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Full text of "Tribune Almanach"

BM!ii_±_i^M'A2;k. 




^ 



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CONTENTS. 

Astronomical Calculations and Calendars for the year 1858, i lo 15 
Government of the United States — Executive and Judicial, lo 

Classified List of the United States Senate m 

List of the House of Representatives, Politically Classified . 17 
The XXXyith Congress, as far as yet chosen (Dec. 1858) — 

ftenatoia and Kepreseiitatives Poliiieully ClassiKed 18 

A dondensed Statement of the Acts of the XXXVth Con- 
gress, First Session 19 to 24 

Lccomptou and Lecompton jr.; or, the action of Congress 

on lire admission of Kansas 24 to 31 

The Public Lands : 

Lund Hills of Messr^. Morrill and (j row, and tlie action of Congress thereon, 31 to 33 

Kansas in 1858 : 

A Succinct History of Affairs iu Kansas during Ihe year 1858 33 to 34 

How they Elect Bogus U. S. Senators in Indiana 35 to 37 

Utah and the Mormons : 

.'V brief Sketch of the rise of Mormon ism, and the recent Difficulties in Utah, 37 to 42 

Governments of Europe, names of European States, Sove- 
reigns, etc 43 

Election Returns of the various States, carefully Compiled 

expressly for the Tuidlne Almanac 44 to 63 

List of States, Capitals, Governors, Times of Legislative / 

Meetings, Holding of Elections, eir 64 H , 

Popular Vote for President, by States, in 1848, 1852 and 1856 ^ 
santile Advertisements 6.i to so 

Index -lilp'ig/- Coei-.r 



\ 



1 




GENERAL INDEX 



Appropriations of Congress for 1S58 24 

Bogus Senators from Indiana 35-7 

Cabinet, the, at Waghington 16 

Calendars 4-15 

Chronological Cycles 1 

Congress, the XXXVth 16 17 

Congress, the XXXYlth 18 

Congress, laws of. 19-24 

Cr.tienden-Montgomery bill 25 

Day and Night, length of 8 

duration of the Seasons 1 

Kclipses in 1S59 1 

Kquinoxes and solstices for 1859 1 

Govemors of the States 64 

Governments of Europe . . .43 

House of Representatives, U. S., politically 

classified 1" 

Kansas in Congress, action on, 24 

Kansas in 1&5S, historical sketch of 33-4 

Lecompton bill 24 

Lecompton, jr., or English bill 29 

Morning and evening stars 1 

Public lands and agricultural colleges 81 

Preemption rights— Mt. Grow's Land bill. .. 32 

Ruling sovereigns of Europe 43 

Supreme Court of the U. S., judges of 16 

State Governments 64 

U. S. Senate politically classified 16 

Table of the solar system 2 

True time ' 1 

Tides _• 8 

Utah and the Mormons 3i-42 



INDEX TO ELECTION RETURNS. 

Arkansas • • 58 

California 63 

Connecticut 56 

Delaware 54 

: Florida 53 

lUUnois... 60-1 

Indiana 59 

Iowa 62-3 

Kansas 58 

Maine 44 

Massachusetts 44 

Michigan 55 

j Minnesota 55 

Missouri 56 

New Hampshire 44 

New Jersey 54 

New York, Governor, President, etc., by 

Counties 45 

New York, Congress and Charter 46 

New Y'ork, Governor by Towns 47-51 

North Carolina 54 

Ohio 5i-S 

Oregon -^^ 

Pennsylvania 5".-3 

I President, popular vote for, by States 64 

I Rhode Island 44 

I South Carolina (c<yver) 

Tennessee ^ 

! Texas 58 

[I Vermont 44 

Wisconsin "'■ 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Agricultural Books, 0. A. Moore 67 

American Watches, Robbins & Appleton .... 76 
Bankers and Brokers, Thompson Brothers. . 78 

Benton's Debates, D. Appleton A Co 66 

Brandrith's Pills 72 

Consumption cured, J. Winchester 75 

Cream Tartar, etc., James Pyle 78 

Cvclopa?dia, New American, D. Appleton 

"& Co 66' 

Dietetic Saleratus, etc., James Pyle. . . {cover) 

Fire Works, G. A. LiUiendahl 77 

Guano, American Company 78 

Home Fire Insurance Co. 65 

Hooped Skirts, Douglas & Sherwood 77 

Holloway's Pills 6S 

Knickerbocker Magazine 78 

Medicinal Saleratus, etc., B. T. Babbitt 71 

New York Ledger, Robert Bonner 79 

Patent Pump, Andrews 78 

Pianofortes, G. & H. Barmore 78 

Pi-inting Ink, John G. Lightbody 74 

Radway's Ready Relief 74 

Salamander Safes, Stearns & Slarvin 69 

Sewing Machines, Wheeler & Wilson . . . . 74 

" " Atwater 76 

Singer 80 

" " Grover and Baker. . (cover) 

Spool Cotton, Wm. H. Smith 68 

Standard School Books, A. S. Barnes & Co.. . 70 

Stationers' Hall, J. A. H. Hasbrouck 69 

Webster's Dictionary, Merriam TS 

Woman's Friend, J. Oakly 76 

Writing Ink. Mavnard & Noyes 78 

" " T. Davids 80 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 

An election for members of the XXXVIth 
Congress was held in this State in 1S6S, which 
resulted in the reelection of the present dele- 
gation without opposition, with the e.xception 
of Hon. James L. Orr, of the Yth District, who 
declined a reelection. In this District, the con- 
test resulted as follows : 



Diftf ids. Abhmore, Pem. 

Anderson 2.153 .... 

Green viUe 1,900 .... 

Pickens .. 1,492 

Spartanbugb . 
Union 



Yemon. Dem. 

24S 

. ... 661 
682 



752 2,690 

904 791 



Total 7,201 4,922 

Majority for .\shmore 2,279. 

The Governor and Presidential electors of 
this State are chosen by Legislature, and that 
body, in Dec, 1858, elected William H. Gist as 
Governor, to serve for two years. 



BMH) fr'JIpW? 




Eclipses in the Year 1859. 

There will be six Eclipses this year, two of 
the Jloon, and four of the Sun, as follows : 

I. A partial Eclipse of the Sun, February 2d, 
invisible in the United States. 

II. A total Eclipse of the IMoon, February 
17th, early in the morning, visible throughout 
the Cnited States. 

IIL A partial Eclipse of the Sun, March 4th, 
invisible in the United States. 

IV. A partial Eclipse of the Sun, July 29th, 
in the afternoon. This Eclipse will be very 
small, lasting only a few minutes, and occurs 
about an hour before sunset. Visible in the 
Eastern, Northern, and Middle States. 

V. A total Eclipie of the Moon, August 13th, 
invisible in the United States. 

VL A partial Eclipse of the Sun, Aagost 
2Sth, Invisibla in the United States. 



Morning and Evening Stars. 

Venus will be Morning Star until September 
27th, then Evening Star the rest of the year. 
Mars will be Evening Star until July 2l5t, then 
Morning Star the rest of the year. Jupiter will 
be Evening Star until June 25th, then morning 
Star the rest of the year. Saturn will -be 
Morning Star until January 29th, then Evening 
Star until August 8th, then Morning Star the 
rest of the year. 

Mercury. 

This planet will be in a position most favora- 
ble for observation on the -^Oth of March, the 
2Sth of July, and 22d of November, when it 
will be in the west, not very far from the place 
of sunset ; also on the 24th of January, the 
22d of May, and 16th of September, at which 
times it will be in the east just before sunrise. 

Chronological Cycles. 

Dominical Letter, B ; Epact, 26 ; Lunar Cy- 
cle, 17 ; Solar Cycle, 20 ; Roman Indiction, 2 ; 
Jolian Period, 6572 ; age of the World, 5362. 

Characters. 

©0 Sun; Ti Moon; 5 Mercury; 9 Tenus; 
9 Earth ; i Mars ; 71 Jupiter ; ^ Saturn ; 
y Uranus ; i same longitude, or near each 
other; □ 90° apart; a opposition, or ISO* 
apart. 

SiGss OK THE Zodiac, t Aries; « Taurus; 
n Gemini ; o Cancer ; ^ Leo ; 115 Virgo ; 
=::= Libra ; tt[ Scorpio ; * Sagittarius ; ^3 Capri- 
corn ; .rv Aquarius ; H Pisces. 

Aspect.* and Nodes. 6 Conjunction ; * Sex- 
tile, 60 decrees ; a Qiiartile, 90 degrees ; 
ii Trine, 120 degrees ; s Opposition, ISO de- 
grees ; Q Ascending Node ; Q Deacending 
Node. 



Eqiiinoses and Solstices for 1859. 

D. H. M. 

Vernal Equinox March 20 4 2S ev. 

Summer Solstice June 211 5 ev. 

Autumnal Equinox Sept. 2:5 3 17 mo. 

■Winter Solstice Dec. 219 4 ev. 

Note. — The Sun's declination is given for the 
inntant his centre is on tJie meridian of 
Washington. 



Duration of the Seasons, etc. 

D. n. M. 

Sun in "nrnter Signs 89 1, 19 

Sun in Spring Signs 92 20 :>f 

Sun In Summer Signs 93 14 12 

Sun in Autumnal Signs 89 17 47 

Tropical Year 865 5 55 

Sun Xorth of the Equator 186 10 49 

Sun South of the Equator 173 19 6 

Difference 7 15 43 



True Time. 

Two kinds of time are used In Almanacs ; 
clock or me'tn-time in some, and apparent or 
mn-tinie in others. Clock-xiias is always 
right, while Sun-lime vario every day. Peo- 
ple generally suppose it is twelve o'clock when 
the sun is due south, or at a properly made 
noon-mark. But this is a mistake. The sun is 
seldom on the meridian at twelve o'clock; 
indeed this is the case only on four days of the 
year : namely, April 15, June 15, Sept. 1, and 
Dec. 24. In this Almanac, as in most other 
Almanacs, the time used is clock-time. The 
time when the sun is on the meridian or at the 
noon-mark, ia also given to the nearest second, 
for the 1st, 9th, 17th, and 25th days of each 
month, at the right hand of the top of each 
calendar page. This affords a ready means of 
obtaining correct time and for setting a clock 
by using a noon-mark, adding or subtracting 
as the sun is slow or fast. 

Old-fashioned Almanacs, which use appnrent 
time, give the rising and setting of the sun's 
centre and make no allowance for the effect of 
refraction of the sun's rays by the atmosphere. 
The more modern and improved Almanacs, 
which use clock-iime, give the rising and set- 
ing of the sun's iipper limb, and duly allow 
for refraction. The practice of setting time- 
pieces by the rising or setting of the sun or 
moon is not strictly correct, as the unevenness 
of the earth's surface and intervening objects, 
such as hills and forests, near the points of 
rising and setting, occ.ision a deviation in 
every place, from the time erpressed in the 
Almanac, which time is adapted to a smooth, 
lerel horizon. The only muans of keeping 
correct time is by the us* of a noon-mark, or 
a meridian line. 






¥ 



TilK TEIBCNK ALMANAC AND POLITICAL RF.GISTKR. 



TABLE OF THE SOLAS SYSTEIVL 



Xanut of the plan- 
et*. 



riodi- 
c»il reT- 
olation, 
m daj3. 



Mean diataDce|D:nmeter 

from the •!![ 

Kn^tisll miles, miles. 



Time of mto- 
iiuD upon axia. 



Dite of dijccvery. 



Sun 

Jlercury.... 

Venus 

Earth 

Mai-3 

Flora 

Melpomene 

Victoria 

Euterpe .... 

Vesta 

Iris 

Metis 

Urania 

Pliocea 

Massiiia .... 

Hebe 

Lufetia 

Fortuna ... 
Parthenope. 

Thetis 

Fides 

Amphitrite . 

Astrasa 

Pomona.... 

Egeria 

Irene 

Thalia 

Eunomia . . . 
Proserpine . 

Circe. 

Juno 

Led'i 

Ceres 

Pallas 

Atalanta ... 
Bellona .... 
Polyhymnia 
Leucothea., 
Calliope .... 
Psyche ..... 
Themis ...., 
Hygeia — 
Euphrosyne 

Jupiter 

Saturn 

Uranua ' 



67 
224 

865 
63T 
1,193 
1,270 
1,-303 
1,313 
1,325 
1,346 
1,34" 
1,:551 
1,359 
1,3dG 
1,379 
1,3S7 
1,395 
l,4i»3 
1,420 
1,456 
1,491 
1,510 
1,511 
1,512 
1,518 
1,554 
1,570 
1,580 
1,591 
1,592 
1,602 
1,631 
1,6S:3 
1,CS5 
1,6S9 
1,772 
1,800 
1,S09 
1,825 
2,033 
2,041 
2,048 
4,8;32 
10,759 
80,636 



86,890,000 
68,000,000 
95,305,000 
145,205,000 
209,930,000 
218,930,000 
222,650,000 
223,770,000 
225,290,000 
227,550,000 
227,580,000 
223,020,000] 
223,940,000] 
229,590,000! 
231,350,0001 
232,240,000 
232,930,000 
23:3,310,000 
235,330,000 
233,772,000 
243,530,000 
245,790,000 
245,840,000 
245,850,000 
240,540,000 
250 420,000 
252,090,000 
253,260,000 
254,430,000 
254,430,000 
263,430,000 
263,740,000 
264,400,000 
264,400,000 
264,650,000 
274,820,000 
276,960,009 
277,970,000 
273,710,000 
299,870,000 
800,840,000 
800,960,000 
495,917,000 
909.026,000 



887,000 
2,950 
7,800 
7,912 
4,500 



D. E. U. S. 

25 7 43 
1 5 28 
23 21 21 

23 56 4 

1 3T 



100,000 
8u,000 
68,000 
55,000 



Knovra to anc'ts. 
Known to anc'ts. 



83,000 
73,000 



9 56 
010 6 



1,829,000,000 86,000 



80,000 
22,000 



Known to anc'ts, 
1847, October IS. 
1852, June 24. 
1350, Septem. 13. 

1353, Novem. 8. 
1807, Si arch 29, 
1347, August 13. 
1343, April 25. 
18.^4, Julv 22. 
18.73, April 6 
1352, Septem, 19, 
1847, July 1. 
1352, Novem. 15. 
1352, August 22. 
1850, Mav 11. 
1352, April 17. 
1855, October 5. 

1354, March 1. 
134.5, Decern. 8. 
1S.54, October 25, 

1350, Novem. 2. 

1351, May 19. 

1352, Decem. 15. 

1351, July 29. 

1353, Jlay 5. 

1355, April 6. 
1804, Septem. 1, 
13.56, January 12, 
1301, January 1, 
1802, March 28. 
1855, October 5. 

1354, March 1. 

1354, October 28. 

1355, April 19. 

1352, Novem, 16, 
1352, March 17. 
1S5:J, April 5. 
1349, April 12. 
1354, Septem. 1. 
Known to anc'ts 
Known to anc is. 
1731, March IS. 



Hind. 

Hind. 

Hind. 

Hind. 

Olbers. 

Hind, 

Graham. 

Hind, 

Chacomac 

Gasparis. 

Hencke. 

Goldsch't. 

Hind. 

Gaspatis. 

Lulher. 

Luther. 

Marth. 

Hencke. 

Goldsch't. 

Gasparis. 

Hind. 

Hind. 

Gasparis. 

Luther. 

Chacomac 

Harding, 

Chacomac 

PiazzL 

Oihers. 

Goldsch't. 

Luther. 

Chacomac 

Luther. 

Hind. 

Gasparis, 

Gasparis. 

Gasparis. 

Ferguson. 



Neptune I 60,128;2,SM,000,000| 85,000| I il346, Septem. 2-3, 



Herschel. 
j LeVerr'r 
1 AAdams 



The above table includes only 33 of the asteroids. Since It was made np, thirteen more 
have been discovered ; making in all at the present time (1853), fifty-one. New discoveries 
are adding to the number of these every year. Le Verrier, the celebrated French astronomer, 
says, he U firmly persuaded that there are many more of the asteroids, and that before 18C0, 
probably, in all, one hundred will be discovered. 



Leap-Year. 

Every year the number of which is divisible by 4 without a remainder. Is a leap-year, ex- 
cept the last year of the century, which is a leap-year only when divisible by 400 without a 
remainder. Thus the year 1900 will not be leap-year. 



TIDES, NOTES TO THE EEADKR, ETC. 



Tides. 



La Place pronounces the formula for deducing the tides the most difficult problem of 
celestial mechanics. It som^time^ happens that the tide comes in tevenU hours later or 
earUer than the most learned calculation would determine; and this in consequence of the 
strength and direction of the wind, which the calculator cannot reckon upon 

The Calendar pages exhibit the time of high-water at Boston, New York and Charleston 
To find the time of high-water at any of the following places, add U, or nublnict from the 
tune of high water, morning or evening, at New York, the quantity of time affixed to such place 
m this table. In using the quantities in this table, observe that more than 12 hours and less 
than 24, from midnight or the begmning of morning, is afternoon of the same day; and that 
more than 12 hours and less than 24, from noon, is morning of the next day. 

..V. ^.u.\ „ 

■fl*'a°y sub. 4 43 New Haven ,,,rt i ^J 

AnnapoUs, Md sub. 3 35 I New London add 1 15 

AnnapoUs,N.S add 1 49 j Newport sX n ^4 

Anb°y add 02 ( Norfolk '"h ^ >? 

^".•'^o'^e sub. 1 40 Plymouth ^dd 2 19 

Bridgeport add 2 5S I Portland add 9 19 

CapetpUt add 2 00 Portsmouth .' ' ■ add ° 10 

KE^:s:-::::-:;::::::::;::::LtSSiKt°"::^ 
•K.«-:::;:;::::;:::;::::::::t3^,hl'lifr--::::::::r--^ 

Marblehead add 3 U I Sandy Hook, N.J .V::. sub 49 

Mv ,%•••; "^^ 1 54 St. John, N. B 'hh 9 4q 

MobilePoint add 1 541 Sunbury.. 

New Bedford sub. 16 ' Windso'r .'.■..'.■ 



add 19 
add 2 40 



1 



Notes to the Reader. 

The Calendar page ' in this Almanac is 
adapted for use in every part of the United 
States. It is based on the fact, that in the 
same Latitude, that is, on a line running due 
east and west, the Sun and Jfoon rise and 
set at the surae moment hy the clock, or <ilma- 
TMC, not only throughout the United States, 
but around the wcrld— the variations being so 
small as to be of no importance for ordinary 
purposes. Thus, if on any day the Snn rises 
at Boston at 5 minutes past 6, it rises at 5 mi- 
nutes past 6 on the same line of latitude west- 
ward throughout the states of Massachusetts, 
New Y'ork, Michigan, Iowa, and the territory 
of Oregon. 

Hence, a Calendar adapted to Boston for 
New England, is equally adapted, as to the 
rising and setting of the Sun and Moon, for 
)i3e in Northern New York and Jlichigan- a 
Calendar for New York city is adapted for use 
in the States of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana 
and Illinois; a Calendar for AVashington city 
is adapted for Virginia, Kentuckv, and Mis- 
souri ; and a Calendar for ChaVleston will 
answer for North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia ' 
Alabama, and Louisiana. Wherever the read- ' 
er is, look for the State at the top of the Calen- i 
dar page, and underneath are the rising and 
setting of the Sun and Moon sufliciently accu- 
rate for all practical purposes. 

The changes, fulls, and quarters of the I 
3roon, however, are governed by another prin- ' 
ciple, and are essentially the same for all ' 
places on the same Longitude ; that is, on any i 
line extending due north and south. Thus, the i 
Moon's phases for Charleston, suit Pittsburgh, I 
etc. Any phasis takes place at the same in- 
stant of absolute time ; but the local time is I 



. earher at the westward, and later at the east- 
ward, at the rate otfour minutes for each de- 
I gree of Longitude ; or at the rate of one min- 
I utejci- every 12 miles 2T3 rods in the Latitude 
of Boston, 13 miles 60 rods in the Latitude of 
I New York city. 13 miles 143 rods in the latitude 
[ of Baltimore, and 14 miles 199 rods in the lati- 
tude of Charleston. 

To Ascertain the Len^h of the Day 
and Night, 

At any time of the year, add 12 hours to the 
time of the sun's setting, and from the sum 
subtract the time of risine, for the l-t,gfh of 
the day. Subtract the time of setting from 12 
hours, and to the remainder add the time of 
rising next morning, for the length of the 
mght. These rules are equally true for ao- 
parent time. 

Moonlight. 

Profe.ssor Smith, the Astronomer Royal for 
Scotland, in his interesting account of a recent 
scientific expedition to the Peak of Teneriffe, 
has set at rest the often-discussed question of 
the heat of moonlight. He savs that his ther- 
moraetrical instruments were sensibly affected 
by the moon's rays, even at the lowest of two 
stations occupied by him at different elevations 
In tropical cUmates, meat which is exposed to 
moonlight rapidly becomes imfrid ; and in the 
West Indies, the negroes, who will lie swelter- 
ing and uncovered beneath the full glare of a 
tropical sun, carefuHy muffle their heads and 
faces when exposed to the moonbeams, which 
they beUeve will cause swelling and distortion 
of the features, and sometimes even blindness 



1st Mouth.] JANUARY, 1859. [31 Days. 1 




MOON'S PHASES. 


BoMtOD. 


New York. 


£iihiiuore 


Chnrleaion. 


.-sun on iViendiun 
or noonmnrk. 






»■ 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


D. 


H. M. s. 




New Moon 


4 


42 m. 


30 m. 


2t) m. u 6 m. 


1 


12 3 50 




First Quarter 


1:: 


2 39 m. 


2 27 ni. 


2 17 m. 2 3 m. 


9 


12 7 24 




Full Moon 


18 


7 5ev. 


6 53 ev. 


6 43 ev. 6 30 ev. 


17 


12 10 23 




Third Quarter 


25 


4. 1 f>v 


S 4.QPV 


3 39 ev. 3 26 ev. 


25 


12 12 37 












"^ 


^ 




BOSTON, N. K.NGLaXD, 


CONNC'T, N. YORK CITY, 


WA.SHINGTON, 




K 


w 


03 


NEW VOKK STATE. 


NEW JERSEY, 


MARYL'D.VIRG'A, 




s 


% 


"B 


jnCUIGAN, WI.-;COXSIN, 


PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO, 


KENT'Y,MISS'URI, 




O 


b 

O 

>• 


•3 


IOWA, OREGON. 


INDIANA, ILLINOIS. 


CALIFORNIA, 




isc.v 


sus 


MOON HighW. 


SON 


SUN 


MOON 


HighVV. 


SUN 


SU.N 


MOON 




Q 


•< 
(3 


tn 


RISES. 


SETS. 


P.ISE9. BiSTON. 


KISES. 


BKTS. 


RISSS, 


N.VORK. 


RISES. 


SKTS. 


RISKS. 




H. H. 


H. M. 


B. M. H. H. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 




I's 


23 1 8 


7 SO 


4 38 


5 38 9 47 


7 25 


4 43 


5 31 


6 33 


7 19 


4 49 


5 24 




2;S 


22 5 51 


7 30 


4 39 


6 36 10 36 


7 25 


4 44 


6 28 


7 22 


7 19 


4 60 


6 21 




SJM 


22 50 11 


7 30 


4 40 


sets 11 19 


7 25 


4 45 


sets 


8 5 


7 19 


4 61 


sets 


\ 


4,T 


22 44 4 


7 30 


4 41 


5 2 morn 


7 25 


4 46 


5 8 


8 49 


7 19 


4 62 


5 14 


6i\V 


22 37 30 


7 30 


4 41 


6 6 


3 


7 25 


4 46 


6 11 


9 31 


7 19 


4 52 


6 16 




6,T 


22 30 29 


j7 30 


4 42 


7 11 


45 


7 25 


4 47 


7 14 


10 10 


7 19 


4 53 


7 18 




7 


F 


22 23 1 


17 30 


4 43 


8 13 


1 24 


7 25 


4 48 


8 15 


10 41 


7 19 


4 64 


8 18 




8 


S 


22 15 7 


7 30 


4 44 


9 16 


1 58 


7 25 


4 49 


9 17 


11 20 


7 19 


4 55 


9 19 




*9 


s 


22 6 4fi 


7 30 


4 45 


10 17 


2 34 


7 25 


4 60 


10 17 


12 


7 19 


4 66 


10 17 




10 


M 


,2168 


7 29 


4 46 


11 22 


3 14 


7 24 


4 51 


10 21 


morn 


7 19 


4 57 


11 20 


11 


T 


21 48 48 


7 29 


4 47 


morn 


3 67 


7 24 


4 52 


morn 


43 


7 18 


4 68 


morn 




12 


W 


21 39 11 


17 29 


4 48 


29 


4 43 


7 24 


4 53 


26 


1 29 


7 18 


4 69 


24 




13 T 


21 29 9 


17 28 


4 49 


1 39 


5 37 


7 23 


4 54 


1 35 


2-23 


7 18 


5 


1 31 




14'F 


21 18 42 


l7 28 


4 50 


2 54 


6 37 


7 23 


4 55 


2 49 


3 23 


7 17 


5 1 


2 44 




15!S 


21 7 50 


17 27 


4 52 


4 11 


7 46 


7 22 


4 57 


4 5 


4 32 


7 17 


5 2 


3 68 




16S 


20 56 34 


|7 27 


4 53 


5 26 


8 57 


7 22 


4 58 


5 19 


5 43 


7 16 


5 3 


5 11 




njM 


20 44 55 


17 26 


4 54 


6 21 


10 6 


7 21 


4 59 


6 14 


6 52 


7 16 


5 4 


6 7 




18iT 


20 32 52 


i7 25 


4 56 


rises 


11 3 


7 20 


5 1 


rises 


7 49 


7 16 


5 6 


rises 


i 


19 W 


20 20 25 


7 25 


4 57 


6 3 


11 69 


7 20 


5 2 


6 6 


8 45 


7 15 


5 7 


6 11 




20T 


20 7 36 


;7 24 


4 58 


7 23 


ev. 50 


7 19 


5 S 


7 25 


9 36 


7 14 


5 8 


7 28 




21:F 


19 54 24 


7 23 


4 69 


8 40 


1 35 


7 18 


5 4 


8 41 


10 21 


7 14 


5 9 


8 41 




228 


19 40 60 


'7 22 


5 1 


9 62 


2 17 


7 18 


5 5 


9 52 


11 3 


7 13 


5 10 


9 51 




23'S 


19 26 54 


7 22 


5 2 


11 4 


3 2 


7 17 


5 6 


11 2 


11 48 


7 12 


5 11 


11 




24|M 


19 12 36 


\n 21 


5 3 


morn 


3 49 


7 16 


5 7 


morn 


ev. 35 


7 12 


5 12 


morn 




25,T 


' 18 57 57 


7 20 


5 4 


llj 4 38 


7 16 


5 8 


8 


1 24 


7 11 


5 13 


5 




26!W 


18 42 57 


i7 19 


5 5 


1 20 


5 31 


7 15 


5 9 


1 15 


2 17 


7 10 


5 14 


1 11 




27 T 


18 27 37 


,7 19 


5 7 


2 26 


6 29 


7 14 


5 11 


2 21 


3 15 


7 9 


5 15 


2 15 




28F 


18 11 56 


!7 18 


5 8 


3 32 


7 31 


7 13 


» 12 


3 26 


4 17 


7 9 


5 16 


3 19 




29S 


17 55 56 


7 17 


5 9 


4 31 


8 29 


7 13 


6 13 


4 24 


5 15 


7 8 


5 17 


4 16 




!30lS 


,17 39 36 


7 16 


5 11 


5 23 


9 25 


7 12 


5 15 


5 16 


6 11 


7 7 


5 19 


5 8 




iSlJM 


' 17 22 58 


7 15 


5 12 


6 4 


10 15 


7 11 


5 16 


5 58 


7 1 


7 7 


5 20 


5 61 




JIr. Blifkins' Bjby.— That first baby was a 
great institution. A3 soon as he came into this 


Of course the lamp was brought, and of course 




the baby lay sucking his fi«t like a little white 


•> 


" breathing world," as the late W. Shakspeare 


bear, as he was. " Sir. Blifkins," said my 


has it, he took command in our house. Every- 


wife, I think I feel a little air ; I wish you 




thing was subservient to him. The baby was 


would get up and see if the w'indow is not open 




the balance-wheel that regulated everj'thing. 


a little, because baby might get sick." No- 


He regulated the temperature, he regulated the 


' thing was the matter with the window, as I j 




food, he regulated the servants, he regulated 


j knew very well. " Mr. Blifkins," says my 




mti. For the first six months of that precious 


; wife, jast as I was going to sleep again, " that | 




existence, he had me up, on an average, six 


1 lamp, as you have placed it, shines directly in i 




times a night. " Mr. Blifkins," says my wife, 


the baby's eyes — strange that you have no ] 




'' bring that light here, do ; the baby looks 


more consideration." I arranged the light, j 




strangely; I'm so afraid it will have a fit." 


and went to bed again. Just as I was drop- 1 





2d Month.] FEBRUARY, 1859. [28 Days. | 


MOON'S PHASES. 


Boston. 


.New York. 


Baltimore. 


CharleBtoD. 


Simon MeridiAD 1 
or noonmark. | 




D. 


H. H. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


D. 1 H. M. S. II 


New iloon 


9 

10 


8 20 ev. 
2 56 ev. 


8 8ev. 
2 44 ev. 


7 58 ev. 
2 34 ev. 


7 45 ev. 
2 21 ev. 


1 

9 


12 13 52 
12 14 30 


First Quarter 


Full Moon 


17 


5 58 m. 


5 46 m. 


5 36 m. 


5 23 m.' 


17 


12 14 17 


Third Quarter 


24 


9 38 ni. 9 26 ni.| 


9 16 ra. 


9 2 m.| 


25 


12 13 18 


ta 




od 


BOSTON, N. EXULAND, 


CONXC'T, N. YOKK CITY, 


Washington, 


s 


u 

H 


NEW YOEK ST.ATE, 


NEW JERSEY, 


MARYL'D,VIRG'A, 


s 


^ 


V 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


PENNSYLVANIA. OHIO, 


KENT'Y.MLSS'URI, 


o 
>• 
< 
a 


O 

>• 
-1 
Q 


a 

3 
CO 


IOWA, OREGON. 


INDIANA, ILLINOIS. 


CALIFORNIA. 


SUN- 
RISKS. 


SETS. 


BIStS. 


Hii;ii\V. 
BOSTON. 


RISBS. 


;.x:. 


M. ION 


HifThW. 


RISE.S. 


6U.V 


RISKS. 


. . . 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


T 


17 6 1 


7 14 


5 14 


6 41 


10 58 


7 10 


5 18 


6 35 


7 44 


7 6 


5 22 


6 30 


o 


W 


16 4S 46 


7 12 


5 15 


sets 


11 36 


7 9 


5 19 


sets 


8 22 


7 6 


5 23 


sets 


3 


T 


16 31 14 


7 11 


5 17 


6 4 


morn. 


7 8'5 20 


6 7 


9 1 


7 4 


5 24 


6 10 


4 


F 


16 13 24 


7 10 


5 18 


7 9 


15 


7 7 


5 21 


7 10 


9 37 


7 3 


5 25 


7 12 


5 


S 


15 65 18 


7 9 


5 19 


8 12 


61 


7 6 


6 22 


8 12 


10 14 


7 2 


5 26 


8 13 


6 


3 


15 36 55 


7 8 


5 21 


9 15 


1 28 


7 5 


5 24 


9 14 


10 45 


7 1 


5 27 


9 13 


1 


M 


15 18 17 


7 7 


5 22 


10 20 


1 59 


7 4 


5 25 


10 18 


11 23 


7 


5 28110 16 f 


8 


T 


14 50 23 


7 6 


5 24 


11 27 


2 37 


7 3 


5 26 


11 24 


morn. 


6 59 


5 29|ll 20 1 


9 


W 


14 40 14 


7 5 


5 25 


morn 


3 22 


7 2 


5 28 


morn 


8 


6 58 


5 30 


morn 


10 


T 


14 20 50 


7 3 


5 26 


40 


4 11 


7 


6 29 


35 


57 


6 67 


5 31 


30 


n 


F 


14 1 13 


7 2 


5 27 


1 54 


5 10 


6 59 


5 30 


1 48 


1 66 


6 q& 


5 32 


1 42 


12 


S 


13 41 21 


7 1 


5 29 


3 6 


6 20 


6 58 


5 32 


2 59 


3 6 


6 55 


5 34 


2 62 


13 


S 


13 21 17 


7 


5 30 


4 IS 


7 35 


6 56 


5 33 


4 6 


4 21 


6 54 


5 35 


3 68 


14 


NT 


13 59 


6 58 


5 31 


5 9 


8 48 


6 55 


5 34 


5 3 


5 34 


6 53 


36 


4 56 


1.0 


T 


12 40 29 


6 57 


5 32 


5 55 


9 55 


6 64 


5 35 


5 50 


6 41 


6 51 


5 37 


5 44 


16 


W 


12 19 46 


6 65 


5 33 


nses 


10 61 


6 63 


5 36 


rises 


7 37 


6 50 


5 38 


rises 


17 


T 


11 58 62 


6 54 


5 34 


6 11 


11 37 


6 51 


5 37 


6 13 


8 23 


6 49 


5 39 


6 15 


18 


F 


11 37 47 


6 52 


5 36 


7 28 


ev. 24 


6 50 


5 38 


7 28 


9 lU 


6 48 


5 40 


7 28 


19 


S 


11 16 30 


6 51 


5 37 


8 41 


1 7 


6 49 


5 39 


8 40 


9 53 


6 47 


5 41 


8 39 


20 


s 


10 55 3 


6 49 


5 39 


9 52 


1 46 


6 47 


5 41 


9 60 


10 32 


6 45 


5 42 


9 47 


21 


M 


10 33 27 


6 48 


5 40 


11 3 


2 26 


6 46 


5 42 


10 59 


11 12 


6 44 


5 43 


10 56 


22 


T 


10 11 39 


6 47 


5 41 


morn 


3 13 


6 44 


5 43 


morn 


11 59 


6 43 


5 44 


morn 


23 


W 


9 49 43 


6 45 


5 43 


14 


4 4 


6 43 


5 45 


8 


ev. 50 


6 42 


.■) 46 


3 


24 


T 


9 27 37 


6 43 


5 44 


1 19 


4 69 


6 41 


5 46 


1 13 


1 45 


6 40 


5 47 


1 7 


25 


F 


9 5 23 


6 42 


5 45 


2 21 


5 59 


6 39 


5 47 


2 14 


2 45 


6 39 


5 48 


2 7 


26 


S 


8 43 1 


6 41 


5 46 


3 16 


7 2 


6 38 


5 48 


3 9 


3 48 


6 3S 


5 49 


3 ). 


27 


s 


8 20 31 


6 39 


5 47 


4 3 


8 2 


6 37 


5 49 


3 66 


4 48 


6 36 


5 50 


3 49 


28 


il 


7 57 53 


6 37 


5 48 


4 41 


8 58 


6 36 


5 49 


4 35 


5 44 :6 34 


5 51 


4 29 


ping to sleep again, " Mr. Blifkins," said my 
wife, " did you think to buy that broma to-day 
for the baby ?" " My dear," said I, " will you 
do me the injustice to believe that I could 
overlook a matter so essential to the comfort 
of that inestimable child?" She apologized 
very handsomely, but made her anxiety the 
scape-goat. I forgave her, and without saying 
a word more to her, I addressed myself to 
sleep. " Mr. Blifkins," said my wife, "shaking 
me, "you must not snore so, you will wake 
the baby." "Jest bo— jest so," said I, half 
asleep, thinking 1 was Solon Shingle. " Mr. 
Ulifidns," said my wife, '' will you get up 


and h.and me the warm gi-uel from the nurse 
lamp for baby? the dear child, if it wasn't 
for its mother, I don't know wha the would 
do. How can you sleep so, Mr. Blifkins ? " 
" I suspect, my dear," said I, " that it is be- 
cause I am tired." " Oh, it's very well for you 
men to talt about being tired " said my wife : 
" I don't know what you would say if you had 
to toil and drudge like a poor woman with a 
baby." I tried, to soothe her by telling her 
she had no patience at all, and got up for the 
posset. Having aided in answering the baby's 
requirements, 1 stepped into bed again, with 
the hope of sleeping. " Mr. Blifkins," said 



! 3d Month.] MARCH, 1859. [31 Days. 




! MOON'S PHASES. 


6<'Blaii. 


New A'ork, j Baltimore. 


C hArleston. t 


.tuu oil .Mcn.liun 
or l,.-»imark. 




1 ■ ■ . 

1 Xew Moon 

1 First Quarter 


D. 


H. M. 


B. H. 1 B. U. 


H. M. 


D. 


n. M. s. 




4 


2 26 ev. 


2 14ev.[ 2 4ev. 


1 61 ev. 


1 


12 12 35 




11 


11 66 ev. 


11 44ev,ll 34 ev. 


11 20 ev. 


9 


12 10 46 




; Full Moon 


18 
26 


5 1 ev. 
4 42 m. 


4 49 ev.' 4 39 ev. 
4 30 ni.| 4 20 m. 


4 26 ev.' 
4 6 m.' 


17 
25 


12 8 33 
12 6 7 




, Third Quarter 




1 = 


a 




BOSTOX. X. ENGLAND, | 


COXXC'T, X.YORK OITV, [ WASHIXGTON, 




ii i 




OS 


XEW YORK ST.VTE, j 


XEW JERSEY, M.A.RYL'D.VIRG'A, 




'■', s 


» 


e> 


MICHIOAX, WISCOXSIX, i 


PEXXSYLVANIA, OHIO, ||KEXT'Y, MISS'URI, 




1 Ev 
. O 

1 >• 


O 


■a 

to 

'a 


IOWA. OREGON. 


IXDIAXA. ILLIXOI.S. || CAUFORXIA. 




8U!t 


sex 


MOOS 


HijbW.j 


m;n 


sex 


Moox HijfnW.II SIN , sex 


MOOX 




'' C 


c 


ta 


KISl-S. 


SETS. 

H. M. 


SI-ES. 

H. H. 


BOSIO!!. 1 


KISES. 


BBTS. 


niSES. N.VOEK.]] RISES. SKIS. 


RISES. 




' • 


H. M. 


H. M. I 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. B. M. 1 B. M. U. M. 


H. M. 




ii 1 


T 


7 35 8 


|6 35 


5 50 


5 14 


9 47j 


6 35 


5 50 


5 9; 6 33 6 33 5 52 


5 4 




I 


W 


7 12 17 


,6 33 


5 51 


5 38 


10 291 


6 33 


5 51 


5 34 


7 15l 6 31 5 53 


5 30 


T 


6 49 20 


6 32 


5 53 


6 ] 


11- 4: 


6 32 


5 53 


5 58 


7 50|:6 30 5 54 


5 56 




4 


F 


6 26 17 


j6 SO 


5 54 


sets 


11 41| 


6 30 


5 54 


sets 


8 27!6 29 5 55 


sets 




5 


S 


6 3 8 


i6 29 


5 55 


7 6 


morn | 


6 29 


5 55 


7 6 


9 4l'6 27 


5 56 


7 5 




6 


s 


5 39 55 


6 27 


5 56 


8 11 


18: 


6 27 


5 56 


8 lOJ 9 40i:6 26 


5 57 


8 8 




7 


M 


5 16 38 


!6 26 


5 58 


9 20 


54 


6 26 


5 58 


9 16 10 17116 25 


5 58 


9 14 




S 


T 


4 53 16 


je 24 


5 59 


10 30 


1 31 


6 24 


5 59 


10 2610 57 !6 24 


5 59 


10 21 




9 


W 


4 29 50 


J6 23 


6 


11 43 


2 11 


6 23 


6 


11 38 11 45:6 22 


6 Ojll 32 




10 


T 


4 6 21 


le 21 


6 1 


morn 


2 59i 


6 21 


6 1 


morn morn i:6 20 
49 42 16 18 


6 1 


mom 




11 


F 


3 42 50 


'6 19 


6 2 


55 


3 56 


6 19 


6 2 


6 2 


42 




12 


S 


3 19 16 


i6 17 


6 3 


2 2 


5 01 


6 17 


6 3 


1 54 1 46 


6 17 


6 3 


1 47 




13 


S 


2 55 39 


6 15 


6 5 


3 3 


6 16[|6 15 


6 4 


2 56 3 2 


6 15 


6 4 


2 49 




14 


M 


2 32 1 


16 14 


6 6 


3 51 


7 29i 


6 14 


6 5 


3 45 4 15:|6 14 


6 5 


3 39 




15 


T 


2 8 22 


16 12 


6 7 


4 28 


8 38i 


6 12 


6 6 


4 24 5 24 6 13 


6 6 


4 19 




16 


W 


144 41 


16 10 


6 8 


4 59 


9 36l 


6 10 


6 7 


4 56 6 22 6 11 


6 7 


4 52 




17 


T 


1 21 


|6 9 


6 y 


5 26 


10 27 


6 9 


6 8 


5 24 7 13 6 10 
rises 7 56 16 8 


6 8 


5 22 




18 


F 


57 18 


6 7 


6 10 


rises 


11 10 


6 7 


6 9 


6 9 


rises ' 




|19 


S 


33 36 


6 5 


6 11 


7 29 


11 52 


6 5 


6 10 


7 27 8 38 


6 6 


6 10 


7 25 




;20 


s 


9 55 


6 3 


6 13 


8 42 


ev. 36 


6 3 


6 12 


8 39 9 22 


6 5 


6 11 


8 35 




121 


M 


y. 13 46 


'6 2 


6 14 


9 62 


1 15; 


6 2 


6 13 


9 47 10 1 


6 3 


6 12 


9 42 




i 22 

23 


T 


37 26 


'6 


6 15 


11 1 


1 57i 


6 


6 14 


10 56|l0 43 


6 2 


6 13 


10 50 




W 


115 


■5 59 


6 17 


morn 


2 43;|5 59 


6 15 


12 Oil 29 


6 1 


6 14 11 53 




'24 


T 


1 24 42 


5 57 


6 18 


6 


3 35^ 


5 58 


6 16 


morn ev. 21;|5 59 


6 15 morn 




25 


F 


148 17 


5 55 


6 19 


1 7 


4 3ll 


5 56 


6 17 


59 


1 17:5 67 


6 16 


52 




126 


S 


2 11 50 


5 5." 


6 20 


1 56 


5 30! 


5 55 


6 18 


1 50 


2 16il5 56 


6 17 


1 42 




1 27 


s 


2 35 20 


5 62 6 21 


2 38 


6 29' 


5 54 


6 19 


2 32 3 15:5 54 


6 18 


2 26 




2S 


M 


2 58 47 


5 51 6 22 


3 12 


7 29 


5 52 


6 20 


8 7 


4 15j;5 53 


6 19 


3> 1 




29 


T 


3 22 11 


5 49 6 23 


3 41 


8 18 


5 51 


6 21 


3 37 


6 4! 5 52 


6 20 


3 32 




30 


W 


3 45 31 


5 47 6 24 


4. 6 


9 9! 


5 49 


6 22 


4 3 


5 55l'5 50 


5 21 


4 




31 


T 


4 8 47 


5 45 6 25 


4 26 


9 52|!5 47 


6 23 


4 24 6 38!i5 48 


6 22 


4 22 




she, in a louder key. I said nothing. " Oh, ing some portion of the bab.v's dress. She had, 




dear!" said that estimable woman, in great in a state of semi-somnolence, mistaken my 




apparent anguish, " how can a man who has head for the pillow, wliich the customarily 




arrived at the honor of a live baby of his own, used for a nocturnal pin-cushion. I protested 




sleep when he don't know that the dear crea- ' against such treatment in somewhat round 




ture will live till morning?" I remained silent, terms, pointing to several perforations in my 




and, after awhile, deeming that Mrs. Blifkins < forehead. Phe told me I should willinKly bear 




had gone to sleep, I stretched my limbs for re- 


such things for the sake of the baby. I ipsisted 




pose How long I slept I don't know, but I 
' was awakened by a furious jab in the forehead 


upon it that I didn't think my duty as a parent 




to that young immortal required the surrender 




1 by some sharp instrument. I started up. and 


of my forehead for a pin-cushion. This was 




Mrs. Blifkins was sitting up in the bed, adjust- 


one of the many nights passed in this way. 





4th Month.] APRIL, 1859. [30 Days. | 




MOON'S PHASES. j B<-.on. | 


.New York. 


l-rr-rrrs. 


_ , Sim 01. .Sl.riil liu 
Ciblltstcn. , „, „oonm..rlt. 






D. D. M 


H. JI. 


a. .M. 


H. M. D. II. U. S. 




j New 1 
First 


ifoon 


3 5 33 m. 
10 6 37 m. 


5 21 m. 

6 25 m. 


5 11 ID. 

6 15 m. 


4 48 ra. 1 12 3 59 
6 2 in.! 9 12 1 38 




Oimrter 




Full Moon 


17 4 22 m. 
24 1 m. 


4 10 ni. 


4. m 


% 17 tn ■' 17ln ^Ot ss 




Third Quarter 


11 49ev. 11 39ev.'ll 26cv.:|25 11 57 53 | 




s 


td 


. 


BOSTOX, X. KXGL.\.\n, 


COXX(}-T, X. YORK CITY. 


WASUIXGTOX, 




o 


5 


S3 


NEW YORK STATE, 


XEW JERSEY. 


MARYI/D.VIBG'A. 




s 


Js 


.§ 


MICHIGAX, WISCOXSIX, 


PEXNSYLVAXIA, OHIO, 


KE.VT'Y.MLSS'URI, 




O 


C 
>• 


"3 
ao 
C 


IOWA, OREGOX. 


IXniAXA, ILMXOIS. 


CAUKORNIA. 




BUN 1 Sf.N MOOS 


UshW. 


SVN ; SEN- 1 MOON jRcllW. 


SL-H 1 fUM MOO«.- 


■^ 


c. 


03 


ElSfS. Kirrs. KL-Kj. 


Bt.BTON. 


K18ES.' f.^.-S. 1 BISES. 


».V011K. 


BlshS.) 9KTS. KISEJ!. 




• • • 


H. M. U. M. U. SI. 


H. M. 


H, M. 'h. M. H. M. 


H. M. 


II. M. 'n. M. H. M. 




\ I 


F 


4 31 59 


5 43 6 26 4 44 


10 30 


5 45 6 24 


4 44 


7 le 


5 46,6 22 4 43 




S 


4 55 5 


5 41 je 27j sets 


11 5 


5 42 6 25 


sets 


7 5] 


5 44 6 23 sets 




i 3 


s 


5 18 6 


5 40,6 28 7 7 


11 46 


5 41,6 26 


7 5 


8 31 


5 43!6 24 7 2 




! 4 


.M 


5 41 2 


5 38i6 29 8 17 


morn 


5 39,6 27 


8 14 


9 13 


5 4i;6 25 8 9 




5 


T 


6 3 52 


5 56 6 30-9 30 


27 


5 3716 28 


9 25 


9 56 


5 39,6 25 9 20 




1 6 


W 


6 26 35 


5 3416 31 10 45 


1 10 


5 35;6 29 


10 fi9|10 43 


5 S8i6 26 10 83 




1 7 


T 


6 49 11 


5 32|6 32' 11 55 


1 57 


5 83 6 30 


11 49 


11 35 


5 37 16 27I1I 41 




; 8 


F 


7 1141 


5 S0;6 33 niorn 


2 49 


5 31 6 31 


morn 


morn 


5 35,6 28 


morn 




: 9 


S 


7 34 3 


5 29 6 34 57 


3 52 


5 30,6 32i 50 


38 


5 83 6 29 


43 




.j 10 


s 


7 56 17 


5 27 [6 85 


1 47 


4 57 


5 28 6 33 


1 41 


1 43 


5 31 ie 80 


1 35 




:lll 


M 


8 18 23: 


5 25;6 86 


2 29 


5 10 


5 26;6 34 


2 24 


2 56 


5 2916 31 


2 19 




•jl2 


T 


8 40 21 


5 24|6 27 


3 


7 14 


5 25 6 35 


2 57 


4 0!5 28 6 32 


2 53 




i 13 


W 


9 2 10 


5 22i6 38 


3 28 


8 14 


5 24i6 36 


3 26 


5 0!5 27 '6 33 


3 23 




! 14 


T 


9 23 50 


5 2116 39 


3 50 


9 11 


5 22 6 37 


3 49 


5 57 


5 25 6 34 


3 48 




: 15 


F 


9 45 20 


5 I9i6 40 


4 13| 9 59| 


5 21 6 38 


4 14 


6 45 


5 24 6 35 


4 14 




11(5 


S 


10 6 41 '5 17'6 411 rise.sllO 42 


5 20j6 39 


rises 


7 28 


5 2316 36 


rises 




:117 


s 


jlO 27 52 5 16 6 42! 7 30;11 24 


5 18'6 40 


7 27 


8 10 5 21|6 37 


7 22 




iiis 


M 


10 48 53 5 15 6 43I 8 4i:ev. 6 


5 16J6 41 


8 36 


8 52 I5 20|6 88 


8 31 




i 19 


T 


jll 9 53 5 13:6 441 9 50 
11 30 22i5 12:6 46 10 53 


49 


5 1516 42 


9 44 


9 35 '5 19 6 39 


9 88 




: 20 


\Y 


1 40 


5 18{6 44J10 47 


10 26 


5 17 6 40I1O 39 




; 21 


T 


:il 50 50 ;5 10^6 47:11 48 


2 20 


5 11;6 45I1I 42 


11 6 


5 I5I6 4111 84 




1 22 


F 


il2 11 6 15 8,6 48 morn 


3 11 


5 10.6 46'morn 


11 57 


5 146 42 mom 




: 23 


S 


:12 31 11 :5 6 6 49; 35 


4 3 


5 916 47 


28 


ey.49 


5 136 43 


21 




! 24 


3 


il2 61 8 i5 416 5l| 1 12 


4 66 


5 7 6 48 


1 7 


1 42 


5 11 6 44 


1 1 




i 25 


M 


;13 10 43;5 3|6 52 1 42 


5 50 


5 6'6 49 


1 37 


2 86 


5 10,6 45 


1 82 




. op 


T 


jlS 30 10 '5 2J6 53 2 8 


6 43 


5 5i6 50 


2 4 


3 29 


5 9,6 46 


2 




W 


13 49 24 '5 16 54 2 29 


7 34 


5 3 6 51 


2 27 


4 20 


5 7 6 47 


2 24 




ii28 


T 


14 8 24 '4 59j6 56 2 47 


8 21 


2I6 52 


2 46 


5 7 


5 6 6 48 


2 45 




i' 2y 

!|30 


F 


14 27 11 i4 67|6 57 3 7 


9 7 


5 16 53 


3 7 


5 53 


5 416 49 


3 8 




S 


14 45 43!'4 obIg 58' 3 28 


9 52 


5 6 54 


3 29! 6 38 


'5 sie 50 


3 31 




j The truth was, that baby was what every other , He watches from his mountain walls. 




man's first baby is, an autocrat— absolute and 


And like a thunder bolt he falls 1 




1 unlimited. Such was the story of Elifkins, as 






. he related it to us the other day. It is a little 
exaggerated picture of almost every man's 
experience. 


Eagle ye Second— By G. WTMUTcim. 

■With hooked claws he clasps ye fence. 
Close by ye hen roost; gazing thence 
He spies a mice what's got no sense. 




Eagle Vie Firstr—By Alfred Tmnysim. 


Te mice beneath can't well gee him; 
He watches from his lofty limb, 




He clasps the crag with crooked hands, 
Close to the sun in lonely lands, 


Then jumpeth down and grabbeth him 




Eing'd with the azure world he stands. 


P. S.— The difference, though only faint 

'Twixt that and this I now'will paint: — 




The WTin'iled sea beneath him crawls ; 


His eagle's wild, my eagle ain't. 





5th Month.] 




MAY, 


1859. 






[31 Days. 


MOOX'S PHASES. 


boston. 


New York. 


Baltimore. 


Cbftrluslon. 1 


Sun OD Meridian 

oT nooniniirW. 




D. 

2 

9 

16 

24 


H. M. 

5 20 ev. 
15 ev. 
4 23 ev. 

6 6ev. 


H. M. 

6 8ev. 
3ev. 

4 11 ev. 

5 53 ev. 


H. M. 

5 4ev. 
11 59 m. 

4 6ev. 

5 49 ev. 


n. M. 

4 45 ev. 
11 40 m. 

3 47 ev. 

5 30 ev. 


D. 

1 

9 

17 
25 


n. M. s. 
11 56 58 




11 56 15 




11 56 8 


Third Quarter 


11 56 36 



!a' 


>i 




BOSTON, X. ENGLAND, 


CONNC'T, N. YORK CITY, 


WASHINGTON, 


z 






NEW VORK STATE, 


NEW JERSEY, 




MARYL'D,VIRG'A, 




^ 


» 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


PENN.SYLVANI.\, OHIO, 


KENT'Y 


MISS'URI, 


C 


b. 

O 

>> 




IOWA, OREGON. 


INDIANA, ILLINOIS 


• 


CALIFORNIA. 


t- 


SIN 


su> 


MOON IHiKhW. 


FUX 


SUN 


MOON jHis 


hW. 


SUN ; SUN 


MOON 


■c 


a 


CO 


RISKS. 


SETS.- 


EISES. BOSTON. 


RISKS. 


s 


ITS. 


KISES. In.VOBK. 


BISES. 9RT8, 


KISRS. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. H. M. 


H. M. 


H. 


M. 


H. M. 


H. 


M. 


H. M. H. 


M. 


H. M. 


1 


s 


15 4 3 


4 54;6 59 


3 50 10 35 


4 59 


6 


55 


3 63 


7 


31 


5 26 


52 


3 56 


2 


il 


15 22 3 


4 53 


7 


sets 


11 IS 


4 58 


6 


56 


sets 


8 


4 


5 l{6 


53 


sets 


3 


T 


15 39 51 


4 51 


7 1 


8 29 


morn 


4 57 


6 


57 


8 23 


8 


52 


5 0!6 


54 


8 17 


4 


W 


'15 57 22 


4 60;7 2 


9 42 


6 


4 66i6 


58 


9 36 


9 


44 


4 59 6 


55 


9 29 


5 


T 


16 14 38 


4 49 7 S 


10 49 


58 


4 55 6 


59 


10 43 


10 


36 


4 58 6 


56 


10 35 


6 


F 


16 31 38 


4 48 7 4 


Jl 43 


1 50 


4 5417 





11 37 


11 


31 


4 67 6 


56 


11 30 


T 


S 


16 48 22 


4 47 7 5 


morn 


2 45 


4 53i7 


1 


morn 


morn 


4 66 6 


57 


morn 


8 


s 


17 4 48 


4 46 7 6 


28 


3 46 


4 52 


7 


2 


23 





32 


4 5516 


58 


17 


9 


Af 


17 20 67 


4 45 7 7 


1 4 


4 49 


4 51 


7 


3 


1 


X 


■35 


4 54J6 


59 


65 


10 


T 


17 36 49 


4 44:7 8 


1 30 


5 49 


4 50 


7 


4 


1 28 


2 


35 


4 53 7 





1 25 


11 


W 


17 52 23 


4 43 7 9 


1 65 


6 50 


4 49 


7 


5 


1 54 


3 


36 


4 52 7 


1 


1 62 


12 


T 


18 7 39 


4 42 7 10 


2 20 


7 44 


4 48 


7 


6 


2 20 


4 


30 


4 517 


2 


2 19 


13 


F 


18 22 37 


4 4117 11 


2 41 


8 39 


4 47 


7 


7 


2 42 


5 


25 


4 50 7 


3 


2 44 


14 


S 


18 37 17 


4 40 7 12 


3 3 


9 26 


4 45 


7 


8 


3 5 


6 


12 


4 49 7 


4 


3 8 


15 


s 


18 51 37 


4 39 7 13 


3 29 


10 15 


4 44 


7 


9 


3 33 


7 


1 


4 48 7 


5 


3 37 


Ifi 


M 


19 5 39 


4 38 7 14 


rises 


11 


4 4317 


10 


rises 


7 


46 


4 47 7 


6 


rises 


17 


T 


19 19 21 


4 37|7 15 


8 38 


11 42 


4 42!7 


11 


8 32 


8 


28 


4 46S7 


7 


8 25 


18 


W 


19 32 44 


4 36|7 16 9 37 


ev. 30 


4 41 


7 


12 


9 30 


9 


16 


4 45 


7 


7 


9 23 


19 


T 


19 45 47 


4 35!7 17 10 27 


1 15 


4 40 


7 


13 


10 20 


10 


1 


4 44 


7 


8 


10 13 


?.o 


F 


19 58 40 


4 3517 ISill 6 


1 58 


4 39 


7 


14 


11 


10 


44 


4 44 


7 


9 


10 54 


21 


S 


20 10 52 


4 34:7 19 11 41 


2 44 


4 38 7 


15 


11 36 


11 


30 


4 43 


7 


10 


11 31 


22 


s 


20 22 54 


4 33i7 20, morn 


3 31 


4 37J7 


16 


mom 


ev. 


17 


4 42 


7 


10 


12 


23 


Af 


20 34 35 


4 32 7 21 


8 


4 16 


4 36 7 


17 


4 


1 


2 


4 42 


7 


11 


morn 


24 


T 


20 45 55 


4 31 


7 22 


30 


5 5 


4 35 7 


18 


27 


1 


51 


4 41 


7 


12 


24 


25 


W 


20 56 54 


4 30 


7 23 


50 


5 51 


4 35 7 


19 


48 


2 


37 


4 40 


7 


13 


47 


26 


T 


21 7 31 


4 29 


7 24 


1 10 


6 39 


4 34 7 


20 


1 10 


3 


25 


4 40 


7 


14 


1 9 


27 


F 


21 17 47 


4 28 


7 25 


1 29 


7 32 


4 33 


7 


21 


1 30 


4 


18 


4 39 


7 


14 


1 31 


28 


S 


21 27 40 


4 2817 26 


1 50 


8 24 


4 33 


7 


22 


1 62 


5 


10 


4 38 7 


15 


1 54 


29 


s 


21 37 11 


4 27 7 27 


2 14 


9 15 


4 32 


7 


23 


2 18 


6 


1 


4 38 7 


16 


2 21 


SO 


.M 


21 46 20 


4 26 7 28 


2 47 


10 8 


4 31 


7 


24 


2 51 


6 


54 


4 37 7 


16 


2 56 


31 


T 


[21 55 6 


'4 2C|7 28' sets 


11 2 


4 31:7 


24 sets 


7 


48 


4 37 17 


17 


sets 



Takisg the Quarter.— During the trial of a 

case in the Esse.x Common Pleas at Newbury- 

port, a witness who was brought from Plaistow, 

N. n., was asked by District-.\ttomey Abbott, 

" Didn't you boast when you lived at Newbury- 

port, that you were the greatest liar in the 

I city? " The witness looked wise for a minute 

I or two before he answered : " Oh, I know what 

' you mean. You see I went into a room one 

night and found some half a dozen fellows who 

seemed to be telling stories. Says one of them, 

' Here's , he'll take the money.' ' What 



money?' I asked. ' That quarter on the ta- 
ble,' was the answer; 'the man that tells tlie 
biggest lie takes it.' I merely told them that I 
shouldn'ttry for it, as I never told a lie in my 
life, and they gave me the quarter." 

"I'm afloat ! I'm afloat !" screamed a young 
lady of powerful lungs, and fingers to match, 
as she exercised both at the piano. 

" I should think you were," growled an old 
bachelor, "judging from the squall you are 
raising." 



6th Month.] JUNE, 1859. [30 Days. j| 


MOON'S PHASES. 


Boston. 


New York 


BuUimore. 


Charleston. , 


Sun on .M«. idian 1 
_or noo„n,,.rk. | 




D. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


B. M. ! 


D. 


H. M. 8. 


New Moon 


1 


2 26 m. 


2 14 m. 


2 4 m. 


1 51 m.' 


1 


11 57 28 

11 58 51 

12 SO 


j First Quarter 


7 


.6 4 ev. 


5 52 ev. 


5 42 ev. 


5 9,SfvJ 


9 


il Full Moon 


15 


5 34 m. 


5 22 m. 


5 12 m. 4 59 m. 


17 


! Third Quarter 


28 


9 4C'm. 


9 36 m. 


9 26 m. 9 13 m'. 


25 


12 2 13 


New Mf^f^Ti - , - 


30 


ct .n7 m 


9 4-.^ m 1 


Q ^r, m Q 99 m 










s 


M 


2 


BOSTON, N. ENGLAND, 


CONNC'T, N. YORK CITY, 


WASHINGTON, 


K 


■:: 




NEW YORK STATE, 


NEW JERSEY', 


MARYL'0,VIRG'A, 


1 ^ 


is 


g 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO, 


KENT'Y.-MISS'URI, 


5 





JO 

'c 

3 


IOWA, OREGON. 


INDIANA, ILLINOIS. 


CALIFORNIA. 


SON 6DN 


Moo.\ HijrhW.I 


SUN 


SDN 


MOON 


HijrhW. 


SDN 


SUN M'.ON, 


Q 


a 


OQ 


RISES. SKT<. 


SETS. BOSTON. [ 


EISES. 


SETS. 


SETS. 


N. VOEK. 


KISES. 


SETS. SErs. 




-; ; — 


H. >I. B. M. 


H. il. H. M. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. H. M. 


1 


w 


22 3 29 


4 25 7 29 


8 33 11 54 


4 31 


7 24 


8 27 


3 40 


4 36 


7 IS 8 19 


2 


T 


22 11 29 


4 24|7 30 


9 36 


morn. 


4 30 


7 25 


9 29 


9 36 


4 36 


7 19 9 22 


3 


F 


22 19 6 


4 24!7 30 


10 23 


50 


4 30 


7 25 


10 19 


10 30 


4 35 


7 19 10 13 


4 


S 


22 26 19 


4 23 7 31 


11 4 


1 44 


4 29 


7 26 


10 59 


11 22 


4 35 


7 20 10 54 


5 


s 


22 33 9 


4 23;7 32 


11 34 


2 36 


4 29 


7 27 


11 31 


morn. 


4 35 


7 20 11 28 


6 


M 


22 39 35 


4 23j7 33 


12 


3 32 


4 28 


7 27 


11 58 


18 


4 34 


7 21 11 66 


7 


T 


22 45 37 


4 2217 33 


morn 


4 25 


4 28 


7 28!morn 


1 11 


4 34 


7 21 morn 


8 


W 


22 51 15 


4 22j7 34 


22 


5 18 


4 28 


7 28{ 22 


2 4 


4 34 


7 22 


21 


9 


T 


22 56 29 


4 22;7 35 


46 


6 16 


4 28 


7 2S 


46 


3 2 


4 34 


7 22 


47 


10 


F 


23 1 19 


4 22;7 35 


1 7 


7 9 


4 28 


7 29 


1 9 


3 55 


4 34 


7 23 


1 12 


11 


S 


23 5 45 


4 227 36 


1 32 


8 5 


4 28j7 30 


1 36 


4 51 


4 34 


7 24 


1 40 


12 


s 


23 9 47 


4 22i7 37 


2 


8 59 


4 28|7 30 


2 5 


5 45 


4 34 


7 25 


2 10 


' 13 


M 


23 13 24 


4 22 ;7 37 


2 34 


9 51] 


4 28 7 31j 2 40 


6 37 


4 34 


7 25 


2 46 


: u 


T 


23 16 36 


4 22 


7 38 


rises 


10 39| 


4 28 7 31 


rises 


7 25 


4 34 


7 26 


rises 


15 


W 


23 19 24 


4 22 


7 38 


8 22 


11 23 


4 28 7 32 


8 15 


8 9 


4 33 


7 27 


8 8 


16 


T 


23 21 47 


4 22 


7 38 


9 5 


ev. 11 


4 28 7 32 


8 59 


8 57 


4 33 


7 27 


8 52 


17 


F 


23 23 46 


'4 22 


7 39 


9 41 


55 


4 28 7 33 


•9 36 


9 41 


4 33 


7 28 


9 30 


18 


S 


23 25 20 


!4 2217 39 


10 10 


1 36 


4 28 7 33 


10 5 


10 22 


4 33 


7 28 


10 1 


19 


S 


23 26 29 


4 23 


7 39 


10 35 


2 14 


4 29 7 34110 32 


11 


4 33 


7 28 


10 28 


20 


M 


23 27 13 


14 23 


7 39 


10 55 


2 54 


4 29|7 34|10 58 


12 40 


4 34 


7 28 


10 51 


21 


T 


23 27 33 


{4 23 


7 39 


11 14 


3 35 


4 29,7 3411 13 


ev. 21 


4 34 


7 28 


11 12 


22 


W 


23 27 27 


4 23]7 40 


11 33 


4 15 


4 29i7 34 11 33 


1 1 


4 34 


7 29 


11 33 


28 


T 


23 26 57 


4 23 7 40 


11 51 


4 5tfi 


4 29 7 35 11 53 


1 45 


4 34 


7 29 


11 54 


24! 


F 


23 26 2 


4 24 


7 40 


morn 


5 51! 


4 30 7 35 morn 


2 37 


4 35 


7 29 


morn 


25! 


S 


23 24 43 


4 24 


7 40 


14 


6 44! 


4 30 7 35 


17 


3 30 


4 35 


7 29 20 li 


26 1 


s 


23 22 58 


4 24 


7 40 


40 


7 43 


4 30 


7 35 


44 


4 29| 


4 35 


7 29 


49 


271 


M 


23 20 49 


4 25 


7 40 


1 12 


8 46 


4 30 


7 35 


1 17 


5 321 


4 35 


7 29 


1 23 


28l 


T 


23 18 15 


4 25 


7 40 


1 55 


9 oOl 


4 31 


7 35 


2 2 


6 36; 


4 36 


7 29 


2 8 


29 


W 


23 15 16 


4 25 


7 40 


sets 


10 50 


4 31 7 35! sets 


7 36 


4 36 


7 29 


sets 


30 


T 


23 11 54 


4 25|7 40! 


8 13 


11 45| 


4 31|7 35> 8 7 


8 31! 


4 36 


7 29 


8 1 


! A (N) ICE JoEE.— A newly arrived John Chi- 


was to be dreseed, and whether it was to be 


naman, in Shasta, California, says an ex- 


cooked for dinner. 


1 change, purchased some ice recently, and find- 


A gentleman who was rather impatient at 


' ing it very wet, laid it out to dry in the sun. 


table declared that he wished he could manage 


, On going to look for it again, he found that it 


without servants, as they were greater plague 


\' iiad disappeared, and forthwith accused the 


than profit. " M'hy not have a dumb waiter ?" 


i! whole Chinese neighborhood of larceny. A 


suggested a friend. "Oh, no," returned the 


, general riot was the consequence. This is 


other, " I hav$ tried them — they don't on- 


. about as good as an anecdote we heard the 


»wer." 


1 other day about a lady of the Irish persuasion. 
[. Biddy liad just arrived and obtained a place to 


An elderly maiden 'lady requests the inser- 
tion of the following : 

Bad Ta.ste — Pretty young girls kissing wi- 
dowers' children. 


; do general housework, soon after which she 
1 innocently inquired of her mistress how the ice 


r ..... - ■ :i 




^^ 








■sm 














1 


""■•" 






.11 ..* 



7th Month.] 

MOON'S PHA8E8. 



JULY, 1859. 



[31 Diiys. 



First Quarter . 
Full Moon . . . 
Third Quarter 
New Moon . . . 



14 



Bc4ton. 



10 m. 
9ev, 
2110 44 ev, 
Oev, 



New York. 



58 m. 
7 57 cv. 
10 32 ev. 
4 48 ev. 



Bal limore. 



48 m. 
7 47 ev. 
10 22CV.110 
4 38 ev. 4 



Charleston, 



U. U. 

35 m. 
7 34 ev. 

9ev. 

5ev. 



<mmnrk. 



1 12 
912 



3 27 

4 51 
6 48 
6 12 



llF 
2'S 

3;s 

4|M 

5|T 

6|W 

7iT 

8F 

9S 

lOS 

ll'M 

12T 

13 ;w 

14lT 

15;f 

16S 

17;S 

18,M 

19T 

20W 

21|T 

22,F 

23 S 

24S 

25M 

26 T 

27 W 

28 T 

29 F 
SOS 
31 S 



BOSTON, N. EXGL.AND, 

NEW YORK ST.A.TE. 

MICHIGAN, ;WISCOXSIN, 

IO\V.\, OREGON. 



H. M. 

26 



23 8 7 
23 3 55 
22 50 19 
22 54 19 
22 48 56 
22 43 8 
22 3G 57 
22 30 22 
22 23 24]!4 31 
22 16 3 4 31 



26 



22 8 19 
22 13 
21 51 43 
21 42 51 
21 33 37 
21 23 59 
21 14 1 
21 3 42 
20 53 1 
20 41 58 
I2O 30 35. 
I20 18 51 



H. U. H. M. 

8 55 morn 



y 35 
10 1 



40 
40 
40 
39'10 26 
39J10 49 
39 11 10 
39:11 35 
38 morn 
38 3 

35 

1 13 

2 1 



42 



CONNC'T, N. YORK CITY, 

NEW JERSEY, 

PENNSYLVANI.*., OHIO, 

INDIANA, ILLINOIS. 



27 

54, 

45! 
40 
34 
36! 

8 35i 

9 32 



4 32 
4 33 

4 34 7 36 2 55il0 24 
[4 35|7 36 rises 111 6 
!4 36 7 35 8 UU 50! 
}4 3717 34 8 39 ev. 31 
4 38'7 34 9 1 
l4 39 7 33 9 18 
i4 39;7 32 9 38 
4 4017 32 9 57 
|4 41i7 31 10 17 
,4 4217 30 1 10 40 
20 6 47|!4 43:7 29jll 9 
19 54 22!|4 44|7 28|11 46 
19 41 38|'4 45:7 27 morn 



4 40 7 31 



19 28 33 4 46,7 26 
19 15 9l!4 47 7 25 
19 1 26' 4 48 7 24 
18 47 24 14 49 7 23 
IS 33 3 14 50 7 22 
18 18 2514 51 7 21 



33 

1 37 

2 51 

sets 

7 46 

8 28 



4 41 7 

4 42 7 



1 
2 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

7 17 

8 28 

9 38 

10 39 

11 SO 
morn 

24 



4 43 
4 43 
4 44 



iHighW. 



U. M. 

35 



J. U. B. M 

8 50 9 28 

9 31110 18 
9 59!ll 3 



WASinXGTrtN, 

MARYL'D, VIRG'A, 

KENT'Y.MISS'L'RI, 

CALIFORNIA, 



B. U. 

37 



34110 25,11 52 



10 49 



33 



morn 



38 7 32 

39 7 32 
39 7 81 



11 12 
11 38 
33jmorn 
33| 7 

40 

1 19 

2 8 
"S 2 
rises 



63 7 19 
4 64I7 18 
4 5517 17 



8 35 

8 57 

9 16 
9 38 
9 

10 19 

10 44 

11 14 
11 52 
morn 

40 

1 44 

2 57 
sets 

7 43 

8 27 



40 
31 
26 
20 
22 
21 
18 
10 
52 

8 36 

9 17 
9 54 

10 27 

11 2 
11 39 
ev. 20 

1 5 



6 24 

7 25 

8 16 

9 10 
9 56 



37 
38 
38 
39 
40 
40 
41 
42 
42 
43 
44 
45|7 25 



45 

46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
50 
51 
62 
53 
53 
54 
55 
56 
56 
57 
58 
14 59 



8 45 

9 27 
9 57 

10 25 

10 60 

11 14 
11 42 
morn 

12 

46 

1 26 

2 15 

3 9 
rises 

8 3 
8 31 

8 65 

9 15 
9 37 
9 59 

10 22 

10 48 

11 19 
11 5'8 
mora 

47 

1 51 
3 4 



14 sets 
14 7 40 
7 13 8 26 



" RirasrsG " CunHCUES.— A man sitting upon 
the verandah of an up-country inn, hailed " one 
of the oldest inhabitants," and inquired the 
denomination of the church upon the opposite 
side of the road. The reply was—" ■« al, she 
was a hard shell Baptist, nat'raUy, but they 
don't run her now." 

Alexander Dumas, the great playwright and 
novelist, married his creditor's daughter one 
day as the most convenient mode which then 
occurred to him of avoiding the jail. A few 
months later he saw, hy accident, a citoy«n In 
the act of kissing bis (Dumas) wife. The 



author of Monte Cristo gazed in amazement 
for a moment, and then exclaimed — "Good 
Heavens ! and he is not obliged to !" 

A woman was testifying In behalf of her son, 
and swore " that he had worked on a farm 
ever since he was born." 

The lawyer who cross-examined her, said, 
" You assert that your son has worked on a 
farm ever since he was bom ?" 

"I do." 

" What did he do the first year f " 

" JTe milked." 

The lawyer evaporated. 





8th Mouth.] AUGUST, 1859. [31 Days. 






MOON'S PHASES. 


Boston, 


New York. 1 Baliiiiiore. CbnrlesioD. 


tail uu .Meriditm 
or iKonmark. 






First Quarter 


D. 


H. M. 

10 38 m 


H. M. 1 H. M. H. M. 

10 26 m 'lO 16 m if^ "> "i 


D. 1 H. M. S. 
112 6 4 

9tl2 5 17 






Full Moon 


IS 


11 52 m. 


11 40 m. 11 30 m. 


U 16 m. 






Third Quarter 


''1 


9 2 m 


8 50 m 


R An tn 


8 27 m. 
U 6ev. 


17!l2 3 53 
25:12 1 57 






New Moon 


27 


11 42 ev. 


11 30 ev. 11 20 ev. 






a 


u 


i 2; 


BOSTON, N. ENGLAND, 


JCONNC'T, N. YORK CITY, 


WASHINGTON, 






S 


u 


NEW YORK STATE. 


NEW JERSEY, 


MARYL'D,VIRG'A, 






s 


is 


1 ij 
1 ^ 


.>UCUIGAN, WIKCOXSIX, 


PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO, 


KENT'Y, MISSTRI, 






>• 


o 


'a 


IOW.\, OREGON. 


INDIANA, ILLINOIS. 


CALIFORNIA, 






SCN 


8DN 1 UOON 


High W. 


6t•.^ 


SU.1 


MOON iHighW. 


tU.N 


hU.V 


MOON 






a 


a 


DQ 


BISKS. 


SETS. 1 BETS. 


BogTOX. 


H1SK6. 


SEIS. 


SETS. (n.VOEK. 


&I6E8. 


SKT8. 


SETS. 






i ' ' ' 


,H. It. 


H. M. B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. j H. M. 


H. M. 


H. U. 


H. M. 






1 


M 


'18 3 28 


4 52 


7 20 8 50 


1 10 


4 56 


7 16 


8 60110 38 


5 


7 12 


8 51 






2T 


17 48 13 


4 53 


7 19 9 14 


1 52 


4 57 


7 15 


9 15ill 20 


5 1 


7 11 


9 17 






3W 


17 32 41 


■4 54 


7 18 9 39 


2 34 


4 58 


7 14 


9 41 morn 


5 2 


7 10 


9 44 






4T 


17 16 53 


4 55 


7 16 10 4 


3 22 


4 59 


7 13 


10 8 


8 


5 2 


7 9 


10 12 






5F 


17 47 


4 56 


7 15 10 35 


4 12 


5 


7 12 


10 40 


58 


5 3 


7 8 


10 46 






6S 


16 44 25 


4 57 


7 ]411 12 


5 8 


5 1 


7 11 


11 18 


1 54 


5 4 


7 7 


11 25 






18 


16 27 47 


4 58 


7 13 11 57 


6 8 


5 2 


7 10 


morn 


2 54 


5 5 


7 6 


morn 






8|M 


16 10 53 


,4 59 


7 11 morn 


7 11 


5 3 


7 9 


4 


3 57 


5 6 


7 4 


11 






9iT 


15 53 43 


15 


7 lO; 50 


8 13 


5 4 


7 8 


57 


4 59 


5 7 


7 3 


1 






lOJW 


15 36 18 


5 1 


7 9 


1 47 


9 11 


5 5 


7 6 


1 54 


5 57 


5 8 


7 1 


2 






lliT 


15 18 39 


i5 2 


7 8 


2 48 10 2 


5 6 


7 5 


2 54 


6 48 


5 9 


7 


3 






12:F 


15 44 


is 3 


7 7 


rises ilO 45 


5 7 


7 3 


rises 


7 31 


5 10 


6 59 


rises 






13S 


14 42 36 


io 4 


7 5 


7 5 11 23 


5 8 


7 2 


7 2 


8 9 


5 11 


6 58 


6 69 






US 


14 24 13 


\o 5 


7 4 


7 2411 59 


5 9 


7 


7 22 


8 45 


5 12 


6 57 


7 21 






15 M 


14 5 36 


15 6 


7 2 


7 43 ev. 36 


5 10 


6 59 


7 43 


9 22 


5 13 


6 55 


7 42 






16T 


13 46 46 


\5 -7 


7 1 


8 3 16 


5 11 


6 58 


8 4 


9 52 


5 14 


6 54 


8 4 






17iW 


13 27 43 


l5 8 


7 


8 23 1 41 


5 12 


6 57 


8 25ll0 27 


5 15 


6 53 


8 27 






18T 


13 8 27 


5 9 


6 58 


8 46 


2 18 


5 13 


6 55 


8 49 11 4 


5 16 


6 52 


8 52 






19F 


12 48 58 


5 10 


6 56 


9 11 


2 69 


5 14 


6 54 


9 15 11 45 


5 17 


6 60 


9 20 






20,S 


12 29 17 


5 11 


6 55 


9 43 


3 48 


5 15 


6 53 


9 48 ev. 34 


5 18 


6 49 


9 54 






21 S 


12 9 24 


5 12,6 54'10 26 


4 43: 


5 16 


6 51 


10 32 1 29 


5 19 


6 48 10 39 






22;M 


11 49 19 


5 14 6 52 11 19 


5 50 

7 3 

8 16 


5 17 


6 50 


11 25 2 36i!5 20 


6 46 11 33 






23;T 


11 29 3 


;5 15 6 51imorn 


5 18 


6 49 


morn 


3 4915 21 


6 45 morn. 






24|W 


11 8 36 


|5 16 


6 49 


26 


5 19 


6 47 


32 


5 2i5 21 


6 43 


39] 






25 IT 


10 47 58 


'5 17 


6 48 


1 43 


9 25 


5 20 


6 45 


1 48 


6 11 15 22 


6 42 


1 541 






26;F 


10 27 9 


5 18 6 46 


3 3 


10 24 


5 21 


6 43 


3 8 


7 10 !5 23 


6 41 


3 12, 






27 S 


10 6 11 


5 19 6 44 sets 


11 11 


5 22 


6 41 


sets 


7 57 ;5 24 


6 39 


sets ' 






28;S 


9 45 3 


5 20*6 42 6 49 11 58: 


5 23 


6 40 


6 49 


8 44 5 25 


6 38 


6 48 






29M 


9 23 46 


5 21j6 41 


7 15 morn | 


5 24 


6 38 


7 161 9 29 !5 26 


6 86 


7 16; 




30T 


9 2 19 


5 22 6 39 


7 39 43| 


5 25 


6 36 


7 41 10 12^5 27 


6 34 


7 43 if 




31 W 


8 40 45 


5 23'6 37 


8 5 1 26' 


5 26 


6 34 


8 9110 51:|o 28 


6 33 


8 13 i 






Alum and common salt in equal quantites, 
powdered and applied to the cavity of an ach- 
ing tooth, is said to be a certain cure for that 
terrible ailment. 

Servant.— "What kind of sauce will you 
have Mr. Blifldns?" 

BuFKiNS. — " I don't allow a servant to give 
me any kind of sauce.' 


I How TO Mexd Chisa. — From an English al- 
; manac we, a long time since, cut a receipt for 
j mending china, and the opportunity having oc- 
1 curred for trying, we found it admirable, the 
fracture scarcely being visible after the article 
1 was repaired. It is thus made: take a very ,■ 
thick solution of gum arabic in water, and stir 
it into plaster of Paris until the mixture be- 




" Homestead exemption," exclaimed Mrs. 
Partington, throwing down the paper, "it's 
come to a pretty pass, indeed, that men are go- 
ing to exempt themselves from home just when 
they please, without any proviso for cold nighte.' 


comes a viscous paste. Apply it with a brush ' 
to the fractured edges and stick them together. 
In three days the article cannot again be bro- ;. 
; ken in the same place. The whiteness of the 
cement renders it doubly valuable. 





9tli Month.] SEPTEMBER, 1859. [30 Days. | 


MOON'S PHASES. 


B.s-.on. 


>ew York. 


Baltimore. | LhArleaton. | 


sua oil .Mc^ndiaa 1 
„rnoonn„.k. {| 




D. 


U. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 1 U. M. 


D. 


H. M. S. 


First Quarter 


3 


11 21 ev. 


11 9ev. 10 69ev.lO 45 ev. 


1 


11 59 55 


Full Moon 


12 


3 47 m. 


3 35 m. 


3 25 m. 


3 12 m.' 


9 


11 57 17 


Third Quarter 


19 


5 30 ev. 


5 18 ev. 


5 8 ev. 


4 55 ev.' 


17 


11 54 29 


Sew iloou 


26 


9 12 m. 


9 m. 


8 50 ni. 


8 37 m.' 


25 


11 51 42 


=• 


iA 




BOSTON, N. E.VGLAXD, 


CONNC't, N. YORK CITY. 


WASHINGTON, 


2 

v"5 


:£ 


z 


NEW YORK STATE, 


NEW JERSEY, 


MARYL D, VIKG'A, 


s 


^ 


4) 


MICHIGAN, \VISC0X6IN, 


PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO, 


KENT' Y, MISS' URI, 


tE. 

o 


b 
O 

>• 




IOWA, OREGON. 


INDIANA, ILLIN®IS. 


CALIFORNIA. 


SCS 1 SUN 


Moox iHi^hW. 


FCN SON 


MOOX 


HighW. 


SUN 


SUN 


MOOM 


-^ 


Q 


m 




SETS. 


Bc.3IO>. 


P.ISIiS. CC1S. 


SFTS. 


N.VORK. 


RlStS. 


SkTS. 


SKTS. 


H. M. H. M. 


H. M. 


u. u. 


H. M. \U. IS. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. U. 


1 


T 


8 19 1 


5 246 36 


8 34 


2 6 


■5 27|6 33 


8 38 11 39 


5 29l6 31 


8 44 


2 


F 


7 57 lo;|5 20 6 35 


9 lOl 2 54 


5 28 6 32 


9 16 


morn 


5 30 6 30 


9 22 


3 


3 


7 35 12 


5 27|6 33 


9 531 3 45 


■5 29,6 30 


9 59 


3] 


5 31 6 28 


10 6 


4 


S 


7 13 6 


5 286 3l!l0 41 


4 42 


'5 30;6 29 


10 48 


i 28 


5 32 6 27 


10 55 


5 


M 


6 50 53 


5 29'6 30 11 39 


5 45 


i5 31 6 27 


11 45 


2 31 


5 33 6 25 


11 52 


6 


T 


6 28 33 


5 30J6 28, morn 


6 46 


I5 32 6 26 


morn 


3 32 


5 34J6 24 


morn 


7 


W 


6 6 8 


5 3l|6 26 


41 


7 46 


5 33 6 24 


47 


4 32 


5 35 6 23 


53 


8 


T 


5 43 36 


5 3216 25 


1 43 


8 43 


|5 346 23 


1 48 


5 29 


5 3516 21 


1 53 


9 


F 


5 20 59 


5 33|6 23 


2 48 


9 30 


'5 35,6 21 


2 51 


6 16 


5 36 6 20 


2 55 


10 


S 


4 58 16 


5 34:6 21 


3 50110 13 


I5 36 6 19 


3 52 


6 59 


5 37 6 18 


3 55 


11 


s 


4 35 28 


5 35 6 19 


rises ^10 51 


'5 36 6 18 


rises 


7 37 


5 ssje 17 


rises 


12 


il 


4 12 36 


5 36 6 17 


6 10,11 24 


5 37 6 16 


6 10 


8 10 


39 


6 15 


6 11 


13 


T 


3 49 SS 


5 37j6 16 


6 28,11 59 


:5 38|6 14 


6 30 


8 45 


5 40 


6 13 


6 3] 


14 


W 


3 26 37 


5 38 6 14 


6 50 ev. 37 


j5 39 6 12 


6 53 


9 23 


5 40 


6 12 


6 56 


15 


T 


3 3 32 


5 39 6 12 


7 15 


1 12 


406 10 


7 19 


9 58 


5 41 


6 10 


7 23 


16 


F 


2 40 24 


5 40i6 11 


7 46 


1 52 


!5 41J6 8 


7 51 10 38 


5 42 


6 9 


7 56 


17 


S 


2 17 12; 


5 4116 9I 8 24 


2 35 


,5 42j6 7 


8 30 11 21 


5 43 


6 7 


8 36 


18 


s 


1 53 57 


5 42'6 7 9 14 


3 30 


5 43 6 5 


9 21 


ev. 16 


5 44*6 5 


9 28 


19 


M 


1 30 39 


5 43 6 5 10 14 


4 31 


5 44 6 4IIO 21 


1 17 


5 44J6 4 


10 28 


20 


T 


1 7 20 


5 446 4 11 22 5 42 


5 45 6 2jll 28 


2 28 


5 45 6 2 


11 34 


21 


W 


43 58 


5 45^6 2 


morn 6 54 


5 46 6 1 morn 


3 39 


5 46 6 1 


morn 


22 


T 


20 35 


5 46)6 


40 8 2 


5 47 5 59 45 


4 48 


5 47 5 59 


51 


23 


F 


, S. 2 49 


5 47i5 58 


1 59 9 5 


5 48 5 57 2 3 


5 51 


5 48 5 67 


2 7 


24 


S 


26 14 


5 4815 56 


3 19 10 


5 49 5 55 3 22 


6 46 


5 49 5 55 


3 24 


25 


s 


49 40 


5 49j5 54 


sets ilO 47 


5 50 5 53 sets 


7 33 


5 50 5 63 


sets 


26 


M 


1 13 5 


5 50' 5 52 


5 38,11 26 


5 51,5 521 5 39 


8 12 


5 5115 62 


5 41 


27 


T 


1 36 31 15 5l!5 50 


6 3 morn 


5 52:5 50 


6 6 


8 59 


5 52 5 51 


6 9 


28 


W 


1 59 55 io 53.5 49 


6 331 13 


5 53J5 49 


6 37 


9 44 


5 53J5 49 


6 42 


29 


T 


2 23 19 jo 54:5 46 


7 6 58 


5 54|5 47 


7 lljlO 271 


5 54 5 47 


7 17 


30 


F 


2 46 41 5 550 45 


7 461 1 41 


5 55:5 45i 7 53 11 14| 


5 5515 45 


7 59 


1 Mareikd a Dollar's Worth. 


our wives ; at forty, our chihJren ; at sixty, 


i A lovesick young pair who had only a dollar 
1 To pay to the priest for the conjugal collar, 


ourselves. This is condensed from some prac- 
tical writer who has experienced them all. 


Were told by the parson "his regular fee, 


Gent on horsebact to boy on a donkey — 


For marrying people, was only a V ;" 


" Get ou*. the way, boy ! get out of the way ! 


" Nay, then," quoth the swain, " good parson. 


my horse don't like donkeys !'' 


now come ! 


Boy—'' Doan't he? then, why don't he kick 


A dollar I'm sure ought to marry us some .' 


thee orf ?" 


'Tis all I have got ; you can take it, you know. 


Why a Mas mat M.irrt a Deceased Wife's 


And marry as far as the money will go I" 


Sbter.— One argument in the British Parlia- 


Thb Eight Ages o? Love —At three years 


ment in favor of letting men marry their de- 


of age we love our mothers ; at six our 


ceased wives' sisters, was that by doing so a 


fathers; at ten, holidays; at sixteen, dress; 


man had only one mother-in-law instead of 


at twenty, our sweethearts ; ai twenty-five, 


two. 


'J 





10th Month.] OCTOBER, 1859. [31 Days. | 




MOON'S PHASES. 


Boston. 


XevT York. 


Baltimore. Charleston. ' 


Sunoi. iier^u.au 1 






D. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. 31. 1 


D. 


B. M. S. 




First Quarter 


3 


3 48 er. 


3 36 ev. 


3 26 ev. 


3 13 ev. 


1 


1149 43 




Fulli 
Third 


[qOD. • 


11 
19 


7 8ev. 
59 m. 


6 56 ev. 
47 m. 


46 ev. 
37 m. 


6 32 ev. 
23 m. 


9 
17 


11 47 21 
11 45 28 




Onnrtpr 




New Moon 


25 


7 49 ev. 


7 37 ev. 


7 27 ev. 


7 14 ev. 


25 


11 44 17 




-~^ 


^ 




BOSTOX, X. EXGLAXU, 


COXXC'T, X. YORK CITY, 


1 WASHIXGTOX, 




z. 


Cd 


ra 


NEW YORK STATE, 


XEW JERSEY, 


MARYL'D.TIRG'A. 




a 


t 


"y 


MICHIGAX, WISCOXSIX, 


PEXX-SYLVAXIA, OHIO, 


kext'y,mi.ssu;ri. 




o 


b 
O 

>• 


■a 

c 


IOWA, OREGOX. 


IXDIAXA, ILLIXOIS. 


1 CALIFORXIA. 




sus 


so.>- 


MOON 


H:gb\V. 


tD.N 1 6U-\ 1 MOO.V H-yliW.l' sex 1 SUN 


IIOOX 




< 

a 


•< 


& 


BIStS. 


SETS, 


SETS. 


BOSTON. 


EI3hS.| SETS. ] Sfrrs. S.VOEK.I] P.ISE3.! SETS. 


SETS. 




• .' 


H. M. 


K. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. i H. M. ! H. M. 


H. M. B. M. 


H. M. 




1 


s 


3 10 2 


5 56 


5 43 


8 34 


2 28 


5 56 


5 43 8 41 morn 


■5 56:5 44 


8 48 




2 


s 


3 33 20 


5 57 


5 42 


9 30 


3 22 


5 57 


5 42 9 36i 8 5 57:5 42 


9 43 




3 


M 


3 56 36 


5 58 


5 40 


10 30 


4 18 


5 58 


5 41 10 36; 1 4 


.5 58 5 41 


10 42 




4 


T 


4 19 48 


^5 59 


5 39 


11 35 


5 15 


5 59 


5 39;11 40 


2 1 


59 5 39 


11 45 




6 


W 


4 42 68 


6 1 


5 38 


morn 


6 17 


6 


5 37 morn 


3 3 


6 5 38 


morn 




6 


T 


5 6 4 


6 2 


5 36 


36 


7 12 


6 1 


5 36 


40 


3 58 


6 l;5 37 


44 




7 


F 


5 29 6 


6 3 


5 34 


1 39 


8 2 


6 2 


5 34 


1 42 


4 48 


6 2 5 35 


1 46 




8 


S 


5 52 4 


6 4 


5 33 


2 40 


8 49 


6 3 


5 33 


2 42 


5 35 


6 3'5 34 


2 44 




9 


S 


6 14 57 


6 5 


5 31 


3 44 


9 32 


6 4 


5 31 


3 44 


6 18 


6 4[5 32 


3 45 




10 


M 


6 37 46 


|6 6 


5 29 


4 45 


10 12; 


6 5 


5 29 


4 44 


6 58 


6 6 5 31 


4 44 




11 


T 


7 28 


j6 8 


5 28 


rises 


10 51 


6 6 


5 28 


rises 


7 37 


6 6;5 30 


rises 




12 


W 


7 23 6 


6 9 


5 26 


5 19 


11 24' 


6 7 


5 26 


5 23! 8 10 


6 7{5 29 


5 27 




13 


T 


7 45 37 


le 10 


5 24 


5 49 


ev. 7; 


6 8 


5 25 


5 541 8 53 


6 8 5 27 


5 59 




14 


F 


8 8 2 


'6 11 


5 22 


6 24 


50 


6 9 


5 23 


6 30 9 36 


6 9 5 25 


6 36 




15 


S 


8 30 20 


6 12 


5 20 


7 8 


1 35 


6 10 


5 22 


7 15 10 21 


6 ]o!o 24 


7 22 




16 


s 


8 52 31 


6 13 


5 19 


8 6 


2 25 


6 11 


5 20 


8 13 11 11 


6 III5 22 


8 20 




17 


M 


9 14 35 


:6 14 


5 17 


9 14 


3 23 


6 12 


5 19 


9 20ev. 9 


6 12'5 20 


9 27 




18 


T 


9 36 31 


6 15 


5 16 


10 27 


4 26 


6 13 


5 17 


10 32 


1 12 


6 13*5 19 


10 38 




19 


.W 


9 58 18 


6 17 


5 14 


IJ 43 


5 31 


6 14 


5 16 


11 47 


2 17 


6 14'5 17 


11 52 




20 


T 


10 19 57 


6 18 5 13 


morn 


6 37; 


6 15 


5 15 


morn 


3 23 


6 15:5 16 


morn 




21 


F 


10 41 27 


6 195 11 


1 1 


7 39:' 


6 16 


5 13 


1 4 


4 25 


6 165 15 


1 6 




22 


S 


11 248 


6 215 10 


2 16 


8 38; 


6 18 


5 12 


2 18 


5 24 


6 17:5 14 


2 19 




23 


s 


11 23 58 


6 22 5 8 


3 31 


9 29 


6 19 


5 10 


3 31 


6 15 


6 18|5 13 


3 31 




24 


Ml 


1 1 44 59 6 23 5 7 


4 46 


10 18 


6 20 


5 8 


4 44 


7 4 


6 196 12 


4 43 




25 


T 


11 5 48 6 24 5 5 


sets 


11 0; 6 21 


5 7 


sets 


7 46 


6 20 '5 10 


sets 




26 


W 


12 26 27 6 25 5 4 


5 1 


11 45; 6 22 


5 5 


5 6 


8 32 


6 21j5 9 


5 11 




27 


T 


12 46 54:6 27 5 2 


5 39 


morn | 6 24 


5 4 


5 45 


9 22 


6 22 5 7 


5 51 




28 


F 


13 7 9 


6 28 5 1 


6 25 


36] 6 25 


5 3| 6 31 


10 9 


6 23 5 5 


6 38 




29 


S 


13 27 11 


6 29 5 


7 18 


1 23; 6 26 


5 2 


7 25 


10 63 


6 24:5 4 


7 32 




30 


s 


13 47 1 


6 214 58 


8 17 


2 7! 


6 27 


5 


8 '24 


11 44 


6 25 5 3 


8 30 




31 


M 


14 6 37 


6 32 4 57 


9 21 


'2 58: 


6 28J4 59 


9 26 morn | 


6 26i5 2 


9 32 




Always was a Coward. — ^Whenthe question | laughter which followed at the expense of the !| 




of the emblems and devices of our national 


Southerner, was more than he could bear. He 




arms was before the old Congress, a member 


construed this good-humored irony into an 




from the South warmly opposed the eagle as a 


insult, and sent a challenge; the bearer de- 




monarchical bird. The king of birds could not 


livered it to Mr. Thatcher, who read and re- 




be a suitable representative of a people whose 


turned it to him, observing that he should not 




institutions were founded in hostility to kings. 


accept it ! " What, will you be branded as a 




The late Judge Thatcher, then a representative 


coward?" " Yes, sir, if he pleases; I always 


from Massachusetts, in reply, proposed the 


was a coward, and he knew it, or he never 


goo>se, which he said was a most humble and 


would have challenged me." The joke was too 




republican bird, and would in other respects 


good to be resisted, even by the angry party, 




prove advantageous, inasmuch as the goslings 


and the former cordial intercourse was soon 




would do to put on the tea cent pieces. The 


restored. 



nth Month.] NOVEMBER, 1859. [30 Days. | 


MOON'S PHASES. 


Boston. 


.New York. 


Bnltimors, 


Clmrleston. | 


Sun on Memli.-ui 
..rnoonm..rl!. 




D. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


D. 1 B. M. S. 


First Quarter 


2 


11 34 m. 


11 22 m. 


11 12 m. 


10 59 m. 


l|ll 43 42 


Full Moon 


10 


9 21 m. 


9 9 m. 


8 59 m. 


8 46 m.| 


9 


11 43 57 i 


Third Quarter 
New JInnn . . 




17 

24 


8 23 m. 
8 59 ni. 


Slim. 
8 47 m. 


8 1m. 
8 37 m. 


7 47 m.l 

8 24 m.l 


17 


114.') hi 




25' n 47 8 II 






^ ' ' : — r 1 


a 


^ 




BOSTON, N. ENGLAND, 


CONNC'T. N. YORK CITY, 


WASHINGTON, 


h" 
X 




CQ 


NEW YORK STATE, 


NEW JERSEY, 


MARYL'D.VIRG'A, 


o 
55 


^ 


« 


MICHIGAN, WI.SCONSIN, 


PENNSYLVANIA, OHIO, 


KENT'Y.MISS'URI, 


O 


o 

>• 


•3 


IOWA, OREGON. 


INDIANA, ILLINOIS. 


CALIFORNIA. 


SUN 


Sl/'N 


MUO.N 


HighW. 


SUN 


SUN 


MOON 


HiKhW. 


SUN 


eCN M.iON 1 


Q 


a 


m 


EISES. 


SETS. 


SETS. 


BOSTON. 


EISKS. 


SETS. 


SKT8. 


N.YOEK. 


KI9E3. 


SETS. SETS. 1 


. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


■B. M. 


H. M. 


U. M. H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


n. M. 


H. M. H. M. 1 


1 


T 


14 26 


6 33 


4 55 


10 24 


3 50 


6 29 4 69 


10 29 


36 


6 27 


5 1 


10 33 


2 


W 


14 45 9 


6 34 


4 54 


11 25 


4 42 


6 30 4 68 


11 29 


1 28 


6 2S 


5 


11 32 


3 


T 


15 4 3 


6 35 


4 53 


morn 


5 32 


6 3l'4 57 


morn 


2 18 


6 29 


4 59 


morn 


4 


F 


15 22 42 


6 36 


4 52 


28 


6 24 


6 32 4 56 


30 


3 10 


6 30 


4 58 


33 


6 


S 


15 41 6 


6 37 


4 50 


1 29 


7 12 


6 33 4 55 


1 30 


3 58 


6 31 


4 57 


1 31 


6 


s 


15 59 16 


6 39 


4 49 


2 31 


8 


6 35 4 53 


2 31 


4 46 


6 32 


4 56 


2 31 


1 


M 


16 17 8 


6 40 


4 48 


3 34 


8 47 


6 36 4 52 


3 32 


5 33 


6 33 


4 55 


3 31 


8 


T 


16 34 34 


6 41 


4 47 


4 39 


9 31 


6 38 4 50 


4 36 


6 17 


6 35 


4 64 


4 34 


9 


W 


16 52 S 


6 43 


4 45 


rises 


10 16 


6 39 


4 49 


rises 


7 2 


6 36 


4 63 


rises 


10 


T 


17 9 5 


6 44 


4 44 


4 21 


11 


6 40 


4 48 


4 26 


7 46 


6 37 


4 52 


4 32 


11 


F 


17 25 60 


6 45 


4 43 


5 6 


11 44 


6 41 


4 47 


6 12 


8 30 


6 39 


4 51 


5 18 


12 


S 


17 42 16 


6 47 


4 42 


6 


ev. 38 


6 43 


4 46 


6 6 


9 24 


6 40 


4 5tj 


6 13 


13 


s 


17 58 25 


6 48 


4 41 


7 5 


1 28 


6 44 


4 45 


7 11 


10 14 


6 41 


4 49 


7 18 


14 


M 


18 14 14 


6 49 


4 40 


8 17 


2 19 


6 45 


4 44 


8 23 


11 6 


6 42 


4 48 


8 29 


15 


T 


18 29 44 


6 51 


4 39 


9 31 


3 16 


6 47 


4 43 


9 36 


ev. 2 


6 43 


4 47 


9 41 


IG 


W 


18 44 56 


6 52 


4 38 


10 50 


4 1? 


6 48 


4 42 


10 63 


59 


6 44 


4 46 


10 56 


17 


T 


IS 59 46 


6 53 


4 37 


morn 


5 11 


6 49 


4 41 


morn 


1 67 


6 45 


4 46 


morn 


18 


F 


19 14 17 


6 54 


4 36 


5 


6 :o 


6 60 


4 40 


6 


2 56 


6 46 


4 45 


8 


19 


S 


19 28 27 


6 65 


4 36 


1 19 


7 7 


6 51 


4 40 


1 19 


3 63 


6 47 


4 44 


1 20 


20 


s 


19 42 16 


6 56 


4 35 


. 2 30 


8 5 


6 62 


4 39 


2 29 


4 61 


6 48 


4 44 


2^28 


21 


M 


19 55 43 


6 58 


4 34 


3 42 


8 69 


6 64 


4 38 


3 40 


5 45 


6 49 


4 43 


3 37 


22 


T 


20 8 49 


6 59 


4 33 


4 64 


9 51 


6 55 


4 38 


4 61 


6 37 


6 60 


4 42 


4 47 


23 


W 


20 21 32 


7 


4 33 


sets 


10 40 


6 66 


4 37 


sets 


7 26 


6 61 


4 42 


sets 


24 


T 


20 33 53 


7 1 


4 32 


4 17 


11 24 


6 67 


4 36 


4 23 


8 10 


6 52 


4 41 


4 30 


25 


F 


20 45 61 


7 3 


4 31 


5 8 


morn. 


6 68 


4 36 


5 14 


9 3 


6 63 


4 41 


5 21 


2G 


S 


20 57 25 


7 4 


4 31 


6 5 


17 


6 69 


4 35 


6 11 


9 50 


6 64 


4 41 


6 18 


27 


s 


21 8 36 


7 5 


4 30 


6 56 


1 4 


7 


4 35 


7 2 


10 34 


6 55 


4 41 


7 8 


28 


M 


21 19 23 


7 6 


4 29 


8 11 


1 48 


7 1 


4 35 


8 15 


11 16 


6 66 


4 40 


8 21 


29 


T 


21 29 46 


7 7 


4 29 


9 14 


2 30 


7 2 


4 34 


9 18 


morn. 


6 67 


4 40 


9 22 


i 30 


W 


21 39 44 


7 9 


4 29 


10 16 


3 16 


7 4 


4 34 


10 18 


2 


|6 58 


4 40 


10 21 


CUBI0U3 Rhymes. 
What is earth, sexton ?— A place to dig graves ; 


■What is earth, soldier ?— A place for a battle ; 


What is earth, herdsman ?— A place to raise 
cattle ; 


What is earth, rich maa?— A place to Avork 


slaves ; 


What is earth, widow ? — A place of true sor- 


What is earth, grey -heard ?— A place to grow 


row; 


old; 


What is earth, tradesman ? — I'll tell you to- 


What is earth, miser ?-A place to di? gold ; 


morrow ; 


What is earth, school-boy ?— A place for my 

piiiy; 

What is earth, maiden ?— A place to he gay ; 


WTiat Is earth, sick man ?— 'Tis nothing to me 


Wiiat is earth, sailor? — My home is the sea; 


What is earth, beamstress ?— A place where I 


What is earth, statesman? — A place to win 
fame ; 


weep ; 
What is earth, sluggard? — A good place to 




What is earth, author? — I'll write there my 


sleep ; ' name ; | 



12th Month.] DECEMBER, 1859. [31 Days. | 


MOON'S PHASES. 


Boston. 


New York 


Baltimore. 


Charleston. 


Sun on Menduui 1 
or noonnwrk. | 




D. 


U. M. 


H. M. 


II. M. 


n. M. 


D. 


H. M. S. 


First Quarter . . • 


2 


9 6 m. 


C 54 m. 


8 44 m. 


8 30 m. 


1 


11 49 12 
11 52 31 


Full Moon 


9 


10 29 ev. 


10 17 ev. 


10 7ev. 


9 54 ev. 


9 


Third Quarter 


16 


4 32 ev. 


4 20 ev. 


4 10 ev. 


3 57 ev. 


17 


11 66 18 


New M""" 


24 


13 m. 


61 m. 


41 m. 


')H m 


25 






_„ — 1 


-0»- ^ ■" 19 


S 


• 




BOSTON', X. ENGLAND, 


CONNC'T, N. YORK CITY, 


WASHINGTON, i 


^ 


OQ 


NEW YORK STATE, 


NEW JERSEY. 


MARTL'D.VIRG'A, | 


s 


^ 


1 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


PENNSY1.VANIA, OHIO, 


KENT'Y,.MIS3'UKI, i 


b. 
O 


o 


•a 

'a 


IOWA. OREGON. 


INDIANA, ILLINOIS. 


CALIFORNIA. \ 


SUN 


SUiS MOON |HigbW.| 


SUN 


SUN 


MOON |H,gb\V.| 


8CN SON 


MOON 


< 
Q 


-< 
a 




H. M. 


SETS. SETS. 


BOSTON. 


RISKS. 


SETS. 


SETS. 


N.YOEK. 


RISES. SETS. 


SETS. 


o . 


H. M. H. M. 


H. >I. 


H. M. 


n. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. H. M. 




H. M. 


1 


T 


21 49 17 


7 10 


4 29 11 17 


4 


7 6 


4 34 


11 19 


46 


6 59 4 40 


11 20 


2 


F 


21 68 25 


7 11 


4 29 morn 


4 44 


7 6 


4 34 


morn 


1 30 


7 0'4 39 


morn 


3 


S 


22 7 7 


7 12 


4 28 


18 


'5 30| 


7 7 


4 34 


18 


2 16 


7 1:4 39 


19 


4 


s 


22 15 24 


7 13 


4 28 


1 19 


6 19 


7 8 


4 33 


1 18 


3 6 


7 2 4 39 


1 18 


5 


M 


22 23 15 


7 14 


4 28 


2 21 


7 6 


7 9 


4 33 


2 19 


3 52 


7 3 4 38 


2 17 


6 


T 


22 30 40 


7 15 


4 28 


'3 28 


7 58 


7 10 


4 83 


3 24 


4 44 


7 4 4 38 


3 21 


7 


W 


22 37 39 


7 16 


4 28 


4 37 


8 52 


7 11 


4 S3 


4 32 


5 38 


7 5 4 38 


4 28 


! 8 


T 


22 44 10 


7 17 


4 28 


5 48 


9 47 


7 12 


4 33 


5 43 


6 33 


7 6 4 38 


5 37 


9 


F 


22 50 16 


7 18 


4 28 


rises 


10 39 


7 13 


4 83 


rises 


7 25 


7 7 4 38 


rises 


10 


S 


22 65 54 


7 19 


4 28 


4 48 


11 29 


7 14 


4 83 


4 55 


8 15 


7 8 4 38 


5 2 


11 


s 


23 1 5 


7 20 


4 28 


G 1 


ev. 27 


7 15 


4 83 


6 7 


9 13 


7 9 4 38 


6 13 


12 
13 


M 


23 5 48 


7 21 


4 28 


7 21 


1 21 


7 15 


4 33 


7 26 10 7 


7 10'4 39 


7 30 


T 


23 10 4 


7 22 


4 28 


8 40 


2 8 


7 16 


4 38 


8 3410 54 


7 10 4 39 


8 47 


14 


W 


23 13 53 


7 22 


4 28 


9 55 


3 


7 17 


4 34 


9 67 11 46 


7 114 39 


9 59 


15 


T 


23 17 13 


7 23 


4 28 


11 8 


3 51 


7 17 


4 34 


11 9ev. 37 


7 114 39 


11 10 


16 


F 


23 20 6 


7 24 


4 28 


morn 


4 44 


7 18 


4 34 


morn 


1 30 


7 12 4 39 


morn 
20 


17'S 1 


23 22 31 


7 24 


4 29 


21 


5 39 


7 18 


4 34 


20 


2 25 


7 12 4 40 


18 
19 


S 


23 24 27 


7 25 


4 29 


1 33 


8 34 


7 19 


4 35 


1 31 


3 20 


7 13i4 40 


1 29 


M 


23 25 56 


7 25 


4 29 


2 45 


7 35 


7 19 


4 35 


2 41 


4 21 


7 13j4 40 


2 38 


20 


T 


23 26 56 


7 26 


4 30 


3 56 


8 31 


7 20 


4 36 


3 51 


5 17 


7 14i4 41 


3 4G 


21 


W 


23 27 27 


7 26 


4 30 


5 5 


9 28 


7 20 


4 36 


4 .59 


6 15 


7 14 


4 41 


4 54 


; 22 


T 


23 27 31 


7 27 


4 31 


6 14 


10 24 


7 21 


4 37 


6 7 7 10 


7 15 


4 42 


6 


F 


23 27 6 


7 27 


4 31 


sets 


11 10 


7 21 


4 37 


sets 7 56 


7 15 


4 42 


sets 


S 


23 26 12 


7 28 


4 32 


4 64 


11 57 


7 22 


4 38 


4 59 8 43 


7 16 


4 43 


5 5 


25 
26 


s 


23 24 51 


7 28 


4 32 


5 56 


morn 


7 22 


4 38 


6 1 9 29 


7 16 


4 43 


6 7 


M 


23 23 1 


7 29 


4 33 


7 2 


43| 


7 23 


4 39 


7 6 10 10 


7 17 


4 44 


7 11 


27 


T 


23 20 42 


7 29 


4 34 


8 4 


1 24; 


7 23 


4 39 


8 7 10 45 


7 17 


4 45 


8 10 


28 


W 


23 17 56 


7 29 4 34 


9 6 


1 59 


7 24 


4 40 


9 7 11 22 


7 18 


4 45 


9 9 


29 


T 


23 14 41 


,7 29;4 35 


10 5 


2 36 


7 24 


4 40 


10 6 morn 


7 18 


4 46 


Ifl 7 


30 


F 


23 10 59 


j7 SO'4 36 


11 6 


3 16 


7 25 


4 41 


11 6 2 


7 19 


4 47 


11 6 


31 


S 


23 6 49 


i7 30'4 37 


morn 


3 66 


7 25 


4 42 


morn 42 


7 19!4 4S 


morn 


What is earth, Monarch ? — For my realm 'tis 


plimentary. I do not know of another indi- 


given ; 


vidual it would give me so much pleasure to 


What 13 earth, Christian ?— The gateway of 


hang." 


Heaven. 






The fbllowing is a passage from the prayer 


A story is told «t a very polite sheriff who 


of a clergyman who officiated in the House 


came very near being outdone by a person i( 


of Representatives on the last day of the ses- 


was the line of his duty to hang. " Sir," said 


sion : 


the gentleman, as the sheriff was carefully 
adjusting the lOpe, "really your attention de- 


" Be with them in their weakness, strength- 


en them with thy strength, scan with thy search- 


serves my thanks. In fact, I do not know of 
one I should rather have hang rae " " Really," 
said the sheriff, " you are pleased to be com- 


ing eye all their legislative acts, and we pray 
Thee, Lord, that Xhou wilt ovenule all their 


doings ! " 



16 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



UNITED STATES GOYERNMEXT. 



THE EXECUTIVE. 

JAMES BUCHANAN, of Pennsylvania, Prfiderit of th« Unitid States Salary $25,000 

JOUX C. BKECKINlUDGE,-of Kentucky, Vice President " 6,000 

THE CABINET. 

LEWIS CASS, of Michigan, Secretary of State Salary $8,000 

HOWELL COBB, of Georeia, Hecrttury of Vie Treitmry " S,(X>0 

JACOB THOMPSON', of Mississippi, Secretary of the Interior .... " S.OOO 

ISAAC TOl'CEr, of Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy " S,C»00 

JOHN B. fhOYD, of Mt^mia., Secretary of War " 8.000 

JERE.MIAH S. BLACK, of Pennsylvania, ^«om«y-G'«»!errt/ " 8,000 

AARON V. BROWN, of Tennessee, Postmaster- General " 8,000 



THE JUDICIARY. 

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 
KOGER B. TANEY, of Maryland, Chief Jwstice, Salary $6,500. 



John M'Lkas of Ohio, Associate Justice. 
James M. Watse, of Georgia, " " 

JoHS Catro.s. of Tennessee, " " 

Peter V. Daniel, of Virginia, " " 



John A. CajIpbell, of A\a., Associate JmHc^ 
Sam'l Nelson, of N. York, " " 

Robert C. Grier, of Pi'un., " " 

Nathan Cliff ord, of Maine, " " 



Salary of Associate Justices, $6,000. Court meets first Monday in December, at Washington. 

XXXVtli COXGRESS. 

Second Session opened Monday, Dec. 6, 1S5S, closes March 4, 1S59. 

SENATE— 64 Members. 

John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, President ea-qfficio. 
[Republicans (in Italics), 20; Democrats (in Roman), 39; Americans (in small capsi, 5, 
Total, 64. The figures before each Senator's name denote the year when his term expires.] 



1861. 
1365. 



1R59. 
Iti61. 



1S61. 

1863. 



iwn. 

1863. 



1859 
1861. 



Iffi9. 
1861 



1861. 
1365 



I 1S61 
1863. 



1R59. 
1861. 



1859. 
1861. 



ALABAMA. 

.Benjamia Kitzpatrick. 
.Clement C. Clay, Jr., 

ARKANSAS. 
.William K.Sebastian. 
. Roben W. Johnson. 

CALIFORNIA. 

.William M. (iwin, 
.•David C. liroderick. 

CONNECnCtTT. 

.l/ifayflU S. footer, 
.* James Dixon. 

DELAWARE. 

.*Mariin W. liateg, 
.James A. Bajard. 

FI/>RIDA. 
.Stephen R. Mallory. 
.David L. Yulee, 

GKORGIA. 
.Alfred Iverson. 
. Robert Toombs, 

I.VDIANA. 

.Graham N'. Filch. 
.Jesiiel). Bright. 

ILLINOIS. 

.Stephen ,\. Donslaa, 
. Lyman Truml/ull. 

IOWA. 

.George \V. Jones, 
.Jam/a Uartark 



1859 
1861 



1859. 
1863. 



KENTnCKT. 

.John B. Thompson, 
.John J. Crittenden. 

lOtriSIANA. 
.Judah P. Benjamin, 
.John Slidell. 

MAINE. 
. William J'ilt Fenseriden, 
.Hannilial Hamlin. 



1859. 
1863. 



1861 
1863. 



1859. 
1863, 



1S.59 
1863 



1859 
1863 



1861. 
1863. 



1861 
1863 



1861 
1863 



* Ki.>t in the preceding Senate. 



MASSACniTSETTS. 

.Ilrtiry Wihon, 
.Chatle<i SunincT. 
MARYLAND. 
. .J.iines A. Pearce, 
.*.4nthony Kennedy. 

michiga.n. 
.Charles K. Stnart 
. .*2arhariah Chandler. 

MI.NNrSOTA. 

, .•James .'^hield8, 
. .•Henry .M. Rice. 

Miwissirpi. 
..Albert G. Brown, 
.'Jefferson Davis. 

MISSOURI. 
..Tames S. 'Jreen, 
.♦Truf^ten Polk. 
Kr.w-BA«rsniRE. 
.'Daniel Clarlt. 
.John P. Hale, 

KEW YORK. 

. WiOiam H. Seward, 
.*PrttU>n King. 

t By Ezecatire 



NEW-JKRSCT. 

IS-W.. William Wright, 
1S63. .JobnR. Thomson. 

NORTH Carolina. 
1859..r)avid.S. Reid. 
1861. .*Thomas L. Clingman.-f 

OHIO. 

ISfil.. George K. Pugb. 
1863. .liaijamin F. Wade. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1861.. William Bigler, 
1863. .*Simon Camfrnn. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1859.. Philip Allen., 
1863 . . * James F. Simmmi.;. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1859. .•.lames Chesnni, Jr., 
1861..*James II. Hammond. 

TE.VNESSEE. 

18,«..JoHN Bell. 
1863. .*Aiidrew Johnson. 

TEXAS. 

1S.W..^.IM H' U5T0N, 

lS61..*.M:itt. Ward.t 

VERMONT. 

)m..JrirohColI<imer, 
1863. .Solomon Fool. 

VIRGINIA. ■ 

1,«03. .James .M. Mason, 
ISCo. . Robert .M. T. Hunter 

■WISCONSIN. 
\9ff\...amrltK Durlef. 
' 1863. .* James R. Doolial^ 
appointxneat to 61) vacancies. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



17 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES— 237 Members, 

JAMES L. ORR, of South Carolina, Speaker. 

James C. Alle*.', of lUinois Clerk. 



ALABAMA. 

1. "James A. Siallworth, 

2. Eli S. Shorter, 

3. James F. DodweU, 

4. *SydenhBm Moore, 

5. George S. Houston, 

6. \V. K. W. Cobb, 

7. *Jabez L. M. Curry, 

ARKAh'SAS. 

1. Alfred B. Greenwood, 

2. *K<lward A. Warren. 

CALirORKIA. 

1. •Charles I,. Scott, 

2. *J. 0. McKibbin 

CONSECIICnT. 

1. Ezra Clarki jr., 

2. "Saniuel Arnold, 

3. .'Sidney Dean, 

1. *\Vilbam D. Bishop. 



FLORIDA. 

♦George S. Hawkins. 

GEORGIA. 

1. James L. Seward, 

2. Martin J. Crawford, 

3. Robert P. Trippe, 
i. *Lucius J. Gartrell, 

5. *Augus.tus R.Wright, 

6. *James Jackson, 

7. »JosuCA Hill, 

S. Alex. U. Stephens. 
iLLiyois. 

1. Elihu a. Wa^hbumt, 

2. *John F. Fariisicortfi, 

3. *Oicen Lorejou, 

4. * W'iUiam Kellogg, 

5. ♦Isaac N. Morris, 

6. (Vacancy,) 

7. *Aiirou riha w, 

8. •Robert Smith, 

9. «S. S. Marshall. 

INDIANA. 

1. *William J. Niblack, 

2. Willi-nm H. Knglith, 

3. •James Hughes, 

4. *James B. Foley, 

5. *JJacid Kilgore, 

6. •James M. Gregg. 

7. •J ohn G. Davis, 

8. *Jame.i Wilson, 

9. Schuyler Col/ax, 

10. *Charles Oine, 

11. John V. PeitU. 

IOWA. 

1. *Smnwl R. Curtit, 

2. * Timothy Davis. 

KE.NTCCKY. 

1. Henry C. Buniett, 

2. *Samuel O. Feyton, 

3. Wm. L. U.vnBRWoOD, 

4. Alljert G. Talbott, 

5. Joshua H. Jewett, 

6. John >I. Elliott, 

7. HoMpu'Y Varshaix, 

8. 'James B. Clay, 

9. •John C. Masoo, 
la *Jno. W. Stevenson. 



LOinSlA»»A. 

1. George Edstis, jr., 

2. Miles Taylor, 

3. Thomas G. Davidson, 

4. John M. Sandige. 

MAINE. 

1. John M. Wood, 

2. *Charks J. Oilman, 

3. *Xehemiah Abbott, 

4. *Freeinan H. Morse, 

5. Israel Wajihbum, jr., 

6. *ilUphen C. Foster. 

MARYL.1ND. 

1. James A. Stewart, 

2. James B. Rioaud, 

3. James M. Harris, 

4. He.sry W. Davis, 
6. *Jacob M. Kunkel, 
6. Thomas F. Bowie. 

MASSACHUSETIS. 

1. Hohert B. Ball. 

2. James Buffinton, 

3. K'illiam H. DamreU, 

4. Ziitus B. Coniijis, 

5. Ait.vm BurlingamA, 

6. Timothy Daris, 

7. Daniel W. Gooch, 

8. Chnunrey L. Knapp, 

9. *Eli Thayer, 

lU. Calcin C. Chaffee, 
11. * Henry L. Daices. 

MICHIGAS. 

1. William A. Howard, 

2. Henry Wabirnn, 

3. Darid S. Walbridge, 

4. *De WiU C. Leach. ■ 

MINNESOTA. 

•William W. Phelps, 
•Jas. M. Cavauaugh. 

HISSOCRI. 

1. *Francis P. Blair, jr., 

2. •Thos. L. Anderson, 

3. •John B. Clark, 

4. •James Craig, 

5. *Sam. H. Woocsorf, 

6. John S. Phelps, 

7. Samuel Caruthers. 



MISSISSIPPI. 

1. •Lucius Q. C. I^^mar, 

2. *Renben Davis, 

3. William Barksdale, 

4. *Olho R. .Singleton, 

5. John J. McRae. 

NEW-HAMPSUIKE. 

1. James Pi)<e. 

2- Jtamn W. Tappan, 

3. Aaron S. C'Ujfin. 

NEW-JERSET. 

1. Isaiah D. Clair son, 

2. George K. Roljhint, 

3. •(iar. B. Adrain, 

4. ♦John Hnyler, 

5. 'John R. Wortendyke. 



6, •John A. Gilmer, 

6. ♦Alfred M. Scales, 

7. Burton Craige, 

8. ♦Jobs B. Va.sce. 

NEW-TORK. 

1. 'John A. Searing, 

2. ♦George Taylor, 

3. •Daniel E. Sickles, 

4. John Kelly, 

5. •WUliam B. Slaclay, 

6. *John Cochrane, 

7. *Elijah Ward, 

8. ♦Hor. F. Clarke, 

9. ♦Jno. B. Haskin, 

10. Amjtfrose S. MuTrrau, 

11. *Williain F. Russtill, 

12. *John Thompson, 

13. *Abraham B. Olin, 

14. ♦Erastus Coming, 
13. Eduard Dodd, 

16. *George W. Palmer, 

17. Francis E. Spinner, 

18. *Clark B. Cochrane, 

19. *Olicer A. Horse, 

20. Orsamus B. Matteson, 

21. Henry Bennett, 

22. *Hemry C. Goodicin, 

23. *aiarhs B. Hoard, 
34. Ama<! P. Grander, 
25. Edicin B. Mort^an, 
28. *Emory B. PoUle, 

27. John M. Parker, 

28. William H. Kelsey, 

29. ''Samuel G. Andrews, 

30. *J.id<ion W. Sherman, 

31. *Silas M. Burroughs, 

32. ♦Israel T. Hatch,' 

33. *lieuLen E. Fenton. 

OHIO. 

1. •Geo H. Pendleton, 

2. 'Wm. K. Groesbeck, 

3. ♦C. L. Vallandigham, 

4. Matthias H. Nichols, 

5. Michard Mott, 

6. •Joseph R. Cockerill. 

7. Aaron Hailan, 

8. Benjamin Si'inton. 

9. ♦Lawrence W. Hall, 

10. ♦Joseph Miller. 

11. Valentine B. Horicn, 

12. ♦Samuel .S. Cox, 

13. John Shennan, 

14. Philemon Bliss, 

15. ♦Joseph Burns, 

16. *0!/dnor B. Tompkins, 

17. ♦^ illiam Lawrence, 

18. Benjamin F. LeiUi,-, 

19. E-ltMTd ^yade. 

20. Joshua R. Gitldings, 

21. John A. Bingham, 

PENNSlXTANLi. 

L Thomas B. Florence, 

2. *Edicard Joy Monis, 

3. ♦James I>HiirJy, 

4. *Henry M. Phillips, 

5. ♦Owen Jones, 

6. .1 o h n Hickman, 

7. •Henry Chapman 

8. WiViam B. Keiw, 

9. Anthony E. Roberts, 
10. John C Kunkel, 



11. ♦William L. Dewart, 

12. ♦Paul Leidy, 

13. •Wm. H. Dimmick, 

14. Galusha A.Grotc, 

15. •Alison White, 

16. •John A. Ahl, 

17. ♦Wilson Reilly, 

18. John R.Edie, 

19. John Cotode, 

20. ♦Wra. Montgomery, 

21. Darid Ritchie, 

22. Samuel A. Purviance, 

23. * William Stetcart, 

24. ♦.lames L. Gillis, 

25. John Dick. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1. IVathaniel B. Durfee, 

2. * William D. Brayton. 

BOCTH CAROLINA. 

1. John McQueen, 

2. ♦W. Porcher Miles, 

3. Lawrence M. Keitt, 

4. ♦Milledge L. Bonham, 

5. James L. Orr, 

6. 'William W. Boyce, 

TENNESSEE. 

1. Albert G. Watkins, 

2. *HOKACE .Mavnakd, 

3. Samuel A. Smith, 

4. John H. Savage, 

5. Charles Readv, 

6. George W. Jones, 

7. John V. Wright, 

8. F. K. ZOLLICOFFER, 

9. ♦John D. C. Atkins, 
10. William T. Avery, 

TEXAS. 

L •Guy M. Bryan, 
2. *James H. Heagac, 

VERMONT. 

1. *Ezekiel P. Walton, 

2. Justin S. Mori ill, 

3. *Momer E. Royce. 

VIRGINIA. 

1. ♦MuscoeR.H.Gametf, 

2. John S. Millson, 
.3. John S. Caskie, 

4. William O. Gooda, 

5. Thomas S. Bocock, 

6. P.iulns Powell. 

7. Williiim Smith, 

S. Charles J. Faulkner, 
9. John Letcher, 

10. ♦.-^herrard Clemens, 

11. ♦Albert G. Jenkins, 

12. Henry A. 7]dmunds'>n, 

13. ♦George W. Hopkiiis, 

WISCONSIN. 

1. *.Tohn F. Poller, 

2. Cfidw. C. Washoume, 

3. Ctiarlet Billinghursi, 

DELEGATES. 

Kansas— A/0/-C J.Parrotl. 
Nebraska — F. Ferguson. 
New iiKxico — M. A. Otero. 
Orego.n — Joseph Line. 
L"i»H— JohnM BeruhseU 
Wash 'ton— 1. J. Steveos. 



NORTH CAROLLNA. 

1. Henry M. Shaw, 

2. Thomas Bnffln. 

3. Warren Wioslow, 

4. L. O'Brien Branch, 
[.Vdminislration Democrats fin Roman), lla ; Antil/ecompton Democrats (Roman spaced), 11 ; Repub' 

licans On Italics), 92; Americans (in small caps), 15. Vacancies, 2.— Total, 238.] 

Note.— Seversl of the Opposilioo MemberB from Pecmylvuiia acd .New Jersey were »uj>port»d by .imerieans 93 wali 
as Re**ublic*ns, and mi^bt, p.»ihaps, bt: mure proj.5r!y yi&teed with the fonxier, 

* Xaw Memberd. 



18 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL EEGISTKR. 



XXXVIth CONGRESS— as far as elected. 

SENATE— 64 Members. 



1561 Beiij. F)i?.patrick, 
1S65 Clement C. Clay, jr. 

.MiKAXSAS. 

1?61 Robert W. Johntoii, 
l»t)5 William K.Sebastimi. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1861 "U'illiam M. llwin, 
lb(33 David C. Broderick. 

CONNECTICUT. 

1861 Lajhyelie S. Foster, 
IbtiS James Dixon. 

DELAWARE. 

1863 James A. Bayard, 
1805 [To be chosen]. 

FLOIlinA. 
1861 Tt&yid L. Yulee, 
1863 Stephen R. Mallory. 

GEORGIA. 

1851 Alfre4 Iveison, 
1885 Robert Toombs. 



INDIANA. 

1861 tGraham N. Fitch, 
1&63 t'lesse D. Bright. 



ILLI-NOIS. 

1861 Lmnan Trumhutt, 
IbtiS L'lio be chosen]. 

IOWA. 
IStU James Harlan. 
1865 *James 11'. (?Atni«. 

kentucky. 
1861 Jno.J.Crittenpbn, 
1865 *Lazarus W. Powell. 

LOUISIANA. 
1861 John Slidell, 
1865 [To be chosen]. 

MAINE. 

1863 Hannibal Hamlin, 
1863 [To be chosen]. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1863 Charles Sumner, 
1865 [To be chosen]. 

MARYLAND. 

18<il James A. Pearce. 
1863 Anth'nyKennedy. 



MINNF.S0TA. 

1853 Henry M. Rice, 
1865 [To be chosen]. 

MISSISSIPPI. 
1863 Jefferson Llavis, 
1865 Albert G. Brown. 
MISSOURI. 

1861 James S. Green, 
1863 Trusten Polk. 

NEW HAMFSHIRE. 

1861 Haniel aari; 
1865 John P. Hale. 

NEW YORK. 

1861 H'i;;tam H. Seward. 
1863 Preston King. 
NEW JERSEY. 
1863 John R. Thomson, 
1865 [To be chosen]. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

1861 Thos. L. Clingman, 
1865 Thomas Bragg. 



OHIO. 

1861 GeorRe E. Pngh, 
1863 ISenJaniin F. Wade. 



MICHIGAN. 

1863 Zachariah Chandler. 
1865 [To be chosen]. 

Democrats (in Romam, 34 ; Republicans (in 7ta?K«), 20 ; Anievicars (in small 
Total, 04. The flgiir-is before mch Senator's name denotes the year v.hen his term 
• .Not membeis of the XXXVih Cougrets. t Election contested. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

1861 William Bigler, 
1863 Simon Cameron. 

KIIOUE IStAND. 

1863 James F. Simmon.^, 
l.SiJo *Heni y B. A nthony, 

,><nrTH CAROLINA. 

1S(W Jas. n. Hammond, 
INio *James Chomiit, Jr. 

TENNESSEE. 

1863 Andrew Johnson, 
1865 W.O. P. Nicholson. 

TEXAS. 

1863 Matthew Ward. 
1S65 *J. AV. Hemphill. 

TERMONT. 

1861 Jacntt CoHnmer, 
1863 Sulomon FooU 

VIRGINIA. 
1863 James M. Mason. 
lS6o Robt. M. T. lluuter. 

WISCONSIN. 
1861 Charles Durkee, 
1863 James R DooliUle. 

CAis), 2 ; To he chosen, 8. 

expiree. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES— 236 Members. 



12 Charles L. Keale, 

13 *Abraham B. Olin, 

14 John H. RevnoldS, 

15 James B. .McKean, 

16 •tieorge W. Palmer, 

17 "Francis E. Spinner, 

18 "Clark B. Cochrane, 

19 James 11. Graham, 

20 Roscoe (-"onkling, 

21 R. Holland Duell, 

22 M. l.indlev Lee, 

23 •Charles B. Hoard, 

24 Charles B. i^edgwick, 

25 Martin Bntterfield, 

26 * Emory B. Pottle, 
21 Alfred Wells, 

28 WiUiam Irvine, 

29 Alfred Ely, 

30 .Anpnstns Frank, 

31 "Silas M. Uiuroughs, 

32 KlbiiilgeG. Spaulding 
3S "Reuben E. Fenton. 

onio. 

1 *George H. Pendleton, 

2 John A. Gurley, 

3 *C. L. Vallandigham, 

4 William Allen. 

5 James M. Ashley, 

6 William Hmrard, 

7 Thomas Corwin, 

8 "Beujiimin ^itanton, 

9 John Carey, 

10 Carey A. Trimble, 

11 Charles D. Mai tin, 

12 * Samuel S. Cox, 

13 "John Sherman, 

14 Cvrns .-pinck. 

15 William Helmick, 

16 "Cvdnor B. Tompkins 

17 Thomas C. Theaker, 

18 Sidnev Kgerton, 
l'.l "Edward Wade, 

20 John Hutch ins, 

21 "Jolui .\. Bingham, 

Republicans (Roman), 103; Adrainistra'n Democrata (Aaltu), 35 ; Anti-LMompton Semocratfl (S.MAU. 
CAPS), 11 i yet to be chosen, !^li. Total, 236. 

• Mamberi of tha preceding HouM. t Election cont«Bted. I AmericMi. 



ARKANSAS. 

1 T. C. Hindman, 

2 Albert HuM. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1 A. L. Dudley, t 

2 "JosephC. JIClilBBIN.t 

DELAWARE. 
1 * William G. WhiUlei/. 

FLORIDA. 

1 *Georgt S. Hawkins. 
IIJ-INOIS. 

1 "Elihu B. Washbnme, 

2 "John F. Farnsworth, 

3 "Owen Lovejoy, 

4 "William Kellogg, 

5 "Isaac N. JIobkis, 

6 [Vacancy]. 

7 James i;. Rop.insoS, 

8 Philip B. Fouke, 

9 j gun a. i.ogan. 

INDIANA. 

1 * William E. lyOilael; 

2 * ir!7(jVt?rt H. English, 

3 William M. Dunn, 

4 William S. Holman, 

5 "David Kilgore, 

6 Albert G. Porter, 

7 "John G. Dav^, 

8 "James Wilson, 

9 "Schuyler t.'olfax, 

10 "Charles Casu. 

11 "JohnU. Pettit. 

IOWA. 

1 "Samuel R. Gnrtis, 

2 William Vandevcr. 

.MAINE. 

1 Daniel E. Somes, 

2 John J. Perry, 

3 Flzra B. French.t 

4 "Freeman H. Morse, 

5 "Israel Washburno, jr. 

6 "Btephen 0. Foster.t 



MA8S.\CnUSETTS. 

1 Thomas 1). l-Uiot, 

2 "James BnfBjiton, 

3 Charles F. Adams, 

4 Ale.\ander H. Rice, 

5 "Anson Uurlingame, 

6 John B. Alley, 

7 "Daniel W. Gooch, 

8 Charles R. Train, 

9 "Eli '1 buyer, 

10 Charles Delano, 
U "Henry I.. Dawes. 

MICHIGAN. 

1 George B. Cooper, 

2 "Henry Waldron, 

3 Francis W. Kellogg, 

4 "DeWilt C. Leach, 

MISSOtlRI. 

1 J. Richard Barret,} 

2 * Thomas L. Andeison, 

3 *Jolin B. Vlaik, 

4 *.lanie.s Oraig, 

5 *Saiiuiei H. H'oodson, 

6 "./«/«! S. Phelps, 

7 John W. NoeU. 

new jkrsey. 

1 John T. Nixon,^: 

2 John I,. N. Stratton,+ 

3 "Garneit B. Adrain, 

4 Jetuk R. Riogs, 

5 William Pennington. 

NEW VOKK. 

1 Luther i',. Carter,^ 

2 James Ilnmphrey, 

3 spaniel E. SiMes,} 

4 Thomas J. ISnrr, 

5 ♦ William B. .Maelay, 

6 ''John Corhrnne, 

7 George BriggR,t 

8 "HoKACF, F. Clark, 

9 "John B. Haski.n, 

10 Charles H. Van Wyck, 

11 Williams. Kenyon, 



FENNSYI.TANTA. 

1 *Thonias B. Flo enee,} 

2 *.^dward .loy Morris, 

3 John P. Veriee, 

4 William Mjilward, 

5 John Wood, 

6 "John Hickman, 

7 Henry C. l.ongnecker, 

8 John Schwakiz, 

9 Thaddcus Stevens, 

10 John W. Killinger 

11 .lames H. t ampbell, 

12 tieorge W. Scranton, 

13 * William H. Limtuick, 

14 "(Jslushft A. Grow, 

15 James T. Hale, 

16 Jienjamin F. .lunkin, 

17 Edwaid McPheison, 

18 SamnelS. hiair, 

19 ».lohn l.'ovode, 

20 * William Montgomery, 

21 James K. Mooiliead, 

22 Robert .McKnipht, 
2;^ "William Stewart, 

24 Chnpin Hall, 

25 Elijah Babbit. 

SOUTH CAROLIWA. 

1 *John McQueen, 

2 * William P. Miles, 

3 *Law)ence M. Keitt, 

4 *MiUedge L. BimhoMl, 

5 John D. Ashmore, 

6 * William W. Boyee. 

VERMONT. 

1 "Esekiel P. Walton, 

2 ".lustiu S. JlorriU, 

3 "Homer E. Royce. 

WISCONSIN. 

1 "John F. Potter, 

2 "Cad. C. Washbume. 

3 Charles B. Lan aliee. 



LAWS OF CONGRESS. 



LAWS OF CONGRESS. 



19 



The following are abstracts of the more im- 
portant Acts passed at the first session of the 
XXXVtb Congress, which assembled at Wash- 
ington, on Monday, Dec. T, 185T, and adjourned 
Monday, June, 1-1, 1858. 

AN ACT TO ACTHORIZE THE ISSUE OF TREASUBT 
NOTES. 

Authorizes the issue of Treasury Notes, by 
order of the President, not exceeding twenty 
millions of dollars, in denominations of not less 
than $100 each, and at an annual interest not, 
exceeding 6 per cent., the notes to be redeem- 
ed within one year after their date, and after 
the maturity of such notes interest thereon to 
cease 60 days after the Treasury Department 
shall have advertised its readiness to redeem 
them. The act also authorizes the Secretary 
of the Treasury to borrow money on the credit 
of such notes. The notes are made transfer- 
able by indorsement, and are receivable for 
dues to the General Government. New notes 
may be issued in place of those redeemed from 
time to time up to 1S59. Counterfeiting these 
notes is made a felony, punishable with impri- 
sonment at hard labor, not less than three nor 
more than ten years, and a fine not exceeding 
$5,000. 

INVALID PENSIONS. 

An act for the payment of Invalid Pensions 
for the year ending June 30, 1859, appropriates : 
For Invalid Pensions under various 

acts, $.343,000 

For widows of revc.'utionary soldiers,. 250,000 
For widows and orphans under acts of 

'48 and '5.3, 86,000 

For navy pensions to widows and or- 
phans, 90,000 

For privateer Invalids, 500 

Total invalid and other pensions, $769,500 

SOUND DCE.S. 

An act to enable the President to carry out 
treaty stipulations with Denmark, for the 
discontinuance of sound dues, appropriates 
$403,781. 

PRINTING DEFICIENCICS. 

An act to supply deficiencies for paper, print- 
ing, binding and engraving, ordered by the 
XXXIIId and XXXIVth Congress, appro- 
priates 

For paper and printing, $161,620 

Binding, lithograph and engraving,. .. 179,570 



ganized by the State of Texas for the defence 
and protection of the frontier, said regiment to 
be composed of 1 colonel, 1 lieut.-colonel, 1 
major, 1 adjutant with rank of 1st lieutenant, 
1 quartermaster and commissary with similar 
rank, 1 surgeon and 2 assistant surgeons, 1 ser- 
geant major, 1 quartermaster and commissary 
sergeant, and 10 companies each with the usual 
officers and 74 privates. Each officer below the 
rank of major is required to furnish himself 
with a horee and equipments, for the use of 
which he shall receive 40 cents per day while 
in actual service. The regiment is to be armed 
at the expense of the United States, receive the 
same pay and rations, and be subject to the 
same rules and regulations as cavalry in the 
regular army. The act also provides that for 
the purpose of quelUng disturbances in Utah, 
and the suppression of Indian hostilities on the 
frontiers, the President may call into the United 
States service for 18 months, two additional 
regiments of volunteers, of 740 privates and 
the usual number of officers, each, which may 
be cavalry or infantry at the option of the 
President. If called as cavalry, to be on a 
footing with the Texas regiment, and if as in- 
fantry, to be on the same footing as infantry in 
the regular service. 

DEFICIENCIES. 

An act to supply deficiencies in the appro- 
priations for the service of 1S58, appropriates 
as follows : 

Expenses of House of Representa- 
tives, $G8,413 

Regular supplies of Quartermaster's 

Department, 773,000 

Horses for dragoons, 252 000 

Incidental expenses of Quartermas- 
ter's Department, 190 OOO 

Transportation of the army, etc., . . . 5,400^000 

Subsistence in kind for army, 1,220,'000 

Deficiency in P. 0. Department, . . . I,'469'l73 

Miscellaneous items, 246 624 



Total printing deficiencies, $341,190 

THREE REGIMENTS OF VOLUNTEERS. 

An act to provide for three regiments of vo- 
lunteers, authorizes the President to receive 
into the service of the United States one regi- 
ment of mounted volunteers for 18 months, 
unless sooner discharged, to be raised and or- 



Total deficiencies, $9,624,210 

The act also provides that whenever here- 
after contracts shall be made by the Secretary 
of War or of the Navy, by virtue of " An act 
in addition to the several acts for the establish- 
ment and regulation of the Treasury, War and 
Navy Departments," he shall, if Congress be in 
session, immediately report to both houses the 
reasons for making such contract, and if it be 
not in session then he shall report at its next 
session, and no such contract shall be made 
hereafter except in cases of pressing exigency. 

TO PROVIDE FOR ISSUING SERVICE AND RETURN 
OF PROCESS IN CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS, 

Bracts as follows : 

All suits not of a local nature, hereafter to 
be brought in the Circuit and District Courts 
of the United States, in a district in any State 
containing more than one district, against a 
single defendant, shall be brought in the dis- 



20 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



trict in which the defendant, resides; but if 
there be two or more defendants, residing in 



LAND CLAIMS IN CALIFORSIA. 

An act to amend " an act to ascertain and 



different districts in the same State, the plaintiff „„,„" ,i,V . „, , „„,, ri,;,«^ ir, r'oi;f„-„i« " 

: -.1 ^■-..;„. „„^ ;--.,„ „ A.,^i: »» settle the private Land Claims in Lalifomia, 

may sue in either district and i5sue a duplicate I ., '^_, . ■ i- ■ .v. j' 

■■; =""= ^" ^ ,]„„,, j:,„„, J ,„ .«,„' provides : That in cases pending in the dis- 

WTit azainst the defendants, directed to the '^ . . . m, i- ■. i ct. . • <-< it 

—--.iT 1 T„„V„^^,»,^^:-.^io.^rif^^!„ ,h^ c,.,„ ; irict courts of the Lnited States in California, 
marshal of any other district witnin the ctate i i » .v i cu • • „ 

■ -Ti • I. t, „\><- .i.„ ,!„<•„•, ^„„.o ,ao:-i„ „„ J on appeal from the decree of the commissioners 
in which anv of the defeadants reside, and i . ^ • j .., .v, ,„ i„„j i„-„ 

1., : J „„,i .„, A ;„t„ .1,^ '«■„„ I to ascertain and settle the private land claims 

when executed and returned into the office , , . Conm-ess nassed March 3 

from which thev were issued, shaU const tute ; "5'°/'^./°?./'" °' Congress passed Marcn .j, 
one suit and be proceeded on accordingly; andi^Sol.if either party shall desire o examine 
upon anv judgment rendered in a su t go ^ P>' y^'^f^,'**''^'"^ '^ »"? pther 'l.^trlct ^wth- 
l; ».7 ,„,„.o „.• »^o^,..:^« r„o,- Ko !-=„o/i I in said State, or shall require the production 
brought, process ot execution mav be issued, ' , ' •.. • . . u i 

J- . A. .1 ,u„i „«• „„^A\'.f^.t ;„ ji.^ i of any paper, written instrument, book or 

directed to the marshal of anv district in the , . • .V • » •. _ „-j 

,,, . T •.„„<■„ i~ .Xi „„,.„„ ,..i,»,^ document, in the possession of a witness resid- 
same state. In suits of a local nature where i . . ,, j- . • . .l . v • .u 

the defendant resides in a different district in i >°S m another district, the court wherein the 

the same State than the one in which suit L. : "^^f "■IP'f'l."'^; °-,''°^ ?f ?^ '^"Tl\TZ 
brought, the plaintiff may have original ^^a order the cUrkoU^^d court to^ssu^ !,^,>',pce,ia ^ 
final process against each defendant, directed or a subpana du<-e^ tec-urn for such witness ; , 
to the marshal of the district in which he re- ^^"']' subpoena or subpcena duces tecum shall 
sides. In all cases of a local nature at law or ! j;"° ^to any other district in said ^tate and 
in equity where the land or other subject-mat- ■ ^.'^ s«^^<^f '^> .''l^ '"^'^•>^'. "^ either d.slnct, as 
ter of afixed character lies partly in one dis- ; "'e .court or judge may direct: And the court 
trict and partly in another, within the same j ;>;; fufo^r^'oSnce trsaid ™ 
State the plaintiff may bring his su^^ 

Circuit or District Court of either district, and , . • j i .w • <• 

the court in which anv such suit shall have 1 1."- ^ \"''P«''^^.'f ."^''. "°''^'-Jf^.^ provisons of 

been commenced, .shalliLiTejurisdictiontohear 1*1"^ ^f ■„"?,* "^'^'vi'V" ^^,!'*' ^^ ^"r^' T'lT 
■" ' ^ide, shall be entitled to the same fees for al- 



and decide the same, and to cause final process 
to be issued and executed as fully as if the land 
or other subject-matter were wholly within the 
district for which such court is constituted. 



IKDIAS APPROPRIATIOSS. 

An act making appropriations for the cur- 
rent and contingent expenses of the Indian 
Department, for the year ending June 80, 1859, 
appropriates as follows : 
Pay of Indian Superintendents, 

Agents etc $230,650 

Payment toBlackfoot nation, 

Payment to the Chippewas of Lake 

Superior and Mississippi, 

Paj'ment to the Sioux of Mississippi, 
Payment to various tribes in fulfill- 
ment of treatj- stipulations, 



tendance as are allowed by the laws of the 
State of California to witnesses in similar cases. 



PCBLIC ARCHIVES OP CALIFORNIA. 



S0,54C 
150,000 



821,297 



An Act to provide for the collection and 
safe-keeping of Public Archives in the State of 
California, makes it the duty of the Secretary 
of the Interior to cause to be collected and | 
deposited in the oCice of the Purveyor-General j 
In California, all official books, papers, instru- j 
I nients of writing, documents, archives, official | 
o..,000 , seals, stamps or dies, that may be found in the j 
unauthorized possession of any individual, ' 
relating to and used in the administration of ■ 
government, and public affairs in the depart- ; 
ment of Upper California, and which belonged 
to the government, during the existence of. 
_ . , , . ,. «-■ ooj jno Spanish or Mexican authority in Upper Cali- ; 

Total Appropnation, 51,334,493 fo^nia; to be securely kept by the Surveyor- 1 

ADMISSION OF MINNESOTA. . General in the archives of his Office ; and copies ; 

An act for the admission of the State of ' thereof, authenticated by the Surveyer-General ^ 
Minnesota into the Union, recites that whereas, i under the seal of his office shall be evidence in 
Congress authorired Minnesota to form a Con- 1 a" cases where the originals would be evidence ; 
stitution and State Government, and the peo- i Provided, That at the time of depositing said 
pie of that territory have formed and adopted >ooks, papers writings and documents in said 
by popular vote such constitution, therefore be i archives, a schedule and accurate description 
it. enacted, etc. that the State of Minnesota shall | thereof shall be made by the Surveyer-General 
be one and is hereby declared to be one of the ' ^''^i a statement of the time and place where 
United States of America, and admitted into j 'he same were found, and when they were de- 
the Union on an equal footing with the original j Posited in the arc.iives w-hich shall be certified 
States, in all respects whatever. The Act fur- ! "^^er ^he seal of the Surveyor-General, and 
ther provides that the State shall be entitled to \ ^'ed in his office ; and a certified copy of said 
two representatives in Congress till the next I schedule shall be transmitted to the Commis- 
apportionment, and constitutes the State a judi- 1 ^'oner of the General Land-Office, and also to 
c al District of the United States. •< the Attorney-General. If the Surveyor-General | 

! shall have cause to suspect a concealment of 

WEST POINT MILITARY ACADEMY. , ^ny such official books, papers, ctc, in any | 

.\n act making appropriations for this nation- house or place, he may have a search warrant | 

al school, appropriates for the pay of from any judge or commissioner of the United ' 

officers, instructors, cadets, etc.,... $112,800 States, by authority of which he may seize any 

Other items, 69,993 j such concealed books, papers, etc. The theft, 

concealment of any of these books, papers. 

Total Appropriation, $182,799 I seals, stamps, etc., from the Surveyor-General's 



LAWS OF CONGRESS. 



21 



oflBce, or their alteration or mutilation, is made 
a misdemeanor punishable by fine not exceed- 
ing $10,000 and imprisonment not exceeding 
10 years ; and the fraudulent placing or caus- 
ing to be placed of any fictitiojos book, writing, 
record, petition, decree, concession, grant, etc. 
among tlie archives of the Attorney-General's 
ofiQce, is made a misdemeanor punishable with 
fine or imprisonment, or both. 

FRAUDS IK LAND TITLES. 

An act for the Prevention and Punishment 
of frauds in land titles in California, provides 
that the counterfeiting, altering or forging of 
any petition, certificate, order, report, decree, 
patent, or any evidence of right or claim to land 
mines, or minerals in California, for the pur- 
pose of establishing against the United States, 
any claim to such property, shall be a misde- 
meanor, punishable with imprisonment at 
hard labor, for not less than 8 nor more than 
10 years and fine not exceeding $10,000. The 
same penalty applies to the presentation of 
false evidences of claims whether they relate to 
claims against the Spanish, Mexican, or United 
States Governments of California. The same 
penalty is also denounced against parties who 
shall, knowingly, present in any United States 
Court any such false evidence of claims to 
lands or minerals in California, or who shall, 
after the passage of this act, continue to pro- 
secute any such suit against the United States, 
founded on such false evidence of claim. 

LASD LAWS IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON 
TERRITORIES. 

An act for extending the Land Laws east of 
the Cascade Mountains, etc., provides as fol- 
lows: 

That the existing laws relating to the survey 
and disposal of the public lands in the Territo- 
tories of Oregon and Washington, west of the 
Cascade Mountains, be, and the same are 
hereby, extended and made applicable also to 
the lands lying east of said mountains within 
said Territories. 

LEGISLATIVE, ESECtTTIVB AND JCDICIAL EXPENSES 
FOR 1859. 

Appropriates as follows : 
Compensation and mileage of Sena- 
tors, $162,750 

Other expenses of the Senate, 828,870 

Pay and Mileage of Congressmen,... 580,250 

Binding documents, 100,000 

Engraving and Lithographing, 100,000 

Other expenses of the House, 320,813 

Other expenses of Congress, 246,980 

Executive and Departments of State, 129,750 

Expenses of Treasury Department, .. 728.610 

" Interior Department, . . . 574,990 

" War Department, 1-39,820 

" Navy Department, 108,458 

" Post Office Department,. 200,80ii 

" U. S. Mint and branches, 497,255 

" Territories, 198,000 

" Judiciary Department, . 1,280, OoO 

Collecting Land Revenue, 120,000 

Various other items, 263,879 

Total expenses, 16,081,270 



LAND -WARRANT TITLES. 

An act declaring the title to land warrants 
in certain cases provides : 

That when proof has been, or shall hereafter 
be, filed in the Pension Office, during the life- 
time of a claimant, establishing to the satisfac- 
tion of that office, his or her right to a warrant 
for military servioes, and such warrant has not 
been, or may not hereafter be, issued untU 
after the death of the claimant, and all such 
wan'ants as have been heretofore issued sub- 
sequent to the death of the claimant, the title 
to such warrants shall vest in the wido^, If 
there be one, and if there be no widow, then in 
the heirs or legatees of the claimant : and all 
such warrants, and all other warrants issued 
pursuant to existing laws, shall be treated as 
personal chattels, and may be conveyed by 
assignment of such widow, heirs, or legatees, 
or by the legal representatives of the deceased 
claimant, for the use of such heirs or legatees 
only. The provisions of the first section of 
the act approved March 22, 1852, to make 
land warrants assignable, and for other pur- 
poses, shall be so extended as to embrace land 
warrants issued under the act of the third 
March, 1855. 

HALF PAT TO WIDOWS AND ORPHANS. 

An act to extend an act entitled "An act to 
continue half-pay to certain widows and or- 
phans," approved February, 3, 1853, provides 
for a continuation of half-pay to all those sur- 
viving widows and minor children, who have 
been or may be granted 5 years half-pay, by 
any law of the United States, viz. : to such 
widows during life, and to such child or chil- 
dren, where there is no widow, while under 
the age of sixteen years, to commence from the 
expiration of the half-pa.v provided for by 
the act of Feb. 22, 1S5S. In the case of the 
marriage, or death of any such widow, the 
half-pay shall go to the children of the de- 
ceased soldier, while under the age of 16. The 
act shall not be construed to include any per- 
son now receiving a pension for life. 

TEXAS BOUNDARY LINE. 

An act to authorize the President, in conjunc- 
tion with the State of Texas, to run and mark 
the boundary line between the territories of 
the United States, and the State of Texas, em- 
powers the President to appoint a suitable 
person or persons, who in conjunction with 
commissioners appointed by Texas, shall run 
and mark the boundary line aforesaid. Be- 
ginning at the point where the 100th deg. of 
long. w. from Greenwich crosses Red River, 
and running thence n. to the point where said 
100th deg. of long, intersects the parallel of j 
36° SO' N. lat., and thence west with the said'' 
parallel of 86' 80' to the point where it inter- 
sects the 103d deg. of long. w. from Greenwich ; 
and thence south with the said lOSd deg. of 
long, to the 82d parallel of n. lat. ; and thence 
west with the said 32d deg. of n. lat. to the 
Rio Grande. Proper landmarks are to be 
established, and $80,000 are appropriated on 
the part of the United States to carry out the 
work. 



22 



THE TRIBCSK AXUANAC AND POLITICAL KKGISTF.R. 



COSSCLAB ASD DIPLOMATIC EXPENSES. 

An act making appropriations for the Con- 
sular and Diplomatic expenses for 1S59, appro- 
priates as foUoffs : 
Pay of Ministers, Commissioners and 

their secretaries, $410,000 

Relief and protection to American Sea- 
men abroad, 150,000 

Pay of Foreign Consuls, etc., . 852,120 

I Total Appropriation, 1912,120 

RATAL APPROPRIATIOSS. 

The appropriations for the Naral service for 
the year 1S59, are : 

Pay" of ofEcers aiid seamen, $8,805,405 

Provisions for officers and seamen, . . 941,700 
Increase, repair, equipment etc., of 

navy 2,850,000 

Ordnance, ordnance stores, and small 

arms, 595,000 

Contingent expenses that may accrue, &a7,600 

Pay, clothing, etc., of marine corps, 895,578 
Construct i'->n and repair of works at 

Navv Yards 1,5S4,6S9 

For 5 steam sloops, per act of 1S57, 1,350,000 
For 7 screw sloops, and 1 side-wheel 

steamer, 1,200,000 

Various other items, 866,1S2 



Total Naval Appropriations,... .|14,4S9,154 
The act provides for the enlistment of boys 
from 11 to 17 years of age, with the consent of 
their parents, or guardians, to serve till they ar- 
rive at the age of 21 years ; also that all the 
steamships of the United States, now building, 
or hereafter to be built, shall be named by the 
Secretary of the Navy, under the direction of 
the President, viz : ail those of 40 guns and up- ] 
ward, to be called after the States of the Union ; ! 
those of 20 guns and under 40, to be named j 
after the rivers and principal towns or cities of 
the country. The act also further provides I 
for the construction of 7 steam screw sloops of : 
war, whose greatest draught shall not exceed ! 
14 feet, to combine the heaviest armament | 
and greatest speed compatible with their char- 
acter and tonnage ; and one side-wheel war 
steamer, whose greatest draught shall not ex- 
ceed 8 feet, armed and provixied for service in 
the China Seas. 

CIVIL APPROPRIATIONS. 

The act making appropriations for sundry 
Civil Expense.^ of Government for 1859, ap- 
propriates as follows : 
To continue Atlantic Coast Survey, . . ?250,000 

To continue Pacific Coast Survey, 130,000 

For Deficiencv in fund for sick and 

disabled Seamen, 150,000 

Expenses of Light-house Establish- 
ment, 873 953 

Expenses of Survey of Public Lands, 862,000 
Coinpleuon Washington Aqueduct,.. 800,000 

For Capitol Fjcteasion 750,000 

Extension of General Post-OfBce, 100,000 
Continuing Extension of Treasury 
Buildings, 500,000 



Carried over.. ..$8,915,953 



Brought over. . . .$8,915,958 
Continuing Custom House, New 

Orleans 250,000 

Continuing Custom House, Charleston, 200,000 
Completing .ind repairing other Cus- 
tom Houses, 354,400 

Completing and repairing Marine 

Hospitals, 200,000 

Printing, binding, etc., ordered by 

previous Congresses, .•. . 816,000 

Various other items, 460,389 

Total Appropriations, $5,686,747 

The act provides for the contracting with 
Messrs. Gales and Seaton, for continuing the 
publication of the '• American State Papers," 
down to the 4th of March, 1859. 

ISDIAS APPROPRIATIOSS. 

An act making supplemental appropriations 
for the current and contingent expenses of the 
Indian Department, fulfilling Indian treaties, 
etc., appropriates the following: 
Subsistence etc., of friendly Indians 

in Oregon and California, ^78,000 

Other Indian appropriations, o85,867 

Total Appropriations, $958,867 

ARMT APPROPRIATIOSS. 

For the support of the Array for 1859, the 
following appropriations are made : 

For the recruiting service, $110,000 

For the Pay of the Army, 8,591,784 

For the Commutation of Ofi&cers' 

subsistence, 99S,4S5 

For the Commutation of forage for 

Officers' horses, 124,128 

For Subsistence in kind 1,380 652 

For Clothing for Army 1,062,703 

For regular supplies, quartermas- 
ter's Department, 1,745.000 

For Incidental Expenses, 600 000 

For constructing barracks, etc , . . . 790,000 

For Transportation of the Army, 8,400,000 

Horses for the new Regiments, 200,000 

Armament of fortifications, 300,000 

Ordnance, Ordnance Stores and 

supplies, 250.000 

Manufacture of Arms, 400,000 

Various other items, 2,206,405 

Total Appropriations, $17,059,107 

The bill also repeals the act for depriving 
sutlers of the right of lien upon any part of the 
soldiers' pay or to receive the soldiers' pay from 
the paymaster ; also repeals all laws author- 
izing the sale of military sites which may be- 
come useless for military purposes, and said 
lands shall not be subject to sale or preemp- 
tion under any of the laws of the United States. 
Certain reservations in Florida, are exempt 
from this act of repeaL 

CCSTOMS REVENtJE. 

The act making appropriations for the ex- 
penses of collecting tjie revenue from Customs, 
appropriates $1,800,000 half-yearly, equal to 
$3,600,000 per annum, also repeals ail laws 
authoriziog the payment of the expenses of 



\ 



LAWS OF CONGRESS. 



28 



collecting revenue out of accruing revenue be- 
fore the same shall have been paid into the 
Treasury, also authorizes the Secretary of the 
Treasury to discontinue aU ports of delivery, 
the revenue of 'which does not amount to 
$10,000 per annum. 

ISDIAN DEFICIEhXIES. 

The act to supply deficiencies in the appro- 
priations for expenses of the Indian Depart- 
ment, and for fulfilling of treaty stipulations, 
appropriates 1339,595, of which |264,000 is for 
maint.aining friendly relations with Indian 
tribes in Oregon. 

OCEAK MAIL TBANSPORTATION. 

The appropriations for the transportation of 
the United States mail by ocean steamers, 
and otherwise, for the year 1&69 are as follows : 
Transporting Maiis between N. Y. 

and Liverpool, $346,500 

Mails to and from N. Y., to N. 0., 

Havana and Chagres, 261,000 

Mails to and from Panama, California, 

and Oregon 328,350 

Mails from CaUfornia to Washington 

Territory, 122,500 

Mails from New York to Ha\Te, 230,000 

Other items 224,167 



Total Ocean Mail Service, $1,512,507 

The Post-master-General may cause mails 
to be transported between the United States 
and foreign ports by steamship for the sea and 
United States Inland postage, if by an Ameri- 
can vessel, and for the sea postage only by a 
foreign vessel, preference being given to Amer- 
ican steamships when departing from the same 
port for the same destination within three days 
of each other. 

GOVERSMEST LOAK. 

An act to authorize a loan not exceeding 
$20,000,000 empowers the President within 12 
months from the passage of the act to borrow 
that amount, on the credit of the United 
States, payable in fifteen years. Coupon stock 
to be issued for the amount bearing interest, 
not exceeding 5 per cent, per annum, payable 
semi-annually, and stock not to be sold by 
govemmeut at less than par. 

TEREirOEIAL C0t;ET3. 

An act in relation to courts, and the holding 
of terms thereof, in the several territories in 
the United States, provides : That the judges of 
the Supreme Court in each Territory of the U. S. 
may hold court within their respective dis- 
tricts, in the counties wherein, by the laws of 
said Territores, courts have been or may be 
estabUshed, for the purpose of hearing and 
determining all matters and causes, except 
those in which the United States is a party : 
Pravided, That the expenses thereof shall be I 
paid by the Territory, or by the counties in ' 
which said courts may be held. 

ISLAND MAIL SERVICE. 

The act making and providing for the ser- 
vice of the P. 0. Dep't for 1S59, appropriates 
as follows : 



Transportation of mails inland,. . . $10,140,520 

Compensation to Post-masters,... 2,325,000 

Clerks in Post-Offices, 850,000 

Post-Office blanks, 125,000 

Stamps and Stamped Envelopes.. 100,000 
T^dous other items and contin- 
gencies, 495,000 

Total Appropriations, $14,085,520 

The act appropriates $3,500,000 to meet any 

deficiency should the revenues of the P. O. 

Dep't be insufficient to meet its requirements. 

C0MPEK3ATI0N OF COKGBESSMEN. 

A joint resolution to amend the act of 1856 
to regulate the Compensation of members of 
Congress, provides, that Congressmen be paid 
as follows : On the first day of the first ses- 
sion of each Congress, or as soon thereafter 
as he may be in attendance and apply, each 
Congressman shall receive his mileage, as now 
provided by law, and all liis compensation 
from the beginning of his term, to be computed 
at the rate of |250 per month, and during the 
session, compensation at the same rate. And 
on the first day of the second or any subse- 
quent session, he shall receive his mileage as 
now allowed by law, and all compensation 
which has accrued during the adjournment, at 
the rate aforesaid, and during said session, 
compensation at the same rate. 

IKVESTIGATIHG COMMITTEES. 

A Joint Resolution providing for the ex- 
penses of Investigating Committees of the 
House, appropriates ^B5,0u0 to be added to 
the miscellaneous item of the House Contingent 
fund. Another resolution appropriates $12,000 
for expenses of Investigating Committees and 
of Judiciary Committees. 

THE EFflCIENCY OF THE NAVr. 

A Joint P.esolution to extend and define the 
authority of the President, t;nder an act of 
1S67, entitled " An act to amend an act entitled 
'An Act to Promote the Efficiency of the 
Navy,' " in respect to dropped and retired 
Naval officers, provides, that in case where the 
records of the courts of inquiry appointed un- 
der the act of Jan. 16, 1S57, may render it ad- 
visable, in the opinion of the President of the 
United States, to restore to tlje active or re- 
served list of the navy, or to transfer from fur- 
lough to leave of absence on the latter list, any 
officer who may have been dropped or retired 
bj the operation of the act of Feb 23, ls£5, 
entitled "An Act to Promote the Efficiency of 
the Navy," he shall have authority, any exist- 
ing law to the contrary notwithstanding, wiihin 
six months from the passage of this resolution, 
to nominate, and by and with the adiice and 
consent of tlie Senate, to appoint such officer 
to the active or reserved list, and ofy.ctrs so 
nominated and confirmed =LaIl occupy positions 
on the active and reserved lists, respectively, 
accoiding to rank and seniority, when dropped 
or retired as aforetaid, and be entitled to all 
the benefits conferred by the act approved 
Jan. 16, 1S57, on officers restored, or trans- 
ferred, to the active or reserved list under that 
act. 



24: 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AUD POLITICAL REGISTER. 



BirnCCLTIES WITH FAKAGUAT. 

The following Besolution was adopted with 
reference to the adjustment of difficulties with 
the Republic of Paraguay. That for the pur- 
pose of adjusting the differences between the 
United States and the republic of ParaguaJ^in 
connection with theattacliOQ the United States 
Bteamer Water M'itch, and nitii othej matters 
referred to in the annual message of the Presi- 
dent, he be, and is hereby authorized to adopt 
such measures and use such force as, in his 
judgment, may be necessary and advisable, 
in the event of a refusal of just satisfaction by 
the government of Paraguay. 

APPCOPRIATIOSa — EECAPITDLATIOS. 

Invalid Pensions, $769,500 

Printing Deficiencies, 841.190 

To Denmark in lieu of Sound Dues, 4t>S,781 

General Deficiencies for 1S63, .... 9,624,210 

Lndian Appropriations, 1,334,493 

C&rried up $12,473,124 



Brought up $12,478,1»4 

Expenses of Military Academy, .. 182,799 
Legislative, E.xecutive, and Judi- 
cial Appropriations, 6,081,270 

Running boundary of Texas and 

Xew Mexico, . . 80,000 

Consular and Diplomatic expenses, 912,120 

Naval Appropriations 14,489,154 

Civil Appropriations, 5,686,747 

Supplemental Indian Appro'tions, 953,867 

Army Appropriations, 17,059,107 

For Collecting Customs Revenue, 3,600,000 

Indian Deficiencies, 889,595 

Inland Mail Service 14,085,520 

Ocean Mail transportation, 1,512,507 

Miscellaneous items, 82,000 

Total Appropriations, $77,497,810 

Note. — There wers several acts passed mak- 
ing indefinite appropriations, that is, appro- 
priations of sums not specified. We cannot 
estimate the amount required to satisfy the 
provisioos of these acts. 



KANSAS. 



LECOMPTOX AND LECOMPTON, JR. 



The following record of the action of 
Congress on the admission of Kansas, and 
of the determined efforts of the Demo- 
cratic Pro-Slavery party to drag or dra- 
goon that Territory into the Union as a 
Slave State, will be interesting for future 
reference. 

The original bill, as it passed the Senate 
under the lead of Senator Green (March 
23, 1858), was as follows: 

THE LKCOMPTOS BILL. 

A Bill for the Admission of the State of Kansas 
into the Union, presented in the Senate by 
Mr. Green, of Missouri, from the Conumittee 
on Territories, February 17, 13.!>3. 
Wh^reiui, The people of the Territory of 
Kansas did, by a Convention of Delegates 
called and assembled at Lecompton, Septem- 
ber 4, 1367, form for themselves a Constitution 
and State Government, which said Convention 
having asked the admission of the Territory 
into the Union as a State on an equal footing 
with the original States, 

Be it enacted by the Ssnate and House of 
lieprese/iiatives of the United Sti'les of 
America in Congress assembled, That the 
State of Kansas shall be, and is hereby de- 
clared to be, one of the United States of 
America, and admitted into the Union on an 
equal footing with the original States, in all 
respects whatever; and the said State shall 
consist of all the territory included within the 
following boundaries, to wit : Beginning at a 
point on the western boundary of the State of 



Missouri where the thirty-seventh parallel of 
latitude crosses the same ; thence west on said 
parallel to the eastern boundary of New Mexi- 
co ; thence north on said "boundary to latitude 
thirty-eight; thence following said boundary 
westward to the eastern boundary of the terri- 
tory of Utah, on the summit of the Rocky 
Mountains ; thence northward on said summit 
to the fortieth parallel of latitude ; thence east 
on said parallel to the western boundary of the 
State of Missouri ; thence south with the west- 
ern boundary of said State to the place of 
beginning: 

Provide, That nothing herein contained 
respecting the boundary of said State shall be 
construed to impair the right of person or pro- 
perty now pertaining to the Indians in said 
Territory so long as such right shall remain 
unextinguished by treaty between the United 
States and such Indians, or to include any 
territory which, by treaty with such Indian 
tribes, is not, without the consent of siiid tribe, 
to be included within the territorial limits or 
jurisdiction of any State or Territory, but all 
such territory shall be excepted out of the 
boundaries, and constitute no part in the State 
of Kansas, until said tribe shall signify their 
assent to the Pre<iident of the United States to 
be included within said State, or to affect the 
authority of the Government of the United 
States to make any regulations respecting such 
Indians, their lands, property, or otherwise, 
which it would have been competent to make 
if this act had not been passed. 

Sec. 2. And be il/urVur enficted. That the 
State of Kansas is admitted into the Union 
upon the express condition that said State 
shall never interfere with the primary disposal 
of the public lands, or with any regulations 



KANSAS — LSCOMPTON AND LECOUPTON, JR. 



25 



which Conijr^s may find necessary for securing 
the titie in said lands to the bona fide purcha- 
sers and grantees thereof, or impose or levy 
any tax, assessment, or imposition of any de- 
scription whatsoever upon them, or other pro- 
perty of the United States, within the limits of 
said State ; and that nothing in this act shall 
be construed to abridge or infringe any right 
of the people asserted in the Constitution of 
Kansas, at all times, to alter, reform or abolish 
their form of government in such manner as 
they may think proper. Congress hereby dis- 
claiming any authority to intervene or declare 
the construction of the Constitution of any 
State, except to see that it is republican in 
form and not in conflict with the Constitution 
of the United States ; and nothing in this act 
shall be construed as an assent by Congress to 
all or to any of the propositions or claims con- 
tained in the ordinance annexed to the Con- 
stitution of the people of Kansas, nor to de- 
prive the said State of Kansas of the same 
grants which were contained in said act of 
Congress, entitled "An act to authorize the 
people of the Territory of Minnesota to form a 
Constitution and State Uovernment, prepara- 
tory to admission into the Union on an equal 
footing with the original States," approved 
February 26, 1S58. 

Sec. 3. And be it further ena<:ted, Tliat 
until the next general census shall be taken, 
and an apportionment of representation made, 
the State of Kansas shall be entitled to one 
Representative in the House of Representatives 
of the United States. 

The bill passed, 33 to 25, as follows : 

TEAS— FOR LECOSIPTON. 

Alabama — Fitzpatrick, Clay. Arkassas — 
Sebastian, Johnson. California — Gwin. Dela- 
ware — Bayard. Florida — Mallory, Yulee. 
GsoKGiA — Iveraon, Toombs. Indiana — Fitch, 
Bright. Iowa — Jones. KENTCCKy — Thompson. 
Louisiana — Benjamin, Slidell. Maryland — 
Pearce, Kennkdy. Missis.sippi— Brown. Mis- 
souri— Green, Polk. New Jkrsbt — Wright, 
Thomson. North Carolina — Biggs. P.^.nn- 
SYLVASiA — Bigler. Rhode Island— Allen. South 
Carolina — Evans, Hammond. Teknescjee — 
Johnson. Texas — Henderson, Houston. Vir- 
ginia— Mason, Hunter. Total, 88. 

HAYS — AQAISST LECOMPTOX. 

California — Broderick. Connecticitt — Fos- 
ter, I>utMii. Illisols— Douglas, TYumbull. 
Iowa — Harlan. KESirccT— Crittenden — 
Maine— i^e*«e«<f€>i, Hamlin. Massachusetts 
— Wilaon, Sumner. Michigan — Stuart, Chand- j 
U,r. New Hampshire — Hale, Clark. New 
York— Seward, King. Ohio— Pugh, Wade, 
Rhode Island — Sfimmons. ■ Tennessee — Bkll. 
Vermont — Collamer, Foot, Wisconsin — J>ur- 
kee. DooliUU. Total, 25. 

Absent or not voting — Messrs. Bates (Del.), 
Reid (N. C ), Davis (Mi.), Cameron (Pa.) Mr. 
Cameron paired off with Mr. Davis. 

Previous to taking this vote, Mr. Crit- 
tendea moved a substitute for tlie bill, in 
substance, that the Constitution be sub- 



mitted to the people at once, and, if ap- 
proved, the President to adihit Kansa.s 
by proclamation. If rejected, the people 
to call a Convention and frame a Consti- 
tution. The substitute made special pro- 
vision against frauds at the election. 

This substitute was lost, Yeas 24, Nays 
34. 

On the first of April the bill was taken 
up in the House and read once, when, its 
second reading having been objected to 
by Mr. Giddings, the question recurred 
uader the rule. Shall the bill be rejected? 
A vote was taken and resulted, Yeas 95, 
Nays 137. 

Mr. Montgomery, of Pa., offered as a 
substitute, with slight alterations, the bill 
which Mr. Crittenden had offered in the 
Senate. Mr. Quitman, of Mississippi, 
also offered a substitute, which was the 
same as the Senate bill, with the omission 
of the declaratory clause, "that the peo- 
ple shall have the right at all times to 
alter or amend the Constitution in such 
manner as they think proper," etc. 

Mr. Quitman's substitute was lost — Yeas 
72, Naj-3 160, the yeas being all from the 
Slave States, and Mr. Montgomery's was 
adopted, 120 to 112. 

The Crittenden-Montgomery substitute, 
as it passed, was in the following words : 

Section 1. Be it ena<:ted, eic. That the 
State of Kansas be, and is hereby, admitted 
into the Union on an equal footing with the 
original States in all respects whatever ; but 
inasmuch as it is greatly dL-puted whether 
the Constitution framed at Lecompton on the 
7th day of November last, and now pending 
before Congress, was fairly made, or expressed 
the will of the people of Kansas, this admission 
of her into the Union as a State is here de- 
clared to be upon this fundamental condition 
precedent, namely : That the said constitu- 
tional Instrument shall be first submitted to a 
vote of the people of Kansas, and assented to 
by them, or a majority of the votti-rs, at an 
election to be held for the purpo?:e; and as 
soon as such assent shall be giv<;n, .i:i;l duly 
made known by a majority of the Comruission- 
ers hfrein appointed to the President of the 
United States, he shall announce the same by 
proclamation, and thereafter, and without any 
further proceedings on the part of Congress, 
the admission of the said State of Kansas into 
the Union upon an equal footing with the origi- 
nal fitates, in all respeas whatever, shall be 



26 



THE TKIBCNK ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



complete and absolute. At the said election 
the voting shall be by ballot, and by indorsing 
on his ballot, as each voter may please, " for 
the Constitution," or " against the Constitu- 
tion." Should the said Constitution be rejected 
at the said election by a majority of votea 
being cast against it, then, and in that event, 
the inhabitants of said Territory are hereby 
authorized and empowered to form for them- 
selves a Constitution and State Government by 
the name of the State of Kansas, according to 
the Federal Constitution, and to that end may 
elect delegates to a convention as hereinafter 
provided. 

Sec. 2. And he it further enacted, That the 
said State of Kansas shall have concurrent 
jurisdiction on the Missouri and all other rivers 
and waters bordering on the said State of Kan- 
sas, so far as the same shall form a common 
boundary to said State and any other State or 
States now or hereafter to be formed or bound- 
ed by the same ; and said rivers and waters, 
and all the navigable waters of said State, 
shall be common highways and forever free, 
as well to the inhabitants of said State as to all 
other citizens of the United States, without 
any tax, duty, impost, or toU therefor. 

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That for 
the purpose of insuring, as far as possible, that 
the elections authorized by this act may be fair 
and free, the Governor and the Secretary of 
the Territory of Kansas, and the presiding 
officers of the two branches of its Legislature, 
namely, the President of the Council and 
Speaker of the House of Kepresentativea, are 
hereby constituted a board of commissioners 
to carry into effect the provisions of this act, 
and to use all the means necessary and proper 
to that end. Any three of them shall consti- 
tute a Board ; and the Board shall have power 
and authority, in respect to each and all of the 
elections hereby authorized or provided for, to 
designate and establish precincts for voting, or 
to adopt those already established ; to cause 
polls to be opened at such places as it may 
I deem proper in the respective counties and 
election precincts of said Territory ; to appoint, 
as judges of election at each of the several 
places of voting, three discreet and respectable 
persons, any two of whom shall be competent 
to act ; to "require the sherififs of the several 
counties, by themselves or deputies, to attend 
the judges at each of the places of voting, for 
the purpose of preserving peace and good 
order, or the said Board may. Instead of said 
sheriffs and their deputies, appoint, at their 
discretion and in such instances as they may 
choose, other fit persons for the same purpose; 
and when the purpose of the election is to elect 
delegates to a convention to form a constitu- 
. , tion as hereinbefore provided for, the number 
l| of delegate? shall be sixty, and they shall be 
apportioned by said board among the several 
counties of said Territory, according to the 
number of voters ; and in making this appor- 
tionment, the Board may join two or more 
counties together to make an election or repre- 
sentative district, where neither of the said 
counties has the requisite number of voters to 
entitle it to a delegate, or to join a smaller to 
a larger county having a gurplus population. 



where it may serve to equalize the representa- 
tion. The elections hereby authorized shall 
continue one day only, and shall not be con- 
tinued later than sundown on that day. The 
said board shall appoint the day of election for 
each of the elections hereby authorized, as the 
same may become necessary. The said Gov- 
ernor shall announce, by proclamation, the 
day appointed for any one of said elections, 
and the day shall be as early a one as is con- 
sistent with due notice thereof to the people of 
said Territory, subject to the provisions of this 
act. The said Board shall have full power to 
prescribe the time, manner and places of each 
of said elections, and to direct the time and 
manner of the returns thereof, which returns 
shall be made to the said Board, whose duty it 
shall be to announce the result by proclama- 
tion, and to appoint therein as early a d.-iy as 
practicable for tjie delegates elected (where 
the election has been for delegates) to assem- 
ble in convention at the seat of Government 
I of said Territory. When so assembled, the 
I convention shall first determine, by a vote, 
' whether it is the wish of the proposed State to 
I be admitted into the Union at that time ; and 
if so, shall proceed to^form a Constitution, and 
take all necessary steps for the establishment 
! of a State Government in conformity with the 
; Federal Constitution, subject to the approval 
and ratification of the people of the proposed 
' State. And the said convention- shall accord- 
; ingly provide for its submission to the vote of 
the people for approval or rejection ; and U 
the majority of votes shall be given for the 
; Constitution so framed as aforesaid, the Gov- 
1 ernor of the Territory shall, within twenty days 
J after the result is known, notify the President 
' of the United States of the same. And there- 
upon thf President shall announce the same by 
; proclamation, and thereafter, and without any 
j further proceedings whatever on the part of 
' Congress, the admission of the said State of 
' Kansas into the Union, upon an equal footing 
with the original States in all respects what- 
ever, shall be complete and absolute. 

Sec. 4. A7id be it farther enacted, That in 
the elections hereby authorized, all white male 
inhabitants of said Temtory over the age of 
twenty-one years, who are legal voters under 
the laws of the Territory of Kansas, and none 
others, shall be allowed to vote ; and this shall 
be the only qualification required to entitle the 
voter to the right of suffrage in said elections. 
And If any person not so qualified shall vote or 
offer to vote, or if any person sliall vote more 
than once at either of said elections, or shall 
make, or cause to be made, any false, fictitious 
or fraudulent returns, or shall alter or change 
any returns of either of said elections, such 
person shall, upon conviction thereof before 
any court of competent jurisdiction, be kept 
at hard labor not less than six months, and not 
more than three years. 

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the 
members of the aforesaid Board of Commis- 
sioners, and all persons appointed by them to 
carry into effect the provisions of this act, shall, 
before entering upon their duties, take an oath 
to perform faithfully the duties of their respec- 
tive offices -, and on failure thereof, they shall 



KANSAS — LKCOMPTON AND LECOMPTON, JP.. 



be liable and subject to the same charges and 
I penalties as are provided in lilce cases under 
the Territorial laws. 

Sec. 6. And be it fartlter enacted. That the 

officers mentioned in the preceding section 

shall receive for their services the same com- 

: pensation as is given for like services under 

I the Territorial lans. 

I Skc. 7. And be it further enacted. That 
I the said State of Kansas, when her admission 
i as a State becomes complete and absolute, shall 
; be entitled to one member in the House of Re- 
presentatives, in the Congress of the United 
States, till the next census be taken by the 
I Federal Government. 

i Skc. 8. And he it furilur enacted. That 
I the following propositions be, and the same 
I are hereby, offered to the said people of Kan- 
I sas for their free acceptance or rejection, which, 
if accepted, shall be obligatory on the United | 
j States atid upon the said State of Kansas, to 
I wit : First, That sections numbered sixteen ' 
I and thirty-six in every township of public lands 
'• in said State, and where either of said sections, i 
or any part thereof, has been sold or otherwise \ 
been disposed of, other lands equivalent there- 
to, and as contiguous as may be, shall be gran- 
ted to said State for the use of schools. 
SecoTid, That seventy-two sections of laud 
shall be set apart and reserved for the use and 
support of a State University, to be selected 
by the Governor of said State, subject to the ' 
approval of the Commissioner of the General : 
Land Office, and to be appropriated and ap- 
plied in such manner as the Legislature of said 
State may prescribe for the purpose aforesaid, 
but for no other purposes. Third : That ten 
entire sections of land, to be selected by the 
Governor of said State, in legal subdivi- 
sions, shall be granted to said State for the 
purpose of completing the public buildings, or 
for the erection of otliers at the seat of govern- 
ment, under the direction of the Legislature 
thereof. Fourth, That all salt springs within 
said State, not exceeding twelve in number, 
with six sections of land adjoining, or as conti- 
guous as may be to each, shall be granted to 
said State for its use ; the same to be selected 
by the Governor thereof within one year after 
the admission of said State, and when so select- 
ed, to be used or disposed of on such terms,- 
conditions and regulations as the Legislature 
shall direct : Froxdded, That no salt springs 
or land the right whereof is now vested in any 
individual or individuals, or which may be 
hereafter confirmed or adjudged to any indi- 
vidual or individuals, shall by this article be 
granted to said State. Fifth, That five per 
centum of the net proceeds of sales of all pub- 
lic lands lying within said States, which shall 
be sold by Congress after the admission of said 
State into the Union, after deducting all the 
expenses incident to the same shall be paid to 
said State, for the purpose of making public 
roads and internal improvements, as the Legis- 
lature shall direct : Froxided. The foregoing 
propositions hereinbefore offered are on the 
condition that the people of Kansas shall pro- 
vide, by an ordinance, irrevocable without the 
consent of the United States, that said State 
shall never interfere with the primary disposal 

II ' ' - - - ~ 



of the soil within the same, by the United 
States, or with any regulations Congress may 
find necessary for securing the title in said soil 
to honafide purchasers thereof, and that no 
tax shall be imposed on lands belonging to the 
United States, and that in no case sliall non- 
resident proprietors be taxed higher than resi- 
dents, ^ixth : And that the said State shall 
never tax the lands or the property of the Unit- 
ed States in that State : Frovided howerer. 
That nothing in this act of admission shall be 
so construed as to ratify or accept the ordinance 
attached to said Constitution ; but said ordi- 
nance is hereby rejected by the Government of 
the United States. 

The following are the Yeas and Nays : 

YEAS— TO .AMEND. 

California— McKibbin — 1. 

CoNSECTiccT — Clark, Deem — 2. 

Illinois— .£'/«7i?i Washburne, Farn^tcorth, 
Lovejoy, Kellogg, Morris, Harris, Shaw, Eo- 
bert Smith, Sam. S. Marshall — 9. 

Indiana — English, Foley, Kilgore, 3. G. Da- 
vis, Wilison, Colfax, Case, Fedit—H. 

Iowa — Curtis, T. Darin— 1. 

KEXTUCKy — Ukderwocd, Hcmi'Hket Mab- 

SHALL — 2. 

Maine— TTooc?, Gilman, Abbott, Morse, I. 
Washburne, Foster — 6. 

Maryland — Ricaud, J. M. Harris, H. Win- 
ter Davis — 3. 

Massachusetts — ITall, Buffi'nton. Damrell, 
Comins, Bui-lingame, Davis, Gooch, Knapp, 
Thayer, Chaffee, Dawes — 11. 
■ Michigan- i/oocarrf, Waldron, Walbridge, 
Leach— 4. 

Missouri— S^air — 1. 

New Hampshire— Piie, Tappan, Cragin — 3 

New Jersey — Clawson, liolbins, Adrain— 3. 

North Carolina— Gilmer — 1. 

Nkw yoRK— Haskin, H. F. Clark, Murray, 
Thompson, Oliyi, Dodd, Falmer, Spinner, 
Chirk B. Cochrane, Aforse, Matiescn. Ben- 
nett, Goodxcin, Hoard, Granger, Morgan, 
Fottle, Farker, Kelsey, Andrews, Sherman, 
Burroughs, Fentoih—ti. 

Ohio — Pendleton, tJroesbeck, Campbell, 
Nichols, Mott, Cockerill, Harlan Stanton, 
Hall, Horton, Cox, Sheim.an, Bliss, Tcmp- 
kins, Lawrence, letter. Wade, Giddinga, 
Bingham — 19. 

Pennsylvania — E. J. Morris, Owen Jcnes, 
Hickman, Roberts, Kniikel, Grow. E^iie, Co- 
vode. Montgomery, Fitchie, Furviance, Stew- 
art, Dick, Chapman — 14. 

PiHoiiE Island— i>M?;/<:«, Brayt<ni—2. 

Vermont — Walton, Mon-ill, Foyce-Z. 

%YiscoNSiN— Po«6r, C. C. Washburne Bit- 
Hnghurst—S.—Tolal, 120. 

NAYS. 

Alabama— f-tsllworth. Shorter, Dowdell, 
Moore, Houston, Cobb, Curry — 7. 

Arkansas— Greenwood, Warren— 2. 

California— Scott— 1. 

Connecticut — Arnold, Bishop -2. 

Delaware— Whiteley—1. 

Florida- Hawkins— 1. 

Georgia- Seward, Crawford. Trippe. Gar- 
trell, Wright, Jackson, Hill, Stephens- 8. 



•28 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



IsDiANA— Nttilack, Hughes, Gregg— 8. 

Kestcckt— Burnett, Peyton, Talbolt, Jew- 
ett, Elliott, Clay, Mason, Stevenson— 8. 

LocisiASA— KcsTis, Taylor, Davidson, San- 
didge — 4. 

Martlaxd— Stewart, Kunkel, Bowie— 8. 

MissocRi — AsDEKSOS, Clark, Craig, Woodsos, 
Phelps-5. 

Mississippi — Lamar, Davis, Barksdale, Sin- 
gleton, Quitman — 5. 

Nkw Jt:R^EV — Huyler, Wortendyke — 2. 

Nor.Ta Carolina- Shaw, Ruffin. 'Winslow, 
Branch, Scales, Craige, Clingman — 7. 

New Vorc — Searing, Taylor, Sickles, Kelly, 
Maclay, John Cochrane, Ward, Kussell, Corn- 
ing, Hatch- 10. 

Uuio— Miller, Burns- 2. 

Pknssylvasia — Florence, Landy, Phillips, 
Glancv Jones, Leidv, Dimmick, AVhlte, Aiil, 
GUlis.'Eeilly, Dewart— 11. 

.SocTH Cauolix.4 — McQueen, Miles, Keitt, 
Bonham, Boyce — 5. 

T KS N ESS tE— Wat kins, Matxard, S. A. Smith, 
Savage, Ready, Jones, Wright, Zoujcoffkb, 
Atkins, Avery — 10. 

Texas— Bryan, Reagan — 2. 

TiRGixiA— Garnett, Milleon, Caskie, Goode, 
Bocock, Powell, Smith. Faulkner, Letcher, Cle- 
mens, Jenkins, Edmundson, Hopkins — 13. To- 
tal, 112. 

.4ise7U— Caruthers (Mo.) 

recapitclatiox.. 
Yeas. 

Republicans, 92 ; Democrats, 22 ; Americans, 
6. Total, 120. 

Nay a. 

DemQcrats, 104 ; Americans, 8. Total, 112. 

The hill having been returned to the 
Senate on the second day of April, Mr. 
Green moved to disagree to the House 
amendment, which motion was adopted, 
Yeas 34, Nays 22. 

The foil owing are the Nays : 

Slessrs. Broderick, Cameron, Chandler, Clark, 
CoUamer, Crittenden, Dixon, Doolittle, Doug- 
la-, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Hale, Hamlin, 
Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, Stuart, lYum-' 
bull, Wade, Wilson. 

In the House of Representatives, on the 
7th of April, Mr. Montgomery, of Penn- 
sylvania, moved that the House adhere to 
its amendment, which motion was carried, 
Yeas 119, Nays 111 — the vote being the 
same as on the adoption of the amend- 
ment, with the exception "of Messrs. Mar- 
shall and Bowie, who paired off and did 
not vote. 

On the 13th of April, the Senate voted 
to insist and ask for a conference commit- 
tee. Yeas 30, Nays 24 — the Nays oeing 
the same as the Nays on Mr. 'Jreon's mo- 



tion to disagree, with the addition of 
Messrs. Bell and Sumner. On the follow- 
ing day, the House received a message 
from the Senate insisting on its disagree- 
ment and asking a committee of confer- 
jence, when Mr. Montgomery, of Pa., 
I moved that the House insist on its ad- 
I herence on which he demanded the pre- 
I vious question. The call for the previous 
j question was lost by the casting vote of 
j the Speaker. 108 to 108. Very much to 
the surprise of the House, Mr. English, of 
' Indiana, who had acted with the Anti- 
Lecompton party up to this time, moved 
I that the House agree to a Conference 
Committee, and that a Committee of three 
be appointed by the Speaker to meet a 
similar committee of the Senate, and on 
I this he called for the previous question, 
[which was ordered. The Yeas and Nays 
I were called, and the vote stood 108 to 
108: the Speaker voting in the affirmative, 
I Mr. English's proposition was agreed to. 
' The Yeas and Nays were as follows : 

] Teas — Messrs. Ahl, Anderson, Atkins, Avery, 
Barksdale, Bishop, Bocock, Bonham, Bowie, 
j Boyce, Branch, Bryan, Burnett, Burns, Caru- 
thers, Caskie, Clark (Mo.), Claj% Clemens, 
Clingman, Cobb, John Cochrane, Craig (Mo.), 
1 Craige (.N. C), Crawford, Curry, Davidson, 
i Davis (Miss.), Dewart. Dowdell, Edmund- 
' son. Elliott, English, Eustis, Faulkner, Flor- 
I ence. Garnet, Gartrell, Gcode, Greenwood, 
Gregg, Hall (Ohio), Hatch, Hawkins, Hill, 
Hopkins, Houston, Hughes, Jackson, Jen- 
j kins, Jewett, Jones (Tenn.), J. Glancj- Jones. 
Owen Jones, Ktitt, Kelly, Kunkel (Md), La- 
, mar. Landy, Leidy, Letcher, Maclay, McQueen, 
Mason, Maynard. Miles, Miller, Mill»on, Moore, 
Niblack, Orr, Pendleton, Peyton, Phelps, Phil- 
lips, Powell, Quitman, Ready, Reagan, Ruffin, 
Russell, Sandidge, Savage, Scales, Scott, Seai- 
iji2, Seward, Shaw (N. C), Shorter, Singleton, 
Smith iTenn.), Smith (Va.), Stallworth, Ste- 
phens, Stevenson, Stewart (Md.), Talbott, Tay- 
lor (N. Y.), Trippe, Ward, Warren, Watkins, 
While, Winslow, Woodson, Wortendvke, 
AVright (Ga.), AV right (Tenn.), ZolUcoffer— io9. 
Nats— Messrs. Abbott, Andrews, Bennett, 
Billinghurst, Bingham, Blair, Bliss, Erayton, 
Buffinton, Burhngame, Burroughs, Campbell, 
Case, Chaffee, Chapman, Clark (Conn.). Clark 
(N. if.), Clawson, Cockerill, Colfax, Comins, 
Covode, Cox, Cragin, Curtis, Damrell, Davis 
(Md.), Davis (Ind.), Davis (Mass.), Davb j 
(Iowa), Dawes, Dean, Dick, Dodd, Durfee, 
Edie. Farnsworth, Fenton, Foley, F'oster, Gid- 1 
dings, Gilman, Gooch, Goodwin, Granger, 
Groesbeck, Grow, Hall (Mass.) Harlan, Harris 
(Md ), Harris (IlL), Haskin, Hickman, Hoard, I 



KANSAS LECOMPTON AND LECOMPTON, JR. 



29 



Horton. Howard, Kellogg, Kelsey, Knapp, Law- 
rence, Leiter. Lovejoy, Marshall (Ky)., Mar- 
shall (111 ), Matteson, Montgomery. Morgan, 
Morrill, Morris (Penn.'). Morris (111.), Morse 
(Me.), Morse (N. Y.), Mott, Murray, Xichoh, 
Palmer, Pettit, Pike, Potter, Pottle, Purviance, 
Ricaud, Ritchie, Robbins, Royce, Shaw (III ), 
Sherman (Ohio). Sherman (N. Y.), Smith (111.), 
Spinner, Stanto'j, Stewart (Penn.), Tappan, 
Thompson, Tompkins, Underwood, Wade, Wal- 
bridge, AValdron, Walion. Washburne (111.), 
Washburne (Me.), Wilson, W6od— 108. 



not voting, had paired 



The foUowing 
off: 

A drain with Huyler. Dimmick with McKib- 
bin. Gillis with Roberts, Clark B. Cochrane 
with Sickles, Keilly with Thayer, Taylor (La.) 
with Kunkel (Pa.), Washburne (Wis.) with 
Arnold, Olin witk Corning. Whiteley, absent. 

The Committee of Conference was com- 
posed of Messrs. James S. Green (5Io.), 
Robert JI. T. Hunter (Va.), and William 
H. Seward (X. Y.), of the Senate, and 
Messrs. William H. English (Ind.), Alex. 
H. Stephens (Ga.), and William A. Howard 
(Mich.), on the part of the House. 

On the 23d of April the Committee made 
their report (a dodging, shufBing affuir, 
susceptible of various interpretations.) 
Messrs. Seward of the Senate, and How- 
ard of the House, dissenting. After a 
running fight of a week between the 
friends and opponents of the new dodge, 
on the 30th of April, the report of the 
Committee was adopted by both branches 
of Congress, and Lecompton, Jr., became 
a law. It is as follows : 

An Act for the Admission of the State of 
Kansas iiUo the Union. — Whereas, the people 
of the Territory of Kansas did, by a convention 
of delegates assembled at Lecompton on the j 
7th day of Nov., 1S57, for that purpose, form | 
for themselves a constitution and State govern- 1 
ment, which Constitution is republican ; and i 
where-ais, at the same time and place, said con- 1 
vention did adopt an ordinance, which said ; 
ordinance asserts that Kansas, when admitted \ 
as a Slate, will have an undoubted right to [ 
tax the lands within her limits belonging to the 
Uiiited States, and proposes to relinquish said 
asserted right if certain conditions set forth in 
said ordinance be accepted and agreed to by the 
Congress of the United States; and wh^erea.''. 
the said constitution and ordinance have been \ 
presented to Congress by order of said conven- , 
tioD, and admission of said Territory into the 
Union thereon as a State requested ; and , 
whereas, said ordinance is not acceptable to ; 
Congress, and it is desirable to ascertain 
whether the people of Kansas concur in the i 
changes in said ordinance, hereinafter stated, , 



and desire admission into the Union as a State 
as herein proposed : Therefore, 

£e it (na<.t<(/, tic. That the State of Kansas 
be, and is hereby admitted into the Union on 
an equal footing with the original States, in 
all respects whatever, but upon this funda- 
mental condition precedent, namely: ^hat the 
question of admission with the following propo- 
sition, in lieu of the ordinance framed at Le- 
compton, be submitted to a vote of the people 
of Kansas, and assented to by them or a ma- 
jority of the voters voting at an election to be 
held for that purpose, namely : That the fol- 
I lowing propositions be and the same are hereby 
i offered to the people of Kansas for acceptance 
or rejection, which, if accepted, shall be obli- 
I gatory on the United States and upon the said I 
I State of Kansas, to wit: Fii'>;t, That sections 
number sixteen and thirty-.»ix in every town- 
I ship of public lands in said State, or where i 
I either of said sections or any part thereof has \ 
\ been sold or otherwise disposed of, other lands 
j equivalent thereto and as contiguous as may 
be, shall be granted to said State for the use of 
I schools. Second, That seventy -two sections of 
i land shall be set apart and reserved for the 
I support of a State University, to be selected 
1 by the Governor of said State, subject to the 
j approval of the Commissioner of the General , 
' Land-Ofllce, and to be appropriated and ap- |i 
I plied in such manner as tlie legislature of said 
I State may prescribe for the purpose aforesaid, 
but for no other purpose. Third, That ten 
entire sections of land, to be selected by the 
Governor of said State, in legal subdivisions, 
shall be granted to said State for the purpose 
of completing the public buildings, or for the ! 
erection of others at the seat of government, 
under the direction of the legislature thereof. 
Fourth, That all salt springs within said State, 
not exceeding twelve in number, with six sec- 
tions of land adjoining, or as contiguous .as 
may be to each, shall be granted to said State 
for its use, the same to be selected by the , 
Governor thereof, within one year after the '! 
admission of said State : and, when so selected, 
to be used or disposed of on such terms, condi- Ij 
tions and regulations as the legislature may 
direct: Pi^ovided, That no salt springer land j 
the right whereof is now vested in any indivi- 
dual or individuals, or which may hereafter be 
confirmed or adjudged to any individual or j 
individuals, shall by this article be granted to 
said Stat-?. Fifth.,'X\iZX five per centum of the 
net proceeds of sales of all public lands lying 
within said State which shall be sold by Con- 
gress after the admission of said State into the 
Union, after deducting all the expenses incident 
to the same, shall be paid to said State for the 
purpose of making public roads and internal 
improvements, as the legislature shall airect : 
Provided, The foregoing propositions herein 
offered are on the condition th?t said State of 
Kansas shall never interfere •,fith the primarv 
disposal of the lands of the United States, or ij 
with any regulations which Congress may find \ 
necessary for securing the title in said soil to i 
bondf-de purchasers thereof, and that no tax i 
shall be imposed on lands belonging to the | 
United States, and that in no case shall non- 
resident proprietors be taxed higher than resi- 1 
dents. Sixth, And that said State shall never i 



so 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



tax the lands or property of the United States 
in that State. 

At the said election the voting shall be by 
ballot, and by endorsing on his ballot, as each 
voter may be pleased, " Propo:^tion accepted," 
or "Proposition rejected." Should a majority 
of the votes cast be for " Proposition accej.ted," 
the President of the United States, as soon as 
the fact is duly made known to him, shall an- 
nounce the same by proclamation ; and there- 
after, and without any further proceedings on 
the part of Congress, the admission of the State 
of Kansas into the Union upon an equal footing 
with the original States in all respects what- 
ever shall be complete and absolute; and said 
State shall be entitled to one member in the 
House of Representatives in the Congress of 
the United States until the next census be 
taken by the Federal Government. But should 
a majority of the votes cast be for " Proposi- 
tion rejected." it shall be deemed and held that 
the people of Kansas do not desire admission 
Into the Union with said constitution under the 
conditions set forth in said proposition: and in 
that event the people of said Territory are 
hereby authorized and empowered to form for 
themselves a constitution and State govern- 
ment, by the name of the State of Kansas, ac- 
cording to the Federal Constitution, and may 
elect delegates for that purpose whenever, and 
not before, it is ascertained by a census duly 
and legally taken that the population of said 
TeiTitory equals or exceeds the ratio of repre- 
sentation required for a member of the House 
of Kepresentatives of the Congress of the United 
States; and whenever thereafter such delegates 
shall assemble in convention, they shall first 
determine by a vote whether it is the wish of 
the people of the proposed State to be ad- 
mitted into the Union at that time; and, if so, 
shall proceed to form a constitution, and take 
all necessary steps for the establishment of a 
State government, in conformity with the Fede- 
ral Constitution subject to such limitations and 
restrictions as to the mode and manner of its 
approval or ratification by the people of the 
proposed State as they may have prescribed by 
law, and shall be entitled to admission into the 
Union as a State under such constitution, thus 
fairly and legally made, with or without slavery, 
as said constitution may prescribe. 

Sec. 2. And be it fai ther enacted^ That for 
the purpose of insuring, as far as possible, tliat 
the elections authorized by this act may be 
fair and free the Governor, Cnited States Dis- 
trict Attorney, and Secretary of the Territory 
of Kansas and the presiding officers of the two 
branches of its legislature, namely, the Presi- 
dent of the Council and Speaker of the House 
of Representatives, are hereby constituted a 
board of commissioners to carry into effect the 
nrovisions of this act, and to use all tlie means 
necessary and proper to that end. And three 
of them shajl constitute a board; and the 
board shall have power and authority to desig- 
nate and establish precincts for voting or to 
adopt those already established ; to cause polls 
to be opened at such places as it may deem 
proper in the respective counties and election 
precincts of said Territory ; to appoint as 
judges of election at each of the several places 



of voting three discreet and respectable per- 
sons, any two of whom shall be competent to 
act ; to require the sheriQs of the several coun- 
ties, by themselves or deputies, to attend the 
judges at each of the places of voting for the 
purpo.^e of preserving peace and good order ; 
or the said board may, instead of said sherilTs 
and tlieir deputies, appoint at their discretion, 
and in such instances as they may choose, other. 
fit persons for the same purpose. The election 
hereby authorized shall continue one day onh-, 
and shall not be continued later than sundown 
on that day. The said board shall appoint the 
day for holding said election, and the said 
governor shall announce the same by prf/cia- 
niation ; and the day shall be as early a one 
as is consistent with due notice thereof to the 
people of said Territory, subject to the provi- 
sions of this act. The said board shall have 
full power to prescribe the time, manner, and 
places of said election, and to direct the time 
[within] which returns shall be made to the 
said board, whose duty it shall be to announce 
the result by proclamation, and the said Gover- 
nor sh;ill certify the same to the President of 
the United States without delay. 

Sec. 3. And be it furtlier enacted. That in 
the election hereby authorized, all white male 
inhabitants of said Territory, over the age of 
twenty-one years, who possess the qualifications 
which were required by the laws of said Terri- 
tory for a legal voter at the last general tlec- 
tion for the members of the territorial legisla- 
ture, and none others, shall be allowed to vote ; 
and this shall be the only qualification required 
to entitle the voter to the rij^ht of suffrage in 
said election. And if any person not so quali- 
fied shall vote or offer to vote, or if any person 
shall vote more than once at said election, or 
shall make or cause to be made any false, ficti- 
tious, or fraudulent returns, or shall alter or 
change any returns of said election, such per- 
^on shall, upon conviction thereof before any 
court of competent jurisdiction, be kept at 
hard labor not less than six months and not 
more than three years. 

Si.c 4. And he it further enacted, lha.i ii\e 
members of the aforesaid board of commis- 
sioners, and all persons appointed by them to 
cany into effect the provisions of this act, shall, 
before entering upon their duties, take an oath 
to perform faithfully the duties of their respec- 
tive offices: and, on failure thereof, they shall 
be liable and subject to the same charges and 
penalties as are provided in like cases under 
the Territorial laws. 

Sec. 5. And he itfxirther enacted. That the 
ofGcors mentioned in the preceding section 
shall receive for their services the same com- 
pensation as is given for like services under the 
Territorial laws. 

The vote in the Senate, on agreeing to the 
Conference Committee's Report, stood — yeas, 
30; nays, 22; as follows: 

Yeas.— Jlcssrs. Allen, Bayard, Benjamin, 
Bigler, Biggs, Bright, Brown, Clay, Davis, 
Evans, Fitzpatrick, Green, Gwin, Hammond, 
Houston, Hunter, Iverson, Johnson (Ark.), 
Johnson (Tenn.), Jones, Kennedy, Mallory, 
Mason, Polk, Pugh, Sebastian, Thomson (N. J.), 
Toombs, Wright, Yulee. 



THE PUBLIC LANDS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES. 



31 



Nays. — Messrs. Broderick, Cameron, Chand- 
ler, CoUamer, Crittenden, Dixon, Doolittle, 
Douglas, Durkee, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, 
Hale, Hamlin, Harlan, King, Seward, Simmons, 
Stuart, Trumbull, AVade, Wilson. 

Paired. — Bell with Pierce, Fitch with Sumner. 

Absent. — Clark, Bates, Henderson, Keid, 
Thompson (Ky.), Slidell. 

In the House, on tlie final vote, among those 
who had voted against the original Lecompton 
Bill and who now supported the English dodge, 
were Gilmer, Am., of N. C, and the following 



Democrats, viz. : English and Foley of Ind. ; 
Cockerill, Cox, Groesbeck, Hall, Lawrence and 
Pendleton, of Ohio; and Owen Jones, of Pa. 
Gen. Quitman of Mississippi, and Mr. Bon- 
ham of S. C, fire eaters, voted No, and the fol- 
lowing members " paired off," viz. : Washburn 
(Wis.) with Arnold ; Matteson witli Reuben 
Davis; Purviance with Dimmick ; Morrill with 
Faulkner; Horton with Hill; J. C. Kunkel 
with Miles Taylor; Montgomery with Warren ; 
Thompson with Stewart (Md.) ; and Wood with 
George Taylor. 



THE PUBLIC LANDS— AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGES. 



The following bill appropriating public 
lands for the establishment of agricultural 
schools, which was introduced by Mr. Mor- 
rill, passed the House of Representatives 
on the •-2d of April, 1858, by a vote of 104 
to 100. 1.1 the Senate it was read twice 
and referred to the Committee on Public 
Lands, and will probably come up for 
final action in that body during this 
(1858-9) winter : 

An Act donating public lands to the several 
States and Tenltories which may provide 
colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the 
mechanic aits. 

Se it en icUd by the Senate and LToiMe of 
Rep'-e^entitive-t of tAo United States ofAm^ 
Hca in. Congreas ansembled, That there be 
g anted to the several States and Tenitoiies, 
f ■ the pu pose hereinafter mentioned, five 
m lions n ne hundred and twenty thousand 
(5,92U,00')) ac: es of land, to be apportioned to 
each State a quantity equal to twenty thousand 
(20,000) aces for each senator and representa- 
tive in Cong ess to which the States are now 
respectively entitled. 

Src. 2. And be it farther eiwicted. That the 
land aforesaid, after being surveyed, shall be 
apportioned to the several States and Terri- 
to.ies in sections or subdivisions of sections, 
not less than one quarter of a section ; and 
whenever there are public lands in a State 
wo.th one dollar and twenty-five cents per 
ac e [the value of said lands to be determined 
by the governor of said State], the quantity to 
which said State shall be entitled shall be 
selected from such lands, and the Secretary of 
the Interior is hereby directed to issue to those 
States in which there are no public lands of 
the value of one dollar and twenty-five cents 
per acre land scrip to the amount of their dis- 
tributive shares in acres under the provisions 
of this act, said scrip to be sold by said States 
anil the proceeds thereof applied to the uses 
and purposes prescribed in this act, and for no 
other use or purpose whatsoever : Provided, 
That in no case shall any State td which land 
scrip may thus be issued be allowed to locate 



the same within the limits of any other State, 
but their assignees may thus locate said land 
scrip upon any of the unappropriated lands of 
the United States subject to private entry. 

Sec. 3. And be it farther enacted. That in 
all the expenses of management and super- 
vision of said lands, previous to their sales, and 
all expenses incurred in the management and 
disbursement of the moneys which may be 
received therefrom, shall be paid by the States 
to which they may belong out of the treasury 
of said States, so that the entire proceeds of the 
sale of said land shall be applied without any 
diminution whatever to the pu; poses herein- 
after mentioned. 

Sec. 4. And be it further enacted. That all 
moneys derived from the sale of the lands 
aforesaid by the States to which the lands are 
apportioned, and f om the sales of land scrip 
hereinbefore provided for, shall be invested in 
stocks of the United States, or of the States, 
or some other safe stocks, yielding not less 
than five per centum upon the par value of 
said stocks; and that the moneys so invested 
shall constitute a perpetual fund, the capital 
of which shall remain forever undiminished 
(except so far as may be provided in section 
fifth of this acy, and the interest of which 
shall be inviolably appropriated by each State 
which may take and claim the benefit of this 
act to the endowment, support, and mainte- 
nance of at least one college where the leading 
object shall be, without excluding other scien- 
tific or classical studies, to teach such branches 
of learning as are related to ag;iculture and 
the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legis- 
latures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and 
practical education of tlie industrial classes in 
the several pursuits and professions in life. 

Sec. 5. And be it furtlier enacted. That the 
grant of land and land scrip hereby authorized 
shall be made on the following conditions, to 
which, as well as to the provisions he. einbefore 
contained, the previous assent of the several 
States shall be signified by legislative acts : 

First. If any portion of the fund invested, as 
provided by the foregoing section, or any por- 
tion of the interest thereon, shall, by any action 
or contingency, be diminished or lost, it »hall 
be replaced by the State to which it belongs, so 
that the capital of the fund shall remain for- 



82 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



ever undiminished ; and the annual interest 
shall be regularly applied without diminution 
to the purposes mentioned in the fourth section 
of this act, except that a sum, not exceeding 
ten per centum upon the amount received by 
any State under the provisions of this act, may 
be expended for the purchase of lands for sites 
or experimental farms, whenever authorized by 
the respective legislatures of said States. 

Second. No portion of said fund, nor the 
interest thereon, shall be applied, directly or 
indirectly, under any pretence whatever, to the 
purchase, erection, preservation, or repair of 
any building or buildings. 

third. Any State which may take and claim 
the benefit of the provisions of this act shall 
provide, within five years, at least not less 
than one college, as described in the fourth 
section of this act, or the grant to such State 
shall cease; and said State shall be bound to 
pay the United States the amount received of 
any lands previously sold, and that the title to 
purchasers under the State shall be valid. 

Fourth. An annual report shall be made 
regarding the progress of each college, record- 
ing any improvements and experiments made, 
with their cost and results, and such other mat- 
ters as may be supposed useful— one copy of 
which shall be transmitted by mail free, by 
each, to all the other colleges which may be 
endowed under the provisions of this act, and 
to the Smithsonian Institution, and the agri- 
cultural department of the Patent Office at 
Washington. 

Fifth. When lands shall be selected from 
those which have been raised to double the 
minimum price, in consequence of railroad 
grants, they shall be computed to the States at 
double the quantity. 

The yeas and nays on the passage of 
this bill were as follows : 

Yeas — Messrs. Abbott, Adrain, Ahl, Andrews, 
Bennett, Bingham, Bishop, Blair, Bliss, Bowie, 
Brayton, Buffinton, Burlingame, Burroughs, 
Campbell, Case, Chaffee, Ezra Clark, Clawson, 
Clark B. Cochrane, Colfax, Comins, Corn.ng, 
Covode, Cragin, Curtis, Damrell, Davis (Md.), 
D.avis (Mass.), Davis (Iowa), Dawes, Dean, 
Dick, Dodd, Durfee, Edie, Farnsworth, Fenton, 
Foley, Foster, Giddings, Gilman, Gooch, Good- 
win, Granger, Kobt. B. Hall, Harlan, J. M. 
Harris, Ilaskin, llatch. Hoard, Howard, Huy- 
ler, Kellogg, Kel.sey, Kilgore, Knapp, Leach, 
Lovejoy, McKibbin, H. Marshall, Maynard, 
Morgan, Morrill, E. J. Morris, F. II. Morse, 
0. A. Morse, Murray, Olin, P.arker, Petlit, 
Pike, Pottle. Purviance, Ready, Iteilly, Ricnud, 
Ililchie, Robbins, Roberts, Royce, Ru,»sell, 
Seward, J. Sherman, J. W. Sherman, Sickles, 
Stanton, Tappan, Thayer, Thompson, Tomp- 
kins, Underwood, Wade, Walbridge, Wald;on, 
AValton, E. B. Washburne, Israel Washbuin, 
^^^lite, AVhiteley, Wihnn, Wood, Wortendyke, 
A. R. Wright, and ZoUicoffer— IM. 

«; ^Ys— Messrs. Anderson, Atkins, Avery, 
Barksdale, BiUinghurst.. Bocock, Bonham, 
Branch. Bryan, Buvnett, Caskie, Chapman, 
J. B. Clark, Clay, Clingman, Cobb, J. Coch- 
rane, Cockerill, Cox, J. Craig. B. Craige, Craw- 
ford, Curry, Davidson, Davis (Ind.). Dewart, 



Dowdell, Edmundson, Elliott, English, Eustis, 
Faulkner, Florence, Gartrell, Goode, Green- 
wood, Gregg, Groesbeck, Grow, L. W. Hall, 
T. L. Harris, Hill, Houston, Hughes, Jackson, ! 
Jenkins, Jewett, Geo. W. Jones, J. G. Jones, 
0. Jones, Keitt, Kelly, Lawrence, Leidy, Leiter^ 
Letcher, Maclay, McQueen, Mason, Miles, Mil. 
ler, MiUson, Montgomery, Moore, Isaac N 
Morris, Mott, Niblack, Nichols, Pendleton, Pey' 
ton, Phelps, Phillips, Potter, Quitman, Keagan" 
Ruffin, Sandige, Savage, Scales, Scott, Searing' 
A. Shaw, H. M. Shaw, Shorter, Singleton, Wmi 
Smith, Spinner, Stallworth, Stephens, Steven, 
son, J. A. Stewart, Talbot, Geo. Taylor, Trippe. 
Ward, Warren, Watkins, Winslow, Woodson 
J. V. Wright— 100. 

PREEMPTION RIGHTS. 

Mr. Grow, member of the House of 
Representatives from Pennsylvania, pro- 
posed at the first session of the XXXVth 
Congress, the following important mea- 
sure for the protection of settlers on the 
Public Domain : 

A Bill to prevent the future sale of the public 
lands under proclamation of the President 
until the same shall have been surveyed for 
at 'east fifteen years. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Uoute of 
liepreseniatives o/tke United States, in Om,- 
green axsemliled. That from and after the first 
day of September, in the year of out Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, no 
public l.inds shall be exp.osed to sale by pro- 
clamation of the Pres^fieiit, uutil the same 
shall have been surveyed and the return 
thereof filed in the land oiiice for at least fifteen 
years. 

This bill, it wU be seen, gives the set 
tiers fifteen years, precedence over the 
speculators. On the 3d of May, 1858, 
Mr. Grow, moved to suspend the rules, 
with a view to the introduction of the 
above bill, which motion was vot^-d down 
as follows : 

Yeas;— Messrs. Abbott, Adrain, Andrews, 
Bennett, Bingham, Blair, Bliss, Brayton, BufGn- 
ton, Bui lingame. Case, E. Clark, //. F. Clark, 
Clawson, Colfax, Comins, Cov,, Crag'n, ,fam<;x 
Craif), Burt'On Craige, Curtis, Damrell, Dav'.s 
(Mass.), Davis (Iowa), Dean, Dick, Dodd, Dur- 
fee, Fo-ter, Giddings, Goodwin, Granger, Grow, 
R. B. Ilall, Harlan, T. L. Uai-ri«, Hickman, 
Hoard, Horton, Howard, G. W. Jones, Kdlogg, 
Kelly, Kelsey, Kilgore, Knapp, Leach, l^ove- 
joy, MuKi/n, Jforgan, Isaac N. Morris, F. H. 
Morse, Palmer, Parker, Pettit, Pike, Potter, 
RiCACD, Ritchie, Royce, A. Shaw, 3. Sherman, 
J. W. Sherman, Spinner, W. Stewart, Tajjpan, 
G. Taylor, Wade, Walbridge, Walton, 0. C. 
Washburn, E. B. Washburne, Israel Wash- 
burn— 74. 

[Republicans in Roman ; Democrats in 
Italion ; Americans in small caps.] 



KANSAS IN 1858. 



33 



Nats— Messi-s. Anderson, Atkins, Avery, 
Barksdale, Bishop, Bocock, Boyce, Branch, 
Bryan, Burnett, Burns, Caruthers, J. B. Clark, 
Clay, Clemens, Cllngman, Cobb, John Coch- 
rane, Cockerni, Crawford, Davidson, Davis 
(Ind.), Dewait, Dowdell, Kdmundson, English, 
Foley, Garnett, Gartrell, Uillis, Goode, Green- 
wood, Gregg, L. W. Ilall, Hawkins, Houston, 
Hughes, Jackson, Jewett, J. G. Jones, Owen 
Jones, Lawrence, Leidy, Leiter, Letcher, Mc- 
Queen, H. Marshall, Matxakd, Millson, Nib- 
lack, Nichols, Peyton, Phelps, Powell, Ready, 
Ueagan, Reiley, Ruffin, Kusseil, Sandige, Sa- 
vage, Scales, Seward, Shorter, Sickles, Single- 
ton, S. A. Smith, Stalworth, Stephens, Trippe, 
UxDERwooD, Watkius, White, Woodson, Wor- 
tendyke, A. R. Wright, J. V. Wright, Zolu- 
COFFER — 78. 

[Democrats in Roman ; Republicans in 
Italics; Americans in small CAPiJ 



Absent or not Votisc— Messrs. Ahl, Arnold, 
Becker, BUUn(jhur»t, Bonliam. Bowie, Mitr- 
roughs, Campbell, Paskie, Cavanaugh, Chaf- 
fee, Chapman, t'. li. Cochrane, Corning, Co- 
TOile, Currie, H. W. Davis, R. Davis. Dawes, 
Dimmick, Edie, F:iliott, Elstack, FamaxnoHh, 
Eaulkner, Fentmi, Florence, CHlman, Gilmer, 
Gooch, Groesbeck, J. M. Harris, Ha.skin, 
Hatch, Hill, Hopkins, Huyler, Jenkins, Keitt, 
J. C. Kunkel, i. M. Kunkel, Lamar, Laudy, 
JIaclay, S. S. Marshall, MaUeson, McKibbin, 
MUler, Miles, Moore, Montgomery, Morfiil, 
E. J. Morris, O. A. Moo^e, Mott, Murray, 
Olin, Orr, Pendleton, Phillips, PUUe, Pur- 
vianee, Quitman, RohMns, Scott, Searing, 
Shaw, K. Smith, W. Smith, .Stanton, J. A. Stew- 
art, Stevenson, Talbott, Miles Taylor, Thayer, 
Thompson, Tompkins, Waldr&ii, Ward, AVar- 
ren, Whiteley, misan, Winslow, Wood — 84 

[Democrats in Roman ; RepubUcaiis in 
Italics ; Americans in smau, caps.] 



KANSAS IN 1858 



Our last sketch of Kansas aflfairs left 
that territory with the Lecompton Consti- 
tutioa hanging over its head. The Con- 
vention which had framed that bogus in- 
strument declined, in spite of the pledges 
of the majority of the members, to submit 
their handiwork to the people. They 
allowed only a vote on the insertion or 
rejection of the clauses by which slave 
property was declared to be before and 
higher than any constitutional sanction, 
and establishiug-the holding of slaves as a 
part of the fundamental law of Kansas. 
The vote upon the adoption or rejection 
of this clause was fixed for the 21st of 
December, but as it was impossible to 
vote against slavery without at the same 
time voting for the Constitution, the Free- 
State men abstained from the polls, and 
the slavery clause was adopted by a vote 
of 6,143 for, to 569 against it. More than 
half the affirmative votes were returned 
from counties along the Missouri border, 
not having in all more than a thousand 
votes. 

The choice of officers under this Lecomp- 
ton Constitution, as ordered by the Con- 
vention, was to c ome off on the first Monday 
in January. There was great difference 
of opinion among the Free-State men 
how they ought to act in reference to | 



it. The whole control of the election, 
the appointment of judges and presiding 
officers, and the final coimting and decla- 
ration of the returns, was vested by the 
Convention in their notorious President 
John Calhoun, and the Free-State men 
had every reason to expect that any 
necessary amotmt of cheating and fal- 
sification would be resorted to, to shape 
the returns according to his wishes. On 
the other hand, there was evident danger 
that this bogus Constitution would be 
forced tipon the Territory ; and it seemed 
a pity, considering the great majority of 
the Free-State men, not to make an effort 
to secm'e the officers to be elected. A Free 
Soil Convention decided to make no nomi- 
nations for State officers, but this was not 
satisfactory to all, and a bolting nomina- 
tion was made. 

Meanwhile, Governor Walker had been 
superseded, and Governor Denver, a com- 
missioner of the Land Office, appointed in 
his place. Secretary Stanton, acting 
Governor in Walker's absence, called a 
special session of the newly elected Terri- 
torial Legislature in which the Free-State 
men had a majority, and they passed an 
act submitting the Lecompton Constitu- 
tion to a vote of the people, to be taken 
on the same day with the Lecompton elec- 
tion. At the beginning of the year, also, 
the Legislature, under the Topeka Con- 
stitution, many of whose members were 



34 



THE TRIBGNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



also members of the Territorial Legisla- 
ture, met at Topeka. Their object merely 
was to keep up the State organization. 

At the election of the 4th of January, a 
majority of 10,226 votes was cast against 
the Lecompton Constitution. The result 
of the Lecompton State election long 
remained in doubt. It was understood 
that a little over six thousand votes (a 
large part of the Free-State men not 
voting) had been given for both sets of 
candidates for State oflScers, but accord- 
ing to Calhoun's figuring, the Pro-Slavery 
men were chosen. It was also understood 
that the Free-State men, of whom a large 
part had voted for members of the Legis- 
lature, had a decided majority in both 
branches of that body; but all depended 
upon the returns from Leavenworth 
County, the returns for some districts of 
which had been falsified on their way to 
Calhoun, and as he kept the whole body 
of returns in his pocket, and refused to 
certify to anybody's election till Congress 
had first acted on the question by admis- 
sion, the matter long remained in doubt. 
It was generally uuderstood that if Kansas 
was admitted, Calhoun would cook up the 
returns so as to produce a Pro-Slavery 
State government and Legislature. 

In spite of this renewed and unequivo- 
cal indication of the entire repugnance of 
a large majority of the people of Kansas 
to the Lecompton Constitution, the Presi- 
dent still adhered to the policy of forcing 
Kansas into the Union, under that Con- 
stitution. A bill to that effect was intro- 
duced, llr. Douglas falling back upon 
his doctrine of Popular Sovereignty, re- 
fused to support it, and, though it passed 
the Senate, in spite of every exertion of 
executive power, it was rejected in the 
House. Some of the bolters were bought 
over; others were half bought over, so 
that finally the bill passed, but only with 
a provision submitting the question of 
admission or not to a vote of the people 
of Kansas, who were also offered a large 
bribe in lands, to come in under the 
Lecompton Constitution, to which was 
added a prohibition against their coming 
in under any other Constitution till thev 
had the full population of 93,340. [A full 
account of these Congressional proceed- 
ings will be found in another part of the 
Almanac] 

It was still further attempted to bribe 
or delude the people of Kansas by an issue 
on the part of John Calhoun, of certificates 
to a majority of Free-State men as mem- 
bers elect of both branches of the Legisla- 
ture. 

The people of Kansas scornfully re- 



jected both bribes and threats, and at the 
election held on the 3d of August, by ten 
thousand majority, trampled the Lecomp- 
ton Constitution under their feet. 

The Territorial Legislature, whose ses- 
sion expired by law with the month of 
February, had "failed to meet the expec^ 
tations of its constituents. The members 
had been altogether too much engrossed 
by private biU>lfor banks, raili-oads, town- 
plots, etc., to have much time or thought 
to give to public interests. The most 
obnoxious of the Border EufBan acts were 
repealed, and a bill was passed to call a 
Convention to frame a new State Consti- 
tution ; it was so late, however, in the 
session, when tnis bill was disposed of, 
as to aflbrd Governor Denver a plausi- 
ble pretence for insisting that it had failed 
to become a law. 

The Convention met, however, in April, 
and framed a Constitution to be submitted 
to Congress, which Constitution was rati- 
fied by the people by a large majority, 
though the entire vote upon it was but 
small, as the people doubted whether 
Congress, after their recent act, would 
consent to admit Kansas as a State, with 
her present population. 

Meanwhile, Kansas has enjoyed an un- 
easy sort of quiet, not, however, without 
some cruel and bloody events in the 
region about Fort Scott, where the Border 
Ruffians made their final stand, and 
against whom the Free-State men were 
obliged to arm in self-defence. Indeed 
there can hardly be said to have been 
any law anywhere in the Territory. Gov- 
ernor Denver adopted the policy of keep- 
ing quiet and doing little, or nothing 
The infamous Lecompte still remained the 
chief justice of the Territory. It is true 
that the Free-State men had been enabled 
to displace by popular election the county 
ofBcers and the Probate Judges, to whom 
the Border EufBan Legislature had given 
a very wide jurisdiction, and to elect Free- 
State men in their places ; but the moment 
that these Probate Courts could no longer 
be used for purposes of Border Ruthan 
oppression, Lecompte and his colleagues 
avowed their intention to decide against 
the validity of the law conferring general 
jurisdiction upon them, thus invalidating 
all the proceedings of those Courts, and 
throwing everything into confusion. To 
give Kansas an efficient government, and 
to wipe out the deep remaining traces of 
the oppression and misrule of which she 
has been the victim the speedy organiza- 
tion of a State government and her ad- 
mission into the Union appear to be 
highly necessary. 



HOW THEY ELECT BOGUS V. S. SENATORS IN INDIANA. 



35 



HOW THEY ELECT BOGUS U. S. SENATORS 
IN INDIANA. 



Ix 1845, fourteen years ago, it became 
the duty of the Indiana Legislature to 
elect a U. S. Senator. The House was 
Whig by 10 majority, the Senate a tie, 
and Jesse D. Bright, as Lieutenant- 
Governor, presided over it. Although 
the House repeatedly invited the Senate 
to meet them in joint convention to elect 
the Senator, every one of their resolutions 
was lost in the' Senate by the casting 
vote of Mr. Bright, its president. The 
election was thus staved off for the ses- 
sion ; the next Legislature was '• Demo- 
cratic," and Mr. Bright received the va- 
cant senatorship as his reward. 

In 1855, another Senator was to be 
elected. In the Senate, in consequence 
of half of its number being hold-overs, 
there was 2 Democratic majority ; but in 
the House there was 16 Anti-Xebraska 
majority, making 14 Republican majority 
on joint ballot. The House sent reso- 
lution after resolution to the Senate for a 
Joint Convention to elect a Senator and 
the numerous State officers which the 
Constitution and the laws i-equired to be 
filled by that session of the Legislature. 
But the Senate, by a party vote, steadily 
refused to joia the House, leaving the 
senatorial seat vacant, and the entire 
patronage of the State in the hands of the 
Democratic Governor. 

Two years passed by, and, in 1856, In- 
diana elected her next Legislature — a 
majority on joint ballot, under the issue 
of •' Buchanan and Fair Play for Kansas," 
being Democratic. But, as it happened, 
while the House had a Democratic ma- 
jority, the Senate now, by the changes 
in the former hold-overs, had an Opposi- 
tion majority of four. In giving a narra- 
tive of what subsequently occurred, it 
should be borne in mind that the Repub- 
licans were willing, from the first to the 
last, that both Senators (to fill the vacancy 
and for Mr. Bright's full term) should be 
chosen by a concurrent vote of each 
House, acting separately — and that they 
demanded as their right, only the Senator 
for the vacancy which they had fairly 
won by the 12,000 Anti-Nebraska major- 
ity of the people and 14 majority in the 
Legislature at the previous election, and 
which they had been deliberately cheated 
out of by their opponents. 

The Constitution of Indiana requires 
that the votes for Governor and Lieute- 
nant-Governor shall be counted in pre- 



sence of both Houses of the Legislature, 
and the Democracy determined to use 
this to trap their opponents into a Joint 
Convention, which, as no law for electing 
Senators exists in Indiana, should imme- 
diately after the counting elect two gen- 
tlemen to that office. The Republicans 
insisted that, in the absence of law, the 
Constitution of the United States was the 
only guide in the matter. That instru- 
ment declares that Senators shall be 
elected by " the Legislature;" and the 
Constitution of Indiana defines the Le- 
gislature to be the Senate and the House, 
and requires all acts of legislation by 
them to be assented to by a majority of 
the entire membership of each, acting 
separately. 

From the ofiScial report, and the official 
copies of the journals of both branches of 
the Legislature appended to Senate Re- 
port No. 275 (Vol. 2, Reports U. S. 
Senate 1857-8), we find the following 
facts : 

On the 12th of January, 1857, the 
House sent to the Senate a resolution in- 
viting them to be present in their hall at 
half past 2 p.m., " to open and publish the 
returns of the election." 

The Republican Senators offered to 
concur, with a proviso that, as soon as 
the counting and swearing in was over, 
the joint meeting should be adjourned 
sine die. But while this was pending, and 
before any vote was taken on the invita- 
tion of the House, and thirty-five minutes 
before the time designated in the resolu- 
tion, Lieutenant-Governor Willard, who 
was presiding, and who was also the 
Governor elect, vacated his seat, and fol- 
lowed by a minority of the Senate, re- 
paired to the Representative Hall, leav- 
ing the Senate still in session. Arrived 
there, this sham Joint Convention opened, 
the Speaker of the House in the chair. 
After counting the votes, one of the De- 
mocratic Senators was, without any mo- 
tion, or any vote, called upon to preside. 
He took his seat, and without any propo- 
sition from any member whatever, or any 
vote being taken, adjourned the Joint 
Convention till Monday, the 2d of Feb- 
ruary, without stating any reason or pre- 
text for its reassembling. 

It becoming evident that a fraudulent 
election of Senators was about to be at- 
tempted (all persuasions to seduce the 
majority of the Senate into a Joint Con- 



86 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTKR. 



vention having failed), the Senate, on 
the 29th of January, four days before the 
time at which the unauthorizoil Conven- 
tion was to meet, adopted a solemn pro- 
test against it by a vote, by ayes and 
noes, of 27 to 20, declaring that they had 
given no assent to any Joint Convention 
for any purpose whatever — that any pre- 
tended assemblage of that sort would be 
illegal and fraudulent — and branding in 
advance any attempt to thus elect Sena- 
tors as insulting to the Senate and dis- 
graceful to the State. 

This formal and solemn protest, thus 
adopted by 27 out of the 50 State Senators, 
staggered the conspirators ; and when 
the 2d of February arrived, although the 
new Lieutenant-Governor, with a minority 
of the Senate, again repah-ed to the 
Representative Hall, leaving the Senate 
still in session and going on with their 
business, nothing whatever was done or 
attempted ; but the presiding officer, 
loithout any motion or any vote, and imthout 
stating any object whatever, declared the 
Joint Convention again adjourned till the 
following Wednesday. 

On Wednesday, the 4th of February, 
the pretended Joint Convention again 
assembled — (and it should be borne in 
mind that the affidavits of the Secretaries 
of the Senate set forth the fact that the 
Senate was never even invited by the House 
to meet them in Joint Convention for the 
purpose of electing Senators from the first 
day of the session till the last) — when, 
without any motion err resolution by any 
member of this illegal assemblage, the 
Lieutenant-Governor instructed them '^io 
proceed to choose United States Senators by 
a viva voce vote." Whereupon 23 Sena- 
tors (out of 50) voted for Bright and 
Fitch — one Senator, who was present, 
looking on, refused to vote — 60 out of the 
100 Representatives (it requires by the 
State Constitution two-thirds of the whole 
number of members to make a quorum 
for transacting business in either branch) 
voted for the same candidates, and two 
other Representatives voted for Geo. G. 
Dunn and R. W. Thompson. The Lieu- 
tenant-Governor declared Bright and 
Fitch elected; and again, without ady 
motion or vote, adjourned the Joint Con- 
vention till February 11th. The inten- 
tion was, at that time, to go on and 
choose the State officers, whose election 
they had prevented two years before ; but 
finding that the incumbents, though of 
their own party, would not consent, with- 
out a legal contest, to be ousted by any 
such bogus election, the Joint Convention, 
when the 11th of February arrived, was 



adjourned sine die, and the patronage 
again left in the hands pf the Governor for 
the ensuing two years. • 

The Senate, having protested against 
this fraud on the 29th of January, m ad- 
vance of its commission, again repudiated 
it the day after Us alleged consummation. 
On the 5th of February, 27 Senators out 
of the 60, signed and placed on their 
Journals a Protest, a copy of which they 
sent to the U. S. Senate, declaring that 
their body had not participated in the 
election, was in session when it was pre- 
tended to have occurred, and most 
solemnly protesting against the recog- 
nition of this fraud. With these papers, 
came up also a petition to the U. S. Sen- 
ate, signed by 27 Senators and 36 Repre- 
sentatives, remonstrating against this 
fraudulent election, which was not par- 
ticipated in by a quorum of either branch 
— declaring this alleged Joint Convention 
unauthorized by any law of the State, by 
any resolution adopted by the Legislature, 
or by any provision of the State or 
National Constitution, and that to affirm 
it wovild destroy the existence of the 
Senate of Indiana as an independent 
branch of the legislative department of 
the State. And to make their argument 
unanswerable, the sworn affidavit of 26 
Senators accompanied these protests, each 
of them solemnly declaring that tliey did 
not participate in this so-called Joint 
Convention, but were, at the very hour 
of its alleged assembling, sitting in their 
' seats in the Senate, in open session. 

Thus it will be seen that this case differs 
from the Harlan or Iowa case most 
materially. In that election, both branches 
had agreed to the Joint Convention, and 
had voted repeatedly but ineffectually for 
Senator ; but finding at last that a Repub- 
lican was about to be elected, a majority 
of the Senate, being Democrats, absented 
themselves ; and although llr. Harlan 
had a clear majority of the whole Legisla- 
ture, the Democrats in the U. S. Senate 
turned him out of his seat. After this 
decision, the above high-handed and dis- 
graceful outrage was carried through in 
Indiana in the very teeth of the Harlan 
decision. And the same U. S. Senate, 
after staving it off for over a year, with 
the usurpers meanwhile in their seats, 
voting Lecompton, Appropriation bills, 
etc., ratify it at last, in the expiring hours 
of the last session, by seven majority. 

The sitting members at the regular ses- 
sion of 1857 — at the extra session — and 
again at the last regular session — insisted 
that they must have more testimony than 
the records afforded. And finally, on 



UTAH ASD THK MORilOKS. 



37 



Feb. IG, 1853, a resolution passed, giving 
them 90 days to take it in, before any 
judge, by giving notice thereof to the 
protestants. But after this long delay on 
this pretext, they did not give a single 
notice under the resolution, and the only 
evidence they proffered was ex parte 
affidavits of political friends, taten when 
no cross-examination was allowed. The 
Republicans, however, gave notice, and 
proved by Gov. Willard himself, by Wm. 
Sheets, ex-Sec'y of State, and 0. H. Smith, 
ex-U. S. Senator, that no Joint Convention 
to count gubernatorial votes had ever even 
attempted to adjourn over for the trans- 
action of other business ; and the two 
latter witnesses, who had known the 
usage in Indiana for electing U. S. Sena- 



tors for 30 years past, testified that there 
never had been a precedent or a parallel 
for this. As one reason for retaining 
these Senators in their seats was that 
there were no contestants claiming them, 
the Indiana Legislature, now in session 
and fresh from the people, having passed 
in each branch, by decisive majorities, a 
resolution denouncing the pretended elec- 
tion as fraudulent, unconstitutional and 
void, propose to elect two others, legally 
and regularly, and to instruct them to 
demand the two seats in the U. S. Senate, 
which belong to the sovereign State of 
Indiana, but to which that body, in spite 
of the above protests, saw fit to elect and 
install these fraudulent claimants. 



UTAH AND THE MORMONS. 



Mormonism is thirty-one years old, but 
its true history is yet to be written. A 
movement which was, at first, derided as a 
weak and absurd imposture, in ten years 
became formidable enough to be driven 
from State to State by exasperated and re- 
lentless mobs. A people bound together by 
anew, strange, and mysterious faith, which 
set them apart from the rest of the body 
politic, of which, nevertheless, they were 
still a part, enjoying the privileges and 
asserting the rights of citizenship, could 
hardly fail to become both feared and 
hated as they increased in numbers, and 
threatened to exercise a potent influence 
in political affairs. That they meant to 
gain and use such influence was the 
charge which, in those early days, was 
made against them, and the alleged provo- 
cation of the persecution to which they 
were subjected. But whether deserving 
or not of condemnation on this score, it 
is certain that they were called upon to 
endure as much sufiering as if they had 
been the disciples of the purest, most 
harmless, and most beneficent religion, 
proclaiming only peace on earth and good 
will to man. 

Bat when, fourteen years ago, the bro- 
thers Hyram, the Patriarch, and Joseph, 



the Prophet, were shot at Nanvoo by a 
mob, in the cell of a jail, like vermin in a 
trap, and their followers were soon after 
driven out upon a desperate flight into 
the western wilderness; then, it was 
thought, the end had come to a mis- 
chievous heresy. But a stronger man 
than the Prophet Joseph was left to 
guide and govern his followers. Brig- 
ham Young, who had stood high in the 
confidence and esteem of his murdered 
chief, and was ah-eady eminent in the 
church, put aside all who contested with 
him the leadership of the Saints, and was 
elected Seer. Possessed of a rough elo- 
quence, of persuasive manners, of great 
shrewdness, tmtiring energy and remark- 
able executive ability, he led the people, 
surrounded by enemies, robbed of their 
possessions, and driven from their homes, 
to a temporary settlement at CouncO 
Blnfis. 

In the course of the next season, the 
" Lion of the Lord," as the .Mormons called 
their new Prophet, marshalled his follow- 
ers for that long and perilous flight through 
a wilderness of a thousand miles that lay 
between the confines of civilization and 
j the home he had chosen for them in the val- 
ley of the Great Salt Lake. This terrible 



88 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



journey of an army of men, women and 
children, encumbered with household stuff, 
beset with foes without in the Indians of 
the plains, weakened by pestilence and 
fever within, and suffering, sometimes 
starving, for want of food, was marked, 
from its beginning to its end, with the 
graves of the pilgrims. But the indomita- 
ble will of their leader, his unbounded 
influence over his followers, their uu- 
swer\'iug belief that they were the chosen 
peoftJe of the Lord, and perhaps the con- 
viction, enforced by years of persecution, 
that behind them, among their civilized 
countrymen, thej' should never tind rest 
for the soles of their feet, sustained them 
through their long and painful journey, 
till at length they looked down from" the 
summit of a mountain upon the gleaming 
beach of the Great Salt Lake, in the val- 
ley of which they were to find a resting- 
place. 

In those early days, both before and 
for some years after they fled beyond the 
confines of civilization, the worst feature 
of their faith was rather suspected than 
known. They were believed to be fana- 
tics, holding tenets at variance with- the 
dogmas of Christianity and the historical 
truths of the Bible, and to be blindly obe- 
dient to the guidance of designing leaders. 
Polygamy had, indeed, been rcveiiled to 
the Seer as the true relation of woman to 
man as early as 1843, but the revelation 
had not yet been made known to the 
''Saints," and was not till about ten 
years later. But they were suspected 
both of the theory and practice of a 
plurality of wives, and though it was 
repeatedly denied by their elders and 
missionaries, the belief obtained that an 
attempt was to be made to establish 
among us, as part of a social and religious 
scheme, a system po abhorrent to the 
received morality of Christendom. The 
belief was at least prophetic ; in 1853. 
polygamy was openly announced and 
defended as the Peculiar Listitution of the 

Eeople of the Valley of the Great Salt 
ake. 

In the meantime, that people, with an 
industry and sobriety which, whatever 
else may be said of them, they certainly 
possess in an eminent degree, were sub- 
duing the soil, reclaiming the wilderness, 
breakintr nature to harness, clothing the 
Great Valley with towns and cities, and 
covering it with farms. A prosperous 
commonwealth, sufiicient to itself, gradu- 
ally increasing in wealth and power, and 
rapidly adding to its numbers from the 
world without, particularly from Europe, 
grew up in that middle land between the 



confines of civilization on the Atlantic 
and Pacific. And when the gold-fields of 
California were opened to that vast tide 
of emigration that flowed over them from 
the East, the Mormon settlement became 
a sort of half-way resting-place to those 
who went to the Pacific coast by the 
overland route. The Jlormou influence 
over the Indians, through the peaceful re- 
lations they had cultivated with them, 
probably made that route a far safer one 
than it would have otherwise been. But 
it was not long before some of these emi- 
grants complained that in the Mormons 
themselves they found an enemy almost 
as dangerous as the savages. They al- 
leged that they were defrauded in trade, 
plundered of their goods, robbed of their 
cattle, and, in various ways, harassed on 
their toilsome journey. Such charges, 
however, the Mormons met with an indig- 
nant denial. They affirmed that the emi- 
grants were the aggressors ; that they 
mocked at Mormonism. insulting Mormon 
wives and outraging Mormon husbands ; 
that they turned their cattle into Mormon 
fields, helped themselves, witliout pay, to 
Mormon produce; laughed at the~Mormon 
judges, before whom they were arraigned, 
escaping the penalty of their misdeeds by 
defiance or bj' flight ; and, in short, con- 
ducted themselves always as if among a 
people toward whom they were under no 
obligation of observing any relation of 
fair dealing or good fellowship. And this 
representation was fully confirmed by 
Lieut. Gunnison, who was vei-y familiar, 
for a considerable period, with the affairs 
of the Territory. Such accusations, how- 
ever, had their effect, and did much to 
awaken the early feeling of hostility 
against the " Saints," and which they had 
fled to the wilderness to escape. The 
death afterward of Lieut. Gunnison still 
further increased the popular enmity. 
This officer was one of the survej'ing 
party under Capt. Stansbury, and pub- 
lished a book upon the Mormons, after 
his return to the States, which, it was 
said, was not acceptable to the people of 
Utah. On a subsequent surveying tour 
in their territory, he and most of his party 
were treacherously murdered by the 
Indians. It was asserted that the murder 
was connived at by Young, or that, at 
least, he might have prevented it. The 
mere suggestion of such a crime found 
ready believers, and but little credence 
was given to the emphatic denial of the 
Mormons, who declared that the murder 
was committed at a time and place where 
it was impossible for them to have inter- 
fered, and that, moreover, the motive, on 



UTAH AND THK MORMONS. 



S9 



their part, for such a deed, was wanting, 
inasmuch as they had none but friendly 
relations with Mr. Gunnison, and that so 
far from being ofl'ended at his book, they 
were grateful to him for having justly 
portrayed their suflcrings and persecu- 
tions, and for not having traduced their 
morals and manners. 

In 1850, Utah was recognized by the 
Federal Government as a Territory of the 
United States, and Brighara Young was 
appointed Governor by Mr. Fillmore. 
The appointment was renewed imder 
Pierce's Administration, Col. Steptoe, of 
the U. S. army, to whom the office was 
tendered, declining it, and uniting, while 
at Salt Lake City, with the leading Mor- 
mons in a memorial, praying that the 
head of the Mormon Church, Brigham 
Young, might continue to be the civil! 
head of the Territory also. The colony 
continued to flourish,- more and more, ] 
year by year, and its people, as they grew , 
prosperous, grew also more contident in 
their own strength, and firmer in the 
assertion of their rights. The history we 
have glanced at is enough to account for J 
a state of feeling and of opinion between ' 
the Mormons and the rest of the country, i 
which might, at any moment, by aggres- j 
siou on one side, or resentment on the 
other, give rise to the most vindictive and 
bitter hostility. Petty causes of jealousy ; 
had, in the course of years, been con- 
stantly ari.sing, till at length, the serious 
crimination of the Mormons by Judge i 
Druramond and other U. S. officials, who ' 
asserted that they were driven from the 
Territory by Mormon outrages, and that 
Brighara Young and his followers were in 
open resistance and defiance of the U. S. 
government; brought about a crisis in the 
affairs of the Territory which had to be 
speedily, and ought to have been wisely . 
met. With the charges of Judge Drum- 
mond the public is familiar. How many 
of them are true it is difficult to say; but 
in justice to the Mormons, it should be 
stated that they contradict and have an- 
swered them ail ; and only one of them, [ 
the burning of the library and i-ecords of 
the U. S. Court, has seemed worthy of 
specification by Mr. Buchanan in any of 
his messages upon Utah ; and this, since 
Gov. Cumming entered into possession of 
his office, has been ascertained to be en- 
tirely without foundation. But true or 
false, it was these charges which were 
made the pretexts for the expedition of 
1S57 against Utah. 

In June, 1857, Gen. Harney was ap- 
pointed to the command of the troops 
who were to accompany Mr. Cumming, 



the new Governor appointed in Brigham 
Young's place. The army was ordered to 
act as aposse comitatus to assist the Gov- 
ernor, if necessary, in establishing his own 
authority, and in enforcing obedience to 
the laws. In his annual message to Con- 
gress, six months later, the President set 
forth the considerations which influenced 
the Executive in sending out this expe- 
dition. It was not easy to reconcile this 
message with the steps which had been 
taken from the time of the appointment 
of Gen. Harney to the opening of Con- 
gress ; and still more difficult is it to give 
to it any creditable explanation in the 
light of subsequent events. In it the 
President assumes that while Brigham 
Young was legally the Governor of Utah, 
he also was the head of the Mormon 
church, and " professed to govern its 
members and dispose of their property 
by direct inspiration and authority from 
tile Almighty." On the other hand, the 
people believed "with a fanatical spirit 
that he was governor of the Territory by 
divine appointment, and obeyed his com- 
mands as if these were direct revelations 
from heaven." But Mr. Buchanan is care- 
ful to say, "with the religious opinions 
of the Mormons, as [so] long as they re- 
mained opinions, however deplorable in I 
themselves and revolting to the moral 
and religious sentiments of all Christen- 
dom, I had no right to interfere." Ac- 
tions, not opinions, he declares, are the 
" legitimate subjects for the jurisdiction of 
the civil magistrate," and he accordingly 
so instructed Gov. Cumming, hoping that 
no necessity would arise to resort to 
military force. The sight of troops, he 
felt, would be quite enough to frighten 
the Mormons into good behavior. But 
that obstinate people would not be so 
alarmed as he expected, while, in the 
meantime, their opinions had hardened 
into action, and they had already com- 
mitted acts of rebellion which, in the 
opinion of the President, was a result 
"long contemplated" by Brigham Young. 
This incipient rebellion, this " long con- 
templated result," existed, as the Presi- 
dent had already said, because the fanati- 
cism of the Mormons, and their blind, 
unquestioning faith in their leader, had 
betrayed them into a position as foolish as 
it was treasonable. In such a rebellion 
he could have no alternative but to inter- 
fere with " religious opinions," which 
were no longer abstract opinions merely, 
but the basis on which rested " actions '' 
of the most reprehensible character. The 
very purpose of the expedition, and the 
instructions to Gov. Cumiaing were, there- 



40 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



fore, inconsistent with each other, and it 
was impossible to blind the eyes of the 
Mormons to so palpable a fact. They 
also believed in actions, and judged of 
President Buchanan's intentions rather 
by what he did than what he said, and 
governed themselves accordingly. 

After the appointment of General Har- 
ney to take command of the expedition, 
the administration were persuaded, appa- 
rently, that there was more immediate 
necessity for troops in Kansas than in 
Utah, as the delay in getting the army 
beyond that Territory is, on any other 
supposition, inexplicable. It was, indeed, 
openly charged upon the Federal govern- 
ment that one of the objects of the Utah 
war was to afford an excuse for keeping 
an army in Kansas during a critical period 
in her affairs, and to provide fat contracts 
wherewith to control votes. But however 
this may be, it is certain that if there was 
any necessity at all for the expedition 
against the Mormons, the dilatoriness with 
which the preparations were made for it, 
and the delays which occurred before the 
troops were on their march, gave strong 
reason for supposing that more than Mor- 
monism was meant to be subdued, il" oc- 
casion called for it. It was a month after 
the appointment of Harney, before even 
an officer of the army was sent forward to 
secure a location for a camp, and make 
purchases of fuel and forage for the troops 
when they should reach Utah. Two 
months passed away and the expedition 
had still to be begun, when Gen. Harney 
was superseded by Colonel Johnston, who 
was ordered to make arrangements "to 
set out from Fort Leavenworth at as early 
a date as practicable." Yet the President 
said in the message — to which we must 
necessarily look as the authority for the 
motives which prompted the Executive to 
send an army to Utah— that there "no 
longer remained any government in Utah 
but the despotism of Brigham Young :" 
that " ih such a condition of affairs in the 
Territorv," the chief Execntive magis- 
trate "could not mistake the path of 
duty," which was "to restore the supre- 
macy of the Constitution and laws ;" and 
certainly if such was the condition of af- 
fairs, the steps taken to fulfill the duty of a 
parent government to so rebellious a pro- 
■\Tnce, were singularly deliberate. It is 
not easv to escape the reflection that 
either tlie Utah expedition was a con- 
tractor's job, or that the government is 
pitiably imbecile in the punishment of 
treason. 

In September, Capt. Van Vliet, the 
officer sent foi-ward to provide for the 



coming army, returned and reported the 
result of his mission. On arriving at 
Great Salt Lake City, he had sought and 
obtained an interview with Governor 
Young, to whom he made known, in ac- 
cordance with his orders, the purport of 
his visit, and the approach of the United 
States troops. Governor Young replied 
that the Mormons had " been persecuted, 
murdered, and robbed in Missouri and 
Illinois, both by the mob and State author- 
ities, and that now the United States were 
about to pursue the same course ; and 
thijit therefore he and the people of Utah 
had determined to resist all persecution at 
the commencement, and that the troops 
now on the march fur Utah should not 
enter the Great Salt Lake Valley;" and, 
adds Capt. Van Vliet, " as he uttered 
these words, all those present concurred 
most heartily in what h'e said." In sub- 
sequent interviews, " the same determi- 
nation to resist to the death the entrance 
of the troops into the valley was expressed 
hy Governor Young and those about 
him." And when, in reply to these ex- 
pressions of determined hostility, Capt. 
Van Vliet assured the Mormons, that 
though they might prevent the small mili- 
tary force then approaching from getting 
through the narrow defiles and rugged 
passes of the mountains, theU. S. Govern- 
ment wonld, the next season, send troops 
enough to overcome aU opposition : the 
answer was invariably the same: "We 
are aware that such will be the case ; but 
when these troojis arrive they will find 
Utah a desert ; every house will be burned 
to the ground, every tree cut down, and 
every held laid waste. We have three 
years' provisions on hand, which we wUl 
'cache,' and then take to the mountains, 
and bid defiance to all the powers of the 
government." That these were no idle 
threatSp Capt. Van Vliet was convinced. 
He beheved, not only that the Mormons 
would resist the advance of tlie army, but 
that that resistance, owing to the small- 
ness of the force, the lateness of the sea- 
son, and the nature of the country, would 
be successful. He thought, however, that 
they would not resort to actual hostili- 
ties till the last moment, but their plan 
of operations would be a system of 
harassment, by burning the grass, cutting 
up the roads, and stampeding the ani- 
mals, till the severity of winter should put 
a stop to the hostile invasion. 

For such a reception of their new Gov- 
ernor and his posse comiiatus, the Mor- 
mons felt that they had ample justifica- 
tion. What that justification was, it is 
proper to state ; for however erroneous 



UTAH AND THE MORMONS. 



41 



■we may consider Mormon religion, and 
however detestable Mormon morality, 
they should not be debarred of that privi- 
lege which is accorded to all criminals. 
Utah, they reasoned, is a Territory of the 
United States, and Brigham Young its 
Governor, under an appointment from 
Washington. He had never, he declared, 
received any official notice of the recall 
of that appointment, and was bound, 
therefore, as it was his right, to continue 
to fulfill the duties of his otfice, and defend 
his people. The charges of incivism 
which were made against them, and which 
they repudiated, they contend, rested 
upon general report, originated with cor- 
rupt officials, and had never been brought 
to the test of judicial examination. To 
such an examination, they affirmed, they 
were ready and anxious to submit, and 
that they would be glad to meet their ac- 
cusers face to face. But as the Govern- 
ment of the United States chose to pursue 
another course with them, to judge them 
first and try them afterward, they were 
determined, warned by the experience 
of former years in Missouri and Illinois, to 
defend their homes so long as any hope 
remained of doing so successfully, and 
when overcome by superior numbers, to 
flee to some more ho-^pitable land, and a 
juster government, and to leave behind 
them a country desolated, and towns and 
cities spoiled. In the proclamation made 
in September to the people of Utah, by 
Governor Young, he said: "We are in- 
vaded by a hostile force, who are evi- 
dently assailing us to accomplish our 
overthrow and destruction. For the last 
twenty-five years we have trusted offi- 
cials of the government, from consta- 
bles and justices, to judges, governors, 
and presidents, only to be scorned, held 
in derision, insulted, and betrayed. Our 
houses have been plundered, and then 
burned, our fields laid waste, our princi- 
pal men butchered while under the 
pledged faith of the government for their 
safety, and our families driven from their 
homes to find that shelter in the barren 
wilderness, and that protection among 
hostile savages, which were- denied them 
in the boasted abodes of Christianity and 
civilization." The statement is forcible, 
and, unfortunately, as relates the past, 
too true. He announces, therefore, in 
consideration of all these things, and 
the issue thus forced upon them, that 
they are compelled to resort to the "great 
first law of self-preservation," and as 
Governor of the Territory, forbids the en- 
trance upon it of any armed force, and 
proclaims martial law. 



In a letter of Capt. Van Vliet's to the 
Secretary' of War, two months later, that 
officer says "that Governor Young in- 
formed me that he had no objection to 
the troops themselves entering the Terri- 
tory ; but if they allowed them to do so, 
it would be opening the door for the 
entrance of the rabble from the fron- 
tiers, who would,' as in former times, 
persecute and annoy them;" * and to pre- 
vent this they, the Mormons, had deter- 
mined to oppose all interference of the 
government in the affairs of their Terri- 
tory." That Young was desirous of a 
peaceful issue of the difficulty between 
his people and the government of the 
United States can hardly now be doubted, 
and that the government was aware that 
such was all along his wish seems, at 
least, not improbable. " On the 21st of 
September," writes Col. Alexander, un- 
der date of October 9th, at Camp Win- 
field, " I met Capt. Van Vliet returning 
from Salt Lake City, and was informed by 
him that although the Mormons, or rather 
Governor Yoimg, were . determined to 
oppose the entrance into ithe city, yet he 
was assured that no armed resistance 
would be attempted if he went no further 
than Fort Bridger or Fort Supply. I was 
still further convinced of this by the cir- 
cumstance that a train of more than one 
hundred contractor's wagons had been 
parked for nearly three weeks on Ham's 
fork without defence, and had been un- 
molested, although they contained provi- 
sions and supplies which would have been 
of great use to the Mormons." And as if 
in confirmation of this statemant. Governor 
Young, on the 29th of September, in his 
first letter to "the officer commanding i 
the forces now invading Utah Territory," I 
warning him not to proceed with that in- 
vasion, says : " Should you deem this 
impracticable " (to retire imrnediatelv) 
" and prefer to remain until spring in the 
vicinity of your present encampment. 
Black fork, or Green Eiver, you can do so 
in peace and unmolested, on condition 
that you deposit your arms and ammuni- 
tion with Lf wis Robinson, quartermaster- 
general of the '^orritory, and leave in the 
spring, as soon l,s the condition of the 
roads will permit you to march." The 
proposition was, of course, an absurd 
one, not to be thought of for a moment by 
a soldier, nor is it at all likely thafGover- 
nor Young supposed it would be acceded 



That this apprehension was not unfounded, is evi- 
dent from a letter from Salt Lake City in The Tri- 
bune of Dec. 16, 1858, describing thecondnot and cha- 
racter of several hundred teamsters which tha army 
had brought into Utah. 



42 



THE TRIBUNK ALMANAC AND POLITICAL KEGISTER. 



to. But it at least shows that he was 
desirous to avoid a collision if he could do 
so with honor, and consistently with what 
he deemed to be his duty to the people 
under his charge. He evinced the same 
spirit in inviting the officei's of the army 
to visit Salt Lake City. 

Such were the attitudes of the respec- 
tive belligerents at the commencement of 
the famous war with which Jlr. Buchanan 
has illustrated his administration. The 
army of the United States, when it could 
be spared from Kansas, took up its line 
of march for the West, and in due season 
reached Fort Bridger. more than a hun- 
dred miles short of Salt Lake City, where 
it went into winter quarters. In the mean- 
time, the Mormons, about the middle of 
September, as an earnest of the reception 
they meant to give the invasion, destroyed 
two provision trains of the army. In De- 
cember, their leading men were indicted 
for ti'eason by the grand jury of the Dis- 
trict Court of the United States, sitting at 
Camp Scott, the damages for the destruc- 
tion of the trains being laid at a million of 
dollars. These were the most serious acts 
of hostility. But the trains have never 
been paid for, and the traitors named in 
the indictment have never been tried. The 
Mormons deserted their outlying villages 
and farms, and those who were not need- 
ed to watch the enemy and guard the 
passes of the mountains, betook them- 
selves to Great Salt Lake City, where they 
were edified bj- the sermons of the elders 
among the saints, exhorted to be faithful 
to '"brother Young," to have none but 
him to rule over them, and to be assured 
that the "poor, miserable devils" who 
were coming among them " would be cer- 
tain to go to hell as sm-e as they lived." 
The army which, had it left Pansas early 
enough in the season, might, instead of 
the Mormons, have occupied Great Salt 
Lake City-^-providing always that there 
had been any Great Salt Lake City to 
occupy — or might, at least, have had the 
satiofaction of attempting to fight their 
way thither, rested ingloriously on their 
arms, cheered only with the hope that 
their laurels would grow with the other 
vegetation of the opening spring. 

But the war was to have quite another 
issue than that of blood. A gentleman 
of Philadelphia, who knew something of 
the Monnons, and who had, in former 
times, by sympathy and acts of friend- 
ship, gained their confidence, packed his 
saddle-bags and started for Utah. What 
credentials, if any. Colonel Kane may 
have carried from Washington, is known 
only to himself and Mr. Buchanan. The 



world only knows, and is only concerned 
to know, that what an army of the United 
States, at an expense of millions of dol- 
lars, failed to do, was done at his private 
charges by a single energetic man of 
straightforward intentions and sound 
judgment. By a few days of friendly 
converse, he subdued the Mormons. The 
''Lion of the Lord" was tamed; the 
gates of the city of the Great Salt Lake 
were in due time thrown wide open ; Gov- 
ernor Gumming and his train of govern- 
ment ofBcials were invited to enter ; the 
proclamation of the President, sent out in 
April last, by two special commissioners, 
was made public, and by was offered "a 
full and free pardon " to all "for the sedi- 
tions and treasons heretofore by them 
committed," with the assurance that he 
made " no crusade against their religion," 
as "the Constitution and laws of the coun- 
try could take no notice of their creed, 
whether it be true or false ;" and so the 
army, Mhether rejoicing or not rejoicing 
in a bloodless victory, took possession of 
the Territory of Utah, and at the latest 
date, was amusing itself with private 
theatricals. '• The present condition of 
the Territory of Utah," says the President 
in his late annual message to Congress, 
" when contrasted with what it was one 
year ago, is a subject for congratulation." 
The country, no doubt, agrees with him ; 
but probably the congratulations would 
be heartier and warmer had Col. Kane 
and the commissioners first gone to 
Utah, and Gov. Gumming and his posse 
comitatus have rather followed than pre- 
ceded them — had so improbable a neces- 
sity in that case have arisen. It would 
have been much, it is thought, had the 
country been saved the disgrace, in the 
eyes of foreign powers, of submitting for 
six months to the deiiance of a handful 
of religious fanatics, who, if there was 
any necessity of subduing them at all, 
should have been instantly and com- 
pletely brought into snbjection by a gov- 
ernment of the resources of the United 
States : it would have been something to 
have been saved the necessarily large 
expenditure attending the march of an 
army, and which, in this case, has become 
enormous, considering the object aimed 
at and the end gained, to the great en- 
richment of peculating and speculating 
contractors ; but it would have been far 
more could we have been saved the hu- 
miliating spectacle of seeing our govern- 
ment undertake a war on insufficient 
grounds, to escape from which it is com- 
pelled to be indebted to the good offices 
of a private citizen. 



GOVERNMENTS OF EUROPE. 



43 













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44 THK TKIBUSE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 

ELECTION RETURNS 

BY STATE?, OONGKESSIONAL DISTEICTS, AXD OOlISTrES. 



MAINE. 

GOTERNOR, 1858. 

OMmtia. -Rep. Dem. 

Morrill. Smith. I 

.^.ndroscoggin.. 3^45 2259.... 

Aroostook 9U 1166. . . . 

Cumberland . . . 7607 6785. . . . 

Franklin 2397 2013.... 

Hancock 3627 2722.... 

Kennebec 5827 3987.... 

Lincoln 4458 4529.... 

Oxford 4345 3765.... 

Penobscot 6595 5303 .... 

Piscataqais 1544 1146.... 

Sagadahoc 1853 1118.... 

Somerset 3671 3243.... 

Waldo 4793 42fti.... 

Washington . . . 3665 3397 .... 

York 6219 6182.... 



Total 60762 51820.... 67179 390SO 3325 

Morrill's majority, 8942 ; Fremont's plu., 28099. 

Congress, 1858. 

IHstrirts. Jiepubiicans. DemoeraU. 3Iajor. 

I Pomes 10410; Drew 9955— 455 

II Perry 12031 ; Hastinps. . .10032—1999 

III French 8994 ; Johnson . . . 8931— 63 

lY Morse 10552; Gile 6990—3562 

Y Wash bume.. 10300; Wiley 8184—2116 

YI Foster 8297; Bradbury.. 7804— 433 

LEGISLATURE. 
SESATE..Repnblicans, 30 ; Democrat?, 1. 
House... Kepublicaus, 103; Democrats, 48. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



PRESTDFST. 


18.Vi. 


i?^p. 


Dem. 


Am. 


■"rem. 


Bi;ch. 


Fill. 


3.H>« 


1699 


l.Sfi 


K37 


795 


^ 


8211 


5258 


605 


25-11 


1.358 


21 


,3667 


2142 


161 


7.H21I 


2487 


■Mi 


4935 


3598 


392 


48(H- 


3116 


28 


7.«<>1 


3793 


341 


17;i4 


915 


97 


29.W 


934 


397 


428;< 


1926 


417 


51.^9 


3138 


114 


3-aW 


2S67 


«■( 


6636 


5054 


154 



GO.TERKOR, 1858. 

Bep. Dem. 



President. 1S56. 
Hep. Dem. Am. 
Fretn. Buch. 
2062 2220 
1511 



Fill 




Cowiiief. ^ -, 

Hsfle. 

Belknap 2045 

Carroll 2060 

Cheshire 3578 

Coos 1189 

Grafton 4798 

Hillsborough.. 6297 

Merrimac 4861 

Rockingham . . 5599 

Strafford 3331 

SuUivan 2293 



Total 26076 3a'*4.... 38345 .327 

Haile's maj., 5192 ; Fremont's pluralit}-, 5556 
The Legislatlbe Is largely Republican in both 
branches. 

VERMONT. 

COSGRESS, 1858. Gov., 1858. Prf.stdest. 1856. 
Districts. Btp. Dem. Hep. Dem. Sep. Dem.Am 
i. WaU.JU.EasUn.in.Hiill. Kevee.Frnn. Bueh.Fill. 

Addison.... 2027 426. 2186 464. 3362 3.34 68 
Bennington. 1736 789. 2021 1183. 2120 785 70 
Rutland.... 3157 fe87. 3269 1033. 4793 831 35 
Washington. 2695 1475. 2850 1675. 3S21 1359 6 

Total... 9615 3577.10326 43.55.14101 3309 178 
Walton over Eastman, 6038 : Hall over Keyes, 5971 ; 
Fremont over Buchanan, 10792. 

n. Morrill. Chase. Hall. Kevet.Frem. Borh.Fill. 

Caledonia.. 2115 1164. 2155 1209. 2540 1061 23 

Orange .... 2998 1794.2980 1947. 3»T7 L'564 61 

Windham .. 2722 8.^7.2759 1009.4068 742 47 

Windsor.... 3741 961. 3683 1213. 5706 1273 66 



Total. ..11576 4306.11577 5378.15521 4440 197 

Morrill over Chase, 6770 ; Hall over Keyes, C199 ; 

Fremont over Bnchanan, 11081. I 



JIL BoTee.Bins'm.Hall.Kevps.Fri-m. Baoh.Fill. 

Chittenden . 1.S85 673. 2067 723. 2844 6S8 73 

Essex 418 372. 528 389. 622 274 4 

Franklin ... 1914 998.1965 1145.2454 870 65 

Grand Isle . 291 166. 278 218. 405 92 9 

Lamoille... 1238 389. 1236 523. 1607 4'J2 13 

Orleans .... 1672 682.1483 807.2007 494 6 

Total.... 7418 3280. 75S7 3805. 9939 2830 170 
Royce over Bingham, 4138 ; Hall over Keyes, 3752; 
Fremont over Buchanan, 7119. 

Total State 29460 13538 . .39561 10569 545 

Hall over Keyes, 15922 ; Frem. over Each., 28992. 

OTHER STATE OFFICERS. 

Republina/is. DemoeraU. AM, 

U. Cor... Martin.. 29596 :1,vraan.. 13529; Pntnam.153 
rroKurer. Bates . .29652 ; TL'rston.l3542 ; Hanks.. 113 

legislature. 
Sesate. Republicans. 29; Democrat, 1. 
House.. Rep. ,190; Dem., 38 ; Abolition,!; Whlg.l. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Governor. 1858. President, 1856. 

Counties. Hep. Dem. Am. Rep. Dem. Am. 

BankA. B«ach. Lawrenee. Frem. Buch. Fill . 

Barnstable.... 1282 566 287... 2667 703 .^00 

Berkshire 3715 2783 456... 5344 2749 377 

Bristol 5093 2144 695... 8845 2465 936 

Pukes 185 177 66... 317 161 122 

Essex 9440 4039 1942... 15885 4577 2612 

Franklin 2894 1324 66... 4445 1266 260 

Hampden .3531 2776 354... 5533 27.30 631 

Hampsldre.... .3375 755 147... 5166 8;S2 277 

Middlesex 11621 7175 2334... 17222 7705 4095 

Nantucket .... 280 142 9. . . 583 126 73 

Norfolk .•il97 3527 1694... 8402 .3697 2670 

Plvmouih 4302 1597 683... 7228 1772 1496 

Suffolk 7259 6861 2095... 8582 5853 4648 

Worcester 10526 4432 1256... 17971 4604 1129 

Totol 68700 3S2yS 12084.. 108190 39240 19626 

Banks over Beach, 30402 ; Fremont over Buchanan, 
68950. 

congress — 1858. 
Diste. Jiepublieanf:. Democrats. Americant. 

I.— Eliot 4854iBates 1749lScaitering 58 

II.— BnCBnton.7385iWil6on....2941i.Scattering 11 

III.— Adams . .6.^24 Austin. . . .,3880 Cobb 1462 

IV.— Rice 4507lWaIdron...351I Thompsonl396 

Y.— Burling'e.62l4iHeard 5823 Scattering 39 

Y].— Allev 5.^Xoring.. . .2116 Lord 3017 

YII.—Gooch... .71 29^ Welch. . . .3.^;8 Baker. ... 810 

Yin.— Train 61961 Butler. . . .3514lTemple. . . 676 

IX.— Tbaver... 7280 Wood 2962iScatlering 31 

X.— Delano. ...6847iO.'good. . .32;6iTi-afton. . . 508 
XI.— Dawes.. ..7631 Plunket...491l|Scattering 7 

legislature. 
SENATE.Repnb'ns, ,37 ; Democrats, 3;Aroer'ns. 0. 
House. .Kepub'ns, 197 , Democrats, 29; Amer'iia. 10. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

GoTERNOB, 1S58. President, 1856. 

OmaitieB. Rep. Dem. Sep. Dem. Am, 

D\er Poller. Fr«m. Buch. Fill. 

BriatoL 390 145 ....603 .337 218 

Kent 770 259 ....1260 566 15 

Newport 1198 r>.39 ....1258 750 659 

Providence... 4667 1897 ....6903 44.32 331 

Washington... 909 732 ....1443 595 452 

Total 7934 3572 ...11467 6680 1675 

Dyer's maJ., 4362 ; Fremont over Buchanan, 4787. 

legist. ATrRF—lS.'W. 

Senate Republicans, SO ; Democrats, 2. 

House .'Republicans, 67 ; Democrais, 4. 



ELECTION BET0RNS. 



45 



NEW YORK. 

Governor, 1S58. Secretirt or State, '37- Govek^oe, '56. Presidekt, '5B. 



CmtrUiea. Rtp. 

Albany 5612 

Allegany 42S8 

Kroome 35S1 

Cattaraugus. 4309 

Cayuga 5952 

Chautauque. 5479 
Chemuiis. . . 2:J69 
Chenango. .. 4461 

Clinton 2698 

Columbia... 3860 
Ccriland.... 2717 
Delaware. . . 3855 

I)ntchess 5518 

Krie 7956 

Essex 2275 

Franklin ... 1621 

Fulton 2090 

Genesee .... 2838 

Greene 2218 

Hamillon... 131 
Herkimer. .. 4568 
Jefferson.... 6«99 

Kings 8170 

Lewis 2557 

I-ivingstou . . 3162 

Madison 44J5 

Monroe 7417 

Montgomery 2834 
Xew York ..21602 

Niagara 3317 

Oneida 10728 

Onondaga... 8400 

Ontario 3872 

Orange 3810 

Orleans 2579 

Oswego 6436 

Otsego 5383 

Putnam 861 

Queens 1779 

Rensselaer.. 5066 
Richmond.. 6S6 
Rockland ... 606 

Saratoga 4163 

Schenectady. 1493 
Schoharie... 2036 
Schuyler.... 2003 

Seneca 1864 

Steuben 6083 

St. Lawrence 7691 

Suffolk 2144 

Sullivan 1344 

Tioga 2822 

Tompkins . . 33S9 

Ulster 2942 

Warren 1730 

Washington. 4498 

Wayne 4731 

Westchester. 4266 
Wyoming... 3205 
Yates 2479 



Dem. Am. 

Parker.Bur'w 

9118 3422 

1891 621 



2573 
2825 
2838 



2129 1395 
2533 148 



Ahol. 
s.Stnith. 
105. . . 
526... 
53... 
227... 
134... 
167 



3558 
23S3 
3459 
1656 



2S68 1072 

5007 718 

7907 4322 

1457 655 



2141 
1689 
1408 
2940 
;^65 
2806 
4595 



782 
464 
584 
542 
10 
452 
547 



13520 3008 
1881 38 



5234 1144 

2262 875 

41065 6991 

2235 1255 

7993 586 

6219 711 

2232 1406 

4306 1011 

1190 976 

4842 455 

4541 355 

1352 62 

3085 1058 

5499 3028 



1368 



3S0 
524 



S691 1281 
1326 832 



3403 
1448 



r26 
271 



1886 1028 

4258 1012 

2618 4S4 

2107 589 

1914 1563 

2628 2:57 

1969 745 

4724 S270 

1444 526 

2511 1170 

2636 852 

6447 142S 

1952 350 

1283 147 



29. 



388 
523 
750 
267 



72... 

66... 

8... 

227... 

145. . . 

87... 

31... 
129... 

66... 

69... 

26... 

24... 
8... 

73... 
204... 

72... 
126... 

72... 
636... 

31... 

20... 

51... 

64... 
150... 
163... 

88... 
6... 

49... 
326... 



10... 
60... 



109., 
22., 
10.. 
73.. 

169.. 
9.. 

24.'; 

80.. 

4.. 

97.. 

110.. 

150.. 

9.. 

64.. 

6.. 



Bep. 
Clapp. 
3800 
3960 
2812 
. 3438 
. 4443 
. 4193 
. 1901 
. 3726 
. 1549 
. 2904 
. 2182 
. 2543 
. 3860 
. 3878 
. 1838 
. 889 
. 1600 
. 2296 
. 1297 
. 75 
. 3171 
. .5757 
. 4525 
. 1838 
. 2341 
. 3968 
. 4927 
. 2224 
.13415 
. 2589 
. 7572 
. 6208 
. 2871 
. 2917 
. 2.%9 
. 5295 
. 4523 
. 558 
. 836 
. 3016 
. 452 
. 326 
. 3064 
. 1312 
. 1670 
. 1725 
. 1369 
. 3914 
. 5707 
. 1151 
. 726 
. 2.3.30 
. 2S65 
, 1666 
, 13.33 
. 3463 
. 3718 
. 2372 
. 2423 
. 1795 



7552 
1707 
2219 
2214 
2154 
1737 
2122 
2949 
2012 
2S81 
1220 
2295 
4180 
6909 
1288 
1674 
1343 
1135 
2402 
360 
1971 
4492 

12431 
1498 
1649 
2022 
4520 
15t;2 

37815 
1852 
6i'.S6 
5203 
1672 
3603 
1084 
4070 
4535 
1069 
2700 
4772 
1335 
1156 
2787 
983 
2871 
1179 
1480 
3187 
2203 

la^s 

1434 
2012 
1570 
4192 
1119 
1735 
2230 
4536 
1354 
932 



Am . 
■.Putnam. 

4188... 
361... 

592. . . 

409. . . 

1006. . . 

1227... 

286... 

506... 

605. . . 
1218... 

290... 
1061... 

778... 
3034... 

714... 

790... 

467... 

858... 

627... 
61... 

654... 

371... 

4615..., 

81... 

1200..., 

457... 
1,531... 
1108..., 
8440... 
1395... 

463. .. . 

798.... 
1277... 
1025... 
1040... 

603.... 

218..., 
• 129.... 
1269. . . . 
S263. . . , 

533..., 

606. . . . 
189J.... 

789..., 

740.... 

289.... 

969. . . . 
1088.... 

117.... 

665. .. . 
1511.... 

123.... 

867.... 
2734.... 

650.... 
1100.... 
1044.... 
1718... 

271-.. 

163.... 



Sep. 

Kins. 

. 4478 

. 6386 

. 4227 

, .5050 

, 6«64 

. 6901 

2571 

. 5300 

2543 

3707 

3510 

4088 

5329 

6662 

, 2&-i7 

1360 

2543 

35H0 

1931 

142 

4969 

8077 

7024 

2952 

3458 

6144 

7380 

30U 

14994 

3856 

10852 

9750 

4411 

4204 

3065 

8'.)04 

6213 

951 

2113 

4711 

731 

648 

4310 

1652 

2178 

2336 

2097 

7119 

9582 

2338 

1589 

3256 

3900 

2803 

2055 

.')025 

5609 

4175 

3942 

2957 



Dem. 'Am. 
Parker.Brooks. 
7909 6655.. 



1655 

2142 

1786 

1793 

1857 

1853 

2487 

2179 1388. . 

3100 20O5.. 

1233 658. . 

2386 1981.. 



987.. 

833.. 
1064.. 
2091.. 
2142.. 

796.. 
1205.. 



,. 6545 1640 

. 4297 2106 

. 5166 1793 

. 7035 1818 

. 7037 1847 

. 2664 1789 

. 5458 2406 

. 2659 2134 

. 3818 3020 



4181 
7711 



2023. 
5552.. 



1184 1011.. 

1602 1260.. 

1398 1066. . 

1409 1216.. 

2541 1555. . 

264 112.. 

1627 1355.. 

3640 1090. . 

14287 8777.. 

1224 495. . 

1652 2132. . 

1933 958. . 



41.384 21423... 

1882 2025. . . 

6573 1746... 

4267 1994. . . 

1665 2283. . . 

3981 2209. . . 

1013 1502... 

3698 l.m... 



2361 2:W4.. 
4467 4913. . 



3596 
4367 
5512 
6901 
2904 



llSl 
2107 
4039 
75.J6 
1173 



1548 
15.38 



957.. 
937.. 



2541 2685. 
805 1258. . 



1469 1600 

. 3593 1374 

. 3620 1434 

. 2164 2346 

. 149 250 

. 5074 1650 

. 8249 3496 

. 7846 14174 

. 3124 1114 

. 3597 1652 

. 6312 1861 

. 7584 4683 

. 3076 1485 

.17771 41913 

. 3908 1864 

.11172 6386 

.10071 4227 

. 4521 1642 

. 4274 3948 

. 3088 1052 

. 8246 36&3 

. 6373 3595 

. 963 1096 

. 1886 2394 

. 5153 4415 

. 736 1550 

668 1526 



2958 
1002 



1700... 
641... 



4524 
1714 



2446 

787 



1651 1311... 

3297 2116. . . 

1964 1422. . . 

2081 1951... 

1655 2068. . . 

2205 464... 

1511 1470... 

4185 4739... 

1071 818. . . 

1583 2059. . . 

2033 1568... 

4703 3750... 



2376 28.37 

2542 981 

2163 1625 

7270 3217 

9698 1950 

2393 2045 

1690 1583 

3331 2154 

4019 1430 

2932 4030 



2202 
5174 
5776 



1006 
1632 
1999 



1969 
941 



642. 
389... 



2994 915 



Avi. 
Fill. 
6301 

856 

791 

978 
1923 
2017 

765 
1070 
1.311 
1981 

628 

2009 

■ 2013 

6520 

956 
1145 
1034 
1100 
1533 

117 
1230 
1058 
8647 

418 
1979 

865 
3070 
1713 
19922 
1985 
1601 
1724 
2189 
2172 
1412 
1175 
1229 

479 
2521 
4548 

946 
937 
2681 
1213 
1630 
461 
1265 
2034 
13:32 
1980 
2037 
435 
1470 
4703 
735 
1848 
1448 
3641 
571 
351 



Total . .247953 230513 60880 5470. . .177425 1954S2 66882. . . 264400 19S616 130870. . .276004 195878 124604 
Morgan over Parker, 17440. Tucker over Clapp, 18057. King over Parker, 65784. Fremont over Bu- 
chanan, 80126. 

TOTE POK OTHER STATE OFFICEKS. 

RepuhliraTK. DemnrraU. Americans. AboUtionisti. 

Lima -Governor . .R. Campbell. .250,831 ; J. J. Taylor. .229,796 ; N. S. Benton. .62,336 ; S. A. Beers. . .2187 
Omni Commit' nerYl. Gardner . ..249,933; S. B. Piper... 229,848 : J.R.Thomps'n.59,919 ; J.C. Har'gton.lSOl 
Prj«onJn,'7)erfor. .J. T. Everest. 24S,151; E.L.Donn'lly. 2-26,992 ; W.A. Russell. 60,409 ; S. T. Fyler ...1690 
Constitutional Convention. .For Convention. . . .135.266 ; Against Convention .... 144,526. 

T PPTST iTT'RS" ? Se-vate Republicans, 16 ; llemocrats 12 ; Americans, 3 ; Ind. Rep ., 1. 

i.t^ijioL,.i.i uivi!-. J .^ssEjfBLY ..Republicans and Americans, 99 ; Democrats, 29. 
The Senators, with the exception of those from the Xlth and XXXIst Districts, were elected in 1857. 
In the last named district, Erastus S. Prosser, Union Opposition, was elected to fill a vacancy caused bv 
the resignation of Mr. Wadsworth, Dem.. and in the former, Henry C. Wetmore was elected by the Repub- 
licans and Americans, to fill a vacancy caused by the appointment of Senator Mandeville as jostmagtec 
Mr. Mandeville insists that he did not accept the appointment, and is, therefore, still a Senatoc. 



46 



THE TRIBtJNK ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



NEW YORK. 

Congress, 1S58. 

XHaliicti. J?fp- Pern. Ind.D. 

I. fCart«r. Searing. 

Kintre* 11M2 882 

Queens 29S6 2S85 

Richmond.. 1182 1761 
Suffolk 2912 1811 

Total . . . 8122 7339 
Carter's maj., 783. 

II. +Hiimi)hreT. Taylor.Ltphfi'd. 
Brooklj-n . . 6475 4578 5581 

Backhouse, Am., 974. 
Humphrey over Litchfield, 894. 

III. -tWil'mson. Sickles.Walb'e 



r. T, Wd. 1. 224 
^' 2. 292 


710 


741 


153 


82 


3. 249 


193 


251 


6. 934 


949 


732 


8. 1316 


1172 


1068 


. 


- - — 





Total . . . 3015 


3177 


2874 


Sickles over AVilliaiuson, 162. 


IV, Brennau. 


Stel.' 


s.Borr. 


rard 4.... 363 


TM 


t74 


" 6.... 799 


599 


1026 


" lU.... 725 


432 


831 


" . 14.... 403 


92U 


1218 



Total... 2290 2671 .3949 
Farmer, Pern., 7 10 ; Husted, Am., 
306 ; Scattering, 34. 
Ban over Siephens, 1278. 

Rep. Dent. Am. 

V. -tHamiitoii. JlHClay. Dean. 
Ward 7 . . . . 12-i8 2327 320 

" 13... 803 1630 348 

WUliamsb'h 2951 1823 153 

Total . . . 4982 5780 821 
Scattering, 34. 
Maclay over Hamilton, 798. 

VI. IMcCurdy.J. Cochrane. 
Wardll.... 1311 3127 

" 15.... 1910 1039 
" 17.... 2269 3170 

Totsl . . . 5520 7336 
John Cochrane's maj., 1816. 

VII. tBriges. Wa-d. 
Ward 9.... 3318 1754 

" 16.... 2702 2018 
" 20.... 22S6 2319 

Total . . . 8306 6591 
Briggs' maj., 1715. 

VIII. tClsrk. Herrick. 

Ward 12.... 1146 792 

" la.... 2717 15.^9 

" 19.... 1154 1110 

" 21.... 2227 1419 

" 22.... 1791 1458 

Total . . . 9035 6338 
Clark's maj., 2697. 

IX. tlla«kin. KembleJLnd'nrs. 

Putnam 865 1.331 7 

Rockland... 866 1359 2.56 
Westchester. 5906 4884 283 

Total... 76:^7 7624 546 
Haskin over Kemble, 13. 

X. Van Wvck. Niven. Friend 

Oninge 4338 4023 722 

Sullivan.... 2343 1509 865 

Total ... 66S1 5532 1587 
Tan Wjrck over Niven, 1149. 



DMiicU. Brp. Dem. Am. 

XI. tKeiiv.m. ."^irong. 

Greene 2567 3156 

ULster 5599 4911 

Total . . . 8166 8067 
Kenyou's maj., 99. 

XII. tBe.alc. McCIellan. 
Columbia... 451" 3410 
Dutchess.... 6233 4975 

Total . . . 10750 8385 
Beale's maj., 2365. 

XIII. tOlin. Seymonr. 
Ren.sselaer. . 8267 5254 

Olin's majority, 3013. 

XIV. ■tRe-\iiold3.Coming.LiT'«t"n 
Albany "9571 &37l 260 

Reynolds over Coming, 1200. 

XV. McKean. Odell. 
Hamilton... 179 329 

Saratoga 4643 4223 

Warren 2020 1607 

Washington. 4586 3649 



Total . . . 11428 9808 
McKean's maj., 1620 

XVr. Palmer. Waldo. Wataon 

Clinton 2995 2306 321 

Essex 2:W 1610 531 

Franklin . . . 17U6 2161 731 

Total . . . 7058 6079 1589 
Palmer over Waldo, 979. 

XVII. Spinner. Goodrich. 
Herkimer.. 4750 2748 
SLLawreuce 7832 2989 

Total... 12582 57.37 
Spinner's maj., 6845. 

XVIII. tC.B.Cochr'c.Goodvaar. 

Fulton 2610 1661 

Montgomery 3654 2-293 
Schenectady 19,i5 1481 
Schoharie... 2361 3885 

Total . . . lOc^l 9320 
Clark B. tjochrane's maj., 1261. 

XIX. GrRham. Parker. 
Delaware .. 4314 3487 
Otsego 5667 4655 

Total... 9981 8142 
Graham's maj., 1839. 

XX. Conkling. Root. 
Oneida 11084 8251 

Conkling's maj., 2833. 

XXI. Duell. Sanda. 

Broome 3581 2773 

Chenango... 4511 3666 
Cortland . . . 2859 1708 

Total... 10951 8147 
Dneirs maj., 2804. 
XXII. Lee. Tvler. Pcny. 

MaiJison.... 4SJ0 i544 611 
Oswego 6600 4881 454 

Total . . . 11450 7425 1065 
Lee over Tyler, 4025. 

XXIII. Hoard. Lvon. 
Jeiferson . . . 6828 5090 
Lewis 2334 2087 

Total... 9162 7177 
Hoard's maj., 1985. 

XXIV. Sedgivick. Tavlor.JIoron. 
Onondaga . . 8478 6267 648 

Sedgwick over Taylor, 2211. 



Rep. Dem. Am. 

XXV. Bnlterflf M.Griawo d.Siesoii. 

Cayuga 60.')2 2786 755 

Wayne 4803 26u3 876 

Total... 10855 6389 1631 
Butterfield over Griswold, 5466. 

XXVI. Pottle. Ogden. 
Ontario .... 4098 3375 

Seneca 2(H8 2.358 

Yates 2452 1440 

Total... 8593 7173 
Pottle's maj., U25. 

XXVir. Welle. Aniot.LawT'f«. 

Chemung... 2215 2809 

Schnyler... l.S:-;2 2140 35 

Tiotra 2855 2847 

Tompkins . . 3529 1992 636 

Total .. 10131 97SS 670 
Wells over Arnot, 343. 

XXVIII. Irrine.Bradlev.Den'iton. 
Livingston.. 3242 2269 683 
Stenben 6140 4299 968 

Total... 9382 6568 1651 
Irvine over Bradley, 2814. 

XXIX. Elv. Triromer-Angle. 
Monroe 7276 5114 1393 

Kiy over Trimmer, 2162. 

XXX. Frank. Skinner. Blaek. 

Allegaiiv... 4337 1958 950 

Genesee .... 2789 1401 635 

Wyoming .. 2791 1996 679 

Total... 9917 63.'>5 2264 

Frank over Skinner, 4562. 

XXXI. Burrougha. Trott. White. 

Niagara .... 3377 2200 1256 

Orleans 2716 1176 876 



Total . . . 6(193 .'!376 2132 I 
Burroughs over Trott, 2717. 

XXXII. tSpanlding. Hatch. 
Erie 12427 7539 

Spanlding's maj., 4888. 

XXXIII. Fenton. Jenk*. John'n. 
Cattaraugus. 4.3.54 2l'8I 510 
Chautauque. 5ti64 2ll?0 1370 

Total... 10018 4711 1886 
Fenton over Jenks, 5307. 
♦ EiMpt Brooklyn. + Union ef Op. 

N. T. CITY— Comptroller. 

Union Op. Tam.D.Ant.T. D. 

WarJa. Haws. tuiaer.Ruesell. 

1 440 495 693 

TT 241 111 HI 

III 266 137 129 

IV '. 482 1364 220 

V nr, 685 139 

TT :^98 863 753 

Til 1551 9S9 701 

Till 1823 649 515 

IX S-MS 780 676 

X 1621 705 206 

XI 1619 16.;9 432 

XII 982 925 253 

XIII i:«9 9:-io ;v:6 

XIV 525 968 714 

XV 2142 285 372 

XVI 2657 802 717 

XVII 2785 1426 750 

XVIII 2451 S.i; 0^8 

XIX 9fV3 66.^ 564 

XX ?6.^'5 1(02 1161 

XXI 2263 1131 477 

XXil ll«8 nil 143.- 

Total.... 2^686 18427 12114 



NEW YORK- 


-Continued. 


Votefor Governor by ioicns. 


ALBANY COUNTY. 


Sep 


Drm.Am. Abo. 


Touns. g, 


M 


£ -5 


Wdi. 1 


C 


^ 5. 


Albany,..!... 127 
2... 159 

3... stnr 

4.. 318 
5... 144 
6... 247 
7... 187 


919 

428 
394 
316 
187 
278 
849 


165 1 
213 1 
156 5 
134 4 
58 2 
123 2 
148 4 



8... 333 759 216 

9... 493 643 218 1 

" lU... 504 670 3;J0 8 

Total Alb. . 2819 5443 1762 32 

Berne 318 256 49 24 

Bethlehem ... 171 406 313 

Coevmnns 134 340 99 

Guilderland.. 190 241 179 

Knox 206 127 HA 

New ScoiUiid. 322 261 139 3 

Rensserrville. 193 380 50 35 

VVaiervliet ...1012 1450 660 5 

Westeilo 242 214 8? 6 

Total 5612 9118 3422 105 

ALLEGANY COUNTY. 

Angelica 243 79 10 31 

Almond 149 74 100 10 

Alfred 112 42 10 106 

Alma 22 54 7 4 

Allen 126 16 8 21 

Andover 161 87 9 12 

.Amiiy 214 77 18 59 

Belfast 237 80 61 8 

Birdsall 69 38 5 26 

Bolivar 99 56 3 12 

Burns 108 34 7 6 

Clarksville... IHO 24 3 6 

l/'enterville . . . 153 39 1 1 

Caneadea 180 166 21 7 

("aba 229 141 42 2 

Friendship... 149 110 74 49 

Genesee 165 34 1 13 

Grove 62 65 1 1 

Granger 131 29 7 2 

Hume 292 83 10 13 

Independence. 163 70 7 4 

New Hudson.. 136 27 28 1 

Rushford 288 56 6 

Scio 147 142 27 6 

West Almond. 121 63 3 17 

Wellsrille.... 126 &4 113 29 

Wirt 162 60 4 51 

Willing 82 39 16 14 

Ward 53 35 25 10 

Total 42S8 1894 621 526 

BROOME COUNTY. 

Binghamton.. 6S9 648 69 12 

Chenango 2t>3 116 15 

l-ort Crane.... 131 94 14 1 

Barker 165 85 16 

Conklin 187 226 16 

ColesviUe 369 268 22 15 

Lisle 3u3 78 6 13 

Maine 221 106 4 

Nanticoke 78 68 1 

Sandford 276 257 ■ 2 1 

Triangle 219 86 29 1 

Union 247 213 25 7 

Vestal l45 133 89 

Windsor.*.... 298 195 59 3 

Total 3531 2573 367 53 

Morgan over Parker, 958. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



I CATTARAUGUS COUNTY. 
I Morgan. Parit'r.Bur's.SmTi 

'Allegany 101 125 52 1 

■Ashford 190 118 30 

Biicktooth.... 49 30 2 4 

Carrolton 32 57 2 

Coldspring ... 56 71 1 

Conewango... 152 122 7 

Davton 136 73 7 7 

East Otto 135 54 22 30 

Kllicotlville .. 180 175 31 18 

Farmersville.. 205 69 1 

FrankliuvUle. 177 165 2 

Freedom 218 80 4 3 

Great Valley.. 123 121 13 8 

Hinsdale 161 98 22 1 

Humphrey 78 74 

Iscbua 104 105 1 

Leon 172 79 12 12 

Little Valley.. 84 36 21 24! 

Lyndon 131 47 3 4 

Machias 165 53 6 

Mansfield 129 51 17 14l 

jNapoli 139 78 9 2li 

New Albion .. 203 8;J 11 17| 

lOlean 172 216 16 

Otto 1J3 48 17 

Perrysburgh.. 190 78 8 

Persia 86 123 30 

Portville 156 79 2 

Randolph 124 162 3 

South Valley.. "2 45 

1 Yorkshire 186 111 15 

Total 4.309 2825 362 227 

Morgan over Parker, 1484. 

I CAYUGA COUNTY. 

Auburn..!... 274 108 43 

" 2... 196 KM 48 

" 3... 172 131 30 

" 4... 229 194 46 



637 172 

141 87 

149 73 

94 12 



75 23 
317 107 
111 38 



Total Anb... 871 

'Aurelius 250 

Brutus 245 

Cato 329 

Conquest I.i7 

Fleming 157 

Genoa 405 

Ira 194 

Ledyard 286 

Locke 136 

Mentz 401 

Moravia 254 

Niles 269 

Owasco 150 

Scipio 236 

Sempronio^ . . . 176 

Sennett 210 

Spiingport 235 

Sterling 808 

Summer Hill.. 1S3 

Venice 265 

Victory 235 



Total 5952 2S42 739 134 

Morgan over Parker, 3110. 

CHAUTAUQUE COUNTY. 

Arkwright... las 21 34 1 

Busti 226 53 62 16 

Carroll 260 42 4 1 

Charlotte 170 104 56 

Chantauqne . . 259 130 47 1 

Cherry Creek. 10,8 87 7 14 

Clymer Ill 24 2 4 

EUery 256 59 15 

Ellicott 481 HI 153 5 

Ellington 238 65 5 27 

French Creek. 52 48 22 

Gerry 211 14 6 IS 

Hanover 395 144 173 5 

Harmouy 466 97 37 13 

iKiantone 61 23- 27 1 



164 


1 




70 


5 


? 


74 


10 


3 


46 


In 


" 


95 


2,-5 


f 


75 


fi« 




189 


1 


20 


50 


I.T 


? 


6.1 


16 




119 


9 


1 



47 

Morgan. Park'r,BiiTs,Sm'h 

Mina 98 46 16 6 

Poland 181 35 7 8 

Pomfret 457 464 392 31 

Portland 149 86 60 5 

Ripley 181 87 22 

Sherman 172 47 3 3 

.Sheridan 121 55 107 2 

Stockton 205 55 59 4 

Villenovia 143 42 43 

WestQeld 355 20O 46 3 

Total 5479 2129 1395 167 

Morgan over Parker, 3350. 

CHEMUNG COUNTY. 

Baldwin 58 129 

Big Flats 184 1S8 

Chemung 221 201 1 

Cailin 152 116 1 

Elmira, 664 660 72 18 

Erin 101 159 2 

Horseheads... 256 303 4 1 

Sonthport 343 422 19 6 

Veteran 312 209 49 2 

Van Etten 88 196 2 

Total 2869 2533 148 29 

Parker over Morgan, 164. 



Cl^IENANGO 

Afton 216 

Bainb ridge ... 206 

Columbus 234 

Cove.^try 196 

German 93 

Guilford 315 

Greene 330 

LincklEEU 122 

McDonough .. 139 
New Berlin. . . 286 
North Norwich 127 

Norwich 384 

Otselic 1S5 

Oxford 372 

Pharsalia 86 

Pitcher 137 

Preston 98 

Plymouth 206 

Sherburne .... 370 

Smithville 123 

Smyrna 2il 



COUNTY. 

157 12 1 

94 26 2 

55 4 2 

180 11 1 

92 

229 h 

317 97 2 

49 15 19 
173 

218 2 8 

113 7 

445 51 22 
27 3 



128 
323 
169 
133 

105- 



149 49 
101 



Total 4466 3658 388 73 

Jlorgan over Parker, 903. 

COLUMBIA COUNTY. 

Ancram 158 200 

Austerlitz 144 95 8 

Canaan 260 105 4 

Chatham 357 293 33 

Claverack 333 3lt:^ 24 

Clermont 18 92 76 

Copake 146 182 1 

Gallatin 141 131 16 

Germantowu . 128 39 43 

Ghent 224 151 40 

Greeoport 58 122 79 

HiUsdale 236 208 

Hudson.. .1... 108 136 40 

2... 127 144 27 

3... 200 95 36 

" 4... 162 159 39 



Total Hud 
Kinderhook 
Livingston. ... 130 
New Lebanon. 207 

Stockport 13: 

Stuvvesant 122 172 

Tagbkanlc 109 198 



597 524 142 

345 305 51 

134 113 

137 6 

68 45 

50 

14 



Total 3860 .^59 730 

Morgan over Parker, 401. 



48 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



NEW YORK— Ci(»i(mi(«d- 

CLIKTOX COUNTY. 
Totem. Rep.Dem.Am.Aho. 
Morgan.Parkcr.But's.Sm'l 



ItJO 11 



268 ajo 

3U9 153 



Altona r U* 79 

Ausable 190 153 lU 

Beekmantown 172 1S6 63 

Klack Brook.. 154 
Champlain 

Ohazy 

Climou 15 218 

Dannemora.. . 50 

Ellenbaigh... 139 

Mooers 341 200 

Peru 258 165 102 1 

Plattsburg. . . . 419 421 35 14 

Sariinac 82 164 126 

Schuyler Fails 193 146 14 1 



43 15 
95 20 



Total 2693 2333 523 56 

Morgan over Parker, 315. 

CORTLAND COUNTY, 

Cincinnaius. .. 131 118 23 

Conlandville . 494 282 29 

Freetown 114 

Harford 87 

Homer 471 

Lapeer 76 

Marathon 146 118 

Freble 139 136 

Scott 162 61 

Solon 101 109 

Taylor 131 82 

Truxton 377 191 28 

Virgil I!t5 133 



48 18 
36 

196 127 
65 



Wiliet 93 



79 



Total 2717 1654 267 

Morgan over Parker, 1063. 
DELAWARE COUNTY. 

Andes 178 50 256 

Bovina 135 39 31 

Colchester.... 236 125 75 

Davenport.... 130 200 82 

Delhi 359 191 32 

Franklin 415 203 42 

Hamden 279 73 33 

Hancock 186 235 37 

Harpersfield . . 66 98 70 

Kortright 129 106 111 



Masonville 224 

Meredith 154 

Middletown... 253 191 

Roxburr 173 2:11 

Stamford 142 

Sidney 183 186 

Tompkins .... 329 288 
Walton . . 



149 

83 37' 



128 89 
13 
41 

205 43 



Morgnn. Park'r.Bur's.Sm'h 

Redhook 190 358 70 

Rhinebeck.... 332 273 52 

Stanford 269 234 

Union Vale . . . 207 145 

Washington... 245 238 

Total 5oOS 50U7 718 87 

Morgan's plurality, .501. 
ERIE COUNTY. 

Alden ; 139 155 125 

Amherst 98 294 188 1 

.\urora 244 123 259 1 

Boston 72 171 41 

Brant 68 99 46 4 

Buffalo Wd. 1. 253 675 126 2 

2. 418 306 370 4 

3. 229 266 183 1 
" 4. 466 415 162 2 

5. 361 577 2i)2 5 

" 6. 432 454 49 

" 7. 564 363 26 

8. 182 335 201 

9. 335 246 293 2 

10. 335 276 263 

11. 244 142 108 

12. 213 184 93 

13. Ill 93 24 



Total Buf. . 4163 
Cheoktowaga . 75 

Clarence 283 

('olden 156 

Collins 2?a 

Concord 299 

Eden 127 

Elma 3J6 

Evans 195 

East Hamburg 170 
Grand Inland. 27 

Hamburg 91 

Holland 108 

Lancaster 190 

.Marilla 103 

Newstead 308 

North Collins. 174 

Sardinia 141 

Tonawanda. .. 75 

Wales 159 

West Seneca.. 42 



4332 2100 

no 119 

84 94 

12;^ 30 

91 64 

148 134 

199 113 

90 54 

160 101 

119 bo 
67 37 

226 137 
i:<6 .W 
264 131 
150 81 

120 SS 
86 22 

113 129 

227 79 
111 70 
109 37 



16 



Total 3855 2781 1087 

Morgan over Parker, 1074. 
DUTCHESS COUNTY. 

Amenia 233 127 

Beekman 227 72 8 

Clinton 211 193 2 

Dover 241 192 3 

East Kishkill.. 163 295 21 

Kishkill 544 450 269 

Hyde Park ... 201 200 48 

La Grange. .. . 193 2:« 

Milan 170 161 8 

North East. .. . 181 200 

Pawling 179 168 1 

Pine Plains... 149 154 

PleasantVal'y 210 225 13 

Poughkeepsie . 212 260 39 

" City I. 328 314 64 

" 2. 266 100 20 

" •' 3. 269 268 69 

" 4. 263 130 32 

Total Pongh. 1126 812 184 



Total "956 7907 4322 

Morgan over Parker, 49. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

Chesterfield . . 99 182 144 

Crownpoint. . . 404 

Elizabethtown 154 

Essex 80 

Jay 193 

Keene 70 

Lewis 144 

Minerva 54 

Moriah 234 

Newcomb '. 15 

North Elba ... 2 
North Hudson 17 
St. Armand . . 25 

Schroon 166 

Ticonderoga . . 242 

Wesiport 168 

Willsboroiigh. 122 
Wilmington . . 84 



78 


7 


1 


74 


23 


S 


K^ 


98 




YM) 


69 


3 


•» 


2 


48 


123 


% 


7 


M 




1 


224 


42 


2 


7 






18 




42 


16 


10 


■i 


19 


11 


2 


i:«i 


29 


i 


112 


8 




Kt 


69 




68 


54 





33 



Total 2275 1457 653 129 

Morgan over Parker, 818. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Bangor 222 127 90 

Belmont 36 81 44 

Bombay HI 183 7 

Brandon 48 48 36 

Burke 67 223 84 

Chaleaugay... 159 3S4 38 

Constable 51 109 93 

liickinson 213 63 



Morgao.ParkV.Bur'sSm'tli 

Dnane 9 24 7 

Fort Covington 117 171 US 

Franklin 60 74 1 

Harrietstown .27 25 2 

Malone 345 384 196 

Moira 127 170 5 • 

Westville "27 125 66 

Total 1621 2141 772 56 

Parker's plurality, 520. 
FULTON COUNTY. 

Bleccker 2S 133 

Broadalbin ... 276 170 54 6 

Caroga 50 .55 5 1 

Ephrata 102 191 68 2 

■Johnstown.... 807 401 266 35 

Mavfield 349 131 U 6 

Northampton, 103 241 27 1 

Oppenheim... 168 189 14 8 

Perth 135 71 Id 

Stratford 72 107 3 10 

Total 2090 1689 464 69 

Morgan over Parker, 401. 

GENESEE COU.VTY. 

Alabama 213 63 15 1 

.Alexander... 238 59 10 3 

Batavia 378 259 130 16 

Bergen 169 88 61-1 

Bethany 167 88 39 1 

Byron 162 51 44 1 

Darien 188 104 66 

Elba 142 80 72 1 

Le Rov 424 2;« 42 

Oakfield 131 44 46 

Pavilion 165 114 28 

Pembroke 276 1.V2 27 1 

Stafford ISO 67 ■* 1 

Tot,->I 2838 1408 584 26 

Morgan over Parker. 1430. 
GREENE COUNTY. 

Achland 116 118 4 

.\thens 218 192 69 

Cairo 239 262 24 

Catskill 490 449 130 

Coxsackie . . . . 319 272 18 

Duriiam 261 343 3 

Greenville.... 170 174 38 

Halcott 26 56 11 

Hunter 38 304 45 

Jewett 64 120 U 

Lexington 20 264 42 

N. Baltimore.. 116 234 35 

PratlBville . . . . 40 162 39 

Windham 101 200 83 

Total "221! 2940 542 24 

Parker over Morgan 722. 

HERKIMER COUNTY. 

Columbia 273 66 84 

Danube 215 32 54 1 

Fairfield 240 108 2 1 

Frankfort ...-. 335 174 35 1 

German Flats. 416 281 79 6 

Herkimer .... 291 252 4 1 

Little Falls... 422 4.t8 81 20 

Litchfield 171 83 24 4 

Manheim 212 LJO 12 11 

Newport &'}4 95 6 

Norway 132 69 14 

Ohio 108 78 6 

Russia 301 106 1 4 

Salisbury 282 160 12 

Schuyler 225 101 2 

Stark I 20'; 99 15 1 

Warren 181 171 49 6 

WinBeld 195 76 1 

Wilmurt 25 ')8 

Total 4563 2556 462 73 

Morgan over Parker. 2012. 



NKW YORK.— Continued. 

UAMILTOX COUNTY. 

Touj/i*. Morg.Purker.Bur's. 

Arietta 3 11 

Oilman 11 1 

Hope 31 149 6 

Lake Pleasant 20 46 1 

I/Ong Lake ... 5 24 

Alorehouse 10 35 

Wills 51 99 4 

Total 131 365 10 

JEFER30X COUNTY. 

Adams 474 166 13 

Alexandria... 332 289 26 

Antwerp 396 201 12 

Krownville... 3S3 144 42 

Cape Vincent . 138 263 124 

Ohampiou.... 234 159 2. 

Clayton 317 317 18 

Ellisbtirgh.... 663 361 5 

Henderson... 270 127 29 

Boiinsfield.... 239 216 61 

liOrraine 145 15U 4 

LeKay 417 2'J3 1 

Lvrae 244 213 

Orleans 307 187 29 

Pamelia 275 188 14 

Philadelpliia. . 178 148 26 

Rodman 249 96 1 

Rutland 281 146 3 

Theresa 283 178 1 

Watertown ... "23 605 128 

Wilna 303 296 18 

Worth 47 42 

Total 6S9S 4595 547 

KINGS COUNTT. 

Br'klvnWd. I. 336 342 61 

II. 163 738 74 

III. 709 392 182 

IV. 627 609 254 

V. 253 1447 123 

•' TI. 6^4 10:« 266 

" VII. 330 766 135 

" VIII. 173 403 85 

IX. 332 875 82 

X. 813 1239 ?34 

XI. 969 1406 431 

" XII. 94 454 31 

" XIII. 883 6:« 206 

" XIV. 317 929 loo 

XV. aS9 3.33 130 

" XVI. 424 640 54 

" XVII. 205 358 143 

" XVIII. 116 168 45 

" XIX. 2ijl 212 44 

Total 7983 128S8 2740 

New Lots 38 200 69 

Flatlands 10 86 86 

Gravesend 35 47 38 

New Utrecht . 49 194 17 

FlatbiisU 45 115 58 

Total 8160 13520 30U8 

LEWIS COUNTY. 

Croghan 53 122 

Denmark 355 143 

niana 99 87 1 

Greig 152 151 

Harri.sburgh.. 187 51 

High Market . 55 125 

Lewis 52 83 

Leydeu 175 152 5 

Lowville 291 108 2 

Martinsburgh. 345 112 

Montague 42 57 

New Bremen . 65 128 

Osceola.^ 48 51 

Piuckuey 119 127 

Turin 230 86 29 



ELECTION RETURNS. 

Towns. Morg.Par'r.Bor'i 

Watson 106 95 

West Turin... 183 190 1 



Total 2557 

LIVINGSTON 

Avon 1.S4 

Conesus 145 

Caledonia 109 

Geneseo 266 

Groveland.... 53 

Livonia 299 

Leicester 131 

Lima 227 

Mt. Morris 251 

N. Dansville . 264 

Nunda 266 

Ossian 124 

Portage 134 

Sparta 95 

Springwater .. 296 
West Sparta . . 101 
York 267 



1868 33 

COUNTY. 

128 123 

53 64 

59 22 
156 84 

92 57 

60 35 
ISO 21 

113 37 
324 135 
224 131 
101 94 
108 3 

65 25 

114 34 
98 58 
38 71 
63 41 



Total 3162 1976 1025 

MADISON COUNTY. 

Brooktield.... 473 279 11 

Cazenovia 454 301 44 

De Ruyter 245 64 71 

Eaton 391 246 25 

Fenner \Si 68 38 

Georgetown... 206 47 

Hamilton 532 160 49 

Lebanon 252 46 3 

Lenox 643 563 51 

Madison 286 118 10 

Nelson 192 135 24 

Smithfield 110 42 

Stockbridge... 203 134 



Towns, 
New fane I 

Niagara 228 

Pendleton .... 102 

Porter 166 

Royalton 365 

Somerset 222 



Mor. Piir'r. 
306 158 



260 102 

97 83 

89 41 

288 106 

31 51 



4i) 



, Sm. 

1 



SulUvan 305 277 287 

Total 4445 2480 614 63( 

MONROE COUNTY. 

Rochester, 3072 2621 416 

5 Brighton 231 180 31 

1 Clarkson 229 150 22 

1 Chili 149 63 91 

2 Gates 170 59 70 

Greece 266 300 7 

Henrietta 246 116 

Irondequoit... 147 166 17 

Mendon 201 183 94 

Ogden 214 183 43 

Parma 342 98 20 

13 Penfield 340 138 6 

5 Perinton 272 101 63 

Pittsford 151 147 31 

2 Riga 172 87 33 

Rush 110 77 37 

70 Sweden 406 185 130 

Union 264 65 32 

Webster 241 137 8 

Wheatland ... 227 165 23 

Total 7450 5224 1144 31 

— ' MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

"'Amsterdam... 434 264 81 9 

I Canajoharie... 355 179 184 2 

16 Charleston 205 104 48 

32 Florida 224 284 78 1 

' I Glen 292 198 U4 

4lMinden 474 314 91 2 

2J Mohawk 301 214 75 4 

Palatine 249 201. 79 

4I Root 201 282 77 

St. Johnsville. 99 222 38 2 

33 Total 2834 2262 865 20 

1 NIAGARA COUNTY. 

2 Cambria 220 75 52 S 

Hartland 287 124 151 4 

1 l/ockport 810 607 405 37 

T'Lewiston 218 191 39 2 



Mheatfield ... 128 208 47 

WUson 265 108 102 

Total 3317 2231 1255 

NEW YORK COUNTY. 

Ward 1 240 1357 60 

2 181 258 97 

3 218 423 58 

4 S69 1872 61 

6 725 1543 323 

6 282 2265 27 

7 1107 2392 357 

8 1028 2032 491 

9 2071 1980 1184 

10 910 1404 288 

U 930 2958 373 

12 532 1196 225 

13 784 1705 324 

14 421 2329 m 

13 1533 1170 397 

16 1771 2155 604 

17 1664 3417 516 

18 1598 2413 426 

19 739 1427 113 

20 1873 2931 485 

21 1317 1969 412 

22 1309 1859 122 

Total.... 21603 41055 6991 
ONEIDA COUNTY. 

Annsville 249 294 23 

Augusta 246 161 2 

Ava 127 " " 



107 



Boonville 553 256 55 



109 
267 

201 



14 



Bridgewater. . 153 

Camden 445 

Deerfield 213 

Florence 142 323 41 

Floyd 133 

Kirkland 436 

Lee 3.33 

Marcy 164 

Marshall 219 

New Hartford. 548 

Paris 469 

Remsen 314 

Rome 680 

Sangerfield . . . 237 216 

Steuben 217 

Trenton 520 

Utica, 1834 1745 132 

Vernon... 366 181 32 

Verona 608 388 50 

Vienna 375 

Western 251 

Westmoreland 432 



l.H 9 

336 26 

274 7 
119 
158 

178 2 

226 14 

155 4 

930 39 



72 
172 



259 
261 

201 



25 



Whitestown . . . 457 249 39 10 



Total . . . .10728 
ONONDAGA 

Camillas 297 

Cicero 421 

Clay 371 

DeWitt 306 

Elbridge 325 

FabiuB 303 

Geddes 211 

La Fayette ... 263 

Lysander 550 

Manlius 606 

Marcellus 324 

Onondaga .... 561 

Otisco 191 

Pompey 46;i 

Salina 215 

Skaneateles. . . 410 
Spafford 211 



7993 586 
COUNTY. 
251 9 
216 9 
135 
240 



414 43 
153 



153 
187 



272 66 
431 43 



145 
381 
122 

288 



5' 
25 j 
91 
6 
6 

3 
9j 



2 I 

10 3 
=11 



50 



TH£ TRIBCSK ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



NEW yORK—Conlinued. 



OTSEGO COUNTY. 

Morgaii.ParK'r.Biu-'».Sin'h 



1(51) 
107 
191 



TosfM. Morgan.Park-r.Bor-s.Sra'hj „„?;"„._ .,.,- 

»uren.:-.^2 ^ J5 _., ^^^^^^-J^: % __ 

Total sioo 6219 7U i^^l J:!^^!^"'";;::; |i| f, 

ONTARIO COUNTY. I liartwick i23 2J6 

Qrigtol 221 42 72 1 1 Laurens 275 1-J 

Canadice 87 20 40 17 Maryland 2U3 213 

Canandaigua . 538 291 320 3i Middlefield ... 248 2s4 

B. BloomSeld . 206 67 84 1 Milford 233 244 

Fanninsion . . . 1S7 36 37 12 Morris 275 180 

Gorhaic 230 94 127 3i New Lisbon. .. 155 198 

:-16 in li Oiieoma 289 '■' 



Hopewell 1-io 

Miinchester .. 2130 

Naples 268 

Phelps 438 

RichJnond 141 

Seneca 642 

S. Bristol 108 

Victor 203 

W. Bloomfifeld 172 



264 .'i2 2 Olego 228 22» 

40 90 5, Otsego 436 425 

494 104 4; PiHilield 187 142 

53 26 12 Plainfield 189 89 

595 112 22ijlichfield 199 77 

25 99 11 Eoseboom 199 146 

123 61 1 Springfield ... 194 219 

32 48 3: UnadiUa 201 316 

1 Weatford 174 162 

Total ..3372 2232 1406 881 Worcester .... 172 222 



OKANGE COUNTY 



139 9 

110 69 

242 164 

181 17 

.•(jy 91 

267 S3 



Blm'g Grove.. 133 

Chester 75 

Cornwall 85 

Crawford 141 

Deerpark 316 

Goshen 209 

Greenville 02 lit i 

Hamptuuborgh 57 125 _ 5 

Minisint 77 141 b 

Monroe 379 236 15 

Montgomery . . i55 276 18 

Mount Uope . . 161 146 4 

Newburgb 535 778 337 

New Windsor. 94 l.Vi 53 

Wallkill 579 469 79 

Warwick 414 401 26 

Wayawanda . . 168 161 34 

Total 3840 4306 lOU 

ORLEANS COUNTY. 

Barrc 529 232 354 

Cu-lion 300 49 102 

Clarendon .... 132 80 102 

Gaines 268 f 81 9 

Kendall Ii5 &4 40 6 

Murray 195 199 b-i 

Ridgeway ■■•■ «7 220 98 

ifhelby 2SJ 153 65 

Yates. 225 80 81 

Total.... 2579 1190 976 
OSWEGO COUNTY. 

Albion 190 150 6 

Amboy 74 136 6 

Eoylst'on 86 46 

Constantia . . . . 275 a)3 5 

Granby 3W 2i4 23 

Hannibal 392 204 26 

Hastings 334 270 2 

Mexico^ 587 1»9 13 

New Haven... 2^9 64 21 

Orwell 97 83 5 

Oswego 249 195 45 

Oswego city .. 9.59 1190 144 

Parisli 125 125 4 

Palermo 276 91 19 

KedUeld 80 87 

KicbUnd 3tSS 253 12 

Schroeppel . . . . 234 290 VO 

Sandy (5reek.. 31)6 122 3 

Scribk 321 221 21 

Volnev 637 452 15 

West 'Monroe .111 115 5 

Williamstown. 86 116 6 



Total 5383 4541 355 70 

PUTNAM COUNTY. 



Carmel 201 

Kent 100 

Patterson 152 

Phillipstown . . 199 
Putnam Valley 64 
South East ... 145 



197 
158 
106 
628 
1S9 
174 



S.VKATOGA COUNTY. 
Toirnt. Morgan. Pttrk'r.iJiir'».Sm'h 



185 



Ballston 147 

Charlton 105 

Clifton Park . . 244 

Corinth 200 

Day 70 

Edinburgh 183 

Galway 246 

Greenfield 361 

Hauley 98 

Halfmoon 206 

Malta U7 

Milton 368 

Morean IfiO 

Northumberl'd 131 
Providence . . . 191 

Saiytoga 2.'i3 257 18: 

Star Springs . . 539 607 

Stillwater 225 

Waferford .... 110 
Wilton 179 



206 

81 
119 
119 
237 
163 

68 
2:i3 

112 23 
335 123 
101 63 
138 61 
128 



66 
189 84 
263 195 
83 24 



Total 4163 3691 1301 45 

SCHENECTADY COUNTY. 

Duaneburgh.. 316 293 10 1 

Olenville 250 178 180 

Niskayima 49 70 60 

Princetown ... 114 76 13 

Rotterdam 195 228 123 

Schenectady . . 560 431 446 7 

Total 1484 1326 832 8 

SCHOHARIE COUNTY. 



Total 861 1352 62 

2 

QUEEN'S COUNTY. 

2 Newtown 259 563 164 

Flushing 247 676 12G_ 

Jamaica 205 386 125^ 

1! N. Hempstead 235 288 42 

I Hempstead ... 436 683 523 

_ Oyotorbay .... 397 489 78 



Total 1779 30S5 1058 10 

RENSSELAER COUNTY. 



Blenheim 78 

Broome 163 

Carlisle 1.'18 

150 



142 
100 
215 



Total 6436 4842 455 326 



Berlin 161 

Brunswick 161 

East Greenb'h 85 

Grafton 88 

Greenbnsh.... 136 

Hoosick 372 

Lansingburg.. 432 

Nassau 401 

N.GreenbUbh. 43 
Petersburg . . . 106 

Pitlstown 362 

PcEstenkill.... 120 

Sandlake 224 

Schaghticoke . 190 

Scbudack 263 

Stepheutown . . 305 



Troy . 



143 91 

237 196 

113 46 

90 182 

297 138 

264 120 

2»2 186 

165 26 

118 141 

168 58 

133 266 

230 34 

168 98 

142 227 

3i9 67 

170 11 



Cobk-skiU 

Coilesville . 

Esperaiiee . 

Fulton 

-IGibboa .,„ »w 

1 Jetferson 156 121 

.iMiddlehnrgh.. 104 400 
■> Richmondville 84 

Schoharie 132 

Seward 97 

Sharon 205 

Summit 91 

Wright 93 



..1627 2440 1152 



28 

41 

10 

29 

45 

2:55 61 

264 145 

207 46 



Total 5076 5499 3028 

RICH.MOND COUNTY. 

Castleton 390 718 IU3 

Northfield .... 87 321 156 

Southlield 97 550 44 

Wesiheld ..... 112 294 77 

Total 686 1883 380 

ROCKLAND COUNTY. 

Clarkstown . . . 59 .SiSS 86 

Haverstraw... 220 334 175 

Orangetown . . 199 415 161 

Bamapo 122 2.'9 102 

Total 600 1366 524 



Total 2fB6 3403 726 109 

SCHUY LER COUNTY. 

Catharine 441 18;i 117 7 

Cavuta 39 98 4 

Dik 256 315 42 5 

Hector 645 287 94 4 

Orange 233 223 2 3 

Reading 198 109 4 2 

Tyrone 191 233 8 1 

Total 2003 1448 271 22 

SENECA COUNTY. 

Covert 220 162 78 

Lodi 131 172 38 1 

6U Ovid 191 m 126 

I Romulus 110 175 101 1 

Varick 126 118 89 2 

I Fayette 211 iTA 135 

I I Waterloo 2:}8 268 147 

I Seneca Falls.. 359 351 280 5 

.lunius 153 103 3 1 

Tyre 125 125 35 

Total 1864 1886 1028 10 

STEUBEN COUNTY. 

I Addison 293 167 143 1 

i Avoca '207 12i 23 9 

Bath 640 418 66 18 

Bradford; 114 131 3 

Catou 167 90 6 

I Cameron 135 62 22 



ELECTION RETCRNS. 



51 



62 


21 


l.W 


2;i 


157 


4 


422 


ISl 


189 




9(» 


67 


1(« 


2 


lU 


4 


«7 


6 


K2 


«1 


m 


4<) 


129 


63 


97 


2 


4.1 


9 


16t 


Sti 


i:« 


13 


94 


19 


4ft 


19 


lU 


12 


lai 


nil 


ItW 


9 


79 


•l\ 


9fi 


4 


lOfi 


4« 


93 


54 



NEW YOKK— Continued. 
Towns. Morgan. Park'r.Biir'sSin'th 
Campbell .... 178 

Canisieo 230 

Coliocton 222 ■ 

CorninK 4S5 

Dansville 185 

Erwin 132 

Fremont 129 

Greenwood ... 107 

Hrtrtsville 124 

Hornby U9 

Uomellsville. . 366 

Howard 237 

Jasper 220 

Lindlev 116 

Pratlsburgb... 231 

yulleney 164 

Raibboue 127 

Thurston 98 

Troiipsburgh . 223 

Urbana 116 

Waylaud ise 

Wayne 74 

West Union . . 63 

Wheeler t)8 

Woodh'ull 241 

Total 6083 4258 1012 73 

BT. LAWRENCE COUNTY. 

Brasher 187 

Colton 87 

Cunton 498 

ne Kalb 303 

Depevster 149 

RdwaVds U7 

Fine 28 

Fowler 154 

Gouvemeur... 34S 

Hammond 206 

Hermon ...... 194 

Hopinkton .... 173 

Lawrence 301 

Liiibon 476 

Ix)uisville 138 

Morriyown . . . 316 

Macomb 127 

Madrid 461 

Massena 206 

Norfolk 180 

Oswcgatcbie.. 730 

Potsdam 789 

Parishville... 333 

Pierpont 2tJ0 

Pitcaim 58 

Rosiie 142 

Rnssell 183 

Stockholm 407 



51 
310 
76 
35 
93 
16 
120 
92 
34 
89 
25 
73 
90 
40 



53 



192 45 

69 10 

73 53 

354 107 

220 20 

44 11 

27 10 



I Tovm, Morgan. Parlier.Bur'8.Sn 

Neversink 165 150 41 

Rockland 47 37 136 

Thompson 134 212 305 

Tosten 30 77 19 

Total 1314 1916 1579 

TIOGA COUNTY. 

Barton 394 

Hevkshire 125 

Candor .^5 

Newark 274 

Nichols 239 

Owego 834 

Richford 135 

Spencer 210 

Tioga-. 266 

Total 2822 2628 237 

TOMPKINS COUNTY. 

Caroline 296 134 33 

Danby 254 08 85 

Dryden 639 288 64 

Kniield 2iJ4 137 49 

Croton 518 184 4 

Ithaca 498 439 357 

Lansing 350 297 10 

Newfield 270 202 74 

Ulysses 360 220 69 

Total 3389 1969 745 

ULSTER COUNTY. 



370 


22 


68 


44 


449 


44 


I3.S 


1! 


145 


10 


771 


79 


114 


fi 


201 


7 


375 


15 



Towna, Morgan. Park'r.BQr'9.Sm'h 

Pntnam 79 6 19 

Salem 328 215 79 7 

White Creek.. 212 199 52 2 
Whitehall . . . . ;262 273 235 1 

Total 4198 2511 1170 110 

WAYNE COUNTY. 
2| Arcadia 425 218 297 

hutler ao ■ 

2| Galen M5 

Huron 187 

Lyons 474 

7i Macedon 258 

i] Marion 296 

Ontario 302 

Palmyra 402 

Rose 213 

24 Savannah 185 

Sodus 493 

Walworth.... 164 

Williamson... 253 

Wolcott. 278 



1.32 


4 


245 


82 


11(1 


61 


350 


H7 


1.34 


64 


52 


13 


m 


34 


2,'J6 


74 


107 


3fi 


1(»7 


16 


.322 


3ft 


73 


14 


165 


11 


259 


34 



101 
120 
65 



10 



169 


■'2 


4:<5 


l.Sft 


198 


49 


160 


19 


10 


Ift 


71 


22 


2;>i 


Ki 


315 


96 



Total 7691 2018 484 169 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Brookhavcn . . 332 471 17 
Easthampton . 155 
Huntington . . . 270 

Islip 119 

Riverhead 264 

Shelter Island. 8 

Smithtown 57 

Southampton . . 4S9 

Southold 450 315 96 1 

Total'..... 2144 2107 589 
SULLIVAN COUNTY. 

Bethel 100 179 167 

Cochecton 67 268 68 

Callicoon 29 207 67 

Fallsburgh ... 149 149 207 

Forestburgh . . 20 78 61 

Fremont 71 56 70 

Highland 29 58 64 

Liberty 145 184 213 

Lumberland . . 27 72 7 

Mamakating.. 33' 189 154 



Denning 44 

Esopus 94 

Gardiner 66 

Hurley .' 47 

Kingston 478 

Lloyd 135 

Marbletown ... 82 
.Marlborough.. 144 
NewPaltz.... i;i3 

Olive 98 

Platiekill 93 

Rochester 148 

Rosendale ... 94 

Saugerties 415 

Shindaken..'. . 60 
Shawangunk. . 1.30 
Wawarsing. . . 617 
Woodstock ... 74 



56 27 

212 2:3 

21-15 147 

93 174 

911 611 

113 161 

185 362 

167 85 

157 104 

2:^1 187 

89 135 

356 142 

152 196 

721 230 

Z¥) 82 

275 99 

459 151 

110 101 



Total.... 2942 47243270 
'■ WARREN COUNTY. 



Total .... 4730 26:J7 862 150 
WESTCHESTER COUNTY. 

Bedford 208 171 120 5 

Cortlandt 413 506 305 

East Chester.. 175 319 61 

Grecnburgh . . 355 489 128 

Harrison 53 58 14 

Lewisboro' 114 74 36 

Maraaroneck.. 39 51 25 

Morrisania.... 333 504 37 

Mt. Pleasant. . 168 317 117 

Newcastle 134 126 26 

NewRochelle. 92 2.57 50 

Northcastle... 139 166 67 

North Salem., l.'io 85 11 

Ofisining 316 427 ia3 

Ponndridge ... 123 91 35 

Pelham 10 45 

Rye 1&4 231 

Scarsdale 19 24 

Somers 75 100 

Westchester... 127 213 

West Farms . . 335 .338 

Whiteplains . . 116 138 

Yonkers 423 514 

Yorktown 160 213 



23 



Total. V... 4266 5157 1428 
WYOiUNG COUNTY. 



Bolton 136 

Caldwell 50 

(>1iester 289 

Hague 43 

Hoticon 156 

Johnsburgh... 1!I9 

Luzerne 158 

. Queensburg... 380 

^ Stony Creek. . . 93 

Thurmun 171 



74 
70 
146 
93 



389 317 
77 2 
64 6 



Warrensbmgh 106 226 15 

Total 1781 1443 549 47 

WASHINGTON COUNTY. 



A-rgyle 392 

Cambridge.... 265 

Dresden .13 

Easton 291 

Fort Ann 285 

Fort Edward . 232 

Granville 41)3 

(jreenv.ich 492 

Hampton 84 

Hartford 283 

Hebion 316 

Jackson 196 

Kingsbury 325 



111 120 

116 43 

69 6 

73 61 

193 128 

269 -58 

198 20 

l'J4 42 

56 16 

66 104 

87 98 

119 39 

238 70 



Attica 276 

Bennington... 199 

Castile 271 

China 137 

Covington 141 

Eagle 170 

Gaines\ille . . . 198 
Genesee Falls. 97 

Java 1 143 

Middlebury... 236 
Orangeville. .. 154 

PeiTy 332 

Pike 271 

Sheldon 123 

Warsaw ■. 342 

Wethersfield.. 114 



192 

189 

120 

162 

45 

45 

103 

72 

215 

69 

66 

90 

82 

234 

136 

127 



18 



Total 32114 1952 350 

YATES COUNTY. 

Barrington 159 78 57 

Benton 352 

Italy 195 

Jerusalem 363 

Middlesex 179 

Milo 491 

Potter 308 

Starkey 299 

Torrey 133 

Total 2479 1283 147 6 



86 


.35 


74 


,3 


180 


3 


40 




Sli9 


40 


107 




207 


1 


142 


8 



62 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL XEGISTER. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

JCDGE Sur. Ct., '58. PRESIDEhT, ISOfi. 

Couniiet. 0pp. Dem. Krp. Bern. Am. 

iimd. Porler. FKlirU Buch. Fill. 

Adams 2220 2346.... 1120 26.S7 1249 

Allegheny 10057 6503. . . . l.Wl 9062 14S8 

Armstrong 2;*6 2003.... 2%3 26S0 1S8 

Beaver 1S61 1152... 

Bedford 1811 2007... 

Berks 5024 9654... 

Blair 27U 1679... 

Bradford 4632 1096... 

Bucks 5205 5171... 

Butler 25:54 1984. 



19('6 

2458 19,36 



Cambria 1671 21W)... 

Oarbon 1467 12Ki... 

Centre 2364 2000... 

Chester 7371 4742... 

Clarion 1.366 2185... 

Clearfield 994 1514... 

Clinton 1240 Vm...- 

Columbia 1458 1902.... 



;658 
306 

1037 11272 35S6 
445 2069 
6938 2314 
6048 6517 
2648 
2<1S7 

390 2hy5 195: 

5:508 63.3:{ 1448 

760 



3401 
804 
692 



24.T0 
101 
761 
67 
968 
465 



788 

718 1978 

618 14K5 

1239 2889 



Crawford 3070 2114.... 5360 3391 

Cumberland ... 2501 2811.... 1472 3427 1h:9 

2185.. 

1604.. 
519.. 

1921.. 



Daupliin . 3:5-14 

Delaware 2318 

Elk 353 

Erie 32.33 

Favette 2205 252: 

Forest J7 

Franklin... .... . 3385 

Fulton 5ti5 

Greene 842 1941.. 

Huntingdon.... 2079 1300... 

Indiana 3(127 

Jeflerson 12.i7 



060. . . . 
730. .. . 



1440.. 
1153... 



1616 S09t 2439 

l.'i90 2005 1010 

275 575 52 

T,\:k, 2584 289 

2U«) S.'^M 1174 

New County. 

2446 3469 1233 

970 566 
2747 



Juniata 1216 1215 



142 
1.321 

926 
3612 
1063 1463 

480 1365 



2164 ltU5 
1762 



526 
2699 



LanoaBter 9925 6066.... 6608 

Lawrence 192:5 601.... ;5065 1220 

Lebanon 2657 1508.... 2414 2511 

Lehigh 2917 3102.... 32.37 4426 

Luzerne 4747 4496.... 4850 6791 

Lvcoming 222:5 2299.... 9:i4 3324 

McKean 773 546.... 812 

Mercer 2S25 2120.... 3686 

Mifflin 1466 1122.... 216 1491 

Monroe 599 1424.... OiiO 2275 

Montgomerv 6576 5525... 

Montour 813 770... 

Northampton .. 2225 3041... 

Northumberland 16:54 2450... 

Perry 1791 1628... 

Philadelphia . . . .33395 26867 . . • 

Pike 176 497... 

Power 9f3 498.... 1264 

PchuvlkiU 5703 6494.... 2188 

Koraereet 2475 1585. ... 1458 

Snvder 1402 1055.... 443 

Susquehanna... 3121 1954.. 

SnlUvan. 307 488.. 

Tioga 3084 1449.. 

Union 1285 748.. 

Venango 1902 1743.... 2041 21.57 



263 

615 

V47 

8731 4592 



96 

437 

122 

868 

1770 

47 

118 

1050 

69 

2845 7134 2265 

666 1271 149 

1168 .')26« 18:58 

566 3059 1.340 

521 2135 1407 

7993 38222 24084 

862 15 

667 6 

035 2«82 

1763 1405 



1256- 
3861 2548 
309 .538 
4r>41 1386 
1429 U)92 



1064 
51 
48 
27 
186 
72 
49 



WarreS 1605 1097.... 2091 1231 

Washington .... 3906 .3677 ... . 4237 4288 

Wayne 1763 2121.... 22,« 23.31 

Westmoreland .. 3783 4456... 4091 6172 299 

Wvoming 844 9il.... 11:58 1171 74 

yjrk ... 3942 4529. ... 511 6876 4301 

Total 198117 171130... 147963 230772 82202 

Ecad's maj., 26987 ; Buchanan's do., 607. 

CANAL COMMISSIO.VER, 185S. 

Fraier, Opp., 196626; Frost, Z)«». , 170336 ; Opposi- 
tion majority, 26290. 

OOSCBFSS, 18.')8. CO.VGRK-S, 1856. 

DistricU. Union. Dem. A.L.D. Union. Dem. 

1 UyHn.FlorVe.Xeb'g'r.KuiKlii.FlorV*. 

Ward 1 1527 1431 646.... 155.5 1571 

•• 2 1481 1414 9.51.... 1845 2294 

•' "si 878 1027 354... 1087 1466 



Ward 4 

" 5 (pari) . 



Union. T>rm, A.L.D. Union. Dem. 
Ryau. FlorV(i.Nebg'r.KuighlJ"lo' 'w. 
720 1387 366.... 875 2o:« 
312 449 68.... 374 499 
1574 1115 107.... 1539 1627 



Tot.lI 6492 6823 2442... 7275 9495 1 

Florence over Ryan, 331 ; do. over Knight, 2220. I 

II. Morris. Martin. Alorris. Mare'll. i 

Ward 6 (part).. 613 637 .... 761 926: 

■' 6 926 817 .... 1162 1413! 

" 8 1134 878 .... 1264 1223 1 

" 9 1162 896 .... 1265 126:5 

" 10 1818 802 .... 1959 119:5 I 

6018 



Total 5653 4030 .... 6411 

Maj. for Morris, 1623 ; do. in 1856, .393. 

Verree.Landy, *Re€d. MillwM.L'ndy 



Ward 11 987 

" 12 1132 

" 16 

" 17 

•' 18 

•' 19 (part) 



1284 
9.34 

l(i67 
973 



872 
831 
1126 
1336 
973 
696 



33.. 



923 
1179 
1287 

940 
1712 

712 



I 

1421 I 
1283 1 
1412 1 
1818 1 
1118 
881 i 



6977 



5&54 62.... 6753 7933 



Total . . 

Verree over Landy, 1U3; Laudy over Millward 
1180. I 

Millwftrd.Phillip8.«Brcpom.»For'8t.Phiri>«. I 



Ward 13 1691 

" 14 1940 

" 15 

19 (part) . 



211. 

21 (part) . 

• 2:5 (part) . 

24 



1976 
506 

1820 
320 
405 

1091 



846 
8<>4 

i:528 
750 

lli9 
340 
316 
978 



13. 



2.... 

0.... 

162.... 



1296 
1522 
960 
376 
1240 
169 
227 
770 



1192 
1444 
l.'-|62 
961 
1890 
347 
396 
1387 



Total 9749 6451 253.... 6560 9279 

Millw'd over Phil., ;5298 ; Phil, over Forrest, 2719. 

V. Wood. Jones. Mulvany.Jone«i. 

Ward 21 (part).. 92:5 660 .... 715 793 

" 22 1513 777 .... 1240 978 

•• 23 (jtart) . 1203 768 .... 1199 1265 

Montgomeiy Co. 6032 5004 .... 4807 6648 

Total 9701 7209 .... 7961 9674 

Wood's maj. 2492-, Jones' do. 1713. 
VJ. Broomall. Manley.Hii-k'n. Bowen.Hick'n. 

CThester 2388 4021 5765. . . . 6969 6055 

Delaware 2288 1164 1021.... 1882 1969 



Total 4676 5185 6786.... 7851 P024 ] 

Hickman over Manley, 1601 ; do. over Bowen, 173. 

VII. Longnecker.Roberts. BradBhftw.Chttp'n. 

Bucks 52.35 5122 .... 5591 6278 

Lehigh 3089 2954 .... 3198 4043 1 

Total 8.324 8076 .... 8789 10.321 

Maj. for Ix)ngnecker, 248 ; do. for Chapman, 1532. 

VIII. Schwarti Jones. Y'wl'-r. Jonos. 
Berks 7321 7302 .... .3947 9951 

Maj. for Schwarti, 19; do. for Jones in '56 6004. 

IX. St«Ten8jI<.pkini;. Rob«rl8.Hei»ter. 
Lancaster 9513 0341 ....lOOOl 8320 

Maj. for Stevens, 3172 ; do. for Roberts, 1681. 



X. 



Killinper.Weidlc. 



Danphin 3255 

Lebanon 2712 

Union 1318 

N'uniberla'd(pt.) 160 

Snyder 1452 



2281 
1460 
787 
27 
1034 



Kunkel.Evsr. 


.3452 


29*13 


2780 


2227 


1505 


1012 


156 


87 


1334 


1131 



Totnl 8897 5589 



9227 



360 



Maj. for Hillinger, 3.308 ; do. for Kunkel, 1867. 

XI. Campbell. Dewart. Cake. Camp'll.Dew't. 

Nonhumberland 1602 1825 .579.... 1615 2750 

Schuylkill 5551 2562 30:5o.... 4803 6209 

Total.. 7153 4.387 3614.... 6418 8059 

Campbell over Dewart, 2766 ; Dewart over Camp- 
bell, 2541. 

* Americans. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



53 



PENNSYLVANIA— Conrtni«yf. 

PMrida. Union. Dem. Union. T)nn. 

XII. Soraiiton. MeReynoldt. Smith, lloni'v. 

ColmnWa 1907 1442.... 1234 264IJ 

Lusenie 6193 3262.... 4676 65IJ9 

Moi.toiir 990 684.... »56 lUtt 

Wyoming 933 S98.... 891 125B 

Totftl 10023 6186.... 76.57 1U412 

Maj. foi- Scranlou, 3S37 ; do. for Montgomery, 27S5. 

X:il. Shocnmker. Dimmick.E.S.Dim'l<. W.H.D. 

Carbon 1538 1126.... 928 1591 

.Monroe 783 1261.... 541 2024 

Northampton 2275 2992.... 1274 4071 

I'ike 179 491.... 2.57 791 

Wayne 1791 2139. . . . 3065 21.58 

Total 6666 8009.... 5065 11235 

Maj. for W. H. Dimmick, 1443 ; do. In 1866, 6170. 
XIV. Grow. Parkhurst. +Grow. Sherwd. 

Bradford 4774 920. . . . 6082 1978 

Susquehanna 3180 1859.... 3510 2296 

I'ioga 32U 680.... 3733 1087 

Total 11165 3359.... 13325 6361 

Maj. for Grow, 7806 ; do. in 1856, 7964. 

XV.' Hal*. White. Irwin. White. 

Centre 25.51 1911.... 2421 2708 

Clinton 1370 1294.... 1214 1446 

Lycoming 2484 2028.... 2768 3119 

.Mifflin 1471 1139.... 1577 1539 

Sullivan 314 489.... 346 493 

rotter 1048 488.... 1124 675 

Total 92.38 7»49.... 9450 9980 

Maj. for Hale, 18S9 ; do. for White, 530. 

XVI. Juiikin. Fisher. Todd. Abl. 

Cumberland 2560 2768. . . . 3089 3027 

Periy 1948 1483.... 1P84 2040 

York 4138 4349.... 4597 6124 

Total 8646 8600.... 9570 11191 

Maj. for Junkin, 46 ; do. for Ahl, 1521. 

XVU. McPherson. Reilly. PumroT. Reilly. 

Adams 2295 2169.... 226§ 2309 

Bedford 1859 1974.... 2174 2297 

Franklin S384 3060.... 3325 3868 

Fulton 675 713.... 6V3 935 

Juniata 12.35 1165.... 1275 1315 

Total 9348 9081.... 9715 10221 

Maj. for McPherson, 267 ; do. for Reilly, 509. 

XVUI. Blair. Pershing. Edie. Persh'g- 

Blair 2798 1567.... 2620 1939 

Cambria 1700 2273.... 1474 2823 

Huntingdon 2115 1261.... 2194 1966 

Somerset 2501 1578.... 2.504 1780 

Total 9114 6679.... S792 8506 

Maj. for Blair, 2435 ; do. for Edie, 281. 

XIX, Covode. Foster. Covode.McKin'y 

Armstrong 2425 2001 2820 2307 

Indiana .3035 1535.... 3340 1488 

Westmoreland 3797 4629 4249 4929 

Total 9257 8165...: 10409 8724 

Maj. for Covode, 1092; do. in 1856, 1685. 

XX. Knight. Montgom'y, Knipht.Montg'y. 

Fayette 1275 3299.... 3265 3410 

Creene 731 21.56.... 1651 2594 

Washington 3792 3799.... 4495 4252 

Total 5798 9254.... 9411 10-256 

Maj. for Montgomery, 34.56 ; do. In 1856, 845. 
^11. McKniehl.Birming'm. fParvi'e. Gibson. 
AUegheny (part)... 2935 217.... 3748 2271 
Butler 2503 285. .. . 3092 2583 

Total 54.38 502.... 6840 4854 

Williams, Anti-Tax. 390-3. 

McK. over Wms. 1535 ; Purviance over Gibson, 1986. 



XXI. Moorhead. Binke. tRitchicMcCan's. 

Allegbenv (part).. f)o.39 4879 7674 5944 

Maj. for Moorhead, 1660 : do. for Ritchie, 1730. 
XXia, Stewart. McGuffin. Stewart.Cun'g'm. 

Beaver 1871 1126.... 2376 1801 

La*rence 1951 615.... 2095 1121 

Meicer 2S99 2036.... 3481 2546 

Total 6721 .3777^^" 8552 6467 

Majority for Siew.irt, 2944 ; do. in 1S56, 3085. 

XXIV. Hall. Gillis. Mvets. Gillia. 

Clarion 1,5.58 2019 1674 2594 

Cletirfield 1028 144.5.... 1211 1831 

Elk 395 479.... 239 488 

Forrest.. No retnrn. No retnm. 

Jefferson 1371 1049.... 1472 1318 

MeKean *. 835 479... 819 412 

Venango 1953 1671.... 1984 1968 

Warren 1765 969.... 1715 1174 

Total 8905 8111.... 9114 9785 

Maj. for Hall, 794 ; do. for Gillis, 671. 

XXV. Babbitt, Marshall. fDick.McFad'n 

Crawford 3110 2033..., 4709 26;« 

Erie 3220 2080.... 4235 1682 

Total 6.360 4113.... 8944 4216 

Maj. for Babbitt, 2247 ; do. for Hick, 4729. 
t Ran exclasively as Republicaus. 

LEGISLATUKE — 18.58-9. 

Senate.. Opposition 16; Hemocr.ats 17. 

HODSE... Opposition 68; Democrats 32. 



FLORIDA. 

Cong., 18.58. Gov.. 18.56. Pees.. '56. 

Counties. Ind.-D. Dem. Am. Dem. Am. Dem. 

Westeott Hawkins. W'k-r.Perrv. KiU.Buch. 

Alachtia 141 349.. 189 .336.. 142 361 

Calhoun 53 89.. m 12., 50 71 

Columbia 529 389.. 449 4X3.. 460 462 

Hade No return. No return. No return. 

Duval 345 296., 488 270.. 434 341 

E.scambia ,,,. 78 304.. 234 259.. 234 249 

Franklin 11 220.. laS 1.56.. 9o 177 

Gad.'sclen 244 411.. 398 354.. 300 328 

Hamilton 144 233.. 226 186.. 157 180 

Hernando m 35.. 40 101 

Hillsboro' 153 73.. ml61.. 173 365 

Holmes 119 35.. 87 76 

Jackson 293 482.. 471 407.. 457 431 

Jefferson 80 4.32.. 176 354., 145 390 

I.eon 123 382.. 368 404.. 294 414 

Lafayette 138 64.. 

Levy 82 100.. 79 68.. 55 45 

Liberty .S3 93.. 63 88 

Madison 278 317-. 535 423.. 360 454 

Manatee 12m 31 24 

Marion 193 254.. 267 353.. 210 324 

Monroe 22 158.. 61 212.. 54 222 

Nassau 65 237.. 78 104.. 70 133 

Orange 45 54.. 33 51 

Putnam m 17..' 25 70 

Santa Rosa 96 331.. 303 207., 334 S\) 

St. John 68 180.. 64 198.. 75 198 

St. Lucia No return. No retnrn. No return. 

Taylor 147 75.. 

Sumter .' 81 82.. 49 100 

Volusia Ifim 41 52 

Waknlla 42 105.. 194 158.. 149 169 

Walton 13m 143 129 

Washington... m46.. 72 153 

Total* 4070 6465.. „007 6407.. 4833 6358 

Hawkins' maj., 2395 ; Perry's do., 400 ; Pucha- 
nan's do., 1525. 

LEGISLATtTKB— 1858-9. 

Senate Democrats, 15 ; Opposition, 6. 

House Democrats, 35; Opposition, 10. 

• Totala for Congrest correct — rettima by counties im- 
p«rfe«t. 



54 




THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 1 


NORTH CAROT.TNA. 


MoRa«. Ellis.Gilmer. Bmgg. Fill. Borb. 
Wayne 164 li.'W.. 274 1332.. 2o8 1172 




Gov 
Irul 


, 1S5S. 
Dem. 


Gov. 


1S56. Pbes., 1856. 


Wilkes 1081 662.. 1264 609.. 992 380 

Wilson 103 880. . New County. 




lIcR.ie 


.EIIia.GiJmer. 




Fill. Buch. 


iailkin 767 7J7.. 8S8 633.. 694 4S3 


Alamance 


. t)16 


82.1. 


645 


916. 


452 714 


Yaacy 199 863.. 320 810.. 208 616 


Alexander . . . 


. :i50 


430.. 
325. 


411 

772 


466. 
334. 


322 314 
723 «311 


Total 39965 56222.. 44959 57555. .36886 48246 


Ashe 


. 6S3 


809. 


708 


734. 


617 831 


KUis's inaj., 1625, ; Bragg s do., 12596 ; Buchanan's 
do., 1136J. 


1 Beaufort 


. 7bO 


685. 


KiH 


.W9. 


796 625 




. 321 
. 329 


459. 
683. 


545 

481 


470. 
60S. 


611 453 
367 463 


Sen ATE.. Opposition — 18; Democrats.... 32. 




J Brunswick . . . 


. 43o 


336.. 
525f 
980. 


468 


404. 


381 364 


HocsK...Oi.posUion 38: Democrats 81. 


Burke 


. 521 
. 701 


459 
786 


52.J. 

969. 


311 378 
731 778 


Congress.— .\. special election in the Vlllth Dis- 
trict to supply the vac.incy caused bv the resignation 


buncombe . . . 


Cabarrus .... 


. 6S2 


481. 


665 


426. 


594 366 


of Hon. Thomas L. Clingman, resulted iu the choice 


Caldwell 


. SlW 


3;i. 


425 


438. 


374 364 


of John B.\ ance,Am.,over Averv,/)«/i.,by 2049 maj. 


Camdeu 


. 434 


112. 


474 


107. 


474 89 


Clingman's mHj. in 1857 was 4914. 


1 Carteret 


. 261 


423. 


502 


11*! 

968. 


389 463 




Caswell 

Catawba .... 


. lei 


996. 
990. 


211 
1.>S 


212 917 
168 653 


NEW JERSEY. 


Chatham 


. 1113 


1077. 


1062 


116.;. 


787 761 


CosGKESs, 1858. President, 1856. 


Cherokee 


. 616 


551. 


574 


6;s2. 


522 


Districts. 0pp. Dem. Am. Rrp. Dem. Am. 


Chowan 


. 184 


307. 


230 


291. 


2LJ 255 


1. Aiiun.W Biker. Joues. Frem't. Buch. Fill. 


Cleveland 


. 207 


1104. 


i:« 


1109. 


71 796' 


Atlantic 788 529 148.... M7 684 160 


Columbus .... 


. 291 


6,-9. 


306 


.W.. 


212 527 


Camden 16:50 1150 1756.... 817 1766 2uSS 


Craven 


. 559 


7.'i3. 


ft:« 


784. 


475 595 


Cape May 499 2:« 411.... 177 312 497 


Cumberland 


. 652 


fM. 


928 


1576. 


767 1257 


Cumberland... 1961 1193 415.... 642 1574 LSI 


Currituck 


. 142 


«:«. 


146 


656. 


128 538 


Gloucester 13.-S5 795 702 639 986 1380 


Davidson 


. 1064 


971. 


1199 


823. 


964 634 


Salem 213U 1442 307.... 432 1769 1516 


Davie 


. 587 


432. 


.-i.* 


35;i.. 


477 279 




Duplin 


. 132 


1257. 


l.-Ki 


1113.. 


117 1173 


Total 8393 6342 37.'59. . . 3254 7091 6872 


Edgecomb . . . 


. lus 


871.. 


1S9 


156;i.. 


151 15S1 


Nixon over Walker, 3i>51 ; Buch. over Fill., 219. 




. 634 


882.. 


926 


1080.. 


772 1043 


U. Stration. W.ill. Frein. Buch. Kill. 


Frauklin .... 


372 


825.. 


334 


744.. 


265 793 


Burlington .... 4817 2963 ....3149 3682 1584 


Gaston 


99 


845.. 


:?^ 


769.. 


53 697 


Mercer 3219 2679 ....2135 2857 lo64 


Gates 


. 393 
. 783 


402.. 
1083.. 


392 
994 


459.. 
1225.. 


303 388 
756 1060 


Monmouth 2196 2675 ....UW3 3319 1S15 

Ocean 1209 450 .... 892 660 304 


Granville .... 


Greene 


. 151 


3-.«. 


»S9 


4.H2.. 


218 375 





Guilford 


. 1819 


409. 


2059 


671.. 


1615 413 


Total 11471 S767 ....7199 10518 4767 


Halifax 


. 401 


712. 


684 


736.. 


509 683 


Stratton over Wall, 2704 ; Buch. over Frem., 3319. 


Harnett 


. 201 


639. 




New County. 


IH. *Aiiraiu. PHtenwn. Frem. Buch. h ill 


Hay ward 


. 215 


527.. 


254 


637.. 


191 413 


Hunterdon 2.i27 2947 ....1554 3196 llOt! 




. 672 


526. 


647 


665.. 


406 434 


Sliddlesex 3247 2483 ....1209 2468 1** 


Hertford 


. 325 


309. 


393 


,S36.. 


373 301 


Somerset 1529 i;07 ....1295 1846 709 


Hyde 


. 412 


421. 


501 


Xi2. 


398 248 


Warren 2410 2118 ....1596 2877 446 


Iredell 


. 1256 


384. 


Li49 


:«i. 


1241 302 


■■ - 


Jackson 


. il9 


587. 


112 


670. 


65 404 


Total 9713 9255 ....5654 10687 4249 


Johnston 


. 728 


819.. 


817 


1036.. 


619 95S 


Adrain over Pat., 45S : Bnch. over Frem , 50(3. 


Jones 


. 182 


238. 


180 


261.. 


157 211 


IV. *Riggs. Huyler. Frem. Buch. FiU. 


1/enoir 


. 274 


462.. 


263 


447.. 


264 424 


Bergen 886 1516 .... 436 1548 797 


Lincoln 


T'^. 


601.. 


222 


614.. 


228 614 


Morris 3050. 2646 ....2310 3008 696 


Macon 


. 337 


365.. 


396 


367.. 


308 247 


Passaic 2112 1881 ....1422 1618 954 


Madison 


. 2;1i 


499.. 


247 


576.. 


182 460 


Sussex 2789 2111 ....1601 3034 31 


Martin 


. 150 


646.. 


34<) 


706.. 


311 725 


■ — ■ • ■ 


Mecklenburg. 


453 


998.. 


6-^3 


11124.. 


573 1031 


Total 8837 8154 ....5769 9228 2478 


McDowell.... 


S68 


429.. 


396 


536.. 


274 380 


Kiggs over Huyler 683 ; Bnch. over Frem., 3459. 
V. PemuEgton. Worlendyke. Frem. Buch. Fill. 




581 


3?;i . 


725 


211.. 


5J6 108 


iloore. ...... 


. 666 


658.. 


677 


733.. 


489 440 


F,ssex 7479 668.1 . . . .4760 6845 4338 


Nash 


. S2l 


798.. 


93 


1107.. 


61 1068 


Hudson.. 2637 2853 ....1702 2574 1411 


J^w Hanover 


. 407 


1410.. 


670 


15-22.. 


577 1472 


Union 1505 1441 New County. 


Northampton . 


. 365 


648.. 


428 


695,. 


466 621 


.^-^ ^_ 


Onslow 


141 


777.. 


108 


771.. 


145 683 


Total 11641 9982 ....6462 9419 5749 


Orange 


1037 


1012.. 


1045 


1119.. 


747 909 


Pennington over Wort., 1659 ; Bnch. over Frem., 2957. 


1 Pasquotank . . 


. 436 


324.. 


502 


330.. 


532 299 


AGGREGATE VOTE OF THE STATE. 


PerquimauB . . 


320 


3J0.. 


318 


304.. 


346 254 


CosG., '58...0pp., SiOOl; Dera., 41.W0: Am., 3793 


Person ... 


. 196 


6:«.. 


384 


678.. 


279 543 


Pees., '56. ..Frem.,28:«8 ; Buch., 46943; FUL, 24115 


Pitt 


. 723 
93 


73:i.. 
205.. 


716 775. . 
No return. 


670 730 
124 156 


ij;gi.'<l.itdbe. 
Senate Democrats, 12; Opposition, 8. 


Polk 


Randolph 


1230 


492.. 


1281 


661.. 


11126 336 


llOLSK Democrats, 24; Opposition, 36. 


Richmond 

Robeson 


525 
. 532 


258.. 
769.. 


656 
669 


246.. 
773.. 


600 176 
666 673 


* Aaii-Lacompton Dem., supported by the Oppotitioo. 


Rockingham . 
Rowan 


. 332 

. 852 


1127.. 
1226.. 


439 

905 


lUK.. 
SS.5.. 


359 1001 
866 779 


DELAWARE. 


Rutherford . . . 


. &-9 


600.. 


781 


1070.. 


412 676 


GovER.NOR. Co.NG., 1858. Pres.,1856. 


Sampson 

Stanly 


. 485 


1041.. 


497 


991).. 


368 927 


Countiu. Opp. Dem. Opp. IMm. Am. Dem. 


821 


139.. 


797 


166.. 


731 1U8 


BockmMier. Burtun. Morrii, Whii'cy. Fill Buch. 


Stokes 


396 


788.. 


498 


769.. 


331 658 


Kent 1S57 2024.... 1824 2062.... 1630 2083 


Surry 


464 


798.. 


579 


877.. 


362 706 


New CasUe.. 3457 3416. ...3389 3482.... 2625 3577 


Tyrrell 

Lnion 


. 141 


217.. 


309 


124.. 


277 92 


Sussex 2240 2318.., .2239 23^4... .2020 2344 


304 


824.. 


273 


K».. 


2:i6 655 




Wake 


779 


1659.. 


nu 


1693. . 


7.S9 1472 


Total .... 7554 7758.... 7462 7868.... 6175 8001 


Warren 


108 


872.. 


101 


819.. 


78 841 


Burton's maj., 204; Whiteley's do., 416; Bucha 


Watanga 


386 


246.. 


392 


257.. 


36S 148 


nan's do., 1829. 


Washington . . 


200 


288.. 


377 


261.. 


364 2i6 


The Legislature Is Democratic In both branches. 



KLECTION KETCRNS. 



55 



MICHIGAN. 



GOVEBSOB, 18o8w 
Counties. H'-p. Dein. 

Wi»:i-r. Smart. 

Allceran ITib 1229.. 

Alpena 'JO 15.. 

B»y 140 270. 



Barry . 



39. . . 
1092. . . 
1211..., 

132. . . 
1702.... 

246..., 

192.... 
1431.... 

UU.... 



1873 1149... 
18 43... 



k . ISIO 1063. 

Berrfen 1973 1969. 

Branch 222S 1216. 

Calhoun 3l>S6 2111., 

Cass 1638 1394. 

Cheboygan 

Chippewa 44 

Clinton 12:11 

Eaton 1602 

Emmet 

Genesee 1509 

Gd. Traverse 209 

Gratiot 360 

Hillsdale 2879 

Houghton 46 

Huron No return. 

Ingham 1917 lb" 

Ionia 

losoo 

Jackson 2752 2254. 

Kalamazoo 2475 15S2.... 

Kent 3112 2813.... 

Lapeer 1251 995.... 

Leuawee 4023 2S37 

Livingston 1740 1S65 

Mackinac 18 118.... 

Macomb 1790 1629.... 

Manistee 9 26.'... 

Maniton 1* 69 

Marqaetto 169 90 

.Mason 72 .39 

Midland 247 55. . . . 

Monroe 1790 1712.... 

Montcalm 464 309.... 

Newaygo 369 238.... 

Oakland 3403 3337.... 

Oceana 68 167 

Ontonagon 119 109.... 

Ottowa 1091 1195... 

=<'"inaw 789^1069... 



President, 1856. 
Sep. Dem. Am. 
Frem't. Boch. Fill. 
1526 1027 29 

New Connty. 

New County. 
1495 872 49 
1926 15)0 132 
^608 1322 14 
U95 2151 122 
1703 1165 41 
No return. 
No return. 
1358 la'U 14 
1888 1228 15 

No return. 
2635 1538 110 

157 24.'5 2 

388 136 
3446 1408 37 

201 398 1 
No return. 
1849 1534 25 
2002 1154 

New County. 
2996 2118 
2803 1620 
2931 2516 
1579 995 
4499 2779 
176.5 1711 

No return. 
2210 1845 

No return. 

No return. 

79 77 



m. K.Uogf.Church. 

.Mlegaa.... 1278 1231 

Barry 1318 1056. 

Berrien 1989 1954. 

Calhoun 3101 2091. 

Clinton 1233 1096. 

Eaton 1611 1206. 

Gratiot 366 191. 

Ionia 1S75 1173. 

Kalamazoo. 24S0 1,567. 

Kent 3111 2786. 



79 
4C0 
317 

68 
1097 



32. 
306.. 
217.. 
157.. 
1190.. 



Walb'ge.Llt'j'n.E 

1514 1100.. 

1504 910.. 

1948 1594.. 

3543 2202.. 

1355 1057.. 

1869 1271.. 

391 137.. 

2000 1181.. 

2814 1648.. 

2972 2573.. 



32 
4i2 



Mason. 
Montcalm . . 
Newaygo... 

Oceana 

Ottawa 

Van Burea . 



Total... 21950 17438.. 23550 16046.. 23403 16228 

Kellogg's maj., 4512 ; Walbridge'B do., 7504 • Bing- 
ham's do., 7175. 



1567 1175. 



12. 

276.. 

No return. 

83 21.. 

1398 1008.. 

1716 1056.. 



nK'm.Felch. 

15.!1 1092 

1496 913 

1941 16:54 

3500 2246 

1.340 1066 

1853 1288 

387 1.-58 

1983 1192 

2807 1667 

2946 2596 

32 12 

405 282 
No return. 

83 21 

1393 1012 

1706 1069 



Leech 
20 
139 



32 
169 
1777 
414 



12 

43 

17a3 

265 



Sanilac. 
Schoolcraft. 
Shiawassee . 
St. Clair. 



301.... 
No return. 
1137 1040.... 
1732 1647.... 



No return, 
4105 3276 

82 21 

No return. 
1392 998 
1042 1222 
803 201 

No return. 
1304 1105 



St. Joseph 2108 1613 ... . 

Tuscola 439 308.... 

Van Buren 1559 1180.... 

Wa,shtenaw . . . . 3:513 2993.... 

Wayne 5105 6107.... 



1807 
2324 
442 
1740 
3570 
5230 



1521 
1475 
242 
1031 
2833 
5777 



Total 66201 56067.... 71762 52136 1660 

WiBner's maj., 9131 ; Frem't over Buchanan, 19626. 

CoKGTtESS, 1858. CosG.. 1S56. Gov., 1856. 

Diftrida. Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem. Hep. Dem. 

I. Howard. Cooper.Howard.Loth*p.BiDgra.Folch 

.Tackson 2721 2282.. 3024 2150.. 2971 2194 

Livingston.. 1751 1852.. 1763 1728.. 1727 1759 
Washtenaw. 3.^33 2'>75.. 3618 2907.. 35.38 2980 
Wayne 5243 6014.. 525:5 6006.. 6160 6041 



Total... 1.3048 1312:5.. 13658 12791.. 13396 12974 
Cooper's maj., 75 ; Howard's do. in '56, 867 ; Bing- 
ham's do., 422. 

II. Waldroii.Stacy.Waldron. Borrv.Binz'm.Felch. 

Branch..... 2217 1219.. 2615 1346.. 2604 1356 

Cass IfiSt 1367.. 1720 1188.. 169* 1210 

Hillsdale... 2871 l.'iSO.. 3.500 1401.. 34.'i5 1462 
Lenawee.... 3991 2&57.. 4519 2923.. 4496 2953 

Monroe 1790 1708.. 1783 1728.. 1767 1743 

St. Joseph.. 2120 1606.. 2330 1480.. 2301 1513 



Total... 14653 10137.. 16467 10064.. 16302 10237 
Waldron's maj., 4516 ; do. in '56, 6403 ; Bingham's 
do., 6065. 



Leech. Peck.Bing'm.Felch 
New Co. New Co. 
New Co. 
No return. 
No return. 
No return. 
2651 1619., 




Total... 16135 14916.. 18248 14524.. 18301 14646 



Leech's maj., 1219; do. in '56, 3734: Brngha-n's 
do., 3655. 

TOTAI. TOTE OF THE STATE. 

Rq»ihlicane. Democrati. Maj. 

Congresf. '58 .Kepub'ns. 65786 ; Demo'ts. 5.5614— 10172 
iietrf.-Goo... Fairfield.. 65065; Munro ..56907— 9158 

Sec.Slate ....Isbell 65876; King 55735—10141 

Treasurer McKin'y .65825 ; Kanter . .55192—10633 

A-ud.Gencral.Case 65499; .^dams ..55356— 10143 

AWy Gen Howard.. 66006 ; Suther'd. 55035— 10971 

S«p.PKA./n«<. Gregory.. 65811 ; Jacokes .51*48— ISOe.'S 

0»//i.X'dOj?!«.Sanbom .65696 ; Ball 55S47— 9*49 

Bd EducaVn.B&xler. . .65812 ; Moore .. ..55847— 9965 
Congrats, '56 .Kepub'ns. 71923; Demo'ts. 53425— IS^SS 
Goc'nor, '56 .Biug'm...71402; Felch... 54085— 17317 



LEGISLATURE— 1859-60. 

Senate... Republicans, 22: Democrata, 10. 
House .... Republicans, 46 ; Democrats, 33. 



MINNESOTA. 

An election for members of the Legislature of thLi 
new State was held in October, 1858, which resulted 
as follows : 

Sesate... Republicans, 18 ; Democrats, 19. 
House.... Republicaiis, 49; Democrats, 31. 
The Legislature elected the year previous was 
Democratic in both branches, and stood : 

Sejt ate... Republicans, 17 ; Democrats, 20. 
House.... Republicana, 37 ; Democrats, 43. 



56 



THE TRIBCNK ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



MISSOURI. 

Congress, ISoS School Srp.,'58.PRES.,'56. 
Diriricts. iiep. Am. Vein. Am. Dem. Am.Dem. 
I. Bluir.B.ick.BairetuProvines.Starke.Kiil. iuch. 

St.I/3nis..6«31 sees 7a57.. 9943 7129.. 6834 55.34 
Barrett over Blair, 426* ; Provines' maj., 2814 ; Fill- 
more do. ,1300. 

II. Hender'n.Ander'n.Frovines,StArte.Fill. Bach. 

Audrain 412 599.. 503 568.. 565 S21 

Boone -l?l 1356. 

Oallowav 367 1696. 

Lincoln 462 1038. 

.Marion 956 106S. 

Monroe 526 1240. 

Montgomery.. 441 601. 

Pike 1122 1233.. 491 121 

Ralls 373 592.. 

St. Charles .. . 659 902.. 
Warren 290 577.. 



1181 890.. 1329 

1046 lOU.. 1095 

73 1131. 

833., 

487. 

418.. 



411 
226 
395 



572 
1.321 
1012 

603 



429 



407.. 
1439.. 
117.. 



1131 11131 
534 369 



583 
378 



Total 6089 10902 

Anderson'.s maj., 4813; 

more's do., 1516. 

III. John B. Clark, 

Adair i)«)i., elect- 

Canoll ed without 

Chariton opposiiiou. 

Clark 

Gmndy 

Howard 

Knox 

Lewis 

Linn 

Livingston ... 

Mercer 

Macon 

Patnam 

Randolph 

Schuyler 

Shelby 

Scotland 

.Sullivan 



. 4S59 8513.. 9123 
Starke's do., 3654 ; 

Pro viues.Stwke. Fill. 
18.. 283 
60.. 399 
440 



71 

138 

714 918. 

115 573. 

382 948. 

215 684 



Bach. 
410 
659 
559 



358 962. 
4S6 509 



47 1389. 

591.. 

643 854.. 

896.. 

105 294.. 

15 850.. 

981.. 



391 

642 

3fi3 

926. . 430 

568. 



435 
257 
606 
287 
4;v2 
353 
260 



3379 13465.. 7884 

; Bnchanan's do., 2163. 

Craig.ProviDe*.Starke. Fill. 

1021.. 310 6S5.. 428 

274.. 132 

119 2443.. 768 

94 314. . 237 




Bach. 
889 
345 

1036 
295 
675 
397 
572 
336 
757 
493 
409 
438 

1263 
874 



Total 7824 12439.. 3347 11606.. 6200 8781 

CralB's maj., 4615 ; Starke's do., 8059 ; Buchanan's 
do., 2381. 

V. Reid.Woort'n.Provines.Starke.Fill. Bnch. 

42 652.. 159 467 

SJ 588.. 596 561 

402 776.. 259 552 

189 1065.. 787 778 

487 464.. 402 369 

693 1504.. 894 1168 

650 751.. 844 640 

471 274.. 1293 634 

11 411.. 108 224 

6 400.. 387 427 

376. . 227 403 

432 319 



B«nton. 



SU2 233.. 

Cass 449 6I7.. 

Cole 744 116.. 

Cooper 727 853. . 

Henry 221 762.. 

Jackson 1447 1075.. 

Johnson 515 850.. 

Lafayette 340 936.. 

Miller 450 176.. 

Moniteau 391 649. . 

Morgan 285 368.. 

Pettis 207 455.. 

SaUne 669 832.. 



135 427. 

693 826.. 853 599 



Total 6947 7942.. 3768 8514.. 7241 7061 

Smith, 7nd., 20.3.8. 

Woodson over Keid, 995 ; Starke's maj., 4(46 ; Fill- 
more's do., 180. 

• Conteatcd. 



Vr. Richardson. rhelp«.Pror'nes.Starke.Fill. Buch. 

Bates 10 826.. 20 655.. 2.S5 4i.<t 

Barton 59 193.. with Jn.sper. S3 64 

Barrv 232 687.. 9 519.. H8 48.'' 

C,<>mden 241 242.. 132 2iil.. 210 269 

Cedar 220 628.. 2 95.. 163 391 

DaJe 213 652.. 204 492.. 3:i3 418 

Pallas 462 272. . 201 126. . 1.12 454 

Gasconade ... 641 245. . 12 493. . 220 403 

Greene 1135 1029.. 1073 980.. 1003 1029 

Hickory 168 350.. 68.. 130 333 

Howell 156 97.. 9 178..NewCo. 

Jasper .344 434.. 325 277.. 294 39S 

Laclede 355 378.. 262 311.. 223 .321 

Lawrence 608 666.. 318 388.. 358 .574 

Maries 36 472.. 21 409.. 67 246 

-McDonald.... 153 346.. 39 191.. 61 299 

Newton 410 779.. 116 257.. 236 528 

Oregon 137 IS'J.. 17 125.. 37 324 

Osage 427 451.. 123 464.. 219 412 

Ozark &DoQg's 240 373.. 77 186.. 61 149 

Polk 672 6.30.. 635 597.. 412 662 

Pula.«ki 118 255.. 20 93.. 68 268 

St. Clair 114 721.. 20 594.. 210 347 

Stone 113 173.. 88 158.. 3 137 

Tanev 206 486.. 165 428.. 34 388 

Texas 124 573.. 4 432.. 91 479 

Temon 41 409.. 237.. 172 cOZ 

■Webster 528 579.. 452 552.. 189 468 

Wright 84 389.. 35 289.. 64 267 

Total 8050 13424.. 4379 9795.. 5J38 10827 

Phelp's maj., 5374 ; Starke's, 5416 ; Buch.'s, 5389. 

Vn. Zeiglcr.Koell.Provines.Starke.Kill. Bnch. 

Bollinger.... 136 528.. 176.. 199 413 

Bniler 98 211.. ..09.. 34 143 

CapeGirard'n 734 548.. 332 228.. 664 898 

Crawford 150 423.. 4 7-. 460 iM 

Dent 52 468. . 77 396 

Dunklin 333 58.. 159.. 101 147 

Franklin .... 1012 767.. 360 209.. 531 846 

Iron 353 174.. 124 80.. New Co. 

Jefferson 364 620.. 999.. 523 387 

Madison 81 654.. P.. 355 418 

Mississippi... 126 .377.. 5 226.. 317 .327 

New Madrid.. 227 327.. 8.. 295 234 

Pemiscot .... 55 268.. 71.. Ill 119 

Perry 150 759.. 4 534.. 207 586 

Phelps 71 498.. 20 353..NewCo. 

Reynolds 173 187.. 251.. 82 114 

Ripley 66 411.. 400.. 41 .306 

Scott 298 392.. 128 2«S.. 345 222 

Shannon 12 197.. 170.. 14 40 

St. Genevieve. 278 397.. 30 369.. .3(« 35*; 

St. Francois . . 349 608.. 8 270.. 4i)l .541 

Stoddard 217 472.. 98.. 151 315 

Washington.. 273 702.. 4 164.. 437 578 

Wayne 200 458. . 79. . 100 287 

Total 5808 1(M04.. 1019 .^256..5S03 8107 

Noell'smaj., 4596 ; Starke's, 4237 : Buch'.s, 2301. 
Total State. . .30894 64278. .48523 57964 

Starke's mnj., 33384 : Bnchanan's do., 9441. 
The LEOiiLATLKE is largely Democratic. 

CONNECTICUT. 

Governor, 1853. Presiiient, 1?56. 

Ocnmtiex. Sep. Dan. Jitp. Dem. Am. 

BackiDgham.Prstt.Scatt'g. Freni. Bach. Fill. 

Fairfield 5455 5277 0...6233 5.539 92S 

Hartf..rd 7200 71.W 71....S416 70.37 Suit 

Litchfield 4495 4065 1...6481 :-;9?6 150 

Middlesex 2480 2682 15... 2887 2964 183 

.New Haven. .. 6910 6768 127... 7976 7.315 6ftt 
Xewlyoudon.. 46<X) 36(8 67... 5402 395:J S.'W 

Toliand 2113 1886 4... 2107 195.* 33 

Windham 3045 2113 0... 3913 2248 56 

Total.... 36298 3:^549 285... 42715 34996 2615 
Bnck'm over Pratt, 2749 : Frem. over Bach'o, 7720. 

LEGISLATCBE. 

Sesate.. Republicans.. 15; Democrats 6. 

House... Republicans.. 143; Democrats..;. 90. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



57 



OHIO. 

Co.tGREM. SrF. Jc'E.SS. Presid't, 1856. 

PUtridi. Hep. Urm. Kep. Bern. Rep. Dem. Am. 

I. Djiv.Ptnd'n.Peck.Bsrtlev.Frein'l.Buch. Fill. 

Ham'n(pt.) 6785 7 131 15326 Ulsl. 9345 13051 6680 
Pendleton's maj., 346 ; Peck's do., 1175 ; Bucha- 
nan's plurality, 3706. 

n. Guiiev.Gro<.s'k.Peclt.B«rt'T. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 
Ham'nfpt.) SOM 7263. an Isi district.) 
Majority for Gnrley, 791. 

III. Campb'l.Vali'm.Peck.Bart'v. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 
Butler.... 2595 .'ifisg. 2512 3723'. 2301 3509 296 
Mntgom'y 4&12 4602. 4650 4640. 4038 4285 391 
Preble.... 2478 1642. 246S 1612. 2249 1561 273 

Total.. 9715 9903. 9660 10005. 8588 9355 960 
Vallandigliam's maj. 188; Bartley's do., 345; Bu- 
chanan's plurality, 767. 

IV. Nichols. Allen. Pei:k.B«rt'v,Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Allen 1449 1481. 1422 1522. 1415 150S 94 

Auglaize.. 82:J 1540. 794 1557. 912 1604 88 

Darke.... 2170 2191.2205 21S0. 2086 19S 209 

Mercer... 570 1121. 649 1159. 629 1159 114 

Miami .... 2964 1861. 2<*43 1884.3171 1988 159 

Shelby.... 1395 1364. 1385 1379. l.'JSe 1446 127 



Total 

Allen's 

plurality, 

V. 
Defiance . 
Fulton ... 
Hancock . 

Henry 

Lucas 

Paulding. 
Putnam'. . 
Van Wert 
Williams. 
Wood ... 



.. 9371 9558. 9398 9681 
maj., 187 ; Bartley's do., 
124. 

A«h>y3IniiEen.Pcck.Bart'i 

.. 824 1005. 828 1012. 

,. 1197 833. 1173 859. 

.. 1807 2010. 1822 2021. 

.. 530 697. 522 703. 

1746 1557. 1768 1581. 

466 2.32. 465 2:^. 

770 996. 761 999. 

726 766. 719 773. 

1097 980. 1086 996. 

1369 910. 1360 935. 



9.569 9693 791 
283; Buchanan's 



'.Fri 



Bnch. Fill. 
895 



1008 772 

1773 1944 

587 a55 

1639 1866 

497 170 

790 1116 

758 789 

1327 1U22 

1319 935 



Carey. Hull. Peck.Bartley. Fre. Bnch. Fill 
feneca.... 2327 2165. 2236 2285. 2565 2605 103 
Wyandotte 1414 962. 1288. 1141 1247 1278 1U8 



Total.. 9304 9197- 8941 9759. 9957 10270 .375 
Carey's maj., 107 ; Peck's do-, 818 ; Buchanan's 
plurality, 313. 

X. Tnmble^Miller.Pcck.Barllev. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Gallia 1528 1346. 1522 1359. 610 1341 1206 

Jackfon.. 1254 1052.1243 1076. 938 1383 416 

Lawrence. 14.32 1092. 14:i8 1103. 743 1150 902 

Pike 1726 1113. 728 1131. 623 1175 375 

Ross 2772 2551. 2713 2683. 2436 2681 589 

Scioto 1870 1489. 1912 1470. 546 1634 1321 



Total.. 10582 8643. 9556 8822. 5796 9364 4809 
Trimble's maj., 1939 ; Peck's do., 734 ; Buchanan's 
plurality, 3508. 

XI. VanVorli»8.Mar(iQ.Peck.Bartley. Fre. Bnch Fill. 

Athens.... 2143 l.°03. 2105 1354. 2299 i;<50 154 

Fairfield .. 1714 2948. 1738 '2.%'i- 1700 3233 711 

Hocking.. 1115 1324.1109 1402. 1092 1454 115 

Meigs 1951 1353. 1932 1371. 1098 1603 344 

Perry 1455 1677. 1450 1694. 1385 1847 492 

Vinton.... 1068 1118. 1074 1113. 932 1174 51 



Total.. 105.32 9986.10504 10116.106159 10164 880 
William A. Hunter received 69 votes for Congress. 
Ashley's plur., 546 ; Peck's maj., 388 ; Fremont's 
plurality, 445. 

VI. Clark JIow'd.Peck.Bertkv. Fre. Bach. Fill. 
Adams.... 1173 1202. 1170 1211. 1407 1790 278 
Brown.... 15S8 23.54. 1559 2393. 17a5 2700 428 
Clermont.. 2395 2.388. 2398 2406. 21S 2741 781 
Highland . 1766 1848. 1798 1853. 1810 2140 894 

Total. . 6922 7792. 6925 7863. 7190 9371 2381 
W. R. Arthur received 394 votes for Congress. 

Howard's plurality, 870 ; Bartley's maj., 933; Bu- 
chanan's plurality, 2181. 

VII. Corwin. Blair. Peck.BartIey. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Clinton... 1707 1083.1807 1082.2117 1170 210 

Fayette ... 1215 761.1236 786.1209 880 373 

Greene.... 2369 1104. 2463 1103. 31132 1465 214 

Madison... 1155 657. 1092 709- 997 656 475 

Warren... 2420 1415. 2475 1434. 2688 1776 344 

Total.. 8866 5020. 9073 5114.10043 6947 1646 
Corwin's maj., 3846; Peck's do., 3959; Fremont's 
plurality, 4096. 

I Vin. St«!ton.Hab'd.Peek.Bart!ev. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Champ'ign 1675 1275.1666 1259". 1995 1711 .320 

Clark 2110 1169.2108 1175.2641 1539 168 

Delaware. 2010 1436. 1911 1500. 2367 1649 230 

I Logan .... 17.W 1176.1724 1217.2093 1323 257 

Union.... 1170 872.1143 899.1431 1055 263 



Total.. 9446 9723. 9408 9903. 9406 10661 1867 
Martin's maj., 277 ; Bartley's do., 495 ; Buchanan's 
plurality, 1255. 

Xll. Case. Coi. Peck.Bartley. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Franklin .. 3903 4132.3775 4336.3188 3791 574 

Licking... 3172 3.S;i. 3141 3508.3027 3371 417 

Pickaway. 1838 2057. 1839 2117. 1724 2066 382 

TotaL. 8913 95f.O. 8755 9961. 8239 9228 1373 
Cox's maj., 647 ; Bartley's do., 1206; Buchanan's 
pltu-ahty, 989. 

Xrn. Sheruijn.Patr'k. PeckJBartley. Fre. Boch. Fill. 

Erie 2010 1338.1972 1388.2258 1377 75 

Huron .... 3009 1494.2966 15.35.3468 1709 54 

Morrow... 1874 1605. 1826 1654. 20.31 1667 101 

Ricblaod.. 2533 2658. 2420 2752. 2726 2909 53 



Total.. 9426 7095. 9184 7329.10)83 7662 283 
Sherman's maj., 2331 ; Peck's do., 1855 ; Fremont's 
plurality, 2821. 

XrV. Spink. Jeerie8.Peck.Bartley. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Ashland.. 1651 1849. 1649 1842. 1912 2089 39 

Lorain.... 2800 1308. 2798 1328. 3604 1420 54 

Medina... 2153 1404. 21.38 1431. 2635 1572 28 

Wayne.... 2834 2757. 2775 2828. 2904 2918 47 

Total.. 94.38 7318. 9360 7429.11055 7999 168 

Spink's maj., 2120; Peck's do., 1S31; Freraom's 



plurality, 3056. 



Imick.Bnrae. Peck.Bartley. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Coshocton. 2044 2338. 2061 2363. 2162 2281 56 

Hohnes... 1269 1798. 1241 1893. 1285 2103 5 

Knox 2746 2215.2594 2400.2735 2437 124 

Tuscara'as. 2891 2368. 2737 2619. 3C07 2656 18 



Total.. 8716 6923. 85.52 6050.10527 7282 1248 
Stanton's maj., 2788 ; Peck's do., 2502 ; Fremont's 
plurality, 3245. 

rX. Carev. Hall. Peck Bsrtley. Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Crawford. 1576 2014.1509 21.'^. 16S5 2154 32 

Hardin... 1034 771.1014 811.1091 882 82 

Marion ... 1.371 120i). 13.30 12.51.1367 1275 4 

Ottawa.... 325 569. 327 572. 454 477 1 

Sandusky . 1257 1516. 1237 1560. 1548 1599 45 



Total.. 8949 8719. 8633 9275. 9189 9477 203 
Helmick's maj., 230 ; Bartley's do., 642 ; Buchanan's 
plurality, 288. ' „ , ^-„ 

XVl.Tomkins.Mon'e'v.Peck.Barlley. Fre. Btch. Fi'l 
Morgan .. 1895 14^^ 1930 1423. 2125 1669 201 
.Musking'm 3437 3212. 3495 3244. 3172 3391 1092 
Wash'gton 2345 2191. 2386 2155. 2783 2251 281 

Total.. "7677 6855.7810 6822.8080 7311 1574 
Jonathan Swank, Ind., received 49 votes for Con- 
gress. 

Tompkins plurality, 822 ; Peck's maj.. 988; Fre- 
mont's plurality, 769. 

XVII. Tlieaker.Spngfe.Peck.Bart lev, Fre. Buch. Fill. 
Belmont.. 2804 2466. 2730 2529. 1817 2810 1753 
Guernsey. 2145 1720.2115 1752.2392 1932 210 
Monroe... 911 2122. 894 2142.1016 2812 413 
Noble 1451 911.1368 1057.1603 1337 154 



Total.. 7311 7219. 7107 7480. 6828 8891 2530 
Theaker's maj., 92 ; Bartley's do., 373 ; Buchanan's 
pluralitv, 2063. 



58 



THE TRIBCSE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 



OHIO— (Cbniinued.) 

Bom. Pern. Rep. Senu Rep. Dan. Am. 

XVtn. Edger'n.Rnuney.Peck.Birtley.Fre. Buch. Fill. 

Portage... 2505 2055. 2571 1985. 2983 2072 6 

Starke .... 3080 .S2S7. SlW 32aj. 3770 3633 29 

Sunraiit... 2599 1820. 2733 1738. 3135 1(46 74 

Total.. Slii 7162 8391 7003. 9933 7451 109 
Edgerton's maj., 1022 ; Peck's do., 13aS ; Fremont's 
plurality, 2487. 

XrX. Wsde. Grnv.P8ck.Bartl«y.Fre. Eudx. Fill. 

Cuyahoga. 4977 3632. 50*1 3723. 6.360 4446 296 

Geauga... ISM 514. 1S63 533. 2691 575 58 

Lake 1726 451.1726 461.2371 628 39 



Total.. 8557 4597- 8673 4717.11423 5649 393 
Kelly, Ind., received 99 votes for Cougress. 

Wade's plurality, 3960 ; Peck's maj., 3936 ; Fre- 
Snont's plurality, 5776. 

XX. Hatchins. Tod. Peck.BartI«yJre. Bnch. Fill. 

Ashtabula. 3132 S34. 3403 m. 5108 975 252 

Mahoning. 2253 2W3. 2272 2027. 2323 1937 29 

TrumbuU . 2936 1664. 3098 1623. 4049 1920 18 



Total.. 8321 4541. 8773 4514.11480 4832 299 
Kichmond. Ind., received 366 and Giddings 32 votes 
for Congress. 

Hutchins' plurality, 37S0 ; Peck's m^j., 4261 ; Fre- 
mont's plurality, 6648. 

XXI. Bingh«m. Mans. Petk.Bsrtloy.Fre. Bnch. FUl. 

Can-oil.... 1536 1266. 1575 1242. 1750 12.>5 87 

Colnmbi'na 3069 20ti9. 3066 2081.3516 2497 9b 

Harrison.. 1949 1300. 1925 1342. 2060 1473 110 

Jeflfersoa . 2329 1912. 2S55 1949. 2424 1991 259 



Total.. 8SS3 6577.8921 6614.9750 7216 552 
Biugham's maj., 2306 ; Peck's do., 2307 ; Fremont's 
plurality, 2531. 

AGGBEGATE VOTE FOR STATE OFTICEES, 1S58. 

ReputAimm. Democrats. ilaj. 
Sut> j!«?/7e.... Peck.. 182952; Hartley. 162608-20344 
Ail/ Gen . . . .-VTolc'tt 1S29S5 ; Ward. . .162137-a)S48 
Cb7rrp<;o/J«-... Thrall.. 1S«13; Gibson .161838-21375 
£'di'»6.ir'4s.Mar»n.l831U; Heud'n .161S15— 21296 
Pr«id«nl, '56.. Fremont, 187497; Buchanan, 170S74 ; 
FiUmorc, 28121. . 

The Leoislatube (elected in 1857 for two years) II 
Democratic in both branches. 



ARKANSAS. 

The people of this State elected Congresstnen, 
Members of the I.,€gislatiire, and certain Judicial 
OfBcem in 1858. But the voters so strongly adhere 
to what is facetiously termed " Democraiic." that 
the details of their elections have ceased to possess 
anv general interest. For Congress in the First Dis- 
trict Mr Thomas C. Hindman, the regular Demo- 
cratic candidate, received 18,255 votes to 2853 for 
Crteby, Independent, 

In the Second District, Albert Ru!<t, regular Demo- 
crat, received 16,302 votes to 3104 for J. A. Jones, 
and 3452 for Thos. S. Drew, Independent candidates. 

Two years ago the vote of the State for Congress 
stood: in the First District for Greenwood, Dem., 
13 3*" • Thompson, Am., 6161. Majority tor Green- 
woodl '9238. In the sjecond District^Mr. \\ arren, 
DemT, received 11,835 ; Fowler, Am.. 87U1. Majority 
for AN^arren, 3131. For President, Mr. Buchanan;^8 
vote in the .State was 21,910; 111. lillmore'i 10,i87. 
Majority for Buchanan, 11,123. 

The Legisi-iicee is strongly Democratic. 



TENNESSEE. 

The only general elections held in this State during 
the year 1858, were for a Judge of the Supreme Court, 
and to a^^rtain the sense of the people relative to a 
proposed Convention to amend the State Constitution. 
The people seem to have taken very little inteiest in 
the election, as tess than one-fifth of the voters voted 
on the occasion. The vote for Judge, which does not 
appear to have been a partv contest, resulted as fol- 
lows: Wrigh^ 12,867; Walker, 6885. ^lajority for 
Wright, 6982. 

The call for a Constitution was voted down very 
emphatically, the returns footing up for a Convention, 
4210 ; againot a Convention, 23,563. Majority against 
a Convention, 19,353. 



TEXAS. ^ 

An election was held in this State in 1858 for Chief- 
Jnstlce and As.sociste Jusrice of the Supreme Court, 
Attorney-General, Treasurer and Comptroller. The 
only office contested was that of As.sociate -Justice, 
the regular Democratic candidate being C^jnstantine 
W. Buckley, who was defeated by James H. Bell, 
Independent Democrat, after an animated contest, by 
420 majority. The remainder of the Democratic 
ticket, elected without opposition, was as follows : 

Chief-Justice Royal T. Wheeler. 

JUornry-GeneroJ. Malcolm D. (rraham. 
Slate Trfasm-er...C. H. Randolph. 
ComptrolUr Clement R. Johns 

KANSAS. 

" An Act for the admission of the StJ»te of Eanras 
into the Union," better known as the F.nglish bill, 
was submitted lo a vote of the People of that Terri- 
torv, on the first Monday in August, 1858, with the 
following result: 



"? 



Countiet. 



Atchinson 260 

Anderson i 

Allen 23 

Brown 35 

Breckenridge 4 

Bourbon 37 

Calhoun 32 

Coffey 16 

Doniphan 421 

Davis 27 

Douglas 40 

Dorn 9 

Franklin 

Hunter 

Johnson 154 

iJefferson 36 

I.*avenworth 4.56 

Lvkins 99 



Linn 

Maisdon 

McGee 

Nemaha 

Pottowatomie . 

Riley 

Richardson . . . 

Shawnee 

Wise 




9613 



Total 1788 11301 13089 

Majority against proposition, 9313. 

. 

Three precinctsj-ejected for informality on the part 
of the returning omcers, gave 3 for accepting proposi- 
tion, and 197 against it. 

• Miyonty for acc«pting proposition. 



ELECTION EETCRSS. 



59 



Cose, 

Sistruts. Kep. 

I. 'Hovcy 

Daviess .... 734 

Dubois 191 

Gibson 1072 

Knox 1042 

Murtin 441 

.Pike 569 

Posey 129'J 

.Spencer 1210 

Vanderb'gh 1846 
Wftrrick . . . 542 



INDIANA. 

1853. Sec.St'e, '58. Pres., 1856. 

Dem. Rep. Dfm. Rep. Dem.Am. 
Xibrt.Pcclle.MoCl'e.Fre. Bu«h. Fill. 

lu32. 693 1016. 26 1115 939 
109 1076. 



1117. 
1021. 
1206. 
B65. 



612. 458 
i:i09 



1191 236 
37 945. 365 1286 766 
9S9 1208. 657 1512 535 
76 
80 



363 



789. 
654 



641 1678. 
99 1044. 



769 350 

772 574 

306 1819 625 

235 1260 808 



1163. 1068 1411. 372 1880 840 
1097. 357 1193. 107 1506 480 



Total... 8945 10329. 6214 11014. 2145 13110 6153 
Niblacli's maj , 1383 ; McClure's do., 480U ; Uucha- 
nan over Fillmore, 6957. 

II. WUson.Eogliih.Peelle.M^Cl'e.Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Clark 1129 144(>. 1130 1505. 492 1950 1074 

Crawford.. 533 7i6. 541 719. 24 735 509 

Flovd 1535 1429.1534 1467. 228 1767 1262 

Harrison... 1367 1493. 1340 1530. 873 1681 623 
Orange.... 611 994. 558 994. 49 1207 606 

Peny 601 985: 365 976. 96 1066 632 

>;cott 556 703. 537 755. 278 693-264 

Washington ll'J2 1522. 1074 15:i5. 331 1778 691 

Total... 7434 9293. 7079 9481. 2371 10877 5661 
English's maj., 1859 ; McClure's do., 2402; Bucha- 
nan over Fillmore, 5216. 

nr. Dunn.Hughei.Peelle.McCI'e.Fro. Buch. Fill. 

Barth'mew 1340 1227. 1332 1329. 1292 1844 142 

Brown 253 548. 239 698. 148 681 90 

Jackson... 778 1249. 767 1535. 299 1700 516 
Jefferson... 2378 1491. 2251 1668. 2314 1936 425 
Jennings... 1323 943. 1319 1041. 1293 1159 172 
Lawrence . 1095 8S0. 1057 1065. 480 1126 660 

Monroe 1075 964. HX'C 1035. 498 1191 392 

Switzerland 1121 10S3. 1129 1089. 228 1121 1040 



Total... 9363 8385. 9131 9460. 6552 
Carr, A. L. Denn., for Conjrress, 1432. 
Dunn over Hughes, 978: McClore's maj., 
chanao over Fremont, 4206. 

IV. Hack!einan.Horn.Peelle.McCl'e.Fre. 
Dearborn.. 1472 2335. 1486 2^. 1573 
Decatur.... 1672 1444. 1668 1444. 1718 
Franklin... 1264 2135. 12.-)2 21.35. 1437 

Ohio 424 492. 425 476. 104 

Ripley 1.S81 1464. 1365 1422. 1425 

Kuhh \^i 1565. 1614 1587. 1644 



10753 3437 


329; 


Bu- 


Bach. 


Fill. 


2619 


297 


16.39 


61 


22W 


41 


mo 


379 


1661 


1.H4 


1685 


83 



Total... 7^56 9425. 7840 9427. 7901 10368 1045 
Holman's msj., 1569 ; McClure's do., 1587 ; Bucha- 
nan over Fremont, 2467. 

V. Kilgore.DevlinJPeelle.McCre.Fre. Bntb. Fill 

Delaware.. 1293 718. 1227 826. 1736 992 32 
F.iyette.... 1069 933. 1071 9.38. 1189 1002 40 

Henry 1956 912.2017 913.2741 1229 49 

Randolph.. 1572 1053. 1620 1037. 2042 1253 59 

Union 743 640. 750 641. 75:1 710 19 

Wayne 2750 1665. 2886 1632. 3688 1958 100 

Total... 9383 5921. 9571 5987.121.59 7144 299 
Eilgore's maj., 3462 ; Peelle's do.j 3o&4 ; Fremont 
over Buchanan, 5115. 

VI Porter.Rar.Peelle.McClure.Fre. Bnch. Fill. 

Hancock... 875 1040. 846 1073. 962 B43 24 
Hendricks.. 1662 1174. 1043 119<0. 16S0 1378 74 
.Johnson.... 1114 1415. 1073 1455. 1095 1608 153 
Marion ... 3956 3<J54. 3718 3201. 36% 3738 205 
Morein . . . . 1590 1402. l.'S65 1404.1573 1528 68 
Shelby .... 1579 1631. 1533 1722. 1510 2075 142 

Total ..10776 9716.10.383 10045.10516 116,-0 666 
Porter's maj., 1060; Peelle's do., 338; Buchanan 
over Fremont, 1154: 

VU »Davi«.Secrea!.PeeIle.McCl're.Fre. Bnch. Fill. 
Clav ." . 842 -\ti. 577 750. 365 1108 296 
Greene.'.... 1266 1112. 806 1005. 379 1129*533 



•DavU.Secr'uPeelle.McC'e.Fre. Bich. Fill. 

Owan liyo 759. 815 9.36. 487 1239 586 

Parke 1795 507. 1536 865. 1494 1253 192 

Putnam ... 1820 1656. 1729 1746. 1345 1882 423 

Sullivan... 1122 1100. 443 1538. 257 1650 397 

Vermillion.. 907 515. 810 654. 866 824 80 

Vigo 1951 1226. 1642 1487. 1165 1808 883 



Total... 10893 7584. 8358 8990. 

Davis' maj., 3309 ; McClure's do., 
over Fremont, 4365. 

Vni. WMfon.Blake.Peelle.McCl'e, 

Boone 1500 1380. 14.87 1389. 

Carroll .... 1385 1382.1377 1388. 
Clinton .... 1184 1346.1186 1369. 
Fountain... 1580 1626. 1580 1625. 
Montgom'ry 1936 1989. 1964 1991. 
Tippecanoe. 2441 2021. 2460 2012. 
Warren 1002 643. 1024 620. 



6358 10923 3390 


632; 


Huchajian 


Fre. 


BMk. Fill. 


1299 


1493 81 


1261 


1344 22 


1261 


1.S64 34 


1606 


1588 36 


1910 


2088 142 


2778 


2307 45 


1167 


767 76 



Total. ..11028 10387. 
Wilson's maj., 641 ; 
over Buchanan, 331. 
IX. ColfRjt.Walk'r. 

Benton 279 204. 

Cafis 1527 1477. 

Fulton 888 927. 

Jasper 643 483. 

Lake 1063 550. 

Laporte 2789 2224. 

Marsliall... 1215 1122. 

Sliami 1551 1519. 

Porter 1146 1025. 

Pulaski 420 552. 

St. Joseph . -2067 1586. 

Starke 144 185. 

White 809 756. 



11073 1U394. 11282 10951 436 
Peelle's do., 684 ; Fremonf 



.Peelle 


McOl' 


.Fie. 


Bnch. 


FilU 


275 


209. 


315 


217 


K 


1499 


VM). 


1.504 


1.5:^9 


40 


869 


949. 


H22 


k:« 


9 


t;3i 


4Q0. 


«:« 


548 


63 


1045 


.'V.52. 


92:< 


■Mf, 


3 


2706 


2242. 


•i.V.2 


22:« 


45 


1215 


1126. 


927 


ll«9 





1528 


\fM. 


1:^90 


1513 


38 


1116 


\mi. 


H47 


614 


10 


4(B 


.561. 


:«i 


.'>,57 


27 


2024 


1631 . 


1HI2 


I.VH 


6 


145 


185. 


112 


155 


7 


783 


774. 


703 


746 


42 


14244 12817. 


12861 11857 


298 


Peelle 


's do. 


1427 


; Frenont 


.Peclle.McCl' 


i.Fre. 


Bu«h. Fill. 


. 1790 


2901. 


I.59;i 


,3?11 


145 


1053 


1148 


1097 


1247 


75 


1967 


J 647 


1971 


1651 


18 


. 1.573 


1064 


U>i2 


1075 


13 


. 1064 


462. 


U(« 


640 


6 


1222 


U.V,!. 


12.57 


1198 


48 


1093 


4.58 


1215 


.5.% 


19 


744 


902 


797 


851 


57 



Total... 14541 12610 
Colfa.x's maj., 1931 ; 
over Buchanan, 1004. 

X. Caae.Daw'n 

.\llen 1949 2707 

DeKalb ... 1047 1157. 
F.lkhart.... 1971 1649 
Kosciusco . . 1584 1057 
La Grange . 1062 460 

Noble 1278 1080. 

Steuben 1113 441. 

Whitley.... 776 866. 

Total. ..10780 9417.10506 9734.10998 10426 
Case over Dawson, 1363 ; Peelle over McClnre, 
Fremont over Buchanan, 572. 

XI. Pettit.Coffr'h.Peclle.McCl'e.Frc. Bnch. 

Adams 474 842. 402 847. 413 847 

Blackford.. 251 379. 231 388. 238 404 

Grant 1297 973.1281 981.1395 1035 

Hamilton.. 1471 1003.1472 1001. 1748 1185 
Howard.... 1W9' 622. 986 Ki3. 1057 686 
Huntington 1218 1395: 1264 1359. 12:52 1181 

Jav 847 772. 832 782. 883 830 64 

Madison.... 12119 1451. 1197 14.53. 1.309 liX)3 54 

Tipton 505 627. 5.30 626. 546 738 14 

Wabash.... 1797 1126. 1803 1122. 1785 1096 108 
Wells 670 848. 655 867.. 726 931 16 

Total.. .10748 10038.10653 10059. 113:J2 10586 599 
Pettit over Coffroih, 710 ; Peelle over .McClure, 594 ; 
Fremont over Buchanan, 746. 

AOGEEGATE VOTE OF THE STATE. 

R/niuhHcanA. Democrats. Maj. 

Sec. State.... Pee lie ..10482.S; Mc< 'lure .107409— 2581 

AwlUoT I.ange... 106493: Dodrl ... .107242— 1749 

Trearurer ...Harper.. 1054 16; Cun'g'm .1076.34—2218 

AtVy Gen ...Otto 105757 ; McDou'd. 107291— 1534 

Sup. Pui./n*. Young.. 105014: Rugg ....107910—2896 
Pr<»iJ«J....Kret.. 94475; Buch..llS670; FUl.. 22356 

I.EGISLATt;RE. 

Senate. . .Rep., 25 ; Dem., 22 ; .\nti-Lec., .3. 

HOCSE Hep.. 50 ; Dem., 46 ; Anti-Lee., 4. 

* Anti-LeeoujptoD Democrat. 



60 



TBK TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL RGGISTKR. 



ILLINOIS. 



Treasurer, 

CourUia. Rrp.Doug.D 

Miller.Fondey, 

Adams 2986 34U3 

Alexander.... 31 308 

Bond 716 720 

Boone 1705 287 

Brown 574 862 

Bnrean 2588 603 

CaUioun 172 513 

Carroll 1138 273 

Cass 745 1057 

Champaign... 1306 889 

Christian 587 923 

Clark 1071 1-113 

Clay 421 703 

Clinton. S62 893 

Coles.. 1823 10S4 

Cook 10119 8312 

Crawford 647 9:i3 

Cumberland . . 482 "42 

De Kalb 2078 613 

DeWitt 1025 768 

DuPage 1278 502 

Edgar 1431 1436 

Edwards 362 230 

Effingham.... 207 796 

Fayette 580 834 

Franklin 9 974 

Fulton 2990 3238 

Gallatin 226 535 

Greene 765 1512 

Grundy 1018 702 

Hamilton 11 1133 

Hancock 2032 2385 

Hardin 36 269 

Henderson 1005 761 

Henry 2242 1100 

Iroquois 1217 743 

Jackson 76 1171 

Jasper 462 6)0 

Jefferson 259 1220 

Jereey 593 1051 

Jo Daviess . . . 1920 1510 

Johnson 7 1135 

Kane 3177 1039 

Kankakee 1319 854 

Kendall 1431 403 

Knox E952 18.^1 

Lake 1672 623 

La Salle 41U5 3415 

Lawrence 429 6^ 

Lee 1639 692 

Livingston 1001 789 

Logan 1306 1180 

Macon 963 1120 

Macoupin 1620 2086 

Madison 2030 2221 

Marion 528 1173 

Marshall 12U0 1055 

ilas-sac 19 669 

.Mhsod 821 1040 

M'Donough... 1771 1952 

M'Henry 2227 1077 

M'Lean 2723 2127 

Menard 766 871 

Mercer 1416 905 

Monroe 529 1161 

.Montgomery.. 789 1219 

Morgan 1795 2061 

Moultrie 614 683 

Ogle 2111 816 

Peoria 2593 2639 

Perry 463 727 

Piatt 540 482 

Pike 1997 2481 

Pope 22 692 

Pulaski 56 636 

Putnam 606 298 

Randolph 913 1105 

Richland 608 739 

Rock bland.. 1546 1.306 

SaUne 1138 



1858. Presidp,n-t, 1856. 

Buch.D. Kep. Dem, Am. 

Doueh'iv. Frem. Buch. Fill. 

78... 2226 3311 662 

192... 15 401 230 

1... 153 C07 659 

3... 1748 243 27 

37... 169 903 433 

777... 2603 1234 48 

0... 70 391 163 

38... 1161 237 153 

9... 303 914 438 

37... 732 550 236 

13... 239 8*4 299 

0... 709 1318 S30 

4... 29 731 540 

14... 161 840 362 

9... 783 1178 796 

296... 9020 66.«0 242 

1... 477 961 244 

0... 246 641 235 

44... 2254 .381 75 

252... 623 679 378 

18... 1387 542 2 

5... 952 1342 308 

20... 176 2S3 310 

0... 90 784 163 

4... 68 947 799 

110... 6 1051 251 

6... 2021 2724 898 

206... 24 764 423 

1... 245 1565 719 

6... 923 618 

1... 9 1135 162 

52. ..1120 2011 999 

28... 4 332 229 

78... 7-57 610 153 

26... 1924 876 47 

32... 750 460 108 

26... 14 1056 322 

4... 323 679 158 

37... 60 1278 426 

9... 387 702 530 

53. ..2110 1509 44 

2... 2 1144 74 

72... 3750 912 29 

9... 1386 258 60 

22... 1622 3:54 13 

55... 2851 1490 277 

61...2,S47 .558 10 

30... 3721 2665 121 

0... 89 729 5:53 

55...18(H 601 32 

0. . . 585 480 72 

8... 655 823 484 

31... 500 821 393 

75... 823 1778 1010 

29... nil 1451 1658 

29... 150 11»J 413 

65... 1003 834 115 

1... 5 6.30 251 

2... 267 737 653 

4... 590 1370 864 

32... 2869 946 43 

24... 1937 1517 660 

13... 109 854 668 

54... 1141 769 140 

30... 346 900 618 

27- .. 162 992 68<> 

.7... 96:1 1656 885 

0... IM 4.',2 305 

108... 2469 734 289 

272... 2082 2459 391 

68... 200 671 4:i3 

4... 85 310 350 

26... 1053 2163 1010 

18... U 85.5 214 

66... 21 473 166 

99... 632 307 115 

26. . . 109 1222 646 

0... 39 786 440 

42... 1439 1114 276 

12... 4 1004 229 



'tv. Freiu. Buch. 


Fill. 


..1174 


2175 


1612 


.. 388 


1369 


670 


.. 183 


843 


536 


.. 152 


1414 


451 


.. 718 


353 


l.W 


..1996 


1728 


973 


..1907 


1308 


60 


..1028 


1313 


757 


.. 46 


1283 


246 


..1.506 


1111 


194 


.. 122 


481 


485 


..1282 


1117 


307 


.. 244 


li:i2 


■2K^ 


.. 129 


1218 


402 


.. 27 


1062 


K4fi 


..1902 


613 


210 


..2393 


1575 


10 


.. 10 


1419 


188 


..3636 


457 


61 


.. 596 


747 


189 



Miller.Fondey.DoncU 

Sangamon.... 2726 3078 138. 

Schuyler 1054 149B 37. 

Scott 654 1002 2. 

Shelby 541 1400 2. 

Stark 93:1 689 2. 

St. Clair 2422 1980 139. 

.Stephenson... 2160 1483 16. 

Tazewell 1798 1954 9. 

Union 61 584 462.. 

Vermillion... 16)^8 1122 0. 

Wabash 409 606 2. 

Warren 1738 1408 19. 

Washington.. 425 1064 6. 

Wayne 292 1189 0. 

White ;. 646 1220 1.. 

Whiteside.... 1991 701 127. 

Will 2709 2186 41.. 

Williamson... 47 1516 13. 

Wiimebago ... 2918 453 34. 

Woodford 819 1144 26., 



Total.... 125430 12l6u9 5071 96200 105298 .37454 
Miller over Fondey, 3821 ; Buchanan over Fremont, 
9098. 

Congress, 1858. Co.vgress, '56. 

Districts. Rep. Doug. A.L.D. Jirp. Dan. 

1. Waahbume. Bright. Jscluou.Washb'n.Molooy. 

Boone 1704 286 3 1739 251 

Carroll 1137 256 53. ...1182 2.37 

Jo Daviess 1938 1476 65 ....2168 1470 

Lake 1677 

McHenrj- 2224 

Ogle 2092 

Stephenson 2140 

Winnebago 2899 

Total 15811 6457 370 ....18070 6227 

Washburn over Bright, 9354 ; do. over Molony, in 
'56, 11813. 

U. Famswortli. Dver. Black'n. Farae. V.Nor. 

Cook 10UI8 8278 305 .... 899:5 5.i72 

612 
496 
1121 
689 
1.302 
700 128 



620 


60 .. 


.. 2334 


6?4 


081 


30 .. 


.. 2530 


949 


815 


102 .. 


.. 2477 


9T2 


489 


16 .. 


.. 2000 


1313 


434 


41 .. 


.. 3610 


461 



De Kalb 2067 

DuPage 1280 

Kane 3172 

Lee 1638 

Rock Island 1542 

Whiteside 1990 



Total 21797 13198 

Fariisworth over Dyer, 8599 
wick. 11704. 

III. Lovejnv. AraMtrtiDg, 

Bureau 2546 607 

Champaign 1271 900 

De Wilt 992 755 

(Jmndy 999 715 

Iroquois 1199 744 

Kankakee 1366 852 

Kendall 1423 405 

La Salle 4040 34:58 

Livingston 9S6 794 

M'Lean 2570 2155 

Putnam 682 299 

VermiUion 1661 1126 

Will 2678 2198 



Totel 22313 14988 1328 

lyovejoy over Armstrong, 7325 ; do. 
54,6061. 

CellogET. DavtdaoD. Gal«. 



53 .. 


.. 2248 


.371 


19 .. 


.. 1382 


646 


03 .. 


.. 3733 


912 


53 .. 


.. 1S92 


625 


42 .. 


.. 1404 


1082 



...1866 



706 



701 ....21518 9814 
; do. over Van Nort- 



Le Roy. Lov*v.O*g<Vid. 
770 .... 244"0 1312 



644 
915 
746 



27 

262 .... 

9 .... 

31 .... 

9 .... 1377 

22 .... 1604 

30 .... 3693 

1 .... 560 

26 .... 1916 

100 .... .521 

.... 1.526 

41 .... 2344 



625 
569 
391 
437 

27:-:8 
463 

1818 
414 

1174 

1621 



Fulton 2980 

Henry ...; 2242 

Knox 2965 

Marshall 120:i 

Mason 822 

.VIercer 1419 

Peoria 2601 

Stark 929 

Tazewell 1783 

Warren 1732 

Woodford 811 



.3224 
1101 
1820 
1054 
1038 

898 
2623 

684 
1960 
1406 
1162 



....19068 13007 
over Osgood, in 

KelloffS. David. 
.... 24K9 29ir.' 
.... 1917 813 
.... 2^90 1564 

... 1028 

... 445 

... 1185 



923 



.... 757 

.... 1245 

.... 13:52 

.... 609 



796 
2694 

465 
1555 
1121 

813 



Total 19487 16860 653 16175 14474 

Kellogg over Davidson, 2627 ; do. hi '54,1701. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



61 



UAAyOlS-iOmHnufxD. 

V. Grirnshaw. Morris. Duvis. GrimsV. Morris. 

Adams 3(KV1 3280 136 .... 2821 3182 

Brown 59(1 fM9 30.... 571 892 

Callioan 171 WJT 5.... 2.i2 457 

Hancock 205-J 2234 172 1717 1980 

Henderson 1001 755 82.... 807 608 

.McDonald 1774 1944 10 ....1336 1388 

Plko 1991 2471 31 .... 1937 22.33 

Schuyler lUiB 1J89 38 ... . 873 1319 

Total 11648 13.^29 504 ....10294 12059 

Morris over Grinishaw, 1881 ; do. in '54, 1765. 

VI. Matheny. Harris kcConnell. Wma. Harris. 

Cass 743 106S 3 .... 720 921 

Cliristiau 591 923 15 492 908 

nreene 765 1517 1 905 1562 

.lersey ."174 1059 11 769 732 

Macoupin 1615 2093 73 .... 1756 IRSl 

I .Menard 780 851 13 .... 766 852 

Morgan 1789 2054 16 .... 1829 1667 

.Monlgomery.... 786 1222 28.... 8:« 992 

Sangamon 2803 3010 112 .... 2751 2474 

Scoit 650 1002 3.... 714 840 

Shelby 550 1394 2 .... 542 1417 

Total 11646 16193 277 ...12077 14196 

Hanis o»er Math , 4547 ; do. over Williams, 2119. 

Vn. Oglesbv. RobiDson. Baldwin. Brown'l. Shaw. 

Clay 424 712 1.... 457 768 

(lark 1076 1405 .... 985 1328 

Coles 1859 1578 T .... 1300 1291 

(•nmberland.... 483 696 .... 40.S 641 

Crawford '693 922 .... 731 1123 

Edgar 1446 1431 1 .... 114(5 1.373 

Kffingham 214 803 .... 220 788 

Kavetie fti5 842 .... 502 953 

Ja.sper 459 619 468 676 

Lawrence 455 662 .... 641 789 

I.o«:an 1315 1174 6.... 1111 m 

Macou 1168 939 17 741 864 

Moultrie 513 570 .... 419 445 

rum 546 480 4 .... 411 313 

Richland 499 755 .... 438 803 

Total 11760 13588 36 9878 12994 

Robinson over Oglesby, 1828; Shaw's maj., 3115. 

VTU. Baker. Fouke. Hope. Laoaing. Smith 

Bond 731 700 3 .... 557 611 

t.linton 377 SS<3 15 .325 872 

.lefferson 288 1193 23 .... 151 1232 

Madison 2054 2185 31 .... 1951 1695 

Marion 575 1142 23 440 1162 

Monroe 569 1149 6 .... 532 11:^5 

Randolph 917 109O 13 .... 872 1459 

St. Clair 2464 2058 73 . . . . 2414 1974 

Washington.... 435 1090 11 .... 270 1159 

Total 8410 11490 198 ....7512 11299 

Foiike over Baker, 3080; Smith over Lansing, 3787. 

IX. Phillips. Lopin. Parish. Wilev. Mars'l. 

Alexander 41 378 .... 95 408 

Edwards 395 267 12 292 

Franklin 19 lO.W .... 91 1110 

Gallatin 207 815 .... 232 910 

Hamilton 6 1155 68 1228 

Hardin 46 356 .... 175 328 

Jivckson 79 1225 69 1084 

.lohnson 7 1157 .... 9 1195 

Massac 15 "50 .... 2^3 6.33 

Ferry '..... 474 798 .... 5.56 696 

Pope 18 774 .... 65 889 

Pulaski 67 589 .... 21 443 

Saline 3 1143 144.... .34 1091 

Union 65 819 .... 81 1231 

Wabash 396 623 .... 551 516 

White 611 1250 .... 374 1281 

WilUamson 43 1554 .... 717 1136 

Wayne 304 1195 ... 46 1502 

Total 2796 15«78 144.... 3419 15973 

I/)gan over Phillips, 13il82 : Marshall's maj., 12554. 

For Superintendent of Public Instruction, Bateman, 

Kep., received 124,556 votes ; French, Doug., 122,413 ; 

Reynolds, Buck.. 5173. 



LKGISLATDRE. 

Senate.. Republicans, 11; Democrats,' 14. 
HocsE... Republicans, 35; Democrats, 40. 



■WISCONSIN. 

Congress. 1858. President, 1856. 
Districts. Sep. Bern. Hep. Dem. Am 

I. Potter. Bi ■ 



Kenosha 1477 

Milwaukee 4296 

Racine ;... 2431 

Walworth 3539 

Waukesha 2685 



791 
5025 
1829 , 
1284 
2242 



Total 14428 11171 ... 

Potter's maj., 3257 ; Buchanan 
Waeliburp. Dunn 



Adams 767 

Bad Ax 4.57 

Buffalo 151 

Chippewa 120 

(^lark 110 

Crawford 608 

Dane 3134 

Douglas 49 

Dunn 167 

Eau Claire 316 

Grant 2230 

Green 1473 

Iowa 1375 

Jackson 242 

J uneau 766 

La Crosse 919 

Lafayette 1267 

La Pointe 38 

Marathon 243 

Hunroe 762 

Pepin 202 

Pierce 501 

Polk 124 

Portage 633 

Richland 782 

Rock 3810 

St. Croix 478 

Sauk 1662 

Trempeleau 248 

Wood 283 



338 ... 
194 ... 

200 ... 
235 ... 

42 ... 

797 ... 

4015 ... 

95 ... 

203 ... 

263 ... 
1695 ... 

831 ... 
1646 ... 

f74 ... 

526 ... 

998 ... 
1646 ... 

132 ... 

474 ... 

536 ... 

201 ... 
251 ... 
135 ... 
478 ... 
682 ... 

1759 ... 
471 ... 
744 ... 
97 ... 
309 ... 



Fiemont. Bnch. Fill, 

. 151)8 831 

. 2798 

. 2299 1688 

. 3518 1297 4 

. 2875 2020 8 

.12998 13024 43 
over Fremont, 26. 
Fremont. Buch. Fill. 

,. 1591 6-25 9 

,. 597 231 21 

.68 163 
. No return. 

.73 37 

. 521 429 1 

. 3996 3443 6 
. No return. 

. 390 119 
. New County. 
. 2809 1419 186 

.. 2004 10S7 32 

. 1497 1474 27 

. ?i)6 144 6 
. With Adams. 

987 541 25 

1415 1722 19 

No return. 

269 207 J 

722 254 6 



7188 25 



. 414 

. 95 

. 680 

. 882 

. 4707 

. 417 

. 2015 

. 190 

. 260 



105 11 

64 1 

361 13 

455 37 

1965 10 

252 

993 4 

45 

95 



Total 23917 20167 ....26905 16221 415 

Washburn's ma]., 3750 ; Fremont Over Buch, 10684. 
III. Billinghurst. Larrabee. Fremont. Bnoh. Fill. 

Brown 262 

Calumet »... 484 

Columbia 2631 

Dodge 3601 

Door 100 

Fond dn Lac . . . 2972 

(Jreen Lake 1947 

.lefferson 2205 

Kewaunee 69 

Maiiitouwoc 1085 

Marquette 487 

Oconto 221 

Osaukee 348 

Outagamie 523 

Shawano 43 

Sheboygan 1309 

Washington 466 

Waupacca 964 

Washara 986 

Winnebago 2308 



1.303 .. 


.. 499 


1004 


n 


6.36 .. 


.. 486 


408 


1 


1618 . . 


.. 2950 


1239 


7 


3211 .. 


. . 3455 


2784 


15 


73 .. 


. . No return. 




2414 .. 


.. 3292 


2511 


Zi 


928 .. 








2151 .. 


.. 3290 


3434 


6 


505 .. 


.. 89 


206 


() 


1596 . . 


.. 1177 


1907 





788 .. 


.. 2518 


1032 


19 


278 .. 


. . No return. 




15J5 .. 


.. 360 


2a'?2 





810 .. 


.. 602 


753 


1 


83 .. 


.. 68 


21 


(I 


1842 .. 


.. is;n 


1921 


15 


1735 .. 


.. 813 


2041 


7 


404 .. 


.. 16.36 


75 





441 .. 


.. 1292 


215 


6 


1584 .. 


.. 2769 


1415 


20 



Total 23011 23905 ....27187 2.3598 122 

Larrabee's maj., 894 ; Fremtjnt over Buch., 3589. 

TOTAL TOTE OF THE STATE. 

r-nnqrfju< Republican, 61356; Democratic, 55243. 

Preeitjlenl, '59. Fremont,.. . 67090 ; Buchanan,.. 52843. 
Fillmore, 580. 

LEGtSLATCRE. 

Sen.^te Republicans, 16; Democrats, 14. 

HotJSE Republicans, 55 ; Democrats, 42. 



62 


THE TRI 


BCNE ALMAKAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 








IOWA. 




Union 


Sella. 
. 119 


Doiigla*. Frem't. Bnch'n. 
143.... 102 121 


Fill. 
17 






Sec. State, 1858 


President, 1856. 


Van Buren . . . 


. 1173 


1283.... 1U92 1396 


324 






Jiep, Dnii. 


Rep. JJem. Am. 


Wnpello 


. 984 


1149.... 1093 1175 


252 






Sells. Douglas. 




W anen 


. 959 


620.... 865 513 


102 






. if, 65... 


72 27 4 


Washington.. 


. 1012 


678.... 1188 629 


403 






. 127 90... 


113 78 3 


Wayne 


344 


476.... 133 368 


17(1 






. 6^6 795. . . 


630 500 28 


Webster 


. 255 


3W. ... 389 209 


31 




Appanoose . . 


. 573 lUTO... 


191 854 487 


Winnebago. . 


18 


20. . . . New County 






34 42. . . 


23 31 4 


Winneshiek . . 


. 832 


635.... 770 209 


13 






. 702 657... 


658 426 123 


Woodburj- . . . 


. 120 


167.... New County 








. 664 449. . . 


566 282 33 


Worth 


79 


31 New County 








286 406. . . 


203 319 66 


Wright 


83 


55.... 91 24 








. 384 318... 


327 172 48 








.^__ 




Boiler 


. 347 245... 


223 141 29 


Total 


. 49085 


45748.... 43954 36170 


9IS0 




Hucbanan . . . 


. 692 613. . . 


709 343 21 


Sells' maj., 


3837 ; Fremont over Buchiinan, 7784. | 






16 15. . . 


9 14 












Carroll .■...-. 


23 24... 


New County. 


Congress 


•58.Ba'k'gLaw,'58.Conc 


.,'.Vi 




Cass 


170 143. . . 
. 1047 886... 


132 84 
. 1016 701 176 


Dwtncta. 
L 


Rep. Dem. For Against Rep.Dfin. 
Curris-Trimble. Law. Law. Curlie.Hull. 




Cedar 




Cerro Gordo . 
Cherokee 


. 130 46... 
17 3... 


101 40 1 




. 89 


63.. 33 10.. 29 






New County. 


Adams 


. 128 


88.. 61 69.. 73 


65 






. 427 325. . . 


361 102 32 


.\ndubon 


. 34 


42. . No return. 20 


»I4 




Clark 


471 392... 


. 346 338 77 


A ppanoose . . 


. 607 


1036.. 393 237.. 420 


31 




Clay 

Clayton 


9 9... 
. 1493 1154... 


New County. 
. 1420 754 67 




. 174 


142.. 83 45.. 108 






Clark 


. 472 


391.. 213 134.. 335 


.349 




Clinton 


. 1417 1360. . . 


1245 839 142 


Dallas 


. 429 


396.. 299 118.. 455 


Xi2 






46 30... 


36 8 


DaVis 


.. 653 


1122.. 339 189.. 426 


938 






. 430 397... 
. 668 1104... 

. 280 577... 


. 487 319 20 
. 201 1014 752 
. 243 583 133 


Decatur 

Des Moines . . 
Fremont 


. 283 
. 1320 
. 249 


685.. 225 172.. 2,38 
1422.. 726 104.. 1365 
373.. 20 177.. 197 


353 
1323 
307 














. 749 evo... 


601 500 149 


Guthrie 


. 221 


228.. 134 119.. 192 


192 






. 1310 1417... 


1338 1413 522 


Harrison 


. 195 


232.. 85 133.. 157 


138 




Dickinson . . . 


35 10... 


New County. 


Henry 


. 1526 


847.. 907 158.. 1517 


6W 




nnbnque 


. 1412 2937... 


. 1322 2427 256 


Jasper 


.. 8.17 


467.. 653 147.. 770 


278 




FttTette. 


. 1U94 662... 


. 1043 452 114 


Jefierson.... 


. 1035 


852.. 444 270.. 1144 


899 




Floyd 


. 494 2)6... 


.224 124 '14 


Keokuk 


.. 728 


689.. 726 301.. 784 


72,3 






149 56... 


. 120 33 


Lee 


. 1889 


2207.. No return. 1601 


)%5 






246 373. . . 


. 166 203 103 


Louisa 


.. 1114 


847.. 840 297.. 841 


467 






. 102 123. . . 


. I."? 117 


Lucas 


. 437 


374.. 231 360.. 179 


324 






88 18... 


. 65 2 


Madison 


.. 688 


612.. 373 107.. 551 


4V.i 




Gutlirie 


. . 220 229... 


. 196 205 12 


Mahaska 


. 1032 


S».. 930 195.. 1237 


91(1 






. . 207 109. . . 


New County. 


Marion 


. 1188 


1319.. 626 341.. 1127 


1273 




Hancock 


.. 21 6... 
.. 191 236... 


New L'o\inty. 
. 170 124 9 


Mills 


. . 311 


3:il.. 154 235.. 263 


157 




Monroe 


.. 555 


610.. 305 211.. 636 


605 




Hardin 


.. 570 413.. 


. 683 195 18 


Montgomery 


.. 86 


82. . No return. 79 


53 




Henry 


.. 1542 aw... 


. 1767 767 SOS 


Fage 


.. 300 


287.. No return. 98 


213 




Howaid 


. 316 214... 


. 207 63 


Polk 


.. 1035 


933.. 1170 79.. 913 


719 




Humboldt. . . 


57 14... 


New County. 


Potawatomie 


.. 242 


451.. 313 94.. 142 


36;h 




Ida 


5 4.. 


New County. 


Poweshiek . . 


.. 677 


366.. 824 161.. 446 


299 






.. 530 471.. 


. 492 S26 79 


Kirggold.... 


.. 216 


113.. 62 54.. 108 


.S9 




.] ackson 


.. 1149 1506... 


. 1163 1332 276 


Shelby 


.. 74 


62. . No return. 62 


5 




Jasper 


.. 839 469.. 


. 878 455 33 


Taylor 


.. 275 


214.. 195 76.. 105 


187 






.. 1028 856... 
. Iii90 1384... 


. 1188 1023 206 








147 




Johnson 


. 1215 964 282 


Van Buren . . 


.. 1184 


1272.. 665 389.. 1286 


1261 






.. 634 784.. 


. 964 663 10 
. 895 830 197 


Wapello .... 
Warren 


.. 999 
.. 9ti9 


1142.. ai2 403.. 1083 
615.. 739 204.. 856 


490 




Keokuk 


.. 727 689.. 




Kossuth 


72 31.. 


. 85 12 


Washington . 


.. 1022 


668.. No return. 1150 


704 




I-ee 


.. 1850 2251.. 


. 1780 21.58 650 


Wayne 


.. 338 


493.. 293 118.. 234 


■iiV> 






.. 1445 1111.. 


. 1652 971 273 






. 






Loiieia 


.. 1127 836.. 


. 993 642 2l« 


Total.... 


..2.3529 22929.. 13777 6774.. 21421 


,9604 




Lucas 


.. 432 375.. 


. 288 355 176 


Maj. for Curtis, 600 


do. for General Banking Law, 




.Madison 


.. 578 613.. 


. 580 619 61 


8003 ; do. for Curtis in 


'66, 1817. 






MaliHska 


. . lCr24 839. . 


. 1284 940 208 


11. Vaodever.LcfKiig'il. For.Agamst.Davis.Leff"r. 






. . 1179 1323. . 


No return. 


Alamakee... 


.. 605 


646.. 424 314.. 455 


352 




Mai shall . . . 


.. 712 277-. 


531 199 104 


Benton 


.. 731 


667.. 462 182.. 434 


377 




Mills 


.. 310 332.. 


. 287 l.« 102 
. 314 135 1 


Black Hawk 
Boone 


.. 643 
.. 284 


459.. 317 110.. 528 
405.. -m 194.. 222 


286 
365 




Jiiichell.... 


.. 416 175.. 






.. 549 617.. 


. 622 60."i 93 


Bremer 


.. 388 


320.. 208 112.. 258 


199 






77 79. . 


41 56 13 


Buchanan .. 


.. 693 


612.. 794 289.. 482 


252 






86 83. . 


..63 58 17 


Butler 


.. 348 


247.. 141 84.. 67 


85 






.. 1244 1063.. 


. 1091 895 32 


Calhouii 


.. 16 


15. . No return. New 


Co. 






.. 3(U 227.. 


. 100 171 lh9 


Carroll 


.. 23 


24.. 3 19.. New 


Co. 




Polk 


.. 10.55 911.. 


.. 1065 888 91 
New County. 


Cedar 

Cerro Cordo 


.. 1048 
.. 129 


880.. 655 150.. 840 
46.. 47 .. 73 


708 

28 




Plymouth... 


.. 24 




Potawatomie 


.. 2.32 460.. 


.. 259 i«3 84 


( herokee... 


.. 17 


3. . No return. Nev 


Co. 




Poweshiek . 


. . 679 364. . 


..459 255 87 


Chickasaw . . 


.. 427 


322.. 229 24.. 226 


81 




Ringgold ... 


. . . 215 116. . 


..93 62 64 


Clay 


9 


9.. No return. New 


Co. 






31 37.. 


.. 25 35 


Clayton 


. . 14S3 


1138.. 713 168.. 1081 


376 




Scott 


.. 2063 1347.. 


.. 1675 1119 S2S 


Clinton 


.. 1368 


1409.. 958 1.S7.. 944 


71V 




htory 


. . 334 318. . 


.. -Bi 272 79 


Crawford... 


.. 42 


22.. 16 28.. 20 


5 




fchelby 


77 54. . 


62 19 


Delaware .. 


.. 743 


684.. No return. .599 


305 






555 260. . 


.. 470 296 9C 


Dickinson... 


.. 35 
.. 1426 


10.. No return. New 
2928.. 1459 218.. 1172 


Co. 
1898 




Taylor 


... 277 ^08.. 


.. 119 183 31 


Dubuque. . . 





KHECTION RETURNS. 



63 



IOWA— (Q»i(t7»««d.) 
Tandever.LefiBng'U. For.Against.Davis.Leff'r. 

Fayette 1001 063.. 556 80.. 801 293 

Floyd -195 216.. i67 36.. 291 79 

Franklin 1-19 58.. 83 2S.. 30 20 

Greene 104 126.. 10 62.. 24 99 

Grundv 87 19.. Noretoin. 53 1 

Hamiliou £07 112.. 309 21.. New Co. 

Hancock 20 7.. No return. New Co. 

Hardin 509 414.. 382 117.. 428 145 

Howard 321 206.. 247 10.. 97 30 

Hiunboldt 66 16.. 23 8.. New Co. 

Ida 5 4.. No rctnm. New Co. 

Iowa ScO 475.. 231 198.. 404 320 

JackBOn 1117 1531.. 642 338.. 1052 970 

Johnson i:«j9 1384.. 748 376.. 1092 876 

Jones 036 781.. 627 203.. 754 584 

Kossuth 72 32.. 70 28.. 32 13 

Linn 1417 1112.. 1026 313.. 1430 836 

Marshall 713 21S.. 375 93.. 468 173 

Mitchell 411 179.. No return. 238 87 

Monona 78 81.. 39 25.. 31 

Mii-scatine 1201 1099.. 1036 44.. 956 827 

i'lymouth 10 9.. No return. New Co. 

Sue 31 37.. 2 36.. 20 17 

Scott 2048 1369.. No return. 1472 1030 

iJtory 331 320.. 329 79.. 203 229 

Tama 6.S5 264.. 306 114.. 439 158 

Webster 255 340.. 225 49.. 323 259 

Wii.nebago 18 20.. No return. New Co. 

Winneshiek.... 827 537.. 05 49.. 446 145 

Woo*hury 116 170.. 372 43.. 30 87 

Worth 79 31.. No return. New Co. 

Wright 82 58.. No return. 46 25 

Totrf 25.503 22764. .14626 4389. .18529 13.374 

Maj. for Vandever, 27S9; do. for Banking Law, 
10237 ; do for Davis, 5155. 

TOTAL TOTE OF THE ST.^TE. 

SepMicum. Oemocrale. Haj. 

A uditor Cattel 1 ... 48797 ; Pavvin . . . 46083—27 14 

Treagwer Jones 48^36 ; Lorah 45735—3101 

AU'v Gen Rice 48814; Elwoed . .45727— 3097 

iandiieffisier.Miller... 49253; Reid 46539—3714 

JJ.3I.Im. Ctom.Drake . ..4S175 ; Baldwin .45444—2731 
LEGISLATURE. 

Senate... RepublicauK, 21 ; Democrats, 15. 
HotlSE. . . .Kepubllcaus, 42 ; Democratf, 30. 

OAIilFORNIA. 

Supreme Court. President, 1856. 

Countiea. A.L.Dem. Lec.Bmi. Sep. Dem. Am. 

Currey.Baldwio. Frem. Buch. Fill. 

Alameda 724 786.... 723 729 213 

Amador 1716 1260.... 667 1784 li)57 

Butie 1314 817.... 744 2501 1702 

Calaveras 1952 2298.... 562 2615 UM 

Colusi 101 312.... 18 289 305 

rx>ntraC08t» .. 391 488.... 188 457 288 

Del Norte 75 330 New County. 

F.l Dorado 2638 2607.... 1391 4W8 2958 

Frezno 1 243.... 1 218 123 

Humboldt 364 239.... 103 204 191 

Klamath 81 691.... 82 832 440 

Los Augelos... 36 1410.... 521 721 135 

Marin. 90 480.... 151 350 82 

Mariposa 154 1141....- 165 1264 772 

Merced 9 236.... 14 249 124 

Monterey 342 278.... 220 267 169 

Napa 6X5 563.... 157 444 341 

Nevada 2535 2005.... 1462 .3500 2238 

Placer 1790 2168.... 992 2808 2096 

Plumas 793 681.... 217 1124 865 

Sacramento.... 278S 2449.... 941 3438 3386 

San Bernardino 10 502.... 93 314 7 

San Diego 17 185.... W 173 38 

San Francisco . 5621 2963.... 5089 6332 1593 

San Joaquin ... 894 1237.... 648 1285 1040 

SanLnisObispo 4 256.... 107 SA 15 

San Mateo 204 308.... 238 282 113 

Santa Barbara. 1 313.... 183 176 10 

Santa Clara.... 627 1064.... 809 576 673 



Baldwin. 


Frem. 


Buch. 


Fill 


371.... 


196 


320 


288 


1017.... 


1G9 


15:i7 


1083 


2439. . . . 


693 


2506 


■y?in 


1563.... 


464 


2073 


1791 


895.... 


189 


799 


6,34 


1812.... 


382 


1515 


498 


238.... 


21 


436 


2'?8 


583.... 


92 


491 


347 


822.... 


44 


4.36 


311 


802. .. . 


188 


1011 


as2 


25.35. . . . 


1056 


2936 


211? 


431.... 


23 


2)8 


1,S9 


532. . . . 


130 


553 


.IKS 


1689.... 


650 


2451 


2081 



Curry. 

Santa Cmz .... 388 

Shasta 441 

Sierra 1580 

Si.'*Kiyou 1136 

Solano 827 

Sonoma&Mend'o 1070 

Stanislaus 63 

Sutter l47 

Tehama 95 

Trinity 617 

Tuolumne 1582 

TulareA B.Vista 28 

Yolo 422 

Yuba 1838 



Total 36147 41599.... 20691 53365 36165 

Baldwin's majority, 8452; Buchanan over Fill- 
more, 1720U. 

Mr. Curry was supported by AntiLecompton 
Democrats and Republicans. 

For Comptroller, Melony, Lfcompton Dem., received 
44285 votes ; Dawley, Anti-Lecompton Dem., 27759 ; 
Gunn, Sep., 7481. 

Mr. Gunn's vote does not represent the Republican 
strength of the State, as many Kepubliciins voted for 
the Anti-Lecompton candidate, Mr. Dawley. 

For Congress. McKibbin received 32098 ; Dudley, 
22791 ; Tracy, 9.S8L 

Messrs. McKibbin andj)udley were the candidates 
of the Anti.Lecorapton ^or Bioderick Democracy, 
while the Republicans supported Mr. .McKibbin ami 
Mr. Tracy, and the Lecompton or Administration 
Democracy did not nominate candidates for Congress 
at all, contending that the election should, according 
to law, take place in 1859, and not in 1858. Of course, 
another election will be held, and there will be a con- 
test at Washington for seats, unless Messrs. McKib- 
bin and Dudley should be re-elected next year. 

LEGISLATURE. 

Senate. Repub'ns, 4; Lee. Dem., 25; A.L.Dem., 5. 
HoDSE..Repub'ns, 8; Lee. Dem., 55; A.L.Dem., 17. 



OREGON — [JVoi yet admiUed.] 

Congress. 
Ojip. Dem. 



Gotep.noe. 
Counties. 0pp. Dem. 

BfliDum. Whit'r. Deonv, 



Benton 405 

Clackmas 383 

Clatsop 61 

Columbia 59 

Coos 7 

Curry 8 

Douglas 307 

Jackson 432 

Josephine 194 

Lane 393 

Liim 219 

Marion 408 

Multnomah 536 

Polk 259 

Tillamook 6 

Umpqua 93 

Wasco 13 

Washington... 2(16 

Yamhill 418 



212 
346 

37 1 . 

.55 56 . 

84 
126 

301 S . 
440 6 . 
411 

481 5 . 
776 20 . 
736 

398 1 . 
S59 1 . 

16 
108 
212 

188 2 . 
259 1 . 



Kelly. Grover.BIcB. 
392 224 



... 400 
... 60 
.. 63 
.. U 
.. 10 
.. 289 
...243 
.. 179 
.. 417 
.. 257 
.. .307 
..543 
.. 273 
.. 6 
.. 95 
.. 21 
.. 211 
.. 422 



317 

44 2 
62 . 
86 6 

126 

342 

628 8 

423 4 

448 6 

784 18 

827 1 

396 

362 1 
17 

121 

213 . 

188 2 

261 



Total 4407 5M5 97 ....4199 5859 47 

Whitaker over Barnum, 1138 ; Grover over Kelly, 
1660. Messrs. Denny and McBride ran as Republi- 
cans, though the Republicans generally voted for the 
Opposition candidates. 

OTHER STATE OmCERS. 

Opposition. Democrats. Maj. 

Sec. State Rice 3659 ; Heath . . . .5746—2087 

Treasurer Brumley . .3531 ; Boon 5676—2145 

State Printer . .O'Meara. .4557 ; Bush 4958— 401 

For Treasurer, Applegate, Straight Rep., received 
590 votes ; and for State Printer, Craig, Straight Sep., 
received 413. 

LEGISLATURE. 

Senate.. Republicans... 4; Democrats 12. 

House. ..RepubUcans... 7 ; Democrats 2i). 



64 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC AND POLITICAL REGISTER. 

STATE GOVERNMENTS. 



■State,*. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut. . . 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kentncky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi. .. . 

Missouri 

N. Hampshire.. 

New Jersey 

New York 

N. Carolina 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania . 
Rhode Island. . 
South Carolina 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 



Capitals. 



Montgomery 

Little Kock 

Sacramento 

Hartford & N. H'n, 

Oover 

Tallahassee 

Milledgeville 

Springfield 

Indianapolis 

Des Jloines 

Frankfort 

Baton Rouge 

Augusta 

Annapolis 

Bo.stou i^ 

Lansing 

St. Paul 

Jackson 

Jefferson City 

Concord 

Trenton 

Albany 

Raleigh 

Columbus 

Harrisburg 

Newport ifc Prov'e. 

Columbia 

Nashville 

Austin 

Montpelier 

Richmond 

Madison 



Governors. 



Andrew B. Moore.. 
Elias N. Conway... 

John B. Weller 

William A. Buckingliam 
William Burton ...... 

MarshallS. Perry .... 

Joseph E. Brown 

William H. Bissell. . . . 
AshbelP. Willard... 

Ralph P. Lowe 

Charles S. MoitEHEAU 

K. C. Wickliffe 

Lotil. Morrill 

Thomas H. Hicks 

Natlianifl P. JianJcs . . 

Moses Wisner 

Henry H. Sibley 

William McWiilie.... 

Robert M. Stewart 

William Haile 

William A. Newell. . . . 

Edwin D. Morgan 

JohnW. Ellis 

Salmon P. Chase 

William F. Packer... 

JElisha Dyer 

WliliamH. Gist 

Isham G. Harris 

Hardin R. Runnells.. 

Biland Hall 

Henry A. Wise 

Alexander W. Mandall 



Term Exp Sal'ry LegWe Me^ls. Gen. Election 



Dec. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

May, 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Aug. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Dee. 

June, 

Jan, 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

May, 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Dec. 



1839 
1860 
1859 
IS59 
18(53 
1861 
1859 
181)1 
18B1 
IStiO 
1859 
1860 
1860 
1862 
1860 
1861 
1860 
1860 
1860 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1861 
1860 
1861 
1839 
1860 
1859 
1861 
1859 
1860 
1859 



$2,500 
1,800 

10,000 
1,000 

1,33;^ 

1,500 
3,000 
1,500 
1,300 
1,000 
2,500 

1,500 
3,600 
2,500 
1,500 

3,000 
2,000 
1,000 
1,800 
4,000 
2,000 
1,800 
3,500 

400 
3,.')00 
2,000 
3,000 

750 
5,000 
1,250 



2 M. Nov. 
1 M. Nov. 
1 .M. Jan. 
1 W. May. 
1 Tu. June. 
I M. Nov. 

1 M. Nov. 

2 M. Jan. 
January. 

2 M. Jan. 
1 M. Dec. 

3 M. Jan. 
1 W. Jan. 
1 W. Jan. 
1 W. Jan. 
1 W. Jan. 

1 M. Jan. 
Last M.Dec 

1 W. June. 

2 Tu. Jan. 
I Tu. Jan. 

3 .M. Nov. 
1 M. Jan. 
1 Tu. Jan. 
May A Oct. 

4 M. Nov. 

1 M. Oct. 
In Decem'r 

2 Th. Oct. 
2 M. Jan. 
1 M. Jan. 



1 M. Aug. 
1 M. Aug. 
1 Th. Sept 

1 M. April. 

2 Tu. Nov. 
1 M. Oct. 

1 JI. Oct. 

1 Tu. Nov. 
2Tu.0ct. 

2 Tu. Oct, 
1 M. Aug. 

1 M. Nov. 

2 M. Sept. 
1 W. Nov. 
1 Tu. Nov. 

1 Tu. Nov. 

2 Tu, Oct. 
1 M. Oct. 

1 M Aug. 

2 Tu. March. 
1 Tu. Nov. 

1 Tu. Nov. 

2 Th. Aug. 
2 Tu. Oct. 
2 Tu. Oct. 

1 W. April. 

2 M. Oct. 

1 Th. Aug. 
1 M. Aug. 
1 Tu. Sept. 
4 Th. May. 
1 Th. Nov. 



Governors of Territories. — New Mexico^ Abraham Reneher; iVasMn^'.on^ Fayetto Ms.MuUeu ; Nebraska 
Wm. A. Richardson ; (/ioA, Alfred Cunimiug ; A'ansas, Samuel Medury; Oregon, Geo. L. Curry. 

The following Stiites hold LegislHtive Smsions biennially, vii. : Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, 
Alabama, Michigan, Missiaaippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Ohio, ludiaua, Misaouri, Iowa, a 

Democrats in Roman ; Republicans in /raiics ; Americans in small c.\ps. 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 



1856. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Jowa 

Kentucky 

Loaisiaua 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts . . . 

Michigan 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina... 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania .. . 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina.. . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Total 



20,691 

42,715 

308 



96,189 

94,375 

43,954 

314 

67,179 

281 

108,190 

71,762 



38,.^45 
28,3,38 
276,004 

187.497 

147,903 

11,467 

Presiden 



291 
66,090 



1„341,5I4 1,838,232 



46,739 
21,910 
53,365 
34,995 
8,004 
6.358 
56,581 
105,3J8 
118,670 
36.170 
74,642 
22.164 
39,080 
,39,115 
39,210 
62,136 
35,446 
58,164 
32,789 
46,943 
195,878 
48,246 
170,874 
230,772 
6;6S0 
tial Rlec 
73,636 
31,169 
10,569 
89,706 
52.843 



1852. 



Whig. 

Seoiu 



15,038 

7.404 

34,971 

30,359 

6,K13 

2,S75 

16.660 

64,93t 

80,901 

15,855 

57,068 

17,255 

32,543 

35.077 

56,062 

33,860 

17,548 

29,984 

16,147 

.38,5,56 

2:il,8S2 

39,058 

152,526 

179,122 

7,626 

En by the 

58.898 

4,9.15 

22,173 

57,1.32 

22,240 



Dem. 
Pierce, 



26,881 
12,173 
39,665 
33,249 
6,318 
4,318 
34,705 
80.597 
95,299 
17,762 
53,806 
18,647 
41,609 
40,022 
46,880 
4LS42 
26,876 
.38,353 
29,997 
44,305 
262,083 
39,744 
169,220 
198,568 
8,735 
Legislat 
57,018 
13.552 
13,014 
72,413 
.■5;i,658 



100 

3,160 

62 



9,966 

6,934 

1,606 

265 

8,030 

29,993 
7,237 



6,695 

350 

25,329 

59 

31,682 

8,524 

644 

ure. 



8,621 
8,814 



1848. 



Whig. 

Taylor. 



30,482 

7,588 

Admitt 

30,314 

6,422 

4,539 

47,544 

53,ai5 

69,907 

11,178 

67,141 

18,217 

.3.5,276 

37,702 

61,070 

2*,940 

25,922 

32,671 

14,781 

40,015 

218.58:^ 

43.519 

138,:«9 

185,730 

6,779 

64,705 
4;509 
23,122 
45.265 
13,747 



1.393,089 1.596.395 1.58,123 ll,.362,232 1.223,795 291.378 I 



31,363 

9,300 

ed since 

27,046 

5,910 

3,238 

44,802 

56,6-29 

74,745 

12,125 

49,720 

15,370 

40,206 

34,528 

35,281 

30,687 

26,537 

40,077 

27,763 

36,901 

114,.319 

34,869 

354,773 

172,186 

3,646 

68,419 
10,668 
10,948 
46,738 
15,001 



1848. 
5,005 
80 



15,804 
8,100 
1,126 

1 

12,178 
125 

38,0,'i8 
10,389 



7,560 

849 

120,497 

85 

35,347 

11,177 

730 



3 
13,837 



HOME INSURANCE COMPANY 



OF NEW YORK. 

OFFICE, 112 and 114 BROADWAY. 



CASH CAPITAL 
SURPLUS, OVER 



$600,000 
250,000 



Insures Buildings, Merchandise, and Property generally against 
Loss or Damage by Fire. 

Dwellings and Farm Propekty Insured for one, three, or five 
years, on favorable terms. 

D I R E C TO RS. 



Charlss J. Martin, President. 

A. F. WiLLMARTn, Vice-President. 

WiLUAM G-. Lambkrt, of A.& A. Lawrence & Co. 
Grorgb C. Collins, of Sherman & Collins. 
Danford N. Barney, of Wells, Fargo & Co. 
Lncics Hopkins, Pres't Importers' & Traders' 

Bank. 
Thomas Mkssenoer, of T. & H. Messenger. 
William H. Mellen, of Claflin, Mellen & Co. 
CnAS. B. Hatch, of Hatch, Hiller & Mersereau. 

B. Watson Bcll, of Haskell, Merrick & Bull. 
Homer Moboan.a 

Levi P. Stone, of Stone, Starr & Co. 

Jamks Hcmphret, of Barney, Humphrey & But- 
ler. 

Gkorre Peahce, of George Pearce & Co. 

Ward A. Work, of Ward A. Work & Son. 

James Low, of James Low & Co., of Louisville. 

Isaac H. Fr.oTHiNGHAii, of I. H. Frot'hinghamA 
Co. 

Charles A. Bclklkt, of Bulkley & Co. 

Cephas H. Norton, of Norton & Jewett. 

Georos D. Morgan, of E D. Morgan & Co. 

Theodore McNamee, of Bowen, McNameeA Co. 

Riciurp Bigelow, of Doan. King A Co., St. 
Louis. 



Oliver E. Wood, of Willard, Wood & Co. 

Alfred S. Barnes, of A. S. Barnes & Co. 

George Bliss, of Phe!ps, Bliss & Co. 

Roe Lockwood, of R. Lockwood & Son. 

John G. Nelson, of Nelson & Co. 

Lyman Cooke, of Cooke, Dowd, Baker 4 Co. 

Levi P. Morton, of Morton, Grinnell A Co. 

Cdrtis Noble, of Gondii A Noble. 

John B. Hutchinsok, of J. C. Howe A Co., of 

Boston. 
Charles P. Baldwin, of Baldwin, Starr A Co. 
Amos T. Dwight, of Trowbridge, Dwight A Co. 
Henry A. Hublbut, of Swift, Hurlhut A Co. 
Jesse Hoyt, of Jes^e Hoyt & Co. 
Wm. Stobgis, Jr., of Sturgis, Shaw A Co. 
John R. Ford, of Ford Rubber Co. 
Sidney Mason, of Mason A Thompson 
Geo. T. Stedman, of Stedman, Carlile A Shaw, 

of Cincinnati. 
Ctrds Yale, Jr., of Cyrus Yale, Jr. A Co., of 

New Orleans. 
Wm. R. Fosdick, of Wm. R. A Chas. B. Fosdlck. 
David I. Boyd, of Boyd Brothers A Co., of 

Albany, N. Y. 
F. H. CotsiTT, of Cossitt, Hill A Taliaadge, of 

Memphis, Tenn. 



CHARLES .J. MARTIN, President. 
A. F. WILLMARTH, Vice-President. 
J. MILTON SMITH, Secretary. 

This Company has Agencies in the Principal cities and villages in the United 
States. 



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ready. An additional volume will be published once in three months. 

Price, in Cloth, J8 00 ; Law Sheep, $3 50; Half Mor., %i 00; Half Calf, $4 50, each. 
A WAY OF PROCURING THE CYCLOPEDIA, or THE DEBATES. 

Form a club of four, and remit the price of four books, and five copies will be sent at the 
remitter's expense for carriage ; or for ten subscribers, eleven copies in clothTrill be sent at our 
expense for carriage. 

TKIRTT YEARS' VIEW: Or a History of the Working of the American Govern- 
ment for Thirty Years, from 1820 to 1850. Chiefly taken from the Congress Debates, the 
private papers of General Jackson, and the speeches of ex-Senator Benton, with his actual 
view of men and affairs : with Historical Notes and Illustrations, and some notices of eminent 
deceased contemporaries. By Hon. Thomas H. Beston. 
Complete in two volumes, royal octavo, of about 750 pages each. 
Price, in Cloth, $5 00 ; Sheep, $6 00 ; Half Mor., $7 00. 
I CYCI,<tP^DIA OF ^VIT AND HUMOR :— Of America, Ireland, Scotland, 
' and England. By Wx. E. Burton, Comedian. Embellished with upwards of fite hundred 
i engravings from original designs, and 24 portraits on steel. Complete in two large volumes. 
, Price, in Cloth, $7 CO ; Sheep, $8 00 ; Half Calf, f 10 00. 

AMERICAN ELOQUENCE : A Collection of the Speeches and Addresses of the 
most eminent Orators of America: with Biographical Sketches, and illustrative. Notes. By 
Fkake Moork. Complete in two volumes, royal octavo, with 14 steel-plate portraits. 

Price, in Cloth, $5 00 ; Sheep, $6 00 ; Half Mor., $7 00. 

No other works will f50 liberally reward the exertions of Agents. Terms made 
known upon application to the Publishers. 



AGRICULTURAL BOOKS 



PUBLISHED BY 



«T 



A. O. MOORE & CO., 

140 Fulton Street, New York. 

Sent by mail to any part of the United States on receipt of price. 



American Farmers' Encyclopsedia — A 

Work of great value $4 00 

Allen's American Farm Book 1 00 

Allen's Diseases of Domestic Animals 75 

Allen's Rural Architecture 1 25 

Allen on the Culture of the Grape. ... 1 00 
American Architect, or Plans for 

Country Dwellings 6 00 

American Florist's Guide T5 

Barry's Fruit Garden 125 

Blake's Farmer at Home. . ,. 125 

Bnus-iingault's Rural Economy 1 25 

Browns's Bird Fancier 50 

Browne's Poultry Yard 10" 

Browne's Field Book of Manures 1 25 

Bridgeman's Gardener's Assistant... 1 50 

Bridgeinan's Florist's Guide 60 

Bridgenian's Kitchen Gardener's In- 
structor 60 

Bridgeman's Fruit Cultivator's Ma- 

nual 60 

Breck's Book of Flowers 1 00 

Buist's Flower Garden Directory 1 25 

Buist's Family Kitchen Gardener 75 

Chinese Sugar Cane and Sugar Mak- 
ing 25 

Chorlton's Grape Grower's Guide .. 6i> 

Cohhett'- American Gardener 60 

Cottage and Farm Bee-Vieeper 25 

Cole's American Fruit Book 50 

Cole's American Veterinarian....... 50 

Dadd's .Modern Horse Doctor 1 00 

Dadd's American Cattle Doctor 1 00 

Dadd's Anatomy and Physiology of 

the Horse 2 00 

Do. colored plates 4 00 

Dana's Muck Manual 1 00 

Dana's Priee Essay on Manures. 25 

Darlington's Weeds and Useful 

Plants 160 

Domestic and Ornamental Poultry. . . 1 00 

Do. colored plates, 2 00 

Downing's Landscape Gardening .3 50 

Downing's Rural Essays 3 00 

Eastwood's Cranherry Culture 60 

Elliott's Western Fruit Book 1 25 

Kvery Lady her own Flower Gardener Bn 

Fe-scndf-n's Farmer and Gardener... 1 50 

Pessenden's Am. Kitchen Gardener.. 25 

Field's Pear Culture 100 

Fish Culture 1 Oi 

Flint on Grasses 125 

Guennn on Milch Cows 60 

Herbert's Hints to Horse-keepers 1 00 

Hooper's Dog and Gun 25 

Hyde's Chinese Sugar Cane 25 

Johnston's Agricultural Chemistry... 1 25 



Johnston's Elements of Agricultural 
Chemistry and Geology 

Johnston's Catechism of Agricultural 
Chemistry for Schools 

Langstroth on the Hive and Honey 
Bee 

Leucher's Hot-houses 

Lieliig's Familiar Letters to Farmers 

Linsley's Morgan Horses 

Miner s Bee keeper's Manual 

Mdes on the Horse's Foot... 

.Milhurn on the Cow 

Moore's Rural Hand Books, bound 
in 4 Series each 

Munn's Land Drainer 

Nash's Progressive Farmer 

Neill's Gardener's Companion 

Norton's Elements of Agriculture.. . 

Olcott's Sorgho and Imphee 

Pardee on the Strawberry 

Pedder's Land Measurer 

Person' New Culture of the Vine 

Phelps' Bee-keeper's Chart. 

Quinby's Mysteries of Bee keeping. . 

Rabbit Fancier 

Randall's Sheep Ilusbandry 

Richardson on the Horse 

Richardson's Pests of the Farm ... 

Richardson's Domestic Fowls 

Richardson on the Hog 

Uichardson on the Honey Bee 

Richardson on the Dog 

Reemelin's Vine-dresser's Manual... 

Sheplierd's Own Book 

Stewart's Stable Book 

Stray Leaves from the Book of Na- 
ture 

Stephens' Book of the Farm, 2 vols.. 

Stockhardt's Cliem. Field Lectures.. 

Skillful Housewife 

Skinner's Elements of Agriculture.. 

Smith's Landscape Gardening 

Thaer's Principles of Agriculture.... 

Thomas' Farm Implements 

Thompson's Food of Animals 

The Rose Culturist 

Topham's Chemistry Made Ea.«y. . . 

Turner's Cotton Planter's Manual... 

Warder's Hedges and Evergreens... 

Waring's Elements of Agriculture.. . 

Weeks on Bees 

White's Gardening for the South. . . 

Wilson on Flax . 

Youatt and Martin on Cattle 

Youatt on the Horse 

Vouatt on Sheep 

Youatt on the Hog ', 



$1 00 
25 

1 25 

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50 

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1 00 

50 

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60 

1 00 
60 
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50 

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25 
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26 
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25 
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50 

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75 

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26 

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75 

75 



STRONG AS LINEN. 



Z 

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o 
o 

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o 

Q. 

in 

u 
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IVORY POLISHED 

nnm guce spooi cotton, 

MANUFACTURED BY 

JONAS BROOK & BROTHERS, 

MELTHAM MILLS, ENGLAND. 

WHITE, BLACK, AND AIL COLORS, ON SPOOLS OF 200 OB 
500 YARDS. 



The great demand for this Sewing Cotton has compelled the Manufacturers 
largely to increase their production, and their Agent can now promptly supply all 
orders. Being made of the 

FINEST SEA ISLAND COTTON, 

it combines the SMOOTHNESS AND LUSTRE OF SILK, with the STRENOTH 
OF LINEN, and for either MACHINE or HAND SEWING it has no equal. In 
competition with all other Spool Cotton at the Hreat Exhibitions in London and 
Paris, it took the highest prizes awarded to Sewing Cotton, and the justness of this 
decision is confirmed by thousands of families and manufacturers now using it in 
the United Slates. Its great popularity has brought into the market numerous 
imitations, which are sold at lower prices, but which will not stand the friction of 
the needle, nor retain their strength after washing. Brook's Cotton may be known 
by their name and crest—" A Go.it's Head " — on one end of the spool. Lengths 
marked on each spool guarantied. 

Sold by respectable dealers generally throughout the country, and ia assorted 
cases of 100 dozen each by the Manufacturers' Agent, 

33 and. 34 "Vesey st., IJCew Yorli 



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SMOOTH AS SILK. 



HOLLOWAY'S OINTMENT AND PILLS. 

A BOON TO THE SICK. 

The want of a sterling medicinal 
to meet the ills and necessities of the 
suffering portion of liumanity, and 
one entirely free from mineral and 
other deleterious panicles, was se- 
verely felt till this all powerful medi- 
cine was ushered into the world ; 
Holloway's invaluable Pills have 
become the hocseuold kemedy of all 
nations. Their attribute is to pre- 
vent as well as to cure ; assisting 
nature in her task of vital and rusc- 

TIONARY REFORMATION. 

BAD LEGS, OLD .SORKS, A\'D ULCERS. 

Cases of many years' standing that have pertinaciously refused to yield to any other remedy 
or treatment, have invariably succumbed to a few applications of this powerful unguent. 
N. B.— Directions for the guidance of patients in every disorder affixed to each box. 





69 

STEARNS & MARVIN'S 

WZZ.DER PATENT 

SALAMANDER SAFE, 

SECURED BY OCR 



^11 iilLi^^ 



POWDER PROOF LOCK. 



Manufactured for nearly seventeen years, and which have been severely tested in over 
ROO accidental Fires. 

NOT ONE HAS EVER FAILED! 

f No. 40 Murray St., New York. 
-STEARNS & MARVIN,-^ 57 Gravier St., N. Orleans. 

( 29 N. Main St., St. Louis. 

J. A. H. HASBROUCK 

ST^TIOISTER'S II.A.LL, 
174 & 176 PEARL. STREET, XE\*' YORK, 

IMPOF.-FER OF AND IiEALKR IN 

FOUEIGjr a^TD nOJflESTlC ST^ITIO^VERY^ 

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CONSISTISO IM PART OF 

ENGLISH DRAWING AND TRACING PAPERS, ENVELOPES, 
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GENUINE FABER'S DRAWING AND OTHER PENCILS. 
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COUNTRY MERCHANTS INVITED TO CALL. 



SCHOOL ^OOl^S ¥0U THE TJXIOX. 



National Series of Standard School Books, 

PUBLISHED BY 

A. S. BARNES & CO., 

51 & 53 Jolin St., NewlTork. 

Teachers and Educators tcill please examine the follcicing Books. 

1. READING AND ORTHOGRAPHY. 

Parker and Watson's Readers, 5 Nos. i Smith's Juvenile Definer, 80c. 

Parker and AVatson's Primer, Illustrated. 15c. I Smith's Granimar-School Speller, 40 

Parker and Watson's Speller, 25 I Smith's Definer's Manual 60 

■Wright's Analytical Orthography, 25 | Northend's Dictation Exercises, 25 

Page's Normal Chart of Elementary Sounds, $2 50. 

2. ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. 

Clark's First Lessons in Eng. Grammar,.. $0 30 | Welch's Analysis of Englsh Sentences,.. |0 75 

Claik's English Grammar, 60 Cla k's Etymological Chart, 2 50 

Clark's Analysis of English Language, ... 40 I B. ookfield's First Book in Composition, . . 40 

3. GEOGRAPHICAL SERIES. 

Monteith'g First Lessons in Geography, . 25c. | Monte"th's Manual of Geography, |0 60 

Monteith's Introduction to Manual, . 40 | McNally's Cornp^^ie School Geography,.. 1 00 

4. DA VIES' SERIES OF ARITHMETICS. 

Davies' Primary Arithmetic, 15c. | Davies' New School Arithmetic, 4bc. 

Davies' Intellectual Arithmetic, 25 | Davies' University Arithmetic, 76 

5 SCHOOL HISTORIES. 

Monteith's Youth's History of U. States, . 50c. I Willard's Universal History, $1 50 

Willard's School Hist, of United States,. . 75 | Ricord's History of Rome, 1 00 



6. NATURAL PHILOSOPHY AND CHEMISTRY. 

Parker's Ist Lessons In Nat. Philosophy, $0 37 I Norton and Porter's 1st Book of Science, fl 00 

Paker's School Compendium of Philos'y, 1 00 Porter's Principles of Chemistry, 1 00 

Bartlett's College Philosophy. 4 vols. | Gregory's Outlines of Chemistry, 2 vols., 8 00 

7. DAVIES' ALGEBRA — GEOMETRY, &c. 



8. ELOCUTION, INTELLECTUAL PHILOSOPHY, RHETORIC, &c. 

Northend's Little Speaker, . . . $0 34 I Mahan's Intellectual Philosophy, . $1 00 
Northend's Amer'can Speaker, . . 75 | Koyd's Karnes' Elements of Criticism, 1 25 
Northend's School D-alogues, . . 75 I Day's Art of Rheto:ic, . . . 76 

Zacho's New American Speaker, . 1 25 Fulton and Eastman's System of Book- 

I keeping, 76 

^^ Copies sent to any pari of the United States {postage paid), upon receipt of the price. 

»1. S. Barnes If Co.^s Descriptive Catalogue of all their 
Books sent gratis. 



SOMETHING NEW. 

B. T. BABBITT'S BEST MEDICINAL SALERATTJS is manufactured from common 
salt. B. T. Babbitt's best Saleratus is prepared entirely different from other Saleratus. AH the 
deleterious matter extracted in such a manner as to produce Bread, Biscuit, and all kinds of Cake, 
without containing a particle of S^aleratus when the Bread or Cake is baked ; thereby producing 
wholesome results. Every particle of Saleratus is turned to gas and passes through the Bread 
or Biscuit while baking : consequently nothing remains but common salt, water and flour. 
You will readily perceive, by the taste of this Saleratus, that it is entirely ditTerent from other 
Saleratus. V/hen you purchase one paper you should take the old paper with you, and be very 
particular and get the next e.xactly like the first (name and picture, twisted loaf bread, with a 
glass effervescing water on the top). 

Full directions for making Bread with Sour Milk and Cream Tartar, and all kinds of Pastry ; 
also for making Soda water ; also directions for making Seidlitz Powders will accompany each 
package. B. T. BABBITT, 

2fo3. 68 ajid 70 Washington St., K. T., and JV^j. 83 India St., Boston. 

PURE CONCENTRATED POTASH, 

In 6 lb. cans — Six pounds of this Potash are equal to twelve pounds of common Potash. This 
article is broken into small pieces, suitable for retailing in the smallest quantities. The attention 
of Druggists is especially called to this Potash. Cases of 1 doz., 2 doz , 8 doz., and 6 dor. 

The Proprietor of this POTASH has for many years seen the necessity of having some 
reliable standard for the strength of POTASH. The adulteration has become so general, 
that it has, notwithstanding its valuable properties, gone nearly out of use. The Proprietor has 
taken the responsibility of subscribing his name to every package, and warrants the stren^'th 
to be uniform, and when used, always producing the same results. Potash many times is adul- 
terated with salt, which is destructive in making soap ; it makes the ladles say they did not 
have good luck, etc. One other reason that Potash has gone out of use is, it is so unpleasant 
to handle, being put up in wooden casks, and becoming a liquid in many cases, and very 
troublesome to the retailers. 

Now the Proprietor first obtains pure Potashes, always being the same strength, and pro- 
ducing the same results ; and will warrant it in all cases. If the directions are followed, to pro- 
duce double the effect in making soaps, and all other purposes for which Potash is used, with 
full directions for making the best of Soft, Hard, or Fancy Soaps, in one to five hours, without 
smell in the house, If made often while the grease is sweet. It is made with little trouble ; the 
ley is all prepared in five or ten minutes, and the kettle can stand on the stove, at a moderate 
boil, until its contents becomes soap, which is usually In about one to five hours. The soap 
must be all rinsed out of the clothes before drying. 



B. T. BABBITT'S 

SOAP POWDER! 

This SOAP POWDER has been in use for the last ten years, and gives the best of 
satisfaction. There have been many kinds introduced in market, but no brand retains patron- 
age except BABBITT'S, and that continues to gradually increase. One family will get 
all their clothes hung out by 10 o'clock, and very white at that; this leads to inquiry. 

Neighbors will say, how is it that you always get your washing out so much earlier than 
others, and so much whiter. The answer is, we use BABBITT'S SOAP POWDER, 
This has been many times related in my ofBce. One man at the South got a box of SOAP 
PO"\VDER to sell ; he kept it about six months, thinking it a dead letter ; finally took some 
in his own house for his wife to try, and the result led to the above description, and the sale 
commenced rapidly. 

This SO.*P PO'WDER not only whitens the clothes, but when soaked according to 
directions over night, it causes the dirt to rinse out with slight rubbing, which is always very 
desirable for the ladies. No bleaching on the grass is required, and the clothes will last three 
times as long from not being rubbed to pieces. 

B. T. BABBITT, 

2^os. 63 and TO Washington St., iV^. Y., and A^o. 8S India St., Boston. 
FOR SALE BY ALL GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS. 



73 

BRAKDRETH'S PILLS 

Are the Original Vegetable and Universal Medicine, and weighed by the public lOS years, and 
not found wanting. Intrinsic me:it is relied upon as their claim to public favor; because their 
usefulness is measured by their curative, their purgative riualities. They cure or greatly relieve 
all disease, because they open all the natural outlets ; and no disease or pain can all'ect us 
EXCEPT WHEN SOME OF THESE ARE CLOSED. 

Br.indreth's Pills have restored millions to health, when all other medicines had failed, and 
the patient left to die. 

Though entirely vegetable and innocent, yet they are more searching and more to be depended 
upon as expellents than calomel. While sickness is present, they may be used daily ; because 
they do not take any essential or good property from the blood, but actually impart to it vital- 
izing qualities. They require no change in diet or especial care against cold or otherwise. 

Fevers, Rheumatisms, Influenza, Colds, Coughs, and especially sudden attacks of severe 
sickness, often resulting in death, wliich all are subject to contract when obliged to expose 
themselves to the changes of our variable climate— these, two or three doses of BraniiRKtu's 
Pills cure, save long doctor's bills and life. Let the wise consider. 

FEVER AND AGUE CURED. 

Mr. John Y. Haight, Supervisor of New Castle, Westchester county, desires the attention of 
those inte.estfed. He says, November 1S58: " I was, about two years ago, attacked with fever 
and ague, which, notwithstanding the best medical advice, continued to sorely afflict me for six 
tedious months. I became yellow as saffron, and reduced to skin and bone. Medicine and 
physicians were abandoned in despair. As an experiment, I concluded to try a single dose of 
six of Brandreth's Vegetable L'niversal Pills on an empty stomach, early in the morning. This 
first dose seemed to aiouse all the latent energies of my exhausted frame; I feared tlie worst — 
their purgative efl'ect was different fiom anything I had ever used or heard of. At length this 
effect ceased, and I seemed lighter and breathed freer. That evening I was, indeed, sensibly 
better, and slept soundly all night. The next day I followed the same course, and took the 
same dose of Pills. I continued to take the Pills in this way about three weeks, when I found 
myself entirely cured. It is two years ago, and I have had no return ; my health has been 
surprisingly good, and I have used no medicine since. 1 have made this statement in accord- 
ance with what I conceive to be my duty." 

OBSTRt CTION. 

A young lady, beautiful and healthy, took cold, which caused a serious obstruction for two 
years ; her health was broken down, and her beauty departed. At length, Brandreth's Pills 
were tried : eleven doses, of from two to four, were taken in fifteen days preceding the usual 
period. Regularity was restoied, and her health and good looks recovered. 

AVORIWS. 

Brandreth's Pills are the best vermifuge; they are infallible. A little child, six years old, for 
some weeks was drooping; its mother gave it one of Brandreth's sugar-coated pills— the next 
day there came away a worm sixteen inches long, and as large as a child's finger. The child 
was well. 

PLEURISY. 

A gentleman, away from home, was taken with pleurisy; the inflammation was terrible; 
every breath made him wiithe with agony Eight Brandreth's Pills were swallowed, and warm 
ol applied locally ; the pills ope.ated, and the pain was relieved ; plenty of gruel was taken, 
and six more pills, and the second day the patient was cured. 

INFIiAMMATION OF THE KIDNEYS CURED. 

Gentleman aged fifty, florid complexion, scrofulous habit ; sudden attack of inflammation of 
the kidneys ; pain excruciating. Could neither sit, lie down, nor stand up without mortal agony. 
He had the assistance of the best Physicians the village afforded, without any mitigation of his 
sufferings. When hope had departed, as a last means, he swallowed eight Brandreth's Vegeta- 
ble Universal Pills, and then applied over the seat of the pain a mustard plaster. In five hours 
the pills operated, and though the pain continued until this effect occurred, yet it then ceased 
entirely, and he recovei ed his health in a few days. Over two years have now passed, and 
there has been no return of the disease. 

CHRONIC COSTIVENESS CURED. 

A gentleman of New York suffered from pain in the chest, and dispepsia, in consequence of 
severe costiveness. He made his will, and fully expected that his days were short. But he was 
preva-led ujton to take one B; and. eth Vegetable Universal Pill each n ght while they benefited 
him. He commenced, and was relieved even the first day. He took another, and yet another; 
his health imp: oved, and he st 11 continued to take a pill each night. He did this for three 
bundled and sixty-five nights, and by that time he had become entirely cured, and added 
seventy-five pounds to his weght. 

BRANDRETH'S PILLS are sold at 25 cents per box— with directions— the same sugar-coated. 

Principal Of/ice 294 Canal Street, JVctv l^ork, 

BRANDRETH BUILDING. 



MAYNARD & NOYES' 




MORE THAN FORTY YEARS ESTABLISHED. 



COMPAEE DR. CHILTON'S PREVIOUS TESTS WITH THE 
FOLLOWING : 

From experiments instituted by me, in 1855 and 1856, and repeated within 
the past six months, I am fully satisfied that Maynard & Noyes' Writing Inlc is 
entitled to the pre-eminence it has always sustained for LEGIBILITY and 
PERMANENCE of Color. 

JAMES R. CHILTON, M.D,, Chemist. 

NEW YORK, Mat 11, 185S. 

The above popular Ink, together with 

Blue, Red, Carmine and Copying Ink, Ink Powder, etc.. 

Is for sale by the Manufacturers in Boston, also by Stationers and Booksellers 
in all parts of the country. 



AMERICAN GUANO. 



TO FARMERS AND DEALERS IN GUANO. 

This Guano, from Jarvis Island, in the Pacific Ocean, containing 80 per 
cent, of 

PHOSPHATES OF LIME, 



MOST VALUABLE FERTILIZER NOW KNOWN, 

IS OFFERED FOR SALE IN QUANTITIES, LARGE OR SMALL. 

For full information and particulars, address 

PicesYdewt ilmevican Gwano Co., 

66 ^UVmii St., X.Y. 



WHEELER & WILSON'S 

SBfflK HtCIIIIES. 

PRICES GREATLY REDUCED. 
Office, No. 605 Broadvray, New York. 

SEND FOB A CIRCULAR. 
Diagram of the Lock-Stitch made by this Machine. 




This 13 the only Stitch that cannot be ravelled and 
that presents the same appearance on each side of the R 
seam. It is made with two threads, one upon each S 
side of the fabric, and interlocked in the centre of it. 

GOOD NEWS. — A reduction in the prices of Sewing Machines is announced In our 
advertising columns. Their utility is established beyond question , and, at the present prices, 
we see no reason why they should not be found, as they ought to be, in every household. 
Several varieties are manufactured adapted to various purposes. So far as public opinion has 
been formed and uttered, the preference is emphatically accorded to the Wheeler and Wilson 
machine for family use, and for manufactures in the same range of ))urpose and material. 
During the present autumn the trials have been numerous, and all the patents of any preten- 
sion have been brought fairly into competition. In every case, the Wheeler and Wilson machine 
has won the highest premium. We may instance the State Fairs of New York, New Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Illinois, Wisconsin, Virginia, Michigan, Indiana, Mississippi, Missouri, 
and California, and the FaiiS in Cincinnati, Chicago, St. Louis, Baltimore, Kichinond, and San 
Francisco. At the Fair of the St. Louis Mechanical Associatiou, the E.xamining Committee was 
composed of twenty-five Ladies of the highest social standing, who, without a dissenting voice, 
awarded for the Wheeler and Wilson Machine, the highest and only premium, a Silver Pitcher, 
valued at $75. If these facts do not establish a reputation, we know not what can. — Chmstiun 
Advocate and Journal. 



iF^iFLiKrTiKrcs- ir^is. 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

AT 

No. 24 Beekman Street, New York. 



JOHN G. LIGHTBODY 

IS CONSTANTLY MANUFACTURING, AND HAS ALWAYS ON HAND, EVEUY VARIETY 
of Printing Ink, from the finest black and colored to News Ink, which he warrants equal to any 
ever manufactured, and at as low prices as can be sold by any regular manufacturer. Orders 
forwarded by steamboat and railroad to any part of the country, by addressing a note to me, 
at No. 24 Beekman Street, N. Y. 



I=L. 



JEL, 



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RAD WAV'S RENO.ATING RESOI.VENT. 
For the cure of Chronic Diseases — such as Scrofulous and Syphilitic complaints, consumptive 
and other affections of the Lungs and Throat, Induration and Enlargement of Parts, Eruptive 
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arising from an impure state of the blood. RADWAY & CO.. Ifi2 Fulton street, N. Y. 

SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE. 



ITS PKKVKNTION AND CUKE. 75 

t>:r. jr. w. ciixjRciiiLiL,'s discovery! 

(Made to thk French Academy of Medicine, in 1S56) 

THE HYPOPHOSPHITES OF LIME, SODA, AND POTASH. 

The discovery of a Specific Remedy for the treatment of Tuberculosis (Consumption), made 
after years of scientific research, by the celebrated Dr. John Francis Churchill, of Paris, marks 
a nevT and important Era in the history of Cheraico-Medical Science. 

It has long been known that, among the inorganic or mineral substances which enter into 
tlie composition of the body, phosphorus is to be met with in considerable quantities, but chem- 
ists and physiologists are, as yet, unable to decide whether it is found only as phosphoric acid ; 
that is, in a state of complete oxydation, and, as such, no longer liable to be burnt by the oxy- 
gen of the atmosphere, or whether it also exists in a lower state of oxydation, and, as such, 
capable of keeping up the slow com,hustion which coimiitutes one of the principal pheno- 
mena of life. 

Dr. Churchill came to the conclusion, founded on the successful treatment of a large number 
of cases in the second and third stages of Consumption, that Phosphorus existed in the body in 
an oxydizable or combustible condition ; and that the proximate cause, or at least an indis- 
pensable condition of the tubercular diathesis, is the decrease in the system of the Phosphorus 
it contains in an oaeygenizahle state. Hence, he drew the obvious conclusion that the Speci- 
fic Remedy of the Disease consists in restoring the deficient elemknt, by the use of Phos- 
phorus, in such a staie that it may be both oxydisable and assimilable — that is, capable of 
entering into and forming a part of the system. 

These conditions were found to exist in the hypophosphites of lime, soda, and potash, which 
seemed best to fulfill the two requisites of oxydation, or combustion, and assimilation. The 
use of the Hypophosphites shows these preparations to have a two-fold specific action. On the 
one hand, they increase the principle, whatever that may be, which constitutes N^Rvous 
force; and on the other they are the most powhRFUL blood generating agents, far superior 
to any hitherto known. 

The Physiological effects of their use are shown by an increase of nertocs power, some- 
times even from the first day of their administration, together with an unusual feeling of 
comfort and strkngth. The appetite increases often in an extraordinary manner. The 
evacuations become regular and more abundant ; the perspirations, if any have existed, 
cease; sleep becomes calm and profound. 

" The effect of these salts," states Dr. C in his paper to the Academy, "upon the tubercular 
diathesis, is immediate, all the general symptoms disappearing with a rapidity which is 
really marvelltius. If the tuberculous deposit is of recent formation, if softening has only just 
set in, and does not proceed too rapidly, the tubercles are absorbed and disappear. When 
the deposit has existed for a certain time, when the softening has attained a certain degree, it 
sometimes continues in spite of the ti eatment ; and the issue of the disease then depends upon 
the anatomical condition of the local lesion, on its extent, and upon the existence or non-exist- 
ence of complications." 

The Hypophosphites have not only a curative effect, but will, if used whenever there exists 
a suspicion of pulmonary disease, preveiit its development, and thus act as a preservative 
with regard to Consumption, just as vaccination does with regard to small pox. 

The cure of Consumption, in the second and third stages (at a period when there can be no 
unce:tainty as to the nature of the disease), can be obtained, in all cases, by this treatment, 
except when the existing leison of the lungs is of itself sufficient to produce death. Contrary 
to the opinion generally received, the third stage of consumption is, all other circumstances 
being equal, more amenable to ti eatment than the second. Hereditary predisposition seems in 
no way to counteract the effect of the hypophosphites ; patients, in whom it was most strongly 
marked, recovering as rapidly as others. • 

The American Medical Monthly, edited by Dr. Parker, of New York, says : " Whatever 
may be our conclusions with refei ence to the claims of Dr. Churchill for the Hypophosphites as 
sovereign remedies in tuberculosis [Consumption] there can be no doubt as to the value 
of these salts as remedial agents." 

This Remedy is equally beneficial in all cases of nervous debility, scrofula, loss of vital 
energy, indigestion, female complaints, and chronic or constitutional diseases. 

the: 3Ei'5r:E»<z>i»3^os»DE=>mT:Es 

Are now offered to those suffering from consumption and kindred diseases, as prescribed by 
Dr. Churchill, and they may therefore be relied upon as chemically pure, and as the only 
reliable form of this invaluable remedy. 

|3^~ Beware of Spurious preparations claiming to be Dr. Churchill's. 

^g" Single bottles, Two Dollars, which will be sent by mail in a concentrated solutiojt, 
when so ordered. Three bottles for Five Dollars, which will be forwarded by Express iu all 
practicable cases. Full directions for use accomjiany each package. Druggists supplied. 

1^°° The Genuine Hypophosphites are sold at the sole General Depot in the United States, 
wholesale and retail, by 

J. WINCHESTER, 
American and Foreign Agency, 49 John street, Jfew York. 



76 ATWATEU'S FIRST PREMIUM FIFTEEN AND TWENTY-FIVE DOLLAR 

FAMILY SEWING MACHINE. 

This Macliine was awarded the First Premium Silver Medal and Diploma at the New York 
State Fair, held at Buffalo, October, lSu7, and at the Michigan State Fair, held at Detroit, Octo- 
ber, IS.iS, for Practical L'tility, Durability, Simplicity, Capacity and Beauty ; Singer's and 
Wheeler & Wilson's high-priced machines being in competition. 

This is the most wonderful, ingenious and yet simple machine ever produced. It has been 
pronounced by skillful and scientific mechanics to be the most durable, practical and complete 
machine ever invented. The examiner of Sewing Machines at the United States Patent Office 
remarked that it was the most marked improvement in Sewing Machines he had seen from the 
beginning. 

It is emphatically the best Machine for family use. It makes the moat reliable stitch, which 
no stretching or pressure will be likely to break. It runs without noise, is reliable in opera- 
tion, and is not iiable to get out of order. It will work as fast and do as good work as any of 
the high-priced machines, and any person with ordinary skill can use it. 

To avoid delay and risk in transit, we have made arrangements with all the principal Ex- 
press Cos. to act as our Agents in delivering Machines and collecting money, so that parties at 
a distance have only to send us their order by mail, specifying which style of Machine they 
wish to have delivered by the expressman, who will receive the price and give our receipt. 

Send for a circular. Address 

ATWATER SEWING MACHINE CO., 

P. S. — We warrant our Machines for one year. 403 Broadway, N. Y. 



WOMAN'S FRIEND!! 



TIME, MONEY AND LABOR SAYED 

BY USING THE 

GERMAN MAGICAL DETERSIVE SOAP." 

This article (formerly known as the " H. B. Ames' German Chemical Erasive Soap ") is made 
by a process not known to any other manufacturer in the United States, and possesses the fol- 
lowing advantages over all other washing soaps, viz. : It may be used equally well with hard 
or soft water. It requires not half the quantity as of other soaps to accomplish the same 
object. Clothes need but little rubbing and no boiling if thoroughly rinsed, thus avoiding the 
wear upon the washboard. It does not require one-half the time and labor to accomplish the 
same object that the best family soaps do, and it tends to set the colors, and does not injure 
the fabric. 

N.B. — As there are numerous vile imitations of the article palmed off on the public, be par- 
ticular to observe tJiat each bar is stamped " H. B. Ames' German Magical Detersive Soap, 
Newburgh, N. Y." 

Manufactured by JESSIE OAKLiEY. 

Sales Office No. SOI Fulton St., N. Y. 



APPIiETON, TRACY & CO.'S 

TINE QTJ ALLED AMEEICAN WATCHES, 

Manufactured at Wallham, Mass., have received the Gold Medal and the Highest Premium of the 
American Institute, amd similar awards wherever they have been exhibited. These Watches 
are constructed by a novel system of machinery, in a single establisnment, and have been 
proved, by repeated trials of unexampled severity, to possess all the requisites of perfect time- 
keepers, uniformly more reliable than any other watches In the market. The price of American 
movements, without cases, is about one-half the coat of reliable English movements. 
OUR NETir CHRONODROinETER. 

We have just perfected this unequalled time-keeper for rating the speed of horses to the fourth 
of a second. Our Watches are all const ructeii on the simplest form of the patent-lever escape- 
ment, all being operated by a very small amount of motive power, with a less number of parts 
than any other movement. Under every variety of motion, climate, and position, the accuracy 
of all our watches is the same, and, as a peculiar advantage, there is no danger of stopping 
under the most riolent exercise. The following gentlemen, among many others, attest the 
superiority of these Watches as timekeepers : Dr. J. Marion Sims, Hon. Horace Greeley, 
Hon. Jolin Appleton, Jr., Gen. George P. Morris, Carlos D. Stuart, Frank Leslie, Prof. 
Wm. M. Phelps, Hon. Nathaniel P. Banks, James W. Simonton. Esq., Dr. James 0. Noyes, 
Hon. A. Burlingame, N. P. Willis, E«q., James Cruikshank, Esq., Dr. Abel Stevens, Hon. 
S. S. Randall, Hon. Daniel F. Tieroann, Abram S. Hewitt, Esq., C. Edwards Lester, Esq. 
Peter Cooper, E-q , Wilson G. Hunt. E:*q , John H. Brower, E«q., Hon. H. H. Van Dyck. 

Cadtion.— No Watch is genuine unless accompanied by a Certificate. 

RORBINS & APPIiETON, Genl. Agts., 15 Maiden Lame, N. Y. 



DOUGLAS & SHERWOOD'S SKIRTS- 

We respectfully call the attention of the Trade to our well-known and universally approved 
Skirts. It is now five years since we introduced our first styles to the public, and during 
that time we have produced nearly one hundred varieties— all of which have been well received, 
and many of them have become so well known that they are as familiar to the ladies as 
" Household W-ords." 

Some of our most popular styles have been copied by the leading manufacturers of London, 
Paris, Vienna, and other large cities of the Old World, who have thus unwillingly testified to 
their superiority, besides countless imitators in the United States. Many thousand skirts of 
Inferior quality (and often infringements of our various patents) have been sold for ours, which 
never emanated from our establishment. AVe would here state that all the skirts made by us 
are stamped with our name, and, if patented, with the date of the patent. 

The most of our goods are made under IJ. S. patents, and we caution all against infringe- 
ments of them. The following are some of our most approved patents : 

THE ADJUSTABLE BUSTLE, Patented April 21st, 1857. 

This is the only Bustle that can be adjusted to suit the pleasure of the wearer — it is so well 
known that a description is unnecessary. 

METAL SLIDE, Patented Dec, 1858. 
This is the slide we use on our celebrated exfansion skirt. This skirt is also made under 
PATENT dated Nov. 9, 1S5S, for the Pkinxiple or Expansio.n. 

DETACHABLE HOOP FASTENING, Patented Nov. 12, 1858. 

This last-named patent is the " ne-plus-ultra " of improvement upon Hooped Skirts ; it en- 
ables the wearer of muslin skirts in which it is used to take out the springs, and have the skirt 
washed ai pleasure ; the lack of this maybe said to have been the " night-mare " of skirt- 
wearers, who may now rest in their slumbers. 

The most popular skirt made with this fastening is the MATINEE SKIRT. "We have otLer 
valuable patents which we use, also some pending; one of them, the Tocrnare Corset will be 
introduced during the month of January. It has been pronounced by all who have seen it — 
amongwhom were several eminent members of the medical faculty — to be the only corset with- 
out (in objection, either artistic or physiological. 

Jobbers can be supplied by the agents named below, upon the same terms and at the same 
prices as at our ofijce in New York. DOUGLAS &, SHERWOOD, 51, 53 & 55 Whitest. 

Agencies. — Billings, Roop Washington, Philadelphia ; Wm. H. Ryan, Baltimore; B. Went- 
worth, New Orleans; J. A. Le Cain, Cincinnati; , Boston. 



G. A. LILLIENDAHL, 



Manufacturer of all descriptions of 





^% joblK street, 

mmw YQMKo 



Mr. L. deems it necessary to mention, that, although the 
youngest Pyrotechnist in the United States, so rapid has been 
the demand for his particular style of goods, that he can 
now, with pleasure, state the fact of having the largest man- 
ufactory of fireworks in the world, his buildings occupying 
over 22 acres of ground. 

Orders addressed either to himself or to his agents, Messrs. 
FUNSTON & SCOFIELD, 62 John street, will be punctually 
attended to. 




Ts WEBSTER'S QUARTO DICTIONARY. 

" A man who would know everything, or anything, as he ought to know, must own 'Webster's 
large Dictionary. It Is a great light, and he that will not avail himself of it must walk in dark- 
ness. Every young housekeeper should lay it in, to occupy the place which was formerly fiiled 
with decanters and wine glasses. 

" Eyery farmer should give his sons two or three square rods of ground, well prepared, with 
the avails of which they may buy it. Every mechanic should put a receiving box in some co!i» 
spicuous place in the house, to catch the stray pennies for the like purpose. 

" It is a great labor-saver— it has saved us time enough in one year's use to pay for itself : and 
that must be deemed good property, which will clear itself once a year." — Max's. Life Boat. 

'• All young persons should have a standard Dictionary at their elbows. And while you are 
BiboM it, get the best ; that Dictionary is Noah Webster's. The great rtork unabiddged. If 
you are too poor, save the amount from oflf your back, to put it into your head."— PAren-oZoj/t- 
j: cal Journal. 

Published by G. & C. MERRIAM, Springfield, Mass.— Sold by all Booksellers. 




ANDREWS' 

Patent Centrifugal Pump. 



This is the most simple pump made, and is warranted to 
discharge more water with the same power than any 
other. 

There are no valves or rubbing parts except the shaft 
to wear. Will discharge mud, sand, gravel, corn, paper 
pulp, tan bark, etc., and are adapted to Mines, Mills, 
Factories, Railroad Stations, draining lands, and for fire 
engines. Capacity from 60 gals, to 30,000 gals, per minute. 
For particulars, send for circular to the patentee and manufacturer. 

WM. D. ANDREWS, Iron dealer, 414 Water street, ^^ew York. 



KIVICKERBOCKER MAGAZINE, 

Vol. 53. TermJi, %ZM per year; tico copies $5.00 .• three copies $6 00 ; single copies 25cts. 

The Knickerbocker and X. Y. Weekly Tribune, ^3; Knickerbocker and Chdstian Advocate 
and Journal, |3 25 ; Knickerbocker and" N. Y. Independent, or N. Y. Evangelist, |3.50; Knick- 
erbocker and N. Y. Observer, and Home Journal, $4; Knickerbocker and Gleason's Line-of- 
Battle Ship, or Ballou's Pictorial, $4.00. 

These unprecedented terms are offe; ed only to new subscribers of each of the above standard 
publications. Send nine cents in stamps for January number of Knickerbocker. Address 

JOHN' A. GR.\Y, PuhHsher oj'lhe Knickerboclcer, 16 and 18 Jacob St., Jf. Y. 



THOMPSON BROTHERS, Bankers and Brokers, No. 2, Wall street, N. Y. 

Offer for sale at all times a variety of State Stocks and other first-class securities, in amounts 
to suit. Collections promptly made on all points of the United States and Canadas. Cocktrt 
Bankers' and Merchants' accounts received on the most favorable terms. Orders for the pur- 
chase and sale of Stocks at the Board of Brokers promptly executed on commission only. 
Cncurrent Money discounted at all times at our quotations, and better in most cases. We have 
a d stinct specie office, and deal largely in coin and bullion, at extremely favorable rates. 
Land Warrants bought at the highest market prices, and orders filled at all times for any 
amount, with our full and unlimited guaranty. Subscriptions received for Thompson''s Sank 
Note Reporter, edited by John Thompson, and quotations corrected by Thompson Brothers, 
giving at all times the standard quotations for currency, etc. The oldest, widest circulated, and 
most complete Bank Note Reporter in existence. 




G. & H. BARMORE, 348 Bleecker street, JST. Y., 

Manufacturers of the celebrated gold medal first premium PIANO 
FORTE:^. which stand unrivalled for beauty of appearance, depth of 

tone and delicacy of touch ; constantly on hand a large and varied 

^^='\F ^S assortment, made in the best manner and fully warranted, at greatly 
reduced prices, from 11.60 upwards. 



JA^riES PYI.E, 

MANUFACTURER AND WHOLESALE DEALER, 

313 IVashington street, JS'ew York. 
Cream Tartar and Super Carbonate of Soda, put up in any style required by the Trade, and 
warranted pure ; Sal. Soda, Chemical Soaps, Yeast Powders, Fancy Soaps, GLENFI^LD Starch, 
Dixon's Stovk Polish, Thompson's Soap, etc., always on hand and sold at manufacturer's 
rates. 



THE GBEAT FaMltY PAPER! 



PKOSPECTUS FOR THE YEAE 1859. 



The proprietor of the NEW YORK LEDGER Is gratified at haviBg It in his poorer to 
announce in liis Prospectus for the new year — 1859 — that all the old popular and eminent 
writers of the Ledger staff have been retained, and new ones added. Among the latter we are 
pleased to mention the name of the Hon. Edward Everett, who is to furnish a series of articles, 
to be continued during the entire year, under the title of 

"THE IMOXJISrT "VKRIVO^nT F^PERS." 

For these articles alone we have already paid Mr. Everett (for the benefit of the Ladies' Mount 
Vernon Afsocintion) the sum of ten thocsakd dollars. 

As an indication of the popularity of the Ledger, we need only state the simple fact that itt, 
circulation is larger than that of any other tes literary papers in the country. Its great suc- 
cess is owing to the facts that its proprietor secures the best writers in the country, and spares 
no expense in getting up the Best Family Paper— a paper of high moral tone. The exalted 
reputation of its contributors, the practical and invariably pure and healthy character of all its 
articles, the care which is taken that not even one offensive word shall appear in its columns, 
and the superiority of its tales and sketches, have gained for the New York Ledger a position 
that no literary paper has ever before reached. AVe feel, and always have felt, since the 
Ledger attained its immense circulation, that a heavy responsibility rests upon us, and have 
endeavored to discharge that responsibility conscientiously, feeling confident that ultimately 
we should receive the thanks of thousands and tens of thousands of families. 

As to the future, we are at a loss what to say. Vi'e prefer to perform rather than to promise. 
What we have heretofore done is known to our readers ; they know what the Ledger has been, 
and is now, and must therefrom judge what it will be hereafter. We can only say that among 
the regular contributors to the Ledger are 



GEORGE D. PRENTICE, 
JOHN G. SAXE, 
SYLVANUS COBB. JR. 
EMEKsON BENNETT, 
T. S. ARTHUR, 



WM. ROES WALLACE, 
CARLOS D. STUART, 
COL. W. B. DUNLAP, 
FANNY FERN, 
MRS. SIGOURNEY', 
MRS. SOUTHWORTH, 



1 ALICE CART, 

I EMMA ALICE BROWN, 

j SALLIE M. BRYAN, 

I MARY STANLEY GIBSON, 

I AUGUSTA MOORE, 



j.ad many eminent Lawyers, Clergymen, Professors in colleges, and others, who write for the 
Ledger anonymously ; and that our complete arrangements are such that the current expenses of 
the Ledger are now and will constantly be at? the rate of over three hwidred thmusand doUara 
per annum. 

Facts like these carry with them more weight than any comments that could be made, and 

I comments will therefore be dispensed with As we have already intimated, we shall leave 

promining to those who prefer to expend their force in that way, and content ourselves with 

doing what we can to make the Ledger the most interesting and instructive Family Paper in 

the world. 

The New Y'ork Ledger is published every Saturday, and sold at all the news-ofiices in every 

city and town throughout the country, and is mailed to subscribers at two dollars per annum ; 

' two copies are sent for three dollars. Any person obtaining eight subscribers at $1 50 each 

(Which is our lowest Club rate), and sending us J12, will be entitled to one copy free. Terms 

invariably in advance. 

J^" The postage on the Ledger to any part of the United States, paid quarterly or yearly 
in advance at the oflBce where it is received, is only twenty-six cents a year. Canada sub- r 
scribers must each send us twenty-six cents in addition to the subscription price of the Ledger, ' 
to pay the American postage. 

J3^ Subscribers must write their addresses, including the names of the place, county and 
Statf in which they reside, in a plain hand, so as to avoid mistakes. 
i f^" No subscriptions are wanted from cities, large villages or other places where news offices 
are permanently established. 

^^ All communications must be addressed, postage paid, to 

ROBERT BONNER, 

Proprietor of the New York Ledger, JVo. 44 Ann St., N. Y. 

N.B.— The number of the Ledger dated January 1st. 1S59, will be a good one for subscrip- i 
tions to date from, as in that number the " Mount Vernon Papers," by the Hon. Edward 
Everett, will be commenced. Mr. Everett's articles will be copyrighted, so as to prevent 
publication in any other paper. 



80 






rm 


\ 


SINGER'S 






"^fe 


ii 


,SEWE 


MO A/iACHINES. 




wi 




fff 


These Machines, always known to be superior to every other, 
have been greatly improyed, while the 


M 


H 




m)P 


"Prices 


\va\e \)eeYi l^eAwced 









Twenty-five Dollars on each machine. For the use of private families, we have lately intro- 
duced 

Singer's New Family Machine, 

which in speed, beauty, and efficiency is unsurpassed — at the extreme low price of FIFTY 
DOLLARS. Also an entirely new and superb machine of larger size, price SEVENTY-FIVE 
DOLLARS. 

i^- Send for a copy of SINGER & CO.'S GAZETTE, which contains all desirable infor- 
mation, and will be supplied gratis. _^^ 

I. M. SINGER, & CO., 

458 Broadway, New York. 



THADDEUS DAVIDS & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WRITING INKS, LIMPID FLUID, 

SEALING WAX, 

WAFERS, MUCILAGE, ETC., ETC., 

137 and 129 WII.I.IAM STREET, 

WASHINGTON STORES, 

[Between John and Fulton Streets.] 

NEW YORK. 



THADDEUS DAVIDS, MANUFACTORY 

BENJ. POMEROY. Established 1825. 



Our Stkel Pen Black Ink was tested by the Mechanics' Institute in 1886, with two other 
well known Inks, to show their comparative qualities for permanence. The result shows our 
Ink to be legible, while the others are much faded. 

Dr. Chilton's test, made In 1836, engraved fac-simlles of which can be seen at our office, 
proves conclusively that 

Our Black Ink is better adapted for STATE AND COUNTY RECORDS, 

and for all purposes where it is important that ths writing shonld be legible 

fifty years hence, than any other Ink now before the public. 










GROVER &, BAKER'S 

F A M I L Y 

SEWING MACHINEt 

Price from $50 to $100, 

IS BEYOND ALL QCESTIOX THE BEST 
IX THE MARKET. 

The first place in public estimation is justly accorded 
to the Grover & Baker Machine, for family sewing, 
— — — =i_— for the following reasons : 

1st It i« more simple and ei'-ilj kej t in order than any other Machine. 
2d. It makes a ^i^aQi nhn.h >i ill Dui Tij^ Or ravel, though every third stitch be cut. 
8d. It sews from two ordinary spools, and thus all trouble of winding thread is avoided, wliile 
the Machine can be adapted, by a mere change of spools, to all varieties of work. 

4th. 'Ihe machine runs silk, linen thread, and common spool cotton, with equal facility 
5th. Thes?amls as elastic as the most elastic fabric, so that it is free from all liability to 
break in washing, ironing, or otherwise. 
6th. The stitch is more beautiful than any other made, either by hand or machine. 

OFFICES OF EXHIBITION AND SALE : 

495 Broadway. N. Y. 18 Summer St., Boston. 730 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. 

137 Baltimore St., Baltimore. 58 West Fourth St., Cincinnati. 

Agencies in all the pi-incipal Cities and Tovms in the United States. 

SEND FOR A. CIIiCTJL.A.R. 




WHOLESOME BREAD. 



JAMES PYLE'S 

DIETETIC 
SALERATUS. 

JAMES PYLE'S 

DIETETIC 
SALERATUS. 



THE nEST IS TIME CtlE.lPEST. 

This SALEBATU!' should be ffnuid in the culinary depart- 
ment of every hou?e in this land. Its unquestionable purity and 
excellence in producing good bkfad, must bring it into general 
use. The wide-spread reputation it has already gained is the 
result of real merit, and shows the ability of the American peo- 
ple to discriminate in favor of a wholesome article. 

There are thousands of sufferers from dyspepsia, decayed 
teeth, and other derangements of the system, brought on by the 
use of common catixlic Salei utit!< It is a sad spectacle, too, 
to look upon the " puny-faced child " of the present day, without 
constitution, and with its teeth all eaten out, and think of the 
cause being impurities in food. 

How much longer, good mothers, is this state 'of things to 
last? Ask for 

JAMES PYLES DIETETIC SALERATUS, 
which is FREE FROM EVERY IMPCRITY, and as harmless to the 
stomach as flour itself 

If you want nice Biscuit, Cake, etc., you can find nothing 
equal' to it. Tell your Grocer you want no other. No doubt he 
will tell you it is no better than any otlier. in order to get rid of 
his old stock, or something on which he can realize larger profit ; 

but persevere until you-get it, and JUDGE FOE, YOURSELF. 

BKAVARE OF COrNTERFElTS. 
The readiness of unscrupulous rivals to imitate our labels, signifies much in our favor. The 
genuine is done up in pounds, halves and quarters, with the name of "James Pyle " on each. 

DEPOT, 313 "WASHINGTON ST., N.Y. Sold by Grocers generally. 



JAMES PYLE'S 

DIETETIC 
SALERATUS. 



THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE, 
1 e s e-s o. 



I — _ — 

tl! 

f!' THE NEW YORK TRIBUNE, now more than seventeen years old^which was the first 

i Journal in tlie wo Id that appeared regula ly on an impoiial eight-page sh^t at so low a price 
S as two cents, and which has attained the unparalleled aggregate of more than 200,000 subscrip- 
|i tions, respectfully solicits its sharfe of the patronage which the Metropolitan Press is henceforth 
i: to receive. 

m AVithin the p esent year, TUE TRIBUNE has provided itself with a new and faster Press, at 
a cost of -fGO.OOO, merely that some of our subscribe- s may receive the'r papers a mail earlier 
than they otherwise might do. With correspondents at the most important points throughout 
the civil zed world, and a staff of writers chosen f.om among the best in the country, we believe 
that even those who d slike the politics of our sheet concede to it frankness in avowing its con- 
victions and ability in maintaining them. We appeal, then, to those wlio believe that an 
increased circulation of THE TRIBUNE would conduce to the political, intellectual, and moral 
well-being of the Republic, to aid us in effecting such increase. 

I THE D.MLY TRIBUNE is primed on a large imperial sheet, and pul)l;shed every morning 
and evening (Sunday excepted), and mailed to subscribers for si.\ dollars per annum; three 
; dollars for six mouths. 

' THE SEMI-AVEEKLY TRIBUNE rs publshed every Tdesdat and Frid.w, and contains all 
ithe Editorials of the Daily, with the Cattle, Horse, and General Markets reliably reported ex- 
Ipressly for THE TRIHUNE ; Foreign and Domestic Correspondence, and during the present 
', Session of Congress it will contain a summary of Congressional doings, with the more important 

speeches. We shall, as heretofore, make THE SEMI-WEEKLY TRIBUNE a Mterary, as well 
'• as a Political and News paper, and we are determined that it shall remain in the front ranks of 

family papers. 
.' ' ^ ^ TERMS: 

One Copy, one year, $3 00 

j Two Copies, one year, 5 00 

i Five Copies, one year, 1125 

j Ten Copies, io one address, 20 00 

THE SEMI-WEEKLY TRIBUNE is sent to Clergymen at f2 per annum. 

THE NEW Y'ORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE, a large eight page paper for the country, is pub- 
lished every Saturday, and contains Editorials on the important topics of the times, the news 
of the week, interesting correspondence fioin all parts of the world, the New York Cattle, 
i Horse, and Produce JIarkets, interesting and reliable Political, Mechanical, and Agricultural 
articles, etc., etc. 

We shall, during the next year, as hitherto, constantly labor to improve the quality of the 
instructive entertainment afforded by THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE, which, we intend, shall con- 
tinue to be the best Kaui'.ly Weekly Newspaper published in the World. 

TERMS: 

One Copy, one year, , S 2 00 

Three copies, one year,.. '. .' 5 00 

Five Copies, one yearj'!;. 8 00 

Ten Copies, one year, 12 00 

Twenty Copies, to one addres», at the rate of $1 00 per annum, 20 00 

Twenty Copies, to address of each ttubscriber, and any larger number, at 

the rate of $1 20 each, .':.'. 2^ 00 

Any person sending us a Club of Twenty or more will be entitled to an extra copy. We 
continue to send THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE to clergymen for $1 00. 

Subscriptions may commence at any time. Terms always cash in advance. Whftn a draft 
can be procured it is much safer than to remit bank bills. All letter to be afldressed to 

HORACE GREELEY & CO., 

Ti-ibtme BuUdings, Kaisaxi iitrefi, New YovJc.