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♦ •V 



v v r* 



*•>'. 






^Sf-v j 










LIBRARY 

OF THE 

University of California. 



Class 




k 



LIBRARY OF TRIBUNE EXTRAS. 



V^ XVIII. January. 1906. 



No. f 



TRIBUNE 
ALMANAC 

T otitic at "Register 






1906. 



25 CENTS A COPY. 



BBB 



SaSSBBBBSBSSX 



BURNS BROS., 

26 Oortlandt Street, 



DEALERS IN 



COAL. 



Small Order* Solicited. 



Prices Low, 



WEI8HT, QUALITY AND PREPARATION BOARANTf ED. 

Tel. call 8507 Cortlandt. 



The 20 th Century Saw. 



OVER 40.000 IN USE. 




Our Chlstl -Tooth Saw Is 
adapted to all kinds and condi- 
tions of sawing, and does equally 
well in soft or hard woods, 
winter or summer, large or small 
mills. 

It increases the output of the 
mill, requires less power and 
makes better lumber at less cost 
than any othsr saw. 



BEWARE OP IMITATIONS. 



Ths Only Successful Inserted -Tooth 
Saw. 



The genuine is made only by 

R. HOE & CO., 

904 to 520 Grand Street, 

NEW YORK, U. S. A. 



THE 



Tribune. Almanac] 



and 



POLITICAL REGISTER 



! 



1906 



•i.vs,,.:.. ■ t 

' i- / 



HEW-YORKl 

THE TRIBUNE ASSOCIATION 

ipo6 



tin? 



COPYRIGHT rgoo 
BY THE TRIBUNE ASSOCIATION 



SOB CONTENTS AND INDEX BEE E ND OF VOLUME. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 

Prepared by Berlin H. Wright, Penn Tan, N. Y. f and Lake Helen, Pla. 

TIDE TABLES. (From U. 8. Coast 8urvey.) 
To find the time of high water for any place given In the table below, apply the 
correction opposite the place to the Umee of high water for Its respective port given 
for every day on the twelve calendar pages of this Almanac. Add the correction to 
time of high water when It la plus, and subtract it when it is minus. Example: To 
find time of high water at Rockland, Me., on January 8, 1906; 

Time of high water at Boston, January 8...» +■ 9 33 a. m. 

Correction for Rockland, Me. (see below) 26 

Time of high water at Rockland. Me., January ft. . . .". 007a.m. 



Corrections to 

times of high water 

at New-York for: 



Corrections to 

times of high water 

at Boston for: 



Cor- 
rec- 
tion. 



Cor- 
rec- 
tion. 



Corrections to 
times of high water 
at Charleston for: 



Cor- 
rec- 
tion. 



Eastport, Me » 

Weet Quoddy EPd, Me 
Machlasport, Me. ..». 
Indian Harbor, Me.. 
ML Desert Nar., Me. 
8.W. H. ML D. L.Me 
Bass H.. MLD. L.Me 
Rockland, Me....... 

Oceanville, D. L. Me. 

Bangor, Me.... 

Boothbay, Me 

Bath, Me • 

Gardiner. Me 

Augusta, Me ~. 

Portland. Me 

Portsmouth N. R... 
Isles of Shoal L..N.H 
Newbury port, Mass.. 
Gloucester. Mass.... 

Salem, Mass. 

Nahant, Mass 

Boston Light, Mass.. 

Plymouth, Mass 

Wellfleet, a C, Mass 
Provincetown, Mass. 
8iasconseL Nant'k I 
Nantucket H., Mai 
Edgartown, Mass.. 
No Mans L'd I.,Mass 
Vlney'd HaVn. Mass 
Falmouth. 



J 01 
IS 



Tarpaulin Cove, Mass 
Cuttyhunk L., Mass.. 
Woods Hole, Mass... 
Bird Island I*, Mass. 
New-Bedford, Masa~ 

Newport, B. I 

Bristol. R. L. *....— . 

PawtuxeL R. I 

Providence. R. L.... 



H.M. 
-4)35 
—0 40 
—0 40 
—0 65 
— 
—0 44 
—0 45 
—0 20 
—0 36 
■f 1 12 

~43 
31 

2 
.37 
-0 34 
—0 15 
^-0 20 
—0 15 
— 
—Oil 
—018 
—0 18 
— 9 
-Oil 
— 1 

"" 1 

55 
44 
—4 6 
4011 
—1 8 
—8 41 
—4 1 
—2 55 
—8 48 
—8 40 
—3 48 
—8 84 
-*21 
—3 28 



Block Island, R. L.. 
Stonlngton, Conn.... 
New-London, Conn.. 

Norwich, Conn 

Middletown, Conn... 
Hartford, Coan. ..... 

Duck Island, Conn.. 
New-Haven, Coniu.. 

Stamford, Conn 

City I., L. I. S.. N.Y. 
College P..E.R.. N.T. 
Flushing, H. R., N.T. 
Pot Cove, AsL, N. T. 
B'ckwell's I. L..N.Y. 
B. 41st-sL. N. Y. a 
E. 27th-eL. N. Y. a 
Brooklyn N. Y . N.Y 
B'klyn Bridge. N. Y. 
E. llOth-st., N. Y. a 
High Bridge, N.Y.C.. 
Kingsbrtdge, N.Y.C 
Wlllets Point, N. Y. 
Qlen C, L.I.S.. tf. Y. 
Oyster B..L.LS..N.Y 
NthpL H.,L.I.3..N.Y 
Tram. B., L.LS..N.Y 
Sag Har., L.I.S..N.Y 
Montauk PL L.. N.Y. 

Bellport. N. Y 

Fire Ist'd InleL N.Y. 
Rockaway InleLN.Y. 
Coney Island, N. Y. 
Tottenvllle, S. I..N.Y 
Fort Tom., S.L. N.Y 
Osainlng, H.R.. N.Y.| 
Albany. rl. R.. N. Y. 
Ells' port. N. B.. N. J 
Long Branch, N. J.. 
Atlantic City. N. J. . 
Cape May City. N. J. 



H.M. 
— 1 2 

49 

+1 6 

147 

5 1 

4 58 

-•2 28 

5 

4 

--8 7 
-.3 21 
40 
2 

--150 
--187 
+123 
40 
•0 20 
6 
21 
+0 66 
--8 7 
--8 6 
+8 6 
8 5 
2 11 

— 1 
+2 30 
—0 56 
—0 35 
—0 42 
—0 21 
—0 28 
+1 49 
+0 33 
+010 
—0 87 
—0 28 
—0 16 



Dover, Del 

Sea Breeze, N. J.... 
New-Castle, DeL.... 
Wilmington, Del.... 
Gray's F., 8. R.. Pa 
Pbila., Wash-ave*... 

Trenton, N. J — 

Rehoboth, DeL.. M .. 

Ocean City. Md 

Cape Chas. L.. Va... 
Old Point Com., Va. 
Newport News, Va*. 
Petersburg, Va...... 

Richmond, Va. 

Yorktown, Va 

PL L.. P. Em Md.... 
Alexandria, P. R.,Va 
l«v,«h. N Y, D. C. 
Crisfleld, C. R. Md.l 
Cambridge, C. b. t Ma 

Oxford, Md 

Annapolis, Md 

Bait.. Fells PL, Md. 

Elkton, Md. 

PL Dep., S. R.. M<L. 
Virginia Beach, Va.. 
Hatteras Inlet. N.C. 
Cape Lookout. N. C. 

Beaufort, N. C 

Carolina Beach, N.C 
Wilmington, N. C... 
B'ner man's B.. N. C. 
White Hall, N. a... 
Georgetown, S. C... 
Bluflf PL W. B.. S.C. 
Port RoyaL S. C... 

Beaufort. S. C 

Savannah, Qa 

Warsaw Sound, Qa.. 
SL Andrew S., Ga... 



JKWISH CALENDAR. Yr. 0666-7. 

The year 5666 is the fourth of the 286th cycle of 19 yean. 



6666 1906. 

Fast of Tebet Sunday, Jan. 

Rosh-Chodesh Saturday. Jan. 27 

Rosh-Chodesh. .Sunday, Monday, Feb. 25-26 

Fast of Esther Saturday. March 10* 

Purlm Sunday, Monday. March 11-12 

Rosh-Chodesh Tuesday. March 27 



Fast of Av .Tuesday, 

Rosh-Chodesh Tues.. WedL, An 



Rosh-Chodesh*... Wed^ Thurs.. April 25-26 

Lag-B'Omer Sunday, May 18 

83d day of Omer. 

Rosh-Chodesh Friday, May 25 

First Day of Pentecost. .Wednesday, May 80 

Rosh-Chodesh SaL, Sun., June 23-24 

Fast of Tammus Tuesday, July 10 



5666—1906. 

. July 81 

,. _jig. 21-22 

—1906. 
First Day of New Year. .Thursday. Sept 20 

Fast of GedaUah .Saturday, Sept *2f 

Yom-Klppoor. „ . . . Saturday, Sept. 29 



First Day of Passover... Tuesday, April 10 First Day of Tabernacles Thurs, Oct. 4 



Hoshhannah-Rabbah... Wednesday, OcL 10 

Sh'mlnl-Atseres. Thursday, OcL 11 

Simchas-Torah Friday. OcL 12 

Rosh-Chodesh Fri., Bat., OcL 19-20 

Rosh-Chodesh ..... ^ .... . .Sunday, Nov. 18 

First Day of Ofcarnikah Wed.. Dec 12 

.. Rosh-Chodesh Won. Tue*, Dec 17-18 

...Monday, July 23iFast of Tebet TOuirsdAv* Deo. 27 

Rosh-Chodesh, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 1907. 
•Observed on the previous Thursday. tObserved September 28. 



a 



TIM13 CAL.C1JLATJ.ON& 



T1MK CALCULATIONS ANI> EXPLANATIONS OF 8IGN8 AJW ABBilEVIA- 

TiONS. 

All tho calculations except the Moon's Phnseg, Tide* and s«ason« are. 1n mear. 
local time. (See tobi.> for its conversion into Standard Time.) Tho Sun's rising and 
vetting ia for tho upper limb and corroded for refraction. The signs used are as 
toilow.s: o* conjunction or noar approach, at which timp a lino from the Ni>rth 
Star through one will also pass through tho other; ft, opposition or 18(T from th«» Sun* 
at which timo tho Superior Planets arc the brightest; Q quadrature or 00" from tb« 
Sun; Q, Sun; @, Earth; $, Mercury; ?, Venus; *\ Mars; 1/, Jupiter; Ii, Maturn; 
,?,, Uranus; ^, Momi lowest; <», Moon hJ^hcbt; p, Mcon generally: X), Ascending 
Noile; y, Descending Node. 

Per.- Perhelion, or nearest to Sun; opposed to Planets. 

Aph. — Aphelion, or furthest from Sun; anplied to Piamt.?. 

Per.- -Perigee, or noart st to Earth; applied to tho Moon. 

Ho. — Southing, or Meridian Passage. 

STANDARD TIWR TABLE. 

To obtain standard time, add or subtract the figures given to local time. 





..Land aid 


Ccr 


ec- 


City. 


of 


Hon. 




Division. 


Mm 


utea 


A bany, N. Y 


Eastern: 


5 


Au. tin, Texas 


Central 


4 


31 


Ualtimopr, Md 


Eastern 


4 


G 


Paten Kongo-, La 


Central 


4 


4 


Pn-unarek, N. Dak . . 


Central 


4 


43 


Host. in, Mriss 


Ea : torn 




in 


ItutTalo, N. Y 


Eastrrn 


1- 


id 


Piling I on, Iowa .... 


Central 


4 


n 


Cairo. Ill 


Central 




a 


c/har'.pslon, a C. . . . 


Eastern 


-\- 


20 


Chicago, III 


Central 




10 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


C< ntral 





22 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Central 


— 


XI 


Columbia, {?. C 


Eastern 


4 


24 


Columbus. Ohio 


Central 


-_ 


2S 


Day ten, Ohio 


Central 


, — 


'2'.i 




| Mountain 
Central 


4 



14 


Pes Moines, Iowa . . . 


Detroit, Mich 


Central 




2S 


Dubuque. Iowa 


Central 


4 


a 


Duiuth, Minn 


Central 


+ 


n 


Kne, Pa 


Central 




30 


lOvansville, Jnd. ... '. 


Central 





10 


i'*t. C.ihson, Cher. N. . 


Central 


X 


ui 


I-'ort Smith, Ark 


Central 


4 


10 


Eort Wayne, Ind 


Central 




20 


Catena, Iii 


t Central 


4 


2 


Oalveston, Texar> . . . . 


Central 


4 


19 


Crand Haven, Mich.. 


Contra] 




If) 


Harri.sburg, Pa 


Ka* torn- 


4- 


7 


Houston. Texas 


Centra I 


4 


21 


Huntsvillo, Ala 


Central 




12 


Indianapolis. Jnd. . . . 


Central 





111 


.Jackson, Miss 


Central 


+ 


1 


.Jacksonville, Ffa. . .. 


Central 




33 


Janosville, Wis 


Central 


«_ 


4 


1 e.i'« rs«m City, Mo. . . 


Central 


4 


9 


Kansas City, Mo. . , . 


Ct ntral 


4 


10 


Keokuk. Iowa 


Central 


+ 


(i 


K noxvillo, Tenn 


Central- 




24 


l.a Crosse, Wis 


Central 


t 


fi 


Lawrence, Kan 


Central 


21 


Lexington, Ky 


Central 




23 



I 


Ktandard 


Correc- 


City. 


of 


tion. 


^ 


Divbdooi 


Minutes> 


♦LifUe Rook. Ark.. . 


Central 


-t « 


Louisville, Ky 


Ontral 


— 18 


1 vuehburg. Va 


• Eawtorn 


• + 17 


JY1c mortis. Tenn 


Central 





M « 1 waukeo, Wis 


Central 


- 8. 


Mobile. Ala 


< Jo ntral 


~ 8 


Mortl^imcry, Ala 


Central 


— if> 


>N'...-hviilc, Tenn. . . . 


Central 


— 13 


New Haven, Conn 


Eastern 


— 8 


New Or loan •< La.. ,. 


Contra! 


ff 


N-.v York, N. Y 


10a stern 


— 4 


Norfolk, Va 


JCastem 


r If 


Ogdensburg, N. Y 


Eastern 


r 2 


Omaha. Nt Ji 




H- 24 
- It 


ieiisacuia, Fla 


< Jentral 


chiiadoJubia. Pa 


Eastern 


i- 1 


Pittsburg, Pa 


Eastern 


I- 20 


Portland. Mo 


Ka«tern 


— 10 


Providence, R. I 


' ICastern 


— 14 


yitinoy, nr 


Central 


-r- « 
+ i. r > 


Hal»-iifli, N. C 


Eaatem 


H is hmond, Ya 


Eastern 


+ to 


Rochester, X. Y 


Eastern 


+ lr 


KorK Island, III 


Central 


-»- a 


f-'nn I'Vancineo, (>al... 


Pacific 


+ 10 


-anta l'*o, N. M 


! Mountain 


■4- 4 


Savannah, (JJa. 


Central 


— 3ti 


-hro.vepovt, T-a 


Central' 


■ -f- 15 


Mprh!Kfi«ld. HI 


Central 


i 


t. Joseph. Mo 


Central 


J- 19 


t^t. Louis. Mo 


Central 


" 4- > 


St. Paul, Mine 


Central 


-*- 12 


^cpcrior City, Wis... 


Central - 


+ 8 


Svraouse, N. Y 


Kastern 


-h 5 


Toledo, Ohio 


Central 


— 26 


noiUon, N. J 


Eastern 


— 1 


Utioa, N. Y 


Eastei-n 


-f 1 


Washington. D. C 


Eastern 


4- $ 


Whi-ellnR. \V. Va 


Eastern 


t 2 l 


Wilmington, IDel 


Eastern 


Wilmington, H. C 


1 ICastern 


4- 13 


Yank Urn, S. Dak 


r Central 


v -»- 29 



TIMK 8TANDAR118. 

The following la the table of times, based upon tb« meridian- ueed* lxy tlie United 
States and CanaJn: 



Nemo of Time. 

Intercolonial 
Eastern 
Central 
Mountain 
Pac.ilc . 
K-itka ... 
Tahiti 
Hawaiian 




Central Meridian. 
Fr om (i r« :e.n w ich . 

4 hours west. 

5 hours we?t. 

6 hours west. 

7 hours west. 

8 houra west. 

9 hours west. 
10 hours west. 
10 h. 31 m. we**t. 



Nearest PTace. 



About 316° east of Halifax,. N> S. 

Petween Now York and Philadelphia. 

«t. I^uiH and New Orleans. 

Denver, Cof. 

l'.-j* east of Sacramento, Cal. 

'/i a ea3t of «itka, Alaska-. 

&* west of the island of Tahiti 

Near centre of Molokal 



S 



EXPLANATION OF THE CALENDAR PAGES. 



It Is obvious that to express the time of rising and setting of the Sun and Moon 
tn standard time would limit the usefulness of such data to the single paint or ola< e 
for which It was computed, "while In the meantime it la practically correct for places 
as widely separated as the wim^ o t' «■ " •< < " j ,c alre.Miy exolaim'd, and persons 
itor which it was computed, while In the mean time it is practically 'correct for places 
making uae of the table on page 4. 

EXPLANATION OF THE CALENDAR PAGES. 

Time. 

All the calculations In The Tribune Almanac arc based upon mean or clock time 
ninless otherwise stated. The Sun's rising and setting are for the upper limb, corrected 
*or parallax and refraction. In the case of the Moon no correction Is needed, as in 
-the Sun, for "parallax and refraction"; with her they are of an opposite nature and 
$ust balance each .other. The figures given, therefore, are for the Moon's centre on 
a true horizon, such as the ocean or a large plain affords. 

The calculations in each of the geographical divisions of each calendar page will 
apply with sufficient accuracy to all places In the contiguous North American zones 
indicated by the headings of the divisions. This statement is based on the fact that 
tn the same latitude, or In the same line running due east and west, the Sun and 
Moon rise and set at almost the same moment of loeal or mean time, the ** iff •••*»*-- -e 




1..J.:- 









25*»|i 




,—-- i -M ^ ' '-^ 

J- . 



3--- ■■■ ■-■ r^'-itfisf Li, ! -■ ^.i (r- ; -^ ,.. 



I^Cmtfr&Y 



MP^ff 












BBttna 







Map of the Standard Time Belts. 
to extremes being so slight as to be of no in\poriance for ordinary purposes, except 
In the case of the Moon's rising, southing and setting, when Gin. for Pacific Coas* 
points and 3m. for Mississippi River Valley region, including Chicago, etc. must be 
added, or 2m. for each hour of longitude. 

The heavy dotted lints show tue arbitrary divisions of time tn the United States. 
The plus and minus marks on either side of the meridian '.ires show whether it if 
necessary to add to or subtract from the standard time of points east or west of 
these lines to arrive at actual, or mean local, time. See table on page 4. 

STANDARD TIMK. 

For the convenience of the railroads and business in general a standard of time 
was established by mutual agreement in 1883. and it is by this method of calculation 
that trains are now, run and local time is regulated. In accordance with this system 
the United States, extending from 05° to 12f>° west longitude, is divided into four 
time sections, as shown on the map. Inside of each of these sections standard time 
is Uniterm, and the time of each section differs from that next to it by exactly 
one hour. 

Ff the standard time correction for any place not enumerated In the table he 
desired proceed as follows: Locate the place, as any one can approximately on this 
map. and then subdivide the hour space in which the place is until the distance in 
time (60m. «= one space) from that meridian within whose bounds the place is located 
is apparent. Th<»n add or subtract the result to mean lime as the slim at the top of 
the map indicates. Example: What will be the. standard time of sun rise July 1 at 
Penn Yann. N. Y.? The map dors not give the lines of latitude and longitude, bul 
most people can locate their own place in Its respective State on tho map with suffi- 
cient correctness. Hv this means I locate Penn Yann at about oue eighth of the d"s- 
tance between the 75th and 90th meridians and within the Eastern time zone. This 
win give 8m. to b e adde d, or 4:34 



C A S'J HO NUM1CAL 

CHINESE (AlyKNDAR. 

The year 1006 corresponds nearly to th^ yar 4(i03 of the Chinese era, and is the 
43d year of the 76th cycle of 60 years. 

1906 J906 

First month begins January 25 I So enth month begins August 20 

Second month begins February 23 j Eighth month begins September 18 

Thirtf month begins: March 25 ! Ninth month b< gins " October 18 

Fourth month begins April 2-1 [ Tenth month begins November 16 

Fourth month begins May 23 j Ele\ enth month begins December 16 

Fifth month begins June 22 | 1007 

Sixth month begins July 21 i Twelfth month begins January 14 



THE HVS'S COITRfeE THROUGH THE ZODIAC AM) THE SEASONS. 
"Washington mean time. 



Sun 

filters 

►Sign. Con. 

O J- Do.vnibtr 

l/> January 

S£ Fehruarv 

X Mai eh 

T April, 

ci May 

O June 

T.o July 

fl August 

Tig St Member 

> Oi'tdj^r 

TIP November 

S Dv -ember 



D. H. M. 

22 « AH a.m. 

20 fi 27 p.m. 
ID 7 5:4 a.m. 

21 (? f.« a.m. 

20 7 23 p.m. 

21 7 8 p.m. 

22 2 5C a.m. 

23 2 16 a.m. 
2M 9 45 p.m. 

23 5 fi!) p.m. 

24 2 30 a.m. 
22 It 3K p.m. 
22 37 p.m. 



J"). H. M. 
Winfri begins, and la.'*« . c 9 8 S. of M;uator. 

Kprini, begins, ami lusJs 92 19 D9 N. of Equator. 

Kummer L'-gins, an«l lasts 1*3 15 4 N. of Eouator. 

Aul'imi* begin*, and la->f«- ^9 18 38 S. of Equator. 



begins. 
Tropical 



.365 5 49 



7 

Time north of the Equator, 186.5. lib. 3m. 
Time south of the Equator, 17*d. ISh. 4(m. 

7d. 16h. 17m. longer north of the Equator than south of it. 
This is duo to the slower motion of thr- Earth (Sun's apparent motion) while in that 
portion of its orbit most distant from the Sun (.aphelion). Hence in the summer 
months we arc further from th" Sun thai: in the winter time. 



MORNINd 



THE PLANETS. 

STARS— WEST OF SUN. ' H- Just 



IW.-rc 



onjun- tion, 1 



INFERIOR PLANETS. 
Mercury (§), until February 20, April 4 
to June 4, August 12 to September 24 and 
after NoA'ember 30. 

• Venus (9), until February 14 and after 
November 29. 

The planet Venus will present the vari 
ous phages, as shown on page 7, as fol 
lows: 

A — Fifteen after superior 
or March 1. 

B — At greatest elongation west, 1VJ-. 
8, 1907. 

C — When brightest as a morning star, 
Jan. 4, 1907. 

D — Just after inferior conjunction, 01 
Feb. 15. 

B— Fifteen days before superior con- 
junction, Jan. 30. 

F — At greatest elongation east, Sept. 
20. 

G — When brightest as an evening star, 
Oct 20. 



superior conjunction, 



Nov. 20. 

SUPERIOR PLANETS. 
Mars (J), after July 15. 
Jupiter C~l), from June 10 to October 3. 
Saturn Vi), from February 24 to June 6. 
Uranus (*,), until March 29. 
Neptune iU/>, from July 2 to October 6. 
EVENING STARS— EAST OF SUN. 

INFERIOR PLANETS. 
Mercury, from February 20 to April 4, 
I .Kino 4 to August 12 and September 24 to 
j Nov-rr.ber 30. 

I \vnus, from February 14 to Novem- 
ber 29. 

SUPERIOR PLANETS. 

Mars, until July 15. 

Jupiter, until June 10 and after Octo- 
ber 3. 

Saturn, until February 24 and after 
June 0. 

Uranus, after March 29. 

Neptune, until July 2 and after O-'t. 6. 



ASTRONOMICAL. 



THE PLANETS (Continued). 
Mercury wltl be brightest — 
<1) As en evening star, east, of the Sun 



(© 



. . , setting- shortly after the Sun. March 5 

to .15. He will be at greatest eastern elongation March 18. 



As a morning star, west of the sun, rising shortly before sunrise September; 
1 to 10 and December 10 to 20. His times of greatest western elongation 
nearest these dates are: August 29 and December 18. 
This planet is not at nis brightest, or, at least, best seen, when at hie ?longa- 




Toward 
the Sun. 

N 
Phases of „ 



tions. as some almanacs state. 

Venus will be brightest as an evening 
star October 25, being at her greatest 
eastern elongation September 20. when 
her angular distance from the Sun will be 
48° 29'. 

An opera glass or small telescope will 
bring oat her phases, as shown in the an- 
nexed cut. Her difference in apparent size 
or diameter Is due to her varying distance 
from the Earth, according as she is between 
us and the Sun or in the opposite portion of 
her orbit. Bee the table following this divi- 
sion fo»* her motion in her orbit; also that As seen in the As seen in the 
of the other principal planets. Morning. Evening. 

Mars will not be nt nis Lwiehtest this year, but next year will be brighter than 
<it any time since 1V92. and will then be an object of unusual interest. Jupiter 
will be brightest December 2S. rising at sunset. Saturn will be brightest Sep- 
tember 4, rising at sunset. Uranus will be brightest June 28, rising at sunset. 
Neptune will be brightest in 1907. 



drnases or ^ vs\ 
ooDJ 



MERIDIAN PASSAGE, RISING AND SETTING OF THE PLANETS. 

tAll P. M. figures are in black type.) 



January 

January 

January 

February. .. . 
February. . . . 
February. , . . 

March 

March 

March 

April... 

April 

April **>< 

May 

May 

May 

Jane. ....... 

Jane. ....... 

June ........ 

July 

July 

July 

August....*. 

August 

August 

September . .. 
September. . . 
September. . . 

October 

October. .... 

October 

November. . . 
November. . . 
November. . . 
December. 



uocemuer.,.! x ll «>•> r- 
December. ... 1 1)10 39) 5 



December. 
December. . .. 



JH M 



1 
11 
21 

1 
11 
21 

1 
11 
21 

1 
11 
21 

1 
11 
21 

1 
11 
21 

1! 

. 11 

21 

1 
11 
21 

1 
11 
21 

1 
Hi 
21 

I 
11 
21 

1 



11 IS 
11 33 

11 48 
13 2 

12 12 
12 33 
12 29 
12 35 
12 41 
12 48 
12 55 

1 4 
114 
126 
139 
155 

2 8 

3 20 
2 29\ 
2 36 
2 41 
2 44 
2 46 
2 46 
2 48 
2 45 
2 44 
2 42 
2 37 
2 27 
2 5 
1 31 

12 40 
11 38 






8g 



r-Itises.- 
H M]H M 
6 IT. | 6 45! 
6 30j 7 
6 42| 7 9 
, — Sets. — J 
5 34> 5 15i 
5 55| 5 41; 



6 13 
6 28 



6 



6 5i 
6 24j 



6 451 C4Q 

7 5 

7 22 
43 



8 22 
8 39 



7 lffj 

7 371 

8 » 
8 3{ 8 18! 



8 52 

9 11 



8 56J 9 28 



9 37 



9 

9 9) 9 38 
9 14j 9,'Wi 
9 II 9 29 
9 H, 9 18 
8 561 9 1 
8 481 Xlli 
8 351 8 29 
8 24, 8 11 
7 52 
7 58! 7 35 



7 47i 
7 35 
7 19 
6 54 
6 22 
5 85 



21( 9 
Sl| 9 26) 



4 85 
4 15] 



7 18; 

7 I 
6 43 

6 17! 
5 44 

5 48, 
4 ! 
4 24' 



| MARS. 


3 


to 
o 


2 


2. 


?3 


?3. 


3 


: 




• 


, — Se 


8.--^ 


H M 


H M 


>H M 


3 42 


9 lti 


9 3 
9 8 


3 31 


9 12 


3 19 


9 7 


9 2 


3 7 


9 2 


• °, 


2 55 


9 


9 2' 


2 43 


8 55 


9 


2 33 


8 49 


8 57 


221 


8 44 


8 56 


2 9 


8 46 


8 55 


15G 


8 30 


8 49 


145 


8 28 


8 46 


134 


8 20 


8 43 


124 


8 15 


8 41 


•118 


8 7 


8 34 


1 3 


8 


8 29 


IS 52 


7 52 


8 22 


12 42 


7 42 


8 12 


12 32 


7 32 


8 2 


1221 


7 20 


751 


12 tO 


7 6 


7 36 


11 59 


Invi 


*ible. 


11 45 






U 32 


r-Rif 


»es.— x 


U 19 


4 36 


4 14 


U 3 


4 27 


4 10 


10 48 


4 18 


4 2 


10 33 


4 7 


3 55 


i») 17 


3 58 


3 4V> 


10 1 


3 47 


3 40 


9 45 


3 36 


3 31 


9 27 


3 25 


3 22 


9 10 


3 15 


3 17 


8 r,4 


3 6 


3 11 


8 38 


2" 54 


3 2 


8 21 


2 42 


2 52 


8 5 


2 31 


2 44 


7 49 


2 20 


2 35 



J UP IT BR. 


SATURN. 




7> 




K* 


S3 


TO 




sS 


p ? 


fl> 

1 


p -z 


?,V 


3 


r 3 


* 2 


2 


r 3 


r 3 




^~Sets.~> 


1r— "Sets . — > 


H M 


H MlH M 


H M|H MlH M 


8 57 


3 47 


4 10 


3 261 


8 55! 8 40 


8 16 


5 6 


3 29 


2 50 


8 19( 8 4 

7 37] 7 33 
7 8| 6 52 


7 35 


2 15 


2 48 


2 15 


6 53 


1 43 


2 6 


1 36 


6 16 


1 6 


1 29 


1 1 


6 331 6 19 


5 40 


12 30 


If 53 


12 27 


6 1! 5 48 


5 12 


11 58 


12 25 


11 59 


/-Rises.-* 


4 38 


11 28 


11 51 


11 25 


5 48 


6 


4 5 


10 53 


11 18 


10 50 


5 13 


5 25 


3 29 


10 17 


10 42 


10 11 


4 32 


4 42 


2 58 


9 49 


10 15 


9 35 


3 5C 


4 « 


2 27 


9 18 


9 44 


9 


3 21 


3 31 


157 


8 48 


9 14 


ft 24 


£ 43 


2 52 


1 27 


8 20 


8 48 


7 47 


2 € 


2 15 


12 57 


750 


8 18 


711 


1 30 


1 39 


12 25 


7 18 


7 46 


6 29 


12' 48 


12 57 


n 56 


z— Rises. -v 


5 51 


12 10 


12 19 


11 26 


4 29 


4 


5 13 


11 36 


1145 


10 54 


3 57 


3 28 


4 34 


10 57 


11 6 


10 27 


3 30 


3 1 


3 54 


10 13 


1022 


9 57 


3 


2 31 


3 13 


9 32 


9 41 


9 24 


2 27 


1 57 


t 26 


8 47 


8 56 


8 53 


1 57 


1 26 


1 47 


8 6 


8 15 


8 22 


1 25 


12 56 


1 5 


7 26 


7 36 


7 47 


12 50 


12 24 


12 19 


6 40 


6 50 


7 14 


12 17 


1152 


11 32 


r- Bets.--% 


6 40 


11 47 


11 18 


10 50 


4 31 


4 19 


6 51 tl 12 


10 43 


10 8 


3 49 


3 37 


5 281 10 3«il0 7 


9 27 


3 8 


2 5G 


4 52 


9 59] 9 30 


8 46 


2 27 


2 15 


4 9 


9l6i 8 47 


8 2 


1 43 


1 31 


3 29 


8 361 8 7 


7 22 


1 3 


12 31 


2 47 


7 54j 7 25 


6 43112 24 


12 12 


2 4 


7 11 6 42 


6 4|11 11 


11 29 


I 20 


6 27f 5.5? 


5 26! 1 1 » 


10 51 


12 35 


5 421 6 13 


4 4J)!lO?9 


10 14 


[11 45 


4 48 


4 19' 


4 13 


| 9 52 


I 9 40 



ASTRONOMICAL. 



• Characteristics 



THE MEMBERS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM. 

of the Sun an. I its eight satellites, dimensions, density, 
periodicity, eta 



Name. 



Mcaja I 
distance 
from sun, 
millions I 
of miles. ' 



Slden»al 
period, 
days. 



•I 



36.0 87.900 
07.21 224.7H1I 
92. 8 f 805.250} 
141.5| 686. !»5 
483 31 43.i2.08 
8S0.0 1 10759.22 
1781. 9 1 30686. H2 
2731.6J6018l.il 




Sun 

Mercury . 
Venus ... 
FJarth .... 

Mars 

Jupiter . . 
Saturn . . . 
Uranus . . 
Neptu ne . 

Between Mars and Jupiter th. re are about 450 asteroids* or little planets, whose 
combined mass is estimated to be about one-tenth of that of the ESartb. 



CHRONOLOGICAL ERAS. 



EMBER DATS. 



The year 1906, which comprises the bit- uv^n^.,^,. i,...^,,.. ««>■ e»«* .-^„ <•* 
tar part o, .ho iKHh a.K, th? be K in„in K of * ?#£ ^ n.£f^ &&%«& T^TTo. 

Pentecost- -June 6, 8, 0. 
September 14 — September 19. 21, 



the l.'ilst year of the indepenupnoe of the 
United States of America, corresponds 
nearly to — 

The Mahometan year 1324, which begins 
on February 25. 

The Jewish year 56C7 of the Jewwsh lira, 
which beerins at Kunset September H>. 

The Chinese year 4603, which begins 
January 25. 

"" The year 7414-'15 of the Byzantine Kra, 
beginning September 1. 

The year 2218 of the Grecian Era. which 
began near the Vernal Mquinox U. «'. 312. 

The year 2666 of the Japanese Era. 



Dei ember 13- December 19, 21 and 22. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 

Dominical Jitter -,, 

Mpact 

Lunar Cycle (Golden Number) 

Solar ( •yelo 

Roman Indirtion 

Julian Period 

Jewish Lunar Cycle 



. G 

7 

. 11 

4 

6619 

4 



SITU ATION OF PRINC IPAL PLANETS FOR EACH SUNDAY OF YEAR. 



Planet. 



Jan. 



Feb. Mch. Apr. May. June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



Venus . . 
Mars. . . 
Jupiter. 
Saturn. . 
Uranus . 









V 
8 



n 
8 
8 



n 



u 
8 



m 
n 
n 



m 
n 



KB 

n 



- - * 



- t - 



* — 



The place indicated is that constellation in which the planet is situated on the 
first, second, third, fourth and lifth Sundays of each month in the order named. 



CHURCH DAYS AND MOVABLE 

— FEASTS. 

f-'ept uagesima Sunday Feb. 11 

Sexagesima Sunday Feb. 18 

Quinquagcsima Sunday Feb. 25 

Shrove Tuesday Feb. 27 

| Ash Wednesday, (Lent begins) .... Feb. 28 

Quadragesima Sunday March 4 

Mid-Lent Sunday March 25 

Passion Sunday ^ April 1 

Palm Sunday April 8 

Good Friday April 13 

Easter Sunday • •••• April 15 

Low Sunday April 22 

Rogation Sunday ........May 2o 

Ascension Thursday May 24 

Pentecost (Whit Sunday) June 3 

Trinity Sunday June 10 

Corpus Christi June 14 

Advent Sunday Dec. 2 



MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 

The year 1324 is the fourth of the 46th 
cycle of 30 years, and contains 354 days — 
a common lunar year. Lasts, 

Month. v Begins, days. 

.Dul KaedaC1905).Dec. 28 30 
.Dulhegge (1906).. Jan. 27 29 

.Muharrem Feb. 25 30 

.Saphar March 27 29 

.Rabia I. ...... .April 25 30 

. Rabia II. ..... . .May 25 29 

.Jomhadi I June 25 30 

.Jomhadi II July 25 26 

.Rajeb ......... .Aug. 23 30 

.Shaban Sept. 22 , 29 

9. . . Ramadan* Oct. 21 30 

Feast of Balram. 

1324...10. ..Schawall Nov 20 29 

1324... 11... Dul Kaeda .Dec. 19 30 

1324. . .12. . .Dulhegge (1907). .Jan t8 2» 
1325... 1... Muharrem OSODJTeb. 14 30 




♦Fasting. 



8 



, ASTRONOMICAL 



ECLIPSES. 

There will toe five eclipses this year, three of the Sun and two of the Moon, ai 
follows: 

I. Total of the Moon Feb. 8-0, visible generally on the evening of the 8th and 
morning of the 9th throughout the United States. The following is the standard tim« 
of the different phases: 

- Inter- 

colonial Eastern Central Mountain Pacific 
Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard 

Time. Time. Time. Time. Time. 

H.BA H.M. H.M. H.M. H.M, 



0:54 AM 11:54 PM' 10:54 PM 9:54 PM 8:54 Pfl 



1:57 " 


0:57 AM 11:57 " 10:57 " 0:57 ** 


2:27 " 


1:27 " 


0:27 AM 11:27 " 10:27 " 
0:58 " 11:58 ** 10:58 ** 


2:58 •• 


1:58 " 


8:47 " 


2:47 " 


1:47 " 0:47 AM 11:47 •• 


4:36 " 


3:30 " 


2:3ft " 1:36 " -0:30 Afl 


5: 6 " 


4:4 " 


3: " 2: 6 " 1: 6 " 


5:37 " 


4:37 " 


3:37 " 2:37 " 1:37 " 


6:40 '* 


5:40 " 


4:40 *« 3:40 " 2:40 '* 



Moon enters Penumbra or L»ight 

: Shadow (a) 

Moon enters Umbra or Dark Shadow . (b) 

Hirst 6 Digits Eclipsed (1) 

Total Eclipse begins (c) 

Middle or Greatest Eclipse (d) 

Total Eclipse ends i (e) 

LASt 6 Digits Eclipsed (2) 

Partial Eclipse ends (f) 

Moon leaves Penumbra " . ■ • <g) 

f.— N 

North During the time the Moot 

is immersed in the penumbrc 
or light shadow at b and : 
tho diminution of light wil 
be slight but noticeable. Th< 
real partial phase of thi 
<»clipse does not begin untt 
tho Moon, in her eastward 
course, indicated by the ar- 
row, touches the earth' t 
umbra or dark shadow at 1 
and lasts until wholly im- 
mersed at c Even whei 
entirely within the dart 
shadow her outline may b< 
distinctly followed, her dis< 
presenting a dull coppery 
hue. The shadow which th< 
earth casts into space is 
about 860,000 miles in lengtl 
and its diameter at the dis- 
tance where the Mbon wil 
pass through it is about 6,50< 
miles. The total distance 
through both shadows trav- 
ersed by the Moon in thii 
eclipse being about 10,000 miles in 5 hours 46 minutes. The size of this eclipse h 
19.57Migita, the Moon's diameter being taken as 12 digits. This is measured on £ 
line at right angles to the arrow from d, the middle point, and downward, or south 
in this case because the Moon passes below the centre of the shadow. The circles a' 
1 and 2 show how the Moon will appear when the first and last six digits are eclipsed 
The total phase will begin at c and end at e. Hold the cut so the north point will b< 
toward the North Star and look upward at the figure to have it natural. 

II. Partial of the Sun Feb. 23. invisible in America 

III. Partial of the Sun July 21, invisible in America. 

IV. Total of the Moon Aug. 4. The beginning only of this eclipee will be visibh 
in the United States and that in the central and western parts. 

Central Mountain Pacific 

Standard Standard Standard 

Time. Time. Time. 

H.M. H.M. H.M. 

Moon enters Penumbra or JJght Shadow 4:12 A.M. 3:12 A.M. 2:12 A.M 

Moon enters Umbra or Dark Shadow •«.,«•• 6:11 '* . 

Fist, six Digits Eclipsed 5:40 " 

Total Ecjipse begins V • 6:9 

V. Partial of the Sun Aug. 19. Visible as a very small eclipse near sunset in th. 
extreme northwestern portion of the United States, vis: West of a line from Lake o 
the Woods throjigh Grand Forks, N. D., and southwesterly along tho Cheyenne Rive 
through the Uinta and Wasatch Mountains to Payson, Utah, south of Salt Lake Cit; 
and north of a line from Payson northwesterly to the mouth of the Umpqua River 
Oregon. Throughout most of Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming the Bun will as 
more or less eclipsed. 




South 
Path of the Moon through the earth's shadow, Feb. 8-9. 



4:11 " 


3:11 


4:40 " 


8:40 


i: 9 •• 


4: 9 



10 



THE BRIGHKST STARS. 



THK BRIGHTEST STAKS. 

LATITUDE NEW-rORK CITS'. 



Name. 



Consign ft tioti or 
grouj>. 






Alpheratz .... 
Capli (Var.)... 

Algenib 

Alpha 

Schedir (Var.) 

Dlphda 

Gan ma 

Mirach 

Caph 

Ache mar 

Sheratan 

Almaach 

Hamel 

Mira (Var.)... 

Menkar 

Algol (Var.)... 

Marfak 

Alcyone 

Aidebaran .... 

Cape.IIa 

Rigel 

El Nath 

Mtntaka 

Al Nilam 



Andromeda 

Cassiopeia 

Pegasus 

Phoenix 

Cassiopeia 

Ceuis (Whale) 

Cassiopeia 

Andromeda 

Ursa Major 

Ei idanus 

Aries (Rani) ( f p) 

Andromeda 

Aries (Kam) 

Cetua (Whale) 

Cetus (Whale) 

Perseus 

Perseus 

Taurus (Pleiades, or 7 stars) 

Taurus (Bull) (H) 

Auriga 

Orion 

Taurus 

Orion (Kll and Vard) 

Orion (Middle of Yard, or 

Belt.) 

Colomba 

Orion 

Orion (Var.) 

Auriga 

\rgus 

Gemini (Twins) (CI) 

Canis Major 

Canis Major 

Gemini (Twins) 

Canis Minor 

Gemini 

Cancer (Crab) (&) 

Hydra 

Leo fIJon) (<Q).... 

Argus 

Ursa Major 

Leo (Lion) »•...... 

Southern Cross 

Corvus (Crow) 

Virgo (Virgin) (m?) 

Centaurus 

Bootes 

Cent aurus 

Libra (Scales) (^=) 

Ursa Minor , 

Northern Crown 

Serpent Bearer 

eorpion (ot) « 

II ercules 

Jragon 

Lyre 

Sagittarius (?) 



Capricorn (>&) 

'ygnus (Swan) 

Cephus 

. \quarius (sr.) 

Pegasus 

The. Crane 

Pisces Australis... 

Pegasus 

Pisees (K) 



2.1 
2.4 

2.8 
3.0 
2.3 
2.2 



2.2 

2.2 

0.4 

2.8 

2.2 

2.1 

2-10 

2.0 

2-4 

1.9 

3.1 

1.0 

0.1 

0.3 

1.8 

2.3 

1.8 



Phfet 

Saiph 

Betelgeuse . . 

Menkalina 

Canopus 

Al Hena 

Sirius(DogSfr) 

Adara 

Castor 

Piocyon (Var.) 

Pollux 

B».ta 

Alphard 

Regulus 

Eta 

Public 

Denebola .. 

[ Acrux 

Beta 

Spies 

Ager.a 

Arcturus 

Bengula 

Alpha 

Koehnb 

Alphacea 

Unuk 

Anlares 

Rutilkus 

Etamin . 

Vega 

Delta 

Altair 

Alpha 

Deneb 

Alderamin .... 

Beta 

Rnif 

Sepha 

Po.nalhaut ... 

Markab 

Iota •_...--- 

Explanation. — To ascertain when any star or constellation will be on the upppr 
meridian, add the numbers opposite in the column "for meridian passage" to the 



2.3 
0.9 
2.0 
0.8 
2.0 
—1.4 
1.5 
1.0 
0.5 
1.2 
3.8 
2.1 
1.3 
l.G 
2.0 
2.2 
0.9 
2.8 
1.1 
0.7 
0.2 
0.2 
2.0 
22 
2.3 
2.7 
1.2 
2.K 
2.5 
0.2 
2.3 
0.9 
3.7 
1.4 
2.6 
2.9 
2.4 
1.0 
1.3 

2.r> 

4.3 







g »!? 




Right 




3»« 


ascension. 


Decltra- 


D *a 


3m*» 


•sidereal 


tlon. 


<-J£*t 


time. 






3=r£. 
: ?•* 


H. M. S. 


u , » 


H.M.'" 


H.M. 


3 25 


+ 28 33 3£ 


3 


7 52 


4 3 


+58 37 13 


4 




8 17 


+ 14 39 


8 


6 51 


21 24 


—43 18 43 


12 


•2 26 


35 3 


+56 39 


35 




38 46 


—18 30 48 


9 38 


4 53 


50 54 


+ 60 11 49 


50 




1 4 21 


+ 35 6 42 


1 4 


8 29 


1 24 If, 


+ 88 47 42 


1 24 




1 34 8 


— S7 43 26 


1 34 


• 


1 49 20 


+ 20 20 20 


1 49 


7 14 


1 58 


-4-41 52 10 


1 57 


9 21 


2 1 46 


+ 23 31 


2 1 


7 26 


2 13 28 


— 3 37 9 


2 13 


5 48 


2 57 16 


+ 3 42 48 


2 56 


6 IS 


3 1 55 


+ 40 35 10 


3 


9 10 


3 17 28 


+ 49 31 12 


3 18 




3 41 47 


+ 23 4S 31 


3 41 


7 29 


4 30 25 


+ 16 19 


4 29 


6 58 


B 9 36 


+ 45 54 3 


5 9 


10 14 


5 9 55 


— 8 18 44 


5 9 


5 31 


5 20 13 


+ 28 31 38 


5 19 


7 52 


G 27 6 


— 22 12 


5 26 


5 59 


5 31 21 


— 1 15 46 


5 30 


5 56 


5 36 10 


—34 7 30 


5 35 


•3 37 


5 43 12 


— 9 42 12 


5 42 


5 26 


5 49 58 


+ 7 23 22 


5 49 


6 26 


5 52 29 


+44 56 17 


5 51 


9 53 


6 21 49 


—32 38 35 


6 21 


• 


6 32 10 


+ 16 28 54 


6 31 


6 59 


6 40 55 


—16 35 3 


6 40 


5 1 


C 54 51 


—28 50 28 


6 54 


4 7 


7 28 29 


+32 5 f»9 


7 27 


8 11 


7 34 17 


+ 5 28 16 


7 33 


6 10 


7 39 27 


+ 28 15 ?0 


7 38 


7 50 


8 11 19 


+ 9 28 54 


8 10 


6 33 


22 52 


— 8 14 32 


9 21 


5 31 


10 3 16 


+ 12 26 12 


10 t 


6 44 


10 41 20 


—50 10 47 


10 39 


• 


10 57 49 


+ 62 16 10 


10 56 


- 


11 44 10 


+ 15 6 32 


11 42 


6 54 


12 21 15 


—62 34 1 


12 19 


• 


12 29 21 


—22 51 57 


12 27 


4 35 


13 20 8 


—10 29 37 


13 18 


6 23 


13 57 3 


—59 54 36 


13 54 


• 


14 11 17 


+ 19 40 55 


14 9 


7 12 


14 33 5 


—60 26 22 


14 30 


• 


14 45 34 


—15 38 35 


14 43 


4 


14 50 59 


+74 32 f>2 


14 48 




15 30 37 


+ 27 2 14 


15 28 


7 44 


15 39 32 


+ 6 43 39 


15 37 


6 23 


16 23 31 


—26 13 9 


16 20 


4 20 


16 26 6 


+ 21 41 54 


16 23 


7 20 


17 54 23 


+ 51 30 


17 51 




18 33 41 


+38 41 39 


18 30 


S 54 


18 49 19 


—26 24 59 


18 46 


4 19 


19 46 6 


+ 8 36 52 


19 43 


6 30 


20 12 44 


—12 50 34 


20 9 


6 55 


20 38 10 


+44 56 13 


20 35 


9 59 


21 16 17 


+ 62 10 43 


21 12 




21 26 30 


— 5 59 38 


21 23 


5 39 


21 39 28 


+ 9 26 5 


21 36 


6 32 


22 2 11 


—47 25 34 


21 58 


*1 21 


22 52 21 


—30 7 52 


22 48 


4 


23 


+ 14 41 19 


22 56 


6 52 


23 35 1 


^ 5 6 21 


23 31 


e 17 



ASTRONOMICAL. 






11 

figures in the table "Sidereal noon" following this note. Note whether the figures be 
"Morn" or "EJve." If "Morn" and the sum is more than 12 hours, the result will be 
evening- of the same day; if "Eve," und the sum is more than 12 hours, the result 
will be morning of the next day. Having found the time of meridian passage, for 
the rising subtract and for the setting add the numbers opposite the name of the star 
in the column headed "For rising and setting," observing the directions as to "Morn" 

and "Eve," as given above. Those stars marked in the last column are circum- 

polar and do not rise or set in the latitude of New- York City. Stars having an 
asterisk (*) in the test column are only to be peen in the far south and when near the 
meridian, as the vapors of the horizon will obneure them at rising or setting. 

To tell how high up from the nearest point of the horizon a star will be at its 
meridian passage, subtract tb*. declination of the star from S>0°, and if the result is 
less than the latitude of the place of the observer that star will neither rl?e nor set, 
but is cireumpolar, and the difference between that result and the latitude ehows the 
Star's altitude above the north point of the horizon or below the soumern horizon. 
Or, (&0° — dec.) — latitude — altitude or elevation of the star above the nearest pMnt 
of the horizon at meridian passage for stars of a rcouth declination. Examples: 

Sidereal noon, November 5 ■* 03 p. m. 

Fomalhaut in "meridian" column 22 4S 



7 51 p. m. 

4 in "Rising and setting" column. 



. in. of the Mb --Time >,t meridian parage. 
7 51 p. m. 
4 



3 51 p. m. --■= Time of ri«in& 11 51 p. m. -->* Tim.' <•!' setting. 

Declination of Fomalhaut -■--= 30° soutj..: therefore 90' — 30° -» 0u° — 40° — 20 J = 
altitude of Fomalhaut in latitude 40' nurt;i at the time of the meridian paK.«?-se of 
that sta*.' To mc.-i.suro ee)e.<-tial distances \."itr» the eye, 'keep in mind that o»ie-Uiird 
of the distance from th* zenith to the horizon is 30°. For smaller measurements use 
the "Pointers" in tho "fJig Dipper," which ar<* nearly 5° apait— a convenient eeltstial 
unit because alwavs in -ight. The '-Va:. it-tick" or "Ell ami Yard" in Orion, or the 
"Kings." is just 3 a J«;nq:, ov 1^° each way from the centra! star (see Star table). 
When tho declination of a star !s such as io brinsr it nearer to the zenith than to the 
horizon at meridian passage, use its zenith distance to locate it. The difference 
between latitude and declination --= zenith distance. If declination is greater than lati- 
tude, such difference is to bu count*- d northward (otherwise soithwardj from zenith. 

. SIDKREAI, NOON. 

To be used in connection with tljc foregoing 1 Star Tabic 
same. Fu 11-faced, bla ck n g u r es_ar ^_ P^J" ; a 11 o t hers a. m. 
Feb. 'Mar. , Apr. May 
— M " 



Sec note following 



"[ Jan. 
H.M 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

2* 

24 

|25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 



H.M.jH.M.IH. 
5 18| 3 16; 1 86111 



|.Iune.|July.| Aug. |Sc 
H.MJH.M.iH.M.iH.M.lH 



3 12| 

3 8j 

3 5| 

» 1; 



3 56 
3 52 
3 48 
3 44 
3 40 
3 36 
3 32 
3 28 
3 24 
3 20 



531 I 

•l»jl3 

<!5| 

41 

37 1 

33 1 

29! 

25j 

21| 

I7j 

13 1 

21 

2 21 

I 58! 

54 1 



22| 

181 

141 

10 1 

71 



3<11 
59)10 

55 1 

5i ; 

47| 
431 
39j 
35! 
31 
27 
23 
10 
15 
12 



11 5G 

18 
44 
40 
36 
32 
11 28 



26; 7 

119! 
15, 

HI 

31 7 
SM| 6 
55; 
51; 
47; 
4 3 ; 
3«i 

3F 
31i 

ij! 

201 
16 1 

12! 



52) 
•18' 

441 

40: 

36j 
32; 

281 



21 

17 

13 

9 

II 

67| 
53 

49| 
45| 

«l 
37) 

33 

29 
26 
22 
18 
14 
10 
G 
2 
58 
54 
50 
46 
12 
38 
34 
SO 



27 


3 25 


23 


21 


19 


17 


15 


13 


11 


9 


7 


5 


3 


3 1 


59 


2 57 


aa 


53 


51 


49 


47 


45 


43 


11 


39 


37 



3 4 j 

30| 
26| 
22j 
18j 
1*1 

io| 

6|12 

,2111 

5s;n 

54! 
50j 
461 
42| 



31 jll 
27 



pt . 1 Oct. 


Nov.; Dec. 


.M.JH.M. 


H.M.|H.M. 


23 


11 SI 


9 19| 7 21 


19 


17 


15| 17 


15 


13 


11 


13 


11 


9 


7 


9 


7 


5 


9 3 


5 


3 


11 1 


8 59 


7 1 


59 


1Q 57 


55 


6 57 


55 


53 


51 


54 


51 


49 


48 


50 


47 


46 


44 


46 


43 


42 


40 


42 


40 


38 


36 


38 


36 


34 


32 


34 


32 


30 


28 


30 


2b 


26 


21 


26 


24 


22 


20 


22 


20 


18 


16 


18 


16 


14 


12 


. 14 


12 


10 


8 


10 


8 


6 


4 


6 


4 


10 2 


8 Of 6 2 


56 


9 58 


7 56" 5 58 


52 


54 


53 1 55 


48 


59 


40 51 


44 


47 


45 47 


41 


43 


41 f 43 


37 


39 


37 


89 


33 


35 


' 33 


35 


29 


31 


29 


31 


25 


27 


7 25 


%7 




| 9 23 




5 *9 



ASTRONOMICAL. 







MOON'S PLAOJB I» 


' THE 

y. lJu 


ZODIAC 


AT 1 


P 


. M 












Jan. 1 Feb. 1 Men.! Apr. 


Ma 


ne. 


July.l Aug. 


Sept. 1 Oct. 


Nov. 


Rec 


'ay. 


C. Dk»C. 


DkIC. Di?|C 


D? 


C._ 


DfflC. 
13 TO 


3 


C. 


t>* 


r. 


Df 


r> 


1^1 C. Dg 


c\ 


i>? 


C D? 


1 


K 4 


••T 


i« <v 20 j n 


10 


li 


I 


r 


'/> 


27 


X 2 


<P 


18 


i* 20 




16 




an 


b 7 


22 




26 




17 




26 




2n 




10 


15 




30 


n 2 


J 


28 


rn 


12 


19 


f3 


B 


O 


10 


Z* 


2 


TQ 


11 


V> 


4 




23 


27 


H 


11 


14 


1 


<P 1< 




24 


a 2 




18 




24 




17 




20 




If 


X 


6 


<P 8 




2-3 


2« 


S 


22 


n 


6 


14 





1 


m 


8 


m 


2 


/ 


11 


*» 


2 




19 21 


U 


5 


23 8 


B 


8 4 




19 


27 




16 




23 




17 




25 




ir 


V 


1 


» 3 




17 


28 


J 


16 


23 


2 


•3 10 




30 


.<%. 


8 


T 


2 


v> 


10 




2 1 




13 


15 




29 


U 2 


* 


28 




10 


24 


TV 


15 




24| 


17 




24 


X 


it 




25 


27 


•3 


11 


15 


ft 


n it 




29 


-0 « 




::o 


ni 


Ollfr 


1 


■«£ 


7 




23 


H 


7 


n 9 




24 


28 


!) 


24 





13 


22 


^ 


15 




24 


15 




20 


<P 


r 




19 


21 


u 


e^m ir 




23 7 




27 


n* o 




30 


T 


9 




29 


X 


3 




17 


n 


1 


Z3 3 




20 


8K 


i 


20 


tn? 


11 


21 


m 


15 




23 


^» 


12 




IK 




29 




13 


10 


.rw 


& 


i* 11 


3 


a 8 




20 


^ 




29 


!/> 


7 




24 




27 


H 


11 




25 


29 




is 


20 


* 


17 


■j-u 


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21 


r 


13 




20 


* 


7 


V 


9 




2:' 


T3 


8 


kf » 


:£* 


8 


111 I! 


* 


m? i 




24 


m. 5 




27 


*3S 


8 




19 




21 


n 


f 




21 


2*1 




18 


26 


(i 


15 


n\ 


8 


19 


v> 


10 




ir> 


V 


1 


H 


3 




17 


cr 


4 


i* 10 


m 


3 


* ii 


7 


251 




22 


> 3 




23 




28 




13 




15 




8P 




18 


25 




18 


20 


1 


t~ 13 


7* 





17 


«• 


6 


¥ 


10 




25 




27 


•3 


11? 


IV 


2 


- 10, 


t 


3 


* A> 


D 


27 




20 


30 




18 




22 


K 


6»n 


9 




2* 




16 


26 




18 


25 





IT) 12 


i> 


3 


i£ 13 


* 


1 


np 


4 




18 




21 





» 


O: 





in, 9 


y> 


2 


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26 




17 


26 




13 




18 


n 





*5 


4 




22 




15 


24 




1H 


22 


2 


T 10 




no 


«l 9 




25 




28 




12 




17 


Rt 


f 




29 


f 8 




W> 


H * 


< 


24 


ss 


13 


21 


¥ 


7 


8 


9 




2ft 




29 




20 


m 


14 


23 


% 


13 


n 


4 


V> 8 




25 


H 4 




19 




21 


o-j 


7 


O 


131 A 


<j 




2H 


t0> 6 




25 


29 


5 


21 


* 


8 


16 


« 


1 


n 


3 




20 




20 




1* 


r 


12 


19 


X 


8 


<1f> 1! 


ft 


:s 4 




20 


28 




12 




in 


O 


3 


TIP 


10 


m 


3 




20 


- 3 




20 


23 


7 


17 


•cp 


2 


qp 10 




24 




28 




1« 




23 




17 


7> 


o 


16 cp 


2 


^ -R 


* 


29 




14 


22 


n 


« 


<r-j 


10 




29 


•Os 


7 


r 


1 




23 


28 




14 


17 


) 


X 12 






8 4 




18 




23 


TTV 


13 




22 




if 


22 


• 


K 11 




26 


29 





24 






16 


orj 


1 





6 




27 


tn 


6 




2i» 




•19 


23 


& 


8DH 


1 


<T> G 






28 








19 






21 


& 


I3i 






cp 5 






23 



SIGNS OF TILE ZODIAC* 

The Blgns of the Zodiac and parts of the human body supposed to be affected by 

he same: Pisces X. feet, Aries c p, head: Taurus ft. neck: Gemini n. arr~ 
nnocr £3, breast: I>,o X}, heart; VI rero itb. bowels; Libra £i. kidneys; Scorpio nt» 1^ 1] 
agittarlus $, thighs; Caplcornua l>. knees; Aquarius «l. legs. 



MERIDIAN PASSAGE OH SOUTHING OF THUS MOON. 

(Washington Mean Time.) 
For places west of Washington add two minutes for each tiottr of longitude. 

'ull -faced, black type indicates p. m. 



I. 
&. 
J. 
I. 

i. 
» . 
?. 
I. 
). 
). 
L. 

!! 
t. 
i. 

r! 
j. 
). 
>. 
i. 

i. 

i'. 

r. 
i. 

K 
). 

t. 



Jan. 


Peb. 


Mar. 1 Apr. 


May. {.Tune. 


July . 1 AttYlSepV.l Oct \ Nov.t Dec. 


H.M. 


H. 


M 


H.M.jH. 


M. 


H.M.JH. 


M. 


h.m.)h.m.)h. 


M. 


H.M-FH.M.fH.M. 


5 35 


6 20 


4 58! 6 


1 





25! 7 


39 


8 71 9 49111 


26j 


11 421 1 


12 3 


6 17 


7 


5 


5 431 6 


51 


7 


15 


8 


30 


9 % 


10 49 






112 35 


12 50 


6 59 


7 


51 


6 30] 7 


42 


8 


6 


9 24 


10 2 


11 48 


12 


15 


u wi l tn 


1 33 


7 42 


8 


40 


7 19} 8 


34 


8 


57 


10 


20 


11 S 




1 


2 


1 111 2 6 


2 26 


8 26 


9 


80 


8 10' 9 


20! 9 
19 10 


50 


11 


19 




12 43 


1 


48 


1 55 t 54 


3 15 


9 12 


10 


23 


.9 2110 


44 






12 5 


1 35 


2 


32 


2 39 3 42 


4 3 


10 


11 


16 


9 55 


11 


12 11 


46 


12 


21 


1 6 


2 25 


3 


16 


3 25 4 3& 


4 51 


10 59 






10 48 










1 


23 


2 3 


3 11 


4 





4 11 & 19 


5 38 


11 41 


12 


9 


11 41 


12 


6 


12 


89 


2 


24 


2 57 


3 56 


4 


45 


4 59! « fc 


6 25 




1 


2 




1 


2 


1 


40 


3 


23 


3 47 


4 39 


5 


81 


5 48 6 56 


7 13 


12 3S 


1 


54 


12 35 


1 


59 


2 


41 


4 


17 


4 34 


5 23 


6 


13 


6 37 7 45 


8 3 


1 2fi 


2 


46 


1 28 


2 


57 


3 


41 


5 


S 


5 18 


6 6 


7 


7 


7 27j 8 34 


8 55 


2 18 


3 


37 


2 21 


3 


56 


4 


39 


5 


55 


6 2 


6 51 


7 


56 


8 17 9 25 


9 50 


3 9 


4 


29 


3 16 


4 


55 


5 


34 


6 


39 


6 44 


7 38 


8 


47 


9 7 1ft 17 


10 4* 


4 e 


5 


22 


4 11 


5 


52 


6 


2'5 


7 


22 


7 28 


8 27 


9 


38 


9 57|11 12 


11 51 


4 5" 


6 


17 


5 8 





47 


7 


13 


8 


5 


8 12 


9 17 


10 


28 


10 48 12 10 


12 KK 


6 41 


7 


12 


6 5 


7 


39 


7 


58 


8 


47 


8 57 


10 6 


11 


19 


11 40 1 If 


1 58 


6 32 


8 


9 


7 1 


8 


28 


8 


41 


9 


31 


9 45 


10 57 


12 


10 


12 84 * 18 


2 58 


7 26 


9 


6 


7 57 


9 


14 


9 


24 


10 


15 


10 33 


11 48 


1 


1 


1 3d 3 15 


8 55 


8 2! 


10 


1 


8 50 


9 


59 


10 


6 


11 


2!ll 23 


12 38 


1 


53 


2 28 4 15 


4 47 


9 IP 


10 


55 


9 41 


10 


42 


10 


49111 


49 


12 14 


1 28 


2 


46 


3 28 5 11 


9 85 


10 17 


11 


4fi 


10 29 


11 


24 


11 


33(12 


39 


1 4 


2 18 


3 


41 


4 27 6 3 


6 21 


11 m 


12 


31 


11 lfi 


•2 


7 


12 


18| 1 


2« 


1 54 


3 « 


4 


3S 


5 2<*t 6 52 


7 5 


12 11 


1 


20H2 0!12 


50 


1 


5( 2 


18 


2 44 


3 59 


5 


35 


221 7 38 


7 48 


1 5 


1 


5H2 441 1 


851 1 


53 1 3 


8 


3 32 


4 51 


n 


33 


7 16 8 23 


8 31 


J 55 


•> 


481 1 271 2 


20 2 


421 3 


57 


4 21 


5 46 


7 


31 


8 6 9 6 


9 15 


r 2 13 


3 


3l! 2 10! 3 


7! 3 


311 4 


40 


5 11 


6 42 


8 


26 


8 541 9 49 


10 


3 28 


4 


14 


2 53 8 


55! 4 


211 5 


34 


6 2 


7 40 


9 


19 


9 89(10 S3 


10 47 


4 11 






8 88j 4 


451 5 


10! 6 


23 


6 55 


8 89 


10 


9 


10 23 11 17 


11 24 


4 54 






4 241 5 


35| 5 


591 7 


14 


7 5t 


9 36 


10 56 


11 7 




5 37 






5 12 









49 






8 49 


10 32 






11 51 


12 23 



I 



A8TRONOMICAI* 



13 



CHART SHOWING RSTLATIVK DUKATTON OP TWILIGHT. DAYLIGHT AND 
DARELNKSS FOR LAT. 42* + . 



mmm- 



« 



■ GO- -j , 

fife ■ P— 





KT>.1S! 






^tTTJ'f 



r iihH i • : 



--f 



ft JAW, 

21 



1 

II FEB, 
21 

I 

II tfCH. 
21 



i^ffl ■ -■ 



1 

11 APR, 






gilt! 






II AUG 



, 1? SEPT 
■21 



1 1|CC~ 

121 



rf^/- 



- —■- : 



S tl NOV, 

t 



h*h>w 



Note. — Twilitfhc ix oonsuior^d to Uo-=t un'.ii th^ Si, i i 
horizon,- and to boepn lvhen the Sen roach***? a .similar \» 
before sunrise. Whfn the line on which th?* 1S C is in. a-urcl is siru 
twilight will be tho shortest, ami vice vr-rsa. This an^e« t>^ short* 
occur in the winter months in northern lat i i udes. and hm^-Kt in win,m< 

By an examination of t-lw chart we find tho m:a. c u.ro of twilight 
4aylit;ht oi" the 24 hours to be: 

Jain. 1. Lonjrth of diy 8h. 54m. Juno 21. Tyngt'j *d <!av . 

Length of twilight In. 40m. !.cn-ih of twlnjri 

The remainder of the spac* v,ii] more than mafep th-: 1M 'voirrs w- 
refraction of H&M, which causes an increase in th«» «ipi>< : ir"nl length 
ateo <tf duration of the twtl-i.ehtH. This apparent » nor is ir.-ai.-st 
■••nths, «a the San th*n siiin^s through a deneer and o>cp*r atmo«ph*r 






i'U-s( tli 
?t twili: 



darkn 
. ...ISh 



•it . . . 2h 
•hi'-h is < 
of tho d 
in the 
ic onvrlti 



j ) t ho 

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mi the 
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. Mm. 
.'50! i). 
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>'j us 
/inter 



14 



PLANETS IN CONWNCTIOIC 



PLANETARY CONJUNCTIONS AND OTHER PHENOMENA FOR 100ft. 



Month 



Day. 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



Ap # r. 



May 



June 



1 
8 
4 
4 

6 

13 
16 
20 
22 
24 



3 

6 

8-9 

9 
14 
16 
18 
22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
23 
24 
26 

2 

2 
11 
18 
IS 
22 
25 
27 
28 
29 
29 
29 
30 

4 

5 
13 
19 
24 
24 
25 
25 
26 
26 

2 

2 

6 
11 
16 
18 
24 
24 
25 
30 

2 

6 

t 
13 
IS 
23 
24 
25 



Aspect and 
distance apart. 



Venus In t5 
3J In Perihelion 
5k.e.w.^O-23°0 
6? I 9 0*6' N 
d'41 1*4*25' N 
Rcir'ua oc by* 

SU W N. 

Btat-Wnary 
°69' S 
, _ '52' S 

f» f w>°3r S 

cf S^2°28' N 
f 1/ *^4°39' N 
A 3d an oc by! 
j III Aphelion. 
1 EolfpBed tot 
Bfs'ua oc byl 
. d 9 © Superior 

3 ' 



Washing- 
ton time. 



H.M. 
2 cv. 

11 
10 
12 



mo. 
ev. 
mo. 



3 32 mo. 
10 22 mo. 



4 

014 
332 
3 3 



ev. 
ev. 
ev. 
mo. 
ev. 



& * 5>55' 
¥ h 9 0° V 






. N. 
£ h G f>° 17' S 
g &<?^0*22' S. 
© iL'cdpsed. 
} F| 9 »j0°14' S 
6 o » ? 0° 2' S. 
3£©»2 Inv*ble 
d cf irffrM' N 
3 V 144°42' N 
Ald'n oc by J 
rf in n 

3 $ .»£3°46' N 
9QrEof©-l8 3l' 
d '.■ 9 hW N 
6 V f9S"14' N 
6 d l<fS°27' N 
d C ; 9 9 4* 46' N 
G Q lias tern 
5 If f 1M°?.2' N 
Q e,@ Western 
OAIaal/n 1 oc 
q S © Inferior 
rtltos'ln-s $ oc 
3 n. 1 5°34' S 

o^i k m r n 

V it, , ■ 

6 9 j ? 5»ir n 

6 cf i .-■ °34' N 
5 In Apl elion. 
"4 V. °16' N 



7 7 mo. 
1122 mo. 

113 ev. 

1 mo. 
Visible. 

5 59 ev. 

4 mo. 
12 ev. 

9 29 ev. 

ev. 

4 ev. 

1 mo. 
Invis.U.S. 

5 40 mo. 

7 21 mo. 

6 ev. 

8 50 mo. 
17 mo. 

9 36 ev. 
10 mo. 

4 28 mo. 
ev. 
ev. 
ev. 




?>; 9 ! ir n! 

i 11**1 ("41' N. 

if? 



3b, - -. 
°6' N. 



'58' N 
•57' N. 
51' N. 

riu» i oc 

d?¥9 '■ 24' N. 
ChOK-yj' W© 

3'il'< '56' N. 
3 3 cT y ■ °50' N 
Jwirf >52' N 
3 9 1 ¥ °29' N 
drf 4rf l»49' N 
ftftegtus * oc 




640 

49 _. 

10 28 mo. 
5 mo. 

1 mo. 

4 32 ev. 
7 ev. 
511 mo. 

11 ev. 
158 ev. 

11 6 mo. 

5 45 mo. 
5 ev. 

10 14 ev. 

1133 mo. 

ev. 

10 32 mo. 

11 45- mo. 
10 64 ev. 

12 ev. 
9 mo. 

10 ev. 

3 28 ev. 

7 mo. 

5 24 mo. 
11 23 mo. 

9 54 mo. 

6 46 mo. 
ev. 

mo. 
mo. 



9 

3 
11 

31 mo. 

11 ev. 

9 21 mo. 

4 34 ev. 

8 mo. 

1116 mo. 



Month 



July 



Auc 



Sept 



Oct 



Nov. 



Dec. 



Day. 



6 

9 

10 

15 

17 

18 

20 

22 

25 

27 

29 

6 

6 

9 

t 

13 

13 

15 

17 

17 

23 

26 

29 

30 

1 

8 

U 

13 

14 

18 

19 

20 

23 



Aspect and 
distance apart 



(£ in Aphelion. 
0h3h 0°58' N 
5GE1 26°88'E © 
6 c/ © d" Invis 
dAldVan 1 oc 
d^llf 3°a' N 
©Eclipsed. 
dReg r ius 1 



..919 1° 
IS 1 6 



oc 

S 
cU 1 I 3°28'S 
1 tot Eel. 
J*ll*l 0°49' N 
d § © Inferior 
d Aid' ran 1 oc 
9 in O 
d^l "4 Z°V N 

$ d $ 5°5' S. 
dc^lo" 0°54' N 
©Ec, part vis 
6 919 6°39' S 

6 5 15 3°28' S 
$ GrElW-18'12' 
6h*h 0°34' N 
9 in Perihelion 
d $ d $ 0°9' N. 
8h® & Bright 
c5Ald'ran % oc 
(5^1^ 2°3*' N 
d¥l¥ 1°37' N 

1 Stationary, 
do" 1 d 0°44'S 
9 in Aphelion. 

7 GrBl 46°29' E 
6 ¥ 1 9 8*46' S 
gj&® Superior 

^ Eastern 
ffifl 0°26' N 
fro© Western 
J-tlTI 2°12' N 
J G Hel Lat S 
def 1 d 2°16' S 
d" in Aphelion. 

5 in Aphelion. 
d 9 1 9 9°51' S 
3 I * 5 3°3' S 
? Brightest 
<Sh*h 0*32' N 
If Stationary. 
cU'1^4 1°B6' N 
5W 1 y 1°7' N 
? Stationary. 

B Gr. EL E 23° 
3d 1 j rf 3°30'S 
b Stationary. 

6 6 9 § 1°57' N 
r=S § * ? 8'ir 8 
d $ 1 $ 6°12' S 
d^!l^ 0*52' N 

5 in H 

d 9 © Inferior 
I S f5 2»34' N 
"'? © Eastern 

d^!4 1°68' N 

dtf 1 d 1 4°14' S 

6 tf 9 ^ 0°48' N 
3 9 19 2°40* S 
5 G E W 21«>35' 
V Stationary. 
6h*h 1°15' N 
$H(S Sc Bright. 
dW¥ 2*16' N 



6 



Washing- 
ton time. 



H.M. 
3 

9 
10 
3 

638 , 
823 



mo. 
mo. 
mo. 

ev. 
mo. 

ev. 



Invis.U.S. 

4 55 ev. 

2 ev. 

7 43 €▼. 
Via. U. S. 

4 24 ev. 



7 
217 
7 

334 
2 
1129 



mo. 

ev. 
mo. 

ev. 

ev. 

ev. 



in U. S. 

4 19 ' mo. 

132 

5 

10 6 
10 

9 

10 
10 22 

9 3 

623 

3 

439 

6 

6 

159 



10 

2 8 

2 
10 52 

3 

917 
11 
10 

230 

152 
12 

525 

8 

711 
1013 

4 

5 

133 

8 

1 

9 54 

58 
10 36 

7 
12 

4 



9 42 

5 7 

9 

121 



3 

746 
10 

851 



mo. 

ev. 

ev. 
mo, 

ev. 

ev. 

ev. 
mo. 

ev. 
mo. 

ev. 

ev. 

ev. 

ev. 
mo. 
mo. 
mo. 

ev. 

ev. 
mo. 
mo. 

ev. 
mo. 

ev. 

ev. 

ev. 
mo. 

ev. 
mo. 
mo. 

ev. 

ev. 
mo. 
mo. 
mo. 
mo. 

ev. 
mo. 

ev. 

ev. 

ev. 

ev. 
mo. 

ev. 
mo. 
mo. 

ev. 

ev. 

ev. 
mo. 
mo. 



SITUATION OP PLANETS— DfSTANClSS ON HORIZON. 



15 



Note. — The time for the phenomena given In the table on the preceding page la for 
the geocentric event, and as seen from the earth's surface the error may be a* much* 
as 21m., more or leas; but the given time is near enough for all purposes and places. 

Explanatory. — The sign 6 signifies conjunction, or when an. imaginary line from 
the north star through one of two planets or bodies in the same quarter of the 
heavens will also pass through the other one. 

Hi the ease of the moon and any other body, when the distance apart is M' 
or less there is apt to be an occnitation, as the moon's apparent semi-diameter 
is about 16'. . This will be the case on December 30, when the centre of the moon 
and of Mars are only 4' of arc apart. This occupation wilt be visible every - 
where between the latitudes 32° — and 34°-+:, where these bodies are above the 
horizon at 5b. 31m. p. m., Washington mean time. 

. The Inferior planet* are said to be at "greatest elongation" when they attain 
their greatest angular distance east or west of the sun. Planets are said to be 
"stationary" when they are in that portion of their orbit whence their motion is 
in the same direction as our line of vision, and hence they. can have no apparent 
motion to us. Bodies are at Perihelion when nearest the sun, and at Aphelion 
when furthest from him. The sign 8 signifies opposition, or 189° east or west from 
t in* sun. 

The sign Q signifies quadrature, or 90* east or west from the, son. 



THE HORIZON AT SEA LEVEL. 

Distances of objects visible at varying elevations from one foot to one thou- 
sand feet. 
The elevations given are in feet. 



Elevation. 


\ Miles, 1 1 Elevation. 


Miles. | Elevation. J 


Miles. 


1 


1.31 
2.96 
3.24 
3.49 
3.73 
4.18 
4.18 
6.92 


25 


6.61 
7.25 
7.H3 
8.37 
8.87 
9.35 
10.25 
11.07 


80 

90 

100 


11.83 
12.25 
13.23 
10.22 
18. < 2 
22.91 
20.58 
33.41 


5 


80 


6 , 


3ff 


7 


40 


150 m... 

200 


8. 


45 


».,,• 


50 


300 


10 


60 » 


500 


20 


70 


1.000 '. 















DISTANCE FROM THE EARTH IN LIGHT YEARS OF CER- 
TAIN FIXED STARS. 



Stars. 


2 «* 


Stars. 




Polaris (Pole Star) 


40 ) 
71 
15 
27 
28 
8.0 


Vega j 

61Cygni 

Beta Cassiopeia? 

Gamma Draconis 

S5Pegasl 


23 


Capella 


6 — 8 


Birius .••«........ 


17 




20 


Arcturus 

Alpha Centauri 


00 



DEGREES OF TEMPERATURE AT WHICH CERTAIN SUB- 
STANCES FREEZE, FUSE AND BOIL. 



6ubstancei3. 



Bromine freezes at. 
Olive oil freezes at. 
Quicksilver freezer at 
Water freezes at.... 
Bismuth fuses at... 
Copper fuses at...., 

Gold fuses at 

Iron fuses at.. 

Lead fuses at 

Potassium fuses at 



I! 


H 


'T 


? 


— 20 # 


— 7.6- 


10 


50 


-39.4 


—«J 





82 


264 


507 


1.204 


2,200 


1.380 


2,518 


1,538 


2,800 


825 


617 


62. B 


144.5 



Substances* 



Silver fus * at. . . 
Sodium fu es at... 
sulphur f % :ses at. 

Tin fuses at , 

Zinc fuses at...., 
Alcohol boils at. 
Bromine boils at, 
Ether boils at.... 
Iodine boils at.. 
Water boils at.. 



1.OO0* 

05.6 
115 
228 
412 

74.4 

63 

85.5 
175 
100 



1,832° 
204 
239 
442 
773 
167 
145 
96 
347 
212 



1st Month, 



JANUARY, 1906. 



31 Days. 



' Moon's Phases. | D. 


later-Col. 


Eastern. 


Central. 






H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


£ First Quarter 


2 


10 52 


9 52 


8 52 


©Full Moon... 


10 


37 


1137 


10 37 


<F Last Quarter 


17 


4 48 


348 


248 


% New Mooni . . 


24 


1 9 


9 


11 9 



Mountain. 



H.M. 
7 52 
9 37 
148 

10 9 



Pacific 



H.M. 
6 52 

8 37 
048 

9 9 



The full-faoed or black type figures are P. M., all others A. M. 



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6 6 

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16 



2d Month. 



FEBRUARY, 1906- 



28 Days. 



Moon' a Phases. 



P. 



I 

$ First Quarter) 1 
J Full Moon... J 9 
£Last Quarter. | 16 
• New Moon... | 23 



Inter-Col. 



H.M. 

8 31 

3 45 

22 16th 

3 57 



H.M. 
7 31 
2 45 

1122 

' 2 57 



Central. 



H.M. 

*6 31 

145 

10 22 

157 



Mountain. 



H.M. 
5 31 
45 
922 

57 



Pacific. 



H.M. 

4 31 

11 46 Sth 

822 
♦1157 



Hawaiian. 



H.M. 

2 

9 14 8th 

5 51 

♦9 26 



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MARCH, 1906. 



31 Days. 



Moon's Phases. 



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Moon's Phages. | D. 



AFFIX,. 1906. 



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JUNE, 1906. 



30 Days. 



Moott's Phases. $ D. 


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7th. Month. 



JULY, 1906. 



31 Days. 



Moon's Phases. 


D. 


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Central. 


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, Pacific. 


Hawaiian 






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2i 


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28 


356 


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8th Month. 



AUGUST, 19067 



31 Days. 



. Moon's Phases. 



©Pull Moon...] 4 

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• New Moon...j 19 

J 1 First Quarter 26 



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9th Month. 



SEPTEMBER, 1906. 



30 Days. 



Moon's Phaaee. ^ D. 



Inter-Col. 

~"h.mT"~ 

7 36 
4 53 

8 33 
2 11 

TTne full-faced or black type 

<M iC I- < 



©Full Moon... I 2 
£ Last Quarter.) 10 

?New Moon... J 18 
First Quarter! 25 




C'eTUial. 
~~~H.M.'~ 

5 36 
2 53 

6 33 
11 



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< "h."m7~" 

4 36 
'1 53 

5 33 
♦11 11 



re R M., all others 



Pacific. 

H.Mr 

3 36 
• 53 

4 33 

* 10 H 

A. M, : 



! Hawaiian. 

' ii.m~ 

! 1 5 
10 22 
! 2 2. 
I *7 40 
'24Th. ~ 



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10th Month. 



OCTOBER, 1906. 



Moon's Phases. | D. 



@Full Moon... 
£ Last Quarter. 
#New Moon... 
£ First Quarter 
©Full Mbon. 



Inter-Col. 
H.M. 

8 48 
1139 

6 42 

9 49 
♦0 45 



3 1 Days. 



Eastern. 


Central. 


Mountain 


H.M. 


H.M. 


, H.M. 


7 48 


6 48 


5 48 


10 39 


9 39 


8 39 


5 42 


4 42 


342 


8 49 


' 7 49 


6 49 


11 45 


10 45 


945 



_Paclfic._ 
H.M. 

4 48 
7 39 
2 42 

5 49 
845 



H.M. 

2 17 

5 8 
011 

3 18 

6 14 



The full-faced or black t<ype figures are P. M., all others A. M. *Nov. X.. 



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(JT •• ' 



' 



CO»Jv 

o Umtrd Hialp^ which hi 

i n nhfM 
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I 






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uch State, ehou^n by the Li 

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I i Q r i 

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re Hon. iti 



:i thr-n ii ■• s. N< 

Be-nula 

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mi»ru In the afcsi ru- 

resident of (U- it**. Tli* 8- 

to try ill 

■ hi, When iirni of Hi- 

lide, and no pr 
I* of the m&mbwfi praeiL .lu 
ttendl further Mian to removal from a 

if honor, trvef Or p* lite l T *i 

tuirly m 



jr»» to Codsl'03* — 



unij manner of holding eleellonj! for Sen 
ribed in each SI 
.mgrens fii;i 
rcgulatioritf, esoevt u 
The Congress JthGll assemble at Ictwi 
and flueh meeting shall be on I in D*-< 

uleon Uiey nhall by Intw appoint a different day, 
'!-)«« shall he h 
Uona of its own member*, ^id a majority of *aeh ahall 
tiUALne&a; bat a flmaltrr room her m»v 
Hc-niirni*> Pownrs aiii) may he authortst-ii to compel 

ii Uoums*, members, In audi manner and uml-'r ■act! penatliee &a < 
provides. Etich hunse may *!••: ■ 
pfoooodln^, puni. . for illtQTrieriy b»?hnvi. 






CONSTITUTION OF TUB UNITED STATES, 



29 



Pmidoitf* Aetfoa. 



of tvro-tliivda, Bxpel a member. Bach house shall keep a journal of its proceed- 
ings and from time to time publish the same, "excepting such parts as may in their 
Judgment require secrecy, and the yeas and nays of the members of either house 
oa any Question shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the 
Journal. Neither house, during the session of Congress, shall, without the consent 
«f the other, adjourn for more than three day*, tier to any other place than that 
in which Ahe *wo -houses shaH he sitting. 

4 See. *. 4Bbe Senators and Representatives shall receive a compensation for 

t*h*ir surviesa, to *>e ascertained by law, and paid out of the Treasury of tho 

United States. They shall, in all cases except treason, felony 

^i m up t ma mUmm — lsl and hreach of the peace, be privileged from arrest, during their 

rilittumil. attendance at the session of their respective houses, and in 

going to and returning from the same; and for any speech or 

debate in -either ^ouse they shall not be questioned in any other place. Ho Senator 

or Representative shall, during the time for which he was elected, be appointed 

$o any civil office under the authority of the United States which shall have been 

created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during such time; 

and no person holding any office under the United States shall be a member of 

either house during his continuance in office. 

See. 7. -All Mils for raising revenue shall originate -in the House of Repre- 
sentatives, hut the Senate jmay propose or concur with amendment}, as on other 
bills. Every bill which shall have passed the House 
of Representatives and the Senate shall, before it 
becomes a taw, be presented to the President of tho 
United States; if he approve he shall sign it. but if 
«ot he shall return It, with his objections, to that house in which it shall have 
•originated, who shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and proceed 
to reconsider it It after such reconsideration two-thirds of that house shall agree 
to pass tho blU, It shall be sent, together with the objections, lo the other house, 
by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of that 
house it shall become a law. But in all cases the votes of both houses shall he 
determined by yeas and nays, and the names of the persons voting.for and against 
the bill shall be entered on the Journal of each houie respectively. If any bili 
shall not be returned by the President within ten days (Sundays excepted) after 
It shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if 
he had signed It, unless Congress by their adjournment prevents its return, in 
which case It shall not be a law. Kvery order, resolution or vote to which the 
concurrence of the Senate and House of Representatives may be necessary (ex- 
cept on a question of adjournment) shall be presented s to the President of the. 
United States; and before the same shall take effect shall be approved by him, or, 
•being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by two-thirds of the Senate nnd 
House of Representatives, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the 
oase of a bill. 

Sec. 3. The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts 
and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defence and general 
welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and 
tB e u e ral P owetsof excises shall be uniform throughout the United States; to bor- 
Coogress. tow money on the credit of the United States; to regulate 

commerce with foreign nations, and among the several States 
and wltfc the Indian tribes; to establish a uniform rule of naturalization and 
uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States; to coin 
money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of 
weights and measures; to provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securi- 
ties and eorrent coin of the United States; to establish postomces and postroads; 
to promote the progress of science and useful arts, by sccui h g for limited times 
to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and dis- 
coveries; to constitute tribunals inferior to the Suprme Court, to define and punish 
piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offences against the laws of 
nations; -to declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules 
concerning ruptures on land and water; to raise and support armies, but no appro- 
priation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years, to 
provide and maintain a navy, to make rules for the government and regulation 
of the land and naval forces; to provide for calling forth the militia to execute 
the taws of the Union, suppress insurrection and expel Invasions; to provide for 
organising, arming and disciplining the militia, and for governing such part of 
them as may be employed In the service of the United States, reserving to tho 
.States re sp ec t ively the appointment of the officers and the authority of training 
the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; to exercise exclusive 
legislation in ail cases whatsoever over such district (not exceeding ten miles 
square) as aaay. by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congre is. 
become the^oat of government of the United States, and to exercise like authority 
tovar all planes purchased by the consent of the Legislature of the State in which 
the same shall be, for the erection ef forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and 
other needful 'buildings; and to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper 
for -carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by 
this *toBS4rtUith» la the Government of the United States, or In any department or 
o&eer thereof. 



ffoti, ft. The irilje 
■x lot tag shall think 



Uj nl ta tfoas «f 1 If 

I'pwon, 



ity may be 
dollar* for each person, 

all Hot bd filial it 

or tnvo^ may require It No 

• I ration or other 
imeration Iierelnbefoi 
ivJiaM b« lul.1 on articles f\ ported from any Sti 
gfren by auv regulation of commerce or revenue to 1 
thus* of ajjo* sli all vessels bound, to or from one State be ooiir 

.mat her* Ho money shall h*' drawn from the Tnu? 
-aprlatioiis rnadr: by law; and a rujj lilar ltiii< 

and * vi-rnJlluroy of rU pnMl< 
Jo title of nobility shall be granted by U 
on holding an office of pro tit or trust under (hem anaJl, with 
oonsent of ch« Congress, accept of any present, emolument office or title uf aaf 
kind whatever, from any king* prince or foreign Slate, 

Beo, l& No Hi tat e «hali enter Into any treaty, aillancs or confoder. 

Utters of marque and reprisal; coin money; emit bill* of credit; mak 

but gold and silver *?oln a tender in payment of debt.- 

Llmltaitan* of bill of attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing th 

Rtixte i'4w«rf, of contracts, or grant any title of nor. Mat* *hn' 

out the consent of the Congress, lay any Imports or du 
ports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing 
spscUon laws; and the net produce of all duties and !• n 

Imports or exports shall be for the use of the Treaaury of the United 

h laws aha)] bo subject to the revision ai ■* fl. NO 

State shall* without the consent of Congress, pay any duty of tounagt:. 
or ahipf of war In time of peace, enter Into any agreement or eomp» 
scata, or wiui n foreign power, op engage In war, unless actus 
or In such Imminent danger as wll) not admit of delay. 

ARTICLE II. 
Thm Prertdcat and His Powers* 
Bastion 1, Tfci sxemUve power shall be Tested In a President of the United 
States of America, lie shall bold his office during the term of four years, and, 

together with the Vice -President, chosen f.: 
irwtor*l Contsftt — TCIigibPity, same term, ho elected as follows; Bach Fttv 

Suceassloflj UouipeDsattaD. appoint, In such manner as the Leglsiaturn Ihtrecf 

may direct, a number of electors, equal to the 
whole number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be i 
in the Congress; but no Senator or ftepre tentative or person holding an ofi 

r profit under the United States shall be appointed an elector The • 
Shall meet in then- respective States, and vote by ballot for two persona, of 
one At least Shall not be an Inhabitant of the same Stair: with Ihcmwlv^. An4 
Ih*ry chaff make a list nf all the persona voied for and of the number 
eswi; lvhlrn Ttet they a hall sign and certify, and transmit, scaled, to 
a^vemraent of the United States, directed to the President of the genu'.' 
P rem Id cut of the Senate shall, lu ih* presence of the Senate and Bon. 

ivfis, open all the ccrltficatea, and the votes shall then be* eountoJ The 
person having the irr^at&st number of votes shall be the President If such number 
be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if there be mon; than 
one who hare such a majority, and have an equal number of vote*, then the 
House of Representatives aboil Immediately choose by ballot one of them Presi- 
dent, and If no person have a majority then firom the five highest en the list 
the said House a hall In like manner choose the President. But in choosing 
the President* the votes shall tie taken by States* the representation fro™ ^ach 
State having one vote* a quorum far this purpose shall consist of a member or 
members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority or all the States ilial) be 
necessary to a choice-, In every case, aft*r the choice of the President the person 
having the greatest n mon bar ef votes of tha electors shall be ibe Vice- President 
Bat If there should remain two Or more who have equal voles, the Senate shall 
choose from them by ballot the Vice -President The Congress may detarmlri'j the 
tJnui of choosing the electors, and the day on which they eball give their 
which day fthal] be the same throughout the United States, No person except a 
n a tors] horn citizen or a cJttmen of the United States at the time of the adopt ton 
of this Constitution shall be eligible to the office of President? neither shall any 
person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to the age of thirty- 
five years, and been fourteen years a resident within the United States, In cose Of 
the removal of the President from office, or of his death, resignation or inability 
to discharge the powers and duties of the said office, the same shall dev 
the Vice-President, and the Congress mikj by law provide for the ease of removal, 
death, resignation or inability both of the President and Vice-- President, declaring 
• nicer shall then, act as President^ and such officer Khali act accordingly unit) 
iblllty be ramtrvea or a President shall be elected. The President shall, at 
stated times, receive for bis services a compensation which shall be netth^r in- 
creased nor diminished dsrtng the period for which he shall have bosh eJcetod, 
and be shall not receive wtthfn that period any stfaer emoleanont fjwm the United 



CONSTITUTION OF THIS UNITED STATES. 



tt 



States, or any of them. Before he enters on the execution of his office Its shall take 
ert> following oath or aHlrm&tion* ^1 do solemnly swear (or amrm) that I will faith- 
fully execute the office of President of the United States, and will, to the best e* my 
abifity, preserve, protect and d«end the Constitution of th* United States." 

Sec. 2. The President shalll be Conuaander-ln-Cktof of the Army and Navy 

©t the United States, and of the militia of the several States; when called 4iHo 

the actus* service of the Un-ited States, he may require the 

sfllftary. Civil a*4 opinion. In writing, of the principal officer In each of the 

"~ ^y-nuAl** executive departments, upon any subject relating to the 

hl duties of their respective offices, and he shall have power to 

grant reprieves and pardons for otfenoes against the United 
States, except la cases of Impeachment. He shall have power, by and with the* 
advice and consent ot the Snate. to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the 
Senators present concur, and he shall nominate, and, by and with the advice Ah* 
consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers and; 
consuls; judges of th« Supreme Court, and all other officers of the United States 
Whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be 
established by law; "but the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such 
Inferior officers as they think proper. In the President alone, in the courts of law 
or in the beads of departments. The President shall have power to fin all 
vacancies that may happen during the recess o? the Senate, by granting commis- 
sions which shall expire at the end of their next session. 

"Sec 3. He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the 

state of the Union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he 

shall Judge necessary and expedient; he may, on extraordU 

If fwages said Kxta» nary occasions convene both houses, or either of them, and. 

Sessions. in case of disagreement between them, with respect to the 

time of adjournment he may adjourn them to such time as 

he shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and the public ministers; he 

shaTl take care that the taws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all of 

the officers of the United States. 

Sec. 4. The President, Vice-President and all civil officers of the United 
States shall be removed from office on Impeachment for and 
fltosAO val by Im- conviction of treason, bribery or other hush crimes and, 
peachmenfe. misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE m. 
. Supreme Courts and Judicial Powers* 
Section 1. Tfea Judicial power of the United States shall be vested In one 
Supreme Court, and In such inferior courts as the Congress may from time to 
time ordain and establish. The judges, both of the Supreme and inferior oourta, 
shall hold their offices during good behavior, and shall at stated times receive 
for their services a compensation v which shall not be diminished during their con* 
tftraance in office, ' . 

Bee. t. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising 
under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made or which 
shall be made, under their authority; to all cases affecting 
limits of Judicial ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, to all case* 
Power. of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction: to controversies to 

which the United States shall be a party; to controversies 
between two or more States: between a State and citizens of another State; 
between cltifeens of. different States; .between citizens of the same Slate claiming 
lands under grants of different States, and between a State, or the citizens thereof, 
and foreign States, citizens or subjects. In all cases a fleeting ambassadors* other 
public ministers and consuls, and those in which a State shall be a party, the 
Supreme Court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases before 
mentioned the Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law 
and fact. With such exceptions and under such regulations as the Congress shall 
make. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of Impeachment, shall be by jury, 
and such trial shall be held In the State where the said crime shall have been 
committed, but when not committed within any State, the trial shall be at such 
place or places as the Congress may by .law have directed. 

Sec; %. Treason against the United States shall consist only in levying war 
against them, or 1 In adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No 
person shall be convicted of treason . unless on the testimony 
Treaso-B and Its of two witnesses to the same overt act. or on confession in open 
Punishment. court. The Congress shall have power to declare the punish- 
ment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work cor- 
ruption of blood or forfeiture except during the life of the person attainted. 

ARTICLE IV. 
Rights of States and Citizens. 
Section I. Vull faith and credit shall be given In each State to the public 
acts, records and judicial proceedings of every other State. And the Congress 
may by general laws prescribe the manner in which such acts, records and pro- 
ceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 

Sec. 2. The citizens of each State shaH be entitled to all privileges and Im- 
munities of c4t,lsena in the several States. A person charged in any State with 
treason, felony, or other crime, who shall flee from justice,, and 
Equal Rights of be found in another State, shall, on demand of the executive 
.Citizens. .authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up to be 

— removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime. No per- 
son held to service or lahor in one State, under the laws thereof, escaping into 



S3 



INSTITUTION 



Cnwilon of K«w 



Tho 
Bean tioYorunient. 



r, <hail« in TOiuwjTranco of any law or reflation therein, br 
nich sorriee or labor, bat shall Ira deLtverod op ua claim ct ' 
1 1 such flKnrlC'-s or labor may ho du*w 

New dfates may be admitted by the CntJgretfW Into this Union 
viihin the juris'dirjtioQ of any • 
\.ny State ba farmed by the junction of two or 
or part of States* without Ui*> consent or the legtBlr 
Hiat.i? ooncerfted as well aa of the, CobgreOL The Congress 
abolJ h«vs power to dlsp<?e4 otvand make alt needful 
etl&jl thi territory or other property belonging to th*? ! 

• ;ution shall ho so construed aa to prejudice aajr 
ted tJtaies, or of any particular Stat". 

4 Stated ahull guarantee to every State In tl> 
republican form '*f government, and shall prut*- 
fhi'm kib'tiSnsE invasion, and on application of the 

EOCUtJve fwh^n the Legislature cannot Us ^,oa- 
venedj, against domestic violence. 
AOTIfXK V> 
Amendment* to CamtiLittlon. 
( >riijcw, whenever two- thirds of both bousos shall deem It Decenary* 
shall propoflo utnendmfnita to this Constitution, or, on the application of th> 
lii tares of two- thirds of the we vera! fftatefl, shall 
tiy Con &rmiai convention for proposing 1 amendments, which In eltftetf erase 
ItutifiCttiion. shall be valid to all intents rand purposes; aa part of tht* 

not Ion , when ratified by tho iGg;lslatur«s of three- 
nf (lie several States, or by conventions in three -fourths thereof, as the 
tber mode, of ratification may bo proposed by tho Congress; p; 
that no amendment which may be made prior to ths year one tb>.' 
hundred and eight shall in any maimer affect the first and fourth clause 
ninth section of the rirst article; and that no State, without it* consent, shall bo 
-.■quaJ suffrage in the Senate, 

AKTICLE VI, 
Rupreun* Authority of f?on*lif ration. 
All debts contracted and lenU entered Into before th* adiH" 

ttstitatiop shall be as valid against I states under tbl 

tion as under the confederation. This Oonstitui 
IM*** and Treaties— laws of the United States which shall be made In pur 
iMlieLraJ Oaths— No thereof* and all treaties mad<\ or which shall ha mad*, 
tadigioaB Test, under the authority uf the United States, shall be the 

supremo law Of the land; and the judges in 
fthAll h* hound thereby* anything In the Con r laws of any State to the 

Landing. The Senators a ives hefor. 

he several State legislatures, and all executive and 
Officers^, tilled stated and of ibe -tea, shall 1 

n to support this Constitution; hui n>- niigjous tesl 
ulrcd as a qua! ideation to any office or public trust under the Una. ■« 
ARTICLE VII. 
Ratification or Constitution . 
Ti>e ratification, of the convention of nine States shall be sufficient for tin? 

ll&hment of this Ccmsti ration between the States so ratifying the 
Nuih tftatcs Xuf- some, 

'0 Establish, JJnne 1'! m hy the winrimous consent of the 

pnmi ventemth day of September, In tho 

our Lnrd on* 1 \ hen sand seven hundred and eighty -y?en ( and of the lncb:jM 
of America the twelfth. In witness whereof we have 
untij ^ubsciibed stir namsn. 

CSKO, WASH TNil TON* President and Deputy trom Virginia. 
',Jro— JHHN UNODON, NICtlOIiAf? fill.MAN, 
i \NLEL GORHAM, RU¥TJ9 

[tire SI7SKMAN. 
FIAMJIVTON, 
U. CtVINaSTON, DA VXD HREARl.Y. WM PATT3RSQN, lOMA 
DAYTON, 
P-nnaylvauha^-n. FTiANKl.TW, THOMAS MIFFI.IN ROBF7RT MORRIS, »^R<1 
, TH-'MAS FITZtSIMONS, JAltED INaERSOLJ^ JAMES 
MORRIS. 
peJawOi aUNNlNO RI1D iPORD, Jun'r. JOHN DICKINSON 

T. JACO. BROOM- 
Murvland- t n ST, THOMA? JJiTNlPER. DANI* CAJ 

IR, JAMIJ» MADISON, Jun'r, 
n^-WM. HL.OUNT, RP HARD DO BBS SPAIOHT. HIT, WTT.T.T * 
! Tirol Ida— J RUTI^EDOB. < H S COATESWOBTH PINCitJMliY. CB 

KNWY. P)! : Jd'JR. 

t -WltdJAM FEW, ABR BALDWIN. 

Attest: WD^LJAM JACESOR Secret 
AMENDMENTS, 
(The flrat ten amendments were proposed at the n>st BCsston of the 1st Con- 
gress of the United Htates, which wa? beg^un and held at the city of New*Yorfc on 
a, 1TKQ, ami were adopted l;v too requlatte nnmher of Btntes— 1 vol Laws 
i ir e p 72. They togeLhci eoiiNirtnte n Bill of Rlghi^) The following Is the 
on; Couetpss of the United States begun and 



CONSTITUTION^ 09 THE UNITED STATES. 



dty of New- York, on Wednesday, the 4th of March, 1789. The conventions of 
a number of the States having at the time of their adopting the Constitution ex- 
pressed a desire, in order to prevent . misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that 
further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added; and as extending the 
ground, of public confidence in the government will best insure the beneficent 
ends of its Constitution. 

. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of 
America, in Congress assembled, two- thirds of both -houses concurring, That the 
following articles be proposed to the legislatures of the several States as amend- 
ments to the Constitution of the United States, ail or any of which articles, when 
ratified by three-fourths of said legislatures, to be valid to all intents and pur- 
poses as part of said Constitution, namely: 

ARTICLE I. — Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of re- 
ligion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, 
or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition 
the Government for a redress of grievances. 

ARTICLE II. — A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a 
f re.e State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. 

ARTICLE III. — No soldier shall in time of peace be quartered in any house 
without the consent of the owner, nor in time of war, but in a manner tp be pre- 
scribed by Haw. ,■ 
ARTICLE IV. — The right of the people to be secure in their person's, houses, 
papers and effects against unreasonable searches arid seizures. -shall not- be violated, 
and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affir- 
mation, and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons ox 
things to be seized. 

ARTICLE V. — No person shall be held to answer for a capital or otherwise in- 
famous crime unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in 
cases arising in the land or naval forces or in the militia when in actual service 
in time of war or public danger, 'nor shall any person be subject for the same 
offence to be twice put In jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any 
criminal case to be a witness against himself; nor be deprived of life, liberty or 
property without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for 
public use without just compensation. 

ARTICLE VI. — In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall enjoy the right 
to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein 
the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have, been previously 
ascertained by law, and to be informed of Uie nature and cause of the accusation; 
to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for 
obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel, for his 
defence. 

ARTICLE VII. — In "suits at common law, where the value in controversy shall 
exceed $20, the righf of trial by jury shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a 
Jury shall be otherwise re-examined in any court of the United States, than ac- 
cording to the rules of the common law. 

ARTICLE VIII. — Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines im- 
posed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 

ARTICLE IX. — The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not 
be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people. 

ARTICLE X. — The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitu- 
tion, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or 
to the people. 

ARTICLE XI. — (Proposed by Congress held at Philadelphia, December 2. 1793; 
ratification declared by President, January 8, 1798.) The judicial power of the 
United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, com- 
menced or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of another State, 
or by citizens or subjects of any foreign State. 

ARTICLE XII.— (Proposed at first session of VIHth Congress, in Washington, 
October 17, 180S; ratification announced by Secretary of State, September 25, 1804.) 
The electors shall meet in their respective States and vote by 
Election, of Presi- ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom at least 
dent and shall not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves; 

Vice-President* they shall name in their ballots the persons voted ior as Presi- 
dent, and in distinct ballots the persons voted for as Vice- 
President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, 
and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the number of votes for 
each; which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of 
government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The 
Presjdent of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted; the per- 
son having the greatest number of votes for President shall be the President, if 
such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed: and if no 
person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers, 
not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as President, the House of Rep- 
resentatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing 
the President, the vote shall be taken by States, the representation from each 
State having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or 
members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall be 
necessary to a choice. And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a 
President whenever the right of chpice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth 
day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as 






person nr 



1mio*fm*j>t* Vt>\- 
owlajf Civil Witr. 



i MtfheSt 
for the f 



.•<-> power to erirorc* ihU nrf(. l [egtilaUen, 

'..'pnjrrE'sa .Iiino I*, 1(6$; mllflce 



of law, nor deny to any pi 
>r*CttOn of (he law*. 

Iv« fbatl be apportioned itmo:<£ the sevor 
their respective number*, counting the whole r 
r>5 Indians not tinted. Hut vl- 
'►re for President amd 
datives In -eeutlve a- 

- of thPi lPKi?.Uiture thereof. la denied In sny . 
y-one yun of age, t 
Ally way abridged, except far participation 
of representation therein shall be redo 
male citizens shall bear to the whole number ol 
k I ti rocb State. 
Snr. 3* No person shall be a Senator or Representative In Cnngre**, or - 
of President or Vice- President, or hold jtny office, civil or military, uno" 
United States, ec under any Slat*, who, having prsYlrii.Laiy taken an oa' 
her of Congress, or as fin officer of the United State*, or aa .1 
State Legislature, or as an executive or Judicial officer of any 
the Gondii tattoo of Hie United Stales, shall have engaged In tns-urr. ' 
hellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the men 
Congress ma^ by a vote of two-thirds of each house, remove such di 

(Note, — -On June T, ltt>S r President McK inlay approved of an ctfttM 

■ leelared that ^the dtMB.hiiit.ic9 Impoaeri by Section &, XlVth Amend rr 
the Constitution, heretofore Incurred, are hereby removed."! 

4. — Tbo validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by 
lew, Including debts Incurred fur payment of pensions, and bounties fop services In 
mppreastag the Insurrec Hon. or rebellion, shsli not be questioned. But nelu 
United State* nor any Slate shall assume or pay any debt or obligation In 
■Hlon or rebellion against the irnited Suites, or any claim i 
loss or emai 1 any slave; but all such debts, obligations and eialtr 

be tield illegal and void. 

See. F» The GrngTesa shall bare power to enforce, by appropriate leplalaUoa, 
the provisions of this article. 

ARTfi'NK XV **d by Congress February !T, 1B6*: rniiftcattoa an* 

neancnd by Secretary of State* March 3fl, U70,} Section 1, The rlghi 

1" the United States to vote shall not he denied or ahrlrt-n 
States or by any State on account of ra^e. color or prevlou 

Sec* £, Coaere«s shall have power to enforce this nrude by appr 

TTO FRE81BKNTIAI- ACCESSION LAW, 
The Presidential lUGceaslon \* fixed by Chapter 1 of the act* of tho XLfXth 
Congress, first session. In cas* of the removal, death, resigna* : 
both the President and \ ice-President, ih^n tho Secretary 

it'll the disability of the President 01 V lee- President 
President Is elected If there he no Secretary of State, to en th> 
Treasury will act, and the remainder of the order l>1 miojks.-... 
The Secretary of War, Attorney- Central, PostmaAlor-Gcneml, S^"' 
■ f the Interior. The Act 1 

not at the tlm& In sessi ■ .ary I^^^^H 

This act applies only to such Cabinet of! 
-advice and consent of lbs Senate, »nd aro^^H 

■ 
?ss raising ment of Agriculture to ths rank of an 

riant and jtivin^ li m head & seal In the P 

<abor wore both 

act to lb i 



- 



Lrt In ll 
been made of tHo pro 



I tut na 



THE UNITED S TATES GOVERNMENT. 

THE EXECUTIVE DEPA RTMENT. 
THB EXECUTIVE. 

PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT, of New-York 

VICE-PRESIDENT , CHARLES W. FAIRBANfcs. of Indiana 

SECRETARY TO THB PRESID ENT. WILLIAM LOEB, Jr., of New-York, 

THB CABINET. 

SECRETARY OF STATE ~^.. *ELIHU ROOT, of New-York 

SECRETARY OF THB TREASURY. ; • . LESLIE M. SHAW, of Iowa 

SECRETARY OF WAR <* .WILLIAM H. TAFT, of Ohio 

ATTORNEY GENERAL .WILLIAM H. MOODY, of Massachusetts 

POSTMASTER GENERAL GEORGE B. CORTELYOU. ofNew-York 

SECRETARY OF THE NAVY . ; . . 'CHARLES J. BONAPARTE, of Maryland 

SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. .. .ETHAN ALLEN HITCHCOCK, of Missouri 

SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE .JAMES WILSON, Of Iowa 

SECRETARY OF COMMERCE AND LABOR VICTOR H. METCALF. of California 

[The salary of the President is $50,000 a year; the salary of the. Vice-President and 
of each of the members of the Cabinet ,1s $8,000 a year; the Secretary, to the President 
receives $5,000 a year.} 

DEPARTMENT OF 8TATE. 

SECRETARY OF STATE. ELIHU ROOT (1005), N. Y., $8,000 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY. ROBERT BACON (1905), N. Y., $4,800 

SECOND . ASSISTANT SECRETARY ALVEY A. ADEE (1880). D. C, $4,500 



THIRD ASSISTANT SECRETARY. .. .HERBERT H, D. PEIRCB 0901), Mass., 



600 



Chief of • Bureau of Appointments— 
Charles Ray Dean 0905), D. a, $2,100. 

Chief of Bureau of Passports— Galllard 
Hunt (1808). D. C. $2,100. 
U. S. Representatives oa International 
Tribunals of Egypt* 

Court of Appeals at Alexandria — Geo. 8* 
Batcheller, N. Y. (1902). 

Court of First Instance at Cairo— Wm, 
G. Van Home, Utah (1902). - 

Court of First Instance at Mansourab— 
Somerville P. Tuck. N. Y. (1894). 
Bureau . of American Republics. 

Director— Williams a Fox (1906). N. Y.» 
$6,000. 

Chief Clerk— W. C. Wells 0905), D. O. 
$2,000. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

SECRETARY OF THB TREASURY LESLIE M. SHAW 0902), Iowa, $8,000 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY HORACE A. TAYLOR (1899), Wis., $4,500 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY .JAMES , B. REYNOLDS (1906), Mass., $4,600 

j ASSISTANT SECRETARY;...... CHARLES HALLAM KEEP (1908). N. Y.. $4,500 



Solicitor—William L. Penneld (1897), 
Ind.. $3,500. 

Assistant Solicitor— Frederick Van Dyne 
(1900). N. Y., $3,000. 

Chief Clerk-Charles Denby (1905), Ind., 
$3,000* 

Chief of Diplomatic Bureau— Sidney Y. 
Smith (1897), D. C., $2,100. 

Chief of Consular Bureau— Wilbur J. 
Carr (1902), N. Y., $2,100. 

Chief of Bureau of Indexes and Archives 

■ < — >. - — •; *2.ioo. 

Chief of Bureau of Accounts— Thomas 
Morrison U900). N. Y., $2,100. 

Chief of Bureau of Rolls and Library— 
William McNeir (1905), , $2,100. 

Chief of Bureau of Trade Relations — 
John B. Osborne (1905), , $2,100. 



Chief Clerk— Walter W. Ladlow 0906}) 
Minn., $3,000. 

Chief of Division of Appointments — 
Charles Lyman (1898), Conn., $2,750. 
' Comptroller— (Robert J. Tracewell 0897), 
Ind., $5,500. 

, Assistant Comptroller — Leander P. 
Mitchell (1897), Ind.. $4,500. 

Auditor for State Department— Ernest 
G. Timme (1897), Wis., $4,000. 

Auditor for Treasury Department —Will- 
iam E. Andrews (1897). Neb., $4,000. 
- Auditor for War Department— Benj. F. 
Harper (1905), Ind., $4,000. 

Auditor for Postomce Department— 
J. J. MoCardy (1904), Minn.. $4,000. 
* Auditor for Navy Department— William 
W. Brown (1900), Penn., $4,000. 

Auditor for Interior Department — R. A. 
L Person (1901), S. Dak., $4,000. 
:'. Treasurer of United States— Charles H. 
Treat O906), N. Y., $8,000. 

Assistant Treasurer— James F. Meline 
; (1898), Ohio, $8,000. 



Deputy Assistant Treasurer— Gideon C 
Bants (1901), Md.. $8,200. 

Register . of the Treasury— Judson W. 
Lyons (1898), Ga.. $4.0007 

Comptroller of the Currency— Wm. B. 
Ridjrley (1801), 111., $5,000. 

Deputy Comptroller of* the Currency — 
Thomas P. Kane (1899), D. a, $3,500. 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue- 
John W. Yerkes (1900), Ky., $8,000. 

Deputy Commissi oners of Internal Rev- 
enue— Robert Williams (1899), La., $4,000; 
J. C. Wheeler 0900). Mich.. $8,600. 

Director of the Mint — George E. Rob- 
erta (1897), Iowa, $4,500. 

Chief of Secret Service Division— John 
E. Wilkle (1897), 111.. $4,000. 

Surgeon General of the Public Health 
and Marine Hospital Service— Walter Wy- 
man (1891). Mo.. $5,000. 

Supervising Architect— James K. Taylor 
(1897), Penn., $4,500. 

Director Bureau of Engraving and Print- 
ing— Wm. M. Meredith (1900), 111., $4,500. 



» Commissioned July 19, succeeding John Hay. deceased. 'Commissioned July 1. 
succeeding Paul Morton, resigned. All other members of the Cabinet commissioned 
or reeommisskmed from March 0, 1906. 




HMUNT OFF 



ill Supe 

— B I 1 



Ulna. 

: 

WAR DEPARTMENT. 
or r autm r.»T\i, o rncv BJ 



ri»Q4> OtOo. 



H3li 



i n, itwM 



i^rctary , 4 , . ■•«, Fred C. Alr**j'- 

Jrn'*rn- .rgo H. Bur< 

wtei Cteb*r*J- Churleo F< tiiam 

ranrftl.< 0*n. Iloben M. 

WkkMrt. »,,».., *«« .,*.,..» Brig. ^Jrn. A lexcmdpr Mac! 

, I5i [tf. Gen, Wilhitoi Croater , 

Boerg* IK, Dan - 

ll Officer • ■ . «•*> 2* t»Oi 

Clutrles a 

— j Bhltoh WfttKinn I 

>nvr» J- >l 

i 

ft a. a 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE- 

:RAli W1LJ-1 All IL MOODY <itM&. Misl, $8,000 

Ak>1 ' 

CJay (UkOJU, Wait 

V ft+I $4,000. 
Cblsl Cltrk— Orrlu J. FleM tIttJa*. K*IK, 

, Law Clerk nnu 

Atetar. ' 

CcmunlMieii to if. Lftfra of Hie 

Coram^viicinors — DfeVtd J 
ri-^WHl Ohio; Wm. D By nam (lOOty 
Julio T. Ltotl tlDU&), Onio. B&i 



Aa»l e tant AtMrneyF. 

Wis. John 0. 
fc&rtas H. 

. 



. t, Ohio, 
Doadvis 

f tn« rUSlUlTtniE'ilit D' 

iuii] LAbor— Etlvrlti Wajilar SI ma 
(to? of tUe Trersuiiry—M auric* V'. 




POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT, 

TMASTER OlSNFJlA* .'1KOBGH B COKT£>LTOO UDOG), *♦ Y„ IMOQ 

P ASSISTANT POBTMASTEB CJBNERAU 

FHANK H, HITCHCOCK CSQW. B* C. fA.DOO 
*ND ASSIST A(fT POBTMASTBR GENERAL. 

W. S 4 SHALLHrNBEItGlSR fl*fl71. F*hju ti.Mtf 
ASSISTANT POrfTM AST15R GENKH M,. . M, C, 1*ADI 
ANT PO«T^lABT«R CHBNTBRAU 

PETiflft V. DB! GitAW tt&O©, rpitn., $4„g«> 



Clerk— Men-let O, Owmoe C18CHK 

•■-.Boa 

Jrnt of Porffgro Mai 1b — Nbw- 
:s (189ft, ^ 

of Money Order , 
-►dl (lft)&< Mass.* $3JJO0. 
Finuwo— Q, 
'i»02j, Md., |2,2fi0. 
am at Re^&atfp &yata«i— 
Mill^^ (LAM). D. C, h «2 r f»0. 

-tent Rural Delivery Berrtoe— 
uiim (!»»>. Ivan i:t,oou, 



General Supertaietidem of £iiijlv 
service— Jaa. R Whit* CISSO). 

Sir per En Undent of Dead Letter • 
Junei R, Youhff {l&0f>>. Penn., $2,&0Q. 

Superintendent of itaJlw^v a>j> 
- J ii j new II. Crew tlttK:> Ohio, & 

bTjperintcndenl f Itv IHllverv Servloa— 
Brvin H, Tanrpe U903», Vt. 4 fl^OOGl 

(itiriftr*! Suz>L Sabrlas ami AltowikBCWB 

—a m, Wbi«i (UMjai col, um*>> 

Chist Ppstoffico Inapiclo^-WUllAni X 
Vickery <lbo 



CHIMP DEPARTMENT OFFICERS. 



87 



NAVY DEPARTMENT. 

SECRETARY OF TKE NAVY CHARLES J. BONAPARTE <1305) Md"., $8,000 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY TRUMAN H. NEWBERRY (1905), Mich., $4,500 

CHIEF CLERK B. F. PETERS (1*97). Penn., $3,000 

BUREAU CHIEFS AND DEPARTMENTAL OFFICERS. 
Bureau.* Name. Date appointed. 

Navigation^ . "Rear Admiral. George A. Converse. . . July 29, 1904 

Equipment *Oat>taln Henry N. Manney Mar. 15, 1904 

Ordnance.. ♦....•Commander Newton E. Mason Auar. 1, 1904 

Medicine and Surgery •Medical Inspector Presley M. Rlxey. . .. Aug. 24, 1900 

Supplies and Accounts *Pay Director H. T. B. Harri* retired). June 24. 1903 

Steam Engineering *Captain Charles W. Rae Aug. 9, lfl<»3 

Construction and Repair. •Chief Constr'c'r Washington L. Cap pa. Nov. 1, 1903 

Yards and Dock© •Civil Engineer Mordecai T. Endicott... April 4, 1898 

Judge Advocate General T-Cornmander Samuel W. B. Dlehl June 4, 1904 

Office of NavallntelUgence Captain Seaton Schroed*>r May 1, 1H03 

Hydrographer. Cantain Harry M. Hodges (retired).. Feb. 9,1904 

Superintendent Naval Observatory. Rear Admiral Colby M. Chester Nov. 1, 1902 

Director of Nautical A Imanae Professor Walter S. Harshmaiv Mar. 28. 1901 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR. 

SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR. .ETHAN ALLEN HITCHCOCK. (1899). Mo., $8,000 

FIRST ASSISTANT SECRETARY THOMAS RYAN (15197). Kan., $6,000 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY JESSE E. WILSON (1905), Ind., $4,500 



Chief Clerk— Edward M. TJawson C1897), l 
Md., $3,000. 

Commissioner of Genera* Land Office — 
William A. Richards (1903), Wyo., $5,000, 

Assistant Commissioner General of Land 
Office— John H. Flmple (1903). Ohio. $3,500. 

Commissioner of Pensions — Vespasian 
Warner (1905), Ttt. t $5,000. 

First Deputy Commissioner of Pensions 
—James L. Davenport OS97), N. H., 
$3,600. 

Second Deputy Commissioner, of Pen- 
sions— Leverett M. Kelley (1897), III., 
$3,600. 



Commissioner of Patents — Frederick L 
: Allen (1901), N. Y., $5,000. 

Assistant Commissioner of Patents — Ed- 
ward B. Moore (1901), D. C, $3,000. 

Commissioner of Education— William 
T. Harris (1889), Mass.. $3.G00. 

Commissioner of Indian Affairs— Fran- 
cis E. Leupp (1905), D. C. $5,000. 

Commissioner of Railroads— ~ 

( >. , $4,500. 



Director of Geological Survey— Charles 
D. Walcott (1897). N. Y., $0,000. 

Superintendent of Capitol Building and 
Grounds— Elliott Woods (1902). Ind., $4,500. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE JAMES WILSON (18»7>, Iowa, $8,000 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY WILLETT N. HAYS (1904), Minn., $4,500 

Chief of Bureau of Forestry— Gifford 
Plnchot (1898), N. Y., $3,500. 

Chief of Bureau of Chemistry— Harvey 
W. Wiley (1893). Ind.. $3 500. 

Chief of Bureau of Soils — Milton Whit- 
ney (1901), Md., $3,500. 

Chief of Division of Publications— Geo. 
Wm. Hill (1895). Minn., $3,090. 

Chief «f Bureau «f Statistics— 
$3,500. 



Burch (1903), 
L. 



Chief Clerk — Silvester R. 
Kan.. $2,500. 

Chief of Weather Bureau — WiHls 
Moore (1895), Ohio, $5,000. 

Assistant Chief of Weather Bureau — 
Henry E. Williams (1908). Penn., $3,000. 

Chief of Bureau of Animal Industry — 
Alonzo D. Melvin (1905), 111., $5,000. 

Chief of Bureau of Plant Industry — B. 
T. Galloway (1901). Mo.. $4,500. 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND LABOR. 

SECRETARY OF OOMKERCB AND 1^?.^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ 
ASSISTANT SECRETARY LAWRENCE O. MURRAY (1903), 111., 



$8,000 
$5,000 



Chief Clerk— Frank HL Bo-wen (1900), 
D. C. $3,000. 

Comm4ssioner of Corpora tions 1 — James R. 
Garfield (1903), Ohio, $5,000. 

Deputy Commissioner of Corporations — 
Herbert Knox Smith (1903), Conn., $3,500. 

Commissioner of Labor— Charles P. 
Nelll (1905), D. C. $5,000. 

Commissioner General of Immigration — 
Frank P. Sargent C902). III., $5,000. Com- 
missioners at Ports— Robert Wachthorn 
<1005), New-York, $5,000; Louis T. Weis 
(1902), Baltimore. Md., $3,000; George B. 
Bikings 0897). Boston. $2,600; John J. S. 
Rogers (1895). Philadelphia. $2,500; Hart 
H. North (1895X Snn Francisco, $2,500; 
John H. Clark (T905X Montreal, $2,500; 
David Heary flS99). Vancouver, $2,500; 



Graham L. Riee (1904). San Juau. Porto 

Rico. $2,500. 

Supervising Inspector General of Steam 
Vessels— George Uhler (1903). Penn., $3,500. 

Director of the Bureau of Standard* — 
Samuel W. Stratton (1901). 111., $5,000. 

Commissioner of Navigation — Eugene T. 
Chamberlain (1893), N. Y.. $4,000. 

Director of the Census— S. N. D. Nortn 
(1903), Mass., $6,000. 

Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries- 
George M. Bowers (1897), W. Va., $5.C00. 

Superintendent U. S. Const and Geodetic 
«5 lirV py— O. H. Tittman (1900). Mo.. $5 000, 

Chief of the Bureau of Statistics — Oecar 
P. Austin (1898) D. C. $4,000. 

Chief of the Bureau of Manufacture* — 
John M. Carson (1905), Penn., $4,000. 



•Rank of read? admiral while chief of bureau. 1Rank of captain while Judge Ad- 
vocate General. 



THB UNITED STATES ARMY. 



DEPARTMENT OP COMMERCE AND LABOR— (Continued). 



Lighthouse Board — President of board, 
Victor H. Metcalf; chairman. Rear Ad- 
miral Benjamin P. Lamberton, U. S, N.: 
members. Col. Walter S. Franklin, U. S. 
A.; Col. Amos Stickney, U. S. A.; Henry 

•INDEPENDENT COMMI 
Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Commissioners — Martin A. Knapp (1891), 
N. Y.. chairman; Judson C. Clements 
(1802), Ga.; Charles A. Prouty (1896), Vt.; 
Francis M. Cockrell (1906). Mo.; Franklin 
Lane (1906). Cat; each, f 7,500. 

Secretary— EJdward A. Moseley (1887), 
Mass., $3,600. 

Civil Serrlee CommisalMu 

Commissioners— John C. Black (1904), 
I1L: Henry F. Greene (1908). Minn.; Al- 
trord W. Cooley (1998). N. Y.: each 
$3,500. 



Kigglns 



S. Pritchett, Capt. Albert Rosa. U. a 
N.: Major Horry F. Hodges. U. 'S. A.; 
Captain Uriel Sebrce. U. S. N:, 
naval secretary; Lieut. Col. Daniel W. 
Lockwood. U. S. A., engineer secretary. 

8SION3 AND OFFICES. 

Chief Examiner — Fsank M. 
(1903), Tenn., $3,000. » 

Secretary— John T. Doyle (1880), N. T.. 
$2,600. 

Government Printing Office. 

Public Printer— Charles A. Stililmjs 
(1905), Mass., $4,500. 

Library of Congress, 

Librarian — Herbert Putnam (1899), 
Mass.. $6,000. 

Assistant Librarian — A. R. Spofford 
(1897). Ohio. $4,000. 



THE UNITED STATES ARMY. 

The actual strength of the army on June 30, 1905, including the Philippine Scouts 
anil the Porto Rico Regiment, was 3.934 officers and 63,022 enlisted men— total, 66,956. 
There were lost to the army In the year ended June 30, 1905. 133 officers and 13,592 
enlisted men. Of the officers 29 were killed in action or died from wounds or disease. 
Of the men 488 were killed In action or died from wounds or disease; the remander 
representing men discharged for expiration of term of service, for disability, by sen- 
tence of court martial, desertions and retirements. There were, in the Philippine Scouts 
on June 30, 1906, 108 officers and 5,039 enlisted men, and in the Porto Rico Regiment 
108 officers and 650 enlisted men. 

GENERAL STAFF OF THE ARMY. 

Lieutenant General Adna R. Chaffee, Chief of Staff. 
Major General John C. lrtites. Brigadier General Samuel M. Mills. 



Colonels. 

Stephen P. Jocelyn, I4ih Infantry. 

John B. Kerr, 12th Cavalry. 

Enoch EL Crowder, Judge Advocate Gen- 
eral's Department. 

James T. Kerr, Military Secretary's De- 
partment. 

lieutenant Colonels. 

Crosby P. Miller, Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment. 

Walter S. Schuyler, 2d Cava]ry. 

Henry A. Greene, 1st Infantry. 

John G. D. Knight, Corps of Engineers. 

W. W. Wotherspoon. 19th Infantry. 

Smith S. Leach, Corps of Engineers. 
Majors. 

George W. Goethais, Corps of Engineers. 

William A. Mann, 14th Infantry. 

Montgomery M. Macomb, Artillery Corps. 

George F. E. Harrison, Artillery Corps. 

"William D. Beach, 10th Cavalry. 

John S. Mallory, 12th Infantry. 

Samuel Reber, Signal Corps. 

Erusmus M. Weaver, Artillery Corps. 
Francis J. Kernan, 25th Infantry. 



William W. Gibson, Ordnance Depart- 
ment. 
David Du B. Galllard. 
Henry L. Ripley, 8th Cavalry. 

Captains. 
Charles Lynch, Medical Department. • 
Joseph T. Dickman. 8th Cavalry. 
Harry C. Hale, 15th Infantry. 
James K. Thompson, 12th Infantry. 
William M. Wright. 2d Infantry. 
Charles H. Muir, 2d Infantry. 
Frank DeW. Ramsey, 9th Infantry. 
James H. McRae, 3d Infantry. 
George W. Read, 9th Cavalry. 
Grote Hutcheson, Cth Cavalry. 
.Sydney A. Cloman, 23d Infantry. 
Robert E. L. Mlchio. 12th Cavalry. 
John J. Fershing. 15th Cavalry. 
Charles T. Menoher, Artillery Corps. 
Peyton C. March, Artillery Corps. 
William G. Haan, Artillery Corps. 
Charles D. Rhodes. Cth Cavalry. 
Dennis E. Nolan. 30th Infantry. 
John C. Oakes, Corps of Engineers. 



STAFF OF ARMY WAR COLLEGE. 



Brigadier General Thomas H. Barry, president; Colonel 



and Lieu- 



tenant Colonel William W. Wotherspoon, directors; Major Samuel Reber. secretary. 
MILITARY DIVISIONS AND DEPARTMENTS. 

The Atlantic Division. — Embracing the Department of the East and Depart- 
ment of the Gulf. Headquarters. Governor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Major 
General James F. Wade. 

Department of the East. — Embracing the New England States, New York, New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, West Virginia, 
Virginia, Porto Rico and islands and keys adjacent thereto. Headquarters, Gov- 
ernor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Brigadier General Frederick D. Grant. 



•For Philippine and Panama Canal Strip Commissions, see under 
Dependencies." 



"Insular 



MILIT ARY DEPARTMENTS— GJ5NKRAL OFFICERS. 89 

MILITARY DIVISIONS ANI> DEPARTMENTS— (Continued.) 

Department of the Gulf. — Embracing the States of North Carolina, South Car- 
olina, Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Headquarters, At- 
lanta, Ga. Commander, Major General James F. Wade. 

xue Northern Division. — Embracing the Department of the Iake8> Department 
of the Missouri, 'and the Department of Dakota, Headquarters, St. Louis, Mo. 
Commander, Major General John F. Weston. 

j^epuiiii.ent of the Lakes. — Embracing the States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illi- 
nois, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky. N Headquarters, Chicago, 111. Commander, 
Brigadier General William H. Carter. 

LepartmeiH of the Missouri.— Embracing the States of Iowa, Nebraska, South 
Dakota, Wyoming (except the Yellowstone National Park), Missouri and Kansas. 
Headquarters at Omaha, Neb. Commander. Brigadier General Theodore J. Wint. 

Department of Dakota. — Embracing the States of Minnesota, North Dakota, 
Montana, and so much of Idaho and Wyoming as is included in the Yellowstone 
National Park. Headquarters, St. Paul, Minn. Commander, Brigadier General 
Camillo C. C. Carr. 

The Southwestern Division. — Embracing the Department of Texas and the 
Department .of the Colorado. Headquarters, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Com- 
mander, Brigadier General Frank D. Baldwin. 

Department of Texas. — Embracing the States of Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas, 
Indian Territory and Oklahoma. Headquarters, San Antonio, Tex. Commander, 
Brig\dier General Jesse M. Lee. 

Department of the Colorado. — Embracing the States of Colorado and Utah, and 
the Territories of Arizona and New-Mexico. Headquarters, Denver, Col. Com- 
mander, Brigadier General William S. McCaskey. 

1.1-e Pacili^ Division. — Embracing the Department of California and the De- 
partment of the Columbia, Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal. Commander, Major 
General Samuel S. Sumner. 

Department ef California. — Embracing the States of California and Nevada, 
and the Territory of Hawaii. Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal. Commander, 
Brigadier General Frederick Funston. 

l>.euaitnunt of the Columbia. — Embracing the States of Washington, Oregon and 
Idaho (except that part included in the Yellowstone National Park), and the 
Territory of Alaska. Headquarters, Vancouver Barracks, Wash. Commander, 
Brigadier General Constant Williams. * 

The Philippines Division. — Embracing the Department of I/i«m, Department 
of the Visayas and Department of Mindanao. Headquarters, Manila, P. I. Com- 
mander, Major Gei *iral Henry C. Corbin. 

Department of Luzon. — Embracing all that portion of the Philippine Archi- 
pelago lying north of a line passing southeastwardly through the West Pass of Apo, 
or Mindoro Strait, to the 12th parallel of north latitude, thence east along said 
parallel- to the 124th degree 10 minutes east of Greenwich, but including the entire 
Island of Masbate; thence north to San Bernardino Strait. Headquarters, Manila, P. I. 
Commander, Brigadier General Tasker H. Bliss. 

Department of the Visayas. — Includes all islands south of the southern 
line of the Department of Luzon and east of longitude 121 degrees 45 minutes east of 
Greenwich and north of the 9th parallel of latitude, excepting the islands of Min- 
danao, Paragua, and all islands east of the Strait of Surigao. Headquarters, Hollo, 
P. I. Commander, Brigadier General James A. Buchanan. 

Department of Mindanao. — Includes all the remaining islands of the Philip- 
pine Archipelago. Headquarters, Zamboanga, P. I. Commander, Major General 
Leonard Wood. 

OFFICERS OF THE AEMY. 

IJEUTENANT GENERAL. 

Date of appointment. Date of retirement. 

Adna R. Chaffee. .- . . Jan. 9, 1904 April 14, 1006 

MAJOR GENERALS. 

Aithur MacArthur Feb. 5, 1901 Jure 2, 1909 

John C. Bates July 15, 1902 Aug. 12, 1900 j 

James F. Wade April 13, 11)03 April 14, 11107 

Samuel U3. Sumner July 26, 1903 Feb. 6, 11)06 

Leonard Wood Aug. S, 11)03 Oct. 9, 1924 

John P. Weston Oct. 8, 7000 Nov. 13, 1909 

BRIGADIER GENEKALS. 

Frederick D. Grant Feb. 18, 1901 May 30. 1914 

J. Franklin Bell .Feb. 19, 1901 Jan. 9. 1920 

Frederick Funston * April t, 1901 Nov. 9, 102:» 

Fiank D. Baldwin June 9, 1902 June 20, lilflii 

Theodore J. Wint June 9, 1902 Mar. 0, 1909 

Jesse M. Lee June 17, 1902 Jan. 2, 1907 

William H. Carter July 15, 1902 Nov. 19, 1915 

Camillo C. C. Carr ~ Aug. 17, 1903 Mar. 23. 1900 

Thomas H. Barrv ." Aug. 18, 1903 Oct. 13, 1919 

William S. McCaskey Jan. 24, 1904 0<;t. 2. 19<>7 

AM or? L. Mills May 7. 1904 May 7,191s 

Constant W'Miams Julv 12. 1904 May 25, 1907 

James A. Buchanan April 14, 1905 . .--- "—7"" 

Winf.eld S. Edgorly June 23, IMo May 29, 1910 



STAFF OFFICERS OF THE ARMY. 



CHIEF OFFICERS OF STAFF CORPS. 

Officers marked thua * are detailed from the line, under Section 26, act of Feb. 2, 19$L 

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

HENRY C. CORBIN, adjutant general (major general, June 6, 1900), commanding 
, the Philippines Division. 
MILITARY SECRETARY'S DEPARTMENT. 
FRRD C. AINSWORTH. the Military Secretary (rank of major gen.).. April 23. 04 

WILLIAM P. HALL, Military Secretary (rank of brigadier gen.) April 23. 04 

Colonels. I Name. Date app't'd. | Name. Date app't'd. 

Name Date app't'd. | •Robinson, H. E...Apr. 7, (>4| *Frederick. D. A.Jan.. 31, 02 

Hei^tand H.O S. .July 22, 02| *Hickey, J. R. . .Nov. 30, 04, •L.itfgett. Hunter. . .May 5. 02 

Andrews' George.. Aug. 7, 031 Brodie, Alex. O.. June 10. or>;*Williams. J. R. ..June 18, 02 

Simpson' W. A. .Aug. 1&, 03 Alvord, Benj. . . . June 17, 05i*Todd. Albert Nov. 6. 02 

McCain. 'H. P. '...Apr. 23, 04| Majors. |*Dunning. S. W . . Mar. 19, 03 

Kerr Jas. T June 17, 05;»Evans. Wm. P. . .Feb. 2, 01]*White, John V Aug. 3. 03 

Lieutenant Colonels. *Guilfoyle, J. F. Feb. 28, 0l|*Noyes, C. R Aug. 12, 03 

♦Davis T F Aug. 14, 03I*Finley, W. L. . .Feb. 28, 01 1 Ladd, Eugene F. . June 23, 05 

•Crane! C J Aug .21, 03j ♦Starr, Chas. G. . .Mar. 4, 01', 

•Wood, Oliver E.Jan. 21. 04|*Waltz. M. F July 5, 01 1 

INSPECTOR GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

GEORGE H. BURTON, inspector general (rank of brigadier general) .. .April 12, 1003 

Colonel*. I •West. Frank Mar. 2, 03| ♦Gresham, J. C. .Sept. 17, 01 

Garlington. E. A. .Mar. 1, 01 1 * Pratt, .Sedgwick. Aug. 10. 03| •Nichols, Wm. A... Oct. 5. 01 



•Wisser, J. P Nov. 4, 01 

•Gale, G. H. G...Dec. 6, 01 
•Blossom. A. P.. Feb. 17, 03 
•Galbraith. J. G..Apr. 18, 03 



Mills. Stephen C.Apr. 12, 03i*Bru8h, D. II Aug. 13,03 

Chamberlain, J. L., I Majors. 

Nov. 21, 04! Wood. Wm. T. ..Feb. 2. 01 

liicntenant Colonels, l*Febig«r, Lea — Feb. 28. 01 

•Reynolds Alf. ..Feb. 23, 031 'French, F. H. . .Feb. 28, 01 

JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

GEO. B. DAVIS. Judge advocate general (rank of brigadier general) May 24, 1901 

Colonels. |Hull, John A . .. ; Apr. 16. 03| Goodler, Lewis E.June 18.01 

Crowder, E.H. (g.s.)Ap,16,03lDunn. George M.Nov. 22, 031 Morrow, Henry M.Jan. 27, 03 

Dudley Edgar S.Nov. 22, 031 Majors. jBethel, W. A .July 15, 03 

Lieutenant Colonels. IDodds. Frank L. . May 22. 01 1 Winship, Bl an ton. .Jan. 4, 04 
Carbaugh, H. C.Dec. 18, 021 Porter. John B. . .May 27. 01) 

QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 

CHAS. F. HUMPHREY, quartermaster general (rank of brigadier gen.). April 12. 1903 
Colonels. ^ I Jones, S. R... . .Aug. i;, 031 Cruse, Thomas. ... .July 5. 02 



Marshall, J. M...Feb. 2, 01 
McCauley. C.A.H.Feb. 24, 03 
Clem, John 1». . ..Aug. 15. 03 
Patten, Wm. S..Aug. 17, 03 

Pond. Geo. E Jan. 20. 04 

Pullman. J. W. .June 25, 04 
Lieutenant Colonels. 

Pope, J. W July 5, 02 

Miller. C. P. (sen. ^ 

staff) Oct. 2. 02 

Ruhlen, Geo Aug. 2. 03 

Miller, Wm. H..Aug. 15, 03 



McCarthy, D. E Oct. 2, .02 

Knight, John T...Feb. 24. 03 
Carson, J. M., Jr. .Apr. 12 r 03 

Palmer, A. M Aug. 2, 03 

Baxter, J. E. .. . .Aug. 15. ©3 
Zalinskl, M. G....Aug. 17,03 

Wood, W. S Jan. 20, 04 

Baker. C. B Jan. 22, 04 

Will' mson.G.McK. June 25, 04 

Slavens. T. H July 9; 04 

Stanley. D. S. ... .July 10,04 



Robinson, W.W. Jr. Jan 20, 04 
Von Schrader. F.July 9, 04 

Sawyer. J. E July 10, 04 

Stevens, R. R Dec. 15, 06 

Majors. 
Hodg.,on. F. G....Fcb. 2. 01 
Bellinger, J. B. ...Feb. 2, 01 
French. J. T.. jr. .Feb.' 2, 01 

A.eshire. J. B Feb. 2. 01 

Littell. Isaac W. .Oct. 26. 01 
Bingham. G. S. . .Oct. 26, 01 

Devol, Carroll A. .May 5, 02) Schofield, R. McA.Dec. 15,' 05' 
SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 
HFJNRY G. SHARPE, commissary general (rank of brigadier general). .. .Oct. 12, 1905 

Colonels. I Da vis, Geo. B Oct. 6, .05 j Hart, Wm. H July 27, 03 

Osgood. H. B..,.Jan. 19. OSjWest, B. K Oct. 13, 06 Davis. Alex. M . . . Mar. 17. 04 

Dravo, E. B..~ . .Oct. 6, 05 1 Majors. . I Gallagher. H. J.. Jan. 19, 05 

Smith. Abiel L. ..Oct. 13, 05! Kniskern, A. D...Feb. 2, OliRuthers, G. W. . . Aug. 28. 05 

Lieutenant Colonels. ) Eastman, F. F...Apr. 1, 01|WUkins, H. E Oct. 6.05 

Allison. J. N....July 27. 03 ; Krauthoff. C R. .Apr. 8, 01 j Geary, W. L OoJ. 13, 05 

Bralnard, D. L. .Aug. 28, 05| | .. 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. - • 

ROBERT M. O'REILLY, surgeon general (rank of brigadier general). .. .Sept. 7, 1902 
Colonels. _ I Name. DateappH'd.) Name. Date app't'd. 



Name. 
Heizmann, C. L. .Apr. 7, 02 

Glrard. J. B Sept. 7, 02 

Hall, John D....Feb. 13, 03 
Gorgas, Wm. C.Mar. 9. 03 
Harvey, Philip F.Aug. 6, 03 
Byrne, Chas. B...Aug. 9. 03 
Havard. Vaiery. .Apr. 20, 04 



Date app't'd. ] Turri U, H. S June 28, 02 

~ " ~~ Taylor, Blair D.. June 30. 02 

Torney, Geo. H. . .Aug. 6, 03 
Crampton, L. W.Aug. 9, 03 
Corbusier, W. H.Apr. 26, 04 

Appel, D. M Aug. 8. 04 

Perley, H. O . . . . Aug. 14, 04 
Davis, W. B Jan. 19, 06 



Hoff, J. Van R,.Jan. 19. 05] Gray, W. W.....Apr. 6, 05 

Adair, G. W Apr. 6, 05| Brechemin, I .July • 1, 05 

Lieutenant Colonels. I Majors. 

Moseley. E. B...Feb. 14, 02 La Garde, L. A.Nov. 13. 96 
Maus. Louis M....Apr. 7, 02] Banjstdr, J. M...Jan. 26, 07 1 



Appel, Aaron H... May 3, 97 

Powell, J. L» Oct. 1,97 J 

Richard, Chas Nov. 15, 97 

Carter, W. F . . . . Nov. -80; 97 

I Ebert, R. G .Apr. 17. OS 

Gibson, Robt. J. .Apr. 23, 9S 
Arthur, Wm. H.. Aug. 23..' 98 
■Bushnell, G. E. ..Dec. 10,! 08 
Birmingham.H. P.Dec. 15.198 

Carter, E. C Dec. 21,1 98 

Wyeth, M. C June 8,! 99; 

Johnson, EL W. ..Nov. 6,!lK> 



STAFF OFFICERS OF THE ARMY. 



Majors. 

Nam e . . Date app' t' d . ' 

Ives. Francis J... Feb. 2, 01 
Egan, Pe ter R . . . . Feb. 2, 00 
Wakeman. W. J.Feb. 21, 00 
Stephenson, W. ..Apr. 28, 00 

Phillips, J. L Oct. 8, 00 

Borden. Wm. C.Feb. 2. 01 

Mearns, E. A Feb. 2, 01 

Edie, Guy L- , . . . .Feb. 2, 01 
Crosby. Wm. D...Feb. 2, 01 
Kneecller. Wm. L.Feb. 2, 01 
Gandy. Ohaa. M. .Feb. 2, 01 
Ewing. Chas. B...Feb. 2, 01 
McCaw, W. D....Feb. 2. 01 
Kean. J. R Feb. 2, 01, 



MEDICAL, DEPARTMENT— (Continued). 



Name. Date app't'd. 

Kendall. Wm. P.... Feb. 2, 01 

Morris, E. R Feb. 2, 01 

Harris. H. 9. T....Feb. 4, 01 
Banister, Wm. B. . . Apr. 2, 01 
Woodruff, C. E...Apr. 13, 01 

Sbillock, Paul June 7, 01 

RafCerty, Ogden. . .Oct. 24, 01 

Mason, Chas. F.. .Dec. 9, 01 

Glennan, Jas. D...Jan. 1, 02 

Bradley, Alfred E..Jan.l, 02 

Willcox, Charles... Apr. 7, 0J 

Frick, Euclid B . .June 28, 02 

Keefer, Frank R.June 30, 02 Woodson. R. S. 

Raymond. T. U..Aug. 12, 02 

Snyder, Henry D.. Sept. 7, 02 



Name. Date app't'd 

Smith, Allen M...Nov. 23, 02 
Clarke, Joseph T.Feb. 13. 03 
Lippitt, Wm. F. ..Mar. 18, 03 

Ireland, M. W Aug. 3. 03 

Fisher, Henry C. . .Aug. 9. 03 
Shaw, Henry A... Sept. 22. 03 

Kjeffer, C. F Apr. 26, 04 

Winter. F. A. . . . .. Aug. 3. 04 

Purviance, W. E-.Aug. 14, 04 
Deohon, G. D. . . . .Dec. 5. 04 

McCulloch.C.C.jr.. Jan. 19. 05 
Reynolds, F. P. . .Mar. 31, 05 

_ S Apr. 6, 05 

Hallock. H. M. . . .July 1, 05 
Newgarden, G. J.. Nov. 23, 05 



Raymond. H. I. .Feb. 2. 01 Wales, Philip G... Oct. 27, 02 

PAY DEPARTMENT. 

FRANCIS S. DODGE, paymaster general (rank of brigadier general) . .Jan. 23, 1D04 
Colonels. ~ — ' -- " - ... - - . - - - -- — 

Towar. Albert s:.. Feb. 2. 01 
Stiffen. Culver C. May 3, 01 j 
Whipple. C. ' H. . .Jan. 25, 04 

Lieutenant Colonels. 
Comegys, W_ H. ..Feb. 20. 02 
Tucker, Wm. F..Feb. 19, 031 
Muhlenberg. J. C.Jan. 23, 04 

Smith, Geo. R Jan. 25, 04 

Majors. - 
Halford, E. W...Jan. 10. 931 



Rogers, Harry L. . May 2, 98 
Vinson, Webster... Apr. 3, 99 
Wallace, H. S. . . .Sept. 9, 99 

Payson. F. L Mar. 5, 00 

Downey, Geo. F. . .Feb. 2, 01 
Goodman. T. C. . .May 3. 01 
Houston, Jas. B. . .May 3, 01 
Ray.Beecher B. .Nov. 12, 01 
Lord, Herbert M.Feb. 20, 02 
Rochester, W. B., jr. 

July 24, 02 1 



Smith, Robert S... Feb. 19, 03 
Holloway, G. T. ..Nov. 30. 03 
Gambrill,, W. G. ..Jan. 23, 04 

Keleher. T. D .Jan. 25, 04 

Schofield. W. B... Mar. 3, 04 
Pickett, Geo. E. . .Sept. 6. 04 

Curry, M. B Apr. 13, <;5 

Dawes, J. W Aug. 12. 05 

Canby, Jas...'. Oct. 4, 05 



, CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

ALEXANDER MACKENZIE* chief of engineers (rank o*f brig. gen.).. Jan. 23, 1904 



Colonels. 

Suter. Clias. R. -.Oct. 12, 95 
Lydecker, G. J. ..Apr .30. 01 
SUckney. Amos... .May 2, 01 
Ernst, O. H...... Feb. 20, 03 

Adams. M. B Apr. 23, 04 

-Livermore, W. R.Apr. 23, 04 
Heuer. W. H. . ..June 11, 04 

Stanton. W. S. .Sept. 14, 04 
Adams. H. M. ...June 2ft, 05 

Davis, C. B. L. .Oct, 15. 05 
-• lieutenant Colonels. 
Qui nn, James B. .Jan. 29. 03 
Lockwood, D. W.Peb. 20, 03 
Ruffner. E. H. ..Apr. 13, 03 
Sears. Clinton B..Apr. 21, 03 
Lowell. C. F..... Jan. 22. 04 

Knight. J. G. D. .Jan. 23, 04 
Hozie. R. L. . . .. .Apr. 23. 04 

Marshall W. I*. .Apr. 23, 04 
WUlard. J. H... .Apr. 23. 04 



Bixby, Wm. H. . .Apr. 23. 04 
Rossell, Wm. T. .Apr. 23, 04 
Symons, T. W. . .June 11, 04 
Leach, S. S Sept. 14, 04 



Beach. L. H Feb. 

Zihn. George' A. V* . Apr. 13V 03 
Langfltt. W. C.Apr. 21, 03 
SandfordT J. C. . ..Jan. 22, 04 



Kingman, D. C. .Feb. 16, 05|C«lttenden. H. M.. Jan. 23, 04 

Black, W. M June 26, 05|Fitch. G. D. ; . . . . .Apr. 23, 04 

Fisk, Walter L. .Oct. 15, 05 J Gillette, C. E. . .. .Apr. 23, 04 
Major*. Gaillard. D. DuB.Apr. 23, 04 



Roessler, S. W. . .July 5, 08 
Derby. Geo. McC.July5,08 
Lusk. James L. . . . July 5, 08 

Abbot, F. V.. JulyS. 98 

Casey, Thos. L July 5. 08 

Townsend, C. McD. . . 

Jan. 29, 00 
Goethala. G. W...Feb. 7, 00 
Millis. John....... Apr. 2, 00 

Biddle, John .Apr. 30. 01 

Hodges, H. F.....May 2. .01 
Warren. J. G. . . . .May 3, 01 
Burr. Bdw*rd....Jan/29, 93 



Taylor. Harry..... Apr. 23..04 

Sibert, .W. L Apr. 23, 04 

Kuhn. J. E Apr. 23. 04 

Cralghill. W. E . . Apr. 23, 04 
Newcomer, H. C. .Apr. 23. 04 
Patrick. M. M. .. :Apr. 23. 04 
Rich*. C. S ..... . .June 11, 04 

Rees. T. H. . . . . . .July 11, 04 

Potter. C. L. ....Sept 14. 04 

Shunk, F, R. Feb. lfl» 06 

Lucas.EvW.Van C.June26.05 
Jervey. Henry. . . . .Oct. 15; 05 



ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT. 

WILLIAM CROZIE5R, chief of ordnance (rank of brigadier general) ..... Nov. 22, 1901 

Colonels. iLyle, D. A... Jan. 21, 04|Bruff, Lawrence L.Apr. 5, 03 

Phipps. Frank H.Feb. 17, 03j Rockwell, James, jr.. JClarJ*, Charles H..Aug. 1. 03 

Greer. John B...Jan. 19, 041 Sept. 17. 04|Hobbs. Frank E..Aug. 16. 03 

Pitman. John Jan, 21. 04 (Russell, A. H. . ..Jan. 19, 05jBenet. J. W Jan. 19, 04 

Smith. Chas. S. .Jan. 19, 05 [ Majors, Gibson. W. W. . ..Jan. 21. 04 

Lieutenant Colonels. iBirnie. Rogers Feb. 7. 01 Babbitt. E. B Aug. 25. 04 

Blunt, S. E .Aug. 1, 03| MacNutt, Ira Oct. 15, 01 Lissak, O. M Sept. 17, 04 

Heath, Frank... .Aug. 16, 03 1 Baker. Frank June 14. 02 Durn, B. W Jan, 19, 05 

Taylor. D. M Jan. 19. 04|Mitchara, Orin B.Feb. 17, 03 j 

SIGNAL CORPS. 

ADOLPHUS W. GREELY, chief signal officer (rank of brigadier gen.).. March 3, 1887 

Colonel. 1 Name. Dale app't'd. 1 Name. Date app't'd. 

Name. Date app't'd. iScriven, Geo. P.. .July 0, 04|Reber. 9. (g. staff). Mar. 2, 03 

Allen; James ..... . July 6, 04 1 Majors. - I Squler. Geo. . O Mar. 2. 03 

• Ueutenant Colonels. 1 Glassford, W. A. .Feb. 2. 01 ! Russel. Edgar July fy 04 

Thompson, R. B.. .Mar. 2, 03 1 Greene, Frank... Mar. 2, 03|Fechet, E. 0,....Aug. 22, -05 

CHAPLAINS. 

Bank of Major. 

Allensworth. A, .Juno 14.04 1 Swift. Henry. . . .June 14, 04 1 Pierce. C. C..::. .June 14. 04 



LINK OFFICERS OF THE ARMY. 



PROFESSORS AT THE MILITARY ACADEMY. 
Bank of Colonel. I Wood. Edward E..Oct. 1. 812 j Gordon, Witt. B..Mar. 27, 01 

Lamed, Chas. W.July 25, 76 1 1 tank Lieutenant Colonel, j Echols. C. P.. ....June 29. 04 

Tillman, & E Dec. 21, 80|Flcbegor, G. J May 4, 8G| 

CHIEF OFFICERS OF THE LINE. 
CAVALRY. 

Cotor felt, | Hunt, L. P Apr. 7, KB ILockett, J Jan. 30, 03 

Wallace, W. M...Mar. 1. 01 1 Murray, O. H Apr. 8, OS!) Wksoir.. A. P...leb. 17,08 

Godfrey, B. 8. ..June 28. Oi I Varnum, C, A... Apr. 10, c« Gaston, J. A..... Feb. 22, 0J 

Augur, J. A June 9, 02|Tutb^rly. H. E.. .June 22, u Scott, H. L i.Veb. 25. 03 

Moiton, C Feb. 25, 0.i| Jones, T. W Oct. 20, 0L . McCuimick. L. 8.. Apr. 15, 03 

Hatfield, C. A. P.. Mar. 2, 0s\ foajors. .*....«.», **. L. .. .. .Apr. 15, 03 

Kerr, J. B Mar. 30, 03|Hardie, F. H Feb. 2, 01 iGalbralth, J. G...Apr. 18, Oi; 

l*>rst, J. H Apr. 15, 03 Hunter, G. K. Feb. 2, 01 1 Erwin, J. B Apr. 22, 09 

Anderson, G. S...Apr. 18, 03 (O'Connor, C. M....*eb. 2, 01|M»jrgan, G. H Apr. 27,051 

Thomas, E. D Apr. 19, 03 Wilder W. E. .. .Feb. 19, 01 ; Bought*?, D. M... May 26, 03 

Hirghes, M. B....Aug. 5. 03|GuilfoyIe f J. F...Feb. 28, OljSickel, H, G July 16, 03 

.Stedman, C. A. .Aug. 16, 03 Watts, C. H Feb. 2*. 01 1 Hammond. A. G...Aug. 5, OK 

Steever. E. Z....A-ug. 17, 03 Howards, F. A. . .Feb. 28, 01 Johnson, F. O Aug. 16,03 

Stanton, W Mar. 18, 05 [Day. M. W Feb. 28, OllSlocum, II. J Au«. 20. C3 

Godwin, E. A....June22. 05 rinley, W. L Feb. 28, 01! Nicholson, W. J. .May 13, 04 

' Ayres, C. G Apr. 29, 01 i Foster, B\ W July 8, 04 

Grtsham, J. C --------- - 

Gale, G. H. G. 

Plu-.her, J 

Taylor, C. W. 

Roach. W. 1) June 9, 02 

Shunk, W. A.... June 28, t'2 

Bishop, H. 8 July8, 02 

Andrus, E. P July 15, 02 



Ward, F. K June 23, 05 

Lieutenant Colonels. 

Rodgers, A Jan. 30, 03 

Schuyler, W. S. .Feb. 17, 0J 
Kingsbury, H. P.Feb. 25. 03 

West, F Mar. 2, 03 

Chare, Q. F Apr. 16, 03 

Bomus, P. S Apr. 18, 03 

"arker, . J Apr. 19, Oi 



Sept. 17. 01 1 Browp, W. C July 28, 04 

..,Dec. 0, 01; Brewer. R. P Sep*. 15, 04 

. .Lee. 9. 01 ' Brown. O. J Nov. 30. 04 

.Feb. 22. 021 Brett. L. M Mar. 30, 05 

"" \\ illcox, El P.. -.*. ..Apr. 7, Ui 

Goldman. H. J Apr. 8. 05 

Macomb L A. O Apr. 10, 00 

\Ws, T. J Ap.\ 22, 06 



Garrard, J Apr. 22, 03 j Sibley, F. W July 30, 02 Merr-er, W. A June 20, 05 

Paddock, G. H- .Aug. 16, 03J Oieever, B. H. . .Sept. 13, 02 Grierson, C H Aug. 2,^)6 

Dodd, G. A July 28, 04JWheeler, H. W...Oct. 29, 02 Renso > , H. C Oct. 20, 05 

1'ickey. J. B Nov. 30, 04 1 Read. R. D., Jr. .Jan. 1C, 03JSandB, G. H Oct. 20, 05 

McClernand, E. J.Mar. 18, OClSwift, K Jan. 24, 03 1 

ARTILLERY. 
SAMUEL M. MILLS (gen. staff), chief of artillery (rank ot btfgadier general). 

June 20, 05. 



Colonels. 

Morris, C ^eb. 21, 02| 

Greenough, G. G.Feb. 21. 03 

Men-ill. A. H Apr. 14, 03 

Grimes. G. 8 July 19, 03 

Davis, J. M. K.. July 28, 0i 



Crawford, M . . . . . J une 20. Of I Foster, C. W July 28, 03 

Whistler. G. N. ..June 30. ''5 (Deems, C : July 31. C6 

Reed, H. A Sept. 16, 05 1 White, J. V Aug. 3, 03 

cummins. A. R...Nov. 7, 05| Weaver, E. If Aug. 4, 03 

Majors. Hoyle, E. D Aug. 10, 03 

_. .... __. . Reed, H. A Aug. 22, 01 1 Adams, G Aug. 10, 03 

Stewart, W. F. .Aug. 11 (KTCummins, A. S. .Aug. 22, 01 Marsh, F Aug. 11, (3 

Thorp, Frank Jan. 21, 04 1 Dyer, A. B Aug. 23, 01 Woodward, C. a.. Aug. 14, 03 

Caziarc. L. V.. . .Jan. 23, 04 1 Walker, L 11. . .Sept. 23, 01 j Gayle, E. E Aug. 14, 03 

Howe, W May 20, 04 : Duvnll, W.P. (g.s.)£ep.23, 01 Rowan, HamIlton..Nov. 1. 03 

Potts, R. D June 8, 05 1 Andrews. H. M. .Sept. 23, 01 1 Pi ice, D Jan. 21, 04 

Hills, E. R June 19, 05 Parkhurst. C. D. Sept. 23 0< i Harlow, F, 8 Apr. 1, 04 

Taylor, F. W June 5*>. '"" I Macomb, M.M (g.?.)Nov.4,ri I * m*>«\ p. E Ma v 20. 04 

i Lomla, Lugia Nov. 7, 05 1 Wi.sser, J. P Nov. 4, 01 iGreble, B. St. G...Oct. 7, 04 

Lieutenant Colonels. inn-rison, G. FE. Feb. 21, 02, strong, p. S Nov. 2*. 04 



Pratt, S Aug. 10, 03 

MeCle Han, ► A ug. 1 1 , 03 

AnuV.rson, H. R.Aug. 14. 03 
Patterson, R. H..Nov. 1, 03 

Wood, O. E Jan. 21, 04 

*alifr, J. M May 20. 04 

Hoskins, J.D.C. .Mar. 22, 05 
I arris. H. L Apr. 12, 05 



Williams, J. R..June 18. 02lBIunt, A. C Apr. 12,05 

. u, ~ { "" Raff erty, W. C... Apr. 14,^6 

Newcorab, W. P. .May 20, 1)5 
Phillips, C. L June 8, 05 



Bailey, C. J June 11, 05 

Townsley, C. P.. .June 20, 05 
rpv, <? # F. . ..Tur>e -W. OR 



Homer, W. B ...July 22\ 02 
Anderson, G. L... July 30, 02 

Niles, L Sept. 11, 02 

Coffin. W. H Sept. 20, 02 

Todd, A Nov. «. 02 

Brown, E. T Dec. 3. 02 

__ _ Slaker. A l>c. 20, 021-Rumbough. D. J. .Sept. 16, 05 

Murray, A Apr. 14. OH (Ludlow, H. H. ...Apr. 14, 03 1 Harmon. M. F. Nov. 7, 05 

Birkhimer, W. E. May 20.0M Hamilton, W. R..Apr. 14, 03 Cronkhite, A Nov. 24. 06 

Lundeen, J. A... June 8, 05| | 

rNFANTRY. 

Colonels. |Ray. P. H Aug. 12, 03 1 Wheeler, W. B. ..Oct. 11. 06 

Joeelyn, S. P Feb. 28, 01 1 Lock wood. B. C.Aug. 13, 031 Scott. Walter S. . .Oct. 30. 05 

Hubb. J. W July 1, 01 Reade, P Aug. 13. <3| Lieutenant Colonels. 

Marklcy. A C Oct. 5, 01) Van Orsdale. J.T.Aug. 14, 03 j Gardener, C Feb. 18, 03 

Noble, C. H June 9. 02* Huston, J. F. .. .Aug. 15. 03 1 Reynolds, A Feb. 23, 03 

'Duggan. W. T Oct. 3, 02 1 Hoyt, R. W Dec. 3, 03 1 Alien, L. C Mar. 15, 03 

i Price, B. D O-t. 18, 02 j Williams, C. A. . .Jan. 23. 04 | Macklin, J. E Apr. 20,«3 

I Sweet, O J Feb. 18. 03iMaus, M. P Jan. 24, 04 Pitcher. W. L... May 25. 03 

j Myer A L Feb. 23, 03 j Smith, F. A Jan. 24. 04 j Foster, H. S July 26, 03 

'Duncan. J. W Aug. 9. 03 1 Woodbury, T. C. Mar. 20, 04 1 Dent, J. C July 29, 03 



Whitlull, S. R ruly 2«, 03 

Rpgan. J July 29. 03 

f '"•-niivi.ti, D Auc;. 8, 03 

Hall. C. B Aug. 8, 03 

I Mansfield, F. W..Aug. 12, 03 



Brown. G. Le R.July 12, 04 1 McGunnegle, G. K 

Pratt. E. B Dec. P*. 04 » July 30. 03 

Oowles, C. D Apr. 11, 05 1 Robertson. E. B. .July 31, 03 

Borden, G. P.,... Apr. 14, 051 Greene, H. A Aug. 8, C3 



NATIONAL. HQMB FOR DISABLED VOL.UNTEl>l SOLDIERS, 



43 



INFANTRY— (ConUnued). 
I . Name. Dateapp't'd 



Name. 



Date app't'd. 



Ballard. R. L Apr. 1. 01 ! H<we. E. W .Feb. To, w 

Moon. H. B Apr. 13, 01 1 Dunning. S. W...Mar. 19. 03 

Glenn, E. F Apr. 22, 01 j Panjilo, J. M. T.Apr. 17. 03 

Cecil, G. R May 4, 01 Strother, L, H....Apr. 20, 03 



Lieut.-Colonel£. 

Name. Dateapp't'd. 

BoRon K. B Aug. 9, 03 

Pettit. J. S Aug. 11. 03 

Hodges, C. L. Aug. 18, 08 

Loughborough, R. 

H R Aug. 12,03 

Yeatman, R. T. .Aug. 14, 03 

Davis. T. F. Aug. 14, 03 

Brush, D. H. . . .Aug. 16, OS 

Crane, C. J Aug. 21, 03 

Bailey, H. K Oct. 81. 03 

Paulding. W Jan. 20, 04 

Cooke, L. W Jan. 24, 04 

3harpe. A. C... Mar. 29, 04 
Roach. O. H. . . .Mar. 29. 04 
Bowen, W. H. CMar. 29, 04 
Robinson. H. E.. .Apr. 7. 04 
Wotherspoon, W,.July 12, 04 
Mason, a W....Oct: 20. 04 
Williams. A. ;. . . .Dec. 16. 04 

Irons, J. A Apr. 9, 06 

Lovering, U A. *Apr. 11. 05 
Brans. R, K. . . .Apr. 14, 05 

Booth. C. A Aug. 8, 08 

Cooke, G. P July 28, 05 

rCttubb, a St J.. .Oct. 11,05 

Wood. P. G Oct. 80, 05 

Majors. 
Crittenden, J. J.. Feb. 2, 01 

Wood. W. T Feb. 2, 01 

Evans, W. P Feb. 2, 01 

Irvine, R. J. C.Feb. 28. 01 
Hardin, B. B....Feb. 28, 6* 
Wilson. R, H....Feb. 28, 01 

Febiger, L JVJb. 28. 01 

Byrne, B. A Feb. 28, 01 

French, F. H....Feb. 28, 01 
Augur, A. A..... Feb. 28, 01 

McClure. C .Mar. 1, 01 

Wolf, S. A Mar. 2, 01 

Starr. C. G Mar. 4, 01 

Buttler, W. C....Mar. 5. 01 

Rogers, J. S Mar. 25, 01 

Young, G. 8 Apr. 1, 01 

THIS NATIONAL HOME FOR DISABLED VOLUNTEER SOLDIERS. 

Board of Managers— The President of the United States; the Chief Justice of 
the United States: the Secretary of War, ex-officlis; General Martin T. McMahon. presi- 
dent, 346 Broadway (New York Life Building). New York (term expires 1010); General 
Thomas J. Henderson, first vice-president, Princeton. IlL (term expires 1908); Gen- 
eral J. Marshall Brown, second vice-president, Portland, Me. (term expires 1008);' 
General Charles M. Anderson, secretary, Greenville. O. (term expires 1906); Captain 
Henry E. Palraer, Omaha. Neb. (term . expires 1910); Colonel Walter P. Brownlow, 
Jonesboro, Tenn. (term expires 1908,; John M. Holley, La Crosse. Wis. (term expires 
19*)); Major William Warper, Kansas City, Mo. (term expires 190G); Colonel Henry 
H. Markham, Pasadena, Cal. (term expires 1910); Franklin Murphy, Newark. N. J. 
(term expires 1906); Colonel Edwin P. Hami_aond, Lafayette, Ind. (term expires 1908); 
Major Moses Harris, general treasurer. 

The principal officers of branch homes are: Central, Dayton, Ohio: governor, J. B 
Thomas; treasurer, A. J. Clark; surgeon, F. W. Roush. Northwestern. Milwaukee, 
Wis.: governor. Cornelius Wheeler; treasurer. J. E. Armitage; surgeon Oscar Chrysler 
Eastern, Togus, Me.; governor, John T. Richards; treasurer. A. L. Smith; surgeon W." 
E. Elwell. Southern, Hampton, Va.: Governor, William Thompson; tieasurer, Ii'. A. 
Beeson; surgeon, John A. Johnston. Western, Leavenworth, Kan. : governor, Sidney G. 
Cooke; treasurer. W. W. Martin; surgeon. John L. Fryer. Pacific. Santa Monica, Cal.: 
governor, O. H. La Grange; treasurer, T. J. Cochrane; surgeon. O. C. McNary. Marlon, 
Marion, Ind.: governor, Geo. W. Steele; treasurer, J. Q. Adams; surgeon, Harry Mil- 
ler. Danville, Danville, 111.- governor, Isaac Clements; treasurer, M. J. P>arges; bur- 
geon. D. C. Jones. Mountain^ Johnson City. Tenn.: governor, J. P. Smith; treasurer, 
P. E. Divine; surgeon, E. T. West. Battle Mountain Sanatorium* Hot Springs, S. 
D.: surgeon and superintendent, A. G. Hull; building^ 

The requirements for admission include an honorable discharge from the United 
States service and disability which prevents the applicant from earning his living by 
labor. Soldiers or sailors whose pensions exceed $16 a month are not eligible unless 
the reasons are explained to the manager and are satisfactory to him. 

There are also thirty State homes, located as follows: Veterans' Home of Cali- 
fornia, Yountville; Colorado Soldiers and Sailors' Home, Monte Vista; Fitch'3 Home 
for Soldiers, Noroton, Conn.; Idaho State Soldiers' Home, Boisfe; Illinois Soldiers and 
Sailors' Home, Quincy; Indiana State Soldiers' Home, Lafayette; Iowa State Soldiers- 
Home, Marshalltown ; Kansas State Soldiers' Home, Fort Dodge; Massachusetts State 



Mann. W. A July 1, 01 

Waltz, M. F July 5, 01 

Ames, R. F July 11, 01 

Getty. R. N July 23, 01 

Jones, F. B July 28, 01 

Byrne, G Sept. 22, 01 

Abercromble, W. R. . . 

Sept. 27, 01 

Nichols, W. A Oct. 5, 01 

Terrett, C. P Oct. 7, 01 

Phister. N. P Oct. 15, 01 

Paxton, A. R Oct. 16, 01 

Torrey, Z. W Nov. 8, 01 

Jackson, J. B Nov. 11, 01 

Turner. R. B Dec. 8, 01 

Frederick, D. A. .Jan. 3L 02 
Tillson. J. C. P 4 Mar. 12, 02 
Browne, E. H..Mar. 28, 02 

Ducat, A. C Apr. 14, 02 

Travis, P. M. B.Apr. 14. 02 

Goe, J. B Apr. 15, 02 

Uggett. H May 5. 02 

Kennon, L. W. V.A£ay 28, 02 

Lassiter. W .May 28, 02 

Morton, C. G. . . .May 28, 02 

Pickering, A June 9, 02 

Maney, J. ' A June 28. 02 

Bailey, H. I June 29, 02 

Mallory, J. S. July 8T02 

Emery, J. A- . . . .July 10, 02 

Palmer, G July 15, 02 

Miller. S. W. . . . .July 30, 02 
Benbam, H. H..Sept. 24, 02 
Van Vliet, R. C.Oct 8, 02 

Buck, W. L Oct. 11, 02 

Clark, W. O. ...Nov. 28. 02 
Chvnoweth, E....Dec. 5, 02 



Fremont, F. P.... May 25, 03 

Truitt, C. M June 23. 03 

Bel!, G., Jr. . . . ; . .July 26, 03 
Clarke. C. J. T.... July 29, 03 
Parka J. S.. jr. . .July 31, 03 

McCoy, F. B Aug. 8, 03 

Chandler, H Aug. 9, 03 

Noyes. C. R Aug. 12, 03 

Blatchford, R. M.Aug. 13. 03 

Beacom, J. H Aug. 14, 03 

May. W. T Aug. 14, 03 

Hovey. H, W Aug. 14, 03 

Hearn. L. J Aug. 15; 03 

Wright, W. K....Aug. 26. 03 

Hardin, C. B Aug. 26. 03 

Pendleton, E. P. .Aug. 26,03 
Leonhaeeaer, H. A. Sept. 3, 03 
Penrose, C. W... .Oct. 15, 03 
Howell, D. L.... Nov. 24,03 

Stafford, J Nov. 28, 03 

Kernan, F. J Jan. 20, 04 

Kennedy, C. W. ..Jan. 24, 04 
Griffith. T. W. . . .Mar. 29, 04 
Mclver, G. W. . . .Mar. 29. 04 
Richardson. W. P. .Apr. 7, 04 

Barth. C. H Apr. 7, 04 

Bundy. O July 12, 04 

Hatch. E. E Oct. 20, 04 

Shanks, D. C Nov. 5, 04 

Allaire, W. H Nov. 5. 04 

Stamper, W. T Dec. 16.04 

Blanvelt, W. F Apr. 4, 05 

Hodges, H. a. Jr.. July 15. 05 
Hirst, R. L. .,. ... . July 20, 06 

Roberts, H. L July 28. 05 

f'hatfleld, W. H... Aug. 15. 05 
Morrison, J. F Oct 6, 05 



Plummer. E. H .. Dec. 31, 02 1 Rowan, A. S Oct. 11. 05 

KJrby, H Feb. 4, 03j Andrus, F. B Oct. 30. 05 



















































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MILITARY ACAI>gMY~TROOPS IN WARS OF THB U. & 



45 



UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY. 

Situated at West Point, N- Y. 
BKTFBRTHTTENDENT. BRIGADIER GENERAL A. L,. MILiil, I*. S. A. 

Ttafe. United States Military Academy at West Point was founded in 1802. Each 
Coagiean district and Territ&ry. the District of Columbia and Porto Rico Is entitled to 
have one cadet at the academy. Each State is also entitled to have two cadets at the 
academy tvam the State at large. Forty are also appointed from the United States 
at large. The appointment* (except those from the United States at large and from 
the. District of Columbia) are made fey the Secretary of War at the request of the 
Senator, Representative or Delegate in Congress- and the person appointed must be an 
actual resident of the State. District or Territory from which the appointment 4s made. 
Tha appointments from the United States at large and from the District of Columbia 
are specialty conferred by the Pr&sideni. The appointment of the cadet from Porto 
Rico is made fey the President on the recommendation of the Resident Commissioner 
from Porta Rico. The number of students is thus limited to 522. 

Appointment* are required by law to be made one year in advance of date of admds- 
sloav and may fee made either after competitive examination or given direct «* the 
option of the Representative. For each candidate appointed there may be nominated 
two alternates* who will oe examined with the regular nominee, and one of whom may 
be admitted fta the event of the letter's failure to pass the prescribed preliminary 
'examinational Appointees to the Military Academy must be between seventeen and 
twenty-twe- years of age at date of admission, at least five feet three Inches in height, 
weigh 100 pounds, be unmarried, free from ar.y infectious or moral disorder, and. 
generally, t*om any deformity, disease or infirnJty; must be well versed in reading, 
in writing, taetuding orthography. In arithmetic, and have a knowledge ef the ele- 
ments of English grammar, of descriptive geography (particularly of the United 
States), and oc the history of the United States. The course of instruction requires 
four years, and ts largely mathematical and professional. 

The principal subjects taught are mathematics, French, drawing, tactics of all arms 
of the service, natural and experimental philosophy, chemistry, mineralogy, geology 
and electricity, history, International, constitutional and military law. Spanish, and 
civil and military engineering and science of war. Academic duties commence Sep- 
tember 1 and continue until June 1. Examinations are heKl in each December and 
June, and cadets deficient In either conduct or studies are discharged. From about the 
middle of June to the end of August cadets live in camp, engaged only in military 
duties and receiving practical military instruction. Cadets fire allowed but one leave 
of aosence during the four years' course and, as a rule, it Is granted at the expiration 
of the first two years. The pay of a cadet, with commutation for ration, te $000 00 a 
year, and with proper economy is sufficient for his support, Upon graduating cadets 
are commissioned as second lieutenants In the United States Army. 

MANNER OF APPLICATION. — Applications may be made at any time, by letter, 
to the Secretary of War. to have the applicant's name registered for submission to 
the proper Representative when a vacancy occurs. The application must exhibit the 
full name, date of birth and perrr»an°nt abode of applicant, with the number of the 
Congress district In which his resider.ee is situated. Immediately after his admission, 
and before receiving his warrant of appointment, the cadet mxxdt sign the following 
engagement for service, in the presence of the Superintendent or rtome officer deputed 

by him: "I, . of the State (or Territory) of , aged years — 

months, do teerel y engage (with the consent of my pai^nt or ^uardian) that, from the 
date of my admission as a cadet of the United States Military Academy. I will serve 
in the Army of the United States for eight years, unless sooner d.scharged by compe- 
tent authority. In the presence .'* The candidate must then take 

the following oath or affirmation: '*!. . do solemnly swear that I will sup- 
port the Constitution of the United States, and bear true allegiance to- the National 
Government; that I will maintain and defend the sovereignty of the United States 
paramount to a.iy and all allegiance, sovereignty or fealty I may ewe to any State or 
country whatsoever, and that I will at all times obey the legal orders of my superior 
officers, and the rules and articles governing the armies of the United States." 

UNITED STATES SOLDIERS' HOME COMMISSION. 

Commissioners — Major General Henry C. Corbin. Adjutant General; Major General 
p CL Ainsworth, the Military Secretary; Quartermaster General Charles F. Humphrey, 
Commissary General Alfred C. Shnrpe. Surgeon General Robert M. O'Reilly. Judge 
Advocate General G. B. Davis. Brigadier General Alexander Mackenzie, Chief of 
Engineers, and Brigadier General Hamilton a Hawkins (retired); secretary of the 
board, N, Hershler. 

Officers of the United States Soldiers* Home, Washington—Brigadier General Ham- 
ilton S. Hawkins (retired), governor; Brigadier General Edw. B. Wllliston (retired), 
deputy governor; Major Henry M. Kendall (retired), secretary and treasurer; Major 
W«. A- Arthur, attending surgeon. 

TROOPS IN WARS OF TUB UNITED STATES. 



Wars, 



| Years, V Troops. { J 



Wars, 



Revofntton 

Northwest Indians 

With France (naval). . 
With Tripoli (naval).. 

! Creek Indiana. 

War of 1812 

Sftmiaote Indians. ...... 

j Black Hawk Indlars. .. 
Creek Indians......... 



1775-1783 
1790-1705 
171)8-1800 
1801-1805 
1813-1814 
1812-1815 
1817-1818 
1831-1832 
183&-IE37 



895.330 
8.983 
4.503 
3.330 
13.781 

628.274 
5,911 
5,031 



| Years. | Troops. 



12.4831 J 



I Cherokee troubles 

{Florida Indiana 

( A roostook troubles 

I Mexican 

1 Apache. Navajo & Utah 

(Civil War 

ISeminole Indians 

) Spanish War..., 



1836-1837 
1835-1843 
1838-1839 
1840-1848 
1849-1855 
1801-18(15 
1850-18581 
1898 



3. 920 

29.253 

1.500 

108.475 

2,561 

2.778.301 

8.087 

298. 913 



t 



THE UNITED STATES NAVY. 



NAVAL STATIONS AND COMMANDERS. 

North A riant Jo Fleet (Rear Admiral Robley J>. Evans, command er-in- 
Ohief).— First Squadron— First Division: Maine, Missouri, Kentucky, Kcaraarge; Second 
Division (Rear Admiral Charles H. Davis, commanding): Alabama, Illinois. Iowa* 
Massachusetts. Second Squadron (Rear Admiral Charles p. Sigabee, commanding)— 
Third Division: Brooklyn. Chattanooga, Galveston, Tacoma; Fourth Division (Rear 
Admiral Wiliard H. Brownson, commanding): West Virginia, Colorado. Maryland, 
Pennsylvania. Third Squadron (Rear Admiral Royal B. Bradford, commanding)— Firth 
Division: Olympia. Cleveland, Denver, Des Moines; Sixth Division: Newport, Nash- 
vttle. Yankee. Coast Squadron (Rear Admiral Francis W. Picking, commanding) — 
Texas, Arkansas, Florida, Nevada. 

Pacific Squadron (Rear Admiral Caspar F. Goodrloh, commander-in-chief).—* 
Chicago, Boston. Concord, Marblehead, Princeton. 

Asiatic Fleet (Rear Admiral Charles J. Train, commander-in-chief)- — Battleship 
Squadron — Ohio. Oregon, Wisconsin. Gunboat division — Callao, Villalobos, Qulros. 
Cruiser Squadron— Baltimore, Cincinnati, Raleigh. Philippine Squadron (Rear Admiral 
George C. Reiter, commanding) — Rainbow, Arayat, Elcano, Frolic, Mindoro, Monadnock, 
Pampanga, Paraguay 

Ai^flof Service Squadron (Rear Admiral Colby M. Chester, commander-in-chief). 
-^•Minneapolis. 

Naval Station, Boston. — Rear Admiral Albert S. Snow, commandant. 

Naval Station, New-York. — Rear Admiral Joseph B. Coghlan, commandant. 

Naval Station, Philadelphia. — Rear Admiral Joseph E. Ciaig. commandant. 

Naval Station, Norfolk. — Rear Admiral Purnell F. Harrington, commandant. 
' Nazal Station, Portsmouth, N. H. — Rear Admiral William M. Mead, comrm.ndant 

Naval station, Washington, D. C— -Rear Admiral Captain Edwin C Pendleton, 
oommandant. „ . - 

Naval Station, Mara Island, Cal.— -Rear Admiral B. H. McCalla, commandant. 

Navy Yard, Paget Sound, Wash. — Rear Admiral Captain William T. Burwell. 
oommandant. 

Naval Home> Philadelphia- — Rear Admiral Nicoll Ludlow (retired), governor. 

NAVAL OFFICERS ABOVE THE GRADE OF LIEUTENANT. 

/ Admiral. 

Date of appointment. Date of retirement. 

George Dewey ..,.. ►.. Mar. 2,1899 ■ — 

. . Rear Admirals. 

(Ranking with major general.) 

RoWey D. Evans..... « Feb. J 1. 1901 Aug. 18,1008 

Henry Glass ..... Oct. ». 1901 Jan. 7. 1906 

Joseph B. Ceghlan ........Apr. 11. 1902 Dec. 8, 1906 

James H. Sands...... . Apr. 11, 1902 July 12, 1907 

Surneli F. Harrmgtoa. .< Mar. 21. 1903 June 6, 1906 

harles D. Slgshos..., Aug. 10. 1903 Jan. 16, 1907 

Colby M. Chester... Aug. 10. 1903 Feb. 28, 1906 

Freacn E. Chadwick Oct. 11.1903 Feb. 29,1900 

Bowman H. McCaUa Oct. 11,1903 June 19. -*• 

Caspar F. Goodrich Feb. 17, 1904 Jan. 7, WOO 

Francis W. Dlckins. ........ June 17. 1904 Nov. 2. 1906 

Charles F. F. Wilde.... ***'£• }25} F cb « & J*2 

Charles H. Davis Aug. 24. 1904 Aug. 28, 1907 

Charles J. Train Sept. 13. 1904 May 14, 1007 

GeorgVA, Convert*.- — Nov. 8. 1904 May 13, 1006 

(Ranking with brigadier general.) 

Royal B. Bradford...... Nov. 22. 1904 July 22, 1906 

Joseph E. Craig t>ec. 28, 1904 Feb. 24. 1907 

Charles M. Thomas Jan. 12.1905 Oct. 1.1908 

Albert S. Snow Feb. 21. 1905 Nov. 18. 1907 

George C. Reiter M*r. 31. 1PO« July 6, 190r 

Wlllard H. Brownson.. May 6, 1906 July 8. 1907 

William W. Mead J» ,l y 1. 1005 Feb. 8. 1907 

Edwin UAgnecker..- ........July 8, 1905 Feb. 19, 19)0 

Thomas Perry .......Sept. 8. 1905 May 26. 1906 

LINE OFFICERS IN GRADES OF CAPTAIN, COMMANDER AND 
LIEUTENANT COMMANDER. 

Captains. I Name. Date apo't'd.) Name. DatP anp't'd 

fRahk with colonel.) I Berry. Robt. M..Feb. 11. 01|Leutze, E. H. C. .. .Oct. 9, 01 

Name Date app'fd.l Very. Samuel W.Feb. 19. OljSebree, Uriel Oct. 9. 01 

fitorkton Chas. H.July 8. 99 Manney. Henry N.Mar. 3, 01 iCouden, Albert R. .Jan. 15.02 
Wafker Asa.^;... Sept. 0.99 Swinburne. W, T. Mar. 3. Oil Pendleton, E. C. ..Jan. 21. 02 

Cvcm Henry W.. Mar. 27. 00] Hemphill. Jos. N.Mar. 3. 01 1 Swift, William Feb.. 9. 02 

Dayton Jaa. H. .Mar. 29. 00 1 Emory. Wm. H. .Apr. 14; 01 Ross. Albert Apr. 11. 02 

Mackenzie M.R.S.July 1, 00| Bieknell, Geo. A.May 12. 01 1 Clover, Rich'dson.Apr. 11, 02 
Snerry. Chas 8. . .July 1. 00| Ackley. Seth M. . A|>r. 8. 04< Millar. Jas. M. .. .Apr. 29. 02 
Hunker John J.. Dec. 11. OOlTilley. Beni. h\ . .S^pt. 2. 01 jColby. H. G. O. ..Juno 18, 02 
Burwell. Wm. T.Nov. 29. OOlMerrell, John P. Sept. 26. 01| 







4* OFFICERS OF THE NAVY 




NuUi 


tfajn«. 






- 








■ i w.is.h. m r- 1 

oa 1 










I, OB 








a, B. E 
















-j. B,*June ** 








W. C June 14, L>2 U nlges. B< W. . 








J, O 








■ 






10. OS 
10, 03| 


'{arrlvon, It. W 












J3. 03 


; Frank a..Niv 
Morrell, Henrj , , . -Nov. 7, 02 
Nuv 21, 02 


Kenton, W 

Hoatwi^ K M .J Hi j 
l!ufQbaq£h, H. M 
riOflMTt T. s. . 








C, B. T..NOV. 21 j 02 S.'M.-II. V. J. i,, 
P E D W..Dec 1 ir, J, G**- . 












4. 04 


Rfjmol- .11, J. II. . . 






■ r. W, II r> i IT, 04 


U . , .Jan, 4, 03 1 






MaJ IS *M 


K ..Jan. 








Inn, 10, ni 








17. in 


10. 03 


Lieutenant Conimajj. 








idlry A.Mti'- 
John I\ .Mijj-. . 


<FUuiU with Hj, 






lferpor, G. Fi. . ,,Scpt. 


Hutching, h Mfir. 'ji. oa 


Knapp, Mutt 1 I 01 






m, N. i: ..KepC. HO, 04 


', Juhn M.Mar. 21 03 


RrrJ^erii, Ttfm. L. ,Fel 1t^ 01 








r?olwril< John C.Apr. 


Mi.itb, Ray :. 01 






ft, 04 


Auf.-. H» (W 








Baton, Wrii. <.\ .Aih 








NLiii.ro, Aifi\iir P + P*e, 28, 04 


Canada Alt. B. .Au«, 10, 08 






12, (W 


Z;.n<-. V V 3*pt H 03 


liMwn/^l. 






:• . Jan in, U5 


Bklwards, .!. Mji,,-, l[. M, 






U. 05 


1, 01 
H*lm. J a me- H.,Oct, 1 1 








WillilF, Albert n.i'i'i. i 10, <u 
■ 








L B. K > 1 








Noel, Yoi , Wm. 1- r. i I. 01 








Cutler, W G. . .Die 31 














1 






s June 


r, v. V, ..Mar, ]2 r V4 Knapp, Jot.; 
K. H. , r -Mar. ] rohn. 














\la.r, 18, 04 j Hoyden, R 








M 1j Bryan. Beit 






July 1, 00 


•', L"Iv, \l 






• uth Inly 1, 06 


CofflH, F W July 1, (14 Marsh. Chfl 






July 1, 05 


R iw Aug, «, Vi \ Harlow, CJ 






.Julv 1, OS 


jBailey, F, H Auk *M. vUlOatr, < Uarei 






.Juti 1, 05 


| Capnri.ori, W. B.Aug. 31, 04 M Jill, Wm. A,*.. 






July I, *J5 


Bmltb, J- T. Sept, l; n, Harold 1 








W-llits, G. 3, „ .Sept. l ictt, F. M 








1 i*4 : LHni^berty, J. A Jan 








30, n4iRfrnaaou, JoJin 






JO, 05 


■ ►, P, H,.Bi (ilbbouB, John H. ,!■% 
H. C ..Oct fl i (Mi Sijuwi 






C?omjtMuuli 






r R.mk with Ilettt, < ft.) 


ratte. T. M .Nov. H. 04 i Carter, Thos. F. , Mrr 






Unit: upp'l'd. 


ra. F, C. 






J h-ilu 


Walling. Bums T. 1 Salisbury, Geo r I 








Bquah r ■ Un. V2, tc. Purttll, John T, 






Hugo-. Jul 


Sears, J. Hu ►, . *,Jai*, J LT, <iTi'Lop*»z Rob^n, P - 11 OS 








Culvci', A + B..,.FPh. 12, ih :.' K^Uqgg, FT*lt "W 






ruin- , ,juli 12, mi 


Mayo, H. T t * h „ .Feb. 21, 05 Bit Tor, Reuben O .1 u i 








Ragers. C C..F ^ 'helps, Barry*- 








J. T ...Mar, 21, OT'iAikermatt, A. A 






Sail, j&f, H. . . 


in, B, ..... W Mlnt-T, L^jti 








Pond, C, F. Mar. .il. oriNlblavk Alb, p 








. W ...Mar. 31. Or* Hall, Haxr» . s ,i IT. 02 
Cbfimberp, W. L. Apr, 22, ORl^impson, &iw ,fiopt 1T, U2 






W*ro\ Aaron .. 








<.T, ... Apr, 30, OR | KEnkELid, Thoa. V 






•i. -ft, 01 


i \ A .... ». .,Ma; • Wm. S, . 






| 0. 01 


t.YjJTTnan. Dr>W, Junn-' 16, 00 Van Dtuwr. L. B. .Nov l:1, 02 






2n oi 


Orlffln, T D-.-.Juijf 2<;. u5j Puchanan, W. V. r 2 02 






W. A. + Urc 27, OJ 


Mullli?mn. 1^. 11, Wui J 
| U rau d wren t her , W 






>a llrnry >*-Pefc 







OFFICERS OF THE NAVY. 



: Name. Dateaw^f 

Ltipy. John F 'an. 4, 

Clark, Lewis J. . .Jan. 10. 
Rodman. Hugh. . .Mar. it, 
Hpogewerff. J. A. .Mar. 3, 
Capehart, E>. B...Mar. 3, 
Wilson, Henry B..Mar.3, 
Kaemmerling. G. .Mar. 3, 
Arnold. Solon. . . .Mar. 21. 

Thtess. Emil Art. 28, 

Wood, Spencer S.July 18, 
Brown. Guy W. .Aug. 10. 
Fletcher, Wm. B.Aug. 10. 

Johnston. M Aug. 10, 

Anderson. E. A. Sept. 11, 
Jayne. Jos. L...Sept. 11. 

Doyle. J. G .Sept. 23. 

Key, Albert I* . .Oct. 11, 
Howard. Wm. L.Oct, 11, 
Poyer, John M...Oct 11, 
Higgins. Robt. B.Oct. 11. 
Leonard, John C.Oct. 26, 
Ellioott, J, M.... Dec. 27, 
Dyson. C. W. . . ..Dec 31, 
Gecrge, Harry.... Jan. 1. 
Chapin, F. L. . . . .Jan. 1. 
Herbert. W. C....Jan. 1, 
Halstead, A. 8... Jan. 1, 

Field. H. A Jan. 1. 

Knepper, C. M. . .Jan. 1, 
Williams. C. S...Feb.4, 

Hill. F. K Feb. 4, 

Welles, Roger. .. .Feb. 4, 

McDonald, J. D..Feb. 4, 
Hulme, W. O.... Feb. 17, 

Parmenter, H. B.Mar. 12, 
Jones. H. P.. Jr.. Mar. 16, 
Shoemaker. W.R.Mar. 18. 
Seymour. I. K.....Apr. 2. 

Fans. C. M.......May5, 

Plunkett, C. P. . .June 1, 
Diffenbach, A. C. June 17, 

Fenton, T. CL July 1, 

Ohase. V. O Aug. 1, T 

Hourigan, p. W. Aug. 24, 
Slocum, Q. R.... Aug. 24, 
Miller. W. G.... Aug. 81, 
Kltne, G. W> . ; : -Sept 18, 
McGuinness, J. P. Sept 13. 
Strauss, Joseph*. Sept. 80, 
Stan worth. C. a. Sept. 80, 



d. Name. Date App't'd. 

02 Russell, R~ L. . .Sept. 30, 04 

02 Bispham, H. A. .Sept. 30. 04 

03 Rust. Armistead..Oct. 3, 04 

03 Evans, G. R Nov. 8, 04 

08 Eb?rle, B. W....Nov. 23, 04 
03 McCormick. C. M.Dec. 18, 04 
03 Tarboic, Glennie. .Dec. 28. 04 
03 Gilmer, W. W....Jan. 1. 05 

03 Coontz, R. E. Jan. 1, 05 

03 Bullard, W H. G.Jan. 1, 05 

03 Edgar, W. A Jan. L 05 

08 Oman, J. W Jan. 1, 05 

03 Andrews, P Jan. 1, 05 

03 Hines,. H. K. .Jan. 1, 05 

03 Coooer, G. F Jan. 12. 05 

03 Witherspoon, E.T-Jan. 12, 05 

03 McKean, J. S Feb. 12,05 

03 Hayes, C. H Feb. 21, 05 

03 Jones. H. W Feb. 21, 05 

03 Me Alpine, K Mar. 21, 05 

03 Bush, W. W Mar. 21, 05 

03 Decker, B. C Mar. 31. 05 

03 1 Bristol, M. L Mar. 31. 05 



04) Wells. B. W Mar. 31, 05 

04{McCully, N. A... Apr. 22, 05 
04lBertolette, L. C. Apr. 30, 05 

041 Logan. G. W May ft, 05 

04 Bryan, H. F June 18, 05 

04 Long. A. T June 21. 05 

04 Durell. E. H June 26. 05 

04 Scales. A. H. June 28. 05 

04 Blue. V .....June 28. 05 

04 Stone, C. M June 28, 05 

04 1 Washington, T . . June 30, 05 

04 Davis, A. H July 1, 05 

04 Burrage, G. H....July 1, 05 

04 Russell, F. M July 1, 05 

04 Marble, F July 1, 05 

04 Robertson, A. H..Julyl, 05 
04 Brittain, a B....Julyl, 05 

04 Morgan, C. B. July 1. 05 

04 Crose, W. M July 1, 05 

04 Hubbard, G. F...Julyl, 05 
04 Miller, M. I*. . ..July L 05 
04 Chandler, L. H. . .July 1, 05 
04 Koester, O. W....Julyl, 05 
04 Hay word, G, N...Julyl. 05 
04 Robison, S. S.....Julyl, 05 

04 Hughes, a F July 1, 05 

04 Norton, A* L July 1, 05 

MEDICAL CORPS. 



Name. Date App't'd.. 

Reid. J. H. ;. July 1,05 

Beach, E. L July 1. 05 

Stickney. H. O....Julyl, 05 

Wiley. H. A July 1, 05 

Bassett, F. B., jr.. July 1, 05 

Gates, H. G. July 1, 05 

Jackson, R. H July 1, .05 

Hoff, A. B July 1, 05 

Twining, N. C July 1, 05 

Hutchison, B. F.,. July 1,05 
Magruder. T. P. . . -July 1, 05 
Klttelle, S. E. W..Julyl, 05 

Pratt, W. V July 1, 05 

NultoiC L. M July 1, 05 

Marvell, G. R July 1, 05 

Patton, J. B. iJulyl, 06 

McDougall, W. D..Julyl; 05 

Bradafcaw, G. B July L 05 

Offley, C f N July 1, 05 

Steigner, L. R. de.Julyl. 05 

Phelps. W. W July 1, 05 

Raiser, L. A July 1, 05 

Cole. W- C July 1, 05 

Brand, C. A July 1, 05 

Williams, P July 1,06 

Terhune. W. J July.l, 05 

Mitchell, G. G July 1, 05 

Davis, C. . . July 1, 05 

Harrison, W. K...Julyl, 05 

Schofleld. F. H July 1, 05 

Chase, J. V July 1. 05 

Zlegemeier, H. J... July 1, 05 
Signor, M. H. .. . . .July 1. 05 

Williams. P July 1, 05 

Price. C. B July 1, 05 

Taylor, M. M July 1, 05 

Vogelgesang, C. T.July 1," 05 
McVay. C. B., jr.. July 1, 05 

Bailey, C July 1, 05 

Dayton, J. H July 1, t*5 

Bostwlck, L. A July 1. 05; 

Moffett, W. A July 1. 05 

Latimer, J. L July 1, 05 

Dismukes. D. E July 1, 05 

Edie, J. R July 8. -05 

Belknap. R. R July 18, 05 

Blamer. DeWi tt. . . Sept. 8, 05 
Robison. J. K. . .'.Sept. '9, 05 
Wlllard, A. L...Sept. 30, 05 



PRESLEY M. RLXBE, surgeon general (rank of rear admiral). 



Medical Directors. 

(Rank of captain.) 
Price, Abel F..,..Apr. 9, 99 
Marmion, R. A. . ,Ocfc 25, 90 

Dickinson, D Nov. 11, 99 

Wise. John C... Feb. 7, 00 
Bradley, Geo. P..May3L00 
Fitzsimons, PauLNov. 19. 00 
Dixon, Wm. S...Apr. 28, 01 
Pereona, Remus CNov. 3. 01 
Waggoner, J. R.. Jan. 20. 03 
Streets, Thos. H..Jan. 31, 03 



Simons. M. H. . . .June 9, 03 
Boyd, Jdhn C. . . .June 20, 03 
Harmon, G. E. H..Dec. 8, 04 
Wells, Howard... Jan. 1, 05 
Bertolette; D. N..Apr. 5, 05 
Medical Inspectors. 
(Rank of commander.) 

Derr, Ezra Z Feb. 7, 00 

Rixoy, Presley M.Aug. 24, 00 
MoClurg, W. A.. No v. 19, 00 
Herndon, CO.. .Apr. 28, Ot 



Heneberger, L. G. 
Green, Edward H 

Dickson, S. H 

Lewis, David O. . 
Ames. Howard E. 
Anderson, Frank. 
Lovering, P. A. . , 
Du Bose, Wra. R.. 
Hibbert. C. T..< 
Drake, N. EL... 
Beyer. BL G...„ 



Aug. 24, 00 
.Oct. 29. 01 
.Nov. 3. 01 
.Jan. 26, 02 
.Jan. 4. 03 
.Jan. 20. 03 
.Jan, 81, 03 
.June 9, 03 
.June 20, 03 
*Dec. 8, 04 
..Jan. t, 05 
.Apr. 5, 05 



PAY CORPS, 

HENRY T. B. HARRIS (retired), paymaster general (rank of rear admiral). June 24, 03 



Pay- Directors. 

(Rank with captain.) 
Rand , Stephen .... July 1, 02 
Boggs. L. G. . . . .Sept. 28, 02 
Colhoun, S. R...Nov. 22, 02 
Ring, James A... Deo. 10, 02 
Cann, James B. . .Jan. 5, 03 
Speel. John N...~Tau. 11. 03 

Frazer. Reah. Jan. 19. 03 

Drury. Hiram B. .Nov. 4, 03 
LiUlefield, C. W-Dec 87, 08 



Gait, W. W Dec. 27, 

Martin. J. R Apr. 13, 04 

Ray. C. M Feb. 18, 05 

McDonald, M. C.Mar. 10, 05 
Rogers, E. B....Mar. 13, 05 
Pay Inspectors. 
(Rank of commander.) 
Kerr. Leeds C.Sept. 28, 02 
Ball, R. T. M... Nov. 22, 02 
Williams, ChaarS.Dec. 10, 02 



Carpenter, John S..Jan. U, 03 
Hunt, Livings ton.. J an. 19, 03 
Mudd, John A. , . .Feb. 27, 03 
Simpson, Geo. W. .Mar. 8, 03 
Sullivan, Harry R..Mar. 3, 03 

Heap, S. L .Dec. 27, 03 

Phillips, J. S Apr. 13. 04 

Jewett, T. S Feb, 18, 05 

Arms, F. T. .. M .Mar. 10. 05 
Hicks, T. H. Mar. 18, 05 



Cowie. Thos. J.... Jan. 5, 03 1 Reynolds, Z. W.June 14, 05 



i 



fHB MARIXB CORPS— VE3SEXLS OP THE NAVY. 



NAVAL CONSTRUCTION CORPS. 
WASHINGTON L. CAFFS, chief naval constructor (rank of rear admiral). . .Nov. 1, 89 
Captains. | Stahl, Albert W .. . J uly 9, t* . Bankson, Lloyd. . .Jams 36, 96 

Linnard, Jos. 11. .Mar. 3, 91 (Baxter, W. J Aug. 10, 03| lawvcsey. John G.June 30. 86 

Woodward, Jos. J. Mar. 3, 91 Commanders. ;stocker, Robert... Nov. 11. ST 
Taylor. I>avld W..Dec 6, 91 l Cappe, W. L. Jan. 28, 96 1 Snow, KIttot Nov. 11, W 

CIVIL ENGINEER CORPS. 

If. T. ENDICOTT, chief Bureau of Tarda and Dock* (rank of rear admiral).. Apr. 4, 9ft 
Captain. \ Commander*. 

Name. Dateapp't'd.) Name. Dateapp't'd. 

White, U. 6. Q... Jan. 9, 77|Maxaon. F. O....Oct. 26, 81 

i Peary. Root. K...OcL 26, 81 



Name. Dateapp't'd. 
Hollyday. R. C.Mar. 16,94 
Menocai. A. J Mar. 1ft. M 



Chaplains. 

(Rank of captain.) 
Trioou. David H. .Feb. 5, 72 
Clark, Henry H..Jan. 27, 73 

rbompeon, F May 16, 81 

Hoes, RosweU R.July 26, 82 

(Rank of commander.) 
Wright. Carrol] Q.mar. 3, 85 



CHAPLAINS AND PROFESSORS. 



Isaaes, Walter Q.Apr. 26, 8b 
lieaney, W. H. I. 

Mar. 14, 92 
Frasier, John B..Mar. 2, 9o 
Jones, Harry W.. June 6, 96 
Cassard, William G. 

Apr. 3, S7 
Helms, W. T Feb. 4, 98 



iProfessm «f Matb*matlc*. 

(Rank of captain.) 
Hendrickaoh.W.W.Mar. 21, *3 
Brown. Stimson J.. Oct. 13, 8a 

Haw eon, E. K Oct. 28, 90 

(Rank of commander.) 

Alger. Philip R Nov. 1. 90 

Dodge, Omenao G.June 29, 92 



THE MABINE COBPS. 

GEORGE F. ELLIOTT, brigadier general and commandant Oct. 3 03 

LINE OFFICERS ABOVE THE GRADE OF CAPTAIN. 

Colonels. | Karmany, L Dec. 9, 04 1 Kane, Theo. P. . . .Mar. 3. 03 

Goodrell, M. C Mar. 3, 03| Harnett, G F^b. 28, 05] Lucas, Lewis C.Mar. 3,03 

Kelton, Allan C. Dec. 27, 03 Doyen, C. A Mar 11, 05} Long. Chas. G... .June 18, 03 

Berryman, O. C. . . June 4, 04 Mahoney, J. E. .. .Apr. 1, 05 1 Fuller, B. H Dec. 27. 03 

Mumhy. P. St, C.Dcr, 8, 04| Majors. i Moses, L. H Mar. 6. 04 

Biddle, W. P Feb. 28, 05|Moses. Franklin J. Mar. 2, 031 Neville, W. C June 4! 04 

Waller, L. W. T.Mar. 11, 05|Perkins, Con M. .Mar. 3, 031 r i readwelL T. C.Dec 9 04 

Dickins. R Apr. 1, U5|Pendloton, Jos. II. Mar. 3, 03| Wilinins, D Feb. 2»! 05 

Lieutenant Colonels. I Ltjeune. John A. Mar. 3, 03|Dutton, R. McM..Mar. 11, 15 

Wood. T. N Mar. G, 04 Cole, Eli K. Mar. 3, 03 Lowndes. E. R.. .. .Apr. 1. 05 

White. H. K June 4. 04| j • * • *. w 

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT. 

Colonel. C. H. Lauchheimer (Dec. 15, 03); lieutenant colonel, H. C. Haines (Dec. 
IB, 03): majors, R. H. Lane (June 18, 03); L. J. Magill (June 18, 03): A. 8. McLemore 
(Dec. 15, 04). 

QUARTERMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Colonel, Frank L. Denny (Mar. 3. 98); lieutenant colonel, Thomas C. Prince (Mar 
8. 03); majors, Charles L. McCawley (Mar. 8, 99); Cyrus S. Radford (Mar. 3, 03). ^^* 

PAYMASTER'S DEPARTMENT. 

Colonel, Green Clay Goodloe (Mar. 3, 99); lieutenant colonel, George Richards 
(Mar. 3, 03); major, William C. Dawson (June 18 03). ^ 



VESSELS OF THE NAVY. 



•*B. L. R." means breech loading rifles; "B. L. H.. 
F.," rapid fire guns; "H. R. C," Hotchkiss revolving 
rapid fire breech loading rifles; "mm.,** millimetre "~ ' 
•sinrtorin tnhp«- STriole screw: *Twin 1 



H., M breech leading howitzers; • i B. 
olving cannon; "R. JP. B. L. R./' 
; "D.,'* displacement In tons; •TP., M 



torpedo tubes; 8 Triple screw; *Twin screw; ^Captured in Spanish-American War. 
BATTLESHIPS — First Class. 

• ALABAMA— D., 11,703; speed, 17,013 
knots; armament, 4 13-in. B. L. R.; 14 0- 
ln R. F\, 16 6-pdr. R. F.; 8 1-pdr. R. F., 
2 *3-in. R. F. field and 4 Colts; 4 T. 
Launched May, 1898. 

♦ CONNECTICUT— D., 16,000; speed, 18 
knots; armament, 4 12-in. B. L, R., 8 
8-in B. L. P.. 12 7 in. B. L. R., 20 3-in. 
R. F., 12 3-pclr. semi-auto., 8 1-pdr. 
auto.. 2 3-in. field guns, 8 machine guns. 
Launched September, 1904. 

•GEORGIA— D., 14.948; speed, 19 knots; 
armament, 4 12-ln. B. L. R„ 8 8-in. B. 
L, R., 12 & in. R. F. G., 12 8-ln. R. F. G., 
12 3-pdr. R. F., 8 1-pdr. R. F., 2 8-ln. 
field, 2 machine, 9 auto. guns. Launched 
October, 1904. 



IDAHO— D., 13,600; speed, 17 knots: 
armament, 4 12-in. B. L. R, 8 8-in. B. 
L. R., 8 7-in. B. JU R., 12 8-in. R. F G., 
3-pdr. R. F., 4 1-pdr. R. F. f 2 8-ta, field 
guns, 8 machine guns, 2 submerged tor- 
pedo tubei. Launched, December, 1905. 

•ILLINOIS— D., 11,861; speed, 17.448 
knots; 4 J 3-in. B. I* R.:14 6-in. R. F.J 
16 6-pdr. R. F.. 1 6-pdr. R. F., 2 8-in, R. 
F. and 8 Colts; 4 T. 

•INDIANA— D„ 10.163; speed 16,647 
knots; armament, 4 13-ln.. 8 8-in. B. L> 
R.. 4 6-in. R. F. G., 20 6-pdr., 6 1-pdr. 
R. F.. 2 Colt nuto., 1 3-in. field gun, 2 T. 
Launched Feb., 1898. 

•IOWA— D.. 11.275; vpeed 17,087 knots; 
armament, 4 12-ttu, 8 8-in,, B. L. R.«, • 



VESSELS OF THB NAVY. 



01 



4-ln. B, F, R I* R.; 20 6-pdr.. 4 1-pdr. 
R. S\. 4 Colts and 2 3-in. R. F. field guns; 
4 T. Launched March, 1898. 

KANSAS— D.. 16.000; speed, 18 knots; 
armament. 4 12-ln.. 8 8-ln.. 12 T-ln, B. 
L. R.. 20 3-ln. R. P.. 12 3-pdr. seml-auto., 
8 1-pdr. auto.. 2 8-tn. field, 8 machine 
Sons. Building, New-York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, N. J. i 

♦KEARSARGE— D. 11,724; speed, 16.82 
knots; armament,. 4 iS-in. and 4 8-ln. B. 
L. R-; 14 5-ln.. 2C 6-pdr. and 8 1-pdr. 
R. F.; 4 Colts and 2 3-ln. R. F. field 
guns; 4 T. I launched March, 1898. 

♦KENTUCKY — Same as Kearsarge. 
speed 16.90 knots. Launched March, 1898. 

♦LOUISIANA— Same as Connecticut. 
Launched August. 1904. 

♦MAINE—D... 12.846; speed, 18 knots; 
same armament as Missouri. Launched 
July, 1901. 

♦MASSAC H U SE TTS— P.. 10.168; speed, 
16.2 knots; armament, 4 13-ln., 8 8-in. 
B. L. R.; 4 6-in. R. F. G.: 20 6-pdr., 9 
1-pdr. R. F. : 2 Colts, 2 3-4n field guns; 
2 T. Launched June, 1893. 

MICHIGAN— Authorised by Act of 
March 3,, 1995. Plans not completed. 

MINNESOTA— D.. 16.000: speed, 18 
knc-s; armament same as the Kansas: 2 
su'vmexged torpedo tubes. Launched AprlL 
1906. 

MISSISSIPPI— D., 13,000; speed, 17 
knots; 4 12-in. B. L. R.; 8 8-in. B. L. R.; 
8 7-ln. B. L. R.; 12 8-4n. TEL F.; 6 3-pdr. 
seml-auto; 4 1-pdr. R. F.; 2 .8-ln. field 
and 8 Colts; 2 T. Launched- September, 
1906. 

•MISSOURI— D.. 12,362; speed 18.15 
knots; armament 4 12-in. B. L. R.; 16 
6-in. R. F.; 6 8-4n. R. F. G.; 8 3-pdr. R. 
F.; 6 1-pdr. R. F.; 2 Colts; 2 8-in. R. F. 
field; 2 T. Launched December, 1901 . 

♦NEBRASKA— D., 14,948; speed, 19 
knots; armament same as Georgia. 
Launched October, 1904. 

NEW HAMP8HIRE— D.. 16.000; speed, 
18 knots. Armament same as Minnesota. 

♦NEW-JERSEY— Same as Georgia. 
Launched November, 1904. 

♦OHIO— D.. 12,508; speed, 18 knots; ar- 
mament same, as Missouri. Launched 
May. 1901. 

♦OREGON— D.. 10,524; speed, 16.79 
knots; armament, 4 13-ln. B. L. R. ; 8 
8-ln. B. L. R.; 4 6-in. R. F. G.: 20 6-pdr.. 
6 1-pdr. R. F. G.: 2 Colts; 2 £-ln. R. F. 
field guns; 8 T. Launched Oct.. 1893. 

♦RHODE ISLAND— D., 14,948; speed 19 
knots; . armament same as Georgia. 
Launched May. 1904. 

SOUTH CAROLINA — Authorized by 
Act of March 3, 1905. Plans not com- 
pleted. 

♦VERMONT— D.. 16.000; speed. 18 
knots; ' armament same as Minnesota. 
Launched August, 1906. 

♦VIRGINIA — Same as Georgia. 
Launched AprlL 1904. 

♦WISCONStfT— D.. 11,653; speed, 17,174 
knots; armament same as Alabama, ex- 
cept 6 1-pdr. R, F. G.. Instead of eight. 
Launched Nov., 1898. 

BATTLESHIPS — Second 61asa, 

♦TEXAS— D., 6.327; speed, 17.8 knots; 
armament, 2 12-in., 6 6-in. B. L. R.; 12 
6-pdr., 4 1-pdr.. 4 87-mm. H. R. C., 2 
Colts. Launched June, 1892. 

ARMORED CRUISERS. 

♦BROOKLYN— D„ 9.215; speed, 21.91 



knots; armament 8 8-in. B. L. R.; 12 5- 
In. R. F. B. L. R. : 12 6-pdr., 4 1-pdr. R. 
F.; 4 Colts and 2 3-in, R. F. field guns. 
Launched Oct, 1895. 

♦CALIFORNIA— D.. 13.680; speed, 22 
knots; armament, 4 8-in. B. L, R., 14 6- 
in. R. F.. 18 3-in. R. F., 12 3-pdr. seml- 
auto. R. F.. 8 1-pdr. R. F., 2 3-in. R. F. 
field, £ machine, 6 auto. Launched 
April, 1904. 

♦COLORADO— D.. 13,780; speed. 22.24 
knots. Armament same as California. 
Launched, , 1904. 

♦MARYLAND— Same as California. 
Launched — , 1904. 

MONTANA— D.. 14,500; speed, 22 knots; 
4 10-ln. B. L. R.; 16 6-in. R. F.; 22 
3-ln. R. F.; 12 3-pdr. seml-auto; 4 1-pdr. 
seml-auto; 2 3-in field; 2 machine and 2 
Colts; 4 1*. 

♦NEW- YORK— D., 8.2JH); speed, 21 
knots; armament, 6 8-ln. B. L. R.; 12 
4-in. R. F. B. L. R.; 8 6-pdr., 2 1-pdr. 
R. F., 4 Colts. 2 3-in. field guns, 2 T. 
Launched Dec., 1891. 

NORTH CAROLINA— Same as Mon- 



♦PBNNSYLVANIA— D., 13,780; speed, 
22 knots. Armament same as California. 
Launched September, 1903. 

♦SOUTH DAKOTA— Sams as California. 
Launched July, 1904. 

♦TENNESSEE— D., 14.500; speed, 22 
knocs; armament, 4 10-ln. B. L. R., 16 
6- In. R. F.. 22 3-in. R. F.. 12 3-pdr., 4 
1-pdr. R. F., 2 3-ln. R. F. field guns, 
2 .80-caL machine, 6 .30 caL auto. 
Launched December. 1904. 

♦WASHINGTON— D., 14.618; speed. 22 
knots; armament, same as Tennessee. 
Lounched March. 1905. 

♦WEST VIRGINIA— Same as California. 
Launched April. 1903. 

HARBOR DEFENCE BAM. 

♦K AT AH DIN— D., 2,155; speed, 16.11 
knots; armament, 4 6-pdr. R. F. Launched 
Feb.. 1893. 

SINGLE TURRET HARBOR DEFENCE 
MONITORS. 

ARKANSAS— D., 3,126; speed, 12.03 
knots; armament, 2 12-ln. B. L. R.; 4 
4-ln. R. F.; 8 6-pdr. R. F.; 6 1-pdr. R. F.; 
2 Colts. Launched Nov., 1900. 

FLORH>A— D., S.125; speed, 12.4 knots; 
armament, same as Ar k ansas. Launched 
Nov.. 1901. 

NEVADA— D.. 8,197; speed, 13.04 knots; 
armament, same as Arkansas. Launched 
Nov.. 1900. _ 

WYOMING— D., 8,180; speed, 11.80 
knots; armament, same as Arkansas. 
Launched Sept. 1900. 

DOUBLE-TURRET MONITORS. 

♦AMPHITRITB— D.. 8.960; speed, 10.5 
knots; armament, 4 10-in. B. L. R 2 
4-ln.. 2 6-pdr., 2- 3-pdr. R. F.; 2 87-ram. 
H. R. C; 6 1-pdr. R. F. G.; 1 Colt, 1 3- 
ln. field gun. Launched June. 1893. 

♦MIANTONOMOH— D„ 8,990; speed, 10.5 
knots: armament, 4 10-ln. B. L. R.; 2 
6-pdr., 2 3-pdr. R. F.; 4 1-pdr. R. F.; 1 
Colt. Launched Dec, 1876. 

♦MONADNOCK— D., 4.005; speed, 12 
knots; armament, 4 10-ln. B. L. R., 2 4- 
in. R, F. G.. 2 6-pdr., 2 3-pdr.. 2 1-pdr. 
R. F. G., 2 37-mm. H. R. C. Launched 
Sept., 1883. 



62 



vessel*? of Tarn navy. 



♦MONTKUEl-D., 4,084; speed,. 18.6 
knots; ttrmameirt, 2 12-in., 2 10 in. B. L. 
H.; « pdr., 4 1-pdr. ft. F.; 2 Colt*. 
.Launched April, 181)1. 

'FUKITAN-D., 6,060; speed, 12.4 knots; 
armament, 4 12-in. B. 1*. R ; Q 4~in. R. 
F. B. L. R.; 6 6-pdr.. 6 1-pdr. R. F. ; 2 
Colt auto.; 2 machine. Launched Doc., 
1882. 

• TERROR— D., 8,990; spee4 10.6 knots; 
armament, 4 10-in. B. L. R., 4 4-i». R. 
F. G., 2- 6-pdr., 2 3-pdr., 2 1 pdr. R. F. G., 
2 37-nun. H. R. C. Lauocfaed Mareb, 
1883. 

PROTECTS D STKKfj CKU18KRJ9. 

♦ALBANY-D., 3,7(19; speed, 20.5 knots; 
armament. 6 6~ln. R. F. ; 4 4.7-in. R. F. ; 
10 «-pdr. R F. : 8 1-pdr. R. F., and 2 
Colts. Launched January, 1809. 

ATLANTA— D., 3,000; speed. 15.6 knots; 
armament, 2 8-tn. B. L. R., « (J- to. R. F. 
G. : 6 6-pdr., 4 1-pdr. R. F. ; 2 Colts, 1 
8-ln. R. F. field gun. Launched Oct., 1S84. 

♦BALTIMORE*— D., 4,413; speed, 20.096 
knots; armament, 12 <Mn. R. F. G.; 6 14- 
pdr., 6 3-pdr., 4 J -pdr. R. F. ; 4 Colt 
auto*?., 1 3 in. R. F. field gun, I machine. 
Launched Oct., 1888. 

BOSTON— D., 3.035; speed, «J.« knots; 
armament, 6 6-ln.,, 2 8- In. B. L. R. ; « 
6-pdr., 4 1-pdr. R. F.; 1 3- to. field gtin, 2 
Colts. launched Dec., 1884. 

♦CHAKLEBTON-D., 9,706; spc**, 22 
knots; armament, 14 6-in. R. F. B. L. R. ; 
18 3^ In. R. F. ; 12 3-nd*\ semi-auto.; 4 1- 
pdr. anto., 8 1-pdr. R. F. ; 2 8-in. R. F. 
Held guns, 2 .30-calibre machine, 8 30- 
calibre auto., 2 3 -in. ikkL Launched 
, 1904. 

«fTHATTANOT>GA— D., 8.200; speed, 1fi.5 
knot 3; arniamcni. 1*0 5-in., W 0-pdr. and 2 
1-pdr. R. F.; 4 Ooit auto*., 1 3-te. Sieid 
gun. 

•CHICAGO— D., 6.000; speed, 18 knots; 
armament, 4 8-in. B. L. R., 14 6-in. R. 
F.; 9 6-pdr., 2 1-pdr. R. F. ; 2 Colte; 1 
3-ln. R. F. field gun. Launched Dec, 1885. 

•CINCINNATI— D., 8,213; speed, 19 
knots; armament. 11 5-ln. R. F. B. L. R. ; 
8 6 -pdr., 2 6-pdr., 1 3-ln. R. F. field gun; 
2 Colts. launched Nov., 1892. 

•CLEVELAND— Same as Chattanooga. 
Launched Sept., 1901. 

( COLUMBIA-D. f 7,875; speed, 22.8 
knots; armament, 1 8-in. B. L. R. ; 2 6-ln., 
8 4-in. R. F. E. L. R.; 12 6-pdr.. 2 1- 
pdr. R. F. : 2 Colts; 1 3-in. R. F. field 
gun; 4 T. Launched July, 1892. 

•DENVER— Same as Chattanooga. 
Launched June. 1902. 

•DBS MOINES— Same as Chattanooga, 
Launched Sept., 1902. 

•GALVESTON- -Same as Chattanooga. 

MILWAUKEE-Saort as Charleston. 
Building, "Union Iron WorkB, San Fran- 
cisco. 

a MINNEAPOLIS— Same as Columbia; 4 
T. Launched Aug., 1S93. 

•NEWARK— D., 4,098; speed, 19 knots; 
armament, 12 G-in. R. F.; 6 14Hpdr., 
•6-pdr., 4 1-pdr. R. F. ; 4 Colts; 1 3-in. 
field gun. Launched 1 March, 1890. 

'NF7W -OR LEANS— D., 3,709; speed, 20 
knots; armament, same as Albany. 
Launched Dec, 1£96. 

•OLYMPIA— D., 5,ST0; speed, 21.6*6 
knots; armament, 4 8-in. B. L. R. ; 10 5- 
in. R. F. B. L. R.; 14 6-pdr., 4 1-pdr. R. 
F. ; 3 Catlings, 1 Colt. " Lasmched Nov., 
1892. 



•PHILADELPHIA— D„ «,M0; - a 

19.078 knots; armanent 12 6-ln. R. F. 
4 6-pdr, 4 3-pdr., 5 1-pdr.; 4 OdKs* 1 
3-in. R. F. flekl gun. Launched Sept., 

•RALEIGH— D., 2,210; speed, 1* *nt*Bi 
armament, li fMn. R. F. ; 8 6-ptfr., 2' 
1-pdr. R. F. ; 2 Co7t«, 1 8-faj. field sua. 
Launched March. 1892. 

•SAN FRANCISCO— D., 4.868; speed, 
19.525 knots; armament, 32 0-fn. B. I4. R.; 
10 6-pdr., 4 1-pdr., 2 Colts. Launcbad 
Oct.. 1809. 

•ST. LOUTS— D., 0,700; speed, 22 knot*] 
armament same as Charleston. Launched 
May, 1005. ! 

•TACOMA— D., 3,215; speed, 16.5 know; 
armament, same as Chattanooga. 
Launched Juno, 1903. 
UNPKOTTCCTKD STEM, CR1HSBKL 

•DETROIT— D., 2,103; speet; *B.T1 
knots; armament, 10 *-bx R. F. B. I* R. ; 
6 6-pdr., 2 1-pdr. R. F. ; 2 Colts; 1 3-1*; ; 
R. F. ftchJ guru Launch*! Oct.. 1831. 

♦MARRLBHEAD-D., 2,089; speed, 
18.44 knots; arwament, 10 5-ia. R, jy. ; 
6 fi-pdr., 2 1-pdr. R. F.; 2 Ce4ta; 1 Z-ln. 
Meld gun. Launched Aag., 1892. 

•MONTGOMERY— D„ 2,088; spe«4, ».05 
knots; armament, 10 5-te. R. F. ; >6 
6 pdj.. 2 1-pdr. &. F.; 2 Coils. Lati»c2*«d 

Dec. 1S91. 

SCOTrT CRUISlffRS. 

BIRMINGHAM— Authorised April 2f, 
1904. Plant* being completed. 

CHESTER— Authorized April 27, 19Q4, 
Flans hcing completed. ; 

SALEM— Autlioriaed AiffO 2f. W&L 
Plans being complete*. 

UNARMORED STEBI- GUHBOAS9* 

•BASCROFT— D.. 830; speed. 14.3T 
knots; armament, 4 4-*n. 1L F. B I* R. ; 
8 3-pdr., t 1-pdr. R. F.5 I CWt. ! 
Launched April, 1892. 

•BENNINGTON— D., 1,T1*: «««, 1?.5: 
knots: armament, 6 6-to. 0, L. R.*. 4 
6-pdr., 4 1 pdr. R. F.; I Oott atfl*. 
Launched June, 1890. 

•CASTINE— D., 1,177; speed, 16032 
krots; armament, 8 4-in, R. F.; 6 6-pdr., 
2 1-pdr. R. F.; 1 CoM a*to» Laawched 
May, 1892. 

•<X)NCORD— O., 1,710; spee4t, M.» knots; 
armarnent, 6-ln. B. L. R.; 2 6-j>dr., 2 
3-twlr. R. F.; 2 37-mm, H. R. C; 2 .30- 
caiibre Colts. Launched March, 1806. 

6 DON JUAN DS AUSTRlA^-r>., 1.IW; 
speed, 14 knots; armament, 4 5-tn. R. F. 
G.; 4 6-pdr. R. F.. 4 Oafta Laoo«a»9 
1887. 

'GEBWRAL ALAVA— T>.. l,J3Si speed, 
10.5 knots; armament, 2 6-pdr. f 2 3-pdr., 
1 Colt auto. 

MSLA D0 CUBA— D., 1,125: «p*Bd. 16 
knots: armament, 4 4-ln, R. IP. O.; 4 €- 
pdr. R. F. : 4 Colts. 

»ISLA DS LUZON— Sam* «r 19w IbIa de 
Cuba. 

•MACTTIAS— D-., f,17T: spe«^ 15,46 
knots; armament, 8 4-ln. R. F. B. 1». R. : 
4 6-pdr., 2 1-pdr. R. F.; 2 CoH». Launched 
Dec. 1891. 

PETPEI.T-D., 802; speedi, Jt» knota: 
armament, 4 6-ln. B. L. S. ; 2 *-pdr., 2 
l-pdr. R. F.; 2 Colts ante. 1 awnmHsn 
Oct., 1888. 

TOPEKA— T>., 2.300; spee*. 16 knots; 
armament, 6 4-in^ R. F.; 6 3-pdr., 2 1-pdr. 
R. F. ; 1 Colt. Purchased. Lavftched 1881. 



r 



VESSELS OF THE3 NAVY. 



53 



«YORKTOW«— D., 1.710; speed. 16. M 
knots; armament. 6 6-1 n. B. L. Bt.; 2 6~ 
sd*.. 2 3-ndr. and 4 l-pdr, R. f.; S Colts, 
launched April. 1888. 

Ma 10— Authorised by act o* Way 4, 
8888. but never designed. 

UQUT DBAGGHT GUNBOATS. 

♦HKLKNA-D.. 1.387; speed. 15.5 knots; 
sumtameni, * *-4n., 4 8-pdr. R. *'., 4 1- 
#dr. H. P., 2 Colts, t 3-to. fieM -gun, 
Launched Jan.. WW. 

♦NASHVILLE— D.. UW1; speed. 16.80 
knots; armament, 8 4-iav. 4 6-pdr. R. P.; 
2 l-pdr. R. F.: 2 Colta. Launched Oct.. 
S805. 

♦WILMINGTON— D., 1,397; speed. 15.08 
knots; armament, 8 4-in, R. F. G. ; 4 6- 
»dr., 4 1-pdr. R. »c 4 Colts. Launched 
Oct.. 1886. 
621 ABatORBB COMPOSHTJfi OCNBOAT& 

«ANNAPUL£S— *)., 1,080; speed, 18.17 
knots; armament, 4V 4- to., 4 6-pdr.. 2 1- 
pdr. R, P.; 1 Cult. Launched Dee.. 1806. 

DUBUQUB— D.. 1,085; speed. 12 knots; 
armament. 6 4-ln. XL F. Q.: 4 6-pdr.. 2 
f-pdr. B, F.; 2 Colts. Launched August, 
2004. 

^MARLETTA— JD., f,088; speed, 18.02 
knots; armanieaf, eame a* Annapolis, 
launched Marts*. 1887. 

♦NEWPORT— D., 1,000; speed. 12.28 
knots; armament, same as Annapolis 
Launched Dec. N 1886. 

PADUCAH— D„ .1,088'. speed. 12 knots; 
armament same as Dubuque. Launched 
October, £804. 

«TRO*CBT©»— ».. 1,809; speed. IS 
knots: armament, .same as Annapolis. 
Lascched June. 1887. 

♦VICKSBURO— B;. 1.800; speed, 12.71 
knees; armament, same as Annapolis. 
Launched Dec.. 1806. 

♦WHEE^IXG— 1>- 1.080; speed, 12.88 
fcrota; armament, same as Aimapoll*. 
Launched March. tfl87. 
fTNARMORED VTOgKLS— Special Class. 

DOLPHIN— fMspaach best; »„ 1,488; 
speed. 15.5 knots; armament. 2 4-te. R. . 
f. B, L. S.; t 6-*dr., 6 3-pdr. R. F.; 2 
Celts. Launched April* 1884. 

♦VESUVIUS— Dynamite cruiser; D., 029; 
speed. 21.42 knot*: armament. 8 15-1 n. 
dynamite; 3 3-sdr. R. W.; t Colts. 
Laerached April. 1888. 

SEVERN— Training ship (sailing); IX, 
I.J75-; anaaaoaat, o 4-in,. 4 6-pdr. and 
8 1-pdr. R. P. ; 2 Corts, Launched June, 
i880. 

COWBBRLAlfD— Steel training ship 
8s*f1tag): B*., 1.800; armament, same as 
Chesapeake. Launched August, 1004. 

INTREPID — Training ship (sailing); 
same as Cumberland. Launched October, 
1004. 

BOXER— Wooden training ship fsail- 
lng>; D.. 845; as armament. Launched 
October. 1904. 

TORPEDO-BOAT iUSSTROYBRS. 

+BAINBR2DQE— D.. 420; speed. 28 45 
knots; armament, 2 long 18-ln. Whitehead 
torpedo tubes; 2 S-ln. R. P. : 5 6-pdr. 
SL V. Launched Aug., 1901. 

•BARRY— ».. 420; speed. 28.12 knots; 
srrearaent, same- as Bainbridge. Launched 
March, 10 02. 

•CHA UNCUT— JX, 490; speed. 28 64 
knots; aranasMent. same as Bainbridge. 
Launched Oct.. 1001. 



*DALB-J)., 420; speed. 28; 10 knots; 
arjcamonC same as Bainbridge. Lasncked; 
July, 1000. 

♦DECATUR— Saasa as Dak). Launched 
8ept.. HW6. 

'HOPKINS— D., 40S; speed. 20.02 knots; 
armament, same as Bainbridge. Launched 
April. 1002. 

♦HULL— D M 408; speed, 28j03 knots; 
armament, same as Bainbridge. Launched 
June. 1002. 

♦LAWRENCW— D. 448; speed. 28.40 
knots; armament, same as Bainbridge. 
Launched Nov., 1000. 

♦MACDONOUQH— D.. 428. speed, 28.85 
knots; armament, same as Batebr-idge. 
Launched Dec.. 1000. 

♦PAUL JONES— D.. fK>i speed. 28.01 
knots; armament, same as Baifibrldge. 
l^anached June, 1802. 

♦PERRY— D.. 480; speed, 28.82 knots: 
armament, same as Bainbridge. Launched 
Oct., 1000. 

♦PREBLE— D., 480; speed. 28.08 knots; 
armament, same as Bainbridge. Launched 
March. 1001. 

♦STEWART— D.. 420; speed, 20.60 
knots; armament, same as Bainbridge. 
Launched May. 1802. 

♦TRUXTUW~D H 433; speed, 20.58 
knots: armament. 2 S-ln. R. F. and Q 6- 
pdr.; t lung 18-ln. Whitehead torpeuo 
tubes. Launched Aug., 1001. 

♦WHIPPLE— D.. 433; speed. 28.52 
knots; armament, same as Tvuxtuo. 
Launched Aug.. 1001. 

♦WORDffiN— D.. 433: speed* 20.88 knots, 
armament, same as Truxtun. Launched 
Aug.. 1001. 
TORPEDO BOATS (alt Twin Sfeeews), 

BAGLEY— D.. 175; speed, 28.15 knots; 
armament. 3 1-pdr. R. F.; 8 M-in. White- 
head torpedo tubes. Launched Sept., 1U00. 

BAILEY— D.. 280; speed. 88.108 knots; 
armament. 4 6-pdr. R. P.; 2 18-ln. White- 
head torpedo tubes. Launched Dec., IK'JO. 

BARNEY— D.. 175; speed. 20.04 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
July I. 1000. 

BIDDLE— Dw. 1T5; dpeed. t8.5? knots; 
armament, same as Bagiejr, Launched 
May. 1001. 

BLAKKLBT— r>., 106*. speed, 28 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Nov.. 1000. 

CUSHINO— D.. 105; speed. 22.5 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Jan.. 1M00. 

DAHLQREN— D., 146.4; speed, 30 
knots; armament. 4 1-pdr. R. P.; 2 18 in. 
Whitehead torpedo tubes. Launched May. 
1808. 

DAVIS— D.. 154; speed. 23.41 knot*; 
armament. 3 1-pdr. R. P.; 3 18-ln, White- 
head torpedo tubes. Launched June, 1M»8. 

DE LONG— D.. 106; speed, 25.52 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Nov.. MOO. 

DU PONT— D., 185; speed. 28.58 knots; 
armament, 4 1-pdr. R. P. : 3 t8-!n. White- 
head torpedo tubes. Launched March. 
1897. 

ERICSSON— D,. 120; speed. 24 knots; 
armament. 4 1-pdr. R. P.; 3 18-ln. White- 
head torpedo tubes. Launched May,. l^lM. 

FARRAGUT— D.. 270; speed. 30.13 
knots; armament, same as Bailey. 
Launched July, 1608. 



64 



V13SSE1L6 OF THH NAVY. 



FOpTE— D., 142; speed. 24.634 knot*: 
armament, same a* Bagley. Launched 
Oct., 1896. 

FOX— D.. . 154: speed. 23.13 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
July, 1898. 

GOLDSBOROUGH— D.. 255; speed, 30 
knots; armament, same as Bailey. 
Launched July, 1899. 

GWIN— D., 45.78; speed, 20,88 knots; 
armament, 1 1-pdr. R. F. ; 2 18-in. White- 
head torpedo tubes. Launched Nov., 1897. 
' MACKENZIE- D., 65; speed, 20.11 
knots; armament, same as Gwin. 
Launched Feb., 1898. 

M'KKE>— D. 65; speed, 19.82 knots; 
armament, 2 1-pdr. R. F. ; 2 18 in. White- 
head torpedo tubes. Launched March, 1898. 

MANLEY— Yarrow boat; purchased 1S98. 

MORRIS— D., 104.75; speed, 24 knots; 
armament, same as Du Font. Launched 
April, 1898. 

NICHOLSON— D., 218.47; speed. 25.75 
knots- armament, same as Bagley. 
Launched Sept., 1901. 

O'BRIEN— D.. 219.C1: sneed, 25 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Sept., 1900. 

PORTER— D.. 165; speed, 28.630 knots; 
armament, same as Du Pont. Launched 
Sept.. 1896. 

RODGERS— D., 142; speed, 24.49 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Nov., 1S96. 

ROWAN— D.. 210; speed, 27.074 knots; 
armament, same as Du Pont. Launched 
April, 1898. • 

SHUBRICK— D., 200; speed, 26.07 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Oct.. 1*99 

SOMI3RS— D., 150: speed, 17.5 knots; 
armament. 4 1-pdr. R. F., 2 18-in. White- 
head torpedo tubes, 1 submerged bow tube. 
Purchased in 1898. 

STOCKTON— D., 200; speed, 26.03 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Dec. 1890. 

STRINGHAM— D., 340; speed, 30 knots; 
armament, 4 6-pdr. R. F. ; 2 18-in. White- 
head torpedo tubes. Launched June. 1S99. 

TALBOT— D., 46^; speed. 21.16 knots; 
armament, same as Gwin. Launched 
Nov., 1897. 

T. A. M. CRAVEN— D., 146.4; speed, 
80 knots: armament, same as Dahlgren. 
Launched Sept.. 1899. 

THORNTON— D., 200; speed, 27.57 
knots; armament, same as Bagley. 
Launched May, 1S90. 

TIXGEY— D., 165; speed, 26 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
March, 1901. 

WILKES— D., 165; speed, 25.99 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Sept.. 1901. 

WINSI^OW— D., 142; speed. 24.82 knots; 
armament, same as Bagley. Launched 
Jan.. 1897. 

STILETTO (Single Screw)— D., 31; 
speed. 18.22 knots; wooden vessel; 2 
Howell tornedoep. 

SUBMARINE BOATS. 

ADDER— D., 122.55; speed. 7.8 knots; 
1 T. Launched July. 1901. 

GRAMPUS— D.. 125: speed, 7.6 knots; 
1 T. Launched July, 1902. 

HOLLAND— D., 74; speed, 8 knots; 1 T. 
Purchased April, 1800. 

MOCCASIN— D., 122.55; speed, 7.14 
knots; 1 T. Launched May, 1901. 



PIKE— D., 125; speed, 7.44 knots; 1 T. 
Launched May. 1901. 

PLUNGER— D., 122.65; speed. 7.25 
knots; 1 T. Launched Oct., 1901. 

PORPOI8B— D., 122.55; speed. 7.12 
knots; 1 T. Launched June 1901. 

SHARK— D.. 122.55; speed. 7.28 knots; 
1 T. Launched July. 1901. 

(Four more submarines authorized and 
under construction.) 
IBON AND WOODEN STEAM VESSELS. 

ADAMS— Wooden; D., 1,400; speed, 9.8 
knots: armament, 6 4-ln., 2 6-pdr. and 2 
1-pdr. R. F.; 2 Coltw. Built 1874-'76. 

ALERT— Iron; D.. 1,110; speed, 10 
knots; armament, 6 4-in. and 4 6-pdr. 
R. F. : 1 Colt. Built 1873-'7B. 

ENTERPRISE)— Wooden; D., 1,375; 
speed, 11.4 knots; no armament. Nautical 
sehoolship of Massachusetts. Built 1873-'76. 

ESSEX— Wooden; D„ 1,375; speed. 10.4 
knots; armament. 6 4-ln., 4 6-pdr. and 2 
1-pdr. R> F. ; 2 Colts. Training ship. 
Built 1874-'7fi. 

FERN— Wooden. D., 840; speed, 8 
knots; no narmament; Naval Militia duty, 
District of Columbia. Built 1871. 

FRANKLIN— Wooden; D., 5,170; speed, 
9 knots; armament, 2 3-pdr. ; receiving 
ship Norfolk Navy Yard. Built I85o; re- 
built 18G5. 

HARTFORD— Wooden; D., 2,790; speed, 
12 knots; armament, 13 5-in., 4 1-pdr. and 
4 6-pdr. R. F. ; 1 3 in. field and 2 Colts. 
Built 1808; rebuilt 189S. 

IROQUOIS*-- Wooden; D., 1.575: 10.7 
knots; Marine Hospital Service. Built 1858. 

LANCASTER— Wooden; D., 3,250; 
speed, 9.6 knots; aimamer.t, 10 5-in. R. 
F. ; 6 6-pdr. and 2 1-pdr. R. F. ; receiv- 
ing ship, League Island Navy Yard. Built 
1858. 

MARION— Wooden; D., 1.900; speed, 
lift knots; no armament; Naval Militia 
duty, California. Built 1871-'75. 

WOLVERINE, formerly MICHIGAN^— 
Iron; D.. 685; speed, 10.5 knots: arma- 
ment 6 6-pdr. R. F.; 2 1-pdr. R. F.; 2 
GatJings. Built 1844. 

MOHICAN— Wroden; D., 1,900; speed, 
10.65 knots; armament, 6 4-in. R. F. ; 
4 6-pdr.. 2 1-pdr.. 2 Colts; apprentice 
traininer ship. R-jilt 1872: rebuilt. 1883. 

NIPSIC— Wooden; D., 1,375; speed, 10.7 
knots. Station ship at Puget Sound Naval 
Station. Built 1873-'79. 

OMAHA— Wooden; D., 2,400; speed. 
11.3 knots. Marine Hospital Service. 
Built 1867-'69. 

PINT A— Iron; D., 550; speed, 8.5 knots; 
no armament: Naval Militia duty, Cali- 
fornia. Built 1865. 

PENS A COL A— Wooden; D., 3,000; 
speed, 9 knots; armament, 1 4-in. R. 
F. ; 1 6-pdr., 1 S-ndr., 2 1-pdr.. 1 3-in. 
field gun, 1 Colt; training ship, Yerba 
Buena Island. San Francisco. Built 1858. 

RANGER— Iron; D., 1,261; speed. 10 
knots; armament, A 4-tn. R. F.; 4 6-pdr. 
R. F. ; 1 Colt. Built 187^7fL 

REINA MHfRCEJDBS— D., 2,835; no ar- 
mament; receiving ship. Portsmouth Navy 
Yard. Captured from Spain. 

RICHMOND— Wooden; D., 2.700; speed, 
9.5 knots: armament, 2 6-pdr. R. F. ; 
receiving ship, Norfolk Navy Yard. Built 

WABASH— Wooden; D,, 4,650; speed. 
9.15 knots: no armament; receiving ship, 
Boston. Buflt 1854. 



NAVAL. PAT TABL.H. 



55 



YANTIC— Wooden: D., 000-; speed, 8.S 
knota. Naval Militia ship, Michigan. 
Built ISO*. 

WOODEN SAILING SHIPS. 

ALLIANCE)— Training ship; D., 1,875; 
armament, 6 4-"in. R. F.; 4 6-pdx\, 2 1- 
pdr. and 2 Colt*. Built 1873. 

CONSTELLATION— Training, ship, New- 
port; D„ 1,970: aimament, 6 G-pdr., 4 
1-pdr., 2 3-ln. field guns, 2 Colts. Built 
IttM. 

CONSTITUTION— D., 2,200; no arma- 
ment; Boston Navy Yard. Built 1997. 

DALE — D., 675; no armament; Naval 
Ifllitia service. Maryland. Built 1 «39. 

EAGER— D., 275. No armament. 

EARNE8T>-D.. 127. No armament. 

INDEPENDENCE— D.. 3,270; arma- 
ment. 2 6-pdrs. ; receiving ship. Mare 
tsland Navy Yard. Built 1837. 

JAMESTOWN^— Quarantine ship; D., 
1.150. Built 1M5. 

MONONGAHELA— Training Squadron: 
D.. 2.100- armament, 6 4 -in. R. P., 4 
6-ndr.. 1 3-ln field gun, 2 Colts. Built 
1882. as steam vessel. 

NEW-HAMPSHIRE— D. 
armament; Naval Militia 
York. Built 1818. 

PORTSMOUTH— D.. 1,125; no arma- 
ment; Naval Militia service, New-Jersey. 
Built 1343. 



- 4.150; no 
service. New- 



ST. LOUIS— D., 830; no armament; 
Navai Militia service, Penn. Built 1828. 

ST. MAHV'S— D., 1,025; no armament; 
nautical schoolship, New- York; Built 1844. 

SARATOGA— D., 1,025 : no armament; 
nautical schooiship, Philadelphia. Built 
1842. 

AUXILIARY CRUISERS. 

BUFFALO (steel)— D., 6,000; speed, 14.5 
knots; armament, 2 5-1 n., 4 4-in. R. P., 
8 6-pdr.. 2 Celts. Purohased 1898. 

DIXIES (steel)— D., 0,114; speed, 18 
knots; armament, 8 5-in. R. P., 4 8-pdr., 
4 1-pdr.. 1 3-ln. field gun, 8 Colts. Pur- 
chased 1898. 

PANTHER (iron)— D.. 3,880; speed, 18 
knots; armament, 6 5-in., 2 4-in. R. P., 
8 3-pdr.. 1 S-in. field gun, 1 Colt Pur- 
chased 1808. 

PRAIRIE (iron)— D., 6. 620; speed, 14.5 
knots; armament, 8 0-in. R. F., 6 G- 
pdr., 4 3-pdr., 4 1-pdr., 2 Colts. Pur- 
chased 1R98. 

YANKEE (iron)— D.. 6.225; speed, 12.5 
knots; armament. 8 5-in. R. F.. 6 8- 
pdr.. 2 1-pdr.. 2 Colts. Purchased 1808.. 

(In addition to tt^e ab^ve there are 43 
tugboats, 15 gunboats ur.der fOO tens, capt- 
ured during the war with Spain, and the 
following purchased during the war with 
Spain for the "Auxiliary Navy**: 23 
yachts, 18 colliers and 15 special class.) 



SUMMARY OF VBS8RLS IN UNITED STATES NAVY. 



Fit for Service or Under Repair. 

First class battleships 12 

Second class battleship 1 

Armored cruisers » • 3 

Armored ram 1 

Single turret harbor defence monitor*. 4 

Double turret monitor* 8 

Protected cruisers 19 

Unprotected cruisers - * 3 

Gunboats 11 

Light draught gunboats 8 

Composite gunboats . . / 7 

Training ship (Naval Academy) 

sheathel 1 

Special ctass (Dolphin-Vesuvius) 2 

<tanboab* under 500 tons 15 

Torpedo-boat lestroyera , .... 16 

Steel torpedo boat* 33 

Submarine torredo boats 8 

Wooden torpedj boat 1 

Iron cruising vessels, steam 6 

Wooden cruising vessels, steam 8 

Wooden sailing vessels 8 

Tugs . 41 

Auxiliary cruisers 5 

Converted yachts 23 

Training brig * . • • 1 



Colliers 16 

Supply ships and hospital ships. ....... 15 

Total -270 

Under Construction or Authorized. 

First class battleships 15 

Armored cruisers 6 

Protected cruisers 3 

Scout cruisers 3 

Gunboat for Great Lakes (not begun). . 1 

Composite gunboat 1 

Steel torpedo boats 2 

Training ships 2 

Colliers 2 

Tugs 2 

Submarine torpedo boats 4 

Total » ~41 

Unfit tor Service. 

Wooden crutsin«r vessels, steam .* 10 



Wooden sailing vessels 



Total 15 

Grand total !s26 



NATAL PAY TABLE. 

-Section ft of tfee Navy Personnel bin. which became a law on March S, 1800, oeo- 
rtded that "after June 80, 1S99, commissioned officers of the line of the Navy and of 
the Medical and Par Corps shall receive the same pay and allowances, except forage, 
as are or may bo provided by or in pursuance of 'aw icr officers of corresponding rank 
In the Army; Provided, that such officers when on shore dutv shall receive the allow- 
ances, but 15 per centum less pay than when on sea duty; but rhis provision shall not 
apply to warrant officers commissioned under Section 12 of this act. Provided further, 
lhat when naval officers are detailed for shore duty beyond seas they shal! receive the 
same pay and allowances as are or may be provided by or in pursuance of law for 
ofiftoer* of the Army detailed for duty in simiter places.*' The pay of officers of the 
Army of and boiow the rank of colonel lb Increased 10 per cent for each five years cf 
service in the grade, until the Increase amounts to 40 per cent of the original pay. 
when no further increase may be made. The pay of a retired officer is 75 per cent of 
too highest pfc* of his grade on the active list. 

Too relative rank between officers of the Navy (whether on the active or retired 
list) and officers of the Army is as follows: Admiral with general, rear admiral with 



56 



THE NAVAL. ACADEMY AT ANNAPOLIS, 



major general and brigadier general, captain with colonel, commander with lieutenant 
colonel, lieutenant commander with major, lieutenant with captain, lieutenant of 
junior grade with first lieutenant, ensign with second lieutenant. The following is 
the pay table: 



| *Sea- I Shore. \ 



"NAVY (LINE). 

Admiral ». 

Rear Admirals: 

First nine 

Second nine 

Chiefs of Bureau 

Captains 

Commanders ......... 

Judge Advocate Gen'l. 
Lieut. Commanders ... 
Lieutenants .......... 

Lieuts. (junior grade) . . 
Ensigns ....... 



113,500 



$13,600 



7,600 


6,375 


6,600 


4,675 


- 


5,500 


8,600 


2,975 


8,000 


2,650 


. 1 . 


3,500 


2,600 


2,125 


1,800 


1,630 


1.600 


1,275 


1,400 


1,100 



Chief boatswains, gun- 
ners, carpenters, sail- 
makers 

Cadets 

MARINE CORPS. 

Brigadier General .. 

Colonels 

Lieutenant Colonels . 

Majors ...: 

Captains (line) ...... 

Captains (staff) . ..-. 

First lieutenants ... 

Second lieutenants .. 

Leader of band 



*Sea. 


| Shore. 


$1,400 


$1,400 


960 


500 


— — . 


5,500 


8,600 


3,500 


8.000 


3.000 


2,600 


2,500 


1,800 


1,800 


2,000 


2,000 


1,600 


, 1,500 


1,400 


1,400 


1,600 


1,500 



1 Sea duty or shore duty beyond sea. 9 Offlcers of the Pay and Medical Corps re- 
ceive the same pay as other officers with whom they rank. 

NAVY (STAFF). 

Chaplains.— First five years, at sea, $2,500; shore duty, $2,000; leave or waiting 
orders, $1,600. Second five years, $2,800, $2,800. $1.9U0. 

Professors of Mathematics. — First five years, at sea or shore duty, $2,400; leave or 
waiting orders, $1,500. Second five years, $2,700, $2,700. $1,800. Third five -years. 
$8,000. $8,000, $2,100. Fourth five years and thereafter, $3,500, $3,500. $2,600. 

Civil Engineers.— Same as professors of mathematics. 

Naval Constructors, — First five years, on duty, $3,200; on leave or waiting orders, 
$2,200. Second five years. $3,400, $2,400. Third five years, $8,700, $2,700. Fourth five 
years, $4,000, $3,000. After twenty years, $4,200, $3,200. 
■ Assistant Naval Constructors. — First four years, $2,000. 

Warrant Officers (boatswains carpenters, gunners, sail makers and machinists). — 
First three years, at sea, $1,200; shore duty, $900; leave or waiting- orders. $760. 
Second three years, $1,300, $1,000, $S00. Third three years, $1,400, $1,800, $900. Fourth 
three years, $1,600, $1,300, $1,000. After twelve years, $1,800, $1,600, $1,200. 

Mates (in service August 1, 1894). — At sea, $1,200; shore duty, $900; leave or 
waiting orders, $700. (Appointed since August 1. 1894.) At sea, $900; shore uuty. $700; 
leave or waiting orders, $500. 



UNITED STATES NAVAX ACADEMY. 

Situated at Annapolis. Md. 
SUPERINTENDENT, REAR ADMIRAL JAMES H. SANDS, U. fj. N. 
Nomination.— The students of the Naval Academy are styled midshipmen. 
Two midshipmen sre allowed for each Senator, Representative and Delegate in Con- 
gress, two- for the District. of Columbia, and five each year from the United States 
at large. The appointments from the District of Columbia and five each year at 
large are made by the President. One midshipman is allowed from Porto Rico, who 
must be a native of that island. The appointment is made by the President, on the 
recommendation of the Governor of Porto Rico. 

' The Congressional appointments are equitably distributed, so that in regular course 
each Senator, Representative and Delegate in Congress may appoint one midshipman 
during each Congress. After June 30. 1913, each Senator, Representative and Delegate 
in Congress will be allowed to appoint only one midshipman instead of two. 

The course for midshipmen is six years — four yelirs at the academy, when the 
succeeding appointment is made, and two years at sea, at the expiration of which 
time the examination for final graduation takes place. Midshipmen who pass the 
examination for final graduation are appointed to fill vacancies in the lower grades 
of the line of the navy and of the Marine Corps, in the order of merit as determined 
by the Academic Board of the Naval Academy. 

The Naval Appropriation act of March 4, 1903, prescribed this method of nomina- 
tions: "The Secretary of the Navy shall as soon as practicable after the fifth day of 
March in each year notify in writing each Senator, Representative and Delegate in 
Congress of any vacancy which may be regarded as existing in the State, district oar 
Territory which he represents, and the nomination of a candidate t&jfltt- s*ea- vacancy, 
shall be made upon the recommendation of the Senator, Representative or Delegate, 
Such recommendation shall be made by the first day of June of that year, and if not 
so made the Secretary of the Navy shall fill the vacancy by the appointment of an 
actual resident of thf State, district or Territory in which the vacancy exists, who 
shall have been for at least two years immediately preceding his appointment An 
actual bona fide resident of the State, district or Territory in which the vacancy exists 
and shall have the qualifications otherwise prescribed by law. 

"And provided further, that the Superintendent of the Naval Academy shall make 
such rules, to be approved by the Secretary of the Navy, as will effectually prevent 
the practice of hazing; and any cadet found guilty of participating in or encouraging 
or countenancing such practice shall he summarily expelled from the Academy, and 
shall not thereafter be reappointed to the corps of cadets or be eligible for appoint- 
ment as a commissioned officer in the army or navy or Marine Corps until two years 
after the graduation of the class of which be was a member." 






REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE. 



57 



Candidates allowed for Congressional districts, for Territories and for the District 
of Columbia must be actual residents of the districts or Territories, respectively, from 
which they are nominated. All candidates must, at the time of their examination for 
admission, be between sixteen and twenty years old. 

Entrance Examinations. — The following examinations for admission are held: 

1. The general examination, to be held on the third Tuesday in April, under the 
supervision of the Civil Servloe Commission, at points named by the Commission. 

2. A second examination to be held at Washington, *D, C, only, on the second 
Tuesday in May, under the supervision of the Civil Service Commission. 

3. A third examination will be- held at Annapolis, Md., only, on the third Tuesday 
in June, under the supervision of the Superintendent of the Naval Academy. 

Candidates are examined mentally only at the examinations held under the super- 
vision <jof the Civil Service Commission. All those qualifying mentally who are 
entitled to appointment in order of nomination will be notified by the Superintendent 
of the Academy when to report at the Academy for physical examination, and if physi- 
cally qualified will be appointed. Should any speoial examination be authorized by the 
Secretary, other than above, it will be immediately after the third Tuesday in June. 

Under the law, candidates failing- to pass the entrance examination will not be 
allowed another examination for admission to the. same class unless recommended for 
re-examination' by the Board of Examiners. . The Civil Service Commission only con- 
ducts the examination of candidates whose names have been furnished by the Navy 
Department. All correspondence relative to the nomination and examination of candi- 
dates should be addressed to the Bureau of Navigation, Navy Department. Candidates 
will be examined physically at the Naval Academy, by a board composed of three 
medical officers of the navy. To be accepted applicants must be free from infectious 
Jor moral disorder and;, • generally, from any deformity, dfsease or infirmity. -No one 
;will be admitted manifestly under -size for his age Five feet is the minimum height? 
prescribed for acceptance. When any candidate who has been nominated upon the 
recommendation of a Senator. Member or Delegate of the House of Representatives is 
round, upon examination, to be physically or mentallv disqualified for admission, the 
Senator, Member. or Delegate shall be notified to recommend another candidate, who 
shall be examined according to the provisions of the preceding section. • 

Candidates are required to enter the Academy immediately after passing the pre- 
scribed examinations. No leave of absence is granted midshipmen of the fourth - class. 
Each midshipman must sign articles binding himself to serve in the U. S. Navy eight 
years (including his time of probation at the Naval: Academy), unless sooner discharged. 

The pay of a midshipman is $500- a year, beginning on admission. • 

Graduate Appointments.— Appointments to fill all vacancies*that may occur 
during a year in the lower grades of the line of the Navy and of the Marine Corps are 
made from the midshipmen, graduates of the year L at the conclusion of their six- 
years' course, in the order of merit as determined by the Academic Board. At least 
fifteen appointments from such graduates will be made each year. To surplus graduates 
who do not receive such appointments will be given a certificate of graduation, an 
honorable discharge and one year's sea pay, as provided for midshipmen. 

UNITED STATES REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE. 

(Under the Treasury Department.) 
HORACE A. TAYLOR. Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, having supervision. 

Captain WORTH G. ROSS, Chief Division Revenue Cutter Service. . .' ..April 1, '05 

JOHN W. COLLINS, Captain of Engineers July 26, '9? 

The U. S. Revenue Cutter. Service is a military arm of the Government attached 
to and under the direction of. the Treasuiy Department. The service was organized 
in 1790 and constituted the nation's first naval defence. Its duties are to enforce the 
navigation- and customs laws of the United States, assist vessels in distress, protect 
the seal industry in Alaska, * enforce the quarantine laws, together with many other 
duties appropriate to its - vessels. The service co-operates with the navy when di- 
rected by the President, and has so co-operated in every war in which the United 
States has bee* engaged. 

The officers of .the service are commissioned by the President and hold rank by 
law with officers of the army and navy, as follows: Captains with Majors- in the 
army and Lieutenant Commanders in the navy; First Lieutenants with Captains in 
the army and Lieutenants in the navy; Second Lieutenants with First Lieutenants in 
the army and Lieutenants (junior grade) in the navy; Third Lieutenants with Second 
Lieutenants in the army and Ensigns in- the navy. The service consists of 222 com- 
missioned officers and cadets on the active list, and 1,300 petty officers and enlisted 
men. Commissioned officers of the line are appointed from , cadet graduates of the 
School of Instruction at South Baltimore, Md. The cadet course covers three years. 
Second Assistant Engineers are appointed from civil life by competitive examination,' 
The commandant of the service is detailed from among the Captains by the Secretary 
of the Treasury. 

PRINCIPAL LINE OFFICERS AND ENGINEERS. 



Date app't'd. 1 Name. 



Captains. 



I Name. 



Date app't'd 



Name. Date app't'd. 

Munger, Fred. M.Aug. 9, 87 
Tozier, Dorr F^.Sept. 22, 87 
Smith, Horatio D.Jan. 31, 01 
Hamlet, Oscar C.Apr. 15, 95 

Dennett, John Apr. 18, 95 

Kilgore, WW. F. .May 3, 95 



Fengar. Chas. C.Apr. 13, 02 
Ross, Worth G... June 3, 02 
Reynolds, W. E..Jan. 31, 03 

Foley, D. P Sept. 23, 03 

Dunwoody. F. M.Sept. 23, 03 
Emery, Howard. Sept. 23, 03 
Broadbent. H. M.Oct. 29, 03 



Fobte, Chas. H Feb. 1, 96 

Pedrick, Willits Apr. 8, 96 

Webber, E. P...:. Mar. 25, 98 
Chalker, James H.May 11, 98 

Howifcon, A. J Aug. 26, 98 

Cutchiu, N. E Aug. 20, 98 

Nash, Chas. F Auk. 20. 98 



OIVU- WAR STATISTICS. 



PRINCIPAL I.1NF, OFrTCJSKA AND KNGINIJHRS— (Continued). 



Captain*. 



J Name. 



Date app't'd. | Name. 



Date a r-o' t'd. ( 



Fill. J. I* Apr. 1, 05 

need. B. L Apr. 29, 05 

Quinan. J. M July 1, tC 

Chief Kngineen*. 
Dally. John R. . .Jan. 19, 76 
Newccmb, F. H..Apr. 18, 02|Kelley, Daniel F.Mar. 25. 78 
Chaytor, K. C.Apr. 13. 02i Schwartz, E. G..Apr. 18. 95 



- "** - . -- 

Cantwell. J. C... .Oct. 11. '"I Falkenstein. F. R.July 27. 00 



Roberts. Wm. H.May 27. 95 1 Thompson. P. W.Jan. 21. o4j Boyd. Harry L...Aug. 2*. 98 

Hall. David A... May 27. 1*5 Moore, J. C June 10. (Hi Spear. Herbert W.Aug. J6, 98 

Tuttle. Francis... May 27. 95 West. H. B June 20. 04j Bowen, Denis F.. Apr. 18. 09 

Walker. Thos. D.Aug. 16. 95 ~ " " " ~ ' ___.-_.- 

Maguire. S. E May 8, W 

Rogers, Henry B.Nov. 9, 96 
Willey. Owen S..Apr. 18.99 
McConnell, O. E..Aug. 5. 09 
Butt. James B Oct. 8. 01 



McLellan. C. H..Apr. 13, 02 
Cushing, Wra. H.Apr. 13, 02, 
Wads worth. F, Q. F. 

Apr. 13, 02 
Rowland. W. S.. Apr. 13, 02 
Hanks, A. P. R,,Apr. 13, 02 
Wild. John F. ... Apr. 13. 02 



Barrows. H. C... May 27. 95 
F.lakemore. W. F.May 27. 95 
Whitworth. H. C.June «, 95 
Coffin, Chas. C... July 5, 95 
French. D. McC. .June 6. 95 
Munroe. Chas. W r .June6, 05 
Owen, Fred'k B..June6. 95 



Coyle, John B July 26. 01 

Butler, Harry U..Sept. 25, 01 
Slay ton, Henry O.Apr. 13, 03 
Dorry. J. Ed ward. Apr. 13, Aft 
McAllister, C. A.. Apr. 13. OS. 
Zastrow, Chas. W.JuJjr 30. 02 
Jones, I^evin T. ..Aug. 17. OX 
Maccoun, Wm. B.Oct. 14, 02 

Green. C. M Dec. «, 03 

Wood. H. N Jan. 17. 04 

Walton. J. Q Jan. 24. 04 

Spencer. H. K Apr. 7, 04 

Kotzschmar. H., jr. Apr. 10, 04 
Schoenbor n. H . F.July 17. 04 



The revenue cutter fleet includes twelve first rate, fourteen second and eleven 
third rate vessels. In the first class are the McCulloch, 1.280 tons; the Bear and the 
Thetis, 1,200 tons; the Mohawk, 980; the Manning, 962; the Algonquin, Gresham and 
Onondaga, 936; the Seminole. 785; the Tuscarora, 670; the Apache, 6C4, and the 
Rush. 550. Two other cutters, No. 12 and No. 14. have been authorized. The Mc- 
Culloch carries six guns, the Algonquin 5, the others from one to four guns. These 
vessels can be converted to military use, and were so converted during -the Spanish 

war. 

CIVIL WAR STATISTICS. 

Number of enlistments In the army, navy and marine corps In the war of 1861-'65, 
taken front-Jatest revised reports of the government; r~nny men who served in the war 
enlisted two or three times and are counted that number of t'mes in the table: 



States, 
Territories. _e^c_ 

Alabama $ 

Arkansas 

California ..... 

Colorado ....... 

Connecticut .... 

Dakota 

Delaware 

Dist. of Col una. 

Maryland • 

Massachusetts • 

Michigan 

Minnesota ..«•« 
Mississippi ..... 
Missouri ....... 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New-HarapBhlre 

New-Jersey 

New- Mexico ...{ 

New-York 

North Carolina 



White 
troops 
of army. 
2,576 
8.289 
15.725 
4.903 
M.037 
206 
11.236 
11.91 
83.995 
122.781 
85.479 
£3.913 
545 
100.610 
3.157 
1.0^0 
82.930 
87.600 
4.561 
404,805 
3.1M1 



Colored 
troops. 



3,163 1,764 

"954 
3.200 
8.718 
3.966 
1.387 
104 



39.920 4.125 



States. 
Territories, etc, 



U 



White 
troops 
army. 



Florida ..1 


1.290 


Illinois 


255.057 


Indiana ....... 


193,748 


Iowa . 


75.797 


Kansas ........ 


18.069 


Kentucky 


31,743 


Louisiana 


5,224 


Maine 


64,973 


Ohio 


304.814 


Oregon 


1.810 


Pennsylvania •• 


315 017 


Rhode Island... 


19.521 


Tennessee 


31.092 


Texas 


1.965 


Vermont 


32.549 


Washington . ... 


964 


West Virginia.. 


31.872 


Wisconsin . ... 


31.029 


Indian Nation.. 


*3.530 


^Colored troops. 


— — 


Totals 


12.493.366 



Sailors 

and 
marines. 



814 



5.030 
3,274 



14.307 

1.878 



419 



133 



105,963 




120 



199 
105 



99.337 

178.973 



Number of deaths, by causes. \r the U. S. Army during the Civil War: 



Causes of death. 



1 En- 

Of- i i leted 

fleers. I men. 



Killed In action... 

Died of wounds n 
ceived in action. 

Died of disease. .. 

Ace Idental deaths 
(except by drown 
ing> 

Drowned 

Murdered 



4.142 



2,223 
2,795 



142 
106 
37 



62.916 



40.789 
22:. 791 



Totals. 
67.058 



43,012 

224,580 



3.072 

4,838 

483 1 



4.114 
4,944 

520 1 



Causes of death. 



Killed after capture, 
Committed suicide.. 
Executed by U. S. 

military auth'ties. 
Executed by enemy 
Dieu from sunstroke 
'Other known causes 
Causes not stated. 

Totals 



, Bn- 
Of- 1 listed 
fleers.] men. 



Totals. 




0,5841349.944(359.528 



1 Indians. 8 Number not credited on the quota of any State. *This Item includes 
all deaths resulting from quarrels, riots and the like which are not definitely reported 
as murder: from being shot for insubordination or by provost guards or sentinels In 
attempting to escape or pass the lines; from exhaustion or exposure; killed whli« 
depredating upon the property of citizens, and all other causes not mentioned In the 
foregoing table. Desertions ^estimated by War Department). 117,247. No trustworthy 
deductions with regard to the nativity of soldiers In service during the Civil War can 
be made from any existing statistics. __ 



THE DIPL OMATIC SERVICE: 

UNITED STATICS EMBASSIES AND LEGATIONS. 

• AMBASSADORS. 



59 



Country. 



Residence. 



Name. 



App'd 
from. 




Austria-Hungary . . . . 1 Vienna 

Brazil Rio Janeiro. ... 

France *.. Paris 

Gexmany Berlin 

Great Britain ! Jjondon 

Italy i Rome 

Mexico !City of Mexico. 

Russia , St. Petersburg. 



Bellamy Storer 

David E. Thompson . . 
Robert S. McCormick. 
Charlemagne Tower. . . . 

Whitelaw Reld 

Henry White 



George von L. Meyer. 



Mass 



MINISTERS PLENIPOTENTIARY. 



Argentine Republic 

Belgium *.* 

Bolivia 

Chili 

China 

Colombia 

Costa. Rica, Nica- 
ragua & Salvador 

Cuba 

Denmark j 

E'-tffedor 

Greece & Montenegro, j 

Guatemala &Honduras 

Hayti 

Japan 

'Korea 

Mo 



Huenos Ayres. . 

Brussels. 

La Paz 

Santiago. 

Peking 

Bogota 



San Jose 

Havana 

Copenhagen. . . . 

Quito 

A thens 

Guatemala . 



Arthur M. BeauprS. 
Henry L. Wilson... 
Joseph W. J. Lee . . • 
John Hicks • . . . . ■. . . , 

W. W. Rockhill 

John Barrett , 



William T,. Merry. 
Edwin V. Morgan., 
Thos. J. O'Brien. .. 
Joseph W. J. Lee.. 
John B. Jackson... 
Leslie Comb<j 



NetheiTds, Luxemb'g. 

Panama '. 

Persia 

Peru 

Portugal 

Rumania & Servia. . . . 

Siam 

Spain 

Sweden & Norway 

Switzerland . ..-. 

Turkey 

Uruguay & Paraguay. 
Venezuela 



Port-au-Prince. .Henry W. Furniss. 



Tokio. 

Seoul 

Tangier 

Th« Hague...., 

Panama 

Teheran 

Lima 

Lisbon 

Bucharest ..... 

Bangkok 

Madrid 

Stockholm 

Berne. 

Constantinople. 
Montevideo. . .. 
Caracas 



Lloyd C. Griscom. 



S. R. Gummer6. ..- 

David J. Hill.. 

8 Charles E. Magoon 

Richmond Pearson .... 

Irving B. Dudley 

Claries Page Bryan. . . . 
John W. Riddle........ 

Hamilton King 

William M. Collier 

Charles H. Graves..... 

Brutus J. Clay 

J. C. A. Leishman 

Edward C. O'Brien ....... 

W. W. Russell, r 



111. ... 
Wash 
Md. ., 
Wis ., 
D. C; 
Ore. ., 

Cal. ., 
N. Y.. 
Mich . 

Md 

N. J... 
Ky \ . . 
Ind.... 
Perm , 

N. J.. 
N. Y. 
Neb. . 
N. C. 
Cal. . 
111. .. 
Minn 
Mich . 
N. Y. ( 
Minn [ 
Ky. . 
Penn 
N. Y. 
Md. . 



|12,000 
10,000 
7,500 
10,000 
12, (KM) 
10,000 

10,000 
12,000 

7,rrfj<M 

7,5001 
7.500! 

10,0001 
7,5001 

12,000 
7.500 
7,500 

10,000 

10,000 
7,500 

10,000 
7,500 
1,500 
7,500 

12,000 
7,500 
7,500 

10,000 
7,500 

10,000 



1004 
1908 
1906 
19U5 
1900 
1905 

1807 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1902 
1900 
1903 

1905 
1905 
1905 
1902 
1897 
1903 
1905 
1903 
1900 
1905 
1903 
1900 
1905 
1905 



MINISTERS RESIDENT AND CONSULS GENERAL. 



Dominican Republic; Santo Domingo. (Thomas C. Dawson. jlowa 

Li beria . * 1 Monrovia i Ernest Lyo n )Md. . 



$5,0001 1904 
5.0001 1903 



DIPLOMATIC AGENTS. 



3 Bulgaria iSofia tJohn B. Jackson IN. J... |7,500| 1903 

♦Egypt iCairo ILewi* M. Jddings |N. Y.. 5,000| 1906 



SECRETARIES OP EMBASSIES AND LEGATIONS. 



Austria-Hungary : 

Secretary 

Second secretary. . . 
Brazil: 

Secretary 

France: • 

Secretary 

Second secretary... 

Th ird secretary .... 
Germany: * 

Secretary 

Second secretary... 

Third secretary .... 
Great Britain: 

Secretary .......... 

Second secretary. • . 

Third secretary.... 
Italy: 

Secretary 

Secopd secretary . . . 



Vienna. 
Vienna. 



Rio Janeiro. 



Paris.. 
Paris. . 
Paris.. 

Berlin. 
Berlin. 
Berlin. 



London. 
London. 
London. 



Rome. 
Rome. 



George B. Rives. . . 
Fiancis G. London. 



Charles Richardson 



Henry Vlgnand .......... 

A. B. Blanchard 

William Bluraenthal 



H. Percival Dodge 

John W. Garrett 

Nelson O'Shaughnessy 



John R. Carter 

Craig W. Wadsworth.. 
Lewis Einstein 



R. S. Reynolds Hitt. 
Leonard M. Thomas.. 



N. J.. 
N. Y. 

Mass 

La. .. 
La. .. 
N. Y. 

Mass . 
Md. . 
N. Y. 

Md. . 
N. Y. 
N. Y. 

m. .. 

Penn 



$2,625 
2,000 

L800 

2,625 
2.000 
1,200 

2,625 
2,000 
1,200 

2,625 
2,000 
1.200 



1906 
1906 

1906 

1885 
1901 
1906 

1902 
1905 
1906 

1906 
1906 
1906 



2,625 .1906 
2.000 1902 



'Foreign affairs conducted through Japan. "Also Governor of the Canal Strip* 

'Also Envoy Extraordinary to Greece and Montenegro, 'Also Consul Genera). 



DIPLOMATS ACCREDITED TO THE UNITED STATEa 



SECRETARIES OF EMB ASSESS AND LEGATIONS— (Continued). 



Country. 



| Resfae 



Name.. 



App'd 
from. 



I Date 
Sal'ry.f of 
japp't 



Mexico: 

Secretary 

Second secretary 
Third secretary. 

Russia: 

Secretaiy 

Second secretary, 
Thi rd secretary . . . . 

Argentine Republic. 

Belgium 

Chill . 

China: 

Secretary 

Second secretary.. 

'Colombia 

uos la Rica, Nicara- 
gua & Salvador.... 

Cuba: 

Secretary , 

Second secretary... 

Denmark 

Greece & Montenegrx 

G ua temala &Honduras 

Japan: 

Secretary 

Second secretary. 

Liberia 

The Netherlands . . . 

Panama 

Peru 

Portugal 

'Rumania & Servla 

'Siam.. v .., 

Snafn , 

Sweden. ........... 

Switzerland » 

Turkey: 

Secretary 

Second secretaiy. 
Venezuela 



Mexico. 
Mexico. 



St. Petersburg. 
St. Petersburg. 
St. Petersburg. 
Buenos Ay res. . 

Brussels 

Santiago , 



Peking. 
Peking. 
Bogota. 



Penton R. McCrcery. 

William Heimke 

Philip M. Hoefele 



Spencer F. Eddy 

R;>mert Woods Bliss. 
Paxton P. Htbben.... 
Charles D. White.... 

Stantcn Sickles 

Edward W. Ames.... 



Mich . 
N. Y.. 
Mo ... 

ni. ... 

N. T.. 
Ind. .. 
N. J... 
N. ¥.. 



San Jose. 



Havana 

Havana. 
Copenhagen. 

Athens 

Guatemala. . 



Tokio 

Tokio 

Monrovia. . . 
The Hague. 
Panama. ... 

Lima 

Lisbon 

Bucharest. . 
Bangkok.... 

Madrid 

Stockholm.. 
Berne , 



John O. Coolidge. 
William Phillips . 
Aibao G. Snyder.. 

James G. Bailey.. 



Jacob Sleeper ..*.., 
Henry L. Janes.... 
Geo. L Lor I Hard... 
Charles S. Wilson.. 
Philip M. Brown... 



Huntington Wilson 

Irving B. Laugh lln 

«'eorf?e W. Ellis 

Roger S. G. Boutell 

wuiiara F. Sands 

Richard R. NeiU 

Henry P. Fletcher 

Thomas E. Moore 

Montgomery Schuyler. Jr. 

Robert M. Winthrop 

E. L. Adams 

Paul G. d'Hautev-Ule 



Constantinople . 
Constantinople. 
Caracas 



Peter A- Jay 

Ulysses Grant Smith..... 
Norman Hutchinson.. «... 



Mass 
Mass 
W. Va 

Ky. .. 

Mj-ss 
Wis. . 
R. L. 
Me. . 
Mass 

III. .. 
Penn 
Kan. 
III.... 
D. C. 
Penn 
Pean 
D. C. 
N. Y. 
Mass 
N. Y. 
R. I.. 

R. L. 
Penn 
Cat . 



2.625 

2,000 
L200 

2,626 
2.0W 
1.200 
1.800 
1.800 
1.800 

2,625 
1.800 
2.000 

L800 

2,000 
1,500 
1.800 
1.800 
1.800 

2.625 

i.eoo 

1.500 
1.800 
2.000, 
2.000 
1.800 
1,500 
1.800 
1*800 
2.500 
1,80* 

2.625 
1.800 
L800 



1897 
189? 
1900 

1908 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1903 
1904 

1902 
1905 
1903 

1903 

1902 
1905 
19J5 
1905 
1903 

1900 
1905 
1902 
1905 
190* 
1884 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1908 
1902 
1905 



1903 
1903 
1904 



'Also Consul "General. 

MILITARY AND NAVAL ATTACHES. 

The following Army and Navy officers are detailed a* attaches to Embassies and 
Legations: Great Britain— Lieutenant Com. J. J. Gibbons, U. S. N., and Major John xi. 
JJeacom, U. S. A. Germany — Lieut. Com. William L. Howard. U. S. N., and* Captain 
William S. Biddle, Jr., U. S. A. France — Lieutenant Com. Roy Campbell Smith, 
U S. N., and Captain William S. GulKnard. U. S. A. Russia— Lieut. Com. Roy Camp- 
bell Smith, U. S. N. # and Captain WlUiam S. Gutgnard. U. 8. A. Austria-Hungary— 
Lieut. Com. William L. Howard, U. & N.. and Lieut. John MeClinlock. U. S. A. 
Italy— Lieut. Com. William L. Howard. U. S. N.. and Major Frank A Edwards, 
U. S. A. China— Lieut. Frank Marble, U. S. N„ and Captain Andre W. Brewster. 
IT. S. A. Dominican republic — Captain Charles Young, U. S. A. Haytl — Captain 
Charles Young, U. S. A. Japan— Lieut. Frank Marble, U. S. N., and Captain John J. 
Pershing, U. S. A Mexico— Captain Horaee M Reeve, U. S. A 



♦DIPLOMATS ACCREDITED TO THE UNITED STATES. 

fiMBAS&IEUft. 

Austria-Hungary. — Ambassador E. and P„ Ladtslaus Hangelmftttar von Hen- 

PTfrvar; P. C„ Counsellor of Embassy, Count Louis Ssechenyl; Secretasy of Em- 
bassy, Ivan von Rubldo-Zichy; Attaches, Moritx von Saent-Ivany. Count Josef Weack- 
heim. Embassy. 1.307 Connectlcut-ave. 

Brazil. — Ambassador E. and P., Joaauim Nabuco; -First Secretary of iSm- 
bapsv, Sylvino Gurgel do Amaral; Second Secretaries, E. L. Cbermeat, A. de 
Vellosc; Military Attache, Major A. V. de Pedemeiras. Embassy. 1710 H-st. 

France. — Ambassador E. and P., J. J. J us se rand: Counsellor of Embassy, M. 
den Portes de la Fosse; Secretary, Viscount Charles de Chambrun; Military At- 
tache, Capt. Foumlsr; Naval Attache, Lieut. Com. de Faramond de Lafajoie. Em- 
bassy, 1.640 Rhode Island-ave. 

Germany. — Ambassador E. and P., Freiherr <Speok von Sternburg; Counsellor 
of Legation and First Secretary of Embassy, Freiherr von dem Buseehe-Ha&den- 
haunen; Second Secretary. Robert R. Bcheiler-Stetawart*; Third Secretary, Graf von 



S 



DIPLOMATS A<2CREDTT"EDr TO THE5 UNITED STATES. 61 



Brawler: Military Attach*. Major Koerner; Naval Attache. Commander Hans Geoi-g 
Behbinghaua. Embassy, 1,435 Masaachusettsr-ave. 

Great Britain. — Ambassador E. and P., the Right Honorable Sir H. M. Du- 
rand O* C. M. G. K. C: S. I., K. C. I. K; Counsellor of Embassy, Walter Beau- 
pre Townley; First Secretary, Ernest Rennie; Second Secretary, Hon. Ronald C. 
Lindsay Attache, William Seeds; Military Attache, Colonel H. J. Foatcr; Naval At- 
tache, Captain F. E. C. Rjau. Embassy, 1,300 Connectieut-av*. 

Italy. — Ambassador B. and P., Baron Edmondo May«r des Planches; Secretary, 
Gmlio Ca?sare Montagna; Attaches. Riearda Borghetti, Roberto Centaro, Count G. B. 
Nani Mocenigo; Naval Attache, Lieutenant Carlo Pfister; Commercial Delegate. Profes- 
sor Antonio Ravaioli. Embassy, 1,400 New- Hampshirelave. 

Mexico. — Ambassador E. and P., Joaquin de Casasus: First Secretary Jo.s£ F. 
Godoy; Second 1 Secretaries, Crisdforo Canseco, Balbino Davalos; Third Secretary, Jose 

Castellot, jr.; Manual Zapata Vera, Jr.; Military Attache. . Embassy 1,415 

1-st. 

Iliuwiia. — Ambassador E. and P., Baron Rosen, Master of fhe Imperial Court; 
First Secretary of Embassy, Theodore Hansen; First Secretary of Legation at- 
tached to Embassy, Prince Nicolas Koudacheff; Second Secretaries, B. de Piebert, 
M. de Thai; Military Attache. Colonel Raspopoff; Naval Attach*. Command r 
Alexandre Boutakoff; Financial Agent, Gregory Witenkiu. Embassy, 1,634 I-st. 



LEGATIONS. 



Argentine Republic. — E. B. and M. P. Epifanio Portela: First Secretary of 
tion, Carlos LZ. Zavalia; Second Secfetary, Luis de Olivcira Cezar; Attache .1 
Pnrteln: Naval" Attache, Lieut. Commander Luis A. Lan. Legation, 2,10$ Sixteen 



tion. 1710 K-St. 



T>ga- 

Jnliau 
Sixteen th-st. 



Belgian*— -B. K an* M. P., Baron lAido^ic Monche^r; Cannsellor of Legation, 
EHavenith; First fceeretary, Adhen^r XJelcolgne; Attache, Pol L. Tellier. Lega- 
ttorr, j,« 10 rr— si. 

Bolivia.— E E. and M. P., Ignacio Calderon; First Secretary, Jorge E. Zalles; 
Honorary Attache, Wm. Alfred Reid. Legation, 1,300 Seventh nth-st "«"«•'. 

Chili. — E. E. and M. P., Joaquin Walker- Martinez; First Secr«tarv, German 
Munita; Second Secretary. : Military Attache, Colonel Vlncente del Solar. Le- 
gation, 17 IS MasBachusrtts-ave. 

China. — E. E. and M. P., Sir Chentung LiaBg-Ch*ng, K. C. M. G. : First Sec- 
retary, Chow Tazchi; Second Secretaries, Chang Chuan, Sun S/e-yee; Attach/-? Li 
Kwoh- Cheng, Wu Chang, Liang Pl-Chuan. Legation, 2,001 Nineteentb-st. 

Colombia. — E. E. and M. P., Df«go Mendoza; First Secretary of Legation Edu- 
a»d* Peres Triana; Counsellor of Legation. L. H. Andrews. Legation, the Rochambeau. 

Casta Rica. — El E. and M. P., Joaquin Bernardo Calvo. Legation, 1.329 
Hi g n te en tn -a t. 

Cuba. — EL R. and M. P., Gonzalo de Quesada; First Secretary, Antonio Martin 
Rivero; feecoud Secretary, Francisco Pina y Marin; Attaches, Aituro Macaai Konitro, 
AatonioARuia y Oltvures. Legation, 1,006 Sixteenth- at. 

Denmark. — E. B. and M. P., Conetantin Bnra. Legation, 1,521 Twentieth-st. 

Dominican Republic. — M. R., Emilio C. Joubcrt; Counsellor of Legation, Henry 
G. K. Heathy Secretary of Legation, Artura L. Fiallo. Legation, the Shoreham. 

M^iador. — *E. B; and M. P., General L. Plaza; Secretary of Legation, Dr. Serafln 
&. Wither; Military Attache, Lieutenant Colonel Enrique Roca, Legation. 11 Broad- 
way, New- York City. 

Guatemala. — B. B. and M. P., JorgQ Munoz; Secretary of Legation. Joaqpin 
Yera. Legation, the Highland*. 
Hoodnrair* — Yacan t . 

,, Mn * , 3rt | T" R ' B anti M p ' x N ' Mger; Secretary, Perceval Thoby. Legation, 
1,429 Rhode Island-ave. 

Japan. — E. B. and M. P., Kogoro Takahira; First Secretary, Bki Hioki; Third 
Secretary, Masanao Hanihara; Attaches, Bunzo Kubota, Isaburo Yoshlda; Naval At- 
tache, Commander Isaas Take&hita. Legation, 1,310 N-st. 

J K«rea.~ 

Netherlands. — B*. B: and M. P., Jonkherr R. dft Marcos Van Swinderen; Sec- 
retary- ol* Legation, Baron E. L. L. Van Tuyll Van Sexooskerlren. Legatioji,' 1,73 fi 

Nic«ragmi.— R B; andi M. P., Luis P. Corea; Seeond Secretary. Nicholas 
Velos*. Legation, 2,003 Out. 

Norway. — Change d' Affaires, C. Harg*. Legal inn, the Nev Willard. 

Panama.— E. B. and M. P,, J. Domingo de Obaldia; Secretary, C C. Arose- 
mena; Attach*, Cfc 4a Obaldia.; Honoj-ary Atta»Jie, Jorge E, Boyd. Legation tho 
Highlands. 

Paraguay. — B". B; and M. P., Cecilio Baez; Counsellor of Legation, Clifford 6. 
Walton; Attache. Reinaldo Biboiini. Legation. (JOO Bond Building. 



^Ftoeign «eiation» conducted through Japan, 



62 



CONSULS GENERAL, CONSULS ATD CONSULAR AGENTS. 



Pers ia .— -IB. B. and M. P.. General Mortesa Khan; Secretary- of Legation, Mearop 
Nevton Khan; Attache. EL P. Mirikelam. Legation, L800 19th-*t. 

Peru.— E. B. and ML P., Manuel Alvarez Calderon (absent) ; Second Seoretary, 
Alfredo Alvarez Calderon; Attaches, Manuel R. Canrtamo, Alfredo Benavidea. Lega- 
tion, the Rochambeaa. 

PortogaL— E2. EL and M. P.. Viscount de Alto. Legation, 190© N-at. 

Salvador.— EL B. and M. P. (vacant). 

Slanu— E. B. and M. P., Phya Akharaj Varadhara; Secretary of Legation, 
Edward BL Loftus; Attache, Mom Luang KruavaL Legation, the Arlington. 

Spain, — B. B. and M. P.. Bernardo Jacinto de Cologan: First Secretary, Luis 
Pastor; Second Secretary, Manuel Walls y Merino; Military Attache, Lieutenant Colo- 
nel Federtoo de Mooteverde. Legation; 720 EUghteenth-6t. 

Sweden*— B. B. and M. P., A. Grip; Secretary of Legation, G. de Strale. 
Legation, 2,117 S-ftt 

Switzerland. — B. B. and M. P., Leo Yogel; Secretary of Legation, A de Pury. 
Legation, 2,013 Hllyer Place. 

Turkey. — B. EL and M. P., Cheklb Bey; First Secretary, DJelal Munlf Bey; 
Second Secretary. Bidky Bey; Military Attache, Lieutenant Colonel Asia Bey, Legation. 
2.101 S-st. 

Uruguay;— E. BL and M. P., Bduardo Aceredo Dias; First Secretary, Pedro 
Requena Berxnudez. Legation, the Portland.^ 

Venezuela.— E. B. and M. P. — : — — ; charge d'affaires N. Velos-Golticoa; First 
Secretary of Legation, Augusto F. Pnlido. Legation, 1,812 Twenty-first-st. 



•Corrected to Dec. L 1006. Addresses, if not otherwise stated, Washington, D. C. 

UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICE. 



ARGENTINE REP. 
Buenos Ayres 

Bahia Blanca. ....*. 

Cbrdoba ^ 

Rosario ...... 

AUSTRIA- 

HUNGARY/. 

Budapest ...... 

Flume 

Carlsbad 

Prague 

Reichenberg ^ i# 

Haida M 

Trieste .*....*. 

Vienna •«••«•••- 

Brlinn ............. 

BELGIUM. 

Antwerp •*.••• 

Brussels 

Oharlerol M 

Ghent ...... 

Liege * 

Verviers 

BRAZIL. 
Bahia — ... 

Aracaja «••*>••••••• 

x^ara ....•»..««»».-•«« 

Manaos ...~...... 

Maranhao • — 

Pernambuco ......... 

Ceara .•••»••«••«•. 

Macelo ........... 

Natal 

Rio de Janeiro 

Victoria ^ 

Santos 

Rio Grande do SuL. 

CHILL 

Antofagasta •*•••••- 

Arica .......»*. 

Iquique 

Valparaiso •••••«•••• 

Caldera ........... 

Coquirabo ...«...•• 

Coronel 

Punta 

Taleahuano 

Valdivia 



(Corrected to December 



George C. Cole (C. G.) 

Walter T. Jones (A.) 

•John M. Thome (V. a).... 
Thomas B. Van Home (C.) 



L 19050 



•Frank D. Chester (C. G.).. 

F. H. La Guardia (A.) 

John S. Twells (C. A) 

Urbaln J. Ledoux (C> 

Silas C. McFarland (C.).... 

Frank SlUer (A.) 

Frederick W. Hossfeld (CL). 
William A Rublee (a G.).. 
Alfred W. Donegan (A.).... 

Church Howe (C. G.) 

George W. Roosevelt (a G.). 
Albert H. Michelson (A.)... 

Frank R Mowrer (0.) 

James G. McNally (C.) 

Henry Dodt (A) 

H. W, Furniss (CJ.... M ... 
Luis Schmidt (A). ......... 

Louis H. Aynae (C.) 

George B. Pell (A.)..., 

J. R do Prado (A) 

William U Sewell (a) 

A a da Frota (A) 

Oscar Falsao (A.) 

Henry J. Green (A.) 

Eugene Seeger (C G.) 

Jean Zlnsen (A.) 

Jesse H. Johnson (CD 

Jorge Vereker (A~).....~..~. 

'Charles C Greene (C)««.. 
•John W. Lata (C.)......... 

•Charles S. Wlnans (CO.... 

Robert B. MatoAeld (d)... 

John C. Morong (A.) 

Andrew Kerr (A.) 

Benjamin R. Robertson (A). 

Moritz Brann (A) 

Joseph O. Smith (A.) - 

Robert N. Williams (A.)... 



W. Va.... 


1906 


S3, 000 


12^26 


Arg. Ren*. 


1892 




1 


Penn .... 


1877 


____ 


12 


Ohio 


1906 


2.000 


797 


Mass ..~ 


1904 


2,000 


1.613 


Aria ..... 


1904 


.. . . 


690 


Penn .... 


1902 


— 


4.923 


Maine ... 


1903 


3,000 


4)580 


Iowa ..... 


1902 


2.600 


8,261 


Wis 


1898 


___ 


3,966 


Iowa ..... 


1897 


2,000 


1,932 


Wis ...... 


1903 


3.600 


8,000 


Ala — ... 


1906 





2,612 


Neb 


1903 


8,600 


7.866 


Penn .... 


1906 


2.600 


7.314 


Mass .... 


1901 





2,682 


Ohio 


1901 


2.000 


4.962 


Penn .... 


1902 


2,600 


2,166 


Germany . 


1890 





890 


Ind 


1898 


3,000 


L839 


Brazil ..*. 


1889 





_— _ 


Illinois ... 


1903 


8,000 


1.696 


N. T...... 


1903 


. 


1,819 


Brazil .... 


1903 


— __ 


200 


Ohio 


1901 


8.000 


688 


Brazil —.. 


1897 


- -.i. i 


122 


Brazil .... 


1902 




20 


N. T 


1904 


_. 


10 


Illinois ... 


1897 


6,000 


4.036 


Brazil .... 


1890 


_ 


232 


Texas ... 


1901 


3,000 


<9*L 


Brasil ».. 


1897 




142 


R. L. 


1898 


" 


887 


Ohio 


1898 




820 


Michigan . 


1900 


1 ■!.■ 


984 


Indiana .. 


1901 
1871 


8,000 


426 


Chill 




27 


Chili 


1898 


■ HI 


207 


Chill 


1903 




^K* 


Chili ..... 


1896 




112 


Chili 


1896 




239 


Cal ...... 


1904 


— — 


1 



$144 



68 



1.684 
176 



37 

32 

679 

1,666 



L102 
L667 



436 
72 



,0 S 

61 
122 

72 
861 



CONSULS OEKEBAt* CONSULS AND CON8TJUMI AGENT* 



RAMB AMD RAKX. 



F««> tar ye«r 

cm -ng Juim 



- CHINA. 

Amoy , 

Antung 

Canton , 

Cneefoo .., 

Chianfa 

Chans Ki»r- .... 

Fachav ».. 

Hangrbow ......... 

Hankav .-....:...... 

Mukden 

Nankin* 

Niuchwang 

Shanghai 

Tientsin 

COLOMBIA. 
BarranquHla 

Santa Marta , 

Bogota 

Bucaramanga 

Call * , 

Cucuta , 

Honda 

Cartagena ....: 

Qnibdo 

• COSTA RICA. 

"*ort Limon 

San Jcw6 , 

Punta Arenas , 

CUBA, 
Clenfoegos 

Caibarien , 

Nuevitas 

Sagua la Grande. ." 

Santa Clara , 

Havana 

Cardenas *., 

Matanzas , 

Santiago de Cuba.... 

' Bancs 

Baracoa 

Goantanarao ■ 

Manzanfllo 

OfeNMARK & DOMS 
Copenhagen ......... 

St. Thomas. W. I.... 

* Christiansted, S.C.I. 
Frederlcksted.S.C.I . 

DOMINICAN REP. 

I Puerto Plata 

Monte Cbristi 



George Hi Anderson (C.).... 
James W. Davidson (C>... 

Julius G. Lay (C. G.) 

John Fowler iC.) 

W. B. Hamilton (A.) 

Mason Mitchell (C.) 

Samuel L. Gracey <C.) 

<C.) 

William Martin <C. G.) 

Fleming D. Cheshire fC.G.). 

Thornwell Haynes (C.) 

Thomas Samroons (C. G.)... 
James LJnn Rodgers (C.G.). 
James W. Ragsdale <C G.). 

Pierre Paal Demers- (C.)... 

William A. Trotit <A.) 

Alban G. Snyder (C. G.)... 

Gustave Volkman (A.) 

Henry J. EUer (A.) 

Philip Tillinghast, jr. (A.).. 

John Owen (A.) 

L-uther T. Ellsworth (C.)... 
Henry G. Granger (A.) 



Chester Donaldson <C) N. Y... 

John C. Caldwell (C.) Kansas 

Lceu A. Marquez (A.y Costa R. 



Max J. Baehr (C.) 

P. B. Anderson (A.) 

John F. Hanson (A.) 

John F. Jova (A.> 

James H. Dod (A.) 

Frank Stelnhart (C G.).... 

Edwin B. Webster (A.) 

(A.) 



R. E. Jloladay (C.) 

George Bayllss (A.).. 

Arthur F. Lindley (A.) 

Thrmas H. Truslow (A.)....} 
"rancis B. Bertot (A.).... 



u 



R. R. Frazier (C.) 

iO. H. Payne <C.) 

i Andrew J. Blackwood tA.). 

R. L.. ,Merwin (A.) 



Santo Domingo 

Asma.. 

Macorla ........... 

Sanches 

ECUADOR. 
Guayaquil 

Pah la de Caraque*. 

EsmeraJdas 

Manta 

FRANCS * DOMS. 
I 1 airier* 

Bone, Algeria..,*-. . 

Oran, Algeria 

Bordeaux 

Biarritz 

Calais • •• 

Boulogne-sur-Mer . 
Gore© Dakar, Africa. 

Grenoble 

Guadeloupe, W. I.... 
Havre 

Cherbourg ......... 

HosOeor 

Renne* 

8t. Malo 



3 WilHam W. Handley (C.).. 

l>aac T. Petit <A.) 

Federfco Lample (A.) 

Thomas C. Dawson (C. G.). 

John Hardy (A.) 

'Edward C. Reed (A.) 

'Jose C. Ariza (A.) 

1H. R. Dietrich (C. G.) 

[Alberto Santos (A.) 

{Rene Dumareat (A.) 

I Paul Genzenbaeh (A.> 



James Johnston (C.)........ 

Antoine F. Garbe (A.) 

Benjamin A. Oourcelle <A.). 
Dominic I. Murphy (C.) 

F. E. Gibert (A.) 

James B. Milner (C.) 

William Whitman (A.) 

2 Peter Strickland (C.) 

C. P. H. Naeon (C) 

G. Jarvis Bowens <C>) 

Alphonse Gaulin (C.) 

H. J. E. Halnneville (A.)... 
Henry M. Hardy <A.)...... 

Ernest Folliard <A.) 

Raymond Maulton (A.) 



N. J 

Algeria . 
Algeria . 

D. C 

N. Y.... 
Indiana . 
France .. 
Conn ... 
Perm ... 
Virginia 

R. I 

France .. 
France .. 
France .. 
N. Y.... 



1906 
1006 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1900 
1891 



1,645 



1906 
1904 
1900 
1905 
1905 
1908 

1900 

1900 
1903 
1895 
1902 
1897 
1903 
1903 
1899 

1905 
1897 
1904 



Neb 


1 
1902 


Penn .... 


1903 


N. Y 


PdO-T 


N. Y 


1903 


N. Y...:. 


1905 


Penn .... 


1903 


Conn .... 


1904 


Ohio 


1902 


Cal 


1903 


N. Y 


1904 


N. J 


1904 


N. Y 


1905 


Wis 


1903 


W. Va.... 


1903 


Denmark . 


1893 


Conn .... 


1901 


N. Y 


1905 


D. R 


1895 


D. R 


1904 


Iowa .... 


1904 


Mass 


1885 


D. R 


1894 


D. R 


1901 


Missouri . 


1903 


Ecuador .. 


1900 


N. Y 


1905 


N. Y 


1902 



1905 
189rt 

1885 
1905 
1905 
1898 
1903 
18S3 
1901 
1905 
1905 
189G 
1886 
1897 
18S0 



2,600 
2,000 



1,500 



3.000 



5,000 



3,000 



2,000 
2,500 



6,000 



3.000 



2,000 



8.000 
2.500 



2441 
310 



190 
"411 

~145 

19 
600 
446 

97 

e 

124 

72 

16 

76 

6 



49 
157 



64 



CONSULS GBN1SRAL. CONSUL* AND CONSULAR AGENTS, 



pulc* 



NAME AJID BA.1TK. 






If 

V 



La Rochelle 

Cognac 

Limoges 

Lyons .»#....... 

Dijon 

Marseilles 

Da st la, Corsica 

Cette ....: «.. 

Toulon 

Martinique, W\ I..... 
Nantes 

Angers *-.... 

Brest 

Lorient 

Nice 

■ Cannes 

Mentone 

Monaco 

Paris 

Rheima ..♦ 

-Troyes . .„ 

Roubalx 

Caudry ...*......,. 

Dunkirk •. 

Lille 

Rouen 

Amiens 

Dieppe 

Saigon, Cochin China. 

St Etlenne.... 

St Pierre, «t P. I. . . 

Hhfeiti 

^amatave, Madafcar 
Tunis. Africa. ....... 

GBRMANT. 

A*k la Chapelle 

Anuaberg 

Apia. Samoa. 

Bamberg 

Barmen 

Berlin 

Sorau ............. 

Bremen 

Brake 

Bremerhaven 

Bresian ».«•.... 

Brunswick ........... 

Chemnitz .... 

Coburg — 

Sonneburg . 

Cologne 

Crefeld ..—........... 

Dresden 

Dusseldorf .. .. 

Elbenstock .......... 

Frankfort 

Cassel 

Langen Schwalbach 

Wiesbaden 

Freiburg, Baden.. M .. 

Glauchau 

Hamburg ........... 

Kiel ...„ ..;. 

LUbeck 

Ritzsbuttel & Cux- 

-haven ....... 

Hanover . .. M .. ....... 

Kehl 

Lelpsic .*............. 

Gera 

Magdeburg .......... 

Mainz ^.... 

Mannheim .«.««•*...... 

Neustadt .......... 

Munich ...~.. 

Augsburg ......r^. 

Nuremburg ............ 



George H. . Jackson (C.). 

Ellsee Jouard (A.) 

Walter T. Griffin (C. A.)... 

John C. Covert (C.) , 

Charles Laureau (A.) ..... . 

Robert P. Skinner (C. G.)., 

Simon Damiani (A.) '. 

C. D. Hagelin (A.) 

B. A. Joave (A.) 

John F. Jewell (C.) 

Louis GolOschmidt (C.) 

Leon Ponsolle (A.) 

A. Pltel (A.) 

Leon Depress (A.) 

H. 8. Van Buren (a> 

J. B. Cognet (A.) 

Achille Ispard (A.) 

Emile de Loth (A.) . 



Frank H. Mason (C. G.).:.; 
J. Martin Miller (C.)...... 

Gaston Baltet (A.) 

William P. Atwel! (C.) 

Hans Dietiker (A.) 

Benjamin Morel (A.) 

C. J. King (A.) 

Oscar Malmros (C.) 

Chas. Tassencourt (A.) 

Raoul le Bourgeois (A.) 

Lorltz L. Stang 'C. A.) 

Hilary S. Brunot (C.) 

2 Chas. M. Freeman (C. A.). 

*W. F. Doty (C.) 

William H. Hunt (C.).:.... 
'Auguste J. Proux CV, C) . . 

Pendleton King (C) 

John F. Whiter (C.) 

George Heimrod (C. G.).... 

William Bardel (C.) 

T. H. Bluthardt (Ct) 

Alex. M. Tnackara (C. G.).. 
William B. Murphy (A.).... 
Henry W. Diedrich (C.) . 

Wilhelm Clemens (A.) 

John H. SchnabelCA.) 



Earnest A. Man (C.) 

Talbot J. Albert (C.) 

Ernest L. Harris (C.) 



Edward H. Ozmun (C. G.). 

F. F. Dumont (A.) 

Hiram J. Dunlap (C.) 

Thomas R. Wallace (C.) . . . . 
T. St. John Gaffney (C, G.) . 

Peter Lieber (0.) 

Charles B. Barnes (C. A.).. 
"Richard Guenther (C. G.) . . . 

Gustav C. Kothe (A.) : 

Ernest Grebert (A.) ........ 

J. B. Breuer CA.) 

B. T. Llefeld (C.) 

(C). 



Hugh Pitcairn (a G.)... 
P. H. J. Sartor! (A.).... 
Wolfgang Gaedertz (A.). 



Johann G. F. Starke (A.) . . . 

Jay White (C.) 

Joseph L Brittain (0.) 

Southard P. Warner (C.).... 

Charles Neuer (A.) 

Frank S. Hannah (C.) 

Walter Schumann (C). .. . . . 

Heaton W. Harris (C.)..... 

Leopold Blum (A.) 

William F. Wright (a G.).. 

G. Oberndorf (A.) 

George B. Baldwin (C.) 



Conn . . 
N. Y... 
N. .Y... 
Ohio ... 
France . 
Ohio ... 
Corsica 
France 
France 
Illinois 
N. H... 
France 
France 
France 
N. J...'. 
France 
France 
Franca 
Ohio ... 
N. J.... 
France 
D. a... 
France 
France 
R, L... 
Minn .. 
France 
France 
Saigon . 
Pemi .. 
N. H... 
N. J.... 
N. Y... 
Tunis - 



N. C 

Illinois .. 
Neb .... 

N. Y 

Illinois ., 
Penn . . . , 

N. C 

D. C 

Germany 
Germany , 
Florida ., 
Maryland 
Illinois ., 

I Minn 

Penn 

Illinois ., 
Iowa 

N. Y 

Indiana . , 
Illinois . 

Wis 

Kansas . . 
Germany 

N. Y 

Conn 



Penn 
Germany 
Germany , 

Germany 
Michigan 

Ohio 

Maryland 

N. Y 

Illinois .. 

N. Y 

Ohio 

Germany 
Penn ..., 

N. Y 

Oht© ..... 



898 
890 

1887 
897 
900 
901 
886 
901 
899 

1002 
904 
904 
884 
808 
897 
901 
898 
1874 
90S 
900 
890 
899 
891 
883 
902 
905 
904 
888 
.906 
897 
898 
902 
901 
1900 

906 

898 
901 
1902 
.903 
905 
1898 
899 

808 
901 
.897 
905 
1906 
904 
906 
901 
905 
899 
905 
,898 
.894 
.884 
903 
897 



903 

899 
885 

L890 
898 
.902 
904 
904 
904 
897 
899 
893 
.904 
886 
901 



1.500 



3,000 



1,500 



2,000 



1.500 



2.000 
1,500 
1,000 
2.000 



2.500 
2.600 
3.000 
2.000 
3,000 
4.000 

sTsoo 



3,000 



2,000 
2.000 
3,500 



2,000 
2,000 
2,000 

2.000 
2,500 
2.000 



**«• for rear 
e&tttaff J mm 



OfflcUL riftL- • 



000)11,908 



841 



22 



3,475 
17 
923 
286 
299 
514 
116 
376 



1,472 
177 
16 
256 
647 
126 

3,334 
190 
103 



CONSUIiS GENERAL* CONSULS AND CONSULAR) AGENTS. 



65 



NAME AND UANK. 



Plauen ! 

Mark neuklrchen . . . 

Solirgen 

Stettin 

Danzig T t.... 

Konigsberg- ..' 

SwinemUnde •♦../.. 

Stuttgart ,. 

Weimar 

Zittau 

GREAT BRITAIN & 

DOMINIONS. 
Aden, Arabia 

Hodeida 

Amherstburg . ► 

Antigua, W. I «.. 

Montserrat, W. I 

Roseau, Dominica. .. i 
Auckland. N. Z | 

Christ Church, N.Z, I 

Dunedin, N. Z 

Wellington, N. Z... 

Barbados, W. I 

-..St. Lucia 

St. Vincent, 

Belfast, Ireland I 

Ballymena ' 

Londonderry ! 

Lurgan , I 

Belize, Honduras i 

Belleville, Ont # .| 

Deseronto 1 

Napanee * j 

Picton ., 1 

Trenton -I 

Birmingham ...» \ 

Kidderminster 

. Redditch . . .- 

Wolverhampton . . .. I 
Bombay, India ....... I 

Karachi : 

Bradford . ., ! 

Bristol I 

Gloucester < 

Rockville, Ont I 

Burslem ., ! 

Calcutta i 

• Caittagong ... I 

Madras ! 

Rangoon i 

Campbellton. N. B... ! 

Bathurst. N. B \ 

Cape Town, S. A..-.. I 

Durban ". .' I 

East London ! 

Kimberley 

Port Elizabeth 

Cardiff 

Newport 

Charlottetown, P.E.I 

Alberton 

Georgetown 

- Sojiris ." 

Summerside 

Chatham, Ont 

Coaticook, Quebec i 

Hereford I 

-Lir.fboro 

Stanstead 

Coliingwood . Ont . 

Barri- 

Owen Sound .... 

Parry Sound... 
Colombo. Ceylon . . 

Point de Galle. 
Cork 

Wo.r*»rford 



I 8 



F«mm for j'ear 
en ting June 



J Official. | 



Carl Bailey Hurst (C.) : 

W. F. L. Fiedler (A.) 

William R. Estes (C.) 

2 John E. Kohl (C.)... 

Ernst A. Claaszen (A.) 

Alexander Bckhardt (A.)... 

Guatav Ludwig (A.) 

Frank Dillingham (C.) 

Clarence R. Slocum (C.) 

(C.) 



ID. C ... 
Germany 
Minn . . . 

Ohio 

Germany 
N. Y.-. .. 
Germany" 

!Cal 

IN .Y 



1905) 2,500! 7.y*2| 



190l| 
1905) 
118971 
|1902 
! 18991 
i 1399 j 
119051 



I Cor 



Wm. W. Masterson (C.) 

Siegmund Reis (A.) 

Chester W. Martin (C.) 

George B. Anderson (C.) 

Frederick Driver (A.) 

Henry A. Frampton (A.)... 
William A. Priekitt (C. G.) 

Frank Graham (A.) 

F. O. Brldgeman (A.) 

John Duncan (A.) 

Arthur J. Clare (C.) 

William Peter (A.) 

E. A. Richards <A.) 

S. S. Knabenshue (C.) 

Wilson McKeown (A.) 

P. T. Rodger (A.) 

F. W. Magahan (A.) 

William L. Avery (C.) 

2 Michaei J. Hendrick (C.)... 

C. A. Milliner (A.) 

William Tempieton (A.) 

Jacob F. Beringer (A.)..... 

Stephen J. Young (A.) 

Marshal Halstead (C.) 

James Morton (A.) 

William U. Breuer <A.) 

John Neve (A. > , . 

William T. Fee (O 

Edward L. Rogers (A.) 

Erastus Sheldon Day (C.)... 

Lorin A. Lathrop (C.) 

Arnold H. Pal in (X.) 

E. Scott Hotehkiss (C) 

William P. Smyth (C.) 

W r illiam H. Michael (C. G.). 

John L. Brown (A.) 

Algernon J. Yorke (A.) 

W T illiam Q. Rowett (A.) 

Mason Mitchell (C. A.) 

B. 0. Mullins (A.) 

H. Lee Washington <C\ G.). 

(A.) ,... 

William H. Fuller (A.) 

Gardner Williams .(A.) 

John A. Ohabaud (A.) 

Daniel W. Williams (C). ... 

William ID. Heard (A.) 

Delmar J. Vail (C. ) 

Albert Glidden iA.) 

A. J. McDonald (A.) 

<'»leb C. Carlton, jr. 
Richard Hunt <"A.).. 

George N. Ifft (C.) 

Franklin D. Hale (C.) 

John R. Nichols (A.) 

Hoel S. Beebe (A.) 

B. F. Butterfield (A.'i 

Robert B. Mosher (C.) 

A. 13. H. Cr^swicka (A.>.... 
William T. RobcrUuii (A.). 

Walter R. Foot (A.) 

William Morey (C % - v 

Jean Steiger <A.) 

Edwin N. Gunsaulu* CO... 
William H. Furr-dl (A.'i 



Kentucky 

Arabia . . 

Michigan 

D. C 

Montana . 
I Dominica 

|N. J 

IN. Z 

JN. Z 

IN. Z 

|D. C 

ISt. Lucia. 
|St. Vin't.. 

iOhio 

! Ireland .. 
I Ireland . . 
! Ireland .. 
I Montana . 

IN. Y 

I Canada . . 
[Canada .. 
1 Canada . . 
j Canada . . 

JN. Y 

I England . 
I Penn 
(England . 

!Ohio 

! India .... 
i Conn 

! Calif 

! England . 

I Wis 

! Mo 

Neb 

I India 

India 

India . . . . 

X. Y 

N. B. 

D. C. 



| 3.H16 

2,000 1 3.035 

1,300 557 

187 

1 1,028 

3.295 



2,500] 



19051 2.0001 4,8S« 



2,000 



1903 
19031 

18971 
1905) 
19011 
1 1896 j 

J1905I 
| 1903 i 
190* 
19051 
1905J 
11873 
1897 
1905 
Il90l| 
|1888l 
18821 
118981 
11893 
! 1890] 
11888 
!1888 
11891 
1897 
1870 
1905 
1869 
1899 
1901 
1897 
1891 
18951 
19021 
19051 

1905; 

1901 f 
1903! 
1903 ! 
1905 
1893 
1905 



1.500 



822 

2.000 ' 415 
1.500' 204 



2,500! 



2,500 



3,000 



2,500 



3,000 



3,000 
1,500 



1.500 
2.500| 

5.000113,0811 
10 



(A.).. 



122 

. 40 

CO 

100 

290 




CONSULS GENERAL. CONSULS AND CONSULAR AGENTS; 



MAUB AND BANK. 



if 



Nuta- 
Oftclal. ifaU. 



COtuttaa, Out 

Dawson City, Yukon 

Paramaribo ...... 

Dublin, Ireland...... 

Athlone 

Galway 

Limerick ......... 

Dundee 

Aberdeen 

Dunfermline 

JCirkcaldy 

Edinburgh 

Galasheils 

Falmouth, England. . 

St. Mary's, SciUy 

Islands 

Fort Erie, Ont, 

Gaspe, Que 

Paspehlac 

Georgetown, Guiana.. 

Cayenne 

Gibraltar „. 

Glasgow. Scotland.... 

Greenock 

Troon 

Goderich, Ont 

Clinton 

G ren v Ule, Quebec .... 

Guelph, Ont 

Halifax, N. 8........ 

Bridgewater, N. S. 

Liverpool. N. S.... 

Lunenburg, N. S... 
Hamilton, Bermuda. 
Hamilton. Ont 

Brantf ord 

Gait 

Paris 

Hobart, Tasmania... 

Launceston , 

Hong Kong 

Huddersfield, Eng. ., 

Hull 

Jamestown. St Helena 
Kingston, Jamaica. 

Black River 

Montego Bay 

Port Morant 

St. Aim's Bay 

Savana la Mar 



/ ju, iidaiiilun iij. A.).. . 
Gabriel B. Ravndal (C)... 
ttilliani H. Bradley (A.)... 

A. K. Moe (C.) 

John Burgess (A.) 

R. A. Tennant (A.)'. 

Edmund Ludlow (A.) 

John C. Hisgin* <C) 

Adolphe Danslger (A.) 

John N. MoCwra <C.) 

Jf. L Innes (A.) 

Ru-fus Fleming (C.) 

John Stalker (A.) 

'Howard Fox (C.) 



John Banfield, jr. (A.)., 

H. J. Harvey <C.) , 

Almar F. Dickson (C). 

Daniel Bisson (A.) 

John McMackta (C.L 
C. H. Fourrage <A.). 



Richard L 8 Prague (C.)-..- 

Samuel M, Taylor (C.) 

James A. Love (A.) 

P. H. Waddell (A.) 

J. If. Shirley (C. A.) 

A. O. Pattlson (A.) ... 

PMllp Carroll <C. A.) 

Alexander Heingartner (C.) 

Wm. R. Holloway <C. G.).- 

William H. Owen (A.) 

Jason M. Mack (A.) 

Daniel M. Oweu (A.) 

W. Maxwell Greene <C.).... 

James M. Sheuard (C.) 

Martin W. McEwen (A.)... 

James Ry ergon (A.) 

William W. Hume (A.) 

^Alexander G. Webster (C). 

Lindsay Tullock (A.) 

Edward S. Bragg (C. G.>... 

Benjamin F. Stone <C.)..... 

[Walter C. Hamm (C) 

* Robert 1*. Pooley (C.) 

'Geo. H. Bridgman (C> 

C. M. Farquharson (A.) . . . . 

G. L P. Corinaldi (A.) 

C. C. I^anglois (A.) 

A. B. D. Rerrle (A.) 

f'has. S. Farquharson (A.)-. 
Kingston, Ont tHoward D. Van Sant (C.)., 



Leeds ... . 

Liverpool. Eng 

Holyhead 

London. Eng 

Dover 

London, Ont 

Malta 

Manchester, Eng 

St. Helens 

Melbourne, Australia, 

Adelaide .......... 

Freomantle .. ...... , 

Moneton, n. B 

Newcastle, N. B.», 

Richibucto 

Montreal, Quebeo 

Coteau ,j 

Hemmingford • •* • . 

Huntington .... 
Napsau, N. P...., 

Albert Town... 

Dun more Town. 

Governor's Harbor. 1 

Green Turtle Cay, 

Mnthcwtown .... 
Newcastle on Tyne 



Lewis Dexter <C). 

John L Griffiths (C.) 

Richard D. Roberts (A.).... 
Robert J. Wynne (C. G.)... 

Arthur G. Fuller (A.) 

Henry S. Culver (C.) 

John H. Grout (C.) 

Wm. H. Bradley <C.) 

John Hammill (A.) 

John P. Bray (C. G.) 

Charles A. Murphy (A.).... 

Frank R. Perrot (A.) 

Gu8. Beutelspacher <C. A.). 

B»ron N. Call (A.) 

Thomas O. Murray <A.) 

Aranson W. Edwards (C.G.). 

Thomas Stapleton (A.) 

W. W^ Wark <A.). 



John Dineen (A.).. ., 

Julian Potter <C,),,.. 

Jose Q. Maura (A.)...... 

N. K. B. Munro <A.> 

Abwr W. Griffin (A.)... 

F/Tward W. Bethel (A.).. 

" * P. ?arerent <A.\. . 

W. Metealf rC). 



iven^ucky 

a B- 

S. Y 

N. J 

Ireland . . 
Ireland . . 
Ireland . . 
Delaware 

Cal 

Wis 

Scotland , 

Ohio 

Scotland , 
Etagland . 

England . 
N. Y... 
Mass .. 

Canada 
N. Y... 
Guiana 
Mass .. 
Ohio ... 
Scotland 
Scotland 
Illinois . 
Canada 
N. Y.. 
Ohio .. 
Indiana 
N. 8.,., 
N. S... 
M. S... 
R. I.... 
Michigan 
Canada 
Canada 
Canada 
Tasmania 
Tasmania 

Wis 

Ohio 

Pern 

N. Y 

N. J 

Jamaica . 
Jamaica , 
Jamaica . 
Jamaica . 
Jamaica , 

N. J 

R. I 

ma , 

England . 
Penn 
Mass 

Ohio ..... 
Mass . . . , 
rilinois . , 
Ftogland . 
N. Dak... 
A ustralia 

Cal 

Ohio 

N. B...,, 
N. B...., 

N. D 

Canada ., 
Canada .. 
Canada .. 
N. Y...,. 
Bahamas 
Bahamas 
Bahamas 
Ha ham as 
Bahamas 
Maine .., 



luaA 
1900 
1906 
1904 
18*8 
1901 
189ft 
1897 
1904 
1£97 
1903 
1897 
1894 
1874 

1876 
1902 

1887 
1889 
1906 
1903 
1901 
1897 
1891 
1*96 
1902 
1890 
1904 
11005 
'1903 
1872, 
18Q6 
1883. 
1898 
1807 
1904 
1899 
1892 
l«70i 
1887 
1902i 
1897 
1903 
PW 
1902 

i°03 

18Kfi 
1901 
1912 
1P9K 
1905 
1*97 
1906 
1896.J 
1905 
1904 
1897 
1*9« 
190S 
18«W 
1P97 
1«87 
1904 
1897 
1904 
1901 
1903 
1*9* 
1**11 

iwt 
im 
iw 

188ft 
189* 
t«9tf 
1»9B 
1897 



2.000 



2.600 



2,000 



2.500 



1.600: 
1.600 



3.000 



1,500 
3.000 



1,500 
3.500 



2.000 
2,000 



6.000 
2,600 
2,000 
2.000 
3.000 



L500 
2. 0«> 
6,000 

eiaofr 
ioao 

2.000 
3.000 



4.000 



2,000 



2.000 



80 



CONSULS GENERAL. CONSULS AND CONSULAR ACCENTS. 



07 



Fooh for ye* ' 

en ails Juu« 

«. 9 . 




NAKS AND BAMS. 



Carlisle 

Sunderland 

West Hartlepool .... 
Newcastle, N. S. W.. 

Brisbane, Queens- 
land 

Townsviile 

Vlagara Falls, Ont... 

St. Catharines 

Nottingham 

Derby ... % 

Leicester 

OrllHo, Ont 

Midland 

North Bay, Nipis- 
sing- . 

Sudbury 

Ottawa, Ont 

Arnprior ....* 

Peterborough, Ont.... 
Plymouth, Eng 

Dartmouth 

Guernsey 

Jersey .../. 

Port Antonio, Ja- 
maica ; 

Port Maria 

Port Hope, Ont 

Lindsay 

Port Louis, Mauritius 

Port Rowan, Ont 

Port Stanley, F. I... 

Prescott, Ont 

Pretoria, Transvaal. . 

Itloemfontein ...... 

Johannesburg 

Quebec 

Levis 

Rimouski, Quebec. . . . 

Cabano 

St. Christopher, W. I. 

Nevis 

St. George, Bermuda. 
St. Hyacinthe, Que... 

Sorel 

Waterloo 

St. John, N. B 

Campobello Id 

Fredericton 

Grand ManaiL. 

St. George 

St. John's, N. F 

Bay Bulls 

Port aux Basques.. 
St. John's, Quebec.. M 
St. Stephen, N. B.... 

St. Andrews. 

St. Thomas, Ont 

Courtright 

Sarnia. Ont 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 
Sheffield ;..; 

Barnsley . . 

Sherbrooke, Quebec. ., 

Oookshire 

Megantic 

Sierra Leone.... 
Singapore, S. S. 

Penang 

San dak an, British 

North Borneo.... 

Southampton 

Portsmouth 

Weymouth ~. 

Stan bridge, Quebec... 

Clarencevllle 

Stratford. Ont 



Thomas S. btrong (A.) 

Thomas A. Ho-ran (A.) 

Hans C. Nielsen (A.) 

^Frederic W. Coding (C.)... 

William J. Waath-erlU (A.).. 

David J. Brownhill 

W. H. H. Webster (C.) 

George H. Murphy (A.) 

F. W. Mahln (tt) 

Charles K. Eddowes (A.>... 
Samuel S. Partrklse (A.>... 

EX A. Wakefield (C.) 

F. J. McCailum (A.) 



D. J. McKeown (A.) 

N. T. M. Hillary 

John G. Foster (C. G.) 

Arthur Bur wash CA.) 

Roland J. Hommick (C. A.) 
Edward A. Creevey (C) .... 

Jasper Bartlett (A.) 

William Carey (A.) 

B. B. Renouf (A.) 

"Nicholas R. Snyder (C. A. 

Alfred Savarian (A.7 

Harfy P. Dill (C.) 

James K. Knowlson (A.).. 

Theodosius Botkin (C.) 

*Geo. B. Killrnaster <C. A.; 

John B. Rowen (C. ) 

Martin R. Sackett (C.) 

John H. S nod grass (C.) 

Henry F. Gill (A.) 

Nicholas J. Northlngton (A. 
William W. Henry (C.) 

C. M. Barclay (A.) 

B. H. Dennison (C. A.) 

Jay Wirt Hall (A.) 

Joseph E. Haven (C. A.)... 
Charles C. Greaves (A,)... 
Howard D. Fox (V. C. A.). 
Joseph M. Authler (C. A.). 

Isale Sylvestre (A.) 

Charles M. Vastman (A.).. 

Gebhard Willrich (C.) 

John I. Alexander -(A.) 

James T. Sharkey (A.) 

Henry E. Fraser (A.) 

Edward Miiliken (A.) 

George O. Cornelius (C.)... 

Hamilton Weeks (A.) 

J. W. Keating (A.) 

Charles Deal (C.) 

C. A. McCul lough (C.) 

George H. Stfckney (A.)... 
Maxwell K. Moorhcad (C). 
Frederick W. Baby (A.)... 

Neal McMillan (C.) 

''George W. Shotts (C. A.). 

Charles N. Daniels (C.) 

Charles McNaughton (A.).. 

Paul Lang (C.) 

William F. Given (A.) 

Henry W. Albro (A.) 

John T. Williams (C.) 

David F. Wilber (C. G.)... 
Otto Scheie (A.) 

A. Tucker Ward roo ( A.) . . . 

Albert W. Swalm (C.) 

John Main (A.) 

Fred W. Fuller CA.> 

»A. J. Fleming (C. A.)...., 
Thomas II. Derlck (A.).... 
August 'G. Seyfert ((!).... 



68 



CONSUL OBNEKAL, <CONSU!LS AND CONSULAR AGENTS. 




Fuv.i, Mji fslanda.. ... 
fv.mscft, Wales 

Dlam-lly 

Mil ford listen 

Fydncy. N. g 

Arichat 

rape. Cnnso 

J^uiisburg 

Piclou 

Port Hawkesbury & 
MulRrave 

Putrwash & Wallae* 
Sydney, N. S. W 

Norfolk Island 

Three. Rivri-H, Quebec 

Clranrl More 

Victoria viHe 

Toronto, Out 

Trinidad, W. I 

Granada 

Turk's Island. W. I. . 

i o< Khirn iiarbor. . . 

r-'att Gay 

Vancouver, B. 

Gumhorlarui 

Kern J ft 

Nelson 

RoKsland . . , 
Victoria. B. 0. 

Ghemainus 

N-inaimo . . . 
WalKreburff, 
Wiiufser. N 

Cheverio 

Parr:* bono • 

Rivea- Jlobett 

Windsor, Out 

Winnipeg, Manitoba.. 

Poloraino 

Fl ners«on 

Ft. William, Or*1... 

Oretna 

fjclhbridge, Alhorta 

tf. Portal, Assini - 
Iwia 

Rat Portage, Ont. .. 

Vot^Htork, N. B 

Kdmunston . . . ..... 

farmouth, N. S 

A nnui>olis 

Pa rrt union 

Pigrl.y 

Ivockeport .......... 

•ohejhurne .. 

GRRECB. 
At liens 

Pira?us . . . 

Patrns 

Corfu 

GPATi^MADA. 
Guatemala 

< 'hHHinerleo . . 

3 J v illusion 



KAME AND KANJL 



C... 



t)nt. 
S.... 



itienu.d A. Moeri (A.) 

^Leslie K. Brown (C. A.).. 

I Griihlh \V. Prees (c;.| 

(William lV»wen (A.) 

I George S. K el way (A.) 

I GeorK* N. Went (C-) 

jritana^e Rind (A.) 

I Alfred W. Hart lA.) 

1H. C. V. J^e Yalte (A,) 

John R. Davies <A,) 

Alexander Pain (A.).. .....•• 

I Conrad W. Mt-vris (A.) 

I Orlando H. Baker (Cj.) 

I Isaac Robinson (A.) 

I James H. Worman (C.}..,, 

\b\ 11. Russell (A.) 

I George, J3. Reaudet (A.) . ... 
I Robert fc! Chilton, Jr. <<?.). 
! William W. llandiey tC). 

|P. J. Dean (A.) 

Klosenh A. Iiowells 

|C. H. Durham (A.) 

|D. F. Harriott (A.) 

D. E<<win Dudley (C.) 

IG. W. -Ciintou (A.) 

I J. R. Pollock (A.) 

i Walter >S. Pihlct (A.) 

{George A. Ohron (A,) 

Jk. K. Smith «?.) 

Henry '}. Seaborn (A.^.... 

George C. S.iielky (A.) 

Percy C. lleald (C. A.) 

Mos-eph T. Hoke (C.) 

J. G. RurirosH a A.) 

T„. II. H: J'O .(A.) 

William Moffat i\.) 

Henry A. t'onant (C) 

Samuel H. Shank (C.) 

A. M. Herrou (A.) 

Duncan Me Arthur (A.)...* 

IG. W. JarviH (A..) 

I Michael l^jntr (A.) 

C. B. Bowman <A.) 



<<S 



Pan Jose de Guate- 
mala 

HAYTJ. 
■Capo TluyUen 

Connives 

Port, de Pa»x 

Port a'i Prince 

Aux -Cayes 

.P;eimJ 

Jeremio 

Rlirapoaue 

Petit Goavo 



I 

IW. H. PJorscy (A.) 

!G. C. Kihsbio (A.) 

\\<\ C. Den i son (C) 

|.l. Ado) r.he Guy (A.) 

•K'rtward A. Crecvey (C.) . . 

'I Jacob M. Owen (A A 

IThoa. W. Rob<rl*on (A..).. 
I W i iiiam R. Si ewart (A.) . . 
IWilliam McMillan (A.)... 
j Edward M. Bill (A.) 



! George Hart on <G.) 

J Marino T. Soumiely .(A.).. 

1 •-'.lames V. Dons (C) 

iChas. E. ilancoek (A.)..- • 

lAirrefl A. Wlnslow (C. G.'). 

Cart G. lleitman (A.) 

IlCdward Reed iA.) 

• rtaniuol Wolford (A.) 



I Prank Sinis Swan (A.) . . . . 

{ = Tj.. W. TJvinjTSlon (CO 

|J. W. Wool (A.) ■• . 

|P»rl AhcxiT (A.) 

I 'John R. Ten-cfi (G.) 

KrnFt D. Dullon (A.) 

Douis Vital (A.) 

S't. Charles Villixirouin (A.) 

I'.troil Goldonb. r^ {A$ 

D. Kampmeycr (A ) . . . . . . 



CONSOLS GENERAL, CONSULS AND CONSULAR AGENTS, 




KAMS AND BANK. 



HONDTJRAS. 



Tela -•• 

TfruxlUfr .... .... 

Puerto Got*bb. .. . . 

Saa Ped*o 3ula, 
"Tegucigalpa ....... 

Amapaia 

■ San. Juancltcu . ... 
0«lla 

Banacea ....... 

Ruataa .......... 

GasteUara&eB dfcStabla 
Capri 



ix-uartlea Miot (A.). •'• 

KD«nn Rr. Wood' (pit L. . . 

}W. C. Hutchinson (A.);.... 

I John T: Glynn (A.)*. 

iJPellx s: S. Johnson (C.)..., 
|J. MT. Mitchell, jr. (A.)--...... 

'WP'iam E. Alger (C.>: 

•WUltem Hoyden (A.) 

If, H. Wfcddle (A.*..: 

i 2 Herbert R. Wright <£;);.".. 

William Bayly (A.). . ••• 

David Warren- fcfc.X. ..*;... ., 



€%tania 

. Florence- ........ 

Bologna .......••• 

tifenoa 

ii Remo~ 

ftegftovn ..,.. — .*•••■•••« 

Carrara — .■•■• 

Messina ..:....•••.• 

Reggie*. Cala&rla-. 

Wan .„..►... ■• 

Efenles - • • • 

Bttrl .... 

Rodt ...^..♦.•— — •■ 
F&iermo ...j. *....*• 



Girgcnti ••• 

Lieaia .........•••.• 

Ttapant .......... 

Itame . .-• 

Ancona . ... . 

Cagllani ....- 

Civlta Vecchta*.... 

'Burin 



JAPAN; 

lEbtoe 

Nagasaki 

*Bamsui, 
Yttcohanm 
Hakodate 



a. Crowntashleid CC. A.). 

Thomas S. Jerome (A.)..... 

.F. Ciampa (A.fc 

■Benjamin F. Chase (C:) 

Jerome A. Quay (C). ....... 

Carlo Gardlni (A.)\ 

James Jeffrey Roche (C.) . . . 

j Albert AmeRUo (A.) ».. 

I^Tames A. Smith (C); 

fcUlisae Boccaci CA.y. 

I Charles M. Caughy ■ (C.T 

»r«arlo Celestl (A.) 

TJamee TC. Dunning (.C >, . ... 
|'A. Homer Rylngton (C>.... 

liNicholas Schuck (A.)' 

j-Tonraso del Guldlce <A. )*... 

William H. Bishop CC.) 

W. Crocchioio (A.) 

13*.. Ctotta (A.) 

{•*. Wrderame (A.)' ».-... 

IC Serraln© CA.) 

I-Hector de Castro (C G'.). .. 

Ittdward A. Kane (A.* 

I Alphonse Dol- (A ) 

Uames B. Tngle (A.):.. 

t'Pletro Cune (G) 

Paul Nash *<C.fc .. 



Hunter Sharp- (C.) 

rrharlea B. Harris <C^.. 
lFr*t D. Fisher (C.) 

Henry B. Miller (C: G.). 

Edward J. King (A.).... 



iSbwIon Paddoo* (C. G.)..*. 
LIBEBTA. 

UPmm Qvlas ..••«. i£h?nest Lyon (CT G.V* ....... 

MB5CTC©:. 

Aeapulooi •—• • • -Geo»f» W. Dickinson' (C.>. . 

MUrttaA Ca*!Mite»i..... Octree B 4 . Whrdman (C.A.y. 
Gnttmahua -..•♦ WilJlam W. Mills (C.) 

Parral ...... ...... • ' Tamfs J. Lorn? (A.) 

CSUdad JBuanea.. [Thomas D. Fdwards (C.)- .. 

Oludad Porftrlo ©iaa.|T*w!s A. Martin 'C.j 

Sierra Hojfedft » Wm. Q. Marsh (A.) 

Bftrango ».Tames A. Lo Pov (C:) 

Tbrreoti ......... 'George C. Carothers (A.K.. 

W«ienadtt fW»errtt B. Bailey (C.) 

H*wnosilh> i^ouls Hcstetter <C.) ....... 

Jalaoa M*ohn B. Richardson (C.)'. .. . 

h» Paz.. 1* (C.Y 

f*aw Jo«ff. ..i Arthur Embieton (A.) 

■*f*nwin!Ub ..«*«. V. MeKie fC. A.V 

MatUmorafl IP. Merrill Griffith (C.) 

Mazatian fLouis Rp'sor (C:).. 

Tttpolobampo ...... ^August SatHer rA.r 

Mexico -•• y (r * n 'y 

Guadalajara f William R. Davis (A.), 

Guanajnatp . . • mwl«rht Furnas (A.) 

OflMaca. .i^^-^rirs H. Arthur (A.) 

puebla ».lWiiram M. Chnmbp™ <\.r< 

Zacateca* »«*rt^und Von Gehren <A.y. . 

Mhnterey IPhilip C. Hanna- (C. Q.).... 



70 



CONSULS GENERAL. CONSULS AND CONSULAR AGENTS. 



KAMI AND BAWL 



If 
V 



«* far jflir 

-jft£ J turn 



Victoria 

Nogales 

Alamos • 

Cananea 

Guayraas ~. 

Nuevo Laredo. .... ... 

Progreso v 

Campecbe 

Laguna de Terminos 

Saltillo 

Tarapico 

San Luis Potosi.... 

Tuxpam 

Vera Cruz 

Coatzacoalcos 

Frontera 

Tlacotalpan 

MOROCCO. 
Tangier ,. 

Casa Blanca 

Mogador 

NETHERLANDS * 
DOMINIONS. 

Amsterdam 

Batavia, Java 

Macassar, Celebes. . 

Padang, Sumatra. . 

Samarang 

Soerabaya 

Curacao, \V. I 

Buen Ayrc : 

Rotterdam 

Flushing 

Luxemburg, Lux- 
emburg 

Schiedam 

St. Martin, W. I 

St. Eustatius 

NICARAGUA. 
Cape Gracias a Dlos, 
(Port Deitrick)... 
Managua 

Corinto 

Matagalpa 

San Juan del Sur. . 
San Juan del Norte. . 

Bluerlelds .... 

NORWAY. v 
Bergen.. . ../ 

Drontbeim 

Chrlstiania 

Christiansand 

Stavanger. 

OMAN. 

Ma.skat 

PANAMA. 
Colon 

Bocas del Toro 

Panama 

David - 

Santiago 

PARAGUAY. 

Asuncion •• 

PERSIA. 

Teheran 

PERU. 
Callao 

Chimbote 

Eten 

Mollendo 

Paita 

Salarsrry 

PORTUGAL AND 

DOMINIONS. 

Funchal. Madeira. ... 

Lisbon ♦ 

Brava, 0. V. 1..... 



iiitam J. Storms 1A.) 

A, R. Morawetz (C.) , 

Charles A. Hardy (A.) 

W. J. Galbraith (A.) 

Frank M. Crocker lA.) 

Alonzo B, Garrett (C.)...:.. 
Edward H. Thompson (C). 

Joseph Espinola (A.) , 

Ervin J. Beule (A) 

Victor L. Duhaime , 

Samuel E. Magill (C.) 

SoWall E. Cross *A.) 

2 A. J. Le&pinasse (C.) 

William W. Canada *C.).... 

Alfred R. Stubbs (A.) ...... 

<A.). 



H. J. Langdon (A.) 

Hoffman Philip (C. OJ.. 

Conrad H. Toel (A.) 

George Broome (A.) 



Frank D. Hill (C.) 

2 Hradstreet S. Rairden (C). 

Karl Auer (A.) 

C. G. Veth (A.) 

B. Caulfleld Stoker (A.) 

Benjamin N. Powell (A.)... 

Ettas H. Cheney (C.) 

G. W. Hellmund (A.) 

Soren Listoe (C. G.) 

P. F. Auer (A.) 



Ernst Derulle (A.) 

Anders C. Nelson (A.). 

a (C.) 

J. G. C. Every (A.) 



Edwin W. Trimmer (a).. 



Henry Palazro (A.) 

W. H. de Savigny (A.) . . . 

C. Hoimann (A.). 

Frederick M. Ryder (C). 
Michael J. Clancy (A.)... 



E. S. Cunningham (C.) 

Claus Berg (A.) 

Henry Bordewlch (C. G.)... 

Berne Reinhardt (A.) 

'Bertil M. Rasmuser* (C). 

Archibald Mackirdy (V. C). 



James C. Kellogg (C.) 

David R. Hand (A.)..... 
Arnold Slianklin (C. G.).. 
(A.). 



Nathaniel J. Hill (A.) 

John N. Ruffin (C.) 

John Tyler (V. C. G.) 

Alfred M. Gottschalk (C.G.). 

Victor Pezet (A) 

L. G. Marquina (A.) 

Etarique Meier (A.) 

Louis Blacker (A.) 

George W. Chase (A.) 



N. Y 

Arizona ., 
Mass 

Calif 

Iowa 

W. Va,... 

Mass 

La 

Wis 

N. H 

Illinois . . 
Maine . . . 

N. Y 

Indiana .. 
N. Y 



Calif 



1902 
1905 
1905 
1902 
1901 
1897 
1902 
1905 
1903 
1897 
1901 
1902 
1897 
1901 



N. Y.... 

Morocco 
Morocco 



Minn ... 
Maine . . 
Celebes . 
Sumatra 

Java 

Java 

N. H. ... 
B. Ayre.. 
Minn ... 
Ncth .... 



N. Y.., 
Illinois 



Maskat 



Thomas C. Jones (CO 

» Jacob H. Tbieiiot (C.).. 
A. J. Nunes (A.) 



Kentucky 

N. Y 

C. V. I.. 



1,500 



1901 

1905 
1904 w 
1891 * 



1900 
1895 
1900 
1899 
1807 
3899 
1900 
1897 
1899 

1904 
1901 



1891 



1906 



1885 
1905 
1886 
1904 
1905 

1903 
1898 
1900 
1897 
1905 

1881 

1905 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1904 

1897 

1893 

1905 
1904 
1904 
1893 
1901 
1900 



1893 
1898 
1900 



3,000 



2,500 



2,500 
1,500 



2,000 
3,000 



1.500 
2,000 



2.500 



1.600 



1,820 



1,318 

3,199 

1,965 

303 

395 

1,224 

2,041 

1,325 

358 

2,819 

262 

430 

133 

300 
100 
165 



7,877 

1,334 
240 
435 
475 
726 

1,073 
126 

9,729 



17 
2,078 



8 

163 

2 

vi 
fc 646 
1,773 

1.414 
172 

1,352 
175 
921 

173 

994 

704 
701 



6 
20 
779 

667 
210 



230 

2,408 

43 



139 



92 

54 



48 



146 
40 

342 
96 

164 



97 
30 
30 



4 
270 



eo 



CONSULS GT3NBRAL, CONSULS AND CONSULAR AtUCNTt*. 



placs. 



MA1UE AND HANK. 



P 






t Cl» IK J lllu 



OWri«J. 



No»t- 
ital. 



Oporto 

SL Vincent, C. V. I. 

Setubal 

Lorenzo' Marques. . ». . 

Beira , 

St. Michael" a.Aabrea. 

Fayal 

Plow* .. 

San Jorge..., 

Tercelra ». 

RUMANIA. 

Bucharest 

RUSSIA. 

Batura 

Dalny. Manchuria.... 
Helsingfora 

Abo ..r 

Wiborg 

Moscow 

Odessa .............. 

Roatoff on Don 

Riga 

St Petersburg 

Cronstadt . . « 

Lltau 

Rcv&l 

Vladivostok 

Warsaw 

SALVADOR. 
San Salvador... 

Aeajutla ...V. 

La Llbertad 

La Union 

SERVIA. 

Belgrade 

SIAM. 

Banglcok 

SPAIN AND DOM. 
Barcelona 

Bilbao .' 

San Fellu de Gulxola 

Santander 

Tarragona 

Carthagena 

Ooronna 

Vlg© 

Jeres de la Pronterft. 
Madrid 



William Stuve (A.) 

J. B. • Guimaraes (A.) 

Alphonso H. O'Neill (A J.., 

W. Stanley Jiollla (C.) 

A. W. H. Qlenny (A.) 

"George H. Pickerell (C.). .., 

Moy&es Benarus (A.) 

James Mackay (A.) ..... — 

J. J. Cardoeo (A.) 

It de Castro (A.) 



Almeria 

Seville 

CadU 

Huelva 

Port at, Mary' a... 
Tanerlffe, G I » 

Grand Canary.*... 

' La Palms/: 

Valencia 

Alicante 

Denis *. 

BWBDKN 
Gothenburg 

Heelngborg ...... 

Malmo ....••.:••• 
Stockholm . t 

Sundsvalt ........ 

SWITZERLAND. 

Basel • 

Berne •• 

Chaux-de-FimdB .. 
Geneva - •> 

Vevey ....«...- •• 
Lucerne 

Aarau — 

St. Gall 

Zurich 



*Thoa. Swing Moore (CO.). 



(C.) ■.. 

John KL Jones (C.) 

*Roger S. Greene (C. A.).. 

MoriU Kramer (A.) 

C. E. Efcstrom (A.) 

Samuel Smith (C>~ 

Thomas B. Heenan (C.) . . . . 

George R. Martin (A.) 

«N. P. A. Bornholdt ((?.)... 
Ktrielbert Watts (C. O.).... 

Peter Wigius (A.) 

Hugo Smlt (A.) 

Christian Rothermann (A.). 

* (C. A.) 

Alfred Leffingwell (C.) 



John Jenkins <C\ G.). 
Frank Wager (A.).... 
Henry Hussey (A.)... 
S. F. I*>rd (A.) 



*THbs. Ewing Mcorc (C!.G.). 
•M'gom'y Schuyler, jr.(C.G.) 



BenJ. H. Ridgely (C. 

O. Yensen (A.) 

P. Ksteva (A.) 

&\ Odrlosola (A.) 

U J. Agostlni (A.)... 
•Joseph Bowron fC-).. 
1 Julio Harmony <C>.. 
Enrique Mujder (A.).. 
*M. M. Price (C. A.). 
(C). 



G.>. 



David R. Birch (a) 

A. Hi Carlton (A.) 

Richard M. Bartleman (C). 
(A.). 



William J. A I cock (A.). 
Oeorge M. Daniel (A.).. 
Solomon Berliner (C.)... 
Peter Swanston (A.).... 

Manuel Yanes f A.) 

Henry A. Johnson (C).. 
Henry W. Carey (A.)... 
J. R. Morand (A.) 



Robert 8. S. Bergh (C.).. 

Lars Virgin (A.) 

Hugo Llndgren (A.) 

«B. U Adams (C. G.).... 
Victor Svensson (A.).... 



George Gilford (C.) 

Edward Higgins (C.) 

H. Pleckei, Jr. (A.) 

Francis R. Keene (C). . . . , 
Theodoro F\ Dwight (A.). 

H. H. Morgan (C.) 

Alfred C. Tovls (A.) 

Thos. Willing Peters (C.). 
Adam Lieberkn&cht (C.).. 



Portugal . 
C. V. I... 
Portugal . 



fiJ. Africa. 

Ohio 

A sores . . 
Aaoree 
Asores 
Aroree 

D. C 

D. C 



I81O 
1895 
11KJS 
1898 
1»02 

l^yy 

18W9 
1872 
18'iD 
1875 

100& 



Mass.. . 
Russia 
Russia ... 

N. J 

Minn 

Russia . . . 
Russia . . . 

Penn 

Russia . . . 
Russia . . . 
Russia . . . 

N. Y 

N. Y 

Nebraska 
Penn . . . . 
Salvador . 
Calif 

D. C 

N. Y 



1.500 

1905 

.TaOO 
.}1005| 2.500 



1802 
1901 
1885 
100;». 
1^0 

looa 

18KJ 

1MJ2 
10! »2 
1K0S 
1905 

1005 
1003 
VMM 
1000 

1005 , 

nm 



Spain 



11)04 



1«>« 
1P0R 
1&03 

1808 
I00:r 

nw 
ioor> 

1004 

loo? 

1004 
100^ 
18&7 



2.000 
^.OCJ 



"1.000 
4.000 



2.500 



2.000 



J.500 



1.500 
1.500 



2,000 



2.000 



2.000 

£ooo 



1.1C2 
221 

2.W 
250 

r> 

402 
172 
47 
01 
GO 



74S 



;i,«28 
:t}-5 

127 

1.376 

7»7 

C75 
9Ti 



2 

581 
2l<5 
^21 

no 

52 

8vft 

200 

450 

122 

2S2 

14<{ 

2.1J17 

2^t3 

2.710 

2.0ft7 

1.570 

588 

735 

1.278 

514 

774 

87 

684 

245 

500 

1.&0A 
00 

.•WS8 
2.221 



4.120 

1.407 

1.714 

1.114 

«W 

2?C 

2.002 

10. TOR 

3.107 



SI 



42 
2 

207 

2JS 

" 80 
,'{7(1 

10 
834 

i!;k 



W 



CONSULS GENERAL, CONSULS AND JCONSULAR AGENTS. 



HAlflB AND BANK. 



if 
I 2 




Wmterthur 

TURKEY & DOM. 
Alexandretta 

Aleppo 

• Mersine 

Bagdad 

Bassorah 

Beirut, Syria 

Damascus 

Haifa 

Tripoli 

Cairo, Egypt 

Alexandria 

Assioot 



H. Gruebler (A.) tSwitz . . 



Jesse B. Jackson (C). 
Frederick Pochfc (A.). 

R. Viterbo (A.) 

(C.). 



Henry P. Chalk (A.). 
Leo Bergholz (0. G.). 
Nasif Mezhaka (A.).. 
(A.). 



G.).. 



Ira Harris (A.) 

Lewis M. Jddings <C. 

James Hewat (A.) 

George Wlssa P.ey (A.)-- 

Port Said I Harry Uroadbent < A. ) . . . 

Suez I St. Leger A. Toubay (A.) 

Constantinople iChas. M. Dickinson <C. G.).IN. Y 

Dardanelles [Frank Calvert (A.) I Turkey .. 

Saloniki IP. H. Lazzaro (A.) [Turkey .. 

Harput I Evan B. Young (C.) ! S. Dak 

Jerusalem, Syria tSelan Merrill. (C) ! MasB 

Yafa | EL Hardegg (A.) I Syria 



Ohio ... 
Syria .• . 
Turkey 

Turkey 
N. Y... 
Syria .. 

N.~~Y.*'! 
N. Y... 

Egypt , 
Egypt , 
Egypt - . 
D. " 



Sivas 

>?myrna 

' Mytilcne 

Trebizond 

Samsoun 

URUGUAY. 

Colonia 

Montevideo 

Paysandu 

VENEZUELA. 
La Guayra 

Barcelona 

Caracas 

Carupano 

Ciudad Bolivar.. 
Maracaibo 

Coro 

Tovar , 

Valera .... -<+jj*r& 
Puerto Cai5e"R*. , > * 

Valencia ... 

ZANZIBAR. 
Zanzibar 



<C.).... |- 

Thomas H. Norton <C.) iOhio 

M. M, B^ottion ( A .) I Turkey . . 

Milo A. Jewett (CA 'Mass 

G. C. Stephopoulo iA.) Turkey . 

2 Benjamin D. Man ton (C.).|r. I 

John \V. O'Hara lO.) f Indiana . 

2 John G. Hufnagel (C. A.). . (Maryland 

Thomas P. Moffat <c.) | n. Y. ... 

Ignaoio H. Baiz M.) I Venez . . 

Rudolph Dolge (A.) IN. Y.... 

Jos* Blasini <A.> iVenez .. 

Robert Henderson <A.> Venez .> 

E. H. Pluinacher U.\ G.)....'Tenn ... 

J. L. Senior (A.) IVenez .. 

W. J. H. Muche (A/> i Germany 

(A.) I .... 

Jerume B. Peterson iC. )....• N. Y.... 

SHvio A. Braschi (A.).. iVenez .. 

I 
Frederic MacMaster (C.)....}N. Y. . . . 



.'1905 



NOTE. — Consular agencies are attached above to the consulates of which they are 
branch offices. Abbreviations used are: <C. G.), Consul General; (V. C. G.), vice- 
Consul General; (C), Consul; (V. C), Vice-Consul; (C. A.), Commercial Agent; 
(A.), Consular Agent. 1 Also Minister Resident 2 Allowed to engage in business. All 
consular officials not receiving fixed salaries have the same privilege. a Also Diplomatic 
Agent. *Also Secretary of Legation. The aggregate of official fees, when* not exceed- 
ing $2,500, is retained by officers not receiving a salary fixed by law; any surplus 
f over $2,500 is turned into the Treasury. Consuls who receive a fixed salary retain 
notarial fees only, and are accountable to the government for all official fees received 
by them. 

On September 20, 1895, an executive order was issued partially incorporating the 
Consular Service in the Federal Civil Service. As modified by President Roosevelt on 
November 10, 1905, the order reads: 

"It is hereby ordered that any vacancy in a consulate or commercial 'agency now or 
hereafter existing, the salary of which is not more than $2,500, nor less than $1,000, or 
the compensation of which, if derived from official fees, exclusive of notarial and other 
unofficial receipts, does not exceed $2,500, nor fall below $1,000. shall be filled 0) by 
a transfer or promotion from some other position under the Department of State of a 
character tending to qualify the incumbent for the position to be flUed; or (») by ap- 
pointment of a person not under the Department of State, but having previously served 
thereunder to its satisfaction in a capacity tending to qualify him for the position to 
be filled; or ( 8 ) by the appointment of a person wlro, having furnished the customary 
evidence of character, responsibility, and capacity,, and being thereupon selected by 
the President for examination, is found upon such examination to h« qualified for the 
position. For the purpose of this order material and unofficial fees shall not be re- 
garded, but the compensation of an office shall be ascertained, if the office is salaried, 
by reference to the. last preceding appropriation act, and if the office is not salaried 
by reference to the returns of official fees for the last preciding fiscal year. Examina- 
tion shall be by a board of three . persons designated by the Secretary • of State, who 
shall' also prescribe the subjects- to which such examinations shall relate and the gen- 
eral mode of conducting the same by the board." 



PRINCIPAL JUDICIAL OFFICERS. 



JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

(Salary of Chief Justice, $13,000; of each Associate Justice, $12,500.) 

Circuit. Justices. Appointed. 

4. MELVTLLE W. FULLER, Illinois, Chief Justice . . .1888 

1. OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES, Massachusetts 1902 

2. RUPUS W. PECKHAM, New- York .. 1895 

3. WILLIAM R. DAY, Ohio 1903 

5. EDWARD D. WHITE, Louisiana ; 1894 

.6. JOHN M. HARLAN, Kentucky 1877 

7. HENRY B. BROWN, Michigan 1890 

8. DAVID J. BREWER, Kansas • 1*89 

9. JOSEPH M'KENNA, California 1898 

Reporter of the Supreme Court — Charles Henry Butler (1902), New- York. 
Clerk— James H., McKenney 1880), District of Columbia. 

Marshal— J. M. Wrlxht (1888). -Kentucky. " : 

UNITED STATES CIRCUIT JUDGES. { Idaho— James H. Bsatty, Boise City. 

.(Annual salary, $7,000.) I Illinois— (N. D.) Solomon H. Bethea 

." I. Maine. Massachusetts, New-Hamp- i » n ? K ene . sa ™ ^7 -^J^v Chicago ( ,?; 
shire and Rhode Island; Le Baron B. ! D.) Francis M. Wright, Urbana; <S. D.) 
Colt, Rhode Island: William L. Putnam, ! J T °; Humphrey, Springfield.. 
Maine; Francis C. Lowell, Massachusetts. ! Indiana — Alb-it B. Anderson, Indianap- 

II. -Connecticut, New-York and Ver- | °^ s - ; 

mont; William J. Wallace, E. Henry La- | Iowa — (N. D."> Henry T. Reed, Creseo; 
'combe and Alfred C. Coxe, New-York; i (S. D.) Smith McPherson. Red Oak. 
William K. Townsend, Connecticut. ' j Kansas— John c. Pollock Topeka 

HI. Delaware, New-Jersey and Penn- ! Kenturkv ip n» a x* t rv^u~«« 

sylVania; Marcus W. Afheson and George: M fvS ,w n?wi rr *-°J h ran. 
M. Dallas, Pennsylvania; George Gray, j ^ sville ' ™- D > Walter EvanA « Louis- 
Delaware. >«*«. 

• IV. Maryland^ North Carolina, South ! Louisiana— iE. D.) Charles Parlange, 
Carolina, Virginia and W. Virginia; Na- j New-Orleans; «.W. D.) Alack Boarman, 
than Goff, West Virginia; Jeter C. ' khreveport. 
Pritchard, North Carolina. , ! Maine — Clarence Hale. Portland. 

V. Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisi- , Maryland — Thomas J. Morris, Baltimore 
ana, Mississippi and Texas; Don A. Par- : Massachusetts — Frederick Dodge, Bos-' 
dee, Louisiana; Andrew P. McCormick, ton. 

Texas; David D. Shelby, Alabama. ! Michigan— ^E. D.) Hy. H. Swan, De- 

VI. Kentucky", Michigan, Ohio and ; troit; (W. D.) Geo. p. Wanty, Grand 
Tennessee", Horace H. Lurton. Tennesree; i Ripids. 

John K. Richards, Ohio; Henry F. Sev-T Minnesota — William Lochren, Minneap- 
erns. Michigan. olis: Page Moiriss, Duluth. 

VII. Illinois. Indiana and Wisconsin; Mississippi — (N. and S. D.) Henry C. 
Francis E. Baker, Indiana; James G. Jen- i Niles, Kosciusko. 

kins and William H. Seaman, •Wisconsin; Missouri — (E. IX) Gustavus A. Finkeln- 
Peter S. Grosscup and Christian C Kohl-, burg, St. Louis; (W. D.) J. F Phillips, 
"saat, Illinois. Kansas City. '.. . 

VIII. Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kan- Montana — William H. Hunt, Helena. 
sas\ Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North | Nebraska -William H. Munger, Omaha. 
Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyo- j Nevada — Thos. P. Hawley, Carson City, 
ming, New-Mexico, Oklahoma, and Ind- j New-Hampshire— Edgar Aldrieh. Little- 
ian-: Territories; Walter H. Sanborn, Min- | ton. 

nesota; Willis Van Devanter, Wyoming;) New- Jersey — William M. • Lanning, 
William C. Hook, Kansas', Elmer B. Trenton; Joseph Cross, Elizabeth. 
Adams. Missouri. ; New-York — (N. D.) George W. Ray, 

IX. California, Idaho, Montana. Neva- , Norwich; (S. D.) George B. Adams and 
da. .Oregon and Washington, and Terri- j George C. Holt, New- York City; (E. D.) 
tories of Alaska, Arizona and. Hawaii; i Edward R. Thomas, Brooklyn; (W. D.) 
William W. Morrow and Erskine M. Ross, '- Tohn R. Hazel. Buffalo. 

Califomaia; William B. Gilbert, Oregon. North Carolina— (E. D.) T. R. Purnell, 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGES. \ Ualeigh; (W. D.) J. E. Boyd, Greensboro. 

(Annual salary, $6,000.) North Dakota— Charles F. Amidon, 

Alabama— (N D., M. D.) T. G. Jones, ; Fargo. 
-Montgomery; (S. D.) H. T. Toulmin, Mo- ; Ohio— (N. D.) A. J. Ricks and F. J. 
bile- r- . Wing. Cleveland; <S. D.) A. C. Thomp- 

Arkansas — (E. D.) Jacob Triebcr, Little , ton, Cincinnati. 
Rock; (W. D.) J. H. Rogers, -FoTt Smith. ; Oregon — Charles E. Wolverton, Portland. 

California — (N. D.) • J. -.• J. - De Haven. Pennsylvania— (E. D.) John B. MePher- 
San Francisco; (S. D.). Olin Wellborn,: son- and James B. Holland,- Philadelphia; 
Los Angeles. ' iM. D.) Robert W. Archbald, Scranton; 

Colorado— Moses Hallett, Denver. i (W. D.) Joseph Buffington,' Pittsburg. 

Connecticut — Jas. P. Piatt, Hartford, j Porto Rico — Charles F. McKenna, San 

Delaware— E. G. Bradford. Wilmington. Juan. 
' Florida — (N. D.) Charles Swayne, Pen- ! Rhode IslancW-A. L. Brown. Providence, 
sacola; (S. D.) J. W. Locke, Jacksonville, j South Carolnia— William H. Brawley, 

Georgia^-(N. 'D.) W; T. Newman, At- ] Charleston. 
lanta; (S. D.) Emory Speer, Macon. South Dakota — J. E. Carland, Sioux 

Hawaii — Sanford B. . Dole, Honolulu. > Falls. 

73 



74 



UNITED STATES JUDGES AND ATTORNEYS. 



Tennessee — (E. and M. D.) Charles D. 
Clark, Chattanooga; (W. D.) John E. 
McC&U, Memphis. 

Texas— (N. D.) EM ward R. Meek. Fort 
Worth; (S. D.) Waller T. Burns, Houston; 
(E. D.) David E. Bryant, Sherman; (VV. 
D.) Thomas S. Maxey, Auutln. 

Utah— John A. Marshall. Salt Lake City. 

Vermont— lioyt H. Wheeler, Brattleboro. 

Virginia— (E. D.) Edmund Waddlll, Jr.. 
Richmond; (W. D.) Henry C. McDoweil 
Uigstonc Qap. 

Washington — (W. D.) Cornelius H. 
Hanlord. Seattle; (E. D.) Edward Whlt- 
son, Spokane. 

West Virginia— (N. D.) Alston O. Day- 
ton, Philippl; (S. D.) Benjamin F. Keller. 
Bramwell. 

Wisconsin — (E. D.) Joseph V. Quarles, 
Milwaukee; (W. D.) Arthur I* Sanborn, 
Madison. 

Wyoming— John A. Rlner. Cheyenne. 
UNITED STATES JUDGES IN TERRI- 
TORIES AND FEDERAL DISTRICT. 

Alaska— First Division, Royal A. Gun- 
nison, Juneau; Second Division, Alfred S. 
Moore, Nome; Third Division, James 
Wickereham, Eagle City. Annual salary, 
$5,000. 

Arizona— Chief Justice. Edward Kent, 
Phoenix. Associate Justices— Fletcher M. 
Doan Florence; R. E. Sloan, Prescott; 

John H. Campbell, Tucson; — 

, Globe. Annual salary, $3,000. 

Hawaii— Supreme Court — chief Justice, 
W. F. Frear. Associate Justices— Alfred 
S. Hartwcll and Arthur A. Wilder, Hono- 
lulu. Annual salary of Chief Justice, 
$6,500; of Associates, $5,000. Circuit 
Judges— First Circuit. John T. DeBolt, 
Alex. Lindsay, Jr., and W. J. Robinson, 
Honolulu; Second Circuit, A. N. Kopoikai, 
Walluku; Third Circuit, John A. Mat- 
thewman, Kailua; Fourth Circuit, Charles 
F. Parsons. Hllo; Fifth Circuit, J. Hardy, 
Uhue. Annual salary. $3,000. 

Indian Territory — Judges District Courts 
— (N. D.) J. A. Gill and Luman F. 
Parker, Vlnita; tW. D.) Wm. R. Lawrence 
and Louis Sulzbacher. Muscogee; (C. D.) 
W. H. H. Clayton and Thomas C 
Humphrey. South McAteeter; (a D.) H. 
Townsend and Joseoh T. Dickerson, Ard- 
more. Annual salary. $5,000. 

New-Mexico— Chief Justice, W. J. Mills, 
Las Vegas. Associate Justices — J. R. Mc- 
Fie. Santa Fe; F. W. Parker, Silver City. 
W. H. Pope, Socorro; Edward A. Mann, 
Alaraogordo; Ira A. Abbott, Albuquerque. 
Annual salary, +3.000. 
. Oklahoma — Chief Justice. J. H. Bnrford. 
Guthrie. Associate Justices — C. F. Irwin, 
El Reno: B. F. Burwell, Oklahoma City; 
Bayard T. Hainer, Perry; J. L. Pancoast. 
Alva; J. K. Beauchamp, Enid; F. E. 
Gillette. Anadarko. Annual salary, $3,000. 

Porto Rico — Chief Juatice, Jos6 Severo 
Qulnones. San Juan. Associate Justices — 
.tdolph Grant Wolf. San Juan; Jos6 C. 
Hernandez. Jaee M. Flgueras and James 
rf. McLeary. San Juan. Annual salary of 
;tdef Justice. $5,000; of Associate Jus- 
aces $4,500. 
UNITED STATES COURT OF CLAIMS. 

Chief Justice, Charles C. Nott, New- 
York. Associate Justices — S. J. Peelle. 
Indiana: C. B. Howry, Mississippi; Fen- 
ton W. Booth. Illinois; George W. Atkin- 
son. West Virginia; . 

Annual salary of Chief Justice, $6,500; of 
Associate Justices, $6,000. 



COURT OF APPEALS. D. C. 

Chief Justice, Setn Shepard, D. C. As- 
sociate Justices — Utarles H. Duel!. New- 
York; Louis E. Mccomas, Maryland. 
Annual salary of Chief Justice, $7,500; 
of Associates. $7,000. 

SUPREME COURT, D. C. 

Chief Justice, Harry M. dabaugh, 
Maryland. Associate Justices — Job Bar- 
nard, D. C. ; T. H. Anderson, Ohio; Ash- 
ley M. Gould, Maryland; Wend* J **. Staf- 
ford, Vermont; Daniel Thew Wright, 
Ohio. Annual salary, $8,000. 

U. S. DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 

(Salaries range from $3,000 to $8,000, ac- 
cording to relative Unpoitance of posts.) 
- Alabama— (N. D.) Thomas R. Roulhac, 
Birmingham; (M* D.) W. S. Reese, jr., 
Montgomery; (S. D.) William H. Arm- 
brecht. Mobile. 

Alaska — First District, John J. Boyce, 
Juneau; Second, Henry M. Hoyt, Nome; 
Third. N. V. Harlan, Fairbanks.. 

Arizona— J. L, B. Alexander, Tucson. 

Aikansas— <E. D.) \\. U. Whipple. Little 
Rock: (W. D.) J. K. Barnes, Fort Smith. 

Californiar-(N. D.) Robert T. Devlin, 
San Francisco: <& D.) L, H. Valentine, 
Los Angeles. 

Colorado— Earl M. Cranston, Denver. 

Connecticut — F. H. Parker, Hartford. 

Delaware— John P. Nlelda, Wilmington. 

District of Columbia— Daniel W. Baker, 
Wa^hiutiton. 

Florida— <N. D. William B. Sheppard. 
Pensacola; (S. D.) John M. Cheney, Jack- 
sonville. 

Georgia — (N. D.) Far lab C. Tate, At- 
lanta; (8. D.) Marion Erwln, Macon. 

Hawaii- Rob't W. Breckons, Honolulu. 

Idaho — Norman M. Rulck, Moscow. 

Illinois— (N. D.) Charles B. Morrison, 
Chicago; (E. D.) William B. Trautmann. 
Danville; (S. D.) William A. Northcott, 
Springfield. 

Indiana— J. B. Healing, Indianapolis. 

Iowa— <N. D.) H. G. McMillan. Cedar 
Rapids; (S: D.) Lewis Miles, Cdrydon. 

Indian Territory— (N. D.) Wade S. 
Stanfleld. Vinlta; (C. D.) J. H. Wlllrins. 
South McAlester: (W. D.) William H. 
Mellette, Muscogee; (S. D.) W. B. John- 
son, Ardraore. 

Kansas— Henry J. Bone, Topeka. 

Kentucky-^<E. D.) J. H. Tinaley. Cor- 
ington; (W. D.) R. D. HIU, JLoulsvlhe. 

Louisiana— (E. D.) W. W. Howe, New- 
Orleans; (W. D.) M. C. Elstner.Shreveport. 

Maine— Isaac W. Dyer. Portland. 

Maryland— John C. Rose, BaltimoTe. 

Massachusetts — Melrln O; Adams, Boston. 

Michigan— (E. D.) W. D. Gordon, De- 
troit: (W. D.> G. G. Co veil, Grand «tapids. 

Minnesota— Chas. C. Houpt, St. Paul 

Mlsfissippi— <N. D.) William D. Fraaee, 
Oxford; (S. D.> Robert C. Lee, Jackson. , 

Missouri— (E. D.) D. P. Dyer, 8t Louis: 
(W. D.) A. S. Van * Valkenburgn, Kansas 
City. 

Montana — Carl Rasch, Helena. 

Nebraska — Irving F. Baxter, Omaha. 

Nevada — Sardis SummerfteJd, Carson 
City. 

New-Hampshire — C J. Hamblett, Con- 
cord. 

New-Jersey— J. B. Vreeland, Newark. 

New-Mexico — W. H. H. Llewellyn, Al- 
buquerque. 

New- York— (N. D.) Q. R. Curtlss. Blng- 
hamton: (S. D.) H. L. Burnett. New- 
York City; (E. D.) William J. Youngs, 



75 



I 

UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS AND MARSHAL. 



Brooklyn; CW. D.) C. H. Brown, Buffalo. 

North Carolina— (B. D.) Ha*ry Skinner, 
Raleigh; (W. D.) A. E. Holton, Winston. 

North Dakota — P. H. Rourke. Fa: go. 

Ohio— (N. D.) John J. Sullivan, Cleve- 
land: (S. D.) Sherman T. McPfaerson, 
Cincinnati. 

Oklahoma — Horace Speed, Guthrie. 

Oregon— William C. Bristol, Portland. 

Pennsylvania— (E. D.) J. Whittaker 
Thompson. Philadelphia; (M. D.) S. J. M. 
Mocaneil, Harrisburg; (W. D.) John W. 
Dunkle, Pittsburg. * 

Porto Rico— N. B. K. Pettingill, San 
\ Juan. 

Rhode Island — C. A. Wilson, ^Providence. 

9. Carolina — J. G. Capers, Charleston. 

South Dakota-— J. D. Elliott, Sioux Falls. 

Tennessee— (E. D.) J. R. Penland, Knox-, 
yille; (M. D.) A. M. Tillman, Nashville; 
(W. D.) George Randolph, Memphis.* 

Texas— (N. D.) W. H. Atwell, Dallas; 
(S. D.) M. C. McLemore, Galveston; (E. 
D.) James W. OwnUy, Paris; (W. D.) 
Henry Terrell, San Antonio. 

Utah — Joseph Lippman, Salt Lake City. 

Vermont — James L. Martin, Brattleboro. 

Virginia— (E. D.) Lunsford L. Lewis, 
Richmond; (W. D.) T. L. Moore, Roanoke. 

Washington— (W. D.) Jesse A. Frye, 
Seattle; (E. D.) A. George Avery, Spo- 
kane. 

West Virginia— (N. D.) Reese Blizzard, 
Parkersburg; (S. D.) Klllott Northcott, 
Huntington. 

Wisconsin— (E. D.) Henry K. Butter- 
field, Milwaukee; (W. D.) William G. 
Wheeler, Madison. 

Wyoming— Timothy F. Burke, Cheyenne. 
1/N1TED STATES MARSHALS. 

Alabama— (N. D.) Pope M. Long, 
Birmingham; (M. D.) James H. Judkins, 
Montgomery; (S. D.) Gilbert B. Deans, 
Mobile. 

Alaska— (First Division) James M. 
Shoup, Juneau; (Second Division) Thomas 
C. Powell, Nome r (Third Division) George 
G. Perry, Fairbanks. 

Arizona — Benamin F. Daniels, Phocenix. 

Arkansas— iaS. D.) Asbury S. Fowler, 
Little Rock; (W. D.) Solomon F. Stahl. 
Fort Smith. • 

California— <N. D.) John H. Shine, San 
Francisco; (S. D.) Henry Z. Osborne, Los 
Angeles. 

Colorado— Dewey C. Bailey, Denver. 

Connecticut — Edson S. Bishop, Hartford. 

Delaware— William R, Flinn, Wilming- 
ton. 

- District of Columbia— AuUck Palmer, 
Washington. 

Florida— (N. D.) Thomas F. McGourin; 
(S. D.) John F. Horr. Tampa. 

Georgia— <N. D.) Walter H. Johnson, At- 
lanta; (S. D.) George F. White, Macon. 

Hawaii— E. R. Hendry, Honolulu. 

Idaho— Ruel Rounds, Boise. 

Illinois — (N. D.) John C. Ames, Chicago; 
(E. D.) Charles P. Hitch, Danville; (a 
D.) Leon A. Townsend, Springfield. 

Indiana— Henry C. Pettlt, Indianapolis. 

Indian Territory— (N. D.) William H. 
Darrough. Vlnita; (W. D.) Leo E. Bennett, 
Muscogee; (C. D.) George K. Pritchard, 
South McAl«ster; <S. D.) Benjamin H, 
Colbert, Ardmore. 

Iowa — (N. D.) Edward Knott, Dubuque; 
(S. D.) George M. Christian, Des Moines. 

Kansas— William EL Mackey, jr.. To- 
peka. 



Kentucky— (E. D.) Stephen G. Sharp, 
Covington; (W. DO George W. Long, 
Louihviiie. 

Louisiana— (E. D.) Victor Loisel, New- 
Orleans; (W. D.) B. F. Oneal, Shreve- 
port. 

Maine — Henry W. Mayo, Portland. 

Maryland — John F. Langhammer, Balti- 
more. 

Massachusetts — Charles K. Darling, 
Boston. 

Michigan— (a D.) William R. Bates, 
Detroit; (W. D.) Frank W. Wait, Grand 
Rapids. 

Minnesota— William H. Grimsaaw, St. 
Paul. 

Mississippi— (N. D.) James A. Toler. 
Oxford; (S. D.) Edgar S. Wilson, Jackson. 

Missouri— (15,. D.> William L. Morse}. 
St. Louis; (W. D.) Edwin R. Durham, 
Kansas City. » 

Montana— C. F. Lloyd, Helena. - 

Nebraska — — , — , 

Omaha. 

Nevada— Robert Grimmon, Carson City. 

New-Hampshire— Eugene P. Hute, Con- 
cord. 

New-Jersey— Thomas J. Alcott, Trenton. 

New-Mexico — Creighton M. Foraker, Al- 
buquerque. 

New-York— (N. D.) Clinton MacDougall, 
Auburn; (S. D.) William Henkel, New- 
York City; (B. D.) Charles J. Haubert, 
Brooklyn; (W. D.) William R. Compton, 
Elm Ira. 

North Carolina— (E. D.) Henry C. Dock- 
ery, Raleigh; James M. Millikan, Greens- 
boro. 

Worth Dakota*— James F. Shea, Fargo. 

Ohio— (N. D.) Frank M. Chanaier. 
Cleveland; (S. D.) Vivian J. Fagan, Qn- 
cinnatl. 

Oklahoma— William D. Fossett, Guthrie, 

Oregon — Charles J. Reed, Portland. 

Pennsylvania— (E. D.) John B. Robin- 
son, Philadelphia; (M. D.) Frederick C. 
Leonard. Harrisburg; (W. D.) Stephen P. 
Stone. Pittsburg. 

Porto Rico— H. S. Hubbard, San Juan. 

Rhode Island — John E. Kendrick, Provi- 
dence. 

South Carolina — J. Duncan Adams, 
Charleston. 

douth Dakota— Seth Bullock, Sioux 
Falls. 

Tennessee — (E. D.) William A. Dunlap, 
Knoxville; (M. D.) John W. Overall, Nash- 
ville; <W. D.) Frank S. Elgin, Memphis. 

Texas-^(N: D.) George H. Green. Dal- 
las; (S. D.) William M. Hanson, Galves- 
ton; (B. D.) Andrew J. Houston, Paris; 
(W. D.) George L. Siebrecht. San Antonio, 

Utah— Benjamin B. Heywood, Salt Lake 
City. 

Vermont — Horace Ward Bailey, New- 
bury. 

Virginia — <E. D.) Morgan Treat, Rich- 
mond; (W. D.) S. Brown Allen. Harrison- 
burg. 

Washington — (W. D.) Charles B. Hop- 
kins, Tacoma; (IS. D.) George H. Baker, 
Spokane. 

West Virginia— (N. D.) Charles D. El- 
liott, Parkersburg; (S. IXT John K. 
Thompson, Charleston. - 

Wisconsin — (El D.) Thomas B. Held, 
Milwaukee; (W. D.) Charles LewJston, 
Madison. 

Wyoming — Frank A. HadBoQ. 



THE FIFTY-NINTH CONGRESS. 



TUB SKNATK. 

CHARLES W FAIRBANKS, of Indiana. Vice- President and President 

of the' Senate. $8,000. 
CHARLES G. BENNETT, of Now- York. Secretary, $5,000. 
Republicans, 66; Democrats. 33; vacant. 1. * 



Term cxp. ALABAMA. Home P. O. 

1007 John T. Morpan (D. >. . . Felma. 
19(*> Kdm. W. Pettus (D.)...SUma. 
ARKANSAS. 

1907 Jamei R. Berry (D.)... •fl™ ton y"\f- 

1909 Jas. P. Clai ke (D.) Little Uock. 

- CALIFORNIA. 
1909- Geo, C. Perkins (R.). . .Oakland 
1911 Frank P. Flint (R.). . . .Loa Angeles. 
COLORADO. 

1907 Thos.M. Fa^™ " (D ^*"™^ C»v 
1909 Henry M. Teller (D.). . .Central City. 
CONNECTICUT. 

1909 F. R. Brandagee (R.). . •£ cw ffl? ( nd ° n * 
1911 M. O. Bulkeley (R.). . . .Hartford. 

DFSLAWARB. 
1907 J. Frank Allee (R.) . . . .DoW* . 

1911 » 

FLORIDA. 

GEORGIA. 

1907 A. O. Bacon (D.) J}® 8 ?^. n 

1909 Alex. S. Clay <D.) Marietta. 

IDAHO. 
1907 Fred. T. DHbr-ls CD.). . .Rc4se ^Ny. 
1909 W. B. Heytourn (R.)... .Wal.ace, 

ILLINOIS. 
1907 Shelby M. Cu»om (R.).. Springfield. 
1809 Albert J. Hopkins (H.). Aurora. 

INDIANA. 
1909 » James A. Hemenway (R> Bonneville. 
1911 A. J. Beverldge (R.)... .Indianapolis. 

IOWA. 
1907 John P. Dolliver (R.), .Fort Dodge. 
1909 Win. B. Allison (R.), . .Dubuqtte* 

KANSAS. 
1007 To* R. Burton (R.). .. -AWleae. 
1800 Chester I. Long (R.) . Medicine Lodge. 

KENTUCKY. 
1907 J.C. S. Blackburn (I).). Versailles. 
1909 Jas. B. McCieary (D.). Richmond. 

LOUISIANA. 
1907 "Murphy J. Foster (D.>. Franklin. 
1909 a D. MoEnery (I>^. ...New-Orleans. 

MAINE. 
1907 William P. Frye (R.). . .Lewistan. 

1911 Eugene Hale (R.) Ellsworth. 

MARYLAND. 
1909 Arthur P. Gorman (D.). Laurel. 

1911 lsidor Rayner (D> Baltimore, 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
1907 W. Murray Crane (R.»..Dalton. 
1911 Henry C. I^odge <R.). . . Xahant. 



Term exp. MICHIGAN. Home P. ©. 

1907 Russell A. Alger (R.)... Detroit. 

1911 Julius C. Bui rows (R.). Kalamazoo. 
MINNESOTA. 

1907 Knute Nelson (R.> Alexandria. 

11*11 Moses K. Ciapp (R.)....SL Paul, 

MISSISSIPPI. 
19J1 »A. J. Mef^aurin (D.).. Brandon. 
1911 H. do S. Money (D. ). . .Carrollton. 

* MISSOURL 

1909 Wm. J. Stone (D>. ....... St. Lou la. 

1UU VVUllam Warner (R.) Kanaaa City. 

MONTANA, 
1907 William A. dark (D.). ,. . Helena. 
1911 Thou. H. Carter (R.) Helena. 

NI4I.tR A SKA. 
1907 Joseph H. Millard (R.>. . .Omaha. 
1911 J^lmer J. Burkett (R.).. . .Lincoln, 
NEVADA. 

1!T» F. O. Newtands CD.) Reno. 

1911 George S. Rlxon (R> Carson City. 

NEW-HAMPSHIRE. 

1907 H. EX Burnham CR. ; Manchester. 

1^09 Jacob H. Gallinger fR.). .Concord. 
NEW-JERSEY. 

1907 John F. Dryden (R.I Newark. 

191 1 John Kean (R.) Rlizabetn. 

NEW-YORK. 

1909 Thomas C. Piatt CR.>. Owcg». 

iwi Ui. M. Depew (R.) New-Yortc. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

. 1907 F. M. Simmons tf>.) New-Bent. 

1909 Lee S. Overman (D.) Salisbury. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 
1909 H. C. Hansbrough (R.). ..Devils Lake. 

1911 P. J. McCumber GO Wahpeoa. 

OHIO. 
1909 Jos. B. Foraker fR.)... ..Cincinnati. 

1911 Charles D4ok CR.) \fcroa. 

OREGON. 
1907 «John M. Gearin <T>)., . K rtland. 

1909 Chaa. W. Fulton (R.> Astoria. 

PF1NNSYLVANIA. 

1909 Bole* Penrose (R.) Philadelphia, 

1911 Philander c. Knox (R.) . . Pittstarc 

RHODE ISLAND. 
1907 Geo. P. Wetmore (R.). ... Newport. 
1911 Nelson W. Aldrlch GO ... Providence. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
1907 Renj. R. Tillman OX). ...Trenton. 
1909Asbury C. Latimer (D.).Belton. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
1907 Robert J. Gamble (R. )... Yankton. 

1909 A. K. Kittredge (R.) Sioux Falls* 

TFlNNESSEB. 

1907 B. W. Carmack (D.) Memphis. 

1911 * James B. Frazier (D.>. Nashville. 



1 Elected to nil vacancy caused by resignation of Charles W. Fairbanks fR,). •Re- 
elected for term ending March 3. 1913. "Re-elected for lerm ending March 3, 1913. 
*A»Dolnted to fill vacancy caused by death of John H. Mitchell (R.). » Elected to fill 
unexpired term of William^. Bate OKh . 

76 



THK HOtfSB OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



T*rm exp • TEXAS. Home P. O. 

190T Jos. W. Bailey OD.) Gainesville. 

1011 Chas. A. Culberson <D0«. Dallas. 
UTAH. 

1903 Reed Smoot <R.) .....Provo City. 

1911 Geore« Sutherland €R.)...Salt Lake. 

VERMONT. 
1900 W. P. Dillingham (R.)...Montpcllcr. 
1911 R^dfieW Proctor <R. )..... Procotr. 
VIRGINIA, 

1907 The*. S. Martin ID.) ScottsviHe. 

1911 John W Daniel (D.) Lynchburg. 



Term cxp. WASHINGTON. Home P. O. 

1909 Levi Ankeny (R.) .Walla Walla. 

1913 Samuel H. Plies (R.) Spokane. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 
1907 Stephen B. Elkins (R.J . . . Krkins. 

1911 Nathan B. Scott (R.) Wheeling. 

WISCONSIN. 
1909 John C. Snootier (R.) . . . 
1911 R. M. LafolleUc (R.).. 

WYOMING. 
1911 Clarence D. Claik (R.). . 
1907 Francis K. Warren XR.). . 



Madison. 
Madison. 



Cheyenne. 
)<lvans-.nn. 



HOCSB OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Joseph Cannon <R.), Illinois/ Spsaker, $£,000. 

Alexander M'Dowcll, Pennsylvania, Clerk, $5,000. 

Republicans, 249; Democrats, 136; vacant, 1. 



ALABAMA. 
Geor/re W. Taylor <D.)...Damopo!is. 
Ariosto A. WHey <D.>. .Montgomery. 
Henry D. Clayto« <D.>. .EufauJa. 
Sidney J. Bowie G3.). ... Anniston. 
J. Thomas- Hcrtin (D.L ..Lafayette. 
John H. Bankhead <D.) . Fayette. 

John L. Burnett <D.) Owdsfren. 

Wm. Richardson CD). . .Hmitsville 
0. W. Underwood <D.). .Birmingham. 

ARKANSAS. 
R. Brue« Macon JD.).... Helena. 
8. BrundidKe. jr. <D.) ... Searcy. 

J. C. Floyd <D.) Yellvilte. 

John a Uttle (D.) Greenwood. 

Charles C. Rcid *D.). . . MorriUton. 

J. T. Robinson <D.) I*>no*e. 

R. Minor Wallace (D.>. Magnolia. 
CALIFORNIA. 

.7. N. Oittett (R.) Kureka. 

D K. MeKinlay (R) Santa Rosa. 

Jos. R. Knowlahd (R ».. Alameda. 

Julias Kahu tR-> • • -Can Francisco. 

K. A. Hayes <R-) San Jose. 

J. C. Needbam <R.) Modesto. 

James McLaehlan <R.) . .Pasadena. 

«. C. Sanith (R.) Bakeralield _ 

COLORADO. 
Lars©— F.E. Brooks <R.). Colorado Sp'gs. 

R. W. Bcnynge <R0 Denver. 

H, M. Ho*e (RO Telluride. 

CONNRCTTCUT 
Larse—<?. L. Lillcy <R.). Waferbvtry. 
B. Stevens Henry <R.). .Rockville. 

N r>. Sr>errv <P.) New Haven. 

JR'dwln W. Hteeins <R.). Norwich. 
Etwneaer J. HH1 iK.). . .NorwalK 

y DELAWARE. 
Larafe— Hiram R. Burton 

<R.) Lewes. . 

FLORIDA. 
S. M. Sparkman (D.). .. .Tampa. 

Frank Clark <D.) Lake City. 

Wm. B. Lamar (D.). •• -Tallahassee. 
GEORGIA. 

Riafus K. Lester tD.) Savannah. 

James M. Grk'^s (D.).. .Dawson 
iClijah B. Lewis <D.). ... Montezuma. 
Wm. C A^amson <D.). .CarroPton. 
L. P. Livingston <D.). . .'Kln;r». 
Chas. I*. Bartlett (D.).. . M«v .?•.>«. 

Gordon Lee (D.) .* Chie.kamaufia. 

Wm. H- Howard <D.) ... Lexington. 
Thomas. M. RcH fD.). . .Gainesville. 

T. W. Hardwick (D.) Sanrtersville. 

Wm. G. Brantley <D.). ..Brunswick. 

'DAIIO. 
Large — Burton L. French 

<R.) Moscow 

ILLINOIS. 

M. B. Madden <R.) Chicago. 

James R. Mann <R.) Chicago. 



3. Wm. W. Wilson (R.)... 

4. C. S. Wharton <R.) 

6. Anthony Michalek <R). 

0. William Lorimer (It.).. 

7. Philip Knopf (R.) 

8. Charles McGavin (R.)... 

9. Henry S. Boulell (R.).. 
1^, <Jcor«c K. l«\>e^ (K.).... 

11. H. M. Snapp (R.) 

12< Chas. IS. Fuller <K.) 

13. Kobert R. Hitt (R.) 

14. *James McKinney (H).. 

15. George W. Prince (R.).. 

1«<. JcserJi V. Graft < R.) 

17. J. A. Sterling (K.) 

IS. J. G. Cannon (R.) 

19. W. B. MeKfnley (R.)... 

20. H. T. Rainey (D.) 

21. '/eno J. Kives 'R ) 

22. W. A. Rodenbur* (Ii.).. 

23. F. L. Dixon tR.) 

24. P. T. ChapinfiTi fR. )..... 

25. Geors* W. Sniith <R.)... 

INDIANA. 
J. 3 John H. Foster (P. > 

2. John C. Ch-'ii^y <R.) 

3. Williar.i T. /a nor <D.).. 

4. 7,. \V. Dixon (D.) 

B. FHas S. lioiliday (R.)... 
«. James 15. Watson (R.).. 

7. Je«8e Overstrcet iR.).... 

8. Geo. W. Cromer (R.).... 

9. t;has. B. Landis <R.) 

10. K. D. CrumpacUer (R.).. 

11. Frederick Land is <R-).-. 

12. N. W. Gilbert (R.) 

13. Abraliava L. Brick <R.).. 

IOWA. 

1. Thoma« Hodge (R.'J 

2. A. F. Dawson <R.) 

3. H. P. RirdBall (R.) , 

4. Gilbert N. 1-luugcn (R.).. 
■ R. Roht. G. -Cousins {R)... 

«5. John F. Laeov <R.) 

7. John A. T. Hull di.)..., 
«. Wm. P. Hepburn (R.}. ., 
9. Walter J. Smith (U.)..., 

10. Janie?; 1'. Conner (R..).., 

11. K. IT. Jlubbarrl U<..)... 

KANSAS. 
At Large- <C. F. Seolt (R.), 

I, Charles Curtis (K.) 

II. J. D. Rowersork (R.)... 
a. 1*. P. Cami.he:i (R.) 

4. Jamcy M. Millar (R.). ... 

5. W. A. OiihleThe.ad (R). 

«. Wrn. ^V. Rrei;«-r n<.) 

7. 'Yicto.- Mun'Joek <R.) 

KKNTUCK.Y. 

1. i)llie M. James il> ) 

2. A. O. Stanley (1 J ) 

3. J. M. Richardson G>)., 



0.1 cage. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
.Chicaso. 
Chi capo. 
Chicago. 
ChicaKO. 
Chicago. 
Joiiet. 
llelvlden*. 
Mt. Morrip. 
Ah do. 
Galepburi?. 
Peoria. 
Bloon-iins-toii. 
Danville. 
Champaign. 
Carroiltf.n. 
Litchfield. 
Kant St. Louis. 
Ramsey. 
Vienna. 
Murphy.sboi-o. 

E^an^ville. 

Sullivan. 

Cory don. 

North Vernon. 

Brazil. 

Rushville. 

Indianapolis. 

Muncie. 

Delphi. 

Valparaiso. 

Lo^ansport. 

Fort Wayne. 

South Bend. 



Burrlnston. 
Tree ton. 
Clarion. 
North wood. 
Tipton. 
Ofkakosa. 
Den Mf>in.-E. 
Ciarind-.i. 
Council JBiufi'3 
. Den i won. 
Hioux City. 



Inla. 
Top<ka. 

PittHlMl.t. 

Cuurnil (J o\ o 
M;ir\R\ illc. 

Wichita. 



Marinn. 
Hen<i>>iNeii. 



THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 

a 

7. 

1. 

2. 

a. 

4. 

i. 

2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 
6. 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 

1. 

2. 

8. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 

1. 
2. 
8. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 

1. 

2. 
8. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

1. 

2. 
8. 



David H. Smith (D.) Hodgensvllle, 

Joseph f*. Sherley (D.). .Louisville. 

J. L. Rhinock (D.) Covington. 

South Trimble (D.) FrankforL 

George O. Gilbert (D.) . . Shelbyvllie. 

J. B. Bennett (R.) Greenup. 

V. A, Hopkins (D.) Prestonsburg. 

D. C. Edwards (R.) London. 

LOUISIANA. 

Adolph Meyer (D.) New-Orfrans. 

Robert C. Davey (D.) New-Orleans, 

Robt. B\ Broussard (D.). New-Iberia, 

J. T. Watkins (D.) Minden. 

Joseph E. Rarxsdell (D.).L. Providence, 
barol. M. Robertson (D.). Baton Rouge. 

A. P. Pujo (D.) Lake Gharlos. 

MAINE. 

Amos L. Allen (R.) Alfred. 

Chas. E. LitUeiield (R.). Rockland. 
Edwin C Burleigh (R.). .Augusta. 
Lewellyn Powers (R,). ..Houiton. 

MARYLAND. 
Thomas A. Smith (D.). .Ridgely. 
J. F. C. Talbott (D.>... . Lutlvervllle. 
Frank C. Wachter (R). . Baltimore 

John Gill, jr. (1>.) Baltimore. 

Sydney E. Mmid (R) La Plata. 

George A. Pearre (R.). . .Cumberland. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
Geo. P. Lawrence (R.). .North Adams. 
Frcdk. H. Gillett fR.). ..Springfield. 
Rockwood Hoar <R.). . . . Worcester. 

Chas. Q. Tirrell (R.) Natick. 

Butler Ames (R.) Lowell. 

A. P. Gardner (R.) Hamilton. 

Ernest W. Roberts (R.). Chelsea. 
Kami. W. McCall (R.). .. Winchester. 

J. A. Kellher (D.) Boston. 

W. S. McNary (D.) Boston. 

John A. Sullivan (D.). ..Boston. 

John W. Weeks (R.) Newton. 

Wm, C. Loverlng (R,). .Tauntou. 

Wm. S. Greene (R.) Fail River. 

MICHIGAN. 

Edwin Denby (R.) Detroit. 

C. E. Towpsend (R,). . .Jackson. 
Wash'n Gardner (R.). ...Albion. 
Edw. L. Hamilton (R.). .Niles. 
Wm. Alden Smith (R.). .Grand Rapids, 
Samuel W. Smith (R.). .Pontiae, 
Henry McMoran (R. ) . . . . Port Huron. 
Jos. W. Fordney (R.). .. -Saginaw. 
Roswell F. Bishop CR). • Ludington. 
George A. Loud (R.) .... Oscoda. 

A. B. Darragh (R.) St. Louis. 

H. O. Young (R.) iBhpeming. 

MINNESOTA. 
Jas. A. Tawney (R.). .. .Winona. 
Jas. T. McCleary (R.). .Mankato. 

C. R. Davis (R.) St. Peter. 

Fred. C. Stevens (R.)...St. Paul. 

Loren Fletcher (R.) Minneapolis. 

G. B. Buckman (R.). .. .Little Falls. 

A. J. Volstead (R.) Granite Falls. 

J. Adam Bede (R.) Pine City. 

H. Steenerson (R.) Crookston, 

MISSISSIPPI. 

E. S. Candler, jr. (D.). .Corinth. 
Thomas Spight (D.) Ripley. 

B. G. Humphreys (D.). .Greenville. 
W. S. Hill (D.) Winona. 

A. M, Byrd (D.) Philadelphia, 

E. J. Bowers (D.) Bay St. Louis. 

F. A. McLain (D.) Gtoster. 

J. S. Williams CD.) Yazoo. 

MISSOURI. 

Jas. T. Lloyd (D.) Shelbyviile. 

Wm, W. Rucker (D.). ...Keytesville. 
Frank B,»Keppler (R.) Kingston. 



4. F. B. Fulkerson (R.)...,St. Joseph. 

5. Edward C. Ellis (R.). .. .Kansas City. 
«. D. A, De Armond. CD.).. Butler. 

7. John Welborn (R) Lexington. 

8. D. W. Shackelford (D.).. Jefferson City. 

9. Champ Clark (D.) Bowling Green. 

10. Richard Bartholdt (R.)..St. Louis. 

11. John T. Hunt (D.) St. Louis. 

12. E. E. W T ood (D.) St. Louis. 

13. M. E. Rhodes (R.) Potosl. 

14. William T. Tindall fR.). Sparta. 

15. Cassius M. Shartel (It.). Neosho. 
18c Arthur P. Murphy (R.).Crocker. 

MONTANA, 
At Large — J. M. Dixon (R.). Missoula. 
NEBRASKA. 

*K. M. Pollard (R.) Nehawka. 

J. L. Kennedy (R.) Omaha. 

J. J. McCarthy (R.) Ponca, 

E. H. Hlnshaw (R.) Fulrbury. 

G. W. Norrla (R.) MeCook. 

M. P. Kinkaid (R.) O'Neill. 

NEVADA. 
Large. C. D. Vaa Duzer 

ip.) Tonopah. 

NEW-HAMPSHIRS. 
C. A. Sulloway (R.) Manchester. 

F. D. Currier (R.) Canaan. 

NEW-JERSEY. 

n. C. Loudenslager (R.).Panlaboro. 
John J. Gardner (R.). ...Atlantic City. 

B. F. Howell (R~) N. Brunswick. 

Ira w. Wood (R) -..Trenton. 

Chas. N. Fowler (R.). . .Elizabeth. 

Henry C. Allen (R.) Paterson. 

R. Wayne Parker (R.). .Newark. 

Wm H. Wiley (R.) East Orange, 

M. Van W r inkle (R.) Jersey City. 

A. L. McDermott CD.). ..Jersey City. 

NEW- YORK. 
W. W. Cocks (R ) Old Westbury. 

G. H. Lindsay (D.) Brooklyn. 

Chas. T. Dun well (R.). .Brooklyn. 
Charles B. Law (R.). . ..Brooklyn. 
George E. Waldo (R.). ..Brooklyn, 
W. M. Calder (R. )..... .Brooklyn. 

J. J. Fitzgerald (D.) New-York. 

T. D. Sullivan (D.) "New-York. 

H. M. Goldfogle (D.). ...New-York. 

William Sulzer (D.) New-York. 

Wm. R. Hearst (D.) New-York. 

W. Bourke Cockran (D.). New-York. 
Herbert Par«ons (R.). .. .New-York. 
Charles A. Towne"(D.). .New-York. 
J. Van V. Olcott (R.). . .New-York. 
Jacob Ruppert, jr. (D.). .New- York. 

Wm. S. Bennet (R.) New- York. 

J. A. Goulden CD ) New-York. 

John E. Andrus cR.)... .Yonkers. 

T. W. Bradley (R.) Walden. 

J. H. Ketcham (R.) Dover Plains. 

Wm. H. Draper (R.). ...Lansingburg. 
G. N. Southwiok (R.)... Albany. 

F. J. Lefevre CR) New-Palta. 

L. N. Littauer (R.) Gloversville. 

W. H. Flack fR.) Malone. 

Jas. S. Sherman CR.)- ...Utica. 
Chas. L. Knapp CR.). .. .Low villa. 

M. E. Driscoll (R.). Syracuse. 

John W. Dwight (R.). ...Dryden. 
Sereno E. Payne* (R. ) . .. . Auburn. 
Jas B. Perkins (R.).... Rochester 

J. Sloat Fassett (R.) Elmlra, 

J. W. Wadsworth (R.) . . GeneseOv 

Wm. H. Ryan (D.) Buffalo. 

DeA. S. Alexander CR-). Buffalo. 
E. B. Vreeland CR.) Salamanca. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

John H. Small (D.) Washlnirtoii. 

Claude Kitchin CD.) Scotland "Nfeelc.' 

Chas. R. Thomas (D.).. .Newbern. 



Tf?B HOUSB OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



79 



4. Edward W. Pou (D.)...'.Smithfield. 

6. Win. W. Kltchin (D.). ..Roxboro. 
G. G. B. Patterson (D.). ...Max ton, 

7. Robert N. Page <D<) Aberdeen. 

8. Spencer Blackburn (R.) . WUkesboro. 

9. E. Y. Webb U>.) Shelby % 

10. J. M. Gudger. Jr. CD.). ..Aeheville. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 
At Large — T. F. Marshall 

<R.) Oakes. 

A. P. Gronna (R. )..... ..Lakota. 

-OHIO. m 

1. N. LonirworCh (R,).... T. Cincinnati. 

2. H. P. Goebel (R.) Cincinnati. 

3. Robert M. Nevin OR.). ..Dayton. 

4. H. C. Garber (D.) Green viHe. 

5. W. W. Campbell {R.)... Napoleon. 

6. T. S. Scraggy (R-) Xenla. 

7. J. Warren Keif er (R.) . . Springfield. 

8. Ralph D. Cole (R.) Findlay. 

9. Jae. H. Southard (R.)... Toledo. 

10. Henry T. Bannon <R.) . . Portsmouth. 

11. C. H. Groevenor <R.) Athens. 

12. E. I*. Taylor, jr. CR.). ..Columbus. 

13. G. E. Mouser CR.) Marion. 

14. A. R. Webber rR.) Elyria. 

15. B. G. Dawes <R.) Marietta. 

16. Capell L. Weoms <R.)»..St. Claircvllle. 

17. M. L. F. Smysar (R.) . . . Wooster. 

18. James, Kennedy* 'R.) Youngstown. 

10. W. A. Thomas »R.) Niles. 

20. J. A. Beidler (R.) Willoughby. 

21. T. E. Burton (R.) Cleveland. 

OREGON. 

1. Binger Hermann (R.). . . . Roseburg. 

2. J. N. Williamson <R.\. . . Prineville. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1. H. H. Bingham (R.) Philadelphia. 

2. Robert Adams. Jr. (R.).. Philadelphia. 

3. George A. Castor (R.). . .Philadelphia. 

4. Reuben O. Moon (R.) Philadelphia. 

5. E. De V. Morrell (R.)... Philadelphia. 

6. Geo. D. McCreary (R.). .Philadelphia. 
T.Thomas S. Butler (R.).. West Chester. 

8. Irving P. W anger (R.) . . Norristown. 

9. H. Burd Cassel <R.) Marietta. 

10. Thomas H. Dale <R.) Scranton. 

11. H. W. Palmer (R.) WHkesbarre. 

12. Geo. R. Patterson (R.). .Ashland. 

13. M. C. L. Kline (D.) Allentown. 

14. Mial B. Lilley (R.) Towanda. 

15. Ellas Deemer (R.) Wiiliamsport. 

16. B. W. Samuels <R.) Mt. Carmel. 

17. T. M. Hahon (R.) Ohambej sburg 

18. M. B. Olmsted (R.) Harrisburg. 

19. J. M. Reynolds <R.) Bedford. 

20. D. F. Lafean *R) York. 

21. S. R. Dresser (R.) Bradford. 

22. George F. Huff (R.) Greensburg. 

23. Allen F. Cooper (R.) Uniontown. 

24. Ernest F. Acheson <R.). .Washington. 
2*. Arthur L. Bates <R.)....Meadville. 

26. G. A. ScbneebeU CR)... Nazareth. 

27. W. O. Smith (R.). Ptmxsutawney 

28. Joeeph C. Sibley (R.). ...Franklin. 

29. Wm. H. Graham <R.)... Allegheny. 

30. John Dalsell (R.) Pittsburg. 

31. James p. Burke (R.)... .Pittsburg. 

32. A. J. Barchfeld <R.) Pittsburg. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1. D. L. D. Granger (D.). .Providence. 

2. Adin B. Capron. (R.) Stillwater. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1. George S. Legare <D.)... Charleston. 

2. J. O. Patterson <D.) Barnwell. 

8. D. Wyatt Aiken (D.). ... Abbeville. 

4. Joseph T. Johnson (P.). -S partanburg. Mark A. Smith (D.)..'...Tnrnn. 

'To fill vacancy caused by resignation of F. B. B/andagee (R.). a To : .1 vacancy 
caused by deatn of B. F. Marsh <n.). "To fil' vacancy caused by resignation 
of Jamea A, Hemenway (R.). «To fill vacancy caused by resignation of Elmer J. Bur- 
kett (R.). »To fill vacancy caused by death of John M. Pinfcney (D.). tt To nil vacancy 
"by resignation of Alston G. Dayton <R.). 



5. David E. Flnley (D.). ...Yorkville. 

6. J. E. Ellerbe (D.) Sellers. 

7. A. F. Lever (D.) Lexington. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
At Large— C. H. Burke <R.>, Pierre. 
Eben W. Martin (R.)....Deadwood. 
TENNESSEE. 

1. W. P. Brownlow (R.) . . . Jonesboro. 

2. N. W. Hate (R.) Knoxvillc. 

3. John A. Moon (D.) Chattanooga. 

4. M. G. Butler (D.) Gainesboro. 

6. W. C. Houston (D.*. Woodbury. 

6. John W. Gaines (D.). ...Nashville. 

7. Lemuel P. Padgett (D.). Columbia. 

8. Thems W. Sims (D.) Linden. 

0. F. J. Garrett (D. ) Dresden. 

10. M. R. Patterson (D.).... Memphis. 

TEXAS. 

1. Morris Rheppard <D.) Texarkana. 

2. M. L. Brooks (D.) San Augustine. 

5. Gordon Russell (D.) Tyler. 

4. Choice B. Randell -<D.). . Sherman. 

5. Jack Beall <D.) Waxahackie. 

O.Scott Field (D.).... Calvert. 

7. A. W. Gregg (D.) Palestine. 

8. "John M. Moore (D.). .. .Richmond. 

0. Geo. F. Burgess (D.). .. .Gonza.es. 

10. Albert S. Burleson (D.).. Austin. 

11. Robert L. Henry (D.)...Waco. 

12. O. W. Gillespie a».J- Fort Wnrth. 

13. John H. Stephens (D.). .Vernon. 

14. James L. Slayden (D.)...San Antonio. 

15. John N. Garner (D.) Uvaldo. 

10. W. R. Smith (D.) Colorado. 

UTAH. 
At Ijargc— Jos. Howell (R.). WelbullUv 
VERMONT. 

1. David J. Foster (R.) Burlington. 

2. KUtredgo. Haskins (R.). .Brattlcboro. 

VIRGINIA. 

1. William A. Jones tD.). ..Warsaw. 

2. Harry L. Maynard (D.).Portsmouili. 

3. John Lamb (D.).. Rlchmord. 

4. R. G. Southall <D.) Amelia. 

5. 

0. Carter Glass (D/) Lynchburg. 

7. James Hay <D.) Madison. 

8. John F. Rixey (D.) Brandy. 

O.Campbell Slemp (R,) Big Stono Gap. 

10. Henry D. Flood (D.) Appomattox. 

WASHINGTON. 
At Large— W. L. Jones (R.)- North Yakima. 

F. W. Cu«?hmah (R.) Tacoma. . 

W. E. Humphrey (R.). ..Seattle. 
WEST VIRGINIA. 

1. B. B. Dovener (R.) Wheeling. 

2. •Thomas B. Davis (D.). Keyser. 

3. Jos. Holt Gaines <R.). ..Charleston. 

4. H. C. Woodyard (R.). ...Spencer. 

5. James A. Hughes (R.).. Huntington. 

WISCONSIN. 

1. Henry A. Cooper (R.).. .Raelnn. 

2. H. C. Adams (R.) Madison. 

3. J. W. Babcftok (R.) Neeedah. 

4. Theobald Otjen (R.) .Milwaukee. 

5. W. H. Stafford <R.) Milwaukee. 

6. C. H. Weiyse (D.). ..... .Sheboygan F'ls 

7. John J. Esch (R.) La Crosse. 

8. J. H. Davidson <R.) Oshkosh. 

9. Edward S. Minor (R.). ..Sturxe.cn Bay. 

10. Webster E. Brown <R.). .Rhinolander. 

11. John J. Jenkins (R.t Chippewa Fall* 

WYOMING. 

Frank W. Mondeli (R.). .Newcastle. 

ARIZONA, 



ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS. LVIIITH CONGRESS. 



NEW-MEXICO. 
W. H. Andrews (R>. ... Albuquerque. 

OKLAHOMA. 



HAWAII. 

J K. Kalanianaple OR.) . Honolulu. 

PORTO RICO. 

(Resident Commissioner.) 



Bird S. Maguire (R.) Guthrie. ) Tulio Larrinaga (R.) 



THE FIFTY-EIGHTH CONGRESS. 

PI' BMC ACTS A>JD RESOLUTIONS"*)* THE TlllRIf SESSION— Dec. 5, 1«04» 
v to March 4, 1905. 



An net approved February 6. 1905. entitled "An act to amend an act approved 
July 1, 11)02, entitled 'An act temporarily to provide for the administration of the 
affairs* of the civil government in the Philippine Islands and 
1 ub He Improvements for other purposes.' and to amend an act approved March 8. 
in the Philippines. 11)02. entitled 'An act temporarily to provide revenue for" the 

Philippine Islands, and for other purposes.' and to amend an 
act approved March 2, 1903, entitled 'An act to establish a standard of value and to 
provide for a coinage system in the Philippine Islands,' and to provide for the more 
efficient administration of civil government in the Philippine Islands, and for other 
purposes/ ' provided in its first and second sections that all bonds issued by the 
government of the Philippine Islands, or by its authority, shall be exempt from taxa- 
tion by the government of the United States, or by the government of the Philippine 
Islands or of any political or municipal subdivision thereof, or hy any State, or by 
any county, municipality or other municipal subdivision of any Slate or Territory of 
the United States, or by the District of Columbia. For the purpose of providing 
funds to construct port and harbor work*, bridges, roads, buildings for provincial 
and municipal schools, courthouses, penal institutions, and other public improve- 
ments for the development of the Philippine Islands by the general government 
thereof, the said government is authorized from time to time to incur indebtedness, 
borrow money, and to issue and sell therefor (at not less than par value in gold 
coin of the United Statist registered or coupon bonds of such denominations and 
payable at such time or times,, not later than forty years after the date of the 
approval of this act. as may be determined by said government, with interest thereon 
not to exeeed 4Vi per centum per annum: provided, that the entire indebtedrfess of 
said government created by the authority conferred by this section shall not exceed at 
any one time the sum of $3,000,000; and provided further, that the law of said 
government creating the indebtedness and authorizing the issue of the bonds under 
this section shall be approved by the President of the United States. 

Section 8 provided that Section 68 of the act of Congress approved July 1, 1902. 
entitled "An act temporarily to provide for the administration of the affairs of civil 
government in the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes," is herebv amended to 
read as follows: "Section 06. That for the purpose of providing funds to construct 
necessary sewer and drainage facilities, to secure a sufficient supply of water and 
necessary buildings for primary public schools in municipalities, the government of 
the Philippine Islands may. where current taxation is inadequate for the purpose. 
under such limitations, terms and conditions as it may prescribe, authorize, by 
appropriate legislation, to be approved by the President of the United States, any 
municipality of said islands to incur indebtedness, borrow money and to issue and 
sell (at not less than par value in gold coin of the United States^ registered or coupon 
bonds, in such amount and payable at such time as may be determined to be neces- 
sary by the government of said islands, with interest thereon not to exceed 5 per 
centum per annum; provided, that the entire indebtedness of any municipality shall 
not exceed 5 per centum of the assessed valuation of the real estate In said munici- 
pality, and any obligation in excess of such limit shall be null and void." 

Section 4 provided that for the purpose of aiding in the construction, equipment, 
operation and maintenance of such railroads, using steam electricity, or other 
power, in the Philpnine Inlands as the Philippine government may hereafter spe- 
cifically authorize, the said government is empowered to enter into a contract of 
guaianty with any railroad company organized pursuant to the laws of said govern- 
imrt or of the United States or any State thereof undertaking to, construct, equip, 
operate and maintain any such railroad, whereby the said government shall guarantee 
interest, at not exceeding 4 p«r centum per annum upon first lien bonds to be issued 
by such company, properly secured by mortgage or deed of trust upon the said rail- 
road, its equipment, franchises and other property, real, personal and mixed then 
owned and thereafter to be acquired. Such contract of guaranty shall be signed on 
behalf of said government by thv gc.ven. .r general thereof, and on behalf of the 
railroad company undertaking the construction, equipment, maintenance and opera- 
tion of said railroad by tie- thief officer llv T.-of. thereunto duly' authorized by the 
stock ho. c.ers and directors of the same and shall contain, among others, the follow- 
ing provisions: 

FiT-i. That the total nmount of bonds th^ interest upon which is to be guar- 
anteed shall in no event exceed the amount actually invested in cash in the con- 
struction and equipment ot such railroad, to be determined as hereinafter provided. 

Second. That no debt except as above provided shall be incurred by the said 
undertaking railroad company, its successors cr assigns, by which a lien shall be 
created upon such railroad, its equipment or other property, prior to the Hen of said 



ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS. LVTI1TH CONGRESS. 81 



government to secure the repayment of the interest paid by It under said guaranty 
without the consent of the Congress. 

Third. That the said railroad shall he constructed and equipped within the time 
limited in the first instance by the Philippine government, or any extension of said 

time granted by said rovernnnent for good cause shown. 
Conditions of Fourth. That after the construction and equipment of said rail- 

Rallroad road in accordance with the foregoing provisions and all others of 

Construction. the contract of guaranty, the railroad shall apply its gross 
«*mings as follows: First, to the- necessary operating expenses, 
including reasonable expenses of the corporation i second, to the necessary and 
ordinary repairs of said railroad and its equipment; third, to such betterments 
and extraordinary repajrs of said railroad or equipment as may be first by the 
governor-general of the islands, in writing, expressly consented to; fourth, to the 
payment of the interest on the bonds, the interest on which to any extent shall have 
been guaranteed by the Philippine government un*er this section. The contract of 
guaranty shall be in substance indorsed upon said bonds and signed by the treasurer 
of said government, and the said contract of guaranty shall not be executed except 
upon satisfactory proof of the completion of the railroad in sections of not less than 
twenty continuous miles each, and in such proportion, to be fixed from time to time 
by said government, as the actual capital invested in completed road and acquired 
equipment shall bear to the capital required for the completion and equipment of the 
entire road, to be determined by the said government. All payments made under 
any such guaranty shall be from the time the same are paid a lien upon said rail- 
road -and its properly then owned and thereafter to be acquired subject only to the 
lien of the mortgage or deed of trust executed to secure the bonds, the interest upon 
which shall have been so guaranteed, and the total sum paid under sucfh guaranty 
shall at the expiration thereof be payable to said Philippine government upon 
demand, and in default of such payment the said lien shall be immediately fore- 
closeable. Provided, that in no event shall the total annual contingent liability of 
said government under the guaranties authorized by this section at any time exceed 
the sum of $1,200,000, and no such guaranty shall continue for a longer period than 
thirty years. 

- For the further security of the Philippine government said government shall 
declare the proper rules for ascertaining clearly the cash capital actually invested 
in said, railroads and the net income actually received on said capital so invested, 
and shall provide for supervision by said Philippine government, through the audit- 
ing, engineering and railroad bureaus thereof and by such other agencies as may be 
fixed by law, of the conduct of the finances of the road, and of its location, con- 
struction, operation and maintenance. The Philippine government shall appoint two 
members of the board of directors of any undertaking company the interest on whose 
bonds shall be guaranteed as provided in this section. Buch such railroad company 
shall majce such reports from time to time as to its receipts and expenditures, in 
such form and substance and sworn to by such officials', as may be prescribed by the 
Philippine government. The Supreme Court of the Philippine Islands shall have 
original and exclusive jurisdiction In all actions, proceedings or suits at law or in 
equity brought by the Philippine government against any person or corporation 
involving the construction of this section or any right existing under, duty enjoined 
or act prohibited by said section or any contract mad* in pursuance thereof; and 
jurisdiction is hereby vested in the Supreme Court to make such order, to enter such 
Judgment or decree and to take such proceedings in enforcement thereof as may be 
proper. During the vacations of said court the chief justice or any judge thereof 
shall have all the power tc grant restraining orders, orders of injunction, to appoint 
receivers', or to do any other act under authority here granted, that a judge of a 
court of general jurisdiction may do in the vacation of court. Section 74 of an act 
entitled "An act temporarily to provide for the administration of the affairs of civil 
government in the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes," approved July 1. 1002, 
so far as the same is not in conflict with the provisions of this section, is hereby 
made applicable to the corporations the interest upon whose bonds or any part 
thereof shall be guaranteed urder the provisions hereof. 

Section 5 provided that material imported Into the Philippine Islands for the 
construction and equipment of railroads therein may, in the discretion of the general 
government of said islands, t-nder rules and regu Unions to be by it prescribed, be 
admitted free of duty. 

Section 6 provided that the immigration laws of the United States in force in 
the Philippine Islands shall be administered by the officers of the general govern- 
ment thereof designated by appropriate legislation of said government, and all moneys 
collected under said law» as duty or head tax on alien immigrants coming into said 
islands shall not be covered Into the general fund of the Treasury of the United 
States, but shall be paid into the treasury of said islands to be used and expended 
for the government and benefit of said islands. 

Section 7 authorized the government of the Philippine Islands to pros-ribe the 
compensation for the chief justice and associate justices of the Supreme Court of the 
islands, not to exceed $10,500 for the chief justice and $10,000 for each associate l 
justice per annum. Whenever, by reason of temporary disability ' 
Compensation of any judge of the supreme court or by reason of vacancies occur ring 
forjudges. therein, a quorum of the court shall not be present for busimss the 

governor-general of paid islands is authorized to designate 
a judge or judges of the court of first instane* in the islands to pit" and 
act temporarily as a judge or judges of the «uprem« court in order to constitute 



nt acts am» resolutions, lviijth conukkss. 



a quorum of said Supreme Court for business. If a .itidge so designated shall not 
have his usual place of residence at the city of Manila, he shall be allowed his 
travel! irs expenses from his usual place of residence to Manila and return and tire 
sum of 10 pesos. Philippine currency, a day for tb« period during which he is 
engaged In the Supreme Court, the period to be calculated from the time he leaves 
hts usual place of residence until his return lrom Manila. 

Section 8 declared that the civil governor cf the Philippine Islands shall, here- 
after be known as the governer-general of the Philippine Islands. 

Section » amended at length the sections of tru« act approved July 1, 1962. relat- 
ing to The riling of vlaitns to mineral or saline lands. 

Section 10 provided that Section S of an act. of Congress approved March 2. 1303, 
cm tilted "An act to establish a standard of value and to provide for a coinage system 
in the. Philippine Islands," is hereby amended by striking out th^ word ''ten" in 
said section and inserting in lieu thereof the words "five, hundred." bo that said 
section when, amended shall read as follows:. "Sn th>n &. That the treasurer of the 
Philippine Islands is hereby authorized, in his discretion, to receive deposits of the 
standard silver coins of one peso authorized by this net to !> rt coined, at the treasury 
of the government of said inlands or any of its brunches, in sums of not less than 
20 pe^os, and to issue silver certificates .therefor in denominations of not less than 
2 pesos nor more than frOO pesos, sjid coin so deposited shall be retained in the 
treasury and held for the payment of such certificates on demand, and used for no 
other purpose. Such certificates shall by receivable for customs, tuxws and for all- 
public duet- in the Philippine Inlands, and when so received may be reissued, and 
whtn held by anv banking a.vs-oeiaUon in t>aid Islands may b« counted as a part of 
its lawful rererve." - . 

Section 11 authorised the government of the Philippine Islands to modify, bus-. 
pnd ;r repeal the provisions respecting tennage dues stt forth in Sections 14 and 15 
of an act entitled "An act to revise and amend the tariff laws of the Philippine 
Archipelago," enacted by the Philippine Commission on September 17. 1ML and eon- 
firmed hy an act of Congress approved March S ,1'M2. entitled '.'An ,act temporarily 
to provide revenue for the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes." 

An act approved March 3, 1905, rn'titled "An act to revise and amend the 
tariff laws of the Philippine Islands." put into force on May 
Philippine Tariff . 2, I OOf.. new tariff rates on imports to and exports from the 
archipelago. 

By an act approved Feb. 6, 190.">. the laws of the United 
Extradition. States covering the extradition of fugitives from justice from for- 
eign countries were extended to the Philippines-. 

An act approved March 2, 1905, entitled "An act fixing the status of mer- 
chandise coming into the United States, from the Canal Zone, 
Merchandise Isthmus of Panama," provided that all laws affecting imports 

from the Panama of articles, goods, wares and merchandise and entry of persons 
Canal Zone. into the United States from foreign countries shall apply to 

articles, goods, wares and merchandise, and persons coming 
from the Canal Zone. Isthmus of Panama, and seeking entry into any State or 
Territory of the. United States or the District of Columbia. 

By jive acts approved March 3. 1905. and taking effect July 1, 1-905, Congress 
revised the statutes relating to steamboat inspections and safety of steamboat 
travel. The. first 1 of these provided that section forty-four hundred 
Steamboat and five of the Revised Statutes of the United States be, and it is 
Inspection hereby, amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4.405. The supervising 
Heforuib. inspectors and the Supervising Inspector-General shall assemble as 

a board once in each year, at the city of Washington, District of 
Columbia, on the third Wednesday in January, and at stich other times as the 
Secretary of Commerce and Labor shall prescribe, for joint consultation, and 
shall assign to each of the supervising inspectors the limits of territory within 
which he shall perform his duties. The board shall establish all necessary regu- 
lations required to carry out in the most effective manner the provisions of this 
title, and such regulations, when approved by the Secretary of Commerce and 
Labor, shall have the force of law. The supervising inspector for the district 
embracing the Pacific Coast shall not be under obligation to attend the meetings 
of the board of toner than once in two years: but when he does not attend such 
meeting he shall make his communications thereto, in the way of a report, in 
such manner as the board shall prescribe: Provided, that the Secretary of Com- 
merce and Labor may at any time" call in session, after rea'onable public notice, 
a meeting of an executive committee, to be composed of the Supervising Inspector- 
General and any two supervising inspectors, which committee, with the approval 
of the. said Secretary, shall have power to alter, amend, add to. or repeal any of 
the rules and regulations made, with the approval of the Secretary of Commerce 
and Labor, by Cue board of supervising inspectors, either by virtue of this section 
or under any power granted by this title, or any amendments thereof, su^h 
aUeralon. amendment, addition, or repeal, when approved hy the said secretary. 
Lo hare the force of law. and to continue in effect until thirty days after the 
adjournment of the next meeting of the board of supervising inspectors. The 
foregoing powers of such executive committee, acting with the said secretary" 
shall also extend to the approval of tht: instruments, machines and equipments 
referred to in section forty-four hundred and ninety-one of ih!s title." 

The -second provided that section forty-four hundred and seventeen of the 
Revised Statutes of the United States be amended to read as follows:. "Sec, -4,417. 
The local inspectors shall, once in every year, at least, carefully inspect the hull 



ACTS AND RESOL.TJTIONa L.VI1ITH CONGRESS. S3 



of each steam vessel within their respective districts, and shall satisfy themselves 
that every such vessel so submitted to their inspection is of a structure suitable 
for the service in which she is to be employed, has suitable accommodations for 
passengers and crew, and is in a condition to warrant the belief that she may be 
fused in navigation as a steamer, with safety to life, and that all the requirements 
of law in regard to fires, boats, pumps, hose, life-preservers, iloats, anchors, 
cables and other things are faithfully complied with; and if they 'deem it expe- 
dient they may direct the vessel to be put in motion, and may adopt any other 
suitable means to test her sufficiency and that of her equipment. The local in- 
spectors shall, once ih every year, at least carefully inspect the hull of each pail 
vessel of over seven hundred tons carrying passengers for hire and all other 
vessels and barges of over one hundred tons burden carrying' passengers for hire 
within their respective districts, and shall satisfy -themselves that every such 
vessel so submitted to their inspection is of a structure suitable for the service in 
which she is to be employed, has suitable accommodations for the crew, and is in 
condition to warrant the belief that she may be used in navigation "with safety to 
life: Provided, that vessels while laid up and dismantled and out of commission 
riiay, by- regulations established by the Board of Supervising Inspectors, with the 
approval of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, be exempted from any or all 
inspection under sections forty-four hundred and seventeen, forty-four hundred 
and. eighteen^ forty- four hundred and twenty-six, forty-four hundred and twenty- 
seven. Whenever- any inspector • or assistant inspector shall, in the' performance- 
of his duty, find on board any vessel subject to the provisionn of this title, as 
part, of the required equipment thereof, any equipment, machinery, apparatus or 
appliances not conforming to the requirements of law, he shall require the" same 
to be placed in proper condition by the owner or master of the said vessel, if 
possible; and if said inspector or assistant inspector shartl find on board any ,^ueh 
Vessel any life-preservers or fire hose so defective as to be incapable of repair, he- 
Shall require that the same be destroyed in his presence by sueh owner or master. 
And in any of the foregoing cases local inspectors by whom or under w hose- 
supervision said vessel is -then being inspected shall have powr to enforce the 
foregoing, requirements by revoking the certificate of the said vessel. - and by 
refusing to Issue a new certificate to the said vessel, until the said requirements 
shall have been fully complied with or -until such action of the local inspectors 
shall have been reversed, modified, or set aside by the supervising inspector of the 
district on proper appeal by the owner- or master of said vessel, which appeal 
shall be made to the said supervising inspector within ten days after the final 
action as aforesaid by the local inspectors; and upon such appeal, duly made, the 
supervising Inspector shall have power to affirm, modify, or set aside such 
action by. the local inspectors." „....-, . , 

Section .second amended Section 4,453, Reviser! Statute*, to read: "In addition 
to the annual inspection, the local inspectors shall examine, at 
Life proper times, steamers arriving and departing to and from their 

Savins:. • respective ports, so often as to enable them to lietect any neglect 

Appliances. A to comply with the requirements of law, and also any defects or 

imperfections becoming apparent after the i»spe-.*iion -aforesaid, and 
tending to render the navigation of the vessels unsafe; and ;f they shall discover any 
omission to comply with the law, ©r that repairs have become necessary to make the 
vessel safe, the inspector shall at once notify the master, in writing, stating In the no- 
tice what is required; and if he deems the requirements unreasonable or unnecessary he 
may apply for a re-lamination of the case to the supervising inspector, as provided 
in the preceding section. All inspections, and orders for repairs.. shall be'prompUy made 
by the inspectors, and when it can be safely, done, in their judgment, they shali per- 
mit repairs to be made where those interested can most conveniently do them. 
And whenever any local inspector or supervising inspector ascertains to his satis- 
faction that any vessel, subject to the provisions of this title, has been or is 
being navigated or operated without complying with the terms of the vessel's 
certificate of inspection regarding the nuriibor and class 'of licensed officers and 
crew, or without complying with the provisions of law and her «aid certificate as 
to the -number or kind of life-saving or fire-fighting apparatus, or without main- 
taining in good and efficient condition her lifeboats, fire pumps, fire hose, and life 
preservers, or that for any other reason said vessel cannot be operated with 
safety to life, the said local or supervising inspector shall order the owner or 
master of said vessel to correct such unlawful conditions, and may require that 
the vessel at once cease navigating and be submitted to reinspection; and in oa.se 
the said orders of such inspector shall not at once be complied with, the said in- 
spector shall revoke the said vessel's certificate of inspection and shall imme- 
diately give to the owner, master, or agent of said vessel notice, in writing, of 
such revocation ; and no new certificate of inspection shall be again issued to her 
; until the provisions of this title have been complied with. Any vessel subject to 
the- pro-visions -of this title operating or navigating or attempting to operate or 
navigate after the revocation of her certificate of inspection and before the 
issuance of a new certificate shall, upon application by the inspector to any dis- 
trict court of the United States having jurisdiction, and by proper order or action 
"of said court in the premises, be seized summarily by way of libel and held 
without privilege of release by bail or bond until a proper certificate of inspec- 
tion shall have been issued to said vessel: Provided, that the master or owner 
of any vessel whose certificate shall have been so revoked may within thirty 
days after receiving notice of such revocation appeal to the Secretary of Com- 
merce and- Labor for a re-examination of the case, and upon such appeal the said 
Secretary shall have power to revise, modify, or set aside such action of the local 



mm 



84 " ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS. L.VI11TH CONGBK8& 



or supervising Inspector and direct the Issuance to such vessel of her original 
certificate or of a new certificate of inspection; and in case the said Secretary 
shall so direct the issuance of a certificate, ali judicial process against said vessel 
based on thiB section shall thereupon be of no further force or effect, and the 
vessel shall thereupon be released." 

Section third provided that Section 4.488 of the Revised Statute* of tho United 
States be amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4,488. Every steamer navigating: the 
ocean, or any lake. bay. or sound of the United States, shall bo provided with such 
numbers of lifeboats, floats* rafts, life preservers, line-carrying projectiles, and 
the moans of propellng them, and drags, as will best secure the safety af all 
persons on board such vessel in case of disaster; and every • sea going vessel 
carrying passengers, and every such vessel navigating any of the northern or 
northwestern lakes, shall have the lifeboats required by law. provided with suita- 
ble, boat disengaging apparatus, so arranged as to allow such boats to be safely 
launched while such vessels are under speed or otherwise, and so as to allow 
such disengaging apparatus to be operated by one person, disengaging both ends 
of the boat simultaneously from the tackles by which it may be lowered to the 
water. And the board of supervising inspectors shall fix and determine, by their 
rules and regulations, the character of lifeboats, floats, rafts, life preservers, tine 
carrying projectiles, and the means of propelling them, and drags that shall be 
used on such vesels. and also the character and capacity of pumps or other ap- 
pliances for freeing the steamer from water In case of heavy leakage, the capacity 
of such pumps or appliances being suited to the navigation In which the steamer 
is employed. Every vessel subject to the provisions of this title shall, while in 
operation, carry one life preserver for each and every person allowed to be car- 
ried on said vessel by the certificate of inspection, including each member of the 
crow: Provided, however, *hat upon such vessels and under such conditions as 
are specified in Section 4,482 floats may be substituted for life preservers. Any 
person who wilfully and knowingly manufactures or sells, or offers for sale, or has 
in his possession with intent to sell, life preservers containing metal or other 
nonbuoyant material, for the purpose of Increasing the weight thereof, or more 
metal or other such material than Is reasonably necessary for the construction 
thereof, or who shall so manufacture, sell, offer for sale, or possess with intent 
to sell any other articles commonly used for preservation of life or the prevention 
of fire on board vesels subject to the provisions of this title, which articles shall 
be so defective as to be inefficient to accomplish the purposes for which they are 
respectively intended and designed, shall, upon conviction, be fined not more than 
$2,000. and may, in addition thereto, in the discretion of the court, be imprisoned 
not exceeding five years." 

Section four amended Section 4.499 Revised Statutes, to read as follows: ,r If any 
vessel propelled In whole or In part by sicam be navigated without 
Penalties. complying with the terms of this title, the owner shall be liable to 

the United States in a penalty of $500 for each offence, one-half for the 
use of the informer, for which sum the vessel so navigated shall bo liable, and may 
>>e seized and proceeded against by way of libel In any district court of the United 
States having jurisdiction of the offence. Persons or corporations chartering or en- 
gaging or contracting for the use of vessels subject to this title, under such terms and 
conditions that they have full and exclusive control of the management and operation 
of such vessels, shall be subject to the same penalties for violations of the provisions 
of this title as' are now imposed upon owners of vessels thereunder, and In such cases 
the owners shall not be liable to such penalties for such violations by such charterers 
or contractors." 

Section five provided that Section 5,344 of the Revised Statutes of th»e United 
States be, and it is hereby, amended to read as follows: "Sec, 5,344. Every cap- 
tain, engineer, pilot, or other person omployed on any steamboat or vessel, by 
whose misconduct, negligence, or inattention to his duties on such vessel the life 
of any person is destroyed, and every owner, charterer. Inspector, or other public 
officer, through whose fraud, neglect, connivance, misconduct, or violation of law. 
the life of any person is destroyed, shall be deemed guilty of the felony of man- 
slaughter, and upon conviction thereof, before any circuit court of the United 
States, shall be sentenced to pay a fine of not more than $10,000, or to confine- 
ment at hard labor for a period of not more than ten years, or either, or both: 
Provided, That when the owner or charterer of any steamboat or vessel shall be 
a corporation, any executive officer of such corporation, for the time being 
actually charged with the control and management of the operation, equipment, 
or navigation of such steamboat or vessel, who has knowingly and wilfully caused t 
or allowed such fraud, neglect, connivance, misconduct, or violation of law. by 
which the life of any person is destroyed, shall be deemed guilty of the ferony of 
manslaughter, and upon conviction thereof, before any circuit court of the United 
States, shall be sentenced to confinement at hard labor for a period of not more 
than ten years." 

The third act rearranged the Inspection districts and the compensation of 

inspector? and provided further that the Secretary of Commerce and 

Districts I^abor may from time to time detail said assistant inspectors of one 

Ilearranged. port or difttilct, as the needs of the steamboat inspection service may. 

In his discretion require. 

The fourth act provided that Section 4.418 of the Revised Statutes of tho United 
States be. and is hereby, amended ta read as follows: "Sec. 4.418. The local inspec- 
tors, shall also inspect the boilers and their appurtenances in all steam vessels before 
the same shall be used, and once at least In every year thereafter, and shall subject alr| 



ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS, L.V1I1TH CONGRESS. 85 

bolters to the hydrostatic pressure. All such vessels shall comply with the following 
conditions; that the openings for the passage of waier and steam, respecti vcly. 
and all pipes and tubes exposed to heat, are of proper dimensions and free from 
obstructions; that the spaees between and around the flues .are sufficient; that 
flues, boilers, furnaces, safety valves, fusible plugs, low water indicators, feed 
water apparatus, gauge cocks, steam gaugus, water and steam pipes connecting 
boilers, means of prevention of sparks and flames from lire doors, low water 
gauges, means of removing mud and sediment from boilers, and all other sue* 
machinery and appurtenances thereof, are of such construction, shape, condition 
arrangement, and material that the same may be safely employed in the service 
proposed without peril to life; and the local inspectors shall satisfy themselves by 
thorough examination that said requirements of law and regulations in regard 
thereto have been fully complied with. All boilers used on steam vessels and 
constructed of iron or steel plates, inspected under the provisions of Section 
forty-four hundred and thirty, shall be subjected to a hydrostatic test, in the 
ratio of one hundred and fifty pounds to the square Inch to one hundred pounds 
to the square inch of the working steam power allowed. No boiler or flue pip'*, 
nor any of the connections therewith, shall be approved, which is made, In whole 
or In part, of bad material, or is unsafe in Its form, or dangerous from defective 
workmanship, age, use, or other cause." 

Section two provided that Section 4,480 of the Revised Statutes of the United 
States be, and it is hereby, amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4, 4 SO. Every 
steamer carrying pa sengers shall be provided with such tiller ropes, tiller rods, 
or chains for the purpose of steering- and navigating the vessel, and such bell 
pulls for signalizing the engineer from the pilot house, and such tubes or other 
arrangement to repeat back the signal to the pilot house, as may be prescribed 
by the board of supervising inspectors, with the approval of the Secretary of 
Commerce and Labor." 

Section three piovidcd that Section 4,483 of the Revised Statutes of the Unftod 
States be, and it is hereby, amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4,4 83. Every such 
steam vessel carrying passengers shall keep such fire buckets, axes and water 
barrels as shall be prescribed by the regulations established by the board of 
supervising inspectors, with the approval of the Secretary of Commcw and 
Labor. The buckets and barrels shall be Kept in convenient places and rilled with 
water, to be in readiness in case of fire, and the axes shall be kept in #ood 
order and ready for immediate use. Tanks of suitable dimensions and arrange- 
ment, or buckets In «ul!icient number, may be substituted for barrels." 

Section four repealed Sections 4,43574,436 and 4,459 of the Revised Statutes 
of the United States. 

The fifth act provided that Section 4,415 of the Revised Statutes of the 
United States be, and it Is hereby, amended 'to read as follows: "Sec. 4,41.5. The j 

inspector of hulls shall be a person of good character and 
Halls and Licenses, suitable qualifications and attainments to perform the! 
services required of an inspector of hulls, who from j 
his ' practical knowledge of shipbuilding and nnvigatlon and the wnos of j 
steam in navigation iw fully competent to make a reliable estimate of tho strcngtn, 
seaworthiness and other qualities of the hulls of vessels ami the equipment. ; 
deemed essential to safety of Ufe in their navigation; and the inspector of boilers j 
shall be a person of good character and suitable qualifications and attainments u> , 
perform the services required of an inspector of boilers, who from his knowledge! 
and experience of the duties of an engineer employed In navigating vessels by j 
steam, and also of the construction and use of boilers, and machinery and appor- 
tenances therewith connected, is able to form a reliable opinion of the strength, 
form, workmanship and suitableness of boilers and machinery to be employed,'! 
without hazard to life from imperfection in tho material, workmanship, or 
arrangement of any part of sueh apparatus for steaming. The inspector of hulls 
and the Inspector of boilers designated by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor 
shall, from the date of designation, constitute a board of local inspectors." 

Section two provided that Section 4,4 1f> of the Revised Statute:* yof tho United 
States be amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4,116. No person interested, oitlier 
directly or Indirectly, in any patented article required to be used on any steamer 
by this title, or who Is a member of any association of owners, masters, engi- 
neers, or pilots of steamboats, or who is, directly or indirectly, pecuniarily inter- 
ested' In any steam vessel, or who has not the qualifications and acquirements 
prescribed by this title, or who is intemperate in his habits. shall bo eligible to 
hold the office of either supervising, local, or assistant inspector, or to discharge 
the duties thereof; and if any .such person shall attempt to exercise the functions 
of the office of either inspector he shall b deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, 
punishable bjr a fine of $500, and shall he dismissed from office." 

Section three provided that Section 4,423 of the Revised -Statutes of the United 
States be, and it is hereby, amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4,423. Every col- 
lector or ">ther chief officer of the customs shall retain on file all original certifi- 
cates of He Inspectors required to he delivered to him, and shall give to the 
master or owner of the ve>sel therein named throe certified copies thereof, two 
of which shall be placed by such master or owner in conspicuous places in the 
vessel where they will bo most likely to be observed by passengers and others, 
and there kept at all times, framed under glass, and the other shall be retained 
by such master or owner as evidence of the authority thereby conferred; Pro- 
vided however, that where it is not practicable to so expose *aid copies they 
shall be carried in the vessel in such manner as shall t*? prescribed by tho regu- 



86 ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS. LVII1TH CONGRESS. 



latlons established by the board of supervising inspectors with the approval of 
the Secretary of Commerce and Labor." 

Section four provided that Section 4,426 of the Revised Statutes of the United 
States, as amended by act of January IS, 18^7. be, and it is hereby, further 
amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4,426. The hull and boilers of every ferry- 
boat, canal boat, yacht, or other small craft of like character propelled by steam, 
shall be inspected under the provisions of this title. Such other provisions of 
law for the better security of life as may be applicable to such vessels shall, bv 
the regulations of the board of supervising inspectors, also be required to be 
complied with before a certificate of inspection shall be granted, and no such 
vessel shall be navigated without a licensed engineer and a licensed pilot: Pro- 
vided, however, that in open steam launches of ten tons burden and under, one 
person, If duly qualified, may serve in the double capacity of pilot and engineer. 
All vessels of above fifteen tons burden carrying freight or passengers for hire,- 
propelled by gas, fluid, naphtha, or electric motors, shall be, and are hereby 
made subject to all the provisions of Section 4.426 of the Revised Statutes of the 
United States relating to the inspection of hulls and boilers and requiring engi- 
neers and pilots, and for any violation of the provisions of this title applicable 
to such vessels, or of rules or regulations lawfully established thereunder and to 
the extent to which such provisions of law and regulations aro so applicable, the 
said vessels, their masters, officers and owners shall be subject to the provisions 
of Sections 4,496, 4,497, 4,498, 4.499 and 4,500. relating to the imposition and 
enforcement of penalties and the enforcement of law." 

Section five amended Section 4.449, Revised Statutes, to read as follows: "If any 
licensed officer shall, to the hindrance of commerce wrongfully or unreasonably 
refuse to serve In his official capacity on anv vessel as authorized 
Revocations by the terms of his certificate of licensv, or shall fail to deliver to 

said the applicant for such service at the time of such refusal, if the 

Suspensions. same shall be demanded, a statement in writing assigning good and 

sufficient reasons therefor, or if any pilot or engineer shall refuse 
to admit Into the pilot house or engine room any person whom the master or owner 
of the vessel may desire to place there for the purpose of learning the urofesslon, hu- 
ll cense shall be revoked or suspended upon the same procedings as are provided In other 
cases of revocation or suspension of such licenses." 

Section six provided that Section 4,452 of the Revised Statutes of .the United 
States bo, and tt la hereby, amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4,452. Whenever 
any board of local Inspectors refuses to grant a license to any person applying 
for the same, or suspends or revokes the license of anv master, mate, engineer, 
or pilot, any person deeming himself wronged by such refusal, suspension or 
revocation may, within thirty days thereof, on application to the supervising 
Inspector of the district, have his case examined anew bv such supervising In- 
spector; and the local board shall furnish to the supervising inspector, in writing 
the reasons for its doings in the premises; and such supervising inspector shall 
examine the case anew, and he fhall have the same powers to summon witnesses 
and compel their attendance and to administer oaths that are conferred oti local 
inspectors; and such witnesses and the marshal shall be paid In the same manner 
as provided for by the preceding section; and such supervising Inspector may- 
revoke, change, or modify the decision of such local board; and like proceedings 
may be had by any master or, owner of any steam vessel in relation to the in- 
spection of such vessel, or her boilers or machinery, by any such local board: 
and in case of repairs, and in any investigation or inspection, where there shali 
be a disagreement between the local inspectors, the supervising Inspector, when 
so requested, shall investigate and decide the case, in cases of trials for the 
revocation or suspension of an officer's license, where either the license has been 
revoked or suspension for more than six months ha* been made, and such action 
has been affirmed by the supervising inspector, the officer whose license is in 
question may have the case examined anew by the supervising inspector general 
who shall have the same powers to summon witnesses, to compel their attendance," 
and to administer oaths as are conferred on local Inspectors, and the supervising 
inspector general may revoke, change, or modify said decisions. Application for 
such re-examination of the case shall be made to the supervising Inspector general 
within thirty days after final decision by the supervising Inspector." 

Section seven provided that Section 4,470 of the Revised Statutes of the United 
States be. and It Is hereby, amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4 470 Every 
steamer carrying passengers or freight shall be provided with suitable pipes and 
valves attached to the boiler to convey steam into the hold and to the different 
compartments thereof to extinguish fire, or such other suitable apparatus as 
may be prescribed by the regulations of the board of supervising inspectors, with 
the approval of the Secretary of Commerce and Labor, for extinguishing Are in 
the hold and compartments thereof by the Introduction through pipes Into such 
hold and compartments of carbonic acid gas or other fire extinguishing gas or 
vapor; and every stove used on board of any such vessel shall be well and 
securely fastened, so as to prevent it from being moved or overthrown, and all 
woodwork or other lgnltlble substances about the boilers, chimneys cook houses 
and stovepipes, exposed to Ignition, shall be thoroughly shielded by* some Incom- 
bustible material in such a manner as to leave the air to circulate freely between 
such material and woodwork or other lgnltlble substance; and before granting a 
certificate of Inspection the inspector shall require all other necessary provisions 1 
to be made throughout sueh vessel to guard against loss or danger from fire," 

Section eight provided that Seotlon 4,471 of the Revised Statutes of the Unite* 



ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS, LV1I1TH CONGRESS. 



rt 



1 



Statcfl be, and it is hereby, amended to read as follows: "Sec. 4,472. No loose 
hay, loose cotton, or loose hemp, camphene, nitroglycerine, naphiha, benzine, ben- 
sole, coal oil, crude or refined petroleum, or other like explosive burning fluids, j 
or like dangerous articles, shall be carried as freight or used as stores on any 
steamer carrying passengers; nor shall baled cotton or hemp be carried on such 
steamers unless the bales are compactly pressed and thoroughly covered and 
secured in 4 BUCh manner as shall be prescribed by the regulations established by 
the board of supervising Inspectors with the approval of the Secretary of Com- 
merce and Labor; nor shall gunpowder* bo carried on any such vesst 1 except 
under special license; nor. shall oil of vitriol, nitric cr ether chemical acids be 
carried on such steamers except on the decks or guards thereof or in such other 
safe part of the vessel as shall be prescribed by the inspectors. Refined petro- ' 
leum, which will not ignite at a temperature less than 110 degrees of Fahrenheit 
thermometer, may be carried on board such steamers upon routes where there Is 
no other practicable mode of transporting it, and under such regulations as shall 
be prescribed by the board of supervising inspectors with the approval of the 
Secretary of Commerce and J,abor; and oil or spirits of turpentine may be carried 
on such steamers when put up in good metallic vessel:,- or ea.sks or barrels well 
and Becurely bound with iron and stowed in a secure part of the vessel, and 
friction matches may be carried on such steamers when securely packed in 
strong, tight chests or boxes, the covers of which shall be well secured by locks, 
screws, or other reliable fastenings, and stowed in a safe part of the voss'.d at a 
secure distance from any Are or heat. All such other provisions shall be made 
on every steamer carrying passengers or freight, to guard against and extin- 
guish fire, as shall be prescribed by the board of supervising inspectors and ap- 
proved by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor. Nothing in the foregoing or 
following sections of this act shall prohibit the transportation by steam vessels 
of gasolene or any of the products of petroleum when carried by motor vehicles 
(commonly known as automobiles) using the same as a source of motive power: 
Provided, however, that all lire, if any, in such vehi. les or automobiles be extin- 
guished immediately after entering the sa.id vessel, and that the same be not 
relighted until immediately before said vehicle shall l.'ave the vessel: Provided 
further, that any owner, master, agent, or other person having charge of passen- 
ger steam vessels shall have the right to refuse to transport automobile vehicles 
the tanks of which contain gasolene, naphtha, or other dangerous burning fluids." 

Section nine provided that Section. 4,498 of the Revised Statutes of the United 
Btates be, and it is hereby, amended to read as follows: "See. 4,498. A register, 
enrolment, . or license shall not he granted or other papers be issued by any 
collector or other chief ofliee.r of customs to any vessel .subject by law to inspec- 
tion under, this title until all the provisions of this title applicable to such vessel 
havo been fully complied* with and until the certificate of inspection required by 
this title for such vessel has been hied with said collector/* 

Section ten provided that rule one of Section 4,222 of the Revised Statutes of 
the United States be amended- to read as follows: "Rule 1. Every steam vessel 
which is under sail and not under steam shall be considered a sail vessel; and 
every steam vessel which is under steam, whether und»»r sail or not, shall be 
considered a. steam vessel. The words steam vessel shall include any vessel pro- 
pelled by machinery." 

Ao act approved March & t -lfl05, provided that there shall be inaugurated in 
the year ISO?, on and near the waters of Hampton Roads, in the State of Virginia, 
an International naval, marine ami military celebration, beginning 
JittMmrt own - May 13. and ending not later than November 1, 1SM)7. Section second 
CeJebraitoA. appropriated $250,000, to be expended by the Secretary of the Treas- 
ure and apportioned as follows: Fifty thousand dollars for the ex- 
penditures whicn shall be made by the commission hereinafter created and not 
herein specifically provided for, in preparing for and conducting said celebration, 
Including the expense of said commission. One hundred and twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars for the official entertainment of foreign military and naval repre- 
sentatives* of which amount f 100. 000 shall be expended by the commander-in- 
Chief of the North Atlantic fleet, under the supervision of the Secretary of the 
Navy, and $25,000 thereof by the chief of staff of the army, under the supervision 
of the Secretary of War. Fifty thousand dollars for a permanent monument upon 
the place of the first permanent English settlement at Jamestown, Va., and in 
commemoration thereof; the site and design to he selected by the commission 
hereinafter named, subject to the approval of the President: Provided, that the 
site be donated to tho United States by proper deed. Fifteen thousand dollars for 
permanent moorings for the me of vessels participating in said celebration at 
Hampton Roads, subject to the approval of the Secretary of the Navy. Ten 
thousand dollars for exhibiting on the scene of the engagement between the 
Monitor and Merrwnae one or more of the old monitors of that period in order to 
illustrate the progress of naval construction. 

Section three authorized the President of the United States to make procla- 
mation -of said celebration, setting forth the ev< nt to be commemorated, inviting 
foreign nations to psrti* ipate by the sending of their naval vessels and such rep- 
re3e»«tal ion. of their military organizations as may be practicable, and to have 
such portions of cur army and navy assembled there during the said celebration 
as may be compatible with tho ptiblic service. And the President is also author- 
ized, to invite participation in said celebration by the militia of the several 
Stages, but at -their own expense. 

Section Jour authorized the President to constitute a commission to consist 



ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS. LVIHTH CONGRESS. 



of the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, and the Secretary of the 
Navy, to be known as the Jamestown Tor-Centennial Commission. The said 
commission shall have full power and authority to do any and all things by this 
act required to be done for the carrying on of said celebration, including the 
detail of such persons as may be necessary for clerical and other services in con- 
nection with the work of said commission from the departments of which they 
are respectively at the head, and not in terms expressly intrusted to others, and 
all things necessary to the appropriate inauguration and successful holding of 
said celebration. 

The Naval Appropriation act approved March 8, 1905, authorized the Presi- 
dent to have constructed by contract or in navy yards two first class battleships, 
carrying the heaviest armor and most powerful armament for ves- 
Increase sels of their class upon a maximum trial displacement of not more 

of the Navy, than sixteen thousand tons; to have the highest practicable speed 
and great radius of action, and to cost, exclusive of armor and 
armament, not exceeding $4,400,000 each. The act also provided that the limit 
of cost for each of the two scout cruisers authorized by the act of April 27, 1904, 
should be increased to $1,900,000. It provided further that the Secretary of the 
Navy should cause a thorough inquiry to be made as to the cost of armor plate 
and of armor plant, and report to Congress. 

An act approved March 3, 1905, amended Section 4,952 of the Revised 
Statutes to read as follows: "Sec. 4,952. The* author, inventor, designer, or pro- 
prietor of any book, map. chart, dramatic or musical compos i- 
Copyright Law tion, engraving, cut, print, or photograph, or negative thereof, or 
Amendments. of a painting, drawing, chromo, statue, statuary, and of models 
or designs intended to be perfected as works of the fine arts, and 
the executors, administrators, or assigns of any such person shaH, upon com- 
plying with the provisions of this chapter, have the sole liberty of printing, re- 
printing, publishing, completing, copying, executing, finishing and vending the 
same: and, in the case of a dramatic composition, of publicly performing or rep- 
resenting it, or causing it to be performed or represented by others. And authors 
or their assigns shall have exclusive right to dramatize or translate any of their 
works for which copyright shall have been obtained under the laws of the United 
States. 

"Whenever the author or proprietor of a book in a foreign language, which 
shall be published in a foreign country before the day of publication in this 
country, or his executors, administrators, or assigns, shall deposit one complete 
copy of the same, including all maps and other illustrations, in the I/lbrary of 
Congress, Washington. District of Columbia, within thirty days after the first 
publication of such book in a foreign country, and shall insert in such copy, and 
in all copies of such book sold or distributed in the United States, on the title 
page or the page immediately following, a notice of the reservation of copyright 
in the name of the proprietor, together with the true date of first publication of 
such book, in the following words: 'Published , 19 . Privilege of copyright 
in the United States reserved under the act approved * , 1905, by ,' and 

shall, within twelve months after the first publication of such book in a foreign 
country, file the title of such book and deposit two copies of it in the original 
language or, at his option, of a translation of it in the English language, printed 
from type set within the limits of the United States, or from plates made there- 
from, containing a notice of copyright, as provided by the copyright laws now 
in force, he and they shall have during the term of twenty-eight years from the 
date of recording the title of the book or of the English translation of it, as pro- 
vided for above, the sole liberty of printing, reprinting, publishing, Venning, trans- 
lating and dramatizing the said book: Provided, that this act shall only apply to 
a citizen or subject of a foreign State or nation when such i^reign State or 
nation permits to citizens of the United States of America the benefit of copy- 
right on substantially the same basis as to its own citizens." 

An act approved February 20, 1905, regulated the registration of trademarks used 
in commerce with foreign nations among the several States or yvith Indian tribes. 
Section 1 provided that the owner of a trademark used in commerce 
Trade Mark with foreign nations, or among the several States, or with Indian 
Registration. tribes, provided such owner shall be domiciled within the territory 
of the United States, or resides in or is located in any foreign country 
which, by treaty, convention or law, affords similar privileges to the citizens of the 
United States, may obtain registration for such trademark by complying with the fol- 
lowing requirements: First, by filing in the Patent Office an application therefor, in 
writing, aaddressed to the Commissioner of Patents, signed by the applicant, specify- 
ing hiV name, domicile, location, and ciiiz^nship; the class of merchandise and—the 
particular description of goods Comprised in such class to which the tiademark is 
appropriated; a description of the trademark itself, and a statement of the mode 
in which the same is applied and affixed to goods, and the length of time during 
which the trademark has been used. With this statement shall be filed a drawing 
of the trademark, signed by the applicant, or his attorney, and such number of speci- 
mens of the trademark, as actually used, as may be required by the Commissioner of 
Patents. Second, by paying into the. Treasury of the United States the sum of ten 
dollars, and otherwise complying with the requirements of this Act and such regula- 
tions as may be prescribed by the Commissioner of Patents. 

Section 2 provided that the application prescribed in the foregoing section, in 
order to create anv right whatever in favor of the party filing it, must be accompanied 
by a written declaration verified by the applicant, or by a member of the firm or an 
officer of the corporation or association applying, to the effect that the applicant be- 



ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS, I.VIIITH CONGRESS, 89 



lieves himself or the firm, corporation, or association in whose behalf he makes the 
application to be the owner of the trademark sought to be registered, and that no 
other person, .firm* corporation, .or association, to the beat of the applicant's knowledge 
and belief, has the right to such use, either in the identical form or in such near 
resemblance thereto as might be calculated to deceive; that such trademark is used 
In commerce among the several States, or with foreign nations, or with Indian tribes, 
and that the description and drawing presented truly represent the trademark sought 
to be registered. If the applicant resides or is located in a foreign country, the state- 
ment required shall, in addition to the foregoing, set forth that the trademark has 
been registered by the applicant, or that an application for the registration thereof 
has-been filed by him In the foreign country in which he resides or is located, and' 
shall give the date Of such registration, or the application therefor, as the case may 
be, except that inr the application in such cases it shall not be necessary to state that 
the mark has been used In commerce with the United States or among the States 
thereof. The verification required, by this section may be made before any person 
within the United -States authorized by law to administer oaths, or. when th* appli- 
cant resides in a foreign country, before a*ny minister, charge d'affaires, consul, or 
commercial agent holding commission under the Government of the -United -States, or 
before any notary public. Judge, or magistrate having an official seal and authorized 
to administer oaths. in the foreign country in which: the applicant may be whose au- 
thority shall be proved by a certificate of a diplomatic or consular officer of the 
United ..States. 

Sections 3 ancL 4 provide that every applicant for registration of a trademark, 

or for renewal of registration of a trademark, who is not domiciled 
Designation within the United States, shall, before the issuance of the certifi- 

of Agents. cate of registration, as hereinafter provided for, designate, by a 

notice in writing, filed in the Patent Office, some person residing 
within the United States on whom process affecting the right of ownership of the 
trademark of which such applicant may claim to be the owner, brought un- 
der the provisions of this Aot or under other laws of the United States, 
may be served, with the same force and effect as if served upon the applicant 
or registrant In person. For the purposes qf this Act it shall be deemed sufficient to 
serve such notice upon such applicant, registrant, or representative by leaving a copy 
of such process or notice addressed to him at the last address of which the Commis- 
sioner of Patents has been notified. An application for registration of a trademark 
filed in this country by any person who has previously regularly filed in any foreign 
country which, by treaty, convention, or law, affords similar privileges to citizens 
of the United States an application for registration of the same trademark shall be 
accorded the same force and effect as would be accorded to the same application if 
filed in this country on the date on which application for registration of the same 
trademark was first filed In such foreign country: Provided, That such application is 
filed in this country within four months from the date on which the application v/as 
first filed in suoh foreign country: And provided, That certificate of registration 
shall not be issued for any mark for registration of which application has been filed 
by an applicant located in a foreign country until such mark has been actually regis- 
tered by the applicant in the country in which he is located. 

Section 5 provides that no mark by which the goods of the owner of th*> mark 
may be distinguished from other good^-of the same class shall be refused registration 
as a trademark on account of the nature of such mark unless such mark — 

(a) Consists of or comprises immoral or scandalous matter; 

(b) Consists of or comprises the flag or coat of arms or other insignia of the 
United States* or any simulation thereof, or of any State or municipality, or or anv 
foreign nation: Provided, That trademarks which are identical with a registered or 
known trademark owned and in use by another, and appropriated to merchandise of j 
the same descriptive properties, or which so nearly resemble a registered or known 
trademark owned and in use by another, and appropriated to merchandise of the I 
same descriptive properties, as to be likely to cause confusion or mistake in the mind I 
of the public, or to deceive purchasers, shall not be registered: Provided, That no 1 
mark which consists merely in the name of an individual, firm, corporation or asso- 
ciation, not written, printed, impressed or woven in some particular or distinctive 
manner' or In association with a portrait of the individual, or merely in words or 
devices which are descriptive of the goods with which they are used, or of trie 
character or quality of such goods, or merely a geographical name or term, shall 
be registered under the terms of this Act: Provided further, That no portrait of :i 
living individual 'may be registered as a trademark, except by the consent of such 
individual, evidenced by an instrument in writing: And provided further. That nothing 
herein, shall prevent the registration of any mark used by the applicant or his pre J. 
ecessors, or by those from whom title to the mark is derived in commerce with 
foreign nations or among the several States, or with Indian tribes, which wa.i pi 
actual and exclusive use as a trademark of the applicant or his predecessors from 
whom be derived title for ten years next preceding the passage of this Act. 

Sections 6 and 7 provide that on the filing of an application for registration of • 
trademark which complies with the renuirements of this Act, and the payment «if r- 
the fees herein provided for, the Commissioner of Patents shall cause an examiim- tj 
Uon thereof to be made: and if on such examination it shall appear that the api'lie:n< 3 
is eutitled to have his trademark registered under the provisions of this Act t!> £ 
Commissioner shall cause the mark to be published at least once in the Official Gaz-lf • ;| 
of* the Patent Office. Any person who believes he wou*d be damaged by the re«i;;'r.; ,, 
tion of a mark may oppose the same by filing notice of opposition, stating the gruuu-l-- - 4 
therefor in the Patent Office within thirty days after the publication of the tv ..r •; > 
sought to be registered, which notice of opposition shall be verified by th". person tfl.ie, ; ; 



i,0 ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS. LV1I1TH CONGRESS. 



the famo before one of the oliicers mentioned in Section 2 of this Act. If no notice of 
op]K>«ition is filed within said time, tho Commissioner shall issue a certificate of regis- 
tration theivfor, as liereinafter provided for. If on examination an application is re- 
fused, tho Conmilssicp.er ahull notify the applicant, grvi..g him his reasons therefor. In 
all cases where notice of oppesiticn has been filed the. Commissioner of Patents shall 
notify the applicant thereof and the grounds therefor. "Whenever application is made 
for the registration of a trademark which id substantially identical with a trademark 
appropriated to goods of the same descriptive properties, for which a certificate of 
registration has been previously issued to another, or for registration of which an- 
other has previously made application, or which so nearly resembles such trade- 
mark, or a known trademark owned and used by another, as, in the opinion of the 
Commissioner, to be likely to be mistaken therefor by the public, he may declare 
that an interference exists as to such trademark, and in every case of interference 
or opposition to registration re shall direct the examiner in charge of interferences 
to determine the question of the risrht of registration to such trademark, and of the 
sufficiency of objections to registration, in such mannw and upon such notice to those 
interested as the Commissioner may by rules prescribe. The Commissioner may re- 
fuse to register the mark against the registration of which objection, fs filed, or may 
refuse to legister both of two interfering marks, or may register the mark, as a 
trademarb, for the person first to adopt and use the mark, if otherwise entitled to 
register the pame, unless an appeal Is taken, as hereinafter provided for, from his 
decision by a party interested in the proceeding, within such time (not less than 
twenty days) as the -Commissioner may prescr be. 

Sections 8. and 10 provide that every applicant for the registration of a trade- 
mark, or for the renewal of the registration of a trademark, which application is 
refused, or a party to an interference against whom a decision has been ren- 
Ippcals. t!ered, or a party who has filed a notice of opposition as to a trademark, 
may appeal from the f cession of the examiner in charge of trademarks, or 
tho examiner in charge of interferences, to the Commissioner in person, having once 
paid the fee for such appeal. If an applicant for registration of a trademark or a party 
to an interference as to a trademark or a party who has filed opposition to the regis- 
tration of a trademark, or party to on application for the cancellation of the registra- 
tion of a trademark, is disstfefled with the decision of the Commissioner of Patents, he 
may appeal to the Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia, on complying with the 
conditions required in ease of an appeal from the decision of the Commissioner by en 
applicant for patent, or a party to an interference as to an invention, and the sam« 
rules of practice and procedure shail govern in every stage r*f such proceedings, as far 
an the samo may he applicable. Kvcry registered trademark, and every ma^k for the 
registration of whicli application has been made, together with the application for 
■rear* st rr»t ion of the same, rball be assignable in connection with the frcodwlll of the 
bi's : ness in which the mark Is used. Such assignment must be by an instrument In. 
writing and duly acknowledged according to the laws of the country or State in which 
the 'same i« executed: any such assignment shall he void as against any subsequent' 
?>urchaser for a valuable cons'deration, without notice, unless it is recorded in the 
Patent Office within xhrc-e months from date thereof. Th« Commissioner shalj keep, 
a record of such assignments. ' 

Sections 11, 12 and 13 provide that certificates of registration ef trademark* shall 
bo issued In-'thu name of the United States Of America, tmder the seal «t 
the Patent Office, and shall be timed by the Commissioner of Patents, and a recoird 
thereof, together with printed oopies of the drawing and statement of tho applicant, 
shall be kept in books for that purpose. The certificate shall state the date on 
which the application for registration was received in the Patent 6lB«. Certificates 
of registration of trademarks may he issued to the assignee of the applicant. 0m 
tthe assignment must first be entered of record in the Patent Office, "Written e> 
printed copies of any records, books, papers or drawings relating to trademarks be- 
liWB'ing to the Patent Office and of certificates of registration, authenticated by the 
seal of the Patent OfFee rnd- certified by the Commissioner thereof, shall be evi- 
rt*>h"e in alleges wherein the oneinals eould be evidence; and any i>erson making 
application therefor rnd nay ing the fee required by law shall have certified copies 
thereof. . That a certificate of registration shall remain in fcrce for twenty years, 
exre^t that in the case of trademarks previously registered 1n a fcrelim country such 
certificates shall cease to be In force on the day on which the trademark ceases to bfe 
nr^tertcd in si»ch foreign citmtrv. and shall in no ease remain in force more than 
tw^ntv years, mPess renewed. Certificates of registration may he. from time to time. 
renewed for like r<»Hrds on payment of the renewal fees reouired by this Act, upon 
request' hv the ■ registrant. Ms If^nl ■ • r^pres^ntaliw**, or trarfferees of r^cm-d t« th*» 
Patent Office, and such reorest may he made at any time rot more thrm six months 
rriov fo the expiration' of th»» period f"r wMeh the certificates of registr»t } on ''ww 
issued or renewed. Certificates of registration ; n force et the date at which this 
Aft- fpVes pffrv-l «mnll remain »n force 'or t v e re^t^d for wMeb tb*"v were Issued h»rt 
shall he renewable on fh< same conditions end for the ca^e periods as certificates 
Issued vruW t*o proviviTs- rf this Act, a^d w*en so rerKw^d shall have tho same 
f"icQ a*>d ^e^t ?s certiflctes 1*<"'ed -um?er- this • Act. Whenever any Person- shall 
d*em • hi-^opif jn<"red hv the re«»f'-tratv*n ft <♦ trademark: In th*» Pa.te*>t" Offh-e h> may 
at nny time «r-r>Jy to t T, e Com.mifslone*' of Patents to canret the ree-ist ration thereof. 
' r ?e Commissioner s^*l refor s"eh amplication to the examiner in charge of ipterf*>r- 
"neen • -w^o r s ^mr-ewered t--» henr and dete?-mine this ouestion and w*o shall rfve 
iv>»i^'> -t*ert « f to the re^*f«tr*»^t. Tr i? an^°r af*er a he^rinp- before the evarmln-er 
ih-\t the . re^^rnnt was not ^titled to the use of the wrfirl* et the date- -of his apptica— • 
tion for re~h-trntion t^ererf, rr that the m^rk 's not used by 1^e registrant, or "has 
^••n nh«ndr»r-ed, and the examiner Phall so decide, the Commissioner shall c«ne*f the 



ACTS AND RESOWXTIONS. LVUITH CONGRESS. 91 



registration. Appeal may be taken to the Commissioner in person from the decision 
of the examiner in charge of interferences. 

Sections 14, 15 and 16 provide that the following shall be the rates for trademark 
fees: 

On filing each original application fo* registration of a trademark $10: 
Provided, That an application for registration of a trademark pending at the date 
of the passage of this Act, and on which certificate of registration shall not have 
issued at such date, may, at the option of the applicant, be proceeded with and 
registered under the provisions of this Act without the payment of further fee. 

On filing each application for renewal of the registration of a trademark, $10. 

On flUng notice of opposition to the registration of a trademark, $10. 

On an appeal from the examiner in charge of trademarks to the Commissioner 
of Patents, $15. 

On an appeal from the decision of the examiner in charge of interferences, award- 
ing ownership of a trademark or cancelling the registration of a trademark, to the 
Commissioner of Patents, $15. 

For certified and uncertified copies of certificates of registration and other papers, 
and for recording transfers and other papers, the same fees as required by law for 
guchycopies of patents and for recording assignments and other papers relating to 
patents. Sections 4,935 and 4,936 of the Revised Statutes, relating to the payment of 
patent fees and to the repayment of fees paid by mistake, are made applicable to trade- 
mark fees. The registration of a trademark under the provisions of this Act shall be 
prima facto evidence of ownership. Any person who shall, without the consent of the 
owner thereof, reproduce, counterfeit, copy, or colorably imitate any such trademark and 
affix the same to merchandise of substantially the same descriptive properties as those 
set forth In the registration, or to labels, signs, prints, packages, wrappers, or receptacles 
Intended to be used upon or in connection with the sale of merchandise of substantially 
the same descriptive properties as those set forth in such registration, and shall use, 
or shall have used, such reproduction, counterfeit, copy, or colorable imitation In 
commerce among the several States, or with a foreign nation, or with the Indian 
tribes, shall be liable to an action for damages therefor at the suit of the owner 
thereof; and whenever in any such action a verdict is rendered for the plaintiff, the 
court may enter Judgment therein for any sum above the amount found by the verdict 
as the actual damages, according to the circumstances of the case, not exceeding three 
times the amount of such verdict, together with the costs. 

- Sections 17. 18, 19. and 20 provide that the Circuit and Territorial courts of the 
United States and the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia shall have original 
Jurisdiction, and the Circuit Court of Appeals of the United States and the Court of 
Appeals of the District of Columbia shall have appellate jurisdiction of all suits at 
law or In equity respecting trademarks registered In accordance with the provisions 
of this Act. arising under the present Act, without regard to the amount In controversy. 

Writs of certiorari may be granted by the Supreme Court of the United States 
for the review of cases arising under this Act in the same manner as provided for 
patent cases by the Act creating the Circuit Court of Appeals. The several courts 
vested with jurisdiction of cases arising under the present Act 
Tntdelma-rloi shall have power to grant injunctions, according to the course and 

lis the Courts. principles of ecruity, to prevent the violation of any right of the 

owner of a trademark registered under this Act. on such terms 
as the court may deem reasonable: and upon a decree being rendered tn any such 
case f or wrongful use of a trademark the complainant shall be entitled to recover, 
In addition to the profits to be accounted for by the defendant, the damages the com- 
plainant has sustained thereby, and the court shall assess the same or cause the same 
to be assessed under its direction. The court shall have the same power to Increase 
such damages, m Its discretion, as Is given by section 16 of this Act for In- 
creasing damares found by verdict tn actions of law: and fo assessing profits the 
plaintiff shall be requtred to prove defendant's sales only; defendant must prove all 
elements of cost which are claimed. In any case involving the rfjrht to a trademark 
registered .in accordance with the provisions of this Act, In which the verdict has 
been fonnd for the plaintiff, or an Injunction issued, the court may order that all labels. 
signs, brints, packages, wrappers, or receptacles In the possession of the defendant, 
bearing the trademark of the plaintifT or complainant, or any reproduction, counter- 
feit, copy, or colorable imitation thereof, shall be delivered up and destroyed. Any 
Injunction that may be granted upon hearing, after notice to the defendant, to pre- 
vent the violation of any right of the owner of* a trademark registered in accordance 
with the provisions of this Act. by any Circuit Court of the United States, or by a 
Judge thereof may be served on the parties against whom such injunction may be 
granted anywhere in the United States where they may be found, and shall be opera- 
tive, and may be enforced by proceedings to punish for contempt, or otherwise, by 
the court by which such injunction was granted, or by any other Circuit Court, or 
Judge thereof. In the United States, or by the Supreme Conrt of the District of Co- 
lumbia, or a Judge thereof. The said courts, or judges thereof, shall have Jurisdic- 
tion to. enforce said tnlonctlon, as herein provided, as fully as if the Injunction had 
been granted by the Circuit Court in which It Is sought to he enforced. The clerk 
of the court or Judge granting the injunction shall, when required to do so by the 
oourt before which application to enforce said Injunction Is made, transfer without 
delay to said court a certified conv of ail the papers on which the said injunction was 
■ranted that are on file tn his office. 

Sections M to- 28 provide that no action or suit shall be ms/ntalned 
•tnderthe previsions of this Act In any case when the trademark Is used In 
SnlawfulbinKesBTor upon any article Injurious tn Itself, or which mark has been 






. 






fl to rnnHxi 






yrnr, ATiy vtfrn 1 



tffim* bmuAi- fts? CongrcHB for Chat ftecnB year,, or invol'uo the* ffow:rn.mvB>t bv 
amy cffltfaradl en obligation for- fiho-. Uutur© payment of money- h* osxcvsa «*' 
auefti aj»pcupria£tons unless such- contract or ©hliErjtiun is nutnuriKGd 
bQP Sut b Nor shalli astty AffparLmeaC or officer e>€ the government accept »(*lv 
*' for tffte gPve.rnmo.nt or employ personal service in ckcubk of 6hat 
auttiuiteed by law, except in cases of sudden- emergency, involv- 
i»ng <she fcs-s of human life 01? the destruction of property'. Al* 

„ appropriations, made &>e <fl»« fulfilment of contracts obligations 

I - expresses- authorize* b» law, or for object* required' or 

atfiOfenrifized ■*- tew without reference «o the amounts, annually appropriated 
Ifcfcerwfor,. ahaJfc. «n or »«far* tfhet beginning of each- fiscal: year., fee so> apportioned 
fear mo<n.eh>Hp err ofcHeir allotments, as to prevent uuntlJtfe errpend ifcures. to- ov.&. portion 
•f taw yeas ttJtariL may require- deficiency, or additional appropriations to complete 
Ik*. aerwiMto of ttur SscaX year: and; ait such apportionments shalL be adhered to 
«mepft nh«n waived- o* nwxilrlvd ta- apeeinc eaae* by tho- written order e£ th« 
keadi of «n* Executive department or o*h-or government estabhshnaxmt having 
cemfvofc off ttfcft «atpend/i«ure, 1 but this provision; shal* not apply «o> the cooiftififiFirf- 
apprceorntftairot of the* Senate or House of Representatives-, and' aW such- walvcra 



ACTS. AWI> »KSQlL*rTIOtN3?.. I/VIE* 1T« C05N'GK.Ii,8:3. S3" 




♦r modlAcaftkrasv together wifch the reasons- therefor, shaH. 1 b*- communicated' toc« 
Cba&res* fan connexion. wl4f». estimates, foe any additional 1 appropriations, »equired 
foj* account thereof". Any person- violating any prwi^ion of this section- shti.1T be 
larilfjr raraowed from office and may also be punished by a nno of not Bes» 
SlOfl or by imprisonment for not leas than one month." 
AM a*<5 appwwrad' February t, l!)05 v provided that the Secretary of tthe D*»pairt- 
■tent off Agjrtsulture should, from and. after &ne passage of said, act* execute off 
cause- to be- executed all* laws affecting, public, lands: heretofore ob 
Transitor hereafter reserved under- the provisions of Section 2* ot the act 

•fBVeof- enttitte* "A a act tto repeat the timber culture k\\vs, and tor ©ifte* 

Reserves to purposes,** approved March 3, l»9t, and acta supplemental Go and 
Affri«ultttntf amendatory thereof, after such lands have been so reserved, cx- 
>m|M»iiiii«i eepting such, V&mvm as affect the survey inar, piosp«cting. Uocatiu<r.. 
appropriating;, entering, relinquiyhini?, reconveying".. certifying, or 
patenting' ©T any «f such, hftnds, PUlp. wood or wood' pulp manufactured f-ronx 
(timber bi th« cDistrict of Alaska may be exported therefrom, forest supervisors 
ttad< ran^era shall be- soiected, when practleable, from qualified ci'tixona. of tiic 
States or T»nrt«oriesi t-n which- the said reserves, respectively, are situated. Rijrhrs 
94! way ffor Cb« construction and maintenance of dams;, reservoirs, water plants, 
dACcn«s, ffumea; p4pes, tunnels, and canals, within and across ttie forest reserve.* raf 
tthe United States, are hereby granted' to. citizens and corporations of the United 
States for municipal or mining purposes, and for the purposes: of the milling and 
ced>ueti0W ot ores, during the period of their beneficial u<c. urdar such rulas and. 
regulations-, a* may be prescribed bv th«- Secretary of the Interior, and subject to 
«he haw** of the State or Territory in which said reserves are. respectively 
aitua-ted. AIT> money received from the sale of any products or the use of any 
land or resources of said 1 forest reserves shall be covered Into the Treasury of the 
United Sta?esr and for a period oP Ave years from the pa.-sa^e of thia act shall 
k constitute a special' fund available, until expended,, as the Secretary of A^ricu.- 
fttere mar tfirect, for the- protection* administration, improvement aaxl extension. 
of fieiieraF foreat peseuvw. 

A. jointJ resolution,, approved February 9, "F905. authoriwd the Director of the 
Osama- ta, eoJtect and publish in connection with the ginmrs' reports of cotton 
production' provided for In Section 9 of an act of Congress entitled 
CMitottaaA "Aft act to- provide for a permanent. Census. Oilice," approved March 
Bivare«- <L 1902-, statistics of the consumption of cotton, the surplus of eo>tt?n 

StatlrtJc*. aeld by UUte manufacturers^ and the quantity of cotton exported!,, the 
statistics to- be-, summarized as. of September l! each year so as. to 
show tli» ■ cotton, production and consumption of the preceding year. And* the 
'Director of ttte Census shall make semi-monthly publication of the amount of 
cotton- ffinn«a ftm Weu of the monthly reports which he now makes. The Director 
'of the Cfcn ua is, also- authorized and directed to collect and publish the statistics 
of ami refcttl«g to marriage and divorce in the several States ami Territories and 
t*e IWstrtcIL ot CoJumbLa since January 1, I88T: Provided, that such statistics as. 
nonr reottkred fcy liaw t» be collected be used so far as it is practicable t» do aov 

A» a«t appirerKed' February 9>. 1905, to^ take effect July 1, 1»9«5^ pro.vlded th-at 
Am B£e» •€ tt« Hst in duplicate of pctssengers now prescribed- by Section 9" of the 
i act approved August 2?, 1:882, entitled "An act to regulata the car- 

liBts of riage of passengers by sea," the master shall submit for Inspection 

fa, the officer of customs, who: first makes demand, therefor,, and shall 
aoteequcntly deliver with, bis manifest of cargo* on entry, a correct 
Hat, signed and verified on oath by the master, of all passengers 
,.<»«. ~~ t«" » «he vessel at any foreign port or place, specifying, in the manner 
'la to pj»«a««ta«d! §romi time to time by the Secretary of Commerce and Labor., the 
iaiune- m4 eaefe passenger, age- (if a ehilvi o€ eight years or under)), sex, marcicd; op 
staSLteu. teeattoat of Cdmpartm-enb or- space occupied, during the voya^» (d£ the. yas- 
8«acer •* o«ft«r taan; a cabin; passenger)!, whether a citizen of the United St at < 3.. 
Lfttilmfeev ot pieces, of kaggage, an<i if any passenger die on- the voyage the list 
! sAai? aoecifa' the »a«m-«; age,, and cause o-f cleat h of each, deceased passenger. 

Aa awrti approved B'ebru.try 1.8, IJJOSv, uro-vided that the amendment to Section 
4 m& (rf iUko. Jtewiaed Statutes, approved February 2-fl;. 190 li». be anaendod to »ead a« 
frJiAwo? "NaflbiHtt to the Kocegoing. or following sections^ of this act snail ni-ihibii 
^lSe«3S«sportatlQ» of stea*: vessels or gasolene or any of th« products of- yetroteum 



ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS, LViJUTH CONGRESS. 



when carried by motor vehicles (commonly known as automobiles) using the flame an a 
source of motive power: Provided, however, that all Are, if any, In such vehicles 
or automobiles be extinguished immediately after entering the 
Automobile* said vessel, and that the same be not relighted until immediately 

on Steamboats. before said vehicle shall leave the vessel: Provided further, that 

any owner, master, agent, or other person having charge of 
passenger steam vessels shall have the right to refuse to transport automobile vehicles 
the tanks of which contain gasolene, naphtha, or other dangerous burning fluids." 

The legislative, Executive and Judicial Appropriation act, approved February 
3, 1905, provided that no part of any money appropriated by it or any other act 
shall be used for purchasing, maintaining, driving, or operating 
Carriages for any carriage or vehicle (other than those for the use of the Presi- 
Ofheial Use. . dent of the United States, the heads of the executive departments, 
and the secretary to the President, and other than those used for; 
transportation of property belonging to or in the custody of the United States)., 
for the personal or official use of any officer or employe of any of the executive 
departments or other government establishments at Washington, District of Co- 
lumbia, unless the same shall be specifically authorized by law or provided for 
in terms by appropriation of mon^y, and all such carriages and vehicles so pro- 
cured and used for official purposes shall have conspicuously painted thereon at- 
all times the full name of the executive department or other branch of the public 
service to which the same belong and in the service- of which, the same 
an 1 used. 

An act approved Februarv 8, 190.1, provided that the act of Febrnary 8, 1897, 
entitled "An art to prevent the* carrying of obscene literature from one State or Terri- 
tory into another," he amended so as to read: "It shall be unlawful for 
Obscene anv person to deposit with any express company or other common carrier 

Literature. for carriage from one State or Territory of the United States or the 
District of Columbia into any other Stace or Territory of the United 
States or the District of Columbia, or from any place in or subject to the 
jurisdiction of the United States to a foreign country, or from any place 
in or subject to the jurisdiction of the United States through a foreign 
country to any place in or subject to the Jurisdiction of the United States, 
or who shall cause to be brought into any place in or subject to the 
jurisdiction of the United States from any foreign country, any obscene, lewd, or 
lascivious book, pamphlet, picture, paper, letter, writing, print, or other matter 
of indecent character, or any article or thing designed or intended for the pre- 
vention of conception, or procuring of abortion, or any written or printed card, 
letter circular, book, pamphlet, advertisement, or notice of any kind giving in- 
formation directly or indirectly, where, how or of whom, or by what means any 
of the hereinbefore mentioned articles, matters, or things may be obtained or 
made- and anv person who shall knowingly deposit, or cause to be deposited, 
with any express company or other common carrier for carriage from one State 
or Territory of the United States or the District of Columbia to any other State 
or Territory of the United States, or for carriage from any place in or subject 
to the Jurisdiction of the United States to a foreign country, or from any plaee 
in or subject to the jurisdiction of the United States through any foreign country. 
to any place in or subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, or who shall 
take from such express company or other common carrier with intent to sell^ dig- 
tribute or circulate any matter or thing herein forbidden to be deposited for 
carriage shall for each offence, upon conviction thereof, be fined not more than 
$5,UH0 or imprisoned at hard labor not more than five years, or both, at the dis- 
cretion -^ c J h £ p^'.Ja February 28, 1905, amended section 5.146 of the Revised 
Statutes relating to qualifications of directors of national banking associations 
S o as to read: "Sec. 5,146. Every director must, during his 
National Bank whole term of service, be a citizen of the United States, and at 
Directors. least three-fourths of the directors' must have resided in the 

State, Territory, or district in which the association is located 
Ifor at least one year' immediately preceding their election and must be residents 
therein during their continuance in office. Every director must own in his own 
right at least ten shares of the capital stock of the association of which he is a 
director, unless the capital of the bank shall not exceed twenty-five thousand 
dollars, 'in winch case he must own in his own right at least five shares of such 
capital stock. Any director who ceases to be the owner of the required number 
of shares of stock, or who becomes in any other manner disqualified, shall thereby 
vacate his place." 

The Legislative, Executive and Judicial Appropriation act, approved Febru- 
ary 3, 1905, appropriated $30,000 for compensation 
Special Foreign Trade Agents, at not more than $10 a day and actual necessary 
travelling expenses of special agents to investigate 
trade conditions abroad, with the object of promoting the foreign commerce of 
the United States, the results of such investigation to be reported to Congress; 

An act approved March 3, 1905, provided that when the territorial govern- 
ment of Hawaii shall cede to the United States in perpetuity a suitable tract of 
land one mile square, more or less, on the leper reservation 
leprosy in Hawaii, at Molokai, Hawaii, tbere shall be established thereon a 
hospital station and . laboratory of the Public Health and 
Marine Hospital Service of the United Stales for the study of the methods of 
transmission, cause and treatment of lepro*/. The Secretary of the Treasury is 



ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS* 1/VIIITH CtoNGKBJSS. 



authorrzctl to tense the crecTlon upon such bite of suitable and necessary build- 
ings for the purposes of thist act, at & coat not. to exceed fluO.000. The 
"surgeon general is authorized to receive at such station such patients af~ 
^Jlcrted with leprosy as may be committed to his care under legal authori- 
zation of the Territory of Hawaii, not to exceed forty in number to be 
under treatment at *.ny time, said patienta to remain under the jurisdiction of 
the tw.fd Rurgreoh general, or his agent, until returned to the proper authorities 
of Hawaii. The 8urge«»n general of the Public Health' and Marine Hospital Ser- 
vice of tm» United StaUs is authorized to detail or appoint, for the purposes of 
these investigations and treatment, such medical officers, acting assistant sur- 
geons, pharmacists and employes as may be necessary for Raid purposes 

A. joint resolution approved February 2*. 1905, authorized the Secretary of 
War to deliver to the proper authorities of the respective States 
Confederate in which th^ regiments which bore those color** w< ro organized 

Flags Returueo. certain Union and Confederate battle flags now in the custody 
of the War Department, for such final disposition an the afore- 
said proper authorities may determine. 

The Agricultural Appropriation- act, approved March 3. 1005. provided that 
any person who shall knowingly issue or publish any counterfeit weather fore- 
casts or warnings of weather conditions, falsely representing 
Counterfeit such forecasts or warnings to have been issued or published 

Weather forecaets. by the Weather Bureau, or olher branch of the government 
service, or shall molest or interfere with any weather or 
$torm flair or weather map or bulletin displayed' or Issued by the United States 
Weather : Bureau, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction 
thereof, foe each offence, be fined in a sum not exceeding $500, or bo imprisoned 
not to exceed ninety days, or be both lined and imprisoned, in the discretion of 
-the court. 

An act approved February 21, 1905 made it unlawful for any person, part- 
nership, association, or corporation engaged in commerce among the several « 

States. Territories, District of Columbia, and possessions of 
ITraadnleat . - the. United States, or with any foreign country, to stamp any 
Ammy Stamps -on ffold. silver, or goods manufactured therefrom, and which are 
•Gold and Silver intended and used in such commerce, with the words "United 
Ware*., . . . .States, assay," or -with any words, phrases, or devices calcu- 

lated to convey the impression that the United States Govern- 
ment has certified to the fineness or qua'ity of such gold or siiver. or of the 
gold or silver contained in any. of the goods., manufactured therefrom. Each and 
every such stamp shall constitute a separate offence. The. penalty for such -4ms- 
repreaentation h$ to be a flue of not more than $5,000 or improsinment for not 
more than one year, or both, at th* discretion of the court. Any gold, silver, or 
.goods manufactured therefrom after the date of the passage of this act, bear- 
ins; any of the stamps, words, phrases, or devices prohibited to be use! under 
•flection one hereof, and being in the course of transportaciun from one State to 
another, or to or from a Territory, the District of Columbia, or possessions of the 
tfnited Htnte«. shall be forfeited to the United States, and may be seized and con- 
demned hy. llks proceedings as tho^e provided by tow for the forfeiture, seizure 
and condemnation of property imported into the United States contrary to law. 

An act approved l«Ybruary 2:5. 1905. authorized the President of the United 
States to cause to be prepared bronze medals of honor, with suitable emblematic 
devices, which shall bo bestowed upon any persons who shall Inreufter 
by extreme daring, endanger their own lives in saving, or 
Mf*8*VF*S endeavoring to save, lives from any wreck, disaster, or grave 
61ft Railroads, accident, or in preventing or endeavoring to prevent such wreck, 
disaster or grave, accident, upon any railroad within the XTnited 
States engaged in interstate commerce: Provided, that no award of said mndai shall 
be made to any person Until sufficient evidence, of his deserving shall have been 
furnished and placed on fUe. und» r such regulations as may be prescribed by the 
President of the .United States. The President- is also authorized to l^sue to any 
person to whom a medal of honor may be awarded under the provisions of this 
a'ct a rosette; or knot, to be worn In lk-u of the modal, and a ribbon to be worn 
\ylth the medal: said rosette or knot and ribbon to be each of a pattern to be 
prescribed by the president of the United St'Ue«; Provided, that win-never a 
ribbon issued under the n v ovisions of this act shall have been hist, destroyed, or 
rendered unfit. for use without fault or neglect on the.- part of the nerson t<* whom 
it waw isKued, a new rihN»n shall le issued to surh person without charp,«* therefor 

An act approved March 'A, 1905. authorized tin.- Secretary of War to -sell, at 
the prices at which thy are listed for the army, i?pon the. request ct the (luvcr- 
* • nors of the several States and Territories, such magazine, rifles be- 

Ri fie Club*, longing to- the United States as are not necessary for the. equipment 
of the army and the organized militia, for the use of rifle clubs 
formed under regulations prepared by the national board for the promotion -of 
rifle practice and approved by the Secretary of War." The Secretary of War is 
also- authorized In 'his discretion to sell to the several States and Territories, as 
prescribed in Section 17 of the actrapproved January 21, 1D0J, for the use of said 
club--, ammunition, ordnance stores, and equipments of the government standard 
at th* prices at which they are listed for the «n *my. The practh e of tlui rifle 
clubs herein provided shall be carried on in conformity to regulations prescribed 



96 



TREATIES WITH FOREUOiN COUNTRIES. 



I 



by th* national board for the promotion of rifle practice, approved by the Secre- 
tary of War, and the retmlts thereof shall be filed in the office of the Military 
Secretary of the Army. 

Other acts and joint resolutions approved included the following: Providing 
for the appointment of an additional Circuit Judge in the Seventh Judicial Cir- 
cuit, for the appointment of an additional judge in the Northern 
Miscellaneous. District of Illinois, the creation of an additional district in Illi- 
nois, to be known as the Eastern District, and changing the 
boundaries of the other districts; to divide the State of Washington into two 
judicial districts; to authorize the appointment of an additional judge for the 
district of ' New- Jersey; to authorize the appointment of an additional Circuit 
Judge for the First Judicial Circuit; to authorize the appointment of an addi- 
tional associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the Territory of Arizona; incor- 
porating the American Academy in Rome; incorporating the American National 
Red Cross; accepting the recession by the State of California of the Yosemite 
Valley Grant and the Mariposa Big Tree Grove in the Yosemite National Park; 
to incorporate the trustees of the grand encampment of Knights Templar of the 
United- States of America; to provide for the construction and maintenance of 
roads, the establishment and maintenance of schools, and the care and support of 
insane persons in the district of Alaska; authorizing the Secretary of the Navy 
to accept the torpedo boats Stringham and Goldsboxough; to extend the western 
boundary line of the Stato of Arkansas; to exclude from the Yosemite National 
Park, California, certain lands and to include them in th« Sierra Forest Reserve; 
extending the time within which actions for the recovery of duties paid in Porto 
Rico may be brought in the Court of Claims under the act of April 29, 1902; 
authorizing the construction of a steam revenue cutter adapted to service in the 
waters of Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, North Carolina; amending an act ap- 
proved August 13, 1894, entitled "An act for the protection of persons furnishing 
materials and labor for the construction of public works"; causing certain lands 
heretofore withdrawn from market for reservoir purposes to be restored to the 
public domain, subject to entry under the homestead law, with certain restric- 
tion*; amending Section 787 of the Revised Statutes of the United States relating 
lo bonds on imports; enabling the Secretary of Agriculture to establish and main- 
tain quarantine districts, to permit and regulate the movement of cattle and 
other live stock therefrom, and for other purposes; prohibiting importation or 
interstate transportation of insect pests, and the use of the United States mails 
for that purpose; amending the act relating to the printing and distribution of 
public documents. 



TREATIES WITH FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

The Senate ratified on January 11, 1906, a treaty providing for the arbitration of 
_ . . pecuniary claims signed at the City of Mexico on January 3«> 1902, 

Pan -American by representatives of the United States, the Argentine Republic, 

Arbitration, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chili, the Dominican Republic, 

Ecuador, Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nica- 
ragua, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. The text of the treaty is as follows: 

Art. 1. The high contracting parties agree to submit to arbitration all claims for 
pecuniary loss or damage which may be presented by their respective citizens and 
which cannot be amicably^adjusted through diplomatic channels and when said claims 
are of sufiicient importance to warrant the expenses of arbitration. 

Art. 2. By virtue of the faculty recognized by Article 26 of the Convention Of 
The Hague for the pacific settlement of international disputes, the high contracting 
parties agree to .submit to the decision of the permanent Court of Arbitration estab- 
lished by said convention, all controversies which are the subject matter of the present 
treaty, unless both parties should prefer that a special jurisdiction be organized, ac- 
cording to Article 2l of the convention referred to. If a case is submitted to the Per- 
manent Court of The Hague, the high contracting parties accept the provisions of the 
said convention, in so far as they relate to the organization of the Arbitral Tribunal, 
and with regard to the procedure to be followed, and to the obligation to comply with 
the sentence. 

Art. 3. The present treaty shall not be obligatory except upon those States which 
ha^e subscribed to the convention for the pacific settlement of international dispute* 
signed at The Hague, July 20. 1899, and upon those which ratify the protocol unan- 
imously adopted by the Republics represented in the Second International Conference 
of American States, for their adherence to the conventions signed at The Hague Julv 
29, 181)9. - ' *» 

Art. 4. If. for any cause whatever, the Permanent Court of The Hague should 
not be opened to one or more of the high contracting parties, they obligate themselves 
10 stipulate, in a special treaty, the rules under which the tribunal shall be estab- 
lished, as well as its form of procedure, which shall take cognizance of tho questions 
referred to in Article 1 of the present treaty. 

Art 5. This treaty shall be binding on the States ratifying it, from the date 
on which five signatory governments have ratified the same, and shall be in force for 
five years. The ratification of this treaty by the signatory States shall be trans- 
mitted to the Government of the United States of Mexico, which shall notify th« other 
governments of the ratifications it may receive. 

The treaty was ratified by Guatemala on April 26, 1902; by Salvador May 19, 18G2- 
by Peru October 29, 1903; by Honduras July 6, 1904. It became effective on the ratifi- 
cation by the United State* and was proclaimed March 24, 190P. 



APPROPRIATIONS, 1003, 1904, 1905. 



97 



. The Senate mtified an extradition treaty with Haiti on December 15, 1904; an 
extradition treaty with Panama on January 6.. 1906; a treaty with Norway amending 
"the extradition treuy of June 7, 1893, dtx January 6, 3905; a treaty for the pro- 
jection of trademarks with Luxemburg on February 3, 1905, and a treaty with Great 
Britain relinquishing ixtra-territorial rights in Zanzibar on March 8, 1905. 

APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FI9CAX TEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1904, 1905 
v ANI> 1906. 



Title. 



1. 



Estimates, 
190o-'<Ki. 



Agriculture , 

Army 

Diplomatic, con- 
sular 

*Dist. of Columbia. 

Fortification 

Indian 

Legislative, etc 

Mill tary Academy . 

Navy 

Pension ....; 

*Postofflce ........ 

River and harbor. . 
Sundry civil 



$6,4io,8to ooi 

72,076,231991 



Law, 
1905-06. 



$6,882,690 00 
70,396,631 64 



2,423, 
11,062, 
10,458, 

7,144, 

29,685, 

722, 

114,530, 

138,250, 

183,748, 

. - < s > 
•66,902, 



222 )2\ 
370 00| 
570 40 f 
,2t3 02 
207 84 
91 38 
638 34 
100 00 
495 00 

390 52 



2,123, 

•9.801, 

6,747, 

7,923, 

29,136, 

673, 

100,336, 

138,250, 

181,022, 

« IS, 18V 

'66,813, 



047 72 
,197 62 
893 00 
814 34 
752 06 
713 38 
679 94 
100 00 
093 75 
875 41 
450 66 



Law, 
1904-'05. 



$5,902,040 001 
77,070,300 88 



2.020, 

11,018, 

7,518, 

9,447, 

28,553, 

973, 

97,505, 

138,260, 

172,545 

*3.000, 

•57,840, 



100 69 
540 00 
192 00 
96140 
258 22 
947 26 
140 94 1 
700 00 1 
f 98 75 
000 001 
21134 



Law,, 
_J903-^04. 

$5, 978. 160 00 
; 77,888,7* 83 



Totals 

1 •Urgent deficiency | 
* •Deficiency 



Totals . . . 
Miscellaneous 



$643,-424,047 21] 
•35,000,000 00 



"Totals , 
"Permanent 



88 Grand totals. 



$678,424,047 21) 
•10, 000, 000 00| 



$638,289,939 52] 

262,500 001 
i •31,420,788 72| 



$611,761,391 48 
16,102,157 64 
10,669.732 54 



$669,973,228 24! 
3,375,086 72| 



$638,533,281 66 
1,167,273 52 



$688,424,047 21 
11 146, 836, 320 00 



$073,348,314 96 
11 146, 836, 320 00 



$639,700,555 18 
1 * 141,471,820 00 



$835,260,367 21 1 "$820, 184, 634 96 ^$781, 172,375 18) 18 $753,058.506 02 



1,968, 

8,638. 

7,188, 

8,540, 

27,598, 

652, 

81,876. 

139,847, 

163.511, 

< 15 ) 

1 •82,372, 



250 69 
097 00 
416 22 
406 77 
653 66 
748 67 
701 43 
600 00 
549 75 

360 00 



$596,061,787 12 

1,140,400 00 

100,500 00 

20,224,760 25 



$617,527,447 37 
2,941,238 65 



$620,468,680 02 
» '132,589, 820 00 



1 One-half of the amounts for the District of Columbia payable by the United 
States, except amounts for the water department (estimated for 1906 at $137,720), 
which are payable from the revenues of the water department. 2 Includes all expenses 
of the postal service payable from postal revenues and out of the Treasury. 8 No 
amount is estimated for rivers and harbors for 1906 except the sum of $8,442,- 
396 to meet contracts authorized by law for river and harbor improvements included 
in the sundry civil estimates for 1906. 4 In addition to this amount, the sum of $10,- 
544,132 is appropriated in the sundry civil act to carry out contracts authorized by 
law for river and harbor improvements for 1906. 6 In addition to this amount, the sum 
of $7,872,200 is appropriated in the sundry civil act to carry out contracts authorized 
by law for river and harbor improvements for 1905. 'This amount includes $8,442,396 
to meet contracts authorized by law for river and harbor improvements for 1906. 
7 This amount includes $10,544,132 to carry out contracts authorized by law for river 
ana harbor improvements for 1906, 8 This amount includes $7,872,200 to cany out con- 
tracts authorized by law for river and harbor Improvements for 1905. "This amount 
is estimated. . 10 This amount includes $4,500,000 for expenses of collecting revenue 
from customs, $4,500,000 for payment of pensions, and $14,962,466 77 for the naval 
establishment. 1J This is the amount submitted by the Secretary of the Treasury in the 
annual estimates for the fiscal year 1906, the exact amount appropriated not being as- 
certainable until two years after the close of the fiscal year. This amount includes 
estimated amount of $57,000,000 to meet sinking fund obligations for 1906, and $30,- 
000,000 estimated redemptions of national bank notes in 1906 out of deposits by banks 
for that purpose. 12 In addition to this amount, contracts are authorized to be en- 
tered into, subject to future appropriations by Congress, as follows: By the District 
of- Columbia act, $130,400; by the naval act, $8,800,000; by the river and harbor act, 
$17,184,657 63; by the sundry civil act, $655,000; in all, $26,770,057 63. 18 In addition to 
this amount, contracts are authorized to be entered into, subject to future appropria- 
tions by Congress, as follows: By the District of Columbia act, $1,460,000; by the 
naval act, $22,526,000; by the sundry civil act. $7,850,000; by the act of March 8, 
190>(public buildings act), $5,153,859 34: in all, $36,989,859 34. "This amount includes 
$56,500,000 estimated to meet the requirements of the sinking fund. 16 No river and 
harbor bill passed for 1904, but $20,228,150 59 wag appropriated in the sujadry civil act 
for river and harbor contracts. 10 Includes $20,228,150 59 for river and harbor contracts 
for 1904, "Amount submitted by the Secretary of the Treasury in the estimates for 
1903-'04, the exact amount not being ascertainable until two years after the close of 
the fiscal year. 18 In addition to this amount contracts are authorized to be entered 
into subject to future appropriations by Congress, as follows: By District of Columbia 
act $1,460,000; by the naval appropriation act, $22,526,000; by sundry civil act, $7,- 
SSO'OOO; by the act of March 3, 1903 (public buildings act), $5,153,859 34; in all, $36,- 
f)8o[S59 34. 10 For 1904-'05. ,0 For 1904-'05 and prior years. ai Regular annual appro- 
priations*. "Annual appropriation*!. 23 Regular and permanent annual appropriations. 







Tl/lC FEDERAL SEUl 1( 








■ 
1 

> thf \»yw-€ ft* lb* frcgriclcnt to *pq 








u'>drr penalty of. line «r h 
1 pfrwoti In the ■<" 








r Lho c-xecutivt Civil Service of W ■ 










-r- ? 'i' 1 






r t fff » <*riF' i 








Kia ml nations are fifcltJ In every St:, i i «tv t u l-eii^l t*ice % 
JTtify .' bo p^rformi'il anil, v ! 

A*li».i><*1on» pDlnlmeiil wtociE"- Mandlni- 

i»ml «Pfiiiiv*l^ p?v cent. ein*pi Hr.ldier* and Hollars havtnv 

s»- ■ 

mL A ewrtliteatt 






elections aio cnn 






••-tj », 








■ ! swi*i*Jti(t th* same in wrlh ,n "^ *|^|^H 
hall h# rcQUlrrd excvpr in i! 
i errrli rPfcMf-ns, tmHch tin tad or Ui 

the tT*m<[ 






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: in Tin* ptt-ctiLlre rivj; Sen 
























1 

If '■-" 


J 1 



POSTAL. LAWS AND RATES. 99 



workmen In th* government employment in such other large cities as might be 
agreed on toy heads of departments and th« Civil Service Commission: In the fiscal 
year 1904-05 148,739 persons were examined, 116,019 passed and 40,923 were appointed 
to office. • 

In addition to tht home service, the commission holds examinations for positions 
in the Isthmus of Panama Canal aone, in the Philippines, Porto Rico and Hawaii. 
Besides examinations foi positions in the classified service, the commission also holds 
examinations for entrance to th£ Naval Academy, the municipal government of the 
District of Columbia, including the office of the Recorder of Deeds, and for mere 
laborers Jn the departments at Waehington and In the large cities of the country. 

In pursuance of an act of Congress approved April 12, 1900, the civil authority 
of the united States succeeded the military in Porto Rico. Inasmuch as the ex- 
ecutive officers and employes under this ict became a part of 
In Porto Rico the executive" Civil Service of the United States, they were 
and Hawaii. held to come within' the operations of the Civil Service act 
and rules. Thfre are approximately 301 federal positions, of 
which 152 are suDject to competitive educational examination, 81 subject to competi- 
tive registration, 20 are excepted aiH 48 are not subject to classification. In Hawaii 
the same classes of positions are embraced within the classified Civil Service ae are 
included in that service Jn other Territories. 

On September 19, 1»<)0, the* United States Phi lipprne Commission passed an 
"act for the establishment and maintenance of an efficient and honest Civil Servtco 
in the Philippine Islands." The act provides for a Civil .Ser- 
in the Philippines, vice Board o,f three persons, which is authorised to prepare 
rules for appointments and promotions according to merit 
and by competitive examination as far as practicable. The act applies with few 
exceptions to all appointments of civilians to positions under the civil government, 
and vacancies in the highest positions must be tilled by promotion. On November 30, 
1900, the President issued an order directing the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission to render such assistance as may be practicable to the Philippine Civil Ser- 
vice Board. In accordance with this order the commission examined 1.174 persons 
for the Philippine service during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1002, and 534 during 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1903 These examinations were for positions re- 
quiring professional, technical, scientific or special clerical ability, as natives are 
appointed to all positions for which th»-y are competent. The revised Civil Service 
rules provide that those who enter the Philippine Service are eligible for transfer, to 
the home service alter three years* employment in the Philippines. On June 30, 
1903, there were 2,777 Americans in the Philippine civil service. 



POSTAL LAWS- GENKRAI, POSTAX INFORMATION. * 

t'iaaaeft of Domestic Mail Matter. — Domestic mail is divided- into four classes, 

as follows: ■ * 

First Class — Letters, postal cards, private mailing cards and matter wholly or 
partly in writing/whether sealed or unsealed (except manuscript copy accompany- 
ing proof sheets or corrected proof sheets of the same), and all matter sealed or 
otherwise closed against inspection. Rates of postage — Two cents per ounce or 
fraction thereof. Postal cards, one cent each. "Post Cards" with written mes- 
sages, conforming approximately to government postal cards in quality and weight and 
to the regulations prescribed by the Postmaster General, one cent each. On "drop" 
letters, two cents per ounce or fraction* thereof, when mailed at letter carrier 
otfices, or when mailed, at efflees -which are not letter carrier offices, if .rural free 
delivery has been- established and the persons addressed can be served by rural 
carrier. The only drop letters entitled to the one cent drop letter rate of postage 
are those deposited in postoffiees where neither letter carrier nor rural delivery ser- 
vice has been established and those deposited in postofnees where rural delivery ser- 
vice has been established, and the personB addressed cannot be. served by rural 
carrier, because they reside beyond the limits of the rural delivery service. 

Second Class — Newspapers and publications issued at stated intervals as often as 
four times a year, bearing a date of issue and numbered consecutively, issued from 
a known office of publication, and formed of printed paper sheets, without board, 
cloth, leather or other substantial binding. Such publications must be originated and 
published for the dissemination of information of a public character, or devoted to 
literature, the sciences, art, or some special industry. They must have a legitimate 
list of subscribers equal to 50 per cent of the number of copies regularly issued an d 
circulated, and must not be designed primarily for advertising purposes, or for fre< 
circulation, or at nominal rates, or have the characteristics of books. Rate of post- 
age — p r publishers and news agents, one cent a pound or fraction thereof. For others 
than publishers and news agents one cent for each four ounces or fraction thereof. 

Third Class — Boofes, periodicals and matter wholly in print (not included In second 
class), proof sheets, corrected proo' sheets and manuscript copy accompanying the 
same. Rate of postage — One cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof. Seeds, 
scions, cuttings, roots and plants, and also correspondence of the blind printed in 
raised characters, and sent unsealed, are mailable at third class rates. The insertion 
!of the date, name of the addressee and sender in writing does not impair the rights 
of a circular to the third class. 

Fourth Class — Merchandise, namely, all matter not embraced In the other 
three classes, and which is not in its form or nature liable to destroy, deface or 
otherwise damage the contents of the mail bag, or hajrm the person of any one 
engaged in the postal service, and not above the weight provided by law. Rate 
of- postage— One cent per ounoe or fraction thereof. 







IMO T Kt* 




V'lt^KiMit (.1 l>i»«IV^> 






Mote** fU>t*» 






■ 1 |«Ul.-iK 1 -- 1 








Mfdr+Aawa. 'i*he rec ta K . 




Veijr»t.— A p»ck*fr« 




H»j<' 




Ke «' ntmtlar row h* mf>|»<> r, ,i if r Si 

:«.-, ou, not nu> 










number* 






MWrntntM r* r^n- v r&u a <*i$ki oenw m addUto* Id the r 
meoqr ****** | Myj*^ g *g* « **e»ey ©fdore we a* ( 






>' ^b^ trSJiTn flf* 1 * 1 ** pa !* a ' > w 8 ' & tJv * Knii 
' "' :h«4 In CUT^ada, Cub 






tiftd St Vincent CWeat fticlreai 






• Tnt. ri..ttioA*l or<1»« payable hi Abhu-Lji, BiftMi^ JjoIrJu-i 






li-nnJuraK, < v, Don at,. 






*w.*Td Tatand** 






s*?Jen, Swltaertad, Ti-u.n-tvHa.1 and 






LO OHJoliB p&yttbk" tn A 

tutfut, Qtt&rriatazscl, Ru*»jii, Salvador 






la The " 

up lo ItOCl, whl- 




or UUefl ft.ntl 






ftny. Franc*. Italy, r 
























' ~KP ?i~ iX!5* 7 


















■<- or 






tn T*» c I n « m * afRl 












n FTT'K^t 1* WftMr 












^STJlLJ? rf 1 






'" Ulfe jT aeirvwy «»mpa are ivh rtvi\nn.hie for tftfi r 






postage lumps be used t. 






,<ig* rn*tnjer KM«. — Tt»f> f^Ipe of pctatftge tQ al! foret|- : 






and Mt'Tdeo) aro rej follpwu: Letter* 






; double post nt card*. e&Ofet 4e. ; newsr 




•. Cammerciai n&perat Pi, 




10 otincr^ for each g ounce* 






teefa n^( (ft enass of 4 buncea. 2t<; packi-m m tan 






,. for each £ ounces or fraction thereof, la, fte^iatratioo fro on bettort 
,, He 
? rtter* for any Ibreipn country CPxces 1 * Canada and Me* 










prepaid on them « not. AVI of! u | 






ly Mnltc 






iba, T-*anaTi. 






11 were adureK^d # of delivery In the Onfcted States. Ffc!" 






.-.- fared ftrr 






ioid, fie lea - >. ,^e ta not prepnjj 






ine deftvie t led of the addressee whfri 






•red. Tho rate on *Von ie«i t* cfie f fttn? 






fitly i3ork^g;f>, vhatev- -.. t . ^ fc 






ol merrohsj 3 Genres is .|rv 






PC ry lf ji the Tow est chixrprt on any package, ivhii^vt-r i 






r*SU522F% ft!, /"' 






j^^^^H 






Kb lit; JffefM3hvmns, NinsT» t Qu> mff _j 







NATURALIZATION LAWS. 101 



hai, Taku, Tienstin, Wencbow, Wuchang, Wuhu and Yontal, are transmissible in the 
mails nutde up at San Francisco, Seattle and Taeoma for the United States Postal 
Agency at Shanghai; bw at plares other than Shanghai additional charges for postage 
may be collected of the addressees upon the delivery of the articles. 

Parcels Post. — The first parcels post -convention between the United States and 
any country In Europe wan signed between the TTwjtod States and Germany on August 
26, 1899. and went into operation October 1. It was the beginning of a postal service 
by means of which articles of merchandise may be exchanged by mail between the ! 
two countries, provided they are put up in packages which do not exceed 4 pounds t> 
ounces Is weight. The postage Tate for parcels going from the United States to 
Germany is fixed at 12c. for each pound or fraction *A a pound. The rate in Ger- 
many on parceN for the United States is fixed at 1 mark 40 pfennigs a parcel, what-- 
ever its weight. Provision is made for customs declaration an* payment. The United 
States had parcel* post «onventioi»s with several countries In Central a*id Sooth 
America and the "West India Islands, but tins was the fim convention made with 
•awy country in Bhirope. t?4mt1ar conventions were signed with Great Britain, effective 
en April 1, and with Australia, effective on August 1, 1906. The law empowers the 
Postmaster General to make such oonveutions by and with the advkse and ooosent of 
4he President. 

Postage Sates Between the United Stated, Cuba and Island Possessions. — 
All mail madter sent between the United States and Cuba, the Island of Guam, tfco 
■Philippine Archipelago, or Tutuila <incliuling ell adjacent inlands of the Samoan group 
■which are possessions of the United "States), or from one to another of these Islands, 
to subject to the United States domestic elassiflcauon, oondiilons and rates of postage. 

NATURALIZATION LAWS. 

Declaration of Intention. — An alien seeking naturalization as a citizen : 
of the United States must declare on oath before a Circuit or District Court of the 
TJwited States, or » District or Supreme Court of the Territories, or a court, of record ! 
of any of the States having common law Jurisdiction and a seal and a clerk, ai least ' 
two years before his admission, that it is bona fide, his intent kin to become a citizen ■ 
of the United States, and to renounce forever all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign | 
State or naJer, and particularly to the one of which, he may be at the time a citizen 
or subject. : 

Oath op Application for Admission.— At the time of hi* application for' 
admission he must also declare on oath, before some one of the courts above specified 
*1hat he will support the Constitution of the United States, and that he absolutely and* 
entirely renounces and abjures all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign prince, 
potentate. State or sovereignty, and particularly, by name, to the prince, potentate, 
State or sovereignty of which he was be'ore a citizen or subject." 

Conditions of Citizenship. — It must appear to the satisfaction of the court 
to which the alien has applied for final admission that he has resided continuously 
within the I'ni'ed Stales for at least five years, and in the State or Territory where j 
the court is held at least one year, and that during that time "he has behaved as aj 
man of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the | 
United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same." « 

Titles of Nobility. — if the applicant bears any hereditary title or belongs to any | 
Older of nobility, he must make an express renunciation at. the time of his application. ! 

Soldiers. — Any alien, twenty-one years of age, or over, who has served one 
year or over, in the Regular or Volunteer Army of the United States and has been' 
?>onorably discharged, may, upon application to a court as Fpeeiiied above, proof ol j 
one year's residence, good moral character and honorable discharge, be admitted a 
citizen of the United States. 

Heamen. — Seamen who have declared their intention to become -citiBens, and 
wbo subsequently to such declaration, have served three years on board a mer- 
chant vessel of the United States, may be admitted to citizenship. 
. Navy or Marine Corn"* — Any alien, twenty-one years of ago, or over, who 

} has served five years, or over, in the United States Navy or United States Marin* 
Corps *nd has been honorably discharged, may. upon application to a court aa 
specified above, proof of good moral character, five years* service and honorable dis- 
charge, be admitted a citizen of the United States, 

Wife. — A wife may become a citizen by her husband's naturalisation, if she 
might herself bo lawfully naturalised. 

Minors. — Any alien under the age of twenty-one, who has resided in the United 
States three years next preceding his twenty-lirst birthday, and has continued to reside 
therein up to the time he makes application to be admitted a citizen, may, after he ! 
anives at the age of twe*ity-one, and after he has resided five years wlth'n tho 
United States, including the three years of his minority, be admitted a citizen; but 
.iv must make a declaration on oath and prove to the satisfaction of the court that lor 
the two ycarB next preceding it ha? been his bona fide intention to become a eiliaen. , 

Children of Naturalised Citizens. — The children of persons who have* 
been duly naturalized, being under twenty-one at the lime of the naturalization of 
their parents, shall, if dwelling in the Unkod States, be considered os citizens. 

CHfeens' Children Born Abroad. — The children of persons who now are 
or have been citizens of the United States are considered as citiisens, though they may 
be bom out of the limits and jurisdiction of the United States. 

Chinese. — The Naturalisation laws of the United States have never allowed ,. 
otbe* than "free white persons" and "persone of Africa* nativity or deacent" to be t 
naturalized. The naturalization of Chinamen is also expressly prohibited by SeeUuii ' 
14*. Chapter 12G, Laws of 1882. 



10* 



PENSION LAWS AND PAYMfcNTS. 



Protection of Naturalized Citizens. — Section 2,000 of the Revised Stat- 
utes of the United States expressly declares that •'all naturalized citizens of the 
United States while in foreign countries are entitled to and shall receive from this 
Government the same protection of person and property which Is accoided to native 
born citizens." 

The Right of Suffrage. — The right to vote is conferred by the State, 
naturalization by the United States. In several States Aliens who have declared their 
intentions enjoy the right to vote equally with naturalized or native born citizens. 
But the Federal Naturalization laws apply to the whole Union alike, and no alien 
may be naturalized until after five years' residence, except an honorably discharged 
soldier or a person whose parents have been naturalized while he was under twenty- 
one years of age, as above recited. Even after five years' residence and due naturaliza- 
tion he is not entitled to vote unless the laws of the State confer the privilege npon him 

Excluding Anarchists. — The act of March 3, 1903 (taking effect June 1, 
1903). imposed these further restrictions on the naturalization of aliens: No person who 
disbelieves in or who is opposed to all organized government, or who Is a member of 
or affiliated with any organization entertaining and teaching such disbelief In of oppo- 
sition to all organized government, or who advocates or teaches the duty, necessity, or 
propriety of the unlawful assaulting or killing of any officer or officers, either of specific 
Individuals or of officers generally, of the government of the United States or of any 
other organized government, because of his or their official character, or who has 
violated any of the provisions of this act, shall he naturalized or be made a citizen 
of the United States. All courts and tribunals and all Judges and officers thereof hav- 
ing jurisdiction of naturalization proceedings or duties to perform In regard thereto 
shall, on the final application for naturalization, make careful Inquiry into such mat- 
ters, and before issuing the final order or certificate of naturalization cause to be 
entered of record the affidavit of the applicant and of his witnesses s'o far as applica- 
ble, reciting and reaffirming the truth of every material fact requisite for naturalization. 
All final orders and certificates of naturalization hereafter made shall show on their 
face specifically that said affidavits were duly made and recorded, and all orders and 
certificates that fail to show such facts shall be null and void. 

Any person who purposely procures naturalization in violation of the provisions of 
this section shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars, or shall be imprisoned 
not less than one nor more than ten years, or both, and the court in which such con ■ 
victlon Is had shall thereupon adjudge and declare the order or decree and all certifi- 
cates admitting such person to citizenship null and void. Jurisdiction Is hereby con- 
ferred on the courts having jurisdiction of the trial of such offence to make such 
adjudication. 

Any person who knowingly aids, advises or encourages any such person to apply 
for or to secure naturalization or to file the orelimtnary papers declaring an intent to 
become a citizen of the United Stntes, or who in any naturalization proceeding know- 
ingly procures or gives false testimony as to any material fact, or who knowingly 
makes an affidavit false as to any material fact required to be proved in such proceed- 
ing, shall be fined not more than five thousand dollars, or imprisoned not less than one 
nor more than ten years, or both. 

PENSION LAWS AND STATISTICSr 
Persons Entitled to Pensions. 

The act of March 18, 1818, thirty-five years after the termination of the Revolution- 
ary War, was the first general act passed granltng a pension for service only. Its 
beneficiaries were required to be in indigent circumstances and in need of assistance. 
About 1820 Congress became alarmed at the large number of ap- 
RevoUitionary plicants for pensions under this act (there were about 8,000) and 

War, on May 1, 1320, passed what has been known as the "alarm act," 

which required all pensioners then on the roll to furnish a schedule 
of the amount of property then In their possession. Many of the pensioners whose 
schedules showed they possessed too much property were dropped from the rolls, pen- 
sioners were dropped who owned as small an amount as $150 worth of property. On 
May 15, 1828, or forty-five years after the war, service pension was granted to those 
who served to $he end of the war of the Revolution. On June 7, 1832, or forty-nine 
years after the^fclose of the war, a general law was enacted pensioning survivors who 
served not less than six months In said war. 

On July 4, 1836, being fifty-three years after the termination of the war, an act 
was passed granting pension for five years to Revolutionary War widows, provided 
they were married to the soldier or sailor before the close of his last service and that 
his service was not less than six months. On July 7, 1838, or fifty- five years after 
the close of the war, the above act was amended so an to provide where the marriage 
took place before January 1, 1704. On July 29, 1818, or sixty-five years after the war, 
the above laws were, amended to include those who were married prior to January 1,; 
1800. On February 3, 1853, or seventy years after the wax, an act was passed striking 
out the limitation as to date of marriage. 

The first law granting pension for service to the War of 1812 was passed ^February I 
14, 1871, fifty-six years after the close of the war. This act required sixty days' 
service, and widows were not entitled unless they were married 
War of to soldier or sailor prior to the treaty of peace FebrtAry 17, 1815. 

1812. The act of March 9, 1878, sixty-three years after the close of the 

• war, reduced the period of service to fourteen days, and made no 

limitation as to date of marriage In case of widows. 

On July 27, 1892, fifty years after period included in the act, pension was provided 
for those who served thirty days in the Black Hawk, Creek, Cherokee and Florida 1 



l 



PENSION LAWS AND PAYMENTS. 



wars with Seminole Indians from If 32 to 1842 and to their widows. On June 27. 100-', 
the benefits of said act were extended from that date to the sur- 
rnitlaTi vivors of the Florida and Georgia Seminole Indian war of 1*17 

Wars. and 1*18; the Fevre River Indian war of Illinois of 1*27; the Sac 

and Fox Indian war of 1831; tho Sabine Indian disturbances ef 
1838 and 1837; the Oayuse Indian war of 1847-48 on the Pacific coast; the Florida 
ware with the Seminole Indians from 1842 to 1858; tho Texas and New Mexico Indian 
war of 1849 to 1856; the California Indian disturbances of 1851 and 1K52; the Utah 
Jndfan disturbances of 1850 to JfB3, and the Oregon and tho Washington Territory 
Indian wars from 1851 to 1856, emd to the surviving widow*. 

On January 29, 1S87, thirty- nine years after the close of the war, an act was 
Tom* wtth passed providing for soldiers and sailors and their widows for 

u u service of sixty day**, if U2 years of age, or disabled or de- 

ftl«x*co. pendent. 

There has never been any law pensioning widows of soldiers whose death was due 
to service in time of peace prior to Mar eh. 4, 1WS1. No provision' has ever been made 
for mothers and fathers and brothers and sister* if tho death of soldier or tailor re- 
sulted from service prior to March 4, 18<U. The laws relating to pension have been 
more liberal since I8tl than they were prior to that date. To make it plainer, as an 
illustration of this fact, a sailor who lost both arms in the service and line of duty 
prior to March 4, 1861, -would be entitled to a rating beginning at $3.50 per month 
and to the various rates provided from time to time to February 12, 3889, when ho 
weald receive $100 per month. 

Any officer, soldier, sailor or marine, disabled by reason of wound received oV 
disease contracted in the rervice of the United States*, ami in the line of duty, may 
be pensioned for- such disability during its continuance, fn case 
Acts of July 14^ _ cf his death from causes originating as above set forth, Ms 
IIIQS, and widow or his child or children under l*i years of age become en - 

Store* 8, 1S78. titled to pension. If he left no widow, or child under 10, hi* 

dependent mother, father, or orphan sisters and brothers are en 
till*), fn the -order named. 

Any officer, soldier, sailer or marine Who served ninety days or more-in the mili- 
tary or naval service of the United States during the late war of the rebellion, who 
ha* been. . honorably discharged therefrom, and who is suffering from, disability of a 
permanent character, not the result of bis own vicious habits, 
Aot ef «Nne 27, which -incapacitate*! him from the performance erf- manual labo* 

1890, as Amended in such a degree as to render him unable to earn a support,- is 
l>y the Act of •. entitled to pension under this act of not less than $6 per month 

May 9* 1900. nor more than $12 per month. In case of the death ef any person 

named above his widow becomes entitled te' pension, provided- she 
married him prior te June 27, 1890, and that she is without, other means of puppom, 
than her daily labor. If she remarrle* or die* the child or children of such soldier 
or sailor tinder the age of 1*1 years become entitled. The act of May 9, t»«X>, which 
a:- a»i amendment of the act of June 27, 1H90, provides that in determining inability 
te «ai» a snpport «*ack and every inllrraity sball be duly considered^ ami the aggre- 
gate of the disahilities shown bo rated. It is also provided- that a widow may have 
title to pension if she is left without means of support other than her daily latn>r 
an*! aj» actual net' income not exceeding $250 per yeur. 

A1J women employed by the Surgeon General of the army as nurses during the 
A . - late war of the rebellion for a period of .six months or more, and 

m. **!•»> wno weru honorably relieved from such service, are granted a 

,Mff08* m t ivm*. pension, provided they are unable to earn a support. 

There is bo law granting service pension to any person- for eervice rendered sine* 
1858, aside from the allowances made under the provisions of 
Service sections 4756 and 4757, Revised Statutes, for twenty year*' an* 

Pensions. ken years* service, respectively, in the Unite4 States Navy ©r 

Marine Corps- 
Ta obtain a pension tho applicant must file a claim with the Commissioner of Pen- 
sions, Washington, D. C. In a claim by the soldier he shouid set forth ail bis military 
or navar service, giving dates of enlistment and discharge. The prime requirement to 
establish a claim under act of July 14, 18C2, omally termed the 
3fetfco£« ef , general law. is to sl.ow that the disability for which pension is 

Application. claimed had its origin while in the service and line of duty; that 

it has existed as a disabling cause from date of discharge, and 
now exists In a doRrce pensionable under the law. In a claim under the act of June 
27, tt-80, the essential requirements are: A service of ninety days or more, an hon- 
i\ orahle Uscharge therefrom and proof that the disability for which pension is claimed 
\i3 not duo to '-Airvmant's o\yn vicious. hab-Us. but it need not necessartly.be of service 
{origin. In a widow's claim it is necessary to show her legal marriage to the soldier. 
I the three of his death, and; under the -general law, that It wa3 due to some cause of 
service origin. 8he must also show that she has remained bis widow. If th^re are 
children of the soldier under sixteen years of age at the date of bis death, the.ii' names 
>-hottltl he given and the date of birth of each clearly shown. If any h.t\c died the 
date should be proved. In a widow's claim under the act of June 27, PiM), the re- 
quirements as to service- 4s the same as under an invalid claim, and in addition there- 
to she nruFt show a legal marriage to the soldier prior to the passage of the act, 
tlip Tact of ^oldirr's death tnut it need' not be shown to be due to service), her con 
Untied widowhood and that she is. without other means of support than her daily 

' , " The act r.f May 9, IfMW, amending the av*t of Jor.o 2T, 1?9?>,. gi-ves title to wttows 
,wbo are without means of frurport other than their daily labor and a net annual In- 



It4 



PENSION LAWS AND PAYMENTS. 



come of $250. A minor child's title to pension accrues only on the death or remarriage 
of the widow, which fact must be shown, in addition to the requirements in widow's 
claim. A dependent mother must show her relationship to the soldier, his celibacy, 
that he contributed to her support, that his death was due to some cause of service 
origin, the date of his death, and, under the general law, that she was dependent 
upon him at the date of his death. Under the act of June 27, 1890, it is only neces- 
sary to show dependence at date of filing claim and since then. A dependent father 
must show relationship by legal marriage to soldier's mother, the date of soldier's 
birth and of the mother's death, in addition to the requirements in the mother's claim. 
Applications rejected by a Board of Pension Surgeons may be reconsidered on the 
evidence of two physicians that disability exists. Pensions for privates range from 
$6 to $30 a month In most cases, though $72 is granted to those who have lost Doth 
feet or both eyes, and $100 a month to those who have lost both hands. 

The following executive order, issued March 15, 1904, further denned certain gen- 
eral conditions under which a claimant's disability may be presumed: 

"Ordered: (1) In the adjudication of pension claims under said act of June 27. 
1890, as amended, it shall be taken and considered as an evidential fact, if the con- 
trary does not appear, and if all other legal requirements are. prop-. 
Ajre Order eHy met, that, when a claimant has passed the age of 02 years 

©f 1904. he is disabled one-half in ability to perform manual labor and is" 

entitled to be rated at six dollars per month; after 05 years at 
eight dollars per month; after 08 years at ten dollars- per month, and after TO years 
at twelve dollars per month* 

"(2) Allowances at higher rate, not exceeding twelve dollars per month, will con- 
tinue to be made as heretofore, where disabilities other than age show a condition of 
inability to perform manual labor. 

"(3) This order shall take effect April 13. 1904, and shall not be deemed retro- 
active. The former rules of the office fixing the minimum and maximum at 65 and 75 
years, respectively, are hereby modified as above." 

The number of pensioners on the rolls on June SO, 1905, and the total amount paid 
during the fiscal year ended on that date were as follows: 



States, 
and Territories. 



Alabama 

Alaska ..«..«-.. 
Arizona •*••».• 
Arkansas .►.«.». 
California ...... 

Colorado 

Connecticut ...- 

Delaware 

District Colombia. 

Florida 

Georgia •.— ... 
Hawaii ........— 

Idaho 

Illinois <.... 

Indiana 

Indian Territory. 

Iowa 

Kansas .._»•«. 
Kentucky ...... 

Louisiana .►...» 
Maine ..»......» 

Maryland ....... 

Massachusetts . • 
Michigan ....... 

Minnesota ......... 

Mississippi . ». . . 
Missouri ....*•». 

Montana 

Nebraska ...... 

Nevada 

New Hampshire , 

New Jersey 

New Mexico. ... . 
New York 



No. 

3,982 

91 

817 

11,525 

24,406 

8.484 
12,963 

2,676 

8,728 

4,108 

8,698 
52 

2,109 
70,145 
62.133 

8.929 
35,980 
40.355 
27.783 

6.801 
19.091 
12,791 
40,659 
42,633 
16,075 

4.824 
52,542 

2,041 

16,375 

335 

8,529 
21,473 

2,025 
89,674 



Amount. _ 

$543,436 63 

11,080 85 

114,193 79 

1,588,566 32 

3.333.401 28 

1.194.402 81 
1,620,059 94 

882,547 79 
1,435,694 46 

537.167 23 
508,485 85 

6,077 89 

292,450 33 
9,840,949 49 
10,104,908 43 

555,877 96 
5,480,045 82 
5.658,251 39 
3,936,336 59 

860,793 75 
2,910,457 34 
1,674,830 70 
5,276,813 95 
6,558,716 30 
2,232,278 91 

634,108 99 
7,855,888 78 

282,657 77 

2,195,106 91 

44,322 26 

1.246,486 26 

2,499,216 21 

295.168 47 
11,971,813 17 



States 
and Territories. 



North Carolina., 
North Dakota... 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . 
Rhode Island . , 
South Carolina 
South Dakota .. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia , 

Washington 
West Virginia ., 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



No. 



4,258 

1.972 

100,335 

0,198 

7,588 

100,920 

5,509 

2,120 

4,611 

19,681 

9.069 

973 

8,564 

8,813 

9,765 

12,216 

26,981! 

894 



Totals 1993. 199 ($140,280, 875 87 

Insular Possessions- 



Amount. 



589,804 20 

287,538 61 

15,102,612 33 

1,294,206 79 

989,07158 

13,478.14824 

661,786 85 

278,280 60 

070,336 22 

2,765,070 27 

1,203,780 29 

129,343 59 

1,392,060 93 

1,261,741 67 

1,278.66015 

1J36,038 81 

87861,085 68 

123,220 44 



Philippine Islands 

Porto Rico 

Samoa 

In foreign countries. 



Totals 

Payments by Treas- 
u r y Department 
(Treasury settle- 
ments)' -.... 



Grand total. .-.. 



21 
*o\182 



998,441 



*.... 



7,651 07 

2,595 00 

18 00 

745.972 56 



$141,036,612 50 



106,246 83 



)$141,l42 r 861 83 



The federal pension agents and pension agencies are: 



Place. 



Name of agent. 



I 



Place. 



Augusta, Me. ....... Selden Connor. 

Boston, Mass Augustus J. Hoitt. 

Buffalo, N. Y Charles A, Orr. 

Chicago, HI Jonathan Merriam. 

Columbus, Ohio Joseph W, Jones. 

Concord, N. H Hugh Henry. 

Des Moines, Iowa. ... ■ 

Detroit, Mich ... Oscar A. Janes, 

Indianapolis, Ind Albert O. Marsh. 



Knoxvilia, Tenn. .. 

Louisville, Ky 

Milwaukee, Wis. . . 

New- York City 

Philadelphia, Penn. 
Pittsburg, Penn. .. , 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Topeka, Kan 

Washington. D. C. , 



Name of agent. 



.William Rule. 
.Andrew T. Wood. 
.Edwin D. Coe. 
.Michael Kerwin. 
.St. C. A. Mulholland. 
.John W. Nesbit- 
. Jesse B. Fuller. 
.Wilder S. Metcalf. 
.John R. King. 



I I ! — 

PENSION PAYMENTS ANI> NT7MHER. OF PENSIONERS. 



1«S 



There were added to the rolls during the year ending June 80. 1908, the names of 
51,865 new pensioners. The number of pensioners lost from the rolls during the year 
was 48,186, showing an increase of 8,679 on the rolls as compared with the close of the 
fiscal year 1901. The 998,441 pensioners on. the rolls June 80, 1906, were classified as 
follows: 



War, Revolutionary: 

Widows ~.. 

Daughters •»••• 

War of 1812: 

Widows ., •••«.••-•••... 
Indian wars: 

Survivors •—♦, 

Widows ....♦•. 

Mexican war: 
Survivors ••♦♦►. ..►«... 

Widows .*♦, •♦... 

Civil war: 
General laxr— 

Invalids .;»*« 

Widows 

Minor children 

Mother* , 

Fathers . . 

Brothers and sisters. 
Helpless children ... 
Act Jane 27, 1890— 

Invalids 

Widows .*:.... 

Minor children 



1 

4 

776 

2,260 
8*461 

4.540 
7,608 



210.384 

n.eao 

769 
4,645 
776 
196 
472 

468,224 

169,066 

4,177 



Act June 27, 1890— 
Mothers ..... ~. .,..., 


..•*_».. 


1,998 
684 


Helpless children ... 




250 
603 


War with Spain: 

Invalids ..%**............-.. 

Widows » ..... -- 


i5.ni 

1,068 


Minor children 




272 
8,957 


Fathers 


~ 


473 
9 




1 


Regular establishment: 
Invalids ........ ~ r 


10.030 


Widows 

Minor children 

Mothers ,.......*..•... 


/.I mm 


2,463 
115 
714 


Fathers ....•.•••.••. 


108 




6 


Helpless children .»,..,-- 


7 








Total 


998,441 



PENSION PAYMENTS AND NUMBER OF PENSIONERS. 

Pension payments, the cost of the pension establishment and the number of pen- 
sioners carried on the roll from 186fi-'66 to 1904-' 05 are shown in the following table: 



Year. 



Paid as pensions. 



Cost, main- 
tenance, etc. 



8407,165 00 

490.977 85 

553,020 34 

564,526 81 

• 600,997 86 

863,079 00 

951.253 00 

1,008,200 64 

966,794 13 

982,695 35 

1.015,078 81 

1,034,459 83 

1,032,500 09 

837,734 14 

935,027 28 

1,072,059 64 

1,466,236 01 

2,591,648 29 

2.835,181 00 

3,392,576 34 

3,245,016 61 

3,753,400 91 

8,515,057 27 

8,466,968 40 

8,526,382 13 

4,700,636 44 

4,898,665 80 

4,867,734 42 

8,963,976 31 

4,338,020 21 

3.991,875 61 

3,087,783 07 

4,114.091 46 

4,147,517 73 

3.841,706 74 

3,868,795 44 

3.831.378 96 

3.993.216 79 

. 3,849,366 25 

3.721,832 82 



Total. 



815,857,714 88 

21,275,767 04 

23.654,529 70 

29,077,774 08 

29,952,486 64 

29,381,871 62 

30,703,999 81 

27,985,264 53 

2U, 173,573 12 

80,253.100 11 

28,951.288 34 

29,217,281 05 

27.818,509 53 

34.502.168 06 

57,624,256 86 

51,655,464 99 

55,779,408 06 

63.019,222 10 

60.747,568 47 

68,564,513 46 

67,336,159 51 

77,506,397 99 

82,465,558 94 

92,309,688 98 

109,620,232 52 

122,013,326 04 

144,292,812 91 

161,774,372 36 

143,950.702 48 

144,150,314 51 

142,212,080 07 

143,937,500 42 

148,765,971 26 

142,502,570 68 

142,303,837 39 

142,400,279 28 

141,335,646 95 

141,752,870 50 

144,942,937 74 

144.864,694 15 



Number of 
pensione rs. 
126.722 
155.474 
169,648 
187,963 
198,686 
207,495 
232,189 
238,411 
236,241 
234,821 
232.137 
232,104 
223.998 
242,755 
250,802 
268,880 
285.697 
803,658 
822.756 
845,125 
86u,783 
406,007 
452,557 
489,725 
537,944 
676,160 
876,068 
966,012 
969,544 
970,524 
970,678 
976,014 
998,714 
991,519 
993,529 
997,735 
999.446 
996,545 
994,762 
998.441 



1866.... 
1867. .T. 



1869 ™ 

1870..., 

1871 „. 

1872 *™ 

1873 ... 

1874......— 

1875.... ~... 

1876 ~. 

1877 — 

1878 

1879 ~. 

1880 ,..- 

1881 ~. 

1882 ~. 

1888.... ~.« 

1884 ~. 

1885 ~. 

1886 -~ 

1887 ~. 

1888.... 

1889 „~. 

1890 ~. 

1891 

1892 

1893 -. 

1894 

1895... v,.... 

1896 ~. 

1897.... ~... 

1898 .».. 

1899. ....-.,.. 

1900 -.. 

1901 ~. 

1902 

1903 .... 

1904 

1905 



815,450,549 88 
20,784,789 09 
23,101,509 36 
28,513,247 27 
29,851,488 78 
28,518,792 62 
29,752,746 81 
26,982.063 89 
30,206.778 99 

29.270.404 76 
27,936.209 53 
28,182,821 72 
26,786,009 44 
33.GG4.428 92 
56,689,229 08 

50.583.405 85 
54,313,172 05 
60,427,573 81 
57,912,387 47 
65,171,937 12 
64,091,142 90 
73,752,997 08 
78,950,501 67 
88,842,720 58 

106,093,850 39 
117,312,690 50 
139.394.147 11 
156,906,637 94 
189,986,726 17 
139.812,294 30 
138.220.704 46 
139,940,717 35 
144,651,870 80 
138,855.052 95 
188,462.130 65 
138.531,483 84 
137,504,267 99 
137,759.653 71 
141.093.571 49 
141.142.861 33 



Totals . . 



$3.224,41 4. 578 75 | $103.219.1 33 7 8 j $3. 327 .633,712 53 i 



From July 1, 1790, to .Tune 30, 1SUT>, disbursements for pet sions were $96, 445,444. !I3. 



KM 



1W 



PATENT OFVICB STATISTICS— PASSPORT REGULATIONS. 



PATENT OFFICE STATISTICS. 

In 1904 there were received 51,168 application* for mechanical patents, JOS 
applications for design patents, lf>7 applications for reissue* of patents. 8,524 ap- 
plications for registration of trademarks, 1,336 applications for registration of 
labels and 397 applications for registration of prints. There were 30,324 paten** 
issued, including desigus; 110 patents reissued, and 2,158 trademarks, 1,114 labels 
and 2*97 prints registered. The number of patents that expired was £*V429. The 
number of allowed applications awaiting the payment fit fmal fees was 9,302 and the 
number forfeited for non-payment of the final fee* 5,413. The total receipts were 
$1,657,326 53, the expenditures $1,470,000 38, and tbe surplus of receipts over ex- 
penditures. $181,326 15. The total balance to the credit of rhe Patent Office in the 
Treasury of the United States on January 1, 1900, was $5,803,866 76. 

In proportion to population more patents were issued to citizens of Connecticut 
than to those of any other State— rl to every 1,097. Next in order are the follow- 
ing: District of Columbia, 1 to every 1,146; Massachusetts, 1 to every l.Sfil; 
Colorado, 1 to every 1,394; New-Jersey, 1 to every 1,452; California, 1 to every 
1.463; Rhode Island,. 1 to every 1,509; New- York. 1 to every 1,614; Illinois, 1 to 
every 1,673; Washington 1 to every 1,693; Ohio, 1 to every 1,908: Pennsylvania, 1 
to every. 2,064; Michigan, 1 to every 3,543; Montana, 1 to every 2,561; Oregon, 1 to 
every 3,086; Oklahoma, 1 to every 3,264; Missouri, 1 to every 3.30t; Wvoming, 
t to evt:ry 3.304; Minnesota, I to every 3,474; Iowa, 1 to every 3,451; Wisconsin, 
1 to every 3,555; Indiana, 1 to every 3,509; Arizona, 1 to every 3.S4I; Vermont, 1 to 
every 3,949; Maryland, 1 to every 4.117; Utah, I to every 4,130; Nevada, 1 ta every 
4.233; Kansas, 1 to every 4,376; South Dakota, 1 to every 4,7 2H; Nebraska, 1 to 
every 4,749; Idaho, 1 to every 4,7f>8; Delaware 1 to every 4,992; New-Hampshire, 
I to every 5,415; Maine, . 1 to every 0,739; West Virginia, 1 to every 6,030; North 
Dakota. 1 to every 6,382"; New-Mexico, 1 to e\<ny 6,510: Florida, 1 to evey 6.«^4; 
Texas, 1 to every 7.34G; Virginia, 1 to every 7,957; Kentucky, 1 to every 8,420; 
Tennessee, 1 to every 9,480, and Georgia, 1 to every 9.0S3. The. fewest patents 
granted in proportion to the number of inhabitants were in the following .States 
and Territories: Alaska, 1 to every 31.720; Hawaii, 1 to every 22,000; South Caro-. 
lina, 1 to every 1>, 14?; Mississippi, 1 to every 17.236: North - .Caro-Hn-% 1 to every 
15,272; Arkansas, 1 to eveTy 13,115; Alabama, 1 to every 12,613; Indian Territory, 
1 to every 10,887, and Louisiana, 1 to every 10.0S4. 

Of foreign patents, 910 were granted to citizens of Germany; tT30 to those of 
England, 412 to those of Canada, 331 to those cf France, 119 to those of Austria- 
Hungary, 87 to those of Switzerland, 80 to those of Scotland, 73 to .those of 
Sweden, 5? to those of New-Zealand, 48 to those of Victor**, 42 to tftvwft'Of Bel- 
gium 37 to those of Russia, 28 to those of Mexico. 20 to those of Ireland,* 25 to 
those of New South Wale:?, 23 to those of Norway, 22 each to those of Denmark 
and Italy, 20 to those of the Netherlands. 11 to those of Spain, 10 each to those 
of India and the Transvaal, 7 to those of Queensland, 5 each to those of Angen.- 
tina, Cuba, South Australia and Western .* ustralia; 4 each to those of Japan and 
Turkey 3 each to those of Brazil. Costa Rica and Newfoundland; 2 each to *bo«e 
of Cape Colony, China, Natal, Rumania, San Salvador and TasmanJaL and 1 >acb 
to those of Africa, Bermuda, Colombia, Ecuador. Guatemala, Isle of Hart, Java, 
Persia* Peru and Perineal . , . .' 

PA8SFORT REGULATIONS, 

The law forbids the granting- of a passport to any person not a eirJaen of th* 
United States, or loyal resident of an insular possession: of th« United" States. A 
person who has only made the declaration of intention to heeeme a efttfcen cannot 
receive a passport. No one but the Secretary of State may grant and tesue pass- 
ports in the United States. A person who is entitled to receive a passport, jr tem- 
porarily abroad, should apply to the diplomatic representative of the United State* 
in the country where he happens to be. or, in the absence of a diplomatic representa- 
tive to the Consul-General of the United States, or, in the absence of "both, to * 
consul of the United States. The necessary statements may be mate "before the 
nearest consular officer. Application for a passport by a person In one of the insular 
possessions of the United States should be made to tfrs Chief Executive oT such pos- 
session. The evidence required of a person making application abroad or in 'an insu- 
lar possession of tbe United States is tbe same as that required of ail applicant in 
the United States. ^,,, 

Such application, in the form of an affidavit* must be attested fey an office* 
authorized to administer oaths. The applicant is required to state the date and 
place of his birth, his occupation, the place of his permanent residence; and within 
what length ©f time he intends to return to the United States with the purpose oi 
residing and performing the duties of citizenship therein The applicant must take 
the oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States. THe application 
must be accompanied by a description stating the following particulars i Age. stature 
forehead' eyes, nose, mouth chin, hair, complexion, face, arid by a certificate from at" 



least" one credible witness that the applicant is the person he represents himself' to be. 
"in the affidavit are true to the best of the witnesses kabwledae 
and belief. 



and that the facts stated 1 



. A person -of the Chinese- race, alleging birth in the United States, mu*t accom- 
pany hts application with supporting affidavits from at least two credii».e witnesses- 
preferably not of the Chinese race, having personal knowledge of the 'apphearf* 
birth in the United States. A person born- abroad whose father. was a native citizen 
: of the United States must show that' his father was born ;n the United States, resided t 



TRADE-MARK LAWS. * 107 



therein, and was a citizen at the time of the applicant's birth. The department may- 
require that this affidavit be supported by that of one ot» r citizen acquainted with 
the facts. A naturalized citizen must transmit his eertilii ate of naturalization or a 
duly certified copy of the court record thereof/ with hi3 application. He must state 
in his affidavit when and from what port he emigrated to this country, what shin 
he sailed In, where he has lived since his arrival In the United States, when and 
before what court he was naturalized, and that he is the identical person described 
In, the certificate of naturalization. 

If a woman making application is unmarried she should state that she has never 
been married. If she is the wife or widow of a native citizen of the United States 
the fact should be made to appear. If she is the wife or widow of a naturalized 
citizen she must transmit for inspection her husband's certificate of naturalization, 
must state that she is the wife (or widow) of the person described therein, and must 
set forth the facts of his emigration, naturalization and residence, as required in the 
rule governing the application of a naturalized citizen. A married woman's citizen- 
ship follows that of her husband so far as her international status Is concerned. It 
Is essential, therefore, that a woman's marital relations be indicated in her appli- 
cation for a passport, and that in «-\e case of a married woman her husband's citizen- 
ship be established. The child of a naturalized citizen claiming citizenship through 
the naturalicatlon of the parent must state that be or she is the son or daughter, as 
the case may be, of the person described in the certificate of naturalization, which 
must be submitted for inspection, and must set forth the facts of emigration, natural- 
ization and residence, as required in the rule governing the application of a natural- 
ized citizen. A resident of an insular possession of the United States who owes 
allegiance to the United States must state that he owes allegiance to the United 
States, and that he does not acknowledge allegiance to any other government, and 
must submit affidavits from at least two credible witnesses having good means of 
knowledge in substantiation of his statements of birth, residence and loyalty 

A passport expires two years from the date of Issuance. A new one will be 
Issued upon a new application, and, if the applicant be a naturalized citizen, the old 
passport will be accepted in lieu of a certificate of naturalization. If the application 
upon which it was issued is found to contain sufficient information as to the natural- 
ization of the applicant. When the applicant is accompanied by his wife, minor 
children or servant who would be entitled to receive a passport, it will be sufficient 
to state the fact, giving the respective ages of the children and the allegiance of the 
servant, when one passport will suffice for all. For any other person In the party a 
separate passport will be required. A woman's passport may include he*.* minor chil- 
dren and servant under the above-named conditions. Tho term servant does not 
include a governess, tutor, pupil, companion or person holding like relations to the 
applicant for a passport. Professional and other titles will not be inserted in passports 

By act of Congress, a fee of $1 is required to be collected for every citizen's 
passport. That amount in currency or postal money order should accompany each 
application made, by a citizen of the United States. Orders should be made payable 
to the disbursing clerk of the. Department of State. I>rafts or checks will not be 
accepted. Blank forms of application will be furnished by the department The 
Secretary of State may refuse to issue a passport to any one who he has reason to 
believe desires It to further an unlawful or improper purpose. 

Passports are not required in the Argentine Republic, Belgium, Bolivia Brazil 
Chili. Colombia. Costa Rica. Denmark and possessions. Great Britain and possessions' 
Guatemala, Honduras, Japan, Liberia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Norway, Paraguay, Peru' 
Portugal and possessions. Salvador, Sweden and Uruguay. It Is recommended, how- 
ever, that Americans intending to visit those countries be. provided with passports for 
convenience to travel . without interruption. The laws of the following countries 
require that every foreigner must fce provided with ;a passport before entering their 
domains: Austria-Hungary. Dominican Republic Germany, Greece, Hayti, Nether- 
lands and possessions, Persia, Rumania, Russia, Servia, Turkey and possessions and 
Venezuela. As a general rule it is wise for persons intending travelling abroad out- 
side of British dominion*, where passports are never demanded, to provide themselves 
With passports before leaving th<> United States. Persons intending to enter Russian 
or Turkish territory should have their passports vised (countersigned) by a Russian or 
Turkish consular representative in this country before sailing. There is now ^mailed 
by the State Department, with each passport Issued to a naturalized citizen an 
unofficial statement showing what his status will be under the laws of the country of 

his origin If he returns, * 

\ TRADE-MARK IAWS. 

The following classes may obtain registration: (a) Any person, firm or corpora- 
tion domiciled In the United States or located in any foreign country which, by treatv 
convention or law. affords similar privileges to citizens of the United States and who 
Is entitled to the exclusive use of any trad^-mark and uses the same in commerce with 
foreign nations or with Indian tribes, (b) Any cituen or resident of this country wish 
tag the protection of his trade-mark In any foreign country the laws of which reauir* 
registration In the United States as a condition precedent. An application for the 
registration of a trade-mark will consist of a statement or specification, a declaration 
or oath, and drawing, which must follow rules laid down. These should be preceded 
by a brief letter, of advice requesting registration and signed by the applicant Tho 
statement should announce the full name, citizenship, domicile, residence, and oiace of 
business of the applicant (or, if the applicant be a corporation, under the laws of 
What State or nation incorporated), with a fall, xnd clear specification of the trad#»- 
4nark. It should state from what time the trade-mark has been used by the applicant thV 
class of merchandise, and tne particular goods, comprised in such class to which the 
— : = — ' ■ ** 



108 • THB BANKRUPTCY LAW. 



trade-mark is appropriated, «nd the manner !n which the trade-mark has been appJied 
to the goods. The declaration should be 'n the f c . rr of on oath by the person, or by 
a member oi the llrm, or by an officer of the corporation, making the application, to 
the Wfect that the party has at the ime >l' filing his application a right to the us€ 
of the trade-mark described in the statement, .hjt ».o other person, firm, or corpora- 
tion has a right to such use, either in the Identical form or in such near resemblance 
thereto as might be calculated to decei-e, that such trade-mark is used in lawful 
commerce will' fo<eign nations oi Indian f . i ibes. one or more of which should be par- 
ticularly named, end thai it is truly reoresented .n th^ fee- simile presented for regis- 
try. The oath may be taken within the United States before a notary public. Justice 
of the peace, or the judge oj clerk :f any c urt ot record. In any foreign country it 
may be taken before tMe secretary of a !egation or cons' Jar officer of the Unite* 
States, or before ai*> person duly qualified by ihe laws of the country to Administer 
oaths, whose official character shall be certified by a representative of the United 
States having an official 6eal. A fee of $2B is required on /ling application, except in 
cases named in the following: Owners oj trade— mt» us for which protection has been 
sought b> registering thei- in the Patent Office under trie act of July 8. 1870 {declared 
unconstitutional by the Si pi erne Cot rt of the United States), may register the same 
"or the same goods, without f. e, on compliance with :he forgoing require menu. With 
*ach application oi this chai >-cte.* a specific reference to the date and number of Uk- 
formei certificate Is requned applicants whose case* were Hied under toe act ot 
1870, either prk-r to cr since the decision of he Supreme Court declaring it uncon- 
stitutional, which are now pending betor>. the office are advised to prepare appiica- 
I tlons In conformity with the law and forgoing rules. On the. receipt of such an 
1 application, referring to the date of the ore former'v filed, all fees tnereon will be 
ouiy applied. Those who have paid only $10 as a nrst tee are advised that the law 
does not provide for a division of the le^al fee of $25, and that the remainder of the 
entire fee is required heforo the application can be entertained 

F\>r details of Trade-Mark Registration Act, approved February 20, 1806, see pagoa 
88—92 of this volume. / 



THE BANKRUPTCY LAW. 

The Bankruptcy I>aw paraed by both houses of the L.Vth Congress and approved 
July 1, 1898, provides a complete system for the administration of the affairs of 
bankrupts and the distribution of their property among their creditcs, uniform 
throughout the United States and administered by the United States courts, in 
place of the different systems formerly in existence in the various States admin- 
istered by State courts. In bankruptcy proceedings a bankrupt debtor may turn 
over all his property to the court to bo admiri.stcred for the benefit of his creditors, 
and then get a complete discharge from his debts. A bankrupt may of his Own 
motion offer to surrender his property to the administration of the United States court 
and ask for his discharge in voluntary bankruptcy, or creditors may apply to the 
court to compel a bankrupt to turn over his nroperty to be administered under the 
act for the benefit of the creditors in voluntary bankruptcy. The bankrupt who has 
turned over all his propeity and conformed to the provisions of the act is entitled to 
a judgment of court discharging him from any future liability to his credltois. 

Extended powers are given for tak.ng possession of the assets, among others, 
to allow and disallow all claims against bankrupt estates, appoint receivers and 
fake the necessary measures for the preservation and charge of the porperty of a 
bankrupt; to arraign, try and punish bankrupts, officers and other persons and 
the agents officers, members of the board of directors or trustees or other similar 
bodies of corporations for violation of the act; to authorize the business of the 
bankrupt to be conducted for limited periods, to cause the assets to be collected and 
reduced to money and distributed, and substantially determine ail controversies in re- 
lation thereto, to enforce obedience to lawful orders by fine or imprisonment, and to 
extradite bankrupts from one district to amther. The proceeding once inaugurated by 
the filing of a petition b2' ihe bankrupt and the adjudication in bankruptcy having 
been made, the Court proceeds to take charge of the bankrupt's property, and ad- 
minister the eatne for the benefit of the creditors, and de:ermine all questions which 
may ari^e in regard to the right? of the bankrupt or the creditors, either as against 
the bankrupt or as between themselves in accordance with the above- prescribed 
powers. A trustee is appointed, either selected by the creditors at a meeting called for 
that purpose or, in case they fail to select a trustee, one is appointed by the Court. 

His duty is to collect the propertv, realize on it in such manner as may be" for 
the best interests of all concerned, and ultimately distribute it among the cred- 
itors in such proportions as they may he adjudicated to be entitled thereto. As all 
question*, both of law and fact, in relation to the property or the rights of the 
various parties must be decided in the bankruptcy proceeding, it is provided that 
referees he appointed, who are charged with the duty of hearing the allegations and 
testimony of all parties and deciding all such questions that may arise. Each case, 
as it comes up, is assigned to some referee, whose duty it is to adjudicate and pas» 
upon all such questions arising therein in the* first Instance, the right being reserved 
to any parties to appeal from ihe decision of 'he referee to the United States District 
Court. The duties of the referee are substantially of a judicial character, and h* 
occupies much the position of a Judge of p> !mary resort, subject to an appeal to th' 
Court, and is required to take the same oath of office as that prescribed for judges of. 
the United States courts. By Section 38 of the act, the rpferee is Invested with 
jurisdiction to consider all petitions referred to him by the clerks, make adjudication* 
or dismiss the petition; exercise the powers vested in courts of bankruptcy for the 
administering of oaths to and the examination of witnesses, and for reQuiriag the 



FEDERAL LABOR LAWS. 100 



production of documents la proceedings before him, except th*. power of commit r 
and. tn the absence of the Judge, te exercise fell his powers for taking possession and 
releasing the property ©f a bankrupt, and to perform such part ©f the dirties of the 
courts of bankruptcy as they may prescribe by nrtes and orders, excepting only ques- 
tions arising on applications of bankrupt* for com positions or discharges. 

All Questions in regard to the property or assets or rights of the creditors and 
person* Interested come before the referee for determination, subject to tho right 
of appeal. After tbe- rights* of all parties have been ascertained and determined, and 
the property has been realised npon. It is distributed among the creditors. Provision 
is made In the act for allowing bankrupt* to compromise or settle with their creditors 
by a proceeding known as composit ten proceeding*, whereby, if a bankrupt and a m*- 
jortLy of his creditors agree upon some basis of settlement, the same. If approved by 
tbe Court, shaft become binding open all creditors. The decision of the Question as to 
the approval or compositions and granting discharges to a bankrupt from his debts 
la specifically reserved by tbe act t» the fudges of the United States, courts; bat tbe 
Court, by virtue oX Us general powers, may refer such matters to the referee to take 
testimony and report to the Court his opinion thereon. Trie aim of tne act has been 
to make the expense of the proceedings depend largely upon the amount of the property 
Involved, and the compensation of the referees (s fixed substantially at 1 per cent an 
the amount distributed to the creditors In ordinary cases, where the assets are dis- 
tributed by the Court, and one-half of t per cent tot composition cases, and the trustees 
who have charge of the actual management of the bankrupt's property receive as 
compensation *uch commissions on amounts paid out by them as dividends as the 
Court may allow, not to exceed, however, % per cent on the first $5,000, 2 per cent on 
the second 15*000. and J per cent on all sums in excess of 110.000. Detailed provisions 
are made In the ae* for giving notice to all creditors and other persons interested in 
the estate of tbe pendency of the proceedings, the payment and declaration of dividends 
and other matters, and providing methods whereby all parties interested may be heard 
on aU subjects arising in the course of the proceedings. 

Some minor modifications, were made In the application of the bankruptcy system 
by the act of February 5, 1903. amending the act of July 1, 1893. 



LABOI, I-AWS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The United States statutes at large provide lor a Bureau of Labot tn the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Labor, said bureau to be in charge of an officer designated the 
Commissioner Qf Labor. The general design and duties of the Bureau 
Labor of Labor are to acquire and diffuse among the people of the United 

Comraigsfloner. States useful information on subjects connected with labor, in the 
most general and comprehensive sense of that word, and especially 
upon its relation to capital. hour3 of labor, the earnings of laboring men and women, 
aad the means of promoting their material, social, intellectual and moral prosperity. 
The information collected by the Commissioner Is given to the public through three 
vehicles — an annual report, special reports (when in the judgment of the Commissioner 
such reports are essential), and a bimonthly bulletin. Eighteen annual reports, ten 
snecial reports and fifty-five bulletins have been published. It Is the duty of the 
Commissioner to collect and present in annual reports statistical details relating to all 
departments of labor In the Territory of Hawaii. . 

in an article entitled **Lmplo>er and Employe Under the Common Law," pub- 
lished in the U. S. Department of Labor Bulletin No. 1. pages 08 and 99, the common 
law on the subject of boycotting, as laid down by the courts, is 
Boycotting, stated as follows: "Every one has the right to work or to refuse 
to work for whom and on what terms he pleases* or to refuse 
to deal with whom he pleases; and a number of persons. If they have no 
unlawful object In view, have tho right to agree that they will not work for 
or deal with certain persons, or that they will not work under a fixed price or without 
certain conditions The right of employes to re use to work, either singly or In com- 
bination* except upon terms and conditions satisfactory to themselves, is balanced by 
the right of employerr to- refuse to engage the services of any one for any reason they 
deem proper. The master ie*y fix the wages, and other conditions not untawfut. upon 
which he will employ workmen, and has the right to refuse to employ them upon any 
other terms. In short, both employers and employes are entitled to exercise the fullest 
i liberty In entering Lto contracts of service, and neither party can hold the other re- 
j sponsible for refusing to enter Into such contracts. It has been held, however, that 
employers In separate, Independent establishments have no right to combine for the 
purpose of preventing workmen who have incurred the hostility of one of them from 
securing employment upon any terms and by the method commonly known as black- 
listing debarring such workmen from exercising their vocation, such a combination 
being regarded as a criminal conspiracy. On the other hand, a combination of em- 
ployes having- for rts purpose the accomplishment of an illegal object is unlawful; for 
instance, a conspiracy to extort money from an employer by inducing his workmen to 
leave him and deterring others from entering his service is illegal; and an association 
which undertakes to coerce workmen to become members thereof or to dictate to em- 
ployers as to -the methods or terms upon which their business shall be conducted by 
means of force, threats or Intimidation, interfering with their traffic or lawful em- 
ployment of other persons Is, as t» such purposes, an illegal combination. Unlawful 
interference by employes, er former employes, or persons acting in sympathy with 
them* with the businest* of a railroad company In the hands of a receiver renders the 
pecsons interferfcng liable to punishment for contempt of court." 

The tf. S. Statute 1 ? at Large provide *hat the service and employment of ail 



110 COPYRIGHT— INTHRNATIONAL, COPYRIGHT. 

laborSsimd mechanics employed by the Government of the United States, by the 
District of Columbia, or by any contractor- or sub-contractoi 
Hours of Labor, uoon any of tbe public works of the United States, or oi 
the District of Columbia, shall be limited and restricted to 
eight hoars in any one calendar day. Also, that it shall be unlawful for any officer 
of the United States or of the District of Columbia, or lor any contractor or sub- 
contractor as above described, to require or permit any such laborer or mechanic to 
work more than eight hours in any calendar day, except in cases of extraordinary 
emergency. (Chap. 352, acts of Congress, 1891-' OH.) In 1*87 Congress provided by act 
that eight hours «hculd constitute a day's work for letter carriers in cities or postal 
districts connected therewith, and if any Irtter carrier should be employed a greater 
number of hours per day he should oe paid °xtra "or the same. (Chap. 308, acta of 
Congress, 1887-' 88.) Chap. 47, acts of Congress, 1887-'&S, directs the Public Printer to 
enforce the eight-hour law in the departme.it under his charge. 

All persons of the Government service as per diem employes are allowed the fol- 
lowing holidays, for which they shall receive pay the same as 
Holiday Pay. on other days: January 1 February 22, May 30 (Memorial Day), July 
4, first Monday in September. L.abor Day (to employees of the Govern- 
ment Printing Office only), December 25, and such days as the President may appoint 
as days for national thanksgiving. (Resolution No. 5, acts of Congress, 1884-'$S, and 
Resolution No» 6, aots of Congress, lSSG-'ST.) An act of January 12, 1885, Chap, 28; 
Sec. 46, 28 Stat. 607, provides that Inauguration Day shall be a holiday, with pay, 
for employes of the Government Printing Office. 

Chap. 370, acts of Congress, !W7-'98, provides that when a controversy arises 
between a common carrier, engaged in interstate or foreign commerce, and its em- 
ployes, which interrupts or threatens to interrupt Its business. 
Arbitration of the chairman of the Interstate Commerce Commission and the 
Labor Dispute**. Commissioner, of Labor shall, upon the request of either party, 
communicate with the parties and try by mediation and con- 
ciliation to settle the controversy, and if their efforts are unsuccessful they 
shall then try to bring about an arbitration of said controversy; that if th# 
effort at mediation as above does not succeed the controversy may, by the consent of 
the parties, be submitted to the arbitration, oi a board of three persona, one to he 
named by the employing carrier, one to-be named by the employes, and the third to 
be chosen by the two first named, or, if they cannot agree on any one. then by the 
chairman of the Interstate Cdrnmerce Commission and the Commissiotu-r of I«abor; 
that a majority of said arbitrators may make a valid and binding award, which must 
be found and filed in the clerk's office of the Circuit Court of. the United States for 
the district wherein the controversy ar^se or the arbitration was entered into, within 
thirty days from the date of the appointment of the third arbitrator; that the sub- 
mission or the controversy shall be in writing and signed by both parties, and must be 
filed with the award and with a transcript of all the testimony; that these papers so 
filed in court with the award shall have the force and effect of a bill of exceptions; 
that the award shall be final and conclusive upon both parties unless set aside by the 
court for error of law apparent on the record; that the award shall go intp practical 
operation and judgment shall be entered thereon at the expiration of ten. days from 
the filing unless, within said ten days, either party shall file exceptions thereto for 
matter of law apparent upon the record; that at the expiration of ten days from the 
judgment of the Circuit Court upon exceptions taken as above, judgment shall be 
entered in accordance with the decision of the court unless, within said ten days, either 
party shall appeal to the Circuit Court of Appeals; the decision of the Circuit Court of 
Appeals shall be final; that employes dissatisfied with the award must not quit tb«- 
employer before the expiration of three months from and after the making of the 
award without giving thirty days' notice in writing of their intention, and that an 
employer so dissatisfied must not, on account of said dissatisfaction, dismiss an em- 
ploye before the expiration of said three months without giving the same notice; that 
during the pendency of such arbitration it shall not be lawful for the employer party 
to such arbitration to discharge employes parties thereto, except for inefficiency, viola- 
tion of law or neglect of duty, nor for the employes to unite in. aid or abet strikes 
against said employer, and that for a period of three months after an award under 
such an arbitration it shall not be lawful for an employer to discharge employes, ex- 
cept for the causes aforesaid, without giving thirty days' notice in writing of his in- 
tention so to do, nor for any employes, during a like period, to quit the service of the 
employer without just cause without giving a like notice; that each member of such 
board of arbitration shall receive a compensation of $10 per day for the time he is 
actually employed and also his travelling and other necessary expenses. 

COPYRIGHT IN THK UNITED STATES. . ' 

Under the International Copyright act (approved March 3, 1891; took effect Ju?y 1, 
1801) any United States .-itizen, or any citizen or subject of a foreign nation which 
grants copyrignt to United States citizens on substantially the same basis with its own 
citizens, may secure for twenty-eight years the sole liberty of printing, reprinting, pub- 
lishing, completing, copying, executing, finishing and vending his work; and, in case of 
a dramatic composition, of publicly performing or representing it, or causing it to be 
performed or represented by others. This term of security is renewable for fourteen 
years more. The right of citizens or subjects of a foreign nation to copyright in the 
United States, on January 1. 1896, had been extended by Presidential proclamations to 
Great Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Denmark and Switz- 
erland. On February 27, 1S96, copyright bmefii* were extended to citizens of Mexico 
by proclamation of the President; on May 25, 1896, to citizens of Chili; on October 
19, 1899, to those of Costa IMca, and on November 20. 1899, to those of the Netherlands 



THE WBATHBR BtHUSAU. 



ill 



(Holland) and possessions. A bill of Congress, signed toy tne President January S, lS0t, 
mak« an tnfciwction against the unlawful production «f & nlay obtained In a TJnlted 
States District Court operative in all districts, instead of only in the one in which it is 
granted, as formerly, ft also makes the tmUiwful prod action of a play puntebatte by 
Imprisonment, under certain conditions. To aid in haying the taw strictly complied 
with, so that *»o Question can arise as to the validity of the entry recorded* and Hiat. 
the application shall be in such a f^ftn that the Copyright Office can. upon its receipt, • 
promptly mate the entries desired, and thus avoid delay through the necessity for 
correspondence, an application form has been prepared, which can be obtained by 
addressing "Register of Copyrights, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. M 

By application to the same otHce a pamphlet giving directions for securing copyrights/ 
etc., may be obtained. The law imposes a penalty of $100 upon any person who shall insert 
the notice of copyright, or words of the saom purport, upon any book or other aitick; 
jrh'ich has not: been copyrighted, whether such article be subject to copyright or other- • 
#ise; or wn* shall knowingly Issue or Bell any article bearing a notice ot United 
states cowriirht which has not been copyrighted in the United dates; or who shal' 
iShoort any boafe, photograph, chromo or lithograph, or other artl.de bearing such 
notice ©£ copyright or words of the same purport, which is not copyrighted in, this 
country. The president of the American Copyright League 4s Edmund Clarence Sted- 
rnan, and the secretary Is K. U. Johnson, No. 38 Bast 17th-st„ New York 
City. N. Y. . . . , . >v . .: 

WEATHER BTJRJSATJ FORECASTS AND STORM WARNINGS. 

The Weather bureau ' furnishes, when practicable, for the benefit of all interests 
dependent upon weather conditions; the "Forecasts" which are prepared daily at the 
Certral Office In Washington. D. C, and certain designated stations. These forecasts 
are telegraphed, to stations of the 'Weathet Bureau, railway officials, postmasters, and 
many others, to be communicated to the public by means of flags or sfeam whistles; 
The flags adopted tor this purpose are five In number, and of the forms and colors: 
Indicated below: ' ! 

.. Explanation op weather pugs. ..■■'..' 

Ke. I, No. 2. No. 8. No. 4. No. 5. i 

White Flag. Blue Flag. White and Blue Black Triangular White Flag with 

_ '•■■•■ ^ Flag. ^ Flag. for k sq. tn centre. 

si m 

il 

Clearer fair Rain or Local Rain Temperature. • Cold Wave 

weather. Snow. or Snow. ..-.'. 

'When N» 4 w "placed above No, 1. 2, or 3, it Indicates warmer; when below 
colder; when not displayed, the temperature is expected to remain about stationary! 
rkirmg the late spring and early fall the cold wave flag is also used to Indicate an- 
ticioated frosts. 

EXPLANATION OF WHISTLE SIGNALS. 
A warning felast of from fifteen to twenty seconds* duration is sounded to attract 
attention. After this warning the longer blasts (of from four to aix seconds' duration) 
.refer to weather, . and shorter blasts (from one to three -seconds' duration^, refer to 
temperatsire; thouc .for weather are sounded first. * 

PUafls. Indicate. Blasts; • Indicate. 

One long JFair weather. One short. .....L©w«r temperature 

Two Ion*..... ....Ram or snow. "Two short .. .' ..Higher temperature. 

[Three long # ..Local rain or snow. Three short Cold wave; 

By repeating each combination a few times, with intervals of ten seconds, liability 
to error in reading the signals may be avoided. As far as -practicable, the forecast 
messages will be telegraphed at the expense of the Weather Bureau; but if this is im- 
practicable, they will be furnished at the regular commercial rates and sent "collect." 
In no case will the forecasts be sent to a second address in any place, except at the 
expense of the applicant. Persons desiring to display the flags or sound the whistle 
signals for the benefit of the public should communicate, with thr. Weather Bureau 
officials In charge of the climate and crop service of their respective States the central 
.stations Of . which are as follows: Montgomery Ala., Phcenix, Ariz.; Little'Rock Ark • 
San Francisco, Cal.; Denver, Col.; Jacksonville, Fla. ; Atlanta, Ga. • Boise Idaho' 
Springfield; 111.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Des Moines. Iowa: Topeka, Kan.; Louisville, Ky • 
•New-Orleans. La.; Baltimore. Md. (for Delaware and Maryland); Boston, Mass. (for 
, New-^England) ; Grand Rapids, Mich.; Minneapolis* Minn.; Vicksburg. Miss*- Columbia 
Mo.; Helena. Munt. ; Lincoln, Neb. ; Carson City, New ; Atlantic Citv. N. J. : Santa Fe* 
N.« M. ; Ithaca. N. Y. ; Fvaieigh, N. C. ; l'J.smarck. N. D. ; Columbus. Ohio:' Oklahoma* 
OKla. (for Oklahoma and Indian Territories); Portland. Ore.; Philadelphia. Perm.; Co- 
lumbia, S> C; Huron, S» D. ; Nashville, Tenn. ; Galveston. Tex.; Salt Lake. City, Utah; 
Richmond. Va,; Seattle, Wash.; Parkersburs, W. Va. ; Milwaukee, Wis.; . Cliey- 
*nne. : Wy&. ■ 

There are also storm and hurricane warnings, the combinations teefhg made with 




u* 



RAINFALL, TBMIERATUttB. 



a white triangular flag, a red triangular flag and a square red flag with a black square 
in the centre. The combinations follow: ♦ 

Storm 'warnings. Hurricane warning. 




(Flags with light lines red. squares in the centre black.) 
Storm warning — A red flag with a black centre Indicates that a storm of marked 
violence is expected. The pennants displayed with the flags indicate the direction of 
the wind— red, Easterly (from northeast to south)'; white, westerly (from southwest to 
north). The pennant above the flag indicates that the wind is expected to blow from 
the northerly quadrants; below, from the southerly quadrants. By night a red light 
indicates easterly winds, and a white above a red light, westerly winds. 

Hurricane warning — Two red flags with black centres displayed one above the 
ofher indicate the expected approach of a .tropical hurricane, or one of those extremely 
severe and dangerous storms which occasionally move across the lakes and Northern 
Atlantic Coast. No night hurricane warnings are displayed. 

RAINFALL AND TEMPERATURE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

^Prepared by United States Weather Bureau. The letters at the head of each col- 
umn indicate as follows: "M. A. R.," mean annual rainfall (including snow melted>. In 
inches. "M. A. T.," mean annual temperature. "H. R. T.," highest recorded tem- 
perature at the station. 



"L. R. T.," lowest recorded temperature at the .station. 



Stations. 



Alabama, Montgomery... 

Arizona, Phoenix 

Arkansas, Little Rock... 
California, San Francisco 

Colorado, Denver 

Connecticut, New-Haven. 

Florida, Jacksonville . 4 

Georgia, Atlanta 

Idaho, Boise City........ 

Illinois, Springfleld 

Indiana, Indianapolis .... 

Iowa, Des Moines 

Kansas, Dodge 

Kentucky. Louisville 

Louisiana. New-Orleans.. 

Maine. Portland 

Maryland. Baltimore 

Massachusetts, Boston... 

Michigan, Detroit 

Minnesota, St Paul 

Mississippi, Vicksburg. . . 

Missouri, St. Louis 

Montana, Helena 

Nebraska, Omaha 



g 
f> 

5277 
6.9 
53.6 
23.7 
14.5 
47.9 
54.1 
50.4 
14.4 
38.0 
43.0 
33.1 
19.8 
45.8 
60.5 
42.3 
44.0 
45.0 
32.3 
27.5 
55.7 
41.1 
13.2 
31.7 



55. 8 1 101 
49.41105 



65T2 
69.2 
61.5 



49.4 
69.0 
61.2 
50.6 
52.3 
52.7 
48.5 
53.1 
56.7 
68.8 
45.7 
55.2 
48.6 
48.1 
43.3 
65.3 
55.6 
43.1 
49.6 



P 
12 

i'12 
• £? 

*29 
»14 
10 

* 8 
128 
l 22 
*25 
130 
*26 
120 

7 
*17 

* 7 
U3 
*24 
»41 
» 1 
i22 
142 
132 



Stations. 



Nevada, Winnemucca. . . . 
New-H'pshire, Concord. 1 . 
New-Jersey, Atl'tlc City. 
New-Mexico, Santa Fe . . 

New-York, Albany 

North Carolina, Raleigh. 
North Dakota, Bismarck. 

Ohio, Columbus 

Oklahoma, Oklaho'a City 

Oregon, Portland 

Pennsylvania, P*delphia. . 
Rhode Island, Block Is'd 
South Carolina, Ch'lston. 
South Dakota, Yankton.. 

Tennessee, Nashville 

Texas, San Antonio 

Utah, Salt Lake Cit} .... 

Vermont, Burlington 

Virginia, Lynchburg 

Washington, Seattle 

Washington, D. C 

W. Virginia. Parkersb'g.. 
Wisconsin, Milwaukee. . . 
Wyoming, Cheyenne. . . . . 



8.5 
40.3 
42.7 
14.2 



87.9(48.2 



46.1 
18.4 
38.9 
31.1 
46.8 
IJ.8 
44.2 
56.7 
26.8 
50.1 
29.7 
16.2 
82.9 
42.9 
35.9 
43.5 
41.0 
32.1 
12.2 



48.6 
46.0 
61.9 
48.3 



.1 
39.6 
52.1 
_.'.4 
52.5 
53.4 
49.1 
65.8 
45.8 

3 
68.5 
51.3 
45.3 
56.9 

81? 

54.4 
45.0 
44.4 



104 
100 

09 

97 
1100 
103 
106. 
104 
104 
102 
103 
. 89 
104 
107 
104 
108 
102 

07 
102 

06 
104 
102 
100 
100 



•128 
'35 
» 7 
*13 
124 

* 2 
*4A 
120 

m 

* 2 

» 6 

1 4 
7 
*S4 
*13 
4 
»20 
*25 

\l 

*15 

127 
J 25 



1 Indicates temperature below zero. 2 Figures corrected to December 31, 1904. 

INDIAN SERVICE. 

Different objects appropriated for in the Indian acts of 1003-04 and 1904-'05. 

! ~l004-'05. t 1905-0*67 



Current and contingent expenses. . 
Fulfilling treaty stipulations....... 

Mi&cellaneous supports, gratuities 

Incidental expenses . . « 

Support of schools 

Miscellaneous 

Kansas consolidated fund 



Totals If9,018,824 69 88,129.312 46 



$728,400 00 
3,514,285 85 
343,570 94 
84,900 00 
3,883.740 00 
1,119,154 90 



$761,600 00 

2,078,468 96 

685,000 00 

84,900 00 

3,777,100 00 

696,266 01 

155,976 88 





CENSUS STATISTICS. 






CENSUS OF 1900. 




States and 
Territories. 


Popula- 
tion. 


Sex. ' 


Native and 
foreign born. 


3 Race and color. 


Males. 


Females. 


Native. 


2 Foreign. 


White. 


Negro. 
8277307 


Alabama 


1,828,697 


916.764 


911,933 


1,814,698 


24,233 


1,001,152 


Alaska ....,..-. 


63,592 


45,872 


17,720 


50,105 


14,592 


30,493 


168 


Aiiiona ....... 


122,931 


71,795 


51,136 


98,931 


12,661 


92,203 


1,848 


Arkansas ..... 


1,311.564 


675.312 


636,252 


1,297.275 


14,289 


944,580 


366,856 


California .... 


1,485.053 


820,531 


664.522 


1,117,813 


367,240 


1,402,727 


11,045 


Colorado ....'.. 


539.700 


295,332 


244,368 


448,545 


91,155 


529,046 


8,570 1 


Connecticut ... 


908,420 


454,294 454,126 


670,210 


238.210 


892.424 


15,226 


Delaware ..... 


184,735 


94,158' 90,577 


170,945 


13.810 


153,977 


30.697 


D. of Columbia 


278,7181 132,004! 146,714 


258.599 


20,119 


191,532 


86,702 


Florida 


528,5421 275,246] 253.296 


504,710 


23,832 


297,833 


230,730 


Georgia 


2,216,3311 1,103.201 1,113.130 


2,203.928 


12,403 


1,181.294 


1,034,813- 


Hawaii 


154,0011 106,3691 47.632 


63.221 


90,780 


66,890 


233 


Idaho 


161,7721 93,367 i 68.405 
4,821.5501 2,472,7821 2,348,768 


137,168 
3.854.803 


24,604 
966,747 


154,495 
4,734,873 


293 
85,078 


Illinois 


Indiana 


2,516.462! 1,285,4041 1,231,058 


2,374,341 


142,121 


'2,458.502 


57,505 


Indian Ter 


392,0601 208.952! 183.108 


387.202 


4.858 


302,680 


36,852 


lev. a 


2,231,8531 1,156,849 1,075,004 


1.925,933 


305,920 


2,218,667 


12,693 


Kansas 


1,470,4951 768.716 


701,779 


1,343,810 


126,685 


1.416.319 


52,003 


Kentucky 


2,147,174 


1,090,227 


1.056,947 


2.096,925 


50,249 


1,862.309 


284,706 


Louisiana 


1,381,625 


694,733 


686,892 


1,328.722 


52,903 


729.612 


650,804 


Main.? 


694,466 


350,995 


343,471 


601.136 


93.330 


692.226 


1,319 


Maryland 


l,l88 k 044 


589,275 


598,769 


1,094.110 


93,934 


952,424 


235,064 


Massachusetts 


2 r NtKi,346 


1,367,474 


1,437,872 


1,959.022 


846.324 


2,769,704 


31.974 


Michigan 


1'. 4^i|. 1+82 


1,248,905 


1,172,077 


1,879,329 


541.653 


2,398,563 


15,816 


Minnesota .... 
Mississippi ». . 


■1.751. 394 


932,490 


818,904 


1,246,076 


505.318 


1,737,036 


4,959 


1,6^1.270 


781,451 


769,819 


1,543.289 


7.981 


641,200 


907,630 


Missouri 


a.iwi.fifls 


1,595,710 


1,510,955 


2,890,286 


216.379 


2,944,843 


161,234 


Montana ...... 


243.;' "29 


149.842 


.93,487 


176.262 


67,067 


226,283 


1,523 


-Nebraska . . . . . 


l.OG&SOO 


564,592 


501,708 


888,953 


177,347 


1,056,526 


6,269 


Nevada ....... 


42.-'::J5 


25.603 


16.732 


32.242 


10,093 


35,405 


134 


N. -Hampshire 


431,988 


205,379 


206,209 


323.481 


88,107 


410,791 


662 


New- Jersey ... 


1,883.660 


941,760 


941,909 


1,451,785 


431,884 


1,812,317 


69.844 


New-Mexico .« 


iP5.:U0 


104,228 


91,082 


181,685 


13,625 


180,207 


1,610 


New -York .... 


7, 2t38,S94 


3,614,780 


3,654,114 


5.368,469 


1,900.425 


7,156,881 


99,232 


North Carolina 


3 . MIC. s 10 


938,677 


955,133 


1,889,318 


4,492 


1,263,603 


624,469 


North Dakota. 


310.146 


177,493 


141,653 
2,054.890 


206.055 


113,091 


311,712 


286 


Ohio 


4.ir>7.r.*5 


2,102,655 


3,698,811 


458,734 


4,060,204 


96,901 


Oklahoma .... 


308.S31 


214,359 


183,972 


382,651 


15,680 


367,524 


18.831 


Oregon 


4l3.r.36 


232,985 


180.551 


347.788 


65,748 


394,582 


1,105 


Pennsylvania . 


& 802*115 


3,204.541 


3,097,574 


5,316,865 


9.85,250 


6,141,064 


156.845 


Rhode Island. . 


■ilS, 1.56 


210,516 


218.040 


294,037 


131,519 


419.050 


9,092 


South Carolina. 


].::^.;'16 


664,895 


675.421 


1,334,788 


5,528 


557,807 


782,321 


South Dakota.. 


401,570 


216,164 


185,406 


' 313,062 


88,508 


380,714 


465 


Tennessee . ... 


2. r Hio, (516 


1,021,224 


999,392 


2,002,870 


17,746 


1.540.186 


480,243 


Texas 


ii.iu* 710 


1,578,900 


1,469.810 


2,869,353 


179,357 


2,426,669 


620,772 


Utah 


27*749 
343,641 


141,687 
175,138 


135,062 
168,503 


222,972 
298.894 


53.777 
44,747 


272,465 
342,771 


672 
826 


Vermont ...... 


Virginia ....... 


1,854,184 925,897 


928.287 


1,834,723 


19,461 


1,192,855 


660.722 


Washington . . 
West Virginia, 


518.1031 304.178 


213.925 


406,739 


111.364 


496,304 


2,514 


958, 800 j 499,242 


459,558 


936,349 


22.451 


915,233 


43,499 


Wisconsin .... 


2,069,0421 1,067,562 


1,001.480 


1 1,553.071 


515.971 


2,057,911 


2,542 


Wyoming ..... 


92,531 


I 58,184 


34,347 
37.244.145 


I 75,116 
| ♦55.843,302 


• 17,415 


89,051 
"66,099.788 


940 


United States! * 76,303,387 


139,059,242 


'10,460.085 


"8,840.789 
ws ; Con- 


iThis total includes population enumerated by the ( 


>nsus Office as folio 


tinentab United States, 75,994,575; Alaska, 63,592; Hawa 


ii, 154,001; military i 


ind naval, 


91 219 The population for the ent : re United States is 


5 84,233,069. the tota 


Is for the 


Insular dependencies being: Philippines, 6,961,339; Por 


to Rico, 953,243; Gu 


am, 9,000; 


Samoa 6,100. 2 Of these 10,250,063 are whites and 210. 


022 colored, includinj 


? Chinese, 


Japanese, etc 'In addition to the negro population t 


here are in the Uni 


ted States 


classified as colored 119,050 Chinese, 85.983 Japanese, 


137,242 Indians taxe 


d, 129.518 


Indians not taxed. * These totals include 84,209 whi 


tes and 6,394 negro 


es in the 


military and naval service. 








72 females; of the for 


elgn born. 


6 730 112 are males and 4,729,973 females; of the total > 


tfhite, 34,349,021 are 


males and 


.the native white of native parents, 20.934,099 are males 


ales and 27.937,551 f 


emales; of 


and 20,119.318 fema 


'*s; of the 




and 7.818,233 female 


>s; of thf 


foreign white, 5,545.833 are males and 4,704,230 females 


; of the total colored 


. 4.710.221 


are males and 


4,602,364 


females; < 


>f the nej 


jroes, 4.3C 


3.221 are 


males and 


4.447,568 



114 CITIES OF OVER 25,000 POPULATION. 







females; of the Chinese, 111,054 are males and 7,996 females; of the Japanese. 71,380 


! are males and 14,000 females; of the Indiana, 134,500 are 


males and 


132.200 females. 


States and 
Territories. 


Native white. 


Males, voting age. 


White 
voting 


males, 
age. 


Illiterates 
10 years 
or av-er. 

"~ 443.590 


Natwe 
parents. 


■roreign 
parents. 


White. 


Negro- 
181,471 


Native. 
224,212 


Foreign 
bor&>. 
8,082 


Alabama ... .1 


956,685 


30,1561 232,294 


Alaska 


17,401 


4.215 


25,953 


141 


' 18,001 


7,952 


23.311 


Arizona 


44,830 


25,678 


34.911 


1,084 


22,, 50 


12.161 


27.307 


Arkansas ... 


891,668 


32,726 


226,597 


87.157 


218.319 


8,278 


190,655 


California .. 


644,428 


441,794 


489,545 


3,711 


309,251 


180,294 


58,95*) 


Colorado .... 


311,335 


127,236 


181,616 


3,215 


130.454 


61,162 


17.7 1 « 


Connecticut . 


372,783 


282,245 


275,126 


4,576 


168.723 


100.403 


r 42.973 


Delaware . . . 


118,029 


22,219i 


45.592 


8,374 


38,845- 


0,747 


17,631 


D.of Col'mbia 


134,073 


37,939 


60,318 


\ 23,072 


50.718 


9.C00 ! 20.028 


Florida 


254,032 


24,044 


77,962 


61,417 


68,237 


8v72Sj 


84,285 


Georgia 


1,144,360 


24,913 


277.396 


223,073 


270.789 


0,707 


480.420 


Hawaii 


37,919 


16,223 


19,576 


93 


12,876 


0,700 


42 r 340 


l4aho ....... 


89,851 


42.754 


50,328 


130 


36,837 


13.491 


6,506 


Illinois 


2,271,765 


1,498,473 


1,370,209 


29,762 


803,086 


467,123 


; 157.96* 


Indiana 


1.952,194 


364,447 


701,761 


18,186 


628,674 


73,087 


90.539' 


Indian Ter... 


28-7,647 


10,247 


77,865 


9,146 


74,922 


2.943 


52,052 ; 


Iowa 


1,261,068 


651,817 


630, 665 


4,441 


472,759 


157,906 


40,172 


Kansas 


1,013,655 


276,087 


398,552 


14.6S5 


331,614 


66,938 


32,513 


Kentucky . . . 


1,673,413 


138,763 


469,206 


74,728 


444.067 


25,139 


262.95-4 


Louisiana ... 


560,962 


107,797 


177,878 


147.348 


152,538 


26,340 


381,145 


Maine 


493,082 


106,209 


216.866 


445 


178,341 


38.515 


29,000 


Maryland . . . 


680,049 


179,231 


260,979 


00,406 


218.968 


42,011 


101,947 


Massach' setts 


1,032,264 


897.386 


830,049 10,456 


486,527 


343,622 


134.043 


Michigan . . . 


1,026,714 


831,653 


712,245 


5,193 


450,830 


261,415 


80,482 


Minnesota . . 


425,780 


806,321 


602,384 


2,168 


241,631 


260,753 


62,940 


Mississippi . . 


614,067 


! ' 19,508 


150.530 


197,936 


145,815 


4.715 


351.461 


Missouri .... 


2,204,874 


624,194 


809,797 


46,418 


697,314 


112,483 


152,844 


Montana .... 


92,937 


70,973 


94,873 


711 


54,890 


39,983 


11,675 


Nebraska . . . 


553.524 


325,885 


297,817 


2,298 


206,892 


90,925 


17.907 


Nevada . 


15,111 


11,713 


14,6521 70 


8,855 


6,797 


4,045 


N. -H'mpshire 


242.614 


80.216 


130,648 


| 230 


95,819 


34,769 


21,076 


New-Jersey . 


825,973 


656,294 


632,750 


21,474 


336,152 


196,598 


86,668 


New-Mexico 


149,029 


17.917 


50,804 


775 


43,553 


7,251 


46v07l 


New-York . . 


2,851.513 


2,415,845 


2,14u,057 


31.425 


1,315.583 


829,474 


318,160 


No. Carolina- 


1,250,811 


8,398 


289,263 


127.114 


286,812 


2,451 


386,251 


No. Dakota-. 


65,811 


133,311 


93.2?*7 


115 


37,67ft 


55,558 


12.719 


Ohio 


i 2,651,440 


950,864 


1.180 598 


31,235 


954,911 


225.088 


131,541 


Oklahoma . . 


313,905 


38,015 


101,543 


4,827 


92.946- 


8.597 


15,774 


Oregon 


256,125 


84,596 


131,261 


560 


99,775 


31,486 


10,686 


Pennsylvania 


3,729.093 


1.430.028 


1,763.482 


61.668) 


1,278,679 


484,803 


299.376 


! Rhode Island 


144,986 


140,292 


124,001 


2,765 


70,233 


\ 53,768 


29,004 


] So. Carolina. 


540,766 


11,670 


130,375 


t 152.860 


127,396 


2.979 


338.669 


So. Dakota.. 


136,191 


156,194 


107,353 


184 


61,907 


45.446 


14,832 


Tennessee . . 


1,481,636 


40.964 


• 875,046 


112.236 


365.537 


! 9.509 


: 300,830 


Texas 


1,959,762 


289,326 


659,961 


136,875 


514. 18$ 


85.773 


314,018 


Utah 


104,020 


115.635 


65.205 


358 


40,799 


24,406 


6.141 


Vermont .... 


225,381 


72,696 


108.027 


289 


87,181 


20,846 


10,247 


Virginia .... 


1,141,213 


82.574 


' 301,379 


146, ^2 


290.294 


i 11,085 


312,120 


Washington 


265.068 


129.111 


183.999 


1,230 


122.254 


61,745 


12,740 


W. Virginia. 


843,981 


48.873 


233,129 


14,786 


220.251 


12.878 


80.105 


Wisconsin .. 


6*5.903 


956,303 


• 667,213 


1.006 


309.909 


257,304 


13,779 


: Wyoming . . . 
! Total* 


' 47,982 


24.487 


36,262 


481 


25,651 



3 14 r 103. 61 9 


10,611 
M.032,524 


2378 j 
«0.240,8B7 


'41,053,417 


;*15,687,322 


'16,036,143 


2 2. 065, 989 


! s These totals Include 48,643 of native parentage a 


nd 20.86T 


of whole 


or partial 


I foreign parentage in the military or naval service. 2 Th 


ese totals- i 


ncltad* 71,! 


m whites 


1 and 5,453 negroes in the military and naval services. 
1 natives and 13,602 foreign born in the military and nava 


"These t 


etals inch 


ice 68,315 


services. 


«TMs tota 


I Includes 


1,137 illiterates fcn the military and 


naval services. H)nc 


or both. 
OR MO 


RB. 




j POPULATION OF 


CITTES OF 25,00 


1 The following statistics, prepared ua<ler the dlrectl 
j itattstician for population of the Census Bureau, give tl 


on ©f Will] 


ia» C Hi 


mt, efctef 


10 populate 


m of the 


160 eitieB 


j having 25,000 inhabitants ev more to 1900, according t 


3 the offici 


al caum < 


Jf the v- 


i Urns of the Twelfth Census, taken as cf June 1. 1900. 


The 159 c 


itiee com© 


ine6ft*ve 


a population to 1900 of 19,694,625, as compared with a 


population 


for the m 


une cities 


of 14,855,489 in- J890, and of 9,933,927 in 1880. The abso 


lute increa 


se to the i 


jopuJattoj* 


of these cities from 1890 to 1900 was 4.839.136, or 82, ^ 


26 less th 


in the at* 


rotate to- 


•crease from 1880 to 1890, when it was 4.92\562. T,*e pe 


rcentage of 


increase i 


«» popai»* 


I tlon of the 159 eitiet* from 1890 to 1900 was 32.5» as a 


gainst 49. 5 


from 1S8( 


» to 189* 


j In 3880 there weie but twenty cttiea which eontained 


more than. 


100,000- in 


habitant*. 



CITLBS OP OVBR 25.000 POPULATION. 



_U5_| 



bat in 1890 th» number had Increased to twenty-eight, and in 1900 to thirty-eight. 
In 1900 there are seventy-eight cities of 60, 000 Inhabitants or more as compared with 
flfty-eigbt in 1890 and thirty-five in 1880. The combined Dopulation in 1900 of the nine- 
teen cities of the first class (above 200,000) is 11,79.~>.8C9, as against a population In 
1890 of 8,879.105, representing an increase during the ten years of 2.910,704, or 82.8 
per cent. The same cities showed an increase from 1880 to 1890 of 2,507.452, or 40.0 
per e?enL The nineteen cities of the second class (between 100,000 and 200,000) have a 
combined population in 1900 of 2,412 53S, and show an increase of 33.3 per cent from 
U90 to 1900, as against an increase of T9.2 per cent from 1880 to 1890, The forty cities 
of the third class (between 60.000 and 100,000) have a combined population in 1900 of 
2,709.238, as against a population in 1S90 of 2,067,169, which is equivalent to an increase 
during the decade of 81 per cent, as compared with aa increase of 51 per cent during 
the preceding ten years. The eighty-one cities of the fourth class (between 25.000 and 
50.000) have a combined population in 1900 of 2,776,940, having gained since 1890 676,381 
in number, or 82.2 per cent, as against an increase of 08.7 per cent from 1880 to 1890. 



I Population. \ Inc. 



Cities. 



New-York, N. Y.. 

Chicago, IlL 

Philadelphia, Penn 
St. Louis, Mo..... 
Boston, Mass.*.... 
Baltimore. Md.... 
Cleveland, Ohio... 

Buffalo. N. Y 

San Francisco. Cal 
Cincinnati. Ohio. . 
Pittsburg Penn... 
New-Orleans, La.. 
Detroit, Mich. .... 
Milwaukee, Wis... 
Washington. D. C. 

Newark, N. J 

Jersey City. N. J. 

Louis vUle, Ky 

Minneapolis, Minn 
Provldenfce, R. I.. 
Indianapolis. Ind.. 
Kansas City, Mo.. 
St. Paul, Minn.... 
Rochester, N. Y... 

Denver. Col. .- 

Toledo, Ohio 

Allegheny, Penn..| 
Columbus, Ohio. . . 
Worcester, Mass.. 
Syracuse, N. Y... 
New-Haven. Conn. 
Paterson, N. J.... 
Fall River. Mass.. 
St Joseph, Mo... 

Omaha. Neb 

Lob Angeles, Cal.. 
Memphis, Tenn... 
Scranton, Penn. . . 

Lowell, Mass 

Albany, N. Y 

Cambridge. Mass.. 

Portland. Ore 

Atlanta. Ga 

Grand Rapids, M'h 

Dayton, Ohio 

Richmond, Va 

Nashville. Tenn... 

Seattle, Wash 

Hartford, Conn. . . 
Reading. Penn.... 
Wilmington, Del.. 
Camden, N. J.... 
Trenton. N. J.... 
Bridgeport Conn. . 

Lynn. Mass 

Oakland, Cal 

Lawrence, Mass. . 
New-Bedford. Mass 
Des Moines, Iowa. 
Springfield, Mass.. 
Somerville. Mass.. 



.437,202 
,898,676 
,2$>3,697 
670.23H 
H0tB83 
6W.057 
88 1 .768 
852.887 
3»2.7»2 
326.902 
321,016 
2JtT;ll>4 
£86,704 
285. 81B 
±70.7 Its 
246. 070 
200. 4 tt 
£04,731 
202,713 
176,697 
low,!*;* 

103.752 

103 ,005 

l«2,fl08 

183,869 

131,822 

ltt.000 

325. 560 

1I0.4U1 

108,374 

108,027 

10G.I71 

104,1*03 

102,079 

192,50* 

102.479 

102,320 

102. 020 

04.t*00 

04.101 

bl. 83ft 

00424 

80,872 

87.565 

85, aw 

B0,0M 

m, fros 

80,671 
TJ.Kto 
78,061 
TO. &03 

73,307 
TOJOi 
08,513 
60,960 
02 r 6 50 
02.444 
02. 1 30 
02.050 
01,042 



_m&_ 

£.492.591 
1,000,850 
1,046,964 
4il h 770 
4*8.477 
434. 43P 
201,860 
255.004 
208,997 
200,000 
23*.*; 1 7 
242,080 
900,070 
21.14, 408 
330,392 
101.030 
103. 003 
101.120 
100,738 
132.149 
100.430, 
132,710 
133,150 
1 33,600 
106.713 
8L434 
100.2H7 
00,U-oi 
84,065 

as. i-i3 

81,20* 
78.347 
74,30s 
02,824 
140.402 
00386 
04,495 
7", 215 
77.6HO 
94.923 
70,028 
40.386 
05,533 
00.278 
81.220 
81,383 
70.103 
42.837 
03,230 
08,001 
01.431 
68.313 
GT.45H 
40.880 
5(1,727 
48,*i.H2 

40,733 
00,003 

44.17JJ 

io.'Oi 



Per 
cent. 



Cities. 



Troy, N. Y 

Hoboken. N. J. 
Evansvllle, Ind... 
Manchester, N. H. 

Utlca. N. Y 

Peoria, III 

Charleston. S. C. . 
8 Savannah, Ga. .... 

6 Salt I>ake City, U. 

7 San Antonio. Tex. 

7|Duluth, Minn 

O.Erie, Penn 

7 Elizabeth. N. J... 
5| Wilkeebarre, Penn 
9, Kansas City, Kan 
3 Harrisburg, Penn. 
6 Portland, Me. 

Yonkers. N. Y.... 

0: Norfolk, Va 

8 1 Waterbnry, Conn. 
4! Holyoke, Mass.... 

3 Fort Wayne, Ind . 

4 Youngatown, Ohio. 

4 Houston. Tex 

4 Covington, Ky. ... 

8 Akron, Ohio 

3 Dallas, Tex 

4 i Saginaw, Mich .... 

8 Lancaster. Penn.. 

9 Lincoln, Neb 

8 Brockton. Mass. . . 
2 Blnghamton, N. Y 
n Augusta, Ga 

Pawtucket. R. I.. 

Altoona, Penn 

Wheeling. W. Va. 

Mobile, Ala 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Little Rock, Ark.. 

Springfield. Ohio.. 
_ Galveston, Tex.... 
.9 Tacoma, Wash.... 

1 Haverhill, Mass... 

2 Spokane, Wash. . . . 

3 .Terra Haute, Ind. 
4| Dubuque. Iowa.... 

1 Qulncy, III 

3 1 South Bend. Ind.. 
Salem. Mass 

.0 Johnstown, Perm. . 

5 Elmira, N. Y 

2'Allentown, Penn.. 
5 Davenport, Iowa.. 
.2 McKeesport, Penn. 

9 Springfield, III.... 
Chelsea, Mass.... 
Chester. Penn..... 

2 York. Penn 

Maiden, Mass. ..— 
4 | Topeka, Kan...,« 
Newton. Mass 



Population 



ffOO, 

•0,601 

59.36* 
BO.OOT 
56,087 
09,383 

60,100 
65,1-07 
64.244 
03.531 
5L5.321 
62J>60 
t2.733 
62.130 
61,721 
51,418 
60,107 
60. 1 45 
47,1*31 
40.024 
45,900 
45,712 
4M16 
44, HBO 

44.B33 

12,938 

42, WM 
42 345 
41.4"p!t 
40. 1*KP 
40.00a 
30, Ei 47 
30 (41 
30,231 
as, 07^ 

SS.S7.S 
38,4flO 
3«. 415 
Sa.3i»T 

3&,2r,3 
07. Tw 



00,000 

43,048 

», mo 

44,120 
44,007 
41,024 

M.eoo 

43 . 1 so 

44.043 

57, era 
as.no 

40, 634 
37.764 
07.718 
30,310 
89,306 
00,420 
3^,033 

34,871 

28,040 
86,087 

35.3001 
0,1 . 2SO 
27,537 
37,371 
27, &" I 
38.0*7 
40,322 

55, 104 
£7,204 
35,005 
03.000 
27.033 
80,331 
04,023 
31,076 
20, 17a 
26,074 

si.no 



37.714 


06,000 


87470 


27,412 


30 H4S 


10,022 


Si;.0r3 


30,217 


30,207 


30,311 


30 252- 


31»44M 


35,000 


£1,010 


35,909 


30. 0(1 1 


aa.iifco 


SI, SOB 


35,072 


.lO.NU.i 


»r. \\'i 


25. 22S 


33,354 


20.H72 


34.227 


20,741 


04,1 so 


£4,003 


84,072 


27,900 


83, [1*8 


£0 220 


33.700 


20.7r*3 


3- ■■ 


23,03.1 


3 


310*17 


33.5*7 


«t,<»tv 



Inc. 



Per 

cent. 
~M>5 
30.0 
10.2 
29.1 
28.1 
36.7 

IB 
25.5 
193 
41.5 
59.9 
29.7 
38.0 
37.1 
34.1 
27.3 
37.0 
490 
33.7 
00.0 
28.2 
27.4 
35.1 
01.0 
14.8 
54.8 
12.0 
!8.5 
29.5 
l 27.1 
46.7 
13.2 
18.4 
41.9 
28.4 
126 
23.7 
46.7 
48.0 
19.9 
20.9 

4.7 
35.6 
84.9 
21.3 
19.7 
15.1 
04.9 
10.7 
64.8 
15.4 
40.3 
31.1 
65.0 
30.8 
22.0 
68.0 
02.1 
46.1 

8.3 
37.7 




116 



TOWNS AND CITIES BELOW 85.000. 



POPULATION OF CITTES, 1*00— ^Continued). 



Sictjx City, Iowa. . 
Bayonne, N. J.... 
Knoxville, Tenn.. 
Chattanooga, Tenn 
Schenectady, N. Y 
Fi'tchburg, Mass.. 

Superior, Wis 

Rockford. Ill 

Taunton, Mass.... 

Canton, Ohio 

Butte, Mont 

MoMpomery, Ala. 
Auburn N. Y... 
East SI. Louis, HI 

Joliet, 111 

Sacramento, Cai. . . 

Pacine, Wis 

l«a Crosse. Wis... 
WilHamsport, P»n. 



1900. _ 

83.111 
32,722 
32.037 
32.490 
31,6.32- 
31.531 
31.001 
31,1.51 
31,030 
30, oo? 
30,470 
80,340 
30,345 
29,655 
20.353 
20.282 
29. 102 
28,895 
28,757 



1890. 
37.806 
19,«33 
22535, 
29,1<j0 
19,902 
22,037 
11.983 
23,584 
25.448 
26,1 S9 
10,723 
21,883 
25.858 
15,169 
23,264 
26,386 
21.014 
25,090 
27,132| 



CUiea. 



M2.4 
71.9 
44.8 
11.6 
89.1 
43.0 

159.4 
31.6 
21.9 
17.0 

184.1 
38.6 
17.3 
95.4 
26.1 
10.9 
38.4, 
15.11 
5.»J 



Jacksonville, Pla.. 
Newcastle, Penn.. 

Newport, Ky .. 

Oshkosh, Wis 

Woonsjcket, R. I. 

Pueblo, Col 

Atlantic City, N. J 

Passaic, N. J 

Bay City, Mich... 
Fort Worth, Tex..- 
Lexington, Ky . . . . 
Gloucester, Mass..' 
South Omaha. Neb 
New-Britain, Conn 
Council Bluffs, I'a 
^•iar Rapids, I'a, 

Kaston, Penn 

Jackson, Mich..... 



Population. 



28,429 

28,3^9' 

28.801 

28,284] 

28,204 

28,167: 

27,838 

27,777 

27.628 

26.688' 

26.369 

26,121 

26.00^ 

25,998 

23.802 

25,650 

26,238 

25,180 



1880. 



iPtt 



17.201 1 US.i 



n.floo 

24.918' 
22,836 

20.830: 



24,553; 14.6 



13,055 
13.028! 
27.839- 
23.076 
21.J567 
24.651 
8,062 
16.519 
21,471 
18,020. 
14,481 
20,798 



144L3 
13.6 
23.8 
364 



H3.2 
113.2 
»0.7 
15.6 
22.2 
5.S 
!22.fi 
57.3 
20.1 
42.3 
74.2 
21.0 



* Decrease. 



Alabama— 

Annlston . .... 9.695 
Avcndale ..... 3.060 



TOWNS AND CITIES BKTWKKX 3,099 AND 
Hamden 4,626 



Bessemer .... 


. 6,358 


Decatur 


. 3,114 


Dothan 


. 3,275 


Eufaula ..... 


. 4,532 


F'.orence 


. 6.178 


Gadsden 


. 4,282 


Glrwrd 


. 3.840 


Greenville . . . 


. 3,102 


Huntsville ... 


. 8,008 


New -Decutar, 


. 4,437 


Opeiika . . . . 


. 4.245 


PhoeniY ..... 


. 4,103 


Pratt City.... 


. 8,485 


Solma 


. 8,713 


Sheffield 


. 3,333 


Tali>u3ee"a ... 


. 5,050 


Troy 


. 4 097 


Tuscaloosa . . 


. 6,094 


Alaska— 




Nome ....... 


12.4SS 


Skaepvay .... 


. 3,117 


Arizona— 




Phcenix 


. 5,544 


Pres«>ott 


. s mo 


Tucpan 


. 7,531 


Arknnsa*- 




Kurok'i bp'ngs 1,570 


Fayettevrlle . 


. 4,001 


Fort SnaitU... 


.11,587 


Helena 


5,550 


Hot Springs.. 


9,973 


Joncsboro . . . 


4,508 


Mena 


3,423 


Paragould, . . . 


. 3,324 


Pine Bluff... 


11,49(5 



Texarkana ... 4,914 
California- 

Alameda 16,404 

Bakerslield ... 4. 830 

Berkeley 13,214 

Kuretoi 7.327 

Fresno 12,470 

Gi-as-s Valley.. 4.719 
Marysville ... 3,407 

Napa 4,030 

Nevada City.. 3,250 
Pasadena ..... 9,117 
Petaiuma .... 3,871 
Pomona 5,526 



Kedlands 4,797 

Riverside 7,973 

Salinas 3,304 

S. Bernardino. 6,150 

San Diego 17,700 

San Joso. ......21.500 

3. Luis Obispo 3,021 
San Rafael... 3,879 

Santa Ana 4,933 

Santa Barbara 6,587 
Santa Clara... 3,050 

Santm Cruvs 5,059 

Santa Monica. 3,057 
Santa Rosa... 6.0V3 

Stockton 17,506 

Vallejo 7,905 

Visalia 3,085 

Watsonvlllc .. 3,528 
Colorado- 
Aspen 3,303 

Boulder . 6.150 

Canyon City.. 3,775 
Central City.. 3,114 
Colorado Sp's.21.085 
Cripple Creek.. 10, 147 

Durango 3,317 

Florence 3,728 

Fort Collins... 8,053 
Or. Junction.. 3,503 

Greeley 3,023 

Leadville 12,455 

Sallda ........ 8,722 

S. Canyon City 958 

Trinidad 5,345 

Victor 4,986 

Connecticut — 

Ansonia 12,081 

Berlin 3.448 

BranfonI 6,706 

Bristol 6,208 

Banbury ......16,537 

Darien 3.116 

Derby 7,930! 

ISast Hartford. 6,406 
Kast Windsor. 3.158 

Rnfield 6,069 

Fairfield -4.489' 

Farmington ... 3.331 
Glastonbury .. 4.260! 
Greenwich ....12.172 

Grifw/Qia 3,490 

Groton 6.962 



Iritchfield ... 


. 3,214 


Manchester . 


.10,601 


Meririen 


.24,200 


Mid.Jletown .. 


. 9,589 


MSlford 


. 3.7S3 


Naugatuck . . 


.10,541 


New Hartford 


8,424 


New-Jvinrlon 


.17,548 


Ncw-MilforcL. 


. 4,804 


Newtown .... 


. 3,270 


Norwalk 


. 6,125 


Norwich 


.17,251 


Plain field ... 


. 4,821 


Portland .... 


. 3,856 


Putnam ..... 


. 6,667 


Rockvil!e ... 


7,287 


Salisbury .... 


. 3.489 


Seymour .... 


. 3,541 


Scuthington . 


. 3,4111 


South Norwalk 6,591 


Stafford 


4,207 


Stamford .... 


.15.997 


S torsi ngton >,. 


. 8 540 


Stratiord .... 


. 8,657 


SulVield ...... 


3,521 


Thorn aston . „ 


8,300. 


Thompson . . . 


. 6,442 


Tornngton . . 


8,360 


Walltr.Rford . 


6.737 i 


Wate-rtown .. 


. 3,100 


West Hartford 3. 186 


West Haven. 


5.247 


Weptport .... 


. 4.017 


Willimantic . 


8,937 


Windsor 


3,614 s 


Wi Kfsor Looks 3 002: 


Winsted 


6,804 


Delaware— 




Dover 


3.329 


Newcastle . . . 


8,380 


Florida— 




Apalachicola 


3,077 : 


Fernardina ... 


3,245 


Gainesville .. 


S.633 


Key West.... 


37,114 


Lak.- City.... 


4,013 


Ocala 


8.380 


Palatka ..... 


3,3™ 


Pe-nsacola . . . 


17,747 


St. Augustine 


4,272 


Tawipa 


15.839 \ 



25,060. 
Georgrio-^ 

Albany 

Amerfcug , , 

Athena 

Bamesvflle . 
Brunswick .. 
CartersvHIe . 
ColirmlHHi . . . 

Cordele ." 

Dalton ...... 

Elb©rto*\...; 
Gainesville .., 

Griffin , 

L«a Grange... 

Macon 

Marietta 

MUledgevirte 

Ncwnan 

Horns 

Summer* m* . 
Thmnasvilte . 
Vaktosta .... 
Washington 
Waycross , 
Idaho— 

Botee , . 

Pocatetto .... 

Illtl»*i»— 

Altoa 

Aurora 

Batavia 

Bea rdstewn . , 
Belksville ... 
BelvJdere . ... 
B?oomin«t<m . 
Blue Island. . 
BraWwood . . 
Catr« ........ 

Catcm ,. 

Carhondale . . 
CarllnTiTle .. 
Ccrttralla . . . , 
Champaiim .. 
Charleston ..,, 
Chfcaso H'ta. 

Clinton 

Oollirtsvitte. .. 
Danville ...., 

Decatnr 

n^kaJij 

Dixon ....... 

Dw»wAtn 



. 4,C0* 
. 7,<574 
.10.244) 
. 3,036 
9/>8I 
3,133 
.17,6M 
. 3,473 
. 4.SU 
. 5,834 
. 4,382 
. 6,857 
.4,274 
^3,272 
. 4.4« 
. 4,21» 
. 3,654 
. 7,291 
.. 3.24b 
. 5,322 
. ft, 613 
. 3,300 
. 8,»1* 

. 5,987 
.. 4,4>4*J 

.14,21« 

.24,147 
. S.«71 
. 4,«27 
.17.484 
. 6,107 

23.2^6 
«.1H 
8,279 

12 60S 
6,664 
3,31-8 
3.502 
6.721 
9.008 
6,488 
5.100 
4,452 
4,621 

1«.«84 

2,. i 5^ 

f.«17 

a *M 



TOWWS AlfD CITIES BBLOW »&.*<«. 



Ill 



BdwardavUlfr . 4,157 
Kfiiagaam . . . . & * • * 

Kureka .••••••••SI 

Bvanaten J&.259 

Freeport U.258 

Galen* *«£ 

Gcaeseo ...... £.«£> 

Granite *•**£ 

Harlem 4.0S6 

Harvey Jgg 

Havana fg» 

jacksonv4tte •**£•??? 
jersey vlU* «• MJJ 
Kankakee .—».g* 

Lagrange ..•^K 

Ifaywood ..— Vg" 

Mendotit J.M6 

MetropnU* --J HS 
Motlne .-•••••*$•?£ 

Morria ...... J^f 

Mt. Carrw*..- 4.3U 
Mt. V.er«o»... *J» 

Normal Jjg 

Wawn IS 

R3. •;::;::;: Vs 
RSr.:::::.': IS 

Pc*tl*e J.2«8 

Prince** v-.f52 
Bock l8iaa4^^lJ.JJJ 

Urban* J.TO 

Wauke*a« ••• •**•* 
Indiana— 
Alexandra --J;*" 
Anders** --^Hl 
Atttea J.JJI 

Aurora - }}» 

Bedford f*J£ 

*o*»*»Stoa . J.460 

SSSr.:::r.:t.» 

CfcltHnfcua ...... J^MJ 

CfenneravUle. .. 6.83» 
Oawtordavfflfr «.64» 

Decatur j. Ml 

Dunkirk 8J87 

Bast CJMea**- 8.417 

Mkbart U*8J 

IBweod ......IS.** 

Ratrmoant .— 3»*6» 
Praakfert .— JJ2} 

lfcai*H« 4.066 

G*r*ett ...... $£10 

0*9 Cats...... 8.622 

Gtotftiea ....... *.«** 

fareeacaatje .. a.eei 



*ireenMcld 4.-*brf 

Green sburg ... 6,034 
Hammond ....12,376 
Hartford City. 5.612 
Huntington . . ¥,491 
Jeffc-rsonville .1ft. 774 
Kendallv-kE*. .. 3,354 

Kokomo 10,609 

Lafayette ....18. lie 

Laporte 7.113 

Lawrenoeburg. 4.326 

Lebanon *,U& 

Linton ....... aBTl 

Ijoganaport ...16,204 

Madiscm 7.835 

Marten 17.337 

Martinsville .. 4,638 
Miefcigan City.M.850 
Mfsfeawaka .. 5,586 
Moatnelier . . . 8,466 
Ml Vernoft... 5.138 
M uncle .......80,64* 

New- Albany .20.628 
New Castle.... 3.406 

Nobles* ille ... 4,782 
Parker City... 909 

Peru 8,483 

Plymouth .... 3,656 

Portland 4.798 

Princeton .... 6,041 
Richmond .... 18,226 
Rochester .... 3; 421 

RusbvUle 4,541 

Seymour ..... 6.445 
Shelnyvme ... *,«8 

SuKlvaa 3UH 

Tipton . 2.7*4 

Valparaiso ... 6 286 
Vlneenenea ..16,249 

Wabaah 8.616 

Warsaw 8,987 

Washington .. k,&51 

Whiting 8.066 

Winchester ... 3.70ft 

Ardranve ..... ft.681 
Cfciekaaha ... 3,2nd 
Muscogee .... 4,254 
3. McAlester.. 3.4J& 
Iowa— 

Atlantic 6.046 

Bella Plafcie.. 3 283 
Boone ........ ft.8S6 

Burtington ...23.261 
Cedar Falto... ft.31* 
Centervllle ... 6.256 

Charitoa' 3,686 

Charlea Citr... 4,»7 
Cherokee ..... 3,866 
Clor'nda .*... 3.276 

Clinton 22 6»« 

t Crestfm ...... 7,752 

iDecorah ...... 3 246 

Eagrle Groove... 3.557 
K«ther»r,l^ ... 3.2it7 

Fafrfield 4.689 

Fort Dodfire. ..12,162 
Fort Madison. » 278 
Otenwood .... 3,640 

Orlrmell 3,8«0 

Independence.. 3.656 
Indianoia .... 8.261 

Iowa City 7,987 

Keokuk 1*641 

Knoxvitte ^. .. 3,131 

1> Mars 4.146 

Maquoketa ... 8.777 

Marian 4.102 

Marefcall town. 11.544 
Mann City... 6 746 



*ii*BOvri Vary 4.010 
Mt. Pteaaanr.. 4.10V 
Muscatine ....14.073 
Newton .'..... 8.682 

Oelwein 5.142 

Oskaioosa .... 9.212 
Ottumwa . . . .*8 167 
Perry ........ 3,J»8ft 

Red Oak 4,3Ki 

Shenandoah .-. 8.573 

Spencer 8,095 

Vinton 8.469 

Washington .. 4,255 

Waterloo 12.580 

Waverly 8,177 

Weeeter City.. 4,613 
Winterset .... a639 
Kaitaan— 

Abilene *,507 

Argrentlne 5.878 

Arkansas City 6.140 
Atchison .....15 722 

Cfianute 4,208 

Cherry vale ... 3,472 
Clay Center... 3,06a 
Coffey vKle ... 4.953 
Concordia .... 3.401 

Eldorado 3.466 

Kra porta ..... 8.223 

Fort Seott 10 322 

Galena, .......10,155 

Holtoit 3.082 

Korton 3,398 

Hutenlnson ... ft. 370 
Independence.. 4 851 

Tola 5.791 

Sanction 4.695 

Lawrence ....16.862 
Leaven worth .20.735 
Manhattan ... 3,438 

Newton 62^8 

Otathe ....... 3,451 

Osawatomle .. 4 191 
Ottawa ...... 6,934 

Paofa 3.144 

Paraona T.68^ 

Pittekurg; 16. ITS 

Rosedale 3.270 

Sallna 6 074 

Wellington ... 4,245 

Wichita 24,671 

WJnfleld 5,554 

Kentwclcr— 

Ashland « 6.860 

Bel lev »e 6.332 

Bowling Green 8.826 
Cattettsbur* 8,66» 
Cynthlana- ..,. 8,257 

Danville 4,283 

Dayton .< 6.164 

Earltngtoii ... 3.612 
Frankfort .... 6.487 
Georgetown .. 3,82^ 
Hendersion ...16 272 
Hopkinsrttle ,. 7,280 

Lebanon 3,043 

Ludlow 3 334 

Madlsonvttle . 8.628 

Mayfleld 4,081 

Maysvllte 6,423 

MiddleBhoro .. 4,162 
Mt. Sterling... 3,561 
Owensbore ...13.186 

Paducah- 19,446 

Paris 4,603 

Richmond .... 4.653 
ShelbyvUie ... 3.016 
Somerset ^ . . . 3,384 
Winchester ... 5.964 



Louisiana—* 

Alexandria ... 5.648 
Baton Rouge.. 11,266 

■ Crowley 4.214 

* Donaldsonvilte 4, 105 

Houma 3.21 'i 

Lafayette .... 3.814 
iLaae Charles. 6.U30 

Monr&e 6,428 

New Iberia... 6.815 
Plaquemtne .. 8 590 
Shreveport ..,16,013 
Thib«xiai4JC ... 3,253 
M aine^- 

Attborn *2,9&1 

A»i«»vfe% 11.633 

Banker ■• 21.850 

Bath 10.477 

Belfast 4.615 

Blddpfhrd ....16.145 

Brewer 4.835 

Brunswick ... 6.216 

Calais T.655 

Cartboti 4.75S 

Chei^a 3.o M 2 

Eaatprvt 5.311 

Wden I. 4,376 

HJltawotth .... 4.29T 

Fafrfleld ..... 3.«»Tft 

w Fariningto« .. 3,283 

|Ft. FalraeUL. 4.181 

Gardiner S.Sftt 

Hnultoa 4.686 

Kennebunk ... 3.2281 

Levtisten 23,761 

1 t?bon ....... 3,603 

Lub«»e ....... 3.665 

f>ld Town..... 5.763 

Oron© 3,247 

Paris • 

Prestfue Isle.. 3.804 

Roekteaid 8.156 

Pace, 6.122 

Sanford ft.u78 

Skowfef-gan ... 4.266 
Ponth Berwick 3.188 
So. Portland.. 6.287 
WaWoboro ... 3.145 
Waterville .. 6,477 
Wesrbrook ... 7.883 
Maryland—* 
Annapolis .... 6.525 
.CambrUge ... R.747 
Chestertown .. S.068 

CriafleM 3,165 

Cumberland .. 17.128 

Easton 3,674 

Frederick 6.296 

Frcstbnrg 5.274 

Hagerst&ww ..13,«91 
Havre deGrace 3,423 
fiallabary .... 4.277 
Westmfnjter .. 3 19!» 
. Ma«sael»itiictt»— 

'Ablnprton 4.489 

Adams 11,134 

Amesbnry .... 9.47H 

Amherst 5 028 

Andover 8.8i:i 

Arlington ..... 8 603 

Athol 7.061 

Attleboro ....11.335 
Barnstable ... 4.304 

Belmont 3 9^ 

Beverly 13.884 

Blackatone ... 5.721 
Braintrei? .... 5.9K1 
Bridge water . 5 &t)tf 
Broohfleld .... 3.0^)2 
Brookllne ....19.93? 



118 

Canton 4,oS4 

Chelmsford ... 3,084 

.Ghicopee 19,167 

Clinton 13,667 

Concord ...:.. 5,652 

Dalton 3,014 

Danvers 8,542 

Dartmouth ... 3,669 

Dednam 7,457 

Dracut 3,253 

Dudley 3,553 

B Bridgewater 3.U25 
Easthaoipton . 5,603 

Easton u 4,837 

Everett 24,336 

Fairhaven .... 3,567 

•Falmouth 3,500 

iFoxboro 3,266 

Framingham .11.302 

Franklin 5,017 

Gardner 10,813 

Grafton 4,869 

Gt Barrington. .5,854 
'Greenfield 7,927 

*Hardwlckj .... 8,203 

.Hingham „.., 5,059 

Hudson • 8,454 

Hyde Park. . . .13,244 

Ipswich 4,658 

Lee 8,596 

.Leicester 8,416 

Leominster ...12,392 
Lexington .... 8,831 

Ludlow 3,586 

Mansfield .-. . 4,006 
Marblehead .. 7,582 

Marlboro 18.609 

Maynard 3,142 

Medford .18,244 

Melrose 12,962 

Methuen 7,512 

Middleboro . . . 6,885 

Milford 11,376 

Millbury 4,400 

Milton 6,578 

Monson 3,402 

Montague .... 6,150 
Nantucket ... 3,006 

Natlck 9,488 

Needham 4,016 

Newburyport .14,478 
North Adams. 24, 200 
Northampton .18,643 
N. Andover... 4,243 
N. Attleboro.. 7,253 
Nortfcbridge .. 7,036 
N. Brookfleld,. 4,587 
Norwood ..... 5,480 
Orange ....... 5,520 

Palmer 7,801 

Peabody 11,523 

Pepperell 3,701 

Pittsfleld 21,766 

Plymouth .... 9,592 
Provincetown.. 4,247 

Qutncy 23,899 

Randolph .... 3,993 

Reading 4,969 

Revere .10,395 

Rockland .... 5,327 

Rockport 4,592 

Saugus 5,084 

flouthbridge ..10,025 
South Hadley. 4,526 

Spencer 7,627 

Stoneham .... 6,197 
Stoughton .... 0,442 

Sutton 3,828 

Swampscott ... 4,548 



TOWNS AND CITD3S 3ELOW 25,000. 



Templeton ... 3,41c 
Tewksbury ... a 683 

Uxbridge 8,599 

Wakefield ..".. 9,290 

Walpole 8,572 

Waltham ....23,481 

Ware 8.263 

Wareham .... 3,43.4 

Warren 4,417 

Watertown ... 9,706 

Webster 8,804 

Wellesley .... 5,072 

Westboro 5,400 

Westfield 12,310 

W. Springfield 7,105 
Weymouth ...11,324 

Whitman 6,155 

WilliamBtown. 5,013 
Winchendon .5,001 
Winchester ... 7,248 

Winthrop «V)58 

Woburn 14,254 

Michigan— - 

Adrian 9,654 

Albion *. 4,519 

Alpena. 11,802 

Ann Arbor.... 14,509 
Battle Jreek. .18,563 

Belding 3,282 

Benton Harbor 6,562 

Bessemer 3,911 

Big- Rapids... 4,686 

Cadillac 5,997 

Charlotte 4,092 

Cheboygan ... 6,489 
Coldwater .... 6,216 
Crystal Falls.. 3,231 

Delray 4,573 

Dowagiac .... 4 151 

Escanaba 9,549 

Flint 13,103 

Gladstone 3,380 

Grand Haven. 4,743 

Greenville 3,381 

Hancock 4,050 

Hastings 3,172 

Hillsdale 4,151 

Holland 7.790 

Houghton .... 3,359 

Ionia 5.209 

Iron Mountain 9,242 
Ironwooa .... 9,705 
Isbpeming . ..13,255 
Kalamazoo .. 24,404 

Lansing 16,485 

Lapeer 8,297 

Laurtam 0,643 

Ludlngton ..... 7,166 

Manistee 14,260 

Manistiqtw .... 4,126 
Marine City... 8,829 
Marquette ....10,068 

Marshall 4,370 

Menominee ...12,818 

Midland 2,363 

Monroe 5,043 

Mt. Clemens.. 6,576 
Mt. Pleasant.. 3,662 

Muskegon 20.818 

Negaunee. ..... 6,935 

N»es .... 4,287 

Norway 4.170 

Owosso .-.«.. 8,696 
Pctoskey ..... 0,285 

Pohtiac 9,769 

Port Huron... 19, 158 
Red Jacket-. . 4,668 

St John's 8,388 

St. Joseph.... 5,155 
S. Sle. MarJc.lMSS 



South Haven.. 4,009 
Three Rivers.. 3,550 
Traverse City. 9,407 
W. Bay City.. 13, 13 9 
Wyandotte ... 5,183 

Ypsilantl 7,378 

Minnesota— 

Anoka 3,760 

Albert Lea.... 4,500 

Austin 0,474 

Brainerd 7,524 

Cloquet 8,072 



5,339 
8,717 
3,040 
7, 



Crookston 

Ely 

Fairmount 

Faribault 

Fergus Falls.. 6,072 

Hastings 3.811 

Little Falls. . . 6,774 , 

Mankato 10,099 

Moorbead .... 8,730 . 
New-Ulm .... 5,403 
Northfield .... 3,210 \ 
Owatonna .... 5,561 j 

Red Wing 7,525 

Rochester .... 6,843 I 

St. Cloud 8,663 I 

St. Peter 4,302 

Stillvater 12,318 

Two Harbors. 3,278 

Waseca 3,103 

Wlllmar 3,409 

Winona 19,714 

Mississippi— 

Aberdeen 8,434 

Biloxi 6,t67 

Canton 3,404 

Columbus 6,484 

Corinth 8,661 

Greenville .... 7,642 
Greenwood ... 3,026 
Hattiesbuxg .. 4,175 

Jackson 7,816 

Laurel 8,193 

McComb 4,477 

Meridian 14,050 

Natchez 12,210 

Vicksburg 14,834 

Water Valley. 8,813 

Wesson 3,279 

West Point... 3,193 
Yazoo City. . . . 4,944 
Missouri— 

Aurora 6,191 

Boonville 4,377 

Brookfleld .... 6,484 

Butler .' 8,158 

C, Girardeau.. 4,815 
Carrollton .... 8,854 
Carterville ... 4,445 

Carthage 9,416 

Chillicothe .... 6,905 

Clinton 5.061 

Columbia 0,651 

De Soto ~. 0,611 

Fjulton 4,883* 

Hannibal 12,780 

Independence.. 6,974 
Jefferson City. 9,664 
Kirksville «... 6,966 
Lexington ...^ 4,190 
Louisiana .:.. 0,131 

Macon .. 4,068 

Marshall 0,086 

Maryville .... 4,577 

Mexico 0,099 

Moberly ...... 8,012 

Mooett ....... 3,115 

Nevada - 7.461 

Poplar Bluff.. 4,321 



•Rich Hill. 4,058 

Richmond .... 3,478 
St. Charles.... 7,982 

Sedalla 15,231 

Springfield ....23,267 

Trenton 5,396 j 

Warrensburg . 4,724 
Washington .. 3.015 

Webb City 9,201 

Mitntmin— 
Anaconda .... 9,453 

Billings 3,221 

Bozeman 3,419 

Great Falls... 14.930 

Helena 10,770 

Missoula 4,366 

Nebruka— 

Beatrice 7,875 

Columbus .... 3.522 

Fftirbury 3,140 

Falls City..... 8,022 

Fremont 7,241 

Grand Island.. 7,554 

Hastings 7,188 

Holdredjpe .... 3,007 

Kearney ...... 6.634 

Nebraska City 7,380 

Norfolk 3,883 

North Platte.. 3,640 
Plattsmouth .. 4,964 

York > 6,132 

Nevada— 

Reno 4,500 

Virginia City. . 2,696 
N. Hsunpsh Ire- 
Berlin 8,886 

Claremont ...6,498 
Concord .„». .19,632 
Conway ....... 3, 154 

Derry ......... 3.583 

Dover -13,207 

Exeter ....... 4,922 

Franklin ...... 6,846 

HaverWn .... 8,414 

Keene ..-.-. 9,166 
Lacoriia ....... 8.042 

Lancaster .... 3,190 

Lebanon •.._. 4,965 
Littleton .«.. 4,066 
Milford ..-.. 8,739 
Nashua ...... 23, 898 

Newport ..... 3,126 

Pembroke .... 3,183 

Portsmouth ...10,637 
Rochester .... 8,466. 

Somersworth . 7,028 
New-Jertey- 
Asbury Park-. 4,148 
Bloomfield .... .9,668 

Boon ton ...... 8,901 

Borden town .. 4,110 
Bridgeton ....13,913 

Burlington ... 7,892 

Dover 5,988 

East Orange.. 21, 506 
Eng-lewood ... 6,253 

Garfield 8,504 

Gloucester Cy 6,840 
Guttenbur? ... 8,830 
Hackensack .. 9,443 
Hamroonton .. 8.481 

Harrison 10,596 

Irvington .... 6,250 

Kearny 10,896 

Keyport 8,413 

Lambertvflle . 4,687 
Long Braneh.. 8,872 
Millvflia ...... 10, 583 

MontclaJr ....18.962 

Morrlstawa ... 11.267 



TOWNS ANI> CTTIJBS BBLOW 25.d00. 


119 




M. Bra»swiek.20<onG New-Roche lie. 14,720 


Bellefontaine 


. 6.640 O, Sandusky. 


. 3.35ft 




Newton ...... 4,376 


Niagara Palls. 19,457 


Believue . . . 


. 4,101 


Urbana 


. 6.308 




N. PlaieflettL. 6.099- 


N. Tarrytown 


. 4,241 


Bowling Green 5.067 


Van Wert.... 


. 6.422 




Orange ...'... 24, 141 


N. Tonawanda 0.060 


Bridgeport .. 


. 3.963 


Wapakoneta 


. 3,915 




e»erth Anibuy . a . . *~«/ 


Norwich 


. 5,766 


Bryan 


. 3,131 


Warren 


. 8,529 




PhtilipsbnrK ..10,052 


Nyack .. N 


. 4.275 


Bucyrus ..;.. 


. 6,560 


Washington C. 




Ptainneld .,.. 14.869 


Ogdensburg .. 
Olean 


.12.633 


Cambridge . . 


. 8.241 


House ..... 


. 5,751 




Princeton .... 8,899 


. 0,462 


Canal Dover, 


. 5.442 


Wollston .... 


. 8,045 
. 6.146. 




Kahway ...... 7,935 


Oneida 


. 6,364 


Chlllicothe .. 


.12,976 


Wellsville ... 




Karitan ..... «.244 


Oneonta .... 


. 7.147 


Clrcleville ... 


. 6.991 


Wilmington . 


. 3.013 




Red Bank..... ft. 428 


■Osslalng .... 


. 7.030 


'Collnwood . . 


. 3,639 


Wooster '. ... 


. 6,063 




1iutl>er£oi4 ... 4,643 


Oswego ..... 


.22; 109 


Conneaut . . • 


. 7,133 


Xenia ....... 


. 8.696 




Salem 6.811 


Owego 


. 6.039 


Coshocton ... 


. 6.473 


SSanesville ... 


.23.638 




So«KHVtU* ... 4,843 


Peekakm .... 


.10.358 


Crestline .... 


. 8,282 


Oklahoma— 




South Arobagr. 6.849 


Penn ran.... 


. 4,690 


Cuyahoga Fie 
fehance .... 


1, 3.186 


BUrenw 


. 3,388 




Smith Orange. *.«Ob 


Plattsfeurg .. 


. 8,484 


.. 7,579 


Enid 


. 3,444 




Summit ..... A.392 


Port Chester. 


. 7.440 


Delaware .... 


. 7,940 


Guthrl© 


.10.006 




Uttton 1848? 


Port Jervis. . 


. 9,385 


Detphos 


. .4.517 


Oklahoma Gry.I0.037 




Vtneland 4.310 


Potsdam .... 


. 3,843. 


Dennison- . . . 


. 8.763 


Perry ...,..; 


. 3,351 




Washington .. 3*580 


Poughkeepafe..24 r 020 


E. Liverpool . 


.1U.485 


. Shawnee .... 


. 3,469- 




W. lloboton..23,W4 
W. New-Y«»rfc. 6*267 


Rensselaer .. 


. 7,466 


Eaton 


. 3.155 


Orejroa— 






Borne ....... 


.15,343 


EJyria ...... 


. 8,791 


Albany ..... 


. 3.149 




West Orange.. 8»8S9 


Salamanca .. 


. 4,251 


Ftndl&y 


.17,613 


Astoria ..... 


. 8,381 




Woodbury ... 4.08* 


Sandy HM. . 


. 4,473 


Fostoria ..... 


. 7,730 


Baker City... 


. 6.663 




Kew-Mexle»- 


Saratoga Sps.. 12,400 


Fremont .... 


. 8,439 


Eugene 


. 3^238 




Albuqucrque . 8+2S8 
Las Vega*.... 3,558 


Saugerties ... 


. 3.697 


Gallon 


. 7,282 


Oregon City.. 


. 3,404 




Beneca Falls. 


. 6,519 


Gallipot is .... 


. 6.432 


Salem 


.'4&5B 




Raton 5.540 


Solvay ...... 


. 3.493 


Hamilton .... 


.23,914 


The Dalies... 


. 3.542 




Santa Fa.... 6,605 


Tarrytown .. 


. 4,770 


Hillsboro . . . 


. 4,535 


Pennsylvania— 




New-¥ei?lc— » 


Tonawanda . 


. 7,421 


Ironton 


.11,868 


Archbald .... 


. 5,396 




Albion *.*** 


Walden 


. 3.147 


Jackson 


. 4.672 


Ashland .... 


. fc43t 

. 4,046 




Amsterdam ...20,501 


Wapplager'* F 8.604 


Kent 


. 4.511 


Ashley 




Ball^ton Spa.. 3,»23 


Warsaw .... 


. 3,048 


Kenton ...... 


. 6,8T»2 


Athens 


. 8,749 




Cat* via 9,186 


Waterford .. 


. 3. no 


Lakewood ... 


. 3.355 


Avoca 


. 3,487 




Bath ~.'*.«*J 


Waterloo .... 


. 4.256 


Lancaster ... 


. 8,991 


Bangor 


. 4,106 




Broikport .... 8,898 


Watertown .. 


.21,696 


Lima 


.21.723 


Beaver Falls. 


.10.054 
. 4,216 




C&nandalgw . 6,151 
Canastot* .... 3,030 


Watervliet .. 


.14,321 


Lisbon 


. 3.330 


Bellefonie . . . 




Waveriy 


. 4 r 4U5 


London 


. 3.511 


Bellevua ..... 


. 3,416 




Catsktil -S.484 


WellsvUl© ... 


. 3,556 


Greenville ... 


. 5,501 


Berwick ..... 


. 3.016 




eSooes &J.910 


Whitehall ... 


. 4,377 


Lorain ...». 


.16.028 


Bethiehem .. 


. 7.293 




Corning 11.681 


White Plains. 


. 7,899 


Mansfield .... 


.17,640 


Blairsviile .. 


. 3,386 




Cortland 9.014 


N. Carolina— 


MadtsonviUe 


.. 3.140 


Btakely 


. 8,915 




DanavtlU .... 3,883 


Asbeville .... 


.14,694 


Logan 


. 3,480 


Bloomsburg . 


. 6.170 




Denew -. 8.37» 


Burlington , . 


. 3.692 


Marietta .... 


.18,348 


Braddock .... 


.15.654 




Dunkirk .....11316 


Charlotte .... 


.18,091 


Greenfield ... 


. 3,075 


Bradford .... 


.15,02ft 




Flshlriil L***8% JJg 


Concord ..... 


. 7.910 


Glenvtlle .... 


. 5.588 


Bridgeport ... 


. 3,097 




port EdwartL. 3,621 


Durham ..... 


. 6.679 


Marion 


.11,862 


Bristol 


. 7.104 




Fredoaia 4.127 


Edenton .... 


. 3,046 


Martins Ferry 7.760 


Butler 


.10.853 




Fulton .• *.281 


Blieabcth City 6,348 


Marysville .. 


. 3.048 


Carbondaie . . 


.13.536 




Geneva ••••••JMg 


FayelltfvUle . 


. 4.670 


MasULon .... 


.1L944 


Carlisle 


. 9.626 




«iena **«■*• 4£fiJ 


Gastonia .... 


. 4,610 


Mlamtsburg . 


. 3,941 


Carnegie .... 


. 7.330 




QloverevUte ..t*349 


Geldsboro ... 


. 5,877 


Mtddletown . 


. 9.215 


Catasauqua . 


. 8,963 




Gouveraeur .. 8;689 


Greensboro- .. 


.10.035 


Mt. Vernon.. 


. 6.633 


Chamoersbtirg. 8,864 




Monroe 


2,427 


Napoleon . . . 


. 3,639 


Charleroi .... 


. 6,930 




Haverstraw .. 6;9» 


Henderson . . 


. 8,(46 


Nelsonv/lle .. 


. 5,421 


Oearflcld .... 


. 6.081 




Hempstead ... fc5g 


High Point.. 


. 4.163 


Newark 


.16,157 


Coatesvllle .. 


. 5.721 




Herkimer «... fw656 


Kinston ..... 


. 4,100 


Nejrbnrg . . . 


. 6,909 


Columbia ... 


.12.316 




Hoosick Falls. 5.871 


Newbern .... 


. 9.09U 


N. Philadelphia 6,213 


Oonaelsville . 


. 7.160 




HtmelteTitte .11,918 


Raleigh...... 


.13.643 


Nitea 


. 7,468 


Conshohocken. 5.762 




HudSifti 1*,S28 


ReidsvUl* ... 


. 3,262 


N. Baltimore 


. 8,561 


Corry 


. 5.389 




Ilion 5,138 


Salem ....... 


. 3.642 


Narwftlk .... 


. 7.674 


Coudersport . 


. 3.217 




Ithaca 18.136 


Salisbury .... 


. 6,277 


Norwood .... 


. 6,486 


Danville .... 


. 8,042 




damestowtt ...22.892 


South port ... 


. 1.336 


Oberlin 


. 4.062 


Darby ....... 


. 2.429 




Johnstown ...19.130 
Kingston .....24.535 


Statesvllle ... 


, 3.141 


painesTille . 


. 5,024 


Dickson 


. 4.948 




Washington . 


.4,842 


Piqua 


.12,172 


Doylestown .. 


. 2.034 




Lancaster ....-3.7*0 


Wilmington . 


.20.076 


Poraeroy .... 


. 4.639 


Dubois 


. 9.375 




LanBiagburg .12,593 


Wilson 


. 3,325 


Portsmouth . 


.17,870 


Duntnore .... 


.12.583 




Leroy 8.144 


Winston ... 


.10.008 


ttavenna .... 


. 4,003 


Duquesne ... 


. 9,086 




besterslurft ... 8.111 


North Dakota- 


Heading 


. 3,076 


Ea&t Mauch 




kittle FftH*... 10.881 


Bismarck . . . 


. 3.319 


BHI'H" «inA«Wtn»>8 


Chunk 


. 3.458 




Lccfcport 16.581 


Fargo 


. 9,f»8» 


889 'Q ••••••• 


*9Up(S 


RdwardHvUie 


. 5.165 




Lynts ,». v ... 4,300 


Q rand Fork*. 


. 7,652 


580'r " 


x».:»tis 


Eaitott 


. 8.345 




Malone .....v. 9,935 


Ohio— 




f^ft'gr---- Xipnpo«s 


Etna 


. 5,384 




Matteawaa ... 8.807 


Alliance 


. 8.074 


ZSQ'l •••••'• 


rabies 


Forest Ci»y. . 


. 4,279 




MechanieavUIe 4.806 


Ashland 


. 4 037 


6QJ:'9 s*Jtirn ">S 


Franklin .... 


. 7,317 




Medina ...... 4.716 


Ashtabula . . 


.12 019 


fgg'g •••|Mi»a4»a %a 


Freeland .... 


. 6,254 




Middletowa ..14 522 
Mt. Vernon. . .21,228 


Athens 


. 8.066 


Tiffin 


J0.989 


Gettysburg .. 


. 2.495 




Barberton . . . 


. 4,35 4 


Toronto ..... 


. 3.526 


Gilberton ... 


. 4.373 
.3.660 




Newark ...... 4*,878 


Baraesvilto . 


. 8,721 


Troy 


. 5,881 


Girardvllle .. 




tfewburg .....24.043 


Bp-Halre ". 


. 9.912 Uhrichsvllle 


.." 4.582 Greensburg .. 


.6,508 


■ 



If 

Greenville ... 4,814 

Hanover 6,302 

Hazleton 14,230 

Homestead ...12,554 
Huntington ... 6,053 

Indiana 4,142 

Jeannette .... 5.865 
Jersey Shore,. 3,070 
Johnsonburg . 3,894 

•Kane 5,296 

Kingston 3,846 

Kittarining ... 3,902 
Knoxville .... 3,511 
Lonsford ..... 4,888 

Latrobe 4,614 

Lebanon 17,628 

Lehigh ton .... 4,629 
Lewisburg .... 3,457 
Lewistown ... 4,451 
X«ock Haven.. 7,210 

Luzerne 3,817 

McKees Rocks 6,352 
Mahanoy City. 13.504 
Mauch Chunk. 4,029 
Meadville ....10,291 
Mechanfcsburg 3,841 

Media 3,075 

Meyersdale . . . 3,024 
Middletown .. 5,608 

MHlvale 6,736 

Milton 6,175 

Minersville ... 4,815 
Monongahela. . 5,173 
lit. Carmel...l3,179 
Mt. Pleasant. 4,745 
Nanticoke ....12,116 
New Brighton 6,820 
N. Kensington 4,665 
Norristowri !.. 22,265 
.N. Braddock.. 6,535 

Oil City 13,264 

Old Forge 5 f 630 

Olyphant 6,180 

Philipsburg ... 3,266 
Phoenixville .. 9,196 

Pittston 12,556 

Plymouth 13,649 

Pottstown .. .13,696 
Pottsville ....15,710 
Punxsutawney 4,375 
Quakertown .. 3,014 

Rankin 3,775 

Renovo 4,082 

Reynoldsville.. 3,435 

Ridgway 3,515 

Rochester .... 4,688 

St. Clair 4,638 

St. Marys 4,295 

Sayre 5,243 

Schuyl. Haven 3,654 

Scottdale 4,261 

Sewickley .... 3,568 
Shamokin ....18,202 

Sharon 8,916 

Sharpsburg .. 6,842 
Shenandoah ..20,321 
Shippensburg . 3,228 
Slatington ... 3,773 
S. Bethlehem. 13,241 
S Williamsport 3,328 

Steelton 12,086 

Stroudsburg .. 3,450 

Sunbury 9,810 

Susquehanna,. 3,813 

Tamaqua 7,267 

Tarentum .... 5,472 

Taylor 4,215 

Titusville .... 8,244 
Towanda ..... 4,663 
Turtle Creek.. 3,262 



TOWNS AND CITTBS BBLOW 25,000. 



Tyrone 5,847 

Union City. ... 3,104 
Uniontown ... 7,844 

Warren 8,043 

Washington .. 7,670 
Waynesboro .. 5,396 
W. Bethlehem 3,465 
West Chester. 9,524 
West Pittston. 5,846 
Wilkinsburg .11,886 
Wilmerding .. 4,179* 
Wintoh ...... 3.425 

Rhode Inland— 

Bristol 6,901 

Burriiville ... 6,317 
Central Falls. 18, ljfc 

Coventry 5.27F 

Cranston 13,343 

Cumberland. ..8,925 
B. Providence. 12, 138 

Johnston 4,305 

Lincoln 8,937 

Newport 22,034 

N> Kingston.. 4,194 
N. Providence 3,016 

Scituate 3,361 

S. Kingston.. 4,972 
Warren ...... 5,108 

Warwick 21,310 

Westerly 7,541 

S. Carolina— 
Abbeville .... 3,766 

Aiken 3,414 

Anderson 6,498 

Beaufort 4,110 

Chester 4,075 

Columbia 21,108 

Darlington ... 3,028 

Florence 4,647 

Gaffney 3,937 

Georgetown . . 4,138 
Greenville ....J1.800 
Greenwood . . . 4,824 

Laurens 4,029 

Newberry 4,607 

Orangeburg . . 4,455 

Rock Hill 5,485 

Spartanburg ..11,395 

Sumter 5,673 

Union 5,400 

Sooth Dakota- 
Aberdeen 4,087 

Dead wood .... 3,498 

Lead 6,210 

Mitchell 4,055 

Sioux Falls.... 10, 266 
Watertown ... 3,352 

Yankton 4,125 

Tennessee — 
Bristol ...:... 5,271 
Clarksville ... 9,431 
Cleveland .... 3,858 

Columbia 6,052 

Dyersburg ... 3,647 
Harriman .... 3,442 

Jackson 14,911 

Johnson City.. 4.645 
Murfreesbofo . 3,999 

Union City 3,407 

Texan— 

Abilene 3,411 

Austin .22,258 

Beaumont . . . 9,427 

Belton 3,700 

Bonham 5,042 

Brenham 5,968 

Brownsville .. 6,305 
Brownwood .. 3.965 
Bryan ....... 3,589 

Calvert ...... 3.332 



Cameron 3,341 

Cleburne 7,493 

Corpus Christ! 4,703 
Corsicana .... 9,313 

Cuero 3,422 

Denison 11,807 

Denton 4,187 

El Paso, 15,906 

Ennis 4,919 

Gainesville ... 7,874 
Gonzales ..... 4,279 
Greenville ... 6,860 
Hillsboro ..... 5,346 

Laredo 13,429 

Longview .... 3,591 
McKinney .:.. 4,342 
Marlih ...... 3,092 

Marshall 7,855 

Navasota .... 3,857 
Oak Cliff...... 3,630 

Orange 3,835 

Palestine 8,297 

Paris 9,358 

Sherman ..,..10.243 
Sulphur Spgs. 3,635 

Taylor 4,211 

Temple .-. 7,065 

Terrell 6,330 

Texarkana . . . 5,256 

Tyler 8,069 

Victoria 4,010 

Waco ..-. 20,686 

Waxahachie . 4,215 
Weatherford . 4,786 

Yoakum 3,499 

Utah- 
Eureka 3,085 

Logan 5,451 

Ogden 16,313 

Park City 3,759 

Provo City.... 6,185 
Springville ... 3,422 
Vermont— 
Barre (city)... 8,448 
Barre (town). . 3,346 
Bellows Falls. 4,337 
Bennington . . 5,656 
Brattleboro .. 5,297 
Burlington ...18,640 

Derby 3,274 

Hartford 3,817 

Middlebury ... 3,045 
Montpelier ... 6.266 

Newport 3,113 

Poultney 3,108 

Randolph 3,141 

Rutland .11,499 

St Albans 6,239 

St. Johnsbury. 5,666 
Springfield ... 3,432 

Swanton 3,745 

Winooski 3,783 

Virginia- 
Alexandria ...14,528 
Berkeley ..... 4,988 

Bristol 4,579 

Charlottesville. 6,449 
Clifton Forge. 3,212 

Danville 16,520 

Fredericksburg 5,068 
Harrisonburg.. 3,521 
Lexington ... 3,203 
Lynchburg ...18,891 
Manchester .. 9,715 
Newport N we. 19,635 
Petersburg ...21,810 
Portsmouth ..17,427 

Radford 3,344 

Roanoke 21,495 



Salem . . .... .. 3,412 

Staunton 7,289 

Suffolk 3.827 

Winchester ... 5,161 
Wytheville .. . 3,008 
Waahiaffton— 

Aberdeen 3,747 

Ballard .„..'.. 4,568 

Everett 7,838 

Fairhaven .... 4,228 
N. Whatcom.. 6.834 
N. Yakima.... 3,154 

Oiympia 3,865 

Pt. Townaend. 3,443 
Vancouver ... 8,126 
Walla Walla.. 10,049 
West Virffinia— 
Benwood ...;. 4,51* 

Bluefield . 4,644 

Charleston ...11,009 
Clarksburg . . . 4,050 

Fairmont 5,655 

Grafton 5,650 

Hinton ....... 3,763 

Huntington ..11.923 
Maftihsburg . 7,564 
Moundsville .. 5,362 
Parkersburg ..11,703 
Wisconsin— 

Antlgo 5,145 

Appleton ..... 15,085 

Ashland 13,074 

Baraboo ...... 5,75,1 

Beaverdam ... 5,128 

Beloit 10,436 

Berlin 4,489 

Chippewa Falls 8,084 

Depere 4,038 

Eau Claire.... 17, 517 
Fond du Lac. .15,110 
Ft. Atkinson.. 3,043 
Grand Rapids. 4,493 
Green. Bay. .\ .18,684 

Hudson 3,259 

Janesville ....13,185 
Kaukauna . . . 5,115 

Kenosha 11,606 

Madison 19,164 

Manitowoc ...11,786 

Marinette 16,195 

Marshfleld .... 5,240 
Menasha ..... 5,589 
Menominee ... 5,655 

Merrill 8,537 

Monroe 3,927 

Neenah, 5,954 

Oconto ....... 5,646 

Platteville ... 3,340 

Portage >. 5,459 

P. Washington 3,010 
Pr. au Chien.. 3,232 
Rhjnelander ,. 4,998 

Rice Lake 3,002 

Sheboygan ...22,962 
S. Milwaukee. 31392 

Sparta 3,555 

Stevens Point 9,524 
Stoughton .-. . . 3,431 
Sturgeon Bay. 3,372 
Two Rivers... 3,784 
Watertown . . . 8,437 
Waukesha ... 7,419 

Waupun 3,185 

Wausau 12,354 

Whitewater... 3,405 
Wyoming;— 
Cheyenne ..... 14,087 i 

Laramie 8,207 

Rock Springs. 4.31*8 



FINANCE, TRA DE AN D INDUSTRY. 

STATEMENT OF THE PUBLIC DEBT AND OF THE CASH IN THE TREAS- 
URY OF THE UNITED STATES, NOVEMBER 1, 1905. 

INTEREST BEARING DEBT. 



Title of loan. 



o a) 



Consols of 1930 

Loan of 1908-1918 

Funded loan of 1907. .'. . 
Refunding certificates, 
of 1925 



2 
3 
4 
4 
4, 



When 
issued.^ 
| 1900 
1898 



When redeemable. 



I After April 
[After Aug. 

1877- 79 1 After July 
1879 

1895-'98{ After Feb. 



JU 19901 
1, 1908( 
1, 19071 



1, 1925| 



Amount 

issued. 

$580, 429,000 1 

198,792,6601 

740,932,3001 

40,012,750 

162,315,4001 



Outstanding 
October 
31, 1905. 



9080,429,000 

68,789,060 i 

127,424,200 

26,780 

118,489,900 



Aggregate of interest bearing debt.......;..: | $1,722, 482,1 10 1 $895,158,940 \ 



DEBT ON WHICH INTEREST HAS CEASED SINCE MATURITY. 
Funded loan of 1891, continue/* at 2 per cent called for redemption 

May 18, 1900; interest ceased August 18, 1900 $82,200 

Funded loan of 1891, matured September 2, 1891 '.'. 26.700 

Loan of 1904, matured February 2, 1904 .' 181,750 

feOlcPdebt matured "at various dates prior to January 1. 1861. and other 
items of debt matured at various dates subsequent to January .1, 1861 



00 



940,425 26 
26; 



Aggregate of debt on which interest has ceased since maturity $1,231,075 

DEBT BEARING NO INTEREST. . 

United States notes- (February 25, 1862; July 11, 1862; March 3, 1863). .. .$346,681,016 00 

Old demand notes (July 47, 1861 ; February 12. .1862) 53,282 50 

National bank notes, redemption account 'July 14, 1890) i 34,470,390 50 

Fractional currency (July .17, 1862; Marcr. 3. 1863; June 30, 1864; less 

$8,375,934 estimated as lost or destroyed, Act of June 21, 1879)...:.. 6,866,700 08 1 



Aggregate of. debt bearing no interest $388,071,398 08 

CERTIFICATES AND NOTES ISSUED ON DEPOSITS OF COIN AND SIL.VER 

BULLION. 

Classification. In Treasury. In circulation. Amount issued. 

Gold certificates $44,490,530 00 $479,965,439 00 $524,455,969 00 

Silver certificates 4,682,224 00 471,625,776 00 476,308,000 00 

Treasury notes of 1890 26,622 00 8 r 594,378 00 8,621,000 00 



Aggregate of certificates and Treas- 
ury notes, offset by cash in the 

Treasury $49,199,376 00 $960,185,593 00 $1,000,384,969 00 

RECAPITULATION. 



Classification. ' Oct. 31, 1905. 

Interest bearing debt $895,158,940 00 

Debt on whiclT interest has ceased 

since maturity 1,231,075 26 

Debt bearing no interest 388,071,398 08 

Aggregate of interest aiul • ^ 

non-interest bearing debt.$l,284,461,413 34 
Certificates and Treasury notes 

offset by an equal amount of m nnA aaa 
cash in the Treasury 1,000,384,969 00 



Sept. 80, 1905. 
$895,158,680 00 Inc. 

1,286,405 26 Dec. 
386,986,616 58 Inc. 



Changes. 
$260 00 



25,330 00 
1,084,781 50 



$1,283,401,70184 Ino. $1,059,71160 



1,003,869,969 00 Ino. 6,525,000 00 



Aggregate of debt, including 
certificates and Treasury 

notes $2,293,846,382 34 $2,287,361,670 84 inc. $6,584,71150 

CASH IN THE TREASURY (CREDIT). 

Reserve fund— Gold coin and bullion ; $150,000,000 00 

tTrUst fund— Gold coin .$524,455,969 00 

Sliver dollars 476,308,000 00 

Silver dollars of 1890 ...... -....-.... 8,620,00000 

= 1,009,384,969 00 

General fund— Gold coin and bullion.^,.. $78,585,548 93 

Gold certificates , 44,490,53000 

Silver certificates ....: 4,682,224 00 

Silver dollars MTjr.MJ 00 

Silver bullion' ^S^'S 9 ? 5 ! 

United States note* 6 » 5 I&*S&9£ 

Treasury note* of 1890,... ' . J*'32?2? 

National bank note© i;,ld4,M5 00 

Fractional silver coin. ~*.. , 8,898,27300 .' 

Fractional aurrancy -•• .... X8H 

Minor coin ♦.. 684,56020 

Bonds and interest jjald, awaiting re- _ 

imburseinent • ••...•....«..«•.•*.••. 86,239 40 



159,559,215 82 



121 



1*2 



CONDITION OF NATIONAL. BANKS. 



CASH IN T*B TREASURY t CREDIT)— (Continued)* 
la national bank, depositaries — To credit of 

Treasurer of United States 106,221.928 21 



To credit of 

officers . , 



United State* disbursing 



9,504,1 



H7 



la 



Treasury of Philippine Islands— To 

credit of Treasurer of United 

States 1.663,82410 

To credit of United States disbursing 

officer* 2,458,214 64 



65,726,312 88 



4,122,038 73 



229,407,G66 93 



Total ....,....„ ,$1.388.792,?536 93 

CASH IN THE TREASURY CDEBIT). 

Gold cerUftcabee $524,455,960 00 

Silver certificates 476,308,000 60 

Treasury notes of 1390.... 8,621,00000 

si^jofcmaeo oo 

National- bank 6 per cent, fund 219,404,902 75 -- 

Outstanding checks and warrants 12,589,299 60 

Disbursing officers' balances 69,511,457 10 

Postomce Department account 3,603,127 30 

Miscellaneous items 2,393.491 35 



97,592,278 10 



Reserve fund .««.««••••• 8150,000,000 00 

Available cash balance, M . 131,816,288 83 



41, 



108,977,247 10 
281,815,288 83 



Total 11.388,792,555 93 

Cash balance In the Treasury September 90, 1905, exclusive of reserve 

and trust funds ..... 186,823,692 86 

Cash balance in the Treasury October 31, 1905, exclusive of reserve 
, and trust funda . - 131,815.288 83 



Decrease during the month , $5,008,404 62 

MEMORANDUM SHOWING AMOUNTS DUE THB UNITED STATES FROM PACIFIC 

RAIL.ROADS ON ACCOUNT OF BONDS ISSUED IN AID 

OF THEIR CONSTRUCTION. 



Na me of road. 



_? l 1??H*k- i_I n **J**L J ?ol»l • 



Central Branch Union Pacific... l$t,6€K),()00 00|$2,lO4,586 501$3t7O4.S865O 

Note.— The unpaid balance of the total indebtedness of the 'Central Pacific and 
Western Pacific Railroad companies to the United States, under settierafeat agreement 
of February 1, 1899, amounts to $20,684,490 46 and accrued Interest, leas transportation 
earnings, ' 



AB8TUACT OF RKPOmTg M&DK TO TUB CONTROIXHB OFTHB CURRENCY 
SHOWING THJB CONDITION OF THK NATIONAL BANKS IK THB VL & 

. .. RESOURCES.. 

Mar. 14. 1905— 



Iioans and discounts. 

Overdrafts' ........ »*..., , 

U. S. bonds to secure circulation. ... 

U. S. bands to secure U. 8, deposits. , 
Other bonds to secure U. & deposits. 
IS. S. bonds on hand. ................ 

Premiums on U. & boad» 4 ........ ., 

Bonds, securities, etc..*.,.........., 

Banking house, furniture & fixtures * 

Other real estate owned 

Due from national banks 

Due from State banks & bankers, etc 
Due from approved reserve agents, % , 
Checks and other cash items,..*..... 
Exchanges from clearing house. ..... 

Bills of other national banks. 

Fractional currency, nickels & cents. 

Specie ........ 

l^egal-tender notes ,. . . * . . » . 

Five per cent, redemption fund. ..... 

Due from Treasurer U. S, ........... i 

Totals j 



1 Nov. 10. 1904— 

I 5,477 Banks._ 

$3,772,658.94158 

&4,S41,936 97 

425,769.09000 

107,566,65000 

6,757,038.67 

15,479.900 00 

15,732,869 51 

COS, 2*7,59585 

122,149,605 01 

20,608,557 74' 

834.318,962 13 

116,058,470 57 

543.144,834 19 

29,210,978 59 

841,998.191 85 

27,530,385 00 

1,758.792 12 

484,187,821 84 

157,942,968 00 

20,706.184 02 

3,222.233 29 



6,587 Banks. 

*a,B6l,83*,472 90 

36>34*>221 m 

440,800,640 00 

96, 855,800 O0 

4,349,419 00 

17.558.850 0ft 

15,030,722 4» 

642,778,943 25 

128.144,430 56 

20,519.501 27 

329,177,405 92 

123,445,301 66 

594,094,119 63 

23,260,772 (14 

287.122.185 75 

27,515,27100 

1.854.387 26 

483.249,060 39 

157,904,573 00* 

21. 460, £89 87 

3.771,926 68 



Aug. 26, 1905 
5,757 Baaks^ 

^998.409,152*2 

• 29,905,638 72 

477.592,690 00 

61.847.670 60 

6.308,121 28: 

12,041,410 00 

14,37*, 131 51 

667,177.767 76 

13*9*7,3*4 QB 

19,926,274 48 

320,743.427 49 

113,466,291 74 

605,464,479 80 

23,061,600 43 

265,080,«27 79 

29,182,633 00 

1,859,804 83 

495,479,452 93 

170.073.847 00 

23,280,126 70 

4,017.141 50 



$7,193,991,955 83} $7,308, 127,086 16t$7,472.350,878 64 



COIN AND PAPER MONKY IN CIRCULATION. 



133 



JU.ABUAT1E8. 
J Nov, 



10, 1904—1 
6,477 Banks. | 



Capital stock paid in .1 $776,089,40100 

Surplus fund | 399,961,534 15 

Undivided profits, less expenses and) 

taxes 195,366,258 06 

National bank notes outstanding.... 419,120,020 00 

State bank notes outstanding 42,663 50 

Due to other national banks 761,568,172 79 

Due to. State banks and bankers 312,830,832 47 

Due to trust companies and savings 

banks < 399,438,881 88 

Due to approved reserve agents. 38,793,020 92 

Dividends unpaid 1,450,704 61 

Individual deposits , 3,707,706,530 93 

U. S. deposits 101,336,914 60 

Deposits of U. S. disbursing officers. 8,965,600 33 

Bonds borrowed | 33,445,272 46 

Notes and bills rediacounted 8,642,079 86 

Bills payable • 25,508,404 19 

Reserved for taxes 

Liabilities other than those above... 6,725,664 08 



Totals 



Mar. 14, 1905^- 

_5,587^Banks J _ 

$782,487,884 67 

408,888,534 08 

194,667,181 00' 
430,955,178 50 
40,344 50 
812,378,655 55 
818,788,438 81 

386,543,992 20* 

37,916,423 26 

915,406 78 

3,777,474,006 12 

84,705,236 83 

8,517,157 53 

34,819,906 69 

6,092,005 30 

16,911,531 69 



-I- 



6,025,803 75 



Aug. 25, 1905 
_5,757 Banks^ 
$799,870,229 00 
417,757,591 42 

202,536.366 23 
468,979,788 50 
30,972 50 
832,078,395 74 
854,253,517 22 

404,183 168 12 

'34,362,500 71 

993,490 14 

3,820,681,713 23 

52,351,688 22 

9,738,611 35 

* 38,485,468 75 

6,911,608 71 

23,181,411 02 

2,360,697 34 

8,593,760 44 



$7,196,991,955 83 1. $7,308, 127, 686 16 ($7,472,350, 878 64 



COIN AND PAPER CIRCULATION OF THE UNITED STATES FROM 1869 
TO 1905, INCLUSIVE, WITH AMOUNT OF CIRCULATION PER CAPITA. 



Tear. 



Coin, incl. 

bullion 

in Treasury. 



1890 

18*1 

1802 

1863 

1864 . 

1865 

iao6 

1807 , 

1868 . 

1869 , 

1870 . 
1871 

1872 . 

1873 . 

1874 , 

1875 . 
187* , 
18T7 , 
1878 , 
1870 . 

1880 , 

1881 . 
18*2 , 
18K3 . 
1884 , 
18SB , 
1826 . 
1887 ; 
18 > 

1889 . 

1890 . 
1831 , 
1892 . 
1893 
18*4 , 
ltfif. 

1896 . 

1897 , 

1898 . 

1899 , 
1*00 . 
19m , 
lfr -2 , 
ilMfl 
»lfl64 
•1005 



1253,000,000 



250,1X10,000- 202,005 7/7 



25.000.u0n 

25,000,00\> 

£5,400,000 

25,000,000 

25,900.000 

25,009,000 

25,000,000 

2.VK';i,"-J'. 1 

25, OOii, (km i 

25,000.000 

25,000,000 

£5,000,000 

25,000,000 

25,000,000 

52,418,7}W 

65837,500 

103,047,907 

357,268,178 

494,363,884 

047,868.6*2 

703,674,839 

769.7 10.048 

SOI, 00*. 939 

972J7B,823 

903.027,304 

1,007,513,1*0] 

1,092,391,090 

1,100,012,4,14 

1,152 ah, ws 

1,132.050.657 
1,1x1.14a, 260 
1,066. 223, 357 
1.008,958,741 

1,007. 610.1W1 

].aia F TPo.BW 
1,397,7*5,969 

l.BOa 543.738 
1,734.861.774 

i.S29.»ia.r*i 
i,«s«.afts 1 Tsa 

2.033,717,414 



u. s. 

notes, 
bank notes. 



j207.102-.r577 



8*3,462,079 
049,i«J7,282 
0xu.Sj8ti.467 
745,120.755 
723, 327, 251 
703,200,612 
691,553,578 
G00, SGI, I, SO 
697.868,401 
716,812,174 
737,721,5*55 
749,445,610 
781,024,781 
773.273,509 
738,204,550 
607,210.341 
687.743,060 
076.372,713 
001.186,443 
701,723(^1 
705 423,050 
702,754.297 
680,180,899 
0^5,257,727 
658,380,470 
625,898,804 



Total | 

money. | 

*4T2,1oi.4T7~ 
452,005,767 

358.452,079 
674, <■ 67,283 



In 

Treasury, 
as assets. 

10 690 m 

3 OOO.owi 
23.7M.33Ti 

70,473,24.1 



Circulation. 



Popula- 
tion. 



fJ £pm tVt q 

70S, 688,007 35, 1*40 . 3S9 

770,129,7*5 f.5. 420,7 WJ 



754,327,254 
728,200,612 

7 16 ,553, 5 78 
715,851480 
722.^68,461 

7H.HU.174 



80,839.010 
60,208,543 
30,449,917 
60, 808, 289 i 

47,055,0071 
25,02). 100 1 



762,721,5*451 24, 412,0 1« 
774,445,610; 22,668.801 

798,273,500 
790. 083,284 
763.053 ,847 



780,790.976 
1,033,040,801 

1,185,55,1,327 
1,349,502.373 
1 ,4 no 397,889 
1,472.404,34 5 
1,4*7,249 838 
1,537,433.550 
1,501,407,774 
1,6*3,412,705 



590.040,337 ' 1, 601.44 1 ,027 



558,060,979 
532,651,791 
6/74,837,407 
621 ,070.937 
672,585,115 
706,120,220 
704,400,451 
702.3€4,P43 
692,216,330 
675,788,473 

ftsir&o.tff: 

732,iW*,460 
743,2*5,518 
733,35,1,107 
TP4,216,!P96 



1,158,1372.413 



20/341,750 
44,171.562 
63.073,896 
40,73^,904 
60,658.342 
215,009.098 
212,168,099 
255,364,254 
235.107,470 
242,188,040 
24 3, 323, 8*. 
244,804,535 
308,707,240 
315,873.662 
310,270,137 
278.31O.704 



1, 085. 1 23 . 429 S55j 872 r 1 S 



1,(577,71*4,044 
1,752,219,197 
1.738.FQ-M72 
1,8115 078,9*1 
1.8 10.359,557 
1.799.975,033 
1,005,000,1119 
2073 574,443 
2,190.093.005 
2„ 1 !39 T 7'>0,K73 
2^83.147,292 
£.563.166.653 
2,742,290.78] 



79 117 

81,061, 

82-329. 

,)X079. 848 ,5861 B79,TlO,WS 1 2. 359.558, X5J j mm, 273 1 2,053. 133 . ft 7* • 8^,72fl, 



8 15 . 5771, n 16 1 2. 848, 292 , 030 



180,363,337 
150,872,010 
l42,l*rV,LJ27 
144,270.253 
217.391.084 
293.540,007 
205,7^7,100 
235; 71 4. 547 
286,022.024 
2*4. 54 H, 675 
307,700,015 
3l3.S7G.107 
293.131.363 
2V4.81fl.200 



$435,407,252 31,14, - 85 

44h,405 7*17 32 0«4.^*' 13.98 

334, 007, 744 1 32,704 000 1 10.23 

595.:;y*.u3s 33,305,000; .'7 84 

869,64 1 47s ■ 34.046,1100 1 I S 67 

714,702,005 34.748,1X1*1 1 20 57 

673, 48*. 244 1 35,460, 0OU | 1 > 99 

661,002,0091 30, 2U. 00" 18.28 

Aao.liKl.rlijl 36.073 r O0O| ih 39 

664,452 801 ! 37,756,009 ' 17 60 

675,21 2,794 |3M,fi58, 371 17.50 

715 , 88fl , 005 1 39. 555. 000 18. 10 

738, .'J09.54lH40.rj96. 000 1H.19 

751 ,881 ,800 141, 077,000 1 804 

776.083.031142,796,000 18.13 

754,101 947 1 43, 051, 000 17.16 

7 27 , f* .9, 388 145.137, 000 16 . 12 

722.3l4.SKt 46.353,000; 15.58 

720, 132,634 147,598,0001 15 32 

818,031,793 1 4 ti, 800.000 10.75 

973, £82, 228 i :a * . 1 ti 5. ; M 10.41 

1,114,238.119 51 316,000 21.71 

1 , 1 74,200,4 1 1 52, 105,000 22 37 

1.230.305.1196 53,693,000 22.91 

1, 243, 025 k 0G9 1 54, 9 U, 000 2^65 

1 , 292. 5f!8. 015 Mi. 1 <K,000 1 23 02 

. j Of), 5^5 57 404,000 21.82 

1,317,539.143 58.689,000 j 22 45 

J, 372,1711.^70 50 974,000' — 88 

1,380,361,640 61.289,000! 2^.52 

1,429,251,270 62.022.250, : L 82 

l r 497 ( 440,707|6:i.947,00(.i| J^.42 

1.601,347.187 65, 101.000 ! 24 56 

1,50^701.245 1 06. 456. f.W0; 24.03 

1,060,808.708 j 67. 740, 000 1 24.52 

I.OOl.OOfi, 473 160,043, 000 23.20 

1 , 506 , 4 34 , 0(i*j 1 7 0. 365, 000 i 21.41 

1 , 640 , 309. ft 1 9 ; 7 1 , TIM . 000 , -2 87 

-' 73,060,000 1 26,15 

74,4:O,000 25.58 



1,831,859,805 

1.904,071,881 
2,055.150.998 
2,175,387,277 
2,249,390,561 
2,449,168.418 
^,^^,470,06^ 



76.2»)^22rr, 2«.94 
77,754, <0<M 27 



x On December 1, 1903, »On November 1, 1904. »On November 1, 1905. 
Note. — Sped* payments were suspended from January 1, 1862, to January 1, 



08 
43 
21 
38 

1879. 




Addtttannl ctrcufcttlDn tesoftf dm-ms In**m4- 

Til (itrwt hftfllCS, 

To t..*nM laerftnaltiff ctrcolRlloiv 

By loaolvpM banks* 

fry lUiuld-itlnv tmnltfi 

»» banks ftjtiftijp: tirculfction under Systran 8 

of the Act of July 1$ 188*. 
ft? reducing banks 

Aggregate fenowMi ana deponlt* to Oct. Hi, tson. 

■ reffrKt by wfrhdrnwa.]- oJ tends by 

t>f*nkn an J redemption no tea of biac- 

•■rvri Ins . . . 

Bjp Innofvpfit bank* 

iQUltlMlng tMDkf. 

hunks retiring clrcnTatton under Section «' 

of ih* agi or ^tiiy i2 b uaa 

Fly rPltiriiLB banks 



Aggi'scnto uot&fl retired sffiCtt *u» named,... 

I itiait mitstanding October M. ^«M»* .»».*..,■ 

id* In circulation fllnr* date aiunnd,.., * 

tsl in circulation since date named *..»•.*. 



*CB, 107.225 



13*«4!u\ <m I *fl24. «Ofr,240 



S4TWV241 KS70AM49 



SAVINGS BANKS DKPOSITS. 



129 



States. 



NUMBER OF SAVINGS DEPOSITORS, AGGREtJATK SAT IM OPS DEPOSITS, AND 
AVERAGE AMOUNT DI3K TO DEPOSITORS IN SAVINGS BANKS IN 
VARIOUS STATES AT DATS OF REPORTS NEAREST TO JUNK 30, 1905. 

Avorage 

to each 

depositor. 

$308~7S 
426 21 
342 <X8 
357 an 
494 03 
404 81 j 



4 N«mber 
|of ba nks. 
— 51 — 

60 
42 

188 
30 
00 



461 | 



Maine 

Ncw-Hamps«lr« 
Vermont ....... 

Massachusetts . 
Rhode Island* . 
Connecticut .... 

Totals New England States.... f 

Ne^f-York 

New- Jersey v.... 

Pen«sy 1 vaiiia* ......... . J 

Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia 

Totals Eastern States. ........ .j 

\ West Virginia 
North Carolina 

Totals Southern States 
Ohto 
Indiana 
Illinois 3 
Wisconsin 
Minnesota 
Iowa 

T(^als Middle States j 

California and totals Pacific State*, j 109 J 

Totals «»it«i«tates J 1,237 



Number <et\ 
depositors. | 

212,133"! 

304,891 | 

144,328 ] 

1,700,014 f 

12*1,(588 1 

174, 548 J_ 

2,880, 202 J _ 

2,6L3,576 I 

254,578 i 

420,113 f 

28,147 1 

151, (i56 f 

10, 1*25 1 




Amownt 
of deposits. _ 
$78,230,219 J 
70.278,001 1 
40,371,907 j 
031,313.801 I 
01,105,146 ) 
_ 220,51/7, 108J 
llTliO, 807,20.2 [ 
VV-r.2,928,300 
81,810,308 
141,511,087 
7, 0*2.078 
€2.859,423 
3,280,831 

$1,040^ 948,0S7J 
$035,206 1 
6,117,207 i 

$6,052 503~T 

©0,755,728 j" 

0.727,125 I 

108,158,702 I 

923,585 J 

16,028,787 1 

100,232,072 j 

$340,424,059") 

$247,013,008 j 

fS, 261,230, 130T 



$384 00 

" $408 47 

321 38 

332 10 

208 33 

414 4J) 

203 40 

^$457 ft) 

$183 v!8 

203 77 

_|»J4 40 

~ 634~0l 

. 343 88 

351 83 

173 88 

238 02 

_ 343 85 

_$357J>0 

_$5W5 82 

"$42374 



1 Partially estimated. *Sa-?lnps deposits in State institutions ha v log savings «3e- 
partraentfjj abstract ©f reports included with 13tate banks. £ ln&utta« 8 banks in 
liquidation. 'Includes 13 banks in liquidation. 



RESOURCES AND INABILITIES OF STATE BANKS, I.OAN AND TRUST COM- 
PANIES, SAVINGS AND PRIVATE BANKS, 10O4-'«5. 

RESOURCES. 



dassificatton. 



I State banTis 
(7,794). 



Lioans o* real estat*^ 
Loans on other coi-j 

lateral security. 
Other loans andl 

discounts . .. , 

Overdrafts 

U. S. bonds. . . , L 
State, county andj 

municipal bonds. 
Railroad boads and] 

stoeks | 

Rank stocks } 

Other .stocks, bonds} 

and securities . . 1 
Due from other] 

banks & bankers! 
Real estate, furni-j 

ture and fhvturesf 
Checks and other! 

cash items J 

Cash on hand. . > . . | 
Other resourcea .. A 



$323,415,000. 
128,300,150 

1,632.275,136 

il2,81'4,975 
3,001,511 

11.658,283 

1)24,350, 
448,053, 

835.506.641 

463,014,806; 

05,330,004 

71,467,859 
234.394,012 
23,258,401 



Totals 



..|$S, 190;, 91 1,378, 



Jjoan and J Savings 
truotcompa-{ banks 

__nicsJP83). 1 0,237). 

$1,200,007,230. 



$144,304,503 
^65,617,000' 

430.274.07t> 

340,401 
1,902,430 

17,657.33a 

. 31,600.440 
4,455,055 

732,206,560, 

824,745,058, 

74,063.232; 

4,099,555' 
64.130,388 
59,580,948* 



$2,865,970,479 



50,015.970; 

276,630,009 

871,340 

13,323,632 

136,408,55& 

321,476,258J 
i!7,173.,U>i; 



(Private I 
banks \ 
_ (1.028). \ 

$23,657,301 
14,802,461 

67,008,729 

1,030,254 

408,104; 



1.036.884,359; 

154,840.204, 

53,746.009; 

342,905: 
27,003.847, 
02,408,218 



$3,368,279,857 



Private 
banks -j Totals 

(3.028). \ (10,742). _ 

$1,408,104,703 



1,158,834,680 

2,415,088,912 
25,072,970 
18,095,577 

169,476,257 

358, 5 1 5, 744 
32,005,004 



27.320. 78& 
4683,41?! 

844,486 
8,333,422 
1,527,002 



$105,233,295 



3,762,080 

4,508,«87i 
570,005 

4,327,3131 2.169,104,882 



074,929,046 

230,724,252 

77,454,865 
814,248,309 
140,834,740 



$9,500,403,001) 



t^pital stock i 

Surplus fund I 

Other undivided! 

profits { 

Dividends unpaid..] 



$370,750,0401 
K*4,439,841 

63,164,603; 
629,922" 



LIABILITIES. 

"$2437l33r022T 
281,280,? 



82,228, 
378, 



$20,191,2041 $22,518,193 

197.682,86?J 6,872,918, 

85,708,8521 2,058,27* 
71 64,612, 



$673,599,140 
640,184,000 



184,058,301 
1.073,033 



ISt 



COINAOfl OF THB MINTS. 



RUPORlfe OP STATE BANKS, BTC.—LJABILJTII3S— <Oontlnued), 



Classification!! 



State banks 
C7,794). 



Loan and 

nles (683). 

trust oompa- 



Savings 

banks 

(1,237). 



C1.028). 

banks 

P/lvate 



Tota l? 
L667,080;j 



857.191.518 
169.218,426 



Individual deposits I 2,366.200,630 
Due to other banks! 



and bankers 
All other liabilities 



Totals 



171.138,862 
66,677.475 



1,080, 866, 787 

163.788,8351 
91303,064 



8.098.0T7.3D7 

276.984 
15,443,503 



127,937,098 

1,992,882 
2,889,364 



$3.190,911,878 



$2.866,976,479 



$3.368,279,857 



1166.233,295 



59.69Q.401.00V 



REGISTERED BONDS ON DEPOSIT IN TREASURY AND DENOMINATIONS 
OF NATIONAL BANK NOTES OUTSTANDING. 



Registered ^bonds on deposit 



Philippine loan , 

Funded loan of 1907, 4 per 

cents 

Railroad and other bonds 
Four per cents, loan of 1926 
Three per cents, loan of 

1908-1918 

Two per cents, consols of 

1903 

District of Columbla3-65's 

1924 

Hawaiian Islands bonds., 



Total on deposit October 
31, 1905 $494,017,790 366,090,300 



To secure 

Circulating 

notes. 



$4,094^50 



4,466.000 
2,276.540 

483,182,900 

I 



To secure 
Public 
deposits. 
$6,040,000 

2.349,500 
1,838.500 
5,333,700 

3,780.000 

44,243,600 

1.332,000 
1.193.000 



National bank notes of each 
denomination outstanding. 

One dollar........ 

Two dollars 



Five dollars 

Ten dollars. ......... 

Twenty dollars 

Faty dollars 

One hundred dollars 
Five hundred dollars 
One thousand dollars | 
Fractional parts ... 



Total 



$344,588 

164.922 

73.509,018 

224,788,830 

167,905,280 

18,472,900 

39,085.400 

94,600 

24.000 

38,844 



$624, 408,249 



NUMBER OF NATIONAL BANKS IN EXISTENCE, AUTHORIZED CAPITAL 
STOCK, BONDS ON DEPOSIT TO SECURE CIRCULATION, CIRCULATION 
SECURED BT BONDS, AND BY LAWFUL MONEY. ON MARCH 14, 1900, 
JUNE 30 AND OCTOBER 31. 1904, JUNE 30 AND OCTOBER 31, 1905. 



Number of banks. 
Authorized capital. 
Bonds on deposit.. 
Circulation on 

bonds I 

Circulation, lawful) 

money .1 

Total circulation..! 



| Mar. 14. 1900 1 June 30. 1004] Oct. 31, 1904, June 30, 1906 j Oct. 31, 1005 



3,617 
$616,308,095 
244,611,670 



5.3861 
$776,904,335 
416,016.690 



216,374,795/ 412,759,449 



38,027.935/ 
264.402,730 



36.475,646 
449,235,0951 



5,495 

$781,126,335 

426,544,790 



5,760 
$801,330,315 
468.066,940 



424,530,5811 462,668,415 



82,750.919 83,050,392 
467,281.6001 495,719,807 



6,858- 
$812,026,076 
494,017,860 

489,937,806 

84,470,443 
524,408.249 



COINAGE EXECUTED AT THE MINTS OF THE UNITED STATES DURING 
THE CALENDAR YEAR 1904. 



Denomination. 



Double Eagles 

Eagles •■ 

Half eagles ........... 

Quarter eagles 

Lewis & Clark dollars. 



Total gold 



Standard dollars 

Half dollars 

Quarter dollars .. 
Dimes 



Total silver ~. 



Five cents 
One eent . . 



Total minor .... ....... .—... .~.......~~~. *.-.. — . • 

Total coinage 136,992,88lt$2S0.781,567 39 



Piec es. 

11,391.972 

270,988 

489.136 

160,960 

26.028 



12.338.084 



8.812.650 

4.663,308 

12,044,813 

15,401,027 



40,924,796! 



21.404,984 
61,328,015 



82.782,999 



Value. 



$227,819,440 00 

2,709.880 00 

2,445.680 00 

402,400 00 

25,028 00 



$233,402,428 00 



$8,812,650 00 
2,331,654 00 
3,011,203 26 
1,540,102 70 



$15,695,609 95 



$1,070,249 20 
613,280 15 



$1,683,529 35 



There were also coined for the Philippines- 16,905,460 silver pieces and 23,808,466; 
plckel and bronze pieces; for Panama 4,710.128, Venezuela 500,000, Costa Rica 250,000 
and Salvador 400.000 silver pieces. 



COINAGEI AND COINS O^ THB UNITKD STATES, 



4XMNA43X OF TUB HINTS OF THE UNITED STATES. CAXENDAB YEARS 

ma to i*§*. 



Calendar rear*. 



1793 to 4879.. 
tarn. 

rasa 

1882 ~.. 

1883 

1884 

1885 

186&.» ....... 

1887... ........ 

lam...«. 



1(00.. 
1881.. 



'1883.. 



1896.. 
lOT.. 
<1898.. 
1889 
1900-. 
1901.. 
1902.. 
190A.. 
1904 



Grand total* 



eo«t 



$1,699,766,456 09 
62,31)8,279 00 
98.850,890 09 
85,887,686 00 
29,241,999 Ott 
23*991,75650 
27, 773,012 50 
28,946,642 09 
23,972. 38a 09 
81.889.8U8 09 
21.418,98199 
29,407,182 59 
29.222 995.09 
84,787,222. £9 
56,997.920 99 
79,544.160 00 
59,816,357 5Q 
47.053.U60 00 
76,028,485 09 
77,985,757 50 

111,344.220 09 
99.272 942 59 

101.735,187 50 
61.980,572 50 
48.683,970 50 

233.4O2.42&09 



flttver. 



$278,674,547 00 
27,411.693 75 
27,940,163 78 
27,973,132 00 
29*246,968 45 
28,534,866 15 
28,062,17*20 
32„086 > 709 99 
3&.191.081 40 
83,025s 609 44 
$5,496,683 10 
39,202,908 29 
27,518,856 69 
12,641,07809 
8,802,797 30 
9,2C0.35i> 85 
5,698,010 25 
23,089,899 00 
18,487.297 39 
23,034.038 45 
28,061,519 99 
36.295.321 46 
30,838,460 75 
30,116,369 45 
18,874.440 00 
15.695,609 95 



Minor. 



\ 



$13,122,403 05 

391,395 95 

428.151 75 

969,400 99 

1,604,770 41 

796,483 78 

191,622 04 

343,18610 

1,215,68a 26 

912.200 m 

1,283,49*4* 

3*4, 792 M 

1,312.441 09 

961.489 42 

1,134.931 79 

438,177 92 

6^430 56 

832,718 93 

1,526.100 26 I 

1.124.836 14 

1,837,461 86 

2.031.137 39 

2.120,122 6ft 

2,429.736 17 

2.251,281 IS 

1,683,529 35 



]$2,644,755>304 00 t$911,150,580 TO 1843,200,874 50 J $3. 599, 006. 759 10 



Totals. 



tt 



391,563,406 65 
90,111,368 70 

125.219,205 50 
94,821,217 00 
60,093,728 86 
53.323,106 43 
66,826.840 74 
61.375,438 0u 
60v379,160 66 
66.318,616 23 
68.194,022 64 
•1.954, 8*2 84 
68,063,30260 
68.389,78092 
66,834.749 90 
89.184,688 T7 
66.196,78131 

70.975.677 98 
•6,941,882 55 

W2. 144.626 09 
189,243,19176 
137,599,401 84 
184,693,770 30 

94.526.678 12 
65,809,691 68 

250,781,567 35 



PAPER CURRENCY OF EACS DENOMINATION OUTSTANDING OCT. 31. 1905. 



Deoomlaa- 
tlos. 




La.ted 
States 
not«9. 



81,894,466 

1,441,732 

8,004,370 

269,049.621 

24,782,352 

4.402,225 

4 140.750 

8» 149,500 

21.796,000 

19.600 

10,000 



8347,681,016 
^.000.000 



Treasury 
Notes #>f 

1890. 

$828,300 

386.435 

1,940.685 

3,3tQ,230 

1.608.350 

30,000, 

402,000 

' ' 358* 000 



National 

1«nk notes. 

l344;558 

164,922 

73,509,015 

224,788.830 

167,905,280 

18,472,900 

39>065.400 

94,500 

24.000 



38,844 



18,621,000 [$524,408,249 



Net ..... $346,681.0161 $8,021, 000[$524,408.249 8524.455.960 l$476.308.000 |1>880, 474.234 



Gold 
certificates. 




COINS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

GOLD COINS. 
Denominations. weignt (In grains) and fineness of the coins of the United States: 



Denomination. 



J Fine gold t *Alloy J 
} contained, foontatned. j 



Denomination. 



1 Fine gold t »Alloy 
fi contained*, f contained. 



One dollar ($1) 

Quarter eagle ($2 60) 
Three dollars «$3>. . 



23.22 
58.05 
69.66 



2.58 TjHair eag] 

6.45 J I Eagle ($10). 

7.74 ft Double eagle ($20).. 



116.10 
232.20 
464.40 



12.90 
25.80 
61.60 



♦The alloy neither adds to nor detracts from the valve of the eetn. 
SILVER COINS. 



Denomination. 



tFlne silver! Alloy I | 
f contained, ^contained. } \ 



Standard dollar.. 
Half dtAlar 



371.26 
173.61 



41.28 
19.29 



I {Quarter dollar. 
jDime 



IFine silver! Alloy 
ntained, 

86.806 



Denomination. | contained, (contained. 



L_|e 



9.645 
8.858 



s. 



INTERNAL. REVENUE STATISTICS. 



COINS OF THE UNITED STATES— (Continued). 



MINOR COINS. 



| Pine copper] Alloy I I 
Denomination. | contained, (contained. [ | 



Denomination, 



| Fine copper | Alloy 
1 contained, {contained. 



♦Five-cent piece | 57.87 1 19.29 | | tOne-cent piece ,| 45.60 |- 2.40- 



♦Seventy-flve per cent copper, 25 per cent nickel. tNlnety-flve per cent copper, 
5 per cent tin and zinc. 



VARIOUS MONEYS OF CIRCULATION. 

Th«»re are ten. different kinds of money in circulation in the United State*, namely :4 
Gold coins, standard silver dollars, subsidiary silver, gold certificates, silver certificates, 
Treasury notes issued under the act of July 14, 1890; United States notes (also called 
greenbacks and legal tenders), National bank notes, and nickel and bronze coins. 
These forms of money are all available as circulation. Gold coin is legal tender at its 
nominal or face value for all debts, public and private, when not below the standard 
; weight and limit of tolerance prescribed by law; and when below such standard of 
tolerance it is legal tender in proportion to its weight. Standard silver dollars are 
legal tender at their nominal or face value in payment of all debts, public and private, 
without regard to the amount, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in the 
contract. 

Subsidiary silver is legal tender for amounts not exceeding $10 in any one pay- 
ment. Treasury notes of the act of July 14, 1890, are legal tender for all debts, 
public and private, except where otherwise expressly stipulated in -the contract. United. 
States notes are legal tender for all debts, public and private, except duties on imports 
and interest on the public debt. Gold certificates, silver certificates and National bank 
notes are not legal tender, but both classes of certificates are receivable for all public 
dues, while National bank notes are receivable for all public dues except duties en 
imports, and may be paid outjby the Government for all salaries and other debts and 
demands owing by the United States to individuals, corporations and associations 
within the United States, except interest on the public debt and in redemption of , the 
National currency. All National banks are required by law to receive th« notes *o£ 
other National banks at par. The minor coins of nickel and copper are legal tender 
to the extent of 25 cents. 

The coinage of legal tender gold was authorized by the first coinage act, passed 
by Congress Afrril 2, 1792. The gold unit of value is the dollar, which contains 
25.8 grains of standard gold 900 fine. The amount of fine gold in the dollar is 
2a. 22 grains, and the remainder of the weight is an alloy of copper. The total 
coinage of gold by the mints of the United States from 1792 to June 30,-1902, was 
$4 328, 134, 400 50, of which it i« estimated that $1,068,811,784 is still in existence as" coin 
in the United States, while the remainder has been exported or consumed in the 
arts. 

The silver unit is the dollar, which contains 412% grains of standard silver 900 fine 
The amount of fine sliver in the dollar Is 371V* grains, and there are 41% grains of 
copper alloy. The standard silver dollar was first authorized by the act of April 2 
1792. The coinage of the standard silver dollar was discontinued by the act of Feb-^ 
ruary J.2, 1873, and it was restored, with restrictions as to. monthly issue, by the' act 
of February 28, 1878. In 1893 the United States ceased to purchase silver for coinage 
into dollars. The total amount of silver coined from 1792 to 1873 was $8,031,238, and 
the amount coined from 1878 to June 30, 1902, was $542,197,805. The coinage ratio 
between goHl and silver under the act of 1792 was 15 to 1, but by the act of 1837 it 
was changed to 15.988 to 1 (commonly called 16 to 1). 



INTERNAL BEVENTJE STATISTICS. 



Objects of Taxation. 



Receipts during fiscal years 

ended June 30. 

1904. | r905. 



SPIRITS. 

Spirits distilled from apples, peaches, grapes, pears, 
pineapples, oranges, apricots, berries, prunes, figs 
and cherries 

Spirits distilled from materials other than apples, 
.peaches, grapes, pears, pineapples, oranges, apricots, 
berries, prunes, figs and cherries ; 

Rectifiers (special tax) 

Wine made in imitation of champagne, and liquors 
produced by being rectified, etc 

Retail liquor dealers (special tax) 

Wholesale liquor dealers (special tax) 

Manufacturers of stills (special tax) 

Stills and worms manufactured (special tax) 

Stamps for distilled spirits intended for export. ....... 

Case stamps for distilled spirits bottled in bond.. ...... 



$1,801,064 53 



127.763,177 96 
297,637 75 



5.341,573 56 

553,618 50 

987 51 

3,240 00 

2,663 55 

46,052 00 



Totals $135,810,015 42 



$1,754,523 42 



127,758,104 77 
306,123 85 

687 80 

5,492,407 54 

579.800 71 

1,029 18 

2,640 00 

2,903 85 

60,292 00 



$135,958,513 t* 



INTERNAL REVENUB STATISTICS— <ContinuedJ. 



129 



Objects of ta xation. 
TOBACCO. 



CSgars weig-hinsr more than 3 pounds per thousand.... 

Cigars weighing not more than S pounds per thousand. 

Cigarettes weighing not mare than 8 pounds per thou- 
sand, 26 cents per poonl. .. 

Cigarettes weighing not more than 3 pounds per thou- 
sand. 18 cents per pound .......... 

Cigarettes weighing more than 8 pounds per thousand. 

Snuff , .................. 

Tobacco, chewing and smoklnsv, , 



Totals 



FERMENTED LIQUORS 
Ale. beer, lager beer, porter and other similar fer- 
mented Manors 

Brewers (apeclsi tax) .....,-.....• 

Retail dealers in malt liquors (special tax) 

Wholesale dealers in malt liquors (special tax) 



Totals 



OX-EOMARGARTNIL 

Oleomargarine, domestic artificially colored in imita- 
tion of butter .-.....„ 

Oleomargarine, free from coloration that causes it to 
look like butter of any shade of yellow 

Oleomargarine Imported from foreign countries. ....... 

Manufacturers of oleomargarine (special tax)......... 

Retail dealers in oleomargarine artificially- colored in 
imitation of batter (special tax}..... 

Retail dealers in oleomargarine free from artificial 
coloration (special tax) 

Ivnoiesale dealers in oleomargarine artificially colored 
in imitation of batter (/special tax) 

Wholesale dealers in oleomargarine free from artificial 
coloration fepecial tax) 



Totals 



FTLJLED HNkmy id 

Filled cheese, domestic and imported 

Manufacturers of filled cheese (special tax)...*..... 

Retail dealers In filled cheese (special tax) ..... 

Wholesale dealers in filled cheese (special tax)....., 

Totals -_-—_• 

ML7CEJD FLOUR, 
&tr barrel of 196 pounds, or more than 98 pounds. . . 
Half barrel of 68 pounds, or more than 40 pounds. . 
Quarter barrel of 49 pounds, or mare than 24% pounds 

Blghth barrel of 24% pounds or less 

Manufacturers, packers, or repackecs of mixed flour 
(special tax)...... ........►......,,,,... 

. Totals : ^ J ^... I ^.... lliilJL1 . 

ADULTERATED BUTTER. 

Adulterated batter manufactured or sold, etc 

Manufacturers of adulterated butter (special tax)..... 

Retail dealers in adulterated butter (special tax) 

Wholesale dealers in adulterated butter (special tax).. 

Totals J 

PROCESS OR RENOVATED BUTTER, 
Process or renovated butter manufactured or sold, etc. 
Manufacturers of process or renovated batter (special 
tax) ~.... 



Totals ►,.... 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Opium .».. 

Playing cards 

Penalties 

Collections not otherwise herein provided for. 



Totals ... 
Aggregate receipts. 



Receipts during fiscal years end- 
edjune 39. 



20>122,415 59 
876,206 25 

2,921,85250 

281,48217 

. 25,364 83 

1,209,454 80 

19.719,042 61 



$44,656,808 75 



48.206,182 66 
166,88137 
247,035 60 
462.409 24 



$49,963,458 77 



116.080 97 

64 00 

19*725 00 

21*563 05 

84*227 63 

0*255 00 

6&V28157 



1484,087 45 



3,243 23 
300 00 



63,543 23 

48 04 

1.053 22 

50 06 

187 68 

226 58 



61.565 58 

865 90 
1,050 00 



$1,915 90 

136,869 34 

4,004 19 



$140,873 58 



876,408 34 

206,958 55 

2,139,135 54 



2,722.502 43 



$232,903,781 06 



29*682,743 73 
896.348 22 

6,004,925 40 

516,37218 

25.262 71 

1,267,911 66 

20,069,34660 



645,659,910 50 



48v459,539 93 
164,741 79 
260.431 76 
>70 



$50,380.55318 



328*435 08 

116.400 33 
99.15 

, nysooo 

21,543 SO 

67,285 32 

4,160 00 

50,265 63 



$665,478 81 



16 00 

1,193 06 

97 00 

16141 

180 02 



61,648 39 

36710 

3,133 87 

138 00 

300 00 



$3,938 97 

158,416 49 

3.818 77 



$156,735 26 



428,575 44 
228,594 73 
*788,027 97 



1,441,198 14 



$234,187,976 I 



"Includes $774.364 59 from legacies on which the tax bad accrued prior to 
the repeal of the act 



1*1 






ii 

land 

"Mai" 
AllriTi 



• <:w 7o 



jHKj 7<h r.<< 






2t,fl 



Lrl 



Ma*K* 



iL-itrt^t <*f Columbia «n*l 
Main* an it 




7.4*1-1 i ■■ 

\ 

ludfntf Rh< 






FOREIGN TRADE OF THE UNITED ST. I TES 

I"- 









mentis 

Amfmalfl (cattle lwraea, mule*. N". •**>.)■ ...*...*. 

., t». ...*,.. , ,,.... .Iv.MtttllK 

. 

, fc*4 ttarie oi. 

■ -ItOlltfl . , * w..».,t< 

* -HM 

.►.*- 

I ) M<l>>.«,r...t. 

iiJe and textile grusedv.. «.»• 

!!*■•»•■ 

■ ■ifnis nutF) ...-, i*i**ti 
,,j fur rfttus ■ ♦ ■ - ■ ■< * ■ 

nut! inam>fiiL lures or (nut intjudiu£ oT«i,. k « 

i na^i i.*fa**t ur#j of . . . 

■ t turpentine, pUctt and ftpfe 

&i < • ■ 

i timed or numufa^tured) ♦ , . 

ea of * 

n Tvax..., - . ..*•-.• -♦■■■; "' 

aUiff nwto.t and lalry product*)-. - . 

1 ** 

.•».»■*••*.*•*• - . 

... 
; -.irns of» 

Total vntaw ■ !••••# -*«4*«* 

uf ftsreLtfft aMranaiuUfte •«*■«< •»• 

Total issrpnnt tTa*li5. .-*.-■ m _L* Ml 



Y*M tftAllUlfc- ill 



'r>.t*S| 



0.4T« 
7.P*M,lHlf 



in.l4S k 222 

tT.ora.Tii 

741,434 

72 «flT.MH 
7.IW3.W 



ft, 4W, i 

18,264 



* i t 4#J.«21. 371 



VT.02B 



FOREIGN TRADES BY COUNTRIES. 



131 



FOREIGN TRADE OF THE UNITED STATES— (Continued). 



Articles. 

Carried In cars and other land vehicles. 

Carried in American vessels..". 

Carried in foreign vessels 

Coin and bullion- 
Gold — In ore ............ 

Bullion and coin 

Silver— In ore ; 

Bullion and coin 



Year ending June 30. 



1904 
143.299,734 
04,900,89* 
1,196,978.389 

729,247 

78,466,740 

69,132 

37.917,732 



1906. 
154.234,890 
120,891,tt>7 
1,210,618,198 

932,624 
85,214,119 

188,272 
36,576. 159 



Free of duty — 
Chemicals, drugs and dyes (n. 
Coffee 



e. s.>. 



Cotton (unmanufactured) 

Fruits, Including nuts (n. e. s.) 

Furs and fur skins, undressed 

Hides and skins (other than fur skins) 

Jewelry, precious stones 

India rubber and tgutta percha (crude), including "Gutta-| 
jodatong," or East Indian gum 

Paper stock (crude) 

Silk (unmanufactured) 

Tea 



Textile grasses and fibrous vegetable substances (n. e. s.).. 

Tin (bars, blocks or pigs, grain or granulated) 

Wood, and manufactures of 



Total, free of duty. 

Dutiable— 

Breadstuffa ♦ 

Chemicals, drugs, dyes and medicines (n. e. s.) 

Cotton (manufactures of) 

Earthen, stone and china ware » 

Flax, hemp, jute, etc. (unmanufactured) 

Flax, hemp, jute, etc. (manufactures of) 

Fruits (including nuts, etc.) 

Furs (manufactures of) 

Glass and glassware 

Hides and skins (other than fur skins) 

Iron and steel (manufactures of) 

Jewelry (manufactures of gold, silver and precious stones) 

Leather, and manufactures of 

Metal, metal compositions, etc. (n. e. s.), Including bronze. 

Silk (manufactures of) 

Sugar and molasses (n. e. s.), and confectionery 

Tobacco (leaf) 

Tobacco (manufactures of) 

Vegetables 

Wines, spirits and malt liquors 

Wood (n. e. s.), and manufactures of 

Total dutiable Imports 

Total value of merchandise 

Brought in cars and other It nd vehicles 

Brought in American vessels 

Brought in foreign vessels 

Coin and bullion — 

Gold— In ore 

Bullion and coin . .., 

Silver — In ore 

Bullion and coin | 



140,866,642 
09,551,799 
8,541,510 
9,71»,754 
9,005,873 
41,017,035 
9,528,397 

41,049,434 
2,900,713 
46.100.500 
18,229.310 
34,403,151 
21.486,311 
8,419,173 



$454,130,240 

$2,551,581 

24,427,910 

49,524.246 

12,005,014 

3.411,134 

39. 221. (-94 

14.720,100 

5.757,129 

6.367.585 

10.989.035 

26,399.898 

16,147,032 

11,100.215 

7,092.125 

31,973,680 

73.016,210 

16,939,487 

3,133.859 

7.608,602 

16,662.702 

18,565,180 



$536, 

991, 

68. 

132. 

790, 

21, 1 



957,131 
087.371 
239.120 
253,065 
595.186 

20,1461 



$39,853,829 
84,654, 062 
9,414,750 
12.358.235 
10,002,1)07 
49,814,518 
11,117,275 

31.6S3.312 
3,796,595 
61,040,053 
16,230,858 
35,213.325 
23,378,471 
6,787,644 



$517,436,352 

555,795,822 

24.939,731 

48,919,930 

11,659.723 

2,898,746 

39.645,324 

13.565,220 

7,803,395 

5,771,382 

14.949,628 

22.885.527 

2.''., 947. 883 

11,606,233 

7.050,119 

32,614,540 

98,805,539 

18,038,077 

4,107,169 

3,983,272 

17,652,323 

22.776,521 



1 



$600,076,277 

1,117.512,629 

78.649,402 

160,730.887 

878,132,280 

9.330.015 
44,318.946 

15.696,876 
11,787,989 



FOREIGN TRADE FOR YEARS ENDING JUNE 30, 1904 AND 1905. 



Countries. 

r 

Europe. 

Austria-Hungary 

Azores and Madeira Islands. . 

Belgium 

Denmark 

France >•• 

Germany 

Gibraltar 



1904. 



Imports. \ Exports. 



1905. 



Imports. | Exports. 



$10,372,089 

19.753 

22,668.342 

093 536 

81.410.347 

109.188.554 

26,653 



$8,225,282 

281.818 

40.871.829 

14.052,821 

84,279,480 

214.780.992 

445,581 



$10,592,139 

22,941 

25.923.150 

1,018,368 

90,050,081 

118.138,089 ; 

104.131! 



$11,617,898 

206,007 

38,401,781 

14,878,568 

76.071,308 

194,498.258 

231,724 



132 



FORKIGN TRADBJ BY COUNTRIES. 



FOREIGN TRADE OV THB UNITED STATBS— <Coattfawied)t 



Countries. 



tireecfe 

Greenland. Iceland .. 

Italy , 

Malta. Gezo 

! Netherlands 

Portcgai 

Rou mania .......;.., 

Russia, Baltic, etc.. 

Russia, (Black Sea).. 

ScrvJa 

Spain 

Sweden and Norway. 

Switzerland 

Turkey in Europe... 
I Uaitetl Kingdom . . . 



Total Bunape 

North America. 

Bermuda 

British HondiH-an , 

Dominion of Canada 

Newfoundland, Labrador 
Central American State*. 

Mexico 

Mlquelen, Langley . etc . . . 
West Indies. 

Brithah 

Cuba 

Danish ..,»...«,......... 

Dutch 

French 

Hayti 

San Domingo 



Total West Indies. 



Total North America . . . 
South America. 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Chin* 

Colombia 

IScuadoi* 

Falkland Islands 

Guiana— British- 

Dutch 

French 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela ^ 

Total South America 

Asia. 

Aden 

flhinese JDrrrpire 

China— British 

French 

Russian 

East Indies— British 

Dutch 

Other sections . . 

Hong-Kong 

Japan 

Korea 

Russia (Asiatic) 

Turkey in Asia. 

All other Asia ~ 



1904. 



Imports. J 

1.588,94* 
85,341 



33,158.0421 

56.010 ; 

19,591,784 

5,243,587 

5.592 

9,535,792 

2^28.119 

9.592 \ 

8,346,1731 

• 6,258,114 

19,534,439 

3,890,597 

165. 785.368 



Bi porta. 

242,229 

60 

3&.720.001 

359,53d t 

72.250,568 

1.936,118 

234,078 

16.410.3fiS 

2.663,943 



$408,697,379 




$90,089,352 



$198,778,952 
$9,835,101 



76,152,745 

10,775,810 

7,949,211 

2,350,493 



Total Asia 

, Oceaniea. 

*BriCrsh Australia ... 
British Oceaniea ... 
French Oceaniea .», 
German Oceaniea . < 
Philippine Island* ., 



1,446,123 

4l.3.P30f 

17,842 

416 

2,899,915 

1,(>44,413 

6,878,348 



$120,364,113 

$2,044,528 
29,345,981 

5,808' 



10,762.344 
11,340,884 

* 271.266 
461.351 

537,340,699 



$1,057,930,131 



$1,291,284 

1,070,449 

181.234,9fe6 

2,647,784^ 

8,499.075 

45.844,720 

77,165 

$9,600,921 

27,377,465 

649,960 

798,508 

1,672,559 

2,594,740 

1,543,754 



$44,243,907 



$234,909,959 

$18,002,0*7, 

54,344 

11,046,856 

. 4,824,857 

4,66*0,891 

1,362,908 



1,751,703 

629,822 

238,150 

21,333 

3,961,360 

2,135,321 

8,165,465, 



2,143 

47,675,328 

10,325,072 

40,495 

1,519,212 

46,537,478 

290 

136,1*0 

5,690,529 

188,371 



$7,134,408 

487,640 

621,698 

305 

12,066,947 



$50,756*027 

$1,465,081 

12,862,432 

29,129 

51,801 

537,523 

6,673.682 

1,609,718 

18,928 

10,458,554 

24,980,421 

387.5TO 

332,184 

648,985 

712,883 



$143,509,153( $60,151,347 



$27,401,446 

58,120 

407,910 

150,296 

4,832,900 



1906. 



$G40,25ft,0l7 



«2, 308*203. 

1,186,029 

12,960^621 * 

46,460,173 



$10,702,683 

$6,318,601 

392,744^ 

19T,919> 

34,529 

1,101,650 

4.6G4.2Q9 



$103.40^235 



$227,364,821 
$15,316,492 



99,843,114 
10,859,403 
6,411,929 
2,495,073 



1,635,082 

638,6ftT 

37,141 

2,206 

S,162,9e< i 

8,158,86ft , 

7,108,050* 



$160,&69,7m 

$2,203,987 

28,100,634 

54,48* 



53,781,740 

18,463478 

17,4*1 

1,556,435 

62,113,87a 

828 

137,674 

ft, 006,867 

168.894 



$162,601,094 

$ll,«0fr,587 

68,329 

701,113 

52,201 

12,637,804 



Exports. 
181,97ft 




$1,«21,515,717 

$1,331,940 

1,034,36ft 

140,741,800 

2,441.420 

14,158,650 

46,681,29« 

60,10ft 




$55,206,990 



$260,096,531 

$23.5«4 I «i€ 
l«f,04t 



10,985,09* 

5,558,357 
3.582,78ft 



44ft 

1,8*4,416 
690,418 

isKrsai 

38 r ia& 
3.657,226 
1,990^704 
3,218,67ft 



967,102,19ft 

Sl.m r S7* 

52,516.361 

928 

/ 1«2^6<W 

8,508 

7,549,39ft 

1,632,426 

127,817 

10,741,3«» 

61,724,726 

1,013,258 

335,123 

360,772 

164*083 



tl23.ft37.8Qft 
«2fi,34fM*>5 

7D>«ai 

338,669 
110.934 

6,200,tt2* 



FOREIGN CARRYING TRADE. 



FOREIGN TRADE OF THE UNITED STATES— (Continued). 



Countries. 



Total Oceanica ........... 

Africa. 

British Wast Africa 

British South Africa 

British East Africa 

Canary Islands 

French Africa . , 

German Africa 

Italian Africa 

(Liberia 

Madagascar 

Portuguese Africa 

Spanish Africa 

Turkey in Africa— Egypt 

Tripoli -. . — 
Ail other Africa. 



Total Africa 
Grand total , 



1004. 



J 



ItMJfi. 



Imports. 

$146,929 

865,255 

836.803 

63,211 

246.715 



'I 



1.948; 



9.859 

15.493 

T. 868, 244' 

47.303 

294,926 



$9,426,776 



$891,087,371 



2,349,621 

17,964.573 

507.286 

871.146 

431.912 

34.923 



35.906, 

11.047 

,1*891.707 

12.384 

B64.957 

"*' 54.664 



$24,230,126 
$1,460.8277271 



Imports, 4 
~$25»378J^4 

16.399 

^48,247 
953.718 
128.493 
625.071 



15 

14.677 

8.646 

8,557.752 

155,837 

256,925 



$11,365,777 



$1,117,512,629 



Exports. 
"$337076^026 

2.291.955 

11.91 1.925 

469,731 

389,076 

812.334 

84.799 



65.309 

8.049 

1,736.788 



752.489 

1.325 

19.681 



$18,533,441 



$1,518,561,720 



WOBMmS CARRYING TKAJDK OF TUB UNITED STATES. 



fiscal 
Tear. 



1899 .. 

1881 .! 

1882 .. 
1863 .. 
1884 .. 
1868 ... 

1868 .. 
1867 .. 

1888 .. 

1869 .. 

1870 .. 

1871 .. 
t8W .. 
1878 .. 
1874 .. 

1875 .. 
4878 .. 

u>n .. 

1878 .. 

1879 .. 

1889 .. 
1881 .. 
1882.. 

1883 .. 

1884 .. 

1885 .. 
1888 .. 

1887 .. 

1888 .. 

1889 .. 
1899 .. 

1891 .. 

1892 .. 

1893 .. 

1894 .. 

1895 .. 

1896 .. 

1897 .. 

1898 ... 

1899 .. 

1900 ... 

1901 ... 

1902 ... 

1908 ... 
19f»4 .. 

1909 .. 



Total value of Imports and exports. 



In vessels. 



American. J F oreign, j T otals. 
$507,247.7571 $255,940,7981 $762,288.5501 
381.516.788 203.478.278 584.905.066* 
217.693.418 218.015.298 435,710,714 
241.872.471 343.056.031 584.028.502 
184,061.486 48*.7P* R 48 669.855.034 
187,402.872 437.01 0.124 604.412.996 
325,711.861 CH5.i:26>M- 1.010,938.552 
297.834.904 f.^J ::;^,403 879.165,307 
297.981.573 6:^. 5415.074 848.527.647 
289.956.772j v>M\,4wM2 876.448.784 
352.989.491, Gi8i*27.4.« 991.896,889 
353.684.172 7^r. 8*2. >76 1.109.486,748 
345.33 1,-191 ftf. ! » . ■■: 1 6 * 32 1. 184, 677. 463 
346,806.592 9itf.Virl651 1.313.^9.243 
850.451,994 W!>. ->iu-:. T 06 1.289.658. 100 
314.257.792 8^4.1^* r f L7 1,199.046,309 
311,076.171 HU.354.987 1.124 431.158 
318.660.261 tco.^ii ;,3fi 1.176 560.817 
313.950.906 fc7uuol,i2D 1. 199.042,035 
272.016.692 911.269.Kt2 1,183.284.924 
258,348.577 1.224,265.434 1.482.612.011 
250.586.470 1.269.002.983 1.519.589,453 

227.229.745 1,212.978.769 1.440.208.514 
240.420.500 1.268.506.924 1.498.927.424 
233.699.035 1.127.798.199 1.361.497.234 
194.865.743 L079.518.560 1.274,384.309 
197.349.503 1.073,911.113 1.271,260.616' 

194.356.746 1.165.194.508 1.35^.551.254 
190.857.473 1.174.607.321 1,366.554.794 
203.805. 108 1.217.063.541 1.420.868.649 
202.451.086 1.371,116.74 4 1.573.567. 8.50 
206.459.725 1.450.0S1.087 1.656.540.812 
220.173.735 1.5(44,558.808 1.784.732.543 
197.765.507 1.428.316.668 1.626.082.075 
195.268.218 1.273,022.450 1.468.290.672 
170.507.198 1.285.806.102 1.456.403.388 
187.691.887 2.377 .973. 521 1.505.665.408 
189.075.277 1.525.753.766) 1.714.829.043 
161.328.017 1.682.492.479 1.743.820.496 
160.612.200 1.646.263.857 1.806.N76 003 
195.084. 192 1 1.894. 444. 424 12.089. 528. 61 6 
177.398.615 1.974 536.70612.151.935.411 
185.819.987 1 .919.029.314 J2.104.849.301 
214.695.03212,(126. 106. 388 1 2,240.801. 420 
229,735 119) ?.. 001.203. 51 4 12.230.038 fl::3 
290.689.269! 2. 103. 195.5661 2.393.884.828 



pa * 

66.5 1 

65.2 * 

50 

41.4 

27.5 

27.7 

32.2 

33.9 

35.1 

33.1 

35.6 

£1.9 

29.2 

26.4 

27.2 

26.1 

27.7 

26.9 

26.3 

23 

17.4 

16.5 

15.8 

16 

17.2 

15.3 

15.5 

14.3 

14 

14.3 

12.9 

12.5 

12.3 

12.2 



Total tonnage of vessets en- 
. teres and cleared. 



13. 

11.7 

12 

11 
93 
8.9 
9.3 
8.2 
8.8 
9 1 

10. S 

12.1 



American iPer J 
Tons. Ucafi 

12,087.209) 

9.913.230 
10.079.5U3 

9.061,059 

6.157,382 

6.968.795 

6.755.236 

6.874.554 

7.268.506 

6.784.U31 

6 992.967 

7.489.682 

7.394.155 

7.369.196 

7,875,777 

7,310,589 

7.343.851 

7.42S.574 

7.514,620 

6,879.770 

6,834.319, 

6,629.119 

6.658.566 

6,562.766 

6.43S.934 

6.363.567 

6.534.946 

6.624.502 

6.781,771 

7.712.779 

8.149.878 

8.836,206 

9.006.106 

8.762.048 

9.304.507 

8.977.057 
10.525.019 
11.143.470 
10.351.493 
10.812.112 
12.344.570 
12.708 652 
13.782.755 
13. 881. 809 
13,320.54 7 
J14.242.315 



184 



IMPORTS AND HXPORTS BY GROUPINGS. 



IMPORTS .AND EXPORTS BY CONTINENTAL DIVISIONS, 1883-1906. 

IMPORTS. 



Fiscal years 
ending June 30 



1803 
1894 
1805 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 



Europe. 
Dollars. 



458.450,093 
295,077,865 
383,645,813 
418,639,121 
430,192,205 
305,933,691 
353.884,534 
440.567,314 
429,620,452 
475,161,941 
547,226,887 
498,697,379 
540.253,017 



North | 
America. 
Dollars. 
183,732,712 
166,962,659 
133.915,682 
126.877.126 
105,924,053 
91,376,807 
112.150,911 
130,035,221 
145,158,104 
151,076,524 
189, 736,475, 



227,354,831 



South 
America. 
Dollars. 



102.207,815 
100,147.107 
112,167,120 
108,828,462 
107.389,406 
92,091,694 
86.587,803 
93.666,774 
110.367,342 
119,785,756 
107,428,323 



198,778,952 120,364,113 



150.559.776 



Asia and 
Oceania. 
Dollars. 



113,621,824 
87,644,320 
95.077,290 
114,206,986 
111,695,036 
119,453,823 
134,089,091 
174,453,438 
129,072,806 
143,849.112 
168,745,901 
163,820,161 
187,979.228 



Africa. 
Dollars. 



M78 

6,162,771 

7,164,060 

11,172,970 

9,629.713 

7,183,689 

10,436.060 

11,218,487 

8,953,461 

13.447.616 

12,581.661 

9,426,776 

11,366,777 



Total. 
Dollars. 



866.400.823 
664,994,622 
731,969,966 
779.724.674 
764,730,412 
616,049,664 
697,148,489 
840,941.184 
823,172.166 
903.320,948 

1,025.719,237 
991,0H7,4ftl 

£117. 612,629 



EXPORTS. 



Fiscal years 
ending June 30 



Europe. 
Dollars. 



1893 


661,076,710 


1894 


700,870,822 


1895 


627,927,692 


1896 .., 


673,043,753 


1897 


813,385,644 


1898 


973,806,245 


1899 


936,602,003 


1900 '.. 


1,040,167,763 


1901 


1,136,504.605 


1902 


1,008.033,081 


1903 


1,029.250,657 


1004 


1.057,930,131 


1908 


1,021.515,717 



North | 
America. 
Dollars._ 
119,788,889 
119,693,212 
108,576,594 
116.567,496 
124.958.461 
139.627,841 
157,931.707 
187,594, 625 
196,534,460 
203,971,080 
21 5, 482, 7K9 
234,909,959 
260.696,552 



South 
America. 
_Dollars. 
32,639,077 
33,212,310 
33,525,935 
36.297,671 
33.768,646 
33,821,701 
35,059,902 
38.945,763 
44,400,195 
38,043,617 
41,137,872 
50.755,027 
57,102,190 



Asia and 
[ Oceania. 
Dollars.^ 

27,421,831 
32,786,943 
30.434,288 
42.827.268 
61,927.678 
66.710.813 
78.235,176 

108,306, 082 
84.783,113 
98.202,118 
95,827,528 
93,002,028 

160.713,820 



Africa. 
_Dollar»._ 

6,838.687 
6,577,288 
7,074,666 
13,870,760 
16.963.127 
17.515,780 
18,594.424 
19,469,849 
25.542,618 
33.468,606 
387436,863 
24,230,126 
18,533,441 



Total. 

Dolla rs. 

847;665,194 

892,140,672 

807,538,166 

882.606.938 

1,060,993.666 

1.231,482,380 

1,227,023.802 

1,394,4*3,082 

1,487,764,991 

1.881,719.401 

1,420,141.679 

1.460,827.271 

1,518,661,720 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS FOR 1904-05 SUMMARIZED BY GROUPS. 

IMPORTS. 



Free 



Groups. 

of duty: 



Articles of food, and animals | 

Articles in a crude condition which enter into| 
the various processes of domestic industry.. 

Articles wholly or partially manufactured for 
use as materials In the manufactures and 
mechanic arts 

Articles manufactured ready for consumption. . 

Articles of voluntary use, luxuries, etc 



Total free of duty. 



1904. 

_pollars. 
113/7317571 

249,029,217 



63,275,668 
17,687.377 
10,406,507 



454,130.240 



Dutiable: 

Articles of food, and animals 

Articles in a crude condition which enter into 
the various processes of domestic industry..] 

Articles wholly or partially manufactured for 
use as materials in the manufactures and 
mechanic arts ; 

Articles manufactured ready for consumption,.. 

Articles of voluntary use, luxuries, etc.. 



Total dutiable 



119,479,827 
72,470,789! 



73,323,225 
149,^49,814 
121,833.476 



636,957.131 



Free and dutiable: 

Articles of food, and animals 

Articles in a crude condition which enter Into 
the various processes of domestic industry.. I 

Articles wholly or partially manufactured for 
use as materials In the manufactures and 
mechanic arts 

Articles manufactured ready for consumption. 

Articles of voluntary use, luxuries, etc 



Total imports of merchandise. 



233,211,39? 
321,500,006 



136,598,793 
167,537,191 
132,239.983 



©91*087,371 



Per 

Cent. 



25.04 
54.84 



13.93 
3.90 
2.29 

100.00 



13.49 



13.60 
27.91 
22.69 



100.00 



23.53; 
32.441 



13.78 
16.91 
13.34 



100.00 



1906. 



Dollars. 



.129.998,259 
289.178,658 



68,032.879 
17,264,227 
12,977,429 



517.436,352 



143,631,594 
97,285.863 



76,119,157 
148,631,865 
135,407.808 



600,076,277 



273,629.853 
886,469,421 



143,152,036 
165.886,082 
148.385,237 



1,117,612,629 



Pfer 
Cent. 



25.13 
55.86 



13.15 
3.83 
2.61 

100.00 



23.94 
16.20 



12.62 
24.77 
22.57 

100.00 



24.49 
34.68 



12.81 
14.84 
18.28 

100.00 



RAIkROA© ACCII>I«JNT&— AGRiCUIiT^RAli STATISTICS. 



IMPORTS AND EXPERTS FOR 1904-05— (Continued). 



Groups. 
Free of duty: 



1804. 
Dollars. 



Per 

Cent. 



Dollars. 



1 Per 

2 Cent. 



Per odht of free ....} 45.82 



Duties collected from customs , „ . . » . . .1 

Remaining in warehouse at the end of the month}. 

&XPORTS. 



262,013.079 



j -*u» 

28ft06Q.«»J~~ 



Domestic: 
Products of — Agriculture 


853.648,073 

452.415,021 

45.981,213 

48.908,956 

8,543.676 

6.688,178 


59.4$ 

81. 1» 

8.20 

4.80 

.60 

.40 

lOOOO 


921,074.439 
543.620.297i 
50,646.447 
62,098,899 
7,318,706 
6.985,908- 


65.04 
36.44 


Min'ng ........ .° 


3.39 


Forest -....-. ' 


4>16 


Fisheries '. . 

Miscellaneous 


.49 
.48 


Total' domestic • 


l,435,lT9,Ctt7- 


1,401.744.695 


100.00 


Foreign; 
BVee of duty.......... 


13,428,399 
12.219.865 


52.26 

47.74] 


13.866.768 
12.951.257 


61.72 


Dutiable ...v. 


48.28 






Total* 'foreign » . v . ..... . 


25.648,254 


100.00 


28.817.025 


100.00 






Total exports 


1,460,827,271 




1,518,561,720 





RAILROAD ACCIDENTS IN THE UNITES STATES. 



— Passengers. -^ | r-Other persons-J , Totals.' * 

Killed. [Injur ed. \ Kille d . (Inju red. | Ki ll ed. (Injured. 
the Interstate Commerce Commission.) 



Year ending 
June d0. 



IS9t 
lc92 
1893 
1894 
1895 
lfc96 
£89? 

ttm 

1899 
1900 

tool 

1992 
$903 
£904 



I, Em.pl 

[ Killed. | 

(From statistical 



2.680 
2,554 
2,727 
1,823 
1,811 
1.861 
1,(93 
1,958 
2,210 
2,550 
2,675 
2,969 
8,606 
3,632 



oyes. J 

Injured. [ 

report of 
26.149 
28,2w7 
31.J2U 
23,422 
25,696 
29.069 
27,667 
31,761 * 
34,923 
39,643 
41,142 
60,524 
00,481 
67,067 



293 t 
876 
299 
324 

no 

181 
222 
221 
239 
249 
282 
345 
355 
441 



!,972 
3,227 
3,229 
3.034 
2,375 
2,8 < 3 
2,705 
2.945 
3,442 
4,128 
4.988 
6.683 
8,231 
9,111 



4,076 I 

4,217 

4,320 

4.300 

4.155 

4.408 

4.522 

4.680 

4.674 

5,066 

6,495 

5,274 

6,879 

6,»73 



4,769 
5,158 
5,435 
5,433 
5,677 
5,846 
6,269 
6,176 
6,255 
6,549 
7,209 
7.455 
-7,841 
7,977 



7,029 
7.147 
7.346 
6.447 
6.136 
8.44H 
6.487 
6,809 
7,123 
7.865 
8,456 
8,«* 
9.840 
10,046 



83,881 
36,652 
40,303 
81.8*9 
83,748 
88.687 
86,731 
40.882 
44,620 
50,320 
64.662 
64,662 
76,603 
84,155 



r The total number of passengers carried in 1904 was 715,419,682, as asalnst 
|«94,891,635 In 1908. 

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 

Tetal yield *d principal farm products of the United 'States, 1900-1904. 



Crops. 



1900. 
; Bushels. 



Com 

OTtoeat ... 

(Oats 

Barley ... 
Rye ...... 

Bocfcwheat 
Potatoes 



12405,103,000 

622,239,000 

809.126,000 

58.926,000 

23,996.000 

9.566,966 



1901. | 1902, J 1903. 
Bushels. | Bushels. ( Bushels. 



I #U10v908|" 50590,877 
Ootto^<bateBV' '..::.. .1 10,401.4531 " 



1,522,520,00012.523, 648*81212, 244,177,000 
748,460,000) 670,063,000] 687.F22.600 
736,809.000- 987.843,0001 784.094,000 
109.933,000 134,954,0004 131.861.000 
80.345,0001 33,631, 0001 29.3*13.000 
15,125.9391 14,529.7704 14,24U.044 



2lQ,926,t<971 187.598.087| 284,632,7811 247.127.880 

-0590,8771 59.857,57*1 ^1,306.940 

9,066,4781 10,584,3691 10,726.428 [ 



1904. 
Bushels. 



652,400,000 

894.596.009 

188.749.008 

27.242.000 

15,008,336 

832^830.300 

«fc696,028 

10,050.963 



Wheat crop «f the world, as published by the Department of Agriculture. 



Continents. 



■North America 
South America 

taurope 

Asia •.*.. 

Australasia . . . 



1900. 
Bushels. 



588,300.0001 

120.546,000 

1,507.L98,00V 

331.266,00a 

42,872,000 

50.111.000 



1901. | 

Bushels. _| 

856,e98,000f 

87,417,000 

1,513, 553, 000 j 

395,574,000! 

41, 428, 000 j 

56,610.000] 



1902. 

Bushels. 

7777194^000 

75,984.000 

1,82S.419,006 

S£1,879,U08 

51,931,000 

43,927.009 



1903. 
Bushels. 



733,786,000 
118.876,000 
1,726, 177, OtK) 
478,615.000 
50,523,000 
20,461.000 



1904. 
Bushels. 



640,£<27.000 

140.598.000 

1.726.177,O<.0 

619.505.000 

50,606.000 

84,627.000 



Totals 



. . |2,640.75l.000(2,945,275.0OOp,l48;5l7,0W18,28*,58O,1)0Oj 3,162,340.000 



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14J 



PRODUCTION OF QO-LD AND SIL.VKR. 



WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF GOLD AND 8ILVER, CALENDAR TSAR 1*04. 



Country. # 



Gold. 



Fine 
ounces. 



Nortu America — 

United States ....! 

Mexico 

Canada 

Africa 

Australasia ......... 

Europe — 

Russia 

Austria-Hungary .. 

Germany 

Norway , 

Sweden 

Italy 

Spain 

Greece 

Turkey 

Prance 

Great Britain ..... 
South America — 

Argentina 

Bolivia 

Chile 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Brazil ^ . . 

Venezuela 

British Guiana .... 

Dutch Guiana .... 

French Guiana .... 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Central America . . , 
Asia — 

Japan ..,, 

China 

Korea » 

Slam 

India 

British East Indies. 

Dutch East Indies . 



4.962 

446 
147 

30.812 
95.513 

6,430 
98,854 
14,512 
77.828 
23.277 
86.532 
64,300 

1,209 
54.214 

102,726 

217,688 

145,125 

2.508 

556.097 

67.375 

32,046 

Totals 116,780,913 



3,892.480 

609.781 

793.350 

4,166.084 

4.246.744 

L 199.857 

102.428 

8,130 



1.946 

2,128 



M06 



Value. 



$80,464,700 
12,605,300 
16,400,000 
85.913.900 
87.767.300 

24,803.200 

2.117,300 

64.700 



40,200 
44,000 



29.000 



102,400 

9.200 

3,000 

636.900 

1,974,400 

132.900 

2,043,500 

300,000 

1,608,800 

481,200 

1,788,800 

1,329.200 

25,000 

1,120,700 

3,984,000 

4,500,000 

i!, 000. 000 

51,800 

11.495.500 

1,392,800 

662,500 



SUver. 



Fine 



57.682.800 

60.808.978 

3,718,668 

486,408 

14,568.892 

172,912 

1,987.797 

6,799,133 

260,210 

23.702 

757.777 

4,876,076 

895,172 

564,685 

609.638 

174,517 

66,153 

6,083,333 

868.067 

046.066 



3,008,705 

1,093 

665,357 

8,208.620 



175.479 



Coining Commercial 
value. value. 



174.579,800 
78,621,700 

" 4,808,000 

628,900 

18,823.600 



2,570,100 

7.497.900 

836,400 

30,700 

979,800 

6,304.400 

1,157,400 

730.100 

788,200 

225.600 

85.500 
7.865,300 
1.122,400 
1,223,200 



3,890,000 

1,400 

847,800 

1,148,500 



226,900 



t33,466.000 

36,269.200 

2.166.&00 

282,100 

8,444,200 

100.300 

1.152.900 

3,363.600 

150.900 

18,800 

4S9.6O0 

2.828,100 

519.200 

327.500 

353.600 

101.200 

88.400 

3,528.300 

503.600 

648,700 



1.745,100 

600 

380.100 

1,861,000 



101,800 



$346,892,2001 1 168. 390, 238 [$217, 7 16. 700 1 $97.666, 300 



GOLD AND SILVER PRODUCED IN THE 

YEAR 1904. 

(As estimated by the Director of the Mint) 



UNITED STATES, CALENDAR 



State or Territory. 



Alil-ama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Montana , 

Nevada , 

New Mexico . . 
North Carolina 

Ore-Ron 

South Carolina 
South Dakota . 

Tennessee , 

Texn 



Utah 

Virginia 
Washington 
Wyoming . . 



Totals 



Gold. 
Fine 
Ou nces 
1.417 
443,139 
161.761 
1)18,873 
1,180.147 
4,088 
72,742 
116 



246,606 

208.390 

18,475 

5.994 

63,366 

5.802 

339,815 

206 

110 

203,902 

184 

15,862 

793 




5,097.800 

4,307.800 

381,900 

123.900 

1,309.900 

121.800 

7,024.600 

4.300 

2,3u0 

4,215.000 

3.800 

327.900 

16.400 



8,892. 480($80.464.70O 



Silver. 
Fine Commercial 
Ounces. Value. 



200 

198,700 

2.744.100 

1.441,300 

14,331,600 

1.500 

7,810,200 



127,800 

14.608,100 

2,695,100 

214.6001 

14.800 

133.200 

500 

187.000 

50.200 

469.000 

12.484.J0O 

6,700 

149.900 

4,400 



5116 

115.246 

1.591.6*8 

835,954 

8,312,328 

870 

4,529,916 



74,124 

8,472.698 

1,563.158 

124,468 

8.584 

77,256 

290 

108.460 

34,336 

272,368 

7,240.894 

3.886 

86.942 

2,652 



57.682,800 $33, 456,024 



» 



Total 
Value. 



929.416 

9.275.746 

4.935.478 

19.830.754 

32,708.128 

97,770 

6.033.616 

2,400 

74,124 

13.570,498 

6,870.958 

606,368 

132,484 

1,887.156 

122.090 

7,133.060 

38.636 

274.668 

11.466.894 

7. 6H6 

414.842 

18.962 



1113,920,724 



GQL£> AND SILVER STATISTICS. 



143 



WORLD'S PBOPPCTION OF QOLP AJflfr SBLVBR, 1800-1904. 



CMten&ur years. 



i860 ...* 

1001 

ista 

is** 



1809 



WW • •■ 

107$ .»•«.....««. 
{812. • •••«*«««*«. 

E8f?3> — • 

1674 . — ...-. 

1875 —.. 

£8765 ..• • 

1S7T 

t$M& »••••••»•*■•■ 

1*70 - 

tsoo 

188* .......*... 

1882 

1883 

1884 

U8S 

1880 - 

:8Sf 

1888 

1889 

1890 »... 

1S01 

1892 :._,« 



1894 .... 

1895 «... 

is**'.... 

1897 

'£98. 

1890" . . . . 

190a .... 
tooi .... 

1002 .... 
1063 .... 



Gottf 



Fine 

owner B. 
6,4*6,2(12 
6,049,582 
&,*»9.51i2 
0.010,582 
6,949,502 
6,049,582 
0,2W»080 
0,270,086 
6,2*0.086 
0.270.000 
0.210,000 
5.501,014 
6,681,014 
4,663.6TB 
4,800,031 
4,710,5© 
6,010,488 
0,612,196 
6,101,114 
5,202,174 
6,148,880 
4,903,742 
4.924,086 
4,014,580 
4,921,169 
5.245,572 
6,130,07» 
5,116,861 
5,330,775 
5,973,700 
5,740,800 
6,320,104 
7,094,266 
7.016,811 
8,764,362 
9.615,190 
0,783.814 
11.420.000 
13.877,806 
14,859.283 
12,366.319 
12,740,740 
14 318.660 
16,747.378 
16.786,013 



02 I 1104. 




120,014,000 
120,614,000 
129,6*4,000 
120,014.000 
115,677,000 
115,577,000 
06,200,000 
00.730,000 
07,500.000 
103,700,000 
113,947,200 
119,002,800 
108,778,800 
108,436,800 
103,023.100 
101,996,600 
95,302,000 
101,720.600 
108.435,600 
100, 163,900 
105,774.900 
, 110,196,900 
123,489.200 
118,848,700 
180.650,000 
146^651,500 
1577494,800 
181,175.000 
108,763,600 
202,251.600 
286,073,700 
286,879,700 
307,168,800 
255,634,500 
263 374,700 
295.889,600 
325,527,200 
346.602,200 



Sliver. 



Fine 
• races. 

29.006.428 

85,401,972 

36.401,972 

86,401,972 

• 85,401,972 

85,401,972 

40,001,583 

48.051,503 

48,051,583 

48.051.588 

48.051,583 

63,317,014 

63,817,014 

€8,207,187 

66,800,701 

02.201,710 

61,753.120 

62679,910 

78^85,451 

14,383,495 

74.705 273 

70,020,872 

80,472,001 

80,175,023 

81,567,801 

91,009,959 

98 297,290 

90,123,586 

108,827,606 

T20. 2 18. 011 

126 095.062 

137,170.919 

153, 151, 762* 

165,472.621 

164.610,394 

167.500:960 

1577 061,370 

160,421.082 

169 035.255 

167.577,533 

172.838.S70 

174, 99*. 573 

166 955.630 

17T>. 443,^70 

168,300.238 



Gaining 
value. 



837.018.000 

40,772,000 

46,772,000 

48.772,000 

46,772,000 

45,772.000 

55.663,000 

55.603,000 i 

65.663.000 

96,663,000- 

56, 663,00* 

81.864,000 

81.864.000 

81,800,000 

71,500,000 

80,500,000= 

87.600*000 

81.040.700 

94,882,200 

96,172,600 

96.705,000 

102.168,400 

111,802.300 

115.297,000 

105,461.400 

118,445.200 

120,626,800 

124 281,000 

140,706,400 

355 427.700 

163.032.000 

177,352,300 

198.014,400 

213 944.400 

212.829.600 

216 566^000 

203.060.200 

2W7.4T3.000 

218.576.800 

216 665.700 

223.408.200 

22ft 260.700 

215.861,800 

220.371.f00 

217,716,700 



Commercial 

value. 

$88,887, 000" 

46,191,609 

47,651,060 

47.610,000 

47,616,000 

47,368,000 

57,646,060 

67,173y00* 

67.086,000 

67,043,000 

57,173,000 

83*968,60* 

83,705,009 

82,120,800 

70,674,406 

77,578,160 

78,322,60* 

75.278,000 

84.540,000 

88,532,700 

85,640, 600 

89.025,700 

98,232,300 

98,984,300 

90.785.000 

07.518,800 

92.793,500 

94.031.000 

102.185.900 

112,414,100 

131,937.000 

135.500.200 

133,404,400 

129,119,900 

104.493,000 

109.545.600 

105.859.300 

96.252.700 

99.712.600 

100.546.500 

107.1P9.900 

104.999.100 

88.486.500 

02,030.600 

97.666,300 



G0£D ANB BOLTER PRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATER 10** TO 1*04. 



Calendar years. 



1860 . 

1861 . 
180ft . 
1868 . 
1864 . 
I860 . 
1866 . 
1S67 . 
1868 . 

£1860 . 

1870 , 

1871 . 
El*72 . 
MS73 , 

•874 . 
|,MT5 . 

rt87« . 

1877- . 

1870 ! 
f 1M0 . 



Gold. 



Fine 
ounces. 



2,225, 250 
2,080,125 
1,806,300 
1,935,000 
2.230,088 
2,574,75^ 
2,588.063 
2,502,107 
2.822.000 
2,394 665 
2.418,750 
2.104,313 
1.741.500 
1.741.500 
1.620.563 
1.615.725 
1.930, T62 
2.203.7S* 
2,476,800 
1.881.787 
1.741.500 
1.678,612 



Value. 



846. (MX), W0 
43.000 000 
80,200.600 
40,000.000 
46.100,000 
63.225.000 
53,500,000 
01.725.000 

~ 48 000.000 
49.500.000 
50. 000. 000 
43,500 000 
S6.00o.000 
36.000.000 
33.500.000 
33. 4' 000 
39.900,000 
46 900.000 
51.200,000 
88,000,000 
36,000.000 
34,700,000 



Silver. 



Fine " \ 
ounces. ] 




144 



MINERAL. PRODUCTS OF TELE UNTTBD STATBa 



GOLD AND SILVER PRODUCED IN THB UNITED STATES — (Continued). 



Calendar years. 



Gold. 



Fine 
ounces. 



1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1*86 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1S96 
1897 
1F98 
1899 
190Q 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 



1,572,187 
1,451.250 
1,489.950 
1.538.325 
1,693.125 
1.506,375 
1,604.841 
1.587.000 
1,588,880 
1,604,841 
1,596,375 
1,739,328 
1,910,813 
2,254,760 
2.568,132 
2,774.935 
8,118,398 
8,437,210 
8,829,897 
3,805.500 
3,870,000 
3.560,000 
3,892,480 



Valne. 

32.500,000 
80.000,000 
80.800.000 
81.800.000 
85,000,000 
33,000.000 
83.175.000 
52,300.000 
32,845.000 
33.175,000 
88,000,000 
35,955,000 
89,500,000 
46,610,000 
68,088.000 
57.363,000 
64.463,000 
71,053.000 
79,171.000 
78,666.700 
80.000,000 
73,591,700 
80,464,700 



Silver. 



Fine 

ounces. 



38.200.000 
85.730.000 
37.800.000 
39.910.000 
39,440.000 
41,260,000 
45.7&0.000 
50.000.0UO 
64,500,000 
68,330.000 
63,500,000 
60,000,000 
49,500.000 
55.727,000 
' 58,835.000 
53,86V,O»0 
54.438.000 
54 764.000 
67.647.000 
06,214.000 
55.500.000 
64.300,000 
57.682,800 



Coining 1 
value. | 



Commercial 
value. 



46,800,000 
46.200,000 
48.800.000 
61,600.000 
51,000,000 
53,350,000 
59,195.000 
64,646,000 
70,465,000 
75,417.000 
82.101.U0O 
77,576,000 
64,000.000 
72,051,000 
76.069,000 
69,037.000 
70.884,000 
70.806,000 
74,583.000 
71.387,900 
71.757.N75 
70,216,000 



41.120.000 
89.660.000 
42,070,000 
42,600.000 
39,230,000 
40,410,000 
43,020,u00 
46,750.000 
57.225.0UO 
67.630.000 
65,563,000 
46,800.000 
81,422.000 
86.445 000 
89,665,000 
32.816.000 
32,118,000 
32 859,000 
35.741.000 
83,128,400 
29,415.000 
29,322.000 
38,456,024 



MINERAL PRODUCTS OF THE UNITED STATES IMS AND 1964 (CAU5NDAB 

TEAB£k 

(From Chart of United States Geological Survey.) 



Products. 



1906. 



1 



1904. 



Q uantity.! » Value* \ Quantity. \ Value. 



Pig iron (spot value 1 ), long tons*.. 
Silver, coining value 4 , troy ounces.. 
Gold, coining value 9 , troy ounces. . . 
Copper, value at New York City, lbs. 
Lead*, value at New York City, 

short tons . . ► 

Zinc, value at New York City 

short toot ....- ► 

Quicksilver, value at San Ftandseo 

flasks* .......... 

Aluminum, value at Pittsburg, lbs. 
Antimony*, value at San Francisco, 

short tons . . .-. 

Nickel 1 \ valne at Philadelphia, lbs. 

Tin, pounds 

Platinum, value (crude) at San 

Francisco, troy ounces.... »._ 

Total value of metallic products. 
Nonmetallic (spot values 1 ). 
Fuels — 

Bituminous coal 1 *, short tons. 

Pennsylvania anthracite, long tons 

Natural gas 

Petroleum, barrels 1 * . . ... 

Structural materials — 

Brick clay 

Cement, barrels 10 ...~ 

Stone" 

Abrasive materials — 

Corundum and emery, short tons 

Crystalline quartz, short tons 

Garnet for abrasive purposes, short 
tons 

Grindstones 

Infusorial earth and tripoll, short 
tons 

Millstones • 

Oilstones, etc 

Chemical materials— 

Arsenious oxide, short tons. .. 



18,009,2521 

54,300,0001 

3,560,000 

198,044.517 

282,000 

159,219 

35,62^ 
7.500,000 

3,128 
114.200 
< ll > 

110 



282,749.348 
66,613,454 



100,461.337 
"29,899; 140 



2,542 

8,938 



3.950 



9,219 



611 



$344,350,0001 

*70,206,080 

73.591.700 

91,506,006 

23,520,000 

16,717,995 

1.544,934 
2,284,900 

548,433 
45,900 



"2,080 



» 16,497.083 \ 

53,603,0001 

4.090,176 

812,537.267 

307.000 

186,702 

34,570 
8,600,000 

3.057 
24,000 

200 



$624,318,008 



1351,687,933 

152,036,448 

85 r 815,360 

94,694,050 

15,000,000 
31,931,341 
72,945,908 

64,102 
76,906 

132,500 
721,446 

76.273 

52.552 

366,857 

36,691 



279,153,718 
65,318,490 



117,063,421 



31.675,257 



1,932 
31,924 

3,854 



6,274 



9283,025,000 

«60,303,319 

84,551:300 

105,629,845 

26.402,000 

18.670,200 

1,503,795 
•2,477,000 

505.524 
11,400 



2,600 



$542,061,988 



$305,842,268 

138,974,020 

38,496.760 

101,170,466 

13,000,000 
26,031.920 
74,200,361 

57.235 
74,000 

£17,581 
881,527 

44,164 

37,338 

188,985 

X186, 



MINERAL, PRODUCTS OF THJB UNITED STATES. 



146 



1904. 



Products. 



I 



Quantity, 



Value. I Quantity 



Value. 



Borax, pounds .*...—,.•. 

Bromine, pounds . ............ 

Fluorspar, short tons ........ 

Gypsum, short tons «.. 

Lithium minerals, short tons...*.. 

Marls, short tons... -.— .. 

Phosphate rock, long tons..~.w.„.. 

Pyrite, long tons.... 

Sulphur, short tong.........^...... 

Salt, barrels* *.....«»..».. «•«••«••«« 
Pigments— 

Barytes (crude), short tons. .•*.«». 

Cobalt oxide, pounds. 

Mineral paints", short ton*,.— *. 

Zinc white, short tons ••.». 

Miscellaneous — 

Asbestos, short tons 

Asphaltum, short tons -... 

Bauzite r »long tons 

Chromic iron ore, long, tons- 

Clay (all other than , brick 3 *), 
short tons 

Feldspar, short tons 

Fibrous talc, short tons 

Flint, short tons 

Fuller's earth, short tons 

Glass sand, short tons 



| Crude, 
Ishort tons. 
^ 34,430 
698,600 
42,623 
1,041,704 
1,166 
84,211 
1,631,67* 



Graphite. . .. Lshort tons. 



Magnesite, short tons 

Manganese ore, long tons. 



Mica. 



("pounds 

lshort tons. 



Mineral waters, gallons sold........ 

Monazite, pounds ....... 

Zircon, pounds ......... 

Precious stones .....*..«».., 

Pumice stone, short tons 

Rutile, pounds 

Sand, molding, building, etc, 

short tons — 

Talc and soapstone, short tons... 
Uranium and vanadium, short tons 

Total value of non-metallic min- 
eral products 

Total value of metallic products 

Estimated value of mineral 

products unspecified 2 * ..... 



*T233,127 
18,968,069 

60,397 
120.000 
63.087 
#3,962 

887 

101.256 

48,087 

150 

1,641,835 

41,891 

60,230 

55,233 

20,093 

823.044 

Crysfllne, 

pounds. 

4,538,155 

Am'phous, 

short tons. 

16,591 

3,744 

2,825 

Sheet, lbs. 

619,600 

Scrap, 

short tons. 

1,659 

61,242,757 

862,000 

3,000 



661,400 

167,580 

213,617 

8,792,943 

23,425 

22,621 

6,319,294 



1,109,818 
6,286,988 

152,160 
* •228.000 

636,667 
4,801,718 

16,760 

1,005,446 

171,306 

2,260 



Grand total 



2,694,042 
256,733 
421,600 
156,947 
190.277 
855,828 



10.595 
25,335 

118,088 



885 



26,671 
30 



25,040 

9,041,078 

64,630 

570 

807,900 

2,665 



418,460 
5,625 



1793,970,109 
624,318,008 

1,000,000 



Crude, 

short tons. 

45,647 

897,100 

36,452 

940,917 

577 

25,000 

1,874.428 



"333,542 
22,030,002 



65.727 
22,000 
69,785 
63,363. 

1.480 

81,572 

47.661 

123 



1,506,762 
45.188 
64,005 
52,270 
29,480 
858,719 
Cryst' line, 
pounds. 
. 6,681,1771 
225,554 Am'phous, 
short tons. 
19.115 
2,850 
8.146 
Sheet, lbs. 



Scrap, 

short tons. 

1,096 

67.718,600 

["745.9991 

iurao 



27,184 
46 



608,810 

, 269,180 

234,755 

2,784,805 

5,155 

20.000 

6,873,025 



3,460,863 
6,021,222 

174.968 

42.600 

631.171 

4,808,482 

25,740 

903,741 

235,704 

1,845 

2,320,162 
266,326 
507.400 
100,690 
168,500 
796,492 



341,372 



9,298 
29,466 

109,462 



10.864 
10,398,460 

85,088 

815,900 
6.421 
7.000 

4,951,607 

483,831 

10,600 



$747,178,806 
642,081,983 

400,000 



$1,419,288.117 f fSl»289,660,788 



*By "spot" value is meant value at the point of production. 2 Long tons are tons 
of 2,240 avoirdupois pounds; short tons are tons of 2,000 avoirdupois pounds. •Produc- 
tion of iron ore. 1896: 16,967,614 long tons; value at mines, 818,219,684. 1896: 16,- 
006.449 long tons; value at mines, $22,788,069. 1897: 17.518,046 long tons; value at 
mines, $18,958,221. 1898: 19,433,716 long tons; value at mines, $22,060,887. 1899: 
24.688,178 long tons; value at mines, $34,999,077. 1900: 27.553,161 long tons; value at 
mines, $66,590,504. 1901: 28,887,479 long tons: value at mines, $49,266,246. 1902: 
85.664.135 long tons; value at mines, $65,412,950. 1903: 35,019,308 long tons; value 
at mines, $66,828,415. 1904: 27,644,830 long tons; value at mines, $43,186,741. 'Fig- 
ures of production furnished by the Bureau of the Mint, Treasury Department. Coin- 
ing value. $1.2929 per troy ounce. Commercial value 1895: $36,445,000. 1896: $39,- 
656,000. 1897: $32.3167000. 1898: $82,118,420. 1899: $32,868,700. 1900: $35,741,140. 1901: 
$33,128,400. 1902: $29,415,000. 1908: $29,822,000. 1904: $30,982,534. » Figures of production 
furnished by the Bureau of the Mint, Treasury Department Coining value, $20.6718 per 
troy ounce. •The product from domestic ores only. 'Of 76H avoirdupois pounds net; of TO 



BAIl^WAY KOI*8feCFB IN UWIT1ED fift'ATMfct. 



MINERAL MtOOUCTB OF THU UNITED 8TATR J <fl »»0»0«d.). 



inot* f«xmd* n?4 afi*r June, ittfH. *Cooauii»pt1oa Is 11*04. nnirtu 
ocn unpL*tUK3 yrea axid fciiiirTiony o?ntJilafcd in hard lead. " 
• i *Jk-y. and in expoxte.] or* and tnattfc. "No routalti' 
r hfglr-graAe canr-i--ati'&t<.9 shipped to Eruriaxid from South Qiruliiia Id IMS, 
*«ut 1&S> abort tons or coateocnUu ftora Sooth Carolina. South Dakota and 
i41Wtl shipped to England- * "Not im luding JIlj.oOO worth of platinum rafori td uf ooa 
lalttatf In eJimes from copper ore from tb4 Rambler mia», Wjomlnf 

EE5 OaJ i Itwlt « Nu Odbtfcdte UUMd <jkse*wbero than (i ■-■: vi vault GBfcfc 

BE BM01.T3Q SbarT ■■.-,-.. •-'■■■ M »*■ ■ouaft.in: no;;: fettWS -.■..-• lt . M . 
a over.*, 100.408* 664. Itmf: 23.GS1.52D abort tona; value at ovejia, f4-U.031US& 
tu. "Of 5UK> pounds for natural cement* and 400 boi 
urhidln* UmeJtonft for iron (lux, bat not including gr|na*toiifei*. "InoHlrfad 
voder pyrut ittuS, 1003 iuvd 1004, * h Of 2W> pounds Mi Value 1* 

<ckatfvs. "Not Including value of 00 Fhnrt ton* of ecfcalt 

tho. "IncJud-Lng metallic |ial jt< ocher, urubcr, wmrtlan r*d, Bit-rifia. 

14 and mineral black. * l VaU«? of clay product* (n 18*G: 

lies 400.m+i i '.>... >• "-.UM* 18*7; (liaiJBl. IfiS& 174,4*7,0001 sSi/u. CfcMDJ r<- 

luroji to* 7'jr..<70 »H)iK $00,212,345. 1901 : *lln,21i ( 5Sf. 1002: ft 22. 1 00 ,531. 1*03: 

■XBLlltt.421. 1004: 1131,023.248. Value of und-Utn^ brick In 1WH: ItU'MSS. >Hb- 

iuuntttle* of xlrcoli. columbltfc and jsadollnltB-. "Including nlrr.< 
'«c*0m. carnonaia of *xk1&, sulphate of soda and alum elajs used by pnper manufacturer*; 
w, • $M4: molybdenum. 12,1.5; tungsten, $184,000"; and p*au PLW&. 

RAILWAY MlLKAtiE Of THIS UNITED STATES. 



atal* or Tarcttt>ry. 



i .„■ *,«■■■. 



OMMKCtJi'uL 

I'riiwire . 
!a . .., 

Ckw* eo* . . * 
tdaao 



t»«m 



• *uti4*i«>«. 



■■ 

L«4***na 

M^Lrie 

itftryiand 



Ulltfaec on Juao 30 r SUM. 



UnomclaL 



Total*. 



Proper* 

tlon to 

total 

mHaaiBb 



[ MMV 
30, 10W. 



«s«TL«0 



Ml ehtj^an . , .. . 
jjinnttana - » *< 

■ • ( ..... 
Mi riLann .*»., 

N> -w flin 
New Jersey 

ark ...;, 
Korih Ctevllaa 

North Ltekul* . 

I 
(pnnByiv&nla ., 

StJUth Carolina 
■_■ Jcota . 



:inla 




a,U0«.9l 

e.tv^T% 

t,4«l + 03t 
ll.ti(AM4| 
ti.Wli>,UA| 

^Hll U| 

>,bUB,ll 
l.i>ti4.1^| 

1.^7L4,;j 
2.1 IJS. ja 
fe.Ji82.U0 
7. 741.04 

TJ07U6 

jj,aco.io 



ILUH 

74.fi7lj 
*LTSj 
10. to 



:t4 001 



IffZ.OOl 



4.&3J 



LK7&.V7 

3 r 100.77 
o. j hl 1 tt 
L74tk§4 

614;L.2H 
047 14 

li f sia us 

i.0KC.2u 

2.785.1 
7,043.711 



10 001 
0^,03 1 
67 + 4«l 
40,«7| 



77.30L 

■JU.UM 

K4W 

a.00 

7.0O 



13.00 
"*tteL70 



18,00 

* 104.00, 
C»7T4 

5.00 



tHW.30 

CUU.44 

1,017.72 

f ,304,71 

t r 481.BVt 
n,«»C74| 

Khll 4*J 
J, WW. 7 4 

7,4^1-IUj 

\UH.7o 
A600^» 
7^11.U4j 

A«^0.2a, 
7,711.06 
3>207 10, 

i.jfr&.yrj 

1,277,86 

* r L-V7.U* 
4,070.00 
iE.I0Li.77 
0, UHkB4 
1. 73ti,tt4 

U.0-J3U4 
^.11 -HO 
M7&.:* 
;t,o47,ll 
#,4P0,*3 

ll,o4».03 
l,77».rJi 
L0b3.2& 
8,032.33 

2.830.8,1 

l,24i.70 



1.03 
E.WI 

10. 

1.00 

.fin 
G.43| 
3.23 
4.61 
412 
1.52, 
Lb2 
<tt& 
.00) 
.OOj 
4.0SJ 
Lttt 
l.SS 
3.01 
l,i» 
2.7'^ 
,4^1 

00 

t.Oti 

B^sa 

c til 
140 
4- SO 

.81 
5 16 

.10 , 
1.48 
142 
LG3 
fi.54 

3 

IS* 

112| 
B.10 



00.08 
31 

87 m 

75. b5 
13.70 

iua.«7| 

97.40 

3I7.SW 

47.70 
408- V4 
17.01 

*3.11 

38.112 
UH;7« 
175.11 
373,06 

40H 
4,11 

1L10 

14U1 
7.7» 

04,04 

un.«7 

MWIH4 

10,72 

317.40 



14A18 

LM 0i> 
U5.20 

■i.Ol> 

137-13 
7,04 



Nttm0*r 

of hnri 
p«r too 

■apHM 



1.01 

tl 01 
IT 14 
I*,00 

in. a* 

173 

I *2fl 
17. 77 

8-OS 
&T0 
U 4L 

0.8* 

11.22 

St 25 

7.50 

00 

14.75 

ao.27 

17.42 
4.t« 

m m 

MM 

IM4 

11 mi 

Ml 

11.51 



1.2S J 



COMMERCIAL, VALUE OP RAILWAY PROPERTY. 



147 



RAILWAY MILEAGE IN THE UNITED STATES— (Continued.) 



State or Territory, 



Mileage on June 30, 1904. 



Official. 



I 



Unofficial. 



Totale. 



Propor- 
tion to 
total 
mileage. 



Increase 
over June 
80,1903. 



Arizona 

District of Columbia... 

Indian Territory 

New Mexico 

Oklahoma 

United States 1904 

United States, 1908 

United States, 1902..... 

United States, 1901 

United States, 1900 

United States, 1899 

United States, 1898 

United States, 
United States, 
United States, 
United States, 
United Stat es, 



1897... 
1896. . . 
1895... 
1894. . . 
1893... 



1,751.35 

31.20 

2,532.00 

2,504.66 

2,611.08 

212,577.57 

207,186.84 

201,672.83 

196,075.07 

192,840.67 

188,277.49 

185,370.77 

182,919.82 

181,153.77 

179,175.51 

176,602.61 

170,332.30 



.80 



1,326.77 

790.38 

799.02 

1,162.37 

405.11 

1,017.17 

1,025.55 

1,508.65 

L622.S6 

1,481.96 

2,105.94 

6,128.77 



1,751.35 

32.00 

2,532.00 

2,504.66 

2,611.03 

"213,904.34 

207,977.22 

202,471.86 

197,237.44 

193,345.78 

189,294.66 

186,396.32 

184,428.47 

182,776.63 

180,657.47 

178,708.55 

176,461.07 



. .82 

.01 

1.18 

1.17 

1.22 

100.00 

* 100. 00 

100.00 

100.00. 

100. OG' 

100.00 

100.00 

ioo;oo 

100.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



70.85 

.85 

341 

105.40 

639.00 

6,927.12 

5,606.37 

5,234.41 

3,891.66 

4,051.12 

2,898.34 

1,967.85 

1,651.84 

2,119.16 

1,948.02 

2,247.48 

4,897.55 



1 Decrease. s Excludes 27.79 miles in Alaska. 'For 1900 and subsequent years on 
basis of 2,970,038 square miles, which covers "land surface" only, and excludes Alaska. 

COMMERCIAL VALUE OF RAILWAY PROPERTY DEVOTED TO TRANSPOR- 

' TATION IN THE SEVERAL STATES AND TERRITORIES, JUNE 80, 1904. 

(Figures by the Federal Census Bureau.) 



State, Territory 
or District. 



United States... 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut ........ 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky ., 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississfppi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New-Hampshire . . . 

New-Jersey 

New-York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 




14S 



PASSICNGRR AND FREIGHT 8KRV1CB— IdOCKOUTS. 



COJVfMIdRCIAl. VAI..UB OW RAILWAY PROPERTY— (Continued). 



State. Territory 
Or District. 



Rhode Island .. 
Smith Carolina 
South Dakota «. 
'lYmnessee ...... 

Texas , 

Utah 

Vermont ....... 

Virginia , 

Washington .... 
West Virginia .. 



Wiset 



Wyoming 
AkiKka 



** fc I; a 



25.719.000 

75.500,000 

49,646.000 

131.16C.000 

2:57.7 18.000 

00.325.000' 

37.311.000 

211.315,000 

182,837.000 

201.799.PO0 

2P4.niO.WW 

100,307.000 

loo.ooo 

88.356,000 
5,57*. 000 
79. 4 05. 000 
80.400.000 
78.0CK.00O 






0) 



5j 






16. 11,848.03 



Arizona 

District of Columbia 

Indian Territory 

New Mexico * 

Oklahoma _ v ... .._. •_ «■ 

MOxclusivc of Jersey (My ferries of the Pennsylvania Railroad system. *The value 
of this ferry property is $5.CO8,000. 

PASSENGER AND FRKfOHT SERVICE ON RA*T,ROADS FOR THE TEARS 
KNKIUD JUNK 30, 1902. t003 AND 1004. 



0.220 
0.071 
0.441 
*.167 
2114 
0.80.? 
0.832 
1.870 
1.020 
1.70! 
2.530 
0.89! 
0.001 
0.G08 
0.049 
0.70G 
0.708 
-0.700 
Railroad system 



. 11.P9 
8.175.28 
3,047.14; 

8.4P0.83 



1.770.09! 
1.003.25 
3,032.33! 
3,305.83' 
2, 836. 83 ^ 
7.048.76 
1.247.70 

27.70 
1,751.35 

32.00 
£532.00, 
2.504.66 
2,611.03 



121. 4«*> 
23.800 
16.300 
57.700 
20.100 
60.800 
85.100 
63.700 
54, GOO 
71.000 
40.400 
£0.400 

3,<;oo 

39.000 
174,300 
31.400 
84.000 
30,100 



Horn. 



J_ 



1004. 



Passengers carried: 
a. Number of passengers reported as 

carried 

Passengers carried 1 mile 

Passengers carried 1 mil© per mil© of line 
Tons carried: . 

a. Number of tons reported as carried.. 

b. Number of tons reported as carried, 
excluding tonnage received from con- 
necting roads and othevr carriers 

Tons carried 1 mile 

Tons carried 1 mile per mile of line 

Passenger train mileage 

Average number of passengers in train.. 
Average journey per passenger, miles... 

Freight train mileage 

Average number of tons in tram.* 

Average, haul per ton: 

a. Typical haul of the average railway. 
miles • 

b. Tvplcal haul of all the railways re 
gttrdod as a system, mi lea 

Total revenue train mileage. I 

T'«tal mileage of frHght cars^^.^. . 



715.419.682 

21.023,213.036 

104. li>8 

1,309.899. 1C5 



641.080.547 

174,D22.0.*U577 

820.476 

440, 4G4, 8(50. 

46, 

S0.64 | 

535,090.971 j 

307.70 



133.23 

244.30 

1,007.529.452 

14 3P3 650. 0G6; 



694.891,535 

20.915,763,881 

103.291 

1,304,394.323 



038,800.658. 

173,221.278,993 

855,442 

425.142.204 

40 

SO.IOJ 

526.312,433] 

310. 54* 



. 132.90 

24235 

082.946,284 

14,193,718.005 



649,878,505 

19,080.937.(20 

99.314 

1,200,310,787 



581,832,441 

157. 2S9, 370,053 
793,351 
405,613.231 
45 
30.30 
490.711.176 
290.47 



131.4)4 

239.10 

036,148.675 

13.320.514.360 



1887.. 
18«^s. . 
1880.. 
1800.. 
1801.. 
1802. . 



LOCKOUTS IN THE UNITED STATES FROM 1887 rO 1000, 

~~&9.030| 



1893.. 
1*94.. 
1895.. 
18!rt».. 
MX.. 
1808.. 
1 800. . 
1900. . 



Totals. . - 1 



67 

40 
30 
04 
69 
61 
70 
15 
40 
40 
32, 
42 
41 

— C0 
1.005 J 



1,281 
180 
132 
324! 
546 
710 
305 
875 
370 
51 
171 
104 
323: 

2.281 

0.933J" 



15.176 

10,731 

21 .555 

81.014 

32.014 

21,842 

29.619 

14,785 

7. 608 

7,703 

14.217 

14,817 

__€2.GD3 

504. 307 i 



49.8 
74.9 
57.5 
73.0 
37.8 
72.0 
34.7 
39.7 
31.6 
65.1 
38.6 
48.8 
37.5 
265. l_ 

97.1 



4.233, < 00 

1.100.057 

1.379,722 

957.966 

883,709 

2,850,013 

6. 659. 401: 

2,022.709* 

791 .703 

690,915 

.583.006 

880.401 

1.485.174 

16.136,802 

J $48,819.7451 




PRICE AND WAGES AVERAGES. 



140 



PRICES, WAGES AN1> EARNINGS TABLES. 

Prepared by XJ. S. Department of Labor. (Averages lor 1890-1899=100.) 
Summary of Relative Wholesale Prices of Commodities, 1890 to 1903, By Groups. 



Tear. 



I 



1890 . 

ift»l 

1S92 

1*03 

1894 

1896 

1836 

1S97 

1898 

1880 

taoo 

1001 
1902 



110.0 
121.5 
ru.? 

107.0 

1)5.9 

78.3 T 

86,2 

90.1 
100.0 
10&6 

n«.» 

139.6 
118.8 



112.4 
H6\7 
103.6 
110.2 

baa 

84.6 

83.S r 

ffif.7 ..• 

94.4 

98,3 
104.2 
166.9 

111.3 

lu3.1 



2.o 



118.5 

iii.a 

KM* 
107.2 
96.1 
•2.7 
93.3 
91.1 
86.4 
90.? 
106.8 
101.0 
1O2.0 

me. 6 






10*7 
102.7 
101. i 
100.0 
92.4 
98.1 
104.3 
96.4 
954 
105.0 
120.9 

11&6 

134.3 
149.3 



a* 
a- 



119.2 
111.7 
100.0 
100.7 
90.7 
92.0 
03,7 
86.0 
86.4 
114.7 
120.6 
111.9 
117.2 
1176 



% S3 



Q> 



111.8 

108.4 

102.8 

101.9 

9tf.3 

94.1 

93.4 

90.4 

95.8 

105.8 

115.7 

11H. 7 

118.8 

121.4 



Is 



110.2 

103.6 

102 9 

100.6 

80.8 

87 9 

C2.0 

94.4 

100.6 

111.3 

115.7 

115.2 

114.2 

112.0 



353 



2 « 



111.1 


1W.3 


110.2. 


109.4 


100.5 - 


106.2 


104.9 


MJ59 


100. 1 


99.8 


90.5 


94.5 


94.0 


914 


89.8 


92. 1 


92.0 


02.4 


96.1 


! 97.7 


100.1 


109.8 


110.9 


107.4 


112.2 


; 114.1 


113.0 


113.6 






112.9 
111.7 

106. 1 
105.0 
90.1 
93.6 
90.4 
89.7 
93.4 
101.7 
110.5 
108.5 
112.9 
113.0 



Relative 



Retail Price of Food, Weighted According: to th« Average Family 
Consumption, 1890 to 1903. 



Tear. 



1890 

1*91 

1*92 

1.V93 

1894 

1896 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1F9S 

1900. 

1801 

1902 

1903 






102.3 
103.2 
102.1 
104.4 
99.2 
97.7 
97.0 
1-6.0 
08.8 
99 5 
101.2 
104.7 
110.5 
110.1 



»5?2 

: g3 

102.3 
104.5 
101.8 
106.4 
100.6 
98.0 
94.6 
96.6 
98.4 
98.9 
100.8 
106.1 
111.7 
111.0 



&2?> 

bio 2 



101.2 
102.1 
101.1 
103.2 
100.0 
98.7 
9(5.8 
07.1 
09.3 
100.5 
102.4 
100.9 
111.8 
111.2 



•~w <t>' 

; ^3 

~~102.f~ 
103.6 
100.7 
103.5 
100.0 
98.1 
90.1 
97.3 
98.8 
99.0 
101.1 
100.0 
113.5 
113.5 



I5S 



107.7 
108.7 
105.2 
102.9 
90.3 
90.7 
93.2 
92.7 
95.2 
98.5 
98.1 
90.9 
104.4 
103.7 



B 



102.4 
103.8 
101.9 
104.4 
1)9.7 
97.8 
05.5 
06.3 
08.7 
00.5 
100.1 
105.2 
110.0 
110.3 



Relative Employes, Hours Per Week, Wages Per Hour, Weekly Earnings Per 
Employe and of All Employes, Retail Prices of Food, and Purchasing Power 
of Hourly Wages and of Weekly Earnings Per Employe, Measured by Retail 
Prices of Food, 1890 to 1003. 



! 



100.7 

100.6 

1006 

100.3 

00 8 

100. 1 

09. 8 

00.0 

09.7 

09.2 

08.7 

08.1 

07.3 

06.6 



s: 
is 






-5 


Purch'ng 


power, 


c "> 

ag 

it 
"it 


mea&'d 


bv retl. 


L prcs. of food, of 


3? 


Ot3 


: a 




B 3 


102.4 I 


97.9 


98.0 


: 103.8 


90.5 


97.0 


101.9 


98.9 


99.4 


104.4 


90.0 


90-9 


90. 7 


98.2 


98.0 


97.8 


100.5 


100.0 


95.5 


104.4 


104.2 


90.3 


1034 


103.0 


9H 7 


101.6 


101.3 


90.5 


102.5 


: 101.7 


101.1 


104.4 a 


103.0 


105.2 


102.7 


100.7 


no. 9 


101.3 


08.0 


110.3 


106.4 


101.8 






1896* 
1891 
1892; 
1893 
1*94 
1895 
1896 
189T 
1808 
1899 
1000 
1901 
1902 
1903 



04.9 
07.4 
09.1 
00.2 
04.1 
06.3 
08.3 
160 
106.3 
1T0.8 
115.0 
IT9.I 
123.6 
126.4 



100.3 

100.2 

100.8 

100.9 

07.0 

98.3 

99.7 

90.6 

100.3 

102.0 

105.6 

108.0 

112.3 

116.3 



101.0 
100.7 
101.3 
101.2 
97.7 
98.4 
995 
99.2 
100.0 
HH.2 
104.1 
105.0 
9.3 



$ 



Wj^ 



86.8 
98.1 
100.4 
100.4 
91 9 
94.8 
07.8 
100.1 
106.3 
112.1 
120 2 
126. 1 
135.1 
141.9 



ELECTORAL APPORTIONMENT AND VOTE 



REPRESENTATION OF THE SEVERAI* STATES IN THE LOWER BRANCH 
OF CONGRESS UNDER THE APPORTIONMENTS OF 189«1 AND 1801. 



State* 



J Censu s I Census | 
lot 189 0) of 1900 



Alabama . .... 

Arkansas • ••• 

California .... 

Colorado ...... 

Connecticut »• 
Delaware ....• 

Florida 

Oeorgia ...... 

Idaho ..•••••»< 

Illinois 

Indiana ...... 

Iowa .....«..•. 

Kansas ....... 

Kentucky •••« 
EouLsiana .... 

Maine 

Maryland .... 

Massachusetts 
Michigan ..... 

Minnesota .... 

Mississippi ... 
Missouri ...... 

Montana . . ... 

Nebraska 



9 


9 


6 


7 


7 


8 


2 


8 


4 


5 


I 


1 


2 


8 


11 


11 


1 


1 


22 


25 


12 


18 


11 


11 


8 


8 


11 


U 


6 


7 


4 


4 


6 


6 


13 


14 


12 


12 


7 


9 


T 


8 


15 


IS 


1 


- 1 


6 


6 



States. 



Nevada 

New-Hampshire 
New-Jersey .... 

New-York 

North Carolina . 
North Dakota .. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania ... 
Khode Island ... 
South Carolina.. 
South Dakota... 

Tennessee 

Teras ♦ . 

>LTtah 

Vermont ....... 

Virginia 

Washington .... 
West Vlrrinla .. 

Wisconsin 

Wlomin/ 



Totals. 



Census 
of 1890 



1 
2 
8 

34 
9 
1 

21 
2 

80 
2 
7 
2 

10 

18 

~2 
10 

2 

4 

10 

1 

856 



Census 
of 1900 



1 

2 

10 

87 

10 

2 

21 

2 

32 

2 

T 

i* 

18 
1 

2 

10 

8 

11 

1 

386 



1 Utah admitted after the Apportionment act of 1901 ; one Representative allotted on 
admission. 

RATIO 0? REPRESENTATION STNCH 17H9. 



How determined, 



Constitution ..... 

First Census 

Second Census. .• 
Third Census..... 
Fourth Census. • . 

Fifth Census 

Sixth Census..... 
Seventh Census.. 
Kighth Census..., 
Ninth Census.... 
Tenth Census.... 
Kleventh Census. 
Twelfth Census.. 



Tepr. 
~1789~ 
171)3 
1803 
1813 
*S?3 
1833 
1 >43 
1853 
1863 
1878 
1883 
1891 
1901 



_Ratio._ 
30.000 
30,000 
33,000 
35.000 
40.000 
47,700 
70,680 
93.123 
127.381 
131.425 
151.911 
173.901 
194.182 



No. of Rep- 1 

resent ativee | Population, 



65 
105 
141 
181 
213 
240 
223 
233 
243 
293 
325 
356 
386 



8.929,214 

5.308.488 

7,239,881 

9,633,822 

12.tf66.020 

17.069.458 

23.191.876 

31.443,821 

88.558,371 

50,155.873 

62,622.250 

74,565,906 



THE BXECTORAI* COUJCfHB IN 1900 AND 1904. 



States. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California ..,.. 
Colorado .....* 
Connecticut .. 
Delaware ..... 

Florida 

Georgia 

IcUho 

Illinois ....... 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas ...... 

Kentucky •••• 

Louisiana .... 

Maine 

Maryland .... 
Massachusetts 
Michigan ..... 
Minnesota .... 
Mississippi ... 

Missouri 

Montana ..... 
Nebraska .... 



J1900. 


1904.(1 


11 


11 


8 


9 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


3 


4 


5 


13 


13 


S 


3 


24 


27 


15 


15 


13 


13 


10 


10 


13 


13 


8 


9 


6 


6 


6 


6 


15 


16 


14 


14 


9 


11 


9 


10 


17 


18 


8 


3 


8 


\ 



States. 



Nevada 

New-Hampshire 
New-Jersey .... 

New- York 

North Carolina,. 
North Dakota... 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . • 
Rhode Island.... 
South Carolina.. 
South Dakota... 
Tennessee ...... 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont ........ 

Virginia 

Washington .... 

West Virginia... 
Wisconsin ...... 

Wyoming ....... 



Totals..... 

Necessary to a choice. 



8 

4 

12 

39 

12 

4 

28 

4 

84 

4 

9 

4 

12 

18 

8 

4 

12 

5 

7 

18 

3 

476 



"VOTES IN THE EUSCTORAI* COUJSGSL 



151 



VOTES A* PBESTOSNTEAI, BUBCTIONS. 



Candidate*. 



•George Washington... 

• Jobs Adams 

'George Washington... 

John- Adams 

♦Jrtn Adams 

■ Tluynuac Jefferson. « . . 
•1*onma Jefferson. . .. . 

Aaron Burr. •. 

tThoiana Jefferson,.... 

C. C; Pinckney. ..... 

•James Madison 

C: C Pi»ekne» 

•Jarae* Madison. ...... 

' DeWKt Clinton 

James Monroe. ....... 

Rufua King 

•James Monroe........ 

John Q. Adams. . . . . . 

•Joan Q» Adams. ...... 

Andrew Jackson 

•Andrew^ Jackson. 

X. Q. Adamc 

•Aa4rew Jaeaaea>. ..... 

Henry Clay 

•Martin Van Bum.... 

W. H. Harrison..... 

*W. H. Harriaon. 

. Martfo Van Buren. . . 
•Jamea K. Polk 

• Henry day. ......... 

*Zttch*ry Tayio*. ...... 

- fcewfs Casa. ......... 

*FrankH» Pierce 

Wlnfleld Scott 

•Jamea Bochanan...... 

Jes» C. . Fremont. ... 

__**Pb*akam TUntato 

r J. C. Breckinridge... 
>*A7braaam "Lincoln 

• ^onpe B. McCle tlan. 

*UIiMeh S. Gwuit. ..-•«, 
: KMetkr fieyatour.... 

•OTvsaea S. Gran* 

Horace Greeley...... 

*R. B. Hayes... 

ftuattel J. Tllden. ... 
♦Jamet A. fiarteW.... 

; W. S; Hancoek 

^Graver eifeveland 

fames 6. Blaine...... 

•Benjamin Harrison... 

Graver Cleveland.... 
•Qy»ver Clcvehnrf. .... 

Benjamin Harrison.. 
s*Wtt'K»n* McKinley.... 

e- WDJtam J. Bryan, . 
•WtMIara McKinley 

WJHm»J. Bryan.... 
•Theodore Roosevelt... 

Alton B. Parker. .... 



1792 

1706 



lMCO 



1808 



• 1816 
1820 



Politics. 



Federalist 

Federalist 

Federalist.... 

Federalist 

Federalist.... 

Dem.-Rep. . . . 

Dem.-Rep.... 

Dem.-Rep..,.. 

Dem.-Rep.... 

Federalist.... 

Dem.-Rep.... 

Federalist.... 

Dem.-Rep.... 

Federalist.... 

Dem.-Rep.... 

Federalist... . 

Dem.-Rep.... 

Opposition.... 

Coalition 

Dcm.-Rep.... 

Democrat. ... . 

Nat. Rep 

Democrat. ... . 

'Nai. Rep 

'EtenvKrat, 



1844 
: 1938 



HT»« 



1844 

19f8 



W»72 



WW 
188* 



1802 
1806 



lOf-0 
1904 



Whtg.... Ohie. 



1840 Whig 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Whig 

WW* 

Democrat 

Democrat 

WhUr 

Democrat 

Republican..., 

Republican. . . 

Democrat 

Republican... 

Democrat 

Repnolicatt, . . 

Democrat 

■Republican. . 

Dere. * TJb. .. 
' Republr"an... 

DemoTr f... .. 
lf*0|Repi'blt. nn . . 

Democr* • . . . . 

Pcmoc-at . . 

Republican. . 

Republican. .. 

Democrat... .. 

Democrat. .. . 

Republican. .. 

Republican. .. 

Dem. (Sil.>. .. 

Republican. . . 

Democrat. 

Republican. . . 

t Democrat 



State of which 
a resident. 



m 



Virginia 

Massachusetts 

Virginia : 

Massachusetts 
Massachusetts 

Virginia 

Virginia 

New- York ... 

Virginia 

So. Carolina. . 

Virginia 

So. Carolina. . 

Virginia 4 IS 

New-York ... 

Virginia 

Kew-York ... 

Virginia 

Massachusetts* 
Massachusetts 
Tennessee . . . 
Tennessee ... 
Massachusetts 
Tennessee . . . 
Kentucky .... 
New- York ... 



" 34 
135 



17 



IS 



24 
I 24 



Ohio 

New- York ... 

Kentucky ... 
Louisiana . . . 
Michigan .... 
New-H'pshlre 
New-Jersey . 
Pennsylvania 
California ... 

Illinois 

Kentucky • *» • 
Illinois ...... 

New-Jersey . 

Illinois 

New-Tor* ... 

Illinois 

NeT*-York ... 

Ohio 

Now-York ... 

^hfo 

Pennsylvania 
New- York ... 

Maine 

ndiana 

New- York ... 
New- York ... 

Indiana 

Ohio 

Nebraska . .. . 

Ohio 

Nebraska . .. . 

>Tr, W „V 0r H ... 

New-York ... 



2 Eleet'I f 
<*p i votes. 



3' Wl Popular 
vote. 



5 ]&?• 



31 



88 
38 
33 
3S 



40 



45 



138 



132 
77 
71 
«8 

b73 

b73 

K'2 
14 

122 
47 

12* 
89 

183 
34 

231 

1 

84 



178 
83 

21a 

4Q 

170 
■ 73 
284 
CO 
170 
WW 
163 
127 
254 
42 
174 
114 
180 
, 72 
8I4f2l2 

^ .21 

8T 417 1214 



906 



447 



• 1-L 



447 



i so 

286 
d42 
185 
184 
214 

„ir5 

219 
1S2 

233 
HW 
277 
I4. r » 



10«,740 

153,544 

647,231 

500,067 

«A7.fi02 

530.189 

7f.l.B4© 

737.2«4 

1.275.017 

1.128.7C2 

1,337,243 

1.2SO,0fi« 

1.860. Wl 

1.220.544 

l.«01.4T4 

1.380.2M 

1,838. *& 

l,341 r 2«4 

1.86«.:»2 

845.663 

2 r 21«.0«7 

1,808,729 

3.013^17 

2 t 708,ffI3 

8J»7,«fl« 

2.834,079 

4.033.078 

4.284.^73 

4.454. 4l« 

4,444.1)02 

4.874.'jae 

4.851.0* 1 ! 

5,440,708 

5,53«,242 

5,r>54,267 

5.17S.1W1 

7,11T.<«V7 

H,M0.«1R2 

7,220.0^7 



17* 

lPfl|6,3lK1.01« 

I 45't47f'l3;^[7.( ! : > 0.33*i 

|140 |5,07O.O41 



Previous to 1804 «ach elector voted for two candidates for President. The one 
receiving the greatest number was declared President, and the one receiving the 
next hignest was declared Vice-President, a Three States not voting, b Tie vote; 
choice decided by House of Representatives on 36th ballot, c No choiee by Elec- 
tor*! Coltege; choice decided by House of Representatives on first ballot d Horace 
Greeley died before the Electoral College met. and the Greeley electqrs of five 
States voted for Thomas A. Hendricks, e Including votes cast for Bryan and 
Watsdb fPop>> ticket. •Elected President. 



153 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRJi>SIDHNT, 1880-1896. 



118' 






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154 VOTH FOR CONGRESS MIC N, 100ft AND WO*. 


VOTR FOR REPRBSBJJTATIVE8 IN 

J- ■ ■ 1902* ' 


CONGRESS 1902 AND 1904. 




1 Rep. | Dem. || Rtp. j Deni." 1 ♦Scattering. 


Alabama \ 22,438 


67.067 1 


32,385 


83.096 1 


. 689 


A rk ansae* .......... 


6,593 


32,823 i 


77 613 


234 


CnJifurnia 


152,363 


126,290 I 


186 427 


112 687 

112,383 
76,212 


28,997 
7,923 
6,762 ' 


f'ok-rudo 


85,297 


1 84,348 \ 


121,236 


Connecticut 

I >ela ware 


83,666 


70,680 


108,918 


12. WW 


16,306 


23,512 


19.562 


742 


Florida 




16,310 


6,010 
20.083 


25*592 
96.479 


1,150 
402 


Georgia 


: 


39,037 


Idaho 


32.834 


24.878 


44,813 


20.148 


6,446 


Illi-nois 


406,560 


373 4S8 


60S, 695 


343,033 
287.064 


113,345 
31.226 


Indiana 


206.185 


268.010 


351,779 




223,021 


15N.H49 | 


205, 256 


161.801 


20,261 
. 18,157 


Kansas 


108.307 


135,342 


187,983 


105.479; 


Kentucky ......... 


122,746 


358,652 


204,484 


- 217 749 


5,306 
412 


Louisiana 


4,047 


22.21S 


4.632 


47,389 




63,481 


38,633 


70,540 

103 983 

' 235. 3'» 


50.377 

99.160 

152.1-42 


2 102 


Maryland" .......... 


100. 054 
192,680 


91.000 1 
150,055 *l 


6,024 

24,088 


Massac huaetta .... 


Mi<r«*an ......... 


\ 228,309 


155.732 • 


344.053 


158,142 


0,304 




108,843 


00,701 i 
18.058 j 


200,639 
01 


72,919 
52,707 


| 5,583 
449 


Mississippi 


Missouri .. 


230,740 


274 220 | 


317,003 


304.571 


9,766 


Montana 


' 24,628 


10,500 | 


32.S-G7 { 26 729 


4,025 




98,337 
5,10* 


89.214 
5,876 


1 23 9*6 ■ ' **» «»* 


10,333 
572 


Nevada 


5.305 


5.624 


N e w-Ham pan ire 


4M1629 


30.204 


52 112 


33,328 


1,<*90 


New- Jersey 


183.576 


164.100 


230 178 


173.217 


21,371 


New- York 


651,838 
03,038 


1 633,57* 
135.3111 


| .841,057 
78.001 


664.364 
130 048 


[ 62,63* 
I 116. 


N orth Carolina .... 


North Dakota 


32,986 


14,765 


» -10,311 


15.1*22 


2.705 


Ohio 


430 765 


337.65*1 


2*3 314 


I62,"51 
29,930 


\ 48.207 
10,013 


Oregon 


48,082 | 31.811 || 51,096 


Pennsylvania 


610 805 | 303,201 H 72 0.7**2 


318.907 


50,479 


Rho^e Jslaivl 


28,215 | 27.«53 l 


33 f«2 


28.871 


1,072 


South Carolina 


742 | 31 343 t 


2 470 54.676 





S- uth Dakota. 


. 48*54 \ 21.313 t 


70.on2 


22.*92 


7,343 




63 018 ! 98.706 1 


95,539 


128,601 

204.772 

87.446 

16.934 


6*1 

• 2,38? 

11.019 

1.862 




55,320 | 2*6,787 | ' 42.700 


Utah 


L 43.710 J 38.190 
33.530 1 8.544 


( 52.675 
46,9^9 


Vermont 


Virginia 


38.120 ! 82 225 
60.366 ) 34,315 


1 43.791 
' 03,328 


86,520 

25,698 


332 

13.38* 


Washington 


West Virginia...... 


100 223 I 88.350 


129 450 


104.964 


3*745 


Wisconsin 


194.883 1 137.056 


1 251,704' 


150,370 


30.28* 




15,808 ( 8,892 


J 19.682 
J 6,863 853 


9,803: 




Totals 


- 6,455.863 » 5.022,897 


' 5,196,329 


' 696.46* 


Plurality 


' 432,960 j * 


| 1,608.524 





— — 


Note.- Total sea 


ttering vote in 1902. 4<*9.9T> 


8. 




VOTB FOR 


DELKGATH? 


<3 IN- CONGRESS; 




9.230 


r. 9.71* 


1 9,522. 


10,394 


\ *.5» 


Hawaii 


•> 6,630 4,606 




New Mexico 


24,222 I 14.576 
45,703 j 45,469- 


i 22,305 


J*,135 


3,581 
T.823 

12-819 




I 51.454 


49,809 
I 77,38? 




Total* 


85.860 


74,457 


1 83,28! 


Note.— K« altering vote in Territories in 1902. 3,731. 


. •Inoludoii in the scattering column- for 11)04 are the vAtt». tast in the different 


States and Territories for party candidates other than those cm Ch* Republican ami 


Ot-moorHtic ti.-kotw, as follows: Alabama— Pro., 211: Sac, 378. Cal tfon* la— Pro &440~ 


Hoc, 21,<34J ; Pnion lLabor, 916. Colorado— Pro., 3,631; So«\. 3,698; Po*.. 394. Connect*^ 




Florida~Sto»\, 1 , 1 5«>. Georgia— Pop., 332; lnd., 70. Idaho- -Pro., 1,698; Ho*'. 4 219* 




Pro.. 35,63*: Soe.. 70,866; Soe. Lab., 308; Pep., ill); Ind., 6,364 Iowa— Pro. 






ttjo. UK, -476; Ind., 103. Michigan— Pro., 7,402; Soc, 1,797: Soe. !Lab., 105. Minna-* 




7,'.)70; Sop. I-ah., 400; Pop., 349. Montana— Soc. 4,02ft. Nevada — Pop. 572. 


Nebraska — Pro., 5,8.39; So.'., 4,494. New- 1 Tamps hire -Pro., 769; Soc., 921, New-Jer- 


sey— Pro., 6,684; 8oo.„ 8.917: Sec Kab., 2,426; Pop.. 3,304. New- York— Pro., C,f>53« So* 





PRESIDENTS AND CABINET CHIEFS. 



155 



•ELECTORAL VOTES FOB PRESIDENT, 1876 TO 1904. 



Stat**. 



Aw)ftni& • •••••••«. 

Arkansas •••*•••••• 

California .....—. 

Colorado .♦...♦♦♦.. 
Connecticut »..»*.. 
Delaware •••••«•». 

Florida • »••»••*»•«• 

Georgia .... 

Idaho ••••«•••»•'•••» 
Illinois ............ 



Iowa 



Kentucky •••••+••• 

Louisiana • »•«.••••• 

Maine ..••••••••»•. 

Maryland ......... 

Massachusetts ..... 

Michigan .......... 

Minnesota • •• •»•'•• • 

Mississippi .- 

Missouri ..... 

Montana .......... 

Nebraska. .•••—•••• 

Nevada • ••»..♦.•**• 
New-Hampflhire ,. 
New-Jersey ....;.. 

New- York ;.J 

North Carolina..... 
North Dakota...... 

Ohio 

Oregon ...... ...... 

Pennsylvania ..... 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina..... 
South Dakota,... .. 
Tennessee ......... 

Texas •*••« 

Utah ..••••««••••«. 
Vermont ••*••••••* 

Virginia 

Washington ....... 

West Virginia...... 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



1876. 



10 



12 



10 



Totals, 1185J 184 jj2UriS5U 182(219 



10 

7 

8 

8 ^ 

— 6 
811 — 3 

4M •* 

11 



1884. 



4 

— 

— 36 
11 



4 
— 12 



11 



1888. 



6 
3 
H 4 
12 
— 
22 — 
15 
13] — 

13 

—I 8 
6 

ii 

13 
7 
9 

5 
3 

4 

86 



28 
8 

80 

4 
—I 9 

12 
13 

4( 

— 12 



11 



1882. 



11 
8 
8 

— { s 

4 
13 



13 

13 

8 

9 



101 



4 
— 121 



4 
— 12 



1896. 



233I168111451277J 22|12711176H292|155H336<140 



9 

17 

3 

8 

3 

4 

10 

86 

— 11 

8 

23 

4 

82 

4 

9 

4 

12 

15 

8 

12 

4 



3 



1900. 



8 

i~ 

86 



11 



12 



1904. 



11 
10 — 



8 
-H 5 
13 

8 
27 
15 
13 
10 — 



7 

lti — 

14 

11 

10 
18 

8 

8 

8 

4 
12 
89 
_ 12 

4 
28 

4 
84 — 



12 

18 

8 — 



12 



'Republican candidate in first column, 
r third column is the Populist vote. 



Democratic in second column.* In 1892 



PRESIDENTS AND CABINET CHIEFS. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICERS FROM 1789 TO 1905. 

PRESIDENT— George Washington, Va., April 30, 1789, to Mar. 4. 1703. V.-PRES'T— 

• John Adams, Mass. SBC. STATE — Thomas Jefferson, Va., Sept. 26, 1789. SB3C. 

TREASURY— Alexander Hamilton, N. Y.. Sept. 11, 1789. SEC. WAR— Henry 

Knox. Mass.. Sept. 12, 1789. NAVY— The War Department had charge of Naval 

Affairs until April, 1798. POST* R-GEN.— Samuel Osgood, Mass., Sept. 26, 1789; 



Pro- 971; 8©C 1.734. Ohio— Pro., 18,036; Soc. 20.788; Soc Lib., 353; Ind., 80. 
Oregon— Pro*. 8.585; Soc, 6,478. Pennsylvania— Pro., 28,324; Soc., 10.546; Indepen- 
dence, 1.488; Soc Lad., 71; Independent, 16.105. Rhode Island— Pro., 1,072. South 
Dakota— Pro- 8,012; Soc.. 8.115; Pop., 1,216. Tennessee— Soc., 548; Pop., 124. Utah- 
Boo. 4,823; American, 6,796. Texas— Pop.. 2.357. Vermont— Pro., 1,122; Soc, 740. 
Vlnrmla— IwL. 882. Washington— Pro.. 3.059; Soc, 9.005; Soc Lab., 1,320. West 
VtrSinia^PtaT; 8.321: Soc.. 1.424. Wisconsin— Pro., 8.870; Soc, 26.949; Soc Lab.. 
556? Ind., 12. Wyoming— Pro*, 154; Soc. 822. Arizona— Pro.. 125; Soc, 1,304; Soc 
Cab.. 86. New-Mexlcor-Ind. Rept, 8.456; Soc. 162. Oklahoma— Pro.. L544; Soc* 
4448; Po».« 16*. 




pnin toA A TT* X -*1 1 ,N — U* Aw A, P 



M Y , 

THE AS 

Vl., April 7, T»17; 



n 1,1, Crawfort, reappil 
rAVY— Jnhi\ 

■ t, r«appofui 

i-y Ailam!?. Mitkb., Mar. 
C, SSC. ST A I I 

. Pcnrr-, Mar. V 

r, N, Y<. May **. 
Jfj»m M<:Lrf 

TWU, M: is Mac, 4, 1888. V,-P 

" BTAi n v , M^r. R, 

rfay '- ' 

r 4 

27. I 

9* 1fr\7. SEC*. NAVY— Mfl .1i ton PlrRerson, N. J.. J nm * m 



FRESII>HNT43 AND CABIN4ST CHIBI-U 157 



OISH. — Aim* Kendall, Ky., May 1, 1837. ATTY-GEN.- Benjamin F. Duller, K. ¥., 
Wov. 25. 1833. 

PRESIDENT— Martin Van Buren. N. Y.. Mar. 4, 1*37, to Mar. 4, "1*41. V.-PRBS'T- 
•Richard M. Johnson, Ky. SEC STATE— John Forsyth, reappointed. SEC. TREAS- 
URY— Lert Woodbury, reappointed. SBC. WAR-^toel R. Poinsett, S. C, Mar. 
7. 1837. BOC. NAVY— Mafcloa Dictcerson, reappointed; James K. Paulding, N. Y., 
June 25, 1*38. POSfR-GEN. — Amos Kendall, reappointed; John M. Nitts, Conn., 
•ray tft, 1*40. ATT'Y-GEN.— Benjamin E. Htotlor, N. Y„ Mar. 4, 1807.; Felix 
Grundy. Tenn., July 5 1838; Henry D. Gilpin. Penn., Jan. 11. 1840. 

PRESIDBNT— William H. Harr.^on, Ohio Mar. 4, 1841. to April 4, 1841. V.-PREST— 
Jofcn Tyter, Va, SEC. STATS— Dan if 1 Webster, Mas*., Mar. 6. 1841. SEC. 
TRBASURY— Thomas BJwlng, Ohio, Ma;. 6, 1841. SEC. WAR^John Bell, Tenn., 
Mar. S. 1S41 SEC. NAVY— G. E> Ba«jg*r, N C Mar. 6, 1841. POSTR-GEN.— 
France Granger. N. Y., Mar. 6, 1841. ATT Y-GI2N.— John J, Crittenden, Ky., 
Mar. 4. 1841. 

FSSSIDBNT— Jefca Tyler Va., April 4. 1841, U Mar. 4, 1845. V.-PREST— tSawme! 
I* SoMthari. N. J.; t Willie P. Mangum, jtf. C. SEC. STATE— Htigh 9. Ijegare. 
B. C, May * IB43; Afcet P. Upshur, Va , July 24, 1843; John Nelson, Md., Acting, 
Feb. 29, 1844; John C. Calhoun, 9. C., Mar. <J, 1844. SEC. TREASURY— Walter 
Forward, Pen*., .Sept. ifc, 1841; aohn C. Spencer, N. Y., Mar. 3, 1843; George M. 
Bibb, Ky„ Jane 1*. 1844. SEC. WAR— John McLean. Ohio, Sept. Iti, 1841; John C. 
fipencer. f. ¥,, Oct. 12, 1841; james M. Portei, Penn.. Mar. S, 1843; William 
Wilkins. Penn„ Feb. 15, 1844. SEC. NAVY— A. P. Upshur, Va., Sept. 13, 1841; 
David Henahaw. Mass., July tl. 1S43; T W. Gilrner, Va.. Feb. 15, 1844; John Y. 
Mason, Va., Mat. 14, 1844, POST* R-G EN. —Charles A. VVickliffe, Ky., Sept. 13, 
1841. ATT' Y-G EN. —Hugh 3 L^garc. a. C, Sep'.. 13. 1841; Joliu Nelson, Md., 
July 1, 1843. 

PRESIDENT— Jam er K. Pol*% Trmu, ?Jar 4, 1845 to Mar 4, 184X). Y.-PItEST— 
George M. Dallas Pern. SEC STATE— James Buchanan, Penn., Mar. 6, 1845. 
" SBC. TREASURY— Robert J. Walker, Miss.. Mar. 43, 1S43. SEC. WAR— William 
E*. Marcy. N. Y., Mar. G. 1845. SBC. NAVY -George Bancroft. Mass., Mar. 10. 
1S45; John Y. Mason. Va.. Sept. 9, 1S4G. .^OST'U-GEN.— Cave Johnson. Tenn., 
Mar. «. 1845 ATT' Y-GKN.- John Y. Ma3on. Va.. Mar. 6, 1845; Nathan Clifford, 
Me.. Oct 17. 184G; Isaac Toucev. Conn.. .Tune 21, 1818. 

PRESIDENT— Zachary Taylor, La., Mar. 5, 1810. to Jul;' 9. 1850. V.-PREST— 
Mittara Fillmore, N. Y SEC. STATE- Jc.hn M. Clayton, l>el.. Mar. 7. 1849. SEC. 
THF^PT*?Y — W. M. Meredith. Penn., Mar. 8. 184H. SEC. WAR— Revcrdv John- 
son, Acting, Mar. 8, 1S49; Ceorge W. Crawford. Ga., Mar. S, 1849. 8KC NAVY— 
Wm. B. Preston. Va.. Mar o, 1849 POS^'R-GEN.— Jacob Col lamer. Vt.. Mar. 8, 
1849. ATT'Y-GEN.— Reverdy Johnson, Md., Mar. 8, 1849. SEC. INTERIOR— 
Thomas Ewing. Ohio, Mar. 8, 1849. 

PRESIDENT— Mi Hard Fillmore. N. Y„ July 9. 1830, to Mar. 4. 1853. V.-PREST— 
fWUiiam R. Ring. Ala. SEC. STATE- -Daniel Webster, Mass., July 22, 1S50; 
•Edward Everett. Mass.. N<;v. fi. 1S52. S3C. TREASURY— Thomas Corwin. Ohio. 
July 23. 1850. SEC. WAR— Wlnfitid Scott ad interim, July 23, 1850; Charles M. 
Conrad, Lau A us. 15. 1851 SEC. NAVY— William A. Graham. N. C. Julv 22. 
1850; J. P. Kennedy, Md July 22. 1852 POST'U-GEN. -Nathan K. Hall. N. Y.. 
July SS, 1850; Samuel D. Hubbard. CVnn., Aug. 31, 1852. ATT'Y-GEN- John J. 
Crittenden. Ky., July 22. 1850. SEC. INTERIOR— Alex. H. H. Stuart, Va., Sept. 
12, 1850. 

PRESIDENT— Franklin Tierce. N. H., Mar 4. 1S53, to Mar. 4. 1S57. V.-PREST— 
William R. King. Ala., died; t» R. Atchison, tJ D. Bright. SEC. STATE— 
William C Me.rcy. N. Y.. Mar. 7. 1853. SEC. TREASURY— .Tames Guthrie. Ky.. 
Mar. T. t853 SEC. WAR— Jefferson Davi.s, Miss.. Mar. 7. 1853. SEC. NAVY — 
James C Dobbtn, N. C, Mar. 7. 1853. POST/R-G EN.— James Campbell. P«-nn.. 
Mar. 7. 1853. ATT'Y-GEN.— Caleb CVshing. Mass., Mar. 7, 185a. SEC, IN- 
TERIOR— Robert McCelland. Mich, Mr.r. 7. 1S53. 

PRESTDKNT— James Buchanan. I'enn.. Mar. 4. 1857 to Mar. 4, 1861. V.-PREST— 
Johr C. Breckinridge, Ky SEC. STATrt -Lewi.s CaBP. Mich., Mar. 6, 1857; Jere- 
miah 5. Black. Pern., Dec. 17, I860. SEC. TREASURY— Howell Cobb. Ga.. M*r. 
i* 1857; Philip F. Thomas, Md.. Dee. 12, 1860; John A. PIk. N. Y., Jan. II, 18(il. 
SEC. WAR-^John B. Floyrt, Va,, Mar. 45. 18T>7; Joseph Holt. Ky.. Jan. 18. 1861. 
SEC NAVY— Isaac Tnucey. Conn.. Mar. €, 1«j?. POS'rR-G«N.— Aaron V. Brown, 
Tenn.. Mar. <6. I«»7: Jcaeph- Holt, Ky.. Mar. 14, 1P59; Horatio Ktn«*. Me., Feb. 12. 
1W?1. AITY-CiRN.- Jeremiah S. Rlacli. Penn.. Mar. B, 1857; Edwin M. Stanton, 
Penn.. Dec. 20, 18£0. SLX^. INTERIOR— Jacol> Thompson, Miss.. Mar. tJ. 1K57. 

PRKSl DENT— Abraham L.inc« in. 111.. Mar. 4. 1^61, to Mar. 4, 18(K. V.-PRKK'T— 
fiannihal Hamlin, Me. SIOC. STATE— William H. Seward, N. Y., Mar. 5, I8t»i. 
SEC. TREASURY— Salmon P. Chase. Ohio, Mar. fi, 18(>l; William P. Fi&senden. 
Me.. July I, 18S4. SEC. WAR— Siitipn On moron, Penn., Mar. T>. 1801- Edwin M. 
Stantr-n, I*enn., .Tan. 15. 1802. SEC NAVY— Gideon Welles. Ormn.. Mar. T», 1861. 
POST'R-GISN. — Monteome.ry Blair. D. (r.. Mar. 5. 1RC1; Wii'Iam DennLson. Ohio, 
Sept. 24, lW^. ATT* Y-GEN.— liM ward Hatf«, Mo.. Mar. 5. istU; James Spend. Ky.. 
Dee. 2. 1864. SEC. INTERIOR— Caleb IJ. Smilh, Ind., Mac. 6, 18G1; John P. 
Usher. Ind^. Jan. S, 18£ul. 

PRESIDENT — Abraham Dincoln. second term, War. 4. 186T*, to April tZ, 1865. V.- 
PREST — Andrew Johnson. Tenn. SEU-. STATE — William II. Seward, reappointed. 
SEC. TREASURY— Hugh McCullocb, Ind., Mar. 7. 186?. SEC. WAR— Ka win M. 
Stanton, reappointed.. SIOC. NAVY — Gideon Welles, reappointed. POST'R-GIuN.— 
William Dennison, reappointed. A'PT" V -CJEW. — J&mea Spetoi, reappointed,. S15C. 
INTERIOR — John P. Usher, reappointed. 



15* 



PRESIDENTS AND CABINET CHD3F& 



PRESIDENT— Andrew Johnson. Tenn., April 15, 1865, to Mar. 4, 1869. V.-PRES'T— 
tLafayette S. Foster, Conn.; tBenJaniln F. Wade, Ohio. SBC. STATE— William 
H. Seward, continued. SEC. TREASURY— Hugh McCulloch, continued. BBC. 
WAR— Edwin M. Stanton, suspended, Aug. 12, 1867; U. 8. Grant, ad interim, 
Aug. 12. 1*67; Edwin M. Stanton, reinstated, Jan. 14, 1868; J. M. Schoneld, May 
28, 1868. SEC. NAVY — Gideon Welles, continued. POST'R-GEN. — William Den- 
nteon. continued; Alexander W. Randall, Wis., July 26. 1868. ATTY-GEN.— 
James Speed, continued; Henry Stan berry, Ohio, July 23, I860; William M. Evarts, 
N. Y., July 15, 1M:8. SEC. INTERIOR— John P. Usher, continued; James Harlan, 
Iowa, May 15, 1865; O. H. Browning, ID., July 27, 1866. 

PRESIDENT— Ulysses S. Grant, 111., Mar. 4, 1869, to Mar. 4, 1878. V.-PRES'T— 
Schuyler Colfax, Ind. SEC. STATE— E B. Washburne, 111., Mar. 5, 1869; Hamil- 
ton Fish, N. Y., Mar. 11, 1869. SEC. TREASURY— George S. BoutwelL Mass., 
Mar. 11, 1869. SEC. WAR— Jchn A. Rawlins. 111.. Mar. 11, 1869; Wm. T. Sher- 
man, ad Interim, Sept. 9, »869; William W. Belknap, Iowa, Oct. 26, 1809. SEC. 
NAVY-Adolph E. Borie, Penn., Mar. 5, 1869; George M. Robeson, N. J., June 25, 
1869. POST'R-GEN.— John A. J. Creswell, Md., Mar. 5, 1869. ATTY-GEN.— E. 
R. Hoar, Mass., Mar. 5, 1869; Amos T. Ackcrman, Ga., June 23, 1870; Geo. H. 
Williams, Ore., Dec. 14, i871. SEC. INTERIOR— Jacob D. Cox, Ohio. Mar. 6. 
1869; Columbus Dflano, Ohio. Nov. 1, 1870 

PRESIDENT— Ulysses S. Grant, second term, Mar. 4. 1873, to Mar. 4, 1877. V.- 
PRES'T— Henry Wilson, Mass., died; tThomas W. Ferry. Mich. SEC. STATE— 
Hamilton Fish, reappointed, Mar. 17, 1873. SEC. TREASURY— William A. Rich- 
ardson, Mass., Mar. 17, 1873; Benjamin H. Bristow, Ky., June 2, 1874; Lot M. Mor- 
rill, Me., June 21, 1876. SEC. WAR— Wm. W. Belknap, reappointed. Mar. 17, 1873; 
George M. Robeson, Acting, Mar. 2, 1876; Alpbonso Taft, Ohio, Mar. 8. 1876; J. D 
Cameron, Penn., May 22, 1876. SEC. NAVY— Geo. M. Robeson, reappointed, Mar. 
17, 1873. POST'R-GEN —J. A. J. Cre^well, reappointed, Mar. 17, 1873; J. W. 
Marshall, Va., July 3, 1874; Marshall Jewell, Conn., Aug. 24, 1874; James N. Tyner, 
Ind., July 12. 1876. ATTY-GEN.— G H. Williams, reappointed. Mar. 17, 1873; 
Edwards Pierrepont, N. Y., April 26, 1875; Alphonso Taft. Ohio, May 22, 1876. 
SEC. INTERIOR - Columbus Delano, continued, Mar. 17, 1873; Zaehariah Chandler, 
Mich., Oct. 19. 1875. 

PRESIDENT— Rutherford B. Hayes. Ohio, Mar. 4, 1877, to Mar. 4, 1881. V#-PRES'T— 
William A. Wheeler, N. Y. SEC. STATE— Will am M. Evarts. N. Y., Mar. 12, 
1877. SEC. TREASURY— John Sherman. Ohio. May 8. 1877. SEC. WAR- George 
W. McCrary, Iowa, Mar. 12, 1877; Alex Ramsey. Minn., Dec. 10, 1879. SEC 
NAVY— R. W. Thompson, Ind., Mar 12, 1877; Nathan Goflf, jr., W. Va., Jan. 6, 
1881. POST'R-GEN.— David M. Key, Tenn., Mar. 12, 1877; Horace Maynard, Tenn., 
June 2, 1880. ATT'Y-GEN.— Charles De^ea: , Mass.. Mar. 12, 1877. SEC. IN- 
TERIOR— Carl Schurz, Mo.. Mar. 12. 1877. 

PRESIDENT— James A. Garfield. Ohio, Mar. 4, 1881, to Sept. 19, 1881. V.-PRES'T— 
Chester A. Arthur. N. Y. SEC. STATE— James G. Blaine, Me., Mar. 5, 1881. SEC. 
TREASURY— William Windom, Minn., Mar. 6. 1881. SEC. WAR— Robert T. Lin- 
coln 111.. Mar. 5. 1881. SEC. NAVY— William H. Hunt, La., Mar. 5, 1881. 
POST'R-GEN.— Thomas L. James, N. Y., Mar. 6, 1881. ATT'Y-GEN.— Wayne 
MacVeagh. Penn., Mar. 5, 1881. SEC. INTERIOR— Samuel J. Kirkwood. Iowa. 
Mar. 5, 1881. 

PRESIDENT— Chester A. Arthur, N. Y., Sept 20. 1881. to Mar. 4. 1885. V.-PRES'T— 
tT. F. Bayard, tDavid Davis, tG. F. Edmunds. SEC. STATE— F. T. Frelinghuy- 
sen. N J., Dec. 12, 1881. SEC. TREASURY— Charles J. Folger, N. Y., Oct 27, 
1881; Walter Q. Gresham. Tnd.. Sept. 24. 1881; Hugh McCulloch, Ind., Oct 28. 1884 
SEC WAR— Robert T. Lincoln, continued. SEC. NAVY— William EX Chandler! 
N. H.. April 12, 1882. POST'R-GEN.— Thomas L James, reappointed, Oct. 27, 1881; 
Timothy O. Howe. Wis., Dec. 20. 1881: Walter Q. Gresham. Ind., April 3. 1883; 
Frank Hatton, Iowa. Oct. 14, 1884. ATTY-GEN.— Ben j. H. Brewster, Penn., Dec. 
19 1881. SEC. INTERIOR— Henry M. Teller Col., April 6. 1882. 

PRESIDENT — Grover Cltveland, N. Y.. Mar. 4, 1«85, to Mar. 4, 1889. V.-PRES'T 

Thomas A. Hendricks, Ind. died; tjohn Sherman, tJ. J. Ingalls. SEC. STATE 

Thomas F. Bayard. Del.. Mar. 6, 1885. SEC. TREASURY— Daniel Manning N. Y.. 
Mar. 6, 1SS5, died; Charles S. Fairchild. N. Y. April 1. 1887. SEC. WAR— William 
C Endicott, Mass., Mar. 6. 1885. SEC NAVY— William C. Whitney, N. Y., Mar 
6. 1885. POST H-GFN.- William F. Vilas, Wis., Mar. 6. 1885; Don M. Dickinson 
Mich., Jan. 16. 1888. ATTY-GEN.- Augustus H. Garland. Ark., Mar. 6, 1885. 
SEC. INTERIOR— Lucius Q. C. Lamar, Mi?s., Mar. 6, 1885; William F. Vilaa. 
Jan. 16. 1888. SEC. AGRICULTURE— -Norman J. Coleman. Mo., Feb. 13. 1889. 

PRESIDENT— Benjamin Harri--<m, Ind.. Mar. 4. 1889, to Mar. 4, 1893. V.-PRES'T— 
Levi P. Morton. N. Y. SEC. STATE— James G. Blaine, Me., Mar. 5, 1889; J. W 
Foster, Ind., June 29, 1892, resigned; W. F. Wharton, Acting, Feb. 24, 189a SEC. 
TREASURY— William Windom Minn., Mar. 5 1889; Charles Foster. Ohio, Feb 24 
1891. SEC. WAR--Redfield Proctor ^t Mar. 5 1889; Stephen B. Elkins. W. Va ' 
D^c. 22. 1891. SRC. NAVY— Benlamin F. Tracv. N. Y.. Mar. 5. 1889. POSTR-' 
GEN.— John Wanamaker, Penn. Mar. 5. 1889. ATTY-GEN.— Wm. H. H. Miller 
Ind., Mar. 5. 1889. SEC INTERIOR— John W. Noble. Mo.. Mar. 8, 1889. SEC 
AGRICULTURE— Jeremiah M. Rusk, Wis., Mar. 6. 1889. 

PRESIDENT — Grover Cleveland, N. V, Mar. 4. 18J3. to Mar 4, 1897. V.-PRES'T— 
Adlai E. Stevenson. 111. SEC. STATE— Walter Q. Gresham. 111.. Mar. 6. 1893. died- 
E. F. Uhl. Mich., ad interim, May 28. 18S5; Richard Olney, Mass., June 8, 1895* 
SEC. TREASURY— John G. Carlisle. Ky . Mar. 6, 1893. SEC. WAR— Daniel 8 
Lamont, N Y., Mar. 6, 1893. SEC. NAVY— Hilary A. Herbert, Ala., Mar. 6. 1893* 
POST'R-GEN.— Wilson S. Bissell, N. Y., Mar. 6 1893. ATTY-GEN.— Richard 



JUSTICES OF THH SUPREME COURT. 



150 



Olney, Mass.. Mar. 6, 1898- Judeon Harmon, Ohio Jw« «, 1993. -SBC. INT-iMUOR— 
Hoke Smith. Ga., Mar 6, 1893. David R F anc>, Mo., Sept. 8, 1898. SECY AGRI- 
CULTURE—- Jtrtais Sterling Morton. Neb.. Mar. G 1893. 

PRESIDENT— Wj4*Mtm McJLinley. Ohio. Mar. 4. 1897. to Mar. 4. 1901. V.-PRES'T— 
Garret A. Holwut, N. J„ died Nov. 21. 1809. SECL STATE— John Sherman, Ohio, 
Mar, «, 1807; Wm. R. Day, Ohio, April 2t». 1898.; A. A. Adee. D. C, acting, Sept. 
17, 1898; John Hay. D. C, Sept. 20. 1898. SEC. TUEASUR if— Lyman J. Gage, 111.. 
Mar. 5, 1897. SEC. WAR—Russell A. Alger. Mich.. Mar. 5* 1897; Elihu Root, 
N. Y„ Aug. 1, 1899. SEC. NAVY— John 1>. Long. Masa„ Mar. 5, 1897. POST'R- 
G JEN.— James A. Gary, Md., Mar. 5, 1897; Charles Emory Smith, Perm., April XI, 
1898. ATT* Y-GEN.— Joseph McKenna. Cal., Mar. 5, 1897; John W. Gcigga, N. J., 
Jan. 81. 1888. SEC. INTERIOR— Cornelius N. Bliss. N. Y.. Mar. 5, 189?; Ethan 
A Hen Hitchcook, Mo., Dec. il, 1898. SEC. AGRICULTURE— James Wilson, low*, 
Mar. 15, 1897. 

PRESIDENT — WllUatn McKinley, second term. Mar. 4. 1901, to Sept. 14, 1901. V.- 
PRES'T— T*e*dor© Roo**^ elt, N. Y. SEC. STATE— John Hay. D. C., Mar. 5, 1901. 
SEC. TREASURY— Lyman J. Gage. III.. Mar. 5. 1901. SEC. WAR— Eilhu Root. 
N. Y.. Mar. 5, 1901. SEC. NAVY— John D. Long, Mass., Mar. 5. 1901. POST'R- 
GEN.— Charles Emory Smith. Penn., Mar. 5, 1901. ATI" Y- GEN— John W. 
Griggs. N. J., Mar. 5, 1901; Philander C. Knox. April C>. 1901. SEC INTERIOR— 
Ethan A. Hitchcock, Mo., Mar. 5. 1901. SEC. AGRICULTURE— James Wilson, 
Iowa, Mar. 5, 1901. _ 

PRESIDENT— Theodore Roosevelt. N. Y.. Sept. 14, 1901, to Mar. 4. 19D5. Sec. STATE 
—John Hay, D. C. Sept. 14, 10O1. SEC. TREASURY— Lyman J. Ga^e, I1L, Sept. 14, 
1901; Laslie M. Shaw. Iowa, Jan. 9, 1902. SEC. WAR— Elthu Root, N. .Y., Sept 
14, 1901; William H. Taft. Ohio. Feb. 1, 1904. SEC. NAVY— John D. Long, Mass., 
Sept. 14. 1901; William H. Moody. Mass.. April 29, 1902; Paul Morton. III., July 1, 
3904. POST R-GEN.— Charles Emory Smith. Penn.. Sept. 14, 1P(»1 ; Henry C. 
Payne, Wis., .Ian. 9. 1902; Robert J. Wynne. Penn., Oct. 10, 1904. A1TY-GKN.- 
Philander C. Knox, Penn., Sept. 14, 1001; William H. Moody. Mass.. July 1. 1IHJ4. 
SEC. INTERIOR— Ethan Allen Hitchcock, Mo., Sept. 14, 1901. SEC AGRlOnj/L'-- 
URE— James Wilson, Iowa. Sept. 14. 1901. SEC. COMMERCE AND LAHOR— 
George B. Cortolyou, <N. Y.. Feb. 18. 19011; Victor II. Metca-lf. Cal.. July 1. 1904. 

PRESIDENT — Theodore Roosevelt, second term, Mar. 4. 1905, 4.0 Mar. 4, 1900. V.- 
PREB'T— Charles W. Fairbanks. Ind. SEC. STATE— John Hay. D. C, Mar. tf. 
1905- KHhu Root. N. Y^ July 20. 1905. SEC. TREASURY— Leslie M. Shaw. Inwa, 
Mar' 6. 1905. SEC. WAR- William H. Taft, Ohio. Mar. 6, 1005. ATT Y -GEN.— 
William H. Moody, lias?., Mar. 6, 1905. POST'.R-GHN.— Georges B. Cortelyou. 
N Y. Mar 8. 190T>. SEC, NAVY— Paul Morton, III., Mar. 6. 1905; Charles 3. 
Bonaparte, Md.. July 1. 1903. SEC. INTERIOR— Ethan Allen Hitchcock, Mo., 
Mar 6 1906. SBC. ARG1CULTURE— James Wilson, Iowa, Mar. 0, 10C5. <SEC. 
COMMERCE AND LA JiOW— Victor H. Me teal f. Cai.. Mar. 0. 1905. 

MtESIDENTS OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS— Peyton Randolph, Va.., St-frt. 6. 
-1774. Hen-ry Mid*4eton, S. C, Oet. 22, 1774; John Hancock, Mass.. May 24. i775; 
Henry Laurens. S. C, Nov. 1, 1777: John Jay, N. Y., Dec. 10, 1778; Samuel Hunt 
Ington, Conn.. Sept. 28. 1779; Thotnas McKean. Del., July 10. 1781; John Hanson, 
Md.. Nov. 5, 1781; E1»as Boudinot. N. J Nov. 1782; Thomas Mifflin, Penn.. Nov. 
3 1783; Richard Heniy X*e Va.. No". 80, 1784; Nathaniel Gorham. Mass., June G 
178*3: Arthur St. Clair. Penn.. Feb. 2, 1787; Cyrus Griffin, Va., Jan. 22, 1788. 
tPresldent pro tempore of the Senate, 



JU8TTCK9 OF THE UNITED STfkTKS 3CTKKMJS CJOl'RT. 



Hants. 



■ 



Term. \ Yt»ars. } 




•John Jay. N. Y. 

John Ru tie-Age, S. -C 

William Cushiag, Maaa. .. 

James Wilson, Pa 

John Blair, Va, 

Robert II. Harrison. Md. 

James Iredell, N. C 

■Thomas Jottnson, Md 

William Paterson. N. J. ... 

*5oh*i Ru Hedge. 8. C 

Samuel Chase, Md. 

Oliver "Ellsworth, C«n .. 
liuehrcd Washington,, Va. 

Alfred Moore. N. C. ■* 

♦John Marshall. Va. 

William Johnson, S. C. ... 
Brocl: Livings ton e,,-f»T. Y. , 

Tbomas Todd, Ky 

Joseph Story, Mass, 

Gabriel Duval. Md, ...... 

South Thompson. N. T. .. 
Bohert Trimble, Ky 



I 



....1 



1789-1795 
1789-1791 
37!S9-18!0 
1780 1798 
1789-179G 
1789-1790 
1790 1790 
17911793 
1793- -1 806 
179.') 1795 
1790 1811 
3790 1890 
179* 1K29 
1799- 1 S04 
1801-1835 
1804-18.'14 
180*1-1823 
1 807-1820 
181 11X45 
1S11-183C 
1S22 -18-13 
1J-20 1828 



c 


1745 ;| 


2 


17;i9 5 


21 


iv:« 


9 


1742 


7 


17.T2 


1 


1745 


9 


1751 ! 


*» 


17;?2 


13 


1745 • 


— 


1739 


15 


1711 . 


fi 


1745 


SI 


1702 


5 


3 755 


34 


1755 


;io 


1771 


17 


1757 


19 


1705 


Hi 


3 779 


25 


J 752 


2<> ! 


17u7 1 


3 1* t 


1777 i 



1*29 ! 
1800 
ifiJO I 
1 798 

1809 ! 
J TOO: 
179'.- ; 
1S19 ! 
lsor, l 

isoo I 

181 J f 

1807 
1S2?' ! 
1M9 • 

is;c j 
i8:;-i 

1S2;; 
I82<: ' 
1815 1 
1844 ! 
JSi;: 



160 



THB INSULAR GOVERNMENTS, 



JUSTICES OP THB UNITBD STATES SUPREME COURT— (Continued). 



Nam* 



John McLean, Otafo ......... 

Henry Baldwin, Pa. •*.«• ••, 

James M. Wayne, <3a. ......... 

•Roger B. Taney, Md. ............ 

Philip P. Barbour, Va. ...... 

John Catron, Tens .. 

John MeKlnley, Ala. ......... »..~. 

Peter V. Daniels, Va. ............. 

Samuel Nelson, N. T. *...•.••••••. 

Levi Woodbury, N. H. .*.... 

Robert C Grter, Pa. •••••*. 

Benjamin R. Curtis, Man. ........ 

John A. Campbell. Ala. ........... 

Nathan Clifford, Me. ..-. ».. 

Noah H. Swayne, Ohio 

Samuel F. Miner, Iowa .,•«••••••. 

David Davie. lit '.. 

Stephen J. Field, Cat. 

•Salmon P. Chase, Ohio ........... 

William Strong. Penn. 

Joseph P. Bradley, N. J. 

Ward Hunt, N. T. ►. 

♦Morrison R. Waite, Ohio ........ 

John M. Harlan. Ky 

William B. Woods, Qa 

Stanley Matthews, Ohio .......... 

Horace Gray, Mass. ...... 

Samuel Blatchford, N. T. 

Lucius Q. C. Lamar, Miss. ........ 

♦Melville W. Fuller. DL 

David J. Brewer, Kan. 

Henry R. Brown, Mich. ........... 

George Shiras, Jr., Penn. 

Howell B. Jackson, Teun. ........ 

Edward D. White, La. 

Rufus W. Peckham. N. Y ..... 

Joseph McKenna, Cat 

Oliver Wendell Holmes, 
William R. Day. Ohio . 



Service. 



Term. 



1889- 



Years. 



82 
16 
32 
28 

5 
28 
15 
Id 
27 

6' 
23 

6 

8 
23 
20 
28 
15 
34 

9 
10 
22 
10 
14 

"t 

8 

11 
15 



11 

2 



i Born. | 



1T85 
1779. 
1790 
1777 
1783 
1780 
1780 
1785 
1792 
1789 
1794 
1800 
1811 
"*"* 

isig 

ISIS 

J*j8 
1*08 
l*T.'i 
1HH 
18M 
1S83 
lHlU 
1824 
1828 
1820 
1825 
1833 
1837 
1836 
1832 
1832 
1845 
1838 
1843 
1841 
1849 



Died. 



1861 
1844 

18«7 
1864 
1841 
1865 
1852 
1860 
1873 
1851 
1870 
1874 
1889 
1881 
1S84 
1890 
1885 
1899 
1878 
1895 
1892 
1886 



1887 
1889 
1902 
1893 
1898 



1890 



•Chief justices. 



THE INSUL AR DEP ENDENCIES: 

PORTO RICO. 

CAPITAL San Juan. 

RESIDENT COMMISSIONER TO UNITBD STATES Tulio Larrinaga. 

GOVBRNOR Beekman Winthrop. 

SECRETARY -Regis H. Post. 

ATTORNEY GENERAL Frank Feuille. 

TREASURER • W. F. Willoughby. 

AUDITOR Thomas W. Hynes. 

COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION , M Roland P. Falkner. 

COMMISSIONER OF THB ULTERIOR , Laurence H. Grahams 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE . Charles S. McKenna. 

UNITBD STATES DISTRICT ATTORNEY.... N. B. K. Pettingill. 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT MARSHAL Harry a Hubbard. 

COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS. .... .James H. Causten. 

TERRITORIAL CHIEF JUSTICE Jose S. Quinones. 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICES— Adolpb Grant Wolf. Jose C. Hernandez* Jose M. Figueras 

and James H. McLeary. 
THB EXECUTIVE COUNCHr~The Governor, the Secretary of State, the Attorney 
General, the Treasurer, the Auditor, the Commissioner of Education and the Com- 
missioner of the Interior (ex officio), Jos6 C Rarbosa, Andres Grosas, Herminio 
Diaz y Nasario, Rafael del Vallee and Luis Sanchez Morales. 
The island of Porto Rico, thitherto a Spanish colony was formally ceded to the 
United States under the Treaty of Paris of December 10, 1898. A civil government 
was es 4 "^"-^-"" -r\ May 1, 1900. On July 25, 1901, it became a Territory of the United 
States on a basis me respects similar to that of the Territories on the North 

American Continent, but with these important differences, that citizens of Porto Rico 
are no\ tp*a facto citizens of the United States, and that the present status of the 
Territory J» not c«itiivi**.ed to be preliminary to Statehood. Free trade exists between 
the island and the United States. A decision of the United States Supreme Court on 
December 2, 1901, sustained the **Foraker act" and the validity of the tariff system 



PORTO RICO TRADB AND COMMERCE. 



161 



established by the United States Government with respect to Porto Rico, and con- 
firmed the principle that Porto Ricans are npt citizens of the United States. On 
August 2, 1002, the Commissioner General of Immigration issued an order to the effect 
that Porto Ricans coming to the United States were to be regarded as aliens. This 
decision has been sustained by the United States Supreme Court. 

By the terms of the Foraker Act practical autonomy was granted to the Insular 
Government for which it provides, and a large majority of all the officials- through- 
out the island are left to the unrestricted choice of its own citizens. The Governor 
and the heads of the various executive departments are chosen by the President with 
the approval of the Senate, and the Executive Council, which constitutes one of the 
branches of the Legislative Assembly, consists of the six executive department heads 
so chosen, the Secretary, Attorney General, Treasurer, Auditor, Commissioner of 
Education and Commissioner of the Interior, with five natives of Porto Rico, who are 
also appointed by the President. The House of Delegates, or popular branch of the 
Legislative Assembly, consisting of thirty-five members, is elected by the voters from 
the seven election districts into which the island is divided; and in the Judicial De- 
partment the Supreme Court, consisting of fivo members, is appointed by the Presi- 
dent, but a majority of the members chosen for that tribunal of last resort are native 
citizens of the island; and of the judges of the various district courts who are ap- 
pointed by the Governor, the large majority are also selected from among the native 
population. The internal revenue laws of the United States do not apply to Porto 
Rico. 

The growth of commerce between the United- States and Porto Rico since annexa- 
tion Is shown in the table appended, covering the calendar years from 1898 to 1904: 





IS 


Hi 


S 3* 


alue 
to 

from 
Stat 


> 


> 


$2,382,1791 $1,404,004 


3,416,681 


8,677,564 


2,443.906 


2,813,821 


7,018,697 


8,889,274 


9,684,176 


12,195.297 


10,102.923 


11,819,896 


12,963,483 


11,934,978 



1896 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 



The commerce of Porto Rico in the calendar year 1904 amounted to §31,250,000, of 
which $6,333,000 represented trade with foreign countries and $24,750,000 trade with 
the United States. Imports into Porto Rico amounted to $14,135,061, of which the 
value of $2,200,083 was from foreign countries and $11,934,978 from the United States. 
The exports from Porto Rico aggregated $17,043,932 in value, of which $4,080,449 went 
to foreign countries and $12,963,483 to the United States. 

Porto Rico purchases her imported articles chiefly from the United States, Spain, 
Canada, France, the United Kingdom, Venezuela, Uruguay and Germany. The prin- 
cipal gains in imports shown by the various countries in the record of the past two 
years are as follows: United States, from $8,889,274 in 1901 to $11,834,978 in 1904; 
Canada, from $360,664 in 1901 to $524,410 in 1904: Venezuela, from $3,455 in 1901 to 
$182,928 in 1904i France, from $151,114 in 1901 to $230,304 in 1904, and Uruguay, from 
$2,063 in 1901 to $154,944 in 1904. The principal countries showing losses in their 
importations into Porto Rico during 1904 are: Spain, from $#04,462 in 1901 to $536,474 
in 1904: United Kingdom, from $358,617 in 1901 to $226,100 in 1904, and Germany, 
from $151,114 to 1901 to $89,713 in 1904. 

Porto Rico finds her best markets in the United States, Cuba, France, Spam, 
Austria-Hungary, Canada, Germany and Italy, their relative importance being in the 
order named. Her exports to the United States increased from $7,018,697 in 1901 to 
$12,963,483 in 1904; those to Cuba, from $893,729 in 1901 to $1,346,900 in 1904; those to 
Canada, from $309,692 in 1901 to $329,252 in 1904, and those to Italy, from $155,762 in 
1901 to $168,830 in 1904. Decreases occurred hi Porto Rican exports to Prance, $957,- 
,133 being the total in 1901 and $948,954 in 1904; Germany, $244,368 in 1901 and $211.- 
fs62 inl904. and Spain, $728,224 in 1902 and $618,215 in 1904. Total imports into 
Porto Rlcoin 1904 wer? valued at $14,135,061, as against $13,939,418 in 1903 and $10,- 
955 818 in 1901: and exports from Porto Rico in 1904 aggregated $17,043,932, as corn- 
parfi I with $15,549,765 talOOe and $10,472,270 to 1901. 

* . Coffee is the staple product of the island, the product In 1903 being 33,450,000 
pounds from a cultivated area of 170,000 acres. About 62,000 acres are devoted to 
sugar, from which 234,000,000. pounds were produced in the year named. Under to- 
bacco there were 14,000 acres, yielding 12,000,000 pounds. Experiments in the culti- 
vation of 'cotton are under way. Up to this time the mineral resources of the island 
have not been exploited, although gold, silver, iron, copper, bismuth, tin. mercury* 
nickel, and platinum are found In the island. The annual production of salt averages 
about 10.000,000 pounds. 

The census of 190p reported the p opulation of Porte Rico as 953,243, a figure more 



188 



PHILIPPINB TRADE AND COMMJSBCH. 



It showed an Increase of 16 per cent ovw the 
of 2f " 



than two-thirds of the Cuban total. ...... 

population given In the census of 1887. and a density of occupation of 264 aouls to the 
square mite. Of toe population 680.426, or 61.8 per cent, are so-called white; 38,2 per 
cent, or 8153,817. are colored. Only 13,872, or 1.5 per cent, are oT foreign nationality, 
of whom 11,422 are white. Of the white aliens 7.690 are Spanish, scarcely any of 
whom renounced their nationality on the American occupation. 
The population of the Island by Departments is as follows: 



Department. 



1 Number, n 



Department. 



j Member. 



Ouayama 
Humacao 
Ponce . . . 
Areclbc . 
Bayamon 



111.986 |f May ague* 
8*,50l|!Aq.uadiiia 
203,19111 

1(52, 308 (I Total .. 
160.04611 - 



127.6(66 
99,645 



053.248 



THE PHILIPPINES, 
The Philippine Commluloa. 

COMMISSIONERS— Lake B. Wright, president; Dean C. Worcester, Henry C. 
Ide, James F. Smith. W. Cameron Forbes, Trinidad H. Pardo de Tavera, Jose It 
Luzuriaga and Benito Legarda. 

CAPITAL Manila 

Th* Executive. 

Whence appointed. Salary- 

GOVERNOR GENERAL, Luke E. Wright Tennessee 8 20,000 

VICE-GOVERNOR GENERAL AND 
SECRETARY OP FINANCE AND 

JUSTicifl Henry C. Ide Vermont 15.500 

SECRETARY INTERIOR Dean C. Worcester . Michigan 15.500 

SECRETARY PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. .. James F. Smith. .. .California 15,500 

SECRETARY COMMERCE AND POLICE. W. Cameron Forbes. Massachusetts. .. 15, 5* 1 © 
The Supreme Court. 

CHIEF JUSTICE Cayetano Arellano. Philippines $1Q,50© 

ASSOCIATBJ JUSTICES — Florentlno Torres, Philippines; Victorlno Mapa, 
Philippines: Charles A. Willard, Vt.; E. Finlcy Johnson, Mich.; Jan.es 

F. Tracey, N. Y.;. Adam C. Carson, Va.; each... . $10,606 

The population of the Philippines by provinces ia as follows; 



Province or 
iComandancla. 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



A bra 

Albay 

Ambos Com*.- 
rines ...... 

Antique . ..,. 

Baal Ian 

Bataan 

Batangas ... 
Benguat .... 

Bohol 

Bulacan 
Cagayan .... 

CApl z 

Cavite * 

Cebu 

Coltabato ... 

Dapitan 

Davao 

Ilocos Norte. 
Ilocos Sur..... 

IloUo ,, 

Isabel a 

Jol6 

La Laguna. .. 

La Uni6n i 

Lepanto-Bonioc 
Leyte 



61.860! 
240,326 

239,405 

184. M6, 

80.179 

46,737 

257.715 

22.745 

260,223} 

223.742 

156,239 

25*0.721 

134,779 

3653,727 

125,875 

23,577 

65.496 

178,995. 

187. 411 J 

410.315 

76,431 

51,389 

148.606 

137.8^9 

72,750 

3^8.922 



civiiizea: 


Wild. 


37.823 


14,037 


239,434 


802 


233.472 


5.933 


131.245 


2.921 


1,331 


28,848 


45,166 


1.621 


257,715 


..-..' 


917 


21,828 


269,223 


.... 


223,327 


415 


142.625 


18.414 


225,092 


5,629 


134.779 J 




653.727 


•»« , • 


2,313 


123,562 


17,154. 


6.423 


20JJ24 


45.272 i 


17G.785 


2,210 


178,800 


13.611 


403,932 


0,383 


68,793 


7,638 


1.270 


50,119 


148.606 


.... 


127.7*9 


10.O50 i 


2,467 


70,283 


388.922 


. ... 3 



Province or 
Comandancia. 



Manila City., 
"Marinduojue. 
Ma&bate . . , 
Mindoro 
Misarois ..,<_. 
Negros Occlden-< 

tal 

Negros Oriental 
Nuevj, Eeija...i 
Nueya Vizcaya.; 
Pampanga . ... 
Pangairinan ... 

Paragua 

Paragua -Sar..j 

Rizal '.. 

Romblon ...... 

Samar -...*..* 

Siassi ; 

Sorsogon ' 

Surigao 

Tarlac 

Tawi Tawi.-.. 
*Tayabas ..... 
Zambales ..... 
Zamboanga .... 



Total 
popula- 
tion. 



219,928 
£1,674 
43,675 



175,685 

808,272 
201,494 
134,147 
62,541 
223.754- 



23,351, 

6.345 

150.923 

62,848 
266.237 

24,562 
120,495i 
115,112 
135,107 

14.P3S 
153,065 
104,5491 

44,322 



219,9281 

51.674 
45.675 
32,318 
135«473 

893,660 
184.880, 
132,fi9» 
16.026 
222,656 



£97.902 -^394.516 



27.493 

1,850 

148.502 

52.848 

285,549 

207 

120,454 

99.298 

133.513 

93 

150.262 

101.381 

20.C92 



Totals 17,635,420] 6,887.688 



Wild. 



7.264 

40,216 

4.612 
16.465 

1.148 
40,515 

1.088 

3,888 

4.985 
2,421 

*1®8 

24,265 

41 

15,814 

1.591 

14.545 

2.808 

8.168 

23,630 



847,740 



The Philippine Islands came Into the possession of the United States as a result 
of the war with Spain and under the terms of the Treaty of Paris of December fcO, 
1898. On February 4, 1899, two days before the ratification of the treaty by 
the United States Senate, the native forces under Aguinaldo attacked the Amer- 



iComandancia is the Spanish word for military district. At the date of th* 
census the civil organization had not been extended to all parts of the archipelago 
and certain districts were therefore returned as coroanaancias which have since 
become civil district*. 

"Sub-province of Tayaba*. *Exclusiv*e of sub-province of MarlnduQue. 



PHILIPPINE TRADE AND COMMERCE. 



1«3 



lean garrison at Manila, and an insurrection against American authority was 
started, which lasted for nearly two yearsi The Islands were under military rule 
until July 1, 1901, when the provisional military government was superseded by a 
civil government The chief officers of the latter are appointed by the President of 
the United States. Provincial and municipal officers are elected by the people. 
On December 2, 1901. the Supreme Court of the United States decided that free 
trade must prevail between the Philippines and the United States until Congress 
should enact a special tariff law for the inlands. Accordingly a Philippine tariff 
bill was Introduced into Congress and became a law on March 8, 1902. It was fol- 
lowed on July 1, 1902; by a Civil Government act for the Philippines* (For sum- 
maries of these laws see The Tribune Almanac for 1903.) 

A genera] amnesty for all except criminals under the' common law and rebels 
remaining In arms was proclaimed on July 4. 1902. The vexed Question of the friars' 
lands was amicably settled in December, 1903. After protracted negotiations, in the 
course of which Governor Taft visited Rome, an agreement was made with the 
Church authorities by which the insular government acquired the friars* holdings 
at a cost of 17,289,784. The purchase included 891,000 acres. These lands will be 
eventually sold by the Insular government. 

During the year 1908 the Philippines enjoyed an exceptional measure of tran- 
quillity. Some desultory firing occurred In the Moro country; but elsewhere re- 
sistance to American rule died away completely. In accordance with the pro- 
visions of the Civil Government aet of July- 1, 1902, a census of" the inhabitants of 
the archipelago was taken under the direction of Brigadier General Joseph P. Sanger. 
T«e results of this census were published in 1904 and 1905. In March, 1907, the 
Philippine Commission is to call a general election In the Islands (excluding the 
Suftu group) for the choice of delegates to the popular assembly, to be known as 
the Philippine Assembly, and with the Philippine Commission to constitute the 
lelalative branch of the Insular government. 

By the Act of March 2, 1903, Congress provided a system of coinage for the 
Philippines. The unit of value is the gold peso, of twelve and nine-tenths grains of 
gold,- nine-tenths fine. The Philippine Commission is authorised to coin 970,000,000 
"in silver pesos, each peso of 416 grains, 900 parts fine metal and 100 parts copper 
alloy. These silver coins are redeemable at the rate of two for one In gold pesos, 
and are legal tender in the Philippine Islands for all debts, public or private, unless 
otherwise speciflcall) provided by contract. Some new subsidiary coins are also 
provided for. (For complete details of the Coinage Act, see The Tribune Almanac 
for 1904, under title "Fifty-seventh Congress. Public Acts and Resolutions of Second 

nn.nln«i »*\ f 



In 1904 there were again occasional disturbances in the Moro country, but else- 
where tranquillity was unbroken. The Insular military forces have been organ- 
ised as a constabulary. Its five ranking officers are by provision of an act of 
Congress detailed from among the general officers of the United States Army. The 
majors and captains assigned to field work with the companies and regiments have 
been drawn from the officers who went to the Philippines with the volunteer soldiers 
and desired to remain there after their terms of enlistment had expired. 

On March 2, 1904, the United States Government abrogated the Bates treaty of 
1899 with the Sultan of Sulu. 

At the last session of the 58th Congress a new tariff for the Philippines 
was enacted, and a law was passed providing for railroad construction and other 
public improvements and amending the Civil Government act of March 8. 1902. 
(For details of these measures see under "68th Congress, Publio Acts and 
Resolutions of the Third Session," pages 80-83 of this volume.) The new Philippine 
tariff— on goods imported, into the Philippines — went into effect on July 2, 1905. 

The. following tables summarise the foreign trade of the Islands in recent years: 

RECAPITUXATION. 



Countries, 



Europe ........ 

North America 
South America 

Asia 

Oceania ........ 

Africa 



1904. 



_Imports. 

S498.697.379 

198,778,952 

120.364,113 

143,509.153 

20.310.998 

9,426,776 



E xports. 
$1,057,936,131 

234.900.959 
60,755,027 
60,151,347 
82,850,681 
24,230,126 



1900. 



Import s. 

1540.253.017 

227.354,831 

150.559,rj6 

162,601.094 

25,378,134 

11,365,777 



( . E xpor ts. 

Sl,021,51577r? 

260,696,602 

67,102,190 

127,637.800 

33,076,020 

18,533,441 



Foreign carrying trade tonnage entered and cleared, 1898 to 1905. 
ENTERED. 



Tear ending June 80 



1899 ... 

1900 ... 

1901 ... 

1902 ~. 

1903 ... 

1904 ... 

1905 ... 



American. 



T 



Foreign. 



r 



Total. 



Sa il. | S team. | Sail. | Steam. | 



1.501.805 
1,470.827 
1.527,198 
1,613,792 
1,692.989 
1.431,922 
1,110.878 
1,306,392 



3,738.181 



4.606,464 
4,867,613 
0,868,211 
5,474,660 
5*668,800 
0,690,969 



3,109.229 
2,784,395 
2,756,133 
2,523,173 
2,501,489 
2,445,360 
2,174,759 
1,816,995 



17.230,124 
17.985.761 
19,272.220 
20,863.643 
21,191,793 
21,741,731 
21,098,478 
22,080,693 



Safl. 
4,611.094 
4,255,222 
4,282,331 
4.036,965 
4,094,428 
3,877,272 
3,290.632 
3,173,887 



i_ Steam. 

20,968.306 

21.856,694 

23,880,674 

25.731,066 

26,560.004 

27,216,391 

20,661,778 

27,771,563 



164 



THB ISTHMIAN CANAL STRIP. 



CLEARED. 



Year ending June 30 



1808 
1899 

iaoo 

mot 

15)02 
1003 
1904 
19U6 



American. 



I 



Foreign. 



f 



Total. 



Pail. JSteara.J Sail. | Steam. 



[ Sail. 1 Steam. 



1,458,843 
1.625.31)4 
1.573.IW3 
1,590,150 
1.543.571 
1.435.85G 
1,115.87. 
1,388,956, 



3, €62. 604 
3.940,448 
4,035,315 
4,827.107 
5,277,084 
5,530.371 



6,803.098, 



3.281.742 
2.712,621 
2.764,110 
2. 5 17. 580 
2.521.573 
2,391,144 



5.563.300 2,174.750 



1,885.583 



17.355.043 
18,081.603, 



10.308.107, 4.337.710 



20.884,057 
21.100.064 
21.V4S.707 



22.053.096 



4.740. 6P5 
4.237,025, 



4.107,730 
4,065.144, 
3,827,000 



21.00S.478 3, 200.61-2 



3,274,538 



21.007.647 
22,028.051 
23.943.422 
25.712. »4 
26.378,038 
27.489.168 
26.061.778 
27.850.006 



GUAM. 

CAPITAL Agana 

GOVERNOR Oocnnmnder Tempi in 14. Potts. U. 8. K. 

The Inland of Guam, or Guahan, in the Marianne Archipelago, was ceded to the 
United States by Spain under the Treaty of Paris of December 10, 1608. It is used by 
the United States an a nav.nl station, and m>y also afford a landing place for a tranapaoiao 
cable. Supreme governmental authority Is vested in a United States naval officer who 
is appointed Governor of the island, bat the natives retain a large part of their old 
municipal systems. Under American rule a monogamous marriage system has been 
established and non-sectarian public instruction has been provided. Commercial re- 
turns of Guam are grouped with those of Tutuila, which see. At the end of September 
and first of October, 1902, much damage was done on the island by a succession eC 
earthquake shocks. For description of Gua.ua set> Tribune Almanac for 1902,. 



TUTU FLA AND MANUA. 

CAPITAL Pago Pase, 

GOVKUNOR. Commander Charles B. T. Moore, U. S. N. ' 

Tutuila, Manua and some Insignificant islets of the Samoan group came Into the 
poBS^RsKin of the United States in January. 1900. as a result of the treaty of Novem-' 
her 14. 1P99, between Great Britain and Germany, in the terms of which the United 
States acquiesced. Under that treaty Great Britain withdrew altogether from the 
islands, Germany took, the largest two, Upolu and Sava.il, and the United States took 
l)ossession of Tutuila and Manua, the former containing at Pago Pago the fl«*et 
harbor in that part of the world and the only good one in the Samoan group. A 
United States naval officer was appointed Governor of Tutuila and Manua In February, 
1900, and possession was taken of them on April 17. 1900. On October 22, 1002, It 
became known that King Oscar of Sweden and Norway, acting as arbitrator, had 
decided in favor of Germany and against the United States and Great Britain in the 
matter of the dispute over armed intervention in Samoa by the latter two powers tn 
1899, holding them responsible for indemnity for damages done by the bombardment 
at Apia. The area of Tutuila and Manua is about 35.000 acres, much of which is 
rugged and mountfvinous. The total population of the two islands is less than 6,000, 
about twentv being whites and as many more half-breeds. The Imports from thei 
United State's into these islands, and also into Guam and the tshn of Wake, in the 
first nine months of 1902 amounted in value to $33,143. For the first nine months ©fl 
1903 they amounted to $70,413. and for the first eight months of 1904 to $18R.'878. For! 
the first eight months of 1005 shipments from the United States to these islands 
amounted iu value to $01,272. 

THE ISTHMIAN CANAL ZONE. 

■ i 

Isthmian Canal Commissioners. — Theodore P. Shonts, Illinois, chairman; 
CTharlos K Magoon, Nebraska. Civil Engineer Mordecai T. Bndicott, U. S. N.: Brtga-' 
dier General Peter C. Ilains, U. S. A. (retired); Colonel Oswald G. Ernst, U. S. A,, 
Corps of Engineers; lienjamin M. Harrod, Louisiana. 

Heorei ary to the Commission. — Joseph B. Bishop, New York. $10,000. 

Chief Engineer. — John F. Stevens. Illinois. 

Governor of the Canal Zone. — Charles E. Magoon, Nebraska. (Also United 
States Minister to Panama.) 

Advisory Board of Engineers. — Major General George W. Davis, V. 8. A. 
(retired), chairman: Captain John C. Oakes, U. S. A., wcretary: Brieadle^ Gen- 
eral Henry L. Abbot, U. S. A. (retired); Kugene Tincan.sser, Germany; Rdouard 
M Quellenec, Franco; Adolph Guorard, France; J. W. Welckar, the Netherlands; 
Henry Hunter, England; isham Randolph, Illinois; Frederick P. Stearns, Massa- 
chusetts- William 11. P.urr, New-York; Joseph Ripley, Illinois; William Barcl«v 
Parsons, ' New York; Alfred Noble, Pennsylvania. Each member to receive $5,000 
and all expenses. 

Supreme Court of the Canal Zone. — Facundo Mutis Duma. Panama, Chtef 
Justice; L. C. Collins. Illinois, and Hezeklah H. audger. North Carolina, associate 

The United States Senate ratifi ed on March 17, 1903. an Isth mian tlanal Treaty 



Mote, — The compensation allowed to each member of the Canal Commission Is 
$f,500; to the chairman an additional $22,500, to the chief engineer an additional 
$17,500 and to the Governor of the canal zone an additional $10,000. 



THE? ISTHMIAN CANAL STRIP. 169 



with Colombia, drawn to vest in the United States perpetual control for canal 
purposes of a strip of land 30 miles in width stretching across the Isthmus of 
Panama. On August 12, 1903 the Colombian Senate rejected the treaty, and on 
September 12 the time fixed for exchanging ratifications expired. On November 3 
the Department of Panama revolted and an independent republic was proclaimed. 
A eanal treaty between this new republic and the United States was signed on 
November 18, 1903, ratified by Panama on December 2, and by the United Stales 
Senate on February 23, 1904. 

The full text of this treaty Is given under 'Treaties Ratified,*' second session 
LVIIITH Congress, Tribune Almanac for 1905. Bv the terms of Articles II and )II 
the Republic of Panama granted to the United States in perpetuity the use, occu- 
pation and eontrol of the zone of land and land under water fur the construction, 
maintenance, operation, sanitation and protection of said canal of the width of 
t*n miles, extending to the distance of five miles on each side of the central line 
at the route Of the canal to be constructed; the said zone beginning in the Carib- 
bean Sea three marine miles from mean low water mark, and extending to and 
across the Isthmus of Panama into the Pacific Oc,ean to a distance of three 
marine miles from mean low water mark, with the proviso that the cities of 
Panama and Colon and the harbors adjacent to said cities, which are included 
within the boundaries of the zone above described, shall not be included within 
this grant. The Republic of Panama further granted to the United States in 
perpetuity the use, occupation and control of any other lands and waters outside 
of the sone above described which may "be necessary and convenient for the con- 
struction and maintenance, operation, sanitation and protection of the said canal 
or any auxiliary canals or their works necessary and convenient for the construc- 
tion, maintenance, operation, sanitation and protection of the said enterprise. 
Panama further gave to the United States in perpetuity the use, occupation and 
control of all Islands within the limits of the zone above described, and in addi- 
tion thereto the group of small islands in the Bay of Panama, named Perico, 
Naos, Cuiebra and Flamenco. ' 

The Republic of Panama yielded to the United States all the rights, power 
and authority within the zone mentioned and described in Article TI of this agree- 
ment, and 1 within the limits of all auxiliary lands and waters mentioned and de- 
scribed in said Article II, which the United States would possess and exercise if it 
were tins sovereign of the territory within which said lands and waters are 
located to the entire exclusion of the exercise by the Republic of Panama of any 
sovereign rights, power and authority. 

T» provide for the temporary government of this zone Congress passed an act 
approved April 28, 1004, providing that "until the expiration of the LVIIIth Con- 
gress, unless provision fox the temporary government of the canal 
The Canal zone be sooner made by Congress, all military, judicial and civil 
Strip Act. powers, as well as the power to make all rules and regulations neces- 
sary for the government of the canal zone, and all the rights, powers 
and authority granted by the terms of said treaty to the United States, shall be 
vested in such person or persons and shall be exorcised in such manner as the 
President shall direct, for the government of said zone and maintaining and 
protecting the inhabitants thereof in the free enjoyment of their liberty, prop- 
erty and religion." Under the tcrm^ of this act the JstnmiMi om ro"imiss:ion 
was created and a temporary government was set up hi the canal strip, with 
Major General George B. Davis as Governor 

At the third session of the LrVIIJth Congress no further legislation was had 
and the President resumed full control under the genera] Canal act. The Canal 
Commission was reorganized and the Governor of the canal' zone was made also 
Unietd States Minister to Panama. The new commissioners were nominated on 
April 3, 1905. On June 30 John F. Stevens replaced John F. Wallace as chief en- 
gineer and member of the commission. 

May 9, 1904, the President issued these Instructions to the Commission: "Sub- 
ject to the limitations of law and conditions herein contained, the Isthmian Canal 
Commission are authorized and directed: First — To make all needful 
Instructions rules and regulations for the government of the zone and for the 
to the correct administration of the military, civil and judicial affairs of 

Qflmmttttkn, jt 8 possessions until the close of the LVIIIth session of Congress. 

Second — To establish a civil service for the government of | 
the strip and construction of the canal, appointments to which shall 
be secured as nearly as practicable by a merit system. Third — To make 
•r caune to be made all needful surveys, borings, designs, plans and specifi- 
cations of the engineering, hydraulic and sanitary works required, and to super- 
vise the execution of the same. Fourth — To make and cause to be executed after 
doe advertisement all necessary contracts for any and all kinds of engineering 
and construction works. Fifth — To acquire by purchase or through proper and 
uniform expropriation proceedings, to be prescribed by the Commission, any pri- 
vate lands or other real property whose ownership by the United States is essen- 
tial to the excavation and completion of the canal. Sixth — To make all needful 
rules and regulations respecting an economical and correct disbursement and an 
accounting for all funds that may be appropriated by Congress for the construc- 
tion of the canal, its auxiliary works and the government of the canal zone; and 
to establish a proper and comprehensive system of bookkeeping showing the state 
Of the work, the expenditures by classes and the amounts still available. Seventh — 
To make requisition on the Secretary of War for funds needed from time to time 
, in the proper prosecution of the work and to designate the disbursing officers 
' authorized to receipt for the same. 



166 



THH ISTHMIAN CANAL STRIP. 



"The. inhabitants of the Isthmian canal zone are entitled to security In their 
persons, property and religion and in all their private rights and relations. They 
should be so Informed by public announcement. The people should be disturbed 
as little as possible in their oustoms and avocations that are In harmony with 
principles of well ordered and decent living. 

"The municipal laws of the canal zone are to be administered by the ordi- 
nary tribunals substantially as they were before the change. Police magistrates 
and justices ef the peace and other officers discharging duties usually devolving 
upon these officers of the law will be continued in office If they are suitable per- 
sons. The Governor of the zone, subject to approval of the Commission, Is 
authorized to appoint temporarily a judge for the canal zone, who shall have the 
authority equivalent to that usually exercised in Latin countries by a judge of a 
court of first instance; but the Isthmian Canal Commission shall fix his salary 
and may legislate respecting his powers and authority, Increasing or diminishing 
them in their discretion, and also making provision for additional or appellate 
judges, should the public Interest require. 

•The laws of the land with which the inhabitants are familiar, and which M 
were in force on February 26, 1904, will continue in force in the canal zone and 
in other places on the isthmus over which the United States has 
Guarantee* jurisdiction, until altered or annulled by the Commission; but 
•ad Kights. there are certain great principles of government which have been 
made the basis of an existence as a nation which we deem essen- 
tial to the rule of law and the maintenance of order, and which shall have force 
In said zone: 

"The Commission may legislate on all rightful subjects of legislation not in 
consistent with the laws and treaties of the United States so far as they annlv tn 
said zone and other places; and the said power shall Include the enactment of 
sanitary ordinances of a preventive or curative character to be enforced in thA 
cities of Colon and Panama. Such legislative power shall also Include the newer 
to raise and appropriate revenues. All taxes, judicial fines, custom duties and 
other revenues levied and collected m said zone by or under the authority of tn« 
Commission shall be retained, accounted for and disbursed by the Commission for 
its proper purposes. All laws, rules and regulations of a governmental character 
enacted by the Commission are to be submitted to the Secretary of w«T«w 
approval. Gambling is prohibited in the canal strip." - *"** wr 

On June 24 an order was issued extending the Dtngtey Tariff law to the canal 
zone. Two collection districts were created. Nine postoffices were also onan«d 
The establishment of a zone port at Ancon, near Panama, brought a protest from 
the Panama Government, which held that the commerce of the city of Panama 
would be Injured by the opening of new and rival ports of entry. Other allirhf 
administrative difficulties having arisen. Secretary Taft was sent to Panama K 
November, 1904. and all outstanding differences were easily adjusted. '— ■» *u 

On December 4, 1904, an executive order was Issued by the Secretary an- 
nouncing the terms of an agreement reached with President Amador. The order 
^ BIMflll , A provides that no trade for the canal zone or the Republic 

The Taft Settlement, of Panama can enter the ports established by the United 
States at either end of the canal, supplies for- the construp- 
tlon of the canal and articles in transit being excepted. This turns the cus- 
toms receipts of these ports over to the government of Panama. Panama agrees 
to reduce her tariff from 16 per cent ad valorem to 10 per cent This redaction 
applies to all goods except wines, liquors, alcohol and opium. Panama also 
agrees to reduce her consular fees and port charges to W per cent of the rates 
at present charged. 

Absolute free trade is to apply between the canal sone and the Republic of 
Panama. Vessels entering the canal ports have free entry to the ports of Colon 
and Panama, and vessels entering the latter ports have the same privileges in the 
canal ports. Complete Jurisdiction is granted to the United States in the harbors 
of Colon and Panama as to sanitation and quarantine regulations. 

Panama reduces her rate of postage to two cents, and Is to furnish all 
stamps in the republic and tn the canal zone. The zone authorities are to nnr- 
chase stamps from Panama at 40 per cent of their face value. * 

The order of Secretary Taft is to be Ineffective unless Panama shall Dot Into 
effect the gold standard, according to the currency agreement of June ih lse4 
It also makes a stipulation regarding citizenship rights of Panamans In the* canai 
zone, and provision is also made In the order for maintenance by the Unit*/! 
States of Important highways, partly in and partly out of the canal zone, and 
also the building of a hospital. The order became effective December M, SoST 

In giving instructions to the new Commission, the President wrote on Anril 
1, 1905: "The Commission will hold quarterly sessions the first of January April 
July and October of each year, at the office of the Qov- 
The Reorganization eroor of the Isthmus of Panama, and will continue each 
of 1^05. session as long as public business may require. Further 

notice of such meetings shall not be necessary to their 
regularity. The Commission may hold special sessions at the call of the chair- 
man. Four members shall constitute a quorum, and the action of such majority 
shall be the action of the Commission. ^^* ** 

"The Commission, under the supervision and direction of the Secretary of 
War and subject to the approval of the President, Is charged with the general 
duty of the adoption of the plans for the construction and maintenance of the 



THE ISTHMIAN CANAL. STRIP. 101 



canal and with the execution of the work of the same; wit!* the purchase and 
delivery of supplies, machinery and necessary plant; the employment of the necea-j 
sary officers, employes and laborers and with the fixing of their salaries and j 
wages; with the commercial operation of the Panama Railroad Company and its . 
steamship lines as common carriers; with the utilization of the railroad as a means 
of constructing the canal; with, the making of contracts for construction and 
excavation and with? all other matters incident and nece sary to the building of 
a waterway across the Isthmus of Panama, as provided by the act of Congress 
of. June 28, 1S02. ' 

"For convenience, and to secure the uninterrupted course of the work, an , 
executive committee of not less than three members of the Commission shall j 
be appointed by the Commission to act in place of the Commission during the I 
intervals between the meetings of the Commission, and to report its doii.gs in full 
to the Commission at the next regular meeting. Regular r eettngs of the exec- 
utive committee shall be held at the office of the Governor on the Isthmus of 
Panama at 10 o'clock in the forenoon on each Monday and Wednesday of every 
week* and further notiee of such meetings shall not be necessary to their 
legality. A majority of their number shall constitute a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business at such meetings. The action of such majority shall be the 
action of the executive committee. 

"There shall be constituted three executive departments. The head of the first 
department shall be the chairman of the Commission, who shall have direct and 
immediate charge of: (I) The fiscal affairs of the Commission; (2) 
Executive the purchase and delivery of all materials and supplies; (3) the 

Rutiet* accounts, bookkeeping and audits; <4) the commercial operations in 

Defined. * the United States of the Panama Railroad and steamship lines; 

(5) he shall have charge of the general concerns of the Com- 
mission* subject to the supervision and direction of the Secretary of War, and shall 
perform; such other duties as may be placed upon him from time to- time by the 
Secretary ©f War. 

"The he#d of- the second department shall be the Governor • of the zone,, with 
the duties and powers indicated in the executive -order of May 9; 1904, which in- 
cludes in general: (I) The administration and; enforcement of law in the »one; 
(2) alt matters of sanitation within the canaj zone, and also in the cities of 
Panama and Colon and the harbors, etc., so far as authorized by the treaty, , 
the executive orders and decrees of December S. 1504. between the United States 
and the Republic of Panama relating thereto; (3) the custody of all supplies 
needed for sanitary purposes, and such construct ion necessary for sanitary pur- 
poses as may be assigned to this department by the 'Commission ; (4) -such other 
duties as he may be charged with from* time to time h* the Secretary of .W*r; 
<5) he shall reside oa the isthmus and devote his entire time to the service, 
except when granted leave of absence by the Secrtary of War. 

"The head of th<» third departm-nt shall be the chief engineer. He shall have 
full charge on the isthmus: (1) Of all the actual work of construction carried 
on by the Commission on the isthmus; (2> The custody of alt the supplies and 
plant of the Commission upon the isthmus; <&j the practical operation of the 
I railroad on the isthmus, with the special view to its utilisation in canal con- 
struction work; (4) he ehaH reside on the Isthmus and demote his entire time to 
the- service, except, when granted leave of absence by the Secretary of War. 

"All officers and employes shall be appointed and their salaries shall be fixed 
by the head of the department in which they are engaged. Their appointment 
and salary shaW be subject to the approval of- the executive committee. Where the 
Commission • is not in session* of the executive commute*. . The employment of 
laborers where the contract of employment is made in the United States or out- 
ride' of the isthmus shall be negotiated and concluded hv the chairman of the 
Commission subject to the approval of the executive committee. Where the employ- 
; meat of laborers is effected upon the isthmus it shall be conducted under the super- 
* vision of the ebief engineer, subject to the approval of the executive committee. 

"Contracts for the purchase of supplies or for construction involving an esti- 
mated expenditure exceeding $10,000 shall only be made after due public adver- 
tisement in newspapers of general circulation, and shall be awarded to the low- 
est responsible bidder* except in case of emergency, wh^n, with the apo-nval of 
the Secretary of War, advertising may be dispensed with. In the making of 
contracts for pupplies or construction involving an estimated expenditure of more 
than $1,000 and less than $10,000 competitive bids should be secured by invitation 
for advertisement whenever practicable. 

"As soon as practicable after the date of this order the Isthmian Canal Com- 
mission, as hereafter constituted, shall hold a session in the city of Washington 
for the general purposes of organization under this order, and for the special 
purpose of fixing the number and character of officers and employes to service in 
the City of Washington in the work of the Commission. The Commission is 
especially charged with the- duty of maintaining a complete system of accounts 
or the isthmus which shall bo duplicated in W^nine-ton. so tb»t there may 
always bo in Washington the proper means of informing the President, the Sec- 
retary of War and the Congress of the amount of work done, the cost of the 
same, the amount of money available, the amount of money expended and the 
general financial condition of the enterprise." 

The Advisory Board of Engineers met ia Washington on September 1, 1905, 
and later made a visit to the isthmus. 



NATIONAL PARTY CONVENTIONS. 



PRESIDENTIAL AND VICE- PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES, 1904. 

' REPUBLICAN— JUNE 81. 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, of New-York.l CHARLES W. FxURBANKS. of Indiana. 

DEMOCRATIC— JULY 6. 

ALTON B. PARKER, of New-York. | HENRY Q. DAVIS, of West Virginia. 

POPULIST— JULY 4. 

; THOMAS E. WATSON, of Georgia. | THOMAS H. TIBBLES. of Nebraska. 

PROHIBITIONIST— JUNE 59. 

; SLLAS C. SWALLOW, of Pennsylvania. | GEORGE) W. CARROLL, of Texas, 
i SOCIALIST-— MAY 4 

I EUGENE V. DEBS, of Indiana. I BENJAMIN HANFORD, of New- York. 

I SOCIALIST LABOR— JULY 3. 

i CHARLES H. CORREGAN. of New-York. ( WILLIAM W. COX, Of Illinois. 



CONVENTION PROCEEDINGS. 

REPUBLICAN. 

The Republican National Convention was held in Chicago, June 21-23. Nine 
hundred and ninety-four delegates— including two from the Philippines and two 
from Porto Rico — were put on the convention role. Elihu Root, of New-York 
was chosen temporary chairman on June 21, and Joseph G. Cannon permanent 
ctiairman on June 22. The first day's session was devoted chiefly to the delivery 
of Mr. Roofs speech. On the second day Mr. Cannon made a speech and the 
platform was reported and adopted. Balloting for Presidential and Vice-Presi- 
dential candidates occurred on June 23. Theodore Roosevelt, of New-York was 
nominated for President on the first ballot, receiving 994 votes. Charles W. Pair- 
banks, of Indiana, was nominated for Vice-President by acclamation and without 
u rollcall. The convention then adjourned. 

The Platform. 

The platform, adopted unanimously on June 22, was as follows: 

Fifty years ago the Republican party came into existence, dedicated, among 
other purposes, to the great task of arresting the extension of human slavery 
In I860 it elected its first President During twenty-four of the 
Party forty-four years which have elapsed since the election of Lincoln 

Achievements, the Republican party has held complete control of the govern- 
ment. For eighteen more of the forty-four years it has held 
partial control through the possession of one or two branches of the government, 
while the Democratic party during the same period has had complete control for 
only two years. This long tenure of power by the Republican party is not due to 
chance. It is a demonstration that the Republican party has commanded the 
confidence of the American people for nearlv; two generations to a degree never 
equalled in our history, and has displayed a high capacity for rule and govern- 
ment which has been made even more conspicuous by the incapacity and infirmity 
of purpose shown by its opponents. 

The Republican party entered upon its present period of complete supremacy 
in 1S97. We have every right to congratulate ourselves upon the work since then 
accomplished, for it has added lustre even to the traditions of the 
Returning party which carried the government through the storms of civil war. 
Prosperity. We then found the country, after four years of Democratic rule in 
evil plight, oppressed with misfortune and doubtful of the future 
Public credit had been lowered, the revenues were declining, the debt was grow- 
ing, the administration's attitude toward Spain was feeble and mortifying the 
standard of values was threatened and uncertain, labor was unemployed business 
was sunk In the depression which had succeeded the panic of 1893. hope was 
faint and confidence was gone. 

We met these unhappy conditions vigorously, effectively and at onoe. We 
replaced a Democratic tariff law based on free trade principles and garnished 
with sectional protection by a consistent protective tariff, and industry freed 
from oppression and stimulated by the encouragement of wise laws, has expanded 
to a degree never before known, has conquered new markets and has created a 
volume of exports which has surpassed imagination. Under the Dinglev tariff 
labor has been fully employed, wages have risen and aU industries have revived 
and prospered. 

We firmly established the gold standard, which was then menaced with d*» 
struction. Confidence returned to business, and with confidence an unexampled 
prosperity. ««^uui«eu 

National Credit For deficient revenues supplemented by improvident UanM 

Re-established, of bonds we gave the country an income which produced a KnS» 
surplus, and which enabled us only four years after th* Rnnnifh 
war had closed to remove over $100,000,000 of annual war taxes, reduce the nnhii* 
debt and low«»r the interest charges of the government. puu,,t 

169 



NATIONAL. PARTY PLATFORMS. 199 



The public credit, which had been so lowered that In time of peace a 

cratlo administration made large loans at extravagant rates of interest in order 
to pay current expenditures, rose under Republican administration to its highest 
point, and -enabled us to borrow at 2 per cent, even in time of war. 

We refused to palter longer with the miseries of Cuba. We fought a Quick 

and victorious war with Spain. We set Cuba free, governed the island for three 

years, and then gave it to the Cuban people with order restored, 

Wise Foreign with ample revenues, with education and public health estab- 

Pollcies. Ushed, free from debt, and connected with the United States by 

wise provisions for our mutual interests. 

-We have organized the government of Porto Rico, and its people now enjoy 

peace, freedom, order and prosperity. 

In the Philippines we have ' suppressed insurrection, established order, and 
given to life and property a security never known there before. We have organ- 
ised civil, government, made it effective and strong in administration, and have 
conferred upon the people of those islands the largest civil liberty they have 
ever enjoyed. By our possession of the Philippines we were enabled to take 
prompt and effective option In the relief of the legations at Peking and a decisive 
part in preventing the partition and preserving the integrity of China. 

The possession of a route for an isthmian canal, so long the dream of Ameri- 
can statesmanship, is now an accomplished fact. The great work of connecting 
the Pacific and Atlantic by a canal is at last begun, and it is due to the Republi- 
can party. 

We have passed laws which will bring the arid lands of the United States 
within the area of cultivation. We have reorganised the army and put it in the 
highest state of efficiency. We have passed laws for the im prove - 
Domestic ment and support of the militia. We have pushed forward the 

Problems Met* building of the navy, the defence and protection of our honor and 
our interests. Our administration of the great departments of the 
government has been honest and efficient, and wherever wrongdoing has been dis- 
covered the Republican administration has not hesitated to probe the evil and 
bring the offenders to justice without regard to art or political ties. 

Laws enacted by the Republican party which the Democratic party failed to 
enforce, and which were intended for the protection of the public against the 
unjust discrimination or the illegal encroachment of vast aggregations of capital, 
have been fearlessly enforced by a Republican President, and new laws insuring 
reasonable publicity as to the operations of great corporations and providing addi- 
tional remedies for the prevention of discrimination in freight rates have been 
passed by a Republican Congress. 

In this record of achievement during the last eight years may be read the 
pledges which the Republican party has fulfilled. We promise to continue these 
policies and we declare our constant adherence to the following 
Party Pledges, principles: 

Protection. Protection, which guards and develops our industries Is a 

cardinal policy of the Republican party. The measure of pro- 
tection should always at least equal the difference in the cost of production at 
home and abroad. We insist upon the maintenance of the principles of protec- 
tion, and therefore rates of duty should be readjusted only when conditions have 
so changed that the public interest demands their alteration, but this work can- 
not safely be committed to any other hands than those of the Republican party 
To intrust it to the Democratic party is to Invite disaster. 

s Whether, as in 1S92, the Democratic party declared the protective tariff un- 
constitutional, or whether it demands tariff reform or tariff revision, Its real 
object is always the destruction of the protective system. However specious Uxa 
name, the purpose is ever the same. A Democratic tariff has always been fol- 
lowed by business adversity; a Republican tariff by business prosperity. To a 
Republican Congress and a Republican President this great question can be safely 
intrusted. When the only free trade country among the great nations agitates a 
return to protection, the chief protective country should not falter in main- 

We have extended widely our foreign markets, and we believe In the adoption 

Of all practicable methods for their further extension, including 

Reciprocity, commercial reciprocity wherever reciprocal arrangements can be 

„ effected consistent with the principles of protection, and without 

injury to American agriculture, American labor or any American industry. 

We believe it to be the duty of the Republican party to uphold the gold 
standard and the Integrity and value of our national currency 
Gold Standard. The maintenance of the gold standard, established bv the Re- 
publican party, cannot safely be committed to the Democratic 
party, which resisted its adoption, and has never given any proof since that time 
of belief in it or fidelity to it. 

While every other industry has prospered under the fostering aid of Republi- 
can legislation, American shipping engaged in foreign trade, in competition with 
the low cost of construction, low wages and heavy subsidies of 
Shipping, Navy, foreign governments, has not for many years received from the 
vv government of the United States adequate encouragement of any 
kind We therefore favor legislation which will encourage and build up th^ 
American merchant marine, and we cordially approve the legislation of the last 
Congress, which created the Merchant Marine Commission to investigate and 
report upon this subject. , 



170 NATIONAL PARTT PLATFORMS. 



A navy powerful enough to defend the United States against any attack, lo 
uphold the Monroe Doctrine and to watch over our commerce ie essential to tne 
safety and the welfare of the American people. To maintain such- a navy te tile, 
fixed policy of the Republican party. 

We cordially approve the attitude of President Roosevelt *n6 Centres* to 
regard to the exclusion of Chinese labor and promise a contiunaaoe? fl£ the Re- 
publican policy ha that direction. 
CWU . Service, The Civil Service law was placed on the statute books by tlie 

Pensions. Republican party, which has always sustained It* asd we renew 

our former declarations that It shall be thoroughly and bxroestly 
enforced. 

. We are always mindful of the country's debt to the soldiers- and eairors of 
the United States, and we believe in making ample provision for tben* and fas tae 
liberal administration of the pension laws. 

We favor the peaceful settlement of international differences by arbitration. 
We commend the vigorous efforts made by the administration to p rotest 
American citizens in foreign land*, and pledge ourselves to insist upon the Junt 
and equal protection of all our citizens abroad. It Is the un- 
RlghtA Abroad, questioned duty of the government to pftoenre for aft our citizens, 
without disjunction, the rights to travel and sojourn in frlewHy 
countries, and* we declare ourselves in favor of all proper efforts tending to that 
end. Our great interests and our Kviwing commerce in the Orient render the 
condition of China of high Importance to the United States. We cordially com- 
mend the policy pursued in that direction by the administrations of Fresfdewt 
McKrnley and President Roosevelt. 

We favor such Congressional action as shall determine whetneT fey special 

discriminations the electfve franchise in any State has bees 

Disfranchisement, unconstitutionally limited, and ht such Is the case, we demand 

. lt> w that representation in Congress and in the electoral eollegee 

shall be proportionally reduced as directed by the Constitution of the United 

States. 

Combinations of capital and of labor are the results of the economic move- 
ment of the age, but neither must be permitted to infringe upon tne 
Traate, rights and interests of the people. Such coinbinationsy when lawfully 
formed for lawful purposes, are alike entitled to the protection of tne 
laws, but both are subject to the laws, and neither ean be permitted to break them 
The great statesman and patriotic American, William McJ£inley r who was 
re-elected by the Republican party to the Presidency four years* ago, «a» assas- 
sinated .iust at the threshold of his second term. Tne entire nation 
McKinley and mourned his untimely death,, and did that justice to hi*- great 
Roosevelt. qualities of mind and character which history wU> confirm and 

repeat. 
The American people were fortunate in bis strccestror, to whom tnesy turned 
with a trust and confidence which have been fully Justified. President Roosevelt 
brought to the great responsibilities thus sadly forced upon Mm a dear head; a 
*rave heart, an earnest patriotism and high Ideals of public duty and public ser- 
ice. True to the principles of the Republican party and to the policies wMcs 
that party had declare?, he has also shown himself ready for every 
and has met new and vital question* with ability and with «nccem 

The confidence of the people in his justice, inspired by fcj* a*. 

enabled him to render personally an inestimable service to the country by „ 
ing about a settlement of the coal strike, which threatened such tfTimntrnit r*ai^l*V 
at the opening of winter in 1902. «-~=>*«h» "»«*» 

Our foreign policy under his administration- has not only bees able, vfgoroa* 
and dignified, but in the highest degree (successful. The complicated cuestfene 
which arose in Venezuela were settled in such & was 'by Freaf- 
The Roosevelt dent Roosevelt that the Monroe Doctrine was sfenaJIv vi»S- 
Administration, cated. and the cause of peace and arbitration greatly advanced. 
His prompt and vigorous action in Panama* which we eeiav 
mend in the highest terms, not only secured to us the canaF route but avelded, 
foreign complications which might have been of a very seriou* character ^^ 

He has continued the policy of President McKinley in the Orient and Owr 
position in China, signalized by our recent contmercial treats with **■«» emnWa. 
has never been so high. * -»*-™^ 

He secured the tribunal by which the vexed and perilame aae&tlen of tn» 
Alaskan boundary was finally settled. * w "" 

Whenever crimes against humanity have been perpetrated which ha.ee 
shocked our people, his protest has been made and our good offices, have 
tendered, but always with due regard to international obligations." 

Under his guidance we find ourselves at peace with all tne world, and 
were we more respected or our wishes more regarded by foreign- nations.. 

Pre-eminently successful in regard to our foreign relations:, he has bees 
equally fortunate in dealing with domestic questions. The country baa known 
that the public credit and th€i national currency were absolutely safe in. the handa 
of his administration. In the enforcement of the laws he has shewn not en? 
courage, but the wisdom which understands that to permit laws to be violated or 
disregarded opens the door to anarchy, while the just enforcement of the law to 
the soundest conservatism. He has held firmly to the fundamental American doe- 
trine that all men must obey the law; that there must be no distinction between 
rich and poor, between strong and weak; but that justice and equal protection 



NATIONAL PARTY PLATFORMS. 



171 



under the law must be secured to every citizen without regard to race, creed or 
condition. 

His administration has been throughout vigorous and honorable, high minded 
and patriotic We commend it without reservation to the considerate judgment 
of the American people. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

The Democratic National Convention met In St Louis on July 6. Nine hun- 
dred and ninety-eight delegates were admitted to seats, including six from Porto 
Rico. No delegates were admitted from the Philippine Islands. John Sharp 
Williams, of Mississippi, was chosen temporary chairman, and Champ Clark, of 
Missouri, permanent chairman. The first day's session — on July 6 — was devoted 
chiefly to" the delivery of Mr. Williams's speech. On the second day a fight was 
made by W. J. Bryan against the seating of the Hopkins delegation from Illinois, 
but the report of the Committee on Credentials, confirming the title of that 
delegation, was approved by a vote of 647 to 299. The Committee on Resolutions 
failed to come to an agreement until the evening of July 8, when a platform was 
reported and adopted unanimously. Candidates for the Presidential nomination 
were presented and voting began at about 4 a. m.. July 9. Alton B. Parker, of 
New-York,* was chosen on the first ballot. On the rollcall he received 658 votes, 
to 204 for Wintam R. Hearst, 42 for Francis ML Cockreil, 38 for Richard Olney, 
Vt for Edward C. Wail, 8 for George Oray, 8 for John S. Williams, 3 for George 
B. McClellan, % far Nelson A. Miles, 2 for Charles A. Towne, 2 for Arthur P. Gor- 
man, 1 for Bobert E. Pattlson, and 1 for Bird W. Coler. Idaho and Nevada, with 
12 votes, changed from Hearst to Parker, and the tatter's nomination was then 
made unanimous. Early in the " morning of July 10 Henry G. Davis, of West 
Virginia, wa* nominated for Vice-President. He received on the first ballot 652 
votes, against 165 for James B. Williams, of Illinois, 100 for George Turner, of 
Washington, and 58 for W. A. Harris, of Kansas. 

The Platform. 

The platform of 1904 can be properly interpreted only in the light of certain 
events which led up to and followed its adoption. As approved it contained no 
declaration oil the money question. A sub-committee of the Committee on Reso- 
lutions, of which John W. Daniel, Benjamin F.*hively, Henry G. Davis. .Fred T 
Dubois. Francis G.' Newlands, John 8. Williams, Robert E. Pattison, Ben T Cable' 
Charles 8. Hamlin, William J. Bryan, John P. Poe and David B. Hill were mem- 
bers, submitted the following declaration: » 

'The discoveries of gold within the last few years and the great increase In 
the production thereof, adding two thousand million dollars to the world's suddIv 
of which seven hundred millions falls to the share of the United States have 
contributed to the maintenance of a money standard of value no longer ooen to 
Question, removing that issue from the field of political contention." 

The futl committee, by a vote of 35 to 15, struck out this plank and agreed to 
Ignore the money and currency issue entirely, and the convention unanimouslv 
ratified this decision. «*x««ixinouHiy 

Twelve hours after Judge Parker had been nominated, and on the eve of ad- 
journment, the convention received this notice by telegraph from its Presidential 
candidate: 

*«I regard the gold standard as firmly and Irrevocably established and shall 
net accordingly If the action of the convention to-day shall be ratified bv the 
people. As the platform Is silent on the subject, my view should be made known 
to the convention, and if it is proved to be unsatisfactory to the majoritv I re- 
quest you to decline the nomination for me at once, so that another mav h* 
nominated before adjournment." w ""* y DO 

This message provoked an excited debate, contravenmg. as It did. assurances 
previously given by Judge Parker's sponsors and managera The convention 
Anally approved by a vote of T74 to 191 this answer to Judge Parkers telegram: 

"The platform adopted by this convention is silent on the Question of a mone- 
tary standard because It to not regarded by us as a possible ta««e ki this cam- 
paign, and only campaign issues were mentioned in the platform. Therefore. 
there is nothing In the views expressed by you in the telegram Just received 
which would preclude a man entertaining them from accepting a nomination on 
•aid platform." „ ^ ., 

The text of the platform follows: 

The Democratic party ot the United States, In national convention assembled 
declares Its devotion to the essential principles of the Democratic faith which 
brings us together in party communion. tttiC Iaicn wmen 

Under them, local self-government and national unity and prosperity were 
alike established. They underlaid our independence, the structure of our t%Z 
Republic, and every Democratic extension from Louisiana to Cal- 
ifornia and Texas to Oregen, which preserved faithfully in all fhV 
States the tie between taxation and representation. Y They £et 
Inspire the masses of our people, guarding jealously their rights 
and liberties and cherishing their fraternity, peace and orderly development 

They remind us of our duties and responsibilities as citizens and impress aoon 
OS, particularly at this time, the necessity of reform and the rescue of the admin- 
istration- of government from the headstrong, arbitrary and spasmodic methods 
Which Histraot b^rtness by raoertalnty, and pervade the public mind with dread! 
distrust and perturbation. u«*u. 



172 NATIONAL, PARTY PLATFORMS. 



The application of these fundamental principles to the living Issues of the 
Jay Is the first step toward the assured peace, safety and progress of our nation. 
Freedom of the press, of conscience and of speech; equality befo™ the law of 
all cit^ns; the right to trial by jury; freedom of the person defended by the 
writ ol habeas corpus; liberty of personal contract untrammelled by sumptuary 
laws; supremacy of the civil over military authority; a well disciplined militia; 
the separation of church and. state; economies in expenditures; low taxes, that 
labor may be lightly burdened; prompt and .sacred fulfilment of public and private 
obligations; fidelity to treaties; p^aee and friendship with all nations, entangling 
alliances witb none; absolute acquiescence in the will of the majority, the vital 
principle of republics — these are doctrines which Democracy has established as 
proverbs of the nation, and they should be constantly invoked and en- 
forced. 

We favor the enactment and administration of laws giving labor .and capital 

imparts lly their Just rights. Capital and labor ought not 

Capital and Labor, to be enemlea Each is necessary to the other. Bach has its 

rights, but the rights of labor are certainly no less "vested*'* 

no less "sacred" and no less "inalienable" than the rights of capital. 

Constitutional guarantees are violated whenever any citizen is denied the 
right to labor, acquire and enjoy property or reside where Interest or inclination 
may determine. Any denial thereof by individuals, organisations 
Constitutional or governments should be summarily rebuked and punished. 
Guarantees. We deny the right of any executive to disregard or suspend 

any constitutional privilege or limitation. Obedience to the laws 
and respect for their requirements are alike the supreme duty of the citizen and 
the official. 

The military should be used only to support and maintain the law. We 
unqualifiedly condemn it3 employment for the summary banishment of citizens 
without trial or for the control of elections. We approve the measure which 
passed the United States Senate In 1896, but which a Republican Congress has 
ever since refused to enact, relating to contempts in Federal Courts and providing 
for trial by jury in cases of indirect contempt. 

We favor liberal appropriations for the car* and improvement of the water- 
ways of the country. When any waterway like the Mississippi River is of suffi- 
cient importance tiLdemand special aid of the government such aid 
Waterway*, should be extended* with a definfte plan of continuous work until 
permanent improvement Is secured. 

We oppose the Republican policy of starving home development In order to 
feed the greed for conquest and the appetite for national "prestige" and display 
of strength. 

Large reductions can easily be made in the annual expenditures of the gov- 
ernment without impairing the efficiency of any branch of the public service, and 
we shall insist upon the strictest economy and frugality com- 
Rconomy of patible with vigorous and efficient civil, military and naval ad- 

AdmiulHtratioB. ministration as a right of the people too clear to be denied or 
withheld. 

We favor the enforcement of honesty in the public service, and to that end a 
thorough legislative investigation of those executive departments of the govern- 
ment already known to teem with corruption, as well as other departments sus- 
pected of harboring corruption, and the punishment of ascertained corruptionists 
without fear or favor or regard to persons. The persistent and deliberate refusal 
of both Senate and House of Representatives to permit such Investigation to be 
made demonstrates that only by a change in the executive and In the legislative 
departments can complete exposure, punishment and correction be obtained. 

We condemn the action of the Republican party in Congress in refusing to 
prohibit an executive department from entering into contracts with 
Federal convicted trusts or unlawful combinations in restraint of Interstate 

Uovercment trade. We believe that one of the best methods of procuring econ- 
aiid. Trusts, omy and honesty in the public service is to have public officials, 
from the occupant of the White House down to the lowest of them 
returned as nearly as may be to Jeffersonian simplicity of living. 

Wc favor the nomination and election of a President imbued with the prin- 
ciples of the Constitution, who will set his face sternly against 
Executive executive usurpation of legislative and judicial functions, whether 
Usurpation, that usurpation be veiled under the guise of executive construction 
of existing laws or whether it take refuge in the tyrant's plea of 
necessity or superior wisdom. 

We favor the preservation, so far as we can, of the open door for the world's 
commerce in the Orient, without an unnecessary entanglement in Oriental and 
European alfairs and without arbitrary, unlimited, Irresponsible and 
imoerialism. absolute government anywhere within our jurisdiction. 

We oppose, as fervently as did George Washington himself, an 
indefinite, irresponsible, discretionary and vague absolutism and a policy of colonial 
exploitation, uo matter where or by whom invoked or exercised. We believe with 
Thomas Jefferson and John Adams that no government has a right to make one 
set of laws for those "at home and another and a different set of laws, absolute 
in their character, for those in the. colonies. All men under the American fta« 
are entitled to the protection of the institutions whose emblem the flag i* If thev 
are inherently unfit for these institutions, then they are inherently nnftt to b« 
members of the American bodyjsolitic. "^ 



HATIONAt. PARTY PLATFORMS. WS 



Wnerever there may extet a people incapable of being governed under Ameri- 
eaa taws, in consonance with the American Constitution, the territory of that 
people ought not to be pan of the American domain. We insist that we ought to 
do for the Filipinos what wo have already done for the Cubans, and it te our 
duty to make that promise now, and upon suitable guarantees of protection to 
citizens of our own and other countries resident there at the tim* of our with- 
drawal, set the Filipino people upon their feet free and independent to work oat 
their ova destiny. 

The endeavor of the Secretary of War by pledging: fno government's Indorse- 
ment for "promoters" in the Philippine Islands to make the United States a 
partner in speculative legislation of the archipelago, which was only temporarily 
held up by the opposition of the Democratic Senators in the last session, will, if i 
^successful, lead to entanglements from which it will be difficult to escape. 

The Democratic party has been and will continue to he the consistent oppo- 
nent of that class of tariff legislation by which certain interests have been per- 
m ^ mltted through Congressional favor to draw heavy tribute from the 
T%* Ifefiff. American people. This monstrous perversion of those equal oppor- { 

tunlttes which our political institutions were established to secure. 
has caused what may once have been infant industries to become the greatest 
combinations of capital that the world has ever known. These especial favorite© 
of the government have, through trust methods, been converted into monopolies, 
thus bringing to an end domestic competition which was the only alleged cheek 
npon the extravagant profits made possible by the protective system. These in- 
dustrial combinations by the financial assistance they can give, now control the 
policy of the Republican party. We denounce protection as a robbery of the 
many to enrich the few and we favor a tariff limited to the needs of the govern- 
ment, economically administered and so levied as not to discriminate against any 
Industry, class or section, to the end that the burdens of taxation shall be dis- 
tributed as equally as possible. 

"We favor a revision and a gradual reduction or the tariff by the friends of 
the masses and for the common weal, and not by the friends of its abuses, its 
extortions and its discriminations, keeping in view the ultimate ends of "equality 
of burdens and equality of opportunities " and the constitutional purpose of rais- 
ing a revenue by taxation — to wit, the support of the federal government in all 
its integrity and virility, but In simplicity. 

We recognize that the gigantic trusts and combinations designed to enable 
capital to secure more than its just share of the joint products of capital and 
labor, and which have been fostered and promoted under Repub- 
Trusts.and Mean rule, are a menace to beneficial competition and an obstacle 

CpmbiaaiJCTM. to permanent business prosperity. A private monopoly is indefen- 
sible and intolerable. Individual equality of opportunity and free 
competition are essential to a healthy and permanent commercial prosperity, and 
any trust combination or monopoly tending to destroy these, by controlling pro- 
duction, restricting competition or fixing prices should be prohibited and punished 
by law. We especially denounce rebates and discrimination by transportation 
companies. 

As the most potent agency in promoting and strengthening these unlawful 
conspiracies against trade, we demand an enlargement of the powers of the inter- 
state Commission to the end that the travelling public and shippers of this coun- 
try may have prompt and adequate relief for the abuses to which they are sub- 
jected in the matter of transportation. We demand a strict enforcement of 
existing civil and criminal statutes against all such trusts, combinations and 
monopolies, and we demand the enactment of such further legislation as may be 
necessary to effectually suppress them. 

Any trust or unlawful combination engaged in interstate commerce which Is 
monopolizing any branch of business or production should not be permitted to 
transact business outside of the State of its origin. Whenever it shaii be estab- 
lished in any court of competent jurisdiction that such monopolisation exists, such 
prohibition should be enforced through comprehensive laws to be enacted oa the 
subject. 

We congratulate our Western citizens npon the passage of the Newlands irri- 
gation act for the irrigation and reclamation of the arid lands at the West, a 
measure framed by a Democrat, passed in the Senate by a non- 
Raclniuntiou partisan vote and passed in the House against the opposition of 

of. Arid *-f»»A»- almost all the Republican leaders by a vote the majority of 
which was Democratic. 

We call attention to this great Democratic measure, broad and comprehensive 
as it is, working Automatically throughout all time, without further action of 
Congress, until the reclamation of all the land In the arid West capable of re- 
clamation is accomplished, reserving the lands reclaimed for homesoekers in small 
tracts, and rigidly guarding against land monopoly, as an evidence of the policy 
of domestic development contemplated by the Democratic party should it be 
placed in power. »-.*..*. 

Tho Democracy when intrusted with power will construct the Panama Canal 
spO'dlly, honestly and economically, thereby giving to our people 
lathmian CauUL what Democrats have always contended for — a great Inter- 
oceanic canal, furnishing shorter and cheaper lines of transpor- 
tation and broader and less trammelled trade relations with the other peoples of 
the world, 



174 NATIONAL. PARTY PLATFORMS. 



Wo pledge ourselves to. Insist upon the Just and lawful protection of our citi- 
zens at borne and abroad and to use all proper measures to secure for them, 
whether native born or naturalized and without distinction of race 
American or creed, the equal protection of laws and the enjoyment of aU 
Citizenship, rights and privileges open to them under the covenants of our trea- 
ties of friendship and commerce, and if under existing treaties the 
right of travel and sojourn Is denied the American citizen, or recognition is with- 
held from American .passports by any countries on tbe ground of race or creed, 
we favor the beginning of negotiations with the govevrnments of euch countries to 
secure by treaties the removal of these unjust discriminations. 

We demand that all over the world a duly authenticated passport issued by 
tbe government of tbe United States to an American citizen shall be proof of the 
fact that he Is an American citizen and shall entitle him to the treatment .due 
him as such. 

Election of We favor the election of United States Senators by the direct 

Senators. vote of the people. 

We favor the admission of the Territories of Oklahoma and tbe Indian Terri- 
tory. We also favor the immediate admission of Arizona and New-Mexico as 
separate States, and a Territorial government for Alaska and Porto 
Statehood for Rico. We hold that the officials appointed to administer tbe gov- 
Tentteries. ernment of any Territory as well as tbe district of Alaska should 
be bona fide residents at the time of their appointment for tbe 
Territory or district in which their duties are to be performed. 

We demand the extermination of polygamy within tbe Juriedic- 

Polygamy. tlon of the United States and the complete separation of church and 

state in political affairs. 

We denounce the ship subsidy bill recently passed by the United States Senate 

as an iniquitous appropriation of public funds for private purposes and a wasteful, 

illogical and useless attempt to overcome by subsidy the ob- 

Merchant Marine, structions raised by Republican legislation to tbe growth and 

development of American commerce on the Sea. We favor tbe 

upbuilding of a merchant marine without new or additional burdens upon tbe 

people and without bounties from tbe public treasury* 

We favor libera] trade arrangements with Canada and with 
Reciprocity, peoples of other countries where they can be entered into with 
benefit to. American agriculture, manufactures, mining or commerce, 
Monroe Doctrine. We favor the maintenance of the Monroe Doctrine in its 

full integrity. 
We favor the reduction of the army and of army expenditure to a point his- 
torically demonstrated to be safe and sufficient. 

The Democracy would secure to the surviving soldiers and 
Army, Pensions, sailors and their dependents generous pensions, not by an arbi- 
trary executive order, but by legislation which a grateful people 
stand ready to enact. 

Our soldiers and sailors who defend with their lives the Constitution and tbe 
laws have a sacred interest in their just administration. They must therefore 
share with us the humiliation with which we have witnessed tbe exaltation of 
court favorites, without distinguished sea-vice, over the scarred heroes of many 
battles, of their aggrandizement by executive appropriation out of the treasuries of 
a prostrate people in violation of the act of Congress which fixed the compensa- 
tion of allowances of the military officers. 

The Democratic party stands committed to the principles of Civil Service Re- 
form, and we demand their honest, just and impartial enforcement We denounce 
the Republican party for its continued and sinister encroachments 
Civil Service, upon the spirit and operation of Civil Service rules, whereby it has 
^ arbitrarily dispensed with examinations for office In tbe Interests 

of favorites and employed all manner of devices to overreach and set aside the 
principles upon which Civil Service was established. 

The race question has brought countless woes to this country. Tbe calm wis- 
dom of the American people should see to it that it brings no more. 

To revive the dead and hateful race and sectional anfmosi- 

Race Question. ties in any part of our common country means confusion, dis- 

traction of business and the reopening of wounds now happily 

heal North and South, East and West have but recently stood together in line of 
battle from the walls of Peking to the hills of Santiago, and as sharers of a 
common glory and a common destiny we should share fraternally tbe common 

We therefore deprecate and condemn the Bourbonlike, selfish and narrow 
spirit of the recent Republican Convention at Chicago, which sought to kindle 
anew the embers of racial and sectional strife, and we appeal from it to tbe 
sober common sense and spirit of the American people. 

Tbe existing Republican Administration has been spasmodic, erratic, sensa- 
tional, spectacular and arbitrary. It has made Itself a satire upon tbe Congress 
the courts and upon the settled practices and usages of 
Tbe Republican national and international law. 

Administration. It summoned the Congress into hasty and futile extra ses- 

sion and virtually adjourned it, leaving behind its flight from 
Washington uncalled calendars and unaccomplished tasks. 



NATICXNAI* PARTY Pi-A.-Tff©«14«. 



195 



It made war, Which is the sole power of Cong?***, without its authority. 
tfearefey jBfurplug i0ne of Its fu nd^mpn al prerogatives* / 

£t vtotatad a, piain statute *f the United -Skates, as well as plate treaty »*>U- 
,jfla»Ttoaa, internatioraal usages and constitutional taw> and baa done so under 
pretence of ex ecu ting a .great public policy which could have been more -easily 
~ Mbed iawfluUy. constitutionally and -with honor. 

It Corned strained and unnatural constructions upon statatni, usurping judi- 
ffiial 4nte>rpreiatioas and substituting Congresstonal ^enactment 

It withdrew from Congress their customary duties of investigation which 
3**w ,bere*e*»n» an**© *»e ffepraaentaUve* .of tne people and the states tao terror 
-of evildoers. 

*t con i nnt e d a *wxretlyie inTfwtdgation *f its own and boasted *f a few 
sample convictions, while it threw a broad coverlet over the bureaus which had 
feasn their -cbaaem Jfleld of operative abuses and kept in power the superior -officers 
eunder whose administration the crimes had been committed. 

It ordered assaults upon some monoixHtes, but, paralyzed by its first victory, 
it Huns out the flag of truce and scried out that it would not "run amuck," 
^leaving its future purposes beclouded by its vacillations. 

OoaftiMtiatr <he campaign upon this declaration of our principles and pur- 
panea, *re Jnvoka tar our candidates the .support, not only of our great and time 
fensoced organisation, nut also the nctl\« assistance of all of our fellow citizens, 
•who, disregarding past differences, desire the perpetuation of our constitutional 
{government as framed and established by the fathers of the Republic. 

PROHIBITION. 

Tfca ProfciMtlon National Convention met in Indianapolis on June 2t-W. 
Stemar X* Castle. 4>f Pittsburg, was made temporary chairman, and A. G. Wolfen- 
tetlV, «f Omaha* permanent chairman of the convention. On June 30, kieu- 
Xaaant Genaral -Nelson A. Miles having declined to stand as a Presidential candi- 
•date. .Silas C Swallow, of Pennsylvania, was neaninated for President. George 
W. Carroll, of texaa, was nominated for Viee-Prcsident. 

Hn© Platform, 

TTtie platform, adopted on Jnino 1H>, was as follows: 

Ttre widely prevailing system of the licensed and legalized sale of alcoholic 
(beverages la «© rnintwas to individual interests, so inimical to public welfare, so 
■de s tructive to national wealth, and so subversive to the rights 
wf great masses of our citizenship, that the destruction of the 
traffic Is and for years nas been the most important question in 
American politics. 

We iSenwmoa the lack of statesmanship «xhwrted fcy' the leafterg of the 
IDeiODcratie and Republican parties in their refusal to recognize the paramount 
importance vf this question and the cowardice with which the leaders of these 
parties have -caw-ted the favor of those whose selfish interests are advanced by 
thn c on t l n u afiton and augmentation of the traffic, until to-day the Influence of the 
Mqtmr traffic practically dominates national. State and local government through - 
iont the •natron. 

We daeinre *ne truth, •fleTnonstratHl ny the experience of naif a century, that I 
s.U methods of dealing with the liquor traffic which recognize its right to exist, 
da any form, wider any system .of license, or tax, or regulation, have proved 
ponrertea* ft* remove its evils and as useless as checks on its .growth, while the 
*a«lgnlAcant pubHc revenues which have accrued therefrom have scared the 
public conscience against a recognition of its iniquity. 

We «aM public attention to the fact, proved by the experience of more than 
fifty years, thai to secure the enactment and enforcement of prohibitory ieglsla- 
<ta»n, in wnlch alone lies hope of the protection of the people from the liquor 
traffic, it is necessary that the legislative, executive and judicial branches of the 
.government should -be In the hands of a political party in harmony with the 
prohibition principles and pledged to its embodiment in laws and to the execu- 
tion of those lawn. 

We pledge the Prohibition party, wherever given power by the suffragB of 
thn people, to the enactment and enforcement of laws prohibiting and abolishing 
thn manufacture, Importation, transportation and sale of alcoholic beverages. 

We declare that there is not only no other isaue of equal importance before 
the American people to-day, but that the .so-called issues on which the Demo- 
cratic and Republican parties seek to divide the electorate of the country are in 
large ©art aublcrfujres under the cover of which ttey wrangle for the spoils of 
office. 

fiteoe&ttlzlRg" that the intelligent voters of the country may properly ask our 
Attitude on other Questions of public concern, we declare ourselves in favor of: 

"Pen impartial enforcement of all law. 

The .safeguarding of the .people's rights by a rigid application of the princi- 
ples of justice to All combinations and organizations of capital and labor. 

A. more Intimate relation between the people and govern- 
Otn*r Dedbuea- «ment by a wise adaptation of the principle of the initiative and 
Uoua of Policy., rbf trend urn . 

The safeguarding to every citizen in *very place under the 
ig&vernroent nf ithe people of the United states ©f all the rights guaranteed Jay 
the laws and the Constitution. 

International arbitration; and we declare that our nation sbouM contribute 



I 



17« NATIONAL. PARTY PLATFORMS. 



In every manner, consistent with national dignity, to the permanent establish- 
ment of peace between all nations. 

The reform of our divorce laws, the final extirpation of polygamy, and the 
total overthrow of the present shameful system of illegal sanction of the social 
evil (with its unspeakable traffic in girls) by the municipal authorities of almost 
all our cities. 

We declare ourselves in favor of recognition of the fact that the right of 
suffrage should depend on the mental and moral qualification of the citizens. 

We declare ourselves In favor of such changes in our laws as will place tariff 
schedules in the hands of an omnlpartlsan commission. 

We declare ourselves in favor of the application of uniform laws for all our 
oountry and dependencies. - s ' 

We declare ourselves In favor of the extension and honest administration of 
the civil servioe laws. 

We declare ourselves in favor of the election of United States Senators by 1 
vote of the people. • 



SOCKAXIST. 

The Socialist National Convention met in Chicago May 4-6. On May 5 Ehigeae 
V. Debs, of Indiana, was nominated for President, and Benjamin Hanford, of 
New-York, was nominated for Vice-President. Both nominations were made 
unanimously. 

The Platform. 

The platform, adopted on May 6, was as follows: 

We, the Socialist party. In convention assembled, make our appeal to the 
American people as the defender and preserver of the idea of liberty and self- 
government, m which the nation was born; as the only political 
Party movement standing for the programme and principles by which 

Fundamentals, the liberty of the individual may become a fact; as the only 
political organisation that is democratic, and that has for Its pur- 
pose the democratising of the whole of society. 

To this 4dea of liberty the Republican and Democratic parties are equally 
false. They alike struggle for power to maintain and profit by an Industrial sys- 
tem which can be preserved only by the complete overthrow of such liberties as 
we already have, and by the still further enslavement and degradation of labor. 

Our American Institutions came into the world in the name of freedom. 
They have been seized upon by the capitalist class as the means of rooting out 
the idea of freedom from among the people. Our State and national legislatures 
have become the mere agencies of great propertied interests. These interests, con- 
trol the appointments and decisions of the judges of our courts. They have come 
into what is practically a private ownership of all the functions and forces of 
government. They are using these to betray and conquer foreign and weaker 
peoples, in order to establish new markets for the surplus goods which the people 
make, but are too poor to buy. They are gradually so invading and restricting the 
right of suffrage as to take unawares the right of the worker to a vote or voice 
in public affairs. By enacting new 'and misinterpreting old laws, they are pre- 
paring to attack the liberty of the Individual even to speak or think for himself 
or for the common good. 

By controlling all the sources of social revenue, the possessing class Is able 
to silence what might be the voice of protest against the passing of liberty and 
the coming of tyranny. It completely controls the university and public school, 
the pulpit and the press, and the arts and literatures. By making these econom- 
ically dependent upon itself, it has brought all the forms of public teaching Into 
servile submission to its own interests. 

Our political institutions are also being used as the destroyers of that In- 
dividual property upon which all liberty and opportunity depend. The promise of 
economic independence to each man was one of the faiths upon which our institu- 
tions were founded. But under the guise of defending private property, capital- 
ism is using our political institutions to make it impossible for the vast majority 
of human beings to ever become possessors of private property in the means of Ufa 

Capitalism is the enemy and destroyer of essential private property. Its 

development is through the legalized confiscation of all that the labor of the 

working class produces above its subsistence-wage. The private 

Capitalism ownership of the means of employment grounds society in an 

ana Socialism* economic slavery which renders intellectual and political tyranny 

inevitable. 

Socialism comes so to organize Industry and society that every individual 
shall be secure in that private property in the means of life upon which his 
liberty of being, thought and action depend. It comes to rescue the people from 
the fast increasing and successful assault of capitalism upon the liberty of the 
individual. 

As an American Socialist party, we pledge our fidelity to the principles of 
international socialism, as embodied in the united thought and action of the 
Socialists of all nations. In the Industrial development already accomplished, the 
interests of the world's workers are separated by no national boundaries. The 
condition of the most exploited and oppressed workers, in the most remote places 
of the earth, inevitably tends to drag down all the workers of the world to the 
same level. The tendency of the competitive wage system is to make labor's 
lowest condition the measure or rule of its universal condition. Industry and 



NATIONAL PARTY PLATFORMS. 177 



finance are no longer national but international, in both organization and results. 
The chief significance of national boundaries and of the so-called patriotisms 
which the ruling class of each nation is seeking to revive is the power, which 
these give to capitalism to keep the workers of the world from uniting and to 
throw them against each other in the struggles of contending capitalist interests 
for the control of the yet unexploited markets ol the world, or the remaining 
sources of profit. 

The Socialist movement therefore is a world movement. It knows of no con- 
flicts of interest between the workers of one nation and the workers of another. 
It stands for the freedom of the workers of all nations ; and, in so 
A World standing, it makes for the full freedom of all- humanity. 
Movement. The Socialist movement owes its birth and growth to that econom- 

ic development or world process which is rapidly separating a 
working or producing class from a possessing or capitalist class. The class that 
produces nothing possesses labor's fruits, and the opportunities and enjoyments 
these fruits afford, while the class that does the world's real work has Increasing 
economic uncertainty and physical and intellectual misery for its portion. 

The fact that these two classes have not yet become fully conscious of their 
distinction from each other, the fact that the lines of division and interest may 
not yet be clearly drawn, does not change the fact of the class conflict. 

This class struggle is due to the private ownership of the means of employ- 
ment, or the tools of production. Wherever and whenever man owned his own 
land and tools, and by them produced only the things which he used, economic 
independence was possible. But production, or the making of goods, has long 
ceased to be Individual. The labor of scores, or even thousands, enters into 
almost every article produced. Production is now social or collective. Practically 
everything is made or done by many men — sometimes separated by seas or con- 
tinents — working together for the same end. But this co-operation in production 
is not' for the direct use of the things made by the workers who make them, but 
for the profit of the owners of the tools and means of production; and to this is 
due the present division of society into two distinct classes; and from it have 
sprung all the miseries, inharmonies and contradictions of our civilization. 

Between these two classes there can be no possible compromise or identity 
of interests, any more than there can be peace in the midst of war, or light in 
the midst of darkness. A society based upon this class division carries in itself 
the seeds of its own destruction. Such a society is founded in fundamental in- 
justice. There can be no possible basis for social peace, for individual freedom, 
for mental and moral harmony, except in the conscious and complete triumph of 
the working class as the only class that has the right or power to be. 

The Socialist programme is not a theory imposed upon society for its accept- 
ance or rejection. It is but the interpretation of what is, sooner or later, inevi- 
table. Capitalism is already struggling to its destruction. It is no 
Trusts and longer competent to organize or administer the work of the world, or 
Socialism, even to preserve itself. The captains of industry are appalled at 
then* own • inability to control or direct the rapidly socializing forces 
of industry. The so-c%lled trust is but a sign and form of the developing social- 
ization of the world's work. The universal Increase of the uncertainty of em- 
ployment, the universal capitalist determination to break down the unity of labor 
in the trades unions, the widespread apprehensions of Impending change, reveal 
that the institutions of capitalist society are passing under tfee power of inhering 
forces that will soon destroy them. 

Into the midst of the strain and crisis of civilization the Socialist movement 
comes as the only saving or conservative force. If the world is to be saved from 
chaos, from universal disorder and misery, it must be by the union of the work- 
ers of all nations in the Socialist movement. The Socialist party comes with the 
only proposition or programme for intelligently and deliberately organizing; the 
nation for the common good of all its citizens. It is the first time that the mind 
of man has ""ever been directed toward the conscious organization of society. 

Socialism means that all those things upon which the people in common de- 
pend shall by the people in •common be owned and administered. It means that 
the tools of employment shall belong to their creators and users; that all produc- 
tion shall be for the direct use of the producers; that the making of goods for 
profit shall com© to an end; that we shall all be workers together, and that op- 
portunities shall be open and equal to all men. 

To the end that the workers may seize every possible advantage that may 
strengthen them to gain complete control of the powers of government, and 
thereby the sooner establish the co-operative commonwealth, the So- 
Party cialist party pledges Itself to watch and work in both the economic and 
Pledges, the political struggle for earh successive immediate interest of the 
working class; for shortened days of labor and increases of wages; for 
the insurance of the workers against accident, sickness and lack of employment; 
for pensions for aged and exhausted workers; for the public ownership of the 
means of transportation, communication and exchange; for the graduated taxa- 
tion of incomes, inheritances, and of franchise and land values, the proceeds to 
be applied to public employment and bettering the conditions of the workers' 
children, and their freedom from the workshop; for the equal suffrage of men 
and women; for the prevention of the use of the military against tabor in the 
settlement of strikes; for the free administration of justice; for popular govern- 
ment, including initiative, referendum, proportional representation and the recall 
of officers by their constituents; and for every gain or advantage for the workers 



118 



NATIONAL, PARTY PLATFORMS. 



that may be wrested from the capitalist system, and that may relieve tire suffer- 
ing and strengthen the hands of labor., We lay upon every man elected' tK» any 
executive' or legislative office the first duty of striving to procure- whatever is tor 

[the workers* most immediate- interest, and for whatever win lessen; the economic: 
and political powers of the capitalist and increase the like powers of the worker.. 
But, in so doing; we are using these remedial measures as- mjeans to the one- 
great end .of the co-operative commonwealth. Such measures of reWef as we 
may be able to force from capitalism are but a preparation of the worker* to- 
seize the whole powers of government, in order that they may thereby lay hold 
of the whole system of industry, and thus come into their rtgh-tfoT Inheritance. 

To this end we pledge ourselves, as the party- of the working class, to use adk 
political power, as fast as it shall be intrusted to us by our feflo-w workers, bob. 
for their immediate interests and" for their ultimate and* coropJete emancipation. 
To this end we appeal to all the workers of America* and to* att who will lend? 
their lives to the service of the workers m their struggle to gain then* ewn„ and! 
to all who will nobly and disinterestedly give- their days and. energies unfa tim 
workers' cause, to cast their lot and faith with the Boclalist psarty. Our appeal 
for the trust and suffrages of our fellow workers is at ones an appear twr tftwtr 
common good* and freedom, and" for the freedom and" blossoming of otir common? 
humanity. In pledging ourselves, and thb.se we represent, tor be fadthftri' te» the. 
appeal which we make, we believe that we. are but preparing* «Be soil' of I9ta- 

I economic freedom from which will spring; the freedom of the wooSe man; 



FOPTTfilST. 

The Populist National Convention met at Springfield; m„ on Jolyr 4. I*. H. 
Weller. of Iowa, was elected temporary chairman, and J. M. Ma.llett<*» of Texas, 
permanent chairman. On July 5 Thomas E. Watson* of Georgia* was nominated 
for President on the first ballot. The vote stood 334 for Watson. frlff for William 
V. Allen, of Nebraska, and 45 for Frank H. Williams,, of Illinois: After some 
changes to Watson he was declared the unanimous choice of the convention. T_ 
B Tibbies, of Nebraska* was nominated for Vice-President. He received on Wis 
first ballot 453 votes, to 74'$ for George P. Burnnam, of Massachusetts; and 53% 
for Theodore B, Rynder,. of Pennsylvania, 

The Platform. 
Th# platform, adopted on July 5, was as follows: 

The People's party reaffirms its adherence to the basic truths of the Omaha 
\ platform of 1892, and; of the subsequent platforms of 1896 and 1900. In- session 
in its fourth national convention on July 4, 1904, in the city of Sprincfterd> I1X,. it 
draws inspiration from the day that saw the birth of the nation as well as itsi 
own birth as a party, and also, from the soul of him who lived at its present 
place of meeting. We renew our allegiance to the old fashioned American spirit 
that gave this nation existence a,nd made it distinctive among the peoples of the. 
earth. We again sound the keynote of the Declaration of Independence that ail 
men are created equal in a political sense, which was the sense in which that in- 
strument, being a political document, intended that the utterance should be under- 
stood. We assert that the departure from this fundamental truth is responsible 
for the ills from which we suffer as a nation, that the giving at speeiaF privileges' 
to the few has enabled them to dominate the many, thereby fending tor destroy 
the political equality which is the cornerstone of democratic government. 

We ealT for a return to the truths of the fathers, and we vigorously pro- 
test against the spirit of Mammonism and of thinly veiled monarchy that is fn- 
vading- certain sections of our national life, and of the very ad- 
Slilitarisnw ministration itself. This is a nation of peace, and 8 we deplore the 
appeal to the spirit of forcer and militarism which is shown in HI 
advised and vainglorious boasting and in more harmful ways in the denial «f 
the rights of man under martial raw. 

A politica.1 democracy and an industrial" despotism cannot exist side by sfder. 
and nowhere is this truth more plainly shown than in the gigantic transportation: 
monopolies which have bred all sorts of kindred" trusts, sub- 
TYnn sport at ion verted the governments of many ol the States, and established 
Monopoly. their official agents In the national government. We submit 

that it is better for the government to own the railroads than, 
for the railroads to own the government, and that one or the other alternative 
. seems inevitable. 

: We call the attention of our fallow citizens to the fact that the surrender 

of both of the old parties in corporative influences leaves the People's party the' 
only party of reform in the nation. 

Therefore we submit the following platform «f principle* f» the Annwkaini 
people: . * 

The issuing of money is a function of government, an* should never toe- 
delegated to corporations or individuals. The Constitution gives to Congress 

alone power to issue money and regulate its vahae. 
Money and Banks. We therefore demand that all money shalt be issued fcy- 

the government in such quantity as shall maintain a sta- 
bility in prices, every dollar to be full legal tender, none of which shall be? a 
debt redeemable in other money. 

We demand that postal savings banks be established by the* government for 
the safe deposit of the savings of the- people. 

vy> i^ijpvo in th«» ri«*ht of labor to organize for the benefit sa£ proteetfO T fc 



NATIONAL PARTY PLATFORMS. 



179 



o* those who toil; and pledge the efforts of the People's party to preserve this 
right inviolate. Capital is organized and has no right to deny 
Labor Questions, to labor the privilege which it claims tor itself. We feel that 
intelligent organization of labor is essential; that it raises the 
standard of workmanship, promotes the efficiency, intelligence, independence and 
character of the wage earner. We believe with Abraham Lincoln that labor is 
prior to capital, and is not its slave, but its companion, and we plead for that broad 
spirit of toleration and justice which will promote Industrial peace through the 
observance of the principles of voluntary arbitration. 

We favor the enactment of legislation, looking to the improvement of con- 
ditions for wage earners, the abolition of child labor, the suppression of sweat 
shops and of convict labor in competition with free labor, and 'the exclusion 
from American shores of foreign pauper labor. 

We favor the shorter workday, and declare that if eight hours constitutes 
a day's labor In government service, eight hours should constitute a day's labor 
in factories, workshops and mines. 

As a means of placing all public questions directly under the control of the 
people, ^ we demand that legal provision be made under which the people may 
exercise the Initiative, referendum and proportional representation and direct 

vote for all public officers with the right of recall. 
Initiative and Land, including all the natural sources of wealth, is a herl- 

Refereadum. tage of all the people, and should not be monopolized for specu- 
lative purposes, and alien ownership of land should be prohibited. 

We demand a return to the original interpretation of the Constitution and a 
fair and Impartial enforcement of laws under, it, and denounce government by 
injunction and imprisonment without the right of trial by jury. 

To prevent unjust discrimination and monopoly the government should own 

and control the railroads and those public utilities which in their nature are 

monopolies. To perfect the postal service, the government should 

Government own and operate the general telegraph and telephone systems and 

Ownership, provide a parcels post 

As to those trusts and monopolies which are not public utili- 
ties or natural monopolies we demand that those special privileges which they 
now enjoy, and which alone enable them to exist, should be immediately with- 
drawn. Corporations, being the creatures of government, should be subjected to 
such governmental regulations and control as will adequately protect the public. 
We demand the taxation of monopoly privileges, while they remain in private 
hands, to the extent of the value of the privileges granted. 

We demand that Congress shall enact a general law uniformly regulating the 
power and duties of all incorporated companies doing interstate business. 

SOCIALIST LABOR. 

The Socialist Labor National Convention met in New-York City on July 6 and 
nominated Charles H. Corregan, of New-York, for President, and William W. Cox, of 
Illinois, for Vice-President. 

Platform. 

The Socialist Labor Party of America, in convention assembled, reasserts 
the inalienable right of man to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. 

We hold that the purpose of government is to secure to every citizen the 
enjoyment of this right; but taught' by experience we hold furthermore that 
such right Is illusory to the majority of the people, to wit, the working class, 
under the present system of economic inequality that Is essentially destructive 
of thetr life, tbeir liberty and their happiness. 

• We hold that the true theory of politics is that the machinery of govern- 
ment must be controlled by the whole people: but again taught by experience 
we hold furthermore that the true theory of economics is that the means of 
production must likewise be owned, operated and . controlled by the people in 
oommon. Man cannot exercise his right. of life, liberty and the pursuit of hap- 
piness without the ownership of the land and the tool with which to work. 
Deprived of these, his life, his liberty and his fate fall into the hands of the 
class that owns those essentials for work and production. 

We hold that the existing contradiction between the theory of democratic 
government and the fact of a despotic economic system — the private ownership 
- of the natural and social opportunities — divides the people Into- two 

A Struggle classes: The Capitalist Class and the Working Class; throws society 
of Classes. Into the convulsions of the class stiuggle; and perverts government 
to the exclusive benefit of the capitalist class. 

Thus labor Is robbed of the wealth which it alone produces. Is denied the 
means of self-employment, and, by compulsory idleness in wage slavery, is 
even deprived of the necessaries of life. 

Against such a system the Socialist Labor Party raises the banner of re 
volt, and demands the unconditional surrender of the capitalist class. 

The time is fast coming when in the natural course of social evolution, 
this system, through the destructive action of its failures and crises, on the 
one hand, and the constructive tendencies of its trusts and other capitalist com- 
binations, on the other hand, will have worked out its own downfall. 

We, therefore, call upon the wage workers of America to organise under 
the banner of the Socialist Labor Party into a class conscious body, aware of 
Its rights and determined to conquer them. • 









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_ 1 



NATIONAL PARTY ORGANIZATIONS. 



18! 



State or Ter. Member. P. O. address. 

Nov. — John H. Dennis. Reno. 

N. H.— True U Korrta, Portsmouth. 

N. J. — William B. Qourley, Peterson, 

N. Y. — Norman E. Mack,' Buffalo. 

N. C. — Josephus Daniels, Raleigh. 

N. Dak.— H. D. Aliert. Langdon. 

Ohio. , 

Ore.— Frederick V. Holman, Portland. 

Penn.— J. M. OMfey. Pittsburg. 

R. L — Georee W. Greene. Weonsocket. 

S. C. — B. R. Tillman. Trenton. 

& D. — E. 8. Johnson. Armour. 



■R. B. I,. Mouotcastle, KnoxvtDe. 
Tex. — B. M. Johnston. Houston. 



State or Ter. Member. P. O. address, 
Utah.— D. EL Peery. Salt Lake. 
Vu— Bradley B. Smalley, Burlington, 
Va. — J. Taylor EUysoa, Richmond. 
Wash.— John Y. Terry. Seattle. 
W. Va,— John T. McQraw. Grafton. 
Wis. — Timothy E. Ryan. Waukesha, 
Wyo. — John E. Osborne, Rawllngs. 
Alaska.— Arthur J. DaJany. Juneau. 
Ariz. — Ben M. Crawford, Clifton. 
Diet, of Col.— James L. Norrls. Washing**. 
Hawaii. — Palmer P. Woods, Mahukoma. 
.Indian Ter.— R. L. Williams, Darant. 
N. M. — H. B. Ferguson. Albuquerque* 
Okla.— Richard A. Btttapa, OordelL 
Porto Rico. — D. M. Field, Guajrama. 



prohibition. 

les R. Jones, The Temple, H&. 18* La 
SnAe St„ Chicago. UL. chairman; A. G. WoHenbarger, Lincoln, Nab., vice-chairman; 
W. G. Culderwood, Sykes Block, Minneapolis, Mtaa.; secretary, Mix T. MeWhirter, 
Indianapolis, lad., treasurer; A. A. Stevens, Tyrone, Penn.; Samuel Dickie, Albton* 
Mloh.; F. C. Heuirickson, Cumberland, Md. 

Members off the Committee. 
State or Ter. Member. P. O. address. State or Ter. Member. P. Q. address. 

Ark.— John M. Parker. Dardaaeli*; H. 

Brady. Beebe. 
Cal — A. B, Taynten. Oakland; Fred F. 

Wheeler. Lob Angeles. 
OoL — John Hipp and J. N. ScoaHcr, Den- 
vet 
Conn. — Fre deric k G, Piatt and Charles EL 

Steele, New-Britain. 
Dei.— George W. Todd and Aflaton R. 

Tatum, Wilmington. 
Fla.— A. Lu Isler. Ooala; Francis Troe- 

blood. Bradentowa. 
Idaho— SHae S. Gray, atari Herbert A. 

Lee. Weiser. 
fB.— -OWrer W. Stewart, Chicago: Frank 

S Regan. Rock ford 
lad.— F. T. McWMrter. Indfana pells: 

Charles Bnfcfcart, Auburn, 
Iowa— A. Tj. coats. Port; Malcolm 

Smith. Cedar Rapids. 
Kan.— Barle ft DeLay. Smaoria; T. D, 

Talmadge, Hutchinson. 
By.— T. B. Demaree, Nicholas vlile; Dr. 

J. D. Smith. Paducah. 
Me. — VWney B. Cashing. Bangor; Nathan 

F. Woodbury, Auburn. 
Md. — Finley C. Hendrlckson, Cumberland; 

John N. Parker. Baltimore. 
Mass.— John B. Lewis, Jr., Reading; Her- 
bert a Morley. Baidwinvitle. 
Mica.— Samuel Dtekle, Albion; Fred W. 

Corbet t, Adrian. 
Minn. — Rernt B. Haugan. Fergus Palis; 

George W. Hlggins. Minneapolis. 
Mo.— Charles B. Stokes, Kansas City; 

H. P. Faris, Clinton. 
Neb. — L. O. Jones and A. Q. Wolfeu- 

borger, Lincoln. 
N. H. — Ray C. Durgln, Nashua; L. F. 

Richardson, Peterboro. 



N. J.Woe! G. Tan Clse. fsuntnit; 
H_ Nicholson. Haddenueld. 

N. Y.— William T. WardweH, New-York; 
J. H. Durkea, Rochester. 

N. C.— Edwin Sharer, Salisbury; J. M. 

Templeton. Cary. 
N. Dak.— Theo. B. Ostluad, Hlllsboro; 

M. H. Kiff. Tower City. 
Ohio— 6. F. MacLane, Toledo; Robert 

Candy, Columbus. 
Ore, — B. F. Ramp, Brooke. 

more. Brownsville. 
Penn. — Charles K. Jones, Pfciladfrlpnla; A, 

A. Stevens, Tyrone, 
ft. C— Henry B. Meteair, Pawtticket; 

Smith Qulraby. Hills Grove, 
8. Dak. — C. V. Templeton, Wooasooket; 

C. B. Hopkins. Brookicga. 
Team.— James A. Tate, Harriman; Ma). 

A. D. Reynolds, Bristol. 
Tex.— J. V. Cranfili, Dallas; J. G. Adams, 

Fort Worth. _ 

Vt.— The Rev. W. T. Miller. Grand Isle; 

Fred L. Page, Barre. 
Va. — G. M. Smithdeal, Richmond; James 

W. Bodley. Staunton. 
Wash.— R. B. Dunlan, Seattle; W. BL 

Roberta. Latah. 
W. Va. — T. R. Carskadoa. Keyser; U. A. 

Clayton. Salrmpnt. 
Wis.— J. B. Clayton, Milwaukee; Alfred 

Gabrielson, Eau Claire. 
Wyo. — Lemuel L. Laughlln. Toltec; Dr. 

C. J. Sawyer, Laramie. 
Ari.— Frank J. Sibley, Tucson; Prof. J. C 

Waason. Phoenix. 
Okla. — Charles Brown. Cherokee; the Rev. 

J. M. Monroe. Oklahoma City. 



POPULIST. 
Officers of the National Committee.— Chairman, James H. FerrisK. 

Joliet. 11L; Woe-chairman. W. S. Morgan. Hardy. Ark.; secretary. Charles Q. De 
France, Lincoln. Neb.; treasurer. Georg* F. Washburn. Boston. Mass. 

Executive Committee*— J. A. Parker. Louisville.. Ky. : J. H. fidmisten 
Lincoln. N^b.: J. II. Culderhead, Helena. Mont.; Paul J. Dixon. Chtllicothe. Mo.; J. X 
Edgerton. East Orange, N. J.; Milton Park, Dallas, Tex.; B. S. Waterbury, Em- 
poria, Kan. 



NATIONAL. TARTY ORGANIZATIONS. 



Members of the Committee. 



State or Ter. Member. P. O. 
Ate.— J. Gilbert Johnson, Orrville; J. A. 

Hurst, WaHrot Grove; J. P. Pearson, 

Columbiana. 
Ark.— A. W. File*. Little Rock; J. E. 

ficanlan. Bee Branch; W. S. Morgan, 

Hardy. 
CaL— D. P. Rice, Occidental; A. J. Jones, 

Parlier; Robert Shetterly, SpenceviUe. 
Col.— E. B. T. Hazen, Hdyoke; R. H. 

Northcott. Akron: A. B. Gray, Denver. 
Conn. — T. L. Thomas, Forestville; Wa 

W. Wheeler. Meriden. 
Del.— Henry Jones, Wilmington. 
Fla.— W. R. Shields, Blountstown; W. F. 

Woodford, Farmdale; D. L. McKinnon, 

Marian na. 
Ga. — W. F. McDaniel, Cony era; A. J. 

Burnett, Carrol ton; C. 8. Barrett, 

Thomaston, 
Idaho. -^Harry Watkins, Boise; R. D. 

Jones. Bonner* Ferry; E. E. Cox, New- 
Plymouth. ^ „ 
HI. -^Joseph Hopp, Chicago- A. C Van 
'Tine, Flora: J. S. Felter, Springfield. 
Ind.— Samuel W. Williams, Vlncezmes; 

John H. Caldwell, Lebanon; Fred J. S. 

Robinson. Cloverland. 
Iowa. — L. H. Weller, Nashua; J. R. Nor- 
man, Alb la; & M. Harvey, Dee Moines, 
Kan. — F, B. Lawrancet Eldorado; the 

Rev. O. H. Truman, Abilene; J. A. 

Wright. Smith Center. - 
Ky. — Jo A. Parker, Louisville; Joe A. 

Bradburn, Louisville; A. H. Cardin, 

View. 
La.— Leland M. Gafce, Longstreet; J. W. 

Burt, Slmsboro; William McHenry, 

Me.— L. W. Smith, Vinalhaven; Albion 

Gates, Carroll: John White, Levant. 
Md.— F. A. Naille, Henry F. Magneas and 

Frank H. Jones, Baltimore. 
Mass. — Geo. F. Washburn), Boston; E. 

Gerry Brown, Brockton; Dr. P. P. 

Field. Boston. 
Mich.— James E. McBrlde, Grand Rapids; 

Edward 6. Grece, Detroit; Mrs. Marion 

Todd, Springport. 
Miss. — R. Hrewcr, Aubrey; Abe Stein- 

berger, Okolona; J. H. Simpson, Watson. 
Minn. — A. M. Morrison. Mankato; Thomas 

J. Meighen. Forest ville; A. H. Nelson, 

Minneapolis. 
Mo.— J. T. Poison, LaClede; A. M. BaHew, 

Hale: A. E. Nelson, St. Louis. 
Mont. — J. H. Calderhead, Helena; William 

Clancy. Butte; Abram Hall, Miles City. 
Neb. — James T. Brady, Albion; Elmer E. 

Thomas. Omaha; C. Q. De -France, Lin- 
coln. 



State or Ter. Member. P. O. address. 
Nov.— Harry P. Beck, Virginia City; New- 
ton Richards. J. B. McCullotigh, Reno. 
N. H. — George Howie* Philippe Garon, 

Manchester; Dor ranee J&, Currier. Han- 
over. 
N. J.— J. A. Edgerton, East Orange; Geo. 

L. Spence, Atlantic City; John S. De 

Hart. Jersey City. 
N. Y.— Frank S. Johnston. Schenectady; 

Darwin Forrest, Green Island; M. G. 
. Palliser. New-York. 
N. C.— A. C. Shuford, Newton; James B. 

Lloyd. Tarboro; J. P. Soasaman, Char- 
lotte. 
N. Dak.— W. H. Standlsh, Grand Forks; 

John Mostul, Leonard; Thomas Stanley 

Hamilton. 
Ohio.— Hugo Preyer. Cleveland; Dr. R. 

H. Reemelin. Cincinnati; William AUer- 

ton. Alliance. 
Ore.— James K. Sears, McCoy; P. EL 

Phelps. Vale; Dr. J. L. Hill, Albany. 
Peon. — Theot P. Jtynder, Erie; J. P. 

Correll. Eaeton; James A, Fulton, Mo- 

Keesport. 
R. I.— Bartholomew Valette, Bast Provi- 
dence. 
S. C— E. GUstrap. Pickens. 
S. Dak.— John Campbell, Miller; W. C 

Buderus. Stttrgis; William Dailey, Flan- 

dreau. 
Tenn.— A. L. Mims, Antioch; Sid S. Bond, 

Jackson: H. J. Mullens, Franklin. 
Tex.— James W. Biard, Paris; W. D, 

Lewis, Corn Hill; W. R. Cole, Dallas. 
Utah.— S. S. Smith, Ogden; S. G. Delhi, 

Hooper: J. M. Lamb, Vernal 
Vt.— Andrew J. Beebe, Bwantoa. 
Va.— W. H. Tinsley, Salem; V. A. 

Wltcher, RiceviUe; G. T. LoefiSer, Ducat. 
Wash. — Edward Clayson, sr., Seattle; C. 

C. Gibson, Davenport; H. Packard, 

Snohomish. 
W. Va.— a H. Piersol. Parkersmirg; A. 

C. Houston, Union; R. S. Davis, Kirby. 
Wis. — Robert Schilling, Milwaukee; Wm. 

Munro, Superior; Frank Emerson, Oak- 
field. 
Wyo.— D. A. Dilta, Parkman. 
Ariz.— George W. Woy. Glqbe; Albert I*. 

Hensbaw. Phoenix. ' 

Dist. of Col.— Mark Foster, M. A, Boden- 

hamer, Washington. . 
Hawaii. — John M. Horner, Honolulu. 
Ind. Ter.— I. D. Burdick, Fort Gibson: 

John W. Biard. Huge; A. B. Weakley, 
* Comanche. 
N. M.— P. E. Ferguson, Artesia; T. W. 

Watkins. Roswell. 
Okla. — Spencer . E. Sanders, Kingfisher; 

John S. Allan. Norman; Mrs. W. H. 

French, Chandler. 



^SOCIALIST. 

National secretary, J. Mahlon Barnes, No. 269 Dearborn St., Chicago, UL 
National Executive Committee. — Robert Baudlow, Cleveland, Ohio; Victor L» 
Berger, Milwaukee, Wis.; B. Berlyn, Chicago. 111.; William Mailly, Toledo. Ohio; 
S. M. Reynolds, Terre Haute, Ind.; Henry L. Slobodin, No. 280 Broadway, New-York 
City; John M Work, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Members of the Committee. 
State or Ter. Member. P. O. address- 

Ala. — A. J. Larue. Bessemer. 
Ariz. — J. R. Barnette, Globe. 
Ark. — L. W. Lowrey, Little Rock. 
Cal. — Austin Lewis, Lena M. Lewis, San 
Francisco; L. H. Edmtston, Riverside. 



State or Ter. Member. P. O. address. 
Mo.— G. A. Hoehn, St. Louis; E. T. Beb- 

rens, Sedalia. 
Mont. — C. C McHugh, Anaconda.- 
Neb. — George W. Ray. Omaha, 
N. H. — George A. Little, Manchester. 



1 In Wisconsin Social Democratic Party and in Minnesota Municipal Ownership 
Party. 



STATU COMMTTTKB CHAIRMEN. 



IBS 



Col. — A, H. PtoatBn. Collins; Forrest 

Woodside, Colorado Springs, 
Gone.— W. 43. Wfefta, New Haves, 
IRa. — W. R. Healey, Longwood, 
fcdaiso— B. L, jRebk, teeytoura. 
1U.— B. Berlyn, A. M. Sisuano, fteymoar 

Stedraan, Chicago, 
tod.— S. M. R»y»©M*, Torre Unites John 

W. Kel«y, teuton.- 
fawa— John M. Work, W. A, Jacobs, Des 

Moines. 
San. — A. a. MeAiBster. Herring-tons 

George D. Snewer, Oteard. 
Ky, — C. fi. Towner, Newport. 
La. — Wilbur Putnam* Evangeitaa. 
Ma,— Charles L* Fox. No. 1& Fre*«t., 

Portland. 
Mas*.— Howard A. Ofbbs, > Worcester; F. 

H. Wentworth. Swath Haasaa. 
Mien. — C. Q. Lamb, Drydmt; Thos, 2. 

Peach, Graad Rapids. 

M. Holman, Minnaapotlfl. 



N. J. — Henry R. K earns, Arlington; Geo. 
H. Headley, Kearney. 

N. ¥.— Morris HIUquK, N*. 32© Broad- 
way, New York City; John Spargo, 
Yoakers; Ben Hanford, Brooklyn* 

N. Dak.— T, & Larapmaja, Fargo, 

Ohio, — Robert Bandlow* Cleveland. 

Okia,— R. Maschke, Kingfisher. 

Ore. — B. F. Ramp, Brooks. ^ 

Penn. — Joseph Wanhova, ; John 

W. Staycoa, New-Castle. 

R. I.— John H. *ioyd, Pawtucket. 
B. Date. — Samuel Lovett, Aberdeen. 

Tex. — W. E. farmer, Denison. 

Utah— Joseph Gilbert. Salt Lake C«y. 

Vt.— Timothy Sullivan. GcaariteviUe. 

Wash.— O Lund, Spokane; M. j. Ken- 
nedy, Seattle. 

W. Va.— F, A. 7immernai; MeMecneau 

Wis.— Victor L. Berger, C D. Taom*e»Bt 
Milwaukee. 

Wyo.— D. A. Hastings, Cheyaoae. 



socialist labor: 

ffatiettai secretary; Henry Kuhn, Mo. 2-6 Bwade-st» Mew-York City. 



STATE POLITICAL COMMITTEES, 



REPUBLICAN STATE CHAIRMEN. 
M. XiOng. Birmingham. 
Ark.— H. I*. Remmel, Little Rotfc. 
Cal.— William M. Outier, MaryavlilB. 
CuL— JD. B. Wdrtey, Colorado Springs. 
Oettaw— Michael KeneaJar, Stamford 
OdL-4. Frsmklte AUee, Wllasdngam. 
•Ttau— Henry JL Chus*, Gaiaeavme, 
Oa. — W. H. Johnson. Atlanta. 
idato©.— Prank R iSodding, iShoshona. 
Ui.— Roy ©. West, Chicago. 
iofc— -8. P. TH&odrich, indiana$f&U. 
torn.— R. H. Spenca, Mt. Ayr. 
Kan,— W. 8. Stubbs., Lawrence. 
Ky.— C M. Barnett, LouisvMte. 
^ - B, William* Patterson. 



Md. — John *. Hanna, jtel Air. 
•Btw.- -Thprnnii Tasaet, Boston. 
M***,— Gerrtt J. Dieteema. Holland. 
m «b. CohAe HaittUn, -St. Steal. 

1*. W. Cotiias, Jackson. 

, K. ifiedrtavfaaus, SL Loais. 



DEMOCRATIC STATE CHAIRMSQN. 



Mont.— William Lindsay, Gdandtve. 

Neb, — £L C. M. Burgees, Ltaooifi. 

Nev,— George T. Mills, Carson. 

N. H.— Jacob H. ■Qallinger, Coaoavd. 

N. X— Prank CX Brtggs, Trenton. 

N. ¥•— B. a Odell, jr^ Nearourgb. 

N.. a— T. S. Rollins. Greensboro. 

It. Dak.—!.. B. Hanna, F&rgo. 

Ohi©.— Chariest Dick, Akron. 

Ore. — Frank C Baker, Portlaad. 

Penn.— William R. Atidrews, Meadviila. 

R. 1. — £*. E. Holden, Providence. 

S. C— Sdmund H Deas, l^arlingtoau 

S. Dak.— Ftank C^rane, Pierre. 

Tenn.— CL R. MoCaU, Nashville. 

Tex.— Cecil A. Lyons, Sherman. 

Utah.— tJameB H. Anderson, S. Lake Ctty. 

Vt.— T. M. Chapman, Mlddlatour*. 

Va.— C. Blascoro Slemp, Big Stone Gap, 

WaiL- E. B. Palmer, ©aaLUe. 

W. Va.— Elliott Northcott. Parkerabucg. 

Wis.— -W. D. Connor. MUwaukee. 

Wya.--J. A. Van ©ratal. Cheyenne. 



Aia-—H. a D. Manors, Selarn. 
Artc-^O. B. aacdnn. Prescott. 
CaiL— Timothy ApeBacy.. Saa t^ftsdaoow 
CtfL— Wtfton *ntfth. ©enver. 
Coiui.— James J. Walsh. Nor walk. 
tree— Wlilard aaHatmry, ©owe 
«6u— i>. >H. wHatesiac, Jackawavilla. 
Ga.— tt. J. YewnaaaL D»wso»u 
Wsabo.--Chariee H. Jackson, Bods*. 
Sk — Charles Boeschenstein. 'Chicago, 
4nd.— W. H. O'Brien. Lawrencebtu'B;, 
iowa.— S. B. Morrisy. Des M«4«ee. 
IDrti.— William B. Sapp, Topeka. 
Ky.— «- W. Hasjsc LouteWite. 
ta,— S. B, KiTuCtsDfelU, ^ew-Orteana. 
Me.— «. L. Joaes> Waterville. 
Ma. — Murray Vandlver^ Havre de Oraoa. 
Mass. — William P. McNary, Bostoa. 
Mteih. — Edwin 0. Wt>od, Detroit, 
Mkyb — Frank A. Oay. St. Paul. 
Miss.— <1 L. X^raaac, Greenwood. 
Me.— W. H. Evans. SL Louis. 



Mont.— H. L. -Frank. Heleaa. 

Neb.— T. B. Aiten. tlmooln. 

Nev..— James G. Sweeney. Caraea, 

N, H.— P. H, Madlgan. Jr., Conoord. 

N. J..— William B. Oooriey, Paterae*. 
: N. Y.— Cord Meyer, New-York City. 
! N. C— V. m. Simmons, Raleigh. 

N. Dak.— B. S. Brynjolfson, Grand l ^ 

Ohio.— Harvey C Qartoer, Gneeavitte. 
. Ore.— Alex. Sw»ek, Portland, 
n Penn.— J. K. P. HaM, Rldgway. 

R. I.— P. H. Quinn, Providence* 

S. G. — Wtiie Jones, Columbia. 

S. iDak.— John W. Martin, Watertown. 

Tenn. — F. M. Thompson, Chattanooga, 

Tex. — Prank Andrews. Houston. 

Utah.— Simon Bamberger, Salt Lake City. 

V*. — Emory S. Harris, Bennington. 

Va. — J. Taylor Ellyson, Richmond. 

Wash.— J. W. Qoodwin, .Seattle. 

W- Va.— O. S. McKinney, Wheeltog. 

Wia.— A, F. Warden. Milwaukee, 

Wyo. — John S. Hamm. Cheyemw. 



I 



ORGANIZATION OF LEAD ING CHURCHES. 

STATISTICS OF RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



The following table of statistics of the churches In the United States, for 1903, 
was compiled by H. IC Carroll, J A*. T>., and is reproduced by courtesy of "The Chris- 
tian Advocate." The figures are obtained by deducting from the totals for the several 
denominations the returns for missions, etc., in other countries, and this is done to 
make the statistics conform to the United Stated Census of 1900, which is the only 
complete basis of comparison: 



Denominations. 



Net gain for 1904. 



Adventtsts (6 bodies) 

Baptists (13 bodies). 

Brethren (River) (3 bodies) 

Brethren (Plymouth) <4 bodies). 

Catholics (8 bodies) 

Catholic Apostolic 

Chinese Temples 

Christadelphians 

Christian Connection 

Christian Catholic (Dowie) 

.Christian Missionary Association 

Christian Scientists 

Church of God (Wlnebrennarian) 
Church of the New Jerusalem . . 
Communistic Societies (6 bodies) 

Congregationalists 

Disciples of Christ 

Dunkards (4 bodies) 

Evangelical (2 bodies) 

Friends (4 bodies) 

Friends of the Temple 

German Evangelical Protestant, 
German Evangelical Synod.... 

Jews (2 bodies) 

Latter-Day Saints (2 bodies)... 

Lutherans (22 bodies) 

Swedish Evangelical Mission 
Covenant (Wahienstromians) . 

Mennonites (12 bodies) 

Methodists (17 bodies) 

Moravians 

Presbyterians (12 bodies) 

Protestant Episcopal (2 bodies) . 

Reformed (3 bodies) 

Salvation Army . '» - 

Schwenkf eldians 

Social Brethren . . 

Society for Ethical Culture.... 

Spiritualists '. 

Theosophical Society 

United Brethren (2 bodies) 

Unitarians 

Universalists .....••• •••••• 

Independent Congregations 

Grand total in 1904 

grand total in 1903.... 




PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHUBCH. 

-..„ „v,«^/»h has sixty- three dioceses and nineteen missionary jurisdictions in the 
TT^u^qtSes and^en foreign jurisdictions under the care of bishops using the 
«m* I tturlv and I yielding obedience to the constitution of the canons enacted in Gen- 



same Liturgy and yielding 

eral Convention. JaBgon m THB UNITE D STATES. , 

See Cons. See. Cons. 

Alabama— Charles H. Beckwith 1902 Colorado— Charles S. Olmsted. . 1902 

Alaska— Peter Trimble Rowe (miss.)... 1895 Connecticut— Chauncey B. Brewster. .. 1897 

Arizona— John Mills Kendrick (miss.). 1889 Delaware— Leighton Coleman .1888 

Arkansas— William M. Brown .1897 District of Columbia, Washington- 
California— William F. Nichols. . . . . i .1890 Henry Y. Satterlee 1896 

L California, Sacramento— William H. Florida— Edwin Gardner We^d. ...... .1886 

Moreland / (missionary) ......;.... .1899 Florida. South— W. C: Gray, (misa.) . . . 1892 

California , Los Angeleft— J. H.Johngoh.l89C Georgia— C Klnlooh Nelson.../.... . .1892 

J "^-^- — " 184 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 



185 



See. Cons. 
Idaho, Boise— James B. Funsten 
(missionary) 1889 

Illinois— carles P. Anderson 1UU0 

Illinois, Quincy — M. Edward Fawcett.1904 
111., Springfield— George P. Seymour. .1878 

Edward wm. Osborne, coadjutor. . .1904 
Ind., Indianapolis — Jos. M. Francis. . .1889 
Indiana, Michigan City — John Hazen 

White 189C 

Iowa — Theodore N. Morrison 1809 

Kansas— Frank R. Millspaugh 1890 

Kansas. Sallna — Sheldon M. Griswold 

(missionary) 1903 

Kentucky— Charles B. Woodcock 1905 

Ky.. Lexington— Lewis W. BuTton . . . 1890 

Louisiana — Davis Sessums .*. . . 1891 

Maine— Robert Cod Jiian 1900 

Mjtryland— William Paret 1885 | 

Maryland, Easton— William F. Adams. 1875 

Massachusetts— William Lawrence 1893 

Mass.. West— Alexander H. Vinton. . .1902 

Michigan — Charles D. Williams 

Mich., Marquette— G. Mott Williams. .1896 
Mich., Western— «. De N. Gillespie. ..1875 

Minnesota— Samuel C. Edsall 1899 

Minnesota. Duluth — James D. Morri- 
son (missionary) 1897 

Mississippi— Theodore D. Bratton. . . . 1903 

Missouri— Daniel Sylvester Tuttle 186? 

Missouri. Kansas City— Edward R. 

Atwill 1890 

Montana— Leigh R. Brewer 1880 

Nebraska— George Worthington 1885 

Arthur L. Williams, coadjutor 1890 

Nebraska, Laramie — A. R. Graves 

(missionary) 1890 

Nevada, reconstituted with Utah. 
. New-Hampshire— William W. Niles...l870 

New- Jersey — John Scarborough 1875 

New- Jersey, Newark— Edwin S. Lines. 1903 
New-Mexico— John Mills Kendrick 

(missionary) 1889 

New-York— Henry Codman Potter 1883 

David H. Greer, coadjutor 1904 

- N*w-York, Central— Charles T. Olm- 
sted 1902 

New-Tork. Western— Wm. D. Walker. 1883 
New-York, Long Island— Frederick 

Burgees 1902 

New- York. Albany— Wm. C. Doane...l869 

Richard Henry Nelson, coadjutor. ..1904 
North Carolina— Joseph B. Cheshire. . . 1893 

K. C, East— Robert Strange 1905 

North Dakota— Cameron Mann (miss.). 1902 
North Carolina. Ashevllle— Junius M. 

Horner (missionary) 1898 

Ohio— William Andrew Leonard 1889 

Ohio, Southern— Boyd Vincent 1889 



See. Cone. 

Oklahonflt and Indian Territory— F. 

K. Brooke (missionary) 1893 

Oregon— Benjamin Wistar Morris 1868 

Pennsylvania— 0?A William Whi taker: 1869 

Alexander Mackay-Smitii, coadjutor. 1902 

Penn'a., Pittsburg— C. Whitehead 1882 

Pennsylvania, Harrisburg— James H. 

Darlington .1906 

Penn'a.. Central— Sthelbert Talbot. . . .1887 

Rhode Island— Wm. N. McVlckar 1903 

South Carolina— Ellison Capers 1893 

South Dakota— William H. Hare 

(missionary) 1878 

Frederick F. Johnson, coadjutor 1906 

Tennessee— Thomas F. Gaiior 1893 

Texas— George H. Kinsolving 1892 

Texas, Dallas— A. C. Garrett 1874 

Texas, - West— J. S. Johnston 1883 

Utah, Salt Lake— F. S. Spalding, (mis- 
sionary) 1888 

Vermont— Arthur C. A. Hall 1894 

Virginia— Robert A . Gibson 1897 

Virginia, Southern— A. M. Randolph .. 1883 
West Virginia— George W. Peterkin. . .1878 

William L. Gravatt. coadjutor 1899 

Wis.. Milwaukee— I. L. Nicholson ... 1891 

W. W. Webb, coadjutor 

Wis., Fond du Lac— C. C. Graf ton ... 1889 

R. H. Weller, jr„ coadjutor 1900 

Washington, Olympia— Frederic W. 

Keator (missionary) 1902 

Washington. Spokane — Lemuel H. 

Wells (missionary) T 1892 

Wyoming — Reconstituted with Idaho. 
Africa. Cape Palmas — S. D. Ferguson 

(missionary) . .1888 

Shanghai, China— F. R. Graves (mis- 
sionary) 1893 

Hankow, China — Logan H. Roots 

(missionary) 1904 

Tokio, Japan — John McKim (miss.) . . . 1893 
Kioto, Japan— Sidney C. Partridge 

(missionary) 1900 

Philippine Islands — Charles H. Brent 

(missionary) 1902 

Porto Rico — James H. Van Buren 

(missionary) .....; 1902 

Cuba — Hemry'D. Aves (missionary) — 

Mexico— Albion W. Knght (msssion- 

• ary) — 

Channing Moore Williams, late Bishop 

of Yeddo, resigned 1866 

Thomas A. Jagger t late Bishop of 

Southern Ohio, resigned 1875 

Charles C. Penick, late Bishop of 

Cape Palmas, resigned 1877 

S. I. J. •Schereschewsky. late Bishop of 

Shanghai; China, resigned.... 1877 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL OFFICERS. 

BISHOPS. 



2^ 



ii 



Names. 



Born. 



Entered Ministry. 



Conference. |Y'r, 



Residence. 



1872 

1872 

1880 

1880 

1884 

1884 

1884 

1888 

1888 __ 

1888r*>aniel 

1896 Char 

189* Eao-1 

i*oa~ ' 
woo 



Thomas Bowman 

Edward G. Andrews., 
Henry W. Warren..., 

Cyrus T>: Foss 

John M. Walden 

Wiuard F. Mallalleu. 
Charles H. Fowler.., 

John H. Vincent 

James N. FitzGerald. 
___ " ' " Goodsell... 
Charles C. McCabe.., 

Earl Cranston 

David H. Moore ....'. 
John W. Hamilton.., 



July 15, 
Aug. 7. 
Jan. 4, 
Jan. 17, 
Feb. 11, 
Dec. 11, 
Aug. 11. 
Feb. 23, 
July 27, 
Nov. 6, 
Oct. 11, 
Jun* 27, 
Sept. 4. 
Mar. 18, 



1817 
1825 
1831 
1834 
1831 
1828 
1837 
1832 
1837 
1840 
1886 



Baltimore 

Oneida 

New-England. 

New-York 

Cincinnati 

New-England. 
Rock River... 
New-Jersey... 

Newark 

New- York Basl 
Ohio 



1840 Ohio. 

1838 

1846 



Ohio 

Pittstmrr. 



1839 
1848 
1855 
1867 
1858 
1868 
1861 
1853 
1862 
1859 
1860 
1867 
1860 
1866 



East Orange, N. J. 

New-York. 

Denver. 

Philadelphia. 

Cincinnati. 

Auburndale, Mass. 

New-York. 

Indianapolis. 

St. Louis. 

Boston. 

Philadelphia. 

Washington, D. C 

Portland. Ore. 

San Francisco. 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 



METHODIST EPISCO PAL . OFFICERS— BISHOPS— (Continued). 



Names. 



Born. 



Entered Mlu ? st-y. 



Conference. >Y'r. 



2 O 

SMF_ 

19041 Joseph F. Berry J May 13, 1830} Detroit 1 1874 'Huffalo. 

1904' " ~ • ...-■- - i--. - 

1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 



Residence. 



4 1 Henry Spellmeyer 

4 William F. McDowell.. 

4(Jamas W. Bashfcrd... 

{William Burt 

* I Luther B. Wilson 

4 1 Thomas B. Keenly 



Nov. 25, 1847! Newark 18(39 1 Cine. nnatt; 

Feb. 4, 1858; North Ohio... J1.S82J Chicago. 

May 27, lMo;New-England.*jl880!Shanghal. China, 

Oct. 23. lST»2|Ncw-Xork iiastllHhl jZurititt. bwltaeriand. 

Nov. 14, 185(>i Baltimore {1878 (Chattanooga. Toon. 



Junejl2 f 18411 t'hila<ielphl a. . HSOoiBuenos Ayres. 
MISSIONARY BISHOPS. 



18881 James M. Thoburn 

1896] Joseph C. Hartzell 

1900 \ 1 rank W. Warne.. 

1904 Isaiah B. Scott 

19041 William F. Oldham 

1904 John E. Robinson 

1904 j Men Iman C. Harris... 



Mar. 7, 18P.6 Pittsburg 1 18?>8 1 Bombay. India. 

June 1, 1842 Cent. Illinois. 1808{Funchal, Madeira. 
Dec. 31, 1854, Ontario. Can. . 1 1874 JLucknow, India. 

Sept. 30. 1854 t'i ^nnessoe 1 1880 j Aionio via. Lloerla. 

Dec. 15. 1854 Mich. gan j 1S83| Singapore, S. S. 

Feb. 12, 1849 Cent. Illinois. 1874 Caleinta, Ind. 

July 9, 1846' Pittsburg jlbo9 1 Toklo. Japan. 



Agent* of Book Concern. — Homer Eaton and George P. Mains, No. 180 Flfth- 
ave., New-York; H. C. Jennings and Edwin 11. Graham, No. 220 West Fourta- 
at., Cincinnati. 

Euitors.— "Methodist Review," W. V. Kelley, editor; "The Christian Advo- 
cate." J. M. Buckley, editor; James R. Joy, assistant editor; Sunday school pub- 
lication?. J. T. McFarland; "Northern Christian Advocate." Bennett E. Titus, 
Syracuse; "Pittsburg Christian Advocate." C. W. Smith, Pittsburg; "Western 
Christian Advocate," Levi Gilbert; "Der ChristUche Apologete," A. J. Nast; "Haus 
und Herd." Frederick Munz, all at Cincinnati; "Northwestern Christian Advo- 
cate," David D. Thompson, Chicago; "Central Christian Advocate," Claudius B. 
Spencer, Kansas City, Mo.; "California Christian Advocate," F. D. Bovard, San 
Francisco; "Southwestern Christian Advocate," Robert E. Jones. New-Orleans.; 
"Pacific Christian Advocate," D. L. Rader, Portland, Ore.; "Epworth Herald." 
S. J. Herben, Chicago; "World Wide Missions," C. H. Fans, managing editor. 
New-York; "Sandebudet," William Henschen, Chicago. 

Mksionary Society. — President. Bishop Charles H. Fowler; corresponding sec- 
retary, A. B. Leonard; assistant corresponding secretary. H. K. Carroll; recording 
secretary. S. O. Benton; treasurer. Homer Eaton; assistant treasurer, H. C. Jen- 
nings. Cincinnati, Ohio. Offices, No. 150 Flfth-ave., New-York. 

Board of Education. — Corresponding secretary, W. P. Anderson; treasurer, 
J. E. Leaycraft. Offices. No. 150 Flfth-ave., New-York. 

Sunday School Union and Tract Society. — Corresponding Secretary, J. T. Mo- 
Farland; treasurers, S. S. U., J. B. Phillips; Tract Society, George P. Mains. 
Office. No. 150 Fifth-ave., Ne-w-York. 

Hoard of Church Extension. — Corresponding: secretary, J. M. Sing; assist- 
ant corresponding secretary, Robert Forbes; treasurer, Samuel Shaw. Offices, No. 
1,026 Arch-st., Philadelphia. 

Freedmen** Aid and Southern Education Society. — Corresponding secretaries, 
M. C B. Mason and W. P. Thirkieid; treasurer. H, C. Jennings. Offices. No. «s 
West Fourth-st., Cincinnati Ohio. 



OFFICERS AND AGENCIES OF THIS PRESBYTKltlAJf OCwURAL ASSBMBLY. 

The constitution of the Presbyterian Church tn the TJtiKed States of America 
was adopted in 1788, and th« ttrst General Assembly met in 17SS. fh* General 
Assembly embraces the 33 synods and 241 presbyteries of the church, wtaich has a 
total membership of 1. 115.CG2; total contributions last year for missionary and educa- 
tional work and congregational expense*, $18,638,750. The next meeting will be on tho 
third Thursday of May. 1900, at Ues Moines, Iowa. Its officers are: Moderator. Dr. 
James D. Moffat, Washington, Penn.; vice-moderator,, the Hon. John Marshall * Har- 
lan, D. D., Washington, D. C ; stated clerk and treasurer, William H. Roberts, LI*. D., 
No 1.319 Walimt-st., Philadelphia; permanent clerk. William R. NoMe, No. l,*^ 
Linwood-ave., Los Angeles, Cal. Trustees — Pres., John H. Converse, UU D.. Ph*la-j 
de4phia; treas., Frank K. Hippie, UU D., Broad and Chestnut-sta., Philadelphia; soCm 
Dr. Edward B. Hodge. Office, No. 1,319 Walnut-st., Philadelphia. 

Board of Home Missions. — Pres., Dr. D. Stuart Dodge, New-York; sec. I>r. 
Charles L. Thompson; asst. sees., Dr. John Dixon and John Willis Baer; asst. supt. Of 
school work, the Rev. Robert M. Craig; supt. workingmes's department, tfee Rev. 
Charles Stegle; treas., H. C. OHn. Office, No. 156 Fifth-«,v-e.. New-York. Woman's 
Board — j»re3., Mrs. Darwin R. James: sec, Mrs. Ella A, JJoole; treas.. Miss S. F. 
Lincoln. 

Board of Foreign Missions. — Pres., Rev. Dr. George Alexander, Hew-York 
cor. sees.. Dr. Frank F. Ellin* ood, LL. D., Robert E. Speer. Dr. Arthur J. Brown and 
Dr A. Woodruff Halsey; a.sst. sees, home department, Central Section, the Rev. Charles 
E ' Tiradt, Ph. D. ; Sunday Schools, the Rev. Walter Erdinan; East Section, David 
MeConaughy Honorable Educational Secretary. T. P. H. Sailer, Ph. D.; treas., Cnartes 
W Hand. Office. No. 150 Fifth-ave., New-York 

Board of Education. — Pres., Dr. James M. Orowe-H, Philadelphia; oor. see., 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 187 



Dr. Edward B. Hodge; treas., Jacob Wilson. Office, No. 1,319 Walnut-st., Phila- 
delphia. 

Board of Publication and Sabbath School Work. — Pres., the Hon. Robert N. 
Willson, Philadelphia: aec emeritus, Dr. Elijah R. Craven, Li*. D.; sec., Rev. Alex- 
ander Henry; treas,, Rev. Charles T. McMullin; supt. of 8abbath school training, Dr. 
James A. Worden; editorial supt., Dr. James R. Miller; business supt., John H. Scrib- 
ner; manufacturer, Henry P. Scbeetx. Office, No. 1,319 Walnut-st., Philadelphia. 

Board of Church ejection. — Pres., Dr. David Magie, Paterson, N. J.; oor. 
sec., Dr. Btskine N. White; treas., Adam Campbell. Office, No. 156 Fifth-ave., New- 
York. 

Board of Ministerial Relief. — Pres., A. Charles Barclay, Philadelphia; cor. 
sec, Benjamin L. Agnew, LU Du; treas*. Rev. W. W. Heberton. Office, No. 1.3U) 
Walnut-st., Philadelphia. 

Board of Missions for Freedmen. — Pres., Dr. Samuel J. Fisher, Pittsbtirg, 
Penn.; cor. sec. and treas., Dr. Bdward P. Cowan, Pittsburg, Penn.; field sec., Dr. 
Henry T. McClelland. Office, No. 104 Slxth-at., Pittsburg. 

College Board. — Pres. emeritus, Herrick Johnson, LL. D., Chicago; pros.. Dr. 
Robert Mackenzie, New- York; sec.. Dr. James Stuart Diebrou; office sec. and asst. 
treas.. Dr. Bdward C. Ray, New-York. Office, No. 158 Flfth-ave., New-York. 

Special Committee on Systematic Beneficence. — Chairman, Dr. David G. 
Wylie, No. 10 West 96th-et., New-York; sec, William H. Hubbard, LI* D„ Auburn, 
N. Y.; treas., John Sinclair, No. 1 Broadway, New-York. 

Permanent Committee on Temperance. — Chairman and treas., Wimam C. Lil- 
ley, P. O. Box 316. Pittsburg; cor. sec., Dr. John F. HilL Conestoga Building, Pitts- 
burg. 

Permanent Committee on Young People's Societies. — Chairman, Rev. John 
Timothy Stone, Baltimore, Md. ; sec., J. Hugh B. MacCauley, Trenton, N. J.; treas., 
T. A. Wallace, 256 Broadway, New-York. 

"Assembly Herald" Managing Committee* — Chairman, Dr. A. Woodruff Hal- 
Bey. Dr. John Dixon and William H. Scott. Office of publication, No. 1*328 Cbestnut- 
st., Philadelphia. 

Presbyterian Historical Society. — Pres., Dr. Henry C. McCook, Sc D., - Phila- 
delphia; cor. sec. Dr. Samuel T. Lowrie, Philadelphia; rec. sec., Dr. James Price, 
Philadelphia; librarian. Dr. Louis F. Benson, Philadelphia: treas., De B. K. Ludwig, 
Pb. D., Philadelphia; library and museum. No. 1.319 Walnut-st., Philadelphia. 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH (SOUTH). 

The general officers of the General Assembly or the Presbyterian Chnrch in the 
United States (South) are: Stated clerk and treas., W. A. Alexander, D. D., Clarks- 
ville, Tenn.; permanent clerk, Rev. Tbos. H. Daw, D. D., Spartanburg, S. C: sec. 
of Foreign Missions, Rev. S. H. Chester, D. D., -Rev. James O. Reaves, Nashville, 
Tenn.; sec of Home Missions, Rev. S. L. Morris, D. D., Atlanta, Ga. ; sec of Minis- 
terial Education and Relief, Rev. H. H. Sweets, Louisville, Ky.; sec. of Publication, 
and Sunday School Work, R. B. Magill. Esq., Richmond, Va. ; sec of Colored Evan- 
geliastlon, Rev. J. G. Snedecar, Tuscaloosa, Ala.; gen. supt. of Sunday schools, -A. L*. 
Phillips, D. D., Richmond, Va. ; moderator of General Assembly, J. T. Plunkctt, D. D., 
Augusta, Ga. ; pres. Board of Trustees, General Assembly, Dr. B. Nye Hutchinson, 
Charlotte, N. C. The Committee on Closer Relations with other Presbyterian Churches 
1b composed of Rev. Dro. G. B. Strickler, S. M. Noel, C. R. Hemphill, J. F. Cannon,' 
J R. Howerton, J. H. McNeilly, W. E. Boggs, J. T. Plunket, W. J. McKay and W. 
McF. Alexander, and Ruling Elders C. H. Alexander, Thad. Harrison, C N. Roberts 
and T. C. McRae. - + ~„ 

The next General Assembly meets in Greenville," S. G, May 17, 1808. 

PRINCIPAL BAPTIST OFFICERS. 

American Baptist Missionary Union. — Rooms, Tremont Temple, Boston. Pres., 
W. A. Munroe; rec sec, Henry S. Burrage, D. D. ; home sees., Henry C Mabie, D. 
D., Rev. F. P. Haggard; foreign sec, Thomas EL Barbour, D. D. ; treas., Charles W. 
Perkins. 

American Baptist Publication Society. — No. 1,420 Chestnut -st., Philadelphia. 
Pres , Samuel A. Crozer; gen'l sec, Adoniram J. Rowland, D. D. ; miss, and Bible sec, 
R: G. Seymour, D. D.; treas., Harry S. Hopper. Branch houses— New-York, No. 132 
East Twenty-third-st. ; Boston, No. 266 Washington-st. ; Chicago, No. 177 Wabash- 
avc; St. Louis, No. 1,407 Olive-st; Atlanta, Ga., No. 37 South Pryor-Bt.; Dallas, Tex., 

N<V American 'Baptist Home Mission Society.— No. Ill Fifth-ave., New- York. 
Pres., W. S. Shallenberger; treas., Frank T, Moulton; cor. sec, Henry I* Morehouse, 
D D*.: Add sec, E. E, Chivers, D. D. 

" Southern Baptist Convention. — Pres., E. W. Stephens. Columbia, Mo. ; sees., 
Lansing Burrows, D. D.. Nashville, Tenn., and Oliver Fuller Gregory, D. p., 
Montgomery, Ala.; treas., George W. Norton, Louisville. Foreign Mission Board- 
Mission rooms. Richmond, Va. Pres., J. B. Hutson; cor. sec, R. J. Willingham, 
Missura rooms, j^g^^^ Horoe MiBsion Board, Atlanta, Ga.-Pres., W. W. 
Landrum D. D.r cor. sec. B. D. Gray, D. D.: treas., W. Dunson. Sunday bchool 
Boa^— Offices, Nashville, Tenn. Pres.. B. E. Folk. D. D.. NashvUle; cor. sec. and 

trea8 American Baptist Education Society.— No. Ill' Fifth-ave., New- York. Pres., 
A G. Slocum, UU D.. Michigan; car. sec, H. L. Morehouse, D. D., New-York; treas., 
Edward V. Cary, Montclair, N. J. 



1S8 RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 



Baptist Young People's Union of America. — Free., John H. Chapman, Chicago; 
gen. sec, ; treas., Frank -u-oodj, Anlwauktre, v*j*. 

Woman's Baptist Foreign Misslomuy bociety. — Rooms, Tremoni Temple, Bos- 
ton. Pros., Miss barah U. L>uvled; cieik. Mrs. iaa Hum.eu.aa; our. see., j&ra. H, <J. 
Stafford, foreign depL; Mrs. W. M. Waterbury, home depu; treas.. Mini Alio* hV 
Stecimao. 

Women's Baptist Foreign Missionary Society of the West.— Rooms, LM5 Ma- 
sonic Temple, Chicago. Pres., Mrs. John J£. ticoit; foreign seo^ aUa, Frederick 
Cial worthy; home Bee, Miss Julia L. Austin; treas., Mis. M. fi. Kline. 

Women's itaptist Uoiue Mission Society. — Hooma, No. 2.411 ln*diaaa-ave_ Chi- 
cago. Prefix Mrs. J. N, Crouse; cor. sec. Miss M. G. BurdeUe; treaa.. Mm A. H. 
Barber. 

Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society.— Rooms, Trement Temple, 
Boston, Pros., Mrs. Alice it. Coleman; cor. sea* Mrs, M. C Reynolds; treaa.. **«« 
Gertrude L. Davis. 

Woman's missionary Onion. — Rooms, No. • West Lexington^st* Baltimore.— 
Pres., Mrs. C. A. Stakely. Montgomery, Ala.; cor. sec* Miss Annie W. Armstrong: 
treas.. Mrs. William C. Lowndes. 

The German Baptist Con fereneesi— General Conference— Moderator, Professor 
U Kaiser, Rochester J clerks. Rev, J. H, Merkel, Cleveland, Ohio, and Rev. H, W. 
Gell, Rochester. N. Y.; cor. sec.. Rev. Q. A. Schulte, Wost Hoboken, N. J.; treas., 
J. A. Schulte, Philadelphia. Atlantic Conference — Moderator, Rev. Otto Koemg. 
New-Haven, Conn.; clerk, Rev. A. P. Mlhm, Brooklyn. Eastern Conference— Mod- 
erator, Rev. A. Vogel. Buffalo, N. Y.; clerk. Rev. G. A. Sheets, Pittsburg. Central 
Conference — Moderator, Rev. J. Meier, Chicago; clerk. Rev. H. yon Berge, Cleveland. 
Northwestern Conference — Moderator, Rev. F. W. C Meyer, Milwaukee, Wis.; clerk. 
Rev. S. A. Kose. Lacrosse, Wis.. Southwestern Conference — Moderator, Rev R. 
Stracke. Lorraine. Kan.; clerk, Rev. J. Schuflf, Topeka. Texas Conference — Mod- 
erator, Rev. F. Heisig, Denton, Tex.; clerk. Rev. August Becker, Grapevine, Tex. 
Pacific Conference — Moderator, Rev. J. A. H. Wuttke, Bethany. Ore.i clerk. Rev a 
EJchler. Portland, Ore. * ^^ ' **' 

The National Baptist Convention of the Halted States < Colored), —pres., A. C 
Morris, D. D., Helena, Ark.; reo. eec, W. I» Cannier, Nashville, Tean,; treas.. Rev 
J. H. A. Cyrus, Port Royal. Va. «**«*, www.. ■»•#. 

American Baptist Historical Society ,— Office and library. No. i.«0 Chestnut- 
st.. Philadelphia. Pres., B. I* Whitman, D. D.. LLD.; seo^ Rev. B. MacMackin; 
treas., Arthur Malcolm. 

Baptist Congress.— Prea^ Professor A. H Btckraore, New- York Cttr: seo. T 
A. K. Gossler, D. D„ Landing, N. J. ; treas., W. C. Bitting, D. D.. New-York City 

The German Baptist Publication Society.— Nos. 957-959 Payoe-ave.. Cleveland. 
Ohio. Editor of "Sendbote," Rev. Gottlob Fetxer, Cleveland, Ohio: manager. Carl 
Bickel, Cleveland. Ohio. 

The German Baptist Missionary 8©clety.— Pres., Rev, J. Meier. OaJca*© ni • 
»rec. eec, Rev. Q. Ansehutz. West Hoboken, N. J.; gen. sec*. &w/GL^anauita! 
West Hoboken, N. J.; treas.. J. A. Schulte. Philadelphia. oomme. 

CONGREGATIONAL OFFICERS. 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions,— Readaoartera. Con 

gregatlonal House, Boston. New- York Office, Charities Building. Fourth-ave arid 
Twenty-second-st. Pres., Samuel B. Capen, LL. D.; sees.. Dr. Judsoa Smith. Dr 
Cornelius H. Patton and Dr. James L. Barton; treas.. Prank H. Wlggin- editorial 
sec. Dr. E. E. Strong; asst. sep., Harry W. Hicks; district sees.. Dr Charles C 
Creegan, Charities Building, New- York; Dr. A. N. Hitchcock, No. 163 La Salle-st 
Chicago, and the Rev. H. Melville Tenney, Y. M. C. A. Building, San Francisco 

Congregational Home Missionary Society. — Fourth-ave. and Twenty-second-atL 
New-York. Pres.. Dr. Nehemlah Boynton; treas., William B. Howlaad 4 editorial 
sec, Dr. J. B. Clark; cor. sec, Dr. Washington Choate; asso. sec. Don O. Sholtoa: 
field sec. the Rev. V illiam G. Puddefoot. South Framlngham, Mass. 

American Missionary Association. — Charities Building, New-York. Pres. Dr 
Amory H. Bradford: treas.. H. W. Hubbard; home sec. and ed., Dr A F Beard - 
cor. sees.. Dr. James W. Cooper and Dr. C. J, Ryder; tec. sec. Dr. Asher Anderson' 
Boston; sec. Woman's Bureau, Miss D. E. Bmerson; dlstrist sees., Dr. WUliam 1*1 
Tenney. Chicago, and the -Rev. George H. Gutterson, Boston. 

Congregational Church Building Society. — Charities Building, New-York. 
Pres.. Dr. L. C. Warner: treaa.. Charles E. Hope; sec, Dr. C H. Richards* field 
sees., the Rev. George A. Hood, Boston; the Rev. W. W. NowelL Chicago, and the 
Rev. H. H. Wikoff. San Francisco. ^^ "" ine 

Congregational Kflucntion Society. — Congregational House, Boston. Pros, the 
Rev. William H. Campbell; treas.. S. F. WJlkms; sec, the Itev. Edward S. Tead 
western field sec. Dr. Theodore Clifton, Chicago, No. 1R1 Waphington-«t 

Congregational Sunday School and Publishing Society. — Congregational House 
Boston. Pres. Dr. Willard Scott; sec. Dr. frrank K Sander;;; missionary sec Dr 
George M. Boynton; field sec. William A. Duncan, Ph. D. ; editor. M. C. Hasard! 
Ph. D. ; bus. manager, J. H. Tewksbury. 

National Council of Congregational Churches. — Congregational House, Boston 
Moderator. Dr. Washington Gladden; sec. Dr. Asher Anderson; treas, the Rev' 
Samuel B. Forbes. Hartford. Conn. 

National Council's Ministerial Relief Fond. — Fourth-ave. and 22d-eu New- 
York City. Committee — Chaiiman, Dr. Henry A. Stlmson; sec, Dr, William JL BJee- 
treas.. the Rev. Samuel B. Forbes, Hartford. Conn. 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 189 

American Congregational Association. — Congregational House, Boston. Pres., 
William O. Blaney, cor. sec, toe Rev. Joshua Colt; Ureas.. Augustus & Lovett; U- 
brailan. Dr. V«m. H. Cobb. 

Congregational Board of Pastoral Supply. — No. 610 Congregational Bouse, Boa- 
ton. Chairman of directors, Dr. .William 1J. Allbright; sec, Dr. Chaa. B. Rice. 

LUTHERAN CHURCH COUNCIL. 

The General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North America is as 
follows: Pres., the Rev. Theodore B. Bchmauk, D. D., Lebanon, Penn.; English rec 
sec., the Rev. William K. Fricb, D. D., Milwaukee, Wis.; German rec, sec., the Rev. 
Gottlieb C. Berkemeier, D. D.. Mt. Vernon, N. Y.; Swecish rec. sec, the Revv, L. 
Holmes, D. D., L. H. D., Portland, Conn.; English cor. sec., the Rev. Dr. Stephen A. 
Repass, Allentown, Penn.; German cor. sec., the Rev. Christian G. Fischer, No. 34 
Port-st., Elisabeth, N. J.; Swedish cor. sec, the Rev. A. W. Stark, De Kalb, 111.; 
treas.. William H. Staake, No. 133 South Twelfth-st., Philadelphia. 

Board of JSngiish Home Miesfcws. , pres., ; Rev. Geo. W. Sandt, 

D. D., sec., Philadelphia; K. Aug. Miller, treas., No. 602 Walnut-st„ Philadelphia; 
Rev. J. C. Kunzmann, D. D., Kupt., Greensbuig, Penn. 

Board of German Home Missions. — Rev. C. J. Kraeling, pres., 182 Henry-st., 
Brooklyn, W. Y.; Rev. Fr. Holter, sec., Jersey City, N. J.; Martin Wulff, No. 253 
ISaet Seven tleth-st.. New- York, treas. 

Board of Swedish Home Mis 8 ions. — Rev. E. Norelhis, D. D., pres., Vasa, Minn. ; 
Professor C. W. Foea., Ph.D., Ueaa., Rock Island, Uk; Rev. J. G. Dahlberg, sec. 
Rock Island. 111. 

Board of Foreign Missions. — Rev. Dr. H. B. Jacobs, pres,, Mt. Airy, PerJn.; Jas. 
M. Snyder, English sec, Philadelphia; Conrad Itter, German sec, Philadelphia; Rev. 
Dr. William Ash mead Schaeffer, cor. sec, Philadelphia; Ph. 8. Zleber, Esq., treas.. 
No. 518 Washsington-st., Reading, Pa. 

Board of Potto Rico Missions. — Rev. Dr. D. H. Gelssinger, pres., Pittsburg, 
Penn.: Rev. Dr. J. L. Smith, sec, Pittsburg, »Penn. ; Thomas H. Lane, treas., No. 
304 Wood-st.. Pittsburg, Penn. 

Board of Publication. — Rev. Dr. Wm. Ashmcad Schaeffer, pres,, Philadelphia; 
Rev. 8. A. Zlegenfuss, D. D., sec, Philadelphia; Professor S. P. Sadtler, Ph.D., 
LL. D., treas., Chesuiut and Tentb-sta., Philadelphia; Charles B. Opp, manager, No. 
1,522 Arch-st, Philadelphia. 

There are in the Lutheran Church in the United States GO district synods, 7,703 
ministers, 13,387 congregations and 1,842,339 communicant members; 4,31)9 parochial 
schools, 2,668 teachers, and. 245.524 pupils; 6,667 Sunday schools, 67,233 officers and 
teachers, and 644,693 Sunday school scholars. The contributions for missions and 
other benevolent operations of the Church, amount to $1,622,106 60. For the various 
church divisions the figures are the following: 

Name. Synods. Ministers. Congregations. Members. 

General Council 12 1,428 2,231 397,492 

Synodical Conference 5 2,283 3,80? 595,647 

United Synod 8 223 450 45,703 

General Synod 25 1,295 1,697 228,430 

Independent Synods ....15 2,374 8,203 575,061 

There are under Lutheran control 113 educational institutions. Of these there 
are 24 theological seminaries, with property valued at $1,614,000, endowment amount- 
ing to $8C9,260, with 102 professors and 1,063 students; 41 colleges, with property 
valued at $3 754,842, endowment $1,054,165, with 501 professors and 8,371 students, 
38 academies, with property valued at $954,800, endowment $69,000, with 217 in- 
structors and 3,536 students; and 10 colleges for women, with property valued at 
$525,000 and 118 instructors and 1,093 students: a total of 118 institutions, with 
property valued at $6>M8,642, an.'l endowment amounting to $1,922,425, having 424,920 
volumes in their libraries, employing 928 professors and instructors, and having 14,063 
students, of whom 2.P87 have the ministry in view. There are also 114 charitable in- 
stitutions of which 26 are hospitals, 48 orphans' homes, 20 homes for the aged, 13 
immiirrant and seamen's mission homes, and 8 deaooness institutions, with property 
valued at $5,335,624, endowment amounting to $324,788. and sheltering 18,932 inniatea. 

CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR SOCIETY. 

The headquarters of the United Society of Christian Kndeavor are at Tremont 
Temple, Boston, Mass. Officers: Pres.. Dr. B'rancis K. Clark; gen. sec, Von Ogden 
Vogt: tieas., William Shaw. Organized at Portland, Me., Fob. 2, 1881. Motto: "For 
Christ and the Church." On October 1, 1006, there were 67,017 societies in the world, 
45 1*6 Of which are in the United States with 4,021,020 members. Pennsylvania led 
with 6162 societies; then New-York, with 4.628; Ohio, 4,071; Illinois, 8,588; Indiana, 
2 170- Iowa, 1,998; Michigan, 1,703; California, 1.557; Kansas, 1,310; Massachusetts, 
1,493; Missouri, 1,723; New-Jersey, 1,502. 

# THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MOVEMENT. 

Christian Science is a system of religious philosophy, originating with Mrs. Mary 
Baker G. Eddy in 1860. The headquarters of the movement are in Boston, Ma.ss., 
where there is a publishing society, which issues all the denominational literature. 
Including monthly and weekly magazines. The services of all Christian Science 
churches aro uniform, and consist of correlative passages read from the Bible and 
the Christian Science text book, selected to elucidate the subject of the lesson ser- 
mon Tho services are conducted by two readers, generally a man and a woman. 

The Mother Church in Bo.ston has a membership of over ?0,000. There are *?>0 



190 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS, 



branch churches and societies, with an aggregate membership of 35,000. In 'The 
Christian Science Journal" for October, 1904. 102 Institutes for teaching Christian 
Science, and upward of 4,000 practitioners of Christian Science Mind Healing axe 
listed. In recent years Christian Science churches have been erected in Boston, 
Ne-A-Tork, Chicago, Denver. Kansas City, Concord, N. H., and many other cities. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 

The Young Men's Christian Association was organised in London In 1844 by George 
Williams, a junior clerk in a large dry goods house. The first association in America 
was established at Montreal in 1851; the first in the United States at Boston later in 
die same year. The North American work is conducted under the following general 
departments: Office, Field, City and Town, County Wcrk, Railroad, Student, Army and 
Navy, Colored and Indian and sub-departments of Religious and Bible Study. Edu- 
cational, Physical, Social and Boys' Work. The aggregate membership of the 1.826 
North American associations Is 381,982, and the net value of their property is J32,- 
004,886; 728 have libraries, aggregating 660,592 volumes. The following are the 
officers of the committees: 

American International Committee. — Headquarters. No. 3 West Twenty-nlnth- 
st„ New-York. Chairman, Laicien C. Warner; treas., F. B. Schenck; general sec, 
Richard C. Morse. 

Central International Committee. — Headquarters, No. S Rue General Dufour, 
Geneva, Switzerland. Chairman, R. Sarasin-Warnery; treas., Jules Johannot; gen. 
sees Charles Fermaud and Christian Phildius. The committee is composed of mem- 
bers ' representing America, Africa, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Brazil. Ceylon, Den- 
mark. Finland. France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Japan, Italy, Netherlands, 
Norway. Oceanic, Portugal. Russia, South Africa* Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. 

New-York State Committee. — Headquarters, No. 156 Fifth-ave., N*w-York. 
Chairman. Edmund P. Piatt; treas.. Samuel Woolverton; State se<v. J. W. Cook. The 
total membership in New-York State is 52.521, of whom 11,738 are railroad men, 2 f 4S*2 
students, and 7,685 are In the boys' department 

New-York City Association. — Headquarters, No. 156 Fifth-ave., New-York. — 
Prea., William Fellowes Morgan; treas,. Samuel Sloan, jr.; gen. sec, Henry M. Orne. 
Associations of Various Countries. 



Countries. 



• No. | Countries. 



AMERICA. 
United States and 

Canada 1*«26 

Bermuda • * 

Argentine Republic... 1 

Brazil J 

Dutch Guiana •• 2 

Chili I 

Uruguay • ? 

West Indies £ 

Mexico 2 

EUROPE. 
England, Ireland an<T 

Wales 24?9 

Scotland ...... J34 

Franco "» 

Germany ..•••••»••. . .i«W£ 

Luxemburg 8 

Netherlands 841 



Denmark ... — .. 270 

Iceland .. £ 

Switzerland 470 

Norway .......•.•....• 64 

Sweden 120 

Italy 80 

Spain and Portugal... 16 

Belgium 34 

Austria 120 

Hungary •.••...••••.• 29 

Rum; la 11 

Finland 34 

Rumania ••• 1 

Bulgaria S 

Turkey in Europe 6 

Greece ....•• 1 

ASIA. 

Ceylon 14 



No. h Countries. 



No. 



India 104 

China and Hong Kong. 60 

Japan 64 

Turkey in Asia 13 

Persia .„ 2 

Tonkin 3 

Dutch Archipelago. . .. . . 1 

Korea 2 

AFRICA. 

Madagascar 1 

North, West and Cen- 
tral Africa 11 

South Africa 10 

OCEANIA. 

Australia 11 

New-Zealand ...... .... 6 

Total .•....♦♦...8,5 



Associations in the United States and Canada. 



Alberta J 

British Columbia ..... 2 

Manitoba g 

New-Brunswick o 

Nova Scotia *£' 

Ontario *6 

Prince Edward Island. 1 

Quebec •• 8 

Mexico • I 

Hawaii ............... 1 

Alaska • 1 

Alabama ...♦ 27| 

Arizona •• J 

Arkansas •••«••••..»•« *4 

California J8j 

Colorado • J* 

Connecticut 26 

Delaware ~» *\ 

District of Columbia.. g 

Florida •.. Jg 

Georgia ♦..♦*......... 83! 



Idaho 3 

Illinois -. 108 

Indiana 36 

Indian Territory 8 

Iowa 631 

Kansas ..••.•».•••••• 60 

Kentucky ••.••••»...•• 71 

Louisiana •• •• 7 

Maine 20 

Maryland ....•••«.•••• 25 

Massachusetts •..»..•. 86 

Michigan 89 

Minnesota »« 10 

Mississippi .. ...••.... 14 

Missouri »••••.....•••• 63 

Montana ...•....•.»•• 6 

Nebraska ....;•• 82 

New-Hampshire ....... 14 

New-Jersey 63 

New-York — •••« 173 

North Carolina ....... 48 



North Dakota .». 15 

Ohio 80 

Oklahoma ............. 8 

Oregon 16 

Pennsylvania .......... 226 

Philippines 6 

Porto Rico ............ 1 

Rhode Island 10 

South Carolina ........ 27 

South Dakota 83 

Tennessee 48 

Texas ....► 40 

Utah .*.. l 

Vermont .........••..• 18 

Virginia ~ 64 

Washington ............ 16 

West Virginia 24 

Wisconsin .....••».....• 29 

Wyoming .............. l 

Total .1,626 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS. 



191 



ROMAN CATHOLIC HIERARCHY OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Apoatolic Delegation* 

His Excellency the Most Rev. Diomedo Falconto (Archbishop, of Larissa), Apos+olic 
Delegate, No. 201 I-st., Washington D. C. 

Auditor pf the Delegation, r — — -, Secretary of 

the Delegation, the Rev. Louis R. Stickney. 

Archbishop*. 



See. 



Baltimore J. Gibbons, Card...l8*nS 

Boston....... J. J. Williams 1806 

Chicago J. Edward Quigley.1897 

Cincinnati .Henry Moeller 1904 

Dubuque..... John J. Keane.*. . . .1S78 

IVrliwaukee 8. G. Messmer 1892 

New-Orleans — — 

New-York J. M. Farley 1895 



Cons. | | See. 



Cons. 



(Portland Alexander Christie.. 1898 

Philadelphia Patrick J. Ryan... 1872 

at. Louis J. N. Glennon .1890 

St. Paul .John Ireland 1875 

San Francisco P. W. Riordan 1883 

«an Francisco. . . . George Montgomery .1*94 
Santa Fe Peter Bourgade 1885 



Bishops. 



Albany. N. Y T. M. A. Burke. .. .1894 

Alton, III James Ryan 188s 

Altoona E. A. Garvey 1901 

Baker City C. J. O* Reilly 1903 

Baltimore... < A. A. Curtis, aux. .1886 

Belleville, ID J. Janssen .....1888 

Boise City.... A. J» Glorieux 1*85 

Boston John Brady. aux... 1891 

Brooklyn C. E. McDonnell. . .1892 

Buffalo..' Charles H. Colton..l9. 3 

Burlington, Vt.... J. 9. Michaud 1892 

Charleston, S. C. ..H. P. Northrop... .18s2 

Cheyenne John J. Keane 1902 

Chicago .A.J.McGavick, aux.. 1899 

P. J. Muldoon. aux. 1901 

Cleveland Ig. F. Horstmann. . 1892 

Columbus. Ohio.. .James J. Hartley . .1903 

Conctrdia J. F. Cunningham. 189* 

Covington, Ky C. P. Maes ISHft 

Dallas. Texas. ... ..E. J. Dunne 1893 

Davenport, Iowa. . .H. Cosgrove 1884 

Davenport, Iowa... James Davis, 

Coadjutor 1904 

Denver. Nicholas Ma tz 1887 

Detroit John S. Foley 1888 

Dulutb James McGolrlck.. .1889 

Brie J. E. Fitstmaurice. .1898 

i<all Fiver. Jdass..William Stang 1904 

Fort Wayne H. J. Alerd ng 1900 

Galveston N. A. Gallagher. . .18s2 

Grand Rapids. H J. Richter . .1883 

Gr2at Falls, Mont. Matthias lenihan. .1904 

Green Bay, "Wis... Joseph J. Fox 1904 

Harrisburg John W. Shanahan.lb9y 

Hartford, Conn. . . .M. Tierney 1894 

Helena. Mont John P. Carroll 1904 

Indianapolis. F. S. Chatard Ih7a 

D. O'Donaghue. aux. 1900 

Fargo, N. D Jamea Shanley 1889 

Kansas City. Mo.. .John J. Hopan IhOs 

La Crosse, Wis. ...Jacob Schwebacb. . .1802 

Lead City, S. D. . ..J. N. Starika 1902 

Leaven worth...... Thomas F. Lillis. ..1904 

Lincoln. Neh Thos. Bonacum 1887 i 

Little Rock Edward Fitzgerald. 1867 

Los Angeles-. .^. . . . Thomas J. Conaty . . 1901 



Louisville W. G. McCIoskey. .1868 

Maiohester, N. H.John B. Delaney 1904 

Marquette. Micb. ..Frederick Els 1899 

Mobile Edward P. Allen... 1897 

Nashville Thomas S. Byrne... 1894 

Natchez Thomas Heslin 1889 

Natchitoches C. Van de Veri 1904 

VesquaTly, Wash.. Edward O'Dea 1896 

Newark J. j. O'Connor 1901 

New-Orleans G. A. Rouxel. aux.. 1899 

New- York .Thomaa F. Cusack, 

aux 1904 

O^densburg, N. Y..H. Gabriels 1892 

Oklahoma T. Meerschaert 1891 

Omaha Richard Scannell . . . 1887 

Peoria J. L. Spalding 1877 

P. J. O'Reillv, aux. 1900 

Pittsburg Regis Canevin 1903 

Philadelphia E. F. Prendergast. 

aux 1897 

Portland Me ..W. H. O'Connell 1901 

Providence, R. I. . . M. J . Harkins 1887 

Richmond A. Van de Vyver..l8S9 

Rochester B. J. McQuaid UMJ8 

Thos. F. HJckey, 

aux. 1905 

Sacramento Thomaa Grace lS9f» 

St. Augustine W. J. Kenny. 1902 

SI. Cloud. Minn.... James Trobec 1897 

St. Joseph, Mo M. F. Burke 1887 

?alt Lake City Lawrence Scanlan . . 1887 

San Antonio, Tex.. J. A. Forest 1895 

Savannah B. J. Keiley 19O0 

Scranton M. J. Hoban 1890 

Sioux City, la P. J. Garrigan 1902 

Sioux Falls. Thomas O' Gorman. .1896 

Springfield. Mass.. T. D. Beaven 1892 

Superior, Wis. A. F. Schinner . . . .1905 

Syracuse P. A. Ludden 1887 

Trenton........... J. A. McFaul 1894 

Tucson Henry Granjon 1900 

Wheeling, W. Va.. P. J. Donahue 1894 

Wichita. Kan J. J. Hennessy 1888 

Wilmington, Del.. .J. J. Monaghan. .. .1897 

W i non a. Minn John B. Cotter 1 889 

VUsartetes-Apofltolic— Peter Verdaguer7~Brownsvilie, Tex.; 1*0 Haid, North Care- 
Una, 18*8; IJbert Hubert Boeyr.-aema, 1903, Hawaiian Islands. 

Arch Abbots — Leander Schnerr, St. Vincent's Abbey, Beatty, Penn.; Andrew 
Hintenach, Canon City, Col. 

Mitred Abbots — Frowenus Conrad, .Benedictine, Conception, Mo.; Alexis Edel- 
brock, New- York City; Edmund M. Ohrecht, Gethsemane, Ky. ; Peter Engel, Col- 
legeville, Minn.; Rt. Rev. Athanasius Schmitt, St. Meinrad's, Ind. : Hilary Pfraen- 
gle, Newark, N. J.; Innocent Wolf, Atchison, Kan.; Leo Haid, Belmont, N. C; 
Bernard Menges, Cullman, Ala.; Ignatius Conrad, Spielerville, Ark.; N. Jaeper, Chi- 
cago. D?.; Paul Schauble, Covington, La.; Thomaa Mienhofer, Mt. Angel, Ore.; Vin- 
cent Wehrle, Devil's Lake, N. Dak. 

Prefecture- Apostolic of Alaska — J. B. Rene, 8. J. 

Btoho* of Porto Rico — Rt. Rev. James H. Blenk, S. M. Philippines — Manila, 
Archbishop 3. Harty, 1903; Jaro, F. Z. Rooker, 1903; Cebu, T. Bendrick, 1803; Nueva 
Segovia, D. Dangberty, 1903; Nenva Caceres, O. Barin, 1905. 



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EDUCATION BOAKDS AND FUNDS, 20ft 



RHODES OXFORD SCHOLARSHIPS. " 

The first election* of scholars in the United States under the Bequests of Cecil 
J. Rhodes occurred in 1904. AH candidates in each State and Territory must pass an 
Oxford Responsions examination, and one competitor will bo named for each by the 
committee or university charged with making appointments. Scholars must have 
reached at least the end of their sophomore or second year work at some recognized 
degree granting university or college of the United States. Scholars must be unmar- 
ried, must be citizens of the United States, and must be between nineteen and twenty- 
five years of age. The scholarships offered afford a cash allowance of $1,500 a year 
for three years. It is intended to have at all times two beneficiaries at Oxford from 
each of the 45 States and 3 Territories designated. 

Any Inquiries about Oxford, its colleges and the courses of study there should be 
addressed to F. J. Wylie, the Oxford agent of the Rhodes Trustees. Copies of Oxford 
Responsion papers for past years can be obtained from the Oxford University Press, 
Koa. 91 and 90 Fffth-ave~> New- York. 

The president of the State University or College is in each of the following States 
chairman of the committee of selection for that State: Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, 
California. Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho. Indiana, Iowa. Kansas, Louisiana, 
Michigan. Minnesota, Mississippi. Missouri. Montana. Nebraska, Nevada. New-Mexico, 
North Carolina, North Dakota. Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon. Pennsylvania, South Carolina, 
South Dakota, Tennessee, -Texas. Utah. Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin and 
Wyoming. 

The following chairmen have besn named for other States: Connecticut, President 
Arthur T. Hadley, Yale University; Illinois. President W. R. Harper, University of 
Chicago; Kentucky, President D. B.* Gray^ CSeorgetown College; Maryland. President 
W. A. Remcen. Johns Hopkins University: Massachusetts, President Charles W. 
Eliot, Harvard University; New-Jersey President Wood row Wilson, Princeton 
University; New-York State, President Nicholas Murray Butler, Columbia University; 
Rhode Island. President W. H. P Faunce.. Brown University. 

«. In the following States appointments arc made by the chartered colleges and 
universities in rotation: California, University of California, Iceland Stanford Univer- 
sity, smaller colleges every seventh year: Maine, the order ot rotation yet to be fixed; 
Vermont, University of Vermont. Middlcbury College; Washington, the orde*- of 
rotation yet to be fixed. 



UNIVERSITY EXTENSION. 

The American Society for the Extension of University Teaching was founded at 
Philadelphia in June, 189$, and incorporated in March, 1892. Present officer^: Presi- 
dent, Frederick B. Miles; treasurer. Charles A. Brinley; Fecretary. Charles D. Atkins. 
The office is in Philadelphia. The aim of University extension is, first, to extend 
higher education to all classes of people; second, to extend education through the 
Whole of adult life; third, to extend thorough methods of study to subjects of every- 
day interest. During the academic, year 1904- -'05 the society arranged for the de- 
livery of 100 courses of lectures at 82 centres. The total course attendance at lectures 
was 138,026. The number of courses arranged by States was as follows: Pennsyl- 
vania, 44; New-York, 21; New Jersey, 16; Maryland, 5; Connecticut, 9; Delaware, 
3. The division by subject is as follows: Literature, 32; history, 31; music and art, 
10; ethics and philosophy, 11; political economy, 1. 

The constantly widening use that, if being made of the society's lectures and of 
the University Extension system is shown by the auspices under which the courses 
of 196,400 were delivered: Centres under control of woman's clubs, educational 
institutions (schools, Brooklyn Institute, etc.), 128; New- Ycrk City Board of Edu- 
cation ("Free Lectures to the People"), 11; the University Extension Soetety and the 
Free JAbrary of Philadelphia {"Free Lecture Courses to the People"}* 1G". regular Uni- 
versity Extension Centres, 46. The society has just completed its fifteenth year 
of work. Flnee its organization there have been delivered under its direction 1.442 
course* comprising 8,442 lectures. The average attendance at each lecture has been 
207, and the aggregate attendance 1,7154,217. The most important work, outside of 
that of the general society in Philadelphia, is carried on through the University of 
Chicago, the "Regents of the University of New York, Rutgers College, New Hruns- 
wlck* Columbia University, New-York, and in California. Sample syllabi and circu- 
lars descriptive of University Extension work can re obtained free of charge by ad- 
dressing University Extension Society, No 111 South Fifteenth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

THE GENERAL EDUCATIONAL BOARD. 

The General Education PoarowVas incorporated by an Act of Congress approved 
January 12, 1903. The incorporate, rs were William II. Baldwin, jr., Frederick T. < la tec, 
Daniel C. Oilman, Monte K. .lesup. Robert C. Ogdun, Walter H. Page, Ceorge Foster 
Peahody and Albert Shaw. The object of the incorporation is to promote education 
Within the United States without distinction of race, sect or creed. For the promotion 
of such object the said corporation is to build, improve, enlarge, or equip, or to aid 
others to build, improve, enlarge, or equip buildings for elementary or primary 
schools, industrial schools, technical schools, normal schools, training schools for 
teachers, or schools of any grade, or for his;hcr institutions of learning, or, in 
oonnection therewith, libraries, workshops, garden:*? Kitchens, or other educational 
accessories; to establish, main ain, or endow, or aid others to establish, maintain, or 
endow, elementary or primary schools, industrial schools, technical schools, normal 
schools training schools for teachers, or schools of any grade, or higher institutions 
of learning; to employ or aid others to employ tf.*oheis and lecturer-:, to aid, co- 
operate with, or endow associations or other corporations engaged in educational worli 



290 



PATRIOTIC SOGDDTIB&L 



within the United States of America, or to donate to any such association or corpora- 
tion any property or moneys which shall at any time be held by the said corporation 
hereby constituted; to collect educational statistics and Information, and to publish 
and distribute documents and reports containing the same, 

PBABODY EDUCATION FUND. 

The Peabody Education Fund was founded in 1867 by George Peabody for the cause 
of education in the Southern and Southwestern States. The fund first amounted to 
$3,000,000. but as $900,000 of this amount was Invested in Florida and Mississippi 
bonds, afterward repudiated, the fund was reduced to $2,100,000. Officers: Chairman, 
Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller. Washington, d. C.; secretary. Samuel A. Green, 
Boston, Mass.; treasurer. J. Pierpont Morgan. New- York; general agent, Samuel A. 



Green, Boston, Mass. Executive committee— William A. Courtenay, Daniel C, Oilman, 
Charles IB. Penner, James D. Porter, Hoke Smith. The trustees received power to 
terminate the trust after 80 years— that is, in 1887— and at *T meeting on January 24, 
1905, it was voted to take* this action. A grant of $1,000,000 was made to the George. 
Peabody School for Teachers at Nashville, and the rest of the fund— amounting in 
1906 to about $1.800,009- *riU be distributed hereafter. The board wiU not dissolve for 
several years, 

patrio tic so cieties. 

Grand Army of the Republic 

First post organised at Decatur. IiL, April 6, 1866. First national encampment 
held at Indianapolis, November 20. 1866. Headquarters for 1906-1906, FendaU Building. 
Washington, D. C. There are forty-five States and Territorial departments. The 
officers of the national body are: Commander-in-Chief, James Tanner, Washington, 
D. C; senior vice-commander-ln-chlef, George W. Cook, Denver, CoL; Junior vtce- 
commander-ln-chief. Silas H. Fowler. Minneapolis, Minn.; surgeon general, Hufh 
Phlller. Waukesha, Wis.; chaplain-ln-chief, the Rev. J. F. Leary, Chapman, Kan.; 
adjutant general, John TWeddle. Washington, D. C. ; quartermaster general, Frank Bat- 
tles, Concord, N. EL; Inspector general, M. J. Cummings, New- York City; judge advo- 
cate general. Charles A. Clark. Cedar Rapids, Iowa: senior aide-de-camp and chief of 
staff. Frank A. Butts, Washington, D. C. "Executive Committee of the National Coun- 
cil of Administration— Thomas G. Sample, Allegheny. Penn.; Thomas. W. Scott, •Spring- 
field, 111. : Phil Cheek. Baraboo. Wis. ; L. W. Collins. Minneapolis, Minn. ; John W. Her- 
sey. Springfield, Mass.; Charles E. Foote, Kalamazoo, Mich.; Clayland Tilden. Jersey 
City. N. J. — in addition to the commander-in-chief, the adjutant general and the 
Quartermaster general. 

The following was the membership in the various departments on June 80, 1906: 



Departments. 



' Posts. I 



Arizona 

Arkansas •••....••*.«... 
California and Nevada... 
Colorado and Wyoming., 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida .- 

Georgia .-....•• 

Idaho ....•...•••••• 

Illinois ■ 

Indiana 

Indian Territory , 

Iowa • < 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana and Miss..... 

Maine • 

Maryland ••• 

Massachusetts . 

Michigan • • 

Minnesota . 

Missouri 

Montana 



Posts. 

12 

7 

86 

94 

69 

61 

16 

20 

14 

19 

680 

400 

21 

864 

288 

84 

26 

144 

66 

216 

842 

170 

263 

14 



Mem- 
bers. _ 
181 

144 

660 

6.640 

2,404 

8,880 

666 

816 

488 

448 

19,226 

14.861( 

400 

11.697 

9.968 

1,818 

816 

6.666 

2.107 

16.243 

11.964 

6.497 

8.131 

408 



Departments, 



Nebraska — .... 

jNew-xiampshire ........ 

New-Jersey 

New-Mexico ••.. 

New-York 

North Dakota 

Ohio ...— 

Oklahoma — ... 

Oregon » 

Pennsylvania ..•.....••, 

Potomac 

Rhode Island „* , 

South Dakota 

Tennessee , 

Texas „.., 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia and N. Carolina. 
Washington and Alaska.. 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin •......., 



Poets. 

206 
84 

107 
8 

614 
26 

460 
77 
66 

623 
17 
26 
78 
63 
20 
6 
97 
88 
60 
42 

211 



T01 



>tatf 



6.081 



bers. 

-^47487 

2,866 

4.764 

176 

28,268 

466 

18.728 

X606 

1.986 

24,843 

2,298 

1.604 

1*288 

1,332 

641 

254 

2,921 

713 

2.246 

1.047 

7.618 



232.466 



The loss of the organisation by death for the year ending June 80, 1904. was 0,029. 
for the year ending June 80. 1906, 9.162. The high water mark of membership was 
readied In 1890, when 409,489 names were carried on the roKs. The membership on 
June 80. 1904, was 247,840. showing a net loss for the year 1904-4)6 of 14.886. 

Woman's Relief Cerpe. — Officers: President Abble A. Adams. Superior. NeK; 
senior vice-president, Julia G. Sine. Chicago, IIL; Junior vice-president, Eunice M. 
r. Oklahoo "" *~ " . ~. — - 



Munger. Oklahoma City, Okla,; treasurer. Charlotte B. Wright. New-Haven, Conn.; 
chaplain. Catharine C. Kennedy. Denver, CoL ; secretary. Mary R. Morgan. Alma, Neb. ; 
inspector; Annie B. Noyea, Madison. Win.; counselor, Agnes ffitt, Indianapolis, tod.; 
instituting and installing officer. Alios Breltensteio, Dayton, Ky.; chief of stall, BUsa 
Brown Daggett, New-rork City. 



PATRIOTIC SOCIETIES* 



tan 



Department of New- York.— - Vwflcers elected at the thirty-ninth annual eo>- 
c ftnim tfct, feyiacuse, June 22 and 23, ltt05; Commander* James id. dnsuer.. Troy; 
senior vIce-oouimaAder. George E. Dewey, New- York City; junior vice-commander. 
Edward H. Fassett. Kingston; chaplain. Rev. .Augustus W. Green, Oaondaera Valley; 
medical director, Colonel William Taylor, Canlatota. Council of adrainlstrattea-- 
Joseph Murphy. New-York Ut*; M. H. Faraue. Brooklyn; W. R 
ville; W. XL Danieb\ Ogdensburg, and H. P. Tarbox, Batavia. 



Americaa Plag Axsoelatioa. 
. The American Pitas; Association was organised February 11. t»90. Ms motto beiua: 
"Om» Flag, One Country, God Over All." its object is to secure »r»v%»^y and State 
kwlalatloa for the proteetfea of the Has from degrading and eeeceratmg uses, and ta 
secure a general celebration of June 14 as "Flax Day," bees-use op that day to KTI 
Congress enacted "That the flag of the thirteen Uartcd States toe thirteen stripes, al- 
ternate red and white; that the uxikm be thirteen stars, white In a blue field, repre- 
sesttog a new coraueilatioK.*' The nfficere of the association are: President. Colonel 
Ralph B. Prime, Yoakere. N. Y.; secretaries, Theodore Fitcb, No, 130 Broadway, New- 
York, and Mrs. J. WeBs Weatvortlt; treasurejr, A- Noel Btaheman, MO Nsssau-sL. 
New-York. 



laeorporated in ItOft by the New-York Legislature, with the object of preserving 
either by the acquisition as public trustees or otherwise, beautiful American aeemery 
and landmarks and objects possessiBe; scenic or historic value. PresMeat, Walter &. 



J^ogan, New- York; honorary president, J. Pierpoat Morgan, New-York 
P. W. Devoe, George P. Kuns, H. M. Leipxiger, New-York, and Charles S. Pranda, 
Trey, N. Y.; treasurer, N. Taylor Philippe, New- York; secretary, Edward Bagaoaaa 
HaB, Tribune JBuUding, New-York. 



vice-feesidenis; 
rles S. Franc* 



Army of the Teaaeseee ftsaschirtctt. 

The Army of the Tennessee Association was organised fas 1992 "to keep altve 
the memory of each otber and the stirring scenes in which the army took a part 
from. 18*1 to 1866.'* The officers are: President, H. I* Deam, Washington, D. C; 
vice-presidents. George Grind-ey A. D. Gaston, W. M. Jones and B. P. Chase; secre- 
tary, Byron W. Bonney, No. 024 C-st., N. E., Washington, I>. C; treasurer, James 
S. Jtoy. 

' Army aad Nary Vaiea). 

Officers: Commander, cVrioael J. Bdward Brcwne, Washington; senior vice-com- 
ntaader, Edward Strobe), Albany; junior vice-commander, Bdward V. Afcger. Brooklyn; 
adjoitaat general, John Schumacher, Brooklyn; inspector general, S. B. Adams, Jersey 
CSty; judge advocate general. Lieutenant John IX Gute. Buffalo, and national chap- 
lain, the Rev. John P. €nidwick» Now- York City. Next biennial meeting* 1*07. 

Artec Club. 
Organised in the City of Mexico, 1847. Eligible to membership, officers in the 
Mexican War and their descendants. Officers: President, General Minuet vi. Pseneti; 
vice-president, John J. Martin; secretary, Macrae Sykes. No. 23 East 127tb-eU, New- 
York City; treasurer. WTOJam Turn bo IL 

Children of the American Revolution. 

The National Society of the Children of the Amerieao Re volition was Incor- 
porated April IS, 18W5, under the laws of Congress applicable to the District of 
Poftisahlft, aad tta headquarters are fixed In Washington. The olfteera are: President. 
Mrs, tfied T. Dubois; vice-president presiding. Miss- Julia Ten tJyck Blair; vice- 
president la charge of organisation, Mrs. Charles C. Darwin; recording •eeretary, 
Misa EUsa C Tulloeh; corresponding secretary, Miss Martha N. Hooper, No. 1,135 
New-Hampshire-ave., Washington, D. C. ; registrar, Misa Susan R. Hetsel; treasurer. 
Mrs. Violet Blair Janin, No. 12 Lafayette Square. Washington, D. C. : chaplair,. Mrs. 
Tenuis a Bamha. There ar* State organisations in Alabama, California, Colorado, 
CXaiMictleut. Delaware, District or Coiumtwa. Georgia, lnaiana, Iowa, Keoiu^My, 
Maryland, Massachusetts. Michigan. Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, 
New-Masapahire, New-Jersey. Nvw-York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah,. Vermont, Vir- 
ginia, Washington, Weat Virginia. Wisconsin and Wyoming. Pees, 50 cents a year. 
A natr"*** 1 convention is held each year in Washington in April. The objects jf 
the organisation are to preserve the places made sacred by the men and women who 
forwarded American independence; to ascertain the deeds and honor the memories of 
children aad youth who rendered service during the American Revolution; to promote 
the celebration of all patriotic anniversaries; to bold our American flag sacred above 
every other flag on earth, and to love, uphold and extend the institutions ef American 
liberty/. Any girl under eighteen years or boy under twenty-one years of age is 
eligible for membership who Is Lineally descended from a man or woman who rei>- 

- material aid to the eausd of American independence as a soldier, sailor, civil 



officer or recognised patriot in one of the several Colonies or States or of the United 

Colonies or States. Membership about 5,800. 

Uaughtere of the Revelutieck 
August 20. 1801. Membership is based on direct descent from 
ra. To be eUmbkr an applicant must be a lineal desceulant of 



SOS 



PATRIOTIC SOCIiyTIES. 



an ancestor who was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a member of tha 
Continental Congress, or a member of the Congress. Legislature or General Coirt of 
any of the Colonies or States; or rendered civil, military or natal service under the 
authority or any of the thirteen colonies, or of tho Continental Congress; or by service 
rendered during the War of the Revolution became liable to the penalty of treason 
against the government of Great Britain; provided that such ancestor always re- 
mained loyal to the cause of American independence. The headquarters of the general 
society are at No. 156 Fifth-avc. New-York. The officers are: President, Mrs. D. 
Phcenlr Ingraham, New-York; first vice-president, Mrs. Frank E. Fitz, Massachusetts; 
recording secretary. Mrs. Carlton M. Moody, Pennsylvania; corresponding secretary 
Mr*. John A. Heath. No. 348 Marlborough-st.. Boston. Mass. ; treasurer. Miss Mary A. 
Kent, Pennsylvania; registrar, Mrs. Joseph J. Casey, New- York; historian, Mrs. George 
F. Daniels, Massachusetts. ' 

Daughters of the American Revolution. 

The present efforts of the society are directed toward raising funds for a great hall 
to be built in Washington in memorv of the men and women of the Revolution. The 
present membership is 40.547. Headquarters. No 902 F-st.. Washington. D. C. 
National Board of Management; President- general. Mrs, Donald McLean. New-York; 
vice-president-general in charge of organization of chapters, Mrs. Charlotte Emer- 
son Main. No 902 F-st., Washington. D. C; ehap!ain-general. Mrs. Teunis S. Ham- 
lin* recording* secretary general. Miss Mary Desha; corresponding secretary-general. 
Miss Virginia Miller; registrar-general, Mrs. J. Stewart Jamieson; treasurer-general. 
Mrs M E 8 Davis: historian-general. Mrs. J. P. Dolliver; librarian-general. Miss 
Aline B Solomons There are f>rty-eit?ht State and Territorial organizations. A 
Bite for the proposed memorial in Washington was purchased for $50,260.17, and the 
society has now over $100,000 in hand toward building. 
Mayflower I Ascendants. 

Organized. New-York. December 22, 1894, by lineal descendants of the Mayflower 
Pilgrims 4 to preserve their memory, th.'ir records, their history and all facts relating 
to them, their ancestors and their posterity." Every lineal descendant over eighteen 
years of aae, male or female, of any passenger of the voyage *bf the Mayflower which 
terminated at Plymouth, Massachusetts, December, 1620. Including all signers of •The 
Compact" is eligible to membership. Initiation fee, $10; annual dues, $5. The an- 
nual meetlnx Is held November 21. the anniversary of the signing of "The Compact." 
Societies are organized in New-York. Connecticut. Massachusetts l Pennsylvania;. Ohio. 
Illinois New-Jersey, District of Columbia. Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Maine and 
Khode 'island, with a membership of 3.000. The above State societies have formed a; 
national organization, of which Samuel B. Capen is governor general, and A. P. Fitch, 
Jr New-York City, is secretary general. Officers of the New-York society are: 
Governor Walter S. Allerton; deputy governor. Henry C. Brewster; captain, Rich- 
ard H. Greene; elder, the Rev. jame.i S. Dennis; secretary, Clarence. E» Leonard; 
treasurer, Franklin W. Hopkins; librarian, James Le B. Wlllard. 

Medal of Honor Legion. . 

The general officers of the legion are: Commander, Julius J. C Langbein, New- 
York; senior vice-commander, James M. Schoonmaker. Pittsburg, Penn.; junior vice^ 
commander Eraatus W. Jewett, Burlington, Vt,; chaplain. James Miller, Philadelphia. 
The organisation. is composed of men to. whom medals have been given by the national 
government. 

Military Order of the Loyal Lerion. ' - ■' 

Organized April 15. 1865; non-sectarian and non-political. The members are of 
three classes* (1) Commissioned officers and honorably discharged commissioned officers 
of the Armyj Navy and Marine Corps (regulars and volunteers) actually engaged in 
(suppressing the Rebellion prior to April 35, 1865. and all sons of deceased officers 
who served as above. *2) The sons of living original companions of the first class 
who are twenty-one years old. Membership on July 31. 1905, 8,865; composed of 
first class 7 888; second class, 959; third class, 18. Largest com manderies: New- 
York. 1,216 members, New-York City; Pennsylvania, 1,102, Philadelphia.- The other 
eighteen State commatideries in order of their organization and place of headquarters 
are- Maine 173. Portland; Massachusetts, 919, Boston; California, 68£, San Francisco; 
Wisconsin i&2, Milwaukee; Illinois, 030, Chicago; District of Columbia. 824; Ohio, 824, 
Cincinnati'- Michigan. 306. Detroit; Minnesota. 292, St. Paul; Oregon. 66, Portland; 
Missouri 281 St. Louis; Nebraska. 100. Omaha; Kansas. 172, Leavenwortn; Iowa, 1964. 
Des Moines- Colorado. 224, Denver; Indiana. 339. Didianapolis; Washington, 90, Tacoma; 
Vermont 128. Burlington. The. present national officers are: Commander-in-chief, 
General John R. Brooke, senior commander-in-chief; Rear Admiral Geo. C. Remey, 
iuntor vice-commander-in-chief. General Wm. F. Draper; recorder. Colonel John P. 
Nicholson. Philadelphia; registrar, Major William P. Huxford, Washington, D. C.J 
trftaqurer Paymaster George De F. Barton; chancellor. Captain John O. Foering; chap- 
lain Ilenrv S Burrage; council, Major Henry L.. Swords, Captain Russell H. Mason, 
SJIVAu/uatua M. Van Dyke, General F. W. Swift Lieut. Doyall Farragut. 
^^New-York Commauderf. — Commander, Brigadier General Thomas H. Hub- 
bard U s V ; Recorder-Paymaster, A. Noel Blakeman, late U. S. N. Headquarters, 
No. i40"Naasau-nSt.. New-York City. ... 

Military Order of Foreign Wars. 

Instituted December 27. 1894 incorporated January 15. 1895. Eligibility: Veteran 
commissioned officers of the Revolution, war with Tripoli, war with Mejrico. War of 
isMX aad war with Spain. Hereditary companions are denned as direct male descend- 



PATRIOTIC SOCIETIES. 



209 



ants In the male line of veteran companions and all commissioned officers in any one 
of the above named wars. The officers of the National Commandery are: Commander 
general, General Alexander S. Webb, U. S. A.; secretary general, James H. Morgan, St. 
Paul Building, New-York City; treasurer general, Colonel O. O. Bosbyshell, Philadel- 
phia, Penn.; registrar genera), Henry N. Wayne; historian general, Captain Samuel 
B Gross; chaplain general, the Rev. O. Kills Stevens; judge advocate general, ;F. M. 
Avery- deputy secretary general, Major David Banks, jr.; deputy treasurer general, 
James' F. Sands. There are twenty-two subordinate or State commanderies. ; Next 
triennial meeting, 1806. 

National Association of the Ladies* Naval Veterans. 
Following are the officers of the association: Captain Commanding, Mrs.' E. A. 
Whitcher, Jersey City, N. J. ; commander, Mrs. Sine Lex, Philadelphia; lieutenant 
commander Mrs. Maria Ford, Providence* R. I.; senior lieutenant, Mrs. Henry Tobin, 
Philadelphia; national secretary, Mrs. Jennio laird, No. 87 Lippitt-st., "Providence, 
R. I. ..-•'■.' 

* National Association of Naval Veterans. 
Organized 1887. Officers: Commodore commanding,' Walter B. Jacobs, New- 
Haven Conn. • field captain, John N. Phelps, Newark, N. J. ; commander and chief 
of staff Max S. Green, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; lieutenant commander, William Ii. Lord, 
Providence R. I.: lieutenant, Frank Dalton, Salem, Mass.; paymaster Henry F. Mc- 
Calluro New-Haven, Conn.; surgeon, Charles W. Karsner, Philadelphia; chaplain, 
Alex. C. McWllllams, Detroit. 

National Association of Union ex-Prfaoners of War. 
Officers elected at Denver. Colo.,' September 5, 1905. Commander Ore-elected), James 
D Walker Pittsburg, Perm.; senior vice- commander, John Kissane, Cincinnati; chap- 
lain Rpv John S Ferguson, Keokuk, Iowa: historian, Harry White, Indianapolis, Ind.; 
quartermaster general and adjutant general, William C, McKelvy, Guffey, ^Colo. Ex- 
ecutive committee— Aaron T. Bliss, Lansing, Mich.; Charles G. Davis, Boston, Mass.; 
Charles W. Fjscher, St. Paul, Minn.; O. A. Parsons, WUkesbarre, Penn. 
National Society, Army Of the Philippines. 
This society was organized at Denver, Col., August 30, 1900. Its aims are the 
Dernetuation of the ties of friendship between individuals and organizations of the 
Aray rt the Philippines, and the preservation of the history and re cs of the Philip- 
pine campaign. Membership in it is open to every officer and enlisted man. in the 
™«m*irv ^rviVe of the United States, or with honorable discharge from same, who 
selvedhonorab^ beginning of the war with Spain to the Fourth 

n^jriiv 1902 in the Armv of the Philippine Islands, either in the volunteers or in the 
£mS£k aXtltahmentV' and to all United States officers and enlisted men who at the 
l?*^ .JS a? vessels which during the Spanish- American War co-operated with the 
^r^aJw^^S^^orhrved since that time and previous to July 4, 1002, 
hTtff waSrs of rtb€ Philippine Archipelago. The 1905 officers of the society were: 
vL>ii!w RriSdler General Charles King, Milwaukee, Wis.; first vice-president, 
SlonefjamS W POP^ Denver, Col.; second' vice-president, Captain Charles E. Locke. 
Snver CoT ' third vice-president. Fred M. Schutte, St. Paul. Minn. ; fourth vice-presi- 
2S1 rwiin Halstead A. Crow, Connellsvllle, Penn.; fifth vice-president, Brigadier 
r^WiWerTMetolf, I^wrence, Kan.; sixth vice-president Major David S. 
2£!3mm Mr Cltaton Iowa; secretary. Albert E. Fout, No. 4,284 Cook-ave., St Louis; 
freisur^' J E WWte, No 22 Fifth-ave., Chicago; chaplain, the Rev. James Mailley, 
Strorrisberg, Neb. . -„,. 

Naval and Military Order of the Spanish-American War. 
-National Commandery, No. 170 Fifth-ave., New-York; New-York Commandery, No. 
ita ffwh^vo New-York- Massachusetts, Commandery, Boston; Pennsylvania Com- 
iiandVrV Philadelphia; Illinois Commandery, Chicaeo; Connecticut Commandery, - Hart- 
rord- Ohio Commandery, Cincinnati; California Conimandery Ban Francisco. Objects— 
SSriiSihthe memories and associations of the Spanish-American War. The mem- 
££r*hin is limited to those who served on the active list, or performed active duty, as a 
SSmm£slone m officer regular or volunteer, in the United States Army, Navy or Marine 
Co™ %riu Tthe war wi?h Spain, or in the subsequent insurrection in the Philippines, 
«T^S*.« V^rHcinated In the said war or insurrection prior to April 1, 1901, as a naval 
£ I^affiorasVn officer in the United States Revenue Cutter Service on any 
E£ViX«^eato dut? under the control of the United States Navy Department during 
«nfe Jiirnr insurrection or as a warrant officer, non-commissioned officer or enlisted 
man whJ^b^Sy became a commissioned officer in the United States Army, Navy 
S Marin^e^o™ Commander-in-^hief, Major Harry Alv in Hall, Pennsylvania; senior 
2T;2_^mi»id^in-chief Major William B. Dwight, Connecticut; junior vice-com- 
X£?££ ^^Siler Sntata Taylor D. Brown, Illinois; recorder-in-chief, Captain John 
J^gtif^J ef, 170 Fifth-ave Y . New-York • rcgistrar-in-chief .Major Felix Rosenberg, 
Ohl™Uea6U^-in^hief; Major George P. Shiels, California; cha P 2ain-m-<:hIcf. the 
Rev. 'Henry H. Kelsey, Connecticut. 

Naval Order of the United States. 
Organised July 4 1890. It consists of the General Commandery and the Btate 
commanderles of Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, New-York, Illinois, California and Dis- 
trict of ColumbtaT The membership is divided into two classes, the first including 
commissioned officers, midshipmen and naval cadets, or corps or staff officers with 
rftlAtive rank as auch, or appointed volunteer officers in line of promotion, who, were 
toactual service in the Navy, Marine Corps or Eeffpnae Ser vice under the authority of 



SI* 



PATRIOTIC SOCIETIES. 



any of fne thirteen original Colonies or States or of the Continental Congress during 
•the War of the Revolution or of the United States during the war with France, the 
irur with Tripoli, the War of 1812, the war with Mexico, the Civil War, the war with 
Spain, or In face of the enemy in any engagement in which the Navy of the United 
States has participated, and who resigned, were discharged with honor, or who are 
•till In the service., or those who served as aforesaid, hut in a grade below that of * 
eommissioned officer, midshipman, naval cadet, or corps or staff officer, with relative 
rank as such, or appointed volunteer officer in line of promotion, and who subsequently 
became a commissioned officer, regular or volunteer, in the United States Army, Navy, : 
Marine Carps or Re eaue Service: Provided, however. That this clause shall not toe so 
[•construed as to include officerr who at any time h»ve borne arms against the Govern- 
ment of the United States. All male descendants of those who are eligible as above 
specified or In default thereof, then oat such collateral representative as may he 
deemed worthy. The second class, includes enlisted men who have received the naval 
medal of honor for bravery in face of the enemy. The last Triennial Congress of the 
order was held In Washington, D. C., November 4, 1904. The general officers ere: 
Commander, Rear Admiral J. B. ^oghlan, U. 8. N. ; vice-commander. J. W. Miller, 
late U. 8. N.: recorder; Kdward Tronchard. No. 78 Broad-st.. New- York; treasurer, 
CUnton B. Braine; registrar. William 8. Wells: historian, William T. Salter: chap- 
lain, the Rev. P. U Humphreys; council, Lieut.-Commander Socrates Hubbard, U> 
S. N. (retired); George DeForeat Barton. R. 8. Sloan, G. B. Townsend. Jarvis B. Bd- 
son: Loyall Parraerut,' M« B. Fiold. W. DeW. Dimock; trustee of permanent fund, 
Charles Brantiagaaot. 

Navy League of the United States. 
The Navy League of the United States has for Its sole purpose the upbuilding 
of the navy and the maintaining of Its efficiency. The officers are: President. 
General Horace Porter*, vice-president. William McAdoo; treasurer, Allen S. Apgars 
secretary. Robert S, Sloan; general counsel. Herbert L. Satteriee, Executive xom- 
m*tte-» — Herbert Ij. Satteriee. chairman: Robert S. Sloan, Jacob W. Miller, Aaron 
Vanderbllt and J. Frederic Tarns. Headquarters — No. 78 Broad-st., New- York! i 

Order of Peqnot and King Philip. 

The ereamMe of the Order of Peqiiot and King Philip recites that It Is conferred 
npen descendants ef soldiers In those so-called wirs, cr of those who were Subjected 
to and sustained the years' of peril, privation and hardship which those straggles in- 
volved No direct applications or credentials are con? de red or accepted, the sole 
eUerlbflfty being the receipt of the Invitation of the Order officially fc sued open nom- 
ination by a member. Membership Is for life or In perpetuity. The insignia Is worn 
a round the neck, instead of displayed upon the breast. Founded 1*02. The oroeera 
are O. Ij. Frisbee. chairman for New-En*cland. Portsmouth, N. H.; Charles A- Will- 
iams, chairman for Western States, Buffalo. N. Y.: George W. Freeman, chairman for 
Southern States. Morcxntown. W. Va.; acting general registrar during vacancy, Ap-; 
pleton Morgan, Westneld. N. J. . . - 

Order of Veterans of Tndian Wars of the Curbed States. 

Organised April 23, 1808. Qhjects: To perpetuate the faithful services, heroism 1 
and privations of the officers and soldiers of the Army of the United States, as well as 
of the auxiliary forces of the several States of the Union, in the campaigns against 
the Indians on the frontiers, in the interests of civilisation and for the settlement and 
defence of the Territories; also to collect and preserve for publication a record of these 
services and other historical data relating, thereto, as well as to unite In a fraternal 
bond of union ail those who are entitled to membership. There are two classes of 
members. The first class Includes commissioned office :*« of the Army, on the active or 
retired list, or those who have become honorably separated from the service, of goad 
racial character and reputation, and who have served since January, 1784* or may 
hereafter serve in the army in an Indian war In a strictly military capacity; also any 
officer of a State Nattonai Guard or Militia meet lop the above requirements, and who 
regularly served under a commission from the Governor of a State or Territory; also 
the male descendants of those above specified who would have been eligible for sack 
membership, but died prior to becoming: members. The second class includes lineal 
male descendants of living members of the first class. Upon the death of a companion 
of the first class, all descendants who are companions of the second class succeed to 
first class membership. The principal officers are: Commander, Brigadier General 
3. D, Bingham. U, S. A.; recorder and treasurer, Captain Henry Hobart Bellas, U. 3. 
A.. No. 421 Louth Forty-four th-st.. Philadelphia; historian, Brigadier General Charles 
King. 0. S. A*, Milwaukee. Wis, 

Patriotic Order Sons off America, 

The national officers of the Order are: Nattonai president, Edward A.. Doaft, Ho. 
217 East 23d~et~, New-York; national vice-president, W. S. Vailtant, Chestertown. 
Md.; national master of forms, M. B. Downer, Downer's Grove. 111.; national secre- 
tary. Franklin P. Spiese. Tamaqua, Penn.; national chaplain, Rev. D. B. Ropley, 
Mtllersburg, Penn.: national conductor. B. I*. I*y3e*. Valdosta, Ga.; national inspec- 
tor, A. I*. Thompson. Hew Britain, Conn.: national guarl. J. W. Allison, Washing- 
ton, D. C. The Order has camps la twenty- two States, representing a tnembexabio 
of 138,«00. ^^ 

Patriots and Founders of America. 

Organized. New-York City, May 13, IF9B,— Object: To bring together (he descend- 
ants of the founders of the country and those patriots who fought in tee RevoUettea: 
to teach reverent regard for their names, their deeds and their heroism; to ' 



PATRIOTIC SOCIETIES. 



211. 



patriotism among the members: to discover, collect and preserve records, manuscripts, 
monuments and history relating to the genealogy and history of the first colonists and 
their ancestors and descendants, and to commemorate and celebrate events to_the his- 
tory of the Colonies and (Republic Eligibility: Any man above the age of twenty-one 
years, of good moral character and reputation, a citizen of the United States and who, 
is lineally descended in the male line of either parent from an ancestor who settled in 
any of the original colonies, from May 13, 1607, to May 13, 1667, and whose Inter- 
mediate ancestors in the same line adhered as patriots to the cause of the Revolu- 
tionary War. Officers: Governor General, Admiral George Dewey, U. 8. N.; deputy 



governor general, Edward Hagaman Hall, New-Yo 



chaplain general, the Rev, 



Charles • Wadeworth, Pennsylvania; secretary general, Theodore Oilman, New- York; 
treasurer general, Henry D. Miller, New-York; attorney general, Walter 8. Logan, 
New-York; registrar general, Walter 0. Faxon, Connecticut; genealogist general, 
Edward Everett Bill, Connecticut; historian general,- Harry Atwatcr, New-Jersey; 
eounefllors general for three years, Theodore S. Gold, Connecticut; James Albert Betts, 
New-York, and Carlton M. Moody, Pennsylvania, 

Second Army Corps Armorfattoa. 

Officers: Charles Lyman, Washington, D. C, president; De Witt C. Ssrague, vice- 
president for 1st Division; Orville Dewey Thatcher, vice-president, 2d Division; Naf- 
thaniel Shatswell, vice-president, 3d Divsion; H. G. Bradley, secretary and treasurer; 
Itev.* RV S. Stevens, chaplain; William P. Seville, historian; James Mfeerea, sergeant- 
at-arms. Executive committee— Richard W. Tyler, Charles F. Humphrey, William S. 
ShaUenberger, James 8. Wyckoff, John Finn. 

Society of the Amy of the Cumberland, 

Organised in 1872. Officers: President, General Gates P. Thurston, Asheville, Tenn.j 
corresponding secretary. • Major W. J. Colburn, Chattanooga, Tenn.: recording secretary, 
Orlando A. Somers, Kokomo, Ind.; treasurer. General Frank G. Smith, Washington; his- 
torian. Colonel G. C.^Kniffen, Washington; vice-presidents— Colorado, Colonel W. H. 
Fitch; Connecticut, Colonel A. W. Phillips: Delaware, General James H. Wilson; Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Genera] J. C. Breckinridge: Georgia, Major. George 8. Davis; Illinois, 
Major Matthew H. Peters; Indiana, Major Milton Garrigue; Iowa, General D. B. Hen- 
derson; Kansas, Captain C. O. TannlhiU; Kentucky, Captain John Speed; Maine, General 
Francis Fessenden; Maryland. Lieut. T. J. Cannon; Massachusetts, General Horace 
N. Fisher: Michigan, General H. M. Duffield; Minnesota. General J. W. Bishop; Mis- 
souri, Colonel John Cenover; Nebraska, General F. C. Mander&m; New- York, John 
J. McOook; Ohio, General James Barnett; Pennsylvania, Colonel Archibald Blakelely; 
Tennessee. Genera] I. T. Wilder; Wisconsin, Captain George L Robinson; tbo Philip- 
pines, General Henry C. Corbin. Executive committee — General James Barnett, Cleve- 
land, chairman; General C. H. Groevenor, General J. G. Parkburst,. Captate H. S f 
Chamberlain. Captain J. W. Foley, General E. A. Carman, General Smith D, Atkins, 
Major J. M. Farquhar. 

Society of Ike Army of the Ohio. 
- Officers: President, Lieutenant General John M. Schoneld; first vi c e- p re s ident, 
Oesera l Thomas J. Henderson; treasurer. Major J. F. Stewart; secretary and historian, 
J. Praise. Richard, Washington, D. C; executive committee— Captain w. F. McMillan, 
Captain' J. U Thornton, . Colonel John A. Joyce, Captain Gideon Lyon, Captain R. A. 
Regan, N. N. *McCulkmgh and T. M. Talbnadge; publication eonimittee^-Cantain J. C 
Morgan, Captain Aven Pearson, Colonel John B. Brownlow, Captain F. A. Fenton, 
Lieutenant J. EL Simpson, Captain Armour and Lieutenant N. H. Merrill 
Society of the Army of the Potomac. 

Organised I860. Officers: President, General Henry C. Dwigbt, Hartrcrd> Conn.; 
recording secretary, Genera) Horatio C. King Brooklyn, N. Y.; corresponding secre- 
tary. W. I* Potts; treasurer, Frank C. Holliday. 

Society of the Amy of the Ttneseee. 

Organised at Raleigh, N. C.. April 14, 1865. Headquarters, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Officers; "President, Major General Grehvllle M. Dodge, Iowa; vlce-prealdenta, Brig. 
General Fred D. Grant, TJ. 8. A.; Colonel W. L, Barnum, Illinois; Captain George H. 
Richmond. Iowa; Major A. Sabine, Kansas; Captain J. C. Banks, Ohio* Mrs, James 
A. Sexton, Illinois; Major Leo Raaseur, Missouri: Captain W. L. Cadle, nHnole; Cap- 
tain R. M. Campbell, Illinois; General James G. Wilson, New-York; Captain T. N. 
Stevens, Michigan; Captain E. B. Boper, Iowa; corresponding secretary, Major W. H. 
Chamberlain, Cincinnati, Ohio; treasurer. Major Augustus M. Van Dyke, Cincinnati, 
Ohio; recording secretary. Colonel Cornelius Cadle, P. O. box 36, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Society of Colonial War*. 

Principal offio or a Governor general, Frederic J. De Peyster; vice-governor general, 
General Howlaad PeH, New-York; secretary general. Samuel V. Hoffman, New- 
York: treasurer general, Wm. Macpherson Homer, Bryn Mawr, Penn. A deputy governor 
general is elected from each State society. For New-York, Walter L. Suydam. Any 
male person above the age of twenty-one years, of good moral character and 
reputation, may be eligible to membership in the Society of Colonial Wars who 
is UneaJly descended in the male or female line from an ancestor who served as 
a military or naval officer, or as a soldier, sailor or marine, or as a pri- 
vateeraman, under authority of the Colonies which afterward formed the United 
State*, or in the forces of Great Britain which participated with those of the. said 
Colonies in any vara la which the t*|d Colonies were engaged, or in which they 
enrolled men, from the settlement if Jamestown. May 18. 1*07, to the battle of Lex- 
fisctoa, April ^ "~ 



19, im, or who h*M office to any of the Colonies between the dates 



Zto PATRIOTIC SOCIETIES. 



above mentioned, either as director general, vice-director general or member of the 
council or legislative body. Ir tbe Colony cf New-Netherlands; Governor, Lieutenant or 
Deputy Governor. lord proprietor, member of the King's or Governor's Council or legie- 
tatlve body, in the Colonies 01 New-Yo»k, New-Jersey. Virginia, Pennsylvania and 
Delaware; lord proprietor, Q&vernor, Deputy Govern, f »r member of the council or 
legislative body, in Maryland and the Car o Unas; Governor, Deputy Governor, Gover- 
nor's assistant or Commissioner to the United Colonies of New-England, or body of 
assistants or legislative body in any of the Now-Kngland Colonies. Membership, £.000. 
Next triennial meeting. 1906. 

Society of fee Army of Santiago de Onto. 

Organized to (he Governor's Palace at Santiago de Cuba, July 31* 1898, The pur- 
pose of this organization is to record the history and conserve the memory of the 
events of the campaign whjch resulted In the surrender on the J 7th day of July, 1888, 
of the Spanish army, the city of Santiago de Cuba, M nd the military province to which 
-It pertained. The membership of the Society shall consist of all officers and soldiers of 
the United States Army (including acting assistant surgeons and authorised volunteer 
aids) who constituted the expeditionary force to Santiago de Cuba, ami who worthily 
participated in the campaign between the dates of Jane 14 and. July 17, 1P9S. The 
officers of the National Society are: President, Lient, General Adna R. Cft****^ U. £L 
,A.; first vice-president. Major General Joseph Wheeler, XI. & A., retired; second vice- 
president. Major General J. Ford Kent, U. S. A,, retired; third vice-president. Major 
General H. 8. Hawkins. U. S. A. retired; fourth vice-president, Lieut. Colonel Charles 
Dick; secretary and treasurer, Brig. General Alfred C. Sharpe, U. S, A.; assistant sec- 
retary and treasurer. Captain Hollis C. Clark, Roland Park. Baltimore, Md.; his- 
torian, Major G. Crelghtbn Webb, U. S. V. ; registrar general, Colonel Philip Reade. V. 
8. A. Additional Members of Council— Major General- William R. Shatter, U, S. A-, 
retired; Major General John C. Bates, U. S. A.; Lieutenant General S. B. M. Young, 
U. S. A., retired; Major General S. S. Sumner. U. S. A.; Brig General Adalbert Ames, 
U. S. V.; Major General Wallace P. Randolph, U. S. A., retired; Brig. General Cham- 
bers. McKibbin, U. S. A., retired; Colonel Theodore Roosevelt. V. S. V.. President U. 8. 
A.; Drig. General M. D. Dimmick. U. 8. A., retired; General Charles Dick, U. S. V.; 
General George A. Harries. U. S. V.; Major General John P. Weston, U. S. A.: Lieut. 
Colonel George V. Lauman, U. S. V. Annual duos. $1; life membership, $25. No initia- 
tion fee. There are branch societies in Massachusetts, New-York, Ohio, Michigan, 
!■ Illinois. California and the District of Columbia, ^ 

Society of tbe War of 1812, 

The Society of the War of 1812 was organized September 14. 1814. It is 
composed of State societies, organized successively by the original participants tn the 
war and their descendants In Pennsylvania, Maryland, Massachusetts, Connecticut, 
Ohio. Illinois, District cf Columbia, New- York, New-Jersey and Delaware, the mem- 
bers of each of which are borne upon the membership roll of the General Society. Any 
male person above the age of twenty-one years who participated liv or who is a lineal 
descendant of one who served during the War of 1812, in the Army, Navy, Revenue- 
Marine or Privateer Service of the United States, and who is of good moral character 
and reputation, may become a member. The officers are: President general. John 
Cadwalader. Philadelphia; secretary general, Henry Randall Webb. No. 727 Nineteenth- 
st., N. W., Washington, D, C. ; assistant secretary general, Henry Harmon Noble, 
Albany, N. Y.; treasurer general, Frederick Bacon Phllbrook. Boston, Mass.; registrar 
general, Henry Harmon Noble (acting); judge advocate general. A. Leo Knott. Balti- 
more, Md.; chaplain general, the Rt. Rev. Leighton Coleman, Bishop of Delaware. 
Sons of the American Revolution. 

A society of the lineal male descendants of soldiers, sailors and conspicuous 
patriots of the Revolution, formed to encourage the celebration of. Revolutionary 
anniversaries, the preservation of records and relics and perpetuation of the memory 
and spirit of the men who established popular government in America. This society 
does not admit men of collateral descent. Originally Instituted In California In Octo- 
ber. 1875. and organized July 4. 1876. The several State societies organized a nations/ 
society April 30, ISr'O. Oflicers of the national society are: President general, Francis 
H. Appleton, Boston, Mass. ; vice-presidents general, Morris B. Beardsley. Bridgeport, 
Conn.; John C. Lewis, Louisville, Ky.; Benjamin B. Minor, Richmond, Va.; Henry 
Stoekbrldge, Baltimore, Md. : Nelson A. McCIeary, Chicago, 111.; secretary genera! and 
registrar general, A. Howard Clark, Smithsonian Institution, Washington* D. C: 
treasurer general, Isaac W. Blrdseye, Bridgeport, Conn. 
Sons of the Revolution. 

A society formed to perpetuate the memory and principles of the men of the 
American Revolution. The members are descendants of the active -men of the Revo- 
lution. Officers of the general society: General president, John Lee Carroll, Blllcott 
City, Md. ; general vice-president, Garret Dorset Wall Vroora, Trenton, N. J.; second 
general vice-president, Wilson G. Harvey. Charleston, S. C. : general secretary, James 
Mortimer Montgomery, No. 102 Front-st., New- York; assistant general secretary, Will- 
lam HaDH Harris, Baltimore; general treasurer, Richard McCati Cadwalader, No. 188 
South Twelfth-st., Philadelphia; assistant general treasurer, Henry Cadle, Bethany, 
M<>. : general chaplain, the Rev. Dr. T. B. Green, Cedar Rapids, Iowa r general registrar, 
Walter Oilman Page, No. 90 Westland-ave., Boston; general historian, Holdrldxe Osro 
Collins, Los Angeles. Cat. 

Sons of Veterans, 

The genera) officers of the Sons of Veterans are: Oommandw-ln-cfcief, Hartey ¥. 
Speelman, Cincinnati, Ohio; senior vice oommander-in-ohtef, Arthur M. Bewail, Port- 



THE MASONIC ORDER. 



213 



land, Me.; Junior vice-Commander-in-chief, George H. Stebfcins, Louisville, Ky. Chief 
of staff, R. M. J. Reed,. Philadelphia, Councii-in-Chief — James 33. Seabert, Dwight, 
111.; George Addington, Albany, N. Y. ; Thomas B. Hammond, Boston, Maes, Na- 
tional secretary, Horace H. Hammer, Reading, Perm. 

Thirteenth Army Corps Association. 

Organised to 1*89. Officers: President, GenersH Eugene A. Carr, U. a A. 
(retired); secretary, Fletcher White, Pension Bureau, Washington, D. C; EL C. 
Dougherty. Washington, D. C. 

United Spanish War Veterans. 

Organized April 18th, 1904, by the consolidation of the Spanish War Veterans' 
Association, Spanish-American War Veterans' Association, and the Society of the 
Service Men of the Spanish War. The officers are: Commander-in-chief, Major 
Charles R. Miller, Cleveland, Ohio; senior vice-commander, Major John D. Howland, 
Buffalo, N. Y.; junior vice-commander, Captain E. B. Kirk, San Francisccj. Cail.; 
judge advocate general, John T. Ryan, New-York City; chief mustering: officer, Walter 
H. Zuehlke, Milwaukee, Wis.; historian, J. Walter Mitchell, Washington, D. C. 
Soldiers and Eailors of the regular and volunteer army, navy and raarin3 corps who. 
served honorably during the war with Spain or the insurrection in the Philippines are 
eligible to membership. This organization in scope, character and purpose is similar 
to the Grand Army of the Republic and has a large membership. 
' Union Veteran Legion. 

The general officers of the organization are: National commander, Joseph W. Kay* 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; senior vice-national commander, J. Parke Postles, Wilmington, Del.; 
junior vice-national commander, Joseph A. Joel, New-York City; surgeon general, 
J. P. McCord, Pittsburg; quartermaster general, John M. Keyser, Pittsburg; chaplain, 
the Rev. George C. Cloud, Greensburg, Ind. 

Union Veterans' Union. 

The general o/Rcers of the union are: Commander-in-chief^ Richard L. Gorman, 
St. Paul, Minn.; deputy commander-in-chief, Peter Dick man, Defiance, Ohio; second 
deputy commander-in-chief, Henry H. Chandler, Haverhill, Mass.; surgeon-general, 
W. H. Gerts. Everett, Mass.; ehaplain- in-ehief, B. F. Miller, Sod us, N. Y. ; adjutant 
general, 'H. C. Ferguson, St. Pau». Minn.; quartermaster general, Cassius M. Rose, 
St. Paul, Minn.. Executive committee— J. R. Blackweil, St. Paul Minn.; Patrick 
Hayes, Chelsea, Maine; F. C. Knowlton, Chelsea, Mass.; R. A. Stephenson, Manches- 
ter, Ohjo; J. C. Blodgett, Clinton. Iowa; Fred S. Snow, New-Haven, Conn.: G. K. Hall, 
St. Louis, Mo-.; Josepn R. Curtis, Portsmouth, N. H. ; James A. Hard, Rochester, N. Y. 

THE MASONIC ORDER. 

MASONIC GRAND £ODGES OF NOliTII AMERICA. 



Grand Lodges. 



Alabama 

Arizona 

A rkansas 

British Columbia .. 

California 

Canada •••• 

Colorado 

tv eeticnt 

Delaware 

Dist. of Columbia.. 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana •••• 

Indian Territory . . . 

Iowa .....* 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine .•• 

Manitoba 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota ......... 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Jebrnska 

Nevada * IGeorge Gillson 

New-Brunswick '.A. I. Trueman 

New-Hampshire Ira A. Chase. 



Grand Masters. 



Henry H. Matthews. 

George Shand 

Styles T. Rowe 

W. J. Bowser 

George W. Hunter. . 

Benjamin Allen 

Benj. L. James 

A sa P. Fitch 

R. Henry Young. . . . 

Luthin R. Ginn 

Chas. W. Johnson... 
Max Moyerhardt. . . . 
Albert W. Gordon.. 
William B. Wright. , 
George B. Grimes.. 
Wilson O. Burton.. . 
Sumner Miller. ...... 

Saml. R. Peters 

R. H. C. Rea 

L. P. Dclahoussie. . 
Hugh R. Chaplin... 

A.* Chisholm 

Thos. J. Shryock... 

BaaJis Sanford 

F. K. Tuncll 

Henry M. Tusler.,.. 
Thos. R. Franklin.., 
Lcroy B. VaUlant. . . 
Lew Li. Callaway... 
Chas. E, Kurnham. . 



_J?ran<i JSecretary's address. 

Geo. A. Beauehamp, Montgomery. 

George J. Roskruge, Tuscon 

Fay Hempstead, Little Rock.,... 

R. A. Brett. Victoria 

George Johnson, Han Francisco. . . . 

Hugh Murray, Hamilton 

Chas. H. Jaeofcson, Denver.. 

John H. Barlow, Hartford 

Benjamin F. Bar tram, Wilmington 
Arvine W. Johnston, Washington 
YVilber p. Webster, Jacksonville.. 

\V. .V Wolihin. Macon 

TWruhllus W. Randal*, Boise 

IJ 11. C. Dill, Bloomington 

Calvin W. l'rather, Indianapolis.. 

Joseph S. Murrow. Atoka ; 

Newton R. Parvin, Cedar Rapids.- 

Albert K. Wilson, Topeka 

Henry B. Grant, Louisville 

Richard Lambert, New -Orleans. . 

Stephen Beny, Portland. 

James A. Ovas, Winnipeg 

William M. Isaac, Baltimore 

Sereno D. Ni-ekerson, Boston. . , . , . 

Lou B. Winsor, Reed City j 

Thomas Montgomery, St. Paul... 

Frederick Speed, VicKsburg 

John R, Parson, St, Louis 

Cornelius Hodges, Helena 

Francis K. White. FlaUstnoulii. . 

C. N. Noteware, Carson City 

J. Twining Hart, SI. John 

Frank D. Woodbury, Concord.. . 



Mem- 

_ber«. 

lb, 393 

1,(523 

12,410 

2,024 

29,403 

32,708 

10,559 

10,047 

2,002 

7,004 

5,432 

24,120 

1,954 

70,921 
40,190 

5,<?<9 
34,595 
24,742 
25,410 

7,J-'98 
24,011 

4,274 
10.203 
45,370 
49,724 
39,474 
11,457 
39,0*0 

a,7«) 

14,190 

9N6 

2,004 

0,572 



*14 



THH MASONIC ORDBR. 



MASONIC GRAND LODGES OF NORTH AMERICA— (Continued). 



Grand Lodges. 



New- Jersey 

New-Mexico 

New- York 

North Carolina .. 
North Dakota .... 

Nova Scotia 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Prinee Edward Isl'nd 

Quebec 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina. ... 
South Dakota .... 
Tennessee .•...»«.». 

Texas 

Utah ..— 

Vermont . .►... .-. . . 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia ... 

Wisconsin • 

Wyoming...., 



Grand Masters. 



BenJ. F. Wakefield. 
George W. Ward... 
Frank H. Robinson. 

W. 8, Llddell 

James W. Foley. . . . 
Ctoas. R. Smith.... 
Clifford G. Itallou.. 
Geo. H. Phillips.... 

Thomas Gray 

James W. Brown... 

Benj. Rogers 

D. A. Mansoa 

Jos. W. Freeman... 
John R. Bellinger. . 
Ivan W. Goodner... 
James W. Irwin 

A. W. Campbell 

Ohas. S. Varian. . . . 

Olln W. Daley 

Thos. N. Davis 

Bdw. H. VanPatten. 
Geo. W. McClintlc. . , 
David H. Wright.... 
F. A. Lttckfleld 



Grand Secretary* s address. J 

Thomas H. R. Red way, Trenton.. 
Alpheus A- Keen, Albuquerque. . . . 
Bdward M. I* Ehiers, New-York. 

John C. Drewry, Raleigh 

Frank J. Thompson, Fargo 

Thomas Mowbray, Halifax 

J. H. BromweU. Cincinnati...... 

James S. Hunt, Stillwater 

James F. Robinson. Bugene 

William A. Sinn, Philadelphia... 

Nell Macketvie, Summerside 

Will H. Whyte. Montreal. ......;: 

S. Penrose Williams. Providence. 
Charles Ingelsby, Charleston ; . . : . 
George A. Pettigrew, Flaudreau. . 

John B. Garrett, Nashville 

John Watson, Houston 

Chris. J. .Dtehl. Salt Lake City.. 
Henry H. Rose* , Buruagten . ..... 

George W. Carrington, Richmond. 

Thomas M. Reed. Olympia 

Hiram R. Howard, Point Pleasant 

William W. Perry, Milwaukee 

W. U Kuykendall. Saratoga. ... . . 



Mem— 

_bers. 

22.102 

1,481 

132.687 

13.361 

4,847 

4.171 

58,243 

5.219 

6.953 

64,997 

4,433 

6.691 

7,251 

5.710 

18,565 

36.43C 

1.151 

11.288 

15,001 

7.961 

9,399 

ao.sn 

1,469 
068.935 



Total ....|1, 



New-Tart: Grand Lodge. — Officers: Grand master, Frank H. Robinson. Hor 
nellsviUe; deputy grand master, Townsend Scudder; senior grand warden, S. Nelson 
Sawyer. Palmyra; junior grand warden, Charles Smith, Oneonta: grand treasurer. 
Frederick P. Morris, Flushing; grand secretary, Edward M. I* Khiers. New- York. 



ANCIENT ACCEPTED SCOTTISH RITE. 

The Supremo Council of Sovereign Grand Inspectors General, thirty- third and 
last degree of the Ancient Accepted .Scottish Rite of Freemasonry for the United 
States of America, their Territories and Dependencies, Orient of New York 

Officers of the Supreme Council. — Sovereign grand commander, M. W Bayllss 
Washington, D. C; lieutenant grand commander. C. W. Edwards.' Albany; minister of 
state, George Gibson. Washington; treasurer general, Holden O. -Hill, Providence - R> 
I.; secretary general. M. W Morton. Providence; master of ceremonies, Samuel G 
Bberly, Washington; keeper of archive*. James H. Curtin, New*-York: grand marshal! 
John A. GUdden, Dover, N. H.; standard bearer, William Bl. Blxby, Haverhill, Mass/; 
captain of the guard. Peter O. Anderson^ Brooklyn. This Supreme Council was- or- 
ganized In the city of New- York on the 28th day of October, 1807, and exercises juris- 
diction over the whole of the United States* 



KNIOIITS TEMPLAR. 
Officers of the Grand Commander?, State of New-York* — At the animal 

conclave of the Grand Commande.ry of Knights Templar of the State of New- 
York, held at Saratoga Springs. September & and 6» 1905. the following officer* were 
elected and installed: Grand commander, Erastus C. Knight, Buffalo, deputy grand 
conr.mander, Adelbert P. Knapp, Saratoga Springs; grand generalissimo, Herman R. 
Kretschmar, New- York; grand captain general, Edwin B. Anderson, Palmyra* grand 
senior warden, Edwin C. Hall, Syracuse; grand Junior warden, J. Carlisle' Loudon, 
New-York; grand prelate, Rev. Warren C. Hubbard, Brooklyn; grand treasurer, 
George A. Newell, Medina; grand recorder, John EL Bonnington, No. 27 East fclst-st., 
Now-York; grand standard bearer, Guy W. Shoemaker, Elmira; grand sword bearer, 
T. Henry Dumary, Albany; grand warder, EJdward A. Kraussman, New-York; grand 
captain of the guard, James H. Kelley, Albany; chairman of committee on corre- 
spondence, John W. Jenkins, New- York. The ninaly-third annual conclave will he held 
at Albany, Tuesday, September 4, 1906. 



StJFKEMK COITNCCL, A* A* SCOTTISH RITE. SZJ> DEGBKB* 

Officers of the Sovereign Grand Consistory.-— Most putssant sovereign grand 
commander, Andrew J. Provost, Temple Court, New-York; puissant lieutenant grand 
commander, Newton W. Thompson, Albany, N. Y. ; grand orator and minister of 
state. Benjamin C Leveridge, New-York; grand sec. -general, Alfred C Dupont, 
No. 310 West Twenty-thlrd-st., New-York; grand treas. -general, Judah Moses, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y.; grand marshal-general, George A. Strause, New-York; grand master- 
general of ceremonies, Jacob W. Riglander, New- York; grand standard bearer, George 
C. GUI, Brooklyn; grand captain of the gi*ard, Cyrus BL Porter, Buffalo. The 
official address of the Supreme Council Is No. 320 Temple Court, Beekznan-et- New- 
York. '*■ 



AMERICAN LEARNED SOCIETIES, 



Academy of Natural Science*, «f FhM- 
adelpikte* — Founded in 18-11 antf devoted 
to tbe cultivation of the natural sciences. 
President, Samuel O. Dixon;, vice-presi- 
dent*!, Arthur Krwin Brown, Edwin" G. 
Conk}fo; recording secretary, Edward J 
Nolan; corresponding secretary, J. Perey 
Moore; treasurer. George Vaux. jr. Hna 
9 library of 63.000 vofaraea and valuable 
scientific 'eoHecUana, 

Actuarial Society of America^— P~e*i- 
dent. R. W. Weeks; first viee-president.. 
Dantef H. Wells; seeond viee-president, 
John K. Gore; secretary, Arthur Hunter, 
N*w-York City: treasurer,. A< A. Welch, 
editor of tie Transactions, Clayton C. 
HilL AnsoD meeting in May* Annua* 
dneer. III for aaseclates. SIO for member*. 
Menibcra hfp-, IS*. Organised fn 188& fen* 
fbe promotion ot actuarial science. 

American Academy of Arts nod Bri- 
encea. — President, William W. Goodwtn, 
nombrtdre. **»*•.:; ▼lce-nreeWenls» John 
Tumnrlrtrev Henrv P. WaTeott. John C? 
Gray; eorroapondln* secretary; Edwin *?. 
Half; Cambrtdga; Mass.: treasurer,. Charles 
P. BowdKeh Jamaica Plain, Mass. ; II- 
svarf*n. A. l-awrenee Rotcft, Haston. Mass. 
Resident fettcws, 186; associate fellow*,. 
•A: foreign Honorary members, 73. Only 
rrslflents of Msneachwetls nro ellgibks to 
election as resident fellows. 

Arterfess Aeadesny of Mo*r~h«*. — 
President. Bor-Iv C. Hawley, Burlington, 
Vt; viee^-preoHtenta. Helen- C Putnam,. 
ProvW^twe, R. 1.; Geo. W. McCasfcey. 
War* W*vn*. I**».r 71. B. F»WB; ffifw»: 
J. T. Sevcy, Tooealoosav Ala.; secretary 
and t rwBw n. Cnartea Mclntire; East on: 
Fn.; assistant secretary,. & C. Stanton,. 
OktaagQ* TMrty-nrat animal meeting at 
Boat** Mam, Batwdav June % and Maw- 
day, Jane 4, IdOtt. Admission fe«y f&. An- 
nan) tfvea. %%. Membership, t2*L Organ- 
ised in t8H to encourage taa> prone* educa- 
tional preparatto* of- pbyateiana. 

Jbaanrtnnnv' Ai adorns of Foifsaenf sowt 
sosel Social Hufcmiwj Tmsji1>iiI. I* & 
Bow*. University of Peanayferanin? tIco- 
parafdonts, fltamve* VcCwm Ltedany, Unt- 




rerstty of 

Penns y lv ania; nr aa si i rrT , ?tuart Wood. No* 
#99 Ctoatnut-o*.. Fhinnlelpfcfcas counsel, 
fWn*m Racers Woodruff. Norta- AnwHn" 
Bulla***. P n fl adi t»W i > ribrartan. Cart Kef- 
say, Unfaoiaity of Pennsylvania. Aanaal 
•DOS) $fv 1M menOtorsnip. flflO. ©rgan- 
toed In Mow to nrosaoo* seienrrfte study 
ha w ligati on of the aortal softeneea. 



D- Wean; vice-presidents. 

Lowell Lfncofes-. New- York: John H. Con- 
verse* Fniladelnhfck; Everett N. Bee. Sat 
Francisco; 8. O Hopkins, Washington; 
John a CSovetend, ftoartanfevr*. a C: 
nnaas> A. Bmyt*. Pelzerr, S. C. and F. 
Hettyer, CMeaco; treaanrer, Joaopa* R. 
Patter sen t New- York; reeretary. John 
FootC P> a Bon No. X60d, New-York. 
Memberahlp, BQt. AaaaaJ **** $3ML Or- 
gautaed In If 88. 

Inisrirm Aasocnrtfoti fa- taw A«rr*w-*- 
patn* «s flesonee Prfsidenca M. Wood- 
ward, Waanknifton Um\«rfei^, bft. Juoau*. 



Mo.; penrianem secretary, U ©, HowaveV 
Cosmo* Cluh. Waahingtoav D. C; general 
secretary. C. A. Waldo, Lafayette* lad.; 
secretary of the couneLt, John F. BayfosaV 
Waahiiictoa. J}. C; treasurer. R. ft. 
Woodward;, Gamecrfe tnstiiuti^n, Waaa- 
ingrton, D. C. Admission, fee. $5: anmusA 
dues, $3; life membership, $50, Memntr-. 
ship, 4L0OOL Orgaoiixed in 1847. "J. 

American Bar As.sacfarlon. — Preaideirt* : 
Georire R. Pec*. a>ica«o; secretary; Joan. 
Hinkley, Na 21 &• North Charles-«t., BaM^> 
more.; treasure r 4 Frederick E. WnTliaain 
37 Tweddle BuildtoK, Alaaoy, H* -Y.- Tho 
membership, nsimh^ra about a.©0<X Thtoi 
associaUoat at. la wy era was orsaniaed- > ' tn>^ 
1«78. * . :■ .' • .' | 

Amerleaa Cbemfeal 8oH«ty. — Presi- 
dent, Franefe P. ' VeiraWe^ Lfniversity ©f 
vr-rtfr rusroHba;' Chape* Hlir, N. €.; seerW- 
taiy, Wtlliairt A, Nbyea, Bareaif ef Standi 
aids, WasMn^toti, D. C Ann*** does, ftti 
Membership^ 3,000, Gkgnrri»ed fta MTO W# 
the advancement ef etwmk#rf and tA4 
promotion of chemi«al reaeardi. 

American fjtvla 1 ssoelattonv—Preg^ 
dent, J. Horace McFariand. Harrisburg; 
Perm.; vlee-preslde»ta, George Foster Pea- 
body. »«iw-York; FraaJtHn MacYeaghv 
Chicago, and Jamew D. Phektnv San Fran- 
cisco. CaJ.; eorrespondin^ secretary, Clin^ 
ten Rogers Woodruff; Phifadeiphia; tareaa* 
«rer. Ws, B. Htrwiandv New-Torn. Tnw 
league is a federation^ «tf ora^nteattioaw 
and individuals ta promote the nisjaav Bte 
ef American cowaUwrttiea, 

Amorleaa Dialoet Sseisty 
Processor Geor#e Her* " 
MSehigan, Aim Arbor, 
tary-trenanrer. Frotr 
Western Beaervo 
Ohio. Annual 

3CK). Oranniaeo nt 1889 for fn« stnww «t 
the- pronunciation awf nsaao of Amerfca* 
Enrlish when dlfltertaa: frant scnarafte aa> 
eepted uaase. 



* aaelotjF^—Pr nwlftini^ 
Renvpf. ^Wpjtvdrafcy e* 
Mr« Mien., and a*W 
fj ftkwr fA F . ~ 
r_ Oksveysttj^ 4 

nr%« for tl? 



OvF. Bnt«r»e% 
CMvekweX 



Ml A. FwV 




President, Frank 

Masnv ; seere*ary-<i issimi u . Frami 

tar. Itnwon ». T 

MemoershJnv J.00CL _ 

the encanra««nioni of 

ta» naWlcatian «f 

and the 

at 

Awferiran W+>HT+ -mw mymtti* Ansa* 
datn>»— PresldeiTt, WIRtan* a finomr. 
New-York; su^reiary. Albert C Gey* 
aer, Mov »2 WiBfe-aveu Mev>-Y<rrk; 
and treasurer, Riekard J. Nuaa. Savan- 
nah, Ga> Annual dttea, $& Mentbershfpv 
200; Organised in 18*2 far the pnrpoaf 
of deterannina: too. limUatioao and possi- 
bilities of th* eleetarke cwtent to medietas 
and s»rgen» 

American Kafomofoaical Sortety.— 
Pre^tdenl. PaOip P. Carrert; vrce-prest- 
dent, H. W. Wcnzel; secretary, Henry 
bkinner. Fhiiaderphia. Membership, 129. 
Organized in 185d for ftke study of inaeets. 

American Forestry Assorlatiott. — Pres- 
kfen-t. Jamea Wilson, Secretary «f Agrt» 
k'uKure. x\ ashtnKton, D. C. ; rice- presi- 
dent, James W. Ptaebot, N^w-York; cv«^ 
veapoadin« aeeratary r H. M. 8nier, Wa*rt- 
iBK^un, Aj. C; Heeoraias secretary, Kd- 




*1« 



AMERICAN LEARN ED SOCIETIES. 



ward A, Rowters. New-Havson. Conn.; 
treasurer. Otto J. J. Luebkert. Washing- 
ton, D. C. Annual dues, $2; sustaining 
membership, $25 a year, and life member- 
ship, $100. Membership, 2,400. Organized 
In 1882; incorporated January 25, 1897. to 
encourage protection and teach proper use 
of forests. 

American Antiquarian Society. — Pres- 
ident, < — — — : — ; vice-presidents, Edward 
Bverett Hale, Roxbury, Mass., and Samuel 
Abbott Green, Boston, Mass.; secretary 
for foreign correspondence, Franklin Bow- 
ditch Dexter. New-Haven, Conn.; secre- 
tary for domestic correspondence, Charles 
Francis Adams, Lincoln, Mass.; record- 
ing secretary, Charles Augustus Chase. 
Worcester, Mass,; treasurer, Nathan ial 
Paine, Worcester, Mass. ; librarian, Ed- 
mund Mills Barton, Worcester, Mass. 
Admission fee, $5. Annual dues, $5 
from New-England members. Resident 
membership, 140. Organized In 1812 for 
the purpose of collecting and preserving 
the antiquities of our country, and to 
contribute to the advancement of the arts 
and* sciences not only in the United States, 
but tn other parts of the globe. 
- American Genealogical Society. — Pres- 
ident, M. B. Poole. Ithaca, N. Y. : sec- 
retary-treastmer. I*. Nelson Nichols. No. 
187 Montague-st., Brooklyn. A society 
of skilled genealogical compilers. Previ- 
ous service in comnlling family records 
required for membership. 

American Geographical Society, No. 15 

West Eighty-first -st., New-York City. — 
President, Commander R. E, Peary. C. 
E. U. S. N.; vice-presidents, C. C. Tif- 
fany, W. H. H. Moore and D. O. Mills; 
foreign corresponding secretary. Professor 
William Libbey, domestlo corresponding 
secretary, Chandler Robbins; recording 
secretary, Anton A. Raven; treasurer. W. 
R. T. Jones. Annual dues, $10. Member- 
ship. $1,400, Organized in 1852 to encour- 
age geographical exploration and* to aid- 
in spreading geographical knowledge. 

American Historical Association.— 

President, John Bach McMaster, Phila- 
delphia; secretary. A. Howard Clark, 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. 
C; corresponding secretary, Charles H. 
Haskins, Cambridge, Mass.; treasurer, 
Clarence W. Bo wen. Admission fee. $3. 
annual dues, $3. Membership, 2,200. 
Organized in 1884 for the promotion of 
historical studies. Incorporated by Con- 
fess in 1889. 

American Institute of Architects.— 

Offices and library, The Octagon, Wash- 
ington, D. C. President, W. S. Eames. St. 
Louis; first vice-president, Alfred Stone, 
Providence; second vice-president. Cass 
Gilbert, St. Paul. Minn.; secretary and 
treasurer, Glenn Brown, Washington, D. 
C; auditors, Robert Stead, J. G. Hill, 
Washington; directors Frank Miles Day, 
Philadelphia; J. M. Donaldson, Detroit, 
Mich.; W. A. Boring, New-York- 
American Institute of Electrical En- 
gineers. — President, Schuyler S k a a t s 
Wheeler, Ampere. N. J.; treasurer George 
A. Hamilton, 463 West-st., New-York; 
secretary, Ralph W. Pope, No. 95 Liberty- 
st., New-York. Admission fee, $5. A- 
nnual dues $10 for associates, and $15 for 
members. Membership 3694. Organized in 



1884 for the advancement of electrical en- 
gineering. 

American Institute of Homoeopathy.— 

President. W. E. Green, Little -Rock, 
Ark.; first vice-president, W. A. Dewery, 
Ann Arbor, Mich; second vice— presi- 
dent, C. E. Sawyer, Marvin. Ohio; 
general secretary, Ch. Gatchell, No. 100 
State-st.. Chicago; registrar, J. Rlchey 
Horner, Cleveland, Ohio; treasure?, T. 
Franklin Smith. No. 264 Lenox-ave., New- 
York. Admission fee. $2; annual dues, 
$5. Membership, 2,300. Organized April 
10, 1844. Next meeting, September, 1906, 
Atlantic City, N..-J. 

American Institute of Mining Engi- 
neers. — President, James Gayley, No. 
71 Broadway, New- York; secretary, R. W. 
Raymond, No. 99 John-st., New-York; 
treasurer. Frank Lyman. No. 88 Wall-st., 
Nev-York. Annual dues. $10.- Member- 
ship, $4,000. Organized in 1871; incorpor- 
ated in 1905. 

American Mathematical Society. — 
President, W. F. Osgood,, Harvard Univer- 
sity, Cambridge, M a s.«. ;* secretary, F. N. 
Cole, Columbia University. Admission 
fee, $5; annual dues. $5. Membership, 
500. Organized in 1888 as the New-York 
Mathematical Society; reorganized in 1894 
as the American Mathematical Society to 
encourage and" maintain an active interest 
in mathematical science. 

American Medical Association. — Presi- 
dent, Lewis S. McMurtry, Louisville, Ky,; 
president-elect. W. J. Mayo, Rochester. 
Minn.; secretary, George H. Simmons, Chi- 
cago; treasurer. Frank Billings. Chicago. 
Admission fee, $5; annual dues, $5. Mem- 
bership, 21.000. Publishes "Journal of the 
American Medical Association." Organ- 
ized in 1847 for the purpose of fostering 
the growth and diffusion of medical 
knowledge. 

American Microscopical Society.— 
President, Professor Simon H. Gage, 
Cornell University. Ithaca. N. Y. ; first 
vice-president. Dr. A. M. Holmes, Denver, 
Cbl.; second vice-president, professor H." 
A Weber, University, of Ohio, Columbus, 
Ohio; secretary, Professor Robert H. Wol- 
cott. University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 
Neb.; treasurer, J. C. Smith, New Or- 
leans. La,; custodian, Magnus Pflaum, 
Pittsburg. Pa. Admission fee, $3. An- 
nual dues. $2. Life membership, $K0. 
The society was organized for the purpose 
of encouraging microscopical research. It 
has invested funds to the extent of $2,150, 
known as the Spencer-Tolles Fund, the In- 
come of which is granted to members to 
aid In the prosecution of research. 

American Numismatic and Archaeo- 
logical Society, No. 1,271 Broadway, 
New York- — President, Archer M. Hunt- 
ington; vice-presidents, Daniel Parish, Jr., 
Richard Hoe Lawrence; recording secre- 
tary, Bauman Lowe Belden; correspond- 
ing secretary, Henry Russell Drowne; 
treasurer, Charles Pryer; librarian, 8. 
Whitney Dunscomb, jr.; curator, William 
Polllon. Admission fee, $10: annual dues, 
$10. Membership, about 300. Organised 
in 1858; incorporated in 1865, 

American Oriental Society. — President, 
Daniel C. Gilman. Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, Baltimore; corresponding secretary, 
B. Washburn Hopkins. Yale University, 
New-Haven, Conn. Annual dues, $B. 



AMERICAN LEARNED SOCIETIES. 



817 



Membership, 325. Organized in 1842 to 
promote Oriental scholarship. Publishes 
an annual journal in two parts. 

American Ornithologists' Union. — 
President, Charles P. Batchelder, Cam- 
bridge, Mass.; secretary, John H. Sage, 
Portland, Conn. Admission fee. $10, $5 
and $3, according to class of membership, 
annual dues, $5, $4 and $3. Membership, 
820. Organized in 1883 for the advance- 
ment of Its members in ornithological 
science. 

American Philological Association. — 
President. Professor Herbert Weir Smyth, 
Harvard University; secretary-treasurer, 
Professor Frank Gardner Moore, Dart- 
mouth College. Admission fee, $5 ;. an- 
nual 'dues, $3. Membership, 575. Or- 
ganized in 1869 for the advancement and 
diffusion of philological knowledge. 

American Philosophical Society -Hall, 
No. 104 South Fifth-st., Philadelphia. 
President, Edgar F. Smith; vice-presi- 
dents, George F. Barker, William B. Scott 
and Simon Newcomb; secretaries, I. 
Minis Hays. Edwin G. Cohklln, Arthur 
W. Goodspeed and Morris Jastrow, jr.; 
treasurer, H. La Barre Jayne. Founded 
In 1743. 

American Physical Society. — Presi- 
dent, Carl Barus. Brown University, 
Providence. R. I.; vice-president, E. I* 
Nichols, Cornell University, Ithaca, N. 
Y.; secretary, Ernest Merrltt, Cornell 
University, Ithaca, N. Y. ; treasurer, Will- 
iam Hallock, Columbia University, New- 
York. 

American Physiological Society.-^ 
President, William H* Howell, Johns Hop- 
kins University;, secretary, Lafayette B. 
Mendel, Yale University: treasurer, Wal- 
ter B. Cannon. Harvard Medical School, 
Boston.. Members of Council — Walter B. 
Cannon, Harvard Medical School; R. H. 
Chittenden, Yale University; William H. 
Howell, Johns Hopkins University; S. J. 
Meltzer, New-York; L. B. Mendel, Yale 
University. 

American- Political Science Associa- 
tion. — President, F. J. Goodnow, Colum- 
bia University; vice-presidents, Woodrow 
Wilson, Princeton; Paul S. Relnach, Uni- 
versity <*»f Wisconsin; Simeon E. Baldwin, 
Yale; secretary-treasurer, W. W. Wll- 
loughby, Johns Hopkins University. 

American Psychological Association.—- 
President, Professor Mary Whiton Calk- 
Ins; secretary. Professor Wm. Harper Da- 
vis, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Penn. 
Annual dues, $3. Membership, 160. Or- 
ganized in 1892 to advance the interests 
of psychology as a science. 

American Public Health Association.—- 
President, F. C, Robinson, Brunswick, 
Me.; vice-presidents, Joseph J. Kinyoun, 
Pennsylvania; Domingo Orvananos, Mex- 
ico, and Richard H. Lewis, North Caro- 
lina; secretary, Charles O. Probst, Colum- 
bus, Ohio; treasurer, Frank W. Wright, 
New-Haven, Conn. Executive Committee 
— Juan Gulteras, Havana, Cuba; H. L. 
Russell, Wisconsin, and William C. Wood- 
ward, Washington, D. C. Admission fee. 
Including dues for first year, $5; annual 
dues, $5. Organized in 1872 to advance 
public hygiene. 

American Society of Civil Engineers.— 
President, C. C. Schneider, Phildelphia; 



President, Charles Harmany, Louisville 
vice-presidents. F< S. Curtis. Boston, an 
S. L. F. Deyo, New- York; secretary 
Charles Warren Hunt, No. 220 West Fifty 
seventh-st., New-York. Admission fee- 
Membership. $30; associate members, $25 
associate>$20; junior. $10.. Annual dues- 
Re&ident members, $25; non-resident mem 
bers, $15; resident associate members, $25 
non-resident associate members, $15; reel 
dent associates. $15; noti-resldent asso 
ciates. $10; resident Juniors, $15; non-resl 
dent juniors, $10. Membership, 3,600. Of 
ganrzed in 1852 far the advancement Q 
engineering knowledge and the mainte 
nance of a high professional standard 
Meetings, first and third Wednesday? ' 
each month (except July and August), ' ! 

American Society of Naturalists.^ 
President, Wm. James, Harvard Univet 
-sity; secretary, W. B. Castle, Howarj 
University; treasurer, Hermann vq 
Shrank, Missouri Botanio Garden, SI 
Louis, Mo. Annual dues, $1. Member 
ship, 332. Organized in 1888 for the ex 
chan#e. of ideas regarding problems o 
natural history. 

American Society of Zoologists.- 
Eastern Branch.— President, W. E. CastK 
Harvard University; vice-president, Wm 
Patten, Dartmouth College; secretar 
treasurer, H. S. Pratt, Haverford Col 
lege; additional members of ex-commltte* 
H. C. Bumpus, American Museum of Nat 
ural History, New-York; H, S. Jennings 
University of Pennsylvania; A. E. An 
drews, Johns Hopkins University. Cen 
tral Branch — President, Frank R. Lllli* 
University of Chicago; vice-president 
Wm. A. Lacy, Northwestern University 
secretary and treasurer, C. H. McClung 
University of Kansas; additional member 
executive committee, Herbert Osborr 
Ohio State University; T. G. Lee, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota; P. H. Eigenmann, In 
diana University. 

American Statistical Aasoclatlon.- 
President. Carroll D. Wright; vice-presi 
dents, Horace G. Wadlin, Henry C 
Adams. Henry Gannett, S. N. D. Nortl 
and Walter F. Willcox; treasurer. S. B 
Pearmain. No. 53 State-st., Boston; sec 
retary, Davis R. Dewey, No. 491 Boyl 
ston-st., Boston. Annual dues, $2. Mem 
bership, 342. Organized in 1839. 

Archaeological Institute of America.- 
President. Professor Thomas D. Seymour 
Yale University; secretary, Professor F 
W. Kelsey, University of Michigan; re 
corder, Professor William N. Bates, Unl 
versity of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 
Annual dues, $10. Membership, 1,450 
Organized in 1879 to promote and dir?o 
archaeological Investigation and research 

Association of American Anatomists- 
President, Charles S. Minot, Harvari 
University; first vice-president, George A 
Piersol, University of Pennsylvania; sec 
ond vice-oresident. J. M. Flint, Unlver 
sity of California: secretary and treas 
urer. G. Carl Huber, University of Miohi 
gan. 

Association for the Protection of th 
Adirondack*. — President, Henry E. How 
land, New- York; vice-tpresidejits, War 
ren Higley, Colonel A. G. Mills, Jame 
MacNaughton, William G. Rockefelle 
and John G. Agar, New-York; treasurer 
Edwin S, Marston, New-York; secretary 
Henry S. Harper. New-York: assistaa 




■ccrelary, * * 
man H 

The •/ 

ottfect* 

,md rl«h, 

iij lb* Ad*- 

<i of American Physician*.— 

BllUan, Chicago; vlcfc- 
New- York, ewsi'w- 
Huff. Albany, N. 5 

sfpiis ounen, Fhlladrl- 
J. P. Croae* 



f»eolo«l<*al fioctaty *»C Ameri«,— P?e*I- 
• N^wvvt, R. I.; 

W. M* Do 
Bin town, w. Va,; editor. J. Stantei 



Modern LdLnguuge AwtHWinM of 
America* — President, ProTtBtinr 
B, Oummeiu liav*rf\>rd Coil's**, 
lord. Pa,; fiacfetafy. Frafeaiwir 15. H. 
rlisimlgent, Harvard Unlv; 
bridee, M4J<9».; treasurer, W 
Harvard University. Mou^nMp. T3U. 
■I dilea. 13. Publication^ .p;.. 

ftauuaal Aosdfmy of t%c\*n?c*. — Prea^ 
idcnt; Alexander Atfaaaia, Cambridge 
Maaa,; vl^rk-pr -:*"■'.■ i n, Bal- 

llmore; luime secretary* Arnold Hag-ue, 
United Si a tea Geological Harvey. Wash- 
lufftcn, fireiKTi secretary, HLmon New- 
comb* WaabltiKtirn; trea*ui> ; 
tiwiut, Washington. Memberalti 
Organised In 1KB 3. Two meetings a year, 
April and November. 

National Film au<>n» I A««ocin-ri»in — 

President, Nathan C 0cha*f»fcr. Harris 

Ph.; vloe-pnsldcD^ William H- 

Maxwell* New-York; ireasurer. J. N. Wil- 

knipcn; permanent &rH?ietary, lrw»n 

Sh»jyiav(J. Vt'nona H Minn, The i 

office* aeiatlott are ai Winona, 

M*iu here hip. &.0OD attire, Jlmked 

and those actively Idi 

wcrk; associate. HmhiO. 
Tne ftfiMclaimti has an 
Invest. *117>0OO„ writer in in- 
creased ty .,..» addition* .if » 10, 000 or 



Of DUt:' 

Mat tuna I Geographic KhhWj, Hub- 
bard Hall, WaFhltii;".r'ii. P 

\|,-v- 
l; £.reaEiirLT t John 

Annua] due*. |2, 
renin, 9.000. Grganls* 

and dlnuslan ar geographic 

Naval Arenilecta ami Marino Engl- 

— Frv.rt dent, Frauols T. Bo wire, 

tivlncy. Mass,; vice-presidents, Hear 

Admiral W. 1,. Cap ph. hOi^r Admiral 

Char I e* W Kae. tJharkir. 

Constructor Frank J* For paid. 
Jo** Charles H* larlng, tfr&nfc fi. 



N«-w-l 









New- York Zo 



- 
Men 

I'fitW* JJJIaoM of 

iTyajfurcr, hi 'i 

. 
prom 
i . r Liu 

Soclct> or American Itarte-rlelcigi'ilp.— 
PreaW': 

Pitaeott, Mnt^ui-hMsell 

urer, I 
PratJ4enct« R, i. 

Xcc\eiy for tli« PromoUoo of Age*- 
cnltanil Science, — Preside n i . 
Amnefey, State Outhgo, Pdm 
Iffanircr, F, Win. Ran. 
dnilaaion fee, p; annu, 
rshtp, KO. Ortraii 
prom o to the sciences applicil tn afirl- 
culture. 

Noflety for flu* Promniloii of ICnei- 
n^eriaff KdaeatJon.— i^rfisfdfnt, 
L. CtiLnilalt, i^rnt-ri IJnl orally p 
N. Y.; vici 

■ 

Mi In S. Ketchnm, l.rii v'rtsUy 

i 
fipaldlnr, TTnlverBlly o» Mlsaoun, 
tila. Mo, Membership. 3B0, 

The .\mFri<'iin Muprr<qUo Ex(rJ*mtfia> 
t ran Soe i c ty * — O b J i* cte : > ? ; i 
slaiion. caopf-ratlcn, tnlerc*!- 

TilnR the firc;r(i3i?at*ofi ol 
mo«quitcjefl wnd meUiofiF for t 
|n;itmn I'^sdent, Uifhnm J. M; 
No. 1«4 Framv-et,, New- York 
mnt. Wake' - €\ K^.rr, N\ 10 Rrii 
New -York: uwwmrt--!- Frorterlek C, llea<4>« 
No, Sftl Ifroadway, New-YOTk; secretary, 
Henry Clay V/eek«. llayirldf!, L* L ; 
aul swy<-(,v KBCDaa HaJI, 

Trlpuae Kui^mw, New- Yoik, 



FOREIGN MISCELI/ANY. 



UVJJSBS OF THE CHIEF COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD. 

(Titles and terms in parentheses.). 



Country. 



I 



Ruler. 



I 



Acceded. 



Abyssinia •*•••[ Menelek H (Emperor) 

Afghanistan. .a.... Hablbullaa Khan (Ameer)...; 

Argentine Republic,.... ' Manuel Quintar.a (President, 6 years) 

Austria-Hungary....... j^ancis Joseph I (Emperor) 

Bavaria.... ......~ 

Belgium . ..••••••-••-• 

Bolivia. ...►-.• •* • »**< 

Brazil... ..;.»•*•*••• 

Bulgaria.. »~»— . ; • « 
Chili... ..~...»«. ~ 
China . ..••••►•*•••"•< 
Colombia. .»..♦• »*♦• • 
Cores..... ~. .»♦♦•.; 
Costa Rica. ..~~~. 

Cuba. *•*• 

Denmark.. ......... 

Dominican Republic 
Ecuador. .'.'. ......... 

Egypt.. 

France... -.. 

Germany. 



Great Britain •£uw;.nl VII (King). 



iOtho I (King) 

Leopold II (King) 

Ysrr.ael Mantes (I*remdent) 
Francisco de Paula Kodrlgues A-lves (Pres- 
ident) ...'..... 

Ferdinand I (Prince) 

Jermari Rlesco (President) 

Kwang Hsu (Emperor* 

Rafael Reyes. (President. 6 years) 

L»i Hui (Emperor) 

Ascension Bsqulvel ^President) 

Thomas Estrada Palma (President, 4 years) 

Christian IX (King) 

Carlos !«'. Morales (President) 

Ijixardri Garcia (President. 4 years) 

Abbas n (Khedive) 

Emile Loubet (President, 7 years) 

Willi a it II (Emperor and King of Prussia). 



Greece 
Guatemalan ........ 

Hayti ...» 

Honduras* .••»••••• • 

Italy —.... — .. 

Japan •*.— — 

Liberia. . •• •••••••••. 

Mexico........—.... 

Montenegro, ...._-.. 

Morocco. • •* . ..»«..... 

Nethe rlanda. ++**,••+ 

Nicaragua.. ..— 

Norway • «••••• 

Panama. ..;•• 

Paraguay. ♦ • -.*« .v-. 

Persia. ..... •« 

Peru. ...*•»«••••••»» 

Portugal . . *.« «»« •• • 
Prussia. . ...«..~«-«. 

Rumania.. . •••«- P ~»_ 

Russia • _• • . .-. .« 

Salvador •• . . 

Baxony . ...»••«•••«•• 

Bervla. 

Slam. . . ... ..~.~.~.. 

8pain *•-••».• 

Sweden . . . . ~ * 

8 wit w rland 

Turkey.. — ...-.. 

Uruguay 



George. I (King of the Hellenes) 

Mam.*l Estrada Cabrera (President. 6 years) 

Aloxs Nonl (President); 

Mam: el Bomila (President, 6 years) 

Victor Emmanuel III (King) 

Mutsu Hlto {Emperor)..*. 

Arthur Barclay (President) 

Porflrlo Diaz (President, 6 years) 

Nicholas I XPrince) 

Muley Abdul Aziz (Sultan)... 

Wllhelmlna (Queen) .' 

Jos6 Santos Zelaya (President, 4 years).... 

Haakon VII. ". 

Manuel Amador (President, 4 years) ....... 

Juan B. Gaona (President. 4 years) 

Muzaffer-ed-Dln (Emperor) .;.. 

.Tos6 Pardo (President) .....".......... , 

Carlos I (King) 

(See Germany) -. 

Charles I (King) .* 

Nicholas II (Czar) 

P. JosG Eecaldn (President) 

Frederick Augustus (King).... 

Peter I (King) 

Chulalonkorn (King) 

Alfonso XIII (King) 

«. )scar n. (King) 

M. Forrer (President, 1 year)....' 

Abdul Hamld II (Sultan) 

Jos* batlle y Ordonez (.President) 



March 12, 1880 
October 3, 1901 
'October 12, 1904 
December 2, 1848 
June 13. 1880 
December 10, 1886 
August 16, 1904 

November 15, 1909 
July 7, 1887 
July 25, 1901. 
January 12. 1875 
August 7. 1904 
January, 1884 
May 8. 1902 
May 20, 1902 
November 15. 1868 
June 19. 1904 
August 31. 1905. 
January 7, 1892 
February is, i«t*)o 
June IS, 1S88 
January 22, 1001 
June S, 1863 
February H, lg$8 

f lBOfl 

July 8. 1004 
July 31. IflOO 
February 13, 1867 
January 4, lfto* 
December t 1W+4 
August 14, ItfflO 
Jim a f, \SM 
November 23, ISflO 
Decemlnjr t IKXI 
Nov, 3 8, 11*05. 
January. 1901 
December 20. 1004. 
May J, 1S86 
September 24. 1904 
October 11*. IfWO 



Venezuela... Cipri*no Castro (President, .6 years). 



May 10, 1868. 
November 1. 1894 
March 1. 1903 
October 15, 1904 
June 15, 1903 
October 1, 1868 
May 17. 1886 
September 18. 1872 
ucc. 14. 1905 
August 31. 1876 



December 1, 1899 



SWEDEN AND NORWAY SEPARATE. 

The political union of Sweden and Ntorway was declared dissolved by the Storthing 
of Norway on June 7, 1WK5. Dissolution has been desired by Norway for some time 
and the veto by King Oscar II. of an act of the Norwegian parliament establishing a 
separate consular service for Norway was made the basis of separatist action. An ad- 
dress asserting the termination of the union was adopted and sent to King Oscar, 
with an Invitation to that monarch to nominate a member of hla family as Kinq 
of Norway. This Invitation was declined and the sovereign and people of Sweden 
seemed at first Inclined to deny the legality of the Norwegian parliament's attempt 
to break the union. After negotiations lasting until October a pacific agreement was 
reached In the treaty of Karlstadt which permitted separation. This convention wan 
ratified by Norway "Dn October 10 and by Sweden on October 13. In November a 
plebiscite was held to determine whether or not the monarchical form of government 
should be continued by the Norwegians. The vote was 259,563 for a monarchy, and i 
68,264 against It. The crown was ottered to Prince Charles of Denmark, who ao- 
oepted it, becoming King Ilaakon VIL on November 18. 

2tt " "" ~ 









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tfl$. 















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GAM: 5. ti\ 20, GO mid tflQ I 
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.250 TiOO fiiatOftfc, 



. of Eiti/er rfarhiard count he* a?« vain 



J 



CUBA. 



THB CfiMTRAI. GOVWMlfBKT. 

Capital, Havana. 

President. Tomas Estrada Palma 

¥ic^Pre&ident .; .......... •.. — ■■ 

MEMBERS OF THE CABldTOT. 

Secretary <pf tftato and Justice .....Joan. Ptattetea CParrUl 

Secretary of Finance... ....... ..Ruts Rivera 

Secretary of Oovernsnoat .Freyre Andrade 

Secretary of Agriculture. Commerce and Industries . , . — — 

Secretary of Public Instruottoa 



Secretary of Public Works Rafael Montaivo 

Th© island of Cuba, for four hundred years a Spanish colony, was relinquished by 
tbe Spanish Government an a result of the war with the United tttatos, under the 
Treaty of Paris of December 10, 1898. Thereafter for a time the island was occupied 
ami administered by the United States through a Military Governor. Step* toward 
the formation of « native government began with the election of municipal officers 
on June 13. 1900, On September 25. 1900, delegates to a constitutional convention 
were elected, and on November 5, 1800, the convention began rts labors. The work 
of the convention was completed on October X, 1901. A gtaeral election for Governors 
of. Provinces. Representatives in Congress and Senatorial and Presidential elector* 
was held on December 31. 1901. The Presidential electors met on February 24, 1902, 
and chose Tomas Estrada Parma to be first President of the Republic of Cuba. Mr. 
Palma. who waa at -that time a resident of the United States, proceeded to Cuba in 
April, and inado a tour of the island, being everywhere received with popular en- 
thusiasm. On May 20 he was formally inaugurated a* President, the last remains of 
United States control were withdrawn from the island, and the free and independent 
government of Cuba by the Cubans became an accomplished fact. 

The attention of the Cuban Congress was largely occupied during its first session 
by financial questions. A public loan of $35,000,000 was authorised tor tbe payment 
of wages to soldiers of the revolutionary army and for other mgent purposes. The Pres- 
ident was authorized to float the loan at such times ana in such manner as he pleased. 
provided that it was to be redeemable in from ten to forty years, tbe minimum rate 
of issue to be 90- per cent, and the maximum rate of Interest Co be 5 per cent. A 
commission authorized to arrange for floating this loan visited tlie United States in 
1003- In February, 1904, the loan was taken by an American syndicate, headed by 
Speyer & Co. The bonds run forty years at 5 pet cent. To pay the interest on the 
army loan the Cuban Congress passed on February 27. 1903, a Stamp Tax act, which 
met with great criticism and opposition, and was modified by supplementary acts of 
Mav 7 and June 13. These provided for taxes on the Importation of liquors, wines, 
beverages, matches and playing cards, on the exportation of cigars, cigarettes and 
tobacco, and. on the manufacture, sale and consumption of liquors, wines, beers, 
beverages, matches, playing cards, cigars, leaf tobacco and sugar. The tax laws be- 
came effective on November 1. On February 5. 1904. a general increase 'was an- 
nounced in the tariff rates on imports. 

The American Congress having failed fa 1901--'02 to pass any measure authorizing 
tariff concessions on Cuban products in return for similar concessions offered by Cuba 
on American Imports, President Roosevelt authorised the negotiation of a commercial 
treafy with Cuba, which was signed in Havana on December 11. 1902. No action was 
taken on this convention during the life of the 67th Congress; but at a special 
session of the Senate, called March 5, 1903. it was considered, and, with amendments. 
was ratified on March 19. The Cuban Government ratified the amended Instrument 
on March 28. (For full text of the convention see under "C7th Congress, Treaties 
with Foreign Countries." Tribune Almanac for 1904.) By its terms the treaty was 
not to become operative until "approved by Congress,** and a special session cf Con- 
gress was called by President Roosevelt to give this approval. The House of Represen- 
tatives passed oa November 19, and the Senate on December 16, 1903. a blU afluroiug 
the treaty. 

A- naval station cession was agreed on by the two governments by which Cuba 
granted sites for United States stations at Cuantanamo and Bahia Honda. The 
former station was transferred to the United States In November. 1903. On July 2, 
1903. a treaty was signed in Havana confirming Cuba's sovereignty over the Isle of 
Pines. Thlsv convention, which was renewed In 1904. has not yet been ratified by 
the United States Senate. On May 22. 1903. Minister Squiers and Sefior Zaldo. Cuban 
Secretary of State, signed in Havana a permanent treaty between the United States 
and Cuba embodying the terms of the Piatt Amendment. A postal treaty was also 
concluded, and signed by Postmaster General Payne and President Roosevelt in 
Aogust. 1993, perpetuating the regulations fo r the exchange of malls between th e two 

at the average market price of silver for the three months preceding October 1, 1904. 
iUteder former aystenv-Gold: 4 florins <$L929>. 8 florins ($3,868). ducat C$2.287>, 4 
ducats #0.139). Silver: 1 and 2 florins. {Tho sovereign is the standard coin of India, 
but the rupee {$0.8244*6) is the money of account, current at £5 to the roverelgn. 
lAraoy. .794; Canton, .722; Chefoo, .002; Chin Kiang, .707; Fuehau. .609, Haikwan 
f 'osW .139; Hankow, .677; Kiaochow. .714; Nanking, .716; Niuchwang, .679; Ning- 
SeT Pekliu .*<*; Shanghai, .661; Swatow, .669; Takau. .T28; Tten-Tsla, .701. 
_»«4r: Hongkong. .476: British, .476; Mexican chopped, .489. tt£teventy-6ve centi- 
grams fine gold. tttVaa t ue in Mexico, $0.4 98. ; 

221 



90. .G 
beltar 



I 



222 



CUBAN GOVERNMENT AND COMMERCE* 



countries, made when Cuba was under American control. On April 28, 1904, thf 
United States Senate ratified an extradition treaty with Cuba. The Cuban Senate 
ratified thi* convention on January 16, 1905, and It was proclaimed on Feb.. 8, 1906. .; 

President Palma. in hie message to Congress on November 7, 1904, drew an 
optimistic picture of Cuban progress. For the fiscal year ended June 80, 1904, the 
imports were $74,492,000, an increase of $11,872,000. The exports for the same period 
were $94,399,000, an increase of $16,000,000. Sugar alone accounted for $57,700,000, ail 
increase of $14,000,000. The budget for 1905 showed total expenditures of $19,138,102, 
and ' receipts, $19,699,650, leaving a surplus of $661,746. The estimated receipts are as 
'follows: From customs, $17,862,000; consular fees, $260,000; communication, $633:400; 
internal revenue. $683,000; State dues from properties, $257,250, and sundries, $202,000. 
The expenditures were stated thus: Ministry of State and Justice, $473,488; Govern- 
ment, $6,099,214; Finance, $2,253,003; Public Instruction, $3,901,888; Public Works, 
$4,813,854; Agriculture and Industry, $262,347; Judiciary. $1,265,813, and Executive, 
$68,390. 

Fresldent Palm a' e message of Nov. 14, 1905, showed that the Imports for tha 
fiscal year 1904-05 amounted in value to $83,951,000, of which $37,601,000 came from 
the United States, *5,104,000 from Germany, $9,686,000 from Spain, $4,618,000 from 
France, $12,589,000 from Great Britain and $14,353,000 from, other countries. The 
increase in the value of imports over 1903-04 was nearly $14,000,«00. Exports in 1904- 
05 amounted to $99,116 000. of which $84,655,000 went to the United States, $6,190,000 
to Great Britain and- $3,788,000 to Germany. *Kie increase in the value of export* 
over 1903-04 was $6,000,000. The imports from the United States showed an increase of 
$9,000,000, from Germany $462,000, from Spain $747,000 and from Great Britain 
$94,000. Total customs receipts during the fiscal year were $-3,376,068, which exceed- 
ed the estimates by $8,000,000. The total revenue for the fiscal year was nearly 
$20,000,000, against an estimate of $16,500,000. The budget, the President said, could 
be reduced to $16,000,000, with a consequent reduction in taxation, if the State did 
not have to pay $3,444,000 for primary instruction, which ought to be borne by. tha 
avuntamientos according to the constitution, $1,329,000 for sanitation and $244,924 to 
assist the municipalities. 

President Pal ma became in 1905 the nominee of the Moderate party for re-eleo- 
tlon. The Liberals nominated General Jose M. Gomes, but General Gomez subse- 
quently withdrew, leaving a clear fWld for President Pal ma. 

Commerce between the United States and Cuba is already showing a material in- 
crease under the operations of the new reciprocity treaty. That instrument went into 
force on December 27, 1903, and therefore ail the commercial traansactions between 
the two countries since January 1, 1904. reflect the influence of the treaty and furnish 
a measure of its effectiveness. The following table gives the exports to the United 
States and the imports from the United States in the fiscal years from 1895 to 1905: K 



Year ending 
June 30. 

1895 

1*96 

1897 

1898 ........... 

1*99 

1900 



Exports 
to U. S. 
$52,871,259 
40.017,730 
18,406,815 
15,232,477 
25,408,828 
81,371,704 



Imports 
to U. S. 



Year ending 
June 80. 



$12,807,6611)1901 
7,538,880 j M902 
8,259,7761 l U03 
9,661,656 1 1904 

18,616,377 '1905 

26,513,40011 



Exports 

to u. a 



$48,428,068 
34,604,684 
62,942,790 
76,983,418 
86,818.001 



Imports 
_to U. & 
$25,964,901 
26.628,500 
21,761,638 
;27,377,4» 
38,373,600 



Below are given Cuba's imports and exports to and from the principal countries in 
{-the calendar years 1903 and 1904: " . 

CUBAN IMPORTS, 1903 A ND 1 904. \ \ CUBAN EXPORTS, 1908 AND 1904. . 



Country. 



| 1903., | 1904. 



Country. 



I 1903. | 1904. 



United States. ..... {$25,703,100 

10,799,800 

9,113,500 
3,922,000 
8,372,000 



Great Britain. 

Spain 

Germary 

France 

American countries, 

n. e. s 

European countries, 

n. e. s 

Other countries. . . . 



Totals )$63;4C4,500 



8,337,500 



1,892,000 
324,600 



$32,742,000 
12,684,700 
9,707,000 
5,023,800 
4,224,100 

0,686,500 

2,450,100 
563,300 



$77,082,100 



United States 

Great Britain 

Spain 

Germany 

France 

American countries, 

n. e. s 

European countries, 

n. e. s. 

Other countries .... 

Totals 



$00,089,400 
6,590,800 
1.273.200 
5,870.800 
1,132,700 

1,654.500 

81t4O0 
888,000 



$74,466,000 

5,902,500 

731,000 

4,032,300 

1,008,800 

1,693,300 

703.200 
470,200 



$77,20O,8OOf$89,O12»8OO 



Commenting on these figures the Bureau of Statistics of the United States Gov- 
ernment, Department of Commerce and Labor, says: "The United States furniehed 
42.5 per cent, of the total merchandise imports during the calendar year 1904. as 
against 40.5 per cent, during the previous year. The United Kingdom furnished 16.4, 
as against 17.0 in 1903. Spain's share has fallen from 14.3 to 12.6 per cent., while 
Germany's and France's relative shares have risen inconsiderably. 

"The importance of the United States as the principal outlet for Cuban staples 
Is even more pronounced than its leading position in the Cuban import market. 
Moreover, the large gains, both relativ«3 and absolute made by Cuban exports to 
the United States during the last year have reduced the shares in the export trade 
taken by the leading European countries. Thus, while the export* to the United 
States grew from $60,100,000 in 1903 to $74,500,000 in 1904, or from 77.7 per cent: 



::-\ 



THS UNITED STATES OP MHXICO, 






to 83.7 per cent, of the total exports, the share of the United Kingdam tias fallen 
from *e.6O0yO86 to $5,900,600 in 1904; that of Germany has fallen from $5,400,000 to S4~ 
000.000; that of Spain from $1,800,000 to $731,000. and that of France from $1,100,000 to 
$1,000,000. 

"An analysts of the import figures by articles diselrees the fact that the gain 
bi Imports from this country lias been distributed in a fairly eauable manner* bene- 
fiting thus a large number of American interests represented in the Cuban market. 
Thus, the Imports of cotton goods show a gain of over 87 per cent— from $453,100 
In 1003 to $848,500 in 1804— although it should be said that even after such an 
Increase the relative sharo of the United States in the total foreign supply oC cot- 
ton does not exceed 10.4 per cent, as against 54 per cent, supplied by the United 
Kingdom and 18.7 per cent, by Spain. Almost one-half of the manufactures of iron 
and steel is now being furnished by the United States, the gain in 1904 of about 
fcalf a million dollars being far in excess of gains made by other countries during 
the same period. 

"In boots and shoes the share of the United States has risen from 37 per a»nt. 
In 1903 to 40.* per cent, in 1904, the Value of American shoes Imported in 1904 being 
$1,202,200, as against $854,300 In 1903. Spanish boots and shoes, which as late lis 
1900 supplied"* almost 80 per cent, of the- total demand for the foreign article. Con- 
stituted 61.3 per cent, of the total shoe imports in 1903 and 58.(5 per cent, fa 1904. 
The change of taste and habits Illustrated by these figures Is, after all; the product 
of slow growth, and no sudden changes in the import figures could be expected. ' ;i 

"The total import figures of machinery, ' exclusive of machinery for sugar uiills 
and distilleries, show e larger relative growth than those credited to the United 
States, notwithstanding the 20 per cent, differential In favor of the American article. 
The progress made by American machineav Tor use in sugar mills and distilleries is 
more satisfactory, the import figures for 1904 showing substantial gains over those 
for 1903. and the relative sh»re in the total imports for 1904 being 73.2 per cent, 
as against 68.7 per cent, during the preceding year. 

"Considerable gains are shown in the imports of paper and paper manufactures. 
Out of $1,304,200 worth of these articles imported -in 1903, the share supplied by the 
United States was $319,800, wnile in 1904 the imports from all countries amounted 
to $1,367,000, of which the United States supplied $428,200, or 31.3 per cent. The 
Imports of manufactures of wool and textile fibred from this country are stilt Incon- 
siderable. Cuba drawing upon "Europe for these articles. The imports of manufactured 
"linen, jute, •'and other fibres have fal'eh off considerably during the last year, while 
the imports of wool manufactures show a slight increase. 

"The improvement in the economic condition of Cuba is attested by the growth 
of imports of foodstuffs from $21,800,000 in 1903 to about $25,000,000 tn 1904. Prac- 
tically all the flour, corn, and lard had been coming from' the United States even 
prior to reciprocity, and naturally continues to do so now under reciprocity. Of 
these- three articles of popular diet tba imports of Hour have increased from $2,085,- 
000 to $2,»70,008: corn from $800,600. to $898»00jD> whil* laid decreased from $2,885,000 
in 1903 to $2,617,800 in 1904. 

"The 20 per cent, differential ta- favor of American grown coffee has benefited 
the Porto Pican product, the Imports of which into Cuba hare Increased from 
'1207.400 to $711,460, constituting 38.4 per cent.t of the 1904 coffee Imports, as against 
t&j& psr cent, only of the imports for the preceding year." 

The population of Cuba by Provinces in 1899 was: 



Province. 




t Number. \[ Province. 


| Number. 




424.804 

202.444 

173.064 

88.234 


I Santa Clara ......,....•••».»».. 


856.530 
527.715 




Santiago de Cuba ... ..;.. 




Total 


i 




1,572,797 








Government 
1903, have been: 


receipts 


and expenditures in the period from 


July, 1808, to June, 




Tears. | Revenues 


| Expenditures. 



July 18, 1898-June 30. 1S99, 
July 1, 1899-June SO, 1900... 
July 1. 1900-June 30. 1901.. 
July 1. 19"!-May 19 1902... 
Hay 20. 1902-June 30. 1903.. 



$7*961.823.55 
17.385.898.88 
17.160,580.61 
14.708,302.07 
18,007,302,00 



$5,793,733.98 
15.661,093.67 
17.645,427.84 
16.401.480.76 
15,933.646.00 



MEXICO. 



THIS FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. 

Capital. Mexico City. 

President , ...~ » Porflrto Dt*s 

Vice-President Ramon Corral 

The territory of the United Mexican States (Estados Unidos Mejlcanos) is divided 
tato 27 States, 2 Territories and 1 Federal District, whose organization follows that of 



£24 



MEXICAN POPULATION A.NB COMMKRCH 



the American IJrlon, The 3tnt<» T^rritorfes and Federal District, with tfctlr eapilaJB, 
arena and populations, are aa follows: 



Stated. 



CapJtalB. 



A^ua^ciJientcfi ..... 
'imp echo ...,+«*»-- 
<!ijapas ..*..*...>.. 

j, fiihLiaftua. 

Oiahuila.. ► .--■ 

i'ullllML .......* 

Durango ........... 

J.i:ir.ajuato 

'liueirero .-.♦. 

Hidalgo ......♦..•,. 

Jalisco ...... 

Mexico ..»..; 

Mk-honean ... . 

M circles ■ *«+«**/*»»* 

Niievo Loon 

Oaxaca . .... -..»*•♦■ 
iutbla ., — 13*** 

Querfttaro >..,,,.,*♦ 

-an Luje PotoaL.. .. 

Sinaloa 

Bunora ..,.,....,.. 

Tabasco .m.mmmii 

: i .MjKpas ... ♦ 

Tlaxcala. .... h ..... - 

Veracruz .*.* 

Yucatan ........... 

Z&C&lecaa . ^.. 

Territories, 

TppH! ..,.,..., 

LLijji California. . .-■ 
Federal District., .. , 
Itfands 



v. kali 




Campcchc 

T-jxJa CTutlcrrez,. 

Chlhuatua 

BaRHIo 

Coll ma 

Duransro . .. 

Guanajuato 

Chllpanclnsro 

Pacnuca 

Guadalajara 

Toluca 

MoTCUtt 

Cuernavaca 

Monterey 

Oaataca 

Puebla 

Qucr&laro 

Baa L*la Potool 

Cullacan . 

Hermoaillg 

Ran Juan Lautlsta 

Giudad Victoria. 

Xlaxcala 

Jalapa 

M#rlda 

Eacatceas 

Tepfc . , . 

I EuECnada dc To dog Santos 
City of Mexico 



Cities and towns tif Mexico with a population of over 20,000 were according to the 
tensus of 1&95: 



City or Tow n, 

Mexico.* 

Puc-bla. 

Guadalajara. , . 
l^ait Luis Potest 
Leon ..*......„ 

M'jjittrey. + ,*,.,, 
l\uhuca....... 

'/at-atd-as. ..... 

Guanajuato. , . . 



QueK-ta.ro. , . . , . 



3taM». 



! 
J__ 

iFadaraj District, 

Puebla 

Jalisco 

Ban Luis Putoai.. 

Guanajuato 

Nuovo LcOn 

Hldahjo 

[ZacateeaB , 

) Guanajuato ,.... 

Yucatan 

[Queretaro 



teflon. 

63,084 
66,050 1 
68 #26 

40,487 

an, in a' 

3'J n.i-i 
Sti.035 
tfl.o70l 



City or Town. 

Morelta 

Oaxaca 

Orizaba- mhh- 

A guafieaJl elites, 

Soitiiio . 

Durangu. ...... 

Veracruz 

Tcluca ,. . . 

AcanceA. .. 

Delay a, 

I Zupotlanejo. . . . 



\ 


[ Popu- 


\ mate. 


i latlcn. 


jMichoacan 


& r m 


(Oaxaca .. 


:*2,437 


I Veracruz ..,.,.♦ 


si.rna 


lAjjuascallentes ■ 


30,673 


ICoahuiia ,...,,.. 


20*01 


Durango 


20,423 


\ Veracruz ... 


24,085 


[Mexico .. 


•is t im 


| Yucatan ....... 


aa.JJltJ 


I Guanajuato 


21,245 


1 Jalisco . ♦ ..... ♦ - . 


20,270 



Trade belwren Gin United States and Mexico ts constantly Increasing:. Th* 
exports to ami Imports from the United State* tor xhtt years 1S70 to 1WJ0 were 

aa f^illowfl; 



isio 

IH73 
1H73 
1«74 

i!;7r» 
tfitfl 
1 877 

l M7fr 
IhBO 

188 1 . 



! Export? Lo |Impnn» fr«n* i 
I the O P, f the IT, R 



3.200.fi£8 

4.0Pli.;O.> 
4.278,106 

5,174.^)4 
5 T 100 t S7a 
^,204,^4 

ft.3ci,ao2 

S.4U3 J-iJ 
7.^0 r.'i- 
8,3l7.SfC 
8,461,890 
8.177,123 
0,016,4*6 



7,«i^ii^; 

5 r M3,W0 

S r 84(J>8a9 

0,737,2^2 

a,STO.Ii72 

5.e08 r 4»l 

7.460.7O4 

8JtS3,24C 

7,81^,41^1 
31,171,238 |l*ti3 
iri,4s^.r.b^ ii ko 
10,587,630 1001 
12^701298 I JJ»a 



v, a p. 

18S0 
tsoo 
]£01 . 

L8S3 
1804 , 

i ii?iist . 
i.ywi 

23^07 

1H0H 



Eyporl*; to 
the O. 3. 



1 in porta troni 
the U. 9L 



? 17, .123, W0 
21,203.001 

27,205,902 
2«,l07,Ij2fi 
35^.^000 
28,727,006 
19,63% 7S8 
17,4^177 
1^511 ,BT2 
lO r 0(H.863 
22 i !Mi5,722 
2H p (i4 0,053 
2H,fl.M,63S 
40,382,506 



«9 r ^17,723 
11,4^0,800 
13.3R5.2B7 
14 ^10,620 
14;203.t!09 
10,ri6ti,fl84 
1^842,149 

is.ooo.ooe 

10,450,257 
23,421,064 
21,2Crfi.93fr 
20.4^3,075 
34,074,081 
80,470,350 
30,873,006 



THE RBPTJHLK5 OF PANAMA. 



225 



Year. 



1880 
1887 



| Exports to i Import* from 
1 the U. S. | the U. 8. 

8,340,784 
7 r 737, 623 



9, 267,021 
10,687, — 
14,719, 



,021 ! 
,972 1 
>M0 | 



Year. 



| Exports to 
J theU. a 



1903 1 41,313,711 

^1904 43,633,275 

7,969,667^1906 > 46 460,173 



Imports from 
the U. S. 



42,257,106 
45.844.7W 
45,681.296 



Note. — Gold and silver bearing ores are not Included In the exports from Mexico 
after 1894. 

According to statistics prepared by the Mexican Treasury Department the value 
of all imports into Mexico in 19O4-'05 was $85,861,081 in gold, against a value of $7»b- 
360,771 in gold in 1903- '04. The exports for 1904-'05 were valued in silver at f 193,854, 



716; against .a value in silver of $196,726,510 in 1903-04. 
1904-'05 from the chief European, countries were: 



Imports in 1903-04 and 



Germany 
Belgium 
Spain .... 
Prance . . 
Great Britain 



j i904- , 05^ 



$9,810,538 54 
1,433*759 92 
3,734,484 62 
8,482.685 03 

10,418,343 11 



1903-'O4. 

$9,549,665 09 
2,180,405 87 
3,271,494 82 
7,473,474 80 

10,026,146 48 



The condition of the public revenues is, shown by the following table for the years 
1890-96 to 1903-'©4, giving the ordinary revenue and expenditures and the percentages 
which, the annual surpluses represent in proportion to the ordinary disbursements of 
the several years: 



Fiscal years. 



1895-96. . . 
1896-'97. . . 
1897-' 98... 
1898-'99... 
1899-1900. 
1900-'0i . . . 
1901-' 02... 
1902-' 03... 
1903-'04. 



Ordinary 

revenue 

in cash. 

i50, 521 ,"47042 

p 51,500,628 75 

52,607,984 551 

60,139,212 84 

64,261,076 39! 

62,998.804 63 

66,147,048 72 

76,023 416 11 

8«.47» 800 94 



Ordinary 

expenditure 

in cash. 



$45,070,123 13 
48.330,505 25 
51,815,285 66 
53,499,541 94 
57,944,687 8f» 
59,423,005 75 
63,081,513 73 
08,222,522 20 
76,381,643 22 



Excess J Per- 
.of ' J cent- 
revenue. } ages. 



$5,451,347 29 
3,170,123 50 
882,698 89 
6,639.670 90 
6,316,388 54 
3,675,798 88, 
3,066,534 99 
7.800,893 91 

10,092,167 72 



12.11 

6.25 

1.70 

12.41 

10.90 

6.02 

4.86 

11.43 

13.22 



On March 25, 1005, in accordance with the terms of the law of December 9, 1904, 
President Diaz established the gold standard, making the peso of 75 centigrams pure 
irold the unit of the monetary system, and closing the mints to the free coinage of 
silver On July 1. 1905, President Diaz announced by proclamation under the terms 
of the law of May 24, 1905, the abolition of the Zona Libre, or Free Zone, on the 
Tlnltpd States border. This zone, at the time of its abolition, extended from the Gulf 
of Mexico to Lower California. Eleven per can of the full duty was then charged 

° n ^he^egula^army of Mexico on its present footing consists of eight major generals, 
nftv-three brigadier generals, 944 commissioned officers, 2,481 non-commissioned of- 
ficers and 27 247 privates. In the navy are six steel gunboats or training ships. Two 

m ° r An^am?^ was adopted in 1904 create the 

office of Vice-President, and lengthening the term of the President (with that of 
the Vice-President) to six years. 

Mexico now has a railway mil eage of over 11,000 miles, 

PANAMA. 

Capital, City of Panama. 

Manuel Amador 

THE CABINET. 

Minister of Government and Foreign Relations Sa ?2^i£l to w 22Sft 

Minister »f Finance •• Francisco Espriella 

Minister of Justice and Public Instruction ...Julio Fabrega 

Mlniftt^r of Public Works • Manuel Quintero 

On November 3. 1903, a revolution broke out in the City of Panama, which soon 
spread to other parts of the State of Panama, and resulted in the complete obliteration 
«f Colombian sovereignty. Independence was proclaimed by a provisional junta com- 
bed tfjo?/^ Boyd and Tomas Arias. The Governor of 
Panama and the general commanding the Colombian military forces were arrested 
and decor ted. and within forty-eight hours the last vestige of Colombian authority 
on the Isthmus had vanished. Not a life was lost accomplishing the revolution. 

The junta quickly sought recognition as a de facto and then as a de jure govern- 
ment The United States recognized its de facto responsibility, and prepared to keep 
the Tine of Isthmian transit free from interruption in case Colombia should attempt 
to reimpose her sovereignty. Orders were given to allow no Colombian troops to be 
landed at points from which they would menace Isthmian transit. Colombia not 
making and having no power to make, a serious effort to reconquer the Isthmus, th« 
new republic soon asked and obtained complete political recognition. Philippe Bunau- 
Varllla was commissioned envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to the 
United States. He reached Washington from New-York on Novemoer 7, and was 
formally received on November 13 by President Roosevelt. On November 17 the new 



President . 



t2« THE REPUBLJC OP PAH AMA. 



government was recognized by France, and shortly afterward by Great Britain, 
Germany and Russia. 

Ono of the first acts of the new Panama Government was to propose the con- 
clusion of an Isthmian Canal treaty with the United States. A special commission. 
consisting of .Federico Boyd, a member of the Provisional Junta, and Dr. Manuel 
Amador. Minister of Finance, was sent to Washington to conduct the negotiations. 
A canal treaty was drawn and signed in Washington on November 18. It was ratified 
by the Panama Government on December 2, 1903, and was submitted for ratification 
to the United States Senate by President Roosevelt on December 7. This convention, 
the full text of which can be found under 'Treaties Ratified. 2d session LVIIIth Con- 
gress." page 87. was approved by the Senate on February 23. 19U4. 

On December 13 the Provisional Junta published a decree convoking: a national 
convention for January 15. 1904. This convention, elected on December 28, 1908, met 
In Panama, framed a constitution and elected Manuel Amador president of the 
republic. 

By a decree of the convention, which resolved Itself Into a legislative assembly, 
it was declared on March 4 that from December 31, 1904, the monetary unit of Panama 
should be the gold dollar. " .._ 

The Republic of Panama has an area of 31,571 square miles and a population of 
300,000. The principal ports are Panama, on the Pacific Coast, and Colon on the 
Atlantic side, and these ports are visited annually by more than one thousand vessels, 
which land over one million tons of merchandise and nearly 100.000 passengers, chiefly 
t for transfer over the Panama Railway, forty-seven miles in length, connecting the 
Pacific port of Panama with the Atlantic port of Colon. 

Colon, or Asplnwall, as It is sometimes called, has a population of about 3,000 
persona. The city of Panama has a population of about 25.000. It was founded In 
1519. burned in 1671. and rebuilt in 1G73. whild Colon is of much more recent date, 
having been founded in 1855. 

The republic Is divided into seven provinces, as follows: 



Provinces. Capitals* 

Los Santos Los Santos, 

Veragua ............. Santiago. 

Code Penonome. 



Provinces. Capitals. 

Panama Panama. 

Colon ....Colon. 

Bocas del Toro Bocas del Toro. 

Chiriqul ....David. 

The population of the republic Is composed of various elements — Spanish. Indian, 
negro, and a limited number of persons from the European countries and the United 
States, especially those engaged in commerce and transportation and the operation 
of the Panama Railway. Another element 13 that of persons brought to the Isth- 
mus as laborers for the construction of the canal, and their descendants. Since the 
abolition of slavery in Jamaica many blacks and mulattoes have settled on the 
Isthmus as small dealers and farmers. 

Of the commerce of Panama, which reaches a value of $3,000,000 Annually, the 
United States supplies a larger share than any other country. The im- 
portations at the port of Colon for the fiscal year ended 
Commerce* June ,30, 1903. as shown by the report of the United 
States consul, amounted to $952,684, of which $614,179 was from' the 
United States, $119,086 from France, $118,322 from England. $76,386 from Germany. 
The figures of the fiscal year 1903 show a considerable increase from those of tTO. 
in which the value of the Imports at Colon were $776,345. Of the $614,179 Imports 
from the United States at Colon In 1903 $200,744 was drygoods, $189,333 provisions, 
$59,890 coal, $38,642 lumber, $32,900 kerosene. $30,400 liquors, and $31,940 hardware. 
The value of tlie importations from the United States in 1903 exceeded those of 1902 
by about $1G0.000. The exports to the United States from Colon in 1903 amounted 
to $173,370. of which $75,432 was bananas, $54,960 cocoanuts, $12,472 turtle shells, 
$9,400 Ivory nuts. $6,460 hides, and $5,924 coffee. 

From the port of Panama the exDorts to the United States- in the fiscal year 1903 
amounted to $193 342. of which $56,767 was hides. $49,974 India rvbber, $27,805 
cocobolo nuts. $10,598 ivory nuts. $13,372 deerskins, and $6,908 coffee. The consul at 
Panama states that the imported articles come mostly from Ekigland, Germany. 
Prance. Ialy and the United States, but gives no statistics of the imports. The im- 
ports from Panama into the United States in the year ended June 30, 1904, ^were valued 
at $J««<V744. and the exports from the United States to Panama were valued at $979/724. 

Panama Is connected with San Francisco by a wm*V steamer schedule operated 
by the Pacific Mall Steamship Company and with Valparaiso by a weekly steamer 
schedule operated by the Pacific Steam Navigation Company and South American 
Steamship Company. Two passenger and two freight trains leave Panama dally tor 
Colon and Colon daily for Panama. The time for passenger trains over the forty- 
seven miles of railway is three hour*. ^^ 

From Panama there is one cable line north to American ports and one to the 
south. The actual time consumed in communicating with the United States and 
receiving an answer is stated by the consul to be usuallv about four hours. There 
are also cable lines from Colon to-the United States and Europe. 

Import duties average about 10 per cent gold. On linuora and beverages 
there are special taxes: these vary according to the kinds and anilities of 
the imports. Cigars, tobacco, eierarettes. salt and ice are government mo- 
nopolies or are let out by the government to Private parties. The governments of the 
United FtMes and of Panama conceded in 1905 a treaty of extradition and a treaty 

j^- ..i.„. ,,,«.-,» «rc<"i ^M'H'^p pt r'rwp^c '•ate*. «• 



Not* — See other matter about Panama and the canal sone under The *«*inw*f«» 
Canal Zone." 



AflEEBA, POPULATION, TRAjPB OF PRINCIPAL. COUNTRIES. 227 



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STATE GOVERNMENTS. 



ALABAMA— CAPITAL, MONTGOMERY. 



Office. 



I 



Name. 



I Term. 1 Term ends. {Salary 



Governor .' 

Lieu tenan t-Govermw 
Secretary of State... 
Attorney-General • . . 

Auditor 

Treasurer 

Comm'r Agriculture.. 
Supt. of Education.. 



William D. Jelka 

Russell M. Cunningham 

E. R. McDavld 

Massey Wilson 

J. L. Sowell. 

J. Craig Smith 

R. R. Poole 

feaac W. Hill 



4 years. 
4 years. 
4 years. 
4 years. 
4 years. 
4 yearr. 
4 years. 
4 years. 



January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 
January 



19, 1907. 
19. 1907. 
19. 1907. 
19, 1907. 
19. 1907. 
19. 1907. 
19. 1907. 
19. 1907. 



$5,000 

l~5oO 
2.500 
2,400 
2,100 
2.100 
2.250 



All State officials Democrats. 

ALASKA (TERRITORY)— CAPITAL, SITKA. 



Governor" • 

Surveyor-General and 

ex-offloio Secretary. . . . 
General Agent Education 



John G. Brady 14 years. 



William L. Distin. 
Sheldon Jackson . . . 



. 14 years 
.HTHmlt'd 



June 8, 1908. 
June 7. 1908. 



$5,000 



4.000 
2.000 



All Territorial*. officials Republicans.* 

ARIZONA (TERRITORY)— CAPITAL, PHOENIX. 



Governor i Joseph 

Secretary of Territory.. 

Tre xfeurer 

Attorney-General 

Chief Justice. 



H. Kibbey 1 4 years. . | July 1, 1906. 



Edward Kent. 



4 years. .} 

2 years. . [Augtujt, 



2 years. 
4 years . 



1906.. 
| August, 1906.. 
| March 4. 1906. 



$3,000 
1.800 
1,000 
3,500 
4.000 



Ait Territorial officials Republicans. ■ 

ARKANSAS— CAPITAL. LITTLE ROCK. 



Governor 

Secretary of State 

1 Auditor 

Treasurer 

Chief Justice 

Supt. Public Instruction. 
Comm* r Agriculture 



Jeff Davis 

O. C Ludwig. . . 
Avery E. Moore. 

H. C. Tipton 

Joseph M. Hall.. 
J. H. Hinemon.. 
H. T. Bradford. . 



2 years.. 
2 years . . 
2 years . . 
2 years. . 
8 years . . 
2 years . . 
2 years. . 



January, 1907 . . . 
January. 1907... 
January, 1907... 
January, 1907... 
January, 1911 . . . 
October 31, 1906. 
October 31. 1906. 



$3,500 
1.800 
2,250 
2|&0 
3,000 
1,800 
1,800 



All State officials Democrats. 

CALIFORNIA— CAPITAL, SACRAMENTO. 



Governor •••• 

Lieutenant-Governor 

Secretary of Slate 

Controller 

Treasurer 

Chief Justice 

Attorney-General 

Surveyor-General 

Suot. Public Instruction.. 



George C. Pardee. . 
Alden Anderson 
Charles F. Curry. . 
Edward P. Colgan. 
Truman Reeves. . . . 

W. H t Beatty 

IT. S. Webb 

Victor H. Woods... 
Thomas J. Kirk. .. 



4 years . . 
4 yearo. . 
4 years . . 
4 years . . 
4 years . . 
J12 years. 
1 4 years . . 
1 4 years . . 
14 years. . 



January, 
January. 
January, 
January, 
January, 
J January, 
fjanuary, 
I January, 
j January. 



1907.. 
1907., 
1907., 
1907.. 
1907., 
1915. 
1907., 
1907. 
1907.. 



$6,000 

2 

3,000 
3.000 
3.000 
| 6,000 
' 3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



Air State officials Republicans. 

COLORADO— CAPITAL. 



DENVER. 



Governor ■ 

Lieutenant-Governor .... 

Secretary of State 

Auditor 

Treasurer 

Chief Justice 

Attorney-General