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Full text of "Treasure island, "the magic city," 1939-1940; the story of the Golden gate international exposition"

TREASURE ISLAND 

1939 - I94o 



-%- - 




34 



THE MAGIC CITY 



In the Court of the Seven Seas rhythm of tremendous scale 
was obtained by the equal spacing of sixteen sixty-foot pylons 
along its sides. Crowning these pylons were perched prows of 
galleons, each graced with a w r inged figure representing the Spirit 
of Adventure, the work of P. O. Tognelli. "Creation," a group 
by Haig Patigian, was in the center of this court. 

High up on the walls, between these major motifs, were 
spaced a trilogy of sculptural panels by Tognelli depicting "Ex- 
ploration," "Trade" and "Commerce." Other bas-relief work by 
Tognelli in this court included "Discovery," "Flying Cloud" at 
the side entrances, and "Treasure of the Seven Seas." Edstrom's 
"Florence Nightingale" stood before the Hall of Science. 

At the northern terminus of the Fair's main axis was the 
Court of Pacifica, designed by Timothy L. Pflueger. An out- 
standing artistic achievement in this court was a huge bold relief 
mural, "The Peacemakers," done by Margaret, Helen and Esther 
Bruton, emphasizing the Fair's underlying motif, Pacific peace 
and unity. 

The great panel was 144 feet long and 57 feet in height, and 

was done in 270 separate panels, 
each four by eight feet. The entire 
mural covered a space of more than 
8,000 square feet. 

The mural was an artistic hybrid 

a cross between sculpture and 
painting. Color was used, but only 
in large, simple areas. The Brutons 
used bold relief technique because 
it gave a strong light and dark pat- 
tern without destroying the feeling 
of the wall. 

The central figures of "The 
Peacemakers" were a great Buddha 

calm, pacific and an Occidental 
woman, kneeling, swathed in a 
white cowled robe. Friezes of mov- 



Sunlit pool hi upper 
reaches of beautiful 
Lagoon of Nations 




35 



ing figures on either side represented the Orient and the Occi- 
dent, respectively. 

A shimmering, scintillating "prayer curtain" of metal hung 
as a back-drop behind Ralph Stackpole's "Pacifica." Approxi- 
mately 100 feet high and 48 feet wide, the curtain, like the metal- 
lic curtains in Oriental temples, gave off melodious sounds as it 
fluttered gently in the breeze. 

One of the loveliest fountains of the Exposition was located 
in this Court, to the east of the Western Gateway (Architect, 
Ernest E. Weihe) , the entrance opposite the main ferry termi- 
nal with its elephants and howdahs designed by Donald Macky. 

Surrounding the sunken basin of this fountain, on the foun- 
tain itself, were pieces of sculpture fashioned by well known 
artists. Here, expressing the broad Pacific theme of the Exposi- 
tion, were Jacques Schnier's male and female figures, "The 
Orient," symbolizing the quiet, inward-looking spirit of India; 
Brents Carleton's Polynesian group; Adaline Kent's group sym- 
bolic of the islands of the South Pacific, young girls in the sun 
listening to a young man improvising music; Sargent Johnson's 
happy Inca Indians playing the 
Pipes of Pan; Carl George's Ameri- 
can Indian and Modern Women; a 
North American group by Ruth 
Cravath Wakefield Alaskan Boy 
Spearing a Fish, American Woman, 
and Mexican Boy; a South Ameri- 
can group by Cecilia Graham of a 
Primitive Woman Making Farina, 
A South American Fisherman, and 
a Young Native Riding an Alliga- 
tor; and a group of Chinese Musi- 
cians by Helen Phillips. 

Movement and life predominated 
here. From the base of the towering 
figure of Pacifica a cascade of water 
flowed into the fountain. Colored 



Splendor of Tower 
of the Sun as seen 
from East-West axis 




From the collection of the 

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Prefinger 
library 



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San Francisco, California 
2006 



BttMONT ABBEY COLLEGE LIBRARY 
BELMONT, NORTH CAROLINA 












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TREASURE ISLAND 



1939-1940 



TREASURE ISLAND 



rr rr i 

1 h 



e Hlacjic 



THE STORY OF THE 

GOLDEN GATE INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 
By JACK JAMES and EARLE WELLER 




PISANI PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



4A 






COPYRIGHT 1941 

by 
PISANI PRINTING AND PUBLISHING Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



DEDICATION 

To THE FORGOTTEN MAN OR WOMAN (we tried to remember all) 
... to the overlooked event or day (there were so very many) . . . 
to the few who conceived, the scores who planned, the hundreds 
who administered, the thousands who executed, the millions who 
made the Magic City on Treasure Island ... to memories of light 
and laughter ... beauty transcending imagination . . . singing 
strings and flowers nodding in the sunshine . . . the editors 
humbly dedicate this book. 



A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: 
Its loveliness increases; it will never 
Pass into nothingness: 

JOHN KEATS (1795-1821) 



FOREWORD 

THE INSPIRATION of this book is obvious. It springs from memo- 
ries of breath-taking beauty that can never die. 

The reason for its preparation is equally clear. It was only 
fitting and proper that a permanent record of a dream that bur- 
geoned into glorious fruition should have been created. 

The task of research and preparation was delegated to two 
men in whom the management of the Golden Gate International 
Exposition of 1939 and 1940 had implicit confidence Jack 
James, Director of Publicity and Promotion for 1940, and Earle 
Weller, Manager of the Magazine Division the same year. These 
two men knew the picture and appreciated it. They had the facts 
in hand, could secure full check on details. They have done their 
work, and done it well. 

Mr. G. Pisani, head of the Pisani Printing and Publishing 
Company of San Francisco, had close contact with the 1940 Fair 
through his interest in one of its outstanding attractions, the Sa- 
lici Puppets. Mr. Pisani offered to underwrite publication costs 
of this volume, when the Exposition Company was unable to 
undertake that responsibility. The caliber of his contribution is 
apparent. The book speaks for itself. 

When it was finally determined to sponsor the publication 
of this permanent record of Treasure Island, 1939 and 1940, a 
supervisorial committee was chosen, which included, among 
others, Leland W. Cutler, President of the 1939 Fair; Marshall 
Dill, President in 1940 and George Creel, United States Com- 
missioner for both years. This committee has checked and passed 
upon all factual data. 

The theme of this history of the birth and growth of an idea 
might be well summarized in the following extracts from the 
closing addresses of the two Presidents of the Exposition, one on 
October 29, 1939, and the other on September 29, 1940 



. 

"The Golden Gate International Exposition was the dream 
of many states and cities and counties, and boys and girls and 
men and women. Lights are made by men in beauty and last for 
just a little while. Memories come from God and live forever. So 
will our memories of this beauty live until Time's End!" 

LELAND W. CUTLER, 

President of the 1939 Exposition, in 
his closing address, October 29, 1939. 



"Yesterday's bright version of Treasure Island today becomes 
an enduring memory. To have added another chapter to San 
Francisco's prismatic history is something in which we can all 
take pride. 'A thing of beauty is a joy forever: Its loveliness in- 
creases; it will never Pass into nothingness:' . . . 'The feast is over 
and the lamps expire!' ' 

MARSHALL DILL, 

President of the 1940 Exposition, in 
his closing address, September 29, 1940. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

THE EDITORS desire to express their appreciation for the cooperation of 
the various official agencies in the preparation of this volume; to the Gen- 
eral Electric Company and E. T. "Buck" Harris, of KGEI, for the use of 
the color plates of the night lighting made up from photographs by Moulin 
Studios; to Ted Huggins, of Standard Oil Co., Chairman of the Promotion 
Committee for factual material; and to Mrs. Alfred McLaughlin and Mrs. 
Frank Panter for information on the women's events at the Fair; to Leland 
Cutler, Marshall Dill and George Creel for advice and encouragement. 

Authorities consulted for factual material, apart from guide books, 
catalogues of the Thorne Miniature Rooms and the Art Exhibits of '39 and 
'40, were as follows: 

Robert B. Hoover Business Aspects of the Preparations for the Golden 
Gate International Exposition. Master's Thesis. Stanford, 1939. 

Eugen Neuhaus The Art of Treasure Island. University of California 
Press, 1939. 

Stanley Armstrong Hunter, Temple of Religion and Tower of Peace. 
San Francisco, 1939, 1940. 

University of California Science in the Service of Man. University of 
California Press, 1940. 

California Commission Report to Governor Olson, 1941. 

U. S. Commission - Your America. The Story of the United States Gov- 
ernment Exhibit at the Golden Gate International Exposition, 
1939. 

International Business Machines Corp. Contemporary Art of the United 
States, 1940. 

Most of the illustrations included here are from photographs by 
George Grau, of San Francisco. Others are by Moulin, Bates Creel, Elmer 
Eckhardt and members of the Exposition photographic staff directed by 
Carl Wallen. 



CHAPTER PAGE 

Foreword . vii 

I. How It Began 3 

II. An Island is Built 17 

III. The Magic City 25 

IV. Beauty and Color 41 

V. Let There Be Light! 55 

VI. Government on Parade 69 

VII. California Presents 81 

VIII. Show Window of the States 93 

IX. Friends from Abroad 99 

X. The Market Place 121 

XI. Old Masters and Art in Action 133 

XII. Science and Service to Man 143 

XIII. The Women's Role 159 

XIV. Pageantry and Song 179 

XV. Street of the Barkers 209 

XVI. Gala Days of '39 . 215 

XVII. The Months Between 245 

XVIII. The Golden Forties 259 

XIX. And the World Came 279 

XX. The Curtain Falls 287 

Appendix 311 



Illustrations in Color 



ELEPHANT TOWERS AT NIGHT ON 

WESTERN WALLS OF EXPOSITION 187 

CADORIN'S "EVENING STAR" IN 

COURT OF THE MOON, NIGHT SCENE 153 

FLUORESCENT ILLUMINATION OF 

THE TOWER OF THE SUN 51 

SOUTH TOWER, ENTRANCE TO HOMES AND 

GARDENS BUILDING, UNDER FLOOD LIGHTS 255 

STACKPOLE'S "PACIFICA" 

AND HER COURT, AT NlGHT 221 

ARCH OF TRIUMPH AND THE 

COURT OF REFLECTIONS 119 

NIGHT SCENE, GOLDEN GATE 

INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 85 

GIRL AND RAINBOW FOUNTAIN, 

IN THE COURT OF FLOWERS. , 289 



Illustrations in Black and White 



OAKLAND-SAN FRANCISCO BAY BRIDGE 

AND THE SKYLINE OF SAN FRANCISCO ................ 9 

LOOKING DOWN FROM THE TOWER OF THE SUN ON 

THE COURT OF THE MOON AND TREASURE GARDEN ..... 27 

THE COURT OF PACIFICA, WITH THE "FOUNTAIN 

OF WESTERN WATERS" IN THE FOREGROUND .......... 37 

THE COURT OF THE MOON AND STARS, 

DESIGNED BY THE LATE GEORGE W. KELHAM ......... 43 

THE CALIFORNIA AUDITORIUM, HOME OF THE 

FOLIES BERGERE, ON THE LAKE OF NATIONS .......... 48 

GIRL AND RAINBOW FOUNTAIN 

IN THE COURT OF FLOWERS ........................ 57 

FEDERAL BUILDING FROM THE TEMPLE 

COMPOUND ACROSS THE LAKE OF NATIONS ........... 71 

PACIFIC HOUSE, THE THEME 

BUILDING OF THE EXPOSITION ..................... 109 

THE TOWER OF THE SUN, 

DESIGNED BY ARTHUR BROWN, JR ................... 138 

THE YERBA BUENA CLUB, WOMEN'S 

HEADQUARTERS ON TREASURE ISLAND ............... 159 

SCENES FROM A. L. VOLLMAN'S 

"CAVALCADE," EXPOSITION THEME SHOW. ... ........ 184 

ASCAP STARS ON COLISEUM 

STAGE AT 1940 FAIRCMOU//H Photo) .................... 196 

CANDID CAMERA SHOTS ON 

THE GAYWAY (George Gran Photos) ..................... 212 

Jo Jo, THE CLOWN, AND ONE OF His 

JUVENILE PERFORMERS(George Gran Photo) .............. 275 




CHAPTER I 



IN THE BEGINNING there was an idea, an idea to celebrate in some 
fitting manner the completion of the two San Francisco Bay 
Bridges, one the longest single suspension span in the world, 
and the other the largest structure of its kind in the history 
of man. The idea took form in the proposal for an Exposition, 
a World's Fair in keeping with the magnitude of the projects 
it was to celebrate. 

In February, 1933, the "Pulse of the Public" column of the 
San Francisco News carried a letter signed by Joseph Dixon, who 
suggested that a World's Fair be held to commemorate the com- 
pletion of the two bay spans. A few days later the News pub- 
lished an editorial cartoon on the subject. 

For a time the suggestions were forgotten in the days of 
financial crisis, but the idea would not die. On May 3, 1933, the 
newspapers carried a story that the Chamber of Commerce was 
investigating the feasibility of holding a World's Fair and on 
May 18, John Shea, of the San Francisco Convention and Tour- 
ist Bureau, announced that his organization would confer with 



4 THE MAGIC CITY 

Mayor Rossi to ask the appointment of a citizens' committee to 
launch a campaign for an Exposition. Even then, Yerba Buena 
Shoals was mentioned as a possible site. On the following day 
the Chamber of Commerce began a survey of the proposed plan. 

In June, Harmon S. Butler walked into the offices of the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce and carefully deposited a large 
bundle on the counter. 

"Here it is," he exclaimed, "an Exposition site where San 
Francisco can tell the world of her progress." 

It was a miniature relief map upon which Butler had traced 
a circular "man-made" island in San Francisco Bay. 

"Just another 'crackpot' idea," muttered the skeptical, little 
dreaming that less than six years later this little map would 
present a true picture of the area, with the shores of Treasure 
Island, like a shimmering mirage, rising majestically from the 
sea. 

The Board of Supervisors of San Francisco passed a resolu- 
tion on July 31, 1933, calling on Mayor Rossi to appoint a group 
of citizens to investigate the proposal for a Fair. A Bridge Cele- 
bration Founding Committee was appointed which held its first 
meeting on October 10, 1933. An Executive Board of twenty- 
five members and an Advisory Planning Committee of thirty- 
three were named, the latter to sound out public sentiment, de- 
termine the scope of the contemplated celebration, discuss the 
location and the vitally important phase of underwriting the 
preliminary costs. 

The first consideration was the selection of a site. To archi- 
tects W. P. Day and George W. Kelham was assigned the task 
of weighing all the advantages and disadvantages of the various 
locations suggested, which included Golden Gate Park, the Pre- 
sidio, Lake Merced and many other sites. 

Golden Gate Park provided a beautiful setting for an Expo- 
sition, but the physical changes required, the planting and land- 
scaping which would be damaged and, in many cases, destroyed, 
eliminated it from serious consideration. China Basin offered 
possibilities from the standpoint of a vacant expanse of land, but 



HOW IT BEGAN 5 

the surroundings did not lend themselves to adequate develop- 
ment. Similar objections were raised against Candle Stick Point. 
This location was readily accessible by rail and automobile, but 
the approaches were through industrial areas and its possibilities, 
insofar as beauty and charm were concerned, gave rise to grave 
doubts. 

Lake Merced presented an atmosphere of natural beauty and 
was given a thorough investigation by the engineers. It was easily 
accessible by automobile and offered an opportunity for excel- 
lent transportation service through additional car lines. The ex- 
pense of grading and rilling necessary for buildings was a draw- 
back and another objection raised was the summer fog which 
might dampen the spirits of daytime visitors and interfere with 
the effect of the night lighting. Furthermore, it would not be a 
constant visible attraction from the city centers and bore no rela- 
tion whatever to the bay and the bridges. Nevertheless, the engi- 
neers thought it should be given full consideration and prepared 
a definite architectural plan showing its possibilities together 
with a detailed report regarding physical conditions. 

The site which stirred the imaginations of Kelham and Day 
lay in San Francisco bay itself, under the surface of the water 
on the northwest side of Yerba Buena (Goat) Island, an area 
known as Yerba Buena Shoals. The shoals extended over approxi- 
mately 735 acres and were separated from the island by a 900 
foot channel. Yerba Buena itself stands in the center of San 
Francisco bay, midway on the bay bridge, one and three quar- 
ters miles from the Ferry building and three quarters of a mile 
from the end of the Key System mole which juts out from the 
east side of the bay. The island comprises 150 acres, rising 325 
feet above sea level, and has been used as a naval receiving sta- 
tion for many years. 

The engineers, in their investigations of the shoals, sought 
specific information on the character of underlying materials and 
test borings were made to be sure that foundations might be 
laid for permanent buildings without danger of disintegration 
through action of the elements. 






A barge, suitably equipped with an outfit for core borings, 
was rented and several determinations of the depth of water and 
the bay bed were made on the site. Holes were driven to 50 feet 
below the mean low water line and the engineers found, in gen- 
eral, approximately 25 feet of a fine black sand over a dark gray 
clay. They concluded that it would provide satisfactory founda- 
tion for a sand fill and that buildings of considerable height 
could be built without the use of piles. 

In the preliminary report of the engineers, construction of 
a sea wall and the use of dredges and pumps to fill in the basin 
with sand was suggested. Then the man-made island was to be 
joined to Yerba Buena and the bridges by means of a viaduct 
which would be of permanent value as it would provide access 
to the airport to be created on the island when the Exposition 
closed. 

The shoals offered the possibility of an unusual setting; cli- 
matic conditions were favorable; accessibility by bus, train, ferry 
and automobile was an important element. But the outstanding 
argument was the creation of an airport near the metropolitan 

center. In determining the size and 
shape of the reclaimed area, there- 
fore, foremost consideration was 
given to airport requirements and 
the Public Utilities Commission of 
the City of San Francisco and quali- 
fied aviation experts were consulted. 
"It is possible," the report read, 
"to design the Exposition in such a 
way as to make some of the struc- 
tures of permanent character and 
available for airport usage in the fu- 
ture. There also will be available 
the permanent bridge, road and 
causeway, water supply to the site, 
a water distribution system, a storm 
sewer system, and at least a portion 



F.D.R. Smiles u/> at 
Mayor McCrackcn, 
Geo. Creel at right 




HOW IT BEGAN 



of a roadway system. The cost of the permanent improvements 
for airport purposes would approximate almost three and one- 
half million dollars, and in addition there would be available 
on the site ample materials as salvage at a comparatively low 
price, to be used for additional requirements of the airport. 

"The site under consideration offers a unique opportunity 
from the standpoint of beauty of setting. This point is well ex- 
emplified in a recent bird's-eye of the bay area and contiguous 
counties. In addition, aeroplane views of the site, with the San 
Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and the proposed Exposition set 
in their proper locations, have been made, and are indicative of 
the great possibilities. From an advertising standpoint, the in- 
tangible charm of the surroundings is conclusive. The site will 
be in the direct view of all outgoing and incoming ships, of all 
visitors to San Francisco from the East and, in fact, of all traffic 
on the bay. From the hills of San Francisco, a panorama of the 
Exposition will be visible. . . 

"In view of the foregoing, we unequivocally recommend the 
Yerba Buena Shoals as the location offering the greatest proba- 
bility of financial success, consistent 
with the achievement of the objects 
of the Exposition." 

The suggestion for the reclama- 
tion of the Yerba Buena Shoals and 
their use as an aviation field had 
been first made in 1931 when the 
Aeronautics Committee of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
was in search of a site for a terminal 
airport which would serve the grow- 
ing traffic of the San Francisco Bay 
area. 

Following the recommendation 
of the shoals as a site for an airport, 
San Francisco had taken steps to ac- 
quire title. A bill was introduced in 



Press Pass No. 1 for 
First Lady of Land 
From Jack James 




8 THE MAGIC CITY 

the State Legislature and signed by the Governor on June 12, 
1933, which transferred the tidelands and submerged shallows 
to the city. 

The Day-Kelham report was submitted to the general com- 
mittee on July 5, 1934. It was not until February 28, 1935, how- 
ever, after much argument, that the committee reached a deci- 
sion and announced its approval of the shoals as a site for the 
Fair. But more opposition developed and, finally, the question 
was put to a vote of the people of San Francisco and the decision 
of the committee was confirmed. 

The city-wide organization, which had been named in the 
earlier stages of discussion, had selected an executive board, and 
out of this group emerged the San Francisco Bay Exposition 
Company, headed by Leland W. Cutler, who had served as 
President of the Chamber of Commerce and as chairman of the 
Celebration Committee. 

On July 24, 1934, the functions of the San Francisco Bay 
Exposition commenced as a corporation. A Board of Directors, 
consisting of the outstanding business and professional leaders 
in the bay area, was created. With Atholl McBean as chairman 
of the Board, and Leland W. Cutler, President, immediate steps 
were taken for expansion to accommodate such a vast project. 
Subsequently, a group of nine, elected by the Board of Directors 
among its members, was designated as the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Board, with full power and authority, and later still, 
the Executive Committee created a Board of Management of 
four members to which certain duties and responsibilities were 
delegated. The Executive Committee had as its members: Messrs. 
Atholl McBean, Alfred J. Cleary, R. B. Hale, R. F. Allen, Col- 
bert Coldwell, J. W. Mailliard, Jr., Allen L. Chickering, John 
F. Forbes and B. B. Meek, with President Leland W. Cutler as 
ex-officio member. The Board of Management, which was created 
early in 1937, consisted of Messrs. James B. Black, Colbert Cold- 
well, K. R. Kingsbury and J. W. Mailliard, Jr. In the beginning, 
the officers of the corporation were: Messrs. Atholl McBean, 
Chairman of the Board; Leland W. Cutler, President; B. B. 



10 THE MAGIC CITY 

Meek, Vice President; Kenneth R. Kingsbury, Vice President; 
George D. Smith, Vice President; John F. Forbes, Treasurer; 
Allen G. Wright, Secretary and General Counsel; H. C. Bottorff, 
Executive Secretary and Assistant Treasurer. 

Between the formation of the Bay Exposition Company and 
the start of reclamation work on the shoals, the officers and ex- 
ecutive committee of the organization were busily occupied. 
Financing the huge project was the first problem and, in a de- 
pression period, this was no easy matter. Among the first actions 
of the Executive Committee was that of requesting the prepara- 
tion of a master budget and a program of financing. This mam- 
moth task was delegated to John F. Forbes, Treasurer of the 
corporation, with H. C. Bottorff, Executive Secretary and As- 
sistant Treasurer, assisting. 

In May, 1935, W. P. Day was appointed Director of Works 
with an authorization to prepare plans and specifications for 
reclaiming the underwater site. This preliminary work was es- 
sential if funds were to be secured from Federal agencies for the 
airport possibilities of the enterprise. Eight applications were 
submitted covering the reclamation and sea wall, the water 
supply, roadways and bridges, horticulture, pavements, ferry 
slips and architectural and engineering design. 

Almost simultaneously with the appointment of Mr. Day as 
Director of Works, George W. Kelham was appointed Chief of 
Architecture and it was Mr. Kelham's task to create an architec- 
tural theme and design of a Magic City upon the magic isle, one 
which would be an everlasting symbol of beauty in the eyes and 
memories of its visitors. 

Mr. Cutler and George Creel proceeded to Washington where 
they enlisted the enthusiastic support of the President and, in 
1935 and 1936, grants of $5,517,830 were made by the Works 
Progress Administration. These had to be met by a contribution 
from the sponsoring agency, the San Francisco Bay Exposition, 
in the sum of $1,103,566. In addition to the Works Progress 
Administration grant, the Public Works Administration allo- 
cated $1,894,324 against a contribution of the Exposition Com- 



HOW IT BEGAN 11 

pany of approximately $2,315,280. The plans for construction 
and development of the site, such as horticulture, exterior deco- 
rating, electrical equipment, etc. required over and above the 
grants of the Federal Government and the funds provided by 
the Exposition Company to match the Federal grants, the sum of 
$8,106,000, making a total budget for construction of approxi- 
mately $18,937,000. 

In addition to the funds necessary for the development of 
the site, there were funds needed for administration promotion, 
publicity, the selling of exhibit space, concessions, collection of 
exhibits, art treasures and foreign government participation, 
representing a budget estimate of $3,250,000. 

To meet the budget requirements for construction and over- 
head in the pre-period, it was necessary to seek sources of reve- 
nue. It was estimated that receipts accruing from the sale of 
exhibit space, concession contracts, advance sale of tickets, license 
fees, utility service, etc., would produce approximately $3,700,- 
000 in the pre-period. Underwriting by public subscription in 
the total sum of $7,500,000 was then undertaken by the Finance 
Committee under the able leadership of Kenneth Kingsbury. 
His first move in this direction was to call together representa- 
tives of sixty of San Francisco's leading financial, industrial and 
commercial firms. They were asked to donate $15,000 each as a 
temporary subscription pending the results of a public drive. 
These subscriptions were either to be repaid from the perma- 
nent fund, or deducted from later subscriptions of the individual 
concerns. The appeal was successful and the funds secured 
through these preliminary subscriptions helped clear the way 
for actual construction to begin. 

The public subscriptions took the form of non-interest bear- 
ing certificates carrying a promise to the effect the Exposition 
Company pledged itself to do its utmost to redeem the certifi- 
cates at par or as near par as the net surplus of the Exposition 
would permit. The Finance Committee set out to raise the 
$7,500,000 through pledges of commercial interests in the bay 
area. A campaign budget was prepared, potential subscriptions 



12 THE MAGIC CITY 

being based on four items, the proportion of the total subscrip- 
tion made by the individual concern to the 1915 Fair, the pro- 
portion of the total subscription to the Chamber of Commerce, 
the Community Chest and Californians, Inc. 

To augment the estimated receipts accruing in the pre- 
period from public subscriptions, advance sales, etc., in order 
to meet the actual cash requirements for sponsorship of Federal 
grants, overhead and Exposition construction costs, the Execu- 
tive Committee arranged to borrow from two large corporations 
and six major banks in San Francisco, the sum of $2,750,000, 
with the understanding this loan would be repaid from operating 
revenues. 

One of the most important committees, one which operated 
"behind the scenes" and received no public acclaim, was the 
Insurance Committee. Without insurance there could have been 
no Exposition. Priceless works of art, valuable books and fabrics, 
expensive machines ... all these had to be "covered" with ade- 
quate policies. 

Lives of the workmen, guards, cashiers and all who toiled to 
build and operate the Fair required protection. It was no simple 
task to estimate the hazards and determine the premiums on the 
multiplex activities of the Exposition. Realizing the importance 
of this task, early in 1936 the Executive Committee appointed 
an Insurance Committee to consider and recommend to the 
Board the designation of certain insurance brokers who would 
act in an advisory capacity to the management, representing the 
casualty and surety groups and the fire groups. The report of 
the Insurance Committee recommended the appointment of 
John B. Levison (chairman) , Harry W. Spencer, Charles Nich- 
ols, George Levison and N. G. Birkholm for the casualtv and 
surety group, and James M. Ryan (chairman) , Henry Doble 
and Lloyd Rowley for the fire group. The recommendation of 
the Committee was approved and the appointments were made 
official on April 14, 1936. 

In an Exposition, one of the major insurable hazards involves 
the protection and supervision of all personal injuries, both those 



HOW IT BEGAN 13 

involving members of the public and involving employees. In 
insurance terminology this is known as workmen's compensation 
insurance and this form of coverage was immediately procured 
to protect the responsibility of the Exposition Company to its 
employees for all injuries arising out of and occurring during 
the course of employment. By direction of the Exposition man- 
agement, negotiations for placement of casualty insurance and 
surety bonds were carried on primarily with B. G. Wills, Vice 
President of the Fireman's Fund Indemnity Company of San 
Francisco. The result of negotiations with the Fireman's Fund 
Indemnity Company was a specially designed policy, which 
blanketed all personal injury and property damage liability to 
which the Exposition Company would be exposed. In the writing 
of this policy, as in all others, provision was made so as to cover 
the entire construction period, operating period and demolition 
period. In view of this, when it was determined that the Expo- 
sition would operate again in 1940, all that was necessary was 
an extension of the original expiration date. 

Special forms of surety bonds were required to meet the pe- 
culiar circumstances arising out of the inter-relation of responsi- 
bilities among the Exposition Company, the City and County 
of San Francisco, and the State of California Toll Bridge Au- 
thority. These dealt for the most part with the island approaches 
from the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. 

Automobile coverage and many other miscellaneous forms of 
protection had to be provided long before the Fair became an 
actuality. 

One of the vital factors in the entire insurance program was 
exhibitors' and concessionaires' insurance. The Exposition Com- 
pany had to make certain that all participants carried at least 
adequate public liability and workmen's compensation policies. 
To accomplish this, the Exposition Insurance Associates devised 
a master policy under which certificates would be available to 
any participant, thereby providing him with the proper public 
liability insurance. A similar procedure was followed in han- 
dling participants' workmen's compensation insurance. Each par- 



14 THE MAGIC CITY 

ticipant was contacted, insurance requirements thoroughly dis- 
cussed, and adequate evidence of necessary coverage had to be 
furnished by the participants prior to the opening of the Expo- 
sition in compliance with the rules and regulations of the Expo- 
sition Company. 

Under the terms of the master liability policy placed with the 
Fireman's Fund Indemnity Company, provision was made for 
the furnishing, equipping, and operating of a complete emer- 
gency hospital, located in the Administration Building. Super- 
vised by the Exposition Company, the emergency hospital oper- 
ated successfully during the early construction period and both 
operating periods of the Exposition. Ambulance service estab- 
lished in conjunction with the hospital assured prompt medical 
attention being given to all suffering injuries or illness while on 
the Island. 

With the increased tempo of construction, negotiations for 
importations of fine arts and other loan exhibits, purchase and 
rental of equipment, and manifold "hazards" incident to the 
growing Magic City, the grave responsibility of the Exposition 
Company for protection grew\ Ample coverage in fire, marine 
and all-risk insurance was provided. A comprehensive plan of fire 
protection was laid out, including a separate high pressure system 
of mains, hydrants, water supply, fire alarm system, both manual 
and automatic inside the buildings, and a complete "street sys- 
tem." Special attention was given the permanent hangar building 
which housed the irreplaceable and valuable art treasures. 

An intricate network of "coverage" harboured exhibits and 
equipment in transit. All-risk insurance was carried on plans, 
specifications, drawings, models, and designs. Chartered craft 
plying the bay waters between the Island and the mainland were 
protected pending accessibility by automobile. Miscellaneous 
forms of all-risk policies protected property loaned to or owned 
by the Exposition Company. Contractors' and workmen's equip- 
ment and materials were covered. 

The losses on fire and supplemental coverages, from the start 
of construction to the termination of insurance protection w r ere 



HOW IT BEGAN 



15 



very low. The California Building, destroyed by fire, was the 
property of the State of California and insurance on this struc- 
ture was handled by the California Commission. 

The total amount of insurance coverage for the Exposition, 
including Casualty, Fire and All-Risk reached the staggering 
sum of $21,000,000. Due to the proper organization and plan 
of procedure laid well in advance, the cost to the Exposition 
Company in premium was comparatively small in relation to the 
total coverage. The total fire losses covered by insurance aggre- 
gated only $5,920. 

Meanwhile, out of the shallow sands was rising a man-made 
island, gigantic dredges were drawing material from the ocean 
bed to deposit it within a great stone-rimmed cup that loomed 
like a yawning crater on the north side of Yerba Buena Island, a 
fleet of barges was plying back and forth bringing tons of earth, 
rich loam and full-grown trees, and architects and engineers were 
busy with blue prints and specifications, calculating, sketching 
and planning the Magic City which was to rise like the palace of 
Aladdin from the shimmering waters of San Francisco Bay. 



View from the air 
of early building on 
The Isle of Magic 





CHAPTER II 

/? iilcuut )i Built 



DON JUAN MANUEL DE AYALA, the first white man to pass 
through the Golden Gate, discovered Yerba Buena Shoals in 
1775. For more than a century it appeared on the charts as a 
menace to navigation. But in 1936 giant dredges, twice as many 
as were employed in the construction of the Panama Canal, be- 
gan to pump black sand from the bottom of the bay and raise 
the shoals to the dignity of an island. 

In February of 1936, when Exposition-airport plans had ad- 
vanced to the construction point, the Corps of Engineers of the 
United States Army put to work the first of its fleet of dredges; 
more and more were added until there were nine of them work- 
ing at one time. All told, eleven dredges were used, raising 



18 THE MAGIC CITY 

Treasure Island from its age-old depth of 2 to 26 feet below sea 
level to an elevation of 13 feet above mean low water. It was to 
be 5,520 feet long, and 3,400 feet wide, comprising 400 acres. 

For eighteen and one half months the pumps of these dredges 
throbbed in San Francisco Bay, pumping the sand from the bot- 
tom through discharge pipes a mile in length at the peak rate 
of 3,000,000 cubic yards a month. 

More than black sand spurted from the island ends of these 
discharge pipes, for the dredge cutters were disturbing quiet 
depths that had rested inviolate through geological ages. Teeth 
and tusks of extinct and fearsome mammoths, more than 250,000 
and perhaps a million years lost in antiquity, came through. 
Fossilized vegetable remains, peat . . . fish and shell-fish by the 
million gushed into the fill; the seagulls made short work of 
the edibles. 

Construction strategy began the fill on the shallower southern 
portions of Yerba Buena Shoals, which lies just north of the island 
of the same name midpoint of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay 
Bridge. As black sand poured in, its weight pushed softer mate- 
rials constantly ahead and out of the area to be filled in. 

Thus the towers and palaces of the 1939 World's Fair, and 
the airport runways that were to succeed them, were to have a 
firm foundation. As the fill advanced a seawall followed it ... a 
wall more than three miles long, containing 287,000 tons of 
quarried rock and rising two feet above the established level 
of the sand fill. Actual volume of the sand retained within this 
seawall was 20,000,000 cubic feet; the intentional loss through 
sluicing softer mud ahead of the firm sand required the dredges 
to handle 25,000,000 cubic feet in completing the fill. 

As areas near the seawall were dredged down to final depth, 
hopper dredges were brought into action. These sailed the bay 
to "borrow areas" several miles distant and nearer the Golden 
Gate Bridge that spans the harbor entrance. There they dredged 
their material and sailed back to Treasure Island, dumping in 
stock-piles where pipeline dredges were anchored to give the 
material its final boost across the rock rampart and into place. 



AN ISLAND IS BUILT 19 

Leveling was accomplished largely by hydraulic action as the 
water drained back into the bay; finishing touches for construc- 
tion purposes, including the Exposition's $17,500,000 building 
program and the parking lot for 12,000 cars, were accomplished 
by bulldozers and carriers. 

Lt. Col. J. A. Dorst, district engineer, was ranking officer on 
the reclamation project for the Army Engineers. Exposition par- 
ticipation was handled under direction of W. P. Day, vice presi- 
dent and Director of Works, who was in general charge of all 
phases of construction of the Pageant of the Pacific. 

The Army Engineers estimated that it would take them 
eighteen and a half months to dredge Treasure Island out of San 
Francisco Bay, and that it would cost $3,803,900. They used 
eleven dredges; they pulled the last one off the job exactly 
eighteen months and 15 days after the first one went on, and the 
job cost $4,100 less than the estimate. 

A causeway, 900 feet long and 110 feet wide, was constructed 
to link with nearby Yerba Buena. On this craggy island the Bay 
Bridge becomes a tunnel, and at both ends of this bore are the 
highway laterals that bring Treasure Island within 10 minutes 
of San Francisco or Oakland. Without a single left turn or grade 
crossing, traffic was added to and subtracted from the streams 
crossing the bridge contributing to the millions of visitors who 
came to the World's Fair. 

Involving 7,600 feet of highway construction, the network of 
roads between the bridge and Treasure Island was built with 
two objects in view: six lanes of travel during the Exposition 
traffic peak, and three lanes as a permanent connection between 
bridge and airport. Consequently three lanes were of permanent 
construction; the other three were temporary, constructed par- 
tially upon timber trestles to reduce excavation quantities, which 
came to 155,000 cubic yards. 

The highways cost $600,000, and because of the permanent 
airport value of the three-lane link there were Public Works 
Administration funds in this phase of construction. 

Along the western edge of the 400-acre Island was a broad 



20 



THE MAGIC CITY 




automobile highway, diving through an underpass at one point 
to permit pedestrians passengers discharged by ferry boats that 
supplemented the highways in serving the Exposition - to cross 
in safety without interrupting traffic flow. 

One of the difficult problems which confronted the engineers 
was the elimination of salt so that trees and flowers could grow. 

Two hundred wells were drilled 25 feet into the soil and 
vacuum pumps drained millions of gallons of brine into the bay. 
Rains helped to clear the salt away and the pumps were halted 
when the water level had fallen to eight feet below the surface. 
Rich loam was brought from the Sacramento river delta and 
tons of commercial fertilizer were added until tests revealed that 
the island was ready for its horticultural adornment. 

The problem of irrigation was handled, for the most part, 
by installed sprinkler-heads. Water brought from San Francisco 
through an ingenious flexing pipeline between the decks of the 
$77,000,000 San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, was pumped 
into a 3,000,000-gallon reservoir on Yerba Buena Island where 
it flowed by gravity across the 900-foot causeway connecting the 






AN ISLAND IS BUILT 21 

two islands, and was delivered to every corner of Treasure Island 
through a distribution system containing more than 26 miles 
of pipe. 

The theme of the Exposition was "A Pageant of the Pacific" 
so that plantings indigenous to nearly all the Pacific climates 
and nations were selected. 

Some 800,000 annuals were grown from seed at the Balboa 
Park nursery of the Exposition, in San Francisco. Perennials 
numbered more than 400,000, bulbs were planted in their plot- 
ted locations, in September of 1938, 250,000 tulips, 20,000 iris, 
20,000 tuberous begonias, 10,000 hyacinths, and thousands of 
other varieties. 

A daily crew, averaging 350 men in 1937, and 1200 men in 
1938, was directed by the Bureau of Horticulture. Under the 
tutelage of skilled engineers and landscape men, these workmen 
carried out the transplanting and propagating. Headquarters for 
more than a year was the 28-acre Balboa Park nursery, equipped 
with two hot-houses, a cold-house, two lath-houses, and other 
service buildings which, with the 20-acre propagation area, of- 
fered every facility necessary for growing of the whole range 
of World's Fair varieties. 

The propagation program included vines and many smaller 
shrubs, as well as annuals and perennials. The process began 
with seeds or cuttings in the hot-house. After an appropriate 
period they were removed some to the cold-house, some to 
the lath-houses, and finally into the open air for final seasoning 
before transplanting to the island. 

A novel facility was a large "electric hot-bed" in the main 
propagating house, thermostatically controlled to maintain the 
soil at a constant temperature of 60 degrees and nearly doubling 
the rate of growth. Propagating beds heated by highly resistant 
electrical cables were laid among the roots. Clean river sand was 
used and the plantings were fed chemically without mulching 
of any kind thus kept free of pests. 

Many strategies were employed to get maximum "perform- 
ance" out of plantings. Some specimens were kept trimmed of 



THE MAGIC CITY 

blossoms so that strength would go into structural growth; thus 
vines frequently were transplanted with spreads of 25 to 40 feet, 
ready to burst into bloom. Other specimens, too large or not 
sufficiently well-furnished to accord with plans, were "topped" 
and induced to put new roots high on their stems, so that they 
would fit a prescribed purpose. 

A spectacular phase of the program during the summer of 
1938 was the transplanting of the 4,000 trees, with the attendant 
transportation, boxing and anchoring of specimens towering 
from 60 to 70 feet above their boxes. Hundreds of these weighed 
up to 40 tons each, and they were brought from widely scattered 
points in California, held for their "rest period" in Balboa Park, 
and finally transplanted to Treasure Island. More than 10 acres 
of trees once stood boxed in Balboa Park, and many others were 
held boxed in place at various points in the Bay district, to be 
shipped direct to Treasure Island from their original sites when 
the time came. These trees were donated by owners. 

Plant material, when offered, was inspected by the Bureau's 
Division of Procurement, and the best method of transplanting 
each specimen was determined. The size of the box in which 
the tree was placed depended upon the size and root structure 
of the specimen. Superfluous roots were carefully cut, the box 
was built around the cube of earth, and if the tree was to be 
moved immediately, the bottom was added. 

Power winches, heavy jacks and booms raised it to ground 
level and it was placed on low-bed trucks or imderslung trailers. 
In Balboa Park the tree rested, putting out new roots, fed with 
a solution of one ounce of ammonium sulphate for each square 
foot of box and sprayed periodically. Trailers of special design 
were used by the Exposition Company for the larger specimens, 
and trucks, railway flat cars, barges, tugs and tractors helped to 
keep a steady stream of trees and plants moving across the Bay 
and into locations already spotted on blueprints throughout 
the summer and fall of 1938. 

Large-scale transplanting began in May, as soon as the 
"unsalting" of the fill was completed. Five constructing com- 



AN ISLAND IS BUILT 23 

panics of the Bay area plunged into the task of moving 35,000 
tons of big trees, under a "management contract" involving 
about $315,000. At the rate of 40 to 50 daily, the trees moved 
from a 40-mile radius to Treasure Island. Loaded on barges at 
San Francisco, Redwood City and the Berkeley waterfront, they 
moved across the Bay like small floating sections of forest. Un- 
loaded at the World's Fair site, they were hauled to final position 
by caterpillar tractors, and placed in their holes. After the huge 
trees came the smaller ones, as well as the shrubs and flowering 
plants. 

Plantings of ground cover, shrubs, vines and trees at the 
Exposition were governed by two considerations: color, and ex- 
posure. Separate courts of the elaborate architectural plan were 
given separate color schemes, carried out by the bloom and the 
foliage of all forms of growth. Seasonal blooms were changed 
three or four times during the 40 weeks of the Fair. 

From the start of operations on the Exposition until its close, 
Organized Labor cooperated to the fullest extent in every phase 
of the gigantic undertaking. W. P. Day, recognizing the im- 
portance of harmonious relations between contractors and em- 
ployees, invited representatives of the San Francisco Labor 
Council and the San Francisco Building Trades Council to a 
conference early in 1937 and out of this came an agreement satis- 
factory to all parties. As a result, the Golden Gate International 
Exposition passed into history as the greatest Union-made job 
on record from the first scoop of mud to the final lick of paint 
and installation. 

Day by day, and month by month, the island rose from the 
sea and vines and trees came full-grown into their places as by 
enchantment to form a background of beauty and color for the 
palaces which were to rise on what had been a long reach of 
water disturbed only by the restless tides. It was "Treasure 
Island," indeed, a new engineering triumph to stir the imagina- 
tion, set in the silver sea, ready for the architects and builders 
to fashion turrets and towers and columns into a Magic City for 
the pleasure of the world. 




CHAPTER III 



Mcujic. Gi 



BLENDING MAYAN, Incan, Malayan and Cambodian architecture, 
the walls of the Magic City arose on the newly created Treasure 
Island. 

To the architectural commission, composed of Geo. W. Kel- 
ham, Arthur Brown, Jr., Lewis P. Hobart, Wm. G. Merchant, 
Timothy L. Pflueger and Ernest E. Weihe, had been submitted 
the problem of determining the style of architecture and a 
building group plan, controlled only by the assumptions neces- 
sarily made by the Director of Works in the application for 
Federal government funds. Perhaps for the first time in the 
history of expositions, architects were given a site whose shape 
and size were made to order for their purpose. 

This commission, in search of new sources of inspiration, 
studied the Panama-Pacific International Exposition of 1915, 
with its rather strict adherence to established architectural styles, 
and the Chicago Exposition, which attempted something decid- 
edly modern. Architects who had worked on both of these pre- 
vious events served on the Commission for San Francisco's 1939 
Exposition. 



26 



THE MAGIC CITY 



As to the selection of an architectural theme, a member of 
the Exposition staff outlined it as follows: "Since the Exposition 
was to be a Pageant of the Pacific, it was natural that the archi- 
tects should select a structural style set by a race that ran a course 
and died, leaving remains of a forgotten people whose noble 
temples suggest a high civilization. The Maya civilization and 
architecture of old Mexico has been little known in the United 
States, but more attention to archeology and particularly the 
activities of the Carnegie Institute have of late focused wide- 
spread interest upon it." 

Although Maya architecture quite frequently had been em- 
bodied in the design of modern structures, compositions and 
general concepts usually followed recognized classics. In the 
Exposition structures the treatment was adjusted to a modern 
trend with a mingling of Oriental, Cambodian and Mayan styles. 
A major objective was the creation of a practical and at the 
same time dramatic presentation wholly unlike any heretofore 

The Magic Island attempted. 

from Yerba Buena, T i i r i t r 

framed by Eucalypti In the layout or the grounds there was no single focal point 




28 



THE MAGIC CITY 



to confuse traffic; the effort, rather, was to achieve an even dis- 
tribution. This applied primarily to structures erected with 
Exposition company funds, but even for the structures to be 
designed and built by participants the area was laid out with 
wide treelined avenues and streets and the area was subdivided 
into blocks just as a city of ideal, advance planning. 

One of the chief charms of Treasure Island lay in the oppor- 
tunity it provided to the visitor to achieve a perspective and en- 
joy beauty and color apart from the throngs of patterned ways. 
Since wind came from only one direction so much of the 
time, it was decided to provide wind protection by locating 
continuous buildings of considerable height along the western 
boundary of the grounds. Under such an arrangement shelter 
would be provided for the entire area except the space devoted 
to automobile parking. Again, this plan made the southerly end 
of the fill a particularly secluded area partly by reason of the 
building arrangement and partly because of nearby Yerba Buena 
Island. This area, therefore, lent itself well to aquatic sports and 
other uses of the lagoon to be formed between the site and 

Yerba Buena Island. Fortunately, 
nothing in the original assumptions 
upon which all the preliminary 
steps in the construction had been 
based, conflicted with this general 
scheme of arrangement. 

Although design and construction 
of the participants' buildings was 
under the control of the Depart- 
ment of Works, wide latitude was 
permitted in architectural design. 
The result was the creation of a 
group plan of unusual architectural 
unity. It was almost impossible to 
segregate the twelve principal ex- 
hibit palaces into individual units. 
Unbroken walls and parapets ex- 



Yacht Harbor seen 
from crest of Yerba 
Buena (Goat) Island 




29 



tended in two directions, rising to tremendous gateways and 
curving around courts and gardens in an area more than half 
a mile long by a third of a mile wide. 

The first rough plans were developed into a scale model with 
which it was determined by experiment that walls about 80 feet 
high would divert wind to best advantage and give a compara- 
tively sheltered area on the lee side. Manifestly a wall this high 
could not be justified, economically, unless it also served another 
purpose, i.e., was part of a building. It was this consideration 
which led to the great height of the buildings with their setback 
walls and their great unobstructed interior spans. 

More than a million square feet of floor area had to be 
housed by the Exposition company in structures that would be 
in use less than a year. There were permanent structures too, 
of course, such as the hangars and the air terminal building, 
totalling 350,000 square feet of floor space. The latter were built 
of reinforced concrete and structural steel but for the temporary 
structures numerous advantages favored timber. Some of these 
were lower first cost, speed of erection, ease in removal after the 
Exposition and salvage value. 
There was also the consideration 
that lumber was a local product ob- 
tainable from nearby mills. 

Timber was used almost exclu- 
sively in twelve exhibit palaces, the 
400-foot Tower of the Sun (a steel 
frame clothed in timber) and nec- 
essary adjuncts such as warehouses, 
police and fire stations, ferry termi- 
nal buildings, gateways, pools, 
grandstands, flag standards, subways, 
bridges and Pacific basin buildings. 
Altogether, in the buildings, other 
than those put up by individual ex- 
hibitors, about 27,000,000 square 
feet of timber (exclusive of wharves) 



Arch of Triumph 
from the corner of 
Court of Flowers 




30 THE MAGIC CITY 

was required. A large part of this was Douglas fir, although for 
certain uses redwood and hemlock were employed. 

In addition to the normal vertical loading, all structures were 
designed for a wind load of 15 pounds per square foot for the 
first 60 feet of height, and 20 pounds per square foot above that 
height. In all timber structures adequate resistance to lateral 
forces was afforded by a structural design worked out for wind 
loads only. For figuring a combination of vertical and seismic 
loads, the usual working stresses were increased from one-third 
to one-half, depending upon the particular use and type of the 
structure. 

To provide wind load resistance, extensive use was made of 
diagonal sheathing as diaphragms. Practically all of the exhibit 
palaces were designed for a live load of 100 pounds per square 
foot. 

The exhibit palaces were supported on wooden piles about 
65 feet long. Under the central tower, 90-foot piles were used. 
The roof arches, together with the exterior walls and architec- 
tural ornamentation, were supported on concrete and timber 
foundations resting on the piles, but the floor construction was 
supported by timber resting directly on the ground. 

The typical exhibit palaces were 200 feet wide and 887 feet 
long. A series of three-hinged timber arches was used, spanning 
the full width of 200 feet and spaced 41 feet center to center; 
in the center of the building the clear distance from the floor 
to the bottom of the arch was 68 feet. 

The walls of the palace buildings varied from 65 to 85 feet 
in height, with a series of setbacks for architectural effect and 
for concealing floodlight units. It was the setback wall as much 
as the desire to create large and unobstructed spaces adaptable 
to varying needs of participants that made the arch type of roof 
a particularly pleasing and economical solution. 

Consideration was given in the structural design to the proba- 
bility of prefabrication of the various units on the ground, with 
subsequent erection in large units. This possibility was recog- 
nized by the contractors, and resulted in safer and more eco- 



nomical methods of construction. The construction plan was to 
fabricate studs and sheathing on the ground in large panels 
which were then lifted bodily into place. 

Similar methods were employed for placing rafters and other 
structural elements. The timber arches of 200-foot span were 
fabricated on the ground and raised bodily to final position, the 
entire setting operation for each arch requiring only about 30 
minutes. Even the exterior sheathing and studding of the 400- 
foot central tower was prefabricated in panel units which were 
lifted bodily into final position. These prefabrication and erec- 
tion schemes reduced hazard, and also resulted in a saving of 
time and expense. 

The principal structures erected by the company itself were 
two large hangars, an airport terminal building, a series of con- 
nected exhibit palaces covering more than 1,000,000 square feet, 
a central tower, a Pacific basin area (composed of a central 
unit and surrounded by buildings representative of countries 
on the Pacific Ocean), a Western States building, a Fine Arts 
palace, ferry slips, warehouses, police and fire houses, roads, 
bridges, etc.; together with lagoons, fountains, and pools. 

The general design was partly controlled by the necessity 
for the erection of hangars and an airport terminal building for 
a permanent airport for the city of San Francisco. The two han- 
gars were duplicates in design and each had outside dimensions 
of 287!/2x335 feet. The total cost of these two structures of re- 
inforced concrete and structural steel, exclusive of outside and 
inside finish and doors, was $725,000. Their location was at the 
southerly end of the fill, convenient to the nearby lagoon used 
by seaplanes. Hangar construction was started as soon as the fill 
at the southerly end was completed, not from choice,, but be- 
cause of the necessity of continuous construction to comply with 
government requirements. 

The airport terminal building, designed after careful in- 
vestigation of principal terminals of the United States, was of 
reinforced concrete on a pile foundation. It was semi-circular 
and its floor plan contained 160,000 square feet. Its total cost 



32 THE MAGIC CITY 

was about $850,000. This building and the hangar buildings 
were finished with a dash coat of cement plaster to match as 
closely as possible the exterior finish of the temporary exhibition 
structures. 

Crowning the lofty spire of the Tower of the Sun (Archi- 
tect, Arthur Brown, Jr.) was a golden phoenix, symbolizing the 
rise of San Francisco after the disastrous fire of 1906. Modeled 
by O. C. Malmquist, this great mythical bird was 22 feet high, 
fabricated of wrought iron. Next below the spire were Lion 
Head reliefs by Malmquist, and at the tops of the tali, slender 
arches the same sculptor had four relief plaques, repeated in 
duplicate for the octagonal tower, representing "Gentle Wind," 
"Cold Wind," "Trade Wind" and "Storm." 

For the arches in the tower William G. Huff did four 
free-standing figures, representing "Industry," "Agriculture," 
"Science" and "The Arts." These also were repeated to fill the 
octagon, as were two more of Malmquist's signs of the zodiac 
representing the apparent path of the sun through the constel- 
lations near the base of the Tower of the Sun, just above the 
low portals. 

Within the Tower of the Sun was a carillon of 44 bells, a 
gift of Dr. Nathaniel T. Coulson to Grace Cathedral, San Fran- 
cisco, loaned to Treasure Island for the period of the Exposition. 

The largest, or Bourdon bell, was low G and six tons in 
weight, the largest bell in the West. It was played by a great 
electro-pneumatic hammer striking it from the outside, actuated 
either from a paper roll, from a special keyboard, or by the 
swinging of an electric motor actuated by a switch. 

In addition to the 6-ton Bourdon bell, there were 43 bells 
weighing from 13 pounds up to 5,126 pounds. Arranged in five 
tiers, these were fitted into a massive steel frame which stood on 
top of the frame of the Bourdon bell. They represented three 
and one-half chromatic octaves from low C, and, with their 
frames, weighed 34 tons. 

The carillon was played from a regular keyboard. This was 
located at the base of the Tower of the Sun and operated by 



THE MAGIC CITY 33 

electro-pneumatic power. Compressed air at low pressure acting 
on pistons was used to give the actual blow, and low-voltage di- 
rect current provided the connections between the keyboard and 
the air-valves of the pistons. There was also an automatic player 
which operated like an electric piano. In order to operate this 
machine, a paper band was inserted, which had been perforated 
to play the tune desired; then a switch was turned which cut off 
the keyboard, and started the automatic player. 

Several times during a certain week during the 1939 opera- 
tions period, and again during the spring of '40, the Island popu- 
lation was startled out of the daily routine by a jangling crash of 
roulades, cadenzas and whatnot emanating from the carillon. 
Some not naturally moved by concord of sweet sounds were in- 
clined to wonder if perhaps the famous tower might not have 
acquired a sudden case of "bats in the belfry." 

They need not have worried. It was only Alec Templeton, 
the blind piano virtuoso, playing Bach's Fugues! 

Alec was always more than willing to discuss terms for a 
Treasure Island concert. Every visit meant opportunity to try 
out some new arrangements of a classic theme on the carillon. 

Around the Tower of the Sun boldly arcaded pavilions led 
into the main exhibit structures. In each of these four pavilions 
was a single piece of statuary. Malmquist contributed "Fauna" 
and Raymond Puccinelli, "Flora." "Land" and "Sea" were mod- 
eled by Ettore Cadorin and Carlo Taliabue respectively. Over 
the two main arches leading into the Court of Honor were two 
applied figures by Adeline Kent, representing Air and Water. 
In this court, designed by Arthur Brown, Jr., were four small 
fountains, and Clara Huntington's delightful statue of St. Francis. 

Man's conquest of the oceans of the world was expressed by 
the architecture, sculpture and painting of the Court of the 
Seven Seas. Designed originally by George W. Kelham, and car- 
ried to completion after his death by J. H. Clark, it was the 
longest and one of the most beautiful courts of the Exposition. 
Almost a thousand feet long and two hundred feet wide, it ex- 
tended from the Court of Pacifica to the central Court of Honor. 



u 



34 



THE MAGIC CITY 



In the Court of the Seven Seas rhythm of tremendous scale 
was obtained by the equal spacing of sixteen sixty-foot pylons 
along its sides. Crowning these pylons were perched prows of 
galleons, each graced with a winged figure representing the Spirit 
of Adventure, the work of P. O. Tognelli. "Creation," a group 
by Haig Patigian, was in the center of this court. 

High up on the walls, between these major motifs, were 
spaced a trilogy of sculptural panels by Tognelli depicting "Ex- 
ploration," "Trade" and "Commerce." Other bas-relief work by 
Tognelli in this court included "Discovery," "Flying Cloud" at 
the side entrances, and "Treasure of the Seven Seas." Edstrom's 
"Florence Nightingale" stood before the Hall of Science. 

At the northern terminus of the Fair's main axis was the 
Court of Pacifica, designed by Timothy L. Pflueger. An out- 
standing artistic achievement in this court was a huge bold relief 
mural, "The Peacemakers," done by Margaret, Helen and Esther 
Bruton, emphasizing the Fair's underlying motif, Pacific peace 
and unity. 

The great panel was 144 feet long and 57 feet in height, and 

was done in 270 separate panels, 
each four by eight feet. The entire 
mural covered a space of more than 
8,000 square feet. 

The mural was an artistic hybrid 

a cross between sculpture and 
painting. Color was used, but only 
in large, simple areas. The Brutons 
used bold relief technique because 
it gave a strong light and dark pat- 
tern without destroying the feeling 
of the wall. 

The central figures of "The 
Peacemakers" were a great Buddha 

calm, pacific -and an Occidental 
woman, kneeling, swathed in a 
white cowled robe. Friezes of mov- 



Sunlit pool in upper 
reaches of beautiful 
*y^ Lagoon of Nations 




THE MAGIC CITY 



ing figures on either side represented the Orient and the Occi- 
dent, respectively. 

A shimmering, scintillating "prayer curtain" of metal hung 
as a back-drop behind Ralph Stackpole's "Pacifica." Approxi- 
mately 100 feet high and 48 feet wide, the curtain, like the metal- 
lic curtains in Oriental temples, gave off melodious sounds as it 
fluttered gently in the breeze. 

One of the loveliest fountains of the Exposition was located 
in this Court, to the east of the Western Gateway (Architect, 
Ernest E. Weihe) , the entrance opposite the main ferry termi- 
nal with its elephants and howdahs designed by Donald Macky. 

Surrounding the sunken basin of this fountain, on the foun- 
tain itself, were pieces of sculpture fashioned by well known 
artists. Here, expressing the broad Pacific theme of the Exposi- 
tion, were Jacques Schnier's male and female figures, "The 
Orient," symbolizing the quiet, inward-looking spirit of India; 
Brents Carleton's Polynesian group; Adaline Kent's group sym- 
bolic of the islands of the South Pacific, young girls in the sun 
listening to a young man improvising music; Sargent Johnson's 
happy Inca Indians playing the 
Pipes of Pan; Carl George's Ameri- 
can Indian and Modern Women; a 
North American group by Ruth 
Cravath Wakefield Alaskan Boy 
Spearing a Fish, American Woman, 
and Mexican Boy; a South Ameri- 
can group by Cecilia Graham of a 
Primitive Woman Making Farina, 
A South American Fisherman, and 
a Young Native Riding an Alliga- 
tor; and a group of Chinese Musi- 
cians by Helen Phillips. 

Movement and life predominated 
here. From the base of the towering 
figure of Pacifica a cascade of water 
flowed into the fountain. Colored 



Splendor of Toiler 
of the Sun as seen 
from East-West axis 




36 THE MAGIC CITY 

lights, concealed beneath the cascading waters, gave them an 
ever-changing rainbow of colors. Murals by John T. Stoll and 
Armin Hansen adorned the Hall of Science and Vacationland. 

Southward from the Court of Honor, the Court of the Moon 
(Architect, Geo. W. Kelham) , opened out to disclose a series of 
gardens and pools. At night the resources of artificial "moon- 
light" enhanced the charm of this court and its beautiful land- 
scaping. Here a lovely fountain, rectangular in shape, was suffi- 
ciently large to accommodate twenty-four arches of water. Ettore 
Cadorin fashioned two works of sculpture "The Moon and 
the Dawn" and "The Evening Star," for the ends of this court. 
On each corner of the fountain stood a great madrone tree, and 
along the sides, Irish yews with masses of blue hydrangeas. 

Incised in relief on two ornamental pylons, between niches, 
and over building entrances leading off this court, were numer- 
ous works of Tognelli. These included such fanciful subjects as 
St. George, Centaur, the Wonderful Lamp, Fairy Queen, Genie 
of the Gardens, Moon Princess, King Oz and the Polar Bear, 
Prince Igor and Jack and the Beanstalk. 

To the south of the Court of the Moon was Treasure Gar- 
den and a great pool and fountain with a capacity of 406,000 
gallons of water. Around the fountain were grouped the works 
of Haig Patigian called "The Earth Dormant," "Sunshine," 
"Rain" and "Harvest." 

Striving for a new and spectacular effect, engineers, in plan- 
ning the fountain for Treasure Garden, succeeded in shooting 
what are called "long drops" from the fountain jets. These created 
the illusion of the drops of water falling and rising simultane- 
ously and proved a beautiful vista when flooded by colored lights. 

On the walls of the two South Towers flanking the gardens 
were several fine murals. In the easterly tower Helen Forbes had 
two panels painted on canvas 7 feet wide by 16 feet high, while 
Dorothy Puccinelli decorated two walls of the tower in the same 
manner. 

In the westerly tower, the entrance to the Mining Palace, 
Franz W. Bergmann displayed two murals. One of them, "Gold," 



THE MAGIC CITY 

represented three miners digging, with a symbolic figure in the 
center. The other, "Fortuna," represented a miner and a lady 
of the Gay '90's with the symbolic figure of Fortune in the 
center. Two other oils with a mining theme were done for this 
structure by Nelson Poole. 

Directly east from the main court lay the Court of Reflec- 
tions (Architect, Lewis P. Hobart) . Here the spirit of peace 
and tranquility prevailed. Central in this court were two long 
rectangular pools reflecting the soft coral walls with trailing 
vines hanging from the parapets. At the west end of the pools 
was a statue, "Girl and the Penquins," by the late Edgar Walter. 
Unlike the other courts, no fountain disturbed the placid waters 
which mirrored the surroundings of the Court of Reflections. 

Over the entrances leading into this court were two bas relief 
figures by David Slivka, "Abundance," and "Fertility." Four 
relief panels by Michael von Meyer representing "Beauty," 
"Knowledge," "Music" and "Labor" graced the walls. 

Leading from this court into the Court of Flowers was the 
magnificent Arch of Triumph. Designed by Lewis P. Hobart, 
this structure stood 105 feet in height with an arch opening of 
more than 90 feet. For the west face of this arch Jacques Schnier 
designed two stylized eagles representing the United States. Two 
mural panels by Hugo Ballin, each 10 feet wide and 44 feet high, 
beautified the inside face of the arch. Two decorative figures on 
the buttress of the east side of the arch were done by William 
Gordon HufF. 

One of the most colorful areas on Treasure Island was the 
Court of Flowers (Architect, Lewis P. Hobart) . There was a 
feminine quality about this court, the gently curving lines of its 
arcades, the graceful nymphs which adorned the pools, and the 
warm, smooth color scheme. 

Centered in the square court, surrounded by a broad circu- 
lar promenade, was the Fountain of Life and in each of the four 
corners there were secondary fountains with many small but im- 
portant works of sculpture. The largest of the fountains arose 
from a circular basin. The dominating piece of sculpture for 



THE MAGIC CITY 39 

this fountain was fashioned by O. C. Malmquist, as were the 
lesser figures around the base. Topping this 50-foot fountain 
was the 1 2-foot figure of a feminine nude plucking a rainbow out 
of the western sky. Figures of mermaids, seals, and other deni- 
zens of the sea were placed around the base. Floodlighted at 
night, with water cascading down from the basins of the foun- 
tain, causing an effervescent mist to rise, "The Rainbow," bathed 
in the aurora of light and spray, was a spectacle of unusual 
beauty. 

Choosing oil for his medium, Millard Sheets did six panels 
for the north and south walls of the palaces abutting the Court 
of Flowers. Each panel, 20 feet wide and 35 feet high, was framed 
by one of the graceful colonnades extending around the court. 
The first panel depicted the Spanish period of California his- 
tory. Another turbulent period of the state's history was shown 
in the second panel, which portrayed the days of '49. The third 
panel was dedicated to "California Land of the Sun." 

Among the important figures adjoining the East Towers at 
the end of this court were the five-foot statues of "Light" and 
"Darkness" by Beniamino BufFano. 

A cosmopolitan atmosphere was evident in the Pacific Basin, 
eastward of the main east-west axis. Here were concentrated the 
buildings of foreign governments around broad lagoons, spanned 
by bridges to symbolize unity. Structural shapes of these small 
governmental buildings and groups reproduced native forms. 
The entrance into the Court of Flowers was marked by temple- 
towers standing upon ghats and flanked by mural panels (Archi- 
tect, Wm. G. Merchant) . Jacques Schnier decorated the north 
wall with a bas relief representing the "Dance of Life." On the 
south wall adjoining the towers Lulu Hawkins Braghetta did a 
similar panel called "Path of Darkness." 

For Pacific House (Architect, Wm. G. Merchant) , the theme 
building of the Exposition, situated on an island in the center 
of the lagoon, Miguel Covarrubias painted eight great maps of 
the Pacific Basin area. Four of these pictorial mural maps meas- 
ured 15 by 24 feet and four others measured 9 by 13 feet. 



40 THE MAGIC CITY 

A horizontal terra cotta relief map was made for the same 
building by Antonio Sotomayor. This pictorial map, 30 feet wide 
and 47 feet long, was built in 361 sections, on the scale of 4,000 
feet to the inch. 

Adjoining the Pacific Area was the Court of the Nations, and 
beyond it the four-acre Federal Building (Architect, Timothy 
L. Pflueger). On its main facade were two gigantic murals, each 
360 feet long by 60 feet high, spectacular examples of Works 
Progress Administration art. Sketches by Herman Volz, San Fran- 
cisco artist, were transferred to the walls by WPA artists. The 
north mural was entitled "The Conquering of the West by 
Water," and at the south (or right) of the great Colonnade of 
States was "The Conquering of the West by Land." 

Two other murals, in the Hall of National Defense, were done 
in Washington by Frank Imirie, government artist. These were 
250 feet long by 14 feet high, and depicted the evolution of the 
United States Army from Revolutionary times down to the 
present. 

On the California building nearby (Architect, Timothy L. 
Pflueger), Robert B. Howard showed in relief the "Amenities 
of Western Life" and the "Economic Development of the West." 
For the entrance to the Aviation Palace, Carlo Taliabue symbo- 
lized the "Spirit of Aerial Transportation." On the wall near the 
South Tower Jacques Schnier portrayed the spirit of goodwill 
between the East and the West. 

Sculptor, architect and painter had accomplished their task. 
The Magic City had become a reality. But while the massive 
walls and palaces were taking form and the symbolic statuary was 
being put in place there were other artists at work, lending life 
and spirit to the scene. Flower beds were being planted, flood- 
lights were being installed that this dream world should live and 
breathe, a masterpiece of beauty and color. 




CHAPTER IV 



Q&CUltif, 



BEAUTIFUL BY DAY, the night spectacle of the Golden Gate Inter- 
national Exposition was a scene long to be remembered. 

Casting its sheen of gay and lambent light upon the placid 
waters of San Francisco Bay, the brilliant aureole of Treasure 
Island pierced the sky with scintillating fingers and cast a myriad 
of radiant paths across the reaches of land and sea. 

Black light, mysterious element made visible against the back- 
drop of sky, and the new fluorescent lights blended to give con- 
stantly changing color to the picture of nocturnal enchantment. 

A battery of 10,000 flood-lights, new in design and rivaling 
the rays of the sun, bathed the magic isle in brilliant beams. 
Cylindrical lanterns, eighty-six feet high, cast a soft, exotic glow 
along the pathways and through the courts. 

The hues of the rainbow luminous greens, pinks, blues and 
amber played upon the walls and towers and fountains and 
turrets, a glorious symphony of color. 



42 



THE MAGIC CITY 



stanton, Color 



Mixing lights as an artist mixes paints, a modern electrical 
genius was at the beck and call of the Exposition's electrical divi- 
sion, and aided in the creation of a color poem in light that was 
one of the outstanding illumination achievements of all time. 

The wizard of light was A. F. Dickerson, of the General Elec- 
tric Company, who worked with Jesse E. Stanton, the Color 
Architect, in carrying out the night effects in keeping with the 
official "palette of color." This comprised nineteen hues, all 
drawn from the coloring of Pacific shores. They were: Exposition 
ivory, Sun of the Dawn yellow, Pagoda yellow, California ecru, 
Old Mission fawn, Santa Barbara taupe, Polynesian brown, Santa 
Clara apricot, Pebble Beach coral, Imperial Dragon red, Death 
Valley mauve, Evening Star blue, Pacific blue, Southern Cross 
blue, Del Monte blue, China Clipper blue, Hawaiian emerald 
green, Ming jade green (light and dark) , and Treasure Island 
gold. The "palette of color" also governed the choice of flowers 
and shrubs in the various courts. 

From the hills of San Francisco, the night scene accentuated 
first of all the glowing, shimmering Tower of the Sun rising 




44 



above the west walls. The walls themselves were flooded in white 
light, radiated by projectors concealed in troughs. 

Bathed in rose red by distant spotlights, the massive Elephant 
Towers, flanking the Tower of the Sun, marked the portals to 
Treasure Island in vivid and colorful fashion. 

Each court and esplanade received individual lighting treat- 
ment. The gardens and lagoons were lighted placidly, to enhance 
the charm of water-reflected towers and stately vistas. The 40-acre 
Gayway, on the contrary, was lighted in exhilarating hues, de- 
signed to stimulate visitors to the joy of living. 

Nowhere, except on the Gayway, was a light bulb exposed to 
the eye. Throughout the island, a concealed, indirect lighting 
system was installed, with beams in fantastic array shooting from 
mysterious places. 

Under the spell of gaily tinted lights, the fountains appeared 
to be liquid gold. Man-made moonlight, blue-green, softened the 
walls. Shades of red and orange merged to make the courts a 
fanciful fairyland of color. 

Giant spotlights played upon the colossal statue of Pacifica, 

and gave her court a regal splendor. 
Shimmering beams gleamed upon 
the magnificent Persian prayer cur- 
tain which formed a tinkling back- 
ground for the towering Goddess. 

Peach tones against a base of lu- 
minous yellow lit the Gourt of the 
Seven Seas; warm amber shades cast 
a mellow glow over the Court of 
Honor; pink and coral were blended 
to give a placid tone to the Court of 
Reflections. 

With the re-opening of the 
World's Fair in 1940, Color Archi- 
tect Jesse Stanton decided to com- 
pletely transform the picture by day 
and night. The color was set at a 



Massive urns form 
harder of beauty 
for "Evening Star" 




BEAUTY AND COLOR 



45 



higher key, more vivid and stimulating. Palace walls were sprayed 
with bright colors and new flood-lights of every conceivable hue 
were added. The result was startling but entirely in keeping with 
the quickened pace of the second year. 

Pacifica, the 80-foot statue which stood as a symbol of the Ex- 
position, was robed in pure white against a curtain of vivid orange 
and blue. The contrast brought the great figure to life, as if it 
were about to walk down the esplanade into the Court of the 
Seven Seas. 

The Tower of the Sun was encased in glittering ivory, the 
surface encrusted with metallic substances that caught every 
gleam of sunlight and the fluorescent floods at night. The Ele- 
phant Towers were resplendent in apricot and orange red, lemon 
green, silver and gold. 

In the Court of Reflections the pools were decorated in mid- 
night blue. Colors in the Court of the Seven Seas were yellow 
and bright blue green, while pink was the central motif of the 
Court of Flowers. 

Walls of the exhibit palaces were painted a light lemon yellow 
or Spanish white and every statue 
and mural was highlighted with 
color so that it stood out against its 
background of building or shrub- 
bery. 

Pleas were received to preserve 
the general pattern of hues in the 
Court of the Moon. "This was sheer 
perfection," wrote one admirer. 
"Please keep it just as it was." So 
the color architect stayed his hand. 
The Gayway received a new and 
special treatment to provide a can- 
opy of lights of many hues instead 
of the direct white lighting of 1939. 
One of the main entrances into the 
fun zone from the parking area 



Stackpole's statue 
of "Pacifica" with 
its colorful court 




46 THE MAGIC CITY 

opened through a new, giant gateway, decorated in glowing 
neon and fluorescent lights. 

Careful planning and coordination of effort brought about 
a most pleasing harmony between the day and night color of the 
buildings and the massed flowers, trees and shrubbery through 
the entire island. The Department of Horticulture began its 
labors even before the island had been completed, for it, too, 
dealt with blue-prints and long distance planning which would 
bring flowers to their peak of bloom for the opening of the Ex- 
position and then maintain an ever-changing schedule through- 
out the season. 

North of the causeway connecting Treasure Island with 
Yerba Buena Island and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge 
was an Avenue of Palms, with Phoenix canariensis in numbers 
flanking the six-lane motor highway. 

At the two main entrances and at intervals along the west 
facade were stately Washingtonia robusta palms, up to 70 feet 
in height, with hardy shrubs and tropical grasses in borders to 
form a transition between the lofty walls and entrance towers, 
and the striking ground cover planned for this area. There were 
more than a million separate cuttings planted for this spectacular 
feature alone a varicolored "Persian Prayer Rug" or Magic 
Carpet of mesembryanthemum, 25 acres in extent. 

As the Exposition itself was laid out as an ancient walled city, 
courts and gardens within offered opportunity for tender sub- 
tropical plantings to thrive with complete protection from the 
rigors of wind and chill. 

The Department of Horticulture assisted also in coordinating 
the landscaping plans of the State in expending the $5,000,000 ap- 
propriation for buildings and exhibits: the Federal government 
with its $1,500,000, and the individual exhibitors and conces- 
sionnaires who erected their own buildings and landscaped their 
own plots contributed to the general landscaping plan. Avenues 
approaching these buildings, outside the central court group, 
were lined with acacia melanoxylon, acacia latifolia, platanus 
orientalis and olives. The long walls of the East Facade, fronting 



BEAUTY AND COLOR 47 

the Pacific Basin area, were relieved by planting including euca- 
lyptus, cypress, pentstemon, heather, leonotis, and Shasta daisies. 

Along the shores of the lagoons in the Pacific Basin were wil- 
lows overhanging plants along the marginal walks, with water 
plants and a variety of smaller specimens. 

Central feature of the Court of Flowers was a circular pool 
with fountain. Around this pool were pyramidal Grecian laurels 
spaced with aralia sieboldii, a large-leafed tropical plant. Beneath 
these were more than 150 strelitzia regina (Bird of Paradise) , 
with four changes in a border of seasonal flowers to maintain a 
constant color note of gold. 

The central pool was framed in an angular border accentu- 
ated by eucalyptus viminalis, 35 to 40 feet high, spaced with 
boxed red-flowering peach about 12 feet high. In the corners 
of the court were smaller pools backed by eucalyptus polyanthe- 
mos, alsophia Australis (Tree Fern) with aralia paparyfera, cala- 
dium esculanteum (elephants' ears) , rhododendrons, and acan- 
thus mollis ranged along the walls. At accent points were planted 
eugenia myrtifolia 16 to 18 feet high, and eucalyptus ficifolis 
(red-flowering) at the entrances. 

Plans called for 46 different varieties in this court, with more 
than 45,000 individual specimens. The Court of Flowers opened 
the season with calendulas, golden violas, bronze pansies, orange 
and yellow tulips, blue lobelia and sweet alyssum. These were 
followed with double pink larkspur, white and yellow dianthus, 
blue agapanthus, multicolor lantana and celoisa cristata in mix- 
ture, followed in the fall by dwarf chrysanthemums and white 
begonias. 

Adjoining the Court of Flowers was the long Court of Re- 
flections, with bougainvillea supplementing the vine plantings 
at the entrance, and tall poplars beside the Arch of Triumph at 
the eastern end. The color theme here was red, and a spectacular 
feature was the living border of red passion vines 20 to 25 feet 
long, with spreads of 15 to 18 feet, cascading into the court 
from niches high in the walls. 

Central in this court were two long rectangular pools flanked 



Jl 

1 




i5| 



. "*JF 



BEAUTY AND COLOR 49 

by Japanese privet trees 20 to 30 feet high, and eight-foot coton- 
easter franchetti standards, covered with red berries. In this court 
were more than 93,000 separate plantings. From February to 
May it was a mass of red ranunculus and red tulips, with a ground 
cover and borders of ruby violas and tango red pansies. 

The background for these flowers was a mass of red flowering 
rhododendrons accentuated at various points by plantings of 
red geraniums. In May and June red verbenas were at their 
height and were followed by red salvia. From the first of July 
until the early fall hybrid amarayllis, red tuberous begonias, red 
phlox, red salvia and echium bourgaeanum were the main at- 
traction. From early fall until the 1939 closing chrysanthemums, 
fuchsias and poinsettias were at their height. The background 
for these flowers in the red court was carried out as nearly as 
possible in trees and shrubs which produced red flowers or had 
a red cast to their foliage; such as red leafed plum (prunus pis- 
sardi) , eugenia myrtifolia, red flowering eucalpytus, escallonia 
rubra, hydrangeas and red bougainvillea. 

Gold and bronze were the color notes struck in the central 
Court of Honor, around the 400-foot Tower of the Sun. The 
theme tree was Magnolia grandiflora, with its golden-brown 
leaves, and the court was spaced off by boxwood hedge borders 
and two circles of Valencia oranges. The "plant census" in this 
court exceeded 83,000 specimens. It was in full bloom from Feb- 
ruary until May consecutively with blue hyacinths, yellow and 
white tulips, radio violas, Lord Beaconsfield pansies. This plant- 
ing was followed in the early summer and fall by tuberous be- 
gonias, golden bronze dahlias, otaheite dwarf oranges, colorful 
pepper plants and dahlia imerialis, Japanese privet trees, 40 to 
50 feet high, California madrones, California wild lilac, and 
stately Irish yews around the central pool served to dignify the 
Court of the Moon, with its color theme of blue and white. There 
were more than 148,000 plantings here, including violas, Peru- 
vian blue scilla, pure white phlox and candytuft, heavenly blue 
pansies, forget-me-nots, iris, delphiniums and ageratum. 

Live oaks (querous agrifolia) lent distinction to the South 



50 THE MAGIC CITY 

Gardens just beyond, which boasted more than 346,000 plant- 
ings. Pink tulips flanked the four corners of the sunken garden 
area; the pool being massed with quantities of blue hyacinths. 
This planting was followed by colorful annuals of all descriptions 
to carry through the summer and fall months. Almond stocks and 
marguerites formed a background in the remainder of the South 
Garden, accentuated with brilliant plantings of seasonals. 

The Exposition's main north-south avenue, know r n as the 
Court of the Seven Seas, had a row of acacia melanoxylon stand- 
ards along each side of the center line, with strips of seasonal 
plantings beneath them, and a wide lawn between trees and 
walls. Flowering trees, including 70-foot eucalypti, and English 
laurels were spaced along the walls. The color scheme of this 
court was worked out almost entirely in yellows and whites. 
Amurense lemon yellow poppies with a ground cover of apricot 
violas opened the Exposition, together with borders of white 
English daisies, white violas and yellow and white tulips. These 
flowers were accentuated with background of white flowering 
spiraea and Philadelphus coronarius together with double white 
flowering peach and yellow forsythia. This color scheme changed 
in the early summer with the planting of thousands of soft, 
violet phlox. There were more than 215,000 plantings here. 

The Court of Pacifica, northerly terminus of the Seven Seas, 
had a grouping of standard acacia trees around the central foun- 
tain. Blue and gold California's state colors prevailed, car- 
ried out in ageratum, calendulas, marigolds, chrysanthemums, 
marguerites, zinnias, yellow allyssum, centaurea cyaneous, ane- 
mones, Shasta daisies and iris. 

The Court of Nations, between the Federal Building on the 
eastern shore of Treasure Island and the Pacific Basin, opened 
with a planting of yellow calendulas, and white anemones com- 
bined with a ground cover of yellow alyssum and blue ageratum. 
When the calendulas passed their peak, the ageratum carried the 
blooming season through the summer and fall months with a 
consecutive blooming of quantities of dwarf lemon marigolds, 
yellow marguerites, giant marigolds, tithonia speciosa (Mexican 



BEAUTY AND COLOR 53 

zinnias). The color in this court during the fall months was accen- 
tuated with the early dwarf bedding chrysanthemums followed by 
taller growing chrysanthemums in shades of yellow and bronze. 

Fragrance, as well as color and artistic arrangement, was care- 
fully considered by the Bureau of Horticulture. In every court 
and garden were plantings, with penetrating fragrance, so that 
each unit had its characteristic fragrance as well as color. For 
this purpose the planners made considerable use of viburnum 
carlesi, hyacinths cestrum nocturnum, spicy rhododendrons, 
carissa grandiflora, Hildebrand's honeysuckle, star jasmine and 
many others. 

Julius L. Girod, responsible as Chief of the Bureau of Horti- 
culture for the accomplishment of this gigantic two-year task of 
transformation was a protege of John McLaren, famed creator 
of Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. McLaren himself acted 
in an advisory capacity in this, his second World's Fair, for he 
was Chief of Division in the horticultural program of the Pan- 
ama-Pacific International Exposition in 1915. 

Elmer C. Gould, assistant Director of Horticulture in 1939, 
was appointed Chief of the Division for the Fair in Forty and 
designed a planting schedule to conform with the more vivid 
color scheme developed by Color Architect Stanton. 

One of the most spectacular floral sights of the second year 
was the "Border of the Magic Carpet" red Flanders poppies, 
four feet high, rimming the entire front walls of the Exposition. 
The Magic Carpet, 25 acres of mesembryanthemums, was again 
brought into full bloom for the opening. More than 1,500,000 
plants bloomed within the walls. 

Nearly a million new annuals were planted in the flower beds, 
half of which were timed to blossom during the early weeks of the 
Exposition and the remainder from July to September. Each in- 
dividual court, as in the previous year, had its particular color 
scheme and gardeners set to work as soon as the re-opening was 
decided on. Old plants were removed and beds re-cultivated to 
insure the glorious bloom which had been so important a part 
of the picture in 1939. 



54 THE MAGIC CITY 

Treasure Garden was more beautiful than ever with three 
levels of blue Chinese forget-me-nots, gold pansies and yellow 
calendulas making up California's colors of blue and gold. 

Blooming white stocks gave a celestial touch to the blue-white 
Court of the Moon. Mixed cineraria accentuated the Court of 
Honor. California poppies added a vivid orange note to the 
Court of Reflections and red stocks provided a vivid contrast. 

Tuberous begonias bloomed early on Treasure Island and 
were seen in all their beautiful pink, red and yellow in the Court 
of Flowers. 

Mixed orange calliopsis and salmon and orange godetias gave 
a golden hue to the Court of the Seven Seas. In the Court of 
Pacifica, orange calendulas were in full bloom, and around the 
Fountain of Western Waters in the same court, red, yellow and 
purple ranunculus and anemones of the same warm colors lent 
their fragrance to the air. Massed pelargoniums supplied the 
color tempo around the Lake of Nations. 

Seven acres of lawn . . . 4,000 trees fully grown . . . 40,000 
shrubs . . . eight miles of shade trees . . . flowers of every shape 
and hue . . . the perfumed gardens of Treasure Island will always 
be a happy memory to the millions who found in the Magic City 
"a thing of beauty and a joy forever." 





CHAPTER V 



B 



THE CITY-THAT-WAS-TO-BE was pre-viewed and found good by a 
most distinguished and appreciative guest just seven months be- 
fore its formal opening. That guest was President Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt. 

Speaking before a luncheon gathering in the Administration 
Building some 1,000 civic, business, labor, political and in- 
dustrial figures were present by eagerly sought invitation the 
President commented that what he had seen had so impressed 
him that he was inclined to believe "your Exposition will set a 
new standard of beauty." This on July 15, 1938, when construc- 
tion and beautification was hardly more than at the half-way 
mark! 

"I think you people out here on the Pacific Coast, when you 
start to do something, do it better than anyone else in the United 
States," he declared. "All I can tell you is I await the passage of 
months before I can come back here to see your Exposition in its 
completed beauty." 



56 



Choosing his words carefully, definitely sounding policies 
which were to become even more firmly established in the years 
to come, the President spoke briefly on world peace. A signifi- 
cant paragraph: 

"The year 1939 would go down in history not only as the 
year of the two great American Fairs, but would be a year of 
world wide rejoicing if it could also mark definite steps toward 
permanent world peace. That is the hope and prayer of an over- 
whelming number of men and women and children in the world 
today." 

The President saw in the elaborate plans of commerce and 
industry for displays at the New York Fair and the Golden 
Gate International Exposition "an expression of confidence that 
the United States and all the Western Hemisphere will be at 
peace next year." 

This luncheon on Treasure Island was a significant occasion 

in the political and social history of San Francisco. The lion and 

Huge crowd gathers the lamb lay down together for the nonce; righteousness and 

for Fair program in . , , , 

Temple Compound peace had met each other. 




58 THE MAGIC CITY 

A Republican Governor of California (Frank F. Merriam) 
sat next a Democratic United States Senator (the late William 
Gibbs McAdoo) at the head table with a Democratic President. 
Harry Bridges, the waterfront labor leader, sat cheek-by-jowl 
with men high in the waterfront Employers' Association. A. F. of 
L. and C. I. O. shelved differences for the day. So completely 
obliterated were political and economic lines that United States 
Commissioner George Creel, acting as master of ceremonies, 
dared to "wise-crack" about situations which actually were no 
laughing matter. All of which delighted the guest of honor 
no end. 

Introducing Governor Merriam, Creel said he was "not only 
Governor of California, but also one of the few survivors of a 
once-great tribe which still practices the curious rites of its pe- 
culiar political sect." The Governor took this introduction in the 
best of spirits, declared that "the coming elections undoubtedly 
would leave some things to be decided by the people in the 
future." 

San Francisco's Republican Mayor Rossi, even then involved 
with the Department of the Interior over Hetch Hetchy prob- 
lems, was presented by the impish Creel as "one suffering from 
the seven-year Ickes!" 

When Rossi and President Cutler of the Exposition strove to 
express their gratitude to President Roosevelt for Federal aid 
already granted the Exposition, Creel denned gratitude as "a 
lively anticipation of favors to come." 

Despite his eagerly expressed desire to return to Treasure 
Island for a more extended visit, President Roosevelt was never 
to find the time. Advance preparations were made for his recep- 
tion in the summer of 1939, but pressure of more important 
duties forced cancellation of plans. Even so, the Exposition had 
no more active and valued friend than Franklin D. Roosevelt. 

Came at last the fateful day February 18, 1939 when the 
Magic City was to fling wide its gates. 

Years of discussing and planning months of construction on 
a project so ambitious as to stagger the imagination final weeks 



LET THERE BE LIGHT 59 

of frenzied furbishing, of last-minute checking and re-checking 
details 

All this was over and done with now, and the idea that men 
had dreamed five years before had been given solid form, clothed 
in beauty far beyond the concept of the original dreamers. The 
Magic City stood ready, brave and awe-inspiring in the California 
winter sunlight. 

Still a cold and lifeless city, however, for all the broad vision 
of its designers and the tried skill of its builders. A city that had 
yet to find itself. Apprehensive more than serene, and anything 
but indifferent to fate, it sat opposite (rather than by) the 
Golden Gate, awaiting the coming of a happy people to fill its 
echoing courts with laughter and music, to breathe into its high- 
vaulted corridors that soul which was to give it true being. 

Meantime, another and larger city of magic across the bay was 
re-discovering its soul. And a merry, carefree bawdy, even 
process it proved to be! 

Picture the day February 14, 1939. In the wee hours of that 
morning, Mr. John Tourist pulled into San Francisco. Ordi- 
narily, Mr. Tourist would have sought sleep, but in San Francisco 
that day there was neither sleep nor quiet nor sanity nor aware- 
ness of time for it was FIESTA! 

Dawn came, but dawn was merely a pause for hot coffee, a 
lull for reloading six-guns, for taking a hitch in silver belts, for 
straightening bandanas and ten-gallon hats, for greeting thou- 
sands of other modern cowboys, cowgirls, miners and "Thirty- 
niners" with a "Yippi-Yi-Yo." Mr. John Tourist fell in step. 

San Francisco not merely transformed herself for the 1939 
Exposition-opening Fiesta she reverted to type, forsaking fold- 
ing money and all its modern trappings for the rush and dust of 
the good old days. 

No man was safe, that Fiesta Week, who did not sport at least 
one garment or decoration blending into the thoroughly Western 
atmosphere of all San Francisco. Leading more than a half- 
million San Franciscans in the art of going Western was Fiesta's 
President, Parker S. Maddux, President of the San Francisco 



60 THE MAGIC CITY 

Bank. In very un-banker-like fashion, Mr. Maddux worked be- 
hind his desk bedecked in a manner to cause envy in the hearts 
of the Old West's sheriffs and ranchers. But rare was the execu- 
tive in any local industry who worked that week in San Fran- 
cisco's traditionally conservative dress. 

City administration went Western to keep pace with the tax- 
payer's festive mood. Retaining only his white carnation, the 
Honorable Angelo J. Rossi, mayor, conducted city affairs be- 
neath a black sombrero trimmed with silver, packed two six-guns 
to back his proclamation that Fun was King during Fiesta Week. 

Focal point of this gaily mad week was a small office in down- 
town San Francisco. From Fiesta headquarters, a deluge of pub- 
licity roared out across the nation. In national magazines, in the 
press, over the radio, 48 states listened to the greatest round of 
business-building ever staged by any city. (Twenty-two per cent 
jump in retail sales during the week!) Pulling the levers releas- 
ing this avalanche of favorable publicity for San Francisco, 
working with the famous communities which give the city its 
famous color, was Fiesta's Managing Director, Don V. Nicholson. 
In that office men met and created Polk Gulch, the Haight-Cole 
Frontier, The Marina Coast, Old Mission Trail, Rancho del Sol, 
Covered Wagon Days and scores of stunts and opportunities for 
Fiesta fun. 

Parades and kangaroo courts, bunting and mounted posses, 
firecrackers and whistles and horns, costume balls and dragon 
dances, fun from dawn to dawn this was the order of those 
120 brilliant hours that climaxed on Treasure Island, February 
18th, 1939. San Francisco was tired AND happy with her Fair. 

Came 1 940 and another perfect excuse for San Francisco and 
her neighbors to go Fiesta again. Since 1939, forward-looking 
Parker Maddux, supported by the press and civic leaders gener- 
ally, had answered the growing demand for an annual festival 
by permanently organizing The San Francisco Festival Associa- 
tion, Inc., to be sparked and directed by Don V. Nicholson and 
Harold J. Boyd as treasurer. The Association promptly set about 
to prove wrong all those who said the 1939 Fiesta could never 



LET THERE BE LIGHT 61 

again be equalled. It was equalled, but on a different plane, for 
Fiesta had grown up. During the Golden Forties Fiesta, whiskers 
and cowboys appeared aplenty, from May 21 through May 25, 
but the new order placed greater emphasis upon re-creating San 
Francisco's golden days; the bright reds and golds and silvers of 
Old Spain and Mexico, the music of the range and the lands 
south of the border. Again the city's colorful districts burst forth 
with false store fronts, donned their ancestral dress; flags of all 
nations welcomed the tourist and strolling minstrels erased any 
worries found among the local citizenry. And on the night of 
May 22, 1 940, this city of many races whose blood-kin in Europe 
were skidding over the brink of war, staged a parade whose three- 
hour magnificence paid tribute to San Francisco's tolerance, her 
civic pride and her love of a good celebration. 

The public schools dramatized the career of the West in a 
production, "Span of Gold"; fireworks turned night to day along 
the Bay; ten thousand danced in costume at the Civic Audito- 
rium. Hundreds of thousands again sought the spirit of Fiesta 
and turned their full attention to a grand opening of the "Fair 
in Forty." 

Among the many heritages which the Magic City left the 
Bay Area was the well-tested belief that San Francisco and the 
Bay Area deserve, and desire, an annual festival. Thus, the chap- 
ter on "Fiesta" can never be closed; rather, it will be the yearly 
chronicle of The City That Knows How. 

Magic of the Night cast its enchanted spell upon potential 
devotees some hours in advance of the formal opening on Feb- 
ruary 18. That all things might be in readiness, and duly tested 
in advance, the full lighting system of Treasure Island was 
turned on the evening of February 17. From 10:30 until mid- 
night residents of San Francisco and the East-bay cities drank in 
the glowing beauty of that irridescent jewel in the middle of 
San Francisco Bay. It was a dress-rehearsal of unusual promo- 
tional value, whetting public interest as nothing else could have. 

Optimism was tinged with apprehension when the manage- 
ment had completed its final pre-opening survey. Transporta- 



62 THE MAGIC CITY 

tion and travel agencies, hotels, housing committees and other 
sources reported "the greatest influx of visitors the San Francisco 
Bay area has ever known." Fearful lest the Exposition's untried 
facilities for handling crowds might break down under the strain, 
the management sounded a note of warning, rather than broad- 
casting a welcoming "come one, come all!" 

Conservative estimates indicated an opening-day attendance 
of 200,000, it had been reported some days in advance. In light 
of this influx, it was suggested that San Franciscans come to the 
Island by ferry, rather than risk heavy traffic on the bridge. Lest 
the 100-odd cafes and eating-places of Treasure Island, admit- 
tedly "more than adequate for any ordinary banner-day," be 
over-taxed, it was further suggested that visitors bring their own 
lunch and "make a picnic out of it." 

Anticipation and realization frequently fail to coincide in all 
details, however. So it was in this instance. Quoting from the 
San Francisco Examiner's unbiased report of the news of the 
day "That 'horrible traffic situation' that was predicted just 
didn't materialize. At no time did the bridge traffic jam up. At 
no time, up to mid-afternoon, were either the parking facilities, 
the roadway facilities or the crowd-handling facilities on the 
Island or any of its approaches even taxed." 

What the food-dispensing and parking-lot concessionnaires 
had to say on the general theme was not quoted. Possibly it was 
not quotable. 

Truth to tell, the first day's attendance of 128,697 was prob- 
ably a mite disappointing to some of those in authority over 
Exposition affairs. They had builded their hopes high. But then, 
as was pointed out quite cheerfully a few days subsequently, 
comparative attendance figures for the first two days of the San 
Francisco Fair and corresponding days of the Chicago Century 
of Progress gave the edge to the West by something over 50,000. 
The executors and sentiment-accelerators took heart. 

Influx of trade was expected to start early in the morning on 
opening day. All Exposition employes were at their posts at 7 
a.m., prepared for any and all eventualities. Most of them stayed 



LET THERE BE LIGHT 63 

up all night, just to be sure. Others actually worked all night 
those connected with the Department of Works and the Depart- 
ment of Operations in particular. These loyal folk achieved a 
modern miracle in getting the grounds and buildings cleared for 
opening. The night before no one could have imagined that the 
exhibit palaces could possibly be made ready, so great was the 
confusion of last-minute set-ups. Next morning, at 10 o'clock 
promptly, all was swept and garnished to receive company. 

The California Commission staff lays claim to the record 
achievement in this connection. Friday night they all but lost a 
truck in the deep mud of what was to be the court in back of the 
California Building. Saturday morning they were mowing a new 
lawn on that very spot! 

"Fair today and Sunday, gentle northeast wind" was the 
weather prediction for the auspicious occasion and the prom- 
ise was lived up to in full detail. Storms had been threatening 
earlier in the week, but switched providentially to strike Los 
Angeles instead. (Loyal San Franciscans pointed out that that 
was what came of living right!) 

San Francisco's colorful and carefree Fiesta culminated the 
night before Opening Day. The celebration lasted till the dawn's 
early light, and then some. 

Perhaps that is why the first ferry to leave San Francisco at 
8 a.m. for Treasure Island was not crowded anywhere near the 
limit set by Federal regulations, why traffic flowed unimpeded at 
50 miles per hour across the Bay bridge. The celebrants just had 
to catch up on some sleep before challenging further amusement 
over in the Magic City. Some 7,000 persons were registered 
through the turnstiles during the first hour something of a 
disappointment. However, as the morning hours passed, the traf- 
fic of trade increased, and before noon the clients were arriving 
in gratifying number. 

First scheduled official event of the day was to be Governor 
Culbert L. Olson's appearance beneath the Arch of Triumph 
connecting the Court of Reflections and the Court of Flowers. 
There His Excellency was to open a gate, built in the image of 



64 



THE MAGIC CITY 



the Golden Gate bridge, with a large and ornate jeweled key 
specially made for the occasion. This event was billed for 10:30 
in the morning. 

Governor Olson had been quite ill his political opponents 
were showing inclination to make capital out of his alleged "state 
of collapse" so it was suggested by President Leland W. Cut- 
ler of the Exposition that the gate-opening ceremony be post- 
poned an hour in order that the Governor might rest, and go 
immediately to the formal dedicatory exercises in Federal Plaza. 
The Governor rather resented such "coddling" but finally 
agreed. As he left his private suite in the California Building for 
his first appearance of the day, he was heard to remark, sotto voce 
but grimly withal, in passing a group of reporters: "Does this 
look like 'a state of collapse?" Thus proving that even Chief 
Executives have their moments of human frailty. 

By noon the vast Court of Nations (later to become more 
familiarly known as Federal Plaza) was jammed with humanity, 
the crowd spilling over into Temple Compound across the la- 
goon. A large platform had been erected in front of the Federal 

Building facing toward the main axis 
of the courts and exhibit palaces. 

Promptly on the stroke of the 
hour, bursting bombs, followed by 
pealing bells from the Tower of the 
Sun carillon signalized that the cere- 
monies were under way. President 
Cutler stepped to the microphone. 
His voice was carried over all the 
major broadcasting networks and 
was brought to every corner of the 
Island by the public address system. 
Obviously this was a moment in his 
life which he would remember 
always. 

More than any one man or group 
of men Leland W. Cutler was re- 



An airplane soars 
over the gigantic 
figure of "Pacifica" 




LET THERE BE LIGHT 



65 



sponsible for the creation of the Magic City now opening its gates 
to the world. He looked on the culmination of years of labor and 
saw it was good. He spoke slowly, and with marked feeling: 

"I have waited four years for this moment waited as a 
mother waits for her child's first step waited as a man who 
builds an ocean-going ship and, with bated breath watches it 
slide down into the water. Today our Exposition which we have 
been building becomes your Exposition. Treasure Island is of- 
fered today upon the altar of greater peace and greater good will 
among all the nations, among all the races." 

A roar of applause indicated that his hearers were only too 
willing to accept the transfer of ownership. 

The Most Reverend John J. Mitty, Archbishop of San Fran- 
cisco, raised his hand to pronounce the invocation. The serried 
thousands before him bowed their heads reverently. His Grace 
prayed for divine guidance toward the paths of peace, conclud- 
ing his eloquent plea with: "In these days of universal need, 
hold us close to Thee in love and service, and to one another in 
brotherhood, and direct our erring feet into the ways of peace." 

Led by the Exposition Band, a 
massed chorus of 500 sang the Na- 
tional Anthem, as the Stars and 
Stripes rose to full staff, the Cali- 
fornia Grays, Governor Olson's 
guard of honor, stiffly at attention. 

Atholl McBean, chairman of the 
Exposition's board of directors, 
spoke briefly. Rabbi Irving E. Reich- 
ert of Congregation Emanu-El char- 
acterized America's spirit of freedom 
and religious tolerance, exemplified 
on the Island by the non-sectarian 
Temple of Religion, as "an eloquent 
symbol of our faith in the Father- 
hood of God and the Brotherhood 
of Man." 



Tower of the Sun, 
an angle shot by 
artist George Gran 




66 THE MAGIC CITY 

Representing the chief executives of all cities in the Bay 
area, Mayor Angelo J. Rossi of San Francisco gave a warm greet- 
ing to Exposition visitors. He said, in part: 

"To us is given the honor and responsibility of staging the 
Golden Gate International Exposition and acting as host city in 
welcoming the world to participate in a celebration dedicated to 
the future of the Pacific empire. 

"In the spirit of western hospitality we invite the world to 
share the beauty and grandeur of Treasure Island in 1939. 

"As chief executive of the host city, it affords me genuine 
pleasure to assure visitors that a heartfelt welcome awaits their 
coming to the Exposition. Speaking for the citizenry of San Fran- 
cisco, we look forward to upholding western tradition of cor- 
diality and friendship. We know that the journey will be worth 
while, that the visit will be replete with interest and entertain- 
ment, and that memories will be stored with treasures of the 
Golden Gate International Exposition and the attractions of 
California and the west's vacationlands." 

Speaking for the Governors of the eleven western states, Gov- 
ernor Olson dedicated 1939 as the "Fiesta Year of the West." 
His message follows: 

"Living in a land endowed by nature with scenic grandeur, 
natural wonders and resources, we of the western states feel that 
this is a most favored part of the world. Our grandfathers settled 
here and conquered a wilderness. Our parents tamed that wil- 
derness and created for us a great empire, productive enough to 
enable all of us, if we will, to live and enjoy a life worth while. 
They bequeathed to us a tradition of true western hospitality 
characteristic of the pioneers of our land. 

"Upholding this tradition, the whole west from the north 
to the deep south, from the Rockies to the Pacific is holding 
open house, the premiere fiesta of all times the Golden Gate 
International Exposition on Treasure Island in San Francisco 
Bay. This year will be marked by a second mighty westward 
migration with all roads leading to Treasure Island. The eleven 
western states will be the hosts. 



LET THERE BE LIGHT 67 

"Now therefore be it proclaimed by us, the Governors of 
these eleven western states, that in the year 1939 we hereby indi- 
vidually and severally invite the people of the whole world to be 
the guests of the west and the Golden Gate International Expo- 
sition on Treasure Island throughout the year." 

Senor Fernando Berckemeyer, Peruvian Consul General and 
dean of the San Francisco consular corps, brought greetings and 
congratulations from Latin America. 

George Creel, United States Commissioner to the Exposition, 
pointed out that the Federal government was actually "discharg- 
ing an obligation, rather than conferring a favor," by partici- 
pating in this Pageant of the Pacific. Mr. Creel introduced 
Secretary of Commerce Daniel C. Roper as President Roosevelt's 
personal representative for the occasion. Secretary Roper de- 
clared that "these great international expositions both measure 
and pictorialize the panorama of human progress." 

Then Mr. Creel presided over the radio controls to present his 
Chief, whose voice came over the ether-waves, to be rebroadcast 
over the public address system, from the tip of far-off Florida. 
President Roosevelt's message, received with sincere enthusiasm 
follows: 

"As the boundaries of human intercourse are widened by 
giant strides of trade and travel, it is of vital import that the 
bonds of human understanding be maintained, enlarged and 
strengthened rapidly. Unity of the Pacific nations is America's 
concern and responsibility; their onward progress deserves now 
a recognition that will be a stimulus as well. 

"Washington is remote from the Pacific. San Francisco stands 
at the doorway to the sea that roars upon the shores of all these 
nations, and so to the Golden Gate International Exposition I 
gladly entrust a solemn duty. May this, America's World's Fair 
on the Pacific in 1939, truly serve all nations in symbolizing their 
destinies, one with every other, through the ages to come." 

The Right Reverend Edward Lambe Parsons, bishop of the 
Episcopal diocese of California, pronounced a brief benediction. 
The Exposition band and the massed chorus led the huge throng 



68 THE MAGIC CITY 

in the singing of "America." The formal opening ceremonies 
were concluded. The Magic City began to take on new life. 

A gay, carefree life it was, with the carnival spirit predomi- 
nating. The Gayway received a heavy play. The exhibit palaces 
drew their thousands. That night there was free dancing in Festi- 
val Hall and in the Administration Building, and the California 
Ballroom was dedicated to a rich and full life (due to be tragi- 
cally terminated by fire a year and a half later) with a Grand 
Ball. 

Far into the night the merrymakers held sway. The Magic 
City on Treasure Island had found its soul. 

And the following Monday painters and carpenters hastened 
to finish some few chores perforce left undone, due to the ex- 
igencies of Opening Day. Pacific House opened for public in- 
spection. The French Pavilion was ready for customers. The 
Gayway was better prepared for a rush of trade. 

The show settled down for its long scheduled run. 




CHAPTER VI 



O 



n 



GOVERNMENT is NO longer remote but, under the compulsion of 
vast changes in our social and economic structure, now touches 
intimately the life of every citizen from the cradle to the grave, 
from pre-natal care to old age security. The fight against infant 
mortality, the right of every child to health and education, the 
humanization of industry, the right to work and old age security, 
all these are no longer problems of the individual, but govern- 
mental obligations that must be discharged if our democracy is 
to endure. 

The purpose of Federal participation in the Golden Gate In- 
ternational Exposition, as conceived by Commissioner George 
Creel, was to show to citizens, in as dramatic and as interesting 
a manner as possible, the meaning of government today; what it 
is doing and why. Under his direction, exhibits were functional 
in character and not departmental. Such Federal activities as bore 
relation to each other, or joined effort to attain a common end, 
were grouped in order that the whole picture might be seen, not 
merely a part. Moreover, all exhibits were dynamic, rather than 



70 



THE MAGIC CITY 



static, so that what people were shown was really "government 
in action." 

The Federal building, designed by Timothy L. Pflueger, 
occupied a site of approximately seven acres, with a frontage of 
675 feet and a depth of 435 feet. Located on the Oakland side of 
Treasure Island, it stood at the end of the East- West axis of the 
Exposition. The building was in the form of a hollow rectangle 
pierced through the center of the long side by the great Colon- 
nade of States. One hundred feet high and 265 feet long, the slen- 
der columns of the Colonnade were capped by a canopy perforated 
in star-shaped patterns. Each of its 48 columns represented a com- 
monwealth, decorated with the state's seal, while the three aisles 
symbolized the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of 
government. The design, dramatic and unique, was in keeping 
with the exhibits within. 

The west, or principal frontage, faced the great Federal Plaza 
where all outdoor events pageants, military drills, concerts and 
ceremonies ~ were held. Flanking the Colonnade were two por- 
meet Indian chief ticos, each 60 feet high and 190 feet long, the walls of which were 








THE MAGIC CITY 



decorated with two murals in brilliant colors, one dealing with 
the Conquest of the West by land and the other by sea. These 
colossal murals, the largest in the world, were designed by Her- 
man Volz and executed under his direction by a selected crew of 
WPA artists. 

The portions of the building containing the exhibits rose to 
various heights, approximately 35 feet, and the two courts 
North and South were each 160 feet by 200 feet. The exhibits 
themselves, dynamic throughout, were no less impressive than 
the structure itself. 

The functional treatment was strikingly exemplified in the 
"Span of Life," a broad title given the exhibit in the southwest 
wing at the right of the entrance to the Colonnade. Starting with 
pre-natal care and continuing in perfect sequence to old age in- 
surance, the work was shown of all those Federal agencies that 
have to do with infant mortality, child health, education, em- 
ployment, disemployment and larger security for the aged. The 
complete story made an amazing picture. 

Many difficulties attended the creation of an exhibit that 
would make plain the myriad activi- 
ties of the Works Projects Adminis- 
tration, that mighty Federal agency 
designed to provide public employ- 
ment for the unemployed. Out of 
long study came the brilliant con- 
ception of a model community plac- 
arded in such manner as to show 
WPA contributions to our national 
life. When completed, the model 
was only 15 feet high by 10, and yet 
complete with buildings, water 
mains, tennis and golf courses, 
threaded by roads and rivers, and 
landscaped with minute shrubs and 
plants. 

On the doll-size house, a placard 



Candid camera shot 
of real Americans in 
U. S. Indian Exhibit 




GOVERNMENT ON PARADE 



73 



stated that WPA workmen have constructed 3,985 life-size school 
buildings in the United States. Across the street, actually only 
five inches in this midget town, a tiny recreation center carried 
a sign informing visitors that 6,435 such buildings have been 
erected. Looking down on this Lilliputian community, Ameri- 
cans were made to realize that the model, multiplied thousands 
of times, was a facsimile of the United States. 

Surrounding the model community were a score of booths, 
appropriately staffed, showing such WPA projects as termite re- 
search, sewing, ceramics, handicraft, toymaking domestic science, 
together with the output of the Writers' Project and Art Project. 

The Terrarium located in the "L" at the end of the south- 
west wing, was devoted to the Federal Government's campaign 
for conservation of our natural resources, and over the doorway 
hung this warning, "Plan or Perish." 

Fifty feet in diameter, and rising to a domed roof forty feet 
high, the Terrarium had at its center a miniature dust bowl, 
sunk to a depth of eight feet. Devastated farms, deserted commu- 
nities, choked water courses, all were depicted realistically, while 
around the lower wall were exquis- 
itely executed dioramas of land- 
scapes showing the various phases of 
land abuse and soil conservation. 

The first diorama showed Amer- 
ica as the white man found it with 
nature in perfect balance; the sec- 
ond diorama the ravages of erosion 
by wind and water; the third pre- 
sented the progress of the campaign 
of the Soil Conservation Service of 
the Department of Agriculture, 
showing every detail of the fight to 
restore land to productive activity; 
the fourth gave a comprehensive 
picture of TVA work and accom- 
plishments; the fifth demonstrated 



Impressive group of 
statuary found in 
Court of Seven Seas 




74 THE MAGIC CITY 

the Bureau of Biological Survey's fight against stream pollution, 
permitting the return of fish and wild fowl; the sixth dramatized 
the work of the Bureau of Reclamation and its fight against the 
desert. 

The south wing carried this over-all title, "The Helping 
Hand of Uncle Sam," and gave a vivid picture of the Recon- 
struction Finance Corporation, the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation, housing agencies, Federal aid to road building and 
all forms of transportation, the Post Office Department, recipro- 
cal trade treaties, the Veterans' Administration, Rural Electrifi- 
cation, etc., etc. 

The functional treatment was carried to its ultimate in the 
Housing exhibit, where a 100 foot stretch of models and diora- 
mas explained the activities of each agency making home own- 
ership easier, the testing of materials, the checking of costs, and 
plans for slum clearance both in the cities and the rural areas. 

On the outer wall of the building, above the entrance to the 
exhibit, murals gave more colorful interest to the story of hous- 
ing. Side by side with a painting of a city slum, was shown one of 
the new model communities made possible through Federal aid. 
Another mural, showing a drab suburban area, carried these 
captions: "Beauty and Originality Cost No More than Ugly 
Uniformity" and "Today's Jerry Building, Tomorrow's Slums." 

The extreme southern portion of the South Court also con- 
tained a life-size 4-story tenement, brought out from an eastern 
city, and a sharecropper's shack, transported intact from a south- 
ern county. Photographs showed the two generations that were 
born and lived in the tumbledown cabin, while directly adjacent 
were photographs of the new homes that were provided by the 
Rural Resettlement Administration. 

Of particular interest was the Bureau of Public Roads ex- 
hibit. Entitled "Highways of History," it began with the land- 
ing of the first horses in America, and worked on down through 
Boone's Wilderness Road and the Natchez Trace to the modern 
highway and its uses. 

These scenes were depicted in 35 dioramas, which by means 



GOVERNMENT ON PARADE 75 

of a mechanical device and mirrors, were brought successively 
into view, and described by a synchronized recorded narration. 

A popular exhibit was that of the United States Secret Ser- 
vice of the Treasury Department, showing the fight against coun- 
terfeiters of coin and currency. Along with it, the Customs Bu- 
reau displayed the one hundred and one methods used in 
narcotics smuggling. 

The southeast wing was given over in its entirety to those 
contributions that have been made to science and invention by 
public servants working in Federal laboratories and experimental 
stations. No section of the building was more popular, or more 
educational for that matter, due to the fact that few citizens 
were cognizant of the important part that government scientists 
and inventors have played in America's forward march. 

Various ingenious machines showed how the Bureau of 
Standards studies, develops and lists in order to improve the 
products of American factories; a "Forest Horn of Plenty" dis- 
played the innumerable by-products that have been developed 
by government scientists, and striking displays made clear the 
manner in which the Department of Agriculture has improved 
wheat and corn, poultry and livestock. 

A whole room was allotted to the United States Weather 
Bureau, and for the first time thousands of Americans were made 
to understand the incredible amount of work that lies behind 
each daily weather report. The exhibit displayed all of the com- 
plex assortment of meteorological instruments and techniques 
used in measurements of pressure, temperature, relative humid- 
ity, sunshine and evaporation. 

The exhibit of the National Advisory Committee for Aero- 
nautics threw light on the experimental and research work in 
aviation that has resulted in improved aeronautical design and 
increased aircraft safety and efficiency. 

The Coast and Geodetic Survey gave a complete picture of 
the way in which America's sea coasts are surveyed and charted, 
likewise studies made in connection with earthquakes. 

At the south end of the Science wing, the Civil Aeronautics 



76 THE MAGIC CITY 

Authority occupied 3,400 feet of floor space and 2,900 feet of 
wall space. The main floor portion of the exhibit was devoted to 
the demonstration of the activities of a regular Airway Traffic 
Control Center. An effective feature was a huge mural map, 20 
feet high and 32 feet long, titled "The Airman's America" and 
made up of sectional navigation charts issued by the Civil Aero- 
nautics Authority to pilots for cross-country flights. 

The whole long stretch of the northwest wing, including the 
"L," was given over to national defense activities, Army, Navy, 
and Marine Corps sharing the space. Brilliantly designed and 
executed, every detail had life, motion and drama, and public 
interest stood attested by the thousands of visitors that packed 
the wing each day from opening to close. 

The Army exhibit opened dramatically with a Link Trainer 
in action. Next came a huge animated diorama, portraying the 
attack of a brigade of mechanized cavalry. After that, in swift 
succession, were other dioramas, case exhibits, murals, etc., that 
showed every Army activity both in peace and war. 

The Navy Exhibit in the large "L" at the north end of the 
National Defense Wing, was designed to show the growth and 
development of the Navy and naval ships from the time of the 
Revolutionary War up to the present. On the waves of a diorama 
ocean, 1 12 feet long, 20 feet deep and 20 feet high, floated models 
of battleships, cruisers, aircraft carriers, destroyers and subma- 
rines while circling above were six miniature patrol bombing 
planes of the flying boat type, and six miniature bombing planes, 
flying in formations of three. Another feature of the exhibit were 
models of the "Bon Homme Richard," the "Constitution," the 
"Monitor," the "Merrimac," and the "Olympia," Admiral Dew- 
ey's flagship. 

The Marine Corps exhibit consisted of six niches containing 
two dummies each in uniforms worn by members of the United 
States Marine Corps since 1798. Each niche also contained a 
painting, depicting battle scenes in various wars. 

The National Defense exhibit, however, was not confined to 
the building, for a Flying Fortress Type B-17 Army bomber 



GOVERNMENT ON PARADE 77 

-was installed at the east end of the Colonnade of States, and 
two Air Corps enlisted men were always on duty. Visitors entered 
through the main door by a series of steps and a platform, passed 
through the gunner's department, radio room, and exited by a 
flight of steps through the bomb bay. Machine guns, radios and 
dummy bombs were in place and all points of interest were la- 
beled by aluminum cards. 

The Exposition Company of the 30th Infantry was another 
Army highlight. The entire unit, consisting of nine officers, one 
warrant officer and 208 enlisted men encamped on the waterfront 
just north of the Federal Building throughout the two seasons 
of the World's Fair. 

Throughout 1939 and 1940, the Exposition Company pro- 
vided Guards of Honor and Escorts of Honor for distinguished 
visitors officially visiting Treasure Island. The most impressive 
ceremony of all, and one witnessed regularly by thousands, was 
the daily Retreat Ceremony. Each afternoon at four-twenty-five, 
the Regimental Band gave a concert in front of the Federal 
Building, after which the company executed a few movements 
of the Manual of Arms, and stood at Parade Rest while the Color 
Guard lowered the two great flags. 

Two pavilions on the waterfront housed exhibits showing 
the activities of the United States Coast Guard, and also served 
as headquarters for a detail of two officers and thirty enlisted 
men. Daily drills were given, illustrating the use of boats and 
beach apparatus, and on special days, these were followed by a 
capsize drill. From time to time, destroyers, lighthouse ships and 
other craft were moored off shore, all open to visitors. 

The Indian exhibit, located in the north wing of the Federal 
Building, was the largest and most comprehensive ever installed 
at any exposition, covering an area of 50,000 square feet. Be- 
ginning with an introductory gallery of Indian history, eight 
main galleries were devoted to the great areas of Indian cultures 
the Eskimo Hunters of the Arctic, the Fishermen of the 
Northwest Coast, the Seed Gatherers of the Far West, the Buf- 
falo Hunters of the Plains, the Woodsmen of the Eastern Forests, 



78 



THE MAGIC CITY 



the Cornplanters of the Pueblos, the Navajo Shepherds and the 
Desert Dwellers of the Southwest. 

In addition to the stationary displays of Indian arts and 
crafts, there was a program of activities throughout the exhibit 
which included talk tours by national authorities, demonstra- 
tions by outstanding Indian craftsmen of weaving, pottery mak- 
ing, silversmithing, wood-carving, sand painting and other arts. 
In the market place, Indian workers were given opportunity to 
display for sale their finest crafts. 

A striking feature was the Sandpainting Room, specially 
constructed in the form of a Navajo hogan where specially quali- 
fied medicine men performed this esoteric ceremonial rite, never 
witnessed before except in the Navajo country itself. Although 
the room was small, accommodating only 200, in one afternoon 
9,866 persons streamed through the doors. 

All the principal features of the 1939 Indian exhibit were 
retained for 1940, and to them were added a special Maya ex- 
hibit, and an Andean room dealing with the Inca and pre-Inca 
period. 

A small, but completely equipped 
theatre occupied the entire south 
end of the northeast wing and was 
designed both for the Federal The- 
atre Project and the showing of 
Government motion pictures. Prior 
to the discontinuance of the Federal 
Theatre Project on June 30, 1939, 
"Run Little Chillun" and "The 
Swing Mikado" had played to 16,- 
817 paid admissions at 75 perform- 
ances, a remarkable record consid- 
ering that the theatre had a seating 
capacity of only 473. After June 30, 
the theatre was devoted entirely to 
the presentation of documentary 
films covering every activity of the 



Color guard parades 
before the massive 
Federal Building 




GOVERNMENT ON PARADE 



79 



Federal Government, and the same program was carried during 
the 1940 season. 

Adjoining the main theatre was a small auditorium where 
children were admitted without charge to WPA marionette 
shows. Specially equipped with a revolving stage permitting 
seven complete changes of scenery without re-setting, every per- 
formance was played to standing room only. In 1939, some 40,- 
000 children saw 448 performances of "Snow White," and in 
1940, performances of "Pinocchio" and "The Treasure Island 
Varieties" were witnessed by more than 90,000, although the 
seating capacity of the theatre was 100. 

The great South Court, shadowed by magnolia trees and 
bright with flowers, was given over entirely to the varied activi- 
ties of the WPA recreation program. Orchestras from the Music 
Project played throughout each day, and ping-pong tables, bad- 
minton courts, shuffle boards and other games furnished enter- 
tainment to thousands. 

The highlight of the Court was a working model of the pre- 
school play centers, established by hundreds throughout the 
country. An information house of 
modern glass brick gave full infor- 
mation about the WPA recreation 
program, and in twenty booths scat- 
tered about the Court, trained lead- 
ers gave instruction, along with 
displays of finished work. At a minia- 
ture lake instruction in fly casting 
was given by a WPA expert. 

The North Court was turned over 
in its entirety to the National Park 
Service in order to let this agency 
show what it had done to make 
Americans an outdoor people. Vari- 
ous trees, plants and flowers were 
brought down from the Yosemite 
National Park, waterfalls created, 



Artist George Grau 
snaps an unusual 
Tower stairway shot 





80 THE MAGIC CITY 

trails made, and wayside shelters built, complete in every detail. 
In the center of the court huge redwood logs were laid in amphi- 
theatre fashion around a campfire circle, and here Forest Rangers 
and Park officials gave lectures from time to time. This Sylvan 
Theatre was also used for concerts and chorals, and became one 
of the most popular places on the Island. 

Not the least interesting feature of the court was a replica of 
the General Sherman Tree in Sequoia National Park, the "oldest 
living thing in the world." The cross-section of the trunk was so 
skillfully arranged that it seemed to be one piece, and the annu- 
lar rings were captioned in such manner as to connect the growth 
of the giant Sequoia with historical events. 

Shelters built out from the side wall of the court were used 
by the Forest Service to exhibit fire fighting apparatus, and 
blown-up photographs illustrated methods of forest protection. 

A sun deck off the Commissioner's office in the southeast 
wing was used throughout 1939 and 1940 for buffet luncheons 
in honor of distinguished guests. 



b 




CHAPTER VII 



THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA had a $5,350,000 interest in the 
Golden Gate International Exposition, represented in 18 build- 
ings and more than a score of important exhibits. 

The property investment was administered for the people of 
California by the California Commission, a representative body 
of 25 men and women who served without remuneration. 

Chief among the buildings and one of Treasure Island's most 
beautiful structures was the California State Building, the popu- 
larity of which brought 3,500,000 visitors within its doors in 1 939. 

The California State Building adjoined the Federal Plaza 
and overlooked the Court of the Great Seal and the Lake of the 
Nations. Against the walls were chairs and lounges in a tem- 
pered, modern French design upholstered in damask of formal 



82 THE MAGIC CITY 

design, with fuchsia-colored foliage on a cream-colored back- 
ground. 

Opening off the promenade was the Women's Lounge, a 
long, high ceilinged, rectangular room designed primarily as a 
combined dining-room and lounge for women's activities, but 
also used for social gatherings. The massive furniture was of 
pickle oak, a light-grained wood filled in with white lead and 
waxed to a soft finish. French doors, opening on the terrace, 
were draped with straight hangings of blue velvet and, in the 
evening, soft illumination was diffused through diamond shaped 
openings of glass set flush with the ceiling in a novel pattern. 

Opposite the Women's Lounge were three rooms reserved 
for an exhibit of California painters, etchers and photographers. 
The central room, Graphic Hall, was octagonal in shape with 
galleries on either side containing selected exhibits of camera 
studies, lithographs and paintings by California artists. 

The main foyer, or rotunda, was a large circular hall occupy- 
ing the center and reaching the full height of the building. Since 
it was used as a lounge and an audience chamber for visiting 
orchestras, fashion shows and other entertainment, two sides 
were arranged so as to accommodate rows of large wicker chairs, 
comfortably upholstered in the basic tones of deep aquamarine 
blue and Chinese red, which formed a keynote of the decorative 
scheme. 

Decorating the upper portion of the semi-circular walls on 
each side of the Rotunda were pictorial maps, one representing 
the highway system of California and the other the Pacific trade 
routes. Casements extending to the ceiling over the entrance 
doors and over the French doors opposite, which opened onto 
the terrace and the State Gardens, gave a maximum of light. On 
the walls to the right and left of the entrance were hand carved 
wooden plaques bearing the individual seals of all the California 
Counties. A circular recessed dome in the ceiling, rose-tinted, 
was surrounded by light diamonds. 

A room designed especially for Jo Mora's "Portola's Expedi- 
tion in 1769" was located just off the Rotunda. It was in cres- 



CALIFORNIA PRESENTS 



cent form, 100 feet in length and 10 feet in depth, and on 
it was placed a caravan of 64 human and animal figures 
made of plaster of paris, each in different posture. A changing 
combination of colored lights against the diorama, showing the 
pale light of dawn, the hot sun of mid-day, and finally a glow- 
ing panorama of the setting sun fading into the cold blue of 
moonlight, providing a pleasant retreat for visitors, who rested 
in comfortable lounge chairs and were at the same time enter- 
tained with an interesting sound narration describing the scene. 
In the other end of the building was a reception room which 
extended along the inner side of the State Gardens and opened 
full-length into the ballroom. Perhaps the most unusual feature 
of this room was the curved interlacing ceiling fixture, which fur- 
nished the illumination. The predominating color tone of the 
walls and hangings was a soft salmon. Couches and chairs lined 
the room. The light standards were of copper and ebony. An in- 
teresting part of the illumination was a group of light globes 
hung on a slender shaft, which depended from the ceiling at the 
end of the room, where curving stairs led to the balcony. 

The ballroom was an immense, 
rectangular room, with balconies 
extending around three sides. The 
east wall was devoted to a large, re- 
cessed stage, framed by scenes por- 
traying the Spanish Fiesta days of 
early California. 

There were three methods of il- 
lumination in the ballroom, which 
could be used separately or together 
to achieve various effects. The most 
striking, perhaps, was the suspended 
translucent ceiling of "celo-glass" of 
a structural herringbone design, af- 
fording indirect lighting by means 
of concealed light "spots." Large 
balloon lanterns of rose-colored silk 



Gov. Olson greets 
Sierraville Stage at 
The City of Magic 




84 



THE MAGIC CITY 



dropped from the ceiling on straight metal shafts above the bal- 
conies. And not the least effective were the louvers or open niches 
of light housed inside the full height of each of the main struc- 
tural columns supporting the balconies and the ceiling. The 
chairs lining the walls under the balconies were upholstered in 
blue and rose. 

The Executive Offices of the California Commission were lo- 
cated on the second floor. Private offices of Governor Culbert 
L. Olson were entered through a reception room at the head of 
the stairs. On the left of the inner corridor was the Administra- 
tion dining room, and at the end of the corridor was the confer- 
ence room used by the California Commission and other com- 
mittees in official gatherings at the Exposition. 

Under the sponsorship and management of the California 
Commission and located on the southeastern side of Treasure 
Island were the nine county group buildings. In appearance, each 
county building took its cue from the sponsoring region. 

The county buildings included: the Redwood Empire, Ala- 
meda-Contra Costa, San Francisco, Mission Trails, Shasta-Cas- 

cade, Alta California, San Joaquin, 
Sacramento-Tahoe, and Southern 
Counties. Each of these housed a 
number of arresting exhibits and 
dioramas portraying the commer- 
cial, agricultural, recreational and 
educational advantages of the re- 
spective areas represented. 

The Shasta-Cascade building con- 
tained exhibits and decorations typi- 
fying the outdoor wonderland of 
Northern California with a large 
rustic outdoor campfire circle where 
numerous picnics and outdoor 
luncheons were held. 

The Redwood Empire building 
was constructed in the form of a 



Fire raqes in State's 
beautiful building 
on Treasure Island 







. * 



CALIFORNIA PRESENTS 87 

hunting lodge in the heart of the redwoods, with brooks, ponds 
and gardens planted in native wild flowers indigenous to the 
northern coastal counties. 

The Sacramento Valley-Tahoe Region building gave an inti- 
mate picture of the agricultural, mining and recreational re- 
sources of that region. More than $100,000 in nuggets, gold dust, 
wire gold, rich quartz and other specimens were shown there. 

The San Joaquin Valley building specialized in the agricul- 
tural riches of that territory. On many occasions, such as city 
and county "days," samples of fresh or dried fruits were given 
away to visitors. 

The Alta California building had individual dioramas and 
displays of each county represented within its group, in addition 
to a large model of typical agricultural areas of that section, ani- 
mated by model trains. Attracting the attention of visitors were 
numerous fluorescent ores displayed under "black light" in a 
replica of a mine tunnel. 

The Mission Trails building utilized the best architectural 
features of seven of California's famous old Franciscan missions. 
A feature of this building was an imported Spanish tile fountain 
which graced the center of the interior. 

The Alameda-Contra Costa building displayed the industrial 
resources of those two counties. In addition, the garden court 
of this building was one of the floricultural masterpieces of the 
entire Exposition. 

Largest exhibit building in the State-Counties group was 
the Southern Counties building, which, during 1939, housed 
the exhibits of Los Angeles and San Diego Counties, and in 1940, 
Los Angeles County alone. A huge array of fresh fruit and veg- 
etables, dioramas, murals and other media were used to display 
the varied resources of this region. One of the outstanding ex- 
hibits was the Cecil B. DeMille collection which told the amaz- 
ing story of the development of the motion picture industry. 

The San Francisco building was the host City building at 
the Exposition. Connected with the host State building by the 
Court of the Great Seal, the San Francisco building was one of 



88 THE MAGIC CITY 

the important centers on Treasure Island. It depicted the early 
history of San Francisco, its present development and a model 
of a streamlined San Francisco of 1999. Attractions in the build- 
ing included the Franciscan Order's exhibit of historical mission 
relics and the Wells Fargo exhibit of the days beginning with 
the Gold Rush of '49. 

In addition to the exhibits in the California and County 
buildings, the State constructed and maintained a number of 
other displays picturing the varied resources of the great Pacific 
Commonwealth. 

California's greatest industry is Agriculture and it was only 
fitting that this great natural resource should have an outstand- 
ing place. Practically every farm cooperative and organization 
in the State joined with the California Commission in build- 
ing and maintaining this exhibit. The history of agriculture in 
California from the days of the padres down to the present was 
dramatically portrayed in a series of dioramas. Central theme of 
the exhibit was a large globe illustrating how California dis- 
tributes agricultural commodities by sea transportation to the 
concentrated centers of population throughout the world. 

One of the most interesting and instructive exhibits of the 
entire Exposition was that of the University of California. It 
traced the course of human, animal and plant life from the 
pleistocene period to modern times. It showed the seven races of 
man and their early migrations over the earth. The sciences of 
geology, anthropology, paleontology, zoology and the study of 
heredity were illustrated with a truthfulness only science can 
attain. A large section of the exhibit was devoted to medical 
science. One of its outstanding features was a replica of the huge 
atom smasher at the University of California. Space also was 
given to examples of structural engineering and other accom- 
plishments in the modern endeavors of man. 

Every phase of modern schooling in California was shown in 
the Education exhibit. Nursery school, kindergartens, junior 
and senior high schools and their objectives were demonstrated. 
A series of transparencies showed the methods employed in spe- 



CALIFORNIA PRESENTS 89 

cial education, such as for the deaf, blind and crippled. Safety 
education, schoolhouse planning, Indian schools, vocational edu- 
cation and many other phases of this profession were illustrated 
in the exhibit. The entire effort caused widespread comment 
among experts in educational fields throughout the country. 

Probably the greatest collection of the works of contempo- 
rary California artists ever assembled was exhibited during both 
years of the Fair. Scores of paintings, water colors, etchings, wood 
cuts, photographs and other forms of art were hung in the cor- 
ridors of the California building. 

For the first time in the history of Expositions, the recrea- 
tional activities of a great State were shown in detail. In the 
Recreation building there was a little theatre for dramatics, mo- 
tion pictures and puppet shows; a music room for vocal and 
instrumental programs; a junior museum featuring arts, crafts 
and hobbies. Other popular features were a typical backyard 
with fireplace and picnic area for luncheon parties, a well 
equipped playground for children and a sports field. 

California is famous for her flowers and it was natural that 
the California Commission's Hall of Flowers would prove one 
of the most attended spots on Treasure Island. Here profes- 
sional, amateur and scientific exhibitors displayed the finest of 
plants and blooms from North and South America and the 
islands of the South Pacific. Here garden clubs and other organi- 
zations vied with each other in fragrant floral exhibits of riotous 
color. So popular was this building that the California State 
Fair obtained it for future use as a permanent building when 
the 1940 Exposition closed. 

Another important aspect of the California area was the col- 
orful outdoor landscaping. Hundreds of varieties of flowers, 
shrubs and trees made it a garden spot of flowering magnificence. 
Flower lovers from all over the West made trips through the gar- 
dens conducted by competent guides. All of these flowers, shrubs 
and trees were preserved after the Exposition closed for distribu- 
tion among various State institutions. 

One of the engineering wonders of the modern world is the 



90 



Central Valley Project, which, when completed, w r ill harness the 
flood waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers to reclaim 
hundreds of thousands of acres of desert and arid lands and pro- 
vide cheap electric power for all of Northern California. 
Throughout the Exposition, the California Commission main- 
tained a novel exhibit of this project in the Hall of Western 
States. It consisted of a huge screen on which a combination of 
stereopticon slides and motion pictures, all automatically oper- 
ated, continuously unraveled the history, aims and scope of the 
project. 

Perhaps the most realistic and elaborate display of the entire 
Exposition was that of the California Department of Natural Re- 
sources and the Highway Department. A typical mountain brook 
and waterfall so natural in construction they seemed to have been 
lifted bodily out of the High Sierras, first attracted the eye. Then 
in successive dioramas were mounted specimens of all of Cali- 
fornia's principal wild bird and animal life in their natural set- 
tings. In the area devoted to the Highway Department, a series 
of scenes showed the development of the arteries for traffic from 
the time of the narrow dirt road to the modern super-highway. 
Many sections of California served by this highway system were 
portrayed. 

Other buildings built by the California Commission were the 
Coliseum, seating 9,200 people, which was the scene of many 
livestock shows, symphony concerts, rodeos, and horse shows; 
the California Auditorium and radio studios which housed the 
Folies Bergere and from which most of the Treasure Island pro- 
grams were broadcast; the livestock barns; the United States 
Coast Guard buildings, and the Press Building. The Press build- 
ing was one of the most popular gathering places on the island. 

On Saturday, August 24, 1940, at 9:20 o'clock in the morn- 
ing, a staggering blow was dealt the California Commission, the 
one misadventure to mar the entire administration of the State 
of California's participation on Treasure Island. Fire broke out 
in the rear of the ballroom stage of the California State building 
and the flames spread quickly to the entire structure, completely 



CALIFORNIA PRESENTS 



91 



destroying it except for a separate wing housing the displays of 
the Department of Natural Resources. Twenty-seven engine 
companies, 14 truck companies, 5 water wagons, and 2 fireboats, 
comprising the personnel of 52 officers and 252 men, were im- 
mediately set in action and valiant fire fighting was witnessed. 
Sixty thousand six hundred lineal feet of hose, 42 ladders of vary- 
ing length and an 85 foot aerial truck were used. When a check 
was made of the blaze in the ballroom stage, it was found that 
the fire had spread to the roof and was beyond control. 

Meanwhile the work of removing the contents of the build- 
ing was started and a detachment of 200 soldiers, stationed at 
Treasure Island's Camp Hunter Liggett, swung into action, ar- 
riving at the scene on the double. The valuable service of this 
disciplined group, along with the assistance of 160 sailors from 
the United States Navy mine layers, the "Montgomery" and the 
"Ramsay," resulted in the saving of practically all of the works 
of art, many historical objects of intrinsic value and a large 
amount of equipment. The California State Police, San Fran- fire-fighters vainly 

/" T i /"< IT TT- i try to extinguish 

Cisco City Police, California Highway Patrolmen and Exposition the spreading flames 






r* 









I 



im 



a , 



7- 



92 



THE MAGIC CITY 



Guards, also gave their services and aided materially in remov- 
ing official files, furniture and furnishings. 

Within three hours after the destruction of the building, the 
Executive officers had opened new headquarters, re-established 
telephonic communication and were continuing with business 
as usual. A luncheon that was scheduled for several hundred 
guests in the California Building the same day of the fire was 
given on time in another suitable location. 




CHAPTER VIII 



tlte Stated, 



TEN STATES AND BRITISH COLUMBIA paraded their wares in the 
Hall of Western States. Located north of the Federal exhibit 
area, it faced the Concourse of Commonwealths, the main high- 
way on the eastern side of Treasure Island. Represented there 
were Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, 
Oregon, Washington, Utah, and British Columbia. 

The Hall of Western States was constructed around an open 
court, with individual rooms for each State, and an outdoor area 
devoted to a large exhibit of Oregon wild-life. 

The court contained a relief map of the eleven Western 
States and British Columbia. This relief map, the largest ever 
built, was 110 feet square and was composed of 2,048 separate 
sections. For more than a year, as many as 500 people at one 



94 THE MAGIC CITY 

time were engaged to work on the project. Visitors viewed the 
map from a bridge crossing from a fountain at the main gate to 
the entrance of the first of the State exhibits. 

Directly fronting the eastern end of the bridge was the Utah 
exhibit with those of other States flanking it on either side. The 
Utah room contained six dioramas with scenic backgrounds pre- 
senting views of the State. These included the Utah salt beds 
with Captain Eyston's racing car establishing the world's land 
speed record of 357.5 miles per hour, Bryce Canyon, the Utah 
Cooper Company mine, largest copper tonnage producer in the 
world, Temple Square in Salt Lake City, the Natural Bridge, 
the Great White Throne in Zion National Park, and a typical 
agricultural scene. 

Next to the north was the Nevada exhibit. This exhibit was 
composed of an interesting collection of prehistoric fossils, re- 
productions of Indian ruins dating back 2,000 years, Indian 
relics, a diorama of Fort Churchill, examples of Indian bead and 
basket work, mineral specimens, and photographs in color of 
Nevada scenes. 

Idaho displayed a huge diorama, which occupied the entire 
end of the room, reproducing Arrowhead Dam and waterfall. 
Huge photographic enlargements against the other walls of the 
room reached to the ceiling, pictorially relating scenes in Idaho. 
A mechanical life-sized figure of a guitar-playing Idaho agri- 
culturalist, provided a source of interest by conversing with 
World's Fair visitors. 

Montana, the next exhibit, reproduced the interior of a log 
construction lodge. This contained in the north section a large 
diorama expressive of the outdoors, with a stone fireplace and a 
glowing fire in the center. The walls were lined with big-game 
exhibits, fossils, mining scenes and specimens, and Indian relics. 

The end room in this section of the building, as well as the 
grounds adjoining, were occupied by exhibits from Oregon. 
One scene represented the Oregon coast line with the waves of 
the ocean constantly in motion, breaking on the shore. The ex- 
hibits stressed the industrial, agricultural and recreational fea- 



SHOW WINDOW OF THE STATES 95 

tures of the northwest empire. In the outside area, adjacent to 
the building, was an interesting exhibit of Oregon wild-life, 
which included water fowl, quail, pheasants, various types of deer 
and a busy colony of beaver actively at work felling young trees 
and carrying on construction. 

The Colorado exhibit contained a remarkable collection of 
outdoor scenes. The center of the room was dominated by a por- 
trayal of Pike's Peak, which revolved so that visitors might view 
the mountain from all angles. Mesa Verde Cliff dwellings, park 
areas, and other interesting views also were displayed. 

The Arizona presentation in the adjoining room, was charac- 
teristic in its furnishings. Navajo blankets, Indian relics and 
crafts, saddles, scenes of mining industry and cases of specimens 
of native ores were shown. 

British Columbia's section featured murals, mounted speci- 
mens of fish and game, displays of mineral, industrial and agri- 
cultural products. Photographs and illuminated maps supplied 
a graphic picture of the surrounding territory. 

Washington had a diorama of Rainier National Park. Color 
photographs lined the walls. Display cases and other dioramas 
sketched the picturesque story of this northern State. 

The California section was devoted to a detailed presentation 
of the Central Valley Water project. This story was traced in 
historical form from the early days to completion of the project, 
and was presented through the medium of composite still and 
motion pictures, automatically controlled and projected on a 
screen 54 feet wide and 16 feet high. 

The Missouri building and exhibits represented an expendi- 
ture by that State of $130,000. Located north of the Hall of 
Western States and facing the Concourse of Commonwealths, the 
structure covered 10,000 feet of floor space with an outdoor area 
of similar size devoted to well-kept gardens. 

Within the building exhibits traced early history of Missouri, 
its development, cities and towns, resources, scenic aspects, prod- 
ucts, culture and future aims. In the principal section of the build- 
ing were replicas of a pioneer cabin and two historic structures. 



96 THE MAGIC CITY 

The pioneer cabin with its mud-chinked log walls and shake 
roof, was an authentic reproduction of the type of structure 
which housed the early settlers in Missouri. Its furnishings, the 
tools and implements that were used, revealed the self sustaining 
character of the people. Traps, spinning wheel, corn husker, and 
mill, the covered well with its bucket, the enormous fireplace in 
which the family cooking was done, the ox yoke, rifle, churn, a 
four-posted bed and the dinner bell these and other necessities 
fashioned by human hands completed a picture of pioneer life. 

A grove of trees native to Missouri stood stalwart in a central 
area within the building, the trunks gracefully towering into a 
ceiling of branches and blue sky. Other exhibits of Missouri's 
manufactures, agriculture, transportation, and commerce were 
spaced about the walls of the building. Occupying one entire 
end of the room was a vast diorama in which the varied rocks 
and minerals of the State were set. In the center of this was a 
moving panorama in color, of native scenes. 

On the south wall was a unique agricultural map which, 
through the ingenious use of three-sided panels that revolved at 
intervals, presented w r ithin the same frame three entirely differ- 
ent maps of Missouri. In this succession of maps, the agricultural 
products of the State were impressively shown. 

The two farther corners of the structure were given over to 
reproductions of historical buildings of early Missouri days. 
Another section of the building was devoted to Missouri au- 
thors, including Mark Twain and Eugene Field, both native 
sons of the State. Others presented outdoor scenes, bird life, 
mining, agriculture and industry. 

The Illinois Building was located just north of the Missouri 
Building. A life-size statue of Abraham Lincoln marked the en- 
trance. Just inside the building was a corridor leading to the 
exhibit room, lined with paintings portraying the famous scenes 
of the State's early history. These included New Salem, for some 
years Lincoln's home community; Kaskaskia, the first capital; 
President Grant's home at Balena, and the Icariam Mass Hall at 
Nauvoo. The center of the principal exhibit room was taken up 



SHOW WINDOW OF THE STATES 97 

with a great relief map of Chicago. At one end of the room was 
another relief map of the entire State, carved in balsa wood. 
Another map, automatically operated and illuminated, showed 
the agricultural resources of Illinois. Colored photo transparen- 
cies at one side of the map were lighted up in sequence, and si- 
multaneously other areas lighted up to outline the regions from 
which the illustrated products came. 

One of the dioramas was a scene of New Salem as it appeared 
during the time of its first settlement by John Rutledge and John 
Cannon in 1828. This was the settlement in which Lincoln 
worked as a clerk and at other endeavors from 1831 to 1837 while 
striving to complete his education and study law. 

Kaskaskia, in 1818, was the original capital of Illinois, and 
this was pictured, as well as Starved Rock State Park. Miniatures 
of the State capital and Lincoln's home in Springfield occupied 
a section of the building and dioramas and photographs set forth 
the industrial features of the State. 





CHAPTER IX 



AN INVITATION to the world to participate in the Golden Gate 
International Exposition was issued by President Roosevelt fol- 
lowing the passage on June 16, 1936, of a Congressional resolu- 
tion which read in part, as follows: 

"WHEREAS, there is to be held at San Francisco, California, 
during the year 1939 an international exposition which has for 
its purpose the celebration of the completion of the San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland bridge and the Golden Gate bridge, and which is 
designed to depict and exhibit the progress and accomplishments 
of the Pacific area of the United States in science, industry, busi- 
ness, transportation, and culture, and which, because of its world 
character will contribute to cordial relations among the nations 
of the world; and 

"WHEREAS, because of its location and purpose, its scope and 



100 THE MAGIC CITY 

aims, said exposition is deserving of the support and encourage- 
ment of the government of the United States of America: 

"THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Senate and House of 
Representatives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled, 

"That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby 
authorized and respectfully requested by proclamation, or in 
such manner as he may deem proper, to invite all foreign coun- 
tries and nations to such proposed exposition with a request 
that they participate therein." 

In spite of war and rumors of war, the invitation brought 
many acceptances. On the eve of the Exposition's premiere, the 
list of foreign lands participating included the Netherlands East 
Indies, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, New Zealand, Ecuador, Peru, 
Chile, French Indo-China, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Australia, 
France, Italy, Panama, the Philippines, Johore, Norway, Colom- 
bia and Japan. 

Because of war conditions many of these nations were unable 
to continue an official exhibit in 1940, but various organizations 
and groups carried on with representative displays so that the 
second year of the Fair would not be lacking in its picture of art, 
industry and culture of our "friends from abroad." 

Most picturesque section of the Magic City, due to the varied 
types of architecture employed in constructing the buildings for 
the different participating nations, and their setting of lakes and 
lagoons, was that which centered about Pacific House, theme 
building of the "Pageant of the Pacific." Pacific House was the 
hospitality center for foreign visitors, and was dedicated to the 
vast Pacific area, its countries and its peoples. 

Pacific House itself was of unique design, cruciform in 
shape, each of the four walls being identical. Huge windows 50 
feet wide and 40 feet high, allowed light to flood into the build- 
ing. At night an efficient system of indirect lighting accentuated 
the colorful interior and its exhibits. 

Exhibits told the story of culture, commerce, history, social 
life, arts and sciences, recreation, music, dances and handicraft 



FRIENDS FROM ABROAD 



101 



of the Pacific peoples. The entire center of the building, covering 
a space 30 feet wide and 40 feet long, was occupied by a combined 
fountain and relief map of the Pacific area, designed and exe- 
cuted by Antonio Sotomayor. Striking a note of originality were 
four whales in the middle of the fountain, spouting water to feed 
the Pacific Ocean of the elliptical basin with its relief surface. 

High on the north wall of the building was a leaded glass 
map of the trade routes of the Pacific, 15 by 24 feet in size, show- 
ing thirty nations in contrasting colors. 

The dominant features of the main walls were the series of 
six pictorially illuminated maps created by Miguel Covarrubias, 
assisted by Antonio Ruiz. These presented the costumes, physical 
characteristics, products, industries, handicraft, textiles, archi- 
tecture, flora and fauna, history and transportation, and other 
examples of life in the Pacific. 

In the west wing of the building two paintings portrayed the 
economy and the peoples of the Pacific. Other paintings in the 
east end of the room depicted art forms and other features of the view of Pavilion of 
nations in this area. n f ly sh ws P? rtico 

of marble columns 





102 THE MAGIC CITY 

Small cabinets around the main room contained illuminated 
miniatures and dioramas. These included explorations, fossils, 
useful plants, archaeological discoveries, and numerous other in- 
teresting displays. One showed the arrival of Amundsen at the 
South Pole, December 17, 1911. Other historic figures were rep- 
resented, such as Captain Cook mapping the Pacific, Magellan, 
who christened the ocean on his globe circling exploration trip, 
and Balboa's discovery of the Pacific in 1513. 

Around the entire room were growing specimens of trees, 
plants, Mowers and shrubs, native to Pacific nations, selected both 
from the standpoint of decorative beauty and value to civiliza- 
tion. Of special interest to students was the library in which more 
than 10,000 volumes had been assembled with the cooperation 
of the American Library Association and numerous publishers. 
In 1940, reproductions of the Covarrubias maps replaced the li- 
brary and there was also a constantly changing series of interest- 
ing exhibits from the countries of the Pacific Area. 

In addition to the presentation of the various exhibits, Pacific 
House was the scene of a series of meetings and discussions rela- 
tive to the unification of this far-flung area and its diversified 
racial types. Open forum discussions by leaders in science, art, 
business and all subjects pertinent to the Pacific countries were 
on the daily programs. 

In lighter entertainment there was an excellent varied pro- 
gram of movies and of music and dance, each afternoon and 
evening. The educational program was under the sponsorship of 
Pacific House and the Institute of Public Relations. 

For informal contacts with visiting foreigners and for Expo- 
sition hospitality, there was a very large reception room overlook- 
ing the main hall, called the Balcony. Under the chairmanship 
of Mrs. William Denman, the Social Relations Hospitality Com- 
mittee, with its many sub-committees, established a cordial Center 
in the Balcony for the informal meetings of the Consular Corps 
and the Commissioners to the Exposition with the people of the 
Bay Area, and for the more formal Exposition hospitality to the 
visiting representatives of other countries and the United States. 



FRIENDS FROM ABROAD 103 

Pacific House, which was developed as a part of the Golden 
Gate International Exposition's original plan and foreign policy 
in relation to the Pacific Area countries and North American 
unity, is now a California Corporation under a Board of Direc- 
tors who are developing its future permanent organization. 

The corporation owns the famous Covarrubias maps painted 
by this artist for the Exposition. These murals have been loaned 
to the Committee on Art of Mr. Nelson Rockefeller's Commit- 
tee, for the co-ordination of the commercial and cultural relations 
between the American Republics under the Council of National 
Defense. They are on exhibition in New York for one year. 

The lure of Hawaii, magnetic with its languorous and exotic 
atmosphere, was transported to the Hawaiian pavilion on Treas- 
ure Island in 1939. 

This building, in its attractive tropical setting, faced the Con- 
course of Commonwealths, and formed the southeastern boun- 
dary of the area devoted to exhibits of America's outlying 
possessions and those of foreign nations. Over the wide main 
entrance, and embellishing the facade, was a relief presenting a 
typical scene of Hawaii. 

Within the building, at either end of the principal exhibit 
room and reaching its full height, were immense glass enclosed 
cases. These contained colorful native costumes, flowers, fruits, 
utensils, products, and many other attractively grouped displays. 
Similar cases along the other walls of the room contained a rec- 
ord Marlin swordfish weighing 620 pounds, 12 feet 8 inches in 
length, and examples of weapons, implements and dress of Ha- 
waii's earlier civilization. 

On the western side of the main room were dioramas with 
moving exhibits traveling slowly across the foreground, showing 
the scope of Hawaii's outstanding industries, pineapple and 
sugar, and transportation facilities to the island, the latter stress- 
ing the proximity of Hawaii and the United States by air lanes. 

Also of interest to visitors was the sound-color film, "Hawaii, 
U. S. A.," which was presented in the auditorium daily. 

Grouped around the spacious Latin American court were 



104 



THE MAGIC CITY 



picturesque pavilions embracing the exhibits of Chile, Peru, 
Guatemala, Panama, El Salvador and Costa Rica. This area com- 
prised one of the most colorful sections of Treasure Island. 

The Chile exhibit, in one of the pavilions, was divided into 
two rooms, the first being devoted to art and culture, as well as 
travel exhibits of the country. The second room was occupied 
with commercial presentations for the most part, the basic in- 
dustry, nitrate production, being stressed. Pottery, weaving, arts, 
jewelry, silverware, baskets, furniture, saddles, and leather goods, 
also were displayed there. 

Peru offered a colorful exhibit with emphasis on its indus- 
trial and economic resources. Sections were devoted to art objects 
from the ancient Inca civilization, Andean murals and photo- 
graphs, paintings, and native wares such as jewelry, screens, fur- 
niture, blankets, miniatures, textiles and pottery. 

Across the court, forming one side of its northwest entrance, 
stood the Guatemala building. Extensive maps and photographic 
enlargements of Guatemalan scenes were observed in the main 
room. The east room offered a series of exhibits of the art, re- 
sources and vivid costumes of the 
country. Coffee, and a variety of 
agricultural and mineral products 
were featured, as well as hardwoods. 
Under the direction of Benedito 
Ovalle, the Guatemala Marimba 
band, which had performed at the 
1915 Exposition in San Francisco, 
presented afternoon programs in 
the court. 

The Panama exhibit was housed 
in a low structure of Spanish archi- 
tecture. Many of its pottery displays 
were five centuries old. Paintings of 
the San Bias Indians, travel maps, 
and photographs covered the walls. 
One particularly interesting canvas 



Korean dancer in 
native costume at 
Japanese Pavilion 




FRIENDS FROM ABROAD 



105 



showed the native dress, La Pollera, in all its vivid colorings. 
Examples of these hand-made dresses manifested the fine, deli- 
cate needlework of the women. Motion pictures of Panama 
were presented in the pavilion daily. 

Adjacent to the Panama building was the unique El Salvador 
exhibit. Within this building was reproduced an entire section 
of an El Salvador city, with a coffee shop and its gay patio, a band 
stand, palm-lined court, complete even to blue sky in which 
stars twinkled through the medium of hidden lights as the moon 
rose over a mountain background. Around the walls were paint- 
ings and murals and a series of illuminated display cases in which 
the products of the country, its recreational features and its art 
were presented. 

Coffee, rosewood, mahogany, cedar, alabaster, turquoise, gold 
and silver appeared in the varied displays of Costa Rica. Colorful 
dioramas and murals together with an impressive series of speci- 
men groups, told the story of the republic's natural resources. 
Wood carvings, elaborate in design and of artistic excellence, 
were a center of interest during the Exposition. 

The Pavilion of the United States 
of Brazil, unusual in design, faced 
the Pacific Promenade in the center 
of Treasure Island. 

Both ends of the principal room 
were covered with immense murals 
portraying striking native scenes. In 
the center of the room was a large 
scale relief map of South America, 
showing in detail, the topographical 
features of the various countries, 
transportation lines and principal 
cities. Just beyond this was a glass 
topped display case which held some 
exceptionally fine specimens of sap- 
phire, topaz and other stones. Other 
display cases, paintings, dioramas 



Approach to Japan's 
exhibits as framed 
by blossoming trees 




106 THE MAGIC CITY 

and specimen cabinets were utilized throughout the room to pre- 
sent Brazilian commerce, industry, scenery, agricultural and 
mineral resources and production, hardwoods, granite, marble, 
drugs, tobacco, rubber, nuts, cocoa, mate, minerals, etc. 

One entire section was devoted to coffee, in keeping with the 
importance of this industry in Brazil. The entire process of plant- 
ing, cultivating, harvesting, drying and shipping was explained 
by means of photographs, sample cases and displays. 

Bringing into focus the scenic aspects of the country, another 
room contained travel photographs, large maps and other lure. 

One of the most attractive features of the Brazilian pavilion 
was the patio that nestled in a corner formed by the two wings 
of the structure. Here, in a setting of Brazilian flora, umbrella- 
shaded tables were grouped and visitors were served mate, the 
native drink, and coffee. An orchestra offered both American 
and Brazilian music daily from 4 to 7. 

The Pavilion of the Republic of Argentina in 1939 faced the 
Pacific Promenade near the Lake of the Nations and was, in con- 
tour, a vast semicircular glass display of unusual height and depth. 

Within this window was an amazingly varied display of prod- 
ucts of the Argentine, including ponchos, shawls, textiles, and 
furs of vicuna, guanaco, and llama. 

Murals lining the inner walls of the building portrayed typi- 
cal scenes in the Argentine, industry, commerce and transporta- 
tion. Large maps delineated the transportation facilities of the 
country, its resources and products. 

A section devoted to the packing, packaging and shipment 
of food products, especially meats, showed the huge development 
that has taken place in this leading industry. Exhibits of the 
variety of wines produced, native hardwoods and leather, added 
to the interesting display. 

The building also contained an extensive library and read- 
ing room with a separate room set aside for art exhibits, where 
works of the principal painters and sculptors of the Argentine 
were represented. In the auditorium, color and sound pictures of 
this South American Republic were shown at regular intervals. 



107 

The Argentine Cafe, with its excellent cuisine, was a popular 
social center throughout the 1939 run. 

A real cantina and restaurant of old Mexico, serving native 
drinks and dishes, was to be found in the Mexican pavilion in 
the Latin-American court during the 1939 season. Here a floor 
show entertained visitors while, in the exhibit salon, there were 
sandal-makers, silversmiths and leather workers, engaged in their 
crafts. 

In 1940, the Mexican exhibit was presented under private 
auspices. Examples of modern art, textiles, pottery and silver 
work were offered for sale. 

Kangaroos, wallabies, wombats and a collection of strange 
birds were the center of attraction at the Australian pavilion in 
1939. Many exhibits were devoted to vacation advantages and 
travel. On the north wall of the building was a map outlining 
the principal travel routes to Australia. Set off by highly pol- 
ished Australian woods were paintings, photographs, and other 
displays. 

One elaborate scene depicted the brilliant colored fish and 
coral growths. Mounted specimens of the lyre bird, birds of 
paradise, and the little-known duck-billed platypus made inter- 
esting subjects. A model of the world's largest gold nugget, 
weighing over 2,284 ounces, which was found in Australia in 
1869, also was shown. 

An exhibit of wild flower paintings, photographs and speci- 
mens of Australian aboriginal weapons, boats and utensils, occu- 
pied the second floor of the building. 

The New Zealand pavilion was a typical Maori meeting 
house with strangely carved decorations. It was located on the 
Concourse of Commonwealths, on the eastern side of the island. 

Directly over the entrance were three murals depicting the 
coming of the Maoris in 1550, landing of the Tasmanian ships, 
and the arrival of Captain Cook in 1769. Under this was an illu- 
minated map. 

Color photos and display cases lined the w T alls, presenting 
typical New Zealand scenes, products, recreations, and history. 



108 THE MAGIC CITY 

These included modern New Zealand, the discovery of gold in 
1860, clearing the brush, first settlement in 1860 and the famous 
Fox Glacier. One of the most interesting was a typical Maori 
village, with its weavers and Poi dancers. 

Maori handicraft, native village buildings in miniature, war 
canoes, weapons, gods, treasure caskets, emblems of rank, flax 
skirts and allied items were the subjects in another display case. 

One of the unusual settings was that representing Rotorua's 
thermal wonderland with its spouting geysers in action, sur- 
rounded by boiling mud pools and silica terraces. 

Minerals, agriculture and civic and cultural progress were 
featured in elaborate presentations. 

The Philippine pavilion, designed by Gregorio P. Gutie- 
rrez, was a one-story structure of typical Philippine architecture, 
with two wings running to the south and "west from the main 
rotunda, and enclosing a court of remarkable beauty. 

The inside of the building was finished in native woods. The 
story of the Philippines was presented through actual specimens 
rather than through the use of dioramas and murals. 

Centering in the main rotunda was an exhibit of gold pro- 
duction. In the four corners were life-sized figures of Philippine 
native girls in the colorful costumes of the islands. 

The exhibits were divided between the two main wings, one 
side devoted to natural resources and recreation, the other to 
manufactured products of the Philippines. 

Native clothing, implements, utensils, basic products, flora 
and fauna, art and culture, were attractively presented. Tropical 
fruits and vegetables, bamboo and cane furniture, hemp and rope 
products were featured. 

The art of the islands, living conditions, cultural progress 
and educational advancement, were the subjects of other dis- 
plays. Ancient costumes and weapons provided a distinct contrast. 

Clothing, art objects, jewelry and cigars, were included in 
another wing of the building. 

The lighting arrangement of this pavilion was unique and 
effective, with mother of pearl utilized in the fixtures, as well as 



110 THE MAGIC CITY 

in the windows. Partitions and ceiling were of woven split bam- 
boo, trimmed with varieties of hardwood. 

In addition to the exhibits housed in the main structure, the 
island representation also included a band of 1 10 pieces from the 
Philippine Constabulary, which presented daily concerts in their 
own band stand in the lagoon adjoining the Pavilion. 

One of the most extensive exhibits of foreign nations was 
that of Japan. The building represented an ancient Japanese 
feudal castle and Samurai house. All materials, even the work- 
men, were brought over from Japan aboard one of the palatial 
"Maru" liners. The liner dropped anchor in the Port of the 
Trade Winds at Treasure Island and unloaded its Exposition 
cargo and workmen, gaining distinction by being the first ship 
of major tonnage to enter the port of the man-made island. 

Employing a unique method of construction, the roof of the 
Japanese pavilion was fashioned first, then the interior com- 
pleted, and last, the outer walls were erected. All woodwork 
was dovetailed, no nails or bolts being used. 

In flexible soled sandals, known as zoris, and blue and white 
kimonos, Japanese workmen climbed nimbly about on a scaf- 
folding held together by rope lashings instead of nails. Their 
manner of handling and using tools kept a group of curious on- 
lookers agog as saws cut upwards, planes were pulled toward the 
workman and plumb lines were weighted with wooden objects 
resembling a Dutch shoe. 

Situated in a garden setting of charm and artistic beauty, the 
Japanese pavilion was an inviting attraction to visitors. 

The process of fabricating silk was one of the outstanding 
displays, showing the growth of silkworms, drying and boiling 
of the cocoons, reeling and spinning of the threads, and the prep- 
aration of raw silk skeins for shipment. 

Dyed silk rugs, fine pottery, delicate porcelains, mosaic 
screens, painted fans, carved furniture, ornaments, graceful 
flower arrangements and many other objects brought the essence 
of the people's artistry into the rooms. 

Native craftsmen were busily at work demonstrating the 



FRIENDS FROM ABROAD 111 

making and decorating of gaily colored parasols and other forms 
of native workmanship. 

Large, illuminated travel maps covered the walls of a room 
devoted to travel and recreation information. Notable in the 
room were four Japanese scenes pictured in hand embroidered 
silk panels, and a revolving pedestal, set in a fish-pond on which 
figures represented Japanese, Manchurian and Korean girls in 
native robes. 

A picturesque Japanese tea garden provided a pleasant at- 
mosphere for visitors to rest, sip fragrant tea, and eat cakes made 
from rice. 

A small building, adjoining the main pavilion, was known 
as the Hall of Festivals. This was used for special events, doll 
and art exhibits, and other features. Included in the displays 
were seventeenth century armor and costumes, Japanese toys, 
miniatures, ornaments, dolls and many other interesting articles. 

The Japanese pavilion was the focal point of many social 
functions both in 1939 and 1940. Host and hostess were the 
genial Consul-General and his wife. 

Stepping through the portals of the French Indo-China pa- 
vilion was akin to entering an ancient temple. Bas-reliefs from 
Angkor, hand carved wooden figures and ceramic panels, com- 
bined with the strange Annamite architecture, made the two- 
story building distinctive and impressive. A grass covered, open 
court in the center was outlined by rows of hand carved wooden 
columns, dragon designed, and handsome lacquered panels. 

Exhibits were assembled from Laos, Annam, Tonkin, Cam- 
bodia, and Cochin, China. The displays included products of 
the ancient hill tribes, as well as those of the highly developed 
cultural, industrial and commercial life of the urban centers. 

Handicraft included inlaid ivory, silver and jewelry, fans, 
furniture, dresses, sarongs, scarfs, slippers, statues and statuettes. 

Many of the items were from the ancient city of Angkor, 
dating back to the ninth century. Lacquer work was featured in 
furniture, screens, chests and art objects. 

Unusually striking were the weird stage costumes, properties 



112 THE MAGIC CITY 

and musical instruments with their brilliant colorings and gro- 
tesque masks. 

Dioramas portrayed the ancient water wheels used for irri- 
gation, native villages, jungle scenes, boats and carts, various 
tribal customs and dress. On the walls were ancient weapons of 
the early tribes and the crude agricultural tools they used. 

Miniature ship models constructed of tortoise shell, paintings 
on silk, decorated furniture, pottery, ivory work, silk sarongs, 
ceramics were only a few of the exhibits which made up one 
of the most artistic displays at the Fair. 

One room was devoted to big game hunting trophies. Here 
were mounted specimens of the water buffalo, many species of 
deer, panther, and other animals, ivory tusks, and little known 
game such as the serow and mutjac. 

In addition to setting forth in detail the travel, hunting, and 
recreation advantages of this area, attention also was drawn to 
the country's major products, such as rice, rubber, cement, lac- 
quer, pit coal and copra. 

Annamite and Cambodian music was presented every day 
from 2 to 6:30 p.m. 

Reproducing a Hindu-Javanese temple the Netherlands East 
Indies building was prominent for its size, architecture and dec- 
orative features. Decorative embellishments included terra cotta 
reproductions of statues and masks cast from rubber moulds. 
Many of the statues surrounding the grounds and within the 
building were actual examples of Balinese hand-carved stone. 

This pavilion included exhibits from Sumatra, Bali, Borneo, 
Java, the Celebes, and the western half of New Guinea. 

The rotunda of the main entrance contained many statues, 
paintings, carvings, tapestries and textiles. Display cases lined 
the walls filled with a remarkable collection of handicraft, 
jewelry and art work. 

Native arts and crafts were stressed and artists were active in 
their native occupations of Batik work, silversmithing, wood 
carving, and the making of parasols. 

Illuminated travel maps of the Netherlands East Indies and 



FRIENDS FROM ABROAD 113 

the world traced principal transportation routes. Cleverly lighted 
dioramas portrayed island volcanoes in eruption. One diorama 
realistically pictured a Javanese village background with a water- 
buffalo drawn cart in the foreground. 

Directly across the court from the Netherlands East Indies 
pavilion, was the Isle of Bali restaurant where native foods were 
served by Balinese in their picturesque dress. 

On the upper reaches of the Lake of Nations, near Pacific 
House, was the pavilion of Johore, a replica of a sultan's council 
house. 

Dominating several exhibits was a miniature of a tin-ore 
dredge in actual mining operation. The rubber industry was 
presented through a series of photographs and specimens, show- 
ing the entire process by which rubber is secured and made 
ready for marketing, from getting the basic latex from the trees 
to its final preparation for shipment. 

Interesting contrasts were offered in reptiles and animals, 
whose habitats are in Johore. Some of these were the huge moni- 
tor lizard, monkeys, the flying fox, tortoises, tapirs, anteaters, the 
mouse-deer, honey bears, and others. 

Sinister looking blow pipes, their thorn tips covered with 
poison, were displayed. These weapons are still used by the 
jungle people, who are known as Jakuns. Other exhibits in- 
cluded miniature fish traps made of bamboo poles and Malayan 
costumes from the Sultan's collection. 

One of the outstanding pavilions on Treasure Island was 
that of Italy. Names of the leading cities and regions were em- 
bossed on a 115 foot tower at the base of which appeared the 
Fascist emblem, a bronze axe. Marble was used in the construc- 
tion of the columns and the floor. Designed by Dr. Alfio Susini 
of the Italian Royal Academy, the tourist lures of Italy were 
shown in colored motion pictures, murals and dioramas. Native 
flower girls acted as hostesses. The attractive scenes, which were 
the center of interest in the main exhibit room, were the works 
of Prampolini, pupil and friend of Marinetti, pioneer in the field 
of futuristic art. 



114 



THE MAGIC CITY 



Largest in size among the foreign exhibit buildings, were 
those of France, facing the Pacific Promenade. One of the build- 
ings was devoted to French exhibits and the other to the Cafe 
Lafayette, a restaurant serving fine French dishes and wine. 

Typically Parisian in style, the cafe was situated in an at- 
tractive setting. A spacious circular dining room done in blue 
and cream and surrounded by mirrored walls, occupied the cen- 
ter of the building. Following the curve of the room, were a 
cocktail bar and two champagne bars, one serving domestic and 
the other imported vintages. Large and colorful umbrella cov- 
ered tables with matching chairs were set on a "sidewalk" in 
front of the building overlooking a shallow pool and formal gar- 
den effect. This restaurant was one of the most popular meccas 
on Treasure Island. 

Adjacent to the Cafe Lafayette was the imposing exhibit 
pavilion, its facade adorned with a painting of French life. The 
interior was divided into three principal rooms, a number of 
Enthusiastic crowds alcoves, and a motion picture theater. 

saw Salici's Puppets 

air hi Forty Facing the visitor as he stepped through the doors or the pa- 






1 

i 



i i 

* 





FRIENDS FROM ABROAD 115 

vilion was Rodin's famous statue of "The Shadow." Within were 
assembled an extensive collection of the works of well-known 
French painters and sculptors, and early editions of printing. 
Included among the artists represented were Marie Laurencin, 
Utrillo, Dufy, Vlaminck, Derain, Renoir, Marque. 

Displays of modern French stylists contrasted with costumes 
of 1797. Examples of French textiles, velours, mousselines, satins, 
velvets and other materials were offered, as well as an array of 
gold, silver and fine glassware. 

Travel and tourist exhibits, composed of photographs, mu- 
rals, dioramas, and wall maps of Paris, Rheims, Carcassone, and 
other famed places in France, were of interest to the visitor. 

Famed as a winter playground it was fitting that Norway 
should be represented by a ski lodge. Pre-fabricated in the home- 
land, and complete in every detail, the lodge was shipped to 
Treasure Island in 1939, accompanied by carpenters to take 
care of its erection. 

The building was constructed of logs, without the use of 
nails. The roof was covered with salt and growing grass to assure 
insulation from the cold. 

An immense open fireplace in the center of the living room 
gave an inviting warmth and soft glow for friendly gatherings. 
Here, Norwegian delicacies were served to visitors. Around the 
room were skis, sleds, toboggans, and exhibits of Norwegian 
handicraft, all in keeping with the lodge itself. Flanking the 
living room were two wings, one containing a great steam bath 
and the other used as a food storehouse. 

In 1940, Norway residents of the bay area took over the for- 
mer New Zealand pavilion and completely remodeled it for 
their exhibit purposes. Since war conditions prevented importa- 
tion of exhibits, materials for display were collected from Nor- 
wegian colonies throughout the United States. 

The exhibit featured tapestries, knitted articles, carvings, 
silver filigrees, copper and glassware. Occupying a prominent 
section of the pavilion was an extensive Norwegian sports dis- 
play with skiing predominating. This centered on skiing equip- 



116 THE MAGIC CITY 

ment of all sorts, together with Norwegian sportswear and im- 
plements for mountain climbing. 

The Norway pavilion of 1940 was the center of Norwegian 
war relief for the duration of the Exposition. The exhibit was 
sponsored by the Norwegian National League and all Norwe- 
gian societies in the San Francisco Bay area. 

An International Market, where the arts and handicraft of 
more than two dozen different nations were displayed, was a new 
cosmopolitan feature of the 1940 Exposition. 

The 1939 Philippine pavilion was completely rehabilitated 
to house the various exhibits and the combined display contained 
a variety of imported products from simple ornaments to hand- 
made Persian rugs. 

More than twenty-five exhibitors had display space, includ- 
ing Rumania, Hungary, Alaska, Brazil, French Indo-China, Hol- 
land, Java, Bali, Switzerland, Belgium, Italy, the Philippines, 
Persia, India, Egypt, France, England, South Africa and the 
West Indies. 

Costumed attendants, speaking many foreign languages, were 
on hand to sell wares and each bazaar was architecturally repre- 
sentative of its own country. 

French dolls, dressed in Provincial styles; jungle jewelry, 
hand-made by Caribbean natives; batiks, lace, pewter, and wood 
carvings, were among the articles displayed. 

An innovation in 1940 was International Court, located be- 
tween the Avenue of Olives and the Lake of Nations. Here Co- 
lombia, Uruguay, Ecuador, Peru, Portugal and Switzerland had 
pavilions. 

The Malay States took over the Johore building for 1940, 
featuring big game hunting and gold mining. 

Colombia presented exhibits from its land of coffee, gold and 
emeralds. Visitors were served Colombian coffee in a pleasant 
patio. 

Ecuador, rich in silver and noted for its output of "Panama" 
hats, provided one of the best art exhibits on the island. Ancient 
pieces of art brought to Ecuador by the Spaniards, as well as 



FRIENDS FROM ABROAD 117 

the Inca arts, were displayed, together with an imposing com- 
mercial exhibit. 

The rising commercial importance of Peru was stressed by 
means of attractive, electrically lighted maps in the Peruvian 
pavilion. Noted among other displays in this building were the 
four murals by Miguel Covarrubias in the foyer, portraying dif- 
ferent phases of Inca life. 

Portugal presented an enlarged exhibit of Portuguese prod- 
ucts, including Madeira embroideries, filigree jewelry, crockery, 
and the famous Portuguese wines. The Portugal display took 
over the Guatemala building of 1939. 

Switzerland took over the '39 Chile-Paraguay pavilion dis- 
playing for sale commercial articles included embroidered 
pieces. Graphics depicted Switzerland's dairy industry. 

An international Treasure House in which were exhibited 
art objects from all over the world, was opened for the 1940 
Exposition. An Arabian Nights array of gold and silverware 
from Egypt, Arabia, Mesopotamia, Transjordania, Nepal, Tibet, 
Turkey, Greece, the Malay States, China, Japan, and a score of 
other Far Eastern and Western countries, was installed. One 
of the objects of particular interest was the "Wishing Rug," 
which Suzanne of Tiflis wove in 1793 and sold to the Shah of 
Persia to ransom Prince Jean from the wicked Kurd, Sharaf Ali 
Ogloo of Arabia. 

The Treasure House was set up in the Netherlands East 
Indies building, taking over the entire area occupied in 1939 
by the Dutch protectorate. 




CHAPTER X 



Market 



THE VACATIONLAND BUILDING, east of the Palace of Electricity 
and the Hall of Science and bordering on the Court of the Seven 
Seas, summarized the recreational allure of the million square 
miles that comprise the West, "all outdoors under one roof." 
Sponsored by transportation lines, motor manufacturers and 
clubs, travel agencies, regional groups and allied interests, it 
stressed the urge to go places and see things. There were full 
scale models of modern Pullman accommodations. Here, ready 
for occupancy, were shown interiors of an observation car, draw- 
ing room compartment, connecting double bedrooms, roomettes, 
single section with the new type berth and the tourist section. 



122 THE MAGIC CITY 

The travel interest was stirred further by exhibits of South- 
ern Pacific, the Santa Fe, Pennsylvania, Chicago & Northwestern, 
Union Pacific, Western Pacific, Denver and Rio Grande Rail- 
roads, Transcontinental- Western Air and United Airlines, Grey- 
hound, Gray Line and the travel agencies. 

The Santa Fe exhibit, in addition to a model of the newest 
Streamliner locomotive, presented an extensive diorama show- 
ing the operations of a railroad through rural territory and 
communities. 

A model railroad system built by Milton Cronkhite, pioneer 
model builder, was a feature. The miniature railroad had all the 
equipment of a working carrier switches, crossovers, yards, 
water tanks, bridges, block signals and station houses. Ten model 
locomotives and a hundred cars were employed in the demon- 
stration. 

The Southern Pacific Company exhibit included a "Little 
Theatre of the West" showing western attractions in natural 
colors and a display of contemporary Mexican rooms in minia- 
ture. The miniature furniture, paintings, bric-a-brac and other 
items for these rooms were collected in Mexico by Miss Joyce 
Campion of San Francisco, and the designs and arrangements 
were worked out by Hilaire Hiler, nationally known artist who 
has his studio in San Francisco. The Southern Pacific Round- 
house revealed a panorama of illustrated photographs portraying 
the progress of rail transportation. 

Miniature models of locomotives, passenger equipment and 
freight cars were featured in the Pennsylvania Railroad exhibit. 

The Western Pacific railroad 1940 exhibit featured scenes- 
in-action, optical illusions and an animated display showing 
travelers boarding the "Exposition Flyer." The exhibit also 
showed the Feather River Canyon with realistic action effects 
and illuminated murals. 

The California-Nevada Railroad Historical Society assem- 
bled a comprehensive display, including a diorama presenting 
railroading as it was carried on in the Sierra region of early days. 
And it included a reproduction of a small-town railroad station 



THE MARKET PLACE 123 

of the 1870 period, with the station agent's den, the waiting room 
and the baggage room, complete even to a gold-scale, oil lamps, 
worn-out broom and the agent's corn-cob pipe. 

On the east side of this building was the Father Hubbard 
Arctic Expedition exhibit. The clothing, equipment, instruments, 
weapons, boats, sleds, dogs and other items used by Father Hub- 
bard in his frequent explorations of the Far North were displayed 
with native Alaskan ivory, metal, wood and beadwork. 

There were also exhibits of items for vacation use and wear. 
Levi Strauss & Co. put a group of marionette cowboys through a 
wild west show; Keyston Brothers had a "Trading Post" with 
saddles and riding equipment; Mission Sweater Shops had a 
sweater mill in operation; Evinrude and Johnson displayed a line 
of outboard motors; while travel information was handed out by 
the American Express Co., Thos. Cook 8c Son, and the National 
Automobile Club. 

Other displays in the Vacationland Building included: Royce 
Industries, Railway Express, Bethlehem Steel, Logan Knitting 
Mills, the American Bible Society and the Lutheran Church, the 
Boy Scouts of America, a Candid Camera Shop, the Doane Mo- 
tor Truck Co., the Goodrich Tire Company, an oyster bed where 
girls dived for Imperial Pearls, labor-saving devices in a machin- 
ery show, gold mining methods by the Merrill Co., a presenta- 
tion of the work of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, boat 
models of the Pacific Interclub Yacht Association, Weeks-Howe- 
Emerson and Peterson Clippers, sheet metal by the Rheem Co., 
and a Palace Travel Coach which was said to be "the last word 
in trailers." 

Agricultural Hall provided a broad picture of the natural 
resources and industries of California. Individual exhibitors co- 
operated with the State Commission in one of the most compre- 
hensive presentations ever assembled. 

The Dried Fruit Association, the Prune Growers, Sun-Maid 
Raisins, the date industry, hops, flax, walnuts, apricots, lima 
beans, honey, poultry, beet sugar, Calavo avocados, olives and figs 
were all a part of this great panorama of wealth and progress. 



124 



THE MAGIC CITY 



The silk worm industry had a booth as well as the Cotton 
Cooperative. The Peach Canners were there along with the Fruit 
Growers Exchange. The Frosted Foods Institute, The Challenge 
Cream and Butter Association, and the Hay, Grain and Seed 
industry were there. 

California's Future Farmers revealed the strides made in the 
development of youth and a number of leading producers com- 
bined in a showing of the great wine industry of the State. 

The National Livestock and Meat Board, the Peach Canners, 
the University of California, the Western Growers Protective 
Association, brewers, beet and berry growers, the Tri-Valley 
Packing Association, the Seed Council and the State Department 
of Agriculture presented educational and colorful stories of the 
growth and marketing of products of field and farm. 

Bank of America's "Bank of Tomorrow" was one of the most 
beautiful buildings on Treasure Island. It was furnished in mod- 
ernistic style and soft pastel shades as a color theme. Without 
windows and with concealed lighting, streamlined fixtures and 
glass tile counters, it attracted 3,750,000 visitors in 1939, 75,000 

in a single day. Night and day the 
branch's sixty employees were the 
targets for staring, curious eyes. In 
order to render a complete service 
to its customers and the public, the 
branch operated from ten in the 
morning to ten at night. More than 
a thousand checks a day were han- 
dleda total of 260,000 during the 
254 days of 1939. 

Nearly 400 tons of silver were 
taken the first year from the branch 
for use in making change at all the 
various booths, ticket offices and 
cash registers. Surplus cash to the 
amount of $17,500,000 was shipped 
to San Francisco for safe-keeping. 



Afternoon tea in 
General Electric's 
plate glass house 




THE MARKET PLACE 



125 



Visible from all parts of Treasure Island, the giant National 
Cash Register, high as a six-story building, told the story of daily 
and accumulated attendance at the Exposition. Figures on the in- 
dication panel at the top of the huge register were two feet, 
four inches in height. Every half hour the numerals changed, 
bringing the attendance figures up to the minute. At the base of 
the cash register were window displays of National Cash Register 
and Accounting Machine products. 

Collectors, spare time gatherers of everything from buttons 
to beer mugs, had an opportunity to display their belongings 
in the National Hobby Show at the 1940 Fair. 

Miniature railroads, pictures, woodcraft, costumes, stage 
coaches, mosaics, dolls, minerals, puppets, model boats, live 
snakes, stamps, coins, aquariums and many other out-of-the-ordi- 
nary items were included in displays, sponsored by hobby or- 
ganizations and model clubs. 

Jules Charbineau, owner of the world's largest collection of 
smallest curiosities, presented his miniature museum of 28,500 
articles in the Homes and Gardens Building both seasons. 

An ail-American exhibit of con- 
temporary art, in which the 48 states, 
as well as Hawaii, Puerto Rico and 
the Virgin Islands were represented, 
was one of the features of the exhibit 
of the International Business Ma- 
chines Corporation at the 1940 Fair. 

The paintings, which occupied a 
special gallery of science and art, 
were selected by 53 juries of art au- 
thorities and art museum directors. 

The Singer Sewing Machine ex- 
hibit included a sound motion pic- 
ture in technicolor, describing in 
detail the operation of the modern 
sewing machine and its attachments. 

In the Foods and Beverage Palace, 



Sidewalk barbecue 
adds savory odors 
to the atmosphere 




126 THE MAGIC CITY 

there was everything that could be desired in the way of liquid 
and solid refreshment. Here were California Packing Company's 
Del Monte family attractively displayed, Libby, McNeill 8c 
Libby's "Treasure Ship," Heinz's "57," See's Candy, Planter's 
Peanuts, Hills' Coffee, "the Junket folks," Schilling brands and 
Sea Island Sugar. 

Armour & Company offered an entertaining motion picture 
in connection with their extensive displays of merchandise; Na- 
tional Biscuit Company demonstrated the baking of crackers and 
cookies, and there were appetizing offerings by Standard Brands 
of California, and draughts of sparkling wine from the Wine 
Temple. 

California Walnut growers had a model packing house and 
the Leslie Salt Co. had a working model of evaporating and re- 
fining processes. Then it was quite the thing to finish the round 
off with one of the latest Santa Fe cigars. 

In 1940, you could enjoy even a more varied menu of delec- 
tables. There was an attractive lunch room next to the Coca Cola 
bottling machine and Acme Beer was on tap in a neighboring 
booth. There were Loma Linda Health Foods, "Rancho" soups 
right off the fire, and Sun Maid raisins packaged while you 
waited. Roma Wines, as well as Italian Swiss Colony, were avail- 
able and Washington apples were there from Liberty Orchards. 

If you preferred to stroll about the building, there was an 
interesting display from Czecho-Slovakia, an Ant Hut and nov- 
elty booths on every hand. Kerr Glass demonstrated the proper 
way to can fruits and vegetables and a Quickcooker utensil pre- 
pared meals in a jiffy. 

Two live chinchillas, valued at more than $3,500, were 
housed in a double 200-pound ice refrigerator as one of the 
unique features of the Ice Industry exhibit, sponsored by the 
California Association of Ice Industries. 

The Exposition home for the chinchillas was provided for 
the purpose of demonstrating the air-conditioning properties 
of an ice refrigerator, which although air-tight, conditions the 
imprisoned air through ice meltage. 



THE MARKET PLACE 127 

Glass panels were provided in the refrigerator doors so that 
the little animals might be seen at their housekeeping. 

On the east side of the Court of the Moon was the Palace of 
Homes and Gardens. Here were exhibits of scientific home build- 
ing, home products and Dupont's "Wonder World of Chem- 
istry." Demonstrators and lecturers told the story of the achieve- 
ments of research chemists in the transformation of raw mate- 
rials . . . coal, cotton, vegetable oils, salt, wood, air, water . . . 
into fabrics, rubber, dyes, perfumes and plastic. 

Construction, interior fittings, innovations in the use of glass, 
steel, chromium and other materials were featured in the home- 
building division. There were glass tiles, glass partitions, and 
even glass furniture. Bath fixtures in hues of pastel and shining 
chromium, glass walls, glass shower rooms, and glistening gadg- 
ets galore. China displays were also notable. 

Miniature models of low-cost homes, constructed of western 
woods together with specimens of the various types employed, gas 
home appliances: radiators, ranges, water-heaters, ironers. These 
are a few of the varied array in the Palace of Homes and Gardens. 

The Blindcraft exhibit was an attraction and a miniature of 
the Mormon Tabernacle drew much attention. 

Outside the building in the plaza to the east, were full-scale 
model homes, completely furnished. These included the metal 
home, with double walls for insulation, covered with a pumice 
and cement combination, and without dust-collecting corners 
anywhere, all wall intersections being rounded. Then there was 
the model home of Western pine, with its gleaming white, blue- 
trimmed construction set off to advantage in a flower-bordered 
lawn. Just beyond was a nursery exhibit and, adjoining, a steel- 
frame home, scientifically planned and beautifully furnished. 

The American home, from architect to householder, was the 
theme of the 1940 Constructional Industries exhibit. 

Sponsored jointly by the American Institute of Architects, 
the Associated General Contractors of America and the Asso- 
ciated Homebuilders of San Francisco, the building display was 
located in the Homes and Gardens Palace. 



128 THE MAGIC CITY 

More than 100 model homes comprising an entire miniature 
village occupied the center of the exhibit. Each tiny dwelling 
was constructed to scale and exemplified a type of California 
home. 

Surrounding the miniature village were displays of home 
products, materials and furnishings, with a central information 
booth sponsored by the California Redwood Association. 

Specializing in home materials were exhibits by Johns-Man- 
ville, the Horn Products Company and the Michel PfefFer Com- 
pany, with a combination paint and glass display by W. P. Fuller 
and the Pittsburgh Glass Company. Other firms featuring glass 
displays were Libby Owens Ford and the San Francisco Glass 
Association. 

Maxwell Hardware Company of Oakland, Hundley Hard- 
ware, Crane Company and Gladding McBean featured house- 
hold essentials, while the San Francisco Bank, in a special exhibit, 
informed prospective buyers of ways to purchase new homes. 

Homebuilding murals and graphic displays of household 
products were presented by many participants. The Heating and 
Piping Contractors Association exhibit showed home boilers in 
operation and the Paraffine Companies offered an extensive dis- 
play of roofing materials. 

Domestic uses of gas were shown in the display of the Pacific 
Coast Gas Association, lamps and stoves were shown by the Cole- 
man Company, murals in linoleum were featured by the Paraf- 
fine Companies. Building materials were exhibited by Masonite, 
Pioneer Division of Flintkote, the West Coast Lumbermen, and 
the Douglas Fir Plywood Association. Home equipment included 
Serta-Sleeper mattresses, Rudolph Wurlitzer and Baldwin pi- 
anos, Schlage locks, Owens-Illinois Pacific Coast Co. "Talking 
Bottles," Utah Woolen Mills blankets, American Radiator and 
Standard Sanitary Corporation plumbing fixtures, Gladding 
McBean 8c Co. Franciscan ware and decorative tiles, and Mar- 
chant Valve Corporation leak-proof faucets. 

Other exhibits included the Girl Scouts of America, Mrs. G. 
Sharpe, Key Manufacturing Co., California Cotton Mills, Na- 



THE MARKET PLACE 129 

tional Automotive Association, Woman's Almanac, Daggett & 
Ramsdell cosmetics, Collier and Son, publishers; the Salvation 
Army, Gabriel Moulin, photographer; the Independent Order 
of Foresters, Crane Company, Fuller brushes, Lions Interna- 
tional and the Mormon Tabernacle. 

In 1940 there were many new exhibitors, Edna Kirby's glass 
house was an attractive feature, and a Bahai Temple stirred com- 
ment. Then, too, there was an aluminum display, a labor exhibit 
by the Building Trades Council, weatherstrips by Chamberlain, 
sprinklers by Clifford, saws by Dewalt and enamel by Doss. 

The Associated General Contractors were represented as were 
the Heating Contractors, the Hardwood Association, Kraftile 
Nu-Way Couplings, Palace Hardware, the Pyrene Company, 
Salih Enterprises, Vermont Marbles, the Truscon Steel Co., Orig- 
inal Utah Woolen Mills, Standard Sanitary Plumbing Co., the 
Stamp Club and Stainless Steel. 

Outdoor exhibits included the Hindustan Temple and the 
Little Church in the Wildwood. Throughout the second season 
of the Fair the National Garden Show, in an extensive, walled 
plot, across from the Palace of Fine Arts, afforded visitors an 
opportunity for viewing prize gardens created by expert land- 
scape artists in an ideal setting of floral beauty. 

One might "eat in all languages" on Treasure Island, par- 
ticularly during the first season. Although some concessionaires 
dropped out the following year, there was still wide gastronomic 
variety available for visitors. 

The Argentine Cafe was the "swank" spot for the general 
public in '39. The Yerba Buena Club was even more luxurious 
in its appointments, but was a membership proposition. So was 
the Treasure Island Men's Club over on the Avenue of Olives 
in the first months of its operation. Later it became virtually a 
concession, and, in 1940, frankly such. 

Cafe Lafayette's cocktail lounge and cuisine were deservedly 
popular both years, as was the Continental Cafe. 

Chinese dishes were available in Chinese Village. At the 
Javanese Restaurant, hard by the Dutch East Indies Pavilion, one 



130 



THE MAGIC CITY 



might select from an exotic bill of fare up to and including that 
famous tropical Dutch dish, "rijsttafel" (rice table) , sometimes 
known as "20-boy curry." 

There was a Russian restaurant, Holland food at the Dutch 
Windmill, a Philippine cafe in connection with the Pavilion of 
that country. Anyone capable of absorbing haggis could obtain 
it on occasions at the Scotch Village, although gin-and-ginger- 
beer was a more popular offering. There were Mexican special- 
ties provided by a colorful "cantina" on the Avenue of Olives. 
Fisherman's Grotto on the Gayway was the Island "branch" of 
San Francisco's famous Fisherman's Wharf. The Japanese Pavil- 
ion had an annex at which it was frequently necessary to hang 
out a sign "No Tempura Today," so popular was that typical 
Nipponese food. 

The Estonian Cafe on the Gayway specialized in "chicken- 
in-the-rough," serving a large clientele both years. The "Dough- 
nut Tower" was always crowded, whether during pre-operation, 
AH "open-faced" car operation or demolition period. 

of modern design in , 1111 

automobile exhibit Customers generally had to wait their turn to secure a table 




131 



in the Press Building dining room. Admission was by card only, 
but distribution of those much-sought credentials was rather 
widespread. 

On the Cavalcade set was an even more exclusive eating spot 
"The Nose Bag," operated for Cavalcade folk, but open to a 
few friends. 

Foods and Beverages Building housed the Acme Beer Gar- 
den, the Italian-Swiss Colony Wine Garden and the unique 
"Sandwich Slide" both seasons. Oakwood Barbecue, Crillo's Spe- 
cialty Kitchen and the White Star Tuna Restaurant had build- 
ings of their own both in '39 and '40. Cafeterias capable of serv- 
ing hundreds at a time were located in Homes and Gardens, the 
Science Building and Vacationland, and there was a smaller 
cafeteria in the basement of the Administration Building. 

The Owl Drug Company's lunch counter fed hundreds of 
thousands, and there were scores of smaller concessions scattered 
throughout the grounds at which one might secure the succulent 
hamburger, the tasty hot dog, or such innovations as the "crab- 
burger." Even the Palace of Fine Arts "went earthy" in 1940, 
permitting light lunch service on the premises. 

Ghirardelli Chocolate Company had a building of its own 
on the Avenue of Olives, both exhibiting and selling its product. 
And a right tasty product it was, of a coolish evening. 

There was no cause to either hunger or thirst when visiting 
the Magic City. 





CHAPTER XI 

Old MaAteM. a*td Ant in Action 



ONE OF THE MOST magnificent displays of art treasures ever as- 
sembled in the United States was an outstanding feature of the 
1939 Exposition. From all over the world, paintings, sculptures, 
and other art objects were sent to Treasure Island, most of the 
foreign paintings never before having been exhibited in this 
country. These were housed in one of the permanent hangar 
buildings on the Island, familiarly known to Fair goers as the 
Fine Arts Palace. 

Exhibited in the Division of European Art were the finest 
Italian Old Masters and many other paintings and sculptures of 
all historic periods, inestimable in value. Among these were Bot- 
ticelli's "Birth of Venus," Raphael's "Madonna of the Chair," 
and other masterpieces of Michelangelo, Titian, Tintoretto and 
Donetello. Eight specially designed galleries were equipped with 



134 THE MAGIC CITY 

a new system of lighting for the showing. Gothic tapestries, Ren- 
aissance sculptures, hundreds of contemporary paintings by 
Europe's modern artists and a collection of great nineteenth 
century painters' work completed this section. These master- 
pieces were assembled largely through the efforts of Dr. Walter 
Heil, Director of the San Francisco Museum of Art. 

A broad cross-section of contemporary painting and sculp- 
ture by living Americans, Mexicans, and Canadians was dis- 
played in the Division of American Art. California artists were 
represented by 73 paintings selected by Roland J. McKinney, 
Director of Contemporary American Art, who also collected 
750 canvases from outstanding American artists in every state. 
Two galleries were designed to depict the historic background 
of our native art from pre-Revolutionary times to the nineteenth 
century. 

Arts of the Pacific peoples, cultures of the past and present, 
representing two-thirds of the world's population living on the 
borders of the Pacific Ocean and resident on its islands, were 
found in the Division of Pacific Cultures. Here, masterpieces of 
their kind, the lesser known arts of these peoples were dramati- 
cally portrayed in a series of galleries. China, South Asia, Japan, 
the Pacific Islands, South America, Middle America, and the 
Northwest Coast afforded treasures in all media: wood, stone, 
bronze, gold, silver, ivory, and textiles. 

Contemporary creations by artist-craftsmen of Europe and 
America were located in the Division of Decorative Arts, which 
included sculpture, book-binding, ceramics, glass, textiles, and 
furniture done by the world's foremost decorators. Rooms were 
designed in the living spirit of our times, the entire section occu- 
pying the center of the Fine Arts Palace, in the form of a wide 
rectangle. Twelve of these were located on a raised platform 
approximately two and a half feet above the floor, placed back 
to back and joined by a corridor. Many of the rooms, 16 by 20 
feet in size, were fronted by terraces designed for outdoor living 
exhibitions. 

On a balcony across the back of the main room group were a 



OLD MASTERS AND ART IN ACTION 135 

number of small vitrinos housing a room done by Gilbert 
Rhodo; a modern chapel by the Monterey Guild; a velvet ex- 
hibit by Helen Coles; selection of modern hand-made furniture 
by Meis van der Rohe; tapestries from Aubusson, France, by 
Paul Bry and Jean Lurcat; stone pottery by Saxbo; and an elabo- 
rate jewel exhibit. The rest of the balcony was given over to 
work of California artist-craftsmen, including glass, silver, pot- 
tery, ceramics and other decorative arts. 

The terraces exemplifying the pleasures of outdoor living 
were equipped with specially designed furniture. 

Material for the Decorative Arts Exhibit came from England, 
France, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Italy and 
other countries. Dorothy Wright Liebes was responsible for as- 
sembling this interesting display. 

From England came textiles by Gordon Russell, Ltd., Marion 
Dorn, Campbell Fabrics, Edinburgh Weavers, Allan Walton, 
Hayes-Marshall of Fortnum and Mason, Old Beach, Donald 
Brothers and weavings by Mrs. Ethel Mariet. Wells Coates deco- 
rated a room. Modern glass was displayed by Stevens 8c Wil- 
liams, Inc., and James Powell and Sons. 

Other contributions from England included ceramics by 
Wedgwood, and exhibits by Duncan Miller, Oliver Messell, 
Rex Whistler, Royal Doulton ware, Spode-Copeland China, 
flowers and modern vases by Constance Spry and decorative 
panels by Leslie Blanche. 

From France there were textiles by Paule Marrot, Bianchini, 
Colcombet, Sonia Delauney, Mme. Paul Nelson, Lola Prusac, 
Mme. Pingusson, M. Coudurier-Fructus, Ducharme, Helene 
Henry, Germaine Montereau, Mme. Alice Chabert-Dupont, and 
Mme. Cristofanetti, rooms by Le Corbusier, Kohlmann, and 
Rose Adler. 

Other French contributions included: tapestries, rugs, and 
chairs by Mme. Cuttoli; small set of dishes, blue glass chess set, 
and new glass by Jean Luce; an exhibit of glass workmanship by 
Baccarat; screen lacquer by Dunand; screen and porcelain by 
Raoul Dufy; tapestry and chairs by Lurcat; table lace and needle- 



136 THE MAGIC CITY 

work, Noel; table cloths, Rodier; glass heads, Henri Navarre; 
a chest, Ramsey; montage, jewels, by Jean Schlumberger; dress- 
ing table, by Mme. Misia Sort; small decorative piece "Adam et 
Eve," by Gabriel Sebastian; "House in Space," by M. Paul 
Nelson; wrought iron and crystal grill, Raymond Subes; rugs by 
Maurice Lauer; iron chair, straw mannequins, Mme. Zervudaki; 
table glass, Lalique; mirrors, plaster, Tita Terisse; books, mod- 
ern folios, Vollard; leather, tapestry, Herrick; rugs by da Silva 
Bruns; sculpture, Giocometti; leather furniture, Michel-Frank; 
glass by Marinot; rope gallery by Daruix; small figures by Ma- 
tisse; silver by Puiforcat; and glass by Decorchement. 

From Holland came glass by Leerdam, textiles and furniture 
by Metz and Company, rug by Konenklijke Cereenidgo Tapejt- 
fabricken, and chairs by Oud. 

Denmark, long distinguished for its outstanding contribu- 
tions to decorative arts, sent exhibits of stone-ware pottery by 
Saxbo and Natalie Krebs, silver by the famed George Jensen; 
collections of Royal Copenhagen porcelain, and textiles by 
Troba-StofFer, Ditz-Sweitzer, and Dessau-Bo. 

Progressive Sweden was represented at the 1939 Exposition 
through the works of internationally known artists. Exhibits in- 
cluded: glass by Orrefors; textiles by Elsa Gullberg, Maita Fjet- 
terstrom, and Astrid Sample-Hultberg; ceramics by Lizbeth Jobs 
& Sister; Sandberg lace by Greta Sjunnesson; rug by Gulli Lund- 
guster; silver by Baron Fleming; exhibit units by Estrid Erikson, 
Professor Frank, Captain Berg and Archibald Olaf Ostborg. Carl 
Malmston sent furniture and sconces; Nordiska Company a se- 
lection of glass and pottery; Eric Grato examples of wrought 
iron, and Licium, a church piece. 

Among the representative decorative arts from Norway were 
textiles, tapestries and embroidery from Der Norsko Husflids- 
foroning; three rugs and a selection of pottery by Bruskunst; 
ceramics and a wooden horse by Kinstnerforvundet Kjeld; pew- 
ter pieces, wood, and wrought iron by Prydkunst, and a hand- 
woven curtain from Husflidsforening. 

The famous Aalto and Mrs. Aalto of Finland contributed 



OLD MASTERS AND ART IN ACTION 137 

furniture, glass and weaving; Eliel Saarinen sent silver; Mrs. 
Eliel Saarinen a rug; and Hemflet, a collection of rugs. Weaving 
by Martta Taipale and textiles from Finland House completed 
Finland's offering. Italy was represented with a varied selection 
of arts and crafts. 

Craftsmen demonstrating the various techniques of their 
work, were an integral part of the Decorative Arts section. The 
craft idea was presented in two very definite efforts, the first by 
working demonstrations done in practical workshops where the 
visitor could see textiles woven, ceramics made, bookbinding, 
enamel work on metal, and a number of other handicrafts. Two 
of the atoliers were arranged so that the work might be observed 
from various positions from the level of the floor, as well as 
from platforms. Progress from the designer's idea and working 
diagram to the finished product was shown. 

The second phase displayed examples of executed work. 
These examples were assembled into coordinated arrangements, 
chosen for their suitability to one another in design, and for 
their practical use. For instance, dining room furniture, together 
with glassware, china, silverware, and decorative objects, were 
associated in a general dining room layout. 

There were other rooms entirely the work of decorators and 
creators of furniture in the United States. 

A handsome jewelry display also attracted wide attention. 
Against an exotic background of rich velvet hangings, an im- 
mense jewel case contained modern costume ornaments and pre- 
cious gems mounted in settings of beautiful and intricate design. 

Occupying a special section were miniature rooms valued at 
half million dollars, which portrayed development of home de- 
sign and decoration in many countries and periods. These were 
the creation of Mrs. James Ward Thome of Chicago, interna- 
tionally famed for the artistry and beauty of her architectural 
models. 

The model rooms, each about one and a half by three feet 
and two feet in height, were created to scale with sculpture, tex- 
tiles, paintings and furniture perfectly produced in miniature. 



OLD MASTERS AND ART IN ACTION 139 

In rooms such as the French Louis XIV and Louis XV periods, 
for instance, elaborate and skillfully carved woodwork was ex- 
quisitely and beautifully done. 

Textiles used on upholstered pieces were in many cases ac- 
tual bits of original material produced in the periods repre- 
sented, and accessories, such as tableware, glassware and objects 
of art were reproductions in miniature, contemporary with the 
original. 

The thirty-two miniature rooms, in English and American pe- 
riod designs, shown in the Thorne collection, made an interesting 
contrast with contemporary rooms of the full-sized central group. 

In 1940 Mrs. Thorne exhibited twenty-nine rooms. Of spe- 
cial interest were Japanese and Chinese interiors. The other 
units consisted of six American, eight French, three Spanish, a 
Venetian salon, an early Italian and eight English rooms. 

Art in Action a continuing four-month show revealing the 
back-stage side of art in both major and minor projects was 
the 1 940 theme for the Palace of Fine Arts proposed by Timothy 
L. Pflueger. There were Old Masters too, and examples of the 
best work by European and American artists. 

The California artist, Helen Bruton, acted as chief of the Art 
in Action Division, assisted by Beatrice Judd Ryan. The project 
of Art in Action was completely unprecedented in the history of 
art and art display. It was an invitation to the public to see the 
arts backstage. With the central section of the Fine Arts Building 
entirely turned over to the artists, the public was able to see 
sculptors cut their stone, painters mix their oils on the palette, 
print makers pull proofs from zinc and copper plates. 

The artists worked right in the midst of the public. Many 
visitors to whom a painting or a piece of sculpture as a complete 
thing was something remote and mysterious, discovered an en- 
tirely new outlook on art, while visually taking part in the 
process of artistic creation. 

On a high wall was a huge mosaic, 40 by 42 feet, depicting 
great figures of science from Darwin to Ernest Lawrence, Nobel 
prize winner of atom-smasher fame. A staff of artists worked on 



140 THE MAGIC CITY 

scaffolds and the public could watch them putting together the 
polished marble and granite bits of the huge mosaic designed by 
the Swiss-American artist, Hermann Volz of the Federal Arts 
Project. At the other end of the Active Arts Plaza, Diego Rivera 
toiled on a great fresco. Early in 1940, under the sponsorship 
of the Board of Education of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, this outstanding artist was employed by the Exposition 
Company to paint a fresco of approximately 900 square feet in 
the Art in Action section. The subject of the work was the Art 
of the Americas as expressed by the mechanism of the North 
fused with the traditions rooted in the soil of the South. This 
fresco was to be donated by the City School Department for in- 
stallation in the new San Francisco Junior College. 

Three large exhibitions of oil paintings, water colors and 
prints by California artists, were held during the 1940 season. 
Two groups, one of conservatives, and the other of modern taste, 
acted as jurors. Prizes totaling $1,500 were awarded. 

A festive, active spirit dominated the Arts plaza. To create 
an atmosphere of leisure and comfort, there was a lounge in the 
center where people might sit and rest. There was also a restau- 
rant where light foods were served. 

Helen Forbes of San Francisco demonstrated tempera, Max- 
ine Albro of Carmel painted in oil. Glen Lukens, one of the fore- 
most American artists in his field, produced ceramics. Dudley 
Carter did spectacular wood sculpture working with an axe. 
Mickael Chepourkoff offered humorous animal sculpture in 
metal. Antonio Sotomayor, Bolivian-born San Franciscan, cre- 
ated swift and informal caricatures. Marion Simpson of Berkeley 
returned from Mexico to paint in oil. There were weaving dem- 
onstrations by Maga Albee and her group, including Jean Fay 
and Adaline Emerson. 

As a bridge from the Art in Action division of living Cali- 
fornia art to the great section of European and American Paint- 
ing and sculpture, there was a special showing of California 
artists of the past. Considerable space was devoted to the histori- 
cal figures of California painting, William Keith, Thomas Hill, 



141 



Jules Tra vernier, Nahl and others which dealt with people and 
scenes of the early days in California. 

From the Middle Ages to the present, every major trend and 
period in the history of European and American Art was repre- 
sented in the Painting and Sculpture Division. Walter Heil, Di- 
rector of San Francisco's De Young Museum, was head of this 
division, assisted by John D. Forbes. 

Among some of the most famous works shown in the Old 
Master section were Breughel's "Wedding Dance" from the De- 
troit Art Institute, two magnificent El Grecos, several Van 
Dycks, Rembrandts, Murillos and Franz Hals and a group of 
early Italians. There was also a superb Madonna in terra cotta 
by Mino da Fiosole; two works by the Italian fifteenth century 
sculptor, Amadeo; several fine pieces of early Greek statuary; 
also a considerable number of other fine Dutch seventeenth cen- 
tury paintings, and English and French oils of the eighteenth 
century. 

The French schools of the nineteenth century were amply 
represented with distinguished works by Delacroix, Courbet, 
Corot, Manet, Renoir and Monet. Works by Utrillo, Matisse, 
Laurencin and Dufy were included in the group of contempo- 
rary French artists. Another section of this show was devoted to 
Old Master drawings collected by Dr. Annamarie Henle from 
the Schaeffer Galleries. 

A special section was devoted to art works from Central and 
South American countries. Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley, Di- 
rector of the San Francisco Museum of Art, on an all-plane trip 
through Western South America, collected contemporary art 
from that continent, while Thomas Carr Howe, Jr., Director of 
the California Palace of the Legion of Honor, secured works 
from Mexico. 

A unique, comprehensive show of photography was held in 
the east section of the Fine Arts Building. This exhibition was 
directed by Ansel Adams of San Francisco and T. J. Maloney, 
Editor of the United States Camera Magazine. 

Object of the exhibit was to present photography from the 



142 THE MAGIC CITY 

earliest day to the present, both in still and motion picture fields. 
The exhibit comprised presentations of historic, documentary 
and experimental films, a show of color photography, a section 
of technological, scientific and news photography, contemporary 
American photography and a special section devoted to works by 
living California artists. The foyer to the Exhibition was deco- 
rated with large photo murals. 

Daily gallery tours by art experts and regular lectures, as well 
as a series of special displays, were scheduled. 

As an additional feature of the exhibit, an unusual show of 
fine printing was collected, including a copy of the famous 
Gutenberg Bible. Commemorating the 500th anniversary of 
printing with movable type, 500 books of the finest presses in 
the world were on display. This exhibit was arranged by the 
San Francisco Roxburghe Club. 

Examples from celebrated presses from the time of William 
Morris, who recreated the arts in England in the middle of the 
nineteenth century, to the moderns were shown. There was also 
an historical section with examples of the most famous historical 
presses. 

Plans for the architectural exhibition were worked out in 
the East by a group of distinguished architects, headed by How- 
ard Meyers, Editor of the Architectural Forum. 

Richard L. Tobin served as Chairman of the Fine Arts Com- 
mittee with Timothy L. Pflueger as Executive Vice Chairman. 
Kenneth E. Slaughter was Director of the Fine Arts Building. 




CHAPTER XII 

Science awd Service to- Man 



THE FIELD OF SCIENCE provided some of the most interesting 
exhibits on Treasure Island. The wonders of chemistry, physics, 
biology, the ceaseless battle of mankind against the forces of 
disease, the amazing feats of surgery and medicine . . . these were 
only a few of the subjects which were presented in graphic 
fashion, with charts and moving figures, dioramas and changing 
color. 

The feature of the University of California's $300,000 exhibit 
was the miniature cyclotron which enabled visitors to do their 
atom smashing on a small scale. An exact model of the 225-ton 
Berkeley engine was built especially for display at the Exposition. 

Visitors saw the active principle of atom smashing in opera- 
tion when they pressed a button. The electrical impulse liber- 
ated by the button set in motion a number of small spheres in 
the circular imitation vacuum chamber in the model. These 
spheres emerged at a point corresponding to the point where the 
high-speed atomic particles emerged in the real cyclotron, to 
liberate a shower of other atomic particles from an elemental 
target such as sodium or phosphorus. 



144 THE MAGIC CITY 

The target was lacking but the manner of bombardment 
was clearly shown. What happened during the atom-smashing 
process and after was explained by appropriate legends and 
demonstrators. 

In the model, a gravity "pull" whirled the spheres around 
after they had been set in motion, and showed how the magnetic 
"pull" operated in the real cyclotron to develop sufficient speed 
in the whirling atomic particles to smash the atoms in the target. 

Hardly less mystifying was the mechanics exhibits in which 
the bullet from a gun met a ball dropped from the top of the ex- 
hibit booth. Bullet and ball always met, regardless of the muzzle 
velocity of the gun. The velocity was changed from time to time. 
The exhibit demonstrated a number of principles of mechanics, 
particularly Newton's laws, but it had a direct bearing on both 
the differences and the relationships of vertical or gravitational 
motion and horizontal motion. 

Mathematics showed in another display how curved surfaces 
might be generated by a system of straight lines. A number of 
models of ruled surfaces were used in working out this principle. 
In the same display an instrument known as the brachistochrone 
was used to describe the "curve of quickest descent," another 
mathematical poser which required long explanation even in its 
simplest form, but which the brachistochrone visualized with 
startling simplicity. 

The University displays showed how commodities of all sorts 
flowed between San Francisco and Los Angeles. A dioramic 
model of both cities, with the intervening country, was shown, 
and on this was to be seen the movement of train and ship, the 
manner in which they were fitted into exact schedules and how 
their movements were plotted and controlled. 

A large map of California explained University activities. 
One animated exhibit revealed tiny and very eager young men 
and women going into Haviland Hall on the campus, the quar- 
ters of the Education department, and emerging therefrom to 
go through the University entrance at Sather Gate as full-fledged 
graduates. 



145 



The music display was not only seen, but heard. In the midst 
of a group of sepia pictures, showing various developments in 
music instruction on the campus, was placed a recording device 
which rendered orchestral selections. 

Remember the visual-mechanical demonstration of the Men- 
delian law of heredity in the Hall of Science? It was a sort of 
puppet show arrangement. Visitors pressed buttons to match 
blue-eyed and/or brown-eyed parents for scientific exploitation. 
Two little dolls male and female appeared in an upper 
compartment. Then the contrivance started humming and rum- 
bling, and eventually possible offspring of such a union appeared 
below, duly paired off into dominant blonds and recessive bru- 
nettes, or whatever. Carrying on with scientific persistence, the 
machine further showed descendants even unto the third and 
fourth generation, blue-eyed or brown-eyed according to rote. 

Hand in hand, a young couple stood in front of the exhibit. 
Obviously they had but recently exchanged vows; Treasure 
Island was Honeymoon Island for them. 

He looked down into her eyes. They were blue a heavenly 
azure blue. She smiled and blushed prettily and gazed back at 
him. His eyes were brown a virile, vigorous brown. Still 
clutching hands, each pressed the corresponding button. 

Brown-eyed Papa and Blue-eyed Mamma appeared dutifully, 
probably for the some-thousandth time that day. Then some- 
thing went wrong with the mechanism. Instead of showing off- 
spring dolls of the first generation, the thing slipped a cog and 
started begetting blue-eyed blonds, brown-eyed brunettes, blue 
eyes with brown hair, brown eyes with yellow hair, boys and 
girls and indeterminate infants in truly startling number. It 
looked like recess at an orphan asylum! 

The brown-eyed bridegroom fell back, horrorstruck. The 
bride clung in terror to his protecting arm. 

He found his voice first, "Gosh, Babe," he gasped, "if we're 
gonna have that many children, perhaps we never should Ve 
done it!" 

"Let's get out of here quick!" she whimpered. 



146 THE MAGIC CITY 

If this should meet their eyes, would the couple in question 
kindly report progress to date? Just to keep the record straight? 

Time was well taken care of with the centrally controlled 
system of International Business Machines and the Westclox Big 
Ben polaroid giant of General Time Instruments Corporation. 
Music was represented by the Pfeffer Company and the juveniles 
enjoyed watching the antics of the Mystoplane. Western Union 
and Postal offered wire service at all hours and stenographers 
at stenotypes took dictation at around 200 words a minute. 

Vacuum cleaners by Hoover, typewriters by Remington- 
Rand and business machines by the Addressograph-Multigraph 
Corporation gave an insight into modern efficiency methods. 
The Oakland Chamber of Commerce had an exhibit here which 
outlined the East Bay region with Oakland as a focal point for 
distribution and shipping. Electrical products were shown by 
Pacific Electric, Sangamo, the General Cable Company and the 
Bowie Switch Company. Early pianos and clavichords were 
shown by Baldwin. 

One of the outstanding exhibits of the Hall of Science in 
1939 was that of the Mayo Foundation. It provided in a graphic 
manner a comprehensive survey of the age-long battle against 
disease and revealed in an interesting way through photographs, 
moving graphs and models the work of the Mayo clinic in ser- 
vice to man. 

State Departments were represented by a series of exhibits 
including the Board of Education, the state institutions, nar- 
cotics, motor vehicles, the accident commission, social welfare 
and public health. Steps in the prevention of tuberculosis formed 
the subject of an exhibit by the Tuberculosis Association and 
the Birth Control Federation of America had a graphic display. 

Books and education were featured by the International Cor- 
respondence Schools, the Grolier Society, Quarrie Corporation, 
the Merriam Company and the Bookhouse for Children. Crown- 
Zellerbach displayed various paper products. 

Disaster relief, accident prevention and health activities made 
up the Red Cross presentation and safety was stressed by the 



SCIENCE AND SERVICE TO MAN 147 

Aetna Casualty & Insurance Co. The Schering Corporation fea- 
tured hormones and Ciba Pharmaceutical Products explained 
the functions of the heart. Metropolitan Life dealt with life ex- 
pectancy and the value of insurance. Eli Lilly 8c Co. told the 
story of diabetes. Chemical displays were made by Winthrop, 
Sandoz, Dow, Stauffer and Monsanto. 

Other exhibits included Revelation tooth powder, the West 
Disinfecting Co., the California Medical Association, St. Francis 
Hospital Properties, Inc., the American Dental Association, 
which traced the development of dentistry from primitive times 
and emphasized the value of dental health, and Lederle Labora- 
tories, Inc. which explained the serum treatment of pneumonia. 

New exhibits in 1940 included the California Academy of 
Science with a botanical display, the California Heart Associa- 
tion, demonstration of "B-l" by the California Nursery Co., Em- 
ployment and Industrial Relations divisions of the state govern- 
ment, "Magic Shadows," X-ray wonders in medicine and industry, 
by the Pacific Roentgen Club, and Noah Webster's desk and the 
modern dictionary by the Springer Company. 

Dominating the Palace of Mines, Metals and Machinery, one 
of the main exhibit buildings of '39, was Treasure Mountain, 
diorama of a typical mining region. Here, with the aid of minia- 
ture figures, every type of gold mining operation was presented, 
quartz, hydraulic, and panning by hand the bed of a stream. The 
rock formations reproduced in this scene were created by the use 
of moulds, made in the mining regions, from which casts of light 
material were made and fitted together. 

Underneath the mountain was a reproduction of a gold mine. 
Air and water lines were installed, drills of all types were in 
place, the repair shop ready for operation, the hoists awaiting 
their cargo. Various methods of timbering were shown, as well 
as blasting systems. It was a fully equipped mine under actual 
operating conditions. 

In the center of the south entrance lobby stood a glass case, 
protected by iron bars, in which was one of the most unusual gold 
formations ever encountered, a large "leader" of gold protruding 



148 THE MAGIC CITY 

from a quartz formation. Another display case contained samples 
of gold ore collected over a period of fifty years. Included in 
this, and indicative that gold mining was still a very active busi- 
ness in California, were samples of ore taken out within the last 
few years assaying as high as $180,000 to the ton, and nuggets 
from Sierra County running up to more than 40 ounces in 
weight. 

Included in one display group were 68 minerals found in the 
United States. Another revealed the little-known uses of various 
metals in medicine. A hand-made scale, built in Philadelphia 
and weighing nearly 1,000 pounds, on which over $100,000,000 
worth of gold was weighed in the Bonanza district, was another 
interesting item. The assayer's office showed the equipment used 
for testing various types of ores. A mining engineer was also on 
hand to answer all questions involving mining operation. The 
entire exhibit traced the history of metals from the Stone Age 
to the present. 

Around the walls of the exhibit were plaques depicting coin- 
age of various years and a reproduction of the $50 gold "slug," 
an eight-sided coin, blank on one side, made by private interests 
in San Francisco in 1852. 

Operations in milling, smelting and refining were illustrated 
graphically in the McGraw-Hill exhibit. C. W. Marwedel dis- 
played a linotype, tools, metal and machinery. Oliver niters, 
Joshua Hendry mine machinery, rope making by the Tubbs 
Cordage Company, the Dorr Company's "Metallurgy of Gold," 
Neptune meters, tungsten products, processes of precipitation, 
the Great Western Electro-Chemical Company's visual display 
of chemicals, animated blue-prints of the Mine, Smelter Supply 
Company showing gold recovery processes, seamless tubing of 
Timken and the manufacture and application of steel by the 
subsidiaries of the U. S. Steel Corporation, all provided educa- 
tional subjects for the daily throngs. 

One of the largest and most intricate animated displays ever 
conceived was installed by Radio Stations KPO-KGO. Electri- 
cally motivated puppets made of rubber, representing the lead- 



SCIENCE AND SERVICE TO MAN 149 

ing Red and Blue Network stars were seen in a series of 
performances. 

On a stage sixteen feet high there was set a series of little 
stages, twelve in clock-wise fashion on a twelve foot panel and a 
thirteenth in the middle of the circle. Each performance was of 
one minute's duration, providing a twelve-minute complete show 
continuously from 10 a. m. till 10 p.m. 

A television "roaming reporter" interviewed visitors in the 
Court of the Seven Seas for RCA. While persons were being 
interviewed, their friends might watch at the receiving set inside 
the building. 

General Electric Company's powerful international broad- 
casting station KGEI, which has since achieved world fame with 
its daily transmissions covering half the surface of the globe, went 
on the air for the first time on February 18, 1939. 

The dedicatory program broadcast by the station, whose stu- 
dios and transmitter were part of the General Electric exhibit in 
the Palace of Electricity, was on March 4, 1939. 

Thereafter, millions in Latin America, Asia, the Antipodes 
and South Africa listened to Exposition bands and shows, heard 
visiting dignitaries and enjoyed colorful programs at the Fair 
through the short radio waves of KGEI. Occasionally, the sta- 
tion offered listeners in other lands a booklet describing the 
Fair. More than ten thousand requests were received. 

Because of geographical location (it is the only international 
broadcasting station west of the Mississippi) , KGEI was the only 
United States radio station heard in the Orient and the part it 
played in the private lives of tens of thousands of foreign listen- 
ers is a fascinating story. For them, KGEI was the "Voice of 
Uncle Sam" and their sole source of uncolored news. 

The station became a permanent installation in the San 
Francisco region and, in the Spring of 1941, was moved from 
Treasure Island to a permanent location on the mainland, with 
studios and offices at the Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, and 
transmitter at Belmont. 

R. S. Peare of Schenectady, N. Y., was manager of broad- 



150 THE MAGIC CITY 

casting for General Electric. E. T. Buck Harris, former San 
Francisco newspaperman, was the manager of KGEI and H. M. 
Scholes the engineer in charge of technical operations. 

A "phantom house" built of plate glass was a spectacular 
part of the General Electric 1940 exhibit. A full-size five-room 
model home of ultramodern design was shown, with outside and 
inside walls of transparent glass, beautifully decorated and elec- 
trically equipped throughout. The largest light in the world, 
50,000 watts, and the "House of Magic," half-hour scientific 
stage show, attracted the crowds. 

Broadcasting under glass from KGEI, an animated "light- 
conditioning" display contrasting old and modern home lighting 
methods, a reproduction of Edison's laboratory with an old- 
fashioned glass blower making electric lamps just as Edison had 
done, a "Magic Kitchen," which "talked and walked," a "Tire- 
o-Scope," device which X-rayed automobile tires for hidden 
nails, glass, cuts, and an amateur photography contest made the 
General Electric display outstanding. More than four million 
persons visited the exhibit in 1939. 

The Westinghouse exhibit was one of Treasure Island's ma- 
jor industrial attractions both in 1939 and 1940. 

"Willie Vocalite," the mechanical man, and "Sparko," the 
mechanical dog, were popular features. 

The "playground of science" included the Stroboglow and 
Grid Glow Tube, the Breath Relay, the Spencer Discs and the 
"Cashier's Cage." 

A welding exhibit, a cutaway operating turbine, an auto- 
matic elevator and a "Motor Torture Chamber" attracted much 
attention. 

A featured part of the 1 940 Westinghouse exhibit was an oper- 
ating model of the Mount Palomar Telescope, brought from the 
laboratory of the California Institute of Technology to show the 
public just how this largest of all telescopes in the world will 
actually operate. It was a one-tenth scale model which, in itself, 
was a telescope of large proportions, having a mirror 20 inches 
in diameter. 



SCIENCE AND SERVICE TO MAN 151 

There was also a theatre with a sound movie in color. A tele- 
vision lounge in which the public might actually observe tele- 
vision reception on the latest receivers was installed. 

In addition, there was a replica of the Time Capsule buried 
on the site of the New York World's Fair, which contained ob- 
jects representative of life in the 20th century as a message to 
the people 5,000 years hence. Duplicates of the contents in the 
original capsule buried in 1939 were on display. 

"Pedro the Voder" was leading man in the Bell System ex- 
hibit. He carried on a lively and intelligible conversation at the 
bidding of a young lady who operated a set of keys like those on 
an organ. Pedro demonstrated in 1939 his ability to talk. In 
1940, he also sang, recited nursery rhymes, and imitated animals. 

Other features of the Bell System exhibit included the long 
distance demonstration, the word and tone hearing tests, and the 
Voice Mirror. At the long distance demonstration, visitors were 
selected by lot, every half hour, and allowed to place calls to any 
listed telephone of their choosing in the United States. The 
audience listened in. 

At the hearing demonstration visitors were able to test the 
quality of their hearing by taking certain word and tone tests. 

The Voice Mirror, an electrical device by means of w r hich 
people may listen to their own telephone voices, was also a popu- 
lar attraction. 

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company had two exhibits, one 
to treat of electricity and the other of gas. The electric exhibit 
was a 160-foot animated diorama depicting scenes in the days of 
'49 and also the City of the Future, together with a large relief 
map of the company's system, with miniature reproductions of 
power house, transmission lines and distribution centers. Treated 
with fluorescent chemicals, at frequent intervals black light was 
trained on it, creating amazing effects. 

An electrified model of a modern city, operated by automatic 
controls revealed day slowly changing to night, lights going on 
and off, street signs flashing, elevators running in "skyscrapers" 
and many more remarkable details. 



152 THE MAGIC CITY 

A shooting gallery using electric flashes instead of bullets, a 
bicycle to show how much electricity its riders can generate, and a 
talking robot entertained the crowds. Spectacular demonstrations 
of electrical wizardry, including thrilling experiments, high- 
voltage displays, magnetic marvels and many additional "scien- 
tific elec-tricks" were offered in a small theater. 

The gas exhibit was a comprehensive showing of the latest 
in appliances and service. 

Participating in the display of the oil industry were the fif- 
teen companies comprising Golden Gate Exposition Petroleum 
Exhibitors Inc., a non-profit corporation headed by A. C. Gal- 
braith as president. Participating companies included Ethyl Gas- 
oline Corporation, General Petroleum Corporation of Califor- 
nia, Gilmore Oil Company, Hancock Oil Company, Honolulu 
Oil Corporation, Richfield Oil Corporation, Rio Grande Oil, 
Inc., Seaside Oil Company, Signal Oil Company, Shell Oil Com- 
pany, Standard Oil Company of California, Sunset Oil Com- 
pany, The Texas Company California, Tidewater Associated 
Oil Company (Associated Division) and Union Oil Company 
of California. 

In addition to graphic charts, two sparkling fifteen minute 
shows were offered: one, a puppet show, which in 1939 enter- 
tained more than one million people, and in 1940 a new fifteen 
minute show was added, "Oil for Aladdin's Lamp," based on the 
story of oil from discovery to ultimate consumption, and with 
magical highlights. 

A chromium central theme tower, with flowing curtain of 
oil and fascinating bubble columns, captured the attention of 
all who entered the exhibit. 

Three automobile manufacturers were represented in the 
1939 Exposition, Chrysler, Ford and General Motors. The latter 
two were 1940 exhibitors with more elaborate displays which 
were crowded with visitors daily. 

Chrysler and General Motors were located in Vacationland 
the first season, exhibiting the latest models of passenger and 
commercial vehicles together with methods of laboratory tests 



SCIENCE AND SERVICE TO MAN 155 

and a collection of motor cars of ancient vintage which told in 
a graphic manner the history of the industry. 

Ford, in 1939, occupied an entire building on the Court of 
Pacifica, with an extensive display of new models of all types and 
laboratory instruments of popular appeal. One of the exhibits 
illustrated the fallacy of perpetual motion; there was a strobo- 
scope, a Motor X-ray, a weatherometer to test automobile paint 
and a fadeometer to measure the lasting qualities of enamel and 
leather. 

Ford offered an entirely new and more elaborate show in 
1940. In an acre of display space the "Dream of Transportation" 
was presented in twelve scenes. There was a "gentleman's buggy" 
which was a wedding present to Timothy Hopkins from Leland 
Stanford; and a "Governor's Coach" built at a cost of $10,000 
in the days of the Nevada gold rush. With a background of 
historical murals, models of Ford cars, dating from 1903, were on 
display, contrasting with three streamlined productions of the 
present day. In the little theater, technicolor films of motor car 
manufacture and assembly were shown. 

The General Motors exhibit of 1940 was located in the for- 
mer Music Hall, off the Court of Pacifica. The amazing story of 
scientific research was presented here, emphasizing America's 
high standard of living, safety, and the importance of transpor- 
tation. New types of glass, light that could be poured like water, 
a transparent car and murals by Dean Cornwell in aluminum 
and gold leaf, told an interesting story of the advance of industry. 
Chevrolet, Pontiac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Cadillac-La Salle, Fisher 
Body and Frigidaire were among the units participating in the 
exhibit. 

The Palace of Air Transportation was one of the Island's 
permanent structures. It housed an exhibit in which the unbe- 
lievable strides made in air travel were impressively presented. 
Under the same roof the visitor found the 1912 biplane of 1,100 
pounds operated by R. H. Fowler with an 80-horsepower motor 
at a speed of 70 miles per hour, and the Honolulu Clipper, latest 
type of Pan-American passenger ship, with four motors of 1,500 



156 THE MAGIC CITY 

horsepower each, a weight of 41 tons, speed of 200 miles per 
hour and accommodations for 73 passengers. 

Corrigan's "$900 crate" in which he made the wrong-way 
flight to Ireland, was a center of interest and the operating plant 
of the Pan-American Airways and the new Clipper ships pro- 
vided a continually changing picture of modern aviation. On 
the main floor were displays of model airplanes, private passen- 
ger planes, Sperry gyroscope developments and allied lines. The 
shops of the air line were shown in actual operation through the 
large glass windows separating them from the main exhibit room. 
These included the instrument, motor, propeller and machine 
shops, and a Link trainer, employed in training pilots for in- 
strument flying. 

On the east wall was a huge color map of the world, showing 
every air line in operation, and below this a series of dioramas 
with typical scenes in the various nations which are served by 
air transportation. 

In the main hangar there was room for three of the new type 
Clippers and complete equipment for servicing them. 

The Golden Gate International Exposition had the unique 
distinction among international expositions of having ocean air 
transport service operating right on the Fair grounds. 

Pan-American Airways clippers left regularly, each week, 
from Treasure Island for Hawaii, the Philippines and the Ori- 
ent, and arrived weekly from those Pacific ports. In 1940 the 
Antipodean run was pioneered and finally brought to regular 
schedule. 

In the Port of Trade Winds at the southerly end of Treasure 
Island, the Clippers rode at anchor, and on departure days, 
Tuesday and Saturday, crowds of Exposition visitors gathered 
along the esplanade to witness the departure of the winged ships. 

In addition to exhibits and booths maintained by various 
churches and religious organizations there were three separate 
structures dedicated to religion --The Temple of Religion and 
Tower of Peace, the Christian Science Building, and the building 
devoted to the work of the Christian Business Men's Committee. 



SCIENCE AND SERVICE TO MAN 157 

The Temple of Religion was located just off Central Square. 
The Hall of Friendship seated 250 persons with choir accommo- 
dations for 50 voices. Among the permanent displays were ten 
enormous murals hung on panels inside and outside the Hall, a 
300-foot outdoor painting by Peter Llyin presenting the rise of 
religious freedom, the story of creation in murals by Camille A. 
Solon, and a 195-foot painting by Jose Moya del Pino portraying 
the life of man in relation to God. 

Included among the exhibits was a collection of Bibles, dating 
from the ancient days of Hebrew scrolls to the latest editions of 
the world's greatest books. The Breen Bible, carried by the ill- 
fated Donner party, and others equally famous were found here. 
One of the interesting objects on display was a hand-carved 
mother of pearl portrayal of the Lord's Last Supper, carved by 
an Armenian artist in 1735. In the archeological exhibit were 
many rare items of unusual interest, some going back to 1500 
B. C. Pottery used during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, 
carbonized grain, dates and raisins of 1400 B.C., and a stone 
lamp, were among the exhibits. 

The Biblical garden adjacent to the building contained more 
than 100 plants mentioned in the Bible, bulrushes and papyrus 
from the Valley of the Nile, olive and fig trees from Jerusalem, 
and cedar of Lebanon. 

Open to all creeds, the Temple of Religion presented the 
contributions which religion as a whole had made to human 
welfare. Vesper services were held in the auditorium on Sunday 
afternoons at 5 o'clock, with the leader of a different religious 
faith conducting the services each Sunday. 

Near the Central Square was the building in which Christian 
Science activities were presented. This semi-circular structure, 
with its attractive garden in an inner court, contained a series 
of well-arranged exhibits, paintings and dioramas. 

This undertaking was sponsored through the joint efforts 
of the Christian Science Churches and Societies of California, 
joined by many from the eleven western states, Hawaii and 
Alaska. 



158 THE MAGIC CITY 

One of the prominent features of the main exhibit room was 
a globe, six feet in diameter, girdled diagonally by a narrow plat- 
form on which stood figures representing the children of all na- 
tions with hands joined, indicative of the universality of religion. 

Third of the Treasure Island buildings devoted to religious 
activities was that of the Christian Business Men's Association. 
This was located on North Boulevard, in line with the entrance 
marked by the Court of Pacifica, approximately in the center 
of the island. 

In this building the basic story of religion was told through 
a series of scientific exhibits, under the title of "Sermons from 
Science." There were three demonstrations a day, designed to 
prove, through scientific presentation, the harmony of Biblical 
teaching with modern science. 

It was sponsored by a committee composed of representative 
Christian business men from many Churches and religious 
groups in San Francisco and the bay region, and its activities 
covered a wide range in addition to the scientific sermons. 




CHAPTER XIII 



Rale 



(The material for this chapter was prepared for the Woman's Board 
of the Exposition by Hazel Pedlar Faulkner and Marie L. Darrach. Mrs. 
Faulkner was Director of Activities for the Women's Board and Mrs. 
Darrach Publicity Director, 1939-1940. THE EDITORS) 

IN THE MOSAIC which is the Golden Gate International Exposi- 
tion in restrospect, as it covers two years 1939 and 1940, one of 
the brightest designs in the complete pattern reflects the work 
of the Women's Board of the Exposition, as the focal point of 
women's activities. 

Reduced to briefest terms the measure of the women's ac- 
tivities might be summed up in some such caption as Four Years 
Here and There or Two Years on Treasure Island and Two 
Years Before. For the continuous service of the Women's Board 
covered a period dating from its appointment by President Le- 



160 THE MAGIC CITY 

land W. Cutler in December 1936 until the lights went out 
finally on both showings of the gorgeous spectacle which was 
the Exposition. 

More than two years before the gates of Treasure Island 
opened, nine women from the Bay area were invited to serve 
as a central committee to advise in matters of potential interest 
and attraction, to assist with hospitality and to organize and 
carry out a widespread task, namely to interest the women of 
the Western states particularly in what the Golden Gate Inter- 
national Exposition would offer. 

Mrs. George T. Cameron of Burlingame was named chair- 
man of the group, which included Mrs. George Creel, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Denman, Mrs. John F. Forbes of Ross, Mrs. Walter A. 
Haas, Mrs. E. S. Heller, Mrs. Duncan McDuffie of Berkeley, Mrs. 
Alfred McLaughlin, Mrs. Henry Potter Russell of Burlingame. 

The group represented far more than geographical distribu- 
tion and social prestige. Every member was a leader in the cul- 
tural, artistic or educational life of the community women 
whose benefactions extended well beyond the boundaries of their 
own localities. 

It was to such a group that the officials of the 1939 Exposi- 
tion turned for suggestions and assistance in their efforts to 
create an Exposition which should be record-making, both ar- 
tistically and financially. 

One of the earliest acts of the women's committee (later 
named the Women's Board) was the appointment of Mrs. Hazel 
Pedlar Faulkner as its secretary. With its membership and its 
Director unchanged, the Women's Board was invited by Presi- 
dent Marshall Dill of the 1940 Fair to continue, with the em- 
phasis in its efforts for the "repeat performance" laid primarily 
on promotion and publicity concerning 1940 attractions and 
opportunities. In this its work differed somewhat from that of 
previous years, when its major pre-Exposition task had been one 
of organization for interest and attendance on a large scale. 

The task of handling the Women's Board publicity through- 
out both Expositions was performed by Mrs. Marshall Darrach. 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 161 

How effectively that was done may be realized with the state- 
ment that during the 1940 Exposition alone the Women's Board 
office had record of 7,351 inches of publicity, exclusive of photo- 
graphs, which had appeared in more than two hundred papers. 
This record was secured by a state-wide publicity committee, set 
up by Mrs. Darrach and operating along parallel lines with 
county committees. This publicity committee (from 59 coun- 
ties) numbered 216 women 52 of whom were either owners, 
publishers or editors of women's pages of their community news- 
papers. Much valuable publicity for the Exposition was written 
by staff feature writers from New York, Chicago, Washington, 
Denver and other papers, women writers having been assigned 
to cover the Fair on invitation of the Women's Board. 

From its wealth of experience in varied fields, it was early 
apparent that the members of the Women's Board had ideas 
which if and when approved could add much to the im- 
portance and dignity of the Exposition. In a world where in- 
terests and activities overlap without regard to sex lines, the 
women frequently glimpsed the possibilities of distinguished 
attractions, and voiced their thoughts to the Board of Manage- 
ment. Many of their proposals were adopted, as outlined or pro- 
jected either through their own or additional committees. Fre- 
quently they received concrete expression through other depart- 
ments or specially constituted divisions of existing departments. 

Such recommendations originating in and emanating from 
the Women's Board resulted in the creation of the Pacific Area 
Committee, of w r hich Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur was chairman. A 
"unified Pacific Area presentation," with Pacific House as the 
theme building of the Exposition, thus gave reality to the slogan 
of the 1939 Fair A Pageant of the Pacific. The immensely 
popular Hall of Flowers, operated in 1939 under the joint di- 
rection of Miss Jean Boyd and Mrs. Marie Louise Kelly, and in 
1940 by the California Commission (which erected the build- 
ing) was another idea which had its origin in the Women's 
Board where, on suggestion of Mrs. McDuffie, the requests of 
numerous interested horticultural groups were given voice 



162 THE MAGIC CITY 

through the establishment of a Horticultural Committee, with 
Mrs. Cabot Brown, chairman, and the committee, on request, 
"chaperoned" by the Women's Board. So also the exhibit of 
Fine Printing (another suggestion of Mrs. McDuffie) , the Ex- 
position's Federal Theatre productions, linked to the Women's 
Board through the chairmanship of Mrs. George Creel; sponsor- 
ship of the Recreation Building program, early proposed by 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas and approved by the Board; the unique 
Indian Exhibit in the Federal Building and the outstanding 
exhibit of Decorative Arts, under the direction of Dorothy 
Wright Liebes, as a division of the Fine Arts exhibit in 1939 
both these were originally proposed for consideration and de- 
veloped by the Board's Vice-Chairman, Mrs. William Denman. 

In Pacific House throughout 1939 and 1940 the balcony pro- 
gram of hospitality was the special concern of the Pacific Area 
Social Relations Committee, of which Mrs. Denman was chair- 
man, assisted by various hospitality committees. Under the basic 
and active interests of Board Members connected with the In- 
stitute of Public Relations Mrs. McDuffie, Mrs. McLaughlin, 
Mrs. Heller the Institute co-operated with Dr. Philip N. 
Youtz, Director in 1939, and Dr. Grace McCann Morley, Di- 
rector in 1940, in organizing the educational programs for both 
years. 

Before the completion of its first year of service the Women's 
Board, through a committee headed by Mrs. Alfred McLaugh- 
lin, had launched the wide phase of its work the organization 
of the women of the State and of the Western states in the 
interests of Exposition participation and attendance. 

New York on the East and Hawaii on the West, with the ten 
states nearts neighbors to California, had committees with chair- 
men appointed by the Women's Board. Through these chair- 
men and their appointees invitation to membership in the ultra- 
smart Yerba Buena Club was featured with other attractions 
and offerings. The chairmen who aided in this phase of the 
Women's Board work were Mrs. Julius Ochs Adler, New York; 
Mrs. Walter Dillingham, Hawaii; Mrs. Thomas E. Campbell, 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 163 

Arizona; Mrs. John T. Barnett, Colorado; Mrs. Margaret Cobb 
Ailshie, Idaho; Mrs. Charles B. Henderson and Mrs. Tasker L. 
Oddie, Nevada; Mrs. Miguel Otero, New Mexico; Mrs. David 
Honeyman, Oregon; Mrs. George O. Gallagher, Washington; 
Mrs. Katherine Newlin Burt, Wyoming. 

Closer at home, the work of Mrs. McLaughlin's committee 
embraced each of California's fifty-eight counties, with a chair- 
man in each and a committee of varying size and selection, to 
permit of organization or geographical representation, so that 
the work and word of the Exposition might get into every group 
and quarter in each county. 

Recognizing the desirability of affording a channel through 
which women's clubs might present their ideas to the Exposition, 
presidents of thirteen of the largest state groups having national 
and international affiliations were invited to serve on an Ad- 
visory Committee to the Women's Board on Organization. The 
number included the American Association of University Women 
(California State Division) , American Legion Auxiliary, Cali- 
fornia Federation of Business and Professional Women, Cali- 
fornia League of Women Voters, Daughters of the American 
Revolution, National Council of Catholic Women, National 
Council of Jewish Women, Native Daughters of the Golden 
West, California Congress of Parents and Teachers, Inc., Re- 
gional Association of Soroptimist Clubs, Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association and Farm Home Department, California Farm 
Bureau Federation. 

Through these representatives and with the cooperation of 
many other groups through their official publications and in 
open meetings, the Exposition had a direct contact with more 
than a quarter of a million women. As in the cases of all major 
efforts of the women's work for the Exposition, this extensive 
county organization was all carried out on a volunteer basis. 

An Executive Committee, comprised of county chairmen of 
the six bay area counties with representatives of the Sacramento 
and San Joaquin Valleys counties, also aided in the progress of 
the Women's Board county organization work. On this com- 



164 THE MAGIC CITY 

mittee were Miss Annie Florence Brown (1939), Miss Mary 
Barmby (1940), Alameda County; Mrs. A. F. Bray, Contra 
Costa County; Mrs. H. Brainerd, Mann County; Mrs. W. F. 
Chipman (1939), Mrs. Jesse C. Colman (1940), San Francisco; 
Mrs. H. S. Dana, San Mateo; Mrs. Almon E. Roth, Santa Clara 
County; Mrs. Frederick T. Robson, Tehama County; Mrs. Carlos 
McClatchy, Fresno. 

In 1938 the Women's Board, emphasizing the Pageant of the 
Pacific idea through its county organization, sponsored a Pacific 
Area essay contest throughout the high schools and junior col- 
leges of California, furnishing to contestants comprehensive bib- 
liographies (one for adult groups wishing to study the Pacific 
Area was also prepared and sent out) along with sets of colored 
mounts, illustrative of the arts and crafts, the peoples and cus- 
toms of the Pacific basin. Hundreds of young students partici- 
pated in the contest, which was conducted with the generous 
and helpful co-operation of the State, county and local school 
authorities and directed by county chairmen. 

The Women's Board early felt that with such magnificent 
opportunities as the Exposition would afford in the field of 
cultural and educational exhibits, there should be a substantial 
residue of interest and stimulus to continue for future years. To 
that end it encouraged and provided material for club programs, 
furnished speakers on and off Treasure Island on subjects of 
art, international relations, Pacific Area cultures, foreign ex- 
hibits, gardens and Exposition plantings and so on. 

For those who could not come to Treasure Island, the radio 
in 1939 carried twenty-one w r eekly programs, sponsored bv the 
Board and prepared and presented by its Director, Mrs. Faulk- 
ner. From the all-important question of what to wear to Treas- 
ure Island to insure maximum comfort, to the intricacies of 
symphony composition and social welfare in Chile from the 
color of Treasure Island's magic gardens, to the romance of 
coffee in Brazil or public health clinics in the far-away Phil- 
ippine Islands the radio topics ranged, each program with a 
guest speaker and, for a time, a coast-wide audience. 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 165 

Prior to the opening of the 1939 Exposition six of the world's 
most distinguished women received invitations to be Exposition 
visitors guests of the Women's Board. Three of the number 
were able to accept: Mile. Eve Curie, of Paris, author and lec- 
turer; Senora Amanda Labarca of Santiago, educator and soci- 
ologist; Mile. Nadia Boulanger, of Paris, composer and sym- 
phony conductor. Each of these was the center of a busy round 
of activities covering a week, honor guest at luncheons and din- 
ners, guest speaker before appreciative audiences. A fourth 
guest, Madam Sigrid Undset of Norway, a Nobel Prize winner in 
literature and rated as the world's most distinguished woman 
novelist, unable to accept in 1939, was welcomed in 1940, when 
she came, a refugee from her conquered Norwegian homeland. 

The State of California was one of the three participating 
"partners" in the Golden Gate International Exposition enter- 
prise. So, in 1938, Governor Frank F. Merriam named a woman's 
committee to serve in the California Building with the official 
California Commission. Mrs. Cameron, chairman of the Exposi- 
tion Women's Board, was made chairman of the State committee, 
on which the other eight members of the Board were named to 
serve. On the original Executive Committee there were in addi- 
tion to the nine above, the Hon. Florence P. Kahn, Vice-Chair- 
man; Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley, Miss Annie Florence Brown, 
of Oakland; Mrs. W. E. Chipman, Mrs. William J. Hayes, Red- 
wood City; Mrs. Eugene Prince, Mrs. Duncan S. Robinson, Rio 
Vista; Miss Ruth Turner, and Mrs. Sanborn Young of Los Gatos. 

A change in State administration following the November 
elections of that year saw a new California Commission ap- 
pointed, with two women, Mrs. H. E. Erdman and Mrs. George 
Knox, among them. Reorganization of plans for the California 
Building and the retirement of the original and enlarged Wom- 
en's Committee followed. 

From enlisting membership on an honorary committee of 
Governors' wives, to aiding in naming the courts and thorough- 
fares of Treasure Island; from planning and carrying out special 
events and days, to chaperoning a ten-year old who flew out 



166 THE MAGIC CITY 

alone from Baltimore for a two-day whirl at the Fair with 
these and many other odd tasks along with their regular work 
the Women's Board put in a full four years! 

Only on one of the many occasions when the Women's Board 
office was appealed to as a court of final answer or as an informa- 
tion center did it find itself completely unable to help. That 
was the occasion when a hurried delivery clerk thrust a shiny new 
leather horse collar through the door and asked in desperation, 
"Where does this belong did you order it?" 

Such in brief was much of the work, both on and off the 
Island, of the Women's Board from 1937 through 1940. Rela- 
tively few persons realized the extent or the compass of the 
undertakings which the women carried through. To many, their 
main achievement was the building of a club house. 

If you were to ask the average visitor to Treasure Island what 
was the outstanding attraction and the most talked of feature 
during his visit, it is safe to say that from several millions of the 
sixteen millions who visited there, the answer would be: The 
Yerba Buena Club. To many it was the sole achievement of the 
women. And it would have been enough, had it been so, without 
many of the other things w r hich they accomplished. For that, too, 
was a project of the Women's Board, envisioned as a hospitality 
center for the Exposition, as a place for official entertaining and 
a smart meeting spot for its members. 

During the early weeks of the Women's Board meetings, first 
mention of such a plan to the Board of Management was met 
with gasps of surprise. To have women offer to build, furnish 
and operate such an attraction was one thing, devoutly to be 
hoped for; but to have them willing to finance it was another! 
And with the latter fact in view, generous permission was 
granted. "Go ahead, the sky's the limit, but the bills are all 
yours!" was the sort of spirit that prevailed. 

Under the capable chairmanship of Mrs. Henry Potter Rus- 
sell, assisted by Women's Board members Mrs. E. S. Heller, 
architecture and furnishing chairman; Mrs. W. A. Haas, secre- 
tary of the Club House Association; Mrs. John F. Forbes, Gar- 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 167 

den Club plantings; Mrs. George T. Cameron, honorary hospi- 
tality chairman, in official capacity in the corporation, with an 
active and enlarged executive committee, and with all members 
of the Women's Board co-operating on occasion, the Yerba 
Buena Club was a symbol of California hospitality at its best. 

Erected on a plot of ground (contributed by the Exposition) 
facing the Port of Trade Winds, looking toward the Exposition's 
Administration Building (which housed the suite of offices of the 
Women's Board) the Yerba Buena Club faced West. Below it 
was the sunken Treasure Garden, planned by California's most 
distinguished woman landscapist and decorator, Miss Isabella 
Worn. 

Its golden walls lined with stately poplars and surrounded by 
choicest flowers and plantings the further work of Miss Worn 
the exterior of the Yerba Buena Club gave only the slightest 
inkling of the breath-taking beauty which had been achieved 
in its furnishings. That feature of the Yerba Buena Club's 
charm, admired by countless thousands who came from afar to 
see it, was the work of Frances Elkins of Monterey, decorator 
whose genius rose to new heights in the Yerba Buena Club. 
There that magic combination of the work of architect (William 
Wurster) and decorator furnished a setting for the enter- 
tainment of crown princes and potentates, maharajahs and pres- 
idents, first ladies and stars of varying magnitude. Even Charlie 
McCarthy was feted there. Not only did the Women's Board 
center much of its entertaining there during 1939, but in 1940 
when the club had passed to new control did it welcome Mme. 
Undset, Lauritz Melchior, and others of note within its hos- 
pitable walls. 

The operation of the Yerba Buena Club elicited warm praise 
from every quarter and its smooth running and wise administra- 
tion resulted from its capable directors the Executive Com- 
mittee of which included in addition to Mrs. Russell, Mrs. 
Cameron, and the others, several members of the Women's Board, 
Mrs. W. Farmer Fuller, Jr., vice chairman; Mrs. W. F. Chip- 
man, Mrs. Eugene M. Prince, treasurer; Mrs. George M. Bowles, 



168 THE MAGIC CITY 

Mrs. Edward Otis Bartlett, chairman of House Committee; Mrs. 
Silas H. Palmer, Miss Katharine Donohoe, chairman of flowers; 
Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland, Mrs. Sheldon G. Cooper, Mrs. Henry 
Foster Button, Mrs. Fentress Hill, Mrs. Wallace Alexander, Mrs. 
Everett J. Brown, Mrs. Harry East Miller, Mrs. William H. 
Orrick, Mrs. George Pope, Jr., Mrs. Leon Sloss, Jr., Mrs. M. C. 
Sloss, chairman of special hospitality events. 

How the Women's Board helped to set up the machinery 
for the sale of memberships in the Yerba Buena Club, how its 
chairmen, in some instances appointed for the club house effort 
and in others for the complete program of the Board's activities, 
how through the efficiency of the Club House membership sale 
committee 1,400 founder memberships at $100 each were dis- 
posed of by July, 1938, six months before the building was com- 
pleted, and how more than 6,500 contributing memberships, for 
the most part at $10 each, had been eagerly brought by women 
from all over the West the mechanics of the effort which re- 
sulted in the charm spot known as Yerba Buena Club make an 
interesting paragraph in the record of accomplishments of 
women in and for the Golden Gate International Exposition. 

Hospitality efforts of the Women's Board included the ap- 
pointment of an entertainment committee of men and women 
who, with members of the Exposition Board of Directors and 
their wives, State and Federal commissioners and their wives, 
were on call for entertaining visitors within the city's gates, in 
the privacy of homes as often as on Treasure Island. With Mrs. 
Cameron chairman of that committee, much of the arranging 
for official and semi-official hospitality fell to the lot of the 
Women's Board. 

Two large teas given before the opening of the 1939 Ex- 
position, one by the California Commission for its Women's 
Committee and one given by the Women's Board for its county 
chairmen in the same year brought those women working on 
the outside for the Exposition into social contact with those 
officially in the organization. Several county chairmen, notably 
Los Angeles with Mrs. John D. Fredericks on two occasions; 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 169 

San Diego, Mrs. George Burnham; Santa Barbara, Mrs. Harry 
Hancock (1940); San Francisco, Mrs. W. F. Chipman and Mrs. 
Jesse C. Colman; Stanislaus, Mrs. Geome Hobbs, and the states 

J 

of Oregon, Nevada and Colorado, entertained for members of 
the Women's Board who traveled on Exposition business. 

For the "Fair in Forty" the Yerba Buena Club was revived 
as the Treasure Island Women's Club by a new and enthusiastic 
group, with Mrs. Frank Panter as its president. A Board of 
Directors numbering sixty-four included leaders in all fields of 
women's endeavor. This Board entrusted the details of adminis- 
tration of the club to an Executive Committee of ten which, 
in addition to Mrs. Panter, consisted of Mrs. James V. Chloupek, 
representing the East Bay as vice president; Mrs. Paul Springer, 
treasurer; Mrs. George M. Hearst, secretary; Mrs. Eugene Bowles, 
Mrs. J. E. Butterfield, Mrs. Robert Hugh Donaldson, Mrs. Hulda 
McGinn, Mrs. Martin Newall, and Mrs. J. D. Roantree. 

Redecorated and refurnished in soft colors and pleasing com- 
binations by a San Francisco firm under the able direction of 
Mrs. Panter, and with the previously exclusive Founders' section 
opened to the membership, the club became one of the notable 
attractions of the 1940 Exposition. More than 200 paintings and 
other works of leading San Francisco artists, both men and 
women, were displayed within its corridors. Under the direction 
of Mrs. Howard Thomas, assisted by Mrs. Morley P. Thompson, 
the gardens without and the floral and other decorative arrange- 
ments within its walls presented an ever-changing beauty that 
vied in popularity with more specialized horticultural exhibits. 

Celebrities from all over the world were guests there and en- 
joyed the restful atmosphere of the club as well as the excellent 
food served in the palatial dining room. And the members them- 
selves, numbering more than eleven thousand, took advantage of 
these services from the day the 1940 Fair opened until it closed. 

The Executive Committee began its work in January, 1940, 
with no money on hand; but the receipt of immediate applica- 
tions for membership made it possible to buy the building and 
kitchen equipment. Then, through careful budgeting and plan- 



170 THE MAGIC CITY 

ning, the dues received from the ever-increasing membership 
made it possible for the club not only to pay its own way but, 
when the final accounting was made, to send to the Exposition 
Company a sizeable check as its financial contribution to the 
"Fair in Forty." 

General hospitality within the Exposition, which the Wom- 
en's Board still recognized as an obligation, found expression in 
the Popular Hostess House, filling a long-felt need. As the 
result of a generous gesture on the part of the Exposition Man- 
agement, the Hawaiian Building of the 1939 Fair was assigned 
to the Women's Board as a headquarters for such social and cul- 
tural activities of interest to women as fell outside the province 
of the Treasure Island Women's Club. Through the efforts of a 
special committee of the Women's Board which included Mrs. 
E. S. Heller, Mrs. Alfred McLaughlin, and Mrs. Henry Potter 
Russell and the artistic aid of Mrs. Frances Elkins, the building 
was transformed into a social rendezvouz of distinction and out- 
standing beauty. These attractive headquarters also afforded the 
Women's Board an opportunity for the expansion of a previously 
developed participation by women's organizations which was 
housed from early August until the close of the 1939 Exposition 
in the Women's Center in International Hall. Maintenance of 
this Center, under the direction of the Women's Board, was 
made possible by the financial assistance and co-operation of the 
California League of Women Voters, Native Daughters of the 
Golden West, American Association of University Women, Cali- 
fornia Federation of Women's Clubs, Council of Jewish Women 
and the Soroptimists. Open house for women visitors to the 
Exposition was maintained daily and a committee from one of 
the sustaining organizations was always on hand to welcome 
them to the attractive lounge, and to serve a cup of tea from the 
tiny kitchenette. And these same organizations with other groups 
were active participants in the hospitality plans of Hostess House 
throughout 1940. The operation of the building was in the 
hands of a Committee appointed by the Women's Board, of which 
Mrs. Jesse Colman was Chairman, Mrs. Henry Dobel, Vice- 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 171 

Chairman, and whose members were Mrs. Lawrence Clay Brown, 
Miss Alice Burr, Mrs. Lloyd Ackermann, Mrs. Ludwig Frank, 
Mrs. E. H. Heller, Mrs. Stanley Powell, and Dr. Rose Vander- 
burgh. A series of rare loan exhibits, daily programs of artistic 
and cultural merit and receptions for visiting celebrities were 
arranged by this committee and staged in the auditorium and 
in the golden-hued lounge for the pleasure of all who cared to 
wander in and participate. Among the national and international 
celebrities for whom informal receptions were given and whom 
all visitors to the Exposition were invited to meet, were: Mrs. 
Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, Gertrude Lawrence, Lily Pons, 
Andre Kostelanetz, Governor Poindexter of Hawaii and his 
daughter Miss Helen Poindexter, Gladys Swarthout, Lady Brod- 
erick, Marcel Grandjaney, Alec Templeton, Mr. and Mrs. Mar- 
shall Dill, Nicol Smith, Oscar Levant, Grace Moore, Jan Peerce, 
Miriam SoloviefF, Lauritz Melchior and Meredith Willson. 

A daily information service staffed by the National League 
for Woman's Service was an extra feature much appreciated by 
the thousands who visited the building, and a corps of host- 
esses recruited from the women's organizations of the Bay area 
was on duty each day to greet and welcome all comers. Hospi- 
tality at Hostess House was without formality or membership 
restrictions, and typified the friendliness of the "lady next door" 
who never sends out cards for her parties or requests an R.S.V.P. 

Three special entertainment features of the Exposition, spon- 
sored by the Women's Board, which proved to be peak events as 
to attendance and general public interest, were: the Coolidge 
Concerts heard during both the '39 and '40 Fairs; the two Wo- 
man's Days, one in 1939, the other in 1940; and the Flower 
Arrangement Exhibits presented monthly, from June to Septem- 
ber, 1940, in the foyer of the Administration Building, in co- 
operation with the Garden Clubs of Northern California. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, foremost patron of cham- 
ber music in the world, had offered a gift-de luxe to the Expo- 
sition, through the Women's Board. She wished to present the 
'39 Fair with a series of nine chamber music concerts, at which 



172 THE MAGIC CITY . 

the finest string quartet in the country would give programs that 
would make top-flight musicians tingle with anticipation. This 
giving away of concerts with a quartet complete is what 
Mrs. Coolidge herself calls her "mad career." For over twenty- 
five years she has been devoting her large fortune, her time, 
energy and great musical talent to an activity which has for its 
sole purpose the stimulation of a nation-wide appreciation of 
chamber music. And to give her work institutional character she 
established the Elizabeth Coolidge Foundation, which adminis- 
ters a large fund to this end, and built the Hall of Music in the 
Library of Congress in Washington, D. C. She has sponsored 
music festivals in all the capitals of Europe, and her gifts of 
concerts by outstanding quartets have led to the establishment 
of colleges and libraries throughout the United States, Mexico, 
Honolulu, and Puerto Rico. But she had never given a series of 
chamber music concerts to a World's Fair. 

The Golden Gate International Exposition and an approach 
with the Women's Board, had furnished this opportunity. The 
Exposition management at the solicitation of the Women's 
Board, had finally accepted her offer, but the prediction persisted 
in official circles that as an entertainment feature it would prob- 
ably not succeed and go down in Exposition history as a quaint 
manifestation of mental aberration on the part of a group more 
cultured than canny. 

Chamber music at an Exposition! The idea was fantastic! 
Even when heard under the standardized conditions demanded 
for its enjoyment, chamber music is considered "caviar for the 
general." So any expectation that an audience could be assem- 
bled for a series of concerts among the promiscuous crowds 
making up the attendance at a World's Fair was ridiculous. If 
even a half dozen such could be found willing to subject them- 
selves to the agony of a contact with Brahms, or to endure Hads's 
"Lark" for half an hour at a stretch, the Women's Board would 
be indeed lucky. The only thing that might be suggested as more 
absurd, would be for the hot dog vendors to substitute pate de 
foi gras canapes for their succulent hamburgers. 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 173 

But the fact remained that the Coolidge String Quartet 
ranked with the great ensemble groups of the world; that Wil- 
liam Kroll, the first violinist, was perhaps without a peer as an 
artist of sterling merit; that Mrs. Coolidge, the gracious donor of 
a program of the finest musical quality that had ever been heard 
in the West, was coming to California especially to be present; 
and that the tickets to the series of concerts could be had for the 
asking; and with the Exposition committed to acceptance, the 
problem of putting the project across had to be faced. So Mrs. 
Leonora Wood Armsby, Chairman of the Music Co-ordinating 
Committee of the Exposition, and Mrs. Marshall Darrach, Pub- 
licity Director of the Women's Board, took on the job of assem- 
bling an audience on nine consecutive Monday afternoons, that 
would at least be sufficiently large to demonstrate to Mrs. Cool- 
idge that her long crusade to develop a public appreciation for 
chamber music had not been in vain in the far-flung West. 

The success of the concerts, both artistically and from the 
point of view of attendance, was so definite, and Mrs. Coolidge 
was so satisfied that her efforts to improve the public's taste in 
music had not fallen on barren soil, at least in California, that 
she presented another series of five chamber music concerts to 
the Exposition of 1940. These were given in the large ballroom 
of the California Building, again under the sponsorship of the 
Women's Board, and managed in the same way by Mrs. Wood 
Armsby and Mrs. Marshall Darrach. In fact, they took off where 
the others had ended, seemed like a continuation of the first 
series. So, in spite of all vicissitudes, an audience totaling nearly 
eighteen thousand had actually listened to the finest chamber 
music in the world at the Golden Gate International Exposi- 
tions of '39 and '40, and, in so doing, had established a precedent 
and some kind of a record in musical history. 

Woman's Day at the 1939 Exposition will stand as the rank- 
ing individual event sponsored by the Women's Board. It fur- 
nished the highlight, not only because the program was of un- 
usual interest, and a marvel of co-ordinated activity, but its box 
office appeal was such that it attracted the biggest gate of any 



THE MAGIC CITY 

week day during the '39 Exposition. October 25 was designated 
as Woman's Day, ostensibly to honor women for the service they 
had rendered, and for the tremendous contribution they had 
made to the success of the project known around the world as 
the Pageant of the Pacific. 

Unlike the Boards of Lady Managers of World's Fairs of an 
earlier day, who were called in as a sort of decorative accessory 
after everything was finished, the Women's Board of the Golden 
Gate International Exposition had been in it since its birth as 
an idea, down through the organizing, planning and building. 
They had advised and worked helpfully and had furthermore 
persuaded women all over the country to assist them in making 
every project a success. So it seemed fitting, before the lights 
went out on Treasure Island, to set a day apart for them which 
would be a slight gesture of appreciation for what they and the 
women of California had done in this huge co-operative venture. 

But if this had been the intention when a Woman's Day 
was named, such a reason was soon forgotten by the Women's 
Board, who simply recognized it as one more occasion when they 
might be helpful in increasing the prestige of the Exposition. 
So a broad and varied program was immediately drafted for a 
superlative special day which would attract women from every- 
where to the Fair on October 25. And the usual signal for 
assistance was wig-wagged to the 58 county committees in the 
state organization, of which Mrs. Alfred McLaughlin was chair- 
man, and the function of which was to develop plans projected 
by the Woman's Board. 

The day will be recalled as a gala occasion from 8 o'clock in 
the morning till the gates closed at night in a blaze of fireworks, 
with the totalizer registering over 111,000 visitors to the Island. 
The events, directed by Mrs. George Cameron as chairman of 
the day, followed each other with clocklike regularity. Spotlight- 
ing the routine features were the two events largely responsible 
for the presence of the crowds. George Stimson, the "singing 
cop," was heard in the Plaza at noon, and Universal's sensational 
child star, Gloria Jean, sang in the Temple Compound for a 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 175 

half hour, featured with her two popular stage-fellows, seven- 
year-old Kenneth Brown on the accordion, and Billy Lenhart of 
eight, playing the bass violin. At the solicitation of the Women's 
Board, the schools had been closed, so that every mother in San 
Francisco could heed the signs "Go to the Fair" which had been 
tacked up all over town. And the supposition is that most of 
them did, and faithfully covered the gamut of events scheduled 
for their entertainment. 

Home economics editors and radio commentators assembled 
by Josephine Bartlett Martin met housewives at Festival Hall, 
where they discussed culinary matters and carried away food 
prizes; the public wandered through the Yerba Buena Club 
which kept open house for three hours; many had tea with the 
ladies of the California Commission and the recreation commit- 
tee in the lounges of their respective buildings; others viewed 
the rare quilt display shown by the Needlework Guild of 
America under Mrs. R. H. Donaldson's direction, the all-day 
flower arrangement exhibit in the foyer of the Administration 
Building sponsored by the Bay Area Garden Clubs, or attended 
the reception for the women artists in the San Francisco build- 
ing. And at 5 o'clock thousands massed at the Port of Trade 
Winds to see the Pan-American Clipper take off to the Orient - 
on this day to the accompaniment of an orchestra. 

Woman's Day of 1939, as a climax for the activities spon- 
sored by the Women's Board during the Exposition year, was 
one of stellar attractions and impressive gate receipts. 

Woman's Day, again sponsored by the Women's Board, was 
repeated at the 1940 Fair, on September 18 twelve days before 
it closed. For the spectacular features of the first Woman's Day 
was substituted a program of greater maturity and finer quality. 
And while it did not register as sensationally as to attendance as 
the first one, the consensus of opinion was that their recognition 
of women's achievements as expressed in the entertainment at 
luncheon of thirteen nationally famous California-born women 
(named by popular vote as part of the Woman's Day program) 
represented the high water mark of distinction. 



176 THE MAGIC CITY 

At the luncheon given at the Treasure Island Women's Club, 
with the floral decorations reflecting the artistry of Miss Isabella 
Worn at its zenith, the honored guests were Gertrude Atherton, 
Anna Klumpke, Julia Morgan, Dorothy Arzner, Dr. Aurelia 
Henry Reinhardt, Louise A. Boyd, Annette Abbott Adams, Kath- 
leen Norris, Dr. Margaret Smythe, Maude Fay Symington, Flor- 
ence Prag Kahn, Dr. Marianna Bertola and Helen Wills Roark. 

As an innovation, marked by originality, each famous woman 
was introduced by a prominent man, rather than by a single 
toastmaster. These included Marshall Dill, Haig Patigian, Dr. 
S. A. Barrett, John Francis Neylan, Joseph Thompson, Edward 
O'Day, Leland Cutter, Roy Pike, Marshall Dill, Jr., Paul Speegle 
and Randall Larsen. Another feature of the program in keeping 
with the dignified note established at the luncheon, was a stirring 
address on the "American Way of Life" by Judge Dorothy Ken- 
yon, a distinguished New York jurist, who had flown to the Coast 
for the occasion. 

A lighter vein marked the remainder of the entertainment 
features, with the movie star, Anne Rutherford, greeting youth- 
ful admirers and enthusiasts from several vantage points; the 
Hollywood Women's Symphony contributing a series of musical 
numbers; Hostess House presenting Mrs. George Creel's "Forty 
Years of Hats," a collection of headgear which had been part 
of her professional wardrobe as Blanche Bates, and about which 
she talked amusingly. A reception arranged through the courtesy 
of the management of the Press Club was a jolly affair in recog- 
nition of the contribution of California newspaper women who 
had co-operated in publicizing the Exposition. 

One of the most popular events of the 1939 Woman's Day 
had been the flower arrangement exhibit in which the garden 
clubs of Northern California had participated. So, with the open- 
ing of the 1940 Fair, inquiry from these co-operating groups 
had brought the decision that the Women's Board would intro- 
duce them as a monthly entertainment feature for the second 
Exposition. Under the chairmanship of Mrs. John Forbes, as- 
sisted by 20 garden clubs from around the Bay and as far north 



THE WOMEN'S ROLE 177 

as Napa, a series of flower arrangement exhibits were shown 
monthly from June through September in the spacious foyer 
of the Administration Building. These were viewed by thou- 
sands of men and women, entranced with the artistry and in- 
genuity of the displays. It was a revelation to many as to what 
could be actually done with a collection of flowers, shells, sea- 
weed and other paraphernalia as varied as the props of a Broad- 
way musical show. 

The final exhibit as part of the Woman's Day program dur- 
ing the Fair of '40, was an event in the life of local and visiting 
floriculturists and attracted a record crowd. Among the outstand- 
ing displays were a "Fifth Column" novelty arrangement show- 
ing a collection of ants, snails, slugs, and other insect pests 
crossing a lawn in a flower garden; one of sea-pods and forest 
trivia, complete with a "Bottom the Weaver"; and another with 
driftwood as a base and a colorful collection of flowers that flour- 
ish on sand-dunes. The most publicized arrangement of the 
entire show (the publicity department clip sheet showed over 
1500 illustrations of it circulated by the Associated Press) was a 
large floral fan made of baby's breath, and other tiny flowers on 
a base of banana palm trunk. 




CHAPTER XIV 



and 



A COMPLETE BOOK could be written and possibly should be 
on the music of the Exposition. A record of its pageantry even 
a cursory record might well fill another fat volume. This chap- 
ter must need a miracle of condensation to present even flashes 
of two entertainment seasons, to recall so much as a haunting 
strain of melody that filled the crowded hours. 

Music-lovers of San Francisco attempted early in the Exposi- 
tion's history to arrange a series of symphony concerts on the 
Magic Island, but the plan was to meet opposition from many 
sources. The early management had its own ideas as to suitable 
musical programs for a Fair. Dr. Edwin Franko Goldman had 
been a prominently featured attraction of the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition in 1915. Dr. Goldman and his musicians came back 
to San Francisco 24 years later, similarly featured. They played 
twice daily in the Court of Honor from Opening Day of '39 until 
July 2, specializing in operatic and classical selections. 

Not until late in the '39 season, when the management 
and with it the entire entertainment concept had undergone 
complete change, was the Magic City to have its first taste of 
symphony music. Jose Iturbi, the Spanish pianist, inaugurated 
the series on September 13, conducting the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Followed, at intervals of a week, Albert Coates, 
the British conductor, with Milizia Korjus as guest artist; Leo- 
pold Stokowski, of the Philadelphia Symphony and more re- 
cently of Hollywood. These efforts proved so popular that Lily 
Pons and her conductor husband, Andre Kostelanetz, were heard 
with the San Francisco Symphony in a matinee finale on October 
21 that packed the California Coliseum to capacity. 



180 



With the experience of 1939 to guide, the 1940 management 
made early provision for a symphony program to run through 
the second season. Cultural music had proved itself a sound ven- 
ture in showmanship. Heard during the 1940 run were: 

John Charles Thomas, Pierre Monteux conducting, on June 
4. (Grace Moore had been scheduled originally but came down 
with a cold after her open-air appearance on International Busi- 
ness Machines Day.) 

Jan Peerce, tenor, and Miriam SoloviefF, violinist, Monteux 
conducting, on June 18. 

Gladys Swarthout, guest artist, Monteux conducting, July 2. 
Alec Templeton, guest artist, Monteux conducting, July 16. 
(As an encore Alec gave his famous Wagnerian opera burlesque 
and all but brought down the house.) 

Lily Pons and Andre Kostelanetz on July 30. 
Lauritz Melchior, Bruno Walter conducting, on August 13. 
Meredith Willson conducting his own Mission Symphony, 
with Oscar Levant, pianist, as guest artist on August 27. 

Grace Moore, Gaetano Merola conducting, in the finale of 

the series on September 10. 

Popular prices were established 
for these concerts and thousands 
took advantage of this policy to en- 
joy the best in music. 

Organization of a "utility band" 
under the direction of Ralph Mur- 
ray was announced by Director Har- 
ris D. H. Connick a month before 
the '39 opening. Leader Murray was 
to make that "utility" designation a 
masterpiece of understatement 
through the months to come. The 
red-uniformed Exposition bands- 
men became as familiar as Pa- 
cifica herself, and as much an inte- 
gral part of the Exposition. Long 



Junior Musicians' 
Day proved treat for 
all lovers of music 




PAGEANTRY AND SONG 



181 



after virtually all other musicians of the Magic City of '39 and '40 
are forgotten, Ralph Murray and his ever present troupers will 
be remembered with nostalgic affection. 

There was music in the air throughout the day and into the 
night from the earliest days of the Magic City's existence. As the 
season advanced, there was an even greater variety. Only dif- 
ference was that there was a conscious effort to cater to the public 
taste. Dr. Goldman's justly celebrated band was dated. So, for 
that matter, were Benny Goodman, Kay Kyser, Eddy Duchin and 
all the rest. But theirs was an ultra-modern dating, and therefore 
of greater appeal to swing-conscious young moderns. 

Early weeks of '39 found numerous musical groups function- 
ing on schedule. In addition to the featured Goldman band 
there were the Philippine Constabulary Band, the Sonora Ma- 
rimba Band in El Salvador Court, the Brazilian orchestra, Ha- 
waiian musicians in the Hawaiian building, an ever-increasing 
number of visiting organizations heard in the California Build- 
ing, the Hall of Western States Auditorium and Festival Hall. 
Later on Jack Joy's Orchestra became an established feature in 
the California Commission musical 
schedule. Then there was the daily 
program of recorded music sent out 
over the public address system, also 
sponsored by the Commission. Not 
to overlook concerts on the carillon 
in the Tower of the Sun and daily 
offerings by the bell tower of the 
Temple of Religion. Certainly no 
lack of "concord of sweet sounds." 
Standing high in the affections of 
fair-goers from the very first, and 
increasing in popularity to carry 
over into 1940 as firmly established 
as the Tower of the Sun, was the 
Thirtieth Infantry Band, United 
States Army. Models of military pre- 



Diving exhibition 
thrilled Aquacade 
audiences each day 




182 THE MAGIC CITY 

cision and efficiency, ranking high in artistry, the soldier musi- 
cians made a definite contribution to the enjoyment of millions. 
"La Regiment de Sambre et Meuse," punctuated by the rhythm 
of marching feet the stirring strains of "Star Spangled Banner" 
at the daily retreat ceremony such moments are unforgetable. 

Things musical underwent a sudden and distinct change 
after Dr. Charles H. Strub assumed the managing directorship 
early in June of '39. "More and better free entertainment" was 
the keynote of the new program. "Name bands" were featured. 
Building "G," hard by the statue of Pacifica, became "Treasure 
Island Music Hall," after standing empty since opening day. The 
Magic City turned to "swing" to swing attendance over the top. 
And a wise move it proved to be. 

Benny Goodman, the "King of Swing," was the first to bring 
his band to the Island. It was something of a risk to professional 
reputation, playing "for free." But Goodman took a chance. He 
opened on July 2, following the termination of Dr. Goldman's 
engagement, making four daily appearances in Temple Com- 
pound. Twenty days later he was to receive a scroll testifying to 
the unprecedented achievement of having played to a million 
people in less than a month! 

Kay Kyser and his "College of Musical Knowledge" opened 
as an adjunct to the musical revival. He played behind a 40 cent 
gate in Treasure Island Music Hall, while Goodman played the 
free concerts outside. Despite such opposition, Kyser drew a 
record attendance. 

Kyser was followed in Music Hall by a variety troupe headed 
by Betty Grable and Jack Haley, RubinofF and his violin, and 
Alec Templeton, the blind pianist-composer. Goodman played 
for dancing in Music Hall as well as the Temple Compound 
concerts. Attendance continued to set records. Goodman was 
credited with drawing 76.9 percent of total attendance to his 
concerts. 

Ted Lewis and his band and variety show were next, appear- 
ing in both Temple Compound and Music Hall. Frequent inter- 
missions had to be called in order to empty the hall! Followed, in 



PAGEANTRY AND SONG 183 

chronological order, the bands of Eddy Duchin, Phil Harris, 
Harry Owens, George Olsen, Walt Rosener, Count Basic and his 
Sepians, and Freddy Martin. 

Nothing succeeds like the other fellow's success, and imita- 
tion is good indication of success. The "name band" policy 
adopted by the Exposition Company was eyed by the New York 
Fair management. To quote the succinct professional jargon of 
"Variety": 

"Unappeased by the slash in admission fee to the New York 
World's Fairgrounds on Saturday-Sunday from 75tf to 5(K, mid- 
way concessionnaires are looking to name bands to hypo their 
lagging biz. After several deals for bands had been started and 
dropped for various reasons, the Fair decided to follow the lead 
of San Francisco Golden Gate International Exposition and in- 
stall Music Corporation of America outfits in its amusement area 
starting this Saturday. S. F. Expo also used MCA crews, Kay 
Kyser and Benny Goodman proving exceptional draws. . . . 

"Kyser played to 60,000 persons at 40tf each at the newly 
opened Treasure Island Music Hall." 

"Jitterbugs," that strange breed then populating the land, 
were in a seventh heaven of glory during the summer and fall 
months of '39. The greatest exponents of "swing" the world 
over were brought to the Magic City for their pleasure. And 
they took full advantage of the opportunity to "strut their stuff." 

The appearance of such added attractions as Jack Benny and 
Mary Livingstone (with Phil Harris' orchestra over the Labor 
Day week-end) ; Edgar Bergen and his perverse wooden imp, 
Charlie McCarthy (August 7 and 8) , and finally Bing Crosby 
(October 8), cannot be overlooked in any record, however brief. 
Crosby drew what was undoubtedly the greatest throng ever 
packed into Temple Compound. 

The good grace and downright "sportsmanship" of a San 
Francisco-beloved artist on a certain most embarrassing occasion 
must come in for due recognition at this point. 

John Charles Thomas sang in Temple Compound the night 
of September 30, San Francisco Day, appearing with the San 




Scenes from the spectacular pageant, "America, Cavalcade of a Nation." At the upper left is 
Lincoln delivering his Gettysburg address and, below, a candid camera shot of the martyred 
President in the wings where he was puzzling over a cross-word puzzle while waiting for his cue; 
at the right are two of the girls who appeared in the early Colonial scenes; in the center, left, is 
Columbus, sighting land from the bridge of the "Santa Maria"; at the right, the driving of the 
Golden Spike which united the country in a band of steel; at the left, below, is the defense of the 
Alamo and, right, Patrick Henry delivers his famous speech, "Give me liberty or give me death." 



PAGEANTRY AND SONG 185 

Francisco Municipal Chorus. The opening choral number was 
Gounod's "Unfold Ye Portals." And the portals did just short 
of a cloudburst! 

Thousands of music-lovers gathered in the open stuck it out 
regardless. And John Charles, only too pleased by this attention, 
kept on singing in the rain. Finally the downpour was just too 
heavy, so the concert had to be called off. Next morning Mr. 
Thomas went through the whole program on the same spot, re- 
maining until absolute deadline for catching a plane to New 
York to fill another engagement the following night. 

San Franciscans will always remember this to John Charles' 
everlasting credit. 

To dwell upon all groups vocal and instrumental, amateur 
and professional, classical and popular that contributed to the 
Exposition's musical program during the 1939 season is obvi- 
ously impossible. (A complete listing by "days" will be found 
in the appendix.) However, there were certain notable contribu- 
tions that must be set down. 

Outstanding were the nine concerts of the Coolidge String 
Quartet during June and July of 1939, made possible by the 
generosity of Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. These master 
musicians thrilled thousands in their concerts in the Hall of 
Western States, and later in the California Ball Room. They 
came back in 1940 for another equally popular season of five 
invitational concerts. 

The California Federation of Music Clubs conducted a re- 
markably fine festival during the early '39 season, featuring the 
efforts of bands, orchestras and choruses. Original works of 
California composers were presented in a five-day series of 
programs late in August of '39, sponsored by the California 
Commission. 

So successful was this first venture that it was repeated the 
following year. Again sponsored by the California Commission 
and administered by R. C. Coleson and Jack Joy of the Exposi- 
tion's radio division, a five-day Festival of Music was arranged 
for September 15-20. An all-woman orchestra from Hollywood, 



186 THE MAGIC CITY 

known as "The Symphony of Loveliness," was featured. Choral 
groups provided by the California Federation of Music Clubs, 
the Western Women's Band, a concert orchestra of 70 pieces 
under the direction of Jack Joy and Ralph Murray's Exposition 
Band participated in elaborate and excellently executed pro- 
grams. One of the most popular numbers of the lot was the 
Church scene from "Run Little Chillun," with the colored 
chorus that had sung in the stage production. 

Despite inconveniences arising out of the destruction of the 
California Building by fire, the second version of the festival was 
such a distinct success that plans were laid to make this an annual 
event. Just another cultural heritage of the Magic City that is 
no more. 

Junior Musicians of America, 4800 of them, played in a mass 
orchestral concert in Federal Plaza on June 25, 1939. Fifty Cali- 
fornia cities were represented; twelve from Oregon, thirteen 
from Washington, eight from Texas, four from Montana, four 
from Utah, eight from Idaho, four from New Mexico and one 
each from Colorado and Canada. Youngsters from 5 to 18 years 
of age, they played their vari-sized instruments like professional 
veterans under the baton of Carl Stiska, vice-president of the 
organization. Dr. Edwin Franko Goldman was guest conductor 
when they played a number of his composing. 

These skilled youngsters or others of their organization 
made a similar appearance during the summer of 1940. Again 
their artistry thrilled thousands of enthralled listeners. 

Speaking of youngsters, the Kansas City Toy Symphony, 
made up of kidlets from 4 to 9 years of age, played a most suc- 
cessful three-day engagement in June of '39. Their conductor 
was Lloyd Frederick, aged nine! 

Not to be neglected, was a concert staged by students of the 
Hawaii Conservatory of Music, featuring an ensemble of 100 
guitars, on June 4, 1939. The haunting melodies of those hum- 
ming strings still linger in memory. 

Over 1500 vocalists lifted their voices in massed chorus in 
the Court of Nations on September 3, 1939, opening a three-day 





_M -L LL.jMfti.aiJt- 1 

--.-. 




PAGEANTRY AND SONG 189 

"Eisteddfod," Welsh music festival. Some twenty Western choral 
groups participated and competed for final awards. The Clare- 
mont Choral Society of Berkeley won the mixed chorus award. 
The Ralston Male Chorus of Seattle and the Lund-Chaminade 
ladies' group of Salt Lake City took firsts in their respective 
divisions. 

Another choral festival that drew music lovers was that staged 
by the United German Singing Societies of the Pacific Coast the 
end of July that same year. Three thousand voices, with sym- 
phonic accompaniment, made the three-day engagement mem- 
orable. 

A rather ambitious program of sports events was arranged 
for 1939. Opening day found ski-jumpers competing on an artifi- 
cial "hill" in Sports Field. Boxing, a six-day bicycle race, box 
lacrosse, fencing, yacht regattas and other events were scheduled. 
A yachting program was carried out through the summer. 

Eddie Cantor, the "banjo-eyed" comedian, opened California 
Auditorium the week of March 3, 1939, with the first Exposition- 
sponsored "big show." Cantor used the material and technique 
of his radio shows. He conducted a "discovery contest," with a 
damsel of 16 being duly "found." 

The first version of Clifford C. Fischer's famed "Folies Ber- 
gere" opened in the California Auditorium on March 13, quickly 
caught on with the customers, and carried through to a successful 
nine-weeks run. The human form divine feminine version, 
that is was duly glorified. There was graceful dancing, lilting 
music, comedy both broad and subtle. The costumes and settings 
were gorgeous and the prices most reasonable. 

Following a week's run of somewhat "arty" Japanese presen- 
tation, the Takarazuka Ballet, the first version of the Folies was 
succeeded by a show brought to the Island through Director Con- 
nick's contracting \vith Jake Shubert, known as the "Ziegfield 
Follies of 1939." It ran but a few weeks, being supplanted with 
the Folies Bergere, with the same cast that appeared before. 

Another version of the Fischer Follies opened on August 3. 
It, too, enjoyed a profitable run. Its girls were as beautiful, or 



190 THE MAGIC CITY 

perhaps even more so, its comedy was equally sophisticated. It 
ran on to the end, one of the outstanding entertainment features 
of the Exposition. 

In 1940 Mr. Fischer was back again with still another ver- 
sion of his now-famous "Follies." Those who saw all three 
which meant a majority of the Island's permanent and transient 
population were wont to debate which of the three was the 
best. Suffice to say that any one of the three was worthy of metro- 
politan presentation, which was subsequently proved to Mr. 
Fischer's profit. 

Theme show of the Exposition in 1939 and battling hard, 
only to lose pre-eminence to Aquacade in 1940 was "Caval- 
cade." "Cavalcade of the Golden West" in 1939, "America! 
Cavalcade of a Nation" in 1940. A. L. Vollman, better known 
to associates and the public as "Red," was the instigator, the pro- 
ducer, and father confessor of his huge troupe. 

Mr. Vollman's credo of showmanship can best be summarized 
in an interview which he caused to be broadcast to the public 
prints. Quoting: 

"The public today is beginning to demand entertainment 
which portrays romance, historical adventure, sturdy humor, 
patriotism, respect of God, humanness and wholesome living. 

"On both the stage and screen we have proof of the chang- 
ing taste of the American public. The day of the girl show has 
gone and it's now on the way out for cleaner, more wholesome 
and natural entertainment. 

"Shows in America today should be good enough for every 
child to witness. Then over-emphasis on sex will be put on the 
shelf where it belongs. 

"Nakedness can not long remain the motif of the American 
stage. And Cavalcade of the Golden West is proving that people 
today want real, robust entertainment!" 

They called him "Grass-roots" Vollman after that! 

Cavalcade was a pageant presented on a huge outdoor stage, 
450 feet long and 150 feet deep. Some 500 actors went through 
the action of the script, but the words were read in sound-booth, 



coming out on the stage through loud-speakers. "Third-dimen- 
sional sound," it was called. Actually the actors appeared to be 
speaking the lines, so well were the sound effects arranged. A 
water curtain on which colored lights were played made the 
spectacle even more beautiful at night. 

Four-hundred years of the glamorous yesterdays of the West 
were portrayed in the 1939 pageant. Balboa caught his first 
glimpse of the Pacific from the peaks of Darien. Came Cabrillo, 
Cortes, Portola, Sir Francis Drake, Father Junipero Serra. 
Thomas Jefferson received the report of Lewis and Clark's expe- 
dition. Kit Carson, Vallejo, the discovery of gold by Sutter and 
Marshall lived again. Finale was a "Gay Nineties" scene of old 
San Francisco. 

Cavalcade of the Golden West was a marked success. It 
grossed close to half a million dollars for the 1939 run. 

Arthur Linkletter, who had written the script for "Cavalcade 
of the Golden West," increased his scope for the 1940 renewal. 
"America! Cavalcade of a Nation" brought in the history of the 
country at large, rather than that of the West exclusively. Some 
scenes were retained notable the "Meeting of the Rails," link- 
ing West and East by the first trans-continental railway, the "Gay 
Nineties" finale, the cattle-driving scene and others but in 
the main it was an entirely different presentation. Washington 
at Valley Forge, Washington's Inaugural, Lincoln's Gettysburg 
address (never read better and never failing to thrill), Napoleon 
Bonaparte in his bathtub signing away the Louisiana Territory 
were some of the highlights. 

"America! Cavalcade of a Nation" was as good a show as its 
predecessor, quite as worthy of being the "theme show of the 
Exposition." But this time, despite its appeal to the "demand 
for clean, robust entertainment," it had to share honors. A man 
named Billy Rose had brought has "Aquacade" to the Magic City. 

As appears elsewhere, Rose wanted to be connected with the 
1940 Golden Gate International Exposition in some capacity, 
shrewdly estimated its possibilities. Unable to secure complete 
control, as he once suggested, he finally agreed to bring his Aqua- 



192 



cade production intact from the 1939 New York World's Fair. 

There was no little discussion and conference before Rose 
signed on the dotted line. At one time it appeared as though the 
Exposition might sponsor a rival water show, to be called "Treas- 
ure Island Water Follies." But eventually Rose and the man- 
agement came to terms. 

The New York impressario was to have the building that had 
been International Hall, opening on one of the main courts. He 
was to excavate and construct a pool, set up his own seating ar- 
rangements, make whatever structural changes were necessary. 
These expenses he was to bear himself, the Exposition refraining 
from exacting its percentage on gross business until he had com- 
pletely amortized his original expenditure. 

The Exposition started drawing its percentage by the middle 
of July! That shows the drawing power of the spectacle devised 
by Rose the Showman. 

The San Francisco Aquacade was actually more beautiful 
and more spectacular than the New York version, in that it was 
held indoors and lights could be used for all performances. A 
pool some 200 feet long and 60 feet wide was constructed. (Inci- 
dentally, a new technique was attempted. A huge wooden 
"barge" was built, the seams caulked to keep water in, rather 
than out.) A stage on the side, seats around the other three sides. 
A huge "dry" cast, beautifully costumed and excellently drilled, 
formed background for the "wet" cast, those skilled swimmers 
whose rhythmic group movements made unforgettable patterns 
of grace and beauty in the clear water. 

Morton (Yours for a Song) Downey Johnny Weissmuller 
Esther Williams the diving troupe the male chorus the 
beauteous "Aquabelles" in concealing-yet-revealing costumes 
no wonder close to two million persons saw the spectacle. 

It has been said by various persons, some in a position to 
know, that the Aquacade "made" the 1940 Fair. That's taking 
in a lot of territory but it is not far from the truth! 

Near the top of the "must see" list for 1940 was Salici's 
Puppets, occupying Hall of Western States Auditorium for the 



PAGEANTRY AND SONG 193 

season. This unique entertainment quickly caught the public 
fancy, and deservedly. The puppeteer's art has been handed 
down in this one Italian family, from generation to generation, 
for some 200 years, each generation undergoing a long appren- 
ticeship in manipulating the strings on the platform behind the 
proscenium. The culmination of all these decades of artistry was 
a performance so life-like that spectators had little difficulty in 
imagining themselves seated in a large theater, looking at real 
actors on a distant stage. The puppets were larger than average 
and beautifully costumed, thus adding to the effectiveness of the 
illusion. 

High point of the show was the appearance of a "maestro" 
puppet, quickly recognized as an impersonation of Ignace Jan 
Paderewski. This virtuoso seated himself at a tiny piano with 
all the airs of a Paderewski and then proceeded to "play" that 
composer's well-known Minuet. Synchronization of the music, 
actually produced by a pianist in the pit, and the exact move- 
ments of the puppet's fingers was little short of amazing. A 
"coloratura artiste" joined the maestro, singing an aria to his 
accompaniment, a real artiste behind the curtain furnishing 
"sound effects." When the curtains were lifted at the conclusion, 
revealing the puppeteers above, it was almost an anti-climax 
like breaking a spell. 

Salici's Puppets drew fourth on the list of feature shows, be- 
hind Aquacade, Cavalcade and Follies, and might have done 
even better had a larger auditorium been available. 

Major Arthur J. McChrystal, connected with the Exposition 
directly in 1939, branched out as a showman on his own for the 
1940 run, producing the "Treasure Island Ice Frolics" in what 
had been the French Pavilion the year before. Space and costs 
prevented construction of an actual ice rink, but the artificial 
skating surface sufficed, and was made to look sufficiently wintry 
by scenic settings. The "Ice Frolics" featured some interesting 
and spectacular skating routines by skilled performers and 
proved a popular drawing card. 

Hollywood Show "Stage 9," was a concession occupying the 



194 THE MAGIC CITY 

northern half of what had been the Mines, Metals and Machin- 
ery Building in 1939. Originally sponsored by F. Herrick Her- 
rick, a Hollywood producer, the project passed through several 
hands and finally closed before the season was over. Neil Hamil- 
ton and Marian Marsh were featured stars of the show, a musical 
melange which purported to depict "movies in the making." The 
audience was invited to use its own cameras on the stars and 
chorus, and there was an interesting gallery of old-time motion 
picture favorites and museum of costumes on exhibit. 

Occupying the entire north half of the same building was 
"Pantheon de la Guerre," a huge diorama depicting in almost 
life size the "captains and the kings" of the World War Allies. 

The "free entertainment policy" which proved itself in 1939 
was established virtually automatically as a guide for 1940 opera- 
tions. The only difference was in media of entertainment. "Name 
bands" had been featured in 1939. In '40 the specialty was "free 
shows," colorful and spectacular revues, aerial performances. 
Then, too, the general Exposition show program had been con- 
siderably augmented by the addition of Aquacade, Salici's Pup- 
pets, the Treasure Island Ice Follies, Hollywood Show "Stage 9," 
and such. 

The Golden Days of Forty show which had featured the 
Opening Day ceremonies was carried on, to be followed by simi- 
lar revues conceived and staged by Earl Darfler, of the Depart- 
ment of Special Events. Performances were twice daily, in the 
afternoon and evening, the schedule arranged so as not to inter- 
fere with other shows and concessions. The great stage in Federal 
Plaza was the scene of activity, and literally millions were enter- 
tained free of charge during the four months run. 

Spectacular "thrill shows" in the Open Air Theater drew 
thousands to each twice-a-day performance. Aerialists, acrobats, 
various circus acts predominated. Here again the schedule main- 
tained was designed to give the "pay shows" all the best of it. 

Nor were the children overlooked. "Swing Wide the Golden 
Gates," a kiddie revue, was first on this program. Came eventu- 
ally Jo-Jo the Clown and his Candyland House. The youngsters 



PAGEANTRY AND SONG 195 

never would have stood for seeing him leave them, once he got 
established. He was their favorite attraction, and justly so. 

Underneath his painted mask, Jo-Jo is quite an erudite citi- 
zen. He is an authority on child psychology, a university grad- 
uate. His tender and understanding care of youngsters was a 
show in itself. Jo-Jo would persuade young members of his daily 
audience he used to just about fill the Court of Honor every 
afternoon to come up on the stage and recite, dance or sing. 
Lollypops and such were the reward of merit. There were some 
funny incidents weeping infants, frantic mothers, and the like. 
One stands out in memory: 

A precocious bub was reciting something or other, while Jo-Jo 
registered ecstasy. Suddenly the young Demosthenes paused, 
stammered, called out, panic-stricken: 

"Mama Maaa-maaa! How does the rest of it go?" 

"You know how it goes just as well as you know your own 
name!" came the indignant response from the audience below. 
"Now go ahead!" 

He did and got his lollypop. 

Fireworks displays were frequent but occasional during the 
1939 season. (One recalls with a chuckle how one such occasional 
display annoyed Leopold Stokowski, engaged at the moment in 
conducting the San Francisco Symphony orchestra in the ad- 
joining Coliseum.) 

The 1 940 management made fireworks of practical aid as an 
attendance stimulator. They arranged for a nightly display on 
Sports Field, timing it for 10:30 p.m., releasing the crowds so 
that they would head naturally for the Gay way. It proved a most 
effective means of keeping customers on the Island at night. 

Free dancing, as provided in 1939, proved a not unmixed 
blessing in some details. In 1940 a "cover charge" of 25 cents a 
couple enabled the management to maintain a necessary control. 
The charge was willingly absorbed, and thousands danced to the 
music of Paul Martin's orchestra in Festival Hall. 

Perhaps it might be classed as "pageantry" for inclusion in 
this chapter, but actually it was a simple gesture, and most sin- 



^/K' 









R 






AMERICAN SOCIETY OF COMPO 

TREASURE ISLAND 



"THOSE WHO MAKE AMERICA'S Music" 
Perhaps the most notable assemblage 
of artists and composers ever gathered 
together on one stage members of 
the American Society of Composers, 
Authors and Publishers assembled in 
the California Coliseum following 
their never-to-be-forgotten concert the 
evening of September 24, 1940. Full 



identification provided by the Society's 
President, Gene Buck 

Left to right, standing: Dr. Howard 
Hansen, Charles Wakefield Cadman, 
Harry Armstrong, Bert Kalmar, Presi- 
dent Marshall Dill, Harry Ruby, Shel- 
ton Brooks, George M. Cohan, Jimmy 
McHugh, William C. Handy, John 



r T 
f 




ERS, AUTHORS & PURLISHERS 



SEPTEMBER 14, 1940 



Charles Thomas, Albert Von Tilzer, 
Sigmund Romberg, Albert Hay Ma- 
lotte, Ernie Burnett, L. Wolfe Gilbert, 
Edwin McArthur (Standing over Bur- 
nett and Gilbert), Julius Haug, Eugene 
Pete Heyes. (Note: McArthur, Haug 
and Pete Heyes three heads standing 
back of Burnett, Gilbert and Mack 
Gordon the fat felloiv). Mack Gor- 



don, Harold Arlen, Jerome Kern, Gene 
Buck, Leo Robin, Ralph Rainger, 
Harry Warren, Dave Stamper, Jean 
Schwartz, John Mercer. 

Front row, kneeling: Hoagy Carmich- 
ael, Walter Donaldson, Peter De Rose, 
May Singhi Breen, Ann Ronell, Irving 
Berlin, Deems Taylor. 



198 THE MAGIC CITY 

cere both in inspiration and execution. Throughout the 1940 
run, every afternoon promptly at 5 o'clock an announcement 
came over the public address system: "Ladies and gentlemen, 
you are requested to remain silent for 60 seconds in deference to 
your National Anthem." Thereupon the strains of "The Star 
Spangled Banner" would be broadcast, as played by the Thir- 
tieth Infantry Band during retreat ceremony on Federal Plaza. 
All national colors, wherever displayed on the Island, were to 
come down at that moment. 

Guards and cashiers stationed in various sectors took "neigh- 
borhood" pride in observing this moment of quiet attention. 
At least once, a ferry crowd hastening to get off and pass through 
the gates, was halted and held at attention until the "Star 
Spangled Banner" was completed. Far from being resentful, the 
incoming visitors were greatly impressed, most co-operative. 

First big musical event of the 1940 season was the appearance 
of Grace Moore and Lawrence Tibbett in an open-air concert in 
connection with International Business Machines Day on May 
27. The skies were overcast, the weather chill, but some 50,000 
gathered in Federal Plaza to hear these stars sing with the San 
Francisco Symphony and to thrill at their artistry. 

One listener was thrilled past all expression Suzanna Fos- 
ter, Paramount starlet who had appeared in the opening cere- 
monies. She came behind scenes for a close-up. As Miss Moore's 
golden voice soared, Susie grabbed a forearm near her and all 
but sobbed: "Will I ever be able to sing like that?" 

One of the most significant musical contributions of the 1940 
season was the Negro Music Festival staged in the Coliseum July 
26-28. Orchestra and a 40-voice choir traced the development of 
Negro music through six stages jungle rhythms, plantation 
age, minstrel age, ragtime age, jazz age, swing age during the 
three-day schedule. The Festival attracted critical appreciation. 

A musical feature that drew thousands was the daily concert 
in Federal recreational area by the Northern California W.P.A. 
Symphony. Another favorite was the Hurtado Marimba band, 
appearing daily in International Court. 



PAGEANTRY AND SONG 199 

Music lovers were given opportunity to hear favorite num- 
bers on "request programs" arranged for the carillon in the 
Tower of the Sun each Sunday morning. Miss Eleanor Allen, 
who alternated at the keyboard with Sydney Lewis, complied 
with each request to the best of her instrument's limitations. The 
Thirtieth Infantry Band also asked its public to request favorite 
numbers. 

The Federal Theater Project was operating full force when 
the Exposition opened in 1939, and Federal Theater, a pro- 
ducer's dream in every respect, was one of the principal enter- 
tainment centers. "Hansel and Gretel" and "The Swing Mikado" 
were outstanding productions, the latter showing a notable oper- 
ating profit. The Congress cut out Federal Theater appropria- 
tions in the summer of '39, forcing the cessation of activities. 

The Federal Theater folk lived on an old Sacramento river 
steamer moored at the east end of the Island. It was a colorful 
hulk, in a way, and attracted considerable attention. 

The Federal area contributed numerous fine motion pictures 
for the edification of Fair visitors. Memorable among them were 
"Land of Liberty," a cavalcade of the North American conti- 
nent, produced by Cecil B. DeMille as the motion picture in- 
dustry's contribution, and Pare Lorentz' great documentary 
film, "The River." 

In 1940 the Fine Arts Commission provided showings of old 
motion pictures, classics of their time, which attracted thousands. 
The series provided visual documentary evidence of the devel- 
opment of the cinematic art and were decidedly popular. 

Recollection of the outstanding success of the World's Fair 
International Horse Show in 1939 inspired the 1940 manage- 
ment to stage another such event August 10-18. A. P. Fleming 
was called in as manager, as in '39. Some of the finest stables in 
the country competed for the $45,000 in stakes, offered jointly 
by the Exposition and the California Commission. 

A rodeo in the California Coliseum attracted outstanding 
riders and ropers and a gratifying number of customers in 1939. 
This feature was repeated over Labor Day in 1940. 



200 



THE MAGIC CITY 



This chapter would be incomplete if it failed to devote a few 
pages to a "pageant of song" that will live in the memories of 
thousands privileged to have been present at its one and only 
performance. 

"There never has been a show comparable to it before 
there can never be another, in the lifetime of any of us!" 

So spoke Gene Buck, president of the American Society of 
Composers, Authors and Publishers, from the stage in the Coli- 
seum the evening of Tuesday, September 24, 1940. 

It was nearing midnight. A beyond-capacity crowd of close 
to 17,000 persons moved slowly and unwillingly toward the 
exits. Many of those present had been inside the building for 
almost six hours. Since eight o'clock they had been listening to 
"a cavalcade of American compositions devoted to operatic and 
unforgettable songs of the past and present," with the composers 
themselves singing, playing or conducting the huge orchestra in 
their own numbers. It had been a tremendously long program, 
but the audience still was not satisfied. 

On the stage were gathered men and women whose names 

had become a byword in the musi- 
cal and theatrical world Carrie 
Jacobs Bond, John Charles Thomas, 
Sigmund Romberg, Jerome Kern, 
Irving Berlin, George M. Cohan 
and scores of others. Autograph- 
seekers sought to climb up on the 
platform; Exposition guards herded 
them toward the doors. 

"All of you dear people get to- 
gether here on the stage for a pic- 
ture," Mr. Buck called out. "We 
have never been together in such 
number before and we may never 
meet like this again!" 

They formed in a long line across 
the platform men and women who 



Swimming stars in 
formation spectacle 
at 1940 Aquacade 




PAGEANTRY AND SONG 



201 



had given a nation its songs. A stabbing flash of light the click 
of a camera shutter the group broke up. "ASCAP Day" had 
passed into history. 

Superlatives are all too apt to become overworked and mean- 
ingless from constant usage in connection with a World's Fair. 
Wherefore, when need arises for a good strong descriptive phrase 
to fit an epic occasion the vocabulary stammers and stutters in 
futile inadequacy. Suffice to say that "ASCAP Day" was admit- 
tedly the outstanding event on the entire 1940 program of song 
and pageantry and the 1939 program might well be thrown in 
for good measure. 

Close to 50,000 music-lovers gathered before the open-air 
stage in Federal Plaza to listen to a symphonic program in the 
afternoon. There the San Francisco Symphony played composi- 
tions of members of the society, with the composers conducting 
and the inimitable Deems Taylor offering brisk commentary 
between numbers. 

Realizing the mass appeal of this tremendous entertainment 
feature perhaps it should have been mentioned before this 
that both the afternoon and evening 
performances were staged absolutely 
free of charge the Exposition man- 
agement was most desirous of hold- 
ing the evening show on the same 
great stage outdoors. But Mr. Buck 
declined, regretfully but definitely. 
His reason for insisting upon an in- 
door performance came out later 
George M. Cohan, veteran artist 
with literally thousands of perform- 
ances behind him, got stage-fright at 
the thought of appearing before so 
many thousands outdoors! 

So the Coliseum, the building 
with the largest capacity on the Is- 
land, was called into use. Somehow 



Aerialists thrilled 
throngs in balance 
feats on high wires 




or other, 17,000 persons managed to squeeze in without hanging 
from the rafters. Then came the real problem of the evening 
turning away another 35,000 hopefully expectant of getting in. It 
was a serious proposition. Fire Department authorities demanded 
that the doors be locked and that not another man, woman or 
child be admitted. This by shortly after 7 o'clock. 

Police officers and guards had their hands full. Harried Fair 
folk tried to explain to the milling throngs that the building 
could hold only so many, and that more than that many were 
inside already. But somehow or other, their explanations seemed 
to lack authenticity. The customers jammed in front of the va- 
rious doors kept pounding on the glass demanding admission. 
People expected and awaited inside were denied entrance along 
with others less favored. Exposition President Marshall Dill was 
among these. 

George M. Cohan fared but little better. The public address 
system had to be called into action to find him and notify him 
that he could get in by the stage entrance. The climax came when 
Gene Buck himself, followed by several of his featured compo- 
sers, found the way barred by determined police officers and Ex- 
position guards. 

"Okay, buddy then there'll be no show!" declared the im- 
perturbable Mr. Buck. Nor would there have been, had not the 
guardians of the portals received approval from someone inside. 

John Charles Thomas sang that night as he had never sung 
before. "Sweet Adeline" was presented by its composer, Harry 
Armstrong and the serried thousands in the audience joined 
in lusty chorus. 

Joseph Howard, white-haired, but sprightly as he was in his 
days of vaudeville stardom, was trembling and pale off-stage just 
before his cue to go on. 

"Bernie I can't do it! I'm scared stiff! I never played be- 
fore so many people in all my life!" he quavered to R. H. Burn- 
side, the veteran stage manager. 

"Go on out there and do your stuff, you big sissy!" snapped 
Bernie, giving him a shove. 



203 



Joe Howard never "trouped" better in all his years. He lit- 
erally "laid 'em in the aisles." 

It is all but impossible to recapture the feeling and spirit of 
that evening and set it down in cold type. A set of recordings of 
the entire program exists, including Gene Buck's sagely senti- 
mental comments between numbers. (Mr. Buck never forgot 
that he was doing a job of public relations!) Some day these rec- 
ords may be replayed publicly. If they were to be, a full house 
could be guaranteed in any theater in the land. 

But there were some things that not even a faithful recording 
could reproduce. For instance 

William C. Handy, chocolate brown, bald except for a fringe 
of gray hair, bowed and almost blinded by the weight of more 
than seventy years but he can still lip a trumpet! He stood be- 
fore the banked orchestra, played his never-to-be-forgotten "St. 
Louis Blues." The huge audience swayed its shoulders and beat 
time to the inimitable rhythm of the trumpet solo. "Wa-wa-wa 
waa-a-a-a-ah wa-wa-wa- wa-aa wa-a-a-a-h!" 

Eugene Heyes, better known to his friends as Peter, was on 
the podium. Peter is "first sergeant of the second-violin section" 
when the San Francisco Symphony is officially assembled. On 
this occasion, because of his knowledge of modern tempo, he was 
conducting. The orchestra, you must understand, was actually 
the San Francisco Symphony, but on this occasion had to be pro- 
grammed as "members of" the Symphony. A necessary distinc- 
tion without a difference. 

Handy really did "swing" into it on the second chorus. Peter 
Heyes lifted his baton toward his own first trumpet. "Start send- 
ing!" he hissed. The Symphony cornettist "sent." Then a gesture 
toward the trombone section. "Give!" commanded Conductor 
Heyes. The first trombonist "gave" and how! Never let it be 
said that the San Francisco Symphony, so aptly representing "The 
City That Knows How," is strictly classical! Strings and wood- 
winds caught the fever, the tympanni beat out the rhythm with 
jazz-band abandon. The Symphony did "swing it," and the de- 
lighted audience brought the house down! 



204 



THE MAGIC CITY 



One musician managed to retain at least a thread of decorum 
throughout this display. But not for long. Came George Gersh- 
win's "I Got Rhythm," and the sedate lady harpist started to 
"give." In the most moving rhythmatic passages she was plain 
"shadow-boxing" those strings! 

All in all, a never-to-be-forgotten occasion, was "ASCAP 
Day." And, strange to tell, might never have happened but for 
a serious mistake that was made and a wrong that was rectified. 

One morning late in July the Publicity Director found on 
his desk a wire from a Hollywood friend, Arthur Ungar, man- 
aging editor of "Variety," the theatrical paper. Would the Fair 
be interested in arranging for the appearance of such famous 
composers as Irving Berlin, Sigmund Romberg, Jerome Kern, 
George M. Cohan and others at a concert on Treasure Island ten 
days hence? This without cost to the Exposition. 

The day suggested was Sunday, August 5, a day lacking in 
special attraction despite frenzied efforts of the Special Events 

Stage dances and Department. 
melody interlude _ .. 

for Aquacadences Preliminary arrangements were concluded by telephone. A 




PAGEANTRY AND SONG 205 

representative of the American Society of Composers, Authors 
and Publishers was to come up from Hollywood, a publicity 
representative was to be dispatched from New York forthwith. 
Everything was all set. 

Being aware of the developing dispute between the ASCAP 
people and the radio networks, the Publicity Director had more 
than a general idea of the lay of the land in connection with 
this offer. The National Association of Broadcasters, represent- 
ing a majority of radio stations throughout the country, was to 
convene in San Francisco, August 7. Obviously, the American 
Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers desired to put 
forth its side of the case publicly while the N.A.B. people were 
present in numbers. The broadcasters were also to have theii 
day at the Fair, climaxing ceremonies with an elaborate trans- 
continental hook-up with the New York Fair which was to go 
over all stations. If ASCAP wished to come into the picture as 
well, the Exposition might benefit doubly, even though some- 
what in the middle between contestants. 

In any event, it seemed like a fine attendance-stimulator. So 
the publicity department hastened to get out releases and ad- 
vertising matter. There was but little time in which to put such 
an event across with the potential customers. 

Days passed. Still no representative from Hollywood, no sen- 
timent stimulator from New York. Nor yet confirming word 
from Gene Buck, then vacationing at Bohemian Grove. Then 
came the blow. A wire from Hollywood regretted the necessity 
of cancelling out! 

President Dill was taking a week-end off from his presidential 
duties at that same Bohemian Grove when the bad news ar- 
rived. He was contacted by telephone and asked to explain to 
Mr. Buck the embarrassing position in which the Exposition had 
been placed. He did and was told by the surprised Mr. Buck 
that he (Buck) had not known a single detail of any such plan, 
or that it had even been contemplated. 

"Marshall, I promise you we will right this great wrong we 
have done your Fair," Mr. Buck assured Mr. Dill. "Because we 



206 

have disappointed you in this instance, we will put on a show 
for you the like of which has never been seen anywhere. I give 
you my word you will not be disappointed again." 

Seven weeks later Gene Buck and the American Society of 
Composers, Authors and Publishers made good that pledge. 

The programs: 

MUSIC FESTIVAL 

(AT THE FEDERAL PLAZA) 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON, SEPTEMBER 24, 1940, 2:00 P.M. 

Sponsored by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers 
Produced Under the Personal Direction of GENE BUCK, President 

& 

SYMPHONIC CONCERT 
Devoted to Compositions by Members of the Society 

fr 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Introduction of Welcome by MARSHALL DILL 

GENE BUCK 

DEEMS TAYLOR, Composer, Author, Critic and Commentator, Alaster of Ceremonies 

ft 

(1) "JOHNNY COMES MARCHING HOME" By Roy Harris 

Conducted by DR. HOWARD HANSEN 
Director, Eastman School of Music, Rochester, N. Y. 

(2) THIRD SYMPHONY By Dr. Howard Hansen 

Conducted by DR. HOWARD HANSEN 

INTERMISSION 

(3) "CAPONSACCHI" Overture and Selections By Richard Hageman 

Conducted by MR. HAGEMAN 

(4) "DARK DANCERS OF THE MARDI GRAS" By Charles Wakefield Cadman 

MR. CADMAN, Soloist Conducted by EDWIN MCARTHUR 

(5) (a) "LA GUIABLESSE" ) ..,, 
(b) G MINOR SYMPHONY-2 MOVEMENTS [' 

Conducted by MR. STILL 

(6) "CIRCUS DAY" By Deems Taylor 

Conducted by EDWIN MCARTHUR R. H. BURNSIDE, Stage Director 

(AT THE CALIFORNIA COLISEUM) 
TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 24, 1940, 8:00 P.M. 

Sponsored by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers 
Produced Under the Personal Direction of GENE BUCK, President 

EVENING CONCERT 

A Cavalcade of American compositions devoted to operatic and unforgettable songs of 

the past and present, written by members of the 
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers 

GENE BUCK, Master of Ceremonies 

SPECIAL ORCHESTRA COMPOSED OF MEMBERS OF 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Guest Soloist 

(1) "STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER" John Philip Souza 

Conducted by DR. HOWARD HANSEN 



207 



(2) TRIBUTE TO OUR FOUNDER, the late and beloved VICTOR HERBERT 

"GYPSY LOVE SONG" from "The Fortune Teller" .... Lyric by Harry B. Smith 

"KISS ME AGAIN" from "Mile. Modiste" Lyric by Henry Blossom 

"MARCH OF THE TOYS" from "Babes in Toyland" . . . Lyric by Glen MacDonough 
Conducted by EUGENE HAYES 

(3) "SMILES" Composed by Lee Roberts, Lyric by /. Will Callahan 

MR. ROBERTS at the piano 

(4) "LOVE IN BLOOM" By Leo Robin and Ralph Rainger 

Sun by MR. ROBIN MR. RAINGER at the piano 

(5) "TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALL GAME" 

Composed by Albert Von Tilzer, Lyric by Jack Norworth 
MR. VON TILZER at the piano 

(6) "THE LAST ROUND-UP" By Billy Hill 

MR. HILL at the piano 

(7) "SOME OF THESE DAYS" By Shelton Brooks 

MR. BROOKS at the piano 

(8) "OVER THE RAINBOW". . .Composed by Harold Arlen, Lyric by . y. Harburg 

MR. ARLEN at the piano Sung by JUDY GARLAND 

(9) "MELANCHOLY BABY" Composed by Ernie Burnett, Lyric by G. A. Norton 

MR. BURNETT at the piano 

(10) "WAITING FOR THE ROBERT E. LEE" 

Composed by Louis Muir, Lyric by L. Wolfe Gilbert 
Sung by MR. GILBERT 

(11) "THREE LITTLE WORDS" By Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby 

Sung by MR. KALMAR and MR. RUBY 

(12) (a) "MY BLUE HEAVEN". .Composed by Walter Donaldson, Lyric by G. Whiting 
(b) "MY BUDDY" Composed by Walter Donaldson, Lyric by Gus Kahn 

MR. DONALDSON at the piano 

(13) "THE END OF A PERFECT DAY" By Carrie Jacobs Bond 

MISS BOND at the piano Sung by ALLAN LINQUIST 

(14) "THE FLYING FLAG" By Carrie Jacobs Bond 

(Premiere Performance) Sung by ALLAN LINQUIST 

(15) "WHO'S AFRAID OF THE BIG BAD WOLF" 

Composed by Ann Ronell, Lyric by Frank E. Churchill 
MISS RONELL at the piano 

(16) "SINGING IN THE RAIN" By Ralph Freed and Nacio Herb Brown 

MR. FREED at the piano 

(17) "YOU MADE ME LOVE YOU" 

Composed by James V. Monaco, Lyric by Joseph McCarthy 
MR. MONACO at the piano 

(18) (a) "I WONDER WHO'S KISSING HER NOW" 

Composed by Joseph Howard, Lyric by Frank R. Adams and Will Hough 

(b) "GOOD BYE, MY LADY LOVE" By Joseph Howard 

Sung by MR. HOWARD 

(19) "ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE" 

Composed by Jerome Kern, Lyric by Oscar Hammerstein II 
MR. KERN at the piano Sung by TONY MARTIN 

(20) "SMOKE GETS IN YOUR EYES" 

Composed by Jerome Kern, Lyric by Otto Harach 
MR. KERN at the piano 

(21) "SWEET ADELINE". . . .Composed by Harry Armstrong, Lyric by Richard Gerard 

Sung by MR. ARMSTRONG 

(22) "LOVER COME BACK TO ME" 

Composed by Sigmund Romberg, Lyric by Oscar Hammerstein II 
MR. ROMBERG at the piano 

(23) TRIBUTE To the Late George Gershwin 

"SUMMERTIME" Composed by George Gershwin, Lyric by DuBose Heyward 

From "Porgy and Bess" 

"I GOT RHYTHM" Composed by George Gershwin, Lyric by Ira Gershwin 

EDWIN McARTHUR conducting the Orchestra 

(24) "JEEPERS CREEPERS" By Harry Warren and John Mercer 

MR. WARREN at the piano Sung by MR. MERCER 

(25) "I CAN'T GIVE YOU ANYTHING BUT LOVE, BABY" 

Composed by James McHugh, Lyric by Dorothy Fields 
MR. McHUGH at the piano 



208 THE MAGIC CITY 

(26) "STAR DUST" Composed by Hoagy Carmichael, Lyric by Mitchell Parish 

MR. CARMICHAEL at the piano 

(27) (a) "DEEP PURPLE" Composed by Peter De Rose, Lyric by Mitchell Parish 

MR. DE ROSE at the piano 

(b) MAY SINGHI BREEN "THE UKULELE LADY" 
MEDLEY OF MR. DE ROSE'S SONGS- 

(a) "WHEN YOUR HAIR HAS TURNED TO SILVER" 

(b) "HAVE YOU EVER BEEN LONELY?" 

(c) "SOMEBODY LOVES YOU" 

(28) "DID YOU EVER SEE A DREAM WALKING?" 

By Mack Gordon and Harry Revel 
Sung by MR. GORDON 

(29) "CHINATOWN" Composed by Jean Schwartz, Lyric by William Jerome 

MR. SCHWARTZ at the piano 

(30) "ST. LOUIS BLUES" Composed by William C. Handy 

MR. HANDY, Cornet Solo 

(31) JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Guest Soloist 

MR. EUGENE HEYES conducting the Orchestra 

(a) "HOME ON THE RANGE" .By David Guion 

(b) "MIGHTY LAK A ROSE" . . Composed by Elhelbert Nevin, Lyric by F. L. Stanton 

(c) "OLD MAN RIVER" . . . Composed by Jerome Kern, Lyric by O. Hammerstein I! 

MR. KERN at the piano 

(d) "SALLY, WON'T YOU COME BACK" . . . . By Gene Buck and David Stamper 

From the "Ziegfeld Follies" MR. STAMPER at the piano 

(e) "THE LORD'S PRAYER" Composed by Albert Hay Malotte 

MR. MALOTTE conducting the Orchestra 

(32) GEORGE M. COHAN, Composer, Playwright and America's foremost actor 

(a) "GIVE MY REGARDS TO BROADWAY" 

(b) "YANKEE DOODLE BOY" (c) "GRAND OLD FLAG" 

Composed, written and sung by MR. COHAN 

(33) "GOD BLESS AMERICA" The new American anthem 

Written and composed by Irving Berlin 

Sung by MR. BERLIN Orchestra conducted by DR. HOWARD HANSEN 

The folloiuing distinguished conductors will participate in this program: 

EUGENE HEYES EDWIN MCARTHUR RICHARD HAGEMAN DR. HOWARD HANSEN 

General Stage Director R. H. Burnside, Producer of the late Charles B. Dillingham's 

famous productions for Montgomery & Stone; producer and author of the famous New 

York Hippodrome shows, and numerous other successful American musical comedies. 






CHAPTER XV 



Street o the 



THE GAYWAY WAS THE Street of the Barkers, the Highway of 
The Bright Lights, the Fun Zone of the Exposition. It offered 
amusements for all ages, thrills, oddities and assortments of fe- 
male pulchritude from Sally Rand's Nude Ranch to the flood- 
lighted figures in the Candid Camera booth. 

There were hams and bacon to be had on the turn of a wheel; 
there were glass blowers who wrought weird and wonderful 
products with lungs and silica; there were babies in incubators 
and sculptors in sand and Bob Ripley gathered 'em in by the 
thousands to peer at the queer people he had assembled from 
the far corners of the earth. 

For those who remembered the Tower of Jewels and the 
Zone of the Dream City of 1915, there was "Stella," the old 
favorite herself, who seemed not to have suffered from the pas- 
sage of time but looked down from her canvas in much the same 
sophisticated fashion as of yore. 

Dinosaurs of a million years ago provided plenty of material 
for nightmares of memory; wild animals of today went through 
their paces in a circus environment while, a short distance away, 
were the tiny "prehistoric" horses, very much alive and very 
popular with the juvenile visitors to the Fair. 

Up and down the Street of the Barkers paraded the millions, 
pausing to listen to the honeyed tongues of the gentlemen on 
the platforms, to quench their thirst with a draught of Coca Cola 
or assuage a rising hunger with a hot dog or a hot scone filled 
with raspberry jam, while outside the gate the Hum-a-tune man, 
like a modern Pied Piper, set a fast tempo for the milling throngs. 

A full program of vaudeville was put on by the mighty midg- 



210 THE MAGIC CITY 

ets . . . flying scooters, the octopus, the roller coaster and 
roll-o-plane kept the youngsters dizzy from noon until the lights 
went out in the wee small hours of the morning. If you wanted 
to risk a dime with the hope of a "jackpot" of prizes, there was 
everything from a monkey speedway to a derby game to provide 
the opportunity. 

The Giant Crane lifted a group of the air-minded aloft at 
intervals to look over the sea of beauty below; a diving bell 
sank below the waters; great Ferris Wheels whirled and a minia- 
ture railway train threaded its way over the grounds. Fun? 
Barrels of it for everybody from grandpappy to the babe in arms. 

A whole circus came to Treasure Island in 1940 when the 
African Jungle Camp arrived. There were: three baby elephants; 
200 monkeys; 50 lions, tigers and leopards; 3 honeybears; scores 
of camels, zebras, deer, hyenas, donkeys, freak animals and 17 
men. It was the largest animal show ever assembled under one 
roof west of the Mississippi. Captain Terrell Jacobs was in 
charge. 

The Monster Show provided an extra-curricular activity dur- 
ing its first season that had the operators worried. It was in the 
matter of Cleopatra, the South American boa constrictor, and 
her "bundle from heaven" 

It was a case of "now that she's got 'em, what's she going to 
do with 'em?" 

Cleopatra calved or whatever the technical term for a her- 
petological blessed event in the mammalian group might be. It 
was double-quintuplets ten of a kind. First time on zoological 
record of a lady snake becoming a mother while in durance vile. 

Quite aside from its scientific value, Cleopatra's contribution 
to the world was most welcome to the "Palace of Monsters." It 
meant a new rush of business from all sides. But and here was 
the crux of the situation how were these ten hungry infants 
to be fed? 

Though a mammal as well as a mamma, it seemed Cleopatra 
lacked both desire and equipment for the purpose. Had she and 
her offspring been in their natural habitat, probabilities were 



STREET OF THE BARKERS 211 

that the kids would have had to rustle for themselves. That part 
might have been all right, too only the rustling was a bit slim 
on Treasure Island, hardly what you'd call a happy hunting 
ground for juvenile boa constrictors. 

Realizing in advance that they were in for something, her- 
petologists in charge of the "monsters" - (They're alive 
ALIVE!) endeavored to raise their own baby food and have 
it ready when the "expecting" Cleopatra finally came through. 
It seems baby mice are a highly esteemed delicacy in the some- 
what limited diet of baby boa constrictors. So the herpetologists 
made due arrangements. 

Trouble was, Mamma Mouse refused to co-operate. She failed 
to foal (or "farrow," or "litter?") . Meanwhile, Cleopatra's ba- 
bies were getting hungrier and hungrier. You could hear their 
pitiful moans the length of the Gayway though unfeeling 
skeptics might maintain that the noise came from a mournful 
foghorn concealed somewhere about the premises. 

Better Babies exhibit next door was called into consultation. 
Not that the "Monster Pit" wanted to borrow an incubator, or 
get a few whiffs of oxygen. Cleopatra's youngsters were not that 
bad off yet. But expert advice on feeding was needed. The 
baby doctors could only suggest tube feeding and that was out, 
because the baby boas weren't much bigger than a fair-sized tube 
themselves. 

However, where there's a will there's a way. Anyhow, that's 
how Herpetologist C. H. Fogle had it figured. 

If Cleopatra's babies kept on crying for sustenance in their 
sleep which seemed most likely, since they had yet to partake 
of their first meal on earth he proposed to take steps. He 
planned to mix raw egg and milk in a large bowl and then im- 
merse the brood therein. 

If it worked, the little Cleopatras (and/or Mark Antonies) 
might live to a ripe old age. Or, at any rate, long enough to dine 
on those delayed baby mice. 

Came the day and Nature took care of its own. Indeed 
many of the numerous offspring survived without bothering at 




On the Gayway, "The Street of the Barkers," were pitch-men of national and international renown 
spilling adjectives like water over a dam. Some of the best are pictured here. At upper left barkers 
dressed as cowboys told the "bare" facts of Sally Rand's Nude Ranch. The pith-helmeted man at 
upper right exhorted the wonders of the Monster Pit, including Cleopatra and her brood. One of 
the best sellers of feminine pulchritude in the nude was the salesman for Miss America, shown at 
the left in the center of the picture. Dancers of All Nations, employed the participants in the shou< 
to draw their crowds of curious, whose interest was undoubtedly more in the dancers than in their 
terpsichorean efforts. Right center, the Gayway jammed with Fiesta-minded customers on opening 
day. Lower right, the Hum-A-Tune Man demonstrated and sold at the entrance to the Gayway. 



STREET OF THE BARKERS 213 

all about diets or menus and lived to carry on through the season 
of 1940. 

Treasure Island of 1939 had three villages on the Gay way 
China, Estonia and Scotland. The first two were features of 1940, 
as well. 

When China, impoverished by the war, found it impossible to 
participate officially in the Exposition, San Francisco's Chinese 
went to work and raised over f 1,000,000 to create the 12-acre 
Chinatown which formed one of the brightest spots on the Island. 

On this acreage was built a wall, patterned after the Great 
Wall of China, within which were buildings which housed the 
exhibits and entertainment features. Outstanding was the seven- 
story pagoda which towered above the group, with its age-old 
bells to rid the village of evil spirits. 

Decorations and exhibits were prepared under the guidance 
of the best craftsmen of San Francisco's Chinatown, with silken 
streamers and glowing lanterns against a background of vermil- 
ion, tulip yellow and gold from floor to roof of the buildings. 

In furnishing the village and installing its exhibits, the spon- 
sors of the village secured the aid of Princess Der Ling, lady 
in waiting to the Empress Dowager T'Zu Hsi, who also agreed 
to lend her collection of rare art treasures. 

Silks and drapes, jade, ivory, ebony, gold and curios, lamps, 
statues, etchings, paintings on silk, dragons formed a series 
of displays. 

Mask-makers, fortune telling birds, street entertainers, musi- 
cians, dancers, stores and homes, combined to make one of the 
most interesting spots at the Exposition a cross-section of life 
in China. 

South of the Chinese Village, fronting on the Gayway, was 
Estonia village. It covered a three-acre plot, in which the high- 
gabled roofs, the turrets, and the red and green color schemes 
provided a most picturesque setting for the costumes and 
exhibits. 

Curio shops, a beer garden, costume shops in which native 
craftsmanship was displayed, singers, dancers, story-tellers, com- 



214 THE MAGIC CITY 

bined to make up the actual picture of Estonian life. The Es- 
tonian restaurant was gay with native decorations and attend- 
ants in costume. 

At the east end of the Gayway was a bit of Scotland trans- 
planted to Treasure Island in the form of the Scotch Village, 
with its thatched cottages and its reproduction of life in that 
country. Here the bag-pipes skirled while Scotch lassies danced 
the Highland fling. Spinning and weaving were carried on in 
a thatched-roof cottage. There was a Scotch cafe and curio shops. 

Included in the buildings were the Tarn O'Shanter Inn, the 
Post Office, Robert Burns' home, the Sky House, the Black 
House, and the Druids' Temple. 

From high noon until evening, and from evening until 2 
o'clock in the morning, the leather-lunged salesmen of the Gay- 
way kept up their unceasing harangue. The crowds enjoyed it, 
for they came back for more and more, and the promoters en- 
joyed it, too, when they sat down to count the dimes and quarters 
that poured into the cashier cages and piled up a nice little profit 
for everybody concerned. 



CHAPTER XVI 

Qaia 2>ayd oj '39 



"TRYING TO DESCRIBE the Exposition's beauty and scope seems as 
futile as giving three cheers for a sunset!" 

So wrote an enthusiastic but somewhat baffled sentiment- 
accelerator in the press division "for immediate release, Febru- 
ary 19, 1939." 

The editors, approaching a similar task two years later, are 
equally humbled. To properly evaluate the hundreds of special 
days, the thousands of activities that drew millions of visitors 
through the gates of the Magic City is an assignment from which 
even the bravest of chroniclers might shrink. 

Obviously it will be impossible to report in extenso. Set limi- 
tations of this book prohibit. (A chronological listing of "days" 
for both the 1939 and 1940 seasons will be found in the Appen- 
dix.) Rather, the picture will be drawn in broad strokes, with 
details filled in only occasionally. Otherwise, confusion ineffable. 

In the tumult and shouting of Opening Day, an event of 
some importance was overlooked. For the sake of the record it 
should be set down at this point. Treasure Island's first accouche- 
ment occurred at 4 a.m. on February 18, 1939 an Aberdeen 
Angus bull calf, by Bonito Burgess out of Pride of Welford III, 
appropriately named Exposition I. Let no other come forward to 
dispute this claim. 

As might be gathered from the above, the National Beef 
Show was on in the California Coliseum at the time. This was 
the first event of an extensive and elaborate livestock exhibition 
program arranged for the '39 season by California Commission. 

Another "first" of more than passing interest is the report 
of attendance at the Fine Arts Palace for opening day 5,962 



216 THE MAGIC CITY 

patrons. Eventually Fine Arts attendance was to surpass the 
drawing power of even the glamorous Sally Rand Nude Ranch, 
evidence indisputable of the commercial value of a cultural 
background. Remarked the staid Ladies' Home Journal on this 
point: 

"Out of the San Francisco Fair last summer, while Sally 
Rand was going bankrupt, it seems that 1,563,785 people were 
taking in the fine-arts exhibition. That's, incidentally, twice as 
many as visited the two art shows at the World's Fair here, 
which may be why Grover Whalen doesn't wear a gardenia in 
his buttonhole any more." 

Douglas (Wrong Way) Corrigan, the airman who flew a $900 
"crate" to Ireland after telling New York aviation authorities 
that he was leaving for Los Angeles, was an early-season attrac- 
tion in the Hall of Aviation. His plane remained after he had 
concluded his stay. Corrigan autographs eventually slumped on 
a glutted market. 

Washington's Birthday, the first holiday after opening, was 
duly observed with a patriotic pageant, uniformed marchers, 
massed bands. Supervisor Jesse C. Colman of San Francisco was 
general chairman of the day, and Controller Harold Boyd of 
the San Francisco City Hall family delivered the address. At- 
tendance was a gratifying 127,739, less than a thousand under 
that of Opening Day. Partially responsible for this influx was the 
fact that this was the first Children's Dime Day of record. 

The Netherlands Indies Pavilion was formally dedicated on 
February 25, featuring a radio address from far-off Batavia by 
Honorable Madame A. W. L. Tjarda van Starkenborgh Stachou- 
wer, wife of His Excellency the Governor General of the Nether- 
lands East Indies. It might be remarked that the lady's lengthy 
name did not appear in headlines recording the event. 

Elsa Maxwell, famed party-giver, threw a little luncheon for 
103 in the Yerba Buena Club, honoring Mrs. George Cameron, 
chairman of the Women's Board. Elsa was then rated as "vice- 
chairman of the World's Fair hospitality committee," but there 
appears to be no record that she ever worked further at that job. 



GALA DAYS OF '39 217 

Dedications of this building and that marked the latter days 
of February. In the hectic drive for Opening Day, numerous for- 
eign buildings were not completed, and certainly there was nei- 
ther time nor opportunity for formalized ceremony. Native Sons 
and Daughters took over dedication of the California Building 
on Sunday, February 26. Herbert Erskine, member of the Com- 
mission, represented Governor Olson and Frank W. Clark, chair- 
man of the Commission, was speaker for the occasion. 

Dedications of other foreign buildings followed so rapidly 
that President Cutler, Mayor Rossi and Commissioner Creel 
slept in their high hats and cutaway coats. 

"The threat of a world war is gradually being lessened today 
as Germany, Italy and Japan are beginning to suffer economically 
to the point where they will be forced to accept international 
trade for mutual benefit, rather than to risk war and subse- 
quent chaos." So declared Dr. Henry F. Grady, chairman of the 
United States Tariff Commission, in an address signalizing the 
opening of the Peace Projects exhibit, adjoining the Hall of 
Western States. Circumstances were such that the project did not 
attempt to re-open for 1940. 

The regular Exposition sports schedule was augmented by 
such events as a kite-flying contest for youngsters, a rickshaw 
race for the "chop chop" boys who hawked such services in 
front of the Chinese Village. Eddie Cantor came to town for a 
personal radio-show appearance, and was made Treasure Island's 
first "mayor," an honor that very many others were to enjoy 
later. At Necome, Texas, a 1753-mile Pony Express race was 
started by Amon G. Carter, ultimate destination Treasure Island. 
As from the first day, Tex Rankin completed his daily routine of 
lops and power-dives and such for the edification of one and all. 
The Magic City was trying its painstaking best to be alluring. 

General Electric Company's shortwave broadcasting station, 
W6XBE (soon to become internationally known as KGEI), 
had its formal dedication and inaugural broadcast on March 4. 
President Cutler represented the Exposition, with Major O. J. 
Keatinge, Director of Foreign Participation as master of cere- 



218 



THE MAGIC CITY 



monies. Raymond M. Alvord, General Electric vice-president, 
spoke for the company and Lenox R. Lohr, president of the 
National Broadcasting Company, represented the radio industry. 
Consuls of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa 
Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guate- 
mala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uru- 
guay and Venezuela broadcast messages in their native language 
to their homelands. 

Without the formality of dedication, creation of a "complete 
maternity ward, to be available in all emergencies" was an- 
nounced. Seems actuaries had estimated that such a convenience 
might be called into use at least twenty times during the Expo- 
sition's run by "surprised" mothers. Though incipient parents 
were to request the dubious honor frequently and there were 
some rather close calls it is not of record that this so-called 
"ward" was ever put to use. Quite incidentally, the "announce- 
ment" was made by the manager of the Incubator Baby Con- 
cession on the Gayway. 

"A Century of Service" Pageant marked Railway Express 

Day on March 1. One hundred years 

i previously, to the day, one W. F. 

^^^^ Barnden, a former railroad conduc- 

II ^^ tor, had carried a carpetbag full of 

^P parcels from Boston to New York, 

^* the first paid messenger service of 

the sort. Descendants of the first mes- 
senger and some thousands of others 
observed the occasion. 

The Japanese Pavilion celebrated 
"Hinamatsuri," or the Doll Festival, 
handing out souvenir dolls to all 
little girl visitors. 

Exposition officials gloated, as of 
March 1, over the fact that the 
weather man had provided twelve 
straight days of sunshine for the Ex- 




Creel and 
Jim Farley enjoying 
a day at the Fair 



GALA DAYS OF '39 



219 



position. They were reported ready to give that kindly gentle- 
man carte blanche from there on in. Later they were to regret 
their precipitancy. 

A Twin Contest drew an entry of 136 pairs. Patty and 
Georgia Krieg, charming three-year-olds of San Francisco, cap- 
tured first honors. 

Daredevil Jimmy Godwin, the "Bat-Man," thrilled thou- 
sands by plummeting out of the sky from a height of 10,000 feet. 

It was announced that school children of California might 
spend five "classroom days" on Treasure Island during April 
and May with full attendance credit. 

France and America pledged anew their fealty to Democracy 
and freedom and their friendship for each other with dedicatory 
ceremonies in connection with the opening of the French Pa- 
vilion. United States Commissioner George Creel functioned 
for America, Senator Rene Gounin, Commissioner General to 
the Exposition, for France. 

To say the least, the Magic City was versatile. 

An imaginative author in the press division produced a tale 
savoring of the believe-it-or-not. He 
said that a young pig named Phil- 
bert had been introduced into the 
cage of Frigid Frieda, the giant py- 
thon on the gayway, and that Frieda 
had taken Philbert to her bosom, 
rather than into her gullet. Witness 
Philbert's presence, whole and un- 
harmed the following morning. The 
editors are inclined to doubt the re- 
port in toto. 

Pilsener beer and Prague ham was 
served at the dedication of Czecho- 
slovakia's exhibit in International 
Hall. It was a day to be marked with 
a red stone! 

Three Exposition officials were 



Vested choir sings 
processional hymn 
near Mission Tower 




220 THE MAGIC CITY 

singled out for signal honors, as of March 6. President Cutler and 
George Creel were made Grand Officers of the Order of the 
Dragon of Annam. Major O. J. Keatinge became privileged to 
add to his rows of service and war decoration ribbons the symbol 
of a Grand Officer of the Order of the Million Elephants and the 
White Parasol. It was said that this was the first time this decora- 
tion had ever been awarded in America. Presentation was made 
by Comte Jean de Beaumont, Commissioner General of French 
Indo-China, representing the Emperor of Annam. Unfortunately 
for possible attendance records, the investiture was made pri- 
vately at a luncheon extended by the Exposition management to 
the French delegation. 

Free Twilight Concerts in Hall of Western States Audito- 
rium were announced by the Special Events Department as a 
regular Sunday feature. More "dime days" for children were 
approved by the Board of Management as an attendance stimu- 
lator. The pump was being primed assiduously. 

The first millionth visitor loomed over the horizon. He (or 
she) was to be wined and dined, to receive a watch, furniture, 
a camera, and "goodies to a fabulous amount." That welcome 
personage appeared on March 15. 

Italy's exhibit palace was dedicated in March with Arch- 
bishop John J. Mitty, Commander Pier Guglielmo Maggini, 
special delegate of Italy; Cav. Uff. Mario L. Perasso, president 
of the Italian Chamber of Commerce of San Francisco, chair- 
man of the day; Mayor Rossi, and President Cutler officiating. 
The "Star-Spangled Banner" and "Royal March and Giovi- 
nezza" were played as the respective national standards were 
raised. Thousands from San Francisco's large Italian colony 
were in attendance. 

Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia of New York was an honor 
guest of the Exposition management at dinner on March 13. 
Despite the fact that his town was about to open its own World's 
Fair, the "Little Flower" spoke in most complimentary fashion 
of San Francisco's efforts in this line. Incidentally, Mayor La- 
Guardia paid to get into the Magic City. "We are not going to 





JR. 







GALA DAYS OF '39 223 

give passes to the New York Fair, so we don't expect to get them 
here," he told Mayor Rossi. 

A Liars' Contest was arranged. Gayway "pitchmen" and all 
"press agents" were barred! 

Ransohoff Day brought an extra thousand store employees 
and their families to the Island and added considerably to the 
festivities programmed. Similar promotions were suggested and 
pushed. 

A Mardi Gras and St. Patrick's Day costume celebration was 
proposed. Special events folks and others charged with stimula- 
tion of interest and thus of trade were working overtime. 

But all through this period attendance figures were not up 
to expectations. Gratifying enough over the week-end, on Sun- 
days, particularly, but not so encouraging on week days. Weather 
conditions had much to do with the situation. A much higher 
figure had been confidently expected, however. 

Mr. Harris D. H. Connick, then the Exposition's Director, 
put his finger on what he considered the source of the trouble. 
His "policies," announced in connection with the appointment 
of Mel Smith as concessions chief for the Gayway, called for: 

Immediate population of the Gayway; filling in of all gaps, 
ending vacancies with new shows, games and rides; theatrical 
lighting for all show spots on the Island, especially the Gayway; 
installation and operation of attractions which would draw ca- 
pacity houses at the nominal rates of 10 to 25 cents; more free, 
sensational attractions throughout the Island. 

All admitted the soundness of these ideas, the latter two par- 
ticularly. The problem was, just how? 

A special press-review of "The Life of Alexander Graham 
Bell," complete with tie-ins with the modern exhibit of the 
Telephone Company in the Hall of Science, glamourized by the 
presence of such stars as Loretta Young, Don Ameche and Henry 
Fonda, sealed and delivered by expert publicists from Twentieth 
Century Fox in Hollywood, helped the general promotion set-up 
considerably. 

There was probably no intended significance in the designa- 



224 THE MAGIC CITY 

tion of April 1 as "State Legislators' Day." The program stated 
that there would be "meetings of State Legislators in the Cali- 
fornia Building all day, from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m." Visitors who 
came to see this added attraction probably would have found 
most of them gathered at the Press Club, even then famed for 
its hospitable treatment of those who hungered or thirsted. 

Buddhist devotees took over on Sunday, April 2, climaxing 
their celebration with a service in the Temple of Religion in 
the afternoon. 

Dime days for children were becoming frequent, and busi- 
ness at the turnstiles was increasing accordingly. April 5, a 
Wednesday, produced a welcome 51,375 attendance. Army Day, 
on the sixth, brought 55,316. A spectacular mimic aerial attack, 
repelled by anti-aircraft artillery and a battery of searchlights, 
did much to swell the total. For some reason, the clientele was 
not inclined to visit the Island in any great numbers at night. 
Obviously, the gorgeous lighting effects alone could not lure 
them out after dark. 

Easter Sunday, April 9 another "dime day," attracted 
60,257. Special free Easter concert in the California Ballroom in 
the afternoon, but otherwise the regular schedule. Complete 
enough, yet lacking in that intangible something which draws 
attendance. 

Crown Prince Frederic and Crown Princess Ingrid of Den- 
mark visited the Island on April 10. An invitational concert in 
Federal Theater, a decidedly invitational luncheon at the Yerba 
Buena Club to follow. Hardly an attendance-stimulator. Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer had a day on the thirteenth with an invitational 
(again) showing of the popular film, "San Francisco," in Western 
States Auditorium. 

On the more serious side, the first Inter- American Travel 
Congress, with some 400 delegates from the United States, 
Canada, Mexico, Central and South America, foregathered for 
a week's session in the California Ballroom. Jose Tecero, repre- 
senting the Pan-American Union of Washington, sounded the 
keynote: "We want it understood that we are not delegated by 



GALA DAYS OF '39 



225 



our various countries to make treaties. There are absolutely no 
economic nor political aspects to this Congress. It is merely our 
job to aid the various agencies which have taken on the business 
of furthering international good will through the medium of 
tourist traffic." 

Healdsburg and Santa Barbara County shared Sunday, April 
16. The Healdsburg folk brought "two and a half tons of mer- 
chandise" to the Redwood Empire Building to be given away. 
The Santa Barbarans brought their First Presbyterian Church 
choir for two concerts. 

"Miss Two Million" arrived on Saturday, April 15. She 
proved to be Miss Jean Sheriff, of Helena, Mont, a senior stu- 
dent at Stanford. She enjoyed the experience no end. 

Certain fortunate juveniles will remember April 18 as Ice 
Cream Day, when Mayor Rossi, "Miss Ice Cream" and others 
dished up a huge concoction standing four feet in height to such 
as might attend. Very tasty, at that. 

Some 600 singers from a dozen Northern California high Record throng in 
schools lifted their voices in obedience to the baton of Charles o^'VeciT Say" 




.. , 

, * i* + 

>* ' - 



226 THE MAGIC CITY 

M. Dennis, director of music for San Francisco public schools, 
on the evening of April 21, in the California Coliseum. The 
San Francisco public schools All-City band of 100 pieces accom- 
panied this massed choir. Palo Alto, Hollister, Gilroy, San Jose, 
Mountain View, Campbell, Los Gatos, Salinas, Hayward, Oak- 
land and San Francisco high schools contributed to make this 
a memorable occasion in the Exposition's music annals. 

The California State Federation of Music Clubs' conven- 
tion, on April 19-21, brought 1,000 musicians from all sections 
of the State, with some 5,000 high school students participating 
in an instrumental and choral festival. Free programs were ap- 
preciated by thousands of music lovers. 

Came a doughnut-dunking contest for comedy relief, a fea- 
ture of Y.M.C.A. Boys' Day. Prizes were awarded in addition 
to the doughnuts. The contestants liked both. 

The San Francisco County Grand Jury found cause to visit 
the Magic City. Not for official business, however; merely a 
"dinner meeting." 

The Junior Livestock Show was hailed as "the greatest of 
its kind" by experienced stockmen who had aided in its staging. 

Then Knights Templar, San Francisco Central Council of 
Civic Clubs, Lake County and St. Mary's College had their 
"days." 

Saturday, April 29, brought a full schedule Los Angeles 
Day and Japan Day, principally. His Excellency Kensuke Hori- 
nuchi, Japanese Ambassador to the United States, was honor 
guest for the latter celebration, receiving his due military honors 
from the Treasure Island Company and reviewing a colorful 
parade of his costumed countrymen, together with several beau- 
tiful floats, before the Japanese Pavilion. Subsequent ceremonies 
in the Federal Plaza were broadcast nationally, and by short- 
wave to Japan. More parades, more broadcasting, and spectacu- 
lar fireworks at night. All in all, an elaborate and colorful 
occasion. 

An air armada "bombed" Treasure Island with flowers, sig- 
nalizing the start of Los Angeles Day, which was to culminate 



GALA DAYS OF '39 227 

in the dedication of the Los Angeles-San Diego County Building. 
Sheriff Gene Biscailuz was Marshal of the Day, heading his fa- 
mous Mounted Posse in a parade through the Island. The posse, 
mounted on prancing Palomino ponies decked with heavily 
silvered saddles and bridles, and wearing bright Spanish-costume 
uniforms, attracted general admiration. Roger Jessup, chairman 
of the Los Angeles Board of Supervisors, officials of the Los 
Angeles Chamber of Commerce, and other prominent Angelenos 
participated in the dedicatory ceremonies with Exposition folk. 

Italian Day, Redwood City Day, Los Angeles County Day, 
Western Electric Day combined to bring 56,712 to the Island on 
Sunday, April 30. Redwood City brought its delegation by 
ferryboat from its own harbor direct to the Island. Los Angeles 
County added the famed Tournament of Roses Band to the 
Magic City's musical population. San Francisco's Italian colony 
staged a parade from the Italian Building to the Open Air 
Theater, where a program had been arranged, running from 
speeches by Mayor Rossi and Consul General Andrea Rainaldi 
to ballet numbers and folk dances by talented artists of San 
Francisco's "Little Italy." 

The next day was May Day also Dime Day, not to over- 
look start of Better Babies Week, Northern California Junior 
College Conference Choral Festival Day and other noteworthy 
occasions. There was a coronation of a May Queen and dancing 
about the traditional May Pole. 

The Grand Army of the Republic, convening in Oakland, 
was honored with a day on the Island on May 5. The aged vet- 
erans present stood stiffly at attention through the retreat cere- 
mony at which they were the guests of the Treasure Island 
Company. 

Better Babies winners were paraded on Sunday, May 7. It 
was Petaluma Day, Catholic Day, a day of numerous musical 
programs, Dyers and Cleaners Day, with a style show attached. 
"Sunny a.m., overcast and windy p.m.," read the weather rec- 
ord and the attendance was 60,251. 

Week day attendance hovered around the 20,000 mark, with 



228 



THE MAGIC CITY 



a 43,180 Saturday. Girl Scouts had their day on this date. The 
famous Miners' Band of Calaveras County was also present, and 
the even more famous "Jumping Frogs of the Calaveras" hopped 
in competition. 

May 14 Mother's Day Southern Pacific Day, with the 
crowning of a queen, band concert and dancing Rumanian 
Day, with speeches and folk dancing in costume San Jose Day 
Alturas and Modoc County Day Pittsburg and Columbia 
Steel Day, with 5,000 present from that source, drill teams, 
bands, sea scouts and much to-do generally a rodeo in the 
Coliseum, with ace riders letting 'em buck. A full program and 
a well populated Island 73,663. The three millionth visitor 
was just around the corner. 

May 17, "Norway Day," celebrated "Constitution Day" of 
that nation. Crown Prince Olav and Crown Princess Martha 
were honor guests at a banquet attended by their countrymen 
in the California Ballroom, at which Prince Olav made the 
principal address. 

Their Royal Highnesses had a very full program throughout 
their stay both in the Magic City and in its sister city over on 
the mainland. Doubtless they appreciated infrequent intervals 
of rest from public appearances. 

International Business Machines Day on May 18 was dedi- 
cated to world peace through international friendship. Thomas 
J. Watson, president of the company, delivered the principal 
address, which was broadcast nationally and abroad through 
short-wave facilities in Boston. 

On May 19 came the three millionth visitor Mrs. Nellie 
A. Morgan, a pastry cook from Phoenix, Arizona. She came to 

the Fair seeking a missing son. She 
found instead gifts and completely 
surprising hospitality. 

Post Office Day on Sunday, May 
21 and naturally, the greatest post- 
master of them all, James A. Farlev, 
was the rallying-point. He received 




Ferris wheeh make 
ceaseless rounds at 
entrance to Gayway 



GALA DAYS OF '39 



229 



his due military honors as a cabinet officer, was entertained at 
luncheon by Commissioner Creel, was introduced from the Coli- 
seum arena, where a rodeo ceased activity to welcome him, and 
finally addressed some thousands of his letter-carriers and other 
interested parties in Federal Plaza. 

Federal Building attaches will always remember Farley's visit. 
He sat through and presumably consumed his fair share of a 
thirteen-course luncheon. But on the way back from the Coli- 
seum appearance he spotted a hamburger stand, insisted on stop- 
ping off for a snack of "Fair fare." Thoroughly enjoyed it, too. 

Cotton Week and Chrysler Day Coffee Day and Mountain 
View and Los Altos Day. Boy Scouts gave demonstrations of 
soap carving, and instruction was offered in the making and play- 
ing of bamboo flutes in the State Recreational area. School tours 
and puppet shows, organ recitals and school band concerts, art 
lectures and fashion shows the program was extensive, the 
choice varied. 

The Maharajah of Karputhala visited the Exposition offi- 
cially on May 25, receiving his 15-gun salute with impassive 
Oriental dignity. He was attired in bejeweled native formal 
dress, his breast glittering with decorations, carried the bag of 
jewels without which no potentate of the East is completely 
dressed. Flanked by his heir-apparent and two military aides, he 
inspected the troops which were to escort him to the Federal 
Building for further lionizing. Silk toppers and cutaways seemed 
inadequate in the face of such sartorial grandeur. 

Joint retreat by armed forces of the United States Army and 
the Royal Navy added an impressive feature to observance of 
British Empire Day on May 27. Sailors and marines from H.M.S. 
Orion, together with the ship's band, 
staged the British ceremony of "beat- 
ing the retreat," as the Union Jack 
was lowered at the Federal Building. 
The Treasure Island Company of 
tbe Thirtieth Infantry followed with 
its traditional ceremony. 



Pacific area history 
made Pacific House 
of great importance 




230 



Ford Day, Sierra and Plumas Day, Young Republicans Day, 
Santa Clara City Day, Gyro Club Day and quite incidentally, 
Sunday. The 27-millionth Ford car departed for the New York 
Fair with due pomp and ceremony, bearing letters from Gover- 
nor Olson to Governor Lehman, from Mayor Rossi to Mayor 
LaGuardia, from Leland Cutler to Grover Whelan. Total of 
58,787. 

Monday, Oakland Day, among other features. The east ferry 
terminal was hastened along so as to be ready for the influx. 
Mayor William J. McCracken of Oakland ruled as Mayor of 
Treasure Island. Oakland's contribution to the day's schedule 
helped bring one of the best Mondays of record 46,788. 

Memorial Day, Tuesday, May 30. Formal Army observance 
in Federal Plaza at noon, services in Court of the Nations in the 
afternoon, with Major General Paul B. Malone (ret.) the princi- 
pal speaker. Massed colors, solemn participants from American 
Legion posts and other veteran organizations. Retreat at the 
regular hour climaxed observance of the day. And a fairish holi- 
day assemblage of 60,873. 

June 1 was "Public Wedding Day" but of course! Twelve 
couples were united in the Court of Flowers, with a reception 
following in the Administration Building. Superior Judge 
George Steiger read the fatal words. Twelve individual cakes, 
one giant cake, presents for all. 

General Don Anastasio Samoza, president of Nicaragua, was 
received with military honors on June 2, followed by regular 
routine of luncheon, Pacific House reception and invitational 
dinner, not to overlook a nationwide broadcast in between. 

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine took over on June 3, helped to 
draw 35,059 with their colorful parade and ceremonial. The 
next day was Sunday Emeryville Day, Wine and Allied In- 
dustries Day, a Dime Day, and a fair and warm day. 

State days, city days, county days, organization davs pa- 
rades, ceremonies, special music, speeches and grand balls. 

Buildings and exhibits dedicated by late-arriving officials. 
Visiting governors receive their military honors. At long last 



GALA DAYS OF '39 231 

even Father had his day. A typical specimen, sire of seven, was 
made Mayor of the Island, was wined and dined. 

Dr. Charles H. Strub had taken over as Managing Director. 
He believed the Magic City needed more and better free enter- 
tainment in order to stimulate attendance, particularly night at- 
tendance, which had been sparse from the very first. 

In keeping with this concept, he announced that Building 
"G," which had been empty, would be opened as a "Palace of 
Swing," housing famous "name" bands Kay Kyser, Benny 
Goodman and the like. William H. Stein, vice-president of the 
Music Corporation of America, joined the Exposition staff as 
director of special entertainment. 

Walt Rosener's band played for nightly free dancing in Festi- 
val Hall. The innovation caught on with the dancing generation. 

The four-millionth visitor arrived on Wednesday, June 21, 
but was all but overlooked in the press of arrangements for what 
was termed a "gala Summer opening" on Saturday and Sunday, 
June 24 and 25. Features, in addition to new paint and fresh 
lights 

The largest orchestra ever assembled anywhere in the world 
thousands of boys and girls, Junior Musicians gathered from 
the west at large under the baton of the famous conductor, 
Dr. Edwin Franko Goldman; a spectacular show parade, center- 
ing on Cavalcade actors, Gayway performers, glamorous damsels: 
a parade of bands competing for prizes; a Sunday costume pa- 
rade; strolling musicians. 

The World's Fair International Horse Show, offering $45,000 
in stakes and premiums, had been billed for a run from June 
30 to July 9. Some in the seats of authority were inclined to 
doubt its chances for success. With a troop of scarlet-coated 
Royal Canadian Mounted Police as a focus of attraction, the 
horse show became not only an artistic success, but a financial 
success beyond most sanguine hopes. Obviously, the tide was 
turning. The Magic City was reasserting its spell. 

Paul V. McNutt, High Commissioner to the Philippines, en- 
joyed a preview of the Island, returned next day for his official 



232 THE MAGIC CITY 

reception with guns and silk-topper. Civic, State and Fair offi- 
cials feted him at a banquet and his reception in the Philippine 
Building was a feature of the Summer Opening. 

Major General Pedro Aurelia de Goes Monteiro, Chief of 
Staff of the Brazilian Army, and eight high ranking officers, were 
guests of the Exposition with the customary military trimmings, 
afterward hosts at the Brazil Pavilion. Gold braid and striped 
trousers were much in evidence on this last of June's rare days. 

A bargain "package ticket" was offered $5 value for $2. 
It sold enthusiastically. 

Came Sgt. Alvin C. York, designated by General John J. 
Pershing as "the outstanding civilian hero of the World War," 
to participate in Tennessee Day on June 29. That day was also 
celebrated as the 163rd birthday of San Francisco. 

The four-day holiday period from Saturday, July 1 including 
Tuesday July 4, offered a fine opportunity to test public reaction 
to the reputed "renaissance" on Treasure Island. The program 
was full and attractive; it offered just about everything, up to 
and including the appearance of the famous Benny Goodman, 
"King of Swing," and his orchestra, playing twice daily as a 
free attraction. 

In San Francisco Bay was the Battle Fleet of the United States 
Navy, all but complete in number, awesome in its panoply of 
power. 

Majestic in the morning sun, the great ships steamed through 
the Golden Gate on July 1 to drop anchor at their assigned 
berths. Some 50,000 officers and men were aboard, all craving 
shore-leave and a pay-day had been provided, quite providen- 
tially, for the visit. 

Attendance figures for the four days were most satisfactory 
a total of 311,916 paid admissions, for an average of better 
than 77,000 a day. This was the best average recorded up to that 
time. And it must be remembered that a uniform was an ad- 
mission ticket. Thousands came from the Fleet, from Army posts, 
from Mare Island and Yerba Buena. Other thousands partici- 
pated in the great Fourth of July celebration, admitted free. 



GALA DAYS OF '39 233 

Independence Day program was most impressive. One hun- 
dred and sixty-nine units, Army, Navy, Marines, the Canadian 
"Mounties," veterans' organizations assembled on the Espla- 
nade at the south end of the Island, and at the word of command, 
took up the long line of march. Governor Olson, Mayor Rossi 
and ranking officials of the Army and Navy took the salute in 
the reviewing stand. Patriotic exercises took place in Federal 
Plaza following the parade, with Governor Olson, Mayor Rossi 
and Controller Harold Boyd of San Francisco as speakers. 

Twenty-six yachts set sail from markers opposite the Golden 
Gate in line with the Island on the long trek to Honolulu the 
afternoon of Independence Day. It was a memorable sight which 
drew many yachting enthusiasts to the Magic City. 

Hawaii Day Oregon Week Czecho-Slovakia Day. There 
was no more Czecho-Slavakia, actually, but Commissioner Creel 
obtained permission from the War Department for military 
honors for Colonel Vladamire Hurban, erstwhile Minister of 
that country to the United States. His countrymen celebrated 
the day with calisthenic drills, folk dances, flag-raising and in- 
spirational talks, despite heavy hearts. 

Travel was increasing, show attendance was taking a sharp 
rise. For instance, Benny Goodman was playing to 60,000 a day, 
divided between four shows. Cavalcade and the Folies were 
drawing full houses. The horse shows were packing 'em in. 

Treasure Island Talent Parade got under way. Auditions 
were held in the Chrysler exhibit in Vacationland. 

July 8, Navy Day, and Governor Olson presented a com- 
memorative plaque to the U.S.S. California. Men of Battleship 
Division Two paraded in recognition of the occasion. Landing 
forces from the cruisers swept the Island in sham battle, after- 
ward giving exhibitions of deep-sea diving. 

Salinas Day Stanislaus County Day Filipino Federation 
of America Day but Benny Goodman continued to be top at- 
traction. He was drawing 76.9 per cent of the total attendance! 

Something new Children's Day (13 to 18, 25 cents; 6 to 12, 
a dime, as before.) Helped trade, too. 



234 THE MAGIC CITY 

Guest of honor at Engineers' Day, former President Herbert 
Hoover was greeted with a 21 -gun salute from the Army on pa- 
rade. Every minute of Mr. Hoover's stay on the Island was plan- 
ned in advance broadcast, luncheon, two receptions, banquet, 
inspection of exhibits. The politic Mr. Creel engineered the ex- 
president's tour of the Federal Building so that he missed seeing 
the model of Boulder (once Hoover) Dam! 

Tom Sharkey, beloved heavyweight fighter of the Gay Nine- 
ties, appearing as an actor in "Cavalcade," had his moment of 
fame. He put on the gloves with another ex-pugilist, Tille (Kid) 
Herman, for a three-round bout. Tom had wanted to meet his 
old rival Jim Jeffries, but the former champion asked for "more 
time to get into condition." For the record: Tom "won"! 

Argentina commemorated the 123rd anniversary of the 
founding of the republic, with patriotic exercises attended by 
ranking Federal, State, civic and military officials. A two-way 
broadcast to Buenos Aires created a definite link of friendship. 

Attendance for the first ten days in July averaged 59,477, 
bringing the grand average since opening day up to 34,477, an 
increase of over 2,000. Total receipts of all concessions amounted 
to $603,648.25. "Take" at the admission gate was $173,461.35. 
The Horse Show had a gross income of $93,596.75. Prosperity 
appeared to be "just around the corner"- together with the 
five millionth visitor. That eagerly-awaited guest arrived on 
July 12. 

Governor Lloyd C. Stark of Missouri, accompanied by an 
official party, was received with customary honors on Saturday, 
July 15. Entertained by the City, the Exposition and the Cali- 
fornia Commission, he made headquarters at the Missouri Build- 
ing that day and for Homecoming Day on the morrow. 

A dog show was functioning in the Coliseum. It was Lu- 
theran Day, Magicians' Day, Y.M.I, and Y.L.I. Day, California 
State Employees' Day, Rosicrucian Day, Bahai Day. Also Kay 
Kyser and his "College of Musical Knowledge" playing three 
concerts afternoon and evening, in Treasure Island Music Hall, 
and packing 'em in, despite Benny Goodman playing "for free"! 



GALA DAYS OF '39 235 

A draft Horse Show was running in the Coliseum. No charge 
-but it couldn't compete with the other Horse Show just 
concluded. 

Hair Stylists and Scientific Astrologers; Treasure Island 
Talent Parade and Second Division Association; cities, groups, 
companies, fraternal societies all flocking to the Magic City. 

Fall of the Bastille, celebrated by San Francisco's large French 
colony, was marked by a colorful parade and renewed pledges 
to the principles of democracy. And a year hence 

But this was the Magic City, not the war-torn world beyond 
its walls. 

Salvation Army Day 4,000 delegates marching on the 
Island en masse. Meeting in Festival Hall, massed band concert 
at night. 

General Motors Day, one long to be remembered by 8,000 
employees present. "Boss" C. J. Kettering spoke to a large gath- 
ering in the G. M. exhibit in Vacationland on the efforts of his 
corporation to advance comfort and convenience through re- 
search. Then a parade, followed by a gathering in California 
Auditorium for General Motors employees exclusively. Free 
show for children clowns, tumblers and all. Music and spe- 
cial performances of Cavalcade and the Folies Bersjere. Fire- 
works. Quite a day for the celebrants, and a great day for Ex- 
position officials 76,000 attendance on a Saturday! 

A Swine Show followed the Draft Horse Show in the Cali- 
fornia Coliseum. Bacon on the hoof drew only those interested 
in such matters, but the show was a distinct contribution to the 
livestock program sponsored by the California Commission. 

Chicago Day on July 26, with Mayor Edward J. Kelly as 
honored representative of the Windy City. His day, which began 
with an official welcoming in the Court of Pacifica by Mavor 
Rossi, closed with His Honor driving one of the carriages in the 
Gay Nineties scene of "Cavalcade." 

It was "Benny Goodman Jitterbug Week," but it was also 
the Sixth Pacific Science Congress Week, thereby maintaining 
a balance of sorts. 



236 



THE MAGIC CITY 



The 1 1 8th anniversary of Peruvian independence was cele- 
brated on Peru Day, with Consul General Fernando Bercke- 
meyer welcoming a large delegation of his countrymen. National 
hero of Peru, General San Martin, was toasted in Pisco punches, 
that unique and potent brandy of the Andes. Unfortunately for 
the thirsting, the toasting was strictly invitational. 

Lieutenant Governor James C. McManus of Rhode Island 
cracked a bottle of champagne on the Rhode Island column in 
the Federal Building Colonnade of States. Otherwise Rhode 
Island Day passed according to set form. 

The posthumous award of a Soldier's medal to the family of 
a late hero was made as a feature of the retreat ceremony of July 
30. Pvt. Newton Luckie, Quartermaster Corps, was the honoree. 
He had been crushed to death attempting to save a civilian in a 
Brooklyn subway station. In 1940 the Treasure Island Company 
was to stage such citation ceremonies frequently. 

An elaborate fireworks display was staged as an added attrac- 
tion on Sunday night, July 30. In 1940 the fireworks show was 
a nightly feature. 

Swiss-Americans from all sections 
of California made the celebration 
of Swiss Day a notable occasion. 
Youngsters of the bay district had a 
perfectly swell time for themselves 
participating in the "Soap Box 
Derby" for home-made scooters. 

Devotees of the Moral Rearma- 
ment Movement invaded the Magic 
City on August 1 for the first phases 
of an ambitious program. They 
marched with flying banners from 
the Court of Pacifica down North- 
and-South axis to the Administra- 
tion Building. There, at a luncheon 
gathering, they received messages 
from their Majesties of Great Brit- 



liells in the Mission 
*i Trails Building 
.sang of early days 




GALA DAYS OF '39 



237 



ain, from the Premier of Japan, Admiral Richard Byrd, General- 
issimo Chiang Kai-Shek, General John J. Pershing and other 
world notables. Messages of peace were broadcast throughout the 
world over the General Electric short-wave radio station. Key- 
note of all effort was sounded by Dr. Frank N. D. Buchman, 
founder of the movement: "The purpose of MRA is to build a 
hate-free, fear-free and greed-free world." The devotees assem- 
bled on Treasure Island strove mightily for that matter, are 
still striving. 

Some 20,000 Boy Scouts took over the Island on August 3, 
marching and counter-marching, blowing their bugles and beat- 
ing their drums. Demonstrations of Scoutcraft, hitherto confined 
to an area in Vacationland, spread to all sectors. The Scout uni- 
form was an admission ticket, and many a trooper took advan- 
tage of that invitation. 

August 7 was U. S. Lighthouse Service Day, officially opening 
Lighthouse Week, 150th anniversary of the service in the United 
States. The Lightship "Relief," generally anchored outside the 
Golden Gate Heads, was moored at the East end of the Island, 
open for public inspection, and all 
phases of the service's activities were 
on display. 

The six-millionth visitor arrived 
on the evening of August 3. The at- 
tendance cadence was definitely 
quickening. 

Matson Day on August 9 brought 
5 1,527 through the portals, each and 
every one hopeful of winning the 
grand prize of the day, two round- 
trip tickets to Hawaii. The huge 
Matson liner "Mariposa" was an- 
chored in the Port of Trade Winds, 
between Treasure Island and Yerba 
Buena, adding a new touch of the 
spectacular. Hawaiian music, lec- 



Brazil Pavilion was 
center of Social life 
on Treasure Island 




238 THE MAGIC CITY 

tures on Hawaii and "The Pageant of Matson Ports" in Open 
Air Theatre highlighted the day's festivities. 

The inimitable Charles McCarthy and his "stooge," Edgar 
Bergen, appeared in connection with the Ted Lewis Band and 
variety show in Temple Compound on August 7 and 8 and 
literally "packed 'em in and laid 'em in the aisles." 

Sweden Day - - Nevada Day - - Coast Guard Day - - even 
Toastmaster and Toastmistress Day the programs included 
many phases. Market Week Texas Day Dahlia Day there 
was entertainment for all tastes. 

Toy Day, when admission for youngsters was a toy that could 
be repaired for use by others less privileged. Thousands were to 
be made happy by these gifts. 

Eddy Duchin Week succeeded Ted Lewis Week. The Duchin 
band had one of the most successful engagements of the entire 
musical season. 

Nebraska-Union Pacific Day brought hundreds to the Island. 
Alaska-Yukon Day caused many an erstwhile "Sourdough" to 
"mush" over to the Magic City. Swedish-Americans staged a 
colorful pageant. 

The New York Fair dispatched a shipment of gardenias 
the sort Grover Whalen wore as a boutonniere to Treasure 
Island. The Hall of Flowers sent back lilies. 

Leading Families Day (Smith, Johnson, Brown, Miller, An- 
derson, Williams and Jones eligible) brought the clans flocking. 
Prizes were awarded for largest family present, husband calling, 
prettiest girl or woman, homeliest man and so on. 

Ed Preston of the Olympic Club circled the Treasure Island 
Marathon course (5.7 miles) in 22 minutes, 9 8/10ths seconds. 
Disgruntled roller-chair boys claimed they could beat that any 
time. 

Former residents of Connecticut turned out in record num- 
ber to welcome Governor R. D. Baldwin on Connecticut Day. 

Marguerite Skliris (Miss San Francisco) was duly selected 
Miss Treasure Island over pulchritudinous competition. She 
went on to Atlantic City and finished high in the judging. 



GALA DAYS OF '39 239 

Lieutenant General Albert J. Bowley received full military 
honors in recognition of his recently acquired rank. 

Paul Mantz thrilled thousands with a "death defying" ter- 
minal velocity dive as a feature of Aviation Day. Army and 
Navy planes staged mock warfare. 

Treasure Island's lakes and lagoons became "Lake Michigan" 
for Michigan Day. A Norwegian peasant wedding ceremony fea- 
tured Norway Day. The Pacific Coast Championship Regatta 
drew both yachtsmen and yachting enthusiasts. 

Winners (at long last) of the Treasure Island Talent Parade 
Paul Bohigan, boy tenor, and Miss Grace Fettes, San Fran- 
cisco coloratura, gave a farewell performance before heading for 
further trials in New York. 

"Beaver Day" brought wondrous crops of whiskers for judg- 
ing. And there was a Sheep Show on at the California Coliseum. 

Malicious, popular old distance horse, was feature attrac- 
tion of Arcadia Day. 

Emporium friends and employees celebrated their day with 
a picnic and sports. 

Admiral Harry E. Yarnell, retiring commander in chief of 
the United States Asiatic Fleet, found Treasure Island a pleas- 
ing contrast to war-harried Shanghai. 

The seven-millionth visitor arrived on August 23, just 20 
days after the six-millionth. This was more like it the shortest 
interval yet between these significant occasions. An end of the 
month report revealed that the Exposition was operating at a 
profit of $700,000 monthly, that over ten millions of dollars had 
been spent on the Island by Fair visitors. 

The Labor Day week-end, always a significant date in the 
carnival business, brought even greater encouragement. Three 
of the best days of Exposition record brought 274,799 paid ad- 
missions to the Island 59,061 on Saturday, a startling 123,442 
on Sunday, 91,756 on Labor Day itself. This was an average for 
the three days of 91,599. 

What drew them? Well, there was Jack Benny and Mary 
Livingstone, the popular radio comedians, appearing before Phil 



240 THE MAGIC CITY 

Harris' orchestra, for one. And what special events? A Welsh 
Eisteddfod, Master Barbers of California, Negro Day, Amador 
County Day. No outstanding attraction there, one might say. 
Must have been the combined attractions of the Magic City and 
the holiday that and perfect weather. 

The American Federation of Labor held an observance of 
its day in Festival Hall but that could hardly account for the 
presence of over 91,000. The answer was that the show was 
"taking on." 

Next big day was Admission Day, September 9. The Bank 
of America chose this date for its celebration. Thousands of 
its employees and friends came from all sections of the State. 

The Treasure Island Branch, which kept most "un-banklike" 
hours of from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., was headquarters. A variety 
show, with drawing for cash savings accounts, and a huge fire- 
works display featured the funmaking. Over 68,000 attended. 

Brazil Day, the 117th anniversary of the coffee empire's in- 
dependence, was observed at the Brazilian Pavilion, with Mrs. 
Getulio Vargas, wife of the president of Brazil, and her daugh- 
ter and son-in-law as honor guests. Brazilian wine was opened 
for visitors to toast the occasion and a short-wave broadcast en- 
abled Brazilians to address their homeland. 

The outbreak of the War in Europe brought announcement 
of the immediate closing of the Johore Temple. Other foreign 
participation that might have been expected to be affected re- 
mained undisturbed for the time being. With grim irony, and 
at the same time a strong sense of showmanship, the Estonian 
Village management installed rubber-band boundaries around 
Germany on its large map of Europe in front of the concession. 
As Hitler's legions conquered, the flexible boundaries were 
extended. 

A truly marvelous jade exhibit was installed in the Chinese 
Village. Valued at millions of dollars, it attracted tens of thou- 
sands of visitors through its artistry and beauty. 

A series of "Peace Days," on the theme "Keep America Out 
of War" was inaugurated. 



GALA DAYS OF '39 241 

The management sponsored drawings for automobiles as an 
attendance stimulator. Not but what the influx was fairly steady. 

School tours and Contra Costa Day. Von Steuben Day and 
City of Los Angeles Day. Mayor Fletcher Bowron issued a proc- 
lamation calling upon Angelenos to join the delegation of visitors 
which he headed. They did, in some number, and had them a 
real time. 

The eight-millionth visitor arrived on September 14, 22 days 
after the seven-millionth. 

Grand Hotel Day on September 20, sponsored by the Cali- 
fornia State Hotel Association. Ten thousand employees and 
executives as a nucleus, total attendance of 40,041. Rather 
small house, considering the prizes drawn for two free round 
trips to Hawaii and ten days room and meals for two at the 
Royal Hawaiian Hotel a $500 fur coat a week's vacation 
for two at Del Monte, Coronado, Yosemite and San Francisco. 

Autumn Festival, September 22-24. Quilts and coverlets, pies 
and cakes an old fashioned County Fair set down in the middle 
of a large International Exposition. Rural Olympics, in which 
contestants vied at old-fashioned sports, from horseshoe pitching 
to pie-eating; a ranch-hand's pentathlon, for speed and strength 
in accomplishing the common chores. Old time fiddlers, square 
dance teams and bands rock-drillers, sheep-shearers and song 
contests. The "back country" came to the Fair, and the urban- 
ites joined in the fun with zest. 

International Day, a featured date on the Autumn Festival 
calendar, brought a pageant participated in by the foreign-born 
of San Francisco and the bay district. Each group of nationals 
strove to outdo the other in completeness and beauty of its of- 
fering. The result was an assemblage of color, song and dance 
seldom equaled in Exposition history. 

San Francisco Day on September 30 featured a "treasure 
hunt" for patrons throughout the Island, open house in the San 
Francisco Building, musical events, a parade and aerial attack 
demonstration, a reception, fireworks and other features. John 
Charles Thomas and the San Francisco Municipal Chorus pre- 



242 THE MAGIC CITY 

sented a rain-drenched night concert in Temple Compound. 
Despite heavy planning and arranging by committees, atten- 
dance was somewhat disappointing, 50,110. 

September closed with a grand total attendance of 8,512,779. 

The month of October was to see this figure increased by al- 
most two millions. Announcement of an earlier closing than 
scheduled, together with a concentration of entertainment fea- 
tures planned for the next two months into less than one month, 
must be held responsible for this remarkable influx of visitors. 

Strangely enough, October was to see one of the days of low- 
est attendance (Monday the 2nd, 11,776) and also the day of 
greatest attendance, the latter not to be surpassed until Closing 
Day of 1940. This last was Safeway Day, on Sunday, October 8, 
when 187,730 persons jammed all facilities leading to and on 
the Island. 

Hitherto large organizations had been privileged to purchase 
Exposition tickets at a reduced rate 25 cents minimum for 
use of members or employees. A special deal enabled Safeway 
Stores to pass this saving on to their customers. Some few thou- 
sand additional visitors had been expected, but nothing like the 
surge of humanity that ensued. Automobiles were parked along 
the avenues of the Exposition for the first time on record; there 
was no more room in the regular parking lot. Eating places ran 
out of food; even the lowly hot dog could have sold at a premium. 
No one expected such a crowd, so no advance preparations had 
been made for its accommodation. 

How to account for it? Might give Bing Crosby an assist on 
the play. He made an appearance in Temple Compound with 
the George Olson band, and was greeted by such a throng as he 
never played to before or since. They even crowded the roofs 
of adjoining buildings. But the real answer was the 25 cent ticket. 

October 12, Columbus Day, was marked with an observance 
by the Knights of Columbus. It was also Alameda County Day, 
with a generous attendance from the East Bay and ceremonies 
in the Alameda-Contra Costa Court. 

The nine-millionth visitor had arrived on the previous day. 



GALA DAYS OF '39 243 

Woman's Day, on Wednesday, October 25, brought the next 
over-hundred-thousand day, when 111,839 paid to enter the 
gates of the Magic City. Woman's Day is described in another 
chapter. 

The ten-millionth visitor arrived during the course of Wom- 
man's Day festivities. A goal of "one more half-million" was set 
by the optimistic and all but realized, as the crowded entertain- 
ment and special events program carried through the final days. 

At length the final day, Sunday, October 29th. 

It started out like any other Sunday except that the rush 
of early attendance was heavier than usual. Over 17,000 had 
checked in the first hour, over 35,000 the second hour. By 3 p.m. 
there were 101,383 on the Island. It was beginning to look like 
a repetition of "Safeway Day." But it wasn't quite. Final casting 
of accounts found 147,674 registered. 

Mindful of experiences on Opening Day, newspaper and 
radio stations were kept appraised of the traffic situation. They 
in turn notified the public that the roads were open and accom- 
modations adequate. Even so, many thousands stayed away, fear- 
ful of a "crush." 

It was hardly what you'd call a merry crowd. Say, rather, a 
reminiscent crowd. Thousands strolled through courts and gar- 
dens, drinking in their beauty thirstily, as though to create a 
mind picture which time might not erase. The shows drew well, 
the "name band" concert (it was Count Basic and his Sepians 
of Swing) attracted its usual throng. 

But the crowd was waiting for something else and waiting 
with a lump in the throat, if truth be known. 

Came twilight and the lights went on. The nostalgic thou- 
sands reveled in the glowing beauty of the Court of the Moon 
and other favored spots. 

Came at last the closing hour 11:45 p.m. Solemn and 
hushed, a huge throng gathered in Federal Plaza. 

President Cutler stepped to the microphone. His voice trem- 
bled with understandable emotion as he bade farewell to Treas- 
ure Island, presumably for all time. 



244 THE MAGIC CITY 

His message was brief, but telling: 

"The Golden Gate International Exposition was created by 
the people of the United States of America and the foreign 
friends of America. This Island was a dream of many states 
and cities and counties, and boys and girls and men and women. 
No one has to dream about it any more. Here it is! 

"Lights are made by men in beauty, and last for just a little 
while. Memories come from God and live forever. So will our 
memories of this beauty live until Time's End." 

From the top of the Colonnade of States an Army trumpeter 
blew the first bars of "Taps"- perhaps the most poignantly sad 
and moving of all simple music. Another bugler, stationed on 
the Arch of Triumph across the lagoon, answered as though in 
echo. The last note was sounded. The Thirtieth Infantry Band 
broke into "Star Spangled Banner." The Treasure Island Com- 
pany snapped to "present arms," Slowly, lingeringly the National 
colors and the Exposition standard were hauled down from their 
lofty poles. The Magic City was in complete darkness as, one by 
one, the glowing lights on courts and buildings faded and 
flickered out. 

The Treasure Island Company marched off at the quickstep 
behind its band, blaring a brisk march. In the barrel of each 
rifle was a tiny light, sole illumination of a Magic City that was. 

The Gala Days of '39 were over! 




CHAPTER XVII 



THERE WAS TALK much talk of re-opening the Exposition 
for a second year run even before plans were consummated for 
its closing ahead of schedule on October 29. 

Late in August, Mr. Philip H. Patchin, of the Board of Man- 
agement, admitted that such a consideration was being studied 
by the Board. Admitted it somewhat unwillingly, withal, since 
it was felt that premature announcement of such activity might 
tend to discourage currently gratifying attendance. 

When Hitler's legions marched into Poland, it was felt that 
"war dooms a second year." Nevertheless, newspapers the San 
Francisco News and the San Francisco Examiner in particular 
took up the matter in their editorial columns and urged se- 
rious consideration. At the instigation of the late editor of the 
News, William N. Burkhardt, a comprehensive report was pre- 
pared which pointed out advantages and disadvantages of a pos- 
sible second year run, and indicated costs and how such costs 
might be financed. 

At the request of the Board of Management, H. C. Bottorff 
prepared a tentative estimated budget of $1,650,000, as the 
amount required for rehabilitation of buildings and grounds, 
expense of reselling exhibitors and concessionnaires, promotion, 
publicity, and administrative costs. This tentative figure was 
later revised downward to $1,418,000. It was further estimated 
that operating costs for all departments for a four months' pe- 
riod would be $3,340,000. 

Pressed for their reaction, the members of the Board of Man- 
agement stated the plan was being studied so that "if pressure is 
brought on the management to stage a fair again next year, we 



246 THE MAGIC CITY 

will be able to say that it will cost 'X' amount of dollars." It 
was their idea that attendance during the closing weeks of the 
'39 season would be the final criterion as to whether there was 
sufficient public demand to warrant continuance in '40. 

Hotel and transportation men met at the Chamber of Com- 
merce with Exposition and Chamber officials in mid-September 
for further discussion of the possibilities of reopening. The Ex- 
hibitors' Association held a mass meeting on the Island at the 
same time, and reported they did not feel the project was 
"financially sound." 

Nevertheless, favorable sentiment grew, fanned by persistent 
newspaper support. George D. Smith, who was to prove the ulti- 
mate savior of the situation, asked appointment of a Citizens' 
Survey Committee by Mayor Rossi. Mr. Smith saw four ways of 
financing such a deal aid from the Federal Government, a 
City bond issue, a State bond issue or legislative appropriation, 
private contributions. 

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors passed a resolution 
to place on the November 7 ballot a "declaration of Policy" as 
to whether or not there should be a "Fair in Forty." 

By the third week in September, Dan London, heading a 
committee that had been delving around the monied centers, 
reported that potential subscriptions were still a million dollars 
short. However, hope was had in the fact that hotel men were 
reported ready to toss $300,000 into the pot. 

Director Charles Strub had set October 3 1 as a tentative dead- 
line for raising of the $418,000 required before the Board of 
Management could even consider running for a second year. 

On September 27, the 1939 Board of Management cleared 
its skirts of further responsibility for a second season by voting 
to "suspend operations definitely and finally this year." How- 
ever, the door was left open. The official announcement stated 
that if a 1940 season were to be provided for, "at least $1,418,000 
in new and free money must be on hand by October 15." 

The San Francisco Call-Bulletin commented editorially: 

"The problems of raising such a large sum for such a purpose 



THE MONTHS BETWEEN 247 

are very great, and while the committee itself is optimistic, those 
closest to the Fair management believe that only a miracle can 
produce a re-opening of our Exposition for three or four months 
next year. 

"The point is then: See The Fair Now!" 

The Board of Management must have agreed completely 
with this admonition and the psychology behind it. Within a 
week came announcement of final closing on October 29! 

Meanwhile, there had been another meeting of 1940 enthu- 
siasts at the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. On Septem- 
ber 30, Marshall Dill, then President of the Chamber, announced 
the creation of "The 1940 Exposition, Inc.," a group consisting 
of Felix S. McGinnis, Vice-President of the Southern Pacific 
Lines; United States Commissioner George Creel; Henry Q. 
Hawes, advertising man; George D. Smith and Dan London, 
hotel men. The drive for contributions to make possible the 
1940 re-opening was to be conducted by Ray W. Smith, who 
had been employed for the solicitation of funds in the original 
subscription campaign in 1936. 

The "Fair in Forty" group went to work, courageous and 
optimistic. Progress was slow, results none too gratifying. Mr. 
London reported, following the passing of the original October 
15 "deadline," that $700,000 in cash and pledges had been 
raised, that more was in sight, that the committee felt "suffi- 
ciently encouraged to go on." Further time was granted, with 
no deadline set. 

Mayor Rossi found a way to pledge $250,000 in City funds 
for the cause. It would have to be approved by the Board of 
Supervisors in the 1940 budget, which meant that it could not 
be provided until the following July but the pledge was in- 
vigorating to flagging enthusiasm. Commissioner Creel had con- 
sulted with President Roosevelt, and the committee felt that a 
Federal appropriation of $1,500,000 might be forthcoming. But 
there again, arose the problem of waiting for Congressional ac- 
tion. The need was current, and acute. 

Gaining some slight encouragement from the persistent ef- 



248 THE MAGIC CITY 

forts of the Fair in Forty group, certain Exposition creditors 
discussed a deal whereby $250,000 of the monies owed them and 
held for them by the Exposition company might be "tossed into 
the pot" for '40 as a guarantee of the contribution promised 
by the City. Then word came from a meeting held on October 
25 that the Forty group had only $950,000 pledged or collected, 
including the City's quarter million. And that, it was pointed 
out, was not a definite commitment. 

The situation was becoming complicated. 

While tens of thousands thronged the Magic City for what 
might well have been the last time, October 29, 1939, the Board 
of Management mulled over 1940 prospects once more. 

It was not a pretty picture. The largest group of creditors, 
including the banks, announced that it "would make no com- 
mitment for 1940 until sponsors have raised $1,110,000." Ap- 
proximately $950,000 had then been pledged. Exposition of- 
ficials disclosed a loss of $5,000,000 between opening day, 
February 18, and May 1, and a profit of some $2,000,000 from 
May 1 to closing day. This meant a net loss of $3,000,000 at- 
tributed to premature opening of the Exposition. 

Slightly more propitious was the attitude of certain creditors 
who favored "ploughing back" for 1940 about $500,000 held in 
the Exposition treasury in their interest. They foresaw possi- 
bility of a much larger return on their claims if the Exposition 
were to run a second season with any degree of success. The 
contractor creditors were particularly sold on this idea, and 
called all other creditors into joint conference to consider the 
possibility of re-opening. They reported that "a majority of the 
creditors agreed that continuation of the Fair in 1940 will be 
to their best interests." 

But the so-called "lending group" -the banks and other 
large creditors, who held 63 per cent of the outstanding claims 
against the Exposition could not share that optimistic view- 
point. That group declared unequivocally that it would not 
fall in with the other creditors and demanded assurance of 
$1,100,000 "in cash or bankable equivalent." 



THE MONTHS BETWEEN 



249 



The Exposition management had been able to pay off 20 
per cent of its five million dollar debt arising out of the prema- 
ture opening still retaining the wherewithal to pay approxi- 
mately another 20 per cent. It was from these funds that the 
creditors, who had become supporters of the Fair in Forty group, 
hoped to secured the $500,000 they proposed to "plough under" 
for future harvest. 

Despite the attitude taken by the "lending group," the con- 
tractor creditors on October 31 voted to leave the amounts due 
them from the '39 Fair intact and assign them to the Fair in 
Forty committee. Exhibitors and concessionnaires were standing 
by, awaiting developments. 

At a Fair in Forty mass meeting in the Supervisors' cham- 
bers in the City Hall, some 300 civic leaders voiced enthusiasm 
for re-opening. But more than mere enthusiasm was needed at 
this point. 

A November 14 deadline for the campaign had been set by 
the Board of Management at last consideration. The day came San Francisco's host 

, ! . i -r^ buildine was one of 

and passed; an extension was requested and granted. Discourag- the finest on the isle 





250 THE MAGIC CITY 

ing reports were forthcoming from the Ray Smith organization. 
Exhibitors and concessionaires were becoming restless. 

The Bankers' Committee reported on November 22 that the 
Fair in Forty fund was far short of its goal, and that the Island 
would not re-open. Dan London, heading the finance committee, 
dropped out of active participation in its affairs, in keeping with 
a "gentleman's agreement" between himself and the Bankers' 
Committee to abandon the campaign if the necessary money 
could not be raised by a given date. The indefatigable George 
Smith carried on, refusing to concede failure. 

Then came signs of interest from an unexpected source. 

Billy Rose, the New York impressario, wired that he stood 
ready to put up a million dollars in cash, contingent upon being 
given control of the 1940 Fair. Subsequent reports from confi- 
dential agents indicated that Rose was quite ready to raise his 
bid to $1,560,000 or even more. Later, the "Mighty Mite" of 
the show world was to propose lending $2,000,000 to a San 
Francisco committee authorized to run the Fair, with Rose to 
be installed as General Manager. He was ready to fly out in per- 
son, prepared to sign a check. 

A little more than a week before closing day, attorneys for the 
Exposition had appeared before Federal Judge Louderback, pe- 
titioning that the San Francisco Bay Exposition, the sponsoring 
corporation, be taken into "protective custody" by the Referee 
in Bankruptcy, in order to assure "a more orderly distribution 
of assets." This petition was granted, but appearance before the 
referee had been postponed pending development of plans for 
1940. Now that it appeared such plans had reached a stalemate, 
the Board of Management and the Creditors' Committee an- 
nounced an agreement that liquidation plans for the Exposition 
corporation would be filed with Referee Burton J. Wyman 
forthwith. 

On December 1, President Cutler announced, on behalf of 
the Exposition corporation: "By action of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Board of Directors, the Fair will be liquidated." 
George Creel sent word from Washington to the effect "the 



THE MONTHS BETWEEN 251 

President favors a 1940 Fair" but it seemed almost too late to 
do anything about it, even with such support. 

Contractor creditors announced that they would not oppose 
liquidation, despite their enthusiasm for a 1940 season, since it 
appeared "impossible to raise the necessary funds for the re- 
opening." Some exhibitors began to dismantle their exhibits. 
Others stood by, still hopeful. 

It was at this point that Billy Rose came up with his two 
million dollar offer. It was not accepted, but it was regarded as 
sufficient of a trend to cause postponement of liquidation pro- 
ceedings pending before the Referee in Bankruptcy. 

Then George Smith pulled a rabbit out of his hat. He had 
been carrying on, more or less under cover, ever since Dan Lon- 
don had officially dropped out of the fund-raising campaign. On 
the evening of December 9, he took the final courageous gamble. 
Backed up by John Cahill, leader of the optimistic contractors' 
group, he announced that more than sufficient money had been 
raised to make possible a re-opening of the Exposition in May 
of 1940. Newspapers of Sunday, December 10, featured this 
startling news on page one and the die was cast! 

Next morning the switchboard at the Fairgrounds was fairly 
swamped with calls. Scores of actors lined up in front of "Red" 
Vollman's all-but-deserted "Cavalcade" office, demanding to be 
put to work. Sixty-nine concessionnaires held a meeting and 
voted to raise $200,000 for the cause. It was not quite that much 
in the final showdown, but the amount eventually turned over 
to 1 940 Exposition, Inc. was nonetheless definitely a lifesaver. 

The California Toll Bridge Authority, which had profited 
greatly in '39 from Exposition trade, voted to "purchase" the 
Yerba Buena approach to Treasure Island as a means of giving 
the Fair in Forty group a needed $100,000. The Bank of America 
pulled away from others of the "lending group" and announced 
that it would not attempt to liquidate its loan of $220,000 to 
the '39 Fair, but would string along with the '40 project. With 
this added assurance, the Bankers' Committee agreed to accept 
the George Smith plan. 



252 



THE MAGIC CITY 



Details, legal and financial, of the 1940-reopening having 
been agreed upon, George Smith posted a check for $125,000, 
furnished by concessionnaires, with Referee in Bankruptcy Bur- 
ton J. Wyman as a guaranty of good faith. The press waxed duly 
enthusiastic. 

The order extending the Fair through a 1940 season was 
signed on December 22 by Referee Wyman. Like an "All Clear" 
signal following hours of struggle in the face of apparently in- 
evitable defeat, the siren in the Ferry Building tower screamed 
the glad tidings throughout the bay district. 

The Executive Committee then increased its membership 
from nine to fourteen members, and answering the roll-call were 
Messrs. George W. Brainard, John R. Cahill, Alfred J. Cleary, 
George Creel, Leland W. Cutler, Marshall Dill (ex-officio), Clar- 
ence B. Eaton, John F. Forbes, Edward H. Heller, Harry Hilp, 
Dan London, D. M. Messer, George D. Smith and Russell G. 
Smith. 

The Executive Committee named sub-committee chairmen. 
The bandwagon was loading, and various citizens, who had been 

advocating immediate demolition, 
hastened to clamber aboard. 

"Miracle Man" George Smith 
spoke before the first committee 
meeting of the 1 940 Fair, that of the 
Promotion committee. This loyal 
group had stood fast in ranks 
throughout the campaign for re- 
opening, and forthwith voted to 
launch an aggressive promotion 
campaign. 

On January 3 of the new year, the 
election of Marshall Dill, then presi- 
dent of the Chamber of Commerce, 
as President of the 1940 Golden 
Gate International Exposition was 
announced. Leland Cutler, who had 



Workmen prepare 
"Pacifica" for her 
regal role in J940 




THE MONTHS BETWEEN 



253 



served in that office from the very first, had asked to be relieved 
of his exacting duties. 

The next day, William W. Monahan was appointed General 
Manager. Previous experience as an executive in the Exhibits 
and Concessions Department during the organization period 
had familiarized the new General Manager with many of the 
problems he was to face during the months to come. He selected 
his key staff men carefully, delegated to them authority over and 
responsibility for their own departments. 

Raymond C. 1'Heureux (happy as the name implies!) was 
appointed Assistant to the General Manager. The "to" was in- 
serted at his own insistence. He said it gave him a freer hand. 

Ray's principal responsibility was to function as liaison be- 
tween the Exposition Corporation and the California Commis- 
sion. Whenever he appeared at the latter headquarters, one of 
his cronies Jim Smythe, Rusty Mikel, Bob Penfield or Claude 
Cooper would ostentatiously pass the word along: "Lock up 
the safe 1'Heureux is here to talk us out of some more dough!" 

Only those close to the situation can realize the problems 
faced by the management during 
those early months of 1940. As the 
average citizen saw it, the Island was 
there, the buildings were there so 
why not open the gates and let the 
show go on? But it was not quite that 
easy. True, the physical aspects of 
the Magic City were more or less in- 
tact and the buildings had come 
through the winter months in much 
better condition than had been an- 
ticipated. But a new show had to be 
created, a completely new and dif- 
ferent show in most instances. Some 
exhibitors had stood by, hopeful of 
a 1 940 re-opening others had aban- 
doned the project and apparently 



Colombia Pavilion 
was located in area 
for Latin America 




254 THE MAGIC CITY 

were not interested in renewing contracts. The Gayway conces- 
sionnaires had come through with a contribution to the Fair in 
Forty committee which actually turned the issue now, quite 
naturally, they expected to operate on much the same basis as 
in 1939. And their shows needed refurbishing in many instances. 

Was it to be Treasure Island again, or "Pleasure Island?" 
Certain exhibitors and potential foreign participants resented 
that latter designation, as intimating a strictly carnival or "Coney 
Island" atmosphere hardly in keeping with national dignity and 
higher ideals of service and salesmanship. The first duty of the 
Promotion and Publicity Department was to erase that miscon- 
ception from the public consciousness. 

What of foreign participation? The war in Europe San 
Francisco seemed fated to have its Exposition complicated by 
wars! made necessary the withdrawal of British Empire par- 
ticipation, Australia, New Zealand, British Columbia, Johore. 
The Netherlands East Indies and French Indo-China were to 
follow. The Philippines and Hawaii were unable to return for 
a '40 showing. New emphasis had to be placed upon Latin 
America. And here, in several instances, although the spirit of 
neighborly co-operation might be strong, the financial structure 
was weak. 

What of the State of California's participation? Opposition 
to spending was developing in the Legislature, and without an 
appropriation from the State, the Fair in Forty could hardly 
hope to carry on. "If your own State refuses to participate, how 
can you ask us to join your venture?" might well have been the 
logical question of foreign nations and large exhibitors ap- 
proached by Exposition representatives. The State contributed 
generously eventually but it was an epic struggle for a while. 

What of Federal participation? What about a new setup for 
the Palace of Fine Arts, bereft of the Italian Old Masters which 
had been such an outstanding attraction the year before? What 
of a new entertainment plan? What of a new promotion and 
publicity program to inform a none-too-interested world that 
the San Francisco Fair had not ceased to exist when it closed a 



257 

month earlier than scheduled the previous October, when it 
had placed its affairs in the hands of a Federal court, when 
backers of a second year's run had failed in their original efforts, 
when it was off, then on, then off again, and finally definitely 
billed to re-open on May 25? 

Although there was a clear enough heritage from the 1939 
Exposition to the 1940 revival, there was no direct line of con- 
tinuity between the two. This is a distinction that should be 
borne in mind. The 1940 Fair was virtually a new venture in 
the old buildings on the old site. A new plan of operations had 
to be created, new attractions had to be secured, old structures 
had to be given new beauty and color. 

The publicity department fell back upon a hackneyed word 
and called it a "Streamlined" Exposition. There was more sig- 
nificance in the term than might be imagined. Where the pre- 
vious management and administration had had three years in 
which to complete the show, the 1940 management had to con- 
ceive and build an entirely new and different show, all in the 
short space of slightly more than four months. Time was the 
essence of all contacts and contracts during that hectic pre- 
operations period. 



CHAPTER XVIII 



EVENTUALLY AND INEVITABLY came The Day May 25. 

In keeping with the lighter touch typified by the "Fun in 
Forty" theme, a studied informality was sought for at least the 
preliminaries of the second year opening ceremonies. The pro- 
gram differed materially from that of the first year, in that offi- 
cial ceremonies were to start at 7:30 p.m., in order to feature 
one of the chief attractions of the new "Streamlined" Fair, the 
refurbished lighting system. 

However, since customers were bound to come earlier in the 
day and the management saw no valid reason why their prof- 
fers of admission fees at the gate should be refused some ar- 
rangements had to be made to mark the occasion. 

The proverbial bombs bursting in air announced at 9 o'clock 
in the morning that the Island was still there and re-opening 
for business. By 10 o'clock an impressive line of automobiles 
was backed up the causeway from the main gate, awaiting the 
lifting of the barrier. This was accomplished with due pomp 
by President Marshall Dill, in the full regimentals of silk topper 
and cutaway befitting the chief executive of the Exposition. 
Accompanied by Miss Lila Deane (Miss Exposition) and with 
Miss United States (personified by Miss Barbara Dean) looking 
on interestedly, Mr. Dill cut the silken ribbon across the road- 
way and pronounced the 1940 Golden Gate International Expo- 
sition officially open. 

(It might be remarked in passing, strictly as a matter of rec- 
ord and not with any intent to discern a mote in the neighbor's 
eye, that it was not necessary to repeat this procedure several 
times for the benefit of the newsreels and the unseen radio 



260 



THE MAGIC CITY 



audience, as was the unfortunate occurrence when the New 
York Fair had resumed business at Flushing Meadows some two 
weeks previously! Mr. Dill snipped the ribbon clean on the 
first try.) 

So that clients coming by ferry from San Francisco and by 
bus from the East Bay might not feel slighted, Hawaiian instru- 
mentalists and dancers extended welcome at the ferry slip, and 
Spanish entertainers performed a similar function at the bus 
terminal on Sunset Bridge. 

The Gayway folk staged their own opening ceremonies un- 
der the new arch over the entrance to that sector, and at high 
noon in the Court of the Seven Seas, little Miss Suzanna Foster, 
the Paramount Pictures starlet, and Miss Exposition broke a 
large golden paper seal of the Exposition to further indicate 
that this was the day. 

Troubadours and strolling players maintained the tempo 
throughout the early afternoon. Then, as promptly on schedule 
as heavy traffic conditions would permit, came the Golden For- 
ties Fiesta parade, converging on the Island from both ends of 

the San Francisco-Oakland bay 
bridge. 

When the parade was winding its 
route along the main avenues of the 
Island, the younger generation was 
holding an opening ceremony of its 
own in the Court of Reflections. 
There a colorful little performance 
entitled "Swing Wide the Golden 
Gates" was staged by the active pro- 
duction division of the Special 
Events department, with tiny Joa- 
quine Bascou of Oakland, well glam- 
orized for the occasion, functioning 
as "Baby Streamline." She had all 
the airs and graces of her somewhat 
older cohorts. 



Leland W. Culler, 
Mr. cir Mrs. Tihbett 
and T. J. IVatsnit 



COM!/ 




THE GOLDEN FORTIES 



261 



The Fiesta Parades having been duly reviewed and judged, 
the colorfully costumed participants began mingling with the 
ever growing throng, catching a performance of the thrill circus 
which had been set up in the Open Air Theatre, inspecting the 
Gayway, checking on some of the exhibit palaces, and otherwise 
amusing themselves. 

Long before twilight thousands of the more provident were 
beginning to file into seats provided for the general public for 
the main opening ceremonies, row upon row of benches stretched 
the length and width of Federal Plaza. As the opening hour 
neared, other thousands of latecomers overflowed into the stands 
at the East Towers, flanking Temple Compound, on the far side 
of the Lake of the Nations. They were much too far away to see, 
but at least they might hear, since the public address system was 
to carry every word spoken on the great stage to the far corners 
of the Island. 

Guards did their conscientious best to keep the reserved 
sections set aside for the more-or-less fortunate holders of offi- 
cial invitations inviolate. It was a task, and a difficult one as the 
growing mob sought to surge for- 
ward. But, by and large, the peace 
was preserved. 

The great stage had been set up in 
front of the main entrance to the 
Federal Building, with the Con- 
course of Commonwealths kept clear 
for traffic. That was a mistake, as was 
to be evident later on. 

At long last was evening of the 
first day, and darkness was upon the 
face of the waters. The show could 
be staged against a fitting back- 
ground of night. 

As the final ceremony on Octo- 
ber 29, 1939, involved lowering the 
Stars and Stripes (and incidentally 



President Dill in 
opening ceremony 
of 1940 Exposition 




262 



THE MAGIC CITY 



the 1939 Exposition standard) to the sounding of "Taps" by 
Army buglers, while the Treasure Island Company of the Thir- 
tieth Infantry rigidly observed military formalities, so did the 
re-opening in 1940 have its martial touch. Army authorities 
broke precedent to consent to a retreat ceremony at midnight in 
1939. In 1940 they further shattered tradition by participating 
in a reveille and flag raising ceremony at 7:30 in the evening. 

Under the able supervision of then-Major R. C. Lehman, 
Fifteenth Infantry, liaison officer to the Exposition for the Ninth 
Corps, and his adjutant, then-Lieutenant A. G. Elegar, Thirtieth 
Infantry, the Army's participation had been timed in advance 
to the split second. Captain W. L. Burbank commanding the 
Treasure Island Company (this year recruited by rigid selection 
from the Third Division, rather than from the Thirtieth Infan- 
try exclusively) was to march his troops onto Federal Plaza as 
Guard of Honor to Governor Culbert L. Olson at a certain given 
cue. The first blast of the nineteen-gun gubernatorial salute to 
GOV. oison at radio which His Excellency was officially entitled at his first appear- 

as Dill and 1940 i i rr i r 

Beauty await turns ance on the Island, was to be touched oft at the signal from an 



- 



M,i- 




THE GOLDEN FORTIES 



263 



electric buzzer to be pressed by a Lieutenant closer to the stage 
management operations. 

But alas for best-laid plans of trained and co-operative tacti- 
cians! Something had to go wrong was bound to, by all the 
laws of probabilities. 

Through some conflict in radio network schedules, Gover- 
nor Olson was called upon to broadcast from the main studio 
in the California Auditorium, adjoining the scene of the eve- 
ning's principal activities, prior to making his public official ap- 
pearance. Lieutenant Elegar, his watch synchronized to the sec- 
ond, was there to accompany the Governor to his place of honor 
following the escorting troops. 

The broadcast was finished "on the nose," Governor Olson 
came out of the studio, his military aide greeted him with a click 
of the heels and a snap of the saluting hand to the cap brim. 
Almost simultaneously there was the unmistakable roar of a 
blast from a 75 millimeter field piece. Then, at the proper five- 
second interval, another and another. Lieutenant Elegar all 
but swooned in the enveloping folds of his dress cape. Somehow 
or other the saluting battery was 
going off ahead of schedule, with no 
troops drawn up in receiving line, 
and Governor Olson a hundred 
yards away! 

How it had all happened was sim- 
ple enough. Some luckless wight had 
an idea that the signal system should 
be tested in advance, just to be sure 
that it was in working order. So he 
pressed the button. It was working, 
right enough. The nervous young 
Lieutenant in command of the artil- 
lery detail lifted his saber on high 
and shouted "FIRE!" in instant re- 
sponse to the very first buzz. A 
couple of blasts later, seeing neither 



Sheriff Biscailuz in 
lead of parade for 
Los Angeles Day 




264 THE MAGIC CITY 

honor escort nor escorted honoree, he realized that something 
was amiss, so hastily ordered "Cease firing!" 

Finally aware of what had happened, he rushed back to Camp 
Hunter Liggett, broke into the "magazine," and hastened back 
"on the double" with more saluting shells. By the time Governor 
Olson had been rushed to the scene of honors, the troops stood 
stiffly at attention, the guns boomed out their salvo of nineteen, 
and all was quite fit and proper, according to regulations made 
and provided. No one knew the difference not even the Com- 
manding General, who afterward proffered deserved congratula- 
tions to his officers. The superfluous explosions were charged off 
to the programmed exhuberance of the Exposition's Special 
Events Department. 

Bugles sounded "To the Colors." Eighty-five thousand men, 
women and children rose to their feet. The Thirtieth Infantry 
band broke into the stirring chords of the National Anthem. 
The colors rose slowly to full staff on the towering flagpoles 
before the Federal Building, billowing gracefully before a gentle 
evening breeze, glowing proudly in the bright beam of spotlights. 

A second or two of solemn hush, then a thunder of applause. 
Again Treasure Island, stronghold of peace and security, haven 
of culture, of light and laughter in a war-torn, blacked-out world, 
had opened its gates and its heart to its neighbors of the Pacific 
Basin. 

The stage lights flashed on. Came beautiful damsels in suit- 
ably diaphanous attire, to carry out episodes of a Pageant of 
Light light through the ages. Miss Exposition and her attend- 
ing court took their seats on throne and dias. Those near enough 
to see gasped in appreciation. Governor Olson, Mayor Rossi, 
President Marshall Dill and other notables were in their places 
on one side of the stage. 

From the ice-bound wastes of Little America a member of 
the Admiral Byrd Antarctic Expedition spoke to the assembled 
throng by short-wave radio. As the message came over the public 
address system, the more imaginative might have interpreted the 
rumble of static as the roar of a polar storm. 



THE GOLDEN FORTIES 265 

Antarctica signed off. The pageant narrator took up the 
cue. "And now let there be LIGHT!" he cried dramatically. 

There was a stage wait a long stage wait an increasingly 
embarrassing stage wait. Eventually there was light, according to 
the script. But not as dramatic in arrival as originally conceived. 

The narrator hastily turned to consideration of other mat- 
ters. The show went on. A harried stage-manager excitedly de- 
manded to know what-the-what. 

For, according to all previous arrangement, checked and 
double-checked, star-bombs, carrying enough magnesium to light 
the entire bay area and enough decibels of explosive sound to 
shatter the evening quiet for miles around, were to have burst 
in air on the cue-word "light." 

The pageant-director had pressed the electric switch as the 
cue was spoken but nothing happened. No time then to ask 
the reason why. Later the mystery was explained. 

Seems a stray customer had slipped under the ropes and 
made his way through the Colonnade of States in the Federal 
Building forecourt, seeking a more advantageous view of pro- 
ceedings. A guard ordered him to halt, but he refused and took 
to his heels. The guard gave chase. Between the two of them, 
they managed to kick loose the wires that connected the stage- 
director's switch with the bombs in question, lying ready and 
waiting out on the Esplanade back of the Federal Building. No 
connection no bombs. 

But then, nobody except those who had worried over the 
program knew the difference. Miss Exposition and her court 
smiled their prettiest, The Forty Fair Girls (count 'em 40!) 
went into their intricate terpsichorean routine. "The night shall 
be full of music" had been the promise and it was so ordered 
and carried out. 

The President of the Fair in Forty spoke briefly and tellingly. 
The Governor of California and the Mayor of San Francisco 
gave greetings from their respective seats of authority. 

It had been hoped that President Roosevelt might speak di- 
rectly by radio, finally pressing a key to turn on the lights. But 



266 



THE MAGIC CITY 



the President had declined a similar chore for the New York 
Fair, so found it necessary to send regrets to San Francisco. In- 
stead, his representative on Treasure Island, Federal Commis- 
sioner George Creel, climaxed his short address by reading a 
congratulatory telegram from Mr. Roosevelt. 

The Pageant of Light was nearing its finale. Languorous 
beauties moved slowly toward mid-stage, posturing studiedly. 
At the top of the broad terraced platforms rising from the main 
level there arose a glass-like column shimmering with all the 
colors of rainbow light. From this brilliant setting little Suzanna 
Foster stepped forth. Her bouffant frock carried out the rainbow 
theme she had just quitted. She bore herself proudly, confidently 
as she stepped down-stage toward the microphone. (And not two 
minutes before, trembling with quite understandable stage- 
fright, nervously clenching and unclenching her fingers to curb 
an almost irrepressible desire to chew her nails, the hapless Susie 
had all but sobbed to confidants: "I can't do it! I just CAN'T 
face all those people! I'm scared to death.") 

She smiled in childishly graceful pleasure in acknowledg- 
ment of welcoming applause, nod- 
ded professionally to the orchestra 
leader, and lifted that remarkable 
young voice of hers in song. It was 
Victor Herbert's familiar aria, "Kiss 
Me Again." 

The climactic note was to be a B- 
flat above high C, a range that pos- 
sibly only this youngster can achieve 
truly and with clarity. That note, by 
some magic accomplished through 
the kind co-operation of General 
Electric engineers, was to strike an 
electric diaphragm, the impulses of 
which were to motivate a switch 
which would turn on all the remain- 
ing lights of the Exposition. 



Aquacade beauties 
off-stage preparing 
for a curtain call 




THE GOLDEN FORTIES 



267 



(Don't ask the editors how it was to be done. Suffice to say 
that it had been worked out, by logarithms and cosines, and had 
been found not only possible but practicable!) 

Suzanna carried on, gaining assurance and power with every 
fresh young note. She was only a few bars away from the climax 
of the evening. Those who had conceived and sweated over this 
unique finale gripped the edges of their seats in apprehensive 
anticipation. It was coming coming in just another moment 

The piercing whine of a siren shattered the gentler sound 
waves with horrid dissonance. Down the main avenue, directly 
in front of the stage, rushed an ambulance. The driver stepped 
on the siren once more for luck as he passed, then roared on 
into the night. 

Any diva, however tractable, might have been forgiven a 
temperamental outburst in the face of such a raucous interrup- 
tion. Some who might be mentioned probably would have torn 
the microphone out by the roots and hurled it after the ambu- 
lance. But not little Susie Foster! She's all trouper. 

With the most natural, childlike gesture of disgust imagina- 
ble, she put both hands on her hips 
and stared down at the noisy "mercy 
chariot," lips tightly compressed. 
Then, with a toss of her head, she 
picked up with the orchestra, disre- 
garding the bar she had missed, and 
carried on. Carried on to that start- 
lingly beautiful piccolo note, the 
much discussed B-flat above high C. 
And the lights came on came on 
with a breath-taking flash of warm 
beauty! 

Whether the B-flat above high C 
or the wail of the ambulance turned 
the trick, deponent sayeth not! 

Came brilliant fireworks start- 
ling set-pieces, flaring rockets. Came 



Jacobs animal show 
lion interviewed by 
pretty girl reporter 




268 



THE MAGIC CITY 



a carnival parade of mummers from the Gayway. Came dancing 
in the streets to the music of strolling players, dancing in Festival 
Hall and the California Ballroom to cacophony of brass and sing- 
ing strings. Came the debut of Fairyland Fantasy, a nightly fea- 
ture that was to attract thousands throughout the '40 run. Came 
the hoarse bark of Gayway "pitchmen" on and on through the 
night. Came the last ferry to San Francisco, the final bus to Oak- 
land. Came at last Customer No. 123,368 home, and so to bed. 

And came to Treasure Island the dawn of a new era in which 
turnstiles were to hum a merry tune. 

For some reason or other, special "days" seemed to register 
less heavily on the public consciousness in '40 than had been 
the case in '39. True, the people directly concerned were quite 
as enthusiastic as before. But "days" in and of themselves, did 
not, by and large, attract the bulk of those who came to the 
Magic City. People came to the Island for entertainment in 1940, 
as an escape from the dreary picture of war and suffering brought 
Berkeley Boy Scouts them by newspapers and radio. Treasure Island's magic spell 
flir brought peace and forgetfulness, if only for a few brief hours. 




THE GOLDEN FORTIES 



269 



In order to "sell" the literary side of California to the Nation, 
the California Writers' Club sponsored "Literary Talks" at the 
Golden Gate International Exposition every Tuesday at 4 P. M. 
Many of the speakers had won international recognition for their 
literary accomplishments. Among these were Rupert Hughes, of 
Los Angeles, and Harold Lamb, of Hollywood. 

Dr. Suren S. Babington was chairman of the Exposition pro- 
gram. Eva Louise Blum was in charge of publicity. 

America's role as a peacemaker in a world harried by war 
was the theme of International Business Machines Day on May 
27, first special event of consequence on the schedule. Thomas 
J. Watson, president of I. B. M.; Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, presi- 
dent of Stanford University; Dr. Aurelia Henry Reinhart, presi- 
dent of Mills College, and Marshall Dill, president of the Exposi- 
tion, were chief speakers. Lawrence Tibbett and Grace Moore, 
singing with the San Francisco Symphony, made this a memora- 
ble occasion. 

It rained rather heavily the morning of Memorial Day, but 
the skies cleared by noon and 60,597 checked through the gates 
for the day. A review of the Cali- 
fornia Grays, a drill and concert by 
the San Rafael Military Academy, 
and a concert for War Mothers by 
the Exposition band contributed to 
the observation of the day. 

Moral Re-Armament devotees 
took over on June 1 , staging a Youth 
Parade from Court of Pacifica to 
Court of Honor, where a Peace 
Rally was held. The day was also set 
aside for Alameda County, with cer- 
emonies at Alameda-Contra Costa 
building and a reception and dinner 
in California Building. Girl Scouts 
added parade and pageantry. 

Sunday, June 2, was Music Day, 



Elsie Borden gets 
her first glimpse of 
the 1940 Exposition 




270 THE MAGIC CITY 

featuring the Bay Lutheran Chorus, the United Institute of 
Music, San Francisco Music Teachers Association, California 
Association of Teachers of Dancing and the Santa Cruz Male 
Chorus in recitals in various buildings. Redwood City staged its 
day at the same time, as did May wood (Los Angeles County), and 
O'Connor, Moffatt and Company. 

Crippled children from the Eastbay were given a most en- 
joyable tour of the Fair and shows on June 3. 

Hotel Day on June 6, drew hotel folk from all parts of the 
State. Two free round-trip tickets to Honolulu and a week's stay 
at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel were drawn by a lucky visitor. 

Military ceremonies marked the opening of the Federal 
Building for its 1940 run on June 8, with virtually all members 
of the foreign consular corps in San Francisco as honored guests 
of Commissioner George Creel. The Government was on full 
dress parade for the occasion. 

Hungarians from many sectors of the West celebrated Hun- 
garian Day on Sunday, June 9. Ira S. Lillick, Hungarian consul, 
delivered the principal address, followed by concerts in the after- 
noon and evening and a ball that night. 

National Flag Day, on the same date, featured the Pledge 
of Allegiance by thousands gathered in Federal Plaza before 
hundreds of unfurled National colors. A most impressive sight. 

Bank of America took over on Saturday, June 15, bringing 
thousands of employees from 495 branches throughout the State. 
The Order of Sciots descended on the Island in full "regimen- 
tals." Present also were Children of the American Revolution, 
Martinez Chamber of Commerce. The Czechoslovakia exhibit 
was dedicated. 

Next day was Ford Day, with a radio interview with Edsel 
Ford broadcast from New York to dealers and executives gath- 
ered in the Ford Building. Incidentally, the date marked the 
thirty-seventh anniversary of the founding of the Ford Motor 
Company. 

Portuguese nationals staged a colorful ceremony in the In- 
ternational Market Court in observance of Portugal Day. 



THE GOLDEN FORTIES 271 

Something new was attempted Bargain Day for Kids. Vir- 
tually all Gayway rides and concessions were available to young- 
sters under 18 for five cents. Proved a distinct success, such days 
were repeated at frequent intervals. 

Danes of the Bay district re-dedicated their allegiance to a 
temporarily vanquished country at the opening of the Danish 
Pavilion on June 22. A. Sporon-Fielder, consul-general of Den- 
mark, received full military honors and presided at the dedica- 
tory ceremonies. 

Chinese Village was dedicated formally by Chih Tseng Feng, 
consul-general of the Chinese Republic, on June 18, a national 
radio hook-up carrying his words. (Guests present will never 
forget the carving and subsequent consumption of a huge roast 



Swedish residents of the community held a pageant and en- 
tertainment in the California Coliseum. Salvation Army Day 
was observed in Temple of Religion and Festival Hall. Sheriff 
Gene Biscailuz brought his famous Mounted Posse to lead the 
parade in recognition of Los Angeles County Day. 

June 23 was Japan Day, among other specialties. The pro- 
gram included daylight fireworks, military review, a speaking 
program, a parade of colorful floats and costumed marchers. 
Later, Consul-General Toshito Satow was host at an elaborate 
reception in Japanese Pavilion. 

California Editors were guests of the Exposition and the 
California Commission for a full day on June 24. Highlight of 
Allied Construction Industries Day on June 25 was a banquet 
in California Ballroom. Garden lovers from California and out- 
of-state participated in an interesting program of events arranged 
for the National Plant, Flower and Fruit Guild on June 28. 

A program of all-Finnish music, folk dancing and dramatics 
marked observance of Finland Day on June 29. Proceeds of the 
entertainment went to the Finnish Relief fund. 

Special trains from all ten of the railroad's divisions began 
delivering consignments of Southern Pacific employees for a two- 
day celebration. In the Mission Trails building patio a "meri- 



272 



THE MAGIC CITY 



t 



enda," an old Spanish picnic, marked celebration of San Fran- 
cisco's 164th birthday. According to old custom, a huge birth- 
day cake was presented to the "commandante" (in this case, 
Major Raymond C. Lehman, Army liaison officer of the Expo- 
sition) to be cut by his sword. President Dill presided, and ad- 
dresses were heard from Dr. Herbert E. Bolton and Father 
Joseph Thompson of Los Angeles, representing the Mission- 
founding Franciscans. 

Attendance figures for the first month showed an increase 
of 200,000 over the same dates for 1939. The "Fun in Forty" 
theme seemed to be meeting with public approval. 

A most significant and impressive ceremonial was conducted 
on the great stage in Federal Plaza on the afternoon of July 1 . 
One hundred and fifty aliens were sworn into United States 
citizenship before Federal Judge A. F. St. Sure. The oath was 
administered and responses given in mass, and afterward the new 
citizens were honored by "taking the salute" of the Treasure 
Island Company at retreat. This ceremonial was one of the high 
points of "I Am An American Week," which was observed with 

special emphasis in the evening per- 
formance of "America! Cavalcade 
of a Nation." 

Units of the United States Army 
were busily engaged with intensified 
training programs; no naval vessels 
could be spared from patrol and 
other duties to appear over the holi- 
day in San Francisco Bay. Where- 
fore the July 4 celebration on Treas- 
ure Island fell to veteran organiza- 
tions, with the Treasure Island Com- 
pany lending official background. A 
48-gun salute at noon marked the 
celebration, the Island troops being 
reinforced for the occasion by two 
companies from San Francisco Pre- 



Folies Bergere girl 
has back-stage peep 
as the camera snaps 




THE GOLDEN FORTIES 



273 



sidio. Allied War Veterans staged drill and drum corps competi- 
tions, later participated in two big dances. The nightly fireworks 
display was augmented considerably for the holiday. 

France had fallen but the French colony of San Francisco 
carried on to observe July 14, "Fall of the Bastille Day." It was a 
solemn occasion and a sad one, marked by uniting the national 
colors of Czechoslovakia, Poland, Finland, Norway, Belgium, 
and the Netherlands with the tricolor of France in massed display 
on the California Coliseum stage. Singing of the indomitable 
"Marseillaise" brought a lump to many a throat. 

Simon Bolivar Day on July 24 was a gesture of Pan-American 
unity. Eulogies to the great South American patriot and hero 
were delivered by consular representatives of South American 
republics. 

July 25 was Ford Day, a nationwide delegation of Ford deal- 
ers being welcomed to the Exposition by ranking officials of the 
company, headed by Edsel Ford. 

General Motors Day was observed on July 27 with a special Umbrella routine 

,,., TUT T M T f Fair m Forty on 

entertainment program both in General Motors Building and on Federal Plaza stage 



274 



THE MAGIC CITY 



the Island at large a costume parade comprising a pageant of 
transportation, daylight and evening fireworks, a get-together for 
thousands of G. M. employees in California auditorium. 

The three-millionth visitor was checked in at just about the 
half-way mark of the 1940 run. For the same number of oper- 
ating days, the 1940 version had an increase of 691,769. For the 
same calendar period the gain for 1940 was 300,791. 

Governor Henry H. Blood and a delegation from Utah- 
Governor E. P. Carville and guests from Nevada. The special 
event program was proceeding according to established pattern. 

Came delegates to the convention of the National Association 
of Broadcasters, then just warming up for their battle with the 
American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers. Simul- 
taneous ceremonies at both New York and San Francisco Fairs 
were co-ordinated for an hour-long transcontinental broadcast, 
one of the most ambitious undertakings of record, on August 3. 
The theme of the program speakers included Marshall Dill 
BUI Monahan and for the Magic City, Harvey Gibson for New York and Neville 

Marshall Dill with ArM1 i r i -r. TI TT i TTI 

Ford (right) Miller, president ot the Broadcasters was a line by Walt Whit- 




276 THE MAGIC CITY 

man: "The liberties of the people are safe so long as there are 
tongues to speak and ears to hear." A permanent plaque was pre- 
sented the Exposition by the N. A. B., and subsequently they 
gathered in the California Ballroom for a banquet and a show 
of their own, in which the difficulties of radio with various agen- 
cies were outlined in broad humor. 

Crowded days of August passed swiftly. Highlights Ger- 
trude Lawrence Day -Temple of Religion Day Observance 
of the 150th anniversary of the founding of the United States 
Coast Guard Service Junior Musicians by the hundreds, play- 
ing in massed recital Buddhists' Day Insurance Day- 

The legendary "Paul Bunyan" came down from the redwood 
lumber country up Fort Bragg way Alta California Day 
Tennessee Day. 

August 24 the California Building burned. An unsched- 
uled "special event" that the management gladly would have 
avoided. 

That same day Elsie the Cow, pride and joy of the Borden 
company, made an appearance on the great stage in Federal Plaza 
with her offspring, Little Beulah. She had a glassed-in boudoir, 
her name and fame had been spread abroad, tens of thousands 
came to see her and, quite incidentally, the remains of the still- 
smouldering California Building. 

Clearing the Federal Plaza and Court of Nations of debris, 
of rescued art treasures and furniture, of tangled hose-lines was 
a herculean task. But it was accomplished on schedule. Promptly 
on the dot of appointed time, Elsie the Cow was duly greeted by 
President Dill. Some nineteen lines of hose were still stretched, 
several engines were still pumping. But the show went on. And 
continued to go on to the end, despite the handicap arising out 
of loss of one of the main centers of activity on the Island. 

Day succeeded day. Telephone Employees Underprivi- 
leged Children Poland Monterey and numerous others. 

Labor Day week-end, significant period in the show business. 
Total attendance for the three days, Saturday, Sunday and Mon- 
day: 248,296. 



THE GOLDEN FORTIES 



277 



The Improved Order of Red Men staged a significant pag- 
eant, "Building the Heart of an Empire" on September 1, with 
a large cast. 

Labor Day ceremonies were held in the Temple of Religion 
a rodeo in the California Coliseum was an added entertain- 
ment feature. 

The next week-end, September 7-9, brought Safeway Bar- 
gain Days. The year before a similar venture had produced the 
record attendance of 1939. This time the attendance was spread, 
but increased proportionately for a three-day total of 266,132. 

The five-millionth visitor arrived on Sunday, September 8. 
The six millionth was assured. And first estimates of the possi- 
bilities of a 1940 run had set four-and-a-half millions as the 
"must get" goal! 

Alaska Day Construction Industries Jubilee for four days. 

Pacific Gas 8c Electric Company entertained thousands of 
employees, friends and customers on September 14. 

California Music Festival carried on, despite inconvenience Thrills and comedy 

. . r , c , s-^> TC -1-11- entertained crowds 

arising out or loss or the California building. at the free circus 





278 THE MAGIC CITY 

Sunday, September 15 was San Francisco Day and Redwood 
Empire Day. A costumed parade of fraternal, civic, military and 
district organizations free shows fireworks aquatic events 
community singing and finally a free Grand Ball in now- 
overworked Festival Hall. Attendance was a gratifying 127,194, 
far greater than that on San Francisco Day of 1939. Obviously 
the City of Magic across the bay had taken the Forty Fair to its 
heart. 

Mexico took over on Sunday, August 18, and, in a colorful 
ceremony in the Latin-American Court, Consul-General Hector 
M. Escalona bestowed on William R. McWood, San Francisco 
attorney and former Olympic Club swimming champion, a 
Diploma of Distinguished Service from Mexico's government. 

September 21 found Wendell Willkie, Republican nominee 
for President of the United States, honored guest of the Exposi- 
tion. He was driven through cheering throngs, delivered an ad- 
dress of just the right length from the great stage in Federal 
Plaza, was hustled away across the bay bridge to fill other en- 
gagements in San Francisco. 

On September 22, next to the last Sunday, came among other 
features, Mother Lode and Old Timers' Day. Miners' Band from 
Sonora, Welsh Choir from Grass Valley, rock drillers from Jack- 
sonville and other mining centers. From Columbia came the 
venerable "Papete," famous hand-pump fire engine, to compete 
with its rival from San Andreas. "Papete" won, pumping both a 
longer and steadier stream. 

Contra Costa County Day and Fresno County Day helped to 
make a record Sunday attendance 134,197. 

The calendar was crowded that last week, the attendance 
grew daily. The six-million mark had long since been attained. 
Six million and a half was certain. Attendance for the six days 
preceding closing day mounted up to the amazing figure of 
452,574, a daily average of 90,429! 

And final day brought, fittingly enough, the greatest attend- 
ance of either year, 211,020. This for a yearly total of 6,545,796 
a grand total for the two years of 17,041,999. 



CHAPTER XIX 

tke. WoM. Gam* 



DRUM-BEATING FOR THE Big Show of 1939 began as soon as its 
financial foundation was secure. H. C. BottorfF was sent to Chi- 
cago, Cleveland, Dallas and other cities for information regard- 
ing Expositions and participants. Clyde M. Vandeberg was ap- 
pointed Director of Promotion and Publicity and, two years be- 
fore the Golden Gate International Exposition opened its gates, 
typewriters began to click, cameras began to snap and newspaper 
and magazine readers the country over began to note the spec- 
tacular rise of man-made Treasure Island from the shallows of 
the bay, and the birth of a "Magic City" of beauty and color 
where the world might escape from the trials of the moment. 

In keeping with its name, which Robert Louis Stevenson had 
created a half century before, a "Pirate Girl" was selected as an 
ambassador of good will to tour the country and issue the official 
invitations of the West to the World's Fair of '39. 

Zoe Dell Lantis, statuesque brunette, photogenic and an 
accomplished dancer, was taken out of the San Francisco Opera 
Ballet to be the "Theme Girl" of the Exposition. In her tat- 
tered pirate garb, she toured through the states, was photo- 
graphed with mayors and leading citizens as she delivered her 
official message from Treasure Island. Under the guiding hand 
of Carl Wallen, head of the photographic division, she became a 
familiar symbol of the Golden Gate International Exposition 
in the days when the Magic City was building and publicity 
material of an appealing nature was not to be had. 

Thousands of photographs of Zoe Dell appeared in news- 
papers and magazines throughout the country even in New York, 
where competition was keen with "The World of Tomorrow," 
all set for its grand premiere on Flushing Meadows. 



280 THE MAGIC CITY 

As the palaces and towers took form on Treasure Island and 
exhibits and concessions were ready for exploitation, the Promo- 
tion Department found an abundance of new material on hand 
to excite the interest of prospective visitors to the World's Fair 
of the West. But Zoe Dell had paved the way and the Promotion 
Department discovered that editors, by and large, preferred pic- 
tures of human interest to prosaic panoramas of walls and towers 
and statistical rhapsodies which lacked the personal touch. 

The Promotion Department was instructed to achieve three 
objectives: first, to support the sale of exhibit and concession 
space; second, to assist in the development of participation by 
cities, counties, states and foreign nations; and, third, to promote 
public interest in the Exposition and to foster this interest to 
the point where it would ripen into the greatest possible attend- 
ance. The third of these objectives was the main job. 

There was a Press Division to issue releases to newspapers, 
a Magazine Division to prepare articles for national and trade 
journals, an Advertising Division to cooperate with commercial 
interests in the promotion of travel to the San Francisco Bay 
area and a Radio Division for the development of programs and 
spot announcements to go out over the air. 

Every available medium was employed to tell the world of 
the treat in store. Billboards, car-cards, broadsides, lectures, films 
and slides, stickers, emblems, matchbooks, news and mat services, 
clip sheets, posters, folders . . . millions of words all carrying the 
same inspiring message . . . "Come to the Fair!" 

And the World Came 

Californians Inc. reported that 1,547,445 out-of-state visi- 
tors spent a total of $212,380,000 in California during the 254 
days of the 1939 Exposition. State statistics revealed that gasoline 
taxes increased by nearly two million dollars over the previous 
year and the bay bridge tolls gained nearly a million dollars. 
Railroad and bus traffic was up 25 per cent and air-line travel 
40 per cent. In the first six months of 1939 California did $376,- 
000,000 more business than in the same period of 1938. 

When the decision came to re-open the Exposition in 1940, 



281 

a new technique was inaugurated by Jack James, Director of 
Publicity and Promotion. Travel tabulations revealed the areas 
where the 1939 campaign had proved most successful. Compara- 
tively few releases were sent out broadcast. Those sections, how- 
ever, where the 1939 campaign had shown the most favorable 
results, were blanketed with stories and pictures, and with peri- 
odic mat releases of a definite news appeal. 

Freak stories, articles of human interest, feature yarns, and 
straight news coverage of daily events ... all brought tangible 
results in returns of clippings that were measured in bushel bas- 
kets. In the local newspapers alone, 96,640 column inches were 
devoted to the Fair in Forty, the equivalent of more than 600 
full pages. More than two hundred magazine articles were pub- 
lished with attractive picture layouts of the streamlined Pageant 
of 1940. 

And radio? Ten hundred and twenty-seven programs from 
the Island over the four-months period! Not a day passed by but 
the message went out over the ether waves "It's new, it's more 
beautiful Treasure Island is born again!" 

And, again, the World Came 

Out-of-state tourists swelled the totals compiled by Cali- 
fornians Inc. for the two-year period to 2,530,643 and the "new 
money" from visitors to $328,762,470. The figures, compared 
with totals for corresponding periods of 1938 which were con- 
sidered as "normal," indicated increases for the Exposition pe- 
riods of 586,916 or 30.2 per cent in number of tourists, and 
$71,599,925 or 27.8 per cent in tourist expenditures. On this 
basis of comparison the 1939 Exposition (254 days) had a net 
worth to California as a tourist attraction of $43,602,051, and 
the Fair in '40 (128 days), a worth of $27,997,874. 

Central and Northern California were visited by 79 per cent 
of the tourists in California during the Exposition periods. Num- 
bering 2,022,348, they spent in this region of the state $107,006,- 
454. Gains over 1938 periods were 707,308 or 53.8 per cent in 
tourists, and $40,610,634, or 61.1 per cent in expenditures. 

San Francisco Bay area entertained 60 per cent of the tourists 



282 



THE MAGIC CITY 



in California or 74.5 per cent of those who came into the north- 
ern region. They numbered 1,525,966, and their expenditures 
in the bay area amounted to $64,711,986. Gains over 1938 pe- 
riods were 585,370, or 62.2 per cent in tourists, and $34,501,461, 
or 1 14.2 per cent in expenditures. 

An account of exploitation of the '40 Fair would be inade- 
quate if it did not include mention of one of the leading figures 
in that program "Mrs. Sinbad," the peripatetic sea-going hen. 
Presumably "Mrs. Sinbad" arrived in the Port of Trade Winds 
during the March floods of that year, having ridden on a log 
down the Yuba and Sacramento rivers into the bay. Now it can 
be told. The original subject of the first photograph recording 
that historic journey was a stuffed model, borrowed from the 
Federal agricultural exhibit for the occasion. "Mrs. Sinbad" her- 
self was a plaintive Plymouth Rock biddy, hastily purchased in 
a San Francisco market to cover up what might otherwise have 
proved an embarrassing situation. 

The entertainment world would have lost a great actress to 
the stewpot, had another candidate been selected by chance to 

fill this exacting role. Never was 
there a more docile or co-operative 
model. She toured the Pacific Coast 
by air, by train, by high-powered 
automobile. She called on mayors 
and similar dignitaries, leaving 
golden eggs marked, through some 
inexplicable metabolism of her own 
devising, "GGIE '40!" Her name 
and fame and romantic origin were 
transmitted by wire, by radio, by 
wire-photo. She stopped traffic in 
Los Angeles, Seattle and Portland 
on personal appearance tours. 

A kindly woman in far-off Altu- 
ras sent her a mate to help wile away 
the long hours between engagements 



Mrs. Sinbad takes 
her original pose to 
boost the Fair in '40 




AND THE WORLD CAME 283 

a rough-tough individual who automatically was named "Bar- 
nacle Bill." They set up housekeeping and were moved to the 
Alta California Building after 1940 opening, that group having 
claimed the honor of exhibiting them as of right, since "Mrs. 
Sinbad" presumably came from Marysville. 

The two of them disappeared one night shortly thereafter. 
Their fate is shrouded in mystery to this day. Chicken-in-the- 
rough, or founders of a dynasty who shall say? But "Mrs. 
Sinbad" had served the cause, and served it nobly! 

When the Golden Gate International Exposition closed in 
1940, there were many regrets but there were also hosts of 
happy memories. After all, it was a dream city, and its beauty 
and color were not to last forever. Perhaps the best tribute was 
that of one of the rolling chair boys who had toiled day and 
night in all weathers and who knew every nook and corner of 
Treasure Island. He wrote its epitaph in a letter to The 
Chronicle. Here it is: 

THE FAIR FROM BEHIND A ROLLER CHAIR 
EDITOR, The Chronicle Sir: 

We saw a different death of the Fair yesterday than you did. 
To us Treasure Island was more than it could possibly have 
been to you, and more than we can ever express to you. She was 
our life, our living and our home. And then she was more than 
that . . . the "more" that we can't express to you. Everyone else 
on Treasure Island was either a guest or an employee. The em- 
ployees were stationed in one spot . . . the elephant trains wan- 
dered over the island in one path . . . the guards stayed in one 
court . . . we were all over the island, watching it live. The 
guests were our friends and we didn't mind them trespassing 
on our Island. You see, it was our Island. We were the rolling- 
chair boys. 

Every inch of Treasure Island was ours. We saw it all and 
we knew it all. Then, not being selfish, we showed it all to our 
guests. We showed it proudly, like a man showing his trophy case 
and explaining each trophy. We had a lot of friends, and all 
kinds of them. We had many invalids, for they found that we 



284 



THE MAGIC CITY 



knew that they wanted to see the Fair just as much as the next 
fellow; and they also found that we were willing to go through 
all kinds of high water to see that they did. Then we had folks 
who wanted company while they saw the Fair. We had some who 
wanted information, and lots of it. Some laughed as they pre- 
tended they were the "idle rich." Some were the "idle rich." 
We knew them all Eddie Cantor, the Norrisses, Joe Penner, 
Johnny Weissmuller, Mr. McCardle from Fresno, and Mr. Smith 
from East Oakland and they knew us ... by our first names. 
Then there was a bunch whose names we didn't know. 
Those were composed mostly of the people who tapped our 
shoulders and asked, "Where is the Palace of Fine Arts?" (You're 
right in front of it, Madame). "Is it true that they shoot the 
Clipper off those pillars up there?" (No, Ma'am, that's the Fed- 
eral Building). "Why didn't they put dahlias in this court? They 
would have been much more attractive." (I don't know). "Isn't 
it a shame they have to tear the bridges down when the Fair is 
over?" (censored), and . . . ? (You'll find one right in the end of 
Vacationland there, Ma'am). 

Then there was still another 
group free rides. I personally re- 
call: Herb Caen, who pushed me 
half way down the Gay way. I pushed 
him and Jerry the rest of the way 
(reason: H. Caen and J. Bundsen are 
fine fellows) ; the Boy Scout who had 
eaten four hot dogs, three bottles of 
pop, two candy bars and some dill 
pickles (reason: obvious); the little 
old lady who had misplaced her wed- 
ding ring while trying on souvenir 
rings in one of the souvenir stands 
(reason: . . .): the girl in the Federal 
Plaza show who had hurt her ankle 
on the stage (reason: she was a swell 
person and her ankle hurt); more 



Barnacle Bill and 
his shouse at home 
in "Alta California" 




AND THE WORLD CAME 285 

than one pretty girl (reason: company); and lots and lots of others 
(reason: why not?) 

There were all our friends, and there was our own family with 
its parties and its strikes, its fights and its fun. Then there was 
something else there was a Fair asleep and a Fair awakening. 
We saw the Court of Reflections when the Aquacade barker was 
silent and the lights were out; we slept on Jo Jo's Candy House 
stage when we missed the last bus; we saw the unlighted Tower 
of the Sun in heavenly discourse with the stars; we played "Chop- 
sticks" on the carillon at 7 a.m.; we saw Pacifica overlooking a 
sleeping Fair, refusing to close her eyes until even we retired 
for the night; she was our guardian. 

Then we saw the Fair in rain and in storm. We sloshed 
through the rain to deposit comparatively dry charges onto a 
dripping ferryboat. We braced ourselves -against the wind and 
prayed that at least one person would brave the Island and take 
a ride. We pinned our coats high around our necks and still 
caught colds from the penetrating San Francisco fog. And we 
loved it all. 

Sure we argued with customers over price. Some thought 
we robbed them; that w r e made piles of money every day. Some 
days we did make ten or twelve dollars. And some days . . . we 
lost two or three. Many customers thanked us. We liked that. 
We razzed the elephant trains and filled the shows. We crashed 
gates pretending to be guards and we loaned (gave) money to 
kids who had spent their ferryboat money and tried to sell us 
watches without minute hands to get that necessary nickel. 

And that's our Fair; the one we remember. We didn't go 
home with the rest of the people last night. We waited until 
everyone was gone and then remembered our Fair and our 
guests. We always will. 

DixoN 7 GAYER 
San Francisco 




ZOE DELL LANTIS 

1939 Theme Girl of Treasure Island 



CHAPTER XX 

Guitain 



No MAN CAN tether time. The authorities are all agreed on 
this point. 

Banal as the statement may appear in cold type, it is none- 
the-less a fact that closing days of the Exposition were drawing 
painfully near almost before anyone could realize what had hap- 
pened to the crowded weeks of summer. 

A sort of "whispering campaign" was undertaken by friends 
and well-wishers, whether intentionally or otherwise, calling for 
a continuance of the scheduled run through the month of Oc- 
tober. To counteract this, the management fostered a publicity 
campaign of its own, emphasizing the definite and final closing 
date. "Treasure Island closes forever September 29" was the 
reiterated message. Eventually the clients came to believe that 
the management meant what it kept saying, and the influx of 
attendance those final days was highly gratifying. 

How to draw the final curtain? It was a problem that occu- 
pied the best minds, from the Executive Committee down 
through the General Management to the Special Events depart- 
ment, the Entertainment division, the Promotion department 
and all others held responsible. Should it end on a dragging 
"Auld Lang Syne" note or on an "up beat?" Should there be 
more pageantry and pulchritude (what, again?), or should there 
be a touch of dignity, even solemnity? 

It was Robert C. Coleson, director of radio and public ad- 
dress, who finally came up with the prime concept. He offered 
a radio show, a montage treatment that should take in the 
Golden Gate International Exposition from the first thought 
of its creation to the last day of is existence. He proposed that 
this radio show should be produced on the great stage in Fed- 



288 THE MAGIC CITY 

eral Plaza, before a "studio audience" of as many thousands as 
could be accommodated, the while national networks carried 
the words, music and sound-effects to millions of listeners the 
country over. He pointed out that visual episodes could be added 
readily, to be staged while the narration proceeded. He admitted 
that preparation of such a script and direction of such a per- 
formance entailed both financial expense and expenditure of 
much time and effort, but promised that he, his assistant Jack 
Joy, and their staff would turn out the show if the management 
would turn loose with a budget. 

And so it came to pass. Coleson went into a research huddle 
with his ace script writers, Glenn Wheaton and Janet Baird. 
Joy reassembled his orchestra and whipped up musical conti- 
nuity. Earl Darfler, who had resigned earlier in the month, re- 
turned to stage-manage the episodic interpolations. Major Keat- 
inge took charge of arrangements, including authority over the 
invitation list. All who had had a part in making possible the 
Golden Gate International Exposition of 1939 and 1940 were 
called into consultation, and many were subsequently called to 
rehearsal for the final public appearance. 

Came the night of September 29, and 85,000 persons were 
jammed about Federal Plaza and standing in close packed ranks 
on the outskirts. The public address system carried every word 
to many thousands more throughout the Island. Over the facili- 
ties of the National Broadcasting Company, the Columbia 
Broadcasting System, the Mutual Broadcasting System and in- 
dependent stations, the development of the saga of Treasure 
Island was followed by millions. 

Governor Olson was present on the platform for this, the 
culmination of one of the great achievements of his administra- 
tion. Marshall Dill, President of the 1940 Exposition, was there 
to deliver a final word even as he had sounded the first keynote 
for '40 four months before. No "last act" ever played to a larger 
audience, no curtain ever fell on a more complete and moving 
epilogue. 

How better to depict that performance, to rehearse the many 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 291 

and varied circumstances which led to the creation of the Magic 
City how better to catch the spirit of the Exposition that was 
in '39 and that lived again for four gay months in '40 than to 
print the script from which the actors, in person and as mum- 
mers of the air, read their lines? Here it is, in type for the 
first time 

ANNOUNCER: The Golden Gate International Exposition and the California Com- 
mission present the story of Treasure Island. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

NARRATOR: (Slowly, with deep feeling) The Story of Treasure Island. Where the 
tide once ruled, tonight she stands . . . and she will always stand. Not sand, not 
rock and steel and stone, but stronger than all of these . . . for Treasure Island was 
born in the hearts and minds and souls of men in a country so great and free. The 
story of Treasure Island ... a story of those who crossed her path . . . the men who 
dream and the men who toil and sweat and build. A tribute to everyone . . . great 
and small . . . who gave this great adventure something of themselves. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

ANNOUNCER: February 25th, nineteen hundred and thirty-three!!! 

NARRATOR: Into the office of the San Francisco News walks one Joseph Ellsmore 
Dixon, native son, salesman and a man with an idea . . . 

DIXON: San Francisco's building the two greatest bridges in the world . . . and the 
day is not far off when a third bridge, huge Clipper ships, will link San Francisco 
with the Orient and Asia. This Bay Area, I tell you, is mighty! It has grown, and 
will continue to grow, and we ought to tell the whole world about it! 
(Pause) I think San Francisco ought to stage a great World's Fair! 

VOICES: (Pause and then slowly, musingly) Well-I-I . . . Why not? Why not? (Off 
mike and louder) Why not? (Farther off mike and louder) Why not? 

MUSIC: (Coming in with Agitato to build up with ensuing montage.) (Moving off 
mike and lines "Why not, why not, why not?" in chorus building to musical climax.) 

NARRATOR: (On cue) As every lovely flower is first a humble, tiny seed that must 
take root in fertile soil, be nourished and cared for and cultivated, so did Joseph 
Dixon's vision of a great World's Fair begin to grow. 

VOICE: Editorial! . . . 

VOICE 2: This newspaper endorses Mr. Dixon's idea to have San Francisco sponsor 
a World's Fair . . . recommends city-wide consideration of the plan . . . 

SOUND: Rap, rap, rap of gavel. 

ANNOUNCER: 1934! 

MAN: Motion made and seconded that the Sunrise Breakfast Club go on record that 
San Francisco stage a World's Fair . . . (fading off mike) ... to celebrate the two 
great bridges and to tell the world of western progress, industry, travel, recreation . . . 

VOICES: (Shout) All in favor? ! ! (several) Aye! (Shout) No? . . . Carried! 

SOUND: Rap, rap, rap of gavel. 

MAN: Motion carried . . . that the South of Market Boys heartily endorse a World's 
Fair to be held in San Francisco . . . 

SOUND: Background rapping of gavel, not constant but spaced throughout narrator's 
ensuing beginning lines, cut when music sneaks in. 

NARRATOR: Meeting after meeting of San Francisco's civic, improvement, merchant 



292 THE MAGIC CITY 

and social groups . . . and like fire in the dry autumn, the World's Fair idea grew 
hot and strong and spread across the city. Junior and Senior Chambers of Com- 
merce . . . informal little groups meeting in small rooms above San Francisco's 
famous streets in old North Beach, along the water front, along Market Street and 
in every nook and corner of the city by the Golden Gate. Men's groups and women's 
organizations. 

MUSIC: (San Francisco sneaking in.) 

NARRATOR: And once again the city which men may leave but never forget, where 
tradition still marches at the side of progress, stirred with the rumblings of this 
new chance to bid for the spotlight of all the nations throughout the world . . . 
the city proud of her people, a people proud of their city. 
SAN FRANCISCO! 

MUSIC: San Francisco up and to finish. 

SOUND: Fade in crowd noise. 

ANNOUNCER: 1934! 

NARRATOR: Responding to the will of a people audacious enough to tackle the crea- 
tion of the world's two greatest bridges at the same time, Angelo Joseph Rossi, 
carnation-wearing mayor of San Francisco, aided by dynamic city administrator 
Alfred John deary, appointed a Citizen's Committee to probe this new business of 
staging a great World's Fair. Out of that Citizen's Committee came men whose 
names will linger on among the memories that Treasure Island has etched in the 
hearts of millions. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

ANNOUNCER: 1935! 

MUSIC: Maestoso March (Fade to) 

NARRATOR: (On cue) Man's greatest task is the conversion of his finest dreams into 
living reality. The visions, and dreams and thoughts are great only when men use 
them as inspiration, and change them, as the chemist makes the tangible from the in- 
tangible, into something that all mankind can see, and touch, and use. To Architect 
George William Kelhani, and to Engineer William Peyton Day, went the task of 
finding a site for this World's Fair that was conceived, but as yet far from created. 

MUSIC: Agitato (Sneak in) 

NARRATOR: In spite of differences of opinion, engineer and architect Day and Kel- 
ham patiently, methodically, carry on their work, and turn to a spot that four years 
before, the San Francisco Junior Chamber of Commerce had suggested as a future 
downtown airport for the Northern Pacific Coast. 

VOICES: Can you imagine that!!! Surveying the Yerba Buena Shoals for a world's fair 
site . . . Yeah! . . . Gonna have a floating fair! . . . (Derisive laughter) (Fade out). 

MUSIC: Out. 

NARRATOR: With funds allotted to the Citizens' Committee for San Francisco's 
World's Fair, Kelham and Day take soundings over a mile square stretch of water off 
the Yerba Buena Shoals. 

SOUND: Croii'd noise, fade in. 

VOICES: Why it's 30 feet deep a mile out! . . . Take you ten years to dredge her out! 
. . . And then the tides wear it away again . . . We built the two greatest bridges, 
didn't we? . . . Somebody's crazy to think of turnin' water into dry land . . . But 
it would be a wonderful spot for a World's Fair! . . . And a marvelous airport . . . 
right downtown almost! . . . How'd you get from the bridge to the Island? Huh? 

SOUND: Crowd noise up, and blend with airplane fading to 

NARRATOR: But San Francisco has always played stakes for millions . . . has loved 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 293 

the impossible, the daring, the audacious, and perhaps the thought of creating the 
largest island man had ever built . . . with voices raised to say, "It can't be done" 
. . . served only to give the Press this story. 

NEWSBOY: Extra . . . Extra ... All about the Fair. (Fading) All about the Fair. 

SOUND: (Airplane up and out.) 

NARRATOR: With Mr. and Mrs. San Francisco supporting a World's Fair on an 
island yet to be torn from the bottom of San Francisco Bay, two men accept the 
task of touching Uncle Sam for a few million dollars to begin the mighty job. 

(Strings sustained low "G" throughout the following sequence.) 

PAGE: Mr. Cutler and Mr. Creel to see the President. 

2 VOICES: Thank you. 

SOUND: Close doors. 

VOICES: Say, wasn't that George Creel that went in to see the President? . . . Yeah. 
Handled propaganda during the World War. Who's the other fellow? . . . Lei and 
Cutler, President of the San Francisco World's Fair . . . You don't mean it? When 
are they going to hold that? . . . That's probably being settled behind those closed 
doors right now. 

SOUND: Doors open. 

ROOSEVELT: (Laughs) George, you and Lee are thinking about a World's Fair, but 
I'm thinking airport. 

MUSIC: (Bridge). 

NARRATOR: To one Leland W. Cutler, first President of the Golden Gate Interna- 
tional Exposition, and to one George Creel, its United States Commissioner, who 
so clung to their task that many said they became commuters between San Francisco 
and the Nation's Capitol a salute for a great day that brought to first dawn of life 
an island destined to be known throughout the world as Treasure Island. 

MUSIC: (Up to finish). 

ANNOUNCER: February, 1936. 

CUTLER: (Fading in) And so, gentlemen, the period of negotiation has ended. Work 
. . . actual work, may begin at once. From PWA and WPA, a sum in excess of six 
million dollars has been granted, contingent upon the use of the Exposition site as 
a San Francisco municipal air terminal . . . 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

NARRATOR: Beneath the shadow of the mighty Bay Bridges . . . another mighty 
task begins ... to wrest from God the mud and sand buried beneath His tides 
and waves . . . 

MUSIC: Maestoso fade to 

VOICES: America her Government . . . Her Army engineers . . . Her industry . . . 
Her labor . . . Dredges pumping black sand . . . Day and night . . . Day and 
night . . . Day and night . . . Day and night . . . Day and night . . . Day and 
night . . . (Fade) Day and night . . . Dredges working . . . Twenty million cubic 
yards . . . Island getting bigger . . . Going's getting tougher . . . Mud and muck 
... A mile of mud . . . Tides a-washin' ... In and out! . . . Machinery and 
engineers . . . Men, men, more men . . . Dollars, millions of 'em ... A World's Fair 
... An airport . . . Day by day . . . Month by month . . . A-workin' and a- 
sweatin' . . . Swell view from here, ain't it? Somebody's crazy! They'll never plant 
trees and flowers in this ground . . . Mud and salt . . . Raining! . . . Raining! 
Raining! Raining . . . raining . . . raining . . . raining. (Fade, etc.) 

VOICES: Ferry slips are nearly done . . . Digging foundations for airplane hangars! 
Pan American's going to set its Clipper ships down here . . . Man, machines and 



294 THE MAGIC CITY 

shovels! . . . Earth torn from the ocean floor! . . . Mortar, clay, cement, fulfilling 
dreams of men. 

MUSIC: (Up and out.) 

NARRATOR: The sun came out to dry this new Island off the Yerba Buena Shoals, 
and joined the fever heat of organization to build, to sell and promote the World's 
Fair of Western America. 

ANNOUNCER: 1937! 

NARRATOR: Long before the eighteen months' task of building the Island was done, 
President Leland W. Cutler's emissaries were combing the Nation, and all the na- 
tions bordering the Pacific. 

MUSIC: (Latin American music.) 

VOICE 1: (Spanish Accent) Si, si, Senor . . . The Government of Peru is happy to accept 
the invitation of the Golden Gate International Exposition. 

MUSIC: (Up and fade.) 

VOICE 2: ... and sees in your World's Fair an opportunity to further human happi- 
ness and the brotherhood of Nations. 

MUSIC: (Up and fade.) 

NARRATOR: (On cue) The land of the gaucho . . . Argentina accepts . . . we'll build 
a great pavilion of glass and steel . . . 

MUSIC: (Up and fade.) 

Colombia . . . Chile . . . Ecuador. 

VOICE 1: Mighty Brazil will build a pavilion . . . will serve her coffee and play her 
famous music . . . 

MUSIC: (Up and fade.) 

NARRATOR: Guatemala and Panama ... El Salvador . . . Mexico. 

MUSIC: (Up and fade.) 

NARRATOR: Plans forged ahead ... for palaces that would sparkle like stars that 
line the milky way . . . houses of industry, of science, of medicine . . . palaces to show 
the great farm products of all the West . . . plans for beauty that would live beyond 
its death . . . magic carpets of flowers and lights that would do man's bidding, as 
did Aladdin's Lamp. Month after month, more of the Nations throughout the 
\Vorld sent word that when the great day came they would be a vivid, living part 
of the spectacle on San Francisco Bay. 

MUSIC: (International cue.) 

VOICES: France and Italy . . . Japan . . . Norway . . . Johore . . . Netherlands-East 
Indies . . . Australia and Indo-China . . . New Zealand . . . our own Hawaii . . . The 
Philippines . . . 

MUSIC: (Full and out.) 

NARRATOR: The World had heard and had replied. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

NARRATOR: Governor Merriam sets up the California Commission. Five million dol- 
lars are allotted to place the Golden State in the spotlight of the \Vorld ... to 
show her fabulous counties . . . her history . . . her agriculture, livestock, travel, and 
recreation, to play a vital, leading role in this daring venture on San Francisco Bay. 

MUSIC: "California Here I Come" Segue Allegro Cue. 

NARRATOR: One forgotten day, Clyde M. Vandebere. young, curlv-haired director 
of publicity, sits with other young men, who are his right hands of press, maga- 
zines, radio, photography . . . 

SOUND: (Small crowd noise.) 

VOICE: It's a name the whole world knows already . . . People will say we stole it 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 295 

from Robert Louis Stevenson . . . But it's perfect describes the Island and the Fair 
. . . (thoughfully) Hmmmmmmm . . . Treasure Island . . . (Slightly louder) Treasure 
Island . . . boys . . . that's it ... Treasure Island! 

MUSIC: (Up and out.) Segue Agitato Fade to 

NARRATOR: Often in this Twentieth Century, the problem of advertising real estate, 
oranges, and ocean playgrounds is best solved by lovely girls, and so it was with 
Treasure Island. In the same little publicity office, cluttered with typewriters, blue 
pencils and black coffee came, where the name Treasure Island was born the second 
time, a brain-storm caused a beautiful young woman, Zoe Dell Lantis, to listen to 
instruction from Publicity Man Vandeberg . . . 

LANTIS: I'm to wear this? Why ... it hardly covers me. 

VANDEBERG: All you have to do Miss Lantis, is wear that pirate costume and sell 
Treasure Island to every city in the Nation. Travel and see the country . . . You 
don't like it, huh? 

LANTIS: Like it ... I love it ... when do I leave? 

MUSIC: Agitato up and fade to 

SOUND: Train, airplane, automobile, etc. 

Fade to Narrator, on cue: Zoe Dell Lantis, photogenic in her tattered buccaneer's cos- 
tume, became Treasure Island's Pirate Girl in a thousand American cities. Amazing, 
uncanny, was the fact that wherever went the Pirate Girl, there was a camera and 
flash bulb waiting. 

ANNOUNCER: Oregon. 

NARRATOR: Pirate Girl rolls logs in a lumber mill pond. 

ANNOUNCER: Wyoming. 

NARRATOR: Treasure Island's Pirate Girl stunt rides in rodeo. 

ANNOUNCER: New York City. 

NARRATOR: Pirate Girl poses with Fiorella LaGuardia. 

LaGUARDIA: Zoe Dell, you tell that Mayor of yours, Rossi, to think up some excuse 
for me to take a trip out there to Treasure Island. 

VOICE 1: Fifty thousand pictures . . . seventy-five . . . (Music fades out) . . . thousand 
miles . . . Treasure Island's Pirate Girl became the Nation's most photographed 
young beauty. 

NARRATOR: Meanwhile Publicity Dynamo Vandeberg was hammering on the office 
doors of Governors' offices in all the Western States, and getting acceptances. 

ANNOUNCER: 1938! 

NARRATOR: Treasure Island's huge Administration Building, stone and steel heart 
of the future West's mightiest airport is completed, and before a banquet of a 
thousand civic leaders from all the West, America's number one citizen makes a 
famous statement . . . 

ROOSEVELT: When you people out here in the West do a thing you seem to do it 
better than anyone else in the world. 

SOUND: Roar of applause. 

MUSIC: National Emblem March. 

NARRATOR: Hectic months were those of 1938. To hundreds of Treasure Island 
officials, to thousands of sweating workmen builders, painters, electricians, gar- 
deners, work became a sleepless nightmare, ruled over by the deadline day, February 
18th, 1939. As that day approached, a meeting was held in the office of the individual 
who as much as any one man helped to mould an idea into a gigantic city of pleasure 
on the world's greatest man-made Island . . . President Leland W. Cutler. 

VOICE 1: Major O. F. J. Keatinge, reporting on foreign participation. 



296 THE MAGIC CITY 

KEATINGE: Since November, 1936, when President Roosevelt issued the proclama- 
tion inviting the Nations of the earth to participate in America's official 1939 World's 
Fair of the Pacific, the Governments of foreign countries have looked forward with 
increasing interest to participating in the Golden Gate International Exposition. So 
great has been the response to invitations ... so thorough are the displays these 
nations have sent here, that I am satisfied, more than satisfied, that Treasure Island's 
four hundred acres can provide every man with a tour of the World . . . that this 
Exposition will be an international exposition where each nation offers its good 
works, and its friendship, to all nations. 

CUTLER: Thank you, Major Keatinge . . . yours was a big job . . . and you did it as 
we knew you would . . . 

VOICE 1: Mr. F. M. Sandusky, reporting on exhibits. 

SANDUSKY: Gentlemen, more than 350 outstanding American industries are exhibit- 
ing at the Exposition, either in their own building, or with splendid displays in the 
great exhibit halls that radiate from the Tower of the Sun. All who may doubt 
the progress that industry and labor have created in these United States may see, 
at this Exposition, the material benefits of living and of working in a free democracy. 

VOICE 1: Mr. William Day, director of public works. 

DAY: Treasure Island will be physically complete on opening day, February 18th. The 
six great blocks of exhibit palaces, one million square feet, are ready. And, with 
Julius Girod and the beloved John McLaren, we have actually given Treasure Island 
a bath, pumping millions of gallons of fresh water through the soil to remove the 
salt. Treasure Island will be a paradise of flowers. 

VOICE 1: Vandeberg and publicity. 

VANDEBERG: We believe that through wonderful cooperation from the Press, the 
magazines and radio, and from industry and its advertising, Treasure Island is 
better publicized than the Forty-Nine Gold Rush. 

VOICE: Executive Secretary H. C. Bottorff on finance. 

BOTTORFF: You already know the story of the splendid Federal participation. To 
that vital beginning has been added over six million, four hundred fifty thousand 
dollars raised by business and industrial interests in the Bay Area; five million dollars 
from the State of California; one million dollars from the Western States; two million 
dollars more for exhibits of the United States Government, and approximately six 
million dollars advance revenue received from Foreign Governments, exhibitors, con- 
cessionnaires, ticket sales and so forth. Our financial structure is sound and assures 
the opening of the Exposition. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

NARRATOR: From every city, state and county in America, and all over the world 
. . . proving the amazing interest in this, the ninth world fair in six years ... a half 
million people submit names for Treasure Island's amusement zone . . . 

RADIO ANNOUNCER: (Fading in) Good evening listeners everywhere in the West . . . 
from this microphone in the headquarters of the Golden Gate International Exposi- 
tion we are going to bring you, in just a second, a thousand dollar name that twentv 
million Americans will be speaking during 1939. Remember the Pike at the 1906 
St. Louis Exposition . . . The Zone at our own 1915 Fair . . . 

VOICE 1: One moment, please . . . 

ANNOUNCER: The name is ... "THE GAYWAY!" 

MUSIC: Gayway music. 

SOUND: Sirens, whistles, bells and stuff. 

ANNOUNCER: Februarv 18th, 1939. 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 297 



MUSIC: Fanfare (16 bar fanfare, 1939.) 

ANNOUNCER: High noon on Treasure Island, and by radio to all the Nation, and 
to the countries around the World, we bring you the official opening ceremonies of 
the Golden Gate International Exposition . . . 

NARRATOR: And here is your host, Mr. Leland W. Cutler, President of this World's 
Fair of Western America . . . 

SOUND: Applause. 

CUTLER: (with feeling) I have waited four years for this moment, waited as a mother 
waits for her child's first step . . . waited as a man who builds an ocean-going ship 
. . . and with bated breath, watches it slide down into the water. Today our Expo- 
sition which we have been building, becomes your Exposition. Treasure Island is 
offered today, upon the altar of greater peace, and greater good will, among all the 
nations, among all the races. 

MUSIC: Male chorus "The Bells of Treasure Island." 

NARRATOR: And to Treasure Island where thousands pack this Federal Plaza, came 
another message on California's greatest day of '39 ... this message from far-off 
Florida, in a tiny broadcasting room aboard a titan of the United States Navy . . . 

ROOSEVELT: As the boundaries of human intercourse are widened by giant strides 
of trade and travel, it is of vital import that the bonds of human understanding 
be maintained, enlarged and strengthened rapidly. Unity of the Pacific nations is 
America's concern and responsibility . . . their onward progress deserves now a rec- 
ognition that will be a stimulus as well. May this, America's World's Fair on the 
Pacific, in 1939, truly serve all nations in symbolizing their achievements of all the 
ages past . . . and in amalgamating their destinies . . . one with every other through 
all the ages to come. 

NARRATOR: (Powerfully) You remember that day, February 18th, 1939? The dream 
of a few men, now the possession of all men! Treasure Island's moment had come! 
It now belonged to the world. 

VOICE: Culbert L. Olson, Governor of the Golden State . . . 

GOVERNOR: As Governor of the State of California, it is much more than an honor 
to invite you, the nation, to visit with us here on Treasure Island. Somehow, we of 
California and the West look upon this Exposition as our opportunity to repay the 
people of an entire nation for what they have given to us ... for our West is not 
mighty merely because of its mountains, its limitless desert, its great valleys which 
send food to the whole world . . . but rather because it is a great melting pot into 
which this free land has poured thousands of souls, who believed that America's 
frontiers can ever be expanded. Today, proud of Treasure Island, another great 
Western achievement, we also give thanks, to this nation, for our heritage. 

VOICE: The Mayor of San Francisco . . . the Honorable Angelo J. Rossi! 

ROSSI: (Measured) The West has given to San Francisco the honor and responsibility 
of forging the beginnings of the Golden Gate International Exposition, and to act 
as host city in welcoming the world to participate in a celebration dedicated to the 
future of the Pacific Empire. As Chief Executive of "The City That Knows How," I 
assure you that your journey to Treasure Island will be worth while, your visit filled 
with hours of entertainment and interest and your memory stored with pleasure. 

NARRATOR: That day, February 18th, 1939 ... a man's voice went to his native land 
which he had not seen in many a day. Dean of the Consular Corps in San Francisco, 
handsome son of golden Peru Senor Fernando Berckemeyer's message of good will 
between North and South America, flashed by short-wave radio to North and South 
America . 



298 THE MAGIC CITY 

CONSUL: In the life of every man there comes one great moment. / have met that 
moment today. Treasure Island is good proof that dreams are not in vain . . . and 
perhaps what we find here many nations, all races and colors and creeds of man- 
kind may mean that another dream may some day be not in vain ... a world 
fashioned from the lovely picture of Treasure Island. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

NARRATOR: The world that was Treasure Island, on February 18th, 1939, saw these 
nations in review. 

MUSIC: Grand March. (At this point girls representing the different governments par- 
ticipating pass in review and are identified as they present themselves.) 

NARRATOR: In this parade of nations, as in Treasure Island's countless parades in 
'39 and '40 ... parades of civic, fraternal and social groups . . . cities and counties 
and states . . . the trim, brightly clad Treasure Island Band under the direction of 
Ralph Murray, played a colorful, leading role. And so came to a close the opening 
day of ceremonies of Treasure Island an island dedicated to peace and good will 
among the Nations of the World. 

MUSIC: "America" fade to 

MINISTER: Our Father, who art in Heaven, bless this day . . . bless this Island, symbol 
of peace and good will among all men . . . watch over, and preserve this Nation . . . 
grant us always the privilege of great dreams . . . (fade) . . . give us always, as we 
have today, the strength and the courage to strive for progress and achievement . . . 

MUSIC: America Up to finish (Chorus Sings.) 

NARRATOR: Following that momentous day in 1939, the people began to poke into 
every nook and corner of Treasure Island ... to see the flowers, to walch the magic 
lights, the beaver in the Oregon exhibit, the baby kangaroo from Australia ... to 
listen as lucky folks won free long distance calls; chatting with polile soldiers ex- 
plaining bombers and national defense. And there: 

MUSIC: (Sanborn specialty.) 

VOICE: Do you remember . . . 

NARRATOR: Cavalcade of the Golden West. 

CAVALCADE NARRATOR: 1862 and the cry of "Westward Ho!" again is heard 
from Coast to Coast . . . but now the cry is for stronger ties, for bands of steel to 
bridge the wilderness, joining East with West for the nation of tomorrow. From the 
East in Council Bluffs starts the Union Pacific, and from the Pacific Coast in Sacra- 
mento, the strong men of the Central Pacific, Stanford, Huntington, Hopkins, and 
the Crockers, begin with Engineer Judah, the incredible task of scaling the High 
Sierra. Finally, on May 10th, 1869, at Promontory Point in Utah, the rival roads 
come together, as the nation stops to watch . . . 

VOICE: And here, ladies and gentlemen, is the President of the Central Pacific Rail- 
road, with a spike of pure gold, which he will drive into the last tie, made of Cali- 
fornia laurel. I present Governor Leland Stanford of California. 

SOUND: Applause. 

STANFORD: ... we should tender thanks to God for tlie completion of this great 
work, and pray that the way is now made ready for the next chapter in the glowing 
history of the West. Following these rails of steel will come the pioneers of the 
industrial frontier . . . the builders who will create America's new Empire in the 
Golden West. 

SOUND: Tapping of spike. 

SOUND: Locomotive whistles. 

SOUND: Big crowd noise. 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 299 

CAVALCADE NARRATOR: Thus, the meeting of the rails, May 10th, 1869, and the 
bridging of our own industrial age with the romantic days of the trappers, the mis- 
sionaries, the covered wagons, and the Pony Express. Thus the CAVALCADE OF 
THE GOLDEN WEST! 

MUSIC: Fanfare Segue to classical selection. 

NARRATOR: (Cue) One of the greatest exhibits on Treasure Island was the Palace of 
Fine and Decorative Arts, guided by Dorothy Wright Liebes, Dr. Langdon Warner, 
Dr. Walter Heil, and Roland J. McKinney. Paintings that heretofore had been only 
legends and tiny reprints in cultural magazines, were now on Treasure Island . . . 
Botticelli's "Birth of Venus" . . . Raphael's "Madonna of the Chair" . . . the works of 
Michelangelo . . . Titian, Tintoretto and Donatello. The finest arts of the 48 states 
. . . Cothic tapestries, Renaissance sculptures ... a Palace more priceless than the 
palaces of a hundred kings. Another invaluable contribution to the beauty and joy 
of this Exposition has been that of the Women's Board, under the chairmanship of 
Mrs. George T. Cameron, working faithfully from the difficult days of 1936 . . . the 
building of the Yerba Buena club . . . assuming the leadership in entertainment, in 
social affairs that made this Treasure Island more friendly, more human, more real. 

MUSIC: Up to full and finish segue drums. 

NARRATOR: As Treasure Island and 1939 rolled on, summertime's gala new re- 
opening ushered in a new General Manager, Doctor Charles Henry Strub . . . 

VOICE: Flying today from Southern California to spend this last night upon Treasure 
Island . . . Doctor Charley Strub . . . 

STRUB: Many men have served Treasure Island. I was among that fortunate group. 
Each of us was proud to serve in his own humble way . . . and as I look back, tonight, 
I realize that we felt a privilege in serving . . . for we served something bigger than 
the biggest of men . . . something more than men. The contribution to Treasure 
Island which I was able to make will be lived over again at this moment . . . and 
I deeply appreciate having Time turned back, to let me live those days over once 
again . . . 

NARRATOR: Dr. Charles Henry Strub brought with him brilliant new entertainment 
to serve youth and to serve the old, with young ideas. A parade of stars . . . Edgar 
Bergen and Charlie McCarthy, Bing Crosby, Jack Benny, Jack Haley and Rubinoff , 
and a parade of music. The greatest parade of name bands ever assembled in one 
season. A parade that was lead by the King of Swing, Benny Goodman. 

MUSIC: One Chorus of a Benny Goodman number. 

NARRATOR: Second in the line of march in this great parade of America's name 
bands came another. Who was it? Don't you know? Students? . . . 

EVERYBODY SAY: Kay Kyser. 

MUSIC: Kay Kyser Chorus fade to 

VOICES: What will be the darkest place on San Francisco Bay the night of September 
30th? . . . Uh-huh . . . Students . . . ? Treasure Island ! ! ! 

MUSIC: Kyser Chorus up to finish. 

NARRATOR: Temple Compound saw bands to suit the taste of everyone. Hot . . 
sweet . . . rhythmic . . . and smart ... the last of which was perhaps best exemplified 
by that king of the ivories . . . Eddie Duchin. 

MUSIC: Chorus Duchin number. 

NARRATOR: An old timer was not to be denied . . . with his clarinet and his hat with 
a silver lining, he was there to ask: 

VOICE: Is everybody happy? 

MUSIC: Chorus of Ted Lewis number. 



300 THE MAGIC CITY 

NARRATOR: And on they came . . . George Olsen, Smilin' Phil Hams, Hariy Owens 
and his Royal Hawaiian*, and that juggler of jive, Count Basic . . . 

MUSIC: Count Rasie number. 

NARRATOR: American music for an American era, on America's newest city of 
pleasure, with rhythm that set the feet a-tapping and brought smiles into the 
hearts of those who came to this land of Aladdin to find the dreams of their youth. 

ANNOUNCER: October 29th, 1939! 

NARRATOR: Treasure Island on this date turned down its light in a world growing 
darker hour by hour. Somehow the scene from San Francisco's seven hills had sad- 
dened. At night the mighty bridges still decked the bay with golden necklaces of 
light, and the skyline glowed with warmth . . . but many a man could not subdue 
the feeling that something had died on San Francisco Bay . . . something that 
should not have died . . . but along the city streets a jew men chose to say . . . 
Treasure Island has not died . . . it's just a blackout. 

VOICE 1: (Well off mike) Black-out! 

SOUND: Airplane effects . . . air raids . . . bombing, etc. 

VOICE 2: Czechoslovakia! Remember? 

NARRATOR: Yes . . . yes, we do remember . . . Her lovely exhibit out there on 
Treasure Island. 

VOICE 1: Blackout! 

SOUND: Air raid effects ill). 

VOICE 2: Little Holland ... Do you remember? SOUND: Up and fade to 

NARRATOR: Remember little Holland? Yes ... on a day when 40,000 tulip bulbs 
came to Treasure Island ... a gift from little Holland. 

SOUND: Add muffled thunder of guns to air raid sounds. 

VOICE 3: And what gift for Holland now . . . will tulips lie rotting upon graves that 
bombs will dig to swallow up a new generation? 

VOICE 1: Remember the words . . . 

SOUND: Gradually fading out with following speech: 

VOICE 2: (Slow fade on entire speech) That this Exposition will be an international 
Exposition, where each nation offers its good works and its friendship to all other 
nations . . . 

VOICE 1: There were other words from Washington. 

ROOSEVELT: May this Fair serve all Nations, in symbolizing their achievements . . . 
in amalgamating their destinies, one with every other . . . through all the ages to 
come. 

NARRATOR: Through all the ages to come. 

SOUND: Cannonading of guns and screaming of bombs up and blend with "Maestoso 
March." Fade down and music to narrator. 

NARRATOR: It is American to feel the sharp pangs of sorrow and sympathy for all 
those lands where the power lines of freedom have been cut ... it is also American 
to be strong, to keep strong by the preservation of our great achievements, and so 
it was that in a famed hotel atop historic Nob Hill in San Francisco one George D. 
Smith pledged himself that Treasure Island would come to life again. 

VOICES: Board of Directors votes to liquidate . . . Let's take a gamble and open again 
. . . The travel agencies will back it ... The contractors say "Yes" . . . George Smith, 
Dan London . . . the hotels . . . All right . . . raise one million, four hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars . . . and open Treasure Island for 1940 . . . Activities started 
and rosey reports showed that all was well . . . But on October 19th, another voice, 
"the jig was up." The quota set had failed. 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 301 

SOUND: Ticking of telegraph. 

NARRATOR: Trump playing George Smith, played a last ace ... sent telegrams to 
one hundred and eight concessionnaires of the '39 Fair and, in a long, sweaty meeting 
with these men, big tycoons and little hot-dog men, the first chapter in a NEW 
Treasure Island was written. MUSIC: Fanfare. 

ANNOUNCER: On May 25th, 1940, the Fair will open! 

NARRATOR: Electric words. 

VOICES: The Fair will open! . . . The Fair will open! . . . The Fair will open! 

MUSIC: As "The fair Will Open" line begins, enter music softly, with a fast agitato. 

NARRATOR: Aided by the great names who conceived and built the '39 spectacle on 
Treasure Island . . . eminent San Franciscan, Marshall Dill, accepted the presidency 
of a new and streamlined Treasure Island and to the vital post of general manager, 
came young University of California graduate manager, and Chamber of Commerce 
executive, William W. Monahan. 

MUSIC: Fanfare Direct to segue to rlnintba, fade to 

ANNOUNCER: And then FIESTA. 

SOUND: Celebration noises, horns, ratchets, etc. 

NARRATOR: Yes, fiesta. Fiesta in San Francisco, and throughout all the Bay Area. 
Into this ama/ing scene of amazing people, costumed in the glorious colors of the 
old West, singing on the city streets, went the energies of bank president Parker S. 
Maddux, and public relations man Donald V. Nicholson. But greater than Fiesta 
the fever of a population that had grown to love its Treasure Island and so 
throughout the entire week preceding May the 25th, work nearly stopped as men 
and women and children caught the spirit of the Fair in '40. 

MUSIC: Up and finish. 

ANNOUNCER: May 25th, 1940. 

NARRATOR: May the 25th, nineteen hundred and forty! Around the world a trumpet 
call. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

NARRATOR: And the 1940 World Premiere of Treasure Island is on. 

MUSIC: "Waltz of the Flowers" fade to 

NARRATOR: (On cue) \Vhere the great Pacific meets the sky, a flush of gold remains. 
The silver stars are out, and San Francisco wears her evening gems. In semi-darkness 
sits a mighty crowd awaiting that moment when the night will be drenched with 
the splendor of the magic lights of a new and streamlined Treasure Island. 

MUSIC: Fanfare over waltz fade to 

VOICE 1: Here in the Court of the Nations, across a giant stage will flow a pageant 
of this Exposition city, enchanting and lovely tonight in her 1940 makeup. Young 
and gay and vivacious . . . 

VOICE 2: (Dramatic interruption) Ladies and gentlemen . . . We have just established 
contact with the Admiral Byrd Expedition in Little America in the Antarctic. It is 
our privilege to ask Little America to send a word of greeting to "The Fair in 
Forty" which will turn on the fabulous illumination system. Come in, Little America. 

MUSIC: Out abruptly. 

VOICE 1: (Short wave effect) Greetings to Treasure Island . . . Greetings filled with 
regret that we are not with you there tonight. It is cold and lonely here . . . but we 
are with you by radio . . . close to your music and laughter. And here in Little 
America, we are grateful for the honor of sending an electrical impulse across the 
thousands of miles to turn on your magic lights. And as we say good-bye, we say 
"Let there be light on Treasure Island." 



302 THE MAGIC CITY 



SOUND: Bursting bomb. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

VOICE 1: And there was light again on Treasure Island. 

NARRATOR: Light and music and action. 

VOICES: The Fair in Forty, with its Forty Fair Girls . . . Miss San Francisco . . . Miss 
California . . . Miss Treasure Island . . . Miss U. S. A. 

GIRL: (Close to mike) Hello there, America. 

SOUND: Fade in airplane in distance. 

NARRATOR: And at that moment, up in the sky, that like the land and the sea man 
has conquered, a girl and a boy look down upon this new Treasure Island. 

SOUND: Airplane up trifle. 

BAIRD: If only everyone could see Treasure Island from up here in the sky. 

VENTER: The Tower of the Sun, like a dagger of white fire . . . 

BAIRD: It's like flying over a giant fire opal ... an opal lying on a rippling black 
velvet. It's like the Arabian Nights come true. There just couldn't be anything more 
beautiful . . . will you look at the light in the Court of the Moon. 

VENTER: And those silver pictures on the Pool of Reflections. 

BAIRD: Palace walls blazing . . . courtyards washed in blue . . . and fountains tumbling 
like bubbling gold. 

VENTER: It's amazing, a few short minutes ago, everything lost in the darkness of 
the night, and then suddenly all this light and color. It just doesn't seem real. 

BAIRD: It's lovely this lovely Treasure Island. Let's hurry back and see it close to. 

SOUND: Airplane up and out. 

NARRATOR: (Cued in before airplane entirely out) And as nearly 125,000 people on 
Treasure Island, and millions throughout the world listen, dignified Exposition 
President, Marshall W. Dill, spoke words that came from the hearts of many men, 
that glamorous night of May 25th, 1940: 

DILL: We have not come to this day without much labor and some sacrifice. To re- 
create an "Evanescent City" has been our task. We of the 1940 Fair pay tribute 
to those who dredged this "City Beautiful" out of the silt of the Bay. They laid the 
sills upon which we have re-built. We are the grateful heirs of their faith and their 
dreaming, and in this world of tumult and strife abroad, we hope we have done 
something here on Treasure Island to lift the sadness from a weary day ... a little 
island where peace, beauty and humanity abound. We have lighted a lamp of the 
spirit and we can only fervently hope that some of its rays may light the dark places. 

MUSIC: Musical comedy selection fade to 

VOICE: And from Hollywood . . . 

NARRATOR: From the cinema capital of the world, a gift to Treasure Island. A gift 
of loveliness, wrapped in youth and presented in song. Seventeen-year-old Suzanna 
Foster, outstanding discovery in the land where discovery is the rule, and not the 
exception. 

MUSIC: "Kiss Me Again" Suzanna Foster. 

NARRATOR: That night on May the 25th, nineteen hundred and forty, all who felt 
the spirit of this NEW Treasure Island, knew as men know that day and night will 
come, that it filled a need in nervous times . . . and as midnight came, that world 
premiere on San Francisco Bay rose to its finish . . . 

MUSIC: "Valse Triste"fade to 

VOICE: (Venter) Beneath the white stars that tonight look down upon a world whose 
minutes drag themselves through a sea of blood and horror and hatred, we speak a 
humble prayer on a lovely Island in San Francisco Bay Treasure Island. May God 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 303 

grant that those of us who may, come to this Island to reassure themselves that 
America is yet a Nation capable of constant peace, of lasting happiness. May God 
giant that all of us draw upon the spirit which created this Golden Gate Interna- 
tional Exposition ... the same spirit which gave it re-birth . . . and that moments 
like this, will be ours to treasure always. 

MUSIC "Omnipotence" by Male Chorus. 

ANNOUNCER: June 15th. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

NARRATOR: But twenty days after the world premiere of 1940 streamlined Treasure 
Island, the word "success" hardened into reality. 

SOUND: Crowd noise . . . large crowds, millions of people. 

VOICE 1: The one millionth visitor. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

ANNOUNCER: July 30th. 

VOICE 1 : Three million visitors have come to Treasure Island. 

SOUND: Crowd noise . . . fades to, and behind 

NARRATOR: (On cue) One million visitors every twenty days! Hundreds of thousands 
ahead of the most optimistic hopes. The spark-plug who kept this explosive record 
hitting on all sixteen cylinders . . . was modest general manager, William W. Mona- 
han. Each Tuesday night, by the medium of radio, he kept his public interested and 
informed . . . 

RADIO ANNOUNCER: We are speaking to you from our studios in San Francisco, 
and it is now time for the weekly program, "The Exposition Speaks," which origi- 
nates in the offices of VV. W. Monahan. We take you now to Treasure Island. 

MONAHAN: Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. With three million people having 
already visited us here on Treasure Island, we are cautiously beginning to feel 
that we have quite a Fair on our hands. This is really no miracle. The miracle of 
Treasure Island happened long ago ... in its creation and its building. The credit 
for our 1940 record, which we modestly admit is amazing, can go to no one man or 
woman. Rather, it's the old business of working like a family (and by the way, we 
notice lots of their families here) . 

Tonight, however, I'd like to throw a few orchids in the general direction of a few 
of the favorite sons in this Exposition family of ours. To one, H. C. BottorfF, a 
tribute . . . for his talent in keeping the complex machinery of Treasure Island well 
oiled. And a bouquet to Major Keatinge, our strong man holding down two im- 
portant posts, governmental participation and special events. In the latter depart- 
ment, the thrill circus in the open air theater . . . the big variety shows on the 
Federal Plaza . . . and the daily fireworks spectacle detailed to the hands of a blind 
man, charming and capable personality, Charles Duffield. I want to pay tribute, too, 
to F. M. Sandusky, our director of exhibits and concessions for his efficient handling 
of this difficult and important assignment; to Emil Bondeson, director of music and 
shows, who arranged the outstanding events of our musical season; and to H. C. 
Vensano, our director of works, who is responsible for the beautiful setting in which 
this great pageant has been held; and to Jack James, our director of promotion 
whose voice extolling the wonders of Treasure Island and the West has, indeed, been 
heard all around the world. And I would also like to pay tribute to all those who 
entered so enthusiastically into our streamlined plan of 1940, exhibitors, large and 
small, concessionnaires, and the whole personnel of the Exposition who have toiled 
faithfully and long to make the Fair in Forty go down in history as an unqualified 
success, a pleasant memory of beauty and pageantry and fun. 



304 THE iMAGIC CITY 

MUSIC: Introduction to "High On A Windy Hill" fade to 

NARRATOR: 1940 Treasure Island rumor had it ... had it that one Billy Rose, New 
York and points north, south, east and west, had surveyed the Pacific Ocean up and 
down the Coast of California for a gigantic aquacade . . . had thought twice, and 
signed a contract with his new friend, Bill Monahan. As the ink dried on this co- 
lossal bit of paper, to Treasure Island with a fanfare, came barrel-chested Johnny 
Weissmuller, iron-man Marshall Wayne, and lovely Esther Williams, trailed by a 
gorgeous horde of Aquabelles and amid millions of gallons of water, great publicity, 
and great music, the show of shows wa son . . . Billy Rose's Aquacade! Remember? 

VOICE 1: Morton Downey. 

MUSIC: "Yours For A Song" Morion Downey. 

ANNOUNCER: America! Cavalcade of a Nation! 

MUSIC: "Star Spangled Banner" fanfare tytnpani roll under narrator. 

NARRATOR: Like twigs and leaves and scraps of paper upon a stream, the "River 
of Time" has washed each great episode in American history out into the Ocean of 
the Past. The land, the sea, the hills remain . . . but the human clay has crumbled 
to dust under the destructive force of Time. Yet Time will never erase the romantic 
memory of this Nation's four hundred vibrant years. "America! Cavalcade of a 
Nation" re-lived those tour hundred years, in another show of shows on Treasure 
Island . . . re-lived one moment in our history as vivid today as it was on the day 
a tall lean American stepped awkwardly before a handful of our ancestors . . . 

LINCOLN: "Gettysburg Address." 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

ANNOUNCER: The Folies Bergere. 

MUSIC: "Orpheus Overture"- fade to 

NARRATOR: Paris in the spring was Treasure Island in 1940 . . . for as each sunset 
came, men talked to their wives of business and important meetings, and sped by 
their offices enrou te to the California Auditorium on Treasure Island . . . where 
famed showman, Clifford Fischer, had set up one of the world's loveliest collections 
of blondes and brunettes. And was any man disappointed? Of course not. From 
front row to last row, the answer was the same. Television, ladies and gentlemen, 
is unfortunately just around the corner ... so tonight, just one last glimpse of the 
Folies Bergere. Petite Michel. 

MUSIC: "Michel" specialty. 

MUSIC: "Angelus" fade to 

NARRATOR: Like a few of those who rushed west in '49, and found their pot of 
gold, so did many who browsed around on 1940 Treasure Island, discover new de- 
lights in "Art in Action." Harvard and Groton men, and those who carve meat and 
drive trucks found pleasure in this priceless Palace of Fine and Decorative Arts. 
The masters of the past . . . and the masters of the present, fitted into the theme 
of this new Treasure Island . . . life, and action. And in this new-found phase of 
Treasure Island, the leading name was Timothy Pflueger. What better man to tell 
the story? 

PFLUEGER: The idea of Art in Action came from my own enjoyment in watching the 
development of art projects. The thanks of the Exposition are due to one hundred 
artists who contributed their time in the interest of all artists, in making these 
demonstrations. On the other hand the thanks of the artists are due the Exposition 
for making available to them this opportunity. The WPA art project also con- 
tributed in accenting the Palace of Fine Arts! Several projects have been sponsored 
by the San Francisco Board of Education. The public was very deeply interested 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 305 

and I look for this form of art activity to take a permanent place not only in Exposi- 
tions, but in regular established museums. 

MUSIC: Fanfare. 

NARRATOR: Memorable words of '39. 

ROOSEVELT: May this, America's World's Fair of the Pacific, truly serve all nations in 
symbolizing their achievements of all the ages past . . . and in amalgamating their 
destinies, one with every other, through all the ages to come . . . 

MUSIC: "Peking Street Suite" fade to 

NARRATOR: Will you ever forget Pacific House . . . heart of the family of nations 
on Treasure Island. Serene and proud. In her halls, many languages, many ideals 
and heritages, differing in detail, but not in fundamentals . . . scenes that were the 
crossroads of the earth . . . her pictorial maps by the great Covarrubias . . . the 
ceramic reliefs by Sotomayor . . . glass maps by Taylor ... a picture of this earth 
on which we try to live and work in peace. Pacific House! . . . her flags of all 
nations, her lectures, her music from all the world . . . and her symbolism of a 
closer unity among those nations across whose shores roll the waves of the mighty 
Pacific. 

MUSIC: Up and finish. 

NARRATOR: It is but a lovely step across the lagoon from Pacific House to Inter- 
national Court. The many thousands who visited this area found therein the essence 
of all the charm of the foreign nations who shared in this Exposition; nations which 
showed in graphic beauty lands of the tropics and of the north. The foreign par- 
ticipation was an integral part of this Exposition; they made it theirs. For those 
nations, the Dean of the San Francisco Consular Corps, Dr. Casas-Briceno, Consul- 
General of Venezuela, speaks. 

CONSUL: Elevating our reason and lending dignity to our will, this San Francisco 
Fair, gentlemen, has covered in all its aspects the transcendency of one sole purpose: 
to encourage confidence and peace between all people. And I am proud to pro- 
claim that Pan America received from this Exposition a permanent promise of con- 
tinental solidarity. The Golden Gate Exposition, and the gentlemen who directed 
it, leave with us a promising lesson of unity, and a deep reciprocal sentiment of 
intercontinental friendship, as well as a mutual understanding. This Exposition has 
revived history, and at the same time, the feeling of security for all of us that 
individual liberty cannot be maintained in surroundings of international insecurity. 

NARRATOR: Folies Bergere, Cavalcade, Aquacade and the other great shows on 
Treasure Island caused General Manager Bill Monahan every twenty days to say . . . 

VOICE: (for Monahan) The Fourth Million . . . The Fifth Million . . . The Sixth 
Million . . . 

NARRATOR: And still they come . . . riding herd on the day and night job of telling 
the millions of what to see on Treasure Island, informing, interpreting, selling, 
promoting and still finding time to make himself thoroughly liked wherever he 
went long, lanky, genial, straight-talking Jack James, 1940 Treasure Island's Direc- 
tor of Publicity and Promotion. 

NARRATOR: As 1940 Treasure Island took in the hearts of all kinds of men it pre- 
sented a great panorama of the music all men will love always. The San Franicsco 
Symphony Orchestra, conducted by beloved Pierre Monteux, guest conductors Koste- 
lanetz, Bruno Walter, Meredith Wilson and Gaetano Merola . . . and voices which 
have carved themselves in America's Album of Music . . . John Charles Thomas, 
Grace Moore, Jan Peerce, Gladys Swarthout, Lily Pons and Lauritz Melchoir, Oscar 
Levant . . . the blind genius, Alec Templeton. 



THE MAGIC CITY 



MUSIC: Herod Overture fade to 

NARRATOR: On the foundations of '39 the Forty Fair was built . . . and in the pano- 
rama of great music, there was no break between the years. In '39 the series "Cali- 
fornia Composers," and to the Golden State's pride of climate and material achieve- 
ments was added the new-found pride in the discovery and realization that it had 
made, was making, a major contribution to the realm of fine music. To the Cali- 
fornia Commission went a man with an idea, and thereafter, week after week, the 
west and all of Canada heard the music of California's own composers. 

MUSIC: Up and fade. 

NARRATOR: The outgrowth of California Composers was a greater, wider venture 
on 1940 Treasure Island. An idea had grown, and in the height of Treasure Island's 
summer glory, the California Music Festival took the spotlight. Invitations to great 
and small musical organizations were extended to come and play and sing their 
music ... to give expression and to receive acclaim . . . the accomplished and the 
beginners . . . professional and the amateur. The movement met success. Among 
the gifts that Treasure Island leaves behind is the powerful impetus to the California 
Music Festival. As that movement is destined to live on into the future of California, 
so it is our privilege to bring its music back for this one night . . . directed as it was 
in '39 and '40 by Jack Joy. 

MUSIC: Up and finish "Herod Overture" segue drum and march fade to 

NARRATOR: Momentous indeed are these days roaring across the American scene. 
Headlines, and holocaust, and opinions and wishes and fears . . . and a nation mo- 
bilizing materially and spiritually to be faithful unto freedom no matter the cost . . 
We bring you now the man, who, during the birth of this great World's Fair of 
Western America, was chosen by the President as United States Commissioner to 
the Golden Gate International Exposition, George Creel. No one is better fitted to 
describe Federal participation than this man whose dreams and ideas became a 
reality. Mr. Creel . . . 

CREEL: Here on Treasure Island, the Federal Exhibits Building has towering above 
it the forty -eight Golden Colonnades representing our 48 states. Behind its muraled 
walls depicting the conquering of the West by water . . . and by land ... is our 
Federal "Government in Action" . . . and in the cast, the Army, the Navy, the Marine 
Corps . . . and the dramatic, rough-and-ready Coast Guard. Here, too, we have the 
intricate machinery to keep abreast of 1940's social economic change and problems, 
Social Security, WPA, Housing, Slum-Clearance, Reclamation projects, reforestation, 
electrification, highways . . . the Department of Agriculture. (Cue, Treasure Island 
Company marches in front of stage) (very slight pause). One display of the might of 
this free nation of America made hearts beat faster each Treasure Island evening in 
this great Federal Plaza. 

ANNOUNCER: This is the Voice of the Exposition. Ladies and gentlemen . . . there 
will be a colorful and patriotic ceremony in front of the Federal Building . . . car- 
ried out by the Treasure Island Company, United States Army, and the Thirtieth 
Infantry Band. . . . The members of the Company were selected from the regular 
Army regiments in the Ninth Corps Area, and are permanently quartered at Camp 
Hunter Liggett on the Exposition grounds. The ritual of lowering and folding the 
American flag is one of the greatest importance. Our care of the flag is symbolic of 
the esteem in which we hold our country. The flag must never touch the ground, 
and great care is taken in folding it upon its being lowered. The red and white is 
always folded into the blue of the night. This ceremony, called Retreat, will at this 
moment give way to the lowering of the flag. It is a proper mark of respect for ALL 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 307 

of us to stand as the flag is lowered ... to observe silence, the men removing their 
hats and holding hat or hand over their hearts. Flag Lowering Ceremony . . . 

MUSIC: Treasure Island Company Band . . . Troops march off. 

NARRATOR: Eyes clear, figures stiff and strong and straight . . . hearts and bodies 
moulded into one unswerving unity by the greatest love of all the love of this 
country of America. Marching off into the nighttime shadows created by the blazing 
lights of this farewell Story of Treasure Island in humanity-packed Federal Plaza 
the Treasure Island Company of the Regular Army .... under the leadership of 
Lt. Col. Raymond Godfrey Lehman. 

MUSIC: Drum roll March. 

NARRATOR: Symbolic, too, of the strength of this Nation, the works of one of its 48 
states . . . the Golden State of California, represented by the California Commission, 
guided and directed by Frank W. Clark . . . and assisting Mr. Clark in the adminis- 
tration of the California Commission activities were Bob Penfield, James Smyth, 
Rusty Mikel, Phil Van Dusen, Fred Grey, and Claude Cooper. 

VOICE: Magnificent California .... Empire of beauty in which man has achieved, not 
perfection, but a record of progress through agriculture, shipping, industry, recrea- 
tion and climate that is a bright spot in the annals of this nation's history. 

NARRATOR: Grouped on Treasure Island 18 lovely buildings, representing the 
limitless resources of California. 

VOICES: Redwood Empire . . . man-made counterpart of the oldest living things . . . 
Alameda-Contra Costa Building . . . recreation and sunshine and good living . . . 
San Joaquin Valley Building . . . the richness of the Earth stretched forth between 
the mountains . . . Sacramento-Tahoe Building . . . Capital of the Golden State . . . 
mountain retreats and historic border towns . . . Southern Counties Building . . . 
family of great producers of the nation's finest food . . . San Francisco Building . . . 
the fabulous history of a fabulous city . . . 

VOICE: The California Building! 

SOUND: Fire siren. 

VOICES: (Repeat) Fire, Fire, Fire, Fire! 

MUSIC: "Orgy of Spirits." 

NARRATOR: Saturday, August 24th ... a burst of flame and fire clawed at the tim- 
bers and walls and very foundation of the lovely California Building. The host 
building of Treasure Island . . . home of western hospitality . . . open house for a 
fun-seeking nation . . . burning ... an inferno. 

SOUND: Up sirens. 

SOUND: Crackle of fire. 

VOICE: There's a breeze! 

VOICE 2: There's a fortune in art treasures in there! 

VOICE 3: And a pipe-organ. 

VOICE 4: (Shouts) Here come the soldiers . . . 

NARRATOR: As the fire caught huge curtains and jumped hungrily for the bright 
dry wood, scores of our soldiers from the Treasure Island Company dashed into the 
blazing symbol of California, began removing every priceless painting and object of 
art. Through their courageous work, an unreplaceable record of California's past 
was saved from black ashes. Not heroes, said they . . . only soldiers functioning in 
the routine of duty. And we say in peace as in war, they are beside us. 

VOICE: As though incensed at the removal of those things of greatest value, the fire 
howled on to reduce the California Building to ruins, and even as it burned, radio, 
. . . fast, mobile radio, was on the scene from coast to coast . . . 



308 THE MAGIC CITY 

RADIO ANNOUNCER: (Excited) Ladies and gentlemen, we are standing beside the 
blazing California Building on Treasure Island, not blazing in beauty, but in fire . . . 

VOICE: There's Frank Clark and Bob Penfield of the California Commission. 

RADIO ANNOUNCER: Mr. Clark . . . over here, please. You're Chairman of the Cali- 
fornia Commission, which erected this lovely building. No need to ask you how you 
must feel at this moment . . . 

CLARK: Well ... I feel like any good Californian. This is terrible . . . terrible. But 
this won't stop a thing here on Treasure Island. The show goes on ... and the 
California Commission will be right in there giving the public everything on 
schedule! 

MUSIC: Up and finish. 

NARRATOR: (Softly) Beside mountain lakes in the still of night . . . where the Mis- 
sissippi meets the full moon and the darkies and the cotton ... in pent-house 
cabarets above 42nd street ... in little farm-house living rooms ... all who are 
American have felt the spirit of a now fragile and white-haired woman who many 
years ago poured out her heart in music as ageless as love. She is Carrie Jacobs 
Bond and she is here tonight on Treasure Island. If this be Treasure Island's end 
... it is the end of a perfect day. The past gave to Carrie Jacobs Bond her inspira- 
tion for that song . . . and tonight I see in her face, and in her eyes, that this moment 
of 1940 is as great as that day so many years ago. End of a Perfect Day . . . 

CARRIE JACOBS BOND: Piano. "End Of A Perfect Day." 

ORCHESTRA: Builds into number. Solo and duet. 

NARRATOR: (Cue) To you, Treasure Island, farewell. Much you have given us. The 
beauty of dawn and the beauty of sunset. Joy of abandon and forgetfulness. Tonight 
we find that joy is sorrow, and sorrow joy . . . and both are sweet. Here, in your 
lovely, wordless way, you have taught us friendship. The good and the bad have 
come to you and you have had gifts for all who would receive them. As the world 
has lived, your life was all too short. It seems but yesterday you lay beneath the 
sea . . . but who are we to reckon Time . . . for today, tonight are but our future 
memories, and we will have them each new day. We will we promise you. 

MUSIC: "Taps" segue to cymbal and tympani roll. 

NARRATOR: (Change of pace throughout) The end of a perfect day is but the 
dawn of a greater day. Each good life that passes from this earth leaves behind it 
material for the betterment of life to come. Treasur Island's perfect day is ending 
. . . but it is not Death for Treasure Island; it is just new life. The flowers may fade, 
the palaces may fall to earth, the music and laughter stilled . . . the face may change 
but the soul never ... for the dreams of men are never stifled, never crushed. 
Closer to a greater destiny! 
Ready for a greater task! 

As God measures Time, it is but tomorrow that huge airplanes will glide down 
through the air which tonight is ruled by the Tower of the Sun . . . will roll across 
the ground where Pacific House now stands. Let there be no sadness tonight . . . 
for remember, sorrow is of the past and joy is of the future. And so it is we say to 
Treasure Island ... a salute to a greater future that starts tonight! 

MUSIC: "Glory" by Cadman. 

MUSIC: Trumpet "Reveille." 

SIGNOFF 

ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen, "The Story of Treasure Island" was written 
by Glenn A. Wheaton and produced by Robert C. Coleson, with music directed by 
Jack Joy. Narrators were John B. Hughes, Arthur Linkletter, Mel Venter and 



THE CURTAIN FALLS 



309 



Don Thompson. The voice of the President of the United States was imitated by 
Fred McKaye. Suzannah Foster, from the new film,. "There's Magic in Music," 
appeared through the courtesy of Paramount Pictures. "The Story of Treasure 
Island," presented by the California Commission of the Golden Gate International 
Exposition, came from the great stage in the Federal Plaza, through the radio fa- 
cilities of the California Commission. 
We return you to your local studios. 



APPENDIX 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



JAMES B. BLACK 1939 

G. W. BRAINARD 1 94O 

JOHN R. CAHILL 1 94O 

A. J. CLEARY 1939-4O 

COLBERT CDLDWELL 1939 

GEORGE CREEL 1939-4D 

LELAND W. CUTLER 1 939-4O 

MARSHALL DILL . . Ex-OFFlciD 1 94O 

CLARENCE B. EATON 1 94O 

MILTDN H. ESBERG 1939 

JOHN F. FDRBES 1939-4O 

E. H. HELLER . . 1 94O 



HARRY H. HILP 1 94O 

B. W. LETCHER 1939 

DAN LONDON 1 94D 

J. W. MAILLIARD, JR 1939 

ATHDLL McBEAN 1939 

D. M. MESSER 1 94O 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 1 939 

GEORGE D. SMITH 1939-4O 

RUSSELL G. SMITH 1 94D 

MAYOR ANGELO J. ROSSI, 

HONORARY MEMBER. , . 1 939-4D 



BOARD OF MANAGEMENT 1939 

JAMES B. BLACK COLBERT COLDWELL PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

LELAND W. CUTLER CEx-OFFICID] J. W. MAILLIARD, JR. 



LIQUIDATING COMMITTEE 1940-41 



G. W. BRAINARD, CHAIRMAN 



CLARENCE B. EATON 
HARRY H. HILP 
DAN LONDON 



D. M. MESSER 
RUSSELL G. SMITH 
GEORGE D. SMITH 



OFFICERS 



CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD 1939 ATHOLL McBEAN 

PRESIDENT 1 939 LELAND W. CUTLER 

PRESIDENT 1 94D MARSHALL DILL 

VICE PRESIDENT CHARLES KENDRICK 

VICE PRESIDENT GEORGE D. SMITH 

VICE PRESIDENT RICHARD M. TOBIN 

VICE PRESIDENT AND DIRECTOR OF WORKS 1939 W. P. DAY 

TREASURER JOHN F. FDRBES 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY AND ASSISTANT TREASURER 1 939 | 

ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER AND ASSISTANT TREASURER 1 94D j 
SECRETARY AND GENERAL COUNSEL. . COL ALLEN G. WRIGHT 



H. C. BOTTORFF 



EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 



EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT 1 93B COL. J. FRANKLIN BELL 

CHIEF DIRECTOR 1939 H. D. H. CONNICK 

MANAGING DIRECTOR 1939 CHARLES H. STRUB 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER 1 94D W. W. MONAHAN 

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND GEN. MGR. CPosr PERIOD] 194D-41 . . . H. C. BDTTDRFF 



MEMBERS OF THE CALIFORNIA COMMISSION 



EDWARD H. HELLER 
ALEXANDER WATCHMAN 
J. C. BERENDSEN 
L. E. BONTZ* 
A. M. BOWLES 
FRANCIS CARR 
MICHAEL COSTELLD 
LEO A. CUNNINGHAM 

'DECEASED 



HON. FRANK W. CLARK, CHAIRM 
MRS. HENRY E. ERDMAN 
HERBERT ERSKINE 
JOHN ANSON FORD 
EUGENE N. FRITZ 
R. V. GARROD 
A. P. GIANNINI 
GORDON F. IRVINE 
DR. EDWARD E. JOHNSON 
MRS. GEORGE J. KNOX 



AN 

WILLIAM M. MALDNE 
C. T. MERCHANT 
HAROLD J. McCURRY 
FREDERICK PETERSON 
C. M. REDSTED 
KERNAN RDBSON 
PAUL C. SMITH 
J. C. YOUNGBERG 



XVI 11 



THE MAGIC CITY 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



GEORGE H. ALLEN 
RAYMOND M. ALVORD 
G. CHESLEY ANDERSON 

E. N. AYER 
GEORGE W. BAKER 
WAKEFIELD BAKER 
CAPTAIN FRANK M. BARTLETT 
HENRY BECKER 

FRANK G. BELCHER 

F. N. BELGRANO, JR. 
S. BELITHER 
ALBERT M. BENDER 
HAROLD BERLINER 
LEO M. BIANCO 
REGINALD H. BIGGS 
LOUI5 BLDCH 
JACOB BLUMLEIN 
JOHN M. BONNER 

A. M. BOWLES 

G. W. BRAINARD 

H. R. BREAKENRIDGE 
LOUIS J. BREUNER 
DR. LEROY H. BRIGG5 
JOSEPH A. BROWN 
E. H. BROWNSTONE 
HUGH W. BRUNK 
FRANK E. BUCK 
HENRY F. BUDDE 

C. A. BULLWINKEL 
LEWIS F. BYINGTON 
CHARLES M. CADMAN 
JOHN R. CAHILL 

J. F. CALVERLEY 

GEORGE T. CAMERON 

RICHARD A. CARRINGTON, JR. 

THOMAS 0. CARTER 

ANTHONY CASTELLINO 

W. W. CHAPIN 

ALLEN L. CHICKERING 

DR. J. FREDERIC CHING 

CHARLES A. CHRISTIN 

HON. ALFRED J. CLEARY 

THOMAS I. COAKLEY 

R. B. COONS 

R. W. COSTELLD 

HON. GEORGE CREEL 

TEMPLETON CROCKER 

W. W. CROCKER 

LELAND W. CUTLER 

D. G. DAVIS 
HAROLD R. DEAL 
ALEXANDER DE BRETTEVILLE 
MARSHALL DILL 

R. STANLEY DOLLAR 
DOUGLAS DORN 
FLORENCE DOUGLAS 
FRANK P. DDYLE 
PORTER DUNLAP 
GEORGE B. DUNSCOMB 
A. W. EAMES 
CLARENCE B. EATON 
SIDNEY R. EHRMAN 
HENRY EICKHOFF, JR. 
CHARLES T. ELSEY 
ALFRED I. ESBERG 
PHILIP J. FAY 

A. R. FENNIMORE 
WILLIAM P. FILMER 
VINING T. FISHER 
WILLIAM FITZMAURICE 
HERBERT FLEISHHACKER 
JOHN F. FORBES 

J. E. FRENCH 

R. D. FRISSELLE 

FRANK W. FULLER, JR. 

B. R. FUNSTEN 
FRANK S. GAINES 
H. R. GAITHER 

A. P. GIANNINI 

L. M. GIANNINI 

DON E. GILMAN 

DR. H. T. GDODSPEED 

J. D. GRANT 



B. I. GRAVES 

A. CRAWFORD GREENE 

W. K. GROESBECK 

WALTER A. HAAS 

GERALD H. HAGAR 

MARSHAL HALE 

R. B. HALE 

GEORGE J. HARNEY 

MAURICE E. HARRISON 

HON. JOHN F. HASSLER 

HON. FRANCK R. HAVENNER 

HENRY O- HAWES 

JOHN R. HAYDEN 

WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST 

EDWARD H. HELLER 

EUGENE HERZDG 

ELMER L. HICKS 

H. R. HIGGINS 

E. E. HILLS 

HARRY H. HILP 

ROBERT P. HOLLIDAY 

CLIFFORD E. HOLMBDE 

C. S. HOWARD 
J. W. HOWELL 
WILLIAM L. HUGHSON 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
FRANK JACKSON 

A. P. JACOBS 
SAMUEL KAHN 
M. J. KELLY 
A. N. KEMP 
GEORGE W. KEMPER 
CHARLES KENDRICK 
EUGENE F. KERN 
JOSEPH H. KING 
J. R. KNOWLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
GUS LACHMAN 
R. D. LAPHAM 
J. B. LEVISON 
JOY LICHENSTEIN 

E. C. LIPMAN 

N. B. LIVERMDRE 
JAMES K. LDCHEAD 
DAN E. LONDON 
BARON LONG 
ALFRED J. LUNDBERG 

JAMES w. MCALLISTER 

F. M. McAULIFFE 
JAMES H. McCABE 

HON. WILLIAM H. MCCARTHY 
HON. W. J. McCRACKEN 

A. D. MCDONALD 

FELIX S. McGINNIS 
CHARLES K. MclNTOSH 
WESLEY McKENZIE 

GEORGE A. MCQUEEN 
PARKER S. MADDUX 
DAN P. MAHER 
STEPHEN MALATESTA 
CARL L. MARITZEN 
SAM M. MARKOWITZ 
MAURICE M. MARSHALL 
WILLIAM MARSHALL 
M. S. MAXWELL 
THOMAS C. MEAGHER 
DWIGHTL. MERRIMAN 

D. M. MESSER 
WILSON MEYER 
GRANT D. MILLER 
ROBERT WATT MILLER 
HAL MILLS 

H. B. MILLS 

JAMES K. MDFFITT 

J. ELMER MDRRISH 

WILL F. MORRISH 

S. F. B. MORSE 

A. J. MOUNT 

PAUL E. MUDGETT 

A. STANWOOD MURPHY 

D. J. MURPHY 

MRS. MARTIN C. NEWALL 

HENRY D. NICHOLS 



APPENDIX 



xix 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS (Continued) 



HENRY NORTH 

R. H. NORTON 

JOHN A. O'CONNELL 

ROBERT B. ODELL 

LOUIS O'NEAL 

W. H. ORRICK 

JOSEPH OSTERLOH 

W. F. OSTRANDER 

CURTIS O'SULLIVAN 

HON. JOHN J. O'TOOLE 

FRED PABST 

CHARLES R. PAGE 

SILAS H. PALMER 

R. P. PAOLI 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

J. H. PATRICK 

MORRIS E. PENTER 

ADOLPH PETRY 

F. ELLIS PIERCE 

JAMES E. POWER, JR. 

N. R. POWLEY 

ARCHIBALD H. PRICE 

HERMAN QUAST 

JAMES H. QUINN 

STUART L. RAWLINGS 

MORRIS READ 

PHIL RILEY 

M. H. RDBBINS 

HARRISON S. ROBINSON 

HON. ANGELD J. ROSSI 

W. P. ROTH 

CASS RUNNING 

L. P. ST. CLAIR 

ANNA SCANLON 

RAY SCHILLER 

NAT SCHMULOWITZ 

CARL SCHUSTER 

ALBERT E. SCHWABACHER 

CHARLES R. SCHWANENBERG 

HARVEY C. SCOTT 

PORTER B. 5E5NDN 

R. S. SHAINWALD 

HON. WARREN SHANNON 



HON. JOHN F. SHELLEY 

PAUL SHOUP 

JUDGE M. C. SLOSS 

GEORGE D. SMITH 

PAUL C. SMITH 

DR. ALDO SOAVE 

MAX SOBEL 

ALLEN 5PIVOCK 

DR. ROBERT GORDON SPROUL 

W. H. STEWART 

CHARLES STRUB 

WALTER GAINES SWANSON 

HOLDS R. THOMPSON 

JOSEPH S. THOMPSON 

W. H. THOMSON 

RICHARD M. TOBIN 

DR. DON B. TRESSIDER 

NION R. TUCKER 

EDWARD D. VANDELEUR 

W. J. VARLEY 

FREDERICK WAGNER 

CARLTON H. WALL 

EMMETT F. WALT 

HON. EARL WARREN 

L. A. WARREN 

ALEXANDER WATCHMAN 

JAMES F. WATERS 

T. J. WATSON 

HAROLD D. WEBER 

WALTER A. WEBER 

DR. ALANSON WEEKS 

HENRY A. WEICHHART 

BUD WEISER 

HON. RICHARD J. WELCH 

FREDERICK CROCKER WH ITMAN 

STANLEY D. WHITNEY 

DR. RAY LYMAN WILBUR 

HARRY G. WILLIAMS 

A. EMORY WISHON 

LEONARD E. WOOD 

CLEVELAND R. WRIGHT 

TRUMAN R. YOUNG 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



JOHN F. FORBES, TREASURER 

H. C. BDTTORFF, ASSISTANT TREASURER C. J. HASSON, CONTROLLER 

SEE APPENDIX: PAGE 67 

SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

H. C. BOTTDRFF, DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS 
SEE APPENDIX: PAGE 67 



LEGAL DEPARTMENT 

COL. ALLEN G. WRIGHT, SECRETARY AND GENERAL COUNSEL 
RANDELL LARSON, ASSISTANT COUNSEL 



DEPARTMENT OF WORKS 



DIRECTOR 1 939 W. P. DAY 

DIRECTOR 1 94O H. C. VENSAND 

CHIEF OF CONSTRUCTION 1939-4O LLOYD J. BROWN 

CHIEF OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 1939 JOHN J. GOULD 

CHIEF OF HORTICULTURE 1939 JULIUS J. GIROD 

CHIEF OF HORTICULTURE 1 94O ELMER GOULD 

CHIEF OF ELECTRICITY 1939 W. R. VAN BOKKELYN 

CHIEF OF ELECTRICITY 1 94D GILBERT WOOD 

CHIEF OF ARCHITECTURE 1 939 EDWARD L. FRICK 

CHIEF OF COLOR 1939. . . . J. E. STANTON 



xx THE MAGIC CITY 

DEPARTMENT OF WORKS (Continued) 

CHIEF OF SPECIFICATIONS 1 939 A. J. EVER5 

CHIEF OF TRANSPORTATION 1939 I. B. SHATTLJCK 

EXPEDITING OFFICER 1 939 H. V. GRANT 

CHIEF OF ROADS AND BRIDGES 1 939 JOHN B. LEONARD 

CHIEF OF WATER SUPPLY AND SANITATION 1939 CHARLES H. LEE 

CHIEF OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 1939 WILLIAM E. LELAND 

CHIEF DF RECLAMATION 1 939 JAMES J. WALSH 

CHIEF OF JANITORIAL DIVISION 1 94D DON L. GEISERT 

DEPARTMENT OF EXHIBITS AND CONCESSIONS 

DIRECTOR F. M. SANDUSKY 

CHIEF OF CONCESSIONS 1939 FREDERICK WEDDLETON 

CHIEF OF CONCESSIONS 1 94O RAY MAXWELL 

GOVERNMENTAL PARTICIPATION, EVENTS, CEREMONIES 

DIRECTOR 1939 BRIG. GEN. WILLIAM E. GILLMORE 

DIRECTOR 1 94O MAJ. D. J. KEATINGE 

CHIEF OF STATE PARTICIPATION 1939 KEITH SOUTHARD 

DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL EVENTS 1937-3B WALTER REIMERS 

CHIEF OF SPECIAL EVENTS 1 939 R. G. CONGDON 

CHIEF OF SPECIAL EVENTS 1 94O EARL DARFLER 

EXPLOITATION, PROMOTION AND PUBLICITY 

DIRECTOR 1 939 C. M. VANDEBURG 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 1939 CROMPTON BANGS, JR. 

DIRECTOR 1 94D JACK JAMES 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 1 94O GORDON E. CLAYCOMBE 

MANAGER PRESS DIVISION 1 939 LYN FOX 

MANAGER PRESS DIVISION 1 94D J. A. COOK 

MANAGER MAGAZINE DIVISION 1 939 BILL WRIGHT 

MANAGER MAGAZINE DIVISION 1 94D EARLE V. WELLER 

MANAGER PUBLICATIONS AND PROMOTION DIVISION 1939 FRANK FELIZ 

MANAGER PUBLICATIONS AND PROMOTIONS DIVISION 1 94O LEE BLAIR 

MANAGER RADIO DIVISION 1939 ARTHUR E. ROWE 

MANAGER RADIO DIVISION 1 94D ROBERT COLESON 

MANAGER PHOTO DIVISION 1939-4O CARL WALLEN 

MANAGER LECTURE DIVISION 1 939 FRANK PETERSON 

MANAGER TRAVEL DIVISION 1939 NEWMAN TUCKER 

MANAGER ART DIVISION 1939 KEN SAWYER 

MANAGER ART DIVISION 1 94O NEIL SAMPSON 

DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC AREA 

CONSULTANT 1 939 PHILIP N. YOUTZ 

DIRECTOR 1 94D DR. GRACE L. McCANN MORLEY 

DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

VICE CHAIRMAN 1 94O TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER 

SECRETARY 1939-194D KENNETH SLAUGHTER 

CHIEF FINE ARTS DIVISION DR. LANGDDN WARNER 

CHIEF DECORATIVE ARTS DIVISION DOROTHY WRIGHT LIEBES 

LIVESTOCK DEPARTMENT 

E. J. FJELDSTED, DIRECTOR 1939 

MUSIC AND SHOWS DIRECTORS 

E. D. BONDESON . .1 939- 1 94O PAUL POSZ 1 939 



APPENDIX 



xxi 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

ARCHITECTURAL COMMISSION ARTHUR BRDWN, JR. 

AVIATION COMMITTEE FRANK W. FULLER, JR. 

COMMITTEE ON CONCESSIONS AND AMUSEMENTS J 1 ^39 MILTON H. ESBERG 

1 i94n N. L. MCLAREN 
COMMITTEE ON SPECIAL EVENTS, CEREMONIES AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS . . . W. P. F. BRAWNER 

EXHIBITS COMMITTEE A. EMORY WISHDN 

FINANCE COMMITTEE J 1 93B KENNETH R. KINGSBURY 

< 1939 JAMES B. BLACK 

FINE ARTS COMMITTEE } ^39 HERBERT FLEISHHACKER 

< 1 94O RICHARD M. TOBIN 

VICE-CHAIRMAN T. L. PFLUEGER 

COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENTAL PARTICIPATION S. F. B. MORSE 

COMMITTEE ON LIVESTOCK AFFAIRS j. SHELDON POTTER 

MARINE EVENTS COMMITTEE PHILIP FINNELL 

Music COORDINATING COMMITTEE MRS. LENORA WOOD ARMSBY 

COORDINATING COMMITTEE FDR THE PACIFIC AREA DR. RAY LYMAN WILBUR 

PROMOTION COMMITTEE TED HUGGINS 

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE H. R. HIGGINS 

WELFARE COMMITTEE MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER, JR. 

WOMEN'S BOARD MRS. GEORGE T. CAMERON 

WORKS COMMITTEE SILAS PALMER 



ADVISORY PLANNING COMMITTEE 



ALLEN, R. F. 
BDNNER, JOHN M. 
BRUNNIER, H. J. 
BUTLER, HARMON S. 
COFFMAN, WM. M. 
CDDNS, ROBERT B. 
CUDDY, JOHN 
GUMMING, JOSEPH M. 
DERLETH, CHARLES, JR. 
DIXON, J. E. 
EDMONDSON, CLYDE 
GILMAN, DON 
HAMMAN, K. L. 
HICKEY, JOSEPH R. 
KING, JOSEPH H. 
KLAWANS, J. RUFUS 
LATHROP, FRANK C. 



McCRACKEN, HON. W. J. 
MAILLAIRD, J. W. JR. 
MERCHANT, W. G. 
MEYER, FREDERICK H. 
MILLER, CHESTER H. 
OPPENHEIMER, SELBY 
PABST, FREDERICK W. 
POWEROY, HUGH R. 
REINHART, R. W. 
ROSSI, HON. ANGELO J. 
SHATTUCK, IRA S. 
SHEA, JOHN F. 
THOMPSON, JOSEPH S. 
WALES, JAMES E. 
WELLER, EARLE V. 
WOODFIELD, WM. H., JR. 



ARCHITECTURAL COMMISSION 

ARTHUR BROWN JR. LEWIS P. HDBART ERNEST E. WEIHE 

WILLIAM G. MERCHANT TIMOTHY L. PFLUEGER 



RICHARD BRADLEY 
W. P. F. BRAWNER 
ARTHUR CONDVER 
HENRY EICKHOFF 



AVIATION COMMITTEE 

FRANK W. FULLER, JR., CHAIRMAN 

GEN. W. E. GILLMORE 
TED HUGGINS 
GEORGE NORTH 
A. EMORY WISHON 



BRIDGE CELEBRATION FOUNDING COMMITTEE 



ADAMS, CHARLES C. 
ALLEN, R. F. 

AMENT, HON. EDWARD N. 
ANDERSON, FRANK B. 
BAEN, CLARENCE E. 
BIEBRACH, W. L. 
BDGGS, LEE S. 
BONNER, JOHN M. 
BROWN, CHARLES R. 
BRUNER, A. W. 
BULL, E. B. 
BURKHARDT, W. N. 



CAMERON, GEORGE C. 

CAMPBELL, GEORGE B. 

CARR, HON. OSSIAN E. 

CARRINGTON, R. A. 

CASEY, MICHAEL 

CLEARY, HON. A. J. 

CONNOLLY, ROBERT E. 

COOMBS, NATHAN 

COONS, NEWELL 

COOPER, CLARENCE N. 

CRAIG, MAJOR GENERAL MALIN B. 

CUMMING, JOSEPH M. 



XX11 



THE MAGIC CITY 



BRIDGE CELEBRATION FOUNDING COMMITTEE (Continued) 



CURTIS, E. N. 
CUTLER, LELANDW. 
DAVIS, M. R. 
DIXDN, DAWSDN 
DDHRMANN, FRED W. 
DDYLE, FRANK P. 
EDMDNDSDN, CLYDE 
EDWARDS, L. P. 
ELLSWORTH, HON. OLIVER 
FENNIMORE, W. D. 
FILMER, WM. P. 
FINLEY, ERNEST 
FISHER, H. P. 
FISHER, R. E. 
FORBES, J. F. 
FUN5TEN, B. R. 
DIBERSON, J. R. 
GILMAN, DON 
HALE, MARSHAL 
HALE, R. B. 
HAMILTON, WM. J. 
HOLLIDAY, ROBERT P. 
HAYDEN, J. EMMET 
HAYDEN, J. R. 
HUGHSON. WILLIAM L. 
JENSEN, LEX 
JONES, F. V. 
KEESLING, FRANCIS V. 
KING, JOSEPH H. 
KNOWLAND, JOSEPH R. 
LAVERS, C. N. 
LAWS, ADMIRAL GEORGE 
LINDNER, CLARENCE 
LUTGENS, HARRY 
MAXWELL, THOMAS 



McCRACKEN, HON. WM. J. 

MCDONALD, ANGUS 

MAILLAIRD, J. W. f JR. 
MEEK. B. B. 
MEYER, WILSON 
MYERS. MAJ. GEN. JOHN T. 
MORRISH, WILL F. 
MURRAY, HON. WILLIAM F. 
NORRIS. T. W. 
D'CDNNELL, JOHN A. 
O'HARA, T. J. 
DLMSTED, J. E. 
PABST, FREDERICK W. 
PARKER, JOSEPH M. 
PARSONS, I. B. 
PATCHIN, PHILIP H. 
PDWLEY, N. R. 
PRESLEY, GEORGE J. 
REICHEL, WILLIAM F. 
ROBINSON, HARRISONS. 
ROSSI, HON. ANGELD J. 
RYDER, E. G. 
SANFORD, P. M. 
SILVEY, J. M. 
SMITH, H. H. 
STEIN, DR. J. L. 
THOMPSON, FRED 
THOMPSON, HON. HOLLI5 R. 
THOMPSON, JOSEPH S. 
TREADWELL, EDWARD F. 
TRUMBULL, ROBERT 
WILLIAMS, GEORGE W. 
WOOD, HOWARD I. 
WDDDFIELD, WILLIAM, JR. 



COMMITTEE ON CONCESSIONS AND AMUSEMENTS 



MILTON H. ESBERG, CHAIRMAN 



WALTER H. SULLIVAN, VICE CHAIRMAN 
DON GILMAN 
SAM G. BLYTHE 
CHARLES H. STRUB 



J. PAUL ST. SURE 
GENE BUCK 
N. L. MCLAREN 



SUB-COMMITTEE TO THE COMMITTEE ON CONCESSIONS AND AMUSEMENTS 



LEWIS A. LAPHAM 
KENETH MONTEAGLE 
MILTON H. ESBERG, JR. 



JOHN M. MENZIE5 
PORTER SESNON 



COMMITTEE ON SPECIAL EVENTS, CEREMONIES 
AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS 



Music: 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

SPORTS: 

RENWICK G. CONGDON 

ARTHUR CONOVER 



W. P. F. BRAWNER, CHAIRMAN 

STATES & CITIES; 
DWIGHT L. MERRIMAN 

MISCELLANEOUS: 
CLIFTON MAYNE 
FRANK W. TEASDEL 



BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL: 

W. K. DYSON 

FOREIGN: 
HAIGHT STANTON 



FRATERNAL: 
G. M. NEUMAN 

STAFF MEMBERS: 
STANLEY BEAUBAIRE 
WALTER REIMERS, SECRETARY 



BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL (Sub-Committee) 



ARDEN R. DAVIDSON 
GEORGE D. GAVIN 
JOHN J. HASTER 



L. E. TOWNSEND 
CARL ZACHRISSON 



A PPENDI X 



xxm 



SPORTS COMMITTEE (Sub-Committee) 



GERALD M. NAUMAN, CHAIRMAN 



J. A. ADDLEMAN 
HARRY B. ALTEN 
FAY BOWMAN 
D. W. BRDBST 
EDWARD CHANDLER 
ROBERT A. CHISHDLM 
WALTER M. CHRISTIE 
W. J. CLASSEN 
JOHN S. COATES 
WM. M. COFFMAN 
J. J. CONDON 
JAMES J. CRONIN 
JOHN P. CLJNEO 
GEORGE DAVIS 
LLOYD DINKELSPIEL 
SAM DUNNE 
KY EBRIGHT 
PHIL FINNELL 
FRANK E. R. GEIS 
CAPTAIN CHAS. GOFF 
WALTER D. HELLER 
A. T. HEUER 
JOSEPH R. HICKEY 
MORRIS HUDSON 



CHAS. F. HUNTER 
ELMER W. IRWIN 
L. V. JOHNSON 
HENRY KANTER 
HOWARD KINSEY 
JAMES LANG 
DOUGLAS B. LEWIS 
C. W. LINDEMANN 
E. P. MADIGAN 
HARRY MALONEY 
ALFRED M. MASTERS 
PAUL G. MCDONALD 
R. A. MCGUIRE 
PHIL PATTERSON 
FATHER LEO POWELSON 
KENNETH PRIESTLEY 
CAPT. L. E. ROGERS 
AL SANDELL 
R. C. SCHWERIN 

L. T. SHAW 
JOS. SPRINGER 
GERALD STRATFORD 
RUSSELL WISLER 
HARRY WOLTER 



FENCING 

FERARD LEICESTER, CHAIRMAN 



ELWYN BUGGE, SECRETARY 
ERICH FUNKE 
JAMES N. HOWELL 
MARY GARD JAMISON 
HELEN MAYER 
HARRY MALONEY 



MALCOLM MCDONALD 
BRYAN H. SMITH 
JACK THOMPSON 
HARRY UYTTENHOVE 
EDWARD H. VISCONTI 



INTER-COLLEGIATE BOXING 



W. E. ACKERMAN 
HARRY MALONEY 
ALFRED R. MASTERS 
JOSEPH NIDEROST 



J. B. RICE 
MYRON SCHMALL 
I. F. TOOMEY 



FAY BOWMAN 
ERNST BRANSTEN 
DR. A. DE FERRARI 
HAROLD DITTMORE 
RAY DOUGHERTY 
E. C. LA MONTAGNE 



SWIMMING 

PHILIP PATTERSON, CHAIRMAN 

GUS RISSMAN 
L. V. JOHNSON 



DISTANT SWIMMING: 
HARRY CORBETT, CHAIRMAN 



FRAZIER BAILEY 
JACOB BLUMLEIN 
AMBROSE DIEHL 
HERBERT FLEISHHACKER 



EXHIBITS COMMITTEE 

A. EMORY WISHON, CHAIRMAN 

REED FUNSTEN 
CARL HEISE 
EDWIN OLIVER 
ALMON E. ROTH 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

JAMES B. BLACK, CHAIRMAN 



HENRY Q. HAWES 

RAY W. SMITH 

WALLACE M. ALEXANDER 

W. H. BERG 

CHARLES R. BLYTH 



CHARLES M. CADMAN 
W. W. CROCKER 
BARTLEY C. CRUM 
PERRY T. CUMBERSON 



XXIV 



THE MAGIC CITY 



FINANCE COMMITTEE (Continued) 



MILTON H. ESBERG 
HERBERT FLE ISH HACKER 
J. E. FRENCH 

A. P. GIANNINI 

B. I. GRAVES 
SAMUEL KAHN 

J. R. KNDWLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
ROGER D. LAPHAM 
J. B. LEVISON 
ALFRED J. LUNDBERG 



J. W. MAILLIARD, JR. 
A. D. MCDONALD 

A. H. MEYER 
GEORGE D. SMITH 
J. H. THRELKELD 
L. A. WARREN 
MICHEL D. WEILL 
EX-DFFICIO: 

ATHOLL McBEAN 
LELAND W. CUTLER 
JOHN F. FORBES 



COMMITTEE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF 
GOVERNMENTAL PARTICIPATION 



S. F. B. MORSE, CHAIRMAN 



WALLACE ALEXANDER 
SYLVESTER ANDRIANO 
ETTORE AVENALI 
S. BELITHER 
J. B. BLAIR 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 
PHILIP BRADLEY 
WM. H. BURKHARDT 
H. B. COLLIER 
J. S. CURRAN 
PAUL DIETRICH 
MARSHALL DILL 
STANLEY DOLLAR 

D. PORTER DUNLAP 
ALFRED EHRMAN 
PAUL I. FAGAN 
PHILIP J. FAY 

E. T. FORD 
TIREY L. FORD 
L. M. GIANNINI 
DON GILMAN 
STANFORD GWIN 
H. H. HAIGHT 
FRED G. HARPER 
MAURICE E. HARRISON 
CHARLES KENDRICK 

P. A. KINNOCH 
JOSEPH KNDWLAND 
FRED T. KOSTER 
CLIFTON KROLL 



ROGER LAPHAM 

JOY LICHTENSTEIN 

IRA S. LILLICK 

CLARENCE LINDNER 

N. B. LIVERMORE 

HUGH MACKENZIE 

FRANCIS B. LOOMIS 

ELLIOT MCALLISTER, JR. 

RENE A. MAY 

WILSON MEYER 

CLAY MILLER 

GEORGE MONTGOMERY 

GENERAL THORNWELL MULLALLY 

WILLIAM OLIN 

W. R. PHILLIPS 

JEROME POLITZER 

THOMAS ROLPH 

W. P. ROTH 

ALBERT E. SCHWABACHER 

ROBERT SIBLEY 

PAUL SMITH 

NION R. TUCKER 

RICHARD TURNER 

PAUL VERDIER 

FREDERICK WAGNER 

EARL WARREN 

MICHEL WEILL 

BRAYTON WILBUR 

COL. C. H. YOUNG 



COMMITTEE ON LIVESTOCK COMMITTEE 



W. H. BABER 
ERWIN C. EASTDN 
SAMUEL H. GREENE 
ROBERT P. HDLLIDAY 
FRED KLEPPE 



J. SHELDON POTTER, CHAIRMAN 

JOHN P. LAWLOR 

CHARLES R. PAGE 

A. T. SPENCER 

J. W. MAILLIARD, JR. CEx-DFFICID] 



MUSIC COORDINATING COMMITTEE 

MRS. LENORA WOOD ARMSBY, CHAIRMAN 

DON E. GILMAN HOWARD K. SKI NNER 

ROBERT W. MILLER R I CHARD M. TOBI N 

GUIDO MUSTO MILTON ESBERG CEx-DFFICID] 

MRS. MARJDRIE PETRAY W. P. F. BRAWNER CEx-OFFICIOD 

DONALD THORNBURG 

COORDINATING COMMITTEE FOR THE PACIFIC AREA 

DOCTOR RAY LYMAN WILBUR, CHAIRMAN 



MRS. DUNCAN McDUFFIE 
DOCTOR CARL ALSBERG 
MRS. WILLIAM DENMAN 
MRS. ALFRED MCLAUGHLIN 
HERMAN PFLEGER 
JUDGE M. C. SLOSS 
DR. R. G. SPROUL 
ROGER LAPHAM 
WALLACE ALEXANDER 
ALBERT BENDER 
SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 



A. CRAWFORD GREENE 

HDN. HERBERT HOOVER 

JEROME POLITZER 

DR. HOWARD NAFFZIGER 

RICHARD M. TOBIN 

R. S. TURNER 

DR. W. W. BDARDMAN 

JUDGE WILLIAM DENMAN 

EDWIN DICKINSON 

GALEN M. FISHER 



APPENDIX 



XXV 



COORDINATING COMMITTEE FOR THE PACIFIC AREA 

(Continued) 



MISS MABEL GILLI5 

MRS. ARTURD G. DRENA 

RT. REV. E. L. PARSONS 

STUART RAWLINGS 

DR. AURELIA H. REINHARDT 

MRS. LENDRA WDDD ARMSBY 

RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. GEORGE CREEL 

BARTLEY DRUM 

MRS. WILLIAM DENMAN 

MRS. MILTON ESBERG 



MARSHALL MADISON 

RICHARD ODDIE 

DR. ROBERT CALKINS 

TEMPLETON CROCKER 

DR. HERBERT EVANS 

DR. HERBERT E. GREGORY 

DR. A. L. KROEBER 

DR. F. M. McFARLAND 

DR. JOHN C. MERRIAM 

DR. CARL SAUER 

DR. ROBERT E. SWAYNE 



PROMOTION COMMITTEE 



TED MUGGINS, CHAIRMAN 



CLAY BERNARD, VICE CHAIRMAN 

WINSTON C. BLACK 

J. L. BOSSEMEYER 

HAROLD J. BDYD 

W. A. BROWN 

RALPH BRUNTON 

J. E. CARPENTER 

CHARLES D. CARROLL 

CARLTON S. CONNOLLY 

PASCAL COWAN 

GEORGE CREEL 

JOHN CUDDY 

JOSEPH M. GUMMING 

HAROLD R. DEAL 

R. W. DOE 

DENIS DONDHOE 

CARL J. EASTMAN 

CLYDE EDMONDSON 

L. R. EVERETT 

P. T. FARNSWORTH 

WALTER A. FOLGER 

MISS JULIE GOSS 

HOWARD G. HANVEY 

GENE HOFFMAN 



HARRY H. HOLLISTER 

WALLACE I. HUTCHINSON 

A. C. JOY 

CHRIS LYKKE 

W. H. MOLJLTHROP 

D. V. NICHOLSON 

GEORGE L. NORTH 

EDWARD F. O'DAY 

JOHN W. PETTIT 

J. H. QUIRE 

BURCK SMITH 

WM. ST. SURE 

WALTER G. SWANSON 

I. 5. TERRELL 

F. q. TREDWAY 

HARRY TROUPE 

FRANCIS WALTON 

JOSEPH C. WHITNAH 

HAL WILTERMOOD 

MISS ZELIA ZIGLER 

MISS ELIZABETH HARRIS 

JOHN B. LONG 

DWIGHT O'DELL 

MAJOR ERNIE SMITH 



AVIATION: 

5. A. STIMPSON 



TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 

H. R. HIGGINS, CHAIRMAN 

F. S. McGINNIS 



INDUSTRY: 

I. F. LYONS 

R. N. SLINGERLAND 

RAILWAYS: 
J. R. HAYDEN 

J. F. HOGAN 



STEAMSOIP LINES: 
L. E. ARCHER 
DREW CHIDESTER 

J. E. RYAN 

TRAVEL AGENCIES: 
B. A. LECHNER 
A. L. HAMMELL 



SUB-COMMITTEES OF THE TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE: 



RAIL PASSENGER TRAFFIC: 
F. S. McGINNIS, CHAIRMAN 

J. R. HAYDEN 
J. F. HOGAN 

RAIL FREIGHT TRAFFIC: 

J. F. HOGAN, CHAIRMAN 

J. R. HAYDEN 

IRVING F. LYONS 

WATER PASSENGER TRAFFIC: 

LEO E. ARCHER, CHAIRMAN 

F. A. BAILEY 
DREW CHIDESTER 



WATER FREIGHT TRAFFIC: 

DREW CHIDESTER, CHAIRMAN 

F. A. BAILEY 

IRVING F. LYONS 

INTRA-FAIR AND AUTO TRAFFIC: 

R. N. SLINGERLAND, CHAIRMAN 

J. R. HAYDEN 

J. F. HOGAN 

AIR TRAFFIC: 

S. A. STIMPSON, CHAIRMAN 

B. A. LECHNER 

R. N. SLINGERLAND 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 



MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER, JR., CHAIRMAN 

MISS HELEN H. BRIDGE B. W. LETCHER 

JOHN H. McCALLUM MRS ELIZABETH LOSSING 

MRS. MILTON H. ESBERG EMERY EDWARD STONE 

MISS ALICE GRIFFITH MRS. F. BURCKHALTER 

MISS ANNIE CLD WATSON RABBI WM. M. STERN 

JOHN C. NEUBAUER MRS. WM. L. HYMAN 



XXVI 



THE MAGIC CITY 



WOMEN'S BOARD 



MRS. GED. T. CAMERON, CHAIRMAN 
MRS. HAZEL P. FAULKNER, SECRETARY 

MRS. GEORGE CREEL MRS. E. S. HELLER 

MRS. WILLIAM DENMAN MRS. DUNCAN McDUFFIE 

MRS. JOHN F. FORBES MRS. ALFRED MCLAUGHLIN 

MRS. WALTER HAAS MRS. HENRY POTTER RUSSELL 



RAYMOND ALVDRD 
CARL G. BROWN 
A. B. CAHILL 

E. B. DEGDLIA 

MARSHALL DILL 
WM. H. HARRELSON 
N. B. LIVERMORE 



WORKS COMMITTEE 



SILAS PALMER, CHAIRMAN 

ARTHUR H. MARKWART 
ALBERT C. MATTEI 
WARREN H. McBRYDE 
DWIGHT L. MERRIMAN 
STUART L. RAWLINGS 
COL. JOHN H. SKEGGS 



1939 EXHIBITS 



ACME EXHIBITS 

CACME BREWING CO. 3 

ADDRESSaDRAPH -MULTI GRAPH CORP. 
AETNA CASUALTY & SURETY CO. 

AETNA LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

THE AUTOMOBILE INS. CO. 

THE STANDARD FIRE INS. CO. 
AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY 
AMERICAN DENTAL ASSN. 
AMERICAN EXPRESS CO. 
AMERICAN LEGION 
AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSN. 
AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS 
AMERICAN POTASH & CHEMICAL CORP. 
AMER. RADIATOR & STAND. SAN. CORP. 
ARMOUR & COMPANY 
ATCHISON TOPEKA & SANTA FE RY. 
BALDWIN PIANO COMPANY 
BANK OF AMERICA N. T. & S. ASSN. 
BARKER BROTHERS 
BASALT ROCK CO., INC. 
BETHLEHEM STEEL CO. 
THE BOOKHOUSE FOR CHILDREN 
BOWIE SWITCH COMPANY 
BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA, INC. 
BRITO-CANADIAN MACHINE CO. 
CALIF. ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 
CALIF. ASSN. OF ICE INDUSTRIES 
CALIF. COMMISSION FOR G. G. I. E. 

AGRICULTURE CSEC. BD 

CALIFORNIA MEDICAL ASSN. 

DEPT. OF INSTITUTIONS 

DEPT. OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

DEPT. OF PENOLOGY 

CDiv. OF NARCOTIC ENFORCEMENT} 

DEPT. OF SOCIAL WELFARE 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM 

INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT COMMISSION 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

STATE DEPT. OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

TREASURE MOUNTAIN 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
CALIF. -NEVADA RAILROAD 
CALIFORNIA COTTON MILLS CO. 
CALIF. FRUIT GROWERS EXCHANGE 
CALIFORNIA NURSERY COMPANY 
CALIFORNIA PACKING COMPANY 
CALIF. TUBERCULOSIS ASSN. INC. 
CALIF. WALNUT GROWERS ASSN. 
CAMEL-BELL, INC. 

CHICAGO & NORTHWESTERN RY. CO. 
CHRISTIAN BUSINESS MEN'S COM. 
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ACTIVITIES AT G. 

G. I. E., INC. 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER 

DAY SAINTS 
CHRYSLER SALES CORPORATION 

AIRTEMP, INC. 



AMPLEX CORP. 

DE SOTO MOTOR CORP. 

DODGE BROS. CORP. 

FARGO MOTOR CORP. 

PLYMOUTH MOTOR CORP. 
CIBA PHARMACEUTICAL PROD. INC. 
CITY OF PARIS DRYGOODS CO. 
COCA COLA BOTTLING CO. OF CALIF. 
THE COLEMAN LAMP & STOVE CO. OF 

CALIFORNIA 

COMPTON METAL HOMES 
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES SECTION 

S. F. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
THOS. COOK & SONS-WAGON-LITS INC. 
CRANE COMPANY 
A. CROSETTI BROS. & CO. 
CROWN -ZELLERB AC H CORP. 
DAGGETT & RAMSDELL 
DAHL MANUFACTURING CO. 
DENVER & RIO GRANDE WESTERN RY. 
DESERT DATE SHOP 
M. H. DEYOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 
DIAMOND SAVILIFT CO. 
DOSS ENAMELING CO. & WESTERN 

STOVE CO. 

THE DORR COMPANY, INC. 
DOUGLAS FIR PLYWOOD ASSN. 
THE DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY 
AUGUST E. DRUCKER CO. 
DUTROW & JOHNSON 

EDISON GENERAL ELEC. APPLIANCE 
ELECTRIC HOUSEHOLD UTILITIES 

HURLEY MACHINE DIV. 
ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO. 
ENCYCLOPEDIA AMERICANA 
EVINRUDE MOTORS 
E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

DU PONT FILM MFG. CORP. 
EXHIBITORS ART & DESIGN SERV., INC. 
EXPOSITION MODEL TOURS, INC. 
FEDERAL ART PROJECT 
FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION 
FEDERAL THEATER PROJECT 
FORD MOTOR COMPANY 

THE AMERICAN BRASS CO. 

CHAMPION SPARK PLUG CO. 

FIRESTONE TIRE & RUBBER CO. 
ROBERT FOWLER 
W. P. FULLER & CO. 
THE FULLER BRUSH COMPANY 
GENERAL CABLE CORPORATION 
GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 
GENERAL MOTORS CORP. 

BUICK MOTOR DIV. 

CADILLAC MOTOR CAR DIV. 

CHEVROLET MOTOR DIV. 

DIESEL ENGINE DIV. 

LA SALLE MOTOR CAR DIV. 



XXV11 



1939 EXHIBITS (Continued) 



DLDSMDBILE DIV. 

PDNTIAC MOTOR DIV. 
GENERAL TIME INSTRUMENTS CORP. 

BETH THOMAS DIV. 

5TRDMBERG ELECTRIC CO. 

WESTCLDX DIV. 

WESTERN CLOCK CO., LTD. 
W. W. GIBSON 
GIRL SCOUTS 
MRS. MORTON R. GIBBONS 

A. GIURLANI & BRO. 
GLADDING McBEAN & CO. 
GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER CO. 

B. F. GOODRICH CO. 
MILLER 

HOOD 
DIAMOND 
BRUNSWICK 

GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION PETROLEUM 
EXHIBITORS, INC. 
ETHYL GASOLINE CORP. 
GEN. PETROLEUM CORP. OF CALIF. 
GILMORE OIL CORP. 
RICHFIELD OIL CORP. 
RID GRANDE OIL CD. 
SEASIDE OIL CO. 
SHELL OIL CO. 
SIGNAL OIL CO. 
SUNSET OIL CO. 

STANDARD OIL CD. OF CALIF. 
THE TEXAS CO. OF CALIF. 
TIDEWATER ASSOCIATED OIL CO. 

CASSDCIATED DIVISIDN3 

UNION OIL CO. OF CALIF. 
THE GRAYLINE, INC. 

GREAT WESTERN ELECTRO CHEM. CO. 
DAVID DRAY, JR. 
TED GRISWOLD 
THE GROLIER SOCIETY, INC. 
H. J. HEINZ CO. 
HILLS BROS. 
CHAS. HOLTZ 
THE HOOVER CO. 
FATHER HUBBARD ARCTIC EXPEDITION 

CLOANJ 

JOHN B. HUGHES 
IMPERIAL PEARL SYNDICATE 
INDEPENDENT ORDER OF FORESTERS 
INGLESIDE PUBLIC GOLF COURSE 
INTERNAT'L BUSINESS MACHINES CORP. 
INTERNAT'L CORRES. SCHOOLS 
ITALIAN SWISS COLONY 
JOHNS-MANVILLE SALES CORP. 
JOHNSON MOTORS 
JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS 
THE JUNKET FOLKS 
KERR GLASS MFD. CO. 
KEYSTONE BROTHERS 
LAKE ELSINORE CLUBS 
LA SALLE EXTENSION UNIV. 
LEDERLE LABORATORIES, INC. 
LESLIE SALT COMPANY 
LEVI STRAUSS & CO. 
LIBERTY ORCHARDS CO. 
LIBBY McNEILL & LIBBY 
LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD GLASS CO 
ELI LILLY & COMPANY 
LIONS INTERNATIONAL 
LITTLE CHURCH IN THE WILDWOOD 
LOGAN KNITTING MILLS 
LOS ANGELES KNITTING MILLS, INC 
LUTHERAN CHURCH CMissaum SYNOD} 
LYONS-MAGNUS INC. 
MARCHANT VALVE CORP. 
C. W. MARWEDEL 

AETNA BALL BEARING CO. 

AMERICAN SWISS FILE & TOOL CO 

BOSTON GEAR WORKS, INC 

CINCINNATI TOOL CO. 

DIAMOND EXPANSION BELT CO 

EAGLE MANUFACTURING CO. 

EASTMAN MANUFACTURING CO. 



EGYPTIAN LACQUER CO. 
FAULTLESS CASTER CO. 
EDWIN H. FITLER 
HANSON CLUTCH & MFG. CO. 
IMPERIAL BRASS MFG. CO. 
JOHNSON BRONZE CO. 
JOYCE-GRIDLAND CO. 
LINCOLN BRASS WORKS 
OSBORN MFG. CD. 
WM. H. OTTEMILLER CO. 
PARKER-KALAN CORP. 
REED MFG. COMPANY. 
STANDARD PRESSED STEEL CO. 
STANLEY ELECTRIC TOOL DIV. 
L. 5. STARRETT CO. 
N. A. STRAND & CO. 
D. A. STUART & CO. 
U. S. GAUGE CD. 

UTICA DROP FORGE & TOOL CO. 
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO. 
MASONITE CORP. 
HENRY B. MAAS 
MAYO FOUNDATION 
G. & C. MERRIAM CO. 
THE MERRILL CO. 
METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO. 
LEO J. MEYBERG CO. 
MILLS COLLEGE 

McGRAW HILL PUBLISHING CO. 
THE MINE & SMELTER SUPPLY CO. 
MISSION SWEATER SHOPS 
MONSANTO CHEMICAL CO. 
GABRIEL MOULIN STUDIO 
MYSTOPLANE CO., INC. 
NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE CLUB 
NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE FIBRES, INC. 
NATIONAL BISCUIT CO. 
NATIONAL-STANDARD CO. 
THE NAT'L CASH REGISTER CO. 
NEPTUNE METER COMPANY 
NEVADA-MASSACHUSETTS CD. 
OAKLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
THE OKONITE COMPANY 
OLIVER UNITED FILTERS, INC. 
THE ORIGINAL UTAH WOOLEN MILLS 
OWENS-ILLINOIS PAC. COAST CO. 
PACIFIC COAST GAS ASSN. 
AMERICAN BRASS CD. 
AMERICAN METER CO. 
AMERICAN STOVE CO. 
ART CONCRETE WORKS 
ATLAS HEATING & VENTIL. CO., LTD. 
H. R. BASFORD CO. 
CALIF.-PACIFIC UTILITIES CO. 
CENTRAL ARIZ. LIGHT & POWER CD. 
COAST COUNTIES GAS & ELEC. CO. 
CONTINENTAL WATER HTR. CO. LTD. 
CRIBBIN & SEXTON CO. 
DAY & NIGHT WATER HTR. CO. LTD. 
S. R. DRESSER MFG. CO. 
EL PASO NATURAL GAS CO. 
FRASER FURNACE CO., INC. 
GAFFERS & SATTLER 
GENERAL WATER HEATER CORP. 
JAMES GRAHAM MFG. CO. 
GRAYSON HEAT CONTROL LTD. 
HAMMER-BRAY CO. 
HONOLULU GAS COMPANY 
HOYT HEATER CO. OF NO. CALIF. 
IRONRITE IRONER CO. 
MERCO NORDSTROM VALVE CO. 
MERIT WATER HEATER CO. LTD. 
LEO J. MEYBERG CO. 
MISSION WATER HEATER CO. 
NORGE DIV. BERG WARNER CORP. 
THE MUELLER COMPANY 
PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC CO. 
PACIFIC GAS RADIATOR CD. 
PAYNE FURNACE & SUPPLY CD. 
PITTSBURGH EQUITABLE METER CD. 
PORTLAND GAS & COKE CO. 
RELIANCE REGULATOR CORP. 
REPUBLIC ELEC. POWER CORP. 



XXV111 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939 EXHIBITS (Continued) 



GEO. D. RDPER CORP. 

RUDD MANUFACTURING CD. 

SANTA MARIA GAS CD. 

SAN JOAQUIN LIGHT & POWER CORP. 

SEATTLE GAS COMPANY 

SERVEL, INC. 

SIERRA PACIFIC POWER CD. 

SO. CALIF. GAS CO. 

SO. COUNTIES GAS CD. 

SPRAGUE METER CD. 

WARD HEATER CD., LTD. 

WELSBACH COMPANY 
PACIFIC ELECTRIC MFG. CO. 
PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC CD. 
PACIFIC GREYHOUND LINES 
PAC. INTERCLUB YACHTING ASSN. 
PACIFIC RDENTGEN CLUB 
THE PACIFIC TEL. & TEL. CD. 
PAN AMERICAN AIRWAYS INC. 
THE PARAFFINE CDS., INC. 
PEACE PROJECTS, INC. 
THE PIONEER FLINTKOTE CD. 
PIPER AIRCRAFT CORP. 
THE PULLMAN COMPANY 
PEFFER MUSIC COMPANY 
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO. 
FRANCOIS & HENRI PERROSET 
PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CD. 
PLANTERS NUT & CHOC. CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CD. 
THE QUARRIE CORP. 

RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 
RAILWAY EXPRESS AGENCY, INC. 
RAILWAY & LOCOMOTIVE HIST. SOC. 
REMINGTON-RAND INC. 
REFRESHMENT, INC. 
REX IMPORT CD. 
RHEEM MFG. CO. 
JOHN A. ROEBLING'S SONS CO. 
ROMA WINE CO. 
ROYCE INDUSTRIES, INC. 
ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL PROP'S. INC 
THE SALVATION ARMY 
SANDOZ CHEMICAL CD. 
SANGAMD ELECTRIC CO. 
SAVE -THE -REDWOODS- LEAGUE 
SCHERING CORP. 
A. SCHILLING & CO. 
SCHLAGE LOCK CO. 
SCHUCKL & CO., INC. 
SEE'S CANDY SHOPS, INC. 
A. SENSENBRENNER SONS 
S. F. AQUARIUM SOCIETY 
S. F. ASSOCIATION FOR THE BLIND 
S. F. ELECTRICAL DEVELOPMENT 

LEAGUE 

S. F. GAS MODEL CLUB 

S. F. JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
SIMON MATTRESS MFD. CO. 
SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO. 
SLEEPER, INC. 

ADAM WUEST, INC. 

ALEXANDRIA BEDDING CO. 

ARROW BEDDING CO. 

AUGUSTA BEDDING CO. 

CAPITAL BEDDING CD. 

CHATTANOOGA MATTRESS CO. 

L. C. DOUP 

ENTERPRISE MATTRESS CO. 

ENTERPRISE MOAKLER CO. 

FLORIDA SPRING MFG. CO. 

GLDBE BEDDING CD. 

GORDON-CHAPMAN CO. 

HANDCRAFT BEDDING CORP. 

F. S. HARMON MFD. DO. 

HERR MFD. CO. 

J. C. HIRSCHMAN CO. 

HONORBILT PRODUCTS, INC. 

INDRAHAM MATTRESS & MFG. CO. 

JAMISON-ANCHOR BEDDING CD. 

KENTUCKY SANITARY BEDDING CD. 

MARQUARDT BEDDING CO. 



McENTIRE BROTHERS 

NAT'L ROSE SPRING & MATTRESS CO. 

PERFECTION MATTRESS & SPRG. CD. 

RE-LY-DN PRODUCTS CO. 

ROYAL BEDDING CD. 

SALT LAKE MATTRESS MFG. CO. 

SIMDN MATTRESS MFG. CD. 

SLEEPER INC. OF CHICAGO 
SOULE STEEL CO. 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC CD. 

SPIRITUAL ASSEMBLY OF BAHAI OF S.F. 
SPERRY GYROSCOPE CD., INC. 
J. D. & A. B. SPRECKELS CO. 
STAMP CLUBS OF NORTHERN CALIF. 
STANDARD BRANDS OF CALIF. 
STANDARD SANITARY MFG. CO. 
TEA GARDEN PRODUCTS CD. 
THERMADDR ELEC. MFG. CD. 
TIEN CHU VE-TSIN MFG. CD., LTD. 
TIMKEN ROLLER BEARING CD. 
TUBBS CORDAGE CO. 
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD CO. 
UNITED AIRCRAFT CORP. 
UNITED AIR LINES TRANSPORT CORP. 
UNITED STATES STEEL CORP. 

AMERICAN BRIDGE CO. 

AMERICAN STEEL & WIRE CD. 

CARNEGIE-ILLINOIS STEEL CORP. 

COLUMBIA STEEL COMPANY 

FEDERAL SHIPBLDG. & DRYDDCK CO. 

NATIONAL TUBE CD. 

OIL WELL SUPPLY CD. 

TENNESSEE COAL, IRON & R. R. CO. 

U. S. STEEL PRODUCTS CO. 

UNIVERSAL ATLAS CEMENT CO. 

VIRGINIA BRIDGE CD. 
VANCOUVER BREWING CO. 
VITICULTURAL INDUSTRIES, INC. 

BEAULIEU VINEYARD 

BERINGER BROS., INC. 

CALIF. GRAPE PRODUCTS CO. 

CRESTA BLANCA WINE CO. 

B. CRIBARI & SONS INC. 

EAST-SIDE WINERY 

FRUIT INDUSTRIES, LTD. 

FOUNTAINGRDVE VINEYARD 

WM. HDELSCHER & CD. 

INGLENOOK VINEYARD CO. 

ITALIAN SWISS COLONY 

MONTEBELLD WINE CO. OF CALIF. 

F. KORBEL & BROS., INC. 

MONT LA SALLE VINEYARDS 

MUTHER WINE CD. 

NAPA & SONOMA WINE CD. 

NOVITIATE DF LOS GATDS 

PETRI WINE CO. 

ROMA WINE CO., INC. 

F. SALMINA & CD. 

SANTA ROSA WINERY 

SHEWAN-JDNES, INC. 

SDLAND WINERY, INC. 

SWEET WINE PRODUCERS ASSN. 

WENTE BROTHERS 

WINE INSTITUTE 
COMMANDER P. H. W. WEEMS 
WEST COAST LUMBERMEN'S ASSN. 
WEST DISINFECTING CD. 
WESTERN PACIFIC RAILWAY CD. 
WESTERN PINE ASSOCIATION 
WESTERN SUGAR REFINERY 
J. D. & A. B. SPRECKELS CD. 
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 
WESTINGHOUSE ELEC. & MFG. CO. 

THE BRYANT ELECTRIC CO. 

WESTINGHOUSE ELEC. ELEVATOR CO. 

WESTINGHOUSE ELEC. & MFG. CD. 

WESTINGHDUSE ELEC. INTERN'L CO. 

WESTINGHDUSE ELEC. SUPPLY CD. 
WESTINGHOUSE X-RAY CO., INC. 
LUCILLE WHEELER 
WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO. 
WINTHROP CHEMICAL CD. 
THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER CD. 



APPENDIX 



XXIX 



STATE AND TERRITORIAL PARTICIPATION 1939 



ARIZONA 

CALIFORNIA 

COLORADO 

IDAHO 

ILLINOIS 



MISSOURI 
MONTANA 
NEVADA 
NEW MEXICO 
OREGON 



UTAH 

WASHINGTON 
WYOMING 
TERRITORY OF HAWAI I 



FOREIGN PARTICIPATION 1939 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 

AUSTRALIA 

BRAZIL 

REPUBLIC OF CHILE 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA 

CZECHOSLOVAKIA 

DENMARK 

ECUADOR 



EL SALVADOR 

FRANCE 

FRENCH INDO-CHINA 

GUATEMALA 

ITALY 

JAPAN 

JOHORE 

MEXICO 

NETHERLANDS 



NETHERLANDS EAST INDIES 

NEW ZEALAND 

NORWAY 

PANAMA 

PERU 

PHILIPPINES 

PORTUGAL 

SWEDEN 



1940 EXHIBITS 



AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATES 

C. ALBRIGHT 

AMERICAN BUILDING MTNCE. CO. 

AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY 

AMERICAN NAT'L RED CROSS 

AMERICAN PHYSICIANS' ART ASSN. 

AMERICAN RADIATOR & STD. SANITARY 

AMERICAN RED CROSS 

AMERICAN UROLOGICAL ASSN. 

ASSO. GEN'L CONTRACTORS OF AMER. 

ATCHISON, TOPEKA & SANTA FE RY. 

AWFUL FRESH McFARLANE CANDIES 

EDWARD R. BACON COMPANY 

BALDWIN PIANO COMPANY 

BANK OF AMERICA 

THE BARRY PINOCCHIO 

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA, INC. 

BRITISH WAR RELIEF ASSN. 

BRITO-CANADIAN MACHINE CO. 

HELEN BURTON 

CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 

CALIFORNIA ASSN. OF ICE INDUSTRIES 

CALIF. COLLEGE OF ARTS & CRAFTS 

CALIFORNIA COMMISSION 

CALIFORNIA HEART ASSOCIATION 

CALIF. MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

CALIFORNIA NURSERY CO. 

CALIF. STATE ASSN. OF CHIROPODISTS 

CALIFORNIA REDWOOD ASSOCIATION 

CALIF. TUBERCULOSIS ASSN., INC. 

CHAMBERLIN METAL WEATHER STRIP 

CO., INC. 

CHICAGO & NORTHWESTERN RY. 
THE CHILDREN'S GUILD 
CHINESE ART DISPLAY 
CHRISTIAN BUS. MEN'S COM. OF 5. F. 

BAY REGION 
CHRIS. SCIENCE ACTIVITIES AT THE 

1940 G.G.I.E., INC. 
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER 

DAY SAINTS 

CLIPPER YACHT COMPANY 
J. V. CLODS 

COCA COLA BOTTLING CO. 
CONSOLIDATED REALTY CO. 
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES EXHIBIT 
CRANE COMPANY 
A. CROSETTI BRO. & CO. 
CROWLEY LAUNCH & TUGBOAT CO. 
CROWN ZELLERBACH CORP. 
DALMO MANUFACTURING CO. 
DENVER & RIO GRANDE WESTERN RY. 
DESERT DATE SHOP 

DEWALT ELECTRIC SAW & TOOL CO. 
DOANE MOTOR TRUCK CO. 
DOHRMANN COMMERCIAL CO. D. B. A. 
DONNER TRAIL SKI EXHIBIT 
DOSS ENAMELING COMPANY 



DOW CHEMICAL COMPANY, THE 

EQUITABLE LIFE ASSUR. SOC. OF U. S. 

FORD MOTOR COMPANY 

FRESH-OMATIC COFFEE ROASTING 
SYSTEM, INC. 

FULLER & CO., W. P. 

GEDDES, S. R. CNAT'L HOBBY SHOW] 

GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. 

GENERAL MOTORS CORP. 

GLADDING McBEAN & CO. 

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE & HIGHWAY 
DISTRICT PAINTINGS 

GOLDEN GATE EXPOSITION PETROLEUM 
EXHIBITORS, INC. 

GOLDEN STATE TRANSPORTATION HIS- 
TORICAL SOCIETY 

GOODRICH CO., THE B. F. 

GRAYLINE INC., THE 

GROLIER SOCIETY, INC., THE 

HAROLD R. HANEFELD 

HARRAN RICKARD & McCDNE CO. 

HEATING & PIPING CONTRACTOR 

HILLS BROS. COFFEE INC. 

HORN PRODUCTS COMPANY 

FR. HUBBARD ARCTIC EXPEDITION 

IMPERIAL PEARL SYNDICATE 

INCANDESCENT SUPPLY CO. 

INTERNATIONAL BUS. MACHINES CORP. 

ISLAND CATERING CO. 

ISLAND SERVICE COMPANY 

ITALIAN SWISS COLONY WINE CO. 

JOHNS-MANVILLE SALES CORP. 

JOHNSON PRODUCTS, INC. 

KEYSTON BROTHERS 

EDNA KIRBY'S GLASS HOUSE 

KOREAN EXHIBIT 

GEO. F. KREMKAU & SONS AND STAR 
MARINE ENGINE CO. 

LESLIE SALT COMPANY 

LEV! STRAUSS & CO. 

LIBBY McNEILL & LIBBY 

LIBBEY-OWENS-FORD GLASS PROD. 

LIBERTY ORCHARDS CO. 

ELI LILLY & COMPANY 

LITTLE CHURCH OF WILDWOOD 

LONGSTREET MEMORIAL ASSN. 

LOMA LINDA FOOD CO. 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MEDICAL ASSN. 

LUCKY STORES, INC. 

M-A-P CHEMICAL CO. 

MARCHANT PLUMBING SUPPLY CO. 

MARITIME EXHIBITION COMMITTEE 

MASONITE CORPORATION 

MAXWELL HARDWARE CO. 

MRS. ANN MCCONNELL 

WENDELL McMALULL 

MERRILL CO., THE 



XXX 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1940 EXHIBITS (Continued) 



METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO. 

LEO J. MEYBERG CO. BENDIX 

MIRAMONTE BEACH & COUNTRY CLUB 

MICHEL & PFEFFER IRON WORKS, INC. 

MYSTOPLANE CO., INC. 

R. M. NASON COMPANY 

NATHAN DOHRMANN 

NATIONAL BISCUIT CO. 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING CO. 

NAT'L CASH REGISTER CO. 

NATIONAL PRESSURE COOKER CO. 

NATIONAL WOMEN'S PARTY 

MRS. V. NEALE 

NEPTUNE METER COMPANY 

H. D. NEWHOUSE 

NICROMETAL MARINE HARDWARE CO. 

NUNES BROTHERS 

NU-WAY COUPLING CO. 

PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC CO. 

PACIFIC GREYHOUND LINES 

PACIFIC PUMPING CO. 

PACIFIC ROENTGEN CLUB 

PACIFIC TEL. & TEL. CO. 

PACIFIC TRANSIT BUS SALES CO. 

PALACE HARDWARE CO. 

PALACE TRAVEL COACH CORP. 

PAN AMERICAN AIRWAYS 

PARAFFINE COMPANIES, INC., THE 

PENNSYLVANIA RAILWAY CO. 

PERROSET, FRANCOIS & HENRI 

PICARD, MICHEL A. 

PITCHER SLIDING DOOR CO. 

PLANTERS NUT & CHOCOLATE CO. 

PORT OF OAKLAND 

POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 

PYRENE MANUFACTURING CO. 

QUARRIE CORP., THE 

JOHN G. RAPP CO. 

R. C. A. MANUFACTURING CO., INC. 

RAIROADIANS OF AMERICA Cs. F. SECTION] 

RAILWAY EXPRESS COMPANY 



REFRESHMENT INC. CCOCA COLA] 

REX IMPORT COMPANY 

RHEEM MANUFACTURING CO. 

ROMA WINE CO., INC. 

GEORGE D. ROPER CORP. 

RY-LOCK CO., LTD. 

ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL ASSN. 

S. F. ASSN. FOR THE BLIND, THE 

SAN FRANCISCO BANK, THE 

S. F. GLASS COMPANY 

5. F. JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

SCHLAGE LOCK COMPANY 

SCHUCKL & CO. 

SEE'S CANDY SHOPS, INC. 

SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY 

SPIRITUAL ASSEMBLY OF THE BAHAI 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
S. SPRINGER 

STAMP CLUBS OF NORTHERN CALIF. 
MRS. MARY STANLEY 
STAR MARINE ENGINE COMPANY 
STENOTYPE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA 
SUN-MAID RAISIN GROWERS ASSN. 
SUNNYVALE PACKING COMPANY 
SWISS SNACK 

TIEDEMANN & HARRIS, INC. 
TIMBER ENGINEERING CO. OF CALIF. 
TRUSCON STEEL CO. 
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD CO. 
UNITED AIRLNIE TRANSPORT CORP. 
UTAH WOOLEN MILLS 
RUSSEL J. VARSI 
VERMONT MARBLE CO. 
EDWARD B. WARD & CO. 
WEEKS-HOWE-EMERSON CO. 
WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD CO. 
WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH CO. 
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC & MFG. CO. 
WIERK DRAFT ELIMINATOR CO. 
W. P. A. NURSERY SCHOOL 



STATE AND TERRITORIAL PARTICIPATION 1940 



ARIZONA 

CALIFORNIA 

ILLINOIS 



MISSOURI 
NEVADA 
OREGON 
UTAH 



WASHINGTON 
TERRITORY OF HAWAII 
ALASKA 



FOREIGN PARTICIPATION 1940 



BELGIUM 

BRAZIL* 

BRITISH INDIA 

BRITISH WEST INDIES 

COLOMBIA* 

CZECHOSLOVAKIA* 

DENMARK* 

ECUADOR* 

FRANCE 



FRENCH INDO CHINA 

GREAT BRITAIN 

HOLLAND 

HUNGARY 

ITALY* 

JAPAN* 

MALAYSIA* 

MEXICO 

NETHERLANDS EAST INDIES 

*DFFICIAL PARTICIPATION 



NORWAY* 

PERSIA 

PERU* 

PHILIPPINES 

PORTUGAL* 

RUSSIA 

TURKEY 

SWITZERLAND 



1939 CONCESSIONS 



AMUSEMENT GAME, R. MABRY 
AMUSEMENT GAME, R. SECKEL 
AN CLACHAN, HAMILTON, BARRDW, WADE, 

GUTHRIE & CO. 

ANIMAL SHOW, AETNA AMUSEMENT CD. 
ANTI-MIST, INC., ALLEN ELLIS 
ARGENTINE, JUAN A. DE MARVEL 
ART COLORS & LAVENDER, 

H. O. STRIKER & JACK RUSHIN 
ATELIER D'ART, E. E. LDCKWDOD 
AUTO PARKING, MAURICE KATLEMAN 
AUTO SCOOTERS 

AUTOMAT PHOTOGRAPHS, W. OSWALD 
AUTOMOBILE EMBLEM, E. M. SUMMERS 



BABY TURTLES, S. GORDON 
BAGUIO GIFT SHOP, U. V. CARILLO 
BALLOON GAME, R. SECKEL 
BALLOON GAME, SDL GRANT 
BARBECUE, DNG AUR LUNE 
BARBER SHOP, JACK LA VINE 
BEAN POTS, R. MABRY 
BELLEVUE SHOP, DOROTHEA J. BEHNE 
BEST SANDWICHES, JAMES A. GRAY 
BINOCULARS, CLARENCE JOHNSON 
BINOCULARS, G. F. McNAlR 
BINOCULARS, TOWER OPTICAL CO. 
BLACKSMITH SHOP, D. MACRURY 
BLANKET & RADIO WHEEL, 
B. HYMAN & HARRY BERMAN 



APPENDIX 



XXXI 



1939 CONCESSIONS (Continued) 



BLANKET WHEEL & AMUSEMENT GAME, 

M. LlCHTMAN 
BOAT CDNCESSIDN, CRDWLEY LAUNCH AND 

TUBBDAT CD. 
BOWERY MUSIC HALL, RAY SMITH AND 

ASSOCIATES 
BRAZILIAN HANDICRAFTS, 

SlLVAND DE SlLVA & WALDO HERNANDEZ 
BUILDING "I" RESTAURANT, 

C. L. CAMERDN 

BURL BOWL, LUCILLE & V. WHEELER 
ROBERT BURNS' COTTAGE, M. GARRICK 
CACTUS SHOP, C. E. PRENTICE 
CAFE RAT MONTE, GLOVER & HARTLEY 
CALIF. GOLD COINS, PHIL SCHUMAN 
CANDIED APPLES, JOHN GENTLES 
CANDID CAMERA, MAX SCHWARTZ 
CANDY CORN, J. A. HARVEY, JR. 
CANDY & TOY SHOP, MRS. E. PERSON 
CANDY SHOP, SID WOLFE 

CARD & COIN DECK DISPLAY, H. BARRETT 
CASA MEXICANA, BOARD OF TRADE 
CENTRAL COURT CAFETERIA, 

C. L. CAMERON 
CERTIFICATE OF ATTENDANCE, 

H. G. WALTERS 
CHECK STAND, SHEA & DAY 
CHECKING STAND, J. A. GRAY & F. BERLIN 
CHET ART, CHET ART Co. 
THE CHICKEN, H. COBB 

CHILDRENS' VILLAGE, THORNTON HOWELL 
CHILI BOWL, F. & N. WOOLLEY 
CHINA NAT'L TEA CORP. 

CHINESE VILLAGE, CHINESE FACTORS, INC. 
CHINESE CANDY & NUT STAND, M. CHUNG 
CHINESE CANDY & NUTS, W. LlNDROOTH 
CHUCK WAGON, C. S. PEFLEY 
CIGAR STANDS, TED STILL 

CIGARETTE WHEEL GAME, MORTON &5TILL 
CITY ICE DELIVERY COMPANY 
CANDY BUTCHER SHOP, STEINBERG AND 

SPENCER 

CANDY FLOSS, ANTHONY TREMP 
CANDY SHOP, W. & M. STOCKLEY 
CANDY SHOP, STEINBERG & SPENCER 
CANDY STORE, McGRATH BROS. 
CZECHO-SLOVAK EXHIBIT, A. RUSKA 
CLICKER CAMERAS, 

KNOWLES BLAIR & RAWSON HOLMES 
COCA COLA, FRANK BERLIN 
COHN'S JEWELRY SHOP, AL COHN 
COIN OPERATED SCALES, MR. TARTAR 
CONKLE'S COSTUME JEWELRY, A. CONKLE 
CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES, 

C. ROSE 

CONTINENTAL CAFE, J. G. KRUTZLER 
COOKIE CUTTER, 

H. O. STRIKER & JACK RUSHIN 

CORNER OF PARIS, A. CHOURAGUI 
CORN ON THE COB, JOE ARCHER 
CRILLO'S SPECIALTY KITCHEN, 

Louis CRILLD 
CUBOID FOOT COMFORT SHOP, E. BUSH 

& F. Koss 
CUP DISPENSING MACHINE 

BLAKE, MOFFAT & TDWNE 
CURIOS, LOK HlNG Co. 
CUT FAST STEEL, J. R. ANDERSON 
DAIRYLAND, SAM GREENE 
DANCE PAVILION, T. Y. TANG 
DANCERS OF THE WORLD, 

Louis A. STUTZ 
DAY DREAMS, R. SECKEL 
DART GAME, R. SECKEL 
DEEP SEA DIVER, J. T. BRANSON 
DENMARK, AXEL ZACHD 
PRINCESS DER LING 
DICTIONARIES, S. SPRINGER 
DIVING BELL, EDMOND S. MARTINE 
THE DOLL HOUSE, H. A. DEVAUX 
DOUGHNUT TOWER, ELMER BdSE 



DRINKING WATER, 

NATIONAL PURE DRINKING WATER 

DRINKING WATER, ALHAMBRA WATER 
DUCK SAMBO, R. SECKEL 
DUTCH WINDMILL, 

MRS. S. MENGES DE HARTOG 
EGYPTIAN ART BAZAAR, L. ZERAH 
ELEC. PRESSER SHOP, R. W. STORMER 
ELYSIUM THEATER, ARTHUR ALLEN 
ESTONIAN CAFE, GEORGE D. SMITH 
ESTONIAN PANCAKE SHOP, B. F. STEACY 
ESTONIAN VILLAGE, ESTONIAN CULTURAL 

COMMITTEE 

EXPO. CATERING SERVICE, GEO. SMITH 
EXPOSITION ICE CO. INC., W. B. WDLKEN 
EXPO. ICE CREAM CO. INC., W. B. WOLKEN 
EXPO. PETROLEUM CO., E. A. HUGILL 
EXPOSITION TELESCOPE CO., C. LYKKE 
FEATURE ANALYSIS, B. & J. & B. CHAM- 
BERLIN 

FERRIS WHEEL, MR. BlTTLE 
FERRY TERMINAL NOVELTIES, 

JAMES A. GRAY 

FILM STAND NO. 1 & 2, MAX SCHWARTZ 
FISHERMAN'S GROTTO, A. W. BELCHER 
FLASHER GAME, ARNOLD HERSCHFIELD 
FLEUR CELO NOVELTIES, 

H. C. SWEARINGEN & A. L. PAULSEN 
FLEUR DE LUXE, F. S. & J. WOODINGTON 
FLOWER STANDS, J. VARSI COMPANY 

FLYING SCOOTER, EVERETT HINZ 

FOOT OSCILLATORS, W. BERCOVICH 
FOOT OSCILLATORS, JAMES ZANCKER 
FOUNTAIN LUNCH, JAMES A. GRAY 
FRANKFURTER STANDS 

FRENCH FRIES, SOL ABRAMS & J. ADAMS 
FRENCH INDD CHINA SHOP, 

C. H. BONFILS 

FRENCH PASTRY, LE MOULIN DE LA GALLET 
FRESH FRUITS, SAM WEINER 
FROZEN CUSTARD, J. B. LANE 
FRUIT & VEGETABLE JUICES, C. B. BOYD 
FRUIT & VEGETABLE STANDS, MCLAUGH- 
LIN & BERING 

GAY PAREE, PIONEER PALACE DPER. CO. 

GHIRARDELLI'S, D. GHIRARDELLI Co. 
GIANT CRANE, HANS SCHAPIRA 
GIANT OCTOPUS, D. C. CROSS 
GILBERT'S PERFUME, B. & G. GILBERT 
GIRL FROZEN IN ICE, D. W. NICHOLSON 
GLASS BLOWERS OF THE WORLD, 
TOM WOLFE 

GLOBE-A-DROME, J. F. BRANSON 
GOLDEN BOOK, FLORINDO NANNINI 
GOVT. OF BRAZIL, EURICO PENTRADO 
GRAYLINE TOUR AND GUIDE SERVICE, 

THE GRAYLINE, INC. 

GREAT ACE CARD TRICK, BRUCE BROOKS 
GREENWICH VILLAGE, SIEBER & CASTLE 
GUESS YOUR AGE, HAMILTON & GUSTAFSON 
GUESS YOUR WEIGHT, 

GUSTAFSON & HAMILTON 
GUIDE SERVICE, JOHN A. BOYD 
HAM & BACON FLASHER, L. H. DRIVER 
HAMLET, S. M. SAROYAN & L. YACDUBIAN 
HANDWRITING ANALYSIS, SID WOLFE 
HANSEN TELESCOPES, S. A. HANSEN 
HAPPY VALLEY RANCHO, C. L. CAMERON 
HAT SHOP, E. BYBEE 
HAWAIIAN NOVELTIES & PERFUME, 

MR. C. Q. PANG 

HEADLESS GIRL SHOW, D. W. NICHOLSON 
HENSON'S RESTAURANT, S. A. HENSON 
HINDUSTAN TEMPLE, J. L. MATHUR 
HI STRIKER, CLARENCE GUMP 
HOLE-IN-ONE, F. C. BLAKE 
HOLLYWOOD BATHING BEAUTIES, 
HONEY CHOC-MALT, DALMO MFG. CD. 
HOUSE OF FOOK LOOK, JOE TANG 
HUM-A-TUNE, MORRIS GOLDSTEIN 
WALTER OSWALD 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939 CONCESSIONS (Continued) 



HYDROSPHERE, ALEX D. DANDIN1 
INCUBATOR BABIES, BETTER BABIES, INC. 
INTERNATIONAL GIFT SHOP, 

WDLF & LEVY 

INTERNATIONAL MOVIE FLASH 
INTRA-MURAL KEY SYSTEM, 

WM. P. ST. SURE 
ISLAND CLUB, 

BARTLEY C. CRUM, WM. B. WDLKEN 
ISLAND RETREAT, MABDAMD, YOTOKO AND 

ZEIBAK 
ITALIAN SANDWICH SHOP, JOSEPH AR- 

CARO AND MARID FASTA 
IVORY, WAH MINE FACTORY 
JAPAN PAVILION, TOSHITO SATDW 
JAVANESE RESTAURANT, JOE VAN BUSSEL 
JERUSALEM, THE HOLYLAND, T. A. WOLF 
JEWELRY SHOP, H. SWEET 
JOHNSON'S COSTUME JEWELRY, 

HARRY LEE JOHNSON 
JOHNSON'S PRODUCTS, 

DUTROW & JOHNSON 
JOHORE GUIDE BOOK, 

INCHE ONN BIN JA'AFAR 

JOLLY ROGER, MR. BENDER 

BUCK JONES 

JUNIPER WOOD NOVELTIES, 

VEARL LOHRMAN 

KITCHEN UTENSILS, JACK RUSHIN 
KOSHER SANDWICHES, M. KATLEMAN 
LACQUER SHOP, SHEN SHAD AND Au LANG 

KEE 

LAFFLAND, CHAS. F. KELLER, JR. 
LAGOON BOATS, GEO. C. BDARDMAN, JR. 
LA MISE EN BOITE, H. DELAVEAUX 
LANDSCAPE SKETCHINGS, YANG LlNG-Fu 
LAVENDER & ROSE BEANS, J. RUSHIN 
LAVENDER & SACHETS, SlD WOLFE 
LICENSE PLATES, KINDEL & GRAHAM 
LIFE SHOW, RDBT. CURTIS 
LINDY LOOP, H. ILLIONS 
LINEN SHOP, T. DETO 

LIVESTOCK RESTAURANT, C. L. CAMERON 
LUNCH ROOM & SERVICE BAR, CLARDNE 

CORPORATION 

LUX THEATER, J. A. HARVEY, JR. 
MAGIC PICTURES, GUY A. MEEK 
MAGIKITCHEN, R. F. TlLLMANS 
MAJOLICA WARE, WM. & AL. NERLI 
MARCO POLO RESTAURANT, CAMPANELLI 

& FERRARIS 
MARQUISE LE POMPADOURE, 

DANA & LILA 

MARK TWAIN'S TERRITORIAL ENTER- 
PRISE, A. M. BLAKE 
McFADDEN'S COSTUME JEWELRY, 

FRED J. MCFADDEN 
MENTAL ACT, BEN LEXEL 
MERRY-GO-ROUND, WHITNEY BROS. 
MIDGET AUTO RACE, CHAS. F. KELLER 
MIDGET CITY, LED SINGER 
MILK BOTTLE GAME, SOL GRANT 
THE MILL, W. B. ROBERTSON 
MINIATURE RAILWAY, J. M. ANDERSON 

MISS AMERICA, JAKE EHRLICH 

MEXICAN ARTS & CRAFTS, J. H. ARIAS 
METAL AUTO EMBLEMS, 

Miss E. M. SUMMERS 
MILK, TREASURE ISLAND MILK Co. 
MILK BOTTLE GAME, WALTER STUTZ 
MINIATURE CURIOSITIES, J. CHARBNEAU 
MONKEY SPEEDWAY, A. HYNES 
MONTE CARLO SECRETS, H. E. DRAKE 
MONTE CRISTO GLASS CLEANER, 

E. VORGANG 

MOVIE FLASH, L. T. SEVAN 
MOVIE-OF-U, ALFRED LAMB 
MT. PALOMAR TELESCOPE, 

DRLDFF & ORKIN 
MUSEE MECHANIQUE, WOLFE & MULLIGAN 

NATIONAL BAZAAR 

R. SILVERMAN & R. BELGRADE 



NETHERLANDS EXHIBIT, 

HOLLAND-AMER. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
NOVELTIES, DICKSDN & DAVIS 
NOVELTY CAROUSEL, H. DELAVEAU 
NOVELTY SHOP, VICTORIA ARDITTI 
OAKWOOD BARBECUE, C. L. CAMERON 
OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER, 

GABRIEL MOULIN STUDID 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS, 

H. S. CROCKER & Co. 
ORIENTAL BAZAAR, SlD WOLFE 
OWL DRUG CO., H. W. HUDDLESON 
PALACE OF ELEGANCE, DON EARLY 
PALACE OF ILLUSIONS, MYSTERY, INC. 
PARFUM, M. ZIMMERMAN 

PASTOR'S BEAUTY SALON, A. A. PASTOR 
PEANUTS & POPCORN, 

TREASURE ISLAND CATERING CD. 
PENGRAPH HANDWRITING, DR. E. F. BELL 
PENCILMANIAC, A. L. PAULSON 
PENNY ARCADE, HERMAN ZAPF 
PENNY CRUSHERS, BERNARD DAVIS 
PERFUME, ROYAL HAWAIIAN DISTRIB. Co. 
PHILIPPINE PAVILION, ARSENID LUZ 
PHOTOSTRIP MACHINES, 

H. L. CUNNINGHAM 

PIG-N-BLANKET, EWING & GlBSDN 
PIRATE'S CHEST, ADOREE BERRY 
PLASTIC NOVELTIES, E. G. FARRINDTON 
PLAY SCHOOL NURSERY, INC., M. BURCH 
POST CARD, 

STANFORD CONVALESCENT HOME 
PORTRAIT ARTIST, A. E. MDHR 
THE "POST OFFICE", DOUGLAS ARCHER 
POTTERY SHOPPE, R. BELGRADE 
PUNCH & JUDY SHOW, F. J. BAKER 
RECORD AMUSEMENT GAME, M. KLEIN 
REDWOOD NOVELTIES, 

REDWOOD BURL SALES Co. 
REDWOOD NOVELTIES, JESS I. LUBIN 
REDWOOD NOVELTIES, C. D. MOLANDER 
REDWOOD PLAQUES, E. B. MODNEY 
RESTAURANT, TDM WIND KONG 
RICKSHAS, TOY MQN SING 
RING-A-PIN, HARRY TAYLDR 
RIPLEY'S BELIEVE IT OR NOT, 

FRANK ZAMBRENE 

ROLLER COASTER, CHAS. KELLER 
ROLL-O-PLANE, D. C. CROSS 
RUDICK'S GIFT SHOP, HERMANN RUDICK 
SACHET AND LAVENDER, SlD WOLFE 
SALLY RAND'S NUDE RANCH, 

HENRY C. CLAUSEN 

SAND SCULPTOR, CLAUD K. BELL 
SANDWICH SLIDE, JESSE A. MUELLER 
SANDWICH STANDS, 

WARREN J. & BEN F. STEACY, JR. 
SEA FOOD COCKTAILS, A. W. BELCHER 
SEA PLANE RIDES, A. PAUL MANTZ 

SEA SHELLS, MARIANO PRISINZANO 

SHEET MUSIC, P. F. PHELPS 

SHOOTING GALLERIES, F. M. McFALL 

SHOWBOAT, P. A. PFEIFFER 

SIGRID HEMATITE SHOP, S. M. ANDERSON 

SILHOUETTE ARTIST, DON AUSLEY 

SKETCH ARTIST, A. H. GHENT 

SKETCH ARTIST, BROOKS HUNT 

THE SNACK, J. D. WRIGHT 

SNAKE SHOW, CLIF WILSON 

SNOKO, A. R. WALTERS 

SOCIAL SECURITY PLATES, BERT STEVENS 

SOUVENIR PLATES, STANFORDS, INC. 

SOUVENIR PLATES, L. H. DRIVER 

SOUVENIR QUARTZ, TURNER & BATES 

SOUVENIR SPOONS, 

EXHIBITORS ART & DESIGN SERVICE, INC. 
SPEED & EXCURSION BOATS, 

A. B. CROWLEY 

SPORTSMEN'S EXHIBIT, HARRY WoLPA 
SPORT & TRAVEL MAGAZINES, 

W. W. BROWN 

SPORTLAND, WALTER OSWALD 



XXX111 



1939 CONCESSIONS (Continued) 



STARLAND, IVY LANE AND NATE STEIN 
STEAK SANDWICH, RUDOLPH TlLLMANS 
STELLA, G. G. COMMERCIAL Co. 
STOP SNQR, DUISTGARD & WAITE 

STRATDSHIP, H. E. HANEY 

STROMBERG CONDENSER, H. D. STRIKER 

SUN GLASSES, BEN SILVERMAN 

SWING-IT, HARRY ILLIONS 

SWISS VILLAGE, SID WOLFE & A. MULLIGAN 

STREETS OF ALL NATIONS 

TAM O'SHANTER INN, P. C. KATZ 

TEA GARDEN, PHILIP FONG 

TELEVISION OPERA HOUSE, W. McMAHILL 

TEMPLE OF RELIGION, R. I. COFFEE 

THRELKELD'S SCONES, J. P. CARBTENSEN 

TILT-A-WHIRL, TEX CDRDELL 

TIN TYPE OPERATOR, MAX SCHWARTZ 

TREASURE ISLAND CATERING CO. 

TREASURE SEA SHELLS, M. PRISINZANO 

TOWER OF JEWELS, A. F. SANFORD 

TOY COW, H. A. DEVAUX 

TRICK CARDS & COINS, HENRY BARRETT 

TROPICAL SKIES, ALFRED DAVIS 



TRUE BLUE CAFETERIA, L. SVENSGAARD 
UNIQUE STAMP SHOP, REV. A. BUCCI 
VAN CATERING CO., H. S. ANDERSON 
VENDING MACHINES, WALTER OSWALD 
VOICE RECORDING, 5. M. WRIGHT 
WEST INDIAN JEWELRY, L. CARDOZA 
WESTERN UNION IN INFO. BOOTHS, 

A. E. LITTLER 

WHEEL CHAIRS, G. A. WAHLGREEN 
WHITE STAR CAFE, JACK SPRINGER 
WDLD, w. VON TRUTZSCHLER 
WOMEN'S CLUB HOUSE, 

MRS. M. W. FULLER, MRS. W. HAAS 
WONDER MOUSE, DUTROW & JOHNSON 
WONDERS OF SAND ART, C. K. BELL 
WORLD IN MOTION, 

J. A. HARVEY, JR. 
WORLD'S LARGEST HORSE, 

R. M. FOGELMAN 

YAR CRUSSIAN RESTAURANT] E. BERNADSKY 
YELLOW CABS 

ZIRCONS, BENJAMIN HECKER 



1940 CONCESSIONS 



ACME EXHIBIT, C. L. CAMERON 
ADMINISTRATION BLDG. CAFE, 

GEO. D. SMITH 
AIRPLANE RIDE, P. BlLLMER 
ALASKAN TRADING POST, JAKE SANDUSKY 
ALHAMBRA WATER COMPANY, 

E. D. SELLERS 

ALPINE VILLAGE, SlD WOLFE 
AMUSEMENT GAME, C. L. CAMERON 
ANIMAL SHOW, J. A. HARVEY, JR. 
ART COLORS & LAVENDER, JACK RUSHIN 
ART PRINTS, IRVIN SINCLAIR 
ARTISTS AND MODELS, MAX SCHWARTZ 
AUTOMAT PHOTOGRAPHS, 

WALTER OSWALD 

AUTO PARKING, MAURICE KATLEMAN 
AUTO SCOOTER, NATE MILLER 
BABY DOLLS, KlNDEL & GRAHAM 
BALL GAME, WALTER B. STUTZ 
BALLOON DART GAME, J. A. HARVEY, JR. 
BALLOON GAME, ELMER C. SMITH 
BARBER SHOP, JACK LAVlNE 
BEAN POTS, C. L. CAMERON 
BEER GARDEN, M. C. BARULICH 
BEST SANDWICH SHOPS, JAMES A. GRAY 
BLANKET & RADIO WHEEL, 

BARNETT HYMAN 

BOAT CONCESSION. THOS. B. CROWLEY 
BUILDING I RESTAURANT, C. L. CAMERON 
BURL BOWL, LUCILE WHEELER 
BUTTERMILK, ALEX TUMMERS 
CACTUS NOVELTIES, CHAB. DAVIS 
CALIF. GOLD COINS, PHIL SCHUMAN 
CANDID CAMERA, MAX SCHWARTZ 
CANDY FLOSS, HENRY BARRETT 
CAR-BO-TET, E. A. NEECH 

CARD AND COIN DISPLAY, HENRY BARRETT 
CENTRAL COURT CAFETERIA, 

C. L. CAMERON 

CHECKING STANDS, A. W. NATHANBDN 
CHECKING STANDS, JAMES A. GRAY 
CHICKEN HOUSE, C. E. JONES 
CHINATOWN, CHINESE FACTORS INC. 
CIGAR STANDS, MORTON & STILL 
CIGARETTE WHEEL, MORTON & STILL 
CITY ICE DELIVERY CO., A. M. STOKER 
CLUB HOUSE RESTAURANT AND BAR, 

W. W. NAYLDR 

CUP DISPENSING MACHINES, L. CONNOR 
CUT FAST STEEL, JOHN R. ANDERSON 
CRAFTS OF WORLD, J. R. MAYORCAS 
CZECHOSLOVAK GIFT SHOP, 

VLASTA K. PETRANKOVA 



CRILLO'S RESTAURANT, WILLIAM LEE 
COCA COLA, FRANK J. BERLIN 
COHEN JEWELRY SHOP, AL COHEN 
COLISEUM RESTAURANT, C. L. CAMERON 
CONTINENTAL CAFE, JOHN KRUTZLER 
COOKIE CUTTER, JOHN KRUTZLER 
CORNER OF PARIS, A. CHOURAOUI 
CORN ON THE COB, 

SOL A. ABRADE & JAMES ADAM 
COZY SANDWICH SHOP, 

MARIO & MARIE TESTA 
DARKEST AFRICA, 

ISLAND CONCESSIONS INC. 
DAIRYLAND, J. A. HARVEY, JR. 
DERBY RACE GAME AND ANTI-AIRCRAFT 

MACHINES, WALTER OSWALD 
DINTY'S, RAY W. SMITH 
DIVING BELL, EDMUND S. MARTINE 
DOLLS OF ALL NATIONS, 
THE DOLL HOUSE, ROBERT TUCK 
DO-NUT TOWER, ELMER BOSE 
DRINKING WATER, ALHAMBRA WATER Co. 
DRINKING WATER, NAT'L PURE WATER Co. 
ELECTRIC PRESSER SHOP, E. F. GROGAN 
EL PATIO RESTAURANT, H. W. WHITLEY 
ENGLISH SHOPPE, C. VANDERSTEEN 
ESTONIAN CAFE, A. J. KUPER 
ESTONIAN VILLAGE, DR. ELIZABETH JUDAS 
EXPO. PETROLEUM, E. A. HUGILL, JR. 
FILM STANDS, MAX SCHWARTZ 
FLOWER STAND, RUSSELL J. VARSI 
FLYING SCOOTER, EVERETT HlNZ 
FOOT OSCILLATORS, J. C. ZANCKER 
FOUNTAIN PENS, CYRUS RAPOPDRT 
FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH, D. W. NICHOLSON 
FOUNTAIN PENS, 

EDWARD ARNHEIM & WM. BROWN 
FRENCH FRIES, SOL ABRAMS & JAMES ADAM 
FRIEDMAN BINOCULARS, JERRY FRIEDMAN 
FROZEN CUSTARD NO. 1, J. B. LANE 
FRUIT JUICE, WESLEY W. BERCOVICH 
FUN HOUSE, WALTER R. STUTZ 

GHIRARDELLI'S, ALFRED GHIRARDELLI 

GIANT CRANE, HANS SCHAPIRA 
GLASS BLOWERS, T. A. WOLFE 
GOAT RIDE, H. EWALD 
GOLD WIRE CONCESSION, 

M. L. GLASS & L. DANA 
GOV'T OF BRAZIL, SILVANO DE SILVA 
GUESS YOUR WEIGHT, GUESS YOUR AGE, 

JOHN A. PDLLITT 



XXXIV 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1940 CONCESSIONS (Continued) 



HANDWRITING ANALYSIS, SlD WOLFE 
HAM AND BACON, STAMFORDS, INC. 
HAMLET, S. M. SAROYAN 

HAPPY VALLEY RANCHD. C. L. CAMERON 
HAWAIIAN SHOP, EVELYN YAMAMOTD 
HINDUSTAN TEMPLE, 

MRS. MOHAN DEVI MATHUR 
HOLLAND HOUSE, C. VANDERSTEEN 
HOLLAND-JAVA-BALINESE BAZAAR, 

CHARLES V. Ross 

HOLLYWOOD SHOW, F. HERRICK HERRICK 
HOLLYWOOD STAR ROOM, C. S. WHITE 
HOLLYWOOD WALKIES, TED GRISWDLD 
HOLE IN ONE, F. C. BLAKE 
HOSTESS HOUSE, J. A. HARVEY, JR. 
HOT DOG CONCESSION, 

ISLAND CATERING Co., INC. 
HUM-A-TUNE, MORRIS GOLDSTEIN 
ICE CREAM CONCESSION, JULIAN HARVEY 

ICE SHOW, A. J. McCHRYSTAL 
INCUBATOR BABIES, BETTER BABIES INC. 
INDIA BAZAAR, G. R. CHANNON 
INTRA-MURAL TRANSPORTATION, 

NATIONAL SERVICE Co. 

INTERNATIONAL GIFT SHOP, LEWIS LEAVY 
INT'L TREASURE HOUSE, M. H. ATIKIAN 
ISLAND CLUB, BARTLEY C. CRUM 
JADE EXHIBIT, CHINESE FACTORS, INC. 

JAPAN TEMPURA STAND, T. SATOW 

JAPAN TEA ROOM, T. SATOW, 

JAVANESE RESTAURANT, JOE VAN BUSSEL 
JERUSALEM, T. A. WOLFE 
JEWELRY SHOP, N. F. COLIN 
JOHNSON'S COSTUME JEWELRY, 

JOHN G. DDRWARD, SR. 
JOHNSON PRODS., A. H. JOHNSON 
JOLLY ROGER RESTAURANT, E. S. BENDER 
KIDDIES AUTO RIDE, A. TREMP 
KIDDIES MERRY-GO-ROUND, A. TREMP 
KOSHER SANDWICHES, MICHEL KATLEMAN 
LAFAYETTE CAFE, DON EARLY 
LAGOON BOATS, GEO. C. BoARDMAN, JR. 
LATIN AMERICAN CENTER, V. P. DEXTRE 
LAVENDER & ROSE BEANS, JACK RUSHIN 
LE PETIT PARIS, ARMAND CHOURAQUI 
LICENSE TAG KEY RINGS, J. W. KRANDON 

PAUL SCHMERGEL 

LIFE SHOW, DUFOUR & ROGERS Co. 
LINEN SHOP, V. ARDITTI 
LITE-A-LINE, MAX SCHWARTZ 
LITTLE GIFT SHOP, DOROTHEA J. BEHNE 
LITTLE HUNGARIA, PAUL SCHMERGEL 
LITTLE WILD HORSES & DIXI INN, 

J. A. HARVEY, JR. 

MAGIKITCH'N NO. 1, R. F. TlLLMANNS 
MANILA INN, 5. A. HENSON 
McFADDEN'S JEWELRY, FRED J. McFADDEN 
MEN'S CLUBHOUSE RESTAURANT AND 

BAR, W. W. NAYLDR 
MENTAL ACT NO. 1, BEN LEXEL 
MENTAL ACT NO. 2, BEN LEXEL 
MERRY-GO-ROUND, GEO. K. WHITNEY 
MEXICAN ARTS & CRAFTS, L. H. ARIAS 
MEXICAN SHOP, F. C. CUELLER 
MIDGET AUTO RACES, TRABAK OPERATORS 
MINIATURE CURIOSITIES, 

JULES CHARBNEAU 

MINIATURE RAILWAY, J. M. ANDERSON 
MINIATURE SAZAPHONES, M. GOLDSTEIN 
MISS AMERICA, SALLY RAND ENT. INC. 
MONKEY SPEEDWAY, A. J. HYNES 
MONTE CRISTO GLASS CLEANER, 

ROBERT VORGANG 
MOVIE FLASH, MAX SCHWARTZ 
MOVIE OF YOU, ALFRED LAMB 
MUSEE MECHANIQUE, SlD WOLFE 
NAIL GAME, SlD WOLF 

NATIONAL GARDEN SHOW, T. R. EWART 
NIPPON BAZAAR, A. KANZAKI 
NORWAY, P. R. POULSSON 
NOVELTIES, CHAS. G. DAVIS 
NOVELTY PHOTOGRAPHY, MAX SCHWARTZ 



NUDE RANCH, SALLY RAND, 

W. KEN DAILEY 

OAKWOOD BARBECUE, C. L. CAMERON 
OCTOPUS, DANIEL C. CROSS 
OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER, 

RAYMOND MOULIN 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS, 

H. S. CROCKER Co. INC. 
OLD BUDAPEST, NICHOLAS KRAUSZ 
OLD SOUTHERN CANDY KITCHEN, 

J. A. HARVEY, JR. 
ORANGE BLOSSOMS & LAVENDER, 

JACK RUSHIN 

ORIENTAL BAZAAR, SIDNEY WOLFE 
OWL DRUG STORE, J. W. PORTER 
PANCAKE SHOP, B. F. STEACY 
PANTHEON DE LA GUERRE, 

ISLAND CONCESSIONS INC. 
PAVILION OF PORTUGAL, 

E. GOULARD DA COSTA 
PEANUTS & POPCORN, 

ISLAND CATERING Co. 
PEGGY'S SHOW, PEGGY COFFIN 
PENGRAPH HANDWRITING ANALYSIS, 

DR. E. F. BELL 

PENNY ARCADE, HERMAN R. ZAPF 
PENNY CRUSHERS, BERNARD DAVIS 
PENNY WEIGHING SCALES, 

PEERLESS W. & V. MACHINES 
PERFUME CONCESSION, SlD WOLFE 
PHILIPPINE SHOP, GORMAN R. SILEN 
PHOTO-STRIP MACH., H. L. CUNNINGHAM 
PIG'N WHISTLE, B. J. CROMBIE 
PLASTIC NOVELTIES, ELIOT G. FARRINGTDN 
PLASTIC & WOOD NAMES, JACK RUSHIN 
PLAYLAND, E. MOLINEUX 
PONY RIDE, J. A. BANKS 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH, L. J. MILLER 
PUPPET SHOW CSALICI'SD, MR. BONDESDN 

REDWOOD NOVELTIES, C. D. MDLANDER 
REDWOOD PLAQUES, MODNEY ART Co. 
RIPLEY'S BELIEVE IT OR NOT, 

FRANK ZAMBRENO 
ROLLER COASTER, CYCLONE COASTER CO. 

ROLLO-PLANE, DANIEL C. CROSS 
RONDAVOO RESTAURANT & BAR, 

GEORGE HALEY 

RUDICK'S GIFT SHOPS, HERMAN RUDICK 
RUMANIA SHOP, ANGELA JONESCU 
RUSHIN LINEN, JACK RUSHIN 
RUSHIN GADGETS, JACK RUSHIN 
RUSHIN LEATHER GOODS, JACK RUSHIN 
RUSSIAN RESTAURANT, E. BORNADSKY 
RUSSIAN ARTS & CRAFTS, ROSE ISAAK 
SALIH ENTERPRISES, FRED M. SALIH 
SALLY RAND NUDE RANCH, 
SALLY RAND ENTERPRISES 
SANDWICH SLIDE, JOHN L. Co. 
SEA PLANE, A. P. MANTZ 
SHEA AND DAY CHECKING STANDS, 
FRANK SHEA 

SHOOTING GALLERY, F. M. McFALLS 

SIGRID HEMATITE SHOP, 
SIGRID M. ANDERSON 

SO-REAL FLOWERS, T. J. O'DWYER 

SNAKE SHOW, CLIF WlLSDN 

5NOKO, WALTERS & MUHLMAN 

SOUTH OF THE BORDER, AMDS CENDALLI 

SOUVENIR PLATES, M. SELLER & Co. 

SOUVENIR TURTLES, S. GORDON 

SPILL THE MILK, J. A. HARVEY, JR. 

SPORTLAND, WALTER OSWALD 

STARLAND, BUD CARPENTER 

STEACY SERVICE CO., D. F. STEACY 

STRATOSHIP, NATE MILLER 

STROMBERG CONDENSER, JACK RUSHIN 

SWISS-BELGIUM-ITALY SHOP, 
BERTHA SOLY 

SWISS SALES EXHIBIT, HANS STALDER 

TEMPLE OF RELIGION AND TOWER OF 
PEACE, DR. R. E. SHIELDS 

THRELKELD'S SCONES, J. H. THRELKELD 



APPENDIX 



XXXV 



1940 CONCESSIONS (Continued) 



TIN TYPE OPERATORS, MAX SCHWARTZ 
TOILET LOCKS, COIN OPTD., G. W. DICKSDN 
TOWER OF JEWELS, A. F. SANFORD 
TOWER OPTICAL CO. INC., C. R. JOHNSON 
TOY SHOP, PHIL SCHUMAN 
TREASURE ISLAND MILK CO., 

THOMAS E. FOSTER 
TRUE BLUE CAFETERIA, 

LARS SVENDSGAARD 
UNIQUE NOVELTY AND GIFT SHOP, 

KINDEL & GRAHAM 
VATICINATION, L. WILSON 
VENDING MACHINES, WALTER OSWALD 
VOICE RECORDING MACHINE, 

S. M. WRIGHT 



WATCHLA, GEORGE HALEY 

WESTERN UNION, A. E. LITTLER 

WEST FERRY BLDG. FOUNTAIN LUNCH 

AND NOVELTIES, JAMES A. GRAY 
WEST INDIES HUT, C. VANDERSTEEN 
WEST INDIAN JEWELRY, LEO CARDOZO 
WHEEL CHAIRS H. A. WAHLGREEN 
WHITE STAR CAFE, 

THRELKELD COMMISSARY 
WINE GARDEN, W. GOLDMAN 
WOMEN'S CLUB HSE., MRS. GEO. HEARST 
WONDERS OF SAND ART, CLAUDE K. BELL 
WORLD OF A MILLION YEARS AGO, 

ISLAND CONCESSIONS INC. 

YELLOW CAB CO., W. LANCING ROTHCHILD 



1939 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY IB 

OPENING CEREMONIES, NATIONAL BEEF 
SHOW, BEAUTY CONTEST, COSSACK CHOR- 
US, SKI JUMP. 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19 
BEEF SHOW, SKI JUMP. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY ZO 

BEEF SHOW, FORD LUNCHEON, GERTRUDE 
ATHERTON, SKI JUMP. 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21 

SKI JUMP, RICHMOND LODGE DANCE. 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22 

CHILDREN'S DAY, FEDERAL CHORUS, HIS- 
TORICAL PAGEANT, FEDERAL CHOIR AND 
BAND, POST CONTROL OPERATORS' DIN- 
NER. 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23 

BANK OF AMERICA DINNER, AUCTION OF 
STEERS. 

FRIDAY, MARCH 1O 

NATIONAL STATE AND COUNTY PARK SER- 
VICE, COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL HIGHWAY 
OFFICIALS. 

SATURDAY, MARCH 11 

W. P. FULLER DAY, ARCHITECT'S AND EN- 
GINEER'S DAY, RECREATIONAL CAMPING 
AND WILDLIFE DAY. 

SUNDAY, MARCH 12 
RANSOHOFF'S DAY. 

MONDAY, MARCH 13 

WESTERN MAYORS' DAY. 

TUESDAY, MARCH 14 

DINNER FOR MAYOR LAGUARDIA. 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15 

SAN FRANCISCO ARCHITECTURAL CLUB 
[ARTHUR BROWN, SPEAKER}, MLLE. EVE 
CURIE DINNER. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 16 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSICAL CLUB, TEA AND 
MUSICAL. 

FRIDAY, MARCH 17 

IRELAND DAY, 6- DAY BIKE RACE. 

SATURDAY, MARCH IB 

SHERIFF'S DAY, CHAPMAN COLLEGE DAY, 
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DAY, WELLS 
FARGO DAY. 

SUNDAY, MARCH 19 

CHILDREN'S DAY, NEWSPAPER BOY'S DAY. 

MONDAY, MARCH 2O 

MRS. ELEANOR ROOSEVELT DAY, ORDER 
OF MOOSE DINNER. 

TUESDAY, MARCH 21 

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASS'N., 
CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL, BAND CON- 
CERT, EDWIN FRANKO GOLDMAN. 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22 

PAN AMERICAN AIRWAY DAY, EXPOSITION 
BAND CONCERT. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 23 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF DECORATORS 
DAY, CARILLON RECITAL. 

FRIDAY, MARCH 24 

CALIFORNIA DAIRY COUNCIL DAY, FRESNO 



CITY, COUNTY & FRESNO STATE COLLEGE 
DAY. 

SATURDAY, MARCH 25 

OSTEOPATHIC DAY, Los ANGELES EX- 
AMINER DAY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
GROUP, BRUNO LASKER SPEAKER. 

SUNDAY, MARCH 26 

CONCERT, DR. EDWIN FRANKO GOLDMAN, 
CONDUCTOR. 

MONDAY, MARCH 27 

FIRESTONE DAY, PACIFIC MANIFOLDING 
BOOK DAY, SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, RICH- 
ARD CROOKS. 

TUESDAY, MARCH 2B 

CONCERT, PHILIPPINE CONSTABULARY 
BAND. 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29 
FEDERAL BUILDING OPEN. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 3O 

POPPY DAY, CITY AND COUNTY FEDERA- 
TION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. 

FRIDAY, MARCH 31 

SACRAMENTO JUNIOR COLLEGE DAY. MET- 
ALCRAFT DEMONSTRATION. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 1 

AMERICAN LEGION DAY, STATE LEGISLA- 
TORS DAY, SAN JOSE STATE COLLEGE 
DAY, ALPHA GAMMA SIGMA DAY. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 2 

BUDDHIST DAY. LAUREL CLUB DAY. 

MONDAY, APRIL 3 

SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY ENGINEERS, 
CHILDREN'S DAY. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 4 

UNIVERSITY OF REDLANDS, PACIFIC ARTS 
ASSOCIATION, L. A. EXAMINER NEWSBOYS. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5 

CHILDREN'S DAY, YOUTH DAY, ROYAL 
NEIGHBORS. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 6 

ARMY DAY, AMERICAN ASSN. DF HEALTH, 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION & RECREATION DAY. 

FRIDAY, APRIL 7 
CHILDREN'S DAY. 

SATURDAY, APRIL B 

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS, 
CROWN ZELLERBACH DAY. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 9 
CHILDREN'S DAY. 

MONDAY, APRIL ID 

VISIT OF CROWN PRINCE FREDERIC AND 
CROWN PRINCESS INGRID OF DENMARK. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 11 

PUBLIC BROADCAST, EDUCATIONAL EX- 
HIBIT, SAN FRANCISCO BUILDING, BALBOA 
HIGH DRAMA STUDENTS. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12 

APARTMENT HOUSE INDUSTRY DAY. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 13 

M-G-M DAY, CONCERT, BRAZILIAN OR- 
CHESTRA. 

FRIDAY, APRIL 14 

OPENING OF INTER-AMERICAN TRAVEL 



XXXVI 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM (Continued) 



CONGRESS WEEK. LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEERS 
DAY, CHICD STATE COLLEGE, PAN AMERI- 
CAN DAY. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 15 

CONCERT, EDWIN FRANKO GOLDMAN 
BAND, BCIQTS CEREMONIAL AND PAG- 
EANT, CIVITAN INTERNATIONAL, [PACIFIC 
HOUSED, BUCK JONES AT CHILDREN'S 
VILLAGE, CHILDREN'S DAY, Los ANGELES 
TIMES, CALIFORNIA SCHOLARSHIP FED- 
ERATION, POMONA COLLEGE, I.A.T. C. 
DAY. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 16 

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY, HEALDSBURG 
DAY, INTER-AMERICAN TRAVEL CONGRESS, 
NATIONAL GARDEN WEEK. 

MONDAY, APRIL 17 

AUTOMOBILE DAY, DAUGHTERS OF CALI- 
FORNIA PIONEERS, SAFEWAY EMPLOYEES 
ASSOCIATION OF OFFICERS DAY. 

TUESDAY, APRIL IB 
JOHN MUIR DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19 

SONS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTION DAY. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 2D 

SONOMA COUNTY, FEDERATION OF CON- 
GREGATIONAL WOMEN OF CALIFORNIA DAY. 

FRIDAY, APRIL 21 

SAN FRANCISCO ADVERTISING CLUB DAY. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 22 

CHILDREN'S DAY, ST. MARY'S COLLEGE, 
Y.M.C.A. BOYS, JOHN MUIR DAY, NA- 
TIONAL RESTAURANT ASSOCIATION. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 23 

LAKE COUNTY, COLLEGE OF HOLY NAMES, 
KNIGHTS TEMPLAR, SAN FRANCISCO CEN- 
TRAL COUNCIL OF Civic CLUBS DAY. 

MONDAY, APRIL 24 

NATIONAL WILDFLDWER PROTECTION DAY. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 25 

EDWIN MARKHAM DAY, NATIONAL INSTI- 
TUTE OF Music AND ARTS, GOLD STAR 
MOTHERS DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26 

OPENING CALIFORNIA STATE FEDERATION 
OF Music CLUBS CONVENTION OF TREAS- 
URE ISLAND. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 27 

CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL Music FESTI- 
VAL. 

FRIDAY, APRIL 2B 

STATE HIGH SCHOOL BAND, ORCHESTRA 
AND CHORUS, FESTIVAL CALIFORNIA FED- 
ERATION OF Music CLUBS. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 29 

Los ANGELES DAY, JAPAN DAY, CHIL- 
DREN'S DAY, CALIFORNIA HIGH SCHOOL 
BAND FESTIVAL, ROUND TABLE INTERNA- 
TIONAL, CALIFORNIA STATE ECLECTIC MED- 
ICAL SOCIETY, SIXTH WESTERN SHADE 
TREE CONFERENCE DAY. 

SUNDAY, APRIL 3D 

ITALY DAY, Los ANGELES COUNTY, RED- 
WOOD CITY, WESTERN ELECTRIC Co., 
RAINBOW GIRLS DAY. 

MONDAY, MAY 1 

MAY DAY, BETTER BABIES WEEK, CHIL- 
DREN'S DAY, CERTIFIED BOILER ELEVATOR 
AND PRESSURE VESSEL INSPECTORS DAY. 

TUESDAY, MAY 2 

BETTER BABIES DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 3 
PORTOLA MOTHERS. 

THURSDAY, MAY 4 

PRESIDIO HIGH SCHOOL P.T.A. DAY. 

FRIDAY, MAY 5 

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC, MADERA 
COUNTY, PACIFIC NATIONAL BANK, HUM- 
BOLDT COUNTY DAY. 

SATURDAY, MAY 6 

SMITH DAY, CHILDREN'S DAY, SAN FRAN- 



CISCO STATE COLLEGE, SAN FRANCISCO 
COLLEGE FDR WOMEN DAY. 

SUNDAY, MAY 7 

CLEANERS AND DYERS, SANTA CLARA 
COUNTY, CATHOLIC DAY, PETALUMA DAY, 
CALIFORNIA FEDERATION OF LEGAL SEC- 
RETARIES, LAMBDA SIGMA PHI DAY. 

MONDAY, MAY B 

EDWIN FRANKO GOLDMAN BAND, FASH- 
ION SHOW AT CAFE LAFAYETTE. 

TUESDAY, MAY 9 

CALIFORNIA GRAYS, UNITED DAUGHTERS 
OF THE CONFEDERACY DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY ID 

JEWISH DAY, MISSION GRAMMAR SCHOOL, 
PRODUCERS COUNCIL ARCHITECTS DAY. 

THURSDAY, MAY 11 

ODD FELLOWS DAY, CANDY DAY, FIFTH 
REGIONAL Music FESTIVAL, CHILDREN'S 
DAY. 

FRIDAY, MAY 12 

HOSPITAL DAY, FIFTH REGIONAL Music 
FESTIVAL, PALO ALTO SCHOOLS, SAN 
FERNANDO VALLEY, WEST SIDE, OPTIMIST 
INTERNATIONAL, PACIFIC STUDENT BODY 
PRESIDENTS' DAY. 

SATURDAY, MAY 13 

TRIPLET DAY, CALAVERAS COUNTY, Mu 
PHI EPSILON DAY, CHILDREN'S DAY, GIRL 
SCOUTS, SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF Music, WEDGEWDOD DAY. 

SUNDAY, MAY 14 

MOTHERS' DAY, SOUTHERN PACIFIC, RO- 
MANIA, SAN JOSE, PITTSBURG AND CO- 
LUMBIA STEEL Co., ALTURAS AND MDDOC 
COUNTY DAY. 

MONDAY, MAY 15 

HAYWARD DAY, CALIFORNIA CONSERVING 
Co., FRANCONIA DAY. 

TUESDAY, MAY 16 

NATIVE SONS, CALIFORNIA CONFERENCE 
OF SOCIAL WORKERS DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 17 

NORWAY DAY, SAN FRANCISCO ARCHITEC- 
TURAL CLUB, ST. DOMINIC'S BOYS CHOIR. 

THURSDAY, MAY IB 

WORLD PEACE DAY, AMERICAN WAR MOTH- 
ERS' DAY, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MA- 
CHINES DAY. 

FRIDAY, MAY 19 

SCHOOL TRAFFIC PATROL, BERKELEY DAY, 
SAN BENITO AND HOLISTER COUNTY, 
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS, SAN FRANCISCO 
SAFE DEPOSIT ASSOCIATION DAY. 

SATURDAY, MAY 2O 

SAN Luis OBISPO COUNTY, RUSSIAN 
RIVER RECREATIONAL AREA, DON LEE, 
SUPREME FOREST WOODMAN'S CIRCLE 
DAY. 

SUNDAY, MAY 21 

POST OFFICE, LIVERMQRE, VALLEY OF THE 
MOON, UNITED GROCERS, LTD., CIGAR 
AND TOBACCO PRODS., NEVADA COUNTY 
DAY. 

MONDAY, MAY 22 

COTTON WEEK, CHRYSLER DAY. 

TUESDAY, MAY 23 

Los GATOS AND SARATOGA, NATIONAL 
ASSOCIATION OF PURCHASING AGENTS 
DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24 

COFFEE DAY, MOUNTAIN VIEW AND Los 
GATDS DAY. 

THURSDAY, MAY 25 

CATHOLIC DAUGHTERS OF AMERICA, IN- 
TERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FDR IDENTIFI- 
CATION, FOOD INDUSTRY DAY. 

FRIDAY, MAY 26 

ALAMEDA CITY, PULP AND PAPER MILL 
EMPLOYEES, NATIONAL SOJOURNERS' DAY. 

SATURDAY, MAY 27 

BRITISH EMPIRE, MENDDCINO COUNTY, 



APPENDIX 



XXX Vll 



1939 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM (Continued) 



JUNKET FOOD PRODUCTS, AMERICAN AS- 
SOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S DAY. 

SUNDAY, MAY 28 

CHILDREN'S DAY, SANTA CLARA CITY, 
FORD DAY, SIERRA AND PLUMAS COUNTY, 
YOUNG REPUBLICANS, CITY OF PARIS, 
GYRO CLUB DAY. 

MONDAY, MAY 29 

OAKLAND DAY, CHILDREN'S DAY, CHIRO- 
PRACTORS, UNITED COMMERCIAL TRAVEL- 
ERS DAY. 

TUESDAY, MAY 3D 

MEMORIAL DAY, SAN RAFAEL MILITARY 
ACADEMY DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 31 

ORGAN RECITAL, JAMES MCMILLAM OF 
MONTEZUMA SCHOOL, DEDICATION DF NA- 
TIONAL GUARD STATUE IN CALIFORNIA 
BUILDING. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 1 

PUBLIC WEDDING DAY. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 2 

PRESIDENT SAMOZA DAY, SAN LEANDRO 
SCHOOLS' DAY. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 3 

SHRINE DAY, CALIFORNIA STATE FRA- 
TERNAL CONGRESS, CHILDREN'S DAY. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 4 

MODESTO, POLK GULCH, HONOLULU CON- 
SERVATORY OF Music, APPLE DAY. 

MONDAY, JUNE 5 

EMERYVILLE, DIME DAY, WINE AND AL- 
LIED INDUSTRIES DAY. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 6 

CALIFORNIA WRITERS' CLUB DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7 

ARMY BAND CONCERT, ORGAN RECITAL BY 
MARGUERITE Dix. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 8 

OREGON STATE COLLEGE DAY. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 9 

HOOVER CLEANER, SOCIETY OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINEERS' DAY. 

SATURDAY, JUNE ID 

MILLS COLLEGE, JAPAN TOURIST DAY, 
SCHMIDT LITHOGRAPH, CATHOLIC PRO- 
FESSIONAL WOMEN, PRINTING INDUSTRIES 
DAY. 
SUNDAY, JUNE 11 

ARMOUR AND COMPANY, MASSACHUSETTS, 
SAN RAFAEL, SAN MATED COUNTY, 
CROCKER FIRST NATIONAL BANK DAY. 

MONDAY, JUNE 12 

CHILDREN'S DAY, CATHOLIC LADIES AID 
SOCIETY, CALIFORNIA REAL ESTATE AS- 
SOCIATION DAY. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 13 

NEIGHBORS OF WOODCRAFT DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14 

UTAH, FLAG DAY, AMERICAN SEED TRADE 
ASSOCIATION DAY. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 15 

RECEPTION AND TEA, HONORING WIVES OF 
WESTERN FARM ECONOMICS ASSN., WASH- 
INGTON STATE GOLDEN JUBILEE CHOIR 
FROM LUTHERAN COLLEGE. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 16 

GRADUATION EXERCISES, CALIF. NAUTI- 
CAL SCHOOL. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 17 

DENMARK, ARIZONA, SAN DIEGO CITY AND 
COUNTY, YOLD COUNTY, KERN COUNTY, 
OREGON CAVEMEN, STATE ASSOCIATION 
OF COUNTY TREASURERS, MOTHER GOOSE 
DAY. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 18 

ELKS FLAG DAY, BURBANK, BEAR PHOTO 
SERVICE, FATHER'S DAY. 

MONDAY, JUNE 19 

CHILDREN'S DAY, Miss KLO DAY, PA- 
CIFIC COAST DPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
DAY. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 2O 

Pi BETA Mu, AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSO- 
CIATION DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21 

NATIONAL CREDIT, ASSOCIATION OF IN- 
SURANCE COMMISSIONERS, NEW HAMP- 
SHIRE DAY. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 22 

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION, AGRI- 
CULTURAL COUNCIL DAY. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 23 

DRUIDS', NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
BUILDING OWNERS AND MANAGER, AL- 
LIED AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRIES DAY. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 24 

FINNISH DAY, RAINBOW, 42ND DIVISION, 
BOYS' DAY, INSURANCE DAY, ADVERTIS- 
ING WEEK, DISTRICT ATTORNEYS DAY. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 25 

VALLEJO TIMES- HERALD, VIRGINIA CITY, 
JUNIOR MUSICIANS, PACIFIC ADVERTISING 
CLUBS, CALIFORNIA NEWSPAPER PUBLISH- 
ERS ASSOCIATION DAY, GAS MODEL HY- 
DROPLANE MEET, LUTHERAN DAY. 

MONDAY, JUNE 26 

JUNIOR STATESMEN OF AMERICA DAY, 
COOLIDGE QUARTET. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 27 

DELAWARE, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
MUSEUMS DAY, FENCING CHAMPIONSHIPS, 
SHOPPING NEWS CARRIERS, CALIFORNIA 
SHOPPING NEWS CARRIERS, JUN. STATES- 
MEN, Music TEACHERS, CALIF. WRITERS' 
CLUB. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28 

RETAIL DRY GOODS ASSN. OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS 
DAY, FENCING CHAMPIONSHIPS. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 29 

TENNESSEE, THETA DELTA CHI, ASSOCIA- 
TED TRAFFIC CLUBS OF AMERICA. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 3O 

CALIFORNIA ARTISTS, WASHINGTON, HIGH 
TWELVE DAY. 

SATURDAY, JULY 1 

BRITISH COLUMBIA AND DOMINION OF 
CANADA, NATIONAL RETAIL DRY GOODS 
ASSN., OPTOMETRISTS, PACIFIC SLOPE 
TYPOGRAPHICAL, LINCOLN HIGHWAY, UNI- 
VERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SUMMER SESSION, 
NATIONAL EDITORS ASSOCIATION DAY. 

SUNDAY, JULY 2 

PACIFIC DIVISION OF AMERICAN SOCIETY 
FOR ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE, DPTOM- 
ETRY, SANTA CRUZ, JUGOSLAV, SANTA FE 
DAY, BENNY GOODMAN BAND, EXPOSITION 
REGATTA. 

MONDAY, JULY 3 

NILES, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON DAY, 
COOLIDGE QUARTET, GLDBE, ARIZONA 
DAY, CHILDREN'S DAY, FRECKLE FACE 
DAY, INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW WEEK, 
OREGON WEEK, NAVY WEEK. 

TUESDAY, JULY 4 

FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATIONS, ALLIED 
VETERANS, FICTION DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 5 

SIGMA KAPPA SORORITY, NATIONAL AMA- 
TEUR PRESS ASSOCIATION, TREASURE IS- 
LAND TALENT PARADE. 

THURSDAY, JULY 6 

INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW, ASTORIA, 
OREGON DAY, NATIONAL ORGANIZATION 
HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM DIRECTORS. 

FRIDAY, JULY 7 

HAWAII, NATIONAL EDUCATION DAY, RED 
HEAD CONTEST, SIGMA KAPPA SORORITY 
CALUMNI], PASADENA JUNIOR COLLEGE, 
AUNT MARY DAY. 

SATURDAY, JULY 8 

CALIFORNIA RACE RELATIONS, CZECHO- 
SLOVOKIA, INTERSTATE COMMISSION ON 



XXXV111 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM (Continued) 



CRIME, SOUTHERN MONTEREY COUNTY 
AND KING CITY DAY, NAVY DANCES. 
SUNDAY, JULY 9 

ASHLAND, DREGON DAY, SALINAS DAY, 
STANISLAUS COUNTY, FILIPINO FEDERA- 
TION OF AMERICA, ARGENTINA DAY. 
MONDAY, JULY ID 

AMERICAN SOCIETY MECHANICAL ENGI- 
NEERS WEEK, COOLIDGE QUARTET, CHIL- 
DREN'S DAY, NAVY MOTHERS' DAY, 
TREASURE ISLAND JAPANESE STAR FESTI- 
VAL DAY. 
TUESDAY, JULY 11 

CALIFORNIA WRITERS' CLUB, MARYLAND, 
SALINAS OUTDOOR GIRL, ALPHA DMI- 
CRON Pi SORORITY DAY. 
WEDNESDAY, JULY 12 

ORPHANS' DAY. 
THURSDAY, JULY 13 

ENGINEERS' DAY, CALIF. SCHOOL EM- 
PLOYEES ASSOCIATION. 
FRIDAY, JULY 14 

KAY KYSER WEEK, FRANCE DAY, LIONS 
INTERNATIONAL DAY. 
SATURDAY, JULY 15 

TREASURE ISLAND DOG SHOW, MISSOURI 
GOVERNOR'S, AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIA- 
TION, DOLL DAY, POETRY DAY, IOTA TAU 
TAU DAY. 
SUNDAY, JULY 16 

MAGICIANS' DAY, CALIF. STATE EMPLOY- 
MISSOURI HOMECOMING, LUTHERAN DAY, 
EES, ROSICRUCIANS, BAHAI DAY. 
MONDAY, JULY 17 

DRAFT HORSE SHOW, CDOLIDGE QUAR- 
TET, JITTERBUG CONTEST, CHILDREN'S 
DAY. 
TUESDAY, JULY 18 

Y.M.I. AND Y.L.I. DAY, INTERNATIONAL 
STEREDTYPERS AND ELECTRDTYPERS UN- 
ION CONVENTION, CALIFORNIA NURSERY- 
MAN'S DAY. 
WEDNESDAY, JULY 19 

HAIR STYLISTS, SCIENTIFIC ASTROLOGERS, 
S. F. STATE COLLEGE SUMMER SESSION 
DAY. 
THURSDAY, JULY 2d 

UTAH DAY, B'NAI BRITH DAY. 
FRIDAY, JULY 21 

Music HALL VARIETIES WEEK, PA- 
CIFIC GROVE, PHI DELTA CHI, SECOND 
DIVISION ASSOCIATION DAY, REXALL 
GOLDEN GATE JUBILEE CONVENTION. 
SATURDAY, JULY 22 

GENERAL MOTORS DAY, SALVATION ARMY, 
IDAHO, PACIFIC MANIFOLDING BOOK COM- 
PANY, EMPLOYEES DAY, TRAVELERS' PRO- 
TECTIVE ASSOCIATION DAY, Music HALL 
VARIETIES WEEK. 
SUNDAY, JULY 23 

RECREATION WEEK, VALLEJO EVENING 
CHRONICLE DAY, LOYAL DRDER OF MOOSE. 
MONDAY, JULY 24 

COOLIDGE QUARTET, PRESBYTERIAN CON- 
FERENCE, CHILDREN'S DAY. 
TUESDAY, JULY 25 

LITERARY LANDMARKS DAY. 
WEDNESDAY, JULY 26 

CHICAGO, AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF HOME- 
OPATH ics DAY. 
THURSDAY, JULY 27 

SIXTH PACIFIC SCIENCE CONGRESS WEEK, 
CIVIL ENGINEERS, RHODE ISLAND, CHIR- 
OPODISTS' DAY. 
FRIDAY, JULY 28 

TED LEWIS VARIETY SHOW, JITTERBUG 
CONTEST. 
SATURDAY, JULY 29 

SIXTH PACIFIC SCIENCE CONGRESS, CATH- 
OLIC CENTRAL VERIN, DERRICK LEHMER, 
CAN'T BUST 'EM, LEAGUE OF WESTERN 
WRITERS' DAY. 



SUNDAY, JULY 3D 

Swiss DAY, SOAP Box DERBY, SWINE 
SHOW WEEK, OAKLAND BIG SISTER HOME 
VISIT, SHASTA TRINITY COUNTY REUNION 
PICNIC. 
MONDAY, JULY 31 

COOLIDGE QUARTET, UNITED GERMAN 
SANGERFEST, CHILDREN'S DAY. 
TUESDAY, AUGUST 1 

MORAL REARMAMENT DAY. 
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2 

CULVER MILITARY ACADEMY ALUMNI, 
HONG KONG CLIPPER DAY. 
THURSDAY, AUGUST 3 

OPENING NEW FOLIES BERGERE, BASE- 
BALL, BOY SCOUT, WESTERN PINE ASSO- 
CIATION, CHILDREN'S DAY. 
FRIDAY, AUGUST 4 

U. S. COAST GUARD DAY. 
SATURDAY, AUGUST 5 

AMERICAN HAWAIIAN STEAMSHIP, NEVADA, 
SWEDEN, PACIFIC NATIONAL FIRE INSUR- 
ANCE DAY. 
SUNDAY, AUGUST 6 

AUTO RACES, MARVELOUS MARIN, WOMEN 
OF THE MOOSE, GIDEON, FOOD INDUSTRY, 
GALLUP, NEW MEXICO DAY, CACTUS DAY. 
MONDAY, AUGUST 7 

MARKET WEEK, CHARLIE MCCARTHY DAY, 
CERAMICS, CHILDREN'S DAY. 
TUESDAY, AUGUST 8 

CALIFORNIA WRITERS' CLUB DAY, NA- 
TIONAL DUNKING, CHILDREN'S DAY. 
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9 
MATSON, CLIPPER DAY. 
THURSDAY, AUGUST ID 

MILITARY ORDER OF PURPLE HEART, 
TOASTMASTER AND TDASTM I STRESS, PENN- 
SYLVANIA STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE DAY. 
FRIDAY, AUGUST 11 

POSTAL SUPERVISORS DAY. 
SATURDAY, AUGUST 12 

AMERICAN LEGION, TEXAS, SISKIYDU 
COUNTY, FIESTA PLAZA, DAHLIA, AMERI- 
CAN BUILDING MAINTENANCE DAY. 
SUNDAY, AUGUST 13 

PHILIPPINE VETERANS, FOURTH DIVISION 
DAY, TREASURE ISLAND MARATHON. 
MONDAY, AUGUST 14 

CONNECTICUT, TOY DAY, CHILDREN'S DAY. 
TUESDAY, AUGUST 15 

EDDY DUCHIN VARIETY WEEK, ELECTRI- 
CAL INSPECTORS, CALIFORNIA WRITERS' 
CLUB DAY. 
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16 

REGISTERED NURSES, AMERICAN TRANSIT 
ASSOCIATION, NEBRASKA- UNION PACIFIC, 
CLIPPER DAY. 
THURSDAY, AUGUST 17 

ALASKA-YUKON, YUBA-SUTTER DAY. 
FRIDAY, AUGUST 18 

ROTARY, METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE, 
INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER DAY. 
SATURDAY, AUGUST 19 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF BANKING, AVIA- 
TION, LONG BEACH, WOMEN'S CHAMBER 
OF COMMERCE, ORDER OF JOB'S DAUGH- 
TERS, LESLIE SALT, PHI SIGMI CHI DAY. 
SUNDAY, AUGUST 2D 

TEHAMA COUNTY, HUNGARY, IMPROVED 
ORDER OF REDMEN, VETERANS 3lsT RAIL- 
WAY ENGINEERS, FORT BRAGG, SUISUN- 
FAIRFIELD, OAKLAND WHOLESALE GRO- 
CERS, SMITH, JOHNSON, BROWN, MILLER, 
ANDERSON, WILLIAMS AND JONES DAY. 
MONDAY, AUGUST 21 

STAR BOAT CHAMPIONSHIP REGATTA WEEK, 
INTERNATIONAL PHOTO -ENGRAVERS, ILLU- 
MINATING ENGINEERS SOCIETY, ILLUMINA- 
TION NIGHT, OAKDALE CHILDREN'S DAY. 
TUESDAY, AUGUST 22 

WRITERS AND COMPOSERS WEEK, STAR 



XXXIX 



1939 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM (Continued) 



BOAT CHAMPIONSHIP REGATTA WEEK, 
CALIFORNIA MRA, ADMIRAL YARNELL, 
AMERICAN TITLE ASSOCIATION. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23 

CLIPPER DAY, MERKLEY'S MUSICAL MAIDS. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 24 

UNITARIAN, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
CREDIT MEN'S DAY. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 25 

AMERICAN DIETETIC ASSOCIATION, CALI- 
FORNIA WILD FLOWER DAY. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26 

POWER CRUISER RACES, MICHIGAN, ALA- 
BAMA, ARCADIA, SCOTTISH, SYNTONIC, 
SIGMA CHI, PACIFIC COAST ASSOCIATION 
OF PORT AUTHORITIES DAY. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27 

POWER CRUISER RACES, NORWAY, EAGLES, 
SEBASTOPOL, NORTH DAKOTA STATE SO- 
CIETY, EMPORIUM, BETA SIGMA PHI, CON- 
TRA COSTA OIL WORKERS, SANTA CATA- 
LINA ISLAND DAY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY 
PICNIC. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 28 

REGATTA, BEAVER, CHILDREN'S DAY, 
NORTH DAKOTA DAY. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 29 

PHIL HARRIS WEEK, ORDER OF EASTERN 
STAR, ASSOCIATED PRESS DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3D 

CLIPPER DAY, FREE PLYMOUTH DAY, 
GOLDEN WEDDING DAY. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 

NETHERLANDS, CANDID CAMERA, LAMBDA 
CHI ALPHA, CHI Psi DAY. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 

CHRISTIAN BUSINESS MEN'S COMMITTEE 
DAY, WELSH EISTEDDFOD AND Music 
FESTIVAL, TWENTY-THIRTY CLUB DAY. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 

JACK BENNY, MARY LIVINGSTONE AND 
PHIL HARRIS MUSICAL VARIETY SHOW, 
GOOD TEMPLARS, SEA SCOUT REGATTA, 
WAUKEGAN, AMATEUR RADIO RELAY 
LEAGUE DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 

MASTER BARBERS, MCMAHAN FURNITURE 
COMPANY, 141ST AREO SQUADRON A. E. F., 
NEGRO DAY, NAVY COMMUNICATION RE- 
SERVE, AMADOR COUNTY DAY. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 

LABOR DAY, ALPHA KAPPA LAMBDA, WAL- 
THER LEAGUE LUTHERAN CHURCH, CON- 
SUMER CO-OPERATIVES, ASSOCIATION OF 
BUSINESS OFFICERS OF COLLEGES AND 
UNIVERSITIES OF THE WESTERN STATES, 
BEN BARD PLAYERS DAY. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 

SIGMA PHI EPSILDN, NATIONAL FEDERA- 
TION OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 
PORTUGAL DAY, CLIPPER DAY. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 

BRAZIL DAY, 4-H CLUB, CHEVROLET, 
OUTDOOR SHOWMEN, CLIPPER DAY. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER S 

ILLINOIS, PIONEER WOMEN OF CALIFOR- 
NIA. LODI DAY. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 

ADMISSION DAY, WINE DAY, WEST COAST 
LIFE INSURANCE, GAS APPLIANCE, BANK 
OF AMERICA DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER TO 

KEEP AMERICA OUT OF WAR" DAY, DELTA 
PHI EPSILDN, HOT Music SOCIETY, CARD 
ROMA, SONS OF ITALY DAY. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 
PHI DELTA THETA DAY. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 

HARRY OWENS AND HIS ROYAL HAWAIIANS 
MUSICAL VARIETY WEEK, BIGGS DAY. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 

JOSE ITURBI AND SAN FRANCISCO SYM- 
PHONY CONCERT, NATIONAL CUSTOMS 
SERVICE ASSOCIATION. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 

FREE FOOD DAY, NATIONAL COUNCIL OF 
CATHOLIC WOMEN'S DAY. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 

SAN LEANDRO, MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY, PACIFIC COAST HARDWARE 
DEALERS ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL AMERI- 
CAN DAY. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 

CITY OF Los ANGELES, STEUBEN DAY, 
KEY SYSTEM, ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIES, 
MONTANA DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 

TUOLUMNE COUNTY, DELTA CHI SIGMA 
SORORITY, SACRAMENTO BREUNER, DEL 
NORTE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA JUNIOR 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE DAY. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER IB 
CHILE, HIBERNIA DAY. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 

LEAGUE OF CALIFORNIA MUNICIPALITIES, 
CALIFORNIA SEWAGE WORKS ASSOCIATION, 
ANAHEIM DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2O 

TREASURE ISLAND SYMPHONY CONCERT, 
GRAND HOTEL, PENNSYLVANIA, ACCOUNT- 
ANTS DAY. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 
FREE PLYMOUTH DAY. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 

GEORGE OLSEN MUSICAL VARIETY WEEK, 
AUTUMN FESTIVAL, FIRE CHIEFS', CALI- 
FORNIA APARTMENT HOUSE ASSOCIATION 
DAY. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 

LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI SYMPHONY CON- 
CERT, GOVERNOR OLSON, BAKERSFIELD, 
CALIFORNIA STATE BUILDERS EXCHANGE, 
LADIES AUXILIARY INTERNATIONAL ASSO- 
CIATION OF MACHINISTS, CALIFORNIA 
BIRD DAY, SHEEP SHOW, NATIONAL 
GUARD, PIONEER PHILATELIC AND TOUR- 
ISTS' ASSOCIATION DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 

ALBANY, GOLD STAR MOTHERS, SOUTH 
OF MARKET BOYS AND GIRLS, SUNRISE 
BREAKFAST CLUB, INTERNATIONAL, SAN 
FRANCISCO SHUT-IN ASSOCIATION DAY. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 

EXPOSITION STYLE CLINIC AND FASHION 
FESTIVAL. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 

CALIFORNIA WRITERS' CLUB, CHILDREN'S 
DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 

NATIONAL REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION, 
CLIPPER DAY. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2B 

CARRILLO, GOLDEN GATE DENTAL CON- 
GRESS DAY. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 

COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSIONERS, SUN- 
KIST, DIXON, STOCKTON AND COLLEGE 
OF PACIFIC DAY. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 3O 

HARBDR DAY, SOUTHERN COUNCIL DF 
Civic CLUBS, PACIFIC ASSOCIATION OF 
RAILWAY SURGEONS, RETAIL FURNITURE 
DAY, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. SCHOOL 
TRUSTEES ASSOCIATION. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 1 

DE MOLAY, GUADALUPE PARLOR NATIVE 
SONS AND DAUGHTERS, ELDERBLOOM DAY. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 2 

GONZAGA UNIVERSITY DAY. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
TOUR DAY. 



XL 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM (Continued) 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4 

CLIPPER DAY, AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRIC AS- 
SOCIATION. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5 

GEORGE OLSEN MUSICAL VARIETY WEEK, 
BUILDING OFFICIALS DAY. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6 

MOTOR COURTS DAY, ST. IGNATIUS HIGH 
SCHOOL TOUR, SANTA CLARA UNIVER- 
SITY, SAN FRANCISCO GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL 
TOUR DAY. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7 

GENERAL ELECTRIC, SAN FRANCISCO 
BOYS' CLUB, SAN FRANCISCO LINCOLN 
GRAMMAR SCHOOL ASSOCIATION, SHASTA 
UNION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TOUR, PO- 
LAND, SAFEWAY STORES '-CUSTOMERS 
DAY," STOCKTON JUNIOR COLLEGE, Es- 
CALON GRAMMAR SCHOOL TOUR DAY. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8 

COMMUNITY CHEST DAY, ALL-BREEDS 
CHAMPIONSHIP CAT SHOW, REDWOOD 
EMPIRE WEEK, UNITED INSTITUTE OF Mu- 
sic, UKIAH ORPHANS DAY. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 9 

Music WEEK, REDWOOD EMPIRE WEEK. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER TO 

SANGER DAY, INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIA- 
TION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11 

SUNSWEET, ARCHITECTS, MASONIC, NA- 
TIONAL ASSOCIATION INDEPENDENT TIRE 
DEALERS DAY. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12 

ALAMEDA COUNTY DAY, NOKOMIS INDIAN 
TOUR, KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS DAY. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ASSESSORS 
DAY. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 

UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFOR- 
NIA SCHOLARSHIP FEDERATION DAY, CATH- 
OLIC ORPHANS TOUR, CAMPFIRE GIRLS 
DAY, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT Los 
ANGELES WEEK-END. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15 

PETROLEUM DAY, VALLEJO DAY, JEWISH 
FOLK FESTIVAL. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16 

COUNT BASIE DAY, Los ANGELES 
SCHOOLS' TOUR, NATIONAL TAX ASSO- 
CIATION DAY. 



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17 

NATIONAL ASSN. OF MASTER BREWERS 
DAY, JEFFERSON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
TOUR, CANYON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
TOUR. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER IB 

CIVIL SERVICE ASSEMBLY, HALL OF 
FLOWERS WEEK, SAN JOSE THEODORE 
ROOSEVELT JR. HIGH SCHOOL TOUR. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19 

BAKERS, WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPER- 
ANCE UNION, MUNICIPAL FINANCE OFFI- 
CERS DAY. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2O 

TENDER LEAF TEA, JOAQUIN MILLER, 
JULES CHARBNEAU DAY. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21 

LILY PONS DAY, DAIRY SHOW, TEX RAN- 
KIN AERIAL STUNTS, PAC. GAS & ELEC- 
TRIC, PHILIPPINE, CHALLENGE BUTTER 
DAY, CALIFORNIA ALMOND WEEK. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22 

DALY CITY, SORDPTIMIST CLUB, WATSON- 
VILLE, D. N. & E. WALTER COMPANY DAY, 
RAILROAD FANS DAY. 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 23 

S. F. SOCIETY FOR HARD OF HEARING 
WEEK. 

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24 

CALIFORNIA WRITERS' CLUB DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25 

GLORIA JEAN, WOMEN'S DAY, CLIPPER 
DAY, DAIRY INDUSTRIES SUPPLY CORP. 
DAY. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26 

EAST BAY DISABLED FOLKS DAY, GRID- 
LEY UNION HIGH SCHOOL TOUR. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 27 

PLEASANTON, REEDLEY, YDUNTVILLE VET- 
ERANS HOME DAY, NATIONAL GLASS DIS- 
TRIBUTORS. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28 

CALIFORNIA GRAYS' BALL, UNIVERSITY 
OF CALIF. DAY, SANTA BARBARA STATE 
COLLEGE DAY. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29 

FREDDY MARTIN & ORCHESTRA, MILL VAL- 
LEY, OWL DRUG COMPANY EMPLOYEES, 
AMERICAN BOTTLERS OF CARBONATED 
BEVERAGES ASSOCIATION DAY. 



1940 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM 



SATURDAY, MAY 25 

OPENING DAY FIESTA, PAGEANT OF LIGHT, 
GAYWAY FIESTA, MAJORETTE CONTEST, 
FLORISTS' TELEGRAPH DELIVERY DAY. 

SUNDAY, MAY 26 

THRILL AERIAL CIRCUS, NATIONAL GAR- 
DEN SHOW, BARBERS' DAY, WHISKERINO 
CONTEST, ROBERT RIPLEY DAY, YOUNG 
CARTOONISTS' CONTEST. 

MONDAY, MAY 27 

Los ANGELES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
GOODWILL VISIT, INTERNATIONAL BUSI- 
NESS MACHINES DAY WITH GRACE MOORE, 
LAWRENCE TIBBETT CONCERT, G. G. I.E. 
PROMOTION COMMITTEE DAY. 

TUESDAY, MAY 2B 

S. F. R.O.T. C. DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 

SCHOOL SAFETY PATROL DAY. 

THURSDAY, MAY 3O 

MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION. 

FRIDAY, MAY 31 

FOREIGN PAVILIONS OPEN. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 1 

S. F. SCHOOL REGATTA, ALAMEDA COUNTY, 
HIGH TWELVE CLUBS, JUNIOR STATES- 



MEN OF AMERICA, GIRL SCOUTS, MORAL 
RE-ARMAMENT DAY. 

SUNDAY, JUNE 2 

SECOND MRA, O'CONNOR MOFFATT & Co., 
REDWOOD CITY, GRANDMOTHERS, MAY- 
WOOD CL.A. COUNTY], Music DAY. 

MONDAY, JUNE 3 

EAST BAY CRIPPLED CHILDREN'S DAY. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 4 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY CONCERT, 
CALIFORNIA WRITERS CLUB, CLIPPER DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 

MOTHERS OF AMERICA, AD. CLUB DAY, 
S. F. WOMEN'S CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
MEETING. 

THURSDAY, JUNE 6 

HOTELS, BETTER SPEECH, AMERICAN PEN 
WOMEN'S DAY. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 

FEDERAL BUILDING OPENING CEREMONIES, 
COMMENCEMENT DAY, FEDERATION OF 
WOMEN'S CLUBS MEETING. 

SATURDAY, JUNE B 

FEDERAL BUILDING DEDICATION, KINGS 
DAUGHTERS, SCHMIDT LITHOGRAPH Co., 
MILLS COLLEGE, Y.M.C.A., S. F. CON- 



APPENDIX 



XLl 



1940 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM (Continued) 



SERVATDRY DF MUSIC, LOYAL WORKERS 
SOCIETY, NATIONAL NEGRO LEAGUE DAY, 
JUNIOR BRIDGE TOURNAMENT, AMERICAN 
WAR MOTHERS, CALIF. Soc. OF SPEECH 
THERAPY DAY. 
SUNDAY, JUNE 9 

HUNGARY DAY, NATIONAL FLAG, SIERRA- 
PLUMAS DAY, TEMPLE OF RELIGION PAG- 
EANT. 
MONDAY, JUNE Id 

COOLIDGE QUARTET DAY. 
TUESDAY, JUNE 11 

CLIPPER DAY. 
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 

WASHINGTON HIGH SCHOOL BAND CON- 
CERT. 
THURSDAY, JUNE 13 

TRAVELLARIAN NIGHT. 
FRIDAY, JUNE 14 

THRILL AERIAL SHOW, MOVIES, "ALL 
QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT," SYM- 
PHONY ORCHESTRA CONCERT BY NORTH- 
ERN CALIFORNIA Music PROJECT, PLAY 
OPERA GROUP RECITALS, SAN MATED 
JUNIOR COLLEGE, SOPHOMORE DANCE. 
SATURDAY, JUNE 15 

BANK OF AMERICA, MARTINEZ CHAMBER 
OF COMMERCE, CHILDREN OF AMERICAN 
REVOLUTION, DANCE STUDIOS, SCIOTS 
DAY, CZECHOSLOVAKIA EXHIBIT DEDICA- 
TION, OUTDOOR GIRL CONTEST. 
SUNDAY, JUNE 16 

FORD DAY, PORTUGAL DAY, CLEANERS 
& DYERS, VALLEJO TIMES-HERALD, FA- 
THERS, CIGAR & TOBACCO PRODUCTS 
DAY, BRUNCH ARTS CLUB MEETING, 
MOTHERSINGERS CONCERT. 
MONDAY, JUNE 17 

DAUGHTERS OF CALIFORNIA PIONEERS, 
SHOPPING NEWS CARRIERS DAY. 
TUESDAY, JUNE IS 

TREASURE ISLAND SYMPHONY CONCERT. 
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19 

WESTERN WOMEN'S CLUB, CHIURA OBATA, 
JAPANESE ARTIST, "ATTITUDES OF OR- 
IENTAL PAINTING", PAUL MARTIN'S Music. 
THURSDAY, JUNE 2O 

CALIF. STATE SUPERVISORS & COUNTY 
ENGINEERS' DAY, PAN AMERICAN LEAGUE 
MEETING. 
FRIDAY, JUNE 21 

WINE INDUSTRIES DAY, JADE EXHIBITION, 
OAKLAND NEGRO CHORUS. 
SATURDAY, JUNE 22 

SWEDEN, DENMARK, Los ANGELES COUN- 
TY, KERN COUNTY HERALD, ANGLO-CALIF. 
BANK, SALVATION ARMY, ALPHA CHI SIG- 
MA, KAPPA GAMMA Pi, LIONS CLUB STU- 
DENT SPEAKERS DAY. 
SUNDAY, JUNE 23 

CALIFORNIA STATE EMPLOYEES WEEKEND, 
AMERICAN LEGION PILGRIMAGE, JAPAN, 
ESTONIA, TWINS, LUTHERAN CHURCH DAY. 
MONDAY, JUNE 24 

CALIFORNIA EDITORS DAY. 
TUESDAY, JUNE 25 

ALLIED CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES, CALI- 
FORNIA PHARMACEUTICAL ASS'N, SOROP- 
TDMIST CLUB DAY. 
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26 

SOCIETY FOR PROMOTION OF ENGINEER- 
ING, EDUCATION DAY. 
THURSDAY, JUNE 27 

TALKS "LIFE AROUND THE PACIFIC," 
"TRAVELING WITH THE CHINESE ARMIES," 
PRESENTED BY MAJOR EVANS F. CARLSON. 

FRIDAY, JUNE 28 

CALIFORNIA REALTORS, NATIONAL PLANT, 
FLOWER AND FRUIT GUILD DAY. 
SATURDAY, JUNE 29 

FINLAND DAY, S. F. 164TH BIRTHDAY 
PARTY, SOUTHERN PACIFIC WEEKEND. 



SUNDAY, JUNE 3D 

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS, ALASKA-YUKON, 
S.P.R.S. I., SAN FERNANDO VALLEY, CALI- 
FORNIA PIONEERS DAY. 
MONDAY, JULY 1 

NATURALIZATION DAY, INDIAN EXHIBIT, 
GLADYS SWARTHOUT RECEPTION. 

TUESDAY, JULY 2 

SYMPHONY CONCERT. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR HARD OF HEAR- 
ING. 

THURSDAY, JULY 4 

INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION, ALLIED 
VETERANS DAY, LUM AND ABNER SHOW, 
GREAT AMERICAN BARN DANCE. 

FRIDAY, JULY 5 

HAWAII DAY, PAUL MANTZ, FAMED STUNT 
FLYER BOMBARDS TREASURE ISLAND WITH 
HAWAIIAN LEIS . 

SATURDAY, JULY 6 

CZECHO-SLOVAKIA, BOY SCOUTS DAY. 

SUNDAY, JULY 7 

MARINE CORPS LEAGUE DAY, CALIF. AS- 
SOCIATION TEACHERS OF DANCING PRO- 
GRAM. 

MONDAY, JULY 8 

EDUCATIONAL FILM "KINDERGARTEN TO 
COLLEGE," RECEPTION FDR Miss GRACE 
PARKER OF NEW YORK, ORGANIZER NA- 
TIONAL LEAGUE OF WOMEN'S SERVICE. 

TUESDAY, JULY 9 

ROOSEVELT DELEGATION, NATIONAL ASSN. 
OF HOUSING OFFICIALS, NATIONAL CON- 
FERENCE OF PLANNING DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY ID 

PASADENA TOURNAMENT OF ROSES BAND, 
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION DINNER. 

THURSDAY, JULY 11 

TREASURE ISLAND GARDEN PARTY, AMER- 
ICAN PENWDMEN'S PROGRAM. 

FRIDAY, JULY 12 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DAY, EAST BAY 
GLADIOLUS SHOW, INAUGURAL FLIGHT, 
AMERICAN CLIPPER TO NEW ZEALAND. 

SATURDAY, JULY 13 

AMERICAN ART FEDERATION DAY. 

SUNDAY, JULY 14 

FRENCH, SALINAS, VIRGINIA CITY, Rosi- 
CRUCIAN, ZETA Psi FRATERNITY, COWBOY 
DAY, WILD FLOWER WEEK RECEPTION. 

MONDAY, JULY 15 

CALIFORNIA WILD FLOWER WEEK, ALEC 
TEMPLETON RECEPTION. 

TUESDAY, JULY 16 

SYMPHONY NIGHT CMDNTEUX-TEMPLE- 
TONJ", SALINAS OUTDOOR GIRL DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17 

WILD FLOWER RECEPTION, HALL OF AG- 
RICULTURE. 

THURSDAY, JULY IB 

THRILL AERIAL SHOW FEATURING THE SEN- 
SATIONAL MARIONS, THE FOUR MONARCHS 
AND THE FOUR JAYS. OPEN AlR THEATRE. 

FRIDAY, JULY 19 

JAPAN TOURISTS NIGHT, ANTARCTIC DAY. 

SATURDAY, JULY 2O 

JOBS DAUGHTERS, COLUMBIA INDEPEND- 
ENCE, MISSISSIPPI, TRAVELERS PROTEC- 
TIVE ASS'N DAY. 

SUNDAY, JULY 21 

STANISLAUS COUNTY, ALPHA IOTA SO- 
RORITY, MCLAREN PARK BOYS CLUB DAY, 
NAVAL RESERVE, FLIGHT OVER TREASURE 
ISLAND. 

MONDAY, JULY 22 

NATIONAL GARDEN SHOW, HOSTESS HOUSE 
OPEN. 

TUESDAY, JULY 23 

ADELPHIAN CLUB DAY. 



XL11 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1940 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM (Continued) 



WEDNESDAY, JULY 24 

SIMON BOLIVAR, CHILDREN'S BARGAIN, 
BAKERS' DAY. 

THURSDAY, JULY 25 

NEGRO DAY, FORD DAY. 

FRIDAY, JULY 26 

NEGRO Music FESTIVAL, JANET DYER 
SPENCER PRESENTS: WOMEN ARTISTS WHO 
HELPED MAKE THE EXPOSITION. 

SATURDAY, JULY 27 

GENERAL MOTORS DAY, NEGRO MOVIE 
BALL, WESTERN AMATEUR CAMERA CON- 
CLAVE, JOSEPH LEE DAY, IDAHO, TWIN 
PEAKS DISTRICT BOY SCOUTS, JEWISH 
WAR VETERANS DAY. 

SUNDAY, JULY 2B 

NORWAY, LILY PONS, BENNY WALKER, 
YOUNG LADIES INSTITUTE, VALLEJO 
CHRONICLE DAY, SOAP Box DERBY. 

MONDAY, JULY 29 

DEMOCRATIC WOMEN'S CLUB DAY. 

TUESDAY, JULY 3D 

LILY PONS, ANDRE KDSTELANETZ SYM- 
PHONY CONCERT, PAUL GALLICO DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31 

UTAH, KIT CARSON DAY, TREASURE ISL- 
AND ICE FOLLIES, THOMAS J. WATSON 
DAY. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1 

NATIONAL FOREIGN TRADE COUNCIL DAY. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 2 
Music DAY. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3 

NEVADA, RADIO, UNITED COMMERCIAL 
TRAVELERS, STATE APARTMENT HOUSE, 
MOTHER SHERWOOD DAY. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4 

GERTRUDE LAWRENCE, NATIONAL ASS'N 
OF DEAF, TEMPLE OF RELIGION, COAST 
GUARD DAY. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 5 

DRY GOODS AND APPAREL DAY. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 6 

Music AUDITION, YOUNG ARTISTS CON- 
TEST. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7 

CHILDREN'S FIVE CENT DAY, TOYLAND, 
NATIONAL ASS'N OF BROADCASTERS DAY, 
FESTIVAL HALL DANCE. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 8 

PIANO CONCERT BY RAYMOND FOOTE, 
AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY PROGRAM. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9 

ARMY AND NAVY UNION DAY. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1O 

INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW, S.5. WASH- 
INGTON, Los ANGELES, ECUADOR, FARM- 
ERS & TRUCK INSURANCE EXCHANGE, 
YOUNG BUDDHISTS, PHILIPPINE, SOUTH- 
ERN Civic COUNCIL, KANSAS UNIVERSITY 
ALUMNI DAY, ALAMEDA COUNTY DAHLIA 
SHOW. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 11 

DENMARK, D. N. & E. WALTER COMPANY, 
JUNIOR MUSICIANS, TRIPLETS, POET LAU- 
REATE DAY. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 12 

SEE A SHOW DAY, PIONEER WOMEN OF 
CALIFORNIA DAY. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 13 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY CONCERT 
WITH LAURITZ MELCHIOR, BRUNO WALTER 
CONDUCTING, MORGAN HILL DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14 

SUNSWEET DAY, FESTIVAL HALL DANCE. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 15 

ST. VINCENT'S SCHOOL FOR BOYS, IN- 
SURANCE, OUTDOOR SPORTS DAY. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 16 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH DAY. 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 17 

COMMONWEALTH INSTITUTE, OKLAHOMA 
DAY. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST IB 

RAILWAY EXPRESS, MAGICIANS, MEXICO, 
ALTA CALIFORNIA, SPORTSMEN'S, Civic 
CLUBS, PAUL BUNYAN DAY. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 19 

Coos BAY PIRATES DAY, KEY SYSTEM 
EMPLOYEES BALL, DISABLED CITIZENS, 
TRAFFIC SAFETY DAY, PROMOTION COM- 
MITTEE NIGHT. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 2O 

ALAMEDA COUNTY FEDERATION OF WOM- 
EN'S CLUBS, STATE GRANGE DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 

NATIONAL EXCHANGE CLUBS DAY. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 22 

AMERICAN RED CROSS DAY, FENCING 
CHAMPIONSHIPS. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 

CHILDREN'S DAY, TENNESSEE DAY. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 24 

HARBOR, TDWNSEND CLUBS, UNION Now, 
CHRISTIAN YOUTH, CASA HISPANA, "ELSIE 
THE Cow," S.S. MANHATTAN, NEW ZEA- 
LAND CLIPPER DAY, OAKLAND WELDON- 
IANS CONCERT. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 25 

TELEPHONE EMPLOYEES, EMPORIUM & 
CAPWELL, YOUNG MEN'S INSTITUTE, HON- 
OLULU CONSERVATORY OF Music DAY. 

MONDAY, AUGUST 26 

WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE DAY. 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27 

OSCAR LEVANT, MEREDITH WILSON AND 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, 
CALIFORNIA WRITERS' CLUB, BARTENDERS 
DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2B 
FAVORITE Music DAY. 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 29 

CARMEL, RALPH MURRAY DAY. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3D 

GOLDEN WEDDING, PACIFIC GROVE DAY. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 31 

TREASURE ISLAND RODEO, POLAND, 
DAUGHTERS OF SCOTIA, UNDERPRIVILEGED 
CHILDREN, MONTEREY, PHI BETA KAPPA 
DAY, VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS, PENN- 
SYLVANIA DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 

RED MEN, DEL NORTE COUNTY, LITTLE 
FLOWER PARISH DAY, SPECIAL HOLLY- 
WOOD SHOW. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 

2O-3O CLUB DAY, LABOR DAY. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 

INDUSTRIAL BRIDGE TOURNAMENT. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 

FLEET RESERVE DAY, FREE MOVIES DAY. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 

AMERICAN PEN WOMEN DAY, CARILLON 
DAY. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 

JAPAN TEACHERS, MARIMBA Music DAY. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 

SAFEWAY, BRAZIL, NEW ENGLAND DAY, 
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY LUNCHEON, 
CIVITAN, ORDER OF AMARANTH, LINCOLN 
GRAMMAR SCHOOL, ASS'N, DR. LEE DE 
FORREST DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER S 

WELSH, KNIGHTS TEMPLAR, SAN Luis 
OBISPO COUNTY, SIGMA PHI EPSILON, 
EASTBAY CELEBRITIES, HARDY PEAR, RED- 
DING DAY. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 

ADMISSION DAY, CALIFORNIA WINE DAY. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER ID 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY CONCERT, 



APPENDIX 



XLlll 



1940 SPECIAL DAYS PROGRAM (Continued) 



BRACE MDDRE, GAETANO MERDLA, DRGAN 
Music DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 

CALIFORNIA LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS, 
FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS DAY. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 

CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRIES JUBILEE DP- 
ENS, PALACE OF FINE ARTS DAY. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 

SAN FRANCISCO GIRL SCOUTS' DAY. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 

LUMBER DAY, CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT, 
F.H.A., ELDERBLOOM, CAMPFIRE GIRLS, 
SIENA ALUMNI, PACIFIC DAS & ELECTRIC 
Co., ASSOCIATION HOME BUILDERS, SPE- 
CIALTY CONTRACTORS, PLUMBERS, AMERI- 
CAN FEDERATION OF LABOR, BUILDERS 
EXCHANGE DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 

SAN FRANCISCO, REDWOOD EMPIRE, CEN- 
TRAL AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE, KPO- 
KGD, GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE, SALESIAN 
BOYS CLUB, COLUMBIA PARK BOYS CLUB, 
ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA, BARBER 
SHOP QUARTETTE, UNITED INSTITUTE OF 
Music, JEWISH FOLK CHORUS, LARSKE 
DANCERS DAY. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 

OAKLAND WOMEN'S CITY CLUB, PUPPET 
SHOWS, JANITORIAL EMPLOYEES DAY. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 

CALIFORNIA FEDERATION OF Music CLUB, 
CALIFORNIA COMPOSERS SOCIETY, STATE 
ASS'N OF PERSONNEL DIRECTORS, CON- 
STITUTION DAY. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER IB 

WOMEN'S DAY, PORTUGUESE WINE, S.D. E. 
LAST ROUND-UP DAY. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 

DRDER OF EASTERN STAR, SPECIAL LI- 
BRARY ASS'N, RICHEY EVANGELIST AS- 
SOCIATION DAY. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER ZD 

ALMOND, CALIFORNIA Music FESTIVAL 
FINAL, "BALLAD FOR AMERICANS," SAN 
FRANCISCO SCHOOLS PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION, SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA COUR- 
TESY COMMITTEE DAY, COLOR CAMERA 
NIGHT. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 

"NEXT-TO-CLOSING" WEEK-END, WEN- 



DELL L. WILLKIE DAY, OAKLAND, UNI- 
VERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAMPING, 
SAN FRANCISCO BOYS CLUB, NATIONAL 
WOMAN'S PARTY, MANTLE CLUB, GENERAL 
LONGSTREET DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 

OLD TIMERS, CONTRA COSTA COUNTY, 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STUDENTS, 
RAINBOW GIRLS, FRESNO COUNTY, UNITED 
INSTITUTE OF Music, JUNIOR COIN COL- 
LECTORS, VALLEJO-NAPA EXCURSION, 
GUSTINE, TUOLUMNE COUNTY ASS'N RE- 
UNION, SAN FRANCISCO ORATORIO SO- 
CIETY DAY. 

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY CRIPPLED CHIL- 
DREN'S DAY. 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF COMPOSERS, AU- 
THORS AND PUBLISHERS DAY GUEST 

STARS, JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, JUDY 
GARLAND AND OTHERS; SONG WRITERS, 
IRVING BERLIN, GEORGE M. COHAN, JER- 
OME KERN AND OTHERS. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 

INSURANCE, REEDLEY, FLOWER DAY. 

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 

SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEES, 
"GREAT AMERICAN COMPOSERS OF PAST" 
DAY, "THE VOICE OF THE EXPOSITION" 
DAY, DANISH CEREMONY NIGHT. 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 

CALIFORNIA GRAYS, TREASURE ISLAND 
COMPANY, U.S.A., STATE EMPLOYEES 
CAMERA CLUB DAY, TREASURE ISLAND 
WOMEN'S CLUB NIGHT, DAILY MENU 
PRINTING COMPANY, Los ANGELES CHAM- 
BER OF COMMERCE DAY. 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 

CALIFORNIA ALUMNI JAMBOREE, CAB- 
RILLO, SAN FRANCISCO APARTMENT HOUSE 
INDUSTRY, GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, MICHI- 
GAN ALUMNI, DR. NATHANIEL COULSON 
DAY. 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 

CLOSING DAY CEREMONIES: CEREMONIES 
WITH SPECTACULAR PAGEANT DEPICTING 
THE HISTORY OF THE '39 AND '4O FAIRS, 
FEDERAL PLAZA. 



1939 ATTENDANCE RECORD 



FEB. 1 B 


1 28,697 


" 1 5 


27,81 8 


" 9 


60,257 


" 4 


25,BO7 


" 1 9 


93,91 2 


" 1 6 


2B.O31 


" 1 O 


20,849 


" 5 


1 B.O21 


" 2D 


27,373 


" 1 7 


28, 1 44 


" 1 1 


1 8,947 


6 


49,72O 


" 21 


31 ,34B 


" 1 8 


52,739 


" 1 2 


1 9,414 


7 


6D,521 


' 22 


1 27,739 


" 1 9 


73,71 7 


" 1 3 


1 7,1 86 


8 


1 3,629 


" 23 


21,559 


" 2O 


1 9,460 


" 14 


22,568 


9 


20,339 


" 24 


21,765 


" 21 


17,2O9 


" 1 5 


46,827 


" 1 O 


2D,594 


" 25 


51 ,443 


" 22 


1 5,357 


" 16 


57,684 


" 1 1 


21 ,285 


" 26 


64,937 


" 23 


1 6,446 


" 17 


1 4,5O3 


" 1 2 


24,924 


" 27 


1 6.42O 


" 24 


1 9,656 


" 1 8 


1 7,291 


" 1 3 


43, 1 BO 


" 2B 


17,424 


" 25 


33,81 4 


" 1 9 


17,939 


" 1 4 


73,663 


MAR. 1 


1 9,6B6 


" 26 


30,266 


" 20 


1 7,672 


" 1 5 


1 6,953 


2 


1 6,743 


' 27 


17,572 


" 21 


2D.243 


" 1 6 


1 7,3BO 


3 


1 6.B73 


" 28 


1 5,1 33 


" 22 


41 ,61 5 


" 17 


21 ,54D 


" 4 


53,951 


" 29 


20,072 


" 23 


5D, 1 86 


" i a 


23,659 


5 


72,1 1 6 


" 3D 


22,6O3 


" 24 


1 4,D46 


" 1 9 


39,74B 


6 


12,961 


" 31 


24,648 


25 


1 B,76O 


" 20 


32,344 


7 


17,708 


APR. 1 


46,924 


" 26 


1 7,826 


" 21 


43,682 


a 


1 0,259 


2 


75,748 


" 27 


1 7,BO4 


" 22 


1 3,942 


9 


14,739 


3 


27,71 5 


" 28 


1 8,734 


" 23 


21,984 


" ID 


20,297 


" 4 


37,670 


" 29 


54,1 86 


" 24 


21 ,36D 


" 1 1 


43,898 


" 5 


51 ,375 


" 3D 


56,71 2 


" 25 


18,622 


" 12 


54,354 


6 


53,31 6 


MAY 1 


21,518 


" 26 


1 8,9DD 


" 13 


14,965 


7 


36,789 


2 


1 4,692 


" 27 


35.2D4 


,, 14 


21,259 


a 


42,474 


" 3 


23,96O 


" 28 


58,787 



XL1V 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939 ATTENDANCE RECORD (Continued) 



" 29 


46.7BB 


" 7 


43,646 


" 1 5 


45.D44 


" 23 


43,81 6 


" 3D 


6O.BB3 


B 


62,735 


16 


48,21 5 


" 24 


48,660 


" 31 


1 5,055 


9 


74,517 


,, 17 


4B.93D 


" 25 


1 1,720 


JUNE 1 


15,723 


" 1 D 


32, 146 


" IB 


44.D75 


" 26 


1 7,855 


2 


1 6,553 


" 1 1 


36,1 26 


1 9 


60,833 


27 


17,578 


3 


35.D59 


" 1 2 


36,B9D 


" 2D 


7B,DB5 


" 28 


1 5,851 


A 


3B.B76 


" 1 3 


36.DB9 


" 21 


43,B94 


" 29 


1 6,574 


" 5 


17.DB2 


" 14 


42,794 


" 22 


44.7B5 


" 3D 


5O,O1 O 


6 


1 B,96D 


" 1 5 


56,296 


" 23 


45,294 


OCT. 1 


41,545 


7 


22, 1 36 


" 1 6 


79,843 


" 24 


46, 1 76 


2 


1 1 ,776 


B 


21,437 


17 


36.7B2 


" 25 


40,974 


3 


14,647 


9 


2D, 1 63 


" IB 


41 ,D26 


" 26 


56,41 2 


" 4 


1 6.9B2 


1 D 


34,924 


" 1 9 


45,362 


" 27 


78,644 


" 5 


1 5,6DD 


" 1 1 


49,1 1 3 


" 2D 


43,71 B 


" 28 


35,3B5 


6 


1 9,670 


" 12 


21,116 


" 21 


36, 1 64 


" 29 


3B,449 


7 


86,629 


1 3 


25.B17 


22 


76,DD9 


" 3D 


35,700 


" B 


1 87,73O 


" 14 


26,869 


' 23 


59,714 


" 31 


3D, 846 


9 


24,377 


" 1 5 


23,927 


' 24 


35,525 


SEPT. 1 


29,742 


" 1 O 


32,358 


" 16 


24.2D4 


' 25 


36,546 


2 


59,601 


" 1 1 


42,951 


" 17 


43,759 


26 


39,054 


3 


1 23,442 


" 1 2 


76,921 


" 1 B 


53,565 


27 


33,922 


4 


91,756 


" 1 3 


35,5D9 


" 1 9 


3D.6BB 


' 2B 


33,896 


" 5 


24,745 


' 14 


86,217 


" 2D 


32,1 3D 


29 


45,294 


" 6 


35,718 


1 5 


1 39,DB6 


" 21 


37.72D 


' 3D 


63,444 


7 


31,587 


' 1 6 


37,549 


" 22 


32,967 


31 


31,74D 


B 


27,347 


1 17 


42,1 79 


" 23 


32,61 7 


AUG. 1 


34,620 


" 9 


68,449 


' 1 B 


45,667 


" 24 


53, 1 B9 


2 


34,252 


" 1 D 


56,031 


' 1 9 


49.4B5 


" 25 


69,1 9D 


3 


41 ,36B 


1 1 


18,759 


' 2D 


56,491 


" 26 


31 ,D4D 


" 4 


35,493 


" 1 2 


22,877 


21 


142,072 


" 27 


31,2D2 


5 


57,592 


" 1 3 


2O,945 


22 


1 24,948 


" 2B 


3D,321 


6 


69.3BD 


" 1 4 


28,677 


23 


53,491 


" 29 


28,766 


7 


45, 1 21 


" 1 5 


23,B33 


' 24 


54, 1 46 


3D 


29,301 


B 


53,897 


" 1 6 


43,81 1 


25 


1 1 1 ,B39 


JULY 1 


41 ,69D 


" 9 


51,527 


,, 17 


75,731 


26 


85,661 


2 


B3,D1 1 


" 1 D 


41 , 1 46 


1 B 


1 9,D25 


' 27 


91 ,B53 


3 


64,636 


" 1 1 


37,635 


" 1 9 


18,925 


' 28 


1 OB,42B 


4 


1 22,579 


" 12 


57,65D 


2D 


4D,O41 


29 


147,674 


5 


29,61 9 


" 1 3 


71,666 


21 


20,691 






" 6 


4D, 1 94 


" 14 


4D,379 


" 22 


1 8,983 







1940 ATTENDANCE RECORD 



MAY 25 1 23,36B 


26 35,713 


" 28 71.46B 


" 29 3D.B77 


" 26 B3,O24 


" 27 3O,779 


" 29 26,285 


" 3D 31,416 


" 27 4D.672 


" 2B 29, 1 1 6 


" 3D 39,320 


" 31 57,635 


" 2B 23,253 


" 29 55,725 


31 33,968 


SEPT. 1 1 1 3,B95 


" 29 32,3B9 


" 3D B1.5D3 


AUG. 1 31,777 


2 76,766 


" 3D 6D.597 


JULY 1 25,952 


" 2 3D.243 


3 22,607 


" 31 44,049 


2 32.B29 


3 47,831 


" 4 28,892 


JUNE 1 65,146 


3 31,754 


4 69,158 


5 27,253 


2 80,991 


" 4 13D.641 


" 5 37,153 


6 26,654 


3 19,932 


5 44,745 


6 35,OB4 


7 65,194 


4 2B.56B 




6 56,027 




' 7 41,965 




B 1 1 B.B63 


5 27,868 




7 59,461 




' B 35,758 




9 B2.O75 


6 34,362 




B 25,513 




9 33,399 




ID 32,437 


7 27,819 




9 32,918 




1 D 62, 1 34 




' 1 1 3D.763 


B 59,B67 




' 1O 34,833 




1 1 1 96,1 06 




' 12 31,607 


9 74.D4D 




' 1 1 32,259 




' 12 33,354 




13 34,701 


" ID 22,465 




12 31,2DO 




13 45,065 




' 14 87,704 


" 1 1 25,157 




' 13 44,310 




' 1 4 42, 1 66 




15 1 27, 1 94 


" 12 27,512 




' 14 66,562 




' 15 42,187 




' 16 26,143 


" 13 28,547 




15 26,271 




' 1 6 43,1 17 




' 17 29,451 


" 14 27,433 




16 37,556 




' 17 63,910 




' IB 58,433 


" 15 56,914 




' 17 34,435 




' IB 1 DO, 677 




. 19 44,910 


" 16 73.D72 




' IB 34,569 




1 19 34,274 




' 20 45,236 


" 17 37.B72 




19 32,956 


" 2D 41,165 




' 21 101,127 


" IB 33,606 




2D 52.BB9 


' 21 40,759 




22 134,197 


" 19 34.OB7 




' 21 68,156 


' 22 41,795 




23 36,598 


" 2O 34,175 




' 22 2B.422 


23 4D,O59 




' 24 67.D4B 


" 21 3D.71B 




23 35,459 


24 61,172 




' 25 73,312 


" 22 57,165 




24 43.6DD 


' 25 1 14, 1 23 




' 26 65,129 


" 23 B1,9OD 




' 25 35, BSD 


26 2B.4DB 




27 82,209 


" 24 26, 15D 




' 26 31,303 


27 42.5BO 




' 28 128,278 


" 25 29,458 


" 27 BO, 156 


" 28 34,D94 




'29 211 ,O2O 



APPENDIX 



XLV 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES 



AABEL, AUSTIN 
AABEL, IDA MAE 
ABER, DOFF 
ABBOTT, C. C. 
ABBOTT, JOSEPH 
ABEL, WILLIAM 
ABKIN, IRVING A. 
ABRAM, WILLIAM R. 
ABRAMS, HERMAN 
ABROTT, L. E. 
ACKERMANN. HERBERT B. 
ACKERMAN, IRVING C. 
ABBOTT, CHARLES CLARK 
ACKERMAN. LIONEL 
ACQUISTAPACE, AGNES 
ACDSTA, E. 
ADAIR, ANTOINETTE 
ADAIR, GEORGE D. 
ADAIR. TFO 
ADAMS, BEN 
ADAMS, DE WITT 
ADAMS, JAMES E. 
ADAMS, LEE H. 
ADAMS, OMAR LEROY 
ADAMS, WM. AARON 
ADAMS, WILLIAM F. 
ADAMS, W. W. 
AFINOFF, MARY 
AFTERGOOD, SHIRLEY H. 
AGNEW, PHYLLIS 
AGUILAR, ALBERT 
AHERN, VEGA 
AHLRORN. MARTIN F. 
AHRENS, ELWOOD V. 
AH TYE. HOWARD 
AINSLIE, KENNETH D. 
AKEY, EVELYN 
ALBERS. JOHN H. 
ALBERTUS, CARL G. 
ALBRECHT, WILLIAM 
ALCH, MATHILDA 
ALCORN, CHEROKEE 
ALCUTT, CLEMINTINE 
ALDERSON, MARIAN 
ALEXANDER, E. 
ALEXANDER, J. C. 
ALEXANDER, RUTH 
ALGAR, PHILIP M. 
ALGFR, ROY 
ALICE, ROBERT 
ALKALAY, EVELYN 
ALKALAY. LEOPOLD J. 
AKEY, EVELYN MARIE 
ALLAN, DONALD B. 
ALLAN, GERALDINE 
ALLAN, LAURA 
ALLARI, VIRGINIA D. 
ALLEN, ARTHURTAYRES 
ALLEN, ELEANOR K. 
ALLEN, BARBARA J. 
ALLEN, GEORGE ELDON 
ALLEN, HAMILTON 
ALLEN, IDA M. 
ALLEN, LES 
ALLEN, R. F. 
ALLEN. WOODWORTH B. 
ALLSTRUM. MILDRED 
ALPI. BERNICE 
ALTSHULER. JOHN D. 
ALVORD, DONALD ROY 
AMADIO. JOE 
AMATI, BETTINA 
AMERY, JULIA LOUISE 
AMES, ROBERT H. 
AMES, WILLIAM 
ANDERSON, CEDRIC H. 
ANDERSON, ARDENE L. 
ANDERSON, ARDINE 
ANDERSON, ELSIE LENORA 
ANDERSON, AUGUST L. 



ANDERSON, AUGUST 
ANDERSON, GEORGE 
ANDERSON, GEO. S. 
ANDERSON, LARRY E. 
ANDERSON, MARGARET F. 
ANDERSON, MARTHA L. 
ANDERSON, MIGNDNNE 
ANDERSON, PRESTON R. 
ANDERSON, ROBERT H. 
ANDERSON, THEODORE F. 
ANDERSON, WALTER W. 
ANDRADE, ETHYL 
ANDRE, ROSEMARY 
ANDREWS, CHARLES S. 
ANDREWS, JERNE P. 
ANGEL, CLARENCE M. 
ANGELL, FRANK M. 
ANSELMI, CARMELA 
ANWILER, J. H. 
APPENWODT, EARL FELIS 
APPLEGATE, RALPH G. 
ARATA, ANGELD E. 
ARCHER, JANE 
ARDEN, LILLIAN 
ARELLANO, RUDOLPH 
ARGALL, GEORGE B. 
ARMITAGE, JOHN M. 
ARMITAGE, M. J. 
ARMSBY, NEWELL 
ARMSTRONG, ELMER 
ARMSTRONG, GAINE5M. 
ARMSTRONG, HAROLD F. 
ARMSTRONG, HELEN 
ARMSTRONG, IRVING 
ARMSTRONG, LEAH B. 
ARMSTRONG, PAUL S. 
ARNAUD, ALFRED 
ARNOLD, HAROLD 
ARNOLD, MARIAN 
ARNOLD, WALTER N. 
ASAY, RALPH N. 
ASHBY, PEGGY GERTRUDE 
ASHCRAFT. DAVID L. 
A5HWELL, ELIZABETH B. 
ASTRELIA, J. 
ASVITT. LEROY R. 
ATCHLEY, THOMAS J. 
ATHERTON, D. 
ATKINSON, ARTHUR G. 
ATKINSON, BETTY 
ALTRDP, W. M. 
ATTEL, GILBERT 
AUDSLEY, RICHARD E. 
AUSTIN, BEVINS 
AUSTIN, JACK B. 
AUSTIN, OTIS 
AUSTIN. R. R. 
AVEILHE, FRANK 
AVERY, VINCENT R. C. 
AVERY, WILLIAM J. 
AYER, MASON W. 
AYLWARD, T. P. 
AYRAULT, MARIE 
AYRE5, TOM J. 



BACH, FRED 

BACHMAN. ROYAL WILLS 
BACKLAND, MAXINE 
BACKOFEN, A. L. 
BACKAS, THOMAS JAMES 
BACON, GEORGE K. JR. 
BADOUIN, ROY 
BADOUIN, WALTER E. 
BAGLEY, LUCILLE 
BAGLINI, JULIUS 
BAHNSEN, LOUISE M. 
BAILEY, BETTY 
BAILEY, B. A. 
BAILEY, DORIS 
BAILEY, ED 
BAILEY, HARDEN J. 



BAILEY, HENRYS. JR. 
BAILEY, J. L. 
BAILEY, MIRIAM J. 
BAILEY, N. T. 
BAILEY, WALTER 
BAILEY, WM. F. 
BAILLY, EDWARD G. 
BAIN, ARCHIE A. 
BAIRD, JAMES 
BAIRD, JANET H. 
BAIROS, ELLEN 
BAIRDS, JEANNE S. 
BAISH, A. R. 
BAISINGER, RDBT. J. 
BAKER, CHARLES A. 
BAKER, CHARLES E. 
BAKER, HARRY 
BAKER, H. H. 
BAKER, H. R. 
BAKER, JANE C. 
BAKER, JOS. J. 
BAKER, LEAVITT 
BAKER, M. W. 
BAKER, MAURICE 
BAKER, NED D. 
BAKER, PHOEBE ANN 
BAKER, STANLEY 
BALDARAMOS, BERNICE A. 
BALDWIN, ALBERT H. 
BALDWIN, GEORGE F. 
BALDWIN, H. L. 
BALDWIN, JAMES J. 
BALICE, G. 
BALL, ADA E. 
BALL, CARL S. 
BALL, VIRGINIA 
BALLARD, ALBERT 
BANDONI, RUTH L. 
BANDY, L. S. 
BANDY, LOIS FERN 
BANGS, CROMPTON JR. 
BARBARIA, FRANK 
BARBER, JOE 
BARBER, JOSEPH D. 
BARBERA, EDNA 
BARBIERI, JACK 
BARBARACK. WILLIAM K. 
BARDIN, HENRY L. 
BARDO, L. 
BARDUE, DOROTHY 
BARHAM, ED 
BARIDN, HERBERT 
BARKAN, BENJAMIN 
BARKER, ANITA 
BARKER, D. E. 
BARKSDALE, LISLE FRANK 
BARLOW, WALTER 
BARNACLE, J. 
BARNES, CHA5. D. 
BARNES, MATTHEW 
BARNES, VELMA K. 
BARNETT, EVELYN 
BARNETT, WILMA 
BARNHART. CLARENCE 
BARNUM, JOHN CORBINE 
BARNEY, BOND 
BARON, JOHN 
BARRETT, BETTY 
BARRETT, JANE 
BARRETT, URSULA 
BARRETT, WILLIAM 
BARRIENTOS, DON X. 
BARRINGER, A. H. 
BARRIOS, ISABEL 
BARROWS, HAROLD 
BARRY, JEFFERSON 
BARTHELS, LAWRENCE 
BARTON, LELAND S. 
BARTRAM, JOHN 
BARTRAM, RAY 
BASHAM, MERLE 
BASS, JAMES E. 



XLV1 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



BASSETT, ROWENA DLENE 
BATCHELDR, RDBT. L. 
BATEMAN, JOHN A. 
BATES, ELIZABETH P. 
BATES, ROBERT C. 
BATELLE, SHERMAN 
BATTESTINI, ALBERT J. 
BAUER, HARRY 
BAUER, HUGO E. 
BAUER, ROLAND J. 
BAUGHAN, BETTY 
BAUM, WILLIAM JAMES 
BAUMAN, E. FRANCES 
BAUMER, WM. H. JR. 
BAUMBERGER, LUCILLE B. 
BAUWENS, VIOLET 
BAXTER, V. B. 
BAYLISS, GEORGE 
BEACH, JACK H. 
BEACH, ROBERT P. 
BEACDM, NELDINEV. 
BEALS, RIXFORDA. 
BEAMAN, H. 
BEAN, WM. JACK 
BEARD, ANNE E. 
BEARD, MORRIS L. 
BEARDSLEY, H. C. 
BEATTY, RUBY P. 
BEAUBAIRE, STANLEY 
BEAZLEY, HAZEL 
BECKER, BERNARD O. 
BECKER, GEORGE E. 
BECKER, HOWARD S. 
BECKER, JOHN W. 
BECKER, MARGUERITE J. 
BECKEY, R. L. 
BECKMAN, DOROTHY 
BECKMAN, ROY C. 
BECKMANN, DOROTHY J. 
BECKWITH, FRED 
BEEBE, ALVIN 
BEED, ROBERTA 
BEEDE, ALBERT J. 
BEEGHLEY, ALICE 
BEGY, JOSEPH E. 
BEHR, STANLEY 
BELARMINO, WILLIAM 
BEHRENOT, BERNICE 
BELCHER, RICHARD 
BELIC, GEORGE N. 
BELIVEAU, KERMIT 
BELL, DEWITT LUDLOW 
BELL, J. FRANKLIN 
BELL, RALPH 
BELL, RAY 

BELL, ROBERT WALLACE 
BELL, T. RAY 
BELLAMY, HARRIET B. 
BELLAMY, JOHN BENTON 
BELLI, TERESA 
BELSHAW, MARY 
BENAROJO, MAX 
BENAS, J. 
BENS, JULIAN N. 
BENEDICT, DONALD E. 
BENGSTON, CARL RODNEY 
BENMAN, HERBERT 
BENNARDO, LOUIS 
BENNETT, BARBARA 
BENETT, DEL A. JR. 
BENNETT, EDWIN C. 
BENNETT, JEANNE L. 
BENNETT, PAUL 
BENNETT, RUSSELL 
BENNETT, THEODORE D. 
BENSON, BERNARD 
BENSON, CARL E. 
BENSON, RICHARD T. 
BENT, CLEAON S. 
BENTLEY, MARK 
BEOMAN, HAROLD 
BERBERICH, PAUL 



BERDEJA, JOHN 
BERG, ALCU V. 
BERG, CHARLES FRANCIS 
BERG, NORMAN F. 
BERGEMANN, WM. T. 
BERGEN, MAURICE 
BERGER, CHARLOTTE 
BERGER, EVELYN 
BERGER, RALPH 
SERGES, MILDRED M. 
BERGGRUEN, HEINZ 
BERGMARK, CARL 
BERKDWITZ, MORRIS 
BERLINER, MARVIN 
BERNASCONI, BRUNO E. 
BERNZOTT, EDWARD 
BERRY, CHARLES F. 
BERSDN, JEANNE 
BERTRAM, ROBERT 
BETTENCOURT, EDWARD 
BETTENCDURT, GEORGE J. 
BETTENCOURT, TONY 
BETTENCOURT, WILLIAM G. 
BETTS, KARYLL F. 
BETTY, PEGE 
BEYFUSS, EVELYN I. 
BEZARD, ELWOOD G. 
BIANCHI, A. 
BIANCHI, RITA 
BIASETTD, LOUIS 
BIBBINS, F. C. 
BICE, LISLE 
BIDAMON, CHARLES A. 
BIDWELL, GEORGE F. 
BIEHL, JOSEPH PARK 
BIERNE, S. 
BERNIE, JOHN 
BIGELDW, DAN 
BIGGERSTAFF, W. E. 
BIGGS, JOHN F. 
BIGGS, WILLIAM A. 
BILKIE, HELEN S. 
BILLE, HELEN 
BILLETT, E. R. JR. 
BILLICK, JOHN J. 
BILLINGS, CLYDE V. 
BILLINGS, EARL C. 
BILLINGS, EILEEN 
BILLINGS, L. F. 
BILUND, ALEX 
BINKLEY, ROBERT P. 
BIONAZ, JOHN 
BIRCHENALL, JOHN B. 
BIRDWELL, EARL 
BIRDWELL, OSCAR 
BIRDWELL, OTIS 
BIRDWELL, RALPH 
BIRDWELL, TOM 
BIRNIE, HANS F. 
BISHOP, BENEDICT LOGAN 
BISHOP, LED 
BISHOP, THOMAS B. 
BISSELL, NINA L. 
EITHER, TOM S. 
BITTING, A. W. 
BITTMAN, H. 
BITTMAN, JOHN 
BIZZO, JAMES 
BLACK, HUDSON 
BLACK, WILLIAM S. 
BLACKIET, LUCKY 
BLACKBURN, WILLIAM 
BLACKWELL, ARTHUR L. 
BLACKWELL, THOMAS 
BLADDN, KATHLEEN 
BLAGG, DONALD H. 
BLAIR, FRANK E. 
BLAIR, LELAND BOYD 
BLAIR, TED F. 
BLAIR, WILLIAM 
BLAKE, JIM 
BLANCHARD, N. E. 



BLANCK, GEORGES. 
BLANFORD, ELLEN S. 
BLAU, SANFDRD JACK 
BLESSMAN, LLOYD 
BLDNSKI, WESLEY V. 
BLOODWORTH, HARRY 
BLODDWDRTH, LUCILE 
BLOOM, JASON 
BLOOM, MARCIA 
BLUNELL, MARCELLA B. 
BLYTHE, S. Q. 
BODE, EDWIN W. 
BODE, FREDERICK A JR. 
BDDEN, E. W. 
BDDEN, JAMES E. 
BDDEN, KATHLEEN 
BDDINSON, WILLIAM M. 
BODLEY, PHIL 
BOGART, HARRY C. 
BDGGS, CHARLES 
BOGGS, WM. 

BOGLE, MARJORIE ADDIE 
BOGUE, HARRIS D. 
BOHIGIAN, PAUL 
BOHIER, WM. DIETRICH 
BOHLER, WILLIAM D. 
BO LAND, J. J. 
BOLGER, FRANK 
BDLTON, EUGENE 
BON, JEANNE 
BDNDESON, E. O. 
BONHAM, VALERE 
BONSACK, DANIEL M. JR. 
BODE, FLDYDE ENID 
BOOGAERT, HARRY W. 
BOONOS, GEORGE M. 
BOOTH, A. E. 
BOOTH, CHAS. W. JR. 
BOOTH, CECLE 
BOOTH, C. W. 
BOOTH, KINGDON WAYNE 
BOOTH, WILLIAM E. 
BOOTH, WILLIAM J. 
BORDEN, ALEC 
BDRGEL, CHARLES 
BORGEL, HELEN 
BORN, ERNEST 
BORREGD, DOROTHY 
BDSE, MARTIN 
BOSCHE, W. E. 
BDTELHO, WALTER 
BDTTDRFF, H. C. 
BOTSFORD, MILDRED 
BOTTARINI, CHARLIE A. 
BOUCHER, DOROTHY Q. 
BOULLARD, EMILE R. 
BOURDET, ROBERT 
BOURNE, CHARLES P. 
BORQUE, J. LOUIS 
BOWDEN, AUGUSTUS R. 
BOUTON, JEANNE 
BOVEE, DONALD L. 
BOWE, G. L. 
BOWEN, IRVING B. 
BOWEN, JAMES 
BOWERMAN, FREDERICK 
BOWES, TIMOTHY W. 
BOWES, T. W. 
BOWMAN, ANN 
BOWMAN, CHARLES W. 
BOWMAN, JOHN 
BOWMAN, W. L. 
BOX, ELEANOR 
BDYACK, CLIFTON D. 
BDYCE, CHARLES R. 
BOYCE, R. W. 
BOYCE, WILLIS 
BOYCHUK, WALTER 
BOYER, JEAN 
BOYERS, JAMES S. 
BOYES, GORDON M. 
BOYNTON, MARY 



A PPENDIX 



XLVll 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



BDYSEN, VERNDN H. 
BRACE, F. RICHARD 
BRADLEY, CECILE V. 
BRADLEY, GEDRGE A. 
BRADLEY, HENRIETTA 
BRADLEY, WINIFRED 
BRAD5HAW, CHARLES JR. 
BRADSTREET, C. B. 
BRADY, MICHAEL R. 
BRADY, MUSA RUTH 
BRADY, OWEN JOSEPH 
BRAGDNIER. RUTH 
BRALEY, WAYNE M. 
BRAMS, RICHARD 
BRAMS, WALLACE 
BRAMSDN, LYLE ALBERT 
BRAND, GEORGIA H. 
BRANDON, J. W. 
BRANSON, LAURA 
BRANDT, ELBERT E. 
BRASFIELD, WM. EDWARD 
BRASHEAR, VERA O. 
BRAUNER, WILLIAM HENRY 
BRAY, HARRY WALRAD 
BRAYTDN, HAROLD 
BRAYTON, TOLY MARIE 
BRECK, RAYMOND A. 
BREEDEN, TDM 
BREGER, SAMUEL 
BREILING. J. J. 
BRELSFDRD, LUCILLE 
BREMMER, ROGER 
BRENK, KURT 

BRENNAN, JAMES PATRICK 
BRENNAN, P. J. 
BREUER, GUSTAV PETER 
BREAUX, SAMUEL L. 
BREWSTER, ROBERT 
BRIARE, CLARENCE R. 
BRICKLEY, HAROLD T. 
BRIDGES, WILLIAM 
BRIERLY, JIMMIE 
BRIESE, LOIS 
BRIGGS, CARROLLWDOD 
BRIGHT, STDDDARD 
BRIGNOLE, T. J. 
BRINKERKOFF, J. 
BRISEBDIS, THYRA D. 
BRISTOL, GLADYS M. 
BRITTDN, JACK 
BRITTAN, JOHN E. 
BROADWELL, DON HAROLD 
BROADWELL, DONALD H. 
BROCK, R. L. 
BRODIE, ALLAN 
BROME, LLOYD G. 
BROOK, PAUL 
BROOKMAN, MURRAY JR. 
BROOKS, HENRY 
BROOKS, MERRILL T. 
BROOKS, PETER 
BROWN, A. R. 
BROPHY, ALICIA 
BROPHY, JOHN T. 
BROSCHAT, RUTH 
BROTHER, ALVIN R. 
BROWN, ALBERT A. 
BROWN, ARCHIE 
BROWN, BARTLETT K. 
BROWN, BETTY LU 
BROWN, CARLOS ED. 
BROWN, C. W. 
BROWN, DOUGLAS J. 
BROWN, EVERETT S. 
BROWN, IRVING F. 
BROWN, JEAN GERTRUDE 
BROWN, JOHN W. 
BROWN, JOSE PEREZ 
BROWN, LEAH D. 
BROWN, LLOYD J. 
BROWN, LOUISE M. 
BROWN, RICHARD D. 



BROWN, ROBERT EDGAR 
BROWN, RDLO F. 
BROWN, ROY 
BROWN, S. W. 
BROWN. THOMAS P. 
BROWN, V. T. 
BROWN, WALTER J. 
BROWNLEE, STEPHEN 
BROWNING, LOUISE 
BROWNING 
BRUBAKER, PHILIPS. 
BUCK, J. ED. 
BRUCE, ALFRED 
BRUDER, LILLIAN 
BRUNEAU, WILFRED 
BRUTDN, HELEN 
BRUSS, W. E. 
BRYSON, ROY H. 
BRYSON, THOMAS 
BUBB, CHARLES 
BRYHAN, ELDON J. 
BUCK, CHAS. 
BUCK, HORACE C. 
BUCK, DSBORNE T. 
BUCKLER, GEOFFREY W. 
BUCKLEY, GEORGE W. 
BUCKLEY, JOHN J. 
BUDD, CLIFFORD J. 
BUCKMAN, PHYLLIS 
BUEHRE, J. M. 
BUELL, STEPHEN D. 
BUETTNER, HAROLD A. 
BULOTTI, CHARLES JR. 
BUNDSCHU, CHARLES 
BUNICH, MARY P. 
BUNYARD, CHESTER EARL 
BUNCH, MILDRED 
BUNTING, L. D. JR. 
BURBERICK, STANFORD V. 
BURCH, L. E. 
BURKE, EMERSON B. 
SURGE, LESTER 
BURGESS, VINCENT L. 
BURGOYNE, MARY L. 
BURGUNDER, BOB 
BURK, JACKSON O. 
BURKARD, DONALD 
BURKARD, WALTER E. 
BURKE, BARBARA 
BURKE, CHARLES B. 
BURKE, ROBERT L. 
BURKE, TERESA VERONICA 
BURLING, WILLIAM S. 
BURNETT, GLENYS 
BURNETT, WAYNE C. 
BURNETT, WILLIAM W. JR. 
BURNHAM, F. R. 
BURNS, ALEX 
BURNS, EDWARD J. 
BURNS, HOWARD C. 
BURNS, NETTIE M. 
BURR, HOWARD L. 
BURR, M. A. 
BURRELL, MRS. G. F. 
BURRELL, JOE 
BURROUGHS, CLAYTON M. 
BURROUGHS, PAUL J. 
BURT, NONA J. 
BURTON, BETTY 
BURTON, FRANCES MAE 
BUSH, CHARLES J. 
BUSH, DAVID 
BUSH, H. E. 
BUSH, J. R. 
BUSH, N. J. 
BUSHNELL, HELEN L. 
BUSHNELL, VALERIE E. 
BUSSENIUS, WILLIAM R. 
BUTLER, G. L. 
BUTTGENBACH, ALBERT 
BYRD, WILLIAM W. 
BYRNE, JOSEPH 



CABALLERO, MIKE 
CABRAL, LOUIS 
CADDEL, HAROLD O. 
CADJEW, DOROTHY 
CADY, BEATRICE H. 
CAGE, DOROTHY D. 
CAGWIN, E. F. 
CAHILL, PERCY 
CAHILL, TED 
CAHILL, WILLIAM J. 
CAHN, LEONARD 
CAIRNS, WILLA JEAN 
CALANI, EDYTHE 
CALBREATH, IRA 
CALDER, EDDIE 
CALDWALADER, GED. G. 
CALDWELL, KATHERINE F. 
CALL, E. H. 
CALL, HARRY 
CALVERT, ROGER H. 
CALVIG, DAVID 
CALVIN, E. W. 
CALVIN, W. 

CAMARENA, VICTOR M. 
CAMERON, JACK W. 
CAMERON, MRS. R. K. 
CAMERON, WILLIAM 
CAMP, HAZEL 
CAMP, M. M. 
CAMP, WILSON B. 
CAMPBELL, CLAIRE A. 
CAMPBELL, DAVE 
CAMPBELL, DON 
CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS S. 
CAMPBELL, E. D. 
CAMPBELL, JACK 
CAMPBELL, MISS JO 
CAMPBELL, J. J. 
CAMPBELL, LOIS MAXINE 
CAMPBELL, LOUIS 
CAMPBELL, MARY E. 
CAMPINI, EARL 
CAMPINI, FRANK A. 
CANAAN, CARL I. 
CANAVAN, ALMA 
CANAVESIO, JOSEPH J. 
CANDLISH, EMILY 
CANFIELD, MARION 
CANNON, LAWRENCE 
CANTILLON, GERTRUDE 
CANTROWITH, MARTIN J. 
CAPELL, W. H. 
CAPDNE, RALPH 
CANTRELL, DONALD C. 
CAPPS, MAURICE H. 
CAPUTD, NICHOLAS 
CARATTO, ROBERT 
CAREY, J. F. 
CAREY, J. J. 

CARLBERG, WOLFGANG 
CARLTON, CHARLES M. 
CARLETDN, J. G. 
CARLIN, C. K. 
CARLISLE, HARRISON 
CARLSON, EVA MARIE 
CARLSON, HAZEL R. 
CARLSON, LESTER E. 
CARLTDN, ANNA A. 
CARMASSI, JOE 
CARMEN, BILL 
CARMODY, DOAN M. 
CARPENTER, MRS. ELIZ. 
CARPENTER, JOHN R. 
CARPENTER, MARGARET 
CARR, ALBERT B. 
CARR, RAYMOND V. 
CARR, SIDNEY ROY 
CARRETTA, TONY 
CARRIEL, HOWARD 
CARRIGAN, EDWARD 



XLV111 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



CARROLL, DAGLEY E. 
CARROLL, DON 
CARROLL, JOHN W. 
CARSON, AMOR 
CARSON, SIDNEY 
CARSSDW, EDNA E. 
CARTER, BETTY 
CARTER, C. B. 
CARTER, MARIANNE 
CARTER, NEDRA 
CARTER, NEILS. 
CARTIER, FRANCIS A. 
CARTMELL, CHARLES 
CARVER, FAYE 
CASADY, MURIEL 
CASASSA, HOWARD 
CASE, KENTON 
CASEY, DONALD 
CASEY, WILLIAM R. 
CASH, FRANK S. 
CASH, WILLIAM F. 
CASDNE, CARMEL 
CASSEDY, JOHN C. 
CASSELL, VIRGINIA L. 
CASSIDY, F. J. 
CASSIDAY, JAMES 
CASSINA, DARIO 
CASSDN, EDWIN J. 
CASTANEDA, FREDERIC 
CASTLE, DUNLAP 
CASTLE, KIT 
CASTLE, RICHARD 
CASTRO, CLAUDE 
CASTRO, CHARLES T. 
CASTRO, DORIS 
CASTRO, EDWARD F. 
CASTRO, ELANDRI 
GATES, HERBERT L. 
CATTERLIN, GRANT 
CAULK INS, C. V. 
CAVAGNARD, DAVID 
CAVAGNARO, MILTON 
CAVALLI, VICTOR 
CAVANAUGH, JACK 
CAVENEY, ELDRED J. 
CAYLOR, ALLEN A. 
CECCARELLI, VIOLA 
CEDER, MELVIN E. 
CELID, GOVE C. 
CELLE, EUGENE 
CENTER, JEAN 
CERIDONO, HELEN E. 
CERLES, THEO. A. 
CESANA, BRUNO 
CHADENEAU, ERLE M. 
CHADWICH, HOPE 
CHALMAN, FRANK E. 
CHAMBERLAIN, JACK S. 
CHAMBERS, MIKE 
CHAMBERLIN, W. D. 
CHAMBERS, HAL 
CHAPIDN, E. F. 
CHAN, EDWIN H. 
CHANCE, GEORGE 
CHANDLER, C. J. 
CHANDLER, HAROLD B. 
CHANDLER, R. T. 
CHANEY, JACK E. 
CHAPELLE, CECIL H. 
CHAPIN, SUZETTE 
CHAPLIN, JACK 
CHAPMAN, FRED 
CHAPMAN, GARRETT 
CHAPMAN, JAMES R. 
CHAPMAN, PHOEBE 
CHAMAN, ZILLA 
CHAPPELL, THELMA B. 
CHARD, HALLENE F. 
CHARMAK, LOUIS 
CHASE, BOYD 
CHASE, LAURA E. 
CHENEY, CHARLES 



CHENEY, JAMES G. 
CHENEY, JOSEPH 
CHERKES, VERA 
CHERNO, JOHN 
CHESTERFIELD, D. K. 
CHICKERING, DOROTHY 
CHICAZOLA, MELVIN A. 
CHILDS, JOHN K. 
CHILDS, MONROE 
CHILDS, WINSTON L. 
CHILDRESS, CHAS. W. 
CHISHOLM, R. B. 
CHONG, MAYBELLE 
CHRISTENSEN, C. W. 
CHRISTENSEN, EDWIN L. 
CHRISTENSEN, VIVIAN D. 
CHRISTERN, EVERETT A. 
CHRISTIAN, RITA 
CHRISTIANSEN, EVELYN 
CHRISTY, WALTER 
CHRYSLER, EVERETT N. 
CHUCK, SARAH L. 
CHURCH, F. L. 
CHURCH, JAMES A. 
CHURCHILL, HENRY C. 
CIMA, VIOLET 
CIMINO, V. 

CIVAROLO, RAYMOND P. 
CIVILLE, LEWIS A. 
CLARK, CHARLES H. 
CLARKE, DUDLEY R. 
CLARK, GLADYS V. 
CLARK, HAROLD W. 
CLARK, J. H. 
CLARK, J. M. 
CLARK, REGINA 
CLARK, ROBERT J. 
CLARK, TED 
CLARKE, ALAN 
CLARK, WILLIAM G. 
CLARKE, RALPH E. 
CLARKSON, JACK 
CLAUDON, PAULV. 
CLAY, WILLIE 
CLAYCOMBE, GORDON E. 
CLEAR, CHARLES G. 
CLEARY, ALFRED J. 
CLEARY, G. H. 
CLEARY, PAT H. 
CLEMENS, DICK 
CLEMENS, MICHAEL 
CLEMENSDN, CAMILLE C. 
CLEMENTS, BETH 
CLEVELAND, BAKER V. 
CLINCH, MARION 
CLINE, LAURA H. 
CLOW, RAY 
CLYDE, WILLIAM J. 
COAN, GLADYS J. 
CDBB, SAMUEL L. 
COBURN, PAT 
COCHRAN, WILLIAM F. 
COFFEE, RUSSELL L. 
COFFIS, JIMMY T. 
CDFFMAN, DONNIE F. 
COFFMAN, DURHAM 
COFFMAN, VIRGINIA E. 
CDGGINS, RAY 
CDGLIATI, JAMES S. 
COHAN, CHARLES C. 
COHEN, HAROLD A. 
COHEN, JOE C. 
COHEN, NAT C. 
CDHICK, W. A. 
CDHN, ELEANOR 
CDHN, ROBERT J. 
COLBERT, DEAN W. 
COLBERT, RALPH 
COLE, CLARENCE 
COLE, DAVID W. 
COLE, JOE S. 
COLEMAN, CHRISTINE D. 



COLEMAN, EMILY 
COLEMAN, H. S. 
COLEMAN, MDR 
CDLEMAN, ROBERT 
CDLEMAN, W. J. 
COLESON, ROBERT C. 
COLL, J. W. 
COLLIER, HELEN 
COLLIER, PATRICIA 
COLLINS, FRANK M. 
COLLINS, HENRY C. 
COLLINS, GENE 
COLLINS, JOHN S. 
COLLINS, KENNETH L. 
COLLINS, MARTHA D. 
COLLINS, MAXINEA. 
COLLINS, R. L. 
COLLINS, WILLIAM 
CDLTHURST, S. E. 
COLTDN, JACK 
COLTON, S. A. 
CDLVIG, DAVID 
CDLVIN, OSCAR J. 
COMBIS, SALLY 
COMISKY, JOHN 
CDMPTDN, J. T. 
CONANT, PAUL 
CONDON, ALBERTA D. 
CONDON, E. W. 
CONE, D. S. 
CONE, ROBERT 
CDNGDON, RENWICK G. 
CONKLIN, ROBERTS. 
CDNLAN, E. G. 
CONLAN, P. 
CDNLAN, W. E. 
CONLEY, H. V. 
CDNLEY, PETER D. 
CONLEY, RUTH 
CDNLEY, WILLIAM 
CONN, S. 

CONNELLEY, E. T. 
CONNOLLY, E. H. 
CONNOLLY, GRACE M. 
CDNNOLY, JOHN 
CONNOLLY, JOHN J. 
CDNNDLLY, JOHN M. 
CDNNOLLY, PAULA. 
CONNELLY, ROSCOE 
CONNER, MALCOLM 
CONNIFF, PAMILLA 
CONNOR, JOHN 
CONNOR, THOMAS F. 
CONWAY, WALTER A. 
CONRAD, HAROLD L. 
CONRAD, LAURA A. 
CDNRY, W. L. 
CDNZELMAN. JOHN 
COOK, ALYCE M. 
COOK, MRS. ELEANOR 
COOK, C. J. 
COOK, FRED 
COOK, GIFFORD A. 
COOK, HARRY L. 
COOK, HYMAN 
COOK, ILA MAE 
COOK, JACK 
COOK, LARRY 
COOK, RAY 
COOK, WALLACE 
COOK, GEORGE R. 
CDOKE, RAYMOND 
CODKSDN, ROBERTA. 
COONEY, LEO B. 
COONTZ. VIRGINIA 
COOPER, ELDISE 
COOPER, JACKIE 
COOPER, HORACE N. 
COPE, FRANK W. 
COPE, FOSTER 
COPE, WILLIAM 
COPELAND, EDWARD F. 



APPENDIX 



XL1X 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



COREL-TON, JUNE 
CDRBETT, MURIEL J. 
CDRBY, EDNA ST. JDHN 
CORCORRAN, NDRMA F. 
CDRDEAL, FRANCES M. 
CDREY, CATHERINE A. 
CDREY, GEDRGE H. 
CDRKE, HENRY 
CDRRISH, MARIAN 
CDRTELLASSI, D. 
CORTS, THELMA M. 
CDDK, JOSEPH 
CDRUM, ROBERT A. 
COSGRIFF, H. H. 
CD5TELLO, JUANITA 
COSTELLO, THOMAS E. 
COTE, BUD 
COTE, BEVERLY L. 
COUGHLIN, THOMAS D. 
COURTIER, HARRY 
COUNTRYMAN, ETHEL L. 
COURTRIGHT, GLENDORA 
COVE, ROBERT W. 
CDVELL, C. M. 
COVERDALE, CHARLES R. 
COVEY, I. M. 
COTTRELL, A. J. 
COWAN, BESSIE 
COWIE, ANDREW 
COX, LEONARD E. 
COX, NESBERT W. 
COX, RAYMOND J. 
COX, SARAH 
CDYE, P. W. 
CRAFTS, JDHN D. 
CRAIG, HARRY B. 
CRAIG, LESLIE F. 
CRAIG, THOMAS 
CRAIG, ROBERT H. 
CRAIG, WESLEY 
CRAMER, B. F. 
CRAMPTON, JACK J. 
CRANDELL, B. T. 
CRANER, GERALD 
CRANE, JAMES B. 
CRANNA, JOHN 
CRANKSHAW, EDWARD 
CRAVERO, AURORA 
CRAWFORD, C. L. 
CRAWFORD, EDITY L. 
CRAWFORD, GRANT M. 
CRAWFORD, LEWIS 
CREE, MRS. KATHRYN 
CREEL, G. BATES 
CREEDON, JDHN 
CREEKMORE, LLOYD J. 
CREIGHTON, ROBERT E. 
CREIGHTON, ROBERT 
CRENSHAW, ALLEN E. 
CREWS, M. C. 
CRIDDLE, HOWARD 
CRIGLAR, W. L. 
CRIMMINS, PHILIP H. 
CRIMMINS, ALYCE 
CRIST, ROBB POTTER 
CRISTIANI, LAWRENCE 
CROCKER, EARL C. 
CRAFTS, EDITH 
CRDNIN, J. P. 
CRONIN, ROBERTA. 
CRONIN, STELLA 
CROPLEY, CARSON C. 
CROSBY, JAMES A. 
CDS5, DLLIE 

CROTTOGINI, AMERIGO F. 
CROW, SAMUEL M. 
CRDWELL, C. S. 
CROWLEY, FRED J. 
CROWLEY, CECELIA P. 
CROWLEY, CHARLES P. 
CROWLEY, JOHN J. 
CRDWLEY, JOHN T. 



CROWLEY, JOHN L. 
CRUM, ANNA L. 
CRUMMEY, WILLIAM F. 
CUDDIHY, STELMA 
CULBERTSON, RUSSELL 
CULLENWARD, W. S. 
CULBY, WILLIAM H. 
CULVERWELL, F. E. 
CUMMING, ETHEL A. 
CUMMINGS, J. E. 
CUNNINGHAM, ALICE M. 
CUNNINGHAM, ARTHUR 
CUNNINGHAM, CARL 
CUNNINGHAM, JOHN H. 
CUNNINGHAM, JOHN 
CUNNINGHAM, LORRAINE 
CUNNINGHAM, LDRAINE 
CUNNINGHAM, RUTH B. 
CUPP5, W. H. 
CURCIO, ROBERT P. 
CURCIO, ROCCO V. 
CURLEY, JOSEPH 
CURRALL, CYNTHIA 
CURRAN, MATTHEW T. 
CURRIER, DONALD D. 
CURRIGAN, MARY 
CURRY, ELIZABETH W. 
CURRY, FRANK 
CURTIN, JAMES P. 
CURTIS, DAVIS F. 
CURTIS, FRED E. 
CURTIS, GEDRGE 
CURTIS, G. R. 
CURTIS, JOSEPH 
HURTIS, MYRON 
CURTIS, ROBERT R. 
CURTIS, RUBE 
CUSH, JOE 
CUSICK, T. P. 
CUTHBERT, ELIZABETH 
CUTLER, DENZIL A. 
CUTLER, HARRISON 
CUTLER, LELANDW. JR. 
CZIZEK, JAY A. 



DAGLEY, ALICE 
DAGLEY, J. WESLEY 
DAHLGREN, JEAN N. 
DAIBER, C. H. 
DAIKER, LOUIS D. 
DAILEY, RUDOLPH J. 
DAILEY, TDNEY B. 
DALE, MARION 
DALEY, HARRY H. 
DALMAN, WILSON 
DALTD, GEORGIA 
DALTON, ARTHUR 
DALY, DORIS I. 
DALY, NED 
DAM, A. MARGARET 
DANEKE, CARL H. 
DANFORD, LOIS 
DANIEL, JOHN 
DANIELS, GORDON F. 
DANIELS, MARK 
DARFLER, EARL 
DARLING, FRANKIE 
DARLING, FREDERICK L. 
DARR, ANTHONY V. 
DARRACH, MRS. MARSHALL 
DART, ROBERT PAUL 
DATE, HARRY 
DAUGHERTY, ELDON 
DAUGHERTY, FENTON 
DAUGHERTY, HERMON 
DAVENPORT, DOROTHY 
DAVENPORT, JDHN F. 
DAVEY, HELENE 
DAVIDSON, ARDEN R. 
DAVIDSON, ROBERT 



DAVIDSON, WILLIAM 
DAVIES, ALVIN 
DAVIS, A. 
DAVIS, AINSLIE E. 
DAVIS, BARBARA 
DAVIS, BUCK 
DAVIS, CLAUDIA 
DAVIS, DEXTER D. 
DAVIS, DONALD J. 
DAVIS, ELIZABETH R. 
DAVIS, GEORGE R. 
DAVIS, HAROLD 
DAVIS, HAROLD R. 
DAVIS, HELEN 
DAVIS, HERBERT D. 
DAVIS, JULIAN C. 
DAVIS, M. 

DAVIS, MADELINE 
DAVIS, MARK 
DAVIS, ROBERT 
DAVIS, RUSSELL G. 
DAVIS, WILLIAM H. 
DAVY, JAMES 
DAWSDN, ANN 
DAWSDN, OLIVER L. 
DAWSDN, ROBERT 
DAWSON, TED 
DAWSON, UNA W. 
DAWSON, URSULA D. 
DAY, DIXIE 
DAY, FRED G. 
DAY, LAURENCE 
DAYKIN, JACK 
DEAGON, WILLIAM 
DEAN, BARBARA 
DEAN, HELEN M. 
DEAN, JACK 
DEAN, LILA 
DEATSCH, JOSEPH 
DEBLOIS, J. B. 
DEBRESTJEAN, R. 
DEBRUNN, FRANK 
DECKER, BOB 
DECKER, GRACE 
DEEDAN, WILLIAM 
DEELLAS, EUGENE 
DEFDRREST, FRANK A. 
DEFRANCO, KAY 
DEGENKOLB, HENRY 
DEGRASSI, ANTONIO 
DEHR, ALBERT 
DEHRER, L. G. 
DEIL, JERRY 
DEKIRBY.IVOR 
DELACROIX, HO RST 
DE LA MARE, ALBERT 
DELARA, L. 
DELEUZE, RENE 
DELL'ACOUA, INEZ . 
DELLING, HAROLD N. 
DELLWIG, ROBERT C. 
DELNO, IDALI 
DELONG, R. p. 
DEL TURCO, FLORENCE 
DELUCA, PAULA 
DEL MONTE, EUGENE A. 
DEMAILLY, ROBERT 
DEMANDEL, DIANE 
DEMARCD, FILOMINA 
DEMARS, VERNON A. 
DEMELLO, WILLIAM 
DEMESS, LEO 
DEMOSS, EDWIN 
DENEND, MARIA 
DENNEY, G. E. 
DENNIS, HAZEL 
DENNIS, RICHARD W. 
DENNY, ANTHONY D. 
DEPETRILLO, WILLIAM 
DERING, B. A. 
DERNBERGER, ROBERTJ. 
DERNING, G. ROBERT 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



DERZDFF, MAGDALENA 
DETERING, WILLIAM R. 
DEUEL, PHILLIP D. 
DEVEREUX, GEORGE 
DEVERT, FRED 
DEVINE, JOHN J. 
DEVLIN, MADISDN 
DEWEY, DLIVE 
DEWEY, WINIFRED C. 
DEWEY, W. G. 

DEWDLF, THEODORE T. 

DlBRANCO, VINCENT 
DICKMAN, BERNARD W. 
DICKSON, CATHERINE 
DICTEROW, HAROLD 
DIEBELS, PAUL C. 
DIEDERICH, JOHN R. 
DIERNI5SE, FRED 
DIETRICH, DAN L. 
DILL, ADELAIDE M. 
DILL, MAX M. 
DILLON, ALICE 
DIMARCO, GEORGANNE 
DINSMORE, RUTH 
DINWDODEY, K. 
DITTMAN, F. J. 
DIVER, FRED 
DIVANOVICH, D. 
DIXON, C. T. 
DIXON, CONSTANCE 
DIXON, E. A. 
DIXDN, JIMMIE 
DIXON, MARIE 
DDANE, CHARLES W. 
DOBBIE, DONALD V. 
DOBBINS, W. R. 
DOCK, SIGURD C. 
DDCKENDDRFF, BERTA 
DODGE, SUMMER D. 
DDDWORTH, WILFRED 
DOEPFNER, BERT O. 
DDERR, ELMER 
DOHERTY, JOSEPH P. 
DOLAN, J. W. 
DDLIN, MAX 
DOLL, EUGENE 
DOLL, CARLTON E. 
DOLL, VINCENT B. 
DOLLIVER, EMERSON 
DONALDSON, GEORGE W. 
DONAHUE, STEVE 
DONDHOE, EARLS. 
DONOHOE, WILLIAM A. 
DDNNAN, ROBERT J. 
DDNNAN, WILLIAM G. 
DOONEY, ARTHUR J. 
DOPHNA, FRANK R. 
DORAN, NINA P. 
DDRIUS, MERLE 
DORSKOFF, JOHN 
DDSTAL, GEORGE O. 
DOTY, AUDREY M. 
DOUGHERTY, C. E. 
DOUGHERTY, FRANKLIN 
DOUGHERTY FRANKLIN 
DOUGHERTY, LEWIS 
DOUGHTY, ROBERT C. 
DOUGLAS, CECILY 
DOUGLASS, FRED C. 
DOVE, MARGARET L. 
DOVE, R. C. 
DOVER, ROLAND E. 
DOWNEY, M. W. 
DOWNIE, J. D. 
DOYLE, JOHN 
DOYLE, RICHARDS. 
DOYLE, T. J. 
DRAGIO, HAYLE E. 
DRAKE, EDWIN 
DRAKE, JOHN W. 
DRAPER, RAY 
DRAYCOTT, W. R. 



DRECHSLER, JACK 
DRENNING, EARL C. 
DREVER, RONALD E. 
DREW, ELIOT 
DRISCOLL, EDWIN G. 
DRISCOLL, JOHN R. 
DRUMMOND, ALLAN A. 
DRISCOLL, ROBERT E. 
DRUM, R. A. 
DRURY, DORIS 
DUANE, RICHARD B. 
DUART, CHARLES 
DuBRUTZ, VICTOR 
DUBUOUE, CHARLES 
DUCKETT, CALVIN 
DUCKWORTH, H. R. 
DUCKETT, RALPH 
DUFFY, D. E. 
DUFFY, JAMES 
DUFFY, LED B. 
DUFFY, PEGGY 
DUFFY, WILLIAM 
DuFRANE, J. 
DUGAS, H. STANLEY 
DUKE, CHARLES N. 
DUMAS, MARY A. 
DUMMEL, DOROTHY 
DUNCAN, GEORGE B. 
DUNBAR, STUART 
DUNCAN, MAXINE N. 
DUNDDN, MARGARET M. 
DUNKLEY, PALMER 
DUNN, HARRY J. 
DUNN, ARTHUR J. 
DUNN, JOHN F. 
DUNN, T. E. 
DUNN, W. H. 
DUNN, W. L. 
DUNNIGAN, T. P. 
DUNWELL, FRANK B. 
DUPUIS, ANDRE 
DUENSING, J. H. 
DURCKEL, PAUL 
DURLING, ETHEL 
DUSEL, MURIEL J. 
DUSOLD, ANDREW J. 
DUTRA, WILLIAM E. 
DYE, BILLIE 
DYKES, ADA J. 



EARLY, FRANK J. 
EAST, JUNE M. 
EASTMAN, KENNETH G. 
EASTWDLD, MARK B. 
EATON, ARTHUR 
EATON, EDNA BEHRENS 
EBBERT, EVELYN 
EBELING, ELEANOR 
EBERLINE, ANNABELLE 
EBERTZ, 5. 
EBLEN, GENE 
ECKARD, SCOTT W. 
EDEN, GERALDINE 
EDGAR, ANDREW 
EDGAR, M. 
EDGAR, PAULINE A. 
EDGARTDN, WALTER L. 
EDELER, WALTER 
EDIE, WILLIAM H. 
EDINGER, GERTRUDE 
EDISON, RITA 
EDMONDSDN, NEAL 
EDMDN5TDN, ZOE 
EDMUNDS, ELFIE 
EDMUNDS, LOVETTA 
EDWARDS, B. H. 
EDWARDS, BEATRICE MAY 
EDWARDS, GENE 
EDWARDS, HOWARD H. 
EDWARDS, INEZ 



EDWARDS, JACK SR. 

EDWARDS, KLYDE P. 

EDWARDS, LENORE 

EDWARDS, THOMAS 

EDWARDS, WM. R. 

EDWARDS, WILLIS G. 

EGAN, ALPHA K. 

EGAN, LUCILLE A. 

EGERT, SARA 

EHRENPFORT, BURNETTS. 

EHRGOTT, GEORGE M. JR. 

EIMERS, LELAND F. 

EITEL, EDMUND WARN 

EISELE, STRETCH 

ELDER, CHRISTINE E. 

ELKINS, FRANCIS 

ELLEBY, FREDERIC W. 

ELLERMAN, WILLIAM H. 

ELLERY, ORA L. 

ELLGDDD, LEWIS F. 

ELLINGSEN, JOHN B. 

ELLIOTT, PEARL 

ELLIOTT, VIOLET 

ELLIOTT, VIRGINIA 

ELLIOTT, WINIFRED 

ELLIS, A. S. 

ELLIS, BOB 

ELLIS, GEORGE M. 

ELLIS, WARDEN E. 

ELLISON, M. 

ELLSMERE, EDNA 

ELWELL, MARIE E. 

EMERY, CHAS. B. JR. 

EMERY, RALPH D. 

ENDER, FRANK 

ENGEL, ELIZABETH 

ENGL, JOHN 

ENGLER, MARY 

ENGLIS, EARL 
ENGLISH, EDGAR F. 
ENGLISH, PETER F. 
ENGLISH, PHYLLIS 
ENGSTRUM, THOMAS G. 
ENNI5, JOSEPH C. 
ENTLER, N. L. 
ENTRUP, MELVIN 
EPPING, NDRBERT I. 
EPSTEIN, EDWIN H. 
ERB, EVELYN 
ERB, FRED A. 
ERDELATZ, EDWARD J. 
ERDEVIG, J. C. 
ERLENHEIM, HOWARD J. 
ERNST, WILLIAM R. 
ERVIN, G. J. 
ERWIN, HUGH ERLE 
ESPEY, JOHN E. JR. 
ESPEY, ROBERT C. 
ESPINAL, MARTIN F. 
ESPINO5A, ARTHUR 
ESPINOSA, RAYMOND 
ESTES, HERBERT 
E5TES, TODD SCOTT 
ETHEN, ROBT. WILLIAM 
ETHERINGTON, W. H. 
EVANS, CHARLES PORTER 
EVANS, E. 

EVANS, ELLEN ADELL 
EVANS, FRANK 
EVANS, FREDERICK C. 
EVANS, HAZEL 
EVANS, HOWARD R. 
EVANS, MARY 
EVANS, RICHARD WEST 
EVANS, ROBERT L. 
EVANS, THOMAS K. 
EVANS, VICKI 
EVENSEN, ARTHUR M. 
EVERHEART, HERMAN 
EVERETT, E. J. 
EVERS, A. J. 
EWART, ANDREW 



APPENDIX 



Ll 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



EWART, ROBERT 
EWING, MARGARET V. 
EWART, SUE 
EYNDN, CYRIL 



FABRE, C. E. 
FACER, ELDEN J. 
FAHEY, PETER 
FAHS, KENNETH G. 
FAIR, WQDDROWW. 
FALCD, EMILY 
FAIRMAN, ROBERT W. 
FALETTI, HELEN 
FALLS, WILLIAM 
FANCHER, RICHARD K. 
FARGE, CLAUDE 
FARLOTTI, B. A. 
FARAN, JOHN J. 
FARRELL, ALEX 
FARRELL, DDRDTHY L. 
FARRELL, GRACE 
FARRELL, JOHN P. 
FARRELL, LOUISE 
FARREN, JOHN 
FARRIS, LEE 
FARRY, B. J. 
FARWELL, STANLEY 
FAULKNER, HAZEL P. 
FAWCETT, VANCE 
FEENEY, CLEMENTINA 
FEERICK, ROBERT 
FEICHTMEIR, ARMAND 
FELKER, LORRAINE 
FELIZ, FRANK E. 
FELIZ, MAURICE 
FELLER, K. R. 
FELS, EDWARD T. 
FELS, JOSEPH F. 
FELTY, JOSEPH 
FENDEL.LOIS DORENE 
FENEFOS, LAWRENCE B. 
FENNIMORE, HERBERTW. 
FENON, MRS. BELLE C. 
FERNANDEZ, M. 
FERNSTROM, GRANT 
FERRARIO, AMIL 
FERRER, TINITA 
FERRIER, G. W. 
FERRY, H. L. 
FESSIO, FLORENCE A. 
FEY, EDWARD 
FIALA, DOROTHY 
FIGERDID, BRYANT 
FIGDNI, NINA 
FILES, LENNIS T. 
FILIPPA, LILLIAN M. 
FINCH, JOHN R. 
FINEBERG, LESTER A. 
FINKE, HENRY JR. 
FINLAYSON, ROBERT H. 
FINLEY, ROBERT 
FINEY, ARTHUR 
FINEY, NORMAN W. 
FIRESTONE, BERNIE 
FISCHER, GLADYS L. 
FISCHER, GEO. E. JR. 
FISCHER, HOWARD 
FISCHER, HAROLD W. 
FISHER, EVERETT E. 
FISHER, FRED M. 
FISHER, FREDERICK V. 
FISHER, THOMAS G. 
FISHER, WINIFRED M. 
FISHMAN, JACK 
FITTERER, ISABELLE 
FITSCHEN, GED. H. 
FITZPATRICK, EDWARD W. 
FITZPATRICK, GERMAINE 
FITZGERALD, JOSEPH B. 
FITZGERALD, J. R. 



FITZGERALD, DR. J. T. 
FITZPATRICK, THOMAS J. 
FJELSTED, DEWILTDN E. 
FLAGG, NORMAN 
FLAHERTY, JOSEPH 
FLANAGAN, HARRY E. 
FLASHMAN, WILLARD 
FLEGAL, RALPH PORTER 
FLEMING, A. P. 
FLETCHER, GEORGE 
FLINT, BRILSFDRDP. 
FLINT, LOUIS R. 
FLONTENY, RUTH 
FLOYD, PAUL D. 
FLYNN, JOHN F. 
FLYNN, JOHN P. 
FLYNN, MICKEY 
FLYNN, THOMAS J. 
FDGARTY, GERALDINE 
FDGERTY, FRANCES 
FOLEY, RAYMOND C. 
FONG, LESLIE H. 
FORBES, JOHN D. 
FORBES, THERESA 
FORD, BUSTER M. 
FORD, ELSON A. 
FORD, PHILIP 
FORD, W. T. 
FDRDE, WILLIAM 
FORREST, EDWIN G. 
FORSTER, JOHN F. 
FORTINI, BEULAH 
FORWARD, THOMAS W. 
FORSSHAGE, GEORGE H. 
FOSTER, CLARENCE 
FOSTER, CLAUDE H. 
FOSTER, DOLORES 
FOSTER, EDWARD 
FOSTER, FLORENCE 
FOSTER, HORACE G. 
FOSTER, JUNE E. 
FOWLER, BETTY ANN 
FOX, C. LYN 
FOX, CHARLES R. 
FOX, CLYDE 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
FRAHM, ARTHUR 
FRAHM, GEORGIE E. 
FRAME, WARREN 
FRANCHI, CHAS. J. 
FRANCIS, ROY E. 
FRANCKAERTS, MARCEL H. 
FRANK, MILTON E. 
FRANZ, EUGENIE 
FRASE, J. C. 
FRASER, CECILIA S. 
FRAZER, STANLEY I. 
FRAY, HAROLD 
FRASIER, LEROY D. 
FRECKMAN, FRANK G. 
FREDERICK, ELLIS H. 
FREDERICK, HARLAND 
FREEDMAN, RUDOLF E. 
FREDERICKS, MARGARET 
FREDERICKS, M. E. 
FREDERICK, EMMETT 
FREDRICKSON, ALICE 
FREEMAN, ARTHUR 
FREEMAN, E. A. 
FREEMAN, HOWARD 
FREEMAN, JOHN T. 
FREGGER, RUTH 
FREITAS, JANE 
FRENCH, ALVIN 
FRENCH, JAMES 
FRENCH, KENDRIC R. 
FRENCH, HARRY T. 
FRENCH, RODERICK 
FRENCH, SAMUEL 
FREY, MASON V. 
FRY, PERRY C. 
FRICKE, JOSEPH 



FRICK, EDWARD L. 
FRICKE, JOSEPH P. 
FRICKE, RAYMOND F. 
FRIEBERG, BURDETTE E. 
FRIEDMAN, EMELIA 
FRIEDMAN, JEROME 
FRIESEN, MARIE E. 
FRISCH, JUANITA 
FRITH, ROLAND G. 
FRIZZELL, MARGARET 
FRDSS, ROY 
FROST, JAMES 
FULLER, ALICE 
FULLER, ROBERT E. 
FULLERTON, MARION 
FULMER, PAUL D. 
FUNK, HORACE R. 
FUNK, JERRY 
FUNK, W. C. 
FUNSTON, ELEANOR 
FURLONG, LAWRENCE P. 



GAFFNEY, MARYON 
GAGAN, KENNETH 
GAIL, ELINOR 
GALBREATH, MARGARET 
GALE, BEATRICE 
GALLAGHER, CHARLES J. 
GALLAGHER, FLORENCE E. 
GALLAGHER, JOHN J. 
GALLARDO, MARIO S. 
GALLATIN, WALTER L. 
GAMARA, NORBET J. 
GAMBLE, SHUBORNE R. 
CANCEL, RAYMOND E. 
GANE, FLORENCE 
GANLEY, THOS. J. 
GARCIA, BERNARD 
GARCIA, CORA D. 
GARDEN, ROY 
GARDNER, ALBERT T. E. 
GARDNER, BETTY MAE 
GARDNER, DON G. 
GARDNER, JOHN A. 
GARDINER, JUNE 
GARDNER, LEROY M. 
GARDNER, LESTER ALMA 
GARDNER, RALPH F. 
GARGAETAS, C. 
GAR 10, J. L. 
GARRELL, PHILIP E. 
GARRETT, ALICE M. 
GARRISON, CHAS. WM. 
GARSIDE, JOE 
GARTNER, LAURA D. 
GARTHORNE, G. E. 
GATES, JACK PATRICK 
GATELY, WILLIAM F. 
GASSION, CHARLES 
GAUNIN, WILFRED P. 
GAVIGLIO, OLGA 
GAY, FRANK M. 
GEDDES, ROBERT E. 
GEANACOS, J. 
GEARY, HAZEL F. 
GEHRING, CONRAD 
GEICH, FRED 
GEIGER, EDWARD C. 
GEISERT, DON L. 
GEMMILL, O. W. 
GENSLER, CAROLYN 
GENTRY, WALTER J. 
GENTSCHEL, ALBIN 
GEORGE, LOVINE 
GEORGE, PETER 
GERAGHTY, RALEIGH 
GERARD, LILLY 
GERBER, LEO 
GERE, WALTER F. 
GERHARDT, FRANK 



Lll 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



GERICKE, JULIUS P. 
GERMAIN, HDMER 
GERRARD, ROBERT JAMES 
GERRY, LOIS 
GETCHELL, LEE 
GENSS, HAROLD F. 
GHOY, HERBERT 
GIACALDNE, JOSEPHINE 
GIACDMINI. A. J. 
GIANERA, J. 
GIANINI, LEO G. 
GIANNINI, RALPH J. 
GIBBONS, DR. MORTON 
GIBERSON, PHILLIP 
GIBSON, ANDY 
GIBSON, ROBERT 
GIFFIN, C. T. 
GIFFORD, JOHN V. JR. 
GIFFDRD, RUTH 
GIFFORD, WILLIAM L. 
GILBERT, A. W. 
GILBERT, BETTY 
GILBERT, CLIFTON B. 
GILBERT, D. L. 
GILBERT, R. M. 
GILBERTSON, HOWARD B- 
GILKEY, HELEN L. 
GILKEY, HOWARD 
GILL, EDDIE 
GILL, HAROLD 
GILLAND, FRANCES 
GILLESPIE, DOLLY 
GILLIGAN, ANDREW 
GILLUM, JOHN C. 
GILMORE, EVELYN 
GILPATRICK, EVELYN L. 
GILROY, ENGEL M. 
GIMMEL, W. 
GINSBERG, JEROME R. 
GIO5I, ORLANDO 
GIROD, J. L. 
GJEDSTED, JEANNE M. 
GLAFKIDES, JAMES 
GLANTZ, BESS LOUISE 
GLASER, ALVIN E. 
GLASER, J. F. 
GLASER, MARIE L. 
GLASSMAN, gUETITAZ. 
CLASSMAN, R. 
GLEESON, MONICA M. 
GLENK, EARL S. 
GLOR, PAUL 
GLOVER, JACK HOWARD 
GLYNN, FRANK J. 
GLYNN, JOHN 
GOBLE, RICHARD LEO 
GDDAT, EVELYN 
GODCHARLES, J. E. 
GOEPPNER, WILLIAM 
GOERL, CONRAD 
GOETZ, VIRGINIA V. 
GOLDEN, BARBARA 
GOLDEN, BETTINA 
GOLDEN, MARGARET E. 
GOLDSCHMIDT, WALTER 
GOLDSMITH, BETTY 
GOLDSTEIN, DORIS M. 
GOLDSTEIN, DR. LOUIS B. 
GOLDSTEIN, ROBERT 
GOLDSTEIN, THORNTON 
GOK, FRED 
GOLDBERG, MORLEY 
GOLDSTEIN, NATHAN 
GOMEZ, TEDDY 
GONCALVES, LORRAINE 
GOOD, DEWITT PAUL 
GODDIN, ED V. 
GOODMAN, BOOTH 
GORDON, ANNE 
GORDON, GENE H. 
GORDON, JOHN 
GORDON, LELAND 



GORDON, WALTER 
GORDY, CHARLES W. 
GORMAN, JOHN 
GORMAN, RAY 
GORRILL, JACK 
GOSS, H. E. 
GOUGH, WALTER L. 
GOULD, ELMER C. 
GOULD, GEOFFREY 
GOULD, JOHN J. 
GDW, ROBERT 
GOYETTE, ERNEST F. 
GRABOW, LOUISE P. 
GRACE, HARRIETT 
GOULD, RAYMOND 
GRADY, HARRY A. 
GRAFF, JOHN ALDEN 
GRAHAM, ALVIN 
GRAHAM, GARRETT 
GRAHAM, GREGORY D. 
GRAHAM, JAMES M. 
GRAHAM, L. W. 
GRANT, CHARLOTTE 
GRANT, EMMA LEA 
GRANT, H. V. 
GRANT, LORRAINE 
GRAU, GEORGE 
GRAVES, DAYL 
GRAVES, SIDNEY N. 
GRAY, AILEEN 
GRAY, FRED 
GRAY, HAROLD E. 
GRAY, JANICE K. 
GRAY, JOHN H. 
GRAY, LOUIS L. 
GRAY, LESTER K. 
GRAY, THOMAS J. 
GRAY, WALTER 
GRAYDON, ROBERT B. 
GRAYSDN, WM. G. 
GREEF, LILLIAN 
GREEN, ALVINA E. 
GREEN, ETHEL 
GREEN, FRED E. 
GREEN, GEORGE R. 
GREEN, JOHN 
GREEN, IVAN 
GREEN, KENNETH 
GREEN, MOLLY 
GREEN, PETER D. 
GREEN, WILLIAM 
GREENE, JOAN A. 
GREENE, L. M. 
GREENWOOD, RAYMOND 
GREER, ELWODD 
GREGERSON, AL 
GRELL, EDWARD E. 
GREW, F. J. 
GREY, MARY E. 
GRIFFIN, EDWARD 
GRIFFIN, HARRY 
GRIFFIN, STANLEY 
GRIFFIN, ROBERT 
GRIFFIN, WILLIAM 
GRIFFING, LENORE 
GRIFFITH, DICK 
GRIFFITH, LOYD 
GRIMES, LOUISE LEE 
GRIMM, GEORGE H. 
GRIMWOOD, J. BRYANT JR. 
GRITZ, EDYTH 
GROAT, BEATRICE 
GRDDMAN, EDNA V. 
GRDGAN, GEORGE B. 
GROSS, WILHELMINA 
GRDSSBEIN, RAYMOND 
GROUNDS, CLARE R. 
GROVE, JUNE D. 
GROVER, HELEN 
GROVES, BARBARA 
GROWNEY, HAROLD 
GRUBB, PETE 



GRUNDY, THOMAS A. 
GUERIN, A. E. 
GUBER, FRANK 
GUERRA, BENJAMIN J. 
GUGLIELMINO, SALVADOR 
GUIDA, N. V. 
GUILMETTE, ALINE 
GULDEN, WILLIAM M. 
GUNN, ALBERT EARL 
GUNNISDN, ROYAL A. 
GUNTHDRPE, BERNEITA 
GUTER, JOSEPH 
GUTHERY, VELMA 
GUTHREY, WALTER 
GUTHRIE, ARTHUR B. 
GUTHRIE, GEORGE 
GUTSCHE, CHAS. 

H 

HAAG, SAM M. 
HAAS, ALBERT MAX 
HACKENBERG, CHAS. 
HACKETT, RAYMOND W. 
HADEN, LILLIAN 
HAENTZEN, LEN 
HAERLE, SERENA P. 
HAGAN, KERMIT D. 
HAGELBERG, GEORGES. 
HAGELBERG, N. W. 
HAGER, MELVIN 
HAGUE, DOUGLAS 
HAHNEMAN, RICHARD V. 
HAIGH, SIMEON C. 
HAIGHT, HENRY HUNTLY 
HAIGHT, SAMUEL C. 
HALE, BRUCE 
HALEY, MATHEW F. 
HALL, FRANK 
HALL, FRED 
HALL, GEO. E. 
HALL, HARRY 
HALL, RALPH ALAN 
HALL, THEODORE 
HALLOQUIST, JOHN C. 
HALL, SHERWOOD 
HALLEY, WINSTON E. 
HALLORAN, A. H. 
HALSEY, CDNANT K. 
HAMILTON, LEE 
HAMILTON, MARGARET K. 
HAMILTON, R. J. 
HAMMELL, JOHN D. 
HAMMER, LOUIS 
HAMMERGREN, MARSHALL 
HAMMERGREN, MILDRED 
HAMMOND, C. BURTON 
HAMMOND, MARGARET T. 
HAMPEL, HARRISON 
HAMPTON, WINIFRED 
HAMRICK, P. A. 
HANCE, EVA 
HANDIN, DOROTHY 
HANDLDN, J. H. JR. 
HANDY, GERTRUDE 
HAN ING, W. F. 
HANKINS, CLYDE 
HANKINS, LEON G. 
HANLEY, C. G. 
HANA, EARL W. 
HANNA, M. W. 
HANNA, PATRICIA 
HANNA, RENA 
HANNAN, GEO. G. JR. 
HANNAN, EARLWM. 
HANRATTY, HARRY T. 
HANS, JAMES ALBERT 
HANSEN, ARTHUR H. 
HANSEN, BUD 
HANSEN, CARL P. 
HANSEN, JOHN 
HANSEN, MABEL 



APPENDIX 



Llll 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



HANSEN, MARSHALL 
HANSEN, ROBERT 
HANSON, CHALMERS J. 
HANSON, LARK M. 
HANNAN, GEORGE G. 
HANSON, O. H. JR. 
HANIBAL, ROBIN 
HANSEN, CDRWIN 
HANWAY, ED 
HAPPEL, ELIZABETH H. 
HARANG, HAROLD J. 
HARBERG, E. T. 
HARBERTS, JOHN CALVIN 
HARDENBLJRG, AGNES 
HARDWICK, H. A. 
HARDY, CHAS. JR. 
HARE, RICHARD F. 
HARGIS, MARION 
HARKINS, ROSE 
HARKRIDER, JOHN 
HARLOW, J. C. 
HARMON, ETHEL 
HARMS, ROLAND A. 
HARPER, D. 
HARPER, JAMES 
HARPER, W. W. 
HARRINGTON, B. W. 
HARRINGTON, FRANK 
HARRINGTON, JOHN M. 
HARRINGTON, WALTER D. 
HARRINGTON, JOHN M. 
HARRIS, BETTY 
HARRIS, E. T. BUCK 
HARRIS, GRACE 
HARRIS, JOHN A. 
HARRIS, HAROLD M. 
HARRIS, MARJORIE E. 
HARRIS, MELVILLE M. 
HARRIS, W. G. 
HARRIS, W. J. 
HARRISON, HOWARD L. 
HARRISON, PAUL 
HARRISON, JEANETTE 
HARSHAW, ANTOINETTE 
HARSHFIELD, JAMES C. 
HART, EDGAR C. 
HART, FRANCES 
HART, FLOYD 
HART, JAMES 
HART, MARGARET L. 
HART, WARD L. 
HARTER, HARRIET D. 
HARTMAN, DORIS E. 
HARTMAN, MARY H. 
HARTSDOK, JOHN 
HARVEY, ADA 
HARVEY, GRANT B. 
HARVEY, STANLEY 
HARVEY, VERNDN 
HARWOOD, J. H. 
HASKINS, JOHN M. 
HA5LAM, LDRNA JEAN 
HASSON, C. J. 
HASTINGS, AGNES 
HASTINGS, MIKE 
HATCH, A. W. 
HATCH, MADELYNNE 
HATCHER, ROBERT 
HATFIELD, EUGENE D. 
HATFIELD, ROBIN 
HATHAWAY, MARY 
HATLELID, DR. F. H. 
HAULRICH, BENJAMIN A. 
HANSEN, THERESA C. 
HAVENS, GERTRUDE 
HAW, ALLAN S. 
HAWKES, THOMAS 
HAWKINS, RICHARD L. 
HAWKINS, THOMAS V. 
HAWKED, VIRGINIA 
HAYDEN, CLYDE C. 
HAYDEN, J. E. 



HAYDEN, MYRTLE D. 
HAYDEN, PAUL R. 
HAYES, BOB C. 
HAYES, CALDER 
HAYES, EUGENIS 
HAYES, GERTRUDE M. 
HAYES, LESLIE WM. 
HAYMOND, MARIAN 
HAYNES, JAMES S. 
HAZELWOOD, FRED J. 
HEADLEY, JESS E. 
HEAL, JIM 

HEALER, MINNEOLAH. 
HEALEY, J. F. 
HEALEY, W. 
HEALY, D. P. 
HEALY, JACK 
HEALY, JAMES J. 
HEALY, JEROME C. 
HEALY, THOMAS N. 
HEALY, WILLIAM A. 
HEARFIELD, DAVID 
HEARN, MARJORIE 
HEATON, DOUGLAS W. 
HEAVERSIDE, JAMES 
HEAVEY, JOHN T. 
HEDDY, EVELYN 
HEDDY, CHARLES E. 
HEDRICK, URSEL ALMOND 
HEEBNER, WILMA IRENE 
HEFFERNAN, JAS. K. 
HEFFERMAN, RAY T. 
HEGARTY, J. A. 
HEHNE, GENE WM. 
HEIDE, H. A. 
HEINEMAN, CHAS. J. 
HEIM, PHILIP LEO JR. 
HELGET, H. H. 
HELLER, GEORGIA F. 
HELLING, VIVIAN 
HELM, RUTH 
HELLMAN, MARY 
HEMBREE, MAXIMEA. 
HENCMANN, ERLDEAN J. 
HENDEE, ROSE W. 
HENDERSON, BETTY 
HENDERSON, CHARLES W. 
HENDERSON, DORWARD 
HENDERSON, JAMES H. 
HENDERSON, J. H. 
HENDRICKS, LOUISE E. 
HENE, JACK 
HENESSEY, JOHN F. 
HENESSY, MARY 
HENNING, ELMA 
HENINGER, GRACE 
HENNING, LOUISA. 
HENNO, PAULA 
HENRICK, HOWARD L. 
HENRY, BARBARA M. 
HENRY, H. L. 
HENRY, JAMES 
HENRY, M. W. 
HENRY, N. 
HENRY, NOEL 
HENRY, WILLIAM W. JR. 
HENSHEL, CLARENCE R. 
HENSLER, JEANNE 
HENSLER, J. E. 
HENSLEY, CHESTER 
HENSON, GORDON M. 
HENZI, HARRY 
HEPP, J. K. 
HERALD, GEORGE H. 
HERATY, FRANCIS J. 
HERBERT, WM. 
HERDMAN, MARY JANE 
HERMAN, ROBERT C. 
HEROLD, R. J. 
HERREMAN, O. E. 
HERRMAN, MARIE 
HERSCOVITZ, BELLA 



HETHERINGTDN, HELEN 
HERWIG, ROPERT J. 
HERZ, VINCENT J. 
HESS, FRED 
HESS, HELEN 
HESTER, HELEN 
HESTER, PHYLLIS J. 
HEWITT, LESLIE G. 
HEYES, LEONARD B. 
HEYMAN, JOHN H. 
HEYN, MARYL 
HEYNARD, WILLIAM 
HICKEY, D. L. 
HICKS, PATRICIA 
HICKS, BURTON 
HICKSON, LEONARD 
HIGGINS, ALBERT J. 
HIGGINS, BETH 
HIGGINS, FRANCES 
HIGGINS, JAMES 
HIGGINS, PATRICK 
HIGGINS, W. R. 
HIGLEY, WILLIS 
HILL, ANN DAVIS 
HILL, CLYDE W. 
HILL, ELINOR M. 
HILL, GLORIA 
HILL, HOWARD F. 
HILL, JACK 
HILL, J. E. 
HILL, JOHN H. 
HILL, MILTON THOMAS 
HILL, R. B. 
HILL, THELMA 
HILLE, WALTER E. 
HILLERS, DORIS 
HILMER, ARNOLD E. 
HILPERT, CHARLES 
HILTON, MARY K. 
HILTON, RALPH 
HIMROD, DONALD 
HINCKLE, WARREN J. 
HINDMAS, PHYLLIS 
HINMAN, HARVEY H. 
HIPSLEY, FRANK 
HIRSH, MARIE 
HITCHCOCK, FRED S. 
HITCHCOCK, HUBERTW. 
HITCHCOCK, ROY L. 
HIRSTEL, HOWARD 
HJERTOS, CATHERINE 
HOAGLAND, WILHELMINA 
HOBBS, LEVI ST. JOHN 
HOBRON, HARRIS 
HOBSON, FRED B. 
HOCH, WILLIAM B. 
HODGES, DR. F. T. 
HODGES, NADINE B. 
HODGINS, ROBERT V. 
HODGSON, E. L. 
HOEFER, CAROLYN 
HDELLING, THEODORE N. 
HOFFMAN, ETHEL 
HOFFMAN, WM. ROGER 
HOFMANN, MONA 
HOGAN, EVERETT 
HDDAN, LARRY 
HOLCOMB, MARY LEE 
HOLDEN, SUE 
HOLGREN, DLOF 
HOLLERAN, JOHN 
HOLLEY, VERNA FAY 
HOLLOWAY, SAM 
HOLM, ADOLPH 
HOLM, THORSTIN J. 
HDLMAN, ROBERT V. 
HOLMBERG, LAWRENCE W. 
HOLMER, HELEN EMILIA 
HOLMES, LEWIS V. 
HOLMQUIST, AIMEE 
HOLSCLAN, H. 
HDLTKAMP, NORMAN 



L1V 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



HDLTZ, MARION 
HDLLY, ERNEST D. 
HDLYDAKE, DE DDREBT 
HONE, DOUGLAS M. 
HOPE, LEONARD T. 
HOPE, M. F. 
HDPF, MARY LDU 
HOPKINS, HENRY L. 
HOPKINS, HORACE L. 
HOPKINS, JERRY C. 
HOPKINS, R. H. 
HOPKINS, ROSALIE 5. 
HORAK, HENRIETTA 
HORAN, PATRICK J. 
HDRNE, MARY 
HORNER, VIRGINIA 
HORSPODL, ERNEST R. 
HORTDN, HOWARD D. JR. 
HDRWITZ, EARL 
HOSE, FRANK 
HOSKIN, FLOYD M. 
HOUGH, WM. E. 
HOUSE, B. J. 
HDUSER, FRANK 
HOUSTON, HOWARD 
HDUY, MONROE 
HOVE, GERMAINE 
HOWARD, ADELINE K. 
HOWARD, CALVIN 
HOWARD, EARL C. 
HOWARD, H. E. 
HOWARD, JOSEPH C. 
HOWARD, RAY 
HOWE, HARRY 
HOWELL, JAMES B. JR. 
HDWEY, GAIL 
HOY, MARJORIE 
HUARTSON, HAROLD H. 
HUBBACK, MALCOLM A. 
HUBBARD, JUNE 
HUBBARD, KATHRYN 
HUBBARD, WILLIS C. 
HUBNER, ROBERT N. 
HUDSON, JOHN C. 
HUDSON, GORDON 
HUDSON, W. E. 
HUD5PETH, B. T. 
HUEY, STANLEY 
HUFF, ROBERT 
HUGHEL, ALFRED B. 
HUGHES, CHAS. L. 
HUGHES, HELENE 
HUGHES, JOHN 
HUGHES, JOHN HARLEY 
HUGHES, LEROY B. 
HUGHES, MARJORIE 
HUGHES, SHEILA 
HUGHES, THOMAS 
HULL, ROBERT BANKS 
HULSE, E. H. 
HUME, JOHN R. 
HUMES, PATTY 
HUMPHRIES, ROBERT 
HUMPHREY, ANTOINETTE 
HUMPHREYS, ABRAM S. 
HUNEKE, ALBERT H. 
HUNGATE, BLANCHE 
HUNT, BOSTON RICE 
HUNT, EDWIN A. 
HUNT, O. M. 
HUNT, OTTO M. 
HUNT, ROY W. 
HUNTER, HELEN 
HUNTER, JOHN 
HUNTER, LA VERNE 
HUNTER, LYNN E. 
HUNTER, M. 
HUNTER, YVONNE M. 
HUNTER, RALPH 
HUNTLEY, BOYD E. 
HUNTSMAN, RAYMOND 
HUNYADY, LEO 



HURABIELLE, ANNETTE 
HURLEY, JACK 
HURLEY, JAMES L. 
HURLEY, JOSEPH P. 
HURLEY, WILLIAM 
HUSH, WILLIAM W. 
HUSON, ELLEN AGATHA 
HUSSEY, E. W. 
HUTCHINSDN, C. J. 
HUTTO, JOSEPH ARNOLD 
HUTCHINSDN, DON EARL 
HUXLEY, FRANCES B. 
HYDE, MATTIE 
HYLAND, HOWARD 



IGAZ, RUDOLPH, JR. 
IMUS, CLIFFORD L. 
INGEBRITSDN, ARTHUR L. 
INGRAHAM, HARRY 
INGRAM, ROY E. 
IRVING, PATRICIA 
IRWIN, ANNA M. 
IRWIN, CHARLOTTE 
I5BELL, JAMES ELLIS 
ISHAM, MARY 
ISENSTEIN, MAXWELL 
IUDICE, C. J. 
IVERS, F. 
IVES, BESSIE 
IWATSU, PETER 



JABOK, JOSEPH 
JACHMAN, CHARLES P. 
JACK, WILLIAM RAYMOND 
JACKLING, GRACE E. 
JACKMAN, RONAL J. 
JACKSON, C. 
JACKSON, CHARLES 
JACKSON, CALHOUN 
JACKSON, ELEANOR 
JACKSON, FRANK J. , JR. 
JACKSON, ROBERT F., JR. 
JACKSON, W. A. 
JACKSON, ZERYL E. 
JACOB, JESSE 
JACOBS, BEATRICE 
JACOBS, EVELYN 
JACOBS, GWEN 
JACOBS, PHILIP S. 
JACOBSON, DORIS J. 
JACDB5EN, CARL H. 
JACDBSON, CHAS. 
JACOBSEN, H. J. 
JACDBSON, L. D. 
JACOBSON, R. 
JACQUES, PAUL LOUIS 
JAMES, DONALD 
JAMESON, DDRENCE C. 
JAMES, JOHN NELSON 
JAMES, JACK 
JAMESON, STUART R. 
JARCHOW, L. W. 
JEFFREY, PAULINE D 
JENKINS, ED 
JENNINGS, DEAN S. 
JENNINGS, GEORGE 
JENNINGS, ROBERT S. 
JENSEN, DOROTHY L. 
JENSEN, LLOYD H. 
JENSEN, NORMAN 
JENSEN, OTTO 
JEPSEN, LAWRENCE 
JESTER, W. E. 
JEWETT, L. R. 
JOHNSON, ALFRED W. 
JOHNSON, ALICE 
JOHNSON, BARBARA 
JOHNSON, BEATRICE 



JOHNSON, BERT J. 

JOHNSON, CHARLES 

JOHNSON, C. E. 

JOHNSON, CLINE 

JOHNSON, EDDIE 

JOHNSON, EDITH M. 

JOHNSON, ERNEST 

JOHNSON, ERNESTINE 

JOHNSON, EVAR 

JOHNSON, EVON 

JOHNSON, F. E. 

JOHNSON, F. E. 

JOHNSON, GEORGE W. 

JOHNSON, H. L. 

JOHNSON, H. T. 

JOHNSON, JEAN 

JOHNSON, J. D. 

JOHNSON, LUD M. 

JOHNSON, RUBY 

JOHNSON, R. E. 

JOHNSON, W. P. 

JOHNSTON, A. B. 

JOHNSTON, E. E. 

JOHNSTON, E. R. 

JOHNSTON, F. M. 

JOHNSTON, H. W. 

JOHNSTON, LOUISE E. 

JOHNSTON, WALDEN 

JOLLY, JACK 

JONAS, JOHN 

JONES, CECIL 

JONES, DONALD 

JONES, EVERETT L. 

JONES, FLORENCE J. 

JONES, GILLDN H. 

JONES, JAMES D. 

JONES, KENNETH 

JONES, PHYLLIS 

JONES, PRESTON 

JONES, RICHARD 

JONES, ROBERT L. 

JONES, ROBERT P. 

JONES, STANLEY D. 
JONES, THOMAS C. 

JONES, W. C. 
JONES, WINTON 
JORDAN, EDWARD 
JORDAN, MERRILL 
JORGENSEN, DEWEY 
JDRGENSEN, DOROTHY 
JORGENSEN, KENT A. 
JDRGENSEN, ROY 
JOSEPH LEW 
JOSEPH, PEARL 
JOURNEY, TRACY T. 
JDVICH, AMANDA 
JOY, JACK E. 
JOYCE, MERVYN J. 
JOYNER, NEDD H. 
JUCK5CH, MERLIN J. . 
JUDELL, BETTY 
JULIAN, VAL W. 
JULIEN, ROBERT K. 
JUNG, FRANCES B. 
JUNGERMAN, DAVID 
JUNGJDHANN, GEORGE A. 
JURGENS, HAROLD E. 
JUSTICE, RICHARD W. 

K 

KAEMMERLING, W. 
KAHLMEIER, LEO H. 
KAHN, ALFRED R. 
KAHN, ROBERT H. 
KALH, W. E. 
KALFAIN, EDWARD 
KALMAN, HERBERT S. 
KALNIN, AUGUST 
KANE, ANN 
KANE, AUDREY L. 
KANE, HARRY T. 



A PPEN DI X 



LV 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



KANGLEY, WILFDRD F. 
KAPLAN, RAE 
KAPDNAT, FLORENCE M. 
KARR, DDRIS K. 
KASOWITZ, HARRY 
KAST, ANNA E. 
KASTEN, FRED 
KATSMA, JDAN 
KAUFMAN, JOHN D. 
KAUFMANN, BLANCHE S. 
KAUFMANN, ROBERT D. 
KAVANAGH, INEZ 
KAY, ALICE 
KAY, HENRY F. 
KAYS, MERL 
KEANE, IMELDA 
KEANE, RUTH ELLEN 
KEARNS, M. H. 
KEATINGE, MAJOR D. J. 
KEATON, RUTH 
KECK, J. H. 
KEEFE, DON 
KEELER, ELOI5E 
KEENAN, HUGH 
KEENEY, GEORGE E. 
KEENEY, WHIT 
KEIM, BEVERLEY 
KEITH, PAUL 
KELLEHER, BART D. 
KELLEHER, CHARLES S. 
KELLEHER, F. J. 
KELLEHER, THERESA C. 
KELLY, ALFRED E. 
KELLY, ALICE 
KELLY, CHARLES H. 
KELLY, FLORENCE M. 
KELLY, GLYTA P. 
KELLY, JDHN 
KELLY, MATHERINE 
KELLY, THERESA A. 
KELLY, THOMAS F. 
KELT, DOUGLAS 
KEMBLE, W. 
KEMP, MARGARET E. 
KENDRYX, CARL F. 
KENEALY, ADELINE 
KENNEDY, ANDREW 
KENNEDY, DUKE 
KENNEDY, ERNESTINE 
KENNEDY, FRANK J. 
KENNEDY, JOSPEH A. JR. 
KENNEDY, KENNETH 
KENNEDY, MAURICE 
KENNEDY, PAT 
KENNEDY, PAULA M. 
KENNEDY, PHIL J. 
KENNETH, CLARK 
KENNY, H. 
KENNY, FLORENCE 
KEN5DALE, HAVLON 
KENT, KARL 
KERFOOT L. A. 
KERN, EUGENE F., JR. 
KERN, MYRON 
KERNER, NANCY 
KERPAN, RALPH 
KERR, E. M. 
KERR, GEORGE R. 
KERR, L. G. 
KERR, RALPH N. 
KERR, WILLIAM L. 
KERRIGAN, BERT 
KERRIGAN, BILL 
KERRIGAN, ESTHER 
KERRIGAN, JACK 
KERSCHER, JACK 
KERTELL, A. T. 
KETCHAM, A. R., JR. 
KEVIE, LESTER 
KEVIE, MELVIN 
KIDDER, GEORGIA 
KIDNEY, FRANCES 



KIDNEY, JOHN G. 
KIDWELL, J. MERVYN 
KIERMAN, CLARENCE E. 
KIESER, CHARLES W. 
KILIAN, RAMONA IRENE 
KILLIAN, DOLORES MAE 
KILLION, B. F. 
KILTDN, RUSSELL 
KIMBALL, ELLIS 
KIMBALL, ROBERT W. 
KIMBERLIN, RICHARD L. 
KIMBRDUGH, J. W. 
KING, C. R. 
KING, ERVA SKINNER 
KING, EVELYN 
KING, GERTRUDE A. 
KING, HARRY H. 
KING, IRIS ANN 
KING, STANLEY C. 
KING, VAN W. 
KING, WESLEY E. 
KINGSFORD, LESLIE 
KINGSFDRD, L. A. 
KINNEAR, C. 
KINNEY, H. F. 
KIRBY, DDRIS 
KIRKENDALL, V. L. 
KIRKWOOD, JACK 
KISSEL, JOSEPH R. 
KITCHEN, G. N. 
KITTS, ELISABETH 
KLANG, HARRY 
KLEIN, CHAS. FRANCIS 
KLINIEKI, PATRICIA M. 
KLING, NORMAN A. 
KLOCK, JOHN L. 
KLDPP, HENRY THEO. 
KNABLE, ROSE B. 
KNEISS, GILBERT H. 
KNIGHT, BETTY JEANNE 
KNIGHT, IRENE 
KNIGHT, NICK 
KNIGHT, R. D. 
KNDWLES, S. L. 
KNOPH, HARRY J. 
KNOWLTON, FRED C. 
KNDWLTON, ORIN H. 
KNOX, FRANK R. 
KOCH, AVISON F. 
KOCH, HARLEY 
KOCH, MARIA 
KOCH, MARIANNA 
KDCHAN, STANLEY S. 
KOBERLE, RUTH 
KOENIG, RUTH C. 
KDETITZ, K. F. 
KOHARITS, JOSEPH 
KOHNKE, F. C. 
KONIGSBERG, DR. J. 
KONKOL, A. J. 
KOORSONER, CHRIS 
KORENIAN, JDHN 
KDRENS, BERNADINE M. 
KORTICK, ABE 
K05TER, MERVYN L. 
KORTICK, YVONNE 
KDULORES, DONNA M. 
KOUMARIAN, VIVIAN 
KDWALSKI, LEON 
KRAHN, KARL 
KRAMER, PAUL 
KRAUSE, HARRY 
KRESS, VICTOR C. 
KRETCHMER, PAUL 
KRIEDT, DAVID 
KRILL, F. ADON 
KROH, LESLIE M. 
KRON, LLOYD A. 
KRDW, BERNARD 
KROW, MORRIS 
KRUG, LILY 
KRUSE, LAWRENCE 



KRUSE, LEROY H. 
KRUTMEYER, A. A. 
KUBICEK, FRED 
KUBISCHEK, PAUL 
KUEHNE, CHARLES 
KUEHNE, VIOLA 
KUHLMAN, C. L. 
KUSAK, KATHRYNE 
KUSHNICK, CLYDE M. 



LA BARGE, VINCENT JR. 
LA BERGE, BERNADETTE 
LABERRIQUE, ANTOINE 
LABOUNTY, AL 
LACEY, JOSEPH P. 
LACHMAN, ARTHUR 
LACHMAN, RICHARD H. 
LADDIS, HOWARD 
LADEN, GEORGE C. 
LAFRANDRE, JOHN R. 
LAGES, ANITA EMILY 
LA HAYE, EUGENE B. 
LA KRAPES, ELVINA 
LA KRAPES, M. H. 

LAMB, A. H. 
LAMBERT, PIERRE A. 
LAMBERT, RENE 
LAMBERTDN, BETTY 
LAMDAN, LEONARD K. 
LAMMERS, WAYNE 
LAMMDN, GEORGE I. 
LAMOREAUX, THOS. L. 
LAMPKIN, ARTHUR W. 
LANA, WILLIAM M. JR. 
LANCASTER, JOHN S. 
LANDAU, ARTHUR J. 
LANDRU5, ELSIE MARIE 
LANDSBORDUGH, L. B. 
LANDUCCI, GIULID 
LANE, FRANK 
LANE, HELEN L. 
LANE, HERBERT 
LANE, LAWRENCE R. 
LANE, W. H. 
LANE, WINIFRED M. 
LAND, DONALD 
LANG, RAY JR. 
LANDER, FELIX 
LANGERT, ELI D. 
LANGHELDT, ROSEMARY 
LANDMAID, ELMER 
LANKFORD, CECIL 
LANNING, JACK L. 
LAPHAM, GRACE K. 
LAPURI, MARGE 
LA PLACE, EMILE 
LAREW, ALTER F. 
LARKE, DILRDY 
LARSON, ELMER J. 
LARSON, HELEN MAE 
LARSDN, RUSSELL E. 
LA RUE, RICHARD 
LA RUE, TRAVERS 
LASATER, RAYMOND C. 
LASATER, DEDRDE J. JR. 
LASDIN, CHRISTINE 
LASKER, BRUNO 
LATHLEAU, GERTRUDE 
LAUENSTEIN, ROBERT F. 
LAUDEN5EN, RDY M. 
LAVALLEE, EMERY A. 
LA VALLE, H. 
LAVETTE, DENZIE 
LAWLOR, T. J. 
LAWRENCE, H. W. 
LAWRENCE, JAMES 
LAWRENCE, JOYCE 
LAWRENCE, PAUL JOHN 
LAURENZI, ALICE 
LEACH, BARBARA W. 



LV1 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



LEACHMAN, LOUIS P. 
LEATHERMAN, EDRIS 
LE BARDN, PAUL 
LE BAS, HARRY E. 
LE CLERE, JAMES E. 
LEDDEN, JAMES A. 
LEE, ALLEN E. 
LEE, ANTENDR E. 
LEE, BRUCE 
LEE, CHARLES H., JR. 
LEE, G. L. 
LEE, IRMA 
LEE, J. G. 
LEE, LILLIE LEW 
LEE, MABEL 
LEE, RICHARD A. JR. 
LEE, ROSE 
LEE, W. 
LEE, W. H. 

LEEDY, ARLIE LERDY 
LEENDERSTEN, HOWARD 
LEEPER, JEAN 
LEES, ALBERT E. 
LE FEAVER, JAMES H. 
LEFFLER, AL 
LE FOR, GUS 
LEGG, B. S. 
LEGG, LEWIS S. 
LEGGE, HERBERT WM. 
LE GLACIE, LEO 
LEHAN, EDWARD 
LEHANE, LOUIS F. 
LEHMAN, CHARLES D. 
LEHMAN, MILTON 
LEITH, JOHN B. 
LELAND, WM. E. 
LENHART, HOLMAN D. 
LENHART, JOS. EDWIN 
LENHART, WILLIAM F. 
LEON, RUTH F. 
LEONARD, EDDIE J. 
LEONARD, DAVID J. 
LEONARD, HARRY 
LEONARD, JOHN B. 
LEONARD, RAY A. 
LEONARD, WILLIAM B. 
LEONG, BERTRAM 
LEONG, EVAN 
LESLIE, ALBERT H. 
LESSER, RUTH M. 
LEUSCHNER, ELIZABETH 
LEVANT, GENE E. 
LEVENSALER, JUDSON 
LEVIN, LILLIAN 
LEVITT, CHARLES 
LEVY, BERTHA 
LEVY, BEVERLY E. 
LEW, WING KEATH 
LEWIS, CAROLYN JANE 
LEWIS, CHARLES J. 
LEWIS, CLAYTON 
LEWIS, DAVID 
LEWIS, EDWARD 
LEWIS, JOHN B. 
LEWIS, J. SIDNEY 
LEWIS, JERRY 
LEWIS, LESLIE 
LEWIS, MARGD 
LEWIS, MELVIN G. 
LEWIS, RAY 
LEWIS, ROBERT R. 
L'HEUREUX, RAYMOND C. 
LHUILLIER, E. A. 
LIBBY, KATHERINE E. 
LIEBES, DDRDTHYW. 
LIEBIG, HERBERT 
LIEDTKE, ARTHUR 
LILLICO, ADRIENNE 
LIM, MAMIE 
LIMDN, MARIE A. 
LINDqUIST, CARL A. 
LING, HONG 



LINGENFELTER, CLIFFORD 

LINK, G. E. 

LINK, MARJORIE 

LINKLETTER, ARTHUR 

LINN, F. F. 

LINNANE, KENNETH J. 

LINTNER, ROGER S. 

LIPPI, LOUIS G. 

LIPSETT, JOAN M. 

LIPSCOMB, A. T. 

LISK, WALTER 

LISKEY, L. W. 

LISSER, ALAN C. 

LISSNER, LOUIS L. 

LITHGAN, JACK 

LITTLE, GEO. 

LITTLE, JACK 

LITTLE, WILLIAM 

LIVINGSTONE, BOB 

LIVINGSTON, EUGENIA 

LLOYD, MILDRED 

LLOYD, ROBERT E. 

LLOYD, RUTH V. 

LLOYD, W. E. 

LOAN, FDD 

LDBLEY, WM. 

LOBSIEN, JULIEN 

LOCH, HARRY C. 

LOCKHART, GEO. W. 

LDCKWODD, HOWARD F. 

LDCKWDOD, R. H. 

LDDIGIANI, JOE 

LDEFFLER, ERWIN S. 

LOFTUS, W. T. 

LOGAN, CONSTANCE 

LOGAN, FRED J. 

LDGE, HELEN 

LONG, ERNEST E. 

LONG, EVALINE 

LONG, LUTHER E. 

LONGO, JULE 

LONGUY, ALBERT 

LORD, FRANK 

LORD, HARRY 

LORD, HUBERT P. 

LORD, BERT 

LORD, O. M. 

LORIMER, C. G. 

LDRIMER, ROSA 

LDRING, LESLIE 

LOSCHER, GEORGE 

LDTMAN, GERTRUDE 

LDUCHARD, ALFRED H. 

LOUDDN, RICHARD H. 

GIVEN, LOUISE 

LDVE, ADA 

LDVENS, WILLARD 

LOVERA, JAMES 

LOWE, PARDEE 

LOWE, REX 

LDWEN, MAX 

LDWRIE, JOE 

LOWRY, MALCOM G. 

LOY, MAXINE 

LUBBOCK, BEATRICE 

LUBECK, PAULA 

LUEBKEMAN, ALFRED E. 

LUCAS, FRED GEORGE JR. 

LUCAS, JOHN F. 

LUCCHESI, DINO 

LUHMAN, ARTHUR 

LUHMAN, GERTRUDE 

LUNARD, CHARLES 

LUND, RODNEY W. 

LUNDBORG, INEZ 

LUTICH, NORMAN 

LUXINGER, C. 

LUTZ, L. A. 

LYDICK, LAWRENCE T. 

LYFORD, JOYCE K. 

LYMAN, JACK 

LYMAN, R. F. JR. 



LYNCH, 

LYNCH, 

LYNCH, 

LYNCH, 

LYNCH, 

LYNCH, 

LYONS, 

LYONS, 

LYONS, 

LYTTLE; 

LYKINS, 



GEO. ALBERT 
DORIS 
JAMES T. 
MARY S. 
NORA A. 
ROSE 
FRANCES 
MARGARET A. 
MARIGENE 
. LELA F. 
LEE T. 



M 

MAA5S, ALVIN F. 
MA AS, R. P. 

MCCARTNEY, FELTON E. 
MACAULAY, JACK L. 
MACCORD, EMMA 
MACDONALD, CLYDE L. 
MACDDNALD, COLLIER 
MACDONALD, D. s. 
MACDONALD, EDWIN 
MACDONALD, EVELYN 
MACDDNALD, F. R. 
MACDDNALD, MILDRED B. 
MACDONALD, MARGARET c. 
MACDONALD, R. D. 
MACDDNALD, WILLIAM 
MAC DONNELL, HUGH 

MAC ELWEE, K. F. 
MAC GDWAN, FREDERICK 
MACHI, ROSE A. 
MACK, MARIE 
MACK, SAM E. JR. 
MACKENZIE, MARSHALL 
MACKIE, JAMES D. 
MACKIN, SIDNEY R. 
MACGIBBONEY, E. L. 

MACLAFFERTY, J. H. 

MACMILLAN, VICTORIA 
MACWAY, E. 
MACWHINNEY, L. E. 
MADDOX, EDGAR W. 
MADERIA, PHIL J. 
MADISON, FLETCHER R. 
MADSEN, FRANK 
MADSEN, ROLAND H. 
MAGER, ELMER F. 
MAGGIDRA, JOSEPHINE 
MAGILL, BERNARD R. 
MAGILL, GLADYS 
MAGLID, JOE S. 
MAHER, FRANK 
MAHL, KENNETH A. 
MAHONEY, BUD 
MAHDNEY, CHARLES 
MAHONEY, DOMINA 
MAHDNEY, HAROLD F. 
MAHONEY, JAMES LEE 
MAHONEY, WILLIAM C. 
MAISLER, MITCHELL 
MALIN, KENNETH B. 
MALKIN, LILLIAN 
MALLEN, MARGARET E. 
MALLIARAS, THOMAS 
MALLON, CARMEN 
MALDFF, ROBERT 
MALONE, H. E. 
MALONE, PEGGY 
MALDNEY, A. E. 
MALDNEY, D. K. 
MALONEY, DOROTHY 
MALONEY, ROSE 
MALONEY, RALPH P. 
MALSBARY, WM. J. 
MALTBY, KATHLEEN 
HAMLOCK, JOSEPH 
MANCINI, ANTONIO 
MANEGGIE, JOE 
MANGAN, A. C. 
MANHEIM, HENRY 



APPENDIX 



LVll 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



MANIDN, ALBERT 
MANIDN, JOHN J. JR. 
MANLEY, VERA L. 
MANN, CLARENCE E. 
MANN, EDWARD 
MANN, L. A. . 
MANN, ROBERT T.J 
MANNING, PATRICIA E. 
MANNDN, RALPH J. 
MAN5ERGH, JACK 
MANSFIELD, BERTHA S 
MANUCK, TENSIE 
MANUS, L. 
MANZER, JA5DN B. 
MARAND, MARIE J. 
MARBLE, L. ; 
MARCHAI5, BED. 
MARCHAND, HENRY L. 
MARCUS, MADISDN 
MARDEL, CHARLES M. 
MAREK, JDE 
MARETTA, W. J. 
MARGETTS, RUTH 
MARIANI, THED. 
MARK, FLORENCE 
MARK, PAUL 
MARKERT, CHARLES 
MARKHAM, MARY HELEN 
MARKLE, BRUCE 
MARKS, LARRY H. JR. 
MARKS, J. L. 
MARKUSE, HOWARD R. 
MARLAND, R. 
MARONEY, R. A. 
MARQUARD, RUDY 
MARQUIS, KATHLEEN 
MARR, WILLIAM LEE 
MARRE, ALPHONSE 
MARRIOTT, DON C. 
MAR5DEN, MARTHA 
MARSH, ALBERTA H. 
MARSH, DAVID G. 
MARSH, DON D. 
MARSHALL, J. M. 
MARSHALL, DEWITTT. 
MARSHALL, EVELYN A. 
MARSHALL, H. WALDON 
MARTIEL, DIXIE J. 
MARTIN, A. C. 
MARTIN, FRANK E. 
MARTIN, CHAS F. JR. 
MARTIN, FRANK E. 
MARTIN, H. D. 
MARTIN, JEANNE 
MARTIN, MARYALICE 
MARTIN, NEIL 
MARTIN, ROY 
MARTIN, R. V. 
MARTIN, WM. E. JR. 
MARTINA, PAUL 
MARTINDALE, MAX 
MARTINE, MURIEL 
MARTY, ED 
MARX, PHILLIP 
MASHIKDFF, VICTOR 
MASOERO, HENRY 
MASON, GEO. H. 
MASONEK, ISAM 
MASSACAR, CHARLES 
MAS5EE, DON L. 
MA5SEY, EVELYN L. 
MASSEY, WILLIAM 
MASS IE, A. D. 
MASTERS, JAMES N. 
MASTERS, M. D. 
MASTERSON, ALICE 
MATHER, RUTH E. 
MATHIAS, PHILIP 
MATLOCK, PARKER 
MATTESON, MORRIS 
MATTHEWS, ELSIE 
MATTHEWS, DUKE 



MATTHEWS, IRENE 
MAURER, E. N. 
MAXAM, LEONARD L. 
MAXWELL, EVELYN 
MAXWELL, J. EVANS 
MAXWELL, JEANNE 
MAXWELL, RALPH 
MAXWELL, RAY 
MAY, GEORGE S. 
MAY, JACK B. 
MAYAR, JULIAN 
MAYFIELD, B. W. 
MAYFIELD, DOROTHY 
MAYFIELD, ETHEL G. 
MAYFIELD, MAJOR E. 
MAYNARD, BARBARA 
MAYO, JOHN J. 
MAYO, MELID M. 
MAYOSKY, J. L. 
MAZEAU, JOSEPH 
MAZEN, WALTER 

MCALLISTER, HUGH c. 

McBAIN, DONALD Z. 
MCBRIDE, JAMES A. 
MCCABE, FRANCIS 
McCABE, MAE 

MCCAFFREY, JOSEPH F. 
MCCAFFREY, JAMES L. 

McCALL, ALBERTA J. 
MCCANLIES, PRESTON H. 
McCANN, CAMILLE 
McCANN, EARL 
McCANN, JIM 
McCANN, ROBERT J. 
McCANN, TED 

MCCARTHY, DALTON 
MCCARTHY, EARLEEN R. 
MCCARTHY, EDWARD j. 
MCCARTHY, ELEANORE 
MCCARTHY, ELIZABETH 
MCCARTHY, JOHN R. 
MCCARTY, LORING 
MCCARTHY, ROBERT 
MCCARTHY, TDM 
MCCARTHY, MARYALICE 

McCAULEY, HARRY W. 
McCAW, HERBERT L. 
MCCHRYSTAL, ARTHUR J. 
McCHRYSTAL, RICHARD 
McCLELLAN, HUGH 
McCLISH, STANTON 
McCLOY, DR. NEIL P. 
McCLURE, WM. J. 
McCOLGAN, ORPHA 
McCOLLISTER, ALFRED A. 
MCCOLLUM, FARRELLA. 
McCDLLUM, H. 
McCONNELL, FRANK H. 
McCDNNELL, JOHN W. 
McCORD, HELEN L. 
MCCORMAC, BERNICE 
McCORMAC, PAULA. 
McCORMICK, JAMES 
McCDRMICK, JACK H. 
McCORMICK, JAMES W. 
McCORMICK, SHIRL L. 
McCOURTNEY, ALFRED 
McCREADY, GILBERT M. 
McCROREY, HOWARD 
McCULLDUGH, JESSE W. 
McCUE, CLAUDE 
McCRYSTLE, ALPHA 
McCULLDUGH, J. W. 
McCRANIE, MOLLY 
McDERMOTT, EDWARD J. 
McDEVITT, BARNEY 
McDEVITT, HARRY F. 
McDEVITT, MARY 

MCDONALD, EDWARD A. 
MCDONALD, GERTRUDE 
MCDONALD, HARRY 
MCDONALD, M. c. 



McDONAUGH, HENRY 
McDONAUGH, RICHARD 

MCDONNELL, JOSEPH A. 

McDONOUGH, MARK J. 
McDDUGLE, FLOYD 
McEACHIN, JOE 
McELHENY, THOMAS J. 
McELVENNY, BEATRICE 
McENTEE, GAILA 
McENTEE, THOMAS 
McENTIRE, GEO. W. 
McEWING, ROBERT L. 
McFARLAND, JAMES R. 
McFARLAND, JOSPEH 
McFEELY, ALFRED R. 
McGARRY, CATHERINE E. 
McGAVRAN, G. E. 
McGEE, ROBERT J. 
McGILLAN, THOS. 

MCGINN, WALTER L. 
McGINNITY, DOROTHY J. 

McGINTY, JAMES B. 
McGLOTHLIN, MARIE 
McGLYNN, LEO J. 
McGOVERN, WM. M. 
McGRATH, RDBT. 
McGUINNESS, DR. J. S. 
McGUIRE, EARL 
McGUIRE, JOHN 
McGUIRE, MICKEY 
MCGURK, C. W. 
MclNERNEY, FRANCES 
MclNNIS, NORMAN 
MclNTDSH, JAMES 
MclNTOSH, RUSSELL W. 
MclNTDSH, WALLACE E. 
MclNTYRE, GORDON 
MclVER, GWEN 
MclVER, J. R. 
McKANNAY, JACK 

MCKAY, DAVID j. 
MCKAY, FRANK 
MCKAY, JAMES 
MCKAY, JAMES M. 
MCKAY, MARGARET R. 
MCKAY, RUTH 

McKEE, DONALD 
McKEE, GEORGE HENRY 
McKEE, MARY KATHERINE 
McKELLIPS, D. O. 
McKENNEY, PATRICIA 
McKEON, PAULINE 
MCKEOUGH, MERVIN D. 
McKIDDY, CECIL 
McKILL, CHARLES 
McKIMMEY, MABEL M. 
MCKINNEY, RUSSELL R. 
McKINLEY, ALLAYNE 

MCLAUGHLIN, RUTH 
MCLAUGHLIN, WALTER J. 
MCLAUGHLIN, WILELLA R. 
MCLEAN, SCOTT 

McLELLAN, A. B. 
McLEDD, HARRY R. C. 
MCLEMDRE, A. C. 
McMAHDN, EVA 
McMAHDN, MARY 
McMACKIN, MYRTLE 
McMULLIN, HOWARD 
McMAINS, BURCHELL R. 
McMILLIAN, M. D. 

MCMILLAN, ROBERT 

McMURRAY, HELEN 
MCNAIR, LELA JOYCE 
McNALLY, IRIS 
McNAMARA, JOHN A. 
McNEILL, DONALD 

MCNEIL, JAMES R. JR. 

McNICOL, CHAS. R. 
McNINCH, E. K. 
MCPHAIL, RUTH 



LV111 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



McPHEETERS, VIRGINIA 

MCQUEEN, ARTHUR j. 

McRAE, MELVIN J. 
McSHANE, JAMES E. 
McSWEEN, JDS. M. 
MCSWEEN, MAX J. 
MCTAVISH, HAROLD C. 
MEAD, FLORENCE 
MEADE, BARBARA 
MEADE, MARY RUTH 
MEADE, WILLIAM A. 
MEADER, KATHRYN A. 
MEAGHER, THDMASSINE 
MEDALIE, ANN 
MEDEIRDS, HENRY 
MEEHAN, LDUIS 
MEEK, J. F. 
MEISEL, NDRMAN 
MELANSDN, WILLIAM 
MELENDEZ, GILBERT 
MELETIS, MADELINE 
MELNICDE, SAMUEL A. 
MELRDSE, CLAIRE H. 
MELVIN, GEORGE C. 
MELVIN, ROBERT C. 
MENDELSDN, JESSE 
MENDDZA, FRANK 
MENIST, ROBERT 
MENGULA, LAWRENCE 
MERCER, EDWIN W. 
MEREDITY, ELIZABETH A. 
MERRELL, WILLIAM E. 
MERRICK, RUTH 
MERRILL, PETER A. 
MERRILL, T. STEPHEN 
MERRILL, VIRGINIA 
MERRIMAN, FRANK 
MERRIN, ROBERT E. 
MERRITT, GEORGE W. 
MERIZ, EMILIE 
MESETH, BERNARD 
MESSINGER, MARIE 
METTLER, FRED 
METAXAS, JACK 
MEW, GEORGE BING 
MEW, HENRY GING 
MEYER, B. C. 
MEYER, CARL F. 
MEYER, FENTON R. 
MEYER, GEORGE 
MEYER, LAMBERT M. 
MEYERS, MERLE 
MEYERS, HIRAM WM. 
MEYERS, WALLACE J. 
MEYERS, WALTER E. 
MICHAEL, GLADYS V. 
MICHEL, CHARLOTTE V. 
MICHEL, W. E. 
MICHAELSON, HARRY M. 
MIDDLESWORTH, J. P. 
MIDDLETON, ROBERTA. 
MIDGLEY, MARJDRIE 
MIHELICH, STEPHEN 
MIKEL, ROSSITER 
MIKESELL, LELAND C. 
MILANI, ANNIBALE F. 
MILBOURNE, ARCHIE 
MILES, M. M. 
MILHOLLAND, STANLEY 
MILITAND, JOHN T. 
MILLER, BARLOW B. 
MILLER, DAVE 
MILLER, DICK 
MILLER, DOUGLAS F. 
MILLER, EDNA MAE 
MILLER, EUGENE J. 
MILLER, EVELYN 
MILLER, FRANK J. 
MILLER, FRANK L. 
MILLER, GEORGE 
MILLER, GEORGE P. 
MILLER, HARRY 



MILLER, H. E. 
MILLER, JOHN P. 
MILLER, L. B. 
MILLER, MARGUERITE C. 
MILLER, O. W. 
MILLER, PAUL 
MILLER, SHIRLEY 
MILLER, SIBYL 
MILLER, STANLEY 
MILLER, STEPHEN 
MILLER, STEVE J. 
MILLER, THOMAS 
MILLER, WESLEY C. 
MILLER, YVONNE N. 
MILLER, WALTER 
MILLIKEN, ARTHUR W. 
MILLIKEN, GEO. ROBT. 
MILLS, BILL 
MILLS, EDDUARD R. 
MILLS, HOWARD 
MILTON, A. 
MINGES, J. R. 
MINOR, B. B. JR. 
MINIHAN, JOHN F. 
MINOR, JACK WEBB 
MINOR, JOE 
MINTURN, MARTHA 
MINZEY, AUGUSTA 
MIRABELLA, GEO. C. 
MISKEL, FRANK 
MISNER, ROBERT 
MITCHELL, A. L. 
MITCHELL, C. L. 
MITCHELL, FRANK B. 
MITCHELL, H. W. 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
MITCHELL, MICHAEL 
MITCHELL, MOWATT 
MISNER, RDBT. W. 
MITCHELL, NORMA 
MITCHELL, RALPH F. 
MITCHELL, RAYMOND A. 
MITCHELL, W. J. 
MOALE, JOHN FOSTER 
MOEBUS, WM. 
MDFFATT, H. W. 
MOHL, VICTOR 
MOLITOR, JOHN 
MOLKENBUHR, CHAS. L. 
MONAGHAN, GEO. D. 
MONAHAN, KENNETH J. 
MONAHAN, W. W. 
MONETTA, DOROTHY J. 
MDNETTE, SYLVIA 
MONEY, WM. THOMAS 
MONGON, IRENE 
MONKS, GEORGE R. 
MONROE, R. 
MONROE, STEPHEN C. 
MONTANARI, O. 
MONTHEITH, T. F. 
MONTENEGRO, R. 
MONTGOMERY, DEWITT 
MONTGOMERY, NOMA 
MONTGOMERY, ROBERT 
MOODY, HARRY W. 
MOORE, BUD C. 
MORAN, DOROTHY 
MOORE, ELLEN 
MOORE, EUGENE 
MOORE, DR. J. M. 
MOORE, JUNE DALE 
MOORE, MARGARET 
MOORE, MARGARET E. 
MOORE, MIRIAM JANE 
MDRAN, THOMAS P. 
MOORE, W. R. 
MOOSE, CLAUDE C. 
MODSER, GEORGE 
MOOSER, HATTIE 
MOOUIN, A. J. 
MORALES, ALBERT 



MORALES, GEORGE 
MORAN, GEORGE 
MORAN, JOS. M. 
MORAN, T. P. 
MORAN, THOMAS W. 
MOREHOUSE, BILL 
MDREHOUSE, G. G. 
MORENO, CHESTER A. 
MORENO, JOSEPH 
MORGAN, JACK 
MORGAN, KATHERINE 
MORK, SANDER 
MORELY, GRACE M. 
MORRELL, FORD S. 
MORRICE, FRANCES 
MORRICE, MARJDRIE 
MORRIS, AL 
MORRIS, LARSEN J. 
MORRIS, NELLIE M. 
MORRIS, STANLEYS. 
MORRIS, TIM 
MORRISON, ELDEANA 
MORROW, MARIAN K. 
MORSE, RALPH 
MORSE, WILLARD A. 
MORSS, F. B. 
MORTENSEN, CARL J. 
MORTIMER, GEO. S. 
MORTIMER, WM. B. 
MORTIMER, WILLIAM 
MORTON, E. L. 
MORTON, VIRGIL 
MOSELY, ISABELLE L. 
MO5HER, CHARLES R. 
MDSIAS, LEONARD S. 
MOSS, ELVAJANE 
MOUBER, SEYMOUR 
MDULTHROP 
MDUNLE, ERNEST 
MOUNTAIN, ROBT. C. 
MOWRY, ELDA 
MOWRY, EDITH 
MOWRY, RDBT. S. 
MOXCHAN, TOMMY 
MDY, CLARENCE 
MOYER, WILLIAM 
MOYLES, JACK 
MDYNE, RUTH HEDWIG 
MUEHLMAN, R. J. 
MUELLER, LDUIS K. 
MUELLER, MARTIN 
MUHLFELDER, FRANCES 
MUIR, ANDREW L. 
MULDOWN, RITA F. 
MULHDLLAND, E. R. 
MULKEY, BUREL 
MULLALY, LEO F. 
MULLANE, EUGENE W. 
MULLERBROUGH, G. A. 
MULLER, A. L. 
MULLER, FRIEDA A. 
MULLER, LEONARD A. 
MULLETT, LESLIE F. 
MULLIGAN, A. 
MULLOW, F. G. 
MULQUEENEY, LOISE. 
MUNRO, HERBERT H. 
MUNSON, JACKSON F. 
MURGITTROYD, R. R. 
MURPHY, FRANCES I. 
MURPHY, JOHN 
MURPHY, J. A. 
MURPHY, LEO 
MURPHY, LEO W. 
MURPHY, MARIE 
MURPHY, RUSSELL C. H. 
MURPHY, T. R. JR. 
MURPHY, VIRGINIA 
MURRAY, J. R. 
MURRAY, JACOB BEAN 
MURRAY, RALPH 



APPENDIX 



L1X 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



MUSSER, HELEN I. 
MLJSSO, EUGENE 
MYATT, JAMES S. 
MYGRANT, ROBERT 

N 

NAIBURG, MEYER 
NANCE, BILL 
NAPIER, DEAN K. 
NASH, JOHN C. 
NASH, MANLEY K. 
NAVRATIL, MARY 
NEDDVICH 
NEELANDS, WM. 
NEELY, DORIS ANN 
NEELY, R. T. 
NEGLEY, OENONE 
NEIBAUR, DICK 
NELLIS, WALTER G. 
NELSEN, ALEXANDRA 
NELSON, A. A. 
NELSON, BETTY 
NELSON, CHARLES H. 
NELSON, C. W. 
NELSON, FRANK A. 
NELSON, GUSTAVE 
NELSON, HELEN 5. 
NELSON, HERMAN G. 
NELSON, LEONARD 
NEMETH, S. A. 
NETTLE, BENJAMIN .E 
NEUHAUS, EUGENE JR. 
NEWMANN, R. H. 
NEUBTADT, MORRIS 
NEWBY, CHAS. 
NEWBY, CHAS. E. 
NEWELL, ALLAN R. 
NEWHALL, JAMES W. 
NEWLAND, GUY E. 
NEWLANDS, JAMES G. 
NEWMAN, ARLENE 
NEWMAN, BARBARA D. 
NEWMAN, CHARLES H. 
NEWMAN, DAVID 
NEWMAN, GLADYS 
NEWMAN, J. 
NEWMAN, SAM 
NEWMAN, VINCENT A. 
NEWMAN, WALTER 
NEWTON, E. A. 
NEWTON, EVELYN 
NEWTON, PEGGY 
NICHDLAY, PAUL 
NICHOLS, JAMES 
NICHOLS, LUTHER JR. 
NICHOLS, RICHARD E. 
NICHOLS, R. E. 
NICHOLSON, DONALD 
NICHOLSON, J. F. 
NICKERSON, CHAS. L. 
NICKERSON, H. 
NICOLAI, ED 
NIELSEN, ELSIE 
NIELSEN, ERICH 
NEILSEN, GERDA 
NIELSEN, JOHN W. 
NIELSEN, ROBERT 
NIENDORFF, ARTHUR S. 
NIHL, FRANK M. 
NISKE, EDWARD G. 
NISKE, VIVIAN 
NIVENS, DTHA O. 
NIX, E. D. 
NIXON, EDNA J. 
NOBLE, CHESTER F. 
NODMANN, ADELE M. 
NOEL, WILLIAM 
NOFREY, CLARENCE E. 
NOLAN, WEBSTER K. 
NDLAND, FRED A. 
NOLL, MARGARET 



NOONA, RICHARD F. 
NDDNAN, W. J. 
NORDEN, DON 
NORGAARD, ALMA M. 
NORMAN, RUBY 
NDRRIS, JERRY F. 
NORTH, CHAS. H. 
NORTH, JOHN M. 
NORTHLEY, GED. 
NORTON, JACK E. 
NORTON, ROY 
NORWOOD, VIRGINIA 
NDVITZKY, FRANK 
NOWELL, HOWARD 
NOYES, JOHN M. 
NUGENT, JUNE M. 



OBER, FOREST E. 
O'BRIEN, AGNES 
O'BRIEN, BETTY JO 
O'BRIEN BERNICE M. 
O'BRIEN, ETHEL 
O'BRIEN, GEMMA 
O'BRIEN, G. M. 
O'BRIEN, MICHAEL 
O'BRIEN, PATRICIA H. 
OCHS, JEAN 

O'CONNOR, BERNARD J. 
O'CONNOR, CONSTANCE 
O'CONNOR, R. F. 
O'DEA, WILLIAM 
ODENTHAL, MARIE 
D'DONNELL, CORRINE 
O'DONNELL, EDWARD 
O'DONNELL, MARIE 
D'DDNNELL, STAFFORD 
O'DOWD, MAYE F. 
OEHME, A. L. 
D'KEEFE, R. F. 
O'GARA, GERALD J. 
OGDEN, BARBARA G. 
O'HARA, BERT 
D'HARA, BETTY 
O'HARA, JOHN F. 
O'HARA, RAYMOND 
DHERN, MAURICE J. 
OHLEMUTZ, ANNE 
OHLIGER, THOMAS W. 
OLBERG, GEORGINA 
O'LEARY, ELEANOR F. 
O'LEARY, FRANK 
O'LEARY, JAMES 
OLIVER, DAN 
DLIPHANT, R. C. 
OLMSTED, B. 
OLSEN, CARL 
DLSEN, CHARLES H. 
OLSEN, SIGNA A. 
OLSEN, WALTER A. 
OLSON, D. L. 
O'NEIL, ANN L. 
D'NEIL, J. A. 
O'NEIL, JOHN C. 
O'NEILL, E. M. 
O'NEILL, EVELYN A. 
O'NEILL, H. J. 
O'NEILL, HARRIETTE 
O'NEILL, JOHN J. 
O'NEILL, PATRICK 
O'NEILL, WILLIAM W. 
ONELLION, MINNETTE 
ONETD, FRANK 
DNETO, MARIE 
ONSTOTT, KYLE 
OPFERMANN, H. B. 
OPPERMAN, RICHARD 
DRLANDI, LLOYD J. 
ORN, LIDA J. 
DRR, JOHN W. 
DRSINI, C. 



ORSINI, CAESAR 
DRTH, CHARLES H. 
DRTHMAN, L. T. 
ORTON, GLEN 
O5BORN, ED 
OSBURN, EARL A. 
DSBDRNE, AVERY H. 
OSOFSKY, ABE M. 
OSTRDM, ROBERTS 
DSTROM, OTIS 
O'SULLIVAN, JAMES F. 
OTAGURO, KAYO 
OTIS, LAWRENCE F. 
OTTO, AGNES C. 
OTTO, RUSSELL H. 
OTIS, MARGARET 
DTTOLINI, ART 
OTTON, HARRY 
DUGH, RICHARD R. 
OVERLEY, CLYDE H. 
OVERTON, WALTON P. 
OWEN, DONALD C. 
OWENS, ELGIN 
OWNES, M. V. 
OWSLEY, ZERELDA W. 
OWYANG, HOPP 
DXTOT, R. A. 



PACCIDRETTI, ANDY 
PACCIDRETTI, ANTOINETTE 
PACE, CLAY L. 
PACE, M. A. 
PACKARD, EMMY LOU 
PACHARD, LEIGHTON K. 
PAGE, EDWARD B. 
PAINE, C. W. 
PAINTER, J. W. 
PALM, ARTHUR 
PALMER, HORACE 
PANELLA, PETER 
PANTERA, RENEE 
PAQUETTE, J. ALBERT 
PARDI, MARVIN J. 
PARK, HELEN 
PARK, JOHN E. 
PARKANS, FERNA H. 
PARKER, A. L. 
PARKER, BILL 
PARKER, D. W. 
PARKER, GEORGE F. 
PARKER, GEORGE P. 
PARKER, JACK 
PARKER, PAUL V. 
PARKIN, THOMAS R. 
PARRY, TERESA 
PARRY, WILLARD 
PASCHALL, ALFRED 
PARSELS, JOHN W. 
PARSONS, JAMES W. 
PASSERI, PETE 
PASTO, EDMUND Q. 
PATNOE, CHESTER L. 
PATNOE, THED F. 
PATRICK, MICHAEL 
PATRIDGE, JOHN J. 
PATTERSON, A. C. 
PATTERSON, C. A. 
PATTERSON, QUENTON 
PETTERSON, FAYE 
PATTON, ROYJ. 
PAULSON, LOUISE 
PAULSON, MARY V. 
PAYNE, KENNETH F. 
PAYSON, HARRY C. 
PEACOCK, CHARLES C. 
PEACOCK, DOROTHY X. 
PEAK, W. R. 
PEARL, MURIEL E. 
PEASE, LAURENCE T. 
PEARSON, A. 5. 



LX 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



PEARSON, CHARLES 
PEARSON, H. A. 
PEARSON, HOWARD J. 
PEARSON, PETE 
PEART, ALBERT E. 
PEART, MARY E. 
PEASE, LORAN T. 
PACK, EDWARD F. 
PECK, RAYMOND J. 
PEDERSEN, FRANK 
PEDERSEN, K. V. 
PEDRIN, ADOLPH J. 
PEDRIN, GEORGE P. 
PEERY, BENJAMIN F. 
PEGLJILLAN, E. F. 
PEISER, LOUIS H. 
PELL, D. C. 
PELLISSIER, LOUIS 
PENCEVICH, MARY A. 
PENEWELL, ETHEL 
PENCDVIC, THEODORE 
PENNELL, ELIZABETH 
PENNINGTON, HENRY M. 
PENNINGTON, W. T. 
PENRDSE, MARSDON 
PERE, FRANK J. 
PEREIRA, J. T. 
PEREZ, FRANK 
PEREZ, OSCAR 
PERKINS, MAC D. 
PERKINS, RICHARD A. 
PERRI, MICHAEL 
PERRY, MAX E. 
PERRY, RICHARD H. 
PERRY, THOMAS W. 
PERSKE, GORDON L. 
PERSON, IRVING 
PERWELLER, NICHOLAS 
PETERS, FRANK R. 
PETERS, JOHN 
PETERSEN, G. W. 
PETERSEN, MARIE 
PETERSEN, PETER A. 
PETERSEN, W. C. 
PETERSON, ALDEN T. 
PETERSON, BRYTE M. 
PETERSON, FRANK 
PETERSON, JOHN P. 
PETERSON, PAULINE J. 
PETERSON, ROBERT C. 
PETERSON, VERN 
PETERSON, W. B. 
PETRIAT, I. TONI 
PETRDFF, L. 
PETRUSICH, JOHN 
PETTIJOHN, CECIL A. 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PFAFFENBERGER, R. A. 
PFAUN, EDNA G. 
PFEIFER, STANLEY W. 
PHELAN, EDWARD 
PHELAN, LOUISE M. 
PHELPS, J. R. 
PHELPS, LELAND 
PHILIPS, FRED 
PHILLIPS, NANCY 
PHILLIPS, WILBUR J. 
PICKERING, M. J. 
PIEPER, JAMES S. 
PIERCE, BROOKS L. 
PIERCE, H. H. 
PIERCE, JENNINGS 
PIERCY, MURIEL 
PIERRE, CHARLES J. 
PIERRE, EMILE A. 
PIERSDN, DDROLOU 
PIETRD, CHARLES 
PHILLIPS, W. H. 
PHILLIPS, W. B. 
PHINNEZZ, W. R. 
PIGEON, W. G. 
PIKE, R. A. 



PIKE, ROSCOE W. 
PINAL, BEATRIZ 
PINAL, EUGENIA 
PINCKNEY, ROBERT W. 
:PINE, IVAN 
PINGATORE, BEN A. 
PINNELL, PAUL 
PINNED, JEANETTE B. 
PINNER, CAROLINE 
PIPKIN, LYNN 
PIPKIN, PAUL 
PIPKIN, ROBERT L. 
PIPPITONE, FRANK 
PIVER, FLORENCE W. 
PLANK, CHARLES R. 
PLATT, HAROLD R. 
PLATT, WILLIAM B. 
PLUMB, RALPH P. 
PLUMMER, GERTRUDE E. 
PLUMMER, STANLEY F. 
PODESTA, A. 
POFAHL, PAUL E. 
POLLACK, AUGUSTUS 
POLLARD, HAROLD E. 
POLLARD, JAMES J. 
POLLARD, WELDON D. 
POLLARD, W. T. 
POLITT, JOHN A. 
POLOS, CHARLES J. 
POND, NYDIA F. 
PONE, PAUL 
POOL, JOHN H. 
POOL, RUTH 
POOLE, AILEEN 
PDOLE, THEODORE K. 
POOLEY, BETTY 
POON, FANNIE 
POORE, PRISCILLA 
POPE, ELNA 
POPE, S. E. 
POPES, ALAN 
PDPOFF, ALEXANDER A. 
POPOFF, SARA 
POPPERS, VICTOR 
PORDZOFF, NICHOLAS 
PORTER, CLARA 
PORTER, EVANS 
PORTER, HARVEY 
PORTO, FRANK 
POSEY, SARALYNE 
POST, MARJORIE 
POSZ, PAUL 
POTTS, CECIL 
POUNDSTONE, DONALD T. 
POWE, LUCAS A. 
POWELL, RALPH L. 
POWELL, WAYNE J. 
POWER, ALICE 
POWERS, SALLY 
POZDRO, IGNATIUS 
PRAGER, ANNA B. 
PRAGER, DELL J. 
PRATER, H. C. 
PRATHER, P. T. 
PRATO, LUCID 
PRATT, A. J. 
PRATT, CHARLES C. 
PRATT, GEORGE 
PRATT, HERBERT 
PRATT, KYLE 
PRATT, RALPH V. 
PRESCDTT, BOB 
PRESSEY, LYLE B. 
PRETTE, EDMUND J. 
PREVITTE, P. 
PRICE, CDLONO 
PRICE, FRANK 
PRICE, LOIS C. 
PRICE, O. F. 
PRINCE, GEORGE E. 
PRINCE, KIRKLAN 5. 
PRITCHARD, FRANCIS T. 



PRITCHARD, WILLIAM 
PRIVAL, ROBERT 
PROBERT, AYLWIN 
PROCTOR, ZILDA 
PRUITT, RUTH 
PUCCINELLI, DOROTHY 
PUENTE, CARMEN M. 
PULLMAN, WALTON G. 
PULVINO, JOSEPH 
PURDY, HELEN C. 
PURSCH, EDWARD A. 
PURVES, ALAN S. 



OUAIL, BARBARA J. 
QUANDT, MARIE 
OUANSTROM, R. 

gUARG, LYDIA E. 
QUEY, BETH 
QUIGLEY, R. S. 
OUINLEY, RICHARD 
QUINN, AURILLA M. 
gUINN, JOHN 
gUINN, J. E. 
gUINN, LOUIS 
gUINN, ROBERT E. 
gUINTERO, ROLAND 
OUIRK, JOHN J. 
QUIRK, MARY L. 
gUONG, ELIZABETH 



RACINE, FRAN 
RADDICK, MARTIN 
RADETICH, JOSEPH P. 
RAE, JOHN 
RAEGENER, GU5SIE 
RAFFO, MAXINE J. 
RAHNN, ALBERT 
RAHM, JUNE E. 
RAINVILLE, EMERY M. 
RAigUEL, P. S. 
RALSTON, LOUISA 
RAMAGE, JACK A. 
RAMSAY, M. 
RAMOS, EMIL 
RAMOS, JUAN 
RAMPOLDI, LOUIS B. 
RAMSAVY, ROBERT L. 
RANDALL, CLINTON 
RANDLES. LYLE M. 
RANKIN, HERBERT E. 
RANSBURG, JOSEPHINE 
RASHALL, BEN I. 
RASLER, S. H. 
RATCLIFFE, IVA MAY 
RATHBUN, EARL H. 
RAUSCH, GEORGE 
RAY, ELVA LOUISE 
RAY, DONALD 
RAY, MABEL 
RAYDEN, ALEX 
RAYMOND, A. J. 
RAYMOND, BERT 
RAYMOND, BETH 
RAYMOND, CAROL 
RAYMOND, H, E. 
RAYNAUD, HERBERT 
RAZOVICH, THOMAS 
RE A, W. R. 
READE, CHADWICK 
REAVIS, C. W. 
REAVIS, MILDRED 
REBHOLTZ, JOSEPH C. 
REDFIELD, THELMA 
REDEWILL, FRANCIS H. 
REED, EDWARD R. 
REED, JAMES B. 
REED, JEANETTE 
REED, MELBA 



APPENDIX 



LXl 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



REED, WESLEY B. 
REED, WILLARD K. 
REDDY, WILLIAM 
REESE, DAVID E. 
REEVES, MARJDRIE E. 
REICHLE, RALPH F. 
RECKENBELL, FRED 
REIDT, W. D. 
REGAN, ANNE E. 
REBAN, WILLIAM E. 
REHERD, R. J. 
REIBIN, SIMEDN S. 
REICHEL, FRANCES 
REID, HELEN C. 
REID, JAMES 
REIDY, JDHN J. 
REILLY, L. F. 
REIMERS, WALTER 
REINDDLLAR, TED 
REINHARDT, BORIS G. 
REINIG, FREDERICK L. 
REIMINGER, E. 
REINDEHL, DONALD E. 
REISNER, JOHN A. 
REMER, AILEEN 
REMINGTON, MERRILL 
REMY, RITA 
RENFER, WARNER R. 
RENNER, ELIZABETH L. 
RENTDN, HARRY W. 
RE3H, ANITA PERLEY 
RESHATOFF, PAUL 
REVELING, J. P. 

REX, ELIZABETH C. 

REXFDRD, D. D. 

REXFORD, JOAN 

REYES, BENN R. 

REYES, SARITA 

REYES, T. 

REYNOLDS, JOHN 

REYNOLDS, R. 

REYNOLDS, RUTH S. 

REYNOSA, N I EVES 

RHEA, CLARENCE A. 

RHINE, CECELIA S. 

RHODES, MATT 

RICCI, ALBERT W. 

RICE, LILLIAN 

RICE, MARGARET 

RICE, WALTER E. 

RICH, ELSIE M. 

RICHARDS, ARTHUR 

RICHARDS, GEO. A. 

RICHARDS, L. A. 

RICHARDSON, G. L. 

RICHARDSON, MADGE 

RICHARDSON, S. J. 

RICHEY, D. A. 

RICHMAN, CLAIRE A. 

RICHTER, E. JOHN 

RICKARD, RAY 

RICKETS, WILLIAM 

RICKMAN, RAMONA 

RIDDELL, AL 

RIDINGS, RUBY 

RIEDEL, RUSSELL R. 

RIES, BENEDICT A. 

RIGBY, FRANCES E. 

RIGGS, ROBERT E. 

RIGNEY, BETTYANE 

RIGTRUP, C. 

RILEA, I. M. 

RILEY, J. G. 

RILEY, THOMAS 

RILES, LUTHER C. 

RING, JAMES 

RIDS, BERTHA 

RISINGER, OSCAR L. 

RITENDUR, CHARLES G. 

RIVERA, ART L. 

RIVERS, VERA 

RIVES, KENNETH 



RIXFORD, LDRING P. 
ROACH, JAMES 
RDBB, ROBERT W. 
ROBBINS, JDHN J. 
ROBBINS, JDHN H. 
ROBERTS, ARTHUR J. 
ROBERTS, C. A. 
ROBERTS, EARL T. 
ROBERTS, FLOYD S. 
ROBERTS, JOHN D. 
ROBERTS, J. CLYDE 
ROBERTS, J. H. 
ROBERTS, MARGUERITE 
ROBERTS, MICKEY 
ROBERTS, RICHARD 
ROBERTS, R. E. 
ROBERTS, SIDNEY E. 
ROBERTS, THOMAS L. 
ROBERTS, THORNTON A. 
ROBERTSON, HARRY H. 
ROBINS, ETTA M. 
ROBINSON, CONSTANCE 
ROBINSON, D. C. 
ROBINSON, D. R. 
ROBINSON, H. W. 
ROBINSON, M. A. 
RDBISON, ELSIE A. 
ROCHE, MAY 
ROCHE, JOHN 
ROCHE, WILLIAM 
ROCK, JAMES O. 
RDCKENFIELD, ROBT. 
RODE, JDHN K. 
RODGER, WILLIAM 
RODGERS, DAVIS L. 
RDDGERS, JANICE L. 
RDDGERS, JOHN 
RODGERS, ROSS 
RODGERS, VERNON P. 
RODRIGO, LETTIE 

RODRIQUEZ, ELEANOR 
RODRIGUEZ, W. 
ROE, LLOYD E. 
RDEDER, MARY V. 

ROESENER, T. M. 

ROESENER, THOMAS 

ROESNER, WALTER J. 

RDGAN, PATRICK 

ROGELL, HAROLD J. 

ROGER, SIDNEY 

ROGERS, BEN J. 

ROGERS, C. C. 

ROGERS, H. R. 

ROGERS, LILLIAN 

ROGERS, MERLE 

ROGERS, RAY C. 

ROGERS, R. E. 

ROHBOCK, C. E. 

ROLFSON, BARBARA J. 

ROLOFSON, D. W. 

RODNEY, J. H. 

ROMANO, DAN 

RODNEY, JDHN H. 

RODNEY, ODETTE 

RODS, GWEN 

ROPER, MYRTLE 

ROSS, ALLEN 

ROSE, D. L. 

ROSE, HALLIE 

ROSE, JOEL 

ROSEN, PAUL S. 

ROSENBERG, FRED 

ROSENBERG, DAVID B. 

ROSENER, ANN 

ROSENTHAL, ADOLPH 

ROSENTHAL, HYMAN 

ROSENSTEIN, SARAH 

ROSEgUIST, THEO. 

ROSS, ALEXANDER 

ROSS, BYRON 

ROSS, CECIL V. 

ROSS, F. M. 



ROSS, LOIS M. 
ROSS, ROY 
ROSS, ROBERT W. 
ROSS, THOMAS F. 
ROSS-LONERGAN, G. 
ROSSELET, GEORGE A. 
ROTH, JERDLP 
ROTH, VICTOR S. 
ROTHENBERG, MINDELL 
RDTHMAN, SELMA 
ROUNDS, ALLEN J. 
ROUSE, ALLISON 
RDUSH, RUTHE 
ROVELLI, ALBERT P. 
RDWE, ARTHUR E. 
ROWE, FRANK 
ROWE, ROBERT A. 
ROWE, WILLIAM H. 
RDYCE, A. T. 
ROYETON, JOHN W. 
ROYSUM, ALFRED N. 
RUBENS, FRANK C. 
RUBON, REBA 
RUCKER, EDNA 
RUDD, CHARLES 
RUDD, JDHN A. 
RUDGEAR, BETTY 
RUDOLPH, WALTER J. 
RUEF, ROBERT J. 
RUEGG, CHARLES 
RUEGG, CARL W. 
RUFFINO, KATHRYN M. 
RUGE, NEIL M. 
RUIZ, ANTONIO M. 
RUMAZ, M. 

RUMKIN, RUDOLPH B. 
RUNNEL, E. A. 
RUNNEL, A. F. 
RUNNER, RALPH 
RUPP, AL 
RUSH, E. J. 
RUPP, MARGARET L. 
RUSSELL, BERNARD D. 
RUSSELL, B. K. 
RUSSELL, BILL 
RUSSELL, C. L. 
RUSSELL, C. A. 
RUSSELL, DOROTHY 
RUSSELL, KATHERINE 
RUSSELL, MILTON 
RUSK, HENRY 
RUSK, WILLIAM L. 
RUST, ROBERT .E 
RUTH, MABELLE 
RUTHERFORD, FRANK 
RUTLEDGE, BRUCE W. 
RYAN, ALICE W. 
RYAN, BEATRICE J. 
RYAN, DUWARD 
RYAN, GEORGE 
RYAN, MARIE B. 
RYAN, MARTIN W. 
RYAN, OSCAR 
RYAN, PATRICIA J. 
RYAN, V. DAN 
RYAN.VELMA F. 



ST. CLAIR, GROVER 
ST. JOHN, WILLIAM 
SAATMAN, FREDERIC R. 
SACHS, WALTER G. 
SADLER, JAMES D. 
SALZNAVE, LEON E. 
SALE, LINDLEY R. 
SALISBURY, R. L. 
SALMON, MARY 
SALTER, L. C. 
SALVADOR, ANTHONY 
SALVATORE, MICHELE 
SAMANIEDO, GEORGINA 
SAMPSON, CORNELIUS 



LX11 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



SAMUEL, LAVINIA R. 
SAMUEL, LIONEL B. 
SAMUELSDN, CLIFFORD 
SANBORN, ADELAIDE 
SANBORN, NELDA 
SANCHEZ, JOSEPH M. 
SANCHEZ, LUPE A. 
SANCHEZ, MANUEL F. 
SANDER, HENRY R. 
SANDERS, A. B. 
SANDERSON, E. H. 
SANDDVAL, CARTER B. 
SANDDVAL, MARIA R. 
SANDUSKY, F. M. 
SANGUENETTI, CARMELITA 
SANOFF, NICHOLAS 
SANSOM, HERBERT M. 
SANTMAN, HARRY A. 
SANTOS, E. A. 
SANTOS, J. W. 
SARGENT, CHARLES R. 
SARGENT, HUGH H. 
SARIN, M. E. 
SARTOR, FRANK 
SASKI, VICTOR 
SASLAW, ABRAHAM 
SATARIANO, FRANCES 
SAUER, PAUL 
SAUNDERS, EDWARD 
SAUNDERS, EDWARD J. 
SAUNDERS, JESSE 
SAUNDERS, THOMAS 
SAUTER, ARTHUR R. 
SAUTER, HERB 
SAVAGE, FRANK S. 
SAVAGE, HELEN L. 
SAVAGE, R. S. 
SAWTELLE, MARIE L. 
SAWYER, KENNtTH P. 

SCADDEN, MILDRED 
SCAFIDI, JOSEPH 
SCALES, ALFRED C. 
SCALLY, LARITA 
SCHACHT, VICTOR R. 
SCHAEFFER, NITA 
SCHAFFER, LILLIAN 
SCHAEFER, WM. B. 
SCHAIBLE, ELMER 
SCHAGEN, JOHN P. 
SCHALLER, FRANCIS J. 
SCHEELER, SHIRLEY M. 
SCHEERER, A. C. 
SCHELENBAUM, DAVE 
SCHELCHER, GEORGE 
SCHELD, HELENE M. 
SCHEMOCK, JOSEPH C. 
SCHENCK, JOHN N. 
SCHENKENBERGER, HUGO 
SCHENNEK, HELEN E. 
SCHER, HAROLD M. 
SCHIERHOLTZ, H. L. 
SCHIESSL, FRANK 
SCHIPPILLITTI, J. 
SCHIRO, LESLIE J. 
SCHLOSS, EDGAR M. 
SCHLOSSER, C. 
SCHMALING, ERNEST 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT 
SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
SCHNEIDER, FRANK 
SCHNEIDER, GUS 
SCHNEIDER, RUTH 
SCHNELL, GORDON C. 
SCHDCH, BENNO A. 
SCHOCH, IVAN N. 
SCHOEN, ROBERT C. 
SCHOENFELDER, WALTER G. 
SCHOLL, EMMETT 
SCHOLL, MARY D. 
SCHODNHAVEN, R. J. 
SCHOONMAKER, H. P. 
SCHRAMM, E. T. 



SCHRADER, DORIS E. 
SCHRODER, HARRIET K. 
SCHROEDER, ALBERT L. 
SCHRDEDER, ERNEST P. 
SCHROEDER, NAOMI P. 
SCHUERT, HELENE 
SCHUGREN, JILL M. 
SCHULER, FRANK C. 
SCHULTZ, E. E. 
SCHULTZ, F. W. 
SCHULTZ, ROBERT 
SCHULTZE, DOLORES C. 
SCHULTZE, G. E. 
SCHUMACHER, MYRON S. 
SCHUPPAN, E. A. 
SCHURMAN, JOSEPHINE 
SCHWARZ, ALEXANDER W. 
SCHWARZ, FRANK H. 
SCHWARTZ, WALTER 
SCHWARZMANN, ALEX 
SCHWARZMAN, ARTHUR 
SCHWARZMAN, BARBARA 
SCHWASS, FRANK H. 
SCHWEDHELM, CARL 
SCHWERIN, PHYLLIS 
SCOLLAN, JAMES C. 
SCOTT, ALFRED J. 
SCDTT, FLOYD P. 
SCOTT, HARRY 
SCDTT, ORA 
SCDTT, MARIE L. 
SCOTT, MILDRED 
SCOTT, ROBERT M. 
SCULLY, ANDREW J. 
SCULLY, DEBORAH 
SCULLY, JAMES 
SEALE, JOHN W. 
SEARLE, LED H. 
SEARLE, WILLIAM H. 
SEBASTIAN, PHILIP P. 
SECHINI, R. 
SECDRD, GEORGE 
5EDGMAN, WILLIAM 
SECREST, BETTY 
SECREST, G. G. 
SEELEY, BRYON L. 
SEELEY, HAROLD B. 
SEELY, DR. HALL 
SEGHETTI, ARMAND 
SEGLER, J. C. 
SEILER, MAURICE L. 
SELINGER, ESTELLE 
SELLERS, ROBERT W. 
SELLON, VIRGINIA 
SELLMAN, ROLAND 
SEMENZA, OTTO A. 
SEMIS, JACK F. 
SENDNER, B. J. 
SEPULVEDA, RAY N. 
SERIO, PHILIP 
SERUMGARD, GENE 
SERGI, JOSEPHINE L. 
SEVERANCE, H. M. 
SEWELL, LOYISE W. 
SEXSON, PAUL A. 
SEXTON, MASON B. 
SEYMOUR, WORTH 
SHAFF, GORDON 
SHAFF, L. K. 
SHAHAN, BLANCHE 
5HAHAN, BOB 
SHAMBAUGH, JOAN 
SHANE, EMMETT R. 
SHANE, HELEN 
SHANE, WILLIAM 
SHANER, TDDD 
SHANIS, JULIUS C. 
SHANIS, RALPH 
SHANKS, ROSEMARY 
SHANNON, CLARENCE M. 
SHANNON, E. G. 
SHANNON, JOHN W. 



SHAPIRO, FLORENCE 
SHARKEY, TOM 
SHARP, HAROLD G. 
SHATTUCK, I. S. 
SHARON, EDWARD 
SHATTUCK, KAY 
SHAVES, LORAINE M. 
SHAW, JULIET 
SHAW, MILDRED 
SHAW, MILLICENT 
SHAW, PAULINE 
SHAW, W. D. 
SHEA, TIMOTHY 
SHEAN, AUSTIN 
SHEEHY, JOHN C. 
SHEARER, ARTHUR 
SHEDD, PHYLLIS 
SHEGDG, MARIE 
SHEEHY, JOHN 
SHEIBLEY, W. C. 
SHELDON, PATSY 
SHELLEY, GENEVIEVE 
SHENBERG, EDA 
SHEMANO, MATILDA 
SHEPHERD, FLORENCE G. 
SHEPARD, SAMUEL P. 
SHERER, FRANKS. 
SHERBY, KADER 
SHERIDAN, SAM 
SHERMAN, KENNETH 
SHERMAN, MELVIN 
SHERMAN, VERA 
SHERRY, PATRICIA A. 
SHERWIN, JOHN W. 
SHEWBRIDGE, THOMAS 
5HICK, MARY E. 
SHIMMON, JOEL 
SHINE, MAY G. 
SHIRES, PAULINE 
SHOCKLEY, AL DEAN 
SHORE, ROBIN K. 
SHORT, GEORGE 
SHORT, JOHN 
SHDVER, ROBERT 
SHRODER, HELEN 
SHORT, W. H. 
SHUGRUE, HORACE E. 
SHWEID, HENRY 
SIBLEY, WALTER K. 
SIEGEL, GEORGE 
SILMER, MYRTLE 
SIGNS, RDSARIA 
SILBERBERG, R. H. 
SILGLAW, E. L. 
SILVA, E. 

SILVER, BERNARD 
SILVER, WILLIAM J. 
SILVERFIELD, ERNEST A. 
SILVERMAN, MILTON M. 
SILVERMAN, SYLVIA 
SILVEY, PEARL M. 
SILVA, ANTHONY 
SILVERSTEIN, J. 
SILVEY, JOHN M. 
SIME, HARRY 
SIMMON, STARLING K. 
SIMMONS, BERNIE 
SIMMONS, CHESTER E. 
SIMMONS, FREDERICK C. 
SIMMS, CHARLES R. 
SIMON, FLORENCE 
SIMON, FRED 
SIMON, SIDNEY 
SIMPSON, FRANCES 
SIMPSON, MAY W. 
SIMPSON, INA A. 
SINAI, JOE 

SINCLAIR, GLENNA H. 
SINCLAIR, ROBERT J. 
SINDT, EARLE D. 
SINGER, LOUIS 
SINGLETON, DOLORES 



APPENDIX 



LXlll 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



SIZER, RANDOLPH S. 
SJDSTRDM, MORRIS E. 
SKELTON, AGNES M. 
SKINNER, AGNES E. 
SKLIRIS, SOPHIE 
SLATTERY, TREACY L. 
SLAUGHTER, K. E. 
SLAVSKY, HERMAN 
SLEEPER, MAXINE 
SLEEPER, W. H. 
SLEEPER, WARREN 
SLEETH, MARSHALL 
SLISCOVICH, J. J. 
SLISSMAN, E. H. 
SLIVAK, ALEX J. 
SLOAN, CHARLES W. 
SLOAN, EDMUND G. 
SLOAN, RICHARD T. 
SLDCUM, GAYLE 
SLONAKER, AL 
SMALL, LAETITIA 
SMERALDI, JOHN B. 
SMITH, A. J. 
SMITH, ARNOLD V. 
SMITH, ALYSON E. 
SMITH, A. E. 
SMITH, CAESAR L. 
SMITH, CHARLES J. 
SMITH, DAVIS H. 
SMITH, DUKE 
SMITH, EMERALD S. 
SMITH, EULALA 
SMITH, F. A. 
SMITH, FRANCIS F. 
SMITH. FRANK 
SMITH, FRED 
SMITH, H 
SMITH, HELEN 
SMITH, HOWARD 
SMITH, HARRY 
SMITH, YVONNE 
SMITH, JABE P. 
SMITH, JACK 
SMITH, JACK L. 
SMITH, JACK M. 
SMITH, JAMES A. 
SMITH, JAMES L. 
SMITH, JEAN 
SMITH, LILLIAN 
SMITH, LUCIUS 
SMITH, LUCY B. 
SMITH, MARGARET E. 
SMITH, MARGUERITE L. 
SMITH, MARJORIE 
SMITH, MARY M. 
SMITH, MEL A. 
SMITH, NAN L. 
SMITH, PAUL C. 
SMITH, PAUL E. 
SMITH, PAUL 
SMITH, PAUL W. 
SMITH, RALPH E. 
SMITH, RAY 
SMITH, R. R. 
SMITH, ROBERT L. 
SMITH, ROBERT H. 
SMITH, ROBERTA 
SMITH, ROBERTA J. 
SMITH, RUSSELL G. 
SMITH, RUSSELL M. 
SMITH, RUTH I. 
SMITH, RUTH M. 
SMITH, STERLING P. 
SMITH, STUART V. 
SMITH, VIC 
SMITH, VICTOR B. 
SMITH, WARREN G. 
SMITH, WAYNE E. 
SMITH, WILLIAM B. 
SMITH, WELDDN H. 
SMYTH, HERSHELD. 
SNAER, SEYMOUR W. 



SNOKELBURG, G. A. 
SOUZE, CLIFFORD 
SNOW, FRANK 
SNYDER, LLDYD S. 
SNYDER, HARRY L. 
SNYDER, UNA N. 
SDANES, WOOD 
SOBELMAN, ARTHUR 
SODER, ELVING 
SOLIS, RAFAEL 
SOLOMON, SAMUEL 
SOLOMON, TRE5SIE R. 
SOLON, JOHN 
SOMMER, ANNA 
5DNNE, J. A. 
SDNNENSCHEIN, W. A. 
SORENSEN, DOROTHEA 
SORENSON, A. M. 
SORENSDN, HUBERT F. 
SOTDMAYOR, ANTONIO 
SOTTERSON, TASULA L. 
SOUTHARD, KEITH 
SOUTHARD, NAOMI 
SOUTHGATE, A. P. 
SOUTHERN, ROBT. A. 
SDUZA, MANUEL E. 
SOUZA, CLIFFORD 
SPADONI, LENA M. 
SPARKS, A. C. 
SPARROW, MYRON M. 
SPEAR, HARRY 
SPEAR, ROY D. 
SPEARS, STANLEY C. 
SPEER, EILEEN 
SPELMAN, JAMES R. 
SPENCER, D. J. 
SPENCER, HAZEL J. 
SPENCER, WILLARD 
SPERRY, JOHN A. 
SPICER, THELMA 
SPILLANE, DANIEL J. 
SPIWAK, L. M. 
SPDNSELLER, IVAN L. 
SPONAMORE, EMILY 
SPRIGG, JOHN H. 
SPROWLS, JAMES M. 
SQUIRES, ALAN F. 
SQUIRES, WILLIAM P. 
STADLER, LOUIS 
STALEY, PHIL C. 
STALL, DEWEY R. 
STALLMAN, GEORGE E. 
STAMMER, DOROTHY C. 
STANDISH, NELL 
STANDLEY, HARRISON 
5TANDLEY, SARAH J. 
STANDAHAR, T. 
STANLEY, JOSEPH 
STANICH, DAN 
STANLEY, DANIEL 
STANNAGE, FRED G. 
STANTON, C. S. 
STANTON, JESSE 
STANTDN, K. 
STANTON, MAURICE 
STANTDN, HUGH H. 
STARBUCK, HELEN 
STARK, HARRY E. 
STARLING, JOHN D. 
STARRETT, ROBERT 
STASCH, FRANKLIN E. 
STAUDINGER, JOSEPH C. 
STAUFFER, PAUL C. 
STEACH, CLAUDE L. 
STEARNS, ANNA S. 
STEBBINS, JAMES B. 
STEELE, ROBERT J. 
STEELL, JOSEPHINE 
STEFFEN, FRANK 
STEFFEN, IRVING H. 
STEFFEN, THEO 
STEFFLER, JOHN H. 



STEGALL, GLADYS R. 
STEIGER, R. E. 
STEIN, WILLIAM 
STEINBERG, DAVIS 
STEINER, VIOLET 
STEINHEIMER, CHAS. E. 
STEINMETZ, EDWARD E. 
STENDER, D. F. 
STENING, CLAIRE L. 
STENSDN, JOHN 
STEPHENS, THEODORE 
STEPHENS, EDWARD B. 
STEPHEN, GRACE B. 
STEPHENSON.ROSE 
STEVENS, CHARLES H. 
STEVENS, ELAINE 
STEVENS, GEORGE N. 
STEVENS, HELEN 
STEVENS, RAY 
STEVENSON, R. B. 
STEVICK, GUY L. 
STEWART, A. R. 
STEWART, BONNIE 
STEWART, EVELYN 
STEWART, ROBERT 
STEWART, ROY G. 
STEWART, S. H. 
STEWART, VERNON F. 
STICKNEY, CHARLES 
STIER, LAWRENCE C. 
STIFFLER, M. G. 
STILLER, HERBERT 
STILLER, NORMAN 
STILLEY, L. 
5TILLINGS, FLOYD 
STILLINGS, HAZEL 
STIRITZ, DONALD 
STOCKL, RUTH 
STOCKMAN, ALICE 
STOCKMAN, DOROTHY 
STOLTENBERG, A. F. 
STONE, BILLY 
STONE, ROBERT 
STORMS, JOSEPH H. 
STDRRY, JOHN 
STOTT, JAMES D. 
STOUT, J. W. 
STOVER, LUTE H. 
STRACHAN, JAMES F. 
STRAM, HAR.OLD M. 
STOUT, MAX J. 
STRANGE, VANCE 
STRATTON, WILLIAM 
STRAUS, LEE 
STRAUSS, LYLE 
5TRICKER, JACK 
STRICKLAND, MURIEL 
STRINGER, JACQUELINE 
STROBEL, DORIS 
STRDHMAIER, A. C. 
STROM, CHARLES L. 
STRDMER5DN, A. G. 
STRUCK, HERMAN 
STRUNZ, RAYMOND T. 
STULL, E. L. 
STULL, KARL M. 
STURMER, EMIL 
STURGEON, JAMES 
STURTEVANT, ROBT. M. 
STUTHMAN, FREDERICK 
5UDDETH, ROBT. E. 
SUDIKOW, JACK 
SUDLDW, BLANCHE W. 
SUDMEYER, FLORENCE 
SUGARMAN, KENNETH H. 
SULLIVAN, CORNELIUS 
SULLIVAN, FLORIAN L. 
SULLIVAN, GERALD 
SULLIVAN, JAMES F. 
SULLIVAN, J. J. 
SULLIVAN, IRMA 
SULLIVAN, MARY L. 



LX1V 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



SULLIVAN, NDRA 
SULLIVAN, PATRICIA 
SULLIVAN, PAULINE 
SULLIVAN, RICHARD V. 
SULLIVAN, RUTH 
SULLIVAN, WILLIAM J. 
SULLIVAN, THEODORE 
SULLY, HARRY S. 
SUMMERS, CLARICE 
SUMMERFIELD, BETSY 
SURBER, CASSIUS C. 
SUTLEY, MERLE 
SUTRD, ROSE V. 
SWALL, ALICE C. 
SWALLOW, CYRIL 
SWANFELT, EDWIN 
SWANFELT, RDBT. W. 
SWANSDN, KENNETH E. 
SWAN5DN, ROBERT E. 
SWARTWOOD, M. C. 
SWARTWDDD, STANELY 
SWAYNE, GEORGE E. 
SWEASY, CLAUDE M. 
SWAIN, BETTY M. 
SWARTZ, WILLIAM 
SWEENEY, ROBERT 
SWEET, NINA 
SWENSON, HELGA 
SWENSDN, MABEL V. 
SWIFT, DEAN A. 
SWIFT, MELVIN R. 
SWINT, INEZ A. 
SWIRSKY, SIDNEY B. 
SWISHER, ARMAND T. 
SYKES, EARL A. 
SYMMES, CHARLES O. 
SYMONS, JACK A. 
SZCZEPANSKI, EDGAR M. 



TACKNEY, JAMES F. 
TADDEUCCI, BERNICE L. 
TAGLIASACCHI, GEORGE 
TAHAR, BEN 
TAILLEFER, JOSEPH M. 
TALVERA, EDMOND 
TALLE, BESSIE 
TALLEY, WESLEY A. 
TAMBOURY, IRVING P. 
TANNER, AMELIA 
TANTARELLI, ALFRED J. 
TAPLEY, ALICE 
TAPLEY, STEWART B. 
TARANTIND, VINCENT 
TATTI, GRACE L. 
TAYLOR, ANN 
TAYLOR, CHARLES S. 
TAYLOR, ELLIS 
TAYLOR, JAMES C. 
TAYLOR, JOHN 
TAYLOR, GRACE G. 
TAYLOR, HELEN 
TAYLOR, HUGH 
TAYLOR, LADDIE 
TAYLOR, MARVIN L. 
TAYLOR, WARREN 
TAYLOR, WILLIAM B. 
TEBAY, ALVA E. 
TELL, THOMAS W. 
TELLER, OTTO H. 
TENNEY, WALLACE R. 
TERHORST, MARGARET 
TERRELL, JACK 
TERRILL, CHARLES C. 
TERRY, ARTHUR 
TERRY, RAYMOND M. 
THAANUM, MRS. M. W. 
TESHARA, EDITH 
THANE, ALICE E. 
THARP, MILTON 
THARP, N. JESS 



THEALL, A. J. 
THIBADEAU, MYRTLE 
THICKSTUN, ANDREW J. 
THIERMAN, HARRY 
THOM, JOHN G. 
THOMAS, EDWARD 
THOMAS, JOHN W. 
THOMAS, JOSEPH 
THOMAS, KEITH H. 
THOMAS, LAURA 
THOMPSON, A. V. 
THOMPSON, BETTY LOU 
THOMPSON, BEULAH M. 
THOMPSON, CLAY 
THOMPSON, DONALD E. 
THOMPSON, ELLSWORTH 
THOMPSON, FRANCES C. 
THOMPSON, GEORGE H. 
THOMPSON, GEORGE V. 
THOMPSON, H. H. 
THOMPSON, JAMES C. 
THOMPSON, JAMES S. 
THOMPSON, LEON 
THOMPSON, MALCOLM B. 
THOMPSON, MARCELLA 
THOMPSON, NORMAN 
THOMPSON, QUENTIN 
THOMPSON, ROY CURTIS 
THOMPSON, TED H. 
THOMPSON, W. T. 
THOMPSON, W. H. 
THOMPSON, VAN 
THOMPSON, WM. F. 
THOMPSON, W. H. 
THDMSEN, ANN J. 
THOMSEN, HANS 
THOMSEN, VIVIAN M. 
THDMSEN, VIVIAN M. 
THOMSON, W. E. 
THULEMEYER, EVELYN 
THULEMEYER, THEO 
THURMAN, H 
TIBBITTS, J. P. 
TIERNEY, R. F. 
TIERNEY, THOMAS D. 
TILLES, AARON D. 
TILLMAN, HAZEL E. 
TILLMAN, RUTH 
TIMDSSI, ADOLF 
TISDEL, MYRON D. 
TIVDL, LEONARD M. 
TITCOMB, ERNEST 
TDBIASON, STANLEYW. 
TOBIN, WILLIAM A. 
TOCHTERMAN, JACK 
TOFANELLI, BLANCHE M. 
TOGNELLI, P. O. 
TOLLE, BESSIE 
TOLSTDNAGE, ERMA 
TOMASELLD, EDWARD J. 
TOMOLA, STEPHEN J. 
TOM5EN, CHARLOTTE J. 
TDNDRD, MARJDRIE E. 
TDNELLI, GUIDD 
TONEY, BUFDRD E. 
TDOMEY, WILLIAM D. 
TORRES, JOSEPH 
TOSCHI, GABRIEL N. 
TOSSELL, OLIVE 
TDTZEK, BRUCE 
TOWELL, BOB B. 
TOWNER, MILDRED 
TOWNSEND, NEAL 
TDWNSLEY, JOHN N. 
TRACY, GEORGE H. 
TRACY, M. 
TRANKLE, ALBERT 
TRAUBE, LIONEL 
TRAVERS, MAE A. 
TRAVIS, DON H. 
TREADWALL, HAROLD 
TREGAY, F. P. 



TREMBLEY, ART 
TRENT, JAMES O. 
TRENT, THOMAS R. 
TREVILLIAN, FRANCISJ. 
TRIPP, BETTY B. 
TROBBE, CYRUS 
TROBOCK, i-i-OVD 
TROTTER, MAURICE 
TRDSEY, JOE 
TRUE, JOHN 
TRUEX, EARL 
TRYNER, CHARLES 
TRYFDRD, L. J. 
T5CHIERSCHKY, A. G. 
TUBACH, FRED A. 
TUCKER, MARY A. 
TUCKER, TOM 
TUCKER, NEWMAN 
TUDOR, JAMES I. 
TURBIVILLE, E. E. 
TURKEL, DR. A. W. 
TURKEL, H. W. 
TURNER, E. C. 
TURNER, EVELYN S. 
TURNER, RUTH 
TURNER, ROBERT L. 
TURNER, VIVIAN 
TURNIDGE, DORIS 
TURNRDEE, ARTHUR F. 
TUTTLE, REUBEN 
TWEDDLE, D. T. 
TWEDT, MARGARET 
TWERMOS, MOGENS E. 
TWIGG, OLIVER C. 
TYLER, DERYL 
TYNAN, JOHN 
TYSON, HERBERT P. 

u 

UBHOFF, C. W. 
UDOVICK, ETHEL L. 
UGLDW, ARTHUR 
ULMAN, SETH POWERS 
ULRICH, J. F. 
ULLNER, HELENE 
UNDEEN, ALBERT H. 
UNDERHILL, ELEANOR 
UPSHUR, PARKE C. 
URBACH, R. HAROLD 
UROUHART, JOHN 



VALENTINE, LILLIAN 
VALLEJO, ALBERT J. 
VALLEJD, E. M. 
VALLIER, EDWIN J. 
VAN ALSTYNE, JOHN S. 
VAN BDKKELEN, WM. R. 
VANCE, JAMES L. 
VANCE, LORENE 
VANDERWEKEN, JAMES 
VAN DEWDKER, HENRY P. 
VANELLA, HARRY J. 
VAN GROSS, JOHN C. 
VAN HOFF, JOHN J. 
VAN HOUTEN, ALICE M. 
VANNELL, LEONARD N. 
VAN NUYS, MARIAN 
VAN DRNUM, WILLIAM 
VAN SCOY, CECIL 
VAN TASSEL, RAY A. 
VAN WIEREN, K. 
VAN ZANDT, EDWIN D. 
VARGAS, JOHN M. 
VA5QUEZ, LOU IS V. 
VARDFF, GEORGE 
VAUGHAN, EVERETT O. 
VAUGHAN, JAMES P. 
VEGAS, DOMINGO 
VELASQUEZ, EDWARD 



APPENDIX 



LXV 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



VELIKDSELSKY, V. 
VENDT, ALBERT 
VENSAND, HARRY C. 
VENTURI, BLANCHE 
VENTURI, BRUND 
VENTURI, MARY E. 
VERDUCCI, JOE 
VERILI, RITA 
VETH, CHRISTINE 
VEZEY, MARY CUSTIS 
VIBERT, WILLIAM E. 
VICCHID, GLADYS 
VICK, GDLDIE 
VICTORS, JACK 
VICTORS, KURT W. 
VIDETICH, JOS. L. 
VIGLINI, V. P. 
VIGND. LAMAR 
VIGNO, GENE 
VILLAVERDE, LUCILLE D. 
VINCE, MABEL I. 
VINCENT, J. D. 
VINCENT. RAMONA 
VINCENT, R. 5. 
VINNICOMBE, KENNETH 
VINCDN, MERRIT A. 
VITT, SHIRLEY 
VIVELLE, DOROTHY H. 
VLOEBERGHS, JEROME 
VDGELGESANG, SHEPARD 
VDGEL, JOHN 
VOGELSANG, R. L. 
VOIGT, DOLORES 
VOLLMAN, A. L. 
VOLTY, E. A. 
VOLZ, BETTY 
VOLZ, FRANCIS J. 
VGN HEYGENDORFF, L. 
VON SCHDNBERG, D. E. 
VDRIS, CLARENCE J. 
VORNHOLT, MARY 
VOSS, RUDOLPH 
VOYNE, PHILIP 

W 

WADDELL, RAY 
WAGAR, HOWARD 
WAGNER, C. K. 
WAGGONER, C. L. 
WAGNER, ED 
WAGNER, FRANZ 
WAGNER, FRED J. 
WAGNER, GLORIA 
WAHLGREN, GEORGE K. 
WAKEMAN, R. A. 
WALDEN, M. H. 
WALEN, HARRY J. 
WALKER, HERMAN L. 
WALKER, JAMES R. 
WALKER, JOHN 
WALKER, JOSEPHINE 
WALKER, MAXINE 
WALKER, HAROLD LUCE 
WALKER, MARY 
WAGNER, JACK 
WAGNER, JEAN 
WAGNGN, WM. B. JR. 
WAGSTAFF, ALEX 
WAG5TAFF, JACK 
WAHL, ERNA 
WAHLGREN, GEO. KARL 
WAITE, ELLA ADAIR 
WALKER, PATRICIA 
WALKEY, D. T. 
WALLACE, DR. W. I. 
WALLEN, CONRAD M. 
WALLEN, CARL E. 
WALRATH, HAROLD A. 
WALSH, J. DON 
WALSH, JAMES J. 
WALSH, R. 
WALSH, WILLIAM 



WALTER, BYRON H. 
WALTER, EDWARD JR. 
WALTER, RUTH 
WALTER, W. H. 
WALTER, W. H. 
WALTERS, VIOLET 
WALTERS, GORDON G. 
WALTERBEEK, JACOB C. 
WALTMAN, I. C. 
WALTON, MONA 
WANSBURY, DIXON E. 
WANSBURY, THOMAS 
WANSER, JOSEPH 
WARD, CLARENCE 
WARD, D. S. 
WARD, EDWARD J. 
WARD, FLORENCE 
WARD, FRED CHARLES 
WARD, FRED MACK 
WARD, GLADYS 
WARD, HARRY MARTIN 
WARD, JOHN 
WARD, J. T. 

WARD, RAYMOND JOSEPH 
WARD, RUTH S. 
WARD, WILLARD S. 
WARDEN, JAS. EDWARD 
WARE, LINDA 
WARE, M. S. 
WARE, JOE 
WARING, DONALD 
WARNER, LANGDON 
WARREN, CLARKE E. JR. 
WARREN, FRANK 
WARREN, MAXWELL S. 
WARREN, WM. E. 
WARTDN, GEORGE 
WASHBURN, ELEANOR 
WASS, BERT 
WASSON, C. H. 
WATERHOUSE, HUBERT W. 
WATERS, BONNIE L. 
WATERS, ROBT. B. 
WATERS, R. B. 
WATKINS, HOWARD D. 
WATKIND, VELMA 
WATSON, HENRIETTA J. 
WATSON, KENNETH 
WATSON, RALPH D. 
WATSON, R. E. JR. 
WATT, DONALD M. 
WATTER5, L. C. 
WATTRON, ROBERT M. 
WAUGH, AVELINA 
WAUGH, P. 
WAY, MARY E. 
WAXMAN, JACK P. 
WEAR, ADELAIDE 
WEATHERFORD, MARION 
WEAVER, FRANK 
WEAVER, FRED 
WEVER, MARGARITA 
WEBB, CHARLES R. JR. 
WEBB, ELIZABETH GILL 
WEBB, JACK ELLSWORTH 
WEBBER, FRANK H. 
WEBBER, MITCHELL E. 
WEBER, LEO 
WEBER, MAX 
WEBER, N. N. 
WEDDLETON, FREDERICK 
WEED, SAM A. 
WEHRLIE, MELVYN J. 
WEIFDRD, V. G. 
WEIHE, TYSON 
WEIL, ANITA 
WEILLER, PAULINE P. 
WEINBERG, EMILY 
WEINER, A. M. 
WEISS, D. 
WEISS, DAVID 
WEISS, FRANCES 



WEIS, JOHN L. 
WEISSEND, G. J. 
WELCH, BERTRAM F. 
WELCH, FRANK HARRY 
WELCH, GEORGE I. 
WELCH, JOHN D. 
WELCH, NAOMI 
WELCH, ROBERT J. 
WELLER, EARLE 
WELLMAN, EDWARD 
WELLS, ALBERT 
WELLS, ARTHUR CREWS 
WELLS, CALVIN NEWLON 
WELLS, CHARLES H. 
WELLS, LOUIS 
WELLS, W. L. 
WELLS, WM. 
WENDT, DAVID B. 
WERHLICK, ALLAN 
WERNER, CARL 
WERNER, GEORGE 
WERNER, NORMAN C. 
WESCDTT, SALLY M. 
WESLEDER, M. G. 

WEST, CHARLES 
WEST, HARRLY L. 

WEST, L. G. 

WEST, HELEN 

WEST, JOE 

WEST, WILLIS 

WEST, WILMA WANITA 

WESTDAHL, RICHARD 

WESTPHAL, ERNEST R. 

WESTMDRE, BILL 

WETTSTEIN, E. 

WHALEY, LILLIAN V. 

WHEATLEY, JAMES 

WHEATLEY, JOSEPHINE 

WHEATON, GLENN A. 

WHEATON, JOYCE 

WHEATON, JOHN 

WHEELER, AUDREY E. 

WHEELER, HORACE B. 

WHELAN, JOHN J. JR. 

WHET5TINE, CHAMP 

WHIPPERN, LEO 

WHITBY, PATRICIA 

WHITCOMB, WM. S. 

WHITCOMB, S. E. JR. 

WHITE, ALBERT 

WHITE, CAROLYN 

WHITE, D. C. 

WHITE, DOYCE ELWYN 

WHITE, H. K. 

WHITE, ETTA 

WHITE, JAMES R. 

WHITE, J. R. 

WHITE, JOSEPH B. 

WHITE, PHILIP 

WHITE, ROBERT 

WHITE, R. DOUGLAS 

WHITE, RICHARD OTIS 

WHITE, STANLEY C. 

WHITE, TDM 

WHITE, SHIRLEY 

WHITE, W. I. 

WHITEFIELD, JOHN T. 

WHITEHEAD, A. H. 

WHITELAW, HARRY F. 

WHITING, PHILIP 

WHITLDCK, ELINDRE 

WHITLOW, WILLIAM 

WHITMAN, RUSSEL R. 

WHITTELSEY, S. G. 

WHITTDN, HELEN 

WHITWELL, CHAS R. 

WHITWELL, LESLIE G. 

WHITWELL, S. B. 

WHITTAKER, ELMER E. 

WIARD, MARY V. ST. 

WICKEN, CARL G. 

WICKER, JOAN 



LXV1 



THE MAGIC CITY 



1939-1940 EMPLOYEES (Continued) 



WICKEB, CLARENCE M. 
WICKSTRDM, C. H. 
WIERNER, FRANCES 
WIESZ, GLADYS 
WIGGINS, EVELYN MAY 
WIGGINS, WALTER 
WIGHTMAN, WILLIAM 
WIK, B. G. 

WILBRAND, HELEN C. 
WILBUR, EVELYN 
WILCDX, EMY 
WILCDX, MAX 
WILD, RAYMOND 
WILD, STANLEY 
WILDENHLJS, HERMAN F. 
WILDER, LILLIAN 
WILDER, MARGARET 
WILEY, FREDERICK 
WILHELM, V. E. 
WILHEIM, WALTER 
WILK, STANLEY 
WILKIE, ALAN 
WILKINSON, JAMES A. 
WILKINSON, VERNON 
WILKINSON, WINSOR D. 
WILKS, EHEA EVA M. 
WILLETT, HARRY 
WILLIAMS, ALLEN V. 
WILLIAMS, ALTON E. R. 
WILLIAMS, ANNA MAE 
WILLIAMS, ARTHUR P. 
WILLIAMS, BEN 
WILLIAMS, BRADFORD B. 
WILLIAMS, CHARLES J. 
WILLIAMS, F. BEN 
WILLIAMS, GERTRUDE L. 
WILLIAMS, HARRY 
WILLIAMS, HARRY A. 
WILLIAMS, KAY 
WILLIAMS, LEON W. JR. 
WILLIAMS, LOUIS 
WILLIAMS, MARCEL J. 
WILLIAMS, MELVIN 
WILLIAMS, MERCER 
WILLIAMS, MICHAEL 
WILLIAMS, PAULA. 
WILLIAMS, RAYMOND W. 
WILLIAMS, ROBERTON C. 
WILLIAMS, S. D. 
WILLIAMS, SAM L. 
WILLIAMS, W. W. 
WILLIAMSON, JOHN 
WILLIAMSON, MAYME E. 
WILLIG, HAZEL M. 
WILLIS, C. L. 
WILLIS, HAROLD 
WILLMAN, ANGELE H. 
WILLOUGHBY, F. G. 
WILLS, P. L. 
WILSCAM, JOSEPH A. 
WILSON, ALBERT D. 
WILSON, A. L. 
WILSON, ALECK L. 
WILSON, DANIEL C. 
WILSON, CLARK 
WILSON, DOROTHY D. 
WILSON, ELIZABETH 
WILSON, FLORA 
WILSON, HARNEY 
WILSON, HARVEY 



WILSON, IVAN H. 
WILSON, JACK W. 
WILSON, JESSE C. 
WILSON, JOSEPH 
WILSON, JUNE 
WILSON, KAY 
WILSON, LOIS E. 
WILSON, MARGARET 
WILSON, PARKE 
WILSON, PAUL A. 
WILSON, ROBERT C. 
WILSON, ROY A. 
WILSON, WALTER K. 
WIND, P. H. 
WINDLE, ALMA L. 
WINEGAR, DORIS 
WING, MARION V. 
WINGERTER, CARL 
WING, ROBERT Y. 
WINKLER, A. R. 
WINN, B. F. 
WINSLOW, KATHRYN 
WINTERS, MARTHA 
WINTERS, ANN 
WINTERS, GLENN F. 
WISE, CLARENCE A. 
WISE, FRANKLIN A. 
WISE, VICTORINE F. 
WISEMAN, KATHERINE 
WITTMAN, JOHN B. 
WOERNER, JOHN 
WDHLE, WILLIAM A. 
WOLDEN, EDWARD 
WOLF, HAROLD 
WOLF, L. C. 
WOLFE, JANE A. 
WOLFE, MADELINE A. 
WOMBLE, CLAUDE W. 
WONG, ARTARNE 
WONG, MAH GONG 
WONG, MARY J. 
WONG, VIRGINIA 
WOOD, BOYD E. 
WOOD, CHARLES P. 
WOOD, GEORGE L. 
WOOD, J. W. 
WOOD, LEONARD P. 
WOOD, SETH 
WOOD, WALTER L. 
WODDD, GILBERT 
WODDD, J. C. 
WODDLING, ELMA L. 
WOODRUFF, ARTHUR 
WOODS, OLIVER J. 
WOODSON, OTIS L. 
WDODWORTH, MARJORIE 
WOODY, MARY A. 
WOODWARD, ROBERT D. 
WOOLSEY, ALICE R. 
WOOLSEY, GEORGE H. 
WDOLY, JAMES 
WORK, GERALDINEJ. 
WORL, MARGARET M. 
WORNES, ALICIA I. 
WORTH, FRED L. 
WORTH, MARY T. 
WORTHINGTON, GRAFTON 
WORTHINGTON, MARTA 
WREN, BARBARA 
WRIGHT, ALLEN G. 



WRIGHT, BETTY 
WRIGHT, ETHEL M. 
WRIGHT, GEORGIA 
WRIGHT, HELEN 
WRIGHT, IRWIN 
WRIGHT, JAMES 
WRIGHT, THOMAS 
WRIGHT, VIRGINIA H. 
WULFF, FRED L. 
WUNDERLICH, ROBERT 
WURZBACH, ALBERT C. 
WYATT, PHILLIP 
WYATT, WALTER A. 
WYLIE, R. E. 
WYNN, RITA A. 
WYNNE, RICHARD H. 



YALE, BILL 
YARDLEY, EVELYN 
YARRINGTON, M. M. 
YASKA, FRANK 
YATES, BERNARD 
YATES, JACK 
YATES, MARY A. 
YATES, NANCY 
YEAMAN, WILFRED 
YEATDN, MARY K. 
YELLAND, E. STARR 
YELLAND, WILLIAM R. 
YEP, HENRY P. 
YETTER, FRANK P. 
YOKELA, J. S. 
YOUMAN, FRANK E. 
YOUNG, ALBERTA D. 
YOUNG, BRUCE 
YOUNG, FAY A. 
YOUNG, HARRYS. 
YOUNG, L. D. 
YOUNG, MARY E. 
YOUNG, MAXINEA. 
YOUNG, RICHARD 
YOUNG, RDLLAND W. 
YOUNGBLUTH, LUCILLE A. 
YOUNGER, GEORGE 



ZALK, ARLYNE H. 
ZALK, SHAYNE F. 
ZEBROWSKI, MARIE A. 
ZEELAW, CLARA 
ZEHNDER, CRIM 
ZEHENDER, GEORGE J. 
ZEFF, SYLVIA 
ZENDNI, GEORGE 
ZERBONE, W. P. 
ZETTERQUI5T, H. R. 
ZIEVE, DON S. 
ZIMMER, J. E. 
ZIMMERMAN, BERTHA E. 
ZIMMERMAN, JOHN C. 
ZINGELER, EMIL H. 
ZINK, BETTY 
ZOHN, AL 
ZOHN, JOE 
ZOOTIS, JAMES G. 
ZUPPANN, SPEER 
ZWICKER, CHARLOTTE 



APPENDIX Lxvii 

FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT 1939-1940 

EARLY IN 1937, the Board of Management adopted General 
Administrative Regulations prepared by the Treasurer's De- 
partment to govern the organization and duties, policies and 
procedure of all departments of the Exposition Company. Under 
these General Administrative Regulations, the responsibility for 
handling all business and financial transactions for both the pre- 
period and operating period of the Exposition was placed with 
the Treasurer's Department. 

To condense the tremendous scope of this department's ac- 
tivies is the aim of these paragraphs. In order to accomplish this, 
only the highlights of its functions can be shown and since the 
most important of these was the handling of vast sums of money, 
endeavor has been made to present as accurate a picture as pos- 
sible of this phase to the reader. 

The Treasurer's Department was composed of twenty-two di- 
visions, each division being headed by a "chief" and all divisions 
directly responsible to the Treasurer's office. Following are these: 

TREASURER JOHN F. FORBES 

ASSISTANT TREASURER & EXECUTIVE SECRETARY H. C. BOTTORFF 

ASSISTANT TO THE TREASURER & EXECUTIVE SECRTARY BEVERLY LEVY 

CONTROLLER'S DIVISION 

CONTROLLER C. J. HASSDN 

AUDITING F. C. KDHNKE 

ACCOUNTING F. J. GREW 

( N. W. HAGELBERG 1939 

REVENUE CONTROL DIV.SION J T LANDSBDRDUGH 1 94D 

TICKET SALES DIVISION T. RDSEQUI5T 

PAYMASTER'S DIVISION E. A. DIXDN 

TICKET CUSTODIAN DIVISION S. E. POPE 

INSURANCE DIVISION B. GLANCE 

TRANSPORTATION DIVISION C. M. COVELL 

f ROBERT STARRETT 1939 

ADMIN. BLDG. & GARBAGE COLLECTION DlV. . . | DEWEY STALL , g4Q 

f E. M. VALLEJO 1 939 

PURCHAS.NG D.VIS.ON > FRAN< NE| _ 5nN _ lg4D 

WAREHOUSE AND STORES DIVISION EDWARD JENKINS 

, . MORTON R. GIBBONS 1939 

EMERGENCY HOSP.TAL < SCAL| _ Y _ ig4D 



I DR. 

.''" 



_ . MAJOR F. J. HERATY 1939 

GUIDES AND GUARDS DIVISION < 

CAPTAIN W. B. ALLEN 1 94D 

INFORMATION BUREAU AND MESSENGER SERVICE ALICE TAPLEY 

TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH DIVISION MAYE F. O'DOWD 

f GEORGE FISCHER 1939 

PASS DIVISION | T LANDSBOROUGH 1 94O 

GENERAL FILES ANNA IRWIN 

EMPLOYMENT D.VISION . { ALPHA McCH RYSTAL 1 939 

| ALICE TAPLEY 1 94D 

MAILING DIVISION LOUIS LEACHMAN 

CAVALCADE BUSINESS MANAGER. . f N. T. BAILEY 1939 

}E. M. VALLEJO 194O 

WELFARE AND LOST AND FOUND DIVISION . . J EVA HANCE 1939 

| (CATHERINE RUSSELL 1 94O 



Lxviii THE MAGIC CITY 

FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT 1939-1940 (Continued) 

Prior to the opening of the 1940 Exposition, a change was made in 
the organization plan which created a department responsible direct to 
the Treasurer, consisting of the Controller's office, Auditing and Account- 
ing Divisions. This permitted an independent check of all financial 
transactions. 

The Treasury Department maintained a budgetary control of opera- 
tions both in the pre-period and operating periods of the Exposition, and 
budgets for all departments, including construction, were built on a three 
months basis. These quarterly budgets were based upon the master budget 
aprpoved by the Executive Committee. Every expenditure, regardless of 
its nature, was checked as to funds available, and before any expenditures 
were made, approval had to be secured from the Treasurer or Assistant 
Treasurer. 

There was a complete separation between the Auditing and Account- 
ing Divisions and the Cashiers' Division in the handling of cash receipts. 
This served to produce a two-way control over every financial transaction. 

During the operating period, loss and gain statements were prepared 
weekly fn order to provide the necessary information to guide the man- 
agement in the operation of the Exposition. 

The Treasury Department collected all receipts from concessionnaires 
and other activities, deposited them in the Exposition bank and settled 
with concessionnaires weekly, first deducting the percentages accruing to 
the Exposition under the terms of their respective contracts, and charges 
for utility and other services. As a result of this plan, there was almost no 
loss incurred by the Exposition insofar as concessionnaires' activities were 
concerned. The amount of money handled through the Exposition bank 
during operations in 1939 and 1940 reached the enormous sum of approxi- 
mately $31,371,000. 

In addition to the funds handled during the operating periods, trans- 
actions were cleared through the records in the pre-periods amounting to 
approximately $14,600,000 from J936 to the opening date in 1939, and 
$1,281,844 from December 1939 to opening date in 1940 or a grand total 
of approximately $15,900,000. 

The gross receipts collected by Exposition cashiers from concession- 
naires and deposited with the Exposition bank during operations in 1939 
totaled $11,086,715.15. In 1940 these collections and deposits amounted to 
$6,933,314.84. Other major sources of receipts controlled by the Exposi- 
tion Company were as follows: 

1939 1940 

ADMISSIONS AND ADVANCE BALE DF TICKETS. . . $4, 1 D5, 1 75.5B $1 ,728,997. 3B 

SPACE RENTALS. PRIVILEGE CHARGES, ETC 1,73n,D54.Q9 791.3B9.Q5 

CASHIERS' SERVICES CHARGED 

To CQNCESSIQNNAIRES 178,639.27 93,058.65 

UTILITIES 617,369.45 224,137.46 

CAVALCADE 736,942.91 317,294.38 

PALACE OF FINE ARTS 294,482. ID im,656.7D 



APPENDIX Lxix 

FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT 1939-1940 (Continued) 

Of the apporximate $18,000,000 total gross receipts from concession- 
naires handled by the Exposition Company, the following were some of 
the leaders insofar as receipts in 1939 and 1940 were concerned: 

1939 1940 

AQUACADE DID NOT OPERATE $ 897,777.56 

FDLIES BERBERE $ 688,376.91 37B.467.Q3 

HOT DOGS 61Q,35B.3B 277,D7D.55 

DWL DRUB COMPANY 483,929.63 245,755.53 

BAY AUTO PARKS CPARKING CONCESSION} 626.34D.49 2G9.6-4l.5D 

ESTONIAN VILLAGE 31 5, ODD. DD 188,494.53 

TRUE BLUE CAFETERIAS 444, 765. BD 1BB.4DB.25 

NATIONAL SERVICE CD. CELEPHANT TRAINS]. . . . 6D4.539.82 1B4,315.BD 

CHINESE VILLAGE 328,426.27 176,785.96 

COCA COLA 219.72D.7B 157,150.33 

DOUGHNUT TOWER 322,378. 1 3 1 56,442.9D 

Following the conclusion of these paragraphs is a condensed general 
financial statement broken down to show the periods from inception to 
December 17, 1939, and from December 18, 1939, to January 31, 1941. As 
the liquidation of the affairs of the Exposition corporation is still under 
way it is not possible to show the actual net result for the two years' opera- 
tion at this time. This will not be ascertained for several months due to 
the numerous transactions yet to be completed. 

A great amount of advance planning and study had been given to the 
financial control prior to the start of construction of the Exposition and 
it was stated by a number of visiting officials connected with former expo- 
sitions that the procedure followed for the financial and business control 
of the activities of the Golden Gate International Exposition far surpassed 
anything theretofore attempted. 

There were literally millions of transactions handled through the va- 
rious divisions of the Treasury and Service Departments, and the final 
audit of the cash showed a shortage of approximately $800, which was 
resultant from minor errors in overages and shortages. 

The Treasury Department alone averaged over 1,000 employees dur- 
ing the operating periods of 1939 and 1940. The total average number of 
employees on the Exposition payroll for 1939 and 1940 was 1,950. Payrolls 
were never at any time delayed. Payments were made to all employees on 
due dates. 

At the close of the 1939 operation, a dividend of approximately 20% 
was paid to those creditors who elected to withdraw at that time and not 
carry over into 1940 operations. Since the close of the Exposition on Sep- 
tember 29, 1940, partial distribution of surplus funds has been made to 
1940 subscribers to the Exposition of approximately 35% of their sub- 
scriptions and to those creditors, who did not withdraw at the close of 
1939 operations, a dividend of 65]/ 2 % has been paid. It is anticipated that 
substantial additional dividends will be made by May 30, 1941. 






LXX 



THE MAGIC CITY 



FINANCIAL DEPARTMENT 1939-1940 (Continued) 

For the Period from Inception to January 31, 1941 



PERIOD FROM 



TOTAL 

GROSS PROFIT FROM OPERATIONS . . $ 1 5.B73, 1 99.49 
LESS: 

OPERATING EXPENSES .... 9,275,479.93 

REMAINDER 

ADD: 



DECEMBER 1B-39 

TO 
JANUARY 31 -41 



INCEPTION 

TO 
DECEMBER 17-39 



$4,401,363.76 $11,471,835.73 



2,71 7,O93.O2 



6,597,71 9.56 



CONTRIBUTIONS FROM CITY AND 
COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO AND 
CALIFORNIA TOLL BRIDGE AU- 
THORITY 



345,000.00 



,6B4,27D.74 



345,000.00 



TOTAL 



6,942,71 9.56 



2,O29,27O.74 



6,558,386.91 



4,91 3.44B.B2 



4,91 3.44B.B2 



AMORTIZATION OF CAPITAL AS- 
SETS AND EXPENSES OF PRE- 
OPERATING PERIOD 1 1 5,91 4,5B7.22 



1,281,884.33 1 4, 632,702. B9 



NET SALVAGE AND FIRE INSU- 
RANCE RECOVERIES TO JAN- 
UARY 31,1 941 

REMAINDER 

REMAIN DERBEFORE DEDUCTING POST- 
EXPOSITION EXPENSES 

POST EXPOSITION EXPENSES 

Loss 

DEDUCT: 

ESTIMATED GAIN IN SETTLEMENT 
WITH CREDITORS WHO WITHDREW 
AT CLOSE OF 1939 EXPOSITION. 
CAPPROX. B1 PCT. OF CLAIMS]. . 



1 90,624. 17 



190,624.17 



1 5,723,963.05 


1,281 ,884.33 


1 4,442, 07B.72 


B,7B1 ,243.49 
204,972.36 


747,386.41 
1 03,227.47 


9,528,629.90 
1 O1.744.B9 


8,986,21 5.85 


644,1 58.94 


9,630,374.79 



LESS: 



ESTIMATED COURT AND LEGAL 



2,D20,O1 D.70 



3D,5OO.DO 



2,D2O,O1 O.7O 



30,500.00 





1 ,989,51 O.7O 


1 ,9B9,51 O.7D 


CONTRIBUTED CAPITAL CSUBSCRIP- 
TIONS AND CONTRIBUTIONS 1939 
EXPOSITION] 


6,437,281.89 


6,437,2B1.B9 


TOTAL 


8,426,792.59 


8,426,792.59 


NET DEFICIT t$ 


559,423.26 $ 644,158.94 


$1,2O3,5B2.2O 



NOTE: tCAPiTAL ASSETS DOES NOT INCLUDE GRANTS FROM WPA AND PWA OF $7,412,154.00. 
{AMOUNT SUBJECT TO FURTHER ADJUSTMENT UPON COMPLETION OF LIQUIDATION. 
DENOTES PLUS FIGURES. 



PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING COMPANY 

7OO MONTGOMERY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 

CALIFORNIA 









* ,' *- 



4 4