Skip to main content

Full text of "Trans-Atlantic passenger ships, past and present"

See other formats


From the collection of the 



n 
m 

Prelinger 



Ti 

i 

AJ 



a 



ibrary 



San Francisco, California 
2006 



RICHAftO PRELINGER 
211 ST ROMAN ST 
NEW HAVEN CONN 
0651 




Ti! US-mum POTHER SHIPS 

PAST AP PRESENT 



BY 
EUGENE W. SMITH 



Published by 

GEORGE H. DEAN COMPANY 
74 INDIA STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



COPYRIGHT, 1947 BY 
EUGENE W. SMITH 



First Edition 



Printed in the United States of America 



FOREWORD 

The writer of this book of reference makes no claim to 
sending it forth as a complete and exhaustive treatment of the 
subject. The task of listing and describing every steamer, 
freight or passenger, which has engaged in the North Atlantic 
trade since 1840 would have necessitated a volume many 
times larger than is the present one. However, the writer has 
endeavored to include in the list every important passenger 
ship which has been employed in this service since its incep- 
tion, together with a large percentage of the lesser known 
steamships. 

Should any errors or noteworthy omissions be discovered 
in the text the writer would much appreciate having his atten- 
tion drawn to the matter, in order that the necessary correc- 
tions may be made in subsequent editions. 

He acknowledges with gratitude the assistance rendered by 
Mr. Stephen Gmelin and Mr. Grant S. Taylor in the matter 
of supplying some of the exact dates upon which certain ves- 
sels were scrapped. This phase of the compilation required 
much laborious research. In fact, it has convinced me that it 
is almost impossible to obtain in full the necessary data 
regarding the final disposition of every transatlantic ship. 

Included in these expressions of appreciation must be also 
those addressed to Mr. Fred C. Poyser of the Nautical Photo 
Agency in England for the generous permission given for the 
use of reproductions of ship photographs. It was early in 
1930 that I first contacted Mr. Poyser via transatlantic cor- 
respondence. Since that time I have been indebted to him 
for many admirable pictures, and the correspondence we 
carried on through the years has been instrumental in 
keeping alive my keen interest in ships and shipping. 



The splendid works of Mr. Frank C. Bowen and Mr. E. C. 
Talbot-Booth on ships and shipping have been of particular 
value to me in the preparation of this book. Future historians 
will ever be grateful for the vast amount of shipping knowl- 
edge they have made available. 

I should also like to mention some of the books dealing with 
the subject which have been of help to me. These are "The 
History of North Atlantic Steam Navigation" by Henry Fry, 
"Chronological History of the Origin and Development of 
Steam Navigation" by Rear- Admiral George H. Preble, "The 
Blue Riband" by Charles E. Lee, Allan L. Gary's series of 
four books on the liners of the world, "The Boys' Book of 
Steamships" by J. R. Howden, "Merchant Fleets" by Crit- 
chell Remington and "Ships and Shipping" by E.P. Harnack. 
Mention should be made of the New York Times for their 
excellent news coverage of the subject. Both the American 
and British marine magazines are splendid sources in provid- 
ing information on the subject of ships. 

The Peabody Museum at Salem, Massachusetts, also 
should be mentioned as it has a wealth of information regard- 
ing the subject and afforded much help to me. 

I should like to draw special attention to The Steamship 
Historical Society of America, who have their national head- 
quarters at the Peabody Museum. I am a member of this 
association and heartily recommend this Society to everyone 
who is interested in nautical subjects. 



EUGENE W. SMITH 



Me'dford, Massachusetts 
May 25, 1947. 



CONTENTS 



PART I 

A Short History of the North Atlantic Record Breakers 

PART II 

Trans-Atlantic Passenger Ships Built Between 1840 and 1940 

PART III 

Fleet List 

PART IV 

The Longest Ships in the World 
Past and Present 

PART V 

Liners over 600 feet Classified by Funnels and Masts 
Past and Present 

PART VI 

Pictorial Section of Representative Ships in 
Chronological Order 

INDEX 

Pages 335 to 350 



PART I 

A SHORT HISTORY OF THE 

NORTH ATLANTIC RECORD BREAKERS 

THE NEED FOR SPEEDY TRANSPORTATION 

In the third and fourth decades of the 19th century, there 
was brought to the Western World a realization of the fact 
that a new era in human history had dawned upon the planet. 
In industrial countries like England the application of steam 
driven machinery for the manufacture of textiles and other 
varieties of consumer goods, had led to an imperative demand 
on the part of the manufacturers for more extensive markets 
for the profitable disposal of their products. In short, 
thoughtful people everywhere were becoming awakened to 
a realization that the industrial age had arrived with a crying 
need for some more rapid form of transportation between the 
ocean-separated countries of the world than had been possible 
in the more leisurely past. 

At the same time the increasingly difficult economic con- 
ditions which were a part of life on the European continent 
were causing many thousands of the poorer classes to cast 
longing eyes in the direction of the new world of America, 
with its limitless opportunities for the industrious and enter- 
prising to attain comforts which in the older countries were 
far beyond their reach, and the need for rapid and safe 
oceanic transportation was not confined exclusively to travel 
from Europe to America. Even then farsighted people were 
becoming aware that before many years had elapsed the 
infant giant of American industrial production would begin 
to flex its baby muscles and revel in its growing strength. 
Soon it would begin to demand a far more extended outlet 
for, first, its raw materials and later on for its manufactured 
goods than at that time was afforded by the home market. 
True a considerable business was even then being carried on 
between the cottirn growers of the Southern States and the 
mill owners of Lancashire, but the transatlantic journey by 



sailing ship was a slow and uncertain business, being subject 
to the unpredictable vagaries of wind and storm, and generally 
unsatisfactory. Thus, it may readily be seen that a pressing 
need existed for an improved and more rapid method of 
travel between Europe and North America. This need ap- 
plied not alone to the interchange of commodities between 
the two continents but also to the bettering of passenger 
traffic conditions, which at the time were of an exceedingly 
primitive nature. In the British Isles thousands of the poorer 
classes longed for an opportunity to seek a new home in 
America, if the journey could be made at a reasonably small 
expense, while on this side of the Atlantic many Americans 
desired fervently to revisit the homes of their ancestors, 
particularly those Americans who hailed from the British 
Isles. 

As has usually been the case among progressive and in- 
ventive peoples, any urgent need occasions ere long a dis- 
covery of some means of satisfying those needs, and so it 
was in this case. The power of steam had already been 
harnessed to the stationary engines and had even been in- 
stalled on some ocean-going ships to serve as an auxiliary to 
the driving force of the wind. The experiment had proved 
so successful that presently it was found feasible to dispense 
entirely with mast and sail, entrusting the task of propelling 
the ship to the power of the steam which was generated in 
the vessel's own boilers. Thus, the steamship came into al- 
most universal use for transatlantic travel. 



THE FORMATION OF THE CUNARD LINE 

In the year 1838 Samuel Cunard a resident of Halifax, 
Nova Scotia and a man of considerable energy and foresight 
initiated the enterprise which led eventually to the formation 
of the famous Cunard Steamship Company. The result of 
his genius and initiative was soon manifest in the creation of 
the fastest line of steamships which up to that time had ever 

2 



made the crossing, and secured for themselves the so called 
Blue Ribbon of the Atlantic, an honorary title awarded to 
the steamship making the fastest time between Great Britain 
and North America. 

The Cunard Line's first great steam propelled vessel was 
called the Britannia, a ship built on the Clyde in 1840. On 
her maiden voyage from Liverpool to Boston the Britannia 
left the former port on the fourth of July 1840 and arrived 
at Halifax twelve days later, on the sixteenth day of the 
month, thus creating a new record of twelve days for the 
voyage. The launching was soon followed by that of her 
three sister ships, the Acadia, Caledonia, and Columbia. 
The construction of these four pioneers of the passenger 
service was entrusted to four different shipbuilding firms. 
The vessels were all built of wood and were driven by engines 
of 740 indicated horse-power. They consumed about 38 tons 
of coal per day, an amount sufficient to drive the paddle- 
wheel propelled ships at a speed of slightly more than eight 
knots an hour. 

The Britannia's first record of a twelve day crossing lasted 
but for a short time. It was eclipsed the following month 
by the performance of her sister ship the Acadia, which 
covered the same distance in eleven days and four hours, thus 
averaging a speed of 9K knots per hour. Later on the 
Britannia regained the record by making the journey in ten 
days flat, a noteworthy achievement for those early days of 
fast passenger service. Again, the Acadia came back to beat 
Britannia's record and to win the crown which remained 
in her possession until the advent of a new Cunarder the 
Hibernia which won the Blue Ribbon in the month of July 
1847, in what was then the phenomenal time of nine days, 
one hour and thirty minutes for the Halifax 'to Liverpool 
voyage, averaging thus a speed of 11.67 knots for the crossing. 
This steamship was built on the Clyde by Robert .Steele in 
1843. The wooden hull was powered by a side lever type 
engine which was able to develop 1,040 indicated horse- 



power. The general design of the Hibernia was so well 
thought of by the Cunard owners that it was repeated two 
years later in the Cambria which also proved herself to be a 
fast ship. The Hibernia finally lost the supremacy in May 
1850, her successor to the crown being still another Cunarder, 
the Asia, which had made the Liverpool to Halifax crossing 
in eight days and seventeen hours at an average speed of 
12.12 knots. 

From 1840 to 1851 the Cunard Line held almost undis- 
puted mastery of the Atlantic crossing, but from that time 
on it began to encounter increasingly stiff competition from 
a newly formed fleet of steamships which, taking the name 
of their founder E. K. Collins, was known as the Collins 
Line. This American company commenced operations 
with a fleet of four sister ships, the Atlantic, Arctic, Baltic 
and Pacific. These ships were, both in respect to speed 
and luxurious appointments, a distinct advance over the 
Cunarders of the period. They even anticipated present 
day conveniences by such innovations as smoking rooms and 
barber shops. Each cost approximately $700,000 to build. 
They were constructed of wood and had huge paddle-wheels 
that measured 353/6 feet in diameter. They were powered 
by two-cylinder side-lever type engines. One of them, the 
Pacific, captured the speed record by raising the average 
speed on the New York to Liverpool trip to 13.01 knots. 
This line after gaining possession of the speed record kept 
it for the next five years, with the Baltic and the Atlantic 
being rated as the fastest vessels afloat Curing that period. 
The history of the Collins Line was, however, destined to be 
a short one. Its complete collapse took place in January 
1858 and put an end for all time to the rivalry that existed 
between its founder, Mr. E. K. Collins and the owners of 
the Cunard Line. Under his aggressive leadership many 
great improvements and a settled policy of expansion were 
being planned and would doubtless have been carried out 
had not fate intervened by bringing about the loss of the 
Arctic, which went down after colliding with the French 



steamer Vesta during conditions of dense fog on September 
27th, 1854. Mr. Collin's wife, their only son and a daughter 
went down with the ill fated ship, and other financial dis- 
asters soon led to the breaking up of the Collins organization. 
In June 1856 the Cunard steamship Persia captured the 
Blue Ribbon for the fastest crossing of the Atlantic up to 
that time by lowering the Queenstown to New York record 
to nine days, one hour and forty-five minutes. The Persia 
was a handsome ship with lines of grace and beauty from 
figurehead to taffrail. She was destined to become one of 
the most famous vessels that had ever served on the Atlantic 
Ferry, and was the first Cunarder equipped with iron paddle- 
wheels. Her 7,130 tons displacement mide her a very sizable 
ship for her day, though that displacement was soon to be 
surpassed by that of the Great Eastern. So much has already 
been written about this remarkable ship, that a few salient 
facts concerning her will be all that is needed to serve our 
purpose. The Great Eastern was built by J. Scott Russell 
at Millwall from the designs of the great French marine 
engineer Brunei, who seemingly was to have been the spark 
plug behind the whole enterprise. This man had both fore- 
sight and ambition. He wished to perpetuate his name by 
some achievement which would be outstanding in the annals 
of marine architecture, and the building of this great ship 
was assuredly an exceedingly ambitious project for that day 
and age. Had the Great Eastern been employed in the service 
for which she had been designed, her career perhaps would 
have been a more successful one. Her builder's intention 
was to have her ply on the European-Australian route. Her 
huge size would have allowed her sufficient coal storage space 
to have covered the long distance with ease. A large number 
of passengers could have been accommodated, plus a cargo 
sufficiently large to have made the venture a paying invest- 
ment. However, she was never used in this service, and as 
an Atlantic passenger ship she proved a failure. Her maiden 
voyage was made from Southampton to New York on June 
17, 1860. The journey taking her 11 days, 13 hours and 15 



minutes to accomplish. On the trip she carried only thirty- 
seven passengers a number far insufficient to cover her large 
operating cost. The bookings for subsequent voyages were 
also out of all proportion to the expense of driving the huge 
hulk across the Atlantic. The discontinuance, therefore, of 
her use as an Atlantic passenger carrier was a foregone con- 
clusion. In consequence of this the great ship was taken off 
the Atlantic service for which she was so obviously unfitted, 
and put to work at the task of laying the Atlantic cable. 
This being completed, the ill fated giant proved a white 
elephant indeed to her owners. She sunk lower and lower in 
the estimation of seafaring men and before her final trip to 
the scrapper's yard in 1891, she had been reduced to the 
ignoble task of serving as a kind of a circus side show for the 
curious to gape at. Thus ended the chequered career of a 
vessel of which much had been expected. 

In 1862 the Cunard Company again came to the fore with 
the launching of that great ship the Scotia. This noted vessel 
won the speed record in the year of her launching and later 
bettered her own record. In December 1863 she made the 
Queenstown to New York passage in 8 days and 3 hours, and 
finally in June 1864 she attained an average speed of 14.54 
knots. This record stood for three years until in 1867, the 
newly built Russia, another Cunarder, took over the honor 
of being Queen of the Atlantic with a record run from New 
York to Queenstown of 8 days and 25 minutes. The Scotia 
had the additional distinction of making the highest average 
speed of any Atlantic paddle steamer. But the Russia failed 
to hold the record for any extended period, for in November 
1867 the Cunard Line relinquished for the second time its 
proud boast of being the holder of the Blue Ribbon that 
symbolized Atlantic supremacy. The new victor was the 
freshly built Inman liner, the City of Paris, which set a new 
record for the westward run, and in December 1869 a second 
Inman liner, called, the City of Brussels, took over the prize. 
This steamship was built by the firm of Tod and McGregor 
of Glasgow. The original engines were of the horizontal 



direct acting trunk type. However, in 1876 they were re- 
placed by four cylinder tandem compound engines. The time 
of 7 days, 22 hours and 3 minutes made by the City of Brussels 
for the New York to Queenstown passage was not bettered 
by any other ship until May 1872, when the Adriatic of the 
newly organized White Star Line took over the leadership and 
the Blue Ribbon of the Atlantic. 



THE ARRIVAL OF THE WHITE STAR LINE 

The pioneer vessel of this fleet was the Oceanic, from the 
yards of Harland and Wolff, shipbuilders of Belfast, Ireland. 
She was launched on August 27, 1870. In February of the 
following year she sailed from her builder's yards to Liver- 
pool, the city which was to be her home port for a number 
of years. The Oceanic, herself never captured the Atlantic 
Blue Ribbon but as has been already stated the trophy was 
won in 1872 by her sister ship the Adriatic, a vessel of similar 
design. This steamer commenced her maiden voyage on 
April 11, 1872 and soon showed herself to be more than a 
match in speed for the Inman liner City of Brussels. The long 
and useful life of the Adriatic lasted until 1896 when she was 
retired from the service, and in 1899 broken up by ship- 
breakers at Preston. In 1873 another White Star liner gained 
the limelight. This was the steamer Baltic which sailed on 
her maiden voyage from the port of Liverpool on September 
4th, 1871. However, it was not until January 1873 that she 
was listed among the champions by making the New York 
to Queenstown crossing in 7 days, 20 hours and 9 minutes, 
averaging a speed for the trip of 15.21 knots, really fast time 
for that period. She was later sold to the Holland American 
Line in 1889 and after being renamed was finally wrecked 
in 1898. 

In 1875 a new record breaker made her appearance. This 
was the Inman liner City of Berlin, a ship that was destined 
to play a prominent part in the history of Atlantic crossings. 

7 



She was built by Caird and Company at Greenock in Scotland 
for the express purpose of restoring to the Inman Line the 
coveted Blue Ribbon which had been lost by the City of 
Brussels to the White Star boat Adriatic. This feat she 
accomplished in September 1875 by making the Queenstown 
to New York passage in 7 days, 18 hours and 2 minutes, thus 
lowering all previous records for the run. Then in October 
of the following year she again cut the time to 7 days, 15 
hours and 28 minutes. Two years later in 1878 the City of 
Berlin created a sensation in maritime circles by installing 
in her saloon, steerage and engine room the recently dis- 
covered illuminating agent "electricity". At the time this 
innovation was regarded as the pinnacle of luxurious appoint- 
ments. 

The trend in shipbuilding was now towards larger and more 
powerful steamers. The White Star Line sister ships Britannic 
and Germanic were the first ones to exceed 5,000 tons gross. 
They were fitted with compound tandem type engines capable 
of developing 5,000 indicated horse-power. Their iron hulls 
were soon put to the test of winning the Blue Ribbon a& they 
commenced their maiden voyages. The Germanic made the 
eastern crossing in February 1876 in 7 days, 15 hours and 
17 minutes, averaging 15.81 knots for the run between New 
York and Liverpool, while her sister the Britannic did the 
westward passage in the record time of 7 days, 12 hours and 
41 minutes. These fine ships proved very popular. Aboard 
them excellent accommodation was provided for 220 first- 
class and 900 third-class passengers. The two ships were 
used on the Atlantic crossing for a number of years, and in 
fact one of them the Germanic was still afloat quite recently 
under the name Gulcemal and of Turkish registry. 

During their heyday the City of Berlin, Britannic and 
Germanic were all fighting for top position as the fastest liner. 
Eventually the Britannic proved to be more consistently the 
fastest and retained the speed record until the end of the 
decade. 



In 1879 a new aspirant appeared to contend for the Atlantic 
Blue Ribbon. The Guion Line launched their new steamship 
Arizona and the White Star Line had to relinquish its hold 
of top place in the speed class. This ship broke all existing 
records for the Queenstown to New York crossing. In July 
1879 she completed the run in 7 days, 10 hours and 22 minutes, 
and by making the return trip in 7 days, 8 hours and 11 
minutes she clinched her claim to the supremacy of the 
Atlantic. The Arizona was built and engined by John Elder 
and Company of Glasgow. She was destined to achieve 
world renown by making the news headlines in November 
1879 while on a homeward bound passage. On this occasion 
she had the misfortune to run full speed into a huge iceberg, 
and remarkable to say she failed to sink. She was able to put 
into the port of St. Johns, Newfoundland, there to undergo 
extensive repairs. It was found that her bow had been com- 
pletely smashed and crumpled almost to the first bulkhead. 
Had the damage extended beyond this point she would 
unquestionably have gone down. It seems an almost miracu- 
lous occurrence that no loss of life or even injury to any one 
aboard ensued as a result of the collision, yet such was the 
case. In this respect the Guion Line was most fortunate for 
had a major tragedy developed the fate of the company 
would have been extremely critical. 

The Arizona was the first Atlantic steamer to be fitted with 
compound 3-crank type engines. She was offered for sale 
in 1894, but failed to find a purchaser at that time. How- 
ever, after being laid up for two years, she was given new 
machinery by her builders, and converted for transpacific 
service, from which she was taken over by the United States 
Government for use in the war against Spain. Her name 
was changed to Hancock, and after her war services as a 
transport was put on the San Francisco and Philippines run 
as an American troop carrier. She was finally broken up by 
shipbreakers near San Francisco in 1926. 

The Arizona was followed by the Alaska. This new Guion 
liner lowered the Queenstown to New York time in April 



1882 to 7 days, 6 hours and 43 minutes and for the first time 
an average speed of 16 knots was attained, her official average 
being recorded as 16.10 knots for the voyage. 

In June 1882 she cut still further time off the record by 
going from New York to Queenstown in 6 days and 22 hours 
flat, thus becoming the first ship to make the distance under 
7 days. This fine ship was another example of the splendid 
work done by the shipbuilders on the Clyde. The Alaska 
like the Arizona also came from the yard of John Elder and 
Company and cost about $1,200,000 to build. She later 
made a crossing at an average speed of 17.17 knots. 

The Oregon was the last important ship launched by the 
Guion Line. She started on her maiden voyage across the 
Atlantic on October 7, 1883 and made the crossing from 
Queenstown to New York in 6 days, 10 hours and 10 minutes. 
Not long afterwards this ship passed into the hands of the 
Cunard Line, owing to the inability of the owners to make 
final payment for the cost of her construction to the builder, 
who, therefore, repossessed her and sold her to the Cunard 
organization. The life of the Oregon was not a long one for 
on March 14, 1886 when off Fire Island, she was in collision 
with an unknown schooner. As she had been struck in a most 
vulnerable place it was plainly evident that any hope of 
saving her was futile. Fortunately for the 641 passengers 
aboard and for the 255 crew members, the express liner Fulda 
of the North German Lloyd Line arrived in time to rescue 
all on board of the doomed ship. 

During the Eighties a number of fast and noteworthy 
passenger ships were employed on the Atlantic Ferry. Among 
these were several impressive looking vessels of the North 
German Lloyd. These were all fairly similar in design and 
as originally built had four well spaced masts with two fun- 
nels situated about midship. The Elbe was the first ship of 
this class to be built, followed by eight others, the Fulda 
which has already been mentioned in connection with the 
rescue from the Oregon, the Werra, Eider, Ems, Aller, Saale, 

10 



Trave and Lahn. These all were built in British shipyards, 
and their efforts caused the North German Lloyd Line to 
assume a leading position in the North Atlantic trade. The 
Lahn was the fastest ship of this group, and for some time 
held the record between the German ports and New York. 
This ship had accommodations for 224 first-class, 106 second- 
class and 700 third-class passengers. Her appearance was 
substantially changed at one time by the removal of two of 
her original four masts, but the alteration failed to lessen 
the beauty of her lines. In 1904 this ship was sold to the 
Russian Government which promptly bestowed on her the 
name of Buss. 

About this time the Cunard Line launched the well known 
ship the Servia. She proved to be fast though not in the 
record breaking class, being designed mainly for spaciousness 
and comfort. The main saloon measured 74 feet by 49 feet 
and provided the luxurious appointments that were beginning 
to be demanded by first class passengers. Of these no less 
than 350 could be seated simultaneously in this large room. 
The ship had a 3-crank compound engine which could develop 
12,000 indicated horse-power. Later the Cunard Company 
launched another outstanding ship, the Aurania. This 
splendid vessel achieved a speed of 18.7 knots during her trial 
trip, after two additional boilers had been installed. She 
shared with the Servia and the Gallia the task of taking care 
of the express travel between Liverpool and New York for 
some time. Her single screw was powered by a 3-crank com- 
pound engine developing as much as 10,000 indicated horse- 
power. 

In the year 1885 came the two Cunard record breakers 
Etruria and Umbria who in their turn won and for a time held 
the Blue Ribbon. These two fine sister ships were built by 
John Elder and Company. Their engines were capable of 
developing 15,000 indicated horse-power thus making them 
the most powerful single screw steamers afloat. The Etruria 
won the Ribbon in May 1885 by making the Queenstown 

11 



to Sandy Hook passage in 6 days, 5 hours and 31 minutes. 
Later in March 1887 she lowered the New York to Queens- 
town record to 6 days, 4 hours and 36 minutes with an 
average speed of 19.90 knots. Her sister ship the Umbria won 
the record for the western passage in May 1887 making the 
distance in 6 days, 4 hours and 42 minutes, averaging 18.89 
knots for the run. 

The Etmria recaptured the record on the same month 
one year later by making the Queenstown to Sandy Hook 
crossing in 6 days, 2 hours and 27 minutes. These two highly 
successful ships continued in the Atlantic trade for many 
years, the Etruria going to the scrapper's yard first in 1909 
at Preston and the Umbria meeting the same fate the follow- 
ing year. 

An old line called the National became prominent for a 
brief period of time with the launching of the steamer America, 
a vessel built by the firm of J. and G. Thomson of Glasgow. 
This fine looking ship with her clipper bow was built for the 
express purpose of competing with the already established 
lines for the first-class passenger trade of the North Atlantic. 
During her trials she made 17.8 knots whereupon she entered 
the Atlantic service in 1884 and immediately won the Blue 
Ribbon for the eastward passage by crossing from New York 
to Queenstown in 6 days, 14 hours and 8 minutes. Her 
triumph, however, was short lived, for but a short time later 
that time was bettered by the Oregon. The America did not 
remain long in the Atlantic service for in 1886 she was sold 
to the Italian government which at once converted her into 
a war cruiser, renaming her Trinacria. Still later she was 
used by the Italian reigning family as a royal yacht. Some 
forty years later in 1925 she finished her career in the scrap- 
per's yard. This ship represented the only attempt on the 
part of the National Line to contend for the speed record. 
Their other ships were for the most part slow moving vessels 
which catered principally to the emigrant trade. 

In 1881 the Inman Line had financed the construction of 
one of the most beautiful steamships ever to plough the waves 

12 



of the Atlantic. This liner named City of Rome was built 
in the yards of the Barrow Shipbuilding and Engineering 
Company. She was launched in the month of June 1881, 
with the confident expectation of the owners that she would 
prove to be a record breaker on the Atlantic passage. This 
goal she was never able to attain, as her engine power proved 
entirely insufficient for the rugged task of negotiating the 
distance in anything like record time. Swallowing their 
disappointment her Inman Line owners, after using her for 
a few Atlantic crossings returned her to the builders who 
resold her to the Anchor Line. She was employed in the 
North Atlantic trade for a number of years and though never 
a really fast ship proved to be a very popular one, her speed 
being quite fast enough for the average passenger. 

Before the advent of two later Inman liners the City of 
Paris and the City of New York, the French Line put in a 
bid for supremacy with several outstanding passenger ships. 
This particular class numbered in its roster such names as 
La Champagne, La Bourgogne, La Bretagne and La Gascogne. 
They were all equipped with the luxurious appointments 
that the period demanded of first class passenger ships. Ac- 
commodations were provided for a list of 390 first-class, 65 
second-class and 690 third-class passengers. Their speed was 
rated at 17 1 A knots, usually regarded at that time as being 
ample. They had four masts and two funnels at first, but 
later dispensed with two of the four masts. The ship La 
Bourgogne was the speediest of the quartet, making the cross- 
ing between La Havre and Sandy Hook in 7 days and 9 hours, 
averaging 17.91 knots. This ill fated ship achieved an 
unenviable notoriety on July 4th, 1898; while off Sable Island 
she was rammed by a British sailing ship named Cromarty- 
shire. In the terrible melee that followed 549 people lost 
their lives. This fearful accident has gone down in history 
as being one of the greatest of all maritime disasters. 

The year 1888 witnessed the launching of the two sen- 
sational Inman liners the City of Paris and the City of New 

13 



York. These famous ships were built by J. and G. Thomson 
of Clydebank, Glasgow. Their construction was originally 
intended to be undertaken by the Lairds of Birkenhead, but 
because of the fact that the shipways of the latter firm were 
not at that time large enough to accommodate ships of 
10,000 tons gross, the order was secured by the Clydebank 
firm. These ships were especially noteworthy due to the 
innovation of their being equipped with twin screw pro- 
pellers. This experiment in ship propulsion proved an 
immediate success a fact that no doubt accounted for their 
capture of the Blue Bibbon from the former holders of the 
trophy, the Cunarder's Etniria and Umbria. Although the 
twin screw idea was a novel one, it was by no means the first 
time it had been employed in steamer construction. At a 
much earlier date than 1888 a steamship called the Netting 
Hill had been fitted with twin screws, and it is significant 
also that several French liners built in the Sixties had been 
converted from paddle-wheel to screw propulsion and of them 
such ships as the Washington were given twin screws. In 
fact much of this conversion work had been initiated during 
the Seventies. 

The City of Paris lowered the record in May 1889 by 
steaming over the Sandy Hook to Queenstown route at an 
average speed of 20.2 knots, thus bringing the average speed 
record up to 20 knots for the first time in the history of 
Atlantic navigation. The new 20 knot liner was soon to see 
her sister ship the City of New York better her record by 
making the same trip in 5 days, 19 hours and 57 minutes, 
averaging for the journey a speed of 20.10 knots. However, 
of the two ships the Paris ultimately proved to be the faster. 
They both had a long and varied life, though their appearance 
was somewhat changed later on by each having a mast and 
a funnel removed. As originally designed they had three 
masts and three funnels, thus making a really impressive 
appearance as they sailed the high seas. In 1893 these two 
fine ships were transferred to American registry as they be- 
came a part of the reorganized American Line. Their names 

14 



were changed by removing the words "City of and thus 
became known as the New York and the Paris. 

During 1889-90, the Hamburg-American Line entered the 
fast liner service with four excellent ships named Normannia, 
Furst Bismark, Columbia and Auguste Victoria. They repre- 
sented their owners' first serious attempt to go into the 
express steamship service. Two of them, the Columbia and 
Normannia, were built in British shipyards, while the Furst 
Bismark and the Auguste Victoria were examples of German 
shipbuilding. These fine appearing three-funnelled ships were 
all somewhat similar in size and design. Their tonnage 
ranged from 7,383 to 8,874 tons gross, and each was able to 
steam at an average speed of 18 knots with ease. The Co- 
lumbia on her maiden voyage in July 1889 from Hamburg to 
New York steamed the distance in 6 days and 19 hours, thus 
proving herself to be almost as fast as the North German 
Lloyd liner Lahn, whose fastest passage she came within two 
or three hours of equalling. The Columbia later improved 
her own time for the Hamburg to New York run by making 
it in 6 days, 15 hours and 58 minutes. Of the quartet, the 
Furst Bismark in the end proved to be the fastest though the 
margin of speed between the four was very slight. The 
Auguste Victoria was subjected to some quite extensive 
alterations in 1896 by having her original length of 461 feet 
extended to 522 feet. Her appearance was further altered 
by the installing of two well-spaced masts to replace the 
original three. In 1904 this ship was sold to the Russians 
and renamed Kuban. She was scrapped three years later in 
1907. These four ships, together with the Deutschland which 
was to be built in 1899, were the only ones built for the Ham- 
burg-American Line which were constructed expressly for 
the purpose of winning the Blue Ribbon of the Atlantic. 
The Deutschland was the only one of the five which succeeded 
in the quest, accomplishing the feat in 1900. 

The La Touraine, built by the French Line in 1891, proved 
to be an exceptionally fast Atlantic liner for that date. Her 

15 



time of 6 days, 18 hours for the trip from La Havre to New 
York was regarded as a remarkable performance for the 
period. This ship had 45 furnaces to furnish her nine boilers 
with an amount of steam pressure sufficient to enable her 
triple expansion engines to drive the vessel at a better than 
19 knots speed. She was a handsome ship equipped with 
two large funnels, and her interior appointments were fully 
in keeping with the high standard set by the French Line. 

The Majestic and the Teutonic, two great White Star liners 
were the outstanding vessels of their day. These splendid 
ships came from the Harland and Wolff yards at Belfast, 
Ireland and took turns in winning the coveted Blue Ribbon 
of the Atlantic. The Teutonic beating all previous records 
by steaming from Queenstown to Sandy Hook in 5 days, 16 
hours and 31 minutes, thus averaging 20.43 knots for the 
trip. These ships were built at a cost of $2,000,000 each and 
were of the twin screw type which by now had been generally 
accepted as being superior to any other method of propulsion 
for the huge express liners of the period. Their 16 boilers 
were heated by 76 furnaces enabling the engines to develop 
17,500 indicated horse-power. Accommodations were pro- 
vided for 300 first-class, 170 second-class and 850 third-class 
passengers. 

Both these great vessels passed long and busy years on the 
Atlantic run, the Majestic finally fulfilling her destiny by 
reaching the shipbreaker's yard just prior to World War I, 
while the Teutonic lingered on till after the war, and reached 
the dismantling process at the hands of shipbreakers in 
Rotterdam in the year 1921. 

The Cunard Line in 1892-3 had two magnificent steamships 
built for them by the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering 
Company of Glasgow. The Campania was the first of these 
to be launched, that event taking place on September 8, 1892. 
Her sister ship the Lucania followed her down the ways five 
months later on February 1893. Ere long a contest for top 
honors in the Atlantic race was to develop between these two 

16 



fast steamers. On April 22, 1893 the Campania led off by 
making her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York in 
very fast time, and on the return trip setting a record break- 
ing mark of 5 days, 17 hours and 27 minutes, averaging 21.07 
knots for the crossing. This incidentally marked the first 
time any ship had averaged 21 knots an hour for an Atlantic 
voyage. Then in May 1894 the Lucania took command of 
the westward passage by making it in 5 days, 12 hours and 
57 minutes, averaging 21.75 knots, a figure which marked the 
highest speed attainment up to that time. Back came the 
Campania to regain the record for the Liverpool to New York 
course by making the distance in 5 days, 9 hours and 21 
minutes. This friendly rivalry between two ships of the 
same Cunard fleet was finally terminated when the Lucania 
grasped the honors for both the eastward and westward 
passages in 1894, a supremacy which she maintained until 
the appearance of the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse. Before 
touching upon the essential facts concerning this latter ship, 
we might pause for a moment to examine a few details in 
reference to the construction and appearance of these two 
great Cunarders, the Campania and Lucania. They were 
ships equipped with two huge rather wide funnels. Their 
triple expansion engines were able to develop 30,000 indicated 
horse-power. On her best days' run the Lucania did 562 
nautical miles. In regard to their interior appointments the 
two ships had main dining saloons which measured 85 feet 
by 63 feet and were able to seat 400 passengers at once. 

With respects to their final fate, the Lucania was almost 
completely gutted by fire while moored to her Liverpool dock 
in 1909. It was decided that the cost of reconditioning would 
be too great an investment to be profitable, therefore the 
grand old ship was sold to the wreckers for scrap. However, 
her engines had not been measurably affected by the destroy- 
ing flames, and in an exceedingly battered state she travelled 
under her own power to her last port in the scrapper's yard, 
actually making on the trip a speed of 17 knots like the 
gallant old warrior that she was. 

17 



When the start of World War I came, her sister ship the 
Campania was still afloat. The British government took 
possession of the old vessel and had her made over into a 
seaplane carrier. She was used in this capacity during the 
early war years and as such she went through the great battle 
of Jutland. Finally her time came on the fifth of November 
1918 at the hands of her own countrymen, for she was rammed 
by the British battleship Revenge in the Firth of Forth and 
sank immediately. 

The Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse was a fine specimen of a 
four-funnelled liner. She was launched on March 4, 1897 
from a German shipyard. Her 14,349 gross tonnage along 
with her general appearance made this ship a very impressive 
sight. She was a North German Lloyd liner and started on 
her maiden voyage from Bremen in the month of September 
the 21st day in the year 1897. After calling at the port of 
Southampton she made a run to Sandy Hook that broke all 
existing records. Her time for the trip was 5 days, 22 hours, 
and 45 minutes. Her return voyage was made in 5 days, 15 
hours and 10 minutes. Thus she won the crown for both the 
eastward and westward passages, and remained Queen of the 
Atlantic until the Hamburg- American Line introduced into 
the Atlantic service their new ocean greyhound the Deutsch- 
land. So for the first time in their history the Hamburg- 
American Line succeeded in capturing the Blue Ribbon of 
the Atlantic. This speedy ship the Deutschland was launched 
in January of the year 1900. She was somewhat larger than 
the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse but as regards outward appear- 
ance both of these German ships were very much alike, for 
they each had four funnels and two masts, and when seen 
together the two vessels had a sister ship aspect. The Deutsch- 
land made her record breaking crossing on the Sandy Hook to 
Plymouth crossing, taking but 5 days, 7 hours and 38 minutes 
for the trip, at an average speed of 24.37 knots, a performance 
which clinched for her the speed record for the time. She 
failed however to retain her supremacy for any extended 
period, for soon came the latest North German Lloyd product 

18 



the Kronprinz Wilhelm. This ship proved conclusively that 
she was a somewhat faster steamship than the Deutschland, 
yet the latter will always be remembered as representing the 
Hamburg-American Line's only successful attempt to capture 
the Atlantic speed record. The Deutschland remained after 
her defeat by the Kronprinz Wilhelm, a very serviceable and 
fast ship for a number of years, and prior to the commence- 
ment of the first World War she was employed as a cruising 
ship, sailing under the name of Victoria Luise. At the close 
of the war she was again renamed, this time Hansa, and after 
being subjected to some alterations she was fitted out for 
service in the emigrant trade. The alterations had drastically 
changed the appearance of the former Deutschland, for now 
she had but two funnels instead of four and had entirely lost 
the ocean greyhound aspect which once distinguished her. 
She was finally broken up by shipbreakers in Italy in 1925. 
The famous Kronprinz Wilhelm had an extremely interesting 
career. She was launched by the Vulcan shipbuilding firm 
at Stettin, Germany, on March 30, 1901. During her speed 
trials the following year she averaged 23.34 knots. In Septem- 
ber 1902 this fine 14,908 ton liner made the Cherbourg to 
Sandy Hook crossing in 5 days, 11 hours and 57 minutes, 
thereby winning the Blue Ribbon. She also broke the east- 
ward record by making the distance in 5 days and 11 hours. 
The Kronprinz was finally forced to bow to a new champion 
the Kaiser Wilhelm II, another North German Lloyd liner. 

The Kronprinz Wilhelm will always remain treasured in 
the hearts of the German people as a result of her remarkable 
exploits during World War I. The great liner was at her 
berth in Hoboken, New Jersey, when war broke out in 
August 1914. It was on the evening of August 3rd that she 
weighed anchor, and with the aid of the harbor tugs she left 
the port of Hoboken to embark upon one of the most venture- 
some voyages she had ever been called upon to undertake. 
It was a cruise that was destined to last for 251 days. Three 
days later she contacted the German light cruiser Karlesruhe 
at an appointed rendezvous in the West Indies. The tension 

19 



and excitement among her crew mounted as a transfer of guns, 
ammunition, and supplies of all kind took place between the 
Karlesruhe and the Kronprinz Wilhelm, with the momentary 
expectation by the officers and crews of the two ships of being 
intercepted and captured by units of the British fleet, which 
was known to be somewhere in the vicinity of the West Indies. 
Before the transfer had been fully completed, the work was 
brought to an abrupt stop when a British cruiser was sighted 
on the horizon. At once the two ships separated, the Kron- 
prinz stealing away, while the Karlesruhe enticed the British 
cruiser to steam in pursuit of her. Eventually the German 
cruiser escaped through her superior speed, after experiencing 
many anxious moments, for a great many shells that would 
have quite probably disabled her, fell harmlessly in the 
water, uncomfortably close to her stern. 

Thus began the epic cruise of the Kronprinz Wilhelm and 
her adventures during this mystery voyage developed all 
the elements of a thrilling odyssey, complete with savage 
storms, daring rendezvous with supply ships, and the sinking 
or capturing of many enemy vessels. By the time the hazard- 
ous cruise was ended the Kronprinz had compiled a list of 
26 victims sunk, representing a total tonnage of 58,201 tons 
gross of merchant shipping. During her 25 1 days of dangerous 
action she had covered more than 37,000 miles of ocean, 
situated for the most part in the region of the South Atlantic. 
She became a terror to all commercial shipping which was 
operating in that part of the world, and the search for her by 
British warships grew daily more intensive. It was not until 
her supplies had become dangerously low, her machinery 
badly in need of overhauling and her fuel supply almost 
exhausted, together with the fact a number of her crew, sick 
with scurvy occasioned by the lack of fresh fruits and vege- 
tables that the decision was reached to seek shelter in a 
neutral port in order to gain the safety offered by internment. 
It was on the evening of April 10, 1915 that the Kronprinz 
Wilhelm found herself some sixty miles off the Virginia Capes, 
with the most dangerous ordeal of her career staring her in 

20 ' 



the face. It will be recalled that at this time the United 
States had not yet entered the conflict, consequently the 
port of Norfolk to which the Kronprinz was heading was 
still neutral territory. The entrance to Chesapeake Bay was 
guarded by a cordon of six British warships, and the task 
which confronted the German raider was that of attempting 
to elude the vigilance of the blockading ships and of making 
a run for safety. It would be an absolute essential that the 
run be an exceedingly fast one, and every effort was devoted 
to the effort of preparing for a lightning dash through the 
blockade. History records that the daring attempt was 
crowned with complete success, though for a time it was 
feared that the boilers of the Kronprinz Wilhelm would blow 
up on account of the terrific pressure put upon her engines 
through the necessity of forcing her to the utmost limit of her 
speed capacity. Commencing at 16 knots her indicator 
climbed until she registered a speed of over 25 knots, well 
beyond the danger mark. Estimating carefully the exact 
moment for the venture, the Kronprinz, in total darkness, shot 
between two British cruisers which were stationed about 
% mile away on either side. At the time the ship's speed 
was so great that she trembled from stem to stern like a 
racing locomotive. After running the blockade she dropped 
anchor in Chesapeake Bay at midnight. The British had 
not observed her in time to bring their guns to bear upon the 
flying vessel, and so for the time being the great ship was 
safe in a neutral harbor. During the latter years of the war, 
the Kronprinz Wilhelm and her crew were interned by the 
United States government at the Norfolk Navy Yard. She 
had successfully weathered the vicissitudes of an epic voyage, 
but it was discovered that in doing so her engines had been 
badly strained through the excessive burden placed upon 
them during her hour of fame. She proved of very little value 
when later taken over by the United States government for 
war service. After hostilities had ceased she was not con- 
sidered worthwhile to be put back as a passenger ship, and 
so until 1923 when she was scrapped she spent her remaining 
years tied up at the dock. 

21 



As previously noted the North German Lloyd liner, Kaiser 
Wilhelm II, was the next in line to capture the Blue Ribbon. 
In her general appearance she was somewhat similar to the 
earlier Kronprinz Wilhelm, though larger and slightly faster. 
She won the trophy in August 1903 by making the eastward 
crossing in 5 days, 10 hours and 42 minutes, with her best 
days run being 564 nautical miles. This fine ship was seized 
by the United States government in World War I and used 
as a troop transport under the name of Agamemnon. Later 
this name was changed to Monticello, and after the war she 
was tied up with her sister ship, Kronprinzessin Cecilie, in 
the St. James River to serve as a reserve unit for the transport 
service of the United States Navy. However, during the 
second World War these two ships were broken up for the 
scrap metal so urgently needed at the time. 

The Kronprinzessin Cecilie was the fourth and last ship of 
this class of North German Lloyd express liners to be built. 
She was practically a duplicate of the Kaiser Wilhelm II. 
Her speed was slightly greater but only by a narrow margin. 
This ship never actually won the Blue Ribbon for those 
phenomenal steamships the Mauretania and the Lusitania, 
were put into service and won the trophy before the German 
liner had any opportunity to try and annex it. 

The Kronprinzessin Cecilie was launched on December 1, 
1906, and had completed her trials by July 1907. Like her 
sister ship Kaiser Wilhelm II she was used by the United 
States government as a transport during the first World War. 
The outbreak of hostilities found her at sea, whereupon she 
was ordered returned to an American port. She was anchored 
first at Bar Harbor, Maine and was later sent on to Boston 
where she remained until the United States entered the war. 
After being seized by the United States government she was 
overhauled at East Boston and converted into a troopship 
and renamed Mount Vernon. While in this service was 
torpedoed off Brest, France, but was able to make port. The 
explosion occurred in one of the engine rooms which had been 

22 



sealed off by water-tight doors and the agonized cries of the 
thirty-six men trapped in this compartment could be clearly 
heard through the ventilators. However, nothing could be 
done to release them from their sad plight and thus developed 
one of the tragedies of World War I. 

A brief description of the Kronprinzessin Cecilie might not 
be out of place here. From her keel to the rim of her funnels 
measured 131 feet. Her long promenade deck was 538 feet 
in length. She had an over-all length of 705 feet, with a 
beam of 74 feet. Her twin-screws were powered by quadruple 
expansion reciprocating engines. Her best passage was one 
of 5 days, 11 hours and 9 minutes for the crossing from Cher- 
bourg to Sandy Hook. While on the eastward course she 
steamed between the two same terminal ports in 5 days, 7 
hours and 23 minutes. 



THE MAURETANIA AND LUSITANIA 

Before taking up the history of these two famous ships, it 
might be apropos to touch upon the somewhat remarkable 
history of another Cunarder, the Elruria, of the vintage of 
the early eighties. Although in the year 1905, being already 
twenty years old, this old time single screw steamer was still 
fast enough to make, in September 1905, a run of 5 days, 10 
hours and 42 minutes on the westward passage between 
Queenstown and Sandy Hook, a feat that was a remarkable 
tribute to the shipbuilding ability of the firm that constructed 
her over twenty years before. On this trip this old veteran 
of the Atlantic crossings actually managed better than 21 
knots an hour, a figure that could be surpassed only by the 
express liners of the most modern construction. 

The Cunarder Mauretania was launched on September 20, 
1906 from the yard of Swan Hunter, and Wigham Richardson, 
Ltd. at Newcastle-on-Tyne. The ceremony was attended by 
thousands of people. One year later she left for her trials, 

23 



to be followed soon by her sister ship the Lusitania. Both 
vessels were designed to serve on the Atlantic express route. 
These two famous vessels were the finest and fastest steam- 
ships ever to be built up to that date, and rightly merited all 
the attention and praise that was showered upon them in the 
press of the period, for the columns of the daily papers were 
replete with lengthy descriptions of the making and luxurious 
appointments of these latest additions to the Atlantic pas- 
senger service. 

It was in June 1909 that the Mauretania won the Blue 
Ribbon by making the eastward crossing in 4 days, 17 hours 
and 21 minutes. The Lusitania followed suit by winning 
the palm for the westward crossing in August 1909 with a 
time mark of 4 days, 11 hours and 42 minutes. Thus the two 
ships shared the honors between them until one of them, the 
Mauretania, outdid her sister ship by making the best time 
for both the eastward and westward crossings and remaining 
Queen of the Atlantic until many years later when her time 
was bettered by that of the North German Lloyd liner Bremen. 
Until the advent of the new German steamship the two great 
Cunarders consistently lived up to their high reputation of 
being the fastest liners afloat. Year after year they made the 
crossings in the same fast time. 

Let us try and describe in detail some of the physical 
features which distinguished these two famous ships. The 
Lusitania came from the yard of John Brown and Company, 
Clydebank, Glasgow. She had a gross tonnage of 31,550 and 
had an overall length of 790 feet with a beam of 87 feet. 
Both the Lusitania and Mauretania had quadruple screws 
powered by steam turbines of 68,000 shaft horse-power. 
They were equipped with 23 double and 2 single ended boilers 
working at 200 Ib. pressure. The tops of their lofty masts 
were 216 feet above the keel and the pilot house was 84 feet 
above the waterline. Accommodations were originally pro- 
vided for 552 first-class, 460 second-class and 1,186 third- 
class passengers. 

24 



The rival careers of the two sister ships were terminated 
under widely differing circumstances. The tragic fate of the 
Lusitania was an event of world-wide importance, one which 
in the opinion of many competent observers was instrumental 
in causing the United States to abandon her neutrality and 
become one of the combatants in World War I. The sad 
event occurred on May 7, 1915 off the Irish coast while the 
ship was England bound from New York with many Ameri- 
cans on board. On that fateful day she was torpedoed and 
sunk by the German submarine U-20 with a loss of life of 
1,198 souls. The calamitous happening had a profound effect 
upon American public opinion and was a contributing factor 
to the eventual downfall of Germany and the abdication of 
the Kaiser. 

The Mauretania survived the entire conflict and was in 
continuous service as a troop carrier, transporting a great 
portion of the A E F to Europe with no loss of life. She was 
also employed during hostilities as a hospital unit. After the 
war she was reconditioned and resumed her place in the 
Atlantic trade, continuing to be one of the most popular of 
Atlantic liners for many years. Through reconditioning she 
had been changed into an oil-burning steamer and soon was 
bettering her prewar speed. In August 1924 she made the 
passage from Ambrose Light to Cherbourg in 5 days, 1 hour 
and 49 minutes. Her latest news-making accomplishment 
occurred in September 1928, just prior to the advent of the 
North German Lloyd super liner Bremen. On this particular 
run the Mauretania made the Cherbourg to Ambrose Light 
crossing in 5 days, 2 hours and 34 minutes, a remarkable feat 
for a twenty-two year old vessel, especially as she was at the 
time equipped with her original "Parson's" steam turbines. 
The grand old ship was finally broken up by shipbreakers at 
Rosyth in 1935, thus ending the career of one of the most 
famous of Atlantic liners. 

After the close of the first World War no truly fast Atlantic 
liners were built until the appearance in 1929 of the Bremen, 

25 



which was the first of two huge sister ships to emerge from 
German ship yards, the other being the Europa. The keel 
of the Bremen was laid on June 18, 1927 at the Weser ship- 
building yard at Bremen. The sister ship Europa was a 
product of Blohm and Voss, shipbuilders at Hamburg. Her 
keel was laid on July 23, 1927. Both vessels were launched 
in August 1928, and had it not been for a disastrous fire which 
occurred on the Europa when nearing completion would have 
commenced service simultaneously. However, the accident 
delayed the debut of this ship for about a year. The Bremen 
commenced her maiden voyage July 16, 1929, and, as was 
anticipated in all marine circles, she captured the Blue 
Ribbon from the Mauretania with ease. Her time for the 
westward crossing was 4 days, 17 hours and 42 minutes, an 
average of 27.82 knots for the journey. On her return voyage, 
the distance of 3,084 miles was covered at an average speed 
of 27.9 knots. When the Europa was placed on the Atlantic 
Ferry service, she improved the time for the westward 
passage by making the distance in 4 days, 17 hours and 6 
minutes. 

The data concerning the appearance of these two superb 
steamships may be found interesting. Both were approxi- 
mately 936 feet in length. Their tonnage varied somewhat, 
for the Bremen was listed as of 51,656 tons gross, while the 
Europa was of 49,746 tons. They had twelve steam turbines 
which totaled 140,000 indicated horse-power. Their two 
huge funnels were later heightened to the extent of 15 feet, 
in order that their smoke would clear the decks even when 
the ships were steaming at a high rate of speed. The shorter 
funnels had been found to be defective in this respect, hence 
the alteration. 

These two fine liners continued to give excellent service 
until the outbreak of the second World War. The Bremen 
was at her New York pier when war was declared between 
Germany and the United States. A few days later in order 
to avoid seizure she made a dash for Germany, and the man- 

26 



ner in which she succeeded in eluding the British fleet during 
this flight constitutes an epic which will long be remembered 
by the members of her crew. In her escape she selected the 
most northerly route, passing close to Greenland and from 
there steaming north of Iceland, from which point she got 
away by hugging the Norwegian coast until she reached her 
German destination. Few would have cared to gamble on 
her success in making a safe voyage back to her German home 
port, in view of the fact that both airplanes and surface ships 
of the Allied powers were combing the seas in search of her. 
However, although she made good her escape upon this 
occasion she eventually became a war casualty, for during 
an air raid on Germany she was bombed and set afire. The 
damage done her was so extensive that the Nazis had her 
scrapped in order to obtain the metal so badly needed for the 
war machine. 

The Europa experienced better fortune than did her sister 
ship, for she survived the war, notwithstanding the efforts 
of the Allied powers to find and destroy her. After the 
cessation of hostilities she was used as a troopship in the work 
of transporting American soldiers between this country and 
Europe. In 1946 the ship was turned over to the French 
Line to be reconditioned by them and used in the Atlantic 
service as a luxury liner. The French gave her a new name, 
the Liberte, and expected great things from their new acqui- 
sition. However, during the reconditioning operations at 
La Havre the ship was struck by a high gale of wind which 
swept her from her moorings and drove her against the 
sunken hull of the former Atlantic liner, Paris, The collision 
opened a gaping hole in the side of the erstwhile Europa and 
she promptly sunk into the shallow bottom of the harbor. 
According to present plans she is to be raised and repaired, 
but the accident will doubtless delay her entry into the 
Atlantic service for sometime. 



27 



THE ITALIAN BID FOR ATLANTIC SUPREMACY 

In 1933 the Blue Ribbon for the first time in history went 
to a ship that was a product of Italian shipbuilding. The 
construction of the great liner Rex was subsidized by the 
Italian government. This huge ship commenced her maiden 
voyage bound for New York from the Italian port of Genoa 
on September 27, 1932. At a later date she made a run from 
Gibraltar to Ambrose Light in 4 days, 13 hours and 58 
minutes covering a distance of 3,181 nautical miles and 
averaging 28.92 knots. The Rex had accommodations for 
2,024 passengers, and her crew numbered 810 members. She 
was propelled by steam turbines of 120,000 s.h.p. Her fore- 
most funnel was 51 feet high from deck level and from her 
keel to the navigating bridge the height was 120 feet. While 
the Rex was still in process of construction an amalgamation 
of the three important Italian steamship lines took place 
under the direction of the Mussolini government. Lines 
affected by the merger were the Lloyd Sabaudo, the Cosulich 
and the Navigazione Generale Italiana lines. Thus when 
the Rex entered the Atlantic passenger trade, she discovered 
that her running mate was to be the equally newly built 
Conte di Savoia, a steamship from the yards of Cantieri 
Riuniti Dell' Adriatico at Trieste, for the Lloyd Sabaudo 
account. Together these two excellent and fast liners pro- 
vided a luxurious service between the United States and the 
Mediterranean ports. 

The Conte di Savoia was slightly smaller in size than was 
the Rex, but her symmetrical graceful lines more than made 
up the difference. This beautiful ship was launched on 
October 28, 1931 at the Adriatic port. She sailed from Genoa 
November 30, 1932 on her maiden voyage to New York. 
This ship had accommodations for 360 first-class, 778 tourist 
and 922 third-class passengers. Her speed was always a 
trifle less than that of the Rex, yet she made a fairly fast 
crossing at an average of 27.63 knots. This great vessel was 
a war casualty, for in September 1943 she was sunk by air- 

28 



craft action near Venice. It has been reported that the 
Conte di Savoia has been refloated, but whether it will be ever 
possible to again use her in the passenger trade remains a 
question, for the cost of putting her back into commission 
may be prohibitive. 

The Rex was also a war victim, being sunk by British 
torpedo planes while she was being towed by the Germans to 
a new hiding place. She now lies on her side in shallow water 
near Trieste with only a fraction of her hull visible above the 
water, surely a tragic sight for those who can remember her 
in the days of her glory, as one of the most luxurious of 
Atlantic liners. 

The great French liner, Normandie, has had a truly eventful 
career. Her keel was laid down in June 1931 at St. Nazaire, 
and she was launched on October 29th, 1932, but it was not 
until May 29, 1935 that she commenced her maiden voyage 
from La Havre to New York. On this trip she broke all 
existing speed records, making it in 4 days, 3 hours and 14 
minutes with an average speed of 31.37 knots. The home- 
ward passage took just 14 minutes longer to accomplish, being 
made in 4 days, 3 hours and 28 minutes. This noble French 
ship was truly a super liner. It is reported that her building 
cost amounted to $60,000,000; as to her exterior appearance 
she possessed many outstanding features. Her over-all 
length was 1,029 feet and after alterations, her tonnage was 
set at 82,799 tons gross. The tops of her masts were 202 feet 
above the water line and her mammoth funnels measured 
160 feet in circumference with the foremost one towering at 
a height of 145 feet. Her main dining room measured 300 feet 
by 43 feet, and was three decks high with a seating capacity 
for 1,000 people. A small theater was installed, two decks 
high, capable of seating 380 people. The swimming pool was 
80 feet in length with a graduated bottom made of tiling. 
The garage on board the ship could furnish storage for 100 
automobiles. Facilities for the movements of both passenger 
and freight were taken care of through the installation of 

29 



numerous elevators, operating between the various decks. 
In short the great liner was a small city in herself with ac- 
commodations for no less than 1,972 passengers, and a crew 
of 1,350 members. 

As might readily be imagined the Normandie was a very 
popular and successful ship. She continued in the regular 
Atlantic service up to the commencement of World War II. 
The outbreak of hostilities found her at her New York pier 
where she remained until the United States took possession 
of her with the intention of converting the great ship into a 
troop carrier. She was renamed Lafayette in honor of the 
great French patriot, who helped the American cause in the 
Revolution. Title to her possession had by this time passed 
from the hands of the French Line into those of America. 
During the process of preparing her to play her new role in 
the war, a fire of mysterious origin started aboard one day 
in the early months of 1942. The blaze soon spread through- 
out the ship in spite of the strenuous attempts to quell it on 
the part of New York's fire fighters. After battling the con- 
flagration for many hours, their efforts to save the great ship 
proved futile, and listing over to one side she slowly settled 
down into the muddy floor of the harbor. Work was soon 
started to raise her, and after months of painstaking effort 
the ship was once again afloat, and for awhile it was thought 
possible to rebuild her. This project, however, was never 
carried out, and in September 1946 the United States put the 
hulk up for auction. She was finally knocked down to a New 
York scrap dealer for approximately $161,000; a ludicrously 
small sum when compared to the vast amount it had cost to 
build her. Early in December 1946, the fallen monarch of 
the seas was towed by a small army of tugs to Port Newark 
where she awaits her dismantling. So passes one of the most 
mighty and impressive ships that ever sailed the seas. 

The keel of the great Cunarder Queen Mary was laid down 
at the yard of John Brown and Company at Clydebank in 
August 1930. During the serious economic conditions, which 

30 



were gripping the entire Western World during the depression 
years, work on this ship had to be suspended in December 
1931 at a time when work on her hull was nearly completed. 
Later on, when conditions had improved and following the 
merging of the Cunard and White Star Lines, building was 
resumed in April 1934, and on September 26 she was launched. 
Two years later, on May 27, 1936, she commenced her maiden 
voyage from Southampton to New York, making the run 
from Bishop Rock to Ambrose Lightship in 4 days and 27 
minutes at an average speed of 30.14 knots. In 1938 she 
made a new eastward record by crossing in 3 days, 20 hours 
and 42 minutes. 

This great Cunard er has an overall length of 1,018 feet and 
a beam of 118 feet. Her masthead towers 234 feet above the 
keel, while the foremost funnel, from deck level to rim, is 70 
feet in height, the second one being 65 feet and the after 
funnel 60 feet. The general effect is that of a streamlined 
tapering off arrangement. The ship's powerful steam turbines 
generate 200,000 shaft horse-power. There are 24 oil-fired 
water-tube boilers, and her quadruple screws are composed 
of magnesium bronze. Prior to the war the Queen Mary 
had accommodations for 2,140 passengers in cabin-class, 
tourist and third-class respectively. Her crew numbered 
about 1,000. The largest room on this ship is the spacious 
and beautiful dining room which measures 160 feet by 118 
feet, with an extreme height of 30 feet and tapering down at 
the sides. The main -lounge is 100 feet in length and 70 feet 
in width, and the center of the room extends into three 
decks. 

This magnificent luxury liner plied the Atlantic route 
regularly until the start of the second World War. She was 
then fitted out for the transporting of troops to the various 
battle fronts. In this capacity she was used throughout the 
great conflict and carried several hundreds of thousands of 
soldiers over seas. It goes without saying that she was in 
constant jeopardy of being attacked by enemy submarines 

31 



and aircraft, while the possibility of colliding at sea with an- 
other vessel remained an ever present menace. In fact, such 
an incident occurred one foggy afternoon in October 1942 
while making an Atlantic crossing with over 15,000 American 
troops on board. She struck amidship the 4,200 ton British 
cruiser Curacoa which went down almost immediately with 
great loss of life among her crew. The Queen Mary continued 
on her voyage at reduced speed, not daring to search for sur- 
vivors on account of the submarine menace. The great liner 
had sustained only the minor injury of a partially smashed in 
bow which was repaired at the Boston Navy Yard. Thus, she 
was fortunate enough to survive every danger, and with the 
war won the British government continued to make use of her 
in the transport service, in which capacity she brought back 
to America many members of the armed forces. In the latter 
part of 1946 she was returned to the Cunard White Star Line, 
and after being reconditioned, she will doubtless resume her 
place in the trans-Atlantic passenger service. 

The latest and perhaps the greatest of the Cunard White 
Star Line ships is the mighty steamship Queen Elizabeth, 
which is now the Queen of the Seas. Her 83,673 gross tonnage 
surpasses all others. The keel of this noble ship was laid 
down in November 1936 at the shipbuilding yard of John 
Brown and Company, Clydebank, Glasgow, also the builders 
of her running mate, the Queen Mary. She was launched on 
September 27, 1938 during a period when rumors of a second 
great war filled the air. Hostilities had already begun at the 
time she was completed. Unlike her forerunner, however, 
the Queen Elizabeth was forced to delay her debut as an express 
passenger liner. The exigencies of the times destined her to 
first play a very different part from that of a luxury liner. 
Her country's peril demanded that she serve her apprentice- 
ship on the ocean in the capacity of a troopship. The decision 
to use her in this manner had naturally necessitated many 
changes in her construction. When made ready to play her 
part in the great war, she slipped quietly away early in 1940 
from her moorings on the Clyde, her departure being kept a 

32 



profound secret from all but those intimately associated with 
her mission. Only these were aware of the fact that the great 
ship was making a crossing to New York. There had been 
no fan-fare of trumpets on this occasion, and no opportunity 
afforded to put her through any trial paces, and so, for the 
first time in the history of noted transatlantic liners, the 
greatest of them all commenced her maiden voyage without 
benefit of any trial trip. From the moment of her first 
Atlantic passage to the close of the war, the movements of 
the Queen Elizabeth were a well kept naval secret. All through 
the great conflict she rendered yeoman service in her capacity 
of troop carrier. Her spacious storage space enabled her to 
ship as many as 15,000 men at one sailing, thus effecting a 
great economy in troop transportation. She went through 
the war without encountering any serious trouble, and at its 
close she was for awhile employed in bringing back to their 
native land many American soldiers who had seen service on 
the European front. Later on she was returned to the Cunard 
White Star Line, whose directors had her sent back to her 
builder's yard to be refitted for the Atlantic service. Reports 
say that $5,000,000 had to be spent in order to put her into 
condition to serve the purpose for which she had been origi- 
nally built. She arrived in New York October 21, 1946 to 
make her long delayed first trip as an express luxury liner. 
Her time for making the crossing was 4 days, 16 hours and 
18 minutes. Not a record breaking passage, and not sur- 
passing the time of her sister ship, the Queen Mary, but on 
this occasion no special effort was made to accomplish that 
feat. Undoubtedly, however, at some future time the Queen 
Elizabeth will have her turn in winning the Blue Ribbon. 
With this mention of the two reigning Queens of the Atlantic 
crossing, we bring to a close our brief history of the exploits 
and record breaking performances of the many stout vessels 
that from 1840 to the present time have won international 
fame as monarchs of the North Atlantic. Slightly more than 
a century of time has witnessed the evolution of transatlantic 
steamers from the somewhat crude and primitive beginnings 

33 



of the mid-Victorian era to the palatial space devouring 
speedsters of the present. The past one hundred years has 
seen greater achievements in rapid marine transportation than 
did all the combined years of human history of the past. 

In the years that lie in the future still faster and perhaps 
larger ships will probably be built. To people whose main 
concern is that of speed in travel, the airplane will doubtless 
have its attractions. Nevertheless, it is our firm belief that 
the appeal which an ocean voyage has held from time im- 
memorial for the human race will always create a demand 
for safe and luxurious passenger liners. The possible future 
use of atomic power as a propelling force, when applied to 
ships can, if it may be done at reasonable cost, make the liner 
a swifter form of ocean travel. The future then seems to hold 
a place for all three great media of transportation, the rail- 
road on land, the plane in the air and the ship for travel on 
the oceans of the world. 



34 



PART II 

PRINCIPAL NORTH ATLANTIC PASSENGER 
SHIPS BUILT BETWEEN 1840 AND 1940 

Aachen (1895) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 3,833. 
Dimensions: 355' x 43'. Single-screw, 12 ^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Crefeld. 

Abyssinia (1870) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 3,253. Dimensions: 363' x 42'. Single-screw, 12 ^ 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. She was destroyed by 
fire at sea in December 1891 with no loss of life. Sister ship: 
Algeria. 

Acadia (1840) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. Wood, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,154. 
Dimensions: 207' x 34'. Paddle-wheels, 9 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: She was sold to the German 
Federated States in 1849 and converted into a warship, re- 
naming her Germania. Sister ships: Britannia, Caledonia 
and Columbia. 

Acropolis (1890) Owner: Stephen D. Stephenidis. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,083. Dimensions: 370' x 44'. Single-screw. Ex-Kil- 
patrick, ex-Michigan. Note: In 1921 she was converted 
into an immigrant carrier and named Acropolis. A second 
funnel was added. The new owner employed her between 
New York and Greece. This service was unsuccessful and 
she was sold and renamed Washington, only to be promptly 
resold and given the name of Great Canton. She was 
broken up by Italian shipbreakers in 1924. 

Adriatic (1857) Collins Line. 

Built by Steers at New York. Tonnage: 3,670. Dimensions: 
355' x 50'. Paddle-wheels, 13 1 / 2 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note : She was the last transatlantic wooden paddle- 
wheel vessel to be built. Launched on April 8, 1856. After 
the collapse of the Collins Line in 1858 was laid up until sold 
to the Gal way Line in 1861. She was unsuccessful in their 
service and was soon sold to be used as a hulk on the west 
coast of Africa. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

35 



Adriatic (1872) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,888. Dimensions: 437' x 44'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. In 1896 was taken off the White 
Star Line service and laid up for two years. Sold to ship- 
breakers in 1899. Sister ship: Celtic. 

Adriatic (1906) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
24,563. Dimensions: 709' x 75'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Note: Laid up at Liverpool on 
August 31, 1933 and in December, 1934 was sold to Japa- 
nese shipbreakers, who dismantled her in 1935. Sister ship: 
Baltic. 

Africa (1850) Gunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,227. Dimensions: 266' x 40'. Paddle-wheels, 12 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. ' Used by the British Govern- 
ment as a floating barracks in 1867 at Liverpool. During the 
following year she was sold out of the Cunard service. Note: 
She was the last wooden ship to be used by the Cunard Line. 
Sister ship: Asia. 

Alaska (1881) Guion Line. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
6,392. Dimensions: 500' x 50'. Single-screw, 17 ^ knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Made the last sailing of the 
Guion Line in April, 1894. Sold in 1898 and was scrapped in 
1902. 

Alaunia (1913) Cunard Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 13,405. Dimensions: 520' x 
64'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two funnels. 
Sunk by a mine 2 miles south of Royal Sovereign Light 
Vessel on October 19, 1916. Sister ship: Andania. 

*Alaunia (1925) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 14,030. Dimensions: 519' x 65'. Twin-screw, 15 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships: Ascania 
and Aurania. Note: This class of ships is very similar to 
the Andania group. 

Albania (1920) Cunard Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 12,768. Dimensions: 523' x 
64'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Renamed: California (Libera Triestina Line). 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

36 



Albert Ballin (1923) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
20,815. Dimensions: 602' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Renamed: Hansa. Sister 
ship: Deutschland. These two ships are very similar to 
the Hamburg and New York. 

Albertic (1923) White Star Line. 

Built by Weser Yard, Bremen. Tonnage: 18,940. Di- 
mensions: 590' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and 
two funnels. Note: Completed in 1920 and turned over to 
the British Controller of Shipping. Sold to the Royal Mail 
Line, who renamed her Ohio for use on their England to New 
York service. Later sold to the White Star Line. Ex- 
Munchen. Broken up by Japanese shipbreakers in 1934. 

Alesia (1906) Fabre Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 9,720. Di- 
mensions: 475' x 55'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Ex-Montreal, ex-Konig Friedrich Auguste. 

Alexander (1897) Wilson-Furness Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 6,919. Dimensions: 475' x 52'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Four masts and one funnel Renamed: 
Menominee. Sister ship: Victoria. 

Alfonso XII (1890) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish). 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,966. 
Dimensions: 463' x 51'. Single-screw, 19 knots. Three masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Meteoro. ex-Havel. Scrapped in 
1926. 

Alfonso XIII (1888) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish). 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 5,000. Dimensions: 408' x 47'. Single-screw, 16 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Sunk in port of San- 
tander in 1915. Sister ship: Reina Maria Cristina. 

Alfonso XIII (1891) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish). 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 7,815. Dimensions: 531' x 54'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Oceana, ex-Scot 
(Union Line). Renamed: (a) De Balboa, (b) Vasco Nunez 
de Balboa. Note: Broken up by Italian shipbreakers in 
1927. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

37 



Alfonso XIII (1923) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish). 

Built by Soc. Espanola de Construction Naval Yard, Bilbao, 
Spain. Tonnage: 10,551. Dimensions: 480' x 61'. Twin- 
screw, 17 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: 
"Habana. Sister ship: Cristobal Colon. 

Algeria (1870) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 3,253. Dimensions: 361' x 41'. Single-screw, 12^ 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Renamed: Pennland. 
Sister ship: Abyssinia. 

Algeria (1891) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 4,510. Dimensions: 375' x 46'. Single-screw, 12^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. 

Algeria (1914) Anchor Line. 

Built by Reiherstieg Schiffs-Werfte, Hamburg. Tonnage: 
8,156. Dimensions: 449' x 55'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Ex-Kigoma. Renamed: Toledo. 

Alice (1907) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 

Built by Russell & Co., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
6,122. Dimensions: 415' x 49'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: Asia. Sister ship: Laura. 

Allemania (1865) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Day & Co., Southampton, England. Tonnage: 
2,619. Dimensions: 301' x 41'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Note: Taken off the Hamburg-New York run in 1883 and 
sold to W. Hunter of Liverpool. Renamed: Oxenholme. 
Resold in 1894 to A. Chapman. Abandoned at sea in April, 
1894. 

Aller (1886) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,217. Dimensions: 437' x 48'. Single- 
screw, 17 knots. Four masts and two funnels. Note: First 
Atlantic express steamship with triple expansion engines. 
Broken up in 1904. Sister ships: Saale and Trave. 

Alsatian (1913) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
18,481. Dimensions: 571' x 72'. Quadruple-screw, 19 1 A 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Launched on 
March 22, 1913. Commenced maiden voyage on January 17, 
1914. Renamed: Empress of France. Sister ship: Cal- 
garian. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

38 



America (1848) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
1,825. Dimensions: 251' x 38'. Paddle-wheels, 10 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Sold in 1863. Renamed: 
Coalgaconder (converted into a sailing ship). Sister ships: 
Canada, Europa and Niagara. 

America (1863) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,752. Dimensions: 328' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1894. 

America (1881) Fabre Line. 

Built by T. Royden & Sons, Liverpool, England. Tonnage: 
2,403. Dimensions: 328' x 40'. Single screw. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1907. 

America (1884) National Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,528. 
Dimensions: 441' x 51'. Single-screw, 18 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Note: Sold in 1886 to the Italian Govern- 
ment and converted into a cruiser-transport named Tri- 
nacria. Later used as a torpedo school ship and finally 
fitted out as an Italian royal yacht. Scrapped in 1925. 

America (1905) United States Lines. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
21,145. Dimensions: 668' x 74'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. In 1932 she was turned over 
to the United States government and laid up as a reserved 
transport in the St. James River. During the second World 
War she was put back into service under the name of Ed- 
mund B. Alexander. Note: Ex-Amerika. 

America (1908) Navigazione Generate Italiana. 

Built by Cont. Nav. Riuniti, Muggiano, Italy. Tonnage: 
8,996. Dimensions: 476' x 55'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Formerly owned and 
operated by La Veloce Line. Scrapped in 1928. 

*America (1940) United States Lines. 

Built by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., 
Newport News, Virginia. Tonnage: 26,454. Dimensions: 
660' x 93'. Twin-screw, 23 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Renamed: (a) West Point, (b) America. Note: 
Her keel was laid on August 22, 1938. Launched on August 
31, 1939. In 1941 was converted into a troopship and 
renamed West Point and in this capacity carried about 
400,000 troops during her war service. In 1946 she was re- 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

39 



conditioned for the Transatlantic trade. Commenced her 
first peacetime Atlantic voyage on November 14, 1946 and 
made the crossing from Ambrose Light to Daunt's Lightship 
in 4 days, 22 hours and 22 minutes, averaging 24.54 knots 
for the run. The America is the largest and finest ship built 
in the United States. 
American Banker (1920) American Merchant Lines. 

Built by American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog 
Island, Penn. Tonnage: 7,430. Dimensions: 436' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Cantigny. Renamed: (a) Ville eT Anvers, (b) City of 
Athens. Sister ships: American Farmer, American Im- 
porter, American Merchant, American Shipper, 
American Trader and American Traveler. Note: There 
were 12 ships built, but some were taken over by the United 
States government and are not included in this group. 

American Farmer (1920) American Merchant Lines. 

Built by American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog 
Island, Penn. Tonnage: 7,430. Dimensions: 436' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Ourcq. Renamed: Ville de Liege. Note: See American 
Banker for list of sister ships. 

American Importer (1920) American Merchant Lines. 

Built by American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog 
Island, Penn. Tonnage: 7,590. Dimensions: 436' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Somme. Renamed: Ville de Gand. Torpedoed and sunk 
in August 1940. Note: See American Banker for list of 
sister ships. 

American Merchant (1920) American Merchant Lines. 

Built by American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog 
Island, Penn. Tonnage: 7,430. Dimensions: 436' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Aisne. Renamed: Ville de Namur. Torpedoed and sunk 
in June 1940. Note: See American Banker for list of sister 
ships. 

American Shipper (1920) American Merchant Lines. 

Built by American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog 
Island Penn. Tonnage: 7,430. Dimensions: 436' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Tours. Renamed: Ville de Mons. Torpedoed and sunk in 
September 1940. Note: See American Banker for list of 
sister ships. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

40 



American Trader (1920) American Merchant Lines. 

Built by American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog 
Island, Penn. Tonnage: 7,430. Dimensions: 436' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Marne. Renamed: Ville de Hasselt. Torpedoed and sunk 
in August 1940. Note: See American Banker for list of 
sister ships. 

American Traveler (1920) American Merchant Lines. 

Built by American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog 
Island, Penn. Tonnage: 7,555. Dimensions: 436' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Cambrai. Renamed: Ville d' Arlon. Note: See American 
Banker for list of sister ships. (This class of ship had ac- 
commodations for 100 passengers.) 

Amerika (1872) Thingvalla Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,867. Dimensions: 437' x 40'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Celtic. Scrapped in 1898. 

Amerika (1905) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
22,225. Dimensions: 668' x 74'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) America, (b) 
Edmund B. Alexander. Note: Interned at Boston during 
World War I and in 1917 converted into an American troop- 
ship. After the War she was sold to the United States Lines 
and used on the Atlantic Ferry again as a passenger liner, 
under the name America. Sold to the United States 
Government in 1932 and was laid up in the James River as 
a reserve transport. During World War II, she was put back 
into government service and assigned the name Edmund B. 
Alexander. 

Amerique (1864) French Line. 

Built at St. Nazaire, France under the supervision of Scott's 
Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd. Tonnage: 3,200. 
Dimensions: 343' x 43'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Imperatrice Eugenie. Note: 
In 1873 was lengthened and altered. These changes in- 
creased her length to 393 feet and tonnage to 4,584. Ran 
ashore at Seabright, New Jersey on January 7, 1877 and it 
was not until April 10, 1877 she was refloated and towed to 
port. She was finally abandoned to shipbreakers for scrap. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

41 



Amsterdam (1879) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,664. Dimensions: 410' x 39'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-British Crown. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1905. 

Anchoria (1874) Anchor Line. 

Built by Vickers Sons & Maxim, Ltd., Barrow -in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 4,168. Dimensions: 408'x 40'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Broken up 
in Germany in 1922. 

Ancona (1908) Italia Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 8,210. Dimensions: 482' x 58'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Torpedoed in the 
Mediterranean on November 7, 1915 by an Austrian sub- 
marine causing a loss of 206 lives. Note: Very similar to the 
Taormina and Verona. 

Andania (1913) Cunard Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 13,404. Dimensions: 520' x 
64'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two funnels. 
Torpedoed 2 miles N. N. E. from Rathlin Light on January 
27, 1918 with the loss of 7 lives. Sister ship: Alaunia. 

Andania (1922) Cunard Line. 

Built by R. and W. Hawthorne, Leslie & Co., Ltd., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 13,950. Dimensions: 
520' x 65'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Torpedoed and sunk on June 16, 1940. Sister ships: 
Ausonia and Antonia. 

Anglo-Saxon (1856) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 1,673. Dimensions: 283' x 35'. Single-screw. 
Wrecked on Cape Race April 27, 1863 with the loss of 237 
lives. 

* Antonia (1921) Cunard Line. 

Built by Vickers- Armstrong, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 13,867. Dimensions: 519' x 65'. Twin- 
screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships: 
Andania and Ausonia. (Note: Very similar to the Alaunia 
class.) 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

42 



Antonio Lopez (1891) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage : 5,975. Dimensions : 430' x 50'. Single-screw, 13 % 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Ruahine. 

*Aquitania (1914) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 45,647. Dimensions: 868' x 97'. Quadruple-screw, 
24 knots. Two masts and four funnels. Launched on April 
21, 1913. Commenced maiden voyage on May 30, 1914. 
Fourth funnel is a dummy. Considered one of the most 
beautiful liners ever built. During World War I she was 
employed as a troopship and later as a hospital ship. In 
World War II was used as a troopship carrying thousands of 
American soldiers overseas. 

Arabia (1852) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,393. Dimensions: 285' x 40'. Paddle-wheels, 12 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Note: She was the last wooden 
vessel built for the Cunard Line. In 1864 was sold and con- 
verted into a sailing ship. 

Arabic (1881) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,386. Dimensions: 430' x 42'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Spaarndam. Sister 
ship: Asiatic. 

Arabic (1903) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
15,801. Dimensions: 600 x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Minnewaska. Note: Laid 
down as the Minnewaska, but before completion was trans- 
ferred to the White Star Line and renamed Arabic. Tor- 
pedoed and sunk off the south coast of Ireland on August 19, 
1915 with the loss of 44 lives. 

Arabic (1908) White Star Line. 

Built by Weser Shipbuilding Works, Bremen, Germany. 
Tonnage: 16,821. Dimensions: 590' x 69'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Berlin. Note: She 
was turned over to the British after the first World War as 
a war prize. Scrapped in 1932. 

Archimede (1881) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 2,837. Dimensions: 340' x 40'. Single- 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

43 



screw, 12 ^ knots. Note: Made final voyage to New York 
in 1900. Sister ships: Washington and Vincenzo Florio. 

Arctic (1849) Collins Line. 

Built by W. H. Brown of New York. Tonnage: 2,856. Di- 
mensions: 282' x 45'. Paddle-wheels, \2 1 A knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Built of wood and cost approximately 
$700,000. Note: In collision with small French iron steam- 
ship named Vesta, during a dense fog when 60 miles off Cape 
Race on September 27, 1854 while bound to New York with 
233 passengers. She sunk four hours later with the loss of 
322 lives. Captain Luce, true to naval tradition went down 
with his ship, but was later rescued and landed at Quebec. 
Sister ships: Atlantic, Baltic and Pacific. 

Argentina (1905) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Fratelli Orlando, Leghorn, Italy. Tonnage: 4,985. 
Dimensions: 394' x 47'. Twin-screw, 14 3/2 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Brasile, (b) Vene- 
zuela. 

Argentina (1907) Unione Austriaco (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Russell & Co., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
5,526. Dimensions: 390' x 48'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Note: After the first World War was 
taken over and operated by the Cosulich Line. 

*Argentina (1913) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 10,137. Dimensions: 
480' x 61'. Quadruple-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Note: Used on the European-South American route. 
Ex-Reina Victoria Eugenia. Sister ship: Uruguay. 

Arizona (1879) Guion Line. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
5,147. Dimensions: 450' x 45'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Four 
masts and two funnels. First Atlantic steamship with com- 
pound 3-crank type engines. She succeeded in breaking the 
speed record in July, 1879 by making the fastest homeward 
passage and in May, 1880 the fastest outward voyage. She 
made the headlines in November, 1879 by running at full 
speed into a huge iceberg and miraculously made port, al- 
though her bow was crushed. No one was lost or injured by 
the mishap. In 1898 was sold to the United States Govern- 
ment and used as a troopship. After the Spanish-American 
War she carried troops between the mainland and the 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

44 



Philippines. Originally she had two funnels but later was 
re-boilered and altered by a single large funnel. Sent to the 
scrapper's yard near San Francisco in 1926. 
Armenian (1895) Leland Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
8,825. Dimensions: 512'. x 59'. Single-screw. Four masts 
and one funnel. 14 knots. Captured and torpedoed by a 
submarine on June 28, 1915 when 20 miles west from Tre- 
vose Head. 

Ascania (1911) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,111. Dimensions: 466' 
x 56'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and two funnels. 
Wrecked off Cape Ray in 1918. Ex-Gerona. 

*Ascania (1925) Cunard Line. 

Built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd., 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 14,013. Dimen- 
sions: 520' x 65'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Sister ships: Alaunia and Aurania. 

Asia (1850) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,227. Dimensions: 268' x 45'. Paddle-wheels, 12 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Note: Made last sailing for 
Cunard Line in 1867 and during the next year was sold and 
converted into a sailing ship. In 1878 was destroyed by fire 
at Bombay, India. 

Asia (1907) Fabre Line. 

Built by Russell & Co., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
6,122. Dimensions: 415' x 49'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Ex-Alice. Destroyed by fire in 1930. 

Assyria (1908) Anchor Line. 

Built by Frd. Krupp, Kiel, Germany. Tonnage: 8,300. 
Dimensions: 449' x 54'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Ypiranga. Renamed: Colonial. 

Assyrian (1880) Allan Line. 

Built by Earle's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd., Hull, 
England. Tonnage: 2,608. Dimensions: 360' x 42'. Single- 
screw. Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Assyrian Monarch. 
Broken up by shipbreakers in 1902. 

Assyrian Monarch (1880) Monarch Line. 

Built by Earle's Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd., Hull, 
England. Tonnage: 2,608. Dimensions: 360' x 42'. Single- 
screw. Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Assyrian. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

45 



Astoria (1884) Anchor Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 5,086. Dimensions: 439' x 46'. Single-screw, 14 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Tainui, ex-Cova- 
donga, ex-Tainui. Originally had four masts. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1908. 

Athinai (1908) Greek Line. 

Built, by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co., Ltd., Middlesbro-on-Tees, 
England. Tonnage: 6,742. Dimensions: 420' x 52'. Twin- 
screw, 15 knots. Two masts and two funnels. She was 
destroyed by fire in North Atlantic in 1915. 

Athenia (1904) Anchor-Donaldson Line. 

Built by Vickers Sons & Maxim, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 9,080. Dimensions: 478' x 56'. Twin- 
screw, 13 }/% knots. Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed 
and sunk 7 miles from Innistrahul on August 16, 1917 with 
the loss of 15 lives. 

Athenia (1923) Donaldson Atlantic Line, Ltd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 13,465. Dimensions: 526' x 66'. Twin- 
screw, 15 ]/2 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: She 
was the first ship to be sunk during World War II. It was 
on September 3, 1939 that she was torpedoed and sunk 200 
miles west of the Hebrides with the loss of 93 lives from the 
1,104 passengers on board. Sister ship: Letitia. 

Atlanta (1908) Unione Austriaco (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Russell & Co., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
5,387. Dimensions: 385' x 49'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Note: After the first World War she 
was owned and operated by the Cosulich Line. 

Atlantian (1899) Leyland Line. 

Built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,399. Dimensions: 
482' x 57'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Four masts and one 
funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 110 miles from Eagle Island 
on June 25, 1918. 

Atlantic (1849) Collins Line. 

Built by William H. Brown of New York. Tonnage: 2,856. 
Dimensions: 282' x 45'. Paddle-wheels, 13 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: Pioneer vessel of the Collins 
Line. Commenced her maiden voyage on April 27, 1849, 
from New York. Her coal consumption was at the average 
of 87 tons per day. After the collapse of the Collins Line 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

46 



she and her sister ship the Baltic were taken over by the 
United States Government for service in the Civil War. 
Both ships were afterwards converted into sailing ships. 
Sister ships: Arctic, Baltic and Pacific. (These steamships 
were the first to have straight stems.) 

Atlantic (1870) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,707. Dimensions: 420' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Wrecked off Meagher's Head, 
22 miles west of Halifax, on April 1, 1873 while bound to 
New York from Liverpool. This disaster cost the lives of 
546 of the 862 persons on board. Sister ships: Baltic, 
Oceanic and Republic. 

Auguste Victoria (1888) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Shipbuilding Co., Stettin, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 7,661. Dimensions: 461' x 56'. Twin-screw, 18J/ 
knots. Three masts and three funnels. Note: In 1896 she 
was lengthened to 522 feet and further altered by having her 
original three masts replaced by two new ones. Her gross 
tonnage thus increased to 8,479 tons. Sold to the Russians 
in 1904 and renamed Kuban. Used as an auxiliary cruiser 
during the Russian- Japanese War. Broken up by ship- 
breakers in May, 1907. Sister ship: Columbia. Note: 
These two liners were very similar in appearance to the 
Furst Bismark and Normannia. 

Augustus (1927) (a) Navigazione Generate Italiana, (b) Italia 
Line. 

Built by Societa Anonima Ansaldo, Sestri, Ponente, Italy. 
Tonnage: 32,650. Dimensions: 666' x 82'. Quadruple-screw, 
19 Yi knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Largest 
motorship built. Sunk during the Second World War. 
Sister ship: Roma. 

Aurania (1883) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 7,269. Dimensions: 470' x 57'. Single-screw, 17 ^ 
knots. Three masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 1905. 

Aurania (1915) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 13,400. Dimensions: 
520' x 64'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: Torpedoed and sunk 15 miles from Inishtra- 
hull on February 4, 1918 with the loss of 8 lives. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

47 



Aurania (1924) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 13,984. Dimensions: 
519' x 65'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Note: Torpedoed and sunk in October, 1941. Sister 
ships: Alan nia and Ascania. 

Ausonia (1909) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on- Tyne, England. Tonnage: 8,153. Dimensions: 450' 
x 54'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Ex-Tortona. Torpedoed and sunk 620 miles from the 
Fastnet on May 30, 1918 with the loss of 44 lives. 

*Ausonia (1921) Cunard Line. 

Built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 13,912. Dimensions: 520' x 65'. 
Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister 
ships: Andania and Antonia. 

Australia (1870) Anchor Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 2,243. Dimensions: 324' x 35'. 
Single-screw. Three masts and one funnel. Note: Used also 
on the Mediterranean route. The Anchor Line sold her in 
1890. Scrapped in 1895. 

Austria (1857) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built at Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,383. Dimensions: 
320' x 40'. Single-screw. Note: Destroyed by fire in the 
North Atlantic in September, 1858 with the loss of 492 lives. 

Avoca (1891) Uranium Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 5,189. Dimensions: 420' x 48'. Single-screw, 14^ 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) San 
Fernando, (b) Avoca, (c) Atlanta, (d) Avoca, (e) Uran- 
ium. Sister ship: Jelunga. 

Baltic (1850) Collins Line. 

Built by Wm. H. Brown of New York. Tonnage: 2,856. 
Dimensions: 282' x 45'. Paddle-wheels, 12 J^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Note: Made the final sailing for the 
Collins Line. Taken over by the United States Government 
during the Civil War. After the war was converted into a 
sailing ship. Scrapped at Apple Island in Boston Harbor 
during 1880. Sister ships: Arctic, Atlantic and Pacific. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

48 



Baltic (1873) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,707. 'Dimensions: 420' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Note: She commenced her 
maiden voyage on September 4, 1871. Renamed: Veendam. 
Sunk in the North Atlantic after striking a derelict in Febru- 
ary, 1898. Sister ships: Atlantic, Oceanic and Republic. 

Baltic (1904) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
23,884. Dimensions: 709' x 75'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Largest ship launched to date. 
Cost approximately $4,000,000 to build. Broken up by 
Japanese shipbreakers in 1933. Sister ship: Adriatic. Note: 
The Celtic and Cedric were very similar ships. 

Baltimore (1868) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,321. Dimensions: 297' x 39'. Single-screw. Sister ship: 
Berlin. 

*Banfora (1914) Fabre Line. 

Built by Kon. Maats de Schelde, Flushing, Netherlands. 
Tonnage: 9,347. Dimensions: 478' x 57'. Twin-screw, 15 ^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Insulinde. 

Barbarossa (1896) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 10,984. Di- 
mensions: 526' x 60'. Twin-screw, 153/2 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: Mercury. Scrapped in 1924. 

Batavia (1870) Cunard Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 2,553. Dimensions: 327' x 39'. Single-screw, 15 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Made last voyage to 
Boston in September, 1883. Later sold to owners on the 
Pacific coast and renamed Tacoma. 

Batavia (1899) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 11,464. Di- 
mensions: 501' x 62'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Renamed: (a) Canada, (b) Hercules. Sister 
ship: Bulgaria. 

*Batory (1936) Gdynia- American Line. 

Built by Cantieri Riuniti dell' Adriatico, Monfalcone, Italy. 
Tonnage: 14,287. Dimensions: 498' x 70'. Twin-screw, 20 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Motorship. Launched 
on July 8, 1935. Sister ship: Pilsudski. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

49 



Bavarian (1900) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 10,376. Dimensions: 501' x 59'. Twin-screw, 
16 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Grounded near 
Montreal in 1905 and dismantled in 1907. Sister ship: 
Tunisian. 

Belgenland (1878) Red Star Line. 

Built by Vickers, Sons & Maxim, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 3,692. Dimensions: 418' x 40'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Sister ship: 
Rhynland. Made final voyage to New York in 1904. 

Belgenland (1917) Red Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
27,132. Dimensions: 670' x 78'. Triple-screw, 17 ^ knots. 
Two masts and three funnels. Ex-Belgic. Renamed: 
Columbia. Broken up by P. & W. Macilellan, Ltd., on the 
Firth of Forth in 1936. 

Belgic (1917) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
24,547. Dimensions: 670' x 78 . Triple- screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Launched on December 
31, 1914. The first Atlantic liner with a cruiser stern. Origi- 
nally designed to carry 800 first class and 2,000 third-class 
passengers and later changed to accommodate 660 first-class 
and 350 second-class passengers. Renamed Belgenland in 
March, 1914, but this name reverted back to Belgic in June, 
1917. She was used as a troopship in World War I. In 1921 
was altered and refitted for service on the Red Star Line. 
Her name was changed back to Belgenland. Finally be- 
came known as the Columbia on the Panama-Pacific Line. 

Belvedere (1913) Lloyd Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Cant. Nav. Triestino, Monfalcone. Tonnage: 7,420. 
Dimensions: 419' x 51'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: Audacious. 

Berengaria (1912) Cunard Line. 

Built by Vulcan Shipbuilding Co., Stettin, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 52,226. Dimensions: 883' x 98'. Quadruple-screw, 
23 y% knots. Two masts and three funnels. Ex-Imperator. 
Note: This great liner commenced her first voyage as a 
Cunarder on February 2, 1920. She was scrapped in 1939. 

*Bergensfjord (1913) Norwegian- American Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 11,013. Dimensions: 512' x 61'. Twin-screw, 17 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

50 



knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: During the 
second World War was used successfully as a troopship under 
the management of Furness, Withy & Company, Ltd., but 
manned by Norwegians. Note: Reported sold to Argentina 
ship owners in 1946. Sister ship: Kristianafjord. 

Berlin (1868) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,333. Dimensions: 297' x 39'. Single-screw. Sister ship: 
Baltimore. 

Berlin (1874) American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
5,526. Dimensions: 488' x ,44'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Ex-City of Berlin. Scrapped 
in 1921. Note: See City of Berlin for additional information. 

Berlin (1908) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Weser Shipbuilding Yard, Bremen, Germany. 
Tonnage: 17,324. Dimensions: 590' x 69'. Twin screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Arabic. 
Note: After the first World War was turned over to the 
British and used on the White Star Line who renamed her 
Arabic. Scrapped in 1932. 

'Berlin (1925) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
15,286. Dimensions: 549' x 69'. Twin-screw, 16 ^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: She rescued a number of 
the survivors from sinking Lamport & Holt liner Vestris 
which went down on November 12, 1928. The Berlin was 
reported in November, 1945 as laid up in Swinemunde Bay 
because of war damage. 

Hi rm a (1894) Russian East Asiatic Steamship Co., Ltd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,595. Dimensions: 415' x 45'. Single- 
screw, 13 Y<L knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Arundel 
Castle. Renamed: (a) Mitau, (b) Joszef Pilsudski, (c) 
Wilbo. Broken up by Italian shipbreakers in 1924. 

Birmania (1882) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Fratelli Orlando, Leghorn, Italy. Tonnage: 2,384. 
Dimensions: 292' x 36'. Single-screw. 

Bismarck (1921) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 56,551. Di- 
mensions: 915' x 100'. Quadruple-screw, 23)^ knots. Two 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

51 



masts and three funnels. Renamed: (a) Majestic, (b) 
Caledonia. Note: Never in service as a Hamburg- American 
liner, as she was handed over to the British upon completion. 

Bluecher (1901) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 12,334. Di- 
mensions: 525' x 62'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Leopoldina, (b) Suffren. 
Scrapped in 1929. Sister ship : Moltke. 

Boadicea (1898) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 7,057. Dimensions: 486' x 52'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: 
Marquette. 

Bohemian (1900) Leyland Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Son, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 8,555. Dimensions: 512' x 58'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Wrecked off 
Halifax in 1920. 

Bolivia (1873) Anchor Line. 

Built by Robert Duncan & Co., Port Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 3,999. Dimensions: 400' x 40'. Single-screw, 12 
knots. Made final voyage to New York in 1901. 

Bologna (1905) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,680. Dimensions: 380' x 46'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. 

Bonn (1895) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Germania Werft, Kiel, Germany. Tonnage: 3,969. 
Dimensions: 355' x 43'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. 

Borussia (1855) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,349. Dimensions: 278' x 38'. Single-screw, 12 knots. The 
first steamship to be operated by the Hamburg-American 
Line. She was sold to the Mississippi and Dominion Line in 
1876. Lost in 1879. Sister ship: Hammonia. 

Bothnia (1874) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 4,556. Dimensions: 420' x 42'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Note: Used on the Liverpool- 
New York service until transferred to the Boston run in 1893. 
Sold to Italian owners in 1898, and was broken up by ship- 
breakers at Marseilles in 1899. Sister ship: Scythia. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

52 



Braga (1907) Fabre Line. 

Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 6,122. Dimensions: 415' x 49'. Twin-screw, 16 Y^. 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Europa, ex-Laura. 
Wrecked near Lipsa Island in 1926. 

Brandenburg (1901) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
7,532. Dimensions: 429' x 54'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Breslau. 

Brasile (1905) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Fratelli Orlando, Leghorn, Italy. Tonnage: 4,985. 
Dimensions: 394' x 47'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Argentina. Renamed: Vene- 
zuela. 

Braunschweig (1873) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,079. Dimensions: 351' x 39'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Note: Also used in the Australian trade. Made final voyage 
to New York in 1896. 

Bremen (1858) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,551. Dimensions: 321' x 39'. Single-screw. Three masts 
and one funnel. This pioneer steamship of the North 
German Lloyd commenced her maiden voyage from Bremen 
on June 19, 1858. She had accommodations for 1,000 pas- 
sengers. Note: The Hudson, New York and Weser were 
similar in appearance. 

Bremen (1896) North German Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 11,570, 
Dimensions: 550' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Constantinople, 
(b) King Alexander. 

Bremen (1900) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Shipbuilding Co., Stettin, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 10,826. Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 Y 2 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Pocahontas, 
ex-Prinzess Irene. Renamed: Karlesruhe. 

Bremen (1929) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Weser Shipbuilding Yard, Bremen. Tonnage: 
51,656. Dimensions: 898' x 101'. Quadruple-screw, 28% 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Launched on 
June 16, 1928. Commenced maiden voyage from Bremen on 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

53 



July 16, 1929, and broke the Atlantic speed record. Had 
accommodations for 600 first-class, 500 second-class and 
1,100 third-class passengers. Cost approximately $20,000,- 
000 to build. Her funnels were later raised 15 feet on account 
of the smoke nuisance when traveling at high speed. She 
was badly gutted by fire when bombed by aircraft during the 
Second World War. Sister ship: Europa. 

Bros I an (1901) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
7,524. Dimensions: 429' x 54'. Twin-screw, 12^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Bridgeport, a unit 
of the United States Navy transport service. Sister ship: 
Brandenburg. 

Bretagne (1922) French Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
10,171. Dimensions: 450' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14 ^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Flandria. Torpedoed 
while bound from the West Indies to England on October 14, 
1939. 

Britania (1902) Fabre Line. 

Built by Ch. & Ateliers de Provence, Port de Bouc, France. 
Tonnage: 5,103. Dimensions: 407' x 46'. Single-screw, 15 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Germania. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1923. 

Britannia (1840) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Duncan & Co., Port Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 1,139. Dimensions: 207' x 34'. Paddle-wheels, 
9 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Built of wood. Note: 
Charles Dickens made a voyage to America on this vessel in 
1842. In 1849 the Britannia was sold to the German 
Government and converted into a warship. She remained a 
hulk in Germany for many years. Sister ships: Acadia, 
Caledonia and Columbia. 

Britannia (1863) Anchor Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,417. Dimensions: 
255' x 33.' Single-screw, 10^ knots. Three masts and one 
funnel. Sister ship: Caledonia. 

Britannia (1881) Fabre Line. 

Built by T. Roy den & Sons, Liverpool, England. Tonnage: 
2,477. Dimensions: 328' x 40'. Single-screw. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1901. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

54 



Britannic (1874) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,004. Dimensions: 455' x 45'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Note: First ship to exceed 
5,000 tons, Great Eastern excepted. This famous steamship 
won the Atlantic speed record in November, 1876. Sister 
ship: Germanic. 

Britannic (1914) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
48,158. Dimensions: 870' x 94'. Triple-screw, 22 knots. 
Two masts and four funnels. Launched in February, 1914, 
and completed after outbreak of the first World War. Her 
navigating bridge was 104 feet above the keel. During the 
War was used as a hospital ship. Sunk by mines laid by a 
submarine in the Aegean Sea on November 21, 1916. 

*Britannic (1930) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
26,840. Dimensions: 683' x 82'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Motorship. Commenced 
maiden voyage from Liverpool on June 30, 1930. Accom- 
modations for 1,550 passengers. Made an Atlantic crossing 
in 1933 at the average speed of 19 % knots. Transferred 
to the London-New York route in April, 1935. Sister ship: 
Georgic. 

British Empire (1886) British Shipowners Co. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,329. Dimensions: 390' x 38'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed : Rotterdam. 

British Empire (1902) British Shipowners Co. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,291. Dimensions: 470' x 
56'. Twin-screw, 12 % knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Renamed: (a) Campania, (b) Campanello, (c) Flavia. 
Sister ships: British Prince and British Princess. 

British King (1881) British Shipowners Co. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,412. Dimensions: 410' x 39'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Sister ship: British Queen. 
Foundered in North Atlantic in 1906. 

British Prince (1899) British Shipowners Co. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,203. Dimensions: 470' x 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

55 



56'. Twin-screw, 12^ knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Renamed: (a) Sannio, (b) Napoli. Sister ships: British 
Empire and British Princess. 

British Princess (1882) American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,164. Dimensions: 420' x 42'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Les Alpes. 

British Queen (1881) British Shipowners Company. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,412. Dimensions: 410' x 39'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Obdam. Sister 
ship: British King. 

Brooklyn (1869) Fabre Line. 

Built at Glasgow. Tonnage: 3,576. Dimensions: 354' x 42'. 
Single-screw. Three masts and one funnel. Ex-City of 
Brooklyn. Ran ashore on Anticosti in 1885 and became a 
total loss. No lives were lost as a result of the accident. 

B uenos Aires ( 1 887) Compania Trasatlantica ( Spanish Line) . 
Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 5,311. Dimensions, 410' x 48'. Single-screw, 14 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. 

Buenos Ayrean (1879) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 4,005. Dimensions: 385' x 42'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: The first Atlantic steam- 
ship built of steel. (The Rotomohana of the Union Steam- 
ship Company of New Zealand was the first ocean-going 
steamship built of steel.) 

Buffalo (1885) Wilson Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 4,431. Dimensions: 385' x 
45'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Four masts and two funnels. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1901. 

Bulgaria (1898) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 11,077. Di- 
mensions: 501' x 62'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Renamed: (a) Canada, (b) Hercules. 

Bulow (1906) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 8,980. Dimensions: 478' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Tras-os-Montes, 
(b) Nyassa. Note: Used mostly on the South American run. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

56 



Burgundia (1882) Fabre Line. 

Built by T. Royden & Sons, Liverpool, England. Tonnage: 
2,908. Dimensions: 328' x 40'. Single-screw. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1901. 

Byron (1914) Byron Line (Greek). 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 9,272. Dimensions: 470' x 58'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Megali Hellas, 
ex-Vasilefs Constantinos. Scrapped in 1937. 

C. F. Tietgen (1897) Scandinavian-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
8,173. Dimensions: 469' x 53'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Rotterdam. Renamed: 
Dwinsk. 

C. Lopez Y. Lopez (1891) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish 
Line). 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
4,170. Dimensions: 396' x 43'. Single-screw. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Westmount, ex-Asia, ex-Susan, ex- 
Susan II, ex-Lismore Castle. Broken up by shipbreakers 
at Savona in 1930. 

Calabria (1857) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 3,321. Dimensions: 338' x 42'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Note: The Cunard Line purchased her in 1860 from the Euro- 
pean and Australian Line. Due to excessive vibration she 
was given new engines and boilers, but was never a successful 
ship and soon was sold and used later as a cable laying ship 
during her last years. Dismantled by shipbreakers at Bolnes 
in 1898. Ex-Australasian. 

Calabria (1901) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 4,376. Dimensions: 376 'x 47'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. 

Caledonia (1840) Cunard Line. 

Built by C. Wood on the Clyde. Tonnage: 1,139. Di- 
mensions: 207' x 34'. Paddle-wheels, 8*/ knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: Sold to Spanish owners in 1850. 
Ran onto a shelf of rocks as she entered Havana harbor in 
1851. The damage was so great that she was abandoned. 
Sister ships: Britannia, Acadia and Columbia. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

57 



Caledonia (1904) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 9,223. Dimensions: 500' x 58'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Torpedoed and sunk in the 
Mediterranean in December, 1916. 

Caledonia (1925) Anchor Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Linthouse, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 17,046. Dimensions: 553' x 70'. Twin-screw, 15^ 
knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: Speed increased 
to 17 knots in 1939. Renamed: Scotstoun (British merchant 
cruiser). Torpedoed on January 13, 1940 while serving as 
an auxiliary cruiser. Sister ship: Transylvania. 

Calgarian (1913) Allan Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 17,515. Dimensions: 571' x 72'. Quad- 
ruple-screw, 19^/2 knots. Two masts and two funnels. 
Torpedoed and sunk on March 1, 1918 while on convoy duty 
with a loss of 49 lives. Sister ship: Alsatian. These two 
ships were the finest and fastest of the pre-war liners to 
Canada. 

Calgaric (1918) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
16,063. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Triple-screw, 14^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Orca. Launched in January, 
1918. In January, 1927, the Orca was transferred to the 
White Star Line and renamed Calgaric for service on their 
Liverpool-St. Lawrence trade. Laid up at Milford Haven 
in 1933 and sold to shipbreakers in 1935. 

California (1863) Anchor Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
1,418. Dimensions: 255' x 33'. Single-screw. 

California (1872) Anchor Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 3,410. Dimensions: 361' x 40'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Broken up 
by Italian shipbreakers at Genoa in 1905. Originally used 
on the North Atlantic route, but later transferred to the 
Mediterranean service. Sister ship: Victoria. 

California (1907) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 8,662. Dimensions: 470' x 58'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

58 



Two masts and two funnels. Torpedoed off the south-west 
coast of Ireland by a German submarine on February 8, 
1917 with the loss of 41 lives. 

California (1923) Anchor Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 16,792. Dimensions: 553' x 70'. Twin- 
screw, 15^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: 
Launched on April 17, 1923. Sailed on maiden voyage 
August 25, 1923. Sister ship: Tuscania. A World War II 
casualty. 

Californian (1902) Leyland Line. 

Built by Caledon Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Dundee. 
Tonnage: 6,223. Dimensions: 447' x 53'. Twin-screw, 13 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 
61 miles from Cape Matapan on November 9, 1915 with the 
loss of one life. 

Cambria (1845) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
1,422. Dimensions: 219' x 35'. Paddle-wheels, 9 1 A knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Had accommodations for 110 
cabin passengers. Sister ship: Hibernia. 

Cambroman (1892) Dominion Line. 

Built by Laird Bros., Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 6,059. 
Dimensions: 429' x 46'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. Four 
masts and one funnel. Later owned by the Warren Line. 

Cameronia (1910) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 10,963. Dimensions: 515' x 62'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Torpedoed and sunk 150 miles 
from Malta on April 15, 1917 with the loss of 11 lives. 

*Cameronia (1920) Anchor Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
16,297. Dimensions: 552' x 70'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Launched on December 23, 
1919. Commenced maiden voyage from Liverpool to New 
York in May, 1921. 

Campania (1893) Cunard Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Go van, Glasgow. Tonnage: 12,950. Dimensions: 598' x 
65'. Twin-screw, 22 knots. Two masts and two funnels. 
Launched on September 8, 1892. Building cost amounted 



to approximately $3,000,000. From her keel to the top of 
her funnels measured 130 feet high. 



The diameter of the 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

59 



funnels was 19 feet. The main dining saloon measured 85 
feet by 63 feet and seated over 400 passengers at one time. 
Commenced her maiden voyage from Liverpool on April 22, 
1893. In 1914 she was sold to T. W. Ward & Company, 
famous shipbreakers. Before scrapping operations could be 
started she was requisitioned by the British Government for 
war service, and converted into a seaplane carrier and used 
at the Battle of Jutland. On November 5, 1918 she was in 
collision with the battleship Revenge in the Firth of Forth 
and as a result sunk. Sister ship: Lucania. 

Campania (1902) Royal Line (Canadian Northern Railways). 
Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,291. Dimensions: 470' x 
56'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Ex-British Empire. Renamed: (a) Campanello, (b) 
Flavia. Note: the Campania was at one time in the service 
of the Navigazione Generale Italiana Line. 

Canada (1848) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
1,831. Dimensions: 251' x 38'. Paddle-wheels, 10 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Note: Had accommodations 
for 140 cabin passengers. In 1867 was sold and converted 
into a sailing ship and renamed Mississippi. Scrapped in 
1883. Sister ships: America, Niagara and Europa. 

Canada (1863) National Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 4,276. Dimensions: 371' x 
41'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Rebuilt and lengthened in 1871. Made final voyage to New 
York in 1892. Scrapped in 1894. 

Canada (1865) French Line. 

Built at St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 4,287. Dimensions: 
354' x 43'. Single-screw, 13)^ knots. Ex-Panama. 

Canada (1896) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
9,415. Dimensions: 500' x 58'. Single-screw, 15 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1926. Note: Taken over 
and operated by the White Star Line during her later years. 

Canada (1898) Unione Austriaca Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 11,440. Di- 
mensions: 501' x 62'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Ex-Bulgaria. Renamed: Hercules. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

60 



'Canada (1911) Fabre Line. 

Built by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediterranee, France. 
Tonnage: 9,684. Dimensions: 476' x 56'. Two masts and 
two funnels. Twin-screw, 15}/ knots. 

Canadian (1854) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 1,873. Dimensions: 278' x 34'. Single-screw, 11 
knots. Three masts arid two funnels. Note: Pioneer Allan 
Line steamship. Commenced her maiden voyage from 
Liverpool to Quebec and Montreal on September 20, 1854. 
Wrecked in the St. Lawrence on June 1, 1857 with no loss of 
life. Sister ship: Indian. Note: These two steamships cost 
about $250,000 each. Had accommodations for 80 first-class 
passengers besides space devoted to a large number of emi- 
grants. 

Canadian (1860) Allan Line. 

Built at Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,926. On June 4, 
1861 was crushed by a field of ice at the entrance of the 
Straits of Belle Isle, and sunk. The disaster cost the lives 
of 30 of those on board. 

Canadian (1900) Leyland Line. 

Built by R. and W. Hawthorne, Leslie & Co., Ltd., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,309. Dimensions: 
530' x 59'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one 
funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 47 miles from the Fastnet on 
April 5, 1917 with the loss of one life. 

Canopic (1900) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
12,268. Dimensions: 578' x 59'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Commonwealth. Scrapped 
in 1925. 

*Caribia (1932) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 12,049. Di- 
mensions: 497' x 65'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Motorship. Note: Used on the Hamburg- 
Central American route. Sister ship: Cordillera. The 
Caribia has been renamed Iljitsch (Russian). 

Carinthia (1895) Cunard Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow, 
Scotland. Tonnage: 5,598. Dimensions: 445' x 49'. Twin- 
screw, 14 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Wrecked near 
Point Gravois, Haiti in 1900. Sister ship: Sylvania. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

61 



Carinthia (1925) Cunard Line. 

Built by Vickers, Armstrong, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 20,277. Dimensions: 600' x 73'. Twin- 
screw, 18 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Torpedoed and 
sunk by a German submarine on June 8, 1940. Sister ship: 
Franconia. 

Carmania (1905) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 19,566. Dimensions: 650' x 72'. Triple-screw, 
18 1/6 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Navigating 
bridge was 60 feet above the water line. She was the first 
Cunarder to be fitted with steam turbines and always a 
faster ship than her sister. On September 14, 1914 she en- 
gaged the armed German liner Cap Trafalgar and after 
many shots had been fired the Hamburg-South American 
Line's vessel was sunk. The Carmania had received 79 
shell holes, but the damage was not severe enough to prevent 
her making port for repairs. The Carmania was sold to 
shipbreakers in November, 1932 and during the following 
year dismantled. Sister ship: Caronia. 

Carolina (1905) Unione Austriaca (Austro-American Line). 
Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 4, 713. Dimensions: 359' x 48'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Francesca. 

Caronia (1905) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 19,782. Dimensions: 650' x 72'. Triple-screw, 
18 ^> knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sold to an English 
shipbreaking firm in January, 1932, but they resold her to 
Japanese shipbreakers for a larger sum of money and she 
sailed to Japan under the name Taiseiyo Maru. Scrapped 
in 1933. Sister ship: Carmania. (Note: These two sister 
ships proved to be very steady in bad weather.) 

Carpathia (1903) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 13,603. Dimensions: 
540' x 64'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots. Four masts and one 
funnel. Had accommodations for 200 second-class and about 
1,600 third-class passengers. The Carpathia answered the 
Titanic's S. O. S. call and succeeded in rescuing a large 
number of the survivors. Sunk by three torpedoes on July 
17, 1918 when 170 miles from Bishop Rock. The lives of 
five men in the stokeholds were lost. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

62 



Carthaginian (1884) Allan Line. 

Built by Go van Shipping Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
4,444. Dimensions: 386' x 45'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Sunk by a mine near Royal 
Sovereign Light Vessel on June 14, 1917. 

Caserta (1904) (a) Lloyd Italiano, (b) Navigazione Generale 
Italiana. 

Built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 7,028. Dimensions: 
420' x 51'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Ex-Mendoza. 

Caspian (1870) Allan Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow, 
Scotland. Tonnage: 2,747. Dimensions: 349' x 38'. Single- 
screw. Three masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1897. 

Cassandra (1905) Anchor-Donaldson Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 8,135. Dimensions: 455' x 
53'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. 

Cassel (1901) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 7,543. Dimensions: 428' x 54'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Marechal Gallieni. 
Sister ship: Chemnitz. 

Castilian (1898) Allan Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 7,441. Dimensions: 470' x 53'. Single-screw, 14 
knots. Wrecked in Bay of Fundy on March 11, 1899 while 
on her maiden voyage. No lives were lost. 

Catalonia (1881) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,841. 
Dimensions: 429' x 43'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1902. 

Cataluna (1883) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 3,665. Dimensions: 384' x 42'. Single-screw, 14 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. 

Cedric (1903) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
21,227. Dimensions: 680' x 75'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Launched on August 21, 1902. 
Sold to shipbreakers in February 1932. Sister ship: Celtic. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

63 



Note: These two ships were very similar to the Baltic and 
Adriatic and they were all noted for their steadiness in bad 
weather. 

Celtic (1872) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,888. Dimensions: 437' x 40'. Single-screw, 14^ knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Amerika. Sister 
ship: Adriatic. 

Celtic (1901) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
20,904. Dimensions: 680' x 75'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Note: First steamship to ex- 
ceed 20,000 tons. Converted to a cabin class liner in 1928. 
Went aground in a dense fog at entrance to Queenstown 
harbor in 1928 and became a total wreck. She was dis- 
mantled by shipbreakers in 1933 owing to the dangerous 
position of the wreck. Sister ship: Cedric. 

Cephalonia (1882) Cunard Line. 

Built by Laird Bros., Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 5,517. 
Dimensions: 430' x 46'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Launched in May, 1882. Commenced 
maiden voyage on August 24, 1882 from Liverpool. Had 
accommodations for 100 first-class passengers and 1,500 in 
steerage class. Renamed :Hailar. Scrapped in 1900. Sister 
ship: Pavonia. 

Cesare Battisti (1920) Transatlantica Italiana Line. 

Built by Societa Anonima Ansaldo, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 
8,331. Dimensions: 434' x 60'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Blew up in Massaua Harbor, 
Eritrea on December 26, 1936. 

Cestrian (1896) Leyland Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
8,776. Dimensions: 512' x 59'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed by enemy sub- 
marine near Skyro on June 24, 1917 with the loss of 3 lives. 

Cevic (1893) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
8,301. Dimensions: 500' x 60'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four 
masts and one funnel. 

Champlain (1932) French Line. 

Built by Chantier et Ateliers de Saint Nazaire, Penhoet. 
Tonnage: 28,124. Dimensions: 606' x 83'. Twin-screw, 20 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

64 



knots. Two masts and one funnel. This fine cabin class 
liner had a dining saloon that was two decks high and 65 
feet long. She struck a mine and sunk on July 3, 1940. 

Chateau Yquem (1883) Fabre Line. 

Built by Chantier et Ateliers de la Gironde, Bordeaux, 
France. Tonnage: 4,211. Dimensions: 386' x 41'. Single- 
screw. Made final voyage to New York in 1900. 

Chemnitz (1901) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 7,543. Dimensions: 428' x 54'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Cassel. 

Chester (1873) American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
4,770. Dimensions: 444' x 44'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Three masts and two funnels. Ex-City of Chester. Re- 
named: Sedgwick. Scrapped in 1907. 

Chicago (1908) French Line. 

Built by Chantier de L' Atlantique, St. Nazaire, France. 
Tonnage: 11,127. Dimensions: 508' x 57'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Guade- 
loupe. 

China (1861) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow. Tonnage: 2,539. 
Dimensions: 326' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: Magellanes (Spanish 
Line). Finally converted into a sailing ship and renamed 
Theodor. Foundered in 1908. 

Chrobry (1939) Gdynia- American Line. 

Built at Nakskov, Denmark. Tonnage: 11,442. Dimen- 
sions: 477' x 66'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Motorship. Torpedoed and sunk during the 
battle for Narvick, Norway in 1940. Sister ship: Sobieski. 

Cimbria (1867) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,037. Dimensions: 326' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sunk as a result of collision with 
the British steamship Sultan off Dutch coast on January 
19, 1883, with the loss of 389 lives. 

Cincinnati (1908) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 16,339. Di- 
mensions: 582' x 65'. Twin-screw, 15 % knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: Covington. Note: During the 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

65 



first World War she was seized at Boston and converted into 
a troopship. In June, 1918 was sunk by torpedoes. Sister 
ship: Cleveland. 

Circassia (1878) Anchor Line. 

Built by Vickers, Sons & Maxim, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 4,272. Dimensions: 399' x 42'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Three masts and one funnel. 

Circassia (1903) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 6,861. Dimensions: 450' x 55'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. 

Circassian (1872) Allan Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,724. Dimensions: 415' x 40'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. 

Citta di Geneva (1882) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Wigham Richardson & Co., Newcastle, England. 
Tonnage: 3,919. Dimensions: 390' x 42'. Single-screw. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1906. 

Citta di Milano (1897) La Veloce Line. 

Built by N. Odero, Sestri, Ponente, Italy. Tonnage: 3,848. 
Dimensions: 364' x 43'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Sister ship: 
Citta di Torino. Made final voyage to New York in 1907. 

Citta di Napoli (1871) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,125. Dimensions: 426' x 41'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Vittoria, ex-Maasdam, 
ex-Republic. Scrapped in 1910. 

Citta di Torino (1898) La Veloce Line. 

Built by N. Odero & Co., Foce, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 
3,836. Dimensions: 363' x 43'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Sister ship: Citta di Milano. Made final voyage to New 
York in 1907. 

City of Antwerp (1867) Inman Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,391. Dimensions: 
332' x 39'. Single-screw. Sold in 1880 to the Johnson Line 
and renamed Thanmore. Listed as missing in 1890. 

City of Baltimore (1854) Inman Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,472. Dimensions: 321' x 33'. Single-screw. Sold to the 
Hall Line in 1874 and renamed Fivaller. Resold in 1882 to 
Spanish owners, who changed her name to Benicarlo, and 
continued to run in their service until 1892. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

66 



City of Berlin (1875) Inman Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
5,491. Dimensions: 488' x 44'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Launched on October 27, 1874. 
Dining saloon was amidships and measured 44 feet by 43 
feet wide. Taken over by the American Line in 1893 and 
renamed Berlin. Turned over to the United States Govern- 
ment in 1898 for service in the war against Spain, and was 
given the name U. S. Meade. After the war she was used 
on the transport service between the mainland and Philip- 
pines. Nearly destroyed by fire in 1906 prior to sailing to 
the Philippines with troops. She was rebuilt, and used as 
a training ship at Boston in 1918. Note: She gained fame 
by winning the Atlantic speed record in 1875. Scrapped in 
1921. 

City of Boston (1864) Inman Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,213. Dimensions: 
313' x 39'. Single-screw. Two masts and one funnel. Left 
Halifax for voyage to Liverpool in January, 1870 with 177 
persons on board. She was never heard of again. 

City of Brooklyn (1869) Inman Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,911. Dimensions: 
354' x 43'. Single-screw. Three masts and one funnel. 
Renamed: Brooklyn. 

City of Brussels (1869) Inman Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,081. Dimensions: 390' x 40'. Single-screw, U l /2 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. She was the first ship to reduce 
the North Atlantic passage to under eight days. Altered in 
1872 by having another deck added, and other improvements 
were made to enable her to compete with newer rivals. Her 
career was suddenly ended when she collided with the steam- 
ship Kirby Hall and sunk off the mouth of the Mersey in 
the dense fog that prevailed on January 7, 1883. 

City of Chester (1873) Inman Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
4,560. Dimensions: 444' x 42'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Three masts and two funnels. Taken over and operated by 
the American Line under the name Chester in 1893. During 
the Spanish-American War was acquisitioned by the Ameri- 
can Government and renamed Sedgwick. After the war she 
was laid up until sold in 1905 to Italians, who renamed her 
Arizona and later to Napoletano. Scrapped in April, 1907. 
Sister ship: City of Richmond. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

67 



City of Chicago (1883) Inman Line. 

Built by Charles Connell & Co., Scotstoun, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 5,000. Dimensions: 430' x 45'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Launched in May, 1883. Ex- 
Vancouver. Wrecked by stranding on south coast of 
Ireland, near Kinsdale in July, 1892. No lives were lost. 

City of Glasgow (1850) Inman Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
1,609. Dimensions: 237' x 34'. Single-screw. Three masts 
and one funnel. Pioneer vessel of the Inman Line. Barque- 
rigged, and carried an enormous amount of canvas. She had 
2 beam engines totalling 350 nominal horse-power geared to 
a single shaft with a propeller 12 feet in diameter. Accom- 
modated 52 passengers in first-class, 85 in second-class and 
400 in the steerage. Crew numbered about seventy. Left 
Liverpool for New York on March 1, 1854, with 480 persons 
on board, and was never heard of again. 

City of London (1863) Inman Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,765. Dimensions: 374' x 41'. Single-screw. Three masts 
and one funnel. Note: Had been lengthened in 1868 to 374 
feet. 

City of Manchester (1851) Inman Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,215. Dimensions: 258' x 34'. Single-screw. Commenced 
maiden voyage in June, 1851. Sold in 1871 and converted 
into a sailing ship. Wrecked in 1876. 

City of Montreal (1872) Inman Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
4,489. Dimensions: 419' x 44'. Single-screw. Three masts 
and one funnel. Originally built with one funnel and was 
later given two stacks. Burnt at sea on August 12, 1887, 
with no loss of life. 

City of New York (1861) Inman Line. 

Built on the Clyde. Tonnage: 2,360. Dimensions ^326' x 
40'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Wrecked on Daunt's Rock, near Queenstown, on March 29, 
1864, with no loss of life. 

City of New York (1865) Inman Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 3,499. Dimensions: 375' xf39'. 
Single-screw. Three masts and two funnels. Lengthened to 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

68 



375 feet, 
Delaware 

1903. 



increasing tonnage to 3,499 tons gross. Ex- 
!. Broken up by shipbreakers in France during 



City of New York (1888) Inman Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 10,499. 
Dimensions: 528' x 63'. Twin-screw, 20^ knots. Three 
masts and three funnels. Note: Launched in March, 1888. 
Made 20.2 knots on trials. Was one of the first steamships 
to be equipped with twin-screws. (The Netting Hill was 
a twin-screw steamship built in 1881. Several of the early 
French Line steamers had been converted from paddle- 
wheels to twin-screws.) In 1898 was commissioned as a 
merchant cruiser in the United States Navy, and given the 
name Harvard. After the Spanish-American War her name 
reverted back to New York. During 1903 she was altered 
by having her three original funnels cut down to two, and, 
also, had new boilers and engines installed. Renamed: (a) 
New York, (b) Harvard, (c) New York. Sister ship: City 
of Paris. (These sister ships were taken over and operated 
by the American Line in 1893.) 

City of Paris (1866) Inman Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,651. Dimensions: 346' x 40'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Commenced maiden voyage in 
November, 1867. Sold and renamed Tonquin in 1883. 
Note: Sunk by collision in 1902. 

City of Paris (1889) Inman Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 10,669. 
Dimensions: 527' x 63'. Twin-screw, 20 knots. Three masts 
and three funnels. Launched in October, 1888. On trials 
made 21.95 knots. Taken over by the United States Govern- 
ment for service in the war against Spain, and went under the 
name Yale. After the war she was reconditioned, and when 
put back in her normal service, appeared with two funnels 
instead of the original three. She was given the name 
Philadelphia, and as such, continued until put on govern- 
ment service in 1917, as the Harrisburg. After the World 
War she was given back her former name Philadelphia, but 
before going to the scrapper's yard at Genoa in 1923 was used 
as a third-class liner to the Baltic, and later tried on the 
Italian emigrant service for a short time. Renamed: (a) 
Yale, (b) Philadelphia, (c) Harrisburg, (d) Phila- 
delphia. Sister ship: City of New York. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

69 



City of Philadelphia (1853) Inman Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 2,168. Dimensions: 294' x 39'. 
Single-screw. On September 9, 1854 was wrecked on Cape 
Race. No loss of life occurred. 

City of Richmond (1873) Inman Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
4,623. Dimensions: 441' x 43'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Three masts and two funnels. Made a fast run from Sandy 
Hook to Fastnet Rock in 1873 in 7 days, 23 hours. Sold in 
1891. Sister ship: City of Chester. 

City of Rome (1881) Inman Line. 

Built by Vickers, Sons & Maxim, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 8,415. Dimensions: 560' x 52'. Single- 
screw, 16 knots. Four masts and three funnels. Launched 
in June, 1881. First liner built with three funnels. Dining 
saloon measured 72 feet by 52 feet wide, and was 9 feet high 
or 17 feet in the opening to the drawing room above. This 
beautiful ship was sold to the Anchor Line not long after 
completion. Broken up by shipbreakers in Germany during 
1902, 

City of Washington (1853) Inman Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 2,870. Dimensions: 358' x 40'. 
Single-screw. Commenced maiden voyage to New York on 
December 31, 1856. She had previously been under charter 
to the French Government for service in the Crimean War. 
Lengthened in 1869. Wrecked near Nova Scotia on July 7, 
1873, with no loss of life. 

Cleveland (1908) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 16,971. Di- 
mensions: 588' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note : Inaugurated a new service to Boston 
in May, 1913, along with the Cincinnati. She was seized 
by the United States Government during the World War, 
and converted into a troopship, and renamed Mobile. 
In 1922 she reverted back to the Hamburg-American Line 
and received her former name. Renamed: (a) Mobile, (b) 
Cleveland. Scrapped in 1933. Sister ship: Cincinnati. 

Coblenz (1923) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Weser Shipbuilding Co., Bremen, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 9,449. Dimensions: 458' x 57'. Twin-screw, 11 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Si cilia. Sister ship: 
Saarbrucken . 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

70 



Coburg (1908) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
6,750. Dimensions: 419' x 54'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: Pocone. Sister ship: 
Eisenach. 

*Colombie (1931) French Line. 

Built by At. et Chantiers de France. Tonnage: 13,391. 
Dimensions: 488' x 66'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Note: Used on the West Indies and Central 
American service. 

Colombo (1917) Navigazione Generate Italiana. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, Newcastle, England. Tonnage: 12,003. Di- 
mensions: 518' x 64'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and 
two funnels. Note: Later transferred to the Lloyd Triestino 
Line. Ex-San Gennaro. 

Colorado (1867) Guion Line. 

Built at Jarrow-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 2,888. Note: 
She had accommodations for approximately 1,000 steerage 
passengers. Sunk by collision in the Mersey in December, 
1873, with the loss of six lives. 

Colorado (1887) Wilson Line. 

Built by Earle's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Hull, England. Tonnage: 4,220. Dimensions: 370' x 44'. 
Single-screw, 14 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1905. 

Columbia (1840) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Sons, Greenock, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 1,155. Dimensions: 207' x 34'. Paddle-wheels, 8J^ 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Wrecked on Devil's 
Limit Rock, near Halifax, on July 2, 1843, while on voyage 
between Boston and Halifax. Sister ships: Acadia, Britan- 
nia and Caledonia. 

Columbia (1866) Anchor Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Son, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 1,322. Dimensions: 283' x 33'. Single- 
screw. Note: In 1894 was sold to the Italians and renamed 
Francesco Crispi. She was wrecked on Ship wash in 
August, 1898. 

Columbia (1889) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Laird Bros., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 
7,383. Dimensions: 463' x 55'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

71 



Three masts and three funnels. Note: Sold to Spain in 1898 
and renamed Rapido. After the Spanish-American War the 
vessel was taken back by the Hamburg-American Line and 
used again on their Atlantic service. She was sold in 1904 
to the Russian Volunteer Fleet, who changed her name to 
Terek. She was scrapped in 1907. Sister ship: Auguste 
Victoria. (These ships were very similar in appearance to 
their running mates the Furst Bismark and Normannia.) 

Columbia (1901) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 8,292. Dimensions: 485' x 56'. Twin-screw, 15^ 
knots. Two masts and three funnels. Renamed: (a) Co- 
lumbella, (b) Moreas. Note: She was used as a British 
merchant cruiser under the name Columbella during World 
War I. Broken up by shipbreakers in Italy during 1929. 

Columbia (1908) Lloyd Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 5,460. Dimensions: 400' x 52'. Single-screw, 13 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Taken over by 
the Cosulich Line after World War I. Sister ship: Georgia. 

Columbus (1900) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
15,378. Dimensions: 593' x 59'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Republic. 

Columbus (1914) North German Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 34,356. 
Dimensions: 751' x 83'. Twin-screw, 20 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Note: She was never in use under this 
name for when completed in 1920 was turned over to the 
British and sold to the White Star Line and renamed 
Homeric. The Columbus of 1922 was a very similar ship. 

Columbus (1922) North German Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 32,354. 
Dimensions: 749' x 83'. Twin-screw, 22 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Note: Commenced her maiden voyage in 
1924. She was the last big liner to be fitted with recipro- 
cating engines. In 1929 was re-engined with geared turbines, 
which increased her speed to 23 knots. She was set on fire 
and scuttled by her crew on December 19, 1939, while being 
pursued by British warships. This vessel was very similar 
to the Homeric. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

72 



Commonwealth (1900) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
12,268. Dimensions: 578' x 59'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: She was transferred to 
the White Star Line in 1903 and renamed Canopic. 

Constantinople (1896) Greek Line. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 11,570. 
Dimensions: 550' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Bremen. Renamed: King 
Alexander. 

Conte Biancamano (1925) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
24,416. Dimensions: 626' x 76'. Twin-screw, 20 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Transferred to the Italia 
Line. She has been employed on the South American trade 
as well as being used on the North Atlantic route. In later 
years was put on the Far East service of Lloyd Triestino. 
Renamed:* Hermitage. Sister ship: Conte Grande. 

Conte Grande (1927) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Stabilmento Tecnico, Trieste, Italy. Tonnage: 
25,661. Dimensions: 624' x 78'. Twin-screw, 21 knots. 
Two rnasts and two funnels. Note: Transferred to the Italia 
Line. Later used on the South American route. Renamed: 
*Monticello. Sister ship: Conte Biancamano. 

Conte Rosso (1922) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
17,048. Dimensions: 570' x 74'. Twin-screw, 18^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Transferred to Lloyd 
Triestino, and put on their Far East service. She struck a 
mine and sunk off Sicily in February, 1941. Sister ship: 
Conte Verde. 

*Conte di Savoia (1932) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Cantieri Riuniti Dell Adriatico, Trieste, Italy. 
Tonnage: 48,502. Dimensions: 785' x 96'. Quadruple-screw, 
28 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: She was taken 
over and operated by the newly formed Italia Line before 
completion. Commenced her maiden voyage in December, 
1932. Equipped with three gyro-stabilizers which operate 
to minimize her motion in a rough sea. Has made the 
crossing between Genoa and New York frequently in 6 ^ 
days. She was never quite as fast as her running mate the 
Rex. She was sunk by air action at Venice, in September, 
1943, but was refloated two years later in October, 1945. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

73 



Conte Verde (1923) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
18,765. Dimensions: 570' x 74'. Twin-screw, 18 }/% knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Transferred to the Lloyd 
Triestino service of the Far East. Beached at Nakata Bay 
in July, 1945. Sister ship: Conte Rosso. 

Coptic (1881) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,384. Dimensions: 430' x 42'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Persia, (b) 
Persia Maru. Laid up at Yokohoma in 1924, and broken 
up by shipbreakers in 1926. 

Corcovado (1907) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Frd. Krupp, Keil, Germany. Tonnage: 8,374. 
Dimensions: 448' x 55'. Twin-screw, 12^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Such, (b) Corcovado, 
(c) Guglielmo Pierce, (d) Maria Christina, (e) *Mou- 
zinho. Sister ship: Ypiranga. Note: The Corcovado and 
Ypiranga were used chiefly on the Central American route. 

Cordillera (1932) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 12,055. Di- 
mensions: 497' x 65'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Motorship. Sister ship: Caribia. These ships 
were usually on the Central American route. 

Corinthian (1899) Allan Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 6,229. Dimensions: 430' x 54'. Single-screw, 12 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Wrecked near Brier 
Island on December 14, 1918. Sister ship: Sicilian. 

Corsican (1907) Allan Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
11,419. Dimensions: 499' x 61'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Marvale. Sister 
ships: Hesperian and Grampian. 

Covadonga (1884) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 5,161. Dimensions: 439' x 46'. Single-screw, 13^ 
knots. Four masts and two funnels. Ex-Tainui. Re- 
named: (a) Tainui, (b) Astoria. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

74 



Crefeld (1895) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Shipbuilding Co., Stettin, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 3,829. Dimensions: 355' x 43'. Single-screw, 12 H 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Espana 
No. 4 (Spanish Government). 

Cretic (1902) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
13,507. Dimensions: 582' x 60'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Mayflower, ex-Han- 
overian. Made final voyage to New York in 1920. 

Cristobal Colon (1866) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish 
Line). 

British built. Tonnage: 2,869. Dimensions: 335' x 42'. 
Single-screw. Ex-Minnesota. Note: Had been purchased 
from the Guion Line in 1875. 

Cristobal Colon (1923) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish 
Line). 

Built by Soc. Espanolo de Constr. Naval Yard, Ferrol, 
Spain. Tonnage: 10,833. Dimensions: 480' x 61'. Twin- 
screw, 17 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: 
Alfonso XIII. 

Cuba (1865) Cunard Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,668. Dimensions: 338' x 42'. Single-screw, 12 Yi knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Accommodations for 160 cabin 
passengers. She made 13.6 knots on trials. 

Cuba (1923) French Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 11,337. Dimensions: 
476' x 62'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: Used mostly on the Central American trade. 
A World War II casualty. 

Cufic (1888) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,639. Dimensions: 430' x 45'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Sunk in 1919. Sister ship: 
Runic. 

Cymric (1898) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
13,096. Dimensions: 585' x 64'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk by sub- 
marine 140 miles from Foreland on May 8, 1916 with the 
loss of five lives. 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

75 



Czar (1912) Russian- American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
6,345. Dimensions: 425' x 53'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Estonia, (b) Pulaski. 

Czaritza (1915) Russian-American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
6,598. Dimensions: 440' x 53'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Lithuania, 
(b) Kosciuszko. 

Dakota (1872) Guion Line. 

Built at Jarrow-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 4,332. Di- 
mensions: 400' x 43'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Wrecked near Anglesea, Wales, on May 9, 
1877, while on voyage from Liverpool to New York. All on 
board were saved. Sister ship: Montana. 

Dania (1889) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Reiherstieg Schiffs-Werfte, Hamburg, Germany. 
Tonnage: 3,898. Dimensions: 373' x 44'. Single-screw, 14 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Montserrat. 
Sister ship: Russia. 

Danmark (1867) Thingvalla Line. 

Built by Henderson, Coulborn Co., Renfrew, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 826. Dimensions: 203' x 28'. Single-screw. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: This little emigrant ship 
foundered in mid-Atlantic on April 6, 1889 and not one of 
the 735 persons aboard, of which 669 were passengers, was 
lost. The rescue was effected by the British steamship 
Missouri. Amid scenes of conspicuous gallantry and cool- 
ness on the part of the officers and men of the British steamer, 
the entire company of passengers and crew of the Danmark 
was transferred to the life boats and all reached port safely. 

Dante Alighieri (1914) Transatlantica Italiana. 

Built by Soc. Esercizio Bacini, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 
9,757. Dimensions: 483' x 59'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: Asahi Maru. 

Darmstadt (1890) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,012. Dimensions: 413' x 48'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Made 
final voyage to New York in 1910 and during 1911 was sold 
to the Turkish Government and renamed Karadeniz. 
Sister ships, Gera, Karlesruhe, Oldenburg and Stuttgart. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

76 



*De Grasse (1924) French Line. 

Built by Cammell Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 17,759. Dimensions: 552' x 71. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: A very fine 
example of an intermediate size liner. During World War II 
had been resting down by the stern in the estuary at Bor- 
deaux, France, for four years, but early in 1946 was raised 
and recondition work started. She should be ready for 
service in 1947. 

De La Salle (1924) French Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
8,400. Dimensions: 440' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Note: Used on the West Indies and 
Central American trade. Identical in appearance to the 
Sinaia of Fabre Line. 

Delphic (1897) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
8,273. Dimensions: 475' x 55'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Four 
mast's and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk near Bishop 
Rock on August 16, 1917, with the loss of 5 lives. 

Demerara (1872) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 1,904. 
Dimensions: 307' x 34'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Note: Used on Boston service and later 
transferred to the Mediterranean trade. Sister ship: 
Trinidad. 

Denmark (1865) National Line. 

Built at Stockton-on-Tees, England. Tonnage: 3,725. Di- 
mensions: 355' x 42'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Three masts 
and one funnel. Note: Later lengthened and altered 
similarly as were other steamships of this line of that period. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1891. 

Derfflinger (1907) North Germart Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 9,144. 
Dimensions: 463' x 57'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Huntsgreen, ex-Derfflinger. Scrapped 
in 1933. Sister ships: Luetzow and Yorck. 

Deutschland (1858) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
903 tons net. Dimensions: 180' x 32'. Single-screw. 
Wrecked on Goodwin Sands on December 6, 1876 with the 
loss of 52 lives. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

77 



Deutschland (1866) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,873. Wrecked off Kentish Knock, North Sea on December 
5, 1875, while bound for New York from Bremen. The lives 
of 157 were lost. 

Deutschland (1899) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 16,502. 
Dimensions: 660' x 67'. Twin-screw, 23 knots. Two masts 
and four funnels. Note: She represented the Hamburg- 
American Line's first and only successful attempt at winning 
the Atlantic Blue Ribbon. In 1910 she was taken off the 
route and converted into a cruise ship. Her speed was re- 
duced to 18 knots for this new service and name changed to 
Victoria Luise. After the first World War was used in the 
emigrant business under the name of Hansa with this new 
service lasting only a short time. Scrapped in 1925 after 
being laid up for a year. 

*Deutschland (1923) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 20,607. Di- 
mensions: 602' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. In 1934 she was lengthened and altered. 
These changes increased her length to 645 feet, her tonnage 
to 21,046 tons gross and speed to 20 knots. Her sister ship 
also underwent similar changes. Sister ship: Albert I Jail in. 
Note : The New York and Hamburg were exactly like these 
ships, except that they had only two masts. The Deutsch- 
land is not now in service on account of war damage. 

Devonia (1877) Anchor Line. 

Built by Barrow Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace. 
Tonnage: 4,270. Dimensions: 400' x 42'. Single-screw, 14 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Broken up by ship- 
breakers at Hamburg in 1899. 

Devonian (1900) Leyland Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
10,418. Dimensions: 552' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 20 miles 
from Tory Island on August 21, 1917, with the loss of two 
lives. Sister ship: Winifredian. 

Dominion (1874) Dominion Line. 

Built at Dumbarton, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,175. Dimen- 
sions: 335' x 38'. Single-screw, 11 knots. Three masts and 
one funnel. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

78 



Dominion (1894) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
7,036. Dimensions: 445' x 50'. Twin-screw. Four masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Prussia. Scrapped in 1922. 

Donau (1868) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,073. Dimensions: 347' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 

Doric (1923) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
16,484. Dimensions: 575' x 67'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Used chiefly on Mon- 
treal-Liverpool route. On September 5, 1935 she collided 
with French steamer Formigny during a dense fog off the 
coast of Portugal. The Doric at once commenced to list, 
but was able to make the port of Vigo and undergo temporary 
repairs. On the 7th of October one month later she left Til- 
bury dock bound for the scrapper's yard where the work of 
reducing her to junk took almost a full year. 

Dresden (1889) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,580. Dimensions: 390' x 46'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Sunk 
by the Russians during the first year of World War I. Re- 
named: (a) Helius, (b) Bezzm-y-Alem. Sister ship: 
Munchen. 

Dresden (1914) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
14,690. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Launched as the Zep- 
pelin in June, 1914, but completion was suspended till after 
the war. Finally completed in 1920 and turned over to the 
British. Sold to the Orient Line and used in that service 
under the name Ormuz. In 1927 she was resold to her 
former owners the North German Lloyd and given the name 
Dresden. On June 20, 1934 while on a cruise to the Nor- 
wegian Fjords with approximately 1,000 passengers aboard, 
she struck a submerged hulk in the thick log which prevailed 
and became a total wreck. During the launching of life 
boats four lives were lost. 

*Drottningholm (1905) Swedish- American Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 11,165. Dimensions: 517' x 60'. Triple- 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

79 



screw, 17 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Virginian. 
Note: Used as a repatriation ship during World War II. Re- 
ported sold to the Cosulich Line and to be renamed Brazil. 

Ducad'Aosta (1908) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Cant. Nav. Siciliani, Palermo, Italy. Tonnage: 
7,804. Dimensions: 476' x 53'. Twin-screw, 16 J/ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Made final voyage to 
New York in 1921. Transferred to the South American 
route. Scrapped in 1929. Sister ship: Duca di Geneva. 

Duca Degli Abruzzi (1907) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 
Built by Cant. Nav. Riuniti, Spezia, Italy. Tonnage: 7,838. 
Dimensions: 475' x 53'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Note: Made final voyage to New 
York in 1922. Transferred to the South American route. 
Scrapped in 1929. Sister ship: Principe Umberto. 

Duca di Galliera (1883) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,304. 
Dimensions: 400' x 44'. Single-screw, 14}/6 knots. Ex- 
Oaxaca. Sister ship: Duchessa di Genova. 

Duca di Genova (1907) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Cant. Nav. Riuniti, Spezia, Italy. Tonnage: 7,811. 
Dimensions: 475' x 53'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Sister ship: Duca d' Aosta. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1916. Removed from register in 
1918. 

Duchess of Athol (1928) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 20,119. Dimensions: 581' x 75'. Twin-screw, 18 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Torpedoed and sunk 
in 1942. Sister ships: Duchess of Bedford, Duchess of 
Richmond and Duchess of York. Note: A very fine class 
of cabin liners. 

*Duchess of Bedford (1928) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 20,123. Dimensions: 581' x 75'. Twin-screw, 18 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Renamed Em- 
press of India in 1946. Sister ships: Duchess of Athol, 
Duchess of Richmond and Duchess of York. 

*Duchess of Richmond (1928) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 20,022. Dimensions: 581' x 75'. Twin-screw, 18 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

80 



knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Renamed Em- 
press of Canada in 1946. Sister ships: Duchess of At hoi, 
Duchess of Bedford and Duchess of York. 

Duchess of York (1929) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 20,021. Dimensions: 581' x 75'. Twin-screw, 18 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sunk by high flying 
Focke Wolfe bombers in the Atlantic, off the Spanish coast, 
during the second World War. Sister ships: Duchess of 
Athol, Duchess of Bedford, and Duchess of Richmond. 

Duchessa di Genoa (1884) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,304. 
Dimensions: 400' x 44'. Single-screw, 14)^ knots. Ex- 
Mexico. Sister ship: Duca di Galliera. 

Duilio (1923) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by G. Ansaldo & Co., Sestri, Ponente, Italy. Tonnage: 
24,281. Dimensions: 602' x 76'. Quadruple-screw, 19 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note : Put on the Italian-South 
African service in 1933. Sunk while attempting to escape 
from Allied forces in the closing days of the Italian invasion. 
Sister ship: Giulio Cesare. 

Dwinsk (1897) Russian- American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
8,500. Dimensions: 469' x 53'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-C. F. Tietgen, ex-Rotterdam. 
Torpedoed and sunk 400 miles from Bermuda on June 18, 
1918, with the loss of 34 lives. 

Edam (1878) Holland- American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,329. Dimensions: 389' x 37'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Rotterdam, ex British 
Empire. In collision off Isle of Wight in September, 1895, 
with no loss of life. 

*Edam (1921) Holland- American Line. 

Built by De Schelde, Netherlands. Tonnage: 8,871. Di- 
mensions: 450' x 58'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Sister ships: Leerdam, Maasdam and 
Spaarndam. Note: These four sister ships originally had 
two funnels, but one was removed at a later date. 

Edison (1896) Byron Steamship Co. (Greek Line). 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 11,103. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

81 



and two funnels. Ex-Omar, ex-Koningin Luise. Broken 
up by shipbreakers after being sold to Italy in 1935. 

Egypt (1871) National Line. 

Built by Liverpool Shipbuilding Co. Tonnage: 4,670. Di- 
mensions: 440' x 43'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. She frequently made voyage from Queens- 
town to Sandy Hook in nine days. Later listed as of 5,089 
tons gross. Burnt at sea on July 19, 1890 with no loss of 
life. Note: Her running mate was the Spain. 

Eider (1884) North German Lloyd. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,719. Di- 
mensions: 430' x 47'. Single-screw, 17 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Lost by stranding on the Isle of Wight on 
January 31, 1892 with no loss of life. Sister ship: Ems. 

Eisenach (1908) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
6,757. Dimensions: 419' x 54'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Santarem. Sister 
ship: Coburg. 

Elbe (1881) North German Lloyd. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,897. Di- 
mensions: 418' x 44'. Single screw, 17 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: She was the first ship built of a new 
class of express liners for the North German Lloyd. Sunk by 
collision with the British steamer Crathie in the North Sea 
on January 30, 1895, with the loss of 335 lives. The ship 
went down a few minutes after being struck. 

*Empress of Australia (1914) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 21,833. 
Dimensions: 588' x 75'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. Two masts 
and three funnels. Ex-Tirpitz. Note: Construction work 
on this ship was held up during the first part of World War I, 
but in 1916 the Kaiser ordered her to be completed as a royal 
yacht in which to receive the Allied naval fleets in the event 
the Germans were victorious. However, such not being the 
case, she was ceded to Great Britain in 1919, and in 1922 
sold to the Canadian Pacific Line and refitted by John Brown 
& Company at Clydebank. In 1925 her original quadruple 
expansion engines were replaced by steam turbines at the 
Fairfield Shipbuilding Company. 

Empress of Britain (1906) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 14,189. Dimensions: 548' x 65'. Twin- 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

82 



screw, 20 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Has 
made the Liverpool-Halifax run in 5 days, 18 hours and 18 
minutes. After being used for war service by the British 
Admiralty she was reconditioned in 1919 and converted to 
oil burning fuel. In 1923 was changed from a first-class liner 
into, cabin-class. Renamed: Montroyal. Sister ship: 
Empress of Ireland. 

Empress of Britain (1931) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 42,348. Dimensions: 733' x 97'. Quadruple-screw, 
24 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: Launched 
on June 11, 1930. Cost about $15,000,000 to build. From 
her water line to top of masts measured 208 feet. Made her 
first World cruise in 1933. Has made the run between 
Southampton and Canada at the average speed of 25.08 
knots. She had accommodations for 423 first-class, 260 
tourist-class and 470 third-class passengers. Largest ship 
built for the Canadian service. Sunk off Ireland by German 
aircraft in October, 1940, and was the largest Allied liner 
lost in World War II. 

Empress of Canada (1922) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 21,517. Dimensions: 627' x 77'. Twin- 
screw, 20 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: Used 
for only a short time on the Atlantic, as she was built for the 
trans-pacific service, between Vancouver and Hong Kong. 
She was torpedoed and sunk in 1943. 

*Empress of Canada (1928) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 20,022. Dimensions: 581' x 75'. Twin-screw, 18 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Duchess of Rich- 
mond. 

Empress of France (1913) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
18,357. Dimensions: 571' x 72'. Quadruple-screw, 19^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Alsatian. Scrapped in 
1935. 

Empress of India (1908) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 16,992. Dimensions: 590' x 68'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Prinz Friedrich 
Wilhelm. Renamed: (a) Montlaurier, (b) Montnairn. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

83 



*Empress of India (1928) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 20,123. Dimensions: 581' x 75'. Twin-screw, 18 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Duchess of 
Bedford. 

Empress of Ireland (1906) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 14,191. Dimensions: 548' x 65'. Twin- 
screw, 19 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Had accom- 
modations for 310 first-class, 470 second-class and 770 third- 
class passengers. Sunk as a result of being in collision with 
the Danish collier Starstad during the thick fog that pre- 
vailed on the St. Lawrence River on May 29, 1914, and went 
down within 15 minutes, with the loss of 1,024 lives. Sister 
ship : Empress of Britain. 

Empress of Scotland (1905) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 25,160. 
Dimensions: 677' x 77'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Kaiserin Auguste Victoria. Note: 
Ceded to Great Britain by the Peace Treaty in 1919. Sold 
to the Canadian Pacific Line in 1921 and reconditioned for 
their services. Accommodated 459 first-class, 478 second- 
class and 536 third-class passengers. Broken up by ship- 
breakers in 1934. 

Ems (1884) North German Lloyd. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,933. Di- 
mensions: 430' x 47'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: Had two of her four original masts 
removed at a later date. Renamed: Lake Simcoe. Sister 
ship: Eider. 

England (1865) National Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,440. Dimensions: 355' x 
42'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Note: Later lengthened and tonnage increased to 4,900 tons 
gross. Made final voyage to New York in 1892. 

Erin (1864) National Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,319. Dimensions: 418' x 
41'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Note: She was later lengthened and tonnage increased to 
4,577 tons gross. Commenced voyage from New York on 
December 31, 1889, with 72 people on board and was never 
heard of again. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

84 



Erzherzog Franz Ferdinand (1899) Lloyd Austriaco. 

Built by Lloyd Austriaco at Trieste. Tonnage: 6,044. Di- 
mensions: 426' x 51'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. 

Espagne (1909) French Line. 

Built by Chantier et Atliers de Provence, Port de Bouc, 
France. Tonnage: 11,155. Dimensions: 539' x 60'. Twin- 
screw, 15^ knots. Two masts and two funnels. Scrapped 
in 1934. 

Estonia (1889) Russian- American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,250. Dimensions: 400' x 45'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex- Yorkshire (Former Bibby 
liner). 

Estonia (1912) East Asiatic Co. (Danish). 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
6,516. Dimensions: 425' x 53'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Czar. Renamed: Pulaski. 
Note: Later taken over and operated by the Gydnia- Ameri- 
can Line (Polish). 

Ethiopia (1873) Anchor Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 4,005. Dimensions: 402' x 40'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1907. 

Etruria (1884) Cunard > Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 8,127. Dimensions: 501' x 57'. Single 
screw, 19^ knots. Three masts and two funnels. Note: 
Taken off the Cunard service in 1909 and broken up by ship- 
breakers at Preston the same year. Sister ship: Umbria. 

Eugenia (1906) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 4,903. Dimensions: 385' x 49'. Single-screw, 13 
knots. Torpedoed and sunk in 1916. 

Europa (1847) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Wood at Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
1,989. Dimensions: 251' x 38'. Paddle-wheels, 10M knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Note: The Cunard Line sold 
her in 1867. She was lengthened by her new owners and 
used in their service for some time. Sister ships: America, 
Canada and Niagara. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

85 



Europa (1907) Fabre Line. 

Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 6,122. Dimensions: 415' x 49'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex- Laura. Renamed: Braga. 

Europa (1907) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Cantieri Nav. Siciliani, Palermo, Italy. Tonnage: 
7,870. Dimensions: 454' x 53'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 1928. 

Europa (1930) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 49,746. Di- 
mensions: 890' x 102'. Quadruple-screw, 28 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. From her keel to top of masts 
measured 236 feet. At one time carried an aeroplane that 
was launched from the ship by a special catapult. Remained 
tied up in German harbor throughout World War II. After- 
wards was used first as a troopship to bring back soldiers to 
the United States and finally turned over to the French Line 
in 1946, and renamed Liberte. While being reconditioned 
at Havre for their Atlantic trade she was torn from her 
moorings during a severe gale in December, 1946, and sus- 
tained serious damage when she crashed into the sunken 
hulk of the former French liner Paris. This probably will 
delay her being used on the Atlantic Ferry for another year. 
Note: The Europa was the largest ship to pass through the 
Panama Canal. Sister ship: Bremen. 

Europe (1864) French Line. 

Built at Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,443. Dimensions: 
350' x 42'. Paddle-wheels. Note: In 1873 was lengthened 
and altered to screw propulsion. Tonnage increased to 
5,333 tons gross. She was abandoned at sea on April 4, 1874, 
while bound to New York from Havre. AH on board were 
saved. 

European (1866) Allan Line. 

Built by Malcolmson Bros., Waterford, Ireland. Tonnage: 
2,708. Dimensions: 326' x 36'. Single-screw. Note: She 
was launched as the William Penn but later was purchased 
by the Allan Line and renamed European. In this service 
she remained for a brief period as she was resold. In 1876 
she broke in two, but was repaired and lengthened. She was 
finally lost through being stranded in 1877. 

Evangeline (1900) Furness Withy Co. 

British built. Tonnage: 3,944. Dimensions: 371' x 45'. 
Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Re- 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

86 



named: Tennyson. Sister ship: Loyalist. Note: These 
small steamers with their clipper stems were used as pas- 
senger carriers between Liverpool, Halifax and St. John, 
Newfoundland. They were engaged in this service but a 
short time and were then sold to the Lamport & Holt Line. 

Excalibur (1930) American Export Line. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. 
Tonnage: 9,359. Dimensions: 450' x 61'. Single-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Joseph 
Hewes. Note: Torpedoed by enemy submarine off the coast 
of Morocco November 11, 1942, during the North African 
invasion. Sister ships: Excambion, Exochorde and 
Exeter. 

Excambion (1931) American Export Line. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. 
Tonnage: 9,360. Dimensions: 450' x 61'. Single-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: John Penn. 
Note: Sunk by the Japanese off Guadacanal on August 13, 
1943. Sister ships: Exeter, Excalibur and Exochorde. 

Exeter (1931) American Export Line. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. 
Tonnage: 9,360. Dimensions: 450' x 61'. Single-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Edward 
Rutledge. Note: Torpedoed by submarine off coast of 
Morocco November 12, 1942, during North African invasion. 
Sister ships: Excambion, Exochorde and Excalibur. 

Exochorde (1931) American Export Line. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. 
Tonnage: 9,359. Dimensions: 450' x 61'. Single-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed *Harry Lee 
(U. S. Navy). Sister ships: Excambion, Exeter and 
Excalibur. 

Ferdinand de Lesseps (1875) French Line. 

Built by A. & J. Inglis Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,920. Dimensions: 350' x 38'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Ex- 
Stad Haarlem. 

Finland (1902) Red Star Line. 

Built by Wm. Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding & Engineering 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa. Tonnage: 12,188. Dimensions: 560' 
x 60'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Note: Later owned and oper- 
ated by the Panama-Pacific Line. Scrapped in 1927. Sister 
ships: Kroonland, Vaterland and Zeeland. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

87 



Flandre (1914) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 8,503. 
Dimensions: 464' x 57'. Quadruple-screw, 17 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Note: Generally used on the West 
Indies and Central American trade. 

Flavia (1902) Cunard Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,291. Dimensions: 470' x 
56'. Twin-screw, 12^ knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Ex-Campanello, ex-Campania, ex-British Empire. Tor- 
pedoed and sunk on August 24, 1918. 

Florida (1905) Lloyd Italiano. 

Built by Societa Esercizio Bacini, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 
5,018. Dimensions: 381 'x 47'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Note: This ship rammed the White 
Star liner Republic on January 23, 1909, just south of 
Martha's Vineyard while navigating in a dense fog. The 
Republic sank quite rapidly, but the Italian liner was able 
to rescue most of the survivors. However, four of the pas- 
sengers on board the Republic were crushed to death in their 
cabins by the bow of the Florida. This tragedy marked the 
first occasion upon which the wireless was put to practical 
use in summoning aid for ships in distress. The S.O.S. was 
answered by no fewer than five liners which steamed im- 
mediately to the assistance of the stricken vessel. These 
were the Baltic, Furnessia, Lucania, La Lorraine and 
New York. The survivors of the Republic were transferred 
from the Florida to the Baltic. The severely damaged 
Florida had thirty feet of her bow doubled up into a space 
of five feet. The collision bulkhead withstood the blow and 
thus prevented the ship from sinking. She was able to steam 
into New York harbor and later had her crushed bow re- 
placed by a new one. The Morse Drydock and Repair 
Company of Brooklyn doing the work within 24 days for the 
sum of $39,500. Made final voyage to New York in 1910. 
Sister ships: Indiana, Luisiana and Virginia. 

Folia (1907) Cunard Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, 
England. Tonnage: 6,365. Dimensions: 430' x 52'. Twin- 
screw, 14 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Princi- 
pello, ex-Principe di Piemonte. Note: Torpedoed and 
sunk four miles from Ram Head, Yougal, on March 11, 1917, 
with the loss of 7 lives. 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

88 



France (1867) National Line. 

Built at Liverpool, England. Tonnage: 4,281. Dimensions: 
385' x 42'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. Three masts and one 
funnel. Note: Her original tonnage was 3,572 tons gross but 
had been lengthened. Made final voyage to New York in 
1893. Sister ships: England and Denmark. 

France (1912) French Line. 

Built by Chantiers et Ateliers de St. Nazaire, France. Ton- 
nage: 23,769. Dimensions: 690' x 75'. Quadruple-screw, 
23 y^. knots. Two masts and four funnels. Note: Laid down 
in February, 1909, and was launched on September 20, 1910. 
Commenced her maiden voyage from Havre to New York 
on August 20, 1912. Has made the run between those two 
ports in 5 days and 17 hours. She was used by the French 
Navy in World War I as the France IV and later employed 
as a hospital ship. Her final use during the war was that of 
a troopship. Returned to the passenger trade in August, 
1919. Laid up in September, 1932, and sold to French ship- 
breakers in November, 1934. 

Francesca (1905) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 4,996. Dimensions: 359' x 48'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Carolina. 

Franconia (1911) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 18,150. Dimensions: 
600' x 71'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: Torpedoed and sunk 195 miles from Malta 
on October 4, 1916, with the loss of 12 lives. Sister ship: 
Laconia. These two ships were built as improvements for 
the Liverpool-Boston trade. 

*Francpnia (1923) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 20,175. Dimensions: 601' x 73'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Had been used 
frequently on cruises prior to the war. Sister ship: Ca- 
rinthia. 

Frankfurt (1869) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,582. Dimensions: 311' x 39'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Note: One of a large class of similar ships built for the North 
German Lloyd. In 1896 she was sold to Newcastle owners, 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

89 



who resold her that same year to Spezia ship owners and 
employed in their service as a coal carrier. Broken up in 
Italy by shipbreakers. 

Frankfurt (1899) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 7,431. Dimensions: 429' x 54'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Koln. 

Franklin (1848) New York and Havre Steam Navigation Co. 
Built by Westervelt & McKay, New York. Tonnage: 2,400. 
Dimensions: 263' x 41'. Paddle-wheels. Commenced first 
voyage in 1850. Made the eastward passage in 12 days, and 
10 hours. Wrecked on Long Island on July 17, 1854, with no 
loss of life. 

Frederik VIII (1913) Scandinavian- American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 11,850. 
Dimensions: 523' x 62'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Scrapped in 1937. 

Friedrich der Grosse (1896) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,771. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: Huron. Sister ship: Konigin 
Luise. 

Friesland (1889) Red Star Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 6,409. 
Dimensions: 437' x 51'. Single-screw, 15 knots. Four masts 
and one funnel. Scrapped in 1912. 

Frisia (1872) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,500. Dimensions: 364' x 42'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Accommodations for 102 first- 
class, 136 second-class and 620 steerage passengers. 

Fulda (1882) North German Lloyd. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,814. Di- 
mensions: 438' x 46'. Single-screw, 17% knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Broken up by shipbreakers in 1899 after 
sustaining serious damage while in drydock. Sister ship: 
Werra. 

Fulda (1924) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Weser Shipbuilding Yard, Bremen, Germany. 
Motorship. Tonnage: 9,492. Dimensions : 458' x 57'. Twin- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Later 
was converted into a freighter and tonnage reduced to 7,744 
tons gross. Sister ships: Werra and Weser. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

90 



Furnessia (1880) Anchor Line. 

Built by Barrow Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 5,495. Dimensions: 445' x 44'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Later 
was altered by having two funnels installed and thus re- 
placing her original single one. Made final voyage to New 
York in 1911. 

Furst Bismark (1890) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,874. 
Dimensions: 504' x 57'. Twin-screw, 19 Y 2 knots. Two 
masts and three funnels. Renamed: (a) Don, (b) Moskva, 
(c) Gaa, (d) San Giusto. Scrapped in 1924. Sister ship: 
Normannia. Note: These sister ships were very similar to 
the Columbia and Auguste Victoria. 

Furst Bismarck (1905) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 8,330. Dimensions: 469' x 55'. Twin- 
screw, 14^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: 
(a) Friedrichsruh, (b) Amboise. 

Gallia (1878) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,809. 
Dimensions: 430' x 44'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: Cost about $775,000 to build. 
In the fall of 1897 was sold for the Canadian service of D. 
and C. Maclver's Beaver Line. Wrecked in 1898. 

Garibaldi (1906) Transatlantica Italiana. 

Built by Soc. Esercizio Bacini, Riva Trigoso, Italy. Ton- 
nage: 5,185. Dimensions: 381' x 48'. Twin-screw, 14j/ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Virginia. Note: 
Later used in the service of the Tirrenia Line. 

Geiser (1881) Thingvalla Line. 

Built at Copenhagen, Denmark. Tonnage: 2,831. Di- 
mensions: 324' x 39'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Sunk as a 
result of collision off Sable Island on August 14, 1888. There 
was a loss of 119 lives. 

Gellert (1874) Eagle Line. (Hamburg, Germany.) 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 3,533. Dimensions: 374' x 40'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Taken 
over and operated by the Hamburg-American Line. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1894. Sister ships: Lessing, 
Wieland and Herder. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

91 



General Artigas (1923) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Howaldtswerke, Germany. Tonnage: 11,343. Di- 
mensions: 473' x 59. Single-screw, 12 1^ knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex- Westphalia. Note: Transferred to the 
Hamburg-South American Line. Sister ship: General San 
Martin. 

*General Osorio (1929) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
11,590.' Dimensions: 492' x 65'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Motorship. Note: Transferred 
to the Hamburg-South American Line. Originally used on 
the Central American trade. 

General San Martin (1922) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Howaldtswerke, Germany. Tonnage: 11,343. Di- 
mensions: 473' x 60'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Thuringia. Note: Transferred to the 
Hamburg-South American Line. Sister ship: General 
Artigas. 

General Von Steuben (1922) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 14,690. 
Dimensions: 526' x 65'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Muenchen. Renamed: Steuben. 
Note: The Muenchen was rebuilt at Bremen in 1931 after 
having been gutted by fire at her New York pier. She was 
renamed General Von Steuben and put back on the At- 
lantic service, no longer resembling her former appearance. 

*George Washington (1908) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 25,570. 
Dimensions: 699' x 78'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: The height of her highest masts 
measured 193^ feet above the keel. Used as an American 
troopship during the first World War. Later was sold to the 
United States Lines and reconditioned for their Atlantic 
service. Her gross tonnage was reduced to 23,788 tons gross. 
Laid up in 1931. Brought put of retirement early in 1941 
and turned over to the British. She was renamed Catlin. 
After one trip to Newfoundland was returned to the United 
States Government and reconditioned at a cost of $11,000- 
000. Her two funnels were replaced by one. Used as a 
troopship during World War II. She is now laid up at a 
New Jersey port. 

Georgia (1908) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow. Tonnage: 
5,380. Dimensions: 400' x 52'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

92 



Two masts and one funnel. Note: Taken over by the Cosu- 
lich Line after World War I. Sister ship: Columbia. 

*Georgic (1895) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
10,077. Dimensions: 558' x 60'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Captured and sunk by the 
German raider Mowe when 590 miles from Cape Race on 
December 10, 1916. 

Georgic (1932) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
27,759. Dimensions: 683' x 82'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Motorship. Keel laid on No- 
vember 29, 1929. Launched on November 12, 1931. Com- 
menced maiden voyage from Liverpool on June 25, 1932. 
In 1933 made a crossing at the average speed of 18.43 knots. 
Transferred to the London-New York route in April, 1935. 
Sister ship: Britannic. Note: These sister ships were trans- 
ferred to the Cunard White Star Limited. 

Gera (1890) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,005. Dimensions: 413' x 47'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships: 
Darmstadt, Karlesruhe, Oldenburg and Stuttgart. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1909. 

Gerania (1909) Gerania Steamship Co. (Austrian). 

Built by Northumberland Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 4,940. Dimensions: 390' x 52'. 
Single-screw, 11 knots. Note: An emigrant carrier. 

Germania (1903) Fabre Line. 

Built by Ch. & Atel de Provence, Port de Bouc, France. 

Tonnage: 5,103. Dimensions: 407' x 46'. Single-screw, 14 

knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Britania. 

Made final trip to New York in 1912, as the Germania. 
Germanic (1874) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 

5,000. Dimensions: 455' x 45'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 

Four masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Ottawa, (b) 

Gulcemal. Sister ship: Britannic. 

Gerolstein (1904) Bernstein Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
7,772. Dimensions: 453' x 56'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Mamari. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

93 



Gerona (1911) Thomson Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,111. Dimensions: 
466' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Renamed: Ascania. 

Gerty (1903) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 

Built by J. Readhead & Sons, South Shields, England. Ton- 
nage: 4,212. Dimensions: 346' x 45'. Single-screw. 12 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Giulia. 

Giulia (1904) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 4,337. Dimensions: 346' x 45'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Gerty. 

Giulio Cesare (1920) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 21,657. Dimensions: 
602' x 76'. Triple-screw, 19 1 A knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: Transferred to the Italia Line. In Novem- 
ber, 1933, was reconditioned and put on the Italy and South 
Africa service. Capsized at Trieste in May, 1945. Sister 
ship: Duilio. 

Giuseppe Verdi (1915) Transatlantica Italiana. 

Built by Soc. Esercizio Bacini, Riva Trigosa, Italy. Ton- 
nage: 9,760. Dimensions: 505' x 59'. Twin-screw, 16 Y 2 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Yamato 
Maru. 

Gneisenau (1903) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,081. 
Dimensions : 442' x 55'. Twin-screw, 13 3^ knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: Citta di Genova. Sister ships: 
Roon and Scharnhorst. 

Goeben (1906) North German Lloyd. 

Built by the Weser Shipbuilding Yard, Bremen. Tonnage: 
8,792. Dimensions: 474' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Roussillon. Scrapped 
in 1931. Sister ship: Kleist. 

Gothic (1893) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
7,755. Dimensions: 490' x 53'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Gothland. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

94 



Gothland (1893) Red Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
7,669. Dimensions: 490' x 53'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Gothic. Scrapped in 1927. 

Graf Bismarck (1871) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,406. Dimensions: 315' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1890. 

Graf Waldersee (1898) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 13,102. Di- 
mensions: 561' x 62'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Four masts 
and one funnel. Scrapped in 1921 while under British owner- 
ship. Sister ships: Patricia, Pennsylvania and Pretoria. 

Grampian (1907) Allan Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 10,920. Dimensions: 485' x 60'. Twin- 
screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Later 
was taken over by the Canadian Pacific Line and operated 
by them under her original name. Sister ships: Corsican 
and Hesperian. Scrapped in 1926. 

Great Britain (1843) Great Western Steamship Co. 

Built at Bristol, England. Tonnage: 3,270. Dimensions: 
274' x 48'. Single- screw, 11 knots. Six masts and one funnel. 
Note: She was the first Atlantic screw steamer and also first 
Atlantic ship to be built of iron. As originally rigged she had 
six masts and one funnel, later this was altered into a four 
masted two funnelled ship. In 1890, was converted into a 
hulk at the Falkland Islands. 

Great Eastern (1858) Great Eastern Steamship Co. 

Built by Scott, Russell & Co., Millwall, London. Tonnage: 
18,915. Dimensions: 680' x 82'. Paddle-wheels and a single 
screw. Speed 13 knots. Six masts and five funnels. Note: 
Launched in 1858. She was to have been called the Levia- 
than, but was christened the Great Eastern. The cost of 
launching the ship exhausted the owner's funds, and she lay 
unfinished for a year. A new company was formed and they 
had her completed in September, 1859. Her building cost 
amounted to about $5,000,000. Commenced her maiden 
voyage for New York on June 17, 1860. Her employment as 
an Atlantic liner was of short duration. Later was used to 
lay the Atlantic cable. Broken up by shipbreakers in 1891. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

95 



Great Western (1838) Great Western Steamship Co. 

Built at Bristol, England. Tonnage: 1,340. Dimensions: 
212' x 35'. Paddle-wheels, 8^ knots. Four masts and one 
funnel. Scrapped in 1856. 

Grecian Monarch (1882) The Monarch Line. 

Built by Earle's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Hull, England. Tonnage: 4,364. Dimensions: 381' x 43'. 
Single-screw. Two masts and one funnel. Sold to the Allan 
Line in 1887 and renamed Pomeranian. Destroyed by 
enemy action on April 16, 1918. 

Greece (1863) National Line. 

Built at Jarrow-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 4,310. Di- 
mensions: 390' x 41'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Three masts 
and one funnel. Ex- Virginia. Made final voyage to New 
York in 1892. 

*Gripsholm (1925) Swedish-American Line. 

Built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage, 17,716. Dimensions: 
553' x 74'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: Has the distinction of being the first Atlantic 
liner with Diesel engines. Became famous as a repatriation 
ship during World War II. 

Grosser Kurfurst (1899) North German Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 13,245. 
Dimensions: 560' x 62'. Twin-screw, 152/j knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Aeolus, (b) City of 
Los Angeles. 

Guadeloupe (1906) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 6,600. 
Dimensions: 432' x 52'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Note: She was captured and sunk by the 
famed merchant cruiser Kronprinz Wilhelm on February 
23, 1915. Sister ship: Perou. 

Guglielmo Pierce (1907) Sicula Americana Line. (Italian) 
Built in Germany. Tonnage: 8,512. Dimensions: 448' x 
55'. Twin-screw, 12 % knots. Two masts and one funnel. 
Ex-Corcovado, ex-Sueh, ex-Corcovado. Renamed: (a) 
Maria Christina, (b) Mouzinho. 

Gulcemal (1874) Turkish owners. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,122. Dimensions: 455' x 45'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

96 



Four masts and two funnels. Ex-Ottawa, ex-Germanic. 
Note: This very famous ship was disposed of during World 
War II. 

H. H. Meier (1892) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Newcastle- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 5,140. Dimensions: 421' x 
48'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Renamed: *Manuel Calvo. 

Habana (1872) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 

Built by Oswald & Co., Sunderland, England. Tonnage: 
2,678. Dimensions: 317' x 37'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Ex-Ernst Moritz Arndt. 

*Habana (1923) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
Built by Soc. Espanola de Construction Naval, Bilbao, 
Spain. Tonnage: 10,551. Dimensions: 480' x 61'. Twin- 
screw, 17 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Alfonso 
XIII. 

Habsburg (1875) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Earle's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Hull, England. Tonnage: 3,094. Dimensions: 351' x 39'. 
Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: 
Also used on the Australian trade. Made final voyage to 
New York in 1895. Sister ship: Salier. 

Haiti (1913) French Line. 

Built in France. Tonnage: 6,288. Dimensions: 410' x 51'. 
Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: 
Chiefly used on the West Indies and Central American trade. 
Renamed: *Marrakech. 

Hamburg (1899) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,532. 
Dimensions: 499' x 60'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Powhatan, (b) President 
Fillmore, (c) New Rochelle, (d) Hudson. Sister ship: 
Konig Albert. 

Hamburg (1926) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 21,133. Di- 
mensions: 602' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and 
two funnels. Note: In 1934 was altered by having a new 
type of bow installed. Her length was increased to 645 feet 
and tonnage to 22,117 tons gross. New engines gave her a 
speed of 20 knots. Sister ship: New York. (These two 
ships were very similar to the Albert Ballin and Deutsch- 
land.) 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

97 



Hammonia (1855) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,026. Single-screw. Note: This ship together with her 
sister ship Borussia inaugurated regular steamship service 
for the Hamburg- American Line. She was laid up in 1864. 
In 1867 was sold to the Allan Line and renamed Belgian. 
Later was sold to Gulf service owners and name changed to 
Missouri. Wrecked in October, 1873. Sister ship: Borussia. 

Hammonia (1867) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,964. Dimensions: 330' x 40'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Note: Sold to the Russian Volunteer Fleet in 1878 and re- 
named Moskva. Wrecked on July 19, 1882 while on voyage 
between Odessa and Hankow. 

Hammonia (1882) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
4,247. Dimensions: 372' x 44'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 
Three masts and two funnels. Renamed: Versailles. 
Broken up by shipbreakers at Genoa in 1914. 

Hannover (1869). North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,571. Dimensions: 311' x 39'. Single-screw. 

Hannover (1899) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 7,305. Dimensions: 429' x 54'. 
Twin-screw, 123^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1923. 

Hansa (1861) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,325. Dimensions: 337' x 41'. Single screw. Note: Similar 
to the America of 1863. 

Hansa (1899) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 16,376. 
Dimensions: 660' x 67'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two funnels 
and two masts. Broken up by shipbreakers in 1925. Note: 
As originally built she had four funnels. Ex-Victoria Luise, 
ex-Deu t schland . 

*Hansa (1923) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 20,815. Di- 
mensions: 602' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: Later lengthened to 648 feet and 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

98 



tonnage increased to 21,131 tons gross. Her speed was in- 
creased to 20 knots by new engines. Ex-Albert Ballin. 
Sister ship: Deutschland. 

Havel (1890) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,963. 
Dimensions: 463' x 51'. Single-screw, 19 knots. Three 
masts and two funnels. Note: She was sold to the Spanish 
Government in 1898. Renamed: (a) Meteoro, (b) Alfonso 
XII. Sister ship: Spree. 

Haverford (1901) American Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 11,635. Dimensions: 531' x 59'. Twin-screw, 13 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: Made final At- 
lantic voyage in 1924. Sister ship: Merion. 

Hekla (1884) Thingvalla Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,225. Dimensions: 330' x 
41'. Single-screw, 13 1 /2 knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Note: Made final voyage to New York in 1904. 

Hellig Olav (1902) Scandinavian-American Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons., Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 9,939. Dimensions: 500' x 58'. Twin-screw, 
16 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1934. 
Sister ships: Oscar II and United States. 

Helvetia (1864) National Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,982. Dimensions: 371' x 
41'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Note: Her tonnage was later 
increased to 4,588 tons gross. In April, 1894, was abandoned 
off Cape Finisterre and her passengers and crew landed at 
Gibraltar. 

Herder (1873) Eagle Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,600. Dimensions: 
375' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Note: The ships of the Eagle Line were later taken 
over by the Hamburg-American Line. The Herder was 
wrecked near Cape Race on October 10, 1882. 

Hermann (1847) Ocean Steam Navigation Company. 

Built by Westervelt and MacKay of New York. Tonnage: 
2,200. Dimensions: 241' x 40'. Paddle-wheels, 11 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Washington. 
Note: Used on the New York-Bremen route. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

99 



Hermann (1865) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,873. Dimensions: 337' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 H knots. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1893. 

Hermann (1881) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Schlesnger, Davis & Co., Newcastle, England. Ton- 
nage: 2,243. Dimensions: 290'x 37'. Single-screw. Ex- 
Mount's Bay. 

Hesperian (1908) Allan Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 9,599. Dimensions: 485' x 60'. Twin-screw, 
15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note : Torpedoed and 
sunk 85 miles from Fastnet on September 4, 1915, with the 
loss of 32 lives. Sister ships: Corsican and Grampian. 

Hibernia (1843) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
1,422. Dimensions: 219' x 35'. Paddle-wheels, 9 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Note: Sold to the Spanish 
Government in 1850. Sister ship: Cambria. 

Hibernia (1865) Anchor Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,615. Dimensions: 
278' x 33'. Foundered on November 25, 1868, with the loss 
of 66 lives. 

Hibernian (1861) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 2,400. Dimensions: 280' x 37'. Single- screw, 
12 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: She was 
modernized in 1884, and lengthened to 351 feet, increasing 
tonnage to 2,997 tons gross. Broken up by shipbreakers in 
Germany during 1901. Sister ship: Norwegian. (These 
two ships were the first Atlantic steamers built with "spar 
decks" fore and aft, without bulwarks, an arrangement which 
added to the safety of the ships and also to the comfort of 
the passengers in bad weather). 

Hohenstaufen (1874) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Earle's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Hull, England. Tonnage: 3,098. Dimensions: 353' x 39'. 
Single-screw, 14 knots. Note: Used also on the Australian 
route. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

100 



Hohenzollern (1889) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,668. 
Dimensions: 449' x 51'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Kaiser Wilhelm II. Wrecked on 
Sardinia in 1908. 

Holland (1858) National Line. 

Built at Newcastle, England. Tonnage: 3,847. Dimensions: 
395' x 40'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Three masts and one 
funnel. Ex-Louisiana. Note: First Atlantic steamer with 
compound engines. Scrapped in 1894. 

Holsatia (1868) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,134. Dimensions: 341' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 ^ knots. 

Homeric (1914) White Star Line. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 34,356. 
Dimensions: 751' x 83'. Twin-screw, 20 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Columbus. Note: Laid down as the 

Columbus for the North German Lloyd. Construction was 

held up during the first World War. In 1920 was completed 
and turned over to the White Star Line. She was the largest 
twin-screw ship built to date. Sold to W. Ward, Ltd., 
Sheffield for scrap on February 27, 1936. She was broken up 
during the year. 

Hudson (1858) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,674. Dimensions: 318' x 40'. Single-screw. Two masts 
and two funnels. Sister ships: Bremen, New York and 
Weser. 

Hudson (1899) United States Government. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 9,699. 
Dimensions: 499' x 60'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-New Rochelle, ex-President Fill- 
more, ex-Powhatan, ex-Hamburg. Scrapped in 1928. 

Hudson (1904) French Line. 

Built by Ch. & Atel de St. Nazaire. Tonnage: 5,558. Di- 
mensions: 391' x 50'. Single screw. Two masts and one 
funnel. Made final voyage to New York in 1915. 

Hungarian (1858) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 2,190. Dimensions: 298' x 38'. Single- screw. 
Three masts and one funnel. Note: She made a fast passage 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

101 



from Quebec to Rock Light in 9 days, 6 hours and 35 minutes. 
She was wrecked on Sable Island on February 20, 1860, with 
the loss of 237 lives. 

Iberia (1928) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 9,829. 
Dimensions: 460' x 60'. Quadruple-screw, 15 ^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Motorship. Note: Used on the 
Hamburg-Central American route. Ex-Magdalena. Re- 
named: *Pobeda (Russian). 

Iberian (1867) Leyland Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
2,890. Dimensions: 390' x 37'. Single-screw. Stranded on 
the south coast of Ireland on November 21, 1885, with no 
loss of life. 

Iberian (1900) Leyland Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, Eng- 
land. Tonnage: 5,223. Dimensions: 437' x 48'. Single- 
screw, 12 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Captured and 
sunk by an enemy submarine near Fastnet on July 30, 1915. 

Ida (1906) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 

Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 4,730. Dimensions: 370' x 49'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Pulawski. 

Idaho (1869) Guion Line. 

Built at Jarrow-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,132. Di- 
mensions: 360' x 43'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Wrecked on the coast of Wexford on June 
1, 1878, with no loss of life. 

*Ile de France (1926) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 43,153. 
Dimensions: 763' x 92'. Quadruple-screw, 24 knots. Two 
masts and three funnels. Note: Her Grand Foyer is four 
decks high. Has accommodations for approximately 1,500 
passengers and carries a crew of about 700 members. Always 
a very popular ship. During the second World War she was 
operated by both the P. & O. Line and the Cunard White 
Star Line as a troop carrier. She was put back onto the 
French Line's Atlantic trade in 1946. 

*Iljitsch (1933) Sovtoraflot (Russian). 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 12,049. Di- 
mensions: 497' x 65'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Motorship. Ex-Caribia. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

102 



Illinois (1873) The American Line. 

Built by Wm. Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., 
Philadelphia, Pa. Tonnage: 3,104. Dimensions: 360' x 42'. 
Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: 
Made a fast passage from Queenstown to Cape Henlopen in 
8 days, 10 hours and 34 minutes in October, 1880. Renamed: 
Supply (U. S. Government). Sister ships: Indiana, Ohio 
and Pennsylvania. Scrapped in 1928. 

Ilsenstein (1904) Bernstein Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 8,216. Dimensions: 447' x 56'. Twin-screw, 13 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Matatua. 

Imperator (1912) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Vulkan Werkes, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
52,226. Dimensions: 883' x 98'. Quadruple-screw, 23 knots. 
Two masts and three funnels. Note: Launched on May 23, 
1912. Commenced maiden voyage in 1913. After the War 
she was ceded to Great Britain under treaty of Versailles. 
Renamed: Berengaria. Note: She was very similar to the 
Vaterland and Bismarck. 

Imperatrice Eugenie (1864) French Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd. 
Tonnage: 3,200. Dimensions: 343' x 43'. Paddle-wheels, 
13 knots. Three masts and two funnels. Note: Later was 
lengthened and converted to screw propulsion. Renamed: 
Amerique. 

Indian (1855) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 1,764. Dimensions: 270' x 40'. Single-screw, 11 
knots. Wrecked near Cape Race on November 21, 1859, 
with the loss of 27 lives. Sister ship: Canadian. 

Indiana (1873) The American Line. 

Built by Wm. Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding & Engineering 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa. Tonnage: 3,104. Dimensions: 360' 
x 42'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. 
Destroyed by fire at Chile in 1918. Sister ships: Illinois, 
Ohio and Pennsylvania. 

Indiana (1905) Lloyd Italiano. 

Built by Soc. Esercizio Bacini, Riva Trigoso, Italy. Ton- 
nage: 5,012. Dimensions: 393' x 48'. Twin-screw, 14^ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ships: Virginia, 
Florida and Luisiana. Note: The Indiana was later owned 
and operated by the Navigazione Generale Italiana Line. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

103 



Infanta Isabel de Borbon (1913) Compania Trasatlantica 
(Spanish Line). 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 10,348. Dimensions: 481' x 61'. Triple-screw, 
17 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Uruguay. 
Sister ship: Reina Victoria Eugenia. 

loannina (1897) National Steam Navigation Company of 
Greece. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 4,167. Dimensions: 366' x 47'. Single-screw, 12^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Hittfeld, ex- 
Arconia, ex- Juliette, ex-Dunolly Castle. Torpedoed and 
sunk off the Azores on December 15, 1917, while bound from 
Piraeus to New York. 

Ionian (1901) Allan Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 8,268. Dimensions: 470' x 57'. Twin-screw, 14 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 
2 miles from St. Govans Head on October 20, 1917, with the 
loss of 7 lives. 

Irene (1905) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 

Built by Craig, Taylor & Co., Stockton, England. Tonnage: 
3,454. Dimensions: 326' x 42'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Renamed: Toyen Maru. Sister ship: Virginia. 

Irishman (1899) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
9,510. Dimensions: 500' x 62'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Four 
masts and one funnel. Ex-Michigan. 

Isla de Panay ( 1882) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line) . 
Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,545. Dimensions: 362' x 
43'. Single-screw, 13 y% knots. 

Island (1882) Thingvalla Line. 

Built by Burmeister & Wain, Copenhagen, Denmark. Ton- 
nage: 2,813. Dimensions: 313' x 39'. Single-screw, 13^ 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Made final voyage to 
New York in 1904. 

Italia (1903) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 4,806. Dimensions: 400' x 49'. Single-screw, 14^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Made final voyage to 
New York in 1919. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

104 



Italia (1905) La Veloce Line. 

Built by N. Odero & Co., Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 5,203. 
Dimensions: 393' x 47'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Note: Later transferred to Navigazione 
- Generate Italiana and finally used on the Lloyd Triestino 
service. 

Italy (1868) National Line. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,341. Di- 
mensions: 389' x 42'. Single-screw, 12 J^ knots. Three masts 
and one funnel. Note: First Atlantic steamship in which 
engines of the compound principle was used. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1892. 

Ivernia (1900) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 14,210. Dimensions: 580' x 64'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: Her extremely 
tall funnel measured 106 feet high from the deck level. Had 
accommodations for 160 first-class, 200 second-class and 
1,600 third-class passengers. Torpedoed and sunk 58 miles 
from Cape Matapan on January 1, 1917, with the loss of 
36 lives. Sister ship: Saxonia. 

Java (1865) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 2,780. 
Dimensions: 337' x 42'. Single-screw, 12 1 A knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: Had accommodations for 160 
cabin passengers. She was quite similar in appearance to 
the Cuba. Later was lengthened. Renamed: Zeeland. 

*John Ericsson (1928) United States Government. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
20,223. Dimensions: 594' x 78'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Motorship. Ex-Kungsholm. 

*Juan Sebastian Elcano (1928) Compania Trasatlantica 
(Spanish Line). 

Built by Soc. fispanola de Const. Naval Yard, Bilbao, Spain. 
Tonnage: 9,965. Dimensions: 459' x 55'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Sold to Russia. 
Sister ships: Magallanes and Marques de Comillas. 

Justicia (1917) British Government. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
32,234. Dimensions: 740' x 86'. Triple-screw. Two masts 
and three funnels. Ex-Statendam. Note : Launched as the 
Statendam in 1914 for the Holland-American Line, but was 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

105 



requisitioned by the British Government and put in service 
as a troop transport. She was torpedoed and sunk 20 miles 
from Skerryvore on July 19, 1918, with the loss often lives. 

Kaiser Franz Josef I (1912) Unione Austriaca (Austro- 
American Line). 

Built at Trieste. Tonnage: 12,588. Dimensions: 477' x 60'. 
Twin-screw, 18 }/% knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: 
The finest Austrian ship built to date. Renamed: (a) Presi- 
dente Wilson, (b) Gange, (c) Marco Polo. 

Kaiser Friedrich (1898) North German Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 12,481. 
Dimensions: 581' x 63'. Twin-screw, 21 }/% knots. Two 
masts and three funnels. Note: Withdrawn early in 1899 
from the North German Lloyd Line because of her un- 
satisfactory speed, and returned to the builder. Later was 
used on the Hamburg-American Line, and finally sold to 
Compagnie de Navigation Sud-Atlantique for their South 
American trade. Renamed: Burdigala. A World War I 
casualty. 

Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse (1897) North German Lloyd. 
Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 14,349. 
Dimensions: 627' x 66'. Twin-screw, 22^ knots. Two 
masts and four funnels. Note: To obtain 22 1 /2 knots she had 
to burn 22 tons of coal per hour. Her best days' run was 580 
nautical miles. She was involved in the great dock fire at 
Hoboken on June 30, 1900, but managed to be towed away 
from the blazing piers, thus escaping damage. On August 
27, 1914, was destroyed by the gun fire of the British cruiser 
Highflyer at the Spanish Colony of Rio de Oro on the west 
coast of Africa, while in the role of an armed merchant 
cruiser. 

Kaiser Wilhelm II (1889) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,990. 
Dimensions: 449' x 51'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: She had accommodations for 120 
first-class, 80 second-class and 1,000 third-class passengers. 
Later was altered by having two of her original four masts 
removed. Renamed: Hohenzollern. 

Kaiser Wilhelm II (1903) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 19,361. 
Dimensions: 684' x 72'. Twin-screw, 23 Y^ knots. Three 
masts and four funnels. Note: Her dining room measured 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

106 



108 feet by 69 feet wide. Height from keel to roof of smoking 
room was 72 feet high. She was one of the highest powered 
ships built with reciprocating engines up to that time. Re- 
named: (a) Agamemnon, (b) Monticello. Scrapped 
during World War II. Sister ship : Kronprinzessin Cecilie. 
These two fine liners together with their running mates the 
Kaiser Friedrich der Grosse and Kronprinz Wilhelm 
made up the North German Lloyd express fleet for that 
period. 

Kaiserin Auguste Victoria (1905) Hamburg- American Line. 
Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 24,581. 
Dimensions: 677' x 77'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: This impressive liner was ceded to 
Great Britain by the Peace Treaty in 1919. The Canadian 
Pacific Line obtained the ship and renamed her Empress of 
Scotland. 

Kaiserin Maria Theresa (1890) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 7,840. 
Dimensions: 528' x 51'. Twin screw, 20 knots. Two masts 
and three funnels. Ex-Spree. Note: As originally built, 
this ship presented an entirely different appearance from 
that which she ultimately assumed, for she had been length- 
ened and further altered by the installation of three funnels 
to take the place of the former two, and two well-spaced 
masts replaced the original three. In addition was given new 
engines and converted to twin-screw propulsion. She was 
sold to the Russians in 1904 and renamed Ural. In the 
Russo-Japanese war that followed she was sunk by the latter 
nation. 

Karlesruhe (1889) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,057. Dimensions: 411' x 47'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Made 
final voyage to New York in 1907. Sister ships: Gera, 
Oldenburg, Darmstadt and Stuttgart. 

Karlesruhe (1900) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,826. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Bremen, ex-Pocahontas, ex- 
Prinzess Irene. Scrapped in 1931. 

Kensington (1894) American Line. 

Built by J. &. G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 8,669. 
Dimensions: 480' x 57'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Four masts 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

107 



and one funnel. Note: She was named after a Philadelphia 
suburb. Scrapped in 1910. Sister ship: Southwark. 

Kiautschou (1900) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,911. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Prinzess Alice, (b) 
Princess Matoika, (c) President Arthur, (d) City of 
Honolulu. Sister ship: Prinzess Irene. 

King Alexander (1896) Greek Line. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 11,455. 
Dimensions: 550' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Constantinople, ex-Bremen. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1925. 

Kleist (1906) North German Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 8,950. 
Dimensions: 474' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: Yoshino Maru. Sister 
ship: Goeben. 

Klopstock (1874) French Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 3,641. 
Dimensions: 377' x 40'. Single-screw, 133^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: Saint Germain. 

Koln (1899) North German Lloyd. . 

Built by Tecklenborg Co., Geestemunde, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 7,409. Dimensions: 428' x 54'. Twin-screw, 12 ^> 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Amphion. 
Sister ship: Frankfurt. 

Konig Albert (1899) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,484. 
Dimensions: 499' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: Ferdinando Palasciano 
(Italian). Sister ship: Hamburg. 

Konig Friedrich Auguste (1906) Hamburg- American Line. 
Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 9,462. Di- 
mensions: 475' x 55'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Montreal, (b) Alesia. 

Konig Wilhelm I (1870) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,300. Dimensions: 312' x 39'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Wrecked near Holland in November, 1873, while bound to 
Bremen from New York. All on board were saved. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

108 



Konig Wilhelm II (1907) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 9,410. 
Dimensions: 490' x 55'. Twin-screw, 153^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Madawaska, (b) 
U. S. Grant. 

Konigin Luise (1896) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,711. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Omar, (b) Edison. 
Sister ship: Friedrich der Grosse. 

Konigstein (1907) Bernstein Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,626. Dimensions: 
459' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Ex-Arawa. Renamed: Gandia. 

Kosciuszko (1915) Gydnia-American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
6,598. Dimensions: 440' x 53'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Lithuania, ex-Czaritza. Re- 
named: Empire Helford. 

Kristianafjord (1913) Norwegian-American Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 10,669. Dimensions: 512' x 61'. Twin-screw, 15}- 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Wrecked seven miles 
west of Cape Race in 1917. Sister ship: Bergensfjord. 

Kronprinz Wilhelm (1901) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 14,908. 
Dimensions: 637' x 66'. Twin-screw, 23 knots. Two masts 
and four funnels. Note: On her trials she averaged 23.34 
knots. She was quite similar in appearance to her running 
mates the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, Kaiser Wilhelm II 
and Kronprinzessin Cecilie. Renamed: Von Steuben. 
Broken up by shipbreakers in 1923. 

Kronprinzessin Cecilie (1906) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 19,503. 
Dimensions: 685' x 74'. Twin-screw, 23 Mi knots. Three 
masts and four funnels. Note: From her keel to top of 
funnels measured 131 feet high. She was seized by the 
United States during the first World War and renamed 
Mount Vernon. Broken up for scrap during the second 
World War. Sister ship: Kaiser Wilhelm II. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

109 



Kroonland (1902) Red Star Line. 

Built by Wm. Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding & Engineering 
Co., Philadelphia, Pa. Tonnage: 12,185. Dimensions: 560' 
x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Four masts and two funnels. 
Scrapped in 1927. Sister ships: Finland, Vaterland and 
Zeeland. 

Kungsholni (1902) Swedish-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
12,500. Dimensions: 550' x 62'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Noordam. Scrapped in 
1928. 

Kungsholm (1928) Swedish-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 20,223. Di- 
mensions: 594' x 78'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Motorship. Note: Commenced her 
maiden voyage from Gothenburg to New York on November 
24, 1928. This excellent liner has a swimming pool that is 
44 feet long by 21 feet wide. Renamed: *John Ericsson. 

Kursk (1910) Russian-American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
7,890. Dimensions : 450 ' x 56'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: Polonia. 

L' Aquitaine (1890) French Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 8,810. Dimensions: 500' x 57'. Twin- 
screw, 18 knots. Three masts and two funnels. Ex-Nor- 
mannia. Note: Later transferred to the Compagnie de 
Navigation Sud-Atlantique (French). 

La Bourdonnais (1904) French Line. 

Built by Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 8,287. Dimensions: 453' x 55'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Scharnhorst. Scrapped in 
1934. 

La Bourgogne (1886) French Line. 

Built at La Seyne, France. Tonnage: 7,303. Dimensions: 
495' x 52'. Single-screw, 17^ knots. Four masts and two 
funnels. Note: Later altered by having two of her four masts 
removed. Sunk after being in collision with the British 
sailing ship Cromartyshire off Sable Island on July 4, 1898. 
The lives of 549 people were lost because of it. Sister ships : 
La Gascogne, La Bretagne and La Champagne. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

110 



La Bretagne (1886) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 6,756. 
Dimensions: 495' x 51'. Single-screw, 17 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: Later was transferred to the Com- 
pagnie de Navigation Sud-Atlantique line and renamed 
Alesia. Scrapped in 1923. Sister ships: La Gascogne, La 
Bourgogne and La Champagne. 

La Champagne (1885) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 6,724. 
Dimensions: 493' x 51'. Single-screw, 17 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Wrecked off St. Nazaire in 1915. Sister 
ships: La Gascogne, La Bourgogne and La Bretagne. 
Note: These ships later had two of their four masts removed. 

La France (1865) French Line. 

Built at St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 4,648. Dimensions: 
394' x 44'. Paddle-wheels, 13 knots. Three masts and two 
funnels. Note: In 1872 she was converted from paddle- 
wheels to screw propulsion. In 1895 after having her original 
engines replaced with new ones of the triple expansion type 
she was put on the West Indies and Central American 
service. Broken up by shipbreakers in 1910. 

La Gascogne (1887) French Line. 

Built by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediterranee, La Seyne, 
France. Tonnage: 7,090. Dimensions: 495' x 52'. Single- 
screw, 17 knots. Four masts and two funnels. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1911. Sister ships: La Bourgogne, 
La Bretagne and La Champagne. 

La Lorraine (1899) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 11,146. 
Dimensions: 563' x 60'. Twin-screw, 21 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Note: Sold to shipbreakers after the sum- 
mer season of 1923 and dismantled during 1924. Sister ship: 
La Savoie. 

La Navarre (1892) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 6,343. 
Dimensions: 471' x 50'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 1924. 

La Normandie (1882) French Line. 

Built by Vickers, Sons & Maxim, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 6,283. Dimensions: 459' x 49'. Single- 
screw, 17 knots. Four masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 
1912. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

Ill 



La Provence (1905) French Line. 

Built by Chantiers & Atliers de la St. Nazaire, Penhoet. 
Tonnage: 13,753. Dimensions: 602' x 64'. Twin-screw, 22 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Made a voyage 
from Havre to New York in 6 days, and 4 hours, averaging 
21.63 knots for the crossing. Taken over by the French 
Government during World War I and used as an armed 
merchant cruiser under the name Provence II. Torpedoed 
and sunk on February 22, 1916, while on voyage from Toulon 
to Salonica. 

La Savoie (1900) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 11,168. 
Dimensions: 563' x 60'. Twin-screw, 21 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Scrapped in 1927. Sister ship: La Lor- 
raine. 

La Touraine (1891) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 8,429. 
Dimensions: 520' x 56'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. Three masts 
and two funnels. Note: She made a crossing from Havre to 
New York in 6 days and 18 hours. As built she had three 
masts but at a later date one was removed. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1922. Scrapped in 1924. 

Labrador (1865) French Line. 

Built at St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 4,612. Dimensions: 
394' x 44'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three masts and two 
funnels. Ex-Nouveau Monde. 

Labrador (1891) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,737. Dimensions: 401' x 47'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Wrecked on Skerryvore, Scot- 
land on March 1, 1899, with no loss of life. 

Laconia (1912) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 18,098. Dimensions: 600' x 71'. 
Twin-screw, 16 3/ knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: 
Her mast tops were 200 feet above the keel. She was tor- 
pedoed and sunk 160 miles from Fastnet on February 25, 
1917, with the loss of 12 lives. Sister ship: Franconia. 

Laconia (1922) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 19,695. Dimensions: 601' x 73'. 
Twin-screw, 16*/ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Tor- 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

112 



pedoed and sunk during World War II. Note: She was the 
first British liner to be fitted with anti-rolling tanks. Sister 
ships: Samaria and Scythia. 

Lafayette (1864) French Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,394. Dimensions: 343' x 
43'. Paddle-wheels, 13^ knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: Rebuilt and converted into a single screw 
vessel. During 1887 she was again altered by having in- 
stalled twin-screws. At a later date she was given three 
masts. 

Lafayette (1915) French Line. 

Built by Chantiers & Atliers de Provence, France. Tonnage: 
11,953. Dimensions: 546' x 64'. Quadruple-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Mexique. 

Lafayette (1930) French Line. 

Built at Penhoet, St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 25,178. 
Dimensions: 577' x 77'. Quadruple-screw, 18 knots. One 
mast and one funnel. Motorship. Note: Destroyed by fire 
while in drydock at Havre on May 5, 1938. 

Lahn (1887) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,681. Dimensions: 448' x 49'. Single- 
screw, 19 knots. Four masts and two funnels. Note: She 
appeared later with two masts. Had accommodations for 
224 first-class, 106 second and 700 third-class passengers. 
As a new ship she was the third fastest steamer on the At- 
lantic. Renamed: (a) Russ, (b) Dniester. The Lahn was 
sold to the Russians in 1904. 

Lake Champlain (1874) Beaver Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,207. Dimensions: 
321' x 35'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Note: Stranded on 
Antrim June 30, 1886, with no loss of life. She was later 
refloated and sold. 

Lake Champlain (1900) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
7,392. Dimensions: 446' x 52'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four 
masts and one funnel. Note : Originally owned by the Beaver 
Line. Renamed: Regina. Sister ship: Lake Erie. 

Lake Erie (1900) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
7,550. Dimensions: 446' x 52'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

113 



masts and one funnel. Note: Originally owned by .Beaver 
Line. Sister ship: Lake Cham plain. 

Lake Huron (1881) Beaver Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow, 
Scotland. Tonnage: 4,040. Dimensions: 385' x 42'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Stranded near 
Quebec and was subsequently broken up by shipbreakers in 
1901. 

Lake Manitoba (1880) Beaver Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 3,300. 
Dimensions: 355' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: Stranded on Miquelan Island 
on June 14, 1885, with no loss of life. Sister ship: Lake 
Winnipeg. 

Lake Manitoba (1901) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 9,674. Dimensions: 469' x 56'. 
Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: 
Originally owned by the Beaver Line. Renamed: Iver 
Heath. Scrapped in 1924. Sister ship: Lake Michigan. 

Lake Megantic (1875) Beaver Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,219. Dimensions: 
321' x 35'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. Wrecked on Anticosta 
in 1878, with no loss of life. 

Lake Michigan (1901) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 8,340. Dimensions: 469' x 56'. 
Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: 
Originally owned by the Beaver Line. Torpedoed and sunk 
93 miles from Eagle Island on April 16, 1918, with the loss 
of one life. Sister ship: Lake Manitoba. 

Lake Nepigon (1875) Beaver Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,209. Dimensions: 
321' x 35'. Single-screw, 12 ^ knots. Renamed: Golden 
Fleece. Wrecked in the West Indies in 1896. 

Lake Ontario (1887) Beaver Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,502. * Dimensions: 374' x 43'. Single-screw, 13 3/6 knots. 
Three masts and two funnels. Note: The only Beaver Line 
steamship with a clipper bow. Broken up by Italian ship- 
breakers in 1905. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

114 



Lake Simcoe (1884) Beaver Line. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,933. Di- 
mensions: 430' x 57'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Ems. Scrapped in 1904. 

Lake Superior (1884) Beaver Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 4,562. Dimensions: 400' x 44'. Single-screw, 13^ 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Wrecked near St. John, 
New Brunswick, in March, 1902 and was dismantled as she 
lay. 

Lake Winnipeg (1879) Beaver Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 3,329. Dimensions: 355' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Renamed: Garbi. Note: 
Torpedoed and sunk during the Tarko-Italian War of 1912. 
Sister ship: Lake Manitoba. 

Lancashire (1889) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,244. Dimensions: 400' x 45'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Note: This former Bibby liner 
was chartered for a short time. Later was sold to the Danish 
East Asiatic Company and operated by their Russian- 
American Line. The ship was renamed Kina and later this 
was changed to Lituania. Sister ship: Yorkshire. 

Lancastria (1922) Cunard Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage. 
16,243. Dimensions: 552' x 70'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots: 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Tyrrhenia. Note: Similar 
in appearance to the Anchor liner Cameronia. The Lan- 
castria was destroyed by enemy action on June 17, 1940. 

Lapland (1908) Red Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
18,565. Dimensions: 605' x 70'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Note: Broken up by Japanese 
shipbreakers in 1934. 

Latvia (1908) Gydnia-American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
8,332. Dimensions: 475' x 57'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Ex-Russ, ex-Rossija, ex- 
Russia. Renamed: (a) Fuso Maru, (b) Huso Maru. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

115 



Laura (1907) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 

Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 6,122. Dimensions: 415' x 49'. Twin-screw, 16 % 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Europa, 
(b) Braga. Sister ship: Alice. 

Laurentian (1872) Allan Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co. , Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage : 
4,522. Dimensions: 400' x 42'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Polynesian. Wrecked near 
Cape Race in 1909 and became a total loss. 

Lauren tic (1909) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
14,892. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Triple-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: Laid down as the Alberta 
for the Dominion Line, but was transferred to the White 
Star Line before completion. Struck a mine off the north 
coast of Ireland on January 25, 1917, while on voyage from 
New York to Great Britain. There was a loss of 350 people. 
Sister ship: Megantic. 

Laurentic (1927) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
18,724. Dimensions: 578' x 75'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Torpedoed and sunk in No- 
vember, 1940. 

Lazio (1899) Navigazione Generate Italiana. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 9,203. Dimensions: 470' x 56'. 
Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex- 
British Princess. Renamed: Palermo. 

*Leerdam (1921) Holland- American Line. 

Built by New Waterway Shipbuilding Co., Schiedam, 
Netherlands. Tonnage: 8,815. Dimensions: 450' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister 
ships: Edam, Maasdam and Spaarndam. (These ships 
originally had two funnels each.) 

Leipzig (1869) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2 ? 287. Dimensions: 312' x 39'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1890. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

116 



Leon XIII (1888) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
British built. Tonnage: 5,087. Dimensions: 410' x 46'. 
Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Isla 
de Cuba, ex-Taroba. 

Leon XIII (1890) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
British built. Tonnage: 5,206. Dimensions: 410' x 48'. 
Single-screw. Ex-Jelunga. Renamed: (a) Santiago, 
(b) Jelunga, (c) Jehangir. 

Leonardo da Vinci (1925) Transatlantica Italiana. 

Built by Soc. Esercizio Bacini, Riva Trigosa, Italy. Ton- 
nage: 7,515. Dimensions: 427' x 52'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. 

Leopoldina (1901) French Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss,Hamburg. Tonnage: 12,334. Di- 
mensions: 525' x 62'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Bluecher. Note: The Leopoldina 
was obtained from the Brazilian Government, and the 
French Line renamed her Suffren. 

Lessing (1874) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 3,527. Dimensions: 374' x 39'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. The Eagle 
Line of Hamburg was the original owner of this ship. Note: 
The French Line later purchased the steamship from the 
Hamburg-American Line. 

Letitia (1912) Anchor-Donaldson Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 8,991. Dimensions: 470' x 
56'. Twin-screw, 14]/2 knots. Two masts and one funnel. 
Note: She was quite similar in appearance to the Saturnia 
built in 1910. The Letitia was lost by stranding near Hali- 
fax in August, 1917, while being used as a hospital ship. 

"Letitia (1925) Donaldson Atlantic Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 13,475. Dimensions: 525' x 66'. Twin- 
screw, 153^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: 
Athenia. Note: Their original owner was the Anchor- 
Donaldson Line. The Letitia has been renamed: Empire 
Brent. 

Leviathan (1914) United States Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 59,957. Di- 
mensions: 907' x 100'. Quadruple-screw, 24 knots. Two 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

117 



masts and three funnels. Note: From her keel to top of 
funnels measured 184 feet. The mast tops were 210 feet high 
from water level. Ex-Vaterland. Broken up by ship- 
breakers in Scotland during 1938. 

"Liberte (1930) French Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
49,746. Dimensions: 890' x 102'. Quadruple-screw, 28 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Europa. Note: 
The French Line obtained this former German superliner 
in 1946. In December, 1946, while being reconditioned for 
their Atlantic trade she was driven by a severe gale against 
the sunken hulk of the former luxury liner Paris. A section 
of the Liberte's hull was ripped opened and she sank in the 
shallow water of the harbor. The necessary repairs will 
delay for about a year her re-entry into the Atlantic service. 

Liguria (1901) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by G. Ansaldo & Co., Sestri, Ponente, Italy. Tonnage: 
4,865. Dimensions: 403' x 46'. Single-screw. Two masts 
and one funnel. 

Lithuania (1915) Danish East Asiatic Co. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
6,598. Dimensions: 440' x 53'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Czaritza. Renamed: Kos- 
ciuszko. 

Lituania (1889) Russian-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,244. Dimensions: 400' x 45'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Lancashire. 

Lombardia (1901) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by G. Ansaldo & Co., Sestri, Ponente, Italy. Tonnage: 
4,815. Dimensions: 403' x 46'. Single-screw. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: Jerousalim. 

Louisiana (1858) National Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,847. Dimensions: 307' x 
39'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Renamed: Holland. Note: She was the first Atlantic 
steamer with compound engines. This vessel was later 
lengthened. Scrapped in 1894. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

118 



Louisiana (1862) French Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,780. Note: Sunk 
by collision on December 20, 1875, while bound for France 
from the West Indies with the loss of 16 lives. 

Loyalist (1901) Furness Withy Co. 

British built. Tonnage: 3,909. Dimensions: 371' x 45'. 
Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: 
See Evangeline for additional data. Renamed: (a) Byron, 
(b) Santiago. Sister ship: Evangeline. 

Lucania (1893) Cunard Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 12,950. Dimensions: 600' x 65'. Twin- 
screw, 22 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Badly 
gutted by fire while at her Liverpool pier in 1909 and was 
broken up by shipbreakers at Swansea during 1910. Sister 
ship: Campania. 

Ludgate Hill (1881) Allan Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 4,063. Dimensions: 420' x 47'. 
Twin-screw, 13 knots. Note: The first Atlantic steamer 
built with twin-screws. Formerly owned and operated by 
the Hill Line. Renamed: Livonian. During World War I 
was filled with cement and sunk, so as to obstruct a channel. 

Luetzow (1908) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Weser Shipbuilding Yard, Bremen, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 8,716. Dimensions: 462' x 57'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1932. Sister ships: 
Derfflinger and Yorck. 

Luisiana (1906) Lloyd Italiano. 

Built by Soc. Esercizio Bacini, Riva Trigoso, Italy. Ton- 
nage: 4,983. Dimensions: 393' x 48'. Twin-screw, 14^ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ships: Florida, 
Indiana and Virginia. Made final voyage to New York in 
1913. 

Lusitania (1907) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 31,550. Dimensions: 762' x 87'. Quadruple- 
screw, 26 knots. Two masts and four funnels. Torpedoed 
and sunk by a German submarine 10 miles off the Old Head 
Kinsale, southeast tip of Ireland on May 7, 1915. She went 
down within 18 minutes and the loss of life amounted to 
1,198 people. Sister ship: Mauretania. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

119 



Lydian Monarch (1881) Wilson Line. 

Built at Dumbarton, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,987. Di- 
mensions: 360' x 43'. Single-screw, 12 3^ knots. Four masts 
and one funnel. Sister ship: Persian Monarch. 

Maasdam (1371) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,707. Dimensions: 420' x 40'. Single-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Republic. Renamed: 
Vittoria. Note: Her last voyage to New York as the 
Maasdam was in 1901. 

*Maasdam (1921) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Maats Fyenoord, Rotterdam. Tonnage: 8,812. 
Dimensions: 450' x 58'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk in the North Atlantic 
on July 26, 1941. Sister ships: Edam, Leerdam and 
Spaarndam. Note: Originally they had two funnels. 

Macedonia (1912) Greek Line. (Embiricos Bros.) 

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, Eng- 
land. Tonnage: 6,333. Dimensions: 422' x 51'. Twin-screw. 
17 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: After several 
voyages to New York she was taken over by the Greek 
government and used as an armed cruiser for the war against 
Turkey. She was shortly afterwards set on fire and sunk by 
a Turkish warship in the harbor of Syra. 

Madonna (1905) Fabre Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 5,633. Dimensions: 430' x 48'. 
Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1924. 

*Madrid (1922) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,753. 
Dimensions: 439' x 56'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Sierra Nevada. 

MegaliHallas (1914) Greek Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 9,272. Dimensions: 470' x 58'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Vasilefs Con- 
stantinos. Renamed: Byron. 

*Magallanes (1928) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
Built by Soc. Espanola de Const. Naval Yard, Cadiz, Spain. 
Tonnage: 9,689. Dimensions: 459' x 56'. Twin-screw, 17 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

120 



knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ships: Juan 
Sebastian Elcano and Marques de Comillas. 

Magdalena (1928) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by F. Schichau Co., Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 
9,779. Dimensions: 460' x 60'. Twin-screw, 153/ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Motorship. Renamed: Iberia. 
Sister ship: Orinoco. Note: After being badly gutted by 
fire she was rebuilt in 1934 and had her name changed to 
Iberia. She was altered by having a new single funnel re- 
place her original two. 

Main (1868) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,893. Dimensions: 365' x 40'. Single-screw, 14^ knots. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1890. 

Main (1900) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 10,067. Di- 
mensions: 501' x 58'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Four masts 
and one funnel. Sister ships: Rhein and Neckar. 

Majestic (1890) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
9,861. Dimensions: 566' x 57'. Twin-screw, 20 knots. 
Three masts and two funnels. Broken up by shipbreakers 
in 1914. Sister ship: Teutonic. Note: These two liners 
had twin-screws that were of the overlapping type. 

Majestic (1921) White Star Line. 

Built by Blohm & oss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 56,551. Di- 
mensions: 915' x 100'. Quadruple-screw, 24 knots. Two 
masts and three funnels. Note: She was launched in 1914 
as the Bismarck for the Hamburg-American Line, but was 
not completed until after the first World War. After being 
finished she was taken over by the White Star Line and 
renamed Majestic and was used on the Atlantic for a num- 
ber of years as a luxury passenger liner, but in May, 1936, 
was withdrawn and sold to the British Admiralty who had 
her converted into a training ship and changed her name to 
H. M. S. Caledonia. Destroyed by fire in 1939. 

Manhattan (1866) Guion Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 2,869. Dimensions: 335' x 
42'. Single-screw. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Had 
accommodations for 72 first-class passengers and 800 emi- 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

121 



grants. Ran as a Guion liner until 1875 when she was sold 
to the Warren Line for use on their Liverpool and Boston 
service. In 1880 again sold and renamed City of Lincoln. 
Wrecked near Cape Town, Africa, on August 15, 1902. 

Manhattan (1932) United States Line. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. 
Tonnage: 24,289. Dimensions: 668' x 86'. Twin-screw, 21 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Keel was laid 
on December 8, 1930 and launched on December 5, 1931. 
Commenced maiden voyage on August 10, 1932. Cost 
approximately $10,500,000 to build. Renamed: *Wakefield. 
Nearly destroyed by fire off Halifax in 1942 while being used 
as a troopship. She was salvaged and towed to Boston where 
she was rebuilt. Sister ship: Washington. 

Manitoba (3892) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,590. Dimensions: 445' x 49'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Logan. Sister 
ships: Massachusetts, Mobile and Mohawk. 

Manitoban (1865) Allan Line. 

Built by Laird's at Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 2,395. 
Dimensions: 338' x 35'. Single-screw. 

Manitou (1898) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Furness, Withy & Co., Ltd., W. Hartlepool, 
England. Tonnage: 6,849. Dimensions: 475' x 52'. Single- 
screw, 14^ knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Victoria. 

Manuel Arnus (1923) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish 
Line). 

Built by Soc. Espanola de Const. Nav., Cadiz, Spain. Ton- 
nage: 7,578. Dimensions: 435' x 56'. Twin screw, 13^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. 

*Manuel Calvo (1892) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish 
Line). 

Built by Armstrong, Mitchell & Co., Ltd., Newcastle, 
England. Tonnage: 5,617. Dimensions: 421' x 48'. Twin- 
screw, 13 % knots. Three masts and one funnel. Ex- 
H. H. Meier. 

Marburn (1900) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 10,743. Dimensions: 500' x 59'. Twin- 
screw, 16 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Tunisian. 
Scrapped in 1928. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

122 



Marco Minghetti (1876) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 
Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 2,489. Dimensions: 350' x 36'. Single-screw, 13 
knots. Ex-Loudoun Castle. Made final voyage to New 
York in 1906. 

Marglen (1898) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
10,417. Dimensions: 515' x 59'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Scotian, ex-Statendam. 
Scrapped in 1927. 

Marloch (1904) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 10,687. Dimensions: 517' x 60'. Triple-screw, 
15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Victorian. 
Scrapped in 1930. 

Marques de Comillas (1928) Compania Trasatlantica 
(Spanish Line). 

Built by Soc. Espanola de Const. Naval Yard, Ferrol, Spain. 
Tonnage: 9,922. Dimensions: 459' x 55'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ships: Juan 
Sebastian Elcano and Magallanes. 

Marquette (1898) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 7,057. Dimensions: 486' x 52'. Single- 
screw, \b l /2 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Boadicea. Torpedoed and sunk 36 miles from Salonica 
Bay on October 23, 1915, with the loss of 29 lives. 

*Marrakech (1913) French Line. 

Built by Atel. & Ch. de Provence, Port de Bouc, France. 
Tonnage: 6,179. Dimensions: 414' x 51'. Twin-screw. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Haiti. Note: Used on the West 
Indies and Central American trade. 

Martello (1884) Wilson Line. 

Built by Earle's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Hull, England. Tonnage: 3,709. Dimensions: 370' x 43'. 
Single-screw. 12 knots. Note: First Atlantic steamer with 
triple expansion engines. Made final voyage to New York 
in 1899. 

Martha Washington (1908) Unione Austriaca (Austro- 
American Line). 

Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 8,347. Dimensions: 459' x 58'. Twin-screw, 17 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

123 



knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: After the first 
World War she was transferred to the Cosulich Line, and 
later became a unit of the newly formed "Italia Line," who 
used her for a time on the South American service. 

Martinique (1883) French Line. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,392. 
Dimensions: 380' x 48'. Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Norham Castle. Broken up by Italian 
shipbreakers in 1932. Note: The French Line used her on 
the West Indies and Central American trade. 

Marvale (1907) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
11,438. Dimensions: 499' x 61'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. (Operated at a speed of 14 ^ 
knots. Ex-Corsican. Wrecked 20 miles west of Cape Race 
in 1923. 

Massachusetts (1892) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,590. Dimensions: 445' x 49'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Sheridan. Wrecked 
by stranding off Barnegat Light in 1910. Sister ships: 
Manitoba, Mohawk and Mobile. 

Massilia (1891) Fabre Line. 

Built by Gourlay Bros. & Co., Dundee. Tonnage: 3,097. 
Dimensions: 340' x 41'. Single-screw. Made final voyage 
to New York in 1910. 

Massilia (1902) Anchor Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 5,156. Dimensions: 400' x 49'. Single- 
screw, 12 knots. 

Mauretania (1907) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter and Wigham Richardson, Ltd., 
Wallsend-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 30,696. Di- 
mensions: 762' x 88'. Quadruple-screw, 26 knots. Two 
masts and four funnels. Note: She was withdrawn from 
service in October, 1934, and during 1935 was broken up by 
shipbreakers at Rosyth. Sister ship: Lusitania. 

*Mauretania (1939) Cunard White Star Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 35,738. Dimensions: 739' x 89'. Twin-screw, 22 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

124 



Mayflower (1902) Dominion Line. 

Built by Hawthorne, Leslie & Co., Ltd., Newcastle, England. 
Tonnage: 13,518. Dimensions: 582' x 60'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Hanoverian. Re- 
named: Cretic. 

Media (1947) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 14,000. Dimensions: 540' x 70'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Single mast and one funnel. Note: Launched on 
December 12, 1946. To have accommodations for 250 pas- 
sengers in one class. Expected to be ready for service during 
the summer of 1947. A sister ship is being built by Harland 
& Wolff, Ltd. 

Megan tic (1909) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
14,878. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: She was laid down as the 
Albany for the Dominion Line, but like her sister ship was 
taken over by the White Star Line and renamed. Broken 
up by shipbreakers in Japan during 1933. Sister ship: 
Laurentic. 

Meknes (1913) French Line. 

Built by Ch. & Atl. de St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 6,127. 
Dimensions: 413' x 51'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Puerto Rico. Torpedoed and sunk 
on July 24, 1940. 

Melita (1918) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
15,183. Dimensions: 520' x 67'. Triple-screw, 16^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Liguria. Sister 
ship: Minnedosa. Note: The Melita, together with her 
sister ship was sold to the Italians in April, 1935. She was 
towed to Genoa in June, 1935, by the Dutch tug Zwarte 
Zee, and was renamed Liguria. 

Memphis (1871) Dominion Line. 

Built at Dumbarton, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,487. Di- 
mensions: 327' x 38'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Three masts 
and one funnel. 

Memphis (1890) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Gourlay Bros. & Co., Dundee, Scotland. Tonnage: 
5,158. Dimensions: 435' x 46'. Single-screw. Ex-America. 
Note: Carried freight and cattle. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

125 



Mendoza (1904) Lloyd Italiano. 

Built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co., Ltd., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 6,847. Dimensions: 
420' x 51'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Renamed: Caserta. 

Menominee (1897) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 6,919. Dimensions: 475' x 52'. Single- 
screw, 14 % knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex- Alex- 
ander. Made final voyage to Boston in 1914. 

Merion (1902) American Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 11,612. Dimensions: 531' x 59'. Twin-screw, 11 ^ 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Sunk during the first 
World War. Sister ship: Haverford. 

Metagama (1915) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
12,420. Dimensions: 500' x 64'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 1934. Sister ship: 
Missanabie. 

Meteoro (1890) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,966. 
Dimensions: 463' x 51'. Single-screw, 19 knots. Three 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Havel. Renamed: Alfonso 
XII. 

Mexico (1876) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 2,113. Dimensions: 331' x 34'. Single-screw, 12 
knots. Ex-Trentham Hall. 

Mexique (1915) French Line. 

Built by Chantier et Ateliers de Provence, Port de Bouc, 
France. Tonnage: 12,220. Dimensions: 546' x 64'. Quad- 
ruple-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex- 
Lafayette. 

Michigan (1887) Warren Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,909. Dimensions: 400' x 47'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 

Michigan (1890) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,722. Dimensions: 370' x 44'. Single-screw, 13 1 A knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Kilpa trick, 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

126 



(b) Acropolis, (c) Washington, (d) Great Canton. 
Broken up by shipbreakers in Italy during 1924. Note: See 
Acropolis for additional information. 

Milwaukee (1897) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 7,317. Dimensions: 470' x 56'. 
Single-screw, 12 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: 
Formerly owned by Elder, Dempster & Co. She was tor- 
pedoed and sunk 260 miles southwest from Fastnet on 
August 31, 1918, with only the loss of one life. Sister ship: 
Mount Royal. 

Milwaukee (1929) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 16,699. Di- 
mensions: 546' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Motorship. Renamed* Empire Waveney. 
(Owned by British government.) Sister ship: St. Louis. 

Minneapolis (1901) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
13,448. Dimensions: 600' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 195 miles 
from Malta on March 23, 1916, with the loss of 12 lives. 
Sister ships: Minnehaha, Minnetonka and Minnewaska. 

Minnedosa (1918) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
15,186. Dimensions: 520' x 67'. Triple-screw, 16 ^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: Her original tonnage 
was 13,972 tons gross, but in 1925 she was reconditioned by 
Cammell, Laird & Co., at Birkenhead and the changes made 
increased her tonnage. In April, 1935, she was sold to 
Italians who were to break her up for scrap, however, the 
Italian Government took her over for transport work. Sister 
ship: Melita. The Minnedosa was renamed *Piemonte. 

Minnehaha (1900) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
13,443. Dimensions: 600' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 12 miles 
from Fastnet on September 7, 1917 with the loss of 43 lives. 
Sister ships: Minneapolis, Minnetonka and Minne- 
waska. 

Minnekahda (1917) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
17,281. Dimensions: 620' x 66'. Triple-screw, 16 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

127 



One mast and one funnel. Note: She was built as an emi- 
grant carrier for 2,000 passengers, but later was converted 
to carry 750 third-class passengers. Refitted in 1920 at 
Quincy, Massachusetts. Broken up by shipbreakers at 
Dalmuir on the Clyde in 1936. 

Minnesota (1866) Warren Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 2,869. Dimensions: 335' x 42'. 
Single-screw. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Cristo- 
bal Colon. Note: She was originally owned by the Guion 
Line. 

Minnesota (1901) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 11,667. Dimensions: 561' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 
knots. Four masts and two funnels. Ex-Northland, ex- 
Zeeland. Scrapped in 1930. 

Minnetonka (1902) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
13,440. Dimensions: 600' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 40 miles 
from Malta on January 30, 1918, with the loss of four lives. 
Sister ships: Minneapolis, Minnehaha and Minnewaska. 

Minnetonka (1924) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
21,716. Dimensions: 600' x 80'. Twin-screw, 16> knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: She commenced her 
maiden voyage in May, 1924. In 1932 she was transferred 
to the Red Star Line. Broken up by shipbreakers in 1935. 
Sister ship: Minnewaska. 

Minnewaska (1894) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,713. Dimensions: 445' x 50'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Ex-Persia. Sister ship: Dominion. 

Minnewaska (1903) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
15,801. Dimensions: 600' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Arabic 

Minnewaska (1909) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
14,317. Dimensions: 600' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Note: Had accommodations 
for 330 first-class passengers. She was taken over by the 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name, 

128 



British government as a troopship in 1916. On November 
29, 1916, she was sunk by a floating mine in Suda Bay while 
transporting 1,800 troops. (She was beached, but her bottom 
had been torn away by the mines and no further use was 
made of the vessel.) Sister ships: Minnehaha, Minne- 
tonka and Minneapolis. 

Minnewaska (1923) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
21,716. Dimensions: 600' x 80'. Twin-screw, 16 ^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: Commenced maiden 
voyage from London to New York on September 1, 1923. 
Broken up by shipbreakers in 1935. Sister ship: Minne- 
tonka. 

Missanabie (1914) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 12,469. Dimensions: 
500' x 64'. Twin-screw, 153/3 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Torpedoed and sunk 52 miles from Daunts Rock 
on September 9, 1918 with the loss of 45 lives. Sister ship: 
Metagama. 

Mississippi (1871) Dominion Line. 

Built at Dumbarton, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,129. Di- 
mensions: 320' x 35'. Single-screw. Three masts and one 
funnel. Renamed: Sicilia. 

Mississippi (1903) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp. Camden, N. J. Ton- 
nage: 9,748. Dimensions: 490' x 58'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Samland. 

Mitau (1894) Russian- American Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,588. Dimensions: 415' x 45'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Birma, 
ex-Arundel Castle. Renamed: (a) Joszef Pilsudski, (b) 
Wilbo. Note: The Russian-American Line was a subsidiary 
company of the Danish East Asiatic Co. 

Mobile (1891) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 5,302. Dimensions: 435' x 
46'. Single-screw, 15^ knots. Ex-Europe. Renamed: 
Sherman. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

129 



Mobile (1908) United States Shipping Board. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 16,971. Di- 
mensions: 588' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Cleveland. Renamed: Cleveland. 

Mohawk (1892) Atlantic Transport Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,678. Dimensions: 445' x 49'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Grant. Sister ships: 
Mobile, Massachusetts and Manitoba. 

Moltke (1901) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 12,335. Di- 
mensions: 525' x 62'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: Pesaro. Scrapped in 1926. 
Sister ship: Bluecher. 

Mongolian (1891) Allan Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
4,837. Dimensions: 400' x 45'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Torpedoed 5 miles from Filey 
Brig on July 21, 1918, with the loss of 36 lives. 

Montana (1872) Guion Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 4,300. Dimensions: 400' x 43'. 
Single-screw, 15^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. 
Wrecked on the Welsh coast on March 14, 1880, with no loss 
of life. 

Montcalm (1897) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Jarrow-on- 
Tyne, England. Tonnage: 5,505. Dimensions: 445' x 52'. 
Single-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Sister 
ship: Monterey. Note: The Montcalm was sold to Nor- 
wegian whalers in 1923 and renamed Rey Alfonso. 

*Montcalm (1921) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 16,418. Dimensions: 549' x 70'. Twin-screw, 
17 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Commenced 
maiden voyage from Liverpool to Canada in January, 1922. 
Sister ships: Montclare and Montrose. 

*Montclare (1922) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 16,314. Dimensions: 549' x 70'. Twin-screw, 
17 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ships: Mont- 
calm and Montrose. 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

130 



Monteagle (1899) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 5,948. Dimensions: 445' x 
52'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Scrapped in 1926. Sister ship : Montfort. Note : They were 
originally owned by Elder, Dempster Co. 

Monterey (1897) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 5,478. Dimensions: 445' x. 
52'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Sister ship: Montcalm. Note: Formerly owned by Elder, 
Dempster Co. 

Montevideo (1889) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 5,205. Dimensions: 410' x 48'. Single-screw, 14 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. 

Montezeuma (1899) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
7,345. Dimensions: 485' x 59'. Single-screw, 12% knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Mount Temple. 
Note: They were formerly owned by Elder, Dempster Co. 

Montfort (1899) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 5,519. Dimensions: 445' x 
52'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Torpedoed and sunk 170 miles from Bishop Rock on October 
1, 1918, with the loss of 5 lives. Sister ship: Monteagle. 
Note: These ships were formerly owned by Elder, Dempster 
Co. 

Montlaurier (1908) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by J. C. Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. 
Tonnage: 16,992. Dimensions: 590' x 68'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Empress of India, 
ex-Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm. Renamed: Montnairn. 

Montnairn (1908) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by J. C. Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. 
Tonnage: 17,282. Dimensions: 590' x 68'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Monti aurier, ex- 
Empress of India, ex-Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm. Note: 
She was turned over to Great Britain after the first World 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

131 



War, and then sold to the Canadian Pacific Line who re- 
conditioned and renamed her. She was sold to shipbreakers 
in 1929 and during 1931 dismantled. 

Montreal (1900) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 8,644. Dimensions: 469' x 56'. 
Single-screw, 12 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Sunk 
after being in collision near Morecambe Bay in January, 

Montreal (1906) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 9,720. Di- 
mensiqns: 475' x 55'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Konig Friedrich Auguste. Renamed: 
Alesia. 

Montrose (1897) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Sir Raylton Dixon & Co., Ltd., Middlesbro-on- 
Tees, England. Tonnage: 6,094. Dimensions: 444' x 52'. 
Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: 
Formerly owned by Elder, Dempster Co. Wrecked on 
Goodwin Sands late in 1914. 

Montrose (1922) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 16,402. Dimensions: 548' x 70'. Twin- 
screw, 17 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: 
Forfar. Torpedoed and sunk in December, 1940. Sister 
ships: Montcalm and Montclare. 

Montroyal (1906) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 15,646. Dimensions: 548' x 65'. Twin- 
screw, 18 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: She 
was converted from a first-class to a cabin class liner in 1923. 
Sold to scrappers in August, 1930, and dismantled soon 
afterwards. 

Montserrat (1889) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 4,147. 
Dimensions: 373' x 44'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Dania 

Moraitis (1907) Greek Line (Owned by D. G. Moraitis). 

Built by Priestman & Co., Sunderland, England. Tonnage: 
6,045. Dimensions: 400' x 50'. Twin-screw. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: Themistocles late in 1908. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

132 



Moravia (1883) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by A. & J. Inglis, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,690. 
Dimensions: 360' x 40'. Single-screw, 10 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Note: While under charter she was wrecked 
on Sable Island on February 12, 1899, with no loss of life. 

Moreas (1901) Greek Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 8,292. Dimensions: 485' x 56'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and three funnels. Ex-Columbia. Broken ur 
by shipbreakers in Italy during 1929. 

Mosel (1872) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage- 
3,200. Dimensions: 365' x 40'. Single-screw, WA knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. She went ashore near the Lizard 
in a thick fog on August 9, 1882, and became a total wreck. 

Mount Carroll (1921) United American Line. 

Built by Merchant Shipbuilding Corp., Chester, Penn. 
Tonnage: 7,469. Dimensions: 440' x 57'. Single-screw, 13}^ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Maunalei. 
Sister ship: Mount Clinton. 

Mount Clay (1904) Harriman Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,170. 
Dimensions: 488' x 55'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-De Kalb, ex-Prinz Eitel Friedrich. 

Mount Clinton (1921) United American Line. 

Built by Merchant Shipbuilding Corp., Chester, Penn. 
Tonnage: 7,159. Dimensions: 440' x 57'. Single-screw, 13^ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ship: Mount 
Carroll. 

Mount Royal (1898) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 7,064. Dimensions: 
470' x 56'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Sister ship: Milwaukee. Note: They were formerly 
owned by Elder, Dempster Co. 

Mount Temple (1901) Canadian Pacific Line. 

Built by Sir W. G. Armstrong, Whit worth & Co., Ltd., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 7,656. Dimensions: 
485' x 59'. Single-screw, 12j/ knots. Four masts and one 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

133 



funnel. Note: On December 6, 1916, was captured and sunk 
by the German raider Mowe, 620 miles west of Fastnet. 
Sister ship: Montezeuma. 

Muenchen (1922) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 13,483. 
Dimensions: 526' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: (a) General Von Steuben, 
(b) Steuben. Sister ship: Stuttgart. Note: After being 
badly gutted by fire at her New York pier she was rebuilt in 
Germany and renamed General Von Steuben. Her out- 
ward appearance was greatly changed by the work. Rebuilt 
and renamed in 1931 after having been badly gutted by 
fire at her New York pier. 

Munchen (1889) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,801. Dimensions: 390' x 46'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: 
Gregory Morch (Turkish). Sister ship: Dresden. 

Munchen (1923) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 18,940. 
Dimensions: 590' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Ohio, (b) Albertic. Note: 
She was never actually in the passenger trade under the name 
Munchen for she was one of the many ships turned over to 
the Allies after the great war. 

Napoleon III (1866) French Line. 

Built by Thames Ironworks, London, England. Tonnage: 
3,950. Dimensions: 363' x 43'. Paddle-wheels, 13 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: In 1872 she was length- 
ened and altered by having her paddle-wheels replaced by 
single-screw propulsion. She was renamed Ville du Havre. 
Sister ship: Periere. 

Napoli (1899) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,203. Dimensions: 470' x 
56'. Twin-screw, 12^ knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Ex-Sannio, ex-British Prince. Sunk by collision in the 
North Atlantic during 1918. 

Napoli (1907) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, England. 
Tonnage: 6,094. Dimensions: 406' x 51'. Twin-screw, 14 
knots. Two masts and three funnels. Ex-San Giorgio. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

134 



Nazario Sauro (1921) Transatlantica Italiana. 

Built by Societa Anonima Ansaldo, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 
8,150. Dimensions: 447' x 52'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Sister ship: Ammiraglio Bettolo. 

*Nea Hellas (1922) Anchor Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 16,991. Dimensions: 552'x70'. Twin- 
screw, 15 }^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Tus- 
cania. Note: In 1939 the Tuscania was sold to the General 
Steam Navigation Company of Greece and renamed Nea 
Hellas, but shortly afterwards she reverted back to the 
Anchor Line. 

Nebraska (1867) Guion Line. 

Built at Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,662. Dimensions: 400' x 
44'. Single-screw. 

Neckar (1873) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,331. Dimensions: 351' x 40'. Single-screw, 14^ knots. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1895. 

Neckar (1901) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 9,832. Dimensions: 499' x 58'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Potomac, (b) 
Antigone. Sister ships: Main and Rhein. 

Nederland (1873) Red Star Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 2,950. Dimensions: 329' x 
38'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1893. 

Neustria (1883) Fabre Line. 

Built by Claparede & Co., Rouen, France. Tonnage: 2,687. 
Dimensions: 328' x 40'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1908. 

Nevada (1868) Guion Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,125. Dimensions: 345' x 
43'. Single-screw. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Sold 
to the Dominion Line and renamed Hamilton. Scrapped 
in 1893. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

135 



New England (1898) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
12,099. Dimensions: 550' x 59'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Romanic, (b) 
Scandinavian. Scrapped in 1923. 

New York (1858) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,528. Dimensions: 310' x 40'. Single-screw. Three masts 
and one funnel. Sister ship: Bremen. 

New York (1888) American Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 10,499. Dimensions: 528' x 63'. Twin-screw, 20 ^ 
knots. Three masts and two funnels. Ex-City of New 
York. Renamed: Pittsburg. Note: As originally built 
this ship had three funnels and three masts. Sister ship: 
Philadelphia. 

New York (1927) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 21,455. Di- 
mensions: 602' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and 
two funnels. Note: She was later lengthened to 645 feet and 
tonnage increased to 23,337 tons gross. At the time of her 
reconstruction her speed was advanced to 20 knots. Sister 
ship: Hamburg. 

Newfoundland (1925) Furness Withy Co. 

Built by Vickers, Armstrong, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 6,791. Dimensions: 406' x 55'. Twin- 
screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sunk by 
bombs of enemy aircraft off Salerno, Italy on September 13, 
1943, while being used as a hospital ship. Sister ship: Nova 
Scotia. 

Niagara (1848) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 1,825. Dimensions: 251' x 38'. Paddle-wheels 10 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: The Cunard 
Line sold her to Glasgow shipbuilders in 1866, who converted 
her into a sailing ship. She was later wrecked near the South 
Stack on June 6, 1875, with no loss of life. Sister ships: 
America, Canada and Europa. 

Niagara (1908) French Line. 

Built by Atel & Ch. de La Loire, St. Nazaire, France. Ton- 
nage: 9,614. Dimensions: 485' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Corse. Scrapped 
in 1931. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

136 



Nieuw Amsterdam (1906) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
17,149. Dimensions: 600' x 68'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1931. 

*Nieuw Amsterdam (1938) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Rotterdam Dry Dock Co., Rotterdam, Nether- 
lands. Tonnage: 36,287. Dimensions: 713' x 88'. Twin- 
screw, 21 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Sur- 
vived all her services as a troopship throughout more than 
four years of this war work. 

Nomadic (1891) White Star Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 5,749. Dimensions: 460' x 49'. Twin-screw, 13 
knots. Sister ship: Tauric. 

Noordam (1902) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
12,531. Dimensions: 550' x 62'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: Kungsholm. Scrapped 
in 1928. Sister ships: Potsdam and Rijndam. 

*Noordam (1939) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Van P. Smit, Jr., Rotterdam, Netherlands. Ton- 
nage: 10,726. Dimensions: 480' x 64'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Zaandam. 

Noordland (1884) Red Star Line. 

Built by Laird Bros., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 
5,129. Dimensions: 400' x 47'. Single-screw, 13 H knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Broken up by shipbreakers in 
1908. 

Nord America (1882) La Veloce Line. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,920. Di- 
mensions: 418' x 50'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Three masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Stirling Castle, ex-Nord America, 
ex-Stirling Castle. Note: Wrecked near Arzilla in 1910. 

Norge (1881) Scandinavian-American Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons., Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 3,318. Dimensions: 340' x 40'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Ex-Pieter de 
Coninck. Wrecked near Rockall in 1904. 

Normandie (1933) French Line. 

Built by Soc. Ch. & Atliers de St. Nazaire, Penhoet. Ton- 
nage: 79,280. Dimensions: 981' x 117'. Quadruple-screw, 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

137 



30 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: Her super- 
structure was enlarged after completion, thus increasing the 
tonnage to 82,799 tons gross. Taken over by the United 
States Government during World War II and renamed 
Lafayette. On February 9, 1942, was badly gutted by fire 
at her New York pier and subsequently keeled over and sunk. 
After much salvage work she was later refloated but was not 
rebuilt and in September, 1946, was sold to the highest bidder 
for scrap. In December, 1946, was towed to Port Newark, 
New Jersey to be dismantled. 

Normannia (1890) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 8,250. Dimensions: 500' x 57'. Twin- 
screw, 18 1/6 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: 
Sold to the Spanish Government in 1898 along with the 
Columbia. The Spaniards renamed her Patriota. In 1899 
she was sold to the French Line for their New York service 
and renamed L' Aquitaine. Scrapped in 1906. Sister 
ship: Columbia. 

Norseman (1882) Dominion Line. 

Built by Laird Bros., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 
4,000. Dimensions: 392' x 44'. Single-screw. 

^Norseman (1897) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
9,545. Dimensions: 500' x 62'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Ex-Brasilia. 

North Briton (1858) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 2,190. Dimensions: 298' x 38'. Single-screw. 
Three masts and one funnel. Wrecked on Paraquet Island 
on November 5, 1861 with no loss of life. 

Norwegian (1861) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 2,449. Single-screw. Note: Wrecked on St. Paul 
Island on June 14, 1863, with no loss of life. Sister ship: 
Hibernian. 

Norwegian (1865) Allan Line. 

Built by Tod & McGregor, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,523. Dimensions: 375' x 39'. Single-screw. Ex-City of 
New York. Made final voyage to New York in 1900. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

138 



Netting Hill (1881) Twin Screw Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,920. Dimensions: 
420' x 45'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. She struck an iceberg 
on February 5, 1883 and sank with no loss of life. 

Nouveau Monde (1865) French Line. 

Built at St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 4,503. Dimensions: 
393' x 45'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three masts and two 
funnels. Ex-Labrador. 

Nova Scotia (1926) Furness Withy Co. 

Built by Vickers, Armstrong, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 6,796. Dimensions: 406' x 55'. Twin- 
screw, 15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Torpedoed 
and sunk in 1942. Sister ship: Newfoundland. Note: 
These ships were used on the Liverpool-St. John-Boston 
route. 

Nova Scotian (1858) Allan Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 2,190. Dimensions: 280' x 38'. Single-screw. 
Three masts and one funnel. She was later lengthened. 

Numidian (1891) Allan Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 4,836. Dimensions: 400' x 45'. Single-screw, 13^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Made final voyage to 
Boston in 1914. Note: During the first World War she was 
filled with cement and sunk in order to block a channel 
against submarines. 

Obdam (1880) Holland American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,699. Dimensions: 410' x 39'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-British Queen. Tor- 
pedoed and sunk in 1918. 

Oceana (1891) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 7,815. Dimensions: 531' x 54'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Scot. Note: Used 
mostly on special cruise trips. Renamed: (a) Alfonso XIII, 
(b) De Balboa, (c) Vasco Nunez de Balboa. 

Oceania (1907) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 
Built by Alexander Stephen & Son, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 5,497. Dimensions: 391' x 50'. Twin-screw, 
15 knots. Two masts and one funnel. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

139 



Oceania (1909) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 9,000. Dimensions: 476' x 55'. Twin- 
screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: 
Stampalia. 

Oceanic (1870) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,808. Dimensions: 420' x 42'. Single-screw, 14^ knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Note: Pioneer vessel of the 
White Star Line. She was laid down in 1869 and launched 
on August 27, 1870. Commenced maiden voyage from 
Liverpool to New York in February, 1871. She terminated 
her career in February, 1896, by being sold to the scrappers, 
and was broken up on the Thames during the same year. 
Sister ships: Atlantic, Baltic and Republic. 

Oceanic (1899) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
17,274. Dimensions: 685' x 68'. Twin-screw, 21 knots. 
Three masts and two funnels. Note: Cost approximately 
$3,600,000 to build. She was the first ship to exceed the 
Great Eastern in length. Her promenade deck extended 
for 400 feet. Commenced her maiden voyage in September, 
1899. Later she made a westward passage in 5 days, 16 hours 
and 34 minutes. She stranded on Foula Island in 1914 and 
became a total wreck. 

Oder (1873) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,265. Dimensions: 351' x 39'. Single-screw, 14 H knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Had accommodations for 90 
first-class, 126 second-class and 680 steerage passengers. 
Note: The Neckar, Mosel, Rhein, Main, Donau, Freser 
and America were similar ships. 

Ohio (1869) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,394. Dimensions: 301' x 39'. Single-screw. 

Ohio (1873) American Line. 

Built by Wm. Cramp & Sons, Shipbuilding & Engineering 
Co., Philadelphia, Penn. Tonnage: 3,104. Dimensions: 
360' x 42'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Foundered in August, 1909, after hitting a rock off 
the Alaskan coast, sustaining a loss of 5 lives. Sister ships: 
Indiana, Illinois and Pennsylvania. Note: Their speed 
was increased later to 14 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

140 



Ohio (1923) Royal Mail Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 18,900. 
Dimensions: 590' x 72'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Munchen. Renamed: Albertic. 
Note: The Ohio was .used for awhile on the Royal Mail 
Line's service to New York during the early twenties. 

Oldenburg (1890) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,006. Dimensions: 415' x 48'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships: 
Gera, Darmstadt, Karlesruhe and Stuttgart. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1907. 

Olinde-Rodrigues (1873) French Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,188. Dimensions: 350' x 39'. Single-screw. Ex-Fran- 
conia. 

Olympia (1871) Anchor Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 2,210. Dimensions: 307' x 34'. 
Single-screw. Note: She was later transferred to the Medi- 
terranean service. Made final voyage to New York in 1897. 

Olympic (1911) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
46,439. Dimensions: 852' x 92'. Triple-screw, 23 knots. 
Two masts and four funnels. Note: Her building cost 
amounted to about $7,500,000. From keel to navigating 
bridge measured 104 feet. The tops of her funnels were 175 
feet above the keel. While on her maiden voyage in 1912 she 
was rammed and holed by the British cruiser Hawke, but 
however, was in no danger of sinking. She acted as a troop- 
ship during the first World War. In 1921 was reconditioned 
and converted to oil burning equipment at a cost of about 
$2,500,000. She rammed and sank the well-known lightship 
Nantucket off the New England coast on May 16, 1934 
during a thick fog. The seven members of the lightship crew 
were lost. Broken up by shipbreakers in 1935. Sister ship: 
Titanic. 

Orbita (1915) Royal Mail Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
15,495. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Triple-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: She was employed on the 
Royal Mail Line's service between Hamburg, Southampton, 
Cherbourg and New York. This service lasted from 1921 to 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

141 



1927 and the Orduna, Oropessa, Orca and Ohio were the 
other ships of the line used on this route. Afterwards the 
Orbita was transferred back to her former owner, which was 
the Pacific Steam Navigation Co. Sister ships: Orca and 
Orduna. 

Orca (1918) Royal Mail Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
16,063. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Triple-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Calgaric. Sister 
ships: Orbita and Orduna. Note: See Orbita for further 
details. 

Orduna (1914) Royal Mail Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
15,507. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Triple-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: This ship was launched 
in September, 1913, for the Pacific Steam Navigation Com- 
pany. Between 1914 to 1918 she was under charter to the 
Cunard Line. After the first World War she was put on the 
Royal Mail Line service between Europe and New York, 
but as this trade was discontinued in 1927 she reverted back 
to her original owner. Sister ships: Orbita and Orca. 

Oregon (1883) Guion Line. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 7,375. Di- 
mensions: 501' x 54'. Single-screw, 18 ^ knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: She had 3-cylinder compound 
engines that developed 13,575 indicated horse-power at 64 
revolutions per minute. She commenced her maiden voyage 
from Queenstown to New York on October 7, 1883, and made 
the crossing in a record time of 6 days, 10 hours and 10 
minutes. In June, 1884, she was sold to the Cunard Line 
and retained her name. It was on March 14, 1886 that she 
was in collision with an unknown schooner 18 miles east of 
Long Island. She subsequently sunk, but all on board were 
rescued by the North German Lloyd steamship Fulda. 

Oregon (1883) Dominion Line. 

Built at Dumbarton, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,672. Di- 
mensions: 360' x 40'. Single-screw, 12 Y^ knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Sister ship: Sarnia. 

Orel (1890) Russian Volunteer Fleet. 

Built by Hawthorne, Leslie & Co., Ltd., Newcastle, England. 
Tonnage: 4,880. Dimensions: 432' x 48'. Twin-screw, 19 
knots. Three masts and two funnels. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

142 



Orione (1883) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow. Tonnage:, 4,161. 
Dimensions: 380' x 42'. Single-screw, 16 knots. Sister ships: 
Perseo and Sirio. 

Oscar II (1901) Scandinavian-American Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, 
England. Tonnage: 10,012. Dimensions: 500' x 58'. Twin- 
screw, 16 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships: 
Hellig Olav and United States. Scrapped in 1934. 

Oslofjord (1938) Norwegian- American Line. 

Built by Deutsche Schiff-und Maschinenbau, Wesermunde, 
Germany. Tonnage: 18,372. Dimensions: 563' x 73'. 
Twin-screw, 20 knots. Two masts and two funnels. She 
was sunk by a mine off the British Isles on December 13, 
1940. 

Ottawa (1874) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,000. Dimensions: 455' x 45'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Ex-Germanic. Renamed: 
Gulcemal. 

P. Caland (1874) Holland- American Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,584. Dimensions: 
350' x 38'. Single-screw, 10 knots. Three masts and one 
funnel. Renamed: Caramanie. 

P. de Satrustegui (1890) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish 
Line). 

Built by A. & J. Inglis, Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,671. Di- 
mensions: 410' x 46'. Single-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Tara. 

Pacific (1849) Collins Line. 

Built by W. H. Brown of New York. Tonnage: 2,856. Di- 
mensions: 282' x 45'. Paddle-wheels, 12% knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Note: Cost about $700,000 to build. 
She sailed from Liverpool on January 23, 1856, and was 
never heard of again. There was a loss of 240 lives. Sister 
ships: Arctic, Baltic and Atlantic. 

Palatia (1893) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 7,118. 
Dimensions: 460' x 52'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Sister ship: 
Patria. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

143 



Palermo (1899) Navigazione Generate I ta liana. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,203. Dimensions: 470' x 
56'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Ex-Lazio, ex-British Princess. 

Palermo (1907) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, 
England. Tonnage: 6,094. Dimensions: 430' x 52'. Twin- 
screw, 14 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-San 
Giovanni. Scrapped in 1928. 

Panama (1865) French Line. 

Built at St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 4,287. Dimensions: 
354' x 43'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. Renamed: Canada. 

Panama (1875) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow, 
Scotland. Tonnage: 2,085. Dimensions: 331' x 34'. Single- 
screw. Ex-Branksome Hall. 

Pannonia (1904) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 9,851. Dimensions: 486' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1922. 

Paris (1889) American Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 10,669. Dimensions: 527' x 63'. Twin-screw, 20 
knots. Three masts and two funnels. Ex-City of Paris. 
Renamed: Philadelphia. Note: On May 20, 1899, she 
stranded on the Manacles Rock, Cornwall, and remained 
there until refloated in July of that year. Sister ship: New 
York. 

Paris (1921) French Line. 

Built by Chantiers et Ateliers de Saint Nazaire, Penhoet, 
St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 34,569. Dimensions: 735' x 
83'. Quadruple-screw, 22 knots. Two masts and three 
funnels. Note: She was laid down in 1913, but it was not 
until 1921 that she was completed. She capsized and sunk 
after being gutted by fire at her Havre pier on April 18, 1939. 
Her hulk still remains in the shallow water of the port. 

Parisian (1881) Allan Line. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,395. 
Dimensions: 446' x 46'. Single-screw, 15 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: This steel built steamship had her 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

144 



original two funnels later replaced by a single large one. Sold 
to Italian shipbreakers in January, 1914, and immediately 
afterwards was dismantled at Genoa. 

Parthia (1870) Cunard Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 3,502. Dimensions: 360' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 
knots. Three masts and two funnels. Renamed: Victoria 
(Alaskan Steamship Co.). Note: She was operated by the 
United States Government during World War II. Now in 
operation between Seattle and Alaska as a freighter. 

Patria (1882) Fabre Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 4,053. 
Dimensions: 358' x 42'. Single-screw, 11 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Ex-Rugia. 

Patria (1893) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 7,118. 
Dimensions: 460' x 52'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Note: 
She was destroyed by fire in the English Channel on No- 
vember 17, 1899, with no loss of life. Sister ship: Palatia. 

Patria (1913) Fabre Line. 

Built by Forges et Chantiers de la Mediterranee, La Seyne, 
France. Tonnage: 11,885. Dimensions: 487' x 59'. Twin- 
screw, 16 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: Sunk 
by an explosion in Haifa Harbor on November 26, 1940. 
Sister ship: Providence. 

Patria (1938) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Deutschewerft, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
16,595. Dimensions: 589' x 73'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Motorship. Note: Used on the 
Central American route. Renamed: (a) Empire Welland, 
(b) *Russia. 

Patricia (1899) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 13,424. 
Dimensions: 560' x 62'. Twin-screw, 13 H knots. Four 
masts and one funnel. Sister ships: Graf Waldersee, 
Pennsylvania and Pretoria. 

Patris (1909) Greek Line. (Embiricps Bros.) 

Built by Northumberland Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., New- 
castle, England. Tonnage: 4,390. Dimensions: 370' x 47'. 
Twin-screw, 14 ^ knots. Two masts and two funnels. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1920. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

145 



Pavonia (1882) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,588. 
Dimensions: 430' x 46'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: Commenced her maiden 
voyage from Liverpool to Boston on October 30, 1882. She 
had accommodations for 200 cabin passengers and 1,000 in 
steerage. Scrapped in 1901. Sister ship: Cepha Ionia. 

Pennland (1870) Red Star Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 3,760. Dimensions: 361' x 41'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Ex-Algeria. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1893. 

Pennland (1922) Red Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
16,322. Dimensions: 575' x 67'. Triple-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Pi ttsburg. Note: She was 
built for the Dominion Line's Canadian service, but was 
transferred to the White Star Line and later to the Red Star 
Line. Finally became a unit of the Holland-American Line. 
Bombed and sunk by German planes in the Gulf of Athens 
on April 25, 1941. The survivors were picked up by a 
British warship. 

Pennsylvania (1863) National Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 2,890. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Note: In 1872 was lengthened 
by Laird Bros., Birkenhead, England. Her tonnage was in- 
creased to 4,276 tons gross. Renamed: Canada. Scrapped 
in 1894. 

Pennsylvania (1873) American Line. 

Built by Wm. Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding & Engineering 
Co., Philadelphia, Penn. Tonnage: 3,126. Dimensions: 
360' x 42'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Note: She ran aground on a ledge off Alaska in 1909 
with a loss of 5 lives. This ship was the pioneer vessel of the 
American Line and was launched in August, 1872. Com- 
menced maiden voyage in May, 1873. Sister ships: Illinois, 
Indiana and Ohio. 

Pennsylvania (1896) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
13,333. Dimensions: 559' x 62'. Twin-screw, 13 Y 2 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

146 



Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Nansamond. 
Scrapped in 1924. Sister ships: Graf Waldersee, Patricia 
and Pretoria. 

Pereire (1865) French Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 3,950. Dimensions, 363' x 46'. 
Paddle-wheels, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Note: During the seventies she was converted into a single- 
screw type of propulsion. In 1888 was sold and converted 
into a sailing ship and given the name Lancing. She was 
sold to Italian shipbreakers in December, 1924, and scrapped 
immediately. Sister ship: Napoleon III. 

Perou (1907) French Line. 

Built by Chantiers de L' Atlantique, St. Nazaire, France. 
Tonnage: 6,599. Dimensions: 432' x 52'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ship: Guade- 
loupe. 

Perseo (1883) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
4,158. Dimensions: 380' x 42'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 

Persia (1856) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow. Tonnage: 3,414. 
Dimensions: 360' x 45'. Paddle-wheels, 12^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Note: She was sold out of the 
Cunard service in 1868. This famous steamship was broken 
up by shipbreakers on the Thames in the early seventies. 
Sister ship: Scotia. 

Persia (1894) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,713. Dimensions: 445' x 50'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Minnewaska. 

Persian Monarch (1880) Wilson Line. 

Built at Dumbarton, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,923. Di- 
mensions: 360' x 48'. Single-screw, 12 ^ knots. Four masts 
and one funnel. Wrecked on Long Island in 1894 with no 
loss of life. Sister ship: Lydian Monarch. 

Perugia (1901) Anchor Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 4,348. Dimensions: 375' x 47'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Sunk in the Mediterranean in 
December, 1916. Note: She was usually on the Mediter- 
ranean trade. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

147 



Peruvian (1863) Allan Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,549. Dimensions: 320' x 39'. Single-screw. Three masts 
and one funnel. Note: She was lengthened in 1874 to 373 
feet and tonnage increased to 3,038 tons gross. Sister ship: 
Moravian. Note: They were very handsome ships with 
fine lines. 

Pesaro (1901) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 12,335. Di- 
mensions: 525' x 62. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Moltke. Note: The Moltke was 
taken over by the Italian Government during the first World 
War and they renamed her Pesaro. In the early twenties 
the Lloyd Sabaudo Line operated her for several Atlantic 
voyages. Scrapped in 1926. 

Philadelphia (1889) American Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 10,786. Dimensions: 527' x 63'. Twin-screw, 19^ 
knots. Three masts and two funnels. Ex-City of Paris. 
Note: She was broken up by shipbreakers in Italy during 
1925 along with sister ship and also the St. Louis. Sister 
ship: New York. 

Phoenicia (1894) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
Dimensions: 460' x 52'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Sister ships: 
Palatia and Patria. 

*Piemonte (1918) Italia Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
15,209. Dimensions: 520' x 67'. Triple-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Minnedosa. Sister ship: 
Liguria. 

Pilsudski (1935) Gdynia- American Line. 

Built by Cantieri Riuniti dell' Adriatico, Italy. Tonnage: 
14,294. Dimensions: 498' x 70'. Twin-screw, 20 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: She was launched on 
December 19, 1934, and entered her regular service in July, 
1936. She was torpedoed and sunk on November 26, 1939. 
Sister ship: Batory. 

Pisa (1896) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 4,959. Dimensions: 390' x 46'. Single- 
screw, 12 knots. Made final voyage to New York in 1914. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

148 



Pittsburg (1922) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
16,322. Dimensions: 575' x 67'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Pennland. Sister 
ship: Regina. Note: These two ships were originally laid 
down for the Dominion Line. For further details see Penn- 
land. 

Pocahontas (1900) United States Mail Steamship Co. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,881. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Prinzess Irene. Renamed: (a) 
Bremen, (b) Karlesruhe. 

Polonia (1910) Gdynia- American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
7,890. Dimensions: 450' x 56'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Kursk. 

Polynesian (1872) Allan Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co. , Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage : 
3,983. Dimensions: 400' x 42'. Single-screw, 13 1 A knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: She commenced her 
maiden voyage in October, 1872. Made the crossing be- 
tween Quebec and Londonderry in 7 days, 18 hours and 55 
minutes. Renamed: Lauren tian. 

Pomeranian (1882) Allan Line. 

Built by Earle's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Hull, England. Tonnage: 4,365. Dimensions: 381' x 43'. 
Single-screw, 12 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- 
Grecian Monarch. Note: The Pomeranian was tor- 
pedoed and sunk 9 miles from Portland Bill on April 15, 
1918, with the loss of 55 lives. 

Pommerania (1873) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,382. Single-screw, 13 ]/ 2 knots. Note: She was sunk by 
collision off Folkestone on November 25, 1878, with the loss 
of over 50 lives. 

Potsdam (1900) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 12,522. Di- 
mensions: 547' x 62'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Stockholm, (b) Solglimt. 
Note: The Stockholm was sold and converted into a floating 
whaling factory ship, and renamed Solglimt. Sister ships: 
Noordam and Rijndam. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

149 



President (1840) London Line. 

Built by Curling and Young at Limehouse on the Thames. 
Tonnage: 2,366. Paddle-wheels. Two funnels and 3 masts. 
Note: She was launched on December 7, 1839, and com- 
menced her maiden voyage on August 1, 1840, making the 
trip in 17 days. On March 11, 1841, she sailed from New 
York with a small number of passengers and was never heard 
of again. 

President Arthur (1900) United States Lines. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,680. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Princess Matoika, ex-Prinzess 
Alice, ex-Kiautschou. Renamed: City of Honolulu. 

President Fillmore (1899) United States Lines. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,532. 
Dimensions: 499' x 60'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Powha tan, ex-Hamburg. Renamed: 
(a) New Rochelle, (b) Hudson. 

President Grant (1907) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
18,072. Dimensions: 599' x 68'. Twin-screw, 14 M> knots. 
Six masts and one funnel. Renamed: Republic. Sister 
ship: President Lincoln. Note: These two fine ships were 
noted for being the only six-masted liners on the Atlantic. 

President Harding (1921) United States Lines. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. 
Tonnage: 13,869. Dimensions: 516' x 72'. Twin-screw, 19 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-President Taft, 
ex-Lone Star State. Renamed: Ville de Bruges. Tor- 
pedoed and sunk in May, 1940. Note: There were a number 
of ships of this class that were taken over by the Dollar Line. 
Sister ship: President Roosevelt. 

President Lincoln (1907) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
18,162. Dimensions: 599' x 68'. Twin-screw, 14 ^ knots. 
Six masts and one funnel. Note: She was laid down for 
Furness Withy & Co., Ltd., as the Scotian, but before com- 
pletion was sold to the Hamburg-American Line who re- 
named her President Lincoln. She was torpedoed and 
sunk on May 31, 1918, with the loss of 26 lives. Sister ship: 
President Grant. 

* 4 Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

150 



President Roosevelt (1922) United States Lines. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. Ton- 
nage: 13,869. Dimensions: 516' x 72'. Twin-screw, 20 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Peninsular State. 
Renamed: Joseph T. Dickman. Sister ship: President 
Harding. Note: These ships were of a class of similar ships 
built during the 1920-1922 period. Most of them were taken 
over by the Dollar Line. 

Presidente Wilson (1912) Cosulich Line. 

Built by Unione Austriaca. Tonnage: 12,588. Dimensions: 
477' x 60'. Twin-screw, 18}/ knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Ex-Kaiser Franz Josef I. Renamed: (a) Gange, 
(b) Marco Polo. 

Pretoria (1897) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 13,234. Di- 
mensions: 561' x 62'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Four masts 
and one funnel. Sister ships: Graf Waldersee, Patricia 
and Pennsylvania. 

Pretorian (1900) Allan Line. 

Built by Furness, Withy & Co., Ltd., W. Hartlepool, Eng- 
land. Tonnage: 6,436. Dimensions: 436' x 53'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 
1925. Note: Had been taken over by the Canadian Pacific 
Line. 

Preussen (1886) North German Lloyd. 

Built by J. C. Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. 
Tonnage: 5,295. Dimensions: 454' x 45'. Single-screw, 14 % 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 1910. 

Princess Matoika (1900) United States Lines. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,680. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-Prinzess Alice, ex-Kiautschou. 
Renamed: (a) President Arthur, (b) City of Honolulu. 
Note: She had been obtained from the United States Ship- 
ping Board. 

Principe di Piemonte (1907) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons., Ltd., Sunderland, Eng- 
land. Tonnage: 6,365. Dimensions: 430' x 52'. Twin-screw, 
14 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) 
Principello, (b) Folia. Sister ships: Re d' Italia and 
Regina d' Italia. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

151 



Principe di Udine (1908) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
7,794. Dimensions: 450' x 55'. Twin-screw, 16 K knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Sister ship : Tomaso di Savoia. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1916. Transferred to the 
South American route. Scrapped in 1929. 

Principe Umberto (1909) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 
Built by Cantieri Navali Riuniti, Palermo, Italy. Tonnage: 
7,838. Dimensions: 476' x 53'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Sister ship: Duca Degli Abruzzi. 
Used on the South American route. Removed from register 
in 1917. 

Principello (1907) Canadian Northern Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, 
England. Tonnage: 6,365. Dimensions: 430' x 52'. Twin- 
screw, 14 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Principe 
di Piemonte. Renamed: Folia. 

Principessa Jolanda (1908) Italian owners. 

Built in Italy. Tonnage: 9,200. Dimensions: 486' x 49'. 
Twin-screw. Two masts and two funnels. Note: Never put 
on the Atlantic service because she capsized while being 
launched on September 22, 1907. She laid on her side in the 
harbor with only a fraction of her completed hull showing 
above water and was subsequently broken up by ship- 
breakers. Sister ship: Principessa Mafalda. 

Principessa Mafalda (1908) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 
Built by Societa Esercizio Bacini, Riva Trigosa, Italy. Ton- 
nage: 9,210. Dimensions: 485' x 58'. Twin-screw, 18^ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Foundered off the 
coast of Bahia, Brazil on October 25, 1927, with the loss of 
314 lives. Sister ship: Principessa Jolanda. 

Prinz Adalbert (1902) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
6,030. Dimensions: 403' x 49'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Sister ship: Prinz Oskar. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1914. 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich (1902) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Flensburger Schiffsbau Ges., Flensburg, Germany. 
Tonnage: 4,650. Dimensions: 371' x 45'. Single-screw, 
12 3^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Otsego. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

152 



Prinz Eitel Friedrich (1904) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,170. 
Dimensions: 488' x 55'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: (a) De Kalb, (b) Mount Clay. 
Sister ship: Prinz Ludwig. 

Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm (1908) North German Lloyd. 

Built by J. C. Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. 
Tonnage: 17,082. Dimensions: 590' x 68'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Empress 
of India, (b) Montnairn, (c) Montlaurier. 

Prinz Ludwig (1906) North German Lloyd. 

German built. Tonnage: 9,687. Dimensions: 492' x 57'. 
Twin-screws, 15 % knots. Two masts and two funnels. Re- 
named : Orcades. Sister ship : Prinz Eitel Friedrich. 

Prinz Oskar (1902) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 6,026. Dimensions: 403' x 49'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Orien. Sister ship: 
Prinz Adalbert. Made final voyage to New York in 1914. 

Prinz Sigismund (1902) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Akt. Ges. "Neptun," Rostock, Germany. Ton- 
nage: 4,689. Dimensions: 370' x 45'. Single-screw, 12^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: General 
W. C. Gorgas. 

Prinz Sigismund (1903) North German Lloyd. 

Built at the Weser Yard at Bremen. Tonnage: 3,302. Di- 
mensions: 327' x 42'. Twin-screw, 12 knots. Two masts and 
two funnels. Renamed: Bambra. Note: Used mostly on 
the Eastern trade. 

Prinzess Alice (1900) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,911. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Kiautschou. Renamed: (a) 
Princess Matoika, (b) President Arthur, (c) City of 
Honolulu. Sister ship: Prinzess Irene. 

Prinzess Irene (1900) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 10,881. 
Dimensions: 523' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 Y^ knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Pocahontas, (b) 
Bremen, (c) Karlesruhe. Sister ship: Prinzess Alice. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

153 



Prinzessin Victoria Luise (1901) Hamburg- American Line. 
Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 4,409. Di- 
mensions: 407' x 47'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and 
two funnels. Note: She was usually employed as a cruise 
ship. Wrecked near Plum Point, Jamaica in 1906. 

*Providence (1915) Fabre Line. 

Built by Forges et Chantiers de la Mediterranee, France. 
Tonnage: 11,996. Dimensions: 511' x 59'. Twin-screw, 
16 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: She was 
later taken over and operated by Messageries Maritimes. 
Sister ship: Patria. 

Prussia (1894) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
7,008. Dimensions: 445' x 50'. Twin-screw. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: Dominion. Sister ship: Persia. 

Puerto Rico (1913) French Line. 

Built by Chantiers et Ateliers de Saint Nazaire, France. 
Tonnage: 6,127. Dimensions: 413' x 51'. Twin-screw, 13 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Meknes. 
Sister ship: Haiti. 

*Pulaski (1912) Gdynia- American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
6,516. Dimensions: 425' x 53'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Estonia, ex-Czar. Note: 
She is to be renamed Empire Penryn and operated by the 
Lamport & Holt Line. (1946 news item) 

Queen (The Queen) (1864) National Line. 

Built at Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 3,500. Di- 
mensions: 371' x 41'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: She was later lengthened and 
tonnage increased to 4,471 tons gross. Made final voyage to 
New York in 1892. Sister ship: England. 

*Queen Elizabeth (1940) Cunard White Star Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 83,673. Dimensions: 1,031 feet overall and beam 
of 118 feet. Quadruple-screw, 31 knots. Two masts and 
two funnels. Note: The largest ship built. Launched on 
September 27, 1938. Used extensively during World War II 
as a troopship. On October 21, 1946, she completed her first 
peacetime voyage and made the Atlantic crossing in four 
days, 16 hours, 18 minutes. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

154 



*Queen Mary (1935) Gunard White Star Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 80,774. Dimensions: 975' x 118'. Quadruple- 
screw, 30 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: 
Launched on September 26, 1934. Commenced her maiden 
voyage on May 27, 1936. Won the Blue Ribbon on August 
25, 1936. She has an overall length of 1,018^ feet. From 
her keel to rim of foremost funnel 180 feet high. 

Re di Italia (1907) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, England. 
Tonnage: 6,237. Dimensions: 430' x 52'. Twin-screw, 14 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ships: Regina di 
Italia and Principe di Piemonte. Made final voyage to 
New York in 1922. Transferred to the South American 
trade. Scrapped in 1930. 

ReVittorio (1907) Navigazione Generate Italians. 

Built by Cantieri Navali Odero, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 
7,847. Dimensions: 476' x 53'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Sister ship: Regina Elena. 
She was used on the South American route. Scrapped in 
1929. 

Regina (1918) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 16,289. Dimensions: 575' x 67'. Triple-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Western- 
land. Note: She was launched as the Regina for the Do- 
minion Line, but shortly afterwards transferred to the White 
Star Line. Sister ship : Pittsburg. 

Regina di Italia (1907) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, England. 
Tonnage: 6,240. Dimensions: 430' x 52'. Twin-screw, 14 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ships: Re <P 
Italia and Principe di Piemonte. Made final voyage to 
New York in 1924. Transferred to the South American 
route. Scrapped in 1929. 

Regina Elena (1907) Navigazione Generate Italiana. 

Built by Cantieri Ligur. Ancon, Ancona, Italy. Tonnage: 
7,865. Dimensions: 476' x 53'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Sister ship: Re Vittorio. Used on 
the South American route. Name removed from register in 
1918. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

155 



Regina Margherita (1884) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 
Built by A.' McMillan & Son, Dumbarton, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 3,577. Dimensions: 396' x 42'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 

Reina Maria Cristina (1888) Compania Trasatlantica 
(Spanish). 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 4,818. Dimensions: 408' x 48'. Single-screw, 
16 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Sister ship : Alfonso 
XIII. 

Reina Victoria Eugenia (1913) Compania Trasatlantica 
(Spanish Line). 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., 
Wallsend-on-Tyne, Newcastle, England. Tonnage: 10,137. 
Dimensions: 480' x 61'. Triple-screw, 17 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: Argentina. Sister ship: Infanta 
Isabel de Borbon. 

Reliance (1920) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Deutsche Schiff, Bremen, Germany. Tonnage : 19,802. 
Dimensions: 590' x 72'. Triple-screw, 17 knots. Two masts 
and three funnels. Note: She was laid down in 1914 for the 
Hamburg-American Line, but work was held up during the 
War. In 1920 she was completed and turned over to the 
Dutch, though soon afterwards transferred to United States. 
The Hamburg-American later purchased the liner for their 
Atlantic trade. Ex-Johann Heinrich Burchardt, ex- 
Limburgia. Sister ship: Resolute. 

Republic (1871) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,707. Dimensions: 426' x 41'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Note: Commenced her maiden 
voyage on February 1, 1872. Renamed: (a) Maasdam, (b) 
Vittoria, (c) Citta di Napoli. Scrapped in 1910. Sister 
ships: Atlantic, Baltic and Oceanic. 

Republic (1900) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
15,378. Dimensions: 593' x 59'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Columbus. Note: She had 
been built as the Columbus for the Dominion Line, but in 
1903 was transferred to the White Star Line. It was on 
January 23, 1909, that she collided with the Italian emigrant 
liner Florida during a dense fog near Nantucket. The dis- 
aster caused the Republic to sink and cost the lives of 6 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

156 



passengers who were in their cabins at time of the crash. 
The use of wireless was the effective means of bringing rescue 
ships to the scene. See Florida for additional information. 

*Republic (1907) United States Lines. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
17,910. Dimensions: 599' x 68'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-President Grant. Note: 
Launched as the Servia for Furness Withy & Co., Ltd., but 
was sold to the Hamburg-American Line before completion 
and renamed President Grant. In 1934 the United States 
Lines sold the Republic to the United States Army and she 
was converted into a troop transport. 

Resolute (1920) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by J. C. Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. 
Tonnage: 19,692. Dimensions: 590' x 72'. Triple-screw, 
17 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Ex-William 
O'Swald, ex-Brabantia. Renamed: Lombardia. Sister 
ship: Reliance. Note: These two ships were laid down in 
1914 for the Hamburg-American Line but were not com- 
pleted until after the War. They were first turned over to 
the Dutch but afterwards transferred to the United States. 
The Hamburg-American Line during the early twenties 
bought both ships for their Atlantic trade. The Resolute 
was sold to the Italian Government in August, 1935, and 
renamed Lombardia. 

Rex (1932) Italia Line. 

Built by Societa Anonima Ansaldo, Sestri, Ponente, Italy. 
Tonnage: 5 1,062. Dimensions: 833' x 97'. Quadruple-screw, 
28 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: This great 
liner was sunk by British torpedo planes on September 9, 
1944, while being towed by the Germans to a new hiding 
place. She now lies on her side in shallow water near Trieste 
with only a fraction of her hull above water. Indeed a pitiful 
sight when one remembers how majestic she appeared before 
the War. 

Rhaetia (1883) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built at the Reiherstieg Yard at Hamburg. Tonnage: 3,458. 
Dimensions: 351' x 43'. Single-screw, 11 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Rugia. 

Rhaetia (1904) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
6,600. Dimensions: 409' x 52'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name 

157 



Rhein (1868) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,075. Dimensions: 345' x 40'. Single-screw, 14^ knots. 

Rhein (1899) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 10,058. Di- 
mensions: 501' x 58'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Four masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: Susquehanna. Sister ships: 
Main and Neckar. 

Rhynland (1879) Red Star Line. 

Built by Vickers, Sons & Maxim, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 3,689. Dimensions: 402' x 40'. Single- 
screw, 123/6 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: 
Rhyna (Italian.) Scrapped in 1906. 

Rijndam (1901) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
12,529. Dimensions: 550' x 62'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1930. Sister ships: 
Noordam and Potsdam. 

Roehu m beau (1911) French Line. 

Built by Chantiers et Ateliers de Saint Nazaire, Penhoet, 
France. Tonnage: 12,678. Dimensions: 559' x 63'. Quad- 
ruple-screw, 15 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Scrap- 
ped in 1934. 

Roma (1902) Fabre Line. 

Built by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediterranee, La Seyne, 
France. Tonnage: 5,291. Dimensions: 411' x 46'. Single- 
screw, 14^ knots. Two masts and two funnels. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1927. 

Roma (1926) Navigazione Generate Italiana. 

Built by Ansaldo Societa Anonima, Sestri, Ponente, Italy. 
Tonnage: 32,583. Dimensions: 666' x 82'. Quadruple-screw, 
21 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: From her keel 
to navigating bridge measured 98 feet. She was converted 
into an Italian aircraft carrier during World War II and re- 
named Aquila. She was sent to the bottom of the sea during 
the War. Sister ship: Augustus. 

Roman (1884) Dominion Line. 

Built by Laird Bros., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 
4,572. Dimensions: 405' x 43'. Single-screw. Four masts 
and one funnel. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

158 



Romanic (1898) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
11,394. Dimensions: 550' x 59'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-New England. Renamed: 
Scandinavian. 

Roon (1903) North German Lloyd. 

Built by J. G. Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. 
Tonnage: 8,022. Dimensions: 453' x 55'. Twin-screw, 14J/ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships: Gneisenau 
and Scharnhorst. 

Rossi ja (1908) Russian- American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 8,596. Dimensions: 475' x 57'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Four masts and two funnels. Ex-Russia. Re- 
named: (a) Russ, (b) Latvia, (c) Fuso Maru, (d) Huso 
Maru. 

Rotterdam (1886) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,329. Dimensions: 390' x 38'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-British Empire. 

Rotterdam (1897) Holland- American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
8,287. Dimensions: 469' x 53'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) C. F. Tietgen, (b) 
Dwinsk. Torpedoed in 1918, while under the name Dwinsk. 

Rotterdam (1908) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
24,149. Dimensions: 560' x 77'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Broken up by shipbreakers in 
1931. Note: She had always been a very comfortable and 
popular liner. 

Roumanian (1882) Allan Line. 

Built by Murray & Co., Dumbarton, Scotland. Tonnage: 
4,126. Dimensions: 420' x 47'. Single-screw. Four masts 
and one funnel. Ex-Richmond Hill. 

Roussillon (1906) French Line. 

Built by the Weser Shipbuilding Yard at Bremen. Tonnage: 
8,800. Dimensions: 462' x 57'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1931. Ex-Goeben. 

Royal Edward (1908) Royal Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 11,117. Dimensions: 525' x 60'. Triple- 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

159 



screw, 20 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Cairo. 
Note: She was torpedoed and sunk 6 miles from Kamade- 
liusa, Aegean Sea on August 13, 1915 with the loss of 132 
lives. Sister ship: Royal George. 

Royal George (1907) Royal Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 11,146. Dimensions : 525 'x 60'. Triple- 
screw, 20 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Heli- 
opolis. Scrapped in 1923. Sister ship: Royal Edward. 
Note: The Royal George was operated by the Cunard Line 
after the first World War for a short time. 

Royal William (1838) City of Dublin Co. 

Built at Liverpool, England. Tonnage: 720. Dimensions: 
145' x 27'. Paddle-wheels, 7}^ knots. Two masts and one 
funnel* Note: She had side lever type of engine of 400 i.h.p. 
Scrapped in 1888. 

Rugia (1882) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 4,053. 
Dimensions: 358' x 42'. Single-screw, 11 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: Patria. Sister ship: 
Rhaetia. 

Rugia (1905) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,598. 
Dimensions: 409' x 52'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. 

Runic (1889) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,833. Dimensions: 430' x 45'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Tampican. Sister 
ship: Cufic. 

Russia (1867) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 2,959. 
Dimensions: 358' x 42'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: Later she was lengthened to 
435 feet and tonnage increased to 4,752 tons. She was sold 
to the Red Star Line in 1881 and renamed Waesland. 

Russia (1889) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built at Liverpool, England. Tonnage: 3,908. Dimensions: 
374' x 44'. oingle-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Ex-Santa Barbara, ex-Russia. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

160 



Russia (1908) Russian- American Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
8,596. Dimensions: 475' x 57'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Rossi ja, (b) 
HUSH, (c) Latvia, (d) Fuso Maru, (e) Huso Maru. 

Saale (1886) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,806. Dimensions: 428' x 47'. Single- 
screw, 18 knots. Four masts and two funnels. Sister ships: 
Aller and Trave. Note: The Saale was built by John Elder 
& Co., Glasgow. This shipbuilding firm's name was shortly 
afterwards changed to Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering 
Co., Ltd. In later years the Saale was sold to the Lucken- 
back Line and converted into a freighter and named J. L. 
Luckenback. Finally her named was changed to Madison. 
She was broken up by Italian shipbreakers in 1924. 

Sachsen (1886) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 5,026. 
Dimensions: 440' x 45'. Single-screw, 14^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Bayern. 

St. Germain (1874) French Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 3,641. Dimensions: 377' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Klopstock. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1900. 

Saint Laurent (1866) French Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., at 
St. Nazaire, France. Tonnage: 3,989. Dimensions: 355' x 
43'. Single-screw. Three masts and two funnels. 

St. Laurent (1905) French Line. 

Built by Ch. & Atel. de St. Nazaire, Rouen. Tonnage: 5,614. 
Dimensions: 392' x 50'. Single-screw. Made final voyage 
to New York in 1914. 

St. Louis (1895) American Line. 

Built by Wm. Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding & Engineering 
Co., Philadelphia, Penn. Tonnage: 11,629. Dimensions: 
535' x 63'. Twin-screw, 21 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: Launched on the Delaware on November 12, 
1894. Commenced her maiden voyage from New York to 
Southampton on June 5, 1895. In 1917 was renamed Louis- 
ville and employed as a transport during the War. In 1925 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

161 



she was towed by two Dutch tugs from New York to Italy 
where ship was dismantled by shipbreakers. Sister ship: 
St. Paul. 

*St. Louis (1929) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
16,732. Dimensions: 543' x 72'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Motorship. Sister ship: 
Milwaukee. 

St. Paul (1895) American Line. 

Built by Wm. Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding & Engineering 
Co., Philadelphia, Penn. Tonnage: 11,629. Dimensions: 
535' x 63'. Twin-screw, 21 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. She was launched in March, 1895. Taken over 
by the United States Government during the War and 
renamed Knoxville. She was towed across the Atlantic to 
Germany in 1923 and broken up by shipbreakers. Sister 
ship: St. Louis. Note: These two fine liners were note- 
worthy additions to American shipping. 

Salier (1875) North German Lloyd. 

Built at Hull, England. Tonnage: 3,098. Dimensions: 353' 
x 39'. Single-screw, 13 ^j knots. Two masts and one funnel. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1895. Note: She was the 
pioneer North German Lloyd mail steamer to Australia, and 
was usually employed on the Germany-Australia route. In 
December, 1896, she sunk in Bay of Biscay with great loss 
of life. Sister ship: Habsburg. 

Samaria (1868) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 2,605. Dimensions: 320' x 39'. Single-screw. Two 
masts and one funnel. Made last voyage to Boston in July, 
1892. Broken up by shipbreakers in 1902. Sister ship: 
Siberia. 

*Samaria (1921) Cunard Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 19,597. Dimensions: 601' x 73'. Twin-screw, 
16^ knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships: 
Laconia and Scythia. 

Samland (1903) Red Star Line. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. 
Tonnage: 9,748. Dimensions: 490' x 58'. Twin-screw, 13 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Belgic, ex-Sam- 
land, ex-Mississippi. Scrapped in 1931. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

162 



San Gennaro (1917) Pierce Bros. Company. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 10,917. Dimensions: 518' x 
64'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and two funnels. 
Renamed: Colombo. 

San Giorgio (1886) Sicula Americana Line. 

Built by Oswald & Co., Southampton, England. Tonnage: 
2,817. Dimensions: 307' x 41'. Single-screw. Ex-Shakes- 
peare. Note: Later was owned by Marittima Italiana. 

San Giorgio (1907) Sicula Americana Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, 
England. Tonnage: 6,222. Dimensions: 406' x 51'. Twin- 
screw, 13^ knots. Two masts and three funnels. Renamed: 
Napoli. 

San Giovanni (1907) Sicula Americana Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing and Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, 
England. Tonnage: 6,592. Dimensions: 430' x 52'. Twin- 
screw, 13^ knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: 
Palermo. 

San Gughelmo (1911) Sicula Americana Line. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 8,341. Dimensions: 470' x 56'. Twin-screw, 15}^ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 1919. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1916. 

San Guisto (1890) Cosulich Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,874. 
Dimensions: 504' x 57'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts 
and three funnels. Ex-Gaa, ex-Moskva, ex-Don, ex-Furst 
Bismark. Note: The San Guisto was used as an emigrant 
carrier for a short time. She was broken up by shipbreakers 
in 1924. 

Sannio (1899) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 9,210. Dimensions: 470' x 
56'. Twin-screw, 12 ]/% knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Ex-British Prince. Renamed: Napoli. 

Sant' Anna (1910) Fabre Line. 

Built by Forges & Chantiers de la Mediterranee, La Seyne, 
France. Tonnage: 9,350. Dimensions: 470' x 56'. Twin- 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

163 



screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1915. Note: Sunk during the first 
World War. 

Santiago (1890) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish Line). 
British built. Tonnage: 5,206. Dimensions: 410' x 48'. 
Single-screw. Ex-Leon XIII, ex-Jelunga. Renamed: (a) 
Jelunga, (b) Jehangir. 

Santo Domingo (1877) Compania Trasatlantica (Spanish 
Line). 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
2,805. Dimensions: 344' x 39'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Dublin Castle. Note: 
Wrecked off the Isle of Pines in July, 1898. 

Saragossa (1874) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 2,166. Dimensions: 316' x 35'. Single-screw. Carried 
few passengers, and employed on the Boston service. 

Sardegna (1923) Italia Line. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
11,452. Dimensions: 490' x 61'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Sierra Ventana. Note: 
The Italians obtained her from the North German Lloyd in 
1935. 

Sardnian (1875) Allan Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 4,376. Dimensions: 400' x 42'. Single-screw, 13 Y^ 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: She caught fire 
from an explosion on board ship while bound to Quebec from 
Liverpool on May 10, 1878. Many lives were lost. 

Sarmatian (1871) Allan Line. 

Built by Robert Steele & Co., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,920. Dimensions: 370' x 42'. Single-screw, 13 H knots. 
Three masts and one funnel. Broken up at Rotterdam by 
shipbreakers in 1908. 

Sarnia (1882) Dominion Line. 

Built by C. Connell Company, Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,726. Dimensions: 360' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Had accommodations for 80 
first-class, 60 second-class and 1,200 steerage. Sister ship: 
Oregon. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

164 



Saturnia (1910) Anchor-Donaldson Line. 

Built by C. Connell & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 8,611. 
Dimensions: 456' x 55'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Note: She was quite similar in appearance 
to the Letitia of 1912. The Saturnia was broken up by 
shipbreakers in 1929. 

*Saturnia (1927) Cosulich Line. 

Built by Cantieri Riuniti Dell' Adriatico, Monfalcone, Italy. 
Tonnage: 23,940. Dimensions: 601' x 79'. Twin-screw, 21 
knots. Motorship. Two masts and one funnel. Note: She 
was later transferred to the newly formed Italia Line. In 
1935 was fitted with new Diesel engines which increased her 
speed to 21 knots. During the second World War was taken 
over by the United States Government and converted into 
a hospital ship and name changed to Francis Y. Slanger. 
Sister ship: Vulcania. These two ships are to be returned 
to the Italians in 1947. 

Savoia (1897) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Navali Odero & Co., Foce, Genoa, Italy. Tonnage: 
4,429. Dimensions: 462' x 45'. Twin-screw, 15 H knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: At one time her tonnage 
was listed as 5,082 tons gross. 

Saxonia (1857) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,404. Dimensions: 317' x 40'. Single-screw. Note: One 
of the very few failures built by Caird & Co. The builders 
replaced her original engines with ones of the compound 
type. In 1877 was sold to the Russian Volunteer Fleet and 
renamed Nijni Novgorod. 

Saxonia (1900) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 14,197. Dimensions: 580' x 64'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: Built for the 
Liverpool-Boston service. She had accommodations for 160 
first-class, 200 second-class and 1,600 third -class passengers. 
Reported to have cost about $1,600,000 to build. Broken 
up by shipbreakers in 1926. Sister ship: Ivernia. Their 
huge single funnels measured 106 feet high from deck level 
and gave them the distinction of having the tallest funnel 
ever fitted to a steamship. 

Scandia (1889) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 4,243. 
Dimensions: 370' x 44'. Single-screw, 13>6 knots. Two 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

165 



masts and one funnel. Had accommodations for 30 first- 
class and 1,400 steerage passengers. 

Scandinavian (1898) Allan Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
12,116. Dimensions: 550' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex- Romanic, ex-New Eng- 
land. Scrapped in 1923. 

Scharnhorst (1904) North German Lloyd. 

Built by J. C. Tecklenborg & Co., Geestemunde, Germany. 
Tonnage: 8,131. Dimensions: 453' x 55'. Twin-screw, 13^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: La Bourdon- 
nais. Sister ships: Roon and Gneisenau. 

Schiller (1872) Eagle Line. (Hamburg, Germany). 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,408. Dimensions: 375' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Wrecked on Sicily Islands on 
the evening of May 7, 1875, while bound on voyage from 
New York to Hamburg. There was a loss of 200 lives. 

Schleswig (1903) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,955. 
Dimensions: 450' x 52'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: General Duchesne. 

Scotia (1862) Cunard Line. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 3,871. Dimensions: 379' x 47'. Paddle-wheels, 13 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note : The last Cunard 
iron paddle steamer. She had the greatest power indicated 
by paddle-wheel engines of transatlantic steamers. Her 
4,000 indicated horse-power engines were capable of driving 
the ship at 14 knots. Sailed on last voyage for Cunard Line 
in September, 1875. She was afterwards sold to the Tele- 
graph Construction and Maintenance Company for telegraph 
cable purposes. They converted her into a twin-screw 
steamer. 

Scotia (1889) Anchor Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 2,846. Dimensions: 310' x 40'. 
Single-screw. 

Scotian (1898) Allan Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
10,417. Dimensions: 505' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Statendam. Renamed: 
Marglen. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

166 



Scotland (1865) National Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,803. Dimensions: 371' x 
41'. Single-screw, 12 knots. Note: She was in collision with 
ship named Kate Dyer off Fire Island, New York, on De- 
cember 1, 1866, and driven ashore where she subsequently 
broke up. 

Scotstoun (1925) British Admiralty. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 17,046. Dimensions: 553' x 70.' Twin- 
screw, 15 ]/2 knots. Two masts and three funnels. Ex- 
Caledonia (former Anchor liner). Torpedoed and sunk on 
January 13, 1940 while serving as a British auxiliary cruiser. 

Scythia (1875) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 4,556. Dimensions: 420' x 42'. Single-screw, 15 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1900. 
Sister ship: Bothnia. 

*Scythia (1920) Cunard Line. 

Built by Vickers, Armstrong, Ltd., Barrow-in-Furnace, 
England. Tonnage: 19,761. Dimensions: 600' x 73'. Twin- 
screw, 16^2 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister ships: 
Laconia and Samaria. 

Semiramis (1895) Lloyd Austriaco. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Brothers, Ltd., Dumbarton, Scot- 
land. Tonnage: 4,165. Dimensions: 377' x 44'. Single- 
screw, 16 knots. Two masts and one funnel. 

Sepione (1877) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Brothers, Ltd., Dumbarton, Scot- 
land. Tonnage: 3,149. Dimensions: 350' x 39'. Single- 
screw. Two masts and one funnel. Ex-German. Note: 
She was converted into a hulk in October, 1902. 

Servia (1881) Cunard Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 7,391. Dimensions: 515' x 52'. Single-screw, 17 
knots. Three masts and two funnels. Note: Attained a 
speed of 18 knots on her trials. She was the first Cunarder 
to be built of steel. Her main dining saloon measured 74 feet 
by 49 feet wide, with a height of 8^ feet, and could seat 350 
passengers. She was broken up by shipbreakers in 1901. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

167 



Seydlitz (1903) North German Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 7,942. 
Dimensions: 442' x 55'. Twin-screw, 14^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1933. Sister ship: 
Zieten. 

Siberia (1867) Cunard Line. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Go van, Glasgow. Tonnage: 
2,498. Dimensions: 320' x 39'. Single-screw. Three masts 
and one funnel. Note: She was regularly employed on the 
Liverpool-Boston route. She made her last voyage to Boston 
as a Cunarder in September, 1878. Later sold and renamed 
Manila. Sister ship: Samaria. 

Siberian (1884) Allan Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 3,846. Dimensions: 372' x 45'. 
Single-screw, 12 knots. Made final voyage to the United 
States in 1906. 

Sicilian (1899) Allan Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 6,224. Dimensions: 430' x 54'. Single-screw, 12^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: Bruton. 
Scrapped in 1925. Sister ship: Corinthian. 

Sicilian Prince (1889) Prince Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,784. Dimensions: 363' x 
42'. Single-screw. Ex-Alvares Cabral, ex-Mocambique. 
Renamed: Abbassick. 

Sierra Nevada (1922) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 8,753. 
Dimensions: 439' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: *Madrid. 

Sierra Ventana (1923) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
11,392. Dimensions: 490' x 61'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Sardegna. Note: 
She was used mostly on the Bremen-South American route, 
as also were her sister ships the Sierra Morena and Sierra 
Cordoba. 

Silesia (1869) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,156. Dimensions: 340' x 40'. Single-screw. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

168 



*Sinaia (1924) Fabre Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
8,567. Dimensions: 439' x 56'. Twin-screw, 14 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Sister ship: De La Salle. 

Sirio (1883) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 4,141. Dimensions: 380' x 42'. Single-screw, 16 knots. 
Note: This Italian emigrant carrier was wrecked off Cape 
Palos on August 4, 1906, with the loss of 350 lives. 

Siiius (1838) British and American Steam Navigation Co. 
Built at Leith, England. Tonnage: 703. Dimensions: 178' 
x 25'. Paddle-wheels, 8 knots. Two masts and one funnel. 
She had a side lever type of engine. The first British steam- 
ship to cross the Atlantic. She was wrecked in 1847. 

Slavonia (1903) Cunard Line. 

Built by Sir James Laing & Sons, Ltd., Sunderland, England. 
Tonnage: 10,606. Dimensions: 510' x 59'. Twin-screw, 15^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Ex- Yamuna. Note: 
She was wrecked in June, 1909, off Flores Island. 

Smolensk (1898) Russian Volunteer Fleet. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 7,270. Dimensions: 487' x 58'. Twin-screw, 20 knots. 
Three masts and three funnels. Ex-Rion (Russian Navy), 
ex-Smolensk. 

*Sobieski (1939) Gydnia-American Line. 

Built at Nakskov, Denmark. Tonnage: 11,030. Dimensions: 
493' x 67'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. Two masts and one 
funnel. Motorship. Sister ship: Chrobry. 

Sofia (1905) Cosulich Line. 

Built by Lloyd Austriaco, Trieste. Tonnage: 5,527. Di- 
mensions: 360' x 48'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Ex-Sofia 
Hohenberg. Made final voyage to New York in 1921. 

Sofia Hohenberg (1905) Unione Austriaca (Austro-American 
Line). 

Built by Lloyd Austriaco, Trieste. Tonnage: 5,491. Di- 
mensions: 360' x 48'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Renamed: 
Sofia. 

South wark (1893) American Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 8,607. Dimensions: 480' x 57'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Note: She was named 
after a Philadelphia suburb. Sister ship: Kensington. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

169 



Spaarndam (1881) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,539. Dimensions: 427' x 41'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Arabic. Made final voyage 
to New York in 1900. 

Spaarndam (1922) Holland- American Line. 

Built by New Waterway Shipbuilding Co., Schiedam, 
Netherlands. Tonnage: 8,857. Dimensions: 450' x 58'. 
Single-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sunk 
by a magnetic mine off England on November 27, 1939, while 
bound for Antwerp and Rotterdam from New Orleans. 
Sister ships: Edam, Leerdam and Maasdam. 

Spain (1871) National Line. 

Built by Laird Bros., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. Tonnage: 
4,512. Dimensions: 440' x 43'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Note: Tonnage increased later 
to 5,089 tons gross. Broken up by French shipbreakers in 
1896. Note: Her running mate was the Egypt. 

Spree (1890) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 6,963. 
Dimensions: 463' x 51'. Single-screw, 19 knots. Three 
masts and two funnels. In 1898 this ship was rebuilt and her 
name changed to Kaiserin Maria Theresa. The alterations 
extended her length to 528 feet and tonnage increased to 
7,840 tons gross. She was speeded up to 20 knots and her 
outward appearance greatly changed for she reappeared with 
three funnels and two masts. She was given new engines 
and converted to twin-screw propulsion. Renamed: (a) 
Kaiserin Maria Theresa, (b) Ural, (c) Russ. Sister ship: 
Havel. 

S turn pal ia (1909) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Cantiere Navali Riuniti, Spezia, Italy. Tonnage: 
9,000. Dimensions: 476' x 55'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two 
masts and two funnels. Ex-Oceania. Torpedoed and sunk 
in 1916. 

State of Alabama (1873) State Line. 

Built by Wingate & Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,313. Dimensions: 321' x 36'. Single-screw. Ex-Ala- 
bama. Made final voyage to New York in 1890. 

State of California (1891) State Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 4,275. Dimensions: 
385' x 46'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one 

* Denotes ship still in seryice under same name. 

170 



funnel. Renamed: (a) Calif ornian, (b) Coamo. Note: 
The State of California was taken over and operated by 
the Allan Line until she was sold. 

State of Florida (1881) State Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 4,000. Dimensions: 400' x 42'. 
Single-screw, 13 ^ knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Sunk by collision at sea on April 18, 1884, with a loss of 108 
lives. 

State of Georgia (1873) State Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 2,490. Dimensions: 330' x 36'. Single-screw, 13 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Ex-Georgia. Note: 
She disappeared on December 23, 1896, with 32 on board and 
was never heard of again. 

State of Indiana (1874) State Line. 

Built by Wingate Co., Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 2,528. 
Dimensions: 329' x 36'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three 
masts and one funnel. Note: She was sold to the Turkish 
Navy in 1893 and renamed Isnir. 

State of Louisiana (1872) State Line. 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,869. Dimensions: 
300' x 35'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one 
funnel. Note: She was wrecked at Lough Larne, Ireland, on 
December 24, 1878, while on voyage from Glasgow to New 
York. All on board were saved. 

State of Nebraska (1880) State Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 3,986. Dimensions: 385' x 43'. Single-screw, 13 1 A 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: In 1891 she was 
sold to the Allan Line, who later resold her in 1902. 

State of Nevada (1874) State Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 2,488. Dimensions: 332' x 36'. Single-screw, 13 
knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: She was taken 
over by the Allan Line in 1891. Renamed: Mecca. Sister 
ship: State of Pennsylvania. 

State of Pennsylvania (1873) State Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow, 
Scotland. Tonnage: 2,488. Dimensions: 332' x 36'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Ex-Pennsyl- 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

171 



vania. Note: She was sold to the Allan Line and then resold 
to Turkish owners in 1895, who renamed her Medina. Sister 
ship: State of Nevada. 

State of Virginia (1873) State Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow, 
Scotland. Tonnage: 2,472. Dimensions: 331' x 34'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: She 
was wrecked on Sable Island on July 15, 1879, with the loss 
of 9 lives. 

Statendam (1898) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
10,491. Dimensions: 515' x 59'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Scotian, (b) 
Mar glen. 

Statendam (1917) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
32,234. Dimensions: 740' x 86'. Triple-screw. Two masts 
and three funnels. Renamed: Justiciax. Note: This large 
liner was never used as a passenger ship for she was taken 
over by the British government during the first World War 
and converted into a troopship. She was torpedoed and sunk 
on July 19, 1918, with the loss of ten lives. 

Statendam (1929) Holland -American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
28,291. Dimensions: 670' x 81'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. 
Two masts and three funnels. Note: The terrible bombing 
of Rotterdam by German planes occurred on May 14, 1940. 
The Statendam was among the several vessels that were in 
the port at the time. Some of the bitterest fighting took 
place in the vicinity of the piers where the ships were tied. 
The Statendam was repeatedly hit by the crossfire from 
both sides of the river and caught fire. She continued to 
blaze for five days and became a total loss. 

*Stavangerfjord (1918) Norwegian-American Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 13,156. Dimensions: 532' x 64'. Twin-screw, 153^ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. 

Steuben (1922) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 14,690. 
Dimensions: 526' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Ex-General Von Steuben, ex-Muen- 
chen. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

172 



Stockholm (1900) Swedish- American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
12,835. Dimensions: 547' x 62'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Potsdam. Note: The 
Swedish-American Line sold her to new owners, who had the 
ship converted into a whaling factory vessel and renamed 
her Solglimt. 

Stockholm (1941) Swedish-American Line. 

Built at Monfalcone, Italy. Tonnage: 28,000. Dimensions: 
642' x 83'. Triple-screw, 19 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Motorship. Note: Never used as a passenger ship 
for she was taken over by the Italian government before com- 
pletion. The Italians renamed her Sabaudia and converted 
her into a troopship. This very beautiful ship capsized at 
Trieste in May, 1945. 

*Stockholm (1947) Swedish- American Line. 

Built at Gothenburg, Sweden. Tonnage: 11,000. Single 
mast and one funnel. Motorship. Note: Launched on 
September 9, 1946, and is the largest ship built in Sweden 
to date. She will have excellent accommodations for 360 
passengers. Should be ready for transatlantic service by 
December, 1947. 

Strassburg (1872) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,025. Dimensions: 351' x 39'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1893. 

Stuttgart (1889) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,048. Dimensions: 415' x 48'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1909. Sister ships: Darmstadt, 
Gera, Karlesruhe and Oldenburg. 

Stuttgart (1923) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 13,387. 
Dimensions: 526' x 65'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts 
and two funnels. Sister ship: Muenchen. 

Sud America (1868) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,185. Dimensions: 339' x 40'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Ex- 
Mentana, ex-Provincia di San Paolo, ex-Atlantica, 
ex-Westphalia. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

173 



Suevia (1874) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,624. Dimensions: 360' x 41'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Made final voyage to New York 
in 1894. 

Suffren (1901) French Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
10,622. Dimensions: 525' x 62'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Leopoldina, ex-Bluecher. 
Scrapped in 1929. 

Susquehanna (1899) United States Lines. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, Germany. Tonnage: 
9,959. Dimensions: 501' x 58'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Rhein. 

Swakopmund (1903) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
5,631. Dimensions: 403' x 49'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Ex-Professor Woermann, 
ex-Florida. Renamed: Arafura. Note: She was formerly 
employed on the South African trade of the Woermann Line. 

Switzerland (1874) Red Star Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 2,957. Dimensions: 345' x 
39'. Single-screw, 13}/ knots. Two masts and one funnel. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1904. 

Sylvania (1895) Cunard Line. 

Built by London and Glasgow Shipbuilding Co., Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 5,598. Dimensions: 445' x 49'. Twin-screw, 14 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Broken up by ship- 
breakers in 1910. Sister ship: Carinthia. 

Taormina (1908) Lloyd Italiano. 

Built by D. & W. Henderson & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 8,921. Dimensions: 482' x 58'. Twin-screw, 16^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: She was later 
operated by the Navigazione Generale Italiana Line. Broken 
up by shipbreakers in 1929. Sister ships: Ancona and 
Verona. 

Tauric (1891) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
5,730. Dimensions: 461' x 49'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: Welshman. Sister 
ship: Nomadic. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

174 



Teresa (1900) Unione Austriaca (Austro- American Line). 

Built by Russell & Co., Ltd., Port Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 3,769. Dimensions: 344' x 49'. Single-screw. 

Teutonia (1856) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,034. Dimensions: 287' x 37'. Single-screw. 

Teutonic (1889) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
9,686. Dimensions: 565' x 57'. Twin-screw, 20 knots. 
Three masts and two funnels. Broken up by shipbreakers 
at Hamburg in 1921. Sister ship: Majestic. 

Themistocles (1907) Greek Line. 

Built by J. Priestman & Co., Sunderland, England. Ton- 
nage: 6,045. Dimensions: 400' x 50'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Moraitis. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1924. 

Thessaloniki (1890) Greek Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 4,682. Dimensions: 412' x 46'. Single-screw. 
Three masts and one funnel. Ex-City of Vienna. Note: 
She sunk after being abandoned in the North Atlantic in 
1916. 

Thingvalla (1874) Scandinavian- American Line. 

Built at Copenhagen, Denmark. Tonnage: 2,524. Di- 
mensions: 301' x 37'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1900. 

Thuringia (1870) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
1,964. Dimensions: 287' x 34'. Single-screw, 133^ knots. 

Thuringia (1922) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Howaldtswerke (German). Tonnage: 11,343. Di- 
mensions: 473' x 60'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: General San Martin. Sister 
ship: Westphalia. 

Timgad (1911) French Line. 

Built by Chantier et Ateliers de Provence, Port de Bouc, 
France. Tonnage: 5,232. Dimensions: 402' x 51'. Twin- 
screw, IS^2 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Sister ship: 
Carthage. Note: Used on the West Indies and Central 
American service. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

175 



Tirpitz (1914) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 21,833. 
Dimensions: 588' x 75'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. Two masts 
and three funnels. Renamed: Empress of Australia. 
Note: She was never operated as a passenger ship under the 
name of Tirpitz as she was turned over to the British upon 
completion and sold to the Canadian Pacific Line who named 
her Empress of Australia. 

Titanic (1911) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
46,329. Dimensions: 852' x 92'. Triple-screw, 21 knots. 
Two masts and four funnels. From keel to top of funnels 
measured 175 feet. Note: Reported to have cost about 
$7*500,000 to build. Commenced maiden voyage with 1,308 
passengers from Southampton to New York on April 12, 
1912, and on the night of April 14th struck an iceberg and 
sank with the loss of 815 of her passengers and 688 of the 
crew. Sister ship: Olympic. 

Tomaso di Savoia (1907) Lloyd Sabaudo Line. 

Built by Barclay, Curie & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
7,761. Dimensions: 450' x 55'. Twin-screw, 16^ knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Made final voyage to New 
York in 1915. Transferred to the South American route. 
Scrapped in 1928. Sister ship: Principe di Udine. 

Toronto (1880) Dominion Line. 

Built by Whiteinch at Dumbarton, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,315. Dimensions: 329' x 39'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. 

Tortona (1909) Thomson Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 8,153. Dimensions: 450' 
x 54'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Four masts and one funnel. 
Renamed: Ausonia. 

Transylvania (1914) Cunard Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 14,315. Dimensions: 548' x 
66'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. Two masts and two funnels. 
Torpedoed and sunk 2 miles south from Cape Vado, Gulf of 
Genoa on May 4, 1917. Note: She had been the first liner 
fitted with double reduction geared turbine machinery. The 
Tuscania of 1915 was identical in appearance. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

176 



Transylvania (1925) Anchor Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 16,923. Dimensions: 552' x 70'. Twin- 
screw, 153^ knots. Two masts and three funnels. Note: 
Her speed was increased to 17 knots in 1938. The first and 
third funnels were dummies. Torpedoed and sunk in the 
Atlantic on August, 1940, while serving as an armed merchant 
cruiser. Sister ship: Caledonia. 

Trave (1886) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. (Formerly the shipbuilding firm of John Elder & 
Co.) Tonnage: 5,262. Dimensions: 437' x 48'. Single- 
screw, 18 knots. Four masts and two funnels. Scrapped in 
1909. Sister ships: Aller and Saale. 

Tunisian (1900) Allan Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 10,576. Dimensions: 500' x 59'. Twin- 
screw, 16 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: 
Marburn. Sister ship: Bavarian. 

Tuscania (1915) Anchor Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 14,348. Dimensions: 548' x 66'. Twin- 
screw, 17 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: She 
was launched in September, 1914, and shortly after going 
into service she was commissioned as a British troopship. 
Torpedoed and sunk 7 miles from Rathlin Light House, 
Ireland on February 5, 1918, with the loss of 213 lives. Note: 
Identical in appearance to the Transylvania of 1914. 

Tuscania (1922) Anchor Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 16,991. Dimensions: 552' x 70'. Twin- 
screw, 15 Yi knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: This 
fine ship was launched on October 4, 1921, and commenced 
her maiden voyage from Glasgow to New York on September 
16, 1922. Renamed: *Nea Hellas. Sister ship: California. 

Tyrrhenia (1922) Cunard Line. 

Built by Wm. Beardmore & Co., Ltd., Glasgow. Tonnage: 
16,243. Dimensions: 552' x 70'. Twin-screw, 17 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Note: This was not a popular 
name and soon after entering service it was changed to 
Lancastria. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

177 



Ultonia (1898) Cunard Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 10,402. Dimensions: 
500' x 57'. Twin-screw, 13^ knots. Four masts and one 
funnel. Torpedoed and sunk 190 miles from Fastnet on 
June 27, 1917, with loss of one life. 

Umbria (1884) Cunard Line. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 8,127. Dimensions: 501' x 57'. Single- 
screw, 19^2 knots. Three masts and two funnels. Scrapped 
in 1910. Sister ship: Etruria. 

United Kingdom (1857) Anchor Line. 

Built at Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 1,264. Dimensions: 
245' x 32'. Single-screw. Note: She disappeared with 80 
people on board on April 17, 1868, and was never heard of 
again. 

United States (1903) Scandinavian- American Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 9,993. Dimensions: 500' x 58'. Twin-screw, 
16 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1935. 
Sister ships: Hellig Olav and Oscar II. 

Uranium (1891) Uranium Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 5,189. Dimensions: 420' x 48'. Single-screw, 
14^2 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Ex-Avoca, ex- 
Atlanta, ex-Avoca, ex-San Fernando, ex-Avoca. Made 
final voyage to New York in 1914. 

Utopia (1874) Anchor Line. 

Built by Robert Duncan & Co., Port Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 2,731. Dimensions: 350' x 35'. Single-screw. 
Note: She was sunk by collision in Gibraltar Bay on March 
17, 1891, with the loss of 563 lives. 

Vancouver (1883) Dominion Line. 

Built by C. Connell & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,232. Di- 
mensions: 430' x 45'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Renamed: City of Chicago. 

Vasco Nunez de Balboa (1891) Spanish Line. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 7,815. Dimensions: 531' x 54'. Twin-screw, 16 knots. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

178 



Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Alfonso XIII, ex-Oceana, 
ex-Scot. Broken up by Italian shipbreakers in 1927. 

Vasilefs Constantinos (1914) Greek Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 9,272. Dimensions: 470' x 58'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Megali 
Hellas, (b) Byron. Note: She was taken over by the British 
government during the first World War, but was handed over 
to the Greek Line when hostilities had ceased. Sister ship: 
Vasilissa Sophia. 

Vasilissa Sophia (1917) Greek Line. 

Built by Cammell, Laird & Co., Ltd., Birkenhead, England. 
Tonnage: 9,100. Dimensions: 488' x 58'. Twin-screw, 17 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Leasowe 
Castle (under management of Union-Castle Line). Note: 
She was torpedoed and sunk while being used as a British 
troopship on May 26, 1918, with the loss of 101 lives. (Never 
actually used as a transatlantic passenger ship.) 

Vaterland (1873) Red Star Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 2,748. Dimensions: 320' x 
38'. Single-screw, 133^ knots. Three masts and one funnel. 
Note: She was the pioneer vessel of the Red Star Line. 
Commenced her maiden voyage from Antwerp to Phila- 
delphia on January 19, 1873. Sister ships: Nederland and 
Switzerland. 

Vaterland (1900) Red Star Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 11,899. Dimensions: 560' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 
knots. Four masts and two funnels. Renamed: Southland. 
Sister ships: Finland, Kroonland and Zeeland. Note: 
As the Southland she was torpedoed and sunk 140 miles 
from Tory Island on June 4, 1917, with the loss of 4 lives. 

Vaterland (1914) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 54,282. Di- 
mensions: 907' x 100'. Quadruple-screw, 24 knots. Two 
masts and three funnels. Note: In August, 1914, after 
having made her second voyage she was interned in New 
York. Later she was seized by the United States govern- 
ment and converted into a troopship. After the war she was 
turned over to the United States Lines and used on their 
service as the Leviathan. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

179 



Vedic (1918) White Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
9,060. Dimensions: 460' x 58'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. 

Veendam (1873) Holland- American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,707. Dimensions: 420' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Baltic. Note: She found- 
ered at sea on February 6, 1898, after the breaking of the 
propeller shaft. There was no loss of life. 

*Veendam (1923) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Govan, Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 15,450. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Twin-screw, 
15 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Note: After the 
second World War she was found laid up in a German port 
in a damaged condition. She left Hamburg for Rotterdam 
on January 14, 1946, for reconditioning. Sister ship: Volen- 
dam. 

Venezia (1907) Fabre Line. 

Built by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., Wall- 
send-on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 6,707. Dimensions: 
457' x 51'. Twin-screw, 15^ knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: She was destroyed by fire in the North 
Atlantic in 1919. 

Verona (1908) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 8,886. Dimensions: 482' x 58'. Twin-screw, 16 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: Her tonnage at 
one time was listed as 8,240 tons gross. Sister ships : Ancona 
and Taormina. Made final voyage to New York in 1915. 

Victoria (1872) Anchor Line. 

British built. Tonnage: 3,358. Dimensions: 360' x 40'. 
Single-screw, 13 knots. Three masts and one funnel. Note: 
She was later transferred to the Mediterranean service. 
Made final voyage to New York in 1904. Sister ship: 
California. 

Victoria (1898) Wilson-Furness Line. 

Built by Furness, Withy & Co., Ltd., W. Hartlepool, 
England. Tonnage: 6,849. Dimensions: 475' x 52'. Single- 
screw, 14 knots. Four masts and one funnel. Renamed: 
Ma nit on. Sister ship: Alexander. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

180 



Victoria Luise (1899) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Vulcan Co., Stettin, Germany. Tonnage: 16,502. 
Dimensions: 660' x 67'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. Two masts 
and four funnels. Ex-Deutschland. Note: She became the 
Victoria Luise in 1911 and was used mostly as a special 
cruise ship. After the first World War she was altered into 
an emigrant carrier and renamed Hansa. 

Victorian (1904) Allan Line. 

Built by Workman, Clark & Co., Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. 
Tonnage: 10,629. Dimensions: 517' x 60'. Triple-screw, 
19 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: She was the 
first Atlantic liner to be fitted with steam turbines. Re- 
named: Marloch. Sister ship: Virginian. 

Villedu Havre (1866) French Line. 

Built by Thames Ironworks Co., Blackwall, England. Ton- 
nage: 5,086. Dimensions: 363' x 43'. Single-screw, 12 knots. 
Ex-Napoleon III. Note: As originally built she had paddle- 
wheels, but in 1872 was converted to screw propulsion, and 
lengthened 50 feet. Sunk after being in collision with the 
ship Loch Earn on November 23, 1873, while bound from 
New York to Havre. There was a loss of 222 lives. 

Vincenzo Florio (1880) Navigazione Generate Italiana. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 2,840. Dimensions: 352' x 38'. Single- 
screw, 123^ knots. Note: Made final voyage to New York 
in 1906. Sister ships: Archimede and Washington. 

Virginia (1906) Unione Austriaca (Austro-American Line). 
Built by Craig, Taylor & Co., Ltd., Stockton, England. 
Tonnage: 3,563. Dimensions: 326' x 42'. Single-screw, 12*4 
knots. Renamed: Kerlew. Sister ship: Irene. 

Virginia (1906) Lloyd Italianp. 

Built by Soc. Esercizio Bacini, Riva Trigoso, Italy. Ton- 
nage: 5,181. Dimensions: 381' x 48'. Twin-screw, 14^ 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: Garibaldi. 
Sister ships: Florida, Indiana and Luisiana. 

Virginian (1905) Allan Line. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 10,754. Dimensions: 517' x 60'. Triple- 
screw, 19 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Renamed: 
Drottningholm. Sister ship: Victorian. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

181 



Vittoria (1883) La Veloce Line. 

Built by Robert Napier & Sons, Glasgow, Scotland. Ton- 
nage: 3,707. Dimensions: 420' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 > 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Maasdam, ex- 
Republic. Renamed: Citta di Napoli. 

Vladimir (1895) Russian Volunteer Fleet. 

Built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 5,621. Dimensions: 432' x 49'. Twin-screw, 12^ 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Made final voyage to 
New York in 1919. 

"Volendam (1922) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Govan, Glasgow. Tonnage: 
15,434. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Note: She has been returned 
to the line. Sister ship: Veendam. 

Volturno (1906) Royal Line. (Canadian Northern Steam- 
ship Co.) 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 3,602. Dimensions: 340' x 43'. Twin- 
screw, 14 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Note: This 
emigrant carrier was destroyed by fire and explosion in the 
Atlantic on October 9, 1913, with a loss of 136 lives. 

"Vulcania (1928) Cosulich Line. 

Built by Cantieri Riuniti Dell' Adriatico, Monfalcone, Italy. 
Tonnage: 24,469. Dimensions: 601' x 79'. Twin-screw, 21 
knots. Two masts and one funnel. Motorship. Note: She 
later became a unit of the newly formed Italia Line in the 
early thirties. Sister ship: Saturnia. It is reported both 
ships are to be returned to Italy after the United States has 
no further use for them as troopships. 

Waesland (1867) Red Star Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. 
Tonnage: 4,752. Dimensions: 435' x 42'. Single-screw, 14 
knots. Four masts and one funnel. Ex-Russia. Note: She 
was later rebuilt, re-engined and lengthened. As the Waes- 
land she appeared with four masts instead of her former 
three. Lost in collision with Houstan liner in 1902. 

Washington (1847) Ocean Steam Navigation Co. 

Built by Westervelt and MacKay, New York, N. Y. Ton- 
nage: 2,000. Dimensions: 236' x 39'. Paddle-wheels, 11 
knots. Commenced maiden voyage in June, 1847. Sister 
ship: Hermann. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

182 



Washington (1863) French Line. 

Built by Scott's Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,401. Dimensions: 345' x 
43'. Twin-screw, 12 Y^ knots. Three masts and two funnels. 
Note: This ship originally had paddle-wheels, but in 1867 
she was converted to screw propulsion, and partially rebuilt. 
She was sold in 1899 and subsequently broken up by ship- 
breakers at Marseilles. Sister ships: Lafayette and Im- 
peratrice Eugenie. 

Washington (1880) Navigazione Generale Italiana. 

Built by Alexander Stephen & Sons, Ltd., Linthouse, Glas- 
gow. Tonnage: 2,814. Dimensions: 340' x 38'. Single- 
screw. Sister ships: Archimede and Vincenzo Florio. 
Note: Later transferred to the La Veloce Line. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1907. 

*Washington (1933) United States Lines. 

Built by New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N. J. 
Tonnage: 24,289. Dimensions: 668' x 86'. Twin-screw, 21 
knots. Two masts and two funnels. Renamed (a) Mount 
Vernon, (b) Washington. Note: As the Mount Vernon 
she was employed during the second World War as a troop- 
ship and in this capacity successfully transported thousands 
of American soldiers overseas. Sister ship: Manhattan. 

Weimar (1891) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co., Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tonnage: 4,996. Dimensions: 415' x 48'. Single- 
screw, 13 knots. Two masts and one funnel. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1907. 

Werkendam (1881) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
3,639. Dimensions: 410' x 39'. Single-screw, 13 knots. Four 
masts and one funnel. Ex-British King. Note: Foundered 
in North Atlantic in 1906. 

Werra (1882) North German Lloyd. 

Built by John Elder & Co., Glasgow. Tonnage: 5,109. Di- 
mensions: 438' x 46'. Single-screw, 173/6 knots. Four masts 
and two funnels. Note: Made final voyage to New York in 
1901. Sister ship : Fulda . 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

183 



Werra (1922) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Weser Shipbuilding Yard, Bremen, Germany. 
Tonnage: 9,476. Dimensions: 458' x 57'. Two masts and 
one funnel. Twin-screw, 12^ knots. Sister ships: Weser 
and Fulda. 

Weser (1858) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,700. Dimensions: 318' x 40'. Single-screw. Note: Her 
running mates were the Bremen, Hudson and New York. 

Weser (1867) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
2,871. Dimensions: 357' x 41'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Note: Made final voyage to New York in 1894. 

Weser (1922) North German Lloyd. 

German built. Tonnage: 9,444. Dimensions: 458' x 57'. 
Twin-screw, 12% knots. Two masts and one funnel. Sister 
ships: Werra and Fulda. 

*Westerdam (1946) Holland-American Line. 

Built in the Netherlands. Tonnage: 10,000. Overall length 
is 518 feet. Two masts and one funnel. Note : She had been 
scheduled to make her maiden voyage in 1940, but the war 
prevented the sailing to be made. During hostilities she was 
sunk in the Dutch harbor three times by different methods, 
so as to keep the ship from being used. On each occasion she 
was eventually raised. It was not until July 8, 1946 that she 
finally made her first entry into New York Harbor. 

Westernland (1884) Red Star Line. 

Built by Laird Brothers, Ltd., Birkenhead, England. Ton- 
nage: 5,665. Dimensions: 440' x 47'. Single-screw, 14^ 
knots. Four masts and two funnels. Note: She was one of 
the early steamships, to be built of steel. Scrapped in 1912. 

Westernland (1918) Red Star Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Govan, Glasgow, Scotland. 
Tonnage: 16,289. Dimensions: 575' x 67'. Triple-screw, 
16 knots. Two masts and two funnels. Ex-Regina. Note: 
The Bernstein Line later obtained ownership of her, but 
continued to run her under the Red Star flag. The Holland- 
American Line took over this liner, together with sister ship, 
just prior to the World War. Laid up in River Blackwater 
in 1946. Sister ship: Pennland. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

184 



Westphalia (1868) Hamburg- American Line. 

Built by Caird & Co., Ltd., Greenock, Scotland. Tonnage: 
3,185. Dimensions: 339' x 40'. Single-screw, 13^ knots. 
Renamed: (a) Atlantica, (b) Provincia di San Paolo, 
(c) Mentana, (d) Sud America. 

Westphalia (1923) Hamburg-Americna Line 

Built by Howaldtswerke (Germany). Tonnage: 11,343. 
Dimensions: 473' x 60'. Single-screw, 12^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Renamed: General Artigas. Note: 
Later transferred to the South American trade. Sister ship: 
Thuringia. 

Wieland (1874) Eagle Line. (Hamburg, Germany). 

Built at Glasgow, Scotland. Tonnage: 3,504. Dimensions: 
371' x 40'. Single-screw, 14 knots. Two masts and two 
funnels. Note: Shortly after completion she was taken over 
and operated by the Hamburg-American Line. Made final 
voyage to New York in 1894. 

Willehad (1894) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 4,761. Di- 
mensions: 383' x 46'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Note: She was originally owned by the Roland 
Line. Renamed: Wyandotte. Scrapped in 1924. Sister 
ship: Wittekind. 

Winifredian (1899) Leyland Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
10,428. Dimensions: 552' x 59'. Twin-screw, 14 ^ knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Scrapped in 1929. Sister ship: 
Devonian. 

Wisconsin (1870) Guion Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,238. Dimensions: 366' x 
43'. Single-screw. Two masts and one funnel. Scrapped 
in 1893. Sister ship: Wyoming. 

Wittekind (1894) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg. Tonnage: 4,755. Di- 
mensions: 383' x 46'. Twin-screw, 13 knots. Two masts and 
one funnel. Note: She was later lengthened to 444 feet and 
tonnage increased to 5,640 tons gross. Renamed: (a) Iro- 
quois, (b) Freedom. Scrapped in 1924. Sister ship: 
Willehad. Note: These two ships were originally operated 
by the Roland Line. 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

185 



Wyoming (1870) Guion Line. 

Built by Palmer's Shipbuilding and Iron Co., Ltd., Jarrow- 
on-Tyne, England. Tonnage: 3,238. Dimensions: 366' x 
43'. Single-screw. Two masts and one funnel. Broken up 
by shipbreakers in 1893. Sister ship: Wisconsin. 

Yorck (1906) North German Lloyd. 

Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 8,976. 
Dimensions: 463' x 57'. Twin-screw, 14}^ knots. Two 
masts and one funnel. Sister ships: Derff linger and Luet- 
zow. Made final voyage to New York in 1929. 

Yorkshire (1889) Dominion Line. 

Built by Harland & Wolff, Ltd., Belfast, Ireland. Tonnage: 
4,269. Dimensions: 400' x 45'. Single-screw, 14 knots. 
Four masts and one funnel. Note: This former Bibby liner 
was operated by the Dominion Line for only a short time and 
sold to the Russian-American Line who renamed her Es- 
tonia. Sister ship: Lancashire (Bibby Line). 

Ypiranga (1908) Hamburg-American Line. 

Built by Frd. Krupp, Kiel, Germany. Tonnage: 8,309. Di- 
mensions: 449' x 54'. Twin-screw, 12^ knots. Two masts 
and one funnel. Renamed: (a) Assyria, (b) Colonial. 
Sister ship: Corcovado. 

Zaandam (1939) Holland-American Line. 

Built by Wilton's at Fijenoord, Netherlands. Tonnage: 
10,909. Dimensions: 480' x 64'. Twin-screw, 19 knots. 
Two masts and one funnel. Motorship. Note: This fine 
looking ship was torpedoed without any warning several 
hundred miles off Recife, Brazil, on November 2, 1942, while 
bound from Cape Town to the United States and sank in less 
than ten minutes. On board the small liner had been a total 
of 299, of which 169 were passengers. The 169 successful 
survivors had great difficulty in reaching safety. The most 
outstanding experience to occur among them was a story 
about five men who climbed onto a raft just after the doomed 
Zaandam went to the bottom of the ocean. For 83 days, 
three of the five occupants of the raft survived the terrible 
ordeal of drifting in the open sea, in all kinds of weather, for 
a distance of over 2,000 miles. Their meager supply of food 
and water was exhausted on 'the 16th day. During the re- 
maining days on the raft they obtained only rain water and 
a few small fish and birds on which to subsist. It was the 
longest period of time that any human beings were known to 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

186 



survive the open sea. On the raft at the outset were, George 
Beasley, an American sailor who had been a passenger on the 
ill fated vessel and he died 66 days later; also, Ensign James 
Maddox of the United States Navy who remained alive for 
77 days. The remaining three were Basil Izzi of South Barre, 
Massachusetts, member of the American gun crew, on the 
Zaandam, an oiler named Cornelis van der Slot, of Rotter- 
dam, and Nicko Hoogendam, a young lad from Vlaardingen. 
The three were living skeletons when picked up by a United 
States Navy patrol ship on January 24, 1943. It is needless 
to say that rescue came none too soon for the nearly gone 
victims of a typical Nazi merchant ship sinking. For a more 

Eaphic description of this disaster see the Holland- American 
ne's booklet "In the War at Sea" by William C. Seabrook. 
This lengthy recital in what is supposed to be a mere 
reference book is meant as a tribute to all who have either 
died or survived the terrific hardships of having been exposed 
to the fury of the elements for extended periods on the open 
sea. 

Zeeland (1865) Red Star Line. 

Built by J. & G. Thomson, Ltd., Clydebank, Glasgow. Ton- 
nage: 2,697. Dimensions: 337' x 42'. Single-screw, 12% 
knots. Ex- Java. Note: The Red Star Line purchased this 
ship from the Cunard Line in 1877 and had her lengthened 
to 370 feet which increased the tonnage to 3,500 tons gross. 

Zeeland (1901) Red Star Line. 

Built by John Brown & Co., Clydebank, Glasgow. Tonnage: 
11,905. Dimensions: 561' x 60'. Twin-screw, 15 knots. 
Four masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Northland, 
(b) Minnesota. Sister ships: Finland, Kroonland and 
Vaterland. 

Zeppelin (1914) North German Lloyd. 

Built by Bremer Vulcan Co., Vegesack, Germany. Tonnage: 
14,588. Dimensions: 550' x 67'. Twin-screw, 18 knots. 
Two masts and two funnels. Renamed: (a) Ormuz, (b) 
Dresden. Note: This liner was never in service under the 
name of Zeppelin, as she was turned over to the British on 
completion. 



Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Germany. Tonnage: 8,043. 
Dimensions: 442' x 55'. Twin-screw, 13}^ knots. Two 



Zieten (1902) North German Lloyd. 
Built by F. Schichau, Danzig, Ger 
Dimensions: 442' x 55'. Twin-sc 
masts and one funnel. Sister ship: Seydlitz. 

* Denotes ship still in service under sam e name. 

187 



PART III 



FLEET LIST 



Past and Present 



The Leading North Atlantic Passenger Ship Lines 
and Their Principal Ships 



NOTE: This fleet list includes a few ships which have not been 
employed on the North Atlantic route. 



An asterisk (*) before name of ship denotes that it is still in 
the service of the designated line. 



189 



DISTANCES IN NAUTICAL MILES BETWEEN 

EUROPEAN AND NORTH AMERICAN PORTS 

(The short route) 

Nautical 
Miles 

New York to Southampton 3,120 

New York to Liverpool 3,058 

New York to London 3,282 

New York to Queenstown 2,840 

New York to Havre 3,170 

New York to Antwerp 3,350 

New York to Rotterdam 3,362 

New York to Bremen 3,590 

New York to Hamburg 3,536 

New York to Gilbraltar 3,192 

New York to Genoa 4,045 

Boston to Liverpool 2,898 

Boston to Gilbraltar 3,065 

Montreal to Liverpool 2,755 



190 



ALLAN LINE 



This line established steamship service between Great Britain 
and Canada in 1854, and in later years absorbed the State Line 
of Glasgow, Royal Exchang3 Steamship Company, and the Hill 
Line. The Canadian Pacific Line acquired the Allan fleet in 1916. 

Principal ports: Glasgow, Montreal, Quebec, New York, 
Boston. 



Year 
Built 

1854 
1855 
1856 
1858 
1858 
1858 
1858 
1860 
1861 
1861 
1863 
1865 
1865 
1866 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1872 
1872 
1872 
1875 
1879 
1880 
1880 
1881 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1884 
1884 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1898 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

Canadian 1,873 

Indian 1,764 

Anglo-Saxon 1,673 

Bohemian 2,100 

Nova Scotian 2,190 

Hungarian 2,190 

North Briton 2,190 

Canadian 1,926 

Hibernian 2,997 

Norwegian 2,449 

Peruvian 2,549 

Manitoban 2,395 

Norwegian 3,523 

European 2,708 

Caspian 2,747 

Sarmatian 3,920 

Polynesian 3,983 

Laurentian 4,522 

Circassian 3,724 

Canadian 2,401 

Sardinian 4,376 

Buenos Ayrean 4,005 

Assyrian 2,608 

State of Nebraska 3,986 

Ludgate Hill 4,063 

Parisian 5,395 

Pomeranian 4,365 

Roumanian 4,126 

Carthaginian 4,444 

Siberian 3,846 

State of California 4,275 

Numidian 4,836 

Mongolian 4,837 

Castilian 7,441 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

191 



ALLAN LINE (Continued) 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1898 Scotian 10,417 

1898 Scandinavian 12,116 

1899 Corinthian 6,229 

1899 Sicilian 6,224 

1900 Pretorian 6,436 
1900 Bavarian 10,376 

1900 Tunisian 10,576 

1901 Ionian 8,268 

1904 Victorian 10,629 

1905 Virginian 10,754 
1907 Corsican 11,419 

1907 Grampian 10,920 

1908 Hesperian 9,599 
1913 Alsatian 18,481 
1913 Calgarian 17,515 



AMERICAN LINE 

This line commenced service in 1873, and was reorganized in 
1893, and at that time acquired the fleet of the Inman Line. 

Principal ports: Liverpool, Southampton, New York. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 



1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1895 
1901 
1902 



Illinois 

Indiana 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Chester 

Berlin 

New York 

Paris 

Philadelphia 

Southwark 

Kensington 

St. Louis 

St. Paul 

Haverford 

Merion 



3,341 

3,335 

3,488 

3,343 

4,770 

5,526 

10,674 

10,669 

10,786 

8,607 

8,669 

11,629 

11,629 

11,635 

11,612 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

192 



ANCHOR LINE 

Established in 1856 
Principal ports: Glasgow, New York 



Year 
BuiU 

1855 
1857 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1872 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1880 
1881 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1884 
1889 
1891 
1892 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1904 
1906 



Name of Ship 

Tempest 
United Kingdom 
Britannia 
California 
Iowa 
Hibernia 
Columbia 
Trojan 
Australia 
Olympia 
California 
Victoria 
Bolivia 
Elysia 
Ethiopia 
Utopia 
Anchoria 
Alsatia 
Devonia 
Circassia 
Furnessia 
Roumania 
City of Rome 
Hesperia 
Belgravia 
Astoria 
Scotia 
Algeria 
Dalmatia 
Columbia 
Calabria 
Perugia 
Massilia 
Circassia 
Italia 
Caledonia 
*Castalia 



Gross 
Tonnage 

798 
1,264 
2,093 
1,418 
2,130 
1,615 
1,322 

744 (net) 
2,243 
2,210 
3,410 
3,358 
3,999 
2,716 
4,005 
2,731 
4,168 
2,766 
4,270 
4,272 
5,495 
3,500 
8,415 
3,037 
4,977 
5,086 
2,846 
4,510 
3317 
8,292 
4,376 
4,348 
5,156 
6,861 
4,806 
9,223 
6,601 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

193 



ANCHOR LINE (Continued) 


Year 




Gross 


Built 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


1908 


Elysia 


6,757 


1907 


California 


8,662 


1908 


Assyria 


8,300 


1910 


Cameronia 


10,963 


1914 


Algeria 


8,156 


1915 


Tuscania 


14,348 


1920 


*Cameronia 


16,297 


1922 


Tuscania 


16,991 


1922 


*Nea Hellas 


16,991 


1923 


California 


16,792 


1925 


Caledonia 


17,046 


1925 


Transylvania 


16,923 


1926 


Britannia 


8,802 


1937 


*Cilicia 


11,250 


1937 


*Carcassia 


11,250 


1947 


*Caledonia (Building) 


11,200 



ATLANTIC TRANSPORT LINE 

Commenced their London and New York service in 1886. 
Passenger service ceased in 1934. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1890 Memphis 5,158 

1890 Michigan 4,909 

1891 Mobile 5,302 

1892 Mohawk 5,678 
1P92 Massachusetts 5 90 
1892 Manitoba 5,590 
1894 Minnewaska 5,713 

1897 Menominee 6,919 

1898 Michigan 8,162 
1898 Boadicea 7,057 
1898 Marquette 7,057 
1898 Manitou 6,849 
1898 Poland 8,282 

1900 Minnehaha 13,443 

1901 Minneapolis 13,448 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

194 



ATLANTIC 


TRANSPORT LINE 


(Continued) 


Year 




Gross 


Built 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


1901 


Minnesota 


11,667 


1902 


Minnetonka 


13,440 


1903 


Minnewaska 


15,801 


1903 


Mississippi 


9,748 


1909 


Minnewaska 


14,317 


1917 


Minnekahda 


17,281 


1923 


Minnewaska 


21,716 


1924 


Minnetonka 


21,716 



AUSTRO-AMERICAN LINE 

(Unione Austriaca) 

Established at Trieste in 1903 by the Fratelli Cosulich ship- 
>ing firm. After the first World War the organization became 
Lnown as the Cosulich Line. 



Terminal ports: 
Year 
Built 
1900 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1912 
1913 



Trieste, New York. 



Name of Ship 
Teresa 
Gerty 
Dora 

pro 

diulia 

Carolina 

Francesca 

Sofia Hohenberg 

Irene 

Virginia 

Ida 

Eugenia 

Argentina 

Oceania 

Alice 

Laura 

Atlanta 

Georgia 

Columbia 

Martha Washington 

Kaiser Franz Josef I. 

Belvedere 



Gross 
Tonnage 
3,769 
4,212 
2,531 
2,531 
4,337 
4,713 
4,996 
5,491 
3,454 
3,563 
4,730 
4,903 
5,526 
5,497 
6,122 
6,122 
5,387 
5,380 
5,460 
8,347 
12,588 
7,420 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

195 



AUSTRO-AMERICAN LINE (Continued) 
(Unione Austriaca) 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1913 Erny 6,515 

1913 Dora 7,037 

BEAVER LINE 

This line was formed in 1867 by a group of Montreal mer- 
chants. The official name of the line was Canada Shipping 
Company. In 1899 the company changed hands and became the 
property of Elder, Dempster Company, who finally sold the line 
to the Canadian Pacific Steamships, Ltd. in 1903. 

Service: Liverpool, Quebec, Montreal. 



Year 




Gross 


Built 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


1874 


Lake Champlain 


2,207 


1875 


Lake Megantic 


2,219 


1875 


Lake Nepigon 


2,209 


1879 


Lake Winnipeg 


3,329 


1879 


Gallia 


4,809 


1880 


Lake Manitoba 


3,300 


1881 


Lake Huron 


4,040 


1884 


Lake Superior 


4,562 


1884 


Lake Simcoe 


4,933 


1887 


Lake Ontario 


4,502 


NOTE: The 


following ships were added to 


the Beaver Line 


service by Elder, Dempster' & Co. 


Year 




Gross 


Built 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


1897 


Montcalm 


5,505 


1897 


Monterey 


5,478 


1897 


Montrose 


6,094 


1897 


Milwaukee 


7,317 


1898 


Monmouth 


8,001 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

196 



BEAVER LINE (Continued) 


Year 




Gross 


Built 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


1898 


Mount Royal 


7,064 


1899 


Montfort 


5,519 


1899 


Monteagle 


5,948 


1899 


Montezeuma 


7,345 


1900 


Montreal 


8,644 


1900 


Lake Champlain 


7,392 


1900 


Lake Erie 


7,550 


1901 


Lake Michigan 


8,340 


1901 


Lake Manitoba 


9,674 


1901 


Mount Temple 


7,656 



BERNSTEIN LINE 

This German firm acquired the Red Star liners Pennland and 
Westernland in 1935 which were later taken over by the Holland- 
American Line. 

Principal ports: Hamburg, Antwerp, Rotterdam, New York. 
Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1904 Gerolstein 7,772 

1904 Ilsenstein 8,216 

1907 Konigstein 9,626 

1918 Westernland 16,231 

1922 Pennland 16,082 



CANADIAN PACIFIC LINE 

(Canadian Pacific Steamships, Ltd.) 

Established their Trans-Atlantic service in 1903. 

They acquired the Beaver Line fleet of Elder, Dempster Com- 
pany in 1903. In 1916 they absorbed the Allan Line fleet. 

Ports: Southampton, Liverpool, Glasgow, Montreal, Quebec, 
Halifax, St. John 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1889 Empress of India 5,920 

1890 Empress of China 5,900 
1890 Empress of Japan 5,905 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

197 



CANADIAN PACIFIC LINE (Continued) 



Year 
Buitl 

1897 
1897 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1918 
1918 
1921 
1922 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


Montcalm 


5,505 


Monterey 


5,478 


Montrose 


6,094 


Milwaukee 


7,317 


Mount Royal 


7,064 


Marglen 


10,417 


Montfort 


5,519 


Monteagle 


5,948 


Montezeuma 


7,345 


Marburn 


10,743 


Montreal 


8,644 


Lake Champlain 


7,392 


Lake Erie 


7,550 


Lake Michigan 


8,340 


Lake Manitoba 


9,674 


Mount Temple 


7,656 


Marloch 


10,687 


Empress of Scotland 


25,160 


Montreal 


9,720 


Empress of Ireland 


14,191 


Empress of Britain 


14,189 


Montroyal 


15,646 


Mar vale 


11,438 


Empress of India 


16,992 


Montnairn 


17,282 


Montlaurier 


16,992 


Empress of Asia 


16,909 


Empress of Russia 


16,810 


Empress of France 


18,357 


*Empress of Australia 


21,833 


Missanabie 


12,469 


Metagama 


12,420 


Melita 


15,183 


Minnedosa 


15,186 


*Montcalm 


16,418 


*Montclare 


16,314 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

198 



CANADIAN PACIFIC LINE (Continued) 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1922 Montrose 16,402 

1922 Empress of Canda 21,517 

1928 Duchess of Athol 20,119 

1928 Duchess of Bedford 20,123 

1928 *Empress of India 20,123 

1928 Duchess of Richmond 20,022 

1928 *Empress of Canada 20,022 

1929 Duchess of York 20,021 

1930 Empress of Japan 26,032 

1930 *Empress of Scotland 26,032 

1931 Empress of Britain 42,348 



COLLINS LINE 

Commenced service in April 1849 with the Atlantic, and ceased 
to operate line in January 1858. 

Terminal ports: Liverpool, New York. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1849 Atlantic 2,856 

1849 Arctic 2,856 

1849 Baltic 2,856 

1849 Pacific 2,856 

1857 Adriatic 3,670 



COSULICH LINE 

Formerly known as the Unione Austriaca (Austro- American 
Line) which was established in 1903 by the'shipping firm of Fra- 
telli Cosulich. In 1931 the Cosulich Line merged with the newly- 
formed "Italia" Line. 

Terminal ports: Trieste, New York; also, on the South Amer- 
ican trade. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1890 San Guisto 8,874 

1903 Gerty 4,212 

1904 Giulia 4,337 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

199 



COSULICH LINE (Continued) 



Year 
Built 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1912 
1913 
1927 
1928 
1932 
1933 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

Carolina 4,713 

Francesca 4,996 

Sofia 5,491 

Argentina 5,526 

Atlanta 5,387 

Georgia 5,380 

Martha Washington 8,347 

Columbia 5,460 

Presidente Wilson 12,588 

Belvedere 7,420 

*Saturnia 23,940 

*Vulcania 24,469 

Neptunia 19,475 

Oceania 19,507 



CUNARD LINE 
Established service in 1840. 

The Cunard and White Star Lines merged in 1934. 

Principal ports: Southampton, Liverpool, London, Glasgow, 
Cherbourg, Belfast, Galway, Cobb, New York, Boston, Mon- 
treal, Quebec, Halifax. 



Year 
Built 
1840 
1840 
1840 
1840 
1843 
1845 
1847 
1848 
1848 
1848 
1850 
1850 
1852 
1856 



Name of Ship 
Britannia 
Acadia 
Caledonia 
Columbia 
Hibernia 
Cambria 
Europa 
America 
Canada 
Niagara 
Africa 
Asia 
Arabia 
Persia 



Gross 

Tonnage 

1,139 

,139 

,139 

,155 

,422 

,422 

,989 

,825 

,831 

,825 

2,227 

2,227 

2,393 

3,414 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

200 



CUNARD LINE (Continued) 



Year 
Built 

1857 
1860 
1860 
1860 
1860 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1867 
1868 
1870 
1870 
1870 
1870 
1872 
1872 
1874 
1874 
1875 
1878 
1881 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1884 
1893 
1893 
1895 
1895 
1898 
1900 
1900 



Name of Ship 

Calabria 

Atlas 

Kedar 

Olympus 

Hecla 

Marathon 

China 

Scotia 

Aleppo 

Tarifa 

Cuba 

Java 

Palmyra 

Siberia 

Russia 

Samaria 

Abyssinia 

Algeria 

Batavia 

Parthia 

Trinidad 

Demerara 



Bothnia 

Scythia 

Gallia 

Catalonia 

Servia 

Cephalonia 

Pavonia 

Aurania 

Etruria 

Umbria 

Campania 

Lucania 

Carinthia 

Sylvania 

Ultonia 

Albania 

Ivernia 



Gross 
Tonnage 

3,321 
2,393 
1,875 
2,415 
2,421 
2,403 
2,539 
3,871 
2,057 
2,058 
2,668 
2,780 
2,403 
2,498 
2,959 
2,605 
3,253 
3,253 
2,553 
3,502 
1,899 
1,904 
2,262 
4,556 
4,556 
4,809 
4,841 
7,391 
5,517 
5,588 
7,269 
8,127 
8,127 

12,950 

12,950 
5,598 
5,598 

10,402 
7,682 

14,210 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

201 



CUNARD LINE (Continued) 



Year 
BuiU 

1900 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1909 
1911 
1911 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1935 



Name of Ship 

Saxonia 

Flavia 

Carpathia 

Slavonia 

Pannonia 

Carmania 

Caronia 

Folia 

Mauretania 

Lusitania 

Ausonia 

Ascania 

Franconia 

Laconia 

Berengaria 

Alaunia 

Andania 

Transylvania 

Aquitania 

Aurania 

Albania 

Scythia 

Samaria 

Antonia 

Ausonia 

Andania 

Tyrrhenia 

Lancastria 

Laconia 

Franconia 

Aurania 

Alaunia 

Ascania 

Carinthia 

Queen Mary 



Gross 
Tonnage 

14,197 
9,291 
13,603 
10,606 
9,851 
19,566 
19,782 
6,365 
30,696 
31,550 
8,153 
9,111 
18,150 
18,098 
52,226 
13,405 
13,404 
14,315 
45,647 
13,400 
12,768 
19,761 
19,597 
13,867 
13,912 
13,950 
16,243 
16,243 
19,695 
20,175 
13,984 
14,030 
14,013 
20,277 
80,774 



NOTE: See Cunard White Star Line 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

202 



CUNARD WHITE STAR LINE 



The merger of the Cunard and White Star Lines occurred 
in 1934. 

Ports: Southampton, Liverpool, London, Glasgow, Cherbourg, 
Belfast, Galway, Cobb, New York, Boston, Canadian ports. 

Year 
Built 

1911 
1912 
1914 
1914 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1923 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1925 
1927 
1930 
1932 
1935 
1939 
1940 
1947 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


Olympic 


46,439 


Berengaria 


52,226 


*Aquitania 


45,647 


Homeric 


34,356 


*Scythia 


19,761 


Majestic 


56,551 


*Samaria 


19,597 


*Antonia 


13,867 


*Ausonia 


13,912 


Andania 


13,950 


Lancastria 


16,243 


Laconia 


19,695 


Doric 


16,484 


*Franconia 


20,175 


Aurania 


13,984 


*Alaunia 


14,030 


*Ascania 


14,013 


Carinthia 


20,277 


Laurentic 


18,724 


*Britannic 


26,840 


*Georgic 


27,759 


*Queen Mary 


80,774 


*Mauretania 


35,673 


*Queen Elizabeth 


83,673 


*Media (Building) 


14,000 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

203 



DOMINION LINE 

NOTE: In 1870 the Mississippi Steamship Company estab- 
lished a Canadian service from Liverpool under the name of 
Mississippi and Dominion Steamship Company. This name was 
changed to Dominion Line. In later years the line was absorbed 
by the White Star Line. 



Principal ports: 


Liverpool, Quebec, Montreal, 


Boston. 


Year 




Gross 


Built 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


1871 


Mississippi 


2,129 


1874 


Dominion 


3,175 


1874 


Ottawa 


5,000 


1880 


Toronto 


3,315 


1882 


Norseman 


4,000 


1882 


Roman 


4,572 


1882 


Sarnia 


3,726 


1883 


Oregon 


3,672 


1883 


Vancouver 


5,149 


(Sold before completion) 


1884 


Vancouver 


5,154 


1891 


Labrador 


4,737 


1892 


Cambroman 


6,059 


1894 


Dominion 


7,036 


1896 


Canada 


9,415 


1897 


Norseman 


9,545 


1898 


New England 


12,099 


1899 


Irishman 


9,510 


1900 


Columbus 


15,378 


1900 


Commonwealth 


12,268 


1902 


Mayflower 


13,518 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

204 



DONALDSON ATLANTIC LINE Ltd. 

The passenger service dates back to 1905 when it was known 
as the Donaldson Line. However, this name was changed in 
1916 to Anchor-Donaldson Line and remained so until reorgan- 
ized again in 1935 when given its present name. 

Principal ports: Glasgow, Halifax, Quebec, Montreal. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1904 Athenia 9,080 

1906 Cassandra 8,135 

1910 Saturnia 8,611 

1912 Letitia 8,991 

1923 Athenia 13,465 

1925 *Letitia 13,475 



FABRE LINE (French) 
(Cyprien Fabre) 

This line acquired their first steamship in 1874. 
Principal ports: Marseilles, Naples, Palermo, New York. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1869 Brooklyn 3,576 

1881 America 2,403 

1881 Britannia 2,477 

1882 Alesia 2,740 
1882 Burgundia 2,908 

1882 Patria 4,053 

1883 Pictavia 2,030 
1883 Neustria 2,687 
1883 Gallia 4,134 
1883 Chateau Yquem 4,211 
1885 Equita 3,369 
1891 Massilia 3,097 
1902 Britania 5,103 

1902 Roma 5,291 

1903 Germania 5,103 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

205 



Year 
Built 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1910 
1911 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1924 



FABRE LINE (Continued) 



Name of Ship 

Madonna 

Alesia 

Europa 

Asia 

Braga 

Venezia 

Sant' Anna 
"Canada 

Patria 
*Banfpra 

Providence 
*Sinaia 



Gross 

Tonnage 

5,633 

9,720 

6,122 

6,122 

6,122 

6,707 

9,350 

9,684 

11,885 

9,347 

11,996 

8,567 



FRENCH LINE 

This line was established in 1862 but did not commence 
their Havre-New York service until 1864. 

Principal ports: Havre, Bordeaux, Plymouth, New York, West 
Indies and Central American ports. 



Year 
Built 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1868 
1870 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

Louisiane 1,780 

Washington 3,401 

Lafayette 3,003 

Amerique 3,200 

Imperatrice Eugenie 3,200 

Europe 3,443 

Nouveau Monde 4,503 

Labrador 4,612 

Ville du Havre 4,000 

La France 4,648 

Canada 4,287 

Panama 4,287 

Pereire 3,950 

Napoleon III 3,950 

Ville de Paris 2,838 

Saint Laurent 3,989 

Caldera 2,064 

Ville de Boudeaux 2,670 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

206 



FRENCH LINE (Continued) 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1870 Ville de Brest 2,676 

1873 Olinde-Rodrigues 3,188 

1874 Ville de Marseille 2,836 
1874 St. Germain 3,641 

1874 Klopstock 3,641 

1875 Ferdinand de Lesseps 2,920 

1882 La Normandie 6,283 

1883 Martinique 4,392 

1883 Ville de St. Nazaire 1,556 

1884 Ville de Tunis 1,903 

1885 La Champagne 6,724 

1886 La Bourgogne 7,303 

1886 La Bretagne 6,756 

1887 La Gascogne 7,090 

1889 Due de Bragance 2,033 

1890 Ville d' Alger 2,097 

1890 L' Aquitaine 8,810 

1891 General Chanzy 2,299 

1891 La Touraine 8,429 

1892 La Navarre 6,343 

1899 La Lorraine 11,146 

1900 La Savoie 11,168 

1901 Leopoldina 12,334 
1901 Suffren 10,622 

1903 Figuig 3,655 

1904 Hudson 5,558 

1904 La Bourdonnais 8,287 

1905 Saint Laurent 5,607 
1905 Louisiane 5,109 
1905 Californie 5,152 

1905 La Provence 13,753 

1906 Roussillon 8,800 

1906 Guadeloupe 6,600 

1907 Perou 6,599 
1907 Floride 7,029 

1907 Virginie 5,579 

1908 Caroline 6,698 
1908 Charles Roux 4,104 
1908 Chicago 11,127 

1908 Niagara 9,614 

1909 Espagne 11,155 

1910 Carthage 5,601 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

207 



FRENCH LINE (Continued) 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1911 Timgad 5,232 

1911 Rochambeau 12,678 

1912 France 23,769 

1912 Due d' Aumale 4,452 

1913 Puerto Rico 6,127 
1913 Meknes 6,127 
1913 Haiti 6,288 
1913 *Marrakech 6,179 

1913 Pellerin de Latoche 8,848 

1914 Flandre 8,503 

1915 Lafayette 11,953 
1915 Mexique 12,220 
1918 Winnipeg 8,379 
1921 Paris 34,569 

1921 Lamoriciere 4,713 

1922 Bretagne 10,171 

1923 Cuba 11,337 

1924 De La Salle 8,400 
1924 *De Grasse 17,759 
1926 *Ile de France 43,153 

1929 President Dal Piaz 4,929 

1930 Lafayette 25,178 

1930 *Liberte 49,746 

1931 *Colombie 13,391 

1932 Champlain 28,124 

1933 Normandie 82,799 

1935 *Ville d' Alger 10,172 

1936 *Ville d' Oran 10,200 



FURNESS WITHY & Co., Ltd. 
(Warren Line) 

Terminal ports: Liverpool, Boston. 

Year Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnape 



Built 
1925 
1926 
1947 
1947 



Newfoundland 6,791 

Nova Scotia 6,796 

*Newfoundland (Building) 7,500 

*Nova Scotia (Building) 7,500 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

208 



GREEK PASSENGER SHIPS 



Service: Greek ports, New York. 



Year 
Built 

1890 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1901 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1912 
1914 
1914 
1914 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


Thessaloniki 


4,682 


Edison 


11,103 


Constantinople 


11,570 


King Alexander 


11,455 


loannina 


4,167 


Moreas 


8,292 


Moraitis 


6,045 


Themistocles 


6,045 


Athinai 


6,742 


Patris 


4,390 


Macedonia 


6,333 


Vasilefs Constantinos 


9,272 


Megali Hallas 


9,272 


Byron 


9,272 



GUION LINE 

Established in 1866. Service ceased in 1892. 
Principal ports: Liverpool, New York. 

Name of Ship 



Year 
Built 



1866 
1866 
1867 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1870 
1872 
1872 
1879 
1881 
1883 



Manhattan 

Chicago 

Nebraska 

Colorado 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Montana 

Dakota 

Arizona 

Alaska 

Oregon 



Gross 
Tonnage 

2,869 
1,948 
3,662 
2,888 
3,125 
3,132 
3,238 
3,238 
4,300 
4,332 
5,147 
6,392 
7,375 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

209 



GYDNIA-AMERICAN LINE 
(Polish Transatlantic Shipping Co., Ltd.) 

Principal ports: Gdynia, Copenhagen, Halifax, New York. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1910 Polonia 7,890 

1912 Pulaski 6,516 

1915 Kosciuszko 6,598 

1935 Pilsudski 14,294 

1936 *Batory 14,287 
1939 Chrobry 11,442 
1939 *Sobieski 11,030 

HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE 

Established in 1847 with sailing ships. Steamship service 
commenced in 1857. 

The Hamburg-American Line acquired the Eagle Line in 1875. 
Service has been temporarily discontinued. 

Principal ports: Hamburg, Boulogne, Cherbourg, Southampton 
New York. NOTE: Service has been provided to numerous other 
ports. 

Year Gross 

Bkiilt Name of Ship Tonnage 

1855 Borussia 2,349 

1855 Hammonia 2,026 

1856 Teutonia 2,034 

1856 Bavaria 2,273 

1857 Austria 2,383 
1857 Saxonia 2,404 
1865 Allemania 2,619 
1867 Hammonia 2,964 

1867 Cimbria 3,037 

1868 Holsatia 3,134 

1868 Westphalia 3,185 

1869 Silesia 3,156 

1870 Thuringia 2,134 
1872 Frisia 3,500 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

210 



HAMBURG- AMERICAN LINE (Continued) 

Name of Ship 



Year 
Built 



Gross 
Tonnage 



1873 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1883 
1883 
1886 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1890 
1890 
1890 
1890 
1891 
1891 
1893 
1893 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 



Herder 

Pommerania 

Schiller 

Lessing 

Gellert 

Suevia 

Wieland 

Bohemia 

Hammonia 

Rugia 

Rhaetia 

Moravia 

Albano 

Auguste Victoria 

Columbia 

Italia 

Dania 

Russia 

Scandia 

Christiania 

Baumwall 

Furst Bismark 

Normannia 

Oceana 

Pallanza 

Palatia 

Patria 

Phoenicia 

Prussia 

Persia 

Pisa 

Armenia 

Pennsylvania 

Pretoria 

Bulgaria 

Graf Waldersee 

Batavia 

Patricia 

Hamburg 

Bosnia 



2,873 
3,382 
3,408 
3,527 
3,533 
3,624 
3,504 
3,441 
4,247 
4,053 
3,458 
3,690 
3,736 
7,661 
7,383 
3,564 
3,898 
3,908 
4,243 
2,816 
2,816 
8,874 
8,250 
7,815 
4,606 
7,118 
7,118 
7,118 
7,008 
5,713 
4,959 
5,471 
13,333 
13,234 
11,077 
13,102 
11,464 
13,424 
10,532 
9,683 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 



211 



HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE (Continued) 



Year 
Built 

1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1912 
1914 
1914 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1922 
1922 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1923 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

Deutschland 16,502 

Victoria Luise 16,502 

Hansa 16,376 

Kiautschou 10,911 
Prinzessin Victoria Luise 4,409 

Bluecher 12,334 

Moltke 12,335 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich 4,650 

Prinz Adalbert 6,030 

Prinz Oskar 6,026 

Prinz Sigismund 4,689 

Swakopmund 5,631 

Rhaetia 6,600 

Rugia 6,598 

Furst Bismarck : 8,330 

Kronprinzessin Cecilie 8,689 

Amerika 22,225 
Kaiserin Auguste Victoria 24,581 
Konig Friedrich Auguste 9,462 

Corcovado 8,374 

Konig Wilhelm II 9,410 

President Grant 18,078 

President Lincoln 18,162 

Ypiranga 8,309 

Cincinnati 16,339 

Cleveland 16,971 

Holsatia 7,442 

Imperator 52,226 

Vaterland 54,282 

Tirpitz 21,833 

Reliance 19,802 

Resolute 39,692 

General Mitre 9,891 

Bismarck 56,551 

Thuringia 11,343 

General San Martin 11,343 

Westphalia 11,343 

General Artigas 11,343 

Albert Ballin 20,815 

Deutschland 20,607 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 



212 



HAMBURG-AMERICAN LINE (Continued) 

Year Gross 

BuiU Name of Ship Tonnage 

1923 Hansa 21,131 

1926 Hamburg 21,133 

1927 New York 21,455 

1928 Orinoco 9,660 
1928 Magdalena 9,779 

1928 Iberia 9,829 

1929 General Osorio 11,590 
1929 Milwaukee 16,699 
1929 St. Louis 16,732 
1932 Caribia 12,049 
1932 Cordillera 12,055 
1938 Patria 16,595 



HOLLAND-AMERICAN LINE 

Service was established in 1872 

Principal ports Rotterdam, Boulogne, Plymouth, Southampton, 
New York, Havana, Vera Cruz, New Orleans. 

Year 
Built 

1871 
1873 
1874 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1881 
1886 
1897 
1898 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1906 
1908 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


Maasdam 


3,707 


Veendam 


3,707 


P. Caland 


2,584 


Edam 


3,329 


Amsterdam 


3,664 


Obdam 


3,699 


Spaarndam 


4,539 


Werkendam 


3,639 


Rotterdam 


3,329 


Rotterdam 


8,287 


Statendam 


10,491 


Potsdam 


12,522 


Rijndam 


12,529 


Noordam 


12,531 


Nieuw Amsterdam 


17,149 


Rotterdam 


24,149 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

213 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


Statendam 


32,234 


*Edam 


8,871 


*Leerdam 


8,815 


*Maasdam 


8,812 


Spaarndam 


8,857 


*Volendam 


15,434 


*Veendam 


15,450 


Statendam 


29,510 


*Nieuw Amsterdam 


36,287 


*Noordam 


10,726 


Zaandam 


10,909 


*Westerdam 


10,000 



HOLLAND-AMERICAN LINE (Continued) 

Year 
Built 

1917 
1921 
1921 
1921 
1922 
1922 
1923 
1929 
1938 
1939 
1939 
1946 



INMAN LINE 

Commenced service in December, 1850 

The American Line acquired this company in 1893. 

Terminal ports: Liverpool, New York. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1850 City of Glasgow 1,609 

1851 City of Pittsburg 

1851 City of Manchester 2,215 

1853 City of Philadelphia 2,168 

1853 City of Washington 2,870 

1854 City of Baltimore 2,472 

1860 City of Bristol 2,655 

1861 City of New York 2,360 
1863 City of Limerick 2,536 

1863 City of London 2,765 

1864 City of Boston 2,213 

1865 City of Durham 697 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

214 



INMAN LINE (Continued) 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


City of New York 


3,499 


City of Lincoln 


3,182 


City of Paris 


2,651 


City of Antwerp 


2,391 


City of Brooklyn 


2,911 


City of Brussels 


3,081 


City of Montreal 


4,489 


City of Chester 


4,560 


City of Richmond 


4,623 


City of Berlin 


5,491 


City of Rome 


8,415 


City of Chicago 


5,000 


City of New York 


10,499 


City of Paris 


10,669 



Year 
Built 

1865 
1866 
1866 
1867 
1869 
1869 
1872 
1873 
1873 
1875 
1881 
1883 
1888 
1889 



"ITALIA" LINE 

Formed in 1931 by the consolidation of Cosulich, Lloyd 
Sabaudo, and Navigazione Generale Italiana Lines. 

Service has been discontinued. 

Ports: Genoa, Naples, :Gibraltar, Trieste, New York, Central 
American and South American Ports. 

Year 
Built 

1913 
1917 
1920 
1921 
1921 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1925 
1925 
1926 
1926 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


Belvedere 


6,889 


Colombo 


12,003 


Lombardia 


20,007 


Sannio 


9,834 


Giulio Cesare 


21,657 


Principessa Giovanna 


8,556 


Principessa Maria 


8,539 


Duilio 


24,281 


Viminale 


8,657 


Conte Biancamano 


24,416 


Roma 


32,583 


Romolo 


9,780 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

215 



'ITALIA" LINE (Continued) 



Year 
Built 

1927 
1927 
1927 
1927 
1927 
1928 
1928 
1932 
1932 
1932 
1933 



Name of Ship 

Remo 

Virgilio 

Orazio 

Augustus 
*Saturnia 
*Vulcania 

Conte Grande 

Rex 

Conte di Savoia 

Neptunia 

Oceania 



Gross 
Tonnage 

9,780 
11,718 
11,669 
32,650 
23,940 
24,469 
25,661 
51,062 
48,502 
19,475 
19,507 



LA VELOCE LINE 

This Italian line was later absorbed by the Navigazione 
Generale Italiana. 



Service: Italian ports, 
ports. 

Year 
Built 

1868 
1871 
1882 
1882 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1894 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1907 
1909 
1909 



New York, Central and South American 



Name of Ship Tonnage 

Sud America 3,185 

Citta di Napoli 4,125 

Citta di Geneva 3,919 

Matteo Bruzzo 3,919 

Nord America 4,920 

Duca di Galliera 4,304 

Duchessa di Geneva 4,304 

Citta di Messina 2,478 

Citta di Milano 3,848 

Savoia 4,429 

Citta di Torino 3,836 

Argentina 4,985 

Brasile 4,985 

Bologna 4,680 

Italia 5,203 

Europa 7,870 

Oceania 9,000 

Stampalia 9,000 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

216 



LLOYD ITALIANO LINE 

This line was later absorbed by Navigazione Generale Ital- 
iana. 

Service. Italian Ports, New York. 

Year 
Built 

1904 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1908 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


Mendoza 


6,847 


Florida 


5,018 


Indiana 


5,012 


Luisiana 


4,983 


Virginia 


5,181 


Taormina 


8,921 



LLOYD SABAUDO LINE 

Established in 1906 

Became part of the newly formed "Italia" Line in 1931. 
Principal ports: Genoa, New York, South American ports. 

Gross 
Name of Ship Tonnage 

Pesaro 12,335 

Principe di Piemonte 6,365 

Regina di Italia 6,240 

Re d' Italia 6,237 

Tomaso di Savoia 7,761 

Principe di Udine 7,794 

Conte Rosso 17,048 

Conte Verde 18,765 

Principessa Giovanna 8,556 

Principessa Maria 8,539 

Conte Biancamano 24,416 

Conte Grande 25,661 

Conte di Savoia 48,502 



Year 
Built 

1901 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1922 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1925 
1927 
1932 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

217 



NATIONAL LINE 



Established in 1863. Service ceased in 1893. 
Principal ports: Liverpool, London, New York 



Year 
Built 

1858 
1858 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1863 
1864 
1864 
1864 
1865 
1865 
1865 
1867 
1868 
1871 
1871 
1884 



Name of Ship 

Louisiana 

Holland 

Pennsylvania 

Virginia 

Canada 

Greece 

The Queen 

Erin 

Helvetia 

Denmark 

Scotland 

England 

France 

Italy 

Spain 

Egypt 

America 



Gross 
Tonnage 

3,847 
3,847 
4,276 
4,310 
4,276 
4,310 
4,471 
4,577 
4,588 
3,725 
3,803 
3,440 
4,281 
4,341 
4,512 
4,670 
5,528 



NAVIGAZIONE GENERALE ITALIANA 

This old Italian steamship line adopted the above name in 
1881. Since then it absorbed the La Veloce, Lloyd Italiana, and 
Transoceania lines. In 1931 became part of the newly formed 
"Italia" Line. 

Terminal ports: Genoa, New York. NOTE: Service was provided 
to many other important ports. 



Year 
Built 

1876 
1877 
1880 
1880 
1881 



Name of Ship 

Marco Minghetti 
Sempione 
Vincenzo Florio 
Washington 
Archimede 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

218 



Gross 
Tonnage 

2,489 
3,149 
2,840 
2,814 
2,837 



NAVIGAZIONE GENERALE ITALIANA (Cont.) 



Year 

Built 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1883 

1883 

1883 

1883 

1883 

1884 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1901 

1901 

1901 

1903 

1904 

1907 

1907 

1907 

1907 

1907 

1907 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1908 

1909 

1917 

1920 

1923 

1926 

1927 

1927 

1927 

1932 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 





Gross 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


Iniziativa 


2,040 


Birmania 


2,384 


Letimbro 


2,202 


Entella 


2,258 


Stura 


2,180 


Orione 


4,161 


Sirio 


4,141 


Perseo 


4,158 


Regina Margherita 


3,577 


Napoli 


9,203 


Palermo 


9,203 


Sannio 


9,210 


Lazio 


9,203 


Liguria 


4,865 


Ravenna 


4,101 


Lombardia 


4,815 


Citta di Geneva 


7,728 


Caserta 


7,028 


Napoli 


6,094 


Palermo 


6,094 


Re Vittorio 


7,847 


Regina Elena 


7,865 


Duca di Geneva 


7,811 


Duca Degli Abruzzi 


7,838 


Duca d' Aosta 


7,804 


Taormina 


8,921 


Ancona 


8,885 


Verona 


8,886 


Principessa Jolanda 


9,200 


Principessa Mafalda 


8,210 


America 


8,996 


Principe Umberto 


7,838 


Colombo 


12,003 


Giulio Cesare 


21,657 


Duilio 


24,281 


Roma 


32,583 


Augustus 


32,650 


Orazio 


11,669 


Virgilio 


11,718 


Rex 


51,062 



219 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD 

Established in 1856. 

Service has been temporarily discontinued. 
Terminal ports: Bremen, New York. 

Year Gross 
Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1858 Bremen 2,551 

1858 Hudson 2,674 

1858 New York 2,528 

1858 Weser 2,700 

1861 Hansa 3,325 

1863 America 2,713 

1865 Hermann 2,873 

1866 Union 2,873 

1866 Deutschland 2,873 

1867 Weser 2,871 

1868 Baltimore 2,321 
1868 Berlin 2,333 
1868 Main 2,893 
1868 Donau 3,073 

1868 Rhein 3,075 

1869 Ohio 2,394 
1869 Frankfurt 2,582 
1869 Leipzig 2,287 

1869 Hannover 2,571 

1870 Konig Wilhelm I 3,300 

1871 Graf Bismarck 2,406 

1871 Kronprinz Freidrich Wilhelm 

2,387 

1872 Mosel 3,200 

1872 Strassburg 3,025 

1873 Braunschweig 3,079 
1873 Nurnberg 3,116 
1873 Oder 3,265 

1873 Neckar 2,331 

1874 General Werder 3,020 

1874 Hohenstaufen 3,098 

1875 Habsburg 3,094 
1875 Salier 3,214 
1881 Hermann 2,243 
1881 Elbe 4,897 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

220 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD (Continued) 



Year 




Gross 


BuiU 


Name of Ship 


Tonnage 


1882 


Fulda 


4,814 


1882 


Werra 


5,109 


1884 


Eider 


4,719 


1884 


Ems 


4,933 


1886 
1886 


Bayern 
Sachsen 


5,034 
5,026 


1886 


Aller 


5,217 


1886 


Saale 


5,381 


1886 


Trave 


5,262 


1886 


Preussen 


5,295 


1887 


Lahn 


5,681 


1889 


Munchen 


4,801 


1889 


Dresden 


4,580 


1889 


Karlesruhe 


5,057 


1889 


Stuttgart 


5,048 


1889 


Kaiser Wilhelm II 


6,990 


1889 


Hohenzollern 


6,668 


1890 


Darmstadt 


5,012 


1890 


Gera 


5,005 


1890 


Oldenburg 


5,006 


1890 - 


Havel 


6,963 


1890 
1890 


Spree 
Kaiserin Maria Theresa 


6,963 
7,840 


1891 


Weimar 


4,996 


1892 


H. H. Meier 


5,140 


1893 


Roland 


3,603 


1893 


Pfalz 


4,604 


1894 


Willehad 


4,761 


1894 


Wittekind 


4,755 




(Tonnage increased to 5,640) 




1895 


Aachen 


3,833 


1895 


Crefeld 


3,829 


1895 


Bonn 


3,969 


1895 


Halle 


3,960 


1895 


Thekla 


3,689 


1895 


Wittenberg 


3,689 


1896 


Barbarossa 


10,984 


1896 


Friedrich der Grosse 


10,771 


1896 


Konigin Luise 


10,711 


1896 


Bremen 


11,570 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 
221 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD (Continued) 



Year 
Built 

1897 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1903 
1904 
1904 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse 14,349 

Trier 3,168 

Kaiser Friedrich 12,481 

Koln 7,409 

Frankfurt 7,431 

Hannover 7,305 

Konig Albert 10,484 

Grosser Kurfurst 13,245 

Rhein 10,058 

Main 10,067 

Prinzess Alice 10,911 

Prinzess Irene 10,881 

Bremen 10,826 

Karlesruhe 10,826 

Brandenburg 7,532 

Breslau 7,524 

Chemnitz 7,543 

Cassel 7,543 

Neckar 9,835 

Kronprinz Wilhelm 14,908 

Zieten 8,043 

Prinz Waldemar 3,227 

Prinz Sigismund 3,302 

Seydlitz 7,942 

Schleswig 6,955 

Gneisenau 8,081 

Roon 8,022 

Kaiser Wilhelm II 19,361 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich 8,170 

Scharnhorst 8,131 

Goeben 8,792 

Kleist 8,950 

Yorck 8,976 

Bulow 8,980 

Prinz Ludwig 9,687 
Kronprinzessin Cecilie 19,503 

Derfflinger 9,144 

Luetzow 8,716 

Coburg 6,750 

Eisenach 6,757 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

222 



NORTH GERMAN LLOYD (Continued) 



Year 
BuiU 

1908 
1908 
1908 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1921 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1922 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1924 
1924 
1924 
1925 
1929 
1930 
1935 
1935 
1935 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm 17,082 

Berlin 17,324 

George Washington 25,570 

Sierra Nevada 8,235 

Sierra Salvada 8,300 

Sierra Ventana 8,396 

Sierra Cordoba 8,135 

Zepplelin 14,588 

Dresden 14,690 

Columbus 34,356 

Koln 9,264 

Sierra Nevada 8,753 

Madrid 8,753 

Werra 9,476 

Weser 9,444 

Crefeld 9,620 

Muenchen 13,483 

General Von Steuben 14,690 

Steuben 14,690 

Columbus 32,354 

Coblenz 9,449 

Munchen 18,940 

Stuttgart 13,387 

Sierra Cordoba 11,469 

Sierra Ventana 11,392 

Sierra Morena 11,430 

Der Deutsche 11,453 

Fulda 9,492 

Berlin 15,286 

Bremen 51,656 

Europa 49,746 

Gneisenau 18,160 

Scharnhorst 18,184 

Potsdam 17,528 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 



223 



NORWEGIAN-AMERICAN LINE 

Established in 1910 with service commencing in 1913. 
Established in 1910 but did not commence until 1913. 
Principal ports: Stavanger, Bergen, New York. 

Year Gross 

BuiU Name of Ship Tonnage 

1913 Kristianafjord 10,669 

1913 Bergensfjord 11,013 

1918 *Stavangerfjord 13,156 

1938 Oslofjord 18,372 



RED STAR LINE 

Established in 1873 

The Bernstein Line of Hamburg acquired the Red Star 
Line in 1935. 

Principal ports: Antwerp, Southampton, New York. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1865 Zeeland 2,697 

1867 Waesland 4,752 

1870 Pennland 3,760 

1873 Nederland 2,950 

1873 Vaterland 2,748 

1874 Switzerland 2,957 

1878 Belgenland 3,692 

1879 Rhynland 3,689 
1884 Noordland 5,129 
1884 Westernland 5,665 
1889 Friesland 6,409 
1893 Gothland 7,669 

1900 Vaterland 11,899 

1901 Zeeland 11,905 

1902 Finland 12,188 

1902 Kroonland 12,185 

1903 Samland 9,748 
1908 Lapland 18,565 

1917 Belgenland 27,132 

1918 Westernland 16,289 
1922 Pennland 16,322 



Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

224 



SCANDINAVIAN-AMERICAN LINE 

(United Steamship Company) 

This Danish shipping firm was established in 1866. The 
company acquired the ships of the Thingvalla Line in 1898. 

Passenger service on this transatlantic line has been dis- 
continued. 

Terminal ports: Copenhagen, New York. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1872 Amerika 3,867 

1874 Thingvalla 2,503 

1881 Norge 3,318 

1882 Island 2,813 
1884 Hekla 3,225 
1897 C. F. Tietgen 8,173 

1901 Oscar II 10,012 

1902 Hellig Olav 9,939 

1903 United States 9,993 
1913 Frederik VIII 11,850 

SPANISH LINE 

(Compania Trasatlantica) 

This line was established at Barcelona in 1881 by A. Lopez 
& Company, steamship owners since 1865. 

Service: Spain, Central and South America, New York. 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1866 Cristobal Colon 2,869 

1867 San Ignacio Loyola 3,228 
1872 Habana 2,678 
1872 Ciudad Condal 3,174 

1875 Panama 2,085 

1876 Mexico 2,113 

1877 Santo Domingo 2,805 
1878 Ciudad de Cadiz 3.202 

* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

225 



SPANISH LINE (Continued) 



Year 
Built 

1878 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1884 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1890 
1890 
1890 
1890 
1890 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1891 
1892 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1923 
1928 
1928 
1928 



Name of Ship 

Don Alvado de Bason 

Isla de Mindanao 

San Augustin 

Isla de Panay 

Cataluna 

Colon 

Covadonga 

Buenos Aires 

Reina Maria Cristina 

Alfonso XIII 

Leon XIII 

Montserrat 

Montevideo 

Leon XIII 

Santiago 

Meteoro 

Alfonso XII 

P. de Satrustegui 

C. Lopez Y. Lopez 

Antonio Lopez 

Alfonso XIII 

Vasco Nunez de Balboa 
*Manuel Calvo 

Reina Victoria Eugenia 

Infanta Isabel de Borbon 
*Argentina 

Uruguay 

Manuel Arnus 

Alfonso XIII 

Cristobal Colon 
*Habana 

Magallanes 
*Juan Sebastian Elcano 

Marques de Comillas 



Gross 
Tonnage 

4,809 

4,125 

2,332 

3,545 

3,665 

5,044 

5,161 

5,311 

4,818 

5,000 

5,087 

4,147 

5,205 

5,206 

5,206 

6,966 

6,966 

4,710 

4,170 

5,975 

7,815 

7,815 

5,617 

10,137 

10,348 

10,137 

10,348 

7,578 

10,551 

10,833 

10,551 

9,689 

9,965 

9,922 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

226 



STATE LINE 



Established in 1873. This company was taken over bv the 
Allan Line in 1891. 

Principal ports: Glasgow, New York. 



Year 
BuiU 

1872 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1880 
1881 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

State of Louisiana 1,869 

State of Alabama 2,313 

State of Georgia 2,490 

State of Pennsylvania 2,488 

State of Virginia 2,472 

State of Nevada 2,488 

State of Indiana 2,528 

State of Nebraska 3,986 

State of Florida 4,000 



SWEDISH-AMERICAN LINE 

Established service in 1915. 
Principal ports: Gothenburg, Halifax, New York 



Year 
Built 

1900 
1902 
1905 
1925 
1928 
1941 
1947 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

Stockholm 12,835 

Kungsholm 12,500 

*Drottningholm 11,165 

*Gripsholm 17,716 

Kungsholm 20,223 

Stockholm 28,000 

*Stockholm (Building) 11,000 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 



227 



UNITED STATES LINES 



This line was established in 1922 after the collapse of the 
United States Mail line. In 1930 was sold to a financial combine 
organized by P. W. Chapman & Co. In 1935 this important 
line was acquired by the well known International Mercantile 
Marine Company. 

Principal ports: New York, Cherbourg, Southampton, London, 
Havre, Hamburg. 



Year 
Built 

1905 
1907 
1908 
1914 
1921 
1922 
1932 
1933 
1940 



Gross 

Name of Ship Tonnage 

America 21,145 

Republic 17,910 

George Washington 23,788 

Leviathan 59,957 

President Harding 13,869 

President Roosevelt 13,869 

Manhattan 24,289 

'Washington 24,289 

*America 26,454 



WHITE STAR LINE 

Commenced steamship service in 1871. 
Merged with Cunard Line in 1934. 
Services: British Ports, New York, Boston, Canadian Ports. 



Year 
Built 

1870 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1881 
1881 



Name of Ship 

Oceanic 

Atlantic 

Republic 

Adriatic 

Celtic 

Baltic 

Britannic 

Germanic 

Arabic 

Coptic 



Gross 
Tonnage 

3,808 
3,707 
3,707 
3,888 
3,888 
3,707 
5,004 
5,000 
4,386 
4,384 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

228 



WHITE 


STAR LINE 


(Continued) 


Year 




Gross 


Built 


Name of Ship Tonnage 


1888 


Cufic 


4,639 


1889 


Runic 


4,833 


1889 


Teutonic 


9,686 


1890 


Majestic 


9,861 


1891 


Nomadic 


5,749 


1891 


Tauric 


5,728 


1892 


Bo vie 


6,583 


1893 


Cevic 


8,301 


1893 


Gothic 


7,755 


1895 


Georgic 


10,077 


1896 


Canada 


9,415 


1897 


Delphic 


8,273 


1898 


Cymric 


13,096 


1898 


Romanic 


11,394 


1899 


Afric 


11,948 


1899 


Medic 


11,948 


1899 


Persic 


11,974 


1899 


Oceanic 


17,274 


1900 


Canopic 


12,268 


1900 


Runic 


12,663 


1900 


Republic 


15,378 


1901 


Suevic 


12,531 


1901 


Celtic 


20,904 


1902 


Ionic 


12,352 


1902 


Corinthic 


12,367 


1902 


Cretic 


13.507 


1903 


Belgic 


9,767 


1903 


Arabic 


15,801 


1903 


Cedric 


21,227 


1904 


Baltic 


23,884 


1906 


Adriatic 


24,563 


1908 


Arabic 


16,821 


1909 


Laurentic 


14,892 


1909 


Megantic 


14,878 


1911 


Titanic 


46,329 


1911 


Olympic 


46,439 


1913 


Ceramic 


18,495 


1914 


Homeric 


34,356 


1914 


Britannic 


48,158 


1917 


Belgic 


24,547 


1917 


Justicia 


32,234 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 

229 



WHITE STAR LINE (Concluded) 

Year Gross 

Built Name of Ship Tonnage 

1918 Vedic 9,060 

1918 Calgaric 16,063 

1918 Regina 16,313 

1921 Majestic 56,551 

1922 Pittsburg 16,322 

1923 Albertic 18,940 
1923 Doric 16,484 
1927 Laurentic 18,724 
1930 Britannic 26,840 
1932 Georgic 27,759 

NOTE: See Cunard White Star Line. 



* Denotes ship still in service under same name. 



230 



I 

w 

E 



en 



o 
fc 

s 




tt i 

CB 





tO ^ (N CO * 
pH \O CO ^< 



00 - 00 O O pH<N 

pHi-H rHO O OO 



00 00 b- PH O 
ON ON ON ON ON 

231 



NO ^ t" tO j-O ON ON 

CO O 00 W C<I CO to 

00 t-NO IO IO CO CO 

00 00 CO 00 00 CO t~- 



CO 

\O 




glJf&gJ 

3 g g'JS? _ 
CJU^;EO 









1 
I 

O 



S -I 




ifi<?r! j 8 *lf .g| 8>8>| jfsf 'Ifc-li o 
| 1 6|| 6 s| Upil Is ii| I II !'! 



- - 

O O i I <M i I 

O ON O\ ON ON 

rHi-l ^H f-Hf-H 



ON rH rH CO r-l XO ^ CO CO \O in C^i ON ^O CO W O rH 
CO CN| CO CO CO O O CO O CO CO i I ONO O CO CO O 
ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON CO ON ON ON ON ON 



Tf"<J< 00 ON CO t~<N CO T? O O CO O O ON T? CO 1-1 ON 

inoNin m co co vo ^ co I-H vo co LO t> co in in vo t^ p \o in 

i To"^' CNfc^f 
CO CO CO CO CO 



co 



CO CO i I ^? ^3* CO CO CO CO in VO rf M ^ ^ ^O CO CO CO ^J" rj CO 

t-cbco co\b ON eo t- oc ^H in in c<i co cs c<i in oo TJ* cq csi c^ in 

CO CO CO COCO CO CO ON CO ON t- l> CO t- 00 00 t- ^O t^- l> 00 CO t- 






.11 



6 

Cu Q) fl} 

2 . .S 

li I gJJJJ c s . s . a . g , 

2C/)'C cd oj's- j CH "^ "3 "i Cj " s 03 

S a 2 ^S os'C 2\! J H-3 J S^o^f/) c 

jSS osC2SSS S S "3 

03^ /v"TsC*S^>*S^S JS r-s -Or^ -"^ ? -> -3 - " 

Si* a 



0) 03 O3 



llffi utflBDffiSD ^^^Si/'D^D 




* 223 



rf<i-H O <N OiOiO 

i I CO VO CO rH * C^l 
ON 1C i-H rH IO rH M 



rH CO ^* tO t^* ON rH 

(M rH <N C<l (N <NCM 



^O SO t^ O CC 
rH (NM COi-H 



CO^ CO 

ihco t~- 
t- co r- 



cocoes c^i to coeospONTf 1 

CO CO t- t- l> VCONCOCOsO 



CO 



CO CO CO CO 



fl rH O O I 



233 



I 



ffl 

O 



I 

O 

1 



S 



3 ss 1 



:'C 



g g 
O O 



. 



gpfr gp 






sg d $3 a .a d.2 S g.o .2 g.o 
EOOUDE 2EE E SE 2< 



J.i.iJ 

;0 




"e3 *3 '"c3 "3 



=e 

2J 3 -=.a 

^IBII 



: > 

. CD 



*! 



1 






I si 1 i ! 

Q a z w 



OJ i 

ft'S 






jag :-g 

11 81 

i'5^'25 



O CO 

ON ON 



O t~- ON rH lO O CO CO t> rH 

CO CNJ CO *$< CO CO CO CO CO CO 

ON ONONON ON ON ON ON ON ON 

rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH i ( rH 



t- l> (N rH ONO rH 

rH CO CO SO CO 
rH CO O lO VO 



(MVOCO 
CO ""3 1 I> l> Tj d 



a i 



00 VO lO C^l C^l (N CO <N C<l C<l 



co coco 



i^aT" 



CO VO O 



234 



MDCOOD c 
cocoes 



i ON ON ON CO 

> CO CO CO CO 
|\O VO-OVO 




::::::::: :'3 :: :'3 ::::::::: 

A . . .A 

j i : j i j j j j |5 j j J5 i j j j : j j "j j 

I nnjniy HI iiinnn 

i| 

'-'ScOeB^S'tSJsScC .52 to I^* cBgofl^Qontfr^'^^ 

cEouutfooooo <<<& tfwuOrctfuQSSeu 

.as coON^coi iiocoto^NO vo ^5 O t coioioiooNt>^ < ^f < i-*rH 

S^ CO CO rH rH O CO CO CO CO <N (N (M CO ON <N (N CO CO CO <N O O rH CO 

'5 ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON CO ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON 

0> CO O !> O CO i I rH C<l t> CO rH i I ON ON t- \O O ^" O rH O 00 i I "O 

B CO t- rH rHO O ^ CO l> SO CO l> O T? rH rH vO CO O \O O rH CO CO 

Sg (M ON^U^t^O^O ON^O^t- O^ rH O i I COlO^ r-^r-^O^^O^t^C^ON^ 

5 r cNfoCo"oo"^''o'oNo'oN o" csiWcT ^r*^eocoG*\ni-*&t^r* 

^ CO rH CO rH rH CM rH (M rH <N CO CO (M rH CO CO rH rH CO CO CO (M i-H CO 
M dM ^* C^ ^* C^ C^ t-O lO l-^ ON nH ^H rH pH CO tO I.O "^ 

g o ib c<i C^^D LO thrhilo co co co ih \bt- vb^*^? oscooco^b^H 

, tg 

5^5 J^^S^^^^^^^* w to _^* ^* vo ^o \o ^ to . 

co co co co co co co co co co co 

\OVO\O 

235 



gg 



I 
i 






O 



w 

2 

B 

i 
s 



I! 



S 

"3 

>> 



3 8 



83 
+J 
(/3C/3GCI 




JJ S-SJIJJII g 8 gj^^ 45 3 * 
Q^d,KSSSzzZfc,uoooo<!<;o.fl.oo<!^-!;<i! 



IN 



st Pfliiaa a s 1 1 i s a^'wa s s s s 

1 " J^l 1^3 s 2 ^'l- 2 - s o-3'g".S..S.S 



^^^^^ _ . 

i- o" co" co" oc" eo" co" t>" -^ i-T eo" aT o" aT eo" *~ i-T r-T o" o" o" aT eo" eo" eo" T?~ 



o o a eo eo eo T? 

(M(Ni (rH( IrHr-* 



N eO lO v t- t- - CO 00 * Tj< Tf T} CO CO irt LO irt rj< 




0> 0) O> 

fi fl 

33 II 33 



,, 



3 











g -5 -s 

i ; i| ; ; ; 1 ij i i * 



a 






W 



.2- i I C^l Tf -^ CO CO t> 

l^ rHrHOOOONO 

.3 ONONONONONOOON 



l> CO 00 O CO OO 
OON(M O<N (MCS| 

ON CO ON ON Os ON ON 



CO CO CO 



O CO ON ON rH O O 00 <N O 
10 ON CO CO 10 i-i t~-vOiO( 

i i O VO ^O CO ON ON O i I OS 



CO CO CO CO 10 (N l> COOOCslO 



CO O 

A 

io"co 



C<1 C<l 

O ON 
00 \O 



i-H rj <N<MlO 

g?ss 

\o't^NcTi> so 



CO CO CO CO 

I tO vO to LO CO 



COWC^ CO^ C<IC^ 

co^jco ONCVI c^cq 
so so t> 



CO 00 



OOOOOOON 



ON ONOO ^f" rfi C<l r-l 

ON ON ON Os ON ON ON ON ON 



237 




-3 cjntaeajt-jjfcjj^g ^^ -^ * * "^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ~ 

- '3 5j'a5 t.5 -5'e 4^ I s i *J< JJJ! 

| g>3<j 3J 5^|^ | i|-|JjW?" 

l^lll l fi!-fl! 1^1 s a 111111 
s 

'a ::::::::::: a 

| 05 

!!!!!!!!!! ^-^ 

o, 

i 

::::::::.:: - 

I j ^ = Uilfl j ri 

CB B.8-S8.S ' SsSES^S g^g |^.2fl.2.2S 

I*S &A 

aj "^3 S ^'aB ^ "*" ' ** ** ^ 

^ JUJJ^Q^ ^ o ow OQ<CJ ^^ 
* * * * * 

CO COCO COONONCO TjM 
(N i-H pH i-H CO CO i I i-H I I 

ON OsON OsONONOs ON ON 





M l> VO CO C<1 CO 
t^(N t^i-H^CO ^CO (M 

TtWoTio'irfso'so' s^T 



COlOOr XTi CO <N VO O rH O 

CO<Mt-lO i-H CO ON CO (M 1/5 CO 

I-H CO ON CO m CO CO^p-^vO^lO^ON^ 

o'cT^KT t-"t s -"t s -''co"'ir5'io'^"' 

C<I W i-H i-H i-H rH i-H i-H rH i-H i-H 




ON CO Tj< sp I-H ON CO 
^f ON i/5 t- Tf t~- f- 

SO 10 I s - t- VO VO VO 



COCOCSIM^ lO^f CO CO 
CO 00 00 t- t- lO tO 1O IJO 

10 10 10 10 m m in 



239 



(MXO so I s - 



CO CO 

I s - in 



00 
I s - t 
inm 



j 

v^ 

3 

I 



m 09 V W 

** skills 




E: I:;; in | iiiJ::: 

s iiii MNNi MMNMJiN 

| I i ai-iJJJ^ MMnMij.M 
i 'JhiSSSSj! | i 

- q If S TJTB 5a s-si! : "S2 -S^eBg 

a O M S > 3 S^r-2 3 
-3,2 

-**.Ci 

00,> 

* * * 

ft^ (.a* WOCO(NO TJtcOCOCOO COiO O ON CO CO CO O OM-H COt-0 

^^ S *3 ^^ ^^ **^ **^ r ^ ^^ f ^ r ^ ^^ ""^ ^^ **^ ^^ ^^ ^^ r ' ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^ 

^H to ^* ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^* ^^ ^ ^^ 

H rH rH rH i-H rH rH rH rH pH rH i-l i-H rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH 

X 

rv] ,. 

?T ^oj \O 1/5 to CO tO iO O ON CO rH O IO rH vO M l> XO CO VO 1 

1 sl Sss33ssgsssa XSSSSS3S s: 

Tfi ^J C^ W t^ CO C<l M tO tO ^ C^ S ? 3 ^ 1 ^^ ^ S^ ^T 1 ? 1 

10 tO CN| C^ M C<I C^l rH rH ^ ^ ^ CO IO C^ C^l rH rH vp C^l ^ CO 

JQ..H3 LOlOlOlOlOmi/5l/5lOlOl/5lO lOlOtOlOtOlrtlfttO 1/31OI/5 

240 



*s 

"SlS^ 
^ 22 C 
^S 



a 
c? ea'aT ^ 

g ll I 



^ fl-j fl^ .^j c 

^ 2 a)a>a>ap<Da>rt ^3 fl>3 a> a? a? 



* ; 



o 



11 I Hill 



Y 
B 






|SSS 

iiii^im.Mllltll 



a-S 



3 S-S 5 S^ 

i-lf-H in 1-1 CO CO ON ON O <N <N l> 



ONONON ON ON CO ON ON CO 



i-HOO 

ONONON 



ONOsONONONON 




MONON^ CO CO CO h- sp C<l 



1 1|| J# W^ ^ ^ ^ jfjj.^ ^ 

SJ5C3 O OOOOO O O ON ON ON 

^^^^ o ^woiSirt ioolrtloto 



241 



S 

I 



g 





% 

-< 

Pk 

K 

tf 

g 






































































a, 














: :g : : 











. 


CC 










iS i 








& 





a 










: : g : 




: :s : 




s 


3 
I 


t-i 

05 




. . . 




. 






: :&S 

. ee >j o 


tn 





1 

3 


W 
;_ 

o 

s 


J.s 

o ? 


ml 


i 


.2 
*S 

03. 

^ 


l-s 11^ 


2 

III 


S3* 

ifii 


CD 

73 

a 

T 



CO f-H Irt CC 1C (N O\ O Vrt O (N Tj<i-H r* 
CO CO C4 <N C<J <N O\ O CS! <M (N C^l O O 




i ^h vo c^i vo co co co co r- 1 i oso LO 

^^^^S5H5!Sa^ S3 



t- VO r? Tf< T? Tp CO CO CO VO CO T?C^I 

VO vb r}< O O O OS OsO O O rH CO 



^^^ ^ ^ CO LO LO T? Tjt CO ^HJ- 

CO CO CO CO CO M C^ Cs| C^l C^ (N (M^H 

LO LO lO LO LO lO lO LO LO lO lO LO LO 

lO lO LO LO VO LO LO lO lO lO to lO LO 



MD LO CO^ ^ t- 

^H rH pH ^H ^H O 

LO lO LO LO LO LO 

LO LO LO lO LO LO 



242 



66 



a a a a 

.2.2 .2 V 03 05 .2 

- 






SS.S 



c3^ 22:SS3S233|222<a23 

l ! is i S2's.8EEaa33*a**Tiaaa 



2-0-G-T3 g 5'd P p^.r J 'q:q 

t- r 

2' 



: <3 



- 






sl : 

Fill 

* * * * 

OS 00 ^J 1 N rH ON O CO (N O OS I I i-H CO i I ON ON 

O rH .-H 00 OSO (N <M CO O r-H ^H r-HO OSOS 

ONON ON ON ON CO ON ON O\ ON ON ON ON ON ON CO CO 



T? LO t 
S p-H C^l 

ON 



O t- tO CO COCO O i I ON CO CO O T? rH <N 
t^ ^^ ON 1 *3* t^^ ^O ON CO C^ ^* ^O tO CO CO ON 

VO lO^"^ COO \O lOtOON > O^h'^ONCO 



COCO O rH ON CO CO O * rH <N O T< O rH 

t~~- \O ON 

P-H" loto^ji' ^"vfiT TjT 



J h, 



g w eotoco coco co co co co co eo co ^ ^c^ ^^ ^ ^ 

23 

Si to T} Tft T? ^ co co co co c<i c<i c^i ^ v ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

r"3o ooo oo o oooooooooooooo 

5.S ifl trstoto loio to lOioiotoiotoiOLOiotovotoioio 

10 tOlOtO tOLO 10 



243 



33 



_, OJ 03 0) OJ 

? d d d c 
*3333 








.S.S 33 
^ d d 
d d 8 s 



II 

^s 



3<S< 

S O B 



Illllssf j|Jll|.ij Is ill 

aajaaijHlaa^sfrfr 



d d d d 
3 co ce co 



. 

s s 



^-s 



H 



si, 



> a fe d 

Sd ? c 

=6^1' 

d x x d 



:l 



-a 



C/D 



00 



H 
O 

! 



f-H (M lO NO NO 
C^ M (N O O 



O m 

O r-l 



NO CO Tj< NO i I O\ ^O M O rH iO CO <N CM CO Ov C<J lO O ON C^ 

,__! i-H i l CO ON CO ? O lO O pH rf NO NO ^O i I <M CO CM ON CO 

i I ^ Cv '~'~ xrJ ^ CVvC eexsc UCOC 



COCOr-l 
p-H r-l N 



1 S'S O 
Sfe.S 10 

30, tj 10 



lOiocoONCO t- LO co ^ ^ co co 

ONONOvCOOO COCOCO 0005?-?- 

LOlOiOiOlO LOiOlO lOlOlOtO LOlOlO IO 



244 



\3 '+3 '43 " * 

c-c-c-c-c 



TJ l 



. o 53 o q q ^fl ^c . . . 

"J :::::: :S i::::::::::::::::: 

I M Mi; ijjj ;|| ; j : ; i I j : j j ; : j 

fl g.2| : -^|l ' : r * 

OONCO CO CO CO NO NO CO CO ON ON t~ so ON ON ON ON ON LO 1C 

CO CO rH C<l (N rH CO CO O O O O CO CO O O O O O ON ON 
3 ONONON ONONON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON CO CO 

., lOt-vO OTtOO t^ O rH O O O NO NO 10 T? 10 NO t- CO ON l> ON ON 

01 O CO <N ON CO NO lO NO NO lO LO ON CO T}< LO CO LO CO t~- CO C^J t~- CNJ C<l 

NOrH CNICOCO t- LO ON ON ON M CO CO ON M C<1 CO C^ ^ N ^ 

COCOLO C^ C^ LO rH ^H ^H ^H ^H O C<l M CO CO Tj" CO CO CO CO 
NOt^NO VONONOt>t-NONONONOt-t>NOsONONONONONO 'J 

I 

a 

<" LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO LO 

245 





w w . w - w JOG w fi rt _c P.S 
|Hfc fefcogdaS, 

i jg 43 -Q pQ -Q X) . . . 
! 03 -^ < 

; . . . "od ! ! i ' i ' i i ' ' ' ' ' '. ' ' ' ' .' 1 

! MM MMiMiMIMMMiMl 

! MM NNMiNiMMnii-ii 

i iff j M M Ml| U| i >- M Ml f 

P fill llll liflilillyil's 

' **&% > u, o O<5 oc X 

i^-gffiCocdajo.g-ga) 

Jffi ^^^^0^ 
* * * * * * 

. w , v , ^,. ON ON ON r I C<l rH (N pH CQ (N i I rj< CO O C^ O CO 

*- B* r-l ON ON W <M<M(MOOON(M (N<N <N CN| O O (N ON ON CO 

2. Js ONCOCOON ON ON ON ON ON CO ON ON ON ON ON ON ON Os CO CO CO 

H 

^ VO CO rj< VO CO t>- CO tO i I lO ^O COO ON irt ON ON lO CO O CO ON 

W & IOCOXO'* CO CO ON CO C<l pH Tp Tf CO <M rf CO O t- r? "# ^O ON 

r* g g i-^vqvq^ t^t^vo^vfi^vqco^i-^ "-I"-! ~l'-l c l l ^. c l < ^i c< 5, <? i, T ^. 

f^ QJO rH rH i-Hi-HrHrHrH rH rHrH rHrHrHrHrHrH rH 

3 

cj <M C^l t*^ CO C* 1 ! C^ C^ CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO C^ 

8 ^ONONC<1 OOOONONTFCO COCO OOOOOONbOrH CO 
f-h NO LO VO V O I s ** I s * t*^ to LO LO ^O ^O ^O V O V O NO ^O ^O ^O LO NO 

coeococo co M co co co co co coco co co co co co co c^i w 

lO LO LO LO tO LO to LO lO LO 

246 




I! 







II 



lllis-s 



ij 

^-^ H>_|rH C8r-J 
Kj O C.rffl 

a3fl?.s|. 

fl fl s fcZ 

iMI^III 



a 
1 



'i 

t-sg-*-* 



Ir9r9r9 
jjJoiJ.J 
"V c x a a 
a a 575 
a> a5 -2 S 

jjgi9* W' 

S|| ^^Ng-SO.g^ l^lcglTSTg g 

ill iSlsl*IIIIl"ll.&.5"l isgoo 

[J^Hj^iZ 

i ; j jHnmnnnn HI^ 

^ ' Oi H _ 

& :| ^ ::::::::::::::: : :^ : $ 
I .js 3 > --s 

I :S ^S | :::::::: l-d j J Jo ci5 

OJ _, ^5 ^ bj hr HH O .. fl .. 

Ill ill 

# * 

8'3 CO ON ON ON ONONCOONONONONONONONONON ONON ON 
J^OQ pH rH rH i-H rHrHi-HrHrHrHrHrHrHrHrHrH 

v ON (N OCO^* LOCO^t^^OvO^t^vOt^^OiO 

^j \O CO ON CO CO *O ^ CO CO CO t*~* CO LO CO i"H ^* rH 

^J S rH rHrHrH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH rH 
t^ 

g c<i w ^ ^ co ^ pH ^' 4 ^ 5^ $?* &z* $* 

g eo ^ ib rH vbooLO^jtvb wc<i MO o vb wo o 

: i J! .9 

Jfee ^O co ON ^ coco ^? N t > *^''-.KJ > " ViP IP 

't*3 l~- t ^D MD ^^D^DvOiOiOLOLOiOiOiO"^ 1 COCO CO 

SJS.S <N W <M <N C^I(M<N(M(NC^M<N(M(N<N(N C^W M 

!&, \n \n in \n iO m m m \n m in m to \n in \n 

247 



I 



-a 



5 - 

^ 



^) G^ 03 




"d 

1 

3 a> o> o> o> .2 >-3 o > i ee > > 

- i 3 5 3 3 $ 3 g 33- 

4* 03 ^HHiJiJiJ^ 3, ^ 1 Sffi 2 2 J Jl 

S flfl"*""'' "32flSa3*3Sr*9S^9S"*^*' 

3 ^llH-^JailJsaJ 33 ! 233 !!' 

>W .^;<;^;^;-^ ^O> IM^ \J XJ2 X X X ' 

_^o0cOcOc0 cO ^j CH F ^ ^ 9 ^^ i^ ^j c^ io ,^* i^ cd cc co cd 

.000 Q.ea 1^'B 2 QJJ^p . ,J3 , .000333 

W 

^ t i J 

*jr 5 . a ' ' 03 

- * ; ;ii^H.jj|. 

g illll j{jljj3fl I jl : : :-8 ; : : ; 

,,.al11lll!i 1 1'8'S'i i3|| g 8 I : JS.9 
w l^lilll^tllllil^lll'llslll 

^" * # * 

W . m m ON co w o o vo ON ON >sO i 1 1 i vo co co in co r ci co co 

CD O^ 3 (N C^ C<1 C<l CO CO M ON C<l (M ON CO CO (N O O O O O C^ i I rH 

(/) ^!fi ONavONONONONON CO ONONCOONONONONONONON ONONONON 

2 

oo I* (M CO CO CO lO (N *O i I O CO O t- CO t~- Tj< O O C^ O t~ lT5 O O 

'^ O IO^IO" < ^^^T|^CO*' OrH <^<^O^ < ^ ( ^ONONON<N I-H co'co'co" 

HiJ E-i i-H i-H rH rH i It I i I i-H rH r-HrHi It li-HrH rH rH i * rH pH 

O 

5?n g C^C<lT}<^<Tji^J< i-H Tjtrf^TjT}<-ICOCOOCO COCO 

Se OOONONONON^ o ONONO^-I^HCOCOCOCOC<I c^in 
v f** f> \^ \^ \Q \& \Q v^ v^ \O *O t^* t*"* *O lO lO i-O ^O *O ^O 



Z* ^ JO VO CO ON vp lO CO COMCOCO 

CO CO CO CO M <N r^H O O O O OOOO 

N W (M C^ (M <M (M <N (N <N (^ (N<N(M(N 

Irt IO IO IO lO IO IO IO IO lO IO IO IO IO IO 

248 




CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 

w c<i c<i c^i esi <N w 
10 in 10 10 10 w 10 



= - 



aaf 
f f-s 3 I 



J- - g .1 

S 8 - 

C 'S ^ 

rt fl< *-N *\ rt*i fl^ fll fl'i fll fl'i ** * C/J C/J ^ CO 5n 5^ J2 

c q q q 3a83^38 q lH'l ^ 

'q s -T3 

g -^ d 

:::::::::::: o : 53 :;: ^ 

O 4J . . i 1 .u _, . OJ 

"'S Q ^-4 *J> 

. 2 1 . 'S'^'" 
fe h ec 

; ; ; ; ; : ; ; g 1 ^ ; :-d ins.g 

C3 a* T|3 5 ^ *^ C2 "fl ^3 ^ fl * fi ^* C3 ^^ c^ '^ '^ ^O T3 

2^S"g3 o'Sc^S.S --S'S'S'S'S 

** H f* ^ . ^, C ri IT< 4J aj < ^rCQ o(.QGjjai(D(Ufli 



*.22 i i 00 CO 1/3 i I i I C^ i I <N r I (N Tf< 1C CO CO l> LO <* i I i I i ( r-( i I i I 
g'2 ONi li-HCvlC^IC^C^C v lC<lC^C s ^(N<M(MC^rHO O (NC^C^C^fNIN 

K ^ CO ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON 

GJ ON CO ^O CO C*l I"** CO ^* ON CO ON ^* O ON ON co ^f ON c^ C^ CO CO CO ON 

SJ g <N CO CO r-H r-l SO r}* Tf CO CO CO CO CO CO CO O lO Csl i I i ( <N (M C^ ON 

g ^ C^ C^l CO CO CO r}< T? Cv| Ol C^ CO C<I ^ ^ M C^l (M <N 

1 rf tO U? CO CO r? O O C^I C^ M CNJ C4 Cs| 8 

.S 

00 OO O ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON CO f- ?- 

C>1CNICSCN|CN|f If- IrHi li I 
Irt IO lO lO VO VO 

249 



I 

9 

PS 

O 
fr 

W 



ffi 

Gf> 



W 
O 



88 

aa- aaa 



2 a 

I 14- 



^O^O^l^J tj , W .'"' W 

feo+j+j- ojfe^ 1 



a.s^ g3Taa33.S j . *^ 

J^i^.2^ fc^SS J&dtf 'Sb-a 1 





l> t- f- T? 

vO (N CO <N t- 

CO i I rH 



\O OMC <N r- 1 
CO CO Irt IO ON 



vO CO i I I> i I CO ^O CO 

ON VO ON CO rj <M CO rH 
i-H ON 



CO O ^f O ON 



C^l C<l C^l CN| C<I C<l C<l M <M M ON ON CO 
C<I C<l M C<1 M W C<J M Csl Csl CO CO ON 



rH C^ (N O O CO CO 
vO SO 10 XO -O 10 VO 



LO 10 10 to 10 LO \n to j/5 ^ ^ co 



lO lO CO CO CO CO 



to 10 10 10 10 10 10 



250 




2J-2'- 
P5^Jfo 

MM I ! j i i i I j ! ; !; i ; ; ; ; ; ; i 

I MM MiMMMM MMjMM 
! :;;; ;;;MMMM | 

g .... ... 55 (.< i- 1-| 

* Ills ijjjijJNjj i^Hlitj 

*1 

COOt^ ferHrHUo5 cEffiffiffi O ^! 

*. t- co I-H to o^coi& NO T}< I-H ON I-H co * co o o m mco eo 

'2 (Ml I CO i-H COOr-H C<||-H(-HCSJ<NC^<N OCOCOi-H i-HO F-H 

^(g ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON 

^i O ON C^ NO ^H ^5 in nH C^ CD NO CO CO NO NO NO C^ C"** NO C^l C^ 

%9 ON NO NO ON NO co NO eo ON m I-H co ^ co or-nc^io mo co 

g g NO^NO^O^ON^ (^in^CO^ CO^NO^in^CO^IM^Cs^NO NO NO^NO^CO^ <N m^ NO 

05^ ^O'w'r-f CO'r-ToC ON'(N'(M''o'co''co' > i-r o'l-Ti-rco" CO'o" CO" 

Pi rH rH i I i I rH rH rH I-H r-i rH rH rH rH i-H rH rH rH 

g co^ P^J"* ONC^M ^p^ 3 ^ ^ r 3 ?'^ V. ^ r" 1 r^5 ^ 

5S COrHCOON t~-CNl^< OrHrHt--"rfTj<C<l ONNONOCO COt^ rH 

fc i j* 

Jj v.e C^ ^ CO CO f fT^ ^ 5 t^ iP iP iP I" 1 iP V^ S^ 

^*lt rHrHrHrH ^ ^ ^ ^ O O O O O O O O O ON ON CO 03 

*^ C QQ.,' m in m m inmm m in in m in in in ininmin inm in 

251 



I 

S 

H 



o 





vO O t- lO O O O CO CO O i i i I i I O O i I Cv -^ ^ CO CO CM 
C<J Csl C<1 i I COCOOsO O C^l CN M <M C<l (M <N <M CO CO i I CO CM 
CN O^ ON ON ON ON ON ON ON CO CO ON CO CO < 



ON^O 



r c<i MD vp 



o o 
eoco 



t- eo co co o eo co co vo i> i> co in co \o 

<M eo co co o eo cc co 10 <N <N o 

i-Hr-a 



-* -j ,-H i I i I i I i I i I i I 00 vO VO VO ^ 
COMDLOIJO lOLOTfTjt rf C<1 M Cs| C<J M C<l CQ p-l rH ^-1 ^-1 i-H ^-1 rH 

0000 OOOO O 0000 O O OO O OOO OO 



m irt LO to 



m m to to to to m ir? 10 10 1 
252 




Line 
Line 



American 
American 



P. & O. Line 
Canadian Pacific Line 
Shaw, Savill & Albion Co 
Aberdeen Line 
Shaw, Savill & 
Aberdeen Line 
Hamburg-South 
Hamburg-South 




e 

! 



- 



-.S c w ee . PA- 

-o :g : o|csjs s i ;fs B9r 

j^ggllallJfrslB ?|< 

i i 1 $ |J S |s S S-J 1 S^ | * & o o 

KQQQQ^^QH^ UJ^ ^H S ^^ 



10<M (N OO 

i-H CNJ C^ CO CO 

ON ON ON ON ON 



t> no M ON 
*O OM-H CO 
O OS O ON T? T? *? 



T? co t^- Os 10 co I-H 

CO CO t- VO (N <M CO 

*? 



J. fr ! e> ! t '" ON ca CO 

& Q\ O < 1-4 t-4 1-4 r-( G* CQ i*4 r-4 & t>"r-To" 



^L' 
c^Tc<i 



CO 00 

co'co" 



i I II r-H f-H i-H iH 




CO 

m 



CO CO CO CO CO CO CO C<J CO CO ^ Csl C^l CO C<1 
CO CO CO CSJ C<l Csl Cs| Tf 10 C^ CNl ON ^C<leO 

toioio^o^ovo^o^o^o^ovom 



i 1 O O O O O 
000000 

m ITMO to to 10 to to to 10 10 m to 



O O O O O 
00000 



IOLO Tj< 

OO O 
IT3 IT5 IO 



253 



bb 

o o 
m m 



coco 
bb 
o o 
in m 



2 t- (N ^ rH \O ? O <? CO rH 
O OfHCOOMMON OOvO 

S ^ O\OVOOCOOSOO ON 00 ON 



o oooooo ooooooooo 
o oooooo ooooooooo 
ITS mmmtftinm mmmmmmmmm 




I 



ti 

W 



4J > 



C3 ro 
pS 8 

^3 p., 

i' 






|C< 

ffl ^5 

I 

o I 

u 5 
53 

i 



OS - 





0^ 







ssl 

1 



o?u 
1 

'3'S 

D 



la a 



Union-C 
North G 




i-HO 0,-iON 

Ov ON O^. O\ 00 



fill 

lifl 

i J i 



i i 



ON\O OONIM 

CM ON 10 ^o O 

CO VO^ IT5 l^ 10 

vo'o i-Tcrfso 

Tj CO CO<M rH 



b- CO ON 

^O CNlTjl 

CO~ oCrfT 



CO t^ \O 



(M (N (MOO 
irt \O 
CO t- 



s 



OO' 
ON(N 



256 




i 

= 3 3 

3 S- 
a.SS 

Illl 

7<?-?g 

03 ee-d ce 

IS! 

Illl 





o a 

c? 
S| 

11 

dK 



?^ 



c 



531 

*<( 



Illl 

s 




' .2 s 



l^lHp*lll^l |l|l""| 

^^> .5^ >5s c0 vfSpn w J w * ** 



I 

s^ 



O <N 
i I CO 
irt O 



O CO 

O OS 



a a ss?3 

OS t- t~ I>I>SO 



257 



a a 

.8 . 

3 ! 

-S ^3y3 

** rs 

s s <2 

03 03 Q O e 

2 flC/5 C/Odn 

JgP &>g 

O O^ ^'-S 

* 3 IS 

cO cd cO 

cu a^K ffiu 



.| 

Irllil 
liJldi 



?H eo t- o t- 

CO COrH i-Hi-H 
"^ 

i-T 

C<I 



03 03 

fl a 

~ 5~ 
d "^ a 
J co 



I 



b 

3 



g 3g 1? 

o o u o fl o 

s S'g si'S 30 

3 a S S $ 

2* st *t 31 

^ 3 s .2s 

S5 41 fl 



= HJ 



.2- 

3 

I.J 



5 < 

S ' 
fee .. 

I| 

sl&j 

fc flr^-- 



;5 

:CQ 
i^fl 

2*C 3 



1 



O VO 

H i I rH r I 



S g: 

Os OS 



O C<1 CO 
O\ CNl 10 



co i- 

N W rH 



O <N <N t- 
cot- 



Hi 



S 



t- !> 

COW 

VOSO 



Os 
O 



t- 

258 



% 



^ ^ % . 

t- I s - OS I 

OS OsOs CO 



3 



a 

a S 



!! 



co-a 

o A 



TS ft.24: : 

S'-S = ^ CO 

pS 02,5 a 

T3X U.W E C 

Illlla 

ftg^^cc;^ 

3o 5 i 

: CO CO CO 

rs o C4 <N 

5 ONON ON 



I 

ii i i . 

fl a fl .S 

g g g ^ a ^ 

^ J 3^11 I 

Sf 5 1.2.2-S3 5 

30 | Illl| I 

P-i PH KH hH Q (Cn ^- 




















' Ja 










o 










!H 
.> 










ed 
o 




* 






> 


^ 


^ 


"85 


* 


A 


Tg 


cc 


S fc 

C8X 

L, C'^ 
M rti L_ 


i 

| 


v i 


Is 

2 o 

Srr 



O ** 

-S^-^b -o 
W ^tfO 



OON O 
T? C^J CO 

ONON ON 



-srt 



COrH 
COiTS 







^ 



COLO 
CO CO 

cot- 






CO CO 

OON 



coco 



259 



0) 0) 


O) 


S 


1 




fl S G 


a 


cj 


i 




?& 

3111 


J 

1 

^3 




CD 

03 


rj 

fe 

3 1 1 


1 


sSs 

S2 E2 
5*3* 

2ili 

i^ 

la^a 


Cunard White 
United States 


United States 
United States 


1 1 |.2 

5 o 

35 35 .a .a o^ 

? |!a 5 l.fi 

P gl 1 11 


. Union-Castle 

















j 


. . . . 
























j 


. . . . 








: : S : 




a 


. . 03 . 

















' ' fe ' 




55$ 




T3 




JS 


cu 
.."3 


:5 


"" * * 




Qd * * *7ri 


ft, 


GQ 


a^ 


r/;-s S : 


2' :Q 


* 


!5 S"o) c S 




H.20 


'-0 



co d 



* * # # * 



03 O 



ON ON ON ON ON ON 



5 eo 

4-3 ^f^ 
*H C -W 

CD CO HH 



BIS 



> 3 a. w v 

,^ gtf 

M 



;^? 
s s 

ON ON 




<O lO 
CO CO 



CO ^H 

rH ^t 

I I 

oC ON" 




CO ON CO <N 
COCO COCO 



ON Os CO CO 






10 O 10 

O rH O 



260 



= I 

S 3 



> 2:3 



<sa 



o> a 

J 

^' 



Si 1 



dl 



.2 .S 
J.S .SJ 



iT3D 4) QJ 3J OJ .in >* 

8 555? flQ 



OOO^tf 



o a 



* 



3 



_ij 

:1 

;u 

; c 

i illlll, 

55o5u^j 



ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON 



i/5 lO ON 
10 * Tf 



(NO 

COO 



O i i rH c^ f- CO i i iiOs 
l> O rf CO t- VO 00 t- O 



toTjo ooo o ooooocs cso 

(N(N<Nr-l rH (N pH C<l rH (N rH <N (N <N (M 



S Cfe 

IN 
ii= 






i\ 



<M CO CO CO 



261 



CO CO ONCO CO 1/5 if) 



fl * 

a s 

.S 5 

3 'I 




i II II III !i ill- 

a so os 





t- rH rH <N <M <M CO 
CS1 CO CO CO CO CO <N 
OS Os Osos 



SO lO 
(N (M O 



S 



S 



rH i I CO CO CO ^ i I i I i I COO 







CO 1-1 rH ON OSOS\O 

t~ CO CO l> I t t^- 



(N T? CO CO 
t- SOt- t- 



rH rH i I 



262 




U UU Ocn 



(M i i CO CO CO 

^| pH ^ ^^ 
Os OvCO COCN 



3 a 

a d 



4> > 

ill 

i I - 

ca ca 

E a 



1* 



II 



1 2i*i 

w S fe | 

1 j*|a! 

fc OH OH v 

S t- t- 
^ O O 

522 



jj 

ij 



cn en 



CO OO OCO 

OS 10 tO 10<N 

o^ "-H.^ o^c^ 

co" co"ci esfo" 

i-4 rH rH i-l M 



CM CO 

NO t~- 

"~1 

co" co" 



OS'S 53 
OCM 



Ills is Is; 

> fe.S NO NONO 10 IO 



s 



^e 10 100 

fe CM CM C\| 

iJ NO NONO 



CM O 

NONO 



263 









: : : : : : 







: 






! . .... 




; 


! 




3 


c 


3 


i 


^ 


il 


S 

1 ? 


c 

i .. J J.S's.sjS j^l 


5 


30, 

t>*a 


' 

TJ 


c 
.5 

*S 


;C 

*. _ 

. c 
. a 

.T 



irii^!lrjiife-ii-ii 
iil411il|ilii 

S.S .Sao.S.S.S 



en 
Pr 
Pa 



j 

^3^ 
S X 



-s 



II ii 

^CQ rHi-H 






tOM-H CO 

.. SS 5. 

'I GS s 



O 00 t- ON 

T?rt r-H CC 
r^r^eO^NO^ 

crTeo'^eo 1 




ii 

fe.i \o^o vo 



vo^o 



VO SO NO ^O ^O 

pH ____-. 

^ 'O NO NO O 



264 




Ja 

O, OJ JJ 

- ~ 



J.SvS .<5,$t.l .= ! 

o^F 
ii i HI i*- 8 j-i|5 

0L<D3js g 

p N NMNi ;Mf 

s 11 ijinij nig 

^ & : : ::::::: : : : : . . 

O : ; ::::::: : : : : | 

S* "0--2 j ; ;^^ ; ; ; ;|^ ; ; 

7 |Jl.&| |i j ^.&j^ u *-.& ^ 1 .s- 

_ ^ ec ^2 ^o ScSS^c B3 a & P -= - c 
g Sg*" s ^J lihil! I = 8 1*1 "|^ " 

I iii|iyii|i||i i-iiiiiicS||i 

U-**2 (3o OH ^ ^ ^3 ^0 ^0 5D^O C/5 OXCC 08> C/DC/2 

-.- * * * * *** *** c*** 

SB.'- * t^^ 

ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON ON * ON 

O t- -O Tj ON CO Csl M ON CO ** O O CO ON 

le'ioio L.OT?-*?coec<N<N CMOSO co so o I-H so 

>CCOiO i/j^^'^'sO^'t- t^-i iO I-H i-HOlO ^" ONiO 
S^sOlO lOOOtOlOCOCO COOO CO COCNlt~~ ^ COON 

|C^ICN| C^t^-LOh-COC^C^ C^LOCO Tf TJ<ON'<* ON ONCO 

03 

sO^i-HOctjOON ONOO lO tOiO^ I-H 
O^\ tO lO tO ^* ^ CO CO CO CO C^l C^ CN| C? O 



II 



I 

265 



e* c* d i-i 

lO lO lO CO 
so SO so so 



. 





t- lO r- I CS| 

CY 'l'* ,'~l 
CO CO* O* 00* 



O Os CO 
*J< CO I-H 
so so so 



266 



PART VI 
PICTORIAL SECTION 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

Aller (1886) North German Lloyd 287 

America (1848) Cunard Line 272 

America ( 1940) I Jnited States Lines .... Frontispiece 

Amerika (1905^ Hamburg- American Line 307 

Amerique (1864) French Line . 275 

Andania (1913) Cunard Line 316 

Aquitania (1914) Cunard Line 316 

Athenia (1923) Anchor-Donaldson Line 321 

Auguste Victoria (1888) Hamburg- American Line . . . 291 

Aurania (1883) Cunard Line 285 

Baltic (1904) White Star Line 304 

Barbarossa (1896) North German Lloyd 296 

Bavarian (1900) Allan Line 301 

Berlin (1925) North German Lloyd 323 

Bremen (1929) North German Lloyd ....... 325 

Britannia (1840) Cunard Line 271 

Britannic (1874) White Star Line 279 

Caledonia (1904) Anchor Line . , 305 

Caledonia (1925) Anchor Line 323 

California (1923) Anchor Line 319 

Canopic( 1900) White Star Line 301 

Caronia (1905) Cunard Line 307 

Carpathia (1903) Cunard Line 304 

Caspian (1870) Allan Line 277 

Champlain (1932) French Line 327 

City of Berlin (1875) Inman Line. . . . . . . .279 

City of Chicago (1883) Inman Line 284 

City of Richmond (1873) Inman Line 278 

City of Rome (1881) Anchor Line 281 

Columbus (1922) North German Lloyd 320 

Conte di Savoia (1932) "Italia" Line 329 

Cristobal Colon (1923) Spanish Line 319 

Darmstadt (1890) North German Lloyd 293 

DeGrasse( 1924) French Line 322 

Deutschland (1923) Hamburg-American Line .... 318 

Elbe (1881) North German Lloyd 284 

Empress of Britain (1906) Canadian Pacific Line ... 308 

Empress of Britain (1931) Canadian Pacific Line . . . 326 

Empress of France (1913) Canadian Pacific Line . . . 314 

Etruria (1884) Cunard Line 285 

Friesland( 1889) Red Star Line 290 

General von Steuben (1922) North German Lloyd ... 322 

Georgic( 1932) White Star Line 325 

Homeric (1914) White Star Line 334 

I vernia( 1900) Cunard Line 302 

269 



Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse (1897) North German Lloyd . 297 

Kaiserin Maria Theresa (1890) North German Lloyd . . 292 

Kiautschou (1900) Hamburg-American Line .... 300 

Kungsholm (1928) Swedish American Line 324 

L' Aquitaine (1890) French Line 291 

La Bretagne ( 1886) French Line 286 

La Champagne (1885) French Line 288 

La Lorraine (1899) French Line 298 

Laconia (1912) Cunard Line 313 

Lucania (1893) Cunard Line 294 

Lusitania (1907) Cunard Line 310 

Majestic (1921) White Star Line 317 

Marloch (1904) Canadian Pacific Line 306 

Mauretania (1907) Cunard Line 309 

Megantic (1909) White Star Line 311 

Minnedosa (1918) Canadian Pacific Line 317 

New York (1888) Inman Line 290 

Normandie (1933) French Line 331 

Oceanic (1870) White Star Line 278 

Oceanic (1899) White Star Line 300 

Olympic (1911) White Star Line 334 

Pavonia (1882) Cunard Line 283 

Pilsudski (1935) Gydnia-America Line 330 

President Grant (1907) Hamburg-American Line . . . 311 

Preussen (1886) North German Lloyd 288 

Principe di I Jdine ( 1908) Lloyd Sabaudo Line .... 310 

Prinz Eitel Friedrich (1904) North German Lloyd ... 306 

Queen Elizabeth (1940) Cunard White Star Line ... 333 

Queen Mary (1935) Cunard White Star Line .... 332 

Republic (1900) White Star Line 303 

Rex (1932) "Italia" Line 328 

Rhynland (1879) Red Star Line 280 

Saale (1886) North German Lloyd 289 

St. Paul (1895) American Line 295 

Samaria (1868) Cunard Line 276 

Sannio (1899) Navigazione Generale Italiana .... 299 

Scotia (1862) Cunard Line 273 

Scythia (1920) Cunard Line 318 

Servia (1881) Cunard Line 282 

Slavonia (1903) Cunard Line 305 

Teutonic (1889) White Star Line 289 

Titanic (1911) White Star Line 312 

Vaterland (1914) Hamburg-American Line 315 

Victorian (1904) Allan Line 306 

Vulcania (1928) Cosulich Line 324 

Washington (1863) French Line . 274 

Washington (1933) United States Lines 330 

270 




271 




272 













273 




1 



274 




a o> 

N 

tf 



275 




276 



II 




277 




THE "OCEANIC" (1870) By courtesy of the White Star Line 




THE "CiTY OF RICHMOND" (1873) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



278 



THE "BRITANNIC" (1874) PA / , Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "CiTY OF BERLIN" (1875) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



279 




280 




281 





282 




283 




THE "ELBE" (1881) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



i,jfe 




THE "CiTY OF CHICAGO" (1883) Pfcoto, Nautical Photo Agency 



284 




THE "ETRURIA" (1884) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "AURANIA" (1883) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



285 




286 




THE "LA CHAMPAGNE" (1885) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "PREUSSEIS" (1886) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



288 




THE "SAALE" (1886) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "TEUTONIC" (1889) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



289 




THE "NEW YORK" (1888) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "FRIESLAND" (1889) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



290 



THE "AuousTE VICTOBIA" (1888) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 
(As altered) 



i^IJtts3S^ A U-- 




THE "L' AQUITANINE" (1890) P/io/o, Nautical Photo Agency 



291 







292 




I S 



293 




m 



i ? 

\i 




294 




295 



* I 




299 




THE "OCEANIC" (1899) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "KIAUTSCHOU" (1900) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



300 



THE "CANOPic"(1900) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 








THE "BAVARIAN" (1900) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



301 




302 





303 



I 





THE "CARPATHIA" (1903) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "BALTIC" (1904) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



304 




""^^IPWBPP^SP 



THE "SLAVONIA" (1903) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "CALEDONIA" (19Q4) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



305 




THE "MARLOCH" (1904) 
(ex- Victorian) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "PRINZ EITEL FRIEDRICH" (1904) Nautical Photo Agency 

306 




THE "AMERIKA" (1905) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "CARONIA" (1905) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 

307 




308 




309 



pL.fi-iJfr f-ijLiaJliiiiiMdii . 




THE "LUSITANIA" (1907) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "PRINCIPE DI UDINE" (1908) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



310 




THE "PRESIDENT GRANT" (1907) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



ii 



THE "MEGANTIC" (1909) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



311 




312 




313 




i 



314 




THE "AQUITANIA" (1914) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 

(Shown as a hospital ship during World War I) 




THE "ANDANIA" (1913) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



316 




THE "MINNEDOSA" (1918) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



m m 




THE "MAJESTIC" (1921) 



By courtesy of White Star Line 



317 



U:t;^-Jfc 










THE "SCYTHIA" (1920) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "DEUTSCHLAND" (1923) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 

(Before alterations) 



318 




THE "CRISTABAL COLON" (1923) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "CALIFORNIA" (1923) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



319 




320 




THE "GENERAL VON STEUBEN" (1923) By courtesy of the 

North German Lloyd 




THE "Dfi GRASSE" (1924) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



322 




THE "CALEDONIA" (1925) 



Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "BERLIN" (1925) By courtesy of the North German Lloyd 



323 







THE "KUNGSHOLM" (1928) 



. JBBBB 

Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "VULCANIA" (1928) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



324 




THE "BREMEN" (1929) By courtesy of the North German Lloyd 



L 



THE "GEORGIC" (1932) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 



325 




I 



IM .1 



I 



326 




I 



I 



327 







328 




329 




THE "WASHINGTON" (1932) Photo, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "PILSUDSKI" (1935) P/wfo, Nautical Photo Agency 



330 




THE "NORMANDIE" (1933) P/ioto, Nautical Photo Agency 




THE "NORMANDIE" (1933) By courtesy of the French Line 

(While under construction) 



331 




fill/ 

i 



.-I 



332 




333 




334 



INDEX 



Aachen (1895) 35, 221 

Abbassick (1889) 168 

Abyssinia (1870) 35, 38, 201 

Acadia (1840) 3, 35, 54, 71, 200 

Acropolis (1890) 35, 127 

Adriatic (1857) 35, 199 

Adriatic (1872) 7, 36, 64, 228 

Adriatic (1906) 36, 49, 229, 232, 258 

Aeolus (1899) 96 

Afric (1899) 229, 243 

Africa (1850) 36, 200 

Agamemnon (1903) 22, 107, 255 

Aisne (1920) 40 

Akaroa (1914) 242 

Alabama (1873) 170 

Alaska (1881) 10, 36, 209, 254 

Alaunia (1913) 36, 42, 202, 248 

Alaunia (1925) 36, 45, 48, 202, 203, 249 

Albania (1900) 201 

Albania (1920) 36, 202, 248 

Albano (1886) 211 

Albert Ballin (1923) 37, 78, 97, 99, 212, 

234, 259 

Alberta (1909) 116 
Albertic (1923) 37, 134, 141, 230, 237 
Alcantara (1913) 240 
Alcantara (1926) 235. 261 
Aleppo (1865) 201 
Alesia (1882) 205 
Alesia (1906) 37, 108, 132, 206 
Alexander (1897) 37, 126, 180 
Alfonso XII (1890) 37, 99, 126, 226 
Alfonso XIII (1888) 37, 156, 226 
Alfonso XIII (1891) 37, 139, 179, 226 
Alfonso XIII (1923) 38, 97, 226 
Algeria (1870) 35, 38, 146, 201 
Algeria (1891) 38, 193 
Algeria (1914) 38, 194 
Alice (1907) 38, 45, 116, 195 
Allemania (1865) 38, 210 
Aller (1886) 11, 38, 161, 177, 221 
Almanzora (1914) 239 
Almeda Star (1926) 239 
Alsatia (1876) 193 
Alsatian (1913) 38, 58, 83, 192, 239 
Alvares Cabral (1889) 168 
Amazon (1906) 250 
Amboise (1905) 91 
America (1848) 39, 60, 85, 136, 200 
America (1863) 39, 98, 140, 220 
America (1881) 39, 205 
America (1884) 12, 39, 218 
America (1890) 125 
America (1905) 39, 41, 228, 233, 258 
America (1908) 39, 219 
America (1940) 39, 228, 233, 260 
American Banker (1920) 40 
American Farmer (1920) 40 
American Importer (1920) 40 



American Legion (1920) 250 

American Merchant (1920) 40 

American Shipper (1920) 40 

American Trader (1920) 41 

American Traveler (1920) 41 

Amerika (1872) 41, 64, 225 

Amerika (1905) 39, 41, 212, 233, 258 

Amerique (1864) 41, 103, 206 

Ammiraglio Bettolo (1921) 135 

Amphion (1899) 108 

Amsterdam (1879) 42, 213 

Anchoria (1874) 42, 193 

Ancona (1908) 42, 174, 180, 219 

Anlalucia Star (1927) 238 

Andania (1913) 36, 42, 202, 248 

Andania (1922) 36, 42, 48, 202,203,248 

Andes (1913) 239 

Andes (1939) 234, 265 

Andre Lebon (1913) 251 

Anglo-Saxon (1856) 42, 191 

Antigone (1901) 135 

Antonia (1921) 42, 48, 202, 203, 249 

Antonia Lopez (1891) 43, 226 

Aorangi (1924) 238 

Aquila (1926) 158, 260 

Aquitania (1914) 43, 202, 203, 231, 255 

Arabia (1852) 43, 200 

Arabic (1881) 43, 170, 228 

Arabic (1903) 43, 128, 229, 237 

Arabic (1908) 43, 51, 229, 237 

Arafura (1903) 174 

Aragon (1905) 250 

Araguaya (1906) 250 

Aramis (1922) 245 

Aramis (1932) 245 

Arandora Star (1927) 251 

Arawa (1907) 109 

Arawa (1922) 246 

Arcadian (1908) 248 

Archimede (1881) 43, 181 r 183, 218 

Arconia (1897) 104 

Arctic (1849) 4, 5, 44, 47, 48, 143, 199 

Argentina (1905) 44, 53, 216 

Argentina (1900 44, 195, 200 

Argentina (1913) 44, 156, 226 

Argentina (1929) 238 

Argentina Maru (1939) 250 

Arizona (1873) 67 

Arizona (1879) 9, 10, 44, 209 

Arlanza (1912) 239 

Armadale Castle (1903) 240 

Armenia (1896) 211 

Armenian (1895) 45 

Arundel Castle (1894) 51, 129 

Arundel Castle (1921) 233, 256, 260 

Asahi Maru (1914) 76 

Asama Maru (1929) 241 

Ascania (1911) 45, 94, 202 

Ascania (1925) 36, 45, 48, 202, 203, 249 



335 



Asia (1850) 36, 45, 200 

Asia (1907) 38, 45, 206 

Asiatic (1881) 43 

Assyria (1908) 45, 1F6, 194 

Assyrian (1880) 45, 191 

Assyrian Monarch (1880) 45 

Astoria (1884) 46, 74, 193 

Asturias (1908) 248 

Asturias (1925) 235, 261 

Athenia (1904) 46, 205 

Athenia (1923) 46, 117, 205, 247 

Athenic (1901) 254 

Athinai (1908) 46, 209 

Athlone Castle (1936) 232, 265 

Athos II (1925) 240 

Atlanta (1891) 48, 178 

Atlanta (1908) 46, 195, 198 

Atlantian (1899) 46 

Atlantic (1849) 4, 44, 46, 48, 143, 199 

Atlantic (1870) 47, 49, 140, 156, 228 

Atlantica (1868) 173, 185 

Atlantis (1913) 239 

Atlas (1860) 201 

Audacious (1913) 50 

Auguste Victoria (1888) 15, 47, 72, 91, 

211 
Augustus (1927) 47, 158, 216, 219, 233, 

260 

Aurania (1883) 11,47,201 
Aurania (1915) 47, 202 
Aurania (1924) 36, 45, 48, 202, 249 
Ausonia (1909) 48, 176, 202 
Ausonia (1921) 42, 48, 202, 203, 249 
Australasian (1857) 57 
Australia (1870) 48, 193 
Austria (1857) 48, 210 
Avila Star (1927) 243 
Avoca (1891) 48, 178 
Avon (1907i 248 
Awatea (1936) 247 

Ballarat (1911) 254 

Ballarat (1921) 249 

Balmoral Castle (1910) 240 

Baloeran (1930) 243 

Balranald (1922) 249 

Baltic (1849) 4, 47, 48, 143. 199 

Baltic (1873) 7, 47, 49, 156, 140, 180. 

228 

Baltic (1904) 49, 88, 229, 232. 258 
Baltimore (1868) 49. 51, 220 
Banibra (1903) 153 
Banfora (1914) 49, 206 
Baradine (1921) 249 
Barbarossa (1896) 49, 221, 247 
Barrabool (1922) 249 
Batavia (1870) 49, 201 
Batavia (1899) 49,211 
Batory (1936) 49, 148, 210 
B uidouinville (1939) 251 
Baumwall (1890) 211 
Bavarian (1856) 210 



Bavarian (1900) 50, 177, 192, 252 

Bayern (1886) 161, 221 

Belgenland (1878) 50, 224 

Belgenland (1917) 50, 224, 233, 257 

Belgian (1855) 98 

Belgic (1903) 229 

Belgic (1917) 50, 229, 257 

Belgravia (1882) 193 

Beltana (1913) 254 

Belvedere (1913) 50, 195, 200, 215 

Benalla (1913) 254 

Bendigo (1922) 249 

Benicarlo (1854) 66 

Berengaria (1912) 50, 103, 202, 203. 

231,257 

Bergensfjord (1913) 50, 109, 224, 250 
Berlin (1868) 51, 220 
Berlin (1874) 51,67, 192 
Berlin (1908) 43, 51, 223, 237 
Berlin (1925) 50, 223, 244 
Bermuda (1927) 247 
Berrima (1913) 254 
Bezzm-y-Alem (1889) 79 
Birma (1894) 51, 129 
Birmania (1882) 51, 219 
Bismarck (1921) 51, 103, 121, 212, 231, 

257 

Bleucher (1901) 52, 117, 130, 174, 212,247 
Boadicea (1898) 52,123, 194 
Bohemia (1881) 211 
Bohemian (1858) 191 
Bohemian (1900) 52 
Boissevain (1937) 245 
Bolivia (1873) 52, 193 
Bologna (1905) 52, 216 
Bonn (1895) 52, 221 
Bordo (1914) 254 
Borussia (1855) 52, 98, 210 
Bosnia (1899) 211 
Bothnia (1874) 52, 167,201 
Bovic (1892) 229 
Brabantia (1920) 157 
Braga (1907) 53. 86, 116. 206 
Brandenburg (1901) 53, 54, 222 
Branksome Hall (1875) 144 
Brasile (1905) 44, 53, 216 
Brasilia (1897) 138 
Braunschweig (1873) 53, 220 
Brazil (1938) 238 
Brazil Maru (1939) 250 
Bremen (1858) 53, 101, 136, 184, 220 
Bremen (1896) 53, 73, 108, 221, 243 
Bremen (1900) 53, 107, 149, 153, 222 
Bremen (1929) 24, 26, 27, 53, 86, 223, 

231 259 

Breslau '(1901) 53, 54, 222 
Bretagne (1922) 54, 208 
Bridgeport (1901) 54 
Britania (1902) 54, 93, 205 
Britannia (1840) 3, 35, 54, 57, 71, 200 
Britannia (1863) 54, 193 
Britannia (1881) 54, 205 



336 



Britannia (1926) 194 
Britannic (1874) 8, 9, 55, 93, 228 
Britannic (1914) 55, 229, 231, 255 
Britannic (1930) 55, 93, 203, 230, 232, 

260 

British Crown (1879) 42 
British Empire (1878) 81 
British Empire (1886) 55, 159 
British Empire (1902) 55, 56, 60, 88 
British King (1881) 55, 56, 183 
British Prince (1899) 55, 134, 163 
British Princess (1882) 56 
British Princess (1899) 144 
British Queen (1881) 56, 55, 139 
Briton (1897) 246 
Brooklyn (1869) 56, 67, 205 
Bruton (1899) 168 
Buenos Aires (1887) 56, 226 
Buenos Ayrean (1879) 56, 191 
Buffalo (1885) 56 
Bulgaria (1898) 49, 56, 60, 211 
Bulow (1906) 56, 222 
Burdigala (1898) 106 
Burgundia (1882) 57, 205 
Byron (1901) 119 
Byron (1914) 57, 120, 179, 209 

C. F. Tietgen (1897) 57, 81, 159, 225 

C. Lopez Y. Lopez (1891) 57, 226 

Cairo (1908) 160 

Calabria (1857) 57, 201 

Calabria (1901) 57, 193 

Caldera (1868) 206 

Caledonia (1840) 3, 35, 54, 57, 71, 200 

Caledonia (1863) 54 

Caledonia (1904) 58, 193, 254 

Caledonia (1921) 52, 257 

Caledonia (1925) 58, 167, 177, 194, 242 

Caledonia (1947) 194 

Calgarian (1913) 38, 58, 192, 239 

Calgaric (1918) 58, 142, 230, 243 

California (1863) 58, 193 

California (1872) 58, 180, 193 

California (1907) 58, 194 

California (1920) 36, 248 

California (1923) 59, 177, 194, 242 

California (1928) 239 

Calif ornian (1891) 170 

Californian (1902) 59 

Californie (1905) 207 

Cambrai (1920) 59 

Cambria (1845) 59, 100, 200 

Cambroman (1892) 59, 204 

Cameronia (1910) 59, 194, 250 

Cameronia (1920) 59, 115, 194, 242 

Campana (1929) 251 

Campanello (1902) 55, 60, 88 

Campania (1893) 17, 18, 59, 119,201, 

237, 263 

Campania (1902) 55, 60, 88 
Canada (1848) 39, 60, 85, 136, 200 
Canada (1863) 60, 146, 218 



Canada (1865) 60, 144, 206 

Canada (1896) 60, 204, 229, 254 

Canada (1898) 49, 56, 60 

Canada (1911) 61, 206 

Canadian (1854) 61, 103, 191 

Canadian (1860) 61, 191 

Canadian (1900) 61 

Canopic (1900) 61, 73, 229, 239 

Cantigny (1920) 40 

Canton (1939) 245 

Cap Arcona (1927) 234, 257 

Cap Finisterre (1911) 241 

Cap Polonia (1914) 235, 258 

Cap Trafalgar (1913) 62, 235, 258 

Capetown Castle (1938) 232, 265 

Caramanie (1874) 143 

Caribia (1932) 61, 74, 102, 213 

Carinthia (1895) 61, 174, 201 

Carinthia 1925) 62, 89, 202, 203, 236, 

266 

Carmania (1905) 62, 202, 234, 261 
Carnarvon Castle (L926) 233, 235, 261, 

265 

Carolina (1905) 62, 195, 198 
Caroline (1908) 207 
Caronia (1905) 62, 89, 202, 234, 261 
Carpathia (1903) 62, 202 
Carthage (1910) 175, 207 
Carthage (1931) 248 
Carthaginian (1884) 63, 191 
Caserta (1904) 63, 126, 219 
Caspian (1870) 63, 191 
Cassandra (1906) 63, 205 
Cassel (1901) 63, 65, 222 
Castalia (1906) 193 
Castilian (1898) 63, 191 
Catalonia (1881) 63, 201 
Cataluna (1883) 63, 226 
Cathay (1925) 248 
Catlin (1908) 92, 258 
Cedric (1903) 63, 64, 229, 233, 258 
Celtic (1872) 36, 41, 64, 228 
Celtic (1901) 63, 64, 229, 232, 258 
Cephalonia (1882) 64, 146, 201 
Ceramic (1913) 229, 233, 263 
Cesare Battisti (1920) 64 
Cestrian (1896) 64 
Cevic (1893) 64, 229 
Champlain (1932) 64, 208, 236, 266 
Champollion (1924) 246 
Charles Roux (1908) 207 
Chateau Yquem (1883) 65, 205 
Chemnitz (1901) 63, 65, 222 
Chenonceaux (1922) 245 
Chester (1873) 65, 67, 192 
Chicago (1866) 209 
Chicago (1908) 65, 207, 251 
Chichibu Maru (1930) 241 
China (1861) 65,201 
China (1896) 253 
Chitral (1925) 247 
Chiyo Maru (1908) 241 



337 



Christian Huygens (1928) 242 

Christiania (1890) 211 

Chrobry (1939) 65, 169, 210 

Cilicia (1937) 194 

Cimbria (1867) 65, 210 

Cincinnati (1908) 65, 70, 212, 238 

Circassia (1878) 66, 193 

Circassia (1903) 66, 193 

Circassia (1937) 194 

Circassian (1872) 66, 191 

Citta di Geneva (1882) 66, 216 

Citta di Geneva (1903) 94, 219 

Citta di Messina (1894) 216 

Citta di Milano (1897) 66, 216 

Citta di Napoli (1871) 66, 156, 216 

Citta di Napoli (1883) 182 

Citta di Torino (1898) 66, 216 

City of Antwerp (1867) 66, 215 

City of Athens (1920) 40 

City of Baltimore (1854) 66, 214 

City of Berlin (1875) 8, 51, 67, 215 

City of Boston (1864) 67, 214 

City of Bristol (1860) 214 

City of Brooklyn (1869) 56, 67, 215 

City of Brussels (1869) 6, 7, 8, 67, 215 

City of Chester (1873) 65, 67. 70, 215 

City of Chicago (1883) 68, 178, 215 

City of Glasgow (1850) 68, 214 

City of Honolulu (1900) 108, 150, 151, 

153, 247 

City of Limerick (1863) 214 
City of Lincoln (1866) 122, 215 
City of London (1~863) 68, 214 
City of Los Angeles (1899) 96, 241 
City of Manchester (1851) 68, 214 
City of Montreal (1872) 68, 215 
City of New York (1861) 68, 214 
City of New York (1865) 68, 138, 215 
City of New York (1888) 13, 14, 69, 

136, 215, 246 

City of Paris (1866) 69, 215 
City of Paris (1889) 13, 14, 60, 144, 

148, 215, 247 

City of Philadelphia (1853) 70, 214 
City of Pitteburg (1851) 214 
City of Richmond (1873) 67, 70, 215 
City of Rome (1881) 13, 70, 193, 215, 

241 

City of Vienna (1890) 175 
City of Washington (1853) 70, 214 
Ciudad Condal (1872) 225 
Ciudad de Cadiz (1878) 225 
Cleveland (1908) 66, 70, 130, 212, 238 
Coalgaconder (1848) 39 
Coamo (1891) 171 
Coblenz (1923) 70, 223 
Coburg (1908) 71, 82, 222 
Colombie (1931) 71, 208 
Colombo (1917) 71, 163, 215, 219, 249 
Colon (1884) 226 
Colonial (1908) 45, 186 
Colorado (1867) 71, 209 



ColumbeUa (19.01) 72 

Columbia (1840) 3, 35, 54, 57, 71, 200 

Columbia (1866) 71, 193 

Columbia (1889) 15, 47, 71, 91, 138, 211 

Columbia (1901) 72, 133, 193 

Columbia (1908) 72, 195, 200 

Columbia (1917) 50, 257 

Columbus (1900) 72, 156, 204 

Columbus (1914) 72, 101, 223, 232, 25S 

Columbus (1922) 72, 223, 232 

Commonwealth (1900) 61, 73, 204 

Comorin (1925) 248 

Constantinople (1896) 53, 73, 108, 209 

Conte Biancamano (1925) 73, 215, 217, 

235, 262 
Conte Grande (1927) 73, 216, 217, 

235, 262 

Conte Rosso (1922) 73, 74, 217, 240 
Conte di Savoia (1932) 28, 29, 73, 216, 

217, 231, 259 

Conte Verde (1923) 73, 74, 217, 240 
Coptic (1881) 74, 228 
Corcovado (1907) 74, 96, 186, 212 
Cordillera (1932) 61, 74, 213 
Corfu (1931) 248 
Corinthian (1899) 74, 168, 192 
Corinthic (1902) 229 
Corse (1908) 136 
Corsican (1907) 74, 95, 100, 124, 192, 

254 

Covadonga (1884) 46, 74, 226 
Covington (1908) 65 
Crathie 82 

Crefeld (1895) 35, 75, 221 
Crefeld (1922) 223 
Cretic (1902) 75, 125, 229, 238 
Cristobal Colon (1866) 75, 128, 225 
Cristobal Colon (1923) 38, 75, 226 
Cromartyshire 14, 110 
Cuba (1865) 75, 105 
Cuba (1923) 75, 201, 208 
Cufic (1888) 75, 160, 229 
Curacoa 32 

Cymric (1898) 75, 229, 238 
Czar (1912) 76, 85, 154 
Czaritza (1915) 76, 109, 118 

D'Artagnan (1924) 245 

Dakota (1872) 76, 209 

Dakota (1904) 235, 263 

Dalmatia (1892) 193 

Dania (1889) 76, 132, 211 

Danmark (1867) 76 

Dante Alighieri (1914) 76 

Darmstadt (1890) 76, 93, 107, 141, 

173, 221 

Darro (1912) 253 
De Balboa (1891) 139 
De Grasse (1924) 77, 208, 242 
De Kalb (1904) 133, 153 
De La Salle (1924) 77, 169, 208 
Delaware (1865) 69 



338 



Delphic (1897) 77, 229 

Demerara (1872) 77, 201 

Demerara (1912) 253 

Demosthenes (1911) 253 

Dempo (1930) 242 

Denmark (1865) 77, 89, 218 

Der Deutsche (1924) 223 

Derfflinger (1907) 77, 119, 186, 222 

Deseado (1912) 253 

Desna (1912) 253 

Deutschland (1858) 77 

Deutschland (1866) 78, 220 

Deutschland (1899) 15, 18, 19, 78, 98, 

181,212,233,256 

Deutschland (1923)37,78, 97, 99, 212, 234 
Devonia (1877) 87, 193 
Devonian (1900) 78, 185, 242 
Dniester (1887) 113 
Dominion (1874) 78, 204 
Dominion (1894) 79, 128, 154, 204 
Dominion Monarch (1939) 233, 260 
Don (1890) 91, 163 
Don Alvado de Bason (1878) 226 
Donau (1868) 79, 140, 220 
Dora (1904) 195 
Dora (1913) 196 
Doric (1923) 79, 203, 230, 239 
Dresden (1889) 79, 134, 221 
Dresden (1914) 79,243 
Drina (1913) 254 

Drottningholm (1905) 254, 79, 181, 227 
Dublin Castle (1877) 164 
Due d' Aumale (1912) 208 
Due de Bragance (1889) 207 
Duca d' Aosta (1908) 80, 219 
Duca Degli Abruzzi (1907) 80, 152, 219 
Duca di GaUiera (1883) 80, 81, 216 
Duca di Genova (1907) 80, 219 
Duchess of Athol (1928) 80, 81, 199, 238 
Duchess of Bedford (1928) 80, 81, 84, 

199, 238 
Duchess of Richmond (1928) 80, 81, 84, 

199, 238 

Duchess of York (1929) 80, 81, 199, 238 
Duchessa di Genoa (1884) 81, 216 
Duilio (1923) 81, 94, 215, 219, 236, 262 
Dunnottar Castle (1936) 245 
Dunolly Castle (1897) 104 
Dunvegan Castle (1936) 245 
Durban Castle (1939) 239 
Dwinsk (1897) 57, 81, 159 

Edam (1878) 81,213 

Edam (1921) 81, 116, 120, 170, 214 

Edinburgh Castle (1910) 240 

Edison (1896) 81, 109, 209, 248 

Edmund B. Alexander (1905) 39, 41, 258 

Edward Rutledge (1931) 87 

Egypt (1871) 82, 170, 218 

Eider (1884) 11, 82, 84, 221 

Eisenach (1908) 71, 82, 222 

Elbe (1881) 82, 220 

Elysia (1873) 193 

Elysia (1908) 194 



Empire Brent (1925) 117 
Empire Fowey (1936) 265 
Empire Penryn (1912) 154 
Empire Waveney (1929) 127 
Empire Welland (1938) 145 
Empress of Asia (1913) 198, 240 
Empress of Australia (1914) 82, 176, 

198, 237 
Empress of Britain (1906) 82, 84, 198. 

244 
Empress of Britian (1931) 83, 199, 232, 

257 
Empress of Canada (1922) 83, 199, 235, 

258 

Empress of Canada (1928) 83, 199, 238 
Empress of China (1889) 197 
Empress of France (1913) 38, 83, 198, 

239 

Empress of India (1889) 197 
Empress of India (1908) 83, 131, 153, 

198 

Empress of India (1928) 84, 198, 238 
Empress of Ireland (1906) 83, 84, 198, 

244 

Empress of Japan (1890) 197 
Empress of Japan (1930) 199, 234, 257 
Empress of Russia (1913) 240 
Empress of Scotland (1905) 84, 107, 

198, 258 
Empress of Scotland (1930) 199, 233, 

234, 251 

Ems (1884) 11, 82, 84, 115, 221 
England (1865) 84, 89, 154, 218 
Entella (1883) 219 
Equita (1885) 205 
Erin (1864) 84, 218 
Ernst Moritz Arndt (1872) 97 
Erny (1904) 195 
Erny (1913) 196 

Erzherzog Franz Ferdinand (1899) 85 
Espagne (1909) 85, 207, 245 
Espana No. 4 (1895) 75 
Esperance Bay (1922) 246 
Estonia (1889) 85, 186 
Estonia (1912) 76, 85, 154 
Ethiopia (1873) 85, 193 
Etruria (1884) 11, 12, 14, 23, 85, 178, 

201, 252 

Eugenia (1906) 85, 195 
Euripides (1914) 242 
Europa (1847) 39, 60, 85, 136, 200 
Europa (1907) 53, 86, 116, 206, 216 
Europa (1930) 26, 27, 54, 86, 118, 223, 

231, 259 

Europe (1864) 86, 206 
Europe (1891) 129 
European (1866) 86, 191 
Evangeline (1900) 86, 119 
Excalibur (1930) 87 
Excambion (1931) 87 
Exeter (1931) 87 
Exochorde (1931) 87 
Experance Bay (1922) 246 



339 



Felix Roussel (1930) 239 

Ferdinand de Lesseps (1875) 87, 207 

Ferdinando Palasciano (1899) 108 

Figuig (1903) 207 

Finland (1902) 87, 110, 179, 224, 241 

Fivaller (1854) 66 

Flandre (1914) 88, 208 

Flandria (1922) 54 

Flavia (1902) 55, 60, 88, 202 

Florida (1903) 174 

Florida (1905) 88, 103, 119, 156, 181, 

217 

Florida (1926) 251 
Floride (1907) 207 
Folia (1907) 88, 151, 152, 202 
Forfar (1922) 132 
Formigny 79 
France (1867) 89, 218 
France (1912) 89, 208, 232, 256 
Francesca (1905) 62, 89, 195, 198 
Francesco Crispi (1866) 71 
Francis Y. Slanger (1927) 165 
Franconia (1873) 141 
Franconia (1911) 89, 112, 202, 237, 263 
Franconia (1923) 62, 89, 202, 203, 236, 

266 

Frankfurt (1869) 89, 220 
Frankfurt (1899) 90, 108, 222 
Franklin (1848) 90 
Frederik VIII (1913) 90, 225, 247 
Freedom (1894) 185 
Friedrich der Grosse (1896) 90, 109, 

221, 248 

Friedrichsruh (1905) 91 
Friesland (1889) 90, 224 
Frisia (1872) 90, 210 
Fulda (1882) 10, 11, 90, 142, 183, 221 
Fulda (1924) 90, 184, 223 
Furnessia (1880) 88, 91, 193 
Furst Bismarck (1905) 91, 163, 212 
Furst Bismark (1890) 15, 47, 72, 91, 

211, 252 

Fushimi Maru (1914) 250 
Fuso Maru (1908) 115 

Gaa (1890) 91, 163 

Gallia (1878) 11, 91, 196, 201 

Gallia (1883) 205 

Gallia (1913) 239 

Gandia (1907) 109 

Gange (1912) 106, 151 

Garbi (1879) 115 

Garibaldi (1906) 91, 181 

Geiser (1881) 91 

Gellert (1874) 91,211 

Gelria (1913) 245 

General Artigas (1923) 92, 185, 212 

General Chanzy (1891) 207 

General Duchesne (1903) 166 

General Mitre (1921) 212 

General Osorio (1929) 92, 213 

General San Martin (1922) 92, 175, 212 



General Von Steuben (1922) 92, 134 
172, 223, 247 

General W. C. Gorgas (1902) 153 

General Werder (1874) 220 

George Washington (1908) 92, 228, 232, 
258 

Georges Philippar (1930) 245 

Georgia (1873) 171 

Georgia (1908) 72, 92, 195, 200, 223 

Georgic (1895) 93, 229, 241 

Georgic (1932) 55, 93, 230, 232, 260 

Gera (1890) 76, 93, 107, 141, 173 221 

Gerania (1909) 93 

German (1877) 167 

Germania (1840) 35 

Germania (1903) 54, 93, 205 

Germanic (1874) 8, 55, 93, 97, 143, 228 

Gerolstein (1904) 93, 197 

Gerona (1911) 45, 94 

Gerty (1903) 94, 195, 199 

Giulia (1904) 94, 195, 199 

Giulio Cesare (1920) 81, 94, 215, 219 
236, 262 

Giuseppe Verdi (1915) 94 

Gneisenau (1903) 94, 159, 166, 222, 265 

Gneisenau (1935) 223, 235 

Goeben (1906) 94, 108, 159, 222 

Golden Fleece (1875) 114 

Gothic (1893) 94, 95, 229 

Gothland (1893) 94, 95, 224 

Gradisca (1913) 245 

Graf Bismarck (1871) 95, 220 

Graf Waldersee (1898) 95, 145, 151, 

211, 240 

Grampian (1907) 74, 95, 151 
Grant (1892) 130 
Great Britain (1843) 95 
Great Canton (1890) 35, 127 
Great Eastern (1858) 5, 95, 140, 233 
Great Northern (1915) 251 
Great Western (1838) 96 
Greater Buffalo (1923) 249 
Greater Detroit (1923) 249 
Grecian Monarch (1882) 96, 149 
Greece (1863) 96, 218 
Gregory Morch (1889) 134 
Gripsholm (1925) 96, 227, 242 
Grosser Kurfurst (1899) 96, 222, 241 
Guadeloupe (1906) 96, 207 
Guadeloupe (1908) 65, 251 
Guglielmo Pierce (1907) 74, 96 
Gulcemal (1874) 8, 93, 96, 143 

H. F. Alexander (1915) 251 

H. H. Meier (1892) 97, 122, 221 

Habana (1872) 97,225 

Habana (1923) 38, 97, 226 

Habsburg (1875) 97, 162, 220 

Hailar (1882^ 64 

Haiti (1913) 97, 123, 154, 208 

Halle (1895) 221 

Hamburg (1899) 97, 101, 108, 150, 211 



340 



Hamburg (1926) 97, 136, 213, 234, 262 

Hamilton (1868) 135 

Hammonia (1855) 52, 98, 210 

Hammonia (1867) 98, 210 

Hammonia (1882) 98,211 

Hancock 9 

Hannover (1869) 98, 220 

Hannover (1899) 98, 222 

Hanoverian (1902) 75, 125 

Hansa (1861) 98, 220 

Hansa (1899) 78, 98, 181, 212, 256 

Hansa (1923) 37, 98, 213, 234, 259 

Harrisburg (1889) 69 

Harry Lee (1931) 87 

Harvard (1888) 69 

Havel (1890) 37, 99, 126, 170, 221 

Haverford (1901) 99, 126, 192, 246 

Hawke 141 

Hecla (1860) 201 

Heian Maru (1930) 251 

Hekla (1884) 99, 225 

Helius (1889) 79, 160 

Hellig Olav (1902) 99, 143, 178, 225, 253 

Helvetia (1864) 99, 218 

Herder (1873) 91, 99, 211 

Hercules (1899) 49, 56, 60 

Hermann (1847) 99, 182 

Hermann (1865) 100, 220 

Hermann (1881) 100, 220 

Hermitage (1925) 73, 262 

Hesperia (1882) 193 

Hesperian (1908) 74, 95, 100, 192 

Hibernia (1843) 3, 4, 59, 100, 200 

Hibernia (1865) 100, 193 

Hibernian (1861) 100, 138, 191 

Highflyer (1897) 106 

Highland Brigade (1923) 248 

Highland Chieftain (1929) 248 

Highland Hope (1929) 248 

Highland Monarch (1928) 248 

Highland Patriot (1932) 248 

Highland Princess (1930) 248 

Hittfeld (1897) 104 

Hiye Maru (1930) 251 

Hobson Bay (1922) 246 

Hohenstaufen (1874) 100, 220 

Hohenzolern (1889) 101, 106, 221 

Holland (1858) 101, 118, 218 

Holsatia (1868) 101, 210, 212 

Homeric (1914) 12, 101, 203, 229, 232, 

259 

Hudson (1858) 53, 101, 184, 220 
Hudson (1899) 97, 101, *50 
Hudson (1904) 101, 207 
Hungarian (1858) 101, 191 
Huntegreen (1907) 77 
Huron (1896) 90 
Husimi Maru (1914) 250 
Huso Maru (1908) 115, 159 

Iberia (1928) 102, 121, 213 
Iberian (1867) 102 



Iberian (1900) 102 

Ida (1906) 102, 195 

Idaho (1869) 102, 209 

He de France (1926) 102, 208, 213, 257 

Iljitsch (1933) 61, 102 

Illinois (1873) 103, 140, 146, 192 

Ilsenstein (1904) 103, 197 

Imperator (1912) 50, 103, 212, 231, 257 

Imperatrice Eugenie (1864) 41, 103, 

183, 206 

Indian (1855) 61, 103, 191 
Indiana (1873) 103, 140, 146, 192 
Indiana (1905) 103, 119, 181, 217 
Infanta Isabel de Borbon (1913) ,104, 

156, 226 

Iniziativa (1881) 219 
Insulinde (1914) 49 
loannina (1897) 104, 209 
Ionian (1901) 104, 192 
Ionic (1902) 229, 254 
Iowa (1864) 193 
Irene (1905) 104, 181, 195 
Irishman (1899) 104, 204 
Iroquois (1894) 185 
Isla de Cuba (1888) 117 
Isla de Mindanao (1881) 226 
Isla de Panay (1882) 104, 226 
Island (1882) 104, 225 
Isnir (1874) 171 
Italia (1889) 211 
Italia (1903) 104, 193 
Italia (1905) 105, 216 
Italy (1868) 105, 218 
Iver Heath (1901) 114 
Ivernia (1900) 105, 165, 201, 238 

J. L. Luckenback (1886) 161 

Java (1865) 105, 201 

Jehangir (1890) 117 

Jelunga (1890) 48, 117, 164 

Jerousalim (1901) 118 

Jervis Bay (1922) 246 

Johan de Witt (1920) 252 

-lohan Van Oldenbarnevelt (1930) 238 

Johann Heinrich Burchardt (1920) 156 

John Ericsson (1928) 105, 110, 237, 263 

John Penn (1931) 87 

Joseph Hewes (1930) 87 

Joseph T. Dickman (1922) 151 

Joszef P. Pilsudski (1894) 51, 129 

Juan Sebastian Elcano (1928) 105, 121, 

123, 226 

Juliette (1897) 104 
Justicia (1917) 105, 172, 229, 232, 257 

Kaiser Franz Josef I (1912) 106, 151, 

195 

Kaiser Friedrich (1898) 106, 222 
Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse (1897) 17, 

18, 106, 107, 109, 222, 235, 256 
Kaiser Wilhelm II (1889) 101, 106, 109, 

221 



341 



Kaiser Wilhelm II (1903) 19, 22, 106, 

109, 222, 232, 255 
Kaiserin Auguste Victoria (1905) 84, 

107, 212, 233, 258 

Kaiserin Maria Theresa (1890) 107, 

170,221,246 

Kamakura Maru (1930) 241 
Karadeniz (1890) 76 
Karlesruhe (1889) 76, 93, 107, 141, 

173, 221 
Karlesruhe (1900) 53, 107, 149, 153, 

222, 247 

Kashima Maru (1913) 252 
Kasuga Maru (1940) 241 
Kate Dyer 167 
Katori Maru (1913) 254 
Kedar (1860) 201 
Kenilworth Castle (1904) 240 
Kensington (1894) 107, 169, 192 
Kerlew (1906) 181 
Kiautschou (1900) 108, 150, 151, 153, 

212 

Kigoma (1914) 38 
Kildonan Castle (1899) 246 
Kilpatrick (1890) 35, 126 
Kina (1889) 115 
Kinfauns Castle (1899) 246 
King Alexander (1896) 53, 73, 108, 209, 

243 

Kirby Hall 67 
Kleist (1906) 94, 108, 222 
Klopstock (1874) 108, 161, 207 
Knoxville (1895) 162 
Koln (1899) 90, 108, 222 
Koln (1921) 223 

Konig Albert (1899) 97, 108, 222 
Konig Friedrich Auguste (1906) 37, 

108, 132, 212 

Konig Wilhelm I (1870) 108, 220 
Konig Wilhelm II (1907) 109, 122 
Konigin Luise (1896) 82, 90, 109, 221, 

248 

Konigstein (1907) 109, 197 
Korea (1901) 242 
Korea Maru (1901) 242 
Kosciuszko (1915) 76, 109, 118, 210 
Kraljica Marija (1906) 250 
Kristianafjord (1913) 51, 109, 224, 251 
Kronprinz Friedrich Wilhelm (1871) 

220 
Kronprinz Wilhelm (1901) 19, 20, 21, 

22, 96, 107, 109, 235, 256 
Kronprinzessin Cecilie (1905) 212 
Kronprinzessin Cecilie (1906) 22, 23, 

107, 109, 232, 255 

Kroonland (1902) 87, 110, 179, 224, 241 
Kuban (1888) 15, 47 
Kungsholm (1902) 110, 137, 227 
Kungsholm (1928) 105, 110, 227, 237, 

263 
Kursk (1910) 110, 149 



L'Aquitaine (1890) 110, 138, 207, 254 

L'Atlantique (1931) 232, 257 

La Bourdonnais (1904) 110, 166, 207 

La Bourgogne (1886) 13, 110, 111, 207 

La Bretagne (1886) 13, 110, 111, 207 

La Champagne (1885) 13, 110, 111, 207 

La France (1865) 111, 206 

La Gascogne (1887) 13, 110, 111, 207 

La Lorraine (1899) 88, 111, 112, 207, 

240 

La Navarre (1892) 111, 207 
La Normandie (1882) 111, 207 
La Provence (1905) 112, 207, 236, 262 
La Savoie (1900) 111, 112, 240 
La Touraine (1891) 16, 112, 249 
Labrador (1865) 112, 139 
Labrador (1891) 112, 204 
Laconia (1912) 89, 112, 202, 237, 263 
Laconia (1922) 112, 162, 167, 202, 203 

236, 266 

Lafayette (1864) 113, 183, 206 
Lafayette (1915) 113, 126, 208 
Lafayette (1930) 113, 208, 239 
Lafayette (1933) 30, 138, 256 
Lahn (1887) 11, 113,221 
Lake Champlain (1874) 113, 196 
Lake Champlain (1900) 113, 114, 197 

198 

Lake Erie (1900) 113, 197, 198 
Lake Huron (1881) 114, 196 
Lake Manitoba (1880) 114, 115, 196 
Lake Manitoba (1901) 114, 197, 198 
Lake Megantic (1875) 114, 196 
Lake Michigan (1901) 114, 197, 198 
Lake Nepigon (1875) 114, 196 
Lake Ontario (1887) 114, 196 
Lake Simcoe (1884) 84, 115, 196 
Lake Superio i(1884) 115, 196 
Lake Winnipeg (1879) 114, 115, 196 
Lamoriciere (1921) 208 
Lancashire (1889) 115, 118, 186 
Lancastria (1922) 115, 177, 202. 203, 

242 

Lapland (1908) 115, 224, 236, 259 
Latvia (1908) 115, 159, 161 
Laura (1907) 38, 53, 86, 116, 195 
Laurentian (1872) 116, 149, 191 
Laurentic (1909) 116, 125, 229, 243 
Laurentic (1927) 116, 203, 230, 239 
Lazio (1899) 116, 144, 219 
Le Jeune (1936) 244 
Leasowe Castle (1917) 179 
Leerdam (1921) 81, 116, 120, 170, 214 
Leipzig (1869) 116, 220 
Leon XIII (1888) 117,226 
Leon XIII (1890) 117, 164, 226 
Leonardo da Vinci (1925) 117 
Leopoldina (1901) 52, 117, 174, 207 
Leopoldville (1929) 252 
Les Alpes (1882) 56 
Lessing (1874) 91, 117, 211 
Letimbro (1883) 219 



342 



Letitia (1912) 117, 165, 205 

Letitia (1925) 46, 117, 205, 247 

Leviathan (1914) 117, 179, 228, 231,257 

Liberte (1930) 27, 86, 118, 208, 231, 259 

Liguria (1901) 118, 219 

Liguria (1918) 125, 148 

Limburgia (1920) 156 

Lismore Castle (1891) 57 

Lithuania (1915) 76, 109, 118 

Lituania (1889) 115, 118 

Livonian (1881) 119 

Llandovery Castle (1914) 254 

Llanstephan Castle (1914) 253 

Loch Earn (1866) 181 

Logan (1892) 122 

Lombardia (1901) 118, 215, 219 

Lombardia (1920) 157, 237 

Lone Star State (1921) 150 

Loudoun Castle (1876) 123 

Louisiana (1858) 101, 118, 218 

Louisiana (1862) 119, 206 

Louisiane (1905) 207 

Louisville (1895) 161 

Loyalist (1901) 87, 119 

Lucania (1893) 17, 60, 88, 119, 201, 

237, 263 

Ludgate Hill (1881) 119, 191 
Luetzow (1908) 77, 119, 186, 222 
Luisiana (1906) 103, 119, 181, 217 
Lurline (1932) 236, 262 
Lusitania (1907) 22, 23, 24, 25, 119, 

124, 202, 232, 256 
Lutetia (1913) 239 
Lydian Monarch (1881) 120 

Maasdam (1871) 66, 120, 156, 213, 214 

Maasdam (1883) 182 

Maasdam (1921) 81, 116, 120, 170 

Macedonia (1904) 246 

Macedonia (1912) 120, 209 

Madawaska (1907) 109 

Madison (1886) 161 

Madonna (1905) 120, 206 

Madrid (1922) 120, 168, 223 

Magallanes (1861) 65 

Magallanes (1928) 105, 120, 123, 226 

Magdalena (1928) 102, 121, 213 

Main (1868) 121, 140, 220 

Main (1900) 121, 135, 158, 222, 253 

Majestic (1890) 16, 121, 175, 229, 240 

Majestic (1921) 52, 121, 203, 230, 231 

Maloja (1911) 243 

Maloja (1923) 236, 262 

Malolo (1927) 241 

Malwa (1908) 245 

Mamari (1904) 93 

Manchuria (1904) 237, 264 

Manhattan (1866) 121, 209 

Manhattan (1932) 122, 183, 228, 233, 

260 

Manila (1867) 168 
Manitoba (1892) 122, 124, 130, 194 



Manitoban (1865) 122, 191 
Manitou (1898) 122, 180, 194 
Manuel Arnus (1923) 122, 226 
Manuel Calvo (1892) 97, 122, 226 
Mantua (1909) 245 
Marathon (1860) 201 
Marathon (1903) 252 
Marburn (1900) 122, 177, 198, 253 
Marco Minghetti (1876) 123, 218 
Marco Polo (1912) 106, 151 
Marechal Gallieni (1901) 63 
Marglen (1898) 123, 166, 172, 198 
Maria Christina (1907) 74, 96 
Mariette Pacha (1925) 252 
Mariposa (1932) 236, 262 
Marloch (1904) 123, 181, 198 
Marmora (1903) 246 
Marne (1920) 41 

Marnix Van St. Aldegonde (1930) 238 
Marques de Comillas (1928) 105, 121, 

123, 226 

Marquette (1898) 52,123, 194 
Marrakech (1913) 97, 123, 208 
Martello (1884) 123 
Martha Washington (1908) 123, 195, 

200 

Martinique (1883) 124, 207 
Marvale (1907) 74, 124, 198, 254 
Massachusetts (1892) 122, 124, 130, 194 
Massilia (1891) 124,205 
Massilia (1902) 124, 193 
Massilia (1920) 239 
Mataroa (1922) 253 
Matatua (1904) 103 
Matsonia (1927) 241 
Matteo Bruzzo (1882) 216 
Maunalei (1921) 133 
Mauretania (1907) 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 

124, 119, 202, 232, 256 
Mauretania (1939) 124, 203, 232, 260 
Mayflower (1902) 75, 125, 204 
Meade (1875) 67 

Mecca (1874) 171 

Media (1847) 125, 203 

Medic (1899) 229, 243 

Medina (1873) 172 

Medina (1911) 243 

Megali Hellas (1914) 57, 120, 179, 209 

Megantic (1909) 116, 125, 229, 243 

Meknes (1913) 125, 154, 208 

Melita (1918) 125, 127, 198, 249 

Memphis (1871) 125 

Memphis (1890) 125, 194 

Mendoza (1904) 63, 126, 217 

Mentana (1868) 173, 185 

Menominee (1897) 37, 126, 194 

Mercury (1896) 49 

Merion (1902) 99, 126, 192, 246 

Metagama (1915) 126, 129, 198, 253 

Meteoro (1890) 37, 99, 126, 226 

Mexico (1876) 126, 225 

Mexique (1915) 113, 126, 208, 244 



343 



Michigan (1887) 126 

Michigan (1890) 35, 126, 194 

Michigan (1898) 194 

Michigan (1899) 104 

Miltiades (1903) 252 

Milwaukee (1897) 127, 133, 196, 198 

Milwaukee (1929) 127, 162, 213 

Minneapolis (1901) 127, 128, 129, 194, 

236, 264 
Minnedosa (1918) 125, 127, 148, 198, 

249 
Minnehaha (1900) 127, 128, 129, 194, 

236, 264 

Minnekahda (1917) 127, 195, 235, 263 
Minnesota (1866) 75, 128 
Minnesota (1901) 128, 195, 240 
Minnesota (1904) 235, 263 
Minnetonka (1902) 127, 128, 195, 236, 

264 
Minnetonka (1924) 128, 129, 195, 236, 

266 

Minnewaska (1894) 128, 194 
Minnewaska (1903) 43, 128, 195, 264 
Minnewaska (1909) 127, 128, 195, 236, 

264 
Minnewaska (1923) 128, 129, 195, 236, 

266 

Missanabie (1914) 129, 198, 253 
Mississippi (1848) 60 
Mississippi (1871) 129, 204 
Mississippi (1903) 129, 162, 195 
Missouri 76 
Mitau (1894) 51, 129 
Mobile (1891) 122, 124, 129, 130, 194 
Mobile (1908) 70, 130 
Mocambique (1889) 168 
Mohawk (1892) 122, 124, 130, 194 
Moldavia (1903) 248 
Moltke (1901) 52, 130, 148, 212, 247 
Monarch of Bermuda (1931) 242 
Mongolia (1903) 248 
Mongolia (1904) 237, 264 
Mongolia (1923) 242 
Mongolian (1891) 130, 191 
Monowai (1925) 253 
Montana (1872) 76, 130, 209 
Montcalm (1897) 130, 131, 196, 198 
Montcalm (1921) 130, 132, 198, 244 
Montclare (1922) 130, 132, 198, 244 
Monte Olivia (1924) 254 
Monte Pascoal (1930) 253 
Monte Rosa (1930) 253 
Monte Sarmiento (1924) 253 
Monteagle (1899) 131, 197, 198 
Monmouth (1898) 196 
Monterey (1897) 130, 131, 196, 198 
Monterey (1932) 236, 262 
Montevideo (1889) 131, 226 
Montezeuma (1899) 131, 134, 197, 198 
Montfort (1899) 131, 197, 198 
Monticello (1903) 22, 73, 107, 255, 262 
Montlaurier (1908) 83, 131, 153, 237 



Montnairn (1908) 83, 131, 153 

Montreal (1900) 132, 197, 198 

Montreal (1906) 37, 108, 132, 198 

Montrose (1897) 132, 196, 198 

Montrose (1922) 130, 132, 198, 244 

Montroyal (1906) 83, 132, 198, 244 

Montserrat (1889) 76, 132, 226 

Mooltan (1905) 248 

Mooltan (1923) 236 

Moraitis (1907) 132, 175, 209 

Moravia (1883) 133, 211 

Moravian (1863) 148 

Morea (1908) 245 

Moreas (1901) 72, 133, 209 

Moreton Bay (1921) 246 

Mosel (1872) 133, 140, 220 

Moskva (1867) 98 

Moskva (1890) 91 

Mount Carroll (1921) 133 

Mount Clay (1904) 133, 153 

Mount Clinton (1921) 133 

Mount Royal (1898) 127, 133, 197, 198 

Mount Temple (1901) 131, 133, 197, 198 

Mount Vernon (1906) 23, 109, 255, 260 

Mount Vernon (1933) 183 

Mount's Bay (1881) 100 

Mouzinho (1907) 96 

Mo we 93, 134 

MuenChen (1922) 92, 134, 172, 173, 

223, 247 

Munchen (1889) 79, 134, 221 
Munchen (1923) 37, 134, 141, 223 

Naldera (1918) 238 

Nantucket 141 

Napoleon III (1866) 134, 181, 206 

Napoletano (1873) 67 

Napoli (1899) 56, 134, 219 

Napoli (1907) 134, 163, 219 

Narkunda (1920) 238 

Nazario Sauro (1921) 135 

Nea Hellas (1922) 135, 177, 194, 242 

Nebraska (1867) 135, 209 

Neckar (1873) 135, 140, 220 

Neckar (1901) 121, 135, 158, 222 

Nederland (1873) 135, 179, 224 

Neptunia (1932) 200, 216, 241 

Nestor (1913) 240 

Neustria (1883) 135, 205 

Nevada (1868) 135, 209 

New England (1898) 136, 159, 166, 

204, 244 

New Rochelle (1899) 97, 101, 150 
New York (1858) 53, 101, 136, 184, 220 
New York (1888) 69, 88, 136, 144, 148, 

192, 246 

New York (1927) 97, 136, 213, 262, 234 
Newfoundland (1925) 136, 139, 208 
Newfoundland (1947) 208 
Niagara (1848) 39, 60, 85, 136, 200 
Niagara (1908) 136, 207 
Niagara (1913) 247 



344 



Nieuw Amsterdam (1906) 137, 213, 264 
Nieuw Amsterdam (1938) 137, 214, 232, 

260 

Nieuw Holland (1928) 245 
Nieuw Zeeland (1928) 245 
Nijni Novgorod (1857) 165 
Nitta Maru (1939) 241 
Nomadic (1891) 137, 174, 229 
Noordam (1902) 110, 137, 149, 213, 243 
Noordam (1939) 137, 214 
Noordland (1884) 137, 224 
Nord America (1882) 137, 216 
Norge (1881) 137, 225 
Norham Castle (1883) 124 
Normandie (1933) 29, 137, 208, 231, 256 
Normannia (1890) 15, 47, 72, 91, 110, 

138, 211, 254 

Norseman (1882) 138, 204 
Norseman (1897) 138 
North Briton (1858) 138, 191 
Northern Pacific (1915) 251 
Northland (1901) 128 
Norwegian (1861) 100, 138, 191 
Norwegian (1865) 138, 191 
Netting Hill (1881) 14, 69, 139 
Nouveau Monde (1865) 112, 139, 206 
Nova Scotia (1926) 136, 139, 208 
Nova Scotia (1947) 208 
Nova Scotian (1858) 139, 191 
Numidian (1891) 139, 191 
Nurnberg (1873) 220 
Nyassa (1906) 56 

Oaxaca (1883) 80 

Obdam (1880) 56, 139, 213 

Oceana (1891) 37, 139, 179, 211 

Oceania (1907) 139, 195 

Oceania (1909) 140, 170, 216 

Oceania (1933) 200, 216, 241 

Oceanic (1870) 7, 47, 49, 140, 156, 228 

Oceanic (1899) 140, 229, 232, 259 

Oder (1873) 140, 220 

Ohio (1869) 140, 220 

Ohio (1873) 103, 140, 146, 192 

Ohio (1923) 37, 134, 141, 142, 237 

Oldenburg (1890) 76, 93, 107, 141, 173, 

221 

Olinde-Rodrigues (1873) 141,207 
Olympia (1871) 141, 193 
Olympic (1911) 141, 176, 203, 229, 

231, 255 

Olympus (1860) 201 
Omar (1896) 82, 109, 248 
Orama (1912) 242 
Orama (1924) 235, 261 
Oranje (1939) 236, 266 
Orazio (1927) 216, 219 
Orbita (1915) 141, 142, 243 
Orca (1918) 58, 142, 243 
Orcades (1906) 153 
Orcades (1937) 234, 266 
Orcoma (1908) 251 



Orduna (1914) 142, 243 

Oregon (1883) 10, 11, 12, 142, 252 

(Guion Line) 
Oregon (1883) 142, 164, 204 

(Dominion Line) 
Orel (1890) 142 
Orford (1928) 235, 261 
Orien (1902) 153 
Orinoco (1928) 121,213 
Orion (1935) 234, 266 
Orione (1883) 143, 209, 219 
Ormeda (1913) 243 
Ormonde (1917) 238 
Ormuz (1914) 79 
Oronsay (1925) 235, 261 
Orontes (1902) 250 
Orontes (1929) 235, 261 
Oropesa (1920) 246 
Oroya (1923) 247 
Oreova (1909) 245 
Orvieto (1909) 245 

Oscar II (1901) 99, 143, 178, 225, 253 
Oslofjord (1938) 143, 224, 240 
Osterley (1909) 245 
Otranto (1909) 245 
Otranto (1925) 235, 261 
Otsegb (1902) 152 
Ottawa (1874) 93, 97, 143, 204 
Otway (1909) 245 
Ourcq (1920) 40 
Oxenholme (1865) 38 

P. Caland (1874) 143, 213 

P. de Satrustegui (1890) 143, 226 

Pacific (1849) 4, 44, 47, 48, 143, 199 

Palatia (1893) 143, 145, 148, 211 

Palermo (1899) 116, 144, 219 

Palermo (1907) 144, 163, 219 

Pallanza (1891) 211 

Palmyra (1866) 201 

Pan American (1921) 249 

Panama (1865) 60, 144, 206 

Panama (1875) 144, 225 

Panamanian (1904) 264 

Pannonia (1904) 144, 202 

Paris (1889) 144, 192 

Paris (1921) 28, 86, 118, 144, 208, 

232, 257 

Parisian (1881) 144, 191 
Parthia (1870) 145, 201 
Pasteur (1939) 233, 265 
Patria (1882) 145, 160, 205 
Patria (1893) 143, 145, 148, 211 
Patria (1913) 145, 154, 206 
Patria (1938) 145, 213, 237 
Patricia (1899) 95, 145, 151, 211, 241 
Patriota (1890) 138 
Patris (1909) 145, 200 
PaulLecat (1911) 251 
Pavonia (1882) 64, 146, 201 
Pellerin de Latoche (1913) 208 
Peninsular State (1922) 151 



345 



Pennland (1870) 146, 224 

Pennland (1922) 146, 149, 184, 197, 

224, 239 

Pennsylvania (1863) 146, 218 
Pennsylvania (1873) 103, 140, 146, 171, 

192 
Pennsylvania (1896) 95, 145, 146, 151, 

211 

Pennsylvania (1929) 238 
Pereire (1865) 134, 147, 206 
Perou (1907) 96, 147, 207 
Perseo (1883) 143, 219 
Persia (1856) 5, 147, 200 
Persia (1881) 74 
Persia (1894) 128, 147, 154, 211 
Persia Maru (1881) 74 
Persian Monarch (1880) 120, 147 
Persic (1899) 229, 243 
Perugia (1901) 147, 193 
Peruvian (1863) 148, 191 
Pesaro (1901) 130, 148, 217 
Pfalz (1893) 221 
Philadelphia (1889) 69, 136, 144, 148, 

192, 247 

Phoenicia (1894) 148, 211 
Pictavia (1883) 203 
Piemonte (1918) 127, 148 
Pieter Corneliszoon Hooft (1925) 248 
Pieter de Coninck (1881) 137 
Pilsudski (1935) 49, 148, 210 
Pisa (1896) 148,211 
Pittsburg (1888) 136 
Pittsburg (1922) 146, 149, 155, 230, 239 
Pobeda (1928) 102 
Pocahontas (1900) 53, 107, 149, 153 
Pocone (1908) 71 
Poland (1898) 194 
Polonia (1910) 110, 149, 210 
Polynesian (1872) 116, 149, 191 
Pomeranian (1882) 96, 149, 191 
Pommerania (1873) 149, 211 
Porthos (1914) 251 
Potomac (1901) 135 
Potsdam (1900) 137, 149, 173, 213, 244 
Potsdam (1935) 223, 236, 265 
President (1840) 150 
President Adams (1921) 252 
President Arthur (1900) 108, 150, 151, 

153 

President Cleveland (1921) 249 
President Coolidge (1931) 235, 262 
President Dal Piaz (1929) 208 
President Fillmore (1899) 97, 101, 150 
President Fillmore (1904) 264 
President Garfield (1921) 252 
President Grant (1907) 150, 157, 212, 

237, 263, 264 

President Grant (1921) 249 
President Harding (1921) 150, 151, 226, 

250 
President Harrison (1921) 252 



President Hayes (1920) 252 
President Hoover (1931) 236, 262 
President Jackson (1921) 250 
President Jefferson (1920) 250 
President Johnson (1904) 264 
President Lincoln (1907) 150, 212, 237, 

263 

President Lincoln (1921) 250 
President Madison (1921) 250 
President McKinley (1921) 250 
President Monroe (1920) 252 
President Pierce ((1921) 249 
President Polk (1921) 252 
President Roosevelt (1922) 106, 150, 

151, 228, 250 

President Taft (1921) 150, 249 
President Van Buren (1920) 252 
President Wilson (1921) 250 
Presidente Wilson (1912) 151, 200 
Pretoria (1887) 240 

Pretoria (1897) 95, 145, 151, 211 

Pretoria (1936) 244 

Pretoria Castle (1939) 239 

Pretorian (1900) 151, 192 

Preussen (1886) 151, 221 

Princess Matoika (1900) 108, 150, 151, 

153 
Principe di Piemonte (1907) 88, 151, 

152, 155, 217 

Principe di Udine (1908) 152, 176, 217 
Principe Umberto (1909) 80, 152, 219 
Principello (1907) 88, 151, 152 
Principessa Giovanna (1923) 215, 217 
Principessa Jolanda (1908) 152, 219 
Principessa Mafalda (1908) 152, 219 
Principessa Maria (1923) 215, 217 
Prinz Adalbert (1902) 152, 153, 212 
Prinz Eitel Friedrich (1902) 152, 212 
Prinz Eitel Friedrich (1904) 133, 153, 

222 
Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm (1908) 83, 131, 

153, 223, 237 

Prinz Ludwig (1906) 153, 222 
Prinz Oskar (1902) 152, 153, 212 
Prinz Sigismund (19021 153, 212 
Prinz Sigismund (1903) 153, 222 
Prinz Waldemar (1903) 222 
Prinzess Alice (1900) 108, 150, 151, 153, 

222, 247 
Prinzess Irene (1900) 53, 107, 108, 149, 

153, 222, 247 

Prinzessin Victoria Luise (1901) 154, 

212 

Professor Woermann (1903) 174 
Provence II (1905) 112 
Providence (1915) 145, 154, 206, 250 
Provincia di San Paolo (1868) 173, 185 
Prussia (1894) 79, 154, 211 
Puerto Rico (1913) 125, 154, 208 
Pulaski (1912) 76, 85, 154, 210 
Pulawski (1906) 102 



346 



Queen, The (1864) 154, 218 

Queen Elizabeth (1940) 32, 33, 34, 154, 

203,231, 259 
Queen Mary (1935) 31, 32, 33, 155, 202, 

203,231,256 
Queen of Bermuda (1933) 242 

Rajputana (1926) 244 

Ranch! (1925) 244 

Rangitane (1929) 246 

Rangitata (1929) 246 

Rangitiki (1929) 246 

Ranpura (1925) 244 

Rapido (1889) 72 

Ravenn (1901) 219 

Rawalpindi (1925) 244 

Razmak (1925) 253 

Re d' Italia (1907) 151, 155, 217 

Re Vittorio (1907) 155, 219 

Regina (1900) 113 

Regina (1918) 149, 155, 184, 230, 239 

Regina di Italia (1907) 151, 155, 217 

Regina Elena (1907) 155, 219 

Regina Margherita (1884) 156, 219 

Reina Del Pacifico (1931) 242 

Reina Maria Cristina (1888) 37, 156, 

226 
Reina Victoria Eugenia (1913) 44, 104, 

156, 226 

Reliance (1920) 156, 157, 212, 237 
Remo (1927) 216 
Republic (1871) 47, 49, 66, 120, 140, 

156, 228 

Republic (1883) 182 
Republic (1900) 72, 88, 156, 229, 237 
Republic (1907) 150, 157, 228, 237, 263, 

264 

Resolute (1920) 156, 157, 212, 237 
Revenge 18, 60 
Rex (1932) 28, 29, 73, 157, 216, 219, 

231,259 

Rey Alfonso (1897) 130 
Rhaetia (1883) 157, 160, 211 
Rhaetia (1904) 157, 212 
Rhein (1868) 140, 158, 220 
Rhein (1899) 121, 135, 158, 174, 222, 

252 

Rhyna (1879) 158 
Rhynland (1879) 50, 158, 224 
Richmond Hill (1882) 159 
Rijndam (1901) 137, 149, 213, 243 
Rimutaka (1923) 242 
Rion (1898) 169 
Robert Ley (1939) 235, 265 
Rochambeau (1911) 158, 208, 241 
Roland (1893) 221 
Roma (1902) 158, 205 
Roma (1926) 47, 158, 215, 219, 233, 260 
Roman (1884) 158, 204 
Romanic (1898) 136, 159, 166, 229, 244 
Romolo (1926) 215 
Roon (1903) 94, 159, 166, 222 



Rossija (1908) 115, 159, 161 
Rotomahana (1879) 56 
Rotorua (1911) 247 
Rotterdam (1886) 55, 159, 213 
Rotterdam (1897) 57, 81, 159, 213 
Rotterdam (1908) 159, 213, 234, 261 
Roumania (1881) 193 
Roumanian (1882) 159, 191 
Roussillon (1906) 94, 159, 207 
Royal Edward (1908) 159, 160, 247 
Royal George (1907) 160, 247 
Royal William (1838) 160 
Ruahine (1891) 43 
Rugia (1882) 145, 160, 211 
Rugia (1905) 160, 212 
Runic (1889) 160 
Runic (1900) 229, 243 
Russ (1887) 11, 113 
Russ (1890) 170 
Russia (1867) 6, 160, 183, 201 
Russia (1889) 76, 180, 211 
Russia (1908) 115, 159, 161 
Russia (1938) 145, 237 
Ruys (1936) 245 

Saale (1886) 11, 38, 161, 177, 221 

Saarbrucken (1923) 70 

Sabaudo (1941) 173, 261 

Sachsen (1886) 161, 221 

St. Germain (1874) 108, 161, 207 

Saint Laurent (1866) 161, 206 

Saint Laurent (1905) 161, 207 

St. Louis (1895) 148, 161, 192, 245 

St. Louis (1929) 127, 162, 213, 244 

St. Paul (1895) 162, 192, 245 

Salier (1875) 97, 162, 220 

Samaria (1868) 162, 168, 201 

Samaria (1921) 113, 162, 167, 202, 203, 

236, 265 

Samland (1903) 129, 162, 224 
San Augustin (1882) 226 
San Fernando (1891) 48, 178 
San Gennaro (1917) 71, 163 
San Giorgio (1886) 163 
San Giorgio (1907) 134, 163 
San Giovanni (1907) 144, 163 
San Guglielmo (1911) 163 
San Guisto (1890) 91, 163, 199 
San Ignacio Loyola (1867) 225 
Sannio (1899) 56, 134, 163, 215, 219 
Sant' Anna (1910) 163, 206 
Santa Barbara (1889) 160 
Santarem (1908) 82 
Santiago (1890) 117, 164, 226 
Santiago (1901) 119 
Santo Domingo (1877) 164, 225 
Saragossa (1874) 164, 201 
Sardegna (1923) 164, 168 
Sardnian (1875) 164, 191 
Sarmatian (1871) 164, 191 
Siarnia (1882) 142, 164, 204 
Saturnia (1910) 117, 165 



347 



Saturnia (1927) 165, 182, 200, 205, 216, 

236, 265 

Savoia (1897) 165, 216 
Saxon (1900) 240 
Saxonia (1857) 165, 210 
Saxonia (1900) 105, 165, 202, 238 
Scandia (1889) 165, 211 
Scandinavian (1898) 136, 159, 166, 192, 

244 
Scharnhorst (1904) 94, 110, 159, 166, 

222 

Scharnhorst (1935) 223, 235, 265 
Schiller (1872) 166, 211 
Schleswig (1903) 166, 222 
Scot (1891) 246 
Scotia (1862) 6, 166, 201 
Scotia (1889) 166, 193 
Scotian (1898) 123, 166, 172, 192, 250 
Scotian (1907) 150 
Scotland (1865) 167, 218 
Scotstoun (1925) 58, 167 
Scythia (1875) 52, 167, 201 
Scythia (1920) 113, 162, 167, 202, 203, 

236, 266 

Sedgwick (1873) 65, 67 
Semiramis (1895) 167 
Sepione (1877) 167, 218 
Servia (1881) 11, 167, 201, 250 
Seydlitz (1903) 168, 222 
Shakespeare (1886) 163 
Sheridan (1892) 124 
Sherman (1891) 129 
Shinyo Maru (1911) 241 
Shropshire (1911) 247 
Sibajak (1927) 252 
Siberia (1867) 162, 168, 201 
Siberia (1901) 242 
Siberia Maru (1901) 242 
Siberian (1884) 168, 191 
Sicilia (1871) 129 
Sicilia (1923) 70 
Sicilian (1899) 74, 168, 192 
Sicilian Prince (1889) 168 
Sierra Cordoba (1913) 223 
Sierra Cordoba (1923) 168, 223 
Sierra Morena (1924) 223 
Sierra Nevada (1912) 223 
Sierra Nevada (1922) 120, 168, 223 
Sierra Salvada (1912) 223 
Sierra Ventana (1912) 223 
Sierra Ventana (1923) 164, 168, 223 
Silesia (1869) 168, 210 
Sinaia (1924) 77, 169, 206 
Sirio (1883) 143, 169, 219 
Sirius (1838) 169 
Slamat (1924) 251 
Slavonia (1903) 169, 202, 251 
Smolensk (1898) 169 
Sobieski (1939) 65, 169, 210 
Sofia (1905) 169, 200 
Sofia Hohenberg (1905) 169, 195 
Solglimt (1900) 149, 173 



Somme (1920) 40 
Sophocles (1922) 253 
Southern Cross (1921) 250 
Southland (1900) 179 
Southwark (1893) 108, 169, 192 
Spaarndam (1881) 43, 81, 170, 213 
Spaarndam (1922) 116, 120, 170, 214 
Spain (1871) 82, 170, 218 
Spree (1890) 99, 107, 170, 221, 246 
Stad Haarlem (1875) 87 
Stampalia (1909) 140, 170, 216 
Starstad 84 

State of Alabama (1873) 170, 227 
State of California (1891) 170, 171, 191 
State of Florida (1881) 171, 227 
State of Georgia (1873) 171, 227 
State of Indiana (1874) 171, 227 
State of Louisiana (1872) 171, 227 
State of Nebraska (1880) 171, 191, 227 
State of Nevada (1874) 171, 172, 227 
State of Pennsylvania (1873) 171, 227 
State of Virginia (1873) 172, 227 
Statendam (1898) 123, 166, 172, 213, 

250 
Statendam (1917) 105, 172, 214, 231, 

257 

Statendam (1929) 172, 214, 257 
Stavangerfjord (1918) 172, 224, 246 
Steuben (1922) 92, 134, 172, 223 
Stirling Castle (1882) 137 
Stirling Castle (1935) 232, 265 
Stockholm (1900) 149, 173, 227, 244 
Stockholm (1941) 173, 227, 234, 261 
Stockholm (1947) 173, 227 
Strassburg (1872) 173, 220 
Strathaird (1931) 234, 258 
Strathallan (1938) 234, 265 
Stratheden (1938) 234, 265 
Strathmore (1935) 234, 265 
Strathnaver (1932) 235, 258 
Stura (1883) 219 
Stuttgart (1889) 76, 93, 107, 141, 173, 

221 

Stuttgart (1923) 134, 173, 223, 247 
Sud America (1868) 173, 185, 216 
Sueh (1907) 74, 96 
Suevia (1874) 174, 211 
Suevic (1901) 229, 243 
Suffren (1901) 52, 117, 174, 207 
Sultan (1867) 65 
Supply (1873) 103 
Susan (1891) 57 
Susan II (1891) 57 
Susquehanna (1899) 158, 174 
Swakopmund (1903) 174, 212 
Switzerland (1874) 174, 179, 224 
Sylvania (1895) 61, 174,201 

Tacoma (1870) 49 
Tainui (1884) 46, 74 
Taiseiyo Maru (1905) 62 
Taiyo Maru (1911) 241 



348 



Tamaroa (1922) 253 

Tampican (1889) 160 

Taormina (1908) 42, 174, 180, 217, 219 

Tara (1890) 143 

Tarifa (1865) 201 

Taroba (1888) 117 

Tatsuta Maru (1929) 241 

Tauric (1891) 137, 174, 229 

Tempest (1855) 193 

Tennyson (1900) 87 

Ttenyo Maru (1908) 241 

Terek (1889) 72 

Teresa (1900) 175, 195 

Teutonia (1856) 175, 210 

Teutonic (1889) 16, 121, 175, 229, 240 

Thanmore (1867) 66 

The Queen (1864) 154, 218 

Thekla (1895) 221 

Themistocles (1907) 132, 175, 209 

Themistocles (1911) 253 

Theodor (1861) 65 

Thessaloniki (1890) 175, 209 

Thingvalla (1874) 175, 225 

Thuringia (1870) 175, 210 

Thuringia (1922) 92, 175, 185, 212 

Timgad (1911) 175, 208 

Tirpitz (1914) 82, 176, 212 

Titanic (1911) 62, 141, 176, 229, 231, 

256 

Toledo (1914) 38 

Tomaso di Savoia (1907) 152, 176,217 
Tonquin (1866) 69 
Toronto (1880) 176, 204 
Tortona (1909) 48, 176 
Tours (1920) 40 
Toyen Maru (1905) 104 
Transylvania (1914) 176, 177, 202, 244 
Transylvania (1925) 58, 177, 194, 242 
Tras-os-Montes (1906) 56 
Trave (1886) 11, 38, 161 r 177, 221 
Trentham Hall (1876) 126 
Trier (1898) 222 
Trinacria 12 
Trinidad (1872) 77, 201 
Trojan (1867) 193 
Tubantia (1913) 245 
Tunisian (1900) 122, 177, 192, 253 
Tuscania (1915) 176, 177, 194, 244 
Tuscania (1922) 59, 135, 177, 194, 242 
Tyrrhenia (1922) 115, 177, 202 

U. S. Grant (1907) 109 

Ultonia (1898) 178, 201, 254 

Ulysses (1913) 240 

Umbria (1884) 11, 12, 14, 85, 178, 201, 

252 

Union (1866) 220 
United Kingdom (1857) 178, 193 
United States (1903) 99, 143, 178, 225, 

253 



Uraguay (1928) 239 
Ural i" 



(1890) 107, 170 



Uranium (1891) 48, 178 
Uruguay (1913) 44, 104, 226 
Utopia (1874) 178, 193 

Vancouver (1883) 68, 178, 204 

Vancouver (1884) 204 

Vandyck (1921) 251 

Vasco Nunez de Balboa (1891) 37, 139, 

178, 226 

Vasilefs Constantinos (1914) 57, 120, 

179, 209 

Vasilissa Sophia (1917) 179 
Vaterland (1873) 179, 224 
Vaterland (1900) 87, 110, 179, 224, 240 
Vaterland (1914) 103, 118, 179, 212, 

231,257 

Vedic (1918) 180, 230 
Veendam (1873) 49, 180 
Veendam (1923) 180, 182, 213, 214, 243 
Venezia (1907) 180, 206 
Venezuela (1905) 44, 53 
Verona (1908) 42, 174, 180, 219 
Versailles (1882) 98 
Vesta 5 

Vestris (1912) 51 
Viceroy of India (1929) 238 
Victoria (1872) 58, 145, 180, 193 
Victoria (1898) 37, 122, 180 
Victoria (1931) 251 
Victoria Luise (1899) 19, 78, 98, 181, 

212, 256 

Victorian (1904) 123, 181, 192, 249 
Ville d' Alger (1890) 207 
Ville d'Alger (1935) 208 
Ville d' Anvers (1920) 40 
Ville d' Arlon (1920) 41 
Ville de Bourdeaux (1870) 206 
Ville de Brest (1870) 207 
Ville de Bruges (1921) 150 
Ville de Gand (1920) 40 
Ville de Hasselt (1920) 41 
Ville de Liege (1920) 40 
Ville de Mons (1920) 40 
Ville de Namur (1920) 40 
Ville d' Oran (1936) 208 
Ville de Paris (1866) 206 
Ville de St. Nazaire (1883) 207 
Ville de Tunis (1884) 207 
Ville du Havre (1866) 134, 181, 206 
Viminale (1925) 215 
Vincenzo Florio (1880) 181, 183, 218 
Virgilio (1927) 219 
Virginia (1863) 96, 218 
Virginia (1906) 91, 103, 119, 181, 195, 

217 

Virginia (1928) 238 
Virginian (1905) 80, 181, 192, 249 
Virginie (1907) 207 
Vittoria (1871) 66, 120, 156 
Vladimir (1895) 182 
Volendam (1922) 180, 182, 214, 243 
Voltaire (1923) 251 



349 



Volturno (1906) 182 

Von Steuben (1901) 109, 256 

Vulcania (1928) 165, 200, 216, 236, 265 

Waesland (1867) 183, 224 
Wakefield (1932) 122, 233, 260 
Walmer Castle (1902) 240 
Waroonga (1914) 251 
Warwick Castle (1931) 234, 260, 265 
Washington (1847) 99, 182 
Washington (1863) 14, 183, 206 
Washington (1880) 181, 183, 218 
Washington (1890) 35, 127 
Washington (1933) 122, 183, 228, 233, 

260 

Weimar (1891) 183, 221 
Welshman (1891) 
Werkendam (1881) 183, 213 
Werra (1882) 11, 90, 183, 220 
Werra (1922) 90, 184, 223 
Weser (1858) 53, 101, 220 
Weser (1867) 184, 220 
Weser (1922) 90, 184, 223 
West Point (1940) 39, 261 
Western World (1921) 249 
Westmount (1891) 57 
Westerdam (1946) 184, 214 
Westernland (1884) 184, 224 
Westernland (1918) 155, 184, 197, 224, 

239 

Westmount (1891) 57 
Westphalia (1868) 173, 185, 210 
Westphalia (1923) 92, 185, 175, 212 



Wieland (1874) 91, 185, 211 

Wilbo (1894) 51 

Wilhelm Gustloff (1938) 234, 265 

Willehad (1894) 185, 221 

William O'Swald (1920) 157 

William Penn (1866) 86 

Winchester Castle (1930) 235, 261, 265 

Windhuk (1936) 244 

Windsor Castle (1920) 233, 256, 260 

Winifredian (1899) 78, 185, 243 

Winnipeg (1918) 208 

Wisconsin (1870) 185, 186, 209 

Wittekind (1894) 185, 221 

Wittenberg (1895) 221 

Wyandotte (1894) 185 

Wyoming (1870) 185, 186, 209 

Yale (1889) 69 

Yamato Maru (1915) 252, 94 
Yamuna (1903) 169 
Yasukuni Maru (1930) 252 
Yawata M*mi (1939) 241 
Yorck (1906) 77, 119, 186, 222 
Yorkshire (1889) 85, 186 
Yoshino Maru (1906) 108 
Ypiranga (1908) 45, 74, 186, 212 

Zaandam (1939) 137, 186, 214 

Zeeland (1865) 105, 187, 224 

Zeeland (1901) 87, 110, 128, 179, 187, 

224, 240 

Zepplelin (1914) 187, 223 
Zieten (1902) 168, 187, 222 



350