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Full text of "The transactions of the Entomological Society of New South Wales. v. 1-2, [1863-73]"

^61 

\/\ 2- 

TRANSACTIONS 



OF THE 



^nt0m0l00ial ^Btkii 



OF 



NEW SOUTH WALES. 



VOL. II. 




\N0V)^5 1S32 

SYDNEY: 

FEINTED, PUBLISHED, AND SOLD FOR THE SOCIETY 

BY J. BEADING & CO., BEIDGE STREET, 

And Sold hy Trubner & Co., 60 Paternoster Row, London. 

1873. 



■ — ^ — 



CONTENTS OF VOL. II. 



On the Anthicidce of Australia, by the Eev. E. L. King, B.A 

On the genus Charagia of Walker, by A. W. Scott, M.A. . 

On a new genus of Sefialidce, by A. W. Scott, M.A. 

On the Agrotis vastator, by A. W. Scott, M.A. 

On Ornitlioftera Cassandra, by A. W. Scott, M.A.... 

Description of a new sj)ecies of Articerus, by the Eev. E. L 
King, B.A 

On the Scaritidce of New Holland, by William MacLeat, 
F.L.S 

On the Byrrhidce of Australia, by the Eev. E. L. King, B.A 

The genus ^«7'eifes, by the Eev. E. L. King, B.A 

The Insects of Gayndah, by William MacLeay, F.L.S. .. 

On Australian Entozoa, by Geeaed Keefft, F.L.S 

New species of Stejihanopis, by H. H. Bueton-Beadley, Esq 

The Insects of Gayjidah, (2ud Paper), by William MacLeay, 
F.L.S 



PAGE 
1 

25 
36 
40 
49 

54 

58 

71 

76 

79 
206 
233 

239 



'* Miscellanea Entomologica," by William MacLeay, F.L.S. 319 



ERRATA. 

In pages 58, 60, and 61, — 

For Baron de Chandoir, read " Baron de Chaudoir.' 



Description of the Anthicides of Australia, by 
Rev. R. L. King, B.A. 

[Read 7th January, 1867.] 

The small insects which compose this very natural family are 
distinguished from other Heteromera by the separation of their 
posterior legs, and by the extension of the anterior edge of 
the first segment of the abdomen in a (generally) triangular form. 
This appears the most certain distinction, though even this is 
shared to some extent by some of the PediJides of La-Cordaire. 
In this family, however, the intercoxal plate when it exists is 
small and naiTow. Although, therefore, it is separated by some 
authors, it is united to the Anthicidge by others. I have met 
with but one member of the abnormal group, and therefore 
have not felt it necessary to separate it from the more numerous 
family to which it is certainly very closely allied. 

The Australian species of the Anthicidse are more numerous 
than was at first supposed, M. Vereaux having reported that 
but 9 were found in Oceanie. Instead of 9, no fewer than 48, 
belonging to 5 different genera, are already known to me as Austra- 
lian : of all but five I have had specimens under examination. I 
have been permitted to describe the species in the Museum 
collection, and in that of Mr. MacLeay. So that together with 
my own collected at Paramatta, and those received from Gawler 
in South Australia from my friend Mrs. Kreusler, my list is at 
least a good instalment, although eventually the number of 
species may be at least doubled. Mr. Masters collected several 
species during his late visit to "Western and South Australia, 
while Queensland is represented by several elegant species 
received by Mr. MacLeay from Port Denison. From Victoria, I 
have not as yet had any specimens. 

Of the Australian species some have a very extensive range, 
indeed the Anthicus fioralis is common to Australia and Europe, 
and several are, to judge by the descriptions, almost identical 
with species from the Cape of Good Hope. One species 
Anthicus hifasciatus extends from Sydney to King George's 



2 DESCIITI'TION OF AXTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

Sound, and would therefore deserve the name Australis, had not 
the name Australasi(s been already appropriated to what appears 
to be a far more local species. 

By far the greater number of the Australian species, as 
indeed of the species from other parts of the world belong to the 
typical genus AntMcus. M. de La Ferte-Senectere in his monograph 
(which I have followed as closely as possible), has included no 
less than 208 of this genera, out of 295 of the true Anthicidce. 
The present paper adds 32 out of 48. 

I have not found it necessary to add to the number of genera, 
though Antlucus abnormis might by some have been regarded as 
entitled to the distinction. The structure of the tarsi in which its 
greatest peculiarity consists is not always a safe guide to generic 
affinities — as the late Mr. W. S. MacLeay has well shew^n. " I 
have, however, found considerable difficulty in following M. 
La Ferte-Senectere's divisions and sub-divisions of the genus 
AntMcus. Some of the groups are no doubt very natural, but nob 
others, himself being witness. 

Although small in size, yet there are few families which sur- 
pass the Anthicidce in the beauty of colour, the elegance of form 
or the rapidity of motion. I know of no Australian forms except 
among the Buprestidee more richly painted than Aiitliicus niti- 
dissimus, none more graceful in its shape than Mecynotarsus con- 
color, more nimble in its movements than Forniicomus agilis. 
Their natural habitat too may please the most fastidious. Most 
of them live in flowers, whence the name of the family ; others are 
found under wood in grass, especially of a dewy morning ; the 
remarkable genus Mecynotarsus is found under debris in the 
dried bed of the river Gawler ; and lastly many are captured 
either flying at sunset, or on the tops of paling fences preparing 
for flight. 

L PSEUDO-ANTHICITES. 

Genus I. Macrarthrius. La Ferte. 
Macratria. Newman. 

Sp. 1. M. australis. 
Ferrugineus pubescens ; thorace ad medium olivaceo, vix 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. 3 

longiori quam lato, autice rotundato postice sub-contracto 
et ad basin lateralitei" marginato ; elytris sab-parallelis 
piloso-striatis, ad humeros paulo thoracis basi latioribus, 
maculis olivaceis elongatis lateralibus obsoletis ; antennis 
et pedibus castaneis. 
Long. .10 poll. 

Gawlei' ; South Australia : " in sand near debris, in the dried 
river bed." Mrs. Kreicsler. 

The intercoxal plate is long and narrow. The spots on the 
thorax and elytra are of au olive colour, but are hardly distinct. 
This species has much the appearance of Dlrccea, and comes near 
the Indian M. concolor. 

II. — Anthicites. 

Genus II. NoTOXus. Geoffrey. 

This genus which has its representatives in many parts of the 
world is remarkable for the prolongation of the fore part of the 
thorax in the shape of a horn over the head. A single Austra- 
lian species has been thus described by Mr. Hope, from Adelaide. 

Sp. 2. N. australasice. La Ferte-Senectere. 
Nigro-piceus, villosus, elytris profunde et parum confertim 
punctatis, pone humeros transversim depressis, ibique ma- 
cula una flava singulari oruatis ; antennis pedibusque sature 
ferrugineis. 
Long. .13 poll. 
Adelaide. 
I have not seen this species. It belongs to the division 
which has the apex of the elytra of both sexes oblique truncate. 
The single macula near the shoulder on each elytron can hardly 
be mistaken. 

Genus III. Mectnotarsus. La Ferte. 

This genus, though possessed of the thoracic horn so remark- 
able in Notoxus, has been separated from that genus in conse- 
quence of the prolongation of the posterior tarsi. I have not 



4 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

met with it in this neighbourhood ; but I have received three 
species from my friend Mrs. Kreusler of Gawler, South Aus- 
tralia. They were all captured under debris in the dried bed of 
the river Gawler. Other species might probably be captured in 
this colony, if looked for under rubbish near the sea beach. 

Sp. 3. M. Ereiosleri. 
Nigro-cinereus ; elytris sub-parallelis brunneis fasciis duabus 

albis, antennis et pedibus ferrugineis. 
Long. .10 poll. 
Gawler ; Mrs. Kreusler. 

The fascige are broad, and apparently composed of whitish 
setae ; at times they are almost separated at the suture, and 
appear as large maculae. 

I have named the species after my friend Mrs. Kreusler, who 
was, I believe, the first to discover them as well as the two 
following species. 

Sp. 4. M. ziczac. 
Cinereus ; elytris convexis fasciis nigris anguloso-undulatis 

notatis ; antennis et pedibus incauo-ferrugineis. 
Long. .10. 
Gawler ; South Australia. Mrs. Kreusler. 

The marking of the elytra differs somewhat in different speci- 
mens, but generally there are two small spots behind the shoulder 
of darker hue than the rest of the elytra. These spots are some- 
times united, while a zigzag fascia at the middle is connected 
at the suture with the dark apex. 

Sp. 5. M. concolor. 
Totus cinereo-castaneus, elytris parallelis. 
Long. .10 poll. 
Gawler ; South Australia. Mrs. Kreusler. 

An exceedingly graceful species. The whole insect is of a 
cinereous chestnut colour with a very silky pubescence over thorax 
and elytra. There is a faint deepening of colour at the shoulders 
and at the middle of the elytra which may possibly in some 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. 5 

varieties amount to spots, but which do not in the numerous speci- 
mens sent me by Mrs. Kreusler. 

Genus IV. Anthelephilus. Hope. 
This genus was separated from the succeeding one, Formicomus, 
to receive the species without any apparent angle at the shoulders 
of the elytra. M. La Ferte-Senectere appears to desire to re-unite 
the species to Formicomus. Not having seen any of them, I am 
not in a position to give an opinion. Judging however from the 
plates of the species, I hardly think there is a necessity for the 
division. A single Australian species has been described by Hope 
in the following terms. 

Sp. 6. A. cyaneiis. Hope. 

Capite nigro, antennis pedibusque atris. 

Long. 2 lin., lat. | lin. 

Nova Hollandia. 

Antennae nigros, articulo basali crasso, reliquis extrorsum 
crassioribus ; thorax ovalis, antice posticeque contractus 
nigro-cyaneus ; elytra cyanea, nitida, glaberriraa ; corpus 
subtus nigrum, pedes concolores. 

Trans. Zool. Soc. Vol. I., page 10] ; Plate XIV., fig. 4. 

Genus V. Formicomus. De la Ferte. 

Form [COMA. Motzch. 

This genus has been established for the reception of the 
Anthicites, which have at the same time the thighs claviform, and 
the elytra convex and oval. The intercoxal plate is generally 
large and obtuse, (truncate or ogee shaped), while in Anthicus, it 
is generally triangular and acute. The species composing this 
genus are among the largest of the whole family, often very 
nimble and sometimes exceedingly handsome. 

Sp. 7. F. GlarTcii. 

Nitidus parce pilosus, capite nigro polito antennis piceis ; 
thorace rufo-flavescente ; elytris nigro-cyaneis post humeros 



6 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

nonnihil depressis, postice rotundatis ; femoribus nigris ad 

basin rufescentibus, tibiis rufescentibus. 
Long. .14 poll. 
Gawler ; South Australia. Mrs. Kreusler. 

This species comes very near F. rubricollis Dej. from South 
Africa, but differs in colour of feet and puncturation of head. The 
last joint of the antennae is sometimes rufous. The thorax (at 
least in dead specimens) is sometimes piceous at the sides ; it 
is rounded in front but regularly contracted towards the base, 
yet without the sudden contraction so frequently observable. 

I have named the species after the Rev. Hamlet Clark, who 
lias described so many Australian insects. 

Sp. 8. F. agilis. 

Fei'rugineus politus subglaber tenuissime punctulatus ; thorace 
longitudinaliter canaliculato, ad basin valde contracto 
minute tuberculato ; elytris nigris humeris albo-maculatis 
pedibus piceis. 

Long. .15. 

Paramatta ; Liverpool Plains. 

The antennjB are piceous at the base, but gradually becoming 
darker towards the extremities. The longitudinal furrow and 
the tubercles at the base of the thorax, together with the oblique 
white maculae on the shoulders of the elytra, distinguish it at a 
glance from all its Australian congeners. Excepting that there 
is a slight projection at the shoulders, this species will come very 
near AnfhelepMlus ruficollis. It appears however to be a true 
Formicomus. 

Sp. 9. F. Denisonii. 

Ferrugineus, nitidus, parce pilosus ; antennis piceis basi 
ferrugineo ; thorace irregulariter punctato ; elytris nigro- 
cyaneis pone humeros depressiusculis ; femoribus basi rufa 
posticis non spinosis. 

Long. .15. 

Port Denison ; collection of Wm. MacLeay, Esq. 



BY THE EEV. E. L. KING, B.A. 7 

A very handsome species from Port Dein'son. It comes very 
near to the description of F. rubricolUs from the Cape of Good 
Hope, but diifers inter alia in its ferruginous head. I have named 
it after the locahty in which it was captured ; and am not sorry to 
have so good a reason for connecting it with the late Governor 
General of N.S.W., who took so lively an interest in all branches 
of Natural History. 

Sp. 10. F. speciosus. 

Piceo-ferrugineus, creberrime punctatus, pubescens setis longi- 
oribus paucis, capite nigro ; thorace antice rotundato 
longitrorsum canaliculate ; elytris convexis nigro-brunneis 
quatuor maculis elongatis transversis notatis. 

Long. .18. 

Gawler ; South Australia. Mrs. J. Kreusler. 

This fine species appears to approach to the description of F. 
aulicus, from India. It is, however, readily distinguished from 
that species by the longitudinal division of the thorax, in which 
it approaches F. agilis and F. canaliculatus. The maculae on 
the elytra are marked by silvery setse. A single specimen in 
Mrs. Kreusler's collection kindly lent me by her for description. 

Sp. 11. F. qnadiiinaculatus. 

Ferruginous, subnitidus, pubescens, antennis gracilibus; thorace 
antice rotundato postice contracto elytris maculis quatuor 
transversis albidis, femoribus parum incrassatis. 

Long. .15. 

Gawler ; South Australia ; collected by Mrs. Kreusler, and by 
Mr. Masters. 

This species also comes very near F. aulicus. It has not the 
marks on the head peculiar to that species ; and the antennas are 
more slender than the description of those organs of the Indian 
species. The spots on the elytra are transverse rather than 
oblique. It is easily distinguished from F. speciosus by its smaller 
size, and its thorax not canaliculate. It appears to be common. 



8 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

Sp. 12. F. australis. 
Pubesoens niger antennis et tarsis ferrugineis ; capite minu- 
tissime punctato, postice quadrato ; - thorace trapezoidal! 
superne planiusculo antice transversim rotundato postice 
contracto ; elytris humeris subquadratis apicibus rotundatis, 
lateribus leviter convexis, maculis albis duabus hameralibus 
transversis, duabus pone medium, abdomine elongato. 
Long. .09. 

N.S.W. Gawler. King George's Sound. 
This species, though subject to some variation in the size of 
the spots, and the size of the whole insect, is easily recognizable, 
and occurs apparently over a large portion of the continent. It 
is common at Paramatta. Mrs Kreusler and Mr. Masters have 
both found it in South Australia, and there are also specimens in 
the collection in the Museum brought by Mr. Masters from King 
George's Sound. It has therefore some claim to the name 
Australis, by which I have distinguished it. 

It is a somewhat aberrant species of this genus, but the 
intercoxal plate is large and somewhat ogee shaped. In external 
appearance it much resembles the genus Anthicus. It is easily 
distinguished from the next species by its transverse rather 
than oblique spots. 

It is found under stones and wood in grass, and is very 
active. 

Sp. 13. F. ohliqui-fasciatus. 

Pubescens niger antennis et tarsis piceis ; capite punctato 
postice rotundato ; thorace antice rotundato postice coarc- 
tato ; elytris post humeros depressis, lateribus parallelis, 
maculis duabus testaceis ad medium obliquis et albis setis 
notatis. 
Long. 0.12. 

Paramatta ; a rare species. 
The thorax is fringed with silvery setce so as to give it a 
somewhat cordiform appearance. At first sight it bears a consider- 
able resemblance to the preceding species. I have not been 
able to examine the intercoxal plate. But I place it in this 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. 9 

genus because of its general resemblance to the preceding species. 
La Ferte appears to lay but little stress vipon the shape of the 
intercoxal plate ; whereas La Corclaire makes it of considerable 
importance. These two species appear designed to unite 
Formicomtts and Antliicus. The large intercoxal plate (at least 
of Australis) placing them in the former genus of La Cordaire, 
and the rather square shoulders bringing them into the Anlhicus 
of La Ferte-Senectere. 

Sp. 14. F. senex. De La Ferte. 
Totus nigro-fuscus, subtiliter punctatus, griseo-pilosus ; thorace 
antice transversim globoso ; elytris pone humeros non- 
nihil depressis. 
Long. .12. 

Nova Hollandia (baie des chiens-marins.) 
I have not seen this species in any collection, and simply 
copy the description from La Ferte. The head is transverse ; and 
head, thorax, and elytra ai'e all of a fuliginous black, the latter 
apparently without any spots. It cannot therefore be mistaken 
for the next species. 

Sp. 15. F. Mastersii. 
Nigro-piceus, creberrime punctatus griseo-pilosus ; capite ro- 
tundato ; thorace antice transversim globoso, postice con- 
tracto ; elytris maculis duabus obliquis elongatis rufis pone 
humeros, alteris duabus griseis pone medium minoribus ; 
antennis et tibiis ferrugineis. 
Long. .17. 

South Australia ; collected by Mr. Masters, Australian Museum. 
This species evidently comes near the preceding. The an- 
terior maculjB do not appear to be constant. The roundness of 
the head as well as the size of the insect, and the maculae on the 
elytra, readily distinguish it from F. senex. 

I have ventured to name this fine species after its discoverer. 

Genus VI. ToMODERUS. De La Ferte. 
This small genus has been formed for tlie reception of the 



10 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

species of anthicwf having a short robust form, moniliform an- 
tenna, and a distinctly bilobed thorax. Erichson has marked one 
from Tasmania, (which La Ferte considers, however, to be iden- 
tical or nearly so with a European form T. compressicolUs.) 

Sp. 16. T. vinctus. Erichs. 

Pubescens, rufo testaceus ; thorace latiusculo cordato ; elytris 

striato-punctatis, fascia pone medium nigra. 
Long Ij lin. 
Tasmania. 
The original insect is in the Berlin Museum. I have not seen 
the species. The thorax is transverse, lightly canaliculate on the 
back, and impressed at the base ; the feet flavous. The black 
fascia on the elytra alone appears to separate it from T. com- 
l^ressicollis. 

Genus VII. Anthicus. Payk. 

The genus Anthiciis is by far the largest of the whole family, 
at least in point of number. It includes all those which have the 
head free, the antenna inserted on the lateral edges of the head, 
the thorax rounded in front, and more or less strongly contracted 
posteriorly, but seldom bilobed ; the thighs only moderately if at 
all enlarged, and the intercoxal plate triangular. Most of the 
species are subject to very great variations in the size and shape 
of the spots on tlie elytra, so that the shape of spots or of fasciae 
on the elytra, or even their presence or absence, can never be 
absolutely depended upon. The colour of the 'thorax and of the 
antennie and feet, and of the ground-work of the elytra is, how- 
ever, generally constant. 

La Ferte has, for the sake of convenient arrangement, divided 
the whole genus into four great sections, distinguished by the 
degree of contraction and convexity of the thorax. These are 
again subdivided into eighteen separate groups, some of which 
are not represented in this countiy. The arrangement is 
probably a merely artificial one ; yet it has its conveniences, and 
is therefore a considerable assistance in the study of the genus. 
I shall therefore follow it as closely as possible, although I feel 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. H 

considerable hesitation as to the particular group under which 
some species should be placed. 

La Ferte's first division of the genus is as follows ; — 

Div. 

A. — Thorax without lateral fossa 

a „ strongly contracted posteriorly I. 

b „ slightly contracted posteriorly 

a disk of thorax, flat and transversely 

rounded anteriorly II. 

b' convex disk and regularly globular 

anteriorly III. 

B. — Thorax with latei'al fossa IV. 

Division I. 

Group I. 

Elytra parallel, hardly convex, elongated, very square ante- 
riorly. Thighs somewhat dilated. Thorax long and bilobed. 

Sp. 17. A. nitidissimus. 

■ Nitidus, subglaber ; capite piceo ; thorace ferragineo, antice 
rotundato postice valde coarctato ; elytris antice punctatis 
ad humeros quadratis piceis, fascia pone humeros flava et 
maculis post medium duabus flaTOScentibus, antennis et 
pedibus flavis. 

Long. .09. 

Gawler ; South Australia. 

A very elegant species, which I place with some hesitation in 
La Ferte's first group. The elytra are nob so much elongated as 
in rhe other species ranged in this group — ^to judge by the descrip- 
tions. The thorax is somewhat suddenly contracted at the 
middle, and swells out again towards the base. The humeral 
fasciae of the elytra are somewhat oblique, in consequence of the 
triangular piceous mark at the scutellum. It is of a more ferru- 
gineous yellow than the maculae. The species seems to ap^Droach 
A. Bodriguii. Latr. 



12 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

Group IV. 

Thoi'ax auteriorly transversely-globose, contracted towards 
the base, the posterior sides slightly inflated ; the base generally 
very minutely tubercled. 

To this group several Australian species are referable. 

Sp. 18. A. pulcher. 
Ferrugineus subtiliter punctatus depressus, antennis flavis 
articulis 7 — 10 moniliformibus ; elytris piceis fasciis duabus 
latis flavis notatis, apicibus rotnndatis ; pedibus flavis. 
Long. .09. 

Gawler ; South Australia. 
The fasciae occupy the greater part of the surface of the 
elytra, and are often separated at the suture. The whole 
insect is very depressed. The thoracic tubercles are very 
distinct. The species appears to approach A. dehilis from Egypt, 
and belongs to that division of the group, with elongated sub- 
parallel and flattened elytra. 

Sp. 19. A. bomiidiodes. La Ferte. 
AntliicMS strichis, Erichsen. 
Niger nitidus glaber ; thorace pone medium valde compresso ; 
elytris maculis duabus altera humerali altera pone medium 
roinuta, flavo-testaceis, antennis pedibusque fuscis, tarsis 
pallidis. ^ 

Long. .18 ; (? .08. an error here in the description of La Ferte. ? ) 
Adelaide ; South Australia. 
I have received from Mrs. Kreusler, from Gawler, two 
specimens which agree with the above description, except in 
regard to the size of the insect and the colour of the elytra. I 
hesitate to regard them as undescribed. The elytra on my speci- 
mens are very convex and oval. 

Sp. 20. A. comptus. La Ferte. 
Piceus, nitidus, capite nigro ; thorace basi ferrugineo ibique 
subtilissime tuberculato ; elytrorum fasciis duabus, anten- 
narum basi tarsisque flavis. 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. 13 

Long. 

Adelaide and Gawler ; South Australia. 
An insect very variable in colour of elytra. Mrs. Kreusler 
has sent me a specimen from Gawler, and Mr. MacLeay has also 
received it from Mr. Odewahn, of the same place. 

Sp. 21. A. imifasciatus . 

■ Piceo-ferrugineus nitidus thorace bisinuato antice polito postice 
alte punctato ad basin bi-tuberculato ; elytris ovatis punctu- 
latis brunneis, fascia flava pone humeros unica ; antennis et 
pedibus ferrugineis. 
Long. 0.10. 
Gawler ; South Australia. 

A very pretty species near A. prcedator, distinguished from its 
Australian congeners, by its single broad yellowish fascia behind 
the omoplates. There is no appearance of spots elsewhere. It 
appears to be not uncommon. 

The name unifasciatus has been used by Schmidt, but as it 
appears to have been applied to the previously described A. venus- 
tus (Villa) ; this name so descriptive of the present species is 
again at liberty. 

Sp. 22. A. hellus. 

Piceus politus capite nigro subtilissime punctato ; thorace 
pone medium valde compresso ad basin punctato 2-tuber- 
culato ; elytris nigro-piceis lateribus convexis raacuHs 
duabus humeralibus testaceis, duabas alteris pone medium ; 
tarsis flavis. 

Long. .10. 

Paramatta ; not uncommon. 

It is very near A. convptus, but the spots on the elytra, though 
very variable in size, never appear to unite as in that species. I 
frequently capture it upon the roof of the house and among the 
dead leaves and sand in the gutters. It is a very pretty and 
active species. 



14 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

Sp. 23. A myrteus. 
Pubescens politus punctatus capite nigro ; thorace piceo aut 
ferrugineo, bisinviato, ad basin plerumque bitnberculato ; 
elytris piceo-brunneis bifasciatis lateribus sub-convexis ; 
femoribus piceis ad basin ferrugineis. 
Long. .10. 

Paramatta ; Gawler. 
This species appears to have a wide range. Specimens 
which I have received from Mrs. Kreusler, captured in South 
Australia, are not to be distinguished from Paramatta specimens. 
It frequents flowers, and is very common among the Leptospermim 
and Bursaria when in bloom. I also frequently find it on roses. 

The antennee are rufous at the base, but piceous at the four 
last joints. The base of the thorax is sometimes so deeply 
punctured as to appear almost foveolate. The fascise on the 
elytra sometimes cover the greater portion of the surface. 

Sp. 24. A. cjlaber. 
Totus castaneus glaberrimus minutissime punctatus capite 
rotundato ; antennis subclavatis : thorace vix ad basin 
tuberculato ; elytrorum marginibus extei'ioribus piceis. 
Long. .08. 

Gawler ; South Australia. 
This species belongs to the same division with A. comptus, 
from which it is distinguished by the roundness of its head as 
well as its colour. I can discover no trace of setas or pubescence 
with a strong lens. The antennte are more clavate than usual ; 
the last three joints gradually increasing in size. 

Sp. 25. A. intricatus. 

Ferrugineus glaber ; thorace antice transverse rotundato 
postice contracto intricate ; elytris brevibus lateribus con- 
vexis punctatis flavo-ferrugineis et medium et ad apicem 
piceomaculatis lineis suturalibus notatis. 

Long. .08. 

King George's Sound ; Mr. Masters, Australian Museum. 



BY THE REV R. L. KING, B.A. 15 

The only specimen collected by Mr. Masters is in the 
Museum. The intricate markings of the thorax and the short 
glabrous elytra, distinguish this species very readily from its 
congeners. The base of the thorax is distinctly tuberculate. 

Sp. 26. A. Denisonii. 

Capite piceo punctato polito antennis ferrugineis articulis 
ultimis piceis ; thorace ferrugineo antice transversim 
rotundato postice contracto lateribus sub-parallelis ad basin 
punctato non tuberculato ; elytris pubescentibus vix punc- 
tatis brunneis fasciis liavis latis duobus, lateribus convexis. 

Long. 0.10. 

Port Denison ; in Mr. MacLeay^s collection. 

Although the thorax is not, or very indistinctly tubercled at 
the base, yet the general appearance of this species is that of 
the group under which I have placed it. The latter half of the 
thorax is nearly cylindrical. The sutural lines are very close to 
the suture. Another specimen from Port Denison in the same 
collection, is much lighter in its colour, but in the paucity of 
specimens, I must place it under the same name. 

I have dedicated the species to our late Governor- General, 
whose name has been given to the locality from which these 
specimens have been received. 

Sp. 27. A. diihius. 

Pallide ferruginous politus ; thorace binodoso non tuberculato ; 
elytris subconvexis flavo-castaneis pubescentibus ; anten- 
narum basi tarsique flavis. 

Long. 0.07. 

Paramatta ; in grass. 
I have placed the species in this gi'oup very doubtfully. 
There are no traces of the thoracic tubercles, though the general 
contour is that of this group. There are hardly any traces 
of marking on the elytra, except in some specimens a slight 
deepening of colour principally due to the transparency of these 
organs, permitting the abdomen to be seen. 



16 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

Group V. 

Thorax rugose, globose anterioi-lj — the sides generally spiny ; 
elytra more or less striato-punctate. 

Sp. 28. A. scy dm een aides. 

Castaneus punctatus setosus ; capite piceo antennis castaneis 
articulis 9 et 10 nigris ; thorace lateribus subangulosis 
subspinosis ; elytris eonvexis liumeris piceis et duabus pone 
medium maculis transvei'sis ; pedibus castaneis. 

Long. 0.10. 

Collection of W. MacLeay, Esq. 

I believe this species to be near the 5th group ; the strong 
black setse on the thorax have ihe appearance of spines ; similar 
strong black setae cover the pubescent elytra. The punctures on 
the elytra are strong, but not at all arranged in stri^. The very 
convex elytra separate it very decidedly from its Australian 
congeners. 

Division II. 
Group VII. 
Thorax cordiform, transverse ; whole body flavo-testaceous. 
A small group ; but represented in Australia by certainly two if 
not three species. 

Sp. 29. A. luridus. 

Pallide ferrugineus, punctatus, sericeo-pubescens ; elytris luri- 

dis immaculatis. 
Long. O.IO. 

Port Denison. Collection of Mr. MacLeay. 
This species comes very near the European form A. hima- 
culatus, but it wants the maculae on the elytra — as indeed is the 
case with some specimens of bimaculatus. The head and thorax 
are decidedly ferrugineous. 

Sp. 30. A. apicalis. 
Luridus, parce setosus ; capite, antennis et elytrorum humeris 
et apicibus murinis ; ad medium elytrorum maculis duabus 
murinis. 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. 17 

Long. 0.10 

Port Denison ; Mr. MacLeay's collection. 
This species also comes very near himaculatus and luridus. 
The elytra are less closely punctate, and therefore I am justified 
in placing more value than usual on the colour of the elytra in 
separating the species. 

Sp. 31. A. immaculatus. 
Pallide ferrugineus punctulatus capite transverse postice qua- 
drate ; thorace subtransverso, antice transverse rotundato 
postice contracto ; elytris brunneis immaculatis lateribus 
rotundatis, lineis suturalibus notatis. 
Long. 0.12. 

South Australia ; Mr. Masters. 
The elytra are much rounded, the sutural lines very distinct. 
There is a faint ferrugineous tint on the shoulders and along the 
suture. A paler variety 1 have received from Mrs. Kreusler, 
captured at Gawler, but it seems to be the same species. There 
are several specimens of the typical form in the Museum collec- 
tion, brought by Mr. Masters from his late Western excursion. 

Group VIII. 

Thorax oblong trapezoidal flattened ; body shining, almost 
glabrous ; elytra parallel, hardly convex, anteriorly quadrate. 

Sp. 32. A. floralis. Payk. 
Fusco-brunneus nitidus glabriusculus, subtiliter punctulatus ; 

antennis, pedibus, thorace, elytrisque antice ferrugineis. 
Long. 0.13. 

South Australia ; Mrs. Kreusler. 
This species, for I cannot distinguish any real difference 
between the South Australian and the European specimens, has 
not only a large range, but has also been long known. It was 
described by the great naturahst in his Fauna Suecica as Meloe 
Floralis in the year 1735 ; and under different names has been 
frequently described since. It has been found in Lapland, Scot- 

15 



18 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

land, Spain, Turkey ; in Algeria, Egypt, and the Cape of Good 
Hope ; in the United States, Chili, and Guadeloupe. Its capture 
in South Australia, by my friend Mrs. Kreusler, shows that it 
has travelled even further than had been supposed by La Ferte. 

Sp. 33. A. hesperi. 
Setosus ; capite nigro punctulato, occipite bilobato ; thorace 
ferrugineo minute punctato ; elytris punctatis lateribus 
subsinuatis, maculis lateralibus qnatuor, duabus pone 
humeros duabus pone medium obliquis. 
Long. 0.12—0.13. 

Paramatta ; Gawler, South Australia ; common in grass ; on 
fences at evening. 

The spots vary in size, at times nearly meeting at the suture, 
at times nearly obsolete. The elytra are slightly convex at the 
sides, widest near the posterior spots. They are depressed 
behind the shoulders. The bilobation of the head is sometimes 
hardly observable. 

I cannot distinguish some of the Gawler specimens from 
those fi^oixi Paramatta. 

Sp. 84. A. inonilis. 
Pallide ferrugineiis, subtiliter punctatus pubescens ; antenna- 
rum articulis 7 — 10 mouiliformibus ; elytris piceis, humeris 
ferrngineis, maculis duabus pone medium flavo»ferrugineis, 
apicibus rotundatis. 
Long. 0.09. 

Gawler ; Mrs. Kreusler, Australian Museum. 
The head is somewhat piceous. The moniliform clava of the 
antennas and the broad pale ferrugineous fascia on the shoulders 
of the elytra distinguish it from its congeners. I have received 
a single specimen from my friend Mrs. Kreusler. A second 
specimen is in the Museum, collected by Mr. Masters in South 
Australia. 

Sp. 35. A. Kreusleri. 
Piceus nitidus subtiliter punctulatus setosus ; capite nigro 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. 19 

occipite bilobato ; thorace ferrugineo ; elytris lateribus sub- 
parallelis macalis duabus rotundatis flavo-ferrugineis pone 
humeros, duabus pone medium ; antennis et pedibas flavis. 

Long. 0.09. 

Gawler ; Mrs. Kreusler, Australian Museum. 

In this very pretty species, the shoulders are hardly so square 
as in the type of the group, the whole insect being narrow. The 
spots on the elytra are generally round, but at times they are so 
much enlarged as almost to form fascisG. The abdomen is not 
wholly covered by the elytra. I have dedicated this apparently 
common and pretty species to my friend the discoverer. 

Sp. 3(5. A. cjiaron. 
Niger nitidus punctulatus subglaber ; thorace subtrapezoidali 
antice nigro, ad basin flavo-rufescenti ; elytris immaculatis 
antice punctatis ; antennis et pedibus ferrugineis. 
Long. 0.10. 

King George's Sound ; in the collection of W. MacLeay, Esq. 
This interesting species is evidently near A. infernus, from. 
Mexico, and A. stijgms from the Cape of Good Hope. The basal 
half of the thorax is yellowish red, the rest is black. The anterior 
portion of the elytra is deeply punctured ; towards the apex the 
punctures almost disappear. The elytra are broadest behind the 
middle. The suture is slightly raised posteriorly. The whole 
insect is very thinly covered with whitish setae. 

Group X. 

Thorax subcordate, the length either equal to, or a little 
greater than the breadth ; elytra varying in colour and punctu- 
ratiou. 

Sp. 37. A. crassipes. La Ferte. 
Fusco-brunneus, subnitidus, parum crebre punctatus, sub- 
hirsuto-pubescens ; autennarum basi tibiis tarsisque rufes- 
centibus elytris maculis duabus obliquis altera pone 
humerum altera pone medium flavo-ferrugineis ; tibiis 
maris iusolite incrassatis introrsum emarg'inatis. 



20 DEiSCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

Long. 0.10. 

Nova Hollandia. 
This was one of the species brought to Paris by M. Verreaux. 
I have not yet been able to distinguish it among the many 
specimens in my collection. The male is distinguished by the 
shape of the posterior tibite, which are robust, broad, somewhat 
bent, but not armed with a spine or tooth, as in the next species. 

Sp. 38. A. brevicollis. 

Setosus ; capite nigro transverso polito, antennis ferrugincis 
articulis ultimis piceis ; thorace brevi transversali cordato, 
antice rotund ato postice contracto, minutissime punctato ; 
linea basali transversa impressa ; elytris fusco-diaphanis ad 
latera et apicem, interdum piceo-notatis ; femoribus piceis 
tibiis flavo ferrugineis ; tibiis posterioribus maris introrsum 
spinigeris. 
Long. .12. 
Randwick. 
The markings of the elytra are subject to considerable 
variation. The male is always darker than the female. 

A species from Gawler, sent me by Mrs. Kreusler, agrees in 
every respect with this description, except that I have not been 
able to discover the spine on the posterior tibice of the male. 
Many of the specimens are smaller, and some are even larger 
than the Randwick specimens. 

The Randwick specimens were captured in some abundance 
on the leaves of Encalypius marginata running about with great 
activity. Others were found in the flowers of a Leptospermum. 

Sp. 39. A. glahricollis. 

Ferrugineo-piceus, tenue pubescens ; capite nigro antennis ad 
basin ferrugineis, clavatis ; thorace ferrugineo cordato 
glabro ; elytris subtiliter punctatis, duabus fasciis latis flavo- 
testaceis ; femoribus piceis. 

Long. .10. 

Gawler ; Mrs. Kreusler. ^ 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. 21 

The thorax is widest close to the head, and then contracts 
very gradually to about f of its length ; the remaining third 
being nearly cylindrical. The fasciae of the elytra are broad and 
almost united at the suture. The sides of the elytra are some- 
what rounded. 

This species is near the preceding, but the thorax is longer. 

Sp. 40. A. crassus, 
Fusco-brunneus, parum crebre punctatus hirsute-pubescens ; 
antennis ferrugineis ; thorace transverse obcordato, ad 
basin ferrugiueo ; elytris maculis duabus flavis, posterioribus 
obliquis. 
Long. .14. 

Gawler ; Mrs. Kreusler. 
This description applies to one of two specimens, the head 
and thorax of which is blackish brown, and the maculae on the 
shoulders are somewhat large. In the second specimen the head 
and thorax are ferrugineous, and the flavous spots cover nearly 
the whole elytra, and are widely connected at the suture. It 
is one of the many species which we owe to the industry of Mrs. 
Kreusler of Gawler. It comes near the description of A. crassipes. 

Division III. 
Group XI. 
Thorax elongated, elytra cylindrico-elongated. 

Sp. 41. A. nigricollis. 
Parce setosus punctulatus niger ; thorace antice rotuudato 
bisinuato ; elytris maculis flavescentibus 2*^"^ pone humeros 
et 2''"^ pone medium, pedibus ferrugineis. 
Long. .10. 

Gawler ; Mrs. Kreusler. 
The elytra are elongated ; the suture is somewhat prominent ; 
the spots behind the shoulder are sub-triangular> those behind 
the middle almost unite to form a fascia. 

The species belongs to the first division of this group, having 
the sides of the thorax bisinuate. 



22 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

Sp. 42. A. Wollastonii. 
Brnnneus opacus punctatus sparse pubescens, occipite quadrato 
plerumque bilobato ; tlioi'ace simplici lateribus nou bisinua- 
tis ; elytris ad humeros quadratis ad basin et latera piceis ; 
macula media prope apicem picea, tarsis posterioribus sub- 
elongatis. 
Long. .14. 

Gawler ; Mrs. Kretisler. 
The posterior tarsi are as long as the tibia. The species is 
subject to considerable variety of coloration, occasionally it is of 
a light straw colour without any trace of spots on the elytra. 
The bilobation of the occiput is not constant. The elytra are 
deeply and closely punctured ; the thorax less deeply. The 
punctures on the head are smaller and more scattered. 

I have named the species after my old friend, the author of 
" The Insects of Madeira " and other standard Entomological 
works. 

Sp. 43. A. varus. 
Piceus punctatus parce setosus ; thorace subelongato antice 
rotundato postice minirae • contracto ; elytris elongatis 
subparallelis 4-maculatis, 2*"*^ maculis rotundatis pone 
humeros, 2"^"^ pone medium fasciam formantibus, lineis 
suturalibus notatis ; pedibus flavescentibus. 
Long. .10. 
Paramatta. 

This handsome species of which I have but a single specimen, 
comes very near A. Wollastonii, but may at once be distinguished 
by its deeper punctures on the elytra and its sutural lines. Like 
the preceding species, the punctures on the thorax are minute. 

Sp. 44. A. Gaivleri. 

Setosus punctatus ; capite piceo postice rotundato occipite bilo- 
bato ; thorace bisinuato ferrugineo, superne convexo ; elytris 
piceis, antice alte punctatis, flavo-fasciatis maculis flavis 
duabus subrotundatis pone medium ; pedibus flavis, antennis 
ferrugineis. 

Long. .12. 

Crawler. Mrs. Kreusler. 



BY THE REV. R. L. KING, B.A. 23 

The punctures on the base of the elytra are much deeper than 
those on the apex. The flavous fascia is very close to the 
shoulder. There is hardly any trace of sutural lines on the elytra. 
The bilobation of the occiput is very distinct. 

Division IV. 
Sides of thorax more or less foveolate. 

Group XVI. 

Thorax oblong, slightly dilated at the base, and therefore 
bisinuate at the sides. 

Sp. 45. A. Krefftli. 
Ferruginous politus punctatas; capite postice rotundato ; thorace 
brevi oblongo, antice subtruncato postice vix contracto ad 
basin parce dilatato, 2''"^ foveolis lateralibus, ad basin 
linea transversa ; elytris magnis humeris quadratis pone 
humeros depressis, lateribus subparallelis, lineis suturalibus 
et fascia obsoleta ad medium notatis. 
Long. .14. 
Paramatta. 

I have captured but a single individual of this species. The 
foveoles on the sides of the thorax are nearly circular, and 
apparently connected by a line. The sides of the elytra are 
nearly parallel, very slightly increasing in breadth, to about two- 
thirds of their length. 

I have dedicated the species to the talented Curator of the 
Australian Museum, the Secretary of our Society. 

Sp. 46. A. M.acLeayii. 

Rufus politus minute punctatus setosus ; capite postice bilobato ; 
elytris lateribus convexis fusco-nigris, 2*"" maculis pone 
humeros triangularibus rufescentibus, altera unica pone 
medium, lineis suturalibus distinctis ; antennarum articulis 
ultimis piceis ; pedibus piceis, tarsis rufis. 

Long. .12. 

Illawarra ; W. MacLeay, Esq. 



24 DESCRIPTION OF ANTHICIDES OF AUSTRALIA. 

This species was found by Mr. MacLeay in dead Palms, on 
the sea beach at lUawarra. It is very distinct from all its 
Australian congeners. The foveoles on the thorax are more 
elongated than in the preceding. 

I have named the species after its discoverer. 

Abnormal Species. 
Sp. 47. Anthicus concolor. 
Totus brunneus opacus setosus alte punctatus ; thorace 
elongato antice transverse rotundato postice lateribus 
parallelis, ad medium longitudinaliter depresso ; elytris 
striato-punctatis, sutara postice subelevata. 
Long. .13. 

Paramatta ; B. L. King : under dead log, with ants. 
This species, of which I have but a single specimen, (there 
is also one in Mr. MacLem/s cabinet) hardly appears at first 
sight to belong to the genus ; nor does it on examination appear 
referable to any of La Ferte Senectere's group, though in some 
respects it approaches VIII. The punctures are very deep, 
especially on the elytra. The thorax is contracted postei-iorly 
above, but the sides are slightly spread towards the base. The 
antennae are stout, scarcely clavate, joints obconical. 

I prefer for the present placing it at the end of the genus, as 
abnormal. So also the following. 

Sp. 48. A. abnortnis. 
Ferruginous punctatus nitidus planus subglaber ; capite trans- 
verso piceo, antennis piceis articulis obconicis ; thorace 
transverse quadrato lateribus sub-parallelis, ad medium 
longitudinaliter obsolete canaliculatis ; elytris lateribus 
parallelis fascia picea ad medium, apicibus piceis ; pedibus 
piceis tarsis ferrugineis articulo penultimo minutissimo. 
Long. 0.10. 
Paramatta. 

A very abnormal Anthicus, the transverse thorax being 
hardly contracted at all, and the penultimate joint of the tarsi 
being almost invisible. It is thinly covered with short ad- 
pressed setae. 



On the genus Charagia of Walker, 
By A. W. Scott, M.A. 

[Read 2nd September, 1867.] 

The Catalogue of the Lepidojotera Heterocera contained in the 
British Museum characterizes in page 1569, the genus Charagia, 
to which generic description is appended a Synopsis of the 
species known to Mr. Walker ; the arrangement being appa- 
rently founded on the colour and marking of the superior wings, 
without taking into due consideration the probability of the 
existence of any of those striking sexual dissimilarities in both 
of these respects, which this group, particularly in the smaller 
kinds, so forcibly exhibits. 

As this Synopsis, when applied to the species of the genus, 
enumerated in the catalogue, and to those additional ones in my 
collection, now to be described, conveys an erroneous principle, 
I am desirous of contributing further information than I have 
already given in the Australian Lepidoptera, on this beautiful, but 
little known, portion of the Hepialidean family, and I therefore 
gladly avail myself of this opportunity to place in a concise 
manner before the members of this Society the practical know- 
ledge I possess of the transformations, sexual distinctions, and 
habits of the Australasian Charagise, in the hope by so doing 
that a clearer and more accurate perception of this restricted 
genus might be attained. 

Genus Chaeagia.^ 

Charagia. Walker ; Brit. Mus. Cat. Lep. Het.,p. 1569: Scott. Aust. Lep.,p. 3. 
Hepialus. Lewin, Doubleday, Boisduval ; Stephen's M.S. S. 

Alee longae, sat latte, leviter falcatge, apice acuminatas ; angulis 
analibus valde rotundatis.' Caput porrectum. Oculi magni, 
prominuli. Antennse brevissimsB, aliquantulum moniliformes, 
leniter ciliatae. Palpi labiales distincti, porrecti, triarticulati. 



1 Generic characters copied from my work on Australian Lepidoptera, p. 3. 
^ Alse posticaB non semi-hyalinsB. Brit. Mus. Cat., p. 1548. 



26 ON THE GENUS CHARAGIA OP WALKER, 

Maxilla obsolefcfB. Abdomen elongatum, alas posticas superans, 
lateraliter moclice compressum, omnibus partibus ejusdem mag- 
nitudinis, apice flabellatum. Pedes excalcariti/ anterioi'es magni, 
validi, tibiis tarsisque dense pilosis ; postici parvi, graciles, tibiis 
hirsutis, in maribus externe scopatis ; tarsi 5-articulatis, fere 
glabris. Larva carnosa, cjlindrica, ad caput incrassata ; capite 
segmentoque anteriori corneis ; in ligno habitans, plerumque 
librivora. Pupa lactiflorea, antice squamosa, postice mollis, 
elongata, annulis serratis. 

Wings long, moderately broad, slightly falcate, pointed at the 
tips and much rounded at the hinder angles. Head projecting. 
Byes large and prominent. Antenna minute, somewhat monoli- 
form, delicately ciliated. Labial palpi distinct, porrected in front, 
3-jointed. Maxillee obsolete. Body elongated, reaching beyond 
the wings, slightly flattened laterally, nearly of an equal thick- 
ness throughout, with the extremity fan-shaped. Legs spurless,^ 
anterior and second pairs large and powerful ; tibi^ and tarsi 
densely pilose ; posterior pairs, small, weak, with long hairs on 
the tibiEe, forming in the males a large brush exteriorly ; tarsi 
5-jointed, almost naked. Larva fleshy, elongated, cylindrical, 
stoutest anteriorly, with head and first segment horny ; living in 
the interior of trees and subsisting principally upon the bark. 
Chrysalis yellowish- white, anterior portion squamose, abdominal, 
soft and elongated with serrated corneous rings. 

Mas Alse anticse virideo argentes, nonnunquam aureo, fasciatas. 

Ate posticjB subcasruleaa. 

-rn A 1 i.- • • 1 £■ • ( virescens, Douhleday. 

Jt<oem.. Alse anticse virides lerruffmeo \ o j.^.- -A 

n ■ , i fecotti, Kamsaii. 

lasciatas ) -,. . y- •'. 

\ lignivora, Lewm. 

AT ,• • •-, , f Ramsayi, Scott. 

Alee antiCEe virides argfenteo \ ■ , i\r t 

o • , ° < scripta, MacLeay. 

lasciatse j • • \ a j^ 

(^eximia r bcott. 

»i ,. . .-,. . ( Lewinii, Stephens. 

Alae anticas purpureee viridi varise <, , i A^ ,. 

^ ^ ( splendens, Scott. 

Alae posticEe rubicund ulas. 



1 Mr. Walker, in the British Museum Catalogue, p. 1569, states that the 
hind tibise have two very minute apical spurs ; these have been repeatedly 
looked for, but hitherto unsuccessfully. 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 27 

The larvfB excavate to some little depth, cylindrical cells in 
the interior of the stems or branches of several species of indi- 
genous plants, in which they wholly pass their lives and undergo 
all the primary changes. Over the external entrance of this 
habitation they construct a covering, composed of triturated 
portions of bark and wood held together by silken threads ; the 
edges of which are closely adherent to the branch, and thus leave 
no opening for the egress or ingress of the animal. In this 
particular, the protective covering, although similar in construc- 
tion and general appearance, differs materially from that formed 
by the caterpillars of the Gryptophasce, where the lower portions 
are left unattached to afford to the insects a free passage in order 
to obtain their natural food, the leaves of the tree within the 
stems of which they are located. At first, this covering is but a 
speck, but by the time the larvae have attained maturity, it 
assumes an inflated bag-like form of considei^able dimensions, and 
which, in many instances, is so large that the smaller plants are 
destroyed by the bark having been eaten completely round the 
main stem. 

The chrysalis is placed within this dwelling, head upwards, 
and, being provided with serrated corneous abdominal rings, and 
considerable vitality, is capable of locomotion, a power it 
exercises frequently by moving up and down the walls of its cell 
with alacrity. At the last metamorphosis, the anterior half of 
the chrysalis is thrust out of the aperture, when the skin rends 
asunder, and the perfect insect departs, leaving the exuvi^ 
remaining in that position. 

The perfect insects are about the most beautiful of the 
nocturnal Lepidoptera ; but unfortunately the colours fade quickly 
after death ; and it is difficult to imagine that the specimens we 
meet with in cabinets, were ever the beings so brilliant at their 
births ; consequently no adequate idea can be formed of the 
beauty of the various species of this group, nor correct descrip- 
tions given of the colouring, unless by the examination of very 
recent specimens. These moths are nocturnal in their habits, and 
fly with great velocity. 



28 ON THE GENUS CHARAGIA OF WALKER, 

1. — Charagu virescens. 

Charagia virescens. Brit. Mus. Cat. Lep. Set., p. 1569. 
Charagia rubroviridans. Brit. Mus. Cat. Lep. Set, p. 1570. 
Hepialus rubroviridans. Stephens M.S S. 
Hepialus virescens. Doubleclay fDiiffenbach' s Neiv Zealand.) 

Male length of w^ings 49 lines : of body 26 lines^ 

Superior wings, lovely bluish green, relieved by 
various silver markings, which consist of: — a line 
along the basal portion of the costa ; an irregular 
broadish obliquely transverse band a little beyond the 
middle ; another semicircular one nearer to the base, 
with numerous others, small and famt, disposed 
transversely between the nervures and terminating in 
lunules at the exterior border. 
Inferior wings, delicate bluish-white. 
Abdomen and thorax bluish-green. Eyes reddish- 
brown. Antennce tawny. 

Female length of wings 62 lines : of body 28 lines. 

Superior ivings, bright green with numerous distinct 
irregular reddish-brown bands and lines mostly dis- 
posed transversely. The costa is barred wdth green 
and brown, and the whole wing edged by reddish- 
brown, the exterior portion being indistinctly scal- 
loped. 

Inferior wings, pale purplish-red. 

Abdomen purplish red, becoming green towards the 
extremity. Thorax green. Eyes and Antenn(s simi- 
lar in colour to those of the Male. 

Larva length at maturity about 37 lines, is throughout of a 

pale ochreous tint, with the squamose portions much 
darker, and the head black-brown. 

These caterpillars were found in great abundance near the 
town of Auckland by my friend Mr. Edward Ramsay, of Do- 
broyde, near Sydney, when on a visit to New Zealand. 

They inhabited the limbs of various trees, and on the stem 

1 1 2 lines to the English inch. 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 29 

of one of them, the Melicytus ramiflorus, or, " Mahoc,^^ of the 
natives, there were no less than thirty habitations of this species 
" literally " as he remarked " studded with their abodes." 

I feel fully assured that the Charagia virescens and the Cha- 
ragia rubroviridans of the Brit. Mus. Cat., pp. 1569 and 1570, 
are the male and female of the one species. 



2. — Charagia lignivora. 

Charagia lignivora. Brit. Mus. Cat. Zep. Set., p. 1570. Scott's Aust. Lep„ 

p. 5, pi. 2. 
Hepialus lignivora. Lewin. Lcp. Ins, New South Wales, pi. 16. 

Male Length of wings 24 lines : of body 15 lines. 

Superior ivings, vivid emerald green, occasionally 
yellowish, adorned by a continuous rather broad sil- 
ver band, running from the base along the costa, to 
about l^ths of its length ; then transversely across the 
wing to the posterior border, from which it proceeds 
towards the half of the discoidal cell, and again 
returns to the interior margin near its base, thus 
forming in its course a somewhat triangular figure of 
bright silver over the bed of green. 
Inferior wings, pale bluish, inclining to a greenish 
hue ; towards the tips are two short indistinct bars, 
slightly yellowish. 

Head and Collar yellowish white : tufts on the thorax 
emerald-green. Abdomen, upper part greenish white, 
central delicate purple, and terminal emerald green. 

Female length of wings 31 lines : of body 18 lines. 

Superior ivings bright light green over which are 
delicate irregular lines of scarlet, those under the 
costa and across the wing a little beyond the middle, 
are much the most distinct. The outer angle and the 
interior portion of the base of the wing, are both 
occupied largely by deep purplish-red, each of these 
patches relieved by spots of lighter and brighter 
colour placed within them. 



30 ON THE GENUS CHARAaiA OF WALKER, 

Inferior icings pale yellowish-red. 
Body yellowish red ; the tufts on the abdomen, the 
collar, and the head being silver-grey. 

Larva about 24 lines in length, of a dark cream-colour 

throughout, with the head and squamose portions 
darker. 
The larvee inhabit the interior of many plants, such as the 
Casuai-ina, Callistemon, Eucalyptus, Dodonsea, Acmena, &c., and 
are plentifully found within a few miles of Sydney, the lower 
Hunter River district, and many other localities of New South 
Wales. 

Lewin, m his woi'k on the Lepidopterous Insects of New South 
Wales, has figured two females, representing them as of diflPerent 
sexes. The correct description of the male of his sjiecies, the 
lignivora, is now given. 

3. — Charagia Lewinii. 

Charagia Lewinii j 

Charagia LamDerti S r > i- > 

Hepialus Lewinii j ^^ ^ 

Hepialus Lamberti \ '■ 

Male length of wings 21 lines; of body 12 lines. 

Sujyerior wings, bright emerald green relieved by 
various silver markings, namely, a line from the base 
along the costa to about fths of its length ; from this 
point transversely across the wing to the margin of 
the inner border, then back towards about half of the 
discoidal cell, where it nearly meets another short 
band, proceeding from the basal portion of the in- 
terior margin, thus having formed an almost right 
angle immediately under the discoidal cell : within 
the space embraced by the two latter bands are placed 
two small transverse marginal streaks, and likewise 
over the outer angle a distinct spot is seen. These 
silver markings are brought out in strong relief by a 
shading of purplish brown. 
The disposition of the silveiy lines and colour of the 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 31 

wings assimilate greatly to those of the Gh : Ugnivora, 
but are infinitely more slender and delicate. 
Inferior wings, pale bluish assuming a purplish tinge 
towards the anterior border. 

Female... ...length of wings 24 lines ; of body 14 lines. 

Sjijoerior ivings, bright I'ich purple ; a large green 

band on the middle, deeply notched in front ; dilated 

and angular behind. 

Injerior wings, pale rich purple. 

The body in colour throughout, similar to the wings, 

but darker towards the lower extremities. 

Larva in length about 19 lines ; is of a cream-colour, slightly 

pinkish in parts ; the head is black-brown, and the 
squamose portions pale reddish-brown. 
The larvEe are common in the vicinity of Sydney, usually 

occupying the main stems of the small saplings of the casuarinae. 
The Charagia Lamberti of the Brit. Mus. Cat. is the male of 

this species, for which we have retained the name of Lewin, 

originally bestowed on the female insect by 3Ir. Stephens. 

4. — Chaeagia splendens. 

Charagia splendens. iScoit, Aiist. Lep., p. 6., pi. 2. 

Male length of wings 26 lines : of body 15 lines. 

Superior wings, bright yellowish green, mottled with 
darker, and gaily adorned by numerous complicated 
markings. A continuous band of silver proceeds 
along the costa to about frds of its length, crosses 
the wing a little beyond the middle to its inner 
margin, thence towards the base in a zig-zag manner, 
forming in this latter course a couple of distinct 
angles. Two silver bands, connected at their upper 
ends by a curve, run parallel to the exterior margin, 
and between these and the first described transverse 
band ai-e two others of a bright, light, silvery-bluish 
green. On the centre of the wing is placed conspicu- 
ously a rather large V shaped figure, also of bright 
bluish-green. 



32 ON THE GENUS CHARAGIA OF WALKER, 

Inferior wings, lustrous bluish white. 
Thorax green ; head, collar, and tufts on thorax 
silvery. Ahdomen bluish white, with an oblong green 
stripe towards the extremity. 

Female length of wings 33 lines : of body 20 lines. 

Superior ivings, the centre occupied by a large tri- 
angular shaped patch of vivid light satin green, deep- 
ening exteriorly, whose lower angle reaches the 
margin of the inner border, and whose basal portion 
immediately under the costa, bears three distinct 
notches. The apical angle to about half of the 
exterior margin also displays a broad mark of the 
same intense green possessing a deep indentation on 
the inner side. With the exception of a distinct spot 
of green near the outer angle and two others adjoining 
the base, the remaining portions of the wing are of a 
deep rich purple. 

Inferior ivings, pale purplish red, becoming darker 
towards the hind angle. 

Head and thorax, reddish brown ; ahdomen, pale pur- 
plish red, deepening towards the extremity. 

Larva is much larger, but in other respects similar to that 

of the Gh : Ugnivora, and these two species occupy 
in common the plants before enumerated. 
We may remark that subsequent to the foregoing descriptions, 

much larger and finer specimens have been obtained. 

5. — Chaeagia Ramsati 

Male length of wings 51 lines : of body 27 lines. 

Superior ivings, light satiny emerald green, adorned 
with various large silvery spots, edged around by 
black-brown, sparingly disposed along the costa and in 
an oblique transverse row a little beyond the middle. 
Three small marginal lunules near the outer angle, 
two small oval spots on the discoidal cell, a dental 
marking towards the base of interior margin, and 
between these two latter, a much curved irregular 
line, — all of silver. 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 33 

Inferior wings, bluish, slightly yellowish towards the 

tip. 

The hody pale emerald green with two large spots of 

silver on the lower part of the thorax ; ^w/fe of hair 

on upper parts of abdomen, silvery ; eyes purplish. 

Female length of wings QQ lines : of body 33 lines. 

Stcperior wings bright grass green, relieved by large, 
very bright silver spots brought out in strong relief 
by an edging of black brown, disposed in a similar 
manner to those on the male ; but being larger and 
brighter they are more conspicuous and striking. 
The curved line, before described, becomes here a 
large spot. 

Inferior wings yellov^^ish-red. 

Body and Jiead similar in colour, but paler, to the 
superior wings, bearing two reddish-spots on the 
thorax ; the tufts on the abdomen are yellowish- red, 
and the fan-shaped extremity purplish. 

Larva.. length about 42 lines: creamy- white throughout 

except the segments over the true feet and the head, 
which are yellowish -brown ; pinkish annular lines, 
also, between each segment. 
The larvae live within the stems of the acmena, alectryon, and 

a few other plants, and were by no means uncommon on Ash 

Island, Hunter River, when I resided there. 

6. — Charagia Scripta. 

Charagia scripta. TF. MacLeay, M.S.S. 

Male length of wings 35 lines: of body 18 lines. 

Superior wings, basal moiety emerald green, exterior 
moiety lustrous yellowish-green, sepai-ated from each 
other by an oblique transverse band of silver, scalloped 
within ; the whole surface adorned with numerous 
labyrinthic silvery lines and bands. The inner half 
is thickly studded over with short lines of silver, 
principally disposed transversely ; the other by three 
bands, also of silver, which run parallel to the 
exterior margin ; the outer one assuming a chain- 
c 



34 ON THE GENUS CHARAGIA OF WALKER, 

like pattern : the exterior marginal border is like- 
wise deeply silvered. 
Inferior loings bluish- white. 

Thorax and head emerald green ; eyes purplish ; 
abdomen bluish-white, with silvery tufts. 

Female length of wings 48 lines ; of body 26 lines. 

Superior tvings bright grass-green with numerous 
intricate markings of much lighter colour, principally 
on the basal half. Two oblique transverse rows, 
beyond the disc, of large bright spots of silver, each 
one placed between the veins, with the exception that 
in the external row, between the 2nd and 3rd median 
nei'vules no spot exists, and also three or four others 
which adjoin the exterior angle, these, together with 
a tooth-shaped marking nearer to the base, and the 
delicate silver lines across the costa, complete the 
oi"namentation of the upper wings of this peculiarly 
handsome insect. 

Inferior ivings yellowish-red inclining to pale yellowish- 
green towards the tips. 

Head, thorax and abdomen bright green ; tufts of 

yellowish-red hairs cover the upper portion of the 

abdomen, excejjting the three ultimate segments : 

the fan-shaped extremity is also . fui'nished with 

similar reddish hairs. 

Several chrysalids in the wood were brought from King 

George's Sound, Western Australia, in 1861, for W. MacLeay, 

Esq., of Elizabeth Bay ; and in whose collection the perfect 

insects are ; from these specimens the foregoing description has 

been taken. 

7. — Charagia Scotti. ? 

Charagia Scotti. $ Ramsay, M.S.S. 

Female length of wings 54 lines : of body 26 lines. 

Superior wings bright grass-green, delicately dotted 
over with pm-plish-bi'own spots : a slight purplish- 
brown transverse band beyond the middle. 
Inferior wings yellowish-red, paler towards the tips. 



BY A. W. SCOTT, MA. 35 

This insect was captured by Mr. Ramsay at Lisniore, 
Richmond River, and the plumage much injured before it 
reached me. In this locality Mr. Ramsay found the caterpillars 
in abundance infesting, among other plants, the nettle tree, 
(urtica gigas) the native Wistaria, &c., &c., but I regret to say, 
that the several he had so cai'efully collected, were all destroyed 
while in their transit to Sydney. 

8. ChARAGIA EXIMIA. ^ 

Male length of wings 36 lines : of body 20 lines. 

Superior wings bright emerald-green, chastely relieved 
with numerous markings ; a transverse oblique band 
of gold a little beyond the middle, but not reaching 
to either margin ; many short, curved lines of bright 
silver disposed between the veins ; those to the 
exteripr of the transverse band form a chain-like 
pattern ; while those to the interior are irregular and 
labyrinthic. 

Inferior wings bluish with a slight shade of green ; 
cilise round the outer angle, golden-brown. 
Head pro-iliorax and tippets similar in colour to the 
fore wings ; thorax and ahdo'inen to the hind wings ; 
eyes and antennce dark purplish-brown. 

Larva length about 42 lines, slightly setigerous, creamy-white 

with a tinge of purplish-red between the segments. 
These larvse inhabited the small stems and branches of the 
DodonEea angustifolia, and were found at Ash Island plentifully. 
All the larv^ we had collected, excepting the one, were lost, arising 
from the want of proper and sufficient nutriment, the pieces of 
wood, in which they were, having become from long keeping 
hard and sapless. The above measurement was taken from one 
of the finest caterpillars, with which the rearing proved 
unsuccessful ; the perfect insect, therefore, whose dimensions are 
given above, is evidently much undersized, and would probably 
reach, under favourable circumstances, to between 50 and 55 lines. 
The more than usually falcate wings ; the band on the fore 
wing and the brush of hair on the tibiae of the posterior leg, 
being of a golden colour ; and the somewhat setigerous larva 
will readily distinguish this species from any of the foregoing. 



Description of a new genus belonging to the family HepiaUdce, 
of Stephens, 

Bij A. W. Scott, M.A. 

[Read 7th October, 1867.] 

The paper on the genus " Charagia" of Walker, which I read 
at the last meeting of our Society, was an endeavour to correct 
certain important errors existing in the Catalogue of the British 
Museum, in relation to this group ; to describe, in a concise man- 
ner, the habits and metamorphoses of the insects ; and to place 
on record the existence of several new species. In illustration 
of the descriptions I tlien gave, I exhibited the coloured drawings 
of all the species enumerated by me, and I trust I succeeded in 
affording a clear perception of a class of insects, so peculiarly 
Australasian. 

I now purpose to present to the attention of the members a 
new and very remarkable example of the Hepialidea-n family, 
and which I hope will prove not only acceptable, but will justify 
me in ci^eatiug a new genus for its reception ; one, I think, 
readily distinguished by several marked characteristics from any 
other, with which I am acquainted. 

I may here remark that the fourteen genera which compose 
the Hepialidae, according to the Museum Catalogue, are but 
feebly represented by species, no less than five of them having 
but one each, and it is therefore fairly presumable that the 
family is, at present, but inadequately known. 

The magnificent forests and brushes of the temperate and 
tropical portions of the globe, thick with underwood, and climb- 
ing plants, must prove, if carefully searched, a prolific source for 
the production of very many new sjjecies of these lignivorous 
lepidoptera ; and it is to such localities that the intelligent col- 
lector will have to look to supply the existing deficiencies. 

Before proceeding further, I have to express my regret that 
the two examples, male and female, of the insect, now under 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 37 

consideration, were forwarded to me in an imperfect state, but 
the numerous component parts, still perfect, render tlie restora- 
tion of the remains, a task of no great difficulty, and a matter of 
considerable certainty. 

The female insect was captured, while at rest on the trunk 
of a tree, by my friend J. E. Stacy, Esq., while on a journey 
between Port Macquarie aiid Newcastle ; to him, therefore, as its 
discoverer, I dedicate the specific name. 

A short time afterwards the male was sent to me in a letter 
by the late Dr. Stephenson, of Chatham, Manning River, accom- 
panied with the following remai'ks : — " I found these splendid 
remains in a spider's web, and as it might be probable you may 
not have seen the insect before, I have taken the liberty of for- 
warding them to you." 

The Manning River, as you are aware, is a short distance to 
the southward of Port Macquarie, and in the line of road to 
Newcastle, so that the two specimens of this rare insect were 
obtained nearly in the same locality, although at different 
periods. 

Hepialid^. Brit. Mus. Cat. Lep. Bet., p. 1548. 
Genus. Zelottpia. 

Corpus crassum ; abdomen longumj alas posticas superans ; 

alee longiB, angustas, apice sub-acuminatte, margine exteriore per- 

obliquo, tantum versus apicem lineis alternis vicibus undulatis ; 

alge anticse ocellatae, macula discali vitrea. 

Foeni caput porrectum ; oculi prominuli : maxilla obsoletee : 

palpi breves, tenues : pedes excalcariti ? anteriores 
validi, pilosi ; postei'iores graciles. 

Mas Pedes posteriores graciles, valde Isesi. 

Body thick ; abdomen long, extending beyond the wings ; 

wings long, narrow, slightly acuminated at the tips, extremely 

oblique along the exterior border, and crumpled towards the 

apices ; fore wings with an ocellus on each, whose disc is 

vitreous. 

Female Head projecting ; eyes large and prominent ; maxillse 

obsolete ; palpi short, slender ; legs spurless F an- 
terior pairs stout, pilose ; posterior slender. 



38 NEW GENUiS OF THE HEPIALID.E, 

Male Legs, posterior pair, slender, much injured. 

The wing veins are similar in structure to those of the genus 
Hepialus. 

Zelotypia Stacyi. 

^^«^e length of wings 76 lines; of body 32 (?) lines'. 

Siiperior wings dark rich fawn-colour ; on the centre 
of each, a large dull green-coloured ocellus, encii^cled 
by a dark brown line, edged with white outwardly, 
and bearing within it a sub-diaphanous pearly spot. 
A broad, irregular, oblique transverse band of silver, 
crosses the wing slightly beyond the ocellus ; the 
whole space between this and the exterior margin is 
occupied by numerous wavy, very fine, distinct, light- 
coloured lines, disposed labyrinthically over the 
ground-colour ; the inner portion of the wing is 
thickly sprinkled over with silver, assuming towards 
the interior angle a series of ovoidal figures. The 
costa is very broad and powerful, amply barred 
transversely with irregular angular bands of silvery- 
white. 

Inferior wings pale bright salmon-colour, dai'ker 
towards the tips, where they become crumpled. 

Female length of wings 117 lines ; of body 47 (?) lines. 

Superior wings pale salmon-colour ; the centre of each 
is occupied by a large, bright, ochreous ocellus, 
girded by rings of brown and white, and carrying 
within it a largish sub -diaphanous spot of a pearly 
hue ; a little to the outward of this latter spot, and 
nearly in the centre of the ocellus, a black lunule- 
shaped marking stretches across ; the discal areolet 
is thickly powdered over with white ; the broad space 
beyond and below the ocellus, from the tip of the 
wing to its interior base is fully occupied with 
numerous chaste wavy lines of reddish-brown, which 

' 12 lines to the English inch. 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 39 

become clouded towards the tip, but more distinct 
and vivid towards the basal portion, forming there 
five conjoined, semi-circular spots of dark brown, 
relieved by pale-coloured rings. The costa is very 
large and powerful ; dark rich brown with numerous 
irregular, somewhat angular, transverse bars of yel- 
lowish-white. 

Inferior tvmgs, salmon coloured throughout. Head, 
thorax, and abdomen, salmon coloured. 

The fanciful generic names usually adopted to distinguish the 
members of this family, has induced me to apply the equally 
fanciful one of Zelotypia to this new genus, derived from the 
male of these monsters possessing large dull-green eyes. 



On the " Ayrotis vastaior," a species of Moth, now infesting 
the Sea-board of New South Wales, 

By A. W. Scott, M.A. 

[Read 2l8t October, 1867.] 

Agrotis V\STAT0R. 

Agrotis vastator, A. W. Scott, M.S.S. W. B. Clarke, Sydney Morning Herald. 
Agrotis Spina? Guen : Brit. Mus. Cat., Lep. Het., p. 348, part 10. 

Corpus robustum. Proboscis sat longa, Fasciculus frontalis 
prominens. Palpi breves, porrecti, pilosi ; articulus 3us longi- 
conicus, 2i diraidio non longior. Antennae corporis dimidio paulo 
longiores : Mas. dimidio apicali pectinatae apices versus ciliat^ ; 
Fcem. simplices graciles. Abdomen alas posticas paulo superans, 
planum non cristatum. Pedes anteriores parvi ; posteriores longi, 
graciles ; tibiae anticae spinosae ; posticae calcaribus quatuor longis. 
Alee longae, sat angustae, plante non diflexEe ; anticse apud costam 
rectae, apice vix angulatee, margine exteriore sat obliquo. 

Body robust. Proboscis rather long. Frontal tuft distinct. 
Palpi short, porrect, pilose ; middle joint about double the length 
of the terminal and half as long again as the basal. Antenna 
somewhat longer than half of the body ; Male pectinated to half 
its length, thence ciliated to the tip ; Female setaceous, ciliated 
beneath. Abdomen extends a little beyond the hind wings, 
terminating in a small tuft, flat, not crested. Legs anterior pair 
small, tibiae spinose in front ; 2nd pair longer with two spurs ; 
posterior pair long and thin with four long spurs ; tibiae and tarsi 
of all the legs covered with elongated scales and rows of setee. 
Wings long, rather narrow, flat not deflexed when at rest ; fore 
wings straight in front, hardly angular at the tips, slightly 
oblique along the exterior border. 

Length of the body 12 lines : of the wings 24 lines.* 

Male : fore wings shining light brown, mottled with darker ; 
a velvety black lanceolate longitudinal discal band, containing 



A line is ei^ual to xV inch. 



EY A.. W. SCOTT, ]\I.A. 41 

within it, near to each extremity, two spots of light colour 
bordered by a thin black line, the exterior one reniform and 
much the largest, the interior one orbicular with, in some, a 
black centre. Numerous wavy transverse lines, generally very 
indistinct, but in some specimens well defined : exterior margin 
entire with a fringe of silvery hue and bordered rather broadly 
by darkish brown ; hind wings light glossy neutral tint becoming 
towards the outer border much darker, and consequently making 
the marginal fringe more distinct than in the upper wing. 

Female : wind's similar in markings to those of the male but 
the colour is throughout much darker and richer. 

The thorax of both sexes is similar in colour to the fore wings, 
and possesses well defined tippets : the abdomen resembles in 
hue the hind wings. The sexes can readily be distinguished, by 
the male being light in colour, and having the antennce pectinated. 

The eggs of lepidopterous insects, when laid in genial 
weather, will hatch in a few days ; those in the autumn will 
remain quiescent during the winter, and come into existence the 
following spring. The dui'ation of the Chrysalis stage is likewise 
extremely variable, and dependent on the difference of tem- 
perature. By keeping the egg and the chrysalis in an ice-house, 
their development may be retarded for two or three years. When 
removed to a hot-house, ten days or a fortnight will suffice to 
bring the insect into animated existence : the principle being 
beautifully illustrated by the late introduction of the ova of the 
Salmon and Trout into the Colony of Victoria. 

The caterpillar of this moth is fleshy, a little attenuated at 
each extremity, sub-vermiform in appearance, and of a livid colour, 
varying much in shade, with the anterior segment furnished with 
a horny plate. It has sixteen feet, measures at maturity about 
24 lines, and undergoes its transformation in the ground. The 
chrysalis is cylindro-conical, of a shining yellowish brown, and 
protected by a slight cocoon of a rough irregular ovoid form, 
composed of agglutinated earth. 

The genus ArjroUs^ even in its limited sense, possesses very 



^ Agrotis. Ochsenheimer ; Stephens ; Boisduval ; British Museum 
Catalogue, Lepidoptera Heterocera 3rd series, p. 303. 



42 ON THE AGROTIS VASTATOR, 

many species which have a range nearly world-wide. The cater- 
pillars of several species, such as the one now under consideration, 
are very destructive, on account of their numbers, feeding on the 
roots and leaves of low herbage, and hiding during the extreme 
heat of noon under clods of earth, stones and other convenient 
places. Their voracious attacks upon the growing crops in the 
field or in the garden, have been for many years past experienced 
to a frightful extent, and are too well known to require description. 
The number of larvse in seasons which prove favourable for their 
development almost surpasses belief, but our astonishment will 
cease when we take into consideration the probable progeny 
of those vast numbers of moths now infesting the sea-board of 
this land for some hundred miles, each pair producing an oflF- 
spring of many hundreds, who in their turn, before the cold sets 
in, will prove equally prolific. The caterpillar no sooner emerges 
from the egg than it begins the great business of life, and falls 
vigorously to work — eating — and his growth is marvellously rapid ; 
" few creatures can equal him in the capacity for doubling his 
weight, not even the starved lodging-house slavey when she gets 
to her new place, with carte-blanche allowance and the key 
of the pantry ; for in the course of twenty-four hours, he will 
have consumed more than twice his own weight of food ; and 
with such persevering avidity does he ply his pleasant task, that, 
it is stated, a caterpillar in the course of one month, has increased 
nearly ten thousand times his original weight on leaving the egg ; 
and to furnish this increase of substance, has consumed the pro- 
digious quantity of forty thousand times his weight of food — 
truly a ruinous rate of living !" ' A few years ago on the Hunter 
River, I carefully examined a paddock of twenty-five acres, under 
oats for hay, which was much infested by the caterpillars of this 
species, and found that nearly every stalk had at least one cater- 
pillar on it, numbers had two ; many three : taking the plants at 
twenty to the square foot, and each with only one caterpillar, the 
result would be 21,780,000 of these insects, and supposing that 
all these lived to become moths, each pair producing by the end 
of the season a progeny of 80,000,^ the total produce for the 



J British Butterliies, by W. S. Coleman, 1860. 
'^- Reaumur. 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 43 

twenty-five acres would amonnt to 871,200,000,000. What then, 
calculating under the same conditions, would be the number of 
the caterpillars, which were, at the time I allude to, ravaging 
whole districts ? — a long line of figures almost unpronounceable. 

Allowing for every reasonable loss caused by weather, not 
unusually severe, accident, or by their numerous enemies, still 
there would remain quite sufiicient to produce those vast numbers 
of moths, collected together from a wide range of country and seen 
clustering in caves, under ledges of rocks, in churches, houses, 
barns, in every nook and cranny where their gregarious habits 
lead them to, seeking shelter from the glai'e of day. I, therefore, 
think that this natural increase, aided by favourable weather, is 
quite suSicient to account for the swarms of moths recently seen 
in many localities, and remarked upon by several correspondents 
of the " Sydney Morning Herald " without having recourse to 
improbable theories. All moths are in their primary stages 
purely terrestrial, and cannot " come in from the sea " in the 
sense used by a writer in the " Newcastle Chronicle.''^ They 
cannot be born there, neither are their wings adapted for so long 
a flight as to cross the ocean from any point of land to the 
eastward of our coast, particularly " in the teeth of westerly 
winds." Indeed many swarms of insects, besides the lepi- 
doptera, are known to be blown from the land, while a few others 
wilfully fly seaward under some unaccountable, almost insane, 
desire ; but all these inevitably perish. Mr. Lindley, when at 
Brazil, in 1803, saw an immense flight of butterflies for several 
days successively, which were observed never to settle, but flew 
in a direction from north-west to south-east, direct towards the 
ocean where they must certainly perish ; and Mr. Barrow in 
1797, writes "the locusts covered an ai"ea of nearly 2,000 square 
miles were driven into the sea by a north-west wind, and formed 
a bank three or four feet high, and when the wind was south-east, 
the stench was so powerful as to be perceptible at the distance of 
one hundred and fifty miles." 

Without multiplying instances I would suggest that the 
moths seen by vessels at sea were either endeavouring vainly to 
emigrate, or, what is far more prohahle, were driven away from 
the land by the prevalent westerly winds, and perished by 



44 ON THE AGROTIS VASTATOR, 

thousands in the ocean : those seen returning to the shore were 
the fortunate few that had escaped before being carried too far 
to sea. I remember some years ago walking along the sands for 
about five miles, between Newcastle and Red Head, and 1 
observed an almost continuous undulating line of dead bodies, 
several deep, of these moths, marking the wash of high water 
along the whole of this length of beach, interrupted only by 
the rocky headlands, and probably this exhibition of the fate of 
these insects in such vast numbers was continued for a con- 
siderable distance on either hand. 

Were it not for the wholesale destruction of these vast 
assemblages of insect pests, caused by the violence of winds — 
by the fall of rain for several days successively — by sudden 
change of temperature — and by the host of enemies, following in 
their wake, consisting of insectivorous birds, and reptiles, and 
the numerous family of the Ichneumonidse, I fear all the 
endeavours of man by artificial means to eradicate them would 
be baffled. The abundant food furnished by the roots and leaves 
of the various weeds and grasses growing over a vast extent of 
waste lands, will always ensure too ample a supply of such 
noxious creatui-es. We can, however, check in some degree the 
injury to our crops, and thus moderate the evil ; by ploughing 
and harrowing the fallow lands, thus cutting off the immediate 
supply of food ; by passing the roller again and again over the 
growing crops when practicable ; and by encouraging, not 
molesting, the many species of birds that visit the fields in flocks 
on such occasions. I have seen crows, large brown hawks, 
magpies, cranes, spur-winged plovers, and a host of smaller 
birds, enjoying during the day ample meals furnished by these 
caterpillars, and had a great difficulty in preventing the overseer 
from driving them away " because," he said, " they eat the 
lucerne." The large family of Ichneumons (little wasp-like 
creatures) is also a great ally of man in the war of extermination, 
for they pierce the bodies of the living caterpillars, depositing 
their eggs within them, and thus cause a slow but certain death 
before the larvae can attain to the perfect or winged state, and 
on this account they ought to be encouraged. I add a few words 
to assist in that object, although with but faint hope of success. 



BY A. W. SCOTT, MA. 45 

The cocoons of the Ichneumons are silky, small, oval and 
yellowish ; attached in groups to walls, palings, and frequently 
over the remains of dead caterpillars : " these," Mr, Westwood 
observes, " ignorant people mistake for the eggs of the caterpillar, 
and destroy, foolishly killing their benefactors." 

The present season, dry and warm, has been unusually pro- 
lific in the production of these insect pests, whose gregarious 
habits have been so well described by the Rev. W. B. Clarke of 
St. Leonard's,* who, inter alia, says that the state of St. Thomas' 
Church, North Shore, on the 14th September, from the enormous 
numbers of moths, was such that Divine service could not be 
held therein ; that seven days hard labour in endeavouring to 
subdue them had been spent in vain ; and that he had counted 
more than 80,000 grouped together on the windows. Accounts 
from Newcastle, 70 miles to the north, Wollongong 40 miles to 
the south of Sydney, and other distant parts confirm this state- 
ment as to numbers, and clearly point out ivliat has been, and 
assuredly leads us to the question what loill he ? should the 
weather continue as it is. Complaints have already reached us 
from Windsor, of whole fields of young Lucerne being destroyed 
by caterpillars, and the farmers appealing to the public for relief. 
The intelligent agriculturist will accept this warning, take time 
by the forelock, and quickly adopt such means as may be at his 
command — for half a loaf is better than none. 

The remains of a moth which Mr. Clarke captured in 1851, 
near the summit of the Mount Kosciusco range in the Australian 
Alps, was sent to mo by that gentleman for comparison with 
those moths now so abundant around us. I have placed this 
mutilated specimen under the microscope, and I believe it to be 
identical with the Agrotis above described. Mr. Clarke assures 
me that this insect was the species so celebrated for being the 
food of the aboriginals of that large district for many years gone 
by, and known by them as the Bougong. I have never visited 
the Upper Tumut, and know nothing personally about the history 
of these very remarkable moths. 



* See Rev. W. B. Clarke's interesting letter in the "Sydney Morning 
Herald," 1 1th October, 1867. 



46 ON THE AGROTIS VASTATOR, 

I therefore add a few lines descriptive of tlieir habits which I 
obtained from a source unmistakeably accurate, and which I 
hope will prove interesting. 

In January and March of the year 1865, my friend Mr. 
Robert Vyner visited the Bougong Mountains, accompanied in 
the first instance by an aboriginal, " Old Wellington," and in the 
other by Mr. Sharp of Adelong, Old Wellington, and another 
black-fellow, both of these latter well acquainted with the habits 
of the moth, called by them " Boogong " and " Gnarliong," 
indiscriminately. The tops of these mountains are composed of 
granite, and present a series of lofty peaks, and it was up one of 
these, named by the natives " ISTumoiadongo " he and his com- 
panions toiled for nearly six hours before attaining the summit ; 
so steep and rugged was the path that even the wild cattle never 
attempted to ascend to these heights. 

The moths were found in vast assemblages sheltered within 
the deep fissures, and between the huge masses of rocks, which 
there form recesses, and might almost be considered as " caves." 
On both sides of the chasms the face of the stone was literally 
covered with these insects, packed closely side by side, over head 
and under, presenting a dark surface of a scale-like pattern — 
each moth, however, was resting firmly by its feet on the rock, 
and not on the back of others, as in a swarm of bees. So numerous 
were these moths that six bushels of them could easily have been 
gathered by the party at this one peak ; and so abundant were 
the remains of the former occupants that a stick was thrust into 
the debris on the floor to a depth of four feet. Mr, Vyner tells 
me that on this occasion he ate, properly cooked by Old 
Wellington, about a quart of the moths, and found them 
exceedingly nice and sweet, with a flavour of walnut, so much 
so that he desires to have " another feed." His clothes, by the 
moths dashing against them on being disturbed, were covered 
with honey, and smelt strongly of it for several days. At the 
time these multitudes assembled, the tea tree and the small 
stunted-looking white gums were in full blossom, no doubt yielding 
up their honied treasures to these nocturnal depredators, whose 
flight, when issuing from their hiding places to the feeding 
grounds, was graphically described by Old Wellington " very 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 47 

much like wind, or flock of sbeep." The Tumut blacks report 
that the moths do not congregrate on the high peaks in the 
spring time, but they first locate the lower mountains, feeding 
on the blossoms which appear there earlier, and then work 
their way up to the higher peaks where the plants are later in 
bloom. 

The Bougong moths are collected and prepared for food by 
the Aborigines, in this wise — a blanket or sheet of bark is spread 
on the floor ; the moths on being disturbed with a stick, fall down, 
are gathered up before they have time to crawl or fly away, and 
thrust into a bag. To cook them a hole is made on a sandy spot, 
and a smart fire lit on it until the sand is thoroughly heated, 
when all portions left of the glowing coal are carefully picked 
out, for fear of scorching the bodies of the insects, (as in such a 
case, a violent storm would inevitably arise, according to their 
superstitious notions). The moths are now poured out of the 
bag, stirred about in the hot ashes for a short time, and then 
placed upon a sheet of bark until cold. The next process is to 
sift them carefully in a net, by which action the heads fall 
through, and thus, the wings and legs having been previously 
f-inged off, the bodies are obtained properly prepared. In this 
state they are generally eaten, but sometimes they are ground 
into a paste by the use of a smooth stone and hollow piece of 
bark, and made into cakes. 

In this locality were seen many of these holes, having been 
formed years ago for a similar purpose by the then numerous 
blacks. 

Mr. Vyner also mentions, that at the period of his visit to 
this peak, he saw hundreds of crows and magpies feeding upon 
these moths, and the foot marks and other tracks of native dogs 
and tiger cats were abundant, leading direct to the fissures of the 
rocks, and although he did not see these animals, he adds, " I am 
certain from their traces that they must feed upon them," (the 
moths). 



48 ON THE AGROTIS VASTATOR. 

Note. — Since the foregoing observations were written, a 
friend of mine, who resides on the Upper Tumut, forwarded to 
me a batch of moths, captured on the heights of the Bougong 
Mountains, purposely, at my solicitation, at the proper season, 
when the Bougong insect is known to congregate in such multi- 
tudes, and when the aborigines in former times were wont to 
assemble for the annual feast upon their bodies. 

I found upon examination of these recently acquired speci- 
mens, that they consisted of the males and females of the Oxy- 
canus fuscomaculatus of the Brit. Mus. Cat. Lep. Het., p. 1574; 
the genus being the 12th of Stephen's family, Hepialidee. At 
this result I felt much relieved, for I had made many unsatisfac- 
tory enquiries, being doubtful of the genus Agrotis, respecting 
the habits of the larvae, which produced in another stage an 
article of agreeable and nourishing food to the natives of the 
locality, so plentifully and probably for generations ; to these 
questions, I invariably received for answer, that no assembled 
multitude of caterpillars, sufficient to account for the vast hordes 
of Bougong moths, were known in the Tumut district. 

It, therefore, appears highly probable that the present insect 
is the true Bougong Moth ; and I give the following reasons for 
this belief : — the body is plump, very oily and sweet to the taste, 
characters similarly entertained by most of the species of the 
Cossidae and Hepialidae ; and the larvae, being under-ground root- 
feeders, would not necessarily attract notice, either from their 
vast numbers or destructive qualities, the latter only exercised 
upon wild and valueless plants. 

These natural conditions are wholly opposed to those pos- 
sessed by the Agrotis vastator ; in whom the abdomen of the 
perfect insect is neither unctions nor palatable ; and whose 
habits in the larval state are strictly external, and, at uncertain 
periods of visitation, highly injurious to the interests of man ; 
characteristics perfectly sure to attract the attention of even the 
most unobservant to their existence. 



On the Ornithoptera Cassandra, 
By A. W. Scott, M.A. 

[Read 6th July, 1868.] 

My friend, Mr. Edward P. Ramsay of Dobroyde, near Sydney, 
having sent me for examination a case containing numerous 
lepidopterous insects, collected for liim by Mr. E. Spalding at 
Rockingham Bay, Northern Australia, during the months of 
December, January, and February last, I had the gratification of 
finding in this collection no less than nine males and seven 
females of the Ornithoptera Cassandra ; an insect, the female of 
which, the male being then unknown, I described and figured in 
page 131, plate 10, of the first volume of our Transactions, from 
an individual captured at Port Denison in February 1862, by Mr. 
George Masters, now assistant Curator of the Australian Museum. 

This was the only specimen I possessed to compare with 
those many nearly-allied species, said to be exclusively confined 
to Australia, and having a geographical range there from 
Richmond River, New South Wales, to Cape York, Queensland ; 
a latitudinal extent of nearly 1000 statute miles^ ; and likewise 
with those inhabiting the adjacent, as well as the more eastern of 
the Indian Islands, comprehending Woodlark and Darnley 
Islands, New Guinea, Amboyna, Solomon Islands, &c. As the 
members of this group closely resemble each other in form and 
colouring, I, therefore, experienced some difiiculty in determining 
the species to be new : my view in this respect has however now 
been happily confirmed by the recent acquisition of so many fine 
examples of both sexes. 

Before proceeding to furnish a detailed account of this 
species, I may be allowed to premise, with respect to the 
plumage of the female insects, now presented to view by these 
recently acquired specimens, that I find among themselves, 
considerable disparity in the size, not in the disposition, of the 
dull- whitish markings on the anterior wings ; and more especially 
to those previously described ; so much so as to necessitate a 
farther description, supplemental to the one already given. 

1 The expression " extreme North of Australia," used by Doubleday and 
Westwood, in defining the range of the Australian Ornithoptera, is incorrect. 



50 ON THE ORNITHOPTERA CASSANDRA, 

These very deviations, however, tending as they do uniformly 
towards the diminution of the spots, as borne by the original 
specimen, itself comparatively obscure, render the majority of 
the species still more sombre and consequently more readily 
distinguishable from others of the family. 

OrNITHOPTERA CASSANDRA. 

Ornithoptera Cassandra. $ W. Maclean M.S. Scott Trans. Ent. Soc.,KS.TF. 
Vol. 1., p. 131, pi. 10. 

Male length of wings : 74 1 lines largest, 67^ lines smallest 

of the 9 specimens. 

Suijerior wings. Upper surface deep velvety-black, 
relieved by two broad irregular curved bands of rich 
satiny green, which spring from the base ; the one 
runs under the costa towards the anterior angle ; the 
other, along the inner margin and the outer one, as 
far as the first discoidal nervule : immediately over 
this latter is placed a large brownish-patch, disposed 
longitudinally. Under surface, black, with a central 
spot, and a large macular band, formed of contiguous 
wedge-shaped spots, placed between the nervules, of 
gilded green. These wedge-shaped spots are dis- 
tinctly separated into two divisions by a broad black 
band. There are, also, two irregular greenish streaks 
towards the anterior angle, the inner one being short, 
almost macular. 

Ivferior wings, upper surface, bright silky-green, with 
the entire marginal border and four, sometimes, five 
somewhat large oval spots, disposed between the 
costal nervure and the first, or second median nervule, 
one in each space, velvet-black : between these spots 
and the posterior border are two, or, three minute 
golden-orange specks, which, however, are not seen 
in some of the specimens. This tendency to change 
also exists in the large quadrate golden-coloured 
space at the immediate basal portion of the anterior 
margin, shown by some, while in others it is much 
lessened, or nearly obsolete. Long, fine, closely-set 
dark-brown hairs spring from immediately under- 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 61 

neath the inner margin, and rising upwards partially 
envelope the upper portion of the abdomen. The 
outline of the nervures are easily traceable by narrow, 
but distinct, lines of black. Under surface, cor- 
responds to the upper, but the green is of a more 
golden hue ; the black spots, here seven in number, 
become larger and less oval, and the nervures are 
broadly picked out with black. 

Heai and thorax deep black, the latter bearing above 
a central line of satiny-green, and below crimson spots 
on either side. Abdomen bright golden-yellow. 

Female length of wings, 93 lines largest ; 87 lines smallest of 

the eight specimens. 

Sttperior ivings, upper surface rich black-brown, re- 
lieved with various irregular patches and spots of 
impure white, similar to, but in lesser degree than 
any of its congeners. Three of these, more or less 
developed, are placed in the discoidal cell ; one, rarely 
two, immediately under ; and a series beyond these, 
running obliquely across the wing, exhibits in some 
specimens (see plate 10, vol. 1) largish and'distinct 
markings ; in others, small and faint ; in the first 
case they become parted into two at the discoidal 
nervules, in the other, indistinct, almost obsolete. A 
few small spots, absent in some, along the outer 
margin, complete the whole relief of this sombre 
insect. Under surface similarly marked to the upper. 
Inferior wings, upper surface possesses four wedge- 
shaped markings of dusky white placed one in each 
space, between the second sub-costal and third median 
nervules, although in some specimens, that one 
between the second sub-costal and first median 
nervules, is obsolete, exhibiting only a small trian- 
gular spot at its lower end, the black ground colour 
of the wing entirely covering the remaining space. 
These markings become dull ochraceous towards their 
outer margins, and bear in their centres large, some- 
what heart-shaped spots of dark brown, which unite 
in the disc with the median nervules. 



62 ON THE ORNITHOPTERA CASSANDRA, 

A slib-quadrate patch of dull ochraceous colour, is 
placed over the anal angle ; and two other spots of 
brightish yellow are situated between the first and 
second sub-costal nervules, near to the anterior angle. 
Under surface similar to the upper, but the white is 
purer, and a bright yellow replaces the ochraceous 
tint. The margins of the wedge-shaped patches are 
also entire. 

Head and thorax dark black-brown, the latter bearing 
ahove a central longitudinal band of satiny green, 
and heloiv crimson spots on each side. The abdomen 
dark black-brown, grayish towards the tip, and 
broadly barred underneath with yellow bands. 
Habitat : Port Denison and Rockingham Bay, Northern 
Australia. 

In estimating the distinctive characters, I shall limit my 
comparisons to those species only, which are comprised within 
Doubleday and Westwood's 1st group of the genus Ornithoptera, 
and which exhibit the peculiar type of colouring, and occupy the 
same geographical range of the present insect : purposely 
excluding the 2nd group, represented by the Amphrisius, 
Amphimedon, Darsiiis, Pompeius, and others, from their marked 
dissimilarity. 

The Ornithoptera Cassandra differs ; from the O. Priamus by 
being smaller ; by the males possessing on the under wings 
small golden specks over the outer margin, instead of two large 
ones, and by the absence of one, between the costal nervure and 
sub-costal nervule ; by having on the underneath surface of the 
upper wings, a distinct double row of gilded- green spots ; by 
the females bearing a green stripe on the thorax ; by the various 
white patches on the anterior wing being smaller and less 
numerous ; and by the much larger spots of fuscous-brown 
which occupy the central portions of the tear, or, wedge-shaped 
markings on the posterior wing. 

Prom the O. Pronomus, it differs by not exhibiting in the males, 
the central veins of metallic green, additional to the two curved 
bands on the anterior wing ; by having four or five black spots, 
instead of three, on the posterior wing : on the vmderneath of 



BY A. W. SCOTT, M.A. 53 

the superior wing, by the much lesser green discal spot, and by 
the contiguous macular baiid being separated into two : by the 
females in the several markings of impure white being very much 
smaller and by the tear-shaped spots being of different form, 
with their centres more occupied by dark-brown. 

From the 0. Euphorion, (of which the female is only known) 
it differs by the faint white band in the discoidal cell and by the 
streak between the fourth and fifth sub-costal nervules of the 
primary wings not containing within it the small black spot, so 
minutely detailed and figured in ihe Brit. Miis. Cat. p. 4, pi. 2, 
fig. 3, as characteristic of the Euphorion; by the whole surface being 
much more obscure ; and by cax-rying on the thorax the green 
longitudinal stripe — not seen in any of the specimens of the 
Euphorion, collected by the late Allan Cunningham, — nor in 
those now in the cabinet of Mr. W. MacLeay. 

From the 0. Richmondia, it differs by being much larger ; by 
the males showing on the upper surface of the anterior wing more 
distinctly the inner marginal green border, and on the under 
surface a much smaller green discoidal marking : by the females 
possessing the tear-shaped markings more occupied by the dark- 
bi'own spots within them ; by the more general sombre appear- 
ance ; and by the green stripe on the thorax. 

From the 0. Poseidon (of which the male is only known) it 
differs by not exhibiting " the rich green colour which extends 
along both sides of the median nervure and partly, or, entirely 
along the course of the nervules of the primary wings towards 
the outer margin " (0. Poseidon, Brit. Mus. Cat.) ; and by having 
on the under-side the transverse macular band separated into 
two parts. 

From the O. Archideus, (of which the female is only known) 
it differs by " the white of the secondary wings " not " reaching 
to the disco-cellular nervules and a portion of the median nervule," 
nor " occupying a small space within the discoidal cell." 

And from the O. Victorise, (of which the female is only 
known) it differs by the far greater obscurity of colouring of 
the entire surface ; the whitish markings being in no ways propor- 
tionate to those of the Victoria ; indeed rendering a further 
comparison between them needless. 



Description of new species of Articcrus, 
By Rev. R. L. King, B.A. 

[Eead 1st October, 1868.] 

The genus Articerus was first established by Dalman* upon a 
species, named by him A. armatus, which had been discovered in 
gum-copal. He was not able, however, to give any very detailed 
description ; nor was any thing more known of the genus until 
the Rev. Mr. Hopef descx'ibed and figured a species sent to 
England from South Australia under the name A. Fortnumi. 
The next additions made to the geiius were those contained in 
Westwood's Monograph of Australian and other Pselaplddce in 
the Transactions of the Entomological Society of London (Vol. 
III., N.S., p. 271). He added A. curvicornis, angusticollis, dila- 
ticornis, and setipes, all from Victoria, and A. hrazilievsis from 
South America. Pascoe has since described a species from 
Western Australia, under the name A. Bostockii, and has dis- 
tinguished the species found so abundantly in South Australia, 
near Gawler, by my friend Mrs. J. Kreusler, under the name A. 
Odewahnii. It is evident, however, that both these last species 
are remarkably close to, if not identical with the original species 
described by Hope, as A.. Fortnumi. A. Duboulayi has been added 
by Waterhouse from Western Australia — a species from Syria, 
(J.. Syriaciis) has also been desci^bed ; and another from North 
America, (A. Fachsii) has been added, vide Proceedings of Soc. 
Phil., 186G. 

The species Braziliensis and Fuclisii appear to have been 
removed from the genus Aniicerus,hv Brendel, and placed under the 
new genus Fustiger; (^fustis gero). Not having had an opportunity 
of consulting the diagnosis of the genus, I can only imagine that 
the peculiar elongate antennae of the former species have been 
regarded as of sufficient importance to justify the erection of a 

* Dalman, Om., Ins. innes i Copal, p. 23. 

t Ann. Nat. Hist. XI., p. 319; and Trans. Ent. Soc, London, IV., 
p. 106, pi. viii. 



BY THE EEV. R. L. KING, B.A. 55 

new genus. In this particular, however, the species placed under 
the new uame are certainly united with A. Forttmmi, Bostochii, 
and Odeivahnii, and in a less decided way with A. Curvicornis. I 
prefer, therefore, for the present, to place the first of the species 
which I am about to describe under the old genus ; although from 
its singular resemblance to A. Braziliensis, it may eventually find 
itself under the new genus Fustiger. 

These insects are rare in New South Wales. But their 
small size, and particularly the ferocity of the ants, under whose 
protection they live, may in some measure account for the 
infrequency of their capture. I have been able, however, to add 
four species to our Colonial Fauna. A. angusticollis occurs in 
ants' nests, at Paramatta, and in the Liverpool Plains. A. 
setipes was captured by my son, Mr. R. King, at Goono Goono, 
in the Liverpool Plains district — hardly differing from specimens 
in my cabinet from Gawler, South Australia. A. curvicornis is 
frequently captured at Liverpool, in the nest of the small black 
ant — and differs only in its somewhat smaller size from the 
description given by Westwood, (Loc. cit.) of Melbourne speci- 
mens. The fourth species, A. regius (niihi) is as far as is yet 
known peculiar to Liverpool. Mr. Masters has also captured a 
species in debris, after a flood, at Rope's Creek, near Penrith, 
which I have described as A. hrevicejps. 



ArTICERUS REGIUS. 

Obscure castaneus, elytrorum disco pallidiori, punctatissimus, 
minute pubescens ; capite oblongo, antennis capite longiori- 
bus linearibus cyliudricis ad basin constrictis ; thorace sub- 
globoso, lateribus rotundatis ; elytris sutura nigricante et 
linea suturali notatis ; abdomine nitido parcissime setoso ; 
pedibus robustis, tibiis maris prioribus et intermediis ad 
medium dentatis. 

Long. mas. .14 poll, 
fem. .10 „ 

Ants' nests in wood ; Liverpool, New South Wales, from June 
to September, 



56 NEW SPECIES OF ARTICERUS, 

A specimen of the male has been deposited in the Australian 
Museum, and another in the collection of W. MacLeay, Esq. 

The correspondence between this species and A. Braziliensis, 
as described and figured by Westwood, (Loc. cit.) is certainly 
very close. Yet the specific differences are quite sufficient to 
leave no doubt on my mind that our insect is quite distinct from 
the American. A. regius has neither the foveoles on the thorax 
nor the discoidal striae on the elytra, which mark the Braziliensis. 
Westwood also describes the legs of the latter as gracHes, a term 
which might apply to those of the female of regius, but by no 
means to those of the male. In our species, the fore tibiae of the 
male are deeply notched and toothed. The intermediate legs 
have the tibiso toothed at the middle, and the femur is armed 
with a strong spine. The female, which is much smaller, has all 
the legs unarmed. 

The head is slightly enlarged between the antennae. The 
antenna are nearly straight, cylindrical, and very slightly 
enlarged towards either extremity. They are somewhat longer 
than the head. 

Westwood says of A. Braziliensis that it is very distinct from 
all the Australasian species in its sub-cylindrical antennae, and in 
the form and sculpture of the head and thorax. This discovery 
of our present species greatly qualifies this assertion, and adds 
another to an already considerable list of forms existing in the 
fauna of Australia closely allied to those of South America. 



Articerus breviceps. 

Brunneus setosus ; capite brevi postice rotundato, antennis 
capite longioribus ad apicera clavatis truncatis ; thorace ad 
medium valde depresso, ante medium latiori, postice subro- 
tundato ; elytris stria suturali notatis. 
Long. .10. 

Rope's Creek ; under debris after a flood. Mr. Masters. 
The head is very short, increasing in breadth to the eyes ; the 
breadth behind the eyes being nearly equal to the whole length. 
The antcnnaj arc longer than the head, thin at the base, but 



BY THE REV. E. L. KING, B.A. 57 

gradually increasing in thickness for about one-half the length, 
and then swelling into a truncate knob ; and bearing no slight 
resemblance to an aboriginal's " waddy." 

The species is very distinct from all the other members of the 
genus. 

The whole genus, as far as is now known, consists of the 
following species : — 

1. Articerus armatus., Dalman, the type of the genus. 

2. A. (Fustiger) Braziliensis. I. 0. Westwood, S. America. 

3. A. (Fustiger) Fuchsii. Brendel, Tennesee. 

4. A. (''Fustiger) regius R. L. K., New South Wales. 

5. A. Fortnumi. Hope, South Australia. 

6. A. Bostochii. Pascoe, Western Australia. 

7. A. Odewahiii. Pascoe, South Australia. 

8. A. curvicornis. I. 0. Westwood, N. S. W. and Victoria. 

9. A. hreviceps. R. L. K., New South Wales. 

10. A. angusticoUis. I. O. Westwood, N. S. W. and Victoria. 

11. A. setipes. I. 0. Westwood, N. S. W., South Australia, 

and Victoria. 

12. A. Duhoulayii. Waterhouse, Western Australia. 

13. A. Spriacus. Saulcy, Syria. 



On the Scaritidce of New Holland, by 

William MacLeay, Esq., F.L.S. 

4th Paper. 

[Read 6th September, 1869.] 

It is now more than foui' year.s since I wrote my third paper on 
the Scaritidce of New Holland, and during that period large 
additions have, as I anticipated, been made to the list of species 
received from various parts of Australia. I am desirous now of 
adding to that list a few species which have come under my 
notice since the date of my last publication, but before doing 
so, I shall take the opportunity thus afforded me of making some 
observations on the genera and species of the Family described 
by Count de Castelnau, in the 1st volume of the Transactions of 
the Royal Society of Victoria, and on the excellent little treatise 
on the genus Carenum, by M. Le Baron de Chandoir, published a 
few months ago in the Transactions of the Entomological Society 
of Belgium. 

The first-named of these Entomologists has, in the above 
cited work, described thirty-four new species of the Family, has 
merged my genus E^iryscajphus in the genus Scaraj^hites, has 
reconstituted the genus Eutoma of Newman, and has formed a 
new genus under tJie name of Neocarenum. 

The reason assigned by Count Castelnau for the rejection of 
the genus Euryscaiohus, is that the character on which I founded 
its divison from Scaraphites, viz.,- some difference in the form of 
the elj'^tra, is neither constant nor of generic importance. 

A reference, however, to my description of EuryscapJms 
(Trans. Ent. Soc, N.S.W., vol. 1., page 187) will show that the 
Count is mistaken in supposing that I formed the genus upon 
any characters as distinct from ScarapMtes, though I certainly 
point out the very different shape of the abdomen in the two 
genera. It will be found that on the contrary I point out the 
almost perfect identity in many respects of Euryscaphus with 
Carenum. In fact, the E^iryscajthi are gigantic Oarenums, and are 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ,, F.L.S. 59 

as far removed from Scarapliites, as are any two genera of the 
Family. They differ in the head, palpi, thorax, elytra, and legs, 
while in all these Euryscaphus nearly agrees with Garenum. 

That there may be insects as stated by Count Castelnau, 
which form an insensible passage between Euryscaphus and 
Scarapliites, I will not deny, but I have not seen any, and the 
instance cited by the Count, viz., Scarapliites Heros, certainly 
does not from his description bear out the assertion. 

But even so, I cannot admit that the discovery of a species 
which appears to form a link between any two genera, is any 
reason for the rejection of either of these genera. 

Of the eight species of Scarapliites, described by Count 
Castelnau in the paper above referred to, probably four species, 
viz.: Howittii, affinis, carhonarms, and Hopei, belong to the genus 
Eiiryscaphus, while the species named Heros, liumeralis, gigas, 
and Martinii, seem to be Scarapliites. 

Count Castelnau appends a note to these descriptions in which 
he gives it as his opinion that Scarapliites rotimdipennis Dejean, 
M^Leayi Westw., and interviedius mihi, are all the same species. 
And here again I must complain of the Count's assertion, that I 
rely entirely on the number of the marginal punctures on the 
elytra for differential characters between these three species. In 
page 190 of the first volume of our Transactions, I give a detailed 
description of Scarapliites intermedius, and append to it a remark 
to the effect, that a ready mode of recognizing the three species, 
ivitliout the trouble of a close examination, is to count these lateral 
punctures of the elytra, which though not constant in number, 
seemed to be generally most numerous in rotundipemiis, and least 
so in intermedius. 

T have no doubt myself that intermedius is a distinct species ; 
the other two, though apparently distinct, may be merely local 
varieties. 

Twelve new species have been added to the genus Garenum, 
in the Count's paper ; one of these he gives as a mere re-descrip- 
tion of G. atronitens mihi, but it is really a new species which I 
have named in my cabinet, G. Gawlerense, and I would suggest 
that it should bear the name henceforth of G. Gatvlerense of Castel- 
nau, as that gentleman was the fii'st to describe it. This species 



60 ON THE SCARITID.^ OF NEW HOLLAND, 

and C. devastator belong to the group in my list of Scaritidse, page 
196, loc. cit., which begins with G. quadripunctatum. C. Bris- 
ianense, ebeniniim, and Westiooodii belong to the C Bonellii group ; 
C. carhonarium and Scliomhurghii to the 0. marginatum group ; 
C. splendens and Odewahnii to the C. coruscum group ; and 
0. multnmpressum to the 0. Spencii group. The other two 
species, C. superhum and amahile, both very remarkable insects 
from the Lachlan, are referred by the Baron de Chandoir, to a 
new genus which he has named Gonopterum, from the peculiar 
shape of the elytra. 

The genus Neocarenum has been established by Count 
Castelnau, on two species, singulare and Kreusleri, one of which 
is certainly my Garenum elongatum, and the other is probably 
only a variety. It occupies an intermediate position between the 
genera Garenum and Eutoma. 

Of the last named genus, which will include the six species in 
the G. tinctillatum group of my list of Scaritidee alluded to above, 
and the first three species of the G. violaceum group. Count 
Castelnau has re-described carefully Newman's original species, 
(titictiUatum') and described six new species, viz., episcopale, New- 
mani, filiforme, purpuratum, Iceve, and Loddonense. He has also 
added six species to the genus Scarites, viz. : substriatus, plicatulus, 
Miichelln, Bostoclcii, rujicornis, and hipundatus . 

M. le Baron de Chandoir's " note on the genus Caremtm,,^' 
above referred to, is deserving of special attention, inasmuch as it 
is the production of one who is a very high authority upon the 
Carabidse generally, and who, has evidently paid great attention 
to the study of this particular sub-family. 

He suggests in the first instance, a sub-division of the genus, 
founded upon more constant and reliable characters than those 
adopted by me in my list of the Australian Scaritidse. 

It is evident, however, that the Baron, though having a most 
thorough Entomological knowledge of his subject, has in his 
possession but few of the many species of the genus, and that 
therefore he is not in the best position to judge of the simplest 
way to render the species recognizable, which is in fact the real 
intent and meaning of these numerous sub-divisions. 

The Baron's sub-divisions are, however, perfectly unexcep- 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 61 

iionable, and I incline to think that his Section 1, " Elytra juxta 
marginem costigera " including Garenum tuberculatum mihi and 
C. carinatum mihi (which I have no doubt is the second species 
alluded to by the Baron, under the name of M'Leayi) ought to 
constitute a distinct genus. 

The new species of Garenum described in the Baron's paper, 
are, G. foveigeruni of the G. Spencii group ; G. iransversicolle, the 
position of which is somewhat doubtful ; * G. Gastelnaui, of the 
G. Bonelli group, and probably identical with G. interrwptum 
mihi ; and G. convexum of the G. marginatum group. 

M. le Baron has also formed a genus upon three species, 
which differ chiefly from all the others of the Family, in having 
only one external tooth to the anterior tibiae. This genus he has 
named Monocentrum, and in addition to Garenum megaceplialum 
of Westwood, which he has referred to it, he has described two 
new species named respectively, grandiceps and longiceps. I 
have never met with any one of the three species, nor have I 
ever seen anything at all even remotely referable to the genus. 

Under the name of Conopterum insigne, the Baron de Chandoir 
describes a peculiar form of insect also unknown to me, and it is 
to the same genus that he believes the species Garenum superbum 
and amabile of Castelnau mentioned above, should be referred. The 
most marked characteristics of the genus are, a large head with 
elytra broad at the base, and gradually decreasing towards the 
apex. 

The genus Garenidium of the same author is formed on the 
Garenum gagatinum mihi. It is clearly a good genus, in the 
form of the elytra, somewhat resembling the last, but its most 
marked characteristics are its excavated labrum and pointed 
antennae. As the Baron de Chandoir's treatise on the genus 
Garenum above referred to, in which this genus (Garenidium) is 
described, is not easily procurable in Sydney, I will, when I come 



* Since writing the above, I have seen a specimen of this insect among 
some Coleoptera, sent by Mr. Diggles from Moreton Bay. The impnnctate 
elytra would place it in the C. politum group, but the transverse rectangular 
thorax agrees with that of C. rectangulare, and is utterly unlike that of any 
other species of Carenum. 



G2 ON THE SCARITID^ OF NEW HOLLAND, 

to the descriptions of two species to be added to it, give the 
Baron's characters of the genus in full. 

One remarkable species, Garjemim mucronatum, which I have 
described in the Proceedings of the Ent. Soc, N.S.W., of the 
2nd October, 1865, is not noticed by either of the above named 
Entomologists, and from that I infer that they have never seen 
it. I only know of two specimens of it, one in the collection of 
the Rev. R. L. King, the other in my own. 

The following species are I believe new : — 

Carendm sexpunctatum. 

Nigrum nitidum purpureo-marginatum, elytris sexpunctatis 
subtilissime striatis, tibiis anticis extus bidentatis. 
Long. 11 lin., lat. 3| lin. 
Hab., Lower Murrumbidgee. 
This species is of the size and general appearance of 0. 
interruptum, but is altogether more brilliant. Its chief peculiarity 
consists in having two punctures about a line apart, and parallel 
to the suture, on the apical third of the elytra. Its habitat 
seems to be the sand hills of the Riverine country. 

Caeenum ctanipenne. 

Nigrum nitidissimum sulcis frontalibus subparallelis, thorace 
subquadrato angulis posticis rotundatis subemarginatis, 
elytris subovatis convexis nigro-cyaneis subpurpurascenti- 
bus quadripunctatis, tibiis anticis extus bidentatis. 
Long. 7 lin., lat. 2J lin. 
Hab., South Australia. 
The only two species of the G. BonelUi group, to which 
this insect belongs, heretofore described from South Australia, 
are C. antliracinimi mihi and C ebeninum Casteln. The present 
species differs from both in being of less size and more brilliancy. 
The head is broad, with the facial grooves short and nearly 
parallel. The thorax is rather broader than long, with the 
anterior angles somewhat prominent, and the posterior cut away 
and very slightly emarginated. The elytra are oval, very smooth, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 63 

and of a beautiful dai'k violet tinge, with two well-marked puncti- 
form impressions on each, one near the shoulder, the other 
towards the apex. 

Carenum Chaudoiri. 
Nigrum nitidum sulcis frontalibus divergentibus, thorace sub- 
quadrato postice subviolaceo, elytris subangustis subtilissime 
striato-punctatis nigro-violaceis quadripunctatis, tibiis anticis 
extus bidentatis. 
Long. 9 lin., lat. 2| lin. 
Hab., Australia. 
I have no record of the particular habitat of this insect, nor of 
how I became possessed of the single specimen of it in my 
cabinet. It is in many respects like G. BonelUi, but differs from 
it in having the shallow transverse depression on the forehead 
less mai'ked, in the colour which has no shade of green, and in 
the narrow form and more distinct sculpture of the elytra. 

Carenum opacdm. 

Nigrum opacum sulcis frontalibus divergentibus, thorace sub- 
quadrato, elytris viridi-aureis subtilissime et confertissime 
punctulatis quadripunctatis, tibiis anticis extus bidentatis. 
Long. 10 lin., lat. 3 liu. 
Hab., Clarence River. 
This species is also in many respects like C. Bonellii. The 
facial grooves, however, are longer and deeper, and the transverse 
depression behind more deep and circular. The thorax is some- 
times of the same dull golden green as the elytra. These last, 
under a lens, show a surface completely and closely covered with 
very minute punctures, giving a shagreen appearance, and no 
doubt causing the dull appearance so characteristic of the species, 

Carenum tristb. 

Nigrum subopacum sulcis frontalibus divergentibus, thorace 
subquadrato angulis posticis rotundatis, elytris ovatia qua- 
dripunctatis, tibiis anticis extus bidentatis. 

Long. 8 lin., lat. 2\ lin. 

Hab., Wide Bay. 



64 ON THE SCARITID^ OF NEW HOLLAND, 

This species is of a less elongate form than G. Bonellii, and 
much narrower than G. mtermptum. It is entirely of a dullish 
black without any apparent marginal colouring. 

Carendm Kingii. 

Nigrum nitidum violaceo-marginatum sulcis frontalibus paral- 
lelis, thorace subtranverso postice rotundato subemarginato, 
elytris opacis bipunctatis, tibiis anticis extus bideutatis. 
Long. 9 lin., lat. 3 lin. 
Hab., Liverpool Plains. 
The Rev. R. L. King has kindly lent me this insect for 
description. It was taken by him at Goondo Goonoo, Liverpool 
Plains, and is I believe unique in his collection. The dull 
appearance of the elytra is caused by close and minute punctura- 
tion, as in the case of C. opacum and others of the genus. 

Carenum propinquum. 

Nigrum nitidum violaceo-marginatum sulcis frontalibus sub- 
parallelis, thorace subtransverso antice transversim impresso 
postice rotundato subemarginato, elytris subtilissime striato- 
punctatis postice fortiter bipunctatis, tibiis anticis extus 
bidentatis. 

Long. 6 lin., lat. 2 lin. 

Hab., Liverpool Plains. 

The insect differs from the last, which it closely resembles, in 
its small size, in the transverse impression on the anterior portion 
of the thorax, and in the sculpture of the elytra, which are not 
dull, are minutely striato-punctate, and have the two punctures 
near the apex large and deep. 

The Rev. Mr. King captured this insect in the same locality 
as the last described one. 

Carenum nitescens. 

Nigrum nitidissimum planum capite bisulcato sulcis latis rugosis 
divergentibus, thorace subquadrato angulis posticis rotun- 
dato linea dorsali fortiter impresso postice utrinque foveolato, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 65 

elytris subovatis piirpureo-marginatis postice fortiter bipunc- 
tatis humeris prominentibus, tibiis anticis extus bidentatis. 
Long. 6 lin., lat. 2 lin. 

Hab., Salt Lake, Hummock Range, South Australia, 
The flat appearance of this insect is its most striking character. 
It is of a very brilliant black, with the sides of the elytra of a 
violet tinge. The frontal grooves diverge a little behind, and the 
face on each side of them is rugose. The thorax is as long as 
broad, gradually narrowing from behind the middle to the 
posterior angles which are slightly emarginated, the dorsal line is 
strongly marked, and on each side of it towards the posterior 
angles, there is a roundish fovea. The elytra are as broad as the 
thorax, with the humeral angles advanced, and the puncture near 
the apex well marked. 

I am indebted to Mr. Odewahn for this as well as many other 
of the South Australian species of Scaritidte. 

Carenum ineditdm. 
Nigrum nitidum viridi-marginatum sulcis frontalibus sub- 
parallelis, thorace transverse postige rotundato, elytris 
impunctatis, tibiis anticis extus bidentatis. 
Long. 8 lin., lat. 2| lin. 
Hab., South Australia. 
The absence of the usual punctiform impression on the elytra, 
will place this insect in the saine group with G. Icevipenne mihi, 
and in general appearance it is not unlike that species. 

Carenum rufipes. 
Violaceum nitidissimum, capite nigro magno sulcis frontalibus 
divergentibus, thorace transverso late marginato, abdomine 
ovato, elytris seriatim punctulatis postice bipunctatis, pedi- 
bus subrufis, tibiis anticis extus tridentatis dente tertio 
minuto. 

Long. 8 lin., lat. 3 lin. 
Hab., Stu'ling Range, Western Australia. 
This very beautiful and distinct species is represented in the 
Sydney Museum, by one rather immature specimen taken by 



GQ ON THE SCARITID^ OF NEW HOLLAND, 

Mr. Masters, at the place above mentioned. G. campestre mihi is 
the species of the group which it most resembles in general form. 

Carenum sdbcyaneum. 

Nigrum nitidum viridi-marginatum sulcis frontalibus sub- 
parallelis, thorace transverso marginato postice lobato 
truncate utrinque emarginato, elytris nigro-cyaneis sub- 
purpurascentibus postice bipunctatis tibiis anticis extua 
tridentatis. 
Long. 8 lin., lat. 3 lin. 
Hab,, South Australia. 
The above measurement is taken from the largest sized, but 
most perfect of five specimens in my possession. Probably 
7 lines is nearer the average length. It is very different from 
the other species of the group in which its tridentate tibiee will 
place it. 

Carenum dispar. 

Nigrum nitidum viridi-marginatum sulcis frontalibus sub- 
parallelis, thorace transverso marginato postice rotundato 
vix lobato, elytris subpurpurascentibus antice latis subtrun- 
catis postice bipunctatis, tibiis anticis extus tridentatis. 
Long. 9 lin., lat. 3| lin. 
Hab., South Australia. 
This also differs from the group in which my subdivision of 
the genus would place it, in its parallel frontal grooves, and non- 
oval elytra, its transverse broadly margined thoi-ax is however 
quite in character with the group. 

Carenum ordinatum. 

Nigrum nitidum late atro-viridi-marginatum, sulcis frontalibus 
divergentibus, thorace transverso postice rotundato sublo- 
bato, elytris ovatis sei-iatim punctulatis postice bipunctatis, 
tibiis anticis extus tridentatis. 

Long. 11 lin., lat. 3| lin. 

Hab., South Australia. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 67 

The affinity of this species is to G. Odeioalmii Castelnau ; it 
differs from it chiefly in its darker and duller appearance, and 
in having seven rows of distinct bat shallow punctures on each 
elytron. 

EUTOMA MaSTERSI. 

Nigrum nitidum, elytris nitidissimis violaceo-marginatis leviter 

striato-punctatis postice bipunctatis. 
Long. 6i lin., lat. If lin. 
Hab., Dabee, near Mudgee. 
The punctured striae on the elytra of this species are quite 
apparent under a common lens, and in this respect it may be 
readily distinguished from any species hitherto described, 

EuTOMA DlGGLESI. 

Nigrum, nitidum, thorace oblongo antice truncate postice rotun- 
dato medio canaliculato transversim substriato viridi- 
marginato, elytris viridibus violaceo-marginatis quadri- 
punctatis. 
Long. 6| lin., lat. 1| lin. 
Hab., More ton Bay. ? 
I am not certain of the habitat of this species. The only 
specimen I have seen was sent from Brisbane by Mr. Diggles, 
with a number of Coleoptera, many of which were not Queensland 
insects. 

The four punctures on the elytra of this species are remarkable, 
inasmuch as it is the first of the genus in which the number has 
exceeded two. The punctures are very large, and are placed 
much in the same way as in Carenum Bonellii. 

Two very remarkable insects may hex'e be noticed ; they are 
probably of different and undescribed genera, but their very 
imperfect state, both being without antennae or palpi, renders it 
impossible to give their proper characters. Their elongated 
form, however, and narrowly shouldered elytra seem to corres- 
pond so closely with the species " elongatmn," upon which the 



68 ON THE SCARITID.E OF NEW HOLLAND, 

Count de Castelnau has formed the genus Neocarenum, that for 
the present I will refer them to that genus. 

Neocarenum Mastersi. 

Nigrum subnitidum sulcis frontalibus divergentibus postice 
profunda antice leviter impressis, thorace elongato postice 
rotundato, elytris elongatis seriatim profunde punctatis ; 
tibiis anticis extus bidentatis. 
Long. 17 lin., lat. 4 lin. 
Hab., Mount Barker, "Western Australia. 
The enormous size and remarkably elongated form of this 
insect separates it at once from all others of the Scaritidce known 
to me. The marking also of the elytra is unusual. There are 
nine rows of punctures on each elytron, those towards the sides 
are almost obsolete, but the five rows on each side of the suture 
are composed of close, large, deep punctvires. The fore legs are 
very strong. 

Neocarenum rugosulum. 

Nigrum subopacum elongatnm capite leviter bisulcato, thorace 
subnitido postice subrotundato linea dorsali leviter impressa, 
elytris angustis ad suturam depressis leviter striatis, tibiis 
anticis extus bidentatis. 
Long. 8 lin., lat. 2 lin. 

Hab., Salt Lake, Hummock Range, South Australia. 
I I'eceived a single and imperfect specimen of this curious 
insect, from Mr. Odewahn, a few days ago. The whole upper 
surface, the thorax excepted, has a slightly rugose appearance, 
the striee on the elytra, though slight, are distinct, and of a wavy 
character. The sutural portion of the elytra is deeply indented. 
There is a well defined punctiform impression on the apical 
portion of the left elytron, but I cannot find any trace of a similar 
impression on the other. 

Genus Carenidium, Chaudoir. 

Frons profunde bisulcata ; clijpeus ad labri latera utrinque 
longius dentatus convexus valde declivis, inter dentes pro- 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 69 

funde emarginatus, labrum amplectens. Caput maximum ; 
mandibulEe crassas validasque. 

Palpi maxillares (modice labiales latissime securifurmes.) 

Labrimi parvum, antice profunde emarginatum, margine antico 
declivi excavato. 

Antenna tenues, thoracis basi breviores, apicem versus attenu- 
atte, articulis septem ultimis elongato-quadratis, angustis, 
valde compressis et utrinque omnino glabris, margine tan- 
tum utroque pubesceute, ultimo pra3cedente plus dimidio 
longiore, apicem versus sensim angustato, subacumiuato, 
summo apice piligero. 

Frosternum inter coxas triangulare subexcavatum. 

JEpisterna metasterni latitudine longiora. 

Abdominis segmenta postice medio baud punctigera, 

Tibice anticte extus bidigitatae intermediee extus apice spina 
longiuscula tenui armata. 

Elytrorum margo tenuis (ut in Oarenis), ad humeros baud 
inflatus, usque ad pedunculum productus. 

Habitus elongatus, elytris elongato-ovatis, convexis. 

With two exceptions, the above is an exact copy of Baron de 
Chaudoir's description of this genus. I have inserted a descrip- 
tion of the Palpi, which were wanting in the Baron's specimen, 
and I have omitfed the word " impunctatis," as applied to the 
elytra, as I have now to desci'ibe a species which has four 
punctures on the elytra, as in Garenum Bonellii, and yet is a 
most perfect example of the genus Garenidium. 



Carenididm Damelii. 

Subnitidum supra ceneo-viride subtus nigrum, elytris quadri- 

punctatis obsolete striato-punctatis. 
Long. 14 lin., lat. 4J lin. 
Hab., Cape York. 
A single specimen of this fine insect was taken at Cape York, 
by Mr. Damel, after whom I have named it. 



70 ON THE SCARITID^ OF NEW HOLLAND. 

Cakenidium Kredsler^. 

Nigrum subnitidum viridi-marginatum, elytris obsolete striato- 

punctatis. 
Long. 15 lin., lat. 4 lin. 
Hab., South. Australia. 

This species differs from G. gagatinum in having the labrum 
less deeply emarginated, the thorax and elytra deeply bordered 
with dull green, and these last indistinctly striated and punctui-ed. 

The only specimen I have seen, was sent to me by Mr. 
Odewahn, labelled "from Mrs. Kreusler, found near Gawler." 

SCARAPHITES MaSTERSI. 

Niger nitidus, capite profunda biimpresso rugoso, thorace 
transverso lateribus rotundato postice truncato, elytris latis 
subtilissime striato-punctulatis punctis: marginalibus con- 
fertis, sub-marginalibus sex, postice suturam versus tribus 
impressis. 

Long. 18 lin., lat. 8 lin. 

Hab., Mount Barker, Western Australia. 
One specimen of this fine insect was brought by Mr. Masters 
from Western Australia, and is now in the Sydney Museum. 
The species it most resembles, is the Scaraphites Silenus, of 
Westwood, but it differs from it very much in the elytra, which 
are more elongated in the present insect, are less distinctly 
striated, have the stri« finely punctured, and have three large 
punctures towards the apex placed parallel to the suture. 



On the Byrrhides of Australia, by the 
Rev. R. L. King, B.A. 

[Read 22nd November, 1869.] 

Although the family is not numerously represented in Australia, 
yet two of the genera, being peculiar to Australasia, are not 
without interest. The genus Microchcetes was described by Mr. 
Hope, in the Transactions of the Entomological Society of 
London, (Vol. I., p. 153) and founded upon a species named by 
him M. sphcericus. The genus differs from the Syncalypta of 
Stephens, principally in the antenna3, of which the first joint is 
rather long, the second to the eighth gradually decreasing in 
length ; the elytra are covered with tufts of stiff and generally 
truncate setge analogous to those which exist in Nosodendron. 

It is possible that futui-e Entomologists will prefer reuniting 
Microchcetes with Syncalypta, the comparati\^e size of the different 
joints of so variable an organ as the antennae being an unsafe 
character on which to rest a generic distinction. At any rate 
the new species which I am about to describe appears to form a 
passage from the one genus to the other, and at the same time to 
differ from them both in its tarsal developement. But that I 
think it probable that the genus Microchcetes may not be retained 
eventually, I might have formed another genus out of my new 
species. 

I am however under no doubt about the generic distinctness 
of my second new species, Byzenia formicicola. Its facial 
developement, the visibility as well as the proportions of its 
strange antennae, and its curious elytra, all combine with its habits 
to point out a wide difference between it and the other members 
of the family. The remarkable forms of many of the coleoptera, 
which inhabit the nests of ants, have often attracted the attention 
of Entomologists ; our present species is no exception. 

I insert, from the original descriptions, the diagnosis of the 
species of Microchcetes which are ali'eady known. 

Genus I. MiCROCHiETES. Hope. 
In this genus the eyes, mandibles, and labrum are quite con- 
cealed when the head is retracted into the thorax. The antennae 



72 ON THE BYRRHIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

are composed of one rather large basal joint, 2 — 8 gradually de- 
creasing, and the remaining joints forming a club. All the tarsi 
are contractile, and received into a groove in the femur : the body 
is covered with tufts of short truncate setee. 

Sp. 1. M. s])h(erlcus. Hope. 
Totum corpus supra nigrum, fusco-tomentosum, pedibus piceis. 
Long. 2 lin., lat. 1| lin. 
Swan River. 
The clypeus is rounded and slightly punctured. The thorax 
is marked with four tubercles placed almost on the middle of the 
back. The elytra are bristling with tubercles disposed in a triple 
series — the body beneath is concolorous. 

Sp. 2. M. scoparms. Erichs. 

Niger, opacus, nigrosetosus, elytris fasciculatis. 

Long, prope 2 lin. 

Tasmania. 
This species is described (Erichs. arch. 1842, L, p. 153) as 
having the body black, opaque, covered above with very fine ashy 
setEe. Antennte slender, piceous. Head densely rugulose punc- 
tate, the fi'ont sprinkled with short truncate black set». The 
thorax is short, the posterior angles elongate acuminate with 
numerous truncate setee on the margin. Elytra substriate with 
numerous truncate setiB, mostly arranged in tufts. Body under- 
neath and feet covered with short reclined setaa. 

The Australian Museum collection contains specimens of the 
genus from IST. S. Wales, Victoria, South Australia, Western 
Australia, and Tasmania. I am inclined to refer the Tasmanian 
specimens to the latter of these descriptions, and the rest to the 
former ; yet not without some doubt. Hardly any two are alike 
on the back of the thorax, and therefore I cannot lay any stress 
upon the four dorsal tubercles mentioned by Hope. And although 
there is no doubt about the number of tufts or fascicules, composed 
of the characteristic short truncate setse, I do not recognize in any 
of these specimens the tubercles disposed in a " triple series." 
Several of the Australian specimens are piceous beneath the body, 
but not all ; others arc as black aw the Tasmanian specimens. 



BY THE EEV. E. L. KING, B.A. 73 

In the specimens from Melbounie the tufts are more numerous 
and coarse. But I cannot detect any difference which requires 
that they should be regarded as a distinct species. 

Among the Museum specimens collected by Mr. Masters at 
King George's Sound, there is one which probably will form a 
new species, but it is in a bad state for description, and whether 
it was originally clothed with set£e disposed in tufts, or (as in 
M. minor) in lines it is now impossible to discern. It is black 
and about one-half the size of those which I regard' as M. 

SpllCBTWUS. 

Sp. 3. M. minor. 

Niger, elytris striato-punctatis, squamis cinereis adpressis et 
setis erectis truncatis longitudinailter dispositis vestitis ; 
pedibus piceis tetrameris. 
Long. .07. poll. 

Paramatta, under stones in grass ; rare. 
Sydney ; Mr. Masters. 
The very small size and the want of tujts of truncate setae at 
once distinguish this from the former species. The truncate 
sette are placed in the punctures of the elytra, and are thus 
arranged in regular lines. 

The antennfB are 10-jointed; the first rather long; the succeed- 
ing joints gradually decrease in length to the 5th, which is the 
smallest of all ; the remaining joints gradually increase in breadth, 
though not in length, to the tenth, which is as long as the three 
preceding. The tarsi are all tetramerous. 

Genus II. MoRTCHUS. Erichs. 

The genus Moryclms of Erichsen is readily distinguished by 
having the anterior tarsi only concealed in the groove of the 
tibia ; the labrum, the mandibles, and part of the eyes are visible 
when the head is retracted into the thorax. The elytra cover the 
whole of the abdomeo. The genus has a somewhat wide range, 
viz : — from Siberia on the north to southern Africa. The de- 
tection of the genus in Australia is due to my friend Mrs. 
Kreusler of South Australia, from whom I have received a 
specimen, to which I have given the name, of — 



74 ON THE BYRRHIDES OF AUSTRALIA, 

Sp. 4. M. Tieteromerus. 

Nigro-piceus, striatus, minute tubercalosus ; antennis et pedi- 
bus piceis ; tarsis heteromeris. 

Long. .21 ; lat. .16 poll. 

Gawler, South Australia. Mrs. Kreusler. 
The nature of the tarsi is very remarkable, and thus, in 
Australia, we have in this one small family representatives of 
three of Latreille's primary divisions of the coleoptera. Microchcstes 
sjplicericus is pentamerous, M. minor is tetramerous, and our 
present species is heteromerous. Well might our late member, 
the learned author of the " Horge Entomologicse," say, that 
" absolute rules of generic distinction, founded upon minute 
differences of structure, are not only faults in themselves, but 
calculated to blind us altogether to those beautiful groups 
vphich the Entomologist has so often occasion to remark in 
nature."* 

Genus III. Byzenia. 

Labrum et mandibula semper conspicua, et antennarum articulus 

primus. 
Mandibuhim acutum, ad medium obsolete unidentatum. 
MaxillcB bilobatee. 
Palpi labiales triarticulati iJiaxtZZaj-es 4-articulati, articulo ultimo 

precedente longiori. 
Labrum transversum. 

Antennm 9-articulatse, articulis 1 et 9 magnis, reliquis parvis. 
Elytra brevia, totum abdomen non tegentia. 
Pedes robusti. 

Tarsorum ai^ticuli 1 et 5 longiores. 
Corpus alatum. 

Sp. 5. B. formicicola. 

Piceus elytris gibbosis rivosis. 
Long. .11.; lat. .07 poll. 
Livei'pool, in nests of ants. 
This very remarkable and distinct form occurs in the nests 

* HoriB EntomologicsB of W. B, MacLeay, p. 491. 



BY THE REV. R L. KING, B.A. 75 

of a large species of ant of the genus Formica. The species is 
readily known by its black colour ornamented on the abdomen 
with yellowish or bronzed setae. The ant makes its nest in the 
ground under wood, rails, or logs, and the beetle is seen on the 
ground among the ants. Three or even four have been taken 
from a single nest at a time — a sultry afternoon in October — 
but I have never met with it elsewhere. 

The head is so far retracted into the cavity of the thorax that 
the labrum and the mandibles and a part of the antennae are alone 
visible. Of these latter organs, the first joint always, and the tip 
of the last joint generally, are seen. The first and the last joints 
are of considerable size ; the first is long and broad and curved at 
the base ; in repose it is brought down nearly to the mouth entirely 
concealing the eyes. The next three joints are small, the fourth 
being the smallest of all, 5 — 8 increase gradually, the ninth is 
nearly as long as the first, but almost cylindrical, rounded at the 
ends ; both the first and the ninth are far larger than all the rest 
together. The mandibles are strong, sharp at the apex, with an 
obsolete denticle near the middle ; the lower part is fringed with 
set^. The maxillae are small and bilobed. The labrum is trans- 
verse and ogee-shaped. The thorax is very transverse. The 
elytra ai'e short, leaving exposed the last two joints of the abdo- 
men. They are marked by four strong ridges all rising towards 
one point, and nearly meeting behind the shoulder, the apparent 
perforation between the points being fringed with a few stiff 
yellowish setae. This peculiarity of formation gives the insect 
the appearance of being transversely divided nearly in the centre. 
The scutellum is small. The tarsi are all concealed in repose 
in grooves in the tibiae, but the legs which are robust are not 
received into cavities, as in Microcluetes. All the legs are very 
widely separated. 

It is not easy to trace the afiinities of this remarkable form. 
There is no question that it belongs to the family of the 
Byrrhidte, notwithstanding the shortness of the elytra leaving the 
abdomen partly uncovered, and the great distance of all the feet 
from each other — particulars in which it is distinguished, I think, 
from all the other members of the group. The nine jointed 
antennae are also peculiar to itself alone of all the Byrrlddce. 



Description of Hiketes, a new genus of Formicicolous Coleopfera, 
By the Rev. R. L. King, B.A. 

[Read 22nd November, 1869. 

In my frequent inspection of ant's nests in tlie neighbourhood of 
Liverpool, I have frequently met with an undescribed form in 
some particulars strikingly anomalous. As a contribution to an 
account of our numerous Coleoptera inhabiting the nests of ants, 
I wish to describe it here. I have named the genus Hiketes, 
and offer the following as the diagnosis. 

Hiketes. nov. gen. 

( 'iKeTTj^. a supplicant.) 

Mandibuhim truncatum parvum. 

Mentiim transversum, lobis lateralibus obtusis. 

Submentum elongatum, postice liberum. 

Palpi lahiales 2-articulati. 

Maxillares 3-articulati. 

Maxillce ? 

Oculi parvi. 

Antennce ante oculos positse 9-articulat£e, 1""° reliquis longiori, 

2 — 7 subgequalibus, 8 et 9 clavem formantibus. 
Thorax subrotundus, lateribus serratis. 
Elytra abdomen tegentia. 

Abdomen 5-articulatum, segmento primo majore. 
Pedes priores et intermedii contigui — posteriores distantes ; 

femoribus magnis. 
Tarsi pentameri, articulis rotundis, 4*° minori. 

The genus, which I have thus described, presents several very 
remarkable peculiaiities. The parts of the mouth are very small, 
almost rudimentary ; and are placed at the extremity of the head, 
protected by the emarginate clypeus. The antennae are short 
and stout, placed near the mouth, and far in advance of the eyes. 



BY THE EEV. E. L. KING, B.A. 77 

The eyes are protected by being sunk in a deep groove formed by 
prominent ridges on the sides of the head. Behind the mentum 
is an oblong plate, the posterior portion of which is quite free, 
the end emargiuate. I have called it in the above description 
the ^uhmentum. 

The nearest approach to it which I have met with is in 
Newman's genus Derataphrus (or Sigerpes of Germar.) I have 
not however seen Newman's description which has been founded 
on four New Holland species, (The Entomologist p. 403.) In 
Hihetes the submentum is placed longitudinally, not as in Dera- 
taphrus transversely. In the latter genus also the antennae are 
11 -jointed — the mandibles are very robust — the thorax much 
elongated, the body subcylindrical and the tarsi tetramerous — 
all points of contrast with our present species. There can how- 
ever be little doubt that the two genera are very closely allied ; 
and that notwithstanding its pentamerous chai-acter our genus 
must — for the present — take its place among the Golydiens of La 
Cordaire, and come next to Derataphr^is among the sub-tribe 
Bothridericles. 

Sp. 1. H. costatus. 

Castaneus punctatus ; thorace 5-costato ; elytro 3-eostato, 

Long. I poll. 

Liverpool, in ant's nests. 
The whole surface is covered with deep and wide punctures. 
The head is flat ; the two ridges forming the groove in which the 
eye is placed meet in front of that organ, the under ridge being 
serrated. The thorax is slightly convex, marked by 5 prominent 
longitudinal costee, and has the sides rounded and serrated. 
Each elytron has three longitudinal costa3. The scutellum is large 
and punctured. The submentum extends from the mentum to the 
eyes. It is nearly twice as long as broad, deeply punctate. The 
first segment of the abdomen is wider than the rest, and 
separates, by a triangular plate, the coxae of the posterior legs. 
The femurs of all the legs are very wide — nearly as broad as 
long. The tibi^ of the male are produced into a sharp point 
beyond the insertion of the tarsi ; in the female the termination 
of the tibiiB is obtuse. 



78 DESCRIPTION OF HIKETES. 

This interesting species is found in the nest of a small red 
ant (formica) living in wood and under bark of dead trees on the 
ground. 

I have much pleasure in adding a second species detected by 
my friend Mr. Masters, at King George's Sound. 

Sp. 2. H. thoracicus. 

Rufo-castaneus ; thorace utrinque dilatato, costis quatuor 
rotate. 

Long. .14. 

King George's Sound — in ant's nests. Mr. Masters. 
The head is more produced than in the preceding species, 
and coarser at the sides. The eyes are placed in a deep notch, 
and are visible both above and below. The thorax is marked 
with four costee, and is remarkably developed at the sides so as 
to resemble the wings of a Ray. This very distinct species was 
found in the nest of a large black ant, under a stone at King 
George's Sound, in December, 1869. 



Notes on a collection of Insects from Gnyndnh, by 
William MacLeay, Esq., F.L.S. 

[Read 3rd April, 1871.] 

Mr. Masters, the assistant Curator of the Australian Museum, 
has lately returned from Ga^'iidah, a town on the Burnett River, 
about 150 miles inland from Wide Bay, where he had been employ- 
ed for some mouths in endeavouring to procure for the Museum, 
specimens of the new description of Fish or Batrachian, lately 
described by Mr. Krefft under the name of i)eratodus Forsteri. 

Mr. Masters has not oidy been so successful in the object of 
his mission as to get nineteen of these anomalous animals, but 
has also brought back with him a very large collection of 
specimens in all bi-anches of Natural History. Among these the 
collection of Coleoptera stands pre-eminent, it contains over 1,100 
species, and numbers nearly 16,000 specimens. 

I pi'opose to give as far as I am able in this paper, a complete 
list of this very magnificent collection, describing the new genera 
and species, and making occasional observations on the habitats 
&c. of the others. 

I have always hitherto in describing new genera and species, 
adopted the system most usual with English Entomologists of 
giving these descriptions in Latin. On this occasion I intend to 
depart from that rule, as I believe that many of those who take an 
interest in Australian Entomology, will infinitely prefer the 
descriptions given in plain and intelligible English. 

CICINDELID^. 

1. — Tetracha crucigbra, MacL., W. Traris. Ent. 
SoG. N. S. Wales, 1863, Vol. 1, page 10. 

I described this species from specimens from Rockhampton 
and Port Denison. It is not as suggested by Count Castelnau 
(Not. Aust. Gnleopt., page 3), identical with T. Australasice, Hope, 
which is from Port Essington. 



80 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

2. — CiciNDELA CIRCUMCINCTA, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 

3. — DiSTYPSiDEKA UNDDLATA, Westw. Mag. Zool., Vol. 
1, page 252. 

4. — DisTTPSiDEKA Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines, width 1| lines. 
This species is of a bronzy olive hue above, vv^ith the middle 
of the labrum, the basal joints of the palpi, the under side of the 
thighs, the tibia?, the tarsi, an arcuated fascia extending from 
the shoulders to near the suture at one third from the base, a 
zigzag fascia about the middle enlarged at the sides and not 
reaching the suture, and the apex of the elytra, of a pale yellow. 
The antennse, excepting the basal joint, and the apex of the 
tibise, and of each joint of the tarsi, are black. Between the eyes the 
head is marked with a number of fine longitudinal striolae, on 
the back of the head the striolee are transverse. The thorax 
is a little longer than the breadth, and is marked with 
transverse strioljB ; the median line is distinct, and the transverse 
depressions near the apex and base are very deep. Between 
these depressions the sides of the thorax are slightly rounded. 
The scutellum is short, broad, depressed in the middle and 
pointed at the apex. The elytra are a little broader than the 
thorax, square at the shoulders, parallel-sided, and round at the 
apex. The sculpture consists of, fine wavy transverse striolee on 
the middle, and punctures on the sides. The legs are thinly 
clothed with short white setae. The under surface is of an uni- 
foi^m brilliant bluish black. 

All the species of this genus very much resemble one another, 
and a mere description without comparison would scarcely sufiice 
for the certain recognition of any one of them. In this case the 
strongest resemblance is to D. tmdulata Westw., it differs in being 
very much smaller, in having the indentations on the sides of 
the labrum much deeper, in the flatter and less laterally rounded 
thorax, in the smoother and less deep sculpture of both thorax 
and elytra, in the shorter scutellum, in the absence of a smooth 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. gl 

protuberance on the shoulder and in the legs being clothed with 
shorter and more thinly distributed white hairs. To D, volitans, 
MacL., W., there is a near approach in size and sculpture, but in 
this last species the colour is darker, the yellow bands are dif- 
ferently disposed, the labrum is distinctly nine-toothed whereas 
seven only are visible in T). Mastersii, the scutellum is much 
longer and the legs are much more densely clothed with hairs. 
In almost all the points of diffei^ence mentioned above, it differs 
still more from D. flavicans, Chaudoir. D. Gruti Pasc, from 
Lizard Island, the only other Australian species of the genus 
described, I have never seen. 



CARABID^. 

5. — Pambords viridis, Gory. Mon. t. 161./. 1. 

6. — Pambords Gtuerinii, Gory. Mag. Zool., 1830, t. 
26,—Mo7i. t. 167. f. 2,—Boisd. Voy. Astrol. 2, 
page 27. 

The insect before me is evidently the small and black variety 
of P. Guerinii, alluded to by Count Castelnau in his notes on 
Australian Coleoptera, as coming from the Pine Mountains, 
Queensland. 

I believe it will be found to constitute a distinct species. 

7. — Pamborus Brisbanensis, Casteln. Not. Aust. 
Col. 1867, 'page 10. 

8. — Casnonia obscuea, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 1867, 
page 14. 

9. — EuDALiA LATiPENNis, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. 8. Wales, Vol. 1 , page 108. Casteln, 
Not. Aust. Col., page 16. 

This insect was originally described by me as Odacantha 
latipennis. Count Castelnau has placed it, and properly, in a 
new genus, which he has named as above, but unfortunately 
without giving the generic characters. 



82 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

10. — Drypta Austealis, Dej. Spec. Coleopt., Vol. 
1, page 185. 

11. — Drypta Mastersii. d. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 

This beautiful Drypta is very distinct from D. Australis, the 
only Australian species hitherto known. The palpi ai^e more 
pointed, the thorax has the median line much less distinct, the 
elytra have the laternal margins, apex, and sutural fascia, of a 
more brilliant blue, and are altogether moi'e convex and strongly 
punctured. The sutural facia, which is very broad and at the 
base extends to the shoulders, terminates at one third from the 
apex, where it is nearly met by a narrow extension upwards on 
each elytron of the blue apical margin. There is a dense ashen 
pubescence over the entire surface of the body. 

12.— PoLYSTiCHus Australis. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 

Of a rather dull brown covered with a dense short yellow 
pubescence, with the antennae, palpi, and legs reddish yellow. 
Head smooth and thinly punctured. Thorax a little longer than the 
breadth, and slightly narrowed behind, with the posterior angles 
rather sharp and with a broad recurved lateral margin, on which 
are two setigerous punctures, one above the middle and at the 
broadest part of the thorax, the other at the posterior angle. 
Scutellum long, triangular, and densely punctured on the basal 
portion. Elytra closely covered with narrow striae, with the 
interstices elevated, every third interstice being distinctly larger ; 
of these striae there are about thirty on each elytron, the lateral 
one only is broad and marked with large and rather distant 
punctures. 

I believe this to be the first of this genus described as Austra- 
lian. I have two specimens of it in my own collection trom Rock- 
hampton. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 83 

18. ■ — GrlGADEMA POLITULUM. n. Sp. 

Length 12 lines. 

Black. Head and thorax nitid and thinly punctured, the former 
elongated and narrowed behind the eyes, the latter, with the 
anterior angles much rounded and advanced, the apex truncated, 
and median line well marked. Elytra closely covered with small 
punctures, and striated, with the interstices elevated. 

This species though smaller, most resembles G. longipenne 
Germ., it however differs from it in many respects, more especially 
in the long neck and in the rounder and more prominent anterior 
angles of the thorax. The apex of the thorax also is in this species 
quite straight, while in the other it is a little concave. 

14. — GiGADEMA SULCATUM, MacL. W. 

Helluo sulcatus, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. Soc. N. S. Wales, 1, 
1864, page 108. 

Gigadema Thoinsoni, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 1867, page 21. 

15. — Helluosoma Masteesii. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 

Entirely of a reddish brown colour. Head very much con- 
stricted behind forming a small neck. Thorax elongated, truncate 
in front, much narrowed behind, covered with coarse punctures 
and longitudinal depressions bounded by rough irregular ridges, 
with the median line extremely fine and in the middle of the 
largest of these depressions. Elytra striated and closely punc- 
tured. Legs and under side of body, abdomen excepted, of a 
lighter colour than the back. 

Urs. Gemminger and Harold have in their '" Catalogue 
Coleopterorum," merged the genera Gigadema, Thoms. and 
Helluosoma, Casteln., in the genus Enigma, Newm. I have, how- 
ever, jareserved them distinct here, as I believe them to be all 
good genera. 



84 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

16. — AcROGENTS HiRSDTA, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. S. Wales, Vol. 1, page 109. 

17. — Pheropsophus verticalis, Dej. Spec. 1, page 
302. 

18. — Galleida pallidicollis, MacL., W. Trigonoihops 
palUdicolUs, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. Soc. N. S. 
Wales, Vol. 1, page 110. 

This may possibly be a new species, the head looks more 
smooth, and the thorax narrower than in the specimens I 
originally got from Port Denison. Mr. Masters only captured 
one specimen. 

19. — Xanthophcea Chaudoiri. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Pale red with the elytra still paler. The thorax is rather elon- 
gate, very little broader in front than behind, and about the 
middle, where it is a little widened, there is a setigerous puncture. 
The median line is deeply marked. The elytra are striated, 
with the striae of a dark hue, and closely punctured. 

I have placed this species under the genus XantJiopJicea, 
because it answers to the description of that genus, but the 
thorax in X. grandis Chaud. is more cordiform, and that insect has 
altogether a more elongate look. I have named the species after 
the founder of the genus, the Baron de Chaudoir. 

20. — Ctmindis ckassiceps. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Of a deep black, with the exception of the antennse, palpi, 
tibise, and tarsi. Head broad, large, convex, and entirely and closely 
covered with longitudinal striolae. Thorax very little narrowed 
behind, median line well marked, lateral margin furnished with 
two setigerous punctures, — one about one-third of the length of 
the thorax from the anterior angles, the other at the posterior 
angles, — and upper surface marked with small punctures, and 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 85 

fine transverse striolse. The elytra show a slight bronzy tint, 
■with the strias deep and finely- punctured and with the interstices 
elevated and smooth. 

Phl(EOCARAbds. n. gen. 

Head small, obtuse in front, narrowed suddenly behind the 
eyes into a distinct neck. Mentum with a large obtuse median 
tooth. Labium rather long, rounded at the apex. Labial palpi, 
moderately securiform ; maxillary, cylindrical. Mandibles short, 
broad at the base, acute and slightly arcuated at the tip. 
Labrum almost square. Antennge of medium length, filiform, the 
first joint largest, the second very small. Thorax rather broader 
than the length, lobed behind. Legs of medium size, fourth 
article of the tarsi, small and entire. 

In many respects the single species of which this genus is 
formed resembles Cymindis, while in others it seems to approach 
Lehia. I prefer to associate it with the first named genus. 

21. — Phlceocarabus Mastbrsii. n. sp. 

Length 3 1 lines. 
Head and thorax of a dark red, the first almost smooth, the 
latter with fine transverse striolae, and well marked median line. 
The elytra are black, with a large spot at the base on each side 
of the suture, and a narrow lateral margin of a dull red. The 
legs and under portion of the body are of a lighter colour. 

Phlceodromius. n. gen. 

Head almost square, very obtuse in front, not narrower 
behind the eyes. Mentum without median tooth, the lateral 
lobes large and rounded, forming internally a right angle with 
the body of the mentum. Palpi short and slightly truncated. 
Labium oblong, truncated and covered with hairs. Labrum 
broader than long, widening gradually towards the apex, which is 
truncate. Mandibles strong, short, thick and slightly arcuated at 
the extremities. Antennaa short, first joint large, second small 



86 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

and thin, third also thin but larger than second, fourth short 
obconic, fifth, sixth, seventh and ?ight joints much thicker and 
somewhat square or moniliform, the remaining joints filiform. 
Thorax broader than the length, truncate in front and at the base, 
rounded at the anterior angles where it is rather narrower than at 
the posterior, the latter slightly obtuse. Elytra much broader than 
the thorax. Legs robust, fourth joint of the tarsi strongly 
bilobed. 



22. — Phlceodromius piceus. n. 



sp. 



Length 4^ lines. 
Pitchy I'ed, of a lighter hue on the head, sides and centre of 
thorax, legs and underside of body. The head and thorax are 
almost smooth or very remotely and finely punctured, the latter 
is broadly margined, more especially towards the posterior angles 
which are recurved. The median line is pretty well marked, and 
on each lateral margin there are two setigerous punctures, one 
at the widest part of the thorax which is almost the centre, the 
other very near the posterior angles. The elytra are striated, 
the striee are closely and finely punctured, and the interstices are 
broad and rather flat. 

I am somewhat puzzled as to the position of this insect, it is 
so unlike any of the Lebiidce hitherto described, but that its 
effinity is to that Family, and as I think to no other is nearly 
certain. Mr. Masters brought one specimen only from Ga3'n- 
dah, but I find that I had previously received a few specimens 
from other portions of Queensland. 

EuLEBiA. n. gen. 

Head oval, scarcely narrower behind than in front of the eyes. 
Mentum with an apparently small median tooth. Palpi cylindri- 
cal and rather blunted at the apex. Mandibles strong, short, 
slightl}- arcuated at the tip. Labum square, truncated at the apex. 
Labium almost corneous, slightly rounded in front. Antennae 
rather short, nearly filiform, the joints from the fourth to the 
ninth rather thicker. Thorax much broader than the length, not 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 87 

narrower behind, the apex truncate, the base extended in the 
middle into a lobe. Elytra broader than the thorax. Legs 
rather long, the fourth joint of the tarsi strongly bilobed. 

23. — EULEBIA PLAGIATA. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Reddish testaceous with a large patch on the elytra extend- 
ing from the base on each side of the suture, to a short distance 
from the apex, and the terminal segments of the abdomen of a 
bluish black. The head is smooth. The thorax is very finely 
and transversely striolate, with the median line well marked, and 
two setigerous punctures on each lateral margin, one a little 
behind the anterior angle, the other very closely above the posterior 
angle. The elytra are striated, with the interstices wide and 
slightly raised. 

24. — EULEBlA PICIPENNIS. n. sp. 

Length 2j lines. 
Entirely of a pitchy red colour, rather darker on the elytra. 
Head and thorax as in the last species. Elytra more deeply 
striated, with the interstices more elevated, and with a depression 
on the third interstice, a little above the middle. 

25. — Sarothrockepis Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
This species though much smaller, looks very like Lebia 
posticalis Guer. It is however of rather a paler hue, and the 
black fascia on the elytra is larger. 

26, — 8arothrocrepi3 pallida, n. sp. 
Length 2 1 lines. 
Smaller than the last, and of a still paler yellow. There is a 
large black patch about the middle of the elytra, from which 
there is a narrow extension behind to the lateral margins. There 
is also a very narrow black vitta along the suture. The labrum 
is not so extended as in the last species. 



88 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

27. — Saeothrocrepis fasciata. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Like the last but much smaller, and with a broad black fascia 
on the hinder part of the elytra which is prolonged along the 
suture towards the apex. 

28. — Saeothrocrepis minima, MacL., W. Trans. 
Ent. Soc. N. S. Wales, 1864, page IIL 

This insect ought to form a new genus. I have not been 
able to spare a specimen for dissection, but I am convinced I was 
wrong in putting it with Sarothrocre])is. 

29. — Dromius humeralis. n. sp. 

Length If lines. 

Glossy, black, with the antennae, palpi, legs, a large iri-egular 
spot on each shoulder covering nearly the whole of the base of 
the elytra, and a round spot on the suture near the apex, of a 
dark red. The head and thorax are smooth, the elytra are very 
lightly striated, and very minutely punctured. 

There is only one specimen of this insect in the collection ; 
I have been unable therefore to make a very minute examination 
of it, but I have little doubt that it belongs to this genus. 

30. — HOMETHES VELUTINUS. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 

Of a deep velvety black, with the apical half of the antennae 
and the legs pale yellow. The thorax has its broadest part near 
the middle where there is a setigerous puncture, the median line 
is indistinct. The elytra are lightly striated, and have a series 
of depressed points along the third interstice and near the sides ; 
these depressions present a slightly yellow appearance. 

The shape of the thorax at once distinguishes this species 
from H. elegans, Newm., it is in this insect shorter and more 
regularly rounded, bringing the broadest part close to the middle, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. • 89 

while in E. elegans the broadest part is near the apex, the sides 
of the thorax are notroanded from that to the base 

31 HOMETHES MARGINIPENNIS. n. Sp. 

Length 3j hnes. 
Black, opaque, with the antennee, legs and lateral margin of 
the elytra pale yellow. The head is smooth. The thorax is 
shagreened, with the broadest part in the middle of its length, 
where it is on each side angulated and furnished with a setigerous 
puncture. The elytra are lightly striated, the striae have an 
interrupted appearance, along the yellow margin there is a series 
of irregular depressions. 

H. guttifer Germ, is not unlike this species, but the smooth 
elytra present a great contrast. 

32. — Philophl(eus unicolor, Chaud. Ann. Soc. Ent. 
Belg. tome 12, page 220. 

33. — Philophlceus maculatus. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Head and thorax of a pitchy red, the elytra brown with a 
small elongated yellow spot in the centre of their basal half, and 
a small round spot at the apex. The sides of the thorax are 
angulated in the middle, where there is one setigerous puncture, 
there is another at the posterior angle. The elytra are very finely 
punctured, sulcated very shallowly and covered with fine short 
yellow pubescence. 

34. — Philophlceus beunnipennis. n. sp. 

Length 3 J lines. 
Red, with the elytra brown. Labrum with a well marked 
longitudinal stria. Thorax broad, broadly margined and punc- 
tured. Elytra broad, short, very finely punctured and lightly 
striated. Under side of body and legs reddish yellow, with the 
exception of the terminal segments of the abdomen which are 
black. 



90 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

35. — Phflophlceus dubius. n. sp. 

Lenti^th 2| lines. 
The head is black and smooth, with the antennae and palpi 
red, the labrura with a well defined median line towards the apex, 
and the penultimate joint of the maxillary palpi shorter than the 
termiTial one. The thorax is like that of the last species, except 
that the setiform puncture marking the broadest part, is in 
this case nearer the apex than the base. The elytra are striated 
with a row of fine punctures in the strige ; the interstices are flat 
and smooth ; the sides are very narrowly margined with red, and 
there is on each elytron near the apex, a narrow, very zigzag 
fascia of the same colour extending from the suture to the seventh 
stria. 

This perhaps ought properly to be considered an Aynnocheila, 
or it may form a new genus. It resembles the last described 
species in having the labrum with a distinct median line. With 
this exception which I have not observed generally in the genus 
Philophloeuft. the labrum is long and rounded as in that genus, 
while the palpi are entirely of the character of Baron de Chaudoir's 
genus, Agonocheila. 

36. — Fhilophlceos vittatds. n. sp. 

Length 2| lines. 
Head, thorax, and legs reddish, the elytra brown, with a 
yellow vitta on each extending from the base to the apex, but 
very much narrowed behind the middle. The labrum which is 
not quite so long as in the typical species of the genus, is deeply 
impressed in the middle, the last joint of the tarsi is longer than 
the preceding one, the head is smooth, the thorax sparingly 
punctured, the elytra very finely punctured, lightly striated as in 
the genus generally, with two setigerous points on the third 
interstice. There is a very narrow yellow margin to the elytra. 

According to the definition of the Baron de Chaudoir, this 
ought certainly to be classed with Agonocheila. It resembles, 
however, in so many ways the genus Philophloeus. that, I prefer to 
place it with the latter. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 91 

37. — Agonocheila suturalis. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Reddish yellow with the fore part of the head, a sutaral 
fascia on the elytra extending from the base to near the apex, 
and a lateral fascia on the same considerably enlarged near the 
apex, black. The thorax is very broad and sparingly punctured. 
The elytra also are broad, very closely and finely punctured, very 
lightly furrowed, and covered with a very fine short yellow pile. 

Edcalyptocola. n. gen. 

Head not narrowed behind the eyes. Mentum with a large 
acute medium tooth. Labium, somewhat long and rounded at 
the apex. Palpi, sub-cylindrical, obtuse. Mandibles, slight, long, 
acute, and only arcuated at the very tip. Labrum, very long, 
rounded, and slightly narrowed at the apex. Antenna of medium 
length, thicker from the fifth joint. Thorax broader than the 
length, not narrower behind than in front, slightly rounded at the 
sides. Elytra broader than the thorax, rounded laterally and 
sinuate-truncate behind ; Legs strong, tarsi filiform, fourth joint 
small, entire. 

38. EUCALYPTOCOLA MaSTERSII. n Sp. 

Pitchy black with the antennae, palpi, legs, margins of thorax 
and elytra, and two broad and very irregular fascia? on the latter : 
consisting of elongated spots on the interstices between the striae, 
one above the middle, the other at the apex ; yellow. The head 
and thorax are nearly smooth. The elytra are sharply striated, 
with the interstices broad, smooth, and rather elevated. 

There is an evident resemblance to the genus Thyreo'pierus in 
this insect, but the true affinity is no doubt to PMlophloeus. 

I have seen specimens of the genus if not the species from the 
Clarence River District. 

39. SCOPODES ^NEUS. n. sp. 

Length 2| lines. 
Above brassy black, beneath bluish black, with the base of the 



92 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

antennae, the palpi, and the tibiae, yellow. The head is closely 
covered with longitudinal striolas. The thorax has the same 
sculpture, but with the striolse in all directions, giving it a very 
rugose appearance, its surface is flat, and not canaliculated, with 
the apex and base truncated sharply, and with the sides, angled and 
furnished with a long seta at its widest part which is above the 
middle. The elytra are opaque, with a slight silvery reflection in 
patches, they have several irregular depressions on their surface, 
and are covered with rows of small rather distant punctures, each 
occupied by a silvery white scale. 

40. — SCOPODES LAEVIS. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Glossy black, eyes very large, thorax smooth, canaliculate, 
widened in the middle where it forms an angle and is furnished 
with a long seta, and much narrowed at the base with tho posterior 
angles rounded. The elytra are finely striated with distinct 
punctures in the striae, the interstices are flat and broad. 

41. — ScOPODES ANGULICOLLIS. n. Sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
The sculpture of the head and thorax is the same in this 
species as in S. ceneus. But the thorax is broad, rounded at the 
anterior angles, and very slightly narrowed at the posterior angles, 
which are sharp and recurved, while on each side there are two 
setigerous punctures, one at the widest point a little below the 
anterior angles, the other at the posterior angles. The elytra are 
lightly striated, the striae are rather irregular and crooked, the 
interstices are broad and rounded. 

The thorax of this species is quite like that of a Lebia in form. 

42. — ScOPODES AUftATDS. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Of a bronzy hue, with patches of golden yellow, especially on 
the elytra, and with the antennae, palpi and legs reddish. The head 
and thorax are smooth but not glossy, the latter is canaliculate, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L S. 93 

and is shaped much like that of the last described species (S. 
angulicolUs) , with the exception of the anterior angles which are 
square and sharp. The elytra are profoundly striated, and thi-re 
are several irregular depressions over their surface. 

43. — SCOPODES SERICEUS. n. sp. 

Length If lines. 
Brassy black with a silken gloss on the elytra, legs and 
antennae brown. The thorax has a shagreen appearance, is 
finely canaliculated, is largely rounded at the apex and base, and 
has both anterior and posterior angles very sharp and prominent. 
Each angle is furnished with a long seta. The elytra are opaque 
and striated, the interstices are somewhat rounded. There are 
three shallow impressions along the third interstice. 

44. — SiLPHOMORPHA sPECiosA, Pasc. Joum. Ent. Vol. 
2, page 2t). 

45. — SiLPHOMORPHA viciNA, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 
1867, ^af/e 28. 

I am not quite sure of the identity of this insect with the one 
described by Count Castelnau. 

46. — SiLPHOMORPHA POLITA. n. Sp. 

Length 5 lines. 
Of a short oval form, with the upper surface of a glossy black, 
without puncturation or marking, and with only faint traces of 
striee on the elytra. The under surface is of a pitchy red. 

I cannot find anything that answers to this insect among the 
species of this genus described by Count Castelnau, but there are 
so many of them almost exactly alike, that I am not at all con- 
fident as to its being undescribed. 

47. — SiLPHOMORPHA BiPLAGiATA, Casteln. Not. Aiist. 
Col. 1867, page 26. 



94 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

48. — SiLPHOMORPHA PiCTA, Casteln. Not. Aud. Col. 
1867, page 25. 

49.^SiLPHOMOiiPHA BicoLOR, Castelii. Not. Aust. Col. 
1867, page 25. 

50. SiLPHOMORPHA HYDROPOROIDES, Westw. Motl. 

page 4^01, t. 14./. 3. 

51. — SiLPHOMORPHA QUADRIMACULATA, MacL., W. 

Trans. Ent. Soc. N. S. Wales, Vol. 1,'page 113. 

52. SiLl'HOMORPHA RUFO-MARGINATA. n. Sp. 

Length 3| lines. 

Of a glossy black with the margins of thorax aud elytra, and 
a rather broad sutural vitta on the latter, dull red. There are 
two rather deep impressions near the base of the thorax, aud a 
few shallower irregular ones near the base of the elytra. 

This species most resembles S. suturalis Germ., it is however 
very much smaller and more convex. 

53. — SiLPHOMORPHA MACULiGERA, MacL., W. Trans. 
Ent. Soc. N. S. Wales, Vol. 1, page 113. 

54. — Adelotopds Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Entirely of a rather glossy black. The elytra which are of 
the same width as the thorax at the base are lightly striated, and 
have a ridge on the suture near the apex. 

This species much resembles A. gyrinoides. Hope. It is a 
large broad convex insect entirely without puncturation. 

55. — Adelotopds bimaculatus, MacL., W. Trans. 
Ent. Soc. N. S. Wales, Vol. 1, page 113. 

56. — Adelotopds sdb-opacds. n. sp. 
Length 2 1 lines. 
Dark brown with the middle of the elytra of a dull red. The 



BY W. MAGLEAY, ESQ., P.L.S. 95 

head is vertical and closely punctured. The thorax is also closely 
punctured, with a faint median line ; it is broad and rounded at. 
the anterior angles, where the reflexed margin is very wide, 
and there are two large depressions at the base nearer the posterior 
angle than the centre. The elytra are somewhat narrower than 
the thorax at its widest part, and are marked with nearly obsolete 
ridges and coarse punctures. 

This species evidently belongs to the same group as A. 
Jpsuicles, Westw. 

57. — Adelotopds castaneds, Casteln. Not. Ausi. Col. 
18G7, i^at/e 33. 

68. — Adelotopds analis. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Glossy black, with the apex of the elytra red. The whole 
upper surface is covered with fine punctures and short erect light 
coloured hairs. The thorax is rounded at the posterior angles, 
with the margin wide, but not much reflexed. 

69. — Adelotopus maculipennis. n. sp. 

Length If lines. 
Very nitid, black, with a tinge of dark red on the thorax, and 
a large spot in the centre of the elytra of the same hue. The 
thorax is very narrowly margined and nearly cylindrical. 

60. — Apotomus Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
In colouring, this species exactly resembles A. Australis, it 
differs from it in having the thorax more globular, the median line 
scarcely marked, and the posterior lobe much shorter. The elytra 
are striated, with the stride full of large punctures. 

61. — MORIO LONGICOLLIS. n. sp. 

Length 6| lines. 
Black, subnitid, the head smooth in front and deeply im- 



96 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

pressed on each side, with the clypeus rough and deeply marked. 
The thorax is longer than the breadth, is slightly narrowed at 
the posterior angles which are acute, and has the median line, and 
the posterior, and transverse impressions well marked. The 
elyti'a are deeply striated, with the interstices convex. 

This insect differs from M. Australis in the deeper grooves on 
each side of the head, in the marks on the clypeus, and in the 
comparatively greater length of the thorax. 

62. — MORIO SETICOLLIS. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 

This species is of a more elongate form than the last. The 
clypeus seems quite smooth, and the head is less deeply grooved 
than in M. longicolUs. 

63.— Setalis NIGER, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 1867, 
jpaije 40. 

64. — Veradia Brisbanensis, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 
1867, page 40. 

Philoscaphus. n. gen. 

Body without wings. Head large and bisulcate. Palpi en- 
larged towards the apex and truncate. Mentum with acute 
median tooth. Antenna? slight, filiform, and pointed at the tip. 
Thorax transverse. Elytra ovate, with a strong costiform mar- 
gin, and one or two large grooves on the sides beneath. Anterior 
tibi» tridentated externally. 

In addition to the species which I name below from Gayndah, 
this genus will comprise Carenum tuberculatum and carinatum 
named by me, and two others undescribed in the collection of the 
Australian Museum, one from South Australia, the other from 
Nicol Bay. 

65. — Philoscaphus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 13 lines. 
The general resemblance of this species to P. tuberculatum, is 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 97 

very great, it can be, however, easily distinguished by the thorax 
being marked with deeper transverse rugae, and with a deeper 
emargination in the centre of the posterior lobe. The elytra also 
are much rougher and more largely tuberculate, with an inter- 
rupted tubercLilate costa extending from the inner side of each 
humeral angle to beyond the middle of eacli elytron. The two 
other species alluded to as being undescribed differ in having an 
additional lateral costa, forming two deep lateral grooves, instead 
of one as in this species and in tuberculatum. P. carinatum is 
different in so many respects that comparison with it is un- 
necessary. 

66. — Carenum salebrosum. n. sp. 
Length 8 1 lines. 
In general appearance not unlike C. loculosum, Newm., but 
diflTering very much in the sculpture of the elytra. Each elytron 
is marked with three irresrular and crooked ridges, one near the 
suture, another more elevated near the centre, and the third 
between that and the lateral margin, the most irregular of all 
and scarcely traceable beyond the middle. Between the suture and 
the first of these ridges, the space is closely filled by deep trans- 
verse impressions, and between that and the second ridge there 
is a series of large deep and square foveas, all the rest of the 
elytra are covered with large deep fove^ of the most irregular 
form. 

67. — Carenum occultum. n. sp. 

Length 11 lines. 
This species very much resembles C. mterruptum, it is, how- 
ever, of a more elongate form, and has a narrow border of a pale 
blue colour, very different from the brilliant purple of the other. 

68. — Carenum viridi-marginatum. n. sp. 

Length 9 lines. 
The resemblance of this insect to G. marginatum is very great ; 
the elytra are, however, proportionately shorter and more ovate, 



98 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

and the basal iobu or prolongation of the thorax is distinctly 
angular at the sides and emarginate in the raiddle. 

69. — Cab-enum politulum. n. sp. 
Length 7o- lines. 
This species is also like 0. marginatum, but the elytra are 
without trace of strife, and are of a more elongate character. The 
basal lobe of the thorax is emarginate in the -middle, but not 
angular at the sides as in the last described species. The whole 
insect is of a glossy black tinged with blue on the elytra, and with 
a green margin to both thorax and elytra. 

70. — Carenum triste, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. Sue. 
N. S. Wales, Vol. 2, page 63. 

71. — Carenum ovipbnne. n. sp. 

Length 6j lines. 

This belongs to the G. Bonellii group. It is entirely black 

without vestige of stri^ on the elytra or any marginal colouring. 

The anterior puncture on the elytra is further from the shoulder 

than in C Bonellii, and the body is of a more perfectly oval form, 

72. — Carendm submetallicdm. n. sp. 
Length 7 lines. 
This also belongs to the G. Bonellii group, and scarcely differs 
in form from that insect. The thorax is margined with pale 
green. The elytra are of a dull greenish bronze hue with pale 
green margin, and are covered with indistinct and interrupted 
strite. 

73. — Carenum deauratum, MacL,, W. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. S. Wales, Vol. I, page 140, 

74. — Carenum angustipenne. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 
Black, subnitid, with a narrow pale green margin to the 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESa, F.L.S. 99 

elj^tra, wliicli are narrower than the thorax and narrowest at the 
base. In form this insect resembles G. quadripimctatum mihi, 
and it belongs to the same group. The antennae are more 
slender and filiform than in the typical Garenmns. 

75.^Edtoma bipunctatdm, MacL., W. Garenum hi- 
punctatum, MacL., W., Trans. Eni. Soc. N. S, 
Wales, Vol. 1, fage 60. 

70. — ScARiTES Cacus, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. Soc. 
N. S. Wales, Vol. 1., page 67. 

77. — EuDEMA ALTERNANS, Castelu. Not. A^lst. Gal. 
1867, page 60. 

78. — EuDEMA AusTRALE, Dej. Spec. Gal., Vol. 5, page 
601. 

79. — EuDEMA AZUREQM, Casteln. Not. Aust. Gol. 
1867, page 61. 

80. — Chl^inius Australis, Dej. Spec. Gol., Vol. 5, 
page 660. 

81. — Chl^nids maculiger, Casteln. Not. Aust. Gol. 
1867, 2^(jg& 62, 

82. — Chl^nius perbgrinus, Laferte. Ann. Fr. 1861, 
page 247. Chaud. Bull. Mosc, 1866, 3, piage 
264 

83. — Chl^nids MARGiNATDS, Dej. Spec. Gol, Vol. 2, 
page 305. 

84. — OoDEs AUSTRALIS, Dej. Spec. Gol., Vol. 5, page 
671. 

85. — Promecoderds viridis. n. sp. 
Length 7 lines. 
The thorax and elytra of this beautiful species are of a blackish 



100 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

green and very nitid. The head and under surface are of a 
glossy black, the antennae, the parts of the mouth and the legs are 
of a pitchy brown. There are a few impressions on the posterior 
part of the lateral margins of the elytra. 

86. — Meonis ater, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 1867, 
page 70. 

87. — Meonis ovicollis. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
This insect differs from M. ater, and niger, the two species 
on which Count Castelnau founded the genus, in beiug much 
smaller, in having the mandibles less exserted, and in having the 
thorax globular and rounded, and in no way cordiform or pro- 
longed at the base. It is of a glossy black with the elytra 
strongly striated in the middle. 

88. — Leirodira Latreillii, Casteln. Not. Aust. Gal. 
1867, page 72. 

89. — Phorticosomus rugiceps. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines. 
Dark brown with the antennse and legs of a pitchy red. The 
head is broad, and much corrugated and wrinkled, the thorax is 
uneven on the surface, and the elytra are striated with the inter- 
stices convex. In all these points it differs from P. Felix the 
type of the genus, which has the head and thorax smooth, and 
the spaces between the striee of the elytra rather flat. 

90. — Lecanomerus ruficeps. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 

Head red, smooth, and deeply impressed on each side, near 

the eyes and rather in front of them. Thorax black — with the 

margin and base slightly reddish, — scarcely broader than the 

length, rounded at the sides anteriorly, not much narrowed 



BY W. MACLEAY, EgQ., F.L.S. 101 

behind, truncate and punctured at the base, deeply impressed 
near the posterior angles and canaliculate in the middle. Elytra 
broader than the thorax, moderately convex, strongly striated 
with the interstices convex ; and black, with a broad dull yellow 
lateral and apical margin. The legs are of a pale yellow. 

91. — -Lecanomerus abereans. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Black, with the legs yellow, the antennae and the parts of the 
mouth red, and with a tinge of the same colour on the margin of 
the thorax and elytra. Head smooth and lightly impressed on each 
side in front of the eyes. Thorax rather broader than the length, 
scarcely narrowed behind, slightly rounded before the middle, 
truncate at the base, very broadly but not deeply impressed near 
the posterior angles, and slightly canaliculate in the middle. 
Elytra strongly striated, the interstices but slightly convex. The 
anterior tarsi in the male of this species are peculiar, the first 
joint is very short and not apparently dilated at all, the second is 
very much dilated, the third is shorter, but quite as much laterally 
dilated as the second, while the fourth is as small as the first. 

92. — Harpalus interstittalis, MacL., W. Trans. 
Ent. Soc. N. 8. Wales, Vol I, page 117. 

93. — Harpalus infelix, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 
1867, page 106. 

94. — Harpalus planipennis. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Head smooth, black, nitid, with a small oval depression on 
each side near the eyes. Thorax glossy, broader than the length, 
emarginate in front, truncate behind, slightly rounded on the 
sides anteriorly, not narrowed behind, canaliculate in the middle, 
and with a broad and shallow rugose impression at the base 
between the median line and the posterior angles ; these last are 
rounded. Elytra bronzy, dull, and lightly striated, the interstices 
flat and broad, with six light punctures at irregular intervals on 



102 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

the tliird interstice, and a series of deeper ones on the lateral 
interstices. Antennae, palpi, and legs, with the exception of the 
upper part of the thighs, of a reddish hue. 

95. — Habpalus Gayndahensis. n. sp. 
Length 3| lines. 
Head and thorax as in the last species. Elytra nitid, with a 
slight purplish tinge ; the striae rather deeper than in planipennis, 
with the interstices equally flat, and with seven or eight well 
marked punctures on the third interstice extending from the 
base to the apex. The thighs are black, the rest of the legs, the 
antennae and palpi are reddish. 

96. — Habpalus angustatds. n. sp. 
Length S^ lines. 
Head and thorax as in the two last species, the latter with the 
surface less smooth and the posterior impressions less marked. 
Elytra scarcely broader than the thorax and of a nitid black, with 
a very slight greenish tinge ; the stri^ are well marked as in the 
last species, and the interstices are flat, with from six to eight 
well marked punctures on the third, placed at irregular intervals 
from the base to the apex. Thighs black, the rest of the legs, 
antennae and palpi are reddish. 

97. — Habpalus convexiusculus. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Glossy black with the legs and palpi red. Head and thorax 
smooth and convex, the latter with the posterior impressions deep, 
short, and narrow, and with the lateral margins red and furnished 
with several setigerous punctures. Elytra convex, very little 
broader than the thorax, lightly striated, with abbreviated striee 
near the suture, and having the interstices broad and nearly quite 
flat. 

98. — Habpalus ^neo-nitens. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Brassy black with a tinge of purple on the elytra. Head 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 103 

smooth. Thorax rather flat, rounded at the sides, truncate behind, 
and rugose on the back, especially near the base, with the median 
line slight and not reaching to the base, and the posterior im- 
pressions broad and rather deep. Elytra flat and distinctly but 
not deeply striated, with the interstices broad and flat, and with 
five or six punctures on the third interstice, and one on the fifth 
near the apex. The abbreviated sutural striae are longer than in 
H. Gayndahensis, the species to which it most appi'oximates. 
The legs and the parts of the mouth are light red. 

99. — Harpalus atro-vieidis. n. sp. 

Length 2f lines. 
More convex than the species last described, but not so much 
so as H. convexiusculus ; of a nitid greenish black colour, with 
yellow legs and palpi. Head broad and smooth. Thorax with 
a very narrow reddish margin, the median line only marked in 
the middle, the posterior impressions deeply marked but small, 
and the sides moderately rounded. The elytra are deeply but 
narrowly striated, with the interstices broad and flat. There is a 
small puncture on the third interstice near the apex, and the 
abbreviated sutural striaa are short, and seem to take their rise 
from the extremity of the second strife. The legs are more than 
usually armed with short spiniform hairs. 

100. — Stenolophus politus. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Black and nitid. Head rugosely impressed on each side 
before the eyes. Thorax nearly square, slightly rounded at the 
sides which have a narrow red margin, and broadly impressed 
and slightly rugose near the base on each side of the median line 
which is very lightly marked. Elytra lightly striated, — the 
interstices flat and broad, — with an obscure spot on the shoulder, 
a narrow lateral margin enlarged towards the apex, and a narrow 
edging on the apical half of the suture, of a yellowish red. The 
legs are of a light red with the apices of the thighs, tibiae, and 
tarsi, dark brown. The antennas and palpi are of a brownish red. 



104 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

101. — AcuPALPus Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Black, nitid, rather convex. Head with a short curved im- 
pressed line on each side from the eye to the transverse line of 
the clypeus. Thorax broader than the length, and rounded on 
the sides and at the posterior angles. The basal impressions are 
scarcely traceable, and the median line is but lightly marked. 
The elytra are strongly striated and have the interstices slightly 
convex. The legs, antennae, and palpi are of a reddish yellow. 

102.- — AcUPALPUS ANGULATUS. U. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Black, nitid, and moderately convex. Head as in the last 
species. Thorax narrower, longer than the breadth, rounded at 
the sides anteriorly, and slightly narrowed behind, with the 
posterior angles almost square and broadly margined, and the 
median line and basal impressions well marked. Elytra con- 
siderably broader than the thorax, with the strige not quite so 
deep, and the interstices rather more flat than in the last species. 
The legs and antennae are of a pale red. 

Ctclothorax. n. gen. 

Mentum deeply emarginate with a large median tooth. La- 
bium rather long, obtuse at the apex. Palpi short, somewhat 
filiform, the tip of the maxillary rather obtuse. Labrum square, 
entire. Mandibles short, strong, and slightly arcuated with a 
small tooth in the centre of the right mandible. Antennae of 
moderate length ; 1st joint long and thicker than the others ; 
2nd small ; 3rd and 6th longer than the others ; the remainder 
equal. Thorax convex, transversal and rounded at the sides and 
base. Elytra broader than the thorax, slightly convex, and short. 
Legs moderately strong, the anterior tarsi slightly dilated in the 
male, the intermediate still less so ; the two first joints of all the 
tarsi longest. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 105 

I am not at all sure of the position of this genus, the dilatation 
of the tibiae in the male is so slight as to be in most instances 
unnoticeable. 

103. — Ctclothorax punctipennis. n. sp. 

Length 2| lines. 
Black, nitid. Head smooth with a deep line on each side near 
the eyes. Thorax emarginate in front, much rounded at the 
sides and base, with a narrow red reflexed margin ; the basal 
portion depressed and punctured, and the remainder smooth and 
without median line. Elytra each with six light striae marked 
with well defined punctures, which become less distinct towards 
the apex, and in the sixth striae do not extend beyond the middle ; 
there is also a punctured sublateral stria. A very narrow reddish 
border is traceable along the sides and hinder portion of the 
suture. The legs, antenna, and palpi, are of a pale red. 

104. — Abacetus ater. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Black, nitid. Head small with a short deep curved impression 
on each side in front. Thorax much broader than the head, and 
a little broader than the length, emarginate anteriorly, much 
rounded on the sides, and truncate at the base. The median line 
is distinct, and takes its rise at some distance from the apex, and 
the two basal impressions are deep, long, and linear. The lateral 
margin is small, reflexed, and of a reddish hue. Elytra scarcely 
broader than the thorax at its broadest part, and deeply striated, 
with small punctures visible in the striae, and with the interstices 
broad and convex. Legs, antennae, and palpi pitchy red. 

105. — Abacetus angdstior. n. sp. 
Length 2 1 lines. 
This species nearly resembles the last ; it differs in the thorax, 
which is less emarginate in front, less bulged out and rounded on 
the sides, and which is rather longer than the width. The elytra 
differ in having the striae smaller, and the interstices much more 
flat. The legs and palpi also are of a lighter colour. 



106 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

106. — Amblttelus amplipennis. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 

Reddish brown, nitid . Head flat, with two broad impressions 
between the eyes. Thorax scarcely broader than the head, 
nearly square, the anterior angles obtuse, the posterior acute, the 
median line distinctly marked, the basal impressions broad and 
very deep, and the surface marked with transverse strioliB, which 
become more profound towards the base. Elytra narrowest at 
the shoulders, widest near the apex, which is broadly rounded ; 
marked with light faintly punctured striee, and with the interstices 
broad and nearly flat. The under surface and legs are of a 
lighter hue. 

This insect ought perhaps to constitute another genus. The 
median tooth of the mentum, though large, is not nearly so much 
so as that of Amblytelus is said to be, and the form of the thorax 
is also very difierent, but the general resemblance and evident 
affinity are very great. 

107. — Amblttelus minutds. n. sp. 
Length 2 1 lines. 
In colouring and marking almost identical with the last 
species, it difiers in being very minute, in having the facial impres- 
sions more profound and linear, and in having the thorax with a 
larger and more reflexed lateral margin, and less profound basal 
impressions. 

108. — Lesticus chloronotus, Chaud. Ann. de la 
Soc. Ent. Belg. T, xi. 

109. TiBARISUS ATER. n. Sp. 

Length 7| lines. 
Black, nitid. Head smooth with two longitudinal impressions 
on each side, one extending from the eyes to the root of the 
mandibles, the other, — a broader impression, — situated between 
and rather in front of the eyes. Thorax square, truncate behind 
and nearly so in front, slightly rounded at the sides and narrowly 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 107 

margined laterally, with the median line distinct, and with two 
basal impressions on each side, the outer one short and curved, 
the inner long and deep. Elytra very profoundly striated with 
the interstices smooth and convex. Tarsi clothed with red hair. 
This species differs from T. melas, Casteln., in being much 
smaller, and in having no vestige of an abbi-eviated stria near the 
scutellum, whereas, in T. melas there is a small impression on 
the first interstice, emanating from the basal end of the second 
stria. 

110. — TiBARISUS NIGEE. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines. 
This species differs from the last in its much smaller size, in 
its palpi being less truncate, in the basal impressions of the 
thorax being broader, and in having a distinct abbreviated stria 
near the scutellum. 

111. — Omalosoma Hercules, Casteln. Not. Aust. 
Col. \^^^1,page 119. 

112. — Omalosoma marginifekdm, Chaud. Bull. Mosc. 
Ill, 'page 68. 

113. — Omalosoma cordatum, Chaud. Bull. Mosc. 
Hi, page 69. 

114. — Omalosoma Cunninghamti, Casteln, Not. Aust. 
Col. 1867, pa^e 120. 

115, — NOTONOMUS PDRPUREIPENNIS. n. sp. 

Length 7 1 lines. 
Head and thorax black with a greenish tint, the latter very 
little longer than the breadth, very slightly rounded at the sides, 
of the same width at the anterior and posterior angles, emarginate 
at the base, and deeply impressed on the median line, with the 
basal impressions long and linear. Elytra purple with a green 
border, and strongly striated, with the interstices convex, the 



108 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

third marked with two large punctures, one near the centre the 
other between that and the apex. Legs ciUated with reddish 
hair. 

This may be the Feronia impressicolUs of Castelnau, if so, he 
has made a mistake in describing the posterior margin of the 
thorax, as being cut convexly in the middle. 

116. — NOTONOMUS VIOLACEOMARGINATDS. n. Sp. 

Length 7^ lines. 
This species is exactly like the last excepting that the elytra 
have a brilliant red violet margin, are opaque, and have the 
interstices between the strise almost flat. 

117. — NOTONOMUS CYANEOCINCTUS. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
Black, nitid. Thorax longer than the breadth, scarcely 
narrowed behind, and slightly rounded at the sides, with the 
median line and basal impressions deeply marked ; the latter are 
broader and shorter than in the two preceding species. Elytra 
deeply striated, with the interstices convex, the third interstice 
marked with two large punctures, one a little behind the 
middle, the other between that and the apex ; the lateral margin 
is of a brilliant blue changing in some lights to green. 

118. — NOTONOMUS VIRIDICINCTUS. n. Sp. 

Length 5 1 lines. 
Head and thorax black and nitid with a purplish gloss, the 
latter longer than the breadth, rounded on the sides anteriorly, 
a little narrowed behind, and emarginate at the base, with the 
median line broadly marked, and the basal impressions long and 
deep. The elytra are of a rather dull purple with a bright 
green margin, and strongly striated, with the interstices but slightly 
convex, and with two large punctures on the third interstice, one 
behind the middle, the other near the apex. Legs clothed with 
reddish hair. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 109 

119. — NOTONOMUS ANGUSTIPENNIS. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines. 
Differs from the last species in being less brilliant throughout, 
in having the thorax less rounded laterally, in having the elytra 
scarcely broader than the thorax, in being destitute of all purple 
gloss except on the elytra, where it is very slight, and in having 
the abbreviate stria near the scutellum shorter and more pointed. 
In other respects the two species are exactly alike. 

120. — Steropds cyaneocinctds, Chaud. Bull. Mosc, 
1865, III,^a^e97. 

121. — Omaseus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 6^ lines. 
Black, very nitid. Head smooth in the middle, with two 
small elongate impressions on each side, the external one 
linear and extending from the eyes to the base of the mandibles, the 
other impression rather broader. Thorax almost square, rounded 
behind the anterior angles, truncate at the base, and very slightly 
narrowed at the posterior angles, with the median line lightly 
marked and with two deep basal impressions on each side ; the 
outer one close to the posterior angle and very short, the other 
moderately long and very broad. Elytra of a brilliant iridescent 
hue, with four deep and distinct stride on each side of the suture, 
and a lateral stria, perfect, with the fifth stria from the suture 
scarcely traceable towards the apex, and the sixth and seventh only 
traceable at the apex. The first four interstices are convex. 

122 — ChljEnioideds planipennis. n, sp. 
Length 8| lines. 
Black, nitid. Head deeply but shortly bisulcated in front. 
Thorax rather broader than the length, slightly rounded at the 
sides anteriorly, scarcely narrowed behind, broader at the 
posterior angles than at the anterior, and truncate at the base, 
with the median line very lightly marked, the inner basal im- 
pressions broad and deep, and the outer almost circular. Elytra 



110 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

broad and lightly but distinctly striated, with the abbreviated 
stria near the scutellara two lines long. The interstices are 
broad and very flat. 

This species differs from G. prolixus Erichs., upon which the 
genus is founded by Baron de Chaudoir, in several particulars, 
the most evident being the much finer striation of the elytra and 
greater flatness of the interstices. 

123. — PiEClLUS SDBIRIDESCENS. n. Sp. 

Length 4| lines. 
Black, nitid. Head with two short impressions in front. 
Thorax longer than the breadth, rounded at the sides, rather 
narrowed behind, truncate at the base, and with the posterior 
angles obtuse and rounded, the median line lightly marked, and 
the basal impressions deep and rather long. Elytra iridescent 
and strongly striated, with no abbreviated sutural stri^, and with 
the interstices convex. The legs and antennae are of a reddish 
brown. 

124. — P.a:ciLus ateonitens. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
In form and general appearance very much resembling P. 
subiridescens. It differs in having the frontal impressions 
smaller and more lightly marked, and in having the spaces be- 
tween the strijB on the elytra more flat. It is also a much smaller 
insect, and with only a trace of iridescence on the elytra. 

125. — Argutok fovetpennis. n. sp. 
Length 3|^ lines. 
Black, nitid. Head with the frontal impressions long and 
well marked. Thorax transversal, rounded behind the anterior 
angles and square at the base with the median line well marked, 
the inner basal impression broad and deep, and the outer very small. 
Elytra duller than the thorax, — of a brownish tinge, with an 
indistinct dull red margin, — and striated, with the abbreviated 
ptria long and joining the first stria from the suture, and with the 
interstices flat ; the third with three shallow fovese, the first above 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESa, F.L.S. m 

the middle on the outside of the interstice, the second about the 
middle on the interstice, and the third between that and the 
apes on the inside of the interstice. The legs and antennae are 
of a pitchy red. 

126. ArGDTOR NITIDIPENNI3. n. Sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Black, nitid. Head with the frontal impressions long. Thorax 
of the same form as in A. foveipennis, but with the basal impres- 
sions broader, shallowei', and somewhat rugose and punctured. 
Elytra brilliant and striated with the abbreviated basal stria long 
and joining the first stria, and with three punctures on the third 
interstice, the upper one not far from the base, and on the outer 
side of the interstice. The legs and antennse are red. 

127. — Argutor Oodiformis. n. sp. 
Length 3 1 lines. 
Black, nitid. Head as in the last, but with the frontal im- 
pressions more rugose. Thorax rather more rounded at the 
anterior angles than in the two preceding species, and having 
much the appearance of an Oodes. Elytra with a slight bronzy 
tinge, and strongly striated, with the interstices convex, the third 
having three punctures as in the last described species ; the ab- 
breviated stria near the scutellum does not join the 1st stria. 
The tarsi and antennae are of a bi'ownish red. 

128. — PlATTNUS NITIDIPENNIS. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Black, very brilliant, with the elytra iridescent, the legs, 
antennas, and palpi red, and the labrum reddish brown. Head 
broadly impressed on each side anteriorly. Thorax nearly square, 
very narrowly margined, a little rounded on the sides anteriorly, 
very slightly narrowed behind, and truncate at the base, with the 
posterior angles obtuse, the median line distinct and the basal 
impressions long, narrow, and deep. The elytra are a little 
broader than the thorax and more than twice the length, and 

H 



112 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

strongly striated, with the interstices convex, and without an 
abbreviated stria near the scutellum. 

This may not be properly one of the Anchomenidce, it much 
resembles some of the Feronidce. The palpi, however, and the 
elongate antennae and legs induce me to place it in this genus. 

129.— Platynus planipennis. n. sp. 
Length 5j lines. 

Of a brilliant bronzy black above, and of a pitchy black below, 
with the margin of the thorax, and the extreme lateral edge of 
the elytra red. Head smooth with the frontal impressions not 
deep. Thorax nearly square, rounded on the sides, a little nar- 
rowed posteriorly, truncate at the base, with the posterior angles 
obtuse and the margin reflexed ; the median line is distinctly 
marked from the anterior transverse impression to the posterior, 
and the basal impression on each side is very broad and shallow. 
The elytra are finely striated, with perfectly flat interstices ; the 
third interstice has on or near it three large punctures, — the 
first a little distance from the base in the third stria, the second 
near the middle in the second stria, and the third nearer the 
apex in the same stria ; the abbreviated stria near the scutellum 
is long. 

130. — PlATTNI'S MAPvGINlCOLLlS. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Head more deeply marked than in the last described species. 
Thorax the same. Elytra narrower and of a greenish hue, with 
the reddish border larger, and the strise closely punctured ; the 
interstices between the sti'i^ also appear less flat and broad, and 
have a shagreen appearance. The legs are yellow. In other 
respects like P. planipennis. 

131. — DiCROcriiLE GoRTi, Boisd. Voy. Astrol. Col., 
page 32. 

SiAGONYX. n. gen. 

Mentum rather large without median tooth, and with the 
lateral lobes acutely pointed at the inner portion of the apex. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 113 

Labium obtuse and corneous at the apex. Palpi long and slender, 
the second joint of the maxillary longest, the terminal joint of 
both thickened, and obtuse or truncate at the tip. Mandibles 
strong and terminating in two very acute arcuated teeth. Labrum 
short, broad and entire or very slightly bi-emarginated. Antennae 
long and slender, the first article long and thicker than the 
others, the second short. Head small, triangular, and slightly 
narrowed behind. Thorax elongate and narrowed behind with 
a broad recurved margin. Elytra very slightly convex and of 
an elongated oval form. Legs long and slender, the first joint 
of the tarsi very long, fourth short and entire, the first three 
joints of the anterior tarsi of the male dilated. 

This genus resembles Lestignathus, Erichs., it differs chiefly 
from it in the very different labium, labrum, and mandibles. 

132. SlAGONTX AMPLIPENNIS. n. Sp. 

Length 7 lines. 
Black, moderately nitid. Head rather rugosely impressed on 
each side in front. Thorax rounded at the sides, narrowed 
behind, reflexed broadly at the posterior angles, rugose at the 
base with the median line deeply marked, and the basal impres- 
sions broad. Elytra much broader than the thorax, broadest 
behind the middle, and strongly striated, with the interstices 
convex. Tarsi and antennte reddish brown. 

133. — SlAGONTX Masteksii. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
This species differs from the preceding in having the head 
smoother, the thorax more narrow, and in being altogether a 
smaller and more elongate looking insect. In other respects 
the two species exactly resemble one another. 

134. — Treghds atriceps. n. sp. 

Length Ij lines. 

Head black, smooth, and deeply impressed on each side in 
front, with the clypeus, labrum, palpi, and two basal joints of the 



114, THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

antennae, yellow. Thorax red, almost square, rounded at the 
sides anteriorly, narrowed behind, and truncate at the base, with 
the median line distinct and the basal impression large, shallow, 
and punctured. Elytra dark brown and striated, with the 
margin and suture red. Legs of a pale red. 

135. TrECHUS RUFILABEIS. n. sp. 

Length. 1| lines. 
Head black, smooth and very lightly impressed in front, with 
the clypeus, labrum, palpi, and antennae of a yellowish red. 
Thorax yellowish red, very little wider than the head, rounded 
slightly on the sides, narrowed behind and rounded at the pos- 
terior angles, with the median line very lightly marked, and the 
basal impressions very shallow and punctured. Elytra flat, 
smooth, obsoletely striated, shorter than the body, and of 
a yellowish red colour, with a large dark brown spot covering 
nearly all the apical half of each elytron. The under side of the 
body and legs are of a pale red. 

136. — Trechds concolor. n. sp. 
Length If lines. 
Entirely of a yellowish red colour, excepting the antennae 
from the third joint to the apex which are of a darker hue, and a 
slight dash of brown on the forehead. Thorax almost square, 
rounded a little on the sides anteriorly, and slightly narrowed 
behind, with the median line slightly marked, and the basal 
portion transversely impressed and punctured. Elytra strongly 
striated, the interstices slightly convex. 

137. — Trechds ater. n. sp. 
Length If lines. 
Black, rather dull. Head deeply impressed on each side. 
Thorax square and very little narrowed behind, with the median 
line distinct, and the basal impressions very broad, very shallow, 
and densely punctured. Elytra strongly striated, with a narrow 
reddish margin, and a slight tinge of the same colour along the 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 115 

apical half of the suture. The legs, palpi, and first joint of the 
antennae are red, the rest of the antennse brown and pilose. 

The following seventeen species have subulate palpi, and 
though compi-ising many different forms, may all be referred to 
the very comprehensive genus Bemhidiuwj. I have not attempted 
to divide them into subgenera. 

138. — Bembidium bistriatum. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 
Black, convex, very nitid. Head deeply impressed on each 
side in front. Thorax somewhat globular, transverse, rounded 
on the sides, a little lobed at the base and slightly impressed on 
the median line. Elytra ovate, with a deep stria on each side of 
the suture, and two lateral strite, the inner one punctured behind ; 
there are also two large dark red round spots on each elytron, one 
near the shoulder, the other near the apex. The legs, antennae, 
andjpalpi^are yellow, the latter have the penultimate joint much 
swelled. 

139. — Bembidium striolatum. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 
Black with a brilliant bronzy lustre. Head and thorax like 
those of B. bistriatum, the latter not so globular, nor so rounded 
on the sides, and with the base more truncate and the posterior 
angles square. Elytra ovate and striated, the striae broad, rather 
shallow, and not extending to the base or apex. There are two 
round yellow spots on each elytron, placed much as in the last 
species, but much smaller. The legs and basal half of the 
antennae are of a reddish yellow, the rest of the antenna is of a 
dark colour, 

140. — Bembidium convexum. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 

This species only differs from B. histriatum in being more 
convex, and in having the thorax more rounded and narrowed 
posteriorly, and in having the impressions or fovese on the basal 
margin of the elytra more profound. 



115 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

141. — Bembididm bipustclatum. n. sp. 

Length Ij lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head smooth and longitudinally impressed 
on each side between the eyes. Thorax rather flat, much broader 
than the length, slightly rounded on the sides, not narrowed 
behind, and truncate at the base, with the median line scarcely 
visible and the basal impressions very short. Elytra broad, 
striated and of a bronzy hue, with an indistinct red spot near the 
apex on the outside of each elytron. Legs, palpi, and antennae 
yellow. 

142. — Bembididm punctipenne. n. sp. 

Length 1 line. 
Entirely of a glossy red. Head large and flat, with the im- 
pressions between the eyes long and deep. Thorax transversal, 
convex, much rounded on the sides and narrowed at the base, 
with the median line lightly marked. Elytra moderately convex, 
and marked with regular rows of distinct punctures which dis- 
appear towards the apex. The suture and lateral margins of the 
elytra are of a rather darker hue than the rest of the body. 

143. — Bembidium atkiceps. n. sp. 

Length 1 line. 
Head black, and largely impressed on each side between the 
eyes. Thorax yellowish red, rather flat, transversal, slightly 
rounded on the sides anteriorly, and with the posterior angles 
square and broadly reflexed. Elytra somewhat flat, strongly 
striated, punctui'ed in the strice, and of a reddish colour, with the 
suture, apex, and a broad median fascia, black. Legs, antennse, 
and palpi yellow. 

144. — Bembidium transversicolle. n. sp. 

Length li lines. 
Of a pale red, slightly clouded with brown on the head and 
elytra. Thorax transversal, convex, rounded on the sides in front, 
square and acute at the posterior angles, and transversely de- 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., r.L.S. 117 

pressed at the base, with the median line distinct. The elytra 
are marked with indistinct striae, those next the suture being the 
most distinct. 

145. — Bembididm sbxstriatdm. n. sp. 

Length 1^ lines. 
Upper surface of a pitchy red clouded in some parts with 
brown. Head with the frontal impressions broad and long. 
Thorax little convex, transversal, rounded on the sides, and but 
very little narrowed towai'ds the posterior angles, which are 
square and broadly reflexed ; the median line is well marked, and 
the centre of the base is transversely depressed and rugose. The 
elytra have three distinct broad striae on each side of the suture, 
beyond these other strife may be traced, but they are very in- 
distinct, there is also a large puncture about the line of the fourth 
stria, at a short distance from the base. The legs and first joint 
of the antennae are yellow. 

146. — Bembididm ovatum. n. sp. 

Length scai'cely 1 line. 
Entirely of a pale testaceous colour, convex, and broadly ovate. 
Head with the frontal impressions long and linear. Thorax 
transversal, rounded on the sides in front, not narrowed behind, 
square and slightly reflexed at the posterior angles, and truncate 
at the base, with a very lightly marked median line and with the 
transversal depression of the base very small. Elytra broadjy 
ovate with a distinct stria on each side of the suture, and a deep 
fovei-form impression on the basal margin on each side of the 
scutellum. 

147. — Bembidium bifoveatum. n. sp. 
Length f of a line. 
This species only diflPers from the last in being smaller, less 
broad, in having no trace of stri^ on the elytra beyond the dis- 
tinct one on each side of the suture, and in having a deep fovei- 
form impression at the base of the thorax on each side of the 



118 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

centre, which extends to the elytra, and is in fact common to 
both. 

148. — Bembidium brtjnnipenne. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 

Head and thorax reddish brown, the former finely punctured 
with the frontal impressions lightly marked. Thorax slightly 
convex, transversal, punctured, rounded on the sides in front, 
and not narrowed behind, with the posterior angles square, the 
transversely depressed portion of the base rather large, the 
median line deeply marked, and the basal impressions short. 
The elytra are of a dark brown, rather flat, finely punctured all 
over and striated. The legs, antennae, and palpi ai-e pale red. 

Mr. Masters informs me that he found this species on stony 
ground, and on the summit of a high hill remote from water, a 
habitat very different from that of this family of insects generally. 

149. — Bembidium rubicundum. n. sp. 
Length f of a line. 

Red, subnitid. Head with the frontal impressions broad but 
not very deep. Thorax transversal, rounded on the sides, and 
slightly narrowed at the posterior angles which are square, with 
the median line very lightly marked, the basal impressions short, 
and the transversely depressed portion of the base strongly 
marked. The elytra are rather depressed, and have about six 
rows of distinct punctures on each side of the suture, extending 
from the base to beyond the middle. 

This species very much resembles JS. pundipenne, it is how- 
ever a much smaller insect, and the shape of the thorax is 
different being square behind in the present species, while in the 
other it is very much rounded. 

150. — Bembidium subviride. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Greenish black, with a metallic reflection. Head broad, 
smooth, and lightly impressed on each side. Thorax scarcely 



BY W. MACLEAT, ESQ., F.L.S. 119 

broader than the head, transversal, rounded on the sides, and not 
narrower behind than in front, with the posterior angles acute 
and slightly reflexed, and with the median line distinctly marked. 
Elytra rather flat, finely striated, the striae finely punctured, and 
the interstices smooth, broad, and flat, with the apex and a lateral 
spot near the apex, orange. The legs, antenna, and palpi, are 
of a pitchy red. 

151. — Bembidium amplipenne. n. sp. 
liength 1| lines. 

Entirely of a testaceous red colour. Head with the frontal 
impressions short and linear. Thorax broader than the head, 
transversal, very slightly rounded on the sides, and truncate at 
the base with the posterior angles square, the median line distinct, 
the basal transverse depressions very deeply marked, and the 
basal impressions short. Elytra broad, moderately convex and 
striated, the strite large and deep, and the interstices convex. 
The legs are yellow. 

152. — Bembidium gagatinum. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 

Black, subnitid, and of an oblong form. Head broad, convex, 
and smooth, without any impression behind the clypeus. Thorax 
a little wider than the head, slightly rounded on the sides, not 
narrowed behind, with the posterior angles very obtuse, the basal 
impressions round, the median line scarcely traceable, and the 
basal portion of the whole thorax lightly rugose and punctured. 
The elytra are a little wider than the thorax, parallel sided, very 
finely striated, the striee full of small punctures, and most distinct 
towards the apex, at the base scarcely traceable. The legs are 
of a pitchy hue. 

153. — Bembidium flavipes. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Head exactly as in the last species. Thorax also exactly as 
in the last species, excepting in being more narrowed behind, and 



120 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

in having the median line distinct. Elytra large, rather depressed, 
widening from the base to near the apex, and faintly striated and 
punctured. The legs are yellow. 

154. — Bembididm bipartitum. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 

Antennae nearly as long as the body. Labrum deeply emar- 
ginated. The terminal subulate joint of the palpi long. Head red, 
long, and very deeply canaliculated on each side from behind the 
eyes to the labrum. Thorax also red, transversal, convex, much 
rounded at the anterior angles, acutely pointed and slightly 
reflexed at the posterior angles, and slightly prolonged into a 
lobe at the base, with the median line deeply marked and the 
anterior transverse line making a deep emarginate impression in 
front. The body is pedunculated as in Scarites. Elytra jet 
black, very nitid, of an oblong form and rather depressed, with 
a deep stria on each side of the suture, and two large punctui-es, 
one near the base, the other below the middle of each elytron. 
The legs are strong and of a pale red. 

This species ought no doubt to form a new genus. I have not, 
however, been able to get a specimen for dissection, and cannot 
consequently undertake to give the generic characters correctly. 

The three following species were accidentally omitted in their 
proper places in this list. 

155. — Helluosoma atrum, Casteln. Not. Aust. Col. 
1867, page 21. 

156. — BaDISTEE ANCHOMENOIDES. n. Sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Black, nitid, with a slight iridescence on the elytra. Head 
smooth, not deeply impressed on each side in fx'ont of the eyes, 
with the labrum thick, membranaceous looking, and triangularly 
emarginated. Thorax square and obtusely angled with the basal 
impressions short but deep, and the median line distinct. Elytra 
striated with the interstices flat. Legs, antennae, and margin of 
thorax and elytra yellow. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESa, F.L.S. 121 



157. — Physol(esthus geandtpalpis. n. sp. 



Lensrth 21 lines 



Brownish black, subnitid and of rather flattened form. Head 
as in the last species, with the last joint of the palpi large and 
obliquely truncated. Thorax rather transversal, with the anterior 
angles advanced, the posterior square and slightly reflexed, the 
median line deep, and the basal impressions broad and long. 
Elytra of an elongated ovate form, strongly striated and with 
the interstices convex. Legs, antennas, and palpi reddish. 

This completes the Garabidce in the Gayndah collection, with 
the exception of five species of Glivina. These I cannot venture 
to name as I have been unable to procure the works of M. Putzeys, 
who has paid special attention to this group, and who has de- 
scribed, I believe, a large number of Australian species. 



DYTISCID^. 

158. — Hydroporus bifasciatus. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Ovate, subconvex, covered with a close puncturation, and of a 
testaceous red colour. Head bordered in front, and with a very 
short oblique lightly impressed line at the inner and anterior 
angle of the eyes. Thorax broad, short, narrowly margined on 
the sides, and broader behind than in front, with tbe anterior 
angles advanced, the posterior subacute, the base slightly bisinuate 
on each side, and a large patch of a dark brown colour on 
each side of the central lobe. Elytra broader than the thorax, 
rounded at the humeral angles and on the sides, and narrowed and 
rounded at the apex, with a very zigzag black fascia about the 
middle, extending from the suture to near the sides, and another 
of the same hue, and rather broader near the apex, extending 
from the sides almost to the suture, the two fasciae being joined 
near the suture, and nearly joined about the middle of the width. 
On each elytron may be traced an obsolete stria a little way from 
the suture, and also a number of small round obsolete looking 
depressions. The tarsi of the male are black and much dilated, 
the third joint being the largest. 



122 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

159. — Hydroporus gigas, Bohem. Bes. Eugen. 1858, 
page 18. 

160. — Hydroporus foveiceps. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Ovate, flat, very finely punctured, and of a testaceous red 
colour. Head vs^itli a small round fovea on each side between 
and in front of the eyes. Thorax broad, short, narrowly margined 
on the sides, and broader behind than in front, with the anterior 
angles advanced, the posterior angles square, the base very slightly 
sinuated and the apical and basal margin tinged with brown. 
Elytra of the same width as the thorax at the base, gradually 
widening to the middle and rather narrowly rounded at the apex, 
with two obsolete striae on each, one close to the suture, the other 
nearer the middle. In colour the elytra are much paler than the 
rest of the insect and of a more lurid hue, with the suture and 
two very large patches nearly covering the apical two thirds, of a 
dark brown. The legs and under side of the body are red. The 
last joint of the four anterior tarsi is long and slight. 

161. — Hydroporus brunnipennis. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Of the same form and sculpture as the last described species. 
The colour is pitchy red, with the thorax margined in front and 
at the base with brown, and with the elytra of a dark brown with 
reddish lateral margin. 

162. — Hydroporus fossulipennis. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Ovate, convex, very finely and closely punctured, and of a 
testaceous red colour. Head margined in front, and with a large 
shallow depression on each side. Thorax bi'oad, short, margined 
at the sides, and broader behind than in front, with the anterior 
angles advanced, the posterior angles sub-acute, and the base 
brown, slightly bisinuated on each side of the centre, and marked 
with short rough " striolaB." Elytra broadly ovate, with the 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 123 

suture and two vittEe, — the first near the suture, the other about 
an equal distance outside of the first, neither reaching the base, 
but joining together towards the apex, and forming a very large 
patch, — of a deep black. A light short stria extends from the 
base to about the middle in the line of the vitta nearest the 
suture, and in the middle of the second vitta, there is a deep, 
short, longitudinal impression. 

163. — Hydroporus nebulosus. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Much smaller than the last insect, less convex, and more coarsely 
punctured. The lateral depressions on the head are very shallow. 
The thorax, which like the head, is of a dull red, is narrowly 
margined with brown at the base. The elytra are rather pointed 
at the apex, and have at their base traces of striae, which are, 
with the exception of the sutural one, very short ; their colour is 
dark brown, with a sub-basal fascia, a lateral vitta, the apex, a 
sub-apical narrow zigzag fascia, and a central spot, of a dull red. 
The legs are pale red, with a narrow band of black on the 
extremity of each joint of the posterior tarsi. 

164. — Hydroporus mastersii. n. sp. 
Length Ij lines. 
Of an elongated oval form, and pale red colour. Head finely 
punctured with a well marked fovea near the anterior angles. 
Thorax also finely punctured, broad, short, rounded slightly at 
the sides, and broader behind than in front, with the anterior 
angles advanced, the posterior angles square, the base very slightly 
bisinuated, the central lobe rounded, a deep basal striola curved 
inward on each side intermediate between the central lobe and 
the posterior angles, and the basal margin between these striolee 
of a dark brown. Elytra finely punctured, with a distinct stria 
on each side of the suture, and the thoracic striola continued on 
them in a straight line to nearly twice the length of that on the 
thorax. The colour of the elytra is a deep dark brown, with a 
very broad zigzag fascia enclosing an elongated brown spot, a 



124 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

spot behind the middle, the apex, and the lateral margins, of a 
pale red. 

165. — Htdropords luridus. n. sp. 
Length Ij lines. 
Only differs from the last in being entirely of a lurid hue, 
with the base of the thorax brown, and some indistinct patches 
of the same colour on the elytra, these last are proportionately 
broader and are entirely without the subsutural stria. 

166. — Htdroporus basalts, n. sp. 
Length f of a line. 
Ovate, rather depressed, very finely punctured. Head dark 
brown, nitid, with scarcely a trace of lateral depressions. 
Thorax of the same form as the two last described species, of a 
yellow colour, with a narrow apical and broad basal margin of 
a deep brown, and with the basal striol^ the same as in 
H. Mastersii and luridus. Elytra deep brown, with the sides and 
two somewhat indistinct vittse of variable length, but not reach- 
ing to the base or apex, of a yellowish hue, and with the sub- 
sutural stria distinct and the thoracic striola continued to 
the middle of each elytron. 

167. — Htdroporus politus. n. sp. 
Length I of a line. 
This may probably not belong to the present genus. It is 
of an elongate convex form almost acuminated at the apex of the 
elytra and very nitid on the entire surface. The head and thorax 
are of a dark red ; the elytra are of a pitchy black ; the last 
six or seven joints of the antenna seem moniliform. 

Necterosoma. n. gen. 

Head, antennae, and parts of the mouth as in Hydroporus. 
Body short, thick, ovate and slightly depressed. Anterior thighs 
and tibise long and stout, the latter in the male largely emargi- 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 125 

nated in the middle of the internal surface. The four antei-ior 
tarsi are five jointed, the first three large, more especially in the 
male, the two last long and slender, the last very long. 

There are several species which will come under this genus, 
which have been described by the late Rev. Hamlet Clark as 
Hi/dropoii, such as H. penicillatus, WoUastonii, dispar., Sfc. 

The shape, however, of the anterior legs and the five jointed 
tarsi, necessitate their removal into another genus. 

168. — Necterosoma vittipbnne. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Ovate, broad, subconvex and of a yellow colour. Head with 
a shallow slightly elongated fovea on each side in front. Thorax 
broad, short, and bisinuate at the base, vpith the basal lobe 
rounded, the posterior angles acute, the anterior angles advanced, 
the apical border brown, the basal border also bi'own and enlarged 
into two spots about midway between the centre and the posterior 
angles, and with a small striola at the base on the outer side of 
these brown spots, and a series of smaller striola along the whole 
basal border. Elytra dark brown, with five yellow vittee on 
each side of the suture, extending from the base to the apex, with 
large spots of the same colour on the sides, and with one or two 
oblique striolse on the scutellar region, giving the appearance of 
a large scutellum. 

169. — Necterosoma flavicolle. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
This species differs from the last in having the frontal de- 
pression more round and very shallow, in having the thorax 
entirely yellow, with a depression at the base equidistant from the 
centre and the posterior angles, in which are three or four small 
but distinct striolae, and in having the elytra without striolse on 
the scutellum region, and of a yellow colour, with a series of six 
vittse, and some lateral spots, brown, the second vitta from the 
suture being abbreviated towards the base and apex. The elytra 
also are quite acuminated at the apex, much more so than in N. 
viUipenne. 



126 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

170. — Batrachomatds WiNGii, Clark. Journ. of Ent. 
Vol. 2, page 15. 

171. — CoLYMBETES AUSTRALis, Aube. Spec, gen., page 
236. 

172. — Agabus mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 

Ovate, broad, black, nitid, subconvex, and very finely and 
closely punctured. Head with two very short transverse 
stride on each side between the eyes, with a large yellow 
spot in the middle, and two smaller and darker ones on the 
vertex. Thorax very broad and short, somewhat rounded at the 
base and very slightly bisinuated, and with the anterior angles 
much advanced, and of a red colour. Elytra round and rather 
depressed behind, with a thin yellow vitta extending from the 
middle to the apex, near the lateral margin, and with one or two 
minute spots of the same colour inside, and near the commence- 
ment of the vitta. Under side of a nitid pitchy black, with a 
yellow spot on the sides of each abdominal segment. The legs 
are of a pitchy red. 

Though much resembling A. spilopterus Germ, from South 
Australia, this species is quite distinct. 

173. — CoPELATUS AUSTRALIA, Clark. Joum. of Ent. 
Vol. 2, page 20. 

174. — CoPELATUs IRREGULARIS. Clark's M.SS. n. sp. 
Length 2 1 lines. 

Black, depressed, subnitid. Head with a small subtrans- 
versal distinct fovea on each side between the eyes, with a less 
distinct one behind it, and with all the middle portion from the 
labrum to the vertex of a dull red. Thorax broad, short, almost 
truncate at the base, covered though not closely with short longi- 
tudinal striolse, and with a broad red lateral margin. Elytra 
marked with twelve deep strijB on each side of the suture, and 
with the base, the apex, and a small indistinct central spot of a 
yellowish red. The under side is of a pitchy red and very much 
acuducted. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 127 

I have spocimens of this insect in nay Cabinet from Lizard 
ijsland. The name attached to it must have been sent to me by 
the late Rev. Hamlet Clark, but I cannot find that it has ever 
been described before under that or any other name. 

175. COPELATDS elongatulhs. n. sp. 

Length If lines. 
Elongate -ovate, subconvex. Head dark red, with two short 
fine transverse striolse on each side between the eyes. Thorax 
of a brownish red, and nearly truncate at the base, with the 
median line distinct in the centre only, and with two broad rather 
wrinkled depressions at the base. Elytra of a cloudy reddish 
brown, with the base margined with yellowish red, and with 
several rows of small distinct punctures not very regularly 
placed, and extending from the base to the apex on each elytron. 

176 — Cybister Gayndahensis. n. sp. 
Length 12 lines, greatest viridth of elytra 6 lines. 
Of a more elongate form than G. scutellaris. Head with a 
shallow fovea on each side between the eyes, and with a broad 
yellow border in front. Thorax shaped as in C. scutellaris with 
a transversal anterior impression consisting of small punctures, 
a median line traceable from the middle to the base, a few 
very fine oblique striolfe passing from it to the base, and with a 
broad yellow lateral margin. Scutellum vpith a slight transverse 
depression in the middle. Elytra of the same olive hue as in 
the other species of the genus, with a broad border of yellow 
extending from the basal angles to the apex near which it is 
angularly widened, and with two lines of distant punctui^es on 
each elytron, much more remote from one another and less 
distinct than in G. scutellarU. The underside of the body is of a 
pitchy black, with the anterior and intermediate thighs and a 
spot on each side of the abdominal segments, yellow. 

177. — EUNECTES PUNCTIPENNIS. n. Sp. 

Length 6| lines. 
Oblong-ovate and of a pale luteous colour. Head with a very 



X28 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDATI, 

small fovea on each side between the eyes, and with a shoi^t 
transverse slightly incurved black band in the centre, and two 
round spots of the same colour on the summit of the vertex. 
Thorax broad, and widening gradually in an almost straight line 
from the anterior angles to the posterior which are acute, with 
the apex somewhat lobed in the centre, and of a deep black along 
the line of the apical transverse line, and with the base nearly 
truncate and marked with two transverse patches of a dark colour 
meeting in the centre and not extending to the posterior angles. 
Elytra closely covered with brown punctures, sinuated and 
acuminated at the apex, and with three rows of distant large and 
shallow punctures on each elytron ; there are also on each elytron 
a lateral spot, and a narrow wavy subapical fascia, of an indistinct 
brown or black. 

178.- — Hydaticus CONSANGUINEUS, Aube. Spec. gen. 
page 160. 

179. — Hydaticus bihamatus, Aube. Sfec. page 174. 
Eschsch. Dej. Gat. 3rd ed. page 61. 
Goryi, Aube. Spec, page 175. 
scriptus, Blanch. Yoy. Pole. Sticl. iv-, p- 46. 

GYRINID^. 

180.— Enhydrcs oblonods, Boisd. Voy. Astrol. Ent. 
page 52. Aube. Sjyec. p. 653. Dej. Cat. 
3rd ed. p. G6. 
Australis, Brulle. Hist. Nat. Ins. y., page 237. 

181.— GrYRiNUS OBLIQUATUS, Aubc. Spec, page *''{Jl. 

182. — Gykinus convexiusculus. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 

Black, nitid, convex, and rather elongate. Head with two 

shallow fovese between the eyes, and the clypeus covered with fine 

strioloe. Thorax rounded behind with the anterior transversal 

line well marked and punctured near the sides, and a median 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. JOQ 

transversal line well marked in the centre. Elytra with a broad 
depression close to the apex, which is rounded in each elytron, 
and with eleven light stri^ marked with distinct punctures on 
each. 

HTDROPHILID^. 

183. — Htdrophilus G-atndahensis. n. sp. 
Length 12 lines. 
This species may most readily be distinguished from the other 
Australians of the genus by the very great length of the sternal 
spine, which passes the extremities of the posterior thighs. The 
anterior tarsi, the hairs on all the tarsi, and the palpi are 
reddish. 

184. — Sternolophus nitidulus. n. sp. 
Length 5 1 lines. 
Black, very nitid, convex, and of an elongated oval form. 
Head with a shallow punctured impression on each side near the 
eyes, and with a semi-circular row of punctures extending from 
the anterior part of the eye forwards, and then inwards and back- 
wards towards the centre of the forehead. Thorax broad, wider 
behind than in front, with all the angles rounded, and with two 
transverse punctured lines on each side, one near the apex, the 
other behind the middle. The elytra are rounded behind and very 
smooth, but there are faint traces of a few rows of punctures on 
them. The tarsi and palpi are red. 

Htdatotrephis. n. gen. 

This genus, of which there are a number of species in Aus- 
tralia, has a general resemblance to Hydrobius. It differs how- 
ever from that genus in having only 8 jointed antennaB, in not 
having the posterior tarsi ciliated, and in having the mesosternum 
prolonged into a tubercle in front of the intermediate thighs. 
The form of the body is short, oval, and convex. The maxillary 
palpi are short for the family, and the last joint is not longer 
than the penultimate. The rest as in HydroMus. 



130 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

185. — Hydatotrephis mastersii. n. sp. 
Lefigth 4 lines. 
Black, very nitid, very finely and closely punctured. Head 
with a broad shallow punctured depression on each side between 
and near the eyes. Thorax broad, slightly rounded on the sides, 
broader behind than in front, truncate at the base, with all the 
angles rounded, and with the apex and base narrowly, and the 
sides broadly, bordered with red. Elytra, with a deep stria on 
each side of the suture, commencing a little above the middle, 
and extending to the apex, and with several indistinct rows of 
irregular and distant punctures on the disk. The under sides of 
the thighs and sides of the metathorax are covered with a pale 
silky pubescence. 

186. — Philhydrus elongatulus. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Elongate, ovate, nitid, subconvex, very finely punctured and of 
a lurid red clouded with brown. Head and anterior margin of 
thorax brown. Elytra with a distinct stria on each side of the 
suture not reaching to the base, and with obsolete brown punc- 
tured striae over the rest of their surface. 

187. — Philhydrus maculiceps. n. sp. 
Length Ij lines. 
Short, ovate, convex, and subnitid. Head black with a large 
yellow spot on each side in front. Thorax luteous with the 
anterior border and a large central spot, brown. Elytra brown, 
bordered and clouded with yellow, and with a distinct stria on 
each side of the suture not reaching the base, and several series 
of obsolete punctured strige. 

188. — Philhydrus maemoratds. n. sp. 
Length f of a line. 
Short, ovate, convex, and subnitid. Head black with a pur- 
plish gloss. Thorax pale red with the middle brown. Elytra 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 131 

yellow clouded with brown, Jind with a number of narrow brown 
punctured strias. 

This may perhaps be a Bernsus. I have not been able to 
examine the species satisfactorily. 

Hydrobaticus. n. gen. 

But for the total absence of any tubercle or carina on the 
mesosternum, the two species I describe under this genus, might 
be almost as well placed with Pliilliyclrus. They are also, how- 
ever, of a more broadly ovate and flat form. As i-egards the 
antennsB and palpi they exactly correspond with Philhydrus. 

189.— Hydrobaticus tristis. n. sp. 

Length 2 1 lines. 
Flat, opaque, coarsely punctured and of a dull reddish brown 
colour clouded with black. Head rather impressed along the 
suture of the epistome, with the labrum black. Thorax consi- 
derably broader than the length, slightly rounded on the sides 
and not broader behind than in front, with the anterior angles 
very round, the posterior angles obtuse, and the base truncate. 
Elytra broader than the tliorax, broadly rounded at the apex, 
and covered with numerous coarse punctured striaa, and with the 
disk of a much darker colour tlian the sides. 

190. — Hydrobaticus luridus. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Of the same form and sculpture as the last described sjiecies, 
differing only in size, and in being entirely of a pale lurid colour, 
with the exception of the labrum and back of the head which are 
black. In both this and the former species the scutellum is 
smaller and less elongate than is usual in Philhydrus. 

I regret that I am unable from paucity of specimens to make 
a proper examination of either of the species. 

Hygrotrophus. n. gen. 
Head large, much prolonged in fi'ont of the eyes, and more or 



132 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

less inflexed beneath the thorax, and narrowed into a neck behind 
the eyes, which are prominent. Labrum rounded anteriorly, 
transverse. Mandibles large, strong, arcuated and bidentate on 
the inner side. Antennas as in Beroms. Maxillary palpi not so 
long as the antennte. Thorax rounded at the base. Scutellum 
elongate, triangular and acute at the apex. Elytra oval, convex. 
Anterior coxte very large. Mesosternum very faintly carina- 
ted. Abdominal segments, six, the last very small. 

This genus though in many respects like Berosus, differs from 
it in a very striking manner in the drooping head and rounded 
base of the thorax. The two species which I have put under it 
differ very much from one another in appearance. 

191. — Htgrotrophus nutans, n. sp. 
Length 2^ lines. 

Of a lurid hue clouded with brown, closely punctured and 
covered with a very fine short pubescence. Thorax transverse, 
much rounded at the anterior angles, almost rectangular behind, 
with the base broadly and rather slightly rounded, and with the 
punctures on its disk transverse. Elytra with a number of rather 
lightly marked punctui'cd strios, and with the interstices flat. 
Posterior tarsi moderately ciliated. Under side of body black, 
legs yellow. 

192. — Hygeotkophus involutus. n. sp. 

Length 1^ lines. 

The very inflexed head, and convex arched form of this insect 
gives it a very different appearance from the last. The head 
and thorax are very closely and sharply punctured, and of a 
golden green colour, the latter narrowly bordered with yellow. 
Elytra very convex, pointed at the apex,- and of a yellow colour, 
with ten well marked brown largely punctured strire on each 
elytron. The whole under side and the basal half of the four 
posterior thighs are black and roughly punctured. The legs are 
yellow. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 133 

193.— Hydrochus parallelos. n. sp. 

Length Tj Hues. 
Of a dark bronzy green and opaque. Head punctured, with 
a deep stria on each side between the eyes extending from the 
occiput to the suture of the epistome, and with a shorter one in 
the middle not reaching the occiput. Thorax coarsely punctured, 
with the surface covered with several large shallow indistinct 
foveas. Elytra more nitid than the thorax, with the suture broad 
and smooth, and on each side of it ten strias, placed close together 
and filled with large punctures, and with the alternate interstices 
slightly elevated. The legs are reddish, the knees black. 

194. HYDRiENA LDRIDIPENNtS. n. Sp. 

Length f of a line. 
Elongate-ovate, subconvex, and closely punctured. Head 
black. Thorax pale at the sides, brown in the middle, not 
broader than the length, with all the angles acute, and with the 
sides bulged out almost angularly in the middle. Elytra of a 
lurid brown closely covered with punctate strias. 

195. — Cyclonotum Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 2 1 lines. 
Oval, convex, black, subnitid, and entirely covered with fine 
punctures. The thorax is narrowly tinged with red on the lateral 
margins. The elytra have a narrow stria on each side of the 
suture. The under side is black and smooth. The tarsi and 
palpi are red. 

196. — Cyclonotqm pygmj;um. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 
With the exception of the great difference in size, the greater 
proportionate width of the elytra behind, and the more oval oblong 
form, there is very little difference between this and the last 
described species. It has the same uniform black colour, the 
same kind of puncturation, and the same subsutural strias on the 
elytra. 



134 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

STAPHTLINID/E. 
Sub-family ALEOCHAiUDyE. 
Myrmecockphalus. n. gen. 

Anfcenntc filiform, the first joint thick and of the same length 
as the third, the rest nearly equal and enlarging slightly towards 
the extremity. Maxillary palpi with the third joint much larger 
than the second, and the fourth very small and awl-shaped. Eyes 
of medium size, round and not prominent. Head convex, nearly 
square, subtruncate behind, rounded at the posterior angles, and 
affixed to the thorax by a short but very narrow neck. Thorax 
of an elongate oval form, narrower than the head, convex, and 
deeply impressed along the median line. Elytra broader than 
the head. Abdomen moderately elongate, widening a little towards 
the apex. 

I have not been able to give a more complete detail than the 
above of the characters of this genus, for want of duplicate 
specimens, but enough I think has been given to enable it to be 
readily identified. The resemblance to an ant, especially about the 
head is very remarkable, and it is most probable that like some 
other genera of the Aleochivtidce its true habitat is in ants nests. 
The two species descinbed below, were taken by Mr. Masters in a 
heap of debris left on the banks of the Burnett River after a heavy 
flood. 

197. — Mtrmecocephalus cingulatds. n. sp. 

Length Ij lines. 
Black, finely punctured, with the antennte and palpi of a 
brownish yellow. The abdomen is subnitid with the hinder part 
of the first segment yellow. 

198. — Myrmecocephalus bicingulatus, n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
This species differs from the last in having the head more 
rounded behind, in having the thorax more angularly rounded on 
the sides at its broadest part, in having the elytra of a more 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESa, F.L.S. 135 

olive black, and in having the second as well as the first segment 
of the abdomen with a yellow ring. 

199. — Tachyusa coracina. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 
Black, nitid, and finely punctured, with the tarsi pale red. 
The elytra much wider than the thorax. 

200.— Myrmedonia austealis. n. sp. 
Length Ij lines. 
Of a pitchy red colour turning to brown on the elytra and 
extremity of the abdomen. The antennae are very hairy, with the 
apical joints yellow. The whole body is nitid and very finely 
and closely punctured. 

201. — Homalota flavicollts. n. sp. 

Length | of a line. 

Head black. Thorax yellow. Elytra brown. Abdomen with 
the two first segments red, the third and fourth dark blue, and 
the remainder yellow. 

202. — Homalota pallidipennis. n. sp. 
Length f of a line. 
Entirely of a pale testaceous colour, with the exception of the 
third and fourth segments of the abdomen which are of a darker 
hue. 

203. — OXYPODA ANALIS. n. Sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Black, nitid, finely punctured, and clothed with a short ashen 
pubescence. The elytra have a tinge of pitchy red throughout, 
and tlje apex of the abdomen and the legs are red. 

204. AlEOCHABA HiiMOBRHOKDAUS, GUEK. To?/. 

Coquille. his. 11, page G3, t. 1 f. 24. 



13G THE INSECTS OF GAYKDAH, 

205. — Aleochara Masteksii. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
This species differs from A. hcemorrhoidalis, in being much 
smaller, in the sculpture of the elytra, which instead of being 
smoothly punctured as in that species is rugose and covered with 
small striolfP, and in the absence of a red termination to the 
abdomen. 

Sub-family TACHYPORlDiE. 
206. — CoNDRUS RUFiPALPis. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Black, subnitid. Thorax with minute striolsB at the base and 
sides. Elytra finely punctured, marked with striolte at the base 
which is of a deep red colour, and obliquely truncate at the apex. 
Abdomen short, and fimbriate. Legs and palpi pale red. 

207. — -CoNDRUS ATRiCEPS. n. sp. 

Length Ij lines. 

Black, very nitid, smooth. Thorax red. Elytra of a darker 
red with the sides and base almost brown. Abdomen short, fim- 
bi'iate and with the terminal segment and the hinder margin of 
the others of a pitchy red. The legs, antennas, and palpi are red. 

208. — CONURUS ELONGATULUS. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 

Of an uniform dull black, and marked almost all over with 
minute striolas. The legs, antennse, and palpi are of a brownish 
yellow. This species differs considerably in form from the two 
described above, it is less convex, proportionately narrower, and 
has the abdomen much more elongate. 

209. — Tachyporus tristis. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 
Head, thorax, and elytra dark brown, the two former very 
finely punctured, the latter punctured on the anterior half, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 137 

striolate on the posterior, and slightly conjointly emarginate at 
the apex. The abdomen is black, the segments finely striolated. 
The legs and antennas are brownish yellow. 

210. — Tachtpoeus rubricollis. n. sp. 

Length 1 line. 

Head and thorax red, subnitid. Elytra pitchy brown and 
covered with fine striolte. Body black, legs and antennoe red. 

Sub-family Staphtlinid^. 
211. — Leptacinus luridipennis. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 

Head black, nitid, parallel-sided, much longer than the 
breadth, a little rounded at the posterior angles, and marked with 
distant punctures. Thorax dark red, nitid, longer and a little 
narrower than the head, slightly emarginate on the sides behind 
the middle, very slightly narrower behind than in front, rounded 
at both ends and sparingly marked with punctures. Scutellum 
large, triangular, and of a brown colour. Elytra roughly punc- 
tured, broader than the thorax, rounded at the apex, of a brown 
colour at the base, and of a pale nitid lurid hue on the posterior 
half. Abdomen dark brown and punctate. Legs, antennae, and 
palpi brownish red. 

The whole insect has an elongated flat appearance. 

212. — Leptacinus ctaneipennis. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Head black, nitid, parallel-sided, twice as long as the width, 
truncate behind, with a deep margined impression on each side 
extending from the inner side of the eye in an oblique direction 
towards the centre of the forehead, and with a few large punc- 
tures on the back part of the head and towards the labrum. N^eck 
very slight. Thorax bright red, nitid, shaped much as in the 
last described species, but more convex, and with the punctures 
more rare. Scutellum red. Elytra dark blue and finely punc- 



138 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

tured. Abdomen black, nitid, smooth, and rather convex, with 
the first and fourth segments red. Tlie legs also are red. 

213. — Xantholinus atriceps. n. sp. 
Length 2f lines. 
Head black, nitid, smooth, a little longer than the breadth 
and rounded behind, with a few punctures scattered over the 
surface. Thorax red, sparingly punctured, longer than the 
breadth, broader than the head, slightly broader behind than in 
front, rounded at both ends and very slightly rounded on the 
sides. Elytra broader than the thorax, of a nitid brownish red 
colour, sparingly punctured and conjointly emarginated to a 
slight degree at the apex. Abdomen brown, very minutely punc- 
tured, clothed with a very short fine pubescence, and having the 
last segment long, pointed, and of a dull red colour. The legs 
are pale red. 

214. — Xantholinus piceus. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 

This species only differs from the last in being a little smaller 
and of an almost uniform pitchy brown hue. 

215.— Xantholinus ceryinipennis. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head nearly square, rather convex, truncate 
behind, and marked with a shallow fovece on each side near the 
eyes, with neai'er the middle two slightly oblique lines converging 
behind, and with a few punctures on the occiput and sides. 
Thorax narrower than the head, longer than the breadth, trun- 
cate in front, narrowed a little behind, and rounded at the apex, 
with a few large punctures on the upper surface. Elytra not 
broader than the broadest part of the thorax, coarsely punctured 
and of a pale brownish red colour. The abdomen is thinly punc- 
tured, is clothed with soft hairs, and has the terminal segment 
and the hinder half of the penultimate one of a deep red. The 
legs and palpi are piccons. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ,., F.L.S. 139 

216.— Xantholinus ctaneipennis. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
This species is about the same length as the last, but has a 
slighter and more elongate look. The head is not so broad, not 
so truncate behind, is proportionately longer, has the punc- 
tures between the eyes more numerous, and the oblique lines 
much shorter. The thorax is as broad as the bead at the apex, 
which is truncate, bat is somewhat narrowed towards the base 
which is rounded. The elytra are scarcely wider than the thorax, 
and are of a chalybeate blue, with a series of small punctures on 
each side of the suture, and another series in an obsolete de- 
pression in the middle of each elytron. The abdomen is dark 
olive, finely punctured and clothed with long soft hair. The legs 
and palpi are of a piceous red. 

217. — Xantholinds dubius. n. sp. 
Length 2 J lines. 

Of a pitchy black, nitid. Head longer than the breadth, and 
rather rounded behind. Thorax rounded in front and behind, and 
broadest at the base. Elytra sparingly punctured, broader than 
the thorax, and with a reddish tinge throughout. Abdomen 
rather dull, with a tinge of red on the two terminal segments. 
Legs red. 

The last joint of the maxillary palpi in this species is neither 
so acuminated nor so slight as is usual in this genus. The form 
of the thorax also, which is very distinctly rounded at the anterior 
angles, marks it out as being a very aberrant species. 

218. — Philonthus Austealis. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head almost round, with a few large seti- 
gerous punctures scattered over its surface. Thorax as broad as 
the head at the apex which is truncate, narrowed a little and 
rounded behind, longer than the breadth, and marked with a 
number of large punctures on each side. Scutellum large, tri- 
angular and closely punctured. Elytra broader than the thorax. 



140 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

coarsely punctured, conjointly emarginate at the apex, and of a 
deep red colour. Abdomen punctate, and clothed with strong 
hairs, with the terminal segment and part of the penultimate red, 
and with the other segments tinged with blue. The tibi^, tarsi, 
palpi, and three terminal joints of the antennae are yellow. 

219. — PhILONTHUS HiEMOKRHOIDALIS. n. Sp. 

Length 5| lines. 

Head of a dark olive hue, very nitid, almost circular, and 
depressed, with a short longitudinal impression in the middle 
and two large punctures on each side of the forehead. Thorax 
marked and shaped as in the preceding species, but with the 
anterior angles quite square. Scutellum large, punctate and of 
a triangular form, with the sides a little rounded. Elytra 
punctate, broader than the thorax, rounded behind and con- 
jointly emarginate, and of a brassy olive hue. Abdomen black, 
and finely punctured with the terminal segment and hinder portion 
of the penultimate one red. The legs and palpi are red. The 
antennae have the tliree basal joints red, the three apical ones 
yellow, and the remainder black. 

220. — Philonthus pilipennis. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head nearly square, with a few punctures 
on each side. Thorax almost as broad as the head, longer than 
the breadth, almost parallel-sided, with the anterior angles square, 
the base I'ound, and the surface smooth with the exception of a 
line of about six punctures on each side of the middle and a few 
scattered ones near the sides. Elytra broader than the thorax, 
punctate, and covered thinly with a greyish decumbent pile. 
Abdomen closely punctured and also clothed with a decumbent 
greyish pile. Legs, palpi, and basal joint of antennae ferruginous. 

221.— Philoutiius politulus. n. sp. 
Length 2^ lines. 
Black, nitid. Head nearlj' circular and smooth. Thorax as 
broad as the head, longer than the breadth, and almost parallel- 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 141 

sided. Elytra broadei' than the thorax, thinly punctured, and 
Avith decumbent hairs. Abdomen also thinly punctured, with 
the anus moderately fimbriate. The legs and terminal joint of 
the antennre are reddish. 

222. — Philonthus subcingulatus. n. sp. 

Length 2| lines. 
Head black, nitid, smooth. Thorax red, nitid, rather longer 
than the breadth, broader behind than in front, ro;inded. at the 
base and marked with a few punctures on the upper surface. 
Elytra broader than the thorax, punctured, and of a brown colour 
with the apical edge yellowish red. Abdomen black, opaque, 
with the apical edge of the three first segments tinged slightly 
with red. The legs and palpi are dark red, the antennae 
brown. 

223. — Philonthus chaltbeipennis. n. sp. 

Length 2^ lines. 
Head and thorax nitid, the former black and nearly circular, 
the latter red, neai^ly square, slightly rounded on the sides, not 
broader behind than in front, and quite smooth. Elytra broader 
than the thorax, blue, punctured, and not nitid. Abdomen black, 
subnitid, and marked with small elongate punctures. The tarsi 
and three terminal joints of the antennse are of a pale red. 

224. — Philonthus Xantholinoides. n. sp. 

Length ] J lines. 
This insect is entirely of a brownish red, with the exception 
of the head which is black. The thorax is nitid, considerably 
longer than the breadth, not broader than the head, broader be- 
hind than in iront, and marked with two or three punctures on 
Ihe upper surface. The elytra and abdomen are of a darker hue 
than the thorax. The two basal joints of the antennse are red, 
the rest brown. The fourth joint of the maxillary palpi is long 
and unusually slight for the genus. 



14.2 THE INSECTS OF QAYNDAH, 

225. — SXArilYLINUS luridipennis. n. Rp. 

Length 3 lines. 

Head and thorax black, nitid, the former somewhat small and 
with a few punctures near the eyes and on the occiput, the latter 
broader than the head, transverse, much widened and rounded 
behind, and marked with two punctures near the middle of the 
upper surface, and a few others along the basal margin. Elytra 
of a lurid hue, punctate, clothed with decumbent pile, and con- 
jointly eraai^ginated at the base. Abdomen brownish black, 
punctate and setose, with the apex reddish. The tibias, tarsi, 
palpi, and antennas are also red. 

226. — Staphtlinus analis. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 

This species only differs from the last, in having the elytra 
quite black, and in having the apical portion of the abdominal 
segments of a steel blue tint. 

227. — Creophilus erythrocephalus. Fab. Syst. Ent. 
page 265. Oliv. Ent. III. 42. p. 12. t. 2. 
fig. 9. Erichs. Gen. 2^ age 351. 



Sub-family P^ederid^. 
228. — Cryptobium Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 5^ lines. 

Head oblong, rounded at the posterior angles, black, opaque, 
and closely punctured. Thorax red, subnitid, sparsely punctured, 
narrower than the head, much longer than the breadth, parallel- 
sided and with all the angles rounded. Elytra broader than the 
thorax, conjointly emarginate behind, densely punctured, black 
on the basal and larger half, and deep red on the apical portion. 
Abdomen black and finely punctured. Thighs yellow with 
black tips. Tibiae, tarsi, and palpi dull red. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 143 

229. — Crtptobium apicale. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Head oblong, black, opaque, closely punctured, and truncate 
behind, with the posterior angles rounded. Thorax black, opaque, 
closely punctured, narrower than the head, much longer than the 
breadth, and slightly rounded on the sides, with all the angles 
rounded, and the median line smooth. Elytra broader than the 
thorax, conjointly emarginate at the apex, closely punctured, and 
of a black colour with the hinder portion deep red. The 
abdomen is black, subnitid, and finely punctured, with the fifth 
segment of a blood red. The legs are yellow. The antennse, 
palpi, and mandibles are reddish brown. 

230. — DOLICAON QUADRATICOLLIS. n. Sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Head black, nitid, square, truncate at the base, and covered 
with rather dista,nt punctures. Thorax red, nearly square, and 
rounded at the angles, with the surface sparsely punctured, and 
the median line smooth. Elytra a little broader than the thorax, 
black with the apex red, and punctured in somewhat irregular 
rows over the whole upper surface. Abdomen black and very 
finely punctured, with the apex red and fimbriate. Legs, palpi 
and antennae pale red. 

231. DOLICAON ELONGATULUS. D. Sp. 

Length 2 1 lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head more elongate than in the last species 
and more closely punctured. Thorax considerably longer than 
the breadth, slightly narrower than the head, rather closely 
punctured on the upper surface, rounded at the angles, and very 
slightly broader in front than behind. Elytra broader than the 
thorax, punctured in somewhat irregular rows with subelevated 
interstices, and with the base black and apex red. Abdomen 
black and finely punctured, with the apex red and fimbriate 
The legs, antennge, and palpi, reddish yellow. 

J 



144 THE INSECTS OP GAYNDAH, 

232. — DOLICAON NIGBIPENNIS. 11. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Head black, nitid, and very sparsely punctured. Thorax red, 
nitid, same width as head, longer than the breadth, parallel- 
sided, rounded at the angles, and very sparsely punctured. 
Elytra broader than the thorax, black, and punctate. Abdomen 
very finely punctured, and broadest in the middle, with the first 
four segments red, and the remainder black. Legs, palpi, 
antennae, and mandibles red. 

233. — Lathrobium polttulum. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Black, hairy, and nitid. Head slightly narrowed and rounded 
behind, punctured sparsely in front and more closely on the sides. 
Thorax of the same width as the head, a little longer than the 
breadth, slightly rounded on the sides, rounded at the angles, and 
sparsely punctured on the upper surface. Elytra broader than 
the thorax and punctured in rows. Abdomen finely punctured 
with the apical margin of each segment smoother and of a lighter 
colour. Legs, antennee, and palpi, red. 

234. — Lathrobium picedm. n. sp. 
Length 65 lines. 
Entirely of a piceous brown, subnitid, hairy. Head and 
thorax of the same form as in L. poUhdum, but with the punctures 
smaller and more numerous. Elytra not broader than the thorax, 
and closely punctured. Abdomen rugosely punctured with a 
reddish tinge on the apical margin of the first, third, and fourth 
segments. The antennce and palpi are nearly red, the latter are 
considerably thicker than in the previously described species. 

235. — LiTHOCHAKIS TRISTIS. n. Sp. 

Length If lines. 
Black, opaque, and punctate. Head square, truncate behind 
and placed on a narrow neck. Thorax reddish brown, longer 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. I45 

than the breadth, not broader than the head, and with all the 
angles rounded. Elytra dark brown, and broader than the thorax. 
Abdomen finely punctured and striolate. Legs, antennae, and 
palpi, reddish brown. 

236. ScOPiEUS EOTUNDICOLLIS. n. Sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Pale brown, strongly and closely punctured and thinly clothed 
with long hairs. Head large, flat, truncate behind, and with the 
posterior angles rounded. Thorax a little longer than the breadth, 
narrower than the head, much rounded on the sides, and rounded 
and narrowed at the apex and base. Elytra broader than the 
thorax, with the apical half of a reddish yellow. Abdomen black, 
broad, rather short, with the fourth segment reddish. The legs, 
antenna, and palpi, yellow. 

237. — Stimcus oyicollis. n. sp. 
Length 1^ lines. 
Pale red, nitid, smooth. Head square, truncate behind, and 
joined to the thorax by a very slight neck. Thorax of an elongate 
oval form, with a peduncular attachment to the body. Elytra 
very little broader than the thorax, with the basal portions brown. 
Abdomen with the first four segments brown. 

238. SUNIUS CYLINDRICUS. n. Sp. 

Length 2 lines. 

Head black, densely punctured, square, and truncate behind. 
Thorax red, closely punctured, nai'rower than the head, and of a 
short oval form. Elytra scarcely broader than the thorax, punc- 
tate, and of a brownish black colour with the base and apex pale 
red. Abdomen elongate, subcylindrical, a little widened towards 
the apex, of a reddish colour, with the fifth and part of the sixth 
segments black. 

This species seems to vary a good deal in colouring. The 
thorax and abdomen have brown marks in one of the specimens 
before me which are not to be traced in the other. 



146 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 
239. PiEDERUS CINGULATDS. n. Sp. 

Length 3i lines. 
This is evidently a distinct species from P. Australis Guer., 
and P. cruenticolUs Germ., the only Australian species described. 
I cannot, however, find any positive difference excepting in the 
coloration of the abdomen. In the present species the third and 
fourth segments are entii'ely red. 

240. — P^DERUS ANGULICOLLIS. n. sp. 

Length 2^: lines. 
This insect is much smaller than the last. It may be readily 
distinguished by the almost square thorax and by the four basal 
segments of the abdomen being of a dull red. 

Sub -family PmoPHiLlD^. 

241. PlNOPHILUS GRANDICEPS. n. Sp. 

Length 7 lines. 
Black, subnitid, closely punctured, and clothed vrith a soft 
ashen pile. Head sparsely punctured in front, broad, slightly 
convex, truncate behind, and affixed to the thorax by a thick but 
very distinct neck. Thorax of the same width as the head in 
front, scarcely longer than the breadth, and slightly narrowed 
towards the posterior angles which are rounded. Elytra not so 
broad as the thorax at its broadest part and very short. Abdo- 
men elongate, somewhat flat, and becoming pointed at the apex. 
The tarsi and antennge are reddish, the latter are of a very slight 
form. The last joint of the maxillary palpi is large, pointed, and 
directed inwards, but it scarcely answers to the description of the 
genus given by Lacordaire. 

242. — PlNOPHILUS Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 6| lines. 
This species may be readily distinguished from the last by 
the much finer and denser puncturation over the whole body, and 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 147 

the denser clothing of soft ashen pile. The thorax also is slightly 
longer, the extremity of the abdomen is of a reddish tint, and the 
legs are entirely of a light red. The fourth joint of the tarsi is 
not so strongly bilobed as in P. grandiceps. 

243.- — PiNOPHILUS BEEVIS. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Though differing very much in size, this insect much resembles 
P. grandiceps. The thorax however is more square, and is 
very briefly carinated at the base on the median line. The legs 
are entirely red. 

244. — Oedichirds p^deroides. n. sp. 

Length 3 1 lines. 

Black, nitid. Thorax red, longer than the breadth, rounded 
behind the anterior angles, narrowed at the base, and marked 
with two deeply punctured impressions not reaching the apex 
and some lateral punctures. Elytra broader than the thorax, 
emarginate at the apex, and punctured, with the punctures large 
and scattered. Abdomen elongate, cylindrical, and punctured in 
transverse rows four on each segment, with the three first seg- 
ments red, the rest black. The maxillary palpi are black, with 
the last joint very much prolonged internally. 

PiNOBiDS. n. gen. 

AntennEe short, moniliform, somewhat geniculate, first joint 
thick, the last pointed. Maxillary palpi with the last joint large, 
subsecuriform, laterally compressed, and very slight at its junction 
with the penultimate one, which is as long, but much slighter 
and a little arcuated. Head round, and depressed. Neck broad, 
distinct. Thorax nearly square. Elytra narrow. Abdomen 
large, elongate, and cylindrical, with the lateral border feebly 
marked. Legs rather slight, anterior tarsi moderately dilated 
with the fourth joint of all small, and slightly lobed. 

Unfortunately there is only one specimen and that a bad one, 
of the insect for whose reception this genus is formed. The 



148 THE INSECTS OF QAYNDAH, 

description is consequently very imperfect, bat until specimens 
can be procured it must suffice. I am far from sure that I am 
right in putting it with the PinopMlidce, but it is marvellously 
unlike any genus of the Pcederidce, the only other division of the 
Brachylytra, which it can be associated with. 

245. — PiNOBius Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 6| lines. 
Head thinly punctured and subnitid, with the front part 
black and the rest red. Neck red. Thorax not broader than 
the head, a little longer than the breadth, not narrowed behind, 
thinly punctured, and red with black base. Elytra thinly punc- 
tured, and black, with a large blood red spot in the centre of each 
elytron. Abdomen broader than the elytra, and finely punctured, 
with the two apical segments black, the rest red. The tarsi and 
two terminal joints of the antennae are reddish. 

Sub-family SiENiDiE. 

246. — Stenus maculatds. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Black, roughly punctured. The thorax has the median line 
deeply marked. On each elytron there is a large golden yellow 
spot, nearer to the side than to the suture, and nearer to the base 
than to the apex. The legs are red with the knees black. 

247. — Stenus Gatndahensis. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Black, strongly punctured. Head with a short raised smooth 
line on the middle and a longer one on each side between the eyes. 
Thorax nearly cylindrical, with a smooth raised central line. 
Legs yellow, with the knees brown. 

248. — Stenus olivaceus. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
This species differs from the last in having the head much 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 149 

excavated between the eyes, and without any smooth ridges, in 
having the thorax more bulged out on the sides, and with an 
olive gloss both on it and the elytra. The legs are black, with 
the exception of the upper part of the thighs which are yellow. 

249. — Stenus similis. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Only differs from the last in being much smaller, in having 
the head less excavated between the eyes, in having the thorax 
more thinly punctured, and in wanting the olive gloss on both 
thorax and elytra. 

250. — Stenus vrEiDi^NEus. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Black, opaque. Head smooth between the eyes. Thorax 
without punctui-ation in the middle, but with transverse looking 
punctures towards the apex and base, which are both rather con- 
stricted. Elytra strongly punctured, and of a brassy green colour 
with a ruddy hue in the middle. 

251. — Stenus cupkeipennis. n. sp. 

Length 2^ lines. 
Head and thorax lightly punctured, the former with a greenish 
the latter with a bluish gloss. Elytra punctured and of a brilliant 
coppery red. Abdomen bluish black, nitid. Basal half of the 
thighs yellow, the i-est brown. Fourth joint of the palpi not 
bilobed. 

252. — Stenus pdncticollis. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
This species also has the elytra of a coppery red, but of a 
redder and less brilliant character than in the last described 
insect. The head and thorax are closely and evenly punctured 
all over, in this respect differing much from both the preceding 
species. Li other respects it exactly resembles S. viridiceneus. 



150 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

Sub-family Oxttelid^. 
253. — Megalops nodipennis. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Pale red, subnitid. Head large and vertical, with a circular 
impression between the eyes, and large punctures over the whole 
surface. Thorax nearly as broad as the head, not longer than 
the breadth, subcylindrical, and covered with a number of 
deep transverse impressions full of punctures, giving a rough and 
irregular appearance to the whole. Elytra brown near the suture, 
the remainder occupied by large yellow rounded nodular eleva- 
tions. Abdomen thick, short, and rounded at the apex. 

254. — Bledius mandibularis. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Brown, opaque, finely punctured. Head with a small horn on 
each side near the eyes. Thorax nearly square, and rounded at 
the posterior angles, with a very fine median line. Elytra a little 
broader than the thorax, conjointly emarginate and slightly 
dehiscent. Abdomen black, with the tip yellow. Legs and palpi 
reddish. 

255. — OXYTELUS brdnneipennis. n. sp. 

Length If lines. 
Red clouded with brown, subnitid. Head large, smooth, ex- 
cavated in front, terminating in a sharp point before the eyes, 
truncate behind, and attached to the thorax by a thick neck. 
Thorax transverse, truncate in front, rather rounded behind, 
with the median line well marked, and on each side two deep 
longitudinal grooves, the external one near the lateral margin. 
Elytra broad, truncate behind. Abdomen broad, rather depressed, 
and becoming suddenly pointed at the apex. 

256. OXYTELUS IMPEESSIFRONS. n. Sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Black, nitid. Head large, smooth, and truncate, with a short 
deep impression in the centre of the forehead. Thorax the same 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 151 

as in the last species, but witli the grooves less deeply marked. 
Elytra brownish yellow. Abdomen as in the last species. Legs 
yellow. 

Sub-family PiestiDjE. 

257. — ISOMALUS PLANICOLLIS. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Black, nitid, very flat and smooth. Head large, square and 
fitting to the thorax. Thorax triangular, the apex towards the 
abdomen. Elytra longer than the breadth, of a piceous hue and 
with a puncture in the middle of each elytron. Abdomen with 
the apical edge of the second and third segments slightly red. 
The legs, antennae, palpi, and mandibles are piceous. 

Sub-family Omalid^. 
258. — Omalidm Gatndahense. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 

Black, subnitid. Head and thorax very finely punctured, the 
latter transverse, truncate in front and behind, and slightly 
rounded on the sides. Elytra more closely punctured, and of a 
dark brown colour. Abdomen broad and rounded at the apex. 
Legs red. Antennee brown. 

PSELAPHID^. 

259. — Tmesiphorus Kingii. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Brown, opaque, and roughly punctured. Antennae with the 
ninth and tenth joints large, and oblong, and with the eleventh still 
larger and round. Head with a deep groove in front between the 
antennte, and two large punctures on the forehead. Thorax 
gibbous. Elytra red and finely punctured, with a deep longitudinal 
impression at the base on each side midway between the suture and 
humeral angle. Abdomen finely punctured, bordered laterally 
and bicarinated, the carina not extending beyond the second 
segment. 



152 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

This species, which would appear from the numbers captured 
to be abundant about Gayndah, very much resembles T. Macleaii 
King, it is, however, of a very much dai'ker colour, and is al- 
together a rougher and more strongly sculptured insect. 

260. — Tyrds Masteesii. n. sp. 

Length 1 line. 
Red, subnitid and punctured. The second joint of the maxil- 
lary palpi is long, slight at the base and much enlarged at the 
apex, Avith a sharp protuberance on the inner side at the thickest 
part ; the third is short and turbinate, with an angular protu- 
berance on the inner side, and the fourth is large, ovate and 
somewhat acuminated. The ninth and tenth joints of the antennae 
are a little longer than the preceding ones, and the eleventh is 
large and oval. The head is rather pi'olonged in front. The 
thorax is scarcely longer than the breadth, very little narrowed 
behind and truncate. The elytra and abdomen are covered with a 
fine ashen pubescence ; the former are of a lighter red than the rest 
of the body, and have the basal stri^ short and light. 

The maxillary palpi of this species are unlike those of any 
Tyrus I have seen, but whether the divergence from the typical 
form is sufficient to render the formation of another genus neces- 
sary, is a question I must leave to be decided by those who have 
made this Family their peculiar study. 

261. — Brtaxis hikta. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 

Red, subnitid, punctate, and clothed with ashen pubescence. 
Antennae with the terminal joint large and pointed, and the 9th 
and 1 0th joints a little longer than the preceding ones. Head 
with two deep fovese on the forehead. Thorax much widened at 
the sides so as to form an angle near the middle, and narrowed 
behind, with the posterior angles acute, and the median line 
lightly carinated. Elytra convex and without strige. 

262. — Brtaxis atriceps. n, sp. 

Length 1 line. 
Red, nitid, and smooth. Antennee long, with the ninth joint 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S, 153 

a little larger than the preceding ones, the tenth elongate, and the 
eleventh of a very elongate oval form. Head black and flat on 
the forehead with two deep round fove^e. Thorax convex, and. 
rounded at the sides, with a deep fovea on each side near the 
base connected together by a transverse impression. Elytra 
bistriated, one on each elytron. Legs long. 



PAUSSID^. 

263. — Arthropteeus Westwoodii. n. sp. 
Length 5| lines. 
Piceous brown, subnitid, and finely punctured. AntennjB 
short, with the first joint transverse, obtusely angled, and truncate, 
the second to the ninth inclusive more than four times broader 
than the length, and the tenth more than twice the length of 
the preceding. Head slightly concave between the eyes, truncate 
behind, and attached to the thorax by a thick neck, with the 
posterior angles prominent, obtuse, and clothed with stiff hairs. 
Thorax scarcely longer than the breadth, rounded at the anterior 
angles, slightly narrowed behind, truncate at the base, margined 
and ciliated on the sides and broadly impressed on the median 
line, more especially towards the base. Elytra rounded at 
the apex with a small sinuation at the external angle. Legs and 
under side of body thinly punctured. Anterior tibiae with the 
external apical angle subacute and the apex deeply emarginate. 
Intermediate and posterior tibiee with the external apical angle 
very broadly rounded and ciliated, and with the apex emarginate. 

264. — Arthropteeus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 6| lines. 
Piceous-black, subnitid, and finely punctured. Antennee with 
the first joint square, obtusely angled, and truncate, the second 
to the ninth inclusive three times broader than the length, and 
the last more than twice the length of the others. Head slightly 
concave between the eyes, truncate behind, and attached to the 
thorax by a thick neck, with the posterior angles obtuse. Thorax 



164 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

much longer than the breadth, and very shghtly narrowed behind, 
with the median, line deeply impressed in the middle, but not 
extending to the apical and basal margins, and with an indistinct 
fovea near the basal part of the lateral margin. Elytra truncate 
at the apex and slightly notched at the external angles. Legs 
and underside of body closely punctured. The four anterior 
tibi«e have the external apical angle acute, and the apex deeply 
emarginate, the posterior ai^e i-ather more obtusely angled. 

265. — Aethropteeds angdsticoenis. n. sp. 
Length 5| lines. 

Of a piceous brown colour and nitid. Antenna) narrow, the 
first joint square with the angles obtuse, the second to the ninth 
inclusive twice as broad as the length, the last equal in length to 
the two preceding united. Head depressed on the vertex and 
coarsely punctured, with a prominent ciliated tubercle at the pos- 
terior angles, and the base truncate. Thorax subcordiform, 
coarsely and transversely punctured, and with the median line 
lightly impressed in the middle. Elytra thinly and finely punc- 
tured, and truncate at the apex, with two small notches at each 
external angle. Body beneath and legs thinly punctured. All 
the tibise have the external apical angle very acute. 

This species seems to approach the A. liarallelocerus of West- 
wood. 

266.— Artheopterds Kingii. n. sp. 
Length 5 1 lines. 
This species differs from the last in being of a pitchy red colour, 
in having no depression on the top of the head, in the tubercle at 
the posterior angles of the head being much smaller, in the thorax 
being more ciliated on the sides and having the median line more 
marked, in the external apical angles of the tibiae being less acute, 
and in the narrower form of the whole body. The antennae are 
of the same character as those of A . angusticornis. 

267. — Artheopterus elongatulus. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Long, narrow, of a reddish colour, subnitid and punctate. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 155 

Antennae rather short, the first joint neai"ly square, and with the 
angles obtuse, the second to the ninth inclusive three times 
broader than the length, and the last more than twice the length 
of the preceding one. Head not depressed in front, and with 
the posterior angles rounded. Thorax much longer than the 
width, very little narrowed behind, and not rounded on the sides, 
with the median line obsoletely carinated and broadly depressed 
near the base. Elj'tra a little wider than the thorax, and with 
the apex triemarginate in nearly equal lengths, and produced into 
acute points between the emarginations. Apex of the abdomen 
nearly black. The external apical angle of the fore tibiae is acute, 
that of the intermediate and posterior tibiae is rather obtuse, with 
the apex subtruncate. 

SCTDMiENID^. 

268. — Phagonophana Kingii, King. Trans. Ent. Soc. 
N. 8. Wales, Vol. 1, page 92. 

269. — SCTUM.ENUS Kingii. n. sp. 
Length | of a line. 
Dark red, nitid and clothed with a short golden pubescence. 
Antennae of medium size, with the two last joints forming an 
elongated club, and the ninth joint alittle larger than the preceding- 
ones. Neck distinct. Thorax rather elongate, not constricted 
behind. Thighs long, clavate. 

SILPHID^. 

270. — Ptomaphila lachtmosa, Schreib. Trans. Linn. 
Soc, Vol. YI., page 194. 

271. — Catops gbscurus. n. sp. 
Length IJ lines. 
This species diflPers from G. australis Erichs., the only Aus- 
tralian species hitherto described, in being clothed with a light 
coloured pubescense, and in having the thorax and elytra longitu- 
dinally instead of transversely scratched or striolated. 



156 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 



SCAPHIDIID^. 

272. SCAPHIDIDM PUNCTIPENNE. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Black, nitid. Thorax broadly margined with red excepting 
in the middle of the base, and with a transverse row of deep 
punctures near the basal margin. Elytra, with a row of deep 
punctures near the base from the suture to near the humeral 
angles, with two or three longitudinal rows of large and rather 
distant punctures, and with two red spots on each elytron, one, 
transverse and near the base, the other, smaller and near the apex. 
The segments of the abdomen showing beyond the elytra are red 
with the apex black. The middle of the posterior thighs is red. 



273. — ScAPHiDiuM Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 1- lines. 
This species is smaller than the last, and differs from it in 
having only the sides of the thorax red, in having only one red 
spot on each elytron situated near the centre and of a transverse 
shape, in having the rows of punctures on the elytra more large 
and distinct, and in having all the abdominal segments red, with a 
black spot on the pical one. 

274.— SCAPHISOMA POLITUM. n. S.p. 

Length f of a line. 
Black, nitid and smooth, with a light stria on each side of the 
suture of the elytra, with the abdomen of a pitchy red, and with 
the legs and antennse of a pale red. 

275. — SCAPHISOMA PDNCTIPENNE. n. sp. 

Length ^ of a line. 
Black and nitid, with the elytra and meso and meta-thorax 
rather thickly punctured, with a light stria on each side of the 
suture of the elytra, and with the legs red. 



BY W. MAOLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 157 

HTSTERID^. 
276.— HoLOLEPTA Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines. 

This species is very like H. Sidnensis Mars. It is of a slightly 
thicker and less flat form, is less punctured on the sides of the 
thorax, has the fovere at the anterior angles of the thorax in the 
male shorter and rounder, and has the pygidium more punctate. 

Mr. Masters found this insect in tolerable abundance in dead 
Bottle trees (StercuUa rupresfris Bentham), and only in them. 
The other two Australian species H. Australis Mars, from Western 
Australia, and H. Sidnensis Mars, from the neighbourhood of 
Sydney, are found exclusively in various species of grass tree 
fXanthon-Jicea.) 

277. — Platysoma subdepressum. n. sp. 
Length 2^ lines. 
Black, nitid, and somewhat flat. Head excavated and punc- 
tured in front. Thorax finely punctured towards the sides. 
Elytra, with the stria nearest the suture extending from the apex 
to a third of the length of the elytra, with the second extending 
to one half the length, with the next three entire, and with a 
short oblique one near the humeral angle. Pygidium covered 
with variolous punctures. 

278. — Plattsoma contexiusculum. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Black, nitid, and rather convex. Head excavated in front, 
and smooth. Thorax with a sublateral stria, and a small round 
depression in the centre of the base. Elytra with the first two 
stri^ from the suture of equal length, extending from the apex 
half way up the elytra, and with the next three entire. Pygi- 
dium punctured as in the last species. 

279. — Platysoma planiceps. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 
Black, nitid, and convex. Head flat in front, with the suture 



158 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

of the epistome straight and well marked. Thorax with a 
faint sublateral stria. Elytra striated as in the last species. 
Pygidium very thinly punctured. 

The elongation and expansion of the prosternum under the 
mouth is not nearly so great in this as in the two preceding 
species, or as it is in the genus Platysoma generally. In the 
absence, however, of specimens for minute examination and 
dissection, I cannot venture to form a genus for its reception. 

280. — Saprinus Gatndahensis. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Head black, very minutely punctured, and with a distinct 
uninterrupted stria surrounding the whole space between the eyes. 
Thorax of a bronzy olive hue, nitid in the middle, and roughly 
punctured towards the sides and along the basal margin, with an 
impressed point in the centre of the basal lobe. Elytra blue, 
nitid, and punctured behind and at the sides, with the sutural 
stria not reaching the base, the next stria short, curved, punctured, 
and taking its rise near the scutellum, the next short and pai'allel 
to the rest, the fourth and fifth about half the length of the elytra, 
and the sixth a little longer and almost joining the sublateral stria 
which extends from the humeral angle to the apex where it 
merges in the marginal one, and with a short stria on the side of 
the humeral angle having the same basal origin as the sublateral 
stria. Body beneath black and nitid. Legs piceous black. 

281. — Sapeinus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 

Head duller and more punctured than in the preceding species. 
Thorax black, with a slight coppery red reflexion, variolous punc- 
tures near the sides and along the base, and two shallow depres- 
sions near the apex at the commencement of the puncturated 
patches. Elytra greenish black, with the apical two thirds punc- 
tured, the sutural stria not reaching the base, the first dorsal stria 
about one third of the length of the elytra, the second third and 
fourth half the length, the fifth long and almost joining the sub- 
lateral stria, the abbreviated humeral and sublateral stria as in S. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 159 

Gayndahensis, and the interstice between the third and fourth 
strife rugose and striolate. Under side of body greenish black 
and punctured. 

282. — Abr^us Australis. n. sp. 
Length Ij lines. 
Black and subnitid. Elytra punctured, with a fine stria on 
each side of the suture, extending from the apex to near the base, 
and diverging gradually from the suture as it proceeds upwards. 

NITIDULID^. 

283. — Brachypeplus Mureati. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Like B. hinotatus Murray. Narrow, black, nitid. Antennae 
with the club pale rufous. Head punctate and bifoveolate. 
Thorax slightly transverse, with the sides ciliated and reddish 
towards the posterior angles. Elytra longer than the thorax, 
striate, finely punctured and pubescent, with a broad band of red 
at the base not extending to the suture. The exposed segments 
of the abdomen are red with the sides black. 

284. — Carpophilus convexiusculus. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 

Red, subconvex, and finely punctate. Antennaa with the ter- 
minal joint of the club yellow, the others brown. Head much 
narrowed behind the eyes, which are prominent. Thorax short, 
transverse, emarginate in front, truncate behind, broader at the 
base than at the apex, rounded at the anterior, and square at the 
posterior angles, with a broad black vitta in the centre, which is 
broadest at the apex, and is gradually narrowed to the base. 
Scutellum black. Elyti^a of the same width as the thorax at the 
base, separately rounded at the apex, and of a subnitid black colour, 
with a basal fascia enclosing a black spot near each shoulder, and 
a round spot behind the middle, red. Abdomen pointed at the 
apex. 

K 



160 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

This species ought- perhaps to be placed in the genus Siauro- 
glossictis Murray. I have not been able to get a specinen for 
dissection and cannot therefore speak with certainty. 

285. — Carpophilus luridipennis. n. sp. 
Length f of a line. 
Head dark brown, punctate, and narrowed behind the eyes, 
which are prominent. Antennae red with the club black. Thorax 
dull red, transverse, not broader behind than in front, punctate, 
and obtusely rectangular. Scutellum large, black, and triangular. 
Elytra not much longer than the breadth, not narrowed behind, 
truncate at the apex, punctate and of a dark lurid colour with 
the apex black. Abdomen reddish brown. Legs red. 

286. — Carpophilus pilipennis. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Reddish brown, punctate, and covered with a short yellow 
pile. Head almost black in front, less narrowed behind, and 
with the eyes less prominent than in the last species. Antennse 
with the club black. Thorax almost square, and somewhat con- 
vex, with an indistinct brown patch in the middle. Scutellum 
large and of a broad triangular form. Elytra of the width of 
the thorax and truncate, with a basal fascia, large in the middle 
and smaller towards the humeral angles, of a deep red. The 
apical portion of the penultimate segment of the abdomen is also 
red. 

287. — Carpophilus obscurus. n. sp. 

Length 1 line. 
Black, ojDaque, punctate, and covered with a grey pile which, 
is longest on the sides of the elytra and abdomen. Head very 
slightly narrowed behind the eyes. Thorax nearly square, a little 
emarginate in front and rounded at the base. Scutellum large 
and rounded at the apex. Elytra of the same width as the thorax, 
and rather obliquely truncate, with a trace of red on each humeral 
angle. Abdomen with the penultimate segment a little red at 
the apex. Legs of an uniform red colour. 



BY W. MAGLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. Ifil 

288, — Cakpophilus aterrimus. n. sp. 
Length 1-| lines. 
Black, opaque, thickly punctate and clothed with short dark 
pile. Head slightly narrowed behind the eyes. Thorax trans- 
verse, emarginate in front, broader behind than at the apex, and 
rounded at the base. Scutellum large, rounded on the sides and 
pointed at the apex. Elytra of the width of the base of the 
thorax, slightly widened behind the humeral angles, and becom- 
ing narrowed again towards the apex, which is obliquely trun- 
cated, each elytron being cut obliquely from the hinder angle up 
towards the suture. The legs are brown with the tarsi pale red. 

289. — Pria rubicunda. n. sp. 
Length ^ a line. 

Entirely of a pale red colour, and punctate. Head small. 
Thorax broad, flat, emarginate in front, broadly rounded at the 
anterior angles and on the sides, and truncate at the base, with 
a large triangular impression on the middle of the disc. Scu- 
tellum large, broad, and rounded. Elytra flat, of the same width 
as the thorax at the base, parallel-sided, rounded at the apex, 
and nearly covering the entire abdomen. 

This very minute insect differs from P. dulcamara Illig. the 
type of the genus in being very flat, in addition to the differences 
in coloration, marking, and general form. I do not know, how- 
ever, of any genus of the NitiduUdce to which it makes a 
nearer approach, and I am unable from the scarcity of specimens, 
to make in this, as in many other instances, an examination 
sufficiently minute to enable me to determine positively the exact 
characters. 

290. — SORONIA VARIEGATA. n. sp. 

Length 2 1 lines. 
Brown, opaque, strongly punctate, with each puncture fur- 
nished with a short semi- decumbent seta, the setae for the most 
part yellow. Head considerably withdrawn into the thorax. 
Thorax transverse, deeply emarginate in front, prominent at the 



162 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

anterior angles, rounded, ciliated, broadly margined and reddish 
on the sides, broadest at the posterior angles, and truncate or 
slightly bisinuate at the base. Scutellum broadly rounded at 
the apex. Elytra multi-striate, the strite punctate and the alter- 
nate interstices larger and less interrupted than the others. The 
insect has a variegated aspect from the disposal of the yellow 
setge or setiform scales over the whole surface. On the elytra 
they are placed so as to give the appearance, under a lens, of 
thi'ee thin yellow fascife. 

291. — POCADIUS PILISTRIATUS. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Brown, punctate, and clothed with a long, pale-coloured, de- 
cumbent pubescence. Head withdrawn into the thorax up to 
the eyes which are large but not prominent. Thorax transverse, 
slightly emarginate in front, much widened behind, slightly bi- 
emarginate at the base, and more villose at the sides than in the 
middle. Scutellum broadly triangular, and obtuse at the apex. 
Elytra not broader than the thorax, parallel-sided, conjointly 
rounded at the apex, not covering the apex of the abdomen, and 
covered with close punctate striee, with the long decumbent 
pubescence disposed in regular rows along these strife. There 
is also a dash of red along the suture and sides of each elytron, 
and the sides are also strongly ciliated. 

292. — NiTIDULA CONCOLOR. n. sp. 

Length If lines. 
Black, opaque, punctate, and clothed with short decumbent 
light coloured pubescence. Head withdrawn into the thorax up 
to the eyes. Thorax transverse, emarginate in front, rounded 
on the sides, broad behind, truncate or slightly bi-emarginate at 
the base, with the posterior angles obtuse. Scutellum broad and 
rounded at the apex. Elytra not broader than the base of the 
thorax, very closely and finely punctato-striate and separately 
rounded at the apex. Abdomen with the last segment large and 
exposed. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 163 

293. — Cychramus niger. n. sp. 
Length 2j lines. 
Black, sabnitid, punctate, and moderately pilose. Head 
small, rather flat, free from pubescence, and sunk to the eyes in 
the emargination of the thorax. Thorax transverse, emarginate 
in front, rounded, margined, ciliated, and reddish on the sides, 
much broader behind than in front, rounded at and behind the 
posterior angles and nearly truncate at the base. Scutellum 
with only the apex visible. Elytra about the width of the thorax 
at the base, and rounded and slightly dehiscent at the apex. 
Pygidium exposed. Legs red, with the tibi^ strongly ciliated. 

294. — Ips politds. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Piceous black, nitid, finely punctate, and subconvex. Head 
broad and sunk deeply in the thorax. Thorax transverse, deeply 
emarginate in front, margined on the sides, and broad and trun- 
cate at the base. Scutellum rounded at the sides and apex. 
Elytra scarcely so broad as the thorax at the base, obtusely 
pointed at the apex, covering all but the very extremity of the 
abdomen, and marked with a few obsolete stride. The under 
side of the body and the legs are punctate and of a pale piceous 
red. 

TROGOSITID^. 

295. — Leperina Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Head black, coarsely punctured, and scaly, with a fascicled 
tubercle on each side near the eye. Thorax punctate, and 
covered with black scales excepting on the sides, and two spots 
near the hinder portion of the disc which are white, and a few 
cinnamon-coloured scales near the middle, with a smooth raised 
median line, and two fascicles near the anterior margin protu- 
ding forwards. Scutellum rounded behind and covered with 
cinnamon-coloured scales. Elytra black, coarsely punctured, 



164 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

covered with cinuamon-coloui-ed scales interspersed with white 
near the scutellum and behind the middle, and spotted with 
black all over, with three costse on each elytron, and a small 
fascicle at the basal end of the second and third, and a larger 
one near the apex of the first costa. Body beneath black. 

L. lacera Pasc, more resemble this species than any other 
hitherto described, the species are however very diffex'ent. 

29G. — Leperina Gayndahensis. n. sp. 

Length 7 lines. 
Head depressed, black, coarsely punctured, thinly clothed 
with small yellow scales, with two velvety black spots on the 
vertex. Thorax with a broad dense mass of yellow scales on the 
sides, not reaching the anterior angles, with a broad fascia of 
velvety black between that and the middle, and with the median 
line coarsely punctured, depressed and almost free of scales. 
Scutellum transverse and semi-circular. Elytra of a brassy green 
colour where exposed, covered with large deep punctures, tricostate 
and marked with numerous velvety black spots, which behind 
form two narrow fascias, with the punctures on the black spots 
showing under a lens a deep fieiy red bottom, while the others 
are occupied each with a round yellow scale. Body beneath and 
legs brownish black, punctate and opaque. 

297. — Lepekina Bdrnettensis. n. sp. 
Length 4| lines. 
Head black, coarsely punctured and rather depressed in front, 
with a fascicle of cinnamon-coloured and white scales on each 
side near the eyes. Thorax punctate with a dense mass of broad 
flattened white scales on the sides, a smooth elevated median line, 
and on each side of it near the anterior margin, three fascicles of 
long black scales, one in advance of the others and on the mar- 
gin. Scutellum rounded at the apex. Elytra piceous, punctate, 
tricostate and thickly clothed with cinnamon-coloured scales, in- 
terspersed with a few white ones, with a black fascicle at the base 
between the second and third cost^, another about the middle 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 165 

between the first and second costae, a third in a line with the 
second near the apex, and a few others of smaller size in other 
positions. The under side of the body is of a dull black and 
punctate, with a large shallow fovea on the side of each of the 
abdominal segments. 

This species seems to approach the L. cirrosa Pasc. It is, 
however, much less variegated, and the fascicles are much shorter 
and less numerous. 

COLYDID^. 

298. — DiTOMA COSTATA. n. sp. 

Length If lines. 
Brown, flat and opaque. Head punctate, with a shallow de- 
pression on each side in front of the eyes. Thorax punctate, and 
nearly square with the anterior angles advanced, the posterior 
square and acute, the sides margined and finely serrated, with 
two costa3 on each side curved towards the apex, and joining to- 
gether on the apical margin, and two others short and ill-defined 
at the base and near the centre. Elytra scarcely wider than the 
thorax, parallel-sided, rounded at the apex, punctato-striate, — 
the altei^nate interstices three in number, elevated into large 
costiB, — and marked each with two indistinct patches of deep dull 
red, one near' the humeral angle, extending nearly diagonally to 
the middle of the elytra and towards the suture, the other an 
elongate spot, is situated between the middle and the apex. 

299. — Deretapheus Pascoei. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Dark brown, subopaque. Head punctate, with a shallow 
round impression on the anterior margin. Thorax elongate, 
cordiform, strongly but not densely punctate, and sinuate at the 
base, with the posterior angles acutely pointed at the termination 
of a short rather oblique costa, and with the thoracic canal deep 
at the base, getting shallower towards the interrupted portion 
which is very short and shallow, and terminating at about one 
fourth of the length from the apical border. Elytra striated and 



1(36 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

strongly punctured in the strise, with the alternate interstices 
elevated, the third somewhat costiform at the apex and the base, 
the fifth and seventh costiform throughout, but not large. 

300. BOTHEIDERES MasTERSII. n. sp. 

Length 2| lines. 
Head black and thinly punctured. Thorax black, subnitid, 
nearly square, slightly broader in front than behind, finely punc- 
tate, slightly advanced at the anterior angles, and strongly and 
acutely p jinted at the posterior, with a large deep and continuous 
groove in the middle, enclosing a large oblong space of the same 
level as the rest of the thorax, and with an extension of the 
groove on the median line at the base, almost to the extremity of 
the basal lobe. Elytra red with black suture, nitid, and very 
finely punctato-striate, with the interstices raised into very narrow 
costse. The legs are piceous. 

301.— BoTHRiDERES Pascoei. n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 

Brown, subopaque. Head coarsely punctured, with two very 
faint almost obsolete longitudinal impressions on the forehead. 
Thorax considerably longer than the width, narrower behind than 
in front, slightly produced at the anterior angles, square and not 
pointed at the posterior angles, lobed at the base, and coarsely 
punctate, with two deep horse-shoe shaped impressions in the 
middle, one near the base with the open part towards the 
apex, the other some distance from the apex, with the open part 
towards the base, the space enclosed by each and intermediate 
between the two being smooth and almost without punctures. 
There are also two or more somewhat rugose impressions ex- 
tending from the hinder impression towards the extremity of the 
basal lobe. Elytra punctato-striate, and punctate in rows on the 
intei^stices, which are elevated, the alternate ones being strongly 
costiform. 

302. — BoTHRiDERES Krefftii. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
This species is very like the last, and both belong evidently to 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 167 

the same group as B. eqidnus and B. taeniahcs Pasc. It differs 
from B. Pascoei in being smaller, in having no trace of frontal 
impressions, in the thorax being longer and more pointed at the 
posterior angles, in having the space between the thoracic im- 
pressions punctate, in having two short costse between the hinder 
thoracic impressions and the base, and in the elytra being of a 
piceous colour and more strongly costate. 

303. BOTHRIDEEES SUTURALIS. n. Sp. 

Length 1| lines. 

Head and thorax black, subnitid, and coarsely but not densely 
punctui'ed, the latter nearly square and with a large oblong space 
in the middle, surrounded except at the base which is open with 
a broad well marked depression. Elytra red, nitid, finely punc- 
tato-striate with the interstices finely costate, and a broad sutural 
black vitta. 

This pretty little species approaches evidently to the group 
in which Mr. Pascoe places the species B. vittatus, musivus, and 
tnerus. 

CUCVJIBJE. 

304. — Hectarthrum cylindricdm. Smith. Col. Brit. 
Mas. I., page 22. 



305. — Prostomis laticeps. 



sp. 



Lensrth 1^^ lines. 



•3 

Red, nitid. Head broad and triangular, with a deep oblique 
impression ou each side in front of the eyes, and a few punctures 
on the forehead and vertex. Thorax scarcely so broad as the 
head, longer than the breadth, finely serrated on the sides, and a 
little narrowed at the base with the anterior angles acute, the 
posterior obtuse, and with two crooked interrupted punctured 
striae on the disc. Elytra elongate, sub-depressed, not broader 
than the thorax, parallel-sided, rounded at the apex and punc- 
tato-striate, with a black fascia behind the middle. 

This species has not got the advanced mandibles of P. man- 
dibularis, nor do the antennas agree with the generic characters 



168 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

given by Lacordaire. The first joint is thick and longer than 
the others, the second a little smaller, the third and following 
joints up to the 9th are short and moniliiorm, and the last three 
form a compact club of which the basal joint is the largest. 

306. — Ipsaphes nitidulus. u. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Brownish red, nitid and punctate Antennas with the third 
joint scarcely longer than the fourth. Head with a slight longi- 
tudinal impression on the forehead. Thorax transversely quad- 
rate, emarginate on the anterior border, and truncate at the base, 
with the angles produced into minute teeth, and with the sides 
a little rounded behind the anterior angles. Scutellum transverse 
and slightly rounded behind. Elytra strongly punctato-striate, 
with a sublateral carina. 

Placonotus. n. gen. 

Like the genus Platisus Erichs ; but difiers entirely in the 
character of the antennae. The body is very flat. The antennae 
are long and filiform, the first joint thick, the second, third, and 
fourth joints of nearly equal size, slighter and shorter than the 
first, the remainder long and slight. The first article of the tarsi 
is of normal length. 

307. — Placonotds longicoenis. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 
Brownish red, nitid, finely punctate. Antennae of the length 
of the body. Thorax nearly square, with a small tooth at each 
angle, and asublateral line. Scutellum transverse and triangular. 
Elytra of a pale red, and very finely panctato-striate, with a broad 
longitudinal depression in the middle of each elytron. 

308. — Beontes nigeicans, Pasc. Journ. of Ent., Vol. 
I., page 321. 

309. SiLVANUS CASTANEUS. n. Sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Of an opaque chesnut colour, mixed slightly with black in 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 169 

some places, and densely punctate. Thorax much longer than 
the breadth, flattened in the middle and finely serrated on the 
sides. Elytra closely punctato-striate, with a depression behind 
the scutellum. 

310. — Omma Stanley:, Newm. A^m. Nat. Hist. III., 
•page 303. 

311. — Omma Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 

Black, opaque, densely punctate and closely covered with 
scales. Head flat, sprinkled with white scales, and afiixed to the 
thorax by a large neck. Thorax about the width of the head, 
broader than the length, much rounded at the anterior angles, 
deeply and largely bi-foveated in fi-ont, truncate at the base, and 
sprinkled with white scales over the basal portion. Scutellum 
transverse, truncate, and covered with wliite scales. Elytra 
broader than the thorax at the base, gradually enlarging towards 
the apex, separately rounded at the apex, coarsely striato-punc- 
tate, and marked with a humeral spot, a median wavy fascia, 
a lateral vitta not reaching the base, and a sutural vitta 
confined to the apical third, composed of white scales. The 
under side of the body and the legs are closely covered with 
white scales. 



LATHRIDID^. 

312. CORTICAKIA POLITA. n. sp. 

Length § of a line. 

Greenish-black, nitid, convex. Head punctate. Antennae 
with the base red, and club black. Thorax ' nearly square, 
not broader than the head, a little rounded on the sides, covered 
with large punctures, with two foveaD near the base, and four 
setigerous points on the sides, one of them forming the posterior 
angle. Elytra broader than the thorax and rounded at the apex. 



170 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

MTCETOPHAGID^. 
313. — Triphtllus fasciatds. n. sp. 
Length. 1^ lines. 
Black, subnitid, punctate, very hairy and of an oval form. 
Thorax transverse and margined on the sides. Elytra red with 
a broad black median fascia, and strongly striato-punctate. 

314. — DiPLOCOELUS OVATUS. n. sp. 

Length I of a line. 
Reddish brown, subnitid, covered with long yellow hair, and 
of a short oval convex form. Thorax transverse, margined at the 
sides, and with two stri^ near the sides. Elytra strongly striato- 
punctate. 

DEHMESTIDtE. 

315. — Dermestes murinus, Linn. Faun Suec, page 
144.— Erichs. Nat. Ins. III., page 429. — 
Bouche. Nat. Lis., page 189 ; 
catta, Pang. Nattirf. 24, 10, t. 1., /. 12.— 
Herbst. Kiif. IV., page 123. t. 40, /. 4 ; 
nebulosus De Geer. Ins. TV., page 197; 
rosewentris Casteln. Hist. Nat. II., page 34. 

316. — Megatoma apicalis. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Black, subnitid, punctate, and clothed with black hair. 
Thorax transverse, convex, with the base triangularly produced. 
Elytra of the width of the base of the thorax, with the apex de- 
hiscent, separately rounded, not covering the pygidium and of a 
piceous hue. Under side of the body punctate and covered 
with a decumbent ashen pile. The legs and antennae are of a 
piceous red. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 17J 

317. — Anthrends nigricans, n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Black, punctate, with the head and thorax sprinkled with a 
whitish pubescence, and with two interrupted fascite of the same 
on the elytra. The under surface of the abdomen and the py- 
gidium are densely covered with orange coloured pubescence. 

318. — Crtptorhopalum obscdrum. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 

Black, opaque, punctate and covered with a short decumbent 
yellowish pile. Basal lobe of thorax broadly rounded. Elytra 
with two distinct lateral strige, and faint traces of others over the 
rest of their surface. 

I may not be correct in placing this insect in the genus 
CryptGrJiopalum ; it will probably be found on an examination 
more minute than I have been able to give it to form a new 
genus. 

319. — Trinodes pdnctipennis. n. sp. 
Length 1^ lines. 
Black, subnitid, punctate and very hairy. Thorax strongly 
bisinuate at the base, with the median lobe slightly emarginate. 
Scutellum smooth, triangular and somewhat convex. Elytra 
coarsely punctured in irregular rows. Legs of a piceous red 
colour. 

320. — Trinodes globosus. n. sp. 
Length I of a line. 
Besides the great difference in size this species differs from 
the last in being very short and convex, in having the base of the 
thorax less bisinuated, and in having the scutellum nearly round. 

BYRRHID^. 

321. — MlCROCH^TES fascicularis. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Black, punctate, and covered all over with erect scales. 



172 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

Thorax transversely impressed in the middle, with a transverse 
series of five fascicles immediately behind the impression. Elytra 
coarsely punctato-striate, with four rows of lengthened fascicles 
on each, one on the third interstice consisting of five or six fasci- 
cles, the second on the fifth interstice of four fascicles, the third 
on the seventh of three, and the fourth on the ninth of two. 
There are a few brown scales mixed with the black in some 
places. 

This species is larger than M. sphaericus or Australis, and 
more regularly striated on the elytra, while in M. scoparia the 
striation of the elytra is much finer than in any of them. 

322. — MiCROCHiETES COSTATDS. n. Sp. 

Length 1 line. 
Black and scaly. Thorax not produced in front over the 
head as in the other species of the genus, but receiving the head 
in the emargination of the anterior border. Elytra very finely 
striate-punctate, with five narrow costae on each, and with the 
intervals quite flat. 

This ought probably to constitute a new genus. 

323. LiMNICHUS FRONTALIS. n. Sp. 

Length I of a line. 
Black, opaque, finely punctate. Head with a large triangular 
impression on the forehead. Thorax very broad, scarcely emar- 
ginate in front, and widening much towards the base, which is 
broadly rounded. The elytra are very finely punctato-striate. 

GEORTSSID^. 

324. — Georyssus Kingii. n. sp. 

Length | a line. 

Black, opaque. Thorax rough, granulose, rounded and rather 

produced over the head in front, and a very little emai'ginate at 

the apex, with the median line bi'oadly marked, and the base 

broadly rounded. Elytra shortly ovate and convex, with four 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 173 

large oostse on each, and with the intervals occupied by trans- 
versal quadrangular foveae. 

The sculpture of this insect is very different from that of G. 
Australis King ; the only Australian species hitherto described. 

HETEROCERID^. 

325. — -Heterocerus Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length If lines. 
Black, finely punctate and pubescent. Thorax rounded at the 
base, with a broad lateral testaceous border. Elytra obsoletely 
striated and of a testaceous colour, with a number of black spots, 
which form themselves into apparently very interrupted fasciae, 
one basal, one median, and the other apical. The legs and man- 
dibles are also testaceous. 

LUCANID^. 

326. — Lamprima Krefftii. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines, mandibles included. 
Though much smaller, this species most resembles L. Latreillii 
MacLeay ; it is, however, evidently a different species. The most 
evident points of difference are : — the thorax of this species is 
more sparsely punctured, but the punctures are much larger, the 
scutellum is more triangular and is minutely emarginate at the 
tip, and the elytra are less rugose and have a distinct stria near 
the suture on each side. The pubescence also on the pygidium 
seems to be of a much darker colour. 

327. — FiGULUS REGDLARis, Westw. Ent. Mag. V., 
page 263. 

328. — FiGULUs LiLLiPUTANUS, Westw. Trans. Ent. 
Soc, 2 Ser. III., page 219, t 12, /. 5 ; 
clivinoides Thorns. Ann. Fr., page 432. 

329. — Adlacocyclus Kaupii. n. sp. 
Length 13 lines. 
Like A. edentulus McLeay, Differs from it in having the 



174 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

labram more emarginate, the frontal horn less arched forwards, 
less emarginate at the extremity, and more sulcate on the back, 
in the lateral fovea on the thorax being more uninterruptedly 
semilunar, and in having the strise on the elytra more profound. 
1 name the species after Dr. J. J. Kaup, of Darmstadt, who 
has made the Passalidce the object of his study for some time. 

330. — TiENiocERUS Masteesii. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines. 
Black, nitid, and of an elongate form, frontal horn short, 
obtuse, and slightly sulcate on the back. Thorax transverse, 
rather rounded behind and deeply impressed on the median line, 
with the lateral foveae shorter, less semilunar and nearer the 
posterior angles than in the species last described. Elytra 
punctato-striate, the punctures indistinct in the first three striae 
from the suture. Club of the antennse large. 

331. — Mastochilus australasicus, Perch. Suijpl. I., 
page 6, t. 77,/. 2. 

332. — Mastochilus polyphyllus, McLeay. 
King^s Survey II., page 439.' — Burm. 
Handb. Y.,page 469. 

Hexaphjllus Boisd. Voy. Astrol. Col., page 241. 
Sexdentatus Perch. Mon., page 28, i. 2./. 5. 

333. — Mastochilus nitidulus. n. sp. 
Length 15 lines. 
Like M. dilatatus Dalm. Head very rugose, with the frontal 
ridge rather long, and from the extremity of it a small ridge ex- 
tending obliquely to the basal angles of the labrum, in the middle 
of these oblique ridges there is a small tubercle, and a low trans- 
verse ridge unites these two tubercles, thus enclosing a small trian- 
gular space in front of the frontal ridge. In these particulars the 
sculpture of the head in this species differs widely from that of 
M. dilatatus, where the tubercles are larger, and there are two 
large transverse ridges, one on the foi'ehead, the other a shorter 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 175 

one near the front. The thorax has the faintest possible trace of 
the median, line in the centre, has the lateral foveae deep, round, 
near the posterior angles, and without other punctures near 
them as in M. dilatatus, and has a shallow fovea containing two 
or three punctures near the anterior angles. The elytra are of 
the same form and sculpture as M. dilatatus. The fore tibiae 
have their exter-nal surface punctured on the apical half only. 

334.— Mastochilus puncticollis. n. sp. 

Length 15 lines. 
The sculpture of the head is much the same as in the last 
species, but the space in front of the frontal ridge is shorter and 
more perpendicular. In addition the whole insect is less nitid, 
there is no trace of median line on the thorax, the fovete are more 
filled with small punctures, and there is an accumulation of punc- 
tures near the anterior angles. The fore tibiae also have their 
external surface punctured almost to their base, and their ex- 
ternal teeth are very obtuse. 

SCARAB^ID^. 

Sub-family Copridj;. 

Canthonosoma. n. gen. 

Body broadly ovate, convex. Head fiat, transverse, broadest 
and angular in the middle, and broadly rounded behind and in 
front, with a small semi-circular emargination between two small 
tubercles at the apex. Eyes oval above and free on the posterior 
edge. Mentum and labial palpi resembling those of Cephalodes- 
mkis. Thorax transverse, convex, flattened on the sides, rounded 
behind and emarginate in front. Elytra as broad as the length, 
sub-convex, much narrowed at the apex with the marginal 
epipleurge deep. Pygidium perpendicular, sub-triangular and 
rounded at the apex. Legs moderately stout ; the anterior with- 
out tarsi, with the tibiae slightly arcuated and furnished with a 
small tooth on the outside near the apex, two short obtuse teeth 
at the exterior apical angle and a strong acute spur at the inner 

L 



176 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

angle ; the intermediate and posterior, long, with the tibiae arcu- 
ated, quadrangular and ciliated, and with two acute spurs at the 
apex of the intermediate and one at the apex of the posterior 
tibias. 

The absence of the anterior tarsi separates this genus from 
the other Australian genera of long legged Gopridce. According 
to Lacordaire's arrangement the genus would be included in the 
small group which he names DeltocMlides. I have two species 
in my cabinet, one from Rockhampton, the other from the Pine 
Mountains, Queensland. 

335. — Canthonosoma Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 

Black, subopaque. Head and thorax finely punctate, the 
latter with the anterior angles acute, the posterior rounded, the 
sides also rounded with a shallow fovea at the broadest part, and 
with a very faint indication near the base of the median line, and 
on each side of it a smooth tuberosity. Elytra scarcely so broad 
as the thorax, thinly and iinely punctate- — each puncture furnished 
with a short semi-decumbent yellow seta — and costate, the costse 
broad, flat, obsolete looking, and six in number on each elytron. 
The pygidium and under surface of the body smooth. 

This insect is common throughout the Northern Districts, and 
is invariably found on Wallaby dung. 

336. — Cephalodesmids quadridens. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Black, opaque, punctate. Head densely punctured on the 
forehead, and quite smooth and nitid in front, with four strong 
acute and slightly recurved teeth on the margin of the clypeus. 
Thorax, with the punctures of an oval shape and setigerous, 
the median line distinct especially towards the base, and a 
fovea near each lateral margin. Elytra striate, punctate, — the 
punctures setigerous, — and subcostate, the costse broad and de- 
pressed. Under surface nitid. Legs piceous, with the tibias pro- 
foundly punctured. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 177 

337. — Temnoplectron tibiale. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Black, nitid, convex and nearly round. Head almost vertical, 
and finely punctate with the clypeus angularly emarginated at the 
apex. Thorax transverse, very finely punctate, emarginate in 
front, slightly rounded behind, broader at the middle than at the 
apex, and parallel sided from the middle to the base. Elytra of 
the width of the thorax at the base, rounded at the apex, not 
longer than the breadth, very finely punctate and marked with 
seven very fine strias — the external one abbreviated, — on each 
elytron. The fore tibite are almost rectangularly bent inwards 
near the apex, and at the external angle formed by the bend there 
is a strong tooth, with two small teeth above. The four posterior 
tibice are slightly curved, enlarged towards the apex, and laterally 
compressed. The antennae and palpi are red. 

MERODONTUS. n. gen. 

Body broadly ovate. Head flat, transverse, rounded behind, 
and emarginate in front, with three minute teeth along the an- 
terior edge of the clypeus on each side of the emargination. 
Eyes only visible through a naiTow slit in the hind margin of the 
head. Mentum narrow and emarginate. Labial palpi with the 
last joint obconic, and about half the length of the penultimate. 
Thorax transverse, subconvex, slightly rounded at the base, and 
emarginate in front, with the anterior angles much enlarged. 
Elytra not covering the pygidium, and flat on the back, with the 
sides and apex deep and vertical. Anterior legs rather short, 
with the tibi^ wide at the apex and minutely tridefttate, and the 
tarsi very short ; intermediate, long with the tibiae strongly triden- 
tate ; posterior, very long, with the thighs thick and furnished in 
one sex with a large acute spur near the apex on the under side, 
and with the tibiee very much arcuated. Pygidium perpendicular. 

The insect on which this genus is formed has a strong gene- 
ral resemblance to the genus Sisyphus, the deep epipleurse of the 
elytra clearly indicate, however, its true position to be with the 
group named Minthophilidce by Lacordaire. 



178 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

338. — Merodontus calcaratus. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Piceous brown, opaque, densely punctate, and clothed with 
short semi-erect pale coloured hairs. Head with a slight convexity 
in the middle, and a short slightly oblique transverse ridge on 
each side in front of the eyes. Thorax with two abbreviated 
ridges near the median line composed each of two elongated 
tubercles, extending from the apical margin to the middle, with 
six small conical tubercles placed at intervals across the thorax 
in a semicircular form, with another tubercle near the posterior 
angles, and with the anterior angles large, flat, and obliquely 
truncate, the hairs on the anterior angles, and on the tubercles 
being longer than on the rest of the surface, and more curled 
at their extremities. Elytra punctato- striate, — the strias con- 
sisting each of two fine lines with flat interstices, the alternate 
interstices red, the others having two or more small tubercles, — 
strongly costate at the lateral margin of the flat dorsal surface, — 
the costa not reaching the suture, and terminating in a reddish 
tubercle, — and furnished with a fine costa near the lateral margin 
of the epipleura. Pygidium convex and taberculate, the tubercles 
small and taking a V shaped position. Under surface piceous 
black, opaque, punctate and somewhat scaly. Legs strongly 
punctate and ciliated with short reddish hair. 

I have seen specimens of this insect from Moreton Bay, and I 
believe it is pretty generally distributed over the whole of the 
Northern parts of New Holland. It is found, as is also the case 
with the last described species Temnoplectron tibiale, in human 
excrement. 

339.— Onthophagus granulatds, Bohem, Bes. Eu- 
genie 1858, page 48. 

340. — Onthophagus quadripustulatus, Fab. Spec. 
Ins. 1., page 31. — Oliv. Ent. I. '^., pagellb, 
t. 15. /. 141. — Montrouz. Ann. Soc. Agr. 
hyon. VII., 1857, I., page 22.— Harold. Gol. 
Heft. II., page ^'^. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. I79 

In the " Catalogus Coleopterorum " of Dr. Gemminger and 
B. von Harold, I find that the species described by me some 
years ago under the name of 0. rubrimacutatus, is put down as a 
synonym of this species. This is incorrect, I have both species, 
there is a marked distinction between them as regards both size 
and sculpture. 

I may here mention two other errors in that publication. 
My Onthophagus furcatus which is put down in the Catalogue 
alluded to as a synonym of 0. auritus Erich., is as widely different 
from that insect as one species of Onthophagus can possibly be 
from another, and my 0. laviinatus, put down as a synonym of 
0. capella Kirby, is very distinct from that species. 

341. — Onthophagus cdniculus, MacL., W. Trans. 
Soc. N. 8. Wales, 1864, I., page 123. 

In my description of this species, I made the mistake of 
describing as the male a female with the thoracic tubercles more 
than usually large. The male has the thorax more retuse in 
front than the female, and has a strong triangular horn in place 
of the two tubercles of the female. 

342. — Onthophagus divaricatus. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Black, subopaque. Head, in the male with a transverse 
raised line between the eyes, and two long rather slender and 
slightly carved horns emanating from each extremity of that 
line, extending in a direction upwards and outwards, and 
obtusely pointed at their apex ; in the female with the frontal 
transverse raised line rising* on each side from the upper angle of 
the eye, and without horn or tubercle ; in both sexes, with the 
clypeus rugosely and transversely punctured, with its suture raised 
and semicirculai% and with the space behind the frontal trans- 
verse ridge smooth and nitid. Thorax transverse, convex, opaque, 
densely panctate, and presenting a granulated appearance, with, 
the sides bulged out behind the middle, with a fovea near the 
bulge, with the posterior angles emarginate, and without any trace 
of the median line. The thorax of the male is less coarsely punctate 



180 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

than tliat of the female, is furnished with a strong laterally com- 
pressed liorn, and is a little refuse and nearly smooth in front. 
Elytra having a shagTeen appearance, with seven fine transverse 
punctured striaa on each elytron, and with the interstices flat. 
Legs ciliated with red hair. Antennas, palpi, and tarsi, red. 

The female of this species very closely resembles the female of 
0. grantdahis, described by me from Port Denison in 1864, which 
species, I see by the " Catalogus Coleopterum," has had its name 
changed by Von Harold to consentaneus, I presume because the 
name granulatus had been previously applied by Boheman to 
another species. I am inclined to believe that in the case of that 
species I made the same mistake as in 0. cuniculus, and described, 
two females only and not the male. The difference between the 
females of 0. consentaneus and the one now described consists 
chiefly in consentaneus having the median line of the thorax 
visible, in having the elytra much more roughly marked, in 
having the under side of the body more hirsute, and in having the 
space on the head behind the frontal transverse ridge, punctate. 

343. — OnthophaCtUS eubicundijlus. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 

Black, opaque, punctate, and marked on the margin of the 
head and clypeus, the sides and base of the thorax, and over all 
parts of the elytra with indistinctly defined deep red spots. Head 
transverse, bisinuate slightly on the sides, emarginate at the apex, 
and of a rather brassy hue with two long slightly curved horns on 
the vertex, extending upwards and outwards, and obtusely pointed, 
in the males, and in the females two small tubercles occupying 
the place of these horns. Thorax transverse, emarginate in front, 
rounded behind, considerably bulged out on the sides, foveate at 
the broadest part, and shallowly variolous-punctate on the sur- 
face, with the punctures each furnished with a decumbent yellow 
seta. The male has in addition an obtuse protuberance near the 
anterior part of the thorax, and a rather deep excavation on each 
side, of a slightly metallic hue. Elytra finely striate, with the 
interstices flat and having in the middle of each a row of punc- 
tures bearing yellow set^e. The legs are of a piceous red. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. ' 181 

344. — Onthophagus perpilosus. n. sp. 

Length 2j lines. 

Black, sabnifcid, strongly punctate, and densely pilose. Head 
with two strong transverse ridges, with the margin of the clypeus 
recurved and the apex emarginate. Thorax with a slight cop- 
pery gloss on the anterior part, a faint fovea near the sides, and 
a faint transverse ridge in the centre near the apex. Elytra 
striate with the interstices broad, somewhat costiform and punc- 
tured in rows. Body beneath black, nitid, punctate, and moder- 
ately hairy, the hair white. Legs piceous. 

The two specimens of this insect in the collection present 
some diflFerences which may be sexual. In one, the teeth of the 
fore tibifB are more large and pointed, the transverse ridge on 
the thorax more distinct, and the emargination of the clypeus 
larger than in the other. 

345. — Onthophagus incornutus. n. sp. 

Length 2| lines. 
Black, subnitid, very finely punctate. Head, in the male 
rather rugosely punctured with the forehead depressed, with a 
slightly elevated curved transverse swelling behind, and with 
the apex of the clypeus almost truncate ; in the female with the 
forehead flat and slightly rugose, and with the clypeus slightly 
emarginate. Thorax in the female of a coppery hue. Elytra 
opaque and finely punctato-striate, with the interstices broad 
and flat, and exhibiting under a lens traces of red spots at the 
humeral angles and apex. Legs piceous, with the dentations of 
the fore tibiee very strong in the female. Antennae pale red. 

346. — Onthophagus Masteesii. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Black, nitid, densely punctate. Head, in the male large, 
rounded in front with the margin reflexed, and armed with two 
long rather slender parallel horns on the forehead and with a 
short broad truncate plate between them ; in the female with 
two transverse ridges and the apex of the clypeus almost trun- 



182 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

cate. Thorax, in the male convex and strongly punctured 
behind, very retuse and smooth in front, and with the elevated 
portion more advanced on the median line than at the sides, in 
the female without tuberosity of any kind, and without any 
trace of the median line. Elytra punctato-striate with the 
interstices broad, moderately flat and punctate. Body beneath 
somewhat hairy. Legs black. Antennse red. 

347. — Onthophagus capella, Kirby. Trans. Linn. 
Soc. XII., page 398. 

348. — Onthophagus desectus. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
Black, nitid, and densely punctate. Head with two trans- 
verse ridges in both sexes, the clypeus a little more pointed and 
reflexed in the male than in the female. Thorax, in the male 
elevated into a tubercle on the median line behind, and present- 
in o- fi'om that point to the anterior margin an oblique flat surface 
as if cut down, on each side of the central tubei-cle and a little 
in front there is a small protuberance also cut through in the 
same way, and on the oblique anterior surface the median line 
is finely carinated ; in the female there is a tubercle in the 
middle of the median line, a slight depression in front, and the 
median line itself is carinated finely in front and shghtly im- 
pressed behind. Elytra with seven fine smooth lightly punctate 
striae on each, with the interstices broad, flat, and smooth. 
Anterior tibise slight and flatly toothed in the male. 

This species has a wide range and is not by any means un- 
common in many parts of New South Wales. I cannot find 
however that it has ever been described. 

349. — Onthophagus quinquetuberculatus. n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 
Black, subnitid, finely and densely punctate. Head trans- 
versely punctate, with the clypeus rounded and reflexed at the apex 
in the female, and almost truncate and more reflexed in the male. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 183 

and with the frontal transverse ridge ahnost obsolete in the 
middle, and pointed at each end in the male, while in the female 
it is of uniform size throughout. Thorax in the male, with a 
prominent advanced tubercle in front and in the middle, and two 
small tubercles on each side placed along the line of the retuse 
anterior front of the thorax, which is perpendicular and consider- 
ably behind the advanced central tuberosity, which is slightly 
eraai'ginated by the median line ; in the female, with the advanced 
central prominence also subemarginate, but very broad, and with 
only one small tubercle between it and the sides. Elytra with eight 
fine stri^ on each, and with the interstices broad, flat, and very 
finely punctate. Body beneath clothed with long fulvous hair. 

, 350. — Onthophagds inermis. n. sp. 
Length 3 1 lines. 
Black, nitid. Head very finely and transversely punctate on 
the forehead, and densely and rugosely on the clypeus, which is 
broadly rounded and moderately reflexed along the margin. 
Thorax quite smooth and without any mark excepting the lateral 
fovea. Elytra punctato-striate, with the interstices almost quite 
flat and smooth. Tibite piceous. 

This species is not unlike 0. mutictis described by me from 
Port Denison, in the transactions of the Entomological Society of 
New South Wales, for the year 1864. It difiers from it in being 
smaller, more brilliant, smoother on the thorax, and more deeply 
striated on the elytra. The only difference I can perceive 
between the sexes, both in this species and in 0. muticus, is in 
the much more strongly developed teeth on the exterior of the 
anterior tibi^ in the female. 

351. — Aphodius gbminatus. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head coarsely punctate, rugose, toothed and 
emarginate in front. Thorax densely punctate, transverse, bi- 
sinuate at the sides, not broader behind than in front, and 
rounded at the base, with a broad depression near each side, and 
a deep broad transverse depression behind the middle, which 



184 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

extends to the base in the centre. Elytra finely striate in pairs, 
with the interstices flat and smooth, and with a few minute 
elongate tubercles on the alternate interstices. Legs piceous. 

In one specimen before me there are no traces of tubercles on 
the elytra. 

352. — Aphodids liyidus, Oliv. Ent., I. 3, page 86, 
t.26,f. 222, ^"c. ^"c. 

cincticulus Hope, Trans. Ent. Soc. Loncl. IV., 
1847, page 284, 8. Australia, 
spilopterus Germ. Linn. Ent. III., 1848, page 
189, jS. Australia. 

353. — Amm(ecius obscurus. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 

Brownish black, opaque, densely punctate, and somewhat 
squamose. Head slightly but broadly emarginate in front. 
Thorax transverse, almost truncate at the apex, nearly parallel 
and bisinuated at the sides, and slightly rounded at the base, with 
the anterior angles large and slightly reflexed, and the posterior 
obtusely pointed backwards. Elytra striate, with the striae large 
and filled with shallow punctures, and with the interstices narrow 
and costiform. 

In one specimen of this insect before me, the thorax has on 
each side two abbreviated transverse depressions. 

354.— Ammcecius ceenatipennis, n. sp. 
Length 1^ lines. 
Black, densely punctate, subopaque. Head broadly rounded 
and emarginate in front. Thorax transverse, and rounded at the 
base, with the sides subparallel, the anterior angles somewhat 
dilated, the posterior not prominent, and the median line slightly 
marked at the base. Elytra punctato-striate, the punctures large 
and giving a crenelated appearance to the costiform interstices. 

356. — Amm(ecius semicoenutus. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head marked with very fine longitudinal 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. I85 

punctures, with the clypeus deeply emarginate and of a reddish 
colour, and with the back of the head on each side furnished with 
a very minute tubercle or tuberosity, which is extended in a 
raised line to the lateral border. Thorax transverse, and not 
densely punctate, with a large shallow depression near the sides, 
with all the angles rounded, and with the median line distinct at 
the base. Elytra strongly punctato-striate, with the interstices 
elevated and smooth. Legs piceous. 

356. — Amm(ecius nitidicollis. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 

Piceous black, nitid. Head almost smooth, reddish in front 
and emarginate. Thorax transverse, almost smooth in front and 
thinly punctate behind, with the anterior angles rounded, the 
posterior square, and the base very slightly rounded. Elytra 
strongly punctato-striate, with the interstices bi'oad, elevated and 
smooth. 

357. BOLBOCBRAS GrATNDAHENSB. n. Sp. 

Length 5| lines. 

Reddish chesnut, nitid. Head with a small short transverse 
ridge in the centre of the occiput elevated at each end into a 
minute tubercle, and with the forehead depressed, punctate, and 
enclosed on the sides and in front by a narrow ridge, which is 
elevated in the middle in front into a minute horn, from which 
horn two elevated lines extend in a diagonal direction to an an- 
terior short transverse ridge. Thorax sparsely punctate, with a 
large round excavation in the middle of the front. Elytra 
punctato-striate, the punctures minute. Body beneath densely 
fulvous pilose. 

There are only two specimens in the collection, both evidently 
females. 

358.— Trox suBCARiNATus, McLeay, W. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. S. Wales, I., page 128. 



186 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

359. — Trox sqdamosus. n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 
Black, opaque, densely, squamose. Head punctate, bitubercu- 
late and clothed beneath with red haii\ Thorax transverse, 
punctate, and interruptedly six-costate, — the costa on each side 
of the median line diverging in the middle and not reaching the 
base, the next entire, close to the last and merging in it in the 
middle, and the third near the posterior angles, thick, interrupted, 
and not extending to the apex — with the lateral margin trituber- 
culate, one tubercle at the posterior angles, the other two forming 
sinuations on the sides behind the anterior angles. Scutellum 
lanciform. Elytra much broader than the thorax, acute at the 
humeral angle, gradually widening behind, broadly rounded and 
minutely emarginate at the apex, and roughly punctured in 
irregular rows, with the alternate interstices furnished with large 
elongated tubercles, and with the first of these alternate inter- 
stices costate at the base. Fore tibise unarmed. 

360. — Trox salebrosus. n. sp. 

Length 3f lines. 
Black, densely punctate and lightly squamose. Head bitu- 
berculate and clothed beneath with yellowish hair. Thorax 
sculptured much in the same manner as in the preceding species 
(T. squamosus) , the central costge however being less divergent 
in the middle, those next to them being more distant and quite 
interrupted in the middle, and the two tubercular sinuations of 
the anterior part of the lateral margin being much more slight. 
Elytra very roughly and coarsely punctured in rows, with small 
elongated tubercles on the interstices, the tubercles on the alter- 
nate interstices being the largest. Fore tibiae with a small tooth 
in the middle of the external margin and a large truncate lami- 
nated one of a reddish colour at the apex. 

361. — Trox semicostatus. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Black, punctate, slightly squamose. Head bituberculate with 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 187 

reddish yellow hair beneath. Thorax more sinuate on the sides 
than in the last species, and with the costae more elevated — the 
median costae almost reaching the base. Scutellum broad and 
lanciform. Elytra punctured in rows with the alternate inter- 
stices strongly costate at the base and towards the apex inter- 
rupted and formed of tubercles, and with the others marked with 
elongate tubercles of smaller size ; there is also near the humeral 
angle a rugose tuberosity and a short elevated costiform line. 
Fore tibijB obtusely toothed in the middle and roundly and not 
prominently at the apex. 

362.— LiPAROCHRUS scuLPTiLis, Westw. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. Land. 2nd Ser. II., page 70. 



Sub-family Melolonthid.^. 

363. — Phtllotocus navicularis, Blanch. Cat. Coll. 
Ent, 1850, page 97. 

364. — Phyllotocus sericeus. n. sp. 
Length 3^ lines. 

Head black, finely punctate. Thorax red very sparingly 
punctured and fringed with erect black hairs. Elytra red with 
a narrow black lateral margin, silky, separately rounded and 
dehiscent at the apex, strongly striate with the interstices 
rounded, and furnished along the lateral border, the suture, and 
the interstices between the strias with erect black somewhat 
distant hairs. Body beneath and legs black and punctate, with 
the exception of the prothorax and anterior coxae which are red. 

Of all the species of Phyllotocus hitherto described, this one 
most resembles P. Australis Boisd. 

365. — Phyllotocus variicollis. n. sp. 
Length 3| lines. 

Head black and punctate. Thorax punctate, thinly fringed 
with black hairs, entirely black in the male and red with a cen- 



188 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

tral black vifcta in the female. Elytra dark red with the suture 
and lateral margin behind black, subnitid, rather rugosely punc- 
tate, and deeply striate with the interstices much rounded. 
Under surface and legs black, excepting the lower surface of the 
fore thighs and tibiee and the ungues of the tarsi which are red. 

The male of this species resembles my P. tnarginipennis, and 
the female my P. inarginatus, it differs from both in having the 
head and thorax more coarsely punctured, and in the elytra 
being punctate and entirely destitute of any silky gloss or velvety 
textui'e. 

366. — DiPHQCEPHALA AUROLiMEATA, Blanch. Gat. Gull. 
Ent. 1850,pa^e99. 

367. — M^CHIDIUS VARIOLOSUS. n. sp. 
Length 4| lines. 
Piceous brown, subnitid, densely punctate, and clothed with 
erect soft reddish brown hairs. Head slightly emarginate and 
reflesed in front. Thorax with the anteinor angles slightly ad- 
vanced and rounded, and the posterior acute. Elytra closely 
covered with series of elongate oval variolous punctures each 
with an erect soft hair at its anterior margin, and with the alter- 
nate interstices a very little broader than the others. Legs 
piceous red. 

368.— Ma^CHIDIUS OBSCURUS. n. sp. 
Length 6| lines. 
Black, opaque, densely variolous, punctate and setose. Head 
much reflexed and slightly emarginate in front. Thorax roughly 
granulose, and shallowly bifoveate near the sides, with the 
median line lightly marked and the sides near the posterior angles 
obliquely narrowed, and very slightly emarginate. Elytra closely 
covered with regular rows of elongate variolous punctures, each 
with a very short decumbent yellow seta at its anterior margin. 
Body beneath piceous black, subnitid and densely punctate. 

369. — MjEChidius rugosicollis. n. sp. 
Length 4| lines. 
Brownish black, opaque, densely variolous, punctate and 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 189 

setose. Head slightly bisinnate at the sides, and emarginate in 
the middle. Thorax rough, bifoveate near the sides and pro- 
foundly emarginate before the posterior angles. Elytra with 
the punctures less elongate and less sharply defined than in 
M. ohscurus, and with elevations at the base, which extend in the 
form of obsolete costee almost to the apex. Pygidium deeply 
emarginate. Body beneath subnitid. 

370. — Mj;chidius parvdlus. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Piceous brown, subnitid, densely variolous-punctate and setose. 
Head bisinuate and reflesed at the sides, and deeply emarginate 
in the middle. Thorax narrowed and rounded towards the 
posterior angles which are sharp. Elytra closely covered with 
regular rows of roundish variolous punctures, each with a decum- 
bent yellow seta the length of itself, and a stria between every 
two rows of punctures. 

371. LlPARETRTJS FULVOHIRTUS. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Head and thorax black, densely punctate, and closely covered 
with erect soft pale red hairs ; the latter with the punctures 
coarser than those of the head, and with the median line visible. 
Elytra red, except on the basal margin, separately rounded and 
somewhat dehiscent at the apex, thinly clothed with erect hairs, 
and coarsely and irregularly punctate, with the three geminate 
stri88 rather indistinct. Pygidium and abdominal segments black, 
punctate and thinly clothed with long light coloured hairs. The 
under side of the thorax densely clothed with hairs of the same 
pallid hue. Legs red. 

372. — LiPARETEUS SERICEUS. n. Sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Head and thorax black, pruinose, very finely punctate. Elytra 
dark red with the base and lateral margin black, broadly rounded 
or almost obliquely truncate at the apex, and irregularly punctate. 



190 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

with four rather well defined geminate punctate striag on each 
elytron. Pygidium black, and finely punctate. Body beneath 
black, and moderately cinereo-pilose. Legs piceous black. 

373. — LiPARETRUS PILOSUS. n. Sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Head black, punctate, densely pilose with the clypeus of the 
male broad, reflexed, and acutely pointed outwards at the angles. 
Thorax also black, densely punctate, and thickly covered with 
long erect soft light brown hairs, with the median line marked 
at the base. Elytra very dark red with the suture, base, and 
lateral margins black, coarsely and irregularly punctate, clothed 
with erect hairs not quite so thick or so long as on the thorax, 
and separately rounded at the apex. Pygidium and under sur- 
face of body black, punctate and densely clothed with a long 
ashen pubescence. Tarsi reddish. 

374. — LiPARETEDS ATRiCEPS, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. S. Wales, I, page 128. 

375. — LiPAEETRUS- PALLIDUS. n. Sp. 

Length 2| lines. 
Of a pale red, nitid, punctate, and without pubescence on the 
upper surface. Head black, with the clypeus broad, short, 
rounded at the angles, nearly ti-uncate, and of a reddish colour. 
Thorax with the median line lightly marked. Elytra irregularly 
punctate each with three tolerably distinct geminate stria?, 
and broadly rounded at the apex. Pygidium finely punctate and 
clothed with short hair. Under side of body rather thinly clothed 
with reddish hairs. 

376. — LiPARETRUS FLAVOPILOSDS. n. Sp. 

Length 3 J lines. 
Head and thorax black, finely punctate, and covered with 
long yellowish somewhat recumbent hair ; the former with the 
clypeus acute and reflexed at the angles, and very slightly emar- 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 191 

giuate in the middle ; the latter with the median line distinct near 
the base. Elytra testaceous red with the basal margin black, 
subnitid, thinly clothed with hair, and irregulai'ly punctate, with 
the geminate striae rather indistinct. Pygidium and under sur- 
face of body black and flavo-pilose. 

377. LiPARETRDS RUPIVENTRIS. n. Sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Head and thorax black, punctate, and covered with long 
reddish yellow somewhat recumbent hair ; the former with the 
clypeus acute and prominent at the angles, and reflexed along 
the entire margin ; the latter with the median line distinct 
almost throughout. Elytra of a rather dark red, subnitid, 
sparingly pilose and coarsely and irregularly punctate with the 
geminate striae distinct. Pygidium, under surface of body, and 
legs, red and cinereo-pilose. 

378. — LiPARETRUS TRIDENTATUS. n. Sp. 

Length 2-| lines. 

Head black, punctate, and clothed with long yellow hair, 
with the clypeus reflexed, and armed in front with three teeth. 
Thorax black, opaque, subsericeous, finely punctate and moder- 
ately flavo-pilose. Elytra of an opaque subsericeous red, with 
the punctures rather shallow and the geminate strife tolerably 
distinct. Pygidium and under side of body black and moderately 
pilose. Legs piceous. 

The form of the clypeus in this species is remarkable, but in 
other respects I see nothing which should remove it from that 
section of Liparetnis which has the antennse eight-jointed. 

379. LiPARETRUS GLABER. n. sp. 

Length 2| lines. 

Head and thorax black, subnitid, punctate, and free from 

hair, the former with the clypeus reflexed and somewhat rounded in 

front. Elytra reddish yellow, nitid, free from hair and irregularly 

punctate with the geminate striae traceable. Abdomen reddish 

M 



192 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

yellow, finely punctate and very sparingly pilose. Pygidium 
large. Legs piceous brown, with the external angle of the fore 
tibiae prolonged to half the length of the tarsi, and without 
external teeth. 



380. — LiPARETRUS PARVULUS. n. Sp. 

Length 1| lines. 

This insect only diflPers from the last in being smaller, in 
having the pygidium and under side of body black, and in 
having a narrow lateral black margin on the elytra. Both 
species have the same peculiarly formed fore tibiae, more like 
those of the genus Diphucephala than of Liparetrus. 

381. — SCITALA SDTURALIS. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 

Head and thorax black, finely punctate, the latter pruinose in 
the centre, and reddish on the sides. Elytra pale testaceous 
with the suture black, subnitid, slightly silky and punctate, with 
a sutural and lateral stria, and four geminate stride on each elytron. 
Under side of body and legs piceous red, nitid and finely 
punctate. 

This species is not unlike the S. pruinosa of Dalman. The 
puncturation throughout however is much finer, and on the 
thorax less dense, and the elytra though slightly silky are without 
the opaque velvety texture of pruinosa. 

382. — SciTALA armaticeps. n. sp. 
Length 5| lines. 

Head and thorax piceous brown, finely and densely punctate ; 
the former with a strong transverse ridge on the clypeus ; the 
latter short, and reddish at the sides. Elytra testaceous with 
the suture brown, nitid, and punctate with a sutural and lateral 
stria and four geminate strife on each elytron. Pygidium, under 
side of body and legs, pale red, nitid and finely punctate. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 193 

HoMOLOTROPOS. n. gen. 

Antennae of nine joints : 1st. long, clavate ; 2ncl. globular ; 
3rd. slight and cylindrical ; 4th. short ; the remaining five joints 
forming a club with the laminae long. Labrum transverse, deeply 
emarginate. Mentum rough, broad at the apex and slightly 
emarginate. Palpi with the terminal joints a little longer than 
the others. Suture of clypeus indistinct. Thorax lobed behind. 
Elytra not covering the pygidiura. Fore tibiae strongly tridentate. 
Body oblong flat. 

The position of this genus is evidently near the genus 
Xylonychus MacLeay. That genus seems to me to be more 
naturally placed among the Meter onyci doe, of Lacordaire, than as 
he has placed it, among the true MelolonthidcB. 

383. — HOMOLOTROPUS LURIDIPENNIS. n. Sp. 

Length 8 lines. 
Head dark brown, with the clypeus large, triangularly ex- 
tended behind, and very densely punctate, and with the forehead 
subnitid and very sparingly punctate. Thorax of a testaceous 
red clouded with black, thinly punctate in patches, transverse, 
moderately emarginate in front, rounded on the sides, and roundly 
lobed at the base, with a carination on the basal half of the median 
line. Scutellum brown, large, densely punctate, rounded at the 
sides.and pointed at the apex. Elytra of a pale brownish yellow, 
subnitid, broader than the thorax, almost truncate at the apex, 
sparingly pilose and punctate, with a sutural strise and four 
geminate strige on each elytron, and irregular punctures and small 
patches of a dark brown colour as in the elytra of Anoj^lognathus 
inustus of Kirby. Body piceous brown, with the pygidium and 
sides of the abdominal segments densely clothed with a cinerous 
pubescence. The under side of the thorax and thighs are pilose. 

384. — Haplontcha pingdis. n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 
Reddish chesnut, nitid, very finely punctate, of oval form and 
very thick. Head almost brown in front and rugosely punctate. 



194 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

Thorax without trace of median Hne, and with a shallow fovea 
near the sides at the broadest part. Elytra with the sutural and 
four geminate striae distinct. Pygidium large, completely un- 
covered, smooth, nitid, and mottled black and red. Abdomen 
piceous brown, smooth, nitid. Pro-meso and metathorax flavo- 
pilose. 

This species differs from H. obesus in being much more finely 
punctate, and in having the pygidium much larger, smoother 
and completely exposed. 

385. — Heteronyx holosbriceus. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
Pale chesnut, subopaque, veiy finely and densely punctate, 
and clothed very thickly with a silky pale yellow pubescence. 
Head a little darker and more coarsely punctate than the rest of 
the upper surface, with the clypeus entire, and the labrum not 
appearing in front of it. Thorax ciliated at the sides with soft 
I'eddish hairs, and almost truncate at the base, with an indistinct 
blackish spot accompanied by a few coarse punctures near each 
side. Elytra striate, — the sutural stria distinct, the rest almost 
obsolete — and ciliated at the sides with soft reddish hairs. Pygi- 
dium exposed, roughly punctate, and sparingly pilose, with a 
fovea on each side and an indistinct depressed line in the middle. 
Under surface less densely pubescent than the upper. Legs red. 

386. — Heteronyx pdbescens. n. sp. 
Length 5 1 lines. 
Brownish red, subnitid, punctate and pubescent. Clypeus 
emarginate with the apex of the labrum visible from above. 
Thorax and elytra coarsely and almost rugosely punctate with 
the pubescence of a yellow colour and longer than in H. liolose- 
riceus. Body beneath and pygidium very sparingly pubescent. 

387. — Heteronyx castaneus. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Pale chesnut, subnitid, finely punctate and pubescent. Cly- 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESa, F.L.S. 195 

peus emarginate with the narrow and rounded apex of the labrum 
visible in front of it. Thorax and elytra much more finely punc- 
tate than the last species, the latter with a few almost obsolete 
traces of stride. Pygidium and body beneath piceous and moder- 
ately pilose. 

388. — Heteronyx substriatds. n. sp. 
Length 3 1 lines. 

Brown, subnitid, punctate and pubescent. Clypeus slightly 
emarginate, with the apex of the labrum broad and truncate, and 
visible in front of it. Thorax not densely punctate, and with the 
median line distinctly impressed. Elytra densely punctate and 
moderately pubescent, with the striee on the elytra more distinct 
than in any of the pi'eceding species. Body beneath rugosely 
punctate. 

389. — Heteronyx infdscatds. n. sp. 
Length 3| lines. 

Brown, nitid, punctate — the punctures large and thinly placed 
— and pilose. Clypeus densely and rugosely punctate, and 
truucate in the middle, with the apex of the labrum broad, very 
slightly rounded and visible in front of it. The sutui'al stria on 
the elytra is pretty distinct. The abdominal segments are 
coarsely punctate and finely acuducted. The legs are red. 

390. — Heteronyx pallidulcs. n. sp. 
Length 3 1 lines. 

Elongate, pale red, subnitid, punctate, without pubescence. 
Clypeus rugosely punctate, and truncate in front, with the apex 
of the labrum broad, nearly truncate, and visible in front of it. 
Thorax somewhat convex, and thinly and finely punctate, with a 
small brown tuberosity near each side, and the median line 
traceable only in the centre. Elytra covered with irregular 
shallow punctures, and with the sutural and one or two other 
striae tolerably defined. Body beneath very sparingly pilose. 



196 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

891. — Heteronyx concolor. b. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Flat, brownish red, subnitid, punctate and finely pubescent. 
Clypeus slightly emarginate with the apex of the labrum broad 
and appearing in front. Thorax finely, elytra roughly punctate. 
Body beneath very sparingly pilose. 

392. — Heteronyx ruficollis. n. sp. 

Length 2^ lines. 
Elongate, punctate, pubescent, subopaque, and black, with 
the head thorax and legs red. Clypeus slightly emarginate with 
the apex of the labrum broad and visible in front. Thorax 
rounded at the base and posterior angles. Elytra subtruncate 
and obsoletely striated. 

393. — Hetekonvx rugosipennis. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
Reddish chesnut, nitid, thinly punctate, and clothed with 
erect fulvous pile. Clypeus rounded, reflexed and entire. Tho- 
rax almost truncate at the base, and with a brown nodule near 
each side. Scutellum densely punctate except at the extremity. 
Elytra coarsely punctate and transversely rugose. Pygidium 
and under side of body thinly punctate — the punctures large and 
each furnished with a long erect hair. 

I have some doubts about this being a Heteronyx at all. The 
labrum is very short, almost truncate, and scarcely turned up at 
the apex. 

Odontotonyx. n. gen. 

Antennae of nine joints, 1st long, clavate ; 2nd globular ; 3rd, 
4th, 5th, and 6th very small ; the other three forming a club with 
the lamince short. Labrum short, narrow, horizontal, lightly 
emarginate, and completely covered by the clypeus. Mentum 
apparently rounded at the apex. Palpi with the terminal joint 
longest. Elytra not entirely covering the pygidium. Fore tibiae 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 197 

tridentate. Ungues of tarsi strongly toothed beneath. Body ob- 
long, flat. 

394. — Odontotonyx brcnneipennis. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 

Head red and densely punctate, with the clypeus round and 
reflexed in front. Thorax of a paler red, thinly and finely 
punctate, and rounded a little at the base, with the posterior 
angles obtuse, and a small brown fovea near each side. Scutellum 
red, oblong and rounded at the apex. Elytra brown, nitid, 
profoundly striated, and roughly punctate. Pygidium pale red, 
opaque, very finely punctate and moderately pilose. Under side 
of body and legs of a pale testaceous colour, nitid, thinly punctate 
and moderately pilose, and on the legs setose. Teeth of fore 
tibiaB strong and of a brown colour. 

In the only specimen of this insect in the coUectioa there 
seems to be a kind of membranaceous appendage beneath to the 
last joint of the tarsi. 

Sub-family. Rutelid^. 

395. — Anoplognathus lineatus, MacL., W. Trans. 
Ent. Soc. N. S. Wales, 1864<, page 18. 

396. — Repsimus purpdkeipes. n. sp. 
Length 10 lines. 
This may be only a variety of B. ceneus. It is, however, a 
considerably larger insect, has the pygidium more exposed, the 
scutellum more distinctly punctate, the elytra of a purplish black, 
and the legs of a splendid reddish purple. 

Sub-family. Dtnastidj:. 

397. ISODON PUNCTICOLLIS. n. Sp. 

Length 7 1 lines. 
Reddish brown, nitid. Head black, densely punctate, and 
rugose, with a transverse i-idge at the suture of the clypeus, with 



198 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

the clypeus subtriangular, emarginate at the sides with a raised 
margin and two small tubercles in front, and with the man- 
dibles externally tridentate. . Thorax convex, subtransverse, 
rounded on the sides and posterior angles, almost truncate at the 
base, and thinly punctate except near the anterior margin, with a 
small tubercle, and a round excavation behind it on the anterior 
margin in the male, and an almost obsolete impression in the 
same place in the female. Scutellum large, smooth and rounded 
behind. Elytra with the suture brown, with a deep stria on each 
side of it, and with the rest of their surface covered with irregular 
rows of coarse punctures, the punctures becoming smaller and 
denser towards the sides and apex. Legs and under side of body 
piceous, nitid and fulvo-pilose. 

398.— ISODON L^VICOLLIS. n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 

Head and clypeus brown, transversely rugose, the latter with 
raised margins and two small tubercles in front as in the last 
species, and with the mandibles externally ti-identate, the posterior 
tooth much larger than the others. Thorax convex, piceous red, 
nitid and smooth. Scutellum also piceous red, large, rounded 
and smooth. Elytra black and nitid, with the suture piceous red, 
with a stria on each side of the suture, and with the rest of their 
surface covered with rows of large punctures much as in the last 
species but more regularly disposed. Pygidium smooth. Legs 
and under side of body piceous red, and moderately pilose. 

The only specimen I have seen is a female. 

399. — Heterontchus picipbs. n. sp. 
Length 8| lines. 
Black, nitid. Head rugose with two small tubercles on the 
transverse ridge, with the clypeus subtriangular and emai'ginate 
in front, and with the mandibles toothed as in the last species. 
Thorax convex, smooth, and very minutely punctate, with a very 
slight depression in front in both sexes. Scutellum smooth, 
rounded at the apex. Elytra with a deep stria on each side of 
the suture, a smooth space beyond these strias, punctured strise 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 199 

over the rest of the surface, and a dense mass of small punctures 
at the apex. Pygidium punctate, smooth in the middle. Legs 
and under side of body piceous and pilose. 

400. — Heterontchus irregularis, n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 

Black, subnitid. Head very rugose, with two indistinct 
tubercles on the transverse ridge, with the clypeus subtriangular 
and minutely trituberculate in front, and with the mandibles 
toothed as in the last two species. Thorax not punctate, with a 
tooth on the anterior margin and a round excavation behind it 
in the male, — the female I have not seen. Scutellum as in the 
last species. Elytra with a deep stria on each side of the suture, 
the space beyond, which in the last species was smooth, marked 
with large irregularly placed punctures, and the rest of the 
surface covered with u-regular rows of large punctures. Pygi- 
dium smooth. Legs and under side of body piceous red and 
sparingly pilose. 

401. — Dasygnathus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 10 lines. 

Black, nitid. Head densely punctate, and furnished in the 
male with a blunt slightly recurved short horn. Thorax very 
finely and thinly punctate, without any impression in the female, 
but in the male retuse and deeply excavated in front, with two 
rather acute tubercles at the summit of the centre, an obtuse 
protuberance at the lateral boundary of the retuse portion, and 
outside of these protuberances an elongate punctate fovea. Scu- 
tellum broadly rounded, punctate at the base. Elytra piceous 
brown, nitid, and covered with large shallow strias, filled with 
large shallow punctures, the striae becoming less marked and the 
punctures smaller and more numerous towards the sides and 
apex. Pygidium very minutely punctate. Under surface of 
body piceous. Sides of head, thorax, elytra above and entire 
under side of body and legs ciliated with red hair. 



200 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

402. — Oryctes obscurus. n. sp. 
Length 10 lines. 

Of a dull chocolate colour, very opaque. Head densely punc- 
tate with a somewhat acute slightly recurved horn in the centre 
of the forehead, and with the clypeus subsinuate at the sides and 
narrow, truncate and bituberculate in front. Thorax largely 
retuse in front, marked on the retuse portion and along the 
anterior parts generally with large shallow transverse variolous 
looking impressions, and on the basal portion with small distant 
punctures. Scutellum rugosely punctate, smooth on the margins 
and semicarinate in the middle. Elytra little convex, and ap- 
parently smooth but seen under a lens to be marked with light 
striae, each stria composed of very shallow variolous impressions. 
Pygidium coarsely punctate. Under side of body fulvo-pilose. 

The only specimen of this insect is a male. 

403. — Semanopterds depressiusculus. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines. 

Black, subnitid. Head rugosely punctate with a small conical 
tubercle in the centre of the forehead, and the apex of the clypeus 
slightly rounded in front, and reflexed in the middle into a 
minute tooth. Thorax transverse, deeply emarginate in front, 
rounded on the sides, almost truncate at the base, with the 
anterior angles advanced and acute, the posterior square, and the 
median line marked with two punctate fovese, the anterior one 
round, the posterior elongate. Scutellum punctate at the base, 
smooth at the apex. Elytra with the suture smooth and elevated, 
and with four costse on each side, the intervals between the first 
three having three irregular rows of coarse punctures, while 
towards the sides the puncturation becomes closer and much less 
regular. Pygidium finely punctate. Under surface nitid, with the 
meso-and meta-thorax densely punctate, and fulvo-pilose. Fore 
tibiae strongly tridentated externally and acutely so in the males, 
and with the internal apical spine large in both sexes and acute 
in the male. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., r.L.S. 201 

404. — Semanopterus convexiusculus. n. sp. 

Length 7|- lines. 
Black, subnitid, subconvex. Head transversely rugose, with 
a small tubercle in the centre of the forehead, and with the 
clypeus truncate. Thorax finely punctate with the impressions 
on the median line more shallow, more elongate and less punctate 
than in the last species. Scutellum subtriangular and smooth 
with two or three punctiform impressions in the centre. Elytra 
strongly striato-punctate, with the interstices rather elevated, and 
the punctures towards the apex small and dense. Under surface 
and legs as in the last species. 

405. — Cryptodus subcostatus. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines. 
Brownish black, subnitid, and of a broad flattish form. Head 
densely punctate, with two small tubercles on the forehead, and 
with the clypeus rounded and reflexed. Thorax subconvex, finely 
but not densely punctate, with the median line broadly but not 
deeply impressed. Elytra flat, of the width of the thorax, and 
slightly dehiscent, with the suture and three tolerably distinct 
lines on each elytron elevated and thinly punctate, with the 
intervals occupied by three irregular rows of oval variolous impres- 
sions, and with a strong tuberosity near the apex on each elytron. 
Under side of body and legs piceous, thinly punctate, each puncture 
bearing a very short yellow decumbent seta. Antennae with the 
first joint rough, punctate, triangular and very large, completely 
covering the rest of the antennas excepting the club. Mentum 
with the base deeply and rather narrowly emarginate. 

406. — CriYPTODns obscurds. n. sp. 
Length 8| lines. 
Difiers only from the last in being opaque, in having the 
clypeus less reflexed, the thorax more punctate and less convex, 
the elytra shorter, and the form generally much narrower and 
rather more convex. 



202 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

407. — Cryptodus incornutus. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 

Piceous brown, subnitid, subconvex, narrow. Head densely 
punctate, with the clypeus broad, slightly reflexed and almost 
truncate. Thorax coarsely and densely punctate, with the 
median line broadly marked in the middle. Elytra dehiscent, 
with the subapical tuberosities strong, the costse scarcely ele- 
vated, and the variolous impressions in the intervals of an 
elongate oval shape. Under side of abdomen densely variolose- 
punctate. First joinf of antennae a little smaller than in the last 
two species. Base of meutum deeply emarginate. Apex of 
prosternum subtruncate and ciliated. 

These three species differ from all those previously described 
in the great size of the first joint of the antennae. I may here 
state that G. paradoxus MacLeay, of which I possess the original 
specimen is a very different insect from G. variolosus White. 

Sub-family Cetoniid^. 

408. — ScHizORHiNA iMPAR, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. S. Wales, I., 1863, page 14. 

409. SCHIZORHINA OCELLATA, MacL., W. TrOMS. 

Ent Soc. N. S. Wales, I., 1863, page 16. 

410. SCHIZORHINA PUNCTATA, Don. Epit. Ins. t. I 

Gory et Percheron. Mon. page 164, t. 28. /. 
4, — Burm. Handb. III., jjap^e 541. 

411. — SCHIZORHINA Australasia, Don. Epit. Ins. t. 
I. /. I. — Gory et Percher. Mon. page 161. 
t. 28. /. I. Burm. Handh. III., page 650. 
Orpheus Perron i. litt. 

Pauzeri Swartz. Scbonh. Syn. Ins. I., 3, 
app., page 50. 

412. — SCHIZORHINA MaSTERSII. n. sp. 

Length 8| lines. 
Black, nitid. Head and thorax densely punctate, the former 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ, F.L.S. 203 

with a transverse elevation highest in the middle on the forehead, 
and with the clypeus lightly emarginate. Scutellum thinlj punc- 
tate. Elytra piceous towards the sides, and roughly and irregu- 
lai-ly striato-punctate, with the second interstice from the suture, 
and the humeral callosity enlarged. Abdomen beneath very 
finely and thinly punctate with the apex of the penultimate segment 
ciliated with reddish hair. Apex of the mesosternum keel shaped, 
not produced. Under side of thorax and thighs moderately 
hairy. Tibise and tarsi red. 

413. SCHIZORHINA HIRTICEPS. n. sp. 

Length 7 lines. 
Head and thorax black, densely punctate and pilose, the 
former with a ridge on the forehead, the base of the clypeus 
yellow, and the apex slightly emarginate, the latter with the apex, 
sides excepting a small spot, and two elongate spots near the 
base, yellow. Scutellum thinly punctate, and brown with the 
centre yellow. Elytra glabrous with the suture elevated and of 
a dark brown colour, with a broad elevated space on each side of 
the suture marked with one row of punctures and of a yellow 
colour with a brown spot behind the middle, and with the rest of 
their surface rugosely punctate, and of a luteous colour. Pygi- 
diura yellow, with the margins and a broad median vitta, brown. 
Abdomen beneath very finely and thinly punctate, nitid, and of a 
yellow colour with a black spot on the side and in the centre of 
each segment. Pro-meso-and meta-thorax black spotted with 
yellow, densely punctate and clothed thickly with long greyish 
hair. Apex of mesosternum, rounded and yellow. Legs red. 

414. — SCHIZORHINA NIGRANS. n. Sp. 

Length 7 lines. 
In shape, size, and sculpture, this species is identical with the 
last, but it is entirely of a nitid black, with the head, thorax, and 
under side of body, thickly clothed with gi'eyish hair. 

415.- — -SCHIZORHINA PULCHRA. n. Sp. 

Length 7 lines. 
Olive brown with a tinge of red, opaque, velvety. Head 



204 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

glabrous, subnifcid, and punctate with the clypeus strongly emar- 
ginate. Thorax thinly punctate the punctures of a semicircular 
form, with the sides broadly margined with yellow. Scutellum 
long, obtuse at the apex. Elytra thinly punctate as on the thorax, 
with some fine striee near the suture, numerous transverse striae 
near the apex, and an interrupted yellow fascia behind the middle. 
Pygidium black with two large yellow spots. Under surface of 
body and legs piceous, punctate, each puncture furnished with a 
white setiform scale, and marked with numerous whitish patches. 
Thighs and tibige ciliated beneath with whitish hair. Apex of 
mesosternum broad and rounded. 

416. — SCHIZORHINA VIRIDICUPREA. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
Of a brilliant coppery green, with the upper surface of the 
thighs, the tibias, the tarsi, the antennae, and the parts of the mouth, 
of a piceous red. Head long, finely punctate, with the clypeus 
slightly emarginate, and of a bluish colour at the apex. Thorax 
smooth and rather elevated along the median line, depressed on 
each side of it, and marked with a number of short transverse 
striolae. Scutellum with a few punctures near the sides. Elytra 
furnished with numerous erect hairs, punctured in irregular rows 
near the suture, rugosely striolate towards the sides, and im- 
pressed with a large oblong fovea behind the middle. Under 
side of thorax and thighs pilose. Apex of mesosternum flat, 
dilated and rounded. 

The sculpture of this insect is the same as in Getonia fulgens 
described by me in Vol. I., page 18, of our Transactions, but it 
differs from it in being of a broader form, and very different colour. 

417.^ — Gltctphana brunnipes, Kirby. Trans. Linn. 
8oc. XII., 2J(ige 465, — Schaum. Ann. Franc. 
1849, page 263. 

conspersa Gory et Perch. Mon., page 287, t. 
56, V. 1. — Burm. Handh. Ti\., page 353. 
oiscura Don. Epit. Ins ? 
viridiobscura, Dej. Cat. 2nd ed., page 173. 
var fasciata. Fab. perversa, Schaum. stolata. 
Fab. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 205 

418. — Valgus nigrinus. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Entirely black, and moderately covered with white scales. 
Head punctate with the clypeus broadly rounded at the apex. 
Thorax longer than the width, and covered with a kind of tesselated 
marking. Scutellum thickly covered with white scales. Elytra 
punctate, striate, and marked much in the same way as the 
thorax. 

419. — Valgus castaneipennis. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Head and thorax black, densely covered with whitish scales, 
the former with the clypeus truncate in front. Elytra chesnut 
and covered with striaB of yellowish scales. Pygidium under 
side of body, and legs very densely clothed with whitish scales. 

The remainder of the Coleoptera in the Gayndah collection 
will form the subject of another paper. 



On Australian Entozoa, ivifh descriptions of new species, by 

Gerard Krefft, f.l.s. 

[Read July 3rd, 1871.] 

The natural history of the intestinal worms has been much 
neglected in Australia, and we are not yet able to tell how many 
of the common European species have accompanied man and 
his domestic animals to this country. It has been ascertained 
on the other hand that some Entozoa, tape-worms for instance, 
of purely Australian origin infest our sheep, and it is a well 
known fact that the common sheep fluke (Fasciola or Distoma 
hepatica) has long occupied the biliary ducts of the kangaroos. 
Our rats are troubled with cysts which contain unmistakeable 
young tape- worms, {Gysiicercus fasciolaris), and nearly every 
specimen which I examined carried several of them, from 
a few lines to two inches in length. It would be interesting 
to know in which animal this cestoid attains maturity. 

Our water fowl are great cestoid bearers, and as these birds 
are easily obtained, I have first paid attention to these and now 
lay the result of my investigations before the Entomological 
Society of New South Wales. 

New genera were not discovered ; some of our species I 
found to be closely allied to European ones, (such as the 
Hammei'-headed tape-worm (Tcenia malleus) ; the young of other 
species were traced, and it was observed that they lived in 
prodiguous numbers in the hosts which carried the perfectly 
mature " colony." My observations were made at first without 
the proper means, I had no microscope, and was without a 
standard work on the subject, both deficiencies were, however, 
kindly supplied by gentlemen interested in these researches, so 
that the next shooting season will find me better prepared 
to make correct drawings of the ova, and take the necessary 
measurements. 

The ova have assisted me much in arriving at a final 
conclusion as to the character of the variable collection obtained. 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S 207 

I had jotted down and sketched, what I considered at least 
thirty species, and these in a great measure owing to the ova- 
test, were reduced to fifteen or sixteen. My practical acquaint- 
ance with Entozoa is of a recent date, but I find the subject of 
such interest that every moment which could be spared from 
other duties has been devoted to it. There is no necessity to 
point out the importance of the study of this group of animals 
to the well being of millions, but as many people consider it 
a particularly nasty subject, I will try and prove to them that 
it is not so. 

The fresh intestines are put into a flat dish, and a stream of 
water is kept running over them till quite clean, a rough board 
beneath prevents the escape of any of the smaller Entozoa which 
the water may force out. The parts are then opened and 
after a gentle flow of the element for several hours, the worms 
may be picked out with a camel hair brush. 

Not having time to make the usual preparations for the 
microscope, and being generally well supplied with duplicate 
specimens, I spread some out on glass slides, and observed them, 
making the necessary sketches at the same time ; they dried gra- 
dually and the changes which the difi'erent parts underwent were 
carefully noticed. Whenever I wish to refer to a specimen it is 
put under the microscope, and any part, even if it is a cestoid of 
several feet in length, can be examined without difficulty. To 
clear up doubtful points, some wet preparations are necessary, 
and these are kept in glass tubes to be used when the first 
plan fails. 

When once dry, the objects are transparent, and under the 
glass look most charming — the fact is, few persons unacquainted 
with them will believe what they are. Some retain their colour, 
and are therefore still more valuable. 

I have mounted the largest flukes in the same way, but had 
to keep them for a day or so in water and press them slightly 
when they were too thick. With a view of giving some idea of 
the arrangement of the Entozoa, I have added Professor von 
Siebold's system, and I need not observe that his first order of 
Gystici is now generally accepted as part of the Cestoidea ; the 
genera arranged under that head being no doubt young tape- 
worms. 



208 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

Class. HELMINTHES. 

It is very difficult to characterize the class Helminthes, for 
it contains animals having widely dissimilar organization. On 
this account the separation of its groups and their distribution 
among the other classes of the invertebrata has been attempted. 
But such various difficulties have arisen from this, that for the 
present it is best that all these animals should remain together. 
If a common character is not furnished by their structure, it 
must be sought for in their manner of life ; for nearly all are 
parasites, and during their whole life or at least during some of 
its periods, seek their abode and nourishment in or upon other 
living animals. 

Order I. Cystici.* 

The body is swollen in form of a bladder, and filled with a 
serous liquid. Digestive and genital organs are wanting. 

Genera : EcMnococciis, Coeiiurus, Gysticercus, A'lithroceplialus. 

Order II. Cestodes. 

The parenchymatous body is riband like, having often incom- 
plete transverse fissurations ; often it is wholly divided trans- 
versely into rings. Digestive organs are wanting. The genital 
organs of both sexes are combined in the same individual, and 
generally are often repeated. Copulatory organs are present. t 

Genera : Gymnorhynchus, Tetrarlynclms Bothriocephalus, 
Tcenia, TricBnoiolwrus, Ligula, Garyophyllmos. 



* Nearly all the genera of their order are considered to be young 
tape-worms. — G.K. 

t Von Siebold has changed his opinion, and states some years later 
" On the Tape and Cystic worms." (translated by Professor Huxley, London, 
1857, page 40)." The sexually matured individuals of the Cestoidea are no 
other than their full grown joints in which are developed the male and 
female genitalia, by whose co-operation eggs capable of reproduction are 
generated, and the continuation of the species is secured. Such a sexually- 
mature hermaphrodite joint of a cestoid worm which separates from the body 
of the scolex with great readiness, is denominated a Proglottis. The formation 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 209 

Order Til. Trematodbs. 

The body is parencliymatous and usually flafcteued. The 
intestinal canal, which is often branching, has a mouth, but 
nearly always is without an anus. The genital organs of both 
sexes are combined in the same individual. Copulatory organs 
are present. 

Genera : Gyrodactylus, Axine, Octobrothrium, Diplozoon, Polys- 
tomum, Aspidocotijlus, Asjndogaster, Tristomum, Monostomum, 
Holostomum, Gasterostomum. Peutastomum. 

Order IV. Acanthocephali. 

The sack-like body is flattened, transversely striated, and 
swollen cylindrically by the absorption of water. Digestive 
organs are wanting. The genital organs are situated in separate 
individuals. Copulatory oi'gans are present. 

Genus : Eckinorlujnclms. 

Order V. Gordiacei. 
The body is filiform and cylindrical. The digestive organs 

of these Proglottides takes place at the posterior end of the scolex by a 
sexual reproduction, viz., by a simple process of growth and division. If we 
compare this process with the phenomena of the alternation of generations, 
we shall discover in it all the essential characters of the latter. The matured 
joints or the sexual individuals of the Cestoidea in their proglottis form, pro- 
duce a brood of embryos armed with six booklets (see plate III., figs. 22 and 
23 of this paper — G.K.) which are quite dissimilar in shape from their 
parents, the Proglottides, (see plate III., tig. 'lib of this paper — G.K.) and 
remain so, since at a later period they assume the scolex form, and take on 
the functions of an agamozooid. From the posterior end of the body of 
such a scoliciform agamozooid a series of joints are developed, — that is to 
say, a generation of sexual individuals which again present the original 
proglottis form. In their organization the Proglottides, apart from their 
sexual apparatus, so far resemble the scolices from which they have been 
produced, that they possess no oral aperture, and moreover are subject to 
a deposit under their integument of those glassy calcareous particles which 
I have already mentioned. (A good idea of a young scolex will be obtained 
by comparing the 2nd plate, figs. 25 and 2c, with the adult form figs. 2 and 
2«— G.K.) It seems, at first, paradoxical to say that the joints of a tape- 
worm which have hitherto been believed to be mere parts of one ani- 
mal, should be considered as individuals ; but whoever will observe with 



210 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

are without an anus. Genital organs ai-e situated upon separate 
individuals. Copulatorj organs are sometimes present. 
Genera : Mermls, Gordius. 

Order VI. Nematodes. 

The body is sack-like and cylindrical. The digestive canal 
has a mouth and anus, and passes in a straight line through the 
cavity of the body. The genital organs are situated upon 
separate individuals. Copulatory organs are present. 

Genera : Sphaerularia, Trichosoma, Trichocephalus, Filaria, 
Anguillula, Physalo'ptera, Liorhynchus, Lecanoceplialus, Cheiracan- 
thus, Onathosoma, Ancijr acanthus, Spirojptera, Hedruris, Strongy- 
lus, Giicullanus, Oxyuris, Ascaris. 

I consider it also necessary (for the purpose of making those 
interested better acquainted with what has been written on Aus- 
tralian Entozoa) to give a complete list of the species already 
described. This I propose to do in chronological order. 

The first Australian intestinal worm {Tcenia festiva) was 
noticed by Rudolphi in the year 1819, in his " Entozoorum 

an unprejudiced eye, a fully developed Tmnia with its sexually matured 
joints, must be convinced that it is no simple animal, but one composed of 
many individuals." 

On page 44' : von Siebold remarks : — " In the Cestoidea the stock is the 
posterior end of the scoliciform agamozooid (the head G.K.) In the alter- 
nation of generations amongst the Cestoidea, there is this peculiarity that the 
agamozooid preserves its efiBcacy and independence, whilst the agamozooids 
of other animals which undergo alternation either die after producing- their 
brood or pass into it. (Huxley doubts this : Gr.K.) We must consider the 
head of every cestoid worm as the agamozooid still remaining and capable 
of reproduction, and its neck as the equivalent of the posterior extremity of 
the scolex. In all cestoids we see that fresh joints are continually being 
developed at the posterior part of the neck which lengthens and becomes 
covered with transverse folds. These folds are at first very close together, 
but as the process of growth throws them backwards further and further from 
their place of origin, they gradually change from indistinct wrinkles into 
sharp transverse lines of demarcation, between which the substance of the 
body dilates into a joint (individual), and assumes its specific shape. At a 
later period the rudiments of the hermaphroditic sexual apparatus make 
their appearance in the interior of the joints, and finallj' they separate 
themselves from their younger fellows as independent individuals." 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.LS. 211 

Synopsis," page 146, from the intestines of the Great Kangaroo 
{Halmahirus giganteus.) The second discovery was, that the 
common slieep iiuke (Bistoma or Fasciola liepatica) inhabited the 
bihary ducts, and the liver of Kangaroos (lb. page 725). No 
description of Austrahan species occurs till February 8th, 1853. 
(Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London for 1853, 
pages 18 to 25), when Dr. Baird describes the following species : — 

Ascaris similis. — From the stomach of a Seal. 

Mermis rigidus. — Habitat unknown but probably Australian. 

Taenia Goezii. — Habitat unknown, probably Australian. 

Tcenia Oederi. — Habitat. The stomach of a Penguin from 
the Antarctic seas. 

Botliriocephaltis antarcticus. — Habitat. The stomach and in- 
testines of a Southern seal. 

In the year 1859, Dr. Baird described (Proceedings of the 
Zool. Soc. of London, page 111). Tcenia sulciceps, from the intes- 
tines of the Wandering Albatross (Dioinedea exulans), and also 
noticed a rare species of Ascaris from the Dugong described by 
Professor Owen as Ascaris halichoris, (lb. pages 148 and 149). 

In 1861, Dr. Baird noticed a small Filai"ia {Filaria sanguinea) 
in the stomach of a little Australian fresh water fish (Galaxias 
scriba). 

In the same publication for 1862, I find a description of a 
new Pentastoma (Pentastoma teretiiisculum) by Dr. Baird, (page 
114) who mentions that he took the specimen from the mouth of 
a snake (Hojiilocephalus superbus), which died at the Zoological 
Society's gardens. I may state here that this worm is generally 
found in the lung of Australian snakes. 

The last of Dr. Bairds descriptions occurs in the Proceedings 
of the Zoological Society for 1865, page 58, and relates to a new 
cestoid worm (Bothridium (^Solenopliorus) arcuatum.} This species 
is common in the Australian Diamond snake (^Morelia spilotes). 

In that most useful book the " Zoological Record," I find 
mention made of an Australian tape-worm from the stomach of 
the Emeu {Dromaius novoi-hollandice) , which is described by the 
Danish Naturalist Krabbe (Record for 1869, page 635), as Taenia 
ausiralis. 



212 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

The following species were taken by myself and by Mr. 
George Masters in the neighbourhood of Sydney and in Queens- 
land : — 

Mammalia. 

From a Dolphin (Delphinus Forsteri) — 

1. A species of Taenia. 

2. A species of Distoma. 

3. An Ascaris. 

4. An Echinorhynchns. 

From a Kangaroo (^Macroptis major) — - 
1. A Fluke (Fasciola hepaticci). 

From a Bandicoot (Perameles nasuta) — 
A species of Ascaris. 

From a domestic Cat (Felis cahis) — 
An Ascaris {Ascaris mystax). 

From a Sheep {Ovis aries) — 

1. Amphistoma conicum (?) 

2. Strongylus filaria. 

3. Ascaris spec. (?) 

From a Pig (Sms scrophct) — 
1. Strongylus suis. 

From a Wallaby (^Halmaturus) — 

1. A species of Tmnia. 

2. A second species of Tcenia. 

From a Phalanger (JPlialangista vulpind) — 
1. A species of Tcsnia. 

Ayes. 

From a black Duck (A^ias superciliosa) — 
Several species of cestoid worms. 

From a Bower Bird (Clilamydera macidata) — 
1. A species of Tania. 

From a Pigeon (Golmiiba livia') — 
1. A species oi Ascaris. 



BY GERARD KREPFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 213 

From a White-eyed Duck (Nyroca aicstralis) — 

1. A cestoid worm, a quarter of an inch and more in width, 

and several feet in length. 

2. Several other smaller species of Taenia. 

From a Teal (^Anas pimctata') — 

1. Several cestoid worms, including the young of the Aus- 
tralian Hammer-headed Tape-worm. 

From a Porphyrio or Red-bill (Porpliyrio melanotus) — ■ 
1. A very small species of Distoma. 

From a White Crane (Heroclias alha) — 

1. A very large Distoma which is distinguished from all 
others in having the vaginal papilla below the ven- 
tral pore, and not as usual between this pore and the 
oi'al sucker. 

From a Pacific Crane (Ardea paoifica) — 
1. A species of Distoma. 

From a Snake Bird or Darter (^Plotus novm-hollandm) — 
1. A new species of Ascaris. 

From a Little Grebe {Podiceps australis) — 
Several species of Ttenia. 

From a Stilt (Ilimantopus leucocephalus) — 
Two cestoid worms. 

From a Shoveller Duck {Spatula rhynchotis) — 

A very curious short cestoid worm with very large head. 

From^'a Musk Duck (Biziura lohata) — ■ 
A fine species of cestoid worm. 

From a Grill Bird (^Antliochcera carunculata) — 

A series oiAscari taken from the eye by Mr. George Masters. 

Reptilia. 

From a Tortoise {Elseya dentata) inhabiting northern Rivers — 

1. A species of Ampkistoma taken by Mr. George Masters. 

2. A species of Ascaris. 



214 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

Fi'om a Lizard {Eyernia Cuninghami) — 

1. Numerous very small and still undetermined Round 
Worms, some with long pointed tail. 

From a Cyclodus or Sleeping Lizard (Gijdodus gigas) — 
1. A species of Physaloptera. 

From a White's Hinulia (Jlintdia Whitei) — 
1 . A species of Ascaris. 

From a Ribbon Lizard (Hinulia tceniolata) — 
1. A species of Pentastoma. 

From a Gecko {Biploddctylus ornatufi) — 
1. A species of Pentastoma. 

From a Gecko (Phyllunis Miliusit) — 
1. A species of ^scam. 

From a Diamond Snake {Morelia spilotes) — 

1. A species of Bothridium, pi-obably identical with Boili- 

rlditim arcuatuvi Baird. 

2. A species of Ascaris with very long spiculse. 

From a Carpet Snake (Moreliu variegata) — 

1. A species of ^scm identical with the above. 

From a Grey Snake {JJiemenia reticulata^ — 

1. Males and females of a large Pentastoma, found attached 

to tlie lungs. 

2. A species o{ Physaloptera. 

3. An Echinorhynchus. 

Pisces. 

From a large vegetable feeding Percoid Fish 

1 . A species of Distoma. 

2. A Round Worm probably a species of Trichocephalus. 

From a " Forster's Ceratodus " (Geratodus Forsteri) — 

1. A species of Ascaris, obtained by Mr. George Masters. 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 215 

The following descriptions are those of the new species : — 

TAENIA TUBERCULATA. 

(Plate I., figs. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 21a. 
Plate II., fig. 3). 

Total length seldom exceeding 42 inches, average breadth 
one quarter of an inch, specimens occur however, which are half 
an inch wide in some parts. Head small, variable, often attached 
to a long slender neck which more frequently ends in a filament. 
Tapering specimens such as figured on Plate II. (fig. 3), are 
common ; the neck appears quite perfect but not a vestige of a 
disk, sucker or proboscis can be observed. I examined more than 
25 White-eyed Ducks (in which this tape worm is principally 
found), and obtained over fifty specimens but only five or six 
were furnished with heads such as are sketched (much enlarged) 
on Plate I. (figs. 12, 13, 14, 16, 19, 20, 21, and 21a). The' 
general form of this cestoid resembles fig. 9 of Plate I. Owing to 
the many tubercles distributed over the posterior portion of the 
segments, the appearance of the colony is irregular though the 
marginal lines are generally straight. The anterior portion for 
about one-fifth of the total length is provided with very close 
segments directly after which the lemniscy appear, one on each 
side of every joint, the edges enlarging till they look in the most 
posterior proglottides, like small mammas. 

Plate II., fig. 3, shows the size of the segments well, the 
figure is from a photograph of a dried specimen, and repro- 
duced here to show the exact length and width of the immature 
and lemnisci-bearing segments. Tubercles and mammaeform 
lemnisci have dried in such a manner that their position is quite 
obliterated. 

The lemnisci proper are covered by a short tube, and in dry 
objects this covering appears to be provided with very small 
spines, I mention this because such a spinous integument occurs 
only in the species under discussion, and has not yet been observed 
in any other Australian cestoid worm. The discharging or male 
organs are seldom much produced, they just peep out of the 
covering tube, though once I have noticed a lemniscus with a bell 



216 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

shaped head which is figured (much enlarged) on plate I., 
No. 15. 

I have taken great pains to ascertain how far 1 am justified 
in classing so many different-headed cestoid colonies as one 
species, but as all contain the same kind of ova, (circular 
bodies enclosing a granular round central capsule without hooks), 

1 must be correct in my observation. 

Besides no other cestoid examined was in any way tuberculated. 
One species closely resembles the present one, and broken pieces 
of it gave much trouble when classifying the specimens obtained 
during a day's collecting, but as soon as the test was applied, 
the different shaped ova proved the fragments to be of 
another form and not those of Tcenia tuberculata. I mentioned 
already that the principal host to this tape-worm is the White- 
eyed Duck (Nyroca mtstralis). 

Many specimens are in the collection of the Australian 
Museum. 

TAENIA NOViE-HOLLANDIiB. 

(Plate I., figs. 1, la, lb, Ic, Id, le, 2, 3, and 18. 
Plate III., figs. 28 and 28a). 

This species resembles the one previously described and is 
almost as variable, with regard to the shape of the anterior 
portion of the colony at least. 

Specimens with short tubercular or thin thread-like processes 
surmounting the broader and thicker " body " or " colony " are 
common, (figs. 16, Id, and 18 of Plate I.), others occur in which 
four indistinct suckers can be traced on the most anterior of the 
segments ; others again resemble the figure given on Plate III., 
No. 28 and 28a, they show four round disks and a retracted 
proboscis, but all produce the same kind of ova. (Plate 1., figs. 

2 and 3.) The most common form consists of an oval 
disk enclosing a tube with round caps at each end and four 
hooks in the middle. Another ovum occui's with the ends more 
arched, and the sides bulged out like a cask, (probably a more 
advanced state) and a third, perhaps an earlier stage, has a double 
cap on one extremity of the tube (Plate I., fig. Ic.) The last 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 217 

was noticed only in one fragment, (Plate T., fig. Ic, nat. size) and 
its shape may be accounted for, because the ovum was obtained 
from a very anterior segment ; no hooks were seen in it. The 
present species seldom exceeds 18 inches in length, shorter 
specimens are, however, of more frequent occurrence. Owing to 
the leniniscy being long, tapering, and often well thrust out, the 
sides of a colony appear quite fringed ; it is also a curious fact 
that many of the segments are provided with these organs 
almost to the very first one. This peculiarity is not shown on 
Plate I., fig. 1 , because I had not noticed it when the sketch was 
made on account of the lemnisci laying close to the joint, I found, 
however, afterwards that they always reach right up the sides of 
the neck, and can be seen with a lens. The joints of the colony 
are regular and very closely packed for the first inch or two, the 
last being generally wide and thick. The anterior part in some 
specimens is very thick also. 

Fig. 18 of Plate I. is an enlarged representation of the 
anterior part of one of the examples which is surmounted by a 
pennant-like filament. All the specimens obtained were found 
, in the Little Grebe (Podiceps cmstralis) . 

TjENIA paradoxa. 
(Plate III., figs. 18, 19, 20, 21, 21a, 2lh, 22, 22a, and 23). 

General form like Tsenia novse-hollandiae, segments smooth, 
lemnisci absent. The head is sometimes surmounted by a short 
proboscis rising between four small distinctly margined suckers 
or pores, (Plate III., fig. 18.) In other specimens the proboscis 
is not visible (Plate III., figs. 19 and 20.) At first sight I have 
often confounded this one with the species which inhabits the 
intestines of the Little Grebe (^Podiceps avstralis), but as the ova 
difier much in both, I have no doubt that it is distinct. 

The ova are round, in fact perfectly circular, covering an oval 
or half oval body with (in the latter case) a produced smaller 
half circle in the middle of the less rounded side, (Plate III., 
figs. 22, 22a., and 23.) The hooks are distributed alike in both 
varieties. The two middle ones vertically and each outer pair 
in a horizontal position. 



218 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

Specimens occur from 12 to 18 inches and more in length, 
and a quarter of an inch wide. Fig. 21b of Plate III., represents 
the posterior segments of the natural size, and tig. 21a of the 
same Plate is a view, (natural size) of the head and neck ; the 
small dot surmounting the figure represents the natural size 
of 21a. 

The Little Grebe (Podiceps australis) is the only bird in 
which the Tcenia paradoxa has hitherto been found. 

T^NIA FORSTERI. 

(Plate I., figs. 4, 5, and 6). 

Head rather large with four distinct oval suckers or disks, 
neck distinct, short, closely articulated, the segments being very 
small but clearly separated. A prominent tubercle on the 
anterior margin of each disk. 

The joints enlarge gradually, their margins are straight, and 
only the last two or three larger than the rest, the terminal joint 
being the narrowest in width. Total length two inches and a 
half. 

I have not been able to obtain a single ovum from the few 
specimens examined, and I find also that the shape of the suckers 
differs ; some heads appear to have them more rounded and the 
corner tubercle very small. The segments are not furnished 
with lemnisci. 

Habitat : from the stomach of a Dolphin (probably Deljjhinus 
Forsteri), caught in Port Jackson. 

T^NIA riMBRIATA. 

(Plate I., figs. 22 and 22a). 

A single fragment about two inches and a half in length and 
a quarter of an inch wide, is all what I have seen of this singular 
form. There is no head, and the joints are close together keeping 
at a uniform distance throughout. The lower margin of each 
is fringed or rather cut out, in a triangular manner, and the edges 
are turned over, which gives the fringe a thick appearance. 
The joints cover each other slightly, and the whole looks like 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., P.L.S, 219 

a piece of coarse fibre-matting. The Lead and neck of 
this species are missing. Lemnisci occur on both sides, and as 
the joints are narrow they look very rough and tattered. Mr. 
Masters who collected the specimen several years ago, was not 
able to remember the habitat ; it is probably from a Northern 
Wallaby. 

T^NIA FLAVESCENS. 

(Plate I., figs. 23, 23a, 23&, and Plate II., fig. 5). 

Total length seldom exceeding two inches, head larger than 
the broadest proglottis, or from -jV^l^ to ith of an inch in diameter. 

Head sub-quadrangular, with rounded corners, and bearing 
four, deep and distinctly margined suckers. Neck segments very 
close for the length of a quarter of an inch or more, after which 
they gradually enlarge to the last one, which is smaller The 
marginnl lines are very seldom quite straight, and the edges 
much produced outwards. Lemnisci were not observed but 
the posterior half of the joints is furnished each in the centre 
with a distinct receptacle full of ova. At first these 
ovaria, if I may call them so, are but scantily filled, but they 
increase in size and become fuller till the last three or four are 
completely stufi'ed out so that the marginal lines between them 
are altogether obliterated, (Plate II., fig. 5.) Tlie head is broad 
and rather flat, the neck contracted, and the four circular disks 
are right upon the upper surface with a small tubercle in the 
middle. (Plate I., figs. 23, 23a, and 236. The disks are not 
large enough in the sketch). 

This is one of the four species in which the colour is beautifully 
preserved, the proglottides being pencilled and spotted with the 
most exquisite chrome yellow. I may state that I refer to 
dry specimens and not to the usual wet preparations ; the 
process of preservation has been already explained. The 
Blue Winged Shoveller (^Spatula rhyncliotis) , and the Black 
Duck {Anas superciliosa) are the birds in the alimentary canal 
of which the present species is found. The first one owing 
to its very narrow and slender intestines is almost destitute of 
Tcenia, and whenever these are present, they generally belong to 
the species just described. 



220 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA/ 

T^NIA CTLINDRICA. 

(Plate II., figs. 6 and 6a). 

The head is a little less in size than the broadest pro- 
glottis, much produced beyond the neck, subquadrangular with 
rounded corners, and with four margined suckers and a tuber- 
cular proboscis in the middle. The body consists of closely 
packed joints not flattened out but perfectly cylindrical ; only 
the posterior segments are slightly larger than the others. The 
beautiful yellow color so prominent in the allied species described 
before has not been noticed in this one, nor can any lemnisci be 
traced. 

Habitat : the intestines of the Black Duck (^Anas superciliosa). 
Total length half an inch, and one sixteenth of an inch wide. 
I have noticed a few much smaller specimens in which the head 
was as large as the whole body, but as I could not see any differ- 
ence except in size, I have arranged them provisionally with the 
present species. 

T^NIA CORONATA. 

(Plate I., figs. 7 and 8). 

Head produced beyond the neck, crown-shaped, with four 
large disks and a small proboscis. The neck forms one-fourth of 
the total length at which distance the joints begin to increase in 
size, the last, which is three lines in width, being the largest. 
The lines between the segments are undulated, and appear to be 
divided into two or three ridges or elongate tubercles with some- 
times an additional one near the openings for the lemnisci, which 
are regular and double. Their situation is the upper corner of 
each proglottis, they are surrounded by a raised line and scarcely 
protrude, so that they ai*e easily overlooked. The lower portion 
of each joint bulges out and overshadows the lemniscus of 
the next one. 

Total length three inches and a half, of which about one inch 
forms the thinner part of the neck. The proglottides are rather 
wide in a vertical direction, that is in proportion to the size of 
the colony ; in the middle I counted 12 segments covering a dis- 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 221 

tance of three lines. No ova were obtained, and there is only 
a single specimen in the Australian Museum collection. 

Habitat : the intestines of the White-headed Stilt (Himan- 
topus lencoceplialus) . 

TaiNiA Mastersii. 
fPlate II., figs. 8, 8a, and 8b). 

Head rather small, rounded, not much produced beyond the 
neck, narrow, with four round and rather indistinct disks. The 
articulations commence close to the head, gradually enlarging, 
but not growing much in a vertical direction. Lower margins 
straight. Four or five deep impressions, forming straight lines, 
run from the neck to the terminal joints, the outer lines being 
particularly distinct. Lemnisci were not observed, the specimens 
appearing all immature, judging from the last rather long and 
contracted joint ; the " Narbe " (scar) of German authors. 

Total length from 4 to 5 inches, and about one-eighth of an 
inch wide in the centre of the colony. 

Habitat. The intestines of a species of Wallaby (Hahnaturus) 
shot by Mr. George Masters in Queensland. 

T^NIA PHALANGIST^. 

(Plate 11., figs. 7, la, 7b, and 7c). 

Head, pear-shaped with four large but not very prominent 
disks upon the upper surface. The disks are flat and not 
encircled by a ring. Head otherwise granular, and without spines. 
The neck is considerably contracted at its commencement, and 
for the first line, (one-twelfth of an inch) does not show any seg- 
mentation, it gradually widens out below this point and the joints 
become distinct. A single specimen is all I possess at present, 
which is four inches in length. The joints are irregular and 
distorted, one appears to grow into the other, there are 
interruptions of the marginal lines, and now and then the 
joints resemble a series of loops. This state occurs however on 
the first or anterior half of the colony only. On the remaining 
portion of the specimen the joints are regular. Some raised 



222 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

dots became visible near the middle of the more posterior 
segments, but always more ou one side than on the other. 
These dots increase iu size as the joints approach the end. No 
lemuisci have been observed, though many discharged ova were 
noticed in all directions, some on the side of the head and others 
on the corners of various joints, (Plate II., figs. 7 and 7a). 

Habitat, the intestines of the common Phalanger, (Flmlangista 
vulpina.) 

T^NIA PEDIFORMIS. 

(Plate IL, figs. 2, 2a, 26, and 2c). 

The present species resembles the Hammer-headed Tape 
Worm of Rudolphi, figured by Bremser, (Icones Helminthum, 
Plate XV., fig. 17, 18, and 19), and like its European representa- 
tive inhabits the intestines of various ducks, in this country. Our 
species are rather larger than the European ones, and more 
elegant in form, the hammer or foot-like frill is completely 
articulated, and in very young specimens this part is perfectly 
erect. It is only when the joints have reached the adult 
stage, that the " head " or rather the head and neck combined 
assume the horizontal position with which Helminthologists are 
most familiar. For the head proper (the first joint or agamozooid) 
I have looked in vain, and only in one or two instances did I 
observe two slight sucker-like depressions on the very tip of the 
thinnest part of the " hammer." 

My best and largest specimen was seven inches in length, and 
occasionally one-eighth of an inch wide ; the hammer-shaped 
combination of head and neck measuring three-eighths of an inch 
from one extremity to the other. In young specimens the whole, 
in adults only two-thirds of the appendage, shows articulations, 
the remaining or lower portions being granular. The joints are 
very irregular, and occasionally a few indistinct divisional lines 
appear, but they can never be traced with certainty. There is 
no sign of any lemnisci, and the edges of the greater portion of 
the colony are crowded with ova, which during the drying 
process were copiously discharged. I was unable at the time to 
sketch them. This species inhabits the intestines of the Black 
Duck {A7ias supercilioscC) , and the Teal {^Anaa punctata?). 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 223 

T^NIA MOSCHATA. 

(Plate II., figs. 9, 9a, 9b, and 9c.) 

Head rather prominent, square, with four rounded and pro- 
duced disks one at each corner. The upper part of the head is 
divided by a cruciform band with a tubercle in the middle. The 
segments are not very close together, except on the neck, 
but are regular in shape, the terminal ones being about a line 
and a half wide. Total length ten or eleven inches, the greatest 
breadth being about one-eighth of an inch. 

The lemnisci are situated on one side only, near the upper 
edge of each proglottis, and commence at the distance of half an 
inch below it, some appear broad and marked with lateral stripes 
(fig. 9a), others are long and tapering (Plate II., fig. 9c), it is pos- 
sible, however, that the broad lemnisci are tubes only, the organ 
being not thrust out. The long and tapering ones occur on the 
terminal proglottides. 

A single perfect specimen taken from the intestines of the 
Musk duck (Biziura lohata) is in the Australian Museum collec- 
tion. On Plate II. is figured No. 9, the head much enlarged ; 
No. 9&, enlarged proglottides with lemnisci ; and 9a and 9c, the 
organs themselves also enlarged. 

T^NIA RUGOSA. 

(Plate II., figs. 4, 4a, 4&, and 4c). 

Head small, surmounted by an unarmed proboscis, and now 
slightly distorded, but fresh probably resembling the head of the 
Common Duck Tape-worm (Plate HI., fig. 4.) The head is pro- 
vided with the usual four indistinct disks and numerous granular 
markings, and is attached to a tapering neck which rises suddenly 
from the base of the more mature segments (Plate II., fig. 4&), 
and is much contracted just below the head. The proglottides or 
joints appear mature at the base of the slender neck, they are of 
moderate size often almost square (fig. 4c), and very rugose 
(fig. 4, enlarged view.) The lemnisci are on alternate sides, 
only one to each joint, they are pendulous, short, and covered 
by a thick sheath. The proglottides resemble those of Tcenia 



224 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

solium. Total length 5 inches and |th of an inch wide in the 
broadest part. A single specimen is in the Museum collection 
which was obtained from the intestines of a White-headed Stilt. 
(Bimantopus leucocejphalus) , shot at the River Hunter, New South 
Wales. 

T^lNIA CHLAMYDERiE. 

(Plate II., figs. 1, la, lb, and Ic). 

This is a small species which occurs in the intestines of the 
Spotted Bower Bird (Ghlamydera maculata) of this colony. It 
seldom exceeds thx-ee inches in length by a line (one-twelfth of 
an inch) in width. The head is rounded, flat on the top, and 
provided with four comparatively large disks or suckers, which in 
some specimens are separated from each other by grooves. The 
segments are as usual narrow at the neck, widen out gradually, 
and show a rather broad marginal line on the upper part with the 
two lower portions of each joint more or less rugose. Lemnisci 
could not be discovered. I give a few rough figures on Plate II., 
No. 1, showing the natural size of the specimen, with an enlarged 
view of the head. No. la, which is rather distorted, the specimen 
having been crushed, and of some of the joints No. 1&. 

T^NIA BAIRDII. 

(Plate III., figs. 1 to 16, and figs. 24, 24a, 26, 27, and 27a). 

Looking at the heads of a series of these cestoid worms, it 
would be quite natural to divide them into at least six species, 
but as no more than two varieties of ova can be obtained from 
many supposed species, it is clear that we must look at them as 
being all identical with one another. 

The total length of a mature colony is from three to seven 
inches, and the broadest posterior proglottides seldom reach the 
width of one-eighth of an inch. In very few examples lemnisci 
have been observed, but whenever this was the case, they were 
noticed to be of great length, from one-third to one-fourth of the 
width of a proglottis. Many of the mature joints have burst by 
accident, and in every case the ova were elongate, tube-like or 



BY GERAKD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 226 

cylindrical in form, the smaller ends slightly rounded off, and con- 
taining an S-shaped or roller-like granular body in the centre. 
On a few occasions four raised lines were noticed in the middle 
of these bodies, I am unable to say, however, whether they were 
really spines or not. On Plate III., I have sketched three kinds 
of ova, but all appear to be identical with one another, as a 
reference to figs. 2, 6, and 16 will easily show. 

After another trial with tape worms the heads of which resemble 
in shape, figs. 1, 4, 5, 15, and 16a of Plate III., I have obtained 
nothing but ova as figured under No. 16, granular in the centre 
and without hooks or spines, I cannot but conclude therefore 
that my first view was correct, and that all the specimens figured 
and mentioned above are identical. 

With regard to the proboscis it is no doubt retractile, and the 
hooks may not always be visible, I certainly have seen them 
occasionally, and have many dried specimens which show them 
even in that state. 

Plate III., fig. 3, is no doubt an accidentally prolonged 
jDroboscis, and figs. 8 and 8a may belong to a difierent species, 
but I possess only a single dried preparation of it, and therefore 
cannot ppply the ova test. Figs. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14, are 
enlarged heads of immature specimens of the same Cestoid ; fig. 
15a being about the natural size of one, and figs. 16d and 16c 
show the manner (natural size and enlarged) in which the mature 
proglottides have burst, no lemnisci being discoverable. Figs. 
7 and 7a are representations enlarged and natural size, 
respectively, of some of the few lemnisci-bearing specimens 
noticed before, these organs are situated on one side only. 

The general form of the T. Bairdii is elegant, proportionate, 
and seldom exceeding seven inches in length, the segments of the 
" neck " are close together they soon widen out however, but 
never attain a large size, and of the most posterior proglottides 
it takes 45, to cover the space of half an inch. The lower mar- 
gins are generally straight and the edges but slightly bulged out, 
though now and then more bell-shaped and irregular-margined, 
proglottides occur. 

The head is generally round without, or pear-shaped 
with, a small proboscis ; four oval disks are indicated but are 



226 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

seldom very distinct, the same may be said with regard to the 
spines or hooks which in the greater number of specimens are 
absent or cannot be observed. These tape-worms are numerous 
in all the Australian Ducks examined, except in the Shoveller, in 
the Musk Duck and the Pink-eyed Duck. Some of the intestines 
are almost chocked with them. Smaller cestoid worms occur 
from a quarter of an inch and less in length, all of which are imma- 
ture specimens of the present, and probably of one or two other 
species. 

On Plate III. will be found a sketch of these immature 
bodies which are very difficult to secure in a perfect state, and 
in most cases are destitute of the head ; I have succeeded, how- 
ever, in getting a large number of them and will add the following 
observations. The head generally resembles the matui'e heads of 
No. 4 (Plate III.), or the half grown form No. 13, the proboscis 
being rather large, and to use a popular expression " Top-heavy." 
specimens resembling fig. 26a of the same plate occur, and 
many like No. 27a are noticed, either with narrow and long, 
or with broad and short joints. In the latter case the head 
Las evidently been lost ; I have seen specimens, however, in 
which the first joint appears quite perfect. It is of no value to 
discuss every immature variety at present, I therefore draw 
attention to fig. 25 of Plate III. which may be considered the type 
of a young specimen of Taenia Bairdii, when from a quarter of an 
inch to half an inch in length. Examples of from one-eighth of 
an incli to less than a line in length occur in large numbers, all 
inhabiting, in company with perfectly mature colonies, the same 
host. 

The quantity of young, half grown and mature colonies from 
a single ■ water-fowl host is quite astounding, yet all the birds 
were in excellent condition, and did not appear to have suffered 
from their guests. On a few occasions I have noticed lemnisci 
thrust out in young specimens, but have not been able to preserve 
them, and confess that even with perfectly mature ones this is a 
rare occurrence. Among perhaps a thousand objects examined, 
I did not find six with the lemnisci visible. The best specimen 
is figured natural size, and enlarged on Plate III., figs. 7 and 7a. 

Kudolphi illustrates a similar cestoid worm (Entozoormn 



_J^^cx/e2nr. 




r^teZ 




d.^ix^ .^i^^CM. 




J^t(a/ejnr 




^^. .'*r«*#S: '^U .<f ^iOt. 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 227 

sive vermium intestinalium, Sfc.,Yol. II., Plate I., Tab. X., fig. 2), 
from the Woodcock (^Scolojjax rusticola) which resembles the 
young of Tcenia Bairdii, and is probably also an immature form. 
This species is found in a great many of the Australian Ducks, 
in particular in the Black Duck (^Anas sicperciliosa.)* 

BOTHRIOCEPHALUS (?) MARGINATUS. 

(Plate III., figs. 17 and 17a). 

This species is founded on a fragment about 3| inches in 
length, without head, it is fully a line in thickness and nearly 
two-eighths of an inch wide ; joints regular, straight, with very 
broad and raised margins below, and a slightly raised central 
papilla. The difierent segments are not produced outwards, and 
without the aid of a lens the outer margins appear perfectly 
straight. Mr. Masters who collected the specimen in some part 
of Queensland (Wide Bay district I believe) is of opinion that it 
was taken from the intestines of a Wallaby. 



DESCRIPTION OF THE PLATES. 



Plate I. 

TiENIA NOV^-HOLLANDI^. 

Fig. 1. — Natural size. 

Fig. la. — A smaller specimen of the same species. 

Fig. lb, — Another fragment of the same worm. The more 

perfect proglottides have parted, and the ovum 

which is marked fig. Ic differs consequently from 

the more perfect ova. 
Fig. Id. — Anterior portion of the specimen No. 1 enlarged. 
Fig. le. — Proglottides, with lemnisci enlarged, taken from the 

posterior portion of the colony. 

* I have just ascertained that the tape-worm figured on Plate HI., figs. 
24 and 24« which I thought was new, is identical (if ova are a test) with 
T. Bairdii. No lemnisci have heen seen in this specimen, which was 
taken from a Stilted Plover. 



228 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

Fig. 2. — Ovum of the same species with four hooks. 

Fig. 3. — A second ovum, probably in a more advanced stage. 

T.a:NIA FORSTERI. 

Fig. 4. — Terminal proglottides enlarged. 

Fig. 5. — Outline sketch showing the natural size. 

Fig. 6. — Head and neck enlarged. 

T^NJA CORONATA. 

Fig. 7. — Head enlarged. 

Fig. 8. — Outlines of perfect colony, natural size. 

T^NIA TUBERCULATA. 

Fig. 9. — Perfect colony of the natural size. 

Fig. 10. • — Head and neck, (enlarged) one of the many varieties 

of heads. 
Fig. 11. — Head natural size, second variety. 
Fig. 12. — Head much enlarged, third variety. 
Fig. 13. — Head enlarged, fourth variety. 
Fig. 14. — Head enlarged, fifth variety. 
Fig. 15. — Lemniscus observed in one specimen. 
Fig. IB. — Head much enlarged, sixth variety. 
Fig. 17. —Proglottides with lemnisci, enlarged. 
Fig. 18. — Head enlarged, eleventh variety. 
Fig. 19. — Head much enlarged, seventh variety. 
Fig. 20. — Head enlarged, eighth variety. 
Fig. 21. — Head, natural size, ninth variety. 
Fig. 21a. — Head, natural size, tenth variety. 

T^NIA FIMBRIATA. 

Fig. 22. — Proglottides and lemnisci (enlarged). 
Fig. 22a. — Fragment, natural size. 

TjENIA FLAVESCENS. 

Fig. 23. — Perfect Colony, natural size. 
Fig. 23a. — Head, much enlarged. 
Fig. 236. — Terminal proglottides. 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 229 

Plate II. 

T^NIA CHLAMYDER^, 

Fig. 1. — Outline sketch, natural size. 

Fig. la. — Head enlarged, and slightly distorted. 

Fig. 1&. — Segments, enlarged. 

Fig. Ic. — Head enlarged, seen from above. 

TiENIA PEDIFORMIS. 

Fig. 2. — Outline sketch of the natural size. 
Fig. 2a. — Head and neck much enlarged. 
Fig. 26. — ^Toung specimen, much enlarged. 
Fig. 2c. — Young specimen, natural size. 

T^NIA TUBERCULATA. 

Fig. 3. — Perfect colony, natural size ; from a specimen dried on 
glass, in which the tubercles had disappeared. 

TAENIA RUGOSA. . 

Fig. 4. — Proglottides and lemnisci on alternate sides. 

Fig. 4a. — Head, neck, and portion of the body of a colony, much 

enlarged. 
Fig. 4&. — Sketch showing the natural size of the same. 
Fig. 4c. — Natural size of mature proglottides. 

T^NIA FLACVESCENS. 

Fig. 5. — Terminal proglottides of a perfect (mature) colony, 
showing the heaps of accumulated ova. 

Tj:NIA CYLINDRICA. 

Fig. 6. — Perfect and mature colony (enlarged.) 
Fig. 6a. — The same, natural size. 

TjENIA PHALANGIST^. 

Fig. 7. — Posterior proglottides, with discharged ova and central 
tubercle. 



230 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA, 

Fig. 7a. — Outline sketch of head, neck, and portion of body. 
Fig. 7b. — Head and neck much enlarged. 

Fig. 7c. — Outline drawing of mature and perfect colony, natural 
size. 

TjENIa Mastersii. 

Fig. 8. — Head much enlarged (outline drawing.) 

Fig. 8a. — Terminal proglottides slightly larger than natural size. 

Fig. 8&. — Proglottides, much enlarged. 

T^NIA MOSCHATA. 

Fig. 9. — Head much enlarged. 

Fig. 9a. — Lemniscus from the anterior portion of the colony. 

Fig. 9&. — Proglottides and lemnisci from the terminal part of 

the colony. 
Fig. 9c. — Lemniscus from the last proglottis but one. 



Plate III. 

T^NiA Baikdii. 

Fig. 1. — Head enlarged, (variety, No. 1.) 

Fig. 2. — Ovum much enlarged. 

Fig 3. — Head and proboscis much enlarged, (variety. No. 2.) 

Fig. 4. — Head much enlarged, (variety, No. 3.) 

Fig. 5. — Head much enlarged, (variety. No. 4.) 

Fig. 6. — Ovum (outline sketch) much enlarged, (variety, No. 2.) 

Fig. 7. — Proglottides with their lemnisci, (situated on one side 

only) much enlarged. 
Fig. 7a. — Proglottides from the posterior portion of the colony, 

natural size. 
Fig. 8. — Terminal proglottides, enlarged. 
Fig. 8a. — Head and neck much enlarged, (variety. No. 6.) 
Figs. 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14— Six varieties of heads of half grown 

and young colonies. 
Figs. 15, 15a — Head much enlarged, and outlines (natural size) 

of young colony, (variety, No. 12.) 



BY GERARD KREFFT, ESQ., F.L.S. 231 

Pig. 16. — Ovum, (outline.) 

Fig. 16a. — Head, much enlarged. 

Fig. 16&. — Perfect colony, (Outline sketch of the natural size) 
This may be considered the typical form. 

Fig. 16c. — Terminal proglottides of the natural size discharging 
ova, and without lemnisci, though these organs are 
sometimes present (see figs. 7 and 7d). 

Fig. 16d. — The same view much enlarged. 

BOTHRIOCEPHALUS (?) MARGINATDS. 

Fig. 17. — Fragment without head (typical specimen). 
Fig. 17a.. — -Proglottides enlarged, shewing the central pore or 
orifice. 

T^NIA PARADOXA. 

Fig. 18. — Head, side view much enlarged (variety No. 1). 

Fig. 19. — Head, upper view shewing the four suckers, much 

enlarged. 
Fig. 20. — Head side view shewing only two suckers. 
Fig. 21. — ^Head, with proboscis and suckers much enlarged 

(outline sketch). 
Fig. 21a. — The same head, natural size, variety No. 3. The 

small dot surmounting the conical neck represents 

the natural size of the much enlarged figure 

No. 21. 
Fig. 21 &. — Terminal proglottides, natural size. 
Fig. 22. — Ovum, with six-hooked embryo. 
Fig. 22a. — One of the hooks; rough sketch (enlai'ged). 
Fig. 23. Ovum, with six-hooked embryo, a second stage, and the 

most common form observed. 

T^KiA Bairdii. 

Fig. 24. — Head and neck much enlarged, variety No. 14. 
Pig. 24a. — Terminal proglottides shewing accumulated ova, but 
no lemnisci. 



232 ON AUSTRALIAN ENTOZOA. 

Fig. 25. — Young colony, much enlarged (the most common 

form) . 
Fig. 25«. — The same colony, natural size. 

Fig. 26. — A second variety of a young colony, of the natural size. 
Fig. 26a. — The same, much enlarged. 

Fig. 27. — A third variety of a young colony of the natural size. 
Fig. 27a.- — The same, much enlarged. 

T^NIA NOViE-HOLLANDIJ!. 

Fig. 28. — Head, much enlarged. 

Fig. 28a.— Perfect colony, outline sketch, natural size. 



P.S. — It may be of interest to know that the number of fowls, constantly 
feeding on some of the Taenia which escaped during the cleaning process, did 
not suffer in consequence. Some killed at various times, by way of experi- 
ment, were totally free from worms. 



Descriptions of eiuht new species of Stephanopis (Cambridge), hy 
11. H. Burton Bradley, Esq. 

[Head 7th August, 1871.] 

The genus Stephanopis was founded by the Rev. 0. P. Cambridge 
on specimens described by him in the Annals and Magazine of 
Natural History, for January 1869, and was by him hesitatingly 
placed among the Thomisicles ; the farther species described 
below with the knowledge of their habits enable me 
to add my opinion to his as to the placing of the genus — at 
least, so far as regards the four first species described by him 
(S. altifrons, nigra, clavata, lata), and those which I have 
described hereafter. To the characters of the genus given by 
Mr. Cambridge, I should add — 

Legs : certainly latex'igrade. 

Habits : living under loose bark of trees without tube or cell 
of silk. 

Stephanopis Cambridget. 

$ length 4 lines. 

Cephalothorax : about 1^ lines long ; breadth a little less. 
Caput and Glypeus as in ^\ altifrons, but the cephalic protuber- 
ance is more developed than in that species ; color above, of a 
greyish-brown, much darker at the edges ; the tip of the 
cephalic protuberance greyish-white. 

Clypeiis : light grey. 

Eyes : anterior intermediate half the size of the others, 
which are nearly equal ; the anterior laterals being slightly 
largest ; all about equidistant, but anterior intermediates are 
placed much below the others. 

Legs : moderately long, very nearly equal ; two anterior pairs 
slightly longest and stronger than the two posterior pairs ; the 
legs are otherwise as in 8. altifrons. Color, 1st and 2nd coxae ; 
yellowish-brown ; femur, nearly black with greyish patch on 
upper side ; tibia, not so dark ; tarsi and metatarsi, greyish- 
brown, banded with stripes of a darker shade ; 3rd and 4th coxae ; 
and femur, yellowish-brown with darker spots ; the other parts 
greyish-brown, banded. 



234 NEW SPECIES OF STEPHANOPIS, 

Palpi : moderate in length and strength ; color and armature 
as in tarsi of legs. 

Falces : moderately long, strong, brownish-red, with yellowish 
spots, hairy, inclined backwards towards the maxillce. 

MaxillcB : reddish, but lighter on the inner edges, moderately 
long, nearly straight ; rounded on the outer sides at the apex ; 
inclined towards the labium which is of the same color as 
maxilla?, about as broad as long, shghtly rounded at the apex, 
and broadest one-fourth of its length from base. 

Sternum: large cordate, narrowest at its posterior part, slightly 
rugulose and hairy,, of a yellowish brown color, hair light grey. 

Abdomen: depressed, about 2| lines long, breadth a little less, 
posterior broadest and thickly furnished with bluntish tubercu- 
lated spines and bristles similar to those on legs ; color above, 
same as cephahtJwrax, but having a dark longitudinal mark in 
the middle ; the edges are greyish, the sides dark with two 
darker transverse markings at posterior part ; below — rugulose 
at the sides, centre part defined, less rugulose and of a darker 
color. 

This insect is from Nepean Towers, where I obtained it in 
August 1870. 

S. MONTICOLA. 

$ length a little over 4 lines. 

Cephalothorax : nearly two lines long, not quite so broad ; 
cordate, broadest at the posterior part, in shape otherwise as in S. 
altifrons, but not so long in proportion ; color above, greyish 
with brown markings, caput reddish brown. Glijpeus, greyish 
but lighter ; the whole slightly rugulose. 

Eyes : as in 8. Gamhridgei, but the cephalic protuberance is 
not so developed. 

Legs : relative length as in S. GtDiibridgei ; color above as 
cephahtJwrax, but there are no regular bandings ; tuberculate 
with blunt spines ; below the coxa and femur, yellowish. 

Palpi : moderate in length, strong ; color, as legs. 

Falces : sarefe color as clypeus but a shade lighter, shape as 
in S. Gamhridgei. 

Maxillce and laUum : form as in that species, but the color is 
a reddish-brown. 



BY H. H. BURTON BRADLEY, ESQ. 235 

Sternum : moderate size, oval, approaching cordate ; broadest 
at base ; color, yellowish. 

Abdomen: depressed, nearly 2^ lines long, and as broad at 
posterior part, which is broadest, and tuberculated on upper sides ; 
color above, as cephalotJiorax, 'darker in the centre and towards 
the sides ; below, yellowish-brown in the centre ; yellowish-grey 
towards the edges ; the sides are greyish-brown ; the two posterior 
spinnerets slightly prolonged. 

This insect is altogether not so strongly tuberculated as 
S- Cambridgei. I obtained it in February 1868, at Tia, New 
England, under bark, without either web or tube of silk. Tia is 
on the coast side and almost on top of the coast range ; I am told 
about 3000 feet above the level of the sea. 

S. TDBERCULATA. 

$ length a little over 3| lines. 

CepJialotJiorax : black rugulose, nearly two lines long, about one 
broad at posterior part, which is slightly broadest and narrowing 
gradually to base of cephalic protuberance, which is narrow and 
rises abruptly. 

Eyes : placed much as in S. nigra, but lateral anteriors nearly 
twice as large as posterior eyes, which again are about twice as 
large as intermediate anteriors. 

Legs : 1st and 2nd equal, longest ; 3rd and 4th equal ; all strong 
and moderately long ; 1st and 2nd very strong in the femur and 
tibia, and tuberculate ; 3rd and 4th less so ; color, above black ; 
below, as far as the tarsi, yellowish-brown, tarsi and metatarsi, 
blackish-brown. 

Palpi : yellowish-brown, strongly armed with tubercles and 
blunt spines, which are nearly black. 

Falces : shape as in S. altifrons ; color, yellowish-grey ; 
fangs, reddish, moderately long, slightly curved. 

Maxillce : shape as in that species ; color, same as that of 
falces ; labium, about as long as broad, and rounded at the apex ; 
broadest at the base. 

Sternum : broad, oval, truncate at fore part, a few light 
colored hairs scattered over it ; color, same as maxillse, but 
slightly darker towards the edges. 



236 NEW SPECIES OF STEPHANOPIS, 

Abdomen: depressed, nearly two lines long, about one line 
broad, nearly oval ; above, black rugulose, tuberculated towards 
the base ; fore part notched, and rising above base of cephalo- 
tJwrax ; below, of a yellowish-brown. 

This insect also caught at Nepean Towers ; was found under 
bark without web or tube of silk, in December 1866. 

S. DEPRESSA. 

$ length nearly 5 lines. 

This insect, in the form of all its parts, closely resembles the 
preceding. 

The cejyhalothorax : a little over two lines long and broad, is 
of a reddish-grey, with two bands of reddish-brown meeting at 
the base of the caput, curving outwards from that point. 

Clypeus : reddish-brown. 

Legs and Palpi : yellowish-brown ; the tubercles of brown, 
which give a mottled appearance above. 

Falces : yellowish-brown. 

Maxillae and Sternum . reddish-brown, with a few scattered 
hairs of a light color. 

Abdomen : depressed, nearly three lines long and nearly as 
broad at posterior part, which is broadest ; color, greyish-brown 
with neai-ly white patches, tuberculated slightly to the sides, 
which are slightly darker ; below, of a dirty brown. 

I have this insect from Cape York, N.A. 

S. KLONGATA. 

$ adult ? length 3^ lines. 

This insect differs from the preceding, which it greatly 
resembles both in form and color ; in the shape of the cephalo- 
thorax which is round ; the legs are longer in proportion ; the 
whole insect is flatter, and more tuberculated at posterior part. 

Sternum : is broadest in rear, truncate in front ; the fem,ur 
and tibia of first pair of legs are of a darker color ; the distinct 
marking on the cephalothorax of the preceding species does not 
appear in this one, but there are two tubercles of a darker color 
in the centre of the cephalothorax ; the general color of this 
species is the same but lighter than that of the preceding. 

I have this insect also from Cape York. 



BY H. H. BURTON BRADLEY, ESQ. 237 

S. Thomisoides. 

$ lengtli a little over 3 lines. 

Cephalothorax : reddish brown, 1 line long, 1 wide at base, 
cordate — cephalic protuberance not very high, slightly rugulose. 

Clypeus : not cleft, slightly prominent, lighter shade of same 
color. 

Eyes : as in S. tuberculata. 

Legs and Palpi : same color as cephalothorax ; armature and 
relative length as in 8. tuherculata. 

Falces : same shape as in that species, lighter red, hairy at 
tips ; fangs red, moderately long and curved. 

Maxillce : straight on outer side, moderately long, not much 
inclined on labium, rounded on inner side. 

Labium : broader than long ; rounded at apex. 

iStermim : as S. tuberculata ; color, reddish-brown. 

Abdomen : depressed ; slightly cleft in front ; about two lines 
long ; broadest at posterior part, and broader than long ; above, 
lighter shade of same color as cephalotlwrax with dark band 
running along sides ; slightly tuberculated at the rear ; below, 
same color but lighter. 

This insect, also from Cape York, in general appearance 
closely approaches the genus Thomisus. 

S. RIJFIVENTBIS. 

$ length 5 lines. 

Cephalothorax : 1| lines long and as broad ; dark reddish- 
brown ; cephalic protuberance moderately high and not cleft. 

Clypeus : not very prominent ; tuberculate red ; the cephalic 
protuberance is continued by a gradual distinct fall to the 
posterior part of the cephalothorax. 

Eyes : anterior intermediate extremely small and not much 
lower than laterals ; anterior laterals twice as large as posteriors ; 
posterior laterals placed lower than intermediates. 

Legs : as in 8. altifrons; color, uniform dark reddish-brown. 

Palpi : moderate in length and strength ; similar to legs in 
color and armature. 

Falces : long and strong ; similar in color to legs ; much 
inclined backwards. 



238 NEW SPECIES OF STEPHANOPIS. 

Maxillce and labium : as in S. altifrons ; color, light red. 

Sternum : large ; nearly round ; clothed with short hairs ; 
same color as labium. 

Abdomen : above, yellowish red with dark red-brown band- 
ings " en chevron ; " slightly rugulose, and furnished with short 
blunt spines more than three lines long and about as broad, oval, 
slight, truncated at the front ; below, reddish-yellow. 

I obtained this insect under bark, without web or tube of silk, 
at Tia, in February 1868. 

S. MACLEAyi. 

$ length 5 lines. 

CephalotJiorax : nearly two lines long and not quite as broad, 
and otherwise very like S. rufiventris ; the cephalic protuberance 
and clypeus also as in that species. 

Eyes : as in that species. 

Legs : very much similar to those of that species, but the 
femur of the first pair is more strongly developed ; color, dark 
reddish brown with irregular brown blotches on femur, two 
vellow bands on tarsi of third and fourth pairs. 

Falpi : moderate in length and strength, similar to the legs 
in color and armature. 

Falces : as in ^'. altifrons ; color I'ed, the fangs curved and 
surrounded with thick reddish hairs. 

Maxillce : moderately long, hollowed on the inner side, 
rounded slightly on the outer, and sui-rounding the labium 
which is as in (S. altifrons. 

Sternum : large oval, narrowest at its fore extremity ; clothed 
with hairs ; reddish brown, with a longitudinal hollow which is 
darker in the centre. 

Abdomen : above 3 lines long and about 2| broad, oval, red- 
dish-brown, a light band extending along the edges ; moderately 
rugulose, hinder part furnished with tubercles and blunt spines ; 
below, yellowish-brown. 

The insect I have described above I received from W. 
MacLeay, Esq., after whom I have named it. I believe he 
obtained it near Groulburn. 



Notes on a collection of Insects from Gayndah, by 

William MacLeay, Esq., F.L.S. 

Second Papek. 

[Read 4th December, 1871.] 

I NOW proceed with the list of Gayndah Coleoptera, in continua- 
tion of my paper of last Api'il. I was in hopes at one time of 
having been able to bring my task to a termination shortly, but 
press of business and other matters have reluctantly compelled 
me to give up all idea of proceeding for some time at least 
beyond the limits of the present paper. 

BUPRESTID^. 

420. — Nascio viridis. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Elongate, narrow, green, opaque, and punctate. Thorax 
slightly lobed in front, truncate behind, and parallel sided, with 
a transverse impression near the base, and a small round fovea 
in the centre of the base. Elytra coarsely striato-punctate — the 
interstices near the suture elevated, — a little broader than the 
thorax at the base, and wedge shaped and serrate towards the 
apex which is bidentate, with the posterior two thirds of the 
suture of a bluish tinge and a small yellow spot in the centre of 
each elytron. Body beneath and legs green, subnitid, punctate, 
and thinly clothed with a whitish pubescence. 

421. — AsTR^us Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 4 Hues. 
Head punctate, whitish pubescent, black on the occiput, green 
in front, with a slight central longitudinal ridge. Thorax punc- 
tate, slightly pubescent, and black with the sides green. Elytra 
black, tinged with green and purple, striato-punctate — the in- 

p 



240 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAII, 

terstices elevated, — and marked with a large round spot near the 
base, a fascia above the middle extending on the sides to near 
the humeral angle and not reaching the suture, another fascia 
behind the middle also not reaching the suture, and a small round 
spot near the apex, all of a golden yellow. Under side of body 
brassy green, with purplish spots on the abdomen. Legs green, 
with the apex of the tibioa and the tarsi yellow. 

422. — Melobasis azukeipennis. n. sp. 

Length 4| lines. 

Head blue, densely clothed with golden hair. Thorax of a 
fiery copper colour and punctate, densely on the sides, thinly in 
the middle. Elytra blue, nitid, sti'iato-punctate — the interstices 
smooth, — and strongly serrated at and near the apex. Body 
beneath brassy green, changing to steel blue towards the apex of 
the abdomen. In the female the under surface and legs are 
entirely blue. 

I find specimens from Port Denison of this beautiful species 
in my collection labelled M. azureipennis La Ferte, but I have not 
been able to find any notice of such an insect having been 
described. 

423. — Melobasis costata. n. sp. 

Length 6| lines. 
Elongate, bronze green, subopaque, densely and finely punc- 
tate. Head clothed with whitish pubescence. Thorax less 
densely punctate than the rest of the body, with a minute fovea 
in the centre of the base, and with an almost imperceptible 
smooth space marking the median line. Scutellum small, rounded, 
green, smooth, and nitid. Elytra slightly serrated towards the 
apex, and marked with three elevated smooth lines, the inner 
one largest and nearly reaching the apex, the second less dis- 
tinct but nearly as long, the third least distinct and much shorter. 
There is also a short costa near the scutellum extending from 
the base to the suture at about one thii'd of its length. Legs 
coppery red, tarsi cyaneous. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 241 

424.— Melobasis apicalis. b. sp. 
Length 4| lines. 
Green, subnitid, densely punctate. Head brassy in front and 
roughly punctate. Thorax transversely punctate, with a short 
clear space marking the base of the median line. Elytra trans- 
versely depressed near the base — the depression not extending 
to the suture — and serrate towards the apex, with the apex and 
the apical portions of the suture and sides of a bluish purple. 
Body beneath and legs of a coppery hue, clothed with a short 
white pubescence. Tarsi green. 

425. — Melobasis obscdra. n. sp. 
Length 2^ lines. 
Reddish brown, opaque, densely punctate, and of an oblong 
oval form. Thorax much broader than the length, broader 
behind than in front, slightly bisinuate at the base and trans- 
versely punctate. Scutellum small, oval, depressed and pur^p 
tate. Elytra transversely impressed near the base, rather flat, 
of the width of the base of the thorax at the base, minutely ser- 
rated behind, separately rounded at the apex, and clouded with 
some dull coppery red patches 

426 — Neocdris Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 2f lines. 

Subelongate, black, subnitid, punctate. Head deeply im- 
pressed between the eyes and of a bluish tinge. Thorax sub- 
convex, and roundly lobed at the base. Scutellum small, sub- 
triangular, punctate. Elytra purplish black, striato-punctate — 
the interstices elevated — with a small yellow spot at the base of 
the fifth interstice, another on the lateral raargin, and a large 
round spot of the same colour above the middle of each elytron. 
The legs, antennae, and underside of body are cyaneous. 

427. — ISTeocuris gracilis, n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Greenish black, subnitid, punctate. Head green in front and 
without frontal impi-ession. Thorax slightly lobed behind, and 



242 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

minutely foveafce in the centre of the base, with the sides of a 
fiery copper colour. Scutellum small, subglobular and smooth. 
Elytra transverselj^ rugose, with the apex separately rounded and 
somewhat dehiscent. Legs viridi-^neous. 

428. — Anthaxia obscora. n. sp. 

Length 2^ lines. 
Brownish or greenish black, opaque, subgranulate, shallowly 
and densely punctate. Forehead viridi-eeneous, clothed with 
white hair. Thorax twice as broad as the length, truncate 
behind, and emarginate on the sides near the posterior angles. 
Scutellum small, elongate, subtriangular, not pointed. Elytra of 
the width of the thorax at the base, and separately rounded at 
the apex, with a distinct transverse line at the base, some shallow 
■indistinct depressions near the base, and a fine stria on each side 
of the suture. 

429. — Anthaxia cupkipes. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. * 

Greenish black, snbopaque, punctate. Forehead clothed with 
whitish pubescence. Thorax nearly twice as broad as the length, 
roundly and broadly lobed in the middle of the base, with a 
small fovea marking the base of the median line. Scutellum 
small, cordate, pointed at the apex and punctate. Elytra trans- 
versely marked at the base, finely serrated on the sides 
posteriorly, and rather acutely roundly at the apex. Under side 
of body very brilliant, green in the centre, and cupreous on the 
sides and apex. Legs of a coppery red. 

430. — Anthaxia purpubeicollis. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Black, subopaque, punctate. Forehead clothed with white 
pubescence. Thorax purple, subnitid, lobed at the base, with a 
minute fovea in the extremity of the lobe. Scutellum subtrian- 
gular, punctate. Elytra bisinuate at the base, transversely 
depressed near the base, acutely rounded and dehiscent at the 



BY W. MACLEAY, E8Q., F.L.S. 243 

apex, and very minutely serrated on the sides towards the ex- 
tremity. Body beneath and legs brassy, punctate and subnitid. 

431. — Anthaxia nigra, n. sp. 
Length 2^ lines. 
Differs from the last in being much smaller, in being entirely 
black, in having the median line of the thorax slightly marked in 
front, and in having the scutellum raised in the centre. 

The three last species agree in having the base of the thorax 
roundly lobed in the centre and sharply at the posterior angles, 
and in so far differ materially from the typical form of Anthaxia. 

NoTOGRAPTUS. n. gen. 

This genus seems to be nearly allied to Anthaxia. The 
antennae are identical, the epistome, the head, the eyes, the palpi, 
the position of the antennal pores, the form of the antennal 
cavities, the prosternum, raetasternura and legs likewise accord in 
almost every particular. The labrum, however, is rounded at the 
apex, the thorax is transverse, rounded on the sides, considerably 
narrowed at the posterior angles, and bisiuuate at the base with 
a central broadly rounded lobe. The scutellum is small, of the 
form of an equilateral triangle, and depressed ou the surface. 
The elytra are broad and rather flat. 

432. NOTOGRAPTUS SULCIPENNJS. n. sp. 

Length 4| lines. 
Brownish black, very opaque, densely punctate. Forehead 
clothed with white hair, and with two small tubercles between the 
eyes. Thorax with three broad longitudinal depressions clothed 
with silvery hair, the central one being on the median line. 
Elytra as broad as the thorax at its broadest part, rounded at 
the humeral angles, and conjointly rounded at the apex, with two 
broad longitudinal depressions on each elytron, one extending 
from the humeral angle downwards and inwards for two-thirds of 
its length, the other outside of the first and short. Under side of 
body and legs black and subnitid. 



244 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

433. — NOTOGRAPTUS HIEROGLTPHICUS. 11. sp 
Length 2 J lines. 
This insect is very much like the last species, it differs chiefly 
in its much smaller size, in the head being without tubercles and 
with the white hair forming two rather indistinct fascias, in the 
thorax not having the lateral longitudinal depressions extending 
to the apex, and in the elytra having a rather narrow line of 
golden pubescence extending from the base to near the apex, 
in a series of zigzag and rectangular forms. 

434. CUEIS SPLENDENS. n. Sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
Head brassy green, densely punctate, and deeply excavated 
in front along the median line. Thorax broader than the length, 
a little broader behind than in front, somewhat lobed in the 
middle at the apex and base, rounded at the anterior angles, 
acute at the posterior angles, and of a dark blue colour, with the 
median line and the sides of a reddish golden lustre and punctate, 
the former narrow in front and broad and foveate behind, the 
latter broad and but slightly foveate. Scutellum small, round, 
and of a reddish golden hue. Elytra as broad as the thorax at 
the base, slightly narrowed behind, obliquely truncate at the apex, 
slightly sinuate on the sides, irregularly and coarsely punctate, of 
a coppery red on the suture and sides, with a strong costa near the 
sides behind and with two costse on the middle of each elytron 
which portion is of a greenish hue. Body beneath brassy green, 
legs blue. The male is smaller and of less brilliant colouring 
than the female. 

The most marked distinguishing feature in this species seems 
to be the broad obliquely truncated elytra. I have seen several 
species from northern parts of Australia similar to it in this 
respect, but none of them have been described. 

435. — Stigmodera impressicollis, MacL., W. Trans. 
Ent. Soc. N. 8. Wales, I., page 32. 

436. — Stigmodera sexguttata, MacL., W. Trails. 
Ent. Soc. N. S. Wales, I., 2}ctge 29. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 245 

437. — Stigmodera distincta, Saund. Journ. Linn. 
Soc, ]8G8,2}age 473. 

438. — Stigmodera Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 

Brassy black, subnitid, finely punctate. Forehead broadly 
excavated. Thorax foveate in the centime of the base. Scutellura 
transverse, smooth, pointed and of a greenish black. Elytra 
striato-punctate, obliquely truncate and strongly bispiuose at the 
apex, and of a yellowish red colour with a spot adjoining the 
scutellum, a narrow fascia behind the middle and a large trans- 
verse spot reaching the suture near the apex, of a bluish black. 
Under surface and legs bluish black, subnitid. 

This species is somewhat like the S. distincta of Saunders 
and S. Andersonii of Laporte and Gory. 

439. — Stigmodera violacea, MacL., W. Trans Ent. 
Soc. N. S. Wales, I., page 23. 

440. — Stigmodera rufipes, MacL., W. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. S. Wales, I., page 23. 

441. — Stigmodera Krefftii. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 

Head and thorax brassy black, punctate and subopaque, the 
latter lightly marked on the median line and foveate at the base. 
Scutellum green, coarsely punctate. El3"tra punctato-striate with 
the second interstice strongly costate, minutely bidentate at the 
apex, and of a blackish purple colour, with a large spot at the 
base not touching the suture, and extending along the side at 
the humeral angle, a bi'oad median fascia not reaching the suture, 
and a smaller subapical fascia, also not reaching the suture, all 
of a reddish yellow. The subapical fascia is extended a little 
along the lateral margin of the elytra and is there of a deep red 
colour. Under side of body bras.sy black, and slightly pubescent. 
Legs and parts of the mouth dark blue. 



246 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

442. — Stigmodbra elongatdla. n. sp. 

Length 4| lines. 

Elongate, narrow, subniticl, punctate. Head and thorax 
brassy green, the former very slightly excavated in front, the 
latter foveate and squamose at the sides, and slightly depressed 
at the base, with the median line lightly marked. Scutellum 
rather elongate, depressed, not punctate. Elytra punctato- 
striate, — the second interstice lai'ger than the others, — closely 
bispinose at the apex, and of a purplish or bluish black colour, 
with four discal and two lateral yellow spots on each el3^tron 
placed much in the same way as in S. Xanthojpilosa Hope. 
Under side of body nitid, with silvery pile or scales. 

I have in my cabinet a Sydney species, which I believe to be 
unnamed, which only differs from this insect in being of a more 
brilliant colouring and in having the scutellum punctate. 

443. — PoLYCESTA Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 9| lines. 
Brown, opaque, rough, and somewhat flat. Head broadly 
depressed in front. Thorax much broader than the head, nearly 
truncate in front, rounded on the sides, evidently broader behind 
than in front, slightly sinuate at the base, foveolate in the middle, 
and marked on the median line by a small elevation. Scutellum 
small, truncate, black and nitid. Elytra coarsely striato-punc- 
tate and somewhat pointed at the apex. Under side of body 
with a slight coppery reflexion. 

444.— Chkysobothkis Saundersii. n. sp. 
Length 7| lines. 
Of a somewhat nitid bi'onz}- colour, densely and finely punc- 
tate. Head pilose in front, coppery red and carinate on the 
summit. Thorax transversely punctate, and obliquely bifoveate 
near the sides, with the median line lightly marked. Scutellum 
small, triangular, and smooth. Elytra flat, and serrate behind, 
with a fine costa near the suture, an abbreviated one about the 
middle, a fovea near the humeral angle, and three small coppery 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 247 

red foveae on each elytron, one at the base of the first costa, the 
second on the middle of the second costa, the other between that 
and the apex and outside the second costa. Body beneath brassy 
black, nitid and thinly clothed with a whitish pubescence. 

445. — Chrtsobotheis Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
This species differs from the last in being less flat, in having 
the head less strongly carinate on the summit, in having the 
thorax of a more purple hue, the lateral fovere scarcely visible, 
the median line not traceable, and the basal lobe more rounded, 
in having the elyti'a of a bluish black colour, without the humeral 
fovea, with the costse less marked, and with the three discal foveae 
larger and of a golden lustre, and in having the under side of 
the body very brilliant. 

446. — Chrysobothkis viridis. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Dark bronzy green, nitid, and finely punctuate. Head flat in 
front, thickly clothed with a short silvery pubescence, and not 
carinatcd on the summit. Thorax transversely punctulate and 
shaped much as in the last described species. Scutellum some- 
what transverse and pointed behind. Elytra flatter than in the 
last species, with the first and second costse as in G. Saunder.^ii, 
with a third costa distinct near the apex, with a deep humeral 
fovea, and with the three discal fovese large, placed as in the 
last species and of a golden green colour. Under side brilliant and 
gi'een in the centre, with the sides and legs cupreous, 

447. — Ethon latipennis. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines. 
Ovate, transversely punctate, subnitid, squaraose, and of a 
black colour. Head golden and covered with whitish hair, which 
forms a prominent tuft near each eye. Thorax rough, foveate at 
the sides, smoother in the middle, distinctly marked and finely 
punctate on the median line, and having a melallic gloss on the 
mai'gins and elevated roughnesses. Scutellum viridi-^neous. 



248 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

almost smooth. Elytra broader than the thorax, subdepressed, 
parallel-sided for two-thirds of their length, narrowed on the 
apical third and separately rounded at the apex, with a strong 
tubercle near the humeral angle, an elongate one between that 
and the scutellum, and with numerous patches of short black 
scales forming towards the apex an irregular fascia. Under 
side of body and legs' dark blue, and finely punctate, with the 
apex of the abdomen and under side of the tibiae, cupreous. 

448. — CissEis DiMiDiATA. n. sp. 
Length 3| lines. 

Entirely of a metallic green, excepting the apical half of the 
elytra and more than half the suture, which are of a coppery red. 
Head densely punctate, and lightly excavated in front. Thorax 
transversely punctate and without fovesB or median line. Under 
side of body finely punctate. 

449. — CiSSEIS IMPRESSICOLLIS. n. Sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Green, nitid, punctate. Thorax impressed longitudinally at 
the base near each side, the impression extending to the elytra. 
Scutellum scarcely punctate. Elytra rather elongate and of a 
purplish green with several round shallow fovese of a brassy 
green. Body beneath very nitid. 

450. — CiSSEIS VirUDl-AUKEA. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
This species closely resembles the last in form and sculpture. 
It is however entirely of a brilliant golden green, and the shallow 
foveas on the elytra are larger, covered with short white setae or 
scales and are without metallic gloss. 

45 L — CORAEBUS MARMORATUS. n. sp. 

Length 3f lines. 
Brassy black, nitid, densely punctate. Head golden coloured 
and lightly excavated. Thorax rounded at the posterior angles, 



BY W. HUCLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 949 

broadly rounded at the basal lobe, and thickly clothed except 
in the middle with short whitish scales. Elytra of the width of 
the thorax at the base, becoming narrower on the posterior third, 
separately rounded at the apex, and marbled all over with 
patches and fasciaj of short whitish scalies. Body beneath bluish 
black. 

452. — Agrilus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
Dark brown, opaque, finely punctate. Head of a roseate hue 
in front and lightly foveated. Thorax deeply marked on the 
median line except in front, and with a short sublateral elevated 
line and a fovea in front of it. Elytra largely foveate at the base, 
unicostate, and pointed and serrate at the apex. Body beneath 
cupreous and nitid, with a short silvery pubescence. 

453.— 7AGRILUS DEAURATDS. n. Sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Very narrow, black, subnitid with au occasional metallic 
gloss, and finely punctate. Head depressed on the vertex. Thorax 
transversely punctate, deeply marked on the median line behind, 
and rather longer than the width. Scutellum transversely 
carinated. Elytra bispinose at the apex, and of a tarnished 
looking golden yellow colour, with an oblique dark blue fascia 
near the apex. Body beneath blue and thinly punctate. 

EUCNEMID^. 

Of this family there are three species in the collection, all of 
different genera, and I believe undescribed, but as I have not been 
able to procure Bonvouloir's Monograph of the group, in which 
he adds many genera and species to those previously known, 
I must pass them over for a time. 

ELATERIDJE. . " 

454. — Agrypnus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 15 lines. 
Brown, subopaque. finely punctate and clothed with a silky 
ashen pubescence. Antennae and palpi dull red. Head lightly 



250 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

excavated in front. Thorax longer than the width, narrower in 
front than behind and rounded a little on the sides, with the an- 
terior angles prominent, the posterior divergent subacufe and 
prolonged backwards, the median line slightly marked near the 
base where it bisects the central tubercle, and with the sides 
finely carinated along the basal half. Scutellum large, longer than 
the width, and broadly rounded at the apex. Elytra as broad as 
the thorax at the base, sinuate behind the humeral angles, 
narrowed gradually and rounded at the apex with eight 
distinctly punctured striaa on each elyti'on. Legs clothed with a 
very silky pubescence. 

455. — Agrtpnds latior. n. sp. 

Length 16| lines. 
This species is longer and broader than the last, and differs 
from it also in having the antennae and palpi brown, the basal 
tubercle of the thorax transverse and not bisected by the median 
line, the posterior angles shorter and more rounded though still 
pointed backwards, and the lateral carination exteadiug beyond 
the posterior half. The scutellum differs also in having three 
impressions on the posterior naargin. In this as in the former 
species the striae on the elytra are most deeply punctate towards 
the sides. 

456 — Lacon mamillatus, Cand. Mon. 1, page 107, 
t. 2./. 3. 

457. — Lacon Gatndahensis. n. sp. 

Length 6| lines. 
Dark brown, subopaque, punctate — each puncture furnished 
with a yellow decumbent setiform scale. Thorax subconvex, 
longer than the width, rounded on the sides in front, slightly nar- 
rowed towards the base, and widened again at the posterior angles 
which are acute, with the base largely but not deeply emarginate, 
the median line scarcely traceable, and the lateral carination very 
small and extending along the basal half. Elytra narrowed and 
rounded at the apex, and striato-punctate — the punctures large 
and quadrangular. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.8. 251 

458. — Lacon alternans. n. sp. 
Length 4j lines. 
Reddish brown, opaque, elongate, flat, punctate and clothed 
with cinereous scales. Head slightly depi-essed in the midSle. 
Thorax longer than the width, rounded on the sides and almost 
truncate behind, with the posterior angles curved outwards, 
rather rounded, and without carination. Elytra subacutely 
rounded at the apex, and covered with rows of large punctures, 
with every second interstice subelevated and densely clothed 
with scales. 

459 — Lacon maculatus. n. sp. 
Length 3| lines. 
Brown, opaque, flat, densely punctate, and clothed with very 
short setiform scales of a brown colour, interspersed with numerous 
indistinct spots of reddish brown and cinerous scales. Thorax 
with the median line traceable, the posterior angles curving 
slightly outwards and truncate at the apex, and the base rather 
deeply bi-emarginate. Scutullum nearlj^ round. Elytra strongly 
striato-punctate, slightly widened about the middle, and narrow- 
ed and rounded at the apex. Antennse and tarsi pale red. 

460. — Lacon gbandlatus. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 

Dark brown, opaque, broad, flat, densely punctate, granulose 
looking, and scaly. Thorax much, longer than the width, with 
the posterior angles not externally produced, and with the base 
deeply bi-emarginate. Scutellum subtransverse. Elytra strongly 
bisinuate at the base, not much longer than the width, narrowed 
roundly at the apex, angularly sinuated behind the humeral 
angles, and striato-punctate with the alternate interstices subcos- 
tate. Beneath with the extremities of the prothorax, the lateral 
margins of the abdominal segments, and the legs, piceous red. 

461. — -Aphileus lucanoides, Cand. Mon. 1, pagelS4, 
t.S.f.5. 



252 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

462. — MoNOCREPiDius Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 10 lines. 
Dark brown, subopaque, finely and densely punctate, and 
clothed with reddish yellow decumbent pile. Antennae and palpi 
reddish. Thoi'ax subconvex, scarcely longer than the width, and 
very lightly marked on the median line near the base, with the 
posterior angles strong, bicarinate, and rather obtuse. Scutellum 
more elongate than in Monocrepidius Australasice. Elytra scarcely 
longer than twice the width, broadest about the middle, slightly 
narrowed and rounded at the apex, and strongly striato-punc- 
tate. Legs reddish. 

463. — Monocrepidius striatus. n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 
Of a more elongate form than the last species, brown, sub- 
opaque, very finely and densely punctate, and thickly clothed 
with a pale fulvous decumbent pile. Thorax longer than the 
width, with the median line marked on the posterior half, and 
with the posterior angles strong, subacute, and bicarinate — the 
inner carina small- Elytra nearly three times as long as the 
width, striated — the interstices nearly flat and densely punctate, — 
and separately subacuminate and minutely emarginate at the 
apex. Legs and antennae yellowish red. 

464. — Monocrepidius acuminatus. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
Subelongate, reddish brown, subopaque, very finely punctate, 
and clothed with a very short ashen pile. Head somewhat 
depressed in the middle. Thorax much longer than the width, 
with the median line scarcely traceable behind and the posterior 
angles strong, subacute and bicarinate — the inner carina very 
small. Elytra finely punctato-striate, with two reddish patches 
at the base, and with the apex emarginate and minutely toothed 
at the outer extremity of the emargination. Legs yellow. 

465. — Monocrepidius breviceps. n. sp. 
Length 7 lines. 
Subelongate, brown, subopaque, finely punctate, and densely 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 253 

clothed with a pale fulvous pubescence. Top of the head as far 
as the frontal ridge short and horizontal. Thorax elongate, with 
the median line distinct throughout, and the posterior angles 
acute and bicarinate. Elytra reddish at the base, nearly three times 
as long as wide, narrowed and separately rounded at the apex, and 
striato-punctate, with the interstices nearly flat. Antennae and 
the parts of the mouth red. Legs reddish brown and silky. 

466. MONOCRBPIDIUS RUBICUNDUS. n. Sp. 

Length 5| lines. 
This species is of a less elongate form than the last, redder 
in colour and more nitid. The head is less horizontal and short 
on the upper part. The thorax is less elongate, has the median 
line deeply marked but on posterior half only, and has the 
posterior angles rather less acute and produced. The punctures 
in the striee of the elytra are also larger. 

467. — MONOCREPIDIUS ATRATUS. n. Sp. 

Length 5 lines. 

Black, subopaque, densely and finely punctate and clothed 
with very short fulvous pile. Head with a small longitudinal 
ridge on the vertex. Thorax subconvex, and very little longer 
than the width, with the median line slightly marked near the 
base only, and the posterior angles rather short, acute and 
strongly bicarinate. Scutellum as well as base of thorax clothed 
with ashen pile. Elytra about two and a half times longer than 
the width, rounded at the apex, and strongly striato-punctate. 
Antennae and legs reddish brown, silky. Abdomen covered with 
a short sericeous fulvous pile. 

468. MONOCREPIDIUS MINOR. n. sp. 

Length 4 li)ies. 

Black, subnitid, punctate and clothed with long ashen pile. 

Head with a fine longitudinal ridge on the vertex. Thorax not 

longer than the width, with the median line indistinctly marked 

and the posterior angles large, acute, and bicarinated. Scutel- 



254 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

lum oblong, I'eddish. Elytra nearly three times longer than the 
width, striate- punctate, and narrowed and rounded at the apex. 
Legs yellow. 

469. — MONOCREPIDIUS SUBMARMOKATDS. n. Sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Subelongate, black, slightly nitid, punctate, and clothed with 
ashen pile. Head reddish in front. Thorax longer than the 
width, with the median line very lightly marked, and the pos- 
terior angles strong, acute, bicarinated, aud of a reddish colour. 
Scutellum elongate, red. Elytra three times longer than the 
width, striato-punctate, and rounded at the apex, with small 
patches, and rather indistinct fasciae of whitish pile interspersed 
over their entire surface. Abdomen and legs of a brownish red. 

470. — MONECREPIDIDS FDLVIPENNIS. n. Sp. 

Length 4^ lines. 
Subnitid, finely punctate, and clothed with long fulvous pu- 
bescence. Head rather convex, black behind and red in front. 
Thorax very little longer than the width, not marked or obso- 
letely so on the median line, and of a brownish colour in front 
and red behind, with the posterior angles broad, acute, and 
strongly bicarinated. Elytra three times longer than the width, 
of a pale red colour, striato-punctate, and rounded at the apex. 
Body beneath and legs brownish red. 

471. — MONOCREPIDIUS NEBDLOSUS. n, Sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Subelongate, dark red, subopaque, densely punctate, and 
slightly pilose. Head subconvex. Thorax much longer than 
the width, without median line, and with the posterior angles 
moderately long, the appearance of having the apex broken off", 
and the inner carination very small. Elytra three times longer 
than the width, strongly striato-punctate, rounded at but not 
narrowed towards the apex, and somewhat cloudily marked with 
a bi-oad sutural vitta and two broad fasciae of a dark brown 
colour. Abdomen pale red. Legs yellow. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ES(i , F.L.S. 255 

472. — MONOCKEPIDIUS SUBFLAVUS. n. sp. 

Length 2 1 lines. 
Pale yellow, subopaque, minutely punctate and pilose. Head 
dark brown, subconvex. Thorax much longer than the width, 
and brown at the apex — the brown colour sometimes extending 
in a point almost to the base in the middle and on the sides — 
with the posterior angles rather short, subacute, and bicarinated, 
the inner carina very minute. Scutellum nearly round. 
Elytra not three times longer than the width, striato-punctate, 
and rounded at the apex, with an elongate lateral spot behind the 
humeral angles, an oblong patch on the suture of the base, and 
a narrow zig-zag fascia behind the middle, of a dark brown. 
Body beneath brownish yellow. 

473. MONOCREPIDIUS SDBMACULATUS. n. sp. 

Length 2^ lines. 
Brown, subopaque, finely and densely punctate, and covered 
with a short yellowish pile. Head subconvex. Thorax longer 
than the width, and pale coloured at the base, with the median 
line obsolete, and the posterior angles acute, unicarinate, and 
slightly curved upwards. Scutellum reddish. Elytra a little 
longer than twice the width, striato-punctate, and rounded at the 
apex, with some indistinct dull red patches over their surface. 
Legs pale yellow. 

474. — MONOCREPIDIDS ALBIDUS. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 

Pale reddish brown, opaque, minutely punctate, and entirely 
covered with a very dense short whitish pubescence. Head 
nearly flat. Thorax longer than the width, without median line, 
and with the posterior angles rather short, acute, and strongly 
carinated. Elytra longer than twice the width, striato-punctate, 
and rounded at the apex. The parts of the mouth yellow. 

475. MONOCRPEIDIUS SDBGEMINATDS. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Reddish brown, subopaque, densely punctate and clothed with 



256 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

aslien pubescence. Head depressed in the middle. Thorax longer 
than the width, without median line, and with the posterior angles 
subacute and strongly bicarinated. Scutellum reddish, subelon- 
gate. Elytra nearly three times longer than the width, narrowed 
and rounded at the apex, and striato punctate — the alternate in- 
terstices being evidently broader. Body beneath dark brown, 
subnitid and finely punctate. Legs pale brown. 

476. — MoNOCREPiDius Candezei. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 

Black, subopaque, densely punctate and clothed with a pale 
fulvous pubescence. Head subconvex. Thorax a little longer 
than the width, reddish at the base, without median line and with 
the posterior angles subacute and unicarinate. Elytra three 
times longer than the width, striato-punctate, and rounded at the 
apex. Legs pale yellow. 

477. — MONOCREPIDIUS ELONGATULUS. n. Sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Black, slightly nitid, punctate, and clothed with a short pale 
fulvous pubescence. Head minutely carinated on the top. Thorax 
much longer than the width, reddish at the base, without median 
line, and with the posterior angles subacute and bicarinate. 
Scutellum reddish, nearly round. Elytra three times longer 
than the width, striato-punctate, and rounded at the apex. Body 
beneath reddish brown, nitid, finely punctate, and clothed with a 
thin silky pubescence. Legs pale yellow. 

478.— MONOCREPIDIUS CASTANEIPENNIS. n. Sp. 

Length 5| lines. 
Brown, punctate, subnitid, and clothed with a long thin 
yellowish pubescence. Thorax not longer than the width, with- 
out median line, and with the posterior angles rather short, 
subacute, and bicarinate. Scutellum subpentagonal. Elytra of 
a dark chesnut colour, twice as long as the width, narrowed and 
rounded at the apex, and striato-punctate, the punctures large 
and oblong. Abdomen reddish. Legs pale red. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 257 

479. — Megapenthes automolus, Cand. Mem. 8oc. 
Boy. Liege Vol. 14, page 495. 

480. — Elastrus flavipes. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Dark brown, subnitid, punctate, and sparingly pubescent. 
Head subconvex. Thorax longer than the width, with the median 
line deeply marked excepting near the apex, and with the 
posterior angles acute, cariuated, curved outwards, and of a 
reddish colour. Scutellum dark red, nearly round. Elytra about 
three times longer than the width, rounded at the apex, rather 
coarsely punctate, and striato-punctate. Body beneath piceous 
brown, nitid, minutely punctate, and finely pubescent. Legs 
yellow. 

481. — Elater Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 2 J lines. 
Blackish brown, subopaqne, finely punctate, and clothed with 
short yellowish red pubescence. Head and thorax convex ; the 
latter short, without median line, with the posterior angles short 
and obtuse, and with a sharp longitudinal impression on the base 
between the posterior angles and the middle. Scutellum large, 
nearly round. Elytra little longer than twice the width, rounded 
at the apex, and strongly striato-punctate. Antennee palpi and 
legs pale red. 

482. — Crtptohypnds vabiegatus. n. sp. 
Length If lines. 
Head and thorax subconvex, punctate, and densely covered 
with short black scales interspersed with some transverse golden 
scales. In form the thorax is little longer than the width, 
rounded on the sides, slightly narrowed behind, with the median 
line marked by a very minute smooth raised line, the posterior 
angles short and subacute, and a short fine ridge extending from 
the base upwards near and parallel to the posterior angles. The 
basal .portion is mostly covered with silvery scales. Elytra 
rounded at the humeral angles, slightly widened towards the 



258 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

middle, narrowed and rounded at the apex, scarcely longer than 
twice the width, striate, and densely covered with scales, those 
near the scutellum being of a golden tinge, and on the sides and 
apex of a silvery white, while a broad fascia behind the middle, — 
which extends upwards in a narrow vitta along the suture and 
spreads outwards on each side into a half-circle, — and two sub- 
apical spots are formed of black scales. The antennae have the 
first joint red, the remainder brown. The legs are pale red. The 
tarsi brown. 

483. — Cardiophorus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Entirely testaceous yellow, opaque, finely punctate, and clothed 
with a long pale yellow pubescence. Thorax not longer than the 
width, and a little wider behind than in front, with the posterior 
angles short, subacute, and not carinated. Scutellum elongate- 
cordiform. Elytra paler than the thorax, very densely pubescent, 
not longer than twice the width, striato-punctate, and narrowed 
and rounded at the apex. 

484. CORYMBITES RUFIPENNIS. n. Sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Nitid, punctate, and black, with the basal articles of the 
antennae, the palpi, the sides and under surface of the prothorax, 
the elytra, and the legs, red. Head with a curved transverse 
depression on the forehead. Thorax not longer than the width, 
with the median line marked near the base, and with the pos- 
terior angles rather short, acute, and carinate. Elytra longer 
than twice the width, roughly punctate, and deeply striated. 
Apex of abdomen reddish. 

485. — CORTMBITES NIGRINUS. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Differs from the last in size, in having the elytra less nar- 
rowed towards the apex, and in being entirely black excepting 
the posterior angles and under side of thorax, the abdomen, and 
the legs which are reddish, and the antennas which are brown. 
Probably the male of the last species. 



BY W. MAGLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 259 

486. — Ophidius brevicornis. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 

Brassy black, densely punctate, and subopaque. Head with 
the border depressed in front, and a broad golden yellow vitta 
on each side between the eyes. Thorax elongate, wider behind 
than in front, bituberculate at the base, and profoundly sulcated 
in the middle, with three broad golden yellow vittee on the back, 
and with the posterior angles long, acute, and carinate. Scutel- 
lum subtriangular, rounded at the apex. Elytra subelongate, 
subacumiuate at the apex, striate with the interstices subcostate, 
and of a testaceous yellow colour barred and spotted with dark 
brown. Under side of body black, subnitid, and minutely punc- 
tate. Legs reddish brown. Antennae black, short, thick, and 
strongly serrate. 

Though resembling very much the other species of OpMdius, 
this insect differs considerably from all of them and from the 
characters of the genus given by M. Candeze. The antennae 
are peculiar, the scutellum is not at all globular, and the tarsi are 
not dilated. 

487.— Anilicus semiflavus, Germ. Zeitschr, Y.,page 
1G3.— Cand. Mon. vol. 4, page 329. 
anticus Dej. Cat. Srd Ed., page 106. 

488. LUDIUS ATRIPENNIS. n. sp. 

Length 2f lines. 
Elongate, narrow, subnitid, punctate, clothed with semi- 
decumbent hairs, and of a black colour with the thorax above and 
below, the three basal segments of the abdomen and the legs red. 
Thorax with the median line lightly marked, and tlie posterior 
angles strongly carinate. Elytra striato-punctate, the punctures 
large and oblong. 

489. — ACRONIOPUS RDFIPENNIS. n. sp. 

Length 2j lines. 
Brown, subopaque, punctate, and clothed with short semi-erect 
hair. Head and thorax convex, the latter not longer than the 



260 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

width, without median line, with the posterior angles rather 
short, and with these and the anterior margin of a dark red 
colour. Scutellum black, nitid, sparingly punctate and of oval 
form. Elytra as broad as the thorax, nearly parallel-sided, 
rounded at the apex, striato-punctate and of a pale red colour. 
Legs red. 

490, — ACRONIOPUS PDBESCENS. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Subelongate, black, subnitid, punctate, and rather densely 
clothed with a whitish pubescence. Thorax not longer than the 
width, without median line, and with the posterior angles acute. 
Elytra subelongate, subacuminate towards the apex, and roughly 
punctate but not distinctly striate. Antennae and legs reddish. 

491. — -AscESis Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 

Brown, subopaque, punctate and thinly clothed with whitish 
pile. Head subconvex, and with the frontal border nearly com- 
plete as in Monocrepidius. Thorax not longer than the width, 
without median line, and with the posterior angles acute, 
moderately long, carinate and slightly directed outwards. Elytra 
three times longer than the width, parallel-sided, rounded at the 
apex, and striato-punctate. Under side of body nitid, silky 
pubescent and minutely punctate. Legs and antennas reddish 
brown. 

I am probably wrong in placing this insect in the genus 
Ascesis. The antennae are shorter, thicker, and more strongly 
dentated than in the typical species. The legs are much more 
thick and short, and the head is more like that of a Monocrepidius, 
than of any of the group in which Ascesis is placed. 

492. — DiCTENIOPHORUS VITTICOLLIS. n. Sp. 

Length ^ 4 lines. 
Black, subnitid, minutely and densely punctate, and densely 
clothed with a yery short fulvous pubescence. Thorax longer 
than the width, red on the sides, and hoary pubescent at the 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 261 

base, With the median Hne marked on the posterior half, and the 
posterior angles acute and carinate. Elytra pale red, subacumi- 
nate towards the apex, and striato-punctate. Antenna shorter 
than half the body, and strongly pectinate. 

493. — DiCTENIOPHORUS APICALIS. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Black, subnitid, punctate and clothed with very short pile. 
Thorax red with basal margin black, and scarcely longer than 
the width, with the median line deeply marked on the posterior 
half, and the posterior angles acute, carinate, curved slightly 
outwards, and of a black colour. Elytra subelongate, subacumi- 
nate at the apex, striato-punctate, and of a pale red colour on the 
basal two-thirds. 

494. — DiCTENIOPHORUS VITTATUS. n. sp. 

Length 1^ 3 lines. 
Elongate, narrow, black, subnitid, punctate, and moderately 
pubescent. Thorax much longer than the width, with the 
median, line only marked at the very base, and the posterior 
angles obtuse and carinate. Elytra striato-punctate with a 
broad lurid yellow vitta along the whole length of each elytron. 
Legs reddish brown. 

Hemiopsida. n. gen. 

Last joint of maxillary palpi small, subovoid. Head rather 
prominent, vertical, excavated, and broadly rounded in front. 
Eyes round, entirely disengaged from the thorax. Antennas 
moderately long, first joint thick, second very small, third also 
small but larger than the second, 4 to 10 long and dentated, 11 
very long and filiform. Thorax short, broadest at the base, 
Scutellum oblong, subtruncate. Legs thick, tarsi entire — 1st joint 
longest, the rest gradually decreasing to the fourth. Body rather 
robust. Prosternum convex and without mentonniere. 

495. — Hemiopsida Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 4 J lines. 
Convex, black, subopaque, punctate, and clothed .with short 



262 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

golden yellow pile. Antenna with the exception of the basal 
joint of a brownish red. Head deeply excavated in front between 
the antennae. Thorax shorter than the width, with the median 
'line slightly marked by a smooth linear space, a small fovea in 
the middle between the median line and the sides, and the pos- 
terior angles short and obtuse. Elytra dark red, coarsely punc- 
tate, and striate with the interstices elevated. Tarsi and ex- 
tremities of the tibias brownish red. 



MALACODERMID^. 

496. — Metriorrhynchus rhipidius, MacL. App. 
King's Surv., page 442. 
$ septemcavus, MacL. App. King's Surv., 
page 443. 

497. — Metriorrhynchus femoralis. n. sp. 
Length (^ 5 lines, ? 7 lines. 
Antennge black, dentate from the third article, and alike in 
both sexes. Head small, black, nitid, and deeply impressed. 
Thorax red with black centre, and divided as in the last species 
into 7 hollows, with the posterior angles pointed backwards 
more acutely than usual in the genus. Scutellum black, nearly 
square, emarginate at the apex. Elytra a little broader than the 
thorax at the base, and of an orange red colour tipped in the 
female with dark blue, with four fine costse on each, and with the 
intervals filled with shallow square puuctures disposed in double 
rows. Body beneath black. Legs black, excepting the coxae 
and basal two-thirds of the thighs which are red. 

498. — Metriorrhynchus nigripes. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
This species differs from the last in having the head only 
lightly impressed on the median line, and not nitid, in having the 
thorax more rounded at the posterior angles and black only on 
the basal portion of the middle, in having the elytra of a darker red 
and more deep punctation, and in having the legs entirely black. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 263 

499. — Metriorehynchus marginicollis. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Black. Antennae strongly dentate. Head transversely and 
deeply impressed between the eyes. Thorax 7-hollowed, txnd 
subtruncate at the base, with the lateral margins yellowish red. 
Scutellum deeply emarginate at the apex. Elytra yellowish red 
four-costate or counting the lateral border and the suture six- 
costate, with the intei'vals rather confusedly punctate in double 
rows, and towards the apex appearing to consist of single rows 
of transverse punctures. Legs and under surface of body entirely 
black. 

500. — Calochromus Guerinii. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 

Bluish black, nitid. Thorax little broader than the head, 
subtransverse, and quadrangular, with the angles rounded, the 
median line deeply impressed and foveate near the base, and the 
sides broadly bifoveate and of an orange colour. Scutellum sub- 
truncate. Elytra orange red with the apex blue, and closely 
subcostate, the alternate costae slightly larger than the others. 

I have named this species after the founder of the genus, who 
nearly forty years ago formed it for the reception of an insect of 
New Guinea. It is not by any means an uncommon Australian 
form. 

501. LdCIOLA FLAVICOLLIS. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Head nearly covered by the thorax, black, subopaque, sub- 
depressed, and canaliculated in the middle, with the eyes in the 
male very large. Thorax luteous yellow, transverse, subquadran- 
gular, largely lobed in the middle at the apex, slightly so at the 
base, and punctate, with the median line distinct, a transverse 
depression near the apex and base, and a shallow elongated 
fovea near the sides. Scutellum yellow, subtriangular, rounded 
at the apex. Elytra broader than the thorax, punctate, and of a 
dark brown colour, with the base, the suture as far as the middle, 
and the sides almost to the apex, of a luteous yellow. Body 



26^ THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

beneath black, eicepting the prothorax, the coxEe, and the basal 
portion of the thighs which are red, and the penultimate^ segment 
of the abdomen, which is of a waxy white. 

502. — Telephobds flavipbnnis. n. sp. 
Length 4| lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head with a yellow transverse spot at the 
insertion of the antennae, the second joint of these very short. 
Thorax square, and margined all round, with the angles and the 
apex rounded and the base minutely emarginate, the whole 
bordered with yellow. Elytra yellow, dehiscent, subacuminate, 
and confusedly punctate, with two very fine cost^ on each, the 
inner one short, the outer extending nearly to the apex. The 
coxjB and the apex of the abdominal segments are yellow. 

503. — Telephoeus ruficollis. n. sp. 
Length 4| lines. 
Head large, black, with a red spot on the vertex, and all in 
front of the insertion of the antennae yellow. The antennae are 
with the exception of the under side of the basal joint, brown. 
Thorax subtransverse, not narrowed behind, rounded at the 
angles, emarginate in the middle of the base, and of a dark red 
colour becoming yellow on the borders. Elytra bluish green, 
subnitid, granulose. Pro-meso, and meta-thorax, and apex of all 
the abdominal segments, yellow, coxae and basal half of 
thighs, red. 

604. — Telephorus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 4| lines. 
Broad, pale red, subnitid. Antennte robust. Thorax trans- 
verse, broadest at the base and deeply impressed at the posterior 
angles. Scutelluna subtriangular, rounded at the apex. Elytra 
confusedly punctate, obsoletely striate and of a yellow colour 
with the base and apex black. Antennae, palpi and legs except- 
ing the coxa3, black. 

505. ICHTHTDRUS DEPEESSICOLLIS. n. Sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Black, subnitid. Antennte brown with the last three joints 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 265 

pale 'red. Thorax rather longer than the width, rounded at the 
apex, base, and angles, transversely depressed in the middle, 
and of a' yellow colour with a broad black band in the middle. 
Scutellum yellow. Elytra short, dehiscent, subacuminate, and 
confusedly punctate, with an elongate yellow patch towards the 
■ base, and a broad fascia of the same colour near the apex. 
Prothorax beneath, coxeb, and apical edge of the abdominal 
segments yellow. Tibiae reddish brown. 

506. — Laius bellulus, Gruer. Voy. Coq., page 78, 
— Germ. Lwm. Ent. III., page 182. 

507. —Laius Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 

Cyaneous, nitid, punctate, hairy. Thorax red, transverse, 
deeply impressed along the base. Elytra with a broad golden 
fascia in the middle. 

This species differs from L. belluhis chiefly in being of a deeper 
blue, in being less strongly punctate, more hirsute, and in having 
no apical spot on the elytra, while the fascia is broader, straighter, 
and of a more yellow hue. 

508. — Malachius luridicollis. n. sp. 
Length 2j lines. 
Oblong, flat, black, subnitid, indistinctly punctate, and clothed 
with short erect fulvous pubescence. Head nitid, with the 
muzzle and three first joints of the antennfe pale red. Thorax 
transverse, nearly truncate at the apex, rounded at the anterior 
and subacute at the posterior angles, broadly rounded at the base, 
and of a lurid red colour, with the margins elevated and with two 
small deep round foveae at the base. Elytra as long as the ab- 
domen, broadest towards the apex, and of a blackish brown colour 
tinged with lurid brown at the base. Legs yellow, the fourth 
joint of the tarsi lobed beneath. 

509. — Carphdrus cyaneipennis. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Narrow, pale red, nitid and hairy. Head foveolate in front, 



266 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

with the first joint of the antennae large and emarginate on the 
upper surface. Thorax of the width of the head, truncate at the 
apex, and gradually rounded from the anterior angles along the 
sides, posterior angles, and base, and with a broad transverse 
depression near the apex and base. Elytra half the length of the 
abdomen, separately rounded at the apex, irregularly punctate 
and of a blue colour. Abdomen above and below with the last 
three segments red, the others black bordered with red. Legs 
and lateral margin of abdominal segments clothed with long hair. 

510. — Carphdrus elongatus. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Narrow, black, nitid, and hairy. Antennae short, submoni- 
liform, with the two first joints red. Head broadly bicanaliculate 
in front, and of a dark red colour. Thorax rather narrower than 
the head, longer than the width, rounded in front and behind, 
margined all round and of a dark red colour, with a black patch 
on each side, and a broad transverse depression near the apex 
and base. Scutellum small, transverse. Elytra very short, 
rather broader than the thorax, lightly punctate, and sub- 
truncate, with the basal half dark red. All the segments of the 
abdomen bordered with red. Tibiae reddish brown. 

511. — Carphdrus apicalis. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Elongate, subnitid, moderately hairy and of a red colour, with 
the six apical joints of the antennae, the back of the head, the 
apical two-thirds of the elytra, and the two apical segments of 
the abdomen, black. Thorax narrower than the head, longer 
than the width, broadest and subtruncate at the apex, constricted 
and ti-ansversely impressed near the base, and moderately rounded 
behind. Elytra short, considerably broader than the thorax, and 
broadest at the apex which is subtruncate. 

512. — Carphdrus azureipennis. n. sp. 
Length 3j lines. 
Elongate, nitid, clothed with long black hair. Head red, ex- 
serted, narrowed behind and deeply bicanaliculate between the 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ, F.L.S. 267 

eyes, with the first two joints of the antennse red, the rest black 
and subdentate. Thorax red, about the width of the head and 
truncate at the apex, longer than broad, slightly narrowed above 
the posterior angles, and slightly rounded and margined at the 
base, with a transverse depression immediately in front of it. 
Scutellum dull red, transverse. Elytra short, deep blue, punctate 
and truncate. Abdomen with the two first segments red, the 
remainder black. Legs entirely black. 

513. — Oarphurus pallidipennis. n. sp. 
Length '2| lines. 
Elongate, nitid, thinly clothed with long blackish hair. 
Head rather large, exserted, slightly narrowed behind the eyes, 
lightly bicanaliculate in front, thinly punctate and of a red colour, 
with the labrum, and the antennae excepting the two first joints, 
black. Thorax red with black sides, narrower than the head, 
longer than the width, truncate in front, rounded behind, trans- 
versely impressed near the base and margined on the sides and 
base. Scutellum transverse, broadly rounded at the apex. Elytra 
short, pale red, punctate, and obliquely truncate. Abdomen 
black, with the two terminal segments piceous. Legs black, with 
the tibiae more or less red. 

Balanophorus. n. gen. 

Maxillary palpi fusiform, obtuse. Labrum transverse, rounded 
in front. Head broad. Eyes large and prominent. Antennae 
rather short, first joint much larger than the second, the third 
dentate, the remainder pectinate. Elytra much shorter than the 
abdomen. Tarsi short, first joint large, the three following very 
small ; in the anterior tarsi the second takes its rise from the 
middle of the base of the first. The visicles of the thorax and 
abdomen large and exserted. 

514. — Balanophorus Mastbrsii. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Nitid, thinly punctate, very hairy. Head black and im- 
pressed with a transverse curve on the forehead, with the anterior 



268 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

part and three first joints of the antennee red, and with the rest 
of the antennge and the tooth of the third joint black. Thorax 
red, nearly truncate in front, slightly narrowed behind, rounded 
and with a recurved margin at the base, and with the thoracic 
vesicles flat and extending along the sides nearly to the apex. 
Scutellum black. Elytra about half the length of the abdomen, 
broader than the thorax, lightly punctate, subtruncate and of a 
chalybeate blue, with the base red. The abdomen has the basal 
joints red, the apical black, but the lateral vesicles on all are red. 
The coxse of the anterior legs are red. 

Two other species of this family are in the collection j but, as 
they are single specimens and , gummed down on cardboard, I 
cannot undertake to describe them. One looks like a Laius 
though with eleven joints to the antennas, the other resembles a 
small Malachius with short elytra and very long hind legs. They 
will both probably be found to be new genera. Indeed I believe 
that the Malacodermidce of Australia, though not very numerous, 
w;ill, when properly investigated, exhibit a number of new 
aud very curious, genera, particularly among the subfamily 
Malf^chidcB. ,, 



CLERID^. 

515. — Cylidrus centr'ams, Pasc. Journ. of Ent. I., 
page 4:41. 

516. — Cylidrus basalis. n. sp. 
■Length 4 lines. r . 

Black, nitid, hairy. Head coarsely punctate with the palpi 
and basal joints of the antennae, red. Thorax lightly punctate. 
Elytra about half the length of the body, rounded at the apex, 
very slightly punctate and with the basal half of a 'dark red 
colour. Legs and metathorax yellow. 

517. — Opilds congruus, Newm. The Entomol. 1842, 
..,, ,,, ,..,., :, . p(^g» 365. / 



BY W. MA.CLEAY, ESQ,, F.L;S; 269. 

, , , 518.--Opilds incektds. n. sp.. 

Length 2 J lines. 
Brownish black, snbnitid, coarsely punctate and hairy. Eyes 
small. Basal joints of antennfe red. Thorax broadly and longi- 
tudinally impressed in the middle and without transverse 
impression. Elytra rounded at the apex and slightly wider there 
than at the base, strongly striato-punctate on the anterior half, 
and almost smooth towards the apex, with a pale yellow fascia 
just behind the middle, and not reaching the suture. 

519. — Natalis CRiBRicoLLis, Spin. Mon. 1, page 20S, 
^.16./. 4. 

520. — Natalis porcata, Fabr. Mmit. Ins. I.,'pag6 127, 
— Klug. Mon., page 318. — Spin. Mon. 1, 
page 201, t. 16./. 2. 
heros, Sturm. Cat. 1843, page 82. 

521. — Natalis Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 
This species differs from N. porcata in being of a darker 
colour, and more elongate form. The thorax differs in being 
much longer than the width, in being constricted in the middle, 
and in having a prominent tubercle or bulge between that and 
the base. The elytra differ in being less hairy, in being more 
regularly punctate, and in having the alternate interstices only 
elevated. 

522. — Stigmatium Gilbert:, White. Mus. Cat. 
Glerid. 1849., page 53. 

523. — Stigmatium Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 5^ lines. 
Black, subnitid, moderately hairy, and densely clothed in 
patches with a silky yellow pubescence. Head in front clothed 
with white hair, with the palpi yellow, and the antennae slender, — 
the basal joints reddish and the third joint the longest. Thorax 
entirely covered with yellow hair. Elytra very coarsely punctate 



270 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

in double distant rows at the base, and very minutely punctate 
towards the apex, with the basal portion marked with small 
patches of white and yellow pubescence, with an intervening 
smooth patch, with a broad post-median fascia of golden yellow 
pile changing in some lights to an olive green, and with the 
apex clothed in the same way. Basal half of thighs yellow. 
Tibiffi and tarsi reddish brown. 

524. — Stigmatiom LiEVius. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
This species is of a much flatter and less robust form than 
the last, and seems from the description to approach very nearly 
to an insect from Prince of Wales Island described by Professor 
Westwood under the name of Omadins olivaceus. 

The upper and under surface is of a subnitid piceous brown 
with the exception of the basal joints of the antennae, the palpi, 
the basal portions of the thighs, the tibiae and the tarsi, which 
are reddish. The head and thorax are covered with yellowish 
hair interspersed with strong setae. Elytra flat, broadest about 
the middle, substriate, thinly punctate, and setose in rows, with 
the basal half covered with pale yellow pubescence, and with an 
irregular fascia behind the middle and the apex similarly marked. 
Hind legs long. 

525. — Stigmatidm ventrale. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Black, densely punctate, hairy. Head clothed in front with 
white hairs and on the top with a golden yellow pubescence. 
Thorax with the sides flavo-pubescent. Elytra striato-punctate, 
setose,— the set^ on the sides white — and granulose with a large 
chocolate coloured patch in the middle which extends near the 
sides to the humeral angles and is bordered by whitish hairs, 
and an irregular semi-circular patch and the apex cinereo- 
pubescent. The meta-thorax and abdomen are red. The legs 
reddish brown. 

526. — Omadius prasinus, Westw. Proc. Zool. Soc, 
1852, page 53, t. 26, /. 2. 



BY W. MAOLEAY, ESQ, F.L.S. 271 

527. — Thanasimus eximius, White. Gat. Mus. Cleridce, 
1849, pag-e 63. — Westw., Proc. Zool. Soc, 
1862, page 54. 

528. — Thanasimus sculptus. n. sp. 
Length 3^ lines. 
Head and thorax brassy black, subnitid, finely punctate, and 
clothed with white hair. Elytra much broader than the thorax, 
closely marked except at the apex with rows of quadrangular 
transverse excavated punctures, and of a beautiful coppery red 
colour, with a broad bluish purple fascia in the middle. Body 
beneath dark blue. Legs purplish. 

529. — Clerus sepdlchraijs, Westw. Proc. Zool. 
Soc, IS52, page 52, t. 25, f. 9. 

530. — Clerus novemguttatus, Westw. Proc. Zool. 
Soc, 1852, page 49. 

531. — Clerus Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Dark blue, nitid, punctate and hairy. Thorax with a broad 
rugose depression in the middle of the median line. Elytra 
broader than the thorax, profoundly punctate except towards the 
apex, and of a bronzy red colour, with a brighter spot near the 
apex, and with a fascia above the middle, the suture from that to 
the base, and the base itself for half its width, yellow. Antennse 
palpi and tarsi pale brown. 

532. — Clerus apicalis. n, sp. 
Length 2| lines. 
Black, subnitid, coarsely punctate and hairy. Thorax im- 
pressed in the middle. Elytra very profoundly punctate almost 
to the apex, with a narrow white fascia behind the middle, and a 
large luteous spot at the apex. Body beneath and legs blue. 
Antennae and palpi reddish. 



272 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

533. — AuLiCDS iNSTABiLis, Newm. The Entomol., p(;ige 
15 — Klug. Mon., page 341. — Spin. Mon. 1, 
page 331, t. 28, /. 1. 
var. castanipes and tihialis, Westw. Whites, 
Gleridce, IV., page 60. 

534. AULICUS RUFIPES. n. sp. 

Length 2J lines. 

Shorter and broader than A. instabilis. Head and thorax 
golden green, the latter very hairy and deeply impressed trans- 
versely and in the middle of the median line. Elytra green and 
punctate, the punctures large towards the base, but nowhere very 
deep or regular. Legs and the parts of the mouth entirely pale 
red. 

535. AULICDS FOVEICOLLIS. n. Sp. 

Length 2f lines. 

Of a more elongate form than the last, entirely of a dark blue 
with the legs reddish brown, very strongly punctate on the elytra 
and with an almost triangular fovea in the centre of the thorax. 

536. — AuLTCDS viRiDissiMus, Pasc. Journ. of Ent. 
1, page, 47. 

The specimen before me is smaller than that Mr. Pascoe 
describes, and has the anterior tarsi of a reddish colour, but in 
other respects they seem identical. 

537. — Taksosternus pulcher. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 

Elongate, red, nitid, thinly punctate and hairy. Head large, 
and convex, with the eyes elongate. Thorax not broader than the 
head, longer than the width, and narrowed at the base. Elytra 
strongly punctate on the basal half, with a very broad blue 
fascia about the middle not reaching the suture and with, 
immediately behind it, a narrow smooth raised white fascia. 
Under side of body and legs reddish brown. Antennse, basal 
joints excepted, dark brown. 

This insect has very much the appearance of a Tillus. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. ' 273 

538. — -Taksostbrnus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 2 1 lines. 

Elongate, densely punctate, and moderately hairy. Head 
and thorax bluish green, coarsely punctate, the former sub- 
convex, with the eyes large and coarsely granulate, the latter 
rather narrower than the head, much longer than the width, and 
narrowed at the base. Elytra very little broader than the thorax, 
three times longer than the width, and densely foveate on the 
basal half, with the base of a brilliant purple red, with a broad 
dark green fascia behind, with a narrow oblique white fascia next, 
with the remainder of the elytra of a burnished purple red, and 
with an apical vitta consisting of white hair. Abdomen beneath 
black. Legs violet red. 

539.— Trogodendron fasciculatum, Schreib. Trans. 
Lim. Soc, 1802, VI., page 195, t. 20, /. 6. 
— Klug. Mon., page 326. — Spin. Muu. 1, 
page 212, t. 18,/. 1. 
var. honestum, Newm. and Lacord. 

540. — ScROBiGER SPLENDIDUS, Newm. The Entomol., 
1840, page 15. 
Beichei Spin. Mon. 1, page 232, t. 14, /'. ]. 

541. — SCROBIGER ALBOCINCTUS, Pasc. Journ. of Ent. 
1, 1860, page 46. 

542. — Zenithicola obesa. White. Stohes voy. app., 
t. 1,/. 9, var. ohesula White. Glerid. Gat. 
Mus., page 26. 

543. — Eleale lepjua, Pasc. Journ. of Ent. 1,1860, 
page 45. 

544 — Eleale fasciata. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Black, subnitid, very densely and coarsely punctate. Antennaj 
pale red. Scutellum covered with white hair. Elytra with a 



274 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

broad orange fascia above the middle and a minute apical spot of 
white hair. Under side of body thickly clothed with white hair. 
Legs cyaneous. 

545. — Eleale apicalis. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Elongate, nitid, densely punctate. Head and thorax of a 
bronze hue, the latter flat on the back, rugosely and transversely 
punctate, longer than the width, constricted and transversely 
impressed near the apex and narrowed at the base. Elytra 
coarsely and irregularly punctate with three slightly raised lines 
on each, and of an orange yellow colour with the apex black. 
Body beneath dark blue or purple with metallic reflection, and 
spotted with tufts of white hair. Antenna yellow. 

546. — Eleale elongatula. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Of more elongate form than E. aspera Newm. and densely 
and coarsely punctate. Head and thorax greenish blue, the 
latter purple on the sides, twice longer than the width and cylin- 
drical. Elytra about four times longer than the width, and of a 
golden green with a broad purple lateral margin. Legs of a 
purple red. Body beneath spotted with tufts of pale pubescence. 
Antennre reddish brown, the apical joint deeply emarginate at 
the inner angle. 

547. — Eleale viridicollis. n. sp. 

Length 3^ lines. 
This species difi'ers from the last in being much smaller, in 
having the head and thorax golden green, and the latter less 
elongate and less cylindrical, in having the elytra entirely of a 
dull purplish green, in having the under portion of the body 
thickly clothed with white hair, but without the white spots of 
the other, and in having the last joint of the antennae more 
largely but less deeply emarginated. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 275 

548. — Lemidia hilaris, Newm. Zoologist, 1843, page 
119. 
corallipennis, Westw. Froc. Zool. Sac, 1852, 
2Jage 47. 

549. — Allelidea ctenostomoides, Waterh. Trans. 
Ent. Soc. II., page 194, t. 17, f. 1. 

550. — -TeNERUS RUFICOLLIS. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 

Nitid, very finely punctate, and moderately hairy. Head 
black, with a dull red spot in the middle and at the insertion of 
the antennae. Thortix red, subquadrate, transversely impressed 
before the middle, not broader than the head. Elytra shorter 
than the body and blue, with a broad ill defined fascia behind the 
middle, and the apex, of a paler hue. Under side of head and 
prothorax pale red. Legs, meso- and meta-thorax, and three 
apical segments of abdomen, dark blue. Basal segments of ab- 
domen deep red. AntennjB black, and subpectinate from the 
fourth joint. 

551. — Pylus pallipes. n. sp. 
Length 3j lines. 

Much smaller and of a less elongate form than P. fatuus 
Newm. Pale chesnut, subnitid, coarsely punctate. Head brown, 
finely punctate, with the eyes large, granulose, and minutely 
emarginate in front. Thorax subquadrate, slightly constricted 
behind the anterior angles, suddenly and largely bulged out in 
the middle, and rectangular and truncate at base, with the punc- 
tures thin and one or two shallow impressions on the disk. 
Elytra much broader than the thorax, and punctate in regular 
rows, — the punctures large. Legs pale reddish yellow. 

552. — Necrobta violacea, Linn. Syst. Nat. Ent. 10, 
page 356. — King. Mon., 'page 349. — Spin. 
Man. 11, page 105. Syn. angustata, 
Falderm. Ghalyhea. Sturm. Cyanella 
Anders., errans. Welsh, quadra. Marsh. 



276 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

PTINID^. 

553. — Ptinus albomacolatds. n. sp. 

Length Ij lines. 
Oval, black, subnitid, punctate, and clothed with erect black 
hairs. Antennje and legs variegated with white pubescence. 
Elytra striato-punctate, the interstices flat and broad, with a round 
spot near the humeral angles and a transverse one behind the 
middle of a yellowish white colour. 

BOSTRYCHID^. 

554. — Rhizopertha elongatula. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Elongate, black, subnitid, thinly punctate. Head with a round 
fovea in the centre of the forehead, and with the antenna and palpi 
of a piceous red. Thorax longer than the width, rough, toothed, 
and somewhat retuse in front and smooth behind. Elytra three 
times longer than the width, punctate, and deeply emarginate on 
the external angle of the apex, with a smaller emargination at the 
apex. Legs red. 

655. — Rhizopertha gtbbicollis. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Of a short oblong form, black, subnitid, and coarsely punctate. 
Thorax broader than the length, very convex, very rough, 
dentated in front, and smooth behind. Elytra piceous red on the 
basal half, and flatly sloped away from near the middle to the 
apex, the flat surface margined all round except near the suture 
on the upper part. Under side of abdomen clothed with a fine 
white pubescence. Legs and antennas piceous red. 

556. BOSTRYCHUS BISPINOSDS. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Oblong, piceous black, subnitid, and punctate. Thorax not 
longer than the width, rough in front and smooth behind. Elytra 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. '^77 

rather roughly punctate, and cut very tlatly and steeply behind, 
with a large subacute spine rising from the suture on each elytron 
near the apex, and extending in a direction backwards and 
outwards. Legs and antenna piceous red. 

557. — BOSTRYCHDS CYLINDRICUS. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Elongate, piceous black, nitid and punctate. Head densely 
and minutely punctaLe. Thorax slightly longer than the width, 
roagh and dentated in front,— the anterior tooth hooked — and 
smooth behind. Elytra coarsely punctate towards the apex, and 
having on the retuse portion six sharp projections, three on each 
elytron, one near the suture, another about the middle and the 
third on the side near the apex, which is obliquely truncate and 
separately rounded. Legs, antennae, and underside of body, 
piceous. 

558. — BosTKYCHDS JESDITDS, Fabr. Ent. Syst. 1, 2, 
page 361. — Boisd. Voy. Astrol. IL, page 461. 

TENEBRIONID^. 

559. — Opatrum Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Ovate, subdepressed, brown, opaque, and covered with short 
yellow setifoi"m scales. Head transversely impressed in front, 
and prominently angled in front of the eyes. Thorax much 
broader than the length, broader behind than in front, rounded 
on the sides, broadly rounded at the base in the middle, and 
emarginate near the angles, with the anterior angles prominent, 
the posterior very acute and slightly pointed backwards and 
outwards, the median line visible, and a broad subconcave lateral 
border. Scutellum transverse, rounded behind. Elytra of the 
width ot, or slightly wider than, the thorax, bisinuate at the base, 
and marked with broad smooth stride, with the interstices broad, 
subconvex, and covei'ed with about three irregular rows of yellow 
setiform scales. 



278 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, ■ 

560. — Apatelus squamosus. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Oblong, black, opaque, punctate, squamosa. Head canalicu- 
late on the suture of the epistome, and very slightly emarginate 
in front. Thorax subquadrate, slightly rounded on the sides, 
and truncate at the base, with the anterior angles moderately 
prominent and the posterior subacute and a little recurved. 
Elytra broader than the thorax, rounded at the humeral angles, 
and striato-punctate with the interstices subcostate. Body 
beneath piceous black, subnitid and punctate. Tarsi piceous and 
clothed with reddish hair. 

561. — Cbstrinus squalidus. n. sp. 

Length ^ 5, '^ 6 lines. 
Black, opaque, roaghly punctate, and very squamose. Thorax 
transverse with broad recurved lateral margin, much rounded 
on the sides, and truncate at the base, with the anterior angles 
prominent and subacute, and the posterior acute and pointed a 
little outwards. Elytra broader than the thorax, rounded at the 
humeral angles, convex, nearly pe rpendicular on the apical thii'd, 
and marked with large elongate punctures disposed in irregular 
rows, and elevated alternate interstices covered with black nitid 
granules. Body beneath less squamose than above. Tarsi 
piceous. 

562. — Htocis pallida, n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 

Oval, subconvex, pale red, subnitid, and punctate — each 
puncture furnished with a very short decumbent yellow seta. 
Head slightly impressed transversely between the eyes. Thorax 
transverse, nearly truncate in front, broadly rounded at the base, 
and slightly rounded at the sides, with the jaedian line distinct. 
Scutellum small, rounded. Elytra of a yellow colour, rather 
broader than the thorax at the base, becoming slightly broader 
towards the apex, and profoundly striato-punctate. Fore tibiae 
large and flat. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 279 

-563. — Hyocis pubescens. n. sp. 

Length Ij lines. 
This species diflFers from the last in its very distinct 
kind of pubescence, which is rather long, decumbent, and of a 
white colour. It differs also in having the head of a brassy 
black and without impressions, in having the thorax with the 
anterior angles advanced, and two longitudinal foveae at the base, 
in having the scutellum triangular, and in having the elytra less 
nitid and marked with a few brown spots. 

564. — Mtchestes Pascoei. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Black, opaque, tuberculose, granulose and densely covered 
with brownish yellow scales. Head foveolate in front, with the 
suture of the clypeus semicircular, the parts of the mouth nitid, 
and the labi'um emarginate. Thorax subtransverse, emarginate 
in front, truncate behind, much bulged out and abruptly rounded 
on the sides and elevated on the disk into a large laterally com- 
pressed rounded tubercle which projects over the head and 
which extends itself backwards in a triangular form nearly to the 
base of the thorax where it terminates in an obtuse tubercle. Scu- 
tellum nearly round. Elytra convex, scarcely longer than the 
widtli at the base, of the same size as the base of the thorax and 
fitting closely to it, swelling out in the middle to the size of 
the thorax at its broadest part, subacuminate and perpendicular 
towards the apex, and rough on the surface, with large depressions 
and obtuse tubercles, the most elevated being a three headed 
tubercle near the base on each side and some distance from the 
suture. 

565. — Mychestes Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Oblong-oval, black, opaque, rough, rugosely tuberculate, and 
densely covered with dark brown scales. Thorax truncate at the 
base, broadly marked on the median line, and advanced in front 
into a round rough projection constricted behind which entirely 
covers the head, and looks from above exactly like a head and 



280 THE INSECTS OF GATNDAH, 

neck. Scutellum small, rounded. Elytra truncate and of 
the same width as the thorax at the base, becoming a little 
wider towards the apex, and covered with obtuse tubercles. 

566. — Plattdema aries, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 280. 

567. — Platydema limacella, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 280. 

568. — Platydema Pascoei. n. sp. 

Length 1| lines. 
Black, subnitid, very finely punctate. Head transversely 
impressed in front of the eyes. Thorax slightly foveolate at the 
base half way between the median line and the posterior angles. 
Elytra finely and distinctly striato-punctate, with the base and 
apex of a piceous red. Legs reddish brown. 

This species is more elongate and less convex than the pre- 
ceding two species and is moreover quite unarmed on the head, 
unless the specimens before me are all females. 

569. — Platydema laticolle. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 

This insect diffei's considerably from the other species of 
Platydema in having a flatter and moi*e oval form, longer 
antennee and larger palpi ; it ought probably to form anew genus. 

The whole insect is of a piceous hue, very nitid and very 
minutely punctate, excepting on the elytra which are distinctly 
striato-punctate. The thorax is broad, more truncate at the base 
than usual in the genus, and distinctly marked with longitudinal 
impressions, instead of foveol^ at the base. 

570. — Ceropria peregrina, Pasc. Journ. of Ent., 
W.,page 460. 

571. — Typhobia puliginba, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 279. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 281 

572. — AcHTHOSus LATicoRNTS, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 294. 

573. TOXICUM DISTINCTUM. li. sp. 

Length 5| lines. 

Black, subopaque, finely punctate, except on the elytra. 
Head with the anterior horns slight, acute, and half a line long, 
the posterior large, thick, obtuse, clothed with yellow hairs on 
the apex and anterior edge, and projecting upwards, forwards, 
and inwards at the apex. Thorax subtransverse, parallel- sided, 
very slightly lobed in front and behind, and marked near the 
middle with two small fovete. Elytra a little broader than the 
thorax, and strongly punctate in regular rows. Tarsi piceous. 
Club of antenna of three joints. 

574. ToXICUM PARVICORNE. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines. 
Black, opaque, densely punctate. Head with the anterior 
horns represented by small acute tubercles, and the posterior 
rather short, broad and laterally compi^essed at the base, subacute 
and with a small yellow tuft on the apex, and directed almost 
straight upwards, and inwards at the apex. Thorax subtrans- 
verse, parallel-sided, very slightly lobed in front and behind, 
slightly prominent and rounded at the anterior angles, and acute 
at the posterior. Elytra a little broader than the thorax, and 
marked with regular rows of small but deep punctures. Under 
side of body thinly punctate. Tarsi piceous. Club of antennce 
of three joints. 

575. — -Pterohel^us asellus, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
February, 1870. 

576. — Pterohel^us Bkemki. n. sp. 

Length 10 lines ; width 6| lines. 
Broadly ovate, black, subopaque. Head lai'ge, subquadrate, 
truncate in front, and rounded at the angles, with a broad shallow 
canaliculation between the eyes. Thorax transverse and 



282 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

largely emarginate in front, with large flat margins, a little raised 
and thickened on the border towards the anterior angles, and 
with the posterior subacutely pointed backwards. Scutellum 
transversely and curvilinearly triangular and transverselj'' im- 
pressed in the middle. Elytra not longer than the width, as 
broad as the thorax at the base, and rounded at the apex, with a 
bi'oad smooth margin — broadest at the humeral angle and 
becoming narrower to the apex — raised on the border, and with 
the disk mai-ked with eight subcostate elevations, the second 
from the suture the largest, the lateral ones resembling con- 
tinuous rows of nodules, and the intervals rather obliterately 
punctate in double rows. Abdomen subnitid, and marked with 
longitudinal striolse. Antennas, palpi, and tarsi, piceous. 

577. — Pterohel^us elongatus. n. sp. 
Length 10 lines, width 4| lines. 
Oblong-oval, black, subopaque. Head transverse, punctate, 
widened in front of the eyes, rounded at the anterior angles, and 
almost truncate in front, with a narrow recurved margin. 
Thorax with a broad lateral margin a little reflexed at 
the anterior angles, and with the posterior angles less pointed back- 
wards than in the last described species. Scutellum triangular. 
Elytra nearly twice as long as the width, narrowly and equally 
margined, and marked with eight costiform elevations alternating 
with smaller ones, some of which are scarcely traceable, with the 
intervals strongly punctate. Under surface nitid, substriolate. 
Antenna, palpi, and tarsi, piceous. 

578. — Pterohel^us Pascoei. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines ; width 6 lines. 

Bi'oadly ovate, black, opaque. Head scarcely enlarged before 
the eyes, broadly rounded in front, finely canaliculate between the 
eyes, and with a semi-circular line or suture extending across, and 
to the front of, the head befoi'e the eyes. Thorax with a broad 
flat mai'gin, and a lightly marked median line. Scutellum curvi- 
linearly triangular. Elytra broadly margined, — the margin of a 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ,., F.L.S. 28B 

dull reddish hue, slightly enlarged towards the middle, narrow 
at the apex, and marked off from the disk by a row of strong 
punctures, — and densely punctate in numerous rows, the punc- 
tures small and sub-obliterate, the interstices also sub-obliterate, 
but a few showing a more costiform appearance than the others. 
Body beneath subnitid, substriolate. Antennae, palpi, and tarsi, 
of a reddish bi'own. 

579. — PXEROHELiEDS CONFUSUS. n. Sp. 

Length 7 lines ; width 4 lines. 
Ovate, black, subnitid. Head a little widened and elevated in 
front of the eyes, and scai'cely emarginate in front, with the 
central canaliculation minute, the semi-circular suture well marked, 
and a transverse raised line near the apex of the clypeus. Thorax 
subconvex, with a broad reddish reflexed margin, and the median 
line scarcely traceable. Scutellum transversely and curvilinearly 
triangular. Elytra subconvex, with the lateral margins red- 
dish, nearly as broad as those of the thorax at the humeral angles, 
and becoming narrower to the apex, with the disk covered 
with very numerous rows of small punctures, becoming obliterated 
towards the apex, and the interstices faintly costate, and quite 
obliterated behind. Under side of body nitid, striolate. Legs 
piceous. Autenuse and tarsi reddish. 

580.- — Saragds ovalis. n. sp. 

Length 9 lines. 
Oblong-ovate, black, opaque. Head widened, and obtusely 
angled before the eyes, and broadly rounded and almost truncate 
in front. Thorax very deeply emarginate in front, deeply bi- 
emarginate at the base, and very slightly emarginate at the centre 
of the basal lobe, with the lateral margins very broad, reflexed and 
of a dull red color. Scutellum transversely triangular. Elytra 
of the width of the thorax at the base and of a dull chocolate 
color, with the lateral margins reflexed as in the thorax, broad at 
the humeral angles, and considerably narrowed towards the apex, 
and with the di.'^k covered with rows of very small obliterate 
punctures. Under surface of body subnitid. Tarsi ciliated with 
golden yellow hair. 



284 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

681. OSPJDDS CHRTSOMELOIDES, PasC. Journ. of 

Ent, page 468. 

582. — Nyctozoilus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines. 
Convex, oval, black, opaque, and squalid. Head coarsely 
punctate, subconvex, and deeply impressed on the median line, 
with the clypeus on a lower plane than the posterior jjortion of 
the head. Thorax transverse, not very deeply emarginate in 
front, and nearly truncate behind, with the lateral margins 
moderately broad, thick, and reflexed, the posterior angles slightly 
constricted on the sides and pointed backwards, and the middle 
of the disk vermiculate. Elytra much broader than the thorax, 
not longer than the width, broadly rounded at the humeral 
angles and the apex, and broadest in the middle, with the suture 
and three irregular lines on each elytron slightly but distinctly 
elevated, and the intervals irregularly and largely reticulate, and 
subfoveate. Under surface less opaque and squalid, and substri- 
olate, 

583. — Ntctozoilos elongatulus. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 
Of a more elongate and less convex form than the last species. 
Head and thorax densely punctate, the former depressed in the 
middle and in front, the latter rather longer than the width, 
with thick reflexed lateral margins and prominent angles. The 
sculpture of the elytra is the same as in N. Mastersii, but much 
more distinctly and regularly reticulate. The head is rather 
sharply angled in front of the eyes, and the clypeus is very 
slightly emarginate. 

584. — Hypaulax Gayndahensis. n. sp. 
Length 10 lines. 
This species only differs from H. ovalis of Bates in having 
the striae on the elytra very small, and the punctures very 
largfc. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 285 

585. — Hypaulax opacicollis. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines. 
The thorax in this insect is more opaque than in the last, and 
the punctures on the elytra are still larger and though placed in 
rows, are not in strife. 

Both insects may have been described by Mr. Bates under the 
names of sinuaticollis and tarda, as I have never seen the descrip- 
tions of these two species. 

586. — Peomethis Pascoeii. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines. 
Of the size, form, and general appearance of Promethis angulata 
Erichs, but differs in having the elytra less deeply striate, while 
the punctures in the striae are much longer and less crowded. 

587. — Menephilus nigerrimus, Boisd. Voy. Astrol. II., 
pap'e254. — Blanch Voy. Pole. 8ud.IV.,page 
168, t. 11,/. 10.— Dej. Gat. Srd. Ed., page 
226.— Blessig. Eor. Ent. Boss. Soc. 1, 1861, 
page 95. 
Australis MacLeay Dej. Cat., page 226. 

588. — Menephilus parvulus. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Oblong, flat, black, subnitid and finely punctate. Head 
broad, rounded in front of the eyes and truncate at the apex, 
with the terminal joint of the maxillary palpi scarcely securiform 
and obliquely truncate. Thorax quadrate with the anterior angles 
advanced, the sides parallel, and the apex truncate. Elytra of 
the width of the thorax, parallel-sided, rounded at the apex, and 
striato-punctate — the striee small and the interstices very slightly 
convex. 

A new genus might very properly be formed for this curious 
little insect. 

589. — Meneristes servulus, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 151. 



280 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

590. — Dechids APHODioiDES, Pasc. Journ. of Ent., II., 
page 445. 

MiCROPHYES. n. gen. 

Antennae shorter than the thorax, the third joint not quite so 
long as the fourth and fifth together, the 6th 7th 8th 9th and 10th 
joints transverse, serrate, and gradually increasing in size, the 11th 
nearly round. Last ai-ticle of maxillary palpi obtuse and sub- 
cylindrical. Labruni shoi't, transverse. Clypeus lightly emar- 
ginate, joined to the head by a semicircular suture. Eyes entirely 
divided by the cheeks. Thorax very transverse, emarginate in 
front, biemarginate behind. Body oval, subdepressed. Legs as 
in Tenehrio. 

The broad oval subdepressed form of the species on which I 
found this genus is unlike any of the Tenehrienidce proper I have 
hitherto come across. In other respects it approaches very 
nearly to Tenehrio. 

591.- — MiCROPHYES RUFiPEs. n. sp. 

Length 2^ lines. 

Ovate, dark piceous brown, subnitid, finely and not densely 
punctate. Thorax twice as broad as the length, finely bordered 
at the sides and base, rounded on the sides, widest at the base, 
and broadly lobed in the middle of the apex, with the anterior 
angles moderately advanced. Scutellum curvilinearly triangu- 
lar. Elytra as broad at the base as the base of the thorax, very 
slightly widened towards the apex which is round, and covered 
with punctures and subobsolete striae, with faintly elevated in- 
terstices. Under side of body and legs reddish. 

592. — Cephaleus chalybeipbnnis. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 
Broadly ovate, very convex, and very nitid. Head and thorax 
finely punctate, and of a golden green colour, the latter margined 
with purple on the sides, and impressed in the middle on the 
median line and on each side of it, with the anterior angles acute 
and reflexed. Scutellum golden green, finely punctate. Elytra 



BY W. MACLEA.Y, ESQ., F.L.S. 287 

much broader than the thorax, truncate at the humeral angles, 
very convex, of a beautiful chalybeate blue colour, with golden 
green margin, and raai'ked in addition to the general fine punc- 
tuation, with several irregular rows of very large rather distant 
punctures. Antennae, palpi, legs, and under surface of body 
black and nitid. 

593. — Ctphaleus cuprigollts. n. sp. 
Length 7 lines. 
Head golden green, densely puncta^te. Thorax of a brilliant 
coppery red, lightly punctate, and almost angled in the middle 
of the sides, with the anterior angles obtuse. Elytra convex, 
broader than the thorax, rounded at the humeral angles, rather 
broader behind than in front, very densely and obliterately punc- 
tate, and of a subnitid bluish green colour, with a large coppery 
patch on the sides at the apex. Legs and under side of body 
greenish black, and nitid. 

594. — Prophanes Westwoobii. u. sp. 
Length 12 lines. 

Elongate-oval, slightly convex, finely punctate, and of a nitid 
bronzy black, with a short brown pubescence. Head flat, trans- 
versely impressed, with the clypeus emarginate. Thorax with 
the afiterior angles long, acute, and reflexed at the tip. Elytra 
of an olive colour, confusedly punctate, and terminating with a 
short slightly recurved spine. Legs and under side black. An- 
tenna piceous. 

This species has a general resemblance to P. aculeahis, 
Westw. 

595. — Chartopteryx Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 

Ovate, convex, punctate, nitid, and clothed with long erect 
hairs. Head and thorax brassy, the latter having a ruddy gloss, 
with the anterior angles short and not acute, and a broad 
depression near the posterior angles. Elytra bi'oader than the 

s 



288 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAII, 

ttorax, a little enlarged behind, terminating in a minute spine, 
covered with large punctures, and of the most varied splendour 
of colouring, being golden on the suture, of a ruby colour next, 
then metallic green, and reddish purple towards the sides behind. 
Antenna, legs and body beneath, black. 

696. — Atryphodes opacicollis. n. sp. 

Length 9 lines. 
Elongate, black, opaque. Head marked with a stirrup shaped 
impression in fi'ont. Thorax longer than the width, narrower at 
the base than in front, and emarginate at both apex and base, 
with the anterior angles rather prominent and subacute, the sides 
gradually rounded to near the base, then subabruptly narrowed 
until close to the posterior angles when they become straight and 
make with the emargination of the base the posterior angles 
acute, and with a distinct median line and a broad sublateral de- 
pression giving the appearance of a broad margin. Elytra rather 
narrower than the thorax, subangular and somewhat reflexed at 
the humeral angles, marked with ten deep sti'ise counting the 
lateral one on each elytron, and with the interstices convex and of 
equal size. Under surface subnitid. Tarsi piceous. 

597. — Atrtpho[)ES pithecius, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 39. 

598. — Atryphodes Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 6| lines. 
Of a bronzy olive, subnitid. Head marked with a stirrup 
shaped impression. Thorax a little broader than the length, 
emarginate in front, very slightly so at the base, a little narrower 
at the base than at the apex, with the sides gradually rounded, 
the anterior angles advanced and subobtuse, the posterior angles 
acute, the median line well marked, the sublateral depressions 
moderately so leaving a rather broad marginal space in the 
middle, and the base deeply impressed near the posterior angles. 
Elytra rounded at the humeral angles and marked with eight deep 
striae on each elytron, — the lateral striEe lightly punctate, — and with 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 289 

the interstices subconvex. Under surface black, nitid. Tarsi 
piceous. 

599. — Adelium striatum, Pasc. Jovrn. of Ent. II., 
page 481. 

600. — Adelium viridipenne. n. sp. 

Length 10 lines. 
This species very closely resembles A. striatum, Pasc, and is 
perhaps only a variety of that insect. It is more nitid, without 
foveas in the middle of the thorax, and has the elytra entirely of 
a blackish-green colour. 

601. — Adelium rugosicolle. n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 
^e&e-mh\es A. plicigerum, Pasc. The thorax however is more 
punctate, and vermiculately rugose, and the whole is of a more 
decided copper coloar. 

602. — Adelium augurale, Pasc. Journ. of Enl. II, , 
page 480. 

603. — Adelium scute llare, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 134. 

604. — Adelium repandum, Pasc. Aim. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 137. 

605. — Adelium convexiusculum. n. sp. 

Length 6 lines. 
Of a bronzy olive, nitid, convex, and ovate. Head finely 
punctate, and a little rounded in front, with the suture of the 
epistome semicircular. Thorax transverse, not broader at the 
base than at the apex, finely punctate, foveate near the sides, and 
subrugose, with the sides rounded, and the posterior angles acute 
and slightly directed outwards. Elytra broader than the thorax 
and not much longer than the width, with nine very fine punc- 
tate striae on each elytron, the punctures mostly small but some- 



290 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

times rather large and elongate, the interstices smooth. Under 
side of body black. Tarsi piceous. 

This insect is, I imagine, somewhat like A. ancilla, Pasc, a 
species I have never seen. The sculpture however appears to be 
different, and in the size of the antennae there must be a very 
marked difference. 

606. — Adelium geminatdm, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
February, 1870. 

607. — Adelium reductum, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, j^a^re 135. 

608. — Adelium parvulum. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Elongate-ovate, subconvex, black, subnitid, and densely 
punctate. Head slightly rounded in front, with the epistome a 
little advanced over the labrum, and with the third joint of the 
antennae not much longer tliau the fourth. Thorax scarcely 
broader than the length, and not broader behind than in front, 
with the apex lightly emarginate, the sides moderately rounded, 
the base truncate, and the median line distinctly marked. 
Scutellum transversely triangular. Elytra scarcely broader than 
the thorax at its broadest part, of a slightly bronzy hue and 
striato-punctate, with the interstices subconvex and finely 
punctate. Body beneath minutely punctate. Tarsi piecous. 

Along with this insect I find in the collection one, which 
though differing considerably, may possibly be the male of the 
same species. It is smaller, is without the well marked median 
line on the thorax of the other, and has the strise of the elytra 
more profound and the interstices more convex. 

609. — Adelium panag^icolle. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Elongate-ovate, subdepressed, black, subopaque, densely and 
coarsely punctate. Head short, and truncate in front, with the 
suture lightly marked. Thorax much like that of the genus 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 291 

Panagceus, transverse, marked on the median line, and slightly 
emarginate in front, with the sides much widened into a rounded 
ano-le in the middle, and emarginately narrowed from there to 
the posterior angles which are acute and very slightly pointed 
outwards. Scutellum very transversely triangular, smooth at the 
apex. Elytra little broader than the thorax and striate, the strias 
becoming punctate and sometimes interrupted towards the sides, 
with the interstices subconvex and finely punctate. Body 
beneath subnitid and very finely punctate. AntennsB and tarsi 
piceous, the former widening and subserrate towards the apex. 



610. — Adelium monilicorne. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Elongate-ovate, subconvex, black, subnitid, and punctate. 
Head coarsely punctate, slightly i-ounded in front, and rather 
prominently and obtusely angled in front of the eyes, with the 
suture of the epistome subsemicircular. Thorax transverse, not 
wider behind than in front, and rounded on the sides. Elytra 
scarcely broader than the thorax at its broadest part and pro- 
foundly striato-punctate, with the interstices convex, and minutely 
punctate. Body beneath finely punctate. Antennsef and tai'si 
piceous red, the former short, submonilifoi'm, and becoming larger 
towards the apex, with the terminal joint round. 

611. — Seirotrana Mastersii, Pasc. Ann. Nat. Hist, 
February, 1870. 

612. — Seirotrana punctifera. n. sp. 

Length 8 lines. 
Of a bronzy olive, subnitid. Head deeply impressed on the 
suture, subtruncate. Thorax subtransverse, slightly rounded on 
the sides, trifoveate at the base, and marked on the disk with a 
few large scattered punctures. Scutellum very transverse, broadly 
rounded behind. Elytra finely striato-punctate with the inter- 
stices flat, the ord 5th and 7th marked with a few large punc- 
tures. Body beneath black. Antennee and tarsi piceous. 



1)92 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

613. — Seibotrana nosodebmoides, Pasc. Ann. Nat. 
Hist., February, 1870. 

614. — Seibotrana femoralis. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Coppery brown, subopaque, punctate and flat. Head and 
thorax densely punctate, the latter subquadrate, slightly emargi- 
nate at the apex, and rounded on the sides. Scutellum transverse, 
rounded behind, of a greenish colour, nitid and punctate. Elytra 
with four fine very interrupted eostse on each, with two rows of 
large rather distant punctures between these costiB, and with a 
few distant granules between the rows. Legs brown with the 
apex of the thighs yellow and the tarsi reddish. 

615. — COBIPERA MASTEBSII. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines. 

Dark copper-brown, nitid, flat. Head coarsely punctate, sub- 
emarginate in front. Thorax subquadrate, emarginate in front, 
lightly rounded on the side, and marked on the disk with a few 
large punctures, with the median line distinct and the posterior 
angles showing a flat square surface. Scutellum transversely 
triangular. Elytra marked with a sutural and three double striee 
strongly punctate, and with three broad flat interstices marked 
with a number of elongate punctate depressions placed in pairs, 
these being more numerous in the first and third interstice than 
in the second. 

The character of the sculpture in this species, is, though much 
more marked, somewhat like that of G. ocellata, Pascoe. 

616. — LiciNOMA ELATA, Pasc. Aim. Nat. Hist., Feb- 
ruarij, 1870. 

617. — LiCINOMA VIOLACEA. n. sp. 

Length 5^ lines. 
Elongate, black, subnitid. Head roughly punctate, subrugose. 
Thorax subquadrate, very finely punctate, truncate in front and 
behind, widest in the middle, and a little narrower at the base 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 293 

than at the apex. Elytra of a violet hue and punctato-striate, 
with the interstices broad and subconvex. Body beneath piceous- 
brown. Tibige and tarsi reddish. 

618. — Bry.copia longipes. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Bronzy black, nitid, punctate. Head with the suture curved, 
and without lateral impressions. Thorax subquadrate, truncate 
in front and behind, rounded on the sides, and considerably 
narrower at the base than at the apex, with two faintly marked 
foveae near the middle. Scutelluin triangular. Elytra deeply 
striato-punctate, with the interstices subconvex and finely punc- 
tate. Under surface and thighs brown. Antennae, tibiae and 
tarsi reddish. Hind legs long. 

619. — Brycopia dubia. n. sp. 
Length 2| lines. 

Ovate, subconvex, black, and nitid. Head with the suture 
straight, and with the lateral canals at right angles to it. Thorax 
transverse, slightly emarginate in front, rounded a little on the 
sides, and very thinly and minutely punctate, with the posterior 
angles acute and minutely recurved. Elytra obovate, broader 
than the thorax, and sti'iato-punctate with the interstices smooth 
and nearly flat. Body beneath brown, nitid. Antennae and 
legs piceous. 

I am perhaps wrong in placing this insect in the genus 
Brycopia. It seems in some respects to show most affinity to 
Adelium monilicorne described by me some pages back. I think 
that a new subgenus might well be formed for the reception of 
both. 

Leptogastrus. n. gen. 

Antennae, thick, and of the length of the head and thorax, 
with the third joint little longer than the fourth, the other joints 
increasing gradually in width up to the eleventh, which is very 
large and oval. Thorax elongate, narrowed behind. Elytra 
elongate-oval. Thighs robust. Body pedunculate, general form 
narrow, subcylindrical. In other respects resembling Adelium. 



294 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

The elongate form, pedunculated body, and clavate antennae, 
are the most marked characteristics of this genus, and separate it 
widely from all others of the group. The genus Licinoma Pascoe 
is the one perhaps to which it approaches nearest. 

620. — Leptogastrus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 2f lines. 
Dark copper-brown, subnitid, punctate. Head coarsely 
punctate, with the epistome subemarginate, the suture deeply 
mai'ked, and without lateral canals. Thorax truncate at the apex, 
not rounded at the sides, and much nari'owed at the base which 
is truncate. Elytra not broader than the thorax, of an elongate- 
oval shape and deeply striato-punctate. Thighs yellow on the 
apical half. Tibiae and tarsi reddish. 

621.— Omolipus corvus, Paso. Journ. of Ent, I., 
page 127, t. 6,/. 9 ; Ann. Nat. Hist., 1869, 
page 143. 

622. — Omolipus gnesioides, Paso. Ann. Nat. Hist., 
1869, page 143. 

623. — Omolipus grandis. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 
Convex, black, subopaque, with the suture of the epistome 
more deeply impressed than in O. corvus. Thorax more opaque. 
Elytra punctate in the same way as corvus, but the punctures 
larger and less acutely impressed. 

624. — Amarygmus rufipes. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
Oblong-ovate. Head, thorax and scutellum black, opaque, 
minutely punctate. Elytra of a semiopaque silky blue, with 
eight regular rows of small well marked punctures on each 
elytron. Antennae piceous. Legs entirely red. Body beneath 
black, subnitid. 

The species named by Mr. Pascoe nigritarsis, is the most like 
Lo this ol all the described species. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 295 

625. — Amarygmus picipes. n. sp. 
Length 5^ lines. 
Shorter and broader than the last, with the elytra green, sub- 
nitid, and a little more largely punctured than in the former 
species, and the legs entirely of a piceous brown. In other 
respects like A. rufipes. 

626. — AmaryCtMus opacicollis. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
Oblong-ovate. Head black, punctate, and flat between the 
antennae, with the eyes prominent and not covered by the thorax. 
Thorax brassy black, opaque, and minutely punctate. Elytra much 
broader than the base of the thorax, of a purplish blue colour be- 
coming green towards the sides, subnitid, and marked on. each 
elytron with eight rows of small closely placed subelongate 
punctures. Under side of body, antennee and legs, dark brown 
and subnitid. 

627. — Amarygmds grandis. n. sp. 
Length 9 lines. 
Oblong-ovate. Head black, punctate, with the eyes large and 
approximate. Thorax short, narrow in front, coppery black, sub- 
opaque, and very minutely punctate. Scutellum black, triangular, 
and smooth. Elytra cyaneous at the suture and showing green, 
purple, blue, and coppery red reflexions over the rest of their sur- 
face, with regular rows of small punctures, and the interstices 
minutely and somewhat rugosely punctate. Under surface black, 
subnitid, minutely punctate and striolate. Legs and antennas 
brownish -black. 

628. — Amarygmus cdpreus, Fabr. Syst. Ent., page 
123 ; Syst. El. II., 2Ktge 12 ;— Oliv. Ent. III., 
58, page 7, t. 1, /. 6. 

1 am not quite positiv-e as to the identity of this insect. 

629. — Amarygmus rugosicollis. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 
Oblong-ovate. Head black, and densely punctate, with the 



296 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

eyes large and partially covered by the thorax. Thorax short, 
not much narrower in front than behind, of a reddish purple, 
opaque, densely punctate, and somewhat rugose in the middle. 
Scutellum purplish black, thinly punctate, and curvilinearly 
triangular. Elytra nitid, viridi-seneous on the suture, and coppery 
red and metallic green on the rest of their surface, with eight 
rows on each elytron of large deeply impressed punctures and 
with the interstices smooth and minutely punctate. Body beneath 
and legs, black, subnitid, and finely punctate. 

630. — Amartgmus punctipennis. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
Oblong-ovate. Head black, and rather thinly punctate, with 
the eyes partially covered by the thorax. Thorax of a coppery 
green, subopaque, and finely but not densely punctate. Scutel- 
lum greenish black, triangular, the sides a little rounded. Elytra 
very nitid, viridi-seneous with the suture and a broad median vitta 
of a purplish red, and marked with eight regular rows of strong 
punctures — larger and more distant than in tlie last species — on 
each elytron, and with the interstices smooth and minutely and 
thinly punctate. Under surface of body and legs black, subnitid, 
the former very finely striolate. 

631. — Amarygmds obsoletus. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
Ovate. Head black, and punctate, with the ej'es almost com- 
pletely covered by the thorax. Thorax short, broad, not much 
narrowed in front, green clouded with coppery red, subopaque, 
and finely punctate. Scutellum black, smooth, curvilinearly 
triangular. Elytra more convex than in most species, green 
with numei-ous patches of coppery red, subopaque, and punctate, 
with the usual rows of punctures almost if not quite obsolete. 
Under surface and legs black, nitid, finely and thinly punctate. 

632. — Amarygmus rugosipennis. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 
Elongate-ovate. Head black, and punctate, with the eyes 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 297 

partially covered. Thorax greenisli black with a dull reddish 
reflexion, subopaque, and finely and thinly punctate. Scutellum 
black, triangular, and impressed towards the apex. Elytra not 
much wider than the base of the thorax, nearly three times as 
long as the width, nitid, of a green colour with purplish red 
reflexions, and marked with eight rows of punctures on each 
elytron, and with the interstices so coarsely punctate as to make 
these rows appear indistinct. Under side of body and legs 
black, nitid, and finely punctate, with the sides of the abdominal 
segments deeply impressed. The antennae and legs of this 
species are unusually robust. 

633. — Amartgmus convexus, Pasc. Journ. of Ent. 
II., yage 485. 

634. — Amakygmus foveolatus. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Ovate, convex. Head black, thinly punctate, and deeply 
impressed on the suture, with the eyes almost completely covei'ed 
by the thorax and not approximate. Thorax black, subnitid, 
very minutely and thinly punctate. Scutellum transverse, black, 
and curvilin early triangular. Elytra dark green, nitid, and 
marked with eight rows of foveolate punctures on each elyti'on. 
Body beneath black, subnitid. Tarsi piceous. 

635. — Amartgmds striatus. n. sp. 
Length 3| lines. 
Ovate, convex, black, subopaque. Head thinly punctate, eyes 
rather distant. Thorax minutely andthinly punctate, and slightly 
impressed transversely near the base. Scutellum curvilinearly 
triangular. Elytra punctato-striate, with the interstices broad 
and subconvex. Under side of body, antennaj and legs dark 
piceous. 

636. — Amarygmus convexiusculds. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Elongate-ovate, convex, subopaque. Head black, and deeply 



298 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

impressed on the suture of the epistome, with the eyes large, and 
subappi'oximate in front. Thorax black, very minutely punctate. 
Elytra of a bluish black, and punctate in rows, the punctures 
distinct, but not so large as in A. convexus. Body beneath piceous 
black. Legs and antennae red. 

637. — Stkongylium Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 6| lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head punctate, with the epistome more 
finely and densely punctated and with the suture very profoundly 
impressed. Thorax nearly square, a little rounded at the anterior 
angles, and finely punctate, with a strong marginal fold at the 
base. Scutellum finely punctate on the sides. Elytra elongate, 
cylindrical, broader and more nitid than the thorax, and slightly 
striate, with a regular row of distinct subapproximate punctures 
in each stria. Body beneath and legs piceous, black, nitid. Tarsi 
and terminal joint of antennte ferruginous. 

638. — Strongylium ruficolle. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Elongate, dark red, subnitid and punctate. Thorax subtrans- 
verse, scarcely rounded on the sides, truncate in front and behind, 
and rounded at the anterior angles, with the median line lightly 
marked, aiid with a raised basal mai'gin. Elj^tra a little wider than 
the thorax, black, and profoundly striato-punctate. 

CISTELID^. 

639. — Apellatus palpalis. n. sp. 
Length 2f lines. 
Pale red, subnitid, punctate and covered with a fine pubes- 
cence. Thorax subquadrate, broader behind than in front and 
truncate at the base, with the median line deeply impressed 
behind and with a small fovea on each side between it and the 
posterior angles. Scutellum large and rounded behind. Elytra 
broader than the thorax and ofa paler colour, punctate and striato- 
punctate, with the apex, the sides and the suture, black. Legs 
pale. Antennae with the middle joints rather broad and flattened. 
Terminal joint of maxillary palpi transversely elongate. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 299 

640. — Apellatus Mastersii. n. sp. 

Length 3 1 lines. 
This species is larger than the last, and of a darker red colour, 
with the maxillary palpi less elongate, the thorax proportionally 
less long- and more rounded at the anterior angles, and with the 
elytra more deeply striato-punctate, and entirely black excepting 
a testaceous patch at the base. 

641. — Metistete Pascoet. n. sp. 
Length 6 lines. 
Black, nitid. Head and thorax finely punctate, the latter 
small, subquadrate, rounded at the anterior angles, and scarcely 
broader at the base than at the apex. Elytra much broader than 
the thorax and broadest near the apex, subacuminate at the apex, 
three times longer than the width, and sharply striato-punctate. 
Legs pale red. AntennsB, palpi, and labrum, piceous red. 

642.— Atkactus ruficollis. u. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 

Red, nitid, and thinly punctate. Thorax longer than the 
width, a little narrowed in front, truncate at the apex and base, 
and rather deeply impressed at the base of the median line. 
Elytra of a brilliant purplish blue, and striato-punctate. Legs and 
prothorax red. Tarsi brown. Abdomen, meso- and meta-thorax 
black. Antennge dark brown, joints 4 to 10 broad and subserrate. 

This species and the following ought to constitute a new 
genus. I place them at present with Atractus, because it is not 
improbable that the genus Idcymnius of Bates, of which I have 
never seen the description, may have been made for one of these 
very species. 

643. — Atractus ctaneus. n. sp. 

Length 3 1 lines. 
This species only differs from the last in being smaller, in 
having the head and thorax of a bronzy black, and in having the 
legs brown and finely pubescent. 



300 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

644. — Atractos vitticollis. n. sp. 
Length 4.^ lines. 
Red, subnitid, punctate and clothed with a very short pale 
pubescence. Head bi'oad, and not narrowed behind the eyes, 
with a black spot on the forehead. Thorax not broader than the 
head, longer than the width, and not narrowed in front, with a 
central black vitta. Scutellum black, and rounded behind. 
Elytra broader than the thorax, and rugosely striato-punctate, 
with a purplish gloss in the middle. A.bdomeu and legs piceous 
brown. 

645. — Atractus rugosulus. n. sp. 
Length 4 lines. 
Piceous black, subnitid, coarsely punctate and pubescent- 
Thorax of the same form as in the preceding species, but of a 
bronzy black, with the median line distinct. Elytra dark red 
and very rugosely striato-punctate, with a slight greenish tinge 
on the suture. 

This and the species before it, A. viticollis, might also I think 
be separated from Atractus. 

646. — Chromom^a Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 3|- lines. 
Bronzy black, nitid, and punctate. Thorax longer than the 
width, and not narrowed in front, with the median line deeply 
impressed at the base. Scutellum black. Elytra red and pro- 
foundly striato-punctate. Legs red. Antennse brown. 

647. — Chromomjia picea. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Dark piceous with the elytra and legs of a redder hue, nitid, 
and finely punctate. Thorax scarcely longer than the width, and 
slightly rounded at the anterior angles, with a shallow fovea near 
the middle of each side, and the median line slightly impressed 
at the base. Elytra much broader than the thorax and finely 
striato-punctate, — the interstices broad and flat. Abdomen 
black, finely pubescent. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 301 

648. — HOMOTRYSIS RDFtCORNIS. n. sp. 
Length 8 lines. 
Black, subnitid, and punctate. Head and thorax finely 
punctate, the latter subtransverse, rounded and narrowed at the 
anterior angles and truncate at the base Elytra broad, convex, 
broadest behind the middle, more than twice longer than the 
width, and covered with large punctures, with 8 distinct punc- 
tured striee on each elytron, and a short one near the scutellum 
running into the first. Antennte red. Legs nitid, with the middle 
of the tibia3 red. 

G49. HOMOTRTSIS SUBGEMINATUS. n. Sp. 

Length 7^ lines. 
Black, subnitid and punctate. Head and thorax finely and. 
thinly punctate, the latter transverse and much broader at the 
base than at the apex. Elytra broad, convex, broadest behind 
the middle, densely punctate and very lightly marked with sub- 
geminate punctate striae. Legs and antennae black. 

650. HOMOTRYSIS REGULAKIS. n. Sp. 

Length (^ 4 lines, $ 7 lines. 
Black, subnitid. Head and thorax densely and finely punctate, 
the latter subtransverse and very little broader at the base than 
at the apex, with the median line lightly marked on its anterior 
half. Elytra very finely punctate, and striato-punctate, the punc- 
tures in the stri^ being large at the base and small towards the 
apex. 

651. — Alleccla elongata. n. sp. 
Length 7| lines. 
Black, subnitid, finely punctate and clothed with a short, 
erect, brown pubescence. Thorax broad, subcon vex, subquadrate, 
slightly lobed at the apex, and slightly bi-emarginate and bi-im- 
pressed at the base, with the anterior angles rounded and the 
posterior acute. Elytra a little bi-oader than the thorax, nearly 
three times longer than the width, densely and finely punctate. 



302 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

and marked with very fine striae, and a series of large square 
punctures in a groove extending from the humeral angles to 
beyond the middle. 

652.— Allecula subsulcata. n. sp. 
Length 5| lines. 
Dark brown, and subnitid, with the parts of the mouth, apex of 
the antennae, and tarsi, piceous red. Head and thorax densely 
punctate, the latter not broader than the head, almost square, a 
little rounded on the sides and broadly depressed on the anterior 
half of the median line. Elytra deeply striato-punctate, with the 
interstices smooth and slightly elevated, and with an abbreviated 
stria near the scutellum. 

653. — Allecula punctipennis. n. sp. 
Length 6^ lines. 
Brown, opaque, and clothed with short semi-erect brown setae. 
Head and thorax densely and finely punctate, the latter rather 
broader than the head, subquadrate, slightly rounded on the sides. 
and without trace of median line. Elytra a little broader than 
the thorax and deeply striato-punctate, with the punctures larger 
towards the base, and with the interstices slightly elevated. Legs 
and palpi opaque, reddish brown. 

654 — Allecula Pascoel n. sp. 
Length 5f lines. 
Brown, opaque, densely and finely punctate, and clothed with 
a fulvous pubescence. Thorax transverse, rounded on the sides 
and anterior angles, and slightly lobed at the base. Elytra 
broader than the thorax, and in addition to the dense puncturation 
of the whole surface, marked with fine but distinct punctate strias 
with an abbreviate one near the scutellum. Under surface, legs, 
and antennae of a reddish bi'own. 

655. — Allecula Mastersil n. sp. 
Length 3 1 lines. 
Brown, subopaque, densely punctate and densely clothed with 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 303 

a short semi-erecfc yellowish, pubescence. Thorax transverse, 
rounded at the anterior angles, and broader at the base than at the 
apex. Elytra closely and coarsely punctate and marked with fine 
strije rather indistinct towards the base. Antennce, palpi, and 
tarsi, reddish. Under surface of body piceous and nitid. 

656.— Allecula planicollis. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Brown, subnitid, punctate and very finely pubescent. Thorax 
quadrate, slightly rounded on the sides anteriorly, broadly 
depressed and flattened on the disc, and bi-foveate at the base. 
Elytra a little broader than the thorax, densely and rather con- 
fusedly punctate, and rather profoundly sti-iato-punctate. Body 
beneath, legs, antennae, and the parts of the mouth, ferruginous. 

657. — CiSTELA CONVEXA. n. Sp. 

Length 3j lines. 
Oval, convex, of an olive-brown colour, subnitid, densely and 
very minutely punctate, and densely clothed with a short whitish 
pubescence. Thorax very transverse, rounded at the anterior 
angles, much broader behind than in front, and slightly bi-foveate 
at the base. Elytra lightly striate with the interstices sub- 
elevated. Body beneath and legs piceous-black and nitid. 

658. — CiSTELA OVATA. n. Sp. 

Length 2 J lines. 
This species differs from tlae last in being much smaller and 
less convex, in being of a pale reddish brown, and in having the 
strijB of the elytra almost obsolete. 

659. CiSTELA DEPRESSIUSCALA. n. Sp. 

Length 2| lines. 
Ovate, subdepressed, piceous brown, subnitid, densely punctate, 
and densely clothed with a fulvous pubescence. Thorax very 
transverse. Elytra rather coarsely punctate, and striato-punctate. 
Legs red. 



304 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 
660. CiSTELA POLITA. n. Sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Elongate-ovate, red, nitid and punctate. Thorax transverse, 
rounded on the sides, and slightly broader at the base than at 
the apex, with the median line and two foveee traceable at the 
base. Elytra black, very nitid, and striato-punctate, with the 
interstices snaooth and flat. Legs pale red. 

MELANDRYID^. 
66L — Oechesia elongata. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Elongate, reddish brown, subopaque, densely and minutely 
punctate, and covei'ed with a fulvous sericeous pubescence. 
Legs, antennEe, and palpi of a paler colour. 

LAGRIID^. 

662. — Lagria grandis, Gyllh. SchonJi. His. 1 , Ins. 
app., 3, page 9. — Blanch. Voy. Pole. Sud. 
IV., page 183, t. 1.2, /. 9.— Erichs. Weigin. 
ArcMv. 184<2, I., page S70. 
rufescens Boisd. Voy. Astrol. II., page 286, 
— Latr. Dej. Cat., Zrd ed., p)age 237. 
ruficollis MsicLeaj Dej. Cat. 3rd ed.,page 237. 

663. — Lagria ctanea. n. sp. 

Length 3| lines. 
Of a greenish blue with a tinge of purple on the elytra, 
moderately convex, subopaque, densely punctate and cinereo- 
pilose. Under surface of body, cox£e, basal portion of the femora 
and basal joints of antennas red, rest of antennae, and legs black. 

Ommatophorus. n. gen. 

Head small. Neck distinct. Eyes large, round and con- 
tiguous. Maxillary palpi securifox'm. Antennae long, filiform, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 305 

1st joint, thick and clavate, 2nd short, 3rd longer, the rest 
gradually increasing in length to the apical one which is very 
long. Thorax flat, transverse- and truncate in front and behind. 
Elytra broader than the thorax, flat, parallel-sided and rounded 
at the apex. Legs as in Lagria. 

664). — Ommatophorus Mastbrsii. n. sp. 
Length 2 1 lines. 
Dark red, subnitid, coarsely punctate and clothed with black 
hair. Head black. Thorax rounded at the anterior angles, and 
square behind. Elytra deeply striato-punctate, and of a brownish 
colour excepting on the sides and suture. Under side of body 
piceous. Legs pale red. 

This is a very distinct genus, but I may be wrong in classing 
it vith the Latjriidce. 

ANTHICID^. 

665. — Mectnotarsus Kreusleri, King. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. 8. Wales, II., jpage 4. 

666. — Mectnotarsus Kingii. n. sp. 
Length Ij lines. 
Much resembling M. concolor King. The thorax is very 
convex, of a brownish colour and densely covered with a silvery 
pubescence, the elytra are more red and clothed with a cinereous 
subsericeous pubescence. The legs and antennjB ai-e red. ^ 

667. — Mectnotarsus Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
This species very much resembles M. Kreusleri King, it is 
however a larger and more beautiful insect. The form is the 
same, but the thorax is covered with a dense silky olive pube- 
scence, and there is a large triangular patch of the same on the 
elytra in the scutellar region, which interrupts the white sub-basal 
fascia in the middle. The apex is also of a sericeous olive hue. 
In all else it is the same as M. Kreusleri, 



306 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

668. — FOEMICOMUS KiNGII. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Black, sub-opaque, very densely punctate and pubescent. 
Thorax lonojer than the width, broad and rounded near the front, 
and narrowed at the base. Elytra elongate-oval, subconvex, sub- 
nitid, with two narrow fasciae not reaching the suture, composed 
of silvery pubescence. Hind thighs very large and strongly 
toothed on the under side near the apex. Antennae, base of thorax, 
scutellum, base of femora, tibias and tarsi, piceous red. 

669. — FoRMicoMDS Denisonii, King. Trans. Ent. 
Soc. N. 8. Wales, II., page 6. 

670. — EORMICOMUS HDMERALIS. n. Sp. 

Length I^ lines. 
Head and thorax red, and subnitid, the latter narrower than 
the head, convex, much narrowed at the base and deeply impressed 
on the median line. Elytra broadly ovate, convex, black, nitid, 
and thinly clothed with hairs, with an oblique white fascia com- 
mencing near the humeral angle, and not reaching the suture. 
Legs and terminal joints of antennse black. 

671. — Anthicus luridds. King. Trans. Ent. Soc. 
N. S. Wales, II., page 16. 

672. — Anthicus pulcher, King. Trans. Ent. Soc. 
N. 8. Wales, II., page 12. 

673. — Anthicus kingii. n. sp. 

Length 1^ lines. 
Black, subnitid, punctate, and hairy. Thorax narrower than 
the head, rounded in front, subconvex, and compressed laterally 
behind. Elytra broad, subdepressed, densely and coarsely punc- 
tate, and of a dark red colour with a broad black median fascia 
not reaching the suture. Legs and antennas red. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 307 

674. — Anthicus propinquds. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Piceous red, subnitid, punctate and hairy. Thorax narrower 
than the head, convex and scarcely compressed laterally behind. 
Elytra subovate, convex, and sparsely and coarsely punctate, with 
the base, apex, and a median fascia not reaching the suture, black. 
Antennse and legs pale red. 

675. — Anthicus laticollis. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Head transverse, black. Thorax transverse, subconvex, as 
broad as the head and much narrowed behind, of a dark red 
colour and clothed with a cinereous pubescence. Elytra red, 
pubescent, subconvex, subnitid, and finely punctate, with a large 
median fascia becoming narrower towards the suture but not 
reaching it, and the apex, black. Antennte and legs red, the 
latter with the apical half of the thighs brown. 

G76. — Anthicus masteesii. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Black, nitid, and thinly punctate. Thorax subconvex, nar- 
rower than the head, longer than the width, slightly and gra- 
dually narrowed towards the base, and piceous at the base. 
Elytra subconvex, with two indistinct deep red transverse spots 
on each elytron, one near the base, the other behind the middle. 
Antennee and legs piceous. 

677. — Anthicus constrictus. n. sp. 
Length 1| lines. 
Black, nitid, minutely punctate, and sparingly pubescent. 
Thorax i-ed, elongate, narrower than the head and much con- 
stricted in the middle. Elytra flat, with a narrow yellow fascia 
near the base. Antennae and legs reddish. 

678. — Anthicus pallidus. n. sp. 
Length 1 line. 
Pale red, subnitid, densely punctate and finely pubescent. 



308 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

Thorax nearly as broad as the head, not longer than the width, 
and narrowed gradually to the base. Elytra somewhat depressed, 
and clouded with brown towards the apes and sides. Eyes very 
small. 

679. — Anthicus aberrans. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Elongate, pale reddish brown, opaque, punctate and fulvo- 
pubescent. Thorax ovate, and as broad as the head, with the 
median line faintly marked towards the base. Elytra elongate, 
parallel-sided, subdepressed, scarcely wider than the thorax and 
of a more red colour, and striato-punctate. Legs and antennae pale 
i-ed, the latter having the 9th and 10th joints broader than the 
others, and the last joint long. 

This species ought to constitute a separate genus. 

PYROCHROIDJE. 

680. — Lemodes Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
This species differs from Lemodes coccinea Bohem, in being of 
a smaller size, broader form, and duller colour and in having the 
legs and basal joints of the antennte red, and the two apical 
joints white. 

MORDELLID^. 

681. — MORDELLA OCTOMACULATA. n. Sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Satiny black, opaque. Head silvery white in front and be- 
hind. Thorax bordered with white and with a white fascia in- 
terrupted in the middle. Elytra with an oblique oval spot in the 
middle near the base, a straight oval spot behind near the suture, 
a round spot towards the apex and a transverse spot on the side 
towards the shoulders, white. Body beneath spotted with white. 

682. MORDELLA 14 MACULATA. U. Sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Of a more elongate form than the last species. The fascia on 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ, F.L.S. 309 

the thorax is narrow, wavy, and complete, and there are two 
small spots behind it. The spots on the elytra are small and are 
placed one at the scutellum, one a little way from the base near 
the centre, one about the middle near the suture, one between 
that and the apex, one very small on the side near the apex, and 
two also small behind the shoulder. The markings on the under 
side are much the same as in M. octomaculata. 

683. — MORDELLA ATERRIMA. n. Sp. 

Length 3 lines. 

Elongate, satiny black, with a white spot on the side of the 
basal segment of the abdomen. 

684. — MoRDELLA AusTRALis, Boisd. Voy. Astrol. II., 
page 289. 

685. — MoRDELLA BRUNNEIPENNIS. n. Sp. 

Length 2 lines. 

Narrow, black, opaque. Elytra chesnut brown with the 
suture narrowly margined with black. 

686. — MORDELLA CDSPIDATA. n. Sp. 

Length 1^ lines. 
Head, thorax, base of elytra, under surface of thorax, and legs, 
red, all the rest of the elytra and the abdominal segments, black. 
Anal spine long and very acute. 

RHIPIPHORID^. 

687. — Teigonodera Gerstackeri. n. sp. 
Length 6| lines. 
Brown, subopaque, densely and very minutely punctate and 
clothed with a fine sericeous fulvous pubescence. Scutellum 
oblong, rounded behind. Elytra moderately attenuated towards 
the apex and marked with obsolete traces of costoe. Under surface 
and legs reddish brown and clothed with a very fine cinereous 
pubescence. Antennse with the first four joints simple, the third 
longest. 



310 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 

688. — Teigonodera Mastersii. n. sp. 
Length 4 1 lines. 
Of more elongate form than the last, dark brown, holosericeous, 
and subopaque. Thorax rather longer than the width. Elytra 
marked with numerous spots of a deeper brown, giving an 
appearance of indistinct fasciae on the apical half. Under surface 
and legs reddish brown and clothed with a very fine whitish 
pubescence. Antennse red, third joint long. 

689. — Ptilophorus Gerstackeei. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 

Elongate, brown, opaque, very densely and minutely punctate, 
and densely clothed with very short cinereous pubescence. Thorax 
convex and profoundly bi-emarginate at the base. Scutellum 
large, subtriangular and rounded at the apex. Elytra reddish- 
brown, and having a patchy appearance from the cinereous 
pubescence not covering equally the whole surface. Antenna 
largely pectinated in the male. 

690. — Rhipiphorus luteipennis. n. sp. 
Length 2 lines. 
Black, nitid, and thinly punctate. Elytra pale luteous and 
acute at the apex. Abdomen and base of tibise red. Antennse 
red, pecten brown. 

CANTHARID^. 

691. — ZONITIS LUTEA. n. Sp. 

Length 5 lines. 

Upper surface entirely luteous, under surface, legs, and antenna9 
black. Head and thorax nitid and thinly punctate, the latter 
scarcely longer than the width, and faintly marked on the median 
line. Elytra subnitid, densely punctate, and finely pubescent. 

692. — ZONITIS FDSCICORNIS. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Pale luteous, subnitid. Head and thorax thinly punctate, the 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 311 

latter elongate, not much broader behind than in front, and dis- 
tinctly impressed on the basal part of the median line. Elytra 
subrugosely and densely punctate and pubescent. Antennae, apex 
of thighs, tibiae and tarsi, brown. Abdominal segments dusky. 

693. ZONITIS APICALIS. n. sp. 

Length 5 lines. 
Luteous, subnitid, very sparingly punctate. Thorax not 
longer than the width, much narrowed at the apex, rounded on 
the sides, and narrowed towards the base. Elytra subdepressed, 
broad, and broadest at the apex, which is black. Antennae, apex 
of thighs, tibiae and tarsi, black. Abdomen dusky brown. 

694. — ZONITIS BIZONATA. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
This species differs only from the last in the elytra which are 
in this insect more convex, very finely and densely punctate, and 
broadly fasciated with black at the base and apex. 

695. ZONITIS ANNULATA. n. sp. 

Length 4| lines. 
Pale luteous, subnitid, punctate. Thorax elongate, with the 
median line distinct towards the base. Elytra very densely 
punctate, thinly pubescent, and brown at the base and apex, with 
four subdistinct raised lines on each elytron. Apex of thighs, 
apex of tibiae, apex of first joint of tarsi and all the others, brown. 
Abdomen dusky brown. Antennce brown with the very base of 
each joint reddish. 

(EDEMERID^. 

696. — Selenopalpds ruscus. n. sp. 
Length 5 lines. 
Reddish brown, opaque, densely fulvo-pubescent. Head sub- 
triangular, black. Neck large. Thorax elongate, and constricted 
in front, with the median line profoundly marked. Elytra 
elongate, subacuminate, coarsely punctate, and cinereo-pubescent, 
with the suture and extreme apex black. Body beneath and 



312 THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH. 

legs black, nitid and slightly cinereo-pubescent. Penultimate 
article of tarsi subbilobed. Antennae short and slender, the 
joints subtriangular, setose, and of nearly equal length. Palpi 
serrate, last joint broadly triangular, 

Neither this nor the following species answer exactly to the 
description given of the maxillary palpi of Selenopalpus, and as 
far as I can ascertain no other characters have been given to 
that genus. I have on this account been more particular in my 
description of the anatomy of the insects, than would have been 
necessary where the genus was properly defined. 

697. — Selenopalpds Masteesii. n. sp. 
Length 3 lines. 
Reddish- brown, opaque, punctate, hairy and cinereo-pubescent. 
Head broadly triangular, flat on the forehead and largely and 
roundly angled behind the eyes. ITeck large and convex. Thorax 
black, subtransverse, subcordiform and covered with whitish hairs. 
Elytra coarsely punctate and densely cinereo-pubescent, the 
white pubescence scanty in some places, giving thereby the 
appearance of a large space near the scutellum, and a broad fascia 
behind the middle, not reaching the suture, of a reddish-brown 
colour. Under side of body, and legs piceous and subnitid. 
Penultimate joint of tarsi strongly bilobed. Antenn89 red, 
longer and more slender than in the last species, and not setose. 
Maxillary palpi with the last joint of an elongate triangular form. 

698. — Ananca vitticollis. n. sp. 
Length 4j lines. 
Black, with the thorax and elytra pale red, the former oblong, 
a little rounded on the sides, and not broader behind than in 
front, with a large central black vitta not reaching the apex, 
Scutellum black. Elytra densely and minutely punctate, opaque, 
finely pubescent, and tricostate, 

699. — Ananca euficollis. n. sp. 

Length 3 lines. 
Head black, thinly punctate. Thorax red, elongate, rounded 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 313 

on the sides in front, and slightly narrowed behind. Elytra bluisli 
black, densely and rugosely punctate. Meso- and meta-thorax, 
abdomen, and legs black, thighs red. 

700. — PseudoltchijS apicalis. n. sp. 

Length 4 lines. 
Black, opaque. Antenna subpectinate. Head transverse. 
Eyes prominent. Thorax of the width of the head, transverse, 
and deeply impressed in the middle and sides. Elytra red with 
the apical third black, very densely punctate and marked with 
three or four slightly elevated longitudinal lines. Under surface 
subnitid. 

The two following species were accidentally omitted in their 
proper places. 

RHIPICERID^. 

701. — PsAcus Mastersit. n. sp. 

Length 2 lines. 
Ovate, convex, black, subopaque, punctate, hairy, and marked 
on the sides of the thorax and elytra with white pubescence. An- 
tennae short, the flabellae short and thick. 

This species is smaller and more convex than Psacus atta- 
genoides, Pascoe, and looks even more like some of the family of 
Dermestidce than that species. 

* DASCILLID^. 

702. — Dascillus brevicornis. 
Length 3| lines. 
Brownish red, subnitid, punctate, and densely clothed with a 
short yellow pubescence. Thorax transverse, of the width of the 
head at the apex, a little broader behind, and emargiuate in the 
middle of the base to fit the scutellum. Elytra scarcely broader 
than the base of the thorax, and obsoletely striate, with the inter- 
stices subelevated. Legs and abdomen red. Antennae shorter 
and less filiform than usual in the genus. 



314 



THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 



I subjoin a List of the Genera and Species described in this and my 
previous Paper. 



DisTYPsiDERA Mastersii 
Drypta Mastersii . . 
PoLYSTiCHUs Australis 
GiGADEMA politulum 
Helluosoma Mastersii 
Xanthophcea Chaudoiri 
Cymixdis crassiceps 
Phlceocakabus genus 

Mastersii 
Phlceodromius genus 

piceus 
EuLEBiA genus 

plagiata . . 
picipennis . . 
Mastersii . . 
pallida 
fasciata 
Dromius humeralis.. 
HoMETHES velatinus 

marginipennis 
Philophlceus maculatus 

brunnipennis 
dubius 
vittatus 
Agonocheila sutnralis 
EucALYPTocoLA genus 

Mastersii 
ScoPODES seneus 
laevis 

angulicollis 
auratus . . 
sericeus . . 

SiLPHOMORPHA polita 

rufo-marginata 
Adelotopus Mastersii 
sub-opacus 
analis . . 
maculipennis 
Apotomus Mastersii 
MoRio longicollis . . 

scticollis 
Philoscaphus genus 

Mastersii 
Carenum salebrosum 
occultum . . 
viridi-marginatum 
politulum 
ovipenne . . 
submetallicum 
angustipenne 
Promecodeuus viridis 
Meonis ovicoUis 
Phorticosomus rugiceps 
Lecanomerus ruficeps 
aberrans 
Harpalus planipennis 



82 
82 
83 
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84 
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87 
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98 



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100 
100 
100 
101 
101 



Harpalus Gayndahensis 
angustatus 
convexiuseulus 
seneo-nitens 
atro-viridis 
Stknolophus politus 
Acupalpus Mastersii 
angulatus 
Cyclothorax genus,. 

punctipennis 
Abacetus ater 

angustior 
Amblytelus amplipennis 

minutus 
TiBARisxJS ater 

niger , . 
NoTONOMUs purpureipennis 

violaceomarginatus 
cj'aneocinctus, 
viridicinctus 
angustipennis 
Omaseus Mastersii . . 
Chl;enioideus planipennis 
PjECilus subiridescens 
atronitens. . 
Argutor foveipennis 
nitidipennis 
Oodilbrmis 
Platynus nitidiijennis 
planipennis 
marginicollis 
SiAGONYX genus 

amplipennis 
Mastersii.. 
Trechtis atriceps . . 
rufilabris . . 
concolor . . 
ater 
Bembidium bistriatum 
striolatum 
convexum 
bipuotulatum 
punctipenne 
atriceps 
transversicoUe 
sexsti latum 
ovatum. . 
bifoveatum 
brunnipenne 
rubicundum 
subviride 
auiplipenne 
gagatinum 
flavipes.. 
bipartitum 
Badister anchomenoides 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 



315 



Physolctisthus grandipalpis 
Hydroporus bilasciatus . . 
foveiceps 
brunnipennis 
fossiilipennis 
nebulosus 
Mastersii 
lurid us 
basalis 
politus 
Necteeosoma gemis . . 

vittipenne 
flavicoUe 
Agabus Masters'ii . • 
CoPELATUs irregularis 

elongatulus 
Cybister Gayndahensis 
EuNECTES punctipennis 
Gyrinus convexiusculus 
Hydrophill's Gayndahensi: 
Sternolophus nitidulus 
Hydatotrephis ffemis 

Mastersii 
Philhydrus elongatulus 
maculiceps 
marmoratus 
Hydrobaticus ffetms 
tristis 
luridus 
Hygrotrophus ffeims 
nutans 
involutus 
Hydrochus parallelus 
HYDRiENA luridipennis 
Cyclonotum Mastersii 
pygnaeum 
Myrmecocephalus ffcni'.s 
Myrmecocephalus cingulatus 

biciugulatus 
Tachyusa coracina,. 
Myrmedonia australis 
HoMALOTA flavicollis 

pallidipennis 
OxYPODA analis 
Aleochara Mastersii 
CoNURUs rufipalpis . . 
atriceps . . 
elongatulus 
Tachyporus tristis 

rubricollis 
Leptacinus luridipennis 
cyaneipennis 
Xantholinus atriceps 
piceus 

cervinipennis 
cyaneipennis 
dubius 
Philonthus australis 

haemorrhoidalis 
pilipennis 



PAGE, 
121 
121 

122 
122 
122 
123 
123 
124 
124 
124 
124 
125 
125 
126 
126 
127 
127 
127 
128 
129 
129 
129 
130 
130 
130 
130 
131 
131 
131 
131 
132 
132 
133 
133 
133 
133 
134 
134 
134 
135 
135 
135 
135 
135 
136 
136 
136 
136 
136 
137 
137 
137 
138 
138 
138 
139 
139 
139 
140 
140 



Philonthus politulus 

subcingulatus 
cbalybeipennis 
xantholinoides 
Staphylinus luridipennis 

analis 
Cryptobium Mastersii 

apicale 
DoLicAON quadraticollis 
elongatulus 
nigripennis 
Lathrobium politulum 

piceum 
LiTHOCHARis tristis 
ScopjEUs rotundicollis 
Rtilicus ovicollis . . 
SuNius cylindricus , . 
P^DERUs cingulatus 

angulicollis 
PiNOPHiLus grandiceps 
Mastersii 
brevis . . 
Oedichirtjs psederoides 
PiNOBius ffenus 

Mastersii 
Stenus maculatus . . 
Gayndahensis 
olivaceus . . 
similis 
viridiaeneus 
cupreipennis 
puncticollis 
Megalops nodipennis 
Bledius mandibularis 
OxYTELUs brunnipennis 
impressifrons 
IsoMALTJS planicollis 
Omalium Gayndahense 
Tmesiphorus Kingii 
Tyrus Mastersii 
Bryaxis hirta 

atriceps 
Arthropterus Westwoodii 
Mastersii 
angusticornis 
Kingii 
elongatulus 
ScYDMiENUs Kingii 
Catops obscurus 
Scaphidium punctipenne 

Mastersii 
iScaphisoma politum 

punctipenne 
Hololepta Mastersii 
Platysoma subdepressum , 
convexiusculum 
planiceps 
Saprinus Gayndahensis 

Mastersii 
Abr^us Australis .. 



316 



THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 



PAGE. 

Bbachypeplus Murray! .. .. lo9 

Carpophilus convexiusculus . . 159 

luridipennis .. 160 

pilipennis .. .. 160 

obscurus .. .. 160 

aterrimus ,. .. 161 

Peia ruticunda .. .. .. 161 

SoEONiA variegata . . . . . . 161 

Pocadius pilistriatus . . . . 162 

NiTiDULA concolor . . .. .. 162 

Ctchramus niger .. •• .. 163 

Ips politus .. .. •• o. 163 

Leperina Mastersii .. .. 163 

Gayndahensis .. .. lei' 

Burnettensis . . . . 164 

DiTOMA costata . . _ . . . . 165 

Deretaphrus Pascoei . . . . 165 

BoTHErDEEES Mastersii .. .. 166 

Pascoei . . . . 166 

Krefftii .. ..166 

suturalis .. .. 167 

Peostomis laticeps . . . . . . 167 

Ipsaphes nitidulus . . .. .. 168 

Placonotus genus .. ., .. 168 

longicornis .. .. 168 

SiLVANUs castaneus .. .. 168 

Omma Mastersii .. .. .. 169 

CoRTiCARiA polita .. .. .. 169 

Tbiphyllus fasciatus .. .. 170 

DiPLocoELUS ovatus .. .. 170 

Megatoma apicalis . . . . » . 170 

Anthrenus nigricans .. .. 171 

Cryptorhopalum obscurum .. 171 

Trlnodes punctipennis . . . . 171 

giobosus.. .. .. 171 

Micheoch^tes fascicularis .. 171 

costatus . . . . 1 72 

LiMNiCHUs frontalis .. .. 172 

Georyssus Kingii , . . . . . 172 

Heterocerus Mastersii .. .. 173 

Lamprima Krefftii.. .. ■• 173 

AuLcocYCLus Kaupii .. .. 173 

T^niocerus Mastersii .. .. 174 

Mastochilus nitidulus .. 174 

puncticoUis . . .. 175 

Canthonosoma ffenus . . . . 175 

Mastersii .. .. 176 

Cephalodesmius quadridens .. 176 

Temnoplectron tibiale . . . . 177 

Merodontus ^e«Ms .. .. 177 

calcaratus . . . . 178 

Onthophagus divaricatus . . .. 179 

rubicundulus .. ISO 

perpilosus . . . . 181 

incornutus.. •• 181 

Mastersii .. .. 181 

desectus .. .. 182 

quinquetuberculatus 182 

inermis .. .. 183 

Aphodius geminatus .. .. 183 





PAGE. 


Ammcecius obscurus 


.. 184 


crenatipennis . . 


.. 184 


semicornutus . . 


.. 184 


nitidicollis 


. . ] 85 


BoLBOCERAS Gayudahcnse 


.. 185 


Trox squamosus 


., 186 


salebrosus 


.. 186 


semicostatus . 


.. 186 


Phyllotocus sericeus 


.. 187 


variicollis . . 


.. 187 


M^CHiDius variolosus 


.. 188 


obscurus 


.. 1S8 


rugosicoUis 


.. 188 


parvulus 


.. 189 


LiPARETEUs fulvohirtus . . 


.. 189 


sericeus 


.. 189 


pilosus . . 


.. 190 


pallidus 


.. 190 


flavopilosus . . 


.. 190 


rufiventris 


.. 191 


tridentatus 


.. 191 


glaber . . 


.. 191 


parvulus 


.. 192 


SciTALA suturalis . . 


.. 192 


armaticeps . . 


.. 192 


HOMOLOTROPUS (/e7lUS 


.. 193 


luridipennis 


.. 193 


Haplonycha pinguis 


.. 193 


Heteronyx holosericeus . . 


.. 194 


pubescens 


.. 194 


castaneus 


.. 194 


substriatus 


.. 195 


infuscatus 


.. 195 


pallidulus 


.. 19.5 


concolor 


.. 196 


ruficollis 


.. 196 


rugosipennis .. 


.. 196 


Odontotonyx ffetms . . 


.. 196 


brunneipennis 


.. 197 


Repsimus purpureipes 


.. 197 


IsoDON puncticoUis . . 


.. 197 


Isevicollis . . 


.. 198 


Heteronychus picipes 


.. 198 


irregularis 


.. 199 


Dasygnathus Mastersii , . 


.. 199 


Oryctes obscurus . . 


.. 200 


Semanopterus depressiusculus 


. . 200 


convexiusculus 


.. 201 


Cryptodus subcostatus 


.. 201 


obscurus 


.. 201 


incornutus 


.. 202 


ScHizoRHiNA Mastersii 


.. 202 


hirticeps 


.. 203 


nigrans 


.. 203 


pulchra 


.. 203 


viridicuprea . . 


.. 204 


Valgus nigrinus 


.. 205 


castaneipennis 


.. 205 


Nascio viridis 


.. 239 


AsTR^us Mastersii . . 


.. 239 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 



317 





page. 


Melobasis azureipennis 


. 240 


costata . . 


. 240 


apicalis . . 


. 241 


obscura , . 


. 241 


Neocuris Mastersii 


. 241 


gracilis .. .. . 


. 241 


Anthaxia obscura . . . . ' . 


. 242 


cupripes . . 


. 242 


purpureicoUis . . 


. 242 


nigra 


. 243 


NOTOGEAPTUS (7CH2<S.. 


. 243 


sulcipennis . . 


. 243 


bieroglyphicus 


. 244 


CuRis splendens 


. 244 


Stigmodeea IMastersii 


. 245 


Kreiftii 


, 245 


elongatula 


. 246 


Polycesta Mastersii 


. 246 


Chrtsobothris Saundersii 


. 246 


Chrysobothris Mastersii . . 


. 247 


viridis 


. 247 


Ethon latipennis . . 


. 247 


Cisseis (limidiata . . 


. 248 


impressicollis 


. 248 


viridiaurea 


. 248 


Coraebt7s marmoratus 


. 248 


Agrilus Mastersii . . 


. 249 


deauratus . . 


. 249 


Agrypntjs Mastersii 


. 240 


latior 


. 250 


Lacon Gayndahesnsis 


. 250 


alternans 


. 251 


maculatus .. 


. 251 


granulatus . . 


. 251 


MoNOCREPiDirs Mastersii.. 


. 252 


striatus . . 


. 252 


acuminatus 


. 252 


breviceps 


. 252 


rubicundus 


. 253 


atratus . . 


. 253 


minor 


. 253 


submarmoratus . 


. 254 


fulvipennis 


. 254 


nebulosus 


. 254 


subflavus . . 


. 255 


submaculatus 


. 255 


albidus . . 


. 255 


subgeminatus . 


. 255 


Candezei . . 


. 256 


elongatulus 


. 256 


castaneipennis . 


. 256 


Elastrus flavipes . . 


. 257 


Elater Mastersii .. 


. 257 


Cryptohypnus variegatus . . 


. 257 


Cardiophorus Mastersii , . 


. 259 


Corymbites rufipennis 


. 258 


nigrinus , . 


. 258 


Ophidius brevicornis . . 


. 259 


LuDius atripennis .. 


. 259 


AcKONioPus rufipennis 


. 259 



AcRONiopus pubescens 
AscEsis Mastersii .. 
DiCTENiopHORUs vitticoUis 
apicalis 
vittatus 
Hemiopsida genus . . 
Mastersii 
Metric RRHYNCHus femoralis 
nigripes 
marginicollis 
Calochromus Guerinii 
Luciola tiavicollis . . 
Telephorus flavipennis 
ruficoUis 
Mastersii 
IcHTHYURUs depressicollis 
Laius Mastersii 
Malachius luridicoUis 
Carphurus cyaneipennis 
elongatus 
apicalis 
azureipennis 
pallidipennis 
Balanophoeus genus 

Mastersii 
Cylidrus basalis .. 
Opilus incertus 
Natalis Mastersii . . 
iSxiGMATiuM Mastersii 
IsBvius 
ventrale 
Thanasimus sculptus 
Clerus Mastersii . . 

apicalis 
AuLicus rutipes 

i'oveicollis . . 
Tarsosternus pulcher 

Mastersii 
Eleale fasciata 
apicalis 
elongatula 
viridicoUis 
Tenertjs ruficollis . . 
Pyltjs pallipes 
Ptln-hs albomaculatus 
Khizopertha elongatula 
gibbicoUis 
BosTEYCHus bispinosus 
cylindricus 
Opatrum Mastersii 
Apateltjs squamosus 
Cestrinus squalidus 
Hyocis pallida 

pubescens . . 
Mychestes Pascoei 

Mastersii 

Platydema Pascoei 

laticoUe 

ToxicuM distinctum 

parvicorne 



318 



THE INSECTS OF GAYNDAH, 





page. 




Ptekobhel^us Bremei 


.. 281 


Atkactus rugosulus 


elongatus . . 


. 282 


Chromom^a Mastersii 


Pascoei . . 


. 282 


picea 


confusus . . 


. 283 


Homotrysis ruficornis 


Sakagus ovalis 


. 283 


subgeminatus . . . 


Nyctozoilus Mastersii 


. 284 


regularis 


elongatulus . . 


. 284 


Allecula elongata 


Hypaulax Gayndahensis .. 


, 284 


subsulcata 


opacicoUis 


. 285 


punctipennis 


Promethis Pascoei 


. 285 


Pascoei.. 


Menephilus parvulus 


. 285 


Mastersii 


MiCROPHYES ffenus .. 


. 286 


planicollis 


rufipes 


. 286 


CiSTELA convexa . . 


Cephaleus chalybfipennis 


. 286 


ovata 


cupricollis 


. 287 


CiSTELA depressiuscula 


Prophanes Westwoodii .. 


. 287 


polita 


Chartopteryx Mastersii . . 


. 287 


Orchesia elongata . . 


Atryphodes opacicollis 


. 288 


Lagria cyanea 


Mastersii 


. 288 


Ommatophorus ffenus 


Adelium viridipenne 


. 289 


Mastersii . . 


rugosicoUe 


. 289 


Mecynotarsus Kingii 


convexiusculum . . 


. 289 


Mastersii . . 


parvulum . . 


, 290 


FoRMicoMUs Kingii 


panagajicolle 


.. 290 


humeralis 


monilicorne 


. 291 


Anthicus Kingii .. 


Seirotrana punctifera 


. 291 


propinquus 


femoralis 


. 292 


laticollis 


Coripera Mastersii. , 


. 292 


Mastersii 


LiciNOMA violacea . . 


. 292 


constrictus 


Brycopia longipes . . 


. 293 


pallidus . . 


dubia 


. 293 


aberrans 


Leptogastkus ffcnus 


. 293 


Lemodes Mastersii . . 


Mastersii . . 


. 294 


MoRDELLA octomaculata . . 


Omolipus grandis . . 


. 294 


14-maculata 


AmArygmus rufipes . . 


. 294 


aterrima 


picipes 


. 295 


brunneipennis • . 


opacicollis 


.. 295 


cuspidata 


grandis 


.. 295 


Trigonodera Gerstackari 


rugosicollis 


. 295 


Mastersii . . 


punctipennis . . 


. 296 


Ptilophorus Gerstackeri . . 


obsoletus 


. 296 


Rhipiphorus luteipennis .. 


rugosipennis .. 


. 296 


ZoNiTis lutea 


foveolatus 


.. 297 


fuscicornis . . 


etriatus 


.. 297 


apicalis 


convexiuseulus 


.. 297 


bizonata . . 


Strongylixjm Mastersii 


.. 298 


annulata . . 


ruficolle 


.. 298 


Selenopalpus fuscus 


Apellatus palpalis . . 


.. 298 


Mastersii . . 


INIastersii 


.. 299 


Ananca vitticollis .. 


Metistete Pascoei . . 


.. 299 


ruficollis . . 


Atractus ruficoUis . . 


. . 299 


PsETJDOLYCUs apicalis 


cyaneus , . 


.. 299 


Psacus Mastersii .. 


vitticollis 


.. 300 


Dascillus brevicornis 



Miscellanea Entomologica, 

By William MacLeat, Esq., F.L.S. 

[Read 7th July, 1873.] 

In the month of January, 1870, I made a hurried entomological 
excursion into the Queanbeyan and Monaro districts. I was ac- 
companied by Mr. Mastei's, of the Australian Museum, by whose 
assistance, notwithstanding the intense heat and dryness of the 
season, I was enabled to add a number of new and interesting 
species to my own as well as to the public collection. 

Among the captures then made, there were two species of small 
Carabideous insects which peculiarly interested me. One of these 
has since been described by H. W. Bates, Esq., in the " Entomo- 
logists' Monthly Magazine" for July, 1871, under the name of 
Eudalia Macleayi. This genus has been associated, very properly, 
by Mr. Bates, with a group of insects named by Lacordaire 
Anchonoderides, and for which he proposes, and with good reason, 
the name of Lachnophorince. 

I had previously, in the first volume of the Transactions of the 
Entomological Society of New South Wales, page 108, described 
a species from Port Denison as Odacantha latipennis. Count 
Castelnau has since (Not. Aust. Col., 1867, page 16) described 
another species from Arnheim's Land, North Australia, under the 
specific name of Waterlwvuei. He also, at the same time, pro- 
posed for those insects the generic name of Eudalia, but without 
giving generic characters, and suggested their probable afl&nity to 
the subfamily Ctenodactylides of Lacordaire. 

Mr. Bates, in the Paper previously referred to, not only de- 
scribes the Monaro species, but gives the character of the genus. 

The habit of the insect goes far to prove the correctness of 
Mr. Bates' hypothesis of its affinity to Lachnophoms. I found 
the species E. Macleayi abundant close to the water in the gravelly 
bed of the Umeralla River, a tributary of the Murrumbidgee, in 

u 



320 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

the Monaro district, and in similar positions in the Upper Mur- 
rumbidgee itself, and its tributary, the Queanbeyan River. How 
far its habitat extends upwards into the Snowy Mountains, or 
downwards along the course of these rivers towards the Plains, 
remains yet undetermined. 

The other insect to which I referred, a small brilliant, brassy, 
black beetle, can scarcely be separated from the genus Cymindis of 
Latreille. It was found tolerably abundant under stones on the 
long sloping Downs beyond Cooma, and in the vicinity of Spring 
Flat. I subjoin a description of this, and another species which 
much resembles it. 

CtMINDIS iENEA. 

Long. 2j lin. 

-^neo-nigra nitida, capite subconvexo, thorace subtiliter cana- 
liculato, elytris viridi-nigris leviter striatis, corpore subtus 
femoribusque piceo-nigris, antennis palpis tibiis tarsisque 
piceo-rufis. 

Cymindis Illaware^. 
Long. 3 lin. 

-^Eneo-nigra nitida, thorace medio canaliculato ad latera mar- 

ginato, elytris viridi-nigris leviter striatis, corpore subtus 

piceo-nigris antennis palpis pedibusque rufis. 

This species, which, as its name indicates, was found in 

lUawarra, differs from cenea in being much larger, in having the 

legs entirely red, and in the form of the thorax, which is more 

regularly rounded, and more broadly margined on the sides. 

The two species described by me (Trans. Ent. Soc. N. S. 
Wales, 1864, p. Ill and 112) under the names of Gymindis 
longicollis and angustioollis, do not belong to the genus, but 
probably belong to Baron de Chaudoir's genus XanthopJioea. 
Gymindis curtula Erichsen is a PMlophlaeus and Gymindis in- 
quinaia of the same author is probably an Agonocheila. This 
reduces the number of Australian species of Gymindis to three, 
the two now described and G. crassiceps, described by me in a 
previous Paper. 



BY W. M4CLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 321 

The insect from the Clarence River, described below, has long 
been known to me, and I have often felt surprised that it should 
remain to the present time undescribed. I have repeatedly received 
specimens from the Clarence, and have seen them in other collec- 
tions, so that it can scarcely be looked upon as a rare insect. 

Genus Lachnodbkma. 

Mentum subtransversum profunde emarginatum, deute medio 
magno valido obtuso lobis lateralibus longioribus apice sub- 
acutis. 

Labium corneum subelongatum apice rotundatum. 

Palpi lobiales validi securiformes. 

Palpi maxillares validi oblique truncati. 

Maxillce apice arcuatae acutae. 

Lahrum quadratum antice ampliatum rotundatum. 

AntenncB sublongge filiformes articulo primo ceteris majori, se- 
cundo breviori. 

Gap>ut postice angustatum oculis prominentibus. 

Tliorax cordiformis transversus angulis posticis acutis recurvis. 

'Elytra thorace latiora subplana truncata. 

Corpus alatum planum hirsutum. 

Pedes subvalidi tarsorum articulo quarto fortiter bilobato. 

Lachnodebma cinctdm. 

Long. 5 lin. 

Piceo-rufum subnitidum fortissime punctatum dense pilosum, 
thorace capita latiori lateribus antice valde rotundatis, 
elytris thorace latioribus coeruleo-cinctis, antennis pedibus- 
que nigris. 

The place of this insect will be with the Helluonidce, a sub- 
family numerously represented in Australia, and of a well defined 
character. 

Count Casteluau has given a very good review of the whole 
group in his " Notes on Australian Coleoptera." He divides 
them into those with wiusrs and those without. 



322 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

Those without wings he refers to the following genera : — 

Helluo Bon., to which only two species can now be referi'ed — 
costaius Bon., from New South Wales, and carinattis Chaud., 
from Victoria. 

PsEUDHELLUO Casteln., represented by one species, Wilsoni 
Casteln., an insect I have never seen. 

AcROGENTS MacLeay, one species, Mrsuta MacLeay, "W. 

Helluodema Casteln., also represented by one species, Batesii 
Thomson. 

The Helluonidas with wings, Castelnau divides into the genera 
GiGADEMA Thomson, Helluosoma Castelnau, and Enigma New- 
man. To these must now be added the present genus Lachno- 
derma. 

This winged division of the sub-family is very much more 
numerous than the unwinged, and I regret to find in G-emminger 
and Harold's " Catalogus Coleopterorum," that the three genera 
to which Count Castelnau referred them, have been merged into 
one — the JEiiigma of Newman. 

Mr. Masters has also made the same mistake in his Catalogue 
of Australian Coleoptera. 

. Gigadema and Helluosoma do not present any great difierences 
of structure, still I think there are sufficient distinctions to justify 
Count Castelnau's classification, but as regards vEnigma there are 
wide and important differences which can leave no doubt as to the 
propriety of the subdivison. The species of these three genera 
hitherto described are : 

Gigadema, 8 species — grande MacLeay, Titanum Thomson, 
longifenne Germar, sulcatum MacLeay, politulum MacLeay, 
Bostockii Casteln., Paroense Casteln., and minutum Casteln. 

Helluosoma, 5 species — atrum Casteln., cyaneum Casteln., 
Mastersii MacLeay, resplendens Casteln., and cyaneipenne Hope. 

-Enigma, 3 species — Iris Newman, splendens Casteln., and 
Newmanni Casteln. 

Enigma unicolor Hope, from Port Essington is believed by 
Count Castelnau to be a Gigadema. 

The following are new species in my collection : — 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 323 

Helluosoma aterktmum. 
Long. 8 lin. 

Nigrum subnitidum albo-hirtum, thorace cordato subquadrato 

punctato medio piano anguste canaliculate, elytris thorace 

latioinbus planis punctatis subleviter striato-punctatis, an- 

tennis tarsisque fulvo-liirtis. 

This species is from Cape York. It is easily distinguished 

from H. atfum Casteln, by its broader and flatter form, less 

elongate thorax, finely striated elytra, and hairy clothing ; and 

from M. cy a Ileum and cj/anipenne — the only other described 

species at all resembling it — by difference of colour, more elongate 

thorax and smoother elytra. 

GiGADEMA DaMBLII. 

Long. 9| lin. 

Nigrum subopacum, thorace punctato cordato subquadrato, 
elytris octo-sulcatis sulcis biseriatim punctatis medio striatis, 
corpore subtus nitido. 
This insect is also from Cape York, and is very like G. sulca- 
tum. In fact the only important difference is to be found in the 
form of the thorax whicli in sulcatum is shorter and more broadly 
rounded than in the present species. The facial grooves near the 
eyes are more strongly marked also in this insect. 

Enigma parvdlum. 
Long. 6 lin. 

Cyaneum nitidum hirtum punctatum, capite subviridi antice 
nigro, thorace cordato trans verso postice valde angustato 
naedio leviter caualiculato, elytris punctatis striato-punctatis, 
corpore subtus subviridi glabro. 
This insect is labelled " New Holland," a mark indicating 
simply that I have no record of the locality from which it came, 
nor how I got it. I am pretty sure, however, that it must have 
come from the Clarence or Richmond River districts. It is the 
smallest of the genus, and differs much from the other species in 
the form of the thoi'ax, which is more like that of a Helluosovia. 
Indeed its resemblance generally to Helluosoma respl67idens Cas- 
teln. is very great. 



324 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

In page 96 of this volame of the Transactions of the Entomo- 
logical Society of New South Wales, I gave the characters of a 
genus which I named PhiJoscaphtts to a group of Scaritidce up to 
that time included in the genus Garemom. Of that group I had 
previously described two species under the names of Carenwm 
tuberculatum and carinatum. 

The first of these is found over a large surface of country 
extending from East to West from the Murrumbidgee to South 
Australia, and probably having an equally wide range from 
North to South. It is not, however, an insect which can be 
called common anywhere, in that respect resembling almost all 
the Australian Scaritidoe. 

The second species Garenum carinatum is very different from 
the first in size and appearance, and is one of the rarest of insects : 
I have only known of its being taken at Wingelo, near Goul- 
burn, and at Bungendore, in the Lake George basin. 

A third species PMloscaphus Mastersii, I described in the Paper 
named " The Insects of Gayndah " (ante page 96), and I men- 
tioned then that I knew of two other species in collections. One 
of these from Nicol Bay I propose to name. 

Philoscaphus costalis. 
Long. 14 lin. 

Niger, thorace transverso lunvilato capite latiori postice lobato, 

elytris ovatis scabris subtuberculatis granulatis sulcis later- 

alibus binis. 

Except in having a double lateral groove on the elytra, this 

species is scarcely distinguishable from tuherculatus and Mastersii. 

This groove which lies between the costa which forms the 

apparent side of the elytra as seen from above, and the true 

lateral costa, and extends from the humeral angle to near the 

apex, is in this species divided by an intermediate costa, which 

takes its rise near the humeral angle and extends towards the 

apex as far as the others. 

Philoscaphus lateralis. 
Long. 11 lin. 
Niger, thorace transverso lunulato capite latiori postice lobato, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 325 

eljtris ovatis ad basin eraarginatis obsolete quinqueseriatim 
tubereulatis sulcis lateralibus binis insequalibus. 
This species is from South Australia, and I believe unique. 
Like the last it has the lateral groove double, but the inter- 
mediate costa in the present insect takes its rise from the upper 
one at some distance from the humeral angle, and diverges 
gradually towards the apex, while the upper groove is throughout 
narrower than the lower. 

Since my last Paper on the Australian Scaritidce, a few species 
have come under my notice, which I shall now describe. 

Caeendm parvulum. 
Long. 5 1 lin. 

Nigrum subangustum, antennis gracilibus submoniliformibus, 
pal pis labialibus apice triangularibus truncatis, thorace 
subquadrato postice rotundato, elytris oblongo-ovatis thorace 
angustioribus subopacis anguste violaceo-marginatis postice 
bipunctatis, tibiis anticis extus tridentatis. 
This species was found by Mr. Masters and myself last slim- 
mer near Murrurundi, a town situated on the upper valley of the 
Hunter, close to the Liverpool range. 

It is remarkable in several respects. It is the smallest Care- 
num I have seen. The antennas most resemble those of the 
C. Spencei group, the palpi are not securiform, and the anterior 
tibiae are strongly tridentate. It would seem to form a kind of 
link between the groups of which C. coruscum and G. Spencei 
are the types. 



Caeenum foveipenne. 



Long. 7| lin. 



Nigrum, thorace subtransverso postice rotundato vix lobato 
anguste viridi-marginato, elytris oblongis antice truncatis 
postice rotundatis anguste viridi-marginatis quadri-seriatim 
foveatis foveis rotundis aureo-viridibus, tibiis anticis extus 
tridentatis dentibus validis subobtusis. 
Mr. Odewahn of Gawler Town, South Australia, sent me this 
species. It differs chiefly from C. Spencei in the colouring of 



326 MISCELLANEA EXTOMOLOGIOA, 

the margins, in having the rows of foveae more distinctly separa- 
ted by raised interstices, and by having a fiery green reflection 
at the bottom of each fovea. 

Carendm Digglesii, 
Long. 7^ hn. 

^Nigrum subopacum, thorace subtransverso antice truncato 
postice lobato anguhs posticis rotundatis subemarginatis, 
elytris ovatis antice emarginatiS obsolete punctatis sub- 
costatis triseriatim foveatis foveis magnis hand profundis, 
tibiis anticis extus tridentatis. 
This species differs from G. Spencei and all the others of that 
group, in the sculpture of the elytra, which present three broad 
though faint costce on each, with rows of almost obliterated punc- 
tures, and three rows of distant shallow foveee, five or six in each 
row. The thorax also differs from that of G. Spencei, in having 
the posterior lobe more truncate, and the posterior angles more 
emarginate. 

The only specimen of this insect I know belongs to Mr. 
Diggles of Brisbane, and was taken on a piece of timber floating 
down the Brisbane River during a flood. 

Carenum planipenne. 
Long. 11 lin. 

Nigrum nitidum, thorace transverso viridi-marginato later- 

aliter rotundato postice lobato emaT'ginato angulis posticis 

emarginatis, elyiris nitidissimis purpurascentibus viridi- 

marginatis ovatis subplanis postice bipunctatis, tibiis 

anticis extus bidentatis. 

This is a South Australian species, and is found I believe at 

Port Wakefield. It is a broad, flat, beautiful insect, of the G. 

marginatum group, but difiering in form and appearance very 

much from that insect. 

Carenidium lacustee. 
Long. 13 lin. 
Nigrum nitidum cyaneo-marginatum, thorace subquadrato sub- 

depresso postice angustato truncato, elytris elongato-ovatis 

punctis sublatei-alibus. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 327 

Like G. Kreuslerce but of more elongate form. It is of a 
brilliant black, with the exception of a narrow margin of blue 
mingled with green on the thorax and elytra ; the latter has a row 
of rather distant punctures along but not in the lateral margin. 

My specimen was taken at Lake Albert, near Wagga Wagga, 
last September. 

Gnathoxys punctipennis. 
Long. 5 lin. 

Niger nitidus, thorace oblongo medio canaliculato, elytris sub- 
seriatim punctatis apice rugosis, antennis palpis pedibu^que 
piceo-rufis, tibiis anticis extus bidentatis. 
The smoothness of the sculpture in this species gives it very 
much the appeai-ance of a Promecoclerus. Tlie punctu ration on 
the elytra is not very marked, and the rugosity at the apex is 
very limited. The upper external tooth on the fore-tibisQ is small 
and near the middle of the joint. 

My only specimen comes from South Australia. 



The aflSnity of the insect described below is manifestly to 
Oraspedophorus. 

I propose for the genus the name of 

PLATTLYTRON. 

Mentum transversum profunde emarginatum dente medio lato 

brevi lobis lateralibus rotundatis. 
Labium corneum parvum truncatum apice bisetosum paraglossia 

adhaerentibus superantibus. 
Palpi onaxillares longi articulo secundo longo, tertio brevi 

curvato, ultimo securiformi. 
Palpi labiales valde securiformes. 
Mandihulce validoo apice acutge arcuatse intus dentatse. 
Labrum transversum leviter emarginatum. 
Antennoe filiformes. 



328 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

Caput parvum. 

Thorax parvus laevis orbicularis. 
Elytra magna ovata subplana. 
Pedes ut in Graspedophorus. 

Platylytron amplipenne. 
Long. 9 lin. 

Nigrum subnitidum, capite antice utrinque foveato, thorace 

leevi antice subemarginato postice subtruncato ad latera 

rotundato late marginato — margine reflexo — dorso canali- 

culato ad basin utrinque profunde impresso, elytris sub- 

planis latis oblongis profunde striatis — interstitiis convexis 

— lateribus apiceque rugose punctatis. 

The head is smooth, and the fovea on each side of the face is 

short. The thorax is smooth and nearly circular, though a little 

emarginate in front and truncate behind, the dorsal line is deeply 

marked, and there are two deep impressions at the base near the 

posterior angles. The sides are rounded and not narrower 

behind than in front, with a broad reflexed margin. The elytra 

are broad, flat, rounded at the humeral angles, broadly rounded 

at the apex, deeply striated and roughly punctured towards the 

apex and sides. The legs are rather slender. 

I received several specimens of this insect from King George's 
Sound some years ago. 



Baron de Chaudoir has given the generic name of Goptocar- 
pus to the insect formerly known as Oocles Australis Dej. He 
gives as the chief characters which distinguish it from Codes 
proper — the adherence of the paraglossse to the sides of the 
labium, the absence of spongy covering on a large portion of the 
under side of the first joint of the anterior tarsi, and the enor- 
mous dilatation of the three first joints of the same tarsi in the 
male. It is probable that these characters are common to all 
the Codes of Australia, the tarsal characters certainly are in all 
those species which I have had an opportunity of examining. 
I shall therefore adopt Baron de Chaudoir's genus Goptocarpus for 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 329 

all the Australian Oocles, as I see has been done already by Mr. 
Masters in his catalogue of Australian Coleoptera. 

Sixteen species have hitherto been described from various 
parts of this country, the majority of them from Western and 
Central Austi'alia, but every portion of New Holland seems to be 
represented by two or more species. With the exception of 
G. Australls Dej. fuscitarsis Blanch., and ReicJiei Laferte, they have 
all been described by Count Castelnau in his " Notes on Austra- 
lian Coleoptera" published in Melbourne in 1867. 

My collection contains the following new species : — 

COPTOCARPUS ChAUDOIEI. 

Long. 5^ lin. 

Niger subnitidus latus, epistomi sutura semicirculari bipunc- 

tata, thorace leviter canaliculato utrinque oblique subim- 

presso, elytris tenuiter striatis stria scutellari brevissima 

interstitiis planis, antennis palpis pedibusque rufis. 

This species is from the Clarence River. It is of a broader 

form than G. Australis, and differs both from it and C . foiscitarsis 

in the extreme shortness of the scutellar stria, which is little 

more than an elongated point. 

CoPTOCARPDS Riverine. 
Long. 7 lin. 

Niger subnitidus, thorace tenuiter canaliculato baud latera- 

liter impresso, elytris leviter striatis stria scutellari scu- 

tello ter longiori, antennis rufis articulis primis et tertiis 

subfuscis. 

In size and general appearance very like G. oblongus Casteln. 

It is however less opaque, and has the scutellar stria a little 

longer, and the hind tibise straighter than that insect. 

The insect from which I take my description is from the 
Murrumbidgee, but I have two imperfect specimens in my col- 
lection labelled " Interior S. Aust." which I believe to be of the 
same species. 



330 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

COPTOCARPUS NITIDUS. 
Long. 5 lin. 

Niger nitidus convexus, thorace tenuiter canaliculate ad latera 

oblique impresso sub-piceo, elytris leviter punctato-striatis, 

antennis palpis tarsisque rufis. 

This pretty little species is very like G. Gonvextis Casteln. 

There is uo scutellar stria, but the stria which runs parallel 

and close to the suture is interrupted near the scutellum. Its 

habitat is Cape York. 



In his " Notes on Australian Coleoptera," published in Mel- 
bourne, in 1867, Count Castelnau has distributed the Gnemacan' 
thidce of Australia among six genera — Mecodema Blanch., Maoria 
Casteln., Promocoderiis Dej., Parroa Casteln., Adotela Casteln., 
and Gerotalis Casteln. The two first of these are chiefly found in 
New Zealand, and are srflficiently distinct, but the other four 
genera are much alike, and in fact were all classed as Promecoderus 
until the publication of the Count's Paper. The new genera I 
believe to be undoubtedly good, but Count Castelnau has not done 
himself or his genera justice in the very careless way in which he 
has characterized them. 

According to his statement, the distinctive characters may be 
summed up as follows : — 

Promecoderus : Mentum with the lateral lobes round, and a 
slightly bifid median tooth. Palpi oval and truncate. Pour first 
joints of the anterior tarsi dilated in the males, and furnished 
beneath with spongy brushes. 

Parroa : Mentum large, without median tooth, and pointed at 
the inner angles of the lateral lobes. Palpi thick, oval, and 
truncate. Four first joints of the anterior tarsi in the males 
triangular, slightly dilated, and armed beneath with strong hairs. 

Adotela : Mentum like Parroa. Palpi strongly securiform. 
Three first joints of anterior tarsi dilated, and furnished beneath 
with spongy brushes. 

Ceeotalis : Mentum with median tooth, lateral lobes rounded. 



BY W. MACLEAT, ESQ., F.L.S. 331 

Palpi as in Promecoderus. Four first joints of anterior tarsi in 
the males furnished beneath with spongy brushes or cushions. 

It will be seen from this that the last named genus approaches 
very closely to Promecoderus. 

I find, however, that the labium also difiers somewhat in 
these genera. In Promecoderus it is subtruncate, but with a 
prominence in the middle, armed with two long sette. In Adotela, 
it is quite truncate, while in Cerotalis it is elongate and subemar- 
g'inate. The labrum also in the two latter genera is more emar- 
ginate than in Promecoderus. 

The insect described by me in the " Insects of Gayndah " 
(ante, page 99) as Promecoderus viridis, is undoubtedly an Adotela. 

The following are new species : — 

Promecoderds parvulus. 
Long. 4| lin. 

Elongatus convexus fusco-niger nitidissimus, thorace ovato 
canaliculato, elytris angustis subparallelis hand striatis, 
corpore subtus piceo-nigro nitido, antennis palpis pedibus 
elytrorumque margine inflexo rufis. 
This species is abundant enough in the Upper Murrumbidgee 
country, near Tass. It scarcely difiers, except in size and colour- 
ing, from the South Australian species, P. gracilis of Grermar. 

Promecoderus Riverine. 
Long. 6 lin, 
. Elongatus convexus nigcr nitidus, thorace elongato-ovato 
canaliculato, elytris angustis baud striatis, antennarum 
articulo primo palpis coxis tarsisque rufis. 
As its name implies, this insect inhabits the Lower Murrum- 
bidgee or Riverina country, and, like the last, closely resembles a 
South Australian species, P. concolor Germar. It may be readily 
distinguished from that species by its smaller size and more 
elongated thorax. 

Promecoderus interruptus. 
Long. 6 lin. 
Elongatus convexus niger nitidissimus, thorace subelongato 



332 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

canaliculato, eljtris ovatis striis dorsalibus interrupfcis, an- 

tennarum articulo primo palpis pedibusque piceis. 

This species is marked on the elytra near the suture with 

what may be termed the semiobsolete interrupted traces of large 

striee. It is from the Clarence River, and is the only species I 

have seen from that part of the countiy. 

Promecoderds Hunteeiensis. 
Long. 6 lin. 

Brunneo-niger nitidissimus, thorace subelongato leviter canali- 
culato, elytris elongato-ovatis versus suturam striatis striis 
subtiliter punctatis, corpore subtus nigro, antennis palpis 
tarsisque piceo-rufis. 
The punctato-striate elytra would place this insect in Castel- 
nau's group composed of P. maritimus, striata -punctatus, Bassii 
and Wilcoxii, whether the resemblance goes further I cannot say, 
as I have never seen any of these four species. The two strias 
next the suture are very distinct, the next three or four are very 
faint, and the sides are quite smooth. The punctures in the 
strige are all very minute. The colour is an olive or bronzy black 
very nitid. Its habitat is the Hunter River district. 

Promecoderus Mastbrsii. 
Long. 7 lin. 

^neo-brunneus nitidus, thorace suboblongo lateraliter rotun- 
dato canaliculato, elytris elongato-ovatis sub lente obsolete 
punctatis striatis striis prope suturam magis profundis 
lateribus a medio sulcatis, corpore subtus nigro, antennis 
palpis tarsisque piceo-rufis. 
The median line of the thorax is very well marked, the two 
striae on each side of the suture of the elytra are also well marked, 
and the sublateral groove extends from the middle or almost 
before it to the apex, where it is widened and biimpressed. These 
characters distinguish this species from P. hrunnicornis Dejeau. 
Its habitat is Monaro. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 333 

Peomecoderus inornatus. 
Long. 6 lin. 

Niger subnitidus, thorace subelongato tenuiter canaliculato, 
elytris elongato-ovatis striatis postice sulco sublaterali brevi 
tripunctato, segmentis abdominalibus 3, 4, et 5, utrinque 
forfciter impressis, an tennis palpis tarsisque piceo-rufis. 
This is also a Monaro insect. The head has a large trans- 
verse impression behind the eyes, and two impressed punctures 
on each side in front, the posterior being on the sutui'e of the 
epistome. The median line of the thorax is very lightly marked. 
The elytra are distinctly striated throughout though more faintly 
towards the sides, while under a strong lens the striee appear 
green and indistinctly punctate. The sublateral groove is much 
shorter than in P. Mastersii, and seems to take its rise from a 
large punctvire. The 3rd, 4th, and 5th abdominal segments have 
on each side a very deep round impression, but this is more or 
less common to every species of the genus. The whole insect is 
of a rather dullish black hue. 

Promecoderus puncticollis. 
Long. 5 lin. 

Niger subnitidus, capite antice utrinque leviter bipunctato, 

thorace subelongato postice subrotundato medio tenuiter 

canaliculato disco ante medium utrinque bipunctato punctis 

oblique positis, elytris fortiter striatis striis ad latera sub- 

obsoletis subpunctatis, antennarum articulo basali rufo. 

This species, also from Monaro, is deeply striated on the 

elytra, excepting close to the sides. The thorax is rather long, is 

rounded at the base, has the median line indistinctly marked, and 

has two diagonally placed punctures near each side in advance of 

the middle. In other respects it resembles P. inornatus. 

Promecoderus dorsalis. 
Long. 6 lin. 

Bruuneo-niger subeeneus nitidus, capite postice nigro-viridi, 
thorace subelongato fortiter canaliculato antice triangu- 



334 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

lariter transversim impresso, elytris sfriatis striis tribus 
versus basin distinctis ceteris subobsoletis, corpore subtus 
nigro segmentis abdominalibus leviter impressis, antennis 
palpis coxis tarsisque piceo-rufis. 
A common species on the Murrumbidgee. It is small and 
narrow. Tbe back of the head is greenish. The thorax has the 
median line deeply impressed and terminating some distance 
from the apex in a deep eniargination of the transverse impres- 
sion. The three stride nearest the suture on the elytra are 
tolerably well marked on the basal half, the others are very 
faint. 



Pbomecoderus anthracinus. 



Long. 6| lin. 



Niger nitidissimus, capite inter oculos utrinque leviter canali- 
culato postice transversim impresso, elytris ad suturara 
bistriatis striis apicem hand attingentibus, segmentis 
abdominalibus utrinque foveatis baud transversim striatis, 
antennarum articulo primo rtifo. 
From the Lower Murrumbidgee. It is of elongate form. 
The head is shallowly impressed on each side between the eyes. 
The thorax is lightly marked on the median line, and has a trans- 
verse impi'ession near the base. The striae on the elytra are 
almost obsolete, excepting two on each side of the suture, which 
are tolerably well marked for two-thirds of their lengths from 
the base. The sublateral groove is very short. All the abdomi- 
nal segments have a deep fovea on each side, but without trans- 
verse striae. 

Promecoderus olivaceds. 

Long. 6 lin. 

^neo-brunueus nitidus, capite nigro, thorace subelongato 
canaliculate, elytris ovatis striatis ad latera glabris sulco 
sublaterali brevi, corpore subtus nigro, segmentis abdo- 
minalibus utrinque leviter foveatis et canaliculatis, antennis 
palpis coxis tarsisque piceo-rufis. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 335 

This insect was taken last summer at Piper's Flats, on the 
western side of the Blue Mountains. It is of a stout convex 
form, and differs from P. hrunnicornis not only in this respect, 
but in being smaller, and in having the median line of the thorax 
and the strias of the elytra more distinctly marked. 

Adotela nigerrima. 
Long. 7 lin. 

Convexa nigra laevis nitidissima, thorace subquadrato canalicu- 
lato ad latera rotundato postice subangustato, elytris ovatis 
apice subacuminatis subrugosis lateribus postice quadri- 
punctatis vix sulcatis, tibiis anticis gracilibus, antennarum 
articulis sex ultimis pubescentibus. 
My only specimen of this insect is a female, and, consequently, 
the remarkable form of the palpi and tarsi does not appear, but I 
have no doubt of its belonging to this genus. 
It is from the Percy Islands. 



Among a number of new and very interesting Coleoptera 
brought by Mr. Darnel from Cape York some years ago, was an 
unique specimen of a very remarkable and gigantic Carabideous 
insect. It has in general appearance a considerable resemblance 
to an insect found in the deserts of the Caspian, Dioctes Lehmanni 
Menetries, about the aJ0S.nities of which entomologists have widely 
disagreed. 

Baron de Chaudoir believes its affinity to be with Acinopus, 
while Lacordaire places it among the Cnemacantlddce. 

The difficulty felt in the case of the genus Dioctes will, I sus- 
pect, extend to the present insect, though, beyond the general re- 
semblance, there is not much in common in the two insects. 

The following are the characters, as nearly as I can give them 
from the rather mutilated specimen in my possession, of this 
genus which I propose to name 

Mectnognathus. 
Mentum magnum profunde emarginatum dente medio brevi 
lato bifido lobis lateralibus rotundatis intus verticalibus. 

V 



336 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

Labium longum subangustum truncatum crassum longitudi- 

naliter carinatum apice bisetosum paraglossia libei'is palpi- 

formibus vix labium superantibus. 
Maxillce subelongatEe subgraciles. 
Palpi maxillares longi apice oblique truncati articulo secundo 

longissimo quarto penultimo breviori. 
Palpi lahlales longi apice sub triangulares oblique truncati 

articulo secundo longissimo. 
Mandibulce masimse porrect^ intus lobatte. 
Lahrum abest. 

Antennce sublongge filiformes articulo secundo breviori. 
Caput maximum crassum subquadratum clypeo profande emar- 

ginato ; subtus concavum utrinque fortiter carinatum. 
Thorax brevis subangustus postice angustatus. 
Elytra ovalia subconvexa. 
Pedes sublongi baud validi tibiis inermibus tarsis sub tri angular i- 

bus. 
Corpus apterum pedunculatum. 

Mecynognathus Damelii. 
Long. 18 lin. (mand. incl.) 

Niger subopacus, capite piano antice subcirculariter impresso 

angulis posticis carinatis, tborace marginato capite angusti- 

ori subcordato medio leviter canaliculate postice trans- 

versim impresso, elytris ovalibus obsolete striatis marginatis, 

pedibus piceis. 

The most striking peculiarity about tbis insect is tbe enormous 

size of the head and mandibles, the two together nearly equalling 

in length the remainder of the body. 

The right mandible which is broken off at about half its 
length, has a pointed lobe on its inner surface ; the left has a 
more rounded lobe on its inner surface about the middle, and 
terminates in an obtuse point without the slightest tendency to 
curve inwai'ds. 

The maxillary palpi are as long as the mandibles, and have 
as well as the labial palpi the second joint much longer than the 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 337 

others. The antennge have the first joint thicker, but not longer 
than the rest ; the second shorter, and from the fourth they 
become evidently more attenuated. The labium is wanting, but 
the edge of the epistome is deeply emarginate. The head above 
is nearly square, flat on the vertex, and hollowed out in front, 
with a lateral carination, which is curved behind so as to form 
the posterior angles ; beneath it is concave and canaliculate in the 
middle, while near each side there is a strong rugose ridge which 
terminates suddenly near the base. 

The form of the thorax is also very unusual, it is flat, broadest 
in front, but scarcely so broad as the head, narrowed rapidly to 
the base and subtrnncate in front and behind, with a lateral re- 
curved margin broadest at the posterior angles. The elytra are 
of an almost perfectly oval form. The legs ai^e not strong for 
the size of the insect ; indeed, the tibite are slight and without 
external teeth, the tarsi ai'e also rather slight, the first joint is 
long, the rest get gradually shorter. 

I can scarcely venture to give an opinion as to the position of 
this remarkable insect among the Garahidce. 

It would appear quite as much out of place among the 
Cnemacanthidce or Stomidce as Diodes, and I cannot see any 
affinity in either genus to Aclnopus. 

On the other hand, there is, judging by description, for I have 
never seen the genus myself, a marked approach in the anatomy 
of the mentum labium, &c., to Lwperca of Castelnau. 



All the Paassidfe of Australia belong to the genus Gerapierus 
of Swederus, a name applied to those of the family which have 
ten joints to the antenna?. 

The genus has since been largely subdivided, and two of the 
subgenera Arthropterus MacLeay and Phymatopterus Westwood 
are peculiar to this country. Of the first of these there are many 
species though all extremely rare. A. Macleayi Don. the original 
species, long remained the sole representative of the group, to 
this Professor Westwood added about twenty years ago the 
species hrevis, denudatus, parallelocerus, subsulcatus, and Wilsoni, 



338 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOaiCA, 

and about a yeai' ago I described in the " Insects of Gayndah " 
five others, angusticornis, elnngakdus, Kingii, Mastersii, and 
Westwoodii. 

In the present Paper I add largely to the number of species, 
but I regret to say that I cannot contribute much to our know- 
ledge of the habits and history of these very curious insects. 
Two observations only can I add to the scanty information we at 
present possess, one is, that some of the species are nocturnal, as 
I have frequently known them to fly into lighted rooms ; the 
other, that one species at least A. brevis Westw. is gregarious. 
On one occasion I found upwards of fifty of them clustered 
together under a small piece of the loose bark of a gum tree, and 
Mr. Masters informs me that he has met with as many as twenty 
or thirty in a similar situation. This by no means proves how- 
ever that it is a bark insect, as in both the instances alluded to, 
the ground was very wet, and the insects may have taken to the 
tree for protection and shelter. I have repeatedly during floods 
in the Murrumbidgee taken large numbers of species of Gatad- 
romus, Aptinus, Steropus, Poecilus, and other undoubted ground 
beetles under the bark of trees. 

In order to simplify to some extent what in such a homo- 
geneous group must always be diSicult — the detection of the 
species — the following synopsis will be useful : 

Arthkopterus. 
Section 1. — Antennse with the joints 2 to 9 three times or 
more broader than the length. 

1st. Thorax longer than bi'oad, body naked. 



A. Mastersii, MacLeay, W. 
• — . cylindricollis, n. sp. 
— . Waterhousei, n. sp. 



A. Macleayi, Don, 

— . elongatulus, MacLeay, W. 
— . bisirmatus, n. sp. 

— . angidicornis, n. sp. 



2nd. Thorax longer than broad, body hairy. 



A. Hopei, Westw. 

— . 'Riverince, n. sp. 

— . nigricornis, n. sp. 

-. — . picipes, n. sp. 



A. montanus, n. sp. 
— . subampUatus, n. sp. 
— . humeralis, n. sp. 
— . ovicolUs, n. sp. 



BY W; MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 339 



3rd. Thorax as broad as long 

A. brevis, Westw. 
— . parallelocerus, Westw. 
— . Westwoodii, MacLeay, W. 



WyanamattcB, 


n 


sp 


angulatus. 


n. 


sp 


subcijlindrlcus, 


n. 


sp 


Adelaidce, 


n. 


sp 


puncticolUs, 


n. 


sp. 



. foveicollis, 


n. 


sp. 


. OdewaJmii, 


n. 


sp. 


. scuiellaris, 


n. 


sp. 


. Turneri, 


n. 


sp. 


. hirtus, 


n. 


sp. 


. Darlingensis, 


n. 


sp. 


. depressus, 


n. 


sp. 



— . Eockhamptonensis, n. sp. 

Section 2. — Antennce with the joints 2 to 9 less than three 
times broader than the leno-th. 



A. Wilsoni, Westw. 
— . Howittii, n. sp. 
— . brevicollis, n. sp. 
— . denudatus, Westw. 



A. polihis, n. sp. 
— . latipennis, n. sp. 
— . angusticornis, MacLeay, W. 
— . Kingii, MacLeay, W. 



The first of these groups contains two distinct types. A. Mas- 
tersii cylindricolUs and Watey'housei constitute one of them. They 
are insects of large size, with the antenna3 moderately broad, the 
thorax elongate and widest in the middle, and the elytra long and 
truncate. The others are of the A. Macleayi type — antennce short 
and broad, and thorax almost parallel-sided. 

The second group, of which A. Hopei Westw. — an insect placed 
most unaccountably in Gremminger and Harold's Catalogue in the 
genus Phymatopterus — may be taken as the type, has the antennas 
broad, the thorax broadest in the middle, and the elytra more or 
less covered with long hair. 

The third group is the most numerous in species, and the most 
difficult of definition of the whole genus. The autennee are very 
short and broad, the thorax is more or less quadrate, broadest in 
front, and rounded and ciliated at the anterior angles, the tibi^ 
are of great width, and the elytra are for the most part short, 
with a corneous apex. In explanation of this last peculiarity, I 
may state that all the Gerapteri have the extreme edge of the ter- 
mination of the elytra thinned down as it were into a corneous 
semitransparent substance, and in most species this corneous edge 
is more or less emarginate and sinuate. In the present group 
this is particularly the case. I have long had an idea that the 



340 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

great variety of outline exhibited in this way would be found to 
give good specihc characters, but as I have not to and any one to 
make accurate sketches of the insects, I have been unable to test 
the value of my theory. 

A. brevis is easily known from the others by its breadth, bril- 
liancy, and subcordiform thorax, but Weskooodii, parallelocervs, 
Wyanamattce, angulatus, suhcijlindricus, AdelcdJce, jnmcticolUs, und 
Odewahnii come so near one another that it is most difficult to find 
good distinctive characters. I am satisfied, however, that I have 
not made too many species ; I believe, in fact, that I have three 
or four more species of this type in my collection. A. foveicollis 
has very distinctive marks, scutellaris and Turneri have a difier- 
ent form of thorax from the others, hirhts and Darlingensis have 
the elytra hairy, and depressus and Boclchamjptnnensis lead ofi" 
towards the next group. 

Section 2 consists of one group only. It comprises all the 
species with narrow antennae and tibiae. Commencing with A. 
Wilsoni, in which the thorax is rather broader than long, it termi- 
nates with A. Kingii, in which the thorax and general form ex- 
hibits a near approach to the insects of the first group — Mastersii, 
cylmdricollis, and Waterliousei. 

The species described by Professor Westwood under the name 
of suhsidcat'us, from King George's Sound, is unknown to me, and 
I cannot tell from his description to which of the above groups it 
would belong. 

I subjoin descriptions of the new species. 

Arthropterus cylindkicollis. 
Long. 6 lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Piceus nitidus, antennis latis articulo prime quadrate nitido 
secundo ceteris angustiori, capite inter oculos bi-impresso, 
thorace capite angustiori eloagato subcylindrico rugoso 
punctate ad latera antice subrotundato postice subconstricto 
ad basin truncate linea dorsali leviter irapressa, elytris 
elongatis parallelis tenuiter punctatis subpilosis pilis brevi- 
bus fulvis, tibiis apice acute angulatis. 

Hab. Rockhampton. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 341 

Of a narrow elongate form and pitchy colour, sparsely covered 
with a short light red pile. The antennae are broad, the first 
joint is square and rectangular, the second is narrower than the 
third, the rest are equal in width, but the last is as long as three 
others put together. The head is abruptly angled behind, form- 
ing a very mai'ked neck. The thorax is narrower than the head 
and much longer than broad, is coarsely and somewhat rugosely 
punctured, has the sides a little rounded before the middle and 
constricted near the base, and has the median line only visible in 
the somewhat flattened middle part of the back. The external 
angles of all the tibi^ are acute. 

Arthropterus Waterhousei. 
Long. 6 lin., lat. If lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus, capite inter oculos depresso, antennis sub- 
latis articulo prime subtransverso, thorace subelongato 
antice angustato dorso punctato canaliculato transversim 
striolato, elytris thorace latioribus parallelis truncatis sub- 
tiliter punctatis punctis setigeris, tibiis posticis extus obtuse 
terminatis. 
Hab. South Australia. 
I name this species after Mr. Waterhouse of South Australia, 
to whom I am indebted for many valuable insects from that 
territory. It in some respects much resembles A. Mastersii, 
but is of narrower form and redder colour, has the antenna less 
broad and the thorax coarsely punctured and depressed on the 
medianjine. 

Arthropterus bisindatus. 
Long. 3 1 lin. 

Piceo-rufus subnitidus punctatus, antennis latissimis articulo 
prime transverse, 2, 3, 4 gradatim latioribus 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 
longitudine quinquies latioribus, thorace oblongo subparal- 
lelo dorso subdepresso medio subtilissime canaliculato, ely- 
tris apice conjunctim emarginatis, tibiis anticis extus acute 
intermediis et posticis obtuse terminatis. 

Hab. Lane Cove, near Sydney. 



342 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

This species resembles A. Madeayi, but may be readily dis- 
tinguished from it " inter alia," by the gradually increasing width 
of the antennae and their bisinuate joints. 

I have never seen but one specimen of this insect, and that 
was taken many years near Lane Cove by that most excellent 
collector the late Mr. Turner. 



Arthropterus angulicornis. 
Long. 4| lin., lat. 1^ lin. 

Rufo-piceus subnitidus crasse punctatus, antennis latissimis 
articulo primo transverso angulo externo subproducto, 
thorace elongate dorso subdepresso lateribus subparallelis, 
elytris postice leviter punctatis subtruncatis, tibiis posteriori- 
bus extus obtuse terminatis. 
Hab. Ipswich, Moreton Bay. 
This also approaches A. Madeayi. It is however of a darker 
colour and denser and coarser puncturation, has the exterior angle 
of the first joint of the antennae produced, and has scarcely any 
trace of the median line on the thorax. 

Arthropterus Riverine. 
Long. 4| lin., lat. If lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus fulvo-hirtus, antennis latissimis articulo 
primo transverso angulo externo subproducto, capite post 
oculos rotundato, thorace oblongo lateribus antice subrotun- 
datis dorso subdepresso canaliculato, elytris leviter rugoso- 
punctatis apice singulatim rotundato-acuminatis, tibiis an- 
ticis extus acute intermediis et posticis obtuse terminatis. 
Hab. Lower Murrumbidgee. 
The thorax in this species is of very different form to that of 
A . Hopei and of the group generally. It is rather broad, not 
narrowed in front, and nearly parallel-sided. It differs also from 
Hopei in the nioi'e angular basal joint of the antennae, the flatter 
and more deeply canaliculate thorax, and the more pointedly 
rounded apex of each elytron. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 343 

Arthroptertis nigricornis. 
Long. 5 ]in., lat. If lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus fulvo-hirtus, antennis latissimis piceo-nigris, 
thorace subelongato antice angustato dorso crasse punctato 
breviter canaliculate, elytris punctatis liirtis subfcruncatis, 
pedibus piceo-nigris tibiis posticis obtuse terminatis. 
Hab. Wide Bay. 
The antennas in this species are broad black and nearly paral- 
leled-sided, the second and third joints being perhaps a shade 
wider than the others. The head is rounded behind the eyes. 
The thorax is oblong, coarsely punctured on the disc, rounded on 
the sides near the front, and canaliculate in the centre of the 
median line. The elytra are rather broad and depressed, punctate, 
fulvo-pilose, as long as the body, and subtruncate or very broadly 
rounded at the apex. 

Arthroptbrus picipes. 
Long. 4| lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Rufo-piceus nitidus fulvo-hirtus, antennis latissimis, capite 
punctato inter oculos utrinque rectangulariter impresso 
angulis posticis rotundatis, thorace oblongo antice angustato 
ad latera subrotundato dorso crasse punctato profunde 
canaliculate, elytris punctatis hirtis apice singulatim sub- 
rotundatis, pedibus piceis, tibiis anticis extus acutissime 
terminatis. 
Hab. South Country, near Yass. 
Very like A. llopei. It is of a darker colour, has the antennte 
broader and longer, and the thorax more deeply canaliculate. 

Arthropterds montanus. 

Long. 5 lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Piceus nitidus fulvo-hirtus, antennis latissimis articulo primo 
parvo quadrato rectangulari, thorace oblongo punctato pro- 
funde breviter canaliculato antice angustato postice sub- 



344 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

constricto lateribus medio subrotundatis, elytris leviter 
punctatis apice subtruncatis, tibiis posterioribus extus ob- 
tusissime terminatis. 
Hab. Bombala, Australian Alps. 
Of narrower form, and much darker colour than A. Eopei. 
The basal joint of the antennae is small and square. The eyes 
are prominent, and black. The thorax is narrowed in front, 
rounded before the middle, constricted near the base, and deeply 
canaliculate on the basal two-thirds of the median line. 

Aethropterus subampliatus. 
Long. 4| lin., lat. If lin. 

Rufo-piceus subnitidus fulvo-hirtus, antennis latissimis articulo 
primo transverse angulato, thorace oblongo parce punctato 
canaliculato antice vix angustato, elytris postice subampliatis 
apice subtruncatis, tibiis anticis extus acate posterioribus 
obtuse terminatis. 
Hab. Bombala. 
This is a shorter, broader, and less nitid insect than the last 
from the same locality. The first joint of the antennae is more 
angular and transverse, the thorax is more depressed, less narrowed 
in front and not constricted behind, and the elytra are wider and 
somewhat ampliated towards the apex. 

Artheoptekus humeralis. 

Long. 5|- lin., lat. 2 lin. 

Rufo-piceus subnitidus fulvo-hirtus, antennis latissimis articulo 
primo transverse, thorace subelongato subdepresso punctato 
medio leviter canaliculato antice angustato postice truncate, 
elytris longis parallelis subdepressis apice late rotundatis 
conjunctim subemarginatis, tubiis anticis extus subacute 
terminatis. 

Hab. Wellington and Dabee. 
This is a large, dull coloured, and very hairy insect. The 
thorax is less deeply canaliculate than in A. Hoj^ei. The elytra 
are prominently rounded at the humeral angles, and broadly 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S, 345 

rounded and conjointly emarginate at the apex. The fore tibite are 
less acutely terminated at the external angle than in the other 
species of the group. The resemblance between this species and 
A. picipes is very great, 

ArTHROPTERUS OVICOLLIS. 

Long. 6| lin., lat. 2 lin. 

Rufo-piceus subnitidus subhirtus, antennis sublatis articulo 
primo quadrate, capite post oculos obtuse producto, thorace 
subovato postice transvei'sim impresso dorso punctato pro- 
funde canaliculate, elytris leviter punctafcis apice late rotun- 
datis, tibiis baud latissimis. 
Hab. South Australia. 
The comparatively narrow antennre and tibi^ and short hair 
of this species, are sufficient of themselves to distinguish it from 
all the others of the Hopei group, while the width and small 
elongation of the thorax are additional proofs of its aberrant 
character. It is in fact a near approach to the insects of the 
second section — A. Wilsoni and others. 

Arthropterus Wyanamatt^. 
Long. 4| lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus crebre punctatus, antennis latissimis arti- 
culis 2-9 brevissimis, oculis pallidis, thorace quadrate pos- 
tice subangustato dorso depresso canaliculate ad latera 
antice rotundato ciliato, scutello transversim pi'ofunde im- 
presso, elyti'is apice sinuato-truncatis, tibiis posticis extus 
apice oblique truncatis. 
. Hab. Camden. 
Two species nearly resembling this insect have been described 
A. pnrallelocerous, Weston, and WeshvoocUi, MacLeay, W. The 
first of these, or rather what I take to be it, is a Melbourne in- 
sect, and is much less densely punctured and more nitid than A. 
Wyanamattce, the other from Gayndah is of a darker colour, has 
the basal joint of the antennae more produced at the external 
angle, has the thorax more narrowed at the base and less densely 



346 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA. 

punctured, and has the elytra more hairy. The transverse de- 
pression on the scutellum is very deep in the present species. I 
have some specimens in my collection from the same locality as 
this insect, which differ in having black eyes and being of a 
darker hue, but I scarcely think they can be of a distinct species. 
The name Wyanamatta is derived from the Geological term 
for the shale, which abounds in the district of Camden. 

Arthroptekus angulatus. 
Long. 4<| lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Piceus nitidus crebre punctatus, antennis latissimis brevissimis 
articulo primo lato angulato, thorace quadrato piano cana- 
liculato ad latera antice late rotundato postice subangustato 
ciliato, elytris subtruncatis angulis humeralibus ciliatis, tibiis 
posterioribus apice late rotundatis. 
Hab. Rockhampton. 
This species is of a very dark colour, densely punctured, and 
covered on the sides of the thorax and elytra with short strong 
hairs. The first joint of the antennae is broad and produced at 
the external angle. The thorax is broad, flat and very broadly 
rounded at the anterior angles. 

Aethropterus sqbcylindricus. 
Long. 5 lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus punctatus, antennis latissimis brevissimis 
articulo primo subacute angulato, thorace capite latiori 
quadrato subplano canaliculato angulis anticis rotundatis, 
scutello ad basin transversim impresso, elytris apice leviter 
trisinuatis, tibiis posticis^extus apice oblique trnncatis. 
Hab. Bogalong, near Yass. 
I believe this species to have a wide range throughout the in- 
land districts of New South Wales. It is more nitid, less punc- 
tate, and less hairy than the last, and is also of a lighter hue. 
The thorax though much rounded near the anterior angles, has a 
very broad square aspect. The transverse impression on the 
scutellum is near the base, and not very deep. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESa, F.L.S. 347 

AkTHROPTERUS ADELAlDiE. 

Long. 4 lin., lat. 1^ lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus parce punctafcus, antennis latissimis brevissi- 
mis articulo primo transverse angalo externo subproducto, 
tborace subquadrato canaliculato ad latera antice subrotun- 
dafco postice leviter angustato obsolete transversim impresso, 
elytris apice subtruncatis minute tri-emarginatis, tibiis pos- 
terioribus apice extas obtuse angulatis. 
Hab. South Australia. 
The thorax is somewhat narrower, and more of the A. Macleayi 
type than the preceding three species. It is also smaller, of a 
lighter colour, and more sparsely punctate. 

ArTHROPTERUS PDNCTICOLLIS. 

Long. 5 1 lin., lat. 2 lin. 

Piceus subnitidus rude punctatus, antennis latissimis brevissi- 
mis nigris articulo primo transverso angulo externo vix 
producto, oculis nigris, thorace quadrato ciliato dorso obso- 
lete punctato profunde canaliculato — canali antice posticeque 
abbreviate — ad latera antice rotundato postice angustato, 
elytris latis ciliatis apice tri-emarginatis, tibiis posticis apice 
extus subtruncatis. 
Hab. Liverpool Plains. 
This is a large, dark coloured, coarsely punctured species. 
The thorax is deeply channeled in the middle, but the depression 
does not extend to the apex or base. On each side of the median 
line, in advance of the middle, there is a large indistinct punc- 
ture ; this, however, may not be constant, and I have never seen 
more than one individual of the species. 

There is a marked resemblance to A. subcylindricus. 

Artheoptbrus foveicollis. 

Long. 5 lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Rufo-piceus subnitidus punctatus, capite inter oculos minute 
bi-impresso, antennis latissimis brevissimis articulo primo 
subquadrato, thorace subquadrato dorso postice canaliculato 



348 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

antice bifoveato angulis anticis rotundatis posticis recHs 
subfoveatis, elytris subsinuato-truncatis, tibiis apice extus 
subacutis. 
Hab. near Sydney. 
This is a very distinct species, and apparently very rare. 
The colour is dark, the head is marked between the eyes by 
two small depressions, the thorax has the median line well marked 
near the base, and has a deep fovea on each side of it near the 
front. 

Akthropterus Odewahnii. 
Long. 5 lin., lat. Ij lin. 

Rufb-piceus subnitidus punctatns subangustns, antennis latissi- 
mis brevissimis articulo primo transverso 2-5 gradatim 
latioribus, oculis nigris, tborace subquadrato dorso postice 
canaliculate ad latera antice subrotuudato postice leviter 
angustato, elytris emarginato-truncatis, tibiis posterioribas 
extus obtuse terminatis. 
Hab. South Australia. 
This insect differs from A. Adelaidoe, the only other South 
Australian species in the group, in the more elongate form, the 
prominent black eyes, and narrower and less square thorax. 

I received my specimen from Mr. Odewahn, of Gawler Town, 
after whom I have named it. 

Arthropterds scutbllaris. 
Long. 4| lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus dense punctatus, antennis latissimis brevissi- 
mis articulo primo magno transverso angulato, oculis nigris, 
thorace subquadrato leviter canaliculato ad latera antice ro- 
tundato postice modice angustato angulis posticis rectis 
subrecurvis, scutello late impresso medio punctato, elytris 
apice subemarginato-rotundatis, tibiis posticis extus apice 
oblique truncatis. 
Hab. South Country. 
I have no record of the exact locality in which this insect was 
captured, but I think it comes from the neighbourhood of Yass. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 349 

The most noticeable feature about it, is the acute sliglitly re- 
curved posterior angle of the thorax. The punctured depression 
on the scutellum also is unusually large. 

Arthropterus Turneri. 
Long. 4| lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus dense punctatus, antennis latissimis brevis- 
simis articulo prime parvo subtransverso, thorace subquad- 
rato postice canaliculate truncate ad latera antice rotundato 
angulis posticis rectis subrecurvis subfoveatis, scutello 
semicirculariter impresso, elytris singulatim subrotundatis, 
tibiis posterioribus apice subtruncatis angulis externis sub- 
acutis. 
Hab. Lane Cove, near Sydney. 
I name this insect after the captor, the late Mr. Turner of 
Lane Cove. It departs considerably in the rather elongate shape 
of the "thorax, from the majority of the group in which I place it. 
The sides are well rounded before the middle, and somewhat 
narrowed near the base which is truncate, with the angles, sharp, 
slightly recurved, and impressed. 

Arthropterus hirtus. 
Long. 4 lin., lat. Ij lin. 

Piceo-rufus subnitidus punctatus, antennis latissimis brevissimis 
articulo prime parvo subquadrato, oculis nigris, thorace 
quadrato subplano leviter canaliculato postice subangustato 
obsolete transversim impresso angulis anticis late rotunda- 
tis, elytris dense fulvo-hirtis subtruncatis ; tibiis posteriori- 
bus apice extus obtuse terminatis. 
Hab. Monaro. 
The thick clothing of soft reddish hair on the elytra is the 
most marked charcteristic of this insect. 

Arthropterus darlingensis. 
Long. 5i lin., lat. If lin. 

Piceo-rufus subnitidus punctatus, antennis latis articulo primo 
parvo subquadrato, capite inter oculos triangulariter leviter 



350 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA. 

impresso, thorace subquadrato medio breviter depresso ad 
latera antice i-otundat opostice obsolete transversira impresso, 
elytris fulvo-hirtis apice singulatim subrotundatis, tibiis 
posterioribus extus obtuse terminatis. 
Hab. Darling River. 
This insect, perhaps, should be placed in the A. Hopei group, 
the fact of the thorax being scarcely longer than broad, is my 
only excuse for its present position. The thorax is peculiar. It 
has in the centre of the median line a short broadish depression, 
which seems to terminate at both ends in an ill-defined roundish 
fovea. 

Akthropteeus depressus. 
Long. 6 lin., lat. 2 lin. 

Rufo-piceus subnitidus latus subplanus dense punctatus pilis 
brevibus vestitus, antennis latis sublongis, thorace subqua- 
drato breviter canaliculate postice subangustato ^ngulis 
anticis rotundatis, elytris longis truncatis, tibiis extus sub- 
obtuse terminatis. 
Hab. Tweed River. 
This species is unlike any other. It is of a dark dullish red 
colour, densely punctate, and thickly clothed with a short fulvous 
pile. The antennas are broad, but owing to the length of the 
joints, the width of each joint is not more than three times the 
length. The thorax is almost broader than the length, nearly 
truncate in front, and quite truncate behind, with the anterior 
angles rounded and the posterior square, slightly narrowed 
towards the base, and shortly canaliculate on the posterior half 
of the median line. The fore tibiee are rather obtusely terminated 
at the external angle, the others still more obtusely. 

ArTHROPTEKUS ROCKHAMPTONENSIS. 

Long. 5 lin., lat. If lin. 

Rufo-piceus nitidus punctatus, antennis sublatis articulo primo 
pai'vo quadrate, capite inter oculos leviter bi-impresso, 
thorace subquadrato canaliculato ad latera antice rotundato 
postice subangustato angulis posticis rectis subrecurvis, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 351 

elytris longis truucatis, tibiis sublatis posfcerioribus extus 
apice subtruncatis. 
Hab. Rockhampton. 
This insect approaches the species of the 2iid section, and 
indeed much resembles some of them, though the antennas and 
tibiae are not so very narrow as in that group. The specimen 
before me is, I beUeve unique, in the collection of Mr. Masters. 

Arthropterus Howittii. 

Long. 5 lin., lat. 1| lin. 

Rufus nitidus punctatus, antennis subangustis articulo primo 
parvo quadrate, 2-9 longitudine baud ter latioribus, oculis 
nigris, thorace subquadrato tenuiter canaliculate ad latera 
antice subrotundato postice vix angustato, elytris apice 
subrotundatis, tibiis subangustis extus acute terminatis. 

Hab. Victoria, 

The thoi'ax in this species is very much of the same character 
as in Westwoodii, WtjanamattcB, &c., but the antenna3 and tibiae 
are very different. The joints 2 to 9 of the former are not three 
times broader than long bat are more than twice. The tibiee are 
wider than in A. Wilsonii but very m.uch narrower than in the 
preceding group. 

Arthropterus brevicollis. 

Long. 4| lin., lat. \^ lin. 

Piceo-rufus nitidus leviter punctatus, antennis subangustis 
articulo primo parvo quadrato ceteris longitudine bis 
latioribus, oculis pallidis, capite inter oculos depresso, thorace 
subtransverso tenuiter canaliculato postice transversim 
impresso, elytris longis apice subemai'ginato-rotundatis, 
tibiis subangustis extus acute terminatis. 

Hab. New South Wales. 

Very like the last species, but differs in the narrower antennae 
and thinner puncturation and in having the thorax a little 

w 



352 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

broader than the length. It approaches A. denudatus Westw. 
or at least what I take for that insect, for I am not by any means 
sure of its identity. 

AeTHROPTEEUS P0LITD3. 

Long. 6i lin. lat. 1| lin. 

Rufo-piceus nitidus leviter punctatus, antennis angustis arti- 
culo primo parvo oblongo, oculis pallidis, capite postice 
subproducto angulato, thorace quadrato breviter profunda 
canaliculato ad latera transversim bifoveato, elytris subti- 
liter punctatis subtruncatis, tibiis angustis. 
Hab. Liverpool Plains. 
The joints 2 to 9 of the antennae are in this species little 
broader than the length, and the tibiaB are as narrow as those of 
A. Wilsonii. It most resembles A. Kingii, but differs inter alia 
in the broader and squarer thorax. 

Aethropteeus latipennis. 
Long. 51 lin., lat, 2 lin. 

Rufo-piceus nitidus latus subplanus leviter punctatus, antennis 
angustis articulo primo quadrato, capite inter oculos bi- 
impresso, thorace subquadrato canaliculato ad latera antice 
late rotundato ciliato postice angustato obsolete transversim 
impresso, elytris latis longis apice late subrotundatis, tibiis 
angustis extus acute terminatis. 
Hab. Flinder's Range, South Australia. 
The antennte in this species are even narrower than the last, 
while the tibice are broader, but its most distinctive character is 
the large, broadly rounded thorax. It is unique in the Museum. 
The genus Phymatopterus Westw. contains the species piceus 
and Macleayi of Westwood, the latter originally taken by him for 
Arthropterus Macleayi Don. Considerable confusion exists as re- 
gards the identity of Donovan's species, and mistakes have, con- 
sequently, been frequently made. 

As I possess the original specimen from the Cabinet of Fran- 
cillon, I am enabled to speak with certainty on the subject. A. 
Macleayi is a narrow species, with elongated thorax, and is found 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 353 

about Rope's Creek and the country lying between Parramatta 
and the Nepean. 

I defer the descriptions of one or two new Phymatopteri for 
the present. 



The genus Anoplogiiathus MacLeay inckides a number of the 
largest and most showy Australian Coleoptera. As might be 
supposed, it has therefore received a tolerably large share of 
attention, and but few species remain to be described. While 
affixing names to, and writing descriptions of the nevelties 
in my collection, it has occurred to me that it might be use- 
ful to take the opportunity of making a general revision of the 
group. In doing so, I shall at present limit myself to the section 
of the family which have the mesosternum produced in front — the 
Anoplognatliides vrais of Lacordaire. The Australian species of 
this group are at present confined to the genera Anoplognathus 
and Bepsimus of MacLeay. — Hor. Ent. 1, p. 143-144. I propose 
to add to these the genus Galloodes White, which, though never 
properly described, and not acknowledged by naturalists, may, I 
think, be very properly used for some intermediate insects, 
having the broad head and Dytiscus like form of Repslmus, but 
without the enlarged hind legs. 

The following synopsis of the first genus Anoplognathus is in 
accordance with Burmeister's plan of subdivision; — 

Section 1. — Pygidium for the most part naked in both sexes, 
sometimes with fine scattered hairs at the sides, or tufted at 
the apex. 

Subsection 1. — Each elytron rounded at the apex, forming a 
deep emargination at the suture. 

a. Pygidium finely acuducted. 

Anoplognathus viridimieus Don. 

6. Pygidium smooth. 

Anoplognathus reticulatus Boisd. 
„ rhinastus Blanch. 

„ longipennis n. sp. 

Subsection 2. — Elytra conjointly rounded at the apex, scarcely 
emarginate at the suture. 



354 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

a. Pygidium smooth and strongly bearded at the apex. 

Anoplognathus analis Dalm. 
„ Olivieri Dalm. 

„ Duponti Boisd. 

„ montanus n. sp, 

„ viridicollis n. sp. 

b. Pygidium sparingly bearded. 

Auoplogtudhus rugosus Kirby 

„ pectoralis Burm. 

„ dispar n. sp. 

c. Pygidium acuducted. 

Anoplognatlms choloropynis Drapiez. 
„ Boisduvallii Boisd. 

Section 2. — Pygidium in both sexes, for the most part finely 
and equally clothed with hair. 

Subsection 1. — The mesosternal process long and acute. 
Anoplognathus porosus Dalm. 

„ pallidicollis Blanch. 

„ velutinus Boisd. 

„ nehulosns MacLeay, W. 

„ concolor Burm. 

„ rubiginosus n. sp. 

„ Odewalinii n. sp. 

„ abnormis n. sp. 

Subsection 2. — The mesosternal process short. 

a. The process obtuse. 

Anoplognathus brunnipennis Gyll. 
„ flavipennis Boisd. 

b. The process acute. 

Anoplognathus hirsutus Burm, 
„ suturalis Boisd. 

The first of these species viridiceneus is a well known Sydney 
insect. It does not seem to extend far inland, nor is it to be 
found in Victoria ; but I have a small variety, in my cabinet, 
which is said to have been taken in Tasmania. I have also seen 
specimens from Wide Bay, Queensland. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 355 

A. reticulatus Boisd. I have never to my knowledge seen. 

A. rliinastus Blanch, comes from Tasmania. I find two speci- 
mens of it in the collection of the late W. S. MacLeay, labelled as 
variety B of ancdis, a species which it much resembles. 

A. longipennis a new species, the description of which with the 
other new ones, will be given farther on, is a Sydney insect. 

A. analis Dalm (vlridltarsis Leach) is an insect of very wide 
range and considerable variety of colouring. 

A. Olivieri Dalm. (impressus Boisd.) has also a wide range, 
and is subject to variety. 

A. Duponti Boisd. is evidently identical with an insect in the 
late Mr. W. S. MacLeay's collection, labelled A. Olivieri, variety B, 
from Van Dieman's Land. 

A. montanus nov. sp. I have found at Monaro and Bathursfc, 
and I have a specimen which I believe to be of the same species 
from Victoria. It has probably a very wide range over the 
inland parts of the country. 

A. viridicollis nov. sp. comes from Darling Downs. 

A. rugosus Kirby seems to be found all over the colonies. 

A. pectoralis Burm. I have from Monaro and Braid wood ; it 
looks very like one of the many varieties of A.porosus. 

A. dispar nov. sp. seems to be rather rare. I do not know 
from what part of New South Wales I procured my specimens. 

A. chloropyrus Drapiez. (iiitidulus Boisd.) is common every- 
where here and in Victoria. 

A. Boisduvallii Boisd. (pulchrips Burm. and lineatus 
MacLeay, W.) is found all over Queensland, and is very subject 
to variety. 

A. porosus Dalm. (inustus Kirby) is found everywhere in 
abundance, and is the most subject to variety of all the species. 

A. pallidicollis Blanch. I believe to be merely a variety of 
porosus. 

A. velutinus Boisd. is pretty generally distributed, but is not 
a common insect. 



356 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGTCA, 

A. nehulosus MacLeay, W., is rare. I have specimens both from 
Port Denison and Rockhampton. 

A. concolor Burm. is from the Clarence River. 

A. nth' ginosus nov. sp. is fi'om New England. 

A. Odeioahnii nov. sp. from South Australia. 

A. abnormis nov. sp. from Wide Bay. 

A. hrunnipennis Schonh. I have never taken this insect ; the 
only specimens I have seen are in the collection of the late Mr. 
W. S. MacLeay, and are labelled " New Holland." 

A . Jiavipennis Boisd. is taken at the Blue Mountains. 

A. Mrsutus Burm. is a Victorian insect. 

A. suturalis Boisd. is common in New South "Wales, Victoria, 
and Tasmania. 

Anoplognathus longipennis. 
Long. 11 lin. 

Luteus nitidus, capite thorace scutelloque seneo-nitentibus 
punctulatis, elytris lougis pygidium tegentibus rugose 
punctatis lateribus parallelis apice singulatim rotundatis 
callo subhumerali brunneo, pedibus seneo-rufis, tarsis viri- 
dibus, corpore subtus viridi-nigro nitidissimo albido-piloso 
mesosterno acute producto, pygidio vii'idi-aureo marginibus 
hirtis. 
I have only a female specimen of this insect. The parallel 
sided and singly rounded elytra are its most marked characteristics. 

Anoplognathus montanus. 

Long. 13 lin. 

Luteus subaaneus nitidus, capite subtiliter punctate clypeo 
producto reflexo, thorace Isevi ad latera leviter punctate, 
elytris obsolete striatis leviter subrugose punctatis apice 
rugosis, pedibus rufis, tarsis nigris, corpore subtus nigro 
albido-piloso, mesosterno elongato subacute punctate, 
pygidio rufo ad latera punctate apice barbate. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 357 

The clypeus of the male is like that of A. analis, and indeed 
there is such a general resemblance that were it not for some 
important differences I should have looked upon it as one of the 
many varieties of that species. The points of difference are the 
head and clypeus are more finely and the elytra more rugosely 
punctured, the under surface, which is entirely black, is more 
densely clothed with white hair, particularly on the sides of the 
abdominal segments, and the mesosternal process is less acutely 
pointed and is punctured to the very apex. 

Considerable variety as to colour seems to exist in this species, 
the luteus colour of the thorax passing in some specimens into a 
brassy green. 

Anoplognathus viridicollis. 
Long. 11| lin. 

^neo-viridis nitidissimus clypeo testaceo subtiliter punctato 
brevi late reflexo, elytris pallide testaceis subnitidis rugose 
productis, pedibus rufis tarsis viridi-nigris, corpore subtus 
viridi-nigro nitido albido-piloso, mesosterno subrufo elon- 
gate acuto Isevi, pygidio purpureo-rufo apice barbate lateri- 
bus punctatis subacuductis. 
The form of the clypeus in the male is very distinct in this 
species, it is of a testaceous colour, and though not pi'oduced so 
much as in the last species, is largely reflexed in front at a right 
angle to the base. The head, thorax, and scutellum are of a 
brilliant golden green, the elytra are of a dull pale testaceous colour 
and rugosely punctate, and the pygidium is acuducted on the 
sides. 

Anoplognathus dispar. 

Long. 10 lin. 

Viridi-Eeneus nitidus, capite antice dense punctulato, thorace 
leviter punctulato, elytris flavis rugose punctatis apice 
singulatim subrotundatis, pedibus fulvis subviridi-^neis 
tarsis viridi-nigris, corpore subtus viridi-nigro albido-piloso, 
mesosterno triangulariter elongato subacute, pygidio viridi- 
aureo nitidissimo apice subbarbato. 



358 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

This insect is not unlike a pale variety of A. rugosus, it diflPers 
in having the elytra less deeply punctured, with the apex of each 
somewhat rounded. The thorax also is more transverse, and the 
mesosternal process is less acute and more triangularly pointed. 

One of this species in the collection of the late Mr. W. S. 
MacLeay, is labelled A. forosus Schonh. which it certainly is not 
unless indeed the porosus of Schonherr is very different from that 
of Boisduval and other authors, and from the inustus of Kirby. 

Anoplognathus rubiginosus. 
Long. 10 lin. 

Breviter ovatus convexus, capite thorace scutelloque seneo-rufis 
subviridibus nitidissimis leviter punctulatis, maris clypeo late 
truncato et cum lateribus reflexo, elytris purpureo-rufis 
dense subseriatim punctatis, pedibus rufis subpurpureis 
tarsis piceis, corpore subtus nigro nitido flavo-piloso, mesos- 
terno acute producto, pygidio magno punctato triaugulari 
viridi-nigro hirto. 
This very distinct species bears no resemblance to any other 
I know. 

The short oval convex form, square clypeus, and large hairy 
pygidium will serve at once to distinguish it. 

Anoplognathus Odewahnii. 
Long. 14 lin. 

Testaceo-aeneus subviridis nitidus, capite dense punctulato maris 
clypeo longo reflexo antice dilatato apice rotundato, thorace 
leviter punctulato medio subtiliter canaliculato ad latera 
subangulariter rotundato, elytris pallidioribus obsolete 
striatis dense leviter punctatis ad suturam brunneis apice 
subrotundatis minime emai'ginatis angulo suturali rotundato, 
pedibus rufis tarsis piceis, corpore subtus viridi piloso, 
mesosterno sublonge producto subacute piloso, pygidio rufo 
acuducto pubescente. 
The above description is taken from a male, what I believe to 
be the female is a very different looking insect. It is broad flat 



BY W. MA.CLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 359 

subnitid, and of a pale testaceous colour. The mesosternal 
process is long, acute, and of a golden lustre, as are also the thighs 
and pygidium, in all else the two sexes are alike. 

Anoplognathus abnormis. 
Long. 7 lin. 

Elongato-ovatus pallide testaceus subnitidus, maris clypeo late 

rotundato anguste reflexo, capite lato piano punctulato 

maculis duabus viridi-nigris ornato, thorace transverse 

punctulato quadrivittato — vittis viridi-nigris externis undu- 

latis — basi viridi-marginato, scutello late viridi-raarginato, 

elytris dense subseriatim punctatis, femoribus testaceo- 

seneis tibiis tarsisque rufis, corpore subtus viridi-nigris 

nitidis parce albido-pilosis, mesosterno acute producto, 

pjgidio dense pubescente. 

The broad rounded head of this insect gives it something of 

the appearance of a Calloodes. A. coricolor Burm. is the species 

it most resembles. 

The genus Calloodes White will comprise Greyanus "White, 
the species for which this genus was originally proposed, a very 
rare and beautiful insect from Port Denison, Bayneri mihi. also 
from Port Denison, a species placed by Gemminger and Harold 
in the genus Repsimus, and ceneus and Atlcinsonil of Waterhouse, 
both from Rockingham Bay. The first of these (ceneus) I have 
never seen, but from the description I have little doubt that it 
has the Calloodes form. 

To those four species I now add the two following : — 

Calloodes prasinds. 

Long. 10 lin. 

Viridis subopalescens subnitidus, clypeo late rotundato in mare 
antice et lateraliter reflexo in femina piano punctate, thorace 
lateraliter punctulato, elytris obsolete striatis leviter punc- 
tulatis pedibus rufo-aureis, corpore subtus viridi parce piloso, 
mesosterno producto subobtuso apice subrecurvo, pygidio 
viridi punctate subacuducto. 

Hab. North Australia. 



360 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

Calloodes Mastersii. 
Long. 8 lin. 

Argenteo-viridis nitidissimus, capite dense punctulato, clypeo 
rotundato in mare angulato, thorace leviter punctulato, 
elytris leviter punctulato-striatis, pedibus pallide rufis, cor- 
pora subtus parce albido-piloso, mesosterno minime producfco 
obtuso, pygidio acuducto apice subbarbato. 

Hab. Port Denison. 

The remaining genus Repsimus will by this arrangement 
comprise only three species — ceneus Fab. found all over New 
South Wales and Queensland, manicatus Swartz. of equally wide 
range, and purpureipes mihi. from Grayndah, Queensland. 



The genus Bolboceras Kirby is well represented in Australia. 
The species described, however, fall far short of the numbers to 
be found in collections. Mr. Bainbridge, and subsequently 
Professor Westwood, described some years ago a number of them, 
but almost exclusively from Western Australia. The species of 
South Australia seem to have been quite overlooked ; and the 
same may be said of those of the North, with the exception of a 
few in Mr. Hope's collection from Port Essington, and of three 
described by me of late years, from Port Denison and Gayndah. 

I shall commence my descriptions of the new species with 
those which have two or more prominent horns on the head in 
the male. 

Bolboceras aemigerum. 
Long. 9 lin. 

E/ufum nitidum, capite antice transversim elevato tricornuto 

postice utrinque excavato Isevi, thorace antice retuso verti- 

cali transversim quadricornuto ad latera rugose punctato 

medio subobliterate canaliculato utrinque prope medium 

alte foveato, elytris striatis striis subtilissime punctatis, 

corpore subtus dense fulvo-hirto, tibiis anticis extus sex 

dentibus armatis. 

Hab. Rockhampton. 

I have only the male of this species. The head is furnished in 

front with a transverse elevation, terminating in three strong 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 361 

horns, the middle one straight, the others diverging ; in front of 
this elevation, and near its base, there is a triangular transverse 
" carina," joined at the apex of the triangle by a straight carina 
proceeding from the middle horn ; behind this the head is 
smooth and concave on each side. The thorax is shortly retuse 
and perpendicular in front from side to side, and is armed on the 
summit of the retuse portion with four strong pointed horns ; 
two near the centre, diverging considerably, and one near each 
anterior angle. The sides are roughly punctuate, and behind 
and a little outside of each of the centre horns there is a very 
deep fovea. The elytra are very finely striated, with the inter- 
stices smooth. 

BOLBOCERAS PDNCTICOLLB. 

Long. 6|lin. 

Piceum nitidum capite antice transversim semicirculariter 
elevato apicibus productis postice inter oculos bicornuto, 
thorace antice parum retuso pone oculos alte foveato 
omnino intervallis punctatis parce instructo, elytris sti'iato- 
punctatis tibiis anticis extus 5 dentatis. 
Femina capite antice transversim elevato tridentato, postice 
inter oculos bituberculato, thorace vix retuso haud alte 
foveato. 
Hab. South Australia. 
The male has a transverse elevation in front, produced at each 
side into a strong horn, and behind, between the eyes, two 
strong, conical horns. The thorax is a little retuse in front, with 
a very deep fovea on each side of the retuse portion, and with 
patches of rough punctures in various portions of the surface. 
In thefemale, the head is tridentate in front, and bituberculate 
behind, and the thorax is without the deep fovea. 

BOLBOCERAS LATICORNE. 

Long. 6 lin. 

Piceo-rufum nitidum capite antice punctato bicornuto — cornu- 
bus fortibus subdivergentibus— postice Isevi ad latera 
utrinque bidentato, thorace brevi punctato antice medio 



362 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

retuso valde excavato — excavatione postice carina trans- 
versa et utrinque lato bifido cornu instructa — elytris striato- 
punctatis interstitiis subconvexis subtiliter punctatis, tibiis 
anticis extus sex dentatis. 
Femina capite bituberculato clypeo apice bidentato, thorace 
baud profunde excavato — excavatione antice utrinque tuber- 
culo instructa. 

Hab. South Australia. 

The head in the male is furnished with two strong divergent 
horns, united at the base in a semicircular transverse elevation, 
and is bidentated on the sides, the posterior dentation being large 
and triangular. The thorax has a very deep excavation in front, 
extending nearly to the base, which is bounded behind by a trans- 
verse carina, on each side by a broad horn bifid at the apex, and 
in front by an extension of the apical border. 

The female differs from the male in having the clypeus biclen- 
tate, the horns of the head mere tubercles, and the thorax less 
excavated, with tubercles in the place of the broad horns of the 
other, and the apical margin distinctly tuberculated in the 
middle. Seven teeth may be counted on the fore tibiae of this 
species, but the uppermost one is very minute. 

The following have only one horn on the head : — 

BOLBOCERAS ANGOLICORNE. 

Long. 10 lin. 

Piceo-rufum aitidum capite antice cornuto — cornu longo subre- 
curvo postice medio triaugulariter dentate antice ad basin 
carina sinuata instructo, thorace brevi valde retuso ante 
medium bicornuto — cornubus latis subtruncatis subrecurvis 
— ad latera punctato subfoveato, elytris striato-punctatis, 
tibiis anticis extus 5 dentatis. 

Hab. Port Curtis. 
Though differing in many ways there is a close affinity in this 
insect to B. Rhinoceros mihi. The chief differences are the 
angular tooth on the back of the horn of the head, the much 
bisinuated " carina " at the base of the horn in front, the very 
broad thoracic horns, and the more deeply striato-punctate 
elytra. I have not seen the female. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 363 

BOLBOCERAS CAVICOLLE. 

Long. 8 lin, 

Piceo-rufum nitidum, capite anfcice cornuto — cornu longo sub- 
recurvo postice medio triangulariter dentato, thorace antice 
medio retuso longitudinaliter profunde excavato utrinque 
breviter cornuto ad latera rugose punctato, elytris leviter 
striato-puuctatis, tibiis anticis extus 6 dentatis. 
Fetnina cornu capitis brevi baud postice angulato, thorace 

leviter retuso bituberculato. 
Hab. South Australia. 
Like the last, the horn on the head is long, slightly recurved, 
and triangularly toothed in the middle of the posterior surface. 
The thorax has a long deep excavation in the middle in front 
which extends nearly to the base, and has a short subrecurved 
horn on each side of the excavation. In the female the horn of 
the head is shorter and without the angular tooth behind, and the 
thorax is only slightly retuse and excavated, with tubercular 
prominences in place of the horns of the male. 

BOLBOCEEAS COENIGERUM. 

Long. 9 lin. 

Piceo-rufum nitidum capite antice cornuto — cornu elongato 
subacuto antice basi bisinuatim carinato, thorace antice 
medio retuso modice excavato — excavatione Isevi utrinque 
cornu brevi instructa — ad latera rugose punctato foveolato, 
elytris striate -punctatis, tibiis anticis extus 5 dentatis. 
Femina capite cornu brevi bifido instructo, thorace antice verti- 

cali IfBvi. 
Hab. Swan River. 
The horn of the head is long, pointed, and without any tooth 
on the posterior surface. The transverse carina at the base of 
the horn in front is emarginate in the middle, and much sinuated 
at each side, as in B. angulicorne. The thorax is only moder- 
ately retuse and concave in front in the middle, and has a short, 
obtuse horn on each side of the retuse portion. The sides are 



364 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

very coarsely punctured, and there is a small deep fovea near 
each posterior angle. The female has no excavation in the 
thorax, and the vertex is furnished with a short bifid horn. 

BOLBOCERAS CARPENTARIiE. 
Long. 8-2 lin. 

Piceo-rufum nitidum, capite antice cornuto — cornu subbrevi 
subacuto antice basi bisinuatim carinato, thorace vix retuso 
bicoi'nuto punctate ad latera foveolato basi laevi, elytris 
striato-punctatis, tibiis anticis estus 5 dentatis. 
Hab. Sweer's Island. 
I have only seen the male of this species. The horn on the 
head is shorter than in the last. The thorax is scarcely exca- 
vated but has a plane surface in front, with a short somewhat 
porrect horn on each side. The base, with the exception of the 
median line, is smooth, the remainder rugosely punctate and 
deeply foveated on each side. 

BOLBOCERAS DENTICOLLE. 
Long. 9| lin. 

Piceo-rufum nitidum, capite punctate apice cornuto ad latera 

utrinque bidentato, thorace subretuso apice subobtuse 

tuberculato-producto medio fortiter bicornuto — cornubus 

divergentibus — omnino parce punctate lateribus serratis, 

elytris fortiter striato-punctatis, tibiis anticis extus 6 

dentatis. 

Hab. Victoria River, or Peak Downs. 

The male of this insect has a short nearly upright horn at the 

very extremity of the head, with two teeth on each side, one 

large and triangular near the eyes, the other smaller between 

that and the clypeus. The thorax has an obtusely pointed 

tubercle at the apex with a somewhat excavated space behind, 

which is surmounted by two strong divergent horns, the sides are 

dentated. The elytra are strongly striato-punctate. I have not 

seen the female. This species is in the Museum collection, and 

was brought from one of the above named localities by the 

Expedition which, under the command of the late Sir Thomas 

Mitchell, first penetrated to the Victoria river. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 365 

BOLBOCERAS LACUNOSUM. 

Long. 8 lin. 

Piceo-rufum nitidum, capite punctato antice transversim carin- 

ato obsolete tridentato, thorace punctato subplano haud 

retuso medio subtriangulariter excavato excavatione antice 

postice et utrinque tuberculo instructa, elytris nigris fortiter 

striato-punctatis interstitiis subconvexis, tibiis anticis extus 

sexdentatis. 

The peculiarity in this species is the horizontally placed thorax 

with a large triangular or cordiform excavation in the middle, at 

the apex of which there is a small horn, a tubercle on each side, 

and a rounded pi'ominence behind. It is found near Sydney. 

This and the two following insects are without horns on the head. 

BOLBOCERAS PLANICEPS. 

Long. 4 lin. 

Rufum nitidum capite piano Isevi antice punctato triangu- 
lariter transversim carinato tenuiter tridentato, thorace 
Isevi minime retuso margine apicali bifoveato linea media 
antice impressa ad latera antice rugose punctato medio sub- 
transversim punctato-foveolato, elytris 8 vel 9 striatis 
striis leviter punctatis interstitiis planis, tibiis anticis extus 
sexdentatis dentibus duobus basalibus subobsoletis. 
Hab. Sweer's Island. 

The flat, smooth head, and the limited number of striae on the 
elytra will serve at once to enable any one to recognize this 
insect. The median line is broadly marked, on the anterior and 
slightly retuse portion of the thorax, there are two small fovese 
on the anterior edge, and an elongate punctured one near the 
middle of each side. 

BOLBOCERAS SWEERII. 

Long. 3 1 lin. 

Piceum nitidum, capite punctato medio obtuse tuberculato 
antice subtriangulariter leviter carinato, thorace parce 



36G MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

punctato antice minime retuso medio leviter canaliculato 
ad latei^a ufcrinque bifoveato, elytris leviter striato-punc- 
tatis, tibiis anticis extus sex-dentatis. 
Hab. Swear's Island. 
This difiers from the last species in having the head punctured, 
in having a tubercle on the forehead, in having the thorax thinly 
punctured, not retuse, and lightly canaliculate in the middle, and 
in having the usual number of stri» on the elytra. 



In a previous portion of this paper I described a number of 
new species of Promecoderus and allied genera. Since then, I 
have received from Peak Downs a very extraordinary looking 
insect, evidently one of the Cnemacantliidce, but very distinct 
from any of the genera of that group. From the massive character 
of the presternum I propose for it the generic name 

Brithysternum. 
Caput magnum longum subnutans. 
Menhim profunde emarginatum, medio edentato, lobis later- 

alibiis magnis extrorsum rotund atis introrsum erectis. 
Labium antice subrotundatum subtilissime emarginatum bise- 

tosum paraglossis adhserentibus haud longioribus. 
Maxillce acutge arcuatee. 
Palpi maxillares subcrassi articulo penultimo brevi, ultimo 

truncato. 
Palpi lahiales sublongi crassi truncati. 
Lahrwm magnum transversum truncatura. 
Mandihaloe haud magnsB subarcuatse. 
Antennce subsetiformes articulo prime crasso, tertio ceteris 

longiori. 
Thorax elongatus. 
Elytra subconvexa angusta. 
Pedes graciles, femoribus anticis longis subarcuatis : intermediis 

subtus versus apicem calcaratis : posticis trochanteribus 

longis acuminatis, tibiis anticis arcuatis, tarsis anticis in 

mare triangularibus. 
Prosternum latum retrorsum porrectum. 
Corpus longum subcylindricum pedunculatum apterum. 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 367 

The description given above will show that in some respects 
this genus resembles Parroa of Castelnau. The very elongate 
form, slight legs, and largely produced sternum gives it, however, 
a very different aspect. 

BErTHTSTERNUM CALCARATUM. 

Long. 12 lin., lat. 3 lin. 

Nigrum nitidum liBve, capite subconvexo inter ocalos leviter 
bi-impresso, clypeo utriuque profunde bipunctato, thoi-ace 
longo antice truncate capite latiori angulis rotundato- 
productis, medio canaliculato, postice truncato subangustato 
trans versim impresso lateribus marginatis vix rotundatis, 
elytris hand thorace latioribus punctis paucis margin- 
alibus, tibiis anticis arcuatis prope apicem emarginatis dente 
interno apicali magno, femoribus intermediis calcare magno 
subtus versus apicem armatis, prosterno lato piano retrorsum 
porrecto subrecurvo. 
The antennae palpi and tarsi are piceous, the rest of the insect 
is black, nitid, and smooth. The head is a little convex, has two 
large shallow fovege between the eyes, and two small but deep 
punctures on each side of the clypeus. The labrum is canaliculate 
in the middle, and has its anterior edge marked with strong 
setigerous punctures. The mandibles are lightly striolate longitu- 
dinally, and the right one is furnished with a tooth in the middle. 
The eyes are round and rather prominent, and there is a small deep 
puncture behind and a little above each eye. The antennoe are 
much shorter than the head and thorax united, the first joint is 
thick, the remainder are all obconical, the second joint being the 
smallest, and the third a little the largest, and gradually tapering 
to the apical joint which is acuminate. The thorax is slightly 
broader than the head in front, nearly twice as long as wide, 
truncate in front and behind, margined at the sides, obtusely 
produced at the anterior angles, very slightly rounded on the 
sides, very little narrowed towards the base, transversely im- 
pressed near the base and finely canaliculate on the median line. 
The elytra are elongate, not wider than the thorax, and smooth 
with the exception of three or four punctures in the humeral 

X 



3G8 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

margin. The legs are slender and rather long. The fore thighs 
and tibijB are a little curved inwards, the latter is not enlarged 
towards the apex, has the emargination on the inner surface small 
and very near the apex, and has the terminal spine on the inner 
side large, acute and curved. The intermediate thighs are armed 
on the under side not far from the apex with a large strong 
slightly curved spur. The trochanters of the hind legs are large, 
straight, and bluntly acuminate. The four first joints of the fore 
tarsi in the male are rather broader than in the female. The 
prosterum is flat and* broad, and is extended backwards in a 
broad laminated and somewhat recurved form, as if by its contact 
with the mesosternum it was intended to prevent the long heavy 
head and thorax of the insect from drooping too much. 



I received, a few months ago, from the Richmond River dis- 
trict, a Feronia of sculpture of a most peculiar and unusual kind. 
It differs in one way or another from all the subgenera given by 
Baron de Chaudoir in his " Essai sur les Feroniens de 1' Aus- 
tralia," and it does not quite fit into any of the very many sub- 
divisions of the group. Ahax seems to be the one to which it 
most approximates, I shall accordingly call the insect 

Abax sulcipennis. 
Long. 9 1 lin. 

Brunneo-cupreus nitidus subplanus, capite profunde bisulcato, 

thorace subtransverso medio profunde canaliculato postice 

profunde utrinque longitudinaliter bifoveato — fovea externa 

lata brevi — ad latera marginato subrotundato basi sub- 

truncato medio minime emarginato angulisanticis rotundatis 

subproductis posticis rectis, elytris thorace parum latioribus 

brevibus planis late bisulcatis, sulcis carinatis apice fortiter 

sinuato lateribus seriatim punctatis, corpore subtus nigro 

nitido, antennis palpis tarsisque piceis. 

If the work so ably commenced by Baron de Chaudoir 

of arranging and classifying the Australian Feronidce, should 

ever be brought to a completion, this insect will, I have no doubt, 



BY W. MACLEAY, ESQ., F.L.S. 369 

form a distinct subgenus. It differs from the most common 
group of the larger Australian Feronice, named by Chaudoir 
Notonomus, in having the third joint of the antennae much longer 
than the fourth, from Uhytistermis of the same author in the 
thicker and more truncate palpi, while from Homalosoma, TricJi- 
osternus, Prionophorus, Loxodactylus, and Ghlcenioidius of Chaudoir, 
it is still wider apart. 

The sculpture of the elytra is unlike that of any of the 
family I have seen, more resembling, in fact, that of a true 
Carahus than of a Feronia. 

Each elytron has two broad, deep grooves, extending from the 
base to the apex, and in the bottom of each groove there is a 
fine rounded " carina." Near each lateral margin there is a row 
of large more or less distant punctures. The extreme apex is 
rounded, but the sides a little above the apex are profoundly 
sinuate. 

My only specimen of this insect is a female. It was found, I 
believe, in the upper valley of the Richmond River. 



When on an Entomological excursion to the Murrumbidgee 
in the spring of last year, Mr. Masters and I captured, in con- 
siderable numbers, in the neighbourhood of Mundarlo and Tar- 
cuttah, a species of Tmesiphorus, which we invariably found in the 
society of a small red ant. So invariable was the association that 
whenever on turning over a log we found some of the ants we 
knew that a search in their passages would certainly lead to the 
discovery of some of these attendant beetles. 

The ant answers very nearly to the genus Ectatomma of 
F. Smith. It is undescribed, I give it therefore a name and 
description. 

Ectatomma socialis. 
Long. 2| lin. 

Piceo-rufa subtilissime dense punctulata parce aureo-pubescens, 
capite quadrato subconvexo subtus hirto, oculis parvis 
lateralibus ante medium positis, abdominis petiola brevi 
lata postice truncata, segmentis terminalibus subhirtis, 
pedibus longis flavis. 



370 MISCELLANEA ENTOMOLOGICA, 

I have only seen the worker of this species. It seems to 
differ somewhat in the size and position of the eye from F. Smith's 
description of the genus. 

For the attendant beetle 1 propose the name of 



Tmesiphorus formicinus. 



Long. Ij lin. 



Piceo-rufus dense punctulatus aureo-pubescens, capite convexo 

bipunctato, thorace convexo rotundato, elytris convexis 

leviter bisulcatis, abdomine marginato postice bicarinato. 

This species differs from T. Kinrjii mihi, in being of a lighter 

colour, finer puncturation, less deep sculpture, denser pubescence 

less elongate thorax, and in having the 9th and 10th joints of the 

antennsB of equal size. From the only other Australian species of 

the genus T. Macleayi King, it differs in being of a darker colour 

denser puncturation, denser pubescence, and in having the thorax 

more round and less elongate. 



INDEX. 



Abacetus angustior. . 


PAGE 
. 105 


Amblytelus amplipennis . . 


ater 


. 105 


minutus . . 


Abax sulcipennis . . 


. 368 


Ammcecius crenatipennis . . 


Abr^us Australis 


. 159 


nitidicoUis 


AcRONioPUS pubescens . . . 


. 260 


obscurus 


rufipennis 


. 259 


semicornutus . . 


AcuPALPUS angulatus 


. 104 


Ananca ruficollis . . 


Mastersii 


. 104 


vitticoUis . . 


Adelitjm convexiusculum . . 


. 289 


Anoplognathus abnormis . . 


monilicorne 


. 291 


dispar 


panagseicolle 


. 290 


longipennis . . 


parvulum 


. 290 


montanus 


rugosicolle 


. 289 


Odewahnii 


viridipenne 


. 289 


rubiginosus 


Adblotopus analis . . 


. 95 


viridicoUis 


maculipennis . . 


. 95 


Anthaxia cupripes . . 


Mastersii . . . 


. 94 


nigra 


subopacus 


94 


obscura . . 


Adotela nigerrima . . . . 


. 335 


purpureicollis . . 


Enigma parvulum 


. 323 


Anthelephilus cyaneus . . 


Agabus Mastersii . . . . . 


. 126 


Anthicus aberrans . . 


Agonccheila suturalis 


. 91 


abnormis . . . . . . 


Agrilus deauratus . . 


. 249 


apicalis . . 


Mastersii ., 


. 249 


bellus 


Agrotis vastator . . 


40 


Bembidioides . . 


Agrypnus latior 


. 250 


brevicollis 


Mastersii 


. 249 


charon 


Aleochara Mastersii 


. 136 


comptus . . 


Allecula elongata . 


. 301 


concolor , . 


Mastersii 


. 302 


constrictus 


Pascoei . . . . , 


. 302 


crassipes . . 


planicollis 


. 303 


crassus .. 


punctipennis 


. 302 


Denisonii 


subsulcata . , 


. 302 


dubius 


Amarygmus convexiusculus 


; 297 


floralis 


foveolatus 


. 297 


Gawleri . . 


grandis 


295 


glaber 


obsoletus . . , 


. 296 


glabricollis 


opacicollis 


. 295 


hesperi . . 


picipes 


. 295 


immaculatus 


punctipennis ,. 


. 296 


intricatus 


rufipes 


. 294 


Kingii 


rugosicoUis 


. 295 


Krefftii 


rugosipennis .. 


. 296 


Kreusleri . . 


striatus 


. 297 


laticollis 



11 


INDEX. 






PAGE 




PAOB 


Anthicus hiridus . . 


. 16 


Articerus breviceps 


.. 56 


Macleayi 


. 23 


regius . . 


.. 55 


Mastersii 


. 307 


AscEsis Mastersii . . 


.. 260 


monilis .. 


18 


AsTRiEUS Mastersii . . . , 


.. 239 


myrteus . . . . 


14 


Atractus cyaneus . . 


.. 299 


nigricoUis 


. 20 


ruficollia 


.. 299 


nitidissimus 


. 11 


rugosulua 


.. 300 


pallidus 


. 307 


vitticollis 


.. 300 


propinquus 


. 307 


Atryphodes Mastersii 


.. 288 


pulcher .. 


. 12 


opacicollis 


.. 288 


rarus 


. 22 


Aulacocyclus Kaupii 


.. 173 


scydmenoides 


. 16 


AuLiCDS foveicollis . . 


.. 272 


unifasciatus 


13 


rufipes . i 


.. 272 


WoUastonii 


. 22 


Badister anchomenoides . . 


.. 120 


Anthrenus nigricans . . 


. 171 


Balanophorus genus 


.. 267 


ApATELua squamosus 


. 278 


Mastersii . . 


.. 267 


Apbllatus Mastersii 


. 299 


Bembidium amplipenne 


.. 119 


palpalis 


. 298 


atriceps 


.. 116 


Aphodius geminatus 


. 183 


bifoveatum . , 


.. 117 


Apotomus Mastersii 


. 95. 


bipartitum 


.. 120 


Akgutok foveipennis 


. no 


bipustulatum . . 


.. 116 


nitidipennia 


. Ill 


bistriatum . , 


.. 115 


Oodiformis . . 


. Ill 


brunnipenne . . 


.. 118 


ARTHROPTERua Adelaides . . 


. 347 


convexum . . 


.. 115 


angulatus .. 


. 346 


flavipes 


.. 119 


angulicornia 


. 342 


gagatinum 


.. 119 


angusticornis 


. 154 


ovatum .. 


.. 117 


bisinuatus 


. 341 


punctipenne 


.. 116 


brevicoUia . . 


. 351 


rubicundum . , 


.. 118 


cylindricoUis 


. 340 


sexstriatum 


.. 117 


Darlingensia 


. 349 


striolatum 


.. 116 


depressus . . 


. 350 


subviride 


.. 118 


elongatulus 


. 154 


transversicolle . . 


.. 116 


foveicollis .. 


. 347 


Bledius mandibularia 


.. 160 


hirtus 


. 349 


BoLBocERAs angulicoms . . 


.. 362 


Howittii .. 


. 351 


armigerum . , 


., 360 


humeralis .. 


. 344 


carpentariae . . 


.. 364 


Kingii 


. 154 


cavicolle 


.. 363 


latipennis .. 


. 352 


cornigerum 


.. 363 


Mastersii . . 


. 153 


denticoUe 


.. 364 


montanus ., 


. 343 


gayndahense .. 


.. 185 


nigricornia 


. 343 


lacunosum 


.. 365 


Odewahnii 


. 348 


laticorne 


.. 361 


ovicollis . . 


. 345 


planiceps 


.. 365 


picipes 


. 343 


punclicoUe 


.. 361 


politus 


. 352 


Sweerii 


.. 365 


puncticollis 


. 347 


BosTRTCHUs bispinosus 


.. 276 


Riverinaa . . 


. 342 


cylindricua 


.. 277 


Rockhamptonensis 


350 


BoTHRiDBREs Krefiftii 


.. 166 


Scutellaria . . 


. 348 


Mastersii 


. 166 


subampliatua 


. 344 


Pascoei 


.. 166 


subcylindricus 


. 346 


suturaiia 


. 167 


Turneri 


. 349 


BoTHRiocEPHALua marginatus 


. 227 


Waterhousei 


. 341 


Beachypeplus Murrayi . . 


. 159 


Westwoodii 


. 153 


Brithysternum genua 


. 366 


Wyanamatt89 


. 345 


calcaratum 


. 367 



INDEX. 



Ill 



Brtaxis atriceps 

hirta 
Bkycopia dubia 

longipea . 
Btzenia genus 

formicicola 
Calochromus Guerin: 
Calloodes Mastersii 
prasinus 
Canthonosoma genus 

Mastersii 
Cardiophorus Mastersii 
Carhnidium Damelii 
KreuslersB 
lacustre 
Carknum angustipenne 
Chaudoiri 
cyanipenne 
Digglesii , 
dispar 
foveipenne 
ineditum . 
Kingii 
nitescens 
occultum . 
opacum . 
ordinatum 
ovipenne 
parvulum 
planipenne 
politulum 
propinquum 
rufipes . . 
ealebrosum 
sexpunctatum 
subcyaneum 
aubmetallicum 
triste 
viridimarginatum 
Carphurus apicalis 

azureipennis 
cyanipennis 
elongatus 
pallidipennis 
Carpophilus aterrimus 

convexiusculus 
luridipennis 
obscurus 
pilipennis 
Catops obscurus 
CEPHALonEsMius quadridens 
Cestrinus squalidus 
Ohahagia genus .. .. 

eximia 
Lewinii . . 
lignivora 



PAGE 

152 

152 

293 

293 

74 

74 

263 

360 

359 

175 

176 

259 

69 

70 

326 

98 

63 

62 

326 

66 

325 

65 

64 

64 

97 

63 

66 

98 

325 

326 

98 

64 

65 

97 

62 

66 

98 

63 

97 

266 

266 

265 

266 

267 

161 

159 

160 

160 

160 

155 

176 

278 

25 

35 

30 

29 



PA OK 

Charagia Ramsayi . . • . 32 

Scottii 34 

Bcripta . . . . . . 33 

splendens .. .. 31 

virescens - . . . 28 

Chartopteryx Mastersii .. .« 287 

Chl^nioideus planipennis .. 109 

Chromomjea Mastersii . . . • 300 

picea .. .. 300 

Ghrysobothris Mastersii . . . . 247 

Saundersii.. .. 246 

viridis . . . . 247 

CissEis dimidiata . . . . . . 248 

impressicoUia .. •• 248 

viridiaurea . . . . . 248 

CiSTELA convexa .. .. .. 303 

depressiuscula . . . • 303 

ovata . . . . . . 303 

polita 304 

Clerus apicalis ., .. .. 271 

Mastersii . . . . . . 271 

CoNURUS atriceps . . , . . . 136 

elongatulus .. •• 136 

rufipalpis .. .. •• 136 

CoPELATUS elongatulus . • • • 127 

irregularis .. •• 126 

CoPTocARPUs Chaudoiri .. .. 329 

nitidus . . . . 330 

RiverinsB . . . . 329 

CoR^BTJs marmoratus •• •• 248 

CoRiPERA Mastersii . . ■ • 292 

CoRTicARiA polita .. .. .. 169 

CoRYMBiTES nigrinus • • . • 258 

rufipennis . . . . 258 

Cryptobium apicale .. .. 143 

Mastersii .. .. 142 

Cryptodus incornutus .. •• 202 

obscurus .. •• 201 

subcostatus .. .. 201 

Cryptohypnus variegatus .. 257 

Cryptorhopalum obscurum .. 171 

CuRis splendens . . . . . . 244 

Cybister gayndahensis .. .. 127 

Cychkamus niger .. ,. .. 163 

Cyclonotum Mastersii .. .. 133 

pygmsBum . . . . 1 33 

Cyclothorax genus .. .. 104 

punctipennis .. 105 

Cylidrus basalis .. .. •• 268 

Cymindis senea .. ... .. 320 

crassiceps . . . . 84 

Illawarrae .. ..320 

Cyphalexjs cbalybeipennis . . 286 

cupricollis .. .. 287 

Dasctllus brevicornis .. .. 313 

Dasygnathus Mastersii .. .. 199 



ly 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Derataphrus Pascoei .. .. 165 

DicTENioPHORUs apicalis ,. .. 261 

vittatus . . . . 261 

vitticoUis 26 1 

DiPLoccELUs ovatus .. ,. 170 

DisTYPSiDERA Mastersii . . . . 80 

DiTOMA costata .. ,, .. 165 

DoLiCAON elongatulus ,. .. 143 

nigripennis .. .. 144 

quadraticollis . . . . 143 

Dromius humeralis. . .. ., 88 

Drypta Mastersii . . . . . . 82 

EcTATOMMA socialis . . . . . . 369 

Elater Mastersii . . . . . . 257 

Elastrus flavipes .. ,. .. 257 

Eleale apicalis . . . . . . 274 

elongatula.. .. .. 274 

fasciata .. .. .. 273 

viridicoUis ., .. 274 

Ethon latipennis . . . . . . 247 

EucALYPTicoLA genus . . . . 91 

Mastersii .. .. 91 

EuLEBiA genus . . . . . . 86 

picipennis.. .. .. 87 

plagiata .. .. .. 87 

EuNECTES punctipennis .. .. 127 

EuTOMA Digglesii . . . . , , 67 

Mastersii 67 

FoRMicoMUs agilis . . . . . . 6 

Australia .. .. 8 

Clarkii . . . , 5 

Denisonii . . ■ . . 6 

humeralis .. .. 306 

Kingii .. ..306 

Mastersii . , . . 9 

obliqui-fasciatus . . 8 

quadrimaculatus . . 7 

senex . . . . . . 9 

speciosus .. .. 7 

Georyssus Kingii .. .. ., 172 

GiGADEMA Damelii . . . . . . 323 

politulum . . . , 83 

Gnathoxys punctipennis . . . . 327 

Gyrinus convexiusculus .. .. 128 

Haplonycha pinguis .. .. 193 

Harpaltjs ssneo-nitens . . , . 102 

angustatus . . . . 102 

atroviridis .. .. 103 

convexiusculus,. .. 102 

gayudahensis .. .. 102 

planipennis .. .. 101 

Helluosoma aterrimuna .. .. 323 

Mastersii . . . . 83 

Hemiopsida genus .. .. .. 261 

Mastersii .. .. 261 

Heterocerus Mastersii .. .. 173 



pace 

Heteronychus irregularis.. .. 199 

picipes .. .. 199 

Heteronyx castaneus .. .. 198 

concolor .. .. 194 

holosericeus .. .. 196 

infuscatns . . . . 195 

pallidulus .. ., 195 

pubescens .. .. 194 

ruficollis . . . . 196 

rugosipennis . . . . 1 95 

substriatus . . . . 195 

Hiketes genus . . . . . . 76 

costatus .. .. .. 77 

thoracicus . . . . . . 78 

HoLOLEPTA Mastersii .. .. 157 

HoMALOTA flavicollis . . . . 135 

pallidipennis .. .. 135 

HoMETHES marginipennis . . . . 89 

velutinus .. .. 88 

HoMOLOTROPUs genus . . . . 1 93 

luridipennis .. 193 

HoMOTRYsis regularis .. .. 301 

ruficomis .. .. 301 

subgeuiinatus. . .. 301 

Hydatotrephis genus ,. .. 129 

Mastersii.. .. 130 

Hydrjena luridipennis .. .. 133 

Hydrobaticus genus .. .. 131 

luridus ., .. 131 

tristis .. .. 131 

Hydrochus parallelus .. .. 133 

Hydrophilus Gayndahensis .. 129 

Hydroporus bosalis . . . . 124 

bifasciatus .. .. 121 

brunnipennis . . 122 

fossulipennis . • .. 122 

foveicei)s . . . . 122 

luridus .. .. 124 

Mastersii .. .. 123 

nebulosus .. .. 123 

politus .. .. 123 

Hygrotrophus genus . . . . 131 

involutus 132 

nutans . . . . 132 

Hyocis pallida 278 

pubescens . . . . . . 279 

Hypaxilax Gayndahensis . . . . 284 

opacicoUis .. .. 285 

IcHTHiuRus depressicoUis . . . . 264 

Ips politus 163 

Ipsaphus nitidulus . . .. .. 168 

IsoDON Isevicollis .. .. .. 198 

puncticollis . . .. .. 197 

IsoMALus planicollis .. .. 151 

LACMJSODiSitMA guUUS . . . . 321 

cinctum ., ,. 321 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Lacon alternans .. .. .. 251 

Gayndahensis . . . . 250 

granulatua ,. .. .. 251 

maculatus . . . . . . 25 1 

LactRIA cyanea . . . . . . o07 

Laius Mastersii .. .. .. 265 

Lampkima Krefftii .. .. .. 173 

Lathrobitjm piceum . . . . 144 

politulum .. .. 144 

Lecanomerus aberrans .. .. 101 

ruficepa . . . lOO 

Lemodes Mastersii . . .. .. 308 

Lepekina Burnettensis .. .. 164 

Gayndahensis .. .. 164 

Mastersii .. .. 163 

Leptacinus cyaneipennis .. .. 137 

luridipennis .. .. 137 

Leptogastrus Genus . . . . 293 

Mastersii .. ..294 

LiciNOMA violacea . . . . . . 292 

Limn icus Australia . . .. .. 172 

LiPARETRUs flavopilosus . . . . 190 

fulvohirtus .. ,. 189 

glaber . . .. . . 191 

pallidus .. ,. 190 

parvulus .. .. 193 

pilosus ., .. 190 

rufiventris .. .. 191 

sericeus .. .. 189 

tridentatuB .. .. 191 

LiTHocHARis tristis.. .. .. 144 

Ltjciola flavicollis . . . . . . 263 

LxJDius atripennis . . . . . . 259 

Macearthkius Australis . , . . 2 

M^CHiDius obscurus . . . . 188 

parvulus . . . . 1 89 

rugosicollis . . . . 188 

variolosus . . 188 

Malachius luridicollis .. .. 265 

Mastochilus nitidulus .. .. 174 

puncticollis .. .. 175 

Mecynognathus Genus . . , . 335 

Damelii . . . . 336 

Mecynotarsus concolor , . . . 4 

Kingii .. ., 305 

Kreuslerii . . . . 4 

Mastersii .. .. 305 

ziczac . . . . 4 

Megalops nodipennis .. .. 150 

Megatoma apiealis . . .. .. 170 

Melobasis apiealis . . , . . .• 241 

azureipennis . . . . 240 

costata . . . . , , 240 

obscura . . . . . . 241 

Menephilus parvulus . . . . 285 

Meonis ovicollis . . . . , . lOO 





PAGE 


Mekodontus Genus 


177 


calcaratus 


178 


Metistete Pascoei . . 


299 


Metkiorrhynchus femoralis 


262 


marginicoUis . . 


263 


nigripes 


262 


Microchcetes costatus 


172 


fascicularis . . 


171 


minor 


73 


scoparius 


72 


sphcericus , , . . 


72 


Microphyes Genus . . 


286 


rufipes 


286 


MoNOCREPiDius acuminatus 


252 


albidus 


255 


atratus 


253 


breviceps . . 


252 


Candezei . . 


256 


castaneipennis 


256 


elongatulus 


256 


fulvipeunis . . 


254 


Mastersii .. 


252 


minor . . . . 


253 


nebulosus . . 


254 


rubicundus 


253 


striatus 


252 


subflavus . . 


255 


subgeminatus , , 


256 


submaculatus . . 


255 


submarmoratus . . 


254 


Mordella aterrima 


309 


brunneipennis .. 


309 


cuspidata 


309 


octomaculata . . 


308 


quatuordecimmaculata 


308 


Morio longicollis . . 


93 


seticoUis . . . , 


96 


Morychus heteromerus , . 


74 


Mychestes Mastersii 


279 


Pascoei 


273 


Myrmecocephalus genus .. 


134 


bicingulatus . . 


134 


cingulatus 


134 


Myrmedonia Australis 


135 


Nascio viridis 


239 


Natalis Mastersii . . 


269 


Nectbrosoma genus 


124 


flavicolle 


125 


vittipenne . . 


125 


Neocarenum Mastersii 


68 


rugulosum . . 


68 


Neocukis gracilis . . 


241 


Mastersii.. 


241 


NiTinuLA concolor . . 


. 162 


NoTOGKAPTUs genus 


243 


hieroglyphicus 


244 



VI 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

NoTOGRAPTUs sulcipennis .. .. 243 

NoTONOMUs angustipennis , , . . 109 

cyaneocinctus .. .. 108 

purpureipennis .. 107 

violaceomargmatus . . 108 

viridicinctua .. .. 108 

NoToxus Australasise . . . . 3 

Nyctozoilus elongatulus . . . . 284 

Mastersii .. ..284 

OnoNTOTONYx genus . . . . 196 

brunneipennis .. 197 

CEdichirus psederoidea .. .. 147 

Omalium Gayndaheuse .. .. l^il 

Omaseus Mastersii .. .. .. 109 

Omma Mastersii .. .. .. 169 

Ommatophohus genus . . . . 304 

Mastersii .. .. 305 

Omolipus grandis . . . . . . 294 

Onthophagus desectus .. .. 182 

divaricatus .. .. 179 

incornutus .. .. 181 

inermis .. .. 183 

Mastersii .. .. 181 

perpilosus . . . . 181 

quinquetuberculatus 182 

rubicundulus .. 180 

Opatrum Mastersii . . . . . . 277 

Ophidius brevicomis . . . . 259 

Opilus incertus . . , . . . 269 

Orchesia elongata . . . . . . 304 

Ornithoptera Cassandra • . •. 49 

Oryctes obscurus . . . . . . 200 

OxYPODA analis .. .. .. 135 

OxYTELUS brunneipennis .. .. 150 

impressifrons .. .. 152 

P^DERUS angulicollis . . . . 146 

cingulatus .. .. 146 

Philhydrus elongatulus .. .. 130 

maculiceps .. .. 130 

marmoratua .. .. 130 

Philonthus Australia .. ., 139 

chalybeipennis •. 141 

hEemorrhoidalis .. 140 

pilipennis .. .. 140 

politulus .. .. 140 

subcingulatus ,. 141 

xantholinoides .. 141 

PhilophLjEUS brunneipennis . . 89 

dubius . . . . 90 

maculatus .• .. 89 

vittatua . . . . 90 

Philoscaphus Genus . . . . 96 

costalis .. ... 324 

lateralis . . . . 324 

Mastersii . . . . 96 

PhLjEocarabus Genus . . . . 85 





PAOE 


Phljeocarabus Mastersii 


.. 85 


Phl^odromius Genus 


.. 85 


piceus 


86 


PHORTicosoMtrs rugiceps 


.. 100 


Phyllotocus sericeus 


.. 187 


variicoUis 


.. 187 


Phtsoljesthus grandipalpis 121 


PiNOBius Genus 


.. 147 


Mastersii .. 


.. 148 


PiNOPHiLUs brevis . . 


.. 147 


grandiceps 


.. 146 


Mastersii 


.. 146 


Placonotus Genus . . _ 


.. 168 


longicornis 


.. 168 


Platydema laticoUe 


.. 280 


Pascoei.. 


.. 280 


Platylytron Genus 


.. 327 


amplipenne 


..328 


Platynus marginicollis 


.. 112 


nitidipennis 


.. Ill 


planipennis 


.. 112 


Platysoma convexiusculum ., 157 


planiceps 


.. 157 


subdepressum 


.. 157 


PocADius pilistriatus 


.. 162 


PoECiLUs atronitens.. 


.. 110 


subiridescens 


.. no 


PoLYCESTA Mastei'sii 


.. 246 


PoLYSTicHUS Australia 


.. 82 


Pria rubicunda 


.. 161 


PaoMECODERUs anthracinus . . 334 


dorsalis 


.. 333 


Hunteriensis . . 332 


inornatus 


.. 333 


interruptus 


.. 331 


Mastersii 


. . 332 


olivaceus 


. . 334 


parvulus 


.. 331 


puncticollis . . 333 


Eiverinse 


..331 


viridis 


.. 99 


Promethis Pascoei . . 


.. 285 


Prophanes Westwoodii 


..287 


Prostomis laticeps . . 


..163 


PsACUs Mastersii _ . ._ 


.. 313 


PsEUDOLYCHus apicalis 


.. 313 


Pterohel^us Bremei 


. . 281 


confusus 


. . 283 


elongatus 


.. 282 


Pascoei 


..282 


Ptilophorus Gerstackeri 


.. 310 


Ptinus albomaculatus 


.. 276 


Pylus pallipes 


. . 275 


Repsimus purpureipes 


.. 197 


Ehipiphorus luteipennis 


.. 310 


RuizoPERTHA elongatula 


.. 276 



INDEX. 



VII 



PAGE 

Ehizopertha gibbicoUis .. .. 276 

Baprinus Gayndahensis .. .. 158 

Mastersii .. .. 158 

Saeagus ovalis . . . . . . 283 

Saeothkocrbpis fasciata . . . . 88 

Mastersii .. 87 

pallida . . . . 87 

ScAPHiDiUM Mastersii .. .. l56 

punctipenne .. .. 15G 

ScAPHisoMA politum . . . . 156 

punctipenne .. ., 156 

ScARAPHiTES Mastersii . . . . 70 

ScHizoKHiNA hirticeps . . . . 203 

Mastersii . . 202 

nigrans .. .. 203 

pulchra .. .. 203 

viridicuprea . . 206 

SciTALA armaticeps . .. .. 192 

suturalis .. .. .. 192 

ScoPODES ceneus . . . . . . 91 

angulicoUis . . . . 92 

auratus .. .. .. 92 

laevis . . . . . , 92 

sericeus . . . . . . 93 

ScopcErs rotund icollia .. .. 145 

ScYDM^Nus Kingii . . . . . . 125 

Seiroxrana femoralis . . . . 292 

punctifera . . . . 291 

Selenopalpus fuscus .. .. 311 

Mastersii .. 312 

Semanopterus convexiusculus .. 201 

depressiusculus . . 200 

SiAGONYX genus . . . . 112 

amplipennis .. .. 113 

Mastersii 113 

SiLPHOMOKPHA polita . . . . 93 

rufomarginata . . 93 

SiLVANUs castaneus . . .. .. 168 

SoRON lA variegata .. .. .. 161 

Staphylinus analis .. .. 142 

luridipennis . . .. 142 

Stenolophxis politus .. .. 130 

Stenus cupricollis . • . . . . 1 49 

Gayndahensis : .. 148 

maculatus .. .. .. 148 

olivaceus ,. .. .. 148 

puncticollis . . .. .. 149 

similis , . . . . . 149 

viridiaeneua .. .. 149 

Stkphanopis Cambridgei . . . . 233 

depressa . . . . 236 

elongata .. .. 236 

Macleayi .. .. 238 

monticola . . . . 234 

rufiventris . . . . 237 

Thomisoides . . . . 237 



FAGU 

Stephanopis tuberculata . . . . 235 

Sternolophus nitidulus .. .. 129 

Stiqmatium Isevius . . . . . . 270 

Mastersii .. .. 269 

ventrale .. .. 273 

Stigmodera elongatula .. .. 246 

Krefftii .. ..245 

• Mastersii .. •• 245 

Stilicus ovicollis .. •• 145 

Strongylium Mastersii . . . . 298 

ruficolle .. ..298 

SuNius cylindricus . . . . . . 145 

Tachyporus rubricollis .. .. 137 

tristis 136 

Tachyusa coracina . . . .. .. 135 

T^NiABairdii 224 

chlamyderas 224 

coronata . . . . . . 220 

cylindrica .. .. .. 220 

fimbriata .. .. .. 218 

flavescens 219 

Forsterii 218 

Mastersii 221 

moschata . . • • . . 223 

Novee-HoUandisB .. .. 216 

rugosa .. .. .. 223 

pediformis . . . . . . 222 

phalangistse. . .. .. 221 

rugosa . . . . . . 223 

tuberculata . . . . . . 218 

T^niocerus Mastersii .. .. 174 

Tarsosternus Mastersii • . . . 273 

pulcher .. .. 272 

Telephorus fiavipennis . . , . 264 

Mastersii .. .. 264 

ruficollis .. .. 264. 

Temnoplectron tibials .. ., 177 

Tenerus ruficollis . . . . 275 

Thanasimus sculptus .. .. 271 

TiBARisus ater .. .. .. 105 

niger 106 

Tmesiphorus formicinus . . . . 370 

Kingii .. .. 151 

Tomoderus vinctus . . . . 10 

ToxicuM destinctum . . . . 281 

parvicorne .. .. 281 

TEECHusater .. .. .. 114 

atriceps .. .. .. 113 

concolor ., .. .. 114 

rufilabris .. .. 114 

Trigonodera Gerstackeri . . 309 

Mastersii .. .. 310 

Teinodes globosus . . .. .. 171 

punctipennis . . . . 171 

Triphyllus fasciatus .. .. 171 

Teox salebrosus .. ,. .. 186 



vrii 



INDEX. 





PAGF- 




PAGE 


Trox semicostatus . . 


. 186 


Xantholinus picipes 


. 138 


squamosus 


. 186 


Xanthoph^a Chaudoiri .. 


. 84 


Tyrus Mastersii 


. 152 


Zelotypia genus .. 


. 37 


Valgus castaneipennis 


. 205 


Staceyii 


38 


nigrinus 


. 205 


ZoNiTis annulata .. 


. 311 


Xantholinus atriceps 


. 138 


apicalis 


. 311 


cervinipennis 


. 138 


bizonata 


. 311 


cyaneipennis 


. 139 


fuscicornis . . 


. 310 


dubius 


. 139 


lutea 


. 310