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Full text of "Transactions for the year ... of the Essex Agricultural Society of the County of Essex, in Massachusetts"

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 



S 

74 

E8E8 

1 896-1 900 



TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1896 



OB^ THE 



SSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETT 



(Organized i8iS,) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 



IN MASSACHUSETTS, 



AND ITS 



Seventy-Third Annual Address 

BY 

HON. ROBERT 5. RANTOUL, 

OF SALEM, 

\A/'ith the Premium List for 1897. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS. : 

Newcomh & Gauss, Priniers, 

1896. 



ONiVhRsirToF 

MASSACHliSETTS 

amherstTmass. 



£^-| 



V 



K7 00 



ADDRESS. 



The speaker who would address this body finds himself 
embarrassed, at the start, Avith a plethora of topics. The 
whole field of agriculture — ancient and modern — lies open 
before him. He may treat agriculture historically, as the 
most venerable of callings, characterized as the " noblest 
of pursuits " b}^ Timothy Pickering in j^our early by-laws. 
He may trace its growth and development since Adam 
delved and Noah began to be an husbandman and planted 
a vineyard. Or he may treat agriculture scientifically, as 
a grand, untiring chemical process, converting tlie elements 
of the air and soil into fruits and root-crops and cereals in 
the first instance, and these in turn, passed once througli 
the potent alembic of the animal economy, — thus one de- 
gree removed from the simple products of the soil, — being- 
rendered into human food in a secondary or condensed con- 
dition, as beef and pork and mutton and dairy products 
and poultry, — the very expressed essence of vegetable 
life. Or he may treat agriculture from its social and 
political side, — showing the varying tenures by which its 
votaries have held, from time to time, the soil they tilled, 
the varying burthens imposed, from time to time, on land 
and those who dress it, — showing the varying rank as- 
signed the husbandman, from time to time, in the estima- 
tion of mankind. Or he may trace agriculture in its new 
adaptation of means to ends, — analyses of soils and 
manures, — rotation of crops, — ever new applications of 
processes and contrivances, — skilful crossing of varieties 



J/^j^^ 



and strains and types, — which modern specialism has 
brougfht to ligfht since the establishment of schools of hus- 
bandry a centnry ago — since the introduction of agricul- 
tural chemistry, a branch of science only half a century of 
age. Or he ma}^ content himself and perhaps his audience 
with reading a prose idyl on the charms of country living. 

But again he may abandon all this. There are still 
other topics open to the speaker, which, if he be of an 
antiquarian turn, he will find it difficult indeed to resist. 
He is addressing a society now four score years of age. 
It has its local traditions and a story which no son of Essex 
can but recall with pride. It bears recorded on its honor- 
able roll, most of the brightest names this ancient, popu- 
lous, intelligent and historic section has produced. It 
embraces a whole County, and that County the third in 
population, wealth and rank, in all the fourteen counties 
of the State, — a county second to none in the variety of its 
industries, in the character, thrift, culture and achieve- 
ments of its people, or, for it embraces Beverly, Glouces- 
ter, Manchester, Topsfield, Andover and the Merrimac, in 
the grandeur of its ocean scenery or in the quiet, winning 
beauty of its rural landscape. He is addressing a society 
which had for its founder in 1817-18 no less a personage 
than that stalwart old Roman — that modern Cincinnatus, 
that stormy-petrel of Massachusetts politics, — Colonel 
Timothy Pickering — and the temptation to any one who 
knows his checkered and extraordinary career, — you re- 
member that he took your first prize at a plowing match, 
when seventy-five years old, — the temptation to postjDone 
all else until he has exhausted that, is so imperious, —so well 
nigh irresistible, tliat only the imminence of the dinner 
hour, and an increasing sense of the emptiness of things 
below, is able to restrain me from inviting you to listen to 
an abstract of his life. 

Turning his face from this engaging picture, the orator 



who addresses this body might well invite you to a review, 
— hurried and inadequate though it could not fail to be, 
— of the record of your own career. Should he rehearse 
this, lie would point for inspii-ation to such names as Story 
and White and Saltonstall and Cummins and Cleaveland 
and Nichols and Merrill and all that splendid group of 
worthies, who took early part with Pickering in assuring 
your success. 

It would be a story of intelligent and public-spirited at- 
tempts to make of a not too generous soil, described in the 
first of the series of practical annual addresses from Col. 
Pickering, in 1820, as "already exhausted and needing 
manures " — to make of the old historic farms of Essex 
county, standing — scores of them — in the names of the 
original settlers — so many of them that your prize lists 
read today like the records of baptisms and burials in the 
early churches, — to make of such a patrimony a fit abiding 
place for themselves and those who should come after them. 
It would be a story of experiments costly of time and 
means, — too often ending in defeat, — in many of the vital 
problems of the present hour: — In the promotion and en- 
couragement of tree-culture, for example, — premiums of- 
fered, year after year, for seedling forest trees, in half-acre 
and acre lots, raised mainly for the shipyards, but also for 
fuel and for bark, — bounties on sumach, in the interests of 
the tanneries, — bounties on larch, a new thing, then, in 
ship-building, — on hackmetac, on white ash, on the oaks, 
for the use of shipwrights, — bounties on hickory for the 
coopers, — not neglecting bounties on the locust and white 
mulberry and sugar-maple ; — it would be a stoiy of large 
funds, raised l)y private gift, in order that the state bounty, 
just offered in a conditional act of 181i», might be secured 
to brave old Essex ; — the story of a trial of Alderney 
stock, as early as 1826 ; — a stoiy of scant attention i)aid to 
horses and to sheep, whilst boldly launching out in a fifteen 



years' effort to force silk-culture and tlie introduction of 
the mulberry ; — a story of failure in a vigorous attempt to 
introduce " live fences," as the records then called hedges, 
— of lirst turning attention, from 1835 to 1840, to horse- 
ploughing, to nurseries, to kitchen-gardening, to the dyna- 
mometer : — a story, finally, of great account naturally made 
of di-ainage, but of quite as much attention paid (and this 
I cannot understand) in essays and bounties and commit- 
tees and gratuities, to the subject of irrigation, as to drain- 
age. To a layman (and you see before you a very lame 
'uii), it would seem that irrigation was a problem foreign 
to the agriculture of Essex count3^ But it has not been so 
treated. And I am driven for an explanation to the peril- 
ous conjecture that, as this watering problem can by no 
possibility have had to do, in an}^ way, with the milk sup- 
ply, it must have borne some hidden relation to the trouble- 
some cider problem, for very great attention was paid, in 
early years, to cider, — cider bounties, cider gratuities, cider 
committees, cider essays, — until, in 1834, a vote was passed 
condemning the barrel of cider which should take the first 
premium each year, for immediate consumption at the an- 
nual dinner, and this siderial frenzy finally giving way be- 
fore a growing adverse sentiment, and a premium offered 
at last for the best essay on feeding cider-apples to swine 
and fiit cattle, in the ver}" year of all others of this cen- 
tury, the year of the hard-cider campaign of 1840. 

These brilliant annual gatherings culminated in the 
splendid fair at Lynn in 1848 — the society then a genera- 
tion old — the finest show thus far — where there were seen 
twenty- nine ploughs, and an unrivaled field of stock, and 
Daniel Webster — show enough in himself — amongst the 
speakers at the dinner : — the society later extending its 
fairs to cover two days each, and holding them at the "same 
spot for two or three consecutive years : — then debating 
long and well the problem of a permanent location : — first 



7, 

in 1825, favoring for a domicile the Switzerland of this 
region, Topsfield, the scene of all their earlier successes, 
for it was, in old stage days, the metropolis of Essex 
county : — then deferring action because two other towns, 
Newbury and South Danvers, both had their advocates : — 
then, in 1860, again proposing Topsfield, for the Treadwell 
Farm had then come into the Society's possession ; and 
now at last, after a migratory, nomadic life of two com- 
pleted generations, comfortably housed under a roof-tree 
of its own at Peabody. 

But I set my face against all these temptations because 
I wish to say a word on one or two topics of present inter- 
est to the agriculture of the county. 

Massachusetts has always been the most thickly settled 
of the States except Rhode Island. Amongst the fourteen 
counties of Massachusetts, Essex County has for many 
years ranked as third in wealth, population and impor- 
tance, yielding precedence in these respects — outside of 
Suffolk County which is practically Boston — to Middlesex 
alone. It became a county in 1643. There are in Massa- 
chusetts thirty-nine towns which were settled before 1650. 
Twelve of these towns, — about one-third of the whole, — 
are in Essex County. You are not unprepared to hear 
that agriculture is an ancient craft in Essex County. No 
county in the State is older. In an old historic section 
agriculture is a tradition and not a new experiment. But 
had we time to look together at the census tables, they 
would disclose other facts to some of which you are not 
quite so well prepared to listen. 

Essex County held, from the taking of the first census 
in 1765 and I know not how long before, down to the for- 
mation of this Society in 1817-18, the first rank — not the 
second nor the third — amongst the fourteen counties of 
Massachusetts, in population and wealth and all that makes 
a people strong and great. Essex County then paid one- 



8 

fifth of the entire tax-levy of the State. The State then 
contained twenty-six and only twenty-six great towns of 
3000 inhabitants and upwards. Eleven of these so-called 
great towns — nearly one-half of them — were in Essex 
County. Of all the towns of four thousand inhabitants 
and upwards, Essex County had more than one-half. 
Shall 1 pause to enumerate these great towns, for every 
one of them was a trade-centre and furnished a natural 
market for farm-produce. They were Salem, second only 
to lioston, her 13,000 people being about one-sixth of the 
population of the County, and following her in the order 
of population came Newburyport, Gloucester, Marblehead, 
Beverly, Newbury, Lynn, Andover, Danvers, Ipswich and 
Haverhill, — a noble roll ! 

Will you pardon me if I venture one step further into 
the dry details of the census table, for I wish to ask your 
attention to a contrast or two between the condition of 
agriculture in this county now, and when your society 
was formed. 

Essex County had in 1817-18 three towns — there were 
no cities chartered in the State then — three towns and no 
more, having a population of six thousand so'uls and up- 
wards. One was Salem, another was Newburyport and the 
third was Gloucester. Essex County has today seven cities 
of 12,000 inhabitants and upwards and, besides these, five or 
six towns of 6,000 inhabitants and upwards. Is there no 
lesson for us in these statistics? These people are con- 
sumers — the}'- must be fed. These facts have special 
meaning for the farmer. Will you be patient with me a 
moment if I endeavor to unfold it ? 

You tell me that I state nothing strange. Whilst the 
acreage under cultivation is substantially not enlarged, the 
population of the County has kept pace with the popula- 
tion of the Country. Essex County had, when Pickering 
and his noble fellows brought this Society into being, about 



seventy-five thousand people. It has more than four 
times tliat number now, — about 330,000 people. They 
must be fed, and it needs only a glance to see what a 
honayiza Essex County farming might have proved with 
such a market at its door, but for the utter, unprecedented 
and revolutionizing change in otlier conditions of the 
problem. There is no class of persons in the county so 
directly and so vitally interested in this growth and cen- 
tralizing of numbers as is the Essex County farmer. 

It was the locomotive engine which made possible the 
development of the great northwest, and it was the loco- 
motive engine which built up eastern cities at the expense 
of the surrounding towns, and the locomotive engine was 
not hit upon until ten years after this Society was founded. 
This contrivance, in conjunction with machinery superced- 
ing hand-work in so many manufactures, has robbed the 
country population of its natural increase, and hived our 
people together like bees, in the great industrial centres, 
— these are the factors in our migration problem which 
have made us from a rural into a city people. How 
thoroughly this change has followed will best appear again 
from the figures. In 1820 the proportion of the popula- 
tion of the County living in the three places which had 
6,000 inhabitants and upwards, was just about one third, 
and half of them were in Salem. In 1895 the proportion 
of the people of the County living in places of 6,000 inhabi- 
tants and upwards, is thirteen-seventeenths of the whole. 
In other words, two people lived in the country then to one 
in a large town, and now thirteen people live in a city or 
large town to four in a town of less than (i,000 inhabitants. 
Time would not serve me to ask how far the general 
thrift and comfort have kept pace with population. Un- 
doubtedly these have advanced, and undoubtedly the 
Essex County farmer profits by it in full proportion with 
the world at large. But how has this apparent corner 



lO 

in agricultural produce^ — this tremendous advance in tlie 
demand for human food in Essex County, with no con- 
siderable extension of the farming area, and a great gain 
in the facilities for reaching his buyer, — how have these 
changes affected the Essex County farmer ? 

If population grows and centres at points within his easy 
reach, but not too near, that helps him because it guaran- 
tees him larger sales and a quickened activity of demand. 
If population grows and centres at points too near him, 
his patrimony becomes too valuable to farm — the assessors 
are on his track with a larger tax-bill, — the land-operators 
are after him with speculative offers, — land which he held 
by the acre will be appraised by the foot, and he is con- 
fronted with a choice between adopting new and advanced 
methods of tillage or putting his farm up for sale in house- 
lots. 

Modern facilities for getting about have revolutionized 
Essex County farming ; whilst they have enlarged the 
farmers' market, they have vastly enlarged the area from 
whicli we draw supplies, and thus exposed him to a wider 
competition. Products which were staple crops in 1820 
cannot now be raised here, because cheap transportation, 
first making possible the miraculous development of the 
great northwest, and then bringing its crops to our ver}" 
threshold, have enabled other sections to lay these staples 
down in our markets cheaper than we can raise them. The 
fai'mer who would make his ends meet, — who would leave 
his ancestral birth-place to his boys, and encourage them to 
stay at home and till it, — must buy largely of what he 
consumes, and raise onl}- that which his neighbors will buy 
of him to his advantage. The old Essex County idea that a 
farm was a tract of arable land on which to bring up a 
family, who were to inherit it and improve it as such, and 
who would be supported, in the main, by its varied pro- 
ducts consumed on the spot, is becoming as extinct as the 



II 

•dodo or the ichthyosaurus, — as strange and out of date as 
the okl colonial farmhouse, with its lean-to slanting north- 
ward, and its roof-tree of hand-hewn rafters, garnished 
with pumpkins and crook-necks and bunches of braided 
onions and golden seed-corn and sweet-marjoram and pen- 
nyroyal, dry and savory, with here and there a home-cured 
ham, or a woodchuck's skin, or a dip of tallow candles, or 
some turkeys' wings to dust out the brick oven, hung up 
against the massive chimney-stack, — and with its ancient 
well-sweep outside, weighted at the end with a generous 
boulder of our native granite, — and over all in leafy majesty 
the grand old elm, like a protecting providence, spread- 
ing its sheltering arms against the vaulted azure of the 
heavens. 

If his farm is within easy reach of some growing city he 
soon finds himself ranked amongst suburbans, and his 
property assessed accordingly. Summer sojourners come 
out to help consume his surplus and advance his prices. 
His milk and eggs and butter and poultry and kitchen- 
gardening and orchard products, so far as he does not serve 
them at his own board, — his hay and root crops and cab- 
bages and squashes, will be consumed by boarders or sent to 
market in the neighboring centre. He will buy his meats 
where he buys his flour. The dust of our county highways 
no longer rises to the droves that used to stir it on their 
way to slaughter. No longer is it possible to raise beef 
and mutton in Essex County. Meats that once came 
to our shambles on the hoof, now come in sides and quarters, 
or in cans or extracts. We cannot compete with sections 
of the country within easy railroad reach where it is said 
they have corn to burn for fuel, and feed good wheat to fat 
cattle because it pays better to move it on the hoof than 
through the elevator, — and where our genial friend, the 
hog, dropped, it is said, into a hopper, — the parting smile 
still lingering, on his lips, — may find himself writhing in 



12 

the cold embrace of merciless machinery, from which he 
shall emerge, by the turning of a crank at the rate of so 
many revolutions per minute, resolved into such elemental 
factors as sausages, glue, hams, bone-meal, souced feet and 
scrubbing-brushes ; we cannot compete witli a virgin soil 
that asks no nutriment and only waits to be broken up and 
planted — a flat, vegetable deposit left by some inland sea 
that has escaped its confines — a rich alluvial mould nine 
feet deep, it is said, in spots, and innocent for miles of such 
a feature as a scrub-tree or a pebble. 

The farmer under all these influences becomes a trades- 
man. He is helped by his wits as much as by his bone and 
sinew. He is no longer the husbandman pure and simple, 
living on his acres, — driving his grist to mill, — doing his 
heavy work with the steers he bought this spring to beef 
them a little later, — hauling his heavy fertilizers about from 
mussel-flats and peat-meadow to muck-heap and compost- 
bed, and tramping to Boston with his bulky night-loads at 
the tedious pace of a double team of oxen. He buys hi& 
fertilizer by the barrel in fine powder, and flings it about as 
he would salt and pepper on an omelette. It may force 
and overtax his soil, but he must quicken up his methods. 
He ploughs and mows and reaps by horse-power. He rides 
to market behind a pair of cheerful steppers and, as 1 heard 
a witty agriculturist once remark in recounting the new 
methods, — instead of swinging the scythe or flail or plod- 
ding behind the plough through the heat of the solstice, he 
trots out briskly in the morning, as though on pleasure 
bent, for his mowing and reaping, and has a chilled plough 
to use when the heat is unendurable. Thus, I take it, is to 
be ultimately extracted the ray of sunshine that is latent 
in the cucumber. He lives by what he buys and sells 
rather than on what he sows and reaps. He watches the 
market. He raises the crop that is merchantable. He fol- 
lows the price-lists as closely as he follows the weather 



13 

reports, — as keenly as the stock-broker keeps tally of the 
stock market, and prices current listed at the Broker's 
Board. He becomes less and less self-sustaining — more 
and more the business partner of the market-man and the 
produce-dealer. I have known a farm in northern New 
Hampshire where the liousehold wore home-spun, woven 
on a hand-loom from the wool of sheep that cropped the 
scanty herbage of that hillside patrimony. This could not 
be seen in Essex County in our day. But probably it 
could have been seen here at the founding of this society, 
when Pickering and his associates were, in vigorous terms, 
denouncing a protective tariff as hostile to agriculture, 
and when raw cotton was sold by the pound over the coun- 
ters of our shops, to be mixed with sheep's wool in .the 
family spinning and weaving. If the farmer is to be the 
independent character we have known him, bearing the 
brunt of our historic struggles, backing our public school 
system when it needed backing, furnishing the conserva- 
tive element in town finance and local politics, owning the 
soil in modest parcels, and pointed at as the model of 
quiet ease and content and manly superiority to the grind- 
ing ambition to be rich and great, — who stood at Lexing- 
ton and Concord, at Saratoga and Louisburg and Ticonde- 
roga and Trenton and fired on every field a shot heard 
round the world, — if he is to be all this, he must maintain 
his birthright by other means than old-school Essex County 
farming. He must reach out for markets to be opened to 
him by specializing his crops. He must avail himself of 
every new facility for distribution. He must cheapen his 
transportation methods. He must localize his sales. He 
must organize for freights, and multipl}'^ and magnify his 
markets nearer home where his produce can be delivered 
fresher and cheaper. 

The cost of production is not a more legitimate element 
of price than is the cost of distribution. I have here a 



copy of the Essex Gazette for April, 1771, in which it ap- 
pears that from and after the spring months of that year, 
three ferry-boats are to pass and repass constantl}' between 
Beverly and Salem in place of the two that had done all 
the carrying there before, so that, as we are assured, " by 
this means and by the good attendance to be given, trav- 
ellers may pass with great ease and dispatch." How 
much of the market which Salem and Marblehead and 
Lynn have afforded for years to the hay and root-crops 
and garden-truck from north of Essex Bridge, from Ham- 
ilton and Ipswich and Rowley and even beyond the Mer- 
rimac, could have existed under these conditions, before 
the Revolution, when the passage of Bass River was ef- 
fected " with ease and despatch " in two or three mud- 
scows ! Products which could only bear transportation a 
few miles in those days because it was so costly or slow or 
injurious, can now be sold thousands of miles from where 
they grow — California fruits, — West Indian, — Bermuda, — 
South American products throughout America, — New 
York and New Jersey and Ohio apples throughout Europe, 
— Wenham ice in India and the Orient, — Gloucester fish 
in the Ohio Valley. 

So the farmer enjoys a wider market at the same time 
that he endures a keener competition. He must not only 
produce cheaply. He must reach his buyer cheaply. If 
the distant producer, farming where land is cheap and 
rich, can outdo him in the cost of production, he must be 
able to reach his market with fresher products or at lower 
freights or with more attractive varieties, or he is undone^ 
The matter of the cheap and rapid distribution of pro- 
ducts is quite too little studied. Coal is a good illustra- 
tion. The value of coal as it comes out of the pit is Br 
small fraction of what it costs us in our coal-bins, — coal 
at the pit, if it would not bear transportation all over the 
continent, would be almost worthless. The little village 



15 

centered round a coal pit, which could reach it with hand- 
barrows or supply itself with tip-carts would never create a 
demand that would sink a shaft below the surface, or, in 
other words, coal, where it is produced, is a drug in the 
market, and the price we pay for coal is made up main- 
ly of the cost of distribution. 

Now apply this, if you will, to Essex County farming. 
Ever}^ day my car-ride takes me through many acres of 
splendid cabbages and squashes, — inestimable esculents, in 
the words of Choate, but bulky crops to handle. These 
are destined to be sold at a very moderate figure in the 
Boston market. I never look at them without reflecting how 
unreasonable a fraction of the price per pound at w^hicli the 
buyer gets them is made up of the inordinate cost of prima- 
tive modes of transportation. If they could reach Boston 
by some cheaper Avay, the buyer would get them cheaper, — 
the farmer would make a better profit, — and his sales 
would steadily grow greater. When I listen at midnight 
to the rumble of that endless caravan of market-wagons 
which has been making its way through Salem for a 
century since Essex Bridge was opened, — -a long, unbroken 
commissary-train rolling at day-break into Boston with the 
day's supply of hay and market-gardening, — I cannot resist 
the obvious reflection that close along-side the highway so 
laboriously traversed is an electric railway ti-ack, utterly 
unused from midnight until day-break, which is, or would 
seem to be, the natural medium for collecting and deliver- 
ing the bulky freight requiring night transportation. If 
this is true of the Boston supply it is true also of the local 
markets of tlie county. These will develop more and more 
as the farmer specializes his crops, and concentrates his 
forces, and raises what will sell, and buys all else, and forr 
gets all that delightful variety of farm-production, which 
went out with quilting bees, and home spinning and weav- 
ing, and peat fuel, and the grist mill. He must at hii* 



i6 

peril, even if his acres suffer for the forcing, search out the 
potent fertilizer and plant the early delicacy, — something 
that will steal the march upon his vigilant and active neigh- 
bors, for the adage about the early bird that catches the 
worm is not more true than this, — that it is the early cu- 
cumber — the early celery — the early spinach — the early 
radish — the early lettuce — the early tomato, that catches 
the customer. 

You do not fail to perceive the drift of my reflections, 
which time will not permit me to develop further. I Avould 
restore the individuality, — the autonomy, — the independent 
activity of the local market and make the smaller cities and 
greater towns self-reliant centres of consumption and dis- 
tribution, — the parade of yesterday is precisely in this line, 
— I would have them precisely what they were before the 
railroad system built up at Boston a central market for 
eastern Massachusetts, and made of it, as it were, a great 
prehensile octopus cast up on the shore of Massachusetts 
Bay, reaching out for everything, and stretching its iron 
tentacles — its steel-rail tentacles, rather — for thirty miles 
around, and sucking into its inexorable maw, not your 
farm-products alone, but a good part of the business energy 
and brain-power and wealth-producing capacity and art 
capacity and capacity for recreation that belong of right to 
the surrounding country. I would have vegetables and 
fruits and butter and eggs and many of the products that 
depend on their freshness for their merchantable value, 
treated very much as milk, for instance, is treated to-day, 
— treated as they can well be treated when street railway 
lines perform their destined function — that is to say, trans- 
ported not so much to a central market at Boston, where 
the wholesaler may deal them out to a country retailer, 
who often brings them back again, — but moving much more 
directly from producer to consumer. A little more organ- 
izing capacity and a little more independence in the rela- 



17 

tions between producer and consumer would dispense, in 
large part with the services of the middleman and save his 
profits to the bettering of both of them. 

A class of reasoners has lately appeared who hold that 
taxes should be levied upon land alone. Land, they say, 
can be seen. It can not escape the grip of the tax-collector 
like stock-certificates and paper values. This view is most 
attractive to the average city resident. He holds no real 
estate. He expects to hold none. The view may become 
popular. Most people have their savings in stocks and 
banks and business securities mainly. But the farmer will 
have no easy task to reconcile this view with his prosperity. 
If the burtheu of the public revenues is to be borne, in the 
first instance, by land, it \vould seem to foUoAv, that the 
holding of land will be a more precarious investment than 
it is, inasmuch as a larger mone}'' return from the products 
of land nuist be assured every year in order to make the 
investment a safe one. There must be an ample reserve 
fund to meet contingencies. No man can then afford to 
take the risk of holding land except he have a plethoric 
bank-account to fall back upon to meet his taxes in case of 
crop-failure, or, what is quite as bad, in case of price-failure 
due to over-production. The acreage of the county, it 
would seem, must in this event pass out of the hands of 
the practical farmer and be absorbed by great land-propri- 
etors, and the tiller of the soil be driven to trade, or to 
manufactures, or to the uncongenial lot of tilling his own 
birthright acres as the tenant of another. You say we are 
in no danger of this, — that the proposition needs only to be 
stated, to be scouted. The national election now in pro- 
gress ought to persuade us that no political vagary is too 
fantastic to command its votaries — that there is no such 
thing as the impossible in politics. It is the whole people 
of the commonwealth who have the settlement of methods 
of taxation. In considering the single-tax proposition, the 



fanner — the holder of arable land — will do well to remem- 
ber that he is in a hopeless minority in this community — 
that he is no longer where Timothy Pickering left him, but 
— thanks to railroads and cotton-mills and machine methods 
generally — he is now outnumbered two to one b}" the citj- 
populations. The centre of gravity is shifted. Only one- 
ninth of the people of this state, in 1817-18, lived in the 
two towns, Boston and Salem, Avhich had at that time 
population enough for a city charter. The other eight- 
ninths of the people lived in towns of less tlian twelve 
thousand inhabitants, or, in other words, eight times as many 
people lived in the country as in the city. To-day, consid- 
■erably more than two-thirds of the people of this common- 
wealth live under city governments. Or in other words — 
more than twice as many people are living in the cities to- 
day as are living in the country, where they can smell the 
breath of kine and drink in the odors of the fresh-turned 
sod. The farmers of Essex County and the State, with 
quite as much acreage as ever to be taxed, and every foot 
of it quite as much in evidence as ever, find >their voting 
strength as compared with the whole population, fatally 
belittled. Less than 50,000 acres of the soil of Essex 
County lie within the area of heT seven cities. More than 
225,000 acres of it lie in the twenty-eight towns of the 
count}^ The proportion in other parts of the state is pretty 
constant. I need not trouble you with the figures. So 
far, then, as the matter of a single land-tax is likely to be- 
come an issue to be determined between the city and the 
rural population, the dwellers under city charters, more 
than two-thirds of the people of the state, will find their 
interests little menaced by the proposal. The question 
involves a score of nice and difficult considerations. But 
it is easy to see, precisely for the reason of their difficulty 
and delicacy, that, to the average city dweller who gets his 
income from trade, from transportation, from the cotton- 



19 

mill or the shoe-factory, — who owns no land and hires the 
house he lives in, and has made no study of the abstract 
question of adjusting taxes, the proposition to levy a single 
tax, and that on land, has an attraction hard to be over- 
come. It looks simple — a great consideration in adjusting- 
taxes — it looks easy to assess and difficult to evade 
If you urge the terrible disturbance of prices and land" 
tenures which must result, he looks complacently to the 
future, that special providence of schemers, to readjust 
such matters. I do not argue the probability or the im- 
probability of such an issue. I merely call attention to it 
as a possibility, and to the hopeless preponderance of the 
cities over the towns, — of the non-holders over the holders 
of land, in population, in wealth, in political control, in 
everything except intelligence and character which goes 
to make up the collective potency of a people. And I 
venture the prediction that if a single tax on land is ever 
substituted for the present system, the Essex County 
farmer, as we have known him, — as he was known to 
Timothy Pickering in the opening quarter of this century 
— the master of a little farm, well tilled — the holder of his 
hundred acres upon which he first saw the sunlight smiling, 
and upon which it is his hope to live, and toil, and work 
out a caieer, and find his comfort and his refuge from 
corroding cares, and rear a family and die respected, Avill 
find himself ground to powder between the upper and the 
nether millstones of coinpetition and taxation, and will 
disappear, in the long process of financial readjustment, 
like flies in winter, out of sight forever. 

May that day be distant ! May some better fate await 
the farmer of Essex County ! May we not live to see dear 
old Massachusetts with all her little farms — the very bed- 
rock of our splendid citizenship and personal independence 
and intelligence and martial strength, — may we not live to 
see this grand old commonwealth given over to any 



20 

baronial notions, born of a great landed proprietary, with 
its costly machinery and extravagant equipment and 
showy methods, within the reach of opulence alone — ■ 
its aggrandizing tendencies, its unfraternal social leanings, 
by dint of which the haughty spirit of patronage may 
supplant the better instinct of good-fellowship and neigh- 
borly good-will, and Massachusetts grow to be — -instead of 
the glorious ideal of the past, her little communities emu- 
lating one another in their successes — knit together more 
firmly b}' sharing one another's struggles, — instead of this 
her little town communities merged into one great central- 
ized, consolidated factory village, with a few rich mill- 
owners and fancy farmers at the top and a mass' of help- 
less, restless, discontented wage-earners looking up to 
them without appeal, as the arbiters of their fate. 

Let me close with the hope that long before such a 
destiny shall overtake the farmers of this county, the new 
facilities for getting about and for the distribution of pro- 
ducts,— the better roads we are to have — thanks mainly to 
summer pleasure-travel and the bicycle — protected, as I 
think they will be, by a premium offered b}^ the towns on 
broad tires, equal in amount to the cost of the change to 
the farmer who adopts them, — the electric railway system, 
soon, I believe to be made more serviceable to the public 
and more remunerative to the investors, by being applied 
IVora midnight until day-break to the collecting and distri- 
l)uting of freight expressage — that these and other changes 
may make the toils of husbandry lighter and its profits 
greater, — and that specialized products and localized 
markets may add to the assurance with which the husband- 
man shall sow his crops and possess his acres. So that 
the agriculture of the county may ap})roach the opening 
century with an unclouded future, and be what it has been 
to us, what it was to the founders of your society — what 
Timothy Pickering said it was, the "noblest of pursuits "% 



21 

— may still remain the stay of public confidence and 
credit— the anchorage ground of conservative hopes and 
aspirations — the equal handmaid of commerce and the 
arts — the reliance of state and nation,— a staff in war, a 
cradle of good citizenship in peace, a training-school for 
patriots in both ! 



SEVENTY-SIXTH 



Annual Cattle Show and Fair 



The Cattle Show and Fair of this society 0[)eiied on 
Sept. 22, 1896, with the promise of good success, but before 
noon it began to rain and continued through tlie day, but 
Wednesda}' the weather was perfect and the attendance 
was the largest on record. 

The exhibits in all departments were larger than for 
many years, and on the, whole it was the most successful 
fair the society ever held, there being about one hundred 
head of cattle on exhibition and neaily the same number 
of horses. The poultry exhibit was especially fine, repre- 
senting more than five hundred fowls of different breeds 
and varieties. At the ploughing match there were not so 
many entries as usual, but those that did plough did good 
work and drew quite a large attendance to witness it. 

Wednesday morning the citizens of Peabody, Salem and 
adjoining towns had a street parade of the business firms 
of those places, which was a very fine -display and drew 
thousands of people to witness it. This parade was a horse 
and cattle show of itself, being a procession over a mile in 
length, composed of some of the finest horses in the coun- 
t}', and notably among the rest a team of nine yoke of 
oxen from the Danvers Asylum. The annual address 
before the Society was delivered Thursda3% in the Pea- 
body Institute, by Hon. Robert S. Rantoul, of Satem, of 
which no praise is necessary to convince anyone that it 
was able and interesting, going back to the earliest history 
of the Society and giving a brief history of its work up to 



23 



the present time. Immediately after the address the annual 
dinner was served in the vestry of the South Church, 'after 
which President Appleton called the assemblage to order, 
and after a few brief remarks in relation to the Society 
and its work, introduced Hon. Geo. V. L. Meyer, Hon. 
William H. Moody, A. E. Wells, and others, all of whom 
made pleasant and interesting remarks, and received a 
grand ovation from those present. 

The entries in the several departments of the Fair for 
1896 and 1895 are tabulated for comparison, as follows : — 

STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON SHOW GROUNDS. 



Entries 
in 1896. 


From 

Different 

Places 

in isiM"). 


Entries 
in 1S95. 


From 

Different 

Flaces 

in 1895. 


Bulls, 6 


8 


4 


2 


I\Iilch Cows, 21 


5 


17 


2 


Herds of Milch Cows, 3 


3 


2 


•> 


Heifers, Puie Bred, 18 


4 


7 


2 


Heifers, Native or Grade, 17 


4 


9 


1 


Working Oxen and Steers, 3 





1 


1 


Steers, 











Stallions, Farm and Draft, 





1 


1. 


Stallions, for Driving Purposes, 6 


6 


5 


4 


Brood Mares, Farm and Draft, 











Brood Mares, Driving Purposes, 4 


o 


1 


1 


Family Horses, 5 


4 


6 


6 


Gents' Driving Horses, 14 


9 


12 


9 


Pairs Gents' Driving Horses, 2 


2 


2 


2 


Farm Horses, 6 


4 


8 


3 


Pairs of Farm Horses over 2500 








lbs., 3 


3 


1 


1 


Pairs of Farm Horses less than 








, 2500 lbs., 4 


4 


2 


2 


Colts, Farm and Draft, 2 


2 


2 


2 


Colts, Driving Purposes, 11 


5 


15 


9 



24 



From From 

Entries Different Entries Different 

in 1896. Places in 1895. Places 

in 1896. in 1895. 



Fast Walking Horses, 
Swine, Large Breeds, 
Swine, Small Breeds, 


5 

24 

6 


5 
3 
1 



15 

8 



1 
1 


Sheep, 
Poultr}^ 
Harrows for trial. 


10 
133 




3 

11 

2 


4 

66 

3 


2 

7 
2 


Agricultural Implements, 
Carriaoes, 


33 
16 


6 
4 


8 

7 


5 
2 


Ploughing, 


8 


4 


10 


3 




362 


22 


216 


22 



EXHIBITS 


IX HALL. 








Entries 
in 1896. 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1896. 


Entries 
in 1895. 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1895. 


Dairy, 


4 


3 








Bread and Canned Fruit, 


90 


12 


28 


5 


Honey, 


2 


1 








Pears, 


181 


11 


176 


11 


Apples, 


368 


21 


118 


13 


Peaches, Grapes and Assorted 










Fruits, 


111 


12 


97 


10 


Plants, 


37 


4 


12 


3 


Flowers, 


115 


10 


87 


7 


Vegetables, 


317 


17 


188 


10 


Grain and Seed, 


12 


4 


6 


2 


Carpetings and Rugs, 


20 


7 


19 


7 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


67 


12 


44 


7 


Articles ^lanuf'd from leathei 


•, 30 


5 


8 


1 


Manu'fr's and General Mdse.. 


, 52 


10 


21 


5 


Fancy Work, 


226 


14 


13S 


11 



25 



From From 

Entries Different Entries Different 

in 1896. Places in 1895. Places 
in 1896. in 1895. 



Works of Art, 


79 


7 


53 


10 


Work by Children under 12 










years of age, 


37 


1 


16 


2 


Grange Exhibit, 


1 


1 









1749 30 1013 26 

Grand total, 2111 entries from 30 out of 35 cities and 
towns in Essex County, against 1228 gentries from 32 cities 
and towns last year. Bradford, Essex, Manchester, Nahant 
and Salisbury did not have exhibits this year. The entries 
were : 

Amesbury, 13 ; Andover, 4 ; Beverly, 96 ; Boxford, 87 ; 
Danvers, 174; Georgetown, 7; Gloucester, 2; Groveland, 
1 ; Hamilton, 35 ; Haverhill, 24; Ipswich, 19; Lawrence, 
33 ; Lynn, 129 ; Lynntield, 12 ; Marblehead, 17 ; Merrimac, 
12 ; Methuen, 13 ; Middleton, 11 ; Newbury, 57 ; Newbury- 
port, 16 ; North Andover, 105 ; Peabody, 1041 ; Rockport, 
3 ; Rowley, 19 : Salem, 113 ; Saugus, 19 ; Swampscott, 6 ; 
Topsfield, 13 ; Wenham, 22 ; West Newbury, 7. 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the Society was held in the Pea- 
body Institute at Peabody, Sept. 23, 1896, when the follow- 
ing business was^transacted : — 

President Appleton called the meeting to order at 10.30 
A. M. and read the call. 

On motion of Mr. Bond of Ipswich, it was voted that 
the chairman appoint a committee of three to receive, assort 
and count the votes for officers for the coming year. 



26 

Ml. P>)iid, of Ipswich, Mr. Nelson, of Georgetown, and 
Mr. NewhiiU, of Lynn, were appointed. 
Whole number of votes cast <2. 

FOR PRESIDENT. 

Asa T. NewhalK of Lynn, had .... 4 

Francis H. Appleton, of Peabody, liad ... 28 

Oliver S. Butler of Georgetown, had ... 40 
and Mr. Butler was elected. 

FOR VICE PRKSIDENT.S. 

James J. H. Gregory, of Marblehead, had . • 72 

H. G. Herrick. of Lawrence, had ... 72 

Asa T. Newhall, of Lynn, had . . ■ .71 

J. D. W. French, of North Andovei-, had . . 10 
and the above were declared elected. 

FOR SECRETARY. 

Charles H. Hills, of Peabody, had . . - 1 

John M. Danforth, of Lynntield, had . . .71 

and was elected. 

After some remarks by Pres. Appleton, Mr. Butler and 

others upon rules, etc. of the society, the meeting dissolved. 



REPORT OP THE DELEGATE FROM THE STATE BOARD OF 
AGRICULTURE TO THE ESSEX SOCIETY FOR 1895. 

To the Hon. Wm. R. Sessions., Secretary of the State Board 
of Agriculture : — 

The seventy-fifth annual exhibition of the Essex County 
Agricultural Society was held on the Society's grounds at 
Peabody, on September 17, 18, and 19, 1895. 

Your delegate arrived on said grounds on the afternoon 
of the 18th, and found the officers there and very busy 



27 

receiving entries and preparing for the next day's exhibi- 
tion. 

The society has daring the past summer purchased land 
and built large barns for cattle and horses. 

The barns appear to be well constructed, and conven- 
iently arranged so that the stock might be easily cared for 
and very comfortably. 

They also have built a 14 mile track, and fenced their 
grounds, "showing that the officers have been very busy. 
They were also very courteous to all. 

I understand that the entries of cattle in the various class- 
es were not as large as usual (whether the location had any- 
thing to do with it, time will tell). Yet there were some 
very fine cows on exhibition, which showed good care and 
breeding. 

There was a very good exhibition of swine, mostly from 
one farm. In the horse barn there were a number of very 
fine animals, and judging from the number of the people 
who constantly filled the barn, should say the horse was 
the favorite in Essex County. 

The exhibition hall where the ladies held the fort, with 
a few of the sterner sex, was very finely arranged .and in 
some departments was very fine. There was quite a large 
exhibit of pears and grapes, also in the fancy work line the 
ladies had some ver}" fine work. 

In the vegetable department, the entries were not large 
in number, but the quality made up in a large degree what 
it lacked in quantity. 

I was compelled to leave on the afternoon of the second 
day, thus did not have the pleasure of being present at the 
annual dinner, which I learn was a grand success ; it could 
not be otherwise under the very able management of the 
officers of the Essex County Society. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. M. Blair. 



Reports of Committees. 



1896. 



The following- pi-emiuins were awarded for live stock : 

BULLS. 

Diploma and -tS. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. 
Andover, for the Holstein Bull " Prince Marion Fair- 
fax," as the best bull for any age or breed with 5 of 
his stock. 
•f6. First premium, to J. D. W. Frencli, No. Andover, for 

the Ayrshire Bull, '' Dago." 
$6. First premium, to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for the 

Jersey Bull, " Duke." 
$4. Second premium, to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for the 

Jersey Bull "' Richard Hamilton." 
i4. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein Bull, " Prince of Pem.'" 
George L. Averill, Charles J. Peabody, Andrew Mans- 
field — Committee. 

To the Cominittee on Bulls : 

I enter for your consideration the Holstein Bull, ''Prince 
Marion Fairfax," No. 21519, H. F. H. B. with five heifers 
of his stock, viz : 



29 

" Zalma Fairfax," calved Mar. 13. '95, Dam " Zalma 2d " 
" Maid of Pem 2d," " " 26, " " " Maid of Pern " 
" Myra Fairfax," " July 28, " " '' Myra W." 
" Betz 2d Fairfax," " " " " " Betz-.2d " 

" Gracie F."(g'i"^cle) " May " '^Jersey | Holstein 

The Dam of the above Bull, " Maid Fairfax," gave an 
average of 14,500 lbs. milk a year for five years. 

And the 2 mo. old Bull calf '•'• Prince of Pern," Sire 
"Prince Marion Fairfax," No. 21519, Dam "Maid of 
Penn," No. 3619. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Poor. 



MILCH COWS. 

S8. First premium, for best Milch Cow of any age or 

breed to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for Holstein 

Cow, " Maid of Pem." 
^7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover. for 

Holstein Cow, " Betz 2nd." 
i7. First premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, for 

Ayrshire Cow, " Tessa," 10972. 
$5. Second premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover. 

for Ayishire Cow, " Nelly Day 2iid" 12497. for best 

Milch Cow of any age or breed. 
■f4. Second premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, 

for Ayrshire Cow, '• Maid Douglass." 
•1^4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein Cow, '• Myra W.'' 
•S7. First premium to Wni, B. Carlton, Dan vers, for 

Grade Ayrshire Cow. 
•f 4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Holstein Cow, " Bessie B." 



$4. Second premium to Mrs J. C. Phillips, Beverly, for 
Jersey Cow, ''Ilex." 
George A. Rogers, E. A. Emerson, Andrew Lane, Jr. — 
Co7nmittee. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

Diploma and flO. First premium to James C. Poor, No. 
Andover, for herd of six Holstein and Grade Cows. 
S. F. Newman, George B. Austin, John S. Tuck — 
Committee. 

Committee on Herds of Milch Cows : 

I enter for your consideration the Holstein Cows 

"Madam Eugeine," "Maid of Pern," " Myra W.," " Betz 

2nd," and grade cows, " Bessie B." and " Minnie H." 

Madam Eugeine's record for one year, 13,560 lbs. 

Maid Pem's " " " ' '' 10,985 - 

Myra W., " " " " 11,540 '• 

Betz 2d, 10,335 " 

Bessie B., " 10,765 " 

MinnieH., 3yrs.old," ' 8,500 " 

Winter feed ; 12 qts. gluten meal and bran, one part 
gluten, two parts bran, one feed of roots, mangolds and 
turnips, or cabbage, with dry fodder, consisting of oats, 
barley and corn fodder, and English ha3% fed and watered 
twice a day. 

In summer they are turned to pasture and the grain 
feed reduced, and fed after Aug. 1st, with green .fodder 
twice a da}'. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Poor. 



31 
HEIFERS, PURE BREED. 

$5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein in milk, '' Myra W. Shepherd," 3 yrs. old. 

'f4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein " Bessie Vernon," 2 yrs. old. 

$2. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein " Maid of Pem 2d," 1 yr. old. 

$4. First premium, to Fred Stiles, Peabody, for Holstein, 
1 yr. old. 

$2. Second premium, to James Hurlihy, Peabody, for 
Holstein, 2 yrs. old. 

f5. First premium to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, for 
Jersey, in milk, 3 yrs. old. 

'$4. First premium to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, for Jer- 
sey, 2 yrs. old. 

■M. First premium to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, for 

, Jersey, 1 yr. old. 

$2. Second premium, to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, 
for Jeisey, 2 yrs. old. 

$2. Second premium, to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for Jer- 
sey, 1 yr. old. 
Benjamin P, Ware, John Barker, Phineas A. Dodge — 

Committee. 

To the Committee on Heifers^ Holstein: — 

I enter for your consideration, for heifer under four years 
old in milk, the Holstein Heifer, " Myra W. Shepard,'' 3 yrs. 
old July last, calved Dec. 6, 1895, is due in November. 

For Holstein Heifers, 2 yrs. old, never calved, '' Bell R. 
Winkle," and "Bessie Vernon.'' 

For Holstein Heifers, one year old and under. Yearling 
Heifers, " Zalma Fairfax," "Maid of Pem, 2d," " Betz 2d 
Fairfax," and the four weeks old heifer calf, " Queen 

Betz." 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. (\ Poor. 



32 

HEIFERS NATIVE OR GRADE. 

$5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Audover, for 

Grade '' Blossom D.'' in milk. 
-14. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade '' Gracie F." 1 year old. 
%2. Second premium to Town of Peabody, for Grade 2 

years old. 
$4:. First premium to Frank W. Stanley, Peabody, for 

Grade Jersey 1 year old. 
•f3. Second premium to Wm. B. Carlton, Danvei's, for 

Grade Jersey in milk. 
i2. Second premium to Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 

Grade Holstein in milk. 
Samuel T. Poor, James M. Bertram, B. F. Barnes — Com- 
mittee. 

To the Committee on Native or Grade Heifers: 

I enter for your consideration for Grade Heifers under 4 
years old, in milk, the Holstein and Ayrshire 2 year old 
Heifer, " Blossom," calved Apr. 20, gave 16 qts. milk a day 
in May, and the Holstein and Jersey Heifer, "EstellaB,"' 
2 years old, calved June 20, gave 14 qts. milk in July. 
For 2 year olds and under, never calved. 
The Holstein and Durham Heifer, " Overna S." 
For 1 year old and under and less than two. 
The Holstein and Jersej^ Heifer, '' Gracie F." 
And the Holstein and Ayrshire Heifer, 5 months calf. 
Blossom 2nd. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Poor. 



AVORKING OXEN. 

•■$8. First premium to 'J^iomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, for 
Oxen. 



33 

16. Second premium to C. E. Hinkley, Peabody, for 
Oxen. 
James C. Poor, B. H. Farnham, George Matthewson — 
Committee. 



STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

$8. First premium to Rial Side stock farm, Beverly, for 

Wilkes Stallion, ''Col. Osgood/' 
$5. First premium to Charles Kernes, Dan vers, for Coach- 
ing Stallion. 
i5. First premium to Willard F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for 3 

year old Stallion, " Quincy Wilkes." 
$3. Second premium to Albert W. Locke, Salem, for "i 
year old Stallion, " Robert Nelson." 
Lewis E. Nickerson, H. H. Denisey, J. D. Drew — Com- 
mittee. 



BROOD MARES FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

$8. First premium to A. B. Forbes, Byfield, for Chestnut 

Mare, •' Fanny Fern." 
f5. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bay 

Mare, "Juliet." 
Amos P. Alley, Charles A. Lunt, D. D. Adams — Com- 
mittee. 



FAMILY HORSES. 

$6. First premium to C. A. Buxton, Salem, for Steel Gray 

Horse, " Prince B." 
•M. Second premium to Chailes Kernes, Dan vers. 

W. F. Kinsman, John W. Lovett, C. T. Batclielder — 
Committee. 



34 
GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

$8. First premium to A. B. Forbes, By field, for pair of 

Bays, " Varnissa and Varick." 
$5. Second premium to Allen F. Gray, Lynnfield, for 

Bay and Brown pair. 
f6. First premium to A. B. Forbes, By field, for single 

Brown Mare, " Audatara." 
$4. Second premium to John H. George, Methuen, for 

Bay Gelding. 
John J. Manning, S. H. Bailey, Geo. L. Averill, M. C- 
Andrews — Committee. 



SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

i6. First premium to F. W. Lyford, Danvers, for Bay 

Horse, " Billy," weight 1250 lbs. 
$4. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Black 

Horse, '^ Swap," weight 1200 lbs. 
$6. First premium to Benj. W. Farnham, No. Andover, 

for Bay Mare, weight 1075 lbs. 
$4. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Bay 

Horse, " Frank,'' weight 1150 lbs. 
Edward A. Fuller, Isaac F. Knowlton, E. N . Brown — 
Committee. 



PAIRS OF FARM HORSES. 

I. First premium, to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, weighty 

2600 lbs. 
). Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 

weight 2800 lbs. 
I. First premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, weight 

2300 lbs. 



35 

$5. Second premium, to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, weight 
2400 lbs. 
George M. Roundy, B. H. Farnham, A. A. Rutherford, 
Edwin Bates, Henry Bushby, W. E. Merrill, B. F, Barnes 

— Covimittee. 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

$5. First premium, to B. P. Ware, Marblehead, for Black 

Mare, " Bessie." 
•$3. Second premium, to A. B. Gardner, Salem, for Brown 
Mare, " Dot." 
B. H. Farnham, F. W. Lyford, Alex'r Robinson, C. O. 
Barker — Committee. 



COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES. 

$6. First premium, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, 4 yrs. 
■ old, 1250 lbs. 
John H. George, D. D. Adams, A. M. Robinson, E. L. 
Wildes — Committee. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING, THREE AND FOUR YEARS 

OLD. 

$6. First premium, to M. F. Mulcady, Peabody, for 4- 

year-old, " Kitty." 
15. Second premium, to George W. Eaton, Peabody, for 

3-year-old. 
$4. Second premium, to A. B. Gardner, Salem, for 4-year- 
old, "Annie Wilkes." 
Thomas W. Pierce, Edw. Harrington, S. D. Hood, By- 
ron G. Kimball — Committee. 



36 
COLTS P^OR DRIVING, ONE AND TWO YEARS OLD. 

$4. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Bytield, for 2-year-old. 
$4. First premium, to Rial Side Stock Farm, Beverly, for 

yearling. 
■S2. Second premium, to Rial Side Stock Farm, Beverly, 

for 2-year-old. 
J. J. Abbott, M. H. Connor, W. H. Hayes, J. W. Park- 
liurst — Committee. 



•$5 



i5 



SWINE, LARGE BREEDS. 

First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

Boar. 
First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

Sow and Pigs. 
First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Berkshire 

Boar. 
First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabodv, for Weaned 

Pigs. 
First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Chester 

Boar. 
First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Weaned 

Pigs. . ^ 

First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Jersey 

Boar. 
First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for large 

Yorkshire Boar. 
First premium, to Town of Peabody, for Weaned Pigs. 
First premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, for Sow 

and Pigs. 
. Second premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, for Weaned 

Pigs. 
J. W. Y''eaton, George A. Dow, C. N. Maguire — Committee. 



Z7 

SWINE, SMALL BREEDS. 

i5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorksliire Boar. 
15. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire Sow and Pios. 
$3. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Sow and 

Pigs. 
$3. Second premium, to F. W. Stanley, Peabodj^, for Boar. 
Charles P. Mighill, Warren M. Cole, George A. Dow — 
Committee. 



SHEEP. 



i5. yirst premium, to Lewis W. Hawkes. Saugus, for 10 
Shropshire Ewes. 

$4. First premium, to Lewis AV. Hawkes, Sangus, for 
Shropshire Lambs. 

#5. First premium, to J. D. W. Fiench. No. Andover, for 
Hampshire Buck. 

$5. First premium, to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, for 
10 Hampshire and Oxford Ewes. 

$5. First premium, to J. B. Thomas, Peabody, for Shrop- 
shire Buck. 

$5. First premium, to J. B. Thomas, Peabody, for 10 
Leicester Ewes. 

14. First premium, to J. B. Thomas, Peabody, for 2 Lei- 
cester Buck Lambs. 
Geo. W. Sargent, E. G. Nason, N. W. Moody, Albert W. 

Dodsre — Committee. 



POULTRY. 

$1.00 and (lii)loma. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Pea- 
body, for Lio-ht Brahma Fowls. 



38 

$1.00 and diploma. First premiuni to 0. L. Beckett, Pea- 
body, for Buft" Cochin Bantam Fowls. 
.50. Second premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 

BufT Cochin Bantam Fowls. 
fl.OO. First premium to C. L.Beckett, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam Chicks. 
.50. Second premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Buff Cochin Bantam Chicks. 
$1.00. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Black Red Game Fowls. 
$1.00. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Black Red Game Chicks. 
.50. Second premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Black Red Game Chicks. 
Diploma to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Breeding Pen 

Black Red Game Chicks. 
.50. Second premium to Wm. B. Davis, Haverhill, for 

Plymouth Rock Fowls. 
$1.00. First premium to Wm. B. Davis, Haverhill, for 

Barred Plymouth Rock Fowls. 
Diploma to Wm. B. Davis, Haverhill, for Barred PI3 mouth 

Rock Chicks. 
$1.00 and diploma to Wm.'E. Sheen, West Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn Chicks. 
$1.00. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, West Peabody, 

for Brown Leghorn Fowls. 
$1.00. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, West Peabody, 

for White Plj-mouth Rock Chicks. 
.50. Second premium to Robert R. Hamilton, Peabody, 

for White Leghorn Chicks. 
$1.00 and diploma to P. W. Perkins, Salem, for Muscovey 

Ducks. 
$1.00. First premium to Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus, for 

Toulouse Geese. 



39 

.50. Second premium to Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus, 

for Toulouse Geese. 
il.OO. First premium to Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus, for 

Emdeu Geese. 
•fl.OO. First premium to Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus, for 

Cayuga Ducks. 
Diploma to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver-laced Wy- 
andotte Fowls. 
^1.00. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

Silver-laced Wyandotte Chicks. 
$1.00. First premium to John C. Jodre}', Danvers, for pen 

of Silver-laced Wyandottes. 
.50. Second premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

Silver-laced Wyandotte Chicks. 
$1.00. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

Golden Wyandotte Fowls. 
$1.00. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

Golden Wyandotte Chicks. 
$1.00. First premium to C. H. Annable, Danvers, for 

White Leghorn Chicks. 
$1.00. First premium to C. H. Annable, Danvers, for 

Rouen Ducks. 
$1.00. First premium to Ella A. Annable, Danvers, for 

Canada Geese. 
$1.00. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn Fowls. 
$1.00. First premium to Geoi'ge A. Knight. Peabody, for 

Brown Leghorn Chicks. 
.50. Second premium to Durkee Bros., West Peabody, 

for Light Brahma Chicks. 
.50. Second premium to Durkee Bros., West Peabody, 

for Canada Geese. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Durkee Bros., West Peabody, for pen 

of 16 Lisfht Brahma Chicks. 



40 

f 1.00. First premium to W. Fred Munroe, Peabody, for 

White Wyandottes. 
.50. Second premium to W. Fred Munroe, Peabody, 

for White Wj^andottes. 
il.OO and diploma to Arthur' Elliot, Peabody, for White 

Leghorn Fowls. 
11.00. First premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for 

Langshan Fowls. 
.50. Second premium to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for 

Geese. 
.50. Second premium to A. W. Beckford, Danvers, for 

Light Brahma Fowls. 
$1.00. First premium to A. W. Beckford, Danvers, for 

Light Brahma Chicks. 
81.00. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Plymouth Rock Fowds. 
$1.00. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Cornish Indian Game Fowls. 
.50. Second premium to S. P. Chase, Peabody, for Light 

Brahma Chicks. 
$1.00. First premium to Walter M. Peterson, West Pea- 
body. for Pyle Game Fowls. 
il.OO. First premium to Walter M. Peterson, West Pea- 
body, for Pyle Game Chicks. 
il.OO. First premium to Thomas F. Gilroy, Peabody, for 

Muscovey Ducks. 
il.OO. First premium to Mrs. A. I. Verne. Lynnfield, for 

Brown and Red Game Chicks. 
.50. Second premium to Mrs. A. I. Verne, Lynnfield, 

for Brown and Red Game Chicks. 
Diploma to Frank Woodbury, 2nd, Beverly, for pen Buff , 

Plymouth Rock ^ 'hicks. 
il.OO. First premium to Frank Woodbury, 2nd, Beverly, 

for pair Buff Plymouth Rock Chicks. 



41 

$1.00 and diploma to^Frank Woodbury, 2nd, Beverly, for 

Buff Leghorns. 
il.OO. First premium to Fi'ank Woodbury, 2nd, Beverly, 
for Buff Leghorn Chicks. 
.50. Second premium [to Thomas F. Ellsworth, Pea- 
body, for Plymouth Kock Chicks. 
11.00 and diploma to David C. Hunter, Peabody, for 

Geese. 
il.OO. First premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 
pen of Wild Geese. 
.50. Second premium to Walter F.^Gould, Ipswich, for 
Geese. 
#1.00. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for 
Black Langshan Chicks. 
.50 and diploma to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for Black 
Langshan Fowls. 
Diploma to G. Preston Pope, Danvers, for pen White 
Plymouth Rocks. 
.50. Second premium to G. Preston Pope, Danvers, for 
White Plymouth Rocks. 
il.OO. First premium toj H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
AVild Geese. 
.50. Second premium to H. L. Ellsworth. Peabody, for 

Muscovy Ducks. 
.50. Second premium to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
Bronze Turkeys. 
•11.00. First premium to H." L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 

Buff Cochins. 
11.00 and diploma to E. i_R. Perkins, Salem, for White 
Woodland Fowls. 
.50. Second premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for White 
Woodland Fowls. 
il.OO. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for White 
Woodland Chicks. 



42 

.50. Second pieinium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for White 

Woodland Chicks. 
.50. Second premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for 
Brown Leghorns. 
$1.00. First premium to Frank Oilman, Topsfieid, for 
Bronze Turkeys. 
D. B. Wallace, S. D. Berry, John F. Jackson, George 
W. Tufts — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WrrH TWO HORSES. 

$G. First premium to Durkee Bros., West Peabody, 

" Hussey Plough." 
$4. Second premium to Phillips Farm. Beverly, " Fr3-e Co. 
Plough." 
W. S. Phillips, Jr., Chas. W. Nelson, C. E. Hinkley, F. 
W. Lj-ford — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES, SWIVEL 

PLOUGH. 

$6. First premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, " Hub- 
bell Plough."' 

$4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 
" 76 A Plough." 
Charles H. Preston, Henry McLawlin, David Warren, 
Fred A. Dodee — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH SULKEY PLOUGH, TWO AND 
THREE HORSES. 

$6. First premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, two 
horses, '"• National Plough." 



43 

i6. First premium to Durkee Bros., West Peabody, three 

horses, -'' National Plough." 
li. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, two horses, 

" National Plough." 
G. R. Dodge, J. C. Underbill, G. S. Phippen— Comm/«eg. 



PLOUGHING BY BOYS FIFTEEN YEARS OLD AND 

UNDER. 

$S. First premium to Charles S. Little, Merrimac, " Frye 
No. 50 Plough.'' 
Benj. P. Ware, E. Pope Barrett, J. D. Drew, A. P. 

Fuller — Committee. 



HARROWS. 

). First premium to Newhall & Colcord, Danvers, for 

" Thomas Disc Harrow.'' 
L Second premium to Blake & Johnson, Peabody, for 

" Acme Harrow." 
Asa T. Newhall— /or the Committee. 



CARRIAGES. 

Gratuity to E. C. Hopkins & Co., Merrimac, for 
Goddard Buggy. 

Gratuity to E. C. Hopkins & Co., Merrimac, for 
Sedan Stanhope Buggy. 

Gratuity to C. E. Gunnison, Merrimac, for Bicycle 
Road Buggy. 

Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for Open Stan- 
hope Buggy. 



44 

$2. Gratuity to T. W. Lane, Amesbuiy, for Top Stanhope 

Buggy. 
$S. Gratuity to Pike & Whipple, Peabody, for Bakers 

Wagon. 
$3. Gratuity to Pike & Whipple, Peabody, for Milk 

Wagon. 
George E. Daniels, Erastus Clark, Elmer A. Lothrop — 
Committee. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

$5-. Gratuity to S. D. Hinoxman, No. Andoyer, for Horse 
Cart. 

$2. Gratuity to S. D. Hinoxman, No. Andover, for Farm 
Wagon. 

$8. and Diploma to Newhall & Col cord, Dan vers, for 
Collection of Implements. 

$S. Gratuity to Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for Col- 
lection of Implements. 

$1. Gratuit}" to Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for Onion 
Weeder. 

$1. Gratuity to Whitcomb & Carter, Beveiiy, for Bone 
Mill. 

$2. Gratuity to Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for 2 Mow- 
ing Machines. 

•f2. Giatuity to James A. Roome, Peabody, for Horse 
Cart. 

$2. , Gratuity to D. A. Small, West Peabody, for 3 sets 
Double Runners. 

$2. Gratuity to Geo. E. Daniels, Rowley, for Two Horse 
Cart. 

i2. (iratuity to Geo. E. Daniels, Rowley, for Pair of 
Wheels in Wood. 



45 

Gratuity to George E. Daniels, Rowle}', for Sled 

Gear. 
Gratuity to Kress Brothers, Lawrence, for Market 

Wagon. 
Gratuity to J. W. Goodhue, Ipswich, for Fritz Horse 

Hoe. " 
Gratuity to J. W. Goodhue, Ipswich, for Collection 

of Ploughs. 
Gratuity to Pike & Whipple, Peabody, for Market 

Wagon. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS. 

There were but fourteen exhibitors in this department, 
yet the exhibit was a large one, both in number and vari- 
ety, by reason of the fine display of imj)lements made by 
Messrs. Newhall & Co. of Danvers, Whitcomb & Carter of 
Beverly, and J. W. Goodhue of Ipswich, making the num- 
ber of different articles not far from one hundred. Of the 
various new plows, the committee, not having before them 
an}^ test of their merits, have nothing to affirm other than 
wonder that, when in the gang reversible and alternate 
plows there is so much improvement over the hand land- 
side class, the public are so slow to adopt them. One of 
the most striking of the new implements, which was ex- 
bibited for the first time this season, was a hand onion 
weeder, the invention of Zephaniah Breed, who originated 
the famous " Breed weeder." It was on the same princi- 
ple as that valuable labor saver, being a series of long steel 
teeth mounted on wheels. Mr. Carter informed us that he 
had sold several, and that it gave great satisfaction on land 
that was-not too heavy, if used before the onions broke 



46 

ground, and its use was repeated whenever the weeds could 
be barely seen. We regret not to have come in contact 
with some onion-grower who had made use of it. I 
anticipate great help from it to the farmers of our 
onion-raising county, from an experience, covering 
several 3'ears, with the larger horse weeder on corn, peas, 
and other crops. The later and heavier horse-weeder, of 
which there was a sample on exhibition, I have used, but 
am not satisfied with its work ; it is altogether too heavy, 
and consequently digs into the ground too deeply, while 
it is too great a burden to lift clear of tlie stones, frag- 
ments of turf, weeds or corn butts it gathers up in its pro- 
gress over the surface, and if it is not promptly cleared of 
these they act almost like plows in furrowing the soil and 
tearing up the young plants. The old original form is 
much lighter and of more practical value, in my experi- 
ence with bo-th forms of them. 

Another valuable new implement is the Drader's Spade 
Harrow. After a season's trial of its merits, I decidedly 
prefer it to Clark's cutaway and several other varieties of 
the disc harrows I have used from time to time, for it cuts 
deeper into the soil. There was an Acme on exhibition. 
This, though an excellent pulverizer and a good smoother 
on land comparatively free from stone, on our average New 
England soil has failed to give satisfaction, and the call for 
it is so rare that dealers tell me it is not kept in stock 
in the agricultural stores of Boston. Probably one reason 
for the dissatisfaction of the public with the Acme was be- 
cause the frame work and teeth went through so many 
changes it was difficult, and sometimes impossible, to match 
broken parts. It is wise when discussing whether or not 
to purchase any farm implement to know how far you may 
have to send to renew broken parts, and also to know what 
will be the price of such parts, for I have found it at times 



47 

excessive, altogetlier out of proportion to the original cost 
of the entire implement, suggesting the thought that the 
manufacturer, knowing that he had you in his power, had 
planned, when fixing his prices, to make the utmost out of 
his victims. 

The Chain-geer Buckeye Mower exhibited by Messrs. 
Whitcomb & Carter is very simple m its construction, 
lighter in draft than the old Buckeye, and is easily thrown 
out of geer by the foot. The same firm exhibited a new 
style of basket for the gathering of apples and similar 
fruit, of about the form and size of a peach basket ; the 
bottom was divided into two parts, each joined to the body 
by a hinge ; when the filled basket was lowered to the bot- 
tom of the barrel a pressure on a wire projection on its 
side opened the bottom. The same idea I saw worked out 
in a fruit basket exhibited at the Philadelphia centennial 
by a man from California, and the wonder is that it has 
taken 20 years to reach New England. 

A wheel spring tooth pulverizing harrow, exhibited by 
Henry Newhall & Co., with a straight tooth harrow at- 
tachment, had a look of utility, and was said to do good 
work. We regard the Russian farmers as but little more 
than half civilized, yet they have an implement the equiv- 
alent of which I have never seen at any of our fairs — a 
harrow following a plow, and the two worked by the same 
team. The result, of course, must be rough work, yet 
under some circumstances the saving of time may make it 
valuable to the farmer. 

Frye's horse hoe, a modification of the old Chandler 
horse hoe, exhibited by Mr. Goodhue and others, is a great 
labor-saving implement, especially for those who continue 
to hill their potatoes or corn, for it will do the work far 
better than by hand, in but a fraction of the time. It can 
also be used to open furrows for planting, and to cover 



48 

them after they are phinted, to the great saving of both 
labor and time. 

Mr. Fuller's new onion hoes had merit in them. Mr. F. 
was the inventor of the finger weeder, and has worked his 
inventive ideas into several of our best agricultural imple- 
ments. 

James J. H. Gregory, Chairman, 

For the Committee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

i25. First premium to Laui-el Grange of West Newbury. 
Sherman Nelson, .Tames W. Bond, Mrs. David Warren 

— Committee. 



DAIRY. 

S<5. First premium to Oscar Gowen, West Newbury, for 
Butter. 

#3. Second j)remium to Mrs. C. W. Gowen, West New- 
bury, for Butter. 
Mrs. B. H. Farnbam, George F. Sanger, John E.'Her- 

rick — Committee. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

$2.00. First premium to Annie C. Horsch, Rowley, jfor 

White Bread. 
'91.00. Second premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 

for White Bread. 
$2.00. First premium to Miss Nora Ford, Peabody,por 

Graham Bread. 
SI. 00. Second premium to Mrs. Mary E. Osborn, Peabody, 

for Graham Bread. 
•'^2.00. First premium to Miss Carrie S. Dummer, Rowley, 

for Rye Bread. 



50 

$1.00. Second premium to Miss Amy H. Poor, Peabody, 

for Brown Bread. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. C. O. Barker, No. Andover, 

for Preserved Fruit. 
'tl.OO. Second premium to Mrs. Thomas Wilson, Pea- 
body, for Porter Ap[)le Jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George F. Watkins, Peabody, 

for Nut Cake, 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Brooks, Peabody, for Plum 

Cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Olivia J. Spencer, Peabody, for Cake. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Nora Ford, Peabody, for White 

Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Annie W. Coakley, Peabody, for 

Oatmeal Bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. White, Danvers, for Jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George B. Miller, Peabody, for 

Preserved Fruits. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Jessie Smith, Peabody, for Pi-e- 

served Fruits and Jellies. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Charles W. Davis, Peabody, for 

Preserved Fruits. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. II. Goulding, Peabody, for 

Preserved Fruits. 
J. Scott Todd, Mrs. Thomas Carroll, Mrs. N. M. Quint. 
Mrs. S. L. Sawyer- — Committee. 



BEES, HIVES AND HONEY. 

■it52. First premium to Warren M. Cole, Boxford, for Honey. 
.fl. Second premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 
Honey. 
Henry Alley, John J. Gould, B. F. Patoli— Coww/ .^''. 



51 

PEARS. 

i2.00. First premium to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for 

Bartlett. 
$2.00. First premium to Charles E. Brown, Peabody, for 

Belle Lucrative. 
$2.00. First premium to J. M. Teal, Lynn, for Bosc. 
$2.00. First premium to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

d'Anjou. 
$2.00. First premium to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

Clairgeau. 
$2.00. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Duchess. 
$2.00. First premium to Wm. P. Hutchinson, Danvers, 

for Dana's Hovey. 
$2.00. First premium to A. VV. Beny, Peabody, for 

Lawrence. 
$2.00. First premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Louis Bonne. 
$2.00. First premium to Charles Haven, Peabody, for 

Paradise. 
$2.00. First premium to Charles Haven, Peabody, for 

Howell. 
$2.00. First premium to G. F. Bailey, Peabody, for Seckels 
$2.00. First premium to C. H. Ramsdell, Lynn, for. 

Sheldon. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Urban- 

iste. 
$3.00. First [)remium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Collec- 
tion. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for V^icar. 
$3.00. First premium, to Charles F. Ropes, Salem, for Col- 
lection. 
$2.00. Fust premium, to Joseph Forness, Peabody, for 

Onondaoo. 



52 

81.50 First piemlura, to A. Dudley Johnson, Saugus, for 

Dudley's Houghton. 
il.OO. Gratuity, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Louis Bonne. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to J. M. Teal, Lynn, for Seckel. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to J. M. Teal, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 
#1.00. Gratuity, to Moses Rich, Lynn, for Sheldon. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to P. P. Cotter, Salem, for Bartlett. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to G. F. Bailey, Peabody, for Bosworth. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to C. G. Mears, Danvers, for Sou de Con- 
gress. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to George Barnaby, Peabody, for Clair- 

geau. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Law- 
rence. 

The committee find that the two collections of pears are 
so nearly alike that they have decided to divide the two 
premiums, the first and second between Edwin Bates, of 
Lynn, and Charles F. Ropes, of Salem, giving to each 
three dollars. 

P. M. Neal, W. H. B. Currier, Geo. W. Chadwick, W. 
Burke Little — Committee. 

The Houghton Horticultural Society, of Lynn, has in- 
troduced to us for the first time a new pear raised from 
the seed of the Bartlett, by Mr. A. Dudley Johnson, of 
East Saugus. some ten years since. He has exhibited it 
several times at the annual exhibitions of the Houghtons, 
and by them it has been named the Dudley Houghton. 
The tree is perfectly hard}-, of upright symmetrical growth, 
having many of the peculiarities of the parent tree, par- 
ticularly in the color and growth of the new shoots. The 
size of the fruit is from medium to large, but not so large 
as the Bartlett. Its form is pyramidical, or pear shape. 



53 

and it is nearl}- covered by a slight russet, but turning yel- 
low at maturity. The stem is inserted in a very slight de- 
pression, but sometimes by a lip. The calyx is open and 
also inserted in a slight depression. The fruit is buttery, 
and perfectly melting, sweet and sprightly, free from that 
strong Bartlett flavor ( which is rather disagreeable to 
manj^ ), but having one peculiar to itself. 

It ripens from the tenth to the thirtieth of October. 

We think it a pear of great promise, and well^vorthy of 
a trial, particularly as it ripens so much later than the 
Bartlett. 

P. AI. Neal — For and hij the' direction of the Committee. 



APPLES. 

.$2.00. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

Sweet Baldwin. 
$2.00. First premium to Charles Mooney, Salem, for 

Roxbury Russett. 
$2.00. First premium to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for 

Drap d"Or. 
$2.00. First premium to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

Smith's Cider. 
$1.50. First premium to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

McLitosh Red. 
$2.00. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Porter. 
$2.00. First premium to Lyman Osborne, Peabody, for 

Danvers Sweet. 
$1.50. First premium to H. P. Farnham, Peabody, for 

Hyslcp Crab. 
$2.00. First premium to George Pratt, Danvers, for Hurl- 

burt. 



54 

$2.00. First premium to George Pratt, Danvers, for 

Hunt's Russett. 
$2.00. First premium to G. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Tompkins King. 
$2.00. First premium to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for Bald- 
win. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. B. N. Moore, Peabody, for 

Tolman Sweet. 
$1.50. First premium to Thomas P. Hale, Rowley, for 

Spitzenburg. 
$1.50. 4^1rst premium to P. H. Sanger, Peabody. for 

Northern Spy. 
$1.50. First premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 

Wagner. 
$2.00. First premium to INlrs. David Warren, Swampscott, 

for Pick man Pippin. 
$2.00. First premium to Lyman S. Wilkins, Topsfield, for 

Gravenstein. 
$2.00. First premium to Warren M. Cole, Boxford, for 

Red Russett. 
$2.00. First premium to Warren M. Cole, Boxford, for 

Snow. 
$2.00. First premium to Solomon Fuller, Danvers, for 

Bailey Sweet. 
$2.00. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Hubbardston. 
$2.00. First premium to George B. Austin, Boxford, for 

R. I. Greening. 
.50. Gratuity to J. C. George, Danvers, for Porter. 
.50. Gratuity to B. F. Southwick, Peabody, for Sweet 

Baldwin. 
.75. Gratuity to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for R. I. 

Greening. 
.50. Gi-atuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Wealthy. 



55 

.75. Grutuity to George B. Austin, Boxford, for T^)l- 
man Sweet. 

.oO. Gratuity to George B. Austin, Boxford, for Brad- 
ford Nonesuch. 

.75. Gratuity to Thomas P.. Hale, Rowley, for Graven- 
stein. 

.75. Gratuity to Thomas P. Hale, Rowley, for Tomp- 
kins' King. 

.50. Gratuity to Thomas P. Hale, Rowley, for Gilli- 
flower. 

.50. Gratuity to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for Hurl- 
burt. 

.50. Gratuity to J. N. Rolf,. Newbury, for Rolf apple. 

.75. Gratuity to Michael Shea, Lawrence, for Baldwin. 

.50. Gratuity to Lyman S. Wilkins, Topsfield, for Detroit 
Red. 

.75. Gratuity to Henry Verry, Danvers, for Hubbard- 
ston. 

.75. Gratuity to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for Roxbury 
Russett. 

.75. Gratuity to Charles F. Knight, Newbury, for Snow. 

.75. Gratuity to J. S. Southwick, Peabody, for Dana's 
Sweet. 

.50. Gratuity to Michael Shea, Lawrence, for Hawley. 

.50. Gratuity to George Deible, Peabody, for Clitton. 

.50. Gratuity to George]K. Walton, Peabody, for Wal- 
ton. 

.50. Gratuity to Blake & Johnson, Peabody, for Wil- 
liams Favorite. 

.50. Gratuity to Chester S. Cook,Wenham, for a name. 

.50. Gratuity to J. M. Fall, Ipswich, for Canada Red. 

B. F. Huntington, A. C. Osborne, S. G. Sargent, Thomas 
P. Hale — Committee. 



56 

PEACHES, GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUIT. 

f!7.00. Gratuity to W. P. Hutchinson, Danveivs, for collee. 
tion, 10 varieties. 

$3.00. First premium to C. B. Haven, Peabody, for Con- 
cord Gi-apes. 

.$3.00. First premium to (i. W. Stickney, Beverly, for 
Black Hamburg. 

$3.00. Second premium to Lyman Osborn, Peabody, for 
Delaware. 

$3.00. First premium to S. J. Barr, Lawrence, for Martha. 

$3.00. First premium to S. J. Barr, Lawrence, for Worden 
Seedling. 

$3.00. First premium to S. C. Lord, Peabody, for Isabella. 

$4.00. First premium to J. M. Teal, Lynn, for Black Ham- 
l)urg. 

$3.00. First premium to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Eaton. 

$1.00. Gratuity to Henry Stone, Lynn, for lona. 

$4.00. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for collection, 10 
varieties. 

$1.00. Gratuit}'^ to Edwin' Bates, L^nin, for Worden. 

$1.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Thomas Wilson, Peabody, for plate 
of Grapes. 

$1.50. Gratuity to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Concord. 

$2.00. Gratuity to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for 10 varieties- 

$1.00. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Niagara. 

$1.00. Gratuity to Robert Hamilton, Peabody, for Niagara. 

$1.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. Raddin, Peabody, for Moore's 
Diamond. 

$1.00. Gratuity to N. R. Waite, Ipswich, for Niagara. 

$1.50. Gratuity to owaier unknown. 

$1.00. Gratuity to T. H. Jackman, Peabody, for Poek- 
linofton. 

$2.00. First premium to G. \V. Richardson, Lynn, for Pur- 
ple Egg Plums. 



57 

f 2.00. First premiums to J. W. Goodell, Lynn, for Impe- 
rial Gage Plums. 
-fl.OO. Gratuity to C. F. Knight, Newbury, for Green 

Gage Seedling Plum. 
fl.OO. Gratuity to \V. K. Cole, Boxford, for Lombard 

Plums. 
$-1.00. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Basket 

Assorted Fruit. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Orange 

Quince, 
f 3.00. First premium, to George A. Waite, Danvers, for 

Orange Quince. 
•$3.00. First premium, to Henrj^ Patch, Wenham, for 

Quinces. 
1*1.00. Gratuity to C. O. Barker, No. Andover, for Orange 

Quinces. 
J. W. Goodell, James W. Bond, C. B. Haven— Com- 
mittee. 



PLANTS. 

$1.00. First premium to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for 

10 Coleus. 
5.00. First premium to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for 

25 specimens of Plants. 
1.00. First premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 

for collection of Gloxinias. 
1.00. First premium to Miss Lizzie Webster, Peabody, 

for collection of Begonias. 
1.00. First premium to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, 

for root of Begonias. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Beo'onias. 



58 

.60. (rratuity to Mrs. J. E. Cole, Peabody, for Fuschias. 

.60. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnliam, Peabody, for 
Geraniums. 

.75. Gratuity to Charles F. Ropes, Salem, for collection 
• of Coleus. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. H. Wliidden, Salem, for Bego- 
nia. 

.75. Gratuity to Samuel Trask, Peabody, for Cotton 
Plant. 

.50. Gratuity to R. B. Mackintosh, Peabod3% for Brug- 
mansia. 

.50. Gratuity to Lewis Southwick, Peabody, for Cox 
combs. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. L. M. Weston, Hamilton, for 
Lace Cactus. 

.50. Gratuity to Charles Hatch, Peabody, for Tobacco 
Plant. 

.50. Gratuity to J. M. Teal, Lynn, for Fern. 

.50. Gratuity to D. M. Wagner, Peabody, for Begonias. 

.50. Gratuity to A. H. Manning, Peabody, for Begonias, 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. H. Williams, Salem, for Bego- 
nias. 
1. 00. Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for 
Nophrolepsic Exaltata. 

Ettore Tassinari, Mrs. W. B. Little, Miss C. I. Chadwick 
— Committee. 



FLOWERS. 

53.00. First premium to Mrs. Julia A. Cain, Lynn,, for 100 
specimens, 50 varieties, cut flowers. 

2.00. First premium to Mrs. Julia A. Cain, Lynn, for 
double Geraniums. 



59 

1.00. First premium to Mrs. Julia A. Cain, Lynn, for 

single Geraniums. 
3.00. First premium to Chester Dwyer, Lynn, for 100 

specimens, 50 varieties, native flowers. 
1.00. First premium to Curtis H. Dwyer, Lynn, for pair 

bouquets native flowers. 
3.00. First premium to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, 

for floral design of greenhouse and cut flowers. 
1.00. First premium to J. C. Vickary,Lynn, for bouquets 

garden flowers. 
1.00. First premium to J. C. Vickary, Lynn, for garden 

annuals. 
1.00. First premium to Mrs. George E. (Jain, Lynn, for 

Calendulas. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George E. Cain, Lynn, for Nastur- 
tiums. 
1.00. First premium to Miles Burke, Lynn, for basket of 

wild flowers. 
1.00. First premium to Susie Vickary, Lynn, for basket 

flowers. 
2.00. First premium to Emily F. Carlton, No. Andover, 

for floral design. 
1.00. Second premium to Susie Vickar}-, Lynn, for floral 

design. 
3.00. Gratuity to Danvers Hospital, for floral design. 
1.00. Second premium to R. B. Mackintosh, Peabody, 

for Native and Introduced AVeeds. 
1.00. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Can- 

nas. 
1.00. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 
Petunias. 
.50. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for garden 

flowers. 
1.00. First premium to George Deibel, Peabody, for 

Verbenas. 



6o 

1.00. First premium to F. E. Hobart, Feabody, for Vic- 
toria Asters. 
1.00. First premium to F. E. Hobart, Feabody, for 

Fompon Asters. 
1.00. First premium to Mrs. H. H. ]\Iorton, Feabody, for 

Drum. Fhlox. 
1.00. First premium to Mrs. Z. A.Eaton, Lynn, for Nas- 
turtiums. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary A. Eaton, Lynn, for branching 

Asters. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary A. Eaton, L3'nn. for Fetunias. 
1.00. First premium to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for Fansies. 
1.00. First premium to Albert E. Cain, Lynn, for Afri- 
can ]\Iarigolds. 
LOO. First premium to J. H. Farker, Lynn, for double 

Zinnias. 
1.00. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for Cox- 
combs. 
1.00. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for double 

Marigolds. 
1.00. First premium to Wilbur Moore, L3ain, for Scabi- 

osas. 
1.00. First premium to Charles Ropes, Salem, for Dian- 

thus. 
1.00. First premium to Gerta Johnson, Peabod}', for 
Sweet Peas. 
.50. Gratuity to Emily F. Carlton, No. Andover, for 

bouquet Drum. Phlox. 
.50. Gratuity to Emily F. Carlton, No. Andover, for 

Verbenas. 
.50. Gratuity to Emily F. Carlton, No. Andover, for 

Floral Design. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Geo. L. Averill, No. Andover, for 
Floral Desiofu. 



6i 

.50 Gratuity to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for Peren- 
nial Sunflower. 

.50. Gratuity to Georgia Ingalls, Peabod3% for Dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Kate Forness, Peabody, for Dahlias. 
1.00. Gratuity to Charles H. Haskell, Lynn, for Show 

Dahlias. 
1.00. Gratuity to Charles H. Haskell, Lynn, for Pompon 
Dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. James Buxton, Peabody, for 
Flowering Dahlias. 
1.00. Gratuity to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for Dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Minnie Osborne, Peabody, for Ver- 
benas. 

.50. Gi'atuity to Warren Bushby,Lynn, for Nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Stephen Osborn, Peabody. for 
Marigolds. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Dorward, Methuen, for 
Dwarf Marigolds. 

.50. Gratuity to C. A. Buxton, Salem, for Scabiosas. 

.50. Gratuity to John C. P . Legro, Danvers, for Hy- 
drangeas. 

.50. Gratuity, to Lilly Wright, Peabody, for Asters. 

.50. Gratuity, to INL-s. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
Gladiolas. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George Morrill, Salem, for Fall 
Anemones. 

.50. Gratuity, to Arthur L. Southwiek, Peabody, for 
Cosmos. 

Edward E. Woodman, Mrs. C. N. S. Homer, Mrs. David 
Warren, Mrs. George F. Osgood, Mrs. F. E. Hobart — Com- 
mittee. 



VEGETABLES, FIRST CLASS. 

•$2.00. First premium, to Wm. Burke Little, Newbury, 
for Eclipse Beets. 



62 

2.00. First preiniuin, to Win. Burke Little, Newbury, 

for Dewings Beets. 
2.00. First premium, to Wm. Burke Little. Newbuiy. 

for Edmauds Beets. 
2.00. First premium, to Wm. Burke Little, Newbury. 

for Short Horn Carrots. 
2.00. First premium to N. A. Bushby, Peabody, for 

Parsnips. 
2.00. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

Cranberries. 
2.00. First premium to Robert Wilson, Peabody, for 

Purple Top Turnips. 
2.00. First premium to Nathan Bushby, Peabody, for 

Collection. 
2.00. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Man- 
gold Wurtzels. 
2.00. First premium to George B. Austin, Boxford, for 

Crosby Corn. 
2.00. First premium to John H. George, Methuen, for 

Danvers Carrots. 
2.00. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Country Gentlemen's Corn. 
1.00. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabod3% for Ed- 

mands Beets. 
.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Dan- 
vers Carrots. 
2.00. First premium to H. A. Stiles, Middleton, for 

White Top Turnips. 
.50. Gratuity to H. A. Stiles, Middleton, for Red Top 

Turnips. 
.50. Gratuity to W. A. .Tacobs, Danvers, for Parsnips. 
1.00. Second premium to Andrew Lane, Rockport, for 

Cranberries. 
.50. Gratuity to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Mangold Wurtzels. 



63 

.50. Gratuity to L. G. Moulton, Peabody, for Rhubarb. 
John Q. Evans, Albert Emerson, T. J. King. — Commit- 
tee. 



VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

12.00. First premium to Durkee Bros., West Peabody, for 

Celery. 
1.00. Second premium to Durkee Bros., West Peabody, 

for Cauliflower. 
2.00. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Red Cabbage. 
2.00. First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham. for 

Savoy Cabbage. 
2.00. First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Stone Tomatoes. 
2.00. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Bruns- 
wick Cabbage. 
2.00. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for All 

Seasons Cabbage. 
2.00. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Butman 

Squash. 
2.00. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Clark's 

No. 1 Potatoes. 
2.00. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Beauty 

of Hebron Potatoes. 
2.00. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Pearl 

of Savoy Potatoes. 
2.00. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Maine Potatoes. 
2.00. First premium to Asa T. Newhall, Lynn, for Stone 

Mason Cabbage. 
1.00. Second premium to Asa T. Newhall, Lynn, for 

Bay State Squash. 



64 

2.00. First premium to David Warren, Swampscott, for 

Hubbard Squash. 
2.00. First premium to David Warren, Swampscott, for 

Warren Squash. 
2.00. First premium to David Warren, Swampscott, for 

Danvers Onion. 
2.00. First premium to George A. Rogers, No. Andover, 

for Essex Hybrid Squash. 
1.00. Second premium to George A. Rogers, No. Ando- 
ver, for Clark's No. 1 Potatoes. 
2.00. First premium to N. A. Bushby, Peabody, for Bay 

State Squash. 
1.00. Second premium to N. A. Bushby, Peabody, for 

Sibley Squash. 
2.00. First premium to Blake & Johnson, Peabody, for 

Sibley Squash. 
2.00. First premium to Edw. E. White, West Peabody, 

for Livingston Tomato. 
.50. Gratuity to Edw. E. White, West Peabody, for 

Cucumbers. 
.50. Gratuity to Edw. E. White, West Peabody, for 

Early North Potatoes. 
2.00. First premium to Wm. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

Flat Onions. 
2.00. First premium to Wm. Burke. Little, Newbury, for 

Red Onions. 
1.00. Second premium to John W. Parkhurst, Boxford, 

for Beauty of Hebron Potatoes. 
2.00. First premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Early Rose Potatoes. 
2.00. First premium to E. Pope Barrett, for New Queen 

Potatoes. 
1.00. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Red Cabbage. 



65 

1.00. Gratuity to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Brunswick 
Cabbage. 

1.00. Gratuity to George A. Rogers, No. Andover, for 
Cauliflower. 

1.00. Gratuity to George A. Rogers, No. Andover, for 
Tomatoes. 

1.00. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Warren Squash. 

1.00. Second premium to Wentworth Winchester, Pea- 
body, for Early Rose Potatoes. 

1.00. Second premium to George B. Austin, Boxford, 
for Essex Hybrid Squash. 

1.00. Second premiuhi to Warren M. Cole, Boxford, for 
Pearl of Savoy Potatoes. 

1.00. Second premium to Warren M. Cole, Boxford, for 
Early Maine Potatoes. 

1.00. Gratuity to Warren M. Cole, Boxford, for Salmon 
Flesh Melons. 

1.00. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Drum- 
head Cabbage. 

1.00. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Early 
Northern Potatoes. 

1.00. Gratuity to S. F. Newman, Newljury, for Warren 
Stone Mason Cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity to S. F. Newman. Newbury, for Flat 
Onions. 

1.00. Gratuity to R. H. Wilson, Peabody, for Stone Ma- 
son Cabbage. 

1. 00. Gratuity to R. H. Wilson, Peabod}^ 'for Hender- 
son Cabbage. 

1.00. Gratuity to C. H. Norton, Peabody, for Stone Ma- 
son Cabbage. 

1.00. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Mar- 
row Squash. 



66 

1.00. Gratuity to A. K. Hutcliiiisoii, Peabody, for Hub- 
bard Squash. 

1.00. Gratuity to Durkee Bros., West Peabody, for Dan- 
vers Onions. 

1.00. Gratuity to Edwin Rates, Lynn, for Hubbard 
S(juash. 

1.00. Gratuity to W. B. Kimball. Peabody, for Crook- 
neck Squash. 

I.OO. Gratuity to Edward Giddings, Peabody, for Crook- 
neck Squash. 

1.00. Gratuity to William B. Carlton, Danvers, for 
Mush Melons. 

1.00. Gratuity to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for Nutmeg 
Melon. 

1.00. Gratuity to George A. Rogers, No. Andover, for 
Tomatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for Hamp- 
den Chief Potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity to J. E. Bliss, Salem, for White Star Po- 
tatoes. 

Nathan A. Bushby, Thaddeus Hale, F. A. Russell — 
Committee. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

>i«2.00. First' premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Yel- 
low Rice Pop Corn. 

3.00. First premium to II. M. Killam, Boxford, for 25 
ears Field Corn. 

•2.00. Second premium to L. H. Bailey, West Newbury, 
for 25 ears Field Corn. 

1.00. First premium to II. M. Killam, Boxford, for peck 
of Shelled Corn. 



67 

1.00. First premium to D. H. Flint, West Newbury, for 

Yellow Eyed Beans. 
1.00. First premium to W. Iv. Cole, Boxford, for peck of 

Seed Oats. 
1.00. Second premium to J. D. Wright, Peabody, for 

Pop Corn. 

Otis Brown, E. E. Ferguson, David F. Haskell — Com- 
mittee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

•13.00. First premium to Mrs. John F. Boynton, Grove- 
land, for Memorial Quilt. 

2.00. Second premium to ^Irs. Grace Martin Stevens, 
Peabody, for Silk Quilt. 

1.00. Gratuity to Harriet L. Blake, Beverly, for Counter- 
pane. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Lawrence Martineau, Peabody, 
for Counterpane. 

1.00. Gratuity to Myra C. Blake, Danvers, for Silk 
Quilt. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mary J. Barker, No. Andover, for Silk 
Quilt. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Franklin Orton, Peabod}^ for 
Crochet Quilt. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Oliver Lane, Peabody, for Knit 
Quilt. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. Baker, Peabody, for Knit 
Afghan. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Alvin Shaw, Peabody, for Cro- 
chet Quilt. 

1.00. Gratuity to Miss Anna W. Bushby, Peabody, for 
Crochet Quilt. 



68 

1.00. Gratuity to Miss Eiiima Carter, Danvers, for Silk 
Quilt". 

1.00. (xratuity to ('. J. Batclielder, Danvers, for Afghan. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. N. K. Stanley, Newburyport, for 
Crochet Quilt. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. George C. Cain, Lynn, for Darn- 
ing. 

1. 00. Gratuity to Mrs. Thomas Wellman. Lynniield, for 

Patch Quilt. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. John N. Cole, Andover, for 
Spread and Shams. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. Dansucan, Peabody, for 
Counterpane. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. O. Tetnant, Peabody, for Coun- 
terpane. 

.75. Gratuity to JNIiss Lavina E. Keith, Peabody, for 
Cotton Quilt. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. \V. H. White, Peabody, for Cro- 
chet Quilt. 

.75. Gratuity to Mary B. Honeycomb, Peabody, for 
Patch Quilt. 

.75. Gratuit}^ to Mrs. E. C. Knowles, Danvers. for Patch 
Quilt. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. John C. Putnam, Danvers, for 
Patch Quilt. 

.50. Gratuit}' to Mrs. John C. Putnam, Danvers, for 
Patch Quilt. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Kenizls, Peabody, for Crib Quilt. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. M. B. Eaton, Lynnfield. for 
Afghan. 

.75. (xratuity to Miss Anna Carter, Danvers, for Silk 
Quilt. 

Mrs. Richard Newell, iMrs. Walter H. Sargent, Miss 
Bessie M. Swan, Mrs. Wni. K. Cole — Committee. 



69 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 
i2.00. First premium to Mrs. C. C. Roberts, Salem, for 
Drawn Rug. 
1.50. First premium to Mrs. John Legro, Dan vers, for 

Knit Rug. 
1.00. First premium to Mary J. Crusey, Beverly, for 

Braided Rug. 
1.00. First premium to Minnie E. Murphy, Peabody, for 
Knit Mat. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. J. A. Trask, Peabod}^ for Braided 

Rug. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. John K. Cole, Peabody, for Flan- 
nel Rug. 
/ .75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. J. Hood, Beverly, for Knit 

Rug. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mi's. H. Rhodes, Peabody, for Drawn 
Rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Laura J. Reed, Peabody, for Knit 

Rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs J. W. Thomas, Peabody, for 

Braided Rugs. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Roberts, Salem, for Braid- 
ed Rug. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Monies, Peabody, for Sheepskin 
Mat. 
.50. Gratuity to Benjamin Pond, Salem, for Fox Skin- 
Anna L. Cole, Kate M. Barker, F. O. Perkins — Com- 
mittee. 



ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

$3.00. First premium to Herbert Gardner, Peabody, for 
Team Harness. 



^o 

3.00. First premium to Tlioinas F. Hill, Georgetown, for 

Carriage Harness. 
3.00. First premium to Charles M. Turner, Danvers, for 

Express Harness. 
1.00. Gratuity to W. W. Bennett, Lynn, for Exhibit of 

Shoes. 
2.00. Gratuity to N. J. Carre w & Co., Lawrence, for 
Carryall Harness. 
Diploma to N. J. Carrew & Co., Lawrence, for General 

Exhibit. 
Diploma to Warren Shaw & Co., Peabocly, for Best Ex- 
hibit of Shoes. 
Diploma to E. A. & R. F. Daley, Salem, for Trunks and 
Bags. 
Hiram N. Harriman, Lyman Osborn, Thomas Carroll — 
Committee. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHAN- 
DISE. 

Diploma to Geo. A. Knight, Peabocly, for 6 Sheepskin jNIats. 

Diploma to H. W. JNIoore, Peabody, for Case of Fancy Mo- 
rocco. 

Diploma to Newman Perkins & Co., Peabody, for Finished 
Split Leather. 

Diploma to Temar, Lear ifc Co., for one dozen Dongola 
Goat Skins. 

Diploma to Franklin Osborn Co., Peabody, for display of 
Upper Leather. 

Diploma to A. B. Clark, I'eabody, for Display of Skins. 

Diploma to L. B. South wick & Co., Peabody, for Display 
of Skins. 

Diploma to Benjamin N. Moore & Son, Peabody, for India 
Tanned Kid and Goat. 



71 

Diploma to H. C. Lawrence & Co., Peabody, for Display 

of Skins. 
Diploma to Poor & Littlefield, Peabody, for Leather. 
Diploma to C. E. Marsh, Lynn, for Exhibit of Soaps. 
Diploma to R. S. Brown, Salem, for Musical Instruments. 
Diploma to Danvers Bleachery, for Bleached and Colored 

Goods. 
Diploma to Henry E. Holden, Peabody, for Grain Leather. 
Diploma to N. N. Dummer, Rowley, for Bread Cereals. 
Diploma to Treadwell Bros. & Clark, Salem, for ^Morocco. 
3.00. First premium to N. L. Stockwell, Peabody, for 

case of Bonnets. 
1.00. First premium to Mary Doherty, Peabody, for 

Home-made Flannel. 
1.00. First premium to Mrs. Clara & T. E. Hobart, Pea- 
body, for case of Home-made Candy. 
2.00. Gratuity to R. B. Smith, No. Andover, for 2 

Mahogany Tables. 
1.00. Gratuity to E. P. Trask, Peabody, for Yacht. • 
.50. Gratuity to A. Hayes, Peabody, for Mattress. 
.50. Gratuity to William H. Berry, Peabody, for Clover 

Leaf Table. 
Cyras T. Batchelder, Otis Brown, Helen B. Merrill— 
Committee. 



FANCY WORK. 

.50. Gi-atuity to Mis-i M. L. Dodge, Beverl}^, for Child's 
Dress. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss .[. xV. Eldredge, Beverly, for Hand- 
kerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. .]. H. Flanders, Newburyport, for 
Dress. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Wilkinson, Peabody, for 
Mexican work. 



72 

.50. (iiatuity to Mary South wick, Peabody, for Mexi- 
can Avork. 
50. Gratuity to Mrs. H.W. Osborn, Peabody, for Mexi- 
can work. 
.50. Gratuity to Kate E. Coney, Lynntield Centre, for 
Mexican work. 
1.00. Gratuity to Addie J. Hale, Lj-nnfield Centre, for 
Handkerchief. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Sumner, Newburyport, for 

Handkerchief. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Peach, Salem, for Handkerchief. 
.50. Gratuity to ^frs. Frank Taylor, Salem, for Collec- 
tion of Embroideries. 
.75. Gratuity to M. O. l)arrett, Peabody, for Pen and 
Ink Collection. 
1.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. P. Newhall, Lynn, Pen and 

Ink Collection. 
1.50. Gratuity to Miss M. H. Pond, Salem, for Centre- 
piece. 
.75. Gratuity to Maria Osgood, Peabody, for Collec- 
tionof Embroidery. 
1.00. Gratuity to Miss Martin, Marblehead, for Collec- 

lection of Embroidery. 
1.00. Gratuity to Miss J. M. Arnold, Peabody, for Col- 
lection of Embroidery. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Besse, Peabody, for Doiley. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss Ella Quint, Peabody, for two Cen- 
trepieces. 
1.00. . Gratuity to Mrs. A. H. Patten, Salem, for Collec- 
tion of Embroidery. 
1.00. (Jratuity to Mrs. N. S. Sumner, Newburyport, for 
2 pieces of Embroider}^. 
.50. Gratuity to Gertrude Cole Peabody, for Centre- 
piece. 



l3 

.50. Gratuity to Fannie Thomas, Peabody, for Centre- 
piece. 
.75. Gratuity to Ellen Ferness, Peabody, for Centre- 
piece and Doylies. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. J. E. Osborn, Peabody, for 2 Cen- 
trepieces. 
1.50. Gratuity to Alice Sawyer, Peabody, for Embroi- 
dery. 
.50. Gratuity to ^Nlary P. Clifford, Peabody, for Sofa 

Pillow. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Lewis Barr, Peabody, for Shams 

and Quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to ^Irs. J. Sutton, No. Andover, for Sofa 
Pillow. 
1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. L.W. Thacher, Peabody, for Quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Margaret J. Holman, Peabody, for 

Lamp Shade 
.50. Gratuity toMrs. Frank Teel, Peabody, for Flannel 

Skirt. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Christina Wick, Peabod}', for 

Night Caps. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss J. P. Cody, Salem, for Collar. 
1. 00. Gratuit}^ to Mrs. R. P. Marshall, Lynn, for Suit of 

L'nderclothing. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Nellie Pingree, Peabody, for 

Hood. 
.50- Gratuity to Mrs. S. P. C. King, Peabody, for 

Crocheted Edging. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Jennie Tibbetts, Danvers, Table 

]\rats. 
.50. Gratuity to Maude F. Raymond, Beverly, for 

Crocheted Edging. 
.50. Gratuity to Viola Van Vranken, Salem, for Skirt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Franklin Osborn, Peabody, for 
Sack. 



74 

.50. Gratuity to ]Mrs. L. Wilkins, Topsfield, for Skirt 
and Apron. 

.oO. Gratuity to Mrs. Kerrizel, Peabody, for Table Cover. 

.50. Gratuit}^ to Mrs. George Raddin, Peabody, for 
Apion. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. Roberts, Salem, for Hose. 

.50. Gratuity to iNIrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
Pressed Sea Mosses. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Rodie. Peabody, for Bureau Scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Anna Buckley, Peabody, for Towels. 

.50. Gratuit}' to Mrs. Philip Richardson, Lynn, for 
Shams. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Lizzie F. Huse, Methuen, for 
Lace Collar. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Susie Hills, Peabody, for Socks. 
■fLOO. Gratuity to Ida F. Searle, Salem, for Doylies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mis. Warren Symonds, Lj'nn, for Col- 
lection of Embroidery. 

.50. Gratuit}- to Nanc}' Osborn, Peabody, for Center- 
piece. 

.75. Gratuity to Maude Walker, Danvers, for 2 Center- 
pieces and Doylies. 

.50. Gratuity to Fanny P. Thayer, Peabody, for 2 Cen- 
terpieces. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. E. Coffin, Newburyport, for 
Sideboard Cover. 

.50. Gratuity to E. M. Stanley, Newburyport, for Col- 
lection of Embroidery. 
$L00. Gratuity to Mrs. Wentwoith, Danvers, for Collec- 
tion of Embroidery. 

.50. (h-atuity to Mrs. Charles B. Price, Salem, fpr Cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Sarah Mooie, Peabod}', for Cen- 
tei[)iece. 



75 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. \V. N. Clark, Peabody, for Cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Sarah B. Dalton, for Collection of 
Embroidery. 

Mrs. F. C. Merrill, Mrs. L. P. Osborn, Carrie P. Lum- 
mus — Committee . 



WORKS OF ART AND OIL PAINTINGS. 

^2.00. Gratuity to Hattie L. Doret, Salem, for Pastel. 

2.00. Gratuit}' to William Carlin, Peabody, for Charcoal 
work. 

2.00. Gratuity to C. B. Whitman, Lynn, for Oil Paint- 
ing. 

2.00. Gratuity to Frank E. Perkins, Salem, for Platino- 
types. 

2.00. Gratuity to Oscar F. Haskell, Middleton, for col- 
lection of Cards. 

2.00. Gratuity to Arthur Haskell, Middleton, for Oil 
Painting. 

2.00. Gratuity to A. O. Elwell, Danvers, for Water 
Color. 

2 00. Gratuity to E. W. Merrill, Danvers, for Photo- 
graphs. 

2.00. Gratuity to Bertha Goodhue, Beverly, for Water 
Color. 

2.00. Gratuity to Alice E. Trask, Peabody, for Water 
Color. 

2.00. Gratuity to Alice E. Trask, Peabody, for Water 
Color. 

1.00. Gratuity to Bessie L. Southwick, Peabody, for Oil 
Painting. 

1.00. Gratuity to Annie K. Thacher, Peabod}-, for 
Crayon. 



76 

1.00. Gratuity to S. E. Dwyer, Salem, for Water Color. 

1.00. Gratuity to Edith Porter, Peabody, for Oil Paint- 
ing. 

1.00. Gratuity to O. H. Wallace, Peabody, for Oil Paint- 
ing. 

1.00. (xratuity to Mary Tigh, Peabody, for ]\Iirror. 

1.00. Gratuity to Alice Turner, Danvers, for Crayon. 

1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. E. H. Langdon, Danvers, for Pas- 
tel. 

1.00. Gratuity to Annie Symonds, Peabody, for Water 
Color. 

1.00. Gratuity to Bertha Goodhue, Beverly, for Oil 
Painting. 

1.00. Gratuity to Bertha Goodhue, Beverly, for Water 
Color. 

1.00. Gratuity to Alice E. Trask, Peabody, for Water 

Color. 

.50. Gratuity to Mary Marsh, Lynn, for Charcoal work. 

.50. Gratuity to ^lary Marsh, Lynn, for Charcoal work. 

Sarah F. Franklin, Belle D. Hodgdon, Mary A. Grosve- 

nor — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

$2.00. Gratuity to C. B. Whitmam, Lynn, for China. 
1.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Price, Salem, for Jar- 
diniere. 
1.50. Gratuity to Nellie Blaney, Peabody, for Platter. , 
1.50. Gratuity to Alice Breed, Salem, for Vase. 
.50. Gratuity to ^L's. Susie Chase, Peabod}-, for Stamp 

Plate. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary Mullen, Peabody, for Plates. 
L. B. Hathaway, Mrs. N. G. Kimball, ^h-s. J. A. Lam- 
son — Committee. 



n 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

#1.00. First premium to Vergie Brown, Peabody, for 

Apron and Night Shirt. 
1.00. First premium to Maiv ^fulleii, Peabody, for 

Table Cover and Quilt. 
1.00. First premium to Nora Cuddire, Peabody, for Shirt 

and Dress. 
. .50. Gratuity to Mary E. Osgood, Peabody, for Scarf. 
.50. Gratuity to Roger Smith, Peabody, for Scarf. 
.50. Gratuity to George M. Teel, Peabody, for Towel. 
.50. Gratuity to Annie Wilson, Peabod}^ for Pillow 

Case and Skirt. 
.50. Gratuity to Thomas F. Reynolds. Peabody, for 

Scarf. 
.50. Gratuity to Lucy Reynolds, Peabody, for Dress. 
.50. Gratuity to Ella Belyea, Peabody, for Pillow Case 

and Handkerchief. > 

.50. Gratuity to Harris O. Galeucia, Peabody, for 

Tray' Cloth. 
.50. Gratuity to Winefred Upton, Peabody, for Table 

Cloth. 
.50. Gratuity to Carrie Louise U})ton, Peabody, for 

Shirt. 
.75. Gratuity to Arthur Gray, Peabody, for Chamber 

and Parlor Sett. 
.50. Gratuity to Bessie Elliott, Peabody, for Tray 

Cloth. 
.50. Gratuity to Elmer Kimball, Peabody, for Towel. 
.50. (rratuity to Ma])el Mack, Peabody, for Pillow 

Case. 
.50. Gratuity to Marion D. Wells, Peabody, for Doll. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary Goodridge, Peabody, for l*illo\v 

Case. 
.50. Gratuity to Maggie DriscoU, I *eabody, for Crochet 

Lace. 



78 

.50. Gratuity to Lillian Welch, Peabody. for Child's 

Dress. 
.50. Gratuity to Mary Nagle, Peabody, for Dolls. 
.75. Gratuity to Roderick MacNeil, Peabody. for Towel, 

Tray Cloth and Darning. 
.50. Gratuity to Maggie Montgomery, Peabody, for 

Pillow Case. 
Mrs. Samuel B. George, Mrs. George F. Sanger — Com- 
mittee. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ROOT CROPS. 

The Committee on Root Crops have attended to fhe 
duty assigned them and recommend the following pre- 
miums. 

ONIONS. 

To John H. George, of Methuen, first premium, $8.00 

POTATOES. 

To John H. George, of Methuen, first premium, 88.00 

CABBAGE. 

To David Warren, of Swampscott, first premium, $8.00 

TURNIPS. 

To Romulus Jaques, of West Newbur}-, first pre- 
mium ' $8.00 

To James C. Poor, of North Andover, second pre- 
mium, $5.00 

MANGOLD WURTZELS. 

To .James C. Poor, of North Andover, first pre- 
mium, $8.00 

To Fred Stultz, of West Newbury, second pre- 
mium, $5.00 



79 

STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF ONIONS RAISED BY 
JOHN H. GEORGE IN THE TOWN OF METHUEN. 

Methuen, Mass., Oct., 1896. 

The crops of 1894 and 1895 were onions, the fertilizer 
used was the Stockbridge Special Onion Fertilizer, and 
each year there was applied ^ ton on the i acre. This 
year (1896) I applied 1,500 lbs. or at the rate of 1| tons 
per acre ; the ground was ploughed in the fall of 1895 : in 
the spring of 181; 6 it was harrowed with spike tooth har- 
row, brushed with birch brush harrow, dragged and then 
sowed ; the fertilizer was applied with a machine belong- 
ing to a neighbor, the maker's name to me unknown or I 
should like to give it here, as it is one of the most labor- 
saving machines I ever used. 

The seed used was Yellow Globe Danvers, bought of 
Warren Barker, Danvers, Mass. The seed was sown 
April 20tli and my memoranda say the land was in prime 
condition. I used a Blake machine. The rows were 10 
inches between and I sowed on the ^ acre 3^ lbs. of seed. 
It came up finely and grew wonderfully until June 2nd 
when the maggots began to get in their work and for a 
month it was nip and tuck between fertilizer and maggots, 
with fertilizer ahead in the home stretch. 

They were hoed live times, weeded four times, cut up 
with a circu'ar wheel hoe, picked up into 1^ bushel crates 
and stored in onion house. 

The yield was 363 bushels on the half acre or at the 
rate of 726 bushels per acre, of most excellent quality, 
good size and no scullions. This is the third year they 
have been grown on Stockbridge Special Onion Fertilizer 
on the same giound. 

The cost of the crop is as follows : 



8o 

Dr. 

To ploughing, 
*' harrowing, brushing and dragging, 
" seed and sowing, 
'■'• hoeing and weeding, 
" fertilizer and applying, 
" harvesting, 

" interest and taxes on land, 
" topping and marketing, 5c per bushel. 



11 


50 


1 


50 


5 


50 


13 


50 


31 


00 


7 


26 


3 


00 


18 


15 



mi 41 



Cr. 
By 363 bushels onions at 50c., *181 50 

Profit on ^ acre, IslOO 09 

" '^ 1 acre, 200 18 

As prices of produce are away down and the price of 
labor away up in proportion, I have allowed the highest 
price paid for labor and the bottom price for onions, so 
you may see that with the use of a good fertilizer and a 
liberal quantity of it, there is yet a living profit. 
Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

I hereby certify that I have measured the piece of land 
on which grew the piece of onions entered by John H. 
(leorge for premium with the Essex Agricultural Society 
and it contains ^ acre. 

Walter Smith. 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF POTATOES RAISED 
BY -JOHN H. GEORGE IN THE TOWN OF INIETHUEN. 

The crop of 1895 was grass ; no manure. The crop of 
1894 was grass: no niaiiure. The soil is a peat meadow. 



8i 

Ploughed in the fall of 1895. 3 inches deep ; in the spring 
of 1896 the ground was thoroughlj^ harrowed with a disc 
harrow, brushed with a brush harrow, and furrows opened 
with an American Cultivator, 2^ feet between rows. Seed 
cut two eyes on a piece from large potatoes, seed dropped 
10 to 12 inches apart in the rows, covered with the same 
cultivator, brushed twice before the potatoes came up 
lengthwise of the rows, cultivated once, earthed up once 
witli cultivator, Paris greened once ; at the same time there 
was made an application of the copper solution recom- 
mended by the ^lassachusetts Experiment Station ; they 
were then left until digging time. 

There were 12 bushels of Beauty of Hebron seed put on 
the half acre. There was also applied i ton of Stock- 
bridge Potato Fertilizer, and no other kind of manure 
whatever. The potatoes came up well and grew finely un- 
til July 10th, when the tops completely covered the 
ground ; but a few days after the blight struck them when 
the tubers were about two-thirds grown, and the conse- 
quence was that at digging time the crop was that much 
short of what it should have been. The yield on the iacre 
was 148 1-2 bushels, or at the rate of 297 bushels per acre. 
There were 27 bushels of seconds and 121 1-2 bushels of 
merchantable ones. I sold the seconds for 30c. per bushel, 
and the others are in the cellar, worth at the present time 
50c. per bushel. 

The cost of the crop was as follows : 

Br. 

To ploughing 1-2 acre, $2 00 

" harrowing, brushing and opening furrows, 1 50 

" seed, 12 bushels, at 30c., 3 60 

'* cutting, dropping and covering, 4 00 

" after cultivation, 3 00 



2 


50 


10 


00 


20 


00 


8 


00 



849 60 



82 



To Paris Green, copper solution and applying. 

" digging and storing, 

" 1-2 ton Stockbridge fertilizer, 

•' interest on land, 



Or. 
By 27 bushels seconds, at 30c., 
*' 121^ large ones, at 50c., 



Profit on half acre, 
•' per acre, 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

I hereby certify that I measured the land on which 
grew the crop of Potatoes entered by John H. George for 
premium with the Essex Agricultural Society, and it con- 
tains one-half acre. 

Lyman George. 



$ 8 


10 


60 


To 


ms 


Ho 


$19 


25 


38 


50 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF CABBAGES, RAISED 
BY DAVID WARREN, OP SWAMPSCOTT. 

To the Committee on Root Crops : 

Gentlemen : — The crop of Cabbages which I offer for 
premium was raised on land that had been to grass the last 
live years, the soil is a light loam with gravelly subsoil. 
Broke it up the first of Jane, applied manure with Kemp's 
Spreader at the rate of nine cords to the acre, cut in with 
Wheel Harrow, smoothed off with drag. Seed put in the 
12th of June with Mathews" seed sower, in rows three feet 



83 

and two inches apart, thinned down from sixteen to twenty- 
four inches apart, cultivated twice and hoed twice. The 
piece of land is sixteen rods long and live rods wide, and 
contains at the present time 4340 good heads of Cabbage. 
The market price at present is from four to five dollars 
per hundred, but I use them for seed so they are of more 
value to me than that. 

COST OF CROP PER ACRE. 

Cost of manure on land, 

Ploughing, 

Wheel harrowing and dragging, 

Cultivating, hoeing and thinning. 

Seed, 

Rent of Land, 

Harvesting, 

•176 00 
Respectfully submitted, 

David Warren. 
Swampscott, Oct. 29, 1896. 

Salem, Oct. 27, 1896. 
This is to certify that I have today measured one half 
acre of land in the field of David Warren, of Swampscott 
and find it contains 4340 marketable cabbages. 

WiLLARD F. Lewis. 



$31 


50 


5 


00 


2 


50 


16 


00 


3 


00 


8 


00 


10 


00 



statement of a crop of turnips raised by ROM- 
ULUS JAQUES, of AVEST NEWBURY. 

The half acre of land on which the turnips I enter for 
premium were grown, was in grass last year. I put four 
cords of manure on tlie half acre, in drills two and a half 



84 

feet apart. The seed was sown July Htli, white German 
sweet. I harvested two hundred and fift3'-three bushels 
(253), the average price being forty cents per bushel. 
Tlie statement is as follows : 

Dr. 

To four cords manure on the ground, $32 00 

Ploughing and harrowing, 2 00 

Seed, 20 

Care and harvesting, 18 60 



152 80 



Cr. 



By 253 bushels turnips, at 40c. *101 20 

Less, 52 80 



Profit per half acre, 148 40 

Respectfully submitted, 

Romulus Jaques. 

I hereby certify that I have measured a tield of turnips 
entered by Romulus Jaques, and find it contains one 
half acre. 



R. P. Jaques. 



West Newbury, Oct. 31, 189o. 



.STATEMENT CONCERNING A CHOP OF TURNIPS RAISED 
BY JAMES C. POOR. 

The half acre of land on which the turnips I enter for 
premium were grown, was a part of three acres of pasture 
that I plowed in June. Soil of sandy loam ; fertilizer used 
l)lain superphosphate with 200 lbs. Bowker's root manure 



85 

drilled in at time of sowing ; seed sown June 28, Shani- 
lock rata baga. I harvested 200 bushels at a cost of pro- 
duction as follows : 



Plowing and harrowing, 

Seed and sowing, 

1000 lbs. plain superphosphate, 

200 " Bowker's fertilizer, 

Thinning, 

Cultivating, 

Harvesting, 



By 200 bushels, at 30 cents, 
" Tops for soiling, 

$63 00 
Proht per half acre, 836 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

James C. Poor. 





Dr. 




16 00 




1 00 




7 00 




4 00 




2 00 




1 00 




6 00 




$27 00 


Or. 




60 00 




3 00 





STATEMENT OF A CROP OF MANGOLD WCJRTZELS RAISED 
BY JAMES C. POOR OF NORTH ANDOVER. 

The piece of Mangold Wurtzels which I enter for 
premium contains i acre of land, of black heavy loam with 
clay subsoil, was in grass in 1895, plowed, manured and 
sowed to hungarian as soon as the hay was cut; the hun- 
garian was a very heavy crop and it completely killed out 
the witch grass. In Nov., 1895, applied manure (about 8 
cords to acre) and cross plowed, and in Spring (1896), 
plowed, harrowed, drilled, using 400 lbs. of Bowker's root 



86 

manure, in the drills, vuriety sown the long Red, crop 
sown May 15. harvested Oct. 18 to 22. Crop weighed in 
loads 16 tons. 

COST OF CROP. 

Br. 

Manure 4 cords, at $6.00, 

400 lbs. fertilizer. 

Plowing, harrowing and drilling,* 

3 lbs. seed, $1.20, sowing, 50 cents. 

Wheel hoeing once, 

Hand hoeing, thinning (twice). 

Cultivating, three times. 

Harvesting, 



124 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 


1 


70 




50 


5 


00 


1 


50 


6 


00 



150 70 



Cr 



[3y 16 tons (or 5331 bushels), at $<i.00. 




■*96 00 


" Tops, 




5 UO 




$101 00 


Profit on the ^ acre. 




50 30 


Respectful 1)^ submitted, 




' 


James 


C. 


Pooh. 



STATEMENT OF A CROP OF MANGOLD WURTZELS, RAISED 
BY FRED STULTZ, WEST NEWBURY. 

The piece of ^Mangold AVurtzels which I enter for jire- 
mium contains one-half acre, with land of sandy loam. 

This is the third year it has been in beets. 

In tlie fall of 1895, six cords of manure was spread broad- 
cast, and ploughed in about four inches deep. 



87 

In spring of 1896, harrowed and ploughed from eight to 
nine inches deep, and harrowed again. 

June 12th, sowed the seed in drills, twenty-eight inches 
apart, with an onion seed sower. I used two pounds of 
seed, most!}' Giant Ovoid. They are not quite as large 
yielders as Intermediate Yellow or Xorbiton Giant, but 
they are sweeter and keep better. 

COST' OF CROl'. 
Dr. 

Manure, 6 cords, 

Ploughing, 

Harrowing and leveling. 

2 lbs. seed, 

Sowing, 

Wheel hoeing (once). 

Thinning, weeding -and resetting. 

Cultivating (three times). 

Harvesting, 

143 30 

Cr. 
Tops, 12 50 

42»j bush., at 15c., 63 90 



130 


00 


1 


50 




50 




80 




50 




50 


3 


00 


1 


50 


5 


00 



$66 40 

Yield per acre, 852 bush., at 15c., $127 80 

"• tops per acre, 5 00 



$132 80 
Cost per acre, 86 60 

Profit per acre, $5(5 20 

Respectfully submitted, 

Fred Stultz. 



88 

This certifies that 1 have measured the piece of Liiid on 
wliich Fred Stultz raised 426 bush. Mangold Wurtzels, 
and it contains one-half acre. 

James Stultz. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SMALL FRUITS. 

The Committee on Strawberries and other small Fruits 
have attended to their duty assigned them and respectfully 
submit the following report : 

The first visit was made to the crop of Strawberries of 
J. W. Barton of Danvers. The crop was fair, the berries 
were large and of fine quality. The varieties were the 
Haverland and Beverly. A part of his vines appeared to 
have some rust. 

The second visit Avas made to the farm of Tufts Brothers 
of Middleton, to view their field of Strawberries, the fruit 
was large, the vines were very thrifty and gave promise of 
an abundant crop, the variety Beverly. This crop of 
Sti'awberries was grown on sandy loam, bordering on a 
wet meadow ; the land has been in cultivation as a vegetable 
farm for several years. The Messrs. Tufts, were entitled 
to the first premium, but as it was doubtful to them they 
declined to make a statement, so the Committee could not 
award them the premium. 

The third visit was made to W. H. Cole's farm at West 
Boxford, to view his Strawberry and Blackberry crop, the 
Strawberries were very large and fine in appearance. This 
variety is a seedling which promises large returns to its 
propagator. Your Committee would recommend this 
variety for cultivation. Mr. Cole's Strawberries wei-e 
grown on a deep sandy soil, near a low meadow, which ap- 
peared to the Committee visiting it to be just the kind of 



89 

land to grow strawberries on. This variety is a late berry. 
The vines had a very strong growth and were well loaded 
with large, well ripened frnit, with a plenty of green to 
follow. The Committee recommend that strawberry grow- 
ers visit one another's crops and see the different soil and 
mode of cultivation. 

Mr. Cole's Blackberries appeared to give a good crop, 
though when the Committee visited it, it was rather early 
to tell just the result, the berries were large and well set. 

The fourth visit was to the farm of Amos Haseltine of 
Haverhill, to view his Blackberry and Currant crop, that 
grew on the same land, as had the fruit for several years. 
Mr. Haseltine's Blackberries were heavily loaded with 
fruit of large size and of excellent quality. 

]Mr. Haseltine's Currants were partly picked at the time 
the Committee visited it, but those ungathered looked fine 
and of good size. This was the only Currant garden en- 
tered for premium. 

The Committee after viewing the several statements of 
small fruit crops, would make the following awards and 
gratuity : 

To William K. Cole of West Boxford, tirst 

premium on Strawberries, $S 00 

To Amos Haseltine of Haverhill, for Black- 
berries, first premium, $8 00 
The Committee recommend a gratuity to W. 

K. Cole, for Blackberries, of ' 15 00 

To Amos Haseltine, first premium on Currants, $S 00 
B.F.Stanley, Thaddeus Hale, L. H. naWey— Commit- 
tee. 



90 

STATEMENT CONCEKNING A CROP OF STRAWBERRIES, 
* RAISED BY W. K. COLE. WEST BOXFORD. 

I'he StrawbeiT}' bed I enter for tlie Society's premium 
was ploughed in the spring of 1895, in April, no manure 
being applied except one bag cottonseed meal and one bag 
of phosphate, spread and harrowed in ; the land had 
been under cultivation several years, the last crop previous 
to this being cabbage. It was set with plants of a seedling 
which I had fruited two years before. Was kept clean and 
fiee from weeds and in the fall was covered with pine 
needles. About the first of May. 1896. these were partly 
removed and three bags of fertilizer applied broadcast. 
Picked the first berries June 23, and the last July 17. 
These berries sold in the open market in Lawrence at 
the wholesale for seventeen to eighteen cents per quart 
box, when other varieties sold for ten to twelve cents per 
box, the last two or three pickings selling for twenty to 
twenty-three cents per box. The piece contains 231 rods 
of land, and the yield was 1291 boxes, which sold for 
$210.49. These accounts have been carefully kept and are 
correct. Xo charge is made for the plants set out, as we 
took as many from the piece to set another bed this year. 

Br. 
To ploughing and harrowing, $ 75 

'• setting plants. 1 50 

" 1 bag cottonseed. 1 05 

'• 1 bag phosphate. 1 50 

" cultivating five times. 75 

'• lioeing and weeding. 5 00 

" covering, uncovering, and spreading 

fertilizer. 5 00 

'• 3 bags fertilizer. 4 50 

'•• picking and marketing 1291 boxes at 

three cents, 38 73 

&5s: 78 



91 

Or- 

I>y plants sold. $1 00 

•"• 1201 boxes berries, 210 40 



S217 49 
68 78 



Profit. *lo8 71 

Profit per acre, 11072 00 

\o. of boxes per acre. 8640 or 270 bushels. 
Tliis estimate per acre is not figured down to a fine 
fraction but is practically. correct. 

W. K. Cole. 

W. BoxFORD, Oct. 7, 1896. 
This is to certify that I have measured the land on 
wliich grew the Strawberry crop entered by AV. K. Cole 
for premium. It contains (231^ twenty-three and three- 
fourths rods. E. S. GuRLEY. 



STATEMENT OF A CROP OF BLACKBERRIES GROWN BY 
AMOS HASELTINE OF HAVERHILL, IN 1896. 

The crop of Blackberries I enter for premium was grown 
on bushes set in the spring of 1892, and part of the plot 
was entered for premium in 1894 and 1895, and for former 
crops and cultivation, I refer you to the Essex County 
'J'ransactions for those years. The kinds were Snyder 
and Taylor. The crop of this year was a full one but the 
price per quart Avas low, and at the last of the season a part 
of the crop was not picked for want of pickers. First pick- 
ing July 25, last Sept. 8. The expenses -were small this 
year, because the canes were cut in 1895 on account of 
winter killing, so that this spring there were not many to cut- 

The account is as follows : — 



92 

lUackberries Dr. to balance of cost, 

Use of land, 

Fertilizer and sowing, 

Trimming, wiring and weeding. 

Picking, selling and boxes 2415 qts. at 4c. 

Total expense, 
liy 2415 quarts at 8^ cts. 
Balance a profit in five years from the time ol" 

planting, 
Crop per acre, 8356 quarts, 
Value " " 

Respectfully submitted, 

Amos Haseltine. 

Haverhill, Mass., Aug. (I, 1896. 
This is to certify that I have measured the land on which 
grew the crop of blackberries entered for premium by 
Amos Haseltine, and find it to contain forty-six and twen- 
ty-four hundredth square rods. (46.24 sq. rds.) 

E. A. Emerson. 



* 6 


00 


o 
•J 


00 


7 


17 


■ r 


59 


96 


60 


•Iill8 


27 


205 


27 


87 


00 


#710 


26 



statement of a crop of currants grown by AMOS 
HASELTINE, OF HAVERHILL, IN 1896. 

The crop of currants I enter for premium, was grown on 
bushes set in the springs of 1892,-B and 4, and the varieties 
were Fa3^ Cherry, Victoria and Wliite Grape. A part of 
the bushes were entered for premium in the years 1894 and 
1895, and for former cultivation and crops see Essex Coun- 
ty Transactions for those years. Thus far the crops have 
mostly been from the Victoria and White Crape. Last 
winter the frost hove out the roots of many bushes which 
seemed to make them weak and sickly and many have died. 



93 

This fall I intend to trim and hill them up, which ylionld 
have been done last fall. So far, from different causes, 
there has not been a good crop in any year. This year's 
ciop has not brought so much a quart as in former years, 
but a large part of them Avere sold at the door, so the ex- 
pense of the selling has been less. I think that about five 
bushels were wasted on account of not having pickers to 
gather them. The account is as follows : 

Currants Dr. to cost to 1896, 

Interest and use of land. 

Fertilizer, 

Hoeing and weeding, 

Destroying currant worms, 

Picking and selling 770 qts. at 3 cts. 



By 770 qts. currants at 7 cents, 
Currants Dr. 



Crop per acre, 2831 quarts. 

Value " " $198 17 

Respectfully submitted, 

Amos Haseltine. 

Haverhill, Mass., Aug. 6, 189(). 
'I'his is to certify that I have measured the land on 
which grew the crop of currants entered for premium by 
Amos Haseltine, and find it to contain forty-three and fifty- 
two hundredths square rods. (43.52 sq. rds.) 

E. A. Emerson. 



$22 


00 


5 


10 


4 


00 


3 


70 


4 


00 


23 


10 


mi 


!I0 


54 


90 


$S 00 



94 
REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RECLAIMED LAND. 

With Mr. Joseph Illsley, of Newbury, and John Barker, 
of North Andover, I visited the farm of Charles R. Ander- 
son and Sons, at West Boxford. on the tirst day of July 
last, and by the splendid growth of the Timothy, Peas, etc., 
upon what had been common meadow hind, we, as the 
Committee on Reclaimed Meadow and Underdraining, 
awarded them the Society's Premium of $15.00. 

Enclosed are their statements, 

For the Committee, 

Andrew Nichols, Chairman. 



STATEMENT OP CHARLES R, ANDERSON. 

The piece of meadow we offer for the society's premium 
contains about one and one-half acres. The soil is a dark 
loam with a clay sand subsoil, and when 'we begun opera- 
tions upon it, about ten years ago, a rough piece of meadow, 
covered with hassocks, clumps of bushes and cranberry 
vines. We dug a ditch through the centre of the meadow 
32 rods longf and laid a stone drainagfe about eio-lit inches 
stjuare, an outlet for the water. We then dug ditches each 
side of the main ditch about thirty feet apart and put in 
two inch tile ; we then ploughed the meadow, we hauled off 
the roots and hassocks, we hauled on about one hundred 
and fifty loads of sandy gravel, and the next season we 
ploughed the gravel in. This piece of meadow has been in 
cultivation ever since, with the exception of about | of an 
acre, which we seeded down to grass two years ago. Las^ 
year we didn't weigh the hay, but we think there was about 



95 

one and one-half tons of hay. This year we had the hay 
weighed by request of the committee. There was two tons 
of good herdgrass hay, and twelve hundred pounds of 
rowen, the remainder of piece of meadow. Last year we 
raised two hundred bushels onions and thirty-eight bushels 
of parsnips. This year we sowed the same piece with 
onion seed, we had a good piece started the first of tlie 
season but the maggots thinned them out so there was only 
fifty-three bushels raised this year, where we had onions 
and parsnips last year. The principal cost was ditching and 
ploughing the first time, since then we have been well paid 
for our labor. The expense was about as follows : — 

Digging main ditch, 32 rods long, 8 feet wide, 8 

feet deep, atoOc. per rod, #16 00 

Hauling stone and filling ditch, at $2 per rod, 64 00 

Digging side ditches, 60 rods long, 8 feet deep, 12 

inches wide, at 20c. per rod, 12 00 

To cash paid for 990 feet of brick tile, two inches 

wide, at 2c. per foot, 19 80 

Ploughing with three men and one yoke of oxen, 

two days, at $7.50 per day, 15 00 

I larrowing and clearing up roots, two men and 

pair horses, two days, at $o per day, 10 00 

Hauling on gravel, two men, one pair horses, six 

days, at |5 per day, 30 00 



*166 80 
Onion crop of 1895, 200 bushels, at 45c. per bu., $90 00 
Parsnip crop of 1895, 38 bushels, at 75c. per bu., 28 00 
Hay crop of 1895, one and one-half tons, at 820 

per ton, 30 00 

Onionjcrop of 1896, 58 bushels, at 55c. per bu., 28 15 



96 

Hay crop of 1896, two tons, at $20 per ton, 40 00 

Rowen crop of 1896. 1200 pounds, $12 per ton, 7 20 



f223 3;') 
ResjDectfully submitted, 

Chas. R. Anderson & Sons. 
Chas. R. Anderson, 
William H. Anderson, 
David A. Anderson. 

West Boxford, Nov. 2, 1896. 



IlEPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TREADWELL 
FARM. 

The Treadwell Farm continues under tlie management 
of John W. Bradstreet, the lessee, who makes milk pro- 
duction the principal business of the farm. He keeps 
fourteen cows and three horses, and sells the milk at tlie 
door. His crops this year have been very good, consider- 
ing the drought of May and June. 

The two barns are well filled with hay, besides a large 
stock of meadow hay outside. He has raised over 200 
bushels of ver}- handsome potatoes, of excellent quality, 
and grown on what has been considered the least produc- 
tive part of the farm ; also about li acres of cabbages, of 
medium growth, and several acres of oats and barley, fed 
ofreen to the cows. The silo is tilled with about 75 tons of 
ensilage, not yet opened. The orchard produced about 75 
barrels of apples. The trees had been carefully sprayed, 
thus keeping the canker worms under subjection. Besides 
what manure has been made on the farm, six tons of fer- 
tilizer has been applied. 



97 

Mr. Rradstreet has experimented this year on curing- 
fodder corn with marked success, adopting a method that 
is new, requiring much less labor than is usually practiced, 
resulting in perfectly cured fodder, that the cows eat with 
much relish and no waste. 

After filling the silo Mr. Bradstreet had three-fourths of 
an acre of ensilage corn more than the silo would hold. He 
cut up the corn, which was green and growing. It had 
formed some ears but as it was rather thick, the growth wa 
not over large, nor the ears very numerous. This was piled 
up into the form of a well made cock of hay and about the 
same size. Xotwithstanding the very rainy weather of 
October, it was perfectly cured, with onh' about two inches 
of the outside discolored by the weather ; the rest is of a 
bright green color, and, as has been said, the cows eat it 
all up, it being taken from the field to the barn as wanted. 

It has been a subject of contention between the advo- 
cates of the silo and of cured fodder corn as to which 
method required the 'less labor. This system of curing 
certainly scores one in favor of the dry fodder. 

Your committee think that, while there is more or less 
loss in nutritive ingredients of the fodder, whether as ensi- 
lage or dried, they are of the opinion that ensilage, being 
in a more succulent condition, is the more natural and bet- 
ter for the production of milk than the cured fodder, but 
certainly Mr. Bradstreet's method reduces the cost and lisk 
of weather very much, and that his experiment is of great 
value to the farmer. 

The committee are pleased with the general condition of 
the farm, with the exception of some necessary repairs to 
the buildings, which will be made. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin P. Ware, Chairman, 
S. D. Hood, 
Andrew Nichols. 



98 

REPORT OF DELEGATE FROM STATE BOARD 
OF AGRICULTURE, 1896. 

I visited the fair of the Essex Agricultural Society, at 
Peabody, Sept. 22, 23 and 24, 1896. Arriving there about 
noon the first day of the fair I found the superintendent of 
the hall and his assistants on duty. The exhibitors were 
busy arranging one of the best exhibitions of fruit and veg- 
etables that I have ever had the pleasure of seeing, not in 
size, but because each and every variety was properly 
named and arranged, and only the best of specimens used. 
This may in part be due to the fact that in Essex county 
many of the best known vegetables had their origin, and of 
the large number there engaged in market-gardening. 

The exhibition of works of art, fancy and needle work, 
was large and excellent. The horses, cattle, sheep and 
swine were well selected and good specimens of the breeds 
which they represented. The poultry exhibit was large, 
and would be a credit to any poultry Ijreeders' association. 
Agents for agricultural manufacturing companies were 
there showing the merits of their various implements* 
Later I visited their new grounds, which are pleasantly 
located, but rather small. The secretary's office, cattle 
and horse barns, and sheep and pig. sheds are convenient 
and well arranged. 

The second day there was a parade of the business men 
of Salem and Peabody, representing their different busi- 
nesses, which passed through the streets and was dismissed 
upon the fair grounds. It was estimated that there were 
fully 10,000 people on the grounds. 

This Society holds its annual dinner on the last day of 
the fair. I did not understand the programme until I ar- 
rived there, and as it was not convenient for me to be away 
from home so long, I did not attend the dinner. I saw no 



99 

objectionable features about the fair, and it was a credit 
to the Society and its officers, and seems to be making 
along the lines on which the State so generously assists the 
agricultural societies. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. A. Harwood, Inspector. 



FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

The Society held four Institutes the past year on as many 
different days, forenoon and afternoon, at which the fol- 
lowing subjects were offered by carefully prepared essays, 
and discussed by any of the audience who desired. 

The first Institute was held at Haverhill, Jan. 10, the 
subject for the forenoon being " Rural and Farm Law," by 
Robert W. Lyman, Esq., of Northampton. Subject for the 
afternoon, " The Food and Care of a Farmer's Household," 
by :M. W. Bartlett, of West Newbury. 

The second Institute was held at Salem, Feb. 7, the sub- 
ject for the forenoon being, "Advanced ^Methods in Feed- 
ing Cattle," by Prof. William P. Brooks, of the Agricul- 
tural College. At the afternoon session Hon. William R. 
Sessions, Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture read 
a carefully prepared paper on the " Gypsy Moth " giving 
a history of its habits and what had been done to destroy it 
in the state. 

The third Institute was held in Newburyport, March 6, 
the subject for both forenoon and afternoon being " Fruit, 
its Cultivation, Care and Marketing," by E. W. Wood, 
Esq., of Newton. 

The fourth and last Listitute of the season was held at 
Beverl}', April 3rd, the subject for both meetings forenoon 
and afternoon being, " Infectious Diseases of Domestic An- 
imals, Their Causation and Prevention," by Dr. Theobald 
Smith, of the Bussey Institution, Jamaica Plain. 



lOO 

REPORT ON ESSAYS AND REPORTS. 

The Committee on Essays and Reports have carefully- 
read and considered three Essaj's submitted to them, of 
more than usual merit, and iiave agreed upon the follow- 
ing awards :— 

To Dr. J. W. Good ell, of Lynn, $10 for essay upon 
" Wattr as a Factor in the Growth of Crops." 

To Mr. Sumner Perkins, of Danveis, -fS for essay on 
" Stock Feeding." 

To Geo. A. Rogers, of No. Andover, $6 for " An Impar- 
tial Report on Peas, Cucumbers, Blood Turnips and 
Beets." 

For the Committee, 

G. L. Streeter, Chairman. 

Co7nmittee — G. L. Streeter, Salem ; D. E. Safford, Ham- 
ilton ; N. M. Hawkes, Lynn ; Geo. B. Blodgett, Rowley; 
J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 



WATER AS A FACTOR IX THE GROWTH OF 
CROPS. 

We will begin by placing this axiom at the head of the 
page. 

ALL PLANT FOOD MUST BE FLUID. 

All sections of country where there is not sufficient 
rainfall to mature vegetation, must be supplied by some 
artificial means, and various methods have been resorted 
to in ages past, to supply that necessar}'- element: 

Growing crops by the aid of irrigation has been prac- 
ticed in the eastern hemisphere from time immemorial, 
where the water could be obtained, by forming a reservoir 



lOI 

of a natural stream by damming, and cause the water to 
flow by natural gravitation. This method was used. ]>ut 
often the water was below the field and had to be raised. 
For this purpose crude water wheels were constructed 
with buckets attached to the arms, which would empty 
into spouts and ditches leading to the planted field. Some 
nations have even watered their crops with water raised 
from the streams and carried to the field by manual labor. 

In the raising of rice, which is the principal food of all 
eastern nations, after the crop was planted (always on 
low land,) the field is flowed and kept so until near the 
time of harvesting. However fertile the land, the water 
must be forthcoming or the crop cannot be assured. 

Tiie growing of crops by irrigation, in the United States, 
has all been brought about within the last fifty years. 
The wonderful possibilities which have been attained in 
California, in the growing of fruits and vegetables have 
been by the application of water, an absolute necessity in 
the rainless season. 

California has but two seasons, six months wet and six 
months dr}'. Commencing about the first of November 
the rainy season sets in, giving an abundance of water, 
and sometimes a superabundance, when two or three 
inches will have fallen in twenty-four hours, very few 
days pass without more or less rain, in showers with bright 
sunshine between. 

Then about the first of May, you may put away your 
mackintosh and umbrella, which have been your constant 
companions for the last six months, with positive assur- 
ance that they will not be needed for six months to come. 

Wheat, rye, oats and barley are grown during the 
rainy season — beginning to plow and sow as soon as the 
rains have softened the ground, in November, and are 
read}' for the harvest in May and June. 



I02 

The first harvesting being that portion which is raised 
for hay and is cnt while in the milk. 

For be it known, that there is not such a thing as an 
acre of what New England jjeople wonld call grass land in 
the whole state of California. If yon go to the market and 
order hay, you are asked whether 3^011 will have wheat, 
oat or barley hay — this is some kind of grain, cut while 
in the milk, cured, baled and used as hay is in New Eng- 
land. In appearance it is much like the straw which our 
grandmothers used to cure for l)raiding. With the grain 
it contains it makes a very good substitute for hay. 

In the next six months everything that is going to be 
planted or grown must he artificially irrigated^ whether it 
be fruit, flower or shrub. Water being a necessity, large 
and costly plants have been established for irrigation and 
it is carried for long distances either in ditches, flumes or 
pipes. In going into the Yosemite Valley we passed with 
our stages under several of these V shaped flumes of 
sufficient size, when filled with water, to float down from 
the mountains cord wood and lumber — and the water sold 
for irrigating crops. These sources of \vater supply are 
not infallible. They depend more especially upon the 
amount of snow deposited on the mountain tops, the melt- 
ing of which keep the mountain streams replenished. 

If the snow is light, the supply of water will be liable to 
give out before the crop is matured. 

So the next source for water supply has been the Arti- 
sian well, when sunk along the foot hills and striking one 
of those large underground streams flowing from the 
mountains to the ocean, they have sometimes thrown a 
two inch stream fifty or sixty feet high. 

liut where abundance of water is found but does not 
flow to the surface — a wind mill and pump is attached to 
do the Avork. 



I03 

Irrioration is a matter which calls for considerable me- 
chanical and engineering skill. 

The water must be let on to the field at its highest point. 
and so guided as to reach all parts by gravitation, in many 
small ditches usually made with the plow. These ditches 
must be filled at least two or three times per month and 
the ground thoroughly soaked. The nearer to the surface 
of the ground the roots of the crop so much oftener will 
the application be required. When we consider the cli- 
mate of California with a temperature of over 100° in the 
shade, sometimes 120°, we perceive that the evaporation 
must be very rapid. 

Although the cool strata of air which comes down from 
the snow clad mountains (always visible the year round, 
requiring one or more blankets to sleep under), there is 
very little dew after the first two months of the dry 
season. Large streams which are navigable in the wet 
season, have become- dried up and their beds used as car- 
riage roads. 

These cold nights, we opine to be the cause of the lack 
of sugar in the fruits of California as compared with those 
grown where the range of temperature is less, and the 
nights much warmer. The only kind of grass that has 
been tried with any degree of success has been the Alfalfa? 
a coarse species of clover which sends its roots sometimes 
from six to ten feet to obtain water. A few years ago an 
experiment was tried to see how much could be raised on 
a measured acre of level land. An embankment was made 
around the plot, so as to hold six inches of water, and was 
filled after taking off each crop. The result was eight 
crops of an average of two tons each. 

I saw myself more than two tons per acre being taken 
from a field near Salt Lake City, in 1881, on the first day 
of May. 



I04 

This city, piobably more than any other in the U. S., 
owes its existence to tlie results of irrigation. The water 
is brought down from the mountain and conducted on 
either side of every street and the ground around each house 
coukl be watered from these streams. Fruit trees and 
shrubbery weie everywhere abundant and in a good 
healthy condition. Thus far we have considered those 
sections of the country where irrigation was a necessity, 
where it is water or No crop. 

Now we propose to discuss the question where oft-times 
it is a poor and a short crop for want of sufficient water at 
the right time. Every observing man of three score or 
more years, will admit that the climate of New England has 
changed much in the last fifty years, and that crops, as a 
general thing, suffer mere and oftener for want of sufficient 
moisture. Our storage capacity has been well nigh de- 
stroyed by denuding our hills of their natural forests, and 
the rivers and brooks of New England are becoming yearly 
smaller and smaller. Any of us can remember of plenty of 
bathing places where the boys used to learn to swim and 
to dive as well, where now if you wanted to wash a sheep, 
you would have to dam up the brook, and wait at least 
over night for the pond to fill. 

Many a farm on the hillside which is now being aban- 
doned, where the rainfall coald be stored at small expense 
for use on the crop in time of drouth, could be worked with 
profit. 

Agriculture in New England is becoming more and more 
intensive each year. The effort is not to see how many 
acres you can cultivate, but how mucli can be raised to the 
single acre of those crops which sell for the best prices in 
the nearest market. Competition is so great, that all quick 
selling crops must be the best of their kind, and such can 
only be procured by one continuous and rapid growth, any 



I05 

piotracted drought stops the growth and stunts the plant, 
and materially injures it in value and appearance. 

We believe that if the farmers of New England would 
put all their labor and fertilizer on to one half or one third of 
the present area cultivated, they would receive infinitely 
more satisfactory results. 

The subject of irrigation is receiving more and more at- 
tention among our market gardeners and fruit growers near 
the large cities each year. 

At the outing of the Massachusetts Fruit Growers' Asso- 
ciation held at Fitchburg, in June of the present year, we 
were shown seven acres of strawberries being irrigated by 
the city water. 

They were just getting ready to harvest. Something 
like sixteen tons of iron pipe were used to conduct the 
water to where it was most needed. On this field we 
measured berries over two inches in diameter. 

The land appeared to be thin of soil and very full of 
small stones. 

On the same farm ten acres had been set for the crop of 
1.S97. 

At our September outing in Concord, one of the speak- 
ers was a fruit grower in Arizona, and said that one Mexi- 
can man could irrigate thirty acres in a day and do it bet- 
ter than Dame Nature. The question was asked how much 
a day he paid the man who could beat the Almighti/. He 
declined to answer, but one of his friends said he believed 
it was about il.50 (^prohahly in Mexican silver). 

This is a factor which even the fruit growers of New 
England have got to take into consideration when esti- 
mating the cost of raising fruits and vegetables for the 
markets. 

In closing we would like to call attention to the unsci- 
entific, wasteful and destructive methods used in watering 
our city lawns. 



io6 

The average city laborer has been taught that it will be 
detrimental to liis health to work for more than a few 
hours in the middle of the day, and all outdoor work must 
be completed before the five o'clock whistle sounds, includ- 
ing the watering of the lawn. 

The consequence is that many of our best lawns are in- 
jured and some actually burned up by watering with a hose 
pipe and sprinkler while the sun is still high above the 
horizon, each drop of water as it stands on the blades of 
grass Ijecomes a prism and concentrates the rays of heat 
so as to actually burn the grass to death. Also at this 
hour of the day the evaporation is so great that very little 
benefit accrues to the roots. One hour's watering after 
sundown is worth two in the morning. 

If you must water during sunshine take off the nozzle 
and lay the hose on the ground, moving it frequently from 
place to place. 



STOCK FEEDING. 

The farmer has two objects in view in his business of 
feeding live stock. The first is to produce at the least 
expense the largest quantities of animal products, such as 
beef, pork, mutton, poultry, eggs, milk, butter, cheese, etc. 
The second is to make the most and the best manure pos- 
sible. The selection of stock feed is to be determined by 
considering each of these objects. Those feeds, ;that con- 
tain the largest proportion of protein, or elements in which 
nitrogen figures largely, make the best and quickest ani- 
mal growth, as well as the best manure. Usually stock 
feeds, containing the most protein, are really the cheapest, 
when their nutritive matters are taken into consideration. 
The economical feeding of live stock is mainly a question 
of the cost of the various feedstuffs. 



I07 

COST. 

Those feeds are to be" employed which are in fact the 
cheapest. It does not follow simply because a certain 
grain or fodder costs but little, it is economy to feed' it. 
The reverse is often the case, and the cheapest in price is 
the dearest to employ. Purchasers must not be deceived 
by the fallacy that the grain which gives the largest bulk 
or heaviest weight per dollar expended, is necessarily the 
most economical. There is no doubt that cottonseed or 
linseed meal at a cost of $20 per ton, fed under proper 
conditions and limitations, is a cheaper feed than bran or 
corn meal at $15 per ton. Then again the market value 
of a feedstuff does not depend upon its nutritive value. 
Other influences than those of chemical composition ordi- 
narily fix the relative commercial valuations of the various 
grains and feeds. 

VARIETY. 

No matter how good any one certain kind of food may 
1)6, it is no reason why it should be fed exclusively; 
Whether the animal to be fed is horse, cow, pig or man, a 
change from one diet to another is always relished and 
welcomed. Any animal prospers better upon a variety of 
foods than upon anj- single one. The same food eaten 
day in and day out, week after week, and year upon year, 
becomes distasteful to the consumer, and a change is 
eagerly sought, even though it be from a better to a poorer 
grade of fodder. This is well illustrated by what every 
farmer has often observed, viz. the avidity with which 
cattle kept long upon the best English hay, will consume 
coarse meadow or salt hay or even straw. In truth variety 
is the " spice of life." 

DIGESTIBILITY. 

It is what an animal digests that nourishes it, rather 
than what it eats. A food may show a high analysis ; but 



io8 

if the 'digestive process does not extract the nutriment, 
why to be sure it can do the animal body no good. Me- 
chanical lightness or porosity has much to do with the 
ease with which a food digests. Corn meal for example 
is so solid and heavy it does not digest well by itself. 
Add bran to it, however, and there is a marked improve- 
ment, since then the particles of meal are largely separated, 
and their exposure to the action of the digestive fluids of 
the stomach greatly increased. Grinding gi-ain is an ex- 
l^edient to render its mastication and digestion by the an- 
imal more easy and more sure. Old animals with [voor 
teeth especially require ground feed. As the dairy cow 
has work enough to do in chewing the large amounts of 
fodder she must consume in order to yield a good met^s of 
milk, it is profitable to give her some assistance b}' grind- 
ing all her grain feed and to some extent cutting her fod- 
der also. 

HAY AND COARSE FODDER. 

It is a Avell known fact that a certain proportion of 
every stock ration should consist of hay or other coarse 
fodder. While good hay contains considerable nutriment, 
its value is largely to be attributed to the aid it furnishes 
proper digestion by distending the stomach and by dilut- 
ing the more concentrated grain feed. It is important to 
feed enough hay but not too much. The farmer very 
readily falls into the practice of feeding too much hay and 
too little grain. This happens because hay is largely pro- 
duced upon the farm, whereas grain is more foreign and 
requires the expenditure of cash for its purchase. It will 
no doubt pay upon a farm where hay is largel}^ grown, to 
sell a portion of it and devote the proceeds of the sale to 
the buying of grain. The remarkable cheapness of all 
kinds of grain, when compared with hay, has been very 



I09 

strongly emphasized during the past year. Hay has been 
selling for #20 per ton upward, when the standard stock 
feeds, such as bran, corn meal, and oatfeed could be bought 
for from f 12 to -f 14 per ton. This disparity is even more 
evident, when it is considered that a ton of grain has at 
least double the nutriment in it that there is in an equal 
weight of hay. Plainly the grain is by all odds far the 
cheaper food, and the more hay the farmer can save under 
such market conditions the better it will be for him. 
Some of the more bulky grain feeds, such as bran and oat- 
feed may well be fed more largely, as partial hay substi- 
tutes ; and corn fodder, millet hay, etc., can be employed 
to take the place of a part of the regular hay rations. 

Eight pounds of hay per day, divided into two or three 
feeds, should be a plenty for a horse. The cow certainly 
needs more coarse fodder than the horse, probably as much 
as fifteen to twenty pounds per day ; but corn fodder, 
ensilage, oat straw and millet may be used very largely 
instead of English hay. The value of good, bright corn 
stalks as fodder is too lightly estimated. Cut when the ears 
are right for boiling, carefully and rapidly cured, and stored 
away from the weather as soon as possible, the fodder of 
sweet corn is certainly worthy of every farmer's considera- 
tion. Treat it the same as good hay ; do not allow it to 
stand in the field, exposed to rains, frosts, and snows ; and 
it will approach ver}-^ closely in feeding value to good 
timothy liay. 

WHEAT. 

Two or three years ago feeders were confronted with a 
condition never before met, viz. : wheat cheaper pound for 
pound than corn or oats. Therefore the question came up 
for practical test as to Avhether wheat, so natural and excel- 
lent a food for man, was not equally good for live stock in 



no 

general. It was found to be a much better grain to feed 
by itself, singly, than was corn, and, as might be supposed, 
all classes of animals, horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and 
poultry throve upon it. ^Millions of bushels of wheat were 
fed to stock, chiefly in the West. This eased the glut of 
that cereal in the market ; and gave the farmer a much 
better price for his wheat converted into meats, etc., than 
he could possibly have secured from the same sold in the 
form of grain. 

COMPOUNDING RATIONS. 

That ration is best which is drawn from the largest num- 
ber of the best sources. In mixing rations the feeder must 
consider the character and composition of the different 
grains. Wheat bran affords an excellent basis for anj"- 
ration, because it is rich in mineral matter and protein and 
is also light, bulky and easy to digest. Oats are rich in 
muscle making elements. They have considerable husk 
so they are also bulky and better to feed alone than any 
other whole grain. Oatfeed, a by-product of the oatmeal 
mills, is a very good feed, although of course not as meaty 
as the entire oats. Corn has too much starch and fat to 
be fed exclusively. It needs to be given in connection 
with other grains, such as bran, oats, etc.. that contain 
more protein and mineral matter. Especially is this need- 
ful in the case of young, growing animals. Then we have 
the so-called concentrated feeds, linseed, cottonseed and 
gluten meals. These are never to be fed alone ; but always 
with other less rich foods. They should form but a com- 
paratively small proportion of the entire ration. Linseed 
meal is the ground cake which is left after linseed oil has 
been expressed from the flaxseed. It is very fine to keep 
the skin and digestive organs in a healthy, active condi- 
tion, and contains, as well, much nutriment. 



Ill 

Cottonseed meal is the residue after oil has been pressed 
from the cotton seed. It has a higher analysis than even 
linseed meal ; but needs to be fed with great care and in 
small quantities, as when given in excess it creates digestive 
disturbances in many animals. It is a very cheap feed 
when rightly used. Gluten meal is a by-product from corn 
in the manufacture of starch and glucose. It is rich in 
gluten and an economical stock feed. 

There are numberless rations that may be compounded. 
One that would be best for one farmer under one condi- 
tion would not be the same for another farmer controlled 
by different conditions. Oats are no doubt the best grain 
to form the basis of the horses' ration. An addition of 
from 25 to 50 % of bran to the oats makes an improve- 
ment upon oats alone. A good cow ration may be com- 
posed of equal parts bran, oatfeed and cornmeal, to each 
peck of which mixture one to two quarts of linseed, cotton- 
seed, or gluten meal may be added. There is no question 
but what the best plan of feeding grain to stock is by cut- 
ting the ha}^ ration, or a portion of it, moistening it slight- 
ly, and mixing the grain thoroughly with it. The reason is 
the grain will then be better masticated, better mixed with 
the juices of the mouth, and better prepared for digestion. 

ElSrSILA^GE AND ROOTS. 

Green, succulent food, as ensilage and roots, is much 
relished by all kinds of stock in winter, Avhen dry food 
forms the bulk of all rations. Such food is beneficial fully 
as much from the tone it gives to the digestive organs, as 
from what nutriment it contains in itself. It is wise for 
every stock feeder to go into winter with good supplies of 
ensilage, carrots, turnips, beets, potatoes, etc. Daily feeds 
of a peck to one-half bushel of roots to liorse or cow will 
be found profitable in the increased thrift imparted to the 
animals so fed. 



I I 2 

AN IMPARTIAL REPORT ON PEAS, CUCUM- 
BERS AND BLOOD TURNIP BEETS. 

With the thousand and one varieties of vegeta^bles in 
existence, it would be folly to try them all in one season. 
]\Iany of them I have tried already and discarded. In 
making up my lists last spring I selected standard kinds and 
supplemented them with this year's novelties and such 
other varieties as had some special claim for public favor. 
I had six varieties of cucumbers on trial, and a detailed re- 
port with each follows. The seed was planted June 14th. 
on sod ground that had been manured at the rate of eight 
cords per acre. A half handful of fertilizer was scattered 
in each hill. Thorburn's Everbearing produced cucum- 
bers large enough for slicing July 29, fifty-five days from 
planting. This variety resembles the old Early Russian 
and grows about three inches long. On light loams the 
vine is a weak grower. It blossomed profusely, but nine 
blossoms out of ten failed to produce fruit. On a rich^ 
moist soil it might do better. When the cucumbers get 
large enough for slicing, they turn yellow with one day's 
exposure to the hot sun, hence it is worthless as a market 
variety. With me the net returns were less than a third 
what they were on a row of white spine beside it, and I 
would only recommend this variety to those who plant on 
rich, moist land, and have a trade willing to buy very 
small pickles at thirty cents or more per hundred. Thor- 
burn's 1896 Pickler requires fifty-seven days to attain the 
slicing size. It is a good bearer of medium sized fruit, and 
with me, the earliest large variety. Like the Everbearing 
the slicers turn yellow when exposed to the sUn, and in 
the future I shall only plant enough of it to furnish me 
with a supply for a few days, until the larger and later 
varieties are ready for use. It is a good variety for pick- 



I f 



ling, but does not pioduee as many first class pickles as 
The New Evergreen or White Spine. The Giant Pera 
and Japanese Climbing are both interesting varieties and 
are worthy of a trial, as a novelty, on a small scale. They 
fail to fill the bill as a market variety, being coarse and 
light colored. They may be adapted to some sections, but 
there are several better varieties for New England. Liv- 
ingstone's Evergreen will grow to slicing size in sixt3'-five 
days. It produces a large crop of handsome pickles and 
the slicers are of good size and hold their color well Tt 
is a good variet}^ and with me, it is second only to the Im- 
proved White Spine. Consumers and dealers demand 
straight, handsome, dark green cucumbers that will keep 
several days when necessary, and not change color. The 
Improved White Spine is the only variety that completely 
fills the bill. While discussing varieties with one of the 
best market gardeners in Essex County a few weeks ago, I 
assured him I could ■find nothing better^ whereupon he re- 
marked that the Improved White Spine was good enough 
to fill the bill for a century to come; I agree with him. 
The best is good enough for all, and I would advise all to 
plant tliis variety for main crop, putting in just enough of 
Thorburn's 189(3 Pickler, or some other early variety, to 
furnish a supply for a couple of weeks. The White Spine 
required sixty -seven days to produce slicers this year. 
Some enterprising grower ought to perfect a strain of it 
that would be ten days earlier without eliminating any of 
its good points. If I had planted this variety exclusively 
this year, I should have had several dollars in my pocket 
that are not there, but I should not have this experience 
to give to others. And while I shall depend upon this va- 
riety for business purposes next year, I shall probably 
plant beside it another half-dozeii of the much lauded 
kinds, and lose money and gain experience by doing it. 



114 



BLOOD TURNIP BEETS. 



I have grown the Edmands, Eclipse, Crosby's Egyptian, 
Detroit Dark Red, Henderson Electric and Half Long, and 
tlie Arlington Favorite under similar conditions this sea- 
son and find them all good. 

New England markets demand round blood turnip beets. 
The half long varieties may sell in New York but not 
here, consequently it would be folly to plant them for 
market purposes. On my own table, I prefer the round 
varieties. For years I have relied on Crosby's Improved 
Egyptian for my early crop, and have found nothing bet- 
ter. It is a rapid grower, has a small top and the root is 
fine in texture, dark blood red, and very sweet. The Ar- 
lington Favorite, Electric, Eclipse and Detroit Dark Red 
are its equal in quality, grow larger, and require several 
days more time to reach* marketable size. The four varie- 
ties last named are all excellent for second early, and are 
suitable for main crop if -they are planted and harvested at 
the right time. The Edmands is the standard main crop 
variety. It is very uniform in type, and has but one tap 
root. For several years I have depended upon this variety 
for a supply to store for winter trade. It is an excellent 
keeper and retains its quality until growth starts in the 
Spring. The majority of growers do not care for more than 
three varieties and were I to select three, they would be 
Crosby's Lnproved Egyptian, Arlington Favorite, and Ed- 
mands. 

PEAS. 

Every year some of the enterprising seedsmen bring- 
out one or more varieties of peas. With every new can- 
didate for public favor comes the assurance that it excels 
all other varieties in one or more particulars. I have 
tried these new vaiieties as they have come along, retain- 



115 

ing for a succession four or five of the best varieties. 
Last year this list contained Rawson's Clipper, McLean's 
Advancer, Yorkshire Hero, Shropshire Hero, and Strata- 
gem. This year 1 dropped Shropshire Hero and added the 
Jutio, Carter's Telephone, Station, Duke of York, Breck's 
New Life, and Heroine to the list. These peas were plant- 
ed April 28Lh, and the number of days required to grow 
the bulk of the crop to market size is given in the follow" 
ing table. 



Rawson's Clipper, 


61 


Duke of York, 


80 


Station, 


65 


Carter's Telephone, 


80 


McLean's Advancer, 


70 


Juno, 


75 


Breck's New Life, 


80 


Heroine, 


85 


Yorkshire Hero, 


80 


Stratagem, 


90 



From the above it will be seen that the Clipper, Station, 
McLean's Advance, Breck's New Life, Juno, Duke of 
York and Stratagem, furnish a good succession for family 
uso, or for market, when planted on the same date. 

For a first early market pea where earliness and yield 
are desired, I settled on Rawson's Clipper several years 
ago, and have found nothing better. For an early pea for 
family use, there is nothing better than Nott's Excelsior, 
l)ut with me it is a few days later than •the Clipper and 
does not yield as well. For a second early pea for market 
the Station is excellent. It produces a bountiful supply 
of large, well filled pods. Its quality is good and its most 
valuable characteristic as a market pea is the fact that it 
matures all the crop at once, and all the pods can be 
gathered at two pickings. McLean's Advancer is an old 
standby, and too well known to need description. For 
years it has been considered the best second early wrinkled 
pea and I consider it such to-day. 

Following McLean's Advancer comes Henderson's Juno 
pea. This is of recent introduction and grows about 



ii6 

30 inches high and is a good bearer of medium sized, well 
tilled pods. With me it does not yield as well as the 
Station or McLean's, but the pods are larger. Immedi- 
ately following the Juno are Breck's New Life, Duke of 
York, Carter's Telephone and Yorkshire Hero. These 
four varieties are ready to pick eighty daj's after planting, 
this being the case the question which to plant must be 
decided upon yield and qualit}^ For several yeai's I have 
grown the Yorkshire Hero. It has yielded well, and the 
peas are sweet, but it has had one weak point, the pods do 
not fill out the entire length. Now that I have found 
something better I shall discard it and depend upon Duke 
of York and Breck's New Life to take its place. The 
Duke of York grows about thirty inches high, and is an 
abundant bearer of large-, well filled pods. In productive- 
ness and size of pod it is equal to the Stratagem and is 
ten dsijs earlier. Breck's New Life is a strong, stocky 
grower. The pods are as large as the Stratagem, and are 
produced abundantly. Both vines and pods retain their 
bright green color for a long time. 

The last two varieties named are both grand, and one is 
as desirable as the other, the extra yield of the Duke of 
York compensating for the dark green color and keeping- 
qualities of the New Life. Carter's Telephone was received 
from the government among other trial seeds. It grows 
three feet high and is a moderate yielder of mammoth 
pods. I have picked pods three (quarters of an inch in 
diameter and five inches long. Association with politicans 
in the government seed distribution has had its effect on 
this pea, for like them it presents a good appearance but 
contains lots of wind. It will not shell over two-thirds as 
many peas from a bushel of pods as the Duke of York oi- 
New Life, consequently I shall discard it. The Heroine 
is a good pea but has two faults. The pods do not fill 



117 

well, <uid turn light colored and present a dry appearance 
unless they are picked very close. I was led to try it by 
the universal commendation of several seedsmen, but shall 
drop it this jea,!'. 

The Stratagem is the standard late variety and will con- 
tinue to be until something better is produced. Its one 
weak point is its proclivity to sport back to the small varie- 
ties from which it originated. Careful selection of seed 
has reduced this tendency to a mininura and this year I 
have seen but two or three sports from four quarts of seed. 
It is good enough for all. 



]N MEMORIAM. 



The following is a list of members deceased not hereto, 
fore reported : 

Abbott, Hartwell B., Audovev, died April 14, '96, aged 79 yrs. 

Afpleton, Isaac, Beverly, died Jan. 31, 1895, aged 79 yrs. 

Blatchford, Eben, Rockport, died March 6, 1896. 

Boynton, Charles, Newbury, died Jan. 22, 1896. 

Browx, William G., Ipswich, died Jan. 2, 1896, aged 66 yrs. 

Bryant, William, West Newbury, died Sept. 4, 1896. 

BuKNHAM, William Howe, Essex, died March 25, 1895. 

Butler, Albert E., Lawrence, died March 20, 1895. 

Butler, J. C, Dan vers, died Dec. 3, 1895. 

Carr, Samuel, West Newbury, died Nov. 2, 1896. 

Chadwick, O. B., Fea])ody, died Sept. 25, 1894. 

Clark John, Gloucester, died July 16, 1896. 

CoLK, David M., Boxford, died March 22, 1896. 

Corliss, Benj. H., Gloucester, died August 7, 1895. 

Curtis, Axdrew, Peabody, died Jan. 4, 1896. 

Dale, William, Jr., No. Andover, died Nov. 5, 1896. 

Dane, John, Jr., Hainiltoa, died since List report. 

Davis, James, Gloucester, died Feb. 9, 1896. 



ii8 

Dennen, George, Gloucester, died April 14, 189G. 

Dodge, Judson AY., Danvers, died Sept. 20, 1896. 

DuRAXT, W. A., Lawrence, died Nov. 8, 1895. 

DuRKEE, Thomas C, Peabody, died June 29, 1S95. 

Eaton, Harrison, Haverhill, died Jan. 29, 1895. 

Foster, Ira, Peabody, died Feb. 10, 1894. 

Frederick, John W., Metliueu, died 1896. 

Hidden, David I. C, Andover, died Sept. 22, 1896, .-iged 73 yis. 

How, Moses, Haverhill, died Jan. 12, 1896. 

Kklliher, W. a., Lawrence, died May 4, 1895 

Lane, Isaac N., West Newbury, died Feb. 1, 1895. 

Lamson, Jarvis, Hamilton, died Aug. 25, 1895, aged 78 \ rs. 

Lawrence, R. C, Gloucester, died April 22, 1895. 

Lovett, William H., Beverly, died Aug. 18, 1896, aged 42 yrs. 

Marsh, Fred, Peabody, died June 22, 1895. 

Mitchell, Eben, Haverhill, died March 19, 1896. 

Montgomery, James, No. Andover, died Nov. 1, 1895 

MouLTON, John A., Beverly, died Aug. 19, 1896, aged 49 yrs. 

NoRRis, George, Hamilton, died since last report. 

Patch, William H., Rockport, died May 20, 1896. 

Pettingill, Henry, Georgetown, died 1896. 

Pratt, Amos, Danvers, died April 8, 1895. 

Price, John, Manchester, died April 18, 1895. 

Richards C. S., Danvers, died Nov. 26, 1895. 

Richardson, W. B., Peabody, died April 25, 1896. 

Sawyer, Thomas, Boxford, died April 23, 1895. 

Stearns, A. W., Lawrence, died April 20, 1896. 

SouTHwiCK, Sumner, Peabody, died INIay 5, 1895. 

Viles, Bowman, Peabody, died Nov. 2, 1896. 

Walker Lawson, Beverly, died Jan. 1, 1894, aged 77 yrs. 

Walton, George D., Peabody, died Jan. 24, 1896. 

Wheeler, William S., Georgetown, died in 1896. 

Wilkins, Frederick A., Danvers, died Sept. 23, 1895. 

Wilson, Robkrt H., Peabody, died Oct. 3, 1896. 

WiNCHELL, James, Haverhill, died Jan. 15, 1896. 



CONSTITUTION 

OK THK 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Article 1. There shall be a President, four Vice Pres- 
idents, a Secretary, and a Treasurer, who shall be Trustees, 
ex-ojflcio. The President, Vice Presidents, and Secretary 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer by the Trustees, annually, at their meeting in 
November. In addition to these, one Trustee shall be 
elected annually for each town in the County, and the 
Trustee for each town shall be elected by members of the 
Society in said town, at a meeting called for that purpose,* 
in accordance with notice issued by the Secretary, and shall 
continue in office until another is elected in his stead ; and 
such election shall be final, and shall constitute the Trus- 
tee so elected a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Society ; and the result of the election in each town sliall 
be communicated as early as possible to the Secretary. 

Art. 2. There shall be an Annual Meetingof the Soci- 
ety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at which 
all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at least shall 
be necessary to constitute a quorum for the transaction of 
l)usiness. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Presidents shall be absent, the 
members present may appoint one from among them to pre- 
side at such meetiup-. 



•^Tliese meetinRS are held the last Tuesday of October, and the Trustees 
«le(;tpil commence their duties at the Novemher meetinff of Trustees. 



I20 

Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting of the Society ; or whenever a 
written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 
shall be made by any twelve members of the Societ}^ to the 
Presidents and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon ; seven of whom, with the presiding officer, shall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The Trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society, during the intervals of its meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the public, 
publish such communications, and offer premiums in such 
form and value as they think proper(provided the premiums 
offered do not exceed the funds of the Society) ; and shall 
lay before the Society, at each of its meetings, a statement of 
their proceedings and of the communications made to them. 

Art. 7. The Secretary shall take minutes of all the 
voles and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books ; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustees shall direct. He 
shall Avrite and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which shall be lodged with the Secretary, who shall make 
a fair record thereof. The Treasurer shall from time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have oiders for from 
the Trustees ; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, render a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of his duty, in such 
sum as the Trustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 



121 

Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed aiumally by 
the Trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 
report to the Society ; and the same being accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretary in his books. 

Art. 10. In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary or of the Treas- 
urer, the Trustees shall take charge of the official books, 
papers, and other effects belonging to the office that may 
be vacated, and give receipts for the same ; which books, 
papers, etc., they may deliver to some person whom they 
may appoint to fill the office until the next meeting of the 
Society, at which time there shall be a new choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society by paying the sum of three dol 
LARS to increase the permanent fund of the institution. 

Aht. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture of 
our county ; the same to be sacredly appropriated to tha 
purpose. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the Gospel who re- 
side within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past Presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a member 
at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the action at 
the next annual meeting of the Society. 

♦Members will receive from the Secretary a " certificate of membership." No 
fines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are entitled to vote in all its 
transactions, with free use of the Library and a copy of the printed " Transac- 
tions" each year. 

A jiremium of six dollars is now offered to the resident of the county obtain- 
intr tlie largest number of new members during the year ending Nov. 1. 



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SUPPLEMENTARY STATEMENT. 



The net amount leceived from the Committee 
on Annual Exhibition, in September, 1895, 
was 11,613 96 

Received from other sources, 1,952 10 



Total current receipts, i3,566 06 

The total payments, including premiums, were 1,903 95 



Gain for the year, 11,662 11 

The amount borrowed to pay for permanent 

grounds and buildings in Peabody was -^8,300 00 

The total payments were ; 

For land, 88,320 62 

For buildings and improvements, 5,983 90 



Total, 19,304 52 

The excess of expenditures, amounting to #1,004.52, 
was paid out of the annual receipts. 

G. L. Streeter, Treasurer. 
Salem, Dec. 24, 1896. 



1 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

FOR 1896-97. 



PUESIDENT. 

OLIVER S. BUTLER, of Georgetown. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead. 
HORATIO G. HERRICK, of Lawrence. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
J. D. W. FRENCH, of North Andover. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER. 

GILBERT L. STREETER, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

BENJAMIN P. WARE, of Marblehead. 
FRANCIS H. APPLE TON, of Peabody. 



DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



125 



TRUSTEES. 



M. B. Chesley, Amesbury, 
Charles C. Blunt, Andover, 
Joku W. Lovett, Beverly, 
William K. Cole, Boxford, 
Charles Haseltine, Bradford, 
Edw. E. AVoodmau, Dan vers, 
Elias Andrews, Essex, 
Sherman Nelson, Georgetown, 
Bennett Griffin, Gloucester, 
Samuel B. George, Groveland, 
George K. Dodge, Hamilton, 
B. Frank Barnes, Haverhill, 
James W. Bond, Ipswich, 
J. D. Drew, Lawrence, 
Edwin Bates, Lynn. 
John H. Perkins, Lynnfield, 
Daniel W. Friend, Manchester, 
E. G. "Kason, 



Amos P. Alley, Marblehead, 
George W. Sargent, Merrimac, 
G. S. Phippen, Methuen, 
Geo. A. Currier, Middleton, 
Herbert F. Otis, Nahant, 
Nathaniel Dole, Newbury, 
Chas. W. Nelson, Newburyport, 
Peter Holt, Jr., No. Andover, 
Francis H. Appleton, Peabody, 
Allen Smith, Rockport, 
Thomas P. Hale, Rowley, 
Nathan R. Morse, Salem, 
John Q. Evans, Salisbury, 
Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus. 
David Warren, Swampscott, 
George F. Averilj, Topsfield, 
David Pingree, Wenham, 
West Newbui-y. 



Members of Essex Agricultural Society. 

DECEMBER, 1896. 



Previous printed list was in 1894 corrected in 1895 Report. 
If any errors are discovered in the following list, please re- 
port them to the Secretary. Trustees are requested to report 
death of members as soon as they occur, when convenient. 



Cammet, Samuel 
Chesley, John F. 
Chesley, M. B. 
Currier, W. H. B. 
Davis, B. Lewis 
Feltch, Elbridge S. 
Gale, Edmund 
Gale, Foster 



AMESBURY— 23. 

Goodwin, E. A. ^JVIorse, Daniel L. 
Hill, Albert C. Nelson, David 0. 

Hollander, Lambert Sawyer, Aaron ^. 
Huntington, B. F. Tewksbury, R. R. 



Little, J. P. 
Lane, T. W. 
Mason, John J. 
Morrill, George T. 



Tibbetts, William B. 
True, Eben 
Vining, William F. 



.\bbott, James J. 
■Abbott, Nathan F. 
•Abbott, Hartwell B. 

Abbott John B. 

Albeget, Lewis 

Andrews, M. C. 

.Vverill, George L. 

Bailey, Moses A. 



ANDOVER— 47. 

Bailey, Samuel H. 
Blunt, Charles C. 
Blunt Joseph H. 
Buchan, George 
Buchan, George W. 
Burnham, George L. 
Butterfield, J. P. 
Carter, Charles L. 



Chandler,'Joshua H. 
Cheever, James O. 
Cole, John N. 
GTt«tmifl^s>-GrO: 
Downing, Mrs. J. J. 
Earaes, Plato 
Flint, John H. 
Foster, George W. 



127 



Foster, George C Jenkins, John B. 
Foster, F. H. Jenkins, E. Kendall 

Gould, Milo H. Johnson, Francis H. 

Harriman, Thos. P. McLawlin, Henry, 
Haywood, Henry A.Moor, J. Warren 
Holt, E. F. Noyes, Henry P. 

Holt, Ballard Poor, Joseph W. 

Playdon, Alfred G. 



Rea, Jasper 
Ripley, George 
Smith, John L. 
Smith, Peter D. 
Smith, Benjamin F. 
Smith, Joseph W. 
Thayer, Samuel 
Tucker, William 



Abbott, Stephen A. 
Andrews, Joseph F. 
Appletou, Nathan D. 
Appleton, Edw. H. 
Avery, Mark B. 
Baker, John I. 
Bancroft, Kobert H. 
Burnham, 0. B. 
Brewer, George 
Carter, John W. 
Caldwell, Charles E. 
Clark, George 
Clark, Arthur E. 
Clark, Aug. N. 
Clark, Peter E. 
Cochrane, Alex'r 
Connelly, Stephen 
Dalton, Charles H. 
Dan forth, E. F. 
Dexter, Gordon 
Dodge, Andrew 
Dodge, Benjamin B 
Dodge, Fred A. 
Dodge, Israel W. 
Dodge, Joshua S. 



BEVERLY— 93. 

Foster, Issacher jr. Xorwood, Francis 
Foster, William A. Obear, Ezekiel F. 
Foster, William B. Paine, Charles C. 
Friend, Seth Perry, Albert 

Giles, Benj. V. Phillips, J. 0. Mrs. 

Gardner, John L. Pickett, Charles 
Herrick, Joseph H. Pierson, C. L. 
Hill, Hugh Pickman, D. L. 

Howse, Thomas W. Pitman, Mark 
Lee, Asa F. Pope, Jasper 

Lord, Cyrus W. Porter, Adouiram 
Larcom, Rufus Preston, Ezra 

Lawrence, C. A. Raymond, John W. 
Loring, Augustus P.Raymond, J. W. jr. 
Loring, Wm, Caleb Saltonstall, Robert 
Lothrop, Elmer A. Sawyer, E. C 



Lovett, Francis S. 
Lovett, John W. 
Mason, Alfred A. 
Mason, George 



Sohier, Wm. D. 
Stickney, George W. 
Stone, Samuel H. 
Swasey, E. 



Mason, Charles A. Trask, J. G. 
. Mason, Lyman Trafton, Darling F. 

Marsters, James A. Trask, Joseph W. 
Mayo, Josiah Vittum, Albert 

Mitchell, John E. Wallis, Joseph A. 



Dodge, Forest C. 
Dodge, Lucius B. 
Dodge, Walter F. 
Elliot, John T. 



128 

Morgan, William C. Webb, Aldeu 
Morse, John T. Williams. Augustus 

M )ulton, Charles Wliitcomb, Austin 
IMoulton, John A. Woodbury, L. jr. 



Eudicott, Robert E. Munsey, John G. Woodbury H. W. 
P\)3ter, David L. Murney, Jjhn M. Woodbury, Rufus 



Anderson,Charles R. 
Andrew, Isaac W. 
Austin, Charles F. 
Austin, George B. 
Barnes, B. S. 
Cbadwick, Geo. W. 
Chal wick, James W. 
Chadwick, Walter I. 



BOXFORD— 22. 

Cole, Warren M. Parkhurst, John 
Cole, Wm. Kimball Parkhurst, John W. 



Day, Isaac C. 
Day, Mrs. John 
Herrick, Israel 
Killam, H. M. 
Nason, James 11. 



Pearl, Edw. E. 
Pearl, oTohn M. 
Perley, Charles 
Wood, John T. 
Webster, James 



H. 



Bradstreet,Justin E. 
Cogswell, Doane 
Cogswell, George 
Day, C. John 
Ellis, John A. 
Emerson, Charles B. 
Franklin, S. F. Miss 
Gage, Edwin V. 
Hazeltine, Charles 
Hazeltine, John 
Hilton, William 



BRADFOPvD— 33. 

Hilton, Charles M. 
Hopkinson,San;"l W 
Johnson, Charles G. 
Johnson, Laburton 
Kimball, Leverett 
Kim ball, William B. 
Kimball, Byron G. 
Kimball, M.Tenney 
Kingsbury, John D. 
Knight, Albert A. 
Ladd, George W. 



McKee, William 
Ordway, Alfred A. 
Peabody, Frank 
Peabody, Daniel 
Phillips,G. Franklin 
Tewksbury, John B. 
Thornton, William 
Towne, Herman W. 
Wales, Herbert E. 
Webster, Charles E. 
Whittier, Arthur G. 



DAN VERS— 87. 

Barton, J. Webb Learoyd, A. P. 
Batchelder, J. Q. A. Legro, John C. P. 



Putnam, Israel H. 
Putnam. John A. 



I 29 



Berry. Allen A. 
Bradstreet, Alvah J. 
Bradstreet, Elijah 
Bradstreet, William 
Carlton, 0. Loring 
Carlton, Wm. B. 
Christopher, Wm. P. 
Clark, K J. 
Day, Clarence 
Deinpsey, L. P. 
Dodge, Francis 
Eaton, Winslow W. 
Fellows, Alfred 
Fernald, Oliver 
Fisher, Franklin W. 
Fuller, Solomon 
Gould. Charles H. 
Gustin, John H. 
Harrigan, D. J. 
Hood, Joseph E. 
Hutchinson, W. P. 
Jacobs, Wm. A. 
Jackson, Eben 
Jones, L. H. 
Kerns, Charles 
Kimball, Francis 0. 
Kimball, Joel 
Kirliy, Patrick 



Lyford, Francis W. 
Massey, Dudley A. 
Marston, Jacob 
Morrison, L. L. 
Mudge Augustus 
Nichols, Andrew 
Nichols, Andrew,] r. 
Newhall, Benj. E. 
Newhall, Henry 
O'Neal, T. H. " 
Page, Charles W. 
Patch, Abraham 
Peabody, George H. 
Peabody, George A. 
Peart, William B. 
Perley, Dean A. 
Perley. Edward P. 
Perkins, Henry A. 
Perkins, Warren G. 
Perkins, William P. 
Perkins, M. Sumner 
Pettingill, David A. 
Pettingill, M. C. 
Pillsbury, H. H. 
Pope, Ira P. 
Porter, J. Prank 
Preston, Charles H. 



Putnam, Joel 
Putnam, Benj. W. 
Putnam, Otis F. 
Pratt, George 
Porter, John W. 
Pope, Daniel }'. 
Proctor, Nathan P. 
Richardson, James 
Roberts, Edmund C. 
Roberts, John F. 
Roberts, Oliver 
Rollins, Jonas 
Rice, Chas. B. 
Sears, John A. 
Swinerton, John 
Smart, John L. 
Tapley, George 
Tapley, Gilbert A. 
Trask, Joseph W. 
Upton, Franklin W. 
Verry, Augustus 
Verry, H. Otis 
Verry, Henry 
Weston, Mrs. L. P. 
White, Henry A. 
Woodman, Edw. E. 
Whipple, John F. 



ESSEX— 14. 

Haskell, David L. 
Haskell, George 
Knowlton, Aaron 
Knowlton. Moses 



Andrews, Elias 
Burn ham, Wash. 
Burnhatn, D. B. 

Choate, Rufus 

Cogswell, Charles B. Knowlton, l^erry B. 



Lee, Edward K. 
Low, Josiah 
Lufkin. A. E 
McDonald, Daniel 



I30 



GEORGETOWN— 28. 



Bate man, A. P. 
Boardinan, MosesN. 
Butler, Oliver S. 
Chapman, Jonathan 
Curtis, Samuel IS". 
Harriman, Hiram N. 
Hilliard, Henry 
Hoyt, Martin L, 
Jackson, John L. 
James, George B. 



Marble, Nafchmiel 
Nelson, Slisnnan 
Osgood. Stephen 
Perley, David E. 
Pillsbury, J. 
Poor, Samuel T. 
Ridley, Amos 
Spotford, Sumner P. 
Tenne}', George J 



Tenney, Gorham D 
Tenney, Milton S. 
Tenney, Moses 
Tenney, Orlando B. 
Towne, Alfred E 
Tuck, John S. 
Weston, George S. 
Whitham, CharlesM. 
Yeaton, Winfred J. 



Babson, Horatio 
Babson, Osman 
Barrett, Charles P. 
Bennett, Charles 
Bradford, George R. 
Brown, Edward H. 
Burnham, A. M. 
Burnham, S. A. 
Calef, John C. 
Carter, John S. 
Carter, Sherman J. 
Cole, Israel H. 
Conant, Thomas 
Cook, Benjamin F. 
Corliss, John 
Cronin, John 
Curtis, Samuel, jr. 
Dodd, Stephen 
Dolliver, John S. 
Dolliver, William P. 
Fears, Robert R. 



GLOUCESTER— 62. 

Ferguson, Thos. B. 
Foster, Jeremiah 
Garland, Joseph 
Griffin, Bennett 
Grover, Charles E. 
Haskell, H. C. L. 
Haskell, William H. 
Hawkes, E. C. 
Herrick, GardnerW. 
Knowles, Thomas J. 
Lane, Andrew 
Lovett, John H. 
Low, David W. 
Marr, Chester, jr. 
Mayo, Israel C. 
Norwood, George 
Parsons, W. Frank 
Patillo, Alexander 
Pew, William A. 
Phillips, N. H. 
Presson, David S. 



Presson, Alfred 
Price, Augustus E. 
Proctor, Joseph 0. 
Proctor, Wilbur F. 
Ricker, Richard W. 
Roberts, Joshua 
Rogers, Allan 
Rogers, John S. 
Rust, William P. 
Shepherd, Joseph C. 
Somes, John E. 
Stacy, John H. 
Stan wood, Barnard 
Story, Cyrus 
Webster, Nathaniel 
Wetherell, M. L. 
Wilson, John J. 
Wonson, F. G. 
Wonson, George M. 
Wonson, J. W. 



1 ^I 



Balch, Charles T. 
Balch, Thomas H. 
Batchelder, Chas. C. 
Day, Randall B. 
Fegan, Henry C. 
George, Edwin B. 
George, Edwin H. 
George, Samuel B. 



GROVELA.ND— 22. 

Harrington, Edward 
Harriman, Moses H 
Harriman, Abel S. 
Hopkinsou, W. H. 
Ladd, Nathaniel E. 
Longfellow, N. 
Martiuo, Philip H. 



Merrill, Burton E. 
Pemberton, L. K. 
Spofford, Henry H. 
Stacy, Edward M. 
Stickuey, Abel 
Tenney, George H. 
Woodbury, Louis A 



Abbott, M. K. 
Allen, Francis R. 
Brown, William A. 
Dane, Ephraim A.. 
Dane, George E. F. 
Dane, Sylvester 
Dodge, Albert W. 
Dodge, Emerson P. 
Dodge, George B. 



HAMILTOX— 26. 

Dodge, George R. Norwood, C. J. 

Dunnels, Ira A. Putnam, Charles 0. 

Foss, Robert Rankin, Eli D. 

Gardner, A. P. Robinson, E. P. 

Gibney, George H. Safford, Daniel E. 
Knowlton, Franklin Smith, Alviu 

Knowlton, Isaac F. Whipple, Era. A. 

Meyer, Geo. V. L. Wright, Frank V. 
Nason, Daniel A. 



Adams, A. H. 
Barnes, B Frank 
Barry J. M. 
Brickett, Benj. F. 
Brickett, Barnard 
Butters, Charles 
Butrick, A. W. 
Chase, C W. 
Cheever, H. VV. 
Corliss, Charles 
Dewhurst, James 



HAVERHILL— 69. 

Hobson, John L. 
Hoyt, H. H. 
Howe, James 
Johnson, Henry H. 
Lackey, Andrew — 
Little, J. G. S. 
Merrill, James C 
Messerve, Wm. S. 
Mitchell, E. 
Moody, Wm. H. 
:Moody, H. L. 



Ridgeway, Jos. 
Riley, A. W. 
Rhodes, C. N. 
Sanders, Thomas 
Smith, George S. 
Sprague, W. W. 
Swasey, H. K. 
Taylor, IMartin 
Taylor, Oliver 
Titcomb, Beniah 
Wadleigh, Levi C. 



Eaton, B. F. 
Emerson, Albert 
Euierson, Marcus 
Emerson, E. A. 
Farnsworth, J. H. 
Fellows, C. H. 
Frost, Henry 
Gale, John E. 
Goodwin, John 0. 
Hanson, M. W. 
Haseltiue, Amos, jr 
Hardy, George H. 



132 

Morse, Leslie K. 
Nichols, John B. 
Nichols, J B. 
Osgood, William W. 
Peters, Daniel 
Piper, G. .Al. T. 
Poore, F. W. 
Porter, Dudley 
Quinby, T. W. 
Randall, John P. 
Richards, F. G. 
• Richardson, John B. 



Webster, C. W. 
Webster, Ebenezer 
Webster, Ira J. 
Webster, Frank S. 
Webster, E. F. 
Webster, Richard 
West, H. K. 
West, James F. 
White, James D. 
Whittier, Alvah 
Whittier, Warner R. 
Wilson, Henry S. 



Abbott, Joseph D. 
Appleton, Francis R 
Appleton, Daniel F. 
Baker, S. N. jr. 
Bond, James W. 
Brown, Everett K 
Brown, S. Albert 
Carlisle, J. W. 
Clark, Erastus 
Fall, Tristam B. 
Fellows, Alonzo B. 



IPSWICH— 34. 
Gould, John J. 
Gould, Walter F. 
Grant, Joshua B. 
Green, George H. 
Haskell, George 
Hobbs, John 
Hodgdon, George 



Kinsman, Willard F- 
Marshall. Joseph 
Perkins, Isaac E. B. 
Reddy, ^Michael 
Ross, Joseph 
Rutherford, Aaron A. 
Shatswell, Nath 



Hodgkms, AugustineStone, Augustine 
HortOD, Joseph Story, Alden 

Kimball, Danial Underbill, J. C. 

Kinnear, James Whittier, Maynard 

Kinsman, Joseph F. 



Allyn, Warren E. 
Ames, M. B. 
Austin, M. E. 
Ball, F. J. 
Hell, Charles U. 
liodwell, S. B. 



LAWRENCE— 75. 
Gile, William H. 
Griffin, Anson L. 
Hall, Dyer S. 
Her rick, H. G. 
Hills, George W. 
Hood, Gilbert E. 



Richardson, E. P. 
Riley, Henry 
Robinson, H. B. 
Ruht, Joseph 
Russell, George W. 
Russell, W. A. 



133 



Boehm, Adolph G. 
Breen, Johu 
Bruce, Alex'r B. 
Cabot, George D. 
Colbuvn, George W 
Collins, Lewis P. 
Currier, Ebeu B. 
Ourran, 3Iaurice K 
DeCourcey, C. A. 
Drew, J. D. 
Dyer, Arthur W. 
Farrell, John 
Fay, John 
Finn, John L. 
Flynn, Edward 
Fitzgerald, Wm. 
Ford, George 
Ford, Patrick 
French, A. J. 



Holt, Lewis G. 
Hubbard, Leavitt 
Jackson, Joseph 
Jewett, Wm. S. 
Joyce, James W. 
Junkius, George S. 
Kittredge, G. H. 
Kline, George E. 
Lewis, S. S. 
McAllister, J. G. 
Mahoney, W. 0. 
McCarthy, Patrick 
Merrill, George S. 
Moore, L. C 
Norwood, John K. 
Oswald, William 
Page, E. F. 
Parker, Walter E. 
Pedrick, W. R. 



Ryan, Thomas F. 
Sanborn, Edwin M. 
Sargent, A. E. 
Saunders, Daniel 
Saunders, Caleb 
Shattuck, Joseph 
Simpson, James R. 
Small, Henry 
Smith, James B. 
Stanley, J. J. 
Stowell, Joseph 
Sylvester, Wm. H. 
Tewksbury, R. H. 
Tompkins, N. S. S. 
Truell, Byron 
Victor, F. M. 
Webster, H. K. 
Wellman, John R. 
Wiggin, Gilman P. 



Aldrich, A. P. 
Allen, Charles 
Allen, Walter B. 
Andrews. Randall 
Bates, Edwin 
Bates, Walter E. 
Bates, William H. 
Bates, Fred H. 
Bates, Wallace 
Beckford, Ebenezer 
Beede, C. 0. 
Berry, Henry N. 
Berry, Benj. J. 
Biay, E. E. 



LYNN— 101. 

Harnden, Henry C. 
Harris, N. S. 
Hawkes, Nathan M. 
Heath, Henry A. 
Heath, James 
Hill, E. L. 
Hopkins, Fred 1. 
Hovey, Rufus P. 
Ingalls, James W. 
Ireson, S. S. 
Jepson, Eli 
Joint, William H. 
Kimball, Rufus 
King, W. P. 



Nichols, Otis 
Nichols, Thomas P. 
Norris, George jr. 
Noyes, George C. 
Oliver, John E. 
Parsons, Charles E. 
Pevear, G. K. 
Pevear, H. A. 
Phillips, B. Frank 
Potter, Edward P. 
Preble, J. H. 
Rarasdell, Chas. H. 
Richards, Edw. A. 
Richardson, Geo. W. 



134 



Breed, Amos F. 
Breed, George H. 
Breed, Henry H. 
Breed, Richard 
Bushby, Warren 
Butman, Joseph E. 
Butman, Wra. W. 
Cain, Julia A. Mrs. 
Chase, L. H. 
Chase, Amos F. 
Cross, Alfred 
Crosoup, James A. 
Cressey, John S. 
Dwyer, Edward F. 
Emery, George E. 
Farrar, Joseph E. 
Fry, Charles C 
Goodell, J. VV. 
Goodwin, Joseph W. 
Haskell, John C. 



Bray, William A. 
Cox, Thomas E. jr. 
Dan forth, John M. 
Derby, Charles H. 
Gerry, Elbridge F. 
Herrick, George E. 



Knox, David 
Lamphier, Joseph C. 
Lewis, Jacob M. 
Mace, Frank W. 
Marsh, George E. 
Marsh, S E. 
May, Lyman A. 
McBrien, Richard 
McKenney, John H 
Merritt, Timothy 
Mockett, Joseph E. 
Mower, A. A. 
Mower, M. Y. B. 
Mudge, John 
Neal, Peter M. 
JSTewhall, Asa T. 
Newhall, G. A. 
Newhall, Hiram L. 
ISTewhall, George T. 
Nichols, H. S. 



Rogers, Ira D. 
Roney. Simon J. 
Rounds, Herbert L. 
Rowell, B. W. 
Scribner, Benj. 
Sheehan, John 
Shorey, John L. 
Shorey, George L. 
.Sawyer, J. A. J. 
Teel, James M. 
Tyler, Thaddeus W. 
Usher, Roland G. 
Vickary, J. C. 
Ward, Benj. A. 
Whipple, Geo. H. 
Willey, James L. 
Wilson, J. C. 
Winslow", Aaron 
Winslow, G. W. 



LYNNFIELD— 16. 

Mausfield, Andrew Perkins, J. Winslow 



Munroe, Harry W. 
Munroe, Wilbur J. 
Newhall,, Frank 
Perkins, John H. 



Roundy, George M. 
Roundy, W. R. 
Smith, Henry E. 
Verne, B. P. 



MANCHESTER— 17. 
Allen, Wm. H. Cheever, Wm. M. Prince, Charles A. 

Baker, John Coolidge, T.JeifersonRockwell, A. P. 

Boardman, T.DennieFriend, Daniel W. Rabardy, Julius F. 
Burnham, John A. Higginson, Henry Sturgis, Russell 
Cheever, John H. Lee, Allen Wiggleswortli, Gf'o. 

Curtis, C. A. Merriain, Arthur M. 



135 

MARBLEHEAD— 14. 

Alley, Amos P. Clough, A. W. Cronin, Michael 

Appleton, Thomas -Cloutman, B, Henry Dennis, W. John 
Gregory, J. J. H. Hathaway, Joseph B. Phillips, Wra. S. jr. 
Fabens, Frank L. Hathaway, Seth W. Ware, Benjamin P. 
Hathaway, Amos C. Paine, Thomas W. 



MERRIMAC— n. 

Adams, George Loud, L. C. 

Haskell, William H.Pike, Jaraes D. 
Hoyt, George W. Sargent, M. Perry 
Hopkins, S. C. Sargent Bailey 



Sargent, Geo. W. 
Sargent, P. Willis 
Sargent, Walter H. 



Bradley, George B. 
Buswell, Joseph E. 
Butters, George A. 
Butters, W. H. 
Crosby, John S. 
Dow, Virgil 
Dow, Homer 
Dwyer, Michael 
Emerson, Jacob, jr. 
George, John H. 
Goss, Chas. E. 



METHUEN— 32. 

Hall, C. H. 
How, Joseph S. 
Mann, C. W. 
Morrison, D. T, 
Noyes, David W. 
Pedlar, S. J. 
Phippen, G. S. 
Parkei", James 0. 
Rogers, William M. 
Russell, Fred A. 
Russell, A. P. 



Sargent, S. G. 
Shirley, John W. 
Sawyer, Chas. M. 
Sleeper, Wm. C. 
Smith, Walter 
Swan, Leverett 
Thurlow, J. E. 
Tozier, C. L. 
Thorp, Alfred 
Webster, Frank W. 



Berry, William 
Currier, Geo. A. 
Flint, James 
Haskell, George F. 



MIDDLETON— 10. 

Peabody, A. W. 
Stiles, Farnum 
Stiles, Hiram A. 



Stewart, Mrs, S. A. 
Weston, Solomon W. 
Wilkins, George B. 



Beal,f- James H. 
Codmau, Edw. W. 
Goodale, By ion 



136 

NAHANT-.12. 

Lodge, Henry Cabot Parker, E. Francis 
Lovering, Charles T. Parker, Arthur H. 
Merriam F. Upham, George P. 



James, Geo. Abbott Otis, Herbert F. Whitney, George 



Adams, Daniel D. 
Adams, George W. 
Adams, James K. 
Adamg, George E. 
Bray, George W. 
Coffin, William P. 
Coleman, Moses 
Dole, Nathaniel 
Forbes, A. B. 
Hale, Stephen P. 
Howard, Horatio M. 
Ilsley, Edwin 
Ilsley, Paul M. 
Hsley, Joseph 
Jaques, Richard 
Jaques,Richard T. j 
Jaques, William 
Kent, Edward 



NEWBURY— 52. 
Knight, Charles F. 
Little, Carleton 
Little, Edward F. 
Little, George 



Noyes, Richard T. 
Noyes, Edward A. 
Noyes,. Justin 
Xoyes, James 



Little, Nathaniel jr. Noyes, Moses K. 
Little, William Perkins, Wm. W. 

Little, Wm. Burke Perkins, Frank 
Longfellow,Horace FPerkins, Paul A. 
Longfellow, Joseph Pearson, Benj. jr. 
Longfellow, Jos. Mrs. Plummer, Geo. H. 
Lucy, Gideon R. Rogers, Abial 
Lunt, Charles M. Rolfe, John C. 
Lunt, C. A. Rolfe, Joseph N. 

Moody, Nath'l W. Tenney, Henry L. 
Moynihan, CorneliusTenuey, Daniel G. 
r.Newman, Sidney F. Toomey Mathew H. 
Noyes, Edwin P. Woods, Charles W. 



Adams, Philip D. 
Adams, Rufus 
Allen, John W. 
Balch, Jolin H. 
Bartlett, Chas. S. 
Bay ley, Wm. H. 
Capers, Thomas 



NEWBURYPORT— 48. 

Johnson, Wm. R. Noyes, Isaac P. 

Kent, Otis L. Ordway, A. D.. 

Knights, George W.Perley, R. M. 

Lewis, Samuel W. Perkins, Charles 
- Little, Hector Plummer, Moses A. 

Little, John G. Poore, George H. 

Lunt, Charles Rowe, D. T. 



6/ 



Colman, James C. 
Conley, Joseph J. 
Cook, T. N. 
Cutter, Eben P. 
Delano, Otis 
Dodge, E. P. 
Griffin, Eliphalet 
Hart, James S. 
Hewett, C. C. 
Huff, William 



Maguire, C. N. 
Marsh, Horace W. 
Moseley Edward A.. 
Moseley, Edward S. 
Mosely, Fred'k S. 
Moultou, Henry W. 
Moulton, Joseph 
Nelson Charles W. 
Newhall, Asa T. 



Sargent, John W. 
Smith, Joseph B. 
Stanley, B. F. 
Stanley, J. C 
Thurlow, William 
Tiltou, Enoch 
Toppan, Edward S. 
Winkley, J. Otis 
Winkley, Panl T. jr. 



NO. ANDOVER— 42. 



Adams, Edward 
Butterfield, Chas. A. 
Bassett, Leon H. 
Barker, John 
Carlton, Daniel A. 
Carlton, Amos D. 
Chever, William J. 
Davis, George G. 
Davis, George E. 
Dale, William J. 
Farnham, B. H. 
Farnham, Mrs. B. 
Farnham, J. L. 
Farnhauj, W. Benj. 



Fuller, Edward A. 
Poster, J. Frank 
Foster, Nathan 
Foster, Orrin 
French, J. D. W. 
Frye Newton P. 
Fuller, Abijah P. 
Goodhue, Hiram P. 
Greene. E. W. 
Hayes, Walter H. 
Holt, Peter, jr. 
Huges, Winfield S. 
Jenkins, Benj. F. 
Jenkins, Milon S. 



Johnson, Charles^F. 
Kittredge, HannahE. 
Loring, Geo. B. 
Mauion, John 
Mathewson, George 
Poor, James C. 
Robinson, Add isonM. 
Rogers, George A. 
Stevens, Moses T. 
Stevens, Oliver 
Symonds, Frederick 
Wilson, Abiel 
Ward well, 'J\ 0. 
Wiley, John A. 



PEA.BODY— 121. 

Aunis, Peter W. Harrington, H. A. 
Appleton, Francis H.Hayes, Andrew J. 
Barrett, E. Pope Haven, C. B. 
Barrett, Edward P. Hills, Charles C. 
Batchelder, CyrusT. Hill, W. L. 



Poor, Albert F. 
Porter, Leonard E. 
Porter, Edward H. 
Preston, Levi 
Quint, Nicholas M. 



I -.8 



Blake, E L. 
Blaney, Stephen 
Bodge, Jacob G. 
Bodge, Henry 
Brown, Lewis 
Brown, Rufus H. 
Brown, R. S. 
Bursley, Geo. A. 
Bushby, N. A. 
Bushby, Charles F. 
Buxton, Henry V. 
Buxton, Simon P. 
Carroll, Thomas 
Clark, George H. 
Clark, A. B. 
Clark, Wm. P. 
Cody, James F. 
Colcord, J. L. 
Colcord, J. H. J. 
Curtis, George S. 
Daley, William J. 
Davis, Charles W. 
Dodge, A. Taylor 
Dole, William T. 
Drown, Isaac A. 
Durkee, T. C. 
Emerton, C. S. 
Farley, Charles B. 
Farrington, Geo. C. 
Fellows, William H. 
Foster, George M. 
Foster, H. K. 
Goodale, Jacob O. 
Goulding, C. H. 
Grosvenor, D. P. 
Hall, Benjamin G. 



Hinkley, C. E. 
Herrick, John E. 
Hooper, Charles H. 
Humprey, B. B. 
Hutchinson, C. K. 
Kimball, ElizabethC. 
Ivelley, Elbridge G. 
King, George H. 
King, J. Augustus 
King, Jonathan 
King, D. Warren 
Knowlton, Isaac P. 
Knapp, Samuel E. 
Linnehan, James 
Lyons, Thomas F. 
Luramus, Abraham 
Mackintosh, Richard. 
Mansfield, E. 
Mansfield, ArthurW. 
McKeen, John D. 
Merrill, Amos 
Moore, Benj. N. 
Morris, R. E. 
Needham, GeorgeA. 
Needham, Joseph S. 
Newhall, Orlando F. 
Nourse, Samuel W. 
Osborne, Abraham C. 
Osborne, Daniel W. 
Osborne, J. Edward 
Osborn, Lyman E. 
Osgood, Geo. Fred 
Osgood, William 
O'Keefe, Timothy 
Pepper, George W. 



Quint, Hazen A. 
Raddin, Alonzo 
Rellihan, Thomas J. 
Reynolds, George 
Rogers, Jacob C. 
Safford, 0. F. 
Sanger, George F. 
Sawyer, Wm. F. 
Shaw, Warren 
Shay, William A. 
Sheen, William E. 
Sim, Peter 
Smith, Jesse H. 
Southwick, B. F. 
Spaulding, George E. 
Stanley, Frank W. 
Stevens, Jacob B. 
Stock well, Harry E. 
Stone, Charles E. 
Taylor, Benj. H. 
Taylor, Geo. W. 
Thomas, Josiah B. 
Trask, Arthur 
Twiss, Everett M. 
Walcott, John G. 
Wallace, David B. 
Ward, William K 
Warner, Charles 0. 
Wells, A. E. 
Wheeler, Benj. S. 
Whiddeu, A. M. 
Whipple, Horace P. 
Whipple, C. H. 
Wiley, William F. 
Winchester, Went'th 



139 



AppletoD, Zeno A. 
Bray, Humphrey P. 
Dodd, Stephen 
Grimes, Loring 
Lane, Andrew 
Lane, Andrew, jr. 
Lane, Horace 



ROCKPORT— 20. 

Low, Martha J. Mrs. Pool, Story D. 
Manning, John J. Howe Amos 
Manning,William N.Sraith, Allen 
Merridew, James P. Smith, William K. 
McNeil, William Smith, Solomon 
Nickerson, Lewis E. Tufts, George W. 
Norwood, Gorham 



Bartlett, B. W. 
Blodgette, George B. 
Carlton, George F. 
Daniels, George E. 
Dodge, Joseph D. 
Dodge, Paul A. 
Dodge, Phineas A. 
Dummer, Nath'l N. 
Hale. Clara A. 



ROWLEY— 26. 

Hale, Daniel H. 
Hale, Thaddeus 
Hale, Agnes H. 
Hale, T. P. 
Keyes, Eben S. 
Lambert, Mary G. 
Mahoney, John 
MighiU, Charles P. 
O'Brien, Daniel 



Pike, John 
Smith, Willard P. 
Stockbridge, Seth 
Stockbridge, A. J. 
Tenney, John H. 
Todd, Frank P. 
Todd, John F. 
Todd, J. Scott 



Almy, James F. 
Abbott, Nathaniel 
Bickerton, William 
•Cur wen, James B. 
Chase, George 
Cooper, Charles A. 
Curwen, Samuel H. 
Clark. Charles S. 
Collins, Wm. F. M. 
Creesy, George W. 
Creamer, George G. 
Daland, John 



SALEM— 66. 

Ives, John S. 
Jones, Samuel G. 
Kemble, Arthur 
Knight, Edmund F. 
Lam son, Frederick 
Little, Philip 
Lord, William 
^Manning, Robert 
Merrill, E. H. 
Merritt, David 
Morse, E. Henry 
Morse, Nathan R. 



Page, James E. 
Pickering, Benj. P. 
Rantoul, Robert S. 
Rogers, Dudley P. 
Robinson, John 
-Rogers, A. D. 
Reynolds, Henry E. 
Ropes, Willis H. 
Ropes, Charles F. 
Ropes, John C. 
Ropes, Reuben W 
Saunders, Robert J. 



140 



Dane, William A. 
Endicott, Win. C. 
Felt, Johu 
Foster, Joseph C. 
Foster, William J. 
Gardner, A. B. 
Hathaway, John 
Hale, Henry A. 
Holman, Lyman 
Horton, William A. 



Bartlett, Moses J. 
Dol^, Edward G. 
Dow, George A. 
Eaton, John F. 
Evans, John Q. 



Blodgett, J. W. 
Faxon, M. B. 
George, Henry M. 
Hawkes, Samuel 



Crosman, S. F. 
Pettingell, L. D. 
Petti n gel 1, S. J. 



Northend, Wm. D. 
Peabody, John P. 
Perkins, E R. 
Perkins, John W. 
Porter, Ellis H. 
Putnam, Henry W. 
Potter, William 
Pingree, David 
Page, John G. 
Phillips, Willard P. 



Shreve, (J. 15. 
Spencer, Charles P. 
Swasey, John A. 
Streeter, Gilbert L. 
Tracey, Patrick 
Ware, Horace C. 
White, Frank W. 
Whitmore, Wm. F. 
Waters, David P. 
Wyman, Isaac C. 



SALISBURY— 15. 



Getchell, N. Tracey Pettengill, Wesley 
Gilraan, Samuel Pettengill, John Q. A. 
Greeley, Furmer H. Smith, John F. 
Greenleaf, Wm. H. Thornton, Robert 
Montgomery, John True, P. Albert 



SAUGUS— 10. 

Hawkes, Lewis W. Newhall, Joseph 
Hill, Alfred C. Penney, George H. 

Xewhall, Herbert B. Whitehead, Joseuh 



SWAMPSCOTT— 7. 

Rowe, Allen 
Washburiie, John 



Warren, David 
Warren, Mrs. N. J. 



TOPSFIELD— 18. 
Averill, George F. Hood, Salmon D. Manning, James 
Bradstreet, Dudley Lamson, J. Arthur Mason, Alphonso 
Ferguson, Edw. E. Leach, Charles H. Peabody, Charles J. 



141 



Pierce, Thomas W. Towne, Frank H. 
Pike. Baxter P. Ward, Richard 

Poole, Benjainiu Wildes, Eugene L. 



Wilson, James 
Wilkins, Lyman S. 
Woodbury, Isaac M. 



WENHAM— 18. 

Alley, Henry Dodge, George F. 

Hatchelder,T.WilsonDodge, William P. 

Cole, Zachariah Hobbs, A. F. 

Day, Everett K. Hobbs, Henry 

Demsey, H. H. Kavanagh, J. 

Dodge, Eobert F. Morgan, William B, Tilton, George H. 



Pingree, David 
Peabody, George W. 
Patch, Henry 
Perkins, Nath'l P. 
Prince, Samuel R. 



WEST NEWBURY— 51. 



Amend, Robert A. 
Bailey, William P. 
Bailey, Lawrence H. 
Bartlett, M. Walsh 
Boy n ton, Eben M. 
Brown, Hayden 
Brown, Leander F. 
Carr, George G. 
Chace, S. F. 
Connor, M. H. 
Connor, J. J. 
Evans, Charles M. 
Follansbee, B. A. 
Flook, George L. 
Goodridge, H. M. 
Gordon, J. R. 
Gowen, Mrs. C. W. 



Gowen, C. W. 
Gowen, Oscar 
Jaques, Romulus 
Jaques, Stephen A. 
King, T. J. 
Ladd, Byron H. 
Merrill, William 
Merrill, William E. 
Merrill, Henry 
Moody, Horace 
Moore, Alfred L. 
Nason, Ezekiel G. 
Nason, Henry F. 
Newell, Richard 
Ordway, Cyrus D. 
Ordway, Cyrus K. 



Ordway, Charles W. 
Pierce, George J. 
Pierce, Henry J. 
Poor, Fred H. 
Poor, George H. 
Poor, William H. 
Poore, Moses H. 
Prince, S. R. 
Rogers, George C. 
Smith, Robert L. 
Stanwood, Moses P. 
Stan wood, G. Miss 
Stultz, Frederick 
Talton, John C. 
Thurlow, Thomas C. 
Titcomb, Silas M. C. 



NON-RESIDENTS— 145. 

Allen, Henry C., Keene, N. H. Low, Sidney, Groton 
Alley, James E. Low, Aaron, Hingham 



142 



Ames, Amos L., TacomajWash. 
Armitage, John S., Wellesley 
Babson, Gustavus,jr., Seward, 

Xeb. 
Balch, Eustis, California 
Balcli, William H., Maiden 
Baker, John, Sanborn, Col. 
Barker, John G., Boston 
Beckford, C. H., Boston 
Bennett, Charles, So. Gardner, 

Mass. 
Blake, J. Albert, Lexington 
Blake, J. P., Newton 
Black, James D., Harvard 
Bodwell, Henry A.,Keene, N.H. 
Bodwell,Jos. R., Hallowell, Me. 
Brackett, 11. Clarke, Virginia 
Burnham, Choate, Boston 
Burnham, Ira T., Lexington 
Caldwell, L., Jacksonville, Fla. 
Campbell, Charles II., Xew 

Rochelle, N. Y. 
Carey, James, Quincy 
Carey, James, New York 
Chapin, W. C, Providence, R.I. 
Chase, Joseph S., Maiden 
Cheever, John H., Somerville 
Clarke, Joseph F., Boston 
Cleveland, H. W. S., Chicago 
Colby, Charles A., New York 
Currier, William A., Boston 
Day, Abraham, Boston 
Davis, Phineas E., Chicago 
Dodge, John S., Chicopee 
Dole, Francis F., Chicopee 
Drew, Charles R., Medford 
Eaton, Thop.. Harriston, 11). 



Low, George P. Hingham 
Lyford, Geo. H., New York 
INtann, Otis, Springfield 
Martin, Walter T., Dover, N.H. 
iNIcFarland, L,, Maine 
Merrill, Geo. F., No. Hampton, 

N. H. 
Merrill, Hayden A., Dedham 
Mills, R. P., Abbott, Col. 
Mitchell, Charles, Milton 
Mitchell, Seth, Boston 
Moulton, Beverly S., Boston 
Nelson, D. Oscar, Portsmouth, 

0. 
Nichols, Albert, Chicago, 111. 
Nichols, D. P., Boston 
Noyes, A. P., Lowell 
Ordway, G. W., Manch'r, N. H. 
Page, Adino, Metamora, 111. 
Page, Nathan jr., AVakefield 
Palmer, Charles L., Cotton 

Wood, Idaho Co., Idaho 
Palmer, Frank H., N. Wey- 
mouth, Mass. 
Patch, A. H., Clarkville, Tenn. 
Pay son, Samuel F., New York 
Perry, Geo. S., Brattleboro, Vt. 
Phelps, N. L., Iowa 
Phillips, A. P., Medfield 
Phillips, Samuel, Brighton 
Pierce, William, Boston 
Poor, Henry, New York 
Porter, Dudley H., Sai'atoga 
Pratt, S. S, , Revere 
Putnam, Benjamin C, Chelsen 
Putnam, Moses W., Phila., N.Y. 
Raymond, Samuel, New Yoik 



H3 

Emanuel, Henry, New York Rea, Loring B., Miles City, 
Estes, Aldeu C, SanLandro,Cal. Mont. 

Farwell, Edwin C, Reading Reynolds, W. B., Derry, N. H. 
Felton, Wm. H., Sherborn Robinson, John L., Manches- 
Fernald, Henry B., Washington ter, N. H. 
Flint, Horace P., Boston Rogers. Isaiah S., Somerville 

Foster, James B., Melrose Rogers, Benjamin, Maiden 
Fowler, W. W., Plymouth Rogers, William, Illinois 
French, Charles, Davenport.O. Rowell, E. F., Worcester 
French, Geo. H., Davenport,0. Safford, N. T., Dunbarton, N.H. 
Gannett, W. W., Boston Sargent, Elmer P., Maiden 

Gaffney, Cornelius, So. Boston Sargent, G. P., Phil., Pa. 
Gilman, Frederic, N. H. Shattuck, Chas. W., Winchester 

Gookin, Samuel F., Boston Shattuck, L. P., Boston 
Gowen, F. H., Brentwood, N.J.Sleeper, S. C, Plaistow, N. H. 
Green, John A., New York Smith. Beaman C, Charlestown 
Greene, Aithur M., Phil. Smith, George J., Boston 

Gulliver, Francis, Binghamp- Spofford, Farnham, Washington 

ton, N. Y. . Spring, J. E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hadley, Wm., Boston Stanley, Samuel S., Boston 

Hale, Joseph S., Lugonia, San Stanwood, Joseph T., Maiden 

Bernandino Co., Cal. Steele, Walter, Stoneham 

Hayes, J. F. C, Iowa Stickney, Charles, Fon du Lac, 

Hawkes, George L., Wakefield Wis. 
Hoag, Charles E., Springfield, Stickney, Niles T., Chicago, III. 

Mass. Styles, Charles F., Woburn 

Hicock, S. S., Rochester, N.H. Stone, Edwin M., Prov., R. I. 
Hill, E. L. Templeton, Mass. Tappan, S. B., Arlington 
Hill, Mark F., Derry, N. H. Taylor, George H., Everett 
Holt, H. E., Lexington Trask, Alfred M., Brockton 

Hubbard, J. G.,Hampste'd, N.H. Walker, Dexter M., Boston 
Hutchinson, C. H.,Rhinebeck, Ward, Winsor M., Wakefield 

N. Y. Ware, Darwin E., Boston 

Johnson, James T., Waltham Webb, Michael jr., Cambridge" 
Kent, Albert S., Colorado Wentzel, David, Amherst 

Kimball, Jonathan, Boston Wheeler, H. T., Worcester 
Kimball, W.F.,Providence,R.I. Wheeler, L. H., California 



144 

King, D. Webster, Boston Whitman, F. A., Lexington 

Knight, J. M., Maine Whittemore, Chas. A., Boston 

Lamb, Wra. D., Southbridge Wliittemore, J. R., Chicopee 
Lake, Clias. H., Churchill, Md. Wilder, S. W., Lowell 
Lovering,John H., Marlborough 

Total number, December, 1896 — 1337 resident members. 

145 non-resident members. Grand total, 1482 members. 



List of Premiums Awarded 1896. 



BULLS. 

James C Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 

Diploma and ^8 00 
James C. Poor, JSTo. Andover, Holstein, second premium, 4 00 
J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire, first premium, 6 00 
Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey, first premium, 6 00 

Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey, second premium, 4 00 

MILCH cows. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein Cow, first 

premium, 8 00 

James C. Poor, No. " Andover, Holstein Cow, first 

premium, 7 00 

James C Poor, No. Andover, Holstein Cow, second 

premium, 4 00 

James C Poor, No. Andover, Grade Cow, second 

premium, 4 00 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire Cow, first 

premium, 7 00 

J. D, W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire Cow, second 

premium, 5 00 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire Cow, second 

premium, 4 00 

Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, Grade Cow, first premium, 7 00 
Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, Jersey Cow, second 

premium, 4 00 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover. 6 Holstein and Grade 

Cows, first premium, Diploma and f 10 00 



146 



HEIFERS. 

James C. Poor, No. Audover, Holstein, first premium, 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holsteiu, first premium, 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second premium, 
Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, Jersey, first premium, 
Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, Jersey, first premium, 
Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, Jersey, first premium, 
Mrs. J. (J. Phillips, Beverly, Jersey, second premium, 
Fred Stiles, Peabody, Holstein, first premium, 
James Hurlihy, Peabody, Holstein, second premium, 
Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey, second premium, 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Grade, first premium, 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Grade, first premium, 
Frank W. Stanley, Peabody, Grade, first premium, 
Wm. B: Carlton, Danvers, Grade, second premium, 
Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, Grade, second premium, 
Town of Peabody, for Grade, second premium, 

WORKING OXEN. 

Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, Working Oxen, first 
premium, 

C. E. Hinkley, Peabody, Working Oxen, second pre- 
mium, 



5 OO 


4 00 


2 00 


5 00 


4 00 


4 00 


2 00 


4 00 


2 00 


2 00 


5 00 


4 00 


4 00 


3 00 


2 00 


2 00 



8 00 
6 00 



STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

Rial Side stock farm, Beverly, Stallion " Col. Os- 
good," first premium, 8 00 

Willard F, Kinsman, Ipswich, Stallion " Quincy 

Wilkes " first premium, 5 00 

Charles Kernes, Danvers, Coaching Stallion, first 
premium, 

Albert W. Locke, Salem, Stallion " Robert Nelson," 

second premium, . 3 00 



5 00 



BROOD MARES. 

A. B. Forbes, Byfield, " Fanny Fern " first premium, 8 00 
Edwin Bates, Lynn, " Juliet " second premium, 5 00 



147 

FAMILY HORSES. 

C. A. Buxton, Salem, lirst pveraium, 
Charles Kernes, Dan vers, second premium, 

GEXTS' DKIVING HORSKS. 

A. B. Forbes, Byfield, for pair, first premium, 
Allen F. Gray, Lynntield, for pair, second premium, 
A. B. Forbes, Byfield, for single, first premium, 
John H. George, Methuen, for single, second premium, 

SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

F. W. Lyford, Dan vers, first premium, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, second premium, 
Benj. W. Farnum, ISTo. Andover, first premium, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, second premium, 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES. 

Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, first premium, 
James C. Poor, ISTo. Andover, second premium, 
E. C. Little, Merrimac, first premium, 
Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, second premium, 

FAST WALKING HORSES 

Benj. P. AVare, Marblehead, first premium, 
A. B. Gardner, Salem, second premium, 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES. 

S. F. Newman, Newbury, first premium, 6 00 

COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

M. F. Mulcady, Peabody, first premium, 4 yr. old, 6 00 

George W. Eaton, Peabody, first premium, 3 yr. old 5 00 

A. B. Gardner, Salem, second premium, 4 yr. old, 4 00 

A. B. Forbes, Byfield, 4 00 

Rial Side Stock Farm, Beverly, 4 00 

Rial Side Stock Farm, Beverly, 2 00 



6 00 


4 00 


8 00 


5 00 


6 00 


4 00 


6 00 


4 00 


6 00 


4 00 


8 00 


5 00 


8 00 


5 00 


5 00 


3 00 



148 

SWIXE, LARGE BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Cheshire 

Boar 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Cheshire 

Sow and Pigs, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Berkshire 

Boar, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Weaned 

Pigs, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Chester 

Boar, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Weaned 

Pigs, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Jersey Boar 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Large York- 
shire Boar, 
Town of Peabody, first premium, for Weaned Pigs, 
E. C. Little, Merrimac, first premium, for Sow and 

Pigs, 

E. C. Little, Merrimac, second premium, for Weaned 

Pigs, 

SWINE, SMALL BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for small York- 
shire Boar, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, for Sow and 

Pigs, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, second premium, for Sow and 

Pigs, 3 00 

F. W. Stanley, Peabody, second premiutu, for Medi- 

um Boar, 3 00 

SHEEP. 

Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus, first premium, for Shrop- 
shire Ewes, 5 00 

Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus, first premium, for Shrop- 
shire Lambs, 4 00 



5 


00 


5 


GO 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 





5 


00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 



149 

J. D. W. French, Xo. Audover, first premium, for 
Hampshire Buck, 

J. D. W. Freuch, No. Audover, first premium for 
Hampshire and Oxford Ewes, 

J. B. Thomas, Peabody, first premium, for Shrop- 
shire Buck, 

J. B. Thomas, Peabody, first premium, for Leicester 
Ewes, 

J. B. Thomas, Peabody, first premium, for Leicester 
Buck Lambs, 

PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES. 

Durkee Bros., West Peabody, first'premium, 
Phillips Farm, Beverly, second premium, 

PLOUGHING WITH SWIVEL PLOUGH. 

Walter P. G-ould, Ipswich, first premium, 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, second premium, 

PLOUGHING WITH SULKY PLOUGH. 

0. F. Newhall, Peabody, first premium, 
Durkee Bros., West Peabody, first premium, 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, second premium, 

PLOUGHING BY BOYS 15 YEARS OLD AND UNDER. 

Charles S. Little, Merrimac, first premium, 8 00 

ROOT CROPS. 

John H. George, Methuen, Crop of Onions, first pre- 
mium, $8 00 

John H. George, Methuen, Crop of Potatoes, first 
premium, 

D ivid Warren, Swampscott, Crop of Cabbages, first 
premium, 

Romulus Jaques, West Newbury, crop of Turnips, 

first premium, 8 00 

James C Poor, No. Andover, Crop of Turnips, sec- 
ond premium, ft 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Crop of Mangold Wurt- 

zels, first premium, 8 00 



5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


4 00 


6 00 


4 00 


6 00 


4 00 


6 00 


6 00 


4 00 



8 00 
8 00 



I50 

Fred Stultz, West Newbury, Crop of Maugold Wurt- 

zels, second premium, 5 00 

SMALL FRUITS. 

William K. Cole, West Boxford, Crop of Strawber- 
ries, first premium, 8 00 

William K. Cole, West Boxford, Crop of Blackber- 
ries, second premium, 5 00 

Amos Haseltine, Haverhill, Crop of Blackberries, 

first premium, 8 00 

Amos Haseltine, Haverhill, Crop of Currants, first 

premium, 8 00 

RECLAIMED LAND. 

Charles R. Audersou, Wvist Boxford, first premium, f 15 00 

OTHER AWARDS. 



oa Poultry, 


$56 00 


" Harrows, 


10 00 


" Agricultural Implements, 


47 00 


'• Carriages, 


24 00 


'• Grange Exhibit, 


25 00 


" Dairy, 


8 00 


" Bread and Canned Fruits, 


17 00 


" Bees, Hives und Honey, 


3 00 


" Pears, 


49 50 


" Apples, 


67 25 


"Peaches, Grapes, etc.. 


68 00 


" Plants and Flowers, 


71 75 


" Vegetables, 


109 00 


" Grain and Seed, 


11 00 


" Counterpanes and Afghajis, 


27 75 


" Carpets and Rugs, 


11 75 


" Manuf. from Leather, 


12 00 


" Manuf. and General Mdse., 


9 00 


" Fancy Work, 


40 00 


" Art Work, 


42 50 


" Work by Children, 


14 00 



RECAPITULATION. 



Awarded for ploughing, $4:4: 00 







FARM STOCK. 




Awarded for Bulls, 


128 00 




i( 


Milch Cows, 


50 00 




a 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


10 00 




it 


Heifers, 


54 00 




a 


Working Oxen, 


14 00 




a 


Horses, 


152 00 




ki 


Swine, 


69 00 




ii 


Sheep, 


33 00 




11 


Poultry, 


56 00 



UQQ 00 



FIELD AND EXPERIMENTAL CROPS. 

Awarded for Root Crops, |50 00 

" Fruit Crops, 29 00 



FARM AND GARDEN PRODUCTS. 



$19 00 



Awarded for Grain and Seed, 


$11 00 


" " Vegetables, 


109 00 


" Fruits, 


174 75 


" " Plants and Flowers, 


71 75 

$36 



50 



152 



DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES. 

Awarded for Bread, Canned Fruit, etc., $17 00 

" " Counterpanes and Afghans, 27 75 

" " Carpetings and Rugs, 11 75 

" Articles Manuf . from Leather 12 00 

-' Manuf. and Gen. IMdse., 9 00 

'' Fancy Work, 40 00 

- Works of Art, 42 50 

•' Children's Work, 14 00 



MISCELLANEOUS. 




Awarded for Grange Exhibit, 


125 00 


'• " Dairy Products, 


8 00 


" " Honey, 


3 00 


u u Agricultural Implements, 


47 00 


" " Harrows, 


10 00 


" " Carriages, 


24 00 


" " Reclaiming Waste Land, 


15 00 


" " Essays and Reports, 


24 00 



*174 00 



The amount of 
als and firms in 29 
as follows : — 

Amesbury, 

Andover, 

F^everly, 

Boxford, 

Dan vers, 

Georgetown, 

Groveland, 

Hamilton, 



*156 00 

TOTAL. 

il,262.50 was awarded to 384 individu- 
different cities and towns, in the County 

$6 00 Methuen, $23 00 

2 00 Middleton, 6 50 
73 76 Newbury, 58 00 
69 25 Newburyport, 4 00 

104 50 North Andover, 148 00 

3 00 Peabody, 392 50 
3 00 Rockport, 1 00 

12 50 Rowley, 15 00 



15: 



Haverhill, 


19 50 


Salem, 


45 50 


Ipswich, 


25 00 


Saugus, 


14 00 


Lawrence, 


11 25 


Swampscott, 


16 00 


Lynn, 


85 50 


Topstield, 


12 00 


Lynnfield, 


9 75 


Wenham, 


9 50 


Marblehead, 


6 00 


West Newbury, 


49 00 


Merrimac, 


36 00 







FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 



Receipts for Admission to Hall and Grounds, -$2912 30 
Receipts for Dinner Tickets, 
Receipts for Grounds for various purposes, 
" Hay sold. 



Total Expense at Hall and Grounds, 
Amount paid Treasurer, 



116 


00 


187 00 


30 


50 


18245 


80 


1462 


09 



11783 71 



1897. 
PREMIUM LIST OF 

Essex Agricultural Society, 

FOR THE 

SEVENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL CATTLE SHOW AND FAIR. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The ti'QStee of each towa is iastructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their du- 
ties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to 
the Exhibition, the importance of entering their exhibits for 
the hall, the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Committees, 
and at the meeting of the Society for filling vacancies in com- 
mittees on the first day of the Exhibition, making sure that 
the names proposed at those meetings are of persons who will 
serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the Fair 
Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the grounds, 
at one o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the exhibition, 
and there organize, take the books of entry, and proceed at 
once to business. Committees in hall, should take the books 
of entry from the Superintendent, promptly after the entries 
close. 

Full reports of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 



155 

Bished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 

Three members of any committee consisting of more than 
that number are authorized to act. 

II^^No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 

The Diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of special merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation b^; the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures, fruits, vegetables 
in hall, and flowers ; or any premium, unless the rules of the 
Society have been strictly complied with. Neither shall they 
award premiums or gratuities in excess of the amount appro- 
priated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals, blue, white and red printed pre- 
mium ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assist- 
ant on the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals 
ox articles designating the grade of premium awarded each, 
and the name of the person to whom awarded, and especial 
care should be taken that the cards issued correspond with the 
awards in their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on ploughing and on 
animals and articles exhibited at the Show, must be delivered 
promptly to the Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

The Society offers liberal premiums for the best reports of 
committees ; and the chairmen of the several committees are 
requested to present to the Secretary a full report explanatory 
of the opinions of the committee on the matter referred to 
them, within two weeks after the awards are made at the 
Show, for publication in the Transactions.* 

Reports on farms, crops, etc., to be presented previous to 
the meeting of the Trustees in November. 

Any virmhi'r of a conimittei' ivho cannot serve on the same is 
refjuestrd to give notice to the Secretary, before the Show, so 
that the vacancy may l)e filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a 
ticket of admission to the hall of exhibition, on application to 
the Secretary. 



•Chairmen of the committees will please notice this request. 



156 
General Rules. 

Competitors are requested to cjirefidly read the rules and pre- 
mium list before maldng entries. 

Claims (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grrouuds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 

All entries o^live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Pair, and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person not a member of the Societij, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, 
for which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase 
the funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium or gratuity is awarded, or 
an agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
First National Bank, Salem, on and after the first Monday of 
November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day of 
September next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered 
as given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the sevei-al committees and adopted by the Soci- 
ety shall be final. Committees should see that the jyremiuin 
cards issued, corresjjond with the premiums and gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his in- 
tention to compete for the same ; and committees are instruct- 
ed to award no premium unless the animal or article offered 
is worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall l)e entered in another class, working oxen, 
working steers, (three year old steers may be entered" for 
ploughing in a double team) and farm horses which may be 
entered for ploughing, horses for fast walking, and milch 
cows, which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premium must be owned by residents 
and kept in the county. 



157 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 
themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered ; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agri- 
culture. 

The Proof that an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 

Standards adopted : — American Jersey C. C Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

The Committees wVl take notice that no premmni icill be 
awarded unless the (otimals or objects are of a. decidedly supe- 
rior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
special merit, in all departments of the Fair. 



Cattle and other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four mouths previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals, whether teams for ploughing, or animals 
entered for premium or exhibition, will be fed during the Ex- 
hibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity, prevented 
from leaving, at the expense of the Society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and Ihe expense thereof, all^of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with committee's report. 



158 

For Pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $8, 6 

For Fat Cow, premiums, $6, 4 

BULLS. 

♦Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or of any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Two years old and upwards, premiums, $6, 4 

Under two years old, for each breed, $4, 3 

BULLS OF AXY AGE OR BREED. 

For the best bull of any age or braed, with five of his stock 
not less than one year old, quality and condition to be taken 
into account, and especially the adaptability of the animal to 
the agriculture of the county, Diploma and .^8 

NOTK.— Coini)etitors are required to "iive a written statement of pedigree, and 
cimmittees are requested to be particular in this respect, and return them to the 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $8, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Holstein, 
Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old and 
upwards, premiums for each breed, $7, 4 

For Native or Grade Cows, four years old and upwards, pre- 
miums, $7, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week 
from June Ist to September 15, premiums, $7, 4 

Note.— A written statement will he require<l of the age and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they droiiped their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, quality and quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding', which stateiiient is to be returned to the Secretary with 
Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to be 
exhibited at the Show, and a correct statement of manner of 
keeping and yield for one year preceding the Show, prem.iums, 

Diploma and $10, 8 

For the greatest produce of milk on any farm, in proportion 
to the number of cows producing it, not less than four., from 
April 1, 1896 to April 1, 1897, statement to be made of the 
exchanges made, manner, and expense of food, use made of 



159 

milk, and such other facts as will illustrate the entire manage- 
ment, special regard being had to the mode in which the 
account is kept, premium. Diploma and $8 

Note.— The above-mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 
January 1st, preceding the Sliow. 

HEIFERS. 

First Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, .$4, 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $4, 2 
Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old, premiums, ^5, 3 
Two years old, that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 
One year old and under, and less than two, premiums, .'$4, 2 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, quality and training, premiums, S8, 6 

For pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $6, 4 

Note. — Tlie Committee are reciuired to consider the (luality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their working capai-ity. The training of working oxen and steers 
will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, "or wagon, containing a load weighing two 
tons for oxen, and three thousand iiounds for steers. [gf^^At the time of entrj- a 
certificate of the weight of tlie cattle must be filed with the Secretary. 

STEERS. 

For pairs of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, .'$4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, $8, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, three years old, 
premiums, IfJS, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account. Diploma and $8 



i6o 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and u]v 
wards, premiums, Diploma and $8, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums, Diploma and $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than one year old, quality and condition taken into ac- 
count, Diploma and $8 

Note.— No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$8,5 

BROOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Driving Purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums. 

Note. — No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all ap- 
parent defects cai)able of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 
For Family Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

Note.— No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $8, 5 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1,200 lbs. and over, premiums. 

$6,4 
For Farm Horses weighing less than 1,200 lbs., premiums, 

. $6,4 

Note.— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of the load to l)e used in trial of Farm 
Horses is to be lixed ui)on by the committee of arrangements for draftin^r, the 
difference in tlic l()a<l for horses of l,'2(tl) lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 lbs. 
to be 1,000 lbs., and l)et\veeii the two classes of pairs •_',()0i). No obstruction shal 
be placed eitlier before or behind the wheels in trials of Draft Horses of either 
class, but wlieels shall be blocked behind to hold the loail when a team stops goinir 
ui>hill. 



i6i 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING 2,500 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing 2,500 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, $H, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2,500 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2,500 lbs. (see 
above note, premiums, $8, 5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 3 AND 4'. YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding four-year-old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year-old Colts, premiums, $5, 3 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two year old colts prem., 

$4, 2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOaR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four year old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three year old colts, premium, 5, 3 

ONE AND TWO YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two year old colts, prem., 

U, 2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., 4, 2 

SWINE,— LARGE BREEDS. 

Large Breeds viz : Cheshire, Berkshire, Chester County 
Whites, Poland China, Large Yorkshire, and any other breed 
or grade, weighing more than 300 lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $5, 3 

For Breeding Sows, with their pigs by their side, premium, 

$5. 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premium, $5, 3 



l62 

SWINE —SMALL BREEDS. 

Small breeds, such as Suffolk, Essex, Small Yorkshire, 
China, and any other breed or grade, weighing less than HOO 
11)S at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $5, 3 

For Breeding S )vvs with their pigs by their side, premiums. 

$5, 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less tlian four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $5, 3 

SHEEP. 

For flocks of Sheep, not less than ten in number, each 

Breed, premiums, $5, 3 

For best Buck, premium, $5 

For lots of Lambs, not less than four in number between 

four and twelve months old, premiums, $4, 2 

POULTRY. 

For pairs of Fowls, Light Brahraas, Dark Brahmas, Buff 
Cochins, Partridge Cochins, Black Cochins, White Cochins, 
Plymouth Rocks, White Plymouth Rocks, Dominiques, White 
Leghorns. Brown L'^ghorns, Dominique Leghorns, Black 
Spanish, Hamburgs, Polish, Games, Dorking. Bantams, 
Black, White and Mottled Javas, Wyandottes, White Wyan- 
dottes. Golden Wyandottes, Black and White Minorcas, Red 
Caps, Audalusias, Langshangs, and other recognized varieties, 
ea''.h variety, premiums, $2, 1 

For pairs of Chickens of above varieties, premiums, $2, I 

For the best breeding pen of each variety — Diploma of the 
Society. 

For the best pairs of Native Fowls, premiums, $!2, 1 

Pairs can be exhibited in " breeding pens,"' by marking the 
competing female (with a ribbon or colored string), which 
with the male will form the pair. 

For lots of Turkeys, and Aleslniry, Rouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China and African Geese, prem., $2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the discharge 
of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any specimen 
on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all claim he 
may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the "American Standard of Excellence."' 

For best exhibit of Poultry Appliances, $4 

Note.— DiiiUniia only :i warded for Kreeding I'ens: 



i63 

STREET PARADE. 

luvitatioais extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams, in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of the Committee in 
charge in premiums or gratuities, $50 

PLOUGHING. 

General Note ox Ploughing.— Stags are excluded. Teams must be entered 
in the names of their owners, and only double ox-teams to have drivers. A team 
consistinji of one pair of oxen and a horse will be considered a double team. The 
owners of seiiarate teams may unite the same and lip allowed to compete for pre- 
miums. The ploughmen and" drivers must have been residents of the Count\ at 
least three months before the exhil)ition. Those who intend to be competitors 
must give notice to reach the Secretary on or before Saturday previous to the 
show. The lands will be staked, but each ploughman will be required to strike 
out his own lands in the presence of •' Committee on Striking Out Grounds for 
Ploughing." after half-past nine o'clock on the morning of the trial. Ploughmen 
with land side ploughs are to back furrow three furrows on each side of the stakes 
set, the last furrovv to be of the depth required in the class. Ploughmen with 
swivel ploughs, to turn the outside of their furrow to the stakes on one side, and 
to finish one foot from the stake on the other. Committees to note and report 
the kind of plough u.sed. 

Ploughing with Double Ox or Horse Teams. — One-eighth 
of an acre, at least eight inches deep, premiums, $8, 6 

Ploughing wrrn Single Ox-Teams. — One-eighth of an 
acre, at least six inches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Two Horses — With any form of plough 
except Swivel, one-eighth of an acre, at least six inches deep, 
premiums, ^6, 4 

Ploughing with Three Horses. — One-eighth of an acre, 
eight inches deep, without driver, premium, $6 

Same with four horses, with driver, premium, $6 

Ploughing with Swivel Plough. — One-eighth of an acre, 
with double ox-teams, at least eight inches deep, premi- 
ums, $6, 4 

One-eighth of an^acre with single ox-teams, at least six 
inches deep, premiums, ;f!6, 4 

One-eighth of an acre with horse teams, consisting of two 
horses, ploughing at least six inches deep, premiums, .f6, 4 

Ploughing with Sulky Plough. — For the liest perform- 
ances, taking into account ease of draft, amount and quality 
of work, 

Sulky Plough, Landside, premiums, SO, 4 

Ploughing by boys, 15 years of age and under, premiums, 

$6,4 



164 

HARROWS. 

For tlie best Harrow exhibited, and its merits shown by 
actual test upon the ploughed ground, $6, 4 

NoTi:.— Entry must be made with the Secretary l)efore the day of the trial, with 
descrii)tion of the Harrow. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no ar- 
ticle offered in collection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium), Diploma and $8 

For implements that are deemed worthy, the Committee 
may at their discretion award in gratuities not exceeding .'f;40 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Rake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the 
merit of which can be known only by actual trial in the field ; 
but manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition 
and inspection. 

CARRIAGES. 

For carriages built in the County, and. exhibited by the 
manufacturer, Diploma, and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 

Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be espec- 
ially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued with 
the names, and sums awarded them, correspond with those in 
their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instructions 
under heading of " Duties of Committee," " General Rules," 
" Premiums to be awarded at the Show,'' see first pages, and 
under " Fruit," " Domestic Manufactures," and " Flowers." 

O^^All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manu- 
factures, must be the product of Essex County, to be entitled 
to a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers fifty dollars to be divided in three premi- 
ums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex County, 
as follows : — Premiums, $20, 15, 10 

Note.— This exhibit iiichides all Fruit, Vegetables and Domestic Manufacttires 
that are exhibited in any other deiiartment in Exhibition Hall. 



i65 



DAIRY. 



For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making 
and management of the Butter, premiums, $5, 3 

For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, .f 5, 3 

BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

For White Bread made of Wheat flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from Graham flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
-with wheat premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread, entered for premiums, to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each. ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collection of Preserved Fruits and 
Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, $2, 1 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of- pro- 
cess used and amount of labor and time required in preparing 
and di-ying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on other articles, entered in this de- 
partment, products of this County, deemed worthy, $5 

BEES, HIVES AND HONEY. 

For the first and second best display of Bees, Hives, and 
Honey, and Apiarian Implements, accompanied with a writ- 
ten description of the bees, hives, etc., number of hives in 
use, and amount of surplus honey, taken from them during the 
season, premiums, )^4, 2 

First and second best Honey, five pounds in comb, made in 
the County, with statement signed of kind of bees and hive, 
and time of year when honey was made, premiums, $2, 1 



I 66 

Fruit. 

All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the tirst day of the exhibition, and each exhibi- 
tor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists of 
the varieties of each class of fruit or to be tiled when entry is 
made. (Committees are not authorized to make awards to 
those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a conspicuous mamicr by the hall 
committee before the entry of exliihltors, with the names of 
fruit, for which premiums are offered, all others of same class 
fruit to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place 
their several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated 
by such labels, or be considered by the committee as not com- 
peting for premium. 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee) to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit. 

PEAE8, 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended" for cultivation in Essex County: Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Angouleme. Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckle, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Cornice, Howell and Clairgeau, each, premium, $2 

Doyenne d'Ete, Gifford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $L50 

For best collection of Pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premium, $5 

In addition to the above are placed at the disposal of the 
committee, to be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 
each, '.fl5 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Red Russet, Tolman's Sweet, 



167 

Hubbardston, Hurlburt, Porter, Pickmau Pippin, Roxbury 
Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Gravenstein, Hunt Russet, 
Smith's Cider, Snow, Bailey Sweet, premium for each, $2, 1 

Red Astrachau, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early.) 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

For best collection of Apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab 
Apple deemed worthy by the committee, )^1.50 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 each, $15 

PEACHES, GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

For best nine specimens of Freestone, White Flesh, Yellow 
Flesh, Essex County Seedling, each variety, $2 

For best collection of Peaches, premium, $3 

For Champion, Lemon, or Orange Quinces, premium, f 2 

For Plums, five varieties to be selected by Committee, each 
variety, premium, $2 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, 
Brighton, Delaware, Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, 
Niagara Grapes, each variety, premium, $2 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than ten pounds 
in all, premiums, $5, $>4 

For best specimens of four bunches of Grapes, varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

fl.60 

For baskets of Assorted Fruits, premiums, $3, 2 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities, of not less than 50 cents each, $20 



Plants and Flowers. 



RULES AND KK(;ULATIONS. 



1. All Plants and Flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or before 



i68 

Eleven o'clock, on the first, day of the Fair, and all such 
Plants and Flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers, and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of Plants and 
Flowers is designated in the schedule, there must be neither 
more nor less than that number or quantity of specimens 
shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article, only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is offej-ed, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for compp- 
titioa, but no variety can be duplicated. 

4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens ex 
hibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of supe- 
riority and worthy of such premium, not even if they are the 
only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admitted 
in competition for another different premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, 
or in the case of Native Plants and Flowers, where such were 
found. 

7. All Plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood, or some other 
permanent and suitable substance and so attached to same as 
to be easily seen. Flowers when specified to be named to 
comply also with above rule. 

8 Plants in Pots to be entitled to premiums rpust show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symmetry and vigor of the specimens ; also Bouquets, Baskets, 
Design Work, etc., must show taste, skill and harmony in ar- 
rangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All Flowers exhibited must be shown upon their own 
stem, flowers in " Design ■" work alone excepted ; and this ex- 
ception if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account by 
the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The Committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or " Designs of merit " for 
which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together), exceed the amount, 
$100, limited by the Society for this department. 



169 

11. No member of the Committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any case vote or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarlUj vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacanc}' for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for Plants and Flowers, and General Rules of the Soci- 
ety, and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhibi- 
tors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 

PLANTS. 

Plants competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots, Native Plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 

For collection Flowering and Ornamental Foliage plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premiums, $5, 3 

For collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, %\ 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, ^1 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 va- 
rieties, premium, %\ 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, .^il 

For collection Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., .^1 

For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., $1 

For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem , )$1 

For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, ^1 

For collection Geraniums, .single, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, 
premium, 3 1 

For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, ,f!l 

For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 



I70 

For collectiou Caruation Pinks, 10 speciiueus, at least 5 va- 
rieties, premium, $1 
For collectiou Calla Lilies, 5 specimens, premium, $1 
For specimen English Ivy, premium, ^l 
For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least oO 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which to be a cross section, and neither to be more than four 
inches in length or diameter, premiums, $5, 3 

FLOWERS. 

For collection Cut Flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties, named, $o, 2 

For collection Cut Flowers, native, 100 specimens, at least 
50 varieties, named, $S, 2 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, green-house flowers, pre- 
miums, $1, .50 
For pair of Hand Bouquets, green-house flowers, premium, 

^1_, .50 
For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of native flowers, premium, 

f 1, .50 
For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, pren)., 

$1, .50 
For Basket of Green-house Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Native Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Garden Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For arrangement of Native Flowers and Autumn Leaves, 
premiums, $2, 1 

For Floral Designs, choice cultivated flowers, prem., $3, 2 
For Floral Designs, native flowers, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Japan Lilies, hardy, named, premiums, $2, 1 
For collections Phlox, hardy, perennial, named, prem., $2, 1 
For collections Pansies, at least 50 specimens neatly and ar- 
tistically arranged, premiums, '1i>2, 1 
For collections of Native and Introduced Weeds, with com- 
mon and botanical name attached, premiums, $2, 1 
For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 
For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six va- 
rieties, named, premium, $1 
Foi' twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, ^1 



171 

For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 

premium, - $1 

For twelve Gladiolas (spikes), at least six varieties, named. 

premium, $i 

For twelve Japan Lilies, at least six varieties, named, 

premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums; double, at least six varieties, named, 

premium, fl 

For twelve Geraniums, siugle, at least six varieties, named, 

premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox, hardy perennial, at least six varieties. 

named, premium. $1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem , $1 
For twenty-four Carnation Pinks, at least six varieties, 

named, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Verbenas, at least six varieties, named, 

premium, $1 

For twenty-four Koses, at least six varieties, named, prem., ^1 
For twenty-four Garden Annuals, at least twelve varieties, 

named, premium, $1 

For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties, named,prem., $1 
For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, |!1 

For twelve Asters, Double Truffaut's Peony flowered, 

premium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Pompone, premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, $i 
For twelve ^Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $i 
For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Zinnias, double, in variet}'", premium, $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, African, in variety, prem., $1 
For twenty-four ^Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty-four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $1 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, $i 
For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Dianthus (double, annual,) in variety, prem., $1 
For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, $1 
For collection of sweet peas, premium, -fl 

VEGETABLES. 

Rules for fruit cipply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens. Eclipse, Dewing, and 
Edraands, premium, each variety, $2 



172 

Carrots — For best twelve, Short Top, Long Orange and 
Dan vers Intermediate, premium, each variety, $2 

For best twelve, Short Horn, Orange carrots, ^2 

f: Mangold AVurtzels — For best six specimens, premium, $2 
Flat Turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top 
and White Flat, premium, each variety, $2 

Ruta Bagas — Twelve specimens. For best yellow and 
White, premium, each variety, $2 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premium, $2 
Onions — Twelve specimens. For l)est Dan vers, Yellow 
Flat, and Red, premium, each variety, $2 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Clark's No. 1, Pearl of Savoy, Early Maine, pre- ' 
mium, each variety, $2 

Cabbages — For best three specimens, Savoy, Fottler's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, each variety, premium, $2 
For next best, each variety, premium, $1 
Cauliflowers — For best three specimens, premium, $2 
For next best, premium, ^l 
Celery — For best four roots, premium, $1 
Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best Early, prem., $2 
For best twelve ears in milk, Late, premium, ^2 
Squashes — For best three specimens, ]\Iarrow, Turban, 
Warner Turban, Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, Bay 
State, Sibley, Butman, each variety, premium, $2 
Melons — For best three specimens. Nutmeg, Musk, Cas- 
saba, Salmon Flesh, each variety, premium, $2 
For best two specimens Watermelons, premium, $2 
Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens, Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premium, .f 2 
For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premium, $»2 
Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premium, $2, 1 
For collection of vegetables, not less'than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 
Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $25 
([^^No competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums are 
offered for. 

CoUrrtions of Voi/etiibleit where i>reiniums are offered for a number of varieties 
must 1)6 entered and ))laced, not less than three of a kind hy themselves on the 
tables assigne<l for collections. No collection shall receive but one premium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to coiniyete with specimens 
of the same variety placed elsewliere. Exhibitors of such collections however, are 
not prevented froin exhiliitin-r <id<litioiial specimens of any variety with and in 
competition with like variety. All ve}ret;-ibles must be entered in the name of the 
grower of tbcin. 



^7Z 

Sizeqr' Ver/'^tables.—THrniy Beets to he from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions, 
21/2 to 4 inches in largest fliameter; Potatoes to be of good size for family use; 
Squashes to be pure" and well ripened, Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

Eor best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premium, $i 

For twenty-five ears of Field Corn, premiums, $5, 4, 3 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, >!6, 4 
All grain or seed jnust have been groivn hij the exhibitor in the 
County to receive a premium. 



Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 1 
o'clock on the first day of the Exhibition. Articles not thus 
deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 
be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to 
the last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wroui^ht Counterpanes having regard to the quality and 
expense of the material, premiums, ^3, 2 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed .'$25 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets, having regard to the quality and expense of 
the material, premiums, $3, 2 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the qual- 
ity of the work and expense of the materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount not to exceed f 20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 

Women's do., Children's do., each, premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each, prera., $3 



174 

$8 are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium. Diploma of the Society. 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

For display of Bonnets, premiums, $3, 2 

For Horn Combs, not less than one dozen, premium, ^l 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 

awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, $15 

FANCY WORK. 

Of Domestic Manufacture are not included in the above. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, $40 

WORKS OF ART. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $40 

DECORATED CHINA. 

At the disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, 
not xceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $20 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, premiums, 

$2, 1 
At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $15 



List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 

FARMS. 

Competitors for this premium must give notice of their in- 
tention to the Secretary on or before June 15th, and the farms 
entered for premium will be viewed by the committee twice 
during the year. Crops growing on farms that are entered for 
premium, cannot be entered with another committee for sep- 
arate premiums — except crop specimens exhibited at the fair. 



175 

Any person desirous of having h!s farm inspected, without 
entering it for premium, may make application to the Secre- 
tary, audit will be viewed and reported upon by the committee. 

For the best conducted and most improved farm, taking 
into view the entire management and cultivation, including 
lands, buildings, fences, orchards, crops, stock and all other 
appendages, with statements in detail, relating thereto, pre- 
mium, $20 

IMPROVING WET MEADOW AND SWAMP LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments relating to wet meadow or 
swamp lauds, on not less than one acre, the course of manage- 
ment, and the produce, etc., for a period of two years at 
least, to be detailed, with a statement of all the incidental 
expenses, premiums, $10, 6 

r-'NOTE. — The Committee is instructed to ascertain how many, if any. reclaimed 
swamps in this Connty have been abandoned or have returned to natural grasses. 
Persons knowing of such, are requested to notify the Secretary or Committee. 

IMPROVING PASTURE AND WASTE LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improving 
pasture land, other than by ploughing, so as to add to their 
value for pasturage, with a statement of the same, premiums, 

$10, 6 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improv- 
ing waste lands, so as to add to their agricultural value, with 
statement of the same, premiums, $10, 6 

No premium to be awarded to any person for a repetition of 
an experiment in meadow, swamp or pasture lands, for which 
he has already received a premium. 

UNDER-DRAINING LAND. 

For best conducted experiments in under-draining land, 
regard being had to the variety of soil, sub-soil, and other 
local circumstances, premiums, $10, 6 

Note.— The same instructions un<ler " [mprovino- Wet Meadow and Swamp 
Lands " apply to this Committee. 

GRAIN AND OTHER CROPS. 

Claimants on Grain and Root Crops will be required to state 
the size of the piece of land, when they enter, and conform 
to following rules : Entries of Grain Crops, to be made on or 
before September 10th ; Root Crops on or before October 



176 

10th ; giving ample time for the crops to be examined by the 
committee before harvesting. Statement to be made in con- 
formity with the following form, must be forwarded to the 
Committee previous to November 1st. 

All calculations and figures given in reports of, and state- 
ments of Crops, are to be made on the basis of an acre, results 
in all cases, to be given at the rate per acre. 

In pursuance of authority delegated to the Board of Agri- 
culture by Chap. 24, of Acts 1862, Agricultural Societies 
receiving the bounty of the State are required to make use of 
the following form, and be governed by its conditions in the 
mode of ascertaining the amount of crops entered for premium. 

Essex Agricultural Society. — Statement concerning a 

crop of , raised by Mr. , in the town of , 

, 1897. 

What was the crop of 1895? What manure was used and 
how much? What was the crop of 1896? What manure 
was used and how much .'' What is the nature of the soil ? 
When and how many times ploughed, and how deep ? What 
other preparation for seed ? Cost of ploughing and other 
preparation ? Amount of manure in loads of thirty bushels, 
and how applied ? 

Value of manure upon the ground ? How used ? (What 
amount of Commercial Fertilizer used ? How used ? Value 
of same when applied ?) When and how planted ? The 
amount and kind of seed ? Cost of seed and planting ? How 
cultivated and how many times ? Cost of cultivation, includ- 
ing weeding and thinning ? Time and manner of harvesting ? 
Cost of harvesting, inchiding the storing and husking or 
threshing ? Amount of crop, etc. Signed by Compe- 
titor. 

The committee, to whom is intrusted the award of the 
premiums on field crops, may award them according to their 
judgment, but for the purpose of furnishing accurate statistics 
for the benefit of agriculture, shall select certain of the crops, 
and require the owners thereof to measure the land and weigh 
the crops accurately, giving to the committee a certificate of 
the same, and give all possible information thereon over their 
own signatures, and return the same to the Secretary of the 
Society, to be published in the annual transactions. 

In ascertaining the amount of crop, any vessel may be used 
and the weight of its contents once, multiplied by the number 
of times it is filled by the crop. 

In measuring the land or weighing crops, any competent 



60 lbs. 


to bush 


62 '•- 


<< 


56 " 


( ( 


32 " 


It 


48 " 


n 


50 " 


It 


55 " 


It 


57 " 


It 



177 

person may be employed, whether a sworn surveyor or not 
and must give certificate. 

The certificate shall state the weight of all crops only in a 
merchantable state. 

lu ascertaining the amount of a hay crop entered for 
premium, the measurement of the hay in the barn may be em- 
ployed. 

Rules of Measure Practiced and Adopted by the State 
Board op Agriculture. 

Wheat, Potatoes, Sugar Beets, Ruta Bagas, 

Mangold Wurtzels, 
White Beans and Peas, 
Corn, Rye, 
Oats, 

Barley, Buckwheat, 
Cracked Corn, Corn and Rye,"and other meal, 

except Oat, 
Parsnips, Carrots, 
Onions, 

1. For the best conducted experiments of Rye, not less 
than twenty bushels to the acre, fifty-six lbs. to the bushel, on 
not less than one acre, premiums, f>7, 4 

2. For best conducted experiments of Wheat, not less than 
thirty bushels to the acre, sixty lbs. to the bushel, on not less 
than one acre, premium, $7, 4 

3. For best conducted experiments of Oats, not less than 
fifty bushels to the acre, thirty-two lbs. to the bushel, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

4. For l)est constructed experiments of Barley, not less 
than forty bushels to the acre, forty-eight lbs. to the bushel, 
on not less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

5. For best conducted experiments of Indian Corn, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, f7, 4 

6. For largest quantity and best quality of English Hay, 
on not less than one acre, regard being had to the mode and 
cost of cultivation, premiums, $7, 4 

7. For best yield of Field Beans, on not less than one-half 
acre, and not less than twenty five bushels per acre, premiums, 

$7,4 

ROOT CROPS. 

1. For best conducted experiments in raising Carrots, fifty- 
five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 



178 

2. For best conducted experiments in raising Parsnips, 
fifty-five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

3. For best conducted experiments in raising Beets, 
premiums, $8, 5 

4. For best conducted experiments in raising Ruta Bagas, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5. 

5. For best conducted experiments in raising Mangold 
Wurtzels, sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

6. For best conducted experiments in raising Sugar Beets, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5. 

7. For best conducted experiments in raising Onions, fifty- 
two pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

8. For best conducted experiments in raising Potatoes, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

9. For best conducted experiments in raising Cabbages, 
premiums, f 8, 5 

10. For best conducted experiments in raising Squashes, 
premiums, $8, 5 

11. For best conducted experiments in raising Summer 
English Turnips for the market, premiums, $8, 5 

Raised on not less than half an acre, and the quantity of 
crop to be ascertained by weight ; so far as practicable the 
crop to be free from dirt, without tops, and in a merchantable 
condition at the time of measurement. 

Claimants for premiums on Grain and Root Crops must 
forward statement to chairman of committee before Nov. Isf. 

FOREST TREES. 

1. For plantation of either of the following species of 
forest trees, viz: White Oak, Yellow Oak, Locust, Birch, 
White Ash, Maple, Walnut, or White Pine, not less than three 
years old, and not less than 1000 trees, premium, $10 

'2. For plantation of not less than 600 trees, premium, $8 
3. For ornamental trees, ten or more set on any street, 
road or farm, and cared for five years, premium, $8 

CRANBERRIES. 

For best conducted experiment in the cultivation of the 
Cranberry, at least two summers, or not less than twenty rods 
of land, with written statement of the quantity and quality of 
the land, expense of planting, weeding and culture, and 
amount of crops produced. Premium to be paid in 1896 and' 
1897, $10 



179 

For best experiment do., oa not less than ten rods of land» 
premium, $7 

STRA.WBERRIES AND OTHER SMALL FRUITS. 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture, crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $7 

For best crop of Currants, Raspberries and Blackberries, 
with statement as above, premiums, each, $7 

SEEDLING POTATOES AND EXPERIMENTS. 

For best Seedling Potato, originating in Essex County, to 
equal in yield, earliness and quality, the Early Rose, and to 
surpass it in one or more of these particulars, premium paid 
after three years' trial, 'f20 

In testing the value of a Seedling Potato, the committee 
are instructed to take sworn testimony of the cultivator with 
regard to the yield, after having inspected the crop. 

For the most satisfactory experiments to extend through 
five consecutive years, to settle the following facts relative 
to raising potatoes :-rpremium, $25 

1st. Will whole, medium sized potatoes yield better re- 
sults than pieces cut to two eyes ? 

2nd. What will be the result of continuously planting 
small-sized potatoes of the same strain a series of years ? 

3d. Difference between hilling and flat cultivation. 

4th. Effect, if any, of cutting off seed ends before planting. 

5th. Effects of deep and shallow planting. 

6th. Raising from sprouts alone from same strain. 

7th. Can potatoes having dwarf vines be planted nearer 
than others. 

8th. Best distance apart for seed in the drill. 

9th. To show the effect of covering the top with earth at 
several times after they had come up. 

To be raised on not less than a half acre of land, uniform 
in character, and all to receive the same kind and quality of 
manure and cultivation, and to be inspected by the committee 
at the time of gathering the crops. 

ESSAYS AND FARM ACCOUNTS. 

The Essays must be transmitted to the Secretary by the 1st 
of November, with sealed envelopes containing the names of 
their authors, respectively, which shall not be opened by the 



i8o 

committee, nor shall the names he known to the committee, 
until they shall have decided upon the merit of the Essay. 

For original Essays on any subject connected with Agricul- 
ture, in a form worthy of publication, premiums, $10, 8 

For best statement of Actual Farm Accounts, drawn from 
the experience of the claimant, in a form worthy of publica- 
tion, premium, $8 

For Keports of Committees upon subjects for which pre- 
miums are offered, premiums, $8, 6 

Committee — G. L. Streeter, Salem; N, M, Hawkes, Lynn; 
D. E. Safford, Hamilton ; Geo. E. Blodgett, Rowley ; J. M. 
Danforth, Lynnfield. 

LIBRARY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; Henry Brooks, Sa- 
lem ; B. P. Ware, Marblehead ] J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 

TREADWELL FARM. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marljlehead ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield; Andrew Nichols, Danvers. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee — J. Hardy Phippen, Saiem ; Benj. P. Ware, 
Marblehead ; E. Pope Barrett; Peabody. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Francis H. Appleton, Peabody ; Nathaniel Dole, Newbury ; 
C. C. Blunt, Andover; 0. S. Butler, Georgetown; John M. 
Danforth, Lynnfield. 

DELEGATES. 

From the Essex Agricultural Society to attend Exhibitions 
of Societies, Farmers' Clubs and Fruit Growers' Associations 
in Essex County, and report any information that shall seem 
valuable for publication. 

The Secretary to be notified of the time of holding their ex- 
hibition, who will notify the chairman of Committee to assign 
Delegate. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of crops, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair, are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Address by Hon. Kobert S. Rantoul 3 

Seventy-Sixth Annual Cattle Show and Fair 22 

Report of the Annual Meeting 25 

Report of the Delegate from the State Board, 1895 26 

Report on Bulls with Statements 28 

Report on Milch Cows 29 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows with Statements 30 

Report on Heifers, Pure Bred 31 

Report on Heifers, Native or Grade 32 

Report on Working Oxen 32 

Report on Stallions for Driving Purposes 33 

Report on Brood Mares 33 

Report on Family Horses 33 

Repoi't on Gents' Driving Horses 34 

Report on Si ngle Farm Horses 34 

Report on Pairs of Farm Horses 34 

Report on Fast Walking Horses 35 

Report on Colts, Farm Purposes 35 

Report on Colts, for Driving 35 

Report on Swine 36 

Report on Sheep 37 

Rejjort on Ploughing 37 

Report on Poultry 42 

Report on Harrows 43 

Report on Carriages 43 

Report on Agricultural Implements 44 

Report of Committee on Root Crops 78 

Statements 79 

Report of Committee on Small Fruits 88 

Statements 91 

Report of Committee on Reclaimed Ijand 94 

Report of Committee on Treadwoll Farm 96 

Report of Delegate from State Board, 189() 98 

Farmer's Institutes 99 

Report of Committee on Essays 100 



I»2 

Statements and Essays 100 

In Memoriam ] 17 

Constitution of the Society 119 

Treasurer's Report 122 

Officers of the Society 124 

List of Members 126 

Recapitulation of Premiums 151 

Financial Statement 1896 Fair 153 

Duties of Trustees, Committees and Exhibitors 154 

Premium List for 1897 157 



\ 



TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1897 



OF THE 



ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



(Organized i8i8,) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 

IN MASSACHUSETTS, 
WITH ADDRESS BY 

HON. GEO. VON L MEYER, 

And the Premium List for 1898. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS.: 

Newcomb & Gauss, Printers, 

1897. 



ADDRESS 



The invitation to address you, while fully appreciated^ 
has been accepted by me with much hesitation, for the 
reason that during the existence of the Essex Agricultural 
Society, which extends over a period of ninety years, it 
has at its annual meetings listened to orations from many 
of the most illustrious men in our State. It was a relief 
to ascertaiu, however, that the addresses had not always 
been made by men experienced in the art of farming. I 
found occasionally that lawyers had addressed you on 
some of these annual reunions. Perhaps it would be well 
to bear in mind Lord Brougham's description of a lawyer, 
"a legal gentleman who rescues your estate from your 
enemies and keeps it himself." Matthew Arnold in a 
well-remembered line describes a bird in Kensington Gar- 
dens " deep in its unknown days employ." But peace to 
the poet its employ is all too certain. Its day is spent in 
struggling to get a living ; and a very hard day it is. So 
it was with the first settlers in Essex County. "If the 
land had been all the same, the struggle for life had been 
all the same, and if the struggle for life had been all the 
same, life itself had been all the same." 

In our Essex County there were two regions, the mari- 
time and the agricultural. In the former, the belt along 
the shore, the peo[)le became fishermen ; in the latter, the 
inland district, the people were farmers. Tlie fisherman's 
life is a precarious life, he becomes hardy, resolute, self- 
reliant. The farmer's life is a settled life, he loves his 
liome and lie becomes domestic and quiet. He lives, or 



used to, on what he produced. It was the turkey who 
said about Thanksgiving time, better to be and to be eaten 
than not to be at all. * 

To trace the struggles of the early settlers, has all been 
minutely recorded, eloquently told, and illustrated in your 
annual reports. We can take pride in remembering that 
to Essex County belongs the credit of erecting in Beverly 
the first cotton mill in America, it was built in 1787, in- 
corporated February, 1789, visited by George Washington 
in October of the same year. 

Today the total product of the manufactures of New 
England is valued at <f 319 per inhabitant, that of old Eng- 
land 1115, that of France 171, and that of Germany $63 
per inhabitant. The manufacturing product of New Eng- 
land has increased three times faster than the gi-owth in 
population. The manufacturing product of the most pros- 
perous country in Europe has barely kept pace with its 
population. Yet of late years there has been a great deal 
of talk about the depression of business in the United 
States. The very atmosphere has been impregnated with 
ideas about hard times. I remember of hearing of an army 
officer, whose salary is always the same, who declared he 
must begin to economize as he found the times so hard. 

During this period of increase of manufacturers' product, 
the wages of workmen have been more than proportionally 
increased. Wages are much higher than those in Europe 
and the cost of food is less. The deposits in savings banks 
are usually looked upon as fair indications of relative 
prosperity of working people of the different countries. 
Deposits of savings banks of New England are $151 per 
inhabitant, Germany -$27, France $19 and England $18. 
If we stop to investigate, the American people "notwith- 
standing some of their own lamentations are not so badly 
off after all. The savings banks show that the working- 
man not only has more money to deposit than his Euro- 
pean brother, but also more confidence in depositing it. 



The United States may be poor as a nation, owing to ex- 
cessive activity of the pendulum of politics or to the in- 
capacity of administration, but the American people are 
well off. The farmer has had more weeds of late and low- 
er prices, but unless all signs fail good times are coming. 

Fifty years after the first cotton mill was erected, the 
first railroad passenger train ran into Salem from Boston. 
It left East Boston at 9 a. m. arriving at Salem an hour 
later. The time has since been cut down one half. Col- 
onel Peabody was the first president of the road, and Hon. 
Leverett Saltonstall was then the mayor of the city of 
Salem. Again, fifty years after the arrival of this passen- 
ger train, a thoroughly successful horseless carriage was 
run through Salem over our Essex roads ; and I venture 
to predict that some of us who are here today, will live to 
see the time when it will be as rare to see carriages drawn 
by horses as it is at present to see street cars drawn by 
horses. I noticed in Paris last winter the automobile, as 
it is there called, is becoming quite a frequent sight, and 
I understand a contract has been made to place for service 
in the streets of that city five hundred of these horseless 
cabs, and the same number are to be placed in the streets 
of London. 

The bicycle is now being manufactured so cheaply that 
it is within the means not only of the business clerk, but 
of the mechanic and farm laborer, opening opportunities 
of employment at distances, which were practically out of 
the question on account of the weary tramp home on foot 
after a hard day's work. It is also bringing about a de- 
mand for better roads which benefits every one ; and the 
result is that on holidays and on the day of rest, we see 
thousands of people flying along on their wheels, enjoying 
an outing in our beautiful Essex County which was for- 
merly to them an undiscovered land^ and at the same time 
gladdening the hearts of inn-keepers who heretofore were 
barely making a living. 



The American farmer, more especiall}^ the western farm- 
er, has had an extraordinary and self-evident illustration 
of the universal law of supply and demand. In the past 
it has been intimated, if not said, that Wall Street controls 
the price of silver, silver controls the price of wheat, the 
price of wheat controls the farmei', therefore Wall 
Street was to blame for the ills and misfortunes of the 
farmer. This has been exploded by silver steadily declin- 
ing, and at the same time wheat rapidly advancing toil. 00 
and over. This advance in wheat, a rough estimate and 
probably not too great, puts the increased price of farm 
products in the United States at 1500,000,000. This is a 
stupendous sum, it is nearl}- equal to the nation's interest 
bearing debt, it is more than the entire volume of green- 
backs now in existence or the entire mass of silver dollars 
coined since the foundation of the republic. It is not 
strange therefore that the farmers in the West are running 
away from Bryanism. 

This is decidedly an American farmers' year. Grain 
can never be grown in Massachusetts so cheaply nor so 
abundantly as in the west. Consequentlj'' the New England 
farmer has to pay his attention to the hay crop and kitchen 
gardening, and in order to succeed it is not sufficient to be 
a practical farmer, but it is necessary, especially in our 
soil, to acquire a knowledge of agricultural chemistry. 
Sir Humphrey Davy may be said to have opened the way 
to progress and improvement in this direction in the earl}^ 
part of the century, yet it was not till 1840 that Liebig 
announced a proposition, i. e. to manure an acre of land 
with forty pounds of bone dust, that awakened the atten- 
tion of intelligent farmers to the importance of applying 
the results of chemical investigation and opening the way 
to the whole system of concentrated fertilizers, which has 
grown to enormous proportions and affected the commerce 
of the whole world. 

The national government has come to the aid of the 



state in establishing agricultural colleges, where attention 
will be given to the various sciences, bearing upon practi- 
cal agriculture and benefit the rising generation, and show- 
ing that a greater application of mind to the labors of the 
hand is to distinguish the future over past generations, 
which will open the wa^^ to higher triumphs for American 
agriculture. 

lu bestowing the bounty of the state upon the agricul- 
tural societies, the condition was made, " that such encour- 
agement should be annually offered as seemed best adapted 
to increase and perpetuate an adequate supply of ship 
timber within the Commonwealth." This sounds strange 
now with steel and iron superceding timber for vessels. 
Mr. Proctor in his address before the Essex Agricultural 
Society in 1844 refers to this, and remarks that the letter 
of the condition has been complied with, but what has 
been the result? He asks, where is the tree now (1844) 
growing that started into being in consequence of this 
bounty? While not needed in the defence of our shore, 
think if his suggestion had been carried out in some bar- 
ren pasture, what a splendid growth of timber would exist 
now after more than fifty years ? What elms might be 
giving grateful shade on a hot summer's day along our 
dusty roads, and village streets ? I know of no better ex- 
ample in order to illustrate to what grandeur these trees 
may aspire, or how effective their appearance on a main 
thoroughfare, than to point to Stockbridge or Deerfield or 
Hadley. In what manner could Essex farmers better con- 
sult the interest of their children, than by planting trees 
in grounds so rough and rocky as to be unfit for tillage. I 
recall to your attention the planting of Indian Hill in New- 
bury by Benjamin Perley Poor and the il,000 prize which 
he won for a ten years' growth. 

I have seen in England and this last year in Scotland, 
hundreds of acres of forest now growing, that were planted 
by the hand of man. The cultivation of trees generally, 



8 



whether for ornament, timber or shade along the borders 
of our streets, demands much more attention than has been 
given to it. Let the trees continue to grow for one gener- 
ation, and the trees themselves will be of more value than 
the land itself on which they are planted. Mrs. Phillips' 
place on Wenham Lake is a fair example of results that 
can be obtained in ordinary pasture land — all the trees 
having been planted by the late Mr. Phillips about twenty 
years ago. Mr. Hunnewell's place in Wellesley, shows 
what beautiful results may be obtained by tree culture 
within the life of the owner, on a place that was bare of 
tree or shrub. 

In locating a portion of one's farm adapted to timber 
growing, Horace Greely made the following suggestions : 
" Land wisely planted with trees and fenced so far as need 
be to keep out cattle, costs nothing. Whatever else you 
grow involves labor and expenditure. Trees grow of their 
own accord. They will richly reward labor and care in 
thinning, trimming, transplanting, but they will do very 
well if simply let alone. Your springs and streams will be 
reinforced and rendered more equable and enduring. All 
ravines and steep hillsides should be devoted to trees ; 
every acre too rocky to be thoroughl}'^ cleared of stones, 
should be set apart for tree growing. Especially ever- 
greens may be so planted as to modify the average temper- 
ature of your garden by forming wind breaks. Crops as 
well as springs will be improved by keeping the crests of 
ridges thickly wooded. Never forget in planting that a 
good tree grows as thriftily and surely as a poor one. 
Whenever timber has become scarce and valuable, a wood 
lot should be thinned out, never more cleared off, unless it 
is to be devoted to a different use. Timber should always 
be cut with intelligent reference to the future." 

It is a matter to be regretted that the cities in Massachu- 
setts are growing in population at the expense of the town, 
due to emigration and preference for other pursuits. I 



have seen it figured that forty per cent, of the towns in 
Massachusetts are losing population. This is now off-set 
in a small way by a tendency of some of the inhabitants of 
cities to return to country life and make their permanent 
home in some small town. Whether this in a way accounts 
for the disappearance of the abandoned farms, I am not 
able to assert, except that Mr. Wni. Henry Bishop after a 
personal search for abandoned farms in New England 
seems to have emerged with doubts as to their existence, 
and declares that you might just as well speak of abandoned 
property in New York City — suggest what a picture of 
gloom for instance might be based upon a catalogue of all 
houses standing vacant for any cause in New York. 

When we reflect upon the mad rush of life in cities, for- 
tunes made and lost, hearts broken by disappointment and 
reverses, is it to be wondered at, that people are discover- 
ing and appreciating the charms of rural life ? The farmer, 
of all people, may reflect with considerable satisfaction up- 
on his life so near" to nature and so free from contamina- 
tion of all other pursuits. It is to the credit of Essex 
county that in many instances the same names are in pos- 
session of the same stone fenced ancient farms. The gen- 
eral holding of farms in this county for two hundred and 
fifty years in family line without any law against alienation 
is something exceptional in human history. May the time 
never come when the Essex farmer yields up his suprema- 
cy amidst the fields and meadows of this grand old county. 



SEVENTY-SEVENTH 

Annual' Cattle Show and Fair. 

The Cattle Show and Fair of this society opened Sept. 
21, 1897, under the most favorable circumstances, and in 
all departments it was throughout a complete success as 
to the crowds of people in attendance and the receipts. 
The total number of entries were eighty less than last 
year. This is probably due to the season being so unfav- 
orable to fruit and vegetables. The poultry exhibit was 
very fine and more than one hundred entries were exhib- 
ited than ever before. Perhaps this is due in some extent 
to the new poultry building erected by the Society the 
past season. 

The general excellence of the exhibits, considering 
the season, was fully up to the Essex County standard, 
which ranks second to none in the state. 

The exhibit of stock was of a very superior quality, 
especially the oxen and steers that are seen in southern 
Essex. 

The street parade was a fine attraction and great credit 
is due to the committee who had charge of it for the 
effort made to get so fine a display of teams from the 
adjoining cities of Lynn and Salem. 

The public spirit and enterprise of the citizens of Pea- 
body, at all times manifest, has as much to do with making 
this fair the largest and most successful ever held as any- 
thing else. 

The annual dinner of the society was served in the 
vestry of the South church, Thursday, the last day of the 



II 



fair, at which there was a large attendance, after which 
President Butler called the assemblage to order with a 
few brief remarks and introduced the Hon. Geo. V. L. 
Meyer, who gave an instructive and pleasing address, fol- 
lowed by Joshua Clarke, Esq., delegate from the State 
Board of Agriculture, Hon. Wm. S. Knox, M. C, Gen. 
Francis H. Appleton and others. 

The entries in the several departments of the Fair, for 
1897 and 1896, are tabulated for comparison as follows : 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON SHOW GROUNDS. 



Class. 



From From 

Entries Different Entries Different 

in 1897. Places in 189(5. Places 

in 1897. in 1896. 



Bulls, 

Fat Cattle, 

Milch Cows, 

Herds of Milch Cows, 

Heifers, Pure Bred, 

Heifers, Native or Grade, 

Working Oxen and Steers, 

Steers, 

Stallions, Farm and Draft, 

Stallions for Driving Purposes, 

Brood Mares, Farm and Draft, 

Brood Mares, Driving Purposes, 

Family Horses, 

Gents' Driving Horses, 

Pairs Gents' Driving Horses, 

Farm Horses, 

Pairs of Farm Horses, over 2500 

lbs.. 
Pairs of Farm Horses, less than 

2500 lbs., 
Colts, Farm and Draft, 
Colts, Driving Purposes, 
Fast Walking Horses, 



8 


5 


6 


3 


2 


2 








25 


4 


21 


5 


2 


2 


3 


3 


24 


6 


18 


4 


15 


4 


17 


4 


4 


3 


8 


2 


3 


1 








2 


1 








5 


4 


6 


6 
















3 


4 


3 


7 


4 





4 


8 


5 


14 


9 


2 


2 


2 


o 


G 


3 


6 


4 



2 


1 


4 


4 


1 


1 


2 


2 


13 


6 


11 


5 


1 


1 


5 


5 



12 



Class. 


Entries 
in 1897. 


From 
Different 
Places 
in 1897. 


Entries 
in 1896. 


From 
Different 
Places, 
in 1866. 


Swine, Large Breeds, 


26 


2 


24 


3 


Swine, Small Breeds, 


12 


1 


6 


1 


Sheep, 


19 


1 


10 


3 


Poultry, 


276 


13 


133 


11 


Harrows for trial. 


5 


3 


2 


2 


Agricultural Implements, 


31 


5 


33 


6 


Carriages, 


24 


6 


16 


4 


Ploughing, 


10 


8 


8 


4 




538 


22 


362 


22 


EXHIBITS IN 


HA LI 








Class. 
Dairy, 


Entries 
in 1897. 

2 


From 
Different 
Places 
in 1897. 

2 


Entries 
in 18%. 

4 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1896. 

3 


Bread and Canned Fruit, 


28 


4 


90 


12 


Honey, 


2 


2 


2 


1 


Pears, 


125 


12 


181 


11 


Apples, 


70 


10 


368 


21 


Peaches, Grapes and Assorted 








Fruits, 


126 


15 


111 


12 


Plants, 


21 


4 


37 


4 


Flowers, 


240 


13 


115 


10 


Vegetables, 


267 


12 


317 


17 


Grain and Seed, 


13 


4 


12 


4 


Carpetings and Rugs, 


42 


9 


20 


7 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


77 


14 


67 


12 


Articles Manuf'd from Leather, 


17 


4 


30 


5 


Manuf'res and General Mdse., 


28 


5 


52 


10 


Fancy Work, 


284 


13 


226 


14 


Works of Art, 


97 


9 


79 • 


7 


Work of Children under 12 yeai 


I'S 








of age, 


55 


4 


37 


1 



1495 24 1749 30 



13 

Grand total 2033 entries from 29 out of 34 cities and 
towns in Essex County against 2111 entries from 30 cities 
and towns last year. Gloucester, Manchester, Methuen, 
Nahant and Salisbury did not have exhibits this year. 
The entries were : Amesbury, 68 ; Andover, 1 ; Beverly, 
97 ; Boxford, 25 ; Danvers, 185 ; Essex, 1 ; Georgetown, 
12 ; Groveland, 13 ; Hamilton, 12 ; Haverhill, 39 ; Ipswich, 
9 ; Lawrence, 16 ; Lynn, 203 ; Lynntield, 15 ; Marblehead, 
16 ; Merrimac, 17 ; Middleton, 15 ; Newbury, 29 ; New- 
buryport, 14 ; North Andover, 78 ; Peabody, 991 ; Rock- 
port, 3 ; Rowley, 13 ; Salem, 119 ; Saugus, 1 , Swampscott, 
20 ; Topsfield, 8 : Wenham, 2 ; West Newbury, 11. 

REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the Pea- 
body Institute at Peabody, Sept. 22, 1897. President 
Butler called the meeting to order at 10.30 o'clock, A. M., 
and read the call. 

On motion of Col. J. Drew of Lawrence, it was voted 
unanimously that the secretary be instructed to cast one 
ballot for the present board of officers for the ensuing 
year, and the following officers were declared elected : 

President. 
Oliver S. Butler, of Georgetown. 

Vice-Presidents. 
James J. H. Gregory, of Marblehead. 
Horatio G. Herrick of Lawrence. 
Asa T. Newhall, of Lynn. 
J. D. W. French, of North Andover. 

Secretary. 
John M. Danforth, of Lynnfield. 

On motion of Asa T. Newhall it was voted that a com- 
mittee consisting of Francis H. Appleton, Oliver S. Butler, 



14 

and John M. Danforth be appointed a Committee of the 
Essex Agricultural Society, to sell the Treadwell Farm 
so called, situate in the town of Topsfield, belonging to 
said society, with full power to execute deeds conveying 
the same or make any arrangements with the Massachusetts 
General Hospital in regard to the sale of said farm that 
they may think p^'oper. Voted : — That the committees, 
report on the revision of the constitution and by-laws of 
this society be accepted and adopted, and the changes as 
recommended be adopted. 

After some remarks by several members of the society 
in regard to matters pertaining to the society, the meeting 
dissolved. 



Reports of Committees. 
1897. 



The following premiums were awarded for live stock : — 

BULLS. 

•16. First premium, to William C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey bull. 
$4:. First premium, to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey bull. 
$4:. First Premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein bull " Prince of Penn." 
$4. Second premium, to J. M. Doherty, Boxford, for 

Jersey bull. 
$4. Second premium, to J. C. Rogers, Peabody, for 

Guernsey bull. 
13. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holsteiu bull, " Prince Clothilde." 
George L. Burnhara, Richard Newell, Andrew Mans- 
field, George L. Averill — Committee. 



FAT CATTLE. 

18. — First premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for two 
fat oxen. 

16. — Second premium, to Everett K. Brown, Ipswich, for 
pair fat oxen. 

$S. — Special premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for col- 
lection of fat oxen. 
John Swinerton, John J. Gould — for the Committee. 



i6 



MILCH COWS. 

I. First premium, to E. W. Moody, No. Andover for Jer- 
sey cow, "Susan W." 
>. Second premium, to William C. Endicott, Dan vers, 

for Jersey cow, " Lea's Pride." 
i. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

the best cow either foreis^n or cjrade to Grade Hoi- 

stein " Minnie B." 
I. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein cow, " Havergale." 
I. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade cow, " Hannah H." 
). Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein cow, " Myra W. Archer.'' 
». Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade cow, "Dot." 
Isaac Damon — Judge. 



To the Committee on Milch Cows : 

I enter for your consideration for best milch cows either 
foreign, native or grade, the Holstein cow, Myra W.,and 
Minnie B., a grade Durham and Holstein. 

" Myra W.," calved Aug. 2, is 12 years old, has given 
48 lbs. milk a day for the past month." 

"Minnie B.," 5 years old, calved Apr. 4, gave 50 lbs. a 
day from April 10 to May 10. 

Holstein cow, " Havergale," 6 years old, calved Aug. 1» 
gave 48 lbs. per day from Aug. 10 to Sept. 10. 

The 4 years old "Myra W. Shepard," calved Oct. 20, 
1896, is due Oct. 25 ; in December, 1896, she gave 40 lbs. 
milk a day. 

For native or grade cows, the 5 years old Jersey and 
Holstein, "Hannah IL," calved Oct. 1, 1896, is due in 
October, gave 46 lbs. milk a day in November, and the 4 



17 

years old Durham and Holslein cow. '•Dot.'" calved Sept., 
1896, is due in October (is not dry), gave 38 lbs. a day in 
November. For feed, etc., see statemeiit of herd of milch 
cows. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Pooh. 

To the Committee on Milch Cows: 

This cow is a full bred Jersey, '• Leo's Pride." She 
dropped her last calf March 18, 1897 ; in March she gave 
126 quarts ; April, 420 ; May, 438 ; June, 420 ; July, 403 ; 
August, 372; September, 210 quarts. From March 21, to 
September 20, the total amount of milk was 2,385 quarts. 
Due to calve again March 1, 1898. 

E. W. Moody. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

$10 and Diploma, to Ja mes C. Poor, No. Andovei, for 5 

Holstein and grade cows with statement. 
$8 and Diploma to Joseph A. Piper, superintendent Pea- 
body Town Farm, for herd of 14 milch cows. 
George E. Herrick, A. P. Fuller, John Swinerton — 
Committee. 

To the Committee oh Herds of Milch Cows : 

I enter for your consideration the Holstein cows, •• Myra 
W.," "Havergale," "Myra W. Shepaid." and grade 
"Minnie B." and "Hannah H." 

"Myra W.," milk record for one year, 10,455 lbs. 

"Havergale," milk record for one year, 11,000 lbs. 

"Myra W. Shepard" (3 yrs. old), milk record foi- one 
year, 8,640 lbs. 



i8 

"Minnie B/' (5 yrs. old), milk record for one year, 
9,280 lbs. 

''Hannah H." (4 yrs. old), milk record for one year, 
8,750 lbs. 

Winter feed, 12 quarts gluten meal and bean, one part 
gluten, two parts beans ; feed in two feeds ; one feed man- 
golds and turnips, and two feeds of dry fodder, consisting 
of oats and barley and corn fodder, with some English 
hay, watered twice a day in the barn. 

In summer they are turned to pasture, with grain feed 
reduced about one-half, and when the pasture gets short 
are fed in barn with green fodder twice a day. 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. POOB. 



HEIFERS— PURE BREED. 

$4. First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 
Jersey heifer, 1 year old. 

$4. First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 
Jersey heifer calf. 

$5. First premium to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for Jersey 
heifer in milk. 

$3. Second premium to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for Jer- 
sey heifer. 

$2. Second premium to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for Jer- 
sey heifer calf. 

$5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein heifer in milk, "Daisy De Fernon," 3 years 
old. 

$i. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein heifer, " Betz 3d," 2 years old. 

$4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein heifer, "Lady Fairfax," 1 year old. 



^9 

•f3. Second premium to James C. Pom, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, "De Feiuon 2d" 3 years old. 
#2. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover. for 

Holstein heifer. " Betz 4th," 1 year old. 
$d. Second premium to B. F. Swasey. Marblehead. for 

Durham heifer, 3 years old. 
■f2. Second premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Jersey heifer. 2 years old. 
$2. Second premium to Joseph A. Piper, superintendent 

Peabody Town Farm, for Holstein heifer calf. 
E. A. Emerson — for the Committee. 

To the Committee on Heifers— pure breed: 

I enter for your consideration for heifers under 4 ye.irs 
old in milk, the Holstein heifer, " Daisy Fernon," 3 years 
old, calved Nov, 28, 1896, due in December; gave 38 lbs. 
milk a day in January, and '" De Fernon 2d," 3 years old, 
calved in November, 1896, is due in December ; s^ave 35 
lbs. milk a day in January. 

For two year olds, never calved, •* Sophie Barter 2d," 
and '-Betz 3d." 

For one year old, and under, *' Lady Light Heait, 20 
months old, and "Betz 4th" one year old, ''Sophie Fair- 
fax," 3 months old, and " Myra W., 2d," 6 weeks old. 
Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Poor. 



HEIFERS— NATIVE OR GRADE. 

$4. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers. for 

grade Guernsey heifer. 
$4. First premium to John V. Higgins. Middleton, for 

grade heifer, 10 mos. old. 
$5. First premium to Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 

grade heifer in milk. 



20 

•fS. Second premium, to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for grade 

Jersey heifer. 
$2. Second premium, to J. E. Day. Danv ers, for grade 

Guernsey heifer. 
#2. Second premium, to Fred Thomas, Peabody, for grade 
Ayrshire and Jersey heifer. 
F. A. Russell, John Barker, A. Whittier, Abel Stick- 
ney — Committee. 



WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

il8. First premium to Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, for 

2 pair Hereford oxen. 
•f G. First premium, to Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, for 

working steers. 
|6. Second premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for 

working oxen. 
Henry A. Hayward, J. W. Yeaton, J. M. Chandler. — 
Committee. 



STEERS. 

$4. First premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for 2 year 

old steers. 
i3. First premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for 1 year 

old steers. 
$3. Gratuity, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for one trained 

steer. 
Geo. L. Averill, B. H. Farnham, Chas. Haseltine — 
Committee. 



STALLIONS FOR FARM AND DRAFT. 

$5. Second premium, to William McNeil, Rockport, for 
dark bay stallion, 6 years old. 
W. R. Roundy, Walter F Gould, James C. Poor, Sher- 
man Nelson — Committee. 



21 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

$8. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for bay 

stallion "■ Zettera," 4 years old. 
i8. First premium, to E. A. Lothrop, Beverly, for brown 

stallion " Col. Osgood," 9 years old. 
•f5. Second piemium, to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for 

chestnut stallion " Quincy Wilkes," 4 years old. 
Byron G. Kimball, Bennett Griffin, Amos P. Alley, H. 
F. Demsey — Committee. 



BROOD MARES FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

18. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for bay 

mare and colt, " Psyche." 
•fo. Second premium, to W. E. Dane & Co., Salem, for 

bay mare and colt. 



FAMILY HORSES. 

$6. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody. for bay mare, 

5 years old. 
$4. Second premium, to Daniel H. Flint. Peabody, for 

bay mare. 
$4. Special premium, to Harry Ray. Lynn, for trick 

pony. 
Byron G. Kimball. W. F. Kinsman, H. A. Quint — Com- 
mittee. 



GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

$6. Fiist premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for bay 

mare " Sylvia." 
•f4. Second premium, to J. Henry Nason, Boxford, for 

black mare. 



22 

$8. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pair twin 

hoises. 
%. Second premium, to Thomas Sanders, Haverhill, for 

pair grey horses. 
Charles H. Gould, Fred I. Hopkins, John H. George, E. 
C. Little, J. D. Drew — Committee. 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

•fo. First premium, to Mrs. L. S. Wilkins, Topsfield. 



SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

$8. Fiist premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for l)lack 

horse '' Sweep." weight 1225 lbs. 
■f4. Second premium, to F. W. Lyford, Danvers, for bay 

horse, 1250 lbs. 
$G. First premium, to B. W. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

bay mare, weight 1075 lbs. 
1^4. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for bay 

gelding, weight 1150 lbs. 
N. A. Bnshby. D. P. Pope, George Pratt. J. H. Nason 
— Committee. 



PAIRS FARM HORSES WEIGHING OVER 2500 LBS- 

$8. First premium, to James C. Poor. No. Andover. for 
[tair Gre}' hor-ses. weight 3100 lbs. 
J. H. Perkins, G. M. Roundy. Edw. L. Harrington — 
Committee. 



23 

PAIRS FARM HORSES WEIGHING LESS THAN 
2500 LBS. 

$8. First premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, for pair 

horses, weight 2250 lbs. 
•f5. Second premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, for pair 

horses, weight 2350 lbs. 
Edwin Bates, I. F. Knowlton, Wm. B. Carlton, E. A. 
Fuller — Committee. 



COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES. 

%g. First premium, to William McNeil, Rockport, for 4 
year-old black mare. 
John H. George. D. D. Adams, E. L. Wildes — Commit- 
tee. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

f6. First premium , to A. B. Clark, Peabody, for bay 
gelding, 4 yeai-s old. 

$4. Second premium, to Henry W. Johnson, Lynn, for 
" Aberdeen " mare, 4 years old. 

•16. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for 3-year- 
old colt. '' Mandella." 

■14. Second premium, to E. A. Lothrop. Beverly, for ba\- 
colt. 3 years old. 

%\. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for bhick 
2-year-old colt. 

■S4. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for chest- 
nut colt, 1 year old. 

•f2. Second premium, to E. W. Moody. No. Andover, for 
1 -year-old colt. 

•12. Second premium, to E. A. Lothroj), Beverly, for 2- 
y ear-old colt. 



24 

Byron G. Kimball, A. B. Fellows, J. E. Henick, H. F. 
Longfellow. Fred H. Bates, Geo. A. Rogers, C. T. Batchel- 
fler — Comnv'ftee. 



SWINE— LARGE BREEDS. 

15. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabndy. for Cheshire 
boar. 

•So. Fii'st premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody. for Cheshire 
sow and pigs. 

%t). First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody. for Berkshire 
boar. 

$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill. Peal)()dy, for Chester 
white boai'. 

|!o. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Chester 
white sow and pigs. 

■lo. First pieraium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for weaned 
pigs. 

f>o. First [)remium, to W. L. Hill. Peabody, for large 
Yorkshire boar. 

•So. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for large 
Yorkshire sow and pigs. 

•1-5. Fiist premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Yorkshire 
weaned pigs. 

•SB. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Ches- 
hire weaned pigs. 

•SB. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Berk- 
shire boar. 

•S3. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for O. I. 
Chester sow and pigs. 

•S5. First [)remium, to Frank W. Stanley, Peabody, for 

Berkshire sow. 
$r,. First premium, to L. F. Newhall, Peabody, for Ches- 
ter boar. 



25 

15. First premium, to L. F. Newhall, Peabody, for York- 
shire pigs. 

83. Second premium, to L. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 
weaned pigs. 

$3. Second premium, to L. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 
Yorkshire boar. 
George A. Dow, J. A. Lamson, George C. Foster — 

Qommittee. 



SWINE— SMALL BREEDS. 

f5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Suffolk 

boar. 
•15. First premium, to W. L. Hill Peabody, for Med. 

Yorkshire boar. 
13 Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire sow. 
$3. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody. for Med. 

Yorkshire pigs. 
Nathan Longfellow, Henry Hilliard, John S. Tuck — 
Committee. 



SHEEP. 

•15. First premium, to J. B. Thomas, Peabody, for Grade 
Cotswold and Leicester buck. 

$5. First premium, to J. B. Thomas, Peabody, for Shrop- 
shire sheep. 

$5. First premium, to J. B. Thomas, Peabody, for Leices- 
ter sheep. 

$5. First premium, to M. Drislane, Peabody, for Shrop- 
shire lambs. 

$2. Second premium, to Harry A. Larrabee, Peabody, for 
sheep. 
H. A. Quint. E. Mansfield, N. F. Abbott, C. C. Blunt— 

Committee. 



26 

POULTRY. 

•12. First premium, to Geo. A. Knight, Peabody, for B. 

Leghorn fowls. 
-12 and diploma to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for White Wy- 
andotte fowls. 
$2. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for Barred 

Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for White 

Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to A. B. Forbes^ Newbur3^ for 

Baried Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to George Lunt, Danvers, for Light 

Brahma chicks. 
$2. First premium, to R. E. WooUard, Amesbury, for 

White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
82. First premium, to R. E. Woollard, Amesbury, for 

White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium, to R. E. Woollard, Amesbury, for 

Buff Cochin chicks. 
'f2. Fijst premium, to R. E. Woollard. Amesbury, for 

S. L. Wyandotte fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to R. E. Woollai-d, Amesbury, for 

S. L. Wyandotte fowls. 
•S2. First premium, to R. E. WooUaid, Amesbury, for 

S. L. Wyandotte chicks, 
fl. Second piemium, to R. E. Woollard. Amesbury, for 

S. L. Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to R. E. Woollard, Amesbury, for 

Brown Leghorn fowls. 
•12. Fiist premium, to R. E. WooHard, Amesbury, for 

Brown Leghoin chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Win. E. Sheen, Peabod}', for S. C. 

Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$\. Second premium, to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

White Plymouth Rock chicks. 



27 

$2. First premium, to R. R. Hamilton, Peabody, for 

White Leghorn chicks. 
12. First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for White 

Leghorn fowls. 
Diploma to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for White Plymouth 

Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam fowls. 
%1. Second premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam fowls. 
•12. First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam chicks. 
Diploma, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody. for Pen of Buff 

Cochin Bantam chicks. 
^'2. First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Red 

Game Bantam fowls. 
•f2. First premium, to C L. Beckett, Peabody, for Red 

Game Bantam chicks. 
#1 and Diploma, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Pen of Red 

Game Bantam chicks. 
%2. First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabod}^ for Black 

Cochin Bantams. 
•S2 and Diploma, to W. W. Osgood. Haverhill, for S. C 

Buff Leghorns. 
•f2 and Diploma, to W. W. Osgood,5Haverhill, for Brown 

Leghorn chicks. 
$i. Gratuity, for Poultry appliances. 
$2. First premium, to S. P. Chase, Peabody, for pen Light 

Brahmas. 
•12. First premium, to S. P. Chase, Peabody. for Light 

Brahma chicks. 
'■$2. First premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, for White 

Game Bantam fowls. 



28 

$2. First premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, for W. G. 

Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Charles Ballard. Salem, for B. G. 

Bantam fowls. 
f 2. First premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, for B. G. 

Bantam chicks. 
%2. First premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, for B. R. G. 

Bantam fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, forB. R. 

G. Bantam fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Chai'les Ballard, Salem, for B. R. 

G. Bantam chicks. 
•SI. Second premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, forB. R. 

G. Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, for Red 

Pyle Game Bantam fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, for Red 

Pyle Gjime Bantam fowls. 
•f2. First premium, to Charles Ballard, Salem, for Red 

Pyle Game Bantam chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to Charles Ballaid, Salem, for Red 

Pyle Game Bantam chicks. 
12. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

White Langshan fowls. 
•SI. Second premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

White Langshan chicks. 
S2. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbiny, Amesbury, for 

White Leghorn fowls. 
$L Second premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

White Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, .Amesbury. for 

Pearl Guinea foAvls. 
SL Second premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

Pearl Guinea chicks. 
$2. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

Dominique fowls. 



29 

$1. Second pieuiiuni, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
Dominique chicks. 

$2. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
Bi-own China geese. 

$\. Second premium, to K. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
Black Langshan fowls. 

$2. First premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
Black Langshan chicks. 

$1. Second premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
pen Black Langshan chicks. 

$2. First premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for Par- 
tridge Cochin fowls. 

$1. Second premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
Bronze turkeys. 

$2. First premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
White China geese. 

$1. Second premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
Gray Canada geese. 

$1. Second premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
Pekin Ducks. 

$2. First premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for Col- 
ored Muscovy ducks. 

$1. Second premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
colored Muscovy ducks. 

$2. First premium, to H. L. Ellsworth, Peabody, for Mal- 
lard ducks. 

•12. First premium, to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for dark 
Brahma fowls. 

$1. Second premium, to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 
light Brahma Fowls. 

$2. First premium, to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 
Canada geese. 

$1. Second premium, to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for 
Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 

$2. First premium, to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for Barred 
Plymouth Rock chicks. 



30 

'SI. Second premiani, to Charles H. Hardy, Groveland, 

for W. Wj'andotte fowls. 
$2 and Diploma, to A. W. Tyler. Peabody, for pairs French 

Houdan fowls. 
■S2. First premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for French 

Houdan chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for French 

Houdan chicks. 
$2. First premium, to 'A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Domin- 
ique Rock chicks. 
|2. First premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Black 

Langshan fowls. 
$2. First premium, to J. W. Perkins, Lynnfield, for 

Black Minorcas. 
$2. First premium, to J. W. Perkins, Lynntield, for R. I. 

Red chicks. 
•'II. Second premium, to J. W. Perkins, Lynnfield, for 

White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
'$2. First premium, to George W. Brown, Peabody, for 

African goose and gander. 
$1. Second premium, to Hattie L. Trask, Peabody, for 

Bronze turkeys. 
Diploma to Edward Hanley, Peabody, for S. C. W. Leg- 
horn chicks. 
ifel. Second premium, to Edward Hanley, for S. C. VV. 

Leghorn chicks. 
12. First premium, to Dwight Foster, Beverly, for W. F. 

Black Spanish fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Dwight Foster, Beverly, for Black 

Spanish chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Horace Whipple, Peabody, for 

White Pekin Bantam fowls. 
|i2. First premium, to Horace Whipple, Peabody, for 

White Pekin Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Thomas Gilroy, Peabody, for 

Pekin ducks. 



•fl. Second premium, to Thomas Gilroy, Peabody, for 
Brown Leghorn fowls. 

11. Second premium, to VV. Fred Miinroe, Peabody, for 

White Wyandotte chicks. 

12. First premium, to C. E. Marshall, Rowley, for Black 

iVIinorca chicks. 

Diploma to C. E. Marshall, Rowley, for Pen Black Minor- 
ca chicks. 

■■11. Gratuity to Joseph Clark, Peabody. for Pouter 
Pigeons. 

11. Second premium, to G. B. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
#1. Second premium, to J. F. Trask, Beverly, for Buff 

Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Josiah Fitz 1th, Lynn, for Buff 

Leghorn chicks. 

$1. Second premium, to Josiah Fitz 4th, Lynn, for Pig- 
eons, " Tumblers." 

<|2. First premium, to W. B. Carlton, Jr.. Danvers, for 
Golden Wyandotte chicks. 

$2. First premium, to A.B. Clark, Peabody, for wild geese. 

12. First premium, to A. B. Clark, Peabody, for English 

pheasants. 
$2. First premium, to A. B. Clark, Peabody, for Bronze 

turkeys. 
$2 and Diploma, to Mrs. M. E. George, Groveland, for 

Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 
il. Second premium, to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for R. L 

Red chicks. 
^2. First premium, to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for Wood. 

land white chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for Wood- 
land white chicks. 
$1. Gratuity, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for collection 

of Pigeons. 
D. B. Wallace — for the Committee. 



32 

PLOUGHING WITH DOUBLE TEAMS. 

$8. First premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, four oxen, 

'' Frye " plough. 
■B6. Second premium, to Pierce & Wilkins, Topsfield, 
four oxen, ''Syracuse '" plough. 
Andrew Lane, Jr., Wm. B. Carlton, Andrew Mansfield, 
E. Mansfield — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES. 

$6. First premium, to G. C. Dennison, Peabody, " Hus- 

sey" plough. 
$4. Second premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, " Frye " 

plough. 
E. P. Barrett, Chas. W. Nelson, A. J. Bradstreet — 
Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES— SWIVEL 
PLOUGH. 

$6. First premium, to F. A. Dodge, Beverly, " Yankee " 

plough. 
$4. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 

" Yankee " plough. 
George E. Daniels, A. P. Fuller — -for Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH SULKY PLOUGH. 

). First premium, to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, " Na- 
tional." 
L Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, "National." 
G. F. Averill, J. Kimball, J. L. Farnham — Committee. 



33 

HARROWS. 

56. First premium, to Newhall & Colcord, Danvers, for 
" Spring tooth." 

^2. Gratuit3% to Newhall & Colcord, Danvers, for " Yan- 
kee " Pulverizer. 

^2. Gratuity to Newhall & Colcord, Danvers, for "Syra- 
cuse " spring tooth. 

&2. Gratuity to E. C. Little, Merrimac, for Tyler's Disk 
harrow. 



CARRIAGES. 

$4. Gratuity, to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for open Stan- 
hope. 

'14. Gratuity, to J. A. Lancaster & Co., for open Surrey. 

S3. Gratuity, to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for light 
express wagon. 

$3. Gratuity, to Pike & Whipple, Peabody, for light de- 
livery wagon. 

15. Gratuity, to E. C. Hopkins, Merrimac, for sleigh in 
wood and iron. 

f 2. Gratuity, to Kress Bros., Lawrence, for double sleigh. 

$2. Gratuity, to Joseph Bruley, Danvers, for democrat 
wagon. 

fl. Gratuity, Wm. Carroll, Salem, for light express 
wagon. 

$1. Gratuity, to H. P. Whipple, Salem, for lumber wagon. 
James Wilson, J. W. Perkins, Geo. C. Daniels — Com- 
mittee. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

$8 and Diploma, to Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for 
collection of implements. 



34 

I. Gratuity, to Newhall & Colcord, Dan vers, for Stevens 
fertilizer distributor. 

5. Gratuity, to Newhall & Colcord, Danvers, for Syra- 
cuse harrows. 

L. Gratuity, to Newhall & Colcord, Danvers, for hoeing 
machine. 

L. Gratuity, to Solomon Fuller, Danvers, for unique hoe. 

3. Gratuity, to Geo. E. Daniels, Rowley, for two horse 
cart. 

3. First premium, to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for 

market wagon. 
Peter Holt, Jr.— for the Committee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



.00. First premium, to Oscar Gowen, \Yest Newbury, 
for butter. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

2.00. First premium, to Miss Minnie Flynn, Peabody, 

white bread. 
2.00. First premium, to Miss Minnie Flynn, Peabody, 

graham bread. 
1.00. First premium, to Susie C. Childs, Peabody, brown 

bread. 
1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. G. H. Plummer, Newbury, 

white bread. 
1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. G. H. Plummer, Newbury, 
graham bread. 
.50. Gratuity, to Annie C. Buckley, Peabody, for 

rolled oats. 
,50. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for 

white bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Sadie O. Morrill, West Newbury, 

for white bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. R. C. Richardson Peabody, for 

pies. 
.50. Gratuity, to Joseph Shaw, Peabody, for cake. 
.50. Gratuity, to C. F. Hathaway, Peabody, for bread 
and rolls. 
^2.00. First premium, to Mrs. C. O. Barker, No. Andover, 
for preserved fruits. 



36 

$1.00. Second premium, to Mrs. C. H. Goiilding, Pea- 
bodj^, for preserved fruits. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. M. Nash, Peabody, for crab 
apple jelly. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. F. Poole, Peabody, for cucum- 
ber pickles. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Nora Durkee, Peabody, for 
grape jelly. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. D. P. Grosvenor, Peabody, for 
grape jelly. 

Mrs. J. S. Tuck, Mrs. C. W. Gowen, Mrs. S. L. Sawyer, 
Clara A. Hale, Mrs. Thomas Carroll. — Committee. 



BEES, HIVES AND HONEY. 

$2. First premium, to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 

honey. 
$1. Second premium, to Fred Stiles, Peabody, for honey. 
Henry Alley, Geo. M. Wonson, John J. Gould. — 
Committee. 



PEARS. 

$2.00. First premium, to Stephen F. Marsh, Lynn, for 

Bartlett. 
$2.00. First premium, to Charles E. Brown, Peabody, for 

Belle Lucrative. 
$2.00. First premium, to A. Barr, Lawrence, for Bosc. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn for Angou- 

leme. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Law 

rence. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, or Louise 
Bonne de Jersey. 



37 

$5.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for collec- 
tion 16 varieties. 
$2.00. First premium, to Mrs. S. J. Ban, Lawrence, for 

Dana's Hovey. 
$2.00. First premium, to Joseph Forness, Peabody, for 

Onandago. 
$2.00. First premium, to C. B. Haven, Peabody, for 

Seckel. 
$2.00. P'irst premium, to J. C. Chase, Lynn, for Sheldon. 
$2.00. First premium, to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for 

Urban is te. 
$2.00. First premium, to A. W. Barry, Peabod}^ for Vicar. 
$2.00. First premium, to F. H. Parker, Lynn, for Howell. 
$2.00. First premium, to Joshua Buxton, Lynn, for 

Clairgeau. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to William Cotter, Salem, for Bartlett. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to E. R. Ward, Peabody, for Bosc. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Dudley A. Johnson, Saugus, for Dud- 
ley Houghton. 
.50. Gratuity, to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Mount 

Vernon. 
.50. Gratuity, to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Chelms- 
ford. 
.50. Gratuity, to Geo. A. Waite, Danvers, for new 

pear. 
.50. Gratuity, to H. M. Osborn, Peabody, for new pear. 
.50. Gratuity, to H. M. Osborn, Peabody, for Belle 

Lucrative. 
.50. Gratuity, to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Bosc 
.50. Gratuity, to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for An- 

gouleme. 
.50. Gratuity, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bosc. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Crosman, Swampscott, for 

d' Anjou. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Crosman, Swampscott, for Par- 
adise d' Automne. 



3^^ 

.50. Gratuity, to ]Mrs. S. J. Bair, Lawrence, for Shel- 
don. 
.50. Gratuity, to William Rhoades, Lynn, for Sheldon. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. P. Hale, Rowley, for d'Anjou. 
Peter M. Neal, W. H. B. Currier, Wm. Burke Little, T. 
P. Hale, A. C. Osborn — Committee. 



APPLES. 

•12.00. First premium, to Mrs. C. K. Hutchinson, Pea- 
body, for Porter. 
(12.00. First premium, to S. P. Buxton, Peabod3% for 

Hubbardston. 
$2.00. First premium, to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Baldwin. 
$2.00. First premium, to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Dan vers Sweet. 
$2.00. First premium, to Chas. S. Knight, Newbur}^ for 

Snow Apple. 
$2.00. First premium, to Wm. Burke Little, Newbury, 

foi' Smith's Cider. 
$2.00. First premium, to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Tompkins King. 
$2.U0. First premium, to Chas. S. Knight, Newbury, for 

Gravenstein. 
$2.00. First premium, to George A. Waite, Danvers, for 

Hunt's Russett. 
$1.50. First premium, to J. H. Remson, Beverly, for 

Wealthy. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Eben S. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Snow apple. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Benj. M. Smith, Beverly, for 

Gravenstien. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Geo. W. Ricliardson, Lynn, 

for Wealthy. 



39 

il.OO. Second piemiuni, to H. A. Harrinj^ton, Peabody, 

for Roxbury Russett. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Geo. W. Ricliardson, Lynn, 

for R. I. Greening. 
$1.00. Second premium, to J. S. Needham, Peabody, for 

Hurlburt. 
$1.00. Second premium, to B. W. Putnam, Danvers, for 

Danvers Sweet. 
•fl.OO. Second premium, to Mrs. C. C. Far well. Peabody, 

for Tompkins King. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Bald- 
win. 

.50. Gratuity, to B. F. South wick, Peabody, for Rox- 
bury Russett. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, for 
Roxbury Russett. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, for 
Pickman Pippen. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mary A. Noyes, L3^nu, for Harvey. 

.50. Gratuity, to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Green 
Sweet. 

.50. Gratuity, to J. S. Needham, Peabody, for Graves* 
tien. 

.50. Gratuity, to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Rox- 
bury Russett. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, for 
Nameless No. 1. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Davi<l Warren, Swampscott, for 
Nameless No. 2. 

.50. Gratuity, to Stephen Blaney, Peabndv. for Drap 
d'Or. 

.60. Gratuity, to George Sanger, Peabody, for Drap 
d'Or.' 

.50. Gratuity, to George Sanger, Peabody, for Roxbnry 
Russett. 



40 

fl.OO. Gratuity, to Charles S. Knight, Newbury, for 

Northern Spy. 
.50. Gratuity, to L. S. Wilkins, Topsfield, for Granite 

Beauty. 
.50. Gratuity, to John O'Counell, Peabody, for Cana- 
dian Red. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to J. N. Parks, Lynn, for Hyslop crab. 
.50. Gratuit3% to T. P. Hale, Rowley, for Transcendent 

crab. 
.50. Gratuity, to H. R. Farnham, Peabody, for Hyslop 

crab. 
.50. Gratuity, to D. B. Hilliard, Haverhill, for Hub- 

bardston. 
.50. Gratuity, to E. S. Flint, Danvers, for Hubbardston. 
.50. Gratuity, to C. B. Hutchinson, Peabody, for Hub- 

bai'dston. 
Albert Emerson, Geo. W. Chadwick, T. C. Thurlow, J, 
O. Goodale — Committee. 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

PEACHES. 

$2.00. First premium, to Geo. W. Chadwick, Boxford, for 
Yellow Flesh peach. 

$2.00. First premium, to Mary A. Noyes, Lynn, for Late 
Crawford. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to John A. Batchelder, Salem, for White 
Flesh peach. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Yellow Flesh 
peach. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Henry A. Hanson, Peabody, for Yel- 
low Flesh peach. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Silas M. Titcomb, West Newbury, for 
Old Mixon. 



41 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Benj. M. Smith, Beverly, for Elberta. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to L. H. Bassett, No. Andover, for Craw- 
ford. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. Edwin T. Pike, Ipswich, for 
Stump of the World. 
.50. Gratuity, to Wm. R. Fifield, for Yellow Flesh. 
.50. Gratuity, to Benj. M. Smith, Beverly, for Foster 

peach. 
.50. Gratuity, to Clarence N. Bodge, Peabody, for Late 

Crawford. 
.50. Gratuity, to Peter M. Neal, Lynn, for Stump 
Seedling. 

GRAPES. 

$3.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Hart- 
ford Prolific. 

$3.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Worden. 

$3.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Concord. 

$3.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Brigh- 
ton. 

$5.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for collec- 
tion. 

$3.00. First premium, to T. H. Jackman, Peabodj^ for 
Pocklington. 

$3.00. First premium, to J. S. Needham, Peabod}^ for 
Moore's Earl}-. 

$3.00. First premium, to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for 
Niagara. 

$4.00. First premium, to G. W. Stickney, Beverly, for 
Black Hamburg. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Moore's 
Early. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Niagara, 

$3.00. Second premium, to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for 
Black Hamburg. 



42 

!8!l.50. (jiatuity, to Mrs. A. L. Raddin, Peabody, for 

Moore's Diamond. 
•11.00. Gratuity, to J. S. Needham, Peabody, for Worden. 
il.OO. Gratuity, to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for Moore's 

Diamond. 
•fl.OO. Gratuity, to James M. Teel, Lynn, for Black Ham- 
burg. 
.50. Gratuity, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Pockling- 

ton. 
.50. Gratuity, to T. H. Jackman, Peabody,for Brighton. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Crosman, Swampscott, for Con- 
cord. 
.50. Gratuity, to Solomon Fuller, Danvers, for Concord. 

QUINCES. 

$3.00. First premium, to George A. Waite, Danvers, for 

Orange. 
•13.00. First premium, to C. O. Barker, No. Andover, for 

Lemon. 
^3.00. First premium, to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Champion. 
'$1.00. Gratuity, to J. M. Teel, Lynn, for Orange. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mary Prescott, No. Andover, for 

Oranofe. 
.50. Gratuity, to N. H. Poor, Peabody, for Orange. 
50. Gratuity, to A. H. Merrill, Peabody, for Orange. 

PLUMS. 

$2.00. First premium, to Herbert Harrington, Peabody, 

for Lombard plums. 
.1;2.00. First premium, to Herbert Harrington, Peabody, 

for Green Gage. 
$2.00. First premium, to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Magna Bonum. 
$2.00. First premium, to Mrs. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Magna j)lums. 



43 

$2.00. First premium, to Eben S. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Golden Drop. 
$2.00. First premium, to J. H. Tenney, Rowley, for 

Quackenboss. 
•12.00. First premium, to J. W. Goodell, Lynn, for Im- 
perial Gage. 
-'12.00. First premium, to Henry Bushby, Peabody, for 

Burbank's Japan. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. H. Kimball, Peabody, for Magna 

Bonum. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Charles F. Knight, Newbury, for 
Lombard. 
.50. Gratuity, to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Pur- 
ple Egg. 
.50. Gratuity, to M. S. Osborn, Peabody, for Green 

Gage. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Tenney, Rowley, for Lombard. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Tenney, Rowley, for Hawkeye. 
$4.00. First premium, to JEdwin Bates, Lynn, for basket 

assorted fruit. 
$3.00. Second premium, to Mrs. Thomas S. Wilson, Pea- 
body, for basket assorted fruit. 
J. W. Goodell, John F. Jackson, J. W. Bond, E. K. 
Lee — Committee. 



PLANTS. 

$5.00. First premium, to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for 

collection foliage plants. 
$1.00. First premium, to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for 

crotons. 
$1.00. First premium, to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, for 

tuberous begonias. 
$1.00. First premium, to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for ]»)• 

coleus. 



44 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for 

gloxinias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

tuberous begonias. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

fancy geraniums. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Henr}'^ Farnham, Peabody, for 

anemone.- 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

begonia. 
.50. Gratuity, to Charles Hatch, Peabody, for cotton 

plant. 
.50. Gratuity, to Charles Hatch, Peabody, for tobacco 

plant. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. K. Saunders, Peabody, for 

begonia. 
50. Gratuity, to Clara A. Giles, Danvers, for marigold. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. A. Dodge. Beverly, for be- 
gonia metalica. 
•11.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for 

nepprolipsis. 
.50. Gratuity, to Dr. C. A. Buxton, Salem, for aspara" 

gus sprengen. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. A. Needham, Peabodj^, for 

Otaheitt orange. 
.75. Gratuity, to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, for 

collection sword ferns. 
Honorable mention of Mr. Simpkins, gardener for J. C- 
Rogers, for his collection of ornamental and foliage plants. 
E. E. Woodman, Mrs. David Warren, Mrs. J. Arthur 
Lamson, Mrs. F. E. Hobart — Committee. 



FLOWERS. 

.00. First premium, to Curtis H. Dwyer, Lynn, for 50 
native flowers. 



45 

$3.00. First premium, to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, for 
floral design. 

$1.00. First premium, to E. & C. Woodman, Danvers, 
for pair greenhouse bouquets. 

$1.00. First premium, to J. C. Vickary, Lynn, for pair 
bouquets native flowers. 

$1.00. First premium, to J. C. Vickary, Ljmn, for single 
geraniums. 

$1.00. First premium, to Emily F. Carleton, No. Ando- 
ver, for garden bouquets. 

$1.00. First premium, to Emily F. Carleton, No.Andover, 
for verbenas. 

$1.00. First premium, to Emily F. Carleton, No. Ando- 
ver, for collection Drummond phlox. 

$1.00. First premium, to Miles Burke, Lynn, for basket 
native flowers. 

$1.00. First premium, to Susie Vickary, Lynn, for basket 
cultivated flowers. 

$1.00. Second premium, to Susie Vickary ,Lynn, for design 
native flowers. 

$2.00. First premium, to Bessie Newhall, Peabody, for 
design native flowers. 

$2.00. First premium, to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, 
for hardy phlox. 

$2.00. First premium, to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 
60 varieties pansies. 

$2.00. First premium', to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 
dianthus. 

$1.00. First premium, to R. P: Struthers, Lynn, for cac- 
tus dahlias. 

$1.00. First premium, to Wm. H. Cruff, Marblehead, for 
show dalilias. 

$1.00. First premium, to C. H. Haskell, Lynn, for pom- 
pon dahlias. 

$1.00. First premium, to W. B. Foster, Beverly, for col- 
lection single dahlias. 



46 

SI. 00. First premium, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for col- 
lection coxcombs. 

$1.00. First premium, to William Ferguson, Groveland, 
for cultivated flowers. 

$1.00. First premium, to J. A. Cain, Lynn, for double 
geraniums. 

$1.00. First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 
cannas. 

$1.00. First premium, to F. P. Grant, Beverly, for carna- 
tions. 

$1.00. First premium, to F. L. Pitman, Peabody, for 
asters. 

$1.00. First premium, to J. H. Kimball, Peabod}-, for 
Victoria asters. 

$1.00. First premium, to Helen Poor, Peabody, for nas- 
turtiums. 

$1.00. First premium, to Warren Wilson, Peabody, for 
zinnias. 

$1.00. First premium, to Albert E. Cain, Lynn, for mari- 
golds. 

$1.00. First premium, to J. H. Parker,^Lynn, for French 
marigolds. 

$1.00. First premium, to E. C. Hall, Beverly, for scabio 
sas. 

$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. B. F. Southwick, Peabody, 
for salpiglossis. 

$1.00. First premium, to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for 
sweet peas. 

$1.00. Second premium, to George R. Felt, Peabody, for 
collection pansies. 

$2.00. Second premium, to J. E. Foster, Beverly, for col- 
lection native flowers. 
.50. Second premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 
garden bouquets. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to L. H. Newhall, Peabody, for cut 
flowers. 



47 

.50. Gratuity, to Curtis H. Dwyer, Lynn, for native 
flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for native 
flowers. 

.50. Gratuity, to Danveis Hospital, for bouquet native 
flowers. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for pair gar- 
den bouquets. 

.75. . Gratuity, to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for single 
geraniums. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for cut flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabod3^ for 
garden bouquets. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
yellow asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for bou- 
quet Drummond phlox. 

.50. Gratuity to F. L. Pitman, Peabody, for garden bou- 
quets. ■ 

.50. Gratuity to F. L. Pitman, Peabody, for dianthus. 

.50. Gratuity to F. L. Pitman, Peabody, for Drummond 
phlox. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. F. Annis, Peabody, for bouquet 
garden flowers. 

.50. Gratuity tojda Morris, Peabody, for bouquet of 
garden flowers. 
$1.00. Gi-atuity to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for basket na- 
tive flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for double 
geraniums. 

.50. Gratuity to Alva Trask, Peabody, for pair garden 
bouquets. 
$3.00. Gratuity to J. M. Ward, Peabody, for floral design. 
$3.00. Gratuity to Danvers Hospital, for floral design. 

.75. Gratuity to Emily F. Carleton, North Andover, 
for desisfu native flowers. 



48 

.50. Gratuity to Emily F. Carleton, North Andover, for 
collection of pansies. 

.50. Gratuity to E. & 0. Woodman, Danvers, for col- 
lection of pansies. 

.75. Gratuity to Wm. Symonds, Marblehead, for pom- 
pon dahlias. 
$1.00. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for pompon 

dahlias. 
■SI. 00. Gratuity to P. Heaney, Peabody, for pompoji dah- 
lias. 

.50. Gratuit}^ to Abbie L. Cain, Lyini, for garden an- 
nuals. 

.50. Gratuity to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for 24 pansies. 

.50. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for bouquet 
pompon dahlias. 

.75. Gratuity to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for bouquet 
show dahlias. 
fl.OO. Gratuity to 0.scar I. Stowell, Lynnfield, for 12 
large dahlias. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Morton, Peabody, for gla- 
diolas. 
il.OO. Gratuity to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, for 

hardy phlox. 
fl.OO. Gratuity to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, for 
hardy shrubs. 

.50. Gratuity to Susie Vickary, Lynn, for petunias. 

-50. Gratuity to Susie Vickary, Lynn, for French Mari- 
golds. 

^50. Gratuity to Miss L. H. Newhall, Peabody, for single 
geraniums. 

.50. Gratuity to George Deibel, Peabody, for verbenas. 

.75. Gratuity to George H. Harwood, Lynn, fox col- 
lection of dahlias. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Bates, Lynn, for coll. of dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Arthur L. Foster, Beverly, for 12 large 
dahlias. 



49 

.50. Gratuity to L. H. Southwick, Peabody, col. culti- 
vated flowers. 

.50. Gratuity to C. W. Gowen, West Newbury, for 
calendulas. 

.50. Gratuity to C. W. Gowen, West Newbury, for 
zinnias. 

.50. Gratuity to Bessie Newhall, Peabody, for Drum- 
mond phlox. 

.50. Gratuity to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for zinnias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for sweet 
peas. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, for 
zinnias. 

.50. Gratuit}^ to Mary E. Trask, Dan vers, for zinnias. 

.75. Gratuity to iNIrs. Frank Messer, No. Andover, for 
marigolds. 

.50. Gratuity to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for colllec- 
tion of marigolds. 

.75. Gratuity to William D. Moore, Lynn, for scabiosas. 

.50. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for scabiosas. 

.75. Gratuity to Agnes Woolakin, Peabody, for sweet 
peas. 

.75. Gratuity to Thomas Woolakin, Peabody, for dahlias. 

.75. Gratuity to J. C. P. Legro, Danvers, for hydrangeas. 

.75. Gratuity to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for helian- 
thus. 

.50. Gratuity to Kate Forness, Peabody, for bouquet of 
dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Dalton, Peabod}'-, for asters. 
fl.OO. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 24 single 
petunias. » 

E. Tassinari, Mrs. N. E. Ladd, Mrs. L. W. Hilliard, Mrs. 
Georo-e Fred Oso-ood. — Committee. 



50 

VEGETABLES, FIRST CLASS. 

•f2.00. First premium to David Warren, Swampscott, for 

Dewing's beets. 
$2.00. First premium to David Warren, Swampscott, for 

Edmands beets. 
$2.00. First premium to David Warren, Swampscott, for 

ripe sweet corn. 
$2.00. Fhst premium to Danvers Hospital, for intermedi- 
ate carrots. 
$2.00. First premium to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

short horn carrots. 
$2.00. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for mangold 

wurtzeis. 
$2.00. First premium to H. A. Stiles, ^liddleton, white 

Hat turnips. 
$2.00. First premium to Henry Bushby, Peabod^^for pur- 
ple top turnips. 
$2.00. First premium to Alvin Smith, Hamilton, for ruta 

baga turnips. 
$2.00. First premium to William G. Dodd, Peabody for 

parsnips. 
$2.00. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

sweet corn in milk. 
$2.00. First premium to William K. Cole, Boxford, for 

cranberries. 
$1.00. Second premium to Nathan Foster, No. Andover, 

for cranberries. 
.50. Gratuity to E. L. Blake, Peabody, for Eclipse 

beets. 
.50. Gratuity to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for Danvers 

intermediate carrots. 
.50. Gratuity to W. Burke Little,Newbury, for Edmands 

beets. 
.50. Gratuity to H. A. Stiles, Middleton, for purple top 

turnips. 



51 

.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for sweet 

corn in milk. 
.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for ripe sweet corn. 
Fred A. Russell, Walter H. Hayes, J. O. Goodale — Com- 
mittee. 



VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

!$2.00. First premium, to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Tur- 
ban squash. 

)|2.00. First premium, to David Warren, Swampscott, for 
Warren turban squash. 

$2.00. First premium, to David Warren, Swampscott, for 
Danvers onions. 

#2.00. Second premium, to David Warren, Swampscott, 

for Stone Mason cabbage. 
•fl.OO. Gratuity, to David Warren, Swampscott, for 

Hubbard squash. 
$2.00. Second premium, to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for 

deep head cabbage. 
11.00. Gratuity, to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for Warren 

squash. 
•$1.00. Gratuit}', to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for Boston 

marrow squash. 
•if^l.OO. Gratuity, to W. A. Jacobs, Danvers, for Bay State 

s(juash. 
•f2.00. First premium, to Willis G. Dodd, Peabody, for 

All Seasons cabbage. 
#2.00. First premium, to Willis G. Dodd, Peabody, for 

Savoy cabbage. 
!i2.00. First premium, to E. P. Barrett, Peabody, for 

New Queen potato. 
•'12.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Red 

onions. 
•'j!2.00. First premium, to E. L. Blake, Peabody, for Sibley 

squash. 



52 

$2.00. First premium, to E. L. Blake, Peabody, for Biit- 
man squash. 

$2.00. Fii-st premium, to Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 
Stone Mason cabbage. 

$2.00. First premium, to Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 
Stone tomato. 

$2.00. First premium, to AVm. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 
Musk melon. 

$2.00. First premium, to B. G. Hall, Peabody, for toma- 
toes (not named). 

$2.00. First premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 
Early Maine potatoes. 

$2.00. First premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 
yellow flat onions. 

$2.00. First premium, to C. A. Mason, Beverly, for Essex 
Hybrid squash. 

$2.00. First premium, to C. A. Mason, Beverly, for Mar- 
row squash. 

$2.00. First premium, to C. A. Mason, Beverly, for Nut- 
meg melon. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to C. A. Mason, Beverl}'-, for potatoes. 

$2.00. First premium, to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Bay State squash. 

$2.00. Second premium, to George Reynolds, Peabody, 
for Red cabbage. 

$2.00. Second premium, to George Reynolds, Peabody, 
for Savoy cabbage. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Early 
Northern potatoes. 

$2.00. First premium, to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for caul- 
iflower. 

$2.00. First premium, to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
Fotler's cabbage. 

$2.00. P'irst premium, to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
Early Rose potatoes. 



53 

|i2.00. First premium, to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for Pearl 
of Savoy potatoes. 

$2.00. First premium, to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
Hebron potatoes. 

$2.00. First premium, to Wm. K. Cole, Boxford, for 
Clark's No. 1 potato. 

$2.00. First premium, to Geo. A. Rogers, No. Audover, 
for Deephead cabbage. 

$2.00. First premium, to Geo. A. Rogers, No. Aiidover, 
for red cabbage. 

$2.00. First premium, to Geo. A. Rogers, No. Andover, 
for Fotler's cabbage. 

$2.00. Second premium, to Geo. A. Rogers, No. Andover, 
for All Seasons cabbage. 

$2.00. First premium, to J. Oscar Goodale, Peabody, for 
Hubbard squash. 

$2.00. Second premium, to J. Oscar Goodale, Peabody, 
for Snowball cauliflower. 

$1.00. Gratuity,to J, Oscar Goodale, Peabody, for Dan- 
vers onions. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to J. Oscar Goodale, Peabody, for Yellow 
Perfection melon. 

$2.00. First premium, to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 
Salmon flesh melon. 

$2.00. First premium, to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 
Paris Golden celery. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Durkee Brothers, Peabody, for Roch- 
ester Beauty potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity, to Durkee Brothers, Peabody, for Golden 

celery. 
.50. Gratuity, to George H. Legro, Peabody, for Mon- 
treal melon. 

$4.00. First premium, to J. J. H. Gregory, Marblehead, 
for collection of vegetables. 

$3.00. Second premium, to George A. Rogers, No. An- 
dover, for collection of vegetables. 



54 

B. F. Huntington, Solomon Fuller, S. H. Boutwell, Otis 
F. Putnam, Daniel P. Pope — Committee. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

$1. First premium, to Henry Killam, Boxford, for shelled 

corn. 
il. 1^ irst premium, to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for rye. 
$5. First premium, to Horace Brown, Ipswich, for 25 

ears field corn. 
$4. Second premium, to Nathan Foster, No. Andover. for 

25 ears field corn. 
Edwin Bates, Kendall Osborn, E. P. Barrett — Commit- 
tee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

13.00. First premium, to Mrs. Pierson, Salem, for quilt. 
^2.00. Second premium, to Mrs. Mary F. Barker, No. 

Andover, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Eleanor Faunce, Salem, for patch quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Gelson, Newburj^port, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George S. Thomas, Salem, for 

patch quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Hannah Foster, Rowley, for 

patch quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Mary Sawyer, Danvers, for patch 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. A. Hupper, Lynn, for home 

made quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. S. Goldsmith, Peabod}-, for 

knit afghan. 
ISl.OO. Gratuity, to Mrs. S. P. Baker, Peabody, for knit 

afLfhan. 



55 

.50. Gsiatiiity, to Mrs. P. Demse}-, Stilem, for knit 

afglian. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Marcia Stoddard, Peabody, for 

afghan. 
.50. Gratuity, to Kate M. Craig, Danvers, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. C. Knowles, Danvers, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. G. Fox, Danvers, for'silk foot 

piece. 
.50. Gratuit3% to Mrs. Marcia Stoddard, Peabody, for 

silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. R. Richardson, Peabody, for 

knit quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. John C. Putnam, Danvers, for 

patch quilt. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. Hiram Holmes, Lynn, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. James Walsh, Peabody, for cro- 
chet spread. . 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. G. Kimball, Danvers, for 

crochet afghan. 
.50. Gratuitv, to Susie F. Sanborn, Salem, for crochet 

afghan. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. G. Young, Lynn, for silk 

quilt. 
$1.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Walter H. Sargent, Merrimac, 

for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. Y. Barnard, Salem, for silk 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Sarah P. Bassett, Salem, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George Gamble, Beverly, for 

knotted spread. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. E. C. Knowles, Danvers, for silk 

quilt. 



56 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Mary B. Hoiie3^comb, "Peabody, 

for patch quilt. 
75. Gratuit}', to Mrs. L. C. Foster, Danvers, for patch 

quilt. 
11.00. Gratuit}^ to Mrs. Frank Dalton, Salem, for knit 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity, to ]Mrs. S. L. Upton, Salem, foisilk quilt. 
.75. Giatuity, to Mrs. J. E. Higgins, Peabody. for silk 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mary C. Dennett, Danvers, for out- 
lined quilt. 
.75. Giatuity, to Mrs. George F. Tyler, Salem, for silk 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. Joseph F. Dalton, Salem, for 

knit quilt. 
.50. Gratuity,'' to Mrs. C. G. Fox, Danvers, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Hariiet Piper, Peabody, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mary W. Wells, Lynnfield, for patch 

quilt. 
Mrs. J. H. Perkins, Mrs. T. B. Alley, Miss Nellie A. 
Huntington — Committee. 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

$2.00. First premium, to Mary E. Herbert, No. Andover, 

for knit rug. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Mrs. Chas. E. Symonds, Sa- 
lem, for braided rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. R. Richardson, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
.25. Gratuity, to Mrs. R. Richardson, Peabody, for 
drawn rusr. 



57 

.50. Gratuity, to Maiy J. Cressey, Beverl}', for knit 

rug. 
.25. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. A. Berry, Beverly, for braided 

rug. 
.25. Gratuity, to Mrs.'E. A. Berry, Beverly, for braided 

rug. 
.25. Gratuity, to Mary E. Roberts, Salem, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Caroline E. Roberts, Salem, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Flora Symonds, Salem, for 

drawn rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. C. P. Legro, Danvers, for 

braided rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Miss Haskell, Ipswich, for box plaited 

rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. Simpson, Salem, for drawn rug. 
.25. Gratuity, to Mrs. John McFadden, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
.25. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. C. Parker, Salem, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Eli Richardson, Middleton, for 

djawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Peter Reid, Danvers, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Giatuity, to ]\Irs. Weston, Peabody, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to ]Mrs. Weston, Peabody, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George B. Courtis, Marblehead, 

for knit rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Samuel Towne, Peabod}^ for 

braided rug. 
.25. Gratuity, to Mrs. Morris Peabody, for home made 

rug. 



58 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. W. Balhud, Salem, for drawn 

nig-. 
.75. Gratuity, to Sarah P. Bassett, Salem, for braided 

rug-. 
.75. Gratuit}^ to Sarah P. Bassett, Salem, for drawn 

riig. 
.75. Giatuity, to Mrs. A. P. Buriiham, No. Andover, 

for 3 drawn mats. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Addie Little, Peabody, for Per- 
sian rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. C. Larrabee, Salem, for draw^n 

rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Sophia S. Black, Salem, for drawn 

rug. 
.25. Giatuity, to Mrs. Jonas M. Rollins, Wenham, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George Gammell, Peabod}-, for 

knit rug. 
.75. (xratuity, to Mrs. Susan Hynd, Danvers, for drawn 

rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. Woodbury, Beverly, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. A. Dunn, Salem, for braided 

mat. 
Mrs. Richard Newell, Mrs. J. Henry Nason, ]\lrs. 
Georo-e L. Averill — Committee. 



ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

S3. 00. First premium, to Thomas F. Hill, Georgetown, 

for team harness. 
$2.00. First premium, to Alonzo Raddin, Peabod'y, for 

best hand-made shoes. 
.|)2.00. First premium, to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for 

best machine-made shoes. 



59 

$3.00. First premium, to Chailes P. Spencer, Salem, for 

Russett Surrey harness. 
$2.00. Gi-atuity, to Charles P. Spencer, Salem, for col- 
lection of harnesses. 
$3.00. First premium, to Charles McFernen, Danvers, for 

express harness. 
$2 00. First premium, to Manning & Conway, Peabocly, 

for men's hand-made shoes. 
$2.00. Gratuity, to Joseph A. Poor, Peabody, for round 

machine belts. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Poor & Littlefield, Peabody, for inner 

soles and shoe stock. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to E. A. & R. F. Daly, Salem, for 

exhibit of trunks and bags. 
William P. Clark, Austin Wliitcomb, Thomas Carroll, 
H. N. Harriman, Mrs. John Barker — Committee. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHAN- 
DISE. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to Nellie L. Stockwell, Peabody, for 

milliner3^ 
$2.00. Gratuity, to Henry E. Holden, Peabody, for 

grain leather. 
$2.00. Gratuity, to Treadwell Brothers & Clark, Salem, 

for chrome leather and colored goat skins. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to W. A. Fifield, Peabody, for exhibit 

of hoiiis. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to J. H. Armstrong, Danvers, for exhibit 

of horseshoes. 
$2.00. And diploma, to L. B. Southwick & Co., Peabody, 

for stamped sheep leather. 
Diploma to A. B. Clark, Peabody, foi- exhibit of colored 

sheep skins and mats. 
Diploma, to Franklin Osborn Co., for uppei- leather. 



6o 

Diploma, to A. C. Lawrence & Co., Peabod}-, for undressed 

glove kid and alum kid. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to D. B. Lord, Peabody, for Welsbach 

light. 
11.00. Gratuity, to W. W. Bennett, Lynn, for blind man's 

wiiting desk. 
William P. Clark, Austin Whitcoinb, Thomas Carroll, 
H. A. Harrington, Mrs. John Barker — Committee. 



FANCY WORK. 

ffl.50. Gratuity, to Charlotte C. Odell, Beverly, for col- 
lection of work. 

.50. Gratuity, to M. F. Wilson, Lynn, for lace hand- 
kerchief. 

.50. Gratuity, to M. F. Wilson, Lynn, for lace hand- 
kerchief. 

.75. Gratuity, to Mary F. Pond, Salem, for original 
design. 

.50. Gratuity, to M. H. Burnhara, Beverly, for centre- 
piece. 
ii.OO. Gratuity, to M. O. Barrett, Peabody, for pen and 
ink work. 

.50. Gratuity, to M. O. Barrett, Peabody, for centre- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mary B. Blaney, Peabody, for cen- 
trepiece. 
11.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. P. Newhall, Lynn, for pen 
and ink work. 

.50. Gratuity, to Ella M. Poor, Peabody, for centre- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. L. K. Nutting, Marblehead, for 
netted centrepiece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Waylan, Salem, for dress. 



6i 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss E. W. Dugan, Salem, for pic- 
ture frames. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. R. D. Neal, Lynn, for centre- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity, to A. J. Gustine, Ljam, for embroidery. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss Carrie Standle}^ Beverl}', for 
handkerchief. 
1.00. Gratuity, to Fanny Ropes, Salem, for doll and 
outfit. 

.50. Gratuity, to Myra C. Blake, Dan vers, for aprons. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. T. Conant, Salem, tray cloth. 

•75. Gratuity, to Mrs. L. A, Davis, Peabody, for table 
cover. 

.50. Gi-atuity to Mrs. A. R. Patterson, Peabod}^ for 
knitted trimming. 

.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. F. S. Worcester, Peabody, for 
centrepiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Blanche Bradford, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. R. C. Richardson, Peabody, for 
doilies. 
il.OO. Gratuity to B. M. Larkin, Haverhill, for bureau 
scarf. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. F. E. Hobart, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. F. ('base, Salem, for doiley. 

.75. Gratuity \o Miss Dora Clark, Salem, for drawn 
work. 

.75. Gi-atuity to Mary Chandler, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.75. Gratuity to Anna Buckley, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Agnes Holman, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Helen Poor, Peabody, for centerpiece. 



62 

.50. Gratuity to M. L. Walton, Peabody, for drawn 
work. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. E. F. Dalton, Peabody, for piano 
scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Grace Walker, Lynn, for handkerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Grovesnor, Peabody, for sofa pil- 
low. 

.50. Gratuit}' to Ellen Quint, Peabody, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. M. Besse, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. N. H. Vittum, Beverly, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to ]Mrs. George I. Kelly, Beverly, for 
centerpiece and doiley. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. W. Carlton, Peabody, for five 
mats. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. Lane, Peabody, for knitted 
shams. 

.50. Gratuity to M. W. Feiguson, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 
#1.00. Gratuity to Grace A. Goodridge, Beverl3% for table 
scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Clara Merrill, Haverhill, for table mats. 

.50. Gratuity to Alice Yeaton, Georgetown, for apron. 

.50. Gratuity to Helen J. Yeaton, Georgetown, for 
knitted collar. 

.50. Gratuity to Alice Yeaton, Georgetown, for table 
cover. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Eliza L. Scott, Georgetown, for 
old English lace. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. S. M. Beach, Lawrence, for table 
cover. 

.50. Gratuity to E. S. Austin, Salem, for centrepiece 
and doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Hattie L. Upton, Danvers, for point 
lace handkercliief. 



63 

.50. Gratuity to ]Mrs. Eunice Putnam, Dauvers, for 
outline picture. 

.75. Gratuity to Clara E. Poor, Peabody, for two 
centerpieces. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. E. Coffin, Newburyport, for 
handkerchief case. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. H. Sumner, Newburyport, 
for watch case and picture frame. 

.50. Gratuity to Lizzie A. Clark, Newburyport, for 
English point-lace handkerchief. 

.75. Gratuity to Nellie Sumner, Newburyport, for five 
doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Chase, L3'nn, for tea cloth. 
•$1.00. Gratuity to Miss Abbott, Lynn, for pen and ink 

work. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. C. D. Wentworth, Danvers, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to C. L. Lummus, Beverly, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. B. Price, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Rose Cassidy, Lynn, for tidy. 

Mrs. F. C. Merrill, Mary A. Leach, Lucy A. Sanger, 
Eliza C. Osborn — Committee. 



WORKS OF ART AND OIL PAINTING. 

Diploma to R. L. Newcomb, Salem, for photographs. 
$2.00. First premium to C. B. Whitman, Lynn, for oil 

painting. 
$2.00, First premium to Alice Trask, Peabody, for water 

color. 
$1.00. Second premium to Alice Trask, Peabody, for 

water color. 



64 

12.00. First premium to Mrs. L. M. Morse, Salem, for 

water color. 
$2.00. First premium to W. G. Plummer, Peabody, for 

photograph. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. A. S. Waldron, Salem, for 

pressed flowers. 
$2.00. First premium to Esther Trask, Danvers, for 

pastel. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Miss M. G. Dewick, Peabody, for 

water color. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Alice Breed, Salem, for photographs. 
$2.00. First premium to Vernon Montague, Salem, for 

portrait. 
$2.00. First premium to Salem Commercial School, for 

penmanship. 
$2.00. First premium to Percy G. Dana, Peabody, for 

nasturtiums. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Frank Perkins, Salem, for platinotype. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Arthur Roberts, Salem, for oil paint- 
ing. 
.50. Gratuity to Arthur Roberts, Salem, for oil paint- 
ing. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Arthur Edwards, Beverly, for crayon. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Charles South wick, Peabody, for 

bromides. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Alfred Haskell, Middleton, for pencil 

drawing. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Oscar Haskell, Middleton, for oil 

painting. 
$1.00. Gratuity to B. W. Goodhue, Beverly, for water 

color. 
$1.00. Gratuity to B. W. Goodhue. Beverly, for oil 

painting. 
.60. Gratuity to Annie Thacher, Peabody, for pastel. 
,50. Gratuity to Annie Thacher, Peabody, for ideal 

head. 



65 

.50. Gratuity to W. H. Tweed, Peabody, for glass 
checkerboard. 

.50. Gratuity to Walter D. Streamburg, Beverly, for 
sepia. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Alice Graves, Danvers, for oil 
painting. 

.50. Gratuity to Geo. W. Rogers, Peabody, for frame. 

.50. Giatuity to Wm. Carline, Peabody, for crayon. 

.50. Gratuit}'^ to Dora Wagner, Peabody, for oil paint- 
ing. 

.50. Gratuity to Elizabeth Sillars, Danvers, for oil 
painting. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Baker, Lynn, for oil paint- 
ing. 

.50. Gratuity to S. E. Dwyer, Salem, for water color. 

Honorable mention is made of S. S. Haswell's exhibit 
of photographs. 

Mrs. Belle D. Hodgkins, Mrs. D. P. Grosvenor, Miss 
Hattie Tenney — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

12.00. Gratuity to Mrs. C. B. Whitman, Lynn, for col- 
lection. 

12.00. Gratuity to Mrs. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 
case of china. 

12.00. Gratuity to Miss S. Louise Flale, Lynnfield, collec- 
tion of china. 

12.00. Gratuity to Arthur R. Roberts, Peabody, for 
tankard. 

12.00. Gratuity to Mrs. E. F. Peabody, Danvers, for col 
lection, 5 pieces. 

Bl.OO. Gratuity to Miss A. H. Breed, Salem, for punch 
bowl tray. 



66 

fl.OO. Gratuity to Mrs. C. G. Mears, Dan vers, for deco- 
rated jar. 

Your committee would respectfully recommend some 
measures be taken to secure uniformity of entry in this 
branch of art. If entries be made as a collection, it 
should consist of a stated number of pieces. Judgment 
can be more satisfactorily rendered on individual pieces. 
Classes should be made in this branch of art. 

Nellie G. Kimball, Haverhill, Agnes H. Hale, Rowley, 
H. N. Harriman, Georgetown — Committee. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

^2.00. First premium to Bertha H. Clark, Peabody, for 

doll. 
^.00. Second premium to Mildred A. Griffin, Peabody, 
for dress. 

.25. Gratuity to Eleanor Frye, Peabody. 

.25. Gratuity to Marion D. Wells, Peabody, for darn- 
ing and patching. 

.25. Gratuity to Winnie Upton, Peabody, for tid_y. 

.25. Gratuity to William Getchell, Peabody, for pillow 
case. 

.50. Gratuity to Christiana Montgomery, Peabodj^ for 
dress. 

.25. Gratuity to Hughera Montgomery, Peabody, for 
skirt. 

.25. Gratuity to -Jamesina Montgomery, Peabody, for 
tal)le cover. 

.75. Gratuit}' to Bessie Patterson, Peabody, for dress. 

.25. Gratuity to Gertrude Mihoney, Peabody, for pil- 
low case. 

.25. Gratuity to Bessie Mahoney, Peabody, for pillow 
case. 



67 






Gratuity to M. Bott, Peabody, for doiley. 
Gratuity to H. A. Israel, Peabody, for tray cloth. 

,25. Gratuity to Aletta Spencer, Peabody, for doiley. 

25. Gratuity to May Richardson, Peabody, for apron. 

.50. Gratuity to Margie DriscoU, Peabody, for crochet 
work. 

.25. Gratuity to George Carbury, Peabody, for tray 
cloth. 

25. Gratuity to Bessie Elliott, Peabody, for doiley. 

50. Gratuity to Elsie M. Chandler, Peabody, for dress. 

50. Gratuity to Lillian M. Welch, Peabody, for doll. 

25. Gratuity to Mary E. Osgood, Peabody, for skirt. 

25. Gratuity to William Roach, Peabody, for towel. 

25. Gratuity to Alexander Chisholm, Peabody, for 
pillow case. 

25. Gratuity to Lena Murphy, Peabody, for pillow 
case. 

25. Gratuity to Mabel A. Collins, Peabody, for book 
of work. 

25. Gratuity to Eva M. Buxton, Peabody, for waist. 

50. Gratuity to Annie T. Carberry, Peabody, for pil- 
low case. 

50. Gratuity to Helen B. Merrill, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow, etc. 

25. Gratuity to Clara M. Tullock, Peabody, for skirt. 

25. Gratuity to Howard P. Beckett, Peabody, for car- 
penter's apron. 

25. Gratuity to Mabel Nevers, Peabody, for sleeve 
elastics. 

25. Gratuity to Abbie M. Trask, Peabody, for skirt. 

50. Gratuity to Helen Gibson, Peabody, for skirt and 
doileys. 

,25. Gratuity to Holly Brown, Peabody, for towel. 

25. Gratuity to (jharley Rietzel, Lynn, for doiley. 

25. (rratuity to Gertrude Weston, Hamilton, for paint- 
ing. 



68 

.50. Gratuity to Alice J. Ranger, Lynn, for quilt. 

.25. Gratuity to George Teel, Peabody, for tidy and 
drawing. 

.25. Gratuity to Olive Teel, Peabody, for sample book. 

.25. Gratuity to Fannie G. Jewett, Ipswich, for doiley. 

.25. Gratuity to Helen F. Renfield, Peabody, for hand- 
kerchief. 

.75. Gratuity to Sarah Kedia, Peabody, for dress. 

.25. Gratuity to Arthur Batchelder, Peabody, for 
towel. 

.25. Gratuity to Arthur Shepard, Peabody, for scarf. 

.25. Gratuity to Thomas Fox, Peabody, for tray cloth. 

.25. Gratuit}^ to J. F. McCullough, Peabody, for tray 
cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Arthur Welch, Peabody, for tray 
cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Ralph Kelly, Peabody, for tray cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Eva Dooling, Peabody, for skirt, etc. 

Mrs. Peter Holt, Jr., Mrs. D. P. Grosvenor — Committee. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ROOT CROPS. 

Your committee received nine entries in 1897. They 
inspected all crops entered and herewith respectfully sub- 
mit the following report : The first entries received were 
from Messrs. J. H. George and F. A. Russell of Methuen, 
Mass. The former entered a crop of onions and a crop of 
potatoes, and the latter crops of beets, parsnips and cab- 
bages. 

On the afternoon of Sept. 4th the five members of the 
committee got together and inspected the above crops. 
The onion crop of Mr. George, with the exception of a 
few bushels that had been marketed, was drying on the 
field. The onions were below medium size, their growth 



69 

having been stopped by blig-ht the month previous. This 
blight has prevailed in all sections of the County this 
year and has reduced the yield of premium crops as well 
as others. Mr. George's crop was nothing exceptional 
and would not have measured up as well as it did, if the 
rows liad not been placed ten inches apart. Mr. George 
has demonstrated that on fertile land the yield can be 
increased by placing the rows ten inches apart, but on the 
average onion bed soil we consider twelve inches near 
enough. Mr. George's crop of potatoes also suffered from 
blight and the heavy stalks and number of tubers set 
showed that the yield would have been twice what it was, 
if they had not blighted. We dug sample hills and were 
glad to note the painstaking manner in which the experi- 
ments with fertilizer and seed were conducted. 

We were met at Mr. George's farm by Mr. Russell and 
taken to his farm on the north bank of the Merrimac 
river where we found thirty acres devoted to market gar- 
den crops. Eleven acres were in celery and we never saw 
a finer field. Celery raising is on the increase in Essex 
County and we suggest that it be added to the list of crops 
in the premium list next year. 

The crops of beets and parsnips were growing at the 
time of our visit. There were no vacant places and not a 
weed was in sight. They were just the right size for mar- 
ket purposes and showed that Mr. Russell is an expert in 
the production of choice vegetables. 

Part of the cabbages had been marketed but what 
remained in the field gave evidence of the excellence of 
the crop. Mr. Russell conducts his farm as carefully as a 
manufacturer does his business and was able to tell us 
how much of each crop had been sold and what it had 
brouglit. 

Sept. 21st your committee inspected an onion crop 
belonging to W. L. Hill at the Ship Rock Piggery, Pea- 



70 

body, Mass., which yielded at the i-ate of 400 bushels per 
acre. This crop was grown on lio^- manure, eighteen cords 
to the acre, on a field literally covered with small stone. 
The onions were of excellent quality but as the yield was 
below the other two crops entered and the net profit only 
fl37.80 per acre, j^our committee must necessarily pass 
this crop without a premium. We trust Mr. Thomas 
Wolloff, the enterprising manager of this farm, will try 
again and succeed in reducing the cost of his crop and 
increasing the 3'ield. 

A few daj^s later your committee visited the farm of W. 
H. Jacobs, Danversport, Mass., and inspected his onion 
and squash crops. Mr. Jacobs has a silo and keeps a good 
sized herd of milch cows and raises a large amount of mar- 
ket garden stuff on thirty acres of land. His onion crop 
this year was raised on a corner lot elevated about three 
feet above the streets that bounded it, consequently it was 
well drained and his crop did not suffer from the exces- 
sive rains early in the season. The land was conqjara- 
tively free from weeds and Mr. Jacobs has shown that on 
the right soil with proper implements it is possible to raise 
a good ci'op at small expense. His crop of squash was 
superior to any crop we have seen this year. This has 
been a poor squash year but Mr. Jacobs planted on well 
drained land and secured a maximum crop. The bulk of 
his crop was the Warren. They colored up well and sold 
readily, the first few barrels bringing $2.50 each. 

Our last visit was at the farm of Alvin Smith, Hamil- 
ton, where we saw a lialf acre of Shamrock ruta bagas 
growing on an old loamy j)asture. A handsomer crop 
could not be asked for. The individual turnips would put 
to shame tlie best St. Andrews turnips that come into 
Boston market. Specimens from this field captured the 
first prize at the fair at Peabody. Mr. Smitii told us that 
wherever he had sold these turnips they had asked him to 



71 

bring more, and everywhere we went the growers of prize 
crops were having a ready sale for their produce. Good 
produce always has, and always will sell readily, and it 
will pay every farmer in Essex County to give better cul- 
ture and thus improve the quality of his produce. 

Your committee have decided that the three crops 
entered by Mr. F. A. Russell of Methuen are worthy the 
first prize of the Society and hereby award him the first 
premium of #8.00 for best field of cabbage, first premium 
of $8.00 for best field of beets, and first premium of $8.00 
for best field of parsnips. 

The crop of potatoes laised by Mr. Geoi'ge shows a nar- 
row margin of piofit, but taking into consideration the 
season and his experiments with fertilizer and seed, your 
committee feel that he is entitled to the first premium and 
herewith award it to him. We also award to Mr. George 
the first premium of 'lr'8.00 on crop of onions, he having 
secured the largest yield and profit per acre, and to Mr. 
W. H. Jacobs, Danversport, Mass., we give the second 
premium of i5.00. Mr. Jacobs' onions were superior to 
Mr. George's and would have given a better yield if they 
had been planted as closely. 

To Mr. W. H. Jacobs of Danversport we award the fust 
premium of $8.00 for crop of squasli, and to Alvin Smith 
of Hamilton the first prize of -^8.00 for ruta baga turnips. 

It will be noticed that both onion crops returned a profit 
of over $300 per acre and the squash crop nearly that 
sum. These figuies show what can be done when condi- 
tions are right and ought to stimulate every farmer in our 
county to improve his methods and increase his profits. 
Your committee feel well repaid for time, trouble and 
expense and hereby tender their thanks to each of the 
gentlemen visited for their cordial welcome and liospi. 
tality. 

George A. Rogers, Chairman, Asa F. Lee, Joshua H. 
Chandler, George Pratt, Joseph E. Buswell — Commit lee. 



72 



STATEMENT OP FREDERICK A. RUSSELL ON CROP OF 

BEETS. 

In 1895 the land was in grass. After haying-, the piece 
was plowed and sowed to barley. In 1896 the crop was 
cabbage. In 1897, about May 1, ten cords of strawey 
horse manure were applied and ground ploughed and har- 
rowed. 

The account stands as follows : 

Dr. 

To 10 cords manure at $2.50, |25 00 

"■ Ploughing, 

" Harrowing and preparing, 
" 5 pounds seed at .50, 
" Sowing, 

" Wheel hoeing 3 times, 
" Weeding and thinnings 
" Harvesting, 

158 00 
Cr. 
By 400 bushels beets at .35, *140 00 

Profit, . !|82 00 

No allowance made for interest on land as many cart- 
loads of refuse were used to feed to stock. 

Value crop per acre, $280 00 

Cost of " " 116 00 

Profit " " 164 00 

This certifies that I have measured the piece of ground 
on which was raised the crop of beets by F. A. Russell, 
and found it to contain eighty rods. 

N. D. Perry. 



1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


50 




50 


2 


50 


14 


50 


10 


00 



73 

STATEMENT OF CROP OF CABBAGES RAISED BY FRED A. 
RUSSELL, METHUEN. 

Ill 1895 the field was in grass. The grass was cut iu 
June, the field ploughed and planted with squash. In 
1896 the crop was squash. In 1897 the field received an 
application of eight cords of stable manure, which was 
ploughed in. The piece was then furrowed, and ten two- 
horse cartloads of horse and hog manure put in drill and 
covered, and seed sowed, May 1. As soon as the plants 
were up they were hoed with wheel hoe. Later they were 
thinned and hoed by hand, which was all the hand work 
given. All other cultivation was done with Breed's weeder 
and Planet, Jr. horse hoe. Variety, Warren's Stone Mason. 

The account is as follows : 

Dr. 

To ploughing, 

8 cords stable manure, at $2.50, 

10 loads manure in drill, at -12.00, 

Applying " "" " 

Furrowing and covering, 

2 oz. seed. 

Sowing, 

Wheel hoeing. 

Thinning and hand hoeing. 

Cultivating, Breed weeder. 

Harvesting and marketing, at 15c., 56 47 

1113 22 



$1 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


1 


50 




50 




50 




75 


4 


50 


3 


00 





Cr. 




By 376 1-2 bbls. cabbages, 


at .46, 


1173.19 


Plants, 




4 00 1177 19 


Profit, 




$63 97 


Value crop per acre, 




$308 16 


Cost per acre. 




$196 88 


Profit per acre. 




$111 28 



74 

No allowance made for interest on laud, as many cart- 
loads of leaves were used to feed to stock. 

This certifies that I have measured the piece of ground 
on which was raised the crop of cabbage by F. A. Rus- 
sell, and found it to contain 92 rods. 

N. D. Perry. 



STATEMENT OF A CROP OF PARSNIPS RAISED BY FRED A. 

RUSSELL. 

In 1895 the field was in grass. In June the grass was 
cut, the piece was ploughed, and planted to squash. In 
1896 the crop was cabbage. In 1897 there were eight two- 
horse cartloads of manure from the barn cellar applied 
and ploughed in. The piece was then harrowed and 
smoothed and sowed with two pounds of Hollow Crown 
parsnip seed. 

The account is as follows : 

Br. 

To 8 loads manure, at |3, $24 00 

Ploughing, harrowing and smoothing, - 

Seed, 

Sowing, 

Using Breed's weeder, 

Shore hoeing. 

Hand weeding, 

Harvesting, 

Marketing 100 bu., at lOc, 

$95 55 



3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 


3 


00 


18 


00 


34 


05 


10 


00 



75 

Gr. 

By 100 1)U. parsnips sold, 

127 bu. parsnips in cellar, at 70c. 



Profit, 

Value of crop per acre, 
Cost " '' " 
Profit " " " " 



$84 


50 


88 


90 


$173 


40 


$77 


85 


$289 


00 


$159 


24 


$129 


76 



This certifies that I have measuied the piece of ground 
on which was raised the crop of parsnips by F. A. Rus- 
sell, and found it to contain 96 rods. 

N. D. Perry. 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF ONIONS RAISED BY 
JOHN H. GEORGE OF METHUEN. 

The cro]3 of 1895 was onions ; the manure used was the 
Stockbridge Onion Fertilizer. The crop of 1896 was 
onions, the manure was Stockbridge Onion Fertilizer, one 
and one-half tons per acre. The soil is peat meadow. It 
was not ploughed at all in 1896, was harrowed with spike- 
tooth harrow, brushed with birch brush . harrow, dragged 
and sowed with Danvers Yellow Globe onion seed, six 
pounds per acre, rows ten inches apart. The manure 
used in 1897 was Stockbridge Onion Fertilizer, it being 
the fourth year since the land had received any other 
kind of manure, and has produced three first premium 
crops on that alone. 



76 

Dr. 

To Preparing land, 
" Fertilizer, 
" Seed and sowing, 
" Hoeing and weeding, 
" Harvesting, 

" Interest and taxes on land, 
" Topping and marketing, .05 per bushel. 



Cr. 
By 285 bushels onions at .80. 

Profit on half acre, 
" one '' 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

Methuen, Mass., Oct. 20, 1897. 
I hereby certify that the land on which grew the crop 
of onions entered by John H.George for premium with 
the Essex Agricultural Society contains one-half acre. 

Lyman George. 



$1 


50 


30 


00 


5 


25 


15 


00 


4 


50 


3 


00 


14 


25 


173 


50 


1228 00 


$154 


50 


«!309 


00 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CHOP OF POTATOES RAISED 
BY JOHN H. GEORGE OF METHUEN. 

The crop of 1896 was potatoes. The fertilizer used was 
the Stockbridge Potato Special. The soil is peat meadow. 
The spring of 1897 the land was ploughed with one horse, 
harrowed with spike-tooth harrow and brushed with birch 
harrow. There was one-half ton of Stockbridge Potato 
Fertilizer ploughed in. The furrows were opened with a 



cultivator and averaged a trifle more than three feet apart. 
There were on the half-acre 32 rows, 210 feet long. 

To see what the potatoes would say about the fertilizer 
whether it furnished enough plant food or not, I tried the 
following experiment : the first five rows were left with 
the fertilizer alone, the next five rows were manured in 
the hill with horse manure in addition to the fertilizer ; 
the next five were left with the fertilizer and the next 
manured in the hill with the horse manure at the rate of 
four cords per acre, and the same way through the piece 
for thirty rows, the odd two rows were left with nothing. 
To also satisfy myself in a measure about the quantity of 
seed needed, I planted in the first ten rows whole large 
potatoes in hills, one in a hill three feet apart in the row, 
the next ten rows were planted with the same sized pota- 
toes cut in halves, the next ten rows (with the exception 
of one row, which was planted with one eye in a place) 
were planted with the same sized potatoes cut in quarters, 
the halves were planted eighteen inches apart, the quar- 
ters twelve inches apart, and the one-eye pieces about ten 
inches apart in the row, so the amount of seed per acre 
was about the same They were struck with blight about 
the first of August, and I dug enough soon after, before 
they began to rot very badly, to ascertain the amount of 
yield in the different rows. You will see that the final 
yield after they had about done rotting fell far short of the 
promised amount. The experiment throughout was con- 
ducted in a very careful manner and the measurements 
and weights as near as I could make them. I herewith 
give you the results as I found them. 

Where the whole potatoes were planted on fertilizer 
alone the yield was 310 pounds per row, or 330 2-3 bushels 
per acre. On fertilizer and manure in the hill the yield 
was 155 pounds per row or 165 1-3 bushels per acre (rotted 
badly). 



7^ 

Wliere the half potatoes were planted with fertilizer 
alone the yield was 310 pounds per row or 330 2-3 bushels 
per acre. On manure and fertilizer the yield was the 
same. 

Where the quarter potato was planted on fertilizer alone 
the yield was 262 1-2 pounds per row or 280 bushels per 
acre. On manure and fertilizer 210 pounds per row or 222 
bushels per acre. 

On the row where the single eye was planted on fertil- 
izer alone the yield was 225 pounds per row, or 240 1-6 
bushels per acre. 

At the final digging I found in every row that was dug, 
where the manure was used the percentage of rotten ones 
was at least 50 ; where the fertilizer alone was used there 
were very few rotten ones, not 5 per cent. I should 
judge. 

One swallow does not make a spring, nor does one ex- 
periment prove a fact, but this trial, although it has been 
a very bad year for such work, has been in line with 
foimer ones I have made as to amount of seed and also 
with regard to the fertilizer and manure. It has shown at 
least this year that the manure had better have been left 
in the pile, that the fertilizer furnished ample food for the 
crop and the work of appljang the manure was lost. The 
3deld of sound tubers at digging time on the half-acre was 
85 bushels. I have sold all but twelve bushels at an aver- 
age of 90 cents per bushel. 

My way of ascertaining the yield was by digging one 
peck from each row where the different sized potatoes Avere 
used and measuring the distance in the row it took to dig 
them, and my computations were made from that. The 
seed was mostly New Queen and there were twelve bush- 
els i)Ut on the half-acre. The seed was treated with the 
Corrosive Sublimate Solution and Paris Green was applied 
once. 



79 

The account stands thus : 

Br. 
o Ploughing, harrowing and brushing 1-2 acre, 
' Appljdng fertilizer with machine, 
' 12 bushels seed potatoes at .40, 
' Opening furrows, dropping and covering seed 

with cultivator, 
' 1-2 ton Stockbridge fertilizer, 
' Treating with solution and cutting, 
' Paris Green and applying, 
' Digging (by hand), 
' Cultivation (all horse work), 
' Interest and taxes, 
' Marketing, 
' 2 cords manure and applying. 



Cr. 

By 85 bushels potatoes at .90, 

Profit on half acre, 
" " one " 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. Geoiige. 

Methuen, Mass., Oct. 20, 1897. 
I hereby certify that the land on which grew the crop of 
potatoes entered by John H. George for premium with 
Essex County Agricultural Society contains one-half acre. 

L. George. 



13 00 




50 


4 


80 


9 


00 


19 


00 


1 


50 




75 


7 


50 


3 


00 


3 


00 


3 


00 


12 


00 


f60 


05 


176 50 


$16 


45 


$3 2 


90 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF ONIONS RAISED BY 
W. H. JACOBS OF DANVEES. 

Land was plowed in 1895 for crop of squash. 
First crop for 1896 was beans, second crop white flat 
turnips. 



8o 

In 1897 planted with Danvers onion seed. Two pounds 
were used. Four cords of manure were used. Weeded 
twice and wheel hoed four times. 



Dr. 




Harvesting and storing, 


$6 00 


Ploughing, 


1 50 


Harrowing, 


75 


Weeding, with Fuller's Patent Hoe, 


6 00 


Wheel-hoeing, 


3 00 


Planting and seed, 


4 00 


Manure, 


16 00 



$37 25 

Cr, 
Amount of crop, 263 bushels, at 75 cents, $197 25 

37 25 



Profit, $160 00 

Yield per acre, 500 bushels. 
Cost per acre, $70.78. 
Profit per acre, $304.00. 

This is to certify that I have measured the land of Wm. 
H. Jacobs, on which the onions grew, and find it to con- 
tain sixty-three rods. 

C. E. HiNKLEY. 

This is to certify that I have measured the crop of 
onions and find it to be 263 bushels. 

W. H. Jacobs. 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CHOP OF SQUASH RAISED BY 
W. H. JACOBS OF DANVERS. 

Land was ploughed in 1895 and planted with potatoes. 
Crop of 1896 was cabbage. 



$4 50 


3 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


4 


00 


32 


00 



8i 

For 1897 the amount of manure was five cords to the 
acre, broadcast, three cords of manure in the hills, with 
300 pounds of Reed's fertilizer. 

Br. 

Manure, 

Cost of ploughing, 

Cost of harrowing. 

Planting and seed. 

Hoeing cost, 

Cost of eight cords of manure, 

U1 00 

Cr. 
14 tons, 850 lbs. squash, $381 00 • 

Profit, *334 00 

Yield per acre, 12, tons, 1643 lbs. 
Cost per acre, $41.78. 
Profit per acre, $296.89. 

This is to certify that I have measured the land of W. 
H. Jacobs on which the squash grew and find it to con- 
tain one acre and an eighth. 

C. E. HiNKLEY. 

This is to certify that I have weighed the crop of 
squash and find it to contain 14 tons, 850 lbs. 

W. H. Jacobs. 



STATEMENT OF ALVIN SMITH, HAMILTON, ON CROP OF 

TURNIPS. 

The land you measured last week on my turnip field 
gave 245 bushels. It was pasture land and had not been 
cultivated since 1867. I ploughed the land June 18, 1897. 



15 00 


20 


00 


2 


50 


2 


00 


10 


00 


2 


00 



82 

I used four cords of stable manure in the drill. I sowed 
one pound of Shamrock seedf June 25, 1897, in rows three 
and one-half feet apart. 

Below is the financial statement : 

Dr. 

Ploughing and harrowing, 
4 cords of manure, 
Seed and planting, 
Labor cultivating, 
Labor harvesting. 
Interest and taxes on land, 

Ml 50 

Cr. 

245 bu. turnips, il25 00 

Profit on one-half acre, . $83 50 

Yield per acre, 490 bu. 
Cost " " 183.00. 
Profit " " $167.00. 

Respectfully, 

Alvin Smith. 

No. Andover, Mass., Nov. 4, 1897. 
This is to certify that I measured the land on which 
grew the crop of turnips entered by Alvin Smith of Ham- 
ilton and that the field entered contained eighty square 
rods. 

Geo. a. Rogers. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SMALL FRUITS. 

To the Trustees of the Essex Agricultural Society : 

The committee on strawberries and other small fruits 
have attended to the duty assigned them, and respectfully 
submit the following report. 



As there were no entries of strawberries this year, there 
are no reports to make on them. 

The first visit was made to the farm of W. K. Cole of 
West Boxford, August 3d, to view the raspberry and 
blackberry crop which he has entered for premium. The 
raspberry vines were of fine growth and looked healthy 
and well fruited, and as though there would be a good 
crop. 

The next visit was to Amos Haseltine at Ayers Village, 
August 4th, to view his blackberry and currant crop. 
There the committee found Mr. Haseltine's blackberries 
grown on a piece of land never entered for premium be- 
fore. The vines were loaded with large, nice fruit. His 
currant crop was grown on the same land as was that 
of last year's premium. The Committee have awarded — 

To William K. Cole, West Boxford, first premium for 
raspberries, $8.00 

To Amos Haseltine, Ayers Village, Haverhill, first pre- 
mium for. blackberries, $8.00 

To Amos Haseltine, Ayers Village, Haverhill, first pre- 
mium for crop of currants, 18.00 

To William K. Cole, West Boxford, gratuity for black- 
berries, 15.00 
B. F. Stanley, Thaddeus Hale, J. D. Drew^, — Committee. 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF BLACKBERRIES, 
RAISED BY AMOS HASELTINE, OP HAVERHILL. 

The crop of blackberries entered for premium was 
grown on bushes set in the springs of 1892, '3, '4 and 5, 
and has been fertilized for two years with muriate of potash 
and commercial fertilizer. The kind of berry is Taylor, 
and this is the first time this plot has been entered for 
premium. 



84 

The cultivation this year lias been but little, no horse 
work has been done for fear of injuring the roots of the 
canes. Former crops have paid all expenses of setting 
and cultivation up to this year. The crop of this year 
was good, but not as great as last year, but the price of 
berries was about two cents a quart more than last year, 
so that the profit is about the same. The account ii as fol- 
lows : 

BLACKBERRIES. 

Or. By 1288 quarts, at 10 and 12^ cts. 1133 37 

Dr. 



To use of land 


$S 00 


" fertilizer and sowing 


6 00 


" wire and stakes 


3 50 


" work weeding and trimming, 


3 00 


" cutting out old canes, 


3 50 


" wiring and staking, 


2 50 


" boxes, picking and selling 1288 




quarts at 4 cents. 


51 52 



■S73 02 

Balance profit, 160 35 

Crop per acre : 6400 quarts. 
Value per acre, $662.72. 
The above statement is respectfully submitted, 

Amos Haseltine. 

Haverhill, Mass., Aug. 24, 1897. 
This is to certify that I have this day surveyed a tract 
of land for Amos Haseltine, on which grew a crop of 
blackberries, which he has entered for premium with the 
Essex County Agricultural Society, and I find the same to 
contain thirty-two and one-quarter rods. (32.25 rds.) 

E. A. Emerson. 



85 

STATEMENT OF RASPBERRY CROP RAISED BY W. K. 
COLE, WEST BOXFORD. 

The piece of raspberries I enter for the Society's pre- 
mium, was set out in the spring of 1895, rows six feet 
apart and plants three feet apart in the row ; the plants 
did well that season, and the following one also. This 
season they required some thinning. They were cultivated 
once and weeded out by hand once this season. The piece 
measures twenty and one-half rods (20.5), the yield was 
5-47 pint boxes. 



RASPBERRIES. 






Dr. 






To cultivating, 
" weeding, &c.. 


25 
3 00 




" 60 pounds ground bone, 


90 




•' 40 pounds muriate potash, 
" picking 547 boxes at l^c. 


90 
8 21 




•' marketing at Ic, 


5 47 


118 73 


Cr. 




By 500 plants taken up, 
" 547 boxes berries. 


$4 00 
62 07 


$66 07 






Profit, 




148 34 



The above statement is respectfully submitted, 

William K. Cole. 
West Boxford, Oct. 18, 1897. 



STATEMENT OF AMOS HASELTINE CONCERNING A CROP 
OF CURRANTS. 

The crop of currants entered for premium was grown on 
bushes set in the springs of 1892, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and were 
fertilized each year with about 100 pounds muriate of 



86 

potash, and 100 pounds of commercial fertilizer. The kinds 
were Fay, Cherry, White Grape and Victoria. The age 
of the bushes is from two to six years. 

This year they blossomed freely, but for some reason, 
did not set much fruit. 

I have found it hard to sell them this year at a fair 
price, as there is but a small demand for them atanypiice, 
and have the same trouble with gooseberries. 1 think that 
while it may be well for farmers to grow what currants 
and gooseberries they wish for home use, there is no use 
in trying to grow them for market as the demand is not 
large enough, and it takes too long to sell them. Tlie 
account this year is as follows : 

Currants Dr. to balance due, $5 00 

^' Use of land, 2 50 

" Fertilizer and sowing, 3 48 

" Trimming, 2 50 

" Hoeing and weeding, 4 00 

" Destroying currant worms, 3 50 
" Boxes, picking and selling 312 qts. 

at 3c, 9 36 



Total Dr., 130 34 

Cr. by 312 qts. at 7 cents, 21 84 



Currants Dr., $8 50 

Crop per acre, 1600. 
Value per acre, -1112.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Amos Haseltine. 

Haverhill, Mass., Aug. 24, 1897. 
This is to certify that I have this da}- surveyed a piece 
of land on which grew a crop of currants entered for pi-e- 
mium with the Essex County Agricultural Society by 



^7 

Amos Haseltine and find the same to contain thirty-one 
and two-tenths rods (31.2 rods). 

E. A. Emerson. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GRAIN CROPS. 

The Committee on Gi-ain Crops have attended to their 
duties, and present the following report. The number of 
entries for premiums were two, viz : one for oats by C. K. 
Ordway & Son of West Newbury, and one of corn by J. 
N. Meserve, of North Andover. 

The committee would recommend the following awards . 

To C. K. Ordway & Son of West Newbury, crop 

of oats, first premium, $7 00 

To J. N. Meserve of North Andover, crop of corn, 

first premium, $7 00 

The crop of oats entered by C. K. Ordway was viewed 
July 31st, and it was a tine piece to look at. Some of the 
straw stood five and one-half feet high. 

The crop of corn entered by J. N. Meserve was viewed 
Oct. 2d. Not receiving notice soon enough, the corn was 
cut and shocked when viewed, but it had a fine appearance 
as far as could be seen. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel D. Adams, for the Committee. 



STATEMENT OF OAT CROP, RAISED BY C. K. ORDAVAY 
& SON OF WEST NEWBURY. 

1895. This was in grass. 

1896. It was ploughed ten inches deep and harrowed, 
six cords of barn-yard manure to the acre, spread broad- 
cast, harrowed and planted with corn. 



88 

1897. The corn hills were split with a Randall Harrow, 
ploughed seven inches deep, harrowed and sowed to Oats, 
three bushels to the acre, without manure or fertilizer of 
any kind. Seed, White Dutch Oats of my own raising. 
The soil clay loam. 

COST OF CROP. 

To ploughing and harrowing, 
Sowing, harrowing and smoothing, 
Seed oats. 

Cutting and binding with machine. 
Drawing and moving, 
Threshing and winnowing, 

$74 75 

Gr. 

By 215 bu. of Oats, at 40 cents, $86 00 

" 3 tons of straw, $9 per ton, 27 00 



$15 


00 


5 


00 


9 


75 


20 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 



Value of crop, $113 00 

52 bu. to the acre, 

Profit, $38 25 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. K. Ordway & Son. 

I hereby certify that I have measured the land on which 
the oats entered for premium grew, owned by C. K. Ord- 
way & Son, and it contained four acres and twenty rods. 

Richard Newell. 



STATEMENT CONCERNING CORN CROP RAISED BY JOHN 
N. MESBRVB, OF NORTH ANDOVER IN 1897. 

1895. Old grass ground, grass very poor. 

1896. Crop, corn, potatoes, beans and peas. Horse- 
manure was used, about 25 loads to the acre. The soil 



89 

is a dark loam. Ploughed in the fall of 1895, and again 
in the spring of '96. Ploughed about ten inches deep. 

1897. Crop, corn. Manure, horse and vault, about twenty 
loads to the acre. Ploughed once about ten inches deep. 
Harrowed and furrowed out to plant in checks. Cost of 
ploughing and other preparations, about $10. Manure 
worth on the ground about -f 6 per cord. 300 pounds of 
Lowell corn fertilizer, dropped in the hill, and a little soil 
brushed over it before dropping the corn. Fertilizer worth 
about $4.50 on the ground. The corn was dropped and 
covered by hand about the last of May. The name of the 
seed is not known, it is almost all red. I planted 12 qts. 

The piece was cultivated three times lengthwise and 
three times crosswise, costing about $8. Cut Sept. 26, 
shocked Sept. 27 and 28. Harvested at odd times from 
middle to last of October, cost not known. 

The amount of merchantable corn as weighed by Frank 
W. Abbott was found to be 132.7 bushels. The land on 
which this corn grew was measured by George A. Rogers 
and found to be one acre. 

John N. Meserve. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON IMPROVED PAS- 
TURE AND WASTE LAND. 

The committee on waste land visited Mr. E. C. Little 
of Merrimac, October 15, 1897, his land being the only 
entry made. 

Having notified the members of the committee and none 
appearing I substituted Mr. Pillsbury of Danvers to act 
with me. 

We met Mr. Little and with him looked over the sev- 
eral acres of land that he had cleared from a woody 
growth and removed all obstructions from, so that now it 
is as fine a field, and well laid down to grass as anyone 



90 

would wish to see. After hearing Mr. Little explain the con- 
dition the land was in three years ago your committee felt 
fully justified in awarding him the first premium of $10.00. 
Isaac F. Knowlton, H. H. Pillshury — Committee. 



STATEMENT OF E. C. LITTLE. 

This land has been a pasture since the oldest remem- 
brance. The last few years it has grown up so thick with 
wood and underbrush it wasn't fit for that. In the spring 
of 1895 I cut off the wood and mowed the underbrush and 
turned in about 20 hogs, fencing off a piece about 15 feet 
square, 4 or 5 hogs in a pen, changing these pens every 
two weeks during the summer. Spring of 1896 I pulled 
out a part of the stumps and ploughed and planted with 
sweet corn. I planted it late so as to have the corn as late 
as possible in the fall, but a frost which we had Sept. 24th» 
stopped a part from filling out. As it was I sold 350 dozen 
off an acre, and should have had 500 dozen if it had not 
been for the frost. 

Cr. 
350 doz. corn, at T cts., i24 50 

4 tons of Fodder, at 18.00, 32 00 







$5t! 50 




Dr. 




Cost of mowing brush, 




§5 00 


Ploughing, 




5 00 


Pulling stumps, 




2 00 


Carting off stumps. 




1 00 


200 lbs. phosphate, 




3 20 


Seed corn, 




1 20 


Planting, 




1 00 


Cultivating, 




1 00 - 


Marketing and cutting up 


fodder, 


5 00 



24 40 
Net profit, #32 10 



91 

In 1897 I ploughed in the spring and planted with po- 
tatoes. They looked fine up to the 1st of July when the 
rust struck them. As it was I got about fifty bushels off 
an acre and I took extra care of the potatoes, and I intend 
to make an onion bed of the land next year. 

Or. 
50 bushels potatoes, at ^1.00, $50 00 

Dr. 



Cost of pulling stumps, 3 men. 2 horses, 




1 day. 


18 00 


Cost of carting stumps, 


2 00 


Ploughing, 


3 00 


Harrowing and picking roots, 


2 00 


Digging potatoes. 


4 00 


Marketing potatoes. 


2 00 


Cultivating 6 times. 


3 00 




24 00 



Net profit, 



26 00 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON TREADWELL 

FARM. 

The experiment required of the tenant this year, was to 
ascertain the cost of ensilage in the silo under ordinary 
conditions. Mr. Bradstreet, who is on the third year of his 
lease, makes the following statement of his experiment. 
3 1-2 acres planted with ensilage corn, 

Ploughing by 1 man, 2 horses, 2 days, 6 days 

Harrowing by 1 man, 2 horses, 1 day, 3 " 

Planting by 2 men, 1 horse, 1 day, 3 " 

Cultivating by 1 man, 1 horse, 5 days, 10 " 

Harvesting by 3 men, 2 horses, 7 days, 35 " 



Total days' work 



67 



92 

57 days at $1.50, 185 50 

15 cwt. of State Grange fertilizer at ^30, 126 25 

Total cost ill silo, filll 75 

Crop of 65 tons, cost per ton, $171 8-10 

OTHER CROPS GROWN UPON THE FARM. 

20 tons English hay. 350 bushels potatoes. 

8 " oat fodder. 1 ton of squashes. 

5 " Hungarian hay. 4000 cabbages. 

25 '' meadow hay. 300 bushels turnips. 

Stock kept on the farm consists of 3 horses and 15 cows. 
The committee have found by collecting the statements 
of the cost of ensilage in the silo from some thirty experi- 
ments in different parts of the country that the average has 
been about il.75 per ton. It will be observed that a liberal 
allowance has been made for the cost of labor of men and 
horses at the same rate per day in this experiment. The 
crop was grown upon land of ordinary tilth, and but a 
moderate amount of fertilizer used, so that the result shows 
what may be reasonably calculated upon in growing this 
crop. The committee on its visit to the farm in June were 
pleased with the general appearance of thrift and good 
management of Mr. Bradstreet, and after a careful exami- 
nation of the buildings found that some repairs were abso- 
lutely necessary, which have been made at a cost of $98.76. 
With these repairs very little, if anything else, will be 
needed for several years to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin P. Wake, 

For the Committee. 



REPORT OF DELEGATE FROM STATE BOARD 
OF AGRICULTURE, 1897. 

The Essex County Agricultural Society held its annual 
fair in the town of Peabody, Sept. 21, 22 and 23, 1897. 



93 

The weather for the three days was all that could have been 
desired. The attendance the second and third days was very 
large. The grounds of the society consist, I believe, of 
about sixteen acres, very beautifully located, and with a 
fine outlook. All necessary buildings are there for the ex- 
hibition of horses, cattle, sheep, swine and poultry. I 
would suggest more light in the building for the horses. 

There being no suitable building for the fruit, flowers 
and fancy work, the town hall was kindly loaned to the 
society free of expense. The hall was made a scene of 
beauty, the various articles being so artistically arranged. 
So large a crowd came to examine the fine display that 
numbers had to wait outside for admission. The peaches 
were very fine ; the apples and pears good for the year ; 
the floral display excellent. The vegetables in the base- 
ment were not large but good for the year. 

On the grounds a large display of animals was on exhi- 
bition, some of them being very fine. From inquiries 
made, your inspector would suggest to the committee on 
blooded stock that they be more particular as to the pedi- 
gree of such stock in awarding premiums. 

In my opinion this fair came very near being an object 
lesson for other fairs held in our county and state ; as, 
without a horse-trot, or other outside attractions, aside 
from a bicycle race and firemen's muster, the attendance 
was very large. The entrance fees, if I was rightly in- 
formed, amounted to over four thousand dollars. The 
dinner, in the vestry of a church, was excellent, and a 
very social time was enjoyed by all. Your inspector was 
pleased with the kind attention given to all by the officers 
of the society and the gentlemanly manner of the police 
officers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joshua Clark, 

Inspector. 



94 

REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have beeen 17 new members added to the Society 
since the last annual report, nine of whom became mem- 
bers by receiving premiums of seven dollars and u[)ward, 
according to the rules of the Society, from different 
towns, as follows : 

Amesbury, 1 Lynn, 2 

Danvers, 1 North Andover, 1 

Georgetown, 1 Peabody, 8 

Haverhill, 1 Salem, 2 

John M. Danforth, Sec'y. 



FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

The Society has held four Institutes during the past 
year on as many different days, forenoon and afternoon, 
at which the following subjects were offered by carefully 
prepared essays, and discussed by any of the audience who 
desired. 

The first Institute was held at Beverly, Dec. 18, 1896. 
The subject for the forenoon was, " The Production of 
Milk, its Food Value, its Proper Care, and its Adultera- 
tion," by George M. Whitaker, of the Dairy Bureau. 
Subject for afternoon, "Management of a Dairy Farm.'' 
" Growing and Feeding Forage Crops for Profit." " Win- 
ter Care of Milch Cows," by George L. Clemence, of 
Southbridge. 

The second Institute was held at Haverhill, January 15, 
1897. Subject for the forenoon, " Market Gardening, 
Fruit and Vegetables in the Home Garden." Subject for 
afternoon, " Fruit Culture in New England." Both sub- 
jects by Prof. S. T. Maynard of Amherst. 

The third Institute was held at Parker Hall, Newbury, 
February 9th. Subject for the forenoon, " Poultry Keep- 



95 

ing for the Farm and Farmers." Subject for the after- 
noon, " Little Leaks vs. Great Wastes." Both papers by 
Dr. Geo. M. Twitchell of Maine. 

The fourth Institute was held at Salem, March 12. 
Subject for forenoon, " The Reflections of a Modern Hay- 
seed." " A Grange, What, Why, and How." Subject for 
afternoon, " Book Farming vs. Moon Farming," by E. D. 
Howe, of Marlboro, Master of the State Grange. 



REPORT ON ESSAYS AND REPORTS. 

The Committee on Essays and Reports have had an un- 
usually light task assigned to them this year, as only a 
single essay and one report have been submitted to them. 
For these they have made awards as follows : 

$6.00 To Mr. M. Sumner Perkins, of Danvers, for essay 

upon " The Fertility of the Soil." 
$6.00 To Mr. George A. Rogers, of North Andover, for 
report on " Root Crops." 

For the Committee, 

G. L. Streetek, Chairman. 

Committee — G. L. Streeter, Salem ; D. E. Safford, Ham- 
ilton ; N. M. Hawkes, Lynn ; Geo. B. Blodgett, Rowley ; 
J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 



THE FERTILITY OF THE SOIL. 

BY M. SUMNER PERKINS. 

What constitutes a fertile soil, a soil that is productive 
of large crops ? To be fertile the soil must possess to an 
eminent degree all the qualities which tend to develop and 
foster a luxuriant plant growth. There must be an abun- 
dance and variety of all the elements of plant food. The 



96 

soil should be neither too loose nor too compact. If it is 
either composed entirely of sand or entirely of clay, it 
cannot well be termed highly fertile ; but, when made up 
of a mixture, partly sand and partly clay, to which is 
added plenty of humus, or organic matter in an advanced 
state of decomposition, and also a variety of mineral sub- 
stances, it forms a substantial basis of fertility. 

Humus is a very necessary component part of a fertile 
soil, which, by its presence, is rendered light and porous 
in texture, capable of readily absorbing and retaining 
much moisture, and suitable for the rapid development and 
extension of systems of plant roots. 

Finally there remains to be mentioned another element 
of fertility, by far the most important of them all. It 
exists in different soils in widely varying quantities. In- 
deed, the amount to be found in any one soil at different 
seasons varies within wide limits. Now it is large, and 
then again very small. Without this element a soil in 
other respects most fertile would be useless as the abode 
of plant life. What is this all important factor ? It is 
water. 

WATER. 

Common, abundant, and cheap as it is, yet water in the 
right quantity and form must be regarded as a prime 
requisite toward making a fertile soil. It forms the major 
portion of all organic life, both animal and vegetable. The 
plant is mainly water. Therefore no plant can long grow 
without plenty of water. But the soil needs to be moist 
in distinction from being actually wet or soaked with 
water. If its pores were constantly filled with water, the 
air would be excluded, and fertility out of the question, 
since a proper degree of aeration of the soil is an absolute 
necessity for the growth of crops. The water table, or 
surface of the ground water, needs to be deep in the sub- 
soil, several feet below the surface of the ground. From 



97 

this water table, by capillary action, during the summer 
months, moisture is being constantly drawn upward, 
through the porous soil, to the surface, where it passes 
away, partly through growing plants and partly by evapo- 
ration from the surface soil. It is this so-called capillary 
moisture which plants require in abundance. Many soils 
need thorough tile drainage to render them fertile. An 
excess of water should rapidly drain away. Likewise in a 
dry season all good land should be irrigated to maintain 
its fertility. Crops fail in a drought not only because they 
do not find sufficient moisture to appropriate, but also be- 
cause, since water is the great solvent and conveyer of 
food to the roots, its absence means starvation to the 
plants. 

TILLAGE. 

Tillage is another active agency for the promotion of 
fertility. We do not plough, and harrow, and cultivate, 
and hoe, merely and solely to kill weeds, necessary as it is 
to destroy the robber plants which spring up and threaten 
the cultivated crops. Tillage is of powerful assistance in 
rendering the soil productive and fertile. The operation 
breaks up and disintegrates the soil particles, admits the 
oxygen, and thereby chemical changes are induced and the 
elements of plant nutrition are made available for use by 
the crops. 

Under the old system of fallows, each field, at regular 
intervals of time, was allowed to rest for a season to recu- 
perate its strength. No crop was grown upon the fallow 
field, but it was continually cultivated, and kept loose and 
mellow, so that much inert plant food was brought out and 
made available for the use of the ci'ops which followed in 
the rotation. This old-time practice, while not advisable 
for us to follow to-day, yet demonstrated how much of 
plant food and fertility lies latent and becomes slowly 



98 

available in every good agricultural soil. The modern 
farmer aims to secure at least one, often two crops, from 
each field every season. He wants every crop to be big 
and paying. Consequently he must manure freely, as 
well as cultivate well ; but he should never neglect tillage 
as a factor in the development of a fertile soil. 

FARM MANURES. 

Ill a consideration of the various manurial substances 
now in use, naturally the manures of the various domestic 
animals, or so-called farm manures, should take prece- 
dence. Such manure, if properly kept and preserved, is 
always the standard of excellence. But as made and 
handled upon the various farms, its virtue varies widely. 
In the first place, live stock must be fed upon rich foods 
if rich manure is to be had. The manure is certainly 
never better than the food from which it comes. Horses 
and cattle fed upon oats, bran, cottonseed, linseed and 
gluten meals will naturally produce a manure of far higher 
fertilizing value than the same animals would, if fed on 
straw or hay mainly. Then again no manure can econom- 
ically be allowed to waste either by excessive heating or 
leaching. Obviously manure exposed beneath the eaves 
of a barn to the leaching rains of an entire winter cannot 
help losing its value very largely. The liquid portions 
are the best, yet they are soonest lost. Plainh* all manure 
not applied to the land shonld be stored in cellar or slied. 
Really good rich manure is one of the ver^^ best and most 
natural fertilizers and should be so used upon the farm as 
to give the largest possible results. But happily the 
American farmer is now far from de})endent upon dung or 
farm manure to grow his cro[)S. This is an age of 

CHE.AriCAL iMANUKES. 

Several widely separated countries supi)ly the farmer 
with plant food. Germany cf)n tributes the potash salts. 



99 

Chili the nitrate of soda, and the Canadian hardwood 
forests furnish wood ashes. The introduction of these 
and still other sources of plant food marks an important 
era in the history of agriculture. Hitherto the farmer was 
greatly handicapped in his operations. He could not in- 
crease his business at will, simply because sufficient fer- 
tilizer was not to be had at any price, whereas now sup- 
plies being practically unlimited, he can increase his oper- 
ations to such extent as he finds it profitable. 

In considering chemical manures or commercial fertil- 
izers we have to think of the three main elements of plant 
food, nitrogen, potash and phosphoric acid. These are all 
the farmer has to concern himself about. Nitrogen is the 
most costly element as well as the one most easily lost, 
since it readily escapes into the air or is washed away into 
the subsoil. Therefore a nitrogeneous fertilizer is only to 
be applied in spring or summer during the period of active 
plant growth. Potash and phosphoric acid on the other 
hand, being of mineral composition, may be applied to the 
soil in the fall, as well as spring. They will make the 
land just so much better put on at any season, and can 
safely be relied upon to remain in the soil until removed 
by the growth of crops. 

The materials now employed in the manufacture of fer- 
tilizers are very numerous ; and, as to what selection the 
farmer will make, that will depend upon the comparative 
cost of the elements of plant food in one substance and in 
another. A slight computation will reveal to any farmer 
at any time where the cheapest source of fertility for him 
is to be found. All he needs as a basis upon which to 
work is the guaranteed percentage of nitrogen, potash, or 
phosphoric acid, which each manurial material contains. 

Ready mixed fertilizers are used very largely. Whether 
it is cheaper for the farmer to purchase fertility by buying 
these, or rather by securing the original chemicals and mix- 



lOO I 

ing them in the proportions he wishes, is a question for each 
agriculturist to settle for himself. It would certainly ap- 
pear that a very material saving may be made by pursuing 
the latter course. Given several substances, the chemical 
contents of each of which are definitely known, what more 
simple matter than for the farmer to take quantities of 
each sufficient to make a fertilizer of the strength he de- 
sires, and thoroughly mix all together upon the barn floor, 
or elsewhere. In this way a good fertilizer can be obtained 
at a comparatively low price. Another way to make a 
large annual saving in the fertilizer bill is to buy for cash 
and in as large quantities as possible. A few neighboring 
farmers, or the members of a grange, can profitably come 
together and find out the total quantity of fertilizer they 
all need. Then let a representative man make the entire 
purchase in a lump for cash, and a very respectable saving 
will be made to help out the " hard times." 

CLOVER AND RYE. 

These are two plants, which must not be lost sight of 
in any article concerned with the maintenance of fertility. 
We are always sure that any piece of ground which is pro- 
ducing a good crop of clover is steadily increasing in fer- 
tility. This is a wonderful plant. With its strong tap 
root, it penetrates deep into the subsoil, thereby securing 
access to stores of plant food and moisture not within the 
reach of more shallow-rooted plants. Clover also possesses 
the faculty, which few agricultural plants do have, of 
feeding upon atmospheric nitrogen, the supply of which 
is free as air and inexhaustible in quantity. All land is 
given fresh life by being sown to clover once in every few 
years, A good thick clover sod, turned under, affords an 
ideal basis for the culture of all farm crops. The atten- 
tion of every farmer is to be turned to the possibilities of 
securing cheap plant food through the medium of the 
clover crop. 



lOI 

Rye is woitliy of attention not in the same sense as 
clover; but principally because it being a hardy, sturdy 
plant, which grows and keeps green more or less through 
the entire winter, is valuable to arrest the loss of plant 
food that is liable to occur by the action of leaching win- 
ter rains. It is best to have some crop upon the hmd at 
all seasons. A crop of winter rye serves to catch the com- 
pounds of nitrogen, which would otherwise leach away and 
be lost. 

MAINTAINING FERTILITY. 

Soil robbing never can be good husbandry. 

To be a good farmer, a man must produce paying crops, 
and, at the same time, maintain the fertility of the land. 
It is far cheaper and wiser to keep the soil in good heart 
year by year than it is to impoverish it to the point where 
it becomes absolutely necessary to manure heavily in or- 
der to get any crop at all. 

No land is proof against continual cropping without pro- 
poitionate restoration of plant food. This is seen plainly 
in the case of the fertile prairies of our great West. These 
were deemed inexhaustible in their supplies of plant food. 
Yet, even thus earl}^ in the history of western agriculture, 
manures and fertilizers are coming more and more into 
use. This problem of increasing, or even maintaining fer- 
tility, is practically the same in all sections of the country. 

To make a brief summary, the farmer, to keep his land 
fertile, must furnish it with an abundance of capillary 
moisture, but not soak it ; he must practice tillage with 
persistence ; he will use all the farm manure he can get ; 
and make up any deficiency with chemicals in so far as he 
finds it profitable so to do. 



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CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Article 1. This society shall be called the Essex 
Agricultural Society. 

Art. 2. The officers of this Society shall consist of a 
President, four Vice-Presidents, Secretary and Treasurer, 
who shall be members of the Board of Trustees ex officio, 
and one Trustee from each town in the county. 

Art. 3. The President, Vice-Presidents and Secretary 
shall be elected by ballot at the annual meeting of the So- 
ciety, and the Treasurer shall be elected annually by the 
Trustees at their meeting in November. 

Art. 4. The Trustees ■ from each town shall be elected 
by the resident members of the Society, at a meeting 
called by the Secretary of the Society, at least two weeks 
previous to the November meeting of the Trustees, at 
which time the newly elected members shall enter upon 
the duties of their office. The secretary of the local 
meeting shall notify the Secretary of the Society of the 
results of the meeting at his earliest convenience. 

Art. 5. It shall be the duty of the President of the 
Society to preside at all meetings of the Society and of 
the Trustees, and to perform such other duties as usually 
devolves upon a presiding officer, and in his absence one 
of the Vice-Presidents shall succeed to his office. The 
President shall, in conjunction with the Secretary, approve 
all bills against the Society. 



I04 

Art. 6. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to take 
minutes of all the proceedings of the Society and the 
Trustees, and enter them in separate books, and shall 
record all such communications as the Trustees shall di- 
rect. He shall write and answer all letters relating to the 
business of the Society, and shall, in conjunction with the 
President, examine and approve all bills against the So- 
ciety. 

Art. 7. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive 
all monies due or payable to the Society, and all donations 
that may be made to the Society, for which he shall give 
duplicate receipts, one of which shall be lodged witli the 
Secretary, who shall make a record of the same. The 
treasurer shall pay out such monies, and at such times as 
he shall have orders from the President and Secretary. 
And he shall annually, and whenever required b}^ the So- 
ciety, or a committee thereof, render a fair and full report 
of his doings. He shall also give bonds for the faithful 
discharge of his duties in such sum as the Trustees may 
direct. 

Art. 8. The Trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society during the intervals of its meetings, and offer 
premiums in such form and value as they think proper 
provided the premiums offered do not exceed the funds of 
the Society. And shall lay before the Society, at each of 
its annual meetings, a statement of their proceedings and 
of the various communications made to them, and to watch 
over the interests of the Society with faithfulness and 
fidelity. 

Art. 9. There shall be held an annual meeting of the 
Society at such time and place as the Trustees shall deter- 
mine, to hear and act upon reports of committees, and to 
transact any other business that may legally come before 
them. 

Art. 10. Tiie salaries of the Secretaiy and Treasurer 
shall be tixetl by the Board of Trustees. 



I05 

Art. 11. All past Presidents of the Society shall be 
honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 12. Any citizen maj- become a member of the 
Society by the payment of the sum of three dollars to in- 
crease the funds of the Society, said members being ex- 
empt from all assessments and taxation. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the gospel may be- 
come members of the Society on their application, without 
the usual admission fee. 

Art. 14. A committee shall be appointed annually by 
the Trustees to audit the accounts of the Treasurer, and 
shall report to the Society their findings, which report 
shall be entered by the Secretary in his books. 

Art. 15. In case of the death or resignation or inca- 
pacity of the Secretary or Treasurer, the Trustees shall 
take charge of the official books and papers belonging to 
the office vacated, and give a receipt for the same, and 
they are authorized to deliver said books and papers to 
some person who may be appointed to fill the office thus 
vacated until the next annual meeting of the Society, at 
which time there shall be a new election. 

Art. 16. The foregoing Constitution and By-Laws may 
be altered or amended, by a proposition of the proposed 
amendment in writing by any member of the society, at 
any meeting of the Society, the same to lay over for final 
action until the next annual meeting of the Society. A 
majority of the members present voting in the affirmative, 
the amendment shall be adopted. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

FOR 1897-98. 



PRESIDENT. 

OLIVER S. BUTLER, of Georgetown. 



VIC E-PRESIDENTS. 



JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead. 
HORATIO G. HERRICK, of Lawrence. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
J. D. W. FRENCH, of North Andover. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynntield. 



TREASURER. 

GILBERT L. STREETER, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 



BENJAMIN p. WARE, of Marblehead. 
FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



I07 

TRUSTEES. 

J. P. Little, Amesbury. Geo. W. Sargent, Merrimac. 

Charles C. Blunt, Andover. G. S. Phippen, Methuen. 
John W. Lovett, Beverly. Geo. A. Currier, Middleton. 
J. Henry Nason, Boxford. Herbert F. Otis, Nahant. 
William B. Carlton, Danvers. James K. Adams, Newbury. 
Edward K. Lee, Essex. Chas. N. Maguire, Newbury- 

Sherman Nelson, Georgetown, port. 

Bennett Griffin, Gloucester. Walter H. Hayes, North An- 
S. B. George, Groveland. dover. 

G. R, Dodge, Hamilton. N. M. Quint, Peabody. 

B. Frank Barnes, Haverhill. Amos Rowe, Rockport. 
A. B. Fellows, Ipswich. Thomas P. Hale, Rowley. 

J. D. Drew, Lawrence. E. R. Perkins, Salem. 

Edwin Bates, Lynn. John Q. Evans, Salisbury. 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield. Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus. 
Daniel W. Friend, Manches- David Warren, Swampscott. 
ter. . George F. Averill, Topstield 

Amos P. Alley, Marblehead. Nath'l P. Perkins, Wenham. 
E. G. Nason, West Newbury. 



List of Premiums Awarded 1897. 



William C. Endicott, Danvers, Guernsey, first premium, 

m 00 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second premium, 

8 00 
J. M. Doherty, Boxford, Jersey, second premium, 4 00 
J. C. Rogers, Peabody, Guernsey, second premium, 4 00 

MILCH COWS. 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey cow, first premium, 

8 00 

William C. Endicott, Danvers, Jersey cow, second pre- 
mium, 5 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Grade Holstein, first pre- 
mium, 8 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein cow, first premium, 

8 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Grade Holstein, first pre- 
mium, 8 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein cow, second pre- 
mium, 5 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Grade Holstein cow, second 
premium, 5 00 



I09 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, 5 Holstein and Grade cows, 
first premium. Diploma and 10 00 

Joseph A. Piper, Supt. Peabody town farm, 14 Milch cows, 
second premium. Diploma and 8 GO 

HEIFERS. 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, $4 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey calf, first premium, 4 00 
Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey in milk, first premium, 5 00 
Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey, second premium, 3 00 
Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey calf, second premium, 2 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein in milk, first 

premium, 5 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second premium, 

3 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second premium, 

2 00 
B. F. Swasey, Marblehead, Durham, second premium, 3 00 
William C. Endicott, Danvers, Jersey, second premium, 

2 00 
William C. Endicott, Danvers, Grade Guernsey, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 

John F. Higgins, Middleton, Grade, first premium, 4 00 
William B. Carlton, Danvers, Grade in milk, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
Robert Foss, Hamilton, Grade Jersey, second premium, 

3 00 
J. E. Day, Danvers, Grade Guernsey, second premium, 2 00 
Fred Thomas, Peabody, Grade Ayrshire, second premium, 

2 00 

Joseph A. Piper, Supt. Peabody Town Farm, Holstein calf, 

second premium, 2 00 



I lO 



WOKKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, working oxen, lirst pre- 
mium, $8 00 

Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, working steers, first pre- 
mium, 6 00 

J. P. Little, Araesbury, working- oxen, second premium, 

6 00 

STEERS. 

J. P. Little, Amesbury, 2 year old steers, first premium, 

14 00 
J. P. Little, Amesbury, 1 year old steers, first premium, 

3 00 
J. P. Little, Amesbury, trained steer, gratuity, 3 00 

FAT CATTLE. 

J. P. Little, Amesbury, fat oxen, first premium, -18 00 

J. P. Little, Amesbury, fat cattle, special premium, 8 00 
Everett K. Brown, Ipswich, fat oxen, second premium, 

6 00 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

William L. McNeil, Rockport, Bay stallion, second pre- 
mium, 15 00 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING. 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, stallion "Zettara," first premium, 

$8 00 

E. A. Lothrop, Beverly, stallion "Col. Osgood,'' first pre- 
mium, 8 00 

W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, stallion "Quincy Wilkes,'' second 
premium, 5 00 

BROOD MARES. 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, mare "Psyche," first premium, 

$S 00 
W. E. Dane & Co., Salem, bay mare, second premium, 5 00 



1 1 1 



FAMILY HORSES. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, bay mare, first premium, $6 00 

Daniel H. Flint, Peabod}', bay mare, second premium, 4 00 

gents' driving horses. 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, bay mare, "Sylvia," first premium, 

16 00 
J. Henry Nason, Boxford, black mare, second premium, 

4 00 
Edwin Bates, Lynn, pair, first premium, 8 00 

Thomas Sanders, Haverhill, pair, second premium, 5 00 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

Mrs. L. A. Wilkins, Topsfield, first premium, $5 00 

SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, first premium, 16 00 

F. W. Lyford, Danvers, second premium, 4 00 

B. W. Farnham, No. Andover, first premium, 6 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, second premium, 4 00 

PAIRS FARM HORSES. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, first premium, f 8 00 

E. C. Little, Merrimac, first premium, 8 00 

E. C. Little, JNIerrimac, second premium, 5 00 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES. 

William McNeil, Rockport, first premium, $6 00 

COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

A. B. Clark, Peabody, first premium, 16 00 

Henry W. Johnson, Lynn, second premium, 4 00 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, first premium, 6 00 

E. A. Lothrop, Beverly, second premium, 4 00 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, first premium, 4 00 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, first premium, 4 00 

E, W. Moody, No. Andover, second premium, 2 00 

E. A. Lothrop, Beverly, second premium, 2 00 



112 



SWINE, LARGE BREEDS. 



W. L. Hill, Peabody, Cheshire boar, first premium $5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Cheshire sow and pigs, first pre- 
mium, ' 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Berkshire boar, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester white boar, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester sow and pigs, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, weaned pigs, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, large Yorkshire boar, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, large Yorkshire sow and pigs, first 
premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire weaned pigs, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
W. L, Hill, Peabody, Cheshire weaned pigs, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Berkshire boar, second premium, 3 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, O. I. Chester sow and pigs, second 
premium, 3 00 
Frank W. Stanley, Peabody, Berkshire sow, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
L. F. Newhall, Peabody, Chester boar, first premium, 5 00 
L. F. Newhall, Peabody, Yorkshire pigs, first premium, 5 00 
L. F. Newhall, Peabody, weaned pigs,second premium, 3 00 
L. F. Newhall, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, second premium, 

3 00 



SWINE, SMALL BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Suffolk boar, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, medium Yorkshire boar, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 



1 1 



W. L. Hill, Peabody, small Yorkshire sow, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabod}', medium Yorkshire pigs, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 



SHEEP. 

J. B. Thomas, Peabody, grade Cotswold buck, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
J. B, Thomas, Peabody, Shropshire sheep, first premium, 

5 00 
J. B. Thomas, Peabody, Leicester sheep, first premium, 5 00 
M. Drislane, Peabody, Shropshire lambs, first premium, 

5 00 
Harry A. Larrabee, Peabody, for sheep, second premium, 

2 00 



PLOUGHING WITH DOUBLE TEAMS. 

J. P. Little, Amegbury, 4 oxen, first premium, $S 00 

Pierce & Wilkins, Topsfield, 4 oxen, second premium, 6 00 



PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES. 

G. C. Dennison, Peabod}^ first premium, $6 00 

E. C. Little, Merrimac, second premium, 4 00 



PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES, SWIVEL PLOUGH. 

F. A. Dodge, Hamilton, first premium, $6 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, second premium, 4 00 

PLOUGHING WITH SULKY PLOUGH. 

O. F. Newhall, Peabody, first premium, $6 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, second premium, 4 00 



114 



OTHER AWARDS. 



Awarded by Committee on Poultry, $liVJ 00 

" Harrows, 12 00 

" " " " Agricultural Implements, 25 00 

" " '' " Carriages, 25 00 

" " " " Dairy 5 00 

" " " " Bread and Canned Fruits,15 00 

" " " '' Bees, Hives and Honey, 3 00 

" " " " Pears, 44 50 

" " " Apples, 40 50 

" " " " Peaches, Grapes, Plums 

&c., 
" " " " Plants and Flowers, 

" " " " Vegetables, 

" " '' " Grain and Seed, 

" " " " Counterpanes and Af- 

ghans, 
" " " Carpets and Rugs, 

" " " " Manuf's from Leather, 21 00 

*' " '' " Manuf. and Gen. Mdse., 12 00 

'^ " Fancy Work, 40 00 

'' Art Work, 47 00 

" Work by children, 18 00 



93 


00 


102 


75 


119 


00 


11 


00 


18 


50 


19 


50 



RECAPITULATION. 



Awarded for Ploughing, $44 00 

FARM STOCK. 



Awarded foi 


' Bulls, 


•f25 00 




u 


ti 


Fat Cattle, 


22 00 




n 


>i 


Milch Cows, 


47 00 




ki 


11 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


18 00 




l( 


11 


Heifers, 


63 00 




(I 


11 


Working Oxen, 


20 00 




(I 


u 


Steers, 


10 00 




a 


11 


Horses, 


160 00 




11 


a 


Swine, 


91 00 




a 


11 


Sheep, 


22 00 




11 


11 


Poultry, 


169 00 


$647 00 








FIELD AND EXPERIMENTAL 


CROPS. 




Awarded for 


Fruit Crops, 


$29 00 




a 


11 


Root Crops, 


61 00 




11 


11 


Grain Crop, 


14 00 




11 


11 


Improved Waste Land, 


10 00 


1114 00 



FARM AND GARDEN PRODUCTS. 

Awarded for Grain and Seed, ill 00 

" " Vegetables, 119 00 

" Fruits, 178 00 

" Plants and Flowers, 102 75 



$410 75 



ii6 



DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES. 

Awarded for Bread and Canned Fruit, $15 00 

" ••' Counterpanes and Afghans, 18 50 

" " Carpetings and Rugs, 19 50 

" Articles Manuf. from Leather, 21 00 

" Manufs. and General Mdse. 12 00 

" Fancy Work, 

" Works of Art, 

^' Children's Work, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Awarded for Dairy Products, 

" Honey, 

" " Agricultural Implements, 

" " Harrows, 

" " Carriages, 

" " Reclaiming Waste Land, 

" " Essays and Reports, 



40 


00 


47 


00 


18 


00 


15 


00 


3 


00 


25 


00 


12 


00 


25 


00 



-flOl 00 



The amount 
and firms in 2^ 
as follows : 
Amesbury, 
Beverly, 
B oxford, 
Danvers, 
Georgetown, 
Groveland, 
Hamilton, 
Haverhill, 
Ipswich, 
Lawrence, 
Lynn, 
Lynn field, 
Marblehead, 
Merrimac, 



of $1476.75 was awarded to 464 individuals 

i different cities and towns, in the County 

$73 00 Methuen, 140 00 

69 75 Middleton, 9 00 

39 00 Newbury, 57 50 

106 50 Newburyport, 2 75 

5 00 North Andover, 139 00 

4 00 Peabody, 492 25 
23 25 Rockport, 11 00 
39 00 Rowley, 10 50 
20 00 Salem, 82 75 

7 00 Saugus, 1 00 

123 25 Swampscott, 17 -00 

5 00 Topstield, 25 50 
5 00 Wenham, 25 

39 50 West Newbury, 20 50 



117 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Receipts for admission to hall and grounds, $4000 05 
Receipts for dinner tickets, 113 00 

Receipts from Firemen's muster, 180 00 

Receipts for ground for various purposes, 279 40 



$4572 45 
Total expense at hall and grounds, 2700 03 



Amount paid treasurer, $1872 42 



1898. 
PREMIUM LIST OF 



Essex Agricultural Society 

FOR THE 

SEVENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL CATTLE SHOW AND FAIR. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The trustee of each town is instructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their du- 
ties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to 
the Exhibition, the importance of entering their exhibits for 
the hall, the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Commit- 
tees, and at the meeting of the Society for filling vacancies in 
committees on the first day of the Exhibition, making sure 
that the names proposed at those meetings are of persons who 
will serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the Fair 
Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the grounds, 
at one o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the exhibition, 
and there organize, take the books of entry, and proceed- at 
once to business. Committees in hall, should take the books 
of entry from the Superintendent, promptly after the entries 
close. 



1 19 

Full reports of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 

Three members of any committee consisting of more than 
that number are authorized to act. 

I^^No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the sames class. 

The Diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles 0/ sjjecial merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures, fruits, vegetables 
in hall, and flowers ; or any premium, unless the rules of the 
Society have been strictly complied with. Neither shall they 
award premiums or gratuities in excess of the amount appro- 
priated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals, blue, white and red printed pre- 
mium ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assis- 
tant on the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals 
or articles designating the grade of premium awarded each, 
and the name of the person to whom awarded, and especial 
care should be taken that the cards issued correspond with 
the awards in their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on ploughing and on 
animals and articles exhibited at the Show, must be delivered 
promptly to the Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

The Society offers liberal premiums for the best reports of 
committees ; and the chairmen of the several committees are 
requested to present to the Secretary a full report explanatory 
of the opinions of the committee on the matter referred to 
them, within two weeks after the awards are made at the 
Show, for publication in the Transactions.* 

Reports on farms, crops, etc., to be presented previous to 
the meeting of the Trustees in November. 

Any member of a committee rvho cannot serve on the same is 
requested to give notice to the Secretary, before the Show, so 
that the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a ticket 
of admission to the hall of exhibition, on application to the 
Secretary. 



♦Chairmen of the committees will please notice this request. 



I20 

General Rules. 

Competitors are requested to carefully read the rules and pre- 
mium list before making entries. 

Claims (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 

. All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair, and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person not a member of the Society, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, 
for which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase 
the funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium or gratuity is awarded, or 
an agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
First National Bank, Salem, on and after the first Monday of 
November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day of 
April next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered as 
given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the several committees and adopted by the Soci- 
ety shall be final. Committees shall see that the premium 
cards issued, co7-respond with the jrremlums a7id gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his in- 
tention to compete for the same ; and committees are instruct- 
ed to award no premium unless the animal or article offered is 
worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall be entered in another class, working oxen, 
working steers, (three year old steers may be entered for 
ploughing in a double team) and farm horses which may be 
entered for ploughing, horses for fast walking, and milch 
cows, which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premium must be owned b3' residents 
and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 



121 

themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agricul- 
ture. 

The Proof that an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 

Standards adopted : — American Jersey C. C. Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

The Committees will take notice that no jjremiuin u-ill be 
awarded unless the animals or objects are of a decidedly supe- 
rior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals ok articles of 
special merit, in all departments of the Fair. 



Cattle and other Farm Stock. 



TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals, whether teams for ploughing, or animals en- 
tered for premium or exhibition, will be fed during the ex- 
hibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity, prevented 
from leaving, at the expense of the Society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense thereof, all of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with committee's report. 

For Fairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $8, 6 

For Fat Cow, premiums. $6, 4 



122 



BULLS. 



♦Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or of any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Two years old and upwards, premiums, $6, 4 

Under two years old, for each breed, $4,3 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREED. 

For the best bull of any age or breed, with five of his stock 
not less than one year old, quality and condition to be taken 
into* account, and especially the adaptability of the animal to 
the agriculture of the county, Diploma and $15 

NoTF.— Competitors are required to give a written statement of pedisrree, and 
committees are requested to be particular in this respect, and return them to the 
Secretarj' with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by -weight 
during one full month, premiums, 88, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Holstein, 
Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old and 
upwards, premiums for each breed, $7, 4 

For Native or Grade Cows, four years old and upwards, 
premiums, $T, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week 
from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $7, 4 

Note.— A written statement will be required of the age and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they dropped their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, qualitv and 'quantity of their food durino; the ssason. and the 
manner of their feeding, which statement is to be returned to the Secretary with 
Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to be 
exhibited at the Show, and a correct statement of manner of 
keeping and yield for one year preceding the Show, premiums, 

Diploma and $10. 8 

For the greatest produce of milk on any farm, in proportion 
to the number of cows producing it, not less than four, from 
April 1, 1896 to April 1, 1897, statement to be made of the 
exchanges made, manner, and expense of food, use made of 
milk, and such other facts as will illustrate the entire manage- 
ment, special regard being had to the mode in which the ac- 
count is kept, premium. Diploma and $8 

Note. — The above mentioned statements are to l)e returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 
January 1st, preceding the Show. 



123 

HEIFERS. 

First Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $4, 2 
Secoxd Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old. premiums, $5, 3 
Two years old, that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 
One year old and under, and less than two, premiums, $4, 2 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, quality and training, premiums, $S, 6 

For pairs of "Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, -$6, 4 

Note.— The Committee are required to consider the quality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their working capacity. The training of working oxen and steers 
wiil be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containing a load weighing two 
tons for oxen, and three thousand pounds for steers. (J^^At the time of entry a 
certificate of the weight of the cattle must be liled with the Secretary. 

STEERS. / 

For pairs of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, ^5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions, for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, ^8, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, three years old, 
premiums, $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account. Diploma and $8 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums. Diploma and $8, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums, Diploma and $5, 3 



124 

For best Stallion of any age and live colts of his stock, not 
less than one year old, quality and condition taken into ac- 
count. Diploma and $S 

NoTK— No staUion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capai>le of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by tlie e.Khibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

BROOD MARES. DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Driving Purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums. 

Note.— No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all ap- 
parent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 
For Family Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

Note.— No horse vcill receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $8, 5 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1,200 lbs. and over, premiums, 

$6,4 

For Farm Horses weighing less than 1,200 lbs., premiums, 

$6,4 

Note.— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether' 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of toe load to be used in trial of Farm 
Horses is to be ttxed upon by the committee of a-rangements for drafting, the 
difference in the load for horses of 1,'JOO lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 lbs. 
to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pair.s 2,000. 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING 2,500 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing 2.500 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, $8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES. WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2,500 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Hor8-!S weighing less than 2,500 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 5 



1^5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 3 AND 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Geldiag four-year-old Colts, premiums, S6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year-old Colts, premiums, ^5, 3 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, prem., 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Geldiug or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AXD FOUR TEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four year old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three year old colts, premium, 5, 3 

ONE AND T^VO YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare,^two year old colts, prem., 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., 4, 2 

SWINE— LARGE BREEDS. 

Large Breeds viz : Cheshire, Berkshire, Chester County 
Whites, Poland China, Large Yorkshire, and any other breed 
or grade, weighing more than 300 lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $5, 3 

For Breeding Sows, with their pigs by their side, premiums, 

$5, 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $5, 3 

SWINE— SMALL BREEDS. 

Small breeds, such as ^Suffolk, Essex, Small Yorkshire, 
China, and any other breed or grade, weighing less than 300 
lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, 35, 3 

For Breeding Sows with their Pigs by their side, premiums, 

$5, 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $5, 3 

SHEEP. 

For Flocks of Sheep, not less than ten in number, each 
Breed, premiums, $5, 3 



126 

For best Buck, premium, $5 

For lots of Lambs, not less than four in number between 

four and twelve months old, premiums, $4, 2 

POULTRY. 

For pairs of Fowls, Light Brahmas, Dark Brahmas, Buff 
Cochins, Partridge Cochins, Black Cochins, White Cochins, 
Plymouth Rocks, White Plymouth Rocks, Dominiques, White 
Leghorns, Brown Leghorns, Dominique Leghorns, Black 
Spanish, Hamburgs, Polish, Games, Dorking, Bantams, 
Black, White and Mottled Javas, Wyandottes, White Wyan- 
dottes, Golden Wyandottes, Black and White Miuorcas, Red 
Caps, Andalusias, Langshangs, and other recognized varieties, 
each variety, premiums, $2, 1 

For pairs of chickens of above varieties, premiums, $2, 1 

For the best breeding pen of each variety — Diploma of the 
Society. 

For the best pairs of native fowls, premiums, $2, 1 

Pairs can be exhibited in " breeding pens," by marking the 
competing female (with a ribbon or colored string), which 
with the male will form the pair. 

For lots of Turkeys, and Alesbury, Rouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China and African Geese, prem., $2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the discharge 
of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any specimen 
on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all claim he 
may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the " American Standard of Excellence." 

For best exhibit of Poultry Appliances, $4 

Note.— Diploma only awarded for Breeding pens. 

STREET PARADE. 

Invitation is extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams, in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of the Committee in 
charge in premiums or gratuities, $50 

PLOUGHING. 

Gknebal Note of I'louching.— Stags are excluded. Teams must be entered 
in the names of their owners, and only double ox-teams to have drivers. 'A team 
consisting of one pair of oxen and a horse will be considered a double team. The 
owners of separate teams may unite the same and be allowed to compete for 
premiums. The j)loughmen and drivers must have been residents of the County 
at least thrte months before the exhibition. Those who intend to be competitors 



127 

must give notice to reach the Secretary on or before Saturday previous to the 
show. The lanils will be staked, but each ploughman will be required to strike 
out his own land in the presence of " C«)mmittee on Str)king Out Grounds for 
Ploughing," after half-past nine o'clock on the morning of the trial. Ploughmen 
with lancl side ploughs are to back furrow three furrows on each side of the stakes 
set. the last furrow to be of the depth required in the class. Ploughmen with 
swivel jdoughs, to turn the outside of their furrow to the stakes on one side, and 
to finish one foot from the stake on the other. Committees to note and report 
the kind of plough used. 

Ploughing WITH Double Ox or Horse Teams. — One-eighth 
of an acre, at least eight inches deep, premiums, $8, 6 

Ploughing with Single Ox-Teams. — One-eighth of an 
acre, at least six inches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Two Horses — With any form of plough 
except Swivel, one eighth of an acre, at least six inches deep, 
premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Three Horses. — One-eighth of an acre, 

eight inches deep, without driver, premium, , $6 

Same with four horses, with driver, premium, $6 

Ploughing with Swivel Plough. — One-eighth of an acre, 
with double ox-teams, at least eight inches deep, premiums, 

$6,4 

One-eighth of an acre with single ox-teams, at least six in- 
ches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

One-eighth of an acre with horse teams, consisting of two 

horses, ploughing at least six inches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Sulky Plough. — For the best perfor- 
mances, taking into account ease of draft, amount and quality 
of work, 

Sulky Plough, Landside, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing by boys 15 years of age and under, premiums, 

16, 4 

HARROWS. 

For the best Harrow exhibited, and its merits shown by 
actual test upon the ploughed ground, $6, 4 

Note.— Entry must be made with the Secretary before the day of the trial, with 
description of the Harrow. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no 
article offered in collectio7i will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium), Diploma and $S 

For implements that are deemed worthy, the Committee 
may at their discretion award in gratuities not exceeding $40. 



128 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Rake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the 
merit of which can be known only by actual trial in tlie field; 
but manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition 
and inspection. 

CARRIAGES. 

For carriages built in the County, and exhibited by the 
manufacturer, Diploma, and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 

Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be es- 
pecially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued 
with the names, and sums awarded them, correspond with 
those in their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instructions 
under heading of "Duties of Committee," " General Rules," 
" Premiums to be awarded at the Show," see first pages, and 
under "Fruit," "Domestic Manufactures," and " Flowers." 

[I^^All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manufac- 
tures, must be the product of Essex County, to be entitled to 
a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers fifty dollars to be divided in three premi- 
ums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex County, as 
follows :— Premiums. $20, 15, 10 

Note.— Tliis exhibit includes all Fruit, Vegetables, and Domestic Manufactui'es 
that are exhibited in any other department in Kxhibition Hall. 

DAIRY. 

For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making 
and management of the butter, premiums, $5, 3 

For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, $5, 3 

BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

For White Bread made of Wheat flour, premiums, $2, 1 
For bread made from Graham flour, premiums, $2, 1 



129 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread, entered for premiums, to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collection of Preserved Fruits and 
Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, $2, 1 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of pro- 
cess used and amount of labor and time required in preparing 
and drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on other articles entered in this de- 
partment, products of this County, deemed worthy, $5 

BEES, HIVES AND HONEY. 

For the first and second best display of Bees, Hives, and 
Honey, and Apiarian Implements, accompanied with a writ- 
ten description of the bees, hives, etc., number of hives in use, 
and amount of surplus honey taken from them during the 
season, premiums, , $4, 2 

First and second best Honey, five pounds in comb, made in 
the County, with statement signed of kind of bees and hive, 
and time of year when honey was made, premiums, $2, 1 



Fruit. 

All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the first day of the exhibition, and each exhibi- 
tor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists of 
the varieties of each class of fruit or to be filed when entry is 
made. (Committees are not authorized to make awards to 
those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a conspicuous manner by the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors, with the names of 
fruit, for which premiums are offered, all others of same class 
fruit to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must p'ace 
their several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated 
by such labels, or be considered by the committee as not com- 
peting for premium. 



I30 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee) to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit. 

PEARS. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Angouleme, Dana^s Hovey, 
Lawrence, Seckle, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, Comice, Howell 
and Clairgeau, each, premium, $2 

Doyenne d'Ete, Gifford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $1.50 

For best collection of Pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premium, $5 

In addition to the above are placed at the disposal of the 
committee, to be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 
each fl5 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Red Russet, Tolman's Sweet, 
Hubbardston, Hurlburt, Porter, Pickman Pippin, Roxbury 
Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Gravenstein, Hunt Russet, 
Smith's Cider, Snow, Bailey Sweet, premium for each, f 2, 1 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early.) 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

For best collection of Apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab 
Apple deemed worthy by the committee, $1.50 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 each, .$15 

PEACHES, GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

For best twelve specimens of Freestone, White Flesh, 
Yellow Flesh, Essex County Seedling, each variety, $2 



131 

For best collection of Peaches, premium, $3 

For Champion, Lemon, or Orange Quinces, premium, ^2 
For Plums, five varieties to be selected by Committee, each 

variety, premium, $2 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, 

Brighton, Delaware, Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, 

Niagara Grapes, Pocklington, each variety, premium, $3 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 

artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of seven varieties, on separate plates, 

not less than ten pounds in all, premiums, $5, 4 

For best specimens of four bunches of Grapes, varieties 

other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

$1.50 
For baskets of Assorted Fruits, premiums, $4, 3 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 

be awarded in gratuities, of not less than 50 cents each, $20 



Plants and Flowers. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



1. All Plants and Flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or before 
eleven o'clock, on the first day of the Fair, and all such 
Plants and Flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers, and flowers used in boquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of Plants and Flow- 
ers is designated in the schedule, there must be neither more 
nor less than that number or quantit}' of specimens shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article, only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is offered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for compe- 
tition, but no variety can be duplicated. 

4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens ex- 
hibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of super- 
iority and worthy of such premium, not even if they are the 
only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admitted 
in competition for another different premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, or 



132 

in the case of Native Plants and Flowers, where such were 
found. 

7. All Plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood, or some 
other permanent and suitable substance and so attached to 
same as to be easily seen. Flowers when specified to be 
named to comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in Pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skillful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symmetry and vigor of the specimens ; also Bouquets, Baskets, 
Design Work, etc., must show taste, skill and harmony in ar- 
rangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All Flowers exhibited must be shown upon their own 
stem, flowers in " Design " work alone excepted ; and this 
exception if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account 
by the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The Committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and (lowers or " Designs of merit" 
for which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together), exceed the amount, 
$100, limited by the Society for this department. 

11. No member of the Committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any ease vote or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarily vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above "Rules and Regula- 
tions for Plants and Flowers, and General Rules of the Socie- 
ty, and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhibi- 
tors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 

PLANTS. 

Plants competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots. Native Plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 

For collection Flowering and Ornamental Foliage plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premiums, $5, 3 

For collection Palms at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, ■ $1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 



133 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., ^1 
For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, premium, ^1 
For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10* varie- 
ties, premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, 
premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 6 
varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Calla Lilies, 5 specimens, premium, ^1 
For specimen Euglish Ivy, premium, $1 
For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least 50 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which to be a cross section, and neither to be more than four 
inches in length or diameter, premiums, $5, 3 

FLOWERS. 

For collection Cut Flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For collection Cut Flowers, native, 100 specimens, at least 
50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For pair of Bouquets for vases, green-house flowers, pre- 
miums, f 1, .50 

For pair of Hand Bouquets, green-house flowers, premiums, 

$1, .50 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of native flowers, premiums, 

f 1, .50 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, pre- 
miums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Green-house flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Native Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 



134 

For Basket of Garden Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For Arrangement of Native Flowers and Autumn Leaves, 
premiums, $2, 1 

For Floral Designs, choice cultivated flowers, prem., $3, 2 

For Floral Designs, native flowers, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Japan Lilies, hardy, named, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Phlox, hardy, perennial, named, premiums, 

f 2, 1 

For collections Pansies, at least 50 specimens neatly and 
artistically arranged, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Xative and Introduced Weeds, with com- 
mon and botanical name attached, premiums, $2, 1 

For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six 
varieties, named, premium, $1 

. For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Gladiolas (spikes), at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Japan Lilies, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox, hardy perennial, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem., ^1 

For twenty-four Carnation Pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Verbenas, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twenty-four Roses, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twenty-four Garden Annuals, at least twelve varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties, named, 
premium, ^1 

For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Double Truffaut's Peony flowered, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Pompone, premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, $1 



For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Pausies, in variety, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Zinnias, double, in variety, premium, $t 
For twenty-four Marigolds, African, in variety, prem., $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre- 
mium, $1 
For twenty-four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $1 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Dianthus (double annual,) in variety, prem., $1 
For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, $1 
For collection of sweet peas, premium, $1 

VEGETABLES. 

Rules for Jrult apphj to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens. Eclipse, Dewing, and 
Edmands, premium, each variety, $2 

Carrots — For best twelve. Short Top, Long Orange and 
Danvers Intermediate, premium, each variety, $2 

For best twelve. Short Horn, Orange carrots, $2 

Mangold Wurtzels — For best six specimens, $2 

Flat Turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top 
and White Flat, premium, each variety, $2 

Kuta Bagas — Twelve specimens. For best yellow and 
white, premium, each variety, $2 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premium, $2 

Onions — Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow 
Flat, and Red. premium, each variety, $2 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Clark's No. 1, Pearl of Savoy, Early Maine, pre- 
mium, each variety, $2, 1 
Cabbages — For best three specimens, Savoy, Fottler's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
Cauliflowers — For best three specimens, premiums, $2, 1 
Celery — For best four roots, premium, $1 
Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best Early, pre- 
miums, $2_, 1 
For best twelve ears in milk, Late, premiums, $2, 1 
Squashes — For best three specimens, Marrow, Turban, War- 
ner Turban, Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, Bay State, 
Sibley, Butman, Victor, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
Melons — For best three specimens, Nutmeg, Musk, Cassaba, 
Salmon Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 



136 . 

For best two specimens Watermelons, premium, $2 

Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens, Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premium, $2, 1 

For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premium, $2 
Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premium, $2, 1 

For collection of vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $25 
(t^^No competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums 
are offered for. 

Collections of Vegetables, where premiums are offered for a number ol varieties 
must be entered and placed, not less than three o- a kind by themselves on the 
tables assigned for collections. No collection shall receive but one jiremlum. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to comi)ete with speci- 
mens of the same variety placed elsewhere. Exhibitors of such collections how- 
ever, are not prevented from exhilutino; (/</'/ /7io?ia/ specimens of any variety with 
and in competition with like variety. All vegetables must be entered 'in the 
name of the grower of them. 

Size of Fef/e<aft?cs.— Turnip Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions, 
2J to 4 inches in largest diameter; Potatoes to be of good size for family use; 
Squashes to be pure and well ripened. Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, all 
to be of uniform size. 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premium, $1 

For twenty-five ears of Field Corn, premiums, $5, 4, 3 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $6, 4 
All grain or seed must have been grown by the exhibitor in the 
County to receive a premium. 



Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 1 
o'clock on the first day of the Exhibition. Articles not thus 
deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 
be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to 
the last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wrought Counterpanes having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $3, 2 



137 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $25 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets, having regard to the quality and expense of 
the material, premiums, $3, 2 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the qual- 
ity of the work and expense of the materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount not to exceed $20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 
Women's do., Children's do., each, premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each, prem., $3 

$8 are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium. Diploma of the Society. 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, $30 

FANCY WORK 

Of Domestic Manufacture is not included in the above. 
At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, $40 

WORKS OF ART. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $40 

DECORATED CHINA. 

At the disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, 
not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $20 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, premiums, 

$2, 1 
At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $25 



138 

List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 



FARMS. 

Competitors for this premium must give notice of their in- 
tention to the Secretary on or before June 15th, and the farms 
entered for premium will be viewed by the committee twice 
during the year. Crops growing on farms that are entered for 
premium, cannot be entered with another committee for sep- 
arate premiums — except crop specimens exhibited at the fair. 

Any person desirous of having his farm inspected, without 
entering it for premium, mdiy make application to the Secre- 
tary, and it will be viewed and reported upon by the committee. 

For the best conducted and most improved farm, taking 
into view the entire management and cultivation, including 
lands, buildings, fences, orchards, crops, stock and all other 
appendages, with statements in detail, relating thereto, pre- 
mium, $20 

IMPROVING WET MEADOW AND SWAMP LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments relating to wet meadow or 
swamp lands, on not less than one'^acre, the course of manage- 
ment, and the produce, etc., for a period of two years at least, 
to be detailed, with a statement of all the incidental expenses, 
premiums, f 10, 6 

Note. — The Committee is instructed to ascertain liow many, if any, reclaimed 
swamps in this County have been abandoned or have returned to natural grasses. 
Persons knoveing of such, are requested to notify the Secretary or Committee. 

IMPROVING PASTURE AND WASTE LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improving 
pasture land, other than by ploughing, so as to add to their 
value for pasturage, with a statement of the same, premiums, 

$10, 6 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improv- 
ing waste lands, so as to add to their agricultural value, with 
statement of the same, premiums, $10, 6 

No premium to be awarded to any person for a repetition of 
an experiment in meadow, swamp or pasture lands, for which 
he has already received a premium. 



139 
UNDER-DRAINING LAND. 

For best conducted experiments in under-draining land, 
regard being had to the variety of soil, sub-soil, and other 
local circumstances, premiums, $10, 6 

Note.— Tlie same instructions under "Improving Wet Meadow and Swamp 
Lands " apjily to this Committee. 

GRAIN AND OTHER CROPS. 

Claimants on Grain and Root Crops will be required to state 
the size of the piece of laud, when they enter, and conform 
to following rules : — Entries of Grain Crops, to be made on or 
before September 10 ; Root Crops on or before October 
10th ; giving ample time for the crops to be examined by the 
committee before harvesting. Statement to be made in con- 
formity with the following form, must be forwarded to the 
Committee previous to November 1st. 

All calculations and figures given in reports of, and state- 
ments of Crops, are to be made on the basis of an acre, results 
in all cases, to be given at the rate per acre. 

In pursuance of authority delegated to the Board of Agri- 
culture by Chap. 24, of Acts 1862, Agricultural Societies 
receiving the bounty of the State are required to make use of 
the following form, and be governed by its conditions in the 
mode of ascertaining the amount of crops entered for premium. 

Essex Agricultural Society. — Statement concerning a 

crop of , raised by Mr. , in the town of , 

, 1897. 

What was the crop of 1895 ? What manure was used and 
how much? What was the crop of 1896? What manure 
was used and how much? What is the nature of the soil? 
When and how many times ploughed, and how deep? What 
other preparation for seed? Cost of ploughing and other 
preparation? Amount of manure in loads of thirty bushels, 
and how applied? 

Value of manure upon the ground? How used? (What 
amount of Commercial Fertilizer used? How used? Value 
of same when applied?) When and how planted? The 
amount and kind of seed? Cost of seed and planting? How 
cultivated and how many times? Cost of cultivation, includ- 
ing weeding and thinning? Time and manner of harvesting? 
Cost of harvesting, including the storing and husking or 
threshing? Amount of crop, etc. Signed by Compe- 
titor. 



I40 

The committee, to whom is intrusted the award of the 
premiums on field crops, may award them according to their 
judgment, but for the purpose of furnishing accurate statistics 
for tlie benefit of agriculture, shall select certain of the crops, 
and require the owners thereof to measure the land and weigh 
the crops accurately, giving to the committee a certificate of 
the same, and give all possible information thereon over their 
own signatures, and return the same to the Secretary of the 
Society, to be published in the annual transactions. 

In ascertaining the amount of crop, any vessel may be used 
and the weight of its contents once, multiplied by the number 
of times it is filled by the crop. 

In measuring the land or weighing crops, any competent 
person may be employed, whether a sworn surveyor or not and 
must give certificate. 

The certificate shall state the weight of all crops only in a 
merchantable state. 

In ascertaining the amount of a hay crop entered for 
premium, the measurement of the hay in the barn may be em- 
ployed. 

Rules of Measure Practised and Adopted by the State 
Board op Agriculture. 

Wheat, Potatoes, Sugar Beets, Ruta Bagas, 

Mangold Wurtzels, 
White Beans and Peas, 
Corn, Rye, 
Oats, 

Barley, Buckwheat, 
Cracked Corn, Corn and Rye, and other meal, 

except Oat, 
Parsnips, Carrots, 
Onions, 

1. For the best conducted experiments of Rye, not less 
than twenty bushels to the acre, fifty-six lbs. to the bushel, on 
not less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

2. For best conducted experiments of Wheat, not less than 
thirty bushels to the acre, sixty lbs. to the bushel, on not less 
than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

3. For best conducted experiments of Oats, not less than 
fifty bushels to the acre, thirty-two lbs. to the bushel, on -not 
less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

4. For best conducted experiments of Barley, not less 
than forty bushels to the acre, forty-eight lbs. to the bushel, 
on not less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 



60 lbs. 


to bush. 


62 " 


<< 


56 " 


<( 


32 " 


<< 


48 " 


<i 


50 " 


(< 


55 " 


<i 


57 '• 


II 



141 

5. For best conducted experiments of Indian Corn, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

6. For largest quantity and best quality of English Hay, 
on not less than one acre, regard being had to the mode and 
cost of cultivation, premiums, $7, 4 

7. For best yield of Field Beans, on not less than one-half 
acre, and not less than twenty-tive bushels per acre, premiums, 

$7, 4 

ROOT CROPS. 

1. For best conducted experiments in raising Carrots, fifty- 
five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

2. For best conducted experiments in raising Parsnips, 
fifty-five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

3. For best conducted experiments in raising Beets, pre- 
miums, $8, 5 

4. For best conducted experiments in raising Ruta Bagas, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

5. For best conducted experiments in raising Mangold 
Wurtzels, sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

6. For best conducted experiments in raising Sugar Beets, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

7. For best conducted experiments in raising Onions, fifty- 
two pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

8. For best conducted experiments in raising Potatoes, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

9. For best conducted experiments in raising Cabbages, 
premiums, $8, 5 

10. For best conducted experiments in raising Squashes, 
premiums, $8, 5 

11. For best conducted experiments in raising Summer 
English Turnips for the market, premiums, $8, 5 

Raised on not less than half an acre, and the quantity of 
crop to be ascertained by weight ; so far as practicable the 
crop to be free from dirt, without tops, and in a merchantable 
condition at the time of measurement. 

Claimants for premiums on Grain and Root Crops must 
forward statement to chairman of committee before Nov. \st. 

FOREST TREES. 

1. For plantation of either of the following species of for- 
est trees, viz: White Oak, Yellow Oak, Locust, Birch, White 
Ash, Maple, Walnut, or White Pine, not less than three years 
old, and not less than 1000 trees, premium, $10 

2. For plantation of not less than GOO trees, premium, ,$8 

3. For ornamental trees, ten or more set on any street, 
road or farm, and cared for five years, premium, $8 



142 

CRANBERRIES. 

For best conducted experiment in the cultivation of the 
Cranberry, at least two summers, or not less than twenty rods 
of land, with written statement of the quantity and quality of 
the land, expense of planting, weeding and culture, and 
amount of crops produced. Premium to be paid in 1896 and 
1897, $10 

For best experiment do., on not less than ten rods of land, 
premium, $7 

STRAWBERRIES AND OTHER SMALL FRUITS. 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of laud, expense of planting, culture, crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $7 

For best crop of Currants, Raspberries and Blackberries, 
with statement as above, premiums, each, $7 

SEEDLING POTATOES AND EXPERIMENTS. 

For best Seedling Potato, originating in Essex County, to 
equal in yield, earliness and quality, the Early Rose, and to 
surpass it in one or more of these particulars, premium paid 
after three years' trial, $20 

In testing the value of a Seedling Potato, the committee 
are instructed to take sworn testimony of the cultivator with 
regard to the yield, after having inspected the crop. 

For the most satisfactory experiments to extend through 
five consecutive years, to settle the following facts relative to 
raising potatoes : — premium, $25 

1st. Will whole, medium sized potatoes yield better re- 
sults than pieces cut to two eyes ? 

2nd. What will be the result of continuously planting 
small-sized potatoes of the same strain a series of years ? 

3d. Difference between hilling and flat cultivation. 

4th. Effect, if any, of cutting off seed ends before planting. 

5th. Effects of deep and shallow planting. 

6th. Raising from sprouts alone from same strain. 

7th. Can potatoes having dwarf vines be planted nearer 
than others. 

8th. Best distance apart for seed in the drill. 

9th. To show the effect of covering the top with earth at 
several times after they had come up. 

To be raised on not less than a half acre of land, uniform 
in character, and all to receive the same kind and quality of 
manure and cultivation, and to be inspected by the committee 
at the time of gathering the crops. 



143 

ESSAYS AND FARM ACCOUNTS. 

The Essays must be transmitted to the Secretary by the 1st 
of November, with sealed envelopes containing the names of 
their authors, respectively, which shall not be opened by the 
committee, nor shall the names be known to the committee, 
until they shall have decided upon the merit of the Essay. 

For original Essays on any subject connected with Agricul- 
ture, in a form worthy of publication, premiums, $10, 8 

For best statement of Actual Farm Accounts, drawn from 
the experience of the claimant, in a form worthy of publica- 
tion, premium, $8 

For reports of committees upon subjects for which pre- 
miums are offered, premiums, $8, 6 

Committee — G. L. Streeter, Salem; N. M. Hawkes, Lynn; 
D. E. Safford, Hamilton ; Geo. E. Blodgett, Rowley ; J. M. 
Danforth, Lynnfield. 

LIBRARY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; Henry Brooks, Sa- 
lem ; B. P. Ware, Marblehead ; J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 

TREADWELL FARM. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield ; Andrew Nichols, Danvers. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee — J. Hardy Phippen, Salem ; Benj. P. Ware, 
Marblehead ; E. Pope Barrett, Peabody. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Francis H. Appleton, Peabody ; Nathaniel Dole, Newbury ; 
C C. Blunt, Andover ; 0. S. Butler, Georgetown ; John M. 
Danforth, Lynnfield. 

DELEGATES. 

From the Essex Agricultural Society to attend Exhibitions 
of Societies, Farmers' Clubs, and Fruit Growers' Associations 
in Essex County, and report any information that shall seem 
valuable for publication. 



144 

The Secretary to be notified of the time of holding their 
exhibition, who will notify the chairman of committee to 
assign delegate. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of crops, 
of exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair, are 
chosen by the trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Seventy-seventh Annual Cattle Show and Fair 10 

Report of the Annual Meeting 13 

Report on Bulls 15 

Report on Fat Cattle 15 

Report on Milch Cows 16 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 17 

Report on Heifers, Pure Breed 18 

Report on Heifers, Native or Grade 19 

Report on Working Oxen and Steers 20 

Report on Steers 20 

Report on Stallions, Farm and Draft 20 

Report on Stallions for Driving 21 

Report on Brood Mares 21 

Report on Family Horses. . 21 

Report on Gents' Driving Horses .... 22 

Report on Single Farm Horses 22 

Report on Pairs of Farm Horses 22 

Report on Fast Walking Horses . . .' 22 

Report on Colts, Farm and Draft 23 

Report on Colts for Driving 23 

Report on Swine 24 

Report on Sheep 25 

Report on Poultry 26 

Report on Ploughing 32 

Report on Harrows 33 

Report on ("arriages 33 

Report on Agricultural Implements .33 

Report on Bread and Canned Fruit 35 

Report on Bees, Hives and Honey 36 

Report on Pears 36 

Report on .Vpples 38 

Report on Peaches, Grapes and Assorted Fruits 40 

Report on Plants 43 

Report on Flowers 44 

Report on Vegetables .")0 



146 

Report on Grain and Seed 54 

Report on CounteriJanes and Afghans '>4 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 56 

Report on Articles Manufactured from Leather 58 

Report on Manufactures and General Merchandise ")9 

Report on Fancy Work 00 

Report on Works of Art and Oil Painting 63 

Report on Decorated China (55 

Report on Work by Children eo 

Report of Committee on Root Crops (iS 

Statements 72 

Report of Committee on Small Fruits 82 

Statements 8;> 

Report of Committee on Grain Crops 87 

Statements 87 

Report of Committee on Reclaimed Land 89 

Report of Committee on Treadwell Farm 91 

Report of Delegate from State Board, 18)7 92 

Report on New Members V)4 

Farmers' Institutes 94 

Report of Committee on Essays 95 

Essays 95 

Treasurer's Report 102 

Constitution of the Society 103 

Officers of the Society 10(> 

Recapitulation of premiums 113 

Financial Statement 1897 Fair 117 

Premium List for 1898 118 



TRANSACTIONS 

FOR THE YEAR 1898 



OK THE 



ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



{Organized iSiS.) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 



IN MASSACHUSETTS, 



WITH ADDRESS BY 



GEN. FRANCIS H. APPLETON. 

And the Premium List for 1899. 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS.: 

Newcomb & Gauss, Printers. 

i8q8. 



ADDRESS. 



When asked to address the Essex Agricultural Society 
at its dinner today I hesitated, feeling that I should prove 
a chestnut, as it were, to those who by their votes permitted 
me to preside for several consecutive years over their Socie- 
ty, Trustee meetings, the all-day educational, "Institute" 
meetings, that are held during the winter months in dif- 
ferent parts of this county. 

That service with our members, and expert speakers on 
agricultural topics, to the agriculture of Essex County, 
was a pleasure to all participants, I am sure, by its bringing 
together in close contact the opinions and agricultural 
needs of our fellow citizens from all parts of the County ; 
and I trust and believe that the work which we did together 
during those years has been of considerable real benefit to 
the business of agriculture, and the welfare of our fellow 
agriculturists. 

The field-meetings that were held at the State Hospital, 
at Danvers, where Implements that are useful on the farm, 
or were new inventions, were exhibited and discussed, also 
brought together the men of Essex who had a common in- 
terest in improving the agricultural business prospects of 
Essex County, that we have voted in, and are proud to call 
our home. I will speak of our fair later. 

But the idea of home has a broader, and wider limit than 
the boundary of City, Town, or County, broader and wider 
than the outlines of our state. 

By the force of our Navy, and the influence of our 



Army, together with the decision of our representatives at 
Washington, the outlines of our National home are to be 
increased from what was the Nation of the past ; and the 
near future will reveal to us, after deliberations, what 
those limits are to be. 

The civilization of the world has been protected b}^ our 
acts in war, and may the business interests of our people 
be so enhanced thereby that the inevitable horrors that 
must come with war shall be made good to the country. 

But to decide what shall be the limits of home, is in the 
keeping, or soon may be, of several Boards of Commission- 
ers, who shall define that future territory of these United 
States. 

When the present uncertainty is done away with, and 
we know what is ours to develop, govern, and protect, 
with stable condition of business, to the good of all well 
ordered men and women, we must also have decided upon 
a form of influence, or power, by which stable conditions of 
government and business shall be kept up during our 
reformations, and which shall continue thereafter. 

We must have an enlarged and sufficient Navy, with the 
means of repairing, docking, and keeping it in good order 
within our own territory, which latter we are approaching, 
and it must be the best for our uses that the world can 
yield. We hear the highest words of deserved praise for 
our Navy in the last war and its management, and must 
see the profit to us of its increase. Its accomplishments, by 
the aid of many boats converted to its use have been grand. 

But let us not forget that latter necessity in the emer- 
gency that confronted us last spring; and may it be a spur 
to provide against an unreasonable lack of Naval power at 
some possible future emergency. May our ships all" be 
converted from the ranks before the next occasion calls. 

The men of our Army also, both regular and volunteer, 
have the heartfelt appreciation of our people for their 



bravery and heroism, and the sincerest sympathy for the 
sickness that has been added to wounds received in battle. 

We reverently bow at the thought of deaths that always 
are, and have been latel}-, a sad, but inevitable, part of 
warfare ; and to the many sad deaths from causes other 
than wounds. 

In the future we must have enough men ready, and 
hardened by regular Army training, for the more immedi- 
ate requirements in case of war ; so that our volunteers shall 
(when called for), have time to prepare for the severities 
of camp life before being precipitated therein. But let us 
always remember that the best capital any man or woman 
can possess, is the knowledge of how to preserve health 
under the varied conditions of life that may come to all of 
us. 

Physical training and personal care are a part of public 
instruction to the youth in many of the older countries. 
We should carefully consider this phase of education. 

In war, the responsibilities that rest upon Commissioned 
Officers, in the several departments cannot be too forcibly 
considered, when many men are placed under their care 
and training. 

It is proper that we agriculturists, and business men of 
varied callings, should insist upon the adoption by State 
Legislature and National Congress, of such laws as shall 
require the strictest examination of applicants for military 
office before the commission shall be awarded. 

In the interests of the men of our laiid, young and old, 
liable for service, we should demand it. 

In the next war — may it be far off — it may be that some 
from o^ir families shall be elected to defend our right and 
interests as citizens ; so that it becomes, indeed, a personal 
charge, and important care upon us, to see that the best 
and safest plan of organization for our army is soon per- 
fected and adopted ; under which those nearest and dearest 



to us, or others, may be best protected against the enemy, 
hunger, bad sanitation, sickness, etc., especiall}- when de- 
feuding or guarding the Nation. 

The training and intelligence of both officers and men 
must be of the highest possible order ; and in the proper 
degree to each and all. 

Up to the time of the breaking out of the last war, the 
law of 1792 governing the military of this country was 
still in force. Congress had been many times appealed to 
to remodel and improve that law, without effect. It is to 
Congress that we must still look, in the hope that they 
may see that we now demand those improvements that 
shall in future make for our army, and the men coming 
from our homes to compose it, as good a plan of organiza- 
tion as the best trained and practiced minds of our Na- 
tion, or the world can produce. 

To come to matters that are of more direct application 
to the tilling of the good, or more difficult, soils of Essex 
County, — may it be for many more years a charge upon 
our Society to continue to promote improvements that 
shall directly advance our farming and horticulture. Let 
us endeavor to take advantage as best we can of the in- 
ventions of the day as they come forward ; and let us ven- 
ture to advance suggestions that mat/ be used to aid in 
this work, that the practical farmer may have them to 
consider. 

How can the land of Essex County be made to yield 
more revenue to those who have it in charge ? The ex- 
pert speakers at our Institutes are the men to lead and ad- 
vise us. 

Our Society's earliest work was to provide markets at 
which the products of the farm and garden should find a 
better and readier sale ; and the producer and consumer be 
brought nearer together. 

We have always endeavored to bring before our cultiva- 



tors the latest inventions that bear upon their work in the 
field ; we have endeavored to promote improvement in the 
seeds used, and the character of the fertilizers given to 
the crops ; and in other ways, and so on, as required by 
our cherished calling. 

What further still can we do ? Surely much remains 
to be done in bettering the yield per acre of our crops, in- 
creasing the yield in milk per cow, in the improvement in 
our horses for the many special purposes to which they 
are put, etc., etc. The fire engine and artillery horses 
should not be too clumsy, and the draught horse should 
not be too slight. The farm horse should be solid enough 
for the team and plow, but light enough for the road and 
getting the doctor quickly when needed. Perhaps the 
doctor should have the fast horse to answer the telephone 
calls. These problems are often somewhat complex, al- 
though none the less real. 

Now that leads me to speak of an experience that I have 
lately had. I have been trying from several of the leading 
dairy implement makers to learn if I could set up a cream 
separator and churn to be run by electricity, via an electric 
motor. But I have had a most trying time, without re- 
sults. I could not understand why the dairy manufactur- 
ers could give me no satisfaction, and I was being referred 
to some one else, until a dairyman told me at our last New 
England fair that the manufacturers had dog and goat 
powers on hand, and were unwilling to advise or consider 
electric power yet, or until the dog and goat powers had 
been sold. 

Electric power in cars has done much to aid the agri- 
culturist in both business and social ways. Cannot the 
way be devised by which the farmer can have his business 
advanced by rendering it possible for him to secure elec- 
tric motors and various machinery that can benefit him 
and increase his profits, to be run thereby? May our 
agriculturists give the thought consideration. 



8 



It would certainly! be a great promoter of profit to the 
farmer if he could secure the electric curient and motor, 
at a somewhat lower price than now, to run his dairy im- 
plements, lathe, {grindstone, and a grist mill, chiefly ; it 
would thus be eas}- to^ keep his implements and smaller 
tools in better condition than is usual, and sharper, which 
latter is a most important factor to a farmer as a source of 
profit. Implements and men's wits are best when they are 
sharp, and so produce the best results. 

We honor the memory of Benjamin Franklin as the pro- 
moter of the use of electricity as brought from the clouds 
by his kite line ; he was a statesman that acted loyally 
and patriotically for his countiy's interests, when in liis 
native land, as well as when representing his country on 
foreign soil. 

May our newly chosen President have a sharp eye out 
to catch the ideas'that will promote the agricultural inter- 
ests of Essex county and Massachusetts, especially when 
he goes to the Paris Exposition of 1900 in our interest, as 
I am sure he will. 

It is claimed that the proper use of ensilage was pro- 
moted by an Essex county representative in Vienna, in 
1873, who reported back what he saw of it in Austria- 
Hungary, and elsewhere ; may we look for something 
more and more useful from another of our representatives. 

The Essex Agricultural Society has had 78 annual ex- 
hibitions already ; may they have many more, and may 
they be constantly improving, be both instructive and en- 
tertaining to those who visit and examine them, and of a 
high, and of an increasingly high order of merit. They 
should have attractions that are real and worth viewing, 
and these can be offered at such a reasonable expense that 
good profits can result to a society which is behind them. 

The good history and record of this Society must and 
will be perpetuated, and the agricultural displays be of 



the highest order, and in combination with the previously 
mentioned characteristics. 

We should venture to have such, and if we venture 
wisely we cannot fail ; and lastly, I believe we can venture 
wisely, and unselfishly, to such a profit, coming from the 
sure interest of the surrounding large population, that the 
whole agricultural interest of this county must be pro- 
moted thereby. With good profits, and free from debt, 
we might deem it wise to establish later a second fair 
ground in another part of the county now not so occupied. 

Our agricultural exhibits of old Essex are not complete 
if the biped live stock — pardon this phrase in my argu- 
ment — that is, the men and women of all callings, are not 
here brought together for meeting and acquaintance to 
their mutual good. 

We must have a sufficient hall on the grounds for our 
exhibit, that the people of Peabody now freely allow us 
to place in their spacious Town Hall. We can offer it a 
good location. And we must have more land for a grand 
stand that shall have seating capacity to rest our visitors 
and patrons, and from which they can view a half-mile 
track to find entertainment. The outlay for such may 
seem high, but the results to come to the Essex Agricul- 
tural Society thereby must soon make the outlay good and 
of profit, with improvements and benefits of high quality 
to come to our strictly agricultural work. 

It not only wants good judgment and early action, but 
it must have the whole board of our trustees, from all 
cities and towns, in hearty accord therewith. 

I believe that we cannot too often call the attention 
of our farmers to the fact that, at large public expendi- 
tures, agricultural colleges and experimentations exist for 
their benefit ; also other institutions, like Harvard Univer- 
sity, have agricultural courses of study, with a farm, 
where all the lectures of the University are open to him 
who may enter there. 



lO 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College is very com- 
pletel}' equipped for such work, and the State offers free 
scholarships there. Harvard does not offer free scholar- 
ships, but it is seldom, I am told, that a needy applicant, 
who can prove his ability, is not able to obtain a loan, or 
other offer of help, to enable him to take a course there. 

Several years ago I was interested to see the Essex 
Agricultural Society turn an annual deficit into an annual 
jDrofit. It was my pleasure to work with a committee that 
accomplished this during my presidency, and to do it they 
decided to locate in this town, in the midst of a large sur- 
rounding population, which makes a possibility of many 
small gate payments towards a large total, if properly 
handled, as I have said, and all readily given and easilj^ 
collected. Some of the strongest organizations in the 
land are thus built up to be crowned with success. 

Let us give to our new President all help and encour- 
agement that is in our power towards a successful adminis- 
tration ; and to his predecessor, who has been active for 
the Society for many years, may he find that the advance- 
ment which has gone along in his terms as President is 
held and built upon. 



SEVENTY-EIGHTH 

Annual Cattle Show and Fair. 



The Cattle Show and Fair of this Society opened Sept. 
20, under very favorable circumstances, the weather being 
all that could be desired and continued throughout the 
three days of the Fair. 

The attendance was not quite as large as last year but 
the net receipts were fully up to that of 1897. 

The exhibit of cattle, quality and quantity considered, 
was equal if not superior of any for many years. 

The poultry exhibits exceeded that of 1897 which was 
the largest on record, and it was all of superior quality. 
The exhibit of horses and colts have fallen off materially, 
the past two or three years. 

At the ploughing match there were nine entries and 
they all did commendable work and quite a large gathering 
was present to witness it. 

The exhibits as a whole were fully up to the Essex 
County standard. 

The street parade is a growing feature of the fair as 
thousands of people can testify who lined the street from 
the Salem boundary to the fair grounds. 

The annual dinner of the society was served in the ves- 
try of the South church, Thursday, the last day of the 
fair, at which there was a very large attendance. After the 
dinner President Butler called the assemblaofe to order with 
a few fitting remarks and introduced Gen. Francis H. Ap- 



12 



pleton, the former president of the society who gave an 
instructive address which will be found on the first pages 
of this report. Gen. Appleton was followed by Augustus 
Pratt, Esq., delegate from the State Board, Hon. Wm. H. 
Moody, Hon. Wm, S. Knox and others. 

The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1897 and 1898 are tabulated for comparison as follows: 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON SHOW GROUNDS. 



Class. 



From From 

Entries Dift'erent Entries DilTerent 

in 1898. Places in 1897. Places 
in 1898. in 1897. 



Bulls, 

Fat Cattle, 

Milch Cows, 

Herds of Milch Cows, 

Heifers, Pure Bred, 

Working Oxen and Steers, 

Steers, 

Stallions, Farm and Draft, 

Stallions, for Driving Purposes, 

Brood Mares, Driving Purposes, 

Family Horses, 

Gents' Driving Horses, 

Pairs Gents' Driving Horses, 

Farm Horses, 

Pairs of Farm Horses, over 2500 

lbs.. 
Pairs of Farm Horses, less than 

2500 lbs., 
Colts, Farm and Draft, 
Colts, Driving Purposes. 
Fast Walking Horses, 
Swine, Large Breeds, 
Swine, Small Breeds, 
Sheep, 



15 


5 


8 


5 


5 


2 


2 


2 


10 


3 


25 


4 


2 


1 


2 


<> 


27 


5 


24 


6 


7 


1 


4 


3 


6 


1 


3 


1 








2 


1 


3 


2 


5 


4 


2 


2 


3 


3 


10 


(i 


7 


4 


5 


4 


8 


5 


1 


1 


2 


2 


4 


4 


6 


3 



1 


1 


2 


1 








1 


1 


3 


2 


13 


6 


3 


3 


1 


1 


23 


2 


26 


2 


15 


2 


12 


1 


7 


2 


19 


1 



13 



Class. 



From From 

Entries Different Entries Different 
in 1898. I'laces in 1897. Places 







in 1898. 




in 1897. 


Poultry, 


284 


12 


276 


13 


Harrows, for Trial, 


2 


2 


5 


3 


Agricultural Implements, 


24 


6 


31 


5 


Carriages, 


11 


3 


24 


6 


Ploughing, 


9 


5 


10 


8 




501 


21 


538 


22 


EXHIBITS IN HALL. 






Class. 


Entries 
in 1898. 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1898. 


Entries 
in 1897. 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1897. 


Dairy, 


o 


2 


2 


2 


Bread and Canned Fruit, 


56 


8 


28 


4 


Honey, 


3 


2 


2 


2 


Pears, 


143 


10 


125 


12 


Apples, 


163 


15 


70 ' 


10 


Peaches, Grapes and Assorted 










Fruits, 


66 


9 


126 


15 


Plants, 


23 


3 


21 


4 


Flowers, 


135 


10 


240 


13 


Vegetables, 


288 


15 


267 


12 


Grain and Seed, 


15 


8 


13 


4 


Carpetings and Rugs, 


31 


5 


42 


9 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


47 


10 


77 


14 


Articles Manuf'd from Leather, 


30 


3 


17 


4 


Manuf'res and General Mdse., 


13 


5 


28 


5 


Fancy Work, 


208 


9 


284 


13 


Works of Art, 


69 


7 


97 


9 


Work of Children under 12 years 








of age, 


40 


2 


55 


4 


Grange Exhibit, 


1 


1 









1334 24 1494 24 



14 

Grand total 1773 entries from 30 out of 34 cities and 
towns in Essex County against 2033 entries from 29 cities 
and towns last year. Essex, Manchester, Nahant and 
Salisbury did not have exhibits this year. 

The entries were : Amesbury, 40 ; Andover, 13 ; Beverly, 
106 ; Boxford, 35 ; Danvers, 180 ; Georgetown, 1 ; Glou- 
cester, 6; Gi'oveland, 13; Hamilton, 10; Ipswich, 6 
Lawrence, 6 ; Lynn, 170 : Lynnfield, 8 ; Marblehead, 20 
Merrimac, 8 ; Methuen, 1 ; Middleton, 14 ; Newbury, 31 
Newburyport, 1 ; North Andover, 61 ; Peabody, 839 ; Rock- 
port, 1; Rowley, 21; Salem, 119; Saugus, 1; Swamp- 
scott, 15; Topsfield, 2 ; Wenham, 15 ; West Newbury, 5. 

REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the Pea- 
body Institute at Peabody, Sept. 21, 1898. President 
Butler called the meeting to order at 9.30 o'clock, A. M., 
and read the call. Col. J. D. Drew of Lawrence, made a 
motion to proceed to elect the ofiQcers for the ensuing year 
all on one ballot and after some discussion, it was so 
voted. The result of the ballot was as follows : 

FOR PRESIDENT. 

Whole Number of Votes, 101 

Oliver S. Butler of Georgetown, had 20 

Frederic A. Russell of Methuen, had 28 

George V. L. Meyer, of Hamilton, had 53 

and the Hon. George V. L. Meyer was declared elected. 

FOR VICE PRESIDENTS. 

James J. H. Gregory of Marblehead, had 100 

Horatio G. Herrick of Lawrence, had "101 

Asa T. Newhall of Lynn, had 101 

J. D. W. French of North Andover, had 100 
and were elected. 



15 



FOR SECRETARY. 



John M. Danforth of Lynnfield, had 87 

and was elected. 

On motion of Mr. Austin Whitcomb of Beverly, the 
following amendment to the Constitution was offered and 
laid over under the rules of the society to be acted upon 
at the next annual meeting : 

Article 3. The President, Vice Presidents, and Sec- 
retary, shall be elected by ballot at the annual meeting of 
the society, to be held in Salem on the second Wednesday 
in November, the hour and place of meeting to be arranged 
by the President and Secretary, notice of said meeting to 
be given by postal to each member by the Secretary. The 
Treasurer shall be elected annually by the trustees at their 
meeting in November. 

After some further discussion upon the merits of the 
amendment the meeting- dissolved. 



Reports of Committees. 
1898. 



The following premiums were awarded for live stock: — 

BULLS. 

S6. First premium, to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 
Jersey bull. 

•S6. First premium, to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for Jersey 
bulL 

86. First premium, to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvei"S, for 
Guernsey bull. 

86. First premium, to A. M. Robinson, North Andover, 
for Holstein bull, " Earl Aggie de Kol.'' 

•S3. Second premium, to A. M. Robinson, North Ando- 
ver, for Holstein bull. 

S4. First premium, to James C. Poor, North Andover, 
for Holstein bull, ''Prince Clothchilde.'" 

84. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 
for Holstein bull, " Sir Don Clothchilde.'" 

84. Second premium, to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, for 
Jersey bull. 

815 and Diploma. First premium, to James C. Poor, 
No. Andover, for Holstein bull, "Sir Don Cloth- 
childe"' and five of his get. 
John Swinerton, George L. Burnham, Richard Newell, 

George L. Averill — Committee. 



FAT CATTLE. 

I, First premium, to J. P. Little, Am e?bury, for grade 
Hereford oxen. 



17 

$6. Second premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for grade 
Hereford oxen. 
Maynard Whittier, Wm. Thornton, Isaac F. Knowlton. 
— Committee. 

Amesbury, Mass., Sept. 19, 1898. 
The oxen entered by me in the fat class are twins, and 
have been owned by me since they were three years old. 
They then weighed a little more than 3000 lbs. They are 
now coming six years old. They worked until a year ago 
this last spring, when they were turned out to pasture. 
Their feed last winter was two feeds of corn ensilage, and 
a mixture of salt and English hay, with four quarts of corn 
meal each daily. This summer their feed has been Eng- 
lish hay, and four quarts of corn meal apiece. 

Youi-s respectfully, 

J. P. Little. 
Amesbury, Mass., Sept. 19, 1898. 
The oxen entered by me for premium in the fat class, 
have been owned by me about one year. They have 
grown about twelve inches in girth. 

Their weight when bought was 3700 lbs. 
They will be six years old this fall. 

They were worked through the fall and the first part of 
the winter. 

Their feed during that time was hay — English and salt 
mixed, with four quarts of corn meal each. Since that 
time their feed has been increased to six quarts of corn 
meal each per day, with the same kind of hay. 

Respectfully, 

J. P. Little. 



MILCH COWS. 

First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
best milch cow, either foreign, native or grade, 
grade Holstein " Minnie B." 



i8 



$S. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade Holstein cow, giving greatest product of milk 

in one year. 
$7. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein cow, " Myra W. Shepard." 
$4. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 

for grade Holstein cow, "Blossom."' 
$5. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 

for grade Holstein cow, " Hannah H." 
$7. First premium, to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey cow. 
$4. Second premium, to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for 

Jersey cow. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

$10 and Diploma. First premium, to James C. Poor, 
No. Andover, for herd of five Holstein cows. 

$8. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 
for herd of five grade cows. 
John Swinerton, Andrew Mansfield, Hazen A. Quint, 

John S. Tuck — Committee. 



Committee on Coivs : 

I enter for the premium offered for best milch cows 
either foreign, native or grade, the grade cows "Minnie B*' 
6 years old, Holstein and Durham, calved August 8, gave 
56 lbs. milk a da}^ from August 12th to Sept. 12th ; and 
" Hannah H." 6 years old, Holstein and Jersey, calved 
Oct. 30, 1897, is due in November; in November, '97 
she averaged 58 lbs. milk a day. 

For Holstein cows 4 years old and upwards, I enter 
« Myra W.," 10359 H. F. H. B., 13 years old, calved July 
25, could not dry her. She was very thin of flesh at time 
of calving, but gave 40 lbs. milk a day, in August. And 



19 

"Myra W. Shepard" 43950, 5 years old, calved August 
2d, milked 45 lbs. a day. 

For native or grade cows, the grade Holstein and Ayr- 
shire cow " Spotty,'' 4 years old, calved July 28, gave 45 
lbs. milk a day in August ; and "Minty," grade Holstein 
and Guernsey, 4 years old, calved June 27, gave 42 lbs. a 
day in Jul3% 

To the Committee on Herds of Milch Cows : ' 

For herds of milch cows I enter the Holstein cows, 
" Myra W.," ^' Myra W. Shepard," " Bettiels Netherland," 
"Daisy Vernon," ''Betz Fairfax" and "Sophie Fairfax." 

" Myra W.," milk record for one year, 9,975 lbs. 

" Myra W. Shepard," (4 yrs. old), milk record for one 
year, 9,865 lbs. 

"Bettiels Netherland," (4 yrs. old), milk record for one 
year, 8,750 lbs. 

"Daisy Vernon,'' (4 yrs. old), milk record for one year, 
8,540 lbs. 

" Betz Fairfax," (3 yrs. old), first calf August 11, one 
month's milk 1,078 lbs. 

" Sophie Fairfax (3 yrs. old), first calf Feb. 22d., 6 
month's milk, 5,400 lbs. 

And the grade herd: " Minnie B," 6 years old, " Han- 
nah H.," 6 years old, " Dott," Syears old, " Minty," 4 years 
old, '-Blossom," 4 years old. 

" Minnie B.,'* milk record for one year, 10,240 lbs. 

"Hannah H.," milk record for one year, 11,250 lbs. 

" Dott," milk record for one year, 9,330 lbs. 

" Minty," milk record for one year, 8,322 lbs. 

" Blossom," milk record for one year, 8,580. 

STATEMENT OF MANNER OF FEEDING. 

The winter feed of these cows is from 8 to 12 quarts 
gluten meal and bran, two parts bran to one part meal ; 



20 



fed in two feeds ; with dry feed consisting of corn fodder, 
oat hay and English hay, fed and watered twice a day. 
In summer they are turned to pasture, the grain rations 
being reduced about one half when the feed is good, and 
increased as the pasture grows short, and green feed is 
also fed morning and night. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Poor. 



HEIFERS— PURE BRED. 

|5. First premium, to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey, 3 years old. 
$4. First premium, to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey, 2 years old. 
$4. First premium, to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey, 1 year old. 
$4. First premium, to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey, 17 months old. 
$5. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein, " Betz Fairfax," 3 years old. 
$4. ^ First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein, " Betz Fairfax, 2nd," 2 years old. 
$4. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein, " Sophie Barto Fairfax," 1 year old. 
$8. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 

for Holstein, " Sophie B. Fairfax," 3 years old. 
$4. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

collection of Holstein calves. 
$3. Second premium, to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, for 

Jersey, 3 years old. 
$2. Second premium, to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, for 

Jersey, 2 years old. 
|2. Second premium, to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 

for Holstein, " Starr," 2 years old. 



21 



$2. Second premium, to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 
for Holstein, " Flossie," 17 montlis old. 

$2. Second premium, to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 
for Holstein, " Beauty Belle," 17 months old. 



I enter for your consideration for heifers under 4 years 
old in milk, the Holstein heifers, " Betz Fairfax," 3 years 
old, calved August 11, gave 38 lbs. milk from August 15 
to September 20; and "Sophie B. Fairfax," 3 years 
old, calved February 22d, she gave 40 lbs. milk a day in 
March ; the Jersey heifer, " Telons Priscilla," No. 121402 
A. M J. C. C, 3 years old, calved September 16 ; Heifers 
two years old, never calved, Holstein heifers, " Betz Fair- 
fax, 2d," and " Daisy Noble." Heifers one year old and 
under, Holstein heifer, " Sophie B. Fairfax, 2d," 14 months 
old; Holstein heifer, " Myra W. Fairfax, 2d," 12 months 
old ; Holstein heifer, " Zalma Clothilde," 2 months old. 

J. C. Poor. 



NATIVE OR GRADE HEIFERS. 

$5. First premium, to W. S. Hughes, No. Andover, for 

grade Jersey, "Silvia." 
$2. Second premium, to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

grade Guernsey, 17 months old. 
$2. Second premium, to Francis O. Kimball, Danvers, for 

grade Guernsey, 3 months old. 
$4. First premium, to Robert Foss, Hamilton, grade Jer- 
sey, 3 years old. 
14. First premium, to S. F. Grossman, Swampscott, for 

grade Guernsey, 17 months old. 
$4. First premium, to James C. Poor. No. Andover, for 

grade Holstein and Durham, " Flossie." 
$4. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade Holstein and Jersey, " Beth Lincoln." 



22 



$3. Second premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, 
for grade Holstein and Jersey, " Sadie." 

$5. First premium, to T. O'Shea, Peabody, for grade in 
milk. 

$4. First premium, to W. C. Endicott, Danvers, for grade 
Guernsey. 
John Swinerton — for the Committee. 

I enter for your consideration for heifers under 4 years 
old in milk, the grade Holstein and Durham heifers, 
"Gracie E.," 2 years old, calved in March, gave 35 lbs. 
milk a day ; "Sadie," 2 yrs. old, calved in March, gave 32 
lbs. milk a day. One year old and under, grade Holstein 
and Durham, " Daisy," 14 months. Holstein and Jersey, 
9 months. Holstein and Guernsey, 2 1-2 months old. 

J. C. Poor. 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

$8. First premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for pair 

Durham oxen. 
$6. Second premium, to J. W. Evans, Amesbury, for pair 

of Hereford oxen. 
$6. First premium, to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for pair 

Hereford working steers, 5 years old. 
$4. Second premium, to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for pair 

Hereford working steers, 4 years old. 
James C. Poor, James Noyes, Samuel T. Poor. — Com- 
mittee. 



STEERS. 

$4. First premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for pair 

Hereford steers, 2 years old. 
$5. Special premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for 

trained steer. 



$o. Second premium, to J. P. Little, Araesbury, for pair 

Holstein steers, 3 years old. 
$5. First premium, to J. W. Evans, Amesbury, for pair 

of 3 year old steers. 
$3. First premium, to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for pair 

steers, 15 months old. 
James C. Poor, James Noyes» Samuel T. Poor — Com- 
mittee. 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

$8 and diploma, first premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, 
for Chestnut Stallion '' Quincy Wilkes,'' 5 years old. 

$5. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for black 
stallion, " Midnight," 3 years old. 

$5. Second premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for 
black stallion, " Alcaria," 5 years old. 

BROOD MARES FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

$8. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for bay 
mare " Clayene." 
B. G. Kimball, Asa T. Newhall, William R. Roundy 
Alonzo B. Fellows — Committee. 

FAMILY HORSES. 

86. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover. 
$4.. Second premium, to Thomas Wolloff, Peabody. 

GENT'S DRIVING HORSES. 

$6. First premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for Bay 

mare, " Audavia." 
$4. Second premium, to J. Henry Nason, Boxford, for 

brown mare, " Gipsey Wilkes.'' 



24 

$5. Second premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pair 

twin horses. 
$5. Special premium, to James J. Ray, Lynn, for saddle 

horse. 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

$5. First premium, to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

black horse. 
$3. Second premium, to Oscar Cram, Middleton, for 

sorrel horse. 
Byron G. Kimball, Sherman Nelson, John L. Shorey. — 
Committee. 

SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

$6. First premium, to B. W. Farnhan, No. Andover, for 
bay horse, 1100 lbs. 
Geo. L. Averill, N. A. Bushby, F. W. Lyford, J. H. 
Perkins. — Committee. 

PAIRS FARM HORSES. 

18. First premium, to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

pair of horses, weight 2700 lbs. 
$5. Second premium, to Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, for 

pair of horses, weight 2550 lbs. 
$8. First premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, for pair of 

horses, weight 2250 lbs. 
J. Henry Nason, J. H. McKenney, Isaac F. Kuowlton. 
Committee. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

I:. First premium, to H. H. Demsey, Wenham, for bay 
filly, " Lady Nelson," 1 year old. 



25 

$2. Second premium, to A. B. Forbes, Newbury, for 
chestnut colt, " Fernara," 2 years old. 
C. W. Maguire, Edward Harrington, A. A. Rutherford, 
Byron G. Kimball. — Committee. 



SWINE— LARGE BREEDS. 

15. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Chester 

white boar. 
$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for 8 weaned 

Chester white pigs. 
S5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for 8 Nat. 

Chester white pigs. 
$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

boar. 
$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

weaned pigs. 
$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Berkshire 

boar. 
$5. First,} premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for grade 

Poland China boar. 
$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Poland 

China weaned pigs. 
$3. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for large 

Yorkshire boar. 
15. First premium, to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for large 

Yorkshire boar. 
$3. Second premium, to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire sow. 
$3. Second premium, to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for 

Yorkshire pigs. 



26 



$'6. Second premium, to F. W. Stanley, Peabody, for 
Beikshire boar. 
Benj. P. Ware, Elias Andrews, C. N. Nelson, J. H. 
Perkins. — Committee. 



SWINE— SMALL BREEDS. 

$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire boar. 
$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire sow and 6 pigs. 
$3. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for 7 

medium Yorkshire weaned pigs. 
$5. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire boar. 
$3. Second premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire boar. 
$5. First premium, to W. C. Winslow, Marblehead, for 6 

medium Yorkshire weaned pigs. 
$3. Second premium, to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for 

medium Yorkshire sow and 7 pigs. 
Wm. B. Carlton, Samuel B. George, George A. Dow, 
David L. Haskell. — Committee. 



SHEEP. 



$5. First premium, to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, 
for Hampshire buck. 

$5. First premium, to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, 
for grade Hampshire ewes. 

$2. Second premium, to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, 
for lambs. 

$5. First premium, to J. A. Roome, Peabody, for Leices- 
ter buck. 

$4. First premium, to J. B. Thomas, Peabody, for 
Leicester lambs. 

Richard Newell, E. G. Nason, Abel Stickney — Committee. 



27 

POULTRY. 

82. First premium, to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pen of Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium, to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pen of Brown Leghorn chicks. 
!|2. First premium, to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Francis H. Foster, Andover, for 

pair White Leghorn chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Francis H. Foster, Andover, for 

pen Light Brahma fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Francis H. Foster, Andover, for 

pair Light Brahma fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for Partridge Cochin fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for White China geese. 
$2. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for Brown China geese. 
$2. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for Toulouse geese. 
$2. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for White Crested ducks. 
$2. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody. 

for Rouen ducks. 
$2. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody. 

for pen Wild Mallard ducks. 
12. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for pen Alesbury ducks. 
$2. First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

tor pen White Call ducks. 



28 



First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for pen Gray Call ducks. 
First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for pen Cayuga ducks. 
First premium, to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 

for pen Colored Muscovy ducks. 
First premium, to Josiali Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for pair 

Buff Leghorn fowls. 
First premium, to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for pair 

Buff Cochin chicks. 
Gratuity, to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for collection of 

pigeons. 
First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Black 

Cochin Bantam chicks. 
First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for White 

Cochin Bantam chicks. 
First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam chicks. 
First premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam fowls. 
Second premium, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam fowls. 
Gratuity, to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for collection of 

pigeons. 
First premium, to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Black Breasted Red Bantam chicks. 
First premium, to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Black Breasted Red Bantam fowls. 
Second premium, to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Black Breasted Red Bantam fowls. 
First premium, to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

pen Black Breasted Red Bantam fowls. 
First premium, to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pen S. 

C. White Leghorn fowls. 
First premium, to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. White Leghorn fowls. 



29 

$1. Second premium, to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for S . 

C. White Leghorn chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Joseph G. Basford, Peabody, for 

pen White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
•S2. First premium, to Joseph G. Basford, Peabody, for 

pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Joseph G. Basford, Peabody, for 

pen White Minoica chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Joseph G. Basford, Peabody, for 

pair White Minorca fowls. 
'$2. First premium, to R. E. Wollard, Amesbury, for Bufif 

Cochin fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to R. E. Wollard, Amesbury, for 

Buff Cochin fowls. 
$2. First premium, to R. E. Wollard, Amesbury, for Buff 

Cochin chicks. 
il. Second premium, to R. E. Wollard, Amesbury, for 

Buff Cochin chicks. 
$2. First premium, to R. E. Wollard, Amesbury, for R. 

C. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium, to R. E. Wollard, Amesbury, for S. 

Comb. Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium, to R. E. Wollard, Amesbury, for S. 

Comb. Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$2. First premium, to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Spangled Hamburg fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Wm. Martin, Danvers, for Trio 

Black Java fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Herbert Clough, Lynn, for pen 

Silver Spangled Hamburgs. 
$2. First premium, to Herbert Clough, Lynn, for pair 

Silver Spangled Hamburgs. 
$1. Second premium, to Herbert Clough, Lynn, for pair 

Black Java fowls. 
$2. First premium, to R. R. Hamilton, Peabody, for pen 

S. C. White Leghorn chicks. 



30 

$2. First premium, to R. R. Hamilton, Peabody, for pair 
Cornish Indian Game fowls. 

i2. First premium, to Frank Woodbury, Beverly, for pen 
Buff Plymouth Rock fowls. 

$2. First premium, to Frank Woodbury, Beverly, for pair 
Bufif Plymouth Rock fowls. 

$2. First premium, to Frank Woodbury, Beverly, for pen 
Buff Plymouth Rock chicks, 

$2. First premium, to Frank Woodbur}', Beverly, for pair 
Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 

$1. Second premium, to Fi-ank Woodbury, Beverly, for 
pair Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 

$2. First premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen 
Black Laiigshan fowls. 

$2. First premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 
Black Langshan fowls. 

$1. Second premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 
Black Langshan fowls. 

$2. First premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 
Black Langshan chicks. 

il. Second premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabodj^ for pair 
Black Langshan chicks. 

i2. First premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for French 
Houdan fowls. 

$1. Second premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for 
French Houdan fowls. 

$2. First premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for French 
Houdan chicks. 

il. Second premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for 
French Houdan chicks. 

f2. First premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Domi- 
nique Rock fowls. 

$2. First ])remium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Domi- 
nique Rock chicks. 

$1. Second premium, to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for Dom- 
inique Rock chicks. 



31 

$1. Second premium, to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pen 

Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium, to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2. First premium, to C. H. Hardy, Groveland, for pen 

White Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium, lo C. H. Hardy, Groveland, for pair 

White Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium, to C. H. Hardy, Groveland, for pen 

White Wyandotte fowls. 
$2. First premium, to C. H. Hardy, Groveland, for pair 

White Wyandotte fowls. 
$2. First preminm, to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pen 

Dark Brahma fowls. 
$2. First premium, to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Dark Brahma fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 

pair Dark Brahma fowls. 
$2. First pi-eraium, to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for pair 

Dark Brahma chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 

pair Dark Brahma chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

pair Light Brahma fowls. 
$1. Gratuity, to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for Canada 

geese. 
$2. First premium, to M. J. Cain, Lynn, for pair Pekin 

ducks. 
$2. First premium, to M. J. Cain, Lynn, for pen Pekin 

ducks. 
$1. Second premium, to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls, 
fl. Second premium, to J. W. Perkins, Lynnfield, for 

pair R. L Red chicks. 



32 

$2. First premium, to J, W. Perkins, Lynnfield, for pen 

Black Minorcas. 
$2. First premium, to J. W. Perkins, Lynnfield, for pair 

Black Minorca chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to F. E. Svveetser, Danvers, for trio 

wild ducks. 
$2. First premium, to F. E. Sweetser, Danvers, for Blue 

Andalusians. 
$2. First premium, to George Lunt, Danvers, for pen 

Light Brahma chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to George Lunt, Danvers, for pair 

Light Brahma chicks. 
$2. First premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for Red 

Pyle Bantam fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for pair 

Red Pyle Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for pen Red 

Pyle Bantam fowls. 
$2. First premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for Brown 

Pyle Bantam fowls. 
$2. First premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for Brown 

Pyle Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for White 

Pyle Bantam fowls. 
$2. First premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for White 

Pyle Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for Black 

Bantam fowls. 
$2. First premium, to C. W. Ballard, Salem, for Silver 

Duckwing fowls. 
$2. First premium, to J. O. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to J. O. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

Silver W3-andotte fowls. 
$2. First premium, to J. O. Jodrey, Danvers, for Silver 

Wyandotte chicks. 



33 

il. Second premium, to J. O. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

Silver Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium, to J. O. Jodrey, Danvers, for Golden 

Wyandotte fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to J. O. Jodrey, Danvers, for Gold- 
en Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium, to A. H. Davenport, Beverly, for pen 

Buff Wyandotte fowls. 
$2. First premium, to A. H. Davenport, Beverly, for pair 

Buff Wyandotte fowls. 
$1. Second premium, to A. H. Davenport, Beverly, for 

pair Buff Wyandotte fowls. 
$2. First premium, to A. H. Davenport, Beverly, for 

pen Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium, to A. H. Davenport, Beverly, for pair 

Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium, to A. Fogg, Peabody, for pair Indian 

Game fowls. 
$2. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for R. I. Red 

fowls. 
$2. First premium, to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for R. I. 

Red chicks. 
.50. Gratuity, to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for White 

Woodland chicks. 
.50. Gratuity, to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for Buff Wood- 
land chicks. 
$1. Second premium, to J. McCarthy, Peabody, for pen 

White Plymouth Rocks. 
|2. First premium, to E. C. Marshall, Rowley, for Black 

Minorca chicks. 
.50. Gratuity to H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for coll. 

muffed Tumbler pigeons. 
$2. First premium, to G. W. Brown, Peabody, for 

African geese. 
$2. First premium, to T. F. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 
pen Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 



34 

$1.00. Second premium, to T. F. Ellsworth, Peabody, for 

pair Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pair 

Brown Leghorn fowls. 
f2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pen 

Brown Leghorn chicks. 
il.OO. Second premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pair 

Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to F. A. Woodbury, Beverly, 

for White Wyandotte chicks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to P. P. Munsey, Beverly, for 

pen S. C. White Leghorn chicks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to P. P. Munsey, Beverly, for 

pair S. C. White Leghorn chicks. 
$2.00. First premium, to E. H. George, Groveland, for 

pen White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2.00. First premium, to E. H. George, Groveland, for 

pair White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2.00. First premium, to E. H. George, Groveland, for 

pen White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2.00. First premium, to E. H. George, Groveland, for 

pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to E. H. George, Groveland, for 

pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$4.00. First premium, to E. H. George, Groveland, for 

coops and poultry appliances. 
$2.00. First premium, to M. Swinerton, Dan vers, for 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium, to Thomas F. Gilroy, Peabody, for 

pair Pekin ducks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Thomas F. Gilroy, Peabody, 

for pair Pekin ducks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Thomas F. Gilroy, Peabody, 

for White Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium, to O. Caswell, Beverly, for pen 

Light Brahma fowls. 



35 

Jfl.OO. Second premium, to O. Caswell, Beverly, for pair 

Light Brahma fowls. 
$1.00. Second premium, to 0. Caswell, Beverly, for pair 

Light Brahma Chicks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to P. A. Dodge, Wenham, for 

pen Black Minorca chicks. 
$2.00. First premium, to P. A. Dodge, Wenham, for pair 

Black Minorca Chicks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for 

pen White Wyandotte chicks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pen 

White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$3.00. Gratuity, to George F. Stone, Newbury, for coll. 

of Bantams. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to E. C. Clement, Newburyport, for 

coll. of Bantams. 
$2.00. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

White Langshan fowls. 
$2.00. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

White Langshan chicks. 
$2.00. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

White Polish chicks. 
$2.00. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

White Polish fowls. 
$2.00. First premium, to R. C. Tuxhury, Amesbury, for 

Golden Polish fowls. 
$2.00. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

Bearded Golden Polish fowls. 
$2.00. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

Golden Pencilled Hamburg fowls. 
$1.00. Second premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for Brown China geese. 
$2.00. First premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

White Muscovy ducks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 
for White Muscovy ducks. 



36 

$1.00. Second premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for Colored Muscovy ducks. 
$1.00. Second premium, to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, 

for American Dominique fowls. 
$2.00. First premium, to H. Foote, , for pair Canada 

geese. 
W. B. Atherton, Judge, Bennett Griifin, John C. 
Ropes, Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH DOUBLE TEAMS. 

i8. First premium, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, four oxen, 

"• Frye " plough. 
6. Second premium, to John C. Evans, Amesbury, four 

oxen. 
B. Frank Barnes, Baxter P. Pike — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES. 

1. First premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, " Frye " 

plough. 
John W. Shirley, A. P. Fuller — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH SWIVEL PLOUGH. 

). First premium, to F. A. Dodge, Beverly, " Yankee 

No. 3 " plough. 
L Second premium, to* James C. Poor, No. Andover, 

" 16 A " plough. 
E. P. Bai-rett, Alvin Smith, George Pratt — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH SULKY PLOUGH. 

First premium, to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, " Nation- 
al " plough. 



37 

$4. Second premium, to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, " Na- 
tional " plough. 
Edwin Bates, W. B. Carlton, A. S. Brown, N. Longfel- 
low — Committee. 



HARROWS. 

16. First premium, to W. F. Dodge, Beverly, Osborn 

combination smoother. 
$4. Second premium, to E. C. Little, Merrimac, Imperial 

harrow. 
Benj. P. Ware, E. K. Lee — Committee. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

)8 and Diploma, to Newhall & Colcord, Danvers, for col- 
lection of implements and machinery. 

)5. Gratuity, to Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for collec- 
tion of implements and machinery. 

)5. Gratuity, to O. H. Whidden & Son, Peabody, for 
collection of implements and machinery. 

)5. Gratuity, to W. Butters, Methuen, for hay wagon. 

>8. Gratuity, to J. W. Bruly, Danvers, for market wagon. 

)8. Gratuity, to George E. Daniels, Rowley, for horse 
cart. 

)1. Gratuity, to George E. Daniels, Rowley, for pung 
gear. 

^5. Gratuity, to Pike & Whipple, Peabody, for milk 
wagon. 

53. Gratuity, to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for market 
wagon. 

52. Gratuity, to Solomon Fuller, Danvers, for slide hoe 
and weeder. 

W. Gratuity, to George A. Leavitt, Danvers, for barrel 
clamp and cap. 



38 

$1. Gratuity, to J. P. Little, Amesbury, for ox yoke. 
J. J. H. Gregory — -for the Committee. 



CARRIAGES. 

$2. Gratuity, to E. C. Hopkins, Merrimac, for Beverly 
wagon. 

$4. Gratuity, to E. C. Hopkins, Merrimac, for Stanhope 
buggy. 

$4. Gratuity, to T. C. Lane, Amesbury, for top Stanhope 
buggy. 

$3. Gratuity, to T. C. Lane, Amesbury, for open pneu- 
matic buggy. 

il. Gratuity, to T. C. Lane, Amesbury, for democrat 
wagon. 

$3. Gratuity, to J. Lancaster, Merrimac, for cut under 
Sutton surry. 

$1. Gratuity, to J. Lancaster, Merrimac, for boulevard 
Stanhope. 

f5. Gratuity, to J. Lancaster, Merrimac, for park Stan- 
hope. 

Diploma, to H. H. Pillsbury, Danvers, for collection of 
carriages. 
D. A'. Story, John W. Lovett, James Wilson — Committee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



GRANGE EXHIBIT. 



$25. First premium, to Laurel Grange, of West Newbury. 
David Pingree, J. W. Yeaton, Asa T. Newhall, Mrs. 
David Warren — Committee. 



DAIRY. 



11. Gratuity, to Miss K. E. Cummings, Peabody, for 
butter. 
W. F. Kinsman^ John J. Gould, Henry Alley, Mrs. C. 
H. Goulding — Committee. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

$2.00. First premium, to Mrs. A. G. Pierce, Peabody, for 

white bread, 
$1.00. Second premium, to Sarah Ford, Peabody, for 

white bread. 
.50. Gratuity, to Katherine Collins, Salem, for white 

bread. 
.50. Gratuity, to Sarah J. Riley, Peabody, for white 

bread. 
$2.00. First premium, to Miss A. C. Horsch, Rowley, for 

graham bread. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Mrs. A. C. Wilson, Beverly, 

for graham bread. 



40 

$1.00. First premium, to Sarah Ford, Peabody, for brown 

bread. 
.50. Gratuity, to Sarah J. Riley, Peabody, for oatmeal 

bread. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Geo. W. Rodie, Peabody, for 

ribbon cake. 
.50. Gratuity, to Lizzie Donahue, Marblehead, for 

sponge cake. 
.50. Gratuity, to Helen Merrill, Peabody, for cream pie. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 

for canned fruit. 
.50. Gratuity, to Nora Durkee, Peabody, for jelly. 
$2.00. First premium, to Mrs. C. O. Barker, No. Andover, 

for canned fruit. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for 

pickles. 
.50. Gratuity, to Nora Durkee, Peabody, for canned 

rhubarb. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Bessie Dugan, Salem, for canned 

cherries. 
Mrs. Albert Emerson, Mrs. J. H. Perkins, Mrs. S. L. 
Sawyer, Mrs. N. M. Quint — Committee. 



STATEMENTS. 

WHITE BREAD. 

One-fourth cup of sugar, large tablespoonful of lard, 
pint of warm milk and water, one-half yeast cake, flour 
enough to knead stiff. 

Mrs. a. G. Pierce. 

white bread. 
One pint of milk, same of water, tablespoonful of butter, 
same of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of salt, one yeast cake. 



41 

Mix with spoon until stiff, then knead with hands thor- 
oughly, then let it rise, and knead three times, and let rise 
again, put in pans, and bake three-quarters of an hour. 

Sarah Ford. 

white bread. 

Two quarts best flour, one pint of warm milk, one-half 

compressed yeast cake, one tablespoonful salt, and two 

tablespoonfuls sugar. Mix and raise over night, in the 

morning put into pans, raise until light and bake one hour. 

Katherine Collins. 

flour bread. 
Scald one tablespoonful lard, one tablespoonful sugar, a 
pinch of salt, in one pint of milk, one pint cold water, one 
cup yeast, mix with flour stiff enough to knead. 

Sarah J. Riley. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

At noon make a sponge of one-half Warner's yeast cake, 
warm water and flour. At night take one quart warm 
milk which has been scalded, one-half cup of sugar, spoon- 
ful of salt, and Glen Mills improved graham flour enough 
for stiff dough, knead into shape, in the morning, cut 
down, raise until night, then put in tins and bake one hour. 

A. C. HORSCH. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

One quart graham flour, one quart white flour, one-half 
yeast cake, tablespoonful salt and half cup of molasses. 
Mix quite soft with warm water, and let raise over night; 
put into pans, raise again and when light bake one hour 
and ten minutes. 

Mrs. a. C. Wilson. 

brown bread. 
Two cups of Indian meal, two cups of rye meal, one cup 



42 



of molasses, one pint and a half of milk, one teaspoonful 
of soda, one of salt ; dissolve the soda and stir into the 
molasses until it foams. 

Sarah Ford. 

oatmeal bread. 

Two cups Quaker oats, one cup molasses, large table- 
spoonful of lard, scald with one quart of boiling water. 
When cool add one cup of yeast, or one-half yeast cake, 
mix with white flour stiff enough to knead. 

Sarah J. Riley. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, two-thirds cup of butter, four eggs, one 
cup of milk, about three cups flour, scant teaspoon cream 
of tartar, one-half soda. Divide in three parts ; flavor 
light part, to the dark add one cup raisins, one cup cur- 
rants, all kinds spice. 

Mrs. Geo. W. Rodie. 

sponge cake. 

Six eggs, one cup sugar, one cup flour, bake forty min. 
utes. 

Lizzie Donahue. 

canned fruit. 

Rhubarb. — Can filled with rhubarb and over run with 
water and sealed. 

Rhubarb. — Cooked until soft, can at once. 

Tomato. — Cooked until soft, can at once. 

Tomato (uncooked.) Peal and put in jar and fill with 
salted water. 

Pine Apple. — Make a syrup of half cup sugar to cup 
of water and cook five minutes, can at once. 



43 

Quince Marmalade. — Cook soft and press through 
vegetable press and cook with sugar to taste, only till it 
boils. 

Cherries, Red, White and Black. — Each cooked in 
water enough to dissolve one-half cup sugar, can as soon 
as they boil up once. 

Strawberries. — To a quart of berries add two-thirds 
cup sugar and let come to a boil, then can at once. 

Raspberries, Blackberries and Blueberries, 
cooked with sugar to be palatable, cook to heat through. 

Pear. — Cook in a syrup of one-half cup sugar to a cup 
of water five minutes after it boils. 

Peach. — Make a syrup of a cup of sugar to two cups of 
water, boil five minutes, can while hot. 

Porter Apple. — Cook until soft and can while hot, 
put in a little water to start. 

Plum. — Peel and cook in a syrup of two-thirds cup of 
sugar to a cup of water and cook ten minutes. 

Damson Plum. — Cook the same as the yellow plum, 
only a third more sugar. 

Twenty-one different kinds. 

Mrs. C. H. Goulding. 

JELLY. 

Three tumblers Moore's Early Grape, made from half- 
ripe grapes with one pint of water to six quarts of grapes. 
Strain the juice twice through cheese cloth with one cup 
of sugar browned in the oven to one cup of the juice. 

Nora Durkee. 

rhubarb canned in cold water. 

Cut the rhubarb and press in the jars and run over with 
cold water, let stand over night with covers off and in the 
morning run over again and seal tight. 

Nora Durkee. 



44 



PICKLES. 

Put in salted water over night, in morning wiped dry 
and packed in jar, with mixed spices, then filled with vin- 
egar and sealed. 

Mrs. C. H. Goulding. 

preserved cherries. 

Stone cherries. Make syrup using one-half pound of 
granulated sugar to one pound of fruit, one cup water to 
three pounds of sugar. When syrup is clear, add cherries 
and boil five minutes. 

Mrs. Bessie Dugan. 



BEES, HIVES AND HONEY. 

$2. First premium, to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich, for 
honey. 
Henry Alley, John J. Gould, Mrs. C. H. Goulding. — 
Committee. 



PEARS. 
$2.00. First premium, to Frank H. Parker, Lynn, for 

Howell. 
$2.00. First premium, to Abraham C. Osborne, Peabody, 

for Dana's Hovey. 
$1.00. First premium, to Abraham C. Osborne, Peabody, 

for Goodale. 
$2.00. First premium, to Wm: Burke Little, Newbury, 

for Clairgeau. 
•12.00. First premium, to Mrs. T. E. Wilson, Peabody, 

for Belle Lucrative. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Duchess. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 



45 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bartlett. 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Louise 
Bonne. 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn for Sheldon. 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Seckel. 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Vicar. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bosc. 
.50. Gratuity, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Lawrence. 

$5.00. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Collec- 
tion. 

$2.00. First premium, to A. Barr, Lawrence, for Bosc. 

$2.00. First premium, to W. B. Allen, Ljam, for Urbanist. 

$2.00. First premium, to W. B. Allen, Lynn, for Law- 
rence. 

$1.00. Gratuit}^ to W. B. Allen, Lynn, for Louise Bonne 
de Jersey. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to A. B. Hatch, Peabody, for Duchess. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. C. Farrell, Peabody, for 
Clairgeau. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. C. Farrell, Peabody, for Shel- 
don. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to P. Cotter, Peabody, for Bartlett. 
.50. Gratuity, to Geo. H. Walton, Peabody, for De 

Congress. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. T. Dole, Peabody, for Beurre 
Superfine. 

$1.00. Gratuity to S. N. Barr, Lawrence, for Bosc. 

.50. Gratuity to A. Barr, Lawrence, for Winter Nellis. 

$1.50. Gratuity, to Dudley Johnson, Saugus, for Dudley 
Houghton. 
.50. Gratuity, to George A. Wait, Dan vers, for Para- 
dise d'Automne. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to E. R. Ward, Peabody, for Bartlett. 

$1.00. Gratuity to J. M. Teel, Lynn, for d'Anjou. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. M. Barry, Danvers, for Bos- 
suck. 



46 

$1.00. Gratuity, to H. M. Osborn, Peabody, for Belle 
Lucrative. 
.50. Gratuity, to O. F. Ingalls, Lynn, for Flemish 

Beauty. 
Peter M. Neal, W. P. Hutchinson, Edward K. Lee, W. 
Burke Little. — Committee. 



APPLES. 

12.00. First premium, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for 

Baldwin. 
$2.00. First premium, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for 

Tolman Sweet. 
$2.00. First premium, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for 

Red Russet. 
.50. Gratuity, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for Hub- 

bardston. 
.50. Gratuity, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for R. L 

Greening. 
.50. Gratuity, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for Rox- 

bury Russet. 
$2.00. First premium, to Myron E. Killam, Boxford, for 

Danvers Sweet. 
$2.00. First premium, to J. A. Andrew, Boxford, for 

Hubbardston. 
$1.50. First premium, to J. A. Andrew, Boxford, for 

Maiden Blush. 
$2.00. First premium, to L. P. Wilkins, Middleton, for 

Porter. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin P. Noyes, Newbury, for 

Roxbury Russets. 
.50. Gratuity, to Edwin P. Noyes, Newbury, for Bald- 
win. 
$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Graven- 
steins. 



47 

$2.00. First premium, to D. H. lilsley, Newbury, for 

Hunt's Russet. 
12.00. First premium, to C. O. Barker, No. Andover, 

for Snow Apple. 
$1.50. First premium, to W. A. Giles, Peabody, for 

Wealthy. 
$2.00. First premium, to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

R. I. Greening. 
.50. Gratuity to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Green 

Sweet. 
$1.00. Second premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Porter. 
$1.50. First premium to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

Northern Spy. 
.50. Gratuity to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Crab 

apples. 
.50. Gratuity to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Baldwin. 
.50. Gratuity, to E. A. Emerson, Haverhill, for Hub- 

bardston. 
$1.00. Second premium, to H. Stone, Lynn, for Baldwin. 
$2.00. First premium to J. D. Mudge, Danvers, for King. 
$1.00. Second premium to M. Cody, Peabody, for King. 
$1.00. Second premium to D. B. Hilliard, Haverhill, for 

Red Russet. 
.50. Gratuity, to D. B. Hilliard, Haverhill, for Green 

Sweet. 
$1.00. Second premium, to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for 

Hubbardston. 
$1.00. Gratuity to J. W. Goodell, Lynn, for Ladies 

Sweet. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. W. Goodale, Lynn, for Fall Queen. 
$1.00. Second premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, 

for Roxbury Russet. 
$1.00. Second premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, 

for Smith's Cider, 



48 

.50. Gratuity, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for Bald- 
win. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Mrs. F. Fittz, Peabody, for 

R. I. Greening. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Annie W. Bushby, Peabody, 
for Gravensteins. 
.50. Gratuity, to H. E. Keyes, Rowley, for Gravenstein. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. M. Moore, Peabody, for 

Gravenstein. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, for 

Pickman Pippin. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, for 
Phillipines. 
fl.OO. Second premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

Snow apple. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 

Wealthy. 
•fl.OO. Gratuity to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Duch- 
ess. 
$1.00. Second premium, to A. B. George, Groveland, for 
Hunt's Russet. 
.50. Gratuity, to A. B. Fellows, Ipswich, for Maiden 

Blush. 
.50. Gratuity, to E. W. Putnam, Peabody, for Wealthy. 
.50. Gratuity, to Geo. F. Sawyer, Peabody, for Drap 

d'Or. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mary A. Noyes, Lynn, for Fall Harvy. 
.50. Gratuity, to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for North- 
ern Spy. 
•50. Gratuity, to A. N. Welch, Peabody, for Marguerite. 
.50. Gratuity, to Patrick Murphy, Peabody, for Os- 
good's Favorite. 
$1.50. First premium, to W. T. Dole, Peabody, for Crab 
apple. 
J. W. Goodell, Charles H. Preston, Albert Emerson, 
George F. Chad wick — Committee. 



49 

The Committee on Apples would submit a further re- 
port and recommend that the prize list for apples be re- 
vised. Striking out those varieties of which there is only- 
one single plate exhibited and adding a like number of 
such as are becoming more popular and attiacting the at- 
tention of growers and marketraen. 

We would advise dropping, Pickman Pippin, Tolman's 
Sweet and Smith's Cider, 

Substituting therefor, Wealthy, Mackintosh Red and 
Ladies' Sweet. 

At our last exhibition there were shown eight plates of 
Wealthy, three of Mackintosh Red, and two of Ladies' 
Sweet. 

All of these apples are on the list of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural Society, and their cultivation is recommended 
and encouraged. Having been sufficiently tested and 
found of good quality and very superior appearance. 

The Wealthy has been raised in the northwest for some 
thirty years and in New England perhaps ten or twelve. 
According to Downing, its time of ripening is December to 
February, but in N. E., it is October and November or 
September to November. 

This discrepancy may be accounted for by the fact that 
an3' apple brought from Minnesota (its native home), to 
New England would ripen at an earlier date. 

The Mcintosh Red originated in Ontario some seventy 
years ago, though lately introduced to N. E., nearly related 
to the Famuse or Snow apple, two or three times the size 
and much darker in color, with all the good qualities of 
the latter, and has proved a very remarkable good keeper. 

At the Horticultural hall in Boston in March, 1898, I 
saw a plate on exhibition beside a plate of Northern Spy 
and the Mcintosh were certainly in the best state of pie- 
servation. 

The tree is said to be hardy and a good annual bearer. 



50 

As a dessert fruit it is not excelled by any apple that I 
have tasted in the last sixty years. 

The Lady's Sweet is an apple with size, shape, color and 
bloom much like the Spy, though much smoother. Tree a 
strong grower and an annual bearer. Downing rates it as 
the best winter sweet apple yet known or cultivated in 
this country. 

Keeps without shrivelling or losing its taste and flavor 
till May. 

These apples are of superior quality either for home use 
or market and are being much used by the young wide- 
awake fruit growers of Essex County. We most earnestly 
desire to see them added to the list of premium apples by 
the Essex Agricultural Society. 

We wish to call the attention of all exhibitors to the ex- 
ercise of more care in the selection of their specimens of 
fruit. If they will consult the " Scale of points used for 
judging fruits," they will observe that color and form 
count fifteen points each, while quality, Freedom irom Im- 
perfection and Uniformity/ in size count 20 points each and 
Size only 10. One bruised or wormy apple takes twenty 
points off ; one or two extra large apples with the remain- 
der of average size loses you twenty points, while unifor- 
mity in size counts you twenty points. 

Remember that the careful judge is going to examine all 
sides and handle freely, looking closely for imperfections. 
We must prune, fertilize, cultivate, spray and thin to get 
the best results. 

J. W. GoODELL, Chairman. 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin P. Noyes, Newbury, for 
Yellow Flesh peach. 



51 

$2.00. First premium, to C. H. Bennett, Salem, for 
White Flesh peach. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to W. A. Fifield, Peabody, for Yellow 
Flesh peach. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for White Flesh 
peach. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Essex 
County seedling. 
.50. Gratuity, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for Yellow 

Flesh. 
.50. Gratuity, to M. E. Jepson, Lynn, for White Flesh. 
.50. Gratuity to Daniel W. Osborn, Peabody, for Blood 
Freestone peach. 

$3.00. First premium, to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Orange 
Quince. 

$1.00. Gratuity to J. N. Teele, Lynn, for Pear quinces. 

$2.00. First premium, to M. S. Osborn, Peabody, for 
Green Gage plums. 

$2.00. First premium, to Otis Brown, Peabody, for 
Bradshaw plums. 

12.00. First premium, to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, 
for Japanese plums. 

$2.00. First premium, to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Lom- 
bard plums. 

$2.00. First premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for 
Moore's Arctic plums. 

$2.00. First premium, to Joseph Burbeck, Peabody, for 
Weaver plums. 

$2.00. First premium, to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Magnum Bonum plums. 

$3.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Hart- 
ford Prolific grapes. 

$3.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Brigh- 
ton grapes. 

$8.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Worden 
grapes. 



52 

$3.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Con- 
cord grapea. 

$3.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Niagara 
grapes. 

$4.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for basket 
assorted fruit. 

$7.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for collec- 
tion grapes. 

$3.00. First premium, to T. H. Jackman, Peabody, for 
Pocklington grapes. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to T. H. Jackman, Peabody, for Brigh- 
ton grapes. 

$4.00. First premium, to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for 
Black Hamburg grapes. 

$3.00. First premium, to Mrs. G. W. Stickney, Beverly, 
for Muscatel grapes. 

$3.00. First premium, to J. S. Needham, Peabody, for 
Moore's Early grapes. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to Nancy L. Moulton, Peabody, for 
Moore's Diamond grapes. 

$2.00. Gratuit}^, to Mrs. Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for 
Moore's Diamond grapes. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to Daniel W. Osborn, Peabody, for Seed- 
ling grape. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to S. F. Crosman, Swampscott, for Green 
Mountain grape. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to G. H. Little, Peabody, for Lee's 
Early grape. 
.50, Gratuity, to Alfred A. Hall, Peabody, for Concord 

grapes. 
A. C. Osborn, B. F. Huntington, George C. Foster — 

Committee. 



PLANTS. 

).00. First premium, to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for 
coll. Foliage plants. 



53 

$1.00. First premium, to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody,for 

collection palms. 
$1.00. First premium, to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody,for 

collection crotons. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for 

plants on stage. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for 

coll. begonias. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for 

pinks. 
$1.00. First premium, to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for 
coleus. 
.50. Gratuity, to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for Jeru- 
salem cherry. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, 
for geraniums. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

anemones. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

begonias. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

coleus. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

maiden hair ferns. 
.50. Giatuity, to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

three begonias. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, for 

cyclamen. 
.50. Gratuity, to Freda Upton, Peabody, for begonia. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. M. A. Knowles, Peabody, for 

lemon plant. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs.Wm. Teuper, Peabody,for balsam. 
.50. Gratuity, to B. B. Merrill, Peabody, for heliotrope. 
.50. Gratuity, to Clarisa Conant, Topsfield, for sweet 
fern. 



54 

.50. Gratuity,to Mrs. R. E. Hager,Peabody,for begonia. 
.50. Gratuity, to Joseph Crehore, Peabody, for cactus. 
Andrew Nichols, Mrs. David Warren, Mrs. G. F. Os- 
good, Otis L. Kent — Committee. 



FLOWERS. 

$3.00. First premium, to J. E. Foster, Beverly, for coll. 

100 varieties native flowers. 
fl.OO. First premium, to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for 

green house bouquets. 
fl.OO. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for green 

house and garden flowers. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. Monies, Peabody, for bouquet 

native flowers. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Bessie Newhall, Peabod}^ for stand 

of native flowers. 
$1.00. First premium, to Josie Buxton, Peabody, for na- 
tive flowers. 
$1.00. First premium, to Clarence Beckett, Peabody, for 

pair bouquets. 
$1.00. First premium, to Clarence Beckett, Peabody, for 

24 petunias. 
.50. Gratuity, to Clarence Beckett, Peabody, for single 
petunias. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 

pansies. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for 

pliolx drummond. 
$1.00. First premium, to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for 

large flowering dahlias. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for bunch 

of dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity, to H. W. Munroe, Lynnfield, for dahlias. 



55 

$1.00. First premium, to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for 12 

dahlia pompons. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for collection 
dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity, to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for phlox 

druramond. 
50. Second premium, to Mrs. S. P. Buxton, Peabody, 

for basket native flowers. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for na- 
tive flowers. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. L. F. Wilkinson, Middleton, for 

native flowers. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 
garden flowers. 
$5.00. Gratuity, to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for 
floral design. 
.50. Gratuity, to Wm. H. Gruff, Marblehead, for 12 
show dahlias. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Wm. H. Gruff, Marblehead, for cat- 
tus dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity, to Wm. H. Gruff, Marblehead, for 12 

dahlias pompon. 
.50. Gratuity, to C. H. Haskell, Lynn, for 12 large 

dahlias. 
.50. Gratuity, to C. H. Haskell, Lynn, for 12 dahlias 

pompon. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Forness, Peabody, for bunch 
dahlias. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for dou- 
ble geraniums. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for 24 

double zinnias. 
$1.00. First premium, to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for nas- 
turtiums. 
$1.00. First premium, to Miss M. A. Osborn, Peabody, 
for verbenas. 



56 

$1.00. First premium, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for pompon 

asters. 
$1.00. First premium, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for double 

asters. 
'fl.OO. First premium, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for double 

marigolds. 
'fl.OO. First premium, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for cox- 
combs. 
fl.OO, First premium, to Frank H. Parker, Lynn, for 12 

scabiosas. 
$1.00. First premium, to Frank H. Parker, Lynn, for 

sweet peas. 
$1.00. First premium, to Mrs. R. E. Hagar, Peabody, for 

12 dianthus. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to John A. Kimball, Peabody, for coll. 
asters. 
.50. Gratuity, to John A. Kimball, Peabody, for 24 

zinnias. 
.50. Gratuity, to John A. Kimball, Peabody, for cox- 
combs. 
.50. Gratuity, to W. H. Harrington, Peabody, for 12 

cannas. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. H. F. Walker, Peabody, for nas- 
turtiums. 
.50. Gratuity, to Freda Upton, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 
.50. Gratviity, to Miss S. Bodge, Peabody, for 24 zinnias. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, for 
24 zinnias. 
$1.00. First premium, to Warren Wilson, Peabody, for 
Afiican marigolds. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George L. Hyde, Danvers, for 

African marigolds. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Joseph Hooper, Marblehead, for 
bunch of marigolds. 



57 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Clinton Foster, Beverly, for 12 

dianthus. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. B. W. Farnham, No. Andover, 

for sweet peas. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Lamson, Beverly, for gladiolas. 
.50. Gratuity, to T. W. Walton, Peabody, for lantern 

plant. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. F. Barrett, Peabody, for sweet 

apple blossoms. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Y. C. Harrington, Salem, for 

anemones. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. D. A. Pettingill, Danvers, for 

begoni-as. 
Edw. E. Woodman, Mrs. George F. Osgood, Mrs. Reu- 
ben Alley — Committee. 



VEGETABLES, FIRST CLASS. 

$2.00. First premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

Dewing's beets. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

short horn carrot. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

long orange carrot. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

yellow flat onions. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

parsnips. 
$2.00. First premium, to Richard Jaques, Peabody, for 

Eclipse beets. 
$2.00. First premium, to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 

Edmands' beets. 
$2.00. First premium, to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Danvers Intermediate carrot. 



58 

i2.00. First preraiam, to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for pur- 
ple top turnip. 

$2.00. First premium, to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for 
Hebron potatoes. 

$2.00. First premium, to Alvin Smith, Hamilton, for 
ruta baga turnips. 

•f 2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for man- 
gold wurtzels. 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for red 
onions. 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pota- 
toes, Clark's No. 1. 

$2.00. First premium, to Edwin Bates," Lynn, for pota- 
toes. Pearl of Savoy. 

$2.00. ^ First premium, to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pota- 
toes. New Queen. 

$2.00. First premium, to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for 
yellow Danvers onion. 

$2.00. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for pota- 
toes, Early Rose. 

$2.00. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for pota- 
toes. Early Maine. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for potatoes, 
Hebron. 

$2.00. First premium, to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for 
white turnips. 
.50. Gratuity, to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for potatoes, 

Delaware. 
.50. Gratuity, to Durkee Bros., Peabod}^ for Danvers 
onions. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Dan- 
vers onions. 
.50. Gratuity, to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Egyp- 
tian beets. 
.50. Gratuity, to Willis G. Dodd, Peabody,for parsnips. 



59 

.50. Gratuity, to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for short horn 

carrot. 
Oscar Gowen, A. P. Russell, A. P. Whittier, Fred A. 
Dodge — Committee. 



VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

$2.00. First premium, to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Savoy cabbage. 
$2.00. First premium, to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

Fottler cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity, to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Bay 

State squasli. 
.50. Gratuitj^ to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Red 

cabbage. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Stone 

tomatoes. 
$2.00. First premium, to C. A. Mason, Beverly, for Es- 
sex Hybrid squash. 
il.OO. Second premium, to F. A. Dodge, Beverly, for 

Hubbard squash. 
$1.00. Second premium, to F. A. Dodge, Beverly, for 

Sweet corn. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. T. Dodge, Beverly, for 

Stone Mason cabbage. 
$1.00. Second premium, to W. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 

Stone Mason cabbage. 
$1.00. Second premium, to W. B. Carlton, Danvers, for 

Marrow squash. 
.50. Gratuity, to W. B. Carlton, Danvers, for Victor 

squash. 
.50. Gratuity, to H. A. Stiles, Middleton, for cran- 
berries. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Fred Stiles, Peabody, for 

Turban squash. 



6o 



.50. Gratuity, to Fred Stiles, Peabody, for squashes. 
§2.00. First premium, to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Bay 

State squash. 
$1.00. Second premium, to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for 

Brunswick cabbage. 
$1.00. Second premium, to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for 

Sweet corn. 
.50. Gratuity, to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Savoy 

cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity, to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Livingston 

tomatoes. 
•f2 00. First premium, to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 

celery. 
12.00. First premium, to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 

Excelsior Sweet corn, 
'f 1.00. Second premium, to W. G. Dodd, Peabody, for All 

Season's cabbage. 
$1.00. Second premium, to E. Dugan, Salem, for Savoy 

cabbage. 
$1.00. Second premium, to F. H. Appleton, Peabody, for 

Ba}^ State squash. 
$1.00. Second premium, to F. H. Appleton, Peabody, for 

Victor squash. 
.50. Gratuity, to F. H. Appleton, Peabody, for Nutmeg 

melon. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cauli- 
flower. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for But- 

man squash. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Sib- 
ley squash. 
$1.00. Second premiam, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for 

cranberries. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

Marrow squash. 



6i 



$1.00. Second premium to W. Burke Little, Newbury, 

for Nutmeg melon. 
$2.00. First premium, to David Warren, Swampscott, for 

sweet corn. 
'fl.OO. Second premium, to David Warren, Swampscott, 
for Turban squash. 
.50.- Gratuity, to David Warren, Swampscott, for Hub- 
bard squash. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. S. Hughs, No. Andover, for 

All Seasons cabbage. 
$2.00. First premium, to B. G. Hall, Peabody, for Living- 
ston tomatoes. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Daniel Evans, Jr., Danvers, 
for Essex Hybrid squash. 
.50, Gratuity, to Daniel Evans, Jr., Danvers, for Faxon 
squash. 
$2.00. First premium, to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for 

Hubbard squash. 
$2.00. First premium, to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for 

Warren Turban squash. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for celery. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for Nutmeg 

melon. 
.50. Gratuity, to Thomas Wolloff , Peabody, for Crook- 
neck squash. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for Yellow 

Plum tomatoes. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for Living- 
ston tomatoes. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for Cherry 
tomatoes. 
$2.00. First premium, to W. H. Price, 2d, Peabody, for 

Red cabbage. 
$2.00. First premium, to A. M. Swinerton, Danvers, for 
Pandorosa tomatoes. 



62 



!.00. First premium, to Daniel E. Cummings, Peabody, 
for Turban squash. 

2.00. First premium, to Andrew Lane, Jr., Rockport, 
for cranberries. 

LOO. First premium, to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for Nut- 
meg melon. 

.00. Second premium, to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for 
cauliflower. 

!.00. First premium, to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for Coll. 
tomatoes. 

..00. Second premium, to E. E. Blake, Peabody, for 
Sibley squash. 

.50. Gratuity, to E. E. Blake, Peabody, for Faxon 
squash. 

.50. Gratuit}-, to George S. Hyde, Danvers, for Marrow- 
squash. 

.50. Gratuity, to George C. Keyes, Rowley, for Red 
Hubbard squash. 

.50. Gratuity to George C. Keyes, Rowley, for Warren 
Hybrid squash. 

S. F. Newman, For the Committee. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

5.00. First premium to L. H. Bailey, West Newbury, 

for 25 ears field corn. 
LOO. Second premium, to J. W. Yeaton, Georgetown, 

for 25 ears field corn. 
L.OO. First premium, to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for peck 

of rye. 
.50. Gratuity, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for sweet corn. 
.50. Gratuity, to Horace Brown, Ipswich, for early 

Canada corn. 
.50. Gratuity, to D. H. Flint, Peabody, for yellow eyed 

beans. 



63 

.50. Gratuity, to D. H. Flint, Peabody, for H. pole 

beans. 
Farnham Stiles, John Mudge, Wm. B. Carlton — Com- 
mittee. 



ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

iS.OO. First pi-emium, to T. F. Hutchinson, Peabody, for 

double harness. 
$1.00. Gratuity to T. F. Hutchinson, Peabody, for 2 cart 

saddles. 
fS.OO. First premium, to Charles McTiernan, Danvers, 

for express harness. 
i2.00. Gratuity, to Charles McTiernan, Danvers, for 

double harness. 
$2.00. First premium, to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for 

ladies' shoes. 
fl.OO. Gratuity,- to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for chil- 
dren's shoes. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to L. B. Southwick & Co., Peabody, for 

children's shoes. 
Diploma, to L. B. Southwick & Co., Peabody, for sheep 

leather. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to J. A. Poor, Peabody, for round belting. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to H. H. Pillsbury, Danvers, for harness. 
$2.00. Gratuity, to the Franklin Osborn Co., for wax 

leather. 
$2.00. Gratuity, to Alexander B. Clark, Peabody, for 

carriage mats. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Poor & Littlefield, Peabody, for shoe 

stock. 
$2.00. Gratuity, to Manning & Conway, Peabody, for 

shoes. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. L. Hanscomb, Peabody, for 

leather sofa pillow. 



64 

1. 00. Gratuity, to E. A. & R. F. Daley, Salem, for trunks. 
[.00. Gratuity, to E. A. & R. F. Daley, Salem, for bags. 
L.OO. Gratuity, to Almy, Bigelow & Wasliburn, Salem, 

for ladies' shoes. 
W.^P. Clark, Henry Hobbs, Henry Hilliard, Otis Brown. 
-Committee. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHAN- 
DISE. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to R. G. Estes, Peabody, for white squad- 
ron. 
.50. Gratuity, to R. G. Estes, Peabody, for discovery 
of the North pole. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to S. B. Diebal, Peabody, for boat in 
glass case. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to S. B. Diebal, Peabody, for four bottles 
and fancy piece. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to J. C. Merrill, Salem, for exhibit of 
Venetian Iron Work. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. C. Merrill, Salem, for cane of inlaid 
wood. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to Glen Mills, Rowley, for cereals. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to C. H. Shepard, Peabody, lor speci- 
mens of printing. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to William Carroll, Peabody, for horse 
shoes. 

$2.00. Gra,tuity, to Beverly Machine Works, Beverly, for 
specimens of plating. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to John F. Carberry, Peabody, for cigars 
and tobacco. 
.50. Gratuity, to George H. Flint, Danvers, for steam 
cooker. 

Rufus Kimball, Otis Brown, Thos. Carroll, Henry Hobbs, 
W. P. Clark. — Committee. 



65 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

$3.00. First premium, to Mrs. Rufus Hart, Dan vers, for 

afghan. 
$3.00. First premium, to Mrs. Mary Barker, No. An- 

dover, for silk quilt. 
$2.00. Second premium, to Mrs. John H. Symonds, Pea- 
body, for quilt. 
.f2.00. Second premium, to Mrs. John Donnell, Peabody, 

for afghan. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. Alice Glennon, Middleton, for 
quilt and shams. 
.50. Gratuity, to Grace Childs, Peabody, for afghan. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Sarah Merrill, Peabody, for quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. W. T. Creese, Danvers, for 
patch quilt. 
• .50. Gratuity, to Mrs. L. A. Fairfield, Lynn, for patch 
quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Annie Carrigan, Peabody, for 

knit quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. L. W. Upton, Peabody, for 

patch quilt. 
50. Gratuity, to Mrs. S. A. Leach, Danvers, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. L. V. Smith, Peabody, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. T. Casino, Peabody, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Annie Weed, Danvers, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. M. Foster, Lynn, for silk quilt. 
Mrs. Andrew Nichols, Helen J. Yeaton, Mrs. L. W. 
Wells. — Committee. 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

.00. First premium, to Mrs. George Trask, Peabody, 
for braided rusr. 



66 



$1.00. Second premium, to Mrs. Rust, Peabody, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George Gammell, Peabody, for 

hooked rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. George Gammell, Peabody, for 

knit rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George Gammell, Peabodj'-, for 

scrap rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Miss Addie Little, Peabody, for 

worked rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for 

braided rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Dennett,Danvers, for braided rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. S. A. Leach, Danvers, for but- 
ton rug. 
.50. Giatuity,to Mrs.Ellen Tucker,Peabody,for knit rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. A. Haskell, Beverly, for 

drawn rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. David Warren, Svvampscott, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Annie Weed, Danvers, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. M. Driscoll, Peabody, for 

braided rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. S. F. Arverson, Peabody, for star 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Harriett Goodwin, Salem, for 

braided rug. 
.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. Phillip Sheridan, Salem, for knit 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Nancy \j. Spencer, Salem, for silk 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. F. Nelson, Newbury, for 

drawn rug. 
Mrs. W. H. Hayes, Mrs. Richard Newell, Mrs. George 
L. Averill, Mary T. Herrick. — Commillee. 



67 

FANCY WORK. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss Cora B. Pope, Danvers, for two 

embroidered centerpieces. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Eliza Besse, Peabody, for lace 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mr. Lord, Beveily, for handkerchief 

drawnwork. 
$1.50. Gratuity to Miss M. O. Barrett, Peabody, for six- 
teen pieces pen and ink work. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. G. Kimball, Danvers, for 

crocheted sofa pillow. 
.60. Gratuity to Miss Julia M. Smith, Danvers, for 

crocheted jacket. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Julia M. Smith, Danvers, for 

six pairs baby's socks. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Carrie A. Ingalls, Salem, for 

embroidered centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Anna S. Burnham, Beverly, for 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. G. C. Arrington, Salem, for 

Mexican doily. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Fannie Teague, Peabody, for 

sofa pillow. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Isabelle Ward, Peabody, for 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Isabelle Ward, Peabod}-, for 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Isabelle Ward, Peabody, for 

centerpiece. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Helen Harrington, Peabody, for 

centeipiece. 
• .50 Gratuity, to Mrs. W, N. Durgin, Lynn, for cen- 
terpiece. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. D. Cooper, Peabody, for sofa 

pillow. 



68 



.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. C. Macdonald, Salem, for lace 
collar. 

.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. C. Macdonald, Salem, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. C. Macdonald, Salem, for 
centerpiece. 

.50 Gratuity, to Miss Myra C. Blake, Danvers, for 
two aprons. 
fl.OO. Gratuity, to Mrs. W. H. Carr, Beverly, for tea 

cloth. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. W. H. Carr, Beverly, for cen- 
terpiece and doily. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. F. E. Hardy, Beverly, for em- 
broidered table cover. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. F. E. Hard}', Beverly, for em- 
broidered table cover. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss E. Dora Clark, Salem, for bureau 
scarf. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. John H. Symonds, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss Mary Ann Brown, Lynn, for 
crocheted work. 
|!l.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Annie L. Newhall, Peabody, for 
pen and ink work. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss A. II. Nelson, Peabody, for tidies. 

.75. Gratuity, to Mrs. G. E. Harnden, Gloucester, for 4 
handkerchiefs. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss Mary Chandler, Peabody, for 
table cover. 
^1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. M. E. Clark, Beverly, for hand- 
kerchief and doily. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. M. E. Clark, Beverly, for cen- 
terpieces. 

^0. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. W. Berry, Peabody, for 
woisted doll. 



69 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. S. W. Dwyer, Salem, for linen 
cases. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss Jennie Tibbetts, Danvers, for 
table mats. 
fl.OO. Gratuity, to Miss Eva George, Danvers, for skirt 
^ and baby dress. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss Mary A. Osborn, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Ethel M. Walton, Danvers, for 
table cover, 
f 1.00. Gratuity, to Miss Helen Poor, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss Nellie M. Daley, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Clarence Dennett, Danvers, for 
table mats. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George Raddin, Peabody, for cro- 
chet. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. M. Brown, Peabody, for 
handkerchief. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for pressed 
flowers. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. R. C. Gilman, No. Andover, for 
lace piece. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. R. C. Gilman, No. Andover, for 
six embroidered pieces. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. A. F. Conant, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss Lilla A. Randall, Salem, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. O. F. Safford, Peabody, for knit 
slippers. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. George Winchester, Peabody, for 
sofa cushion. 



70 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss A. G. Holniau, Peabody, for 

centerpiece. 
50. Gratuity, to Mrs. E. Langley, Swampscott, for six 

centerpieces. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. C. McAndrews, Beverly, for 

handkerchief. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. M. J. Symonds, Lynn, for hand- 
kerchief. 
$1.00. Gratuitj^ to Mrs. Lydia A. Gifford, Danvers, for 

embroidered front for wrapper. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Fannie Beckford, Beverly, for 

decorated fan. 
.50 Gratuity, to Miss Daisy D. Derby, Beverly, for 

centerpiece 
.75. Gratuity, to Miss Mary Southwick, Peabody, for 

picture frame. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. Howley, Salem, for shoulder 

capes. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Abbie S. Daniels, Peabody, for 

apron. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Susan P. McKenzie, Lynn, for 

embroidered centerpiece. 
Mrs. F. C. Merrill, Mrs. C. H. Leach, Mrs. Geo. F. San- 
ger, Mrs. John Barker. — Committee. 



WORKS OF ART AND OIL PAINTINGS. 

$2.00. First premium, to Miss Steinburg, Beverly, for 

water color. 
$2.00. First premium, to Alice Trask, Peabody, for water 

color. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Alice Trask, Peabody, for 

water color. 
$2.00. First premium, to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for 

oil painting. 



71 

$1.00. Second premium, to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, 

for crayon. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, for oil 

painting. 
$2.00. First premium, to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, 

for pen and ink work. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, for 
oil painting. 
$2.00. First premium, to C. H. Goodridge, Lynn, for Py- 

rography. 
$2.00. First premium, to Miss Dewick, Gloucester, for 

water color. 
$2.00. First premium, to Arthur Hall, Peabody, for pen 

and ink work. 
$2.00. First premium, to M. Morrison, Dan vers, for water 

color. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to M. Morrison, Danvers, for water color. 
$2,00. First premium, to F. Perkins, Salem, for photo- 
graphs.- 
$2.00. First premium, to C. B. Whitman, Lynn, for 

water color. 
$2.00. First pi-emium, to Miss Clark, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Miss Clark, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Arthur Roberts, Peabody, for water 

color. 
.50. Gratuity, to Arthur Roberts, Peabody, for water 

color. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Ethel Trask, Danvers, for pastel. 
$1.00. Gratuity,to Archie Dwinnell,Salera,for knife work. 
$1.00. Gratuity,to Archie Dvvinnell,Salem,for knife work. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mr. Little wood, Peabody, for full 

rigged ship. 
.50. Gratuity, to Annie Dickey, Danvers, for child's 

painting. 



72 

.50. Gratuity, to Mabel Woodbury, Beverly, for crayon. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Porter, Peabody, for oil painting. 
.50. Gratuity, to C. R. Cruff, Marblehead, for pencil 

woik. 
.50. Gratuity, to C. R. Cruff, Marblehead, for lace de- 
sign. 
.50. Gratuity, to Freda Upton, Peabody, for design for 

plates. 
Mrs. Belle D. Hodgkins, Harriet T. Tenney, Mary A. 
Grovesnor. — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

$2.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. M. E. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 

case of china. 
$2.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. M. E. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 

punch bowl set. 
$2.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. C. W. Putnam, Lynn, for case of 

china. 
$1.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. J. H. Symonds, Peabody, for case. 
.50. Gratuity, to Georgia Swain, Peabody, for china 

plate. 
.50. Gratuity, to Miss Alice Trask, Peabody, for bonbon 

dish. 
.50. Gratuity, to Arthur Roberts, Salem, for rose jar. 
.75. Gratuity, to Arthur Roberts, Salem, for vase. 
.50. Gratuity, to C. E. Buckley, 'Peabody, for crazy jug. 
.50. Gratuity, to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for vase. 
N. G. Kimball, S. F. Franklin, Eva A. Perley.— (7o»i- 
mittee. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

.00. Gratuity, to Mabel L. King, Peabody, for pillow 
case and doily. 



T2> 

.00. Gratuity, to Mildred Griffin, Peabody, for dress 
and darning. 

.00. Gratuity, to Beatrice Hull, Dan vers, for doilies. 

.25. Gratuity, to Lucy Parker, Peabody, for embroid- 
ered skirt. 

.25. Gratuity, to Eva Buxton. Peabody, for night dress 
and pillow case. 

.75. Gratuity, to Burnette Hallowell, Peabody, for 
white dress. 

.25. Gratuity, to Bertha H. Clark, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.00. Gratuity, to Abbie W. Trask, Peabody, for child's 
dress. 

.25. Gratuity, to Mary Barry, Peabody, for patching and 
darning. 

.25. Gratuity, to , Peabody, for pillow cases. 

.25. Gratuity, to Mary E. Osgood, Peabody, for hem- 
stitched handkerchief. 

,25. Gratuity, to Rose Cassidy, Peabody, for embroid- 
ered doilies. 

.25. Gratuity, to Eva P. Donnell, Peabody, for flannel 

skirt. 
.25. Gratuity, to Raymond Wells, Peabody, for doily 

and darning. 
.50. Gratuity, to Elsie M. Spencer, Peabody, for pillow 

cases. 
.50. Gratuity, to Elsie M. Chandler, Peabody, for doily. 
.25. Gratuity, to Chester Dow, Peabody, for towel. 
.25. Gratuity, to Frank Langley, Peabody, for bureau 

scarf. 
.25. Gratuity,to Eleanor Frye, Peabody, for pillow case. 
.25. Gratuity, to William Roach, Peabod}', for towel 

and darning. 
.25. Gratuity, to Christine Montgomery, Peabody, for 

flannel skirt. 



74 

.25. Gratuity, to Hugh Montgomery, Peabody, for 

dress and two doilies. 
.25. Gratuity, to Roger Buxton, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.25. Gratuity, to Jamie Bresnahan, Peabody, for hand- 
kerchiefs. 
.25. Gratuity, to Fred Sherry, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mary A. Kennon, Peabody, for two rugs. 
.25. Gratuit}', to Eva Dooling, Peabody, for skirt. 
.75. Gratuity, to Eva Dooling, Peabody, for afghan. 
.25. Gratuity, to Charles Reynolds, Peabody, for tray 

cloth. 
.50. Gratuity, to Osborn Palmer, Peabody, for tidy, 
.25. Gratuity, to Florence Foss, Peabody, for outline 

work. 
.25. Gratuity, to Walter P. Foss, Peabody, for pillow 

case. 
$2.00. Gratuity, to Rose Watkins, Peabody, for doll's 

dress and two doilies. 
.25. Gratuity, to Alva Trask, Peabody, for darning. 
.75. Gratuity, to Carrie Upton, Peabody, for flannel 

skirt. 
.25. Gratuity, to Charles S. Young, Peabody, for tray 

cloth. 
.25. Gratuity, to George T. West, Peabody,for tray cloth. 
.25. Gratuity, to Lillian Welch, Peabody, for darning 

and patching. 
Eva A. Perley, N. J. Kimball, S. F. FvunkVin. — Commit- 
tee. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF HALL. 

To the Board of Trustees of Essex Agricultural Society :-t- 

By invitation of your Secretary the undersigned makes a 
brief report of the Exhibition in the Hall, together with 
some suggestions that occur to him from his limited ex- 
perience as Superintendent. 



75 

The hall exhibit this year is believed to have been as 
good in quality as any that have preceded it. The show of 
fruit and vegetables was rather light in quantity, as was 
anticipated, while in flowers, plants, fancy work, etc., the 
supply was abundant. A fine display by Laurel Grange, 
of West Newbury, added much to the exhibit in the vege- 
table hall. The order of display was continued mainly up- 
on tlie lines of my experienced predecessor and is generally 
approved as harmonious and pleasing. 1 do not believe in 
change for itself alone, and should advise no radical re-ar- 
rangement until convinced that it might be an improve- 
ment. 

The crowded state of the hall in the evening renders it 
impossible to protect the exhibits of tempting fruit and 
other articles, and I suggest whether some means may be 
devised to further ensure their safety. Perhaps when the 
Society owns its hall these exhibits may be shown in cases. 
Depredations have been very slight, however, considering 
the conditions. 

Our display of fancy work is mainly shown in cases, 
some of which are old and unsightly. We verj' much need 
a partial new supply of modern cases for these exhibits. 

The hall management adopted a new practice this year 
in marking the exhibits. Numbers alone were used upon 
the exhibits until the judges had performed their duties. 
While this necessitated much extra work and some delay 
in giving out the names of the successful competitors, it 
was very generally approved, and can be made more ser- 
viceable in future. 

Referring to the premium list I find that we have a sep- 
arate committee on Dairy, Bread and Canned Fruit, and 
Bees and Honey. The day for exhibiting bees at our fair 
was considered past or the exhibit would not have been en- 
tered as a hall exhibit. Under this head we get a few en- 
tries of honey. Under dairy we get a few entries of but- 



76 

ter. Dried apples have not been entered for many years 
and might be omitted from the list. I suggest that these 
three departments be united and given to one set of judges. 

Under Vegetables, Class 1, we this year had no second 
premiums. Many asked me the reason but I could give none. 

The departments of Fancy Work, Art and Decorated 
China have grown of late, and some valuable exhibits have 
been received. Many are of such value that owners hesi- 
tate to risk the sending and exhibiting for such small pre- 
miums as are offered. I endorse the recommendation of 
the judges that the premiums be rearranged so as to offer a 
larger sum as first premium in each of these three depart- 
ments. This change will not require a larger gross sum 
and will, I think, encourage parties to bring in more ex- 
tensive and valuable exhibits. 

Finally I wish to call your attention to the loose way in 
which vacancies in judges have had to be filled. When 
the time comes for judges to take their books, not half of 
them report. In some cases not a member of the commit- 
tee can be found. I am expected to put these committees 
at work and have their work done before 2 o'clock. It is 
the most unsatisfactory duty possible. Practically I must 
furnish more than half the judges at a moment's notice and 
at an hour when very few people are in the hall. 

I suggest, Firsts — That more care be used in making up 
the committees to select parties that will serve ; Second^ — 
That any party who does not accept in writing ten days be- 
fore the fair, be considered a vacancy and that suitable 
means be taken to fill the vacancies before the day of the 
fair. 

Thanking you for the honor of the position I have held, 
and apologizing for the length of this " brief " report, I am 
Very truly yours, 

Charles H. Goulding, 

Superintendent of Hall. 
Peabody, Nov. 9, 1898. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON ROOT CROPS. 

The committee jon Root Crops have received the follov^- 
ing entries, viz. : — 

C. K. Ordway & Son, West Newbury, \ acre of carrots. 
John H. Geoige, Methuen, i acre of onions. 
David Warren, Swampscott, \ acre of onions. 
Nath'l P. Perkins, Wenhara, \ acre of onions. 

The committee visited the gentlemen and examined their 
crops and recommend the following premiums : — 

CARROTS. 

To C. K. Ordway & Son, West Newbury, first 

premium, 18 00 

POTATOES. 

To John H. George, Methuen, first premium, $8 00 

ONIONS. 

To Nath'l P. Perkins, Wenham, first premium, 18 00 

'•- John H. George, Methuen, second premium, '|5 00 

E. A. Emerson, For the Committee. 



STATEMENT OF C. K. ORDWAY & SON. 

The land on which the crop of carrots grew was in pas- 
ture fifteen years, then it was ploughed and planted with 
carrots at the rate of six cords of manure to the acre for 
two years. This year we put on six cords of manure to the 
acre, spread broadcast, ploughed twelve inches deep. It 
was harrowed, raked, and sowed the 10th of May, with 
long orange carrot seed of our own raising. 
Dr. To 3 cords manure, $6 00 

'' ploughing, 2 00 

•' harrowing, 50 

" raking and sowing, 2 00 

" one pound seed, 50 

" weeding and thinning, 12 00 

" harvesting, 10 00 

f45 00 



78 



Or. By 17,000 lbs. carrots sold at 112.00 

per ton, 1102 00 

Value of manure left in land, 12 00 



Value of crop, 114 00 

Cost of crop, 45 00 



Profit, 69 00 



STATEMENT OF N. P. PERKINS. 

Tlie land on which this crop of onions grew was in 1896 
planted to onions, potatoes and beets. About three cords of 
stable manure were used, with a light dressing of fertilizer. 
The crop of 1897 was onions, four cords of manure used, 
and also fertilizer and Canada ashes. The soil is black, with 
clay subsoil. In the fall of 1897 applied four coids of cow 
and horse manure and ploughed in. In the spring of 1898 
ploughed again, thus bringing the manure to the surface 
in a fine condition after the frosts of winter. After har- 
rowing, spread on three-fourths of a ton of Canada ashes, 
and levelled with a Thomas harrow and drag. Sowed May 
10th about two lbs. Danvers onion seed, bought of Warren 
Baiker, rows 13 inches apart; wheel hoed and weeded four 
times. The crop did not suffer fiom blight, and continued 
to grow until Sept. 25ih,when they were pulled and dried 
down in good condition, with but few waste onions. 

Dr. 

Seed and sowing, 

Ploughing, 

Harrowing and dragging, 

4 cords manure, 

3-4 ton ashes. 

Wheel hoeing and weeding. 

Harvesting, 

Topping and marketing, 

$71 70 



u 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


18 


00 


8 


00 


16 


00 


6 


00 


15 


70 



79 



Or. 
315 bush, onions, at 65 cents, $204 75 

Profit on i acre, $133.05. 
Crop on one acre, 630 bush. 
Profit on one acre, $266.10. 

N. P. Perkins. 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OP ONIONS RAISED BY 
JOHN H. GEORGE, OF METHUEN. 

The crop of 1896 was onions, raised on the Stockbridge 
Special Onion Fertilizer, as were also the crops of 1897 
and 1898, one and one-half tons per acre, applied broad- 
cast with a machine. The soil is peat meadow land. 

The land was ploughed in the fall of 1897 ; in ^he 
spring of 1898 it was harrowed with a tooth harrow (one 
horse), brushed with a birch brush, fifteen hundred 
pounds of the Stockbridge Special Onion Manure spread, 
brushed again, and sowed with 3 3-4 lbs. of Yellow Globe 
Danvers Onion Seed, rows ten inches apart. They were 
hoed five times, weeded four times, cut up with a circular 
cutter, i-aked out, picked up in crates, and stored. 

This piece of land has been in onions eight years ; 
the last fiye crops have been grown on the Stockbridge 
Special Onion Manure. It has produced four first premi- 
um crops, and this is the statement of the fifth. 

The past season has been too wet for my land, and the 
consequence has been that the water drowned out about 
one-third of the piece, so that the number of bushels har- 
vested has been much smaller than it would have been 
under normal conditions. 

The yield was 261 bushels of medium sized onions on 
the half acre. I have not as yet disposed of my crop, but 
the price in Lawrence market is 65c. per bushel. 



8o 

The cost of the crop is as follows: 

Br. 

To preparing land, ploughing, harrowing, etc., $2 50 

" seed and sowing, 6 00 

" 1500 lbs. Stockbridge Onion Manure, 27 00 

" hoeing and weeding, 15 75 

" harvesting, 3 75 

" interest and taxes on hand, 3 00 

$58 00 
Or. 
By 261 bushels onions, at 65c., 1169 66 

Profit on one-half acre, 'flll.65. 
Profit on one acre, $223.30. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

statement concerning a crop op potatoes raised 
by john h, george, of methuen. 

The crops of 1895-1896-1897 were potatoes, this year 
being the fourth consecutive year that potatoos have been 
raised on the same piece of land and on the same kind of 
manure, viz : Stockbridge Special Potato Manure. The 
soil is peat meadow-land, and this half acre has produced 
three first premium crops of potatoes on the Stockbridge 
Manures. 

The land was ploughed in the spring, harrowed, brushed, 
furrowed, and one-half ton Stockbridge Potato Fertilizer 
applied by hand in the drill, seed dropped, covered with 
horse hoe, cultivated twice, ridged twice, Bordeaux mix- 
ture with Paris Green applied twice, dug by hand, mar- 
keted from the field, and sold to a seedsman for seed pur- 
poses. 

The yield on the half acre was 126 bushels of fine 
potatoes. 



8i 



CROP OF POTATOES. 

Dr. 

To preparing land and applying fertilizer, $ 3 75 

" Fertilizer, 19 00 

" Cultivation, 3 00 

" Seed cutting, dropping and covering (5 1-2 

bus. seed, 7 12 

" To 25 lbs. copper sulphate, 2 lbs. Paris Green, 

and applying, 3 10 

" digging and marketing, 8 00 

" interest and taxes on land, 3 00 



146 97 



Cr. 
By 116 bushels potatoes, at 65c., $75 40 

" 10 bushels seconds, at 30c., 3 00 



S78 40 



Profit on half acre, $31 43 
" " one "" 62 86 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PEACHES, 
GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

To the Trustees of the Essex Agricultural Society : — 

Gentle Ni en : — The Committee on Peaches, Grapes, and 
Assorted Fruits, in compliance with the request of the 
Society, contained in a j)aragraph on page ninth respecting 
"Duties of Committees," would make some remarks aud 
suggestions regarding the matter referred to them. 

In looking over the matter contained in this department 
of the fruit exhibits, as seen in the book of "Arrange- 
ments of Premiums and Committees," there has been 



82 



some misunderstanding as to the number of specimens of 
each variety of fruit shown, the article being very indefi- 
nite. 

We would advise a revision, as follows: For best 
twelve specimens of Freestone, White Flesh, Yellow 
Flesh, Essex County Seedling, each variety as it is now 
fixed, as those terms would cover about all the varieties 
cultivated. 

PLUMS. 

For best twelve specimens of each variety of Plums 
deemed worthy of general cultivation by the committee. 

QUINCE. 

For best twelve specimens of each variety of Quince 
considered worthy of cultivation by the committee. 

GRAPES. 

For the best four bandies of Grapes, as laid down in 
the article under consideration. 

For best collection of eight varieties, not less than ten 
pounds, shown on separate plates. 

We think this change would be plain and simple 
enough for all to understand who wish to exhibit. 

A few thoughts respecting Grapes may not be amiss at 
this time and in this place. It is well known by all those 
people who cultivate grapes more or less extensively that 
some of our best varieties have deteriorated, and many of 
them have been discarded ; among them the Rebecca, 
Creveliing, Diana, and most of the varieties of the Rogers' 
Hybrids. 

The Concord grape, that has been the standard grape 
for earliness and excellence ever since its introduction to 
the public, has within the past few years shown unmis- 
takable signs of falling off. In ripening the best clusters 
contain more or less grapes of a red color, very hard, that 
never soften. If they continue in this backward course 



83 

for a few years longer, we think their cultivation will have 
to be abandoned altogether. Ever since its advent it has 
been considered the standard table grape, and we should 
regret exceedingly to give it up. 

The Hartford Prolific grape, another old variety, is 
pursuing a backward course ; it does not ripen good ; drops 
badly from the bunch if not gathered just as soon as it is 
ripe. It never was a first quality table grape, although a 
little earlier than the Concord. Worden's Seedling is a 
most excellent grape, two weeks or more earlier than the 
Concord, making it a very desirable variety on that ac- 
count ; very hardy in vine, not affected by our severest win- 
ters, the fruit not subject to mildew or blight in summer. 

The Brighton, a Hybrid variety of the very best quality, 
unsurpassed by any out of doors grape, ripens just before 
the Concord. The vine is very apt to be. injured by our 
cold winters ; the fruit is pretty certain to mildew and 
blight if the seasons are not congenial to that variety, 
a weakness that all Hybrids are to a great extent subject 
to. 

The Niagara grapes are a very uncertain variety. When 
they grow right they are large in cluster and fruit, and 
very nice. The vine is extremely hardy, and will stand 
unharmed our ''ironclad winters," but the fruit is almost 
sure to mildew or blight, producing a full and perfect 
crop only once in four or five years. 

Such has been our experience with the above named old 
varieties in our own garden. Within a few years some 
new varieties have been produced, seedlings of some of 
the older sorts, hardy in vine and fruit. Prominent among 
them is the " Lee's Early," a very fine variety, two weeks 
or more earlier than the Concord, not quite as large as the 
Concord in cluster or fruit, but more compact, like the 
Delaware. As near; as we can ascertain, this grape was 
originated in Haverhill, Mass., by a gentleman named 



84 

Lee. Its color is red, very sweet and luscious in quality, 
a valuable acquisition. 

Another new variety has been introduced within a few 
years, has been exhibited at our annual cattle shows, and 
taken premiums, although not on the printed list. We 
refer to the Moore's Diamond — a magnificent grape, large 
in cluster and fruit, perfectly hardy in vine, and free from 
blight or mildew in fruit; color white and clear, ten days 
earlier than the Concord, of excellent quality, sweet and 
delicious. Your committee were unanimous in the opinion 
that these two new and tested varieties should be placed 
upon the printed list of grapes for premiums before our 
next annual fair, as they are eminently worthy of that po- 
sition. 

Another new variety was exhibited at our fair in Sep- 
tember, grown in Peabody, from the seed of one of the 
Rogers' Hybrids, black in color, size of cluster and fruit 
good, from ten days to a fortnight earlier than the Con- 
cord. They were sweet and excellent in quality. The 
committee awarded them a premium. The following state- 
ment from the originator to the committee came with his 
entry : — 

Peabody, Sept. 20th, 1898. 
To the Committee on Peaches and Assorted Fruits : 

Gentlemen. — These gi'apes were raised from seeds of 
Rogers' No. 43. The seeds were planted in the fall of 
1889, and came up the following spring. These grapes are 
from the third year of bearing. 

Respectfully yours, 

Daniel W. Osborne. 

As our seasons have changed somewhat of late years, 
opening much later than formerly, it is very evident that 
some of our older sorts will be discarded altogether, and 
new kinds, earlier in ripening, substituted. As old things 



85 

are fast passing away and all things becoming new, your 
committee would advise that the Society offer a reasonable 
premium for the production of new varieties of grapes, 
hardy and earlier than the Concord, that have been thor- 
oughly tested and found to contain all the requisite quali- 
ties of a perfect table grape. 

We make this suggestion to the Society that it may 
serve as a stimulant to some person or persons to make an 
effort to produce a new variety of grapes to take the place 
of the older varieties that are fast becoming extinct. The 
committee would also earnestly recommend a careful re- 
vision of the book of " Arrangements of Premiums and 
Committees,"as many of the articles contained therein are 
somewhat antiquated and need revision. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Abraham C. Osborne, 

For the Committee. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SMALL FRUITS. 

The committee on strawberries and other small fruits 
have attended to the duty assigned them, and respectfully 
submit the following report. 

There were two entries of strawberries, one of black- 
berries and one of raspberries. 

The first visit was made June 21, to the crop of straw- 
berries of Benjamin W. Farnham of North Andover. The 
vines were of fine growth, evenly distributed over the plot 
of ground they were grown on. The varieties were the 
Beverly, Haverland, Lovett and Bubach. The eveness of 
the plants, and size of the berries attracted the committee's 
attention. They think it is seldom they are called to view 
so nice or more complete a piece of strawberries. 

The second visit was made July 1, to the farm of Oscar 
Gowen, West Newbury, to view the field of strawberries 



86 



which he entered for premium. We found a fair growth 
of vines, not very evenly distributed over the hmd, but 
the berries were large, ripe, and of fine quality, with a 
plenty of green ones to follow. 

In regard to the blackberry and raspberry crops, Mr. 
Cole has made the facts so plain in his statements that it 
seems hardly necessary for the committee to add anything 
farther. On account of a delay in the committee viewing 
the crops, the raspberries were gone by, and the black- 
berries were past their best, but we saw some very good 
berries for the season, as blackberries generally blighted, 
and while the profit may seem small, we think it may com- 
pare favorably with other crops grov/n in the county. As 
will be seen in Mr. Cole's statement, his blackberries have 
not been cultivated for two years, and are at the present 
time very grassy. 

While the committee would recommend clean culture 
at all times, we think from the appearance and results 
of the crop, it has been shown that the agawam variety 
of blackberry blighted less last season than other vari- 
eties, and we recommend the societ3''s premium. 

The raspberry vines had a rank and healthy growth, 
and from the statements consider it a good and profitable 
crop for the last season of low prices, and make the follow- 
ing recommendations : 
$S. First premium, to Benjamin W. Farnham of North 

Andover, for crop of strawberries. 
$5. Gratuity, to Oscar Gowen, West Newbury, for crop 

of strawberries. 
$8. First premium, to William K. Cole, West Boxford, 

for crop of blackberries. 
$8. First premium, to William K. Cole, West Boxford, 

for crop of raspberries. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Benj. F. Stanley, J. D. Drew, Warren M. Cole. — Com- 
mittee. 



87 



STATEMENT OF BENJAMIN W. FARNHAM. 

The piece of land which I enter for premium on straw- 
berry crop, contained 28 square rods. The soil is a grav- 
elly loam, sloping to the south. In 1896 I raised a crop 
of potatoes on it. In 1897 I manured it with barn manure, 
and in May, 1897, set out strawberry plants; Beverly, 
Haverland, Lovett and Bubach, the rows being four feet 
apart, and the plants eighteen inches in the rows. I kept 
them free from weeds by cultivating and weeding. Sev- 
eral times in winter I scattered wood ashes over the bed, 
and covered them in early winter with pine needles, which 
I did not remove in the spring. Commenced to pick the 
berries June 16, and finished July 15. 

Cr. 
1505 boxes of berries, at 9 7-10 cts., il45 98 

Dr. 



Ploughing ground. 


11 


00 




Setting plants. 


2 


50 




Manure, 


5 


00 




Cultivating and weeding. 


6 


00 




Covering with pine needles. 


1 


00 




Picking 1,505 boxes, at 1 1-2 cts., 


22 


58 




Marketing 1,505 boxes at 2 cts.. 


30 


10 


68 18 


Net profit on crop, 






177 80 


RATE PER ACRE. 








8,600 boxes, 






$834 20 


Cost, 






389 60 


Net profit, 


$444 60 


Respectfully submitted. 








Benjamin W. 


Farnham. 


North Andover, Sept. 12, 1898. 









88 



STATEMENT OF O. GOWEN, ON STRAWBERRY CROP. 

The land contains fifty-eight rods on which the berries 
were raised. In 1895 was broken sod and planted to cab- 
bage, manured with henyard manure at rate of six cords 
to the acre. In the spring of '97 was manured at the rate 
of eight cords to the acre, and set to strawberries ; Haver- 
land, Bubach No. 5, Brandywine, Jessie. Plants set 
five feet by fifteen inches. I also applied eighteen bushels 
of wood ashes. 



Or. 



4,000 plants, at $3, 
2,500 boxes berries, at .08 



$ 12 00 
200 00 

1212 00 



Dr. 



Ploughing land. 

Setting plants, 

Ashes, 

Care of land. 

Picking 2,500 boxes, at 1 1-2 cts., 

Marketing, 


11 

1 

4 

5 

37 

25 


00 
00 
50 
00 
50 
00 $74 00 


Net profit on crop. 




$138 00 


RATE PER ACRE. 






6,880 boxes. 
Cost, 


C 


$550 40 
106 40 


Net profit. 

Respectfully submitted. 


$444 00 

). GoWEN. 



West Newbury, Sept. 7, 1898. 



89 



STATEMENT OF WILLIAM K. COLK. 

The crop of blackberries I enter for the society's pre- 
mium, is an old plantation, and for the past two years has 
had no work done upon it, except cutting out old canes, 
and the application of commercial fertilizer, so that, while 
the crop was comparatively small, the small expense of 
raising it, makes it a fairly profitable crop, which would 
have made a much better showing had it not been for a 
blight which ruined nearly all of the late berries, the patch 
contained thirty-six rods. Variety, Agawam. 

Br. 

Fertilizer, 
Catting out canes. 
Picking and Marketing, 
Boxes, 



$2 


00 


1 


50 


6 


39 




80 



110 69 



Cr. 



By 213 boxes berries, $23 06 

" Plants sold, 2 25 



125 31 
10 69 



Profit, 114 62 

W. K. Cole. 

The crop of raspberries I entered this year for the so- 
ciety's premium was grown on the same ground on which 
grew the crop for which I was awarded the premium last 
year. Variety, Cuthbert, in cultivation four years. Plot 
contains 20 1-2 square rods. 



90 



Dr. 

To 2 days labor cutting out canes, S3 00 

" 100 lbs. P. R. fertilizer, 1 40 

" Picking, Marketing, 23 75 

" Boxes, 23 75 

$31 90 

Or. 
By 928 pt. boxes, 178 85 

31 90 



Profit, f46 95 

Respectfully, 

William K. Cole, 
J. D. Drew. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON IMPROVED PAS- 
TURE AND WASTE LAND. 

The committee on improved pasture and waste land, 
having been requested to view a piece of land owned by 
E. C. Little of Merrimac, Mass., have attended to their 
duties, and respectfully report to the secretary that they 
have made the following award as offered by the society. 
The first premium of ten dollars ($10). 

Isaac F. Knowlton, B. F. Barnes. — Committee. 

STATEMENT CONCERNING PIECE OF WASTE LAND 
ENTERED FOR PREMIUM BY E. C. LITTLE. 

This land last year, 1897, was mostly covered with 
huckleberry bushes and sweet fern. We mowed and burnt 
the bushes the last of July, and plowed. It was very 
rocky, so much so that it took two men to follow the plow 
with pickaxes. We picked off the rocks and harrowed 



91 

and sowed barley the twelfth of August, had a fine crop of 
green fodder. This Spring we plowed again, and planted 
with Longfellow corn the second of June and got one 
hundred and ninety bushels of ear corn to the acre. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 






Cr. 










By 100 tons stone, at 30c. 


ton. 






130 00 


" 5 " green fodder. 








15 00 


" 5 "• corn fodder. 








25 00 


" 190 bushels ear corn, 








38 00 




$108 00 


Dr. 










Cost of plowing, two men, 
Team, two daj^s. 


three 


days. 




$9 00 
8 00 


Team, one day harrowing. 








4 00 


Twenty loads manure, 
Planting corn, cultivating. 
Harvesting corn, 
Husking, 








40 00 

2 50 

3 00 

4 00 




$70 50 


Balance, 




$37. 50 


• 




Signed, 
E. 


C. 


Little. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE TREADWELL 

FARM. 

The lease of the farm to John Bradstreet having expired 
on the first of April, it was re-leased to Dudley Bradstreet 
for a term of three years, at $250 per year. Mr. Brad- 
street has managed the farm in a very satisfactory man- 
ner. On visiting it last August, the committee found the 



92 

cultivated crops in a good growing condition, with clean 
culture. The four acres of ensilage corn presented a beau- 
tiful appearance ; no better had been seen by the com- 
mittee elsewhere in the county. They were especially 
interested in the experiment of the year, of laying down 
to grass, a field of squashes. At the last hoeing, just as 
the vines began to run, grass seed was sown, and land be- 
tween the rows made level by Breed's weeder, a rake, 
and the growth of vines did not prevent a fine catch of 
grass, which has proved a complete success, well worthy 
of imitation. 

The crops grown on the farm are as follows : 20 tons of 
English hay, 1 1-2 tons oat fodder, 3 tons Hungarian hay, 
about the usual amount of meadow hay, about 30 tons en- 
silage corn, 225 bushels potatoes, 1-2 acre turnips, a large 
crop not harvested, 35 barrels of apples, first quality. The 
stock kept on the farm consists of 3 horses, 15 horned cattle, 
5 hogs. The buildings have been put in good repair gen- 
erally; a coat of paint would improve their appearance, 
and soon will become necessary for economy's sake. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin P. Ware, 

For the Committee. 



REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have been thirty-two new members added to the 
society since the last annual report, seven of whom became 
members by receiving premiums of seven dollars and up- 
ward, according to the rules of the society, from different 
towns, as follows: 

Beverly, 1 Lynn, . 1 

Danvers, 3 Peabody 24 

Haverhill, 1 Salem, 2 



93 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

The society held four Institutes the past year, on as 
many different days, forenoon and afternoon, at which the 
following subjects were offered by carefully prepared essays, 
and discussed by any of the audience who desired. 

The first Institute was held at West Newbury, Jan. 21, 
the subject for the forenoon being " Book farming vs. 
Moon farming ;" subject for afternoon, "• Good, better, best 
methods of producing and selling milk," 

The second Institute was held at Beverly, Feb. 11, the 
subject being for the forenoon, " Poultry Culture ;" sub- 
ject for afternoon, " Farming forward, "the audience at both 
meetings being addressed by Prof. A. A. Brigham of the 
R. I. Agricultural college. 

The third Institute was held at Newbury, March 4, the 
subjects being respectively, "Small Fruits," and the 
" Home fruit supply," by J. H. Hale." 

The fourth Institute was held at Salem, March 25. 
Subject for the forenoon, " Advances in Horticulture," by 
Dr. J. C. Goodell of Lynn. Afternoon subject, " Roadside 
Improvement," by Francis H. Appleton. 



REPORT OF STATE DELEGATE, 1898. 

I was present on the first and third days of the fair of the 
Essex Agricultural Society, held at Peabody, on September 
20, 21 and 22. The weather was good all three days of the 
show. This society is one of the oldest in the state, organ- 
ized in 1818, and has held its fairs in different towns until 
three years ago, when it purchased ten acres, and has since 
added four more, on an elevated site, overlooking the town 
of Peabody. Adjoining the fair grounds about thirty acres 
have been laid out as a park, and ornamental trees set out, 
which makes a beautiful location for park and fair grounds. 



94 

The society has erected three hirge and well planned build- 
ings for showing horses, cattle and poultry. These are the 
most convenient and best I have seen on any fair grounds. 

The exhibit of horses consisted of about fifty entries of 
very fine animals. The cattle exhibit was upwards of 100 
entries, composed of Holsteins, Jerseys, Herefords and ex- 
cellent specimens of other breeds. I was much interested 
in nine large, handsome pairs of oxen owned and exhibited 
by a farmer from Amesbury. Also from the same town 
two pairs of extra fat cattle, owned by one farmer, weigh- 
ing, one pair, 5,000 lbs., the other, 4,800 lbs. 

The poultry building was packed full of superior fowls 
of all the many breeds. 

There was a very extensive show of swine of excellent 
quality. 

The display of sheep was not large. 

The display of fruit, vegetables, fancy work, etc., was in 
the town hall. The fruit was represented by most of the 
vaiieties, and was of good quality. The floral display was 
large. The art department was well filled with fine work- 
in the basement was a large display of very excellent 
specimens of all the varieties of vegetables. 

On the third day there was a ploughing match, a fire- 
man's muster, and the annual dinner. The dinner was 
served in the vestry of the South church, after which Pres- 
ident Butler spoke of the success of the society, and intro- 
duced Gen. Francis H. Appleton, who gave an interesting 
address. Remarks were made by the President-elect, Hon. 
George von L. Meyer, Hon. Wm. H. Moody and Hon. 
Wm. S. Knox, members of congress, and your delegate. 
The reading of a paper by Hon. J. J. H. Gregory closed the 
exercises at the church. 

This society is in excellent condition, having no debt, 
and owning valuable grounds. They need an exliibition 
hall on the fair grounds, which I think they intend to build 



95 

before many years. The society is very liberal in its offers 
of premiums for field crops, offering several premiums for 
experiments in raising the different varieties of grain, root 
crops, strawberries, cranberries, forest and ornamental 
trees. Also special premiums for producing a seedling po- 
tato superior to the Early Rose, and for the best experi- 
ment in the cultivation of the potato, to extend over a 
series of years. The offer for the above premiums is more 
than one-half the bounty they receive from the state, 
which is very commendable in the society. 

I wish to express my thanks to the officers of the society 
for courtesies shown me. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Augustus Pratt, 

Inspector, 



REPORT ON ESSAYS AND REPORTS. 

The committee on essays and reports have received two 
excellent and valuable essays, and have made the follow- 
ing awards: — 

flO.OO To John H. George, of Methuen, for essay upon 
" The Yield of different varieties of Potatoes 
raised under the same conditions." 
$8.00 To W. Sumner Perkins, of Danvers, for essay on 
" The Warfare against Insects and Fungi." 
No award is made for reports. 

For the Committee, 

G. L. Stkeeter, Chairman. 
Committee : — G. L. Streeter, Salem ; D. E. Safford, Ham- 
ilton ; Geo. B. Blodgett, Rowley; J. M. Danforth, Lynn- 
field. 

ON THE YIELD OF DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF POTATOES 
RAISED UNDER THE SAME CONDITIONS. 

I have carried out the past season an experiment with 



96 

different varieties of potatoes grown as far as may be under 
the same conditions as to fertilizer, cultivation and care 
which I think may be of some benefit to my brother farm- 
ers, I therefore take this means to furnish them the data. 

My business the past winter brought me in contact with 
a great many of the best farmers of Essex and Middlesex 
counties, and especially those who grew crops for the mar- 
ket, and as my time was not limited and the farmers were 
not very busy at that season of the year, I had many a 
good chat with them on the subject of crops and their cul- 
tivation. I know it was to my benefit and I hope it was to 
theirs. These chats in a measure led to this experiment, I 
have for years been very much interested in the potato 
crop, the different varieties which from time to time are 
thrown upon the market and much lauded for their many 
good qualities, have particularly interested me, and many a 
hard earned dollar have I squandered to find that ignis 
fatuus — the best potato in existence. 

Now with this preliminary I will proceed to business. 
Almost my first question to the farmers when I met them 
was, what variety of potatoes do you raise, and strange to 
say almost every farmer thought he had the best one grown, 
and whenever I found one that a whole neighborhood 
thought a good one 1 bought some of that variety and sent 
them home, and the consequence was that when I came to 
plant potatoes this spring I was in possession of fifteen va- 
rieties which were supposed to be world beaters, and among 
which I found several good ones. The old varieties which 
I had previously grown like the Hebrons, Early Rose and 
New Queen I did not touch, but I found many of the farm- 
ers still stick to the old stand bys, which I think is a very 
good thing, until they are convinced that they have found 
a better one. 

I took a half-acre of land for my experiment which was 
in all parts as exactly alike as soil can be found, and each 



97 

variety received the same amount of fertilizer, the same 
care, and no favors shown to any, as my only object was to 
find out, if I could, the best variety for me to raise, and you 
must recollect that these fifteen varieties each have a good 
farmer back of it, who thinks he has the best one. 

The rows on the piece were 200 feet long and there were 
35 rows on the piece ; of some of the varieties I planted 
more than others, but each estimate was made on one row 
of 200 feet, the product was weighed by scales and careful- 
ly noted as to yield and per centage of marketable tubers, 
the yield per row, amount marketable, etc., is in round num- 
bers without fractions, on the above basis there would be 
70 rows on an acre, so the rows must have been a trifle 
over 8 feet apart. The method of cultivation does not con- 
cern us in this experiment, as they were all treated alike, 
but I will state that they were well taken care of, and fer- 
tilized with a ton of Stockbridge potato manure per acre, 
and here is the result. 



Variety. Yi 


eld per row 


. Color. 


Yield per 


acre. 


Markeial 


Delaware, 


200 lbs., 


, white, 


233 1-3 bu., 


85% 


Rural Blush, 


400 " 


red. 


466 2-3 


ii. 


87 " 


Roberts Early, 


375 " 


white, 


437 1-2 


ii. 


90 " 


Winslow Seedling, 


300 " 


pink. 


350 


(. 


86 " 


Gift, 


250 " 


blush, 


291 2-3 


(( 


88 " 


Monroe Seedling, 


300 " 


white, 


350 


l( 


95 " 


Carman No. 3, 


400- 


i; 


466 2-3 


CI 


95" 


Stump the World, 


300 " 


1.1. 


350 


t( 


90 " 


Joseph, 


200 - 


pink. 


233 1-3 


(( 


87" 


Bakers Beauty, 


375 " 


t« 


437 1-2 


C( 


95 " 


Parkers Market, 


150 " 


white, 


175 


C( 


65" 


County Gentlemen 


,375 " 


11 


437 1-2 


!,(, 


85 " 


Mills Banner, 


375 " 


pink. 


437(1-2 


%(. 


90 " 


Rural New Yorker 


, 200 " 


white. 


233 1-3 


k( 


95 " 


White Bliss Trium 


.,150 '' w, 


. p'k eye 175 


(> 


75" 


Uncle Sam, 


100 " 


white. 


, 116 1-2 


1.1, 


25 " 



98 

The Delaware was most liable to scab, the Rural Blush 
almost fiee from it. The experiment showed that the 
white varieties were, as a rule, the most liable to disease, 
while the pinks and reds as a rule were the least liable, of 
course there is a great difference in the looks of the differ- 
ent varieties; the Roberts Early, Monroe Seedling, Car- 
man No. 3, County Gentleman being very handsome, the 
eyes nearly smooth with the surface, while the rest run 
from good to fair. 

There was a great difference as to earliness, the ripening 
time running froni July 28th to September 10th. The 
Rural Blush is the earliest potato with which I am ac- 
quainted, ripening in about 85 days from time of planting. 

They were planted May 2nd, and were fit to dig, the 
Rural Blush July 28th, Roberts Early Aug. 8th, Winslow 
Seedling Aug. 20th, Delaware Aug. 30th, Monroe Seed- 
ling and Carman No. 3 Sept. 10th, Bliss Triumph Aug. 
1st. The others about the time of the Carmans. 

It will be seen by this showing that it makes a great 
deal of difference to a farmer what variety of potato he 
j)lants, and while one potato will not give the same results 
on all farms and soils it will certainly pay every farmer to 
experiment for himself until he finds one which will give 
him satisfactory results, and not be satisfied until he has 
found one which will pay him a profit to raise. 

I have been in the line for 30 years, and in that time I 
have found many a gem, but the best of them deteriorate 
in time, and when they begin to fail is the time to discard 
them for something better, and the only way to find that 
one is to experiment. 



THE WARFARE AGAINST INSECTS AND 
FUN(41. 

The fanner of the [)reseiit day has miu'li In cnntend 
against in the wav of haiiiifiil insects and destiuctive inn- 



99 

gous growth, which was spared the agriculturist of pre- 
vious generations. 

We cannot but think that our ancestors were possessed 
of a veritable horticultural paradise, when we learn how 
in bj^gone times apples grew sound and good without care, 
strangers alike to scab, codlin moth, and curculio; how 
luscious peaches were never attacked by worm or rot ; 
how plums never knew the sting of the curculio ; how pears 
had never found the way of growing dwafted and gnarly, 
and how potatoes produced regularly, large, annual crops, 
unaffected by Colorado beetle, blight and rot. 

At all events, the case is very different today. The 
crop is not cultivated, that is, not injured by at least one 
insect of fatal fungous, while the majority of the crops are 
forced to maintain a struggle with several. That insects 
harmful to crops have enormously increased both in species 
and in numbers, is plainly manifest. What then, has ef- 
fected the change ? 

Modern conditions have united to render this multipli- 
cation of insects possible. 

The destruction of the forests has driven many species 
of insects formerly supported within them, to the cultivated 
fields to find subsistence. 

The massing of tilled crops within comparatively lim- 
ited areas has greatly encouraged the rapid increase in the 
insect world, for it is a natural law that the extent to 
which any animal will reproduce itself is primarily depen- 
dent upon the abundance and availability of its food sup- 
plies, and obviously large continuous orchards of fruit 
trees and immense fields of potatoes furnish ideal condi- 
tions for insects preying upon fruit trees or potatoes, as 
the case may be, to multiply their species in enormous 
numbers, for the food is both ample in supply and easy of 
access. The same is as true of other crops as it is of fruit 
trees and potatoes. 



lOO 



The large facilities for commerce and transportation 
which now exist, are also responsible in no small measure 
for the distribution of insects. Ships plying from foreign 
shores have brought us harmful insects. These have come 
from Europe and the Orient, and from all parts of the 
world, and the railroads have effected their broadcast scat- 
tering throughout this country. 

Then all abandoned or neglected farms serve as breed- 
ing places or nurseries, in which legions of insects are 
hatched to ultimately go forth and stock the entire sur- 
rounding country. This is one of the sad features con- 
nected with the control of these pests. One man may be 
ever so particular and painstaking in his warfare against 
them upon his own premises, while on an adjacent farm 
they may be allowed to work and increase in numbers un- 
disturbed. Cordial co-operation among all land owners is 
demanded, if the undertaking of checkmating insect rav- 
ages is to prove a success. 

The above are some of the causes, which, coupled with 
the extraordinary powers of reproduction which insects 
possess, have resulted in the present plague of these pests. 

But if we are more afflicted with injurious insects than 
our ancestors were, it is a relief to know that we under- 
stand better how to fight bugs then they probably did. 

Insects really place a premium upon intelligence and 
thrift, for whoever takes the pains to preserve his crops 
from insects and fungi will be well rewarded by good 
prices and quick sales for his produce. 

In the warfare against insects, clean culture is of first 
importance. 

CLEAN CULTURE. 

Many insects find refuge during the winter months up- 
on weeds, dead twigs, branches of trees, or other rubbish, 
lying about the garden, orchard and field. Hence the 



lOI 



necessity of gathering all such refuse and destroying it 
either by fire or by incorporating it into the compost heap. 
The old rough bark of trees affords protection for insects 
and their eggs. This fact is very good reason then for 
scraping the trunks and limbs of the trees so as to keep 
them always clean and smooth. It is customary to leave 
the worthless remains of a crop upon the ground from 
time of harvest until it becomes necessary to clear the 
land for a new crop the following spring. For example, 
squash vines are often allowed to lie about the field from 
fall to spring. As these old vines harbor insects destruc- 
tive to the squash, the3' should be promptly destroyed soon 
after the crop is gathered. 

ROTATION OF CROPS. 

A continual rotation of crops exercises an important in- 
fluence in holding insects in check. Growing the same 
crop several years in succession upon the same ground 
naturally provides plenty of food for whatever insects may 
chance to live upon that crop, whereas a ceaseless change 
of crops tends rather to starve out the pests. When the 
squash crop has been grown more than one year in succes- 
sion upon the same piece of land, it becomes more and 
more difficult (if not impossible), each successive year to 
save the crop from the ravages of black bugs and striped 
beetles. By changing about and planting elsewhere how- 
ever, this trouble is largely removed. 

FERTILIZATION. 

Liberal and generous manuring is a judicious practice 
when it is aimed to secure comparative exemption from 
serious insects and fungous difficulties. The crop with an 
abundance of available plant food at its command will de- 
velop a vigorous, robust habit of growth, much better cal- 
culated to withstand the depredations of insects than the 



I02 



starved crops. As among cattle it is the poor, thin beasts 
that get lousy, so in a field of potatoes, the small, stunted 
plants are the ones that are found with the most bugs up- 
on them. So the rich field, dressed with ten or more 
cords of manure per acre and planted to squashes will laugh 
at the bugs, while squashes sown in a field of deficient 
fertility generally succumb to insects in spite of the most 
careful attention. 

ENCOURAGE THE BIRDS. 

There is a balance in nature, which, if disturbed, works 
injury. One class of animals prevents another class from 
assuming undue proportions. Birds hold insects in check, 
as the latter form a large part of the food of the former. 
The less birds the more insects and vice versa. Every 
person who tills a piece of ground should do all in his 
power to protect the birds and encourage them to 
make their nests upon his premises. While there is a side 
of sentiment to the question, the songs of the birds being 
sweet and their companionship dear, yet the idea of utility 
becomes the paramount issue, and, in this connection, it 
should always be remembered that the birds are co-labor- 
ers with man in his efforts to wrest a living from the soil. 

It is certainly a cause of lamentation that the numbers 
of insect-eating birds appear to be gradually dwindling 
away. They have their remorseless persecutors. They 
are caught by cats ; preyed upon by small boys ; shot in 
fun (?) by men, who are not boys, just for the sake of 
shooting something; and killed that their beautiful bodies 
mav be secured for the adornment of ladies' bonnets. 
Even the farmer himself has been known to make this 
mistake when he has fancied himself imposed upon. But 
we can afiford to allow the crow a few hills of corn and 
the robin some cherries, since a large part of the food of 
both these birds consists of injurious insects. 



lO' 



PROTECT THE TOADS. 

The food of the common garden toad consists almost 
entire!}" of bugs, flies, etc. Therefore we cannot have too 
many toads working for us upon the farm. They do not 
demand large wages, and never go out on a strike. They 
keep right at their business and accomplish much. The 
toad is far from prepossessing in appearance ; but there 
is an old saying, " Handsome is that handsome does," and 
judged from that standpoint, the toad must be regarded as 
handsome. 

VALUE OP FARM LIVE STOCK. 

Sheep, pigs and poultry are of value as insect exter- 
minators. Sheep allowed the run of an orchard will con- 
sume fallen fruit, thus destroying the worms contained 
therein. Pigs not only eat fallen fruit, but, by their pro- 
pensity for rooting, they unearth and destroy many grubs 
and worms that have found covering and concealment in 
the soil. But po-ultry are the most efficient insect killing 
live stock upon the farm, and fowls and chickens may 
profitably be allowed to run among the crops which they 
cannot damage, as they possess keen appetites for bugs, 
and have sharp eyes to discover the whereabouts of the 
same. 

SPRAYING. 

The application of substances capable of destroying in- 
sects and fungi to the various crops affected has become a 
necessity. These substances are applied to some extent 
as powders in the dry state, when they are generally di- 
luted with flour, lime, or plaster, but they are most exten- 
sively and economically distributed by mixing them with 
water and applying the same in a fine spray. To spray 
easily and well a good force pump, mounted firmly upon 
a barrel resting on its side, is needed. Tlie pump should 



104 

in all cases have all working parts constructed of brass, 
and really had best be made entirely of brass, when it will 
last a long time. The barrel is to be fastened upon a 
wagon, or some vehicle convenient to draw about. Then 
with plenty of hose and a nozzle discharging a fine spray, 
the work may be performed quickly and thoroughly. What 
is desired is to apply a very fine spray to every part of 
plant or tree, and then stop. A properly sprayed tree will 
not drip much. Many pumps are provided with so-called 
agitators to keep the liquid well shaken up and prevent 
settling, but these must not be depended upon altogether. 
Frequent hand stirring with a good paddle is the safest 
plan. 

Insecticides, or insect killing substances, may be divided 
into two general classes ; first, the internal poisons, which 
cause death of the insect by being eaten with the regular 
food ; and, second, the external irritants, which act from 
the outside, closing the breathing pores, or causing death 
by irritation of the skin. Paris green is an example of 
the first class, and kerosene emulsion of the second. 

PARIS GREEN. 

.. Paris green is now widely used. It is an extremely 
powerful poison. Its active principle is arsenic, of which 
the pure article contains from fifty-five to sixty per cent. 
As it contains copper, it possesses some value as a fungi- 
cide, although for this purpose it is not to be compared with 
the Bordeaux mixture. Very little of the arsenic of Paris 
^reen is soluble in water, yet it is always safest to use the 
same weight of freshly-slaked lime as of the green, when 
applying the poison. This prevents the burning of the 
foliage. The lime renders any soluble arsenic harmless, 
combining with it to form the insoluble arsenite of lime. 
Paris Green rapidly separates from the water with which 
it has been mixed and settles to the bottom of the barrel, 



I05 

or other receptacle in which it is contained. So frequent 
stirring of the liquid is demanded to retain the Paris Green 
in suspension. Much stronger applications of Paris Green 
were formerly made than were necessary. One pound of 
the green to one hundred gallons of water is sufficient for 
the potato. One pound to one hundred and fifty gallons 
enough for apple, and one pound to two hundred (or even 
more) gallons ample for plum or peach. 

LONDON PURPLE. 

London purple is another arsenical poison. It varies 
in comjjosition but contains something near the same 
amount of arsenic as Paris Green. It is a by product from 
the manufacture of aniline dyes. It is cheaper in cost than 
the green, and its particles are finer, so it remains in a 
water mixture much longer. These are advantages. The 
trouble is however, London purple contains considerable 
soluble arsenic, and therefore it is much more liable to in- 
jure the foliage of trees and plants than is Paris Green. 

BORDEAUX MIXTURE. 

The Bordeaux mixture is the most successful applica- 
cation for fungous growths known to science. The formu- 
la for preparing it is as follows: 'Copper sulphate six 
pounds, quicklime four pounds, and water, 50 gallons. 
Dissolve the copper sulphate in hot water and dilute it in 
twenty-five gallons of water. Slake the fresh lime and 
dilute in twenty-five gallons of water. Then finally strain 
lime solution into the copper solution and thoroughly mix. 
The Bordeaux mixture needs t'o be used promptly after 
being prepared, as it deteriorates rapidly when kept. 

Four or five ounces of Paris Green may be added to the 
fifty gallons of the Bordeaux mixture, and then the best 
known combination of insecticide and fungicide will be ob- 
tained. As a general spraying mixture this must receive 
the highest endorsement. 



io6 



KEROSENE EMULSION. 

To prepare a kerosene emulsion, dissolve half a pound of 
hard soap in one gallon of boiling soft water, add two gal- 
lons kerosene oil, and churn the mixture five or ten min- 
utes until it forms a creamy emulsion. This mixture is to 
be diluted with from nine to twenty parts of water to one 
of the emulsion before using. Plant lice can be killed 
with a weak emulsion, while hard-bodied insects require 
a strong emulsion. 

HELLEBORE. 

Hellebore is a standard application for currant worms. 
To be of use however, it must be pure and freshly ground. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

In the application of all spraying mixtures, it is neces- 
sary to be on time. Oftentimes the damage is largely done 
before the remedy is applied. Then the insects and worms 
are much more quickly killed, while they are small and eat- 
ing ravenously. 

One caution to be remembered is never to spray fruit 
trees while they are in blossom. Always do the work just 
after the blossoms have fallen, for to spray while in flower 
means the poisoning of the bees, which are at work gather- 
ing honey and fertilizing the blossom. And killing bees is 
an injury not only to the bee-keeper, but to the fruit- 
grower as well. 

As to the number of times it is necessary to spray in a 
season, it all depends upon the weather and general preva- 
lence of insects. Repeated rains wash off the applications 
and render more spraying imperative. Sometimes once or 
twice will be a plenty, then again three or four times will 
be none too often. It should be aimed always to do the 
work thoroughly. 

In conclusion a word may be said as to whether spray- 



I07 

ing pays. This is now generally and emphatically an- 
swered in the affirmative. If any man doubts, he can easi- 
ly figure the matter out upon a basis of comparison be- 
tween the values of crops sprayed and unsprayed. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



The following is a list of members deceased as returned 
to the Secretary, not heretofore reported. 

Abbott, Nathan F., Andover Curwen, Samuel H., Salem 
Baker, John I., Beverly Dodd, Stephen, Gloucester 

Beede, C. O., Lynn Dolliver, William P. Glou- 

Brickett, Benj. F., Haverhill cester 
Bradstreet,JustinE. Haverhill Dow, Homer, Methuen 
Breed, George H., Lynn Emerson, Marcus, Haverhill 
Bassett,Leon H.,No.Andover Emery, George E., Lynn 
Bailey, William P., West Foster, William A., Beverly 

Newbury Foster, Jeremiah, Gloucester 

Butterfield, Chas. A., North Fernald, Oliver, Danvers 

Andover Goodwin, John O., Haverhill 

Cabot, George D., Lawrence Harriman, Hiram N.,George- 
Calef, John C, Gloucester town 
Carter, John S., Gloucester Hobbs, John, Ipswich 
Carter, Sherman J.,Glouces- Harris, N. S., Lynn 

ter Hart, James S., Newburyport 

Chapman, Jonathan, George- Huff, William, Newburyport 

town Holman, Lyman, Salem 

Chase, C. W., Haverhill Haven, C. B., Peabody 

Cloutman,Henry B., Marble- Hutchinson, C. K., Peabody 

head Johnson, Henry H., Haverhill 

Corliss, Charles, Haverhill Kemble, Arthur, Salem 
Curwen, James B., Salem Kimball, Leverett, Haverhill 



io8 



King, Jonathan, Peabody Richardson, John B., Haver- 
Little, Hectpr, Newburyport hill 
Longfellow,Joseph Mrs. New- Rogers, A. D., Salem 

bury Rogers, George A., North 

Loud, L. C, Merrimac Andover 

Lunt, Charles, Newburyport Saltonstall, Robert, Beverly 
Mason, Lyman, Beverly Sanborn.Ed win M., Lawrence 
Massey, Dudley A,, Danvers Sargent, Willis P., Merrimac 
Merrill, E. H., Salem Shaw, Warren, Peabody 

Morse, Nathan R., Salem Sim, Peter, Peabody 
Morse, Daniel L., Amesbury Smith, George S., Haverhill 
Mower, A. A., Lynn Stickney, George W., Beverly 

Moulton, Henry W., New- Stacy, John H., Gloucester 

buryport Stone, Augustine, Ipswich 

Nichols,Andrew Jr., Danvers Stanwood, Moses P., West 
Norwood,George, Gloucester Newbury 
Newhall, George T., Lynn Talton, John C., West New- 
Nickerson,LewisE., Glouces- bury 

ter Tenney, George J., George- 

O'Keefe, Timothy, Peabody town 

Pedrick, W. R., Lawrence Thomas, Josiah B., Peabody 
Pitman, Mark, Beverly Underbill, J. C, Ipswich 

Putnam, Joel, Danvers Usher, Roland G., Lynn 

Patch, Henry, Wenham Ward, Benjamin A., Lynn 

Parsons, Charles E., Lynn Whittier, Warner R., Haver- 
Pike, James D., Merrimac hill 
Randall, John P., Haverhill 



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CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Article 1. There shall be a President, four Vice Pres- 
idents, a Secretary, and a Treasurer, who shall be Trustees, 
eX'Offi.cio. The President, Vice Presidents, and Secretary 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer by the Trustees, annually, at their meeting in 
November. In addition to these, one Trustee shall be 
elected annually for each town in the County, and the 
Trustee for each town shall be elected by members of the 
Societ}'' in said town, at a meeting called for that purpose,* 
in accordance with notice issued by the Secretary, and shall 
continue in office until another is elected in his stead; and 
such election shall be final, and shall constitute the Trus- 
tee so elected a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Society ; and the result of the election in each town shall 
be communicated as early as possible to the Secretary. 

Art. 2. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the So- 
ciety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at 
which all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at 
least shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Pi-esidents shall be absent, 
the membeis present may appoint one from among them to 
preside at such meeting. 



"These meeting are held the last Tuesday of October, and the Trustees 
elected commence their duties at the November meeting of Trustees. 



Ill 



Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting- of the Society ; or whenever a 
written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 
shall be made by any twelve members of the Society, to the 
Presidents and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon ; seven of whom, with the presiding officer, sliall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The Trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society, during the intervals of its meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the pul)lic, 
publish such conmunications, and offer premiums in such 
form and value as they think proper (provided the premiums 
offered do not exceed the funds of the Societ}^ ; and shall 
lay before the Society, at each of its meetings a statement of 
their proceedings and of the communications made to them. 

Art. 7. The -Secretar}^ shall take minutes of all the 
votes and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books ; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustees shall direct. He 
shall write and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which sliall be lodged with the Secretary, who shall make 
a fair i-ecord thereof. The Treasurer shall fiom time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have orders for from 
the Tiustees ; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, rendei' a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shall 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of his duty, in such 
sum as the Tiustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 



112 



Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed annually by 
the Trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 
report to the Society; and the same being accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretary in his books. 

Art. 10, In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary or of the Treas- 
urer, the Trustees shall take charge of the official books, 
papers, and other effects belonging to the office that may 
be vacated, and give receipts for the same ; which books, 
papers, etc., they may deliver to some person whom they 
may appoint to fill the office until the next meeting of the 
Society, at which time there shall be a new choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society by paying the sum of three dol- 
lars to increase the permanent fund of the institution. 

Art. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture of 
our county ; the same to be sacredly appropriated to that 
purpose. 

Art. 18. All ordained ministers of the Gospel who re- 
side within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past Presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a member 
at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the action 
at the next annual meeting of the Society. 



♦Members will receive from the Secretary a " certificate of membership." No 
fines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are entitled to vote in all its 
transactions, with free use of the Library and a copy of the printed " Transac- 
tions " each year. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY. 

FOR 1898-99. 



PRESIDENT. 

GEORGE V. L. MEYER, of Hamilton. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead. 
HORATIO G. HERRICK, of Lawrence. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
J. D. W. FRENCH, of North Andover. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER. 

GILBERT L. STREETER, of Salem. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

BENJAMIN p. WARE, of Marblehead. 
FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 
OLIVER S. BUTLER, of Georgetown. 



114 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 



TRUSTEES. 

J. P. Little, Amesbuiy. Fred. A. Russell, Metliueii. 

Charles C. Blunt, Andover. Geo. A. Currier, Middleton. 
John W. Lovett, Beverly. Herbert F. Otis, Nahant. 
J. Henry Nason, Boxford. James K. Adams, Newbury. 
Wm. B. Carlton, Danvers. Chas. N. Maguire, Newbury- 
Edward K. Lee, Essex. port. 

Sherman Nelson,Georgetown. WalterH.Hayes,No.Andover. 
Geo M.Wonson, Gloucester. N. M. Quint, Peabody. 
Sam'l B. George, Groveland. Andrew Lane jr., Rockport. 
Alvin Smith, Hamilton. Daniel O'Brien, Rowley. 

B. Frank Barnes, Haverhill. John G. Page, Salem. 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich. John Q. Evans, Salisbury. 
J. D. Drew, Lawrence. Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus. 

Edwin Bates, Lynn. David Warren, Swampscott. 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield. Edw. E. Ferguson, Topsfield. 
Dan'l W. Friend,Manchester. Nathl. P. Perkins, Wenham. 
Amos P. Alley, Marblehead. L. H. Bailey, West Newbury. 
Geo W. Sargent, Merrimac. 



Members of Essex Agricultural Society 



DECEMBER, 1898. 



Previous printed list was in 1896 corrected in 1897 Report. 
If any errors are discovered in the following list, please re- 
port them to the Secretary. Trustees are requested to report 
death of members as soon as they occur, when convenient. 



Cammet, Samuel 
Chesley, John F. 
Chesley, M. B. 
Currier, W. H. B. 
Davis, B. Lewis 
Feltch, Eldridge S. 
Gale, Edmund 
Gale, Foster 



AMESBURY— 23. 

Goodwin, E. A. Nelson, David 0. 

Hill, Albert C. Sawyer, Aaron 

Hollander, Lambert, Tewksbury, R. R.* 
Huntington, B. F. Tibbetts, William B. 



Little, J. P. 
Lane, T. W. 
Mason, John J. 
Morrill, George T. 



Abbott, James J. 
Abbott, John B. 
Albeget, Lewis 
Andrews, M. G. 
Averill, George L. 
Bailey, Moses A. 
Bailey, Samuel H. 
Blunt, Charles C. 
Gould, Milo H. 
Harriman, Thos. P. 
Haywood, Henry A. 



ANDOVER— 45. 

Blunt, Joseph H. 
Buchan, George 
Buchan, George W. 
Burnham, George L. 
Buttertield, J. P. 
Carter, Charles L. 
Chandler, Joshua H. 
Cheever, James 0. 
Johnson, Francis H. 
McLawlin, Henry, 
Moor, J. Warren 



True, Eben 
Vining, William F. 
Wool lard, R. E. 



Cole, John X. 
Cummings, C. 0. 
Downing, Mrs. J. J. 
Fames, Plato 
Flint, John H. 
Foster, George W. 
Foster George C. 
Foster, F. H. 
Ripley, George 
Smith, John L. 
Smitli, Ppter D. 



ii6 



Holt, E. F. Noyes, Henry P. Smith, Benjamin F. 

Holt, Ballard Poor, Joseph W. Smith, Joseph W. 

Jenkins, John B. Playdon, Alfred G. Thayer, Samuel 

Jenkins, E. Kendall Rea, Jasper Tucker, William 



Abbott, Stephen A. 
Andrews, Joseph F. 
Appleton, Nathan D 
Appleton, Edw. H. 
Avery, Mark B. 
Bancroft, Robert H. 
Burnham, O. B. 
Brewer, George 
Carter, John W. 
Caldwell, Charles E. 
Clark, George 
Clark, Arthur E. 
Clark, Aug. N. 
Clark, Peter E. 
Cochrane, Alex'r 
Connelly, Stephen 
Daltou, Charles H. 
Danforth, E. F. 
Davenport, A. H. 
Dexter, Gordon, 
Dodge, Andrew 
Dodge, Benjamin B. 
Dodge, Fred. A. 
Dodge, Israel W. 
Dodge, Joshua S. 
Dodge, Forest C. 
Dodge, Lucius F. 
Dodge, Walter F. 
Elliot John T. 



BEVERLY— 87. 

Endicott, Robert R. 
Foster, David L. 
Foster, Issacher, jr. 
Foster, William B. 
Friend, Seth 
Giles, Benj. V. 
Gardner, John L. 
Herrick, Joseph H. 
Hill, Hugh 
Howse, Thomas W. 
Lee, Asa F. 
Lord, Cyi'us W. 
Larcom, Rufus 
Lawrence, 0. A. 
Loring, Augustus P 
Loring, Wm. Caleb 
Lothrop, Elmer A. 
Lovett, Francis S. 
Lovett, John W. 
Mason, Alfred A. 
Mason, G-^orge 
Mason, Charles A. 
Masters, ^ames A. 
Mayo, Josiah 
Mitchell, John E. 
Morgan, William C 
Morse, John T. 
Moulton, Charles 
Munsey, John G. 



Murney, John M. 
Norwood, Francis, 
Obear, Ezekiel F. 
Paine, Charles C. 
Perry, Albert 
Phillips, J. C. Mrs. 
Pickett, Charles 
Pierson, C. L. 
Pickmau, D. L. 
Pope, Jasper 
Porter, Adoniram 
Preston, Ezra 
Raymond, John W. 
RaymoDtl, J. W., jr. 
Sawyer, E. C. 
S ohier, Wra. D. 
Sr.oue, Samuel H. 
Swasey, E. 
Trask, J. G. 
Trattoii, Dirling F. 
Trask, Joseph W. 
Vittuin, Albert 
W illis, Joseph A. 
W -bl). Alden 
Williaiiis, Augustus 
Wliitcomb, Austin 
\V(>0i|l)ury, L., jr. 
W.)o.lbary, H. W. 
Woodbury, Rufus 



117 



Anderson, Charles R 
Andrew, Isaac W. 
Austin, Charles F. 
Austin, George B. 
Barnes, B. S. 
Chadwick, Geo. W. 
Chadwick, James W 
Chadwick, Walter I 



BOXFORD— 22. 

Cole, Warren M. 
Cole, Wm. Kimball, 
Day, Isaac C 
Day, Mrs. John 
Herrick, Israel 
Killam, H. M. 
.Nason, James H. 



Parkhurst, John 
■ Parkhurst, JohnW. 
Pearl, Edw. E. 
Pearl, John M. 
Perley, Charles 
Wood, John T. 
Webster, James H. 



DANVERS— 90. 



Barton, J. Webb, Kimball, Francis 0. Preston, Charles H, 
Batchelder, J. Q. A. Kimball, Joel Putnam, Benj. W. 

Berry, Allen A. Kirby, Patrick Putnam, Israel H. 

Bradstreet.Alvah J. Learoyd, A. P. Putnam, John A. 

Bradstreet, Elijah Legro, John 0. P. Putnam, Otis F. 
Bradstreet, William Lyford, Francis W. Pratt, George 
Carlton, 0. Loriug Marston, Jacob Porter, John W. 

Carlton, Wm. B. Morrison, L. L. Pope, Daniel P. 

Carlton, Wm. B. Jr. Mudge, Augustus Proctor, Nathan P, 
Christopher, Wm. P.Nichols, Andrew 
Clark, N. J. Newhall, Benj. E. 

Colcord, J. H. J. Newhall, Henry 
Day, Clarence O'Neal, T. H. 

Dempsey, L. P. Page, Charles W. 

Dodge, Francis Patch, Abraham 

Eaton, Winslow W. Peabody, George H. Sawyer, Samuel L. 
Endicott, Wm. C. Peabody, George A. Sears, John A. 
Evans, Sam'l A. Jr. Peart, William B. Swinerton, John 
Fellows, Alfred Perley, Dean A. 

Fisher, Franklin W. Perley, Edward P 
Fuller, Solomon Perry, James 0. 
Perkins, Henry A 



Gould, Charles H. 
Gustin, John H. 
Harrigau, D. J. 
Hood, Joseph E. 



Richardson, James 
Roberts, Edmund C. 
Roberts, John F. 
Roberts, Oliver 
Rollins, Jonas 
Rice, Chas. B. 



Smart, John L. 
Tapley, George 
Tapley, Gilbert A. 
Trask, Joseph W. 



Perkins, Warren G. Upton, Franklin 
Perkins, William P. Verry. Augustus 
Perkins, M. Sumner Verry, H. Otis 



ii8 



Hutchinson, W. P. 
Jacobs, Wm. A. 
Jackson, Eben 
Jones, L. H. 
Kerns, Charles 



Pettingill, David A. Verry, Henry 
Pettingill, M. C. Weston, Mrs. L. P. 
Pillsbury, H. H. White, Henry A. 
Pope, Ira P, Woodman, Edw. E. 

Porter, J. Frank Whipple, John F. 



Andrews, Elias 
Burnham, Wash. 
Burnham, D. B. 
Choate, Rufus 



ESSEX— 14. 

Haskell, David L. 
Haskell, George 
Knowlton, Aaron 



Lee, Edward K. 
Low, Josiah 
Lufkin, A. E. 



Knowlton, Moses McDonald, Daniel 



Cogswell, Charles B. Knowlton, Perry B. 



GEORGETOWN— 26. 



Bateman, A. P. 

Boardman, Moses N. 
Butler, Oliver S. 
Curtis, Samuel N. 
Hilliard, Henry 
Hoyt, Martin L. 
Jackson, John L. 
James, George B. 
Marble, Nathaniel 



Nelson, Sherman 
Osgood, Stephen 
Perley, David E. 
Perkins, Edwin P. 
Pillsbury, J. 
Poor, Samuel T. 
Ridley, Amos 
Spofford, Sumner P. 
Tenney, Gorham D, 



Tenney, Milton S. 
Tenney, Moses 
Tenney, Orlando B. 
Towne, Alfred E. 
Tuck, John S. 
Weston, George S. 
Whitham,Charles M. 
Yeaton, Winfred J. 



Babson, Horatio 
Babson, Osman 
Barrett, Charles P. 
Bennett, Charles 
Bradford, George R. 
Brown, Edward H. 
Burnham, A. M. 
Burnham, S. A. 



GLOUCESTER— 54. 

Griffin, Bennett 
Grover, Charles E. 
Haskell, H. C. L. 
Haskell, William H. 
Hawkes, E. C. 
Herrick, Gardner W. 
Knowles, Thomas J. 
Lane, Andrew 



Price, Augustus E. 
Proctor, Joseph 0. 
Proctor, Wilbur F. 
Ricker, Richard W. 
Roberts, Joshua 
Rogers, Allan 
Rogers, John S. 
Rust, William P. 



119 



Cole, Israel H. 
Conant, Thomas 
Cook, Benjamin F. 
Corliss, John 
Cronin, John 
Curtis, Samuel, jr. 
Dolliver, John S. 
Fears, Robert R. 
Fergusou, Thos. B. 
Garland, Joseph 



Lovett, John fl. 
Low, David W. 
Marr, Chester, jr. 
Mayo, Israel C. 
Parsons, W. Frank 
Patillo, Alexander 
Pew, William A. 
Phillips, X. H. 
Presson, David S. 
Presson, Alfred 



Shepherd, Joseph C. 
Somes, John E. 
Stanwood, Barnard 
Story, Cyrus 
Webster, Nathaniel 
Wetherell, M. L. 
Wilson, John J. 
Wonson, F. G. 
Wonsou, George M. 
Wonson, J. W. 



Balch, Charles T. 
Baloh, Thomas H. 
Batchelder, Chas. C. 
Day, Randall B. 
Fegan, Henry C. 
George, Eiwin B. 
George, Edwin H. 
George, Samuel B. 



Abbott, M. K. 
Allen, Francis R. 
Brown, William A. 
Dane, Ephraim A. 
Dane, George E. F. 
Dane, Sylvester 
Dodge, Albert W. 
Dodge, Emerson P. 
Dodge, George B. 



GROVELAND— 22. 

Harrington, Edward 
Harriman, Moses H. 
Harriman, Abel S. 
Hopkinson, W. H. 
Ladd, Nathaniel E. 
Longfellow, N. 
Martino, Philip H. 



Merrill, Burton E. 
Pemberton, L. K. 
Spofford, Henry H. 
Stacy, Edward M. 
Stickney, Abel 
Tenney, George H. 
Woodbury, Louis A. 



HAMILTON— 26. 

Dodge, George R. 
Dunnels, Ira A. 
Foss, Robert 
Gardner, A. P. 
Gibney, George H. 
Knowiton, Franklin 
Knowlton, Isaac F. 
Meyer, George V. L. 
Nason, Daniel A. 



Norwood, C. J. 
Putnam, Charles 0. 
Rankin, Eli D. 
Robinson, E. P. 
Safford, Daniel E. 
Smith, Alvin 
Underbill, J. C. 
Whipple, Em. A. 



Adams, A. H. 
Barnes, B. Frank 



HAVERHILL— 90. 

Hobson, John L. Moody, H. L. 
Hopkinson, Sam. W. Quinby, T. W. 



I20 



Barry, J. M. 
Bean, John A. 
Brickett, Barnard 
Butters, Charles 
Butrick, A. W. 
Cheever, H. W. 
Cogswell, Doane 
Cogswell, George 
Dewhurst, James 
Day, John C. 
Eaton, B. F. 
Ellis, John A. 
Emerson, Albert 
Emerson, Charles B. 
Emerson, E. A. 
Farnsworth, J. H. 
Fellows, C. H. 
Franklin, Miss S. F. 
Frost, Henry 
Gage, Edwin V. 
Gale, John E. 
Hanson, M. W. 
Haseltine, Amos, jr. 
Hazeltine, Charles 
Hazeltine, John 
Hardy, George H. 
Hilton, William 
Hilton, Charles M. 



Hoyt, H. H. 
Howe, James 
Johnson, Laburton 
Johnson, Charles G. 
Kimball, William B. 
Kimball, Byron G. 
Kimball, M. Tenney 
Kingsbury, John D. 
Knight, Albert A. 
Ladd, George W. 
McKee, William, 
Lackey, Andrew 
Little, J. G. S. 
Martin, George C. 
Merrill, James C. 
Messerve, Wm. S. 
Moody, Wm. H. 
Morse, Leslie K. 
Nichols, John B. 
Nichols, J. B. 
Ordway, Alfred A. 
Osgood, William W. 
Peabody, Frank 
Peabody, Daniel 
Phillips, Frank'n G. 
Peters, Daniel 
Poore, F. W. 
Porter, Dudley 



Richards, F. G. 
Ridge way, Jos. 
Riley, A. W. 
Rhodes, C. N. 
Sanders, Thomas 
Sprague, W. W. 
Swasey, H, K. 
Taylor, Martin 
Taylor, Oliver 
Titcomb, Beniah 
Tewksbury, John B. 
Thornton, William 
Towne, Herman W. 
Wadleigh, Levi 0. 
Wales, Herbert E. 
Webster, Charles E. 
Webster, C. W. 
Webster, Ebenezer 
Webster, Ira J. 
Webster, Frank S. 
Webster, E. F. 
Webster, Richard 
West, H. K. 
West, James F. 
White, James D. 
Whittier, Alvah 
Whittier, Arthur G 
Wilson, Henry S. 



IPSWICH— 33. 

Abbott, Joseph D. Gould, John J. 
Appleton, Francis R.Gould, Walter P. 
Appleton, Daniel F. Grant, Joshua B. 
Baker, S. N. jr. Green, George H. 

Bond, James W. Haskell, George 
Brown, Everett K. Hodgdon, George 



Kinsman, Joseph P. 
Kinsman, Willard F. 
Marshall, Joseph 
Perkins, Isaac E. B. 
Phillips, B. Frank 
Reddy, Michael 



121 



Brown, S. Albert, 
Carlisle, J. W. 
Clark, Erastus 
Fall, Tristam B. 
Fellows, Alonzo B. 



Allyn, Warren E, 
Ames, M. B. 
Austin, M. E. 
Ball, F. J. 
Bell, Charles U. 
Bodwell, S. B. 
Boehm, Adolph C 
Breen, John 
Bruce, Alex'r B. 
Colburn, George W. 
Collins, Lewis P. 
Currier, Eben B. 
Curran, Maurice K. 
DeCourcey, C. A. 
Drew, J. D. 
Dyer, Arthur W. 
Farrell, John 
Fay, John 
Finn, John L. 
Flynn, Edward 
Fitzgerald, Wm. 
Ford, George 
Ford, Patrick 
French, A. J. 



Hodgkins.AugustineRoss, Joseph 
Horton, Joseph Rutherford, Aaron A. 

Horton, William G. Shatswell, Nath. 
Kimball, Daniel Story, Alden 
Kinnear, James Whittier, Maynard 



LAWRENCE— 72. 

Gile, William H. 
Griffin, Anson L. 
Hall, Dyer S. 
Herrick, H. G. 
Hills, George W. 
Hood. Gilbert E. 
Holt, Lewis G. 
Hubbard, Leavitt 
Jackson, Joseph 
Jewett, Wm. S. 
Joyce, James W. 
Junkins, George S. 
Kittredge, G. H. 
Kline, George E. 
Lewis, S. S. 
McAllister, J. G. 
Mahouey, W. 0. 
McCarthy, Patrick 
Merrill. George S. 
Moore, L. C. 
Norwood, John K. 
Oswald, William 
Page, E. F. 
Parker, Walter E. 



Richardson, E. P. 
Riley, Henry 
Robinson, H. B. 
Ruht, Joseph 
Russell, George W. 
Russell, W, A. 
Ryan, Thomas F. 
Sargent, A. E. 
Saunders, Daniel 
Saunders, Caleb 
Shattuck, Joseph 
Simpson, James R. 
Small, Henry 
Smith, James B. 
Stanley, J. J. 
Stowell, Joseph 
Sylvester, Wm. H. 
Tewksbury, R. H. 
Tompkins, N. S. S. 
Truell, Byron 
Victor, F. M. 
Webster, H. K. 
Wellman, John R. 
Wiggin, Oilman P. 



LYNN— 94. 



Aldrich, A. P. Haskell, John C. Nichols, H. S. 

Allen, Charles Harnden, Henry C. Nichols, Otis 



122 



Allen, Walter B. 
Andrews, Randall 
Bates, Edwin' 
Bates, Walter E. 
Bates, William H. 
Bates, Fred H. 
Bates, Wallace 
Beckford, Ebenezer 
Berry, Henry N. 
Berry, Benj. J. 
Bray, E. E. 
Breed, Amos F. 
Breed, Henry H. 
Breed, Richard 
Bushby, Warren 
Butman, Joseph E. 
Butman, Wm. W. 
Cain, Julia A. Mrs. 
Chase, L. H. 
Chase, Amos F. 
Clark, Joseph M. 
Cross, Alfred 
Croscup, James A. 
Cressey, John S. 
Dwyer, Edward F, 
Farrar, Joseph E. 
Fitz, Josiah 4th 
Fry, Charles C. 
Goodell, J. W. 
Good win, Joseph W. 



Bray, William A. 
Cox, Thomas E. jr. 
Danforth, John M. 
Derby, Charles H. 
Gerry, Elbridge F. 
Herrick, George E. 



ILiwkes, Nathan M. 
Heath, Henry A. 
Heath, James 
Hill, E. L. 
Hopkins, Fred I. 
Hovey, Rufus P. 
Ingalls, James W. 
Ireson, S. S. 
Jepson, Eli 
Joint, William H. 
Kimball, Rufus 
King, W. F. 
Knox, David 
Lamphier, Joseph C 
Lewis, Jacob M. 
Mace, Frank W. 
Marsh, George E. 
Marsh, S, E. 
May, Lyman A. 
McBrien, Richard 
McKenney, John H. 
Merritt, Timothy 
Mockett, Joseph E. 
Mower, M. V. B. 
Mudge, John 
Neal, Peter M. 
Newhall, Asa T. 
Newhall, G. A. 
Kewhall, Hiram L. 



Nichols, Thomas P. 
Norris, George, jr. 
Koyes, George C. 
Oliver, John E. 
Pevear, G. K. 
Pevear, H. A. 
Potter, Edward P. 
Preble, J. H. 
Ramsdell, Chas. H. 
Richards, Edw. A. 
Richardson, Geo. W. 
Rogers, Ira D. 
Roney, Simon J. 
.Rounds, Herbert L. 
Rowell, B. W. 
Scribner, Benj. 
Sheehan, John 
Shorey, John L. 
Shorey, George L. 
Sawyer, J. A. J. 
Stone, Henry 
Teel, James M, 
Tyler, Thaddeus W. 
Vickary, J. C. 
Whipple, Geo. H. 
Willey, James L. 
Wilson, J. C. 
Winslow, Aaron 
Winslow, G. W. 



LYNNFIELD— 16. 

Mansfield, Andrew 
Munroe, Harry W. 
Munroe, Wilbur 
Newhall, Frank 
Perkins, John H. 



Perkins, J. Winslow 
Roundy, George M. 
Roundy, W. R. 
Smith, Henry E. 
Verne, B. P. 



12 



MANCHESTER -17. 

Allen, VVm. H. Cheever, Wm. M. Prince, Charles A. 

Baker, John CooUdge,T. JeffersonRockweil, A. P. 

Boardman/r.Dennie Friend, Daniel W. Rabardy, Julius F. 
Burnham, John A. Higginson, Henry Sturgis, Russell 
Cheever, John H. Lee, Allen Wigglesworth, Geo. 

Curtis, C. A. Merriam, Arthur M. 



MARBLE HE AD— 12. 

Alley, Amos P. Hathaway, Amos C. Paine, Thomas W. 

Appleton, Thomas Clough, A. W. Crouin, Michael 

Gregory, J. J. H. Hathaway, Joseph B. Dennis, W. John 

Fabens, Frank L. Hathaway, Seth W. Ware, Benjamin P. 



MERRIMAC— 8. 

Adams, George Hopkins, S. C. Sargent, Geo. W. 

Haskell, William H.Sargent, M. Perry Sargent, Walter H. 
Hoyt, George W. Sargent, Bailey 



Bradley, George B. 
Buswell, Joseph E. 
Butters, George A. 
Butters, W. H. 
Crosby, John S. 
Dow, Virgil 
Dwyer, Michael 
Emerson, Jacob, jr. 
George, John H. 
Goss, Chas. E. 
Hall, C. H. 



METHUEN— 31. 

How, Joseph S. 
Mann, C. W. 
Morrison, D. T. 
Noyes, David W. 
Pedlar, S. J. 
Phippen, G S. 
Parker, James 0. 
Rogers, William M, 
Russell, Fred A. 
Russell, A. P. 



Sargent, S. G. 
Shirley, John W. 
Sawyer, Chas. M. 
Sleeper, Wm. C. 
Smith, Walter 
Swan, Leverett 
Thurlow, J E. 
Tozier, C. L. 
Thorp, Alfred 
Webster, Frank W. 



Berry, William 
Currier, Geo. A. 
Flint, James 
Haskell, George F. 



124 

MIDDLETON— 10. 

Peabody, A. W. 
Stiles, Farnum 
Stiles Hiram A. 



Stewart, Mrs. S. A. 
Weston, Solomon W. 
Wilkins, George B. 



N AH ANT— 12. 

Lodge, Henry Cabot Parker, E. Francis 
Lovering, Charles T. Parker, Arthur H. 
Merriam F. Upham, George P. 

James, Geo. Abbott Otis, Herbert F. Whitney, George 



Beal, James H. 
Codman, Edw. W. 
Goodale, Byron 



NEWBURY— 51. 



Adams, Daniel D. 
Adams, George W. 
Adams, James K. 
Adams, George E. 
Bray, George W. 
Coffin, William P. 
Coleman, Moses 
Dole, Nathaniel 
Forbes, A. B. 
Hale, Stephen P. 
Howard, Horatio M 
Illsley, Edwin 
Illsley, Paul M. 
Illsley, Joseph 
Jaques, Richard 
Jaques, Richard T. jr 
Jaques, William 



Noyes Richard T. 
Noyes, Edward A. 
Noyes, Justin 
Noyes, James 
Noyes, Moses K. 



Kent, Edward 
Knight, Charles F. 
Little, Carleton 
Little, Edward F. 
Little, George 
Little, Nathaniel jr. Perkins, Wm. W. 
Little, William Perkins, Frank 

Little, Wm. Burke, Perkins, Paul A. 
Longfellow, Horace Pearson, Benj. jr. 
Longfellow, Joseph Plummer, Geo. H. 
Lucy, Gideon R. Rogers, Abial 
Lunt, Charles M. Rolfe, John C. 
Lunt, C. A. Rolfe, Joseph N. 

Moody, Nath'l W. Tenney, Henry L. 
Moynihan, CorneliusTenny, Daniel G. 
.Newman, Sidney F. Toomey, Mathew H. 
Noyes, Edwin P. Woods, Charles W. 



NE WB U RYPO RT— 44. 



Adams, Philip D. 
Adams, Rufus 



Johnson, Wm. R. 
Kent, Otis L. 



Parley, R. M. 
Perkins, Charles 



125 



Allen, John W. 
Balch, John H. 
Bartlett, Chas. S. 
Bay ley, Wm. H. 
Capers, Thomas 
Coleman, James C. 
Conley, Joseph J. 
Cook, T. N. " 
Cutter, Eben P. 
Delano, Otis 
Dodge, E. P. 
Griffin, Eliphalet 
Hewett, C. C. 



Knights, George W. 
Lewis, Samuel W. 
Little, John G. 
Maguire, C. K 
Marsh, Horace W. 
Moseley, Edward A. 
Moseley, Edward S. 
Mosely, Fred'k S. 
Moulton, Joseph 
Nelson, Charles W. 
Newhall, Asa T. 
Noyes, Isaac P. 
Ordway, A. D. 



Plummer, Moses A. 
Poore, George H. 
Rowe, D. T. 
Sargent, John W. 
Smith, Joseph B. 
Stanley, B. F. 
Stanley, J. C. 
Thurlow, William 
Tilton, Enoch 
Toppan, Edward S. 
Winkley, J. Otis 
Winkley, Paul T. jr. 



Adams, Edward 
Barker, John 
Carlton, Daniel A. 
Carlton, Amos D. 
Chever, William J. 
Davis, George G. 
Davis, George E. 
Dale, William J. 
Farnham, B. H. 
Farnham, Mrs. B. 
Farnham, J. L. 
Farnham, W. Benj. 
Fuller, Edward A. 
Foster, J. Frank 



NO. ANDOVER— 40. 

Foster, Nathan 
Foster, Orrin 
French, J. D. W. 
•Frye. Newton P. 
Fuller, Abijah P. ■ 
Goodhue, Hiram P. 
Greene, E. W. 
Hayes, Walter H. 
Holt, Peter jr. 
Huges, Winfield S. 
Jenkins, Benj F. 
Jenkins, Milon S. 
Johnson, Charles F. 



Kittredge, Hannah E. 
Loring, Geo. B. 
Manion, John 
Mathewson, George 
Moody, E. W. 
Poor, James C. 
Robinson, AddisonM. 
Stevens, Moses T. 
Stevens, Oliver 
Symonds, Frederick 
Wilson, Abiel 
Wardwell, T. 0. 
Wiley, John A. 



PEABODY— 146. 

Annis, Peter W. Grosvenor, D. P. 
Appleton, Francis H. Hall, Benjamin G. 
Barrett, E. Pope Harablett, E. B. 
Barrett, Edward P. Higgins, John E. 



Osgood, William 
Pepper, George W. 
Parmenter, John W. 
Poor, Charles M. 



126 



Batchelder, Cyrus T 
Beckett, C. L. 
Beckett, Walter H. 
Blake, E. L. 
Blaney, Stephen 
Bodge, Arthur P. 
Bodge, Jacob G. 
Bodge, Plenry 
Bodge, Freeman P. 
Brown, Lewis 
Brown, Rufus H. 
Brown, R. S. 
Bursley, Geo. A. 
Bushby, K A. 
Bushby, Charles F. 
Buxton, Henry V. 
Buxton, Simon P. 
Carroll, Thomas 
Clark, George H. 
Clark, A. B, 
Clark, Wm. P. 
Cody, James F. 
Colcord, J. L. 
Connor, John J. 
Crehou, Joseph S. 
Curtis, George S. 
Daley, William J. 
Davis, Charles W. 
Diston, William 
Dodge, A. Taylor 
Dole, William T. 
Donnell, AVilliam 
Drown, Isaac A. 
Durkee,T. C. 
Durkee, Elmer E. 
Emerton, C. S. 
Ellsworth, H. L. 
Farley, Charles B. 



Harrington, H. A, 
Hayes, Andrew J. 
Hills, Charles C. 
Hill, W. L. 
Hill, Benjamin M. 
Hinckley, C. E. 
Herrick, John E. 
Holman, George L. 
Hooper, Charles H. 
Humphrey, B. B. 
Kimball, Elizabeth C 
Kelley, Elbridge G. 
King, George H. 
King, J. Augustus 
King, D. Warren 
Knight, George A. 
Knowltou, Isaac P. 
Knapp, Samuel E. 
Linnehan, James 
Littlefield, S. S. 
Lyons, Thomas F. 
Lummus, Abraham 
MackintoshjRichard 
Mansfield, E. 
Mansfield,Arthur W. 
McKeen, John D. 
Merrill, Amos 
Moore, Benj. N. 
Morris, R. E. 
Munroe, W. Ford 
Mulcahey, M. .T. 
Needham, George A. 
Needham, Joseph S. 
Newhall, F. L. 
Newha]l,Orlando F. 
Nourse, Samuel W. 
Osborne, Abraham C 
Osborne, Daniel W. 



Poor, Albert F. 
Porter, Leonard E. 
Porter, Edward H. 
Preston, Levi 
Quint, Nicholas M. 
Quint, Hazen A. 
Raddin, Alonzo 
Rellihan, Tliomas J. 
Reynolds, George 
Rogers, Jacob C. 
Safford, 0. F. 
Sanger, George F. 
Sawyer, Wm. F. 
Shay, William A. 
Shannahan, John 
Shaw, Fred M. 
Sheen, William E. 
Simpkins, Charles 
Smith, Jesse H. 
Southwick, B. F. 
Spaulding, George E. 
Stanley, Frank W. 
Stevens, Jacob B. 
Stockwell, Harry E. 
Stone, Charles E. 
Stone, Charles 0. 
Taylor, Benj. H. 
Taylor, Geo. W. 
Trask, Arthur 
Twiss, Everett M. 
Tyler, A. W. 
Walcott, John G. 
Walker, Harry F. 
Wallace, David B. 
Ward, William N. 
Warner, Charles 0. 
Watkins, William 
Wells, A. E. 



127 



Farriugton, Geo. C. 
Farnham, Frank E. 
Fellows, Wm. H. 
Foster, George M. 
Foster, H. K. 
Goodale, Jacob 0. 
Gouldiug, C. H. 



Appleton, Zeno A. 
Bray, Humphrey P. 
Dodd, Stephen 
Grimes, Loring 
Lane, Andrew 
Lane, Andrew, jr. 
Lane, Horace 



Bartlett, B. W. 
Blodgett, George B. 
Carlton, George F. 
Daniels, George E. 
Dodge, Joseph D. 
Dodge, Paul A. 
Dodge, Phineas A. 
Dummer, Nath'l K 
Hale, Clara A. 



Osboi-ne, -I. Edw.inl Wheeler, Benj. S. 
Osborn, Lyman E. Whidden, A. M. 
Osborne, Kendall Whipple, Horace P- 
Osborne, Charles L. Whipple, C. H. 
O'Connor, P. H. Wiley, William P. 
O'Shea, Thomas H. Winchester, Went'th 
Osgood, Geo. Fred 



ROCKPORT— 19. 

Low,Martha J. Mrs. Pool, Story D. 
Manning, John J. Rowe, Amos 
ManningWilliam K Smith, Allen 
Merridew, James P. Smith, William H. 
McNeil, William Smith, Solomon 
Norwood, Gorham Tufts, George W. 



ROWLEY— 26. 

Hale, Daniel H. 
Hale, Thaddeus 
Hale, Agnes H. 
Hale, T. P. 
Keyes, Eben S. 
Lambert, Mary G. 
Mahoney, John 
Mighill, Charles P. 
O'Brien, Daniel 



Pike, John 
Smith, Willard P. 
Stockbridge, Seth 
Stockbridge, A. J. 
Tenney, John H. 
Todd, Frank P. 
Todd, John F. 
Todd, J. Scott 



SALEM— 63. 

Almy, James F. Jones, Samuel G. Rantoul, Robert S. 
Abbott, Nathaniel Knight, Edmund F. Rogers, Dudley P. 
Ballard, Charles W. Lamson, Frederick Robinson, John 
Bickertou, William Little, Philip Reynolds, Henry E. 

Chase, George Lord, William Ropes, Willis H. 



128 



Cooper, Charles A. 
Clark, Charles S. 
Collins, Wm. F. M. 
Creesy, George W. 
Creamer, George G. 
Daland, John 
Dane, William A. 
Eudicott, Wm. C. 
Felt, John 
Foster, Joseph C. 
Foster, Wm. J. 
Gardner, A. B. 
Hathaway, John 
Hale, Henry A. 
Horton, William A. 
Ives, John S. 



Manning, Robert 
Merritt, David 
Morse, E. Henry 
Nichols, Wm. S. 
Northend, Wm. D. 
Peabody, John P. 
Perkins, E. R. 
Perkins, John W. 
Porter, Ellis H. 
Putnam, Henry W. 
Potter, William 
Pingree, David 
Page, John G. 
Page, James E. 
Phillips, Willard P. 
Pickering, Benj. P. 



Ropes, Charles F. 
Ropes, John C. 
Ropes, Reuben W. 
Saunders, Robert J. 
Shreve, 0. B. 
Spencer, Charles P. 
Swasey, John A. 
Streeter, Gilbert L. 
Tracey, Patrick 
Vaughn, Ira 
Ware, Horace C. 
White, Frank W. 
Whitmore, Wm. F. 
Waters, David P. 
Wyman, Isaac C. 
Wright, Frank V. 



Bartlett, Moses J. 
Dole, Edward G. 
Dow, George A. 
Eaton, John F. 
Evans, John Q. 



SALISBURY— 15. 

Getchell, N. Tracey Pettengill, Wesley 
Gilman, Samuel Pettengill, John Q.A. 
Greeley, Furmer H. Smith, John F. 
Greenleaf, Wm. H. Thornton, Robert 
Montgomery, John True, P. Albert 



Blodgett, J. W. 
Faxon, M. B. 
George, Henry M. 
Hawkes, Samuel 



SAUGUS— 10. 

Hawkes, Lewis W. Newhall, Joseph 
Hill, Alfred C. Penney, George H. 

Newhall, Herbert B. Whitehead, Joseph 



Crosman, S. F. 
Pettingell, L. D. 
Pettingell, S. J. 



SWAMPSCOTT— 7. 

Rowe, Allen 
Washburue, John 



Warren, David 
Warren, Mrs. N". J. 



Averill, George F. 
Bradstreet, Dudley 
Ferguson, Edw. E. 
Pierce, Thomas W. 
Pike, Baxter P. 
Poole, Benjamin 



129 

TOPSFIELD— 18. 

Hood, Salmon D. 
Lamson, J. Arthur 
Leach, Charles H. 
Towne, Frank H. 
Ward, Richard 
Wildes, Eugene L. 



Manning, James 
Mason, Alphonso 
Peabody, Charles J. 
Wilson, James, 
Wilkins, Lyman S. 
Woodbury, Isaac M. 



WENHAM— 17. 

Alley, Henry Dodge, George F. 

Batchelder,T.WilsonDodge, William P. 
Cole, Zachariah Hobbs, A. F. 

Day, Everett K. Hobbs, Henry 
Demsey, H. H. Kavanaugh, J. 

Dodge, Robert F. Morgan, William B. 



Pingree, David 
Peabody, George W. 
Perkins, Nath'l P. 
Prince, Samuel R. 
Tilton, George H. 



WEST NEWBURY— 46. 



Amend, Robert A. 
Bailey, Lawrence H. 
Bartlett, M. Walsh 
Boynton, Eben M. 
Brown, Hayden 
Brown, Leander F. 
Carr, George G. 
Chace. S. F. 
Connor, M. H. 
Connor, J. J. 
Evans, Charles M. 
Follansbee, B. A. 
Flook, George L. 
Goodridge, H. M. 
Gordon, J. R. 
Gowen, Mrs. C. W. 



Gowen, C. W. 
Gowen, Oscar 
Jaques, Romulus 
Jaques, Stephen A. 
King, T. J. 
Ladd, Byron H. 
Merrill, William 
Merrill, William E. 
Merrill, Henry 
Moody, Horace 
Moore, Alfred L. 
Nason, Ezekiel G. 
Nason, Henry F. 
Newell, Richard 
Ordway, Cyrus D. 



Ordway, Cyrus K. 
Ordway, Charles W. 
Pierce, George J. 
Pierce, Henry J. 
Poor, Fred H. 
Poor, George H. 
Poor, William H. 
Poore, Moses H. 
Prince, S. R. 
Rogers, George C. 
Smith, Robert L. 
Stan wood, G. Miss 
Stultz, Frederick 
Thurlow, Thomas C. 
Titcomb, Silas M. C. 



I30 

NON-RESIDENTS— 145. 

Allen, Henry C, Keeae, N. H. Lovering,John H.,Marlborough 
Alley, James E. Low, Sidney, Groton 

Ames, Amos L.,Tacoma,Wash. Low, Aaron, Hingham 
Armitage, John S., Wellesley Low, George P., Hingham 
Babson, Gustavus, jr., Seward, Lyford, George H., New York 

Neb. Mann, Otis, Springfield 

Balch, Eustis, California Martin, Walter T., Dover,N. H. 

Balch, William H., Maiden McFarland, L., Maine 
Baker, John, Sanborn, Col. Merrill, Geo. F., No. Hampton, 
Barker, John G., Boston N. H. 

Beckford, C H., Boston Merrill, Hayden A., Dedham 

Bennett, Charles, So.Gardner, Mills, K. P., Abbott, Col. 

Mass. Mitchell, Charles, Milton 

Blake, J. Albert, Lexington Mitchell, Seth, Boston 
Blake, J. P., Newton Moulton, Beverly S., Boston 

Black, James D., Harvard Nelson, D. Oscar, Portsmouth, 
Bodwell, Henry A.,Keene,N.H. 0. 

Bodwell,Jos. R ,Hallowell,Me. Nichols, Albert, Chicago, HI. 
Brackett, H. Clarke, Virginia Nichols, D. P., Boston 
Burnhara, Choate, Boston Noyes, A. P., Lowell 

Burnham, Ira T., Lexington Ordway, G. W.,Manch'r, N. H. 
Caldwell, L., Jacksonville,Fla. Page, Adino, Metamora, 111. 
Campbell, Charles H., !^NeWj_Page. Nathan jr., Wakefield 

Rochelle, N. Y. Palmer, Charles L., Cotton 

Carey, James, Quincy Wood, Idaho Co. Idaho 

Carey, James, New York Palmer. Frank H., N. Wey- 

Chapin,W. C, Providence,R. I. mouth, Mass. 
Chase, Joseph S., Maiden Patch, ^A.|_H., Clarkville, Tenn, 

Cheever, John H., Somerville Payson, Samuel F., New York 
Clarke, Joseph F., Boston Ptsrry, Geo. S., Brattleboro, Vt. 

Cleveland, H. W. S., Chicago Phelps, N. L., Iowa 
Colby, Charles A., New York Phillips, A. P., Medfield 
Currier, William A., Boston Phillips, Wm. S., jr. Colorado 
Day, Abraham, Boston Phillips, Samuel, Brighton 

Davis, Phineas E., Chicago Pierce, William, Boston 
Dodge, John S., Chicopee Poor, Henry, New York 



131 

Dole, Francis F., Chicopee Porter, Dudley H., Saratoga 
Drew, Charles R., Medford Pratt, S. S., Revere 
Eaton, Thos., Harriston, 111. Putnam, Benjamin C, Chelsea 
Emanuel, Henry, New York Putnam, Moses W., Phila,]Sr. Y. 
Estes, Alden C, San Landro, Raymond, Samuel, New York 

Cal. Reynolds, W. B., Derry, N. H. 

Farwell, Edwin C, Reading Robinson, John L., Manches- 
Felton, Wm. H., Sherborn ter, N. H. 

Fernald, Henry B., Washington Rogers, Isaiah S., Somerville 
Flint, Horace P., Boston Rogers, Benjamin, Maiden 

Foster, James B., Wakefield Rogers, William, Illinois 
Fowler, W. W., Plymouth Rowell, E. F., Worcester 
French, Charles, Davenport,0. Safford, N. T., Dunbarton,N.H, 
French, Geo. H., Davenport, 0. Sargent, Elmer P., Maiden 
Gannett, W. W., Boston Sargent, G. P., Phil., Pa. 

Gaffney, Cornelius, So.Boston Shattuck, Chas. W., Winchester 
Gilman, Frederic, N. H. Shattuck, L. P., Boston 

Gookin, Samuel F., Boston Sleeper, S. C, Plaistow, N. H. 
Gowen, F. H,, Brentwood, N. J. Smith, Beaman C, Charlestown 
Green, John A., New York -Smith, George J., Boston 
Greene, Arthur M., Phil. Spofford,Farnham, Washington 

Gulliver, Francis, Binghamp- Spring, J. E., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ton, N. Y. Stanley, Samuel S., Boston 

Hadley, William, Boston Stanwood, Joseph T., Maiden 

Hale, Joseph S., Lugonia, San Steele, Walter, Stoneham 

Bernandino Co., Cal. Stickney, Charles, Fon du Lac, 

Hayes. J. F. C, Iowa Wis. 

Hawkes, George L., Wakefield Stickney, Niles T., Chicago, 111. 
Hoag, Charles E., Springfield, Styles, Charles F,, Woburn 

Mass. Stone, Edwin M. Prov., R. I. 

Hicock, S. S., Rochester, N.H. Tappau, S. B., Arlington 
Hill, E. L., Templeton, Mass. Taylor, George H., Everett 
Hill, Mark F., Derry, N. H. Trask, Alfred M., Brockton 
Holt, H. E., Lexington Walker, Dexter M., Boston 

Hubbard, J.G.,Ham8te'd,N.H. Ward, Winsor M., Wakefield 
Hutchinson, C. H., Rhinebeck,Ware, Darwin E., Boston 

N. Y. Webb, Michael jr., Cambridge 

Johnson, James T., Waltham Wentzel, David, Amherst 



132 

Kent, Albert S., Colorado Wheeler, H. T., Worcester 

Kimball, Jonathan, Boston Wheeler, L. H., California 
Kimball, W.F., Providence, R.I. Whitman, F. A., Lexington 
King, D. Webster, Boston Whittemore, Chas. A., Boston 
Knight, J. M., Maine Whittemore, J. R., Chicopee 

Lamb, Wm. D., Southbridge Wilder, S, W., Lowell 
Lake, Charles H.,Churchill,Md. 

Total number, December, 1898 — 1306 resident members. 

147 non-resident members. Grand total, 1453 members. 



List of Premiums Awarded 1898. 



BULLS. 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, $6 00 
Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey, first premium, 6 00 

William C. Endicott, Dan vers, Guernsey,first premium, G 00 
A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 

6 00 
A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 4 00 
Mrs. J. C. Phillips," Beverly, Jersey, second premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, with 5 of his 

get, first premium. Diploma and 15 00 

FAT CATTLE. 

J. P. Little, Amesbury, pair fat oxen, first premium, 8 00 
J. P. Little, Amesbury, pair fat oxen, second premium, 6 00 

MILCH cows. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstien, first pre- 
mium, 8 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, first pre- 
mium, 8 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstien, first premium, 7 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, second 

premium, 4 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, second 

premium, 5 00 



134 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, 7 00 
Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey, second premium, 4 00 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, 5 Holstein cows, first 

premium, Diploma and $10 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, 5 grade cows, second 

premium, 8 00 

HEIFERS. 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, 5 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, 4 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, 4 00 
William C. Endicott, Danvers, Guernsey, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 
James|C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 5 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein calves, first 

premium, 4 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein heifer, second 

premium, 3 00 

Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, Jersey, second premium, 3 00 
Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, Jersey, second premium, 2 00 
A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 2 00 
A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 2 00 
A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 2 00 
W. S. Hughs, No. Andover, grade Jersey, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
William C. Endicott, Danvers, grade Guernsey, sec- 
ond premium, 2 00 
Francis O. Kimball, Danvers, grade Guernsey, second 

premium, • 2 00 

Robert Foss, Hamilton, grade Jersey, first premium, 4 00 



135 

S. F. Grossman, Swarapscott, grade Guernsey, first 

premium, 4 00 

James G. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, first 

premium, 4 00 

James G. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 

James G. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, second 

premium, 3 00 

T. O'Shea, Peabod}', grade, first premium, 5 00 

W. G. Endicott, Danvers, grade Guernsey, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

J. P. Little, Amesbury, Durham oxen, first premium, 8 00 
J. W. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford oxen, second pre- 
mium, 6 00 
J. G. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford steers, first premium, 6 00 
J. G. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford steers, second pre- 
mium, 4 00 

STEERS. 

J. P. Little, Amesbury, Hereford steers, first premium, 4 00 
J. P. Little, Amesbury, Trained steer, special premium,5 00 
J. P. Little, Amesbury, Holstein steers, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 
J. W. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford steers, first pre- 
mium, , 5 00 
J. W. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford steers, first pre- 
mium, 3 00 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING. 

W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, Ghestnut stallion, first pre- 
mium. Diploma and 8 00 
A. B. Forbes, Newbury, Black stallion, first premium, 5 00 
A. B. Forbes, Newbury, Black stallion, second pre- 
mium, 5 00 

BROOD MARES. 

A. B. Forbes, Newbury, Bay mare, first premium, 8 00 



136 



FAMILY HORSES. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, first premium, 6 00 

Thomas WoUoff, Peabody, second premium, 4 00 

gents' driving horses. 
A. B. Forbes, Newbury, Bay mare, first premium, 6 00 
J. Henry Nason, Boxford, Brown mare, second pre- 
mium, 4 00 
Edwin Bates, Lynn, pair, second premium, 5 00 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Black horse, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
Oscar Cram, Middleton, Sorrel horse, second premium, 

3 00 

SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

Benj. W. Farnham, No. Andover, Bay mare, first pre- 
mium, 6 00 

PAIRS FARM HORSES. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, first premium, 8 00 

Mrs. J. C. Phillips, Beverly, second premium, 5 00 

E. C. Little, Merrimac, first premium, 8 00 

COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

H. H. Demsey, Wenham, Bay filly, first premium, 4 00 
A. B. Forbes, Newbury, Chestnut, second premium, 2 00 
James J. Ray, Lynn, Saddle horse, special premium, 5 00 

SWINE, LARGE BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester white boar, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, 8 Chester pigs, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester pigs, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Cheshire boar, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Cheshire sow, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chesliire pigs, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Berkshire boar, first premium, 5 00 



137 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Poland China boar, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Poland China pigs, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, weaned pigs, second premium, 8 00 

F. L. Newhall, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 

F. L. Newhall, Peabody, Yorkshire sow, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 

F. L. Newhall, Peabody, Yorkshire pigs, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 

F. W. Stanley, Peabody, Berkshire boar, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 

SWINE, SMALL BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, first premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire sow, first premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire pigs, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, small Yorkshire boar, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, small Yorkshire boar, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 

W. C. Winslow, Marblehead, Yorkshire pigs, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 

F. L. Newhall, Peabody, Yorkshire sow, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 

SHEEP. 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover Hampshire buck, first 

premium, 5 00 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, ewes, first premium, 5 00 
J. D. W. French, No. Andover, lamb, second premium, 2 00 
J. A. Roome, Peabody, Leicester buck, first premium, 5 00 
J. B. Thomas, Peabody, lambs, first premium, 4 00 



138 

PLOUGHING WITH DOUBLE TEAM". 

J. P. Little, Amesbury, 4 oxen, first premium, 8 00 

John C. Evans, Amesbury, 4 oxen, second premium, 6 00 

PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES. 

E. C. Little, Merrimac, 2 horses, first premium, 6 00 

PLOUGHING WITH SWIVEL PLOUGH. 

F. A. Dodge, Beverly, first premium, 6 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, second premium, 4 00 

PLOUGHING WITH SULKY PLOUGH. 

J. O. Goodale, Peabody, first premium, 6 00 

O. F. Newhall,Peabody, second premium, 4 00 

OTHER AWARDS. 

Awarded by Committee on Poultry, $266 50 

" Harrows, 10 00 

" . " " " Agricuit'al Implements, 62 00 

" Carriages, 23 00 

" Dairy, 1 00 

" Bread and Canned Fruit,15 00 

" " " " Bees, Hives, and Honey, 1 00 

" Pears, 49 00 

" Apples, 55 00 

'' Peaches, Grapes, etc., 74 00 
" Plants and Flowers, 68 00 
" Vegetables, 117 00 

" Grain and Seed, 8 00 

" " " " Counterpanes and Af- 

ghans, 16 50 

'' . '' " Carpets and Rugs, 13 00 

" Manuf's from Leather, 24 50 
" Manf. and Gen. Mdse., 17 50 
" Fancy Work, 40 50 

" " " " Art Work, 45 75 

" Work by Children, 16 75 



RECAPITULATION. 



Awarded for Ploughing, 




$40 00 




FARM STOCK. 






Awarded for Bulls, 


$54 00 








Fat Cattle, 


14 00 








Milch Cows, 


43 00 








Herds of Milch Cows, 


18 00 








Heifers, 


85 00 








Working Oxen, 


24 00 








Steers, 


20 00 








Horses, 


97 00 








Swine, 


94 00 








Sheep, 


21 00 








Poultry, 


266 50 










$736 50 


FIELD AND EXPERIMENTAL 


CROPS. 




Awarded for Fruit Crops, 


$29 00 




(( (( 


Root Crops, 


29 00 




(( (( 


Improved Waste Land, 


10 00 












$68 00 



FARM AND GARDEN PRODUCTS. 

Awarded for Grain and Seed. $ 8 00 

« " Vegetables, 117 00 

" " Fruits, 178 00 

" Plants and Flowers, 68 00 



$371 00 



140 



DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES. 

Awarded for Bread aud Canned Fruit, $15 00 

" " Counterpanes and Afghans, 16 50 

" " Carpetings and Rugs, 12 50 

" " Articles Manf. from Leather, 24 50 

" Manuf. and Gen. Mdse., 17 50 

" " Fancy Work, 40 50 

" Works of Art, 45 75 

" Children's work, 16 25 



$188 50 



MISCELLANEOUS . 
Awarded for Dairy Products, 
" " Honey, 

" " Agricultural Implements, 
" " Harrows, 
" " Carriages, 
" " Grange Exhibit, 
" " Essays and Reports, 



$ 1 


00 


2 


00 


52 


00 


10 


00 


23 


00 


25 


00 


18 


00 



1131 00 



The amount 
and firms in 30 
as follows : 
Amesbury, 
Andover, 
Beverly, 
Boxford, 
Dan vers, 
Georgetown, 
Gloucester, 
Groveland, 
Hamilton, 
Haverhill, 
Ipswich, 



TOTAL. 

of $1,535 was awarded to 383 individuals 
different cities and towns in the County 

$115 00 Lawrence,- 3 50 

6 00 Lynn, 128 50 

96 50 Lynnfield, 7 50 

39 00 Marblehead, 8 50 

100 00 Merrimac, $43 00 

2 00 Methuen, 28 00 

2 75 Middleton, 6 50 

22 00 Newbury, 61 50 

14 00 Newburyport, 1 50 

17 00 North Andover, 208 50 

11 00 Peabody, 462 75 



141 



Rockport, 


2 00 


Swampscott, 


11 75 


Rowley, 


16 00 


Topsfield, 


50 


Salem, 


54 25 


Wenham, 


23 00 


Saugus, 


1 50 


West Newbury, 


41 00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Receipts from admission to hall and grounds, $4,087 13 

Receipts for dinner tickets, 116 00 

Receipts from grounds for various purposes, 232 30 

14,435 43 
Total expenses at hall and grounds including 

Firemen's muster and bicycle races, $2,592 91 

Amount paid treasurer, 1,842 52 



1899 
PREMIUM LIST OF 



Essex Agricultural Society^ 

FOK THE 

SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL CATTLE SHOW AND FAIR. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The trustee of each town is instructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them the importance of attending to their du- 
ties. Also impress upon exhibtors from localities near to the 
Exhibition, the importance of entering their exhibits for the 
hall, the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Committees, 
and at the meeting of the Society for filling vacancies in com- 
mittees on the first day of the Exhibition, making sure that 
the names proposed at those meetings are of persons who will 
serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the Fair 
Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the grounds, 
at one o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the exhibition, 
and there organize, take the books of entry, and proceed at 
once to business. Committees in hall, should take the books 
of entry from the Superintendent, promptly after the entries 
close. 



143 

Ij'ull reports of awards by committees, ou the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each committee. 

Three members of any committee consisting of more than 
that number are authorized to act. 

I^^No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 

The Diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of special merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures, fruits, vegetables 
in hall, and flowers ; or any premium, unless the rules of the 
Society have been strictly complied with. Neither shall they 
award premiums or gratuities in excess of the amount appro- 
priated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premium 
cards, and also on animals, blue, white and red printed pre- 
mium ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assis- 
tant on the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals 
or articles designating the grade of premium awarded each, 
and the name of the person to whom awarded, and especial 
care should be taken that the cards issued correspond with the 
awards in their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on ploughing and on 
. animals and articles exhibited at the Show, must be delivered 
promptly to the Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

The Society offers liberal premiums for the best reports of 
committees ; and the chairmen of the several committee^ are 
requested to present to the Secretary a full report explanatory 
of the opinions of the committee on the matter referred to 
them within to weeks after the awards are made at the Show, 
for publication in the Transactions.* 

Reports on farms, crops, etc., to be presented previous to 
the meeting of the Trustees in November. 

Any member oj a committee who cannot serve on the same is 
requested to give notice to the Secretary, before the Show, so 
that the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a 
ticket of admission to the hall of exhibition, on application to 
the Secretary. 



•Chairmen of the committeeB will i)lease notice this request. 



144 
General Rules. 

Competitors are requested to carefully read the rules and 
premium list before making entries. 

Claims (entries) for premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 

All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair, and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person 7iot a m^emher of the Society, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, 
for which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase 
the funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium or gratuity is awarded or 
an agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
First National Bank, Salem, on and after the first Monday of 
November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded., the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day of 
April next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered as 
given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the several committees and adopted by the Soci- 
ety shall be final. Committees should see that the premium 
cards issued, correspond with the premiums and gratuities 
awarded in their reports. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his in- 
tention to compete for the same ; and committees are instruct- 
ed to award no premium unless the animal or article offered 
is worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee, shall be entered in another class, working oxen, 
working steers, (three year old steers may be entered for 
ploughing in a double team) and farm horses which may be 
entered for ploughing, horses for fast walking, and milch 
cows, which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premium must be owned by residents 
and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 



145 

themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered ; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agri- 
culture. 

The Proof th2it an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. 

Standards adopted : — American Jersey C. C. Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

The Cominittees will take notice that no premium will be 
awarded imless the animals or objects are of a decidedly super- 
ior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
special merit, in all departments of the Fair. 



Cattle and other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals, whether teams for ploughing, or animals 
entered for premium or exhibition, will be fed during the Ex- 
hibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity, prevented 
from leaving, at the expense of the Society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense thereof, all of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with committee's report. 

For Pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $8, 6 

For Fat Cow, premiums, $6, 4 



146 

BULLS. 

♦Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or of any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Two years old and upwards, premiums. $6, 4 

Under two years old, for each breed, $4, 3 

One year old and under, for each breed, $3, 2 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREED. 

For the best bull of any age or breed, with five of his stock 
not less than one year old, quality and condition to be taken 
into account, and especially the adaptability of the animal to 
the agriculture of the county, Diploma and $8 

Note.— Competitors are required to give a written statement of pedigree, and 
committees are requested to be particular in this respect, and return them to the 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $8, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Holstein, 
Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old and 
upwards, premiums for each breed, $7, 4 

For Native or Grade Cows, four years old and upwards, pre- 
miums, $7, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter iu a single week 
from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $7, 4 

Note.— A written statement will be required of the age and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they dropped their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, quality and quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding, which statement is to be returned to the Secretary with 
Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to be 
exhibited at the Show, and a correct statement of manner of 
keeping and yield for one year preceding the Show, premiums, 

Diploma and $10, 8 

For the greatest produce of milk on any farm, in proportion 
to the number of cows producing it, not less than four, from 
April 1, 1896 to April 1, 1897, statement to be made of the 
exchanges made, manner, and expense of food, use made of 
milk, and such other facts as will illustrate the entire manage- 
ment, special regard being had to the mode in which the 
account is kept, premium. Diploma and $8 

Note.— The above-mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report. The Committee can accept statements dating from 
January 1st, preceding the Show. 



147 

HEIFERS. 

First Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under four 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $4, 2 
Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old, premiums, $5, 3 
Two years old, that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 
One year old and under, and less than two, premiums, $4, 2 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, quality and training, premiums, $8, 6 

For pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $6, 4 

Note. — The Committee are re<iuired to consider the ciuality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their working capacity. The training of working oxen and steers 
will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containing a load weighing two 
tons for oxen, and three thousand pounds for steers. Jl^^'At the time of entry a 
certificate of the weight of the cattle must be filed with the Secretary. 

STEERS. 

For pairs of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma, or premiums, $8, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, three years old, 
premiums, $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account, Diploma and $8 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums. Diploma and f 8, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums, Diploma and $5, 3 



148 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than one year old, quality and condition taken into ac- 
count, Diploma and $8 

Note. — No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$8, 5 

BROOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Driving Purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums. 

Note.— No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all ap- 
parent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 
For Family Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

2JOTE.— No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $8, 5 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

For pairs of Fast Walking Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For single horses, f 5, 3 

For pairs of farm horses with load of 4000 lbs., premiums, 

$6,4 
For single farm horse, with load of 2000 lbs., premiums, 

$5, 3 
(i:^^The above to have trial on the track. 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1200 lbs. and over, premiums, 

$6,4 

For Farm Horses weighing less than 1200 lbs., premiums, 

$6,4 

Note.— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of the load to be used in trial of Farm 
Horses is to be fixed upon by the committee of arrangements for drafting, the 
difference in the load for horses of 1,200 lbs. and over, and those under 1,200 lbs. 
to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pairs, 2,000. No obstruction shall 
be placed either before or behind the wheels in trials of Draft Horses of either 
class, but wheels shall be blocked behind to hold the load when a team stops going 
up hill. 



149 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING 2400 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing 2400 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, $8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2400 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2400 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 3 AND 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding four-year-old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year-old Colts, premiums, $5, 3 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, prem., 

$4,2 
For Stallion, Gelding or More, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOUR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four-year-old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three-year-old colts, premiums, $5, 3 

ONE AND TWO YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, prem., 

f4, 2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

N. B. All the above classes the committees will act with the expert judge ex- 
cept Fat Cattle, Working Oxen and Steers, and Farm Horses. 

SPECIAL PREMIUM. 

For Horses jumping over four, four-foot hurdles, prem., 

$8, 6 
For high hurdle jumping, prem. $8 

SWINE,— LARGE BREEDS. 

Large Breeds, viz : Cheshire, Berkshire, Chester County 
Whites, Poland China, Large Yorkshire, and any other breed 
or grade, weighing more than 300 lbs. at maturity. 



ISO 

For Boars, premiums, $5, 3 

For Breeding Sows, with their pigs by their side, premium, 

^5, 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 

two and four months old, premium, $5, 3 

SWINE,— SMALL BREEDS. 

Small breeds, such as Suffolk, Essex, Small Yorkshire, 
China, and any other breed or grade, weighing less than 300 
lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $5, 3 

For Breeding Sows with their pigs by their side, premiums, 

^5, 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $5, 3 

SHEEP. 

For flocks of Sheep, not less than six ewes in number, each 
breed, premiums, $5, 3 

For best Buck, premium, f 5 

For lots of Lambs, not less than six ewes in number be- 
tween four and twelve months old, premiums, 5, 3 

POULTRY. 

For pairs of Fowls, Light Brahmas, Dark Brahmas, Buff 
Cochins, Partridge Cochins, Black Cochins, White Cochins, 
Plymouth Rocks, White Plymouth Rocks, Dominiques, White 
Leghorns, Brown Leghorns, Dominique Leghorns, Black 
Spanish, Hamburgs, Polish, Games, Dorking, Bantams, Black, 
White and Mottled Javas, Wyandottes, White Wyandottes, 
Golden Wyandottes, Black and White Minorcas, Red Caps, 
Andalusias, Langshangs, and other recognized varieties, each 
variety, premiums, $2, 1 

For pairs of Chickens of above varieties, premiums, $2, 1 

For the best breeding pen of each variety of five females 
and male. Diploma and $1 

For the best pairs of Native Fowls, premiums, $2, 1 

Pairs can be exhibited in " Breeding pens," by marking the 
competing female (with a ribbon or colored string), which 
with the male will form the pair. 

For lots of Turkeys, and Alesbury, Rouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks, and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China and African Geese, prem., ^2, 1 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the discharge 
of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any specimen 



151 

on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all claim he 
may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the " American Standard of Excellence." 

For best exhibit of Poultry Appliances, $4 

Note. — No pair in a pen wiU receive a premium as a;pair. 

STREET PARADE. 

Invitation is extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams, in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of 'the Committee in 
charge in premiums or gratuities, $50 

PLOUGHING. 

General Note ox Ploughing. — Stags are excludert. Teams must be entered 
in the names of their owners, and only double ox-teams to have drivers. A team 
consisting; of one pair of oxen and a horse will be considered a double team. The 
owners of separate teams may unite the same and be allowed to compete for pre- 
miums. The ploushmen and drivers must have l)een residents of the County at 
least three months before the exhibition. Those who intend to be competitors 
must give notice to reach the Secretary on or before Saturday previous to the 
show. The lands will be staked, but each ploughman will be required to strike 
out his own lands in the presence of " Committee on Striking Out Grounds for 
Ploughing," after half-past nine o'clock on the morning of the trial. Ploughmen 
with land side ploughs are to back furrow three furrows on each side of the stakes 
set, the last furrow to be of the depth reipiired in the class. Ploughmen with 
swivel ploughs, to turn the outside of their f urrrow to the stakes on one side, and 
to finish one foot from the stake on the other. Committees to note and report 
the kind of plough used. 

Ploughing with Double Ox or Horse Trams. — One-eighth 
of an acre, at least eight inches deep, premiums, $8, 6 

Ploughing with Single Ox-Teams. — One-eighth of an 
acre, at least six inches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Two Horses. — With any form of plough 
except Swivel, one-eighth of an acre, at least six inches deep, 
premiums, f 6, 4 

Ploughing with Three Horses. — One-eighth of an acre, 
eight inches deep, without driver, premium, $6 

Same with four horses, with driver, premium, $6 

Ploughing with Swivel Plough, — One-eighth of an acre, 
with double ox-teams, at least eight inches deep, premiums, 

16,4 

One-eighth of an acre with single ox-teams, at least six 
inches deep, premiums, f 6, 4 

One-eighth of an acre with horse teams, consisting of two 
horses, ploughing at least six inches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Sulky Plough. — For the best perform- 
ances, taking into account ease of draft, amount and quality 
of work. 

Sulky Plough, Landside, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing by boys, 15 years of age and under, premiums, 

$6. 4 



152 

HARROWS. 

For the best Harrow exhibited, and its merits shown by 
actual test upon the ploughed ground, $6, 4 

Note.— Entry must be made with the Secretary before the day of the trial, with 
description of the Harrow. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

Eor the best collection of Implements and Machines (no ar- 
ticle offered in collection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium), Diploma and $8 

For implements that are deemed worthy, the Committee 
may at their discretion award in gratuities not exceeding $40. 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Rake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the 
merit of which can be known only by actual trial in the field ; 
but manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition 
and inspection. 

CARRIAGES. 

For carriages built in the County, and exhibited by the 
manufacturer, Diploma, and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 

Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be espec- 
ially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued with 
the names, and sums awarded them, correspond with those in 
their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instructions 
under heading of " Duties of Committee," " General Rules," 
" Premiums to be awarded at the Show," see first pages, and 
under " Fruit," "Domestic Manufactures," and " Flowers." 

I^^'All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manu- 
factures, must be the product of Essex County, to be entitled 
to a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers fifty dollars to be divided in three premi- 
ums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex County, 
as follows : — Premiums, $20, 15, 10 

Note.— This exhibit includes all Fniit, Vegetables and Domestic Manufactures 
that are exhibited in any other department in Exhibition Hall. 



^50 

DAIRY, BREAD, CANNED FRUIT AND HONEY. 

For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making 
and management of the Butter, premiums, $5, 3 

For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, $5, 3 

For White Bread made of Wheat Flour, premiums, f 2, 1 

For bread made from Graham flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, $1 

All bread, entered for premiums, to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collection of Preserved Fruits and 
Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums, $2, 1 

For the first and second best live pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of pro- 
cess used and amount of labor and time required in preparing 
and drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on other articles, entered in this de- 
partment, products of this County, deemed worthy, $5 

First and second best Honey, five pounds in comb, made in 
the County, with statement signed of kind of bees and hive, 
and time of year when honey was made, premiums, $3, 2 



Fruit. 

All fruit must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the first day of the exhibition, and each exhibi- 
tor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists of 
the varieties of each class of fruit or to be filed when entry is 
made. (Committees are not authorized to make awards to 
those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a conspicuous manner by the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors, with the names of 



154 

fruit, for which premiums are offered, all others of same class 
fruit to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place 
their several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated 
by such labels, or be considered by the committee as not com- 
peting for premium. 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee) to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit. 

PEARS. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bosc, Anjou, Angouleme, Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckle, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Cornice, Howell and Clairgeau, each premium, $2 

Doyenne d'Ete, Gifford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $L50 

For best collection of Pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premium, $5 

In addition to the above are placed at the disposal of the 
committee, to be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 
each, $15 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Red Russett, Ben Davis, Sut- 
ton Beauty, Hubbardston, Mackintosh Red, Porter, Pickman 
Pippin, Roxbury Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Grav- 
enstein. Hunt Russet, Ladies Sweet, Snow, Bailey Sweet, 
Wealthy, Sutton Beauty, premium for each, $2, 1 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early ) 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

For best collection of Apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums, $3, 2 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab 
Apple deemed worthy by the committee, $1.50 



155 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than f 1 each, ^15 

PEA.CHES. GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

For best twelve specimens of Freestone, White Flesh, 
Yellow Flesh, Essex County Seedling, each variety, ^2 

For best collection of Peaches, premium, $3 

For the best twelve specimens of Champion, Lemon, or 
Orange Quinces, premium, $2 

For the best twelve specimens of Plums, live varieties to be 
selected by Committee, each variety, premium, $2 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worden's Seedling, 
Brighton, Delaware, Hartford Prolific, Green Mountain, 
Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, Pocklington, Niagara Grapes, 
each variety, premium, $2 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than ten pounds 
in all, premiums, $5, $4 

For best specimens of four bunches of Grapes, varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

$;i.50 

For basket of Assorted Fruits, premiums, $3, 2 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities, of not less than 50 cents each, $20 



Plants and Flowers. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



1. All Plants and Flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or before 
eleven o'clock, on the first day of the Fair, and all such 
Plants and Flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers, and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have been grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of Plants and 
Flowers is designated in the schedule, there must be neither 
more nor less tlian that number or quantity of specimens 
shown. 

3. When only one premium from each exhibitor is offered 
for any article, only a single specimen or collection can com- 



156 

pete, but wheu a second or third premium is offered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for compe- 
tition, but no variety can be duplicated. 

4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens ex- 
hibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of superi- 
ority and worthy of such premium, not even if they are the 
only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admitted 
in competition for another different premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, 
or in the case of Native Plants and Flowers, where such were 
found. 

7. All Plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood, or some other 
permanent and suitable substance and so attached to same as 
to be easily seen. Flowers when specified to be named to 
comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in Pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beaut}'-, 
symmetry and vigor of the specimens ; also Bouquets, Baskets, 
Design Work, etc., must show taste, skill and harmony in ar- 
rangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All Flowers exhibited must be shown upon their ow7i 
stem, flowers in "Design" work alone excepted ; aud this ex- 
ception if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account by 
the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The Committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or " Designs of merit" for 
which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together), exceed the amount, 
f 100, limited by the Society for this department. 

11. No member of the Committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any case vote or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarily vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for Plants and Flowers, and General Rules of the Socie- 
ty, aud all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhibi- 
tors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 



157 

PLANTS. 

Plauts competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots, Native Plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 

For collection Flowering and Ornamental Foliage plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premiums, $5, 3 

For collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Draceuas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection of Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., ^1 
For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, 
premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., ^1 
For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 5 va- 
rieties, premium, $1 
For collection Calla Lillies, 5 specimens, premium, $1 
For specimen English Ivy, premium, $1 
For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least 50 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which to be a cross section, and neither to be more than four 
inches in length or diameter, premiums, $5, 3 

FLOWERS. 

For collection Cut Flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties named, $3, 2 



158 

For collection Cut Flowers, native, 100 specimens, at least 
50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, green-house flowers, pre- 
miums. $1, ,50 

For pair of Hand Bouquets, green-house flowers, premiums, 

$1, .50 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of native flowers,premiunis, 

f 1, .50 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, prem., 

f 1, .50 

For Basket of Green-house Flowers, premiums, $1, ,50 

For Basket of Native Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Garden Flowers, premiums, ^1, .50 

For arrangement of Native Flowers and Autumn Leaves, 
premiums, $2,. 1 

For Floral Designs, choice cultivated flowers, prem., $3, 2 

For Floral Designs, native flowers, premiums, $2^ 1 

For collections Japan Lilies, hardy, named, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Phlox, hardy perennial, named, prem., $2, 1 

For collections Pansies, at least 50 specimens neatly and 
artistically arranged, premiums, $2, I 

For collections of Native and Introduced Weeds, with com- 
mon and botanical name attached, premiums, $2, 1 

For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $i 

For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six 
varieties, named, premium, $1 

For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Gladiolas!(spike8), at least six varieties, nameH, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Japan Lilies, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $[ 

For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox, hardy perennial, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem., $1 

For twenty-four Carnation Pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Verbenas, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 



159 

For twenty-four Roses, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twenty-four Garden Annuals, at least twelve varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties,named,prem., $1 
For twelve Asters, Double A^ictoria, premium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Double Truffaut's Peony flowered, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Asters, Pompone, premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Zinnias, double, in variety, premium, $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, African, in variety, prem., $1 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre- 
mium, $1 
For, twenty-four Petunias, single, in variety, premium, $1 
For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium, $1 
For twelve Dianthus (double annual), in variety, prem., $1 
For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, ^1 
For collection' of Sweet Peas, premium, $1 

VEGETABLES— CLASS ONE. 

Rules for fruit apply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens, Eclipse, Dewing, and 
Edmands, premium, each variety, $2, 1 

Carrots — For best twelve, Short Top, liOng Orange and 
Danvers Intermediate, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

For best twelve. Short Horn, Orange carrots, $2, 1 

Mangold Wurtzels — For best six specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Flat Turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top and 
White Flat, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Ruta Bagas — Twelve specimens. For best Yellow and 
White, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Parsnips — For the best twelve specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Onions — Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow Flat, 
and Red, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Clark's No. 1, Pearl of Savoy, Early Maine, Rob- 
erts Early, Carmans No. 3, Rural Blush, Rural New Yorker, 
Early Northern, premiums, each variety, $2, I 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $15 



i6o 



VEGETABLES,— CLASS TWO. 

Cabbages — For the best three specimens, Savoy, Fottler's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
Cauliflowers — For best three specimens, premiums, $2, 1 
Celery — For best four roots, premiums, f 2, 1 
Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best, Early, pre- 
miums, ^2, 1 
For best twelve ears in milk, Late, premium, ^2, 1 
Squashes — For best three specimens. Marrow, Turban, 
Warrer Turban, Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, Bay 
State, Sibley, Butman, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
Melons — For best three specimens, Nutmeg, Musk, Cas- 
saba, Salmon Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For best two specimens Watermelons, premiums, $2, 1 
Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens, Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premiums, 

$2, 1 
Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premiums, $2, 1 

For collection of vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $30 
(I^^No competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums are 
offered for. 

Collections of Vegetables where premiunis are offered for a number of varieties 
must be entered and placed, not less than three of a kind by themselves on the 
tables assigned for collections. No collection shall receive' but one premium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to c;ompete wiih speci- 
mens of the same variety placed elsewhere. Exhibitors of such collections, how- 
ever, are not prevented from exhibiting additional specimens of any variety with 
and in competition with like variety. All vegetables must be entered in the 
name of the grower of them. 

Size of Vef/etables. Turnip Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions, 
2J to 4 inches in largest diameter; Potatoes to be of good size for family use; 
Squashes to be pure and well ripened. Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premium, $1 

For twenty-live ears of Field Corn, premiums, $5, 4, 3 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $6, 4 
All grain or seed must have been grown by the exhibitor in the 
County to receive a premium. 



i6i 



Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 1 
o'clock on the first day of the Exhibition. Articles not thus 
deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 
be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to the 
last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wrought Counterpanes having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $3, 2 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $25 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets, having regard to the quality and expense of 
the material, premiums, $3, 2 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the qual- 
ity of the work and expense of materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount not to exceed f 20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For exhibit of Manufactured Leather and Skins, 

Society's Diploma 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 
Women's do., Children's do., each, premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each, prem., $3 

$20. are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, each, premium. Diploma of the Society. 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $30. 

FANCY WORK. 

Of Domestic Manufacture are not included in the above. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity,.*" 



l62 



WORKS OF ART. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, -140. 

DECORATED CHINA. 

For best collection Decorated China, premiums, $5, 3 

For best individual specimen, premiums, .^3, 2 

For Punch Bowl or set, premiums, J$2, 1 

For Jardiniere or Fern dish, premiums, $2, 1 

For raised Paste or gold, premiums, $2, 1 

For Vase, premiums, $2, 1 

For Tray, plate, etc., premiums, $2, 1 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 

years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, prem., $2, 1 

At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $15 



List of Premiums to be Awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 



FARMS. 



Competitors for this premium must give notice of their in- 
tention to the Secretary on or before June 15th, and the farms 
entered for premium will be viewed by the committee twice 
during the year. Crops growing on farms that are entered for 
premium, cannot be entered with another committee for sep- 
arate premiums — except crop specimens exhibited at the fair. 

Any person desirous of having his farm inspected, without 
entering it for 'premium, may make application to the Secre- 
tary, and it will be viewed and reported upon by the commit- 
tee. 

For the best conducted and most improved farm, taking 
into view the entire management and cultivation, including 
lands, buildings, fences, orchards, crops, stock and all other 
appendages, with statements in detail, relating thereto, pre- 
mium, f20 

IMPROVING WET MEADOW AND SWAMP LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments relating to wet meadow or 
swamp lands, on not less than one acre, the course of manage- 



1 63 

ment, and the produce, etc., for a period of two years at 
least, to be detailed, with a statement of all the incidental 
expenses, premiums, $10, 6 

Note.— The Committee is instructed to ascertain how many, if any, reclaimed 
swamps in this County have been abandoned or have returned to natural grasses. 
Persons knowing of such, are requested to notify the Secretary or Committee. 

IMPROVING PASTURE AND WASTE LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improv- 
ing pasture land, other than by ploughing, so as to add to 
their value for pasturage, with a statement of the same, pre- 
miums, $10, 6 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improv- 
ing waste lands, so as to add to their agricultural value, with 
statement of the same, premiums, $10, 6. 

No premium to be awarded to any person for a repetition of 
an experiment in meadow, swamp or pasture lands, for which 
he has already received a premium. 

UNDER-DRAINING LAND. 

For best conducted experiments in under-draining land, 
regard being had to the variety of soil, sub-soil, and other 
local circumstances, premiums, $10, 6 

Note. — The same instructions under "Improving Wet Meadow and Swamp 
Lands" apply to this Committee. 

GRAINS AND OTHER CROPS. 

Claimants on Grain and Root Crops will be required to 
state the size of the piece of land when they enter, and con- 
form to following rules : Entries of Grain Crops, to be made 
on or before September 10th ; Root Crops on or before October 
10th ; giving ample time for the crops to be examined by the 
committee before harvesting. Statement to be made in con- 
formity with the following form, must be forwarded to the 
Committee previous to November 1st. 

All calculations and figures given in reports of, and state- 
ments of Crops, are to be made on the basis of an acre, results 
in all cases, to be given at the rate per acre. 

In pursuance of authority delegated to the Board of Agri- 
culture^ ^by Chap. 24, of Acts 1862, Agricultural Societies 
receiving the bounty of the State are required to make use of 
the following form, and be governed by its conditions in the 
mode of ascertaining the amount of crops entered for premium. 

Essex Agricultural Society. — Statement concerning a 

crop of , raised by Mr. , in the town of 

, 1898. 

What was the crop of 1896 ? What manure was used and 



164 

how much ? What was the crop of 1897 ? What manure 
was used and how much ? What is the nature of the soil ? 
When and how many times ploughed, and how deep ? What 
other preparation for seed ? Cost of ploughing and other 
preparation? Amount of manure in loads of thirty bushels, 
and how applied ? 

Value of manure upon the ground ? How used ? (What 
amount of Commercial Fertilizer used ? How used ? Value 
of same when applied ?) When and how planted ? The 
amount and kind of seed ? Cost of seed and planting ? How 
cultivated and how many times ? Cost of cultivation, includ- 
ing weeding and thinning ? Time and manner of harvesting ? 
Cost of harvesting, including the storing and husking or thresh- 
ing ? Amount of crop, etc. Signed by Competitor. 

The committee, to whom is intrusted the award of the 
premiums on field crops, may award them according to their 
judgment, but for the purpose of furnishing accurate statistics 
for the benefit of agriculture, shall select certain of the crops, 
and require the owners thereof to measure the land and weigh 
the crops accurately, giving to the committee a certificate of 
the same, and give all possible information thereon over their 
own signatures, and return the same to the Secretary of the 
Society, to be published in the annual transactions. 

In ascertaining the amount of crop, any vessel may be used 
and the weight of its contents once, multiplied by the number 
of times it is filled by the crop. 

In measuring the land or weighing crops, any competent 
person may be employed, whether a sworn surveyor or not, 
and must give certificate. 

The certificate shall state the weight of all crops only in a 
merchantable state. 

In ascertaining the amount of a hay crop entered for 
premium, the measurement of the hay in the barn may be em- 
'ployed. 

Rules of Measure Practiced and Adopted 

Board of Agriculture. 
Wheat, Potatoes, Sugar Beets, Ruta Bagas, 

Mangold Wurtzels, 
White Beans and Peas, 
Corn, Rye, 
Oats, 

Barley, Buckwheat, 
Cracked Corn, Corn and Rye, and other meal, 

except Oat, 50 

Parsnips, Carrots, 55 

Onions, 57 



) BY 


the 


State 


60 lbs. 


iv. 


1 1)uh1). 


62 


" 




'•' 


56 


" 




ii 


32 


" 




(< 


48 


< 1 




^t 



i6; 



1. For the best conducted experiments of Rye, not less 
than twenty bushels to the acre, lifty-six lbs. to the bushel, on 
not less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

2. For best conducted experiments of Wheat, not less than 
thirty bushels to the acre, sixty lbs. to the bushel, on not less 
than one acre, premium, $7, 4 

3. For best conducted experiments of Oats, not less than 
fifty bushels to the acre, thirty-two lbs. to the bushel, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, ,f 7, 4 

4. For best conducted experiments of Barley, not less 
than forty bushels to the acre, forty-eight lbs. to the bushel, 
on not less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

5. For best conducted experiments of Indian Corn, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, . $7, 4 

6. For largest quantity and best quality of English Hay, 
on not less than one acre, regard being had to the mode and 
cost of cultivation, premiums, $7, 4 

7. For best yield of Field Beans, on not less than one-half 
acre, and not less than twenty-five bushels per acre, premiums, 

$7,4 

ROOT CROPS. 

1. For best conducted experiments in raising Carrots, fifty - 
five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

2. For best conducted experiments in raising Parsnips, 
fifty-five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 6 

3. For best conducted experiments in raising Beets, 
premiums, $8, 5 

4. For best conducted experiments in raising Rata Bagas, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $S, 5 

5. For best conducted experiments in raising Mangold 
VVurtzels, sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

6. For best conducted experiments in raising Sugar Beets, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, ^Sy 5 

7. For best conducted experiments in raising Onions, fifty- 
two pounds to the bushel, premiums, .$8, 5 

8. For best conducted experiments in raising Potatoes, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

9. For best conducted experiments in raising Cabbages, 
premiums, $8, 5 

10. For best conducted experiments in raising Squashes, 
premiums, $8, 5 

11. For best conducted experiments in raising Summer 
English Turnips for the market, premiums, $S, 5 

Raised on not less than half an acre, and the quantity of 



1 66 



ciop to be asceitaiued by weight ; so far as practicable the 
crop to be free from dirt, without tops, and in a merchantable 
condition at the time of measurement. 

Claimants for premiums on Grain and Root Crops must 
forward statement to chairman of committee before Nov. \st. 

FOREST TREES. 

1. For plantation of either of the following species of 
forest trees, viz : White Oak, Yellow Oak, Locust, Birch^ 
White Ash, Maple, Walnut or White Pine, Sweet Chestnut, ■ 
not less than three years old, and not less than 600 trees, 
premium, . $10 

2. For plantation of not less than 100 trees, premium, $8 

3. For ornamental trees; ten or more set on any street, 
road or farm, and cared for five years, premium, f 8 

CRANBERRIES. 

For best conducted experiment in the cultivation of the 
Cranberry, at least two summers, or not less than twenty rods 
of land, with written statement of the quantity and quality of 
the land, expense of planting, weeding and culture, and 
amount of crops produced. Premium to be paid in 1897 and 
1898, flO 

For best experiment do., on not less than ten rods of land, 
premium, f7 

STRAWBERRIES AND OTHER SMALL FRUITS. 

For best crop of Strawberries, ou not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture, crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $7 

For best crop of Currants, Raspberries and Blackberries, 
with statement as above, premiums, each, $7 

SEEDLING POTATOES AND EXPERIMENTS. 

For best Seedling Potato, originating in Essex County, to 
equal in yield, earliness and quality, the Early Rose, and to 
surpass it in one or more of the particulars, premium paid 
after three years' trial, $20 

In testing the value of a Seedling Potato, the committee 
are instructed to take sworn testimony of the cultivator with 
regard to the yield, after having inspected the crop. 

For the most satisfactory experiments to extend through 
five consecutive years, to settle the following facts relative 
to raising potatoes : — premium, $25 



107 

1st. Will whole, medium sized potatoes yield better re- 
sults than pieces cut to two eyes ? 

2nd. What will be the result of continuously planting 
small-sized potatoes of the same strain a series of years ? 

3d. Difference between hiiling and flat cultivation. 

4th. Effect, if any, of cutting off seed ends before planting. 

5th. Effects of deep and shallow planting. 

6th. Raising from sprouts alone from same strain. 

7th. Can potatoes having dwarf vines be planted nearer. 

8th. Best distance apart for seed in the drill. 

9th. To show the effect of covering the top with earth at 
several times after they had come up. 

To be raised on not less than a half acre of land, uniform 
in character, and all to receive the same kind and quality of 
manure and cultivation, and to be inspected by the committee 
at the time of gathering the crops. 

ESSAYS AND FARM ACCOUNTS. 

The essays must be transmitted to the Secretary by the 1st 
of November, with sealed envelopes containing the names of 
their authors, respectively, which shall not be opened by the 
committee, nor shall the names be known to the committee, 
until they shall have decided upon the merit of the Essay. 

For original Essays on any subject connected with agri- 
culture, in a form worthy of publication, premiums, ^10, 8 

For best statement of Actual Farm Accounts, drawn from 
the experience of the claimant, in a form worthy of publica- 
tion, premium, $8 

For Reports of Committees upon subjects for which pre- 
miums are offered, premiums, ^8, (5 

Committee— G. L. Streeter, Salem ; N. M. Hawkes, Lynn ; 
D. E. Safford, Hamilton ; George E. Blodgett, Rowley ; j. M. 
Danforth, Lynnfield. 

LIBRARY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Dauvers ; B. P. Ware, Mar- 
blehead , J. AI. Danforth, Lynnfield. 

TREADWELL FARM. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield ; Andrew Nichols ; Danvers. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead ; E. Pope Bar- 
rett, Peabody 



FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Francis H. Appleton, Peabody ; Nathaniel Dole, Newbury ; 
C. C. Blunt, Audover; 0. S. Butler, Georgetown ; John M. 
Danforth, Lynnfield. 

DELEGATES. 

From the Essex Agricultural Society to attend Exhibitions 
of Societies, Farmers' Clubs and Fruit growers' Associations 
in Essex County, and report any information that shall seem 
valuable for publication. 

The Secretary to be notified of the time of holding their ex- 
hibition, who will notify the chairman of Committee to assign 
Delegate. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of crops, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair, are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Seventy-eighth Annual Cattle Show and Fair 11 

Eeport of the Annual Meeting 14 

Keijort on Bulls 16 

Keport on Fat Cattle 16 

Keport on Milch Cows 17 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 18 

Statements 18 

Repoi't on Heifers, Pure Breed ".20 

Rei^ort on Heifers, Native or Grade 21 

Report on Working Oxen and Steers 22 

Report on Steers 22 

Report on Stallions for Driving 2?> 

Report on Brood Mares 23 

Report on Family Horses.. 23 

Report on Gent's Driving Horses 28 

Report on Fast Walking Horses 24 

Eeport on Single Draft Hoi-ses 24 

Report on Pairs of Farm Horses 24 

Report on Colts for Driving 24 

Report on Swine 25 

Report on Sheep 2<i 

Report on Poultry 2" 

Report on Ploughing ;!6 

Report on Harrows :j7 

Report on Agricultural Implements.. ■ 37 

Report on Carriages 38 

Report on Dai r y. 39 

Report on Bread and Canned Fruits 39 

Statements 40 

Report on Bees, Hives and Honey 44 

Report on Pears 44 

Report on Apples 46 

Report on Peaches, Grapes and Assorted Fruit 50 

Report on Plants 52 

Report on Flowers 54 

Report on Vegetables 57 



170 

Report on Grain and Seed H2 

Report on Articles Manufactured from Leather 63 

Report on Manufactures and General Mdse (>4 

Report on Counterpanes and Afghans 65 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 65 

Report on Fancy Work 67 

Report on Works of Art 70 

Report on Decorated China 72 

Report on work by Children 72 

Report of. Supt. of Hall 74 

Report of Committee on Root Crops 77 

Statements 77 

Report of Committee on Peaches, Grapes, etc 81 

Report of Committee on Small Fruits 85 

Statements 87 

Report on Treadwell Farm 91 

Report on New Members 92 

Farmers' Institute 93 

Essays 95 

Treasurer' s Report 109 

Constitution of the Society 1 10 

Officers of the Socieiy 113 

Members 115 

Recapitulation of Premiums 139 

Financial Statement 1898, Fair 141 

Premium list for 1899 ' '. 112 



TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1899 



OF THE 



ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



{Organized i8iS.) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 



IN MASSACHUSETTS. 



And the Premium List for 1900, 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS. 

Newcomb & Gauss, Printers. 

1899. 



SEVENTY-NINTH 

Annual Cattle Show and Fair. 



Tlie Cattle Show and Fair of this Society opened Sept. 
19, with prospects of being very successful. But Wednes- 
day morning the copious rain put an end to our expecta- 
tions and but very few people ventured abroad. Thursday 
morning was again bright but in the afternoon the rain 
again fell in torrents. But the Society had previously 
decided to keep the fair open through Friday, when we had 
a fine day, which added materially to the receipts. But 
the attendance was probably not nearly as large as it would 
have been if the weather had been favorable and therefore 
the receipts felloff materially from last year. 

The exhibit of cattle and poultry were in excess of any 
previous year both in quantity and quality, and although 
the entries in the hall were sixty less than last year, prob- 
ably from the scarcity of fruit, the quality was fully up 
to the standard. 

The street parade Thursday was not so attractive as it 
would have been, had not the storm spoiled many floats 
that were to be in it, but the thousands of people who 
witnessed it thought it fully equal to previous years, and 
we think the committee who had it in charge are deserving 
of great credit in persevering, with the weather against 
them, in making so fine a show. 

The ploughing match took place Friday, with eleven 
entries, and all did commendable work. 

The annual dinner of the Society was served in the 
vestry of the South church, Thursday, at which there was 



a very large attendance. After the dinner, President Geo. 
V. L. Meyer called the assemblage to order, and after ap- 
piopriate remarks for the occasion, called upon Rev. Dr. 
J. M. Pullman of Lynn, ex-Presidents Appleton, Butler 
and Ware, Capt. J. G. B. Adams and others, all of whom 
added instruction and merriment to the occasion. 

REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the Pea- 
body Institute at Peabody, Sept. 20, 1899. President 
Meyer called the meeting to order at 9.45 a. m. 

The first business was to act upon an amendment to the 
constitution of the society offered one year ago, and it was 
voted to lay it upon the table by a unanimous vote. Mr. 
Quint of Peabody made a motion, and it was seconded by 
others, that the secretary cast one ballot for the present 
officers of the society, and the following officers were 
unanimously elected. 

PRESIDENT. 

George v. L. Meyer of Hamilton. 

VICE PKESIDENTS. 

James J. H. Gregory of Marblehead, 
Horatio G. Herrick of Lawrence, 
Asa T. Newhall of Lynn, 
J. D. W. French of North Andover. 

SECRETARY. 

John M. Danforth of Lynnfield. 

After some further discussion upon matters pertaining 
to the society, and a vote to keep the Fair open until Fri- 
day night, the meeting adjourned. 



The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1898 and 1899 are tabulated for comparison as follows : 



STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, 


ETC., 


ON SHOW GROUNDS. 


Class. 


Entries 
in 1899 


From 

Different 

Places 

in 1899 


From 
Entries Different 
in 1898 Places 

in 1898 


Bulls, 




21 


7 


15 


5 


Fat Cattle, 




2 


2 


5 


2 


Milch Cows, 




Id 


3 


10 


3 


Herds of Milch Cows, 




5 


2 


2 


1 


Heifers, Pure Bred, 




24 


4 


23 


5 


Heifers, Grade, 




15 


6 


18 


4 


Working Oxen and Steers, 




4 


1 


7 


1 


Steers, 




3 


1 


6 


1 


Stallions for Driving Purposes, 


4 


3 


3 


2 


Brood Mares, Farm and Draft, 


2 


1 








Brood Mares, Driving Purposes, 


3 


2 


2 


2 ' 


Family Horses, 




S 


5 


10 


6 


Gents' Driving Horses, 




7 


6 


5 


4 


Fast Walking Horses, 




3 


3 


3 


3 


Pairs Fast Walking Horses with 


1 








load, 




7 


3 








Single Farm Horses, 




7 


4 


4 


4 


Pairs Farm Horses, over 2400 lb 


IS. 4 


3 


3 


3 


Pairs Farm Horses, less 


than 










2400 lbs. 




2 


2 


1 


1 


Colts, Farm and Draft, 




4 


4 








Colts, Driving Purposes, 




5 


3 


3 


2 


Swine, Large Breeds, 




31 


4 


23 


2 


Swine, Small Breeds, 




10 


1 


15 


2 


Sheep, 




7 


2 


7 


2 


Poultry, 




297 


15 


284 


12 


Harrows for Trial, 




1 


1 


2 


2 


Agricultural Implements, 




51 


7 


24 


6 


Carriages, 




14 


3 


11 


3 


Ploughing, 


- 


11 


6 
22 


9 
501 


5 




568 


21 



EXHIBITS IN HALL. 

From From 

„, Entries Different Entries Different 

^'^'''- in 1899 Places in 1898 Places 

in 1899 in 1898 



Dairy, 


3 


3 


3 


2 


Bread and Canned Fruit, 


53 


7 


56 


8 


Honey, 


2 


2 


3 


2 


Pears, 


97 


9 


143 


10 


Apples, 


81 


12 


163 


15 


Peaches, Grapes and Assorted 










Fruits, 


126 


10 , 


66 


9 


Plants, 


24 


4 


22 


3 


Flowers, 


131 


10 


135 


10 


Vegetables, 


210 


14 


288 


15 


Grain and Seed, 


24 


U 


15 


8 


Carpetings and Rugs, 


35 


8 


31 


5 


Counterpanes and Afghans, 


53 


9 


47 


10 


Articles Manuf d from Leather, 


6 


3 


30 


3 


Manuf res and General Mdse., 


34 


9 


13 


5 


Fancy Work, 


241 


10 


208 


9 


Work of Art, 


92 


<♦ 


69 


7 


Work of Children under 12 years 








of age 


62 


3 


40 


2 


Grange Exhibit, 








1 


1 



1274 28 1334 24 

Grand total 1842 entries from 31 out of 34 cities and 
towns in Essex County against 1773 entries from 30 cities 
and towns last year. Nahant, Rockport and Salisbury did 
not have exhibits this year. 

The entries were Amesbury, 38 ; Andover, 5 ; Beverly, 
101 ; Boxford, 50 ; Danvers, 154 ; Essex, 1 ; Georgetown, 
3 ; Gloucester, 4 ; Groveland, 28 ; Hamilton, 16 ; Haver- 
hill, 29 ; Ipswich, 17 ; Lawrence, 17 ; Lynn, 191 ; Lynn- 
field, 3 ; Manchester, 2 ; Marblehead, 15 ; Merrimac, 3 ; 



Methuen, 6 ; Middleton, 8 ; Newbury, 13 ; Newbury port, 
27; North Andover, 78; Peabody, 784; Rowley, 5; 
Salem, 189 ; Saugus, 1 ; Swampscott, 16 ; Topsfield, 11 ; 
Wenham, 19 ; West Newbury, 8. 



Reports of Committees. 
1899. 

The following premiums were awarded for live stock. 
BULLS. 

$6. First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey Bull, 3 years old. 
$2. Second premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 
Jersey bull, 1 year old. 
First premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, for 

Jersey bull, " Romulus," 1 year old. 
First premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, for 

Jersey bull, 7 mos. old. 
First premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, for 

Holstein bull, " Earl de Kol," 3 years old. 
Second premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 

for Holstein bull, " Phoenix de Kol," 2 years old. 
First premium to Joseph J. Conley, Newburyport, 
for Guernsey bull, 11 mos. old. 
$12. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein bull, " Netherland Paul,'' 3 years old with 
five of his stock. 
$4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein bull, 3 years old. 
$3. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein bull, "Prince Petz Dexter," 1 year old. 



13. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holsteiii bull, 3 weeks old. 

14. First premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, for 

Ayrshire bull, " Drusus," 2 years old. 
$4. First premium to George L. Averill, Andover, for 

Ayrshire bull, IJ years old. 
Isaac Damon, judge ; George L. Burnham, Andrew- 
Mansfield, Wm. G. Horton — Committee. 



FAT CATTLE. 

$8. First premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for fat oxen. 
$6. Second premium to H. W. Evans, Amesbury, for fat 
oxen. 
Wm. B. Carlton, I. M. Woodbury, C. E. Hinkley, C. D. 
Ordway — Committee. 



MILCH COWS. 

$8. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

best milch cow either foreign or grade, for grade 

Holstein, " Spotty Day." 
$7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein cow, " Susie F, Shepard." 
$7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade cow, " Oveena.*' 
$4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade Holstein, " Sadie." 
$4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade cow, " ^Minnie B." 
$7. First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey best butter cow, " Lois B. 
$7. First premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, for 

Aj-rshire cow, "Fillappa of Boxford." 



lO 

f4. Second premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, 

for Ayrshire cow, " Raperta." 
$5. Second premium to James W. Burns, Danvers, for 

Holstein cow. 
Isaac Damon, judge; A. T. Newhall, A. J. Bradstreet, 
E. A. Emerson — Committee. 

To the Committee on Milch Cotos : 

I enter for your consideration for the best milch cows 
either foreign, native or grade, the grade Holstein and 
Durham cow " Millie B," seven years old ; calved Aug. 8, 
1898 ; due Sept. 25 ; in the month of November, 1898, she 
gave 1680 lbs. milk, average 56 lbs. daily, and " Spotty 
Day," five years old, calved July 28, 1898 ; due Dec. 20, 
'99 ; in November, '98, she gave 1350 lbs. milk, average, 45 
lbs. daily. 

For Holstein cows, the " Myra W. Shepard," five years 
old, calved May 31, due April 20, 1900; in June she gave 
42 lbs. milk a day ; and " Susie F. Shepard," six years old, 
lost her calf Aug. 15 ; is giving 45 lbs. milk a day ; and 
■*' Myra W." milk record one year, 9975 lbs. 

For grade cows, the Holstein and Durham cow, " Ovee- 
na," five years old ; lost her calf March 20 ; not breed ; in 
April she averaged 46 lbs. milk a day ; and " Sadie," 
^rade Holstein and Guernsey, five years, calved May 20 ; 
not breed ; in June she averaged 42 lbs. milk a day. 

James C. Poor. 

lois b, no. 107,595. a. j. c. c. 

Dropped Sept. 15, 1893. 
Lois B, Milk Record for February, 1899, in lbs. 



15 
13 


15 
13 


14 
14 


15 
13 


14 
12 


13 
13 


13 


V2i 

m 


12 
13 


12i 13i 
12 13i 


16 15i 
14i 14i 


12i 
13 


13 
12i 


13 
14 


14 
13i 






13 
15 


16 

15i 


m 

16 


15 

m 


13 14 
14i Ui 


15 14 

17 15 


14 
16 



776^ lbs. in 28 days. 



II 

I certify that the cow Lois B. was fed per day 4 lbs. 
•ground oats, 4 lbs. corn meal, 6 lbs. bran and fine hay (at 
liberty.) That she dropped her last calf Jan. 18, 1899 ; not 
now in calf, and that her milk shows by Babcock's tests 
•5%, 5 1-10% and 5 3-10%, on three separate occasions. 

E. W. Moody. 

Danvers, Sept. 18, 1899. 
Cow entered by me in Essex County fair is 7 years old, 
breed Holstein ; dropped her last calf Nov. 26, 1897, due 
to calve Sept. 23, 1899. For the month of May last the 
smallest amount of milk in one day was 21 quarts ; largest 
amount of milk in one day, 26 quarts, on May 28, 1899. 
Feed was clover hay and grass, fed in barn ; for grain 4 
quarts meal per day, 4 quarts gluten. 

Jas. W. Burns. 

Danvers, Mass., Sept. 18th, 1899. 
This will certify that on May 26th last I was present 
at Mr. Burns' barn morning and evening of that day and 
«aw the cow now on exhibition at the Essex Fair milked, 
and she gave 24 quarts and one-half pint. 

Otis F. Putnam. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

and Diploma. First premium to James C. Poor, No. 
Andover, for herd of 5 Holsteins. 
$S. Second premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 

for herd of 5 cows. 
^8 and Diploma to Otis F. Putnam, Danvers, for 16 grade 
cows producing the greatest amount of milk on one 
farm . 
Isaac Damon, judge ; Asa T. Newhall, A. J. Bradstreet, 
E. A. Emerson — Committee. 



12 



PURE BREED HOLSTEINS. 

" Susie F. Shepard," 6 years old, milk record from Jan. 
1st to July 1st, 5,400 lbs. ; Aug. 15 to Sept. 15, 1,350 lbs. 

"• Myra W. Shepard,'" 5 years old, milk for one year, 
9,764 lbs. 

" Betz Fairfax,"' 3 years old, milk forone3^ear, 8,240 lbs. 

" Zalma Fairfax,"' 4 years old, milk for one year, 9676 lbs. 

" Gracie Shepard," 4 years old, milk for one year, 8,025 
lbs. 

GRADE HOLSTEIN HERD. 

" Millie B." 7 years old, milk record one year, 9,886 lbs. 
" Spotty," 5 years old, milk record one year, 8,989 lbs. 
" Ovena," 5 years old, milk record six months, 6,300 lbs. 
" Sadie," 5 years old, milk record one year, 8,767 lbs. 
" Susan,"' 2 years old, milk record six months, 5,115 lbs. 

STATEMENT OF FEED AND CARE. 

The winter feed of these cows was dry hay, oat and 
corn fodder, twice a day, with eight quarts mixed feed per 
day, consisting two parts bran, one part gluten, one part 
cotton seed meal, fed in two feeds, and watered in barn 
twice a day. Summer feed, have been turned out to pas- 
ture, fed twice a day in barn since July 1st, with oat or 
corn fodder, with four quarts bran and meal (corn and 
gluten.) 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. C. Poor. 

To the Committee on herds of Milch Coivs : 

I enter a Holstein cow, "Florabell Douglass," "Starr 
first," "Starr second," "Lady of Hollis," and Durham 
cow " Lyda Sutton." 

" Florabell Douglass " has a record of 10,880 lbs. 

" Starr first," has a record of 10,040 lbs. 

" Starr second " has a record of 9,840 lbs. 



13 

" Lady of Hollis," has a record of 9,520 lbs. 

" Lyda Sutton " has a record of 8,530 lbs. 

The winter feed of these cows was about a bushel of en- 
silage twice a day witli hay once a day and watered once 
a day ; grain, four quarts of mixed feed, meal and shorts, 
half and half. Summer feed was pasture, grain rations 
the same as winter. As the pastures dried up in summer 
we fed oats and peas and corn fodder at night, what they 
would eat up clean. 

A. M, Robinson. 

Danvers, Mass., Sept. 19, 1899. 
To the Committee on Herds of Milch Cows : 

Gentlemen : — The herd of 17 cows which I have en- 
tered for premium are the most of them grade Holsteins 
and were fed the past year as follows : during the time 
they were in the barn in winter they were fed three feeds 
of cornstalks cut up, and one feed in the evening of second 
crop or English hay, and meal twice daily, consisting of 
three parts cotton seed. Pope gluten and cob meal as near 
as I can estimate by my grain bills, 13 lbs. daily and pas- 
ture feed in pasture time. I have milked an average of 15 
cows, never below 14 and never above 16 of them in milk, 
an average as I think of 15 daily. 1 have sold to A. S. 
Conant $2015.08, and for family use and feeding calves 
that I am raising, $11.10 making $2056.18 ; product of the 
15 cows to Sept. 1st, for one year, being il37.12 per cow, 
20.1 cans daily for year and 11.4 quarts daily per cow. 

Otis F. Putnam. 



HEIFERS— PURE BRED. 

$5. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
Holstein Heifer, " Betz Fairfax, 2d.'" 

$3. Second i:)ren]ium to James C. Poor, No. Andovei-, 
for Holstein Heifer, " Lady Marion Fairfax." 



|4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Hannah Noble." 
i4. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, " Betz Fairfax Clothchild." 
iJt. First premium to F. D. Graves, Peabody, for Guern- 
sey heifer. 
14. First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey heifer. 
i2. Second premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey heifer. 
$2. Second premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 

for Holstein heifer. 
$2. Second premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 

for Holstein heifer. 
$5. First premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, for 

Ayrshire heifer, " Ruby of Boxford." 
$4. First premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover 

for Ayrshire heifer, " Roxanna Clyde, 2d." 
$4. First premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, for 

Ayrshire heifer, " Ruby of Boxford, 3rd." 
12. Second premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover,, 

for Ayrshire heifer, " Maid Douglass, 2d." 
$4. First premium to Robert Foss, Hamilton, for Jersey 

heifer. 



GRADE HEIFERS. 

First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Grade Holstein, " Susie H." 
Second premium to Isaac Schurman, Dan vers, for 

Grade Holstein. 
First premium to Mrs. J. A. King, Peabody, for 

Grade Ayrshire. 
First premium to L. Bordeaux, Danvers, for Grade^ 

Devon. 



15 

$2. Second premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, for 

Grade Holstein. 
$2. Second premium to H. W. Evans, Amesbury, for 

Grade Hereford. 
Isaac Damon, judge — George L. Averill, B. P. Pike, S. 
H. Bailey — Committee. 



WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

First premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for working- 
oxen. 

Second premium to H. W. Evans, Amesbury, for 
working oxen. 

First premium to H. W. Evans, Amesbury, for work- 
ing steers. 

Second premium to H. W. Evans, Amesbury, for 
working steers. 



STEERS. 

$4. First premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for 2 year 

old steers. 
$3. First premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, for 1 year 

old steers. 
•13. First premium to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, 

months old steers. 
James C. Poor, S. H. Bailey — Committee. 



STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

$8. First premium to H. S. Sprague, Haverhill, for stal- 
lion, " El Sable." 

to. Second premium to E. D. Lovett, Hamilton, for stal- 
lion, "Judge Hayes." 



i6 

BROOD MARES FOR FARiM AND DRAFT. 

#8. First premium to I. Schurman, Danvers, for mare 

and foal. 
$5. Secoad premium to A. W. Dodge, Danvers, for mare 

and foal. 



BROOD MARES FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

•S8. First premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for Bay 

mare, " Hera '' and foal. 
'fo. Second premium to E. D. Lovett, Beverly, for gray 

mare. 

B. G. Kimball, A. B. Fellows, Isaac F. Knowlton, Wm. 
R. Round}^ — Committee. 



FAMILY HORSES. 

$6. First premium to W. H. Poor, No. Andover, for gray 
horse, "Marmion." 

'"B-t. Second premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for Chest- 
nut horse, " Sam." 



GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

#6. First premium to D. W. Poor, Peabody, for bay horse. 
•f4. Second premium to C. A. Buxton, Salem, for brown 
mare, "Lady Duric." 



FAST WALKING HORSES. 

#5. First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

black Morgan mare. 
<1?3. Second premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for bay 

mare, " Hera." 



17 

). First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 
single farm horse. 

). First premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, for 
pair farm horses. 

1:. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for pair 
farm horses. 

B. G. Kimball, W. F. Kinsman, John L. Shorey — Com- 
mittee. 



SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

f6. First premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, for 

bay horse, weight 1460 lbs. 
$4. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for brown 

horse, weight 1250 lbs. 
$6. First premium to B. W. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

bay horse, weight 1050 lbs. 
$4. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for bay 

horse, weight 1150 lbs. 
T. E. Cox, J. H. Perkins, Geo. M. Roundy. — Committee. 



PAHiS OF FARM HORSES. 

i8. First premium to J. A. Garland, Hamilton, for pair 

of bay horses, weight 2500 lbs. 
•I'5. Second premium to George Pratt, Danvers, for pair 

of bay horses, weight 2600 lbs. 
$8. First premium to Isaac C. Day, Boxford, for pair of 

gray horses, weight 2300 lbs. 
S.H. Bailey, B.H. Farnham, Geo. L. Averill. — Committee. 



PONYS. 



f4. Gratuity, to Leo. H. Tracy, Salem, for Shetland pony. 
$2. Gratuity to E. B. Hayes, Lynn, for pony. 



i8 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES. 

$3. Second premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

3 year old colt. 
14. First premium to W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, for 2 

year old colt. 
f4. First premium to Joseph Johnson, Andover, for 15 

mos. old colt. 
•f2. Second premium to Isaac C. Day, Boxford, for 15 

mos. old colt. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

$D. First premium to Mrs. C. W. Sylvester, Ipswich, for 

bay colt, 3 years old. 
■S3. Second premium to A. B. Forbes, Byfield, for bay 

filly " Clagette," 3 years old. 
11:. First premium to H. H. Demsey, Wenham, for bay 

filly " Lady Nelson," 2 years old. 
•$4. First premium to A. B. Forbes, Byfield, for Chestnut 

filly " Clayzette," 1 year old. 
$2. Second premium to A. B. Forbes, Byfield, for Ham- 

bletonian Colt, 2 years old. 
B. G. Kimball, Walter F. Gould, M. B. Chesley, John 
J. Manninof. — Committee. 



SWINE— LARGE BREEDS. 

$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Chester 
white boar. 

S5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for O. I. 
Chester white sow and'pigs. 

•'3)3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for O. I. 
Chester white sow and pigs. 

^3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Berk- 
shire boar. 



19 

First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for O. I. 

weaned pigs- 
First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 
sow and pigs. 

First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 
weaned pigs. 

Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Berk- 
shire boar. 

First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Poland 
China pigs. 

First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for large York- 
shire Boar. 

First premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, for 
Berkshire boar. 

First premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, for 
Berkshire sow. 
'f3. Second premium to L. Bordeaux, Danvers, for Ches- 
ter white sow and pigs. 

Second premium to L. Bordeaux, Danvers, for Ches- 
ter white boar. 
13. Second premium to E. E. Stranyan, Danvers, for 
Yorkshire boar. 

Second premium to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for 
Jersey red boar. 

Second premium to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for 
Jersey red sow. 

Second premium to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for 
Chester white sow and pigs. 
George A. Dow, John W. Lovett, J. Arthur Lamson. 
• Committee. 



SWINE— SMALL BREEDS. 

First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 
Yorkshire boar. 



20 

$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire sow. 
'f5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire weaned pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
$3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire boar. 
•f 3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for weaned 

pigs. 
•f 3. Second premium to F. L. Newhall, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire boar. 
W. A. Poor, George A. Dow, J. A. Lamson, John W. 
Lovett. — Committee. 



SHEEP. 



$5. First premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, for 

Shropshire buck. 
$D. First premium to J. D, W. French, No. Andover, for 

grade Hampshire sheep. 
•f8. Second premium to Wyman & Son, Peabody, for 

Leicester sheep. 
$4. First premium to J. B. Thomas Co., Peabody, for 

Shropshire lambs. 
|i4. First premium to J. B. Thomas Co., Peabody, for 

Leicester lambs. 
$5. First premium to J. B. Thomas Co., Peabody, for 

Leicester buck. 
C. W. Webster, James C. Poor, C. C. Blunt. — Commit- 
tee. 



21 



POULTRY. 



$2. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for pair 

Leghorn fowls. 
$1. Second premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair Leghorn fowls. 
$2. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for pair 

Leghorn chicks. 
$1. Second premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair Leghorn chicks. 
$2. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for pen 

Leghorn fowls. 
$1. and diploma to George A. Knight, Peabody, for pen 

Leghorn chicks. 
$1. and diploma to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, for 

pen White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
fl. Second premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pen White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pen White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$1. Second premium to E. H. &S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pen White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
•f2. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pair White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
il. Second premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pair White Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$1. Second premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Groveland, 

for pair White Plymoutli Rock chicks. 
$2. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

Game Bantam fowls. 
12. First premium to C E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

Golden Game Bantam fowls. 
$1. Second premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

Game Bantam chicks. 



22 

$2. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

Buff Cochin Bantam fowls. 
$2. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

Black Cochin Bantam fowls. 
$1. And diploma to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

Black Cochin Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

pair Black Cochin Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

pair White Cochin Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, for 

Red Game Bantam chicks. 
$1. Second premium to Walter H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

Red Game Bantam fowls. 
$1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

Black Langshan fowls. 
$2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

Black Langshan fowls. 
$1. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pen Black Langshan fowls. 
$1. And diploma to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for pen 

Houdan chicks. 
$2. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Houdan chicks. 
^2, First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

Wyandotte fowls. 
$1. Second premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

Wyandotte fowls. 
$2. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

Wyandotte chicks. , 
$1. Second premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for pair 

Wyandotte chicks. 
$1. And diploma to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for pen 

R. L Red chicks. 
$2. First premium to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for pair 

R. L Red Chicks. 



$2. First premium to E, F. Trask, Salem, for Buff 
Plymouth Rock chicks. 

$1. Second premium to E. F. Trask, Salem, for pen Buff 
Plymouth Rock chicks. 

i2. First premium to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 
for White China Geese. 

$1. Second premium to Fairview Poultry Yards, Pea- 
body, for Toulouse geese. 

$1. And diploma to Fairview Poultiy Yards, Peabody, 
for Gray Call ducks. 

$2. First premium to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 
for pair White Pekin ducks. 

$2. First premium to Fairview Poultr}'- Yards, Peabody, 
for Black Langshan chicks. 

$1. Second premium to Fairview Poultry Yards, Pea- 
body, for I^lack Langshan chicks. 

$1. Second premium to Fairview Poultry Yards, Pea- 
body, for pen Black Langshan chicks. 

$2. First premium to Fairview Poultry Yards, Peabody, 
for Black Langshan chicks. 

$2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 
White Leghorn fowls. 

$1. Second premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 
White Leghorn fowls. 

$2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 
White Leghorn chicks. 

$1. Second premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pair 
White Leghorn chicks. 

$1. and diploma to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for pen 
White Leghorn chicks. 

|2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for Buff 
Polish fowls. 

$2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for Buff 
Polish chicks. 

$2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for Silver 
Gray Dorkin fowls. 



24 

$2. First piemium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for Silver 
Gray Dorkin chicks. 

S2. First premium to Arthur Elliott, Peabod}', for Buff 
Cochin fowls. 

$1. Second premium to Mrs. W. M. Peterson, Peabody, 
for R. I. Red chicks. 

$1. and diploma to R. R. Hamilton, Peabody, for pen 
White Leghorn chicks. 

il. Second premium to R. R. Hamilton, Peabody, for 
White Leghorn chicks. 

i2. First premium to R. R. Hamilton, Peabody, for Cor- 
nish Indian Game chicks. 

$2. First premium to Daniel Fuller, Middleton, for 
Bronze turkeys. 

$2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynn, for Embden 
geese. 

$1. Second premium to M. J. Cain, Lynn, for Embden 
geese. 

$1. Second premium to M. J. Cain, Lynn, for Pekin 
ducks. 

$2. First premium to M. J. Cain, Lynn, for White Hol- 
land turkeys. 

$2. First premium to A. M. Swinerton, Danvers, for Gold- 
en Wyandotte chicks. 

f L Second premium to A. M. Swinerton, Danvers, for 
Golden Wyandotte chicks. 

$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
White Muscovy ducks. 

$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
Colored Muscovy ducks. 

$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
American Dominique fowls. 

12. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

American Dominique chicks. 
$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
White Polish fowls. 



25 

$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
Goldea Polish fowls. 

$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
Golden Polish chicks. 

$2. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
Golden Polish fowls. 

$1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
Plaiu Golden chicks. 

$1. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
Plain Golden chicks. 

SI. Second premium to Squires & Da}^ for Barred Ply- 
mouth Rock chicks. 

$1. Second premium to Squires & Day, for White Wy- 
andotte chicks. 

12. First premium to H. W. Gunston, Groveland, for R. 
I. Red chicks. 

.$2. First premium to H. W. Gunston, Groveland, for 
Rose Comb R. I. Red cliicks. 

$1 and Diploma to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabod}^ for pen 
Brown Leghorn fowls. 

12. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pen 
Brown Leghorn chicks. 

-f2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 
Brown Leghorn fowls. 

$2. First premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pair 
Brown Leghorn chicks. 

$2. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabodjs for pair 
Houdan fowls. 

II. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 
Houdan fowls. 

$1 and Diploma to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pen Hou- 
dan fowls. 

$2. First premium to Francis O. Kimball, Danvers, for 
Wild ducks. 

$2. First premium to Wm. E. Martin, Danvers, for Black 
Java fowls. 



26 

$1. Second premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

light Brahma fowls. 
$2. First premium to Elmer E. Durkee, Peabody, for 

Canada geese. 
$2. First premium to George P. Lunt, Danvers, for pair 

Belgian hares. 
$1. And diploma to P. E. Dwinnell, Groveland, for pen 

White Wyandotte fowls. 
$1. Second premium to P. E. Dwinnell, Groveland, for 

pen White Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium to P. E. Dwinnell, Groveland, for 

pair White Wyandotte fowls. 
^2. First i^remium to P. E. Dwinnell, Groveland, for 

pair White Wyandotte chicks. 
|1. Second premium to P. E. Dwinnell, Groveland, for 

pair White Wyandotte chicks. 
$2. First premium to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for Barred 

Plymouth Rock fowls. 
II and Diploma to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for pen 

Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
12. First premium to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for Barred 

Plymouth Rock chicks. 
II. Second premium to A. H. Miller, Salem, for pair 

China geese. 
|2. First premium to Joseph W. Bolster, Peabody, for 

Partridge Cochin fowls. 

11. Gratuity to Louis E. Friend, Beverly, for collection 

of pigeons. 

12. First premium to F. E. Sweetser, Danvers, for Brown 

China goslings. 
12. First premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

Black Polish fowls. 
12. First premium to A. L. Hutchinson, Beverly, for 

Black Polish chicks. 
$2. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for Rose 

Comb R. I. Red fowls. 



27 

$2. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pen Rose 

Comb R. I. Red fowls. 
$1 and Diploma to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pen Rose 

Comb R. I. Red chicks. 
$1 and Diploma to Gustave Bagley, Peabody, for Buff 

Cochin Bantam chicks. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. E. A. Stanyon, Danvers, 

for Canada geese. 
$2. First premium to Charles W. Ballard, Salem, for 

White Game Bantam fowls. 
$1 and Diploma to Charles W. Ballard, Salem, for pen 

White Game Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium to Charles W. Ballard, Salem, for 

Black Game Bantam fowls. 
|2. First premium to Charles W. Ballard, Salem, for 

Brown Red Game Bantam fowls. 
|1. Second premium to Charles W. Ballard, Salem, for 

Brown Red Game Bantam fowls. 
$2. First premium to Charles W. Ballard, Salem, for 

Red Game Bantam chicks. 
$2. First premium to Charles W. Ballard, Salem, for Red 

Pyle Bantam fowls. 
12, First premium to Charles W. Ballard, Salem, for Red 

Pyle Bantam chicks. 
$1.50. Gratuity to Henry H. Buxton, Peabody, for col- 
lection of pigeons. 
•12. First premium to Joseph G. Basford, Peabody, for 

White Minorca fowls. 
$1. Second premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for White 

Wyandotte fowls. 
$1. Second premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$1 and Diploma to W. W. Chase, Groveland, for Frizzled 

fowl. 
11. Second premium to J. D. W. French, No. Andover, 

for R. I. Red chicks. 



28 

$2. First premium to W. E. Simpson, Danvers, for Buff 
Leghorn fowls. 

$2. First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for jjair 
Light Brahma chicks. 

$2. First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair 
Light Brahma chicks. 

$1 and Diploma to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pen Light 
Brahma chicks. 

$1 and Diploma to F. W. Holden, Beverly, for Light 
Brahma chicks. 

$1. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pair 
Brown Leghorn fowls. 

$1. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Ljnn, for pair 
Brown Leghorn chicks. 

$1. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pen 
Brown Leghorn fowls. 

il. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pen 
Brown Leghorn chicks. 

$2. First premium to M. S. Perkins, Danvers, for Tou- 
louse geese. 

$2. First premium to John G. Murphy, Salem, for Buff 
Cochin chicks. 

$2. First premium to John G. Murphy, Salem, for 
Golden Bantam fowls. 

$1. Second premium to John G. Murphy, Salem, for Sil- 
ver Duckwing fowls. 

$2. First premium to A. H. Davenport, Beverly, for Buff 
Wyandotte fowls. 

$2. First premium to A. H. Davenport, Beverly, for Buff 
Wyandotte chicks. 

$2. First premium to G. L. Keyes, Rowley, for pair Or- 
pington chicks. 

$1. Second premium to G. L. Keyes, Rowley, for pair 
Orpington chicks. 

$2. First premium to F. Woodbury 2d, Beverly, for Buff 
Plymouth Rock fowls. 



29 

$1. Second premium to F. Woodbury 2d, Beverly, for 
Buff Plymouth Rock fowls. 

$2. First premium to F. Woodbury 2d, Beverly, for Buff 
Plymouth Rock chicks. 

$1. Second premium to F. Woodbury 2d, Beverly, for 
Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 

•fl aud Diploma to F. Woodbury 2d, Beverly, for pen Buff 
Plj'mouth Rock fowls. 

$2. Gratuity to S. H. Holbrook, Swampscott, for collec- 
tion of pigeons. 

$2. First premium to Josiah Fitz 4th, Lynn, for Buff 
Leghorn fowls. 
W. B. Atherton, judge; Charles O. Putnam, J. W. 

Perkins — Committee. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

f5. Gratuity to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for collec- 
tion dairy implements. 

$10. Gratuity to A. E. Potter, Hamilton, for two-horse 
dump cart. 

Diploma to E. C. Stearns, Syracuse, N. Y., for bone cut- 
ter and ball-bearing lawn mower. 

$1A ^Gratuity to Wyman & Son, Peabody, for milk aerator. 

$10. Gratuity to Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for^ market 
wagon. 

•|2. Gratuity to Solomon Fuller, Dan vers, for collection 
wheel hoes. 

-15. Gratuity to J. H. Nason, Boxford, for two-horse 
farm wagon. 

$2. Gratuity to Colcord Richardson Co., Danvers, for 
fertilizer distributor. 

$5. Gratuity to Colcord Richardson Co., Danvers, for 
farmer's handy wagon. 

f5. Gratuity to D. A. Perley, Danvers, for farm wagon. 



30 

f5. Gratuity to A. H. Whidden, Peabody, for collection 

of implements. 
$8 and Diploma to Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for col- 
lection of agricultural implements. 
J. J. H. Gregory — for the Committee. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURAL 
IMPLEMENTS. 

There were thirty -five entries in this department of our 
annual exhibit, with an average seasoning of the new and 
useful. As usual the Breeds' weeder principle appeared, 
embodied in several implements. The scratching out of 
weeds when just started, by the fingers, always a com- 
mon practice, evidently suggested to Mr. Breed the idea 
of doing with an implement the same kind of work on a 
larger scale. No one can get much benefit from this 
weeder who delays working it until the weeds get to be 
of any size. The true time to work it, for exterminating 
results, is when the weed seed have but sprouted, has not 
fully pierced through, but show only a white, thread-like 
filament to one gently stirring the surface of the soil. A 
plant disturbed in this, its initiatory stages, never survives. 
The hand implement, involving the Breed principle, does 
excellent work among bed stuff, not only killing the weeds 
as they start, but also in -finely breaking the surface of 
land which lies baked after rain and so enabling the seed 
to push through. In every form in which it is used care 
needs to be taken to lift it whenever any stone, corn butt 
or like impediments clog it, otherwise the young plants will 
be torn up as badly as though a small plough had been 
run through them. 

The practical objection I have to some of the heavier 
forms of the weeder is, that when clogged, the driver soon 
gets tired of lifting to clear them and consequently, in 



31 

crops well out of the ground, their work ma}^ do more 
harm than good. In one implement exhibited where the 
Breed idea was embodied in a cultivator, it struck the 
committee that it was overdone, for evidently when this 
implement was used as a simple cultivator, on our average 
New England farms, with the teeth so near together it 
must be a great gatherer of stones and so be in constant 
need of clearing. When spread out to its greatest breadth 
it appeared capable of doing good surface pulverizing 
work among squash hills, but as the work always needed 
there, up to the last moment, as long as the runners will 
permit, is to lighten and firm the soil rather than merely 
scratch over the surface, I fail to see how such an imple- 
ment can be of practical value to the farmer. The collec- 
tion of dairy implements made by Mr. Moody was com- 
plete and very interesting ; in every way an up-to-date 
exhibit, affording a good object lesson. Your committee 
recognized it as well worth of a special gratuity of -15.00. 
The bone cutter (for fowls) exhibited by the Messrs. 
Stearns of Syracuse, N. Y., differs from the well known 
Marsh cutter in having a vertical rather than a hori- 
zontal action of the knives. It appeared to be a well 
made implement. The part containing the knives can be 
replaced for fifty cents and as one set of knives are guar- 
anteed to be able to cut 1000 pounds of raw bone it struck 
your committee as being worthy of notice. There is a 
fundamental mistake made by about every one we have 
ever heard advocating the feeding of bones to poultry, it is 
in asserting that the lime in the bone helps in the formation 
of the shell of the egg. How can this be possible when 
the lime in the bone is in the form of phosphate while it 
is found in the egg shell in the form of carbonate of lime? 
To sustain their position it will be necessary for them to 
prove that this phosphate is changed to a carbonate within 
the fowl. My belief is that what the hen gets from bone is 



32 

the oil and gelatine present and what blood maybe found in 
the shreds of meat that more or less accompany it, besides 
the mechanical use of this hard substance as a grain grind- 
er by the powerful muscles of the gizzard. That fine cut 
green bone helps in egg production is an established fact, 
though the explanation of the process by which this is ac- 
complished is of the non sequiter class of reasoning. 

The varieties of onion hoes exhibited by Mr. S. Fuller 
of Danveis displayed a good deal of ingenuity in adjusting 
means to ends. Some of the most extensive market gar- 
deners in Essex County, are using his single wheel slide hoe 
in preference to all other. On my own farms we have over 
a dozen varieties of these slide hoes, and I was somewhat 
surprised to find this season that my workmen preferred the 
Fuller hoe to all other kinds which run between the rows. 
One of their strongest arguments for it was its stiffness, it 
being entirely free from the wabbling so common after a 
little use to about all of the kinds that run with either one 
or two wheels. 

The broadcast fertilizer distributer, exhibited by Messrs. 
Colcord & Richardson, was very simple in construction and 
appeared capable of doing very good work. It has also 
one great recommendation which is wanting in the two 
machines I have used, and that is that it is capable of ad- 
justment so as to be able to distribute up to considerabl}' 
over a ton to the acre, as much as would be desired under 
any circumstances. Messrs. Colcord & Richardson also 
exhibited " Farmers' handy wagon and platform,'' an affair 
costing about $40.00, having very broad, low wheels and 
a low, broad platform within about thirty inches of the 
ground. One in use on my own farm, I find exceedingly 
handy in the various uses I have thusfarput it to, in haul- 
ing bags of onions and potatoes from the fields and barrels 
of apples from the oi-chards. The low lift makes it very 
easy to load and unload. Especially is its value demon- 



33 

strated in loading barrel stuff, for one able man can readily 
do what two men would be needed for in loading ordinary 
wagons. The platform is capable of taking twenty-seven 
barrels standing on their ends, at a load. 

The grass and sod cutter, exhibited bj' Mr. B. F. Patch 
of Danvers, was strikingly simple in construction and by 
the help of a little muscle did its work very well. 
J. J. H. Gregory, ) 
W. H. Hayes, | Committee. 

Richard Newell, ) 



CARRIAGES. 
$10. Gratuity, to T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for top Stan- 
hope buggy. 
$3 and Diploma, to W. G. & J. H. Ferris, Lynn, for top 
Goddard buggy and collection. 
$10. Gratuity, to J. B. Lancaster, Merrimac, for collec- 
tion. 
$2. Gratuity, to H. P. Whipple, Salem, for pneumatic 
knockabout. 
0. S. Butler, James Wilson, J. H. Nason — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH DOUBLE TEAM. 

$8. First premium, to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, four oxen, 

" Hussy " plough. 
$6. Second premium, to J. C. Evans, Amesbury, four 

oxen, " Syracuse " plough. 
Allen Smith, O. F. Newhall, Daniel W. Osborn— (7ow- 
mittee. 



PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES. 

First premium, to Durkee Bros., Peabody, " Hussy " 
plough. 



34 

$4. Second premium, to W. B. Verry, Danvers, " Hussy" 
plough. 
George Pratt, Frank Newhall, Alvin Smith, A. A. Ruth- 
erford — Committee. 



PLOUGHING WITH SWIVEL PLOUGH. 

$6. First premium, to F. A. Dodge, Beverly, " Yankee " 

plough. 
i4. Second premium, to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 

" Victor " plough. 
Samuel B. George, A. P. Fuller, W. VV. Ch^&Q— Com- 
mittee. 



PLOUGHING WITH SULKY PLOUGH. 

$6. First premium, to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 
"National " plough. 
Geo. L. Averill, Joseph Marshall, J. H. Perkins, Geo. 
Matthewson — Committee. 



HARROWS. 

$5. First premium, to Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for 
spring tooth harrow. 
J. Kavanagh — for the Committee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



DAIRY. 



!|5. First premium to Mrs. C. W. Gowen, West Newbury, 

for butter. 
$3. Second premium to J. M. Fall, Ipswich, for butter. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

$2.00. First premium to Mrs. Isadore G. Richardson, Pea- 
body, for white bread. 
fl.OO. Second premium to Mrs. James Woolahan, Pea- 
body, for white bread. 
i2.00. First premium to Mrs. James Woolahan, Peabody, 

for graham bread. 
$1.00. Second premium to Minnie Flynn, Peabody, for 

graham bread. 
■fl.OO. First premium to Helen E. Bailey, Andover, for 
brown bread. 
.50. Gratuity to C. A. Buckley, Peabody, for oatmeal 

bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. L. S. Wilkins, Middleton, for 

white bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Katherine E. Cummings, Peabody, 

for white bread. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Sarah Meyers, Peabody, for Rus- 
sian bread. 
.50. Gratuity to T^izzie Donahue, Salem, for dough- 
nuts. 
.50. Gratuity to .Mis. .1. F. Barrett, Peabody, for wed- 
ding cake. 



36 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for fruit 
cake. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Helen Osgood, Peabody, for Mc- 
Donald cake.' 

.50. Gratuity to Eliza F. QuinLy, Beverljs for angel 
cake. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 

for canned fruits. 
$1.00. Second premium to Mrs. H. M. O'Donnell, Pea- 
body, for jellies. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Julia Sweeney, Peabody, for 
preserves. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. O'Donnell, Peabody, for 
preserves. 



HONEY. 

$2. First premium to Walter F. Gould, Ipswich. 
$1. Second premium to Fred Stiles, Peabody. 

Mrs. Samuel L. Sawyer, Mrs. J. H. Perkins, John J. 
Gould, Henry Alley — Committee. 



STATEMENTS. 

WEDDING CAKE. 

One and a half pounds butter, one and a half jjounds 
sugar, one-fourth pound lard, twelve eggs, one cup molas- 
ses, two and a half pounds currants, two pounds citron, 
one pound Sultana raisins, one pound raisins stoned and 
chopped, one glass brandy, wine and rose water, all kinds 
of spices ; beat eggs to a froth, St. Louis flour to make 
stiff, bake six hours. Frost plain with frosting made with 
whites of two eggs and finest confectioner's sugar to make 
right consistenc}', flavored with rose water. Let stand till 



37 

next day, then add fancy frosting made by using whites 
of two eggs and sugar to make very stiff, small pinch tar- 
taric acid. Flavor to taste with rose water. Will frost 
one loaf. 

Mrs. Jessie F. Barrett. 

fruit cake. 
One cup sugar, one cup butter, one-half cup molasses, 
one-half cup sour milk, three eggs, one-half teaspoonful 
of salt, one pound raisins stoned, one pound currants, one- 
half pound citron, one teaspoonful of clove, one-half tea- 
spoonful of allspice, cinnamon, and mace each, little nut- 
meg, two squares of Baker's chocolate, two and one-half 
cups flour. 

Carrie Stanley. 

doughnuts. 
Two eggs, one cup sugar, three tablespoonfuls butter, 
one cup sweet, milk, one quart flour, one-half teaspoonful 
salt, little nutmeg, two teaspoonfuls baking powder. 

Lizzie Donahue. 

mcdonald cake. 

One cup butter, one and a half cups sugar, yolks of four 
eggs, teaspoonful of lemon or vanilla, one-half cup milk, 
one and a half cups flour, one-half cup corn starch, one 
teaspoonful cream tartar, half teaspoonful of soda, whites 
of eggs, mix in the order given. 

Helen Osgood. 

white bread. 
Seven quarts flour, two quarts water, half cup sugar, 
quarter cup salt, one yeast cake, bake three-quarters hour. 

Mrs. J. Woolahan. 

GRAHAM bread. 
Three pounds graham flour, one quart white flour, two 



38 

tablespoonfuls sugar, two tablespoonfuls molasses, one 
yeast cake, pint and a half warm water, bake three- 
quarters hour. 

Mrs. James Woolahan. 

brown bread. 
Three cups flour, three cups Indian meal, one cup mo- 
lasses, two teaspoon fuls of soda, quarter of a saltspoonful 
of salt, four cups of warm water, mix in the above order 
thoroughly and steam three and a half hours. 

Helen E. Bailey. 

GRAHAM bread. 

One-half cup molasses, six cups graham flour, half yeast 
cake, one large tablespoonful laid, mix with milk and wa- 
ter. 

Minnie Flynn. 

oatmeal bread. 
One cup rolled oats, two cups boiling water, half cup 
molasses, half yeast cake, one spoonful shortening, one 
teaspoonful salt. 

Miss C. A. Buckley, 

ANGEL cake. 

Whites of eleven eggs, one and a half cups of sugar, 
one teaspoonful of cream tartar, one teaspoonful vanilla, 
one cup flour. 

Eliza F. Quinby. 



PEARS. 

$2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bartlett. 

$2. First piemium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Bosc. 

$2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Duchess. 

$2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Lawrence. 



39 

Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Urbanist. 
First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Vicar. 
First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Howell. 
First premium to H. A. Harrington, Feabody, for 

Belle Lucrative. 
First premium to Mary M. Lord, Salem, for d' Anjou. 
$2. First premium to Wm. T. Hutchinson, Dan vers, for 
Dana's Hovey. 
First premium to D. W. Osborn, Peabody, for Onan- 
dago. 
$1. Gratuity to D. W. Osborn, Peabody, for Sheldon. 

First premium to D. W. Osborn, Peabody, for Cora- 
ice. 
$1. Gratuity to D. W. Osborn, Peabody, for Goodale. 
First premium to W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for Seckel. 
First premium to C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for Sheldon. 
Gratuity to C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for Bussock. 
First premium to Wm. Burke Little, Newbury, for 

Clairgeau. 
Gratuity to P. Colton, Salem, for Bartlett 
Gratuity to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for Belle 

Lucrative. 
Gratuity to Allen Barr, Lawrence, for Bosc. 
Gratuity to Mrs. S. J. Barr, Lawrence, for Lawrence. 
Gratuity to Joseph Forness, Peabody, for Onandago. 
Gratuity, to D. W. Osborn, Peabody, for d'Anjou. 
Gratuity, to M. L. Rand, Peabody, for Seckel. 
Gratuity, to Walter B. Allen, Lynn, for Louis 
Bonne. 
.50. Gratuity, to Sylvester Parrott, Lynn, for Fulton. 
.50. Gratuity, to W. T. Dole, Peabod3% for superfine. 
il. Gratuity, to James A. King, Peabody, for Clair- 
geau. 
The collection of pears recommended for cultivation in 
Essex County, a majority of the committee did not 



40 

deem it worthy of a premium and did not award any. 
Peter M. Neal, B. F. Stanley, A. C. Osborn, Albert 
Emerson — Committee. 



APPLES. 

$2.00. First premium, to Miss C. F. Parker, Lynn, for 
Baldwin. 

$2.00. First premium, to W. E. Kimball, Lynn, for Dan- 
vers Sweet. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to W. E. Kimball, Lynn, for Fall Harvey. 

$2.00. First premium, to G. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Tompkins King. 

$2.00. First premium, to G. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Wealthy. 

$1.00. Second premium, to G. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Porter. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to G. W. Richardson, Lynn, forTolman 
Sweet. 

$1.00. Gratuity, to G. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Olden- 
burg. 

$2.00. First premium, to S. F, Newman, Newbury, for 
Red Russett. 

$2.00. First premium, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for 
R. I. Greening. 

$1.00. Second premium, to S. F. Newman, Newbury, for 
Dan vers Sweet. 

$2.00. First premium, to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Hub- 
bards ton. 

$2.00. First premium, to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Porter. 

$2.00. First premium, to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Pick- 
man Pippin. 

$1.00. Second premium, to Henry Stone, Lynn, for 
Baldwin. 



41 

12.00. First pieniium, to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody^ 

for Hunt's Russett. 
11.50. First premium, to M. A. Noyes, Lynn, for Fall 

Harvey. 
$1.50. First premium, to Charles A.Southwick, Peabody, 

for Wolf River. 
$1.50. First premium, to Charles W. Jewett, L3ain, for 

Jewett. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Charles W. Jewett, Lynn, for 

R. I. Greening. 
$1.50. First premium, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for Crab. 
$1.00. Second premium, to W. T. Dole, Peabody, for 

Tompkins King. 
$1.00. Second premium, to S. P. Buxton, Peabody, for 

Hubbardston. 
$1,00. Second premium, to B. P. Ware, Marblehead, for 

Pickman Pippin. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Benj. M. Smith, Beverly, for 

Gravenstein. 
$1.00. Second premium, to S. B. George, Groveland, for 

Hunt's Russett. 
$1.00. Second premium, to Mrs. S. A. Norton, Danvers, 

for Snow. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Joseph Gregory, Marblehead, for Crab.^ 
$1.00. Gratuity, to J. N. Burbank, Peabody, for Northern 

Spy. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Horace Brown, Ipswich, for Sweet. 

Baldwin. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to G. F. Sanger, Peabody, for Drap 

d'Or. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Henry F. Savar}'-, Groveland, for 

Wolf River. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, for 

Philippine. 
$1.00. Gratuity, to Mrs. Thomas Wilson, Peabody, for 

R. L Greeninof. 



42 

$1.00. Gratuity, to Geo. B. Austin, Boxford, for Baldwin. 
$1.00, Gratuit}^ to Erastus Clark, Ipswich, for Baldwin. 
il.OO- Gratuity, to Miss L. E. Wright, Peabody, for 
Crab. 
T. C. Thurlow, J. C. Goodell, Lyman Osborn — Commit- 
tee. 



PEACHES, GRAPES AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

$2. First premium to Andrew Fitz, Salem, for White 

Flesh peaches. 
$2, First premium to S. M. Titcomb, West Newbury, for 

Yellow Flesh. 
$2. First i^remium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Essex 

County Seedling. 
$2. First premium to John F. Folsom, Salem, for Late 

Crawford. 
f 3. First premium to Edwin Bates, Ljain, for Basket of 

Fruit. 
$2. Second premium to Mrs. Thomas Wilson, Peabody, 

for Basket of Fruit. 
il. Second premium to Mary M. Lord, Salem, for White 

Flesh peaches. 
$1. Second premium to J. N. Teel, Lynn, for Late Craw- 
ford peaches. 
$1. Second premium to S. M. Titcomb, West Newbury, 

for White Flesh. 
$3. First premium to Mrs. S. J. Barr, Lawrence, for 

Concord grapes. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. S. J. Barr, Lawrence, for Worden 

grapes. 
i3. First piemium to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for Worden 

grapes. 
fl. Gratuity to S. J. Barker, Methuen, for Brighton 

grapes. 



43 

Fiist premium to S. M. Titcomb, West Newbury, for 

Brighton grapes. 
First premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Pock- 

lington grapes. 
Gratuity to A. C. Osborn, Peabod)% for Concord 

grapes. 
First premium to N. C. Patterson, Peabody, for 

Green Mountain grapes. 
Gratuity to T. H. Jackraan, Peabody, for Pockling- 

ton grapes. 
First premium to W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for 

Moore's Early grapes. 
Gratuity to W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for Green 

Mountain grapes. 
First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Moore's Diamond grapes. 
First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Niag- 
ara grapes. 
Gratuity to- Solomon Fuller, Danvers, for Concord 

grapes. 
Gratuity to Lyman Osborn, Peabody, for Brighton 

grapes. 
Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for Hartford grapes. 
Gratuity to Robert Hamilton, Peabody, for Pockling- 

ton grapes. 
Gratuity to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for Green 

Mountain grapes. 
Gratuity to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for Moore's 

Diamond grapes. 
Gratuity to Mrs. Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for 

Moore's Diamond grapes. 
Gratuity to Robert Hamilton, Peabody, for Niagara- 
Gratuity to Henry Whittredge, Lynn, for Niagara 

grapes. 
Second premium to Mrs. G. W. Stickney, Beverly^ 

for Black Hamburg grapes. 



44 

13. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Collection of 
grapes. 

$1. Giatuity to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Eaton grapes. 

•fl.oO. First premium to B. N. Moore, Peabody, for 
Martha grapes. 

$1.50. First premium to Mrs. G. W. Sticl<ney, Beverly, 
for lona grapes. 

.50. Gratuity to Erastus Clark, Ipswich, for Moore's 
Early grapes. 

$3. First premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Orange 
quinces. 

i8. First premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 
Champion quinces. 

$1. Gratuity to John T. Folsom, Salem, for Orange 
quinces. 

$1. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Cham- 
pion quinces. 

$2. First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 
Holland plums. 

i2. First premium to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Lom- 
bard plums. 

i2. First premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Magnum Bonum plums. 

$2. First premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Burbank plums. 

i2. First premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, foi- Brad- 
shaw plums. 

.50 Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Lom- 
bard plums. 
W. H. B. Currier, Charles H. Preston, Austin Whit- 
comb. — Committee. 



PLANTS. 

i5. Fiist premium to George W. Creesy, Salem, for col- 
lection of foliage plants. 



45 

$1. Gratuity to George W. Creesy, Salem, for begonia. 

$3. Second premium to Mrs. J. H. Julyn, Salem, for col- 
lection of plants. 

$1. Gratuit}- to Mrs. J. H. Julyn, Salem, for collection 
of begonias. 

$3. Gratuit}^ to Jacob C. Rogers, Peabody, for collection 
of plants. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Manning, Salem, for Buenos Ayres 
lily. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. G. L. Pierson, Salem, for rex be- 
gonia. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. J. A. Brown, Peabody, for spread- 
ing asparagus. 

.50. Gratuity to Michael Dinneen, Peabody ,for orange tree. 

.50. Gratuity to Arthur Hatch, Peabody, for collection 
plants. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. B. F. Chase, Dan vers, for lily pad 
begonia. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Knowles, Peabody, for lemon plant. 

.50. Gratuity to Winifred Upton, Beverly, for begonia. 

.50. Gratuity to Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for Jerusalem 
cheriy tree. 

$1. Gratuity to Otis Brown, Peabody, for variegated 
arbutilon plant. 

$1. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for cactus. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. William Tudbury, Peabody, for oak 
leaf begonia. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. F. E. Hutchinson, Peabody, for 
Jerusalem cherry tree. 

fl. Gratuity to M. P. Ward, Peabody, for display of 
ferns. 

.50. Gratuity to Hattie L. Trask, Peabody, for cotton 
plant. 

•i^l.' Gratuity to Mrs. G. S. Lawson, Dan vers, for begonia. 
Otis L. Kent, Mrs. N. M. Quint, Eva A. Perley, Mrs. C. 
W. Go wen. — Committee. 



46 

FLOWERS. 

$1. First premium to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, for 
coxcombs. 

$1. First premium to B. F. Bickum, Haverliill, for pair 
bouquets. 

il. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for bou- 
quet garden flowers. 

fl. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for petunias. 

$1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for cannas. 

fl. First premium to L. H. Southwick, Peabody, for 
sweet peas. 

$1. First premium to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 
dahlias. 

'fl. First premium to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for 
pompon dahlias. 

$1. Gratuity to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for cactus 
dahlias. 

$1. Gratuity to W. H. Symonds, Marblehead, for collec- 
tion of dahlias. 

11. First premium to Miss Little, Peabody, for African 
marigolds. 

$3. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for 100 
specimens cut flowers. 

$2. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for double 
geraniums. 

$1. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for single 
geraniums. 

$1. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for nastur- 
tiums. 

$1. First premium, to Miss Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for 
Druramond phlox. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for scabiosas. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for zinnias. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for garden 
annuals. 



47 

.50. Gratuity, to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for nasturtiums. 
.50. Gratuity, to D. M. Wagner, Peabody, for snap 

dragon. 
.50. Gratuity, to John Kimball, Peabooy, for pair garden 

bouquets. 
.50. Gratuity, to John Kimball, Peabody, for verbenas. 
.50. Gratuity, to John Kimball, Peabody, for African 

marigoldr. 
$1. Gratuity, to John Kimball, Peabody, for display of 

coxcombs. 
.50. Gratuity, to John Kimball, Peabody, for collection 

of stocks. 
'fl. Gratuity, to John Kimball, Peabody, for bouquet of 

garden flowers. 
.50. Gratuity, to Alva Trask, Peabody, for sweet peas. 
$1. Gratuity, to Mrs. Alice Poor, Peabody, for collection 

of pansies. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Charles Poor, Peabody, for garden 

annuals. ■ 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Charles Poor, Peabody, for ver- 
benas. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Charles Poor, Peabody, for double 

zinnias. 
.50. Gratuity, to Rufus Flint, Salem, for dahlias. 
$1. Gratuity, to Susan A. Bodge, Peabody, for collection 

of Japan lilies. 
.50. Gratuity, to Lizzie Newhall, Peabody, for carnation 

pinks. 
.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. T. P. Teague, Peabody, for varie- 

ofated zinnias. 
.50. Gratuity, to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for phlox drum- 

mond. 
$1. Gratuity, to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for dahlias pom- 
pon. 
$1. Gratuity, to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for collection of. 

dahlias. 



48 

.50. Gratuit3% to Mary A. Parsons, Lynnfield, for Chi- 
nese lantern plant. 

$1. Gratuity, to Mrs. Harry Morton, Peabody, for collec- 
tion of gladiolas. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Harry Morton, Peabodj^ for collec- 
tion double nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity, to Miss D. Sawtelle, Peabody, for nastur- 
tiums. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mrs. G. L. Lawson, Danvers, for fall 
crocus. 

.50. Gratuity, to Mary Whipple, Salem, for double sun- 
flower. 

il. First premium, to Annie M. Little, Newbury, for 
dianthus. 

fl. First premium, to Annie M. Little, Newbury, for 
salpiglossis. 

il. First premium, to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
verbenas. 

$3. First premium, to M. Ward, Peabody, for floral design. 

$1. First premium, to M. Ward, Peabody, for basket 
greenhouse flowers. 

$1. First premium, to Josephine Buxton, Peabody, for 
dianthus. 

.50. Gratuity, to Josephine Buxton, Peabody, for dianthus* 

$2. First premium, to T. C. Thurlow, West NewUny, 
for collection of hardy phlox. 

.50. Gratuity, to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, for col- 
lection of Japan lilies. 

$1. First premium, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for scabiosas. 

•fl. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for French 
marigolds. 

.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for collection of 
coxcombs. 

.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for asters. 

.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for collection of 
asters. 



49 

.50. Gratuity, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for African mari- 
golds. 

^l. First premium, to Mrs. D. A. Parker, Lynn, for col- 
lection of annuals. 

SI. First premium, to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for zinnias. 

#2. First premium, to Susie Vickary, Lynn, for design of 
native flowers. 

.50. Second premium, to Susie Vickary, Lynn, for basket 
garden flowers. 

.50. Second premium, to Susie Vickary, Lynn, for pair 
bouquets of native flowers. 

-50. Gratuity, to J. C. Vickary, Lj-nn, for 50 pansies. 

$1. First premium, to Mrs. J. N. Julyn, Salem, for bas- 
ket garden flowers. 

#1. First premium, to Mrs. J. N. Julyn, Salem, for car- 
nation pinks. 

$L First premium, to Mrs. J. N. Julyn, Salem, for pair 
greenhouse bouquets. 

,50. Gratuity, to Mrs. Dalton, Peabody, for single petunias. 

,50. Gratuity, to E. A. Richards, Lynn, for basket green- 
house flowers. 

.50. Gratuity, to W. H. Harrington, Peabody, for collec- 
tion of cannas. 

.25. 'Gratuity, to Lucy Osborn, Peabody, for passion 
flower. 
The committee desire to make honorable mention of the 

fine display of dahlias exhibited by C.S. Pratt of Reading, 

he being out of the county could not receive a premium 

under the rules of the society. 

Edward E. Woodman, Adeline A. Little, Ettore Tassi- 

nari — Committee. 



VEGETABLES, FIRST CLASS. 
>2. First premium, to Wm. B. Cottrell, Salem, for red 



onions. 



50 

$2. First premium, to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Danvers 

Globe onions. 
$2. First premium, to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, ^^^ 

Danvers carrots. 
$2. First premium, H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

mangel wurtzels. 
$2. First premium, to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for 

Eclipse beets. 
$2. First premium, to Alfred Mason, Beverly, for Dan- 
vers onions. 
$1. Second premium, to Alfred Mason, Beverly, for 

Edmands beets. 
il. Second premium, to Alfred Mason, Beverly, for 

Danvers carrots. 
.50. Gratuity, to Alfred Mason, Beverly, for yellow flat 

onions. 
$2. First premium, to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

early northern potatoes. 
$1. Second premium, to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

parsnips. 
.50. Gratuity, to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Danvers 

carrots. 
$1. Second premium, to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for 

Danvers onions. 
.50. Gratuity, to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for Delaware 

potatoes. 
$2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for white 

flat turnips. 
!$1. Second premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Rose potatoes. 
$2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Beauty 

of Hebron potatoes. 
$2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Clark's 

No. 1 potatoes. 
•f2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Pearl of 

Savoy potatoes. 



51 

#2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for early- 
Maine potatoes. 
i|2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for New- 
Queen potatoes. 
$2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Roberts' 

early potatoes. 
$2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Carman 

No. 3 potatoes. 
'f 2. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 

Blush potatoes. 
12. First premium, to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 

New Yorker. 
if 2. First premium, to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Early Rose potatoes. 
f 1. Second premium, to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Hebron potatoes. 
!|1. Second premium, to Asa T. Newhall, Lynn, for red 

onions. 
^1. Second premium, to D. E. Cummings, Peabody, for 

mangold wurtzels. 
•f 2. First premium, to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Ed- 

mands beets. 
1^1. Second premium, to Lawrence Emerton, Peabody, 

for carmine potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity, to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for yellow globe 

onions. 
.50. Gratuity, to Samuel A. Evans, Danvers, for potatoes. 
.50. Gratuity, to Patrick Beston, Danvers, for potatoes. 
Fred A. Russell — for the Committee. 



VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

<I2. First premium to Samuel A. Evans, Danvers, for 

Dunlap squash. 
$1. Second premium to Samuel A. Evans, Danvers, for 

Essex Hybrid squash. 



52 

.50. Gratuity to Samuel A. Evans, Danvers, for tomatoes. 
$2. First piemium to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, 
for Stone Mason cabbage. 

12. First premium to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, 
for Turban squash. 

$2, First premium to Mrs. David Warren, Swampscott, 
for Hubbard squash. 

'^2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Musk melon. . 

.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Hacken- 
sack melons. 

$2. First premium to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for All 
Seasons cabbage. 

^1. Second premium to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for 
Snowball cauliflower. 

.50. Gratuity to J. O. Goodale, Peabody, for Bay State 
squash. 

'^1. Second premium to W. L. Hall, Peabody, for Stone 
tomatoes. 

■J2. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Nutmeg 
melons. 

••12. First premium to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for Tur- 
ban squash. 

$1. Second premium to Erastus Clark, Ipswich, for Tur 
ban squash. 

#1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Liv- 
ingstone tomatoes. 

^l. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Mar- 
row squash. 

%l. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Bay 
State squash. 

.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Warren Tur- 
ban squash. 

.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for celery. 

•f2. First premium to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for Victor 
squash. 



53 

•f2. First premium to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for Per- 
fection cauliflower. 

$1. Second premium to Durkee Bros., Peabody, foi- Cel- 
ery. 

$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Savoy cabbage. 

f2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabodj^ for 
Butman squash. 

$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Red 
cabbage. 

$1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Hubbard squash. 

fl. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Victor squash. 

|1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Turban squash. 

•12. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Deep 
Head cabbage. 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Fot- 
lers cabbao-e. 

•fl. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for All 
Seasons cabbage. 

%1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Red 
cabbage. 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early Es- 
sex corn. 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Potters 
Excelsior corn. 

-S2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cranber- 
ries. 

12. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Marble- 
head squash. 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Sibley 
squash. 

$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Butman 
squash. 



54 

$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for tomatoes. 

$2. First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Bay 
State squash. 

$2. First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Drum- 
head cabbage. 

$1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Sa- 
voy cabbage. 

$2. First premium to Asa T. Newhall, Lynn, for Essex 
Hybrid squash. 

$2. First premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for Paris 
Golden celery. 

$2. First premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for Beauty 
tomatoes. 

$1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 
Stone jNIason cabbage. 

$2. First premium, to J. W. Nichols, Danvers, for water 
melon. 

■fl. Second premium, to J. W. Nichols, Danvers, for Mil- 
ler's cream melon. 

$1. Second premium, to J. W. Nichols, Danvers, for 
musk melon. 

$1. Second premium, to B. P. Ware, Marblehead, for 
Excelsior corn. 

•fl. Gratuity, to W. B. ('arlton, Danvers, for Victor 
squash. 
Fred A. Dodge, James K. Adams, Geo. B. Austin — 

Committee. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

First premium, to H, M. Killam, Boxford, for field 

corn. 
Third premium, to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for field 

corn. 
First premium, to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for shelled 

corn. 



55 

$2. First premium, to John Barker, No. Andover, for 

pop corn. 

$4. Second premium, to James A. King, Peabody, for 

field corn. 

$1. Second premium, to W. H. Beckett, Peabody, for 

pop corn. 
$1. First premium, to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for rye. 

O. F. Newhall, James K. Adams, Geo. B. Austin — 
Committee. 



ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

i3. First premium, to Charles McTiernen, Danvers, for 
harnesses. 

#1. Gratuity, to J. H. Nash, Peabody, for single harness. 

i2. Gratuity, to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for display of 
shoes. 

Diploma, to Almy, Bigelow & Washburn, Salem, for dis- 
play of shoes. 

Diploma, to the Mass. Glove Co., Danvers, for gloves and 
material. 

$2. Gratuity, to J. Manning, Peabody, for display of 
shoes. 
Otis Brown, E. P. Perkins, Samuel L. Sawyer, Rufus 

Kimball — Committee. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHAN- 
DISE. 
^1. Gratuity, to R. G. Estes, Peabody, for collection of 

woodwork. 
$2. Gratuity, to J. Elmer Graves, Salem, for boys' war 

ship. 
$2. Gratuity, to John F. Carbery, Peabody, for cigars. 
111. Gratuity, to F. W. Lord, Peabody, for case of shoes. 



56 

$2. Gratuity to George H. Smith, Haverhill, for sea mes- 
senger and cases. 

$1. Gratuity, to Joseph Poor, Peabody, for round belt 
lace. 

.50. Gratuity, to Wm. T. Strout, Peabod}^, for double 
runner. 

fl. (xiatuit}^ to John Merrill, Salem, for oriental iron 
work. 

$2. Gratuity, to Littlefield Leather Co., Peabody, for 
shoe stock. 

fl. Gratuity, to Town of Peobody, for electric lighting, 

$2. Gratuity, to A. E. Potter, Hamilton, for horse shoes. 

.50. Gratuit3% to Mrs. J. O'Rourke, Peabody, for home 
spun carpet. 

.50. Gratuity, to Lyman Nichols, for polishing brushes. 

$2. Gratuity, to Thomas F. Hill, Georgetown, for har- 
nesses. 

$1. Gratuity, to W. S. Ward, Salem, for cocoa fibre. 

$1. Gratuity, to Michael Dodge, Peabody, for stuffed 
pheasant. 

$1. Gratuit}^ to R. H. Woodbury, Beverly, for caribou 
head. 

$1. Gratuity, to E. W. Howard, Salem, for work basket. 

$1. Gratuity, to E. W. Howard, Salem, for collection of 
furniture. 
Otis Brown, E. P. Perkins, Samuel L. Sawyer, Rufus 

Kimball — Committee. 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

13. First premium to Nellie A. Dunn, Manchester, for 
crocheted quilt. 

12. Second premium to C. B. Holly, Beverly, for slum- 
ber robe. 

.50. Gratuity to Emma C. Webb, Danvers, for silk quilt. 

.50. Gratuity to Annie M. Kimball, Saugus, for quilt. 



57 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Maria Jevvett, Danvers, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mildred Saul, Peabody, for patch quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Catherine Gallivan, Dauvers, for afghan. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary Gallivan, Danvers, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary A. Palmer, Danvers, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. R. J. Harris, Salem, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Ingalls, Salem, for afghan. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary Barker, No. Andover, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. H. Osboru, Salem, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. B. Thomas, Peabody, for silk 

quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss R. G. Ward, Peabody, for afghan. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Hilda Johnson, Peabody, for afghan. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. W. Hersey, Newburyport, for 

shams. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. J. Carlton, Salem, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to George Jermyu, Peabody, for patch quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Howard, Peabody, for cro- 
cheted quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. John Glencose, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to H. B. Holly, Beverly, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. M. Goodwin, Salem, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gi'atuity to Mrs. H. M. Goodwin, Salem, for knit 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Hattie Munroe, Beverly, for silk 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Florence B. Aldrich, Lynn, for silk quilt. 
Mrs. Richard Newell, Mrs. W. H. Hayes, Sarah B. 
Herrick — Committee. 



58 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

f 2, First premium to Mrs. T. E. Sanderson, Lawrence, 

for rag rug. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. Everett Cameron, Salem, for 

drawn rug. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. Darling Pitts, Salem, for knit 

rug. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Trask, Peabody, for 

braided rug. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. N. P. Joy, Ipswich, for knit 

rug. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. B. F. Porter, Beverly, for 

drawn rug. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. N. P. Joy, Ipswich, for knit 

rug. 
$1. Second premium to S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for braid- 
ed rug. 
.50. Gratuity to S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. S. Osborn, Peabody, for knit rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Howley, Peabody, for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Garamell, Peabody, for 

braided rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. H. Pierson, Salem, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. H. Woodbury, Beverly, for 

drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. H. Wyman, Peabody, for drawn 

rug. 
Mrs. E. P. Nichols, Mrs. M. A. Grosvenor, Nancy J 
Moulton, Mrs. L. T. Currier — Committee. 



FANCY WORK. 

.50. Gratuity to May Fitzpatrick, Salem, for centre piece. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Oliver Roberts, Dan vers, for in- 
fant's dress and collar. 



59 

1.50. Gratuity to Miss Isabelle A. Ward, Peabocly, for col- 
lection of centerpieces. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Alice Whipple, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuit}^ to Miss Alice Whipple, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Arthur Pratt, Peabody, for lace work. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Marj' Palmer, Danvers, for lace 
work. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Anna Russell, Salem, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs, M. C. Jeffrey, Lynn, foi' lace cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Christina Wick,Peabody, for netting. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Frank Teel, Peabody, for handker- 
chief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. C. Allen, Lynn, for handkerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Mary Kinsman, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Mary Kinsman, Salem, for hand- 
kerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Durgin, Lynn, for scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Durgin, Lynn, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. H. Symonds, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. V. Smith, Peabody, for cushion. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Edith Downing, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

$1. Gratuity to Miss Juliette Cook, Peabody, for necktie- 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Hathaway, Salem, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. Towne, Salem, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. A. Ingalls, Salem, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity "to Mrs. C. A. Ingalls, Salem, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Serena P. Perry, Danvers, for lace 
centerpiece. 



6o 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Carr, Beverly, for apron. 

.50. Gi-atuity to Mrs. Stella Carr, Beverly, for scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Nellie Fitz, Salem, for doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Nellie Fitz, Salem, for doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Bertha Wendall, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Bertha Wendall, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Annie Newhall, Lynn, for pen and 
ink work. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Poor, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Hannah Driscoll, Salem, for table 
cover. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Williams, Salem, for bed spread. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. P. Clark, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Albert Fifield, Peabody, for scarf. 

il. Gratuity to Mrs. Eliza M. Besse, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Helen M. Poor, Peabod3% for pic- 
ture frame. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Helen M. Pooi', Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Nellie Lambert, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Helen M. Wallace, Beverly, for 
drawn work. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Frank Perry, Danvers, for dress 
crocheted. 

.50. Gratuit3' to Mrs. Ira Vaughn, Salem, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. W. Berry, Peabody, for dolls. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Gammell, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Rebecca Kingston, Salem, for lace. 



6i 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Peabody, for hand- 
kerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss May C. Tanch, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. B. Smith, Peabody, for rag dolls. 

.60. Gratuity to Miss Mary E. Crane, Peabody, for news- 
paper case. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Abigail Smith, Peabody, for knitted 
shawl. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Frances Grosvenor, Peabody, for 
sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Agnes Price, Salem, for doiley. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Myrtle Dennett, Danvers, for hand- 
kerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Mary O. Smith, Danvers, for doable 
headed doll. 

.75. Giatuity to Mrs. W. H. Sumner, Newburyport, for 
table cover. 

$\. Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Sumner, Newburyport, for 
point lace. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Sumner, Newburyport, for 
seven doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. H. Flanders, Newburyport, for 
baby's dress. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs, Guy Folkins, Salem, for sofa pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Holman, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. E. Ludden, Beverly, for sofa pil- 
low. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. C. Glines, Beverly, for handker- 
chief. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Vaughn, Salem, for table 
cover. 

.75. Gratuity to Miss Eliza Plouff, Ipswich, for coll. of 
embroiderv. 



62 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 
centerpiece. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. B. A. Carr, Beverl}', for table cover. 

.50. Gratuit}^ to Mrs. B. A. Carr, Beverly, for sideboard 
scarf. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Winchester, Salem, for sofa 
pillow. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. E. L. Downing, Salem, for center- 
pieces. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Eliza A. T. Taylor, Peabody, for 
baby's robe. 
Mrs. F. E. Merrill, Mrs. K. M. Barker — Committee. 



WORKS OF ART AND OIL PAINTINGS. * 

$2. Gratuity to Irving Richardson, Peabody, for pen and 
ink work. 

$2. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil painting. 

.'$2. Gratuity to R. F. Kimball, Lynn, for pencil sketches. 

t2. Gratuity to R. F. Kimball, Lynn, for water colors. 

^1. Gratuity to Annie M. Dickey, Danvers, for crayon 
drawing. 

12. Gratuity to Mabel Roberts, Peabody, for Gibson 
drawing. 

$2. Gratuity to Clara Gruff, Marblehead, for pen and ink 
work. 

'f 2. Gratuity to Reno M. Brown, Peabody, for water color. 

(i>2. Gratuity to Reno M. Brown, Peabody, for water color. 

$2. Gratuity to Alice Trask, Peabody, for water color. 

$2. Gratuity to Alice Trask, Peabody, for water color. 

SI. Gratuity to M. S. Richmond, Peabody, for knife work. 

•12. Gratuity to Mrs. J. D. H. Gauss, Salem, for photo- 
graphs. 

!i!2. Gratuity to Mrs. L. Y. Thomas, Peabody, for oil 
painting. 



63 

$2. Gratuity to J. C. Merrill, Salem, for oil painting. 

•f2. Gratuity to Bertha Goodrich, Peabod}-, for oil paint- 
ing. 

$2. Gratuity to ]M. V. Taylor, Gloucester, for oil painting. 

$2. Gratuity to Mabel Roberts, Peabody, for photo color- 
ing. 

$2. Gratuity to Ben Franklin, Haverhill, for crayon 
drawing. 

$2. Gratuity to Ben Franklin, Haverhill, for black and 
white. 

■f 2. Gratuity to Rosa Lord, Salem, for oil painting. 

Mrs. Belle D. Hodgkins, Miss Carrie S. Cressy, Mrs. N. 

G. Kimball, Miss Hattie M. Tenny — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

15. First premium to Mrs. J. H. Syraonds, Peabody, for 

collection. 
■12. First premium to Mrs. B. G. Kimball, Haverhill, for 

textile industry. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. B. G. Kimball, Haverhill, for 

raised paste. 
$8. First premium to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, 

for individual specimen. 
$3. Second premium to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, 

for collection. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, 

for punch bowl. 
i2. First premium to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, 

for vase. 
il. Second premium to Mrs. M. E. B.Hutchinson, Lynn, 

for raised paste. 
11. Gratuity to .ALs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 

tray. 
SI. Second premium to Mrs. Arthur Roberts, Salem, for 

vase. 



64 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Arthur Roberts, Salem, for cups 
and saucers. 

$2. First premium to G. W. Copp, Lawrence, for jardin- 
iere. 

•fl. Second premium to G. W. Copp, Lawrence, for tan- 
kard. 

.75. Gratuity to G. W. Copp, Lawrence, for beriy dish. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. M. Sanborn, L3ain, for vase. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. M. Sanborn, Lynn, for plate. 

Miss Lizzie B. Hathaway, Miss Bessie Swan, Mrs. T. C. 

Thuilow— Committee. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

.25. Gratuity to John Mahoney, Peabody, for towels. 

.15. Gratuity to Dorothy Palmer, Peabody, for book. 

.50. Gratuity to Mary Flynn, Peabody, for doilies. 

il. Gratuity to Sallie Bodge, Peabod}', for shirt and pil- 
low slii3, 

.75. Gratuity to Lucy Parker, Peabodj', for embroidery. 

.50. Gratuity to Eva Dooling, Peabody, for handker- 
chiefs, etc. 

.75. Gratuity to Helen Gibson, Peabody,for dressing sack. 

.10. Gratuity to Edna Blaney, Peabody, for duster. 

.25. Gratuity to Dorothj- Tigh, Salem, for doily. 

.50. Gratuity to Hazel Fawcett, Peabody, for doll's dress. 

.25. Gratuity to E. M. Johnson, Peabody, for shirt. 

.25. Gratuity to Julia Crehore, Peabody, for shirt. 

.25. Gratuity to Nellie Donovan, Peabody, for pillow 
cases. 

.50. Giatuity to Annie Donovan, Peabody, for pillow case 
and shirt. 

.75. Gratuity to Sallie Batchelder, Peabody, for apron. 

.75. Gratuity to J. Gifford, Peabody, for shirt and doll. 

.35. Gratuity to Sally McGwinn, Peabody, for pillow cases. 



65 

.35. Gratuity to Margaret Roche, Peabody, for tidy and 
ornament. 

.35. Gratuity to Ethel Goldthwait, Peabody, for pillow. 

.10. Gratuity to Mary Powell, Peabody, for duster. 

.10. Gratuity to William Powell, Peabody, for glass towel. 

.25. Gratuity to Elizabeth Welch, Peabody, for center- 
piece- 

.35. Gratuity to May Richardson, Peabody, for doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Oda Ware, Peabody, for doily. 

.50. Gratuity to Beatrice Hall, Peabodj-, for doilies. 

.75. Gratuity to Louise Balcom, Peabody, for doily. 

.35. Gratuity to Eva Donnell, Peabody, for sofa pillow. 

.15. Gratuity to James Barrj', Peabody, for towel and 
tray cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Mary Barry, Peabody, for darning and 
patch. 

.15. Gratuity to Ruth Terry, Peabody, for tray cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Marguerite Bott, Peabody, for sofa pillow. 

.15. Gratuity to Martie L. Lafreine, Peabod}^, for tidy. 

.50. Gratuity to Grace Goodrich, Peabody, for darning 
and patching. 

.15. Gratuity to Christine Walker, Peabody, for shirt. 

.25. Gratuity to Florence Walker, Peabody, for pillow case. 

.25. Gratuity to Annie F. Haskell, Peabody,for pillow case. 

.50. Gratuity to Barbara Warner, Peabody, for doll's dress. 

.15, Gratuity to Frank Roberts, Peabody, for doily. 

.50. Gratuity to Harry Mason, Peabody, for boy's blouse. 

.15. Gratuity to Frances Bushby, Peabody, for tray cloth. 

.25. Gratuity to Mary Galucia, Peabody, for apron. 

$1. Gratuity to Eleanor Frye, Peabody, for doll. 

.35. Gratuity to Maurice Flynn, Peabody, for shirt and 
tray cloth. 

.10. Gratuity to Alva Trask, Peabody, for duster. 

.15. Gratuity to Daniel Riley Peabody, for tray cloth. 

.10. Gratuity to Harry Upton, Peabody, for table cloth. 



66 

.35. Gratuity to Gertrude Boyce, Peabody, for shirt. 
.10. Gratuity, to Thomas Boyce, Peabody, for towel. 
.75. Gratuity, to Alice Tracey, Peabody, for mat. 
.50. Gratuity, to Bertha Johnson, Peabody, for pillow 

slip. 
.35. Gratuity, to Fred Sherry, Peabody, for tray cloth 

and tidy. 
.25. Gratuity, to Eleanor Low, Peabody, for doll's quilt. 
.15. Gratuity, to Nellie Carlin, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.50. Gratuity, to Salla Fotherjill, Peabody, for pillow slip. 
.35. Gratuity, to Eva Buxton, Peabody, for pillow cases. 
.10. Gratuity, to Ralph Buxton, Peabody, for towels. 
$1. Gratuity to Stella Hall, Peabody, for quilt. 
il. Gratuity to Rose Watkins, Peabody, for dress, watch 

case and tray cloth. 
.25. Gratuity to Mary L. Bassett, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.25. Gratuity to Franklin Osborn, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.10. Gratuity to Charles Cressy, Salem, for mat. 
.15. Gratuity to Laurie McLean, Danvers, for doily. 

Mrs. A. B. Fellows, Mrs. F. W. Sargent, Irene F. Fel- 
lows — Committee. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON ROOT CROPS. 

The committee on root crops have attended to the duty 
assigned them, and make the follov/ing report: 

Five entries were made, viz : 
Mr. John H. George of Methuen entered a crop of onions 

and a crop of potatoes. 
Messrs. C. K. Ordway & Son of West Newbury entered a 

crop of carrots and a crop of potatoes. 
Mr. Alfonso Mason of Topsfield entered a crop of melons, 

and your committee agreed were extra good. As Mr. 

Mason did not comply with the rules of the Society, we 

could not award him a premium. 



67 

We therefore make the following awards : 
To Mr. John H. George for his crop of onions, first 

premium of |8 00 

For his crop of Potatoes, first premium of 8 00 

To Messrs. C. K. Ordway & Son, for a crop of car- 
rots, first premium of 8 00 
For a crop of potatoes, second premium of 5 00 
Respectfully submitted, 

A. B. Fellows, ) 

B. Frank Phillips, V Committee. 
John Barker, ) 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF POTATOES RAISED 
BY JOHN H. GEORGE IN THE TOWN OF METHUEN. 

The crop of 1898 was potatoes manured with six cords 
of stable manure per acre. The soil is peat meadow. 

This year there was applied six cords of manure per 
acre and 500 lbs. of Stockbridge special potato fertilizer 
per acre. The manure ploughed in, the fertilizer applied 
in the drill. 

The land was ploughed, harrowed and furrowed, the 
potatoes dropped by hand, covered with horse hoe, 
cultivated three times, dug by hand the best of them, as 
also part of the seconds, sold from the field for seed, balance 
stored. 

I planted five varieties, viz.: — Winslow Seedling, Rob- 
erts Early, Rural Blush, Carman No. 3, and Bliss 
Triumph. 

There was six tenths of an acre in the piece and the 
yield was 230 bushels. 165 bushels No. 1 sold at 75 cents 
per bushel ; 55 bushels No. 2 sold for 50 cents per bushel, 
and 10 bushels small ones at 25 cents per bushel. 



68 



CROP OF POTATOES. 

Dr. 

To 3 cords manure, 
" 260 lbs. Stockbridge fertilizer, 
" preparing land, ploughing, harrowing and fur- 
rowing, 
" cultivating, 

" seed (6 bus.) cutting, dropping and covering, 
" digging and marketing, 
" interest and taxes, 



$15 


00 


4 


75 


Lir- 
3 


00 


1 


50 


4 


50 


13 


00 


5 


00 



.$46 75 



Or. 




By 165 bushels. No. 1, at 75c., 


$123 75 


" 55 bushels No. 2, at 50c., 


27 50 


" 10 bushels No. 3, at 25c., 


2 50 



$153 75 
Yield per acre, 368 bushels. 

" per one-half acre, 184 bushels. 
Profit per acre, $175 00 

" per one-half acre, 87 50 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

I hereby certify that I measured the land on which 
grew the crop of potatoes entered by John H. George for 
premium with the Essex Agricultural Society and it con- 
tained six tenths (6-10) of one acre. 

Lyman George. 



STATEMENT OF A CROP OF ONIONS RAISED BY JOHN H. 
GEORGE, METHUEN, 1899. 

The four previous crops on the land were potatoes fer- 
tilized each year with one ton of Stockbridge Special Pota- 



69 

to Fertilizer with no other manure, and each one took the 
society's first premium. With the exception of what was 
put on the land in the fall of 1898, there has been no ma- 
nure on the land for nine years, it being in grass five years, 
in potatoes four years, fertilized as above stated. In the 
fall of '98 there was spread on the piece stable manure at 
the rate of six cords per acre and ploughed in. The spring 
of "99 there was put on Stockbridge Special Onion Fertil- 
izer 3000 lbs. per acre. The land was harrowed with 
tooth harrow, brushed with a birch brush, dragged and 
sowed with four pounds per acre Danvers Yellow Globe 
Onion Seed from Warren Barker of Danvers. It was 
rolled in with a hand roller. The}^ were hoed five times 
with Arlington scuffle hoe, weeded four times, cut out 
with a circular wheel hoe, gathered in crates and stored 
in onion house. 

The yield was 419 bushels, which sold for what this 
year I consider a fancy price, 55 cents per bushel. 

The cost of crop was : 



Dr. 

For 3 cords manure on land, 
" 1500 lbs. Stockbridge Onion Fertilizer, 
" preparation of land for seed, ploughing, har- 
rowing, dragging, etc., 
" 2 lbs. onion seed, at $3.00, 
" sowing and rolling, 
" hoeing, 
"• weeding, 
"• harvesting, topping and marketing, at 5c. per 

bushel, 
" interest and taxes on land. 



$98 70 



$18 


00 


28 


50 


3 


00 


6 


00 


1 


50 


3 


75 


12 


00 


20 


95 


5 


00 



70 

Cr. 

By 419 bushels of onions, at 55c., $230 45 

Profit on one-half acre, f 131.75. 
Profit on one acre, 1263.50. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

I hereby certify that I have measured the land on which 
grew the crop of onions entered by John H. George with 
the Essex County Agricultural Society, and it contains 
one-half acre. 

Lyman George. 



STATEMENT OF C. K. ORDWAY & SON ON A CROP OF 
POTATOES. 

This piece of land was in grass in 1897 and 1898. In 
1899 there was three cords of manure spread on the grass 
land and ploughed nine inches deep, harrowed and planted 
with planter with eight bushels of potatoes, cultivated 
and hoed twice, sprinkled with London Purple twice. 

Drawing manure, $7 00 

Spreading manure, . 1 00 

Plowing, 2 00 

Harrowing, 2 00 

Planting, 1 00 

Cultivating and hoeing, 5 00 

2 lbs. of London Purple and labor, 2 00 
Digging potatoes, 5 00 
8 bushels of potatoes for seed, 8 00 

3 cords of manure, 12 00 

$45 00 



71 

185 40-60 bush, of potatoes, at 75c., 1139 25 
Cost, 45 00 

Profit, 84 25 

Manure on land, 6 00 

178 25 
Respectfully submitted, 

C. K. Ordway & Son, 

West Newbur}^ Mass. 

This is to certify that 1 measured a piece of carrots and 
potatoes entered for premium in the Essex Agricultural 
Society for C. K. Ordway & Son and find it contains one- 
half acre of carrots and one-half acre of potatoes. 

G. D. Whittier. 



STATEMENT OF C. K. ORDWAY & SON ON A CROP OF 
CARROTS. 

In 1897 this piece of land was in grass. 1898, this piece 
of land was in corn. 1899, there was three cords of ma- 
nure spread broadcast and ploughed ten inches deep and 
harrowed and raked and sowed with long orange carrot 
seed of our own raising. 

Dr. 

1 lb. of carrot seed. 
Wheel hoed twice before weeding, 
Weeding twice and thinned, 
Hoed with wheel iioe once. 
Harvesting and storing. 

Cost of manure, 

843 00 





50 


2 


00 


8 


00 




50 


20 


00 


131 00 


12 


00 



72 

Cr. 
23,980 lbs.— 11 ton, 1980 lbs., at $12.00 per ton, 1143 88 
Cost of crop, 43 00 



100 88 
Manure in land, 6 00 



194 88 



Respectfully submitted, 

C. K. Ordway & Son, 

West Newbury, Mass. 

FAIRBANKS' STANDARD SCALES. 

West Newbury, Oct. 15, 1899. 
From C. K. Ordway 
Load of potatoes 

Gross, 11,140 lbs. 
Net, 185 40-60 Bu. 

G. H. Whittier, 

Weigher. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON GRAIN CROPS. 

There was but one entry of crops under this head this 
year, and that was a crop of corn entered by Mr. J. M. 
Pearl of West Boxford. The committee were unanimous 
that he was entitled to the first premium of $7 

Otis F. Putnam, E. A. Emerson, J. Henry Nason — Com- 
mittee. 



STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF CORN RAISED BY J. 
MYRON PEARL OF BOXFORD. 

In 1897 the land was in grass. 1898, crop was corn; 
barnyard manure was used, six cords to the acre. The soil 



is a black loam with a clay subsoil. Ploughed eight inch- 
es deep. 1899, crop corn, barnyard manure, six cords 
to the acre. Ploughed once eight inches deep ; harrowed 
to plant in hills. The corn was planted with machine the 
first of June, eight quarts, and harvested in October. It 
was cultivated and hoed twice ; seed used, Pearl's Im- 
proved. 

Cost of ploughing, harrowing, and planting, $ 5 00 
Manure at $4 per cord, 24 00 

350 lbs. Bradley's fertilizer, 5 25 

Cultivating and hoeing, 7 00 

Cost of harvesting not known. 

141 25 
Credited by 252 bushels of corn on the ear ; weighed by 
Frank W. Kimball. 

I hereby certify that I have measured the land on which 
the corn grew entered for premium by Mr. J. M. Pearl 
and it contained one acre. 

Frank W. Kimball. 



REPORT OX TREADWELL FARM. 

The farm continues under the management of Dudley 
Bradstreet, the tenant, who conducts it in a very satisfac- 
tory manner. The crops grown the last season, notwith- 
standing the severe drought, have been fairly good ; were 
well cared for, weeds kept under control, and the whole 
farm has shown ffood, husbandmanlike attention. 

Mr. Bradstreet has presented the following statement 
of crops produced this season : 

Vegetables — of carrots, 50 bushels ; Rutabaga turnips, 250 
bushels ; White Egg turnips, 50 bushels ; beets, 60 bush- 
els ; White Flat turnips, 10 bushels ; potatoes, 300 bush- 
els ; sweet corn, 150 boxes ; squashes, 2 tons ; tomatoes,. 



74 

40 bushels ; beans, string and shell, 40 bushels ; parsnips, 
100 bushels ; English hay, 10 tons ; meadow hay, 25 tons ; 
oat foddei', 3 tons ; apples, 75 bushels ; cranberries, 5 
bushels ; 4 acres of ensilage corn which yielded a good 
crop, also 1 acre of barley fodder. The stock on the farm 
consists of 3 horses, 1 bull, 20 cows, 5 heifei's, 4 hogs and 
a lot of poultry. 

The buildings, are in fairly good condition after some 
necessary repairs, including a new pump for the cattle's 
use. 

Real estate in Topsfield has recently advanced very 
much, several fine residences have been built, and the farm 
has, and is increasing in value in common with other farms 
in Topsfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Benjamin P. Ware, 

For the Committee. 



REPORT OF NEW MEMBERS. 

There have been seventeen new members added to the 
society since the last annual report, nine of whom became 
members by receiving premiums of seven dollars and up- 
wards according to the rules of the society, from different 
cities and towns as follows : 



Beverly, 


1 Hamilton, 


3 


Danvers, 


2 Lynn, 


2 


Essex, 


1 Peabody, 


5 


Groveland, 


1 Newburyport, 
Topsfield, 1. 


1 



FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

The society held five Institutes the past year on as many 
•different days, forenoon and afternoon at which the fol- 



75 

lowing subjects were offered by carefully prepared essays, 
and discussed by any of the audience who desired. 

The first Institute was held at Essex, Jan. 13, the sub- 
ject for the forenoon being " How to feed the Dairy Cow," 
subject for the afternoon, "• Economic summer and winter 
feeds for milch cows," by Dr. J. B. Lindsey of the State 
Agricultural College. 

The second Institute was held at Newbury, Feb. 3, sub- 
ject for the forenoon, " The demands of the future upon 
the New England farmer." Subject for afternoon, "■ In- 
ducements for sticking to the old farm," by Elbridge 
Cushman of Lakeville. 

The third Institute was held at Beverly, Feb. 24, sub- 
ject for the forenoon, " Practical poultry culture." Sub- 
ject for the afternoon, "'• How to make the farm pa}^" by 
Abel F. Stevens of Wellesley. 

The fourth Institute was held at West Newbury, March 
3, the subject for the forenoon, " The constituents of com- 
mercial fruit culture." Subject for the afternoon, " Mar- 
ket gardening, and how it is practical on some of the 
large vegetable farms in Rhode Island," by Prof. L. F. 
Kinney of Kingston, R. I. 

The fifth Institute was held at Andover, March 17, sub- 
ject for the forenoon, " Silos and ensilage." Subject for 
the afternoon, " How to feed the milch cow," by Prof. 
William P. Brooks of the Amherst Agricultural College. 



REPORT ON THE ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SO- 
CIETY, PEABODY, MASS., 1899. 

The seventy-ninth annual cattle show and fair of the 
Essex Agricultural Society was held on the county fair 
grounds at Peabody, September 19th, 20th and 21st, 
1899. 



76 

The weather the first day was favorable, the entries in 
the different departments were large, and as all entries 
closed at 10.30 A. M., and were then placed in the hands 
of the different committees or experts awarding premiums, 
it made a bus}^ day of it. The second day opened unfavor- 
ably with a heavy rain, so that the programme of Wednes- 
day was not carried out, but postponed until Thursday. 
The first in order Thursday was the coaching parade or 
street parade representing the different industries, which 
started from the Salem line about 12 m. It was witnessed 
by thousands of people. Other attractions followed in the 
afternoon, but rain setting in again it was not very favor- 
able for carrying out the programme of the day. On Fri- 
da}' the ploughing match was the first in order, on the 
grounds at 9.30 A. M. At 11.30 A. M., the annual address 
at the Peabody Institute by Rev. J. M. Pullman : at 12.30, 
the annual dinner in the South church. Other attractions 
followed on the park until the close. 

The cattle department was represented by about one 
hundred head of milch cows, heifers, etc., the Holsteins 
predominating, some most excellent herds among them. 
Also seven yoke of large Hereford oxen, which attracted 
much attention, all being tied up in one building, in clean, 
nice pens, made a remarkable exhibition. A very few 
sheep were on the grounds, consisting of six pens. In the 
swine department there were a large number of the differ- 
ent breeds, occupying forty pens. In the poultry depart- 
ment the number was large, consisting of about three 
hundred coops of nearly all of the different breeds. The 
entries in the hall in all the different departments were on 
such a scale as could hardly be excelled either for quantity 
or quality, and any attempt to give any account of it in 
detail in the crowded condition which existed during the 
days of the fair Avould be almost an imj^ossibility. The 
attendance was very large, especially the second day, but 



11 

would probably have been much larger had the weather 
been continuously favorable. As a whole it was a very 
successful fair. 

Q. L. Reed, 

Inspector. 



REPORT ON ESSAYS AND REPORTS. 

The committee on essays and reports received only two 
essays this year, and have made the following awards : — 

ilO.OO To Walter H. Hayes, of North Andover, for es- 
say upon " Farming Under Glass." 

.f 8.00 To M. Sumner Perkins of Danvers, for essay on 
" Saving Soil Water." 
No award is made for reports on accounts. 

For the Committee, 

G. L. Streeter, Chairman. 
Committee — G. L. Streeter, Salem ; D. E. Safford, Ham- 
ilton ; Geo. B. Blodgett, Rowley ; J. M. Danforth, Lynn- 
field. 



FARMING UNDER GLASS. 

BY WALTER H. HAYES. 

As the 3^ears roll by and we see the great advancement 
in all kinds of industries it opens up the eyes of the 
farmers of Essex county that they, with the ever increasing 
demand for unseasonable products and the competition 
from the south, must income way overcome the long season 
of rest which our New England winters bring to us. And 
the question, how shall we do it, is being answered by the 
steady increase of artificial houses being built for that pur- 
pose in and around Essex county. And I therefore head 



78 

this essay Farming under Glass, and devote most of it to 
lettuce cultuie, as that is the staple product of the green- 
house at the present time. 

Within the last ten or fifteen years the growing of crops 
of winter lettuce, in houses especially erected for the pur- 
pose, has become quite an impoi'tant industry in many lo- 
cations. 

For a long time hot-beds were preferred to forcing 
houses for lettuce growing, but except for late fall and 
early spring they are but little used to-day, while every 
large city has one or more persons engaged in lettuce 
forcing. Tiie industry seems to have reached its largest 
dimensions in the vicinity of Arlington. Ovying to the 
perfection of their methods, the lettuce growers of Ar- 
lington and Belmont have been able to compete with 
local growers in the New York market. Much of the suc- 
cess obtained by these growers is due to the fact that 
they have varieties well adapted for forcing. In fact, 
through the lettuce growing sections of New England, the 
cabbage or head lettuce is grown, the favorite sorts being 
selected strains of White Tennis Ball. Those that seem 
best adapted for the purpose are Hot House selected and 
largely grown by W. W. Rawson of Arlington and Bel- 
mont, or Big Boston, which is the favorite sort of Hittin- 
ger Bros, of Belmont. But there are some growers who 
raise the Grand Rapids and Boston Curled. Among the 
strong points of this variety ma,y be noted : (1) Its 
early maturity, as it develops about one week sooner than 
any other variety. (2) The closeness of planting that it 
will admit of, owing to its erect habit of growth; this per- 
mits the growing of as large heads when planted six 
inches apart each way as can be obtained from the spread- 
ing Tennis Ball sorts at eight inches. (3) It seems to 
require less care and to be less injured by neglect than 
most other varieties. Improper ventilation or watering 



79 

frequently leads to the appearance of mildew, rot or burn- 
ing of the leaves, but it is far less noticeable in the curled 
sorts than in other varieties. 

LETTUCE HOUSES. 

There are a great variety of houses used for this pur- 
pose. The even span, three-quarter span and leanto houses 
are all used with good results, but lettuce houses should 
not be less than twenty feet wide. Houses forty and fifty 
feet wide are not uncommon and prove satisfactory. The 
benches may be either raised or solid. In some of the 
large house even as wide as thirty feet, are solid beds made 
in the centre, leaving only space for narrow walks next to 
the walls, but a centre walk in addition is desirable. Solid 
beds raised one or two feet above the walks are generally 
preferred to raised benches. 

In heating, both steam and hot water are used, but, ex- 
cept in very large houses, although the first cost is more, 
hot water is preferred by many who have made a careful 
test of both methods. 

LETTUCE GROWING. 

With good management three or four crops of lettuce 
can be harvested and the houses can then be used for srrow- 
ing tomato plants, cucumbers, etc. In order to grow so 
many crops, it is desirable to have the first crop come on by 
Thanksgiving or before, and for this purpose the seed 
should be sown in an old cold frame, or in a seed bed es- 
pecially prepared for the purpose, about the last of July or 
the first of August. The bed should be marked off into 
rows six inches apart and the seed scattered thinly in the 
drills or they may be sown broadcast. When the plants 
have formed their first true leaves they should be trans- 
planted to about two inches, or, if in drills, thinned to two 
inches in the row. These plants will be ready to trans- 



8o 

plant to the beds about the fifteenth to the twentieth of 
September, and all designed for the Tlianksgiving trade 
should be in the beds by the first week in October. If the 
Christmas trade is preferred the seed need not be sown un- 
til the middle of August. About the first of October a 
second sowing should be made, and another for tlie third 
crop about the first of December. 

PREPARATION AND CARE OF THE BEDS. 

When shallow beds are used the soil will need to be re- 
placed each year, but in solid beds it will suffice if some of 
the surface soil is removed and the beds filled up with fresh 
manure, which should be thoroughly worked into the soil. 
The best compost for lettuce growing is made by mixing 
one part of fresh horse manure with two parts of rich, 
sandy loam. If this can be prepared in June and worked 
over in August it will be in good condition to use by the 
time it is wanted in September. After setting the plants 
the beds should be thoroughly wet down, but while the 
plants are small, care should be taken not to saturate the 
beds, particularly during dull weather in winter. On sunny 
days the plants may be wet in the morning, but if they are 
wet in dull days or at the edge of evening, it is likely to 
invite the development of mildew and rot. As soon as 
growth starts the beds should be worked over with a hand 
weeder and this should be repeated once in two weeks un- 
til the plants cover the beds. The temperature of the 
house should be kept below fifty degrees at night and in 
dull weather. The houses should be kept well ventilated, 
using the sash which opens opposite to the direction of the 
prevailing wind when it is possible. Keep coolest just 
after setting and when they begin to form heads. 

The most troublesome insect pests in lettuce growing is 
the green fly or aphis, but this can be kept in check if 
taken in time by the use of tobacco stems. As soon as 



their presence is detected the house should be filled with 
tobacco smoke. This should be repeated everyv two or 
three days and, if properly done, the aphides will be 
destroyed. But if they are left until they are developed 
the tobacco smoke does not seem to be powerful enough, 
and other means have to be taken. When given proper con- 
ditions the beds planted the first of October can be cut for 
Thanksgiving purposes. The next crop will develop by the 
first of February, and the third crop will be off by the first 
of April. Under especially favorable conditions two or 
three weeks can be gained upon this which will allow a 
fourth crop to be taken off by the middle of April. About 
two months should be allowed for growing the plants after 
sowing the seed, and seven or eight weeks more for the 
growth of the heads after planting out. This will be none 
too much during the cloudy and short days of November 
and December, but as the sun gets higher in February and 
March six weeks will generally suffice. 

LETTUCE IN HOT BEDS. 

When one has a forcing house or can afford to build 
one, it does not pay to grow lettuce in hot beds in this 
locality earlier than the fifteenth of February or the 
first of March. If one has no forcing house or other place 
for starting the plants, a small hot bed can be made for 
growing them as early as the middle of January, and tliey 
will be large enough to transplant by the middle of Feb- 
ruary. If they are put in thickly at first, a large number 
of plants can be started in a small bed, and besides saving 
labor in the care of the large beds, it will admit of giving 
the plants a fresh bed when finally transplanted. Hot beds 
can be used to good advantage in connection with a green 
house, as seed planted about the first pf February will form 
plants large enough to place in the hot beds by the 15th 
to the 25th of February and will be ready for market as 



82 

soon as the third crop has been cut from the house. When 
there is a demand for lettuce in November it can be grown 
in cold frames at a low cost, and if they are deep and well 
covered on cold nights it can be carried until Thanksgiv- 
ing. 

CONDITIONS FOK SUCCESS. 

The principal reason why the lettuce specialists have 
such remarkable success is that every detail of handling 
the crop is properl}^ attended to. 

As of first importance they consider the character of the 
soil. This should be of a sandy nature with less than five 
per cent, of clay. If the clay is present in much larger 
quantities the surface of the soil, on becoming dry, will 
bake and form clods and it Avill remain wet and cold after 
watering, and it is likely to induce the appearance of the 
rot. A good lettuce soil properly supplied with drainage 
will allow the surplus water to pass through it and the roots 
will penetrate to a much greater depth than in a cold, 
heavier soil. (2) They not only have suitable varieties, 
but the best growers take pains to have selected plants 
from selected seed of those varieties. (3) Careful atten- 
tion to regulating the temperature at night and to venti- 
lation during the day. The burning of the edges of the 
leaves which is so troublesome with head lettuce is un- 
doubtedly due to some neglect in these particulars. 60 
degrees answers well for a day temperature but even at 
this, air should be given, and if it rises higher, the ventila- 
tors should be opened wide. (4) Securing a steady growth 
of the plants and guarding against a check. Aside from 
the top dressing that is desirable after each crop is taken 
off, the application of other ingredients will both increase 
the size of the plants and hasten their maturity. (5) So 
handle the houses that insects and fungous diseases can- 
not gain a foothold. 



S3 

For many years the forcing of tomatoes and cucumbers 
for winter marketing has been quite profitable near some 
of the large markets, but at the present time, there are 
fewer inducements to engage in the business than formerly, 
owing in part to the low prices at which the southern 
growers' crops can be placed on the northern market and 
the competition from the large number of persons who are 
now engaged in the business. During the spring and 
early summer after the time when lettuce can no longer 
be grown with success in the houses, there is still an op- 
portunity of growing both of these crops with profit, as 
the houses can be used for nothing else at this time and 
there will be but a small expenditure for fuel. In the 
winter, however, the expense of keeping up the necessary 
high temperature in the houses will be very large and the 
prices sometimes run very low, but, with good care, fairly 
profitable returns will be secured. In order to secure the 
development of fruit upon most of the common varieties 
of cucumbers artificial fertilization of the flower must be 
resorted to, when they are grown in forcing houses during 
winter, unless a hive of bees is placed in the house for the 
purpose of carrying the pollen from the staminate flower 
to the pistils. It can be done by taking the pollen upon 
a small brush and dusting it over the pistils. 

VARIETIES. 

For most markets the common garden varieties are the 
only ones that are profitable, the White Spine and a strain 
known as Arlington White Spine, being most commonly 
used. The plants are also subject to attacks of various 
fungous diseases, one of the most injurious of which is the 
powdery mildew. 

For diseases of this kind, evaporated sulphur will be 
found an excellent remedy. There are a large number of 
other varieties of vegetables grown under glass by those 



84 

who are engaged largely in the business. Such are aspar- 
agus, rhubarb, carrots, beets, melons, mushrooms, etc. 

I will only speak of one other ciop which is radishes. 

The demand in spring for hot bed and frame radishes 
has grown to large proportions. The crop can be easily 
raised in winter and there is no reason why the area of 
glass now devoted to it cannot readily be doubled. The 
crop succeeds well on either a well drained solid bed or a 
deep raised bench filled with four or six inches of rich, 
light loam. The greater depth should be used for the 
long rooted varieties while the bed can be more easil}^ reg- 
ulated and as good results can be obtained if the soil is 
not over four inches deep for the turnip-rooted sorts. 

The seed should be sown in drills varying from five to 
six inches apart according to the varieties, as some kinds 
have small foliage that will enable the plants to grow close 
together, while other forcing sorts will need at least six 
inches. During entire growth radishes need thorough 
ventilation and the air should be on at least for a short 
time each day, except in the coldest weather. When the 
second rough leaf begins to form, the plants should be 
thinned out so as to leave a plant every one and a half or 
two inches in the row. 

Now while I have gone over these few crops which are 
most commonly grown under glass, I wish to say in con- 
clusion that one may read about growing them, go to In- 
stitute meetings and visit those who are engaged in the 
business, which will all be of some help to him, still he 
must have some experience to be successful, and to be most 
successful one should have enough to take up the most of 
his time, for if he is engaged in other pursuits he will be 
apt to neglect his crops at the time when they most need 
his attention and thereby lose the profit which he other- 
wise miofht have had. 



85 
SAVING SOIL WATER. 

BY M. SUMNER PERKINS. 

The quantity of water which falls in summer rains and 
showers, is utterly insufficient to grow and mature field 
crops. What then is the source of the main supply of 
moisture, conceding the fact, that the rain actually falling 
upon these crops is entirely inadequate to meet their 
needs ? 

The primary and fundamental source of moisture is 
found in the soil Avater. The soil is practically a reser- 
voir, which is continually receiving and storing water dur- 
ing the fall, winter and spring months, and it is this soil 
watei-, upon which we mainly depend to bring our crops to 
maturity. 

Therefore it is of great importance that we do all we 
possibly can to conserve or save this soil water, preventing, 
as far as can be, its needless waste and exhaustion. Few 
of us have opportunities to irrigate crops during periods 
of drought ; but we all can practice some simple rules for 
the retention of the soil water. 

EARLY PLOUGHING. 

Early ploughing may be first mentioned as an effective 
means of saving soil moisture, and as a consequence, ren- 
dering the soil better able to carry the crops through 
periods of prolonged droughts. We all know, that hard, 
solid earth, evaporates and loses its moisture much more 
rapidly than earth loosened and made light and porous by 
the plough. Therefore it may be regarded as a fact, that 
the sooner all farming land is ploughed in the spring, after 
it becomes dry enough to work well, the better the chances 
this same land will have to withstand the droughts, which 
are most liable to occur sometime during the season. 
Plough early and harrow down finely, no matter if the 



86 

crop is not to be put in until quite late, as it is very essen- 
tial to prevent needless exhaustion of water supplies 
through useless evaporation. 

WEEDS. 

Weeds are pumps, that are continually at work deplet- 
ing the quantity of water stored in the soil. Destroy 
weeds, or better, never allow them to grow, and we gain 
just so much moisture for the use of our cultivated crops. 
While weeds are a dead loss, robbing the soil of fertility 
as well as moisture, yet doubtless the loss of water is by 
far the greater source of embarassment to the growing 
crops. This same loss of moisture occurs just when the 
crops most need it for their development. Weeds are 
always an expensive luxury, but especially so in a dry 
season. 

THINNING CROPS. 

A surplus plant sustains the same relation to the crop 
proper, precisely as a weed. Hence surplus plants are to 
be removed early, before they have grown much. Thin 
early and do it thoroughly. Too heavy seeding is inju- 
rious to best interests of the crop at any time, but espec- 
ially is this the case in a season of small rainfall, when 
every particle of water in the soil is required to be saved 
to mature the crop. 

THE EAR.TH MULCH. 

The thin mulch of dry earth upon a well tilled field is 
of inestimable value in saving soil moisture, since it breaks 
off the capillary connection of earth and air, and thereby 
prevents an enormous amount of evaporation. Continual, 
shallow cultivation, with hoe and cultivator, throughout 
the growing season, gives us this earth mulch, always 
present. This is the primary object of thorough tillage. 



87 

Destroying weeds is by no means the main purpose to be 
attained by cultivation, but merely an incidental one. 

SOIL TEXTURE. 

Soil texture, or mechanical condition, materially in- 
fluences the power and ability of the soil to retain moisture. 
In this respect some soils are vastly inferior to others, but 
the thinnest and most leachy soil may be greatly improved 
as a water reservoir. Every soil needs a good lot of or- 
ganic matter in it. This is obtained by ploughing in green 
crops, stable manure, or any material adding vegetable 
fibre to the earth. Wood ashes are famous for their ten- 
dency to draw and retain moisture. Hence their benefi- 
cial effect on lands, which periodically suffer owing to lack 
of water. 

Thus the farmer is not entirely helpless ; as, by the 
practice of wise husbandry, he can in a measure reduce 
the injurious results of protracted and disastrous droughts. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



The following is a list of members deceased as returned 
to the Secretary, not heretofore reported. 

Abbott, M. K., Hamilton Delano, Otis, Newburyport 
Appleton, Thomas, Marble- Dow, Virgil, Methuen 

head Dunnells, Ira A., Hamilton 

Barrett, E. Pope, Peabody Eaton, B. F., Haverhill 
Bushby, Nathan, Peabody Ellis, John A., Haverhill 
Brown, Hayden, West New- Fabens, Frank L., Marble- 
bury head 
Chesley, John F., Araesbury Foster, David L., Beverly 
Cutter, Ebeu P., Newbury- George, Henry M., Saugus 
port Gustin, John H., Danvers 



88 

Haskell, George, Ipswich Pevear, G. K., Lynn 
Hawkes, George L., Wake- Putnam, John A., Danvers 

field Putnam, Benj. W., Danvers 

Hathawa}^ Seth W., Marble- Putnam, Benj. C, Chelsea 

head Prince, Samuel R., Wenham 

Herrick, Israel, Boxford Reddy, Michael, Ipswich 
Hodgdon, George, Ipswich Rowe, Allen, Swampscott 
Manning, James, Topsfield Rowe, Amos, Rockport 
Merrill, Burton E., Grove- Sawyer, Aaron, Amesbury 

land Smart, John L., Danvers 

Lane, Andrew, Rockport Stockbridge, Seth, Rowley 
Lord, Cyrus W., Beverly Tilton, Enoch, Newburyport 
Page, John G., Salem Titcomb, Beniah, Haverhill 

Peabody, George W. Wen- Warren, David, Swampscott 

ham Washburn, John, Swampscott 

Wellman, John R., Lawrence. 



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CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Article 1. There shall be a President, four Vice Pres- 
idents, a Secretary and a Treasurer, who shall be Trustees, 
ex-offic'io. The President, Vice Presidents and Secretary 
shall be elected at the annual meeting by ballot, and the 
Treasurer by the Trustees, annually, at their meeting in 
November. In addition to these, one Trustee shall be 
elected annually for each town in the County, and the 
Trustee for each town shall be elected by members of the 
Society in said town, at a meeting called for that purpose,* 
in accordance with notice issued by the Secretary, and shall 
continue in office until another is elected in his stead ; and 
such election shall be final, and shall constitute the Trus- 
tee so elected a member of the Board of Trustees of the 
Society ; and the result of the election in each town shall 
be communicated as early as possible to the Secretary. 

Art. 2. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the So- 
ciety, at such times as the Trustees shall determine, at 
which all officers shall be elected. Twenty members at 
least shall be necessary to constitute a quorum for the 
transaction of business. 

Art. 3. If at any meeting of the Society, or the trus- 
tees, the President and Vice Presidents shall be absent, 
the members present may appoint one from among them 
to preside at such meeting. 



♦These meetinga are held the last Tuesday of October, and the Trustees 
elected commence their duties at the November meeting of Trustees. 



91 

Art. 4. The President, or in case of his absence, either 
of the Vice Presidents, with the advice of the Trustees, 
may call a special meeting of the Society ; or whenever a 
written application, with the reason assigned therefor, 
shall be made by any twelve members of the Society, to 
the President and Trustees, they shall call such meeting. 

Art. 5. The meetings of the Trustees shall be held at 
such time and place as they shall from time to time agree 
upon ; seven of whom, with the presiding officer, shall 
make a quorum. 

Art. 6. The Trustees shall regulate all the concerns of 
the Society, during the intervals of its meetings ; propose 
such objects of improvement to the attention of the public, 
publish such communications, and offer premiums in such 
form and value as they think proper (provided the premi- 
ums offered do not exceed the funds of the Societ}^) : and 
shall lay before the Societ}', at each of its meetings, a 
statement of their proceedings and of the communications 
made to them. • 

Art. 7. The Secretary shall take minutes of all the 
votes and proceedings of the Society and of the Trustees, 
and enter them in separate books ; and shall record all 
such communications as the Trustees shall direct. He 
shall write and answer all letters relating to the business 
of the Society. 

Art. 8. The Treasurer shall receive all monies due or 
payable to the Society, and all donations that may be made 
to it, for which he shall give duplicate receipts, one of 
which shall be lodged with the Secretary, who shall make 
a fair record thereof. The Treasurer shall from time to 
time pay out such monies as he shall have orders for from 
the Trustees; and shall annually, and whenever thereto 
required, render a fair account of all his receipts and pay- 
ments to the Society or a committee thereof. He shal 
give bonds for the faithful discharge of his duty, in such 
sum as the Trustees shall direct, and with such sureties. 



92 

Art. 9. A committee shall be appointed annually by 
the Trustees to audit the Treasurer's accounts, who shall 
report to the Society ; and the same being accepted, shall 
be entered by the Secretary in his books. 

Art. 10. In case of death, resignation, incapacity, or 
removal out of the county, of the Secretary or of the 
Treasurer, the Trustees shall take charge of the official 
books, papers, and other effects belonging to the office that 
may be vacated, and give receipts for the same ; which 
books, papers, etc., they may deliver to some person whom 
they may appoint to fill the office until the next meeting 
of the Society, at which time there shall be a new choice. 

Art. 11. *Any citizen of the county may become a 
member of the Society by paying the sum of three dol- 
lars to increase the permanent fund of the institution. 

Art. 12. A committee shall be raised from time to 
time to solicit and receive subscriptions for raising a fund 
for encouraging the noblest of pursuits, the Agriculture of 
our county ; the same to be sacredly appropriated to that 
purpose. 

Art. 13. All ordained ministers of the Gospel who 
reside within the county shall be admitted honorary mem- 
bers of the Society. 

Art. 14. In addition to the usual number of Trustees 
annually elected, the past Presidents of the Society shall 
be honorary members of the Board of Trustees. 

Art. 15. The foregoing constitution may be amended 
by a proposition of the amendment in writing by a member 
at a regular meeting ; the same to lie over for the action 
at the next annua Imeeting of the Society. 



•Members will receive from the Secretary a " certificate of membership." 
No fines or assessments are ever imposed. Members are entitled to vote in all 
its transactions, with free use of the Library and a copy of the printed "Tran- 
sactions" each year. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY, 

FOR 1 899- 1 900. 



PRESIDENT. 

GEORGE V. L. MEYER, of Hamilton. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



JAMES J. H. GREGORY, of Marblehead. 
HORATIO G. HERRICK, of Lawrence. 
ASA T. NEWHALL, of Lynn. 
J. D. W.. FRENCH, of North Anclover. 



SECRETARY. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TREASURER. 

GILBERT L. STREETER, of Salem. 



HONORARY TRUSTEES. 

BENJAMIN p. WARE, of Marblehead. 
FRANCIS H. APPLETON, of Peabody. 
OLIVER S. BUTLER, of Georgetown. 



94 

DELEGATE TO THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

JOHN M. DANFORTH, of Lynnfield. 



TEUSTEES. 



J. P. Little, Amesbury Amos P. Alley, Marblehead 

Charles C. Blunt, Andover George W. Sargent, Merri- 
John W. Lovett, Beverly mac 

Walter I. Chadwick, Box- Fred A. Russell, Methuen 

ford Geo. A. Currier, Middleton 

Alvah J. Bradstreet, Danvers Herbert F. Otis, Nabant 
Edward K. Lee, Essex James K. Adams, Newbury 

Sherman Nelson, George- B. F. Stanley, Newburyport 

town E. W. Mood}^ No. Andover 

George M.Wonson,GloucesterN. M. Quint, Peabody 
Sam'l B. Geoige, Groveland John J. Manning, Rockport 
Alvin Smith, Hamilton Willard P. Smith, Rowley 

B. Frank Barnes, Haverhill Ellis H. Porter, Salem 
Alonzo B. Fellows, Ipswich J. Q. Evans, Salisbury 
J. D. Drew, Lawrence Lewis W. Hawkes, Saugus 

Edwin Bates, Lynn S. F. Crosman, Swampscott 

John H. Perkins, Lynnfield Edw. E. Ferguson, Topsfield 
Daniel W. Friend, Manches- H. H. Demsey, Wenham 

ter L. H. Bailey, West Newbury 



List of Premiums Awarded 1899. 



BULLS. 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, $6 00 
E. W, Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, second premium, 2 00 
Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, Jersey, first premium, 3 00 
Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, Jersey, first premium, 3 00 
A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 

6 00 
A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, -i 00 
Joseph J. Conley, Newburyport, Guernsey, first pre- 
mium, 3 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein with five of his 

stock, first premium, 12 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 3 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 3 00 
J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 
George L. Averill, Andover, Ayrshire, first premium, 4 00 

FAT CATTLE. 

J. C. Evans, Amesbury, pair fat oxen, first premium, 8 00 
H. W. Evans, Amesbury, pair fat oxen, second pre- 
mium, 6 00 

MILCH cows. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, first pre- 
mium, 8 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 7 00 



96 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, first pre- 
mium, 7 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, second 

premium, 4 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, second 

premium, 4 00 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, 7 00 
J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire, first pre- 
mium, 7 00 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire, second pre- 
mium, 4 00 
James W. Burns, Danvers, Holstein, second premium, 5 00 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, 5 cows, first premium. 

Diploma and 10 00 

A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, 5 cows, second pre- 
mium, 8 00 

Otis F. Putnam, Danvers, 16 cows producing great- 
est amount of milk in one year. Diploma and 8 00 

HEIFERS. 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 5 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 3 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first premium, 4 00 
James C. Poor, No. Andover, Holstein, first pi-emium, 4 00 

F. D. Graves, Peabody, Guernsey, first premium, 4 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, first premium, $4 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, Jersey, second premium, 2 00 
A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 2 00 

A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, Holstein, second pre- 
mium, 2 00 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire, first pre- 
mium, 5 00 



97 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Ayrshire, second pre- 
mium, 2 00 

Robert Foss, Hamilton, Jersey, first premium, 4 00 

James C. Poor, No. Andover, grade Holstein, first 

premium, 5 00 

Isaac Schurman, Dan vers, grade Holstein, second 

premium, 3 00 

James A. King, Peabody, grade Ayrshire, first pre- 
mium, 4 00 

L. Bordeaux, Danvers, grade Devon, first premium, 4 00 

A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, grade Holstein, second 

premium, 2 00 

H. W. Evans, Amesbury, grade Hereford, second pre- 
mium, 2 00 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

J. C. Evans, Amesbury, grade Hereford, first pre- 
mium, $S 00 

H. W. Evans, Amesbury, grade Hereford, second 

premium, 6 00 

H. W. Evans, Amesbury, working steers, first pre- 
mium, 6 00 

H. W. Evans, Amesbury, working steers, second 

premium, 4 00 

STEERS. 

J. C. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford steers, first pre- 
mium, S4 00 

J. C. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford steers, first pre- 
mium, 3 00 

J. C. Evans, Amesbury, Hereford steers, first pre- 
mium, 3 00 



98 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING. 

W. H. Sprague, Haverhill, first premium, $8 00 

E. D. Lovett, Hamilton, second premium, 6 00 

BROOD MARES — FARM AND DRAFT. 

Isaac Schurman, Danvers, first premium, $S 00 

A. W. Dodge, Danvers, second premium, 6 00 

BROOD MARES FOR DRIVING. 

W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, bay mare, first premium, $S 00 
E. D. Lovett, Beverly, gray mare, second premium, 5 00 

FAMILY HORSES. 

W. H. Poor, No. Andover, gray horse, first premium, 16 00 
E. R. Perkins, Salem, chestnut horse, second prem., 5 00 

gents' driving horses. 

D. W. Poor, Peabody, bay horse, first premium, i6 00 
C. A. Buxton, Salem, brown mare, second premium, 5 00 

FAST "WALKING HORSES. 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, black mare, first prem., !$5 00 
W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, bay mare, second premium, 3 00 
E. W. Moody, No. Andover, single farm horse, first 

premium, 5 00 

A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, pair farm horses, first 

premium, 6 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, pair farm horses, second prem,, 4 00 

SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, bay horse, first pre- 

mium, $6 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, brown horse, second premium, 4 00 

B. W. Farnhara, No. Andover, first premium, 6 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, second premium, 4 00 

PAIRS OE FARM HORSES. 

J. A. Garland, Hamilton, first premium, $8 00 



99 

George Pratt, Danvers, second premium, 
Isaac C. Day, Boxford, first premium, 

PONIES. 

Leo H. Tracey, Salem, first premium, 
E. B. Hayes, Lynn, second premium, 

COLTS — FAEM PURPOSES. 

E. W. Moody, No. Andover, second premium, 
W. F. Kinsman, Ipswich, first premium, 
Joseph Johnson, Andover, first premium, 
Isaac C. Day, Boxford, second premium, 

COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

Mrs. C. W. Sylvester, Ipswich, first premium, 
H. H. Demsey, Wenham, first premium, 
A. B. Forbes, Newbury, first premium, 
A. B. Forbes, Newbury, second premium, 
A. B. Forbes, Newbury, second premium, 

. SWINE — LARGE BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester white boar, first prem., 15 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, O. I. Chester white sow, first 

premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester sow, second premium, 3 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Berkshire boar, second prem., 3 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, weaned pigs, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Chester sow, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, weaned pigs, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Berkshire boar, second prem., 3 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Poland China, first premium, 5 00 
W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, first premium, 5 00 
Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, Berkshire boar, first 

premium, 5 00 

Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, Berkshire sow, first 

premium, 5 00 

L. Bordeaux, Danvers, Chester white sow, second 

premium, 3 00 



5 


00 


8 


00 


$4 00 


2 


00 


13 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


15 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


8 


00 



lOO 

L. Bordeaux, Danveis, Chester boar, second prem., 3 00 

E. E. Stanyan, Danvers, Yorkshire boar, second 

premium, 3 00 

F. L. Newhall, Peabody, Jersey red boar, second 

premium, 3 00 

F. L. Newhall, Peabody, Jersey red sow, second 

premium, B 00 

F. L. Newhall, Peabody, sow and pigs, second prem., 3 00 

SWINE — SMALL BREEDS. 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, medium Yorkshire, first prem., $5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, Yorkshire sow, first premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, weaned pigs, first premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, sow and pigs, first premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, sow and pigs, second premium, 3 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, boar, first premium, 5 00 

W. L. Hill, Peabody, weaned pigs, second premium, 3 00 

F. L. Newhall, Peabody, Yorkshire boar, second prem., 3 00 

SHEEP. 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, Shropshire buck, 

first premium, $5 00 

J. D. W. French, No. Andover, grade ewes, first 

premium, 5 00 

Wyman & Son, Peabody, sheep, first premium, 3 00 

J. B. Thomas, Peabody, lambs, first premium, 4 00 

J. B. Thomas, Peabody, Leicester lambs, first prem., 4 00 
J. B. Thomas, Peabody, Leicester buck, first prem., 5 00 

PLOUGHING WITH DOUBLE TEAMS. 

J. C. Evans, Amesbur}-, four oxen, first premium, $8 00 
J. C. Evans, Amesbury, four oxen, second premium, 6 00 

PLOUGHING WITH TWO HORSES. 

Durkee Brothers, Peabod}'', first premium, $6 00 

W. B. Vei-ry, Danvers, second premium, 4 00 



lOI 



PLOUGHING WITH SWIVEL PLOUGH. 

F. A. Dodge, Beverly, first premium, $6 00 

A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, second premium, 4 00 

PLOUGHING WITH SULKY PLOUGH. 

A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, first premium, $6 00 

OTHER AWARDS. 

Awarded by Committee on Poultry, $232 50 

" '' " " Harrows, 5 GO 

" " '" " Agricult'al Implements, 58 00 

" Carriages, 25 00 

" Dairy, 8 00 

" Bread and Canned Fruit, 15 50 

" " ^' " Honey, 3 00 

- Pears, 42 00 

" '^ '* Apples, 49 00 

" Peaches, Grapes, etc., 83 00 

" " ■" "• Plants and Flowers, 

^' Vegetables, 
" " '' " Grain and Seed, 

" " " " Counterpanes and Af- 

ghans, 
" " " " Carpets and Rugs, 

" " " " Manufr's from Leather, 8 00 

" Man'frs. and Gen. Mdse. 23 50 

" •' " " Fancy Work, 40 00 

" Art Work, 68 00 

" Work by Children, 22 90 



88 


50 


125 


50 


17 


00 


17 


75 


16 


50 



RECAPITULATION. 



Awarded for Ploughing, 



$40 00 





FARM STOCK. 




Awarded for Bulls, 


157 00 




" Fat Cattle, 


14 00 




" Milch Cows, 


53 00 




" Herds of Milch Cows, 


26 00 




"■ Heifers, 


69 00 




" Working Oxen, 


24 00 




" Steers, 


10 00 




" Horses, 


160 00 




" Swine, 


* 106 00 




" Sheep, 


26 00 




" Poultry, 


232 50 



$777 50 



FIELD AND EXPERIMENTAL CROPS. 



Awarded for Root Crops, 
" " Grain Crops, 


$29 00 
7 00 


FARM AND GARDEN 

Awarded for Grain and Seed, 
" " Vegetables, 
" " Fruits, 
" " Plants and Flowers, 


PRODUCTS. 

$17 00 

125 50 

174 00 

88 50 



$36 00 



$405 00 



lO' 



DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES. 

Awarded for Bread and Canned Fruit, $15 50 
" " Counterpanes and Afghans, 
" " Carpetings and Rugs, 
" " Articles Manufactured from 

Leather, 
" '^ Manufrs. and Gen. Mdse., 
" " Fancy Work, 
^' Works of Art, 
" " Children's Work, 



17 


75 


16 


50 


8 


00 


23 


50 


40 


00 


68 


00 


22 


90 



^212 15 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Awarded foi 


Dairy Products, 


18 


00 




a i. 


Honey, 




3 


00 




n ki 


Agricultural Iinplements, 


68 


00 




a (k 


Harrows, 




5 


00 




(( u 


Carriages, 




25 


00 




it, ii 


Essays and Reports, 


18 


00 














1117 00 


The amount of 11,568.25 


was awarded to 453 individu- 


als and firms 


, in 30 different cities and towns, 


as follows : 


Amesbury, 


.f92 00 


Marblehead, 




9 00 


Andover, 


9 00 


Merrimac, 






10 00 


Beverly, 


74 75 


Methuen, 






20 50 


Boxford, 


75 00 


Middleton 






2 50 


Danvers, 


127 65 


Newbury, 






18 00 


Georgetown 


2 00 


Newbury port, 




22 75 


Gloucester, 


2 00 


No. Andover, 




218 60 


Groveland, 


31 00 


Peabody, 






471 75 


Hamilton, 


34 00 


Rowley, 






3 00 


Haverhill, 


24 00 


Salem, 






104 60 


Ipswich, 


30 76 


Saugus, 






50 



I04 



Lawrence, 11 75 


Swampscott, 


9 75 


Lynn, 111 00 


Topsfield, 


16 00 


Lynnfield, 50 


Wenham, 


11 50 


Manchester, 3 00 


West Newbury, 


21 50 


FINANCIAL 


1 STATEMENT. 




Receipts from admission to 


hall and grounds. 


13,037 68 


Receipts from grounds for various purposes. 


353 00 


Receipts for dinner tickets. 




150 00 


Received from hall. 




5 20 




13,545 88 


Total expenses of Fair, 




2,591 79 



Paid^Treasurer, 



$954 09 



1900 
PREMIUM LIST OF 

Essex Agricultural Society, 

FOE THE 

SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL CATTLE SHOW AND FAIR. 



Duties of Trustees. 

The trustee of each towa is instructed to see the several 
members of Committees in his town previous to the Show, 
and urge upon them tlie importance of attending to their du- 
ties. Also impress upon exhibitors from localities near to the 
Exhibition, the importance of entering their exhibits for the 
hall, the afternoon and evening of Monday, in fairness to 
those from a distance, who are obliged to come Tuesday. 

To be prompt at the meeting in June for filling Committees, 
and at the meeting of the Society for filling vacancies in com- 
mittees on the first day of the Exhibition, making sure that 
the names proposed at those meetings are of persons who will 
serve. 



Duties of Committees. 

Committees on live stock and articles exhibited on the Fair 
Grounds should appear at the Secretary's office on the grounds, 
at one o'clock, punctually, on the first day of the exhibition, 
and there organize, take the books of entry, and proceed at 
once to business. Committees in hall, should take the books 
of entry from the Superintendent, promptly after the entries 
close. 



io6 

Full reports of awards by committees, on the blanks fur- 
nished by the Secretary, to be signed by all the members act- 
ing on the same, are required of each'committee. 

Three members of any committee consisting of more than 
that number are authorized to act. 

([^^No member of the Society shall act on any committee 
of which he is an exhibitor in the same class. 

The Diploma of the Society being considered the highest 
premium that can be awarded, no committee is authorized to 
award it, except for animals and articles of sjpecial merit, de- 
serving of endorsement and recommendation by the Society. 

No committee is authorized to award gratuities, except the 
committee on agricultural implements, carriages, bread, honey 
and canned fruits, domestic manufactures, fruits, vegetables 
in hall, and flowers; or any premium, unless the rules of the 
Society have been strictly complied with. Neither shall they 
award premiums or gratuities in excess of the amount appro- 
priated. 

No gratuity is to be awarded of less than fifty cents. 

The several committees are requested to affix premiumi 
cards, and also on animals, blue, white and red printed pre- 
mium ribbons (which may be had of the Secretary or assis- 
tant on the grounds and at the hall), for the several animals 
or articles designating the grade of premium awarded each, 
and the name of the person to whom awarded, and especial 
care should be taken that the cards issued correspond with the 
awards in their report to the Society. 

The reports of awards of premiums on ploughing and on 
animals and articles exhibited at the Show, must be delivered 
promptly to the Secretary for announcement on Thursday. 

The Society offers liberal premiums for the best reports of 
committees ; and the chairmen of the several committees are 
requested to present to the Secretary a full report explanatory 
of the opinions of the committees on the matter referred to 
them, within two weeks after the awards are made at the 
Show, for publication in the Transactions.* 

Reports on farms, crops, etc., to be presented previous to 
the meeting of the Trustees in November. 

Any member of a commMtee who cannot serve on the same is 
requested to give notice to the Secretary, before the Show, so 
that the vacancy may be filled. 

Each member of the several committees will receive a 
ticket of admission to the hall of exhibition, on application to 
the Secretary. 



•Chairmen of the committees will please notice this request. 



I07 
General Rules. 

Competitors are requested to carefully read the rules and 
premium list before making entries. 

Claims (entries) lor premiums to be awarded at the Exhibi- 
tion on the Fair Grounds, other than live stock, must be en- 
tered with the Secretary of the Society, or his agent, and in 
the Exhibition Hall, on or before 11 A. M., of the first day 
thereof. 

All entries of live stock must be entered with the Secretary 
at least one week previous to the holding of the Fair, and no 
entries will be received after that date. 

Any person not a member of the Society, awarded seven dol- 
lars and upwards, shall receive a certificate of membership, 
for which three dollars of his award will be taken to increase 
the funds of the Society. 

Diplomas awarded will be delivered and premiums paid, to 
the person to whom the premium or gratuity is awarded or 
an agent duly authorized, on application to the Treasurer, at 
First National Bank, Salem, on and after the first Monday of 
November. 

All premiums and gratuities awarded, the payment of which 
is not demanded of the Treasurer on or before the first day of 
April next succeeding the Exhibition, will be considered as 
given to increase the funds of the Society. 

In all cases the reports of awards of premiums and gratui- 
ties made by the several. committees and adopted by the Soci- 
ety shall be final. Committees should see that the premium 
cards issued, correspond with the preraiums and gratuities 
awarded in their repjorts. 

No person shall be entitled to receive a premium, unless he 
complies with the conditions on which the premiums are of- 
fered, and by proper entry as required, gives notice of his in- 
tention to compete for the same ; and committees are instruct- 
ed to award no premium unless the animal or article offered 
is worthy. 

No animal or object that is entered in one class, with one 
committee shall be entered in another class, working oxen, 
working steers (three year old steers may be entered for 
ploughing in a double team), and farm horses which may be 
entered for ploughing, horses for fast walking, and milch 
cows, which may be entered with a herd. 

All stock eligible for premiums must be owned by residents 
and kept in the county. 

In regard to all subjects for which premiums are offered, it 
is to be distinctly understood that the Trustees reserve to 



io8 

themselves the right of judging the quality of the animal or 
article offered ; and that no premium will be awarded unless 
the objects of them are of decidedly superior quality. 

Pure Bred Animals, defined by the State Board of Agri- 
culture. 

The P/-oo/that an animal is so bred should be a record of 
the animal or its ancestors, as recorded in some herd book, 
recognized by leading breeders and the public generally, as 
complete and authentic. None others will be accepted as 
pure bred. 

Standards adopted : — American Jersey C. C. Register and 
American Jersey Herd Book, Ayrshire Record and Holstein 
Herd Book. 



Premiums to be Awarded at the Show. 

The Committees ivill take notice that no premium, will be 
awarded unless the animals or objects are of a decidedly super- 
ior quality. 

Diplomas may be awarded for animals or articles of 
special merit, in all departments of the Fair. 



Cattle and other Farm Stock. 

TO BE ENTERED IN THE NAME OF THEIR REAL OWNER. 

All animals to be eligible to a premium, shall have been 
raised by the owner within the County, or owned by the ex- 
hibitor within the County, four months previous to the date 
of exhibition, except Working Oxen and Working Steers. 

All animals, whether teams for ploughing, or animals en- 
tered for premium or exhibition, will be fed during the Ex- 
hibition, and longer, when they are, of necessity, prevented 
from leaving, at the expense of the Society. 

FAT CATTLE. 

Fat cattle, fatted within the County, regard being had to 
manner of feeding, and the expense thereof, all of which shall 
be stated by the exhibitor in writing, and returned to the 
Secretary, with committee's report. 

For Pairs of Fat Cattle, premiums, $8, 6 

For Fat Cow premiums, $6, 4 



I09 

BULLS. 

^Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Holstein, Guernsey, 
or of any other recognized breed, for each breed. 

Two years old and upwards, premiums, $6, 4 

Under two years old, for each breed, $4, 3 

One year old and under, for each breed, $3, 2 

BULLS OF ANY AGE OR BREED. 

For the best bull of any age or breed, with five of his stock 
not less than one year old, quality and conditions to be taken 
into account, and especially the adaptability of the animal to 
the agriculture of the county. Diploma and $8 

Note. — Competitors are required to give a written statement of pedigree, and 
committees are requested to be particular in this respect, and return them to the 
Secretary with report. 

MILCH COWS. 

For Milch Cows, either Foreign, Native or Grade, with sat- 
isfactory evidence as to quantity and quality of milk by weight 
during one full month, premiums, $8, 5 

Milch Cows, Ayrshire, Jersey, Devon, Short Horn, Holstein, 
Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, four years old and 
upwards, premiums for each breed, $7, 4 

For Native or Grade Cows, four years old and upwards, 
premiums, $7, 4 

For the cows that make the most butter in a single week 
from June 1st to September 15, premiums, $7, 4 

Note.— A written statement will be required of the age and breed of all Milch 
Cows entered, and time they dropped their last calf, and when they will next 
calve, the kind, quality and' quantity of their food during the season, and the 
manner of their feeding, which statement is to be returned to the Secretary with 
Committee's report. 

HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

For herds of Milch Cows, not less than five in number, to 
be exhibited at the Show, and a correct statement of manner 
of keeping and yield for one year preceding the Show, pre- 
miums. Diploma and $10, 8 

For the greatest produce of milk on any farm, in proportion 
to the number of cows producing it, not less than four, from 
April 1, 1896 to April 1, 1897, statement to be made of the 
exchanges made, manner and expense of food, use made of 
milk, and such other facts as will illustrate the entire manage- 
ment, special regard being had to the mode in which the 
account is kept, premium, Diploma and $8 

Note.— The above-mentioned statements are to be returned to the Secretary 
with Committee's report, 'riie Committee can accept statements dating from 
January Ist, preceding the Show. 



I lO 



HEIFERS. 

First Class. — Ayrshire, Jersey, Short Horn, Devon, Hol- 
stein, Guernsey, or any other recognized breed, under tour 
years old in milk, premiums for each breed, $5, 3 

Two years old of each breed, that have never calved, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
One year old and under, of each breed, premiums, $4, 2 
Second Class. — Native or Grade Milch, under four years 
old, premiums, $5, 3 
Two years old, that have never calved, premiums, $4, 2 
Oue year old and under, and less than two, premiums, $4, 2 

WORKING OXEN AND STEERS. 

Stags excluded. For pairs of Working Oxen under eight 
and not less than five years old, taking into view their size, 
power, quality and training, premiums, $8, 6 

For pairs of Working Steers, four years old, to be entered 
in the name of the owner, premiums, $6, 4 

Note— The Committee are required to consider the quality and shape of the 
cattle as well as their workinp capacity. The training of working oxen and steers 
will be tested by trial on a cart, drag, or wagon, containing a load weighing two 
tons for oxeo, and three thousand pounds for steers. (Ig^°"At the time of entry a 
certificate of the weight of the cattle must be filed with the Secretary. 

STEERS. 

For pairs of three year old Steers, broken to the yoke, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 
For pairs of two year old Steers, premiums, $4, 2 
For pairs of yearling Steers, and under, premiums, $3, 2 

STALLIONS, FARM AND DRAFT. 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, four years old 
and upwards, diploma or premiums, $8, 5 

For Stallions for Farm and Draft Purposes, three years old, 
premiums, $5, 3 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than five years old, quality and condition to be taken into 
account, Diploma and $8 

STALLIONS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, four years old and up- 
wards, premiums, Diploma and $8, 5 

For Stallions for Driving Purposes, three years old, pre- 
miums, Diploma and $5, 3 



Ill 

For best Stallion of any age and five colts of his stock, not 
less than one year old, quality and condition taken into ac- 
count, Diploma and $8 

MOTK. — No stallion will be entitled to a premium unless free from all apparent 
defects capable of being transmitted. All stallions entered in either class must 
have been owned by the exhibitor four months previous to the exhibition. 

BROOD MARES, FARM AND DRAFT PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Farm and Draft Purposes, with their 
foal not more than eight months old, by their side, premiums, 

$8, 5 

BROOD MARES, DRIVING PURPOSES. 

For Brood Mares for Driving Purposes, with their foal not 
more than eight months old, by their side, premiums. 

Note. — No brood mare will be entitled to a premium unless free from all appar- 
ent defects capable of being transmitted. 

FAMILY HORSES. 
For Family Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

Note.— No horse will receive a premium unless free from all unsoundness. 

GENTLEMEN'S DRIVING HORSES. 

For Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For pairs of Gentlemen's Driving Horses, premiums, $8, 5 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

For pairs of Fast Walking Horses, premiums, $6, 4 

For single horses, $5, 3 

For pairs of farm horses with load of 4000 lbs., premiums, 

$6,4 
For single farm horse, with load of 2000 lbs., premiums, 

$5,3 
l!;^^The above to have trial on the track. 

FARM HORSES. 

For Farm Horses, weighing 1200 lbs. and over, premiums, 

$6,4 

For Farm H)rses weighing less than 1200 lbs., premiums, 

$6,4 

Note.— No horse will be allowed except those actually used on farms, whether 
the owner has a farm or not. The weight of the load to be used in trial of Karm 
Horses is to be fixed upon by the committee of arrangements for druftlng, the 
difference m the load for horses of 1,209 lbs. and over, and those under l.iiOO lbs. 
to be 1,000 lbs., and between the two classes of pairs, 2,000. No obstruction shall 
be placed either before or behind the wheels in trials of Draft Horses of either 
class, but wheels shall be blocked behind to hold the load when a team stops go- 
inc up hill. 



112 



PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING 2400 LBS. AND 

OVER. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing 2400 lbs. and upwards 
(see above note), premiums, $8, 5 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES, WEIGHING LESS THAN 

2400 LBS. 

For pairs of Farm Horses weighing less than 2400 lbs. (see 
above note), premiums, $8, 5 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 3 AND 4 YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding four-year-old Colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding three-year-old Colts, premiums, $5, 3 

COLTS FOR FARM PURPOSES, 1 AND 2 YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

COLTS FOR DRIVING PURPOSES. 

THREE AND FOUR YEARS OLD. 

For Mare or Gelding, four-year-old colts, premiums, $6, 4 
For Mare or Gelding, three-year-old colts, premiums, $5, 3 

ONE AND TWO YEARS OLD. 

For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, two-year-old colts, pre- 
miums, $4, 2 
For Stallion, Gelding or Mare, yearling colts, prem., $4, 2 

N. B. All the above classes the committees will act with the expert judge ex- 
cept Fat Cattle, Working Oxen and Steers, and Farm Horses. 

SPECIAL PREMIUM. 

For Horses jumping over four, four-foot hurdles, pre- 
miums, $8, 6 
For high hurdle jumping, premium, f8 

SWINE,— LARGE BREEDS. 

Large Breeds, viz: Cheshire, Berkshire, Chester County 
Whites, Poland China, Large Yorkshire, and any other breed 
or grade, weighing more than 300 lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $5, 3 



113 

For Breeding Sows, with their pigs by their side, pre- 
miums, $5, 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $5, 3 

SWINE,— SMALL BREEDS. 

Small breeds, such as Suffolk, Essex, Small Yorkshire, 
China, and any other breed or grade, weighing less than 300 
lbs. at maturity. 

For Boars, premiums, $5, 3 

For Breeding Sows with their pigs by their side, premiums, 

$5, 3 

For Litters of Weaned Pigs, not less than four, between 
two and four months old, premiums, $5, 3 

SHEEP. 

For flocks of Sheep, not less than six ewes in number, each 
breed, premiums, $5, 3 

For best Buck, premium, $5 

For lots of Lambs, not less thau six ewes in number be- 
tween four and twelve months old, premiums, $5, 3 

POULTRY. 

For pairs of Fowls, Light Brahmas, Dark Brahmas, Buff 
Cochins, Patridge Cochins, Black Cochins, White Cochins, 
Plymouth Rocks, White Plymouth Rocks, Dominiques, White 
Leghorns, Brown Leghorns, Dominique Leghorns, Black 
Spanish, Hamburgs, Polish, Games, Dorking, Bantams, Black, 
White and Mottled Javas, Wyandottes, White Wyondottes, 
Golden Wyandottes, Black and White Minorcas, Red Caps, 
Andalusias, Langshangs, and other recognized varieties, each 
variety, premiums, $2, 1, .50 

For pairs of Chickens of above varieties, premiums, 

$2, 1, .50 

For the best breeding pen of each variety of four females 
and male. Diploma or $2 

For the best pairs of Native Fowls, premiums, $2, 1, .50 

Pairs can be exhibited in " Breeding pens," by marking the 
competing female (with a ribbon or colored string), which 
with the male will form the pair. 

For lots of Turkeys, and Alesbury, Rouen, Caouga, Pekin, 
White and Colored Muscovey, and Brazilian Ducks, and Tou- 
louse, Emden, Brown China and African Geese, prem.. 

f 2, 1, .50 



114 

Any exhibitor interfering with the Judges in the discharge 
of their duties, or interfering with, or handling any specimen 
on exhibition, other than his own, shall forfeit all claim he 
may have in the premium list. 

All breeds exhibited separately and to be judged by the 
rules of the " American Standard of Excellence." 

For best exhibit of Poultry Appliances, $4 

Note.— No pair in a pen will receive a premium as a pair. 

STREET PARADE. 

Invitation is extended to local tradesmen or others to have 
a street parade or procession of teams, in connection with the 
Fair, to be expended under the direction of the Committee in 
charge in premiums or gratuities, $50 

PLOUGHING. 

General Note ox Ploughing.— Stags are excluded. Teams must be entered 
in the names of their owners, and only double ox-teams to have drivers. A team 
consisting of one pair of oxen and a horse will be considered a double team. The 
owners of separate teams may unite the same and be allowed to compete for pre- 
miums. The ploughmen and'drivers must have been residents of the County at 
least three months before the exhibition. Those who intend to be competitors 
must give notice to reach the Secretary on or before Saturday previous to the 
show. The lands will be staked, but each ploughman will be required to strike 
out his own lands in the presence of " Committee on Striking Out Grounds for 
Ploughing," after half -past nine o'clock on the morning of the trial. Ploughmen 
with land side ploughs are to back furrowthree furrows on each side of the stakes 
set, the last furrow to be of the depth required in the class. Ploughmen with 
swivel ploughs, to turn the outside of their furrow to the stakes on one side, and 
to finish one foot from the stake on the other. Committees to note and report 
the kind of plough used. 

Ploughing WITH Double Ox ok Horse Teams. — One-eighth 
of an acre, at least eight inches deep, premiums, $8, 6 

Ploughing with Single Ox-Teams. — One-eighth of au acre, 
at least six inches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Two Horses. — With any form of plough 
except Swivel, one-eighth of au acre, at least six inches deep, 
premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Three Horses. — One-eighth of an acre, 
eight inches deep, without driver, premium, .f 6 

Ploughing with Swivel Plough. — One-eighth of an acre, 
with double ox-teams, at least eight inches deep, premiums, 

{|6, 4 

One-eighth of an acre with single ox-teams; at least six 
inches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

One-eighth of an acre with horse teams, consisting of two 
horses, ploughing at least six inches deep, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing with Sulky Plough. — For the best perform- 
ances, taking into account ease of draft, amount and quality 
of work. 



115 

Sulky Plough, Landside, premiums, $6, 4 

Ploughing by boys, 15 years of age and under, premiums, 

$6,4 
HARROWS. 

For the best Harrow exhibited, and its merits shown by 
actual test upon the ploughed ground, $6, 4 

Note.— Entry must be made with the Secretary before the day of the trial, with 
description of the Harrow. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

For the best collection of Implements and Machines (no ar- 
ticle offered in cuUection will be entitled to a separate pre- 
mium), Diploma and $8 

For implements that are deemed worthy, the Committee 
may at their discretion award in gratuities not exceeding f 40. 

No premium or gratuity will be awarded for any Mower, 
Horse Rake, Tedder, or other machine or implement, the 
merit of which can be known only by actual trial in the field ; 
but manufacturers are invited to offer the same for exhibition 
and inspection. 

CARRIAGES. 

For carriages built in the County, and exhibited by the 
manufacturer, Diploma, and twenty-five dollars in gratuities, 
may be awarded by the Committee. 



In Exhibition Hall. 

Committees on articles exhibited in the hall should be espec- 
ially careful that the premium or gratuity cards issued with 
the names, and sums awarded them, correspond with those in 
their reports to the Society. 

Committees and Exhibitors will be governed by instructions 
under heading of •' Duties of Committee," " General Rules," 
" Premiums to be awarded at the Show," see first pages, and 
under " Fruit," " Domestic Manufactures," and " Flowers." 

li:^All Fruit, Flowers, Vegetables, and Domestic Manu- 
factures, must be the product of Essex County, to be entitled 
to a premium or gratuity. 

GRANGE EXHIBIT. 

The Society offers fifty dollars to be divided in three premi- 
ums for exhibits by the different Granges in Essex County, 
as follows : — Premiums, |;20, 15, 10 

Note.— This exhibit includes all Fruit, Vegetables and Domestic Manufactures 
that are exhibited in any other department in Exhibition Hall. 



ii6 

DAIRY, BREAD, CANNED FRUIT AND HONEY. 

For specimens of Butter made on any farm within the 
County the present year, samples of not less than five pounds 
to be exhibited, with a full account of the process of making 
and management of the Butter, premiums, $5, 3 

For specimens of New Milk Cheese, made on any farm in 
the County the present year, samples of not less than twenty- 
five pounds to be exhibited, with statement in writing of the 
method of making and preserving same, premiums, f 5, 3 

For White Bread made of Wheat Flour, premiums, $2, 1 

For bread made from Graham flour, premiums, ^2, 1 

For bread made from other grains, or other grains mixed 
with wheat, premiums, $1.50, 1 

All bread, entered for premiums, to be in loaves weighing 
not less than one pound each, and not to be less than twenty- 
four hours old, with a full written statement over the signa- 
ture and address of the maker, stating the kind of flour used, 
quantity of each ingredient, how mixed, and length of time 
kneaded and raised, and how long baked. 

For first and second best collection of Preserved Fruits and 
Jellies made from products of the County, with method of 
preserving to accompany the entry in writing, premiums $2, 1 

For the first and second best five pounds of Dried Apples, 
grown and dried within the County, with statements of pro- 
cess used and amount of labor and time required in preparing 
and drying, premiums, $2, 1 

In addition to the above, are placed in the hands of the 
Committee for gratuities on other articles, entered in this de- 
partment, products of this County, deemed worthy, $5 

First and second best Honey, five pounds in comb, made in 
the County, with statement signed of kind of bees and hive, 
and time of year when honey was made, premiums, $3, 2 



Fruit. 



AH fruits must be entered in the name of the grower before 
11 o'clock on the first day of the exhibition, and each exhibi- 
tor must certify to the same on the Entry Book, or on lists of 
the varieties of each class of fruit or to be filed when entry is 
made. (Committees are not authorized to make awards to 
those who do not comply with this rule.) 

Tables will be labelled in a consplclous manner by the hall 
committee before the entry of exhibitors, with the names of 



117 

fruit, for which premiums are offered, all others of same class 
fruit to be labelled miscellaneous. Exhibitors must place 
their several varieties of each class of fruit where indicated 
by such labels, or be considered by the committee as not com- 
peting for premium. 

Plates of collections of fruit, when premiums are offered 
therefor, must be entered and placed by the exhibitor on the 
table assigned for the exhibit of collections of fruit. 

To entitle exhibitors to receive premiums and gratuities 
awarded, they are required (when requested by the commit- 
tee) to give information in regard to the culture of their fruit. 

PEARS. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Bartlett, 
Belle Lucrative, Bose, Anjou, Angouleme, Dana's Hovey, 
Lawrence, Onondaga, Seckle, Sheldon, Urbaniste, Vicar, 
Comice, Howell and Clairgeau, each premium, $2 

Doyenne d'Ete, Gifford and Clapp's Favorite (ripening 
early), are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered. 

For each dish of twelve best specimens of any other varie- 
ties, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, $L50 

For best collection of Pears, recommended for cultivation, 
premium, $5 

In addition to the above are placed at the disposal of the 
committee, to be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 
each, $15 

APPLES. 

For best twelve specimens of the following varieties, which 
are recommended for cultivation in Essex County : Baldwin, 
Danvers Sweet, Tompkins King, Red Russett, Ben Davis, 
Sutton Beauty, Hubbardston, Mackintosh Red, Porter, Pick- 
man Pippin, Roxbury Russet, Rhode Island Greening, Grav- 
enstein, Hunt Russet, Ladies Sweet, Snow, Bailey Sweet, 
Wealthy, Sutton Beauty, premium for each, $2, 1 

Red Astrachan, William's Favorite, Tetofsky and Sweet 
Bough are recommended for cultivation, but no premium is 
offered (ripening early.) 

For best twelve specimens of any other varieties deemed 
worthy by the committee, premium for each variety, $1.50 

For best collection of Apples, recommended for cultivation, 
premiums. $3, 2 



ii8 

For best twenty-four specimens of any variety of Crab Ap- 
ple deemed worthy by the committee, $1.50 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the committee, to 
be awarded in gratuities of not less than $1 each, $15 

PEACHES, GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUITS. 

For bpst twelve specimens of Freestone, White Flesh, 
Yellow Flesh, P^ssex County Seedling, each variety, $2 

For best collection of Peaches, premium, $3 

For the best twelve specimens of Champion, Lemon, or 
Orange Quinces, premium, $2 

For the best twelve specimens of Plums, live varieties to be 
selected by Committee, each variety, premium, $2 

For best four bunches of Concord, Worcien's Seedling, 
Brighton, Delaware. Hartford Proliiic, Green Mountain, 
Moore's Early, Moore's Diamond, Pocklington,Niagara Grapes, 
for each variety, premium, $2 

For Cold House Grapes, produced with not over one month's 
artificial heat, premiums, $3, 2 

For best collection of six varieties, not less than ten 
pounds in all, premiums, $5, 4 

For best specimens of four bunches of Grapes, varieties 
other than above, deemed worthy by the committee, premium, 

$1.50 

For basket of Assorted Fruits, premiums, $3, 2 

In addition are placed at the disposal of the commitee, 
to be awarded in gratuities, of not less than 50 cents each. 

$20 



Plants and Flowers. 



RULKS AND KEGULATIONS. 



1. All Plants and Flowers for competition and exhibition 
must be entered for examination by the committee on or before 
eleven o'clock, on the first day of the Fair, and all such 
Plants and Flowers must have been grown by the competitor, 
except native plants and flowers, and flowers used in bouquets, 
and baskets of flowers and floral designs, all of which (plants 
and flowers) must have be mi grown within the County. 

2. When a certain number or quantity of Plants and 
Flowers is designated in tlie schedule, there must be neither 
more nor less than that number or quantity of specimens 
shown. 



119 

3. When only one premium for each exhibitor is offered 
for any article, only a single specimen or collection can com- 
pete, but when a second or third premium is offered, one, two 
or three specimens or collections may be exhibited for compe- 
tition, but no variety can be duplicated. 

4. No premium shall be awarded unless the specimens ex- 
hibited are of superior excellence, possessing points of superi- 
ority and worthy of such premium, not even if they are the 
only ones of their kind on exhibition. 

5. No specimen entered for one premium shall be admitted 
in competition for another different premium. 

6. Competitors will be required to furnish information (if 
the committee so request), as to their modes of cultivation, 
or in the ease of Native Plants and Flowers, where such were 
found. 

7. All Plants exhibited for premiums must have the name 
legibly and correctly written on stiff card, wood, or some other 
permanent and suitable substance and so attached to same as 
to be easily seen. F'lowers when specified to be named to 
comply also with above rule. 

8. Plants in Pots to be entitled to premiums must show 
skilful culture in the profusion of bloom and in the beauty, 
symetry and vigor of the specimens ; also Bouquets, Baskets, 
Design Work, etc., must show taste, skill and harmony in ar- 
rangement, both as to colors and material they are made of, 
and purposes for which they are intended. 

9. All Flowers exhibited must be shown upon their o^vn 
stem, flowers in "Design " work alone excepted; and this ex- 
ception if overcome and avoided, to be taken into account by 
the committee in awarding the premiums. 

10. The committee are authorized to award gratuities for 
any new and rare plants and flowers or " Designs of merit " for 
which no premium is offered, but in no case shall the total 
sum (premiums and gratuities together), exceed the amount, 
$100, limited by the Society for this department. 

11. No member of the Committee for awarding premiums 
or gratuities shall in any case vote or decide respecting an 
award for which such member may be a competitor, or in 
which he may have an interest, but in such case such member 
shall temporarily vacate his place upon the Committee, and 
such vacancy for the time being may be filled by the remain- 
ing members of the Committee, or they may act without. 

12. Attention is again called to above Rules and Regula- 
tions for Plants and Flowers, and General Rules of the Socie- 
ty, and all articles not entered in conformity therewith will 
be disqualified, and premiums will be awarded only to exhibi- 
tors who have complied with said Rules, etc. 



I20 



PLANTS. 

Plants competing for these premiums must have been grown 
in pots, Native Plants excepted, etc. See Rules. 

For collection Flowering and Ornamental Foliage Plants, at 
least 25 specimens, premiums, $5, 3 

For collection Palms, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Ferns (cultivated), at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Dracenas, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Crotons, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection Fancy Caladiums, at least 5 specimens, 5 
varieties, premium, $1 

For collection Gloxinias, at least 5 specimens, 5 varieties, 
premium, $1 

For collection of Begonias, tuberous-rooted, at least 5 speci- 
mens, 5 varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Begonias, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, pram., $1 
For collection Coleus, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Fuschias, 5 specimens, varieties, premium, SI 
For collection Cyclamen, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Geraniums, double, 10 specimens, 10 varie- 
ties, premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, single, 10 specimens, 10 varieties, 
premium, $1 
For collection Geraniums, fancy, 10 specimens, at least 5 
varieties, premium, $1 
For collection Hibiscus, 5 specimens, 5 varieties, prem., $1 
For collection Carnation Pinks, 10 specimens, at least 5 va- 
rieties, premium, $1 
For collection Calla Lilies, 5 specimens, premium, $1 
For specimen English Ivy, premium, $1 
For collection of wood of native trees in sections, suitable 
for exhibition, showing bark and the grain of the wood, all 
correctly named with botanical and common name, at least 50 
varieties, each variety to be shown in two sections, one of 
which to be a cross section, and neither to be more than four 
inches in length or diameter, premiums, $5, 3 

FLOWERS. 

For collection Cut Flowers, cultivated, 100 specimens, at 
least 50 varieties named, $3, 2 



121 

For collection Cut Flowers, native., 100 specimens, at least 
50 varieties, named, $3, 2 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, green-house flowers, pre- 
miums, $1> -50 

For pair of Hand Bouquets, green-house flowers, premiums, 

^1, .50 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of native flowers, premiums, 

f 1, .50 

For pair of Bouquets, for vases, of garden flowers, prem., 

f 1, .50 

For Basket of Green-house Flowers, premiums, $1, ,50 

For Basket of Native Flowers, premiums, $1, .50 

For Basket of Garden Flowers, premiums, $1, -50 

For arrangement of Native Flowers and Autumn Leaves, 
premiums, $2, 1 

For Floral Designs, choice cultivated flowers, prem., $3, 2 

For Floral Designs, native flowers, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections Japan Lilies, hardy, named, premiums,$2, 1 

For collections Phlox, hardy perennial, named, prem., $2, 1 

For collections Pansies, at least 50 specimens neatly and 
artistically arranged, premiums, ^2, 1 

For collections of Native and Introduced Weeds, with com- 
mon and botanical name attached, premiums, $2, 1 

For twelve Dahlias, large flowering, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, " $1 

For twelve Dahlias, Pompon or Lilliputian, at least six 
varieties, named, premium, ^1 

For twelve Dahlias, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Petunias, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Gladiolas (spikes), at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Japan Lilies, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, double, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Geraniums, single, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 

For twelve Phlox, hardy perennial, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twelve Cannas, at least six varieties, named, prem., $1 

For twenty-four Carnation Pinks, at least six varieties, 
named, premium, $1 

For twenty-four Verbenas, at least six varieties, named, 
premium, $1 



122 

For twenty-four Roses, at least six varieties, named, 

premium, 

For twenty-four Garden Annuals, at least twelve varieties 

named, premium, 

For twelve Calendulas, at least two varieties, named 

premium, 

For twelve Asters, Double Victoria, premium, 

For twelve Asters, Double Trutfaut's Peony flowered 

premium, $ 

For twelve Asters, Porapone, premium, 
For twelve Phlox Drummondii, in variety, premium, 
For twelve Nasturtiums, at least six varieties, premium, 
For twenty-four Pansies, in variety, premium, 
For twenty-four Zinnias, double, in variety, premium, 
For twenty-four Marigolds, African, in variety, prem., 
For twenty-four Marigolds, Dwarf French, in variety, pre 

mium. 

For twenty-four Petunias, single, in variety, premium. 

For display of Coxcombs, in variety, premium, 

For twelve Scabiosas, in variety, premium. 

For twelve Delphiniums, in variety, premium. 

For twelve Dianthus (double annual), in variety, prem., 

For twelve Salpiglossis, in variety, premium, 

For collection of Sweet Peas, premium, 

VEGETABLES— CLASS ONE. 

Rules for fruit apply to vegetables. 

Beets — For best twelve specimens. Eclipse, Dewing, and 
Edmands, premium, each variety, $2, 1 

Carrots — For best twelve. Short Top, Long Orange and 
Danvers Intermediate, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

For best twelve. Short Horn, Orange carrots, $2, 1 

Mangold Wurtzels — For best six specimens, premiums, f 2, 1 

Flat Turnips — Twelve specimens. For best Purple Top and 
White Flat, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Ruta Bagas — Twelve specimens. For best Yellow and 
White, preiuiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Parsnips— For the best twelve specimens, premiums, $2, 1 

Onions — Twelve specimens. For best Danvers, Yellow Flat 
and Red, premiums, each variety, ^2, 1 

Potatoes — Twelve specimens. For best Early Rose, Beauty 
of Hebron, Clark's No. 1, Pearl of Savoy, Early Maine, Rob- 
erts Early, Carmans No. 3, Rural Blush, Rural New Yorker, 
Early Northern, premiums, each variety, $2, 1 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, ^15 



12 



VEGETABLES,— CLASS TWO. 

Cabbages — For the best three specimens, Savoy, Fottler's 
Drumhead, Stone Mason Drumhead, Red Cabbage, All Sea- 
sons, Deep Head, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
Cauliflowers — For best three specimens, premiums, $2, 1 
Celery — For best four roots, premiums, $2, 1 
Sweet Corn — For twelve ears ripest and best, Early, pre- 
miums, $2, 1 
For best twelve ears in milk, late, premium, $2, 1 
Squashes — For best three specimens, Marrow, Turban, 
Warren Turban, Hubbard, Marblehead, Essex Hybrid, Bay 
State, Sibley, Butman, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
Melons — For best three specimens, Nutmeg, Musk, Cas- 
saba, Salmon Flesh, each variety, premiums, $2, 1 
For best two specimens Watermelons, premiums, $2, 1 
Tomatoes — For best twelve specimens, Round Flat and 
Round Spherical, each variety, premiums, .12, 1 
For exhibition of greatest variety of Tomatoes, premiums, 

$2,1 
Cranberries — For pecks of cultivated, premiums, $2, 1 

For collection of vegetables, not less than three of a kind, 
premiums, $4, 3 

Placed at the disposal of the committee for whatever ap- 
pears meritorious, $30 
(C^^ISro competitor for premium to exhibit more or less 
number of specimens of any vegetables than the premiums are 
offered lor. 

Collections of Vegetables where premiums are offered for a number of varieties 
must be entered and placed, not less than three of a kind by themselves on the 
tables assigned for collections. No collection shall receive but one j>remium. 
Specimens of any varieties, in such collections, are not to compete with speci- 
mens of the same variety placed elsewhere. Exhibitors of such collections, how- 
ever, are not prevented from exhil)itinti; additional specimens of any variety with 
and in comiietition with like variety. All vegetables must be entered in the name 
of the grower of them. 

Size of Vegetaldes. Turnip Beets to be from 2 to 4 inches in diameter; Onions, 
2J to 4 inches in largest diameter; Potatoes to be of good siee for family nse; 
Squashes to be pure and well ripened, Turban, Marrow, Hubbard, Marblehead, 
all to be of uniform size. 

GRAIN AND SEED. 

For best peck of Shelled Corn, Wheat, Oats, Barley, Rye, 
Buckwheat and Field Beans, each, premium, $1 

For twenty-five ears of Field Corn, premiums, $5, 4, 3 

For twenty-five ears of Pop Corn, premiums, $2, 1 

For collections of Field and Garden Seeds, premiums, $G, 4 
All grain or seed must have been grown by the exhibitor in 
the County to receive a premium. 



124 

Domestic Manufactures. 

Contributors must deposit their articles at the Hall before 1 
o'clock on the first day of the Exliibition. Articles not thus 
deposited will not be entitled to a premium. Gratuities will 
be awarded for articles of special merit for which no premium 
is offered ; but no premium or gratuity will be awarded for 
any article manufactured out of the County, or previous to the 
last exhibition of the Society. 

COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

For Wrought Counterpanes having regard to the quality 
and expense of the material, premiums, $3, 2 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount of gratuities not to exceed $25 

CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

For carpets, having regard to the quality and expense of 
the material, premiums, $3, 2 

For Wrought Hearth Rug, having regard both to the qual- 
ity of the work and expense of materials, premiums, $2, 1 

Gratuities will be awarded for articles belonging to this de- 
partment, the whole amount not to exceed $20 

ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

For exhibit of Manufactured Leather and Skins, 

Society's Diploma or $3 

For best pair hand made and machine made Men's Boots, 
Women's do., Children's do., each, premium, $2 

Best Team, Carriage and Express Harness, each, prem., $3 

For the best exhibition of Boots and Shoes, manufactured 
in the county, $3 

$25. are placed at the disposal of this committee, to be 
awarded in gratuities. 

MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, 

$30 

FANCY WORK. 

Of Domestic Manufacture are not included in the above. 
At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $2 in any one gratuity, $50 



125 

WORKS OF ART. 

At the disposal of the committee in this department, to be 
awarded in gratuities not exceeding $3 in any one gratuity, 



DECORATED CHINA.' 

For best collection Decorated China, premiums, $5, 3 

For best individual specimen, premiums, $3, 2 

For Punch Bowl or set, premiums, $2, 1 

For Jardiniere or Fern dish, premiums, $2, 1 

For raised Paste or gold, premiums, $2, 1 

For Vase, premiums, $2, 1 

For Tray, plate, etc., premiums, $2, 1 

WORK BY CHILDREN. 

For specimens of work performed by children under 12 
years of age, exhibiting industry and ingenuity, prem., $2, 1 
At disposal of committee to be awarded in gratuities, $35 
No gratuity to be less than twenty-five cents. 



List of Premiums to be awarded by the 
Trustees in November. 



FARMS. 



Competitors for this premium must give notice of their in- 
tention to the Secretary on or before June 15th, and the farms 
entered for pcemium will be viewed by the committee twice 
during the year. Crops growing on farms that are entered for 
premium, cannot be entered with another committee for sep- 
arate premiums — except crop specimens exhibited at the fair. 

Any person desirous of having his farm inspected, without 
entering it for premium, may make application to the Secre- 
tary, and it will be viewed and reported upon by the commit- 
tee. 

For the best conducted and most improved farm, taking 
into view the entire management and cultivation, including 
lands, buildings, fences, orchards, crops, stock and all other 
appendages, with statements in detail, relating thereto, pre- 
mium, ^20 



126 



IMPROVING WET MEADOW AND SWAMP LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments relating to wet meadow or 
swamp lauds, on not less than one acre, the course of manage- 
ment, and the produce, etc., for the period of two years at 
least to be detailed, with a statement of all the incidental 
expenses, premiums, $10, 6 

Note. — The Committee is instructed to ascertain how many, if any reclaimed 
swamps in this County have been abandoned or have returned to natural grasses. 
Persons knowing of such, are requested to notify the Secretary or Committee. 

IMPROVING PASTURE AND WASTE LANDS. 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improv- 
ing pasture land, other than by ploughing, so as to add to 
their value for pasturage, with a statement of the same, pre- 
miums, $10, 6 

For best conducted experiments in renovating and improv- 
ing waste lands, so as to add to their agricultural value, with 
statement of the same, premiums, $10, 6 

No premium to be awarded to any person for a repetition of 
an experiment in meadow, swamp or pasture lands, for which 
he has already received a premium. 

UNDER-DRAINING LAND. 

For best conducted experiments in under-draining laud, 
regard being had to the variety of soil, sub-soil, and other 
local circumstances, premiums, $10, 6 

Note.— The same instructions under " Improving Wet Meadow and Swamp 
Lands" apply to this Committee. 

GRAINS AND OTHER CROPS. . 

Claimants on Grain and Root Crops will be required to 
state the size of the piece of land when they enter, and con- 
form to following rules : Entries of Grain Crops, to be made 
on or before September 10th ; Root Crops on or before October 
10th ; giving ample time for the crops to be examined by the 
committee before harvesting. Statement to be made in con- 
formity with the following form, must be forwarded to the 
Committee previous to November 1st. 

All calculations and figures given in reports of, and state- 
ments of Crops, are to be made on the basis of an acre, results 
in all cases, to be given at the rate per acre. 



127 

In pursuance of authority delegated to the Board of Agri- 
culture by Chap. 24, of Acts 1862, Agricultural Societies re- 
ceiving the bounty of the State are required to make use of 
the following form, and be governed by its conditions in the 
mode of ascertaining the amount of crops entered for pre- 
mium. 

EssKx Agricultural Society. — Statement concerning a 

crop of , raised by Mr. , in the town of 

, 1899. 

What was the crop of 1897 ? What manure was used and 
how much? What was the crop of 1898? What manure 
was used and how much ? What is the nature of the soil ? 
When and how many times ploughed, and how deep ? What 
other preparation for seed ? Cost of ploughing and other 
preparation ? Amount of manure in loads of thirty bushels, 
and how applied ? 

Value of manure upon the ground ? How used? (What 
amount of Commercial Fertilizer used ? How used ? Value 
of same when applied ?) When and how planted ? The 
amount and kind of seed ? Cost of seed and planting ? How 
cultivated and how many times ? Cost of cultivation, includ- 
ing weeding and thinning ? Time and manner of harvesting ? 
Cost of harvesting, including the storing and husking or thresh- 
ing ? Amount of crop, etc. Signed by Compe- 
titor. 

The committee, to whom is intrusted the award of the 
premiums on field crops, may award them according to their 
judgment, but for the purpose of furnishing accurate statistics 
for the benefit of agriculture, shall select certain of the crops, 
and require the owners thereof to measure the land and weigh 
the crops accurately, giving to the committee a certificate of 
the same, and give all possible information thereon over their 
own signatures, and return the same to the Secretary of the 
Society, to be published in the annual transactions. 

In ascertaining the amount of crop, any vessel may be used 
and the weight of its contents once, multiplied by the number 
of times it is filled by the crop. 

In measuring the land or weighing crops, any competent 
person may be employed, whether a sworn surveyor or not, 
and must give certificate. 

The certificate shall state the weight of all crops only in a 
merchantable state. 

In ascertaining the amount of a hay crop entered for pre- 
mium, the measurement of the hay in the barn may be em- 
ployed. 



60 lbs. 


to bush, 


62 " 


<< 


56 " 


« 


32 " 


(( 


48 " 


<( 


50 " 


(( 


55 " 


(( 


57 " 


<( 



128 

Rules of Measure Practiced and Adopted by the State 
Board of Agriculture. 

White Potatoes, Sugar Beets, Ruta Bagas, 

Mangold Wurtzels, 
Wheat Beans and Peas, 
Corn, Rye, 
Oats, 

Barley, Buckwheat, 
Cracked Corn, Corn and Rye, and other meal, 

except Oat, 
Parsnips, Carrots, 
Onions, 

1. For the best conducted experiments of Rye, not less 
than twenty bushels to the acre, fifty-six lbs. to the bushel, 
on not less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

2. For best conducted experiments of Wheat, not less than 
thirty bushels to the acre, sixty lbs. to the bushel, on not less 
than one acre, premium, $7, 4 

3. For best conducted experiments of Oats, not less than 
fifty bushels to the acre, thirty-two lbs. to the bushel, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

4. For best conducted experiments of Barley, not less 
than forty bushels to the acre, forty-eight lbs. to the bushel, 
on not less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

5. For best conducted experiments of Indian Corn, on not 
less than one acre, premiums, $7, 4 

6. For largest quantity and best quality of English Hay, 
on not less than one acre, regard being had to the mode and 
cost of cultivation, premiums, $7, 4 

7. For best yield of Field Beans, on not less than one-half 
acre, and not less than twenty -five bushels per acre, premiums, 

$7,4 

ROOT CROPS. 

1. For best conducted experiments in raising Carrots, fifty- 
five pounds to the bushul, premiums, $8, 5 

2. For best conducted experiments in raising Parsnips, 
fifty-five pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

3. For best conducted experiments in raising Beets, pre- 
miums, $8, 5 

4. For best conducted experiments in raising Ruta Bagas, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

5. For best conducted experiments in raising Mangold 
Wurtzels, sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 



I 29 

6. For best conducted experiments iu raising Sugar Beets, 
sixty pounds to tiie bushel, premiums $8, 5 

7. For best conducted experiments is raising Onions, fifty- 
two pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

8. For best conducted experiments in raising Potatoes, 
sixty pounds to the bushel, premiums, $8, 5 

9. For best conducted experiments in raising Cabbiges, 
premiums, $8, 5 

10. For best conducted experiments in raising Squashes, 
premiums $8, 5 

11. For best conducted experiments in raising melons, 
premiums $8, 5 

12. For best conducted experiments in raising Summer 
English Turnips for the market, premiums, $8, 5 

Raised on not less than half an acre, and the quantity of 
crop to be ascertained by weight ; so far as practicable the 
crop to be free from dirt, without tops, and in a merchantable 
condition at the time of measurement. 

Claimants for premiums on Grain and Root Crops must 
forward statement to chairman of committee before Nov 1st. 

FOREST TREES. 

1. For plantation of either of the following species of 
forest trees, viz : White Oak, Yellow Oik, Locust, Birch, 
White Ash, Maple, Walnut or White Pine, Sweet Chestnut, 
not less than three years old, and not less than 500 trees, 
premium, $10 

2. For plantation of not less than 100 trees, premium, $8 

3. For ornamental trees, ten or more set on any street, 
road or farm, and cared for five years, premium, $8 

CRANBERRIES. 

For best conducted experiment in the cultivation of the 
Cranberry, at least two summers, or not less than twenty rods 
of land, with written statement of the quantity and quality of 
the land, expense of planting, weeding and culture, and 
amount of crops produced. Premium to be paid in 1900 and 
1901, $10 

For best experiment do., on not less than ten rods of land, 
premium, $7 

STRAWBERRIES AND OTHER SMALT. FRUITS. 

For best crop of Strawberries, on not less than twenty rods 
of land, expense of planting, culture, crop, etc., stated in 
writing, premium, $8 



I30 

For best crop of Currants, Raspberries and Blackberries, 
with statement as above, premiums, each, $8 

SEEDLING^POTATOES^AND EXPERIMENTS. 

For best Seedling Potato, originating in Essex County, to 
equal in yield, earliness and quality, the Early Rose, and to 
surpass it in one or more of the particulars, premium paid 
after three years' trial, $20 

In testing the value of a Seedling Potato, the committee 
are instructed to take sworn testimony of the cultivator with 
regard to the yeild, after having inspected the crop. 

For the most satisfactory experiments to extend through 
five consecutive years, to settle the following facts relative to 
raising potatoes : — premium, $25 

1st. Will whole, medium sized potatoes yield better re- 
sults than pieces cut to two eyes ? 

2nd. What will be the result of continuously planting 
small-sized potatoes of the same strain a series of years ? 

3d. Difference between hilling and fiat cultivation. 

4th. Effect, if any, of cutting off seed ends before planting, 

5th. Effects of deep and shallow planting. 

Gth. Raising from sprouts alone from same strain. 

7th. Can potatoes having dwarf vines be planted nearer. 

8th. Best distance apart for seed in the drill. 

9th. To show the effect of covering the top with earth at 
several times after they had come up. 

To be raised on not less than a half acre of land, uniform 
in character, and all to receive the same kind and quality of 
manure and cultivation, and to be inspected by the committee 
at the time of gathering the crops. 

ESSAYS AND FARM ACCOUNTS. 

The essays must be transmitted to the Secretary by the Ist 
of November, with sealed envelopes containing the names of 
their authors, respectively, which shall not be opened by the 
committee, nor shall the names be known to the committee, 
until they shall have decided upon the merit of the Essay. 

F'or original Essays on any subject connected with agricul- 
ture, in a form worthy of publication, premiums, i $10, 8 

For best statement of Actual Farm Accounts, drawn from 
the experience of the claimant, in a form worthy of publica- 
tion, premium, $8 

For Reports of Committees upon subjects for which pre- 
miums are offered, jiremiums, $8,6 



131 

Committee — G. L. Streeter, Salem ; N. M. Hawkes, Lynn > 
D. E. Safford, Hamilton ; George E. Blodgett, Rowley ; J. M- 
Danforth, Lynnfield. 

LIBRAKY. 

Committee — Andrew Nichols, Danvers ; B. P. Ware, Mar- 
blehead. J. M. Danforth, Lynnfield. 

TREADWELL FARM. 

Committee — Benj. P. Ware, Marblehead ; S. D. Hood, 
Topsfield ; Andrew Nichols, Danvers. 

AUDITORS. 

Committee — William S. Nichols, Salem ; Benj. P. Ware, 
Marblehead ; Lyman Osborn, Peabody. 

FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Pres. Geo. v. L. Meyer, Hamilton; John M. Danforth, 
Lynnfield; Gilbert L. Streeter, Salem. 

DELEGATES. 

From the Essex Agricultural Society to attend Exhibitions 
of Societies, Farmers' Clubs and Fruit Growers' Associations 
in Essex County, and reporb any information that shall seem 
valuable for publication. 

The Secretary to be notified of the time of holding their ex- 
hibition, who will notify the chairman of Committee to assign 
Delegate. 

COMMITTEES. 

All committees, including committees to judge of crops, of 
exhibits at Fair, and of the arrangements for the Fair, are 
chosen by the Trustees at their June meeting. 



CONTENTS. 



Seventv-ninth Annual Tattle Show and Fair 3 

Report of Annual Meeting 4 

Entries 5 

Report on Bulls 8 

Report on Fat Cattle 9 

Report on Milch Cows 9 

Report on Herds of Milch Cows 11 

Statements 12 

Report on Heifers. ... 13 

Report on Working Oxen and Steers 15 

Report on Steers 1 i> 

Report on Stallions 15 

Report on Brood Mares 16 

Report on Family Horses 16 

Report on Gents' Driving Horses 16 

Report on Fast Walking Horses 16 

Report on Single Farm Horses 17 

Report on Pairs of Farm Horses 17 

Report on Ponies 17 

Report on Colts for Farm Purposes 18 

Report on Colts for Driving 18 

Report on Swine . . 18 

Report on Sheep ....... 20 

Report on Poultry 21 

Report on Agricultural Implements. ... 29 

Report on Carriages 33 

Report on Ploughing 33 

Report on Harrows 34 

Report on Dairy 35 

Report on Bread and Canned Fruit 35 

Report on Honey 36 

Statements 36 

Report on Pears 38 

Report on Apples 40 

Report on Peaches, Grapes and Assorted Fruit . . .42 

Report on Plants 44 

Report on Flowers 46 

Report ou Vegetables 49 



134 

Report on Grain and Seed • 54 

Report on Articles Manufactured from Leather 65 

Report on Manufactures and General Mdse 65 

Report on Counterpanes and Afghans 56 

Report on Carpetings and Rugs 58 

Report on Fancy Work 68 

Report on Works of Art 62 

Report on Decorated China 63 

Report on Work by Children 64 

Report of Committee on Root Crops 66 

Report of Committee on Grain Crops 72 

Report on Treadwell Farm 73 

Report of New Members 74 

Farmers' Institutes 74 

Report of State Delegate 76 

Report on Essays and Reports 77 

In Memoriam 87 

Treasurer's Repoi t 89 

Constitution of the Society 90 

Officers of the Society i . . 93 

List of Premiums awarded, 1899 95 

Recapitulation of Premiums 102 

Financial Statement 1899, Fair 104 

Premium List for 1900 105 



TRANSACTIONS 



FOR THE YEAR 1900 



mn AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY 



(Organized 1818.) 



FOR THE 



COUNTY OF ESSEX, 



IN MASSACHUSETTS. 



And the Premium List for 1901, 



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE SOCIETY. 



SALEM, MASS.: 

Newcomb & Gauss, Printers. 

1900. 



EIGHTIETH 

Annual Cattle Show and Fair. 



The officers of the Society had made arrangements for 
the largest and most attractive Fair this Society had ever 
held, and undoubtedly it would have been if the weather 
had been fair, but the rain poured down copiously the open- 
ing morning, which kept at home a large number of live 
stock that had been previously entered, as well as the 
owners and the people in general. But Wednesday, the 
second day, was bright and fair and a very large attend- 
ance of people were present. Thursday again it was dull 
and rain};-, but considering the weather the Fair was a 
marked success, both financially and otherwise. 

The exhibit of horses and cattle was not so large as in 
previous years owing to the weather, but the quality was 
second to none. The poultry, swine and sheep were up to 
the average. 

The fruit, vegetables and other exhibits in the hall were 
an average with previous years, and fully up to the Essex 
County standard, and the street parade made a very im- 
posing appearance. 

The annual dinner of the society was served in the vestry 
of the South church, Thursday, with a large attendance. 
After dinner, owing to the unavoidable absence of Pres. 
Geo. V. L. Meyer, President-elect F. H. Appleton called 
the assemblage to order, and, after a few remarks, an- 
nounced the gift of the grand stand recently erected, from 



President Meyer and spoke of the cause of his absence, after 
which he called upon Congressman William S. Knox, 
Hon. William H. Moody, Capt. J. G. B. Adams, Hon. A. 
P. Gardner and others, all of whom added instruction and 
merriment to the occasion. 

REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 

The annual meeting of the society was held in the Pea- 
body Institute, at Peabody, Sept. 19, 1900. President 
Meyer being absent, the secretary called the meeting to 
order at 9.40 A. M., and called upon Vice-President Hon. 
Asa T. Newhall to preside. Upon motion of Mr. Butler, 
of Georgetown, it was voted to proceed to ballot for officers 
for the society for the ensuing year. 

Mr. Quint, of Peabody, made an amendment which was 
accepted, that the secretary cast one ballot of the printed 
ballots in circulation for officers, and it was unanimously 
Voted. The secretary cast one ballot authorized as follows : 

FOR PRESIDENT. 

Gen. Francis H. Appleton, of Peabody. 

EOR VICE PRESIDENTS. 

James J. H. Gregory, of Marblehead. 
Horatio G. Herrick, of Lawrence- 
Asa T. Newhall, of Lynn. 
Sherman Nelson, of Georgetown. 

FOR SECRETARY. 

John M. Dan forth, of Lynnfield. 

The amendment to the Constitution offered by Mr. 
Whitcomb of Beverly, and laid on the table at the last an- 
nual meeting was taken up. Namely : — 

"Article 3. The President, Vice Presidents and Sec- 



retary shall be elected by ballot at the annual meeting of 
the society to be held in Salem in November or December 
as the society may direct at the next annual meeting, the 
hour and place of meeting to be named by the President 
and Secretary, notice of said meeting to be given by postal 
to each member of the society by the Secretary. The 
Treasurer shall be elected annually by the trustees at their 
meetinsT in November." 

Voted : — That further action on the amendment be 
postponed until the next annual meeting and the same be 
printed in the committee books next year. 

The committee chosen by the trustees in 1899, to look 
into the methods and affairs of the society to see if any 
improvements could be made and report to this meeting, 
and to the trustees in November, submitted the following 
report, which was accepted and under the constitution laid 
over until the next annual meeting: — 

" That the society change its constitution so that the 
trustees of the society shall be elected at the annual meet- 
ing of the societ}^ instead of by the present method. Votes 
for the same to be prepared by some officer or committee 
of the society from nominations made at .least one week 
before said meeting by any member or members of the 
society." Adjourned to Thursday at the dinner. 

After the dinner Thursday, President-elect F. H. Apple- 
ton announced in behalf of President Geo. v. L. Meyer 
that he. President Meyer, would be pleased to pay for the 
building of the " Grand Stand " just erected by the society. 

Upon motion of O. S. Butler of Georgetown, the follow- 
resolution offered by Mr. Butler was unanimously adopted : 

" That the thanks of the society be tendered to the 
Hon. Geo. v. L. Meyer for his generous gift to the society 
of the Grand Stand, on the Fair Grounds. Also for his 
interest and efforts in behalf of the old society during the 
two years of his presidency of the society, and that a copy 
of this resolution be printed in the transactions." 



The entries in the several departments of the fair for 
1900, are tabulated for comparison as follows : 

STOCK, IMPLEMENTS, ETC., ON SHOW GROUNDS. 



Entries : 
Class. in 1900. 


Dillerent 
Places 
in 1900. 


Entries '. 
in 1899. 


Differen 
Places 
in 1899, 


Bulls, 


11 


5 


21 


7 


Fat cattle, , 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Milch Cows, 


14 


5 


16 


3 


Herds of Milch Cows, 


3 


2 


5 


2 


Heifers, Pure Bred, 


20 


4 


24 


4 


Heifers, Grade, 


21 


6 


15 


6 


Working Oxen and Steers, 








4 


1 


Steers, 


1 


1 


3 


1 


Stallions for Driving Purposes 








4 


3 


Brood Mares, Farm and Draft, 








2 


1 


Brood Mares, Driving Purposes, 


4 


3 


3 


2 


Family Horses, 


4 


o 


8 


5 


Gents' Driving Horses, 


6 


3 


7 


6 


Fast Walking Horses, 


4 


2 


3 


3 


Pairs Fast Walking Horses with 










load. 


3 


3 


4 


3 


Single Farm Horses, . 


6 


4 


IT 
( 


4 


Pairs Farm Horses, over 2400 lbs 


., 4 


4 


4 


3 


Pairs Farm Horses, less than 2400 








lbs.. 








2 


2 


Colts, Farm and Draft, 








4 


4 


Colts, Driving Purposes, 


4 


4 


5 


3 


Horses for Hurdle Jumping, 


9 


8 








Swine, large breeds. 


23 


3 


31 


4 


Swine, small breeds, 


8 




10' 


1 


Sheep, 

Poultry, 

Harrows for Trial, 


6 

259 

1 


11 


7 

297 

1 


2 
15 

1 


Agricultural Implements, 


27 




51 


7 



Class. 



From From 

Entries Different Entries Different 

in 1900. Places in 1899. Places 
in 1900. in 1899. 



Carriages, 
Ploughing, 



14 
11 



450 20 56g 22 



Class. 



EXHIBITS IN HALL. 

From 
Entries Different 
in 1900. Places 
in 1900, 



Dairy, 

Bread and Canned Fruit, 40 7 

Honey, 1 1 

Pears^ 111 11 

Apples, 114 13 
Peaches, Grapes and Assorted 

Fruit, 148 

Plants, 29 

Flowers, 109 

Vegetables, ' 253 

Grain and Seed, 22 

Carpetings and Rugs, 36 

Counterpanes and Afghans 65 

Article Manuf'd from Leather, 8 

Manuf'res and General Mdse., 17 

Fancy Work, 196 

Works of Art, 220 

Work by Children under 12 yrs. 

of age, 43 

Grange Exhibit, 2 



14 
5 
9 

11 

6 
7 

10 
4 
5 

10 
8 

2 

9 



From 
Entries Different 
in 1899. Places ^ 

in 1899. 



3 
53 

2 
97 

81 

126 
24 

131 

210 
24 
35 
53 
6 
34 

241 
92 

62 




3 

7 
2 

9 
12 

10 

4 

10 

14 

11 

8 

9 

3 

9 

10 

9 

3 




1394 25 1274 28 

Grand total, 1837 entries from 30 of 34 cities and towns 
in Essex County against 1842 entries from 31 cities and 
towns last year. Georgetown, Manchester, Nahant and 
Salisbury did not have exhibits this year. 



. 8 

The eni/ries were Amesbuiy, 24 ; Andover, 1 ; Beverly, 
l-il^ ; Boxford, 71 ; Danvers, 151 ; Essex, 5 ; Gloucester, 1 ; 
Groveland, 28 ; Hamilton, 33 ; Haverhill, 44 ; Ipswich, 7 ; 
Lawrence, 20 ; Lynn, 159 ; Lynnfield, 2 ; Marblehead, 26 ; 
Merrimac, 3 ; Methuen, 1 ; Middleton, 9 ; Newbury, 1 ; 
Newburyport, 16, North Andover, 49 ; Peabod}^ 766 ; 
Rockport 1 ; Rowley, 4 ; Salem, 214 ; Saugus, 2 ; Swamp- 
cott, 20 ; Topsfield, 17 ; Wenham, 11 ; West Newbi.ry, 8. 



Reports of Committees. 
1900. 



The following premiums were awarded for live stock. 

BULLS. 

$6. First premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, for 

Jersey bull " Fancy Harry," 3 years old. 
14. First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey bull, " Idaspride of Merridale," 2 years old. 
$4. Second premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

Jersey bull, " Silent Beau," 4 years old. 
$6. First premium to A. M. Robinson, No. Andover, for 

Holstein bull, 4 years old. 
$4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein bull, "Prince de Kol,'' 18 months old. 
$6. First premium to Wm. C. Endicott, Danvers, for 

Guernsey bull, 4 years old. 
John J. Manning, S. H. Bailey, Geo. L. Ave rill — Com- 
mittee. 



FAT CATTLE. 

$6. First premium to Lewis Brown, Peabody, for fat cow. 
Samuel T. Poor, S. H. Bailey, John J. Manning — Com- 
mittee. 



MILCH COWS. 

First premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, for 
Jersey cow, •' Dolly Toodles." 



lO 

$4. Second premium to J. Hany Mellon, Lynn, for Jer- 

' sey cow, " Briar." 
$8. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

the best milch cow, either foreign, native or grade, 

for Holstein cow, " Sophia Barto Fairfax." 
$5. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

the best milch cow, either foreign, native or grade, 

for grade Holstein cow, " Ovena." 
S7. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein cow, " Betz Fairfax." 
$1. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

grade Holstein and Guernsey cow, '' Sadie." 
i4. Second premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 

Holstein cow, " Bessie F. Shepard." 
$4. Second premium to John Devitt, No. Andover, for 

grade Jersey cow. 



HERDS OF MILCH COWS. 

110. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
herd of five Holstein cows. 
$8. Second premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, 
for herd of six Jersey cows. 
E. A. Emerson, John Mudge, Andrew Lane. — Commit- 
tee. 

REPORT OF JAMES C. POOR ON HIS HERD OF PURE 
BREED HOLSTEINS. 

" Betz Fairfax " (5 yrs. old), milk record for last year, 
8,625 lbs. 

" Sophie Barto Fairfax " (4 yrs. old), milk record from 
Sept. 1, 1899 to Feb. 1, 1900, 2,875 lbs. Apr. 10 to Sept. 
10, 6,750 lbs. 



II 

" Susie F. Shepard " (7 yrs. old), milk record, Sept., 1899 
to Sept., 1900, 12,775 lbs. 

" Myra W. Shepard " (6 yrs. old), milk record, Sept. 1, 
1899 to Sept. 1, 1900, 8,250 lbs. 

"Betz 2d Fairfax'' (4 yrs. old), milk record, Feb. 8 to 
Sept. 8, 1900, 5,760 lbs. 

FEED AND CARE. 

The winter feed consisted of dry hay, corn and oat fod- 
der, with from 8 to 10 qts. grain per day : four parts bran, . 
three parts gluten or corn meal, one part cotton seed meal; 
fed and watered twice a day ; turned to pasture in sum- 
mer ; grain ration reduced about one-third, and fed twice a 
day in barn, excepting in month of June, with green oats 
or sweet corn fodder. 



REPORT OF THOMAS E. PROCTOR'S HERD OF JERSEY COWS. 

Amount of milk for one year for the following cows . — 
Dolly ToodlesS 5.2 % Butterfat, 5,557 lbs., 12 dz. 

Bydoz Pogis, 
Brown Bessie 4th ^ 
Sophie Hudson 2d, 
Brown Bessie^ 16th, 
Xmas Fancy Gold, 

Feed from Sept. 1st, 1899 to May 20th, 1900 :— 5 qts. 
grain per day, consisting of equal parts corn and cob meal 
and ground oats, with two feeds of corn fodder and one of 
hay each day. This was sometimes varied, giving two 
feeds of hay and one of corn fodder. From Nov. 1st, *99 to 
Apr. 1st, 1900, about a peck of cow beets each day were 
given. From May 20th to July 20th, pasture ; no grain, 
no green feed. From July 20th to Sept. 1, above grain 
ration and corn ,fodder in addition to pasture. 



7.0 " 




5,201 ' 


5 " 


6.5 " 




4,311 ' 


2 " 


5.5 " 




4,365 ' 


10 " 


4.2 " 




8,541 " 


1 " 


4.8'' 




4,054 ' 


5 " 



12 



MILK RECORD FOR MONTH OF AUGUST FOR TWO COWS. 
6.2 BUTTER FAT. 

Brown Bessie 16th. Dolly Toodles. 

lbs. oz. lbs. oz. lbs. oz. llw. oz. 



10 


12 


11 


12 


12 


2 


14 




"Dolly Toodles" 


10 


10 


12 


4 


12 




14 


10 


dropped last 


10 


6 


11 


6 


12 


8 


14 




calf June 25, 


11 




11 


6 


12 


8 


14 




not with calf. 


10 


10 


12 


6 


12 


8 


. 15 




7 years old. 


10 


6 


12 


o 


12 




14 


8 




11 




10 


8 


14 




13 




• 


10 


10 


11 


10 


12 




13 


8 




11 




11 


6 


13 


8 


14 






10 


10 


11 




13 




13 


8 




10 


14 


11 


2 


13 




14 






10 




11 




13 




15 






10 


11 


11 


12 


12 


8 


14 






9 


14 


10 


8 


14 


6 


14 






10 


10 


10 


14 


13 


8 


14 






11 


2 


11 




13 


8 


14 






10 


14 ' 


11 


4 


13 




13. 


, 8 


Brown Bessie 


11 


2 


11 




13 




13 




16th, dropped 


11 


10 


10 




13 


8 


12 


8 


last calf June 


10 


12 


11 


14 


13 




13 




7, not with calf, 


11 


10 


11 




13 




13 


8 


5 years o d. 


9 


6 


10 


10 


14 




13 






12 




11 


10 


14 




13 


8 




11 




10 


14 


13 




12 


8 




12 




10 


14 


14 


8 


13 


4 




11 


4 


10 




13 


8 


12 




. 


12 




9 


14 


14 


8 


12 


8 




11 


10 


10 


14 


14 




12 


8 




11 


12 


11 




14 


12 


12 


8 




10 


14 


11 




15 


8 


12 


8 




11 


10 


10 




14 




12 







13 

HEIFERS— PURE BRED. 

$4. First premium to E. W. Moody, North Andover, for 

Jersey heifer, "Moody's Golden Lady," 2 months 

old. 
$2. Second premium to E. W. Moody, North Andover, 

for Jersey heifer, " Moodj^'s Golden Grace," 2 

months old. 
$5. First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, for 

Holstein heifer, "Sophia Barto 2d," 3 years old, in 

milk. 
$3. Second premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstein heifer, " Fairfax Shepard," 3 years 

old, in milk. 
84. First premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstein heifer, "Nitalias Clothild," 2 years old. 
$4. First premium to James C. Poor, North Andovei', for 

Holstein heifer, "Sophia Barto 3rd," 1 year old. 
$2. Second premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstein heifer calf, " Betz Fairfax de Kol." 
$2. Second premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for Holstein heifer, " Betz Shepard," 2 months old. 
$5. First premium to Mrs. Annie T. Phillips, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, " Leabus," 3 years old, in milk. 
$2. Second premium to Mrs. Annie T. Phillips, Beverly, 

for Jersey heifer, " Lyeopsis," 2 years old. 
J. Henry Nason, John W. Raymond — Committee. 



HEIFERS— NATIVE OR GRADE. 

$4. First premiun to James Hart, Hamilton, for three 

year old heifer. 
'S4. First premium to James C Poor, North Andover, for 

grade Holstein, " Dotty." 



14 

$2. Second premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for grade Holstein, " Millie B. 2iid." 
|i4. First premium to John Davitt, North Andover, for 

grade Jersey. 
$4. First premium to W. C. Endicott, Danvers, for grade 

Guernsey. 
$2. Second premium to H. M. Whitney, North Andover, 

for gi-ade Jersey. 
$2. Second premium to James C. Poor, North Andover, 

for grade Holstein and Jersey. 
J. Henry Nason, John W. Raymond — Committee. 



STEERS. 

1. First premium to Francis O. Kimball, Danvers, for 

Holstein steers, 16 months old. 
Abel Stickney, Edward Harrington — Committee. 



BROOD MARES FOR DRIVING. 

$8. First premium to Geo. v. L. Meyer, Hamilton, for 

mare and foal, 2 months old. 
$5. Second premium to Arthur E. Hussey, Danvers, for 

mare and foal, 3 months old. 
George M. Baker, Judge; William R. Roundy, H. H. 
Pillsburv — Committee. 



FAMILY HORSES. 

16. First premium to E. H. George, Groveland, for bay 

horse, " Dandy." 
14. Second premium to W. H. Poor, No. Andover, for 

bay mare, " Bessie." 



15 
GENTS' DRIVING HORSES. 

8. FirstJpremium|to Thomas Sanders, Haverhill, for 

pair bay geldings. 
B. First premium to Frank H. Edgerly, Peabody, for 

bay mare, " Kittie E." 
L Second premium to James E. O'Brien, Lynn, for bay 

horse " Dandy O." 

FAST WALKING HORSES. 

5. First premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, for 

pair farm horses with a load. 
i. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for pair 

farm horses with a load. 
5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for single 

farm horse with a load. 
5. Second premium to F. Raddin, Peabody, for single 

farm horse with a load. 
). First premium to E. W. Moody, No. Andover, for 

black mare. 
George M. Baker, Judge : A. B. Fellows, Josiah Fitz 4th 
-Committee. . 



SINGLE FARM HORSES. 

$6. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, weight of 

horse 1,300 lbs. 
$4. Second premium to John H. Perkins, Lynnfield, for 

giay horse, weight 1,500 lbs. 
i6. First premium to B. W. Farnliam, No. Andover, for 

bay mare, weight 1,100 lbs. 
$i. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for black 

horse, weiglit 1,100 lbs. 
Thomas E. Cox, Edward Kent, J. B. Stevens — Commit- 
tee. 



i6 

PAIRS OF FARM HORSES. 

$8. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for pair black 

horses, weight 2,500 lbs. 
$5. Second premium to Thomas E. Proctor, Topsfield, 

for pair gray horses, weight 2,500 lbs. 
H [Frank W. Lyford, S. H. Bailey, George L. Averill — 
Committee. 



COLTS FOR DRIVING. 

$h. First premium to H. H. Demsey, Wenham, for 

" Lady Nelson," 3 years old. 
$3. Second premium to Nelson E. Murray, Peabody, for 

sorrel colt, 3 years old. 
i4. First premium to Geo. v. L. Meyer, Hamilton, for 

bay colt, 1 year old. 
George M. Baker, Judge ; Wm. R. Roundy, H. H. Pills- 
bury — Committee. 



HURDLE JUMPING. 

18. First premium to B. W. Palmer, Hamilton, for his 

horse, " Rifle," height 5 feet. 
|!4. Second premium to Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, for 

his horse, " Tornado," height 4 feet,. 9 inches. 
Third premium to H. H. Campbell, Lynnfield, for his 

horse '• Rex," height 4^ feet. 



FOR BEST HIGH JUMP. 

i8. First premium to Thomas W. Pierce, Topsfield, for 
his horse " Tornado," height of jump 5 feet, 9 
inches. 
Thos. P. Frothingham, F. R. Appleton, Dr. Thomas 

Jenkins — Committee. 



17 
SWINE— LARGE BREEDS. 

$5. First premium to Thomas W. Rieley, [Saugus, for 

O. I. C. boar. 
i3. Second premium to Thomas W. Rieley, Saugus, for 

O. I. C. sow. 
$5. First premium to John J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, 

for English Berkshire boar. 
$3. Second premium to John J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, 

for English Berkshire sow. 
15. First premium to John J. Carroll & Co., Peabody, for 

grade Berkshire sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

boar, " Darius, Jr." 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Chester 

white sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

weaned pigs. 
$3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Berk- 
shire boar, "Claude S." 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for large 

Yorkshire boar. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for large 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
$b. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Yorkshire 

weaned pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for Berkshire 

sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L, Hill, Peabody, for Cheshire 

sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for litter of 

weaned pigs. 
$3. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for weaned 

pigs. 
$5. First premium to Florence Collins, Peabody, for 

Poland China boar. 



i8 



Second premium to A. E. Whipple, Hamilton, for 
Yorkshire boar. 



SWINE-SMALL BREEDS. 

$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire boar. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for medium 

Yorkshire sow and pigs. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire boar. 
$5. First premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, for small 

Yorkshire weaned pigs. 
Edwin Bates, John W. Lovett, John W. Shirley — Ootn- 
mittee. 



SHEEP. 



). First premium to J. B. Thomas Co., Peabody, for 

Merino buck. 
). First premium to J. B. Thomas Co., Peabod}?^, for 

6 Shropshire sheep. 
t. First premium to J. B. Thomas Co., Peabody, for 6 

Leicester lambs. 
Charles C. Blunt, John W. Shirley — Committee. 



POULTRY. 

'$2.00. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair Brown Leghorn fowls, 
f 1.50. Second premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, 

for pair Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

breeding pen of Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

breeding pen of Brown Leghorn chicks. 



19 

$2.00. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, 

for pair Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, for 

pair Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to George A. Knight. Peabody, 

for pair Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to George A. Knight, Peabody, 

for breeding pen Buff Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Daniel W. Poor, Peabody, for 

pair Black Minorca chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Henry J. Poor, Peabody, for 

pair Black Minorca chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to VV. B. Davis, Haverhill, for 

breeding pen Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for 

pair Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to W. B. Davis, Haverhill, for 

pair Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

breeding pen Black Langshan fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

Black Langshan fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Black Langslian fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Bhick Langshan chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, 

for pair Black Langshan chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, 

for pair Houdan fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to Harry B. Graves, Peabody, for 

pair Golden Seabright Bantam fowls. 



20 



$1.60. Second premium to D. Griffin, Lynn, for pair 

White Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan fowls. 
il.50. Second premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for 

pair Houdan fowls. 
-12.00. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabod3% for breed- 
ing pen Houdan fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to A. W. Tyler, Peabody, for pair 

Houdan chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to A. W. Tjder, Peabody, for 

pair Houdan chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. C. A. Annable, Danvers, 

for pair Partridge Cochin fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John C. Jodre}', Danvers, for 

breeding pen Silver Laced Wyandotte fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

pair Silver Laced Wyandotte fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

pair Silver Laced Wyandotte fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

pair Silver Laced Wyandotte chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to John C. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

pair Silver Laced Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. E. J. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

breeding pen Golden Laced Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to i\L-s. E. J. Jodrey, Danvers, for 

pair Golden Laced Wyandotte chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Mrs. E. J. Jodrey, Danvers, 

for pair Golden Laced Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pair Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

breeding pen Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

pair Brown Leghorn chicks. 



21 



$2.00. First premium to William E. Sheen, Peabody, for 

breeding pen Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Samuel Buxton, Peabodj^ for 

pair Bronze Turkey chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Samuel Buxton, Peabody, for 

pair Bronze Turkey chicks. 
$2.00. First pieniium to Arthur Elliott, Peabody, for 

pair Buff Laced Polish fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for 

pair Buff Laced Polish fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for pair 

Buff Laced Polish chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for 

pair Laced Polish chicks. 
$2.00 First premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for 

breeding pen Buff Laced Polish chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for pair 

Golden Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Elliot & Hamilton, r'eabody, for 

White Leghorn fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to Elliot & Hamilton, Peabodj^ 

White Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to Elliot & Hamilton, Peabody, 

for White Leghorn chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Elliot & Hamilton, Peabody, 

for White Leghorn chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Elliot & Hamilton, Peabody, for 

breeding pen White Leghorn chicks. 
$2.00. Second premium to Elliot & Hamilton, Peabody, 

for breeding pen White Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for pair 

Buff Plymoutli Rock chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to E. F. Trask, Beverly, for breed- 
ing pen Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2.00. First piemiura to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 

pair Dark Brahma fowls. 



22 



$2.00. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 
pair Dark Brahma chicks. 

$1.50. Second premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 
pair Dark Brahma chicks. 

$2.00. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 
pair Buff Cochin chicks. 

$2.00. First premium to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 
breeding pen Dark Brahma chicks. 

$2.00. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Grove- 
land, for breeding pen White Plymouth Rock 
fowls. 

$1.50. Second premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Grove- 
land, for White Plymouth Rock fowls. 

$2.00. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Grove- 
land, for breeding pen White Plymouth Rock 
chicks. 

$2.00. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Grove- 
land, for pair White Plymouth Rock fowls. 

$1.50. Second premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Grove- 
land, for pair White Plymouth Rock fowls. 

$2.00. First premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Grove- 
land, for pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 

$1.50. Second premium to E. H. & S. H. George, Grove- 
land, for pair White Plymouth Rock chicks. 

$2.00. First premium to Herbert A. Nelson, Peabody, 
for pair Brown China Goslings. 

$2.00. First premium to Herbert A. Nelson, Peabody, for 
pair Brown China Geese. 

$1.50. Second premium to Herbert A. Nelson, Peabody, 
for Wild Black Ducks. 

$2.00. First premium to Roland Davis, Peabody, for 
White China geese. 

$2.00. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
pair White Muscovy ducks. 

$2.00. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 
pair Colored Muscovy ducks. 



$2.00. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Golden Pencilled Hamburg fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Golden Pencilled Hamburg chicks. 
81.50. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Golden Polish Fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Golden Polish fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesburj^ for 

pair Bearded Polish fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Bearded Polish fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to R. CTuxburj^, Amesbury, for 

pair White Polish fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair White Polish chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Dominique fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

Breeding Pen Dominique fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to R. C. Tuxbury, Amesbury, for 

pair Dominique chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Horace Bushby, Peabody, for 

pair R. I. Red fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to Horace Bushby, Peabody, for 

pair R. I. Red chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Burton D. Todd, Lawrence, for 

pair R. I. Red chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Burton D. Todd, Lawrence, 

for pair R. I. Red fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to Burton D. Todd, Lawrence, 

for pair R. L Red chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Burton D. Todd, Lawrence, for 

breeding pen R. I. Red chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to P. S. Hooper, Danvers, for pair 

Native fowls. 



24 

$2.00. First premium to Wm. W. Osgood, Haverhill, for 

pair Buff Wyandotte fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for pair 

Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to W. H. Palmer, Beverly, for 

breeding pen Barred Plymouth Rock fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to Elmer E. Dnrkee, Peabody, 

for pair Light Brahma fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to George Lunt, Danvers, for 

breeding pen White Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Fred W. Holden, Beverly, for 

breeding pen Light Brahma fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pair 

R. L Red fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to E. R. Peikins, Salem, for Breed- 
ing Pen R. I. Red fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pair 

S. C. R. L Red fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to E. R. Perkins, Salem, for pair 

Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to T. L. D. Perkins, Salem, for 

breeding pen Black Langshan chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair 

Liofht Brahma fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to Otis Caswell, Beverly, for pair 

Light Brahma chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Winslow Goldsmith, Beverly, 

for breeding pen Light Brahma chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Winslow Goldsmith, Beverly, 

for pair Light Brahma chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Arthur D. Goldsmith, Bever- 
ly, for pair Brown Leghorn chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to A. P. Spiller, Beverly, for 

pair Buff Leghorn chicks. 



25 

$2.00. First premium to Josiah Fit«, 4th, Lynn, for pair 

Buff Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to Josiah Fitz, 4th, Lynn, for 

pair Buff Leghorn chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to G. Dreer, Danvers, for breeding 

pen Buff Leghorn chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to G. Dreer, Danvers, for pair 

Buff Plymouth Rock chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Albert Sim, Peabody, for pair 

S. C. R. I. Red* chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to G. O. Potter, Peabody, for 

pair R. I. Red chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to James L. Morse, Beverly, for 

pair R. C. R. I. Red chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to Daniel Fuller, Middleton, for 

pair Bronze turkeys. 
$2.00. First premium to D. J. Callahan, Danvers, for 

breeding pen Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for Red Pile Bantam fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Red Pyle Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Red Pyle Bantam chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Red Pyle Bantam chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Black Cochin Bantam chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Black Cochin Bantam chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Black Cochin Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair B. B. Bantam fowls. 
$1.50. Second piemium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Buff Cochin Bantam fowls. 



26 



$2.00. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport,. 

for pair Silver Duckwing Bantam chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Silver Duckwing Bantam chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair Golden Duckwing Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to C. E. Clement, Newburyport, 

for pair B. B. Red Bantam chicks. 
$1.50. Second premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for pair 

R. C. R. I. Red chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to M. S. Perkins, Danvers, for pair 

Toulouse geese. 
$1.50. Second premium to M. S. Perkins, Danvers, for 

pair Brown Leghorn fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

pair Golden Seabright fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

pair Black Red Game chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

breeding pen Black Cochin fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

pair Golden Seabright Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

pair Buff Cochin Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

pair Silver Seabright fowls. 
$1.50. Second premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

pair Black R. G. Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

l^air Silver Duckwing Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

Golden Seabright Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

pair Buff Cochin Bantam fowls. 
$2.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

breeding pen Buff Cochin fowls. 



27 

12.00. First premium to John F. Murphy, Salem, for 

breeding pen Golden Seabright fowls. 
12.00. First premium to Lewis Moses, Beverly, for pen 

Wild Mallard ducks. 
$2.00. First premium to Lewis Moses, Beverl}', for pair 

Wild geese. 
$1.50. Second premium to Lewis Moses, Beverly, for pair 

Wild geese. 
$2.00. First premium to C. H. Hardy, Groveland, for 

pair White Wyandotte chicks. 
$2.00. First premium to C. H. Hardy, Groveland, for 

pair White Wyandotte fowls. 
W. B. Atherton, judge ; S. F. Chase, J. W. Perkins, C. 
S. Bartlett — Committee. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

88. To Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for collection of 

farm implements. 
$5. To J. W. Bruley, Danvers, for farm wagon. 
$5. To Pike & Whipple, Peabody, for light market wagon. 
$10. To Dole & Osgood, Peabody, for heavy express wagon- 
$10. To G. E. Daniels, Rowley, for dump cart. 
$5. To Colcord Richardson Co., Danvers, for exhibit. 
$2. To the Beverly Engine & Machine Co., Beverly, for 

gas engine. 
$2. To Solomon Fuller, Danvers, for collection of wheel 

hoes, etc. 
$1. To B. F. Patch, Danvers, for grass and sod cutter. 
$1. To W. T. Dole, Peabody, for pair heavy truck iron 
hub wheels. 
J. J. H. Gregory, W. J. Munroe, H. M. Goodridge, N. 
J. C ark, J. Kavanaugh. — Committee. 

The exhibition of agricultural implements while, less than 
the average in number, included several that were new and 



28 



contained a promise of value. The " Jacob's ladder" ex- 
hibited by Messrs. Whitcomb & Carter struck us so fav- 
orably that the chairman of your committee purchased one 
for use on his own farm. It consisted of a 30-foot ladder 
made up of five sections, so adjusted to each other that 
they could be readily put together or taken apart, as a 
longer or shorter ladder might be needed. The method 
of connecting the parts made them perfectly secure and 
safe. Its adjustable capacity made it reall}^ five ladders in 
one. One of its greatest recommendations is the convenience 
in handling or storing it, for instead of one of those long, 
heavy affairs, wliich is both heavy to handle and difficult 
to transport, either by hand or cart, we have five short, 
six-foot ladders, which can be transported about as readily 
as so many short boards and stored under cover in any 
convenient six feet of space. The price is -f 4, but little 
more tlian that charged for the long 30-footer of the ladder 
man. 

Messrs. Colcord & Co., exhibited a circular silo, made 
from the never- wear-out cypress of the South, of the height 
of 20 feet and diameter of 12, bound with round hoops of 
about three-quarter inch iron. Its capacity was said to be 
forty tons. The cost, delivered on cars in Essex County, 
was il54 and it would cost about $20 additional to put it 
together, so Mr. Colcord tells us. The committee were 
impressed with the great value of the material for out-door 
silos, which are now deservedly popular, for, as is well 
known, the cypress is by far the most enduring of all our 
American woods when exposed to the action of the ele- 
ments. 

Messrs. Colcord &, Co., also exhibited again their Amer- 
ican harrow and cultivator, on which we must bestow the 
same criticism as of last season : That as a cultivator of 
land abounding in rock or corn stubble, we have but little 
faith in its practical value, but from an examination of its 



29 

structure when spread out into harrow size we can readily 
endorse its great excellency, and do not wonder that it has 
won golden opinions from some of our most extensive 
market gardeners, for thus it becomes the famous Breed's 
weeder improved upon by having a wheel addition, which 
enables the farmer to handle it much more easily than in 
the old form, especially when he makes his turns at the 
ends of his rows. 

The Beverly Engine & Machine Co. exhibited and had 
working on the ground a little one and a half horse-power 
engine, run by gasoline or a motor, at a cost of a cent 
and a half per hour per horse power. As a water pump 
it has the capacity of lifting sixty gallons one hundred 
feet per minute. The price was '1125. The firm manu- 
factures up to five horse power. We are glad to be able 
to announce that such powers are being manufactured 
within our county. 

Among the exhibits of market wagons we were glad to 
see present specimens of the work of those famous builders 
of old, Messrs. Pike & Whipple, a firm which for long 
years has done honor to the reputation of the wagon build- 
ers of Essex County. 

In specifying prices for three of the novelties exhibited 
we have done so with the view of increasing the practical 
value of our report. 

For the Committee^ 

J. J. H. GnEGORY, Chairman. 



CARRIAGES. 

ilO. To T. W. Lane, Amesbury, for collection of four 

carriages. 
$10. To J. A. Lancaster, Merrimac, for three carriages. 

Diploma to M. Plumstead & Son, Lynn, for three carriages. 
H. A. Quint, John W. Shirley. — Committee. 



30 

PLOUCxHING WITH TWO HORSES. 

|6. First premium to Durkee Bros., Peabod}^, " Landside ' 
plough. 
Wm. Bushby, H. M. Goodrich, C. N. Maguire. — Com- 
mittee. 



PLOUGHING WITH SWIVEL PLOUGH. 

$6. First premium to F. A. Dodge, Beverly, "Yankee 
No. 3 " plough. 
George Pratt, Joel Kimball, Wm. B. Carlton. — Com- 
mittee. 



PLOUGHING WITH SULKY PLOUGH. 

$4. Second premium to W. L. Hill, Peabody, " National 
Reversible plough. 
A. P. Russell, A. B. Fellows, S. B. George, J. H. Per- 
kins. — Committee. 



HARROWS. 

$6. First premium to Whitcomb & Carter, Beverly, for 
Disc Harrow, Model " B." 
O. F. Newhall, George Reynolds, Joel Kimball. — Com- 
mittee. 



IN EXHIBITION HALL. 



GRANGES. 



^25. First premimn to Laurel Grange, West Newbury. 
^15. Second premium to Topsfield Grange. 
Sherman Nelson — For the Qommittee. 



BREAD AND CANNED FRUIT. 

$1.00. First premium to Miss Minnie Cauldfield,Peabody, 

for whole wheat bread. 
$1.00. Second premium to Miss Minnie Cauldfield, Pea- 
body, for white bread. 
12,00. First premium to Mrs. A. C. Berkley, Peabod}^ 
for white bread. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Grace E. Bower, Peabody, for 
angel cake. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for rib- 
bon cake. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Maggie Dunbery, Peabody, for 
brown bread. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Dalrymple, Salem, for cake. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Gamwell, Peabody, for 
bread and rolls. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. C. Richardson, Peabody, for 
Bridgeport pie. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Helen Bailey, Andover, for 
brown bread. 



32 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Mary A. Noyes, Lynn, for oat- 
meal bread. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. C. Perkins, Wenham, for an- 
gel cake. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Annie Ball, Beverly, for light 
cake. 
$2.00. First pVemium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 

for collection canned fruit. 
$1.00. Second premium to Miss H. M. O'Donnell, Pea- 
body, for collection canned fruit. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss H. M. O'Donnell, Peabody, for 

jelly. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss H. M. O'Donnell, Peabody, for 
pickles. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for 
canned fruit. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. George Gamwell, Peabody, for 
crab apple and grape. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. S. C. Tucker, Peabody, for pre- 
served fruit. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Fanny Fallon, Peabody, for pre- 
served fruit. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Nellie Lambert, Peabody, for 

jelly. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Mary Herrick, Peabody, for 16 

tumblers jelly. 
•50. Gratuity to Miss Annie G. Wiggin, Peabody, for 

crab apple jelly. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 

jelly- 
Henry Alley, John J. Gould, Rebecca T. Wood. — Com- 
mittee. 



33 
STATEMENTS. 

ENTIRE WHEAT BREAD. 

One tablespoonful lard, half tablespoonful salt, two 
tablespoonfuls molasses, one pint warm milk, one pint 
water, half compressed yeast cake, one quart entire wheat 
flour, one quart white flour; knead stiff twenty minutes, 
rise over night, rise in pans one hour, bake one hour. 

Minnie Cauldfield. 

white bread, 
Two tablespoonfuls sugar, half tablespoonful salt, table- 
spoonful lard, one pint warm milk, one pint water, half 
compressed yeast cake, flour to knead stiff, knead twenty 
minutes, rise over night, rise again in pans one hour, bake 
one hour. 

Minnie Cauldfield. 

oatmeal bread. 
One-half cup Quaker oats, one-half cup molasses, one- 
half tablespoonful of lard, one salt spoonful salt, mix this 
with three- fourths cup boiling water, let cool; when cool 
add one-fourth yeast cake dissolved in one-half cup of 
warm water, thicken mixtui'e with Pillsbury's best flour 
the same as for any bread, rise twelve hours, bake forty-five 
minutes. 

Mrs. Mary A. Noyes. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, four eggs, tea- 
spoonful cream tartar, one-half teaspoonful soda, one-half 
cup milk, juice and rind of one orange, flour to make stiff. 

Mrs. Dalrymple. 

ribbon cake. 
One and one-half cups sugar, one scant cup butter and 
cream together, four eggs separated, three-fourlhs cup 



milk, two and one-half cups sifted flour, sift twice, little 
salt and flour, bake in four layers, two layers flavored 
with vanilla, one layer with chocolate, one with straw- 
berry. 

Lemon Filling. 

Beat one egg, add one cup water, grated rind and juice 
of one lemon, pour this slowly over one cup of sugar 
mixed with two tablespoonfuls of flour, cook in double 
boiler until smooth like cream. 

Miss Carrie Stanley. 

bridgeport pie. 
One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, the yolks of three 
eggs, one-half cup milk, two teaspoonfuls baking pow- 
der, two cups flour, flavor to taste, bake in Washington 
pie plates. 

Filling. 

One cup powdered sugar, water enough to keep it from 
burning, boil until brittle when dripped in cold water, 
take from the fire, beat in white of eggs well beaten, one 
cup raisins chopped fine, spread between and on top. 

Mrs. C. C. Richardson. 

CANNED peaches. 

Put the peaches into a wire basket and set in boiling 
water for two minutes, then set out and remove the skins. 
Drop the fruit into cold water to keep the color. Make a 
syrup of one quart of sugar and one pint of water for 
three lbs. of fruit. When boiling drop the fruit into it 
and let cook about five minutes, then take from the syrup 
with a silver fork and fill the jar, then fill up with strained 
syrup. Have the covers heated in warm water, and put 
on at once. 

crab-apple jelly. 
Wash the apples, remove the blossom end, and cut in 
small pieces, but do not pare or core, for the skins and 



35 

seeds improve the color and quality of the jelly. Cover 
with cold water and cook gently until soft. Keep them 
covered and turn the kettle often, but do not stir or mash 
the apples. When the apples are very soft and the liquid 
is red, turn them into a strainer cloth, and hang it up to 
drip all night. In the morning boil the liquid ten min- 
utes, then strain again through a very fine cloth and meas- 
ure. Allow half a pound of sugar to a pint of juice. 
Boil the juice alone until it begins to thicken on the edge 
of pan, add the sugar, cook five minutes longer, or until 
it jellies, then skim and turn into glasses. 

JELLY MAKING. 

For the crab-apple and Porter apple jelly the fruit was 
covered with water, after removing everything imperfect. 
The skins and seeds are cut up together and cooked until 
soft, then drained through a flannel bag and boiled twenty 
minutes. Then the same quantity of sugar heated is 
added and boiled until it jellies. It is then strained 
through a cheese cloth into a pitcher and poured into the 
glasses. 

For grape and currant jelly no water was added to the 
fruit, those fruits being so juicy in themselves. 

M. F. Herrick. 

AsTRACHAN Apple Jelly. — Take very ripe apples, 
cut off the red parts. I usually take about four quarts of 
apples, one and one-fourth quarts of boiling water, place 
on the back of the range until the color is out of the ap- 
ples, being careful not to stir them ; strain carefully, and 
to one pint of juice allow one lb. of white sugar ; never 
stir ; boil quickly twenty minutes. 

Crab-Apple Jelly. — Same as above, except that it 
must be strained three times and boiled thirty minutes. 

Grape Jelly. — Take very ripe fruit. To four quarts 
picked from the stems I take one and one-half quarts of 



36 

boiling water, cook well, and strain twice. To one pint 
of juice allow one cup of white sugar and boil thirty min- 
utes. 



PEARS. 



$2. First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabodj^, for 

d'Anjou. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Bussock 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Clairgeau. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Sheldon. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Bartlett. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. George H. Rand, Peabody, 

for Seckel. 
$1. Second premium to W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for 

Bartlett. 
$2. First premium to Daniel W. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Cornice. 
$1. Second premium to Daniel W. Osborn, Peabody, for 

Washington. 
$2. First premium to Wm. T. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 

Dana's Hovey. 
$1. Second premium to Alfred Berry, Peabody, for Vicar. 
$2. First premium to John Fulmer, Peabody, for Belle 

Lucrative. 
$2. First premium to Allen Barr, Lawrence, for Howell. 
$1. Second premium to Allen Barr, Lawrence, for Bosc. 
•f2. First premium to W. A. Dodge, Salem, for Seckel. 
$2. First premium to J. M. Teel, Lynn, for Bosc. 
$2. First premium to J. M. Teel, Lynn, for (clairgeau. 
$2. First premium to J. H. Crosman, Swampscott, for 

Lawrence. 



37 

$2. First premium to J. H. Ciosman, Swampscott, for 
Paradise d'Automne. 

^1. Second premium to J. H. Crosman, Swampscott, for 
Sheldon. 

$1. Second premium to Joseph Merrill, Danvers, for 
de Congress. 

$1. Second premium to A. E. Whipple, Hamilton, for 
collection. 

$1. Second premium to George Eaton, Peabody, for 
Clapp's Favorite. 

$1. Second premium to G-eorge Abbott, Salem, for Flem- 
ish Beauty. 

$1. Second premium to Wm. H. Symonds, Marblehead, 
for d'Anjou. 

.50. Gratuity to Wm. T. Dole, Peabody, for Buerre 
Superfine. 

.50. Gratuity to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for Law- 
rence. 

.50. Gratuity to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for Louis Bonne. 

B. F. Stanley, A. C. Osborn, |Albert Emerson — Com- 
mittee. 



APPLES. 

i2.00. First premium to Mrs. C. F. Parker, Lynn, for 
Baldwin. 

$1.00. Second premium to W. B. Kimball, Peabody, for 
Baldwin. 

$2.00. First premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Tompkins King. 

$1.00. Second premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, 
for Wealthy. 

$1.50. First premium to Geo. W. Richardson, Lynn, for 
Duchess of Oldenberg. 

$1.00. Second premium to W. E. Kimball, Lynn, for Dan- 
vers Sweet. 



38 

$1.00. Second premium to Wm. T. Dole, Peabody, for 

Tompkins King. 
$2.00. First premium to George Pratt, Danvers, for 

Mackintosh Red. 
$1.00. Second premium to George Pratt, Danvers, for 

Roxbury Russett. 
$2.00. First premium to George Pratt, Danvers, for 

Hunt's Russett. 
$1.00. Second premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 

Ladies Sweet. 
$1.00. Second premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 

Hunt's Russett. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for Grav- 

enstein. 
$2.00. ' First premium to George Diebel, Peabody, for 

Wealthy. 
$2.00. First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Hubbardston. 
$1.00. Second premium to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for 

Hubbardston. 
$2.00. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

Porter. 
$1.00. Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, 

for Gravenstein. 
$1.00. Second premium to B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, 

for Porter. 
$1.00. Gratuity to B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, for 

Hyslop Crab. 
$2.00. First premium to Otis Brown, Peabody, for R. I. 

Greening. 
$1.00. Second premium to J. W. Barton, Danvers, for R. 

I. Greening. 
$2.00. First premium to Annie W. Bushby, Peabody, for 

Gravenstein. 
$2.00. First premium to W. J. Currier, Danvers, for 

Snow. 



39 

$1.00. Second premium to W. P. Clark, Peabody, for 

Snow. 
$1.50. First premium to M. A. Noyes, Lynn, for Harvey. 
$1.50. First premium to M. A. Noyes, Lynn, for Sudbury 

Sweet. 
$1.50. First premium to W. S. Lefavour, Salem, for 

Northern Spy. 
$1.50. First premium to Michael Shea, Lawrence, for 

Maiden Blush. 
$1.50. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Kil- 

1am Hill. 
$1.50. First premium to Alfred A. Mason, Beverly, for 

N. Y. Greening. 
$1.50. First premium to L. E. Wright, Peabody, for 

Hyslop Crab. 
$1.00. Gratuity to A. N. Welsh, Peabody, for Margeret. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Annie O'Neib Peabody, for Monster 

Pippen. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Walter Whipple, Hamilton, for col- 
lection. 
.50. Gratuity to W. E. Reed, Peabody, for Hyslop 

Crab. 
.50. Gratuity to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Gravensteiu. 
.50. Gratuity to John Carroll, Salem, for Wolf River. 
.50. Gratuity to Ralph O'Connor, Peabody, for Hyslop 

Crab. 
.50. Gratuity to Walter Butman, Peabody,"for Hyslop 

Crab. 
.50. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for Hyslop Crab. 
T. C. Thurlow, J. W. Goodell, Charles H. Preston.— 
Committee. 



PEACHES, GRAPES, AND ASSORTED FRUIT. 

52. First premium to S. M. Titcomb, West Newbur}-, for 
White Flesh peaches. 



40 

$3. First premium to S. M. Titcomb, West Newbury, for 

Brighton grapes. 
$2. First premium to John T. Folsom, Salem, for E. C. 

Seedling peaches. 
.50. Gratuity to John T. Folsom, Sa'em, for Crawford 

peaches. 
$3. First premium to J. H. Crosman, Swampscott, for 

Lemon quince. 
$2. Second premium to Samuel Crosman, Swampscott, 

for assorted fruit. 
.50. Gratuity to Samuel Crosman, Swampscott, for 

Worden grapes. 
.50. Gratuity to Samuel Crosman, Swampscott, for 

Moore's early grapes. 
$3. First premium to Alfred Berry, Peabody, for Orange 

quince. 
$3. First premium to Augustus Verry, Danvers, for 

Champion quince. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. C. C. Farwell, Peabody, for 

Holland plums. 
$2. First premium to James L. Hill, Salem, for Yellow 

Flesh peach. 
$2. First premium to E. P. Balcomb, Salem, for Crawford 

peach. 
i3. First premium to Edwin Bates, Lynn, for assorted 

fruit. 
$3. First premium to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Worden 

grapes. 
fl. Gratuity to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Niagara 

grapes. 
.50. Gratuity to Patrick Cotter, Salem, for Lombard 

plums. 
$7. First premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for collec- 
tion of grapes. 



41 

13. First premium to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Concord 
grapes. 

.50. Gratuity to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Pocklington 
grapes. 

$1. Gratuity to J. M. Teel, Lynn, for Hartford grapes. 

I'3. Fiist premium to W. F. Hutchinson, Danvers, for 
Delaware grapes. 

$2. Gratuity to W. F. Hutchinson, Dan vers, for Hart- 
ford Prolific grapes. 

$3. First premium to Mrs. R. R. Hamilton, Peabody, 
for Pocklington grapes. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. R. R. Hamilton, Peabody, for Niag- 
ara grapes. 

$1. Gratuity to M. A. Noyes, Lynn, for Hartford Prolific 
grapes. 

$1. Gratuity to John Moulton, Peabody, for Green 
Mountain grapes. 

$3. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Moore's Early grapes. 

$3. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Moore's Diamond grapes. 

$3. First premium to Harold A. Dean, Peabody, for Ni- 
agara grapes. 

$4. First premium to Mrs. G. W. Stickney, Beverly, for 
Black Hamburg grapes. 

$3. Second premium to Stephen Blaney, Peabody, for 
Black Hamburg grapes. 

$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Otis Brown, Peabody, for assorted 
fruit. 

.50. Gratuity to Otis Brown, Peabody, for Orange quince. 

.50. Gratuity to William McElroy, Peabody, for Pear 
quince. 

50. Gratuity to E. H. George, Groveland, for White 
Flesh peach. 



42 

.50. Gratuity to E. H. George, Groveland, for Yellow- 
Flesh peach. 
.50. Gratuity to S. F. Tracey, Salem, for White Flesh 

peach. 
.50. Gratuity to W. J. Currier, Danvers, for E. C. Seed- 
ling peach. 
.50. Gratuity to N. C. Locke, Salem, for Stump of the 

World peach. 
.50, Gratuity to G. W. Richardson, Lynn, for Magna Bona 

plums. 
.50. Gratuity to Walter E. Porter, Danvers, for Burbank 

plum. 
.50. Gratuity to Walter E. Porter, Danvers, for Foster 

peach, 
.50. Gratuity to M. Sumner Perkins, Danvers, for Brad- 

shaw plum. 
.50. Gratuity to Henry Stone, Lynn, for Crawford peach. 
.50. Gratuity to T. E. Wilson, Peabody, for assorted 

fruit. 
.50. Gratuity to R. M. Brown, Newbury, for Holland 

plums. 
.50. Gratuity to C. L. Becket, Peabody, for Pocklington 

grapes. 
$1. Gratuity to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for Niagara 

grapes. 
$1. Gratuity to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for Green 

Mountain grapes. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. B. Foster, Beverly, for Moore's 

Early grapes. 
.50. Gratuity to Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for Moore's 

Diamond grapes. 
.50. Gratuity to N. C. Patterson, Peabody, for Moore's 

Diamond grapes. 
.50. Gratuity to L. E. Palmer, Beverly, for Moore's 

Diamond grapes. 



43 

$1. Gratuity to F. A. Gardner, Salem, for Nectarines. 

Walter F. Gould, Edwin Perkins, Henry Alley. — Com- 
mittee. 



PLANTS. 

$5.00. First premiums to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for 
collection of ornamental and foliage plants. 

$1.00. First premium to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for 
coleus. 

$1.00. First premium to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for T. 
R. begonias. 

$1.00. First premium to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for 
mixed begonias. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for flower- 
ing begonia. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. J. M. Julyn, Salem, for collection 
Rex begonias. 

Diploma to Mrs. J. C. Rogers, Peabody, for collection of 
ornamental plants. 

$1.00. First premium to Mrs. C. H. Goulding, Peabody, 
for gloxineas. 

$1.00. First premium to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for 
collection of crotens. 

$1.50. Gratuity to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for dis- 
play of asparagus ferns. 

$1.50. Gratuity to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for dis- 
play of ferns. 

$2.00. First premium to James Currier, Middleton, for 
coll. chrysanthemums. 
.50. Gratuity to C. A. Buxton, Salem, for peanut vine. 
.75. Gratuity to Samuel Trask, Peabody, for cotton 

plant. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. R. Newhall, Peabody, for 
patience plant. 



44 

.50. Gratuity to Eben Gamwell, Peabody, for lemon 

plant. 
.50. Gratuity to Eben Gamwell, Peabody, for begonia. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Calvin Osborn, Peabody, for 

fuscliia. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. M. A. Knowles, Peabody, for 

rubber plant. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. B. Sullivan, Peabody, for begonia. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for 

Jerusalem cherry tree. 
.75. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for 

cotton plant. 
.75. Gratuity to J. M. Kimball, Peabody, for cactus. 
.50. Gratuity to Wm. F. Wiley, for night blooming 

cereus. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. J. T. Rossley, Peabody, for Jeru- 
salem cherry tree. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. C. Perkins, Wenham, for 

asparagus fern. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

cotton plant. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

anemone. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Henry Farnham, Peabody, for 

svvansonia. 
Mrs. S. C. Quint, Mrs. C. W. Gowen, Eva A. Perley.— 
Committee. 



FLOWERS. 

$1. First premium to John Kimball, Peabody, for scab- 

iosas. 
.50. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for double 

asters. 



45 

.75. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for bouquet of 

asters. 
il. First premium to John Kimball, Peabody, for 12 

double asters. 
11. First premium to John Kimball, Peabody, for 24 

marigolds. 
.75. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for zinnias. 
.50. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for coxcombs. 
.50. Gratuity to John Kimball, Peabody, for helianthus. 
$1. First premium to G. E. Ward, Beverly, for del- 
phiniums. 
II. First premium to G. E. Ward, Beverly, for 24 car- 
nations. 
.50. Gratuity to G. E. Ward, Beverly, for geraniums. 
$1. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for dianthus. 
il. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for double 

marigolds. 
$1. First premium to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for coxcombs. 
$1. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for 24 zinnias. 
.50. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for pink asters. 
.50. Gratuity to J. H. Parker, Lynn, for gladiolus. 
il. First premium to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for 

sweet peas. 
il. First premium to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for 

single dahlias. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for double 

asters. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for collec- 
tion of asters. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for col- 
lection pink asters. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. A. Frost, Marblehead, for snap- 
dragon. 
$1. First premium to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for salpi- 
glosis. 



46 

.75. Gratuity to Arthur Elliot, Peabody, for double 
asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Alva Trask,Peabody, for garden bouquet. 

.50. Gratuity to Alva Trask, Peabody, for sweet peas. 

.50. Gratuity to Susan A. Bodge, Peabody, for Japan 
lilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. B. H. Farnham, No. Andover, for 
sweet peas. 

$1. Gratuity to Rufus Flint, Salem, for dahlias. 

$1. Gratuity to Joseph Symonds, Salem for coll. asters. 

$1. First premium to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, 
for phlox. 

$2. First premium to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, for 
Japan lilies. 

12. First premium to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, for 
Japan phlox. 

.50. Gratuity to T. C. Thurlow, West Newbury, for col- 
lection of asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Charles M. Poor, Peabody, for 
pansies. 

$1. Gratuity to Wm. Symonds, Marblehead, for dahlias. 
.75. Gratuity to Wm. Symonds, Marblehead, for collec- 
tion of dahlias. 

$1. Gratuity to Wm. Symonds, Marblehead, for cactus 
dahlias. 

$1. First premium to Wm. Symonds, Marblehead, for 
flowering dahlias. 

$1. First premium to Mrs. D. A. Parker, Lynn, for cal- 
endulas. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. D. A. Parker, Lynn, for garden 
annuals. 

$3. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for collec- 
tion garden flowers, 100 specimens. 

$2. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for 12 
double sferaniums. 



47 

$\. First premium to Mrs. J. A. Cain, Lynn, for- 12 sin- 
gle geraniums. 

$1. First premium to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for garden . 
annuals. 

^1. First premium to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for phlox 
drummondi. 

il. First premium to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for nastur- 
tiums. 
.50. Gratuity to Abbie L. Cain, Lynn, for zinneas. 

$1. Gratuit}- to Horace Bushby, Danvers, for bouquet 

native flowers. 
.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for verbenas. 
.75. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for Pompon dah- 
lias. 
.50. Gratuity to R. P. Struthers, Lynn, for zinneas. 

il. First premium to Clarence Beckett, Peabody, for 
garden flowers. 

il. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 12 
petunias. 

il. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 12 
cannas. 

$1. First premium to C. L. Beckett, Peabody, for 24 

petunias. 
.60. Gratuity to Walter Beckett, Peabody, for datura. 

il. First premium to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, for 
verbenas. 

il. First premium to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, for 

coxcombs. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Carrie Roberts, Peabody, for ga- 
landia. 

i3. First premium to J. M. Ward & Co., Peabody, for 
cultivated flowers. 

il. First premium to Wm. H. Cruff, Marblehead, for 12 
dahlias. 

$1. First premium to H. M. Taggard, Salem, for D. B. 
T. peony. 



48 

,50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Bushby, Peabody, for nas- 
turtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Buslihy, Peabody, for six 
varieties nasturtiums. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Bushby, Peabody, for chrys- 
anthemums. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Andrew Jacobs, Peabody, for zin- 
neas. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. D. Griffin, Lynn, for African 
marigolds. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. G. L. Lamson, Dan vers, for fall 
crocuses. 

.50. Gratuity to Michael Shea, Lawrence, for dahlias. 

.50. Gratuity to Francis T. Dodge, Salem, for dahlias. 

,50. Gratuity to Francis T. Dodge, Salem, for salvia. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. F. Hammond, Peabody, for 
asters. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. G. F. Hammond, Peabody, for sweet 
peas. 
Ettore Tassinari,Mrs. David Warren, Eva A. Perley. — 

Committee. 



VEGETABLES— FIRST CLASS. 

^2. First premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
mangold wurtzels. 

$1. Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 
Danvers carrot. 

|1. Second premium to W. L. Wallace, Peabody, for 
Danvers onions. 

$2. First premium to W. B. Cottrell, Salem, for red 
onions. 

$2. First premium to Willis G. Dodd, Peabody, for Dan- 
vers onions. 



49 ^ 

^2. First premium to Willis G. Dodd, Peabody, for pars- 
nips. 
12. First premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for purple 

top turnips. 
Bl. Second premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for 

Edmands beets. 
$1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 

purple top turnip. 
|2. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for flat 

white turnip. 
$1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Early 

Rose potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Car- 
man's No. 3 potatoes. * 
$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Clark's 

No. 1 potatoes. 
$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Pearl of 

Savoy potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Maine potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for New 

Queen potatoes. 
$2, First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 

New Yorker. 
$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Carman's 

No. 3 potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Early 

Roberts potatoes. 
$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Rural 

Blush potatoes. 
$2. First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for White 

ruta bagas. 
$1. Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Dew- 

ing's beets. 
.50. Gratuity to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Beauty of 
Hebron potatoes. 



50 

$2. First premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Early Rose potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Beauty of Hebron potatoes. 
•fl. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

red onions. 
.50. Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Egyptian 

beets. 
$2. First premium to Cole Bros., Boxford, for yellow 

ruta bagas. 
$2. First premium to Cole Bros., Boxford, for Dewing's 

beets. 
$2. First premium to Cole Bros., Boxford, for Early 

Maine potatoes. 
'$2. First premium to Cole Bros., Boxford, for New Queen 

potatoes. 
$2. First premium to Cole Bros., Boxford, for Early 

Roberts potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to Cole Bros., Boxford, for Pearl 

of Savoy potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to Cole Bros., Boxford, for Clark's 

No. 1 potatoes. 
$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Ed- 
munds' beets. 
$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Orange 

carrots. 
$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for yellow 

flat onions. 
$1. Second premium to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for 

Eclipse beets. 
i2. First premium to Charles W. Paul, No. Andover, for 

Beauty of Hebron potatoes. 
$1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for 

yellow flat onions. 
$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Early Northern potatoes. 



51 

$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Danvers carrots. 

il. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
parsnips. 

$1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
mangold wurtzels. 

.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Egyptian 
beets. 

.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Beauty 
of Hebron potatoes. 

.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Early 
Harvest potatoes. 

$1. Gratuity to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for Delaware 
potatoes. 

iSl. Second premium to J. G. Bo.dge, Peabody, for Early 
Northern potatoes. 

.50. Gratuity to Philip Bushby, Peabody, for Detroit 
beets. 

.50. Gratuity to I. A. Evans, jr., Danvers, for white onions. 

$1. Second premium to Charles R. Anderson, Boxford, 
for yellow turnips. 

.50. Gratuity to Charles R. Anderson, Boxford, for Ed- 
munds beets. 

.50. Gratuity to E. E. White, Peabody, for Enon potatoes. 

.50. Gratuity to E. E. White, Peabody, for Green Moun- 
tain potatoes. 

.50. Gratuity to Henry Bushby, Peabody, for Danvers 
carrots. 
Ered. A. Dodge, F. A. Russell. — Committee. 



VEGETABLES— CLASS TWO. 

$2. First premium to O. F. Newhall, Peabody, for celery. 
$2. First premium to James C. Poor, No. Andover, for 
red cabbage. 



52 

First premium to Willis G. Dodd, Peabody, for War- 
ren squash. 

First premium to Willis G. Dodd, Peabody, for All 
Seasons cabbage. 

First premium to E. E. White, Peabody, for musk 
melons. 

First premium to E. E. White, Peabody, for Living- 
stone tomato. 
$2. First premium to J. H. Nason, Boxford, for water- 
melons. 

First premium to the Danvers Hospital for collection 
of vegetables. 

First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for Corey 
sweet corn. 

First premium to Durkee Bros., Peabody, for Victor 
squash. 

First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Fottler's 
cabbage. 

Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Stone 
Mason cabbage. 

First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for Deep 
Head cabbage. 

First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cauli- 
flower. 

Second premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for early 
sweet corn. 

First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for late sweet 
corn. 

First premium to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for cran- 
berries. 
.50. Gratuity to W. K. Cole, Boxford, for watermelon. 
SI. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody. 
$2. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Bay State squash. 
$1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 
Hubbard squash. 



53 

$1. Second premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Savoy cabbage. 
12. First premium to George Reynolds, Peabody, for 

Brunswick cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity to George Reynolds, Peabody, for Evergreen 

sweet corn. 
$2. First premium to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for Stone 

tomatoes. 
$1. Second premium to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for 

Warren Turban squash. 
.50. Gratuity to B. P. Danforth, Peabody, for Victor 

squash. 
$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Marrow 

squash. 
$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Hubbard 

squash. 
$1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Bay 

State squash. 
$1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for sweet 

corn. 
$1. Second premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for celery. 
$2. First premium to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Essex 

Hybrid squash. 
.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for American 

Turban squash. 
.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Warren tur- 
ban squash. 
.50. Gratuity to A. A. Mason, Beverly, for Livingstone 

tomatoes. 
$2. First premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Stone 

Mason cabbage. 
$1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Marrow squash. 
$1. Second premium to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for 

Paragon tomatoes. 



54 

.50. Gratuity to J. W. Parkhurst, Boxford, for Excelsior 

sweet corn. 
$2. First premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for Savoy 

cabbage. 
$1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for All 

Seasons cabbage. 
$1. Second premium to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for red 

. cabbage. 
.50. Gratuity to N. P. Perkins, Wenham, for pumpkins. 
$1. Second premium to Cole Bros., Boxford, for Deep 

Head cabbage. 
$2. First premium to Charles H. Potter, Peabody, for 

Turban squash. 
.50. Gratuity to Charles H. Potter, Peabody, for Golden 

pumpkins. 
.50. Gratuity to Charles H. Potter, Peabody, for Summer 

squash. 
$1. Gratuity to A. C. Osborn, Peabody, for Faxon 

squash. 
$1. Second premium to S. A. Evans, Jr., Danvers, for 

Essex Hybrid squash. 
SI. Second premium to S. A. Evans, Jr., Danvers, for 

Nutmeg melon. 
-fl. Gratuity to S. A. Evans, Jr., Danvers, for water- 
melon. 
il. Second premium to H. A. Harrington, Peabody, for 

cauliflower. 
•fl. Second premium to J. E. Herrick, Peabody, for 

Victor tomatoes. 
$1. Gratuity to Philip Bushby, Peabody, for Hubbard 

squash. 
.50. Gratuity to John Haggerty, Danvers, for Summer 

squash. 
$1. Gratuity to John Haggerty, Danvers, for Henderson 

cabbage. 



55 

$1. Gratuity to John Haggerty, Danvers, for Turban 
squash. 

.50. Gratuity to M. S. Perkins, Danvers, for Stone "toma- 
toes. 

.50. Gratuity to J. G. Bodge, Peabody, for red cabbage. 

.50. Gratuity to H. M. O'Donnell, Peabody, for peppers. 

.50. Gratuity to Jere. Bresnahan, Peabody, for cabbage. 

.50. Gratuity to Chas. R. Anderson, Boxford, for cauli- 
flower. 

.50. Gratuity to Charles M. Paul, No. Andover, for to- 
matoes. 

.50. Gratuity to Samuel T. Crosman, Swampscott, for 
Faxon squash. 

.50. Gratuity to W. P. Clark, Danvers, for Stone toma- 
toes. 
C. W. Webster, Alvah J. Bradstreet, D. W. Osborn.— 

Committee. 



GRAIN AND SEED. 

$^5. First premium to E. Nason, West Newbury, for 25 
ears field corn. 

14. Second premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for 25 
ears field corn. 

$3. Third premium to A. B. Fellows, Ipswich, for 25 
ears field corn. 

$2. First premium to Andrew Dodge, Beverly, for yel- 
low pop corn. 

$1 Second premium to Wm. E. Sheen, Peabody, for pop 
corn. 

$1. First premium to H. M. Killam, Boxford, for peck 
shelled corn. 

$1. First premium to A. B. Fellows, Ipswich, for peck 
beans. 



56 

[. First premium to John E. Herrick, Peabody, for peck 

. rye. 
T. J. King, A. L. Moore, A. J. Bradstreet. — Committee, 



COUNTERPANES AND AFGHANS. 

$3. First premium to Harriet I. Grant, Methuen, for 

crocheted quilt. 
$2. Second premium to B. F. Porter, Beverly, for silk 

quilt. 
$1. Gratuity to Mary B. Jackson, Lynn, for velvet quilt. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. W. C. Davenport, Salem, for knit 

quilt. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. G. S. Peabody, Salem, for patch 

quilt. 
-fl. Gratuity to Mrs. Ella J. Emerson, Haverhill, for 

knit quilt. 
$1. Gratuity to Mrs. Everett Cameron, Salem, for knit 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. J. H. Boardman, Marblehead for 

silk quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Nicholas Clark, Peabody, for cro- 
cheted quilt. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. L. H. Towne, Beverly, for velvet 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. M. Odell, Salem, for velvet quilt. 
.75. Gratuit}'- to Martha A. Dougherty, Danvers, for cro- 
cheted quilt. 
.76. Gratuity to Mrs. L. P. Wilson, Peabody, for wool 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Winthrop T. Porter, Beverly, for wool 

quilt. 
.60. Gratuity to Henrietta Clarriage, Lynn, for outline 

quilt. • 



57 

.75. Gratuity to Miss Emily Phelps, Salem, for silk quilt. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Flint, Salem, for afghan. 

.50. Gratuity to Catherine Weston, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. J. Copp, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. W. Carlton, Peabody, for patch 

quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. John C. Foote, Danvers, for afghan. 
.75. Gratuity to Mrs. J. H. Warren, Lynn, for silk quilt. 
.50. Gratuity to George H. Smith, Haverhill, kid quilt. 
Elizabeth C. Osborn, Martha Raddin, /or the Committee. 



CARPETINGS AND RUGS. 

$2. First premium to Mrs. Eliza M. Perkins, Peabody, 

for drawn rug. 
$2. First premium to Mrs. S. P. Wilson, Peabody, for 

braided rug. 
II. Second premium to Miss Nellie Rowe, Rockport, for 

braided Kig. 
$1. Second premium to Mrs. C. W. Nutter, ^Haverhill, 

for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. W. Nutter, Haverhill, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Charles H. Wilson, Peabody, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to S. F. Carr, Beverly, for drawn rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Harriet N. Goodwin, Salem, for 

braided rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Ellen Pratt, Peabody, for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. W. Carlton, Peabod}^ for braided 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Miss E. Towne, Salem, for drawn rug. 



58 

.50. Gratuity to Miss M. E. Horton, Beverly, for drawn 

rug. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Charles F. Herrick, Wenham, for 

drawn rug. 
Mrs. Andrew Nichols, Mrs. D. P. Grovesnor, Miss S. F. 
Kittredge — Committee. 



ARTICLES MANUFACTURED FROM LEATHER. 

Diploma to E. W. Burtt & Co., Lynn, for display of shoes. 
$2.00. First premium to Alonzo Raddin, Peabody, for 2 

cases shoes. 
il.50. Gratuity to Alonzo Raddin, for pair of shoes. 
$3.00. First premium to Almy, Bigelow & Washburn, 

Salem, for exhibit of shoes. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Wm. G. Webber & Co., Salem, for 

exhibit of shoes. 
Diploma to Geo. A. Creighton & Son, Lynn, for exhibit 

of shoes. 
$1.50. Gratuity to J. A. Poor, Peabody, for leather 

belting. 
$1.00, Gratuity to the Cushman Novelty Co., Lynn, for 

leather novelties. 
$5.00. Gratuity to Charles McTiernan, Danvers, for 5 

harnesses. 
Otis Brown, Henry Hilliard, I. E. B. Perkins — Com- 
mittee. 



MANUFACTURES AND GENERAL MERCHAN- 
DISE. 

Diploma to the Enos Sheet Holder Co., Peabody, for dis- 
play of yachting material. 

Diploma to G. Farnham Co., Lynn, for shoe and harness 
dressing. 



59 

Diploma to the Ballardvale Lithia Water Co. 

Honorable mention to A. H. Whidden & Son, Peabody, 

for display of door knobs. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Luxton & Wardwell, Peabody, for 

horseshoes. 
$2.00. Gratuity to S. B. Poeton, Peabody, for electrical 

display, 
f 1.00. Gratuity to Simon Devoe, for full rigged barque. 
$1.00. Gratuity to P. F. Conroy, Peabody, for carved 

portraits. 
$1.00. Gratuity to C. H. & J. Price, Salem, for exhibit 

of trusses. 
$1.50. Gratuity to M. E. McCarthy, Peabody, for con- 
fectionery. 
$1.00. Gratuity to W. S. Ward, Beverly, for cocoanut 

fibre and chair hair. 
.50. Gratuity to S. H. Smith, Lynn, for bath cabinet. 
Honorable mention of the exhibit of clothing by Day & 
Hoy't, Salem. 
Otis Brown, Henry Hilliard, I. E. B. Perkins. — Com- 
mittee. 



FANCY WORK. 

.50. Gratuity to George A. Wilkins, Salem, for lace 
collar and cuffs. 

.50. Gratuity to Edith E. Downing, Salem, for frame. 

.50. Gratuity to Edith E. Downing, Salem, for doiley. 

.50. Gratuity to Edith E. Downing, Salem, for doiley. 

.50. Gratuity to Nellie A. Carroll, Lynn, for table 
mats. 

•75. Gratuity to Mrs. Jesse F. Potter, Beverly, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. W. Herrick, Salem, for cen- 
terpiece. 



6o 



.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. B. Swan, Peabody, for scarf 
and lace. 
fl.OO. Gratuity to Mary Hannon, Peabody, for three 
centerpieces. 

.50. Gratuity to E. F. Perrj^ Danvers, for centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. P. J. Keegan, Peabody, for pet- 
ticoat. 

.75. Gratuity to E. B. Hobbs, Danvers, for drawn 
work. 

.50. Gratuit}- to Mrs. Georgia Swain, Lynn, for seed 
bags. 

.50. Gratuity to Juliette Cook, Peabody, for point lace. 

.50. Gratuity to Mary E. Stone, Lynn, for crocheted 
shawl. 
i2.00. Gratuity to Sarah E. Stone, Lynn, for three 

handkerchiefs. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mary E. Murphy, Lynn, for two 

lunch cloths. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. H. Symonds, Salem, for 
Battenburg. 

.75. Gratuity to Miss Nellie G. Rowe, Rockport, for 
two doileys. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Susan P. Blake, Peabody, for 
half dozen doileys. 
fl.OO. Gratuity to Mrs. Elmira Farwell, Peabody, for 
centerpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Alice D. Perkins, Salem, for center- 
piece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. V. Emilio, Salem, for Batten- 
burg. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Sarah E. Sudbury, Salem, for 
lace pieces. 
$1.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. L. Pratt, Peabody, for lace 
scarf and handkerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Annie Hayes, Peabody, for embroid- 
ered petticoat. 



6i 



.75. Gratuity to Mrs. Frank Chase, Salem, for two 
centerpieces. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Frank Chase, Salem, for frame. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. M. Besse, Peabody, for table 
cover. 
fl.OO. Gratuity to Mrs. E. M. Besse, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mary F. Goggin, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Joseph Franklin, Peabody, for 
embroidery. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Lydia Peabody, Middleton, for 
lace trimming. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Rachel Dickinson, Danvers, for 
knit doiley. 

.75. Gratuity to Clara E. Poor, Peabody, for Batten- 
burg centerpiece. 

.75. Gratuity to Mrs. S. F. Tracey, Salem, for three 
centerpieces, 
f 1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. S. F. Tracey, Salem, for two pil- 
lows. 

.50. Gratuity to L. M. Gate, Peabody, for centerpiece. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Bertha Johnson, Beverly, for drawn 
work. 

.75. Gratuity to Miss Carrie Stanley, Beverly, for five 
handkerchiefs. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Mary Tanch, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. S. Price, Salem, for center- 
piece. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. O. F. Carr, Gloucester, for lace 

handkerchief. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Bessie O. Bancroft, Peabody, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. C. G. Mears, Danvers, for Bat- 
tenburg. 



62 



•50. Gratuity to Mrs. W. H. Downes, Salem, for lace 
yoke. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Elizabeth Linnehan, Peabody, 
for embroidery. 

.50. Gratuity to C. A. Ingalls, Salem, for shawl and 
trimming. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. S. Austin, Salem, for half 
dozen doilies. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. A. Fitz, Salem, for lace pieces. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. E. Crocker, Salem, for cen- 
terpiece. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. N. Farley, Peabody, for sofa 
pillow. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. N. Farley, Peabody, for sus- 
penders. 

.75. Gratuity to Christina McCarthy, Peabody, for 
sofa pillow. 
iSl.OO. Gratuity to Mrs. H. H. Buxton, Peabody, for sta- 
tionery. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. A. Chandler, Salem, for table 
cover. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. A. Chandler, Salem, for knit 
trimming. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. F. M. Blakely, Beverly, for sofa 
pillow. 
Bl.OO. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Langley, Swampscott, for 
centerpieces. 

.50. Gratuity to Mrs. E. E. Raddin, Peabody, for mats 
and handkerchief. 

.50. Gratuity to Miss Sallie Reynolds, Salem, for pil- 
low covei". 

.75. Gratuity to Lillian Storey, Essex, for two center- 
pieces. 

.75. Gratuity to Lillian Storey, Essex, for table cover. 
11.00. Gratuity to Lillian Storey, Essex, for table cover. 



63 

$1.00. Gratuity to Lillian Storey, Essex, for drawn work. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Delaney, Lynn, for Batten- 
burg. 
fl.50. Gratuity to Mrs. Wm. Delaney, Lynn, for point 
lace. 
.50. Gratuity to Juliette Cook, Peabody, for point lace 
scarf. 
il.50. Gratuity to Juliette Cook, Peabody, for point lace 
tie. 
.50. Gratuity to Juliette Cook, Peabody, for center- 
piece. 
Mrs. Samuel L. Sawyer, Mrs. George R. Norton, Miss 
Helen J. Yeaton. — Committee. 



WORKS OF ART AND OIL PAINTINGS. 

$2.00. Gratuity to H. F. Withey, Danvers, for oil paint- 
ing. 
$2.00. Gratuity to T. C. Graves, Salem, for photos. 
$1.00. Gratuity to T. C. Graves, Salem, for pen and ink 

work. 
$2.00. Gratuity to L. D. Preston, Beverly, for pen and 

ink work. 
$1.50. Gratuity to J. C. Brainard, Danvers, for oil 

j)ainting. 
.50. Gratuity to H. W. Kinsman, Salem, buttercups. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Miss Hill, Peabody, for charcoal 

drawing. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Rena Brown, Peabody, for water 

color. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, for 

portrait. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, for oil 

painting. 



64 

$2.00. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, for oil 

painting. 
12.00. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, for 

charcoal work. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Miss S. F. Franklin, Haverhill, for oil 

painting. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Miss Trask, Feabody, for water color. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Mr. Baker, Peabod}^, for water color. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Mr. Baker, Peabod}^ for water color. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Mr. Baker, Peabody, for water color. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Miss Cruffs, Marblehead, for pen and 

ink work. 
$1.00. Gratuity to J. C. Merrill, Salem, for oil painting. 
$2.00. Gratuity to J. C Merrill, Salem, for collection 

photos. 
$2.00. Gratuity to C. F. Goodridge, Beverly, for oil 

painting. 
$1.00. Gratuity to A. Shepherd, Salem, for photos. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. Gauss, Salem, for photos. 

.50. Gratuity to Grace Bell, Peabody, for bromide en- 
largement. 
.50. Gratuity to Irving Richardson, Peabody, for 

architectural drawing. 
Mrs. N. G. Kimball, Mrs. D. P. Grosvenor, Miss Bessie 
Swan. — Committee. 



DECORATED CHINA. 

12.00. Gratuity to Gertrude M. Copp, Lawrence, for 

vase. 
13.00. Gratuity to Gertrude M. Copp, Lawrence, for 

salad bowl. 
15.00. Gratuity to Gertrude M. Copp, Lawrence, for 

collection. 



65 

$3.00. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 

collection. 
$2.00. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 

best individual specimen. 
$3.00. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 

raised paste and gold. 
fl.OO. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 

vase. 
$1.00. Gratuity to Mrs. M. E. B. Hutchinson, Lynn, for 

plate. 
.50. Gratuity to Mrs. H. A. Dean, Peabody, for jar. 
Miss Sarah Frances Franklin, Miss Bessie M. Swan, 
Mrs. N. G. Kimball. — Committee. 



WORK BY CHILDREN. 

.25. Gratuity to Edith Mason, Danvers, for sofa pillow. 
.25. Gratuity to Florence Howett, Peabody, for shirt. 
.50. Gratuity to George Worcester, Peabody, for sofa 

pillow. 
.25. Gratuity to Barbara Warner, Peabody, for flannel 

skirt. 
$1. Gratuity to Abbie Parmenter, Peabody, for dress 

and tray cloth. 
.50. Gratuity to C. Winchester, Peabody, for darning 

blouse. 
.25. Gratuity to Grace Cook, Peabody, for darning doiley. 
.25. Gratuity to Charles Blaney, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.50. Gratuity to Luella Hall, Peabody, for flannel doiley 

and skirt. 
.75. Gratuity to Clara Masterson, Peabody, for sofa 

pillow. 
.75. Gratuity to May Flynn, Peabody, for sofa pillow 

and doileys. 



66 

.25. Gratuity to Frances Hall, Peabody, for tray cloth. 

12. Gratuity to Alva P. Trask, Peabody, for doll. 

.25. Gratuity to John Mahoney, Peabody, for tray cloth 

and scarf. 
.25. Gratuity to John McMannus, Peabody, for drawing. 
.75. Gratuity to Hughgenia Montgomery, Peabody, for 

doiley and dolls. 
.25. Gratuity to Louisa Montgomery, Peabody, for kin- 
dergarten. 
.75. Gratuity to Clara Masterson, Peabody, for scarf and 

table cover. 
.25. Gratuity to Elsie Spense, Peabody, for doll's 

drawers. 
.50. Gratuity to John Sullivan, Peabody, for overalls and 

tray cloth. 
.50. Gratuity to Harry Trask, Peabody, for blouse and 

darning. 
.25. Gratuity to George Robinson, Peabody, for tray 

cloth. 
.25. Gratuity to Jennie Copp, Peabody, for skirt. 
.25. Gratuity to Leverett Trask, Peabody, for shoe bag. 
.25. Gratuity to Eliza Johnson, Peabody, for skirt. 
.25. Gratuity to Eleanor Dow, Peabody, for baskets. 
.50. Gratuity to Julia Crehore, Peabody, for dress. 
.25. Gratuity to Caleb Warner, Peabody,. for tray cloth. 
.10. Gratuity to Owen Griffin, Peabody, for v\^ooden 

hatchet. 
.10. Gratuity to Marion Hall, Peabody, for duster. 
.15. Gratuity to Louise Balcomb, Peabody, for doll's 

dress. 
.15. Gratuity to Willie Fellows, Peabody, for towels. 
.15. Gratuity to Mabel Kimball, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.15. Gratuity to Ralph Buxton, Peabody, for tray cloth. 
.10. Gratuity to Michael Sullivan, Peabody, for towel. 
.15. Gratuity to Patrick Sherry, Peabody, for apron. 



67 

.15. Gratuity to Catherine Keenan, Peabody, for table 
cloth. 

Mrs. A. B. Fellows, Mary A. Noyes, Irena Fellows. — 
Committee. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON ROOT CROPS. 

The Committee on Root Crops respectfully submit the 
following report : — 

There were four entries, two of onions, one of potatoes, 
one of carrots. 

Mr. John H. George of Methuen entered a crop of on- 
ions and a crop of potatoes. 

Mr. N. P. Perkins of Wenham a crop of carrots and a 
crop of onions. 
First premium to John H. George of Methuen for 

his crop of onions, $8 00 

First premium to N. P. Perkins of Wenham for his 

crop of carrots, $8 00 

Second premium for his crop of onions, 5 00 

The crop of potatoes entered by Mr. George was so 
small your committee did not think it worthy a premium. 

A. B. Fellows, Wm. B. Carlton, John Barker. — Com- 
mittee. 

STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OP ONIONS RAISED 
BY JOHN H. GEORGE, METHUEN, MASS., 1900. 

The crop of 1899 was onions raised on Bowker's Special 
Onion Fertilizer. The land was peat meadow. The cost 
of preparation of soil for crop of 1900 was, including 
three-fourths ton Stockbridge fertilizer, and cultivation, 
$67 ; harvesting and marketing, $20. I harvested on one- 
half acre, 354 bushels onions, of excellent quality and 
medium size. Cost $87. 



68 



Sold crop for .60 per bushel, |212 40 

Less cost, 87 00 



Profit on one-half acre, $125 40 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

I hereby certify that the land on which grew the above 
crop contains one-half acre. 

Frank W. George. 

statement concerning a crop of potatoes raised 
by john h. george, methuen, mass., 1900. 

The crop grown on this piece of land in 1899 was 
grass. The land is a peat meadow. The manure used 
was two cords stable manure and one-half ton Stockbridge 
potato fertilizer, all applied broadcast. The cost of prepa- 
ration of soil, manure, and cultivation, $35 ; harvesting 
and storing, $7.50 ; total, $42.50. Crop harvested, 85 
bushels. 

75 bush, large ones, at .60 per bush., $45 00 
10 bush, small ones, at .25, 2 50 



$47 50 
42 50 

Profit on half acre, $5.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

John H. George. 

I hereby certify that the land on which grew the above 
crop of potatoes contains one-half acre. 

Frank W. George. 

statement of a crop of carrots raised by n. p. 

PERKINS, WENHAM, 1900. 

The crop for 1898 was squashes, manured with barn 
manure and a small quantity of fertilizer in the hill. The 



69 

crop for 1899 was carrots and beets, manured with about 
four cords of manure and a moderate amount of ashes. 

Ploughed the land 'in fall of 1899, and before ploughing 
spread on four cords of cow and horse manure. Ploughed 
twice in the spring, and applied four bags of Plymouth 
Rock fertilizer. Sowed about June 10th in rows fourteen 
inches apart. The crop is sold mostly for table in the 
Boston market. 

Br. 



To preparation of land, 


$ 5 00 


" seed and sowing, 


3 00 


" manure. 


24 00 


" fertilizer. 


6 00 


" wheelhoeing and weeding. 


13 00 


" harvesting. 


14 00 


" marketing and preparing, 


25 00 


" use of land. 


5 00 




$95 00 


Or. 




By 540 bushels carrots, at 40 cts., 


$216 00 


Cost, 


95 00 



Profit, 1111 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. P. Perkins. 

STATEMENT CONCERNING A CROP OF ONIONS RAISED BY 
N. P. PERKINS, WBNHAM, 1900. 

The crop raised on the land in 1898 was part onions 
and part squashes, manured with manure and Canada 
ashes. The crop for 1899 was onions and carrots, ma- 
nured as before. In the fall of 1899 applied four and one- 
half cords of cow and horse manure, and ploughed the 
same in November. In the spring ploughed again, bring- 
ing the manure to the surface. After harrowing, applied 



70 

about one-half ton Canada ashes. The seed was sown 
May 12, in rows about fourteen inches apart. The variety 
was the Danvers onion grown by Warren Barker. Fol- 
lowing is statement of crop : — 

Dr. 
To ploughing one-half acre, 

" harrowing and leveling, 

" four and one-half cords manure, 

" Canada ashes, 

" seed, 

" wheelhoeing and weeding, 

" harvesting and topping, 

" marketing, 

" use of land, 

Cr. 
By 310 bushels onions, at 65 cts., 

Profit for one-half acre. 
Crop per acre. 
Profit per acre. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. P. Perkins. 



$ 1 50 


2 


00 


22 


00 


6 


00 


4 


75 


25 


00 


13 


00 


12 


00 


5 


00 


$91 75 


mOl 


50 


$109 


7o 


620 bushels 


$219 50 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON SMALL FRUITS. 

The only entry that was made for premium was made 
by Abbott Erving, of Andover. The committee visited 
Mr. Erving's grounds and examined his crop of raspber- 
ries, which were remarkably good, especially for this un- 
favorable season, and we would award Mr. Erving the 
first premium of eight dollars ($8). 

Respectfully submitted, 

O. S. Butler, ( ^ ... 
Edwin Bates, i ^^^^'^^^^' 



71 

REPORT TO THE COMMITTEE ON TREADWELL 

FARM. 

To the Committee on the Treadwell Farm. 

Sirs — The following is a report of the stock kept and 
crops raised upon the farm during the year 1900 : 

2 horses, 23 cows and one bull ; 15 tons English hay, 
15 tons meadow hay, 2| tons oat fodder, 300 bushels pota- 
toes, 60 bushels beets, 75 bushels parsnips, 70 bush, red 
top white globe turnips, 400 bush, ruta baga turnips, 120 
bush, sweet corn, 75 bush, tomatoes, 100 bush, carrots, 60 
bbls. apples, 4 acres ensilage. 

$355 worth of hay was purchased for use during the 
winter of 1899 and 1900. 

il60 has been laid out on the buildings and one new 
pump purchased, costing i8, not ordered. 

Remaining on hand, three and one-half thousand shin- 
gles. 

D. Bradstreet. 



COMMITTEE ON FOREST TREES. 

Agreeably to the notification of entry of a "plantation 
of not less than 300 white pine trees," by Mr. Francis R. 
Appleton of Ipswich, your committee assembled at Ips- 
wich on August 20th, 1900, and were met by Mr. Apple 
ton and driven through the charming town by the river, 
past the former homestead of the late Prof. McKean of 
Harvard, the memorial tablets at one end of the Common, 
and thence under aged elms, and out by the three mile 
drive to Mr. Appleton 's estate. 

The members of the Society's committee who were able 
to attend consisted of Gen. Francis H. Appleton, chair- 
man, and Messrs. David Pingree and John Robinson. 



72 

Starting from the residence shortly after our arrival, the 
party proceeded, by preference, on foot, in a northerly 
direction, and viewed the plantation which was entered 
for premium, and comprised a portion of Mr. Appleton's 
planting that complied with the Society's requirements. 

The trees were looking well, and showed that they had 
received careful and reasonable treatment. They were 
mostly upon a thin loam, with gravelly subsoil, and on 
rolling ground, and were about eight feet apart each way. 
We append statement as to previous treatment. 

This entry represented only a small part of the total 
planting done by our host, and his total was only a por- 
tion of the whole area that had received treatment by 
forestry and arbor culture on the Appleton farms of old 
Ipswich. 

This plantation is at the west side of a vista looking 
northerly as one first drives away from the entrance door 
to the residence. 

The plantation is to be commended both for what it is, 
in itself, and for the example that it sets to others to go and 
do likewise upon many of our New England farms, and 
we put Essex County and Massachusetts first. Your com- 
mittee would insert here, for the benefit of the general 
public who may, perchance, read the report in our Socie- 
ty's " Transactions," that those who plant trees must not 
allow so great and misdirected an affection for them to 
develop which shall prevent a judicious thinning when a 
considerable growth is attained, and when such becomes 
necessary to promote park effect. 

We recommend the award to Francis R. Appleton of 
the prize of $8 and a diploma, to be signed by the Com- 
mittee and the President and Secretary. 

Francis H.