratuity to Miss Carrie E. Smith, Peabody, for Sofa 
Pillow. 

.75 Gratuity to Miss Agnes McCarthy, Salem, for Sofa 
Pillow. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Grace E. Marrs, Peabody, for Table 
Cover. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. J.H.Hogan, Peabod}^, for Sofa Pillow. 

1.50 Gratuity to Miss Caroline M. Mudge, Danvers, for 
Bayberry and Wax Candles. 



56 

.75 Gratuity to Miss Frances Miller, Peabocty, for Sofa 
Pillow. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. F. S. Price, Salem, for Reins and 
Carriage Blanket. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Charles H. Goulding, Peabody, for 
Basket. 

.75 Gratuity to Elsie M. Cameron, Beverly, for Shirt 
Waist. 
2. Gratuity to Miss Jennie M. Titus, Marblehead, for 
Hand Woven Table Covers. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Edward Tutt, Marblehead, for Bas- 
ket. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. F. H. Edgerly, Peabody, for Cen- 
terpiece. 

.50 Gratuity to]Miss Mary L. Hall, Essex, for Pillow 
Cases. 

.50 Gratuity to Miss Hattie Woodbury, Beverly, for 
Sofa Pillow. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. E. H. Langdon, Danvers, for Irish 
Lace. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Isabelle Hanson, Salem, for Sofa Pil- 
low. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. Rosanna Guilford, Peabody, for 
Mexican Centerpiece. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. Olive E. Rodie, Peabody, for Sham 
and Pillow Slips. 

.75 Gratuity to Mrs. Alice W. Cassius, Peabody, for 
Shirt Waist. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. C. F. Lucas, Salem, for 3 Baby 
Jackets. 

1. Gratuity to Miss M. E. Lynch, Danvers, for 3 Baby 

Jackets. 

2. Gratuity to Mrs. Warren F. Low, Georgetown, for 

Centerpiece. 



57 

Mrs. J. W. Perkins, Mrs. D. W. O'Leary, Mrs. Lyman 
P. Osborne, Mrs. Charles H. Preston, Mrs. W. K. Cole.— 

Committee. 



OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

$2. Gratuity to Ada Cole, Marblehead, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. S. L. Bell, Marblehead, for water 

color. 
1. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to Flora L. Danforth, Middleton, for oil 

painting. 

1. Gratuity to Flora L. Danofrth, Middleton, for oil 

painting. 

2. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Salem, for oil 

sketches. 
2. Gratuity to William F. Knight, Saugus, for water 

color. 
2. Gratuity to Alice Hall, Saugus, for water color. 
2. Gratuity to E. H. Richardson, Haverhill, for oil 

painting. 
1. Gratuity to Lena Witham, Lynn, for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to Alice Trask, Peabody, for water color. 
1. Gratuity to H. F. Pierce, Danvers, for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to H. F. Pierce, Danvers, for oil painting. 
.50 Gratuity to Mertie Humphrey, Peabody, for water 

colors. 
.50 Gratuity to Mertie Humphrey, Peabody, for water 

colors. 
1. Gratuity to Theresa Kelley, Salem, for water color. 

1. Gratuity to Theresa Kelley, Salem, for water color. 

2. Gratuity to Sarah Symonds, Salem, for sculpture. 
1. Gratuity to Susie Poor, Peabody, for oil painting. 



58 

$ 1. Gratuity to Susie Poor, Peabody, for oil painting. 
1. Gratuity to Mary E. Mason, North Andover, for oil 
painting. 
Mrs. George W. Creesy, Mrs. Henry Hilliard, Miss 
Susie Osborn Poor — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

$5. First premium to Miss Lucy Hood, Salem, for collec- 
tion. 

2. First premium to Miss Lucy Hood, Salem, for raised 

paste. 

3. Second premium to Miss Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, 

for collection. 

1. Second premium to Miss Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, 

for raised paste. 

2. First premium to Miss Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, 

for vase. 

1. Second premium to Miss Alice C. Jenkins, Andover, 

for tray. 

3. First premium to Mrs. L. F. Batchelder, Salem, for 

individual specimens. 

2. Second premium to Mrs. C. H. Cash, Lynn, for in- 

dividual specimen. 

1. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Cash, Lynn, for sugar and 

cream set. 

2. First premium to Bertha Phelan, Salem, for punch 

bowl. 
1. Second premium to Mrs. Hay ward, Salem, for cider 

set. 
1. Second premium to Bertha Phelan, Salem, for vase. 

1. Gratuity to Bertha Phelan, Salem, for beer mug. 

2. First premium to Sarah Murphy, Salem, for fern dish. 
2. First premium to Harriet Phelan, Lynn, for nut tray 



59 

$1. Gratuity to C. T. Batchelder, Salem, for celery set. 
.50 Gratuity to L. M. Cate, Peabody, for olive dish. 
.50 Gratuity to L. M. Cate, Peabody, for bonbon and 
cheese dish. 
1. Gratuity to A. E. Beggs, Marblehead, for pottery. 

Mrs. D. P. Grosvenor, Mrs. John Barker, Mary E. 
Nason — Committee. 



CHARCOAL PHOTOGRAPHS AND PEN AND INK 

WORK. 

$2. Gratuity to Ada Cole, Beverly, for charcoal work. 
1. Gratuity to Mrs. H. B. Wallis, Beverly, for pyrog- 
raphy. 

1. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Salem, for pen and 

ink work. 

2. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Salem, for charcoal 

work. 
1. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Salem, for pyrogra- 
phy- 

,50 ; Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Salem, for pyrogra- 
phy. 
1. Gratuity to Miss F. L. Danforth, Middleton, for 

photos. 
,1. Gratuity to Miss Lucy Hood, Salem, for pyrography. 

1. Gratuity to Miss Lucy Hood, Salem, for inlaid box. 
.50 Gratuity to William Knight, Saugus, for pyrography. 
.50 Gratuity to William Knight, Saugus, for pyrography. 
.50 Gratuity to Harold Curley, Beverly, for pyrography. 

2. Gratuity to Alice Trask, Peabody, for photos. 

.50 Gratuity to Mrs. A. M. Nash, Peabody, for scroll 

work. 
.50 Gratuity to Thersa Kelley, Salem, for charcoal work. 
1. Gratuity to Sarah Symonds, Beverly, for modeling. 



6o 



.50 Gratuity to L. P. Smith, Peabody, for photos. 

.50 Gratuity to L. P. Smith, Peabody for photos. 

.50 Gratuity to Bertha Chadwick, North Andover, for 
Pyrography. 

.50 Gratuity to Bertha Chadwick, North Andover, for 
pyrography. 
1. Gratuity to Marmion Wilkins, Danvers, for pyrog- 
raphy. 

.50 Gratuity to Mabel Sturgis, Salem, for pyrography. 

.50 Gratuity to Agnes V. Cragen, Salem, for pyrography. 
Sarah F. Franklin, H. C. Allen, Nancy J. Moulton — 

Committee. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

$2. First premium to Roger Hill, Peabody, for Burnt 
Wood. 
1. Second premium to Ruth Munroe, Peabody, for white 
Hat. 

.75 Gratuity to Inez Townsend, Lynn, for white Apron. 

.75 Gratuity to Louise Montgomery, Peabody, for Sofa 
Pillow. 

.50 Gratuity to Alice Durocher, Peabody, for Sofa Pil- 
low and Towel. 

.50 Gratuity to Mary Kennedy, Peabody, for Centre- 
piece. 

.50 Gratuity to Lillian Newton, Peabody, for Slippers. 

.50 Gratuity to Frances Tenney, Peabodj', for Sofa 
Pillow. 

.35 Gratuity to Agnes Cody, Peabody, for Shawl. 

.35 Gratuity to Alice M. Berry, Peabody, for Sampler. 

.35 Gratuity to Irene Masterson, Peabody, for Apron. 

.35 Gratuity to Margaret E. Berry, Peabody, for Center- 
piece. 



6i 



.30 , Gratuit} r to Alice Dean, Peabody, for Drawing. 
.30 Gratuity to Katherine O'Leary, Peabody, for Sam 

pier. 
.30 Gratuity to George S. Barnaby, Middleton, for 

Thistles. 
.25 Gratuity to Edna E. Svvasey, Peabody, for Pastel. 
.25 Gratuity to Helen Kimball, Peabody, for Apron. 
.25 Gratuity to John Cody, Peabody, for Rug. 
.25 Gratuity to Lavina Craig, Peabody, for Tray Cloth. 
.25 Gratuity to Catherine McCarthy, Peabody, for 

Sampler. 
.25 Gratuity to Mary Perry, Peabody, for Sampler. 

Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Mrs. Geo. E. Herrick, Mrs. H. 
Alice Tuttle, Mrs. Ethel K. Cole — Committee. 



REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have been five new members added to the Society 
since the last annual report, four of whom became mem- 
bers by receiving a premium of seven dollars and upwards, 
according to the rules of the Society, from different cities 
and towns, as follows : — 

Haverhill, 1 Peabody, 1 

Lynn, 1 Salem, 1 

Lynnfield, 1 



INSTITUTES. 

The Society held four Institutes the past year, on as 
many different days, both forenoon and afternoon, at which 
the following subjects were discussed by any of the audi- 
ence who desired. 



62 



The first Institute was held at West Newbury, Friday, 
Jan. 12. Subject for the forenoon, "The One Hundred 
Dollar Cow," by Prof. F. S. Cooley. Afternoon, » The 
Growing of Alfalfa in Massachusetts," by Henry Fielding 
of Beverly. 

The second Institute was held at Beverly, Jan. 26. 
Subject for the forenoon, " Fruit, Flowers and Vegeta- 
bles," by A. A. Hixon of Worcester. Afternoon, " The 
Growing of Alfalfa in Massachusetts," by Henry Fielding 
of Beverly. 

The third Institute was held at Parker Hall, Newbury, 
Feb. 9. Subject for the forenoon, " Dairying and Clean 
Milk." Afternoon, same subject, by P. M. Harwood. 

The fourth Institute was held at Grange Hall, Methuen, 
Thursday, March 9. Subject for the forenoon, " Market 
Gardening," by J. Lewis Ellsworth, Secretary State Board 
of Agriculture. Afternoon, " Extensive, Intensive Farm- 
ing in New England," by Prof. J. W. Sanborn of Pitts- 
field, N. H. 



REPORT OF STATE INSPECTOR. 
[copy.] 
Barre, Mass., Nov. 19, 1906. 
J. Lewis Ellsworth, Sec. State Board of Agriculture. 
Dear Sir : — Your inspector, as per assignment, visited 
the annual fair of the Essex Agricultural Society, held at 
Peabody, September 18, 19 and 20, and submits the fol- 
lowing report. I reported to the genial secretary of the 
Society, Mr. John M. Danforth, on the morning of the 
18th. Through his courtesy I met the officers of the So- 
ciety formally. They were all alert in their attentions to 
their patrons and the many duties belonging to their dif- 
ferent stations. 



63 

I first looked over the dairy stock, seventy-two in num- 
ber, mostly thoroughbreds, representatives of the leading 
breeds, viz., Holsteins, Jerseys, Guernseys and Ayrshires. 
They were well housed and groomed, all good specimens 
of their kind, while each competitor showed individuals 
of special merit. Only two pairs of working oxen com- 
peted by showing their strength and docility on the loaded 
stone drag. Your inspector is of the opinion that a trial 
on the cart would be much more practical. 

The horses came next in line, the exhibit consisting of 
stallions for light and heavy harness purposes, gentlemen's 
driving horses, light and heavy brood mares and colts. A 
small entry, but they all appeared well, both in the har- 
ness and the halter. It would seem that the location and 
inducements given would bring out a larger exhibit of 
this very important and useful animal. 

The poultry house was next visited, where I found a 
very unusually large and interesting collection of poultry, 
hens, geese, ducks, pigeons, and pet stock, doing credit to 
the exhibitors and Society as well. There was a small 
entry of good swine of the popular breeds. Sheep made 
a good showing for the locality. 

From the entire absence of the trotting horse, I con- 
clude the Society does not cater to that kind of entertain- 
ment. A small collection of agricultural implements was 
shown under canvass. The midway abounded in side 
shows, fakirs, lunch counters, all crying out their wares. 
A balloon ascension, with parachute drop, a vaudeville 
company appearing on the stage each afternoon, consti- 
tuted the side attractions offered by the Society. 

A very large display of fruit, cut flowers, needle work, 
and works of art, were shown in a down town hall, the 
collection being very large and meritorious. All were 
artistically arranged and carefully labelled, and with a 



6 4 

band concert in the evening, drew large crowds, the paid 
admissions of which must add materially to the treasury 
of the Society. 

The Society's affairs seem to be administered by an able, 
conscientious, conservative board of officers. Its financial 
standing is apparently good. It has large and centrally 
located grounds, first-class buildings to house all kinds of 
stock. The Society should have, as it deserves, first-class 
patronage. This year children, with an age limit, were 
admitted the first day free, a plan which I think other 
societies would do well to carefully consider. 
Respectfully submitted, 
(Signed) J. Harding Allen, Inspector. 



ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE THE ESSEX 
COUNTY AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, JANUARY, 
1906. BY HENRY FIELDEN, SUPT. CHERRY 
HILL FARM, BEVERLY, MASS. 



ALFALFA. 

Alfalfa or lucerne has been cultivated as a forage plant, 
for more than 20 centuries. It was familiar to the Egyp- 
tians, Medes and Persians, it was introduced into Greece 
470 B. C. It grew spontaneously in the high dry regions 
of Central Asia. Preceding the Christian era it was promi- 
nent in Roman agriculture. It was esteemed highly by 
the ancients as forage for their horses, and it has been 
cultivated in Italy to this day. From Italy it was intro- 
duced into Spain and Southern France and was carried to 
Mexico, at the time of the Spanish Invasion. It found its 
way from there to the western coast of South America and 
still may be found growing over large areas of that section. 
From Chili it was taken to California in 1854 and there, 
mainly under irrigation, flourishes today to the exclusion 
of other plants. It has spread rapidly eastward and is 
now grown extensively in the western states and territories, 
and is now commencing to find favor in the eastern states. 

Alfalfa is an upright, branching, smooth perennial clover, 
growing as high as three feet. Its leaves are three parted. 
The blossom is purple, the flowers instead of being in a 
head, as in red clover, are in long loose clusters. These 
clusters are scattered all over the plant instead of being 
borne, as in red clover, on the upper branches only. The 
seeds are kidney shaped, yellowish brown in color and 



66 



average about 1-12 of an inch long by half as thick. They 
are about 1-2 larger than red clover seed. 

Alfalfa feeds deep. The taproots descend to great 
depths wherever the soil is loose and permeable. It has 
been known to send its roots to a depth of 40 feet and 
under specially favorable conditions it is believed would 
go deeper. The young plant consists of a number of low 
branches sprouting from a simple base at the crown of the 
root. The branches ascend directly above the ground and 
form a compact tuft. 

When the stems are cut off the stalk dies back to the base 
and new buds start out of the crown of the root and grow 
forming new stems. This method of growth explains why 
so many report that alfalfa is destroyed by continuous 
close grazing. The stems of most forage plants when cut or 
broken branch out above ground forming lateral shoots that 
immediately grow up and take the place of the old stem. 
With alfalfa it comes direct from the crown of the root. 

Alfalfa will grow in favorable soil anywhere from sea- 
level to 7000 feet elevation, it is not influenced as much 
by altitude as by warmth and depth of soil, the drainage 
and character of subsoil. It will grow best on a light 
sandy loam with a loose subsoil. It was generally believed 
that the plant would thrive best in the regions west of the 
Rocky Mountains but since 1894 as good results have 
been obtained east of the Rocky Mountains and a better 
grade of hay grown where the subsoil was loose and per- 
meable. Alfalfa will not grow well on land that contains 
an excess of iron ; it feeds heaviest on lime, potash, mag- 
nesium and phosphoric acid and succeeds best where these 
elements are in evidence. Lime is the most essential to 
its rapid and thrifty growth. Above all, the land must 
be well drained, naturally or artificially. Alfalfa is seldom 
a success on land where the subsoil is impervious to water. 



67 

The first two months of the life of the alfalfa plant is the 
most critical period, and at this time it is very susceptible 
to changes in temperature and excess of water. Alfalfa 
will not thrive with wet feet. The land on which it is 
proposed to grow alfalfa should have been planted with a 
hoed crop for several years, so that all weeds could be 
subdued. The land should be thoroughly plowed and 
harrowed. In the preparation of the land for alfalfa at 
Cherry Hill Farm the land is first plowed to a depth of 
eight or ten inches, a heavy coating of manure applied 
and thoroughly harrowed in with a double action cutaway 
harrow. Thirty bushels of lime to the acre are applied, 
spread evenly, and thoroughly worked into the soil with 
the same harrow. Five hundred pounds of fertilizer is 
then spread, and the land harrowed as many times as is 
necessary to make a tine seed bed. I have harrowed a 
field as many as fifteen times, and have been well repaid 
for doing so. After the seed bed is prepared, we sow 
thirty pounds of alfalfa seed to the acre. In the past we 
have used a nurse crop with the alfalfa ; in the future we 
shall use none. The first cost of preparation of the soil 
may seem large, but it must be considered that you expect 
to take three crops a year for three and as many more 
years as you can. The first expense is therefore spread 
over several years. Plowing deep is essential to success, 
as shallow plowing often causes failures. If the roots 
cannot penetrate a foot the first year, your crop being a 
surface one, is liable to be killed out the first winter, or by 
severe drought in summer. It would be a benefit to sub- 
soil if your alfalfa goes down fifteen inches the first year. 
I think there is no doubt of success. Alfalfa has been 
known to thrive on land with hardpan sub-soil, but it will 
do better on land with a loose sub-soil. 

The best time to sow the seed is in spring, as soon as the 



68 



land warms up,the seed may be either broadcasted or drilled. 
We sow broadcast. To get a good quality of forage the 
plants should be close together, so that the stems will be 
small and not woody. Alfalfa is easily choked with weeds, 
hence the necessity of clean land. As soon as our plants 
are a foot tall, we mow them down, whether there are 
weeds or not. This cutting should be left on the ground 
to protect the roots from the scorching sun. Whether the 
field is weedy or not, repeat the mowing as often as your 
crop is high enough to cut, as every time you cut off the 
plant it drives the roots deeper into the soil, and this will 
give the plant more strength and vigor to go through the 
winter. Alfalfa will yield a better crop the second and 
succeeding years than the first year. On a plot of three 
acres which had been down three years we cut sixteen and 
one-third tons of cured alfalva in three cuttings, and could 
have cut a fourth cutting, but preferred to leave it for a 
mulch for winter. 

The centre of that field was killed out last winter by 
water collecting on it and freezing, the centre of the field 
being a basin, the outer edges where the water could drain 
off, wintered all right, and we cut off four crops during 
the past season, and then plowed the field up. We have 
ten acres which has srone through two seasons, and we cut 
off three heavy crops the past summer, and on Oct. 18th 
I cut this bunch of alfalfa hap-hazard from the field, and 
it measured eighteen inches tall. This was a fourth crop, 
which was left as a mulch. We cut the alfalfa as soon as 
the first blossoms appear. If you wait until your field is 
in full bloom, you will have lost a good part of your feed- 
ing value, as the stem will have become too woody, mak- 
ing it unpalatable for cattle. We cut in the afternoon, 
let the alfalfa lie in the swath until wilted, then rake into 
windrows, put it up in cocks five feet high. We then 



6 9 

cover these with hay caps ; as soon as the dew is off the fol- 
lowing day, we uncover and move the cocks over on to new 
ground, cover again at night, and continue to do this until 
the alfalva is cured and ready to put in the barn. If 
the cocks are left in one place longer than twenty-four 
hours, the alfalfa plants underneath are liable to be smoth- 
ered. It usually takes six days to cure it in this way, 
which is the only way to cure it, and save the leaves, 
which are its greatest value. Alfalfa does not turn water 
as readily as red clover or timothy, hence it should be cov- 
ered in curing. A soaking rain will decrease its value 
fifty per cent. 

The length of time which alfalfa will grow without re- 
seeding is something we cannot yet tell in this climate, 
but if we only are able to save it three years I consider it 
a paying crop. In the state of Sonora, Mexico, is a field 
known to have been kept in alfalfa for sixty years, and is 
said to be in as good condition to-day as it ever was. In 
the West growers frequently go over their fields with a 
sharp-tooth harrow to loosen up the surface of the ground 
and kill out weeds where they appear, and sow in seed in 
places where the plants are thin. I have not done this 
yet, but propose doing so in the spring. 

FEEDING VALUE. 

For dairy cattle there is no forage that equals alfalfa. 
It is palatable, rich, easily digested. In the west in many 
cases dairy cows are fed alfalfa to the exclusion of every- 
thing else in the forage line, and with corn it makes a 
balanced ration, being rich in protein and lacking in carbo- 
hydrates ; the corn supplies the carbo-hydrates. 

D. H. Otis, Professor of Dairy Husbandry at the Kan- 
sas Agricultural College, says: " Alfalfa can be used in 
place of bran for dairy cows, and is the only roughage 



70 

that can be used with corn and make a balanced ration. 
While feeding the alfalfa to dairy cows at this station, we 
have produced butter fat at 11.9 cents per pound. When 
we did not have alfalfa, and were obliged to balance up 
the ration with high priced concentrates, the butter fat 
cost from 15 to 17 cents a pound." 

When fed to work horses with the addition of a small 
grain ration, they will keep in good condition. 

Alfalva is one of the best soiling crops. It can be fed 
to advantage in this wa} r in New England, especially in 
seasons when the weather is not favorable to curing it. 
Care should be taken not to feed it when it is wet, as, 
like clover, it will bloat the cattle. It can be pastured by 
sheep or cattle, but it is unsafe to pasture it on account of 
danger from over-eating, causing bloating. Another of 
the disadvantages of pasturing alfalfa is the tramping by 
the cattle, which packs the soil too hard around the roots, 
preventing the alfalfa from making proper growth. 

The feeding of alfalfa hay in winter gives the milk and 
butter a rich yellow color. 

As to its value as a milk producer, from recent tests at 
Cherry Hill Farm I found that by feeding alfalfa in place 
of clover mixed hay to eighty cows, at an additional cost 
of one dollar per day over the cost of the clover hay, we 
got an increase in milk of fifty quarts per day, which to 
us was five dollars a day, against an outlay of one dollar. 
To the farmer, getting four cents a quart for his milk, it 
would mean an increase of two dollars for an expenditure 
of one dollar. 

ALFALFA AS A SOIL RENOVATOR. 

Alfalfa belongs to the class of plants known as nitrogen 
gatherers. All legumes draw nitrogen directly from the 
air. The roots of the alfalfa plants will be found to be 



7i 

covered with a number of small nodules, or tubercles, and 
if these nodules are examined under a strong microscope, 
the tissues will show great numbers of bacteria. It is 
through the action of these organisms that the plant draws 
nitrogen from the air. Grasses take no nitrogen, except 
that which is in soluble form in the soil. Alfalfa manu- 
factures the most valuable and expensive fertilizer. By 
raising alfalfa you not only provide the best forage for 
your stock, but you are enriching your fields at the same 
time. When this crop is plowed under or fed to stock, 
and the manure returned to the ground, it supplies a large 
quantity of nitrogen. And in my opinion, in feeding 
alfalfa to your cattle and using the manure from those 
cattle on your land, you are distributing the bacteria nec- 
essary to the successful growing of alfalfa on your land. 

ENEMIES OF ALFALFA. 

In the eastern states the greatest enemy to the success- 
ful growth of Alfalfa is weedy land. Of our native 
grasses, witch grass is the worst, so don't sow alfalfa on 
land infested with witch grass. The worst weed which 
growers of alfalfa east of the Missouri river have to con- 
tend with is dodder or love vine. This weed, or the species 
that does the greatest damage, is an importation, and has 
spread over a large part of the states where alfalfa is 
grown. It was brought to this country in flax and alfalfa 
seed from Europe. Dodder belongs to the morning glory 
family, but unlike the common morning glory of the fields, 
it is parasitic, the stems are without leaves and appear like 
threads, orange or yellow in color. When the seed of the 
dodder germinates the young, the plant is able to grow 
for a short time upon the supply of food laid up for it in 
the seed, but unless its stem can feed it dies. As soon as 
the dodder touches the stem of the alfalfa it twines itself 



72 

around it and fastens itself to the stalk with numerous 
suckers which enter the tissues of the alfalfa plant. These 
suckers draw all the food materials from the alfalfa and 
soon choke it out. The only practical remedy for the ex- 
termination of dodder is to mow the alfalfa in early sum- 
mer and burn it where it lies. This will completely kill 
the dodder without injuring the alfalfa as alfalfa comes 
from crown of the root under ground. The best way is 
to prevent its introduction into your land by buying seed 
free from it. So far I have not heard of any dodder grow- 
ing in New England fields of alfalfa. 

Alfalfa weighs 60 lbs. to the bushel. 

For a hay crop sow 30 lbs. to the acre. 

Sow seed that is clean and free from weed seeds. 

Sow in spring as soon as the ground gets warm. Sow 
broadcast. 

Do not cover the seed too deep. 

Alfalfa does not attain maturity until after the second 
year, therefore do not get discouraged if you do not get 
results at first. 

Alfalfa grows best on a deep sandy loam with a loose 
subsoil. The land must be well drained. 

Alfalfa is a deep feeder, plow the ground thoroughly, 
the deeper the better. 

Alfalfa will not thrive on an acid soil, overcome acid 
conditions with lime. 

Cut when first blossoms appear, in afternoon, allow it to 
wilt, put up in cocks, cover with hay caps, move each day 
until cured. Do not cut too late in the season. 

From U. S. government tests, one acre of alfalfa hay has 
produced as much beef as 9,575 lbs. of timothy hay or 
almost 2 acres of timothy. It has produced as much beef 
as 11,967 lbs. of red clover or equal to 1 3-4 acres. 



73 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE CHOSEN TO PREPARE 

SUITABLE REPORT ON THE DEATH 

OF BENJAMIN P. WARE. 

The Essex Agricultural Society desires to put on record 
its high appreciation of the character and career of Benja- 
min Pond Ware. For two generations, the term extending 
from 1848 until his death at the age of 84, Feb. 7, 1906, 
Mr. Ware was a member of this Society, serving it constant- 
ly in every various function, and for sixteen years, from 
1875 to 1891, he was its president. He was born in Sa- 
lem, Apr. 9, 1822. He was the son of Erastus Ware, a 
typical New England farmer. The father came of sturdy, 
puritanic stock, descendants from an old-world ancestry 
through the pioneer, Robert Ware, who left Suffolk, Eng- 
land, for Dedham in New England, in 1634, and received 
a grant of land in the part of Dedham now Wrentham, 
being a householder, in 1642. Coming from Wrentham in 
Suffolk he probably gave the name of Wrentham to his 
part of Dedham, where he died the second man in impor- 
tance in the town. Erastus Ware had left Wrentham for 
Danvers in 1810, and had at once become an authority in 
milk-farming and in the special problems which husbandry 
involves when conducted in populous sections and near 
city markets. He married a Wardwell, a daughter of one 
of Washington's life-guardsmen, — and from 1820 to 1845, 
he was in charge, together with his sons Horace and Ben- 
jamin, both born there, of the great Pickman Farm in Sa- 
lem, — four hundred and twenty odd acres in area, — the 
largest aggregation of tillage land under one title in this 
county. In 1831, Erastus Ware bought the old farm in 
Marblehead since identified with the name, and here he 
was a pioneer in the practice of opening his doors to sum- 
mer guests. At the old farm house, in 1835, he received 



74 

and protected George Thomson and William Lloyd Garri- 
son, upon whose views of slavery, then denounced with 
threats of violence, the Wares looked with favor. In 
1846 his son Benjamin and he built the Clifton House, 
which took its name from Hannah Upham Clifton, married 
to Benjamin Ware that year, and, with a daughter, survi- 
ving him. It was successfully conducted as a seaside re- 
sort until it burned down in 1893. 

Benjamin Pond Ware lived to a ripe old age. For 
nearly his whole life he was exceptionally active in mind 
and body Growing up as Ijp. did in a family which, with 
Timothy Pickering, regarded husbandry as " the noblest 
of pursuits " and like him, in 1820 found the soil of our 
historic farms "already exhausted and needing manures," 
— there was little to be known of Essex County farming 
which Mr. Ware did not know. It was his fortune to live 
in a day when old systems were making way for new 
scientific methods and larger mechanical aids and better 
facilities for brain-work in the craft which makes two 
blades of grass grow where one grew before. Denser pop- 
ulations to be fed and increased land-values which must 
yield an income were calling for a more productive hus- 
bandry. For a century the French had taught in their 
schools the art and science of tilling the soil by systematic 
methods. Mr. Ware was a true son of the Puritan in his 
reverence for tradition, but his mind was hospitably open 
to new methods. Nobody was before him in the use of 
the silo, and, at the close of his active career, a tour of 
Europe afforded new views of the ancient methods there 
pursued which he made haste to share with the brethren 
of his craft. He was an effective public speaker and 
writer, and the " Massachusetts Ploughman " furnished 
him throughout his life with a medium for reaching others 
which his scanty schooling would have closed to a man of 



75 

less vigor. Two terms at the Phillips Andover Academy 
supplemented for him the winter sessions of the District 
School, but these gave him all the vocabulary which an 
earnest, progressive thinker, full of public spirit, found oc- 
casion to use. His voice was good, — his manner confident 
but unassuming, and his whole bearing, marked by trans- 
parent frankness, was such as carries conviction, and had 
the emphasis that belongs to a strong man. 

Early and late, Mr. Ware urged the establishment of a 
State Agricultural Experimental Station, and he lived to 
be a manager of such a school as well as a member of a 
State Board of Agriculture. He was a Vice-President of 
the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, of which, in 1865, 
he became a life member. He was master of the State 
Grange of Massachusetts for two years, and of Subordinate 
Grange Number 38, for six years. He was President of 
the Marblehead and Swampscott Farmers' Club for four 
years, and for ten years a Trustee of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, and for nine years a trustee of the 
New England Agricultural Society. 

Practical farmer that he was in every fibre, these activ- 
ities, added to the daily oversight of a well-kept farm, did 
not exhaust his vital forces. He was for sixteen years on 
the School Board of his town, and for five years a Trustee 
of the local Savings Bank. No enterprise which seemed 
to promise well for human advancement was without its 
interest for him,— be it good roads,— the planting of shade 
trees,— the protection of children and dumb creatures 
against brutality and neglect,— the improvement of crops 
and live-stock,— or some moral, social, educational or po- 
litical movement which called for self-sacrifice, intelligence 
and courage. Popular or not, Mr. Ware could be counted 
on to stand by his convictions. If he was always the 
thrifty and sagacious model farmer,— the true son of the 



7 6 

soil, — he Avas no less the large-hearted, open-minded, pub- 
lic-spirited citizen. He did much to secure the freeing of 
the Salem and Boston Turnpike and of the Chelsea Bridge, 
with the incidental result that tolls were speedily abolished 
on every incorporated turnpike and bridge in Massachu- 
setts. He did much to promote the chartering of a street 
railway between Lynn and Boston and the subsequent ex- 
tension of it to Marblehead. He did much to push on the 
construction of the spur-track of the Eastern Railroad 
which joined Swampscott with Marblehead. He was a 
principal factor in urging forward to success, in the face 
of grave opposition, the beautiful and now populous shore 
drive called Atlantic Avenue, which has resulted so aus- 
piciously for the surrounding section. New England hus- 
bandry will look far to find a more typical or more esti- 
mable follower of the craft of Adam. 

Robert S. Rantoul ] 

John Robinson I Committee. 

Henry A. Hale \ 



77 



IN MEMORIAM. 

The following is a list of members deceased, as returned 
to the Secretary, not heretofore reported : — 

Aldrich, A. P., Lynn. Lewis, Jacob M., Lynn. 

Bailey, Moses A., Andover. Mason, Alfred A., Beverly. 
Bodge, Jacob G., Peabody. Nichols, J. B., Haverhill. 
Brown, Everett K., Ipswich. Obear, Ezekiel F., Beverly. 
Brown, Rufus H., Peabody. Perry, Albert, Beverly. 
Butters, Charles, Haverhill. Phippen, G. S., Methuen. 
Buxton, Henry V., Peabody. Pillsbury, H. N., Danvers. 
Cammett,Samuel, Amesbury. Pope, Jasper, Beverly. 
Carter, John W., Beverly. Quint, Nicholas M., Peabody. 
Cheever, James O., Andover. Reynolds, George, Peabody. 
Cross, Alfred, Lynn. Rollins, Jonas, Danvers. 

Danforth, E. F., Beverly. Sanger, George F., Peabody. 
Dempsy, L. P., Danvers. Safford, Daniel A., Hamilton. 
Dodge, Francis, Danvers. Southwick, B. F., Peabody. 
Dodge, Forest C, Beverly. Swasey, E., Haverhill. 
Dodge, A. Taylor, Peabody. Stone, Charles O., Peabody. 
Dodge, Robert F., Wenham. Swan, Leverett, Methuen. 
Dodge, George B., Wenham. Trask, J. G., Beverly. 
Dole, William T., Peabody. Verry, Henry, Danvers. 
Eames, Plato, Andover. Ware, Benjamin P., Marble- 

Elliott, John T., Beverly. head. 

Garland, James A., Hamilton. Warren, N. J. Mrs., Lynn. 
Kimball, Elizabeth C, Pea- West, H. K., Haverhill. 

body. Wheeler, Benj. S., Peabody. 

Kinsman, Joseph F., Ipswich. Winchester, Wen'th, Peabody 
Lawrence, C. A., Beverly. Wood, John T., Boxford. 
Lee, Edward K., Essex. Woodbury, Rufus, Beverly. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Awarded 


for Bulls, 


$44 


00 


t< 


« 


Milch Cows, 


42 


00 


a 


« 


Herds of Milch Cows, 8 


00 


u 


u 


Heifers, 


44 


00 


11 


K 


Working Oxen, 


12 


00 


u 


t< 


Steers, 


4 


00 


a 


M 


Horses, 


93 


00 


i( 


(I 


Swine, 


26 


00 


K 
(( 


« 
(< 


Sheep and Goats, 
Poultry, 

FARM AND GRAIN 


9 
209 

CROPS. 


00 
25 
- 1491 25 


Awarded 


for Grain and Seed, 


$13 


00 






Vegetables, 
Fruits, 


133 

148 


00 
75 


t< 


u 


Plants and Flowers, 


131 


00 

— $425 75 



DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

Awarded for Dairy, $ 4 00 

" " Bread and Canned Fruit, 23 50 
" Honey, 3 00 

" " Counterpanes and Afghans, 22 00 
" " Carpetings and Rugs, 14 75 

" " Articles Manufactured from 

Leather, 5 00 

" " Manufactures and General 

Mdse, 2 00 

" " Fancy Work, 44 75 

" Works of Art, 89 00 

" Children's Work, 10 30 

$218 30 



79 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Awarded for Agricultural Implements, $25 00 
« " Carriages, 30 00 



|55 00 



The amount of $1,190.80 


was awarded to 41 


3 individ- 


uals and firms 


in 27 cities and towns, as follows 




Amesbury, 


20 


00 


Marblehead, 


22 00 


Andover, 


33 


00 


Middleton, 


15 80 


Beverly, 


41 


75 


Newbury, 


15 00 


Boxford, 


53 


00 


Newburyport, 


4 00 


Danvers, 


115 


75 


North Andover, 


108 00 


Essex, 




50 


Peabody, 


415 50 


Georgetown, 


2 


00 


Rowley, 


8 00 


Groveland, 


2 


00 


Salem, 


125 00 


Hamilton, 


6 


50 


Saugus, 


5 25 


Haverhill, 


12 


75 


Swampscott, 


6 50 


Ipswich, 


3 


75 


Topsfield, 


5 00 


Lawrence, 


3 


00 


Wenham, 


15 75 


Lynn, 


125 


50 


West Newbury, 


3 50 


Lynnfield, 


23 


00 








FINANCIAL 


STATEMENT. 




Received for admission 


to Hall and Grounds, 


$2,111 77 


If u 


« 


" Grand Stand, 


51 00 


(< (( 


Dinner Tickets, 


114 00 


u it 


from Hall, 




23 00 


it t< 


Grounds, 






552 00 


« it 


Interest, 






1 71 



$2,853 48 



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«i> 


H 




W 








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o 




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I 








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CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Article 1. There shall be a President, four Vice-Pres- 
idents, a Secretary, and a Treasurer, who shall be Trus- 
tees, ex- officio, and one Trustee from each city and town 
in the county. The President, Vice-Presidents, Secretary 
and one Trustee from each city and town in the county 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer by the Trustees annually at their meeting in 
November. Nomination for Trustees may be made by any 
member or members of the Society from the city or town 
from which he is to be elected for at least one week before 
said meeting to the Secretary, and he shall prepare ballots 
for the same. 

Art. 2. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the So- 
ciety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at 
which all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at 
least shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the Trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Presidents shall be absent, 
the members present may appoint one from among them 
to preside at such meeting. 

Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting of the Society ; or whenever a 
written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 



82 

shall be made by any twelve members of the Society to 
the President and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon; seven of whom, with the presiding officer, shall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The Trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society during the intervals of the meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the public, 
publish such communications, and offer such premiums in 
such form and value as they think proper (provided the 
premiums offered do not exceed the funds of the Society) ; 
and shall lay before the Society at each of its meetings a 
statement of their proceedings and of the communications 
made to them. 

Art. 7. The Secretary shall take minutes of all the 
votes and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books ; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustees shall direct. He 
shall write and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which shall be lodged with the Secretary, who shall make 
a fair record thereof. The Treasurer shall from time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have orders for from 
the Trustees ; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, render a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of duty in such sum 
as the trustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 

Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed annually by 



83 

the Trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 
report to the Society ; and the same being accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretary in his books. 

Art. 10. In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary, or of the 
Treasurer, the Trustees shall take charge of the official 
books, papers, and other effects belonging to the office that 
may be vacated, and give receipts for the same, which 
books, papers, etc., they may deliver to some person whom 
they may appoint to fill the office until the next meeting 
of the Society, at which time there shall be a new choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society b} r paying the sum of three dol- 
lars to increase the permanent fund of the institution. 

Art. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture 
of our county, the same to be sacredly appropriated to that 
purpose. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the gospel who 
reside within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a member 
at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the action 
at the next annual meeting of the Society. 



♦Members will receive from the Secretary a certificate of member- 
ship. No fines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are en- 
titled to vote in all its transactions, with free use of the Library and 
a copy of the printed Transactions each year. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY 

For J906-J907. 



PRESIDENT. 

FREDERICK A. RUSSELL, of Methuen. 



VICE PRESIDENTS. 

JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
SHERMAN NELSON, of Georgetown. 
IRA J. WEBSTER, of Haverhill. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER. 

WILLIAM S. NICHOLS, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

GEORGE V. L. MEYER, of Hamilton. 
FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



85 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OP AGRICULTURE, 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TRUSTEES. 



John J. Mason, Amesbury John W. Shirley, Methuen 
George L. Averill, Andover Walter H. Brown, Middleton 
John W. Lovett, Beverly Henry Cabot Lodge, Nahant 
John W. Parkhurst, Boxford Frank Perkins, Newbury 
Charles H. Preston, Danvers Paul V. Winkley, Newbury't 
Elias Andrews, Essex Winfield S. Hughes, No. An- 

Samuel T. Poor, Georgetown dover 

Geo. M. Wonson, Gloucester Orlando F. Newhall, Peabody 
Sam'l B. George, Groveland John J. Manning, Rockport 
Isaac F. Knowlton, Hamilton Frank Todd, Rowley 
B. Frank Barnes, Haverhill George W. Cressey, Salem 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich George A. Dow, Salisbury 
Chas. E. Wingate, Lawrence Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 
Edwin Bates, Lynn Wm. H. Bates, Swampscott 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield Charles J. Peabody, Topsfield 
John H. Cheever,Manchester J. Kavanagh, Wenham 
Amos P. Alley, Marblehead Richard Newell, W. Newbury 
George W. Hoyt, Merrimac 



Members of Essex Agricultural Society. 

DECEMBER, 1906. 



Previous printed list was in 1904. If any errors are dis- 
covered in the following list, please report them to the Secre- 
tary. Trustees are requested to report deaths of members as 
soon as they occur, when convenient. 



Chesley, M. B. 
Davis, B. Lewis 
Gale, Edmund 
Goodwin, E. A. 
Hill, Albert C. 



AMESBURY— 15. 

Hollander,Lambert Morrill George T. 
Huntington, B. F. Sargent M. Perry 
Little, J. P. Tuxbury, R. E. 

Lane, T. W. True, Eben 

Mason, John J. Vining, William F. 



Abbott, James J. 
Andrews, M. C. 
Averill, George L. 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Bell, Charles U. 
Blunt, Charles C. 
Blunt, Joseph H. 
Buchan, George 
Buchan, George W. 
Burnham, George L. 
Carter, Charles L. 
Johnson, Francis H. 
McLawlin, Henry 



ANDOVER— 37. 

Moor, J. Warren 
Cole, John N. 
Downing, Mrs. J. J. 
Flint, John H. 
Foster, George W. 
Foster, George C. 
Foster, F. H. 
Gould, Milo H. 
Ripley, George 
Holt, E. F. 
Holt, Ballard 
Jenkins, John B. 



Jenkins, E. Kendall 
Jenkins, John A. 
Jenkins, Alice C. 
Noyes, Henry P. 
Poor, Joseph W. 
Play don, Alfred G. 
Smith, John L. 
Smith, Peter D. 
Smith, Benjamin F- 
Smith, Joseph W. 
Thayer, Samuel 
Tucker, William 



87 



Abbott, Stephen A. 
Addison, G. A. 
Andrews, Joseph F. 
Appleton, Nathan D. 
Appleton, Edw. H. 
Bancroft, Robert H. 
Burnham, O. B. 
Caldwell, Charles E. 
Caswell, 0. 
Chamberlain, M. L. 
Clark, George 
Clark, Arthur E. 
Clark Peter E. 
Cochrane, Alex'r 
Crampsey, Carrie Mrs, 
Curtis, John S. 
Dalton, Charles H. 
Davenport, A. H. 
Dexter, Philip 
Dodge, Andrew 
Dodge, Benjamin B. 
Dodge, Ered A. 
Dodge, Joshua S. 
Dodge, Lucius F. 
Dodge, Walter F. 
Endicott, Robert R. 
Foster, Isaacher, jr. 



Anderson, Charles R. 
Anderson, David A. 
Austin, George B. 
Chadwick, Geo. W. 
Chadwick, James W. 
Chadwick, Walter I. 



BEVERLY— 79. 

Foster, W T illiani B. Murney, John M. 



Giles, Benj. V. 
Gardner, John L. 
Heaton, Robert C. 
Head, Charles 
Hill, Hugh 
Holden, Fred W. 
Holden, Loren 



Norwood, Francis 

Peabody, F. H. 

Phillips, J. C. Mrs. 

Pickett, Charles 

Pierson, C. L. 

Pickman, D. L. 

Porter, Adoniram 
Howse, Thomas W. Preston, Ezra 
Lee, Asa F Raymond, John W 

Larcom, Rufus Sawyer, E. C. 
Loring, Augustus P.Schurman, Isaac 
Loring, Wm. Caleb Seabury, Frank 
Lothrop, Elmer A. Sohier, Wm. D. 
Lovett, Francis S. Stone, Samuel H. 
Lovett, John W. Trafton, Darling F. 
Mason, George Trask, E. F. 
Mason, Charles A. Trask, Joseph W. 
Masters, James A. Vittum, Albert 
Mayo, Josiah Wallis, Joseph A. 

McKean, Henry P. Webb, Alden 
Mitchell, John E. Williams, Augustus 
Morgan, William C. Whitcomb, Austin 
Morse, John T. Woodbury, L., jr. 
Moulton, Charles Woodbury, H. W. 
Munsey, John G, Woodbury, D., 2d 



BOXFORD— 19. 

Cole, Wm. Kimball Parkhurst, John 
Cole, Harry L. Parkhurst, John W. 



Cole, Warren M. 
Day, Isaac C. 
Killam, H. M. 
Nason, James H. 



Pearl, Edw. E. 
Pearl, John M. 
Perley, Charles 
Webster, James H. 



Amend, Robert A. 
Barton, J. Webb 
Batchelder, J. Q. A. 
Berry, Allen A. 
Blake, E. L. 
Bradstreet, Alvah J. 
Bradstreet, Elijah 
Brown, Walter H. 
Carlton, 0. Loring 
Carlton, Win. B. 
Carlton, Wm. B. jr. 
Christopher, Wm. P. 
Clark, N. J. 
Colcord, J. H. J. 
Day, Clarence 
Doane, M. P. 
Dodge, Francis 
Eaton, Win slow W. 
Endicott, Wm. C. 
Evans, Sam'l A. Jr. 
Fisher, Franklin W. 
Fuller, Solomon 
Haves, Charles A. 



Andrews, Elias 
Andrews, Herbert 
Burnhara, Wash. 



DAN VERS— 69. 
Hutchinson, W. P 
Jacobs, Wm. A. 
Jackson, Eben 
Jodry, J. C. 
Kimball , Francis 
Kimball, Joel 
Knight George A. 
Learoyd, A. P. 
Legro, John C. P. 
Lyford, Francis W. 
Marston, Jacob 
McTiernan,Charles 
Nichols, Andrew 
Newhall, Benj. E. 
Newhall, Henry 
O'Neal, T. H. 
Page, Charles W. 
Peabody, George H 
Peabody, George A 
Perley, Dean A. 
Perley, Edward P. 
Perry, James 0. 
Perkins , Warren G 



Perkins, William P- 
Perkins, M. Sumner 
Pettingill, M. C. 
Porter, J. Frank 
.Preston, Charles H. 
Putnam, Otis F. 
Pratt, George 
Pope, Daniel P. 
Richardson, James 
Roberts,Edmund C. 
Roberts, John F. 
Roberts, Oliver 
Rice, Charles B. 
Sawyer, Samuel L. 
Swinerton, John 
Tapley, Gilbert A. 
Verry, Augustus 
Verry, H. Otis 
Wakefield, W. P. 
Weston, Mrs. L. P. 
Woodman, Edw. E. 
Whipple, John F. 
Whitman, F. A. 



ESSEX— 9. 
Choate, Rufus Low, Herbert 

£!ogswell,Charles B.Low, Josiah 
Haskell, David L. Lufkin, A. E. 



GEORGETOWN— 20. 



Boardman, Moses N. 
Curtis, Samuel N. 
Hilliard, Henry 
Hoyt, Martin L. 
Jackson, John L. 
James, George B. 
Ladd, Byron G. 



Marble, Nathaniel 
Nelson, Sherman 
Osgood, Stephen 
Perley, David E. 
Perkins, Edwin P. 
Pillsbury, J. 
Poor, Samuel T. 



Tenney, Gorham D. 
Tenney, Milton S. 
Tenney, Orlando B. 
Weston, George S. 
Whitham, Chas. M. 
Yeaton, Winfred J. 



8 9 



Babson, Horatio 
Babson, Osman 
Barrett, Charles P. 
Bennett, Charles 
Brown, Edward H. 
Burnham, A. M. 
Burnharn, S. A. 
Cole, Israel H. 
Conant, Thomas 
Cook, Benjamin F. 
Corliss, John 
Cronin, John 
Curtis, Samuel, Jr. 
Dolliver, John S. 
Fears, Robert R. 



GLOUCESTER— 44. 

Fergnson, Thos. B. 
Garland, Joseph 
Griffin, Bennett 
Grover, Charles E. 
Haskell, H. C. L. 
Haskell, William H, 
Haskell, Sidney F. 
Hawkes, E. C. 
Low, David W. 
Marr, Chester, jr. 
Parsons, W. Frank 
Patillo, Alexander 
Pew, William A. 
Phillips, N. H. 
Presson, David S. 



Balch, Charles T. 
Balch Thomas H. 
Batchelder, Chas. C. 
Day, Randall B. 
Fegan, Henry C. 
George, Edwin B. 
George, Edwin H. 
George, Samuel B. 



Agassiz, R. L. 
Cummings, A. C. 
Dodge, Albert W. 
Dodge, George R. 
Gardner, A. P. 
Gibney, George H. 



Presson, Alfred 
Price, Augustus E. 
Ricker, Richard W. 
Rogers, Allan 
Rogers, John S. 
Rust, William P. 
Shepherd,Joseph C. 
Somes, John E. 
Story, Cyrus 
Wetherell, M. L. 
Wilson, John J. 
Wonson, F. G. 
Wonson, George M. 
Wonson, J. W. 



GROVELAND— 24 

Harrington, Ed wardMartino, Philip H. 
Harriman,MosesH. Pemberton, L. K. 
Harriman, Abel S. Rowe, D. T. 
Hopkinson, W. H. Spofford, Henry H. 
Kennett, Henry K. Stacy, Edward M. 
Ladd, Nathaniel E. Stickney, Abel 
Longfellow, N. Tenney George H. 
Merrill, Henry Woodbury, Louis A. 



HAMILTON— 16. 

Gwinn, Charles S. Norwood, C. J. 
Knowlton,Franklin Potter, A. E. 
Knowlton, Isaac F. Smith, Alvin 

Lovett, E. D. Underhill, J. C. 

Meyer, George v.L. Whipple, Em. E. 



90 



Allison, Clara A. 
Barnes, B. Frank 
Barnes, Chas. W. 
Bean, John A. 
Brown, Leander F. 
Butrick, A. W. 
Cheever, H. W. 
Cogswell, Doane 
Dewhurst, James 
Day, John C. 
Emerson, Albert 
Emerson, Charles B. 
Emerson, E. A. 
Fellows, C. H. 
Hopkinson, Sam. W. 
Frost, Henry E. 
Gale, John E. 
Hanson M. W. 
Haseltine, Amos, jr. 
Hazeltine, John 
Hardy, George H. 
Hilton, William 
Hilton Charles M. 
Hobson, John L. 



HAVERHILL— 68. 

Hoyt, H. H. 
Howe, James 
Johnson, Laburton 
Johnson, Chas. G. 
Kimball, WilliamB. 
Kimball, Byron G. 
Kingsbury, John D. 
Knight, Albert A. 
Ladd, George W. 
MoKe.e, William 
Martin, George C. 
Merrill, James C. 
Messerve, Win. S. 
Moody, Wm. H. 
Morse, Leslie K. 
Ordway, Alfred A. 
sgood , William W. 
Peabody, Frank 
Peabody, Daniel 
Phillips,Frank'nG. 
Peters, Daniel 
Poore, F. W. 
Quinby, T. W. 
Ridge way, Jos. 



Abbott, Joseph D. 
Appleton, Francis R. 
Baker, S. N. 
Bond, James W. 
Brown, S. Albert 
Fall, Tristram B. 
Fellows, Alonzo B. 
Gould, John J. 



Riley, A. W. 
Rhodes, C. N. 
Russell, A. P. 
Sanders, Thomas 
Sleeper, William C. 
Sprague, W. W. 
.Swasey, H. K. 
Taylor, Martin 
Taylor, Oliver 
Tewksbury.John D 
Thornton, William 
Towne, Hermon W. 
Towne, Alfred E. 
Wales, Herbert E. 
Webster, Charles E. 
Webster, C. W. 
Webster, Ebenezer 
Webster, Ira J. 
Webster, Frank S. 
Webster, E. F. 
Whittier, Alvah 
Whittier, Arthur G. 
Wilson, Henry S. 



IPSWICH— 22. 

Gould, Walter F. Kinsman, WillardF. 
Grant, Joshua B. Marshall, Joseph 
Green, George H. Perkins, Isaac E. B. 
Hodgkins,August'eRutherford,AaronA. 
Horton William G. Story, Alden 
Kimball, Daniel Sweetser, Arthur L. 
Kinnear, James Whittier, Maynard 



9i 



Allyn, Warren E. 
Ames, M. B. 
Austin, M. E. 
Ball, F. J. 
Boehm, Adolf G. 
Breen, John 
Bruce, Alex'r R. 
Copp, Gertrude M. 
Currau, Maurice K. 
T>f Convey f 0. A 
Dyer, Arthur W. 
Evans, Charles M. 
Fay, John 
Finn, John L. 
Flynn, Edward 
Fitzgerald, Wm. 
Ford, George 
Ford, Patrick 



Allen, Charles 
Allen, Walter B. 
Bates, Edwin 
Bates, Walter E. 
Bates, Fred H. 
Bates, Wallace 
Beckford, Ebenezer 
Berry, Henry N. 
Berry, Benj. J. 
Bray, E. E. 
Breed, Richard 
Butman, Joseph E. 
Butman, Wm. W. 
Buzzell, George A. 
Cain, Julia A. Mrs. 



LAWRENCE— 54. 

French, A. J. 
Gile, William H. 
Griffin, Anson L. 
Hall, Dwyer S. 
Holt, Lewis G. 
Hubbard, Leavitt 
Jackson Joseph 
Jewett, Wm. S. 
Joyce, James W. 
Kittredtre, G H. 
Kline, George E. 
Lewis, S. S. 
McAllister, J. G. 
Mahoney, W. O. 
McCarthy, Patrick 
Norwood, John K. 
Oswald, William 
Parker, Walter E. 



LYNN— 81. 

Hamden, Henry C. 
Heath, Henry A. 
Hill, E. L. 
Hopkins, Fred I. 
Hovey, Rufus P. 
Hutchinson, M.E.B. 

Mrs. 
Ireson, S. S. 
Jepson, Eli 
Joint, William H. 
Kimball, Rufus 
King, W. P. 
LamphieiyJosephC. 
Lacroix, AVilliam 
Mace, Frank W. 



Richardson, E. P. 
Riley, Henry 
Robinson, H. B. 
Russell, George W. 
Ryan, Thomas F. 
Sargent, A. E. 
Saunders, Daniel 
Saunders, Caleb 
Shattuck, Joseph 
Simpson. James R. 
Smith, J. B. 
Stanley, J. J. 
Sylvester, Wm. H. 
Tewksbury, R. H. 
Truell, Byron 
Vietor, F. M. 
Webster, H. K. 
Wingate, Charles E. 



Newhall, Hiram L. 
Nichols, H. S. 
Nichols, Thomas P. 
Norris, George, jr. 
Oliver, John E. 
Pevear, H. A. 
Potter, Edward P. 
Preble, J. H. 
Ramsdell.CharlesH. 
Richards, EdwardA. 
Richardson, Geo.W. 
Rogers, Ira D. 
Roney, Simon J. 
Rounds, Herbert L. 
Rowell B. W. 



9 2 



Carlisle, J. W. 
Chase, L. IL 
Chase, Amos F. 
Clark, Joseph M. 
Croscup, James A. 
Cressey, John S. 
Dennis, C. W. Mrs. 
Dodge, Joseph D. 
Dwyer, Edward F. 
Farrar, Joseph E. 
Fitz, Josiah, 4th 
Goodwin, Joseph W. 
Hawkes, Nathan M. 



Marsh, George E. 
Marsh, S. E. 
May, Lyman A. 
McBrien, Richard 
McKenney,John H. 
Merritt, Timothy 
Moekett, Joseph E. 
Mower, M. V. B. 
Nason, Daniel A. 
Neal, Peter M. 
Newhall, Asa T. 
Newhail, G. A. 



Sheehan, John 
Shorey, John L. 
Shorey, George L. 
Sawyer, J. A. J. 
Stone, Henry 
Tyler, Thaddeus W. 
Viekary, J. C. 
Whipple, Geo. H. 
Wilson, J. C. 
Winslow, Aaron 
Winslow, G. W. 
Wilson, C. G. 



Cain, M. J. 
Cox, Thomas E. 
Danforth, John M. 
Derby Charles H. 
Gerry, Elbridge F. 
Herrick, George E. 



LYNNFIELD— 16. 

Mansfield, Andrew Perkins, J.Winslow 
Munroe, Harry W. Roundy, George M. 
Newhall, Frank Smith, Henry E. 
Perkins, John H. Thompson, Chas. P. 
Perkins, F. O.Mrs. Verne, B. P. 



MANCHESTER— 14. 

Allen, Wm. H. Cotting, Charles E. Prince, Charles A. 

Baker, John Cheever, Wm. M. Rockwell, A. P. 

Boardman, T. Dennie Coolidge, T. Jeffr'nRabardy, Julius F. 
Burnham, John A. Higginson, Henry Wigglesworth, Geo. 
Cheever, John H. Merriam, Arthur M. 



Alley, Amos P. 
Clough, A. W. 



Hoyt, George W. 



MARBLEHEAD— 6 

Cronin, Michael Gregory, J. J. H. 
Dennis, W. John Paine, Thomas W. 



MERRIMAC— 3. 

Little, E. C. Sargent, Bailey 



93 



Barker, S. J. 
Bradley, George B. 
Bus well, Joseph E. 
Butters, W. H. 
Crosby, John S. 
Emerson, Jacob, jr. 
Goss, Chas. E. 



METHUEN— 21. 

Hall, C. H. 

How, Joseph S. 
Mann, C. W. 
Morrison, D. T. 
Parker, James 0. 
Kogers, William M. 
Russell, Fred A. 



Sargent, S. G. 
Shirley, John W. 
Sawyer, Chas. M. 
Smith, Walter 
Thurlow, J. E. 
Tozier, C. L. 
Webster, Frank W. 



Berry, William 
Currier, George A. 
Peabody, A. W. 
Phillips, B. Frank 



MIDDLETON— 10. 

Stiles, Farnum Weston,SolomanW. 
Stiles, Hiram A. Wilkins, George B. 
Stewart, Mrs. S. A. Wilkins, Lyman S. 



NAHANT— 6. 

James, Geo. Abbott Lovering,CharlesT. Otis, Herbert F. 
Lodge, Henry Cabot Merriam, F. Parker, Arthur H. 



Adams, Charles E. 
Adams, Daniel D. 
Adams, George W. 
Adams, James K. 
Bray, George W. 
Coffin, William P. 
Dole, Nathaniel 
Hale, Stephen P. 
Howard, Horatio M. 
Tllsley, Edwin 
Illsey, Daniel H. 
Illsey, Paul M. 
Jacques, Richard 



NEWBURY- 37. 

Jacques, Rich. T. jr 
Jacques, William 
Kent, Edward 
Knight, Charles F. 
Little, Carleton 
Little, Edward F. 
Little, George 
Little, William 
Little, Win. Burke 
Lunt, Charles M. 
Lunt, C. A. 
Moynihan, C. 



.Noyes, Richard T. 
Noyes, Edward A. 
Noyes, Justin 
Noyes, James 
Perkins, Frank 
Perkins, Paul A. 
Pearson, Benj. jr. 
Plummer, Geo. H. 
Rogers, Abial 
Rolfe, John C. 
Tenney, Henry L. 
Tenney, Daniel G. 



94 



NEWBURYPORT— 36. 



Adams, Philip D. 
Adams, Rufus 
Allen, John W. 
Balch, John H. 
Bartlett, Chas. S. 
Bayley, Wm. H. 
Capers, Thomas 
Clements, C. E. 
Coleman, James C, 
Conley, Joseph J. 
Cook, T. N. 
Hewett, C. C. 



Johnson, Wm. R. 
Kent, Otis L. 
Knights ,GeorgeW. 
Little, John G. 
Maguire, C. N. 
Marsh, Horace W. 
Mosely, Edward A. 
Mosely, Fred'k S. 
Moulton, Joseph 
Nelson, Charles W. 
Newhall, Asa T. 
Noyes, Isaac P. 



Ordway, A. D. 
Perley, R. M. 
Perkins, Charles 
Plummer, Moses A. 
Poore, George H. 
Sargent, John W. 
Smith, Joseph B. 
Stanley, B. P. 
Stanley, J. C. 
Toppan, Edward S. 
Winkley, J. Otis 
Winkley,PaulT. jr. 



Adams, Edward 
Barker, John 
Carlton, Daniel A. 
Carlton, Amos D. 
Davis, George G. 
Davis, George E. 
Davitt, John 
Farnham, B. H. 
Farnham, Mrs. B. 
Farnham, W. Benj. 
Fuller, Edward A. 
Foster, J. Frank 
Foster, Nathan 



NO. ANDOVER— 37. 

Foster, Orrin 
Frye, Newton P. 
Fuller, Abijah P. 
Gage, N. A. 
Goodhue, Hiram P 
Greene, E. W. 
Hayes, Walter H. 
Hinxman, G. D. 
Holt, Peter 
Huges, Winfield S. 
Jenkins, Benj. F. 
Jenkins, Milon S. 



Johnson, Charles F. 
Kittredge, H. E. 
Kunhardt, Geo. E. 
Loring, Geo. B. 
Manion, John 
Mathewson, George 
Moody, E. W. 
Paul, C. W. 
Poor, James C. 
Robinson ,Ad'sonM. 
Stevens, Moses T. 
Wardwell, T. 0. 



PEABODY— 141. 

Annis, Peter W. Hamblett, E. B. Osgood, William 

Appleton, Francis H. Higgins, John E. Pearson, Alonzo 

Barrett, Edward P. Harrington, H. A. Poor, Henry 

Beckett, C. I,. Hills, Charles C. Poor, Daniel M. 

Beckett, Walter H. Hill, W. L. Poor, F. W. 



95 



Bodge, Arthur P. 
Bodge, Henry 
Bodge, Freeman P. 
Bodge, William H. 
Bolster, Joseph 
Bradfort, E. E. Mrs. 
Brown, Lewis 
Brown, Otis 
Brown, R. S. 
Brown, Daniel 
Burbeck, Joseph N. 
Bursley, George A. 
Bushby, Charles F. 
Bushby, William 
Buxton, Samuel 
Carroll, J. J. 
Carroll, Thomas 
Clark, George H. 
Clark, A. B. 
Connor, John J. 
Cooper, J. T. 
Crehore, Joseph S. 
Curtis, George S. 
Daley, William J. 
Distin, William 
Donnell, William 
Durkee, Edwin A. 
Durkee, Elmer E. 
Eaton, George A. 
Eliot, Arthur 
Emerton, C. S. 
Farrington, Geo. C. 
Farnham, Frank E. 
Fellows, Wm. H. 
Foster, George M. 
Foster, H. K. 
Galeucia, Nellie Mrs. 



Hill, Benjamin M. Poor, Charles M. 
Hinckley, C. E. Poor, Albert F. 
Holman, George L. Porter, Ernest J. 
Hooper, Charles H. Porter, Leonard E. 
Humphrey, B. B. Porter, Edward H. 
Kimball, Walter B. Preston, Levi 
Kelley, EldridgeG. Quint, Hazen A. 
King, George H. Ramsdell, M. A. 
King, J. Augustus Raddin, Alonzo 
King, D. Warren Reihan, Thomas J. 
Knight, George A. Roome, James A. 
Knowlton, IsaacP. Safford, 0. F. 
Knapp, Samuel E. Sawyer, Wm. F. 
Linnehan, JamesC. Shea, William A. 
Littlefield, S. S. Shannahan, John 
Lyons, Thomas F. Shaw, Fred M. 
Lummus, Abraham Sheen, William E. 
Mackintosh, R.S.B. Simpkins, Charles 
Mannix, Thomas Smith, Jessie H. 



Mansfield, E. 
Mansfield, A. W. 
McCarthy, J. H. 
McGlone, J. J. 



SpaulclingjGeorgeE 
Stanley, Frank W 
Stevens, Jacob B. 
Stockwell, HarryE. 



McKeen, John D. Stone, Charles E. 



Meager, John 
Merrill, Amos 
Moore, Benj. N. 
Morris, R. E. 
Moulton, John 



Symonds, J. H.Mrs. 
Taylor, Benj. H. 
Thomas, Elmer B. 
Trask, J. Arthur 
Tweed, William X. 



Munroe, W. Fred Twiss, Everett M. 
Mulcahey, M. T. Tyler, A. W. 
Nelson, P. T. Walcott, John G. 

Newhall, F. L. Walker, Harry F. 
Newhall,OrlandoF. Ward, William N. 
Nourse, Samuel W. Watkins, William 
Osborn, Daniel W. Wheeler, Benj. S. 
Osborn, J. Edward Whidden, A. H. 



9 6 



Goodale, Jacob 0. 
Goulding, C. H. 
Graves, Harry D. 
Grosvenor, D. P. 
Hall, Benjamin G. 



Appleton, Zena A. 
Dodd, Stephen 
Grimes, Loring 
Lane, Andrew- 
Lane, Horace 



Blodgett, George B. 
Carlton, George F. 
Daniels, George E. 
Dodge, Paul A. 
Dodge, Phineas A. 



Osborn, Lyman E. Whipple, Horace P. 

Osborn, Kendall Whipple, C. H. 

Osborn, Charles L. Wiley, William F. 
O'Connor, P. H. Wilson, Tho. Mrs. 
O'Shea, Thomas H. Wyman, Fred H. 



ROCKPORT— 13. 

Low,Martha J.Mrs. Norwood, Gorham 
Manning, John J. Smith, Allen 
Manning, WillianiN. Smith, Solomon 
Merridew, James P. Tufts, George W. 



ROWLEY— 17. 

Hale, Clara A. 
Hale, Daniel H. 
Hale, Agnes H. 
Hale, T. P. 

Keyes, Eben S. 



Mighill, Charles P. 
O'Brien, Daniel 
Smith, Williard P. 
Tenney, John H. 
Todd, Frank P. 



Dummer, Nath'l N. Lambert, Mary G. 



Batchelder, L. F.Mrs. 
Bickerton, William 
Ben way, L. N. 
Chase, George 
Cooper, Charles A. 
Creesy, George W. 
Creamer, George G. 
Daland, John 
Dane, William A. 
Endicott, Wm. C. 
Felt, John 

Franklin, SarahF.Miss 
Foster, Joseph C. 



SALEM— 53. 

Julyn, J. M. Mrs. 
Jones, Samuel G. 
Knight, EdmundF. 
Lamson, Frederick 
Little, Phillip 
Lord, William 
Merritt, David 
Merrow, E. A. 
Morse, E. Henry 
Murphy, John T. 
Nichols, Wm. S. 
Perkins, John W. 
Peterson, JosephN 



Robinson, John 
Reynolds, Henry E. 
Ropes, Willis H. 
Ropes, Charles F. 
Ropes, Reuben W. 
Sanders, Charles 
Shreve, 0. B. 
Spencer, Charles P. 
Swasey, John A. 
Tracey, Patrick 
Vaughn, Ira 
Whitmore, Wm. F. 
Waters, David P. 



97 



Gardner, A. B. 
Hale, Henry A. 
Horton, William A. 
Hood, Lucy M. Miss 
Ives, John S. 



Bartlett, Moses J. 
Dole, Edward G. 
Dow, George A. 
Eaton, John F. 
Evans, John Q. 



Blodgett, J. W. 
Hawkes, Lewis W. 
Hill, Alfred C. 



Bates, William H. 
Crosman, J. H. 



Averill, George F. 
Bradstreet, Dudley 
Ferguson, Edw. E. 
Foss, Robert 
Pierce, Thomas W. 



Porter, Ellis H. Wheatland, George 
Potter, William White, Frank W. 
Pingree, David Wyman, Isaac C. 
Rantoul, Robert S. Wright, Frank V. 
Rogers , Dudley P. 



SALISBURY— 15. 

Getchell, 1ST. Tracey Pettengill, Wesley 
Gilman, Samuel Pettengill, J. Q. A. 
Greeley, FurmerH. Smith, John F. 
Greenleaf, Wm. H. Thornton, Robert 



Mudge, John 



True, P. Albert 



SAUGUS— 8. 



Newhall,HerbertB. Reiley, Thomas J. 
Newhall, Joseph Whitehead, Joseph 
Penney, George H. 



SWAMPSCOTT— 5. 

Easterbrook, A. F. Pettingell, S. J. 
Pettingell, L. D. 



TOPSFIELD— 15. 

Pike, Baxter P. Ward, Richard 
Hood, Salmon D. Wildes, Eugene L. 
Lamson, J. Arthur Nelson, D. Oscar 
Leach, Charles H. Peabody, Charles J. 
Towne, Frank H. Woodbury, Isaac M. 



WENHAM- 11. 

Alley, Henry Dodge, George F. Pingree, David 

Batchelder, T. Wilson, Dodge, William P. Perkins, Nath'l P. 
Day, Everett K. Hobbs, Henry Perkins, Geo. A. 

Demsey, H. H. Kavanaugh, J. 



9 8 



WEST NEWBURY— 35. 



Bailey, Lawrence H. 
Bartlett, M. Walsh 
Boynton, Eben M. 
Carr, George G. 
Chace, S. F. 
Connor, M. H. 
Connor, J. J. 
Emery, Samuel E. 
Flook, George L. 
Goodridge, H. M. 
Gordon, J. R. 
Gowen, Mrs. C. W. 



Gowen, Oscar Pierce, George J. 

Jacques, Romulus Pierce, Henry J. 
King, T. J. Poor, Fred H. 

Merrill, William Poor, George H. 
Merrill, William E. Poor, William H. 
Moody, Horace Rogers, George C. 



Moore, Alfred L. 
Nason, Ezekiel G. 
Nason, Henry F. 
Newell, Richard 
Ordway, Cyrus D. 
Ordway, Charles W 



Smith, Robert L. 
Stanwood, G. Miss 
Stultz, Frederick 
Thurlow, Thomas C. 
Titcomb, Silas M. C. 



J 907 
PREMIUM LIST OF 

Essex Agricultural Society 

for the 
Eighty-seventh Annual Cattle Show and Fair. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The trustee of each town is instructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their 
duties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to 
the Exhibition the importance of entering their exhibits for 
the hall the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Committees, 
and making sure that the names proposed at those meetings 
are of persons who will serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the 
Fair Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the 
grounds at twelve o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the 
exhibition, and there organize, take the books of entry, and 
proceed at once to business. Committees in hall should take 
the books of entry from the Superintendent promptly after 
the entries close. 

Full reports of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 

A majority of any committee are authorized' to act. 

K^^No member of the Society shall act oa any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 



IOO 



The diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of special merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures in hall, and flowers ; 
or any premium, unless the rules of the Society have been 
strictly complied with. Neither shall they award premiums 
or graiuities in excess of the amount appropriated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents, except 
on work by the children, and none in that class less than 
twenty-five cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals blue and red printed premium rib- 
bons (which may be had of the Secretary or assistants on the 
grounds and at the hall), for the several animals or articles, 
designating the grade of premium awarded each, and the name 
of the peason to whom awarded, and especial care should be 
taken that the cards issued correspond with the awards in 
their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on animals and articles 
exhibited at the Show, must be delivered promptly to the 
Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

Any member of a committee ivho cannot serve on the same is 
requested to give notice to the Secretary, before the show, so that 
the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a ticket 
of admission to the grounds and hall of exhibition on appli- 
cation to the Secretary. 



General Roles. 

Competitors are requested to carefully read the rules and 
premium list before making entries. 

Claim (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 

All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair and no 
entries will be received after that date. 



lOI 



Any person not a member of the Society, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, for 
which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase the 
funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium of gratuity is awarded or an 
agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
Salem Safe Deposit and Trust Co., Salem, on and after the 
first Monday of November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day of 
May next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered as 
given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the several committees and adopted by the Soci- 
eties shall be final. Committees shall see that the premium 
cards issued, correspond with the premiums and gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his 
intention to compete for the same ; and committees are in- 
structed to award no premium unless the animal or article 
offered is worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall be entered in another class, except farm 
horses which may be entered for fast walking, and. Milch 
Cows which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premiums must be owned by residents 
and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 
themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered ; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture. 

The Proof 'that an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the auimal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders, and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 

Standard adopted : — American Jersey C. C. Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



102 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show, 

The Committee will take notice that no premium will be 
awarded unless the animals or objects are of a decidedly supe- 
rior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
sp>ecial merit, in all departments of the Fair. 

In the case of a deficiency in the receipts at the Fair in 
any year, the society reserves the right to reduce the premi- 
ums offered, pro rata, not to exceed one-half the amount offered. 



Cattle and Other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals entered for premium or exhibition will be fed 
during the Exhibition, and longer, when they are of necessity, 
prevented from leaving, at the expense of the society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense thereof, all of which 
shall be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to 
the Secretary, with committee's report. 

For pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $7, 5 

For Fat Cows, premiums, $5, 3 

BULLS. 

*Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Three years old and upwards, premiums, $7, 5 

Under three years old, for earrh breed, $5, 3 

One year old and under, for each breed, $3, 2 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREED. 

For the best bull of any age of either of the above breeds 
with five of his stock not less than six months old, quality and 



103 

condition to be taken into account, and especially the adapta- 
bility of the animal to the agriculture of the county. 

Diploma and $10. 

NOTE— Competitors are required to give a written statement of pedigree and 
committees are requested to be particular in this respect and return them to the 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, native, or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $7, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Holstein, 
Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old and 
upwards, premiums for each breed. $6, 4 

For the best Native or Grade Cow, four 3 T ears old and up- 
wards, premiums, $6, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week, 
from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $6, 4 

NOTE— A written statement will be required of the a»e and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they dropped their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, quality, and quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding, which statement is to be returned to the Secretary with 
Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to 
he exhibited at the Show of either of the above breeds and a 
correct statement of manner of keeping and yield for one 
year preceding the show, premiums, Diploma and $8, 6 

Note— The above mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 
Jan. 1st, preceding the Show. 

HEIFERS. 

First Class — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $3, 2 
Less than two and more than one year old, each breed $3, 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $2, 1 
Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old, premiums, $5, 3 
Two years old that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 
Less than two or more than one year old, premiums, $3, 2 
One year old and under and less than two, premiums, $2, 1 



io4 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, and quality and training, premiums, $7, 5 

Eor pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $5, 4 

NOTE — The Committee are required to consider the quality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their working capacity. The training of working oxen and steers 
will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containing a load weighing two 
tons for oxen and three thousand pounds for steers. (g^~At the time of entry a 
certificate of the weight of the cattle must be filed with the Secretary. 

STEERS. 

For pair of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, $7, 5 

For best Stallion of any age, and five colts of his stock, not 
For Stallions for Farm and Draft purposes, 3 years old, 
premiums, $5, 3 

less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account, Diploma and $6 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums, Diploma and $7, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums, Diploma and $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, no 
less than one year old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account, Diploma and $6 

NOTE— No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal, not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$7,5 



io5 

BKOOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

Eor Brood Mares for Driving purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, $7, 5 

NOTE— No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all appar- 
ent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 
For Family Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

NOTE— No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $9, 6 

LADIES' DRIVING HORSES. 

For Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $7, 5 

For pairs of Ladies' Driving Horses, premiums, $9, 6 

GENTLEMEN'S SADDLE HORSES. 
Gentlemen to ride on track, premiums, $5, 3 

LADIES' SADDLE HORSES. 
Ladies to ride on track, premiums, $5, 3 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

For pairs of Fast Walking Horses, premiums, $5, 4 

For single horses, $4, 3 

For pairs of farm horses with load of 4,000 lbs., premiums, 

$5,4 
For single farm horse, with load of 2,000 lbs., premiums, 

$4,3 
(£§PThe above to have trial on the track. 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1,200 lbs. and over, premiums, 

$6,4 
For Farm Horses weighing less than 1,200 lbs. premiums, 

$6,4 

NO TE— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of the load to be used in trial of Farm 
Horses is to be fixed upon by the committee of arrangements for drafting, the 
difference in the load for horses of 1,200 lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 lbs. 
to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pairs, 2,000. No obstruction shall 
be placed either before or behind the wheels in trials of Draft Horses of either 
class, but wheels shall be blocked behind to hold the load when a team stops 
going up hill. 



io6 



PAIRS OF FARM HORSES WEIGHING 2400 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing 2400 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, 8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2400 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2400 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES 3 AND 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare oi Gelding four-yeai old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year old Colts, premiums, $5, 3 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year old colts, premiums, 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $3, 2 

COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOUR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four-year old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three-year old colts, premiums, $5, 3 

ONE AND TWO YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year old colts, premiums, 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $3, 2 

N. B.— In all the above classes the committee will act witli the expert judge 
except Fat Cattle, Working Oxen and Steers. 

HORSES FOR HURDLE JUMPING. 

For Horses jumping over four foot hurdles, premiums, $8, 6 
For high hurdle- jumping, premium, 8 

SWINE, BOARS. 

For Berkshire, Cheshire, Chester, Essex, Poland China, 
Suffolk, Large Yorkshire, Small Yorkshire Boars, not less 
than one year old, premiums, $4, 2 



For Breeding Sows, and pigs by their side of the above 
breeds with not less than five pigs, premiums, $4, 2 

For the best grade sow and pigs, premiums, $4, 2 

For litters of weaned Pigs, not less than eight weeks old, 
premiums, $4, 2 

Thoroughbred Swine shall show satisfactory proof that they 
are pure blood, otherwise they shall be considered Grade. 

SHEEP. 

For flock of Sheep, not less than six ewes in number, each 
breed, premiums, $5, 3 

For best Buck, premium, 4 

For lots of Lambs, not less than six pw».« in number, be- 
tween four and twelve months old, premiums, $5, 3 

. ANGORA GOATS. 
For flocks of Angora Goats, not less than six, prem., $5, 3 

POULTRY. 

For the best Cockerel, best Hen, Cockerel and Pullet, of all 
recognized breeds, except Game and Bantams, each variety. 
Premium for each, $1,50 

To be used by the Committee in their discretion for collec- 
tions, Game and Bantams, no person to receive more than 
three dollars, $15 

For the best breeding pen of each variety of four females 
and male, premium, $2> 1 

For pairs of turkeys, and Alesbury, Rouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, Indian Runners, and Brazilian 
Ducks, and Toulouse, Emden, Brown China, and African 
Geese, premium, $2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the discharge 
of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any specimen 
other than his own, shall forfeit all claim he may have in the 
premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the " American Standard of Excellence." 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no 
article offered in collection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium Diploma and $8 



io8 



Best market wagon. 

Best horse cart. 

Best ensilage cutter. 

Best fruit evaporator with sample work. 

To be awarded for the above in premiums a sum not exceed- 
ing $30. 

For implements not specified above, the Committee may, at 
their discretion, award $20. 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Rake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the merit 
of which can be shown only by actual trial in the field ; but 
manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition and 
inspection. 

CARRIAGES. 

For carriages built in the county, and exhibited by the 
manufacturer, Diploma and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 

Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be espe- 
cially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued with 
the names and sums awarded them, correspond with these in 
their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instructions 
under heading of " Duties of Committees," " General Rules," 
"Premiums to be awarded at the Show," see first pages and 
under "Fruit," " Domestic Manufactures," and "Flowers." 

(t^p^All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manufac- 
tures, must be the products of Essex County to be entitled to 
a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers one hundred dollars to be divided in 
three premiums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex 
County, as follows : — Premiums, $50, 30, 20 

Note — This Exhibit includes all Fruit, Vegetables and Domestic Manufactures 
that are exhibited in any other department in Exhibition Hall. 



109 

DAIRY, BREAD, CANNED FRUIT AND HONEY. 

For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making- 
and management of the Butter, premiums, $4, 3 

For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, $4, 3 

For white bread made of Wheat Flour, premiums, $2, 1 
. For bread made from Graham Flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread entered for premiums to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collections of Preserved Fruits and 
Jellies made from products of the County, with methods of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, $2, 1 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of process 
used, and amount of labor and time required in preparing and 
drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on articles entered in this depart- 
ment, products of this County deemed worthy, $10 

First and second best honey, not more than five nor less 
than three pounds in comb with one pound of same extracted, 
made in the County, with statement signed of kind of bees and 
hive, and time of year when honey was made, premiums, $2, 1 



Fruit. 



All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the first day of the exhibition, and each exhibit- 
or must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists of 
the varieties of each class of fruit, or to be filed when entry is 
made. (Committees are not authorized to make awards to 
those who do not comply with this rule.) 



1 IO 



Tables will be labelled in a conspicuous manner by the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors, with the names of fruit 
for which premiums are offered, all others of same class fruit 
to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place their 
several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated by such 
labels, or be considered by the committee as not competing for 
premiums. 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the committee), 
to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit. 

PEARS. 

Eor best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex Coimty : Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Angouleme, Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckel, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Cornice, Howell and Clairgeau, each, premiums, $2, 1, 50 

Doyenne d'Ete, Gifford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other variety 
deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $1.50 

For best collection of pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Wolf River, Sutton Beauty, 
Hubbardson, Mackintosh Red, Porter, Pickman Pippin, Rox- 
bury Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Gravenstein, Hunt Rus- 
set, Ladies' Sweet, Snow, Bailey Sweet, Wealthy, premium for 
each, $2, 1, .50 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early). 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

For best collection of apples recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 



Ill 



For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab ap- 
ples deemed worthy by the committee, $1.50, .75 

PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

For best twelve specimens of Freestone, white flesh, yellow 
flesh, Essex County seedling, each variety, $2, 1, .50 

For best collection of peaches, premium, $3 

For the best twelve specimens of Champion, Lemon, or Or- 
ange Quinces, premium, $2, 1, .50 

For the best twelve specimens of plums, five varieties, to be 
selected by committee, each variety, premium, $2, 1, .50 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, 
Brighton, Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, Pocklington, Ni- 
agara Grapes, each variety, premium, $2, 1, .50 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than eight 
pounds in all, premiums, . . $5 

For best specimens of four bunches of grapes, varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

$1.50 

For basket of assorted fruits, premiums, $3, 2 



Plants and Flowers. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

1. All plants and flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or be- 
fore eleven o"clock on the first day of the fair, and all such 
plants and flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of plants and flow- 
ers is designated in the schedule, there must be neither more 
nor less than that number or quantity of specimens shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article,.only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is offered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for compe- 
tition but no variety can be duplicated. 



I 12 



4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens 
exhibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of supe- 
riority and worthy of such premium, not, even if they are the 
only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admitted 
in competition for another different premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, or 
in the case of native plants and flowers, where such were 
found. 

7. All plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood or some 
other permanent and suitable substance, and so attached to 
same as to be easily seen. Flowers when specified to be 
named to comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symetry and vigor of the specimens; also bouquets, baskets, 
design work, etc., must show taste, skill, and harmony in 
arrangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All flowers exhibited must be shown upon their own 
stem, flowers in "Design" word alone excepted; and this 
exception, if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account 
by the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or " Designs of merit " 
for which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together) on plants and flowers 
exceed the amount, $125, limited by the Society for this de- 
partment. 

11. No member of the committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any case vote, or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarily vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for plants and flowers, and General Rules of the Socie- 
ty, and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhib- 
itors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 

Committee on plants and flowers will take notice. 



"3 

PLANTS. 

Plants competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots, native plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 

For collection flowering and ornamental foliage plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premium, $3, 2 

Por collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 3 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection of Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 

For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., $1 

For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, prem., $1 

For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 

For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, $1 

For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $2 

For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $L 

For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 5 va- 
rieties, premium, $2 

For collection Calla Lillies, 5 specimens, premium, $1 

For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least 50 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which is to be a cross section, and neither to be more than 
four inches in length or diameter, premiums, $3, 2 

FLOWERS. 

For collection cut flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties, named, $3, 2 



ii 4 

For collection cut flowers, native, 100 specimens, at least 50 
varieties named, $3, 2 

For pair bouquets for vases, of native flowers, premiums, 

$1, 50 

For pair of bouquets, for vases of garden flowers, prems., 

$1, .50 

For basket of green-house flowers, premiums, $2, 1 

For basket of native flowers, premiums, $1, 50 

For basket of garden flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For arrangement of native flowers and autumn leaves, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 

For floral designs, choice cultivated flowers, prems., $3, 2 

For floral designs, native flowers, premiums, $3, 2 

For collection Pansies, at least 50 specimens, neatly and ar- 
tistically arranged, premiums, $2, 1 

For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premiums, $1, .50 

For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six va- 
rieties, named, premiums, $1, .50 

For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premiums, $1, .50 

For Cactus Dahlias, premiums, $1, .50 

For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $ 1 

For twelve Gladiolus (spikes) , at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premiums, $1, .50 

For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premiums. $1, .50 

For twelve Phlox, hardy, perennial, at least six varieties. 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem., $1 

For twenty-four Carnation pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twenty-four verbenas, at least six varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $1 

For twenty-four Roses, at least six varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $1 

For twenty-four garden annuals, at least twelve varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties, named, pre- 
mium, $ 1 
For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, $1 



U5 

For twelve Branching Asters, premium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Pompon, premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox Druinmondii, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Zinnias, double, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty- four Marigolds, African, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty -four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $1 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium $1 
For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Dianthus (double annual), in variety, premium, 

$1 
For collection of Snapdragon, premium, $1 

For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, $1 

For collection of Sweet Peas, premium, $1 

VEGETABLES.— CLASS ONE. 

Utiles for fruit apply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens, Crosby Egyptian, and 
Edmands, premium, each variety, $2, 1 

Carrots — For best twelve, Long Orange and Danvers, pre- 
miums, each variety, $2, 1 

For best twelve, Short Horn, Orange Carrots, $2, 1 

Mangold Wurtzels — For best six specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Flat turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top, 
White Flat, White Egg and Purple Top Globe, premiums, 
each variety, $2, 1 

Ruta Bagas— Twelve specimens. For best Yellow and 
White, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premiums $2, 1 

Onions— Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow 
Flat and Red, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Robert's Early, Early Harvest, Green Mountain, 
Irish Cobbler, Good Times, Early Northern, premiums, each 
variety, $2, 1 

For collection of above Vegetables, not less than three of a 
kind, premiums, $**, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $10 



n6 



VEGETABLES.- CLASS TWO. 

Cabbages— For the best three specimens, Savoy, Fottlei's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, Jersey Wakefield, Danish Bald Head, each 
variety, premiums, $2, 1 

Cauliflower— For best three specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Celery — For best four roots, Paris Golden, Boston Market, 
Giant Pascal, Bleached, premiums, $2,1 

Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best, Early, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 

For best twelve ears in milk, late, premiums, $2, 1 

Squashes — For best three specimens, Marrow, Warren Tur- 
ban, Hubbard, Golden Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, 
Bav State, Sibley, Butman, Victor, each variety, premiums, 

$2,1 

Melons — For best three specimens, Nutmeg, Musk, Cassaba, 
Salmon Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 

For best two specimens Watermelons, premiums, $1, .50 

Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens, Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premiums, $1, .50 

For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premiums, 

$2, 1 

Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premiums, $2, 1 

For collection of Vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $10 

(C^'No competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums 
are offered for. 

Collections of Vegetables, where premiums are offered for a Dumber of varieties, 
must be entered and placed, cot less than three of a kind by themselves on the 
tables assigned for collections. No collection shall receive but one premium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to compete with speci- 
mens of the same variety placed elsewhere. Exhibitors of such collections, 
however are not prevented from exhibiting additional specimens of any variety 
with and in competition with like variety. All vegetables must be entered in the 
name of the grower of them. 

Size of Vegetables. Turnips, Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions 
2J to 4 inches in largest diameter; Potatoes to be of good size for family use; 
Squashes to be pure and well ripened, Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 

Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premium, $1 

For twenty-five ears Field Corn, premiums, $4, 3, 2 



ii7 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $4, 2 
All grain or seed must have been grown by the exhibitor in 
the County to receive a premium. 



Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 
1 o'clock on the first day of the Exhibition. Articles not 
thus deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities 
will be awarded for articles of special merit for which no pre- 
mium is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded 
for any article manufactured out of the County, or previous 
to the last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wrought Counterpanes, having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $2, I 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $20 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets having regard to the quality and expense of 
the material, premiums, $2, 1 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the quali- 
ty of the work and expense of materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this 
department, the whole amount not to exceed $20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For exhibit of Manufactured Leather and Skins, 

Society's Diploma. 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's 
Boots, Women's do., Children do., each premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each premium, 

$'S 

$20 are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium, Diploma of the Society 



u8 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, 



FANCY WORK. 

( )f Domestic Manufacture are not included in the above. 
At the disposal of the committee in this department, to 
be awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratu ty, 

;40 

OIL PAINTINGS AND WATER COLORS. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, 

$40 

DECORATED CHINA. 

Eor best collection Decorated China, premiums, $5, 3 

For best individual specimen, premiums, $3, 2 

For Punch Bowl or set, premiums, $2, 1 

For Fern dish, premiums, $2, 1 

For raised paste or gold, premiums, $2, 1 

For Vase, premiums, $2, 1 

For Tray, Plate, etc., premiums, $2, 1 
At disposal of the committee for anything meritorious. $5 

CHARCOAL, PEN AND INK WORK, PHOTOGRAPHS, 

ETC. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2, in any one gratuity, 

$20 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, prems., $2, 1 

At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $15 
not less than 25 cents in any one gratuity. 



U9 

List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 



SMALL FRUITS. 

Fov the best product of not less than twenty-five trees, 
taking into account quantity and quality of Peaches, Plums 
and Quinces, premium, $8 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture of crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $7 

For best crop of currants, raspberries, blackberries and 
Gooseberries, with statement as above, premium each, $7 

LIBRARY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Dan vers ; F. A. Russell, 
Methuen ; J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 

TREAD WELL FARM. 

Committee — Frederick A. Russell, Methuen ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield ; Andrew Nichols, Dan vers ; Sherman Nelson, 
Georgetown. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee— Charles Sanders, Salem; George W. Creesy, 
Salem ; Lyman Osborne, Peabody. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Committee — Frederick A. Russell, Methuen ; J. M. Dan- 
forth, Lynnfield Center; Sherman Nelson, Georgetown. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of crops, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Report of Annual Meeting "3 

Entries 5 

Report on Bulls 8 

Report on Milch Cows 8 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 9 

Report on Heifers 9 

Report on Working Oxen ... 10 

Report on Steers 10 

Report on Stallions 11 

Report on Brood Mares 11 

Report on Family Horses 11 

Report on Gents 1 Driving Horses 11 

Report on Ladies' Driving Horses 11 

Report on Fast Walking Horses .12 

Report on Single Farm Horses 12 

Report on Colts 12 

Report on Hurdle Jumping 13 

Report on Horses, Special Class < 13 

Report on Swine .13 

Report on Sheep 14 

Report on Goats 14 

Report on Poultry 14 

Report on Agricultural Implements 26 

Report on Carriages 26 

Report on Dairy, Bread and Canned Fruit, and Honey 27 

Report on Pears 29 

Report on Apples 30 

Report on Peaches, Grapes, and Assorted Fruit 33 

Report on Plants 35 

Report on Flowers , . . 36 

Report on Vegetables 44 

Report on Grain and Seed 49 

Report on Counterpanes and Afghans 50 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 52 

Report on Articles Manufactured from Leather •">:'. 

Report on Manufactures and General Mdse 53 

Report on Fancy Work 53 

Report on Alfalfa 55 

Report on Oil Paintings and Water Colors 57 

Report on Decorated China 58 

Report on Charcoal, Photographs, and Pen and Ink Work 59 

Report on Work by Children <>0 

Report of New Members 61 

Institutes 61 

Report of the State Inspector <>2 

Report on Death of Benj. P. Ware T3 

In Memoriam 77 

Recapitulation 78 

Financial Statement SO 

Constitution of the Society 81 

Officers of the Society 84 

Members of Society ^6 

Premium List for 1905 99