(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Triangle 1939"



S'..e;!J:^H:.E ; 






■ 




NOT TO BE TAKEN 
FROM LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/triangle1939coll 




A. G. DANIELLS MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

Southern Missionary College 

Collegedale, Tennessee 




45649 



There is a destiny that makes us brothers. 

None soes his way alone, 
All that is sent into the lives of others 

Comes back into our own. 

— Edwin Markham. 



LD 

5101 

S367 

A12 

1939 ^ 

(SDA) / / / 



FOREWORD 6 

DEDICATION 9 

ADMINISTRATION . . . . 15 

CLASSES 23 

ACTIVITIES 37 

INDUSTRIAL 6i 

ADVERTISERS 73 



bW 



dete 



rt^ 



rve 



d W 



^ J »*»<««" . „ to *■ M 

,. s ooQ ,s .r re P ,aV ' a *o^ 

W* ** ^ e ^^ eW 6 J to ^ (S9 ° 

t o be ***"* QW >en ^ - 

have ^ eKjoV . . „^9 

. e we ^ . b^ 9 teaW - , t he 

^^ So^^ V «„*.-* 

***** P ,. - ^ ^ " ~ tea " S - 




For hi s , ^"^ 

. ed '^t e th hl "> th e ; r r. V 



Better to stem with heart and hand 
The roaring tide of life, than lie 

Unmindful on the glittering strand 
Of God s occasions floating by. 

—J. G. Whittier. 




II 


1 


, •». "1. 


\ ; : -:'V. 


■ ■■ 
' - \ 


' 


• 1 


. 




vv *. rf, < . 




• 


J"?' 

• 




■ . 





„ « 





>fc2T ■"■ 




Above: North Hall 
Below: South Hall 



,. -v-'.' 




Normal Building 



President's Cottage 








Hill Crest Cottage 



E 

o 




Yellow House 





15 



He is wise who can instruct us, 
And assist us in the business of virtuous 
— Carlyle. 



iving. 



L^cllciic (p^o-axd. ,.•/ /tu.i/i'i'j 




President, J. K. Jones 
Secretary, J. C. Thompson 

Left to right: M. V. Tucker, J. C. Thompson, C. 
O Franz, L. R. Coolidge, M. D., John R. Mitchell, 
D. D. S., F. L. Green, J. K. Jones, C. A. Russell, 
R. I. Keate, H. E. Lysmqer, C. V. Anderson, 
l_. E. Lenheim. Not in picture: E. A. Sutherland, 
M. D., H W. Walker, E. C. Waller. 



17 




J. C. THOMPSON 
President 



H. E. SNIDE 
Bible, Greek 

THEODORA WIRAK 
Registrar 



OLA K. GANT 
Chemistry, Biology 



P. W. WOODS 
Physics, Mathematics 



DON C. LUDINGTON 
Social Sciences 

GRACE EVANS-GREEN 
Normal Director 



MARY HOLDER-DIETEL 
Modern Languages 



STANLEY D. BROWN 
English, Librarian 



R. K. BOYD 

Business Administration 

FRANCES ANN BROOKE 
Business Administration 





F. O. RITTENHOUSE 
History, Sociology 

MAUDE I. JONES 
English, Latin 



OLIVE ROGERS-BATSON 
Expression, Piano 

HAROLD A. MILLER 
Director Music Department 



RUDOLPH JOHNSON 
Dean of Men, History 

OLGA OAKLAND 
Dean of Women, Biology, 
Geometry 



MYRTLE V. MAXWELL 
Critic Teacher 

OLIVIA B. DEAN 
Critic Teacher 




W. E. WILLIAMS 

Physical Education, School Nurse 

EDYTHE COBET WILLIAMS 
Nursing Education, School Nurse 



FRED L. GREEN 
Treasurer 



JOHN W. GEPFORD 
Broom Factory 



DAVID T. CARNAHAN 
Hosiery Mill 



T. R. HUXTABLE 
Wood Products, Puffery 



H. J. HALVORSEN 
Farm, Dairy 



PAUL T. MOUCHON 
Engineer 



G. N. FULLER 
Postmaster, Store 

ALBERT N. HALL 
Salesman, College Press 

ROGER F. GOODGE 
College Press 



TUI A. KNIGHT 
Secretary to the President 



E. E. ZELLMER 
Garage 



ERIC LUNDQUIST 
Accounting Office 



MARLETE TURNER-PITTON 
Laundry 



JOE RAINWATER 
Chef 

ALBERTA REIBER-RAINWATER 
Matron 



20 





Above: Normal School 
Below: Library 




<.»Vfc«J"? - 



^EfetefeK' 




Above: Dining Room 
Below: Cafeteria Counter 



22 




23 



■ Ti s Education forms the common mind; 
Just as the twig is bent, the tree's inclined. 

— Pope. 






ts 




iLL't.i 



President 

LOUIS WALLER, North Carolina 
Premedical 

"Fats" -Choir '38, '39, Male 
Chorus '37, '38, Sabbath school 
secretary '37, Orchestra '39, Sec- 
retary Triangle Club '39, Assis- 
tant Sabbath school superinten- 
dent 39, Vice-president Pre- 
medical club '39. 





1 






Vice-president 

THYRA BOWEN, Mississippi 

College Preparatory 

Pianist Y. P. M. V. '39, Assistant 

leader Seminar '39, Assistant 

leader Junior Sabbath school '39, 

Choir '39. 



Secretary 

INEZ BECK, Virginia 
Business Administration 
"Suzzie" — Secretary Y. P. M. V. 
'39, Treasurer Joshi '39. 







«-• 



'- 



> 



mm 



Treasurer 

ARTHUR HALL, Georgia 

College Preparatory 

Secretary Better Men's society 

'37, Treasurer Junior class '38. 



Pastor 

WALLACE WELLMAN 

Tennessee 
Ministerial 

Secretary V. P. M. V. '38, Apison 
effort '38, '39, Vice-president 
Better Men's society '38, Leader 
Seminar '39. 




Valedictorian 
IRVIN SCHROADER 

North Carolina 
Science 

"Rosie"— Male Chorus '37, '38, 
President Premedical club '38, 
'39, President Junior class '38. 



Motto 
"Serve Jesus Constantly" 

Colors 
Aquamarine and Maroon 

Flower 
Red Carnation 

Sponsor 
F. O. Rittenhouse 



26 



BYRON LIGHTHALL 

M'nnesota 
Ministerial 

Colporteur band '38, Leader Sem- 
inar '38, Religious Activities 
editor TRIANGLE '39 



ALYCE IVEY, Michigan 
Normal 

"Poison" — Women's Chorus '38, 
Junior Sabbath school teacher 
'38, Choir '38, '39, Class Ac- 
tivities editor TRIANGLE '39 



MAXINE FOLLIS, Tennessee 

Normal 

"Frenchy" 



JEAN HADLEY, South Carolina 
Secretarial 




MARGARETE SEILAZ, Tennessee 
Associate in Arts 
Associate Art editor TRIANGLE 
'38, Assistant leader Seminar '38, 
Sabbath school secretary '38, 
Ed, tor "Southland Scroll'' '38, 
'39, Secretary Art club '39, Art 
editor TRIANGLE '39, Salutator- 
ian Senior class '39 



CLARENCE NEWMAN, 

North Carolina 
Business Administration 



KATHERINE CHAMBERS, 

Tennessee 
Pre-dietetics 

"Kitty"— Premedical club '38, 
'39, Assistant Kindergarten Sab- 
bath school '38, Foreign Mission 
band '39 



PIERCE MOORE, Jr., 

South Carolina 
Premedical 

"Jack"— Orchestra '38, '39, Re- 
porter Better Men's society '38, 
Premedical club '38, '39, Junior 
Sabbath school teacher '39 



•caXcini 



f 



CLARENCE BEACH, Ohio 
College Preparatory 



Leader Sunshine band, '38, '39 



ANNIE MAE CHAMBERS, 

Tennessee 
College Preparatory 
Assistant Secretary Y. P. M. V. 
'39, Foreign Mission band '39 




ELIZABETH ANDERSON 

Tennessee 
College Preparatory 



ALTA BURCH, Florida 
College Preparatory 
"Derpy" 



JAMES CUNNINGHAM, 

Tennessee 
College Preparatory 



FOREST HALVORSEN, 

Tennessee 
College Preparatory 
"Horsecollar" 



28 




NADINE FANT, Arkansas 
College Preparatory 



ROBERT HEER, Tennessee 
College Preparatory 



a 



LclXcUllj 



CLIFFORD LUDINGTON, 

Tennessee 

College Prepdrdtory 
String Qudrtet '38, '39, Orches- 
trd '38, '39, Chdttdnoogd Sym- 
phony '38, '39 



VIRGINIA THOMAS, 

Tennessee 
College Prepdrdtory 



DAVID MAGOON, Florida 
College Preparatory 
"Goon" 



IRA WHEELER, Tennessee 
College Prepdrdtory 








^ 



ib«* 



VALDA HICKMAN, Tennessee 
College Prepdrdtory 
Secretary Y. P. M. V. '36 



WILLIAM KIKER, Florida 
College Prepdrdtory 



EARL PADGETT, Florida 
College Prepdrdtory 
"Percy"— Orchestra '38, '39, 
Germdn Band '38, '39. 



HENSON WHITEHEAD, 

Georgia 
College Prepdrdtory 
"Whitey" — Colporteur bdnd 39. 



29 



UHCCtS 



45649 



President 
SUMMEROUR 

Secretary 

PURDIE 




Vice-president 
SNIDE 

Treasurer 
OAKES 



Motto: "On to the Top" Aim: "Deeds — Not Dreams' 

Colors: Orange and Blue Flower: Pansy 

Sponsor: Don C. Ludington 



'/aiin-z L laa f<j>lL 



Barto, Helen 
Beaver, Harold 
Bowen, Robert 
Bugbee, John 
Butler, Jessie 
Callicott, Mary 
Carlson, Patricia 
Chambers, Alma 
Clark, Freida 
Davis, Pearl 
Dillard, Eugene 
Elvin, Viola 
Hicks, Gladys 
Hust, Mildred 
Irwin, John D. 
Levine, Rachel 



Litchfield, Leola 
Ludington, Louis 
Maxson, Elwyn 
McLeod, James 
Parsley, Lucille 
Pitton, Leslie 
Purdie, Gladys 
Ray, Geneva 
Smith, Nellie Jane 
Snide, Rollin 
Strickland, Marguerite 
Strickland, Shirley 
Summerour, Brooke 
Sweet, Irvin 
Thomas, Lillian 
Tripp, Ruby 



ACADEMY ROLL 



Beaube, Gracie 
Chosewood, Raymond 
Cock r ell, Vann 
Damon, Robert 
Davis, Charles 
Dawson, Obelia 
Faust, Oliver 
Holland, Sherman 
Hust, Austin 
Hust, Opal 
Jordan, Helen 
Manuel, Raymond 



McKee, Lois 
Miller, Lora 
Minner, Fred 
Mize, Mildred 
Oakes, Warren 
Rogers, Emory 
Scales, Lawrence 
Snide, June 
Summerour, Sue 
West, Donald 
Wrenn, Helen 



32 




Baito 



Butler 



Cdllicott 



m Mi ■— ▼ , 



Carls 




Chambers 



Bugbee 



Clark 



Davis 



Dillard 



Elvin 



Irwin 



Hicks 



Ludington 



33 



Levine 



McLeod 



Hust 



Parsley 



Maxson 



Litchfield 



Smith 



Pitton 



Ray 



S. Strickland 



Snide 
M. Strickland 



Tripp 



Sweet 



Thomas 




34 




Faust 



Miller 



Scales 



West 



35 




Above: Freshmen 
Below: Sophomores 



FRESHMEN 

James Ford 
Helen Park 
Olive Ford 
Bernice Hastey 
Amalia Hernandez 
Kenneth Boynton 
Kenneth Ray 
George Verlie Fuller 
Harold Miller 
Ray Rogers 



SOPHOMORES 

Inez Dowlen 
Melba Sanders 
Betty Jane Halvorsen 
Betty Phelps 
Ena Manuel 
Verna Bowen 
Dorothy Kaneaster 
Shirley Hanberry 
Miriam Moore 
Glenn Starkey 
William Nix 
Clayton Brodine 
Ben Wheeler 



36 




37 



I have no I i 3 h t by which my feet are guided,. 
Save the lamp of experience.' 

— Patrick Henry. 



n j-.? 



THE TRIANGLE CLUB 

On January 9, 1939, the constitution of 
the "Triangle Club" was ratified, marking 
'he formal organization of a dormitory club 
in South Hall. Its object is to cultivate in 
its members the triangle of essentials of 
Christian manhood physical, mental, and 
spiritual powers. 

Club meetings are held weekly and provide 
opportunities for training and development 
as well as entertainment. (The first semester 
officers are on the top row.) 

THE JOSHI JOTATSU KAI 

Every Thursday evening during the school 
year, the residents of North Hall gather 
in the parlor to enjoy the meeting of the 
"Joshi Club." The programs presented are 
varied and interesting. The practice of hav- 
ing friendship friends is one that is en|oyed 
by all, and the development of individual 
talent is encouraged. The aim of the Joshi 
Jotatsu Kai is to instill in the heart; of its 
members the ideals of "beautiful girlhood. 



THE LITERARY SOCIETY 

This club was organized for those students 
who have a definite interest in creative and 
original writing, its purpose being to spon- 
sor and provide an outlet for their articles. 
Students are encouraged to write such arti- 
cles as appear in our denominational papers 
Through the "Southland Scroll" they have 
opportunity to see their literary efforts in 
print. President, Charles H. Plyer, III; Vice- 
president, Nellie Smith; Secretary, Eunice 
Edgmon. 



THE ART CLUB 

In order that those possessing talent along 
the lines of drawing and painting might 
have a broader opportunity for self expres- 
sion, an Art Club has been organized. With 
Professor Woods as sponsor, the club has 
enjoyed many pleasant and profitable hours 
working together with brush, pen, and pen- 
cil. Thus the members have gained much 
valuable practice. President, Louise Scherer, 
Vice-president, Raulston Hooper, Secre- 
tary-treasurer, Margarete Seilaz. 




j<^eliqiou4 <=4-ctivitie& 



The servant of the Lord has said that true 
education is the harmonious development of 
the physical, mental, and spiritual powers. 
By the study of the great prophecies in 
Daniel and Revelation, the fundamental doc- 
trines, and the dealings of God with His 
people in Old and New Testament times, 
the end of true education is attained. For 
those in the ministerial group, study of New 
Testament Greek is offered, whereby they 
may know the truth more exactly. 

By participating in the various religious ac- 
tivities of the school, we are able to make 
profitable use of the knowledge we have 
gained. The Sabbath school is endeavoring 
to fulfill its purpose of soul-winning, by 
helping us rightly divide the Word of truth. 
This also is the purpose of the Missionary 
Volunteer Society and all its Progressive 
classes, the Colporteur band, and the Minis- 
terial seminar. The seminar is the classroom,- 
the field is the laboratory. At present, work 
is being carried on by students in Silver- 
dale, Standifer Gap, Georgetown, Birch- 
wood, Ringgold, and Apison. We sincerely 
believe that it is through a study of the 
inspired message from above that we are 
prepared for a place in the service of the 
Lord. 



o 
_a 

o 
U 



> 
> 



Cl 

o 





Above: Church Choir 
Below: Community Chorus 



42 



Above: Chapel 
Below: Orchestra 





COMMUNITY CHORUS 

Officers 
Prof. Miller, Director 
Mrs. Batson, Accompanist 
Raymond Morphew, President 
Mr. Boyd, Vice-president 
Mrs. Harter, Secretary 

Sopranos 
Georgette Damon 
Betty Botts 
Mary Gildewell 
Mrs. Ludington 
Mrs. Hall 
Mrs. Boyd 
Mrs. Gepford 
Helen Barto 
Mildred Hust 
Ruby Tripp 
Mrs. Beach 
Helen Park 
Altd Parker 
Dorothy Woodall 
Shirley Hanberry 
Mrs. Miller 
Mrs. Wheeler 
Rebecca Rutledge 
Mrs. Maxwell 
Mrs. Rogers 
Mrs. Rainwater 

Altos 
Thyra Bowen 
Mrs. Hendershot 
Tui Knight 

Betty Jane Halvorsen 
Opal Hust 
Maggie Lee Holmes 
Madeirah Murphy 
Mrs. Aiken 
Mrs. Mouchon 
Mrs. VanArsdell 
Miss Maxwell 
Mrs. Woods 
Alyce Ivey 
Mrs. S. Brown 
Mrs. Zellmer 
Miss Brooke 
Mary Callicott 
Mary K. Woods 

Tenors 
Brooke Summerour 
John D. Irwin 
Eugene Dillard 
Wallace Wellman 
Mr. Rainwater 
Athel Fredericks 

Basses 
Martin Bird 
Mr. Hall 
Mr. Zellmer 
Mr. Parks 
G. E. Maxson 
Fred Minner 
Festus Roberts 
Mr. Harter 
Mr. Goodge 
Wallace Lighthall 



ORCHESTRA 

Donald West 

Clifford Ludington 

Tui Knight 

Melvm Edmister 

Louis Waller 

Rollin Snide 

Irvin Sweet 

Oliver Faust 

Marg e Morgan 

Brooke Summerour 

Wallace Lighthall 

Charles Plyer 

Martin Jansen 

Pearl Davis 

Pierce Moore 

L. F. Roberts 

J. Payne 

Paul Saxon 

Martin Bird 

Raymond Chosewood 

Kenneth Ray 

Robert Bowen 

Daniel Stevenson 

Myra Samples 

Earl Padgett 

Elton King 

Frank Ryles 

Edward Rutledge 

Emory Rogers 

Marian Allen 

Louis Ludington, Conductor 



SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

The science department of Southern Junior 
College offers instruction in the chemical, 
physical, and biological sciences, and it is 
in this group that we find the majority of 
the laboratory courses which are offered in 
the school. The physics laboratory boasts a 
new ten-inch reflecting telescope, a four 
hundred fifty watt shortwave radio trans- 
mitter, and the complete line of apparatus 
necessary for teaching physics and radio. 

The chemistry laboratory is equipped with 
a large stock of glassware, laboratory bal- 
ances with accuracy up to one ten- 
thousandth of a gram, and a stock of chemi- 
cals valued at twelve hundred dollars. In 
the biology department, we have all the 
materials necessary for teaching bacteriolo- 
3Y/ physiology, biology, and zoology. 



44 




Above: Phys.cs Laboratory 
Below: Chemistry Laboratory 
Inset: Ten-inch Telescope 



45 




IRWIN 
Editor 



PLYER 

Business Manager 





nana 



t 



ic <z~>tarj; 



John D. Irwin Editor-in-chief 

Louise Scherer Associate Editor 

Margarete Seilaz Art Editor 

Rae Levine Associate Art Editor 

Byron Lighthall Religious Activities Editor 

Ruby Tripp Social Activities Editor 

Alyce Ivey Class Activities Editor 

Irvin Sweet Snapshot Editor 

Viola Elvin Snapshot Editor 

Charles H. Plyer, III Business Manager 

Leslie H. Pitton Circulation Manager 

Advisory Committee 

Rudolph Johnson Chairman 

Mrs. Fred L. Green Maude I. Jones 

Mrs. Mary Dietel Floyd O. Rittenhouse 



46 






Scherer 
Ivey 

Lighthall 

Johnson 



Dietel 



Jones 




fc^m 




Tripp 
Elvin 
Sweet 



Green 



Rittenhouse 




/<.ecteatic>n 

We realize the importance of 
keeping our bodies in condition, 
so every boy and girl is required 
to have physical training at least 
one hour a week. The boys us- 
ually spend their period playing 
volley ball, and the girls take hikes 
or play soft ball. An interesting 
part of the recreation at the col- 
lege is the Friday afternoon base- 
ball game. These active games not 
only give the boys needed exer- 
cise in the open air, but they also 
teach fair play and sportsmanship. 
Next year when school opens, 
Collegedale will have two fine 
tennis courts ready for use. Sou- 
thern Junior College is endeavor- 
ing to give the students a rounded 
education, looking after not only 
their spiritual and mental con- 
dition, but their physical well- 
being also. 





mr 



i 



i 



7 ■' ■■P 





Mrs. Summerour 
Presidei.t 



Dr. Mitchell 
Vice-president 



. . or tlie <^~hluitit 



it 



Despite the fact that the pursuance of a further educational goal 
has brought upon many of you a double allegiance, we st.ll have an 
abiding faith in the love and loyalty of every alumnus, and hope 
that when our present project — the erect.on of a modern infirmary - 
shall have been realized, not one name will be missing from its 
foundat.on stones. 

Why not begin the next school year with a resolution to keep the 
College and all the members of the Alumni Association in closer 
touch, each with the other, by contributing to a special column in 
the "Scroll"? 

Though some of you may be penetrating dense jungles, fording 
swollen streams, or l.stenmg to booming guns, you are still members 
of the "beautiful flock" which God, through all the years, has 
been giving to Southern Junior College, and ever will you be 
followed by the earnest prayers and tender solicitude of your Alma 
Mater. 



Mrs. Hell 
Treasurer 


■MM MM 


!%L 


Mrs. Dcrt 




A' 


Secretary 


■v 1 


i 




Jle Jlils 

Dedicated to Charles H. Plyer, III 



Some may long for the soothing touch 

Of lavender, cream, or mauve, 
But the ties I wear must possess the glare 

Of a red-hot kitchen stove. 
The books I read and the life I lead 

Are sensible, sane, and mild. 
I like calm hats and I don't wear spats - 

But I want my neckties wild!! 

Give me a wild tie, brother, 
One with a cosmic urge! 

A tie that will rear and rip and tear 
When it sees my old blue serge. 

Oh, some will say that a gent's cravat 
Should only be seen, not heard; 

But I want a tie that will make men cry 
And render their vision blurred. 

I yearn, I long for a tie so strong 

It will take two men to tie it, 

II such there be, just show it to me— 

Whatever the price, I'll buy it! 

— Anonymous. 



53 




ittacitavli 



1 



a 



u 




ittaatapltA . . . 



56 




ALL ABOARD/ 



CAREFUL NOW f 




/ 



vents in U<^evLew 




58 



SEPTEMBER 



1 3^ Registration Begins. President's Opening Address. 

15 Beginning of Instruction. 

16 First chapel exercises,- first vespers. 

17 Faculty — Student Reception. 
25 Motion Pictures. 



OCTOBER 



1 Harvest Ingathering campaign begins. 

3 Old — New Student Reception. 

8 Motion Pictures — Bobby Breen in "Lets Sing Again". 

15 March. 

22 Open Night — Small group entertainments. 

30 Upton Close lectures on world events. 



NOVEMBER 



5 Industrial evening, variety program. 

12 Motion Pictures. 

19 Home night. 

24 Thanksgiving Day — skating, banquet, games. 

DECEMBER 

3 Games, skating, parties. 
10—17 Week of prayer, conducted by Elder Frederick Lee. 
17 Debate-'Medicine Should be Socialized." 
21 — Jan. 2 Christmas vacation. Games, hikes, parties, 
etc., for those who stayed at the college. 

JANUARY 

7 Motion Pictures. 

14 Semester Musical Recital. 

21 Language department presents program. 

28 Jerold Frederic, concert pianist 



FEBRUARY 



4 Orchestra concert, Louis Ludington conducting. 

11 Motion Pictures -"Little Men.'' 

18 Science demonstration program. 

22 Senior class organizes. 

25 Union Conference Home Missionary Rally. 



MARCH 



4 Skating, and small group entertainments. 
11 Games in the gymnasium. 

18 Motion Pictures — "William Tell." 

19 Annual Reception — Joshi Jotatsu Kai entertains the 

Triangle Club in North Hall. 
25 Alabama Srngers concert. Junior class organizes. 



APRIL 



1 Faculty night. 

1 — 8 Week of Prayer, conducted by Elder H. S. Prenier. 
8 College Choir concert of sacred music. 
1 5 Open night. 

22 March. 

23 Junior — Senior sunrise breakfast. Triangle Club 

sponsors marshmallow toast. 
28 — 31 Colporteur Institute, Elder M. V. Tucker, directing. 
30 Senior Banquet. 



MAY 



6 Motion Pictures. 

7 School picnic. 

13 Community chorus presents Gauls cantata, "Ruth' 

20 Mr. Brown lectures about the Cherokee Indians. 

26 Consecration Service. 

27 Baccalaureate sermon. 
Class Night. 

28 Alumni Breakfast. Commencement. 



59 



14Je 



yvtCLiiilc 



the kindness and understanding of all those who have helped 
in the publication of this second volume of the TRIANGLE. 
Many have spent long hours, giving valuable aid. We take 
this opportunity to especially thank Mr. Roger F. Goodge 
of the College Press, for his help in more ways than one, 
Mr. Richard K. Wood, for his patience and efforts on much 
of the portrait and group photography; Mr. W. D. Saunders 
of the Knoxville Engraving Co., for his ideas and suggestions; 
Mr. H. K. Tice, for the excellent work done by the Kingsport 
Press on our cover; the advisory committee for its sympathetic 
counsel; those who submitted snapshots to brighten these 
pages — especially Mr. Arthur Hall, whose prize-winning 
picture appears on page 57; Mr. Harold Beaver and Miss 
Marguerite Strickland, leaders of Band No. 2; Mr. Roland 
Shorter and Miss Mattie Mae Carter, leaders of Band No. 1, 
winners; Miss Carter, for her excellent work with the busi- 
ness manager in handling the business of the TRIANGLE; 
all others who did their part in circulating and subscribing 
to this production, which we earnestly hope has been a 
worthy one. 

-The TRIANGLE staff. 



60 




61 



Nothing is denied to well-directed labor, 
Nothing is ever attained without it. 

— Sir Joshua Reynolds. 



7 / "5S ■ 



Under the competent supervision of Mr. 
Halvorsen, the Southern Junior College 
dairy employs ten workers and has a herd 
of thirty-eight cows and thirty-five heifers 
and calves. The dairy, housed in a two-story 
barn and a milk-house containing an ice 
plant and two storage rooms, produces 
Grade A milk, in addition to chocolate 
milk, cottage cheese, and like products. 

The college farm employs sixteen students, 
and has six heads of work stock, four mule 
colts, seven horse colts, and a saddle horse. 
The farm is listed as one of the Demonstrated 
Farms co-operating with the T. V. A. and 
Tennessee University. In the past year, many 
terraces have been bu.lt, forty acres of hill- 
side have been seeded in permanent pasture, 
two hundred fifty tons of lime have been 
spread, and twenty tons of 43 per cent 
Super-Phosphate, furnished by the T. V. A., 
have been used. Last fall sixty-five acres of 
small grain and twenty-five acres of crimson 
clover were sowed. As far as possible, 
the land is kept covered during the winter 






trytssiii 



■3*ctou 



V 



The broom factory furnishes work for twenty 
young men each year, under the management 
of Mr. Gepford. During the year, 14,400 
dozen brooms are manufactured. For such 
a production, 165 tons of broom corn, seven 
tons of broom wire, three and a half tons 
of broom twine, and four car loads of broom 
handles are used. One day's work produces 
sixty dozen brooms — more than a broom 
every minute. Each year twelve tons of 
mop yarn are used in the manufacturing of 
2,400 dozen mops. On the average, ten 
dozen mops are produced in one day. 

Besides a large wholesale trade in the city 
of Chattanooga, the broom factory keeps 
two men steadily employed as salesmen in 
the states of Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, 
North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, 
and Alabama. This important industry, which 
during the past year has doubled the size 
of its building and added new machinery, 
pays out over eight thousand dollars to stu- 
dents each year, thus helping them put the 
"earn' into "learn ". 



I olleae d/tea 



Thomas A. Carlyle once said, "Every person 
should know something of the art of print- 
ing." No matter what type of business one 
may practice, a knowledge of printing will 
prove to be of value. Not only is a training 
in printing desirable for the intrinsic value 
of the trade itself, but also for the oppor- 
tunities for character development it affords. 
The exacting quality of the work tends to 
teach the student thoroughness, efficiency, 
accuracy, and patience. 

Here at the College Press, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Goodge, twenty students re- 
ceive invaluable training in one of the best 
trades, most of them working the major por- 
tion of their school expenses. Our well- 
equipped shop handles a great volume of 
business, much of it being the finer type of 
job printing, color work, and book and 
catalog publishing. 




^-H-siiexif „ 1 1 ill 



One of the most important industries at Sou- 
thern Junior College is the hosiery mill, 
managed by Mr. Carnahan. The sixty 
students employed in this industry are work- 
ing their entire way through school. There 
are two shifts of workers: the high school 
students are employed in the afternoon and 
evening,- the college students in the morn- 
ing. The machinery consists of nine leggers, 
four footers, seven seamers, and three 
loopers. The building, which was built 
in 1937, is air-conditioned and very modern. 

For a number of years, many students have 
defrayed all their school expenses by work- 
ing in the hosiery mill. More and more the 
mill is becoming a desirable place in which 
students may work, and thereby gain a chris- 
tian education. 





I'tiltexif 



The college puffery furnishes work for five 
students in the building located on the s:de 
of Reservoir hill, behind North Hall. An 
average of one hundred dozen packages of 
Golden Grains are produced in one day, 
from superior quality western wheat. The 
cellophane bags are made by the students 
in the shop. Five men are employed as 
salesmen in the Southern states, and orders 
are sent out almost daily by express or by 
truck. 



1/Uod ftaJbcL ^achxtj 

In a large two-story building, fifteen students 
earn between three and four hundred dol- 
lars each month, manufacturing ironing 
boards, step ladders, kitchen stools, lawn 
chairs, and Venetian blinds. Approximately 
one car load of lumber is used each month, 
with the productions amounting to about 
two thousand dollars. Two salesmen are 
employed in the Southern states, much of 
the business being done with Sears, Roe- 
buck & Co. 

The puffery and the wood products factory 
are both under the capable management of 
Mr. Huxtable. 



-LiiiinAxti, K^itcken, fjaketh 



,'/ 



The school laundry, which serves the com- 
munity as well as the dormitory students, 
furnishes work for fifteen young people, 
under the direction of Mrs. Leslie Pitton. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rainwater superintend 
the dining room and kitchen, employing 
twenty-three students. Last summer eight 
hundred gallons of peaches, and four hun- 
dred gallons of beans were canned for win- 
ter consumption. 

The bakery employs three workers. Each 
week four hundred loaves of bread, seventy- 
five dozen cinnamon buns, and a number of 
pies and cakes are made. The bakery prcd- 
ucts serve only the school kitchen 



A. G. DANIELLS MEMORIAL LIBRAPtt^X^^ 





ti 



auet 



L alLfe SuUenti 



Name 



Pictures on Pages 



Alderman, Craig 39 

Barto, Helen 22, 33, 40, 42, 55 

Beaver, Harold 33, 39, 45, 69 

Beck, Inez £6, 30, 39, 41, 48 

Bowen, Robert 33, 37, 39, 43, 55, 57, 65 

Brocks, Floy 55,66,67 

Bugbee, John 33, 50, 63 

Bugbee, Thad . . . 

Butler, Jessie 33, 55 

Callicott, Mary 33, 42, 52 

Carlson, Patricia 33, 52 

Carter, Edward 67 

Carter, Mattie Mae 39 

Chambers, Alma 33, 66, 67 

Chambers, Kathenne 27, 30 

Clark, Freida 33, 39, 41 

Davis, Bernice 66, 67 

Davis, Pearl 33, 43, 48, 50, 65 

Davison, Robert 49 

Dillard, Eugene 42, 43, 45, 55 

Drake, Jessie 23, 41, 42, 52, 55, 66 

Echols, Walter 21,39,41,65 

Edgmon, Eunice 22, 52 

Edmister, Melvin 43, 66 

Elv.n, Viola 33,39,44,47,55,69 

Foust, Averla 40,55,66,67 

Fo 1 1 is, Maxine 27 

Gaver, Paul 42, 43, 66 

Glidewell, Mary 22,42,55 

Godfrey, James 39,41,49,52,63 

Goodbrad, Burgess 39 

Gorden, Clyde 39, 49 

Gray, Lewis 66 

Hadley, Jean 27, 30 

Hall, Maurice 39 41 

Hendershot, Hoyt 41 

Hicks, Gladys 33, 66 

Hines, James 

Hines, Ruth 69 

Hust, Mildred 34, 39, 41, 42, 57 

Irwin, John D 33, 39, 41, 42, 46, 49, 65 

Ivey, Alyce 27, 30, 42, 47, 68 

Jacobs, Miriam 66, 67 

Jaynes, Hazel 66, 67 

Jordan, Vearl 42, 65 

Klose, Alyse 42, 45, 48, 52, 57 

Levine, Rachel 34, 39, 41 , 42, 47 

Lighthall, Byron 23, 27, 41, 47, 63 

Lighthall, Wallace 38, 41, 42, 43, 57, 63 

Linderman, Mary Evelyn 39, 41, 50, 66, 67 

Lindsey, Glennis 40, 66 

Litchfield, Leola 34, 41 , 50, 55 



Ludington, Louis 33, 39, 41, 42, 43, 48, 49, 52 57 

McLeod, James ' ' 

. . . r| 21, 23 

Manuel, Elsie ' 

,, ri ..23, 34, 41, 42, 63 

Maxson, El wyn "' ' ' ' . „_ 

.. D ' 27, 30. 40, 43, 45, 49 

Moore, Fierce ' ' 

Mauldin, Loraine __" ' " " 

Murphy, Madeirah 22 ' 39 ' *' 

Newman, Clarence ' 

K , D ,. 42, 55, 67 

Nordan, Betty 

Oakes, Grantham 

Parsley, Lucille 

n ■ i_i U 48, 66 

Pervis, Harold 

Petty, Cecil. . . - 

Pickens, Mike , ' ' ' _ 

p,. ,1 34, 47 

Pitton, Leslie , ,„ 

Plyer, Charles 37,39,41,43,46,65 

^ rdl ^ G ' ddyS ". '.'.'.'.'.'.'.: '.34',' 50,' 55 

Ray, Geneva ' 

„! ' | r 41, 42, 43, 66 

Roberts, Leon r 

o I .. 23, 40, 42,48 

Roper, Kathryn ,_ 

e 1 M . 42, 43, 50, 52, 69 

Samples, Myra ' ' ' ' „, 

cu i ,i« ..21,39,45,47,48,52,55 

Scherer, Louise *•'' *"' ' ' ' 

, . . ., Cl i 39, 65 

Schleifer, Stanley ' 

r 1 1 1 26, 30, 41, 45 

Schroader, rvin ' ' 

Seilaz, Mar 9 arete 27, 30, 39^ 41 47 52 

Shorter, Roland 39 < 41 < "< 69 

c . , ' . ... . 34, 55, 66, 67 

Smith, Nellie Jane ' ' ' 

Snide, Rollin 34, 39, 41, 43, 49, 50, 65 

c 1 1 u 39, 41, 49, 55, 64 

Soule, Joseph ' ' ' 

~ r 1 66, 67 

Spencer, hleanor Jean 

r n ■ I 43, 65 

Stevenson, Daniel 

Strickland, Marguerite 34, 39, 42, 55, 66, 67 

Strickland, Shirley 34, 40, 42, 55 6 5, 67 

r o i ^9 39 40 41 42 43, 45, 48, 49, 65 

Summerour, Brooke "/ iv * 4U ' 4I < H ^' nJ ' ^ J ' ' ' 

c „ . , 34, 41, 43, 47, 55 

Sweet, Irvin ' ' ' 

T , , .11. 34, 39, 69 

Thomas, Lillian 

Trawick, Clarence ' ' ' ' ' " 

Tr, PP ,Ruby 34,39,41,42,47,66,67 

Underwood, Hogan \ ' A^ 

Underwood, Pauline 

Waller, Louis 26, 30, 39, 41, 42, 43, 45, 49, 55, 57 

w/ ii ws ii 26, 41, 42 

Wellman, Wallace 

Wheeler, Joseph 



czd-caJUmM <=>tuAent.\ 

Acker, Warren ' '' 

.,,... 43, 55, 66 

Allen, Marian ' ' 

. , r,. 1 ., 28, 30, 48 

Anderson, Elizabeth ' ' 

D , r \ 28, 48 

Beach, Clarence ' 

r, , r- 35, 66 

Beaube, Cracie ' 

Botts, Betty *°' ** 

Bowen, Thyra 23, 26, 30, 42, 48, 49, 52, 55, 57, 68 

Bowen, Verna 21,36,48,57 



Bowen, Dewitt 57 

Boyd, Wilma 

Boynton, Kenneth 36, 49 

Brodine, Clayton 21 , 36 

Burch, Alta 28 

Chambers, Annie Mae 28, 41, 66 

Chisholm, Darrell 48, 49, 55, 66 

Chosewood, Raymond 35, 43, 49 

Cockrell, Ross Vann 35, 41, 49 

Cunn'ngham, James 28 

Damon, Georgette 42 

Damon, Robert 35, 64 

Davis, Charles 35, 55 

Dawson, Obelia 35, 42, 48 

Dortch, Kathryn 55 

Dowlen, Inez 36 

Echols, Harriet 

Fant, Nadme 28, 30, 41, 49, 50, 55, 66 

Follis, Florence 69 

Ford, James 36 

Ford, Ol ive 36 

Foust, Oliver 21, 42, 43 

Frederick, Athel 42 

Frederick, Charles 21, 42, 43, 66 

Fuller, George V 36 

Hall, Arthur 21, 26, 30, 48, 57 

Halvorsen, Betty Jane 36, 42, 48, 50, 65 

Halvorsen, Forest 28, 30, 55, 63 

Hanberry, Shirley 36, 42 

Hastey, Bemice 36, 41 

Heer, Robert 28, 30, 49 

Hernandez, Amalia 36 

Hickman, Valda 29, 30, 65 

Holland, Sherman 35,66 

Holmes, Maggie Lee 55, (.6 

Hust, Austin 35, 42, 43, 45, 57, 66 

Hust, Opal 35, 57 

Jordan, Helen 35, 55 

Kaneaster, Dorothy -36, 50 

Kiker, Will am . . 29, (56 

Ludington, Clifford 29, 30, 43, 48, 49, 55, 65 

McKee Lois 35, 66 

Magoon, David 29, 66 

Manuel, Ena 36 

Manuel, Raymond -5 

May, Luther 41 

Miller, Harold 36 

Miller, Helen 42, 66 

Miller, Lora 35, 66 

Minner, Fred . 21, 35. 42, 52, 68 

Mmner, Wendell. - .52,68 

M ze, Mildred 22, 35, 52, 68 

Moore, Miriam 36, 55 

Morgan, Margie 43 

Morris, Mary 52 



Nix, William 36 

Norrell, Milton 41 

Oakes, Warren 32 

Padgett, Earl '. 29, 37 

Park, Helen 36, 41, 42, 50 

Parker, Alta 22, 42 

Perez, Arturo 42, 49, 55, 57, 65 

Phelps, Betty 36 

Ray, Kenneth 36, 43 

Reiber, Fred 49 

Rogers, Emory 35, 43, 49, 65 

Rogers, Ray 36 

Rutledge, Rebecca 55, 66 

Sanders, Melva 36, 50 

Scales, Lawrence 21, 35, 41, 55 

Shivers, Evelyn 40, 41, 42, 49, 50, 55, 66 

Smalley, Russell 

Snide, June 32, 41, 48, 55 

Starkey, Glenn 36 

Stewart, Nellie Jane 52, 66 

Summerour, Sue 3 5, 41, 48, 55 

Thomas, Virginia 29, 30 

Turner, Carmen 

Walker, Edna 40, 42, 55, 66 

West, Donald 35, 43, 48 

Wheeler, Ben 36, 48, 50 

Wheeler, Ira 29, 50, 55 

Whitehead, Henson 29, 41 

Woodall, Dorothy 40, 42 

Wrenn, Helen 21, 35 



C //an L ntolul 



Aiken, Mrs. G. C 42 

Boynton, Paul 

Cowdrxk, Mary 40 

Hall, Novella 

Harter, Howard 49 

Harter, Betty 42 

Hendershct, Hazel 42, 55 

Hooper, Ralston 39, 66 

Morphew, Raymond 24, 66, 67 

Norton, Bennette 40 

Norton, Margaret 

Sands, A.J 

Britt, Evelyn 52,57 




II 



10 fit a) 

if I 



ifl£ 




73 



Another good thing about telling the truth is that 
you don't have to remember what you said. 

— Overheard. 



, WOMEN S-MISSES APPAREL 


MEN S CLOTHING 




AMES — Coats, Suits, Dresses 


HARDIE & CAUDLE 




728 Market 


809 Market 




THE VOGUE 


FULMER-REEVES & WARE 




719-21-23 Market 


807 Morket 




PICKETT'S 


SIGNAIGO & CAMPBELL 




1 814 Market 


813 Market 




JEWELERS 


DRUGS 




EDWARDS & LeBRON 


ECKERD'S, Inc. 




805 Market 


Creators of Reasonable Drug Prices 




OUR FRIENDS 




Among Chattanooga's Foremost 




RETAIL MERCHANTS 




DEPARTMENT STORES 


FURNITURE 




LOVEMANS 


CLEMONS BROS. CO. 




Cor. 8th and Market 


Cor. Chestnut and W. 8th. 




MILLER BROS. CO. 

Cor. 7th and Market 


STERCHI BROS. STORE 

532 Market 




SPORTING GOODS 

MARTIN THOMPSON CO. 


HAVERTY FURNITURE CO. 

"There's no place like Home" 




706 Cherry 


SHOES 




PHOTOGRAPHY 

C & H PHOTO SHOP 


POLLOCK'S LOVELY SHOES 

722 Market 




918 Market 


CHATTANOOGA SHOE STORE 




STATIONERS - OFFICE OUTFITTERS 


820 Market 




T. H. PAYNE CO. 


DAN COHEN SHOES 




821 Market 


730 Market 





1L 



DP 



\ 



JOHNNY and H. ALLYN 



MOUNTAIN CITY STOVE Co. 



Kitchen and Dining 
Room Equipment, 
and Supplies for 
Hotels, Restaurants 
and Cafeterias 



1240 Market St. Chattanooga, Tenn. 



Compliments of 



THE 

KENTUCKY-TENNESSEE 

CONFERENCE 



The place where student colporteurs are 
welcome and wanted! 



MENTION THE 

TRIANGLE 

WHEN YOU 

DO BUSINESS WITH 

THESE ADVERTISERS. 

IT COSTS NOTHING 
AND HELPS US 
IMMENSELY. 



SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE 

"A School of Standards" 



.=— A c: ^idlii k -/ivti'i///t'i( 'junwx C cllciic 



Accredited by or a member of 
State of Tennessee; American council on Edu 
cation,- Tennessee State College Association 
Southern Association of Private schools 
American Association of Junior Colleges 
Mid-South Association of Private Schools 
Southern Association of Colleges and Second 
ary schools,- Board of Regents of the Genera 
Conference of S. D. A. 



CURRICULA- 

Associate in Arts — Science — Elemen- 
tary Teacher Training — Music — Business 
— Ministerial 

with 

Preparatory Department 



Located amid historical surroundings among the mountains 
of southeastern Tennessee on a nine hundred acre estate. 



COLLEGEDALE ■ ■ TENNESSEE 



The ALABAMA-MISSISSIPPI CONFERENCE 



Affords an unusually large field for Colporteur Work. We cor- 
dially invite the students of Southern Junior College to spend 
the summer in SOUL-WINNING COLPORTEUR WORK. 



Reputation 



We are pardonably proud of our repu^ 
tation for the personal interested service 
on the many annuals that we have des- 
igned and engraved. This book is one of 
them. May we not have the pleasure of 
serving you? We're as near as your post 
office or phone. 

Knoxville Engraving Co. 

P. O. Box 257, Phone 2-5743 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 



KINGSKRAFT COVERS 

"Excel in Quality" 

KINGSPORT PRESS, INC. 

Kingsport, Tennessee 



Vacation Opportunities 

Insure your return to school next fall by using the 

Scholarship Plan 




Follow THE WATCHMAN MAGAZINE trail 

selling SINGLE COPIES 

taking SUBSCRIPTIONS with the new prospectus 

in COMBINATION with your BOOK SALES 



Southern Publishing Association 

Nashville, Tennessee 



Compliments 

T. ALLEN LUPTON WOODS WHITE 

Office Equipment Co. 

814 Broad Street 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



^ytalke\j i\mtma C^ombanu 



CHATTANOOGA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

T. T. WILSON CO. 



Phone 2-5924 

MACS DRY CLEANING 

3217 Brainerd Road 



WE CLEAN EVERYTHING 
DYE FOR YOU 



COMPLIMENTS 
ok the 



COLLEGE 
BARBER SHOP 



ART HALL 



Tonsorial Artist 



C cinyliincnis cj: tlic 



GEORGIA-CUMBERLAND CONFERENCE 



'he — ^ictA L't L yycxlunilii 



FOR STUDENT COLPORTEURS 



THE LESSLY PRODUCE CO. 

Wholesale Distributors 
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES ALSO GROCERS SPECIALTIES 



CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 
Phone 6-8111 



Brainerd Dry Cleaning 
Company 

Cleaning — Dying — Mothproofing 

Plain Garments .35 cents 

3 for $1.00 

L M. GALLANT, Mgr. 

3I05 Brainerd Road 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Phone 2-2167 



Do you need a Vacation? 
Do you enjoy awe-inspiring 



scenery? 

Do you appreciate seeing a 
beautiful sunrise? 
Do you like prompt, depend- 
able and efficient service? 
Do you desire an atmosphere 
which itself bespeaks recu- 
peration? 

Then the place for you is 
the 

'JZohida McuiUaUum 

and Hospital 

Located at Orlando, Florida 
The City Beautiful 



A FINISHED COOK'S RECIPES 



Soyburger Salad 

I can SOYBVRGER 14 02 
': cup shredded cabbage 

' 4 cup chopped onion 

' 1 cup ah 1 eddcd carrol - 

I I cup chopped celerj 
l i cup mayonnaise 

( !hop and shred the vegetal i!i 
finely Mix vegetables together thor- 
oughly. Add jVIayonnaise < 'ul Si >\ 
BTJRGE I; 1 ul" piei • - about 1 >ne inch 
square. Mix this with veg) tables and 
then mash this mixture with hands oi 
potato masher until the pieces ol 
Si >\ BURGEE are mixed thorough!* 
through the vegetables Add sail t" 
taste Serve on crisp lettuce This 

-I'M'-- S liberal salads Kit a iiihit 
decided meat flavor add Rakon 
Veast, Savita, or \ egex. This ia an 
excellent way to eat raw vegetables 
Mayonnaise may be eliminated for 
the reducing diet 



Soyburger Salad Sandwich 

The above Soyburgei Salad maj 
be used as a sandwich spread Spread 
a thick rilling ol \\ on thin sliced 
bread with 01 without butter and 
leal oi lettuce Toasted bread maj 
also he used I it the reducing diet 
eliminate butter and use rye bread 
or bran bread, etc Excellent 011 R 
Krisp or Madison Bran Wafers 
Whole Wheat Wafers, 01 Roy Thin- 
Things Each one of tin—' Madison 
Wafers contains wheat germ, Served 

in this way tin- combination "i | 1- 

is properly balanced t>> produce an 
alkaline reaction 



Soyburger Steak with 
Vegetable Sauce 
Slice Soyburger into one-half inch 
slices, the full round size "t the can, 
either 30 oz. or 14 or. Place in a 
well-oiled pan and brown well on both 
sides, eit her on top of I he sto^ •■ "i in 
the oven When finished, cover with 
the following hot vegetable sauce 
l <-up chopped cabbage 
1 cup chopped onions 
1 .. cup chopped celery 
l' cups tomato soup or puree 

Place onions in oil in a containei 
with lid, until half done Stir oc- 
asionally to prevent sticking to bot- 
tom When onions arc half done add 
the chopped cabbagt and celerj and 
add more oil as desired When two- 
thirds done add tomato soup or puree 
Then add -alt. sugar, and Madison 
Sauce as desired When the mixture 
1m.iI-. it i> finished, ready to serve on 
the browned slices ol Soj burger 



the reducing diet Available at '' browned slices oi Soyburgei 

Health-food stores and specialty groceries. If not obtainable locally, order direct from 

Madison. Transportation charges paid on orders of $2.00 and over. Add 20 per cent 

west of Denver, Colorado. 

FREE! Spring-summer Madison Health Messenger, with requested recipes. 

MADISON FOODS - Madison College, Tenn. 

"DEVOTED TO THE PROTECTION OF YOUR HEALTH" 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



PARK -VIEW HOSPITAL 

V. F. SHULL, M. D. 
MEDICAL DIRECTOR 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 





Like a young voyager, glimpsing 
some lovely isle, a student first 
views the realm of Christian Educa- 
tion. Deep within him stirs an in- 
stinctive longing. To conduct the progressive stu- 
dent .... to explore with him its wonder and 
delight . . . this is the joy, the privilege of the Faculty 
of this college. 

Plan to complete your four years of college at W. M. C. 

For Catalog or information, write to 
Dr. B. G. Wilkinson, President, or Mr. C. C. Pulver, Business Mgr 

WASHINGTON MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Takoma Park, Washington, D. C. 




AMERICAN AWNING AND 
DECORATING CO. 

Incorporated 
1401-1405 Chestnut Street Phone 6-0915 

AWNINGS - - TARPAULINS 

We Decorate for Gala Events 



You 


may be able to afford an Accident - 


but 


Can 


you afford to take the chances of a catastr 


ophe 


with 


out adequate 

INSURANCE? 




s 




s 


E 


If it is 


A 


R 
V 


INSURANCE 


F 
E 


I 


Write us 


T 


C 




Y 


E 








SOUTHERN INSURANCE 


F 
I 


T 
H 


AGENCY 


R 


A 


COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 


S 


T 


Geo. N. Fuller, Agent 


T 
c> 


S 






A 


Why not protect yourself and 


L 


V 


family on having safe insur- 


A 


ance, in a reliable company 


E 


at a REASONABLE COST 


S 


S 




T 



Compliments of 
R.L.WILLIAMS 

Rossville Jeweler 

Watches, Clocks, and Jewlery bought and sold 
Expert repairing and honest prices 
Box 166 
Rossville, Georgia 



Chattanooga Belting & Supply Co. 

"Industrial Supply Distributors 

Belting — Hose — Packing — Tools 

Textile & Mill Supplies 

• • • 
CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



QomptLnicnU, o-fi- 

The FLORIDA 
CONFERENCE 

and the 

FLORIDA 
BOOK 6- BIBLE 
HOUSE 



ORLANDO, FLORIDA 



Phone 7-3288 



RICHARD K. WOOD 

North Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Official Photographer for 

THE TRIANGLE 

Specialist in College Annual Photography 



1L 



M 



k line out of ten times, it is through 
the eyes that first impressions 
come. The typography of your print- 
ed message nearly always is the fac- 
tor which decides whether or not a 
line of it will be read. 



%e COLLEGE PRESS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



Compliments of 

FOWLER BROTHERS CO. 

The Home of Steinway Pianos 

and 
Fine Furnishings for the Home 



Greetings from a former Student 

LEON J. BISHOP 

REPRESENTING 

JACK'S COOKIE COMPANY 

Tampa, Fla. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF THE 

TAKOMA HOSPITAL and SANITARIUM 

GREENEVILLE, TENNESSEE 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



McKESSON 6- DUFF 



CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



COKER STORES 

3246-48-50 BRAINERD ROAD 

Self-Service With Savings 

Y. Lee Coker, Owner 



COMPLIMENTS 

STOVALL HARDWARE CO. 

711 Cherry St. Phone 6-7IOI 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 




Compliments of 



B, F. Summerour Seed Co. 



Producers of 



High Grade Cotton Seed 
Norcross, Georgia 



Ljcii <=A-%e — nviicA to fcui L L ( 



IN THE FINISHING OF THE THIRD ANGEL'S MESSAGE IN THE 



<~>oiitlie 





t/ 1 L y^nion v^ o literal ce 

437 East Ponce de Leon Ave., Decatur, Georgia 



The cities of the South are to be 
worked, and for this work the best 
talent is to be secured, and that 
without delay." 9T214. 



// Achate J I c 1 it'. 



ENTER SOUTHERN JUNIOR COLLEGE THIS FALL 




L^ alt cue d ale 




a net i i 




In the eight years that COLLEGEDALE 
HOSIERY MILL has been operating it has ex- 
panded to such an extent that three years ago a 
new building had to be erected in order to 
successfully carry on the necessary operations. 
The air-conditioning in the new building affords 
a complete change of air every six minutes, thus 
enabling the machines to operate more satisfac- 
torily and making the plant a more healthful 
place in which to work. 



COLLEGEDALE HOSIERY MILL offers 
work to approximately 60 students who are 
not only working their entire way through 
school, but their work in the mill affords 
them a little cash each week. The boys 
are able to draw from $5 to $7 a week 
above their expenses and the g rls often 
draw from $3.50 to $5.00 weekly. Several 
new workers are needed to fill the places 
of those graduating 



Here is an opportunity for any student who earnestly 
desires a Christian Education 



CHATTANOOGA SURGICAL CO. 

Chattanooga's only exclusive Surg cal Supply store 
Oscar A. Spruell, Owner 

Everything for the Doctor, Nurse, Sick- 
room, and convalescent Invalid furni- 
ture rented. Baby scales sold or rented 

REASONABLE RATES 

108 E. Eighth St. 
TELEPHONE 64550 



Qo-ult&'i 3un£.>ia£. Homed 

AMBULANCE 



6-6114 



Complete Funerals at Lower Costs 

801 Vine St. -- East Chattanooga 

Rossville, Georgia — Dayion — Soddy 

Spring City 



Colporteurs — 
Come to Carolina 



The place where scholarships are made 
The conference of opportunity 
A cordial welcome awaits you 
Write us for information 



Carolina Conference 

P. O. Box 930 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



M. F. HICKS TYPEWRITER COMPANY 



The House Behind the Product 



Exclusive Agency Royal Typewriters 

7i7 WALNUT ST. 



//, 



t'llt^ttc'.i 



So often life just trudges on, 
We only know it's passing by ; 
And then we hear a note, a song, 
From out the years a haunting cry. 

We pause, and live again the years 
That we have trod so oft before. 
We feel again the joys and tears - 
And then we softly close the door. 

And travel on our way again 
With life that now seems commonplace 
But in the years to come will gain 
A place that time cannot efface. 

— O. Barnes Dayton. 



93 




J.lu t it A 



94 




For Reference 



Not to be taken 



from this library 







Si 

mi 



u' 



ICO 

:co 



:00 



■!J0 



Ui