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Full text of "The Tribune almanac and political register"



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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 



3iO 
Til 

Cop. I 



REMOTE STORAGE 




CONTKNTS. 

PAOES, 
ArlTROHOMlCAI. DEPARTMPNT : 

Kclipses, ic.for lSt)5 1 to '2 

Difference of Time at 100 places 2 

New and Valuable Tide Table 3 

Places of the Principal Fixed Stars 4 

Calendai 3— Rising and Setting of i?un, Moon, &.; 5 to 16 

Political DEPARTuresT : 

United States Government, Ministers, &c IT 

Senators and Representatives of XXXVIIIth Congress IS to 19 

XXXlXtb Congress, so far as chosen 'JO 

Laws passed at the last Session of Congress 21 to 32 

Public Resolutions and Proclamations .S2 to 83 

Party Platforms of 18(J4(^ Baltimore and Chicago) 34 to 85 

The Rebel Government, Congi-essmen, &n 35 

Slaveholders' Rebellion, or Chronicle of War Events 80 to 48 

Native States of the American-born People 41 to 45 

Election Returns, for President, Governors, Congressmen, Ac, 

in 1804, compared with the Presidential Vote in 13C0... 4G to 6G 
State Capitals, Governors, Salaries, Time Legislatures meet, 

Time of State Elections C7 

Territorial Capitals and Governors (cover) ^ 

Popular A'ote by States for 1S56, l^fiO and 1 jG4 GT f. 

Vote of 1S60 elaborately analyzed and compareti, b.\ Popula- ---^ 

tion, Free and Slave, with percentage, ic CS 




FkANKLLS J.- OfTARdON, CoMPII.KR. 



AND POLITICAL REGISTER 

if 




^1 1 Q A ^ Sil^ASSOCIATION 

mm- 1 o u f J« i|L YORK, r 



■^ 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Astronomical, etc. 

Annivers'les.Jewlsh.FeastailCurrency.ActTor National 25^ Income tax'.'Specfal 

Calendar, Jewish, wiib mo's. 4 Education In Dist. Columbia 28 Paying Interest on Debt 

Calendar, Mahometan ' ''" ' '" 

Oalendars. — lanuary to De- 
cember, Changes of the 
Moon , Planets on the Me- 
ridian Suu on the Noon 
Mark: Sidereal Noon ; Rls- 



I-.inlgrant8, Overland aiiReports.Armv.to be printed :« 

Enrollment Act, Amended.. 21 Tliankn to various officers.. S'J 
Franking Official Business.. 25 ^pr^,-, ^-u.T-ir.va 

Fugitive Slave LawRepealed 28 phoc.lam.vtjons. 

Gold, Times Sales of 27 No. 1.5.-Siispr>nda " Habeas 

OuerrlUas, Punishment of.. 2*) Corpus " tu Kentucky.... 33 
Homestead Law, Amended. 22 No. 11.— President's Plan for 
nmigration, to encourage. 31; Keconstructing the Union. 33 



Indians In California. 



United States ; Higli Wa 

ter 5- 

Cycles Beginning of PeriodB - - „. ., _, ., ,- ^ ... 

?;clip.se8 0f Sun aiid >Ib.m..l,>' Iowa, Kailroad Land Grants .4 

DiiTbiarirof Annular i Justice, Military, Bureau ol. 2S 



RKBKL GOVERNMENT. 



Indian, Siou.K, Damages paid 25!„ i, , -r. », 'o . ' 
Indians. Trade with ....... 2'rRebel Executive, Senators 



Indians, Trade with. 22 . ^^ „, 

-' - and Congressmen :M 

PLATFOKMS. 

•pAjUinoxes and Solstices i Kansas, K. R. Land Grants In aajupniopraiig pj^tf. .chlcaeot .a 

Era,Jewlsb,hj>.va8certalned 4,Land-Offlce Papers, Charges 30 u^Xp?at?orKaltlmo?e ai 
Stars-Rule to find Rising |L eutenant General ^1 „ .™„Vv„,,„ „ 

and Setting 4 Liquor, Taxation of 22 wab chroniclk. 

Star Table-Places of Fixed |Loan8.— Bill $200,000,000 SLBattles, Skirmish, &c., from 

Stars ^ JI^Jl*'^'""®!^?. y^ S-i I>ec.1,lHfi:{,toDep.l,18f.l.:ifi-43 

'Ude.New Table ofllO Places 3 Mai s. Regulation of Ocean^ 2a wnviTv 

•• Rule for ascertaining. 3 Michigan, Railroad Lands. 2. ,28! }>.^riviTT. 

Time— Difiference of at 100 | Minnesota, Railroad Lands.. 24 states of Birth and Keald- 

Places SMlninOregon 311 ence of Native Populat'ni 1,4.'. 

Time True . a'MoneyOrders.How obtained 24| „, ^. „ , 

' I Montana New Territory of. 241 Election Eeturns. 

Political Navy, to promote efflciencv. 29 California (54,6.5 

rouwcai. Nebraska Act to forii State 23 Connecticut. .46 47 

THE GOVERNMENT |Nevada Act to form State of 22lDelawftre. ' ' 47 

Caliinet, t Dr President's 17, Offense at Sea -illllinols 59, 60 

I., i (.ci-s of the I Ontonagon Railroad -'Indiana 5H,59 

l8,l&Oregon Branch Mlntln 31 Iowa . .. . 62 

( XXXlXth), lOregon Courts in 2l:Kansa8.. 66 

t, , If , 20 Oregon Land Grant ^Kentucky 61 

Exc^^^ut.vcv.ia. tirs General. 17 Pacific R.R., Northern 30 j^oulsiana 66 

Foreign Ministers 17 Pacific R. R. Union, Amend . "^ Maino 46 

Judiciary .-Supreme Court 17 Passengers at Sea.. .... ... »j Mar-, land 55 

Post-Offices ot Members ot i Paymasters, Examination ot 2S Massachusetts 46 

Congress IS, 19 Pension Agents 2s Michigan 03,64 

Territories, Delegates from. 19 Pensions, Regulation ol. . • • ^i Minnesota 60,61 

A<)T.i OF co-<ianvas lsi«-04 Postmasters, Salaries ot f Missouri 05,60 

jiVTA OP ( o.Naiittsi,, i^iw-ot. liJost-Oltlce, Money Orders.. 21 Nevada 60 

Actions, Limit of 27iprlnting, Regulating Public 2K jjew UanVptihJre. ... 47 

Ambulance System 23(|Qnarternia8ter'8 Pepartai't. .32 uew Jersev 47 

AsBistaut Secretary of War. 21 Rebel States, Trade with. ... 80 jjew Vork," Gov. and Pres't. 48 

Big Tree Giove preserved.. 2S Registers of Lauds, Pay of , . 28, .. Congress 4vi 

Boundaries of Colorado — 22 Kovolutionary Pensions — 231 •• GovTby Town8.50-53 

Boundaries of Montana 24 Seamen, Accounts of 32 ojjio ... . fl6-.')8 

Boundaries of Nebraska .... 23 siave-Trade Pi'Ohibited 29 Oregon 55 

Boundaries of Nevada. 22 Siuuggltug, To prevent 28 penngylvanla »'.54,55 

Bounty Lands, Claims for. . . 80 Soldiers' Pay, Increase of . . . 28 Rhode Island. .... 46 

Briberjj Act to panish 27 Telegraph to Asia 29 Tennessee 85 

Jiriti8hProvince8,Tradewith87 Telegraph to Pacific States. SO Vermont 47 

California, Courts In 21 Tennessee, Courts in 21 Trr„„, vipfflnia 62,65 

^ alifornia, Indians in 23 Town-Sites, How to dispose 29 wisoonaln " ' .... 68 

( ailfoi-nia, Land granted In. 28 Treaties, Carried Into effect 2i ^Vrrit"rlp« .35 

t^allforula, Titles in "" 

Cent; Weight of the New.. ..- , „..„v,.=, . .. , ,„■,. 

Claims, niidson's Bay, &c.. . 28 Veteran Engineers, Act 24| votk of ISOO. 

Clothing sent to Soldiers. ... 21 Ways and Means 28 Analysis ol I- ree an*J Sl*^^ 

Coal Lauds, How to dispose 29 ■svisconsiu, Railroad Lands. 28 Population, and Note lor 

Courts in North'n Newfork 81 pcm lo rksolttwons. I President In 1860 

Coins.-Desciiptlon of Cent 24 ^^J,''''°^^,Z^„^' „., becapitui-ation. 

Colleges, Laudfl fgr 23 Army Registers to bo pub d. 32 



ss^ Treaties, Carried Into ehect 2i q.p_,.,f,,,.,p8 

28 Utah, Indian Lands In 24 sflYeB Govefnors ' &<■•■ 

24 -Vessels, Names to be on 24 Stales, Go\eriiorB, oii. 



SSlla^-^^pfevWutlKS^pranlKjIvot^ 
?rc^p"t^n^iXSc»| S=5n^ 



THE TERRITORIES. 



MontiiTiu . . 
Nfbraslla.. 
NVw M*xi.' 



Capital: 



. . . Denver 

. . . Yancton 

. . . Lewiston 

. . . Virgioia City . 

... Omaha City... 

. ,. -antaFe...... 

. . . Fillmore tJity . 

...iOlympia 



John N. Goodwin... 

John Evans 

Newton Edwards... 
William H. Wnllace 

Caleb Lyon 

Alvln Saundera 
Henry 0eiineIly 
James D. Doty.. 
Willfem Pickering 




TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



The Astronomical Calculations have been made in meati time, expressly for this Almanac, by 
Dr. Samdel H. Wright, of Dundee, Yates County, New York. 



EaniNOXES AND SOLSTICES. 



Vernal Equinox. . 
Summer Solstice. 



.March 20 8 53 mo. 
.June 21 5 38 mo. 



Autumnal Equinox. Sept. 22 7 51 ere. 

Winter Solstice Dec. 21 1 41 eve. 



THE CYCLES. 

The year 1865 is the first after leap-year, and the latter part of the 89th, and beginning of 
the 90th year of American Independence; the 6,5TSth of the Julian Period; the TiSVSHtth of 
the Byzantine era; the 5,625-6th of the Jewish era ; the 2,6ieth of Rome ; the 2,612th of Na- 
bonassar; the 2,641st of the Olympiads; the 2,lT7th of the Grecian era of the Seleucidae ; the 
l,5Slst of Diocletian ; the l,282d of Mohammed, which begins 27th of May. Dominical Letter, 
A; Epact, 3; Golden Number, 4; Solar Cycle, 26; Roman Indiction, S; Dionysian Period, 194. 
The Jewish year 5,626 begins Sept. 21, 1865. 



iA. xuere >vui 

rica, but viaible ii 

□i 



□ 



ECLIPSES FOR THE YEAR 1865. 

I. There will be a Partial Eclipse of the Moon, April 10th, in the evening, 
or early in the morning of April 11th, visible. Size 2>3 digits, or aboutione 
fifth of the Moon's diameter, being upon the northern limb as shown in the 
engraving at the right. For the times at various places, see the table on 
next page. 

U. There will be a Total Solar Eclipse, April 25th, invisible in North Ame- 
rica, but viaible in most of South America and Africa. 

III. There itilj be a Partial Eclipse of the Moon, October 
4th, in the evening, visible. The Moon will rise in the United States east of 
the Mississippi River partially eclipsed, and in the Pacific States it will be in- 
visible. Size i% digits, or about one third of the Moon's diameter. The be- 
ginning of the eclipse occurs before the Moon rises, and at all places west ef 
the meridian of Buffalo, the middle of the eclipss will also occur before the 
Moon rises. The obscuration will be upon the southern limb, being, when 
largest, as shown in the annexed cut. 
1\. There will be an Annular Eclipse of the Sun, October 19th, in the morn- 
ing, visible throughout the United States as a Partial Eclipse, except along the 
line of the Central Eclipse shown on the map, where the annular or ring-like 
appearance will be seen. The track of central eclipse begins near Nisqually 
in Washington Territory, on Puget's Sound, and passes south-easterly through 
Montana, Idaho, Kansas, Southern Missouri, Western Tennessee, and diago- 
nally through Georgia to Savannah, and thence across the Atlantic and Into 
Africa. Along this route there will be seen a ring of light around the margin I 
of the Sun, as seen in the engraving at the right. The ring will be half a digit wide, and the 
eclipse 11 digits in size on that route. 'Pot ih^ partial eclipse, the time, and size, for many 
places, see the following table : 




A Table op the Solar Eclipse, Octobee 19, 1S63. 






Places. 


Begin.. 


Ends. 


rigit.. 


Placxs. 


Begins. 


Ends. 


DigiU. 


Portland, Me 


H. M. 

9 18 
9 14 
9 8 

8 57 

9 6 
9 
9 4 
8 55 
8 47 
8 88 
8 29 
8 40 
8 37 
8S4 
8 9 


30'p. m. 

27 p. m. 

19 p.m. 

7 p.m. 

17 p.m. 

11p.m. 

17 pm. 

12 p.m. 

5 p.m. 
11 49 mo. 
11 86 mo. 
11 59 mo. 
11 56 mo. 
11 55 mo. 
11 17 mo. 


6* 

1 

P 

i 




■8 i 

8 25 
8 19 
7 89 
7 86 
7 81 
7 36 

7 9 
6 57 

6 58 
before 
sunrise 

8 11 
8 80 

7 47 


ll'lO 
11 46 
11 41 
10 40 
10 40 
10 33 
10 40 

10 6 
9 48 
9 32 
7 82 
7 42 

11 89 
11 40 
10 50 


10 
lOi 

It 

i 






Quebec. 






Madison, Wis 

Springfield, 111 

New Orleans 








New York 


Lawrence, Kansas ... 
Austin, Texas 


Philadelphia 

Rochester 


Toronto 


San Francisco 

Portland, Oregon 

Havana, Cuba 

tBufifalo .... 


Baltimore 




Richmond, 'Va 

Detroit 







1027S3 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



A Tabij: of the EcLHtES of the Moon April 10 and Octobkb 4, 1865. 



1 


April 10th. 


October 4th. 


Principal PLic«& 


April 10th. 


Oet.4Ui. 


PSINCIPAL P^XfES. 


XL 


Ends 
mo. U. 


Middle. 


End. 


X.l 


Endsmor. 
U, eve. 10. 


EDd. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


H H 


H. M. 




H M. 


„ u 


II. M. 


Halifax, N. S 


11 31 


17 


6 26 


7 27 


Pittsburg, Pa 


10 25 


11 mo. 


6 21 


Brunswick, Me..,. 


11 6 


52 


6 1 


7 2 




10 21 


7 mo. 


6 17 


Portlaoa, Me 


11 4 


50 


5 59 


7 


St. Augustine, Fla. 


10 19 


5mp. 
11 59e* 


6 15 


Boston, Mass 


11 1 


47 


5 56 


6 57 


j Detroit, Mich 


10 13 


6 9 


Quebec, C.E 


11 


46 


5 55 


6 56 


1 Cincinnati, Ohio... 


10 8 


11 54 ev. 


6 4 


Concord, N. H.... 


10 59 


45 


5 54 


6 55 


iLouisvUIe.Ky 


10 3 


11 49 ev. 


5 59 


Hartford, Conn... 


10 54 


41 


5 49 


6 50 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


10 1 


11 47 ev. 


5 57 


New Haven, Conn. 


10 53 


39 


5 48 


6 49 


Nashville, Tenn... 


9 58 


11 44 ev. 


5 54 


'I!roy,N. Y 


10 51 


37 


5 46 


6 47 


Chicago, 111 


9 55 


11 41 ev. 


5 51 


A!ban.y, N. Y 


10 50 


86 


5 45 


6 46 


Mobile 


9 53 


11 38 ev. 


5 48 


New York 


10 49 


35 


6 44 


6 45 


Madison, Wis 


9 47 


11 33 ev. 


5 43 


Trenton, N.J 


10 47 


33 


5 42 


6 43 


New Orleans, La.. 


9 45 


11 31 ev. 


5 41 


PliiladeIpliia,Pa.. 


10 45 


31 


5 40 


6 41 


St. Louis, Mo 


9 44 


11 30 ev. 


5 40 


Baltimore, Md..-.. 


10 39 


25 


5 34 


<! 35 


Natchez, Miss 


9 40 


11 26 ev. 


5 36 


Harrisburg, Pa 


10 88 


24 


5 33 


6 34 


Iowa City, Iowa. . . 


9 38 


11 24 ev. 


5 34 


■Washington, D. C. 
Petersburg, Va. . . . 


10 37 
10 86 


23 
23 


5 32 
5 31 


6 32 


Little Rock, Ark... 
.Matamoros. Mex . . 


9 37 
9 14 


11 23 ev. 
11 Oev. 


5 33 




Richmond, Va 


10 35 


21 


5 30 


6 31 


Santa F6,N.M.... 


8 41 


10 27 ev. 


Eclipse 


Rochester, N.Y... 


10 34 


20 


5 25 


6 30 


Oregon City, Or. . . 


7 41 


9 27 ev. 


fore the 
rising o f 


Buffalo, N.Y 


10 30 


16 




6 26 


San Frai;cisco,Cal. 


7 35 


9 21 ev. 


Toronto, C. W 


10 28 


14 




6 24 


Astoria, Oregon. .. 


7 80 


9 16 ev. 


the moon. 



DIFFERENCE OF TIME. 

WlisH it is 12 o'clock at noon at New York city, it will be morning at all places west of New 
York, and afternoon at all places east ; as in the annexed table : 



Morni'g 



Baltimore, Md. 
Bnrlln'ton.N.J. 
Bullalo.N.Y... 
Charleston, S.C 
Chicago, ni.... 
Cincinnati, C. 
Columbus, O... 

Dayton, O 

Detroit, 51 ich.. 

Dover, Del 

Ewing Har.O.T 
FtLeav'nwor'h 
Galveston, Tex 
Geneva, N. Y. . 



Huntsville.Ala 
Indi'apoli8,Ind 
Jackson, Miss.. 
Jefferson, Wo.. 
Key West, Fla. 
Knoxville.Ten. 



1016 48 
11 50 12 
1128 281 
1149 881 
1156 34 
1140 24 
1186 221 
11 6 2 
1118161 
1123 53' 
1110 20! 
1123 54 
1154 4 
8 38 9; 
10 37 8i 

10 36 58 
114753 
1148 44 

I 024 8 

11 816 
111144 
10 55 82 
10 4782 
112851 
1120 28 



LlttleRock.A'k 
Louisville, Ky. 
Mexico, Mex . . 



Mobile, Ala.... 
Monterey, Mex 
Monterey, Cal. 
Nashville, Ten. 
Natchez, Miss.. 
Newark, N.J. . 
Newbern.N.C. 
N.Orleans, La. 
Norfolk, Va.... 
Pen8acola,ria. 
Petersburg.Va. 
Philadelp'a,Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. . 
Poi'tHucl'nWT 
Princeton, N.J. 
Racine, Wis...; 
Raleigh, N.C.. 
Richmond, Va. 
Rochester ,N X. 
SacketHar.NY', 



10 47 16 
1114 4 
1019 44 
1122 45 

11 416 
U 2 
10 14 22 

8 48 35 
11 8 48 

10 50 26 I 
1159 24 

11 47 44 1 

10 56 4 

11 50 49 I 
11 8 
11 46 44 
11 55 35 
11 85 56 

8 45 6 
11 57 26 
11 »23 
11 40 52 1 
1146151 
1144 40 
11 52 16 



PLACE. 



PLACE. 



Sacramento, C'l 
St.Angu8t'e,Fa 
St. Louis, Mo.. 
Bt. Paul, Minn. 
S. Antonio.Tex 
S.Diego, Cal... 
S. Francisco.Cl 
Santa Fe.N.M. 

Santa Cruz 

Savannah, Ga.. 
Scarb'oHarWT 
Springfield, 111. 
Tallahassee,Fn 
Tampico,Mex. 
Toronto, C.W. 
Trenton, N.J. . 
Tuscaloosa, Al. 

Utlca,N.Y 

Vera Cruz,Mex 
Vincennes, Ind 
Washing'n,D.C 
Wheeli'g.AV.Va 
Wilming'n,N.C 
Wilming'n, Del 
Yorktown.Va.. 



1129 441 
1055 4 
10 43 45! 
10 22 8i 
9 711: 

8 4619; 

9 5159 
8 48 4i 

1181821 
8 37 38' 
10 57 52 
1117 10 

10 24 37; 

1157 28J 

11 510 
115512 

10 3130 

11 62-1 
1147 53 
118816 
1143 241 
115412; 
1149 48! 



Albany, N.Y... 
Augusta, Me... 

Bangor. Me I 

Berlin, Prus... 
Boston, Mass .. 
Constantinople 

Dublin I 

Edinburgh .... 
Fredr'kton.NBl 
Halifax, N.S...J 
Hamburg, Ger. 
HartfortHCt... 
London, Eng.. . 
Lowell, Mass . . 
Middletown,rt 
Montreal, L.C.I 
New Haven, Ct 
Paris, France..' 
Portland, Me.. 
Providence, RI, 
Quebec. L.C... 
Rome, Italy....! 
St. Petersburg.! 
Rtockh'm.SwTi] 
Vienna, Aust 'a. 



016 44 
26 56 

5 49 39 
01150 

6 52 
4 SO 42 
4 43 21 
29 4 
04138 
535 58 
5 21 

4 .55 41 
010 43 
5 28 
144 
4 23 

5 5 26 
15 10 
01025 
Oil 

5 45 59 

6 5718 
6 818 



Tr0e Time.— Two kinds of time are used in 
Almanacs ; dock or meOAi-tinie in some, and 
apjiarent or sun-time in others. CtocA-time 
Is always right, while /SwTi-time varies every 
day. People generally suppose it is twelve 
o'clock when the sun is due south, or at a prop- 
erly made noon-mark. But this is a mistake, 
the sun is seldom on the meridian at twelve 
o'clock; indeed this is the case only on four 
days of the year ; namely, April 15, June 15, 
Sept. 1, and Dec. 24. In this Almanac, as in 
most other Almanacs, the time used is clock- 
time. The time when the sun is on the meri- 
dian er at the noon-murk, is also given to the 



nearest second, for the 1st, 7th, ISth, 19th and 
2.5th days of each month, at the right hand of 
the top of each calendar page. This affords a | 
ready means of obtaining correct time and for ' 
setting a clock by using a noon-mark. 

Old-fashioned Almanacs, which use rt7>prtrfn« 
time, give the rising and setting of the sun's 
center and make no allowance for the effect 
of refraction of the sun's rays by the atmo- 
sphere. The more modern and improved Alma- 
nacs, which use clock-time, give the rising and 
setting of the sun's upper limb, and duly allow 
for refraction, bringing the time to a degree 
near perfection. 



i. , 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



NEW AND VALUABLE TIDE TABLE. 

To find the time of high-water at any of the places nam«d iu the following table, add the time 
indicated in the first column of figures to the time of " Moon South," found in the calendar 
pages. Example : Required the time of high-water at New Haven for January 27th and 30th. 
For the 27th, Moon South, at Oh. 26m. in the afternoon, which added to llh. 16m. gires llh. 42m. 
of the same evening for high-water. On the 29th, Moon South at 2h. 17m. eve., which added as 
before, gives 13h. 33m., or 1 o'clock 83m. in the morning of the SOtb, for hfgh-water. 



NoR'EAST Coast. 
Hanniwell'8 Point. 

Portland 

Portsmouth 

Newbaryport 

Bockport 

Salem 

BoatoA Light 



Plymouth 

Wellfleet 

Provencetown.... 

Monomoy 

Nantucket 

Hyannis 

Edgartown. 

HoUnes' Hole 

Tarpaulin Cove... 
"Wood's Hole (X.) . 
Wood's Hole (S.).. 
Menemsha Light.. 
Quick's Hole (N.). 
Quick's Hole (S.).. 

Cuttyhtmk 

Kettle Cove 

Bird Island Ligbt. 
New Bedford 



h.m.if'tI F.i 
U15I 9.3 7.0 
11251 9.9 7.6. 
1123[ 9.9 7.2 
112^1 9.16.6 
!10 57 10.?7.1 
1113 10.6 7.6 
1112 10.9 8.1 
11127,11.3 8.5 
'1119111.4,9.0 
'11 5:13.2 9.21 
1122 10.8 7.71 
11581 5.8 2.6: 
12 24! 3.6 2.6' 



L. IsLAiTD Sound. 

Watch Hill 

Stonington 

Little Gull Island. 

New London 

New Haven 



3.0 2.3 
2.5il.9j 



WUmington 

Georgetown Ent. 
Bull's Island Bay 



2.913.3 

3.112. 



St. Helena Sound . 

Ft. Pulaski 

Savannah. 



12 22 sigiisi 
1216' 2.5 1.6, 



Point Judith 

Kock Island 

Montauk Point.... 

Sandy Hook 

New York 

Hudson Rivek. 

Dobb'e Ferry 

Tarry town 

Verpianck's Point 

West Point 

Ponghfceepsie 

Tivoil 

Stnyvesant 



1.8 1.S' 

2.8 1.8 

4.7 3.11 
2.0 1.2 

3.9 1.8 
4.3 2.9 

3.8 2.3! 

4.2 2.9] 
5.0 3.7 

5.3 3.5; 
4.6 2.8 
4.6 3.1 : 

3.5 2."0 

2.4 1-8! 

5.6 4.0i 

5.4,3.4 

4.42.7 
4.0 2.7 

3.82.5' 

3;9 2;4 
4.6 3.2 
4.4 3.01 



Sand's Point HI 

INewKochelle 115 

Throg'sNeck. .. 
Jebset Coast. 
|Cold Spring Inlet. 
jCape May Landing 
|DsiJk.'BE Bat, &o. 
jDelaw'eBreakw'r. 
Higble'sCape May 
lEgg Island Lig*-"^ 
'Mahon's River 
iNewcastle 



Chesapeake, &c. 
jOld Point Comfort 

Point Lookout 

Annapolis 

Bodkm Light 

Baltimore 

j Washington 

City Point 

IRichmond 

jTappahannook 

'SotrTHEKN Coast. 

Hatteras Inlet 

Beaufort (N.C.)... 

Bald Head 

Smith^alle 



'oig'^ iDoboy Light. 



7 St. Simon'i 



90^54 Ft Clinch........ 

goi-l St.Jolm'sKiver., 

q'« fi'fi i St. Augustine 

90 6 il<-'a?e Florida 

I illndianKey 

- , o^'ISandKev. 



■6 I Key West. 

u.uit.d Tortugas 

11 Charlotte Harbor 

4.5 3.0 I Tampa Bay 

6.2 3.9 Cedar Keys 

7.0^51 iSt. Mark's 

6.9^5.0 Western Coast. 

6.9 6.6 I San Biego 

6.S15.I fSan Pedro 

I I Cuyler'sHarbor , 
o n'o n' San Luis Obispo.. 



i.UjO.8: 

1.30.8 



San Francisco., 
ilMare Island..., 



Benicia. 



S"'}jo'(il i-DBiucia 

o'nli'k iKavenswood . 
3.4 2.31 
1.9 1.8 



3.21.8 



3g0 

Humboldt Bay 

Port Orford 

Astoria 

Nee-oh Harbor.... 
PortTownshend.. 

Stellacoom 

5.5.3.8 !Semi-ah-moo Bay. 



7 43 
7 53 

7 28 

8 21 
834 
8 23 

8 40 
980 

9 56 
13 9 
1121 

11315 
IS 38 



mi 



FT. F. 

3.12.2 
4.7,2.7 
5.7'3.7 
6.0 4.1 

7.4 4.4 
8.0,5.9 
7.65.5 

7.8 5.4 
8.2 5.4 
6.7, 54S 

5.5 3.7 

4.9 3.6 

2!2il!3 
2.0 0^6 
1.5 0.9 
1.5 0.6 
1.8:0.8 
1.81.0 
3.21.6 
2.9,1.4 



4.812.4 

4.3 2.3 

4.4 2.8 
4.3 2.8 

5.2 4.1 
5.1,3.7 

7.3 4.9 

4.7 2.7 

5.5 3.5 

6.8 3.7 

7.4 4.6 
7.4 4.8 
5.514.0 

11.1 1 7.2 



4 50| 6.6'4.8 



The " Establishment of the Port," in the above table, is the mea7i interval between the 
time of the Moon's meridian passage and the time of high-water succeeding t/uit tr-dniit. The 
true interval varies with the Moon's age, being least when the moon culminates about 4h. 80m. 
and greatest when culminating about 10 ox-lock, and at the mean, generally when the moon is 
two days old. It sometimes happens that the tide comes in several hours later or earlier than 
the most learned calculation would determine ; and this in consequence of the strength and 
direction of the wind, which the calculator cannot reckon upon. In using the quantities in this 
andthe Star Table, observe that more than 12 hours and less than 24, from midnight or the 
beginning of morning, is afternoon of the same day ; and that more than 12 hours and less 
than 24, from noon, is morning of the nest day. 



Mahometan Calendar.— The year 12S1 be- 
gins on the 6th of June, 1S64, and ends May 
26th, 1S65. It is the 21st of the 42d cycle, con- 
taining 355 days. The year 1282 begins May 27, 
1S65, contains 354 days, ending May 15, 1SG6. 



8PhabanC64)'29D'c30 
9Ram'n.('65)J30 Ja.28 
10Schewan...|29 F'b27i 
llD8'l-Kadah|30]Mr.28 
laDsn-Kejjah 30 Ap.27' 
1 iluhanem. l30. My 27| 



3Saphar 29 Ju. 26 

3RaT)laI SO Jul.25 

4RabIalI....29'An.24 
SJomadhil.. 30;Sep22 
6JomadhiII. 29'Oct22 

7ReJeb .30N'v20 

SSbaban. i29Dec20 



The Mahometan era began with the day af- 
ter the flight of Mahomet to Medina ; wliich 
event occurred in the night of Thursday, July 
18 (N. S), 623 A. D. The year consists of 12 
months, embracing 12 lunations, or 354 days. 
The intercalary, or leap-years, consist of 355 
days. In a cycle of 30 years, there are 19 com- 
mon and 11 leap-years. Since the Mahometan 
year is 11 days less than the tropical year, " it 
is obvious that in about 83 years the above 
months will correspond with every season and 
every part of the Gregorian year." The 9th 
month is the month of fasting. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



STAR TABLE. 

To ascertain when any star or constellation found in the following Table wUl be on the 
meridian, ad<^ the numbers opposite in the left-hand column of figures to the time of "Sidereal 
Noon " found in the calendar pages. For the rising of a star, subtract the number opposite 
in the right-hand column of figures from its meridian passage. For the setting of a star, 

add the same number to its meridian passage. Thsse marked ( ) revolve in a circle of 

perpetual apparition, and do not rise nor set north of the latitude of New York (40° 4;i 40 ), 
for which latitude the semi-diurnal arcs are calculated. The civil day begins at the preceding 
midnight, and consequently 24 hours after midnight, or 12 hours from noon, is morning of 
the succeeding day ; and 24 hours to 36 hours from noon, is evening of the next day. The 
table is arranged in the order of culmination. 



Name of Stah. 



a AndromedEB (Alpheratz) . 

7 Pegasi (Algeiiib) 

a Cassiopeae (Schedir) 

^Oeti 

^ Andromedse (Merach) 

o Ursa Minoris (Polaris).. . 

/3 Arietis . - . 

7 Andromeda (Almaach).. 

a Piscium 

a. Arietis 

aCeti (Menkarl 

a Persei (Algenib) 

I) Tauri (seven stars) 

a Tauri (Aldebaran) 

a Aurigae (Capella) 

^ Orionis (Rigel) 

/3 Tauri (el Nath) 

•y Orionis (Bellatrix) 

6 Orionis (Mintaka) 

6 Orionis (Anilam) 

^ Orionis (Alnitak) 

a Columbse (Phaet) 

a Orionis (Betelguese) 

n Canis Majoris (Sirius) 

e Canis Majoris (Adhara) . . 

a- Geminor (Castor) 

a Canis Minoris (Procyon) . 

^ Geminor (PoUu.\). 

^ Argus (Naos) 

a Hydra (Alphard) 

a Leonis (Regulus) . 



On Me- 


Uises k , 


ridian. 


Seta. 


H M 


H. M. 


e 1 


7 51 


6 


6 CO 


• 38 




87 


4 51 


1 2 


8 26 


1 10 




1 47 


7 16 


1 55 


9 18 


1 55 


6 6 


1 59 


7 23 


2 55 


6 11 


3 14 




3 89 


7 28 


4 27 


6 57 


5 6 


10 11 


5 7 


5 30 


5 17 


7 50 


5 17 


6 20 


5 24 


5 58 


5 29 


6 55 


5 83 


5 52 


5 34 


8 37 


5 47 


6 25 


6 3S 


5 


6 52 


4 7 


7 25 


8 10 


7 81 


6 19 


7 86 


7 50 


7 63 


2 58 


9 19 


5 31 


10 


6 43 



Na 



Stak. 



7 Leonis (Al Gieba). 



H. Ursae Majoris ( p.in..„ 
a Ursa Majoris f^°"^'^"- 
/S Leonis (Uenebola). .... . 

7 Ursse Majoris (Phad). . . . 

^ Corvi 

€ Ursse Majoris (Alioth) . . 

a Virginis (Spica) 

ij Ursae Majoris 

a Bootis (Arcturus) 

fi Ursas Minoris 

^Librae 

a Coronas Borealia 

a Serpentis 

/3'Scorpii ; 

a Scorpii (Antares) 

a Herculis 

a Ophiuchi 

/3 Draconia 

7 Draoonis 

a Lyrse (Vega) 

/3 LyrfB 

a Aquilae (Altair) 

aCygni(Deneb) 

oCephei 

;3 AquariL 

a Aquarii 

a Pis. Aus. (Fomalhaut). . . 

^ Pegasi (Scheat) 

o Pegasi (Markab) 

Vernal Equinox 



On Me 



10 10 
10 61 

10 54 

11 40 

11 45 

12 25 

12 46 

13 16 

13 40 

14 7 

14 49 

15 1 
15 26 
15 35 

15 55 

16 18 

17 6 
17 26 
17 25 

17 51 

18 29 

18 43 

19 41 

20 33 

21 12 
21 21 

21 55 

22 46 
22 53 
22 54 



7 a 

5"27 
7 ■;3 
6 23 
4 49 

4 19 
6 ro 

5 25 



5 54 

8 16 

6 29 

9 84 

587 

5 56 
4 

7 44 

6 60 



Jewish Calendar.— The 5625th year of 1 2 
montlis, being the fourth Jewish common year 
of 365 days, containing 51 Sabbaths, and being 
the first of the Jewish lunar cycle, began Oc- 
tober 1, 1864, and ends Sept, 20th, 1865. The 
year 6626, begins Sept. 21, 1865, and ends Sept. 
9tb,1666. 



MQX THB. 

4Thebet 

5 Sebat. (1865) 

6Adar 

7 Nlsan 

8Iiar 

gSivan 



agiD'cso 

30lJa.28 
29F'b37 
80 Mr 28 
29!Ap27 
30iMy26 



10 Thammuz.. 29 Jn.25 

11 Ab 30 Jul24 

12Elul 29 Au.23 

1 Tisri .(5626) 30,Sep21 
2Marche8r'n 29,Oct21 
3Chi8leu.... SO'N'vlO 
4Thebet 29 D'cl9 



Jewish Anniversaries.— 77(Oj(6 marked tcith 
a * are to he utrictUj obse/'ved. 

Fast of Esther Adar 13. . .Mar. 11 

•Pnrim Adar 14. . .Mar. 12 

Schnscan Purim Adar 15. . . Jlar. 13 

•Beginning of the Passover.. Nisan 15 . .Apr. 1 1 
•Second Feast of Passover.. .Nisan 16 . .Apr.l2 
•Seventh Feast Nisan 21 . .Apr. 17 



•End of Passover Nlsan 22.. Apr. 18 

Laj; Beomar liar 18 Hay 14 

•Feast of Pentecost Sivan 6.. . .Alay 31 

•Feast of " Slvau7 Jnne 1 

Fast: Tak'goftheTemple..Tham'zir.Julyll 

•Fast: Burning of Temple... Ab 9 Aug. 1 

•Feast for the New Year Tl8rl 1 Sept 21 

•Second Feast of " Tl8rl2 Scpt23 

FaetofGedaljah TlsrlS Sept 2:5 

•Fast of Expiation Tisrl 10.. ..SeptSO 

•Feast of Tabernacles Tl8rll5....0ct. 5 

•Second Feast of " .... ...TlBril6....0ct. 6 

Feast of Palms & Branches. Tisrl 21. ...Oct. 11 

•End of the Hut Feast Tisrl 22... .Oct. 13 

•Rejoicing for the Law Tisri 23.. . .Oct. 13 

Consecration of the Temple . Cbisleu 25 JJoc. 13 
The Jewish Era dates from the creation of 
the world, which the Jews believe to have been 
8760J years before our era began. The Jewish 
year is luni -solar, and consists of 12 and some- 
times 13 months, which contain 29 or 30 days 
each. Ve-Adar is the 18th month, andis intro- 
duced between Adar and Nisan; the latter of 
which is tlie first month of the ecclesiastical 
year. In a cycle of 19 years, Vc-Adar is intro- 
duced 7 times. 



1st Month.] 



JANUAMY, 1865. 



[31 Days. 



FHA-SES OF THE 3Sa:003Sr. ( 


— 


Venus 

South. 


Mars 
South. 


Jupiter 
SoJlth. 


Saturn 
Seuth. 


Sun at Noon- 
Mark. 




NEW YORK. 


WASH'TON. 


— 




p. M. 


p. M. 


MORS. 


MORN. 


H. M. 8. 


' D H M 


H. M. 


H M 


i 


2 54 


9 9 


10 12 


7 7 


12 4 6 


IstQuar ' 4 10 58 m. 


10 46 m. 


10 36 m. 


v 


2 58 


8 45 


9 54 


6 45 


12 6 48 


Full .... 


Ill 6 16 ev. 


6 4 ev. 


5 54 ev. 


13 


3 1 


8 23 


9 36 


6 23 


12 9 11 


3d Quar. . 


19 9 52 ev. 


9 40 ev. 


9 30 ev. 


19 


3 3 


8 3 


9 18 


6 


12 11 11 


New .... 


27| 4 46m. 


4 34 m. 


4 24 m. 


25 


3 4 


7 45 


8 59 


5 37 


12 12 45 



f 


U. 


.3 




. 


BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA- 


WASHINGTON ; 


? 


fe 


g 


g 


I 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MARYL'D, VIRG'A, 


s 


t= 


.0 


g 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN.,OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 




fe 


s 






IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 


>• 




, 


Sc:« 


So.-. Moon 


H. W. 


Sun Sun 


Moon. 


H.W. 


Sun 


S..N 


Moon 


a 


a 


Ev„.,. 








EISES. SKTS. 




NYOEK 




SETS. 


SETS. 






H. 


M. 


H U 


H. M. 


B. M. H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M H M 


H M 


H M 


H M 


H M 


H M 


1 


A 




14 


3 33 


7 30 


4 38 9 30 


1 52 


7 25 4 43 


9 31 


11 2a 


719 


4 49 


9 32 


2JM 




10 


4 26 


7 30 


439:1042 


2 39 


7 25 [4 44 


10 42 


morn 


7 19 


4 50 


10 42 


3T 
4IW 




6 


5 17 


7 30 


4 40!ll 50 


3 32 


7 25 


4 45 


1149 


18 


7 19 


4 51 


11 48 




2 


6 9 


7 30 


4 41 


morn 


4 26 


7 25 


4 46 


morn 


1 12 


7 19 


4 52 


morn 


5 It 




58 


7 1 


7 30 


4 41 


1 


5 24 


7 25 


4 46 


57 


2 10 


719 


4 52 


55 


6F 




54 


7 54 


7 30 


4 42 


2 5 


6 26 


7 25 


4 47 


2 2 


3 12 


7 19 


4 58 


1 59 


7S 




50 


8 48 


7S& 


4 43 


3 11 


7 30 


7 25 


4 48 


3 7 


4 16 


7 19 


4 54 


8 8 


8A 




48 


9 42 


7 30 


4 44 


4 13 


8 32 


7 25 


4 49 


4 9 


5 18 


719 


4 55 


4 5 


9M 




42 


10 36 


7 30 


4 45 


5 11 


9 31 


7 25 


4 50 


5 6 


6 17 


7 19 


4 56 


5 2 


lOT 




38 


11 28 


7 29 


4 46 


6 4 


10 23 


7 24 


4 51 


5 59 


7 9 


719 


4 57 


5 55 


lllW 




34 


morn. 


7 29 


4 47 


rises. 


11 7 


7 24 


4 52 


rises. 


7 53 


718 


4 58 


rises. 


12;T 




30 


18 


7 29 


4 48 


6 1 


11 51 


7 24 


4 53 


6 4 


8 87 


7 18 


4 59 


6 6 


131^' 




27 


1 6 


7 28 


4 49 


7 


ev.35 


7 28 


4 54 


7 2 


9 21 


718 


r. 


7 4 


14S 




23 


1 52 


7 28 


4 50 


7 56 


1 13 


7 23 


4 55 


7 57 


9 59 


717 


5 1 


7 59 


15!a 




19 


2 85 


7 27 


4 52 


8 54 


1 49 


7 22 


457 


8 54 


10 85 


717 


5 2 


8 55 


16JM 




15 


8 18 


7 27 


4 53 


9 50 


2 26 


7 22 


4 58 


9 50 


11 12 


716 


5 3 


9 50 


17 T 




11 


4 


7 26 


4 5410 47 


3 6 


7 21 


4 59 


10 46 


11 52 


7 16 


5 4 


10 45 


18 W 




7 


4 42 


7 25 


4 56 11 45 


3 48 


7 20 


5 1 


11 43 


ev,34 


716 


5 6 


11 41 


19 T 




3 


5 25 


7 25 


4 57imorn 


4 85 


7 20 


5 2 


morn 


1 21 


7 15 


5 7 


morn 


20 F 


3 


59 


6 9 


7 24 


4 58 


04« 


5 22 


7 19 


5 3 


39 


2 8 


7 14 


5 R 


0R« 


21 S 


3 


55 


6 56 


7 23 


4 59 


1 41 


6 21 


7 18 


5 4 


1 37 


8 7 


7 14 


5 9 


1 34 


22 


A 


3 


51 


7 46 


7 22 


5 1 


2 40 


7 20 


718 


5 5 


2 37 


4 6 


718 


.-> 10 


2 32 


23 


M 


3 47| 


8 39 


7 22 


5 2 


3 40 


8 22 


7 17 


5 6 


3 36 


5 8 


7 12 


5 n 


3 81 


24 


T 


3 


43 


9 34 


7 21 


5 3 


4 37 


9 22 


7 16 


5 7 


4 32 


6 8 


712 


5 1? 


4 27 


25 


VV 


3 


39 


10 31 


7 20 


5 4 


5 30 


10 19 


7 16 


5 8 


5 26 


7 5 


7n 


5 18 


5 22 


26 '1' 


3 


35 


11 29 


7 19 


5 5 


6 19 


11 8 


7 15 


5 9 


6 15 


7 54 


7 10 


5 14 


6 11 


27F 


3 


31 


ev. 26] 


7 19 


5 7 


sets. 


11 58 


7 14 5 11 


sets. 


8 44 


7 9 


5 15 


sets. 


28 S 


3 


28 


1 22 


7 18 


5 8 


7 11 


morn 


7 13 5 12 


7 12 


9 33 


7 9 


5 16 


7 18 


29 


Aj 


3 


24 


2 17 


7 17 


5 9 


8 25 


47 


7 13 


5 13 


8 25 


10 20 


7 8 


5 17 


8 25 


30 


Ml 


3 


20 


3 11 


7 16 


5 11 


9 37 


1 34 


7 12 


5 15 


9 36 


11 5 


7 7 


5 19 


9 36 


31 T i 


3 


16' 


4 4 


7 15 


5 12 10 48 


2 19 


7 11 


5 16 


10 46 


11 56 


7 7 


5 20 


10 44 



The late Judge Peters has left behind him 
some good puns, among which is the fol- 
lowing: Wheu on the District Court Bench, 
he observed to Judge Washington that one of 
the witnesses had a vegetable head. " How 
so?" was the inquiry. "He has carroty hair, 
reddish cheeks, a turn-up nose, and a sage 
look." 

What is the difference between an attempted 
homicide and a hog butchery ? One is an as- 
sault with intent to kill, and "the other is a kill 
with intent to salt. 



"What are wages here?" asked a laborer of 
a boy. " I don't know, sir." " What does your 
father get on a Saturday night ?" " Get !" said 
the boy, " why he gets as tight as a brick." 

" Mart," said one pretty girl to another, 
" can you make up your mind to marry that 
odious Mr. Snuff?" " Why, my dear Julia," 
was the reply, " I don't know but what I might 
take him at a pinch." 

Opportdnities, Uke eggs, must be hatched 
when they are fresh. 



2d Month.] 



FEBBUABY, 1865. 



[28 Days. 



FIIA.SES OF THE l^IOOKr. 



BOSTON. 



IstQuar. 2 

FuH 10 

3d Quar. 18 
New 125 



8 24 ev. 

11 43 m. 

4 54 ev. 

3 19 ev. 



NEW YORK. 

8 12 ev. 

11 31m. 

4 42 ev. 

3 7ev. 



WASH'TON. 

8 2 ev. 
11 21m. 
4 32 ev. 
2 57 ev. 





Venus 


M.rs 




Saturn 


D. 


South. 


South. 


South. 


South. 


p. H. 


p. M. 


«OEN. 


MOBN 


1 


3 5 


7 25 


8 37 


5 10 


1 


3 5 


7 9 


8 18 


4 46 


13 


3 5 


6 54 


7 59 


4 23 


19 


3 4 


6 40 


7 39 


3 59 


25 


3 2 


6 28 


7 19 


3 35 



12 13 58 

12 14 27 

12 14 28 

12 14 3 

12 13 14 



E w 


i 






BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA- 


WASHINGTON ; 




S 


z 


d 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MARYL'D, VIRG'A, 


s 






o 


55 ' 


MICHIGAN, WSCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN., OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 


S 


o 


ra 




IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 


>- 


— 


— 


Sus Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun 1 Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun Sun 


MooA 


<i2 


-« 




§ 


SISES. SKTg. 




H. M. 


EISES.| »I!r«. 


SETS. 




""JES. SETS. 


BKT3. 




„ 


M 


B M 


H. U 


1 


W 


3 


12 


4 57 


7" 14 5 14 


\i 56 


3 10 


nihl Ts 


li 54 


mom 


7 65 22 


11 51 


^ 


T 


3 


8 


5 51 


7 12 5 15 


morn 


4 4 


7 95 19 


morn 


50 


7 5 5 23 


morn 


3iF 


3 


4 


6 45 


7 115 17 


1 3 


5 4 


7 85 20 


1 


1 50 


7 4,5 24 


56 


4|S 


3 





7 38 


7 10 jS 18 


2 7 


6 7 


7 7 5 21 


2 3 


2 53 


7 35 25 


1 59 


5A 


2 


56 


8 31 


7 915 19 


3 5 


7 10 


7 6'5 22 


3 1 


3 56 


7 2 5 26 


2 56 


fiM 


2 


R?; 


9 23 


7 8,5 21 


3 58 


8 12 


7 5 5 24 


3 54 


4 58 


7 15 27 


3 49 


7T 


2 48! 


10 13 


7 7 5 22 


4 46 


9 10 


7 4 5 25 


4 42 


5 56 


7 0i5 28 


4 38 


slw 


2. 


44 


11 1 


7 6|5 24 


5 28 


10 11 


7 3 5 26 


5 24 


6 47 


6 5915 29 


5 20 


9!T 


2 40 


11 47 


7 5:5 25 


6 5 


10 46 


7 2 5 28 


6 2 


7 32 


6 58 5 30 


5 59 


10 


F 


2 


36 


morn. 


7 3 


5 26 


rises. 


11 24 


7 5 29 


rises. 


8 10 


6 57i5 31 


rises. 


n 


ft 


2 33 


32 


7 2 


5 27 


6 46 


ev. 4 


6 69 5 30 


6 47 


8 50 


6 66 5 32 


6 47 


12 


A 


2 


29 


1 15 


7 1 


5 29 


7 42 


41 


6 58 5 32 


7 42 


9 27 


6 55'5 34 


7 42 


13 


M 


2 


25 


1 67 


7 


5 30 


8 39 


1 17 


6 56 5 33 


8 39 


10 3 


6 54 5 35 


8 38 


14 


T 


9, 


21 


2 39 


6 58,5 31 


9 34 


1 51 


je 55 5 34 


9 33 


10 37 


6 5315 36 


9 31 


15 


W 


2 


17 


3 21 


6 57:5 32 


10 33 


2 28 


6 54 5 35 


10 31 


1114 


6 51'5 37 


10 28 


16 


T 


2 


13 


4 5 


6 55|5 33 


11 30 


3 11 


16 53'5 36 


11 27 


1157 


6 50 5 38 


11 24 


l7iF 


2 


9 


4 50 


6 54|5 34 


morn 


3 56 


6 51'5 37 


morn 


ev.42 


6 4915 39 


morn 


18 


ft 


2 


5 


5 38 


6 52!5 36 


28 


4 49 


6 50'5 38 


24 


1 35 


6 48;5 40 


20 


19 


A 


2 


1 


6 28 


6 51 j5 37 


1 26 


5 47 


6 49 5 39 


1 22 


2 33 


6 47 5 41 


1 18 


?,0 


M 




57 


7 20 


6 49|5 39 


2 21 


6 50 


6 47.5 41 


2 17 


3 36 


6 45-5 42 


2 12 


?,1 


T 




53 


8 15 


6 48,5 40 


3 10 


7 54 


16 46 5 42 


3 6 


4 40 


6 44I5 43 


3 1 


9.'>. 


W 




49 


9 11 


6 47^5 41 


4 4 


8 57 


16 44 5 43 


4 


5 43 


6 43 5 44 


3 56 


^3 


T 




45 


10 8 


6 45 j5 43 


4 61 


9 57 


6 43 5 45 


4 48 


6 43 


6 42 5 46 


4 45 


^4 


F 




41 


11 4 


6 43i5 44 


5 32 


10 48 


16 41 5 46 


5 30 


7 35 


6 40:5 47 


5 27 


?,5 


ft 




37 


ev. 1 


6 42 5 45 


sets. 


11 35 


6 3915 47 


sets. 


8 21 


6 3915 48 


sets. 


?,6 


A 




34 


56 


6 41;5 46 


7 12 


morn 


6 38 5 48 


7 12 


9 11 


6 38,5 49 


7 12 


27 


M 




30 


1 52 


6 89 5 47 


8 27 


25 


6 37|5 49 


8 25 


9 59 


6 3615 50 


8 24 


28|T 




26 


2 47 


6 37:5 48 


9 39 


1 13 


6 36 5 49 


9 37 


10 44 


6 34 5 51 


9 36 



Eating Three Days' Rations. — In the recent 
advance, Col. John Groesbeck, Thirty-ninth I 
Ohio Infantry, being then in command of the I 
since famous Ohio Brigade, issued an order to 
his command to put in their haversacks three 
days' cooked rations. The projected opera- 
tions being subsequently postponed or changed, 
the Colonel directed the ration or order to*e 
countermanded. His Teutonic messenger iftade 
the rounds of the camp in person, late at night, 
proclaiming that " Col. Groesbeck ordered his 
men to eat up their three days' cooked rations."' 
The ridiculousness of the messenger's render- 
ing of the Colonel's order struck everybody, 
and the boys solemnly got up from their beds 
and sat down to " obey orders." Soon the 



camps were alive with fun rampant. Messes 
sent to "report progress " had got to the mid- 
dle of the second day, or third day's breakfast, 
&c. Some begged an extension of the order, 
some an extension of time. One was full to 
the throat, and had a day and a half's rations 
left. What should he do ? And so through all 
tljc changes possible. The Colonel and the 
Ohio Brigade, which loves him, will never forget 
the famous order to " eat the three days' cooked 
rations." 

A DRUNKES fellow, sitting on the st.eps of a 
church in Boston, the cold wind blowing chill- 
ingly round the corner: "If heaven (hie) 
tempera the wnd to the (liic) shorn lamb, I 
wish the lamb (hie) was on this corner." 





3d Month.] MARCH, 1865. [31 Days. 






I-HAJBES OF THE MIOOlSr. 


^fenus 
c— .1. 


Mars 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


IVuT 


Sun at Noon- 
Mark. 






UOON. 


1 


WASH'TON. 


^ 

D. 








BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


p. M. 


p. M. 


MOKN. 


MORS. 


H. M. s. 








D. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


3 1 


6 19 


7 6 


8 ic 


12 12 30 






IstQuar. 


4 


7 35 m. 


7 23 m. 


7 13 m. 


7 


2 58 


6 7 


6 45 


2 M 


12 11 9 






Full .... 


12 5 58 m. 


5 46 m. 


5 36 m. 


113 


2 54 


5 56 


6 24 


2 29 12 9 33 






3d Quar. . 


20J 7 52 m. 


7 40 m. 


7 30 m. 


19 


2 49 


5 45 


6 3 


2 5 12 7 48 






New .... 


27| 44 m. 


32 m. 


22 m. 


25! 


2 42 


5 35 


5 41 


1 40 12 5 58 






"ri" 


«' 


J 




BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA- 


WASHINGTON 






n 


a 




H 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MARYL'D,.VIRG'A, 






a 


^ 


o 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN.,OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 










s 


i 


IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 








Su.v 


Srx 


Moon 


H. W. 


^UN 


Sun Moon. 


H. W. 


Sun 


Sun 


aiooN 






2 


t 


Even'g. 


s 


BISE8. 


SETS. 




Boston. 






NYORK 




SETS. 












H. M. 


B M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


U. M. 


B. M. 


H. U. 


B M H M 


H. M 


H M 


IT^r 


H. M. 






1 


w 


l' 22 


3 4.3 


6 35 


5 50 


10 50 


1 58 


6 85 


5"56l6 47 


li 35 


6'33 


5 52 


10 44 






2 


T 


1 18 


4 38 


6 33 


5 51 


11 56 


2 49i 


6 33 


5 51 11 53 


morn 


6 31 


5 53 


11 49 






3 


F 


1 14 


5 33 


6 32 


5 53 


morn 


3 44 


6 32 


5 53 morn 


30 


6 30 


5 54 


morn 






4 


S 


1 10 


6 28 


6 30 


5 54 


58 


43 


6 30 


5 54 


54 


1 29 


6 29 


5 55 


50 






6 


A 


1 6 


7 20 


6 29 


5 55 


1 55 


5 47 


6 29 


5 55 


1 51 


2 33 


6 27 


5 56 


1 46 






6 


M 


1 2 


8 11 


6 27 


5 56 


2 43 


6 49 


6 27 


5 56 


2 38 


3 35 


6 26 


557 


2 34 






Y 


T 


58 


8 59 


6 26 


5 58 


3 28 


7 49 


6 26 


5 58; 3 25 


4 35 


6 25 


5 58 


3 21 






8 


W 


54 


9 45 


6 24 


5 59 


4 6 


8 45 


6 24 


5 59 4 3 


5 31 


6 24 


559 


4 






9 


T 


50 


10 30 


6 23 


6 


4 40 


9 34 


6 23 


6 


4 38 


6 20 


6 22 


6 


4 35 






10 


F 


46 


11 13 


6 21 


6 1 


5 13 


10 18 


6 21 


6 1 


5 11 


7 4 


6 20 


6 1 


5 9 






11 


s 


42 


11 65 


6 19 


6 2 


5 41 


10 55 


6 19 


6 2 


5 40 


7 41 


6 18 


6 2 


5 39 






12 


A 


39 


morn. 


6 17 


6 3 


rises. 


11 28 


6 17 


6 3 'rises. 


8 14 


6 17 


6 3 


rises. 






13 


M 


35 


37 


6 15 


6 5 


7 29 


ev. 8 


6 15 


6 4 


7 27 


8 54 


6 15 


6 4 


7 26 






14 


T 


31 


1 20 


6 14 


6 6 


8 26 


45 


6 14 


6 5 


8 24 


9 31 


6 14 


6 5 


8 22 






15 


W 


27 


2 3 


6 12 


6 7 


9 22 


123 


6 12 


6 6 


9 19 


10 9 


6 13 


6 6 


9 16 






16 


T 


23 


2 47 


6 10 


6 8 


10 20 


158 


6 10 


6 7 


10 17 


10 44 


6 11 


6 7 


10 13 






17 


F 


19 


3 34' 


6 9 


6 9 


11 16 


2 40 


6 9 


6 8 


11 13 


11 26 


6 10 


6 8 


11 8 






18 


S 


15 


4 22l 


6 7 


6 10 


morn 


3 28, 


6 7 


6 9 morn 


ev.l4l 


6 8 


6 9 


mom 






19 


A 


11 


5 12; 


6 5 


6 11 


12 


4 20 


6 5 


6 10| 8 


1 6 


6 6 


6 10 


3 






20 


M 


7 


6 5j 


6 3 


6 13 


1 6 


5 18 


6 3 


6 12 1 2 


2 4 


6 5 


6 11 


57 






21 


T 


3 


6 58 


6 2 


6 14 


1 54 


6 23 


6 2 


6 13; 1 50 


3 9 


6 3 


6 12 


146 






22 


W 


morn. 


7 53| 


6 


6 15 


2 41 


7 29 


6 


6 14| 2 37 


4 15 


6 2 


6 13 


2 34 






23 


T 


11 55 


8 47i 


5 59 


6 17 


3 23 


8 31 


5 59 


6 15; 3 20 


5 17 


6 1 


6 14 


3 17 






24 


F 


11 51 


9 42 !5 57 


6 18 


4 2 


9 31 


5 58 


6 16 4 


6 17 


5 59 


6 15 


3 58 






25 


S 


11 47 


10 3815 55 


6 19 


4 41 


10 25 


5 56 


6 17 4 40 


7 11 


5 57 


616 


4 39 






26 


A 


11 43 


11 33|!5 53 


6 20 


5 17 


11 12 


5 55 


6 18 5 17 


7 58 


5 56 


6 17 


6 17 






27 


M 


11 40: 


ev. 30|5 52 


6 21 


sets. 


morn 


5 54 


6 19 'sets. 


8 48; 


5 54 


6 18 


sets. 






28 


T 


11 86 


1 27I 5 51 


6 22 


8 26 


2i 


5 52 


6 20 8 24 


9 39 


5 53 


6 19 


8 21 






29 


W 


11 32 


2 24 5 49 


6 23 


9 38 


53 


5 51 


6 21 9 34 


10 24 


5 52 


6 20 


9 31 






30 


T 


11 28 


3 22 5 47 


6 24 


10 44 


138 


5 49 


6 22 10 40 


11 lol 


5 50 


6 21 


10 86 






31 


F 


11 24 


4 18' 5 45 


6 25 


11 44 


2 29 


5 47 


6 231140 


morn! 


5 48 


6 22 


11 35 






The Philosopbt op Heat.— Philosopher to 


BEGINNISQ TO WALK. 






sharp boy—" What are the properties of heat?'' 
Boy—" The chief property is that it expands 
bodies, while cold contracts them." 

Philosopher— " Very good, give me an ex- 
ample." 


Pe's not got his sea-legs, the darling; 
He's been in our ship but a year ; 

He isn't yet versed in our lingo- 
Knows nothing of sailing, I fear. 






Boy — " In summer, when it is hot, the day is 


But he soon will hear more of the billows, 






long; in winter, when it is cold, the day is 


And learn the salt taste of the wave ; 






short." 


One voyage, though it's short, is sufficient, 






Exit philosopher, lost in amazement that so 


When our ports are the cradle and grave. 






familiar an instance should have so long 


The young lady who gives herself away loses 






escaped his own observation. 1 her self possession. 1 





4th Month.] APRIL, 1865. [30 Days, i 


FHCASBS OF TUB IwIOOlsr. 




South. 


Mars 
South. 


JupiUr 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


iSun at Noon 1 
Mark. 1 


MOOX. 


BOSTON. 






NEW YORK. 


WASH'TON. 


D. 

1 


2 30 


5 23 


MOHN. 

5 15 


MORN. H. M. S. , 

1 10 12 3 50 ; 




D 


H. M. 


H M 


H SI 


IstQuar. 


2 


8 35 ev. 


8 23 ev. 


8 13 ev. 


7 


2 17 


5 13 


4 53 


45 12 2 4 


Full.. 


___ 


10 
18 


11 43 ev. 
6 36 ev. 


11 31 ev. 
6 24 ev. 


11 21 ev. 
6 14 ev. 


13 
19 


1 58 
1 34 


5 4 
4 54 


4 29 
4 6 


20 12 26 
even. 11 58 59 


SdQuar. 


New .... 


25 


9 30 m. 


9 18 m. 


9 8 m. 


25 


1 5 


4 45 


3 42 


11 25 11 57 49 


~ri 


i 


jj 




BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PmLA- 


WASHINGTON ; 


g 




j- 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MARYL'D, VIRG'A, 


s 


^ 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN., OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 


o 


tx 


K 


IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 


■ 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H.W. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun 


SON 


Moon 


2 


p 


Morn'g 


g 








Boston. 


RIIES 




SETS. 


NYOBK 












H. M. 


H M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. H. 


H. M. 


II. M. 


H. M. 


U. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


s 


11 20 


5 13 


5 43 


6 26 


morn 


3 24 


6 45 


6 24 


morn 


10 


6 46 


6 22 


morn 


2 


A 


11 16 


6 6 


5 41 


6 27 


38 


4 22 


5 42 


6 26 


34 


1 8 


5 44 


6 23 


80 


3 


M 


11 12 


6 56 


5 40 


6 28 


1 25 


5 20 


5 41 


6 26 


1 22 


2 6 


5 43 


6 24 


1 17 


4 


T 


11 8 


7 43 


5 38 


6 29 


2 6 


6 20 


5 39 


6 27 


2 3 


3 6 


5 41 


6 25 


2 


5 


W 


11 4 


8 28 


5 36 


6 30 


2 42 


7 17 


5 37 


6 28 


2 40 


4 3l 


5 39 


6 25 


2 37 


6 


T 


11 


9 12 


5 34 


6 31 


3 14 


8 9 


5 36 


6 29 


3 12 


4 55 


5 88 


6 26 


3 10 


T 


F 


10 56 


9 54 


5 32 


6 32 


3 44 


8 59 


6 33 


6 30 


3 43 


5 45 


5 37 


6 27 


3 42 


8 


S 


10 52 


10 36 


5 30 


6 33 


4 11 


9 43 


5 31 


6 31 


4 11 


6 29 


5 35 


6 28 


4 11 


9 


A 


10 48 


11 18 


5 29 


6 34 


4 89 


10 24 


5 30 


6 32 


4 40 


7 10 


5 83 


6 29 


4 40 


10 


M 


10 44 


morn. 


5 27 


6 35 


rises. 


11 


5 28 


6 33 


rises. 


7 46 


531 


6 30 


rises. 


11 


T 


10 41 


i 


5 25 


6 36 


7 16 


1185 


5 26 


6 34 


7 14 


8 21 


5 29 


6 31 


7 11 


12 


W 


10 37 


45 


5 24 


6 37 


8 13 


ev.l5 


5 25 


6 35 


8 10 


9 1 


5 28 


6 32 


8 7 


13 


T 


10 33 


1 31 


5 22 


6 38 


9 10 


55 


5 24 


6 36 


9 7 


9 411 


5 27 


6 33 


9 S 


14 


F 


10 29 


2 19 


5 21 


6 39 


10 7 


1 35 


5 22 


6 37 


10 3 


10 21] 


5 25 


6 84 


9 59 


16 


S 


10 25 


3 9 


5 19 


6 40 


11 


2 18 


6 21 


6 38 


10 56 


11 4 

11 52 


5 24 


6 35 


10 51 


16 


A 


10 21 


4 


6 17 


6 41 


11 50 


3 6 


5 20 


6 39 


1146 


5 23 


6 36 


1142 


\1 


M 


10 17 


4 52 


5 16 


6 42 


morn 


3 59 


5 18 


6 40 


morn 


ev.45 


5 21 


6 37 


morn 


18 


T 


10 13 


5 45 


6 15 


6 43 


36 


4 57 


5 16 


6 41 


33 


143; 


5 20 


6 88 


29 


19 


W 


10 9 


G 38 


5 13 


6 44 


1 19 


5 59 


5 15 


6 42 


1 16 


2 45 


5 19 


6 39 


1 13 i 


20 


T 


10 5 


7 31 


6 12 


6 46 


1 57 


6 52 


5 13 


6 44 


1 55 


3 48| 


5 17 


6 40 


1 53 


21 


F 


10 1 


8 24 


5 10 


6 47 


2 35 


8 4 


5 11 


6 45 


2 34 


4 50 


5 15 


6 41 


2 33 


22 


S 


9 57 


9 17 


5 8 


6 48 


3 11 


9 4 


5 10 


6 46 


3 10 


6 50 


5 14 


6 42 


8 10 


23 


A 


9 53 


10 12 


5 6 


6 49 


3 47 


10 


5 9 


6 47 


3 48 


6 46 


5 13 


6 43 


8 49 


24 


M 


9 49 


11 8 


5 4 


6 51 


4 25 


10 52 


6 7 


6 48 


4 27 


7 38' 


5 11 


6 44 


4 29 


26 


T 


9 46 


ev. 5 


5 3 


6 52 


sets. 


11 39 


5 6 


6 49 


sets. 


8 25 


5 10 


6 45 


sets. 


26 


W 


9 42 


1 3 


6 2 


6 53 


8 20 


morn 


5 5 


6 50 


8 17 


9 18 


5 9 


6 46 


8 13 


27 


T 


9 38 


2 3 


6 1 


6 54 


9 28 


32 


5 3 


6 51 


9 24 


10 9 


5 7 


6 47 


9 20 


28 


F 


9 84 


3 


4 59 


6 56 


10 26 


1 23 


5 2 


6 52 


10 22 


10 56 


6 6 


6 48 


10 17 


29 


S 


9 30 


3 56 


4 57 


6 57 


11 18 


2 9 


5 1 


6 63 


11 14 


11 48 


6 4 


6 49 


11 10 


30 


A 


9 26 


4 48; 


4 56 


6 58 


morn 


3 2 


5 


6 64 


11 58 


morn 


5 3 


6 50 


11 55 


When James T. Braily first opened a lawyer's 


A COLORED preacher within our lines recently 


office in New York, he took a basement room 


felt constrained to preach against the extor- 


which had previously been occupied by a cob- 


tions of the sutlers from which his flock had 


bler. He was somewhat annoyed by the pre- 


suffered. After much deliberation, he an- ■ 


vious occupant's callers, and irritated by the 


nounced his te.xt as follows: "Now de ser- 


fact that he had few of his own. One day an 


pent was more sutler than any beast of de 


Irishman entered. "The cobbler's gone, I see," 


field which de Lord God hath made." 


he said. " I should think he had," tartly re- 


Did the man who ploughed the sea, and af- 


sponded Brady. "And what do ye sell?" 
he asked, looking at the solitary table and a 


terwards planted his foot upon his native soil, 
ever harvest the crops ? 
A WAG, speaking of a blind wood-sawyer, 


few law books. "Blockheads," responded 
Brady. " Be gorra," said the Irishman, " ye 


must be doing a mighty fine business— ye 


says that " while none ever saw him see, thou- 


hain't got but one left." 


sands have seen him saw." 



5th Month.] MAT, 1865. [31 Days. 


Fia:A.ST=3S OF THE JVIOOKr. 




Venus 
South. 


Mars 


Jupit«r 
South 


Saturn 
South. 


\Sunat Naon- 
\ Mark. 


MOON. BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASH'TON. 


"•' 






p. M. 


p. M. 


MOEN. 


p. M. 


B. M. 8. 


D. H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


1 


31 


4 36 


3 17 


11 Olll 5tj OS II 


IstQuar. 2 11 20 m. 


11 8m. 


10 58 m. 


7 .mom 


4 27 


2 52 


10 35 11 56 21 


Full.... lo! 3 39 ev. 


3 27 ev. 


3 17 ev. 


13lll 17 


4 18 


2 26 10 9|ll 56 7 


3dQuar.. 18 1 56 m. 


1 44 m. 


1 34 m. 


119 10 44 


4 9 


2 9 44 11 56 14 


New 124 6 6 ev. 


5 54 ev. 


6 44 ev. 


i25 10 16 


4 


1 34 9 20|ll 56 41 


7 


i 


a 


B 


BOSTON NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA- 


WASHINGTON 






2 =5 

go 


1 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., N-EW 


MARYL'D, VIRG'A, 


g 


% 


g 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN.,OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, JIISSOURI, 


s 

3 


1 


m ^ 




IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 


Morn'g 


Sun Sum 
kisbs. sets. 


Moon 


H. W. 

Boston. 


H. M. 


Sun 

SETS. 
B. .M. 


~M^5n~ 

SBTS. 


K^ 


Sun 

RISES. 


bUN 

SETS. 


Moon 

SETS. 


V. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


M 


9 22 


5 38 


4'54 6"'59 


2 


3 54 


4 59 


6 65 


mom 


40 


5''"2 


6"'52 


mora 


2 


T 


9 18 


6 24 


4 53]7 


42 


4 48 


4 58 


6 56 


39 


134 


5 1 


6 63 


36 


3 


W 


9 14 


7 9 


4 517 1 


1 15 


5 43 


4 57 


6 57 


1 12 


2 29 


5 


6 54 


1 10 


4 


T 


9 10 


7 52 


4 50 


7 2 


1 46 


6 36 


4 66 


6 58 


1 45 


3 22 


4 59 


6 56 


144 


5 


F 


9 6 


8 34 


4 49 


7 3 


2 15 


7 29 


4 55 


6 69 


2 14 


4 15 


4 58 


6 56 


2 14- 


6 


S 


9 2 


9 16 


4 48 


7 4 


2 43 


8 15 


4 54 


7 


2 43 


5 1 


4 57 


6 56 


2 48 


1 


A 


8 58 


9 58 


4 47 


7 5 


3 10 


9 3 


4 53 


7 1 


3 11 


5 49 


4 56 


6 57 


3 12 


8 


M 


8 54 


10 42 


4 46 7 6 


3 38 


9 47 


4 52 


7 2 


3 40 


6 33 


4 55 


6 58 


3 42 


9 


T 


8 51 


11 28 


4 45 7 7 


4 9 


10 28 


4 51 


7 3 


4 12 


7 14 


4 64 


6 59 


4 15 


10 


W 


8 47 


mom. 


4 44 


7 8 


rises. 


11 7 


4 50 


7 4 


rises. 


7 53 


4 53 


7 


rises. 


11 


T 


8 4S 


16 


4 43 


7 9 


8 1 


11 49 


4 49 


7 5 


7 67 


8 35 


4 52 


7 1 


7 53 


12 


F 


8 39 


1 5 


4 42 


7 10 


8 57 


ev.33 


4 48 


|7 6 


8 63 


9 19 


4 51 


7 2 


8 48 


13 


S 


8 35 


1 57 


4 41 


7 11 


9 48 


1 17 


4 47 


17 7 


9 44 


10 3 


4 60 


7 3 


9 40 


14 


A 


8 31 


2 49 


4 40 


7 12 


10 36 


2 


4 45 


7 8 


10 33 


10 46 


4 49 


7 4 


10 28 


15 


M 


8 27 


3 42 


4 39 


7 13 


11 19 


2 48 


4 44 


7 9 


11 15 


1134 


4 48 


7 5 


11 12 


16 


T 


8 23 


4 34 


4 38 


7 14 


1156 


3 40 


4 43 


7 10 


11 54 


ev.26 


4 47 


7 6 


11 61 


17 


W 


8 19 


5 26 


4 37 


7 15 


mom 


4 36 


4 42 


7 11 


mom 


1 22 


4 4« 


7 7 


mora 


18 


T 


8 15 


6 18 


4 36 


7 16 


25 


5 34 


4 41 


17 12 


23 


2 20 


4 45 


7 7 


21 


19 


F 


8 11 


7 9 


4 35 


7 17 


1 9 


6 36 


4 40 


|7 13 


1 8 


3 22I 


4 44 


7 8 


1 8 


20 


S 


8 7 


8 1 


4 35 


7 18 


144 


7 38 


4 39 


,7 14 


1 44 


4 24 


4 44 


7 9 


1 44 


21 


A 


8 3 


8 55 


4 34 


7 19 


2 20 


8 41 


4 38 


i7l5 


2 22 


5 27 


4 43 


7 10 


2 23 


22 


M 


7 59 


9 50 


4 33|7 20 


2 58 


9 39 


4 37 


,7 16 


3 


6 25 


4 42 


7 10 


3 2 


23 


T 


7 55 


10 47 


4 3217 21 


3 40 


10 33 


4 36 


7 17 


3 43 


7 19 


4 42 


7 11 


3 46 


24 


W 


7 51 


11 45 


4 31.7 22 


sets. 


11 22 


4 35 


;7 18 


sets. 


8 8 


4 41 


7 12 


sets. 


25 


T 


7 48 


ev.43 


4 30 7 23 


8 9 


mom 


4 35 


7 19 


8 5 


8 59 


4 40 


7 13 


8 


26 


F 


7 44' 


1 41 


4 29 7 24 


9 6 


13 


4 34 


7 20 


9 2 


9 48 


4 40 


7 14 


8 58 


27 


S 


7 40 


2 36 


4 28 7 25 


9 54 


1 2 


4 33 


^7 21 


9 51 


10 35 


4 39 


7 14 


9 47 


28 


A 


7 36 


3 28 


4 28 7 26 


10 37 


149 


4 33 


7 22 


10 33 


11 20 


4 38 


7 15 


10 30 


29 


M 


7 32 


4 17 


4 27'7 27 


11 14 


2 34 


4 32 


7 23 


11 11 


mora 


4 38 


7 16 


11 9 


30 


T 


7 28 


5 3 


4 2617 28 


1146 


3 23 


4 31 


7 24 


11 44 


9 


4 37 


7 16 


11 42 


31 


W 


7 24 


5 48 


4 26|7 28 


mom 


4 10 


4 31 


|7 25 


morn 


561 


4 37 


7 17 


mora 


A RELATION BY MARRIiGE. 

As my wife, at the window, one day. 


"Bill, did you ever go to sea?" "I guess I 
did. Last year, for instance, I went to see a 


Stood watching a man with a monkey, 
A cart came by with a " broth of a boy," 


red-headed girl, but I only went once." " Why 
so?" "Because her brother had an unpleasant 


Who was driving a stout little donkey. 
To my wife I then spoke, by way of a joke, 


way of throwing boot-jacks and smoothing- 
irons at people." 


"There's a relation of yours in that carriage !" 


To which she repUed, as the donkey she spied. 


A con.NTRT editor, living on the line of a rail- 


"Ah, yes, a relation— by marriage !" ! road, applied for a pass for himself, and added, 


As old gentleman of great experience says | "please embrace my wife." The superintend- 


he is never satisfied that a lady understands j ent returned a pass to the editor, but declined 


a kiss unless he has it from her own mouth. 1 the proposed honor. 





6th Month.] JUNE, 1865. [30 Days. [| 




I'liASBS OF THE l>«003Sr. 


1 


Venua 
South. 


Mar, 

South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


Sun at N«m. 
ifark. 




MOON. BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASH'TON. 




"^ 


MOKN. 


p. M. 


MORN. 


P.M. 


B. M. B, 




D. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. U. 


1 


9 49 


3 49 


59 


8 51 


11 57 83 




IstQuar. 


1 


3 37 m. 


3 2*5 m. 


3 15m, 


7 


9 32 


3 40 


37 


8 27 


11 58 35 




Full 


9 


4 57 m. 


4 45 m. 


4 35 m. 


13 


9 19 


8 31 


10 


8 2 


11 59 46 




3d Quar . 


16 


7 9m. 


6 57 m. 


6 47 m. 


19 


9 9 


3 21 


even. 


7 38 


12 1 3 




New .... 


23 


3 14 m. 


3 2 m. 


2 52 m. 


25 


9 1 


3 12 


11 11 


7 15 


12 2 21 




Ist Quar . 


30 


8 56 ev. 


8 44 ev. 


8 34 ev. 
















n 


m! 


J 




BOSTON J NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA- 


WASHINGTON ; 




g 


«i 


H g 


g 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MARYL'D, VIRG'A, 




S 


^ 




o 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN., OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 






i 


« Z 


i 


, IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. | 






Sun 


Sd.v 


Moon 


11. W. 


Su.v 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun Sun 


MeoK 




O 


2 


Morn'g 


o 


RISES. 
H. M. 


SKTS. 


SSTS. 


BOSTO.V. 
H. H. 


KISES. 


B. M. 




NYOKK 


RISES. SKTS. 
H. M. H. M. 








H. M. 




H M 


U. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 




IT 


7 20 


"e 30 


4 25 


7' 29 


17 


5 


4"'3'i 


7 24 


16 


146 


4 36 7 18 


15 




2F 


7 16 


7 12 


4 24 


7 30 


45 


5 49 


4 30 


7 25 


44 


2 35 


4 36 7 19 


44 




3S 


7 12 


7 55 


4 24 7 30 


1 12 


6 39 


4 30 


7 25 


1 13 


3 25|!4 3617 19 


1 13 




4A 


7 8 


8 38 


4 23 7 31 


140 


7 31 


4 29 


7 26 


1 42 


4 17| 4 35|7 20 


143 




5M 


7 4 


9 23 


4 23 


7 32 


2 10 


8 20 


4 29 


7 27 


2 12 


5 6i!4 35 7 20 2 15 || 




6 


T 


7 


10 10 


4 23 


7 33 


2 43 


9 11 


4 28 


7 27 


2 46 


5 57 14 34,7 21 


2 49 




7 


W 


6 56 


10 59 


4 22 


7 33 


3 20 


9 58 


4 28 


7 28 


3 24 


6 44li4 84;7 21 


8 28 




8 


T 


6 53 


11 50 


4 22 


7 34 


4 3 


10 44 


4 28 


7 28 


4 7 


7 30 


4 34 7 22 


4 11 




9 


F 


6 49 


morn. 


4 22 


7 35 


rises. 


11 26 


4 28 


7 29 


rises. 


8 12 


4 34 7 22 


rises. 




10 


S 


6 45 


43 


4 22 


7 35 


8 33 


ev.l3 


4 28 


7 29 


8 29 


8 59 


4 34 7 23 


8 25 




11 


A 


6 41 


1 37 


4 22 


7 36 


9 18 


1 


4 28 


7 30 


9 14 


9 46 


4 34 7 24 


9 11 




12 


M 


6 37 


2 30 


4 22 


7 37 


9 59 


144 


4 28 


7 80 


9 56 


10 30 


k 34.7 25 


9 53 




13 


T 


6 33 


3 23 


4 22 


7 37 


10 38 


2 30 


4 28 


7 31 


10 36 


11 16 


4 34i7 25 


10 34 




14 


W 


6 29 


4 15 


4 22 


7 38 


11 12 


3 21 


4 28 


7 31 


11 11 


ev. 7 


4 34:7 26 


11 10 




15 


T 


6 25 


5 6 


4 22 


7 38 


11 47 


4 13 


4 28 


7 32 


1147 


59 


4 33,7 27 


1146 




16 


F 


6 21 


5 58 


4 22 


7 38 


morn 


5 11 


4 28 


7 82 


mom 


1 67 


4 33I7 27 


mom 




17 


S 


6 17 


6 49 


4 22 


7 39 


20 


6 11 


4 28 


7 33 


21 


2 57 


4 33 


7 28 


22 




18 


A 


6 13 


7 42 


4 22 


7 39 


56 


7 16 


4 28 


7 33 


58 


4 2 


4 331 


7 28 


1 




19 


M 


6 9 


8 36 


4 23 


7 39 


1 35 


8 18 


4 29 


7 34 


1 38 


5 4 


4 33| 


7 28 


1 41 




20 


T 


6 5 


9 32 


4 2317 39 


2 18 


9 20 


4 29 


7 34 


2 22 


6 6 


4 84; 7 28 


2 25 




21 


W 


6 1 


10 30 


4 23 7 39 


2 58 


10 18 


4 29 


7 34 


3 2 


7 4 


4 3417 28 


3 6 




22 


T 


5 58 


11 27 


4 23 7 40 


4 1 


11 6 


4 29 


7 34 


4 5 


7 52 


4 84l7 29 


4 10 




23 


F 


5 54 


eY.23 


4 23 7 40 


sets. 


11 56 


4 29 


7 35 


sets. 


8 42 


4 34-7 29isets. || 




24 


S 


5 50 


1 17 


4 24 7 40 


8 31 


morn 


4 30 


7 36 


8 27 


9 29 


4 36;7 29 


8 24 




25 


A 


5 46 


2 8 


4 24!7 40 


9 11 


43 


4 30 


7 35 


9 8 


10 13 


4 35 7 29 


9 5 




26 


M 


5 42 


2 56 


4 24 


7 40 


9 45 


1 27 


4 30 


7 35 


9 43 


10 51 


4 35 7 29 


9 41 




27 


T 


5 38 


3 42 


4 25 


7 40 


10 17 


2 5 


4 30 


7 35 


10 15 


1136 


4 35 7 29 


10 14 




28 


W 


5 34 


4 25 


4 25 


7 40 


10 46 


2 48 


4 81 


7 35 


10 46 


morn 


4 36 7 29 


10 45 




29 


T 


5 30 


5 8 


4 25 


7 40 


11 15 


3 31 


4 31 


7 36 


11 15 


17 


4 86 7 29 


11 16 




30 


F 


5 26 


5 50 


|4 25 


7 40 


1142 


4 16 


4 31 


7 35 


11 43 


1 2 


4 3617 29 


1144 




Mr. M., of a certain town in Vermont, is not 


ng the tallow, and exclaiming, "Here, you 




distineuished for liberality, either of purse or 


ascal, you have cheated me ! Do you call 




opinion. His ruling passion is a fear of being 


hat an honest cake of tallow? It is hollow. 




cheated. The loss, whether real or fancied, of 


and there ain't near so much .is there appeared 




a few cents, would give him more pain than the 


be. I want you to make it right." " Cer- 




destruction of an entire navy, lie once bought 


ainly, certainly," replied the merchant, " I'll 




a large cake of tallow at a country store, at 


make it right. I didn't know the cake was hol- 




ten cents a pound. On breaking it to pieces 


ow. Let me see, you paid ten cents per pound. 




at home it was found to contain a large cavity. 


Now, Mr. M., how much do you suppose the 




This he considered a terrible disclosure of cu- 


lole wUl weigh ?" 




pidity and fraud. He drove furiously back to 


Hold fast to your character ; it will be a sup- 




the store, entering in great excitement, bear- 


port and happiness when all else fails. 



7th Month.] 



JULY, I860, 



[31 Days. 



FHA-SES OF 'X'JrdLfcJ 2Sa:003Sr. II Venna 1 Mar. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 

p. M. 


Sun al .V^n- 
Mark. 


MOON. 1 BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASH'TON.Mb. 


MOEN. 1 P. M. 




D. H. M. 


H M 


;i 1 


8 561 3 3 


10 45 


6 51 


12 3 34 


Full .... 


8 3 45 ev. 


3 33 ev. 


3 23 ev. 7 


8 531 2 53 


10 18 


6 28 


12 4 37 


3dQuar.. 


15 11 43 m. 


11 31m. 


11 21m.hl3 


8 51 2 43 


9 52 


6 5 


12 5 26 


New 


22, 1 45 ev. 


1 33 ev. 


1 23ev.';i9 


8 51 2 34 


9 26 


5 42 


12 5 59 


IstQuar. 


30i 2 25 ev. 


2 13 ev. 


3 3ev.^25 


8 52I 2 24 


9 1 


5 19 


12 6 13 



a 


h-' 


J 




BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA-t| WASHINGTON; 


55 


g 


ii 


^ 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW j ImARYL'D, VIRG'A, 


SS 


^ 


g 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN.,OHIO, IN.IIkEN'Y, MISSOURI, 






s 


1 


IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 1 


AND CALIFORNIA. 
Sun , fcN 1 Moon 


p> 


Morn'g 


Sun 1 Sus 


Moon 


H.W. 


Sun 1 Sun j Moon H. W. 1 


a 


-^ 


"* 


KTSKS. ^KTS^ 


SET3. 


Boston. 


EISK9.I SETS. 1 6ETS. NToUK | 






H. U. 


H. M. 


H. M. 1 H. M. 1 H. M. 


1 


s 


5 22 


6 33 


4"2'6 7 46 


morn 


5 2 


4 3i|7 35morn 148 


4 37,7 29 mom 


2 


A 


5 18 


7 17 


4 26[7 40 


Oil 


5 52 


432:735 


13 2 38; 


4 37:7 29; 15 


8 


M 


5 14 


8 2 


4 2717 40 


43 


6 45 


4 32.7 35 


45 3 31 


4 38,7 29, 48 


4 


T 


5 10 


8 51 


4 27 7 39 


116 


7 39 


4 33.1 7 34 


1 19 4 25I 


4 38 7 28' 1 23 


6 


W 


5 6 


9 41 


4 28!7 39 


1 57 


8 36 


4 3317 34| 2 Oi 5 22' 


439:728 2 5 


6 


T 


5 2 


10 33 


4 2917 39 


2 42 


9 30 


4 34,7 341 2 46| 6 16!|4 40 7 2Si 2 50 


7 


F 


4 59 


11 27|4 29!7 39 


3 33 


10 21 


4 34,7 34; 3 37 


7 7 


4 40,7 28i 3 42 


8 


S 


4 55 


inom.|j4 30j7 38 


rises. 


11 6 


4 35 7 33 rises. 


7 52 


4 41 7 27,rises. 


9 


A 


4 51 


22-4 3117 38 


7 58 


11 54 


4 36^7 33 7 55 


8 40' 


4 42^7 27; 7 52 


10 


M 


4 47 


1 17|l4 3l'7 38 


8 38 


ev.43 


4 37,7 33 8 36 


9 29| 


4 42,7 27 8 33 


11 T 


4 43 


2 10 


4 32 7 37 


9 14 


1 28 


4 38:7 32, 9 13 10 14; 


4 43 7 26 9 12 


12iW 


4 39 


3 3 


4 3317 37 


9 49 


2 I2jj4 39;7 32; 9 49110 581 

3 14 39:7 31110 26!ll47| 


4 44'7 26 9 48 


13T 


4 35 


3 55| 


4 34 7 36 


10 25 


445:7 25 10 26 


14 F 


4 31 


4 47 


4 35;7 36 


10 59 


3 53 14 40 7 31111 l!ev.39' 

4 50 4 41 7 30,11 50: 1 36! 


4 45 7 25111 2 


1518 


4 27 


5 39 


4 36(7 35 


1147 


4 46:7 24jll42 


16A 


4 23 


6 32 


4 37'7 34 


morn 


5 5]^!4 42 7 29mom 


2 37! 


4 47' 7 24 morn 


17M 


4 19 


7 27| 


4 38,7 34 


18 


6 5aj|4 43 7 29 


21 


3 44i|4 48 7 23! 24 


181' 


4 15 


8 22 


4 39 7 33 


1 3 


7 2|l4 48,7 28 


1 6 


4 48| 


4 49 7 23 


1 11 


19iW 


4 11 


9 18 


4 39 7 32 


1 53 


8 5»4 44 7 27 


1 57 


5 51i 


4 50,7 22 


2 1 


20, T 


4 7 


10 13 


4 40 7 32 


2 47 


9 in4 45 7 27 


2 51 


6 471 


4 50 7 22 


2 56 


21,F 


4 3 


11 7| 


441 7 31 


3 55 


10 5ll!4 46 7 26 


3 59 


737I 


451I72I 


4 3 


22s 


3 59 


11 59 


4 42|7 30 


sets. 


11 33 


4 47 7 25 


sets. 


8 19| 


4 52:7 20:set8. 


23!a 


3 56 


ev.48 


4 43,7 29 


7 44 


morn 


4 48:7 24 


7 41 


9 4 


4 53 7 19 7 39 


24jM 


3 52 


1 35 


4 44 7 28 


8 18 


18 


4 49|7 23 


8 16 


9 44 


4 53 7 18| 8 14 


25 T 


3 48 


2 20 


4 45,7 27 


8 48 


58 


4 49:7 22 


8 47,10 221 


4 54 7 171 8 46 


26 W 


3 44 


3 3 


4 4617 26 


9 16 


136 


4 50 7 22 


9 lellO 58iJ4 55 7 16 9 16 


27|T 


3 40 


3 46 


447:725 


9 44 


2 12 


4 517 21 


9 45,11 38! 4 56i7 15 9 46 


28!F 


3 36 


4 28 


4 4817 24 


10 13 


2 52 


4 52 7 20;l0 15;morn{ 


4 56 7 14 10 16 


29|S 


3 32 


5 11 


4 49J7 23 
4 50 7 22 


10 42 


3 34 


4 53j7 19 10 44 20 


4 57 7 14;i0 47 


30 A 


3 28 


5 56 


11 15 


4 19 


4 5417 18 11 18 1 5 


4 58 7 14 11 21 


31M 


3 24 


6 42;i4 5li7 21 


11 52 


5 91 


4 55 7 1711 56 1 55! 


4 59 7l3!l2 



BESst:R, the poet, must have been an invet- 
erate woman-hater. Hear him : 
" He laid him domi and slept— and from his 

side 
A woman In her magic beauty rose : 
Dazzled and charmed, he called that woman 

bride, 
And his first sleep became his last repose." 

Wht had a man better lose his arm than a leg ? 
Because, losing his leg, he loses "something to 
boot." 



The hat was passed around a certain congre- 
gation for the purpose of taking up a collec- 
tion. After it had made the circuit of the 
church it was handed to the minister, who, by 
the way, had exchanged pulpits with the regu- 
lar preacher, and he found not a penny in it. 
He inverted the hat over the pulpit cushion 
and shook it, that its emptiness might be known, 
then raising his eyes toward the ceiling he ex- 
claimed with great fervor:—"! thank God 
that I got back my hat from this congrega- 
tion," 



8th Month.] AUGUST, 1865. [31 Days. 




i»iiASBS OF TKCE5 as-iooisr. 


Venu. 1 
South. 1 


Mars 
South. 


Jupit«r 


Saturn ;i.«n«( .Voon- 




MOON. BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASH'TON. 








D. 


HORN. 


r. M. 


p. M. 


P. U. { B. M. S. 








D 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


1 


8 55 


2 13 


8 31 


4 53112 6 1 




Full . 




7 


45 m. 


33 m. 


6 23 m. 


h 


8 58 


2 3 


8 7 


4 3lll2 5 28 




^d Quar. . 


13 


4 58 ev. 


4 46 er. 


4 36 ev. 


13 


9 2 


1 53 


7 43 4 8ll2 4 33 




New. 




21 


2 33 ru. 


2 21m. 


2 11m. 


19 


9 7 


144 


7 20; 3 47il2 3 '19 




1st Quar. 1 29 


7 2in. 


6 50 m. 


6 40 m. 


!25i 


9 12 


1 34 


6 57l 3 25ll2 1 49 




"a" 


^ 


J 




BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA-1| WASHINGTON; 




i 


a 


« z 


1 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW \\ MARYLT), VIRG'A, 




a 


^ 


g 8 


o 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN.,OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 




t> 


>• 


w 


i 


IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 






Sun 


SU!. 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun 


Sun 


MOOK 


H. W. 


Sun 


Sun 


MOON 




1 


1 


Morm'g; 

H. M. 




EISES. 
H.M. 


H. M. 


SETg. 


Boston. 


BISES. 


SETS. 


8KT8, 


NYOEK 


RIBK9. 
H. M. 


SETS. 
H. il. 


SETS. 
H. M. 




H M 


H. M. 


B. M. 




H. U 




1 


T 


3 20 


7 31 


4 52 


7 20 


morn 


6 4 


4 56 


7 16 


morn 


2 50 


5 


7 12 


mom 




2 


W 


3 16 


8 22 


4 53 


7 19 


35 


7 2 


4 57 


7 15 


39 


3 48 


5 1 


7 11 


43 




3 


T 


3 12 


9 15 


4 54 


7 18 


123 


8 2 


4 58 


7 14 


1 27 


4 48 


5 2 


7 10 


1 31 




4 


F 


3 8 


10 9 


4 55 


7 16 


2 17 


9 2 


4 59 


7 13 


2 21 


5 48 


|5 2 


7 9 


2 25 




5 


S 


3 4 


11 4 


4 56 


7 15 


3 17 


9 57 


5 


7 12 


3 20 


6 43 


!5 3 


7 8 


3 24 




6 


A 


3 1 


11 59 


4 57 


7 14 


rises. 


10 49 


5 1 


7 11 


rises. 


7 35 


5 4 


7 7 


rises. 




1 


M 


2 5Y 


morn. 


4 58 


7 13 


7 14 


11 33 


5 2 


7 10 


7 12 


8 19 


5 5 


7 6 


7 10 




8T 


2 53 


64 


4 59 


7 11 


7 51 


ev.24 


5 3 


7 9 


7 50 


9 10 


5 6 


7 4 


7 49 




9 W 


2 49 


1 48 


5 


7 10 


8 25 


110 


5 4 


7 8 


8 25 


9 56 


5 7 


n 


8 26 




10 


T 


2 45 


2 41 


5 1 


7 9 


9 8 


1 53 


5 5 


7 6 


9 4 


10 39 


5 8 


9 15 




11 


F 


2 41 


3 35 


5 2 


7 8 


9 40 


2 41 


5 6 


7 5 


9 42 


11 27 


5 9 


7 


9 44 




12 


S 


2 37 


4 29 


5 3 


7 7 


10 19 


3 35 


5 7 


7 3 


10 22 


eT.21 


'5 10 


6 59 


10 25 




13 


A 


2 33 


5 23 


5 4 


7 5 


11 2 


4 33 


5 8 


7 2 


11 6 


1 19 5 11 


6 58 


11 10 




14 


M 


2 29 


6 18 


5 5 


7 4 


11 52 


5 34 


5 9 


7 


11 56 


2 20 15 12 


6 57 


12 




15 


T 


2 25 


7 14 


5 6 


7 2 


mom 


6 42 


5 10 


6 59 


morn 


3 28 


j5 13 


6 55 


morn 




16 


W 


2 21 


8 8 


5 7 


7 1 


43 


7 45 


5 11 


,6 58 


57 


4 31 


5 14 


6 54 


51 




17 


T 


2 17 


9 2 


5 8 


7 


1 39 


8 48 


5 12 


|6 57 


141 


5 34 


5 15 


6 53 


1 47 




18 


F 


2 13 


9 53 


5 9 


6 58 


2 37 


9 42 


5 13 


6 55 


2 41 


6 28 


5 16 


6 52 


2 45 




19 


S 


2 9 


10 43 


5 10 


6 56 


3 37 


10 29 


5 14 


6 54 


3 40 


7 15 


|5 17 


6 50 


3 43 




20 


A 


2 6 


11 30 


5 11 


6 55 


4 36 


11 9 


5 15 


6 53 


4 38 


7 55 


|5 18 


6 49 


4 41 




21 


M 


2 2 


ey. 15 


5 12 


6 54 


sets. 


1148 


5 16 


6 51 


seta. 


8 34 


5 19 


G48 


sets. 




22 


T 


1 58 


59 


5 14 


6 52 


7 17 


morn 


5 17 


'6 50 


7 17 


9 14 


|5 20 


6 46 


7 17 




23 


W 


1 54 


1 42 


5 15 


6 51 


7 47 


28 


5 18 


16 49 


7 47 


9 50 


|5 21 


6 45 


7 48 




24 


T 


1 50 


2 25 


5 16 


6 49 


8 16 


1 4 


5 19 


6 47 


8 18 


10 25 15 21 


6 43 


8 19 




25 


F 


1 46 


3 7 


5 17 


6 48 


8 45 


1 39 


5 20 


6 45 


8 47 


11 2 6 22 
11 43l|5 23 


6 42 


;8 49 




26 


S 


1 42 


3 51 


5 18 


6 46 


9 18 


2 16 


5 21 


16 43 


9 20 


C41 


9 23 




27 


A 


1 38 


4 36 


5 19 


6 44 


9 51 


2 57 


5 22 


|6 41 


9 55 


morn 5 24 


6 39 


9 58 




28 


M 


1 34 


5 23 


5 20 


6 42 


10 30 


3 42 


5 23 


■6 40 


10 34 


28 :5 25 


6 38 


10 38 




29 


T 


1 30 


6 12 


5 21 


6 41 


11 14 


4 33 


5 24 


6 38 


11 18 


1 19 |5 26 


6 36 


11 22 




30 


W 


1 26 


7 3 


5 22 


6 39 


morn 


5 28 


5 25 


6 36 


morn 


2 14,5 27 


6 34 


morn 




31 


T 


1 22 


7 55 


5 23 


6 37 


4 


6 28 


5 20 


'6 34 


8 


3 14 .5 28 


6 33 


12 




LON( 


i John's Plan for Settling the Slavert i 


ow if a nigger runs away 1 am in favor of 




QUESTI 


oj,._In his late speech at Chicago, in 1 


etting him run till God brings him back." 




reply 


to Vallanrtigham, "Long John Went- 


Irish Gallantrt.— An Irish coachman, driv- 




worth 


' administered this " settler " to the ad- i 


ng past some harvest fields during summer, 




vocate 


3 of the divinity of slavery : a 


ddressing a smart girl engaged in sheaving. 




"Th 


e friends of slavery contend it is a e 


xclaimed— " Arrah, me darling, I wish I was 




divine 


institution, and a delegate to the Chi- i 


n jail for stealing yet" 




cago C 


ouvention told me he believed it orig- 


An editor attempts to explain to his readers 




inated 


nith God, who would protect it. Well, t 


he condition of affairs at his establishment, by 




thUsu 


ggested a new idea, and I said to him, t 


he following lucid typogr.iphical effort : 




then U 


t us leave it to God. Fellow-citizens, I 


" The Printers ajc <•» A S^t'ke jor hiSher 




go for 


that. Let us leave thU institution to 1 


TaGeS. AVe Have concUiDed tO sEt o^r 




God. 


The fugitive-slave law is repealed, and own tYpss in fut Urc ■ It is aAsy anOugh." 





9th Month.] SEPTEMBER, 1865. [30 Days. 


FHA-SBS OF THIB Iw^OOI*-. 




Venus 

South. 


Mare 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 

South. 


Sum at Ncon- 




WASH'TON. 




iSark. 


MOON. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


D. 


MORN. 


p. M. 


p. M. 


p. M, 


H. M. 8. 


1 D 


H M 


B. M. 


H. M. 


1 


9 18 


1 23 


6 30 


3 


11 59 45 


Full. . 




5 
11 


9 8 m. 
14 m. 


8 56 m. 
2 m. 


8 46 m. 
11 52 ev. 


13 


9 23 

9 28 


1 13 
1 4 


6 8 
5 47 


2 38 
2 17 


11 67 46 
11 55 42 


3d Quar . 


New .... 


19 


6 ley. 


5 49 ev. 


5 39 ev. 


19 


9 33 


55 


5 25 


1 56 


11 53 35 


Ist Quar . 


27 10 2 ev. 


9 50 ev. 


9 40 ev. 


25 


9 38 


46 


5 5 


1 35 


11 51 31 


~ri 


ti 


! ij 




BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA- 


WASHINGTON ; 


a 


^ 


i§ 


i 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MARYL'D. VIRG'A, 


i 


fi 


i§ 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN., OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 


8 


i 


s 


1 


IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Spn i Sun 


Moon • 


_o 


A 


Mora'g 


§ 


EI3ES. 




H. M. 






H. M. 


SETS. 


NYOEK 


RisnsJsETS. 


SETS*. 


H. M. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M 


U. M. 


1 


F 


1 18 


8 49 


5"'24 


6"36 


1 1 


7 31 


5^27 


6 33 


1 4 


4l7ii5 29:6 31 


1 9 


2 


S 


1 14 


9 43 


5 26 


6 35 


2 3 


8 33 


5 28 


6 32 


2 6 


5 19 5 30 6 80 


2 10 


3 


A 


1 10 


10 38 


5 27 


6 33 


3 9 


9 32 


5 29 


6 30 


3 11 


6 18 5 316 28 


3 14 


4 


M 


1 6 


11 33 


5 28 


6 31 


4 18 


10 25 


6 30 


6 29 


4 20 


7 11 '5 32 6 27 


4 22 


6 


T 


1 3 


morn. 


5 29 


6 30 


rises. 


11 11 


5 31 


6 27 


rises. 


7 67 !5 3316 25 


rises. 


ejw 


59l 


28 


5 30 


6 28 


6 69 


12 


5 32 


6 26 


7 


8 46 


5 34 6 24 


7 1 


1 


T 


551 


1 24 


5 31 


6 26 


7 36 


ev.49 


5 33 


6 24 


7 38 


9 35 


5 35,6 23 


7 40 


8 


F 


51 


2 19 


5 32 


6 25 


8 18 


1 32 


5 34 


6 23 


8 21 


10 18 


5 35l6 21 


8 24 


9 


S 


47 


3 16 


5 33 


6 23 


9 1 


2 24 


5 35 


6 21 


9 5 


11 10 


5 36 6 20 


9 8 


10 


A 


43 


4 12 


5 34 


6 21 


9 50 


3 18 


5 36 


6 19 


9 53 


ev. 4 


5 37 6 18 


9 58 


11 


M 


39 


5 9 


5 35 


6 19 


10 40 


4 17 


5 36 


6 18 


10 32 


1 3 


5 38 6 17 


10 48 


12 T 


35 


6 4 


5 36 


6 17 


11 36 


5 18 


6 37 


6 16 


1140 


2 4 


5 39 6 15 


11 45 


13 


W 


31 


6 59 


5 37 


6 16 


morn 


6 24 


5 38 


6 14 


morn 


3 lOilS 40|6 IS 


mom 


14 


T 


27 


7 51 


5 38 


6 14 


33 


7 26 


5 39 


6 12 


37 


4 12 5 40 6 12 


41 


15 


F 


23 


8 40 


5 39 


6 12 


1 31 


8 23 


5 40 


6 10 


1 34 


5 9 !5.4ll6 10 


1 37 


16 


S 


19 


9 28 


5 40 


6 11 


2 31 


9 16 


5 41 


6 8 


2 33 


6 2 


5 42 6 9 


2 36 


17 


A 


15 


10 13 


5 41 


6 9 


3 13 


10 1 


5 42 


6 7 


3 17 


6 47 


5 43|6 7 


3 21 


18 M 


12' 


10 57 


5 42 


6 7 


4 26 


10 42 


5 43 


6 5 


4 27 


7 28 


|5 44!6 5 


4 28 


19'T 


8! 


11 40 


5 43 


6 5 


5 24 


11 18 


5 44 


6 4 


5 24 


8 4 


15 44 6 4 


5 24 


20|W 


4' 


ev.22 


5 44 


6 4 


sets. 


11 55 


5 45 


6 2 


sets. 


8 41 


5 45 6 2 


sets. 


21T 


0: 


1 5 


5 45 


6 2 


6 47 


morn 


5 46 


6 1 


6 49 


9 20 


5 46 6 1 


6 51 


22F 


even. 


1 48 


5 46 


6 


7 18 


34 


5 47 


5 59 


7 21 


9 56 


5 47 5 59 


7 23 


23S 


11 48' 


2 33 


5 47 


5 58 


7 51 


1 101 


5 48 


5 57 


7 54 


10 33 '5 48'5 57 


7 57 


24'a 


11 44' 


3 18 


5 48 


5 56 


8 28 


147 


.5 49 


5 55 


8 32 


11 12 Is 49 5 55 


8 36 


25, M 


11 40j 


4 6 


5 49 


5 54 


9 10 


2 26 


5 50 


5 53 


9 14 


11 58 


5 50;5 53 


9 18 


26:t 


11 36 


4 55 


5 50 


5 52 


9 56 


3 12 


5 51 


5 52 


10 


morn 


'5 515 52 


10 4 


27! W 


11 32; 


5 45 


5 51 


5 50 


10 48 


4 2 


5 52 


5 50 


10 52 


48 


5 5215 5110 66 


28T 


11 28 


6 37 


5 53 


5 49 


1146 


4 57 


5 53 


5 49 


11 50 


143 


5 53|5 49 11 54 


29'f 


11 24* 


7 30 


5 54 


5 46 


morn 


5 57 


5 54 


5 47 


morn 


2 43 


5 5415 47 morn 


30;S 


11 20i 


8 23 


5 55 


5 45 


40 


7 1 


5 55 


5 45 


52 


3 47;'5 55:5 45| 55 1 


SixcE the advent of General Logan's splen- 


General, holding the garment in his hand: ' 


did corps at HuntsTille, the rooms in the prin- 


"Do you know Miss Lottie Hougii?" " Ves," 


cipal hotels have been in demand. A beauti- 


answered the chambermaid. "Then, carry 


ful and accomplished actress had been stay- 


this to her with my compliments, and say Gen- 


ing at the Huntsville Hotel, and in about a 


eral is not in the habit of sleeping with 


"minute," " minute-and-a-half," or " two min- 


empty night-gowns." t 


, utcs " after she had vacated her room, the gal- 




1 lant General 0. was asaigned to it by the land- 


A MINISTER, traveling through the West some 


lord. The General, on examining his bed pre- 


years ago, asked an old lady on wliich he 


vious to retiring, found a snovry roJ)e de nnit 


called what she thought of the doctrine of 


neatly folded under his pillow, marked in deli- 


total depravity. " Oh,'' she replied, "I think 


cate characters with the name of the fair owner. 
The chambermaid was called and asked by the 


it is a good doctrine if the people would only 
live up to it." 



10th Month.] OCTOBER, 1865. [31 Days. 




I^HASBS OF THE OWEOOlSr. 




South. 


Mar. I 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


rs;..f- 




MOOX. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASH'TON. 


"i 




MOEN. 


p. M. 


r. M. 


p. u. 








H. M. 


H. M. 


II. M. 


9 42 


37 


4 44 


1 14 


li 49 32 




Full .... 4 


5 47 ev. 


5 35 ev. 


5 25 ev. 


7 


9 46 


28! 


4 24 


5C 


'll 47 44 




SdQuar.. Hi 10 38m. 


10 26 m. 


10 16 m. 


13 


9 50 


20! 


4 5 


3: 


11 46 12 




New.... 19:11 43m. 


11 31m. 


11 21m. 


jl9 


9 53 


12! 


3 45 


11 


,11 44 59 




l9tQuar.l2V:ll 6 m. 


10 54 m. 


10 44 m. 


^ 


9 57 


4l 


3 26 


morn 


111 44 8 




"ri 


.| 


J 




BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA- 


WASHINGTON ; 




K 


a 


IJ 


i 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MARYL'D, VIRG'A, 




E 


& 


§ 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENxV.,OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 






>< 


i"* 




IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 






Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


SuiT 


Sun 


Moon 


H.W. 


Sun 


SUN Moon 




2 


Q 


Eveni'g 


* 


RISES. 


SET3. 


8KT3. 


Bo.STON. 






8KT3. 


NYOEK 




SETS. SKTS. 








11 M 


II M 


H. M.~ 


H M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


ITTT 


H 5[ 


H M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. »I. M. 




1 


A 


11 ie 


9 16 


5 56 


5 43 


1 55 


8 3 


5 56 


5 43 


1 57 


4 49 


5 56 


5 44 2 




2 


M 


11 12 


10 11 


5 57 


5 42 


3 5 


9 3 


5 57 


5 42 


3 6 


5 49 


5 67 


5 42 3 7 




3T| 


11 9 


11 6 


5 58 


5 40 


4 17 


9 59 


5 585 41 


4 17 


6 45 


5 58 


5 41 4 18 




4'W 


11 6 


mora. 


5 59 


5 39 


rises. 


10 50 


5 59 5 39 


rises. 


7 36 


5 59 


5 39 rises. 




5!T 


11 1 


2 


6 1 


5 38 


6 9 


11 36 


6 05 37 


6 12 


8 22 


6 


5 38i 6 14 




6F 


10 57) 


1 


6 2 


5 36 


6 53 


ev.29 


6 15 36 


6 56 


9 15 


6 1 


5 37 6 59 




1 


s 


10 53 


1 59 


6 3 


5 34 


7 40 


1 19 


6 25 34 


7 44 


10 5 


6 2 


5 35 7 47 




8 


A 


10 49 


2 57 


6 4 


5 33 


8 33 


2 6 


6 3 


5 33 


8 38 


10 52 


6 3 


5 34 8 42 




9 


M 


10 45 


3 56 


6 5 


5 31 


9 28 


3 2 


6 4 


5 31 


9 32 


11 48 


6 4 


5 32 9 36 




10 


T 


10 41 


4 52 


6 6 


5 29 


10 25 


3 59 


6 5 


5 29ll0 29 


ev.45 


6 5 


5 31 10 34 




11 


W 


10 37 


5 46 


6 8 


5 28 


11 25 


4 58 


6 6 


5 28lll 28 


1 44 


6 6 


5 30 11 32 




■12T 


10 33 


6 37 


6 9 


5 26 


morn 


5 57 


6 7 


5 26 


morn 


2 43 


6 7 


5 29 'mom 




13F 


10 29 


1 26 


6 10 


5 24 


24 


6 57 


6 8 


5 25 


27 


3 43 


6 8 


5 27 


30 




14S 


10 25 


8 12 


6 11 


5 22 


1 23 


7 51 


6 9 


5 23 


1 25 


4 37 


6 9 


.^25 


1 27 




ISA 


10 21 


8 56 


6 12 


5 20 


2 20 


8 42 


6 10 


5 22 


2 21 


5 28 


6 10 


5 24 


2 23 




16;M 


10 17 


9 39 


6 13 


5 19 


3 17 


9 25 


6 11 


5 20 


3 18 


6 11 


(?11 


5 22 


3 19 




1*7 


T 


10 14 


10 21 


6 14 


5 17 


4 13 


10 9 


6 12 


5 19 


4 13 


6 55 


6 12 


5 20 


4 13 




18 


W 


10 10 


11 3 


6 15 


5 16 


5 9 


10 48 


6 13 


5 17 


5 8 


7 34 


6 13 


5 19 


5 7 




19 


T 


10 6 


11 46 


6 17 


5 14 


sets. 


11 23 


6 14 


5 16 


sets. 


8 9 


6 14 


5 17 


sets. 




20 


F 


10 2 


ev. 31 


6 18 


5 13 


5 63 


morn 


6 15 


5 15 


5 56 


8 49 


6 15 


5 16 


5 59 




21 


S 


9 58 


1 16 


6 19 


5 11 


6 28 


3 


6 16 


5 13 


6 32 


9 28 


6 16 


5 15 


6 35 




22 


A 


9 54 


2 3 


6 21 


5 10 


7 10 


42 


6 18 


5 12 


7 13 


10 9 


6 17 


5 14 


7 18 




23 


M 


9 50 


2 51 


6 22 


5 8 


7 53 


1 23 


6 19 


5 10 


7 57 


10 47 


6 18 


5 13 


8 1 




24 T 


9 46 


3 41 


6 23 


5 7 


8 43 


2 1 


6 20 


5 8 


8 47 


11 33 


6 19 


5 12 


8 51 




25 W 


9 42 


4 31 


6 24 


5 5 


9 38 


2 47 


6 21 


5 7 


9 42 


morn 


6 20 


5 10 


946 




26 T 


9 38 


5 22 


6 25 


5 4 


10 37 


3 37 


6 22 


5 5 


10 41 


23 


6 21 


5 9 


10 44 




27iF 


9 34 


6 13 


6 27 


5 2 


1140 


4 31 


6 24 


5 4 


1142 


1 17 


6 22 


5 7 


11 45 




28 S 


9 30 


7 4 


6 28 


5 1 


morn 


5 29 


6 25 


5 3 


morn 


2 15 


6 23 


5 6 


morn 




29 A 


9 26 


7 56 


6 29 


5 


45 


6 29 


6 26 


5 2 


47 


3 15 


6 24 


5 4 


48 




30 M 


9 22 


8 49 


6 31 


4 58 


1 53 


7 32 


6 27 


5 


1 54 


4 18 


6 25 


5 3 


1 55 




31 T 


9 19 


9 44 


6 32 


4 57 


3 4 


8 33 


6 28 


4 59 


3 4 


5 19 


6 26 


5 2 


3 3 




Tea Brands AND their Meanino.—" Hyson" b 


or," from the care required in its preparation. 




means "before the rains," or "flourishing 


A FELLOW contemplated in utter wonderment 




spring," tliat ig early in the spring ; hence it is t 


he magnitudinous dimensions of a bystander's 




often called "Young Hyson." "Hyson skin" f 


eet, and in a tone of astonishment, said, as he 




is the refuse of other kinds, the native terra of s 


urveyed the man's proportions, " Youd have 




which is " tea skins." Refuse of still coarser b 


een a tall man if they hadn't bent your legs 




descriptions, containing many stems, is called s 


far up." 




"tea bones." "Bohea" is the name of the 


The last case of indolence is that of a man 




hills where U is collected. " Pekoe," or " Poco," 1 r 


amed John Hole, who was so lazy that in writ- 




means "white hair," the down of tender leaves. 1 i 


ng his name he simply used the letter J., and 




" Pouchong," " folded plant." " Souchong," ; t 


len punched a hole through the paper. 




1 "small plant." " Twankay," name of a river j 


Tnu osLT wax-work that's of any account is 




\\ where it Is bought. "Congo," signifying "la- ' got up by the bees. 



nth Month.] NOVEMBER, 1865. [30 Days. 




FHA.SBS OF THE i^iooisr. 


— 


Io*uT. 


M.rs 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


Su. at Noon. 
Mark. 




MOON. 




WASH'TON. 




BOSTON, 


NEW YORK. 


MORN. 


MORN. 


p. M. 


MORN. 


H. M. B. 






D. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


H M 


1 


10 1 


11 55 


3 4 


11 26 


11 43-42 




Full.. 




3 
10 


3 19 m. 
1 Im. 


3 7 m. 

49 m. 


2 57 m. 
39 m. 


7 
13 


10 5 
10 9 


11 48 
11 42 


2 46 
2 27 


11 £ 
10 44 


11 43 51 
11 44 80 




3d Quar . 




New. 




18 


6 16 m. 


6 4 m. 


5 54 m. 


19 


10 14 


U 35 


2 9 


10 2:3 


11 45 40 




l8t Quar. 125 


10 15 ev. 


10 3ev. 


9 53 ev. 


25 


10 19 


11 29 


1 51 


10 S 


11 47 19 




"ri" 


bi 


J 




BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY; PHILA- 


WASHINGTON ; 




S 


g 


ll 


i 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MARYL'D, VIRG'A, 




s 


^ 




MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN., OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 




fa 


§ 


§ 


IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILLINOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 






Sun 


Son 


Moon 


H. W.' 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun 


bUN 


Moon 




_s 


J 


Even'g. 


§ 


RISSS. 
H. M. 


SETS. 


SETS. 
H. M. 


Boston. 

H. M. 


nisES. 


6ETS^ 




NYOHK 




SETS. 
H.M. 


SETS. 




H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 




1 


w 


9 15 


10 40 


6 33 


4'55 


4 16 


9 33 


6"'29 


4"' 59 


4 15 


"6 19 


6 '27 




4 14 




2 


T 


9 11 


11 38 


6 34 


4 54 


5 28 


10 27 


6 30 


4 58 


5 26 


7 13 


6 28 


5 


5 24 




S 


F 


9 7 


morn. 


6 35 


4 53 


rises. 


11 17 


6 31 


4 57 


rises. 


8 3 


6 29 


4 59 


rises. 




4 


S 


9 3 


38 


6 36 


4 52 


6 19 


ev. 9 


6 32 


4 56 


6 22 


8 55 


6 30 


4 58 


6 26 




5 


A 


8 59 


1 39 


6 37 


4 50 


7 14 


1 2 


6 33 


4 55 


7 18 


9 48 


6 31 


4 57 


7 22 




6 


M 


8 55 


2 38 


6 39 


4 49 


8 18 


1 51 


6 35 


4 53 


8 17 


10 37 


6 32 


4 56 


8 21 




7 


T 


8 51 


3 35 


6 40 


4 48 


9 13 


2 41 


6 36 


4 52 


9 17 


1127 


6 33 


4 55 


9 21 




8 


W 


8 47 


4 30 


6 41 


4 47 


10 15 


3 36 


6 38 


4 50 


10 18 


ev.22 


6 35 


4 54 


10 21 




9 


T 


8 43 


5 21 


C 43 


4 45 


11 14 


4 30 


6 39 


4 49 


11 16 


1 16 


6 36 


4 53 


11 19 




10 


F 


8 39 


6 8 


6 44 


4 44 


morn 


5 22 


6 40 


4 48 


morn 


2 8 


6 37 


4 52 


morn 




11 


S 


8 35 


6 53 


6 45 


4 43 


12 


6 17 


6 41 


4 47 


14 


3 3 


6 39 


4 51 


15 




12 


A 


8 31 


7 37 


fi47 


4 42 


111 


7 9 


6 43 


4 46 


1 12 


3 55 


6 40 


4 50 


1 12 




13 


M 


8 27 


8 19 


6 48 


4 41 


2 6 


7 69 


6 44 


4 45 


2 6 


4 45 


6 41 


4 49 


2 6 




14 


T 


8 23 


9 2 


6 49 


4 40 


3 4 


8 48 


6 45 


4 44 


3 3 


5 34 


6 42 


4 48 


8 2 




15 


W 


8 20 


9 44 


6 51 


4 39 


3 59 


9 33 


6 47 


4 43 


3 57 


6 19 


6 48 


4 47 


3 56 




16 


T 


8 16 


10 28 


6 52 


4 38 


4 56 


10 16 


6 48 


4 42 


4 54 


7 2 


6 44 


4 46 


4 51 




17 


F 


8 12 


11 13 


6 53 


4 37 


5 53 


10 55 


6 49 


4 41 


5 50 


7 41 


6 45 


4 46 


5 47 




18 


s 


8 8 


12 


6 54 


4 36 


sets. 


11 34 


6 50 


4 40 


sets. 


8 20 


6 46 


4 45 


sets. 




19 


A 


8 4 


ev.48 


6 55 


4 36 


5 60 


morn 


6 51 


4 40 


5 54 


9 4 


6 47 


4 44 


5 59 




20 


M 


8 


1 38 


6 56 


4 35 


6 39 


18 


6 52 


4 89 


6 43 


9 47 


6 48 


4 44 


6 44 




21 


T 


7 56 


2 28 


6 58 


4 34 


7 32 


1 1 


6 54 


4 38 


7 36 


10 28 


6 49 


4 43 


7 40 




, 22 


W 


7 62 


3 19 


6 59 


4 33 


8 31 


142 


6 55 


4 38 


8 34 


11 13 


6 50 


4 42 


8 38 




23 


T 


7 48 


4 9 


7 


4 33 


9 31 


2 27 


6 56 


4 37 


9 34 


morn 


6 51 


4 42 


9.S7 




24 


F 


7 44 


4 59 


7 1 


4 32 


10 34 


3 15 


6 57 


4 36 


10 36 


1 


6 52 


4 41 


10 S9 




25 


S 


7 40 


5 49 


7 3 


4 31 


11 39 


4 6 


6 58 


4 36 


11 40 


52 


6 53 


4 41 


U 42 




26 


A 


7 36 


6 40 


7 4 


4 31 


morn 


5 1 


6 59 


4 35 


morn 


1 47 


6 54 


4 41 


morn 




27 


M 


7 32 


7 31 


7 5 


4 30 


47 


6 1 


7 


4 34 


47 


2 47 


6 55 


4 41 


47 




28 


T 


7 28 


8 25 


7 6 


4 29 


1 55 


7 2 


7 1 


4 34 


1 54 


3 48 


6 56 


4 40 


1 54 




29 


W 


7 24 


9 20 


7 7 


4 29 


3 6 


8 6 


7 2 


4 33 


3 4 


4 52 


6 57 


4 40 


3 3 




30 


T 


7 20 


10 18 


7 9 


4 29 


4 17 


9 7 


7 4 


4 33 


4 14 


5 53 


6 58 


4 40 


4 12 




Spoo 


NER was arrested for drunkenness, and 


Lady F had arrived at so extreme a de- 




waxed 


indignant thereat. Spooner is loyal. 


gree of sensibility that, seeing a man go by 




" Now, 


I axes," says he, " If it's right to go 


with a mutilated wheelbarrow, she cried out 




and ar 


rest a man for supporting the guv'ment. 


to her companion, " Do turn aside, it distresses 




Every 


irop of licker I swallows is taxed— taxed 


me to see that poor unfortunate wheelbarrow 




to supr 


ort the war. S'pose all us fel's was to 


with one leg." 




stop d: 


inkin'?— why, the war'd stop, and the 
nt'd stop. That's the very reason I 


"I SAY, granny, is there anything good in 




guv'me 


the paper?" "What do you call good, my 




1 drinks. 


I don't like grog ; I mortaUy hates it. 


child?" "Oh, you know; something jolly- 




If I fo 


Uered my own inclination, I'd rather 


about a murder, or a fire, or anything of that 




drink I 


uttermilk, or ginger pop, or soda. But 


sort." 




I licke 


s for the good of my country, and to 


DoBBS says he has one of the most obedient 




set an 


example of loyalty and virtuous resig- 


boys in the world. He tolls him to do as he 




nation 


to the rising generation." 


pleases, and he does it without murmuring. 





12th Month.] DECEMBER, 1865. [31 Days. ] 


FHA-SBS OF TUB l»I003Sr. 




Venus 
Sooth. 


Mar. 

South. 


'i& 


Saturn 
South. 


Sun at Xcon. 


MOON. 


BOSTON. 


NEW YORK. 


WASH'TON. 












~^ 


MORS. 


MOK.V. 


p. M. 


morn. 


11. M. B. 




J, 


n M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


10 25 


11 23 


1 33 


9 41 


11 49 24 


Full 


2 


2 bev. 


1 48 ev. 


1 38 ev. 


7 


10 82 


11 18 


1 15 


9 20 


11 51 52 


8d Quar . 


9 


7 29 ev. 


7 17 ev. 


7 7ev. 


13 


10 89 


11 13 


68 


8 59 


11 64 48 


Few.... 


17 


Im. 


11 49 ev. 


11 89 ev. 


19 


10 47 


11 8 


40 


8 38 


11 57 34 


1st Quar. 


25 


7 47 m. 


7 35 m. 


7 25 m. 


25 


10 56 


11 4 


22 


8 16 


12 84 


¥ 


«• 


>i 




BOSTON ; NEW ENGLAND, 


N. YORK CITY;. PHILA- 


WASHINGTON ; 


X 


g 


a 


S 


NEW YORK STATE, 


DELPHIA, CONN., NEW 


MABYL'D, VIRG-A, 


£ 


^ 


o a 


o 


MICHIGAN, WISCONSIN, 


JERSEY, PENN.,OHIO, IN- 


KEN'Y, MISSOURI, 


t- 




CQ 


i 


IOWA, AND OREGON. 


DIANA AND ILUNOIS. 


AND CALIFORNIA. 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


SUN~ 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun Sun 


Moon 




~ 


Eveni'g 


•3 




SETS. 
H. M. 




Boston. 


RISES. 
H. M. 




BETS. 


NYORK 


RISES. SETS. 
H. M. H. SJ. 


SETS. 
H. M. 


H. H. 


H. M. 


H. M 


M. M. 


H M. 


H. M. 


1 


F 


1 lY 


\i 18 


710 


4 29 


5 28 


10 6 


7 5 


4'34 


5 25 


6 52 


6 59 4 40 


5 22 


2 


S 


7 13 


morn. 


7 11 


4 29 


rises. 


11 


7 6 


4 34 


rises. 


7 46 


7 4 39 


rises. 


8 


A 


7 9 


18 


7 12 


4 28 


5 53 


11 51 


7 7 


4 84 


5 57 


8 87 


7 14 39 


6 1 


4 


M 


7 5 


1 18 


7 13 


4 28 


6 55 


ev.44 


7 8 


4 33 


6 58 


9 80 


7 2 4 39 


7 3. 


5 


T 


7 1 


2 15 


7 14 


4 28 


7 58 


1 82 


7 9 


4 33 


7 1 


10 18 


7 8 4 38 


8 5 


6 W 


6 57 


3 10 


7 15 


4 28 


9 


2 19 


7 10 


4 33 


9 2 


11 5 


7 4 4 38 


9 6 


7T 


6 53 


4 


7 16 


4 28 


10 2 


3 6 


7 11 


4 83 


10 4 


11 52 


7 54 38 


10 6 


- 8 F 


6 49 


4 48 


7 17 


4 28 


11 


8 54 


7 12 


4 38 


11 1 


ev.40 


7 64 38 


11 2 


9S 


6 45 


5 33 


7 18 


4 28 


11 58 


4 43 


7 13 


4 33 


11 58 


1 29 


6 74 38 


11 59 


lOiA 


6 41 


6 16 


7 19 


4 28 


morn 


5 32 


7 14 


4 33 


morn 


2 18 


7 8 4 38 


morn 


11 M 


6 37 


6 59 


7 20 


4 28 


55 


6 24 


7 15 


4 83 


54 


3 10 


7 9 4 38 


54 


12T 


6 83 


7 41 


7 21 


4 28 


1 51 


7 15 


7 15 


4 33 


1 50 


4 1 


7 10 4 39 


148 


ISiW 


6 29 


8 25 


7 22 


4 28 


2 48 


8 6 


7 16 


4 83 


2 46 


4 62 


7 10i4 39 


2 44 


14T 


6 25 


9 9 


7 22 


4 28 


3 45 


8 55 


7 17 


4 34 


8 42 


6 41 


7 li;4 39 


3 39 


15 F 


6 22 


9 55 


7 23 


4 28 


4 41 


9 44 


7 17 


4 34 


4 38 


6 80 


7 ll!4 89 


4 34 


16 


S 


6 18 


10 43 


7 24 


4 28 


5 36 


10 29 


7 18 


4 34 


5 83 


7 15 


7 12i4 39 


5 28 


17 


A 


6 14 


11 33 


7 24 


4 29 


6 33 


11 12 


7 18 


4 34 


6 27 


7 58 


7 12;4 40 


6 23 


18 


M 


6 10 


ev. 24 


7 25 


4 29 


sets. 


11 50 


7 19 


4 35 


sets. 


8 42 


7 131440 


sets. 


19 


T 


6 6 


1 15 


7 25 


4 29 


6 24 


morn 


7 19 


4 85 


6 27 


9 27 


7 13 4 40 


6 31 


20 


W 


6 2 


2 6 


7 26 


4 80 


7 23 


41 


7 20 


4 86 


7 27 


10 12 


7 14 4 41 


7 80 


21 


T 


5 58 


2 57 


7 26 


4 80 


8 27 


1 26 


7 20 


4 36 


8 30 


10 52 


7 1414 41 


8 32 


22 


F 


6 54 


3 47 


7 27 


4 31 


9 32 


2 6 


7 21 


4 37 


9 34 


11 39 


7 15 4 42 


9 35 


23 


S 


6 50 


4 37 


7 27 


4 31 


10 87 


2 53 


7 21 


4 87 


10 38 


morn 


7 15 4 42 


10 39 


24 


A 


5 46 


5 28 


7 28 


4 82 


11 44 


3 43 


7 22 


4 38 


11 44 


29 


7 16 4 43 


1144 


25 


M 


5 42 


6 18 


7 28 


4 82 


morn 


4 38 


7 22 


4 38 


morn 


1 24 


7l6j4 43 


morn 


26 


T 


5 38 


7 11 


7 29 


4 33 


52 


5 84 


7 23 


4 39 


51 


2 20 


7 17 4 44 


50 


27 


W 


5 34 


8 5 


7 29 


4 34 


2 2 


6 39 


7 28 


4 39 


1 59 


3 25 


7 174 45 


1 57 


28T 


5 30 


9 2 


7 29 


4 34 


3 9 


7 42 


7 24 


4 40 


8 


4 28 


7 18 4 46 


8 S 


29F 


5 26 


io 1 


7 29 


4 85 


4 18 


8 48 


7 24 


4 40 


4 14 


5 84 


7 18 4 46 


4 10 


SOS 


5 23 


11 


7 30 


4 86 


5 23 


9 50 


7 25 


4 41 


5 19 


6 86 


7 19 4 47 


5 15 


SIJA 


5 19 


11 68 


7 30 


4 37 


6 24 


10 45 


7 25I4 42 


6 20 


7 31 


!7 19J4 48 


6 16 


A "down-bast" Yankee has invented a rat 


WHY THE STARS WINK. 


exterminator, consisting of snufif. The animal 


" Alas ! each hour of daylight tells 


jerks Us head off at the third sneeze. 


A tale of shame so crushing, 


It was a pretty conceit of a father named 
Rose, who named his daughter " Wild," so that 
she grew up as " Wild Uose." But the romance 
was sadly spoiled when she married a man by 
the name of "Bull." 

"You bachelors ought to be taxed," siid a 


That some turn white as sea-bleached shells, 

And some are always blushing. 
"But when the patient stars look down 

On all their light discovers— 
The traitor's smile, the murderer's frown, 

The lips of lying lovers— 
" They try to shut their saddened eyes. 


lady to a resolute evader of the noose. " I 


And in the vain endeavor 


agree with you, madam," was the reply, "bach- | 


We see them twinkling in the skies. 


elorism is a great liJxury.-' And so they wink forever." |1 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 1^ 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, 

December 1st, 1S64. 
THE EXECUTIVE. 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, oi minoU, President of the United States Salary $25,000 

HANNIBAL HA^ILInI of Maine, Vice-Fres ident «.Wl» 

THE CABINET 



^^LLIAM H. SWVARD.^o^New York, Secretary of Staie^. -;;-■-; Salary $8,000 

8, ^ 

GIDEOn'wELLeK of Connecticut, Secretary of the "Nay •" 8- 



^-ILLIAM PITT FESSENDEN, of Maine, Secretary of ^e Treasury ^^ ^^^ 



EDWIN "m. STANTON, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of War 

pj. Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy „ . 

JOHN P USHER, of Indiana, Secretary of the Interior , ,^ ^' 

JAMES S. SPEED, of Kentucky, Attorney-General. .. ., e-^^ 

WILLIAM DENNISON, of Ohio, Postmaster-General »• "'W" 



THE JUDICIARY. 

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 
SALMON P. CHASE, of Ohio, Chief Justice, Salary, $6,500. 

David Davis, of Illinois, Associate Justice. 
John Catkos, of Tennessee, " " 

Noah H. Swatne, of Ohio, 



Nathan Clifford, of Maine, Associate Justice. 
Samuel Nelson, of N. Y., " ^^ 

RoBEBT C. Gkier, of Penn, 



Vr,',7«V Wayne of Ga . " " Samuei. F. Millbb, of Iowa, 

James M. ^^ ay>e, ua., ^^^^^ ^ ^^^^ ^^ p^,^ M^iociate Justice. 

Salary of Associate Justices, $6,000. Court meets first Monday in December, at Washington. 

:ministeiis to foreign countries. 

ENVOYS EXTRAORDINARY AND MNISTERS PLENIPOTENTIARY. 

Country. Capital. Ministers. Salary.When app'd. 

Austria Vienna J. Lothrop Motley, Mass, ^ ^^?'Snn""it«J 

Bra*U . Rio Janeiro James Watson Webb N. Y JM^----{^fJ 

S" Santiago Thomas H. Nelson, Ind 10,000.... 1861 

Sa Pekin! Anson Burlingame, Mase 12,000.... 1861 

*^nma ^_.^ winiom t. navton N. J IT.oOO 1861 

.1961 
.1861 
.1861 



Cr^t Britain "^.'^^^.''. . . London Charles Francis Adams, Mass 17,500 . . 

Ureatamain George P. Marsh, Yt 12,000... 

^jf^^o :;;:;::;;::Mexrco.::.. Wm.H.Corwin an charge Legafn).. 12,000 

Pern ::: U^a Christopher Robin&on,R. I ISffi"-- 

p^™:- BerUn Norman B. Judd, 111 lI'nAA""" 

RussiL ■■■;■:. .St. Petersburg. . . . .Cassius M. Clay, Ky 12,000 

KUSSia ,,.j.j ° n.notorr Ifmmcr Til 1 12,000 



1861 



Spain. . 



[Madrid ." ' . .Gustav Kcemer, 111 ; 12,000. 



OTNISTERS KESIDEKT. _ „ 

^g^e confederation Paj.^....-.....Kob^ tS^-)^ 

2!& : La Paz Allen A. Hall, Tenn. 

ro^tlRi^ San Jose Charles N. Kiotte, Texas 

Denmark W...... Copenhagen Bradford R. W ood, N. Y 

1^,'l^f miik cliLtemala .' .' '.'.'.'. .Elisha 0. Crosby, N.' Y. '. '. '. '. ". '. '. '. 

Netherlands "'.'.'.'. '. '. '. '. '■ '.Hague James S. Pike, Maine 

Nr^firtnada .Bogota Allan A. Burton, Ky 

Nicaragua ..:■.■.■.■. Nicaragua Andre,y B. Dickinson, NY 

piraeuar Asimcion Charles A. ^Vashburne, Cal 

P^rtTal." Lisbon James E. Harvey, Pa 



Portugal 



.Rome Rufus King, Wis. 



7,500.. 


..1863 


7,500.. 


.1861 


7,500.. 


..1861 


7,500.. 


..1861 


7,500.. 


..1801 


7,500.. 


..1863 


7,500.. 


..1863 


7,500.. 


..1861 


7,500.. 


..1861 


7,500.. 


. .1861 


7,500.. 


..1868 


7,500. 


..1861 


7,500. 


..1861 


7,500. 


..1803 


7,500. 


..1861 


7,500. 


..1861 



Ken andNorway '. '. '. '. '. Stockh'olm ". '. '. '. '. '. '. ". James H. Cat^bell 

l:S^^^''^-::::::::::JoSUino^e::::id:^o?fr%:. t,5oo....i86i 

vSel^ ..:.; Caraccas... Erastus D. Culver, N. Y 7,500. ...1862 

COMMISSIONERS. ^ .. _., 

HavtL Port-au-Prince .... Benjamin F. Whidden, N. H 7,500. . . .1862 

J^beria Monrovia Abraham Hanson, W is 4,000. ..1863 



THE TRIBUNE AL3IANAC FOR 1365. 



XXXVIIItli CONGRESS. 

SKOOITD RbGTILAB SBSBIOK ; CONVENED MONDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1864. 

SENATE, 
HAOTflBAL HAMLIN, Bangor, Maine, PresUlent cx-offlcio. 
John W. Fokney, of Pcnneylvanta, Clerk. 
[Unionists (In Eoman),89; Democrats (in /toHct), 12; Total, 51. The figures before each 
Senator's name denote the year in which his term expires.] 

CALIFORNIA. 

1869 John Conness Placervllle. 

1867 James A, JlcDuugall San Francisco. 

CONNECTICUT. 



I Jam^ Dixon." Hartford. 

' Lafayette S. Foster Norwich. 

DELAWARE. 

' George Btad Rhhlle Wilmington. 

i Willard Saulsbury Georgetown 

ILLINOIS. 



Mchardfion.. .Quincy, 

INDIANA. 

1869 Thomas A. Hendricks Indianapolis. 

186? Henry S. Lane Crawfordsville. 

IOWA. 

1867 James Harlan Mount Pleasant. 

1865 James "W. Grimes Burlington. 

KANSAS. 

1867 Samuel C. Pomeroy Atchison. 

1865 James H. Lane Lawrence. 

KENTUCKY. 

1867 Garret Davis. Paris. 

1865 Lazarus W. Powell Henderson. 

LOUISIANA. 

R. King Cutler New Orleans. 

Charletj Smith New Orleans. 

MAINE. 

1869 Lot M. Morrill Augusta. 

1865 Nathan A. Farwell 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1869 Charles Sumner Boston. 

1865 Henry AVilson Natick. 

MARYLAND. 

1869 Peverdy Johnson Baltimore. 

1867 Thomas H. Hicks Cambridge. 

MICHIGAN. 

1860 Zachariah Chandler Detroit. 

1865 Jacob M. Howaid Detroit. 



MINNESOTA. 

1869 Alexander Ramsay St. Paul. 

1865 Morton S. Wilkinson St. Paul. 

MISSOURI. 

1869 John B. Henderson Louisiana. 

1865 B. Gratz Brown St. Louis. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1867 Daniel Clark Jianchester. 

1865 John P. Hale Dover. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1869 WilUam WHoht Newark. 

1865 John C. Ten Eyck Mount Holly. 

NEW YORK. 

1869 Edwin D. Morgan New Tork. 

1867 Ira Harris Albany. 

OHIO. 

1869 Benjamin F Wade Jefferson. 

1867 John Sherman Mansfield. 

OREGON. 

1869 Benjamin F. Harding Salem. 

1887 James W Nesm-ilh Salem. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1869 Charles R. Buckalew. .... .Bloomsburg. 

1867 Edgar Cowan Greensburg. 

KHODB ISLAND. 

1869 William Spragne Providence. 

1865 Henry B. Antliony Providence. 

' VEKMONT. 

1869 Solomon Foot Rutland. 

1867 Jacob Collamer Woodstock. 

VIRGINIA. 



1865 Ja7nes S. Carlile Clarksburg. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1869 Peter 6. Van Winkle Parkersburg. 

1865 Waitman T. Willey Morgantown. 

WISCONSIN. 

1869 James E. Doolittle Racine. 

1867 Timothy O. Howe Green Bay. 



HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES. 

SCHUYLER COLFAX, of South Bend, Indiana, Speaker. 
Edwaed McPherson, of Gettysburg, Penn., Clerk. 



[Unionists (in Roman) , 103 , Democrats (in Italics) , 80 , Total, 183. Those marked * were In 
the preceding House.] 

DiSt. CALIFORNIA. 

Thomas B. Shannon Plumas. 



Cornelius Cole Santa Cruz. 

CONNECTICUT. 

1 Henry C. Demlng Hartford. 

2 * James E. Enj/Hs/i .New Haven. 

3 Augustus Brandagee New London. 

i John H. Hubbard Litchfield. 

DELAWARE. 

Nathaniel B. Smlthers Dover. 

ILLINOIS. 

1 "Isaac N. Arnold Chicago. 

2 John F.Farnsworth St. Charles. 

3 *Elihu B. Washburne Galena. 

4 Charles M Harris Oquawka. 

5 Ebon 0. IngersoU Peoria. 

6 Jesse O. Korton Jollet. 

7 -John P. Eden Sulll-wn. 

8 John T. Stuart Springfield. 

9 iejws ir. Poss Canton. 

10 * Anthony L. Knapp Jersey vlllc. 

11 * James G. Pobtnson Marshall. 

12 Mllllam P. Morrison Waterloo. 

13 • William J.Allen Marlon. 

James C.Allen, (At large). Palestine. 



Dist. INDIANA. 

i*JohnLaw Evansvllle. 

2 * James A. Cravens , .Hardinburg. 

3 Henry W. Harrington Madison. 

4 • William S. Holman Aurora. 

5 *George W. Julian Centre ville. 



8 Godlove S. Orth Lafayette. 

9 *Scbuyler Colfax Soutli Bend. 

10 Joseph K. Edaerton Fort Wayne. 

11 James F. McVowell Marion. 

lOVA . 

1 « James F. Wilson Fairfield. 

2 Hiram Price Davenport. 

3 William B.Allison Dubugue. 

4 Josi ah B. Grinnell Grinnel 1 . 

5 John A.Kasson Des Moines. 

6 A.W.Hubbard Sioux City. 

KANSAS. 

A. Carter Wilder Leavenworth. 

KENTUCKY. 

1 Lncien Anderson Mayfleld. 

2 * lii'orge H. Yeaman Owensboro. 

S "Ifenrij Qrider Bowline Green. 

4 *Aaron Harding OreensDurg. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1SG5. 



5 'Robert Mallory... }<^,9J^*?f ^ 

6 Green Clay Smith ??Z}°f i"^- 

7 I?rntU8 J. Clav Lexington. 

8 William H. Randall , ,„^<,^i,. 

9 « MVliain H. Wadmcorth MaysviUe. 

MAIKE. 

1 Lnren?.o D. M. Sweat Portland. 

2 Sidney Perham ?*„*;♦„ 

8 .Tames G. Blaine ^"^??'f; 

4 •John H. Rice J°^?'°^^- 

5 •Prederlck A. Pike Calais. 

MAKTI.AKD. 

1 .Tohn A. J. Cresswell Elkton. 

2 «Ed-svin H. Webster l®!??!,- ,« 

8 Henrv Winter Davis Baltimore. 

4 •Franfcis Thomas l^^'^^'^^Jw S;«^ 

5 Benjamin G.Earris Leonardtown. 

1 <Thomas D. Eliot S^rj^^^S" 

2 Oakes Ames. . .^ S^lJL*'^* 

3 'Alexander H. Eice Boston. 

4 'Samuel Hootyer ?°Sl°°- - 

5 'John B. Alley i'7?™„ 

6 *Daniel W. Gooch Melrose. 

7 George S. Boutwell gfoto" v 

8 John D. Baldwin Worcester. 

9 William B. Washburne. . . -Greenfield. 

10 'Henry L. Dawes >orth Adams. 

MICHIGAJf. 

1 'Fernando C Beaman Adrian. 

2 Charles Upson Coldwater . 

8 John W. Longyear Lansing. 

4 'Francis W\ ifellogs Grand Sapids. 

5 AugnHtm C. Baldwin Z°^}^S'^--^^„ 

6 Jolin F. DriggB EastSa£inaw. 

MINNESOTA. 

1 'William Windom Winona. 

2 Ignatius Donnelly Nimnger. 

JUSSOTJRI. „ , . 

1 'Samnel Knox St. Louis . 

2 Henry T. Blow Carondelet. 

3 John G.Scolt I^°'»'^A^®Lt 

4 Joseph W. McClnrg Linn Creek. 

5 Sempronlns H. Boyd Springfield. 

6 Austin A.King S*=H^ ^^h* 

7 Benjamin F Loan g^'^'l^^Pi^ 

8 • yi^Uam A. Hall SlJ^'l^H'^- 

9 • James S. Bollins Columbia . 

NBW HAMPBHIKB. 

1 Daniel Marcu FSJ^l'^r " 

2 'Edward H. Rollins iiP''*^"'!'!- 

8 James W. Patterson Hanover. 

NEW JEKSEY. 

1 John F.Starr 9?,'S„fo.i,n 

2 George Miiklleton Allentown . 

UmUiam G. Steele Somer^lle. 

4 Andrew J. Rogers S!3^i°^° • 

5 *yehenUah Perry Newark. 

KEW YOEK. 

1 Dicigkt Townsend Sta ten Island. 

2 Martin Kalbfleisch Si'ooSy?- 

5 *.ifoses F. Odell S^°"^X?v 

4 •Benjamin Wood New York. 

6 Fernando Wood Kew York. 

l^ElyahWard l!3?^S- 

7 Ja^n W. Chanler New York 

8 James Brooks New YorK. 

9 Anson Herrick ^^^vIS. ' 

10 miliam Badford I°'*^„T ' 

ii Kr/^l^iiiiiiiif^'^epsie. 

l!-^^^ff^^:::::::::||r- 
''- S^I\i^oreS:::::::::f°4i-thtown. 

Calvin T. Hulburd frasher i alls 

18 James M. JIarvin |«'"*\?,85 ^P"^ ^s 

19 Samnel F. Miller Sf ''°H'°^ 

20 '^brose W. Clark Walertown. 

21 Frances Kcrnan L tlca . 

22 De Witt C. Llttlejohn Oswego 

^ Thomas T. Davis Syracuse . 

24 'Theodore M. Pomeroy . . . Auburn. 

25 Daniel Morris pennYan. 



26 Giles W. Hotchkiss Binghamton . 

27 'Robt. B. Van Valkenburg.Bath. 
Freeman Clark Rochester . 

29 'Augustus Frank S?l??^- 

Jotm B. Ganson Buffalo. 

31 'Reuben K. Fenton Jamestown. 

OHIO. „. , 

1 •Gem-ge ff. Pendleton ^inc ?natl 

2 Alexander Long SJ?^<.^„ " 

3 Robert C. Schenck 5.*^*°"- 

4 J. F. ilcKinney Pigna • 

5 Frank C.LeBlond CeUna. 

6 'Chilton A. White ^?,?f„Cr' 

7 *SamuelS. Cox 9,°^*"?5iif- 

8 William Johnson Mansfield . 

9 • Warren P. Noble XI., °i« 

10 'James M. Ashley Toledo. 

U irals A. EvAchiyis Portsmouth . 

12 William E. Finck Somerset. 

13 John o'mm ^v^'^To,"^- 

14 George Miss So°l*®/ "i^ 

11 * James B. Morris jy„^,^^f/J^ " 

16 Joseph W. White Cambridge . 

17 Ephraim R. Eckley Carro ton 

18 Rufus P. Spalding S^.IS,'*'"^- 

19 James A. (iarfield Hiram. 



Ji 



John R. McBride La Fayette . 

PENNSYLVAIOA. 

1 Samuel J. Randall S^^5!}p5!o' 

rhnries O'Neill Philadelphia. 

1 Leonai'l Myers gW^^^lph a. 

4 'William D.'Kelley 5^S?tm,fi5 ll'Ph 

5 M. Russell Thayer ^^ff *?^^"^'*^ 

6 *John D. Stiles All«J^i°.^° " 

7 John M . Broomall Sf^A!,' • 

8 *Sf/denham E. ^ncona Reading 

9 'Thaddeus Stevens fe»?i;1n?J- 

10 Muer Strouse Pottsvllle. 

11 *mip Johns6n ^"fike°sbarre 

12 Charles Dennvion 2I„„-^„<?ltonP 

1 5 Henrv W. Tracy Standing Stone. 

1! ^milmH.Mider Harnsburg. 

iri«.^f^/c<^-.>i:::::foSft. ,^ 
11 'l^^'ff^f.'^":^^•::::K'-^r *=''• 

19 GlSnlW.Scofleld Sai:F;?^ 

24 * Jesse LazearT. Waynesburg. 

RHODE ISLAKD. ,^ 

1 Thomas A. Jenckes Providence . 

2 Nathan F. Dixon Westerly. 

VERMONT. . „ 

1 Frederick E. Woodbridge.VergenneB. 

2 'Justin S. Morrill |*J*Mne 

3 'Portus Baxter Derby Line . 

VTEST VIRGINIA. , 

1 'Jacob B. Blair Parkersbnrg. 

2 'William G.Brown S^^swood. 

S 'Killian V. Whaley Point Pleasant. 

1 Jainea S.Brown Milwatifae. 

2 Ithamar C. Sloan ^S^^^^i^if-.^* 

8 Amasft Cobb ^J*"^,'?^ ^°i?*- 

4 Charles A. Eldrldgc Fond du Lac. 

5 Ezra Wheeler Berlin. 

6 'Waller D. Mclndoe Warsaw. 

DELEGATES FROM TERRITORIES. 
Arizona.— Charles D. Poston, Prescott. 
COLOBADO.-Hiram P. Bennett. Denver City. 
Dakota.- William JajTie, Fort Randall. 
IDAHO.- William H. W\Mlace.Lew!Bton. 
NEBRASKA.-'Samuel G. Daily, Pera, Nemaha 

NEVADA.-Gordon N. Mott, Carson City. 
New MKXioo.-FranclscoPerea, Santa Fe. 
Utah.— /oft;i F. i'!««e2/. Salt Lake City, 
Washington.- Georj/fii'. Coi6, Wallawalla. 



20 



THE TRIBTOE ALMANAC -FOR 1865. 



CAXlrOEK-lA. 

t'rm Ftp 

Jas.A. McDougaU.Ad(r, 
John Conness 186£ 

CONNECTICUT. 

Lafayette S. Foster .1867 
Jamea Dixon 1869 

DELAWARE. 

Geo. Read Hicme, . .1S6S 

ILMNOIS. 

Lyman Trnmbnll . .186 

_ INDIANA. 

Henry S.Lane 186 

thos. A. Hendricks. 

IOWA. 



THE SENATE. 

'^''''^^\nn F.r,. \ MOranESOTA. | OEBGON 

Sam'l C. Pomeroy. .1867 'aIbx. Ramsay '^"" ^m^ Tr,»,^. nr ^ '^™' -^'^- 

NEW jEEsiv '^^""'^ ^- -^ntSony.1871 

^^ i.iii.jj.AjMD. IraHarri? • ,or- ^^''"'"on Foot. ... 1869 

"' "r"=. -- -- "iii". I WISCONSIN 



^ ^. LOUISIANA. 

B.King Cutler 

Charles Smith 

MAINE. 

Lot M. Morrill li 

MASSAOHUSETTS. 

Charles Sumner, li 

MARYLAND. 



^O^SE OF KEPKESENTATIVES. 



CALIFOKNIA, 
J)isl, 

1 I>. C.McRner. 

2 tWlHiam Higby. 
8 John Bid well. 

CONNECTICUT. 

[Four members to be 
elected iu April.] 

DELAWAHE. 

1 oBUn A. MchoUon. 

ILLINOIS. 

1 John Wentworth. 
o lJ"o-F:F»™sworth 
8 tEIihuR.Washburne 

4 A. C. Harding. 

5 tEbon C. Ingersoll 

6 Burton C cook. , i Txnomas D. I 

l^|^|;fc.„U|fSMHo^r. 
11 '^im'liS.JUarshall. 6 +t-.„„!„t -„r"''.^- 



[Vacancy. J 

, , MAINE. 

1 John Lynch. 

2 tSldney Perham. 

3 t James G. Blaine. 

4 tJohn H. Kice. 

5 tlrederiek A. Pike. 

MAEYLAND. 

1 a.WJ'^I"^ HcCuIfouah 

2 tEdwln H.Webster. 

3 Charles E.Phelps. 

4 IFrancis Thomas. 

5 fBe/ij. G. Harris. 

MASSACnrSBTTS. 

1 tlhomas D.Eliot. 



1 Stephen Tabor. 

2 Teuni^ e. Bergen. 
8 James Humphrey. 
4 Mori/an Jonen 



' Morgan Jones. 
5 Nelson Taylor 
■.Ea 



j^ Jehu Baker. 

13 A. j.Knykendall. 

At large.-S.W.MouUon 

INDIANA. 

1 William E.Niblack. 

2 JH. C. Kerr. 

3 Kalph Hill. 

4 J H.Farguhar. 

5 ICeorge W.Julian. 

6 tEbenezer Dumont. 

7 t/>- IT'. Voorkees (C). 

8 tGodlove S. Orth. 
!) tSchuyler Colfax. 

10 Joseph D. Deft-ees. 

11 T.N.Stillwell. 

IOWA. 

1 tJames F. Wilson. 

2 tniram Price. 

8 tWillJam B. Allison. 

4 tJosiahB.GrlnneU. 

5 tJohn A. Kassou. 

6 1A. W. Hubbard. 

KANSAS. 

1 Sidney Clarke. 

EENTUCKY. 

[Nine members to be 
elected in August.] 

LOiriBIANA. 

1 M. F. Bonzano. 

2 A. P. Field. I 
W. D. Jiann 



^^^^■wmrmtms.. 



"tDanielW Gooch. 

I tGeo.S. Bout well. 

tJoliU D. Baldwli 



n x^«?'T J. Raymond, 

7 Uohn W. Chanler 

8 ^JamM Brooks (C) 
,9 Wm. A. Darling • 

15 tJohn A.GrlswSfd" \l ^?^^^L'I^ii''"^^°»' 

'l? iSl».1fS fe^lf Per. 
18 tJames Ar Af" JliSl^-IJS A- 'i-.Glossbremiet 



OEEGON. 

1 J. H.D.Henderson, 

1 4.^.*^^'^;S"SXVANL\. 

2 tCharles O'Keill. 
? tIi«onard Myers. 
i ^7i^ ^- Kelley. 
5 IM.Rnfsell Thayer. 
^ J'-^«>:^,hf,mLoyer. 
I XiP^V^ ^Jt- Broomall. 

n Xij'atlflens Stevens. 



^-^^-imm^^m 



27 Hamilton Ward ^1^'^^ ' ^-a^ience. 

28 KoswellHait rT=-^°°^^ island. 

SI Henry van Ae^.,am^:[WJ^ff, 

? ^w»'U- ^- Schenck. 

I Sam'l Shellabarger. 
i^'S,%l*-Hnbbell. 
9 K. P. Bnckland. 
10 tJames M. Ashley, 
.f,?o^y S- Cundyf 



« ?;'''?,5ia8"wTil!rry! 

5 K-E. Trowbridge. 

tJohn F. Driggs 

^ )"TNNESOTA. 

1 tWilliam ATiudom. 

2 tignatius Donnelly 

WISSOUHI. 

1 Jofiji Bogan. 

2 tHenry T. Blow. 

3 TiiomasE.Koen. 

4 tJos. W. JlcClurg. 
?+S®^P''on '8 H.Boyd. 

6 R- T- Van Horn. 

7 tBcnJ. F. Loan. 

5 ^- 1"'- JlenJamin. 
9 Geo. W. Anderson. 

, „ NEVADA. 

1 H.D.Wortbington 

NEW HAMPSHIHK 



i^'wm 



bers ; none chosen. 

, j^^ JERMOIfT. 

1 tF. S. Woodbrldge. 
3 tPort us Baxter 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

I f.^'^ster D.Hubbard 
I ijf,°- R- Latham. 

3 KilhanV.ANhaley. 

1 TT '";iSCONSIN. 

J Halbcrt E. Paine. 

2 tithamar C. Sloan. 
orAmasaCobb. 

4 fCh( 



..».....a.f„ii,.i.l.ui.jaai;,/n'm.'l'JLl'.;P»y»-fy 




THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



ACTS OF CONGRESS. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PRINCIPAL ACTS PASSED AT THE FIRST SESSION OF 
THIRTY-EIGHTH CONGRESS. 



Chap. II.— War Office.— Creatta the office of 
Second Assistant Secretary of War. Salary, 
$5,000. 

CuAp. V —Clothing hy Mail for the Army.— 
Permits packages of clothing not more than two 
pounds weight to be sent by mail to men in the 
army, at eight cents for every four ounces or 
fraction of four ounces. 

CuAP. V. — Courts in Tennessee. — Transfers 
the U. S. Courts for West Tennessee to Memphis, 
with power to hold terms at Knoxville and 
Nashville, if expedient. 

Chap. IX. — Courts in California and Ore- 
(7072.— Regulates terms of U. S. Courts in Cali- 
fornia and Oregon, and defines modes of pro- 
cedure. In California the Circuit sits at San 
Francisco on the 1st Monday in February, 2d 
Monday in June, and 1st Monday in October, 
and at Monterey the 1st Monday of April, 2d 
Monday of August, and 1st Monday in Decem- 
ber. In Oregon, terms shall be held at Portland 
the 1st Jlonday in January, the 1st Monday in 
Jfay, and the 1st Monday in September. The 
District Court is held at Monterey, Cal., 1st Mon- 
day February, 1st Monday June, and 1st Mon- 
day October; at San Francisco, 1st Blonday 
April, 2d Monday August, 1st Monday Decem- 
ber. In Oregon, at Portland, 1st Monday March, 
1st Monday July, 1st Monday November. 

Chap. XIII. — Amendment to the Enrollment 
Act. — Authorizes the President to call for such 
number of men as the public exigencies may re- 
quire. Quotas of wards, towns, &c., to be de- 
termined according to their population, taking 
into account the number previously furnished, 
for the naval as well as the military service. If 
quotas are not filled in time by volunteering, a 
draft to be made for the deficiency — volunteer- 
ing to go on up to the actual occurrence of the 
draft. Enrolled persons may furnish substitutes, 
who are not liable to the draft, and who shall 
then enjoy an exemption from draft not exceed- 
ing the time for which such substitutes shall 
have been accepted. Drafted persons may also 
furnish acceptable substitutes, in the same man- 
ner. Exemption, thus obtained, shall not ex- 
ceed the time for which such person was drafted. 
Any person now in the military or naval service 
of the United States, not physically disqualified, 
whose term of unexpired service shall not ex- 
ceed six months, may be employed as a substi- 
tute, on account of the State for which he en- 
listed. The payment of commutation money 
exempts only from the immediate quota, and 
not from the filling of future quotas ; and in no 
case shall exemption, so obtained, extend be- 
yond one year. The enrollment includes persons 
arriving at the age of twenty years before the 
draft, aliens who have declared their intentions 



years during the present war. Seamen, drafted, 



I may enlist in the naval service, within eight 
j days after notification ; provided, that the en- 
listment is for the same period required by the 
draft ; and that satisfactory proof shall be af- 
I forded that the person in question is a seaman 
by vocation. Any person now in the military 
service may also enlist into the navy, upon mak- 
ing similar proof with the above ; but the bounty- 
money, which he may have received as a sol- 
dier, shall be deducted from the prize-money to 
which he may become entitled; provided, that 
the whole number of such transfers shall not 
exceed ten thousand. Seamen, thus enlisting, 
shall be credited to the town, ward, &c., whence 
they come, as well as those enlisting into the 
marine corps, under such regulations as the 
Provost-Marshal General may prescribe. Ex- 
empts from enrollment are those who are physi- 
cally unfit for service, all persons who are now 
in the military or naval service, and all who 
have been honorably discharged therefrom, after 
a service of two years, during the present war. 
The law for the enrollment into two classes is 
hereby repealed. Persons forcibly resisting the 
enrollment, shall, upon conviction, be fined not 
exceeding five thousand dollars, imprisoned not 
exceeding five years, or both, at the discretion 
of the court; without being relieved from lia- 
bility to the laws of the State in which the of- 
fense may have been committed. Persons con- 
scientiously opposed to bearing arms, if drafted, 
shall be assigned to hospital or other peaceful 
duty, or pay the sum of three hundred dollars 
for the benefit of sick and wounded soldiers. 
Persons of foreign birth are not to be exempted, 
if they have voted or held any public oflices un- 
der any State, Territory, or the United States. 
Persons obtaining exemption by fraud shall be 
deemed deserters, and punished accordingly. 
Able-bodied male colored persons shall also be 
enrolled, and form part of the national forces ; 
the slaves of loyal masters, upon being drafted, 
becoming free, their boimty of one hundred dol- 
lars being paid the former master. A commis- 
sion, appointed to each of the loyal Slave States, 
shall determine the value of each slave so 
drafted, not to exceed three hundred dollars, 
payable to loyal masters out of funds derived 
from commutations. Colored volunteers or con- 
scripts shall be credited on the quotas of States 
whence they come, but shall be mustered into 
service as United States colored troops. 

Chap. XIV. — Lieutenant-General. — Revives 
the grade of Lieutenant-General (the President 
to appoint by consent of Senate). Pay the same 
as that of Lieut.-Gen. Scott. 

Chap. X\U.—Loan .^1 c?.— Authorizes Secre- 
tary of Treasury to borrow $200,000,000 on gold 
interest five-forty registered coupon bonds. Also 
extends the is5ue to subscribers to the five-twen- 
ties by $11,000,000. 
Chap. X\lll.— Overland Emigrants. — Gives 



22 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



$40,000 for the protection of emigrants overland 
to the Pacific States. 

Chap. XX.— Liquor Taxation, <fcc.— Levies 
60 cts. per gallon on spirits distilled, sold, or re- 
moved for sale before July 1st. Duty rated on 
first proof, and increased according to depee of 
strength. Where these duties are not paid, the 
property may be seized and sold after due pro- 
cess. Spirits for exportation may be taken out 
of the country without paying this duty, but 
drawback is not allowed. Sec. 4 puts a duty of 
two cents per lb. on cotton, except that sold by 
or on account of the Government. Sec. 7 im- 
poses 40 cts. per gallon on imported distilled 
spirits of first proof, also taxing at the same 
rate stocks on hand. Sec. 8 declares consuls of 
other countries not citizens here exempt from 
income tax. Sec. 9 extends the law of March 2, 
1S33, giving power to revenue collectors to all 
the collectors under this act. 

Chap. XXlll.— Trade tvith the Indians.— 
Declares that any person selling or giving 
spirituous liquors to Indians, on conviction, 
shall be imprisoned not more than two years 
and fined not over $300. Indian agents may 
search where they have reason to suspect an in- 
tention to introduce liquors. If any be found it 
is forfeit, one half to the informer and the other 
to the Government. Any person in Government 
service must seize and destroy any liquor actu- 
ally foimd in the Indian country, unless intro- 
duced by authority of the War Department. In 
cases under this act, Indians are competent wit- 
nesses. 

Chap. X.X\Ti.—AmhuJanoe Si/sfem.—Otives 
the Medical Director of the Army and the Medi- 
cal Directors of each Corps direction of ambu- 
lances, medicines, heJp, and everything pertain- 
ing to that branch of duty. Sec. 2 establishes 
regular ambulance corps in each command, with 
a captain and under-officers — the men to be se- 
lected for fitness. Sec. 3 provides for two- 
horse ambulances on the basis of three to each 
regiment of 500 strong, one each for smaller 
regiments, and one for each battery. Sec. 4. 
Horse and mule litters may be substituted where 
necessary. Sec. 5. Captains of ambulance corps 
must drill and instruct their men and see every- 
thing ready in camp or on march. Ambulances 
can only be used to transport sick and wounded, 
or medical supplies in extreme cases. None but 
ambulance and medical force, or men specially 
detailed shall be allowed to take or accompany 
wounded to the rear. Special uniform marks 
are provided for the ambulance forces. Other 
sections provide for reports and minor duties. 

Chap. XXVUl.—Port of Z>eHv6ry.—Ma.keB 
Parkersburg, West Va., a port of delivery in the 
collection district of New Orleans. 

Chap. XXX\1.— Nevada Enabling Act.— 
Authorizes Nevada Territory to form a State 
Government, consisting of the following terri- 
tory: Commencing at the intersection of the 
thirty-eighth degree of longitude west from 
Washington with the thirty-seventh degree of 
north latitude-, thence due west along said 
thirty-seventh degree to the eastern boundary of 
California ; thence in a northwesterly direction 
along the said eastern boundary to the forty- 
third degree of longitude; thence north along 
said forty-third degree and said eastern boun- 
dary line to the forty-second degree ; thence due 



east along the said forty-second degree to its in- 
section with the aforesaid thirty-eighth degree 
of longitude ; thence due south down said thirty- 
eighth degree of longitude to the place of begin- 
ning. All persons qualified to vote for terri- 
torial Assemblymen, may vote for a Convention 
— to frame a State Constitution — soldiers in the 
army may also vote. A State Constitution must 
"be republican and not repugnant to the Con- 
stitution of the United States and the principles 
of the Declaration of Independence ;" and said 
Convention shall provide by an irrevocable, with- 
out the consent of the United States and the peo- 
ple of said State: First, That there shall be 
neither slavery nor involuntary sen'ltude in the 
said State, otherwise than in the punishment of 
crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly 
convicted. Second, That perfect toleration of 
religious sentiment shall be secured, and no in- 
habitant of said State shall ever be molested in 
person or property on account of his or her 
mode of religious worship. Third, That the 
people inhabiting said territory do agree and 
declare that they forever disclaim all right and 
title to the unappropriated public lands lying 
within said territory, and that the same shall 
be and remain at the iole and entire disposition 
of the United States; and that the lauds be- 
longing to citizens of the United States residing 
without the said State shall never be taxed 
higher than the land belonging to the residents 
thereof; and that no taxes shall be imposed by 
said State on lands or property therein belong- 
ing to, or which may hereafter be purchased by, 
the United States. [The Convention has been 
held and the State Constitution adopted, so there 
is no occasion to reproduce the details of the 
law of Congress.] School lands and lands for 
public buildings are set apart ; five per cent, of 
the proceeds of all public lands sold by the 
United States after Nevada is admitted into the 
Union, is to be paid to the State for public roads, 
canals, irrigation, &c., as the Legislature may 
direct. 

Chap. XXXVll.— Colorado Enabling Act— 
[This act is in all respects the same as that for 
Nevada. Colorado, however, voted down the 
Convention, preferring, at present, to remain a 
territory. The boundaries are as follows:] 
Commencing at a point formed by the intersec- 
tion of the thirty-seventh degree of north lati- 
tude with the twenty-fifth degree of longitude 
west from Washington; extending thence due 
west along said thirty-seventh degree to its in- 
tersection with the thirty-second degree of longi- 
tude ; thence due north along said thirty-second 
degree of longitude to its intersection with the 
forty-first degree of north latitude ; thence due 
east along said forty-first degree to its intersec- 
tion with the twenty-fifth degi-ee of longitude, 
thence due south along said twenty-fifth degree 
of west longitude to the place of beginning. 

Chap. XXXYIll.— Amendatory o/the Ifome- 
stead Late. — In case of any person desirous of 
availing himself of the benefits of the home- 
stead act of 20th of May, 1SG2, but who, by rea- 
son of actual service in the military or naval 
service of the United SU.tes, is unable to do the 
personal preliminary acts at the district land- 
office which the said act of 20th May, 1662, re- 
quires, and whose family, mr some member there- 
of, is residing on the land which he desires to 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S66. 



23 



enter, and upon which a bona fide improvement 
and settlement have been made, it shall and 
may be lawful for such person to make the affi- 
davit required by said act before the officer com- 
manding in the branch of the service in wliich 
the party may be engaged, which affidavit shall 
be as binding in law, and with like penalties, as 
if taken before the register or receiver ; and 
upon such affidavit being filed with the register 
by the wife or other representative of the party, 
the same shall become effective from the date 
of such filing, provided the said application and 
affidavit are accompanied by the fee and com- 
missions, as required by law. Sac. 2. That be- 
sides the ten-dollar fee exacted by the said act, 
the homestead applicant shall hereafter pay to 
the register and receiver each, as commissions, 
at the time of entry, one per centum upon the 
cash price as fixed by law, of the land applied 
for, and like conmussions when the claim is 
finally established and the certificate therefor 
issued as the basis of a patent. Sec. 3. That in 
any case hereafter in which the applicant for 
the benefit of the homestead, and whose family 
or some member thereof, is residing on the land 
which he desires to enter, and upon wliich a 
bona fide improvement and settlement have 
been made, is prevented, by reason of distance, 
bodily infirmity, or other good cause, from per- 
sonal attendance at the district land-office, it 
shall and may be lawful for him to make the 
affidavit required by the original statute before 
the clerk of the court for the county in which 
the applicant is an actual resident, and to trans- 
mit the same, with the fee and commissions, to 
the register and receiver. Sec. 4. That in lieu 
of the fee allowed by the twelfth section of the 
preemption act of fourth September, 1S41, the 
register and receiver shall each be entitled to 
one dollar for their services in acting upon pre- 
emption claims, and shall be allowed, jointly, at 
the rate of fifteen cents per hundred words for 
the testimony which may be reduced by them 
to writing for claimants, in establishing pre- 
emption or homestead rights, the regulations for 
gi^ng proper effect to the provisions of this act 
to he prescribed by the commissioner of the gen- 
eral land-office. Sec. 5. That where a preemj)- 
tor has taken the initiatory steps required by 
existing laws in regard to actual settlement, and 
is called away from such settlement by being 
actually engaged in the military or naval service 
of the United States, and by reason of such ab- 
sence is unable to appear at the district land- 
office, to make, before the register or receiver, 
the affidavits required by the thirteenth section 
of the preemption act of the fourth September, 
1841, the time for filing such affidavit and mak- 
ing final proof and entry or location, shall be 
extended six months after the e.xpiration of his 
term of service, upon satisfactory proof by affi- 
davit, or the testimony of witnesses, that the 
said preemptor is so in the service, being filed 
with the register of the land-office for the dis- 
trict in which his settlement is made. Sec. 6. 
That the registers and receivers of the State of 
California, in the State of Oregon, and in the 
Territories of AVashington, Nevada, Colorado, 
Idaho, New Mexico, and Arizona, shall be en- 
titled to collect and receive, in addition to the 
fees and aUowances provided by this act, fifty 
per centum of said fees an* allowances as com- 



pensation for their services ; provided, that the 
salary and fees allowed any register or receiver 
shall not exceed in the aggregate the sum of 
three thousand dollars per annum. 

Chap. XL. — Foreign Mails. — Provides that 
all steamers belonging to citizens of the United 
States, bound to or from any foreign port, shall 
carry such mails as the Post Office Department, 
or ministers, consuls, and commercial agents 
abroad shall offer for such compensation as may 
be fixed by law. Masters must report, under 
oath, concerning such mails. Contracts may be 
made for California mails via Panama or by 
Nicaragua route for not more than $160,000 per 
year. Sec. 4. That all mailable matter carried 
between Kansas and California shall be subject 
to pre-paid letter postage rates, except that reg- 
ular subscribers may receive one regular news- 
paper, and franked matter may go at usual rates. 
Sec. 5. Authorizes contracts for steam mail ser- 
vice between our own ports. Sec. 6. FLxes a 
fine of $100 to $500 for putting "United States 
Mail," or words to that effect, upon steamers, 
&c., not in mail service. Sec. 7. Authorizes the 
Postmaster-General to suspend, where he thinks 
proi)er, the act prohibiting the private carrjing 
of sealed letters on a mail route. 

Chap. XLW.— Revolutionary Pensions.— 
Increases to $100 per year all the remaining pen- 
sions for services in the Revolutionary War. 

Chap. XLVIII. — Indiana in California. — 
Makes that State a separate district, with a 
Superintendent of Indian Affairs. The Presi- 
dent may set apart four tracts for Indian reser- 
vations as remote as practicable from white 
settlements. Provision is made for physicians, 
fanners, blacksmiths, carpenters, S;c., on the res- 
ervations. Sec. 1 enacts that Indian agents shall 
reside at their respective agencies, and shall in 
no case visit Washington except when ordered 
to do Eo by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. 

Chap. 'h^XO..— College ian(7.s.— Extends un- 
til April 14, 1866, the time within which any 
State or Territory may accept the benefits of the 
Act of July 2, 1862, donating lands to the States 
for colleges, agriculture and the mechanic arts ; 
also extends the act to West A'irginia. 

Chap. "LV^.— Nebraska Enahling Act. — 
[Same as that of Nevada, with the following 
boundaries :]^ Commencing at a point formed by 
the intersection of the western boundary of the 
State of Missouri with the fortieth degi-ee of 
north latitude ; extending thence due west along 
said fortieth degree to its intersection with the 
twenty-fifth degree of longitude west from Wash- 
ington ; thence north along said twenty-fifth de- 
gree to its intersection with the forty-first de- 
gree of north latitude ; thence west along said 
forty-first degree of north latitude to its inter- 
section with the twenty-seventh degree of longi- 
tude; thence north along said twenty-seventh 
degree of longitude to its intersection with the 
forty-third degree of north latitude ; thence east 
along said forty-third degree to the Reya Paha 
river ; thence down the middle of the chqraiel 
of said river, with its meandering*, to its junc- 
tion with the Niobrara river ; thence down the 
middle of the channel of said Niobrara river, 
and following the meanderings thereof, to its 
junction with the Missouri river ; thence down 
the middle of the channel of said Jlissouri 
river, and following the meanderings thereof, to 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



the place of beginning. Nebraska has declined, 
thus far, to fonn a State Constitution. 

Chap. LX. — Rock Island Arsenal. — Provides 
for taking possession of Rock Island, Mississippi 
river, as a site for a Government Arsenal. 

Chap. LXVI.— TAe New (7eM^— Provides for 
coining a cent and a two-cent piece, the first 43 
grains, the other 96 grains in weight. (The cent 
weighs exactly one-tenth of a Troy ounce.) 
These coins are 95 per cent, copper and 5 per 
cent, of tin and zinc. The one cent coin is a 
legal tender to the amount of ten cents — the two 
cent piece to the amount of twenty cents. The 
Mint may sell them for lawful United States 
currency at par. If any person shall make or 
pass any coin, token, card or anything intended 
to be passed as money for one or two cent pieces, 
he shall, on conviction, be fined not over $1,000, 
and imprisoned not more than five years. 

Chap. "LKIX.—To Prevent Collisions at Sea. 
— This act establishes a comprehensive series of 
rules for lights, flags, whistles, &c., on vessels, 
and directs how they shall pass each other when 
at sea. It establishes a New Code, which went 
into effect on the 1st of September. 

Chap. IjK.XVII.— Indian Lands in Utah..— 
Provides for selling all Indian reservations in 
Utah, except in Unita Valley, at which place the 
Indians are to be collected as far as 
and provision made for their welfare. 

Chap. LXXVIII. — Names on Vessels. — Every 
steamboat shall have its name on the stern, on 
each side of the pilothouse, and if a side-wheeler, 
on the wheel houses. No name shall be changed 
or disguised. 

Chap. \jXX\X. — Lands to Minnesota.— 
Grants lands (reserving minerals) in alternate 
sections of five sections to a mile on each side of 
a proposed railroad from St. Paul to the head of 
Lake Superior. The minimum price of the sec- 
tions not granted shall be $2.50 per acre. The 
road to be completed within eight years, or the 
grant reverts. 

Chap. LXXX. — Lands to Wisconsin. — Grants, 
upon usual terms, lands to aid in building a 
railroad from St. Croix Lake to Lake Superior ; 
a road from Tomah, Monroe Co., to St. Croix 
Lake ; and a road from Pon du Lac to Bayfield. 

Chap. \jXX.XU1.~ Tunnage. — 'ihii is an 
elaborate law upon the subject of measuring tun- 
nage of vessels. 

Chap. IjXXXIW .—Lands to /wca.— Grants 
lands for a railroad from Sioux City to the 
southern line of Minnesota; also a road from 
South McGregor westward near the 43d parallel 
to intersect the road first named. The grants 
are of alternate odd numbers, ten sections wide 
on each side of the roads, with usual guarantees 
to occupied and preempted lands. The mini- 
mum price shall be double that of public lands. , 
Patents are to issue for 100 sections on the com- [ 
pletion of ten miles of road. There is also a 
grant of land for a road from St. Paul and St. 
AMhony via Minneapolis to the southern line of 
tiWState near the mouth of the Big Sioux. 

Chap. IjXXWn.— Postal Moiieij Orders.— 
Allows the establishment of Money-Order offices 
on a plan similar to that in Great Britain. This 
law went into effect on the 1st of November, 
1S64, at about 140 post offices. The law is 
elaborate and intricate, and mainly for post- 
masters' guidance. The object and effect ot 



money orders, and how to use them, will best 
be understood from the following statement: 
The object of the postal money order system is 
to provide a cheap, swift, and safe means of 
sending small sums of money through the mails, 
when bank drafts cannot be readily procured. 
The money order is made safer than a bank 
draft even, by leaving out of the order the name 
of the party for whom the money is intended. 
The sums for which one money-order office may 
draw on another ranges from one to thirty dol- 
lars, no order being issued for less than one dol- 
lar, nor are fractions of cents to be introduced 
into an money order. The commission on orders 
not exceeding $10 is ten cents ; over $10 and not 
exceeding $20, fifteen cents ; and on those over 
$20, up to $30, twenty cents. To obtain an or- 
der for money, apply to the postmaster of one 
of the money-order offices. He v.-\\\ furnish the 
applicant with a printed blank to be filled out 
with all the particulars of amount, name, ad- 
dress, required to be stated on the money order. 
The order is then completed and handed to the 
applicant upon payment of the sum named and 
the fee, which fee must be paid in money, no 
postage stamps being received for fees ; and no 
money will be received for orders except coin, 
United States notes, or notes of national banks, 
and orders cannot be paid in any other currency. 
By the mail immediately following the issue of 
an order, the postmaster advises the postmaster 
at the office on which it was drawn of the fact, 
and the latter is thus furnished with all neces- 
sary information before the order itself can be 
presented, to enable him to detect fraud, should 
any be intended. A money order is rendered 
invalid unless presented within ninety days 
from its date, to the postmaster on which it was 
drawn. But the Postmaster-General can issue a 
new order on the application of the payee, and 
the paj'ment of a second fee, and a similar plan 
is to be pursued when an order is lost ; the payee 
furnishes a sworn statement that the order is 
lost or destroyed, accompanied by the certificate 
of the postmaster that it has not been paid and 
will not? be if afterwards presented. A money 
order can be transferred by the payee indorsing 
it on the back, with the limitation that an order 
can be indorsed only once. This is to enable 
persons residing at a distance from money-order 
offices to avail themselves of the advantages of 
the system. The New York office is to do the 
banking for all the other offices — will receive the 
money taken for all orders, and postmasters 
elsewhere will draw on the New York office for 
the funds they need. 

Chap. XCII. — Veteran Volunteer Engi- 
neers. — Authorizes such a regiment to be organ- 
ized of veterans in the Army of the Cumber- 
land. 

Chap. XCy .—Montana Territory. —OT%a.n- 
izes a temporary government in this new Terri- 
tory, which is within the following boundaries : 
Commencing at the intersection of the twenty- 
seventh degree of longitude west from Washing- 
ton with the forty-fifth degree of north latitude ; 
thence due west on said forty-fifth degree to Its 
intersection with the thirty-fourth degree of 
longitude ; thence due south along said thirty- 
fourth degree to the forty-fourth degi-ee and 
thirty minutes ; thence due westalong said forty- 
fom-th degree and thirty minutes to its intersec- 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



25 



tlon with the crest of the Rocky Mountains; 
thence following the crest of the Rocky Moun- 
tains northward till its intersection with the 
Bitter Root Mountains ; thence northward along 
the crest of Bitter Root Mountains to its inter- 
section with the thirty-ninth degree of longitude ; 
thence along said thirty-ninth degree northward 
to the boundary line of the British possessions ; 
thence eastward along said boundary line to the 
twenty-seventh degree of longitude; thence 
southward along said twenty-seventh degree to 
the place of beginning. The provisions of the act 
are unimportant save that slaverj' is expressly 
forbidden. Boundary of Idaho changed — 
The last section of the Montana Act provides 
that " until Congress shall otherwise direct, all 
that part of the Territory of Idaho included 
within the following boundaries, to wit : Com- 
mencing at a point formed by the intersection of 
the thirty-third degree of longitude west from 
Washington with the forty-first degree of north 
latitude ; thence along said thirty-third degree 
of longitude to the crest of the Rocky Jloun- 
tains ; thence northward along the said crest of 
the Rocky Moimtains to its intersection with the 
forty-fourth degree and thirty minutes of north 
latitude ; thence eastward along said forty -fourth 
degree thirty minutes to the thirty -fourth degree 
of longitude; thence northward along said 
thirtj'-fourth degree to the forty-fifth degree 
north latitude ; thence eastward along said forty- 
fifth degree to the twenty-seventh degree of long- 
itude ; thence south along said twenty-seventh 
degree to the forty-first degree north latitude ; 
thence west along said forty-first degree to the 
place of beginning, shall be, and is hereby, in- 
corporated temporarily into and made part of 
the Territory of Dakota." 

CuAP. XCVII. — Sioux Damages. — Appropri- 
ates about $1,200,000 to pay ascertained dam- 
ages by the Sioux Indians. 

Chap. XCVni.— Otvrtre 3/(Z«fe.— Authorizes 
the P. M. General to unite with the Post-Office 
Department of Brazil to establish a monthly mail 
by steamers to Rio Janeiro, touching at St. 
Thomas, Bahia, Pemambuco, and other ports, if 
deemed advisable ; the work to be let to the low- 
est bidder. Provision is made that the steamers 
shall be of the best class. 

Chap. Cn.-'Ffanked Matter.— AW commu- 
nications relating to the ofiJcial business of the 
department to which they are sent, addressed to 
the chiefs of the several executive departments 
of the government, or to such principal officers 
of each executive department, being heads of 
bureaus or chief clerks, or one duly authorized 
by the Postmaster-General to frank official mat- 
ter, shall be received and conveyed by mail free 
of postage without being indorsed " official busi- 
ness," or with the name of the writer. 

Chap. CIII.— Zrt«f/s to /otca.— The route of 
the proposed road from Davenport to Council 
Bluffs may be changed, but must still pass 
through Des Moines and Council Bluffs, and 
through or near Newtown, Jasper County. Grants 
of lands are changed to correspond. The Bur- 
lington and Missouri River road, and the Cedar 
Rapids and Missouri River road are also author- 
ized to change their lines ; and so may the Du- 
buque and Iowa City road. The act contains 
the usual provisions protecting the rights of the 
General Government. 



Chap. CVI. — National Ourreney.-~-Esta.h- 
lishes a separate bureau, to be charged with the 
execution of this and all laws respecting a Na- 
tional Currency, secured by United States bonds, 
and names the officers of said bureau, together 
with the securities conditioned by their assump- 
tion of office. Every certificate assignment, and 
conveyance, shall be as valid, when the comptrol- 
ler's sealed is stamped on the paper. Associa- 
tions for carrying on the business of banking 
may be formed by any number of persons not 
less than five, who shall enter into articles of as- 
sociation, signed by the members of the associ- 
ation, a copy of which shall be forwarded to the 
comptroller of the currency. The persons form- 
ing such an association shall make a certificate, 
specifying the name of the association, the 
place where its operations are to be carried on, 
the amount of its capital stock, and the number 
of shares into which it shall be divided, and the 
presentation of this certificate, when properly 
executed, shall be legal evidence of the exist- 
ence of such association in all courts and places 
within the jurisdiction of the United States gov- 
ernment. The requisite capital for the organi- 
zation of associations of this kind, shall be not 
less than two hundred thousand dollars, in a 
city exceeding fifty thousand inhabitants, and 
not less than one hundred thousand dollars in a 
city whose population is less than fifty thousand ; 
provided, however, that banks may be organized, 
with a capital of not less than fifty thousand 
dollars, in anyplace not exceeding six thousand 
inhabitants, with the approval of the Secretary 
of the Treasury. Such association shall trans- 
act no business, except such as may be incidental 
to its own organization, imtil authorized by the 
Comptroller of the Currency. It shall have 
power to adopt a corporate seal, elect directors, 
and, through them, appoint a president, vice- 
president, cashier, and other officers; and its 
board of directors shall also define and regulate 
the manner in which its stock shall be trans- 
feiTed, and its general business conducted. The 
number of directors must be not less than five- 
one of whom shall be president. All of the di- 
rectors must be citizens of the United States, 
and at least three-fourths of them must reside in 
the State in which the association is located, for 
one year before their election, and must con- 
tinue in the same while they remain in office; 
and it is necessary that each director shall own 
at least ten shares of stock. In all elections of 
directors, and in deciding all questions at meet- 
ings of shareholders, each shareholder shall be 
entitled to one vote on each share of stock held 
by him; voting by proxies being permissable, 
provided that the proxies be no officers of the 
association, and that they be duly authorized. 
The capital stock of any association shall be in 
shares of one hundred dollars each, deemed per- 
sonal property, and transferable on the books of 
the association. The shareholders shall be held 
individually responsible, equally and ratably, 
and not one for another, for all contracts, debts, 
and engagements of their association, according 
to the par value of their amount of stock there- 
in, in addition to the amount invested in such 
shares; except in the case of shareholders in 
present existing State banking institutions, of 
not less than five millions of dollars of capital, 
and a surplus of twenty per centum on hand, 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



who shall be liable only to the amount invested 
1b their shares. It shall be lawful for an asso- 
ciation, formed under this act, to provide for an 
Increase of its capital from time to time, subject 
to the limitations of this act ; provided, that the 
maximum of such increase shall be determined 
by the Comptroller ; and that no increase of cap- 
ital shall be valid until the whole amount of such 
increase shall be paid in. And every association 
shall have power, by a vote of shareholders 
owning two-thirds of its stock, to reduce the cap- 
ital of such association to any amount not below 
the amount required by this act for its outstand- 
ing circulation. At least fifty per centum of the 
capital stock of every association must be paid 
in to authorize a commencement of business ; 
and the remainder of the capital stock shall be 
paid in installments of at least ten per centum 
each on the whole amount of capital, as fre- 
quently as one installment at the end of each 
month succeeding the time of commencing busi- 
ness. And if any shareholder, or his assignee, 
shall fail to comply with any of these regula- 
tions for payment of stock, the directors of such 
association may sell his stock at public auction, 
after having given him due notice thereof, the 
proceeds of the sale to go to the payment of the 
amount then due thereon, and the excess, if any, 
to be paid to the delinquent shareholder. If the 
stock of the delinquent cannot be sold for enough 
to cover the amoimt due, with the incidental ex- 
penses, the amount previously paid shall be for- 
feited to the association — thence to be sold 
within six months after the forfeiture, or, if not 
sold, to be canceled and deducted from the cap- 
ital stock of the association. If this shall re- 
duce the capital below the requisite minimum of 
capital, the capital stock shall, within thirty days 
after such cancellation, be increased to the re- 
quirements of the act ; in default of which the 
association shall be closed up according to the 
fiftieth section of this act. Every association, 
preliminary to commencing business, shall de- 
liver to the Treasm-er of the United States United 
States registered bonds to an amount equal to 
one-third of the capital stock ; the deposit to be 
increased as the capital is paid up or increased ; 
■while an association, desiring to diminish its cap- 
ital, or to close up its business, may take up its 
bonds, upon returning to the comptroller its cir- 
culating notes. The comptroller shall examine 
and determine if any association can commence 
business. All transfers of United States bonds 
shall be made to the Treasurer of the United 
States, in trust for the association, the comp- 
troller to keep the transfer-book. Associations, 
after the transfer and delivery of bonds to the 
Treasurer, may receive from the Comptroller cir- 
culating notes, in blank, equal in amount to 
ninety per centum of the cuiTent market value 
of the United States bonds so transferred ; but, 
at no time shall the total amount of such notes 
exceed the amount of its capital stock actually 
paid in. The entire amount of circulating notes, 
to be issued under this act, shall not exceed 
three hundred millions of dollars. Such notes 
shall be received at par in payment of all in- 
debtedness to the United States, except for du- 
ties on imports; and also for all indebtedness of 
the United States, except interest on the public 
debt, and in redemption of the national cur- 
rency. Associations shall, annually or oftener, 



examine Its bonds deposited, and execute to the 
Treasurer a certificate, setting forth the different 
kinds, and the amounts thereof; such examina- I 
tion to be made by a duly appointed officer or 
agent of the association, whose certificate shall 
be of full force and validity. The deposited 
bonds shall be held exclusively for the security 
of the association's circulating notes, the asso- 
ciation haWng the benefit of the interest on the 
bonds which It may have deposited, so long as 
it may redeem its circulating notes. AVhenever 
the value of the bonds depreciates below the 
amount of the circulation, for which they stand 
security, the Comptroller may demand other 
bonds, to the amoimt of the depreciation, to be 
deposited with the Treasurer as long as such 
depreciation continues. Bonds deposited may 
be'exchanged for other United States bonds, au- 
thorized by this act, at the option of the Comp- 
troller ; who also may authorize the return to an 
association of its bonds, of not less than one 
thousand dollars, upon the cancellation of a pro- 
portionate amount of circulating notes ; provid- 
ed, that the remaining deposited bonds shall be 
equal to the amount of circulating notes not sur- 
rendered, and that the amount of bonds shall 
not be reduced below the amount required to be 
kept on deposit ; and provided, that there shall 
have been no violation of the provisions of this 
act, on the part of the association. The coun- 
tersigning and delivery of circulating notes, ex- 
cept as permitted by this act, is unlawful ; and 
any officer convicted of the same, shall be 
deemed guilty of a high misdemeanor, and shall 
be punished by fine not exceeding double the 
amount so countersigned and delivered, and im- 
prisonment not less than one and not more than 
fifteen years. An association shall purchase, 
hold, and convey real estate, firsts — such as shall 
be necessary for the transaction of its business; 
secondly — such as shall be mortgaged to it in 
security for debts previously contracted ;_ thirdly 
— such as shall be conveyed to it in satisfaction 
of debts previously contracted ; fourthly — such 
as it shall purchase under judgments, decrees, 
or mortgages, or shall purchase to secure debts 
due to said association. The total liabilities to 
any association, of any person, company, cor- 
poration, or firm, shall at no time exceed one- 
tenth part of the capital stock of such associa- 
tion, actually paid in; provided, that the dis- 
count of commercial paper, actually owned by 
the person, company, ic, negotiating the same, 
shall not be considered as money borrowed. The 
established interest of the State or Territory, 
wherein the banking association is located, shall 
gOTcrn its charge of interest on loans, notes, 
bills, Ac, and, when there is no established in- 
terest in such State or Territory, the association 
may take interest not exceeding seven per cent- 
um. The penalty for taking greater i nterest than 
herein prescribed shall be a forfeiture of the en- 
tire interest which has been agreed to be paid ; 
and the person or persons who may have paid a 
greater Interest, may recover back from the as- 
sociation receiving the same twice the amount 
of the interest thus paid ; pro\-ided, that euch 
action for recovery is commenced within two 
years after the occurrence of the usurious trans- 
action. The circulating notes of the different 
associations shall be redeemed in New York at 
par, by assaciationa selected for that purpose. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



27 



Any and all notes of any association shall be 
received at par by every other association. Divi- 
dends may be declared semi-annually, after one- 
tenth part of net profits shall have been carried 
to the surplus fvmd. Associations shall not make 
loans on the security of their capital stock, un- 
less to prevent loss upon a debt. The indebted- 
ness of an association must not exceed its ca^ 
ital stock, except on account of its notes of cir- 
culation, moneys deposited with the association, 
bills of exchange against the moneys of the as- 
sociation, and on account of liabilities for divi- 
dends and reserved profits. Associations shall 
not hypothecate their circulating notes, nor 
■withdrav? any portion of their capital. The 
comptroller shall keep control of plates and spe- 
cial dies, expenses to be borne by associations. 
Associations shall pay to the Treasurer, half- 
yearly, a duty of one half per centum on their 
circulating notes, one quarter per centum on 
their deposits, and one quarter per centum on 
their capital stock beyond the amount invested 
in United States bonds. But neither shares nor 
real estate shall be exempt taxation by State au- 
thority. Associations may be closed by a vote 
of shareholders owning two-thirds of the stock. 
Under a similar vote. State banks may become 
national associations, by undergoing the neces- 
sary process. If associations fail to redeem 
their circulation, the notes may be protested, un- 
less the president or cashier shall forward to the 
Comptroller a written admission of the protest, 
and, after such default, the association shall do 
no banking business, except to receive money 
belonging to it, and to deliver special deposits. 
'\\'hen the Comptroller shall have ascertained 
the facts, he will, within thirty days, declare the 
United States bonds and securities pledged by 
such defaulting association, forfeited, and notify 
the holders of notes to present them for paj-ment 
at the Treasury of the United States ; whereupon 
an amount of bonds, equal to the notes re- 
deemed by the Treasurer, shall be canceled ; and, 
thereafter, the United States shall have priority 
of lien upon assets of an association for any de- 
ficiency in the redemption of its circulation ; or 
the Comptroller may supply such deficiency by 
a sale, at auction, or at private sale, of the bonds 
in pledge, to an extent that will redeem the out- 
standing notes. The Comptroller may appoint 
a receiver, to close the affairs of a defaulting as- 
sociation ; but, if the association denies that it 
has failed to redeem its notes, it may apply to 
the courts for an injunction. All transfers, as- 
signments, &c., in contemplation of insolvenc.v, 
shall be void. Directors of associations shall be 
held individually liable for any violation of the 
provisions of this act. OflScers who shall em- 
bezzle the funds of an association, shall, upon 
conviction, be imprisoned for not less than five 
nor more than ten years. Suitable penalties are 
awarded to persons mutilating notes, counter- 
feiting, or knowingly uttering counterfeit, notes, 
for making plates for forging notes, for having 
blank notes, with unlawful intent, &-c. The 
Comptroller of the Currency shall report annu- 
ally to Congress a summary of the condition of 
every association from whom reports have been 
received during the preceding year, and every- 
thing thereto pertaining. The last section repeals 
the Act of February 25th, 1S63, on the same sub- 
ject. (See Tkibuse Almanac for 18&1, p. 29.) 



Chap. CX. — Lands to Michigan. — Amends 
former act so as to change the line of the pro- 
posed road from Fort Wayne, Ind., to Grand 
Rapids and Traverse Bay, Mich. 

Chap. CXIV. — Counterfeiting. — Punishes by 
$8,000 fine and five years imprisonment, or both, 
the making or passing or attempting to pass off 
any base coin of whatever device intended to be 
used as current money. 

Chap. CXVI. — Carrying Treaties into Ef- 
fect. — Stipiilates how consuls and commercial 
agents are to exercise jurisdiction over contro- 
versies between officers of vessels, mariners, &c. 

Chap. C^^ll.—Jielease of Properti/.—Pio- 
vides for release from attachment of property 
claimed by the United States. 

Chap. CX\IU.— Limit of Action.— V^hen- 
ever, during the present rebellion, any action, 
civil or criminal, shall accrue against any per- 
son who, by reason of resistance to the execution 
of the laws of the United States, or the inter- 
ruption of the ordinary course of judicial pro- 
ceedings, cannot be served with process for the 
commencement of such action or the arrest of 
such person, or whenever, after such action, civil 
or criminal, shall have accrued, such person can- 
not, by reason of such resistance of the laws, or 
such interruption of judicial proceedings, be ar- 
rested or served with process for the commence- 
ment of the action, the time during which such 
person shall so be beyond the reach of legal pro- 
cess shall not be deemed or taken as any part of 
the time limited by law for the commencement 
of such action. 

Chap. CXIX.— Anti-Bribery Act.—lso Sena- 
tor or Member of Congress, while in office, nor 
any head of department, of bureau, or clerk, nor 
any officer in government service, shall receive 
or agree to receive any compensation whatso- 
ever, for any services to any person, either by 
himself or another, in relation to any proceed- 
ing, contract, claim, controversy, charge, accu- 
sation, arrest, or other matter or thing in which 
the United States is a party, or interested. Any 
person offending against any provision of this 
act shall, on conviction thereof, be deemed guilty 
of a misdemeanor, and be punished by a fine 
not exceeding ten thousand dollars, and by im- 
prisonment not exceeding two years, at the dis- 
cretion of the court, and shall be forever there- 
after incapable of holding any office of honor, 
trust, or profit under the government of the 
United States. 

Chap. CXXl.— Offenses a< /?««.— Provides for 
special sessions of United States district courts 
to try complaints against officers and mariners 
of vessels, for offenses not capital or infamous. 
They are to be investigated by the district attor- 
ney, and sivmmarily tried. 

CUAP. CXXVII.— TVwe Sales of CoZt/.— [This 
act prohibited speculation in gold; was after- 
wards repealed.] 

CniP. CXXX.— Trade with Br iti.-<h Provin- 
ces.— X\\ vessels navigating the waters oi our 
nejrthern, northeastern, and northwestern fron- 
tiers, are to be enrolled, but do not need certifi- 
cate of register. The remainder of the act re- 
gulates the salaries and fees of collectors. - 

Chap. CXXXIV. — 07it<magon liaitroad.— 
Extends for five years the time first fixed for 
completing the Merqueth and Ontonagon Kail- 
road. 



28 



THE TRIBUKE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



Chap. CXXXVII. — Lands to Michigan. — 
Lands granted to Michigan for wagon-road from 
Saginaw to the Straits of Mackinaw ; and one 
from Grand Rapids to Straits of Mackinaw. 
Roads to be public highways, and be completed 
in five years. 

Chap. CXLV.— Pay of Soldiers— Military 
Justice, <&c. — Increases the pay of non-com- 
missioned officers and soldiers ; privates to have 
$16 per month, and petty oflBcers in proportion. 
Rations to remain the same. Privates, &c., serv- 
ing imder enlistment prior to July 22, 1861, who 
may re-enlist, for three years, get the bounties 
provided by Act of January 13, 1861 Section 
five establishes as a part of the War Department, 
during the rebellion, the Bureau of Military Jus- 
tice, to which shall be returned for revision the 
records and proceedings of all the courts-mar- 
tial, courts of inquiry, and military commissions 
of the armies of the United States, and in which 
a record shall be kept of all proceedings. The 
President shall appoint, by and with the advice 
and consent of the Senate, as the head of said 
bureau, a judge advocate-general, with the rank, 
pay, and allowances of a brigadier-general, and 
an assistant judge advocate-general, with the 
rank, pay, and allowances of a colonel of cav- 
alrj'. And the said judge advocate-general and 
his assistant shall receive, revise, and have re- 
corded the proceedings of the courts-martial, 
coui'ts of inquiry, and military commissions of 
the armies of the United States, and perform 
such other duties as have heretofore been per- 
formed by the judge advocate-general of the 
armies of the United States. 

Chap. CXLIX. — Examination of Paymas- 
ters, <&c. — A board of examiners to inquire into 
the fitness and ability of quartermasters, commis- 
saries, paymasters, and their assistants. Those 
who fail to pass examination are to be dismissed. 

Chap. CLIII. — Lands to Wisconsin. — Grants 
land for a military wagon road from Warsaw, 
Marathon County, up Wisconsin river to Skono- 
waug, thence to the State line in the direction of 
Ontonagon, on Lake Superior. No patent to be 
granted until ten miles are completed, and the 
whole to be done within five years. 

Chap. CLV. — Public Printinfj. — In order to 
furnish early copies of reports, heads of depart- 
ments may havecopies printed before submitting 
to Congress. Regulations are made for com- 
piling, editing, distributing documents, Ac. 

Chap. CLVI. — Instruction. — Kn^nlaXes the 
public schools in the District of Columbia, and 
incorporates the commissioners, provides for 
raising and applying a sufficient school fund, for 
building school houses, for schools for colored 
children, &c., forming a complete code on the 
subject. 

Chap. CLX. — iMndsto California. — Releases 
certain United States lands at Point San Quentin, 
California, for State prison purposes. 

Chap. CLXII.—CTa»»».«.— Authorizes the Pres- 
ident to appoint a commissioner to investigate 
and adjust the claims of the Hudson Day^Com- 
pany and the Puget's Soimd Agricultiu-alTom- 
pany. 

Chap. CLXIV.— 7b Prevent Smuggling.— 
Stringent regulations as to the inspection, search- 
ing, landing, storing, and transmission of im- 
ported goods. 

Caxe.ChXVl.— An Actio repealthe Fugitive 



Slave Act of eighteen hundred amdfifty, and 
all Acts and Parts of Acta for the Rendition 
of Fugitive Slaves.— Be it enacted by the Sen- 
ate and Bouse of Representatives of the Uni- 
ted States of America in Congress assemi let'. 
That sections three and four of an act entitled 
" An act respecting fugitives from justice and 
persons escaping from the service of their mas- 
ters," passed February 12, 1793, and an act en- 
titled '• An act to amend, and supplementary to, 
the act entitled ' An act respecting fugitives from 
justice, and persons escaping from the 8er\'lce of 
their masters,' passed Februaryl2, 1793," passed 
September, eighteen hundred and fifty, be, and 
the same are hereby, repealed. [Approved, June 
23, 1661.] 

Chap. CLXXII.— Ways and Jl/ein*.— Author- 
izes the borrowing of $400,000,000 on coupon 
bonds, running five to thirty years, interest (pay- 
able in coin) not less than six per cent. Such 
bonds, and the five-twenties before authorized, 
may be disposed of in Europe if deemed advisa- 
ble. These, and all other United States bonds, 
notes, and certificates of indebtedness are ex- 
empt from taxation by State or municipal author- 
ity. In lieu of so much of this loan, the Secre- 
ta"ry may issue $200,000,000 of treasury notes 
redeemable within three years, bearing interest 
of seven and three-tenths per cent., convertible 
into bonds. The Secretary of the Treasury may 
also cancel all Treasury notes heretofore issued, 
and issue these in their stead. These notes are 
not to be a legal tender. Bonds may be ex- 
chfciged for seven and three-tenths notes. The 
Secretary may receive temporary loans and issue 
certificates of deposit therefor at six per cent., 
the certificates payable on ten days notice — such 
deposits not to exceed $150,000,000. The same 
act authorizes the issue of $50,000,000 of frac- 
tional or postage currency. 

Chap. CLXXIII.— ?%e Internal Revenue 
Act. — [This act would fill five entire copies of 
our Almanac, and of course cannot be even con- 
densed here. It can be seen at the office of every 
United States assessor and collector.] 

Chap. ChXXX-lll.—Pemion Aiients.—.k^enis 
disbursing $.50,000 to have $500 "for clerk hire, 
rent, Ac, per year; those disbursing $100,000 
have $750, and for every $50,000 additional, 
$250 additional. 

Chap. CLXXXIX.—Big Tree Grove.— (ira.n\.% 
to California lands in the Yo Semite Valley, and 
the wonderful Big Tree Grove, the salable lands 
to go for the preservation of the trees. 

Chap. CXCm.— Titles in California.— Pro- 
vides for expediting the settlement of private 
land claims and titles in California. 

Chap. CXCVl.—Pay of Registers, <tc.— Rail- 
road Location Changed.— yvhere lands are lo- 
cated by States or corporations under grants 
from Congress (except for agricultural colleges) 
the registers and receivers shall have- a fee of 
one dollar for each 160 acres, to be paid by the 
corporation. The Burlington and Missouri Rail- 
road may change its location so as to secure a 
better route. 

Chap. CXC\n.— Postmasters' Salaries.— 
Postmasters to be paid fixed salaries instead of 
fees. They are divided into five classes, based 
upon the fees of the several postmasters for two 
years past. The salaries range from $10 for the 
poorest offices of the fifth class to not over $4,000 



THE TRIBUNE ALM.VNAC FOR 1S65. 



29 



for the best of the first class — the only exception 
being the New York city office, which pays $6,000. 
The salaries are to be adjusted every two years. 
On the first and second class offices proper al- 
lowances are made for office rent and clerks. 
Box rents are made part of the office revenue, 
and no perquisites are allowed. The unifona 
rate of United States postage, ^vithout reference 
to distance, upon letters and other mailable mat- 
ter addressed to, or received from, foreign coun- 
tries, when forwarded from, or received in, the 
United States, shall be as ten cents per single 
rate of half an ounce or under, on letters ; two 
cents each on newspapers ; and the established 
domestic rates on pamphlets, periodicals, and 
other articles of printed matter ; which postage 
shall be prepaid on matter sent, and collected on 
matter received ; these rates shall not apply to 
letters or other matter, addressed to, or received 
from, any country, to and from which different 
rates of postage have been, or shall be, estab- 
lished by international postal convention. Post- 
masters may sell stamps in sums of not less than 
$100 at 5 per cent, discount, and stamped en- 
velopes in packages of 500 at the same rate. 
Minute provisions are made to punish frauds 
upon the mails. Letter carriers are to have sal- 
j aries of not over $S0O a year. The special agent 
of the Department in the Pacific States is paid 
I five dollars a day. 

! Chap. CXCVllI.— Lands to Kamrrx.— Grants 
lands to aid in constructing a raUroai'. and tele- 
! graph from Emporia via Council Grove to Fort 
, Kiley, to connect with the Kansas branch of the 
I Pacific railroad. Allows the Lawrence and Neo- 
I Eho river road route to be changed so as to run 

from Lawrence to Emporia. 
I Chap. CXClX.—Jiiternation<il TtUgraph.— 
Grants right of way and alternate sections of 
public land for a telegraph from the overland 
line in California to the British boundary. Also 
grants the use of a steamer to lay the ocean line 
to Russian Asia. The government is to assist in 
protecting the line, and have priority of use. 
The line is to be open to the public, and the 
charge for messages shall not exceed the aver- 
age usual rate \ox such service in Europe and 
America. The terms for newspaper dispatches 
shall be the same for all, and no contract shall 
be made upon terms not open to all others. 
I Chap. CCl.— Efficiency of fhe Xai-y.—Vro- 
vides for the transfer of persons in military serv- 
ice to the navy, especially seamen who have 
been drafted into the army. Enlistments in the 
navy are to be credited to States and towns the 
same as enlistments In the army, and they re- 
ceive the same bounties as soldiers. 

Chap. CCV.— Coal Lands and Toicn Prop- 
ertij. — Coal lands on the public domain, reserved 
as "mines," may be sold at auction at a mini- 
mum price of $20 per acre, sale to be advertised 
three months; if any such land is not sold at 
auction, it becomes subject to private entry at 
the minimum price. Persons desiring to locate 
a town or city on public lands, must file a map 
thereof, divided into lots of not less than 4,200 
square feet, which lots may be sold by the gov- 
ernment at apt less than $10 each ; lots not sold 
become subject to entry at the minimum price. 
Actual settlers upon such lots, however, are en- 
titled to the provisions of the homestead law. 
CnAP. OCX — Ciml Appropriatiom.—The 



Coasticise Slave Trade Proh ibit6<7.— Attached 
to the civil appropriation bill is the following 
important clause : That sections eight and nine 
of an act entitled "An act to prohibit the im- 
portation of slaves into any port or place within 
the jurisdiction of the United States, from and 
after the first day of January, in the year of our 
Lord eighteen hundred and eight," which said 
sections undertake to regulate the coastwise 
slave-trade, are hereby repealed, and the coast- 
wise slave-trade is prohibited forever. 

Chap. CCXJII.— Lands to Oregon.— Grants 
public lands to aid In the construction of a mil- 
itary wagon road from Eugene City by way of 
Middle Fork of 'Willamette river and the most 
feasible pass in the Cascade Mountains near 
Diamond Peak, to the eastwn boundary of the 
State. 

Chap. CCX\.— Punishment of Guerrillas. — 
Commanding generals in the field or of depart- 
ments shajl have power to carry into execution 
all sentences against guerrilla marauders, as 
well as against spies, mutineers, deserters and 
murderers. An officer ordering a court-martial 
shall have power to pardon or mitigate punish- 
ments ordered by such court, except sentence of 
death, or of cashiering or dismissing au officer. 
Section three provides that a soldier in hospital, 
if discharged, or dying while there, shall be 
deemed to have been discharged or to have died 
in the military sen'ice, so far as it relates to 
bounties. 

Chap. CCXVI.— Union, Pacific Railroad..— 
This is an act amending the act of 1862, incor- 
porating the Pacific Railroad Company. This 
amendatory act makes the shares one hundred 
instead of one thousand doUai-s each, and one 
million of shares instead of one hundred thou- 
sand. To be a director, one must hold fifty 
shares instead of five. The books will be opened 
at the office of the company in New York, and 
in Boston, Pliiladelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, 
Cincinnati and St. Louis. Assessments shall be 
made on the stockholders of not less than five 
dollars per share, at intervals not exceeding six 
months, until the par value shall be paid. Cap- . 
ital stock shall not be increased beyond the ac- 
tual cost of the road. The company is empow- 
ered to purchase and hold any lands necessary 
for the construction and working of the road, 
not exceeding one hundred feet on each side, ex- 
cept for turnouts, depots, &c. Provision is made 
for assessment and appraisement of damages to 
owners of lands taken by the company. The 
term " mineral land" in this act does not include 
coal and iron land ; nor does any grant, by this 
act, defeat or impair any pre-emption, home- 
stead, swamp-land, or other lawful claim, nor 
include any government reservation or mineral 
lands, or the improvements of any bona fide set- 
tler, and the timber necessary to support his im- 
provements as a miner or agriculturist. The 
quantity of land that is exempt by the operation 
of this act, and the act to which this is an 
amendment, shall not exceed one hundred and 
sLxty acres for each agricultural settler, and 
such quantity for each miner as the commis- 
sioner may establish. The time for designating 
the route and the completion of that part of the 
road required by the act is extended one year ; 
fhe Central Pacific Railroad Company of Cali- 
fornia are required to complete twenty-five miles 



30 



TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



of their road in each year thereafter, and the 
whole of it, to the State line, witiiin four years. 
The Pi-esident of the United States is authorized 
to appoint, for each of the roads forming the 
Union Pacific Railroad, three commissioners, 
who shall examine and report upon the divisions 
assigned to them, as provided in the original 
act. So much of the act as provides for the re- 
servation, by the government, of a portion of the 
bonds to be issued, is repealed. The company 
are authorized to establish ferries, construct 
bridges over the Missouri and all other rivers, 
for the convenience of the road, providing proper 
draws on navigable streams. A large portion of 
the act is devoted to arranging the affairs of the 
Central Pacific Railroad Company, of California, 
in connection with the general company. After 
the next election of directors, the niunber to be 
elected by stockholders shall be fifteen, and the 
number appointed by the President shall be five ; 
and the President shall appoint three additional 
directors, to serve until the next election. At 
least one of the government directors shall be on 
each of the standing committees of the company, 
and one on each special committee. The gov- 
ernment directors shall make frequent reports to 
the Secretary of the Interior on the progress of 
the work. Companies are to be united, are au- 
thorized to construct any connection with the 
road and telegraph, for purposes of communica- 
tion, which shall be opened to public use, with- 
out discrimination of persons ; and the company 
are compelled to transmit news by messages, on 
pain of forfeiting one hundrod dollars for each 
refusal, and such other damage as may be recov- 
erable at law. Provision is made for a branch 
from Sioux City, to connect with the main road. 
The Burlington and Missouri Itiver Railroad 
Company may extend its road to a point not 
further west than the one hundredth meridian, 
so as to connect with the main trunk. Provision 
is made for the extinction of Indian titles where 
necessary. There are many other minute pro- 
visions of no public importance. 

Chap. CCXYll.—Xortkern PaciHc Railroad 
and Telegraph. — Incorporates the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company, to build a railroad 
and telegraph, beginning at a point on Lake Su- 
perior, in Minnesota or Wisconsin, thence, on a 
line north of the forty-fifth degree, to some point 
on Puget's Sound, with a branch along the val- 
ley of the Columbia river, at or near Portland, 
in Oregon. This branch will leave the main line 
not more than three hundred miles from its west- 
ern terminus. The capital stock is one million 
shares, of one hundred dollars each. Proper 
provisions, for the organization of the company 
and commencement of the work, are made. 
Right of way Is given, grants of public lands are 
made, &c., in the usual form. The act conforms 
generally to that incorporating the Union Pacific 
Railroad Company. 

Chap. CCXX. — Teleyrap/i !c Communication 
between the At/antic and Pacific States and 
Idaho.— The United States Telegraph Company 
is authorized to erect a line between the Missouri 
river and San Francisco, on such route as they 
may select, to connect with tho lines now con- 
structed throughout the Union. They have the 
use of unoccupied land, as far as it may be ne- 
cessary for the right of way, and rpaterials, and 
for establishing stations for repairs, &c., not ex- 



ceeding at any station a quarter section of land, 
and such stations not to be more than one in fif- 
teen miles, on the average. The company has 
no right of pre-emption. Under the direction of 
the President of the United States, the company 
is authorized to erect a line from Fort Hall, by 
Walla Walla and the Dalles and San Francisco, 
to Portland, in Oregon, and from Fort Hall to 
Bannock and Virginia City, in Idaho— the United 
States to have priority in use of the lines ; for all 
other business the line to be opened to all per- 
sons on established terms. 

Chap. CCXXlV.—Land Office raperf.—KW 
exemplifications of patents, or papers in the 
Land OflBce, required by parties interested, shall 
be furnished by the commissioner, at the rate of 
fifteen cents per hundred words, and two dollars 
for copies of township plates or diagrams, with 
an additional dollar for the commissioner's ver- 
ification and Land Office seal. The money thus 
received to be paid into the Treasury. 

Chap. CCXXV. — Commercial Intercourse 
with the Insurrectionary jState,<i. — ^In addition 
to captured and abandoned property, to be re- 
ceived and disposed of, the Treasury agents shall 
take charge of and lease, for not exceeding one 
year, the abandoned lands and tenements within 
the districts named, and provide for the employ- 
ment and general welfare of all persons within 
the lines of military occupation in said States, 
who have been heretbfore held as slaves, all of 
whom shall become free. Property is regarded 
as abandoned when the lawful owner shall be 
voluntarily absent and engaged, in arms or 
otherwise, in aid of the rebellion. All money 
received from leases and sales shall be paid into 
the Treasury, and properly accounted for. There 
are many provisions on points of law amenda- 
tory of the previous act, concerning the mode of 
sale, distribution, fines, &c., but they do not 
seem to be of general public interest. Investi- 
gations will be made from time to time, to pre- 
vent frauds and abuses in trade ; and the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury is to provide the necessary 
rules and regulations. 

Chap. CCSXVl.— Claims/or Bounty landx.— 
The acts of 1S42, of 1S35, of 1S4S, and of 1S54, 
are renewed and continued. .M\ warrants for 
bounty lands issued in virtue of these acts, may 
be located at any time, and in conformity with 
tlie general laws in force at tho time of such lo- 
cation. 

CuAP. CCXXXVn.—Aniendment to the En- 
rolling Act.— The President may call, at his dis- 
cretion, for volunteers, for one, two or three 
years; and such volunteers, in case of a draft, 
shall be credited to their respective localities. 
Volunteers for one year, when mustered in, have 
a bounty of one himdred dollars ; for two years, 
unless sooner discharged, of two hundred dol- 
lars ; for three yeai-s, unless sooner discharged, 
of three hundred dollars. One third of the 
bounty is paid to the soldier at the time of being 
mustered in ; one third at the expiration of one 
half his term ; one third at the end of his terra. 
In case of death while in service, the residue of 
his boimty is to be paid to his widow, or child- 
ren, or mother, if she be a widow. Should the 
quotas not be filled within sixty days after the 
call for men, a draft is to be ordered. In case 
of a draft, the commutation heretofore allowed 
is repealed, and no man can escape from military 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



service by the payment of money. This act pro- 
vides for the sending, on the part of the loyal 
States, of recruiting agents into any rebellious 
States, except Arkansas, Tennessee and Louisi- 
ana ; and all volunteers got by these agents are 
credited to the States from which the agents 
come. Drafted men, when mustered in, shall be 
assigned to organizations of their own States, as 
far as practicable, and, when so assigned, may 
select their own regiments, in case they are not 
already filled. The Secretary of War shall dis- 
charge all minors imder the age of eighteen, who 
may be drafted or in the service ; and, if any 
officer shall muster in a person under sixteen 
years, without the consent of his parent or guar- 
dian, such person shall be immediately dis- 
charged, upon repaying the bounties received, 
and the officer shall be dismissed the service, 
with a forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and 
be subject to suchfurtherpunishmentasacourt- 
martial may direct. Drafted persons, reporting 
at places of rendezvous, shall be allowed trans- 
portation from their places of residence. Per- 
sons discharged are allowed transportation home. 
All persons in the naval service, who entered the 
service during the rebellion, and who have not 
been credited to the quota of any town or State, 
shall be enrolled and so credited. If a drafted 
person shall be absent from home, on his usual 
business, beyond the time allowed to report, he 
shall not be deemed a deserter, until notice has 
been given him, and a reasonable time allowed. 
Nothing in this act shall change the provisions 
of existing laws relative to permitting persons 
liable to military service to furnish substitutes. 

Chap. CCXhll.—M'anch Mint in Oregon.— 
Establishes, under the usual regulations, a branch 
mint at Dalles City, Oregon, with the customary 
officers, fixing their salaries; the mint being 
under the direction of the Director of the Mint 
at Philadelphia, who is to prepare rules and regu- 
lations. This mint is a place for deposit of pub- 
lic moneys; and the Superintendent is an As- 
sistant Treasurer. The mint may issue certifi- 
cates of deposit for gold dust and bullion. All 
the laws in relation to other mints apply to this. 
One hundred thousand dollars is appropriated to 
carry this act iqto effect. 

Chap. CCLXV. — Courtsinthe N^orthern. Dis- 
trict of Nmo yor^. ^Sessions of the District 
Courts of the United States are to be held at Al- 
bany on the third Tuesday in January ; at Utica 
on the third Tuesday in March ; at Rochester on 
the second Tuesday in May ; at Buffalo on the 
tliird Tuesday in August ; at Auburn on the third 
Tuesday in November ; and, in the discretion of 
the judge of such court, one term annually, at 
such time and place within St. Lawi-ence, Clin- 
ton, Jefferson, Oswego, or Franklin Counties, as 
he may appoint, by notice of twenty days, to be 
published in the State paper. The Circuit Court 
shall be held at Canandaigua on the third Tues- 
day in June, and at Albany on the second Tues- 
day in October. Process issued or proceedings 
pending in either of said courts shall not be im- 
paired hiy change of time and place. Instead of 
the present salary of the Judge of the Northern 
District of New York, he is to be paid quarterly, 
at the rate of $3,.'500 per year. 

Chap. CCXLVI. — Kncotirafting Tm migra- 
tion. — The President is authorized, by consent 
of the Senate, to appoint a Commissioner of Im- 



migration, who shall be subject to the direction 
of the Department of State, shall hold his office 
forfour years, and shall receive a salary of $2,500 
a year. All contracts that shall be made by 
emigrants to the United States in foreign coun- 
tries, in conformity to regulations that may be 
established by the said Commissioner, whereby 
emigrants shall pledge the wages of their labor 
for a term not exceeding twelve months, to repay 
the expenses of their emigration, shall be held 
to be valid in law, and may be enforced in the 
courts of the United States, or of the several 
States and Territories ; and such advances, if so 
stipulated in the contract, and the contract be 
recorded in the recorder's office in the county 
where the emigrant shall settle, shall operate as 
a lien upon any land thereafter acquired by the 
emigrant, whether under the homestead law 
when the title is consummated or on property 
otherwise acquired, until liquidated by th« emi- 
grant; but nothing herein contained shall be 
deemed to authorize any contract contravening 
the Constitution of the United States or creating 
in any way the relation of slavery or servitude. 
No emigrant to the United States who shall ar- 
rive after the passage of this act shall be com- 
pulsively enrolled for military service during the 
existing insurrection, unless such emigrant shall 
voluntarily renounce under oath his allegiance 
to the country of his birth afld declare his in- 
tention to become a citizen of the United States. 
There shall be established in the city of New 
York an office to be known as the United States 
Emigrant Office ; and there shall be appointed 
an officer for said city, to be known as superin- 
tendent of immigation. And such superintend- 
ent shall, under the direction of the Commis- 
sioner of Immigration, make contracts with the 
different railroads and transportation companies 
of the United States for transportation tickets, 
to be furnished to such immigrants, and to be 
paid for by them, and shall, under such rules as 
may be prescribed by the Commissioner of Im- 
migration, protect such immigrants from impo- 
sition and fraud, and shall furnish them such in- 
formation and facilities as will enable them to 
proceed in the cheapest and most expeditious 
manner to the place of their destination. And 
such superintendent of immigration shall per- 
form such other duties as may be prescribed by 
the Commissioner of Immigration. No person 
shall be qualified to fill any office imder this act 
who shall be directly or indirectly interested in 
any corporation having lands for sale to immi- 
grants, or in the carrying or transportation of 
immigrants, either from foreign countries to the 
United States and its Territories or to any part 
thereof, or who shall receive any fee or reward, 
or the promise thereof, for any service performed 
or any benefit rendered to any person or persons 
in the line of his duty under this act. And if 
any officer provided for by this act shall receive 
from any person or company any fee or reward, 
or promise thereof, for any services performed 
or any benefit rendered to any person or persons 
in the line of his duty under this act, he shall, 
upon conviction, be fined one thousand dollars 
or be imprisoned, not to exceed three years, at 
the discretion of a court of competent jurisdic- 
tion, and forever after be ineligible to hold any 
office of honor, trust, or profit in the United 
States. Said Commissioner of Immigration shall 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



at the commencement of each annual meeting 
of Congress submit a detailed report of the for- 
eign immigration during the preceding year, and 
a detailed account of all expeuditures under this 

Chap. CCXLA'II.—/*c»sioH.s.— Biennial exam- 
inations of pensioners may be made by one sur- 
geon only, if of the army or navy, or duly ap- 
pointed by the commissioner ; nor shall a certifi- 
cate of two unappointed civil surgeons be ac- 
cepted in any case, except on evidence that an 
examination by a duly appointed is impractica- 
ble. Fees paid examining surgeons shall be re- 
funded by the Pension Agent; and declarati^ons 
of pension claims shall be made before a court of 
record, or some officer having custody of its seal. 
The Commissioner of Pensions is authorized to 
detail clerks in his office to investigate suspected 
attempts at fraud on the Pension Office, and to 
aid in prosecuting the offenders. Persons who 
have lost both feet, in military service in the line 
of duty, shall have twenty dollars a month ; and 
those who, imder the same conditions, have lost 
both hands or both eyes, have a pension of 
twenty-five dollars a month. No pension claims 
now on file, unless prosecuted to a successful is- 
sue witiiin three .years, and no claim hereafter 
filed not brought to a successful issue within five 
years from the date of filing, shall be admitted, 
without satisfacfory evidence from the War De- 
partment to establish the same. On the re-mar- 
riage of any widow receiving a jiension, the pen- 
sion shall tenninate, and not be renewed should 
she again become a widow. Examining surgeons, 
duly appointed, may be required, from time to 
time, to make special examinations of pension- 
ers, in their respective districts, and such exam- 
inations shall have precedence over those pre- 
viously made, whether specially or biennially. 
Volunteers, not regularly enlisted, who have 
been disabled by wounds, are to have the bene- 
fits of the pension laws, provided their claims 
are presented within three years. If any person 
is entitled to the invalid pension, and dies while 
the application is pending, his widow will receive 
it. Enlisted soldiers, who have become disabled 
in the sorvice, whether they are regularly mus- 
tered in or not, are entitled to the benefits of 
this act. Pension agents and attoraeys, for 
making out the necessary papers to establish a 
claim to pension or bounty, shall receive the fol- 
lowing fees: for executing a declaration, with 
necessary aflSdavits, and forwarding the same, 
with correspondence, ten dollars ; wliich shall be 
j in full for all services, and not be demanded or 
I received until the pension is obtained. Any 
j transgression of this provision is a high misde- 
I meanor, punishable by fine of three hundred 
' dollars, tir imprisonment for two years, or both. 
I AVidows and children of colored soldiers, who 
; may become entitled to pensions, may receive 
i them, without other proof of marriage than that 
the parties had habitually recognized each other 
as man and wife, and lived together as such for 
a period, preceding the soldier's enlistment, of 
not less than two years, provided that such 
widows and children are free. If such parties 
reside in a State in which their marriage may 
have been legally solemnized, the usual evidence 
is required. 

Chap. CCXLXIII.— He! ief of ,?«a»)c«.— Pro- 
vides for settling accounts of seamen and others, 



not officers, of any vessel of the na\-y which may 
have been wrecked, or unheard of so long that 
her wreck may be presumed, or destroyed, or 
lost. 

Ca.w. CCXUX.—Passetigers at &r/.— Pro- 
vides additional safeguards for passengers, by 
steam or other vessels, coastwise to and from the 
Pacific States. 

Chap. CCLIII. — Quartennasiei-''s Depart- 
inent. — This act provides, at great length, for re- 
organizing and systematizing the Quartermas- 
ter's Department of the army. 

PUBLIC RESOLUTIONS. 

No. 1. Thanks of Congress to Major-General 
Grant, and his officers and soldiers, including a 
gold medal to the General. 

No. 2. Thanks of Congress to Capt. Rodgers, 
of the navy. 

No. 5. Continues bounties heretofore paid by 
the War Department to men enlisted for three 
years, or during the war. 

No. 7. Thanks to General Banlcs, officers and 
soldiers. 

No. 8. Thanks to General Burnside, officers 
and men. 

No. 9. Thanks to General Hooker, General 
Meade, General Howard, and the officers and 
men of the Anny of the Potomac. 

No. 10. Thanks to Cornelius Vanderbilt for the 
gift of the steamship "Vanderbilt." 

No. 12. Thanks to General Sherman, officers 
and soldiers. 

No. 16. Thanks to the volunteer soldiers, who 
have re-enlisted in the army. 

No. 17. Extends bounties to veterans, re-en- 
listing. 

No. IS. Thanks to Commodore Ringgold, and 
the officers and crew of the "Sabine." 

No. 20. Authorizes the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury to anticipate the paj-ment of Interest on the 
public debt. 

No. 22. Thanks to Admiral David D. Porter. 

No. 25. Directing an examination into the 
Fort Pillow massacre. 

No. 27. Increases the duty on imports fifty 
per cent, for sixty days from the 2t)th of April, 
excepting on printing paper. 

No. 28. Provides for paying the hundred-day 
volunteers. 

No. 29. Directs the Secretary of War to print 
the official reports of the operations of the Uni- 
ted States armies, and to have the same bound 
in volumes and indexed. 

No. 32. Provides for the election of a Member 
of Congress, at large, in Illinois. 

No. 40. Thanks to Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, 
Fourth regiment Wisconsin Volunteers, for dis- 
tinguished services in the Red River campaign. 
[Saving the gunboat flotilla by running it over 
the falls of that river.] 

No. 49. Continues the increased duties on im- 
ports, until the 1st of July, 1864. 

No. 5;}. Authorizes the Postmaster-General to 
extend and contract all the Overland Mail Com- 
pany. 

No. 64. Provides for the publication of a com- 
plete Army Register. 

No. 7T. This resolution imposes a s])ecial in- 
come duty, to be levied and collected on the 1st 
of October, 1864, for the year ending on the 31st 



THE TRIBUNB ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



of December, 1868, at the rate of five per cent, on 
all sums exceeding six hundred dollars clear In- 
come; to be assessed and collected under the 
rules of the Internal Revenue Department. 



PR0CLAMATI0K9. 

No. 15. This proclamation, dated July 5th, 
1864, suspends the writ of habeas coipus in Ken- 
tucky, and declares martial-law throughout the 
State; but it is not to interfere in any lawful 
elections, or with any constitutional proceedings 
of the legislature or the administration of jus- 
tice in courts of law, so far as they do not affect 
military operations. 

TXo.ii.— The Pre-^idenVs Plan for liecon- 
etfuction. — Just before the adjournment of Con- 
gress a bill was passed to " Guarantee to certain 
States whose governments have been usurped or 
overthrown, a republican form of government." 
This bill provided for the appointment of a pro- 
visional governor in each State, and, as soon as 
military resistance had ceased and the people re- 
turned to obedience, an enrollment to be made of 
all white male citizens, designating those who 
take and those who refuse the oath of allegiance. 
If those who take the oath are a majority, the 
governor shall invite the people to elect a con- 
vention to re-establish their State government in 
conformity with the Constitution of the United 
States. The bill provided the mode of electing 
and assembling such conventions, and enacted 
the following restrictions upon their action: 
" That the convention shall declare, on behalf of 
the people of the State, their submission to the 
Constitution and laws of the United States, and 
shall adopt the following provisions, hereby pre- 
scribed by the United States in the execution of 
the constitutional duty to guarantee a republican 
form of government to every State, and incor- 
porate them in the constitution of the State, that 
xs to say : Fi?:<<t — Noperson who has held or ex- 
ercisedany office, civil or military, except offices 
merely ministerial, and military offices below the 
grade of colonel. State or Confederate, under the 
usurping power, shall vote for or be a member of 
the legislature, or governor. Second — Involun- 
tary servitude is forever prohibited, and the 
freedom of all persons is guaranteed in said 
State. Third— No debt. State or Confederate, 
created by or under the sanction of the usurping 
power, shall be recognized orpaidbythe State." 
Constitutions made or amended by these conven- 
tions were to be submitted to the people, "and 
if a majority of the votes cast shall be for the 
constitution and form of government, he shall 
certify the same, with a copy thereof, to the Pres- 
ident of the United States, who, after obtaining 
the assent of Congress, shall, by proclamation, 
recognize the government so established, and 
none other, as the constitutional government of 
the State, and from the date of such recognition, 
and not before. Senators and Kepresentatives, 
and electors for President and Vice-President 
may be elected in such State, according to the 
laws of the State and of the United States." In 
case the conventions refuse to establish govern- 
ments in accordance with this act, the govemoi-s 
were to dissolve them and order new elections. It 
was also enacted that until the United States shall 
have recognized a republican form of State gov- 
ernment, the provisional governor in each of said 



States shall see that this act, and the laws of the 
United States, and the laws of the btate in force 
when the State government was overthrown by 
the rebellion, are faithfully executed within the 
State ; but no law or usage whereby any person 
was heretofore held in involuntary servitude 
shall be recognized or enforced by any court or 
officer in such State, and the laws for the trl'itl 
and punishment of white persons shall extend to 
all persons, and jurors shall have the qualifica- 
tions of voters under this law for delegates to 
the convention. That until the recognition of a 
State government the provisional governor shall 
cause to be assessed, levied, and collected, for the 
year 1864, and every year thereafter, the t^es 
provided by the laws of such State to be levie* 
during the fiscal year preceding the overthrow 
of the State government. That all persons hetd 
to involuntary servitude or labor in the States 
aforesaid are hereby emancipated and discharged 
therefrom, and they and their posterity shall be 
forever free. And if any such persons or their 
posterity shall be restrained of liberty, under 
pretence of any claim to such service or labor, 
the courts of the United States shall, on habeas 
corpus, discharge them. That if any person de- 
clared free by this act, or any law of the United 
States, or any proclamation of the President, be 
restrained of liberty, with intent to be held in or 
reduced to involuntary servitude or labor, the 
person convicted before a court of competent ju- 
risdiction of such act shall be punished by fine 
of not less than fifteen hundred dollars, and be 
imprisoned not less than five nor more than 
twenty years. That every person who shall 
hereafter hold or exercise any office, civil or 
military, except offices merely ministerial, and 
military offices below the grade of colonel, in 
the rebel service, State or Confederate, is here- 
by declared not to be a citizen of the United 
States. 

This act the President did not sign, but gave 
it publication by a proclamation, in which he 
said : "That, while I am (as I was in December 
last, when by proclamation I propounded a plan 
for ifestoration) unprepared by a formal approval 
of this bill, to be inflexibly committed to any 
single plan of restoration ; and, while I am also 
unprepared to declare that the free State consti- 
tutions and governments already adopted and 
installed in Arkansas and Louisiana shall be set 
aside and held for nought, thereby repelling and 
discouraging the loyal citizens who have set up 
the same as to further effort, or to declare a con- 
stitutional competency in Congress to abolish 
slavery in States, but am at the same time sin- 
cerely hoping and expecting that a constitutional 
amendment abolishing slavery throughout the 
nation may be adopted, nevertheless I am fully 
satisfied with the system for restoration con- 
tained in the bill as one very proper plan for the 
loyal people of any State choosing to adopt it, 
and that I am, and at all times shall be, prepared 
to give the executive aid an ' assistance to any 
such people, so soon as the military resistance to 
the United States shall have been suppressed in 
any such State, and the people thereof shall have 
sufficiently returned to their obedience to the 
Constitution and the laws of the United States, 
in which cases military governors will be ap- 
pointed, with directions to proceed according to 
the biU." 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1SG5. 



BEBEL GOVERNMENT, 1864. 

EXECUTIVE. 

P»-««iy-?H<-.JEFFERSOX DAVIS, of Miss. 
Tice-Pre-wlenl-AhEX . II. STEPHENS, of Ga. 
Sec. Q/Stale-JVD An P BENJAMIN, of La. 
Sec. of l('«r— JAlsres A. SEDDON, of Va. 
Ser. or Tre(M.—JAS. L. TSENHOLM, of S. C. 
,»!«.<:'>■ A'aiy/— STEPHEN R. M.U.LOBY,of Fla. 
Attorne>/-General—GEOB(iE DAVIS, of N. C. 



SECOSD BEQVLAR COXGJiESS. 
THE SENATE. 
Robert M. T. Huntek, of Va., Pres. pro tern. 
.James B. Nasii, of S. C, SecreUtry. 
Alabama.— Rd.AVilfteAValker,Robt.Jami8on. 
Arkansas.— R. "W. .Johnson, Aug. P. Garland. 
Floeida.— .Taa. M. Bakf.r, Ang. E. Maxwell. 
•Geokgia.— HerBC. V. Jolinson, Benj. H. Hill. 
KENxrcKT.- \Vm. E. Simni9,H. C. Burnett. 
Louisiajja.— E. Sparrow, Thos. J. Semmes. 
Mississippi.- J. W. C. Watson, A. G. Brown. 
MissoTTP.i.— L. M. Loais, W. P. Johnson. 
N. Cakolina.— W. A. Graham, W.T. Dortch. 
S. Carolnia.— Jas. L. Orr, Rob. W. BtirnwcU. 
Tennessee.— G. A. Hcury . Laugd. C. Haynes. 
Texas.-W. S. Oldham, Louis T. Wigfall. 
ViEamiA.— R.M. T. Hunter, A. T. Caperton. 
EEPRESEN f ATI YES. 
Thomas S. Booock, ot Virginia, Speaker. 
Albert R. Lamar, of Gsorgia, Clerk. 
Alabama.— 1 Thomas J. Foater, 2 Wm. R. 
Smith, 3 Wm'en R. \V. Cobb, 4 M. H. Cruik- 
Bhank, 5 Francis S. Lyon, "\Vm. P. Chilton, 

7 D. Clopton, 8 Jas. L. Pugh, 9 J. S. Dickinson. 
Ar.KANSAS.— 1 Felix I. Batson,2 Rnfas K. Gar- 
land, S [Vacancy,] 4 Thomas B. Hanly. 

Florida.- 1 St. Geo. Rogers, 2 R. B. Hilton. 
Georgia.— 1 Julian Hanridge, 2 W.E. Smith, 

8 Mark H. Blanford, 4 Clifford Anderson, 5 J. 
T. Shewmake, G J.H.Echols, 7 Jas. M. Smith, 
8 Geo. N. Lester, 9 H. P. Bell, 10 Warren Aiken. 

Kentucky.— 1 Wm. B. Machen, 2 Geo. W. 
Triplott, SHenrv E. Read, 4 Geo. W. Ewing, 
5 Jas. S. Chrisman, G Theo. L. Burnett, 7 H. W . 
Bruce, 8 Humphrey Marshall, 9 Ely M. Bruce, 
10 J. AV. Moore, 11 B. F. Bradley, 12 .J. M. Elliott. 

LocisiANA.— 1 Chas. J. Villere, 2 Charles M. 
Conrad, 3 Duncan F. Kenner,4Lacius J Dapre, 
G John Perkins, Jr. 

MipsTssTT'pr.— 1 John A. Orr, 2 TV. D Holden, 
3 Israel V.'elsh, 4 Hen. C. Chambers, 5 Otho R. 
Slnclcton G Elh. Barksdale, T J. T. Lumpkin. 

Missouri.- IThos. L. Snead, 2 N. L. >orton, 
3 John B. Clark, 4 A. H. Courow, 5 George G. 
Vest, 6 Peter S. Wilkes 7 R. A. Hatcher. 

North Carolina— 1 W. H. N. Smith, 2 Eobt. 
E. Brldgers, 3 J. T. Leach, 4 Thomas C. Fuller, 
5. Josiah Turner, Jr^ 6 John A. Gilmer, 7 Jas. 
M. Leach, H James G. Ramsey, 9 Benjamin S. 
Gaithcr, 10 Geo. W. Logan. 

South CAr.onNA.— 1 J. S. "Witherspoon, 2^. 
P. Miles, 3 Lewis M. Ayer, 4 Wm. V>. Simpson, 
5 James Farrow, 6 Wm. W. Boyce. 

Tennessee.— 1 Joseph B. Heiskell, 3 Wm. G. 
Swan, S A. S. Coly ar, 4 John P. Murray ,5 Henry 
S. Foote, 6 E. A. Kecble, 7 James M. Cnllom, 8 
Thomas Menees, 9 J. D. C. Adkins, 10 John V. 
Wright, 11 tJ. W. Cluskcy. 

Texas.-I Stephen H. Darden, 2 Claib. C. 
Herbert, 3 A. U. Branch, 4 Frank B. Sexton, 
5 J. R. Baylor, f. S. H. Morgan. 

ViKOiNiA.— 1 Robt. L. Jfontagne, 2 Robt. H. 
Whitfield, 3 Wm. C. Wickham, 4 1 lios. S. Ghol- 
son, SThos. S. Bocock, 6 John Goode, Jr., 7 
Wm. C. Rives, 8 D. C. Do Jarnette, David 
Fnnsten, 10 F. W. M. Holliday, 11 Jolin B. 
Baldwin, 12 Waller U. Staples, 13 Fayette 
McMullen, 14 Samuel Miller, 15 Robert John- 
ston, K) Chas. W. Russell. 

Territorial Delecsates.— Arizona, M. H. 
MacwlUie ; Oicrokee Nation, E. C. Boudinot ; 
Choctaw Nation, R. M. Jones ; Creek and Semi- 
nole Nations, S. B. Callalian. 



I THE PLATFORMS OF 1864. 

UNION PLATFORM. 

I The National Convention which assembled at 
Baltimore on the 7th of June, 1S&4, and there 

i nominated ABRAHAM LINCOLN for re-election 
as President, with ANDREW JOHNSON as Vice- 

I President, adopted and presented to the Ameri- 

i can people the following : 

1 JiewlveJ, That it is the highest duty of every 
American citizen to maintain against all their 
enemies the integrity of the Union, and the 
paramount authority of the Constitution and 
laws of the United States; and that, laying 
aside all differences of political opinion, we 
pledge ourselves as Union men, animated Dy a 
common sentiment, and aiming at a common 
object, to do everything in our power to aid the 
Government in quelling by force of arras the re- 
bellion now raging against its authority, and in 
bringing to the punishment due to their crimes, 
the rebels and traitors arrayed against it. 

Resolved, That we approve the determination 
of the Government of the United States not to 
compromise with rebels, nor to offer any terms 
of peace except such as may be based upon an 
"unconditional surrender" of their hostility 
and a return to their just allegiance to the Con- 
stitution and laws of the United States, and that 
we call upon the Government to maintain this 
position and to prosecute the war with the ut- 
most possible vigor to the complete suppression 
of the Rebellion, in full reliance upon the self- 
sacrifice, the patriotism, the heroic valor, and 
the undying devotion of the American people to 
their country and its free institutions. 

Resolved, That, as Slavery was the cause, 
and now constitutes the strength, of this rebel- 
lion, and as it must be always and everywhere 
hostile to the principles of republican govern- 
ment, justice and the national safety demand its 
utter and complete extirpation from the soil of 
the republic; and that we uphold and maintain 
the acts and proclamations by which the Govern- 
ment, In its own defense, has aimed a death- 
blow at this gigantic evil. We are in favor, 
furthermore, of such an amendment to the Con- 
stitution, to be made by the people in conformity 
with its provisions, as shall terminate and for- 
ever prohibit the existence of Slavery within 
the limits of the jurisdiction of the United 
States. 

Rewired, That the thanks of the American 
People are due to the soldiers and sailors of the 
Army and Navy, who have periled their lives in 
defense of their country, and in vindication of 

] the honor of the Dag ; that the nation owes to 
them some permanent recognition of their pat- 
riotism and valor, and ample and permanent 
provision for those of their survivors who have 
received disabling and honorable wounds in the 
service of the country ; and that the memories 
of those who have fallen in its defense shall be 
held in grateful and everlasUug remembrance. 

/le^o? ret/, That we approve and applaud the 
practical wisdom, the unselfish patriotism, and 
unswei-ving fidelity to the Constitution and the 
principles of American liberty, witli which 
Abraham Lincoln has discharged, under circum- 
stances of unparalleled difficulty, the great duties 
and responsibilities and of the Presidential 
office; that we approve and bulorse, as de- 
manded by the emergency and essential to the 
preaerration of the nation, and as within the 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



35 



Constitution, the measures and acts whicli he 
has adopted to defend the nation against its 
open and secret foes ; that we approve especially 
the Proclamation of Emancipation, and the em- 
ployment as Union soldiers of men heretofore 
held in Slavery; and that we have full confi- 
dence in his determination to carry these and 
all other constitutional measures essential to 
the salvation of the country into full and com- 
plete effect. 

Resolved, That we deem it essential to the 
general welfare that harmony should prevail in 
the National councils, and we regard as worthy 
of public confidence and ofBcial trust those only 
who cordially indorse the principles proclaimed 
in these resolutions, and which should charac- 
terize the administration of the Government. 

lieftolrejl , That the Government owes to all 
men employed in its armies, without regard to 
distinction" of color, the full protection of the 
laws of war; and that any violation of these 
laws or of the usages of civilized nations in the 
time of war by the Rebels now in arms, should 
be made the subject of full and prompt redress. 

Bexolved., That the foreign immigration, which 
in the past has added so much to the wealth and 
development of resources and increase of power 
to this nation, the asylum of the oppressed of 
all nations, should be fostered and encouraged 
by a liberal and just policy. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of the speedy 
construction of a Railroad to the Pacific. 

Resolved, That the National faith, pledged for 
the redemption of the Public Debt, must be 
kept inviolate; and that for this pm-pose we 
I recommend economy and rigid responsibility in 
the public expenditui*es, and a vigorous and just 
sj'stem of taxation ; that it is the duty of every 
loyal State to sustain the credit and promote the 
use of the National Currency. 

Resolved, That we approve the position taken 
by the Government that tlie people of the United 
States never regarded with indifference the at- 
tempt of any European power to overthrow by 
force, or to supplant by fraud, the institutions of 
any republican government on the western con- 
tinent, and that they view with extreme jealousy, 
as menacing to the peace and independence of 
this our country, the efforts of any such power to 
obtain new footholds for monarchical govern- 
ments, sustained by a foreign military force, in 
nea proximity to the United States. 

DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM. 

The Democratic National Convention which 
gathered at Chicago on the 29th of August, and 
presented the names of GEORGE B. McCLEL- 
LAN for President, and GEORGE H. PENDLE- 
TON for Vice-President, agreed on and adopted 
the following : 

Re°.olved, That in the future, as in the past, 
we will adhere with unswerving fidelity to the 
Union under the Constitution, as the only solid 
foundation of our strength, security, and happi- 
ness as a people, and as a framework of govern- 
ment equally conducive to the welfare and pros- 
I perity of all the States, both Northern and 
! Southern. 

j Resolverl, That this Convention does ex- 

I plicitly dec!?re, as the sense of the American 

i People, that, .il't'T four years of failure to restore 

the Union iiy the experiment of war, diuring 

which, under the pretense of a military neces- 



sity of a war power higher than the Constitution, 
the Constitution itself has been disregarded in 
every part, and public liberty and private right 
alike trodden down, and the material prosperity 
of the country essentially imvaired, justice, hu- 
manity, liberty, and the public welfare, demand 
that immediate efforts be made for a cessation 
of hostilities, with a view to an ultimate Con- 
vention of all the States, or other peaceable 
means to the end that at the earliest practicable 
moment peace may be restored on the basis of 
the Federal Union of the States. 

Reaolved, That the direct interference of the 
military authority of the United States in the 
recent elections held in Kentucky, Maryland, 
Missouri and Delaware, was a shameful violation 
of the Constitution, and the repetition of such 
acts in the approaching election will be held as 
revolutionary, and resisted with all the means 
and power under our control. 

Reiiohied, That the aim and object of the 
Democratic party is to preserve the Federal 
Union and the rights of the States unimpaired ; 
and they hereby declare that they consider the 
Administrative usurpation ot extraordinary and 
dangerous powers not granted by the Constitu- 
tion, the subversion of the civil by military law 
in States not in insurrection, the arbitrary mili- j 
tary arrest, imprisonment, trial and sentence of 
American citizens in States where civil law 
exists in full foi-ce, the suppression of freedom 
of speech and of the press, the denial of the 
right of asylum, the open and avowed disregard 
of State right*, the employment of unusual test- 
oaths, and the interference with and denial of 
the right of the people to bear arms, as calcu- 
lated to prevent a restoration of the Union and 
the perpetuation of a government deriviug its 
just powers from the consent of the go\ erned. 

Renolved, That the shameful disregard of the 
Administration to its duty in respect to our fel- 
low-citizens who now and long have been pris- 
oners of war in a suiTering condition, deserves 
the severest reprobation, on the scora alike of 
public interest and common humanity. 

Renolved, That the sympathy of "tlhe Demo- 
cratic party is heartily and earnestly extended 
to the soldiery cf our army, who are and have 
been in the field under the flag of our country ; 
and, in the event of oui- attaining power, they 
will receive all the care and protection, regard 
and kindness, that the brave soldiers of the Re- 
public have so nobly earned. 

TSNNBSSEJB. 

An election was held for President, and votes 

were returned from oi coanties and about 13 



contest. Proclamation of the election of Elect- 
ors was mads by the Governor. 

TERBITOBIES. 

AnizoNA.— A Delegate to Congress and Leg- 
islalTiro were chosen in July. l<hr Dekaau : 
Charles D. Poston, Union, D14; Charles Lieb, 
Dein., 220 ; scattering, 145. 

Idaho.— Jilection held In October. Hol- 

brook,Oe)ji., chosen Delegate to Congress over 
— Parks, t/nVon, by asmall malorlty. 

SIONTANA.— W. F. Saunders, hnion, wm 

elected Delegate over Samael M. Lano, Dent. 

Nebraska.— Vote for Delegate: Hitchcoct, 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



THE SLAVEHOLDERS' REBELLION. 

BRIEF CHRONICLE OF EVENT&- Continued /rom Tribune Almanac for 186i. 



1863^Dec. 1.— Hooker retires from Ringgold, 
and Army of Cmnberland again concentrates 

at Cbattanooga Meade recrosses the Rapi- 

dan .... RebelBalt Works, worth three millions, 
destroyed at St. Andrews Sound, Fla. 

Dec. 2.— Village for the Contrabands at Ar- 
lington Heights detUcated . 

Dec. 3.— Sherman's Cavalry near Knoxvllle. 

Dec. 4.— Knoxvllle, Tenn., Longstreet raises 
"»ge of, and retreats towards VIrelnla. 

5ee. 6.— Chesapeake, steamer, seized by rebel 



tor, founders at Charleston Harbor, with all on 
board. 
Dec. 7.— Jefferson Davis Issues his annual 

message U. S. Congress reassembles. 

Dec. 8.— President Lmcolnlssues his Message 
and Proclamation of Amnesty. 

Dec. 11.— Fort Sumter vigorously bombarded 
and partly set on fire. 

Dec. 14.— Bean Station, Va., Longstreet at- 
tacks Union Cavalry under Shackeliord. Reb- 
els lose 800 killed and wounded ; Union loss 
200. 

Dec. 16.— Buford, MaJ.-Gen. John, died at 
Washington.... Virginia and Tennessee Kail- 
road, Averill destroys 15 miles of. 

Dec. 17.— Sangster's, Rebel Cavalry attack 
Meade's commxmlcatlonfl at, and are repulsed. 
Van Brunt, Com. G. J., died at Dedham, 
Jiass, aged 64. . . .Chesapeake, The, recaptured 
In Sambro Harbor by the Ella and Annie. All 
crew but three escape. , _ 

Dec. 18.— Col. Philips, with Indian brigade 
beats and scatters Quantrell's force near Fort 
Gibson, killing 50. , , ^ 

Dec. 19.— Fort Gibson, Ai-k., attacked by 
Standthwalte with 1,600 men. Standthwalte 
repulsed. 

Dec. 22.— Gen. Corcoran killed by a fall from 
his horse .... An expedition from Beaufort 
starts inland under Gen. Seymour. . . .An expe- 
dition of one white and three colored regi- 
ments, starts for Red River from Port Hudson, 
under Gen. Ullman. 

Dec.23.— Longstreet's soldiers are deserting 
30 to SOper day .... Union raid on Luray. Large 
quantifies o Heather, bacon, &c., captured — 
Ferry boat at Memphis attacked by guerrillas 
who killed the captain. The boat escaped. 

Dec. 24.— Choctaw Indians and their Chief 
abandon the Rebel cause.... Christmas Eve 
salute of shotted guns to Rebels at Charleston. 
Reeves, with 150 guerrillas, surprises Cen- 
tervllle. Mo., and captures garrison of 50 men 
Sd M. S. M....Lcgarevllle, 8. C, attacked by 
Rebels, who are driven off. 

Dec. 25.— Pulaski, Tenn., 50 Forrest's guer- 
rillas captured by Gen. Dodge Gen. Sulli- 
van's expedition from Harper's Ferry returns 
with 100 prisoners and 100 horses. . . .Gen. Banks 
establishes Department of the frontier on the 
Rio Grande.... British bark Circassian seized 
In North River by U. S. Marshal.... Gunboat 
Marblehead attacked at St. Johns' Island, by 
rebels on shore wltli battery, and repulses 
them. Loss, 3 killed, 5 wounded. 

Dec. 26.— Dr. Segar, Mr. Perez, and Mr. Car- 
ter, sent to Fort Lafayette for smuggling arms 

to Rebels Dictator, turretea Iron-clad, 

launched at New Torlv. , ,. 

Dec. 28.— Richardson crossed our lines on his 
way South.... Charleston, Tenn., Rebel Gen. 
"WTieelcr, with 1,500 men attacks Col. Llobcrt 
and supply train; captures the latter; Col. 
Long re-enforces Llebort and Rebels are 
beaten, losing 121 prisoners. 



Dec. 29.— Wheeler captures and conscripts all 
stragglers. . . .Part of Union train captured by 
Rebels at Williamsport, Va. 

Dec. 80.— Great naval expedition leaves New 
Orleans, supposed for Mobile. 

Dec. 31.— Seizure of large quantity of Con- 
federate money In New York, and arrest of 
the printers. . . .McChesney's expedition meets 
rebels near Washington, N. C, routs them. Mils 
Lieutenant and five men, captures one cannon 
and ten men. 

1864— Jan. 1.— Gov. Bramlette, of Ky., orders 5 
Rebel sympathizers to be arrested for every 
loyal citizen taken by guerrillas.... Colored 
inhabitants of Norfolk celebrate their first An- 
niversary of Freedom.... Meeting at Cooper 



Institute for same purpose Asmallforce of 

Union pickets are driven In at Winchester. 

Jan. 2.— Major Anthony and Lt. Davis, Reb'els, 
sent to Fort Warren for 15 years for recruiting 
within the Union lines.... Rebel attack on 
Union train at Moorfield and Allegany Junc- 
tion ; 13 Rebels killed and 20 wounded — Union 
guard, one companv, at Patterson's Creek, 
captured by 500 Rebel cavalry. Next day are 
retaken and cavalry routed. 

Jan. 3.— Rebel Sam Jones captures 300 Union 
troops at JonesvlUe, Va., killing and wounding 
eoofthem. 

Jan. 4.— Gen. Grlerson is pursuing Forrest 
south of Cold Water. „ „ ^ , 

Jan. 6.— Klrby Smith commands all Rebal 
force (15,000) west of Mississippi River — Mar- 
maduke and Price are at Arkadelphia and 
Little Rock,wlth 7,000, mostly cavalry. 

Jan. 8.— Rebel obstructions In Charleston 
Harbor mostly washed ashore.... A Loyal 
Mass Meeting held at New Orleans to consider 
formation or a Free State Gorernment — 
Com. Storer, U. S. N., dicd....Fitzhugh Lee 
surrounds, and Is beaten from, Pittsburgh, Va. 

Jan. 9 —Rebel Cavalry conscripted every 
man in Cleveland, Term. 

Jan. 10.— Sharp cavalry fight at Strawberry 
Plains. Rebels repulsed with serious loss . . . 
Rebel Lieutenant and squad of men desert to 

our lines from Price's army Cole's Battalion 

of Maryland Cavalry attacked in Virginia by 
Mosbv, with 400 Rebels, who are defeated with 
loss of four ofllcers and many men. 

Jan. 11.— Longstreet is fortifying at Bull's 
Gap, Tenn., his force 84,000 infantry and 12,000 

cavalry Gunboat Iron Age aground under 

Rebel fire at Wilmington harbor. 

Jan. 12.— Gen. Marston makes an extensive 
raid in Virginia, capturing much gram and 
pork, and other rebel property, and taking A) 
prisoners, many horses, mules, sheep, &c.... 
Part of McCooli's cavalry light with 8th and 
11th Texas, at Mossy Creek, Tenn., killing U 
and capturing 41. „ , , 

Jan. 14.— Two hundred Rebels attempt to 
capture small cavalry force at Three Mile Sta- 
tlon,Va., and are repulsed. . . .Rebel Gen.Vance 
captures Union supply trains near Temsvillo, is 
pursued bv Col. Palmer, who takes him and 
ofllcers prisoners recaptures train, 150 horses, 
arms, &c.... Union soldier found hanging at 
Smith Mills. Va., placarded. Hung by order of 
Gen. Wild In retaliation... .SturglB^ Cavalry 
drive Rebel videttcsoutof nalnbrldge.butfall 
back, enemy being in strong force beyond. 

Jan. 17.— Scout reports 3,000 Rebels at Point 
Pelee, Canada, preparing for a dash on John- 
son's Island.... Desperate attack on our lines 
near Bainbridge, Tenn. Rebels ultimately de- 
feated, losing heavily. Union army fell back 
to Strawberry Plains. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



Z1 



Feb. 3.-Smlth'8 Cavalry expedition leaves 
- - • ■■— of MisBlsBippl and Ala- 



1 Corinth for interior 



jMi. 18.-Fif teen Rebels attack Union pickets 

^j\^"l)"-Gin'woodb^7 takes an expedi- \ SMger. LeVs'rebel cavalry fleeing to 
tlon tb Pinta Kpsa to cut off Rebel cattle sup- . Canton. conscripts in Virginia to re. 



army at Cbattamooga. On i .th lc.0 deserted, 

Jan. 23.-Union foray at Brandon FaiTns on 
James River, captures 22 rebels 7 signal men, 
99 negroes; destroys 24,000 Ibs.pwk, captures 
sloopT schooner, &c., without losmg a man. . . . 
600 Bebel Cavalry threatening Natchez . 
Louisiana and Texas Troops marching to Mis- 
rissippi River to blockade and obtain arms, 
&^.,^from trans-iUssissppi Department 
Union raid to Lake Phelps, N. C. Guerrillas, 
200,000 Ibs.pork, tobacco, cotton, horses, mules, 

&c., captured or destroyed. 

Jan ^.— Rhoddy driven across the Tennes- 
see losts his trains, 20 mule teams, 200 beeves. 



o'rtfbr duty— many refuse. . . .Early's cavalry 
driven out of Moorfield,and hotly pursued by 
Mulligan's cavalry.... Rebel battery at Clin- 
ton, Jjiss., driven off with loss. Union killed. 
15- VounAed,30....Winslow'8 cavalry at Can- 
ton capture many prisoners and one gun. 

Feb. 5.-Early retreats towards Shenandoah 
Valley pursued by General Kelley.... Navajo 
Indians defeated near Fort Sumner. KjHed, 
50, wounded, 25. . . .Part of Sherman's expedi- 
tion attacked on Yazoo by 3,000 rebels, who 
are, after a sharp fight, routed. . . An important 
expedition leavestortRoyal.landing at Jack- 
sonville, Fla., under Gen. Seymour...ySher- 
man's expedition reaches Pearl river. Rebels 
still retreating. . .^Gen.Lor,ng_ crosses Pearl 



Jan. 25.-Major Burroughs guerrilla chief, ridian. marched from 

B River at Bainbric 

. Bebel loss 15, a 
^'^ W^CoL'Bornc''-attacks and destroys ! re^^efThWas^SmrhisTncUans d^^^^^^^^ 
•«*^- A'-^r"„, n"™!i /lr,o,-rtc onri pnntnres ! killed and wounded, and 5U prisoners. ..Union 



iTver at Bainbridge; are repuisea ai ! river.Hurlbut's Corps crossed 5 miles above 



Union loss, 

ca^'of Rebei Home Gu^^dS; and.^^pjurei i killed and^wounded 



many prisoners.... Capt. Cady, of 24th Is. 
Battery captures five rebel murderers and 
1,000 sheep in Tysell Co., N. C. . . .Sturgis gams 
decisive victory at Sevier^nlle,over reoercav- 
alry ; 05 rebels killed and wounded, 100 pris- 
oners, and 3 guns taken. „ 

Jan.28.— A large meeting at Nashville, lenn., 
to restore State Government.... Gen. Palmer 



loss. Skilled and wounded... .Rebels still de- 
monstrating against Kewbera. 

Feb. 8.— Rebel regiment at Dalton mutiny 
rather than re-enlisi,and several men are shot. 
....Eebel army is encamped round Tunnel 
Hill, Dalton and Rome.... Rebel regiment qd. 
Ky.) mutiny at Decatur, Ala., are fired on by 
3d Alabama. 



recomioiters to Tunnel Hill, drove in rebel I ^Feb.9.- 
nickets caoturescompany of cavalry ;3,'rebel8 i burned at 
fclled. Nearly 300 sets of Rebel Salt Works 1 sonville a 



killed.... Nearly 

destroyed near St. Andrews' Bay 



bales cotton 



1,023 bales of cotton, worth 1700,000, 
Wilmington. Rebels fled from Jack- 
after burning a steamboat and 2iC 
ton. Gen. Giflmore captured lOOpris- 



Jan 29 -StSrgTsTrlfes' rebel videttes out of ; oners, 8 guiis, and much property, without 
Danville" Tenn ...Waldron, Jenn., rumored | losing a 



capture(f bv Price.... Gen. Thayer Bucceeds 
Gen. McNeil commanding District of Frontier. 



Feb. 10.— Col. Streight, and 110 other officers, 
ape from Libby Prison by tunneling, 
eb. 11.— Train on Baltimore and OhioRail- 



Quantity material destroyed.. 

Jan. 30.— Union supply tram captured near 
Petersbuig by rebels. Union loss, 30; rebel 

^°Ja'n.*31.-Over 7,300 deserters from Eragg 
since Oct. 20. . . .Hood's army retires from Ring- 
gold and Dalton... Karspn, Kit, pursues Na- 
lajos through Canon de Chelle ; S3 killed, loO 

^FX^-Bebel column in New Creek Valley 
repulsed and driven two miles Draft of oOO, 



esca 

with three brigades. ^ , ^ ^ _, 

Feb. 12.— Mosby attacks pickets at Manassas. 

Gen. Smith's expedition reaches Okolona. 

' "Feb. 13.— Gov. Bramlette issues proclamation 

for protection of fugitive slaves ; the rebempn 

of their masters barring claims of ownership. 

Feb. 14.— Capt. Marshall, 40th Massachusetts, 

surprised Gainsville, Fla. Is attacked by large 

force of rebels, and routs them, with 100 loss. 

Union loss, none; rebel loss, 40 ....Rebel Col. 

Ferguson 6urpriBe_d in ^^.^yne County, West 



lpy^Si^''^^,m rebels and captured j l^^f-^-^^^^-^^/T^g^^^^^^ 



after severe fight 



^"b'^'^^en^. Scammon and staff captured , sui-prised near "Grand Lake by guerrillaa ui 
T rPhpilbn S S Levi .Union re-enforce- Union dress. All killed but two. Some shot 
7 rebels on b._b. i^evi....Lm ^^^^^^^^^ after surrender.... Sherman 'sespeditionoccu- 
captnre and blow pies Meridian; destroys the State arsenal and 
fewbern, N. C... ! great quantities of supplies and ammunition. 
Creek Bridge cap- i Smith's expetUtlon destroys a ^:^st Quantity of 



back to Kinaton.. . . .RebeU 



fc^'f^r bri^'^filhrby sS'i^beU^^^^^^^^ I r"eTeT ^oTn" at-EgyptV Miss. . ■ -Feb. H to 21- 
re;r^n;^?dlf by^rc.enForcemeutB,ana prls- ! ^^^-^;,^i^,^'Xi^'^^^^^i^^^,;^^t 



THE TRIBUNE ALMAXAC FOR 



Marlon, Quitman, Hillsboro', Canton.Lake Sta- 
tion, Decatur, Bolton , and Lauderdale Springs, 
destroyina; immense quantities of stores of all 
kinds. . . .Feb. 11— Cattle depot at Waterproof, 
La., garrison of 400 negroes attacked by rebel 
infantry, cavalry, and artillery, who are re- 
pulsed three times, and retire. 

Feb. 13.— The Cliesapeake handed to OT.ners. 

Feb. 13.— Gen. Pickett accused of hanging 
51 negroes, captm-ed at ?sewtern. 

Feb. 1?.— Sherman's army ari Ives at Quitman, 
Ga., without opposiilon. . . .llonsatonic, Eloop- 
of- war, sunk at Fort " ' ' - - - 



Royal by_ rebel torpedo- 



reaciies Kaldwiu and fortifles. 

Tcb. 20.— Longstrcet retre.its from Straw- 
berry PIr.ins via iVall's Gap ?Ir.jor Cole sur- 
prises Mosljy lit Piedmont, takvjg 3 otdccrs 

and 14 men Seymour's cxp?',!iLion reaches 

Sanderson, r.dvarices G miles lieyond, is at- 
tacked bv 15,0':a rebels, fills baeic i miles to 
Olustec, and liorc forced, alter terrible slaugh- 
ter, to rttro:;t. 'x'wo negro regiments, Mth 
Mass. and Ist :m. C, cover the retreat and save 
the nrmy. Union loss, l,5v0, and many guns. 
Eebsl loss, 2,030. . . .Eev. Dr. Cox, Chaplain 2yth 
Eegt. Corps d'Afriqne, about this date taken 
from Ms house near Donaldsonville, La., and 
hant'cd by guernllas.... Smith's expedition 
moves on \vest Point, wbero Forrest, Lee, 
Chalmers, and Ehocldy attfick them. Smith 
falls back slowly with severe iigliting. 

Feb. 21.— Gen. Palmer occupies Ringgold. . . . 
Smith's forces still falling hack toward J:em- 
T-;his. ro;rc,:l- ;v;iiia attaclrs and coufinuea 
li ■' ' ' ' J "^ l.en lie ia repulsed with 

ts 150 Union cavalry 
n,;. L :\, 7 vroundcd, 75miES- 

iu;; : -o - \j,- .• J iii-Li o;'.ptured at V/arrenton 
by krjor C^iu . ...Saon^ Union column ad- 
vances from Cl-.ntt.inooga towr.rd Tunnel Hill. 

Rebel tr.iindoafroyed near Popl.ir Blnfi's, 

llo. . . .Loi'.ibi;.u.i Mato eleciioa, llichael Hahn 
elected Ciov.ofLouiEinua, by G.iBO votes against 
rellov;'S, ;?,730, and B. I'. Flandc3r8, 1,817. 

Feb. I'G.—Uncrson's and Smith's forces return 
to Memphis. Results of expedition arc 21'0 rebel 
prisoners, 1,E00 negroes, 800 horses taken; 
5,000,000 bashcle corn, 4,C'00 bales cotton, 2,0'itt 
hides, and 40 miles of Mobile and Ohio Kail- 
road Tunnel Hill occupied hy column from 

Chattanooga, after heavy skirmishing. . . .Fire 
opened unon Fort Powell, by Farragut. 

Feb. 27.— Col. Jourdan makes another dash 
into Jones and Onslow counties, N. 0. ; cap- 
tures S prisoners, and destroys stores and am- 
munition Sherman's expedition returns to 

Vickaburg after 22 days*^ raid, devastating 
many tov.np, burning bridges, seizing or de- 
stroying vajt gu.ntiiics of stores, liacratir.g 
lOjCuiO ne.aoes, taking up many^iiiles of rail- 
ways, ami talcing eou prisoners.... Union loss. 
170 kllljed and Trounded....C-ov. Goodman, of 
Arizona, with exploring party, fight with In- 
dians, killins; 5 and wounding many. 

rob. 2S.— Col. Fachardson, notorious gner- 
rllla, c:.ptuied near Cumberland River. . . .Sey- 
mour's reUenting army reaches Baldwin, 
wldch it evacuates, burning stores.... Gen. 
Kilpatric'.-, with 5,00J picked men, leaves Cul- 
pepper for a raid on Richmond, crosses the 
r.i'pirtan at Ely's Ford.snrprlsing rebel pickets 
at ^-po'i Isvlvama Com-t IIouec, and capturing 15 
and 2 oliiccrs. 

l^eb. 2'.>.— Kilnatrlck's exped. passed through 
Louisa Court fiouse, to PamunKey Brldpe, de- 
Btroylug as he went. A force Is sent by Butler 

to re-enforce him Expedition of Custar's 

cavalry cresses Rapidan aud Rivanna, destroys 
an artillery camp, Durns caissons, &c., and re- 
crosses P.ivannaliridge,bnrnlngit. Rebel cav- 
alry charged and scattered at Burton's Ford 



and Stannardsvillc roads, and Costar nafelv re- 
turns with 60 prisoners, horses, &e Rebels In 

force attack Newbern, N. C, Garrison ulti- 
mately relieved by re-enforeements. 

SI arch 1.— Rebel Government Salt Works at 
St. Marks, Fla., destroyed by expeditions from 

funboat Tahoma about this time — Gen. 
homas, re-enforced, marching against Dal- 
ton. from Tunnel Hill. 

March 2.— Re-enforeements reaching Gen. i 

Seymour at Jacksonville Ferguson, of For- I 

rest's cavalry, make dash into Marysville. 
Tenn., murders an old man in cold blood and ; 
burns his farm. , 

March 3.— Kilpatrlck's expedition moves to 
Williamsburg to rest. Many prisoners and 
stores captured and destroyed during this ! 
raid. | 

March 4.— Col. Dahlgren murdered Kll- ] 

pp.trick returns within Union lines, having de- j 
stroyed large portion of Va. Central R. R., and ; 
destroyed several mills on James River, and ; 
penetrated to outer fortifications of Richmond. ! 
Loss 150, including Col. Dahlgren. i 

March 5.— Rebel cav.ilry still scouring conn- I 
tryeastof Knoxville.... Gen. Custar, with 500 
men, crosses Ely's Ford, drives rebel pickets > 
and scouts for several miles without opposi- 
tion. . . .Rebel cavalry, in force, attack 93 of 3d , 
Tenn. at Panther Springs. Union, 2 killed, 8 
wounded, 22 prisoners. Rebel, 80 killed and 

wounded Gov. Chaise withdraws from can- i 

didacy for Presidency ... Battle in TazooCitv, 
between 11th III. and Sth La., and! rebel brl- ' 
gades. Rebels defeatedwith considerable loss. ' 
Union Wiled, 6; wounded, 20. 

March 6.— Gunboat Peterhoff sunk off Wil- 

minKton Tweuty-threo Union soldiers cap- 

ture^l from Gen. Foster's command, hung by 
rebels at Kinston— one was a drummer boy 15 ■ 

years old Sherman's main army at Jackson, 

commencing to cross Pearl River. i 

March 7.— Sherman's advance withdrawn ■ 
from Tunnel Hill to Ringgold. . . .C. L. Vallan- 
digham advises rioting In retalltticu Sher- 
man's Cavalry enter JGrandon, after skirmish- 
ing, and eiimp 2 miles east. 

March 8.— Rebel cavalry driven from cariip 
nearCarrolton. Grain mills and stores burned, i 

^ew York carries soldiers' vole amend- ' 

ment bill by popular election, by over 90,000 
majority. 

March 9.— Sherman at Hillsboro' Forty of 

30th Pa. cvv. cap'd by guerrillas at Eristow 
Station, Va. 

JIarch 10.— Suffolk, Va., capturctl by Union 

forces. E. 25 k., U. 10 3c A naval expedition 

fl'om Brashear City captures camp, arms, flag 
on Atchafalaya River... Pilatka occupied by 
Union forces.... Red River expedition em- 
barks at Vicksburg. 

March 12.— CJcn. Grant rppointed Comman- 
der-in-Chief of armies of the United States. j 

March 1?.— Indianola evac. by our troops. ... ! 
Gen. Smith's nrmy_at Semmesport. | 

Jiarch 11.— Fort ve Russy captured. I 

March 13.— President calls for 200,000 men. ... I 
Rebel plot to assassinate President Lincoln. ... ! 
Sherman repulses rebels near Chunky Creek. 

March lii.- Gov. Bramiette remonstrates 

against employment of 8l.".yes Battle near 

Fort Pillow, rebels defeated, loss of 50 k. and 
w.... Arkansas votes herself a Tree State.... 
tiens. Smith and Banks at Alexandria, rebels 
retreat to Shrevcporc and burn 2 steamers 
with 3,000 bales cotton. 

March 17.— Fort De P.nssy blown up. 

March 39.— Rebel attack on Port Royal falls. 

March 21.— Gen. Mower captures rebel camp 

at Henderson's Hill, 2S:? prisoners, guns, &c 

Rebel raid on Matrnolia Gen. Mower c."p- 

ture3 200rebclR,wilh four guns and caissons, 
at Natchitoches.,.. Banks captures o0« rebels 
nciif Alexandria. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



39 



March 24.— Union City, Mo., and garrison, 
attacked by Forrest. 

March 25.— Owen Lovejoy died, aged 53. 

March 26.— Forrest sacks Paducah, Ky., but 
repulsed from fort by Col. Hicks, ^s^ith white 
and col'd troops four times, and finally retires. 
U. loss, 12 k. 40 w. R. 150 to 300 k. and w . . . . 
Franklin, La., evacuated by our for.-^es. . . .Col. 
Clayton destroys bridge at Longview, Ark.. 
captures 370 men, 35 wagons, 800 Uorees, and 

$80,000 Confederate money Sherman's army 

moves to Canton and encamps. 

March 28.— Louisiana State Convention to 
revise Constitution meets at New Orleans.... 
Battle of Cane River. Rebels defeated. 

March 30.— Natchitoclios captured by Gen. 
Lee .... Battle of Monticello .... Copperhead 
riot at Charleston and JIattoon, 111. 

March 31.— Rebels defeated at Crump's Hill 
(Plney Woods). 

April 1.— S. S. Maple Leaf blown np by tor- 
pedo in St. Johns' River. ...Rebel Ram Ten- 
nessee sunk near Grant's Pass. 

April 2.— Shelby defeated by Steele near 

Camden Grierson's cavalry engages Forrest 

near Summerville, and falls back. 

April 4.— Col. Gooding engages Harrison's 
guerrillas at Campti, and withdraws with loss. 

Marmadnte defeated bv Steele on Little 

Mo.... New York Metropolitan Sanitary Fair 
opened. 

April 5.— Banks' Texas expedition at Grand 
Ecore....Gen. W. P. White, rebel, of George- 
town, S. C, assassinated by his own men. 

April 6.— Fort llalleck, Columbus, Ky., at- 
tacked by rebel Gen. Buford, surrender re- 
fused by Col. Lawrence.... Maryland Consti- 
tutional Convention on Slaverv met. 

April 8.— Battle of Pleasant Hill. Stoneman 

defeated General FranUliu's command of 

Banks' expedition defeated at Mansfield, La., 
losing 24 guns and nearly 2,000 men, and falling 
back to Grand Ecore. Gen. Smith, next day, 
relieved Franklin and defeated rebels at Grand 
Ecore, and captures 36 guns and 2,000 prison- 
ers. . . .Shelbyville entered by 40 guerrillas. 
I April 10.— Cape Lookout Lighthouse seized 
' by 40 rebels. 

April 11.— Banks retires to Grand Ecore. 
I April 12.- Capture of Fort Pillow and mur- 
der of garrison Admiral Porter's Red River 

I expedition attacked by 2.000 rebel infantry on 
; Bhore, who arc beaten oft'. . . .Horrible murder 
j of a farmer by guerrillas at Osage River. 
I April 13.— Nevv York Soldiers' Voting Bill 
passed New York Senate. Yeas 29, nays none. 
i April 14. — Gunboat expedition from Butler's 
' army capture prisoners and stores at Smith- 
' field, Va.... Nebraska Constitution and State 
Government Bill passed by U. S. Senate. 

April 15.— Chenango, gunboat, exploded. 

April IC— Gunboat Eastport, sunk by snag 
above Grand Ecore. 

April 18.— Rebel attack on Fort Wessell.gun- 

, boat Soulhfleld sunk. Com. Flusscr killed and 

I most of crew drowned. Ram also destroys 

the gunboat Bombshell. . . .Baltimore Sanitary 

Fair opened. 

April 19.— Guerrillas driven from Bnrksvllle. 

Transports and gunboats aground above 

Grand Ecore. 

April 20.— Plymouth, N. C, surrendered to 
rebels by Gen. Wessels, after severe loss. 

April 21.— North Carolina Salt Works, worth 
$100^00, near Wilmington, destroyed. 

April 22.— Forrest moving toward Alabama, 
followed by Grierson. 

April 23.— Rebels capture and murder Union 
pickets at Nlckajack. . . . N. Y. Metropolitan 
Sanitary Fair closed. Sword voted to Grant 
by 30,291, ag.iinst l!,509 for McClellan.... Gun- 
boat Petrel burned by Wirt Adams' cavalry. 

April 24.— Battle at Cane River. Rebels los- 
ing 1,000 men and 9 guns. 



April 25.— Train of 540 wagons and 4 regi- 
ments escorting, captured by 6,000 rebels near 
Pine Bluff. 

April 28.— Little Washington, N. C, evacu- 
ated by Union troops. 

May 1.— Com. AV. i). Porter died. 

May 3.— Grant's army moves across the Rapl- 
dan, toward Chancellorsville and the Wilder- 
ness. 

May 4.— Reconstruetion Bill passed. 

May 5.— Leo desperately attacks right, left, 
and center with indecisive results. Grant's 
army remaining in position with headquarters 
in advance of the AVilderneBg. 

May 6.— Lee resumes attack at dawn, and 
continues all day, but finally v.ithdrawing, our 
troops holding their old formation. Loss, this 
and previous day, about 15,000 men on each 
side Gunboat Com. Jones blown up by tor- 
pedo on James River. 

May 7.— Lee moved to his second line on the 
North Anna. A severe battle at Todd'a Tavern, 
between Custar's and rebel cavalry. Loss 250 
each side. Lee made several attacks during 
the day, falling bac^c after each; part of our 
army reaching Fredericksburg .... Tazewell 
Salt Works destroyed by Averill.... Tunnel 
Hill, Ga., taken by Gen. Thomas.... Railroad 
from Petersburg to Riclimond cut off. 

May 8.— Pursuit of Lee continued, with con- 
tinual fighting, Hancock and Burnside camp- 
ing 20 miles from "\V ildcrness battle-field. 

May 9.— Severe fighting, with great mutual 
loss, Hancock finalJy withdrawing and Lea 
holding Spottsvlvania and the region north. 

May 9.— Battle of Cloyd Mountain. Rebels 
lose 3 guns and many prisoners. . . .U. S. Trans- 
port H. A. Weed blown up by torpedo near 
Jacksonville. Fla.... Sheridan's cavalry de- 
stroy rebel station at Beaver Dam, with cars, 
immense stores, &c., and recapturing 378 Unioa 
prisoners.... Gen. Sedgwick liilled by sharp- 
shooter. 

May 10.— Battle of Spottsylvania Grant's 
whole line assaults, part of Gth Corps carries 
enemy's works, caglures 1,000 prisoners and 
several guns, and withdraws with them. Loss 
on this day, 10,000 on each side. . . .Thos. Butler 
King died — Crooke attacked rebels near 
Newbcrn, burned bridge, captured 7 guns and 
many prisoners.... Averill whips Gen. Sam 
Jones at Wytheville, and destroys railroad 

from Blaoksburg to Christiansburg Yazoo 

City captured by Gen. McArtaur. 

May 11.— Sheridan's whole command get be- 
tween 1st and 2d rebel line at Richmond, and 
withdraw after destroying Ashland Station, 
&c. . . .Butler Intrenches at Bermuda Hundred. 
....Grant "proposes to fight it out on this 
line." 

May 12.— Rebel position at Dalton carried 
and held by Sherraaa. 

May 13.— Lee fell slightly back to new de- 
fenses — Mcpherson captured 9 trains with 
rebel military stores from Dalton. 

May 14.— Dalton occupied by 4th Corps.... 
Butler at Drury's Bluli'. Gen Smith carries 
rebels' front line .... 1 1-17.— Hancock carries 
but relinquishes first line of rebel intrench- 
ments. Lnion loss 1,200. 

May 15.— Battle of Resaca. At night rebels 
evacuate town. . . .Battle of Newmarket, Sigel 



defeated. . . .Rocky-faced Ridge taken by Sher- 
■~,an. . . .Lieut. Cobb murdered by rebels. 
May 16.— Attempt to seize Califoraiasteamer 



Ocean Queen Johnston in retreat to At- 
lanta Admiral Porter's fleet above Alexan- 
dria Falls released by Lient.-Col. Bailey's dam. 
May 17th.— South Carolina Union Convention 
meetsatr- " ■ 



May 18.— Ewell attacks Union baggage train 
In rear of Grant's right flr.nl:, but id finally re- 



May 19.— BlacUston's Island Lighthouse de- 



40 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



stroyed by rebels 19-aJ.— Grant placed his 

wbole army across the Nortb Anna and ap- 
proached the South Anna. 

May 20.— Torpedoes explode at Bachelor 
Cieet. Many Xew Yorji soldiers killed and 
wonnded.... Sherman in possession of King- 
ston and Romc....Bebels attack Ames' Divis- 
ion of Butler's armv. Heavy losses on both 
Bides. 

May 23.— U S. tugboat Columbine captured 
on St. Johns IJlver by rebels. 

May 24.— Rebels destroy bridge over North 
Anna. Grant's headquarters at Jericho Mills. 
Sheridan destroyed Danville Railroad near 
Richmond.... Fitzhugh Lee repulsed at Wil- 
son's Wharf by Negroes under Gen. Wild 

Sherman flanks Joliuston at Altoona. 

May 25.— Battle near Dallas. Hooker drives 
rebels 2 miles. Union loss 1.500, rebel about 

same Gen. Birney ascends the Ashcpoo 

River. 6. S. Bostongronnds and is abandoned. 

May 26.— Grant's army moves toward Han- 
overtown Louisiana State Convention abol- 
ishes slavery- 
May 27.— Kight steamers and several river 
craft burned at New Orleans Levee, by incen- 
diaries Lee evacuates position on South 

Anna, and retreats toward Richmond — Sheri- 
dan captures and holds Hanovertown and 
Ferrj' 

May 28.— Longstreet attacks Sherman at Dal- 
las, and is driven toward Marietta. Rebel lots 
2,500 k. and w., and 300 pris. Union loss 300. 

May 29.— Grant's army crosses the Pamun- 
key. 

May 30.— Trains of refugees burned near Sa- 
lem, Ark.; 80 men and several women killed. 
. . . .Lee attacks Grant north of Chickahoniiny, 
Is repulsed; Hancock drives him out of In- 
trencned line of rifle pits and holds it. 

May 31.— Grant's and Lee's armies confront- 
ing each other from Hanover Court House to 

Cold Harbor Gen. Fremont nominated ior 

President, and Gen. Cochrane for Vice-Pres. 

June 1.— Expedition under Gen. Stnrgis de- 
feated, with loss of wagon train, artillery, and 

ammunition Rebel attacks at Cold Harbor 

repulsed.... Rebels twice attack Butler, and 
are repulsed. 

June 2.— Schofield and Hooker at Marietta. 
Cavalry take Allatoona Pass. 

June 3.— Battle of Cold Harbor. 

June 1.— Rebel night attack on Hancock re- 
pulsed Grant's cavalry defeated Hampton's 

cavalry at Howes' Store. 

June 5.— Rebel attack on left (Hancock's) 

repulsed Sherman's army fall back toward 

the Chattahoochie and Atlanta Marmaduke, 

with 3,000 men, defeated at Columbia. Ark. . . . 
Battle of Piedmont, Ya. Rebel loss 1,500 pris- 
oners, 8 guns, 8,000 stand of arms, 8 guns and 
stores, and a large number killed and w-ounded. 

June fi.— Rebel midnight attack on Burnside 
repulsed Sherman's headquarters at Ac- 
worth. 

June 7.— The 9th Coi-ps, on Grant's right, at- 
tacked brisUly, and rebels driven back 



dent 

June 8.— Paris, Ky., taken by a portion of 

Morgan's forces Sherman's whole army 

moves forward toward the Kenesaw range. 
McPherson occupies Pig Shanty, and rebels 
fall back with left on Lost Monntain and right 
on Kenesaw.... Gilmore's raid on Richmond 
fortifications. 

June!".— Gen. Bnrbridge defeats Rebels at 
Mount Sterling. 

June 10.— Frankfort, Ky., unsuccessfully at- 
tacked by 1,200 rebels .... Lexington, Ky., 
robbed by Morgan. . .Rebel guerrillas repulsed 



at Princeton, Ky. . . .Gen. Hunter, with Crook 
and AverlU, moves from Staunton, Va., after 
destroying over 3 millions' worth of rebel 
property Rebel Congress adjourns. 

June 11.— Surrender of Cvnthiana — Battle 
of TrevllUan Station. Rebels badly beaten by 
Sheridan. 

June 12.— Gen. Burbrldge defeats and scat- 
ters Morgan at Cynthlana, with great loss 

Grant crosses the Chickahominy. 

.June 13.— Grant's headquarters at Wilcox's 
Landing... The Fugitive Slave Law repealed 

in House of Representatives Gen. Hobson 

and Staff recapt ured Sheridan reerosses the 

North Anna. 

June 14.— Grant's army crossed to south of 
the James. . . .Gen. Polk killed. . . .Sherman ad- 
vancing toward Kenesaw. 

June 15.— Battle of Baylor's Farm. Sixteen 
Rebel guns and 300 prisoners taken. 

June 16.— Hancock, Smith, and Burnside tin- 
successfully attack 2d line of rebel works at 
Petersburg. Loss 2,000, rebels less. 

June 17.— Burnside captures 6 guns and 400 

prisoners Rebels abandon their intrench- 

ments in front of Bermuda Hundred, and But- 
ler takes railroad between Richmond and Pe- 
tersburg. . .Rebel conscript camp near Atlanta, 
broke lor Union lines. 600 got in, 200 recap- 
tured by rebels. 

June 18.— Grant assaults rebel works and 
fails. Loss, in four davs, over 10,000. . . .Rebels 
place 50 Union officers under fire at Charleston. 

June 19.— Beauregard reoccupies Bermuda 

Hundred and repairs railroad The pirate 

Alabama, Capt. Semmes, snnli off Cherbourg 
by the U. S. S. Kearsarge, Capt. John A. Wins- 
low. Semmes aided to escape by a British 
yacht. 

June 20.— Fitzhugh Lee and Hampton re- 
pulsed at AVhite House. 

June 21.— Foster crosses James River and In- 
trenches between Aiken's Landing and Four 

Mile Creek Second Corps attacks Davis' 

Farm unsuccessfully. ...Rebels assault Sher- 
man seven times, losing 800 men Slemmons' 

Rebel cavalry defeated at Pine Bluff". 

June 22.— House of Representatives resolve 
to abolish slavery. . . .Battle on Weldon Road, 
Barlow flauked, and losing about 2,000 prison- 
ers, 4 guns, and some flags Wilson and 

Kautz capture 2 trains at Ford's Station. 

June 23.— Shelby destrovs U^. S. gunboat 
Queen City . . .Unsuccessful attack on Weldon 

railroad. Union lossheavy Kautz destroys 

railroad junction at Burksville. 

June 24.— Pillow attacks and beaten off from 
Lafayette,Ga.,with much loss.... Norfolk,Va., 

votes for military government Maryland 

Constitutional Convention abolishes slavery. 
....Rebels attack and beaten by Sheridan at 
AVblte House.... Wilson and Kautz moved on 
to destrov 18 miles of Danville Railroad. . . . 
Battle of Staunton Bridge. Wilson and Kautz 
repulsed. 

.Tune 25.— Night attacks on Bnrnside's front 
easily foiled. . . .Sheridan rejoined Grant. 

June 26.— Rebel force (800) all killed or cap- 
tured by expedition from Fort Smith, Ark. 

June 27.— McPherson and Thomas attack 
rebels south and southwest of Kenesaw unsuc- 
cessfully, losing 1,500 men. . . .Gen. Carr defeats 
Shelby near St. Charles, Mo., capturing 200 

Srisoners and guns of recently captured Queen 
rty. Union loss 200 k. and w. Rebel loss, k. 
and w., 500. 

June 2S.— Gen. Carrlngton reports particu- 
lars of Northwestern conspiracy Sherman 

begins again to flank Johnston at Kenesaw 
Mountain . . . .Battle of Stoney Creek. At night 
Wilson and Kautz retreat to Reams. 

June 29.— Battle of Reams' Station. Kautz 
and Wilson defeated and retreat in confuBion. 
Union loss over 1,000. 



THE TRIBUNE AL1VLA.NA0 FOR 1SC5. 



41 



Jnne 80.— Kantz's force reaches Grant's lines 
terribly exhausted . . . Johnston eracnates Ken- 
eeaw Mountain Salmon P. Chase resigned. 

July 1.— Wilson's main force reaches Grant's 
lines, having lost all their guns, ambulance 
and wagon trains, wounded and sick — Gen. 
Foster attacks Seabrook, Johns, and James 
Islands Kebel fort captured on James Isl- 
and Col. Hoyf and lS7 men, captured at 

Johnson's island W. P. Fessenden accepts 

Secretaryship of Treasury. 

July 2.— Ewell invades Shenandoah Valley 
with three columns. Martinsburg evacuated. 

July S.—Slgel falls back to Harper's Ferry. 
Winchester taken, and travel on Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad stopped.... Sherman occupies 
Marietta. 

July 4.— Mosby's Cavalry crossed Potomac 
at Pomt of Kocks. Mulligan evacuates Boli- 
var Heights and Harper's Ferry Sigel, 

Stahel and Mulligan fortify and hold Mary- 
land Heights. 

July 5.— Slocum's expedition routes Rebels 
east of Jackson, occupying Jackson same 
night Elliott's marine colored brigade at- 
tacked by Rebels near Port Hudson : beat 
them off. Loss 150 killed, wounded and 
missing. 

July 6.— Hagerstown evacuated by Union 
forces. 

July 7.— Gen. Wallace's reconnoissance re- 
pulsed near Middletown ; Hagerstown again 

plundered Johnston crossed the Chatta- 

toochie Rebel raid hold Harper's Ferry. 

July 8.— Gen. Wallace evacuates, and Rebels 



July 9.— Battle of Monocacy. Wallace de- 
feated, losing over 1,000 Rebels capture 

Westminster. Couch re-occupies Hagerstown, 
and Hunter Frederick. 

July 10.— Rebels plunder Darnestown and 
Reisterstown, and tear up Northern Central 
Railroad at Cockeysville and Texas. A por- 
tion of them enter and rob Rockville ; the 

main body moving toward Washington 

Gen. Rossea-i leaves Decatur, with a,700 men, 

on a raiding expedition in Hood's rear 

Johnston retreats to fortifications around At- 
lanta. 



cars Rebel salt works at Tampa Bay dc 

stroyed Rebel stores, torpedo, &c., de- 
stroyed at Dutch Gap. 

July 12.— Rebel raid seven miles from Wash- 
ington Gen. Franklin escapes. ...Rebels 

dnven from before Fort Stevens, Washington, 

with considerable loss Five Rebel cotton 

factories destroyed at Rosswell's. 

July 13.—Rebel raiders cross into Virginia, in 

full retreat, with their plunder Tnis and 

two foUomng days. Gens. Smith and Slocum 
defeat Forrest in 5 different battles, driving 
him ft-om Pontotoc to Tupelo, and killing 

over 2,000. Union loss, 300 Rosseau defeats 

5,000 Rebels under Clanton, near Coosaw River. 

July 15.— Rebels take 5,000 cattle and 1,000 
horses from Montgomery Co. and drive them 
Into Virginia. 

July IC— Sherman's army completed cross- 
ing the Chattahoochie in pursuit of Johnston. 

July 17.— Indians murdering and robbing 

near Fort Larime Col. Jaquess and Mr. 

Gilmore visit Jeff. Davis at Richmond. . . .Wirt 



der Clanton, badly whipped by Rosseau at 
Chewa Station. 

July 18-20.— Geo. N. Sanders and others cor- 
respond from Niagara about peace — Crook 
detcated at Island Ford by Breckhiridge ; loss 
800. Gen. Duffle defeated at Ashby's Gap, 
losing 200. . . .Gen. Crook badly whips Early at 



Snicker's Gap, capturing 300 wagons with 

frala, and many prisoners Battle of Peach 
ree Creek, and Rebel repulse. Union loss 
1,713 ; Rebel loss 6,000, including 3 generals . . . 
Averill attacked asd defeated Early and his 
5,000men at Winchester, killing and wounding 
800, captures 4 guns and 200 prisoners. Early 

re-enforced ana repulses Union troops 

Rebel camp, flag, stores, &c., captured at Gon- 
zales. 

July21.— Henderson, Ky., attacked by Rebels 
700 strong. 

July 22.— Hood again assault Sherman's lines 
round Atlanta with great vigor, but unsuc- 
cessfully. His loss on this day and the 20th, 
not less than about 20,000 killed, wounded and 

prisoners Louisiana State Convention 

adopted new Constitution abolishing slavery 
Gen. McPherson shot by Rebel sharpshoot- 
er before Atlanta. 

July 23-24.— Averill defeated at Winchester ; 

fell back, concentrating at Harper's Ferry 

Steamer Clara Bell burned by guerrillas at 
Carrolton Landing. 

July 26.— McCook destroys Macon & Western 
Railroad and 500 wagons ; captures 500 prison- 
ers ; is overtaken by Rebels and defeated, 
losing all his prisoners and over 1,000 of his 
own men. 

July 28.— Rebel stores at Winton, Mason's 
Mill, Coleraine, &c., destroyed. 



Two 
made, but attack finally abandoned with loss 

of over 4,000 Chambersburg robbed and 

burned by Rebels. 

August 1.— Bradley Johnson and McCausland 
defeated at Cumberland, losing part of their 
plunder from Pennsylvania. 

August2.— Col. Stout, with 500 men, posted 
to intercept retreat of McCausland and John- 
son, is captured by them, losing SO men. 

August 4.— Bradley Johnson and McCausland 
defeated at New Creek. . . ..Jeff. Davis's sugar 
mill at Manitee totally destroyed. 

August 5.— Farragut's great victory at Mo- 
bile Bay. 

August 6.— Twenty-third corps of Sherman's 
army unsuccessfully attacks Rebel lines be- 
fore Atlanta, losing over500men. 

August 7.— Gen. Sheridan assumed command 
of Middle Military Division. . . .Battle of Moor- 
fleld. Combined forces of McCausland, John- 
son, Gilmore and McNeil totally de4ieated by 
Averill. 

August 8.— Fort Gaines, Mobile Bay, surren- 
dered. . . .Entire Rebel force evacuates Wary- 
land side of the Potomac Indians attack a 

train of nine wagons near Plumb Creek ; kill 
all the men and burn wagons ; women taken 
prisoners: also burn 27 wagons at Point 
Ranche Gen. Burris returns to New Mad- 
rid after a 17 days' scout in S. E. Mo. and N. E. 
Ark. Result, 50 Rebels killed, 40 wounded, 57 
prisoners ; horses, arms, &c., captured. 

August 9.— Gen. Butler commences Dutch 
Gap Canal — Explosion of an ordnance boat 
at City Point. 

August 10.— Sheridan's advance roach Ber- 

rysvlUe Atlanta bombarded by Sherman's 

forces. 

August 11.— Battle of Sulphur Springs Bridge. 

August 12.— Northern frontier of New York 
threatened by invasion from Canada. 

August 13.— Mosby attacks Sheridan's supply j 

train near Snicker's Gap Rebel cavalry cap- ' 

turod 5 steamers, with Government cattle, at 
Shawneetown. 

August 14.— Battle of Strawberry Plains. 
Tenth Corps take rebel lino of breastworks, 4 

guns and 100 prisoners Dalton attacked by 

Wheeler with 5,000 men ; defended by Siebold 
with 400 men. 

August 15.— Sheriden falls back toward 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 






lib ^^i^'^^Sll?- station, on 
^2^'t°n''«?iq -Sebels attacli at Six Mile 

withdraw. iDmon loss about u^.^^^ ^^ 
Summit Point, tanjarive.^^g ^ 
I pMsentercuoyFonest wunj b^^^^^^ ^.^j. 



?cVll\V™o^vert^alieTnrarL^^^^^^ and se 
yet^ly punished in a t^vo hours b,ttlc.^ ^^^^^ 

^'\f/u^t''o^Z-CuK; Miss., taken by Gens. 
^ifgSsf i^-Torbcrt encounters Early.'s 



"Sa^-Averm drives KebeU out of Mar- 

by Kebels t'-0S,«„',^tt?a'°captnrea by Forrest ; '. 
airy tlefeats Wickham at 



airy deieats „..-»- -- "iiiray, capturing 

^i2*?9?^*Gen Ewln- arrives at KoUa, after 
Elbllfe attack on Hancock's front, on Je- 









4 flags and 200 P„rl^°?,"c%ture8 . . E^beTs fall 

abandon most of his «^P™i ®°vaf a smithfield, 

hack from Sheridan 8ft onttowa^ Smithfield. 

August ^.-EaU^anven 1^^ for Presi- 

tren'chedatJonesboro jonesboro- to 

Sept. 1;-Kebe 8 Q"]^^' ico prisoners and 10 

Lovejoy^Statlon.losin, i^w J . . .Gen.Kous; 

le^'^u'driferitoCORebetstnearMurfreesboro- 

^S e'pt'a'-K^beU before Petersburg cheered 

McCleilan's nomination cavalry 

Sept. 3.-Milroy attacks o.w« toward 

near'^Murfreesboro , andWives v^ moves for- 

i^rTf^om«^o^i^,'rr^ 

I aiVo^rYs^ol-B Tfn»ols.300. ^Moshy 



^^rf^RlbeU m front of TTarren fell back I 
to^'their^^n ''liSeJ'' from Petersburg lead , 
"S^c't^sn^iSlel^mWreabyGuern^^^ 



•^kilpatrick destroyed l^miles of 






instils 

Si?/d"er'^^'ofe.;'^aY:b|to offing and sunk. 

*=fe'-pfebe! lie^n'Srd, with l.W cav 

?rfettcked^°y2S)a near Fort Nel- 
soTOnn. .Defcatethem.^aml k^and w. ... 



S^S"-SB«'"tt^^'8'^Sh^^^^^^^^^^ 
t?a8bmg. NO material advantage gained in 



R^aJyViUc by 230 of am ra. .a, »... - , - ^ n.-^'cegO^'^^g^^/n^^^dTerat'Phliadel 

prisoners. , T„g.ie and 100 men cap- Oct. 18.-MaJ.-Gen. uirnei 

'^Sept.R.-RebelCol. Jessie an. I Plil*; io T^.ttle of Cedar Creek. Steridan's 

*'^o%S"'iS'-the™V army concentrated at j ^ Of^; J'-^rifi^el' Sefeaf Into a great victory. 
^t%"^lO._Grant drives Pjc^etjl- »«-. j I'-J'^c^f ^"f^fai^rretreats at night to Mount 
S^rir'«»-feSKr«.|ja^^_o^^^^^^ ,,,eats Price at t.e 

I Sa Dismal Swamp C«nal. ' 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



"m^ 



Llttla Bine, and forces him to the Big Blue 
Elver. 

Oct. 23.— Shelby drove onr forces under Cur- 
tis from Westport, and was then attacked and 
defeated by Heasanton. 

Oct. 25.— Price defeated at Fort Scott Road, 
losing camp equipage, 20 wagons of plunder, 1 
gun, and cattle. 

Oct. 26.— Price driven from Mine Creek by 
Pleasanton, and loses 1,000 prisoners and 1,500 
stand of arms. Marmadnke and Cabell capt'd. 

Oct. 27.— Grant attaciis Southside Railroad 

and fails. Union loss 8,000; Rebel 1,500 

Price forced to retreat from Marais des 
_ne8. 

>ct. 28. — Gillem repulses Vaughn, capturing 
200 prisoners and McClurg's battery, caissons, 
&c Price again defeated at Newtonia, de- 
stroying more wagons, and losin? 250 men 

Rebel Kam Albemarle destroyed by Lt. W. 13. 
Cushing with a torpedo boat on Roanoke Riv. 

Oct. zS-30.— Rhoddy's cavalry attack Col. 
Morgan's colored troops at Decatur, and lose 
400 prisoners and many killed and wounded. 
Union loss 100. 

Nov. 5.— Rebels unsuccessfully attack Fort 
Sedgwick on Jerusalem Plank Road. Union 
loss TO ; Rebel 120 Gen. Butler assumes com- 
mand of troops in New York, arriving and to 

arrive, "to meet existing emergencies." 

Johnsonville shelled, and 3 tin-clads and 7 
transports destroyed by Forrest on Tennessee. 

Nov.6.— Rebels attack Mott's and Gibson's 
pickets; capture 30 and a mile of Intrench- 
ments, but are driven out and lose 47 prison- 
ers. Several such attacks and repulses at this 
time. 

Nov. S.— President Lincoln re-elected, and 
Andrew Johnson elected Vice-President of 
United States. Hon. Reuben E.Fenton elected 

Governor of New York, over Seymom- Gon. 

lion in the U.S. 
m created Ms 
Regular Anny. 

Nov. 9.— Sheridan moved all his army back 
to Newtown from Cedar Creek Atlanta 



Nov. 10.— Rebels engaged 2d Corps' pickets 
all night, without success, on this and two 
next nights. . . .Rebel plot to seize Pacific Mail 
steamers at Panama discovered. 

Nov. 11.— U. S. S. Tulip destroyed by boiler 
explosion off Ragged Point. 49 officers and 
men killed (all ol crew but 10). 

Nov. 12.— About 10,000 prisoners exchanged 
near Fort Pulaski Nov. 12-16.— Several un- 
important skirmishes between Sheridan and 
Early. Both armies looking for winter quar- 
ters.... Lomax, Rebel general, defeated near 
Nineveh, Va., by Powell, losing 150 prisoners 

and 2 guns Custar captures 150 ana Merrltt 

about 200 prisoners on reconnoissance from 

Cedar Crees Sherman left Kingston, Ga., 

for Atlanta. 

Nov. 13.— Battle of Bull's Gap. Gen. Gillem 
defeated with loss of baggage, train and all 
his artillery. 

Nov. 16.— Sherman left Atlanta for the South 

and East. Portions of Atlanta burned 

Howard drives Rebel Gen. Iverson at Rough 
and Ready. 

Nov. 17.— Slocum burned railroad depot at 
Social Circle Sherman's right wing ad- 
vances on Jonesboro' and McDonough, driving 

out Wheeler and Cobb Covington partially 

burned by Slocum's division Part of But- 



ter Station. 

Nov. 18.— Macon Railroad cut by Slocum at 
Forsyth. . . .Georgia Legislature fled from Mll- 
ledgeville. Sherman close at hand. 

NOV. 19.— Ocmulgee Mver bridged by How- 



Nov.20.— Gen. Gillem's retreating force ar- 
rives at Knoxville Howard crossed the Oc- 
mulgee and entered MUledgeville Georgia 

Central Rnilroad destroved at Grlswoldvifle. 

Sherman crossed the Oconee, arriving at 

Greensboro'. 

Nov. 21.— Thomas' army at Pulaski.... Reb- 
els badly whipped at Liberty, La., losing 3 

guns and 200 prisoners Sherman's cavalry 

resisted by Wheeler at Gordon, but drive him 
out and occupy town. 

Nov. 22.— Hood's advance 20 miles south of 
P'ulaskl. Thomas falls back toward Franklin. 

Sheridan reconnoiters towards Rood's 

Hill, where Rebels are found in force. Rest of 
Early's army at Mt. Jackson and Newmarket. 

Nov. 23.— Battle at Griswoldsville, Ga. 

Nov. 21.— Potomac, James, and Valley ar- 
mies celebrate Thanksgiving with aid of 
thousands of turkeys and other delicacies 
from New York, &c. 

Nov. 25.— Thomas fallen back to Franklin. 
. . . Rebel attempt to burn New York. 15 hotels, 



gard who is repulsed, losing 5CU men. 

Nov. 27.— Steamer Greyhound burned on 
James R. ; Gen. Butler on board, escaped. 

N0V.2S.— Rosser captures Fort Kelly, at New 
Creek, with guns and prisoners. 

Nov. 30.— Battle of Franklin. Hood repulsed 
with lossof 5,000 men, suns, flags, &c., and 1,000 
prisoners. Union loss 1,500. Tliomas resumes 
Iiis march to Nashville, where he halts and 

fortifies Attorney-General Bates resigned. 

Roger A. Pryor captured in front of Pe- 
tersburg Battle of Grahamaville, S. C. 

Dec. 1.— Blockade of Norfolk, Fernandina 

and Pensacola ceased Gen. Banks resumes 

command Department of the Gult Stone v 

Creek Station captured by Gen. Gregg,— 2 guns, 
ISO prisoners, depot burned, &c. 

Dec. 3.— Portions of Hood's army cross the 
Tennessee, between Florence and Decatur. 

Dec. 4.— Merrltt's expedition iu Loudon Val- 
ley returns with 2,000 cattle acd 1.000 sheep. 
The Valley stripped of stock and forage. 

Dec. 5.— U. S. Houses of Congress meet In 2d 

Session, 3Sth Congress Blockhouses at Mur- 

freesboro' unsuccessfully attacked by Rebels. 
. . . .Brig Lizzie Freeman and brig captured by 
pirates olf Warwick River. Passengers 
robbed; one murdered. 

Dec. 6.— Ex-Secretary Chase appointed Chief 

Justice Supreme Court President Lincoln 

speaks at serenade to Gov. Fenton Hood 

sKirmishing 5 miles from Nashville. 

Dec. 7.— Electoral Colleges In States meet 
for election of President and Vice-President. 
. . . .Detroit threatened by Canadian raiders. 

Dec. 8.— Rebels establish a battery on Cum- 
berland River. Gunboats fail to dislodge it. 

Dec. 9.-500 Indians killed, near Fort Lyon, 
by Col. Chivlngton's force. 

At the date of closing our record the follow- 
ing was the position of affairs at the chief 
points of military interest: Sherman, having 
moved through Georgia, had arrived near the 
Atlantic coast, while Thomas, in force at 
Nashville was waiting any attack to be made 
by Hood. Grant, before Petersbm-g. still pre- 
served his grasp of that city and Richmond, 
and Important movements were commencing. 
Sheridan was holding the Shenandoah Valley 
wlthasmall force, a great portion of his forces 
having re-enforced Grant. The blockade was 
vigorously maintained, and a large fleet was 
moving toward the Atlantic coasf, to co-oper- 
ate with Sherman. Gen. Banks had resumed 
command of the Gulf Department, and the 
siege of Charleston was etlll in progress. 



THB TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



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THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 









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III ||i sli I III! &i||i iw I III s?g|l I s r&i||^i iS|f ' 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1SG5. 



ELECTION RETURNS 

COXGRESSIONAL BISTEICTS, 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Gov'NOK, 18(U. PBEe.,'64. Pees.,'60. 



BT STATES, COUNTIES, AND 
MAINE. 

Gov'NOE.lSfrl. Pbe8.,'64. Pbe8.,'60. 
Counties. Union. Dem. Un. Dem. Mep. Vein. 

r.HowardLinc.McClel.LincOtbcrs, 



Andro8COggin3543 207 



8363 1»36.. 8526 1953 

1059 679. . 1142 588 

7728 6365.. 7934 5505 

2248 1790.. 2281 1417 

8143 2144. . 8422 2183 

6803 8347. . 6599 2?09 



oggln 

Aroostook .. .1883 1520. 

Cnml)erlana..8017 6623. 

Franklin 22-13 1807. 

Hancock 3297 2358. 

Kennebec ....6349 8224.. _ 

Knox 2617 2319.. 2349 2162.. 2520 207G 

Lincoln 2486 SJ402.. 2367 2495.. 2.510 1550 

Oxford 4021 SITS. . 4038 8109. . 4:^ 2738 

Penobscot, ....7354 4277 7471 4287.. 6997 Si.-SS 

Fi3cataQui3...1C14 1157.. 1588 916.. 1656 789 

Sagadahoc ...2346 1144.. 2671 1120.. 2257 1048 

Somerset 8552 8788.. 8633 2632.. 4048 2-217 

I Waldo 3825 2749.. 3938 2724.. 3800 2055 

■Washington.. 3356 2Si61.. SC99 2927.. 8315 2743 

York 6484 5903.. 6305 5578.. 6460 4776 



Total . . . .62389 46476. .61803 44211. .62611 38107 
Percent 57.31 4-2.69. . 68.30 41.70.. 6S. 27 37.73 

In 1864, whole vote for Governor, 108,865; 
Samnel Conv over Joseph Howard, 15,913. 
Whole vote for President (aa far as returned), 
103,014 ; Lincoln's majority, 17,592. 

COMGKESS, 1864. 
Di'^t. Union. Dem. Un.Maj. 

I. Lynch 15096; Sw«at 125?8..25i8 

Il.Pcrham 12830; Andrews.... 8814. .4186 

III. Blaine 14055; Gould 9727..4828 

IV. Rice 10802; Madigan .... MS3..3819 

V.Pike 12556; White 8SB0. .3690 

Full Names of Candidates.— Unionists— 3oba 
Ijvnch, Sidney Perham, James G. Blaine, John 
H. Rice, Frederick A. iPike. Democrats— Lor- 
enzo D. M. Sweat. Samuel C. Andreys, A. P. 
Gonld, James C. JIadigan, James White. 

Leuislatuke, 1865. Senate. Hoase. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 28 122 150 

Democrats 3 29 32 



the September election by, yeas 

19,127. Under this a portion of the soldiers 

voted, as follows: 

Union. Dem. U/umai. 

Governor 9S9 24 9l5 

" ■ 2693- 473 2219 



RHODE ISIiAND. 

6ov'NOB,1864. Pbes., '64, Pees.'60. 
Counties. Un. Dem. Cons. Un. Dem. Eep.Dem. 

Smith. Ri-own. Barst. Line. McOl. Line. Others 

Bristol 568 281 14.. 780 449.. 667 462 

Kent 734 808 111.. 1365 815.. 1246 657 

^^ewport .. 1189 813 209.. 1773 84-1.. 1610 879 
Providence 51C0 4518 950.. 81S 5389.. 7202 4875 
Waahingt'n 1189 849 55. . 1622 993. . 1519 834 

Total.... 8S40 7?cii liig. .13692 i470. .123-14 7707 
Per etiU .... 60 4.-i 4M.5 7 U2. .61.79 3S SI. .(;l.S2 SS.66 

In 1861, whole vote for Governor (48 scatter- 
ing), 17,529; James T. Smith over George H. 
Browne, 1,538; Smith over Amos C. Barstow, 
7,501; Smith over both, 199. Whole vote for 
President, 22,162 ; Lincoln's majority, 5,222 ; to 
which add soldiers' vote. Line. 657; McClel. 
2-18; Line's mnl. 5,631.— In 1860, whole vole, 
19,951 ; Lincoln'over the Fusion ticket, 4,537. 

CONORE88.— Two members to be chosen 1st 
Wednesday In April, 1865. 

Lfoislaturb, 1864. Senate.Home. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 23 55 '. 78 

Democrats 9 18 27 



Union majority ... .14 



2371 782 

5202 8302 

7980 2674 

338 238 

148,?2 7794 



Barnstable.. 8977 708.. 8994 701. 

Berkshire ...5284 83f8.. 5314 8863. 

Bristol 9642 2175.. 9736 2173. 

Dukes 470 135.. 475 138. 

Essex 17060 5725. ,17237 5691. 

Franklin ....4169 1321.. 4376 1289. 

Hampden.... 6319 2933.. 6356 2894.. 5184 2881 

Hampshire.. 5057 877.. 5tti6 866„ 4597 1020 

Middlesex ..21873 9684.. 22318 959T. . 17S08 12840 

Nantucket ..487 35.. 48G 86.. 420 116 

Norfolk 10921 ,5.563.. 11040 5502.. 8800 7014 

Plymouth ...7514 2570.. 7610 2512.. 6703 3588 

Suffolk 14594 &1!4. .14692 8-367.. 10974 11195 

Worcester.. 17914 5637.. 18072 5615.. 17272 7515 

Total . .125281 49100.126742 48745. .106533 62642 

Percent 71.81 2S. 19. .7-2. S3 27.77.. 62.S-2 37. CS 

In 18C4, whole vote for Governor, 174,471 ; 
John A. Andrew over Henry W. Paine, 76,691 ; 
whole vote for President, 175,487 ; Lincoln over 
McClellan, 77,997. — In 18C0, whole vote for 
President, 169,175 ; Lincoln over all, 43,891. 

COXGEESS, 1864. 
Dist. Union. Dem. U.Maj. 



.5266... K!25 , 

III.Kice 9711; Sleeker 5864... 8817 | 

IV.Hooper 10403; Abbott 5185... 4918 

V. Alley 13086 ; Morss 4158. . . 8928 

VI.Gooch 13082; Greenwood 5174... 7908 

VII. Eoutwell... 13087; Sweetser .. .5433. . . 6654 



i75... 12146 

X.Dawes 11594; Arnold 6315... 5279 

Full Names of Candidates.— Unionists— Thoa. 
D. Eliot, Oaks Ames, Alexander H. Rice, Sam- 
uel Hooper, John B. Alley, Samuel W. Gooch, 
George S. Eoutwell, John D.Baldwin, William 
B. Washburne, Henry L. Dawes. Democrats— 
Samuel B. Phimicy, James McGuire, John 8. 
Sleeper, Josiah G. Abbott, Joseph B. Morss, 
Thomas J. Greenwood. Theodore H. Sweetser, 
George Hodges, Nathaniel AVood, Harvey 
Arnold. 
Legislature, 1863. Senate. Bouse. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 40 234 274 

Democrats 6 6 



Union majority . 



CONNECTICUT, 
Gov'NOB, 1864. Pres.,'64. Pkes..'60. 
Counties. Un. Dem.. Un. Dem. Hep. Dem. 

Buck'ham.Seym.LincMcrieLLinc.0ther9. 

Fairileld 6831 59!»..7868 7193.. 7025 9067 

Hartford 7942 7215. .8692 8680. . 8519 6738 

Litchfield .... 44S6 8919. .4997 4423.. 6113 3-111 

Middlesex .... 2806 2525.. 8113 3107.. 2883 2625 

New Haven .. 7671 7606. .8761 9638.. 8667 7895 

Naw London. 5034 8629. .5662 4919.. 5470 4003 

Tollati 2295 1738. .2430 2132.. 2^194 1635 

Windham 8305 1625. .3668 2173.. S616 1779 

Total 39820 31162.44691 42285. .43792 37158 

PerceJlt 63 SS 4'!. 17. .M 30 48.61.. 54.10 4,1.90 

In 1S64, whole vote for Governor, 73,932; 
William A. Buckingham over Origen P. Sey- 
mour, 5,658. Whole vote for President, 86,976; 
Lincoln's majority, 2,406. 

Congress.- Four members to be elected Ist 
Monday in April, 1865. 

Legislatxjke, 1884. SenaU. House. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 13 155 173 

Democrats 3 76 79 



Union m^orlty.. 



15 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



attxiwikg Soldieks to Vop;, 1S64. 

■with the foUowinsreBnlt: ^ 

Counties. \es ,^,«;;U^fcMetd....3102 19^3 
Hartford 47S3 g^lgiW^^dlcsex -1795 1092 

Fairfield 



■Windham 



CounUet. 

Addison... 
Bennington 
Caledonia . 
Chittenden 

Essex 

Frantlin... 
Grand Isle. 
Lamoille 



• 1990 66S1 Total...... 24280 14237 

iiSy^or. 10,043. 

07Sfl <112 3J27 9». 

: ^866 Is!:: MS 885. 

2192 986.. 2689 1156. 

846 193.. rSi 

1312 487.. 1760 



; &16 
. 1970 



53i:: 1280 



790 



NEW JEBSEY. , ^ ,,„ 
ftn^'NOK 18(2 Pbes., '64. Pbes.,'60. 

Vn 934 1117 1062.. 1109 794 

lis 21G3::i554 kl.. 14K 2G92 

^,((79 SS'5 5:iS0 4176.. 5269 40S6 

2503 2440::CS:3 2758 24g 2643 

CIS 401.. 701 537.. 680 5J0 

20OO I'JSl 2CC9 20S4..23C5 IKO- 

S 8493::9403 P239.. 8813 9^1 

1CS3 ]&^e..lS9S 1494.. 195o 14(6 

Soco 4-.f;i 4016 6597.. S461 5150 

2141 4U39::2G?.1 4.S55..2827 3934 

F02 b!s6::8726 S792.. 8675 ^ 

9?i«ii. fi, 240i::2l34 2773:: 2814 2415 

1756 2071. .2221 2164.. 2226 19.3 

l^^Pi-^iilil::i^ii^ 

W7 •'0n"2G?l 28CG..2197 2756 
liai l-2S0::2006 370G.. 2401 3225 



Counties. 

Atlantic 

Bergen 

limlington . 
Camden .... 
Cape May .. 
Cumberland 

Essex 

Gloucester . 

Hudson 

Hunterdon . 

Mercer 

Middlesex 



Lamoille.... 1312 ^^-^^^ mx.m 1223 

Orange 28W ^%- ^^ ^626 1749 519 

Orleans 1395 fj^-- |^ 1247 4173 1487 

Rutland 3713 ll*0-- ii^ 1552 2941 1256 

Washington. 2621 1381.. .eg io|4 ^^^^ ^.^ 

^'iSdsoT:::: t^ _ii33::_§6 j^.._53i3 j25i 

Total.... 31260 12m.42419 13321..33808 1^6 

tjuionistB -^ 19 ■"':::::: 19 

Democrats _^ ' 

Union majority .... 30 193 ... . 
NEW HAMPSmRB. 

Counties. 



Salem ,. • • ■ 
Sussex.... 
Somerset . 

Union 

Warren . . . 



Total iOTlO Cim CmaS M. .58324 SBOl 



Districts. Un. pern. 

Starr.Dickinson 



Atlantic 1113 

Cape May ... 763 
Cumberland 2667 

Camden 3SG5 

Salem 2207 

Gloucester.. 19 <8 



1070 



.Sitgreaves. 

Tjnlon 2392 2870 

\\^rrcn ....^ _S651 

Total 12C80 16942 

Charles Sltgreavea 

oyer Charles Scranton, 

4,862. ^. , 

IV. Little. 

Bergen 1555 

Essex (part) 2731 

Morns 32b7 

Passaic 2036 

Sussex .1684 

Total 12173 14059 

Andrew J. Eogers 



Belknap 
Carroll.. 
Cheshire 



GOV'HOK, 18W. PKE8.,'&i,PKE8.'60. 

-'^ lli"1^2 2l^9::lf8 mz 

•••^11IS::ki ^„..8843 2C09 



^^-■M^-^W^:^ 



Mcrrimac ... 46o0 40bi.. 4J 4 4.b» | 



Total 12093 10126 

John F. Starr over 
Isaac V. Dickinson 

^''^/i. Newell.Middle'r 
Burlington.. 5S10 4179 

fiercer ...3750 

*JcX°.^?'.:;^ lio^-Theodore Uftte 

Total .13453 lS89lL V- ,^y>'A\«"5?i^"f^''^ 
WiUiam A. ?reweU',Essex(>.e'k).6<j^ 
over Geo. Middleton, Hudson .mi 

362. ^., ' 

III. Scranton^Sitgreav 
Hunterdon. .366( 4obO 
Middlesex... 3049 



Total 11448 1S.0M 

1 Ediv . Van Rensselaer 
STsa'Wright over Edgar B. 
SomerseT":i923 2328|Wakeman, 1,942. J 

^ l^GisliiuBB, 1865. Senate. Home JoifitBal.* 

Unionists | =^' 

Democrats '■'' 



'31 Wk:'^ S Democratic maj. 



Total 



Boldiers' vote 



DELAWARE. ^ .^ ,_ 

CONGBESS, 1864. PEES.,'C4. PHES.,'60. 

.»:^iS..i^,i^0..3T519 28404 Kent -1684 2398.. 1., 2 2402.. 1070 ,?18 



'3018 6.- 
. *" _ir^' rti^-mnro r,-vpr F.dward W . 1 



18,346; 



Newcastle::: 42S0 
1 Sussex 2369 



: 2074 5290 
, 671 39S3 



8767.. 3815 12224 



CowGKESS.-Three members to be chosen in md^ .^^ Democrat c majonty 8,4tfJ. 

Unionists % *i^ 126 Democrats « " 

Democrats •• ^ ^^ ....■^•. ^ ^ 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



NEW YORK. 

Skc't State, 1863. Sol'r Vot'g,'64. Gov'ii,'64. Gov'i 



Counties. Union. 

Depew. 5 

Albany 8994 

Allegany 5848 

Broome 4560 

CattaraaguB 5047 

Cayuga 6951 

Cliantauqaa 7503 

Chemnng 2873 

Chenango 5111 

Clinton 3155 

Columbia 4568 

Cortland 8721 

Delaware 4709 

DutchesB 6045 

Erie 11421 

Essex 2786 

Franklin 2721 

Fulton 2593 

Genesee 3731 

Greene.. 2829 

Hamilton 169 

Herkimer 4742 

Jefferson 7695 



Dem. 

It. John. 
10977.. 

2459.. 

2490.. 

8029.. 

40;i3. . 



11481. . 
1787.. 
2048. . 
2203.. 
2513. . 
3608.. 
895.. 



Un. Dem. . Un. Dem. 
For. Against. Fenton, Sevm'r 
6625 1805. 



3611 828. . 

4462 37. . 

4998 828.. 

6704 1089.. 

2828 299.. 

4218 471.. 

2397 429. . 

4062 587.. 

2818 320.. 

3776 1075.. 

5282 927. . 

9.561 1432. 

2783 196. 



6262 2555. 

4995 3144. 

5576 8518. 

7560 4403. 

8762 3952. 

3307 8110. 

5569 4021. 

3486 8540. 

4906 5286. 

4005 2082. 

53:^8 4206. 

7300 6598. 

13D55 13398. 

8229 2162. 



Lewis 2748 

Livingston 
Madison . . 
Monroe 8723 

3me 

ork 
Niagara 

Oueida 10357 

Onondaga 10215 

Ontario 4819 

Orange 5759 

Orleans 8408 

Oswego 7694 

Otsego. 
Putnam 

Queens 2776 

Kensselaer 7931 

Kichmond 1296 

Kockland 

St. Lawrence 9621 

Saratoga 5400 

ScUenectady 2071 

Schoharie 

Schuyler 2361 

Seneca 2443 

Steuben 
Suffolk 

Sullivan 2741 

Tioga... 

Tompkins 4277 

Ulster 5697 

Warren 3274 

Washington 5178 

AVayne 5527 

Westchester 6043 

Wyoming S8T7 

Yates... 2713 



1911 687.. 2868 
1884 525.. 2984 2834, 
3363 161.. 4050 2760 
2533 1973.. 3121 3891 
178 108. with Fulton. 
4103 500.. 5114 4173, 
6355 818.. 8603 5813, 
749.. 20745 25663 
301.. 3111 
4600 

3744 
414.. 10247 



Un. Dem. 
Wa'jB. Seym' 
. &169 10629. 
. 5796 2493. 
. 4285 2733. 
. 4824 3240. 
. 6141 40r2. 
. 7178 3712. 
. 2589 2631. 
. 5084 3795. 
. 2778 3279. 



. 4435 8969. 
. 5005 5419. 
. 9^ 11783. 
. 2607 1866. 
. 2325 2250. 
. 2693 26'S. 
. 3491 2.5.59. 
. 2561 3757. 
with Fulton. 
. 4576 3413. 
. 7633 5176. 
. 12922 19554. 

2476. 

8097. 
5501 

7461 



Pbes't,'61. Pbeb't,'60. 

Un.Dem. Rep. Dem. 
: Lincoln. McClel. Lin.- Others. 

. 10206 12984.. 9835 11145 

. 6240 2561.. 6448 2530 

. 5003 3139.. 4554 2876 

. 5506 3575.. 5955 3109 

. 7531 4408.. 7922 8954 

. 8700 3992.. 8181 S<J73 

. 8292 8109.. 2949 2478 



. 8471 3546. 

. 4876 5-i40. 

. 3983 2063. 

. 5297 4249. 

. 7201 6643. 

. 13061 13370. 

. 3224 2164. 

; 2972 2887; 

. 4030 2772. 

. 3087 8897. 
with Fulton. 

. 5087 4207. 

. 85:2 5^2. 

. 20838 25T26. 

. 3078 2911. 



. 8961 3270 

. 5108 4722 

. 3893 1712 

. 5001 3212 

. 6?63 6071 

. 12430 10835 

. »451 1793 

. 3103 2402 

. 8111 2897 

. 4464 2456 

. 3137 3531 
with Fulton. 

. 5302 8362 

. 8796 5581 




6771 

4493 2390 

" 1466 



In 186.3, The whole vote for Secretary of State was 599,289; Chauncey M. Depew (Union), 
over Daniel B. St. .Tohn (Dem.), 29,405.— In 1864, the entire vote on amending the Constitution 
so as to permit soldiers who are qualified voters at home to vote while in service iu the army 
or navy ovit of the State, was 806,874 ; majority in favor, 210,71fi.— In 1862, whole vote (or Gover- 
nor was 602,5-16; Horatio Seymour (Dem.1, having 10,752 majority over James S. Wndsworth 
(Union).— In 1864, whole vote for Qovernor was 730,821 , Reuben E. Fenton (Union), having a 
malority of 8,293 over Iloratlo Seymonr (Dem). In 1864, the whole vote for President, taking 
highest'Elector on each ticket, was 730,721, (the highest vote ever given In the State); Lincoln's 
raatority, 6,749. In 1860, the whole vote for President was 675,150; Lincoln's msOorlty over the 
Democratic Fusion ticket, being 50,136. 

VOTB FOB OTHBR STATB OFFICERS, 1804. 

Officers. UiiinninlK. D/'morrnts. m.yfaj. 

Ltevt^nant-Oovernor. . .Thomas G. Alvord 369,365 ; David R. Floyd Jones. . .861,849. .7,716 

Canal Commissioner . . .Franklin A. Alberger 369,367 ; Jarvis Lord 361,642. .7,735 

Inwector of Prisons. . . .David P. Forrest 869,428 ; David B. McNeil .361,313. .8,115 

Average vote 868,387 861,601.. 7,786 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S66. 



XXI. Conkling. Kernsn. 

KaUfonl., Oneida 11906 10816 

1612; Roscoe Conkllng over Fran- 



Perrv. 



2^ cis Kernan, 

91o?j XXU. Holmes. 

iMadison 6114 

13033 Oswego 8534 



Total. 



14638 



OISS 



9781 



CONGRESS, 1864. iT. Smith (irreg. Dem.) had 311 

I>iaiiote. Vuion. Democrat.] x. Larkin, R«.ifnr,i 

I. Curtis. Taber Putnam 1418 

QneenB 4211 5393 Kockland 1889 

Bichmond 1571 28^4 Westchester 7411 

Sttflolk 4241: 4015 

Total 10218 

Total 10023 12232 TTm. Radford over Francis 

Stephen Taber over George Larkin, 2815. 

"W. Onrtis, 2209. I XL Murrav. Wiufield. SidneyT.Holmesover Alber 

I— Vacaucv. Stebbins. Townsend Orange 6782 6485 t US Perry, 4857. 

Queens....; 4079 5002 SuIUvan 2954 3490! xxiii. Davis. Ruger. 

Richmond 1529 2S30i Cortland 3970 2030 

Snflolk 4089 3996i Total 9786 9976 Onondaga 10830 8434 

1 Charles H.'Winfleldover Am-, 

Total 9697 11838 brose S. Murray, 240. j Total 14800 lO-lOl 

Dwlght Townsendover Hen-i xn. Ketcham. Nelson. |_ Thomas T.Davis over Wm.C. 

ry G. Stebbins, 2131. IColumbia 4877 

II. Maddoi. Bergen. Dutchess 7352 

Brooklyn,&c 8829 13630 

Tennis G. Bergen over Sam-; Total 12229 

nelT. Maddox,4S01. | John H. Ketcham ove 

IIL Humphrer.Foron. A. Nelson, 670. 

Brooklvn, part 11752 11168, xiu. Gates 

James Humphrey over Thorn- Greene 3068 

a8H.Faron,584. ; Ulster... 

IV. P.rvant..Tone9.Walali 

N.Y.Clty,W'd 1.. 87 1333 744 Total 

2.. 20 280 169j Edwin N. Hubbell over Theo- Ontarl 
" 3. . 159 313 169 dore B. Gates, 1545. Tates . 

" 4.. 151 1154 1309 1 :av. Gardiner Goodvear 

5.. 798 983 1059! Albany 10148 12789 Total 12763 8962 

" 6. . 71 2846 687 Schoharie 2799 4708 Daniel Morris over Barzillal 

8. . 398 2666 1375 Slosson, 3801. 

Total 12942 174971 XXVI. HotcEkiss. Maeee 

Total 1684 9605 55121 Charles Goodyear over John Broome 4927 3075 

Morjgan Jones (Tammany; H. Gardiner, 4555. Schuyler 2159 1836 

over Carolan O'B. Bryant, 7921;, xv. Griswold.VanAUtvne. Tioga 3713 2944 

over Wm. Walsh (Moiart;, 4093. Rensselaer 9118 d283!TomDliins.. . 4444 i951 

V. Kllery Taylor. MaclaT.[ Washington 6183 S6i5| 

N. Y., Ward 7... 963 2549 1537j Total. 15543 10806 

10. ..1478 1788 559 Total 15251 129261 Giles W.Hotchklss over John 

13... 813 1955 973' John A. Griswold oyer Wm. Magee, 4737. 

'"-- *■-" ""-^ XXVII. Ward. ilcNett 



5176|Buger, 4836. 

6383 XXIV. romeroT. 

'Cayuga "tSSt 

11559 Seneca 2625 

Wayne 6015 

Hubbell. ! Total 16027 

3849 Theodore M. Pomeroy over 
7524iGeorge W. Cnyler,5195. 

1 XXV. Morris. Slosson. 

Livingston 4453 3H6 



4311 



11832 



3006 



1664 



" 14... 667 2980 1217, A. Van Alstyne, 

; XVI. Kellogg, 

Total 3921 9272 4286 Clinton 3437 

Nelson Taylor (Tammany), Essex 3228 



'I] 
over Epes P. EUery, 
Wm. B. Maclay (Mozart), 4986. 

VI. Ravmuud. Ward Norton. Hawkins. 

Ward' 9.... 3106 2619 920 486 
" 15.... 1906 1486 249 370 
"• 16.... 2303 2824 478 541 

Total... P15 6929 1647 1347 

Henry J.ftaymond over Ell- 

iahWard ( fam.) , &%: over Eli P. 

Norton (Mozart) ,5668; overRneh 

C. Hawkins (irreg. Union), 5968. 



N.Y.,Ward 11.... 2256 



Warren 2323 



Jray.; Allegany 5944 2506 

3473 Chemung 3230 3063 

2051| Steuben 7771 5602 

2151 

1 Total 16915 11176 

Total. 8988 7675 Hamilton Ward over Andrew 

Orlando Kellogg ovcrj. McNett,5769. 

Thomas - S. Gray, 1313. xxviii. Hart. Angle. 

XVII. Hulburd. AveriU. Monroe 9422 *117 

Franklin 2706 1785 Orleans ; . . . . 3059 2124 

St. Lawrence.... 10177 3874 

Total 13081 11841 

Total 13183 5659 Eoswell Hart over James L. 

Calvin T. Hulburd over Wm. Angle, 1240. 

Aira>.i11 'TK'iA '■ XXI.X. 



Van Horn. Willelt. 
.... 3923 2790 

2812 Niagara 4712 4201 

3880 Wyoming 4039 2542 



J. Averill, 7524. 

XVI (I. Marvin. 

4949 Fulton & Hamilton .2899 

6564 Montgomery 3411 

— — Saratoga 5990 

Total 5638 11513, Schenectady 2153 23891 Total. . . 12671 9588 

John Wlnthrop Chanler over Burt Van Horn over James 

William Boardman, 5877. Total 14453 135T2 M. Willott, 313S. 

viii. Doiige. Brooks. Barr. James M. Marvin Over Alon-i XX.\. Hollev. llumplirev. 

N.Y.. Ward 18. .^735 2831 1212!z« C.Paige, 881. Erie 12861 133S1 

" 20. .2873 3389 1824 xi-K. Huhbard. Sturges.l James M. Humphrey over 

-■" 3920,Samuel J.Holley,370. 

""■ "XXI. Van Aernam. ButtoB. 



Total 8435 8583 4514 Otsego 

James Brooks over Wm. E. 
Dodge, 148 ; over Thomas J. 
Barr (Tammany), 4,039. - 

I.\ Darling. Wood. Herriok, 

N.Y., Ward 12.. 1815 1236 99( 

19. .2052 1174 1959 

22.. 2455 2339 1442 



.6384 5981|Cattaraugus 5878 S4S3 

Chautauqua 8618 

Total 17067 » 14078 1 

Demas Hubbard, Jr., over Total 13996 .7874 



Hezekiah Sturges, 2989. 



Hubbard. 
4109 
5720 



Herkimer 

Jefferson 

;Lewi8 3052 2875 

Total 5822 4749 4397 

Wm. A. Darling over Fernan- Total 16141 12704 

do Wood CMozart),1073: over Addison H. Laflin over Fred- 
Anson Herrlck (Tarn.) 1425. J.ierickW. Hubbard, 3737. 



LEGisLATirr.E, 1865. 
Senate. Anftem. J. Ballot. 
Unionists.... 21 76.. 97 
Democrats.. .11 52.. 68 



60 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1365. 



Towns Fenton.Saym' 
IColdsprlng.... 80 



Albany city 1. 



Tote for Gov. hyToicns. 
ALBANT COUNTY. |^S;,"ewang^o . . .195 

18&1. ^ , Vi- -D««- Dayton . 170 -.;o 

iSS Iifi'Farmersvine..212 53 

A 4W SS FrankUnvnie .IM 184 

5-1?^ |gJ Great Valley.. 170 137 

§• Im qm Hinsdale 190 151 

■fS qfii Humphrey.... 88 86 

^" iSlIachaa.... lO^l 109 

Leon 225 



Towns. Fenton.Pevmonr., Town.. Fento».Sevii»nr 

Pomft-et 524 S37Copake 210 224 

Portland 26» 



" 9. 723 979|: 

" 10.1114 961 

Total Alb'y.5039 7551 

Bethlehem.... 54d 571 

Berne S.5 839 

Coeynians .... 235 462 

Guildcrland 451 2(9 

Knox 30O 1S2 

Kcwdcotland. 43l -46 

Renssel'rville. 2t>7 473 
AVatervliet . . .2:.^ 

Westerlo 3i 



uittle Valley. 

[A-ndon 

Machlas 



144 



343 

Total ....1025012929 
Swmonr'amaj. 2679, 
ALLEGANY CO. 

Alfred 290 45 

Allen 200 

Alma „35 

Almond 234 

Amity 28o 

Andover ^ 

Angelica 2b3 

Belfast 23o 

Blrdsall ^92 

Bolivar 147 

.fBurns I'J 

Caneadea ^jj 

Centervine ...216 
Clarlis-viile ...164 

Cuba 310 

Friendship ...282 

Genesee I'l 

Granger 210 

Grove 97 

Hume ^1 

Independence.225 
New Hudson. .23a 

Uushford 340 f 

Sclo 184 159 

Word 108 54 

wlllsviile ....297 226 
West Almond. Ill 50 

Willing 15; 71 

Wirt .....^ _64 

Total G2G2 2555 

Fenton'smaj. 3707. 
BROOME COUNTY 

Barker .201 13S 

Bingbamton .ITC <58 
Chenango .... 2.6 114 

Colesvifie.... 136 10 

Conklin ...... 408 

Kirk wood.... 150 

LlBle S'J9 

Maine.., 341 

Nantlcok-e... lo8 
PortCrano... 2.^3 

Sanford ^3 

Triangle 813 

XTnion »» 

Vestal 226 

Windsor 882 



Napoli 206 

New Albion... 221 

Olean 2i2 

Otto 200 

Perrysburgh..233 

Persia 148 

Portville 203 

Randolph 205 

Salamanca.... 187 
South Valley.. 70 
Yorkshire ....201 



Total 5580 3518 

Fenton'smaj. 2002. 
CAYUGA COUNTY. 
Auburn, 1st W. 430 284 
» '2d " . 319 184 
" 3d " . 291 183 

" 4th" . 250 815 

Total, Aub..l299 916 

Aurelius 231 272 

Brutus 338 216 

Cato 341 158 

Conqnest 229 186 

Fleming 201 84 

38jLedyard 349 99 

OOLocko 205 6b 

giMentz 293 244 

63iMontezuma... 154 163 

63iMoravia 305 100 

Niles 285 195 



168 Gallatin 199 151 

142 Germantown...l71 123 

156 Ghent 331 267 

(iO Greenport 121 170 

153 Hillsdale 253 281 

i:il Hudson, istWd.llS 195 
2J9| " 2d " .129 275 
— " 8d " .328 195 

Total 8762 3952 " 4th " .213 266 

Fenton'smaj. 4810. Total, Hud'n. 714 '.Bl 
r'TTi?\fTTvr' rci Klnderhook....38t 419 

T^ninSF,?"^ <^?-i,JLiving8ton 236 229 

5ig,?>'8 168 2^^ Stockport 163 101 

Stnvvesant 161 298 

Taghkanlc 124 203 

Do.Ulty,l8tW.183 110 



Sheridan 221 

Sherman . . . ; . .250 

Stockton 285 

Villenova .... .213 
Westfleld 481 



.315 



Total 4906 5236 

™= ?ia Seymour's maj. 330. 
"^ ^^^ CORTLAND CO. 

Cincinnatn8....l66 136 



Owasco . „. , ,. 

■ 805 12( 

Sempronius... 190 80 

Sennett 249 115 

Springport....270 189 

Sterling 3r0 217 

Summer HiU.. 217 /jS 

Throop 157 140 

Venice 375 91 

Victory 286 145 

Total 7560 4403 

Fenton'smaj. 3157. 
CHAUTAUQUA CO 

99 
44 

206 



8d 

4th" .^41 253 

Total. Elm'..i206 iJi;Cortlandville..845 

l^\^cheads:::i! |??Kwn::::::| | 
^?n«^::::::i^ ^X^-::^^ 2! 
^^t"'^'^ £! if Sfa^rltU- :;:;::2ii m 

Total 330r SllOfreble 162 16-3 

Fenton's maj . 197. Scott . . 2« -0 

CHENANGO CO .^^l|°V°,^;: ; ! ! ! ! ! " ! Im ^89 

Afton 261 182Trnxton 1S6 218 

Bainbridge 281 131 ir^?^r.'!::::::::306 no 

Columbus 2&. ^ willett 115 125 

Coventry 240 172i 

Gertoan 104 74 xotal 4005 2082 

|=d.:::::::| | ^^lt^^%r6. 

J;;?'Y,*Ch 527 516 ij^. i- ,^jg 240 

Otselic 2fal lo3 ^j.aniiiin 528 288 

Pjtchcr 196 l|gt?p%°rtfie,d:::i63 ?61 

Ply"»°^0* 124 ipKortright 203 239 

f f tvl*^?.,;; 1^ ov] Masonville 221 161 

Imi hvm« 161 2-4 Meredith , 2S0 107 

iSJli^i ^« ^o:|Middletown ...285 412 

Smyrna ^ _8v jjoj^jjuy 203 327 

CLFNTON COUNTY Waltou 437 

Altona 144 120 

Ausable 205 276 

Beekmantown .271 2:s3 

Blackbrook....l56 2U 

Champlain 329 320 Amenia. 

Chazy 401 lag Beekinan 



Arkwright 

134 Bust! 318 

137iCarroU 297 

135| Charlotte 210 

65 Chautauqua ..404 
106 Cherry Creek.2U 

S33 ciymer 273 

146 Dunkirk 539 

242,Ellery 324 

219IElllcott 911 

228'Ellington 367 

iFrench Ci-eek.l02 

Total 4994 3144;Gcrry 267 

Fenton'smaj. 1850. Hanover &a 

CATTARAUGUS CO. "armony <o9 

Allp'Tanv ....179 238 klantone »b 

Ashford^.;:":230 143 Mlna 188 

Oarroltou 



22i 



Poland':: ::.... -268 49 



Totjil 5338 4200 

Fentbn's maj. 1133. 
DUTCHESS CO. 

312 211 

„. „,, x^cc=..-<.^ 219 75 

Clinton 3d 22. cunton 237 211 

Dannemora.... 83 63 po^er 249 255 

EUenburgh ....200 2m Ea8tFi8hkni...l94 315 

Morns 372 295 p,^kill 867 917 

Pern S&J 259H^epart 375 306 

Plattsburgh....523 596 f ^^j^range 213 233 

Saranac 218 SOi^jji^n. ..210 IBl 

Schuyler Fall3.183 188 Northeast '. 2:56 l« 

Total ..,...3186,3540,^",^e"pilins-::::f9^ 130 

Seymour's maj. 54. pleasant Valley263 2.35 

COLUMBLA CO. Poughkeepsle..291 S65 

Ancram 173 224 '*^ C"*? i-''^''' i^S 

Austerlitz 212 1431 " 2.401 208 

Canaan 201 1441 " " S.S89 506 

Chatham .556 4231 " " 4.40! 216 

Claverack . . .403 S98 Red Hooft 339 456 

Clermont. .. 40 171!Rl»inebeck *43 347 



THE TRIBtTNE ALMANAC FOR 1SC5. 



Town?!. Fenton.Sevmour. 1 Towns, Fenton.Pevmonr. 

etaoford 270 214lFort Covington22'7 149 

Union Vale.... 25-3 114 Franklin 114 91 

Washington... 306 207 HarrletBtown . . 23 83 

JIalone 709 306 

Total TS05 6o93 Moira 148 158 

Fenton's maj. Tl-:;. iWestTllle m 111 

F.RIECOUXTT. J 



Altlen 20T 

Amherst 296 

Aurora 33^ 

Brandt 147 

Boston ISl 

Boflalo 1 329 

2 783 

8 440 



31C1 



Total , 



5863 1859 



" B 751 

C 694 

" 7 717 

" 8 318 

" 9 719 

" 10 760 

" 11 419 

" 12 269 

" 13 163 

Tot.Bnftalo.7057 
Cheektowaga .296 

Clarence 439 

Colrlcn 175 

Collins 370 

Concord 396 

E. Hambnrgh.250 

Eden 211 

Elma 226 

Evana 340 

Grand Island. .124 
Hamburgli ....190 

Holland 141 

Lancaster 322 

Marilla 175 

KewBtead 457 

Korth Collins. 223 

Sardinia 256 

Tonawanda...in 

Wales 176 

West Seneca.. 127 



52()! Fenton'8 maj . 1004 
199; FULTOJI coins TT. 

135 Bleecker 38 135 

207,Broadalbin 318 ^0 

jetCaroga ....37 71 

503|Ephratali 231 267 

534 Johnstown ... .1230 775 

597 Ma vfleld 293 221 

991 ICorthampton . .161 219 
952 Oppenheim ....216 315 

798 Perth 128 98 

579 Stratford 113 122 

394: 

3701 Total 2765 2493 

201] Fenton'Bmaj.272. 
??-t GENESEE COTTNTY. 

J.i'i Alabama 303 104 

'?Sg Alexander 283 119 

iVgBatavla 614 595 



154 

ii;^ Byron." 266 109 

?5!Darlen 262 195 

i?:^Elba 251 199 

SSLeRoy 515 444 

SSOakfield 106 103 

^SPaviUon 242 147 

„S Pembroke 375 256 

y^^Stattord 241 134 

452' 



209i 



'i7 Lexington 71 -„ 

NewBaltlmore.217 3S6 

Prattsville 83 22't 

Windham 193 214 



Total 4050 2760 

23Q ' Fenton'8 maj . 1290. 
141 1 GREENE COtTSTTT. 

185 Ashland 152 95 

352 Athens 253 806 

147, Cairo 250 315 

2S3Cat8kni 674 te7 

— Coxsackle 353 S9t 

Total ...13055 13398 I>urham 305 820 

Seymour's maj. 313. jGreenville 280 261 

•pcoir-r rnnvTV Halcott 81 68 

_?- :?- . .2n 21S?°°tcr "" '^ 

Crown Point 

Ellzabethtown.228 

Essex 141 141 

Jay 270 

Keene 119 26 

iil^rva ■ • ^t^ ^ii Total 3121 8391 

MoriaT.:::::::^ ^ Seyinom-'8maJ.770. 

Newcomb 29 6 HEKKLMER CO. 

North Elba 33 42 Columbia 282 185 

North Hudson. 69 80 Danube 204 162 

St. Armand. ... 57 22 Fairfield 243 154 

Schroon 213 128 Frankfort ......392 819 

Ticonderoga...3ol 20-2 German Flatts. 619 &yi 

Westport 208 149 Herkimer 267 407 

Willsboroneh..l64 101 Little Falls 491 714' 

Wilmington.... 127 125 Litchfield 218 128 i 

Manheim 184 2a5 

Total 8229 2162 Nc^rpo^t 846 106 

Fenton'smal.1067. iNorway 129 83 j 

FRANKLlSr CO, lohio 109 120 j 

Bangor 321 118 Russia 860 1S3 i 

Belmont 106 94 Salisbury 317 148 I 

Bombay 117 157 Schuyler 240 140 

Brandon 90 41 Stark 219 171 

Brigliton 26 11 Warren 203 242 

Burke 136 183 Wlnfield 275 94 

Chateanguey . . .251 272, Wllmurt 16 20 

Constable 141 75 -— 

Dickinson 800 44 Total 5114 4173 

Duane 24 16! Fenton'8maJ.941. 



HAMILTON CO. 

ToH-u3. Fenton.Sevmonr 

Whole County..319 8811 Avon 831 

Seymour's maj. 162. Caledonia... 211 

JEFFERSON CO. g^Slleo 850 

Adams 557 187 r®°^|?.('- V • • ^, 

tn'twp",^'^* • • • -fj ^? LeTester^.--. ! m 

Antwerp 483 24lTim« <fi>n 

?^°^H^^J.tnrf^ i4^™f^i •;:::;: ^i 

Cape \incent.. 289 326 ^.^ i^nrria <!T7 

ga^"^ f4 lif N.D^nJyille: 346 

HenderBon 843 158 p^n "'e 178 

Honnsfield 378 264 Sparta 1« 

Leray 443 311 gg^f '^;^ •;" • iif 

Lorraine 183 150 ?P^'?|Tr^;f '• ^ 



York.. 



Lj-me 

Orleans 

Phil'artl*1,;hYn---?S9 iJsl Total.... 4600 3535 
Rodman!^.'.":::! '»? Fenton'8 maj. 1065. 

Rutland 302 142l MADISON COUNTY 

Theresa 321 250iBrookfleld .. 578 350 

Watertown....890 726 Cazenoyia... 611 392 

Wilna 475 372!»eRuyter... 310 117 

Worth 56 78Eaton 557 294 

— iFenner Zt6 117 

Total 8603 5813 Georgetown. 272 76 

Teuton's maj. 2790. I Hamilton "™ 



KINGS COUNTY. 
Brooklyn 1.. 492 

8:; 

" 4.. 



Lebanon. 

Lenox 1082 822 

Madison 402 149 

Nelson • 248 180 

813 1023smithfield... 265 54 
1204 6T2,stockbrldge. 265 151 
1140 1053,SuUivan .... 477 675 

817 1888 

991 1702 Total.... 6221 3744 
1091 1180 Fenton'8 maj. 2477. 
52"^ »^4! MONROE COUNTY. 



9.. 1079 17IS5 BH„hton 

10- 1§?9 236ogSifi'!!°?'.:::: m ss 

Jo-- ^ J5??Clarkson.... 235 168 

}i--ilS 1^? Gates 241 277 

J?-- M?S ???o Greece 311 454 

}i-- S? lii§ Hamlin 389 128 

}?-• i%5 1^ Henrietta. .. 273 207 

J6..1399 lj.<4 irondeqnoit. 254 .344 

JI-- ??2 i2*Mendon 291 310 

Jo-- *in K«Ogden 306 298 

in- 1-ffi iftSiPllmer 433 ir3 

20.. iiib luDS ppfifipi/i ans W1 

Total City .19907 24379 ^ISnton.:::: 418 258 



167 



Flatbnsh 
Flatlands.:. 
Gravesend . 
New Lots... 251 
New Utrecht 126 



224 



213 Pittsford . 

lloRiga 230 

133 Rochester 1. 265 

2. 823 

8. 480 

4. 260 

6. 296 



Total Co.20745 2566! 

Seymour's maj. 4924. 

LEWIS COUNTY. 

Croghan 90 279 

Denmark 411 172 " 9. 821 

Diana 150 170 " 10. 547 

Greig 173 196i " U. 249 890 

Harrisburg 165 107 " 12. 2S9 294 

Highmarket. . . . 27 176i " 13. 292 213 

Lewis 55 207 Total F^och.. 4383 4445 

Leyden 249 186 Rush 186 155 

LowvlUe 403 183 Sweden 529 821 

Martinsburg . . .368 169 Webster 873 211 

Montague 79 54 Wheatland . . 817 210 

New Bremen... 107 2531 „ . 

Osceola 69 76 Total ... .10347 9078 

Pinckney 153 128 Fenton's maj. 1169. 

Turin 291 1)0 MONTGOMERY CO. 

AVat8on 221 136 Amsterdam ... .654 535 

WestTurin 194 284 Cana1oharie....446 451 

Charleston 281 185 

Total 3111 2896 Florida 289 423 

Fenton's maj. 213. iGlen 321 851 



191 



63 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



Towns. Fonton. Sevtnonr.l Towni. Fenton Pevmour. 

I MSnden 580 588|Verona Cfif m 

Mohawk 

Palatine ,, „„^ 

Boot 143 262 

St. Jolin8vme..261 899 



861 Vienna. 

.215 395 1 "Western 257 

We8f.morelan(14S4 
Whitestown. 519 



NEW TOKK CO. 
New York City, 



21S2 



Total.... 12075 10933 
Teuton's maj. 1152. 
ONONDAGA CO. 

Camillas 3U 267 

Cicero 506 198 



3 221 

4 897 2428 

5 1012 2030 

347 S434 

7 1199 4060 

H 1520 3274 

8504 8809 

10 1626 2.368 

11 1885 5473 

12 127T 2485 

18 1082 2762 

14 809 4251 

15 2228 1972 

16 2867 3454 

17 .... 8362 7049 



Clay 515 228 

SOOtDeWltt 



1918 3589 



" 21 2783 4129 

" 22 ._2343_4138 

Total . . . .86310 73537 
Seymour's inaj. 37227, 
NIAGARA CO. 

Cambria 286 145 

Hartland.... 428 264 
Lewiston.... 288 218 
Lockport.... 12S1 1222 



New fane . 



278 



Elbridge 391 503 

Fabius 386 134 

Geddes 290 254 

Lafayette 309 249 

Lysander 65a 421 

Manlius 766 601 

Marcellus 378 187 

Onondaga 0G2 482 

Otlfico. 234 161 

Pompey 565 320 

Salina: 222 328 

Skeneatele8....452 381 

Spafford 235 164 

Syracuse. 1 275 490 

•' ■' 2 393 497 

8 217 3-20 

4 476 431 

5 344 834 



0ELEA2fS COUNTY. I QUEENS COUNTY, 

ci^e",''"'^ if; l^&town ::::::6lli2r2 

^f^f^n ■■■■#,? i-^No.Hemp8tead.530 411 

Murray. ::::::::2^ -^93 oyster ifay 601 _953 

S^^T*y S^ 2/1 Total 4307 5405 

Tntnl 37r.q 2442 Berlin 234 228 

Fjnt^^.Vmkj!fl7r|Brunsw.^^^^^^^ 365 

OSWEGO COUNTY. Grafton.. 245 184 

Albion 293 185'Greenbush .... 304 581 

Amboy 134 leiHoosick ... 510 4<6 

Boylston 139 77,Lan8lngburgh. ..% 4^ 

Constantia 384 332 Nassau . ... . . 4b6 ^ 

Granby 439 849 N. Greenbtisb. 221 300 

Hannibal 478 239^Pet^rBbur(;h. . . 214 167 

Hastings 418 280 Pittstown .... 527 2ito 

Mexico 600 mPoestenkill... ■■"« 

New Haven.... 381 75Sandlake.. 

Orwell 183 127 Schaghticoke 

Oswego .530 241,Schodack 

Oswego City 1.284 3S9!Steplientown 

" " 2.248 334,Troy 1 



' 8 354 198 

Total Syracufle3128 3165 

TuUy.: 256 144 

Van Buren 403 829 



Pendleton... 

Porter 

Eoyalton.... 
Somerset — 
Wheatfleld.. 
Wilson 



368 885 



129 



ONEIDA COUNTY. 

AnnsviUe.... 304 31 

Augusta 317 l! 

Ava..: 1-^ 1. 

Boonville.... 582 4' 

Bridgewater 195 1 

Camden 496 2 

Doerfleld.... 840 

Florence 12o 

Floyd 140 

Kirkland.... 497 

Lee 83.3 

Marcy ,. 183 

Marshall..... 290 

NewHartford 537 

Paris, 530 

Kemsen 376 

Borne 770 

Saugerfleld.. 246 

Steuben 2.S4 



Total 11023 8-..^ 

Fenton's maj. 2326. 
ONTARIO COUNTY. 

,„„ Bristol 252 120 

170 canadlce 149 57 

Canandaigua . .760» 666 
E.BloomSeld..288 164 
Farmlngton....282 89 

Gorham 800 252 

Hopewell 216 173 

-—.Manchester . . . .390 371 

4176 Naples 348 144 

PUelps 502 577 

Richmond 2.56 76 

Seneca 925 853 

South Bristol . .153 89 

Victor 301 237 

W. Bloomfleld .875 89 



Total 5457 3957 



422 Blooni'g Grove.283 160 

180 Chester 194 2U 

42^ Cornwall S80 412 

366 Crawford 189 280 

189'Deerpark 586 683 

2Uj Goshen 297 407 

261 Greenville 76 184 

287 Hamptonburgh 88 150 

252 1 Highland.. 194 52 

1240|MJnl8lnk 78 187 

285l Monroe 170 176 

10l!Montgomery...477 349 



196 2*4 

8:24 253 

SSi 305 

395 511 

322 183 



3.425 482 
" " 4.4i;5 358 

Total O. City. 1422 1513 

Parish 259 176 

Palermo S77 112 

Bedfleld 98 116 

Richland 583 299 

Schnupel 422 857 

rnuy 'creek... 380 187 

criba 403 2C8 



Willlamstown .103 181 

Total 8798 6220 

Fenton's ma], 2578. 
OTSEGO COUNTY. 



. 53T 853 

. 3:37 128 

. 414 271 

. 410 182 

. 256 323 

. 8T3 573 

. 235 869 

. 180 740 

. 470 376 

.3577 4385 



Trenton ; . . . . 590 2!J5 , Mt. Hope 

trtlca. 1 105 205Newbnrgh 

" 2 290 

8 445 

" 4 463 



1604 1409 

331 !Now Windsor. .221 257 

Smithfield 157 105 



" 6 842 532 

" 7 876 340 

Total mica 2183 2473 

Vernon 427 250, 



WalklU 907 

Warwick 532 555 

Wayawanda...l84 206 



Burlington 285 199 

Butternuts 383 188 

Clierry Valley .212 330 

Decatur 86 118 

Edmeston 267 200 

Exeter 252 109 

Hartwick 285 280 

Laurens 248 231 

Maryland 253 810 

Middlefield....2.51 427 

Jillford 271 320 

Morris 319 244 

New Lisbon.... 193 231 

Oneonta 328 280 

Otego 2!)1 258 

Otsego 532 523 

Pittsleld 201 

Plainfleld 227 

Richfield 279 151 

Roseboom 225 203 

Springfield..... 224 371 

Xfnadilla 247 372 

AVestford 164 184 

Worcester 234 289 

Total 6167 60^ 

Fenton's maj. 117. 
PUTNAM CO. 

Carmel 277 24? 

Kent .....157 180 

Patterson 214 11 

Phinipstown...421 56 
Put. Valley ....126 23 
Southeast 251 278 

Total 1146 1616 

Seymour's maj. 170, 



Total Troy. 

Total 9174 9375 

Seymour's maj. 201. 
IIICHMOND CO. 

Cestleton 518 757 

Middletown....l89 824 

Northfield 357 528 

Southfield 158 427 

Westfield 363 350 

Total 1.tS5 2888 

Seymour's maj. 1301. 

ROCKLAND CO. 

Clarkstown....227 578 

Haverstraw 394 692 

Orangetown . . .449 579 
Ramapo 358 444 

Total lis 22^ 



72 



56 



Brasher 292 

Canton 738 

Colton 187 

Dekalb 475 

Depeyster 197 

Edwards 199 

Fine 66 

Fowler 228 130 

Gouverneur....514 154 

Hammond 288 55 

Hermon 218 182 

Hopklnton 815 52 

Lawrence 48i> 82 

Lisbon 766 135 

Louisville 190 140 

Macomb 173 106 

Madrid .353 86 

Massena 279 14* 



MorriBtown....lMl 

Norfolk 221 

Oswegatchie...982 

Parishvllle 4?2 

Pierpont 401 

Pltcaim 79 



THE TRIBUKE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



53 



Towns. renton.Seymour.f Totms. Fent(>n.Sermoiir. 

Potsdam lOU 282 Jnnlns 155 155 

Rossle 179 135Lodl 245 245 

Ruseell 362 175 Ovid 270 276 

Stockholm 661 102 Eomulns 179 225 

W'a(idinetoii....S43 104 Seneca Falls... 542 713 

iTyre 160 155 

Total 10904 40531 Variek 210 217 

Fenton'smaj.BSol. Waterloo 354 516 

Eaatt^r^**'' 11S%J Total i^ iii 

CbarltonV.-.V.-.-.m 194 Seymour's maj. 546. 
Clifton Park... 376 249 STEUBEN COIINTT. 

Corinth 279 41 Addison 191 179 

Day 86 156lAvoca 39S 168 

Edlnburgb 791 152lBatli 822 534 

Galway! 290 220 Bradford 107 137 

Greenfield 444 197 Cameron 217 87 

Hadley 128 61 Campbell 276 104 

Halfmoon 824 S34 Canisteo 326 152 

Malta .'....157 162 Caton 268 80 

Milton 499 486Coliocton 329 215 

Korean 262 174 Corning 576 612 

Nortlinmberl'd.210 141 Dansville 183 281 

Providence ....155 121 Erwin 233 159 

Saratoga 522 278 Fremont 137 133 

" Sprlng8.837 608 Greenwood ....144 112 

Still-water 2S4 379 Hartsvllle 135 73 

"Waterford 306 378 Hornby 179 94 

Wilton 215 lOOiHornellsville . .468 527 

Howard &45 191 

Total 5923 4712 Jasper 280 97 

Fenton'8 maj. 1310. Lindley 124 62 

SCHENECTADY CO. Prattsbnrgb ...2^ 320 

Dnanesburg ...440 278 Pnltney m 14, 

Glenville 349 896,Rathbone l^b 99 

Kiskaynna 95 89iThurBton... .1.9 82 

Princetown....l43 80 TroapsburgU . .277 151 

Rotterdam ....2C2 252 Tnscarora 197 ,8 

Schenec'y.lW.m 189|Urbana 231 202 

" 2" 186 189 Wayland 216 297 

.225 257 Wayne 109 ''° 



5' 
Total City. 



.285 295 
.192 283 
.995 1213 



West Union.... 137 101 

AVheeler 158 141 

WoodbuU 823 111 



Total 6123 5804 

Fenton'iiinaJ.2319. 
SUFFOLK COUNTY. 
Brookhaven 



Total 2284 2308 

Seymour's maj. 24. 

SCHOHARIE CO. 

Blenheim 113 182 _ - ^ ^ ooo 

Broome 223 142 Ea6thampton...220 223 

Carlisle 179 247 Huntington ....840 942 

CobleskiU 189 399!lBUp 326 819 

ConesviUe 108 202!Riverhead 387 303 

Esperance 193 129 Shelter Island. 55 29 

Fulton 117 470|Smithtown 169 177 

Gilboa 287 269' ' 

Jeflerson 250 155 

Mlddleburgh...217 465 
Eichmondville.132 859 

Schoharie 183 469 

Seward 154 306 

Sharon 237 402 

Summit 154 268 

Wright 153 331 



Total 2SS6 4793 

Seymour's maj. 1007. 
SCHUYLER CO. 

Catharine 238 122 

Cayuta 50 120 

D«x 398 386 

Hector 829 459 

Montour 280 170 

Orange 256 244 

Reading 236 143 

Tyrone 288 2=' 

Total 2570 18! 

Fenton'8 maj. 680. 
SENECA COUNTY 

Covert 278 261 

Fayette 310 "" 



Total 4327 4038 

Fenton'8 maj. 289. 
SULLIVAN CO. 

Bethel 226 271 

Callicoon 134 872 

Cochecton 136 470 

Falleburg 404 291 

Forestburg .... 53 108 

Fremont 1C8 238 

Highland 07 403 

Lifierty C;n5 280 

Lnmberlond.... 48 157 
Mamakating . . .523 385 
NeverBink.:....257 264 

Rockland 180 149 

Thompson 450 883 

Tusten 56 127 

Total 2773 8548 

Seymour's maj. 575, 
TIOGA COUNTY. 

Barton 500 417 

Berkshire 161 96 

Candor 402 488 



Tomis. rent^nSevmour. 

New ark Valley .879 165 

Nichols., 268 160 

Oweeo 1237 924 

Eichford 201 110 

Spencer 259 215 

Tioga 301 439 



■WAYNE COUNTY. 

Towns. Fenton.Serraonr. 

Arcadia 628 609 

Butler 386 150 

Galen 503 470 

Huron 383 158 

Lyons 506 594 



irrr Macedo 



.410 



229 



Marion 

Ontario 398 157 

Palmyra 484 487 

Rose 306 202 

Savannah 275 156 

Sodus 587 458 

Walworth 289 173 

Williamson ....376 183 

Wolcott 362 853 



Tot.al 3789 8014 

Fenton'8 maj. 775. 
TOMPKINS CO. 

Caroline 849 204 

Danby 340 159 

Dryden 852 820 

Enfleld 268 206 

Groton 594 226 

Ithaca 887 839 

Lansing 401 844 

Newfield 862 830 Total 6117 4413 

Ulysses 456 828 Fenton's maj. 1701. 

rr * 1 1^ 'S^'l TVESTCHESTER CO. 

^Total ,4509 S006 Bedford 421 836 

Fenton's maj. 1503. cortlandt 820 819 

ULSTER COUNTY. lEast Chester... 357 547 

Denning 70 100iGreenburgh....608 826 

Esopns. 458 401iHarri6on lU 104 

Gardiner 182 226 Lewisboro 263 102 

Hardenbergh . . 40 C4lMamaroneck... 88 113 



Hurley ....:.... 291 lOliMorrisanla 575 1097 

Kingston 1294 1807iMt. Pleasant . . .803 509 



Lloyd 

MarWetown ...SSS 378 

Marlborough... 292 232 

New Paltz 246 192 

Olive 306 378 

Plattekill 259 151 

Rochester 239 171 

Rosendale 239' 258 

Saugertles 885 998 

Shandaken 192 610 

Shawangunk ..255 400 
Wawarsing....826 737 
Woodstock .... 215 157 

Total 6958 7719 

Seymotir '8 maj. 761. 

WARREN COUNTY. 

Bolton 178 99 

Caldwell 88 159 

Chester 273 274 

Hague 54 74 

Horicon 170 143 

Johnsburgh ...2.31 257 

Luzerne 206 60 

a'J.l.rcSv.::! I 

Thnnnan.......l07 142 

Warrensbnrghoae 251 

Total 24412152 

Fenton's maj. 289. 
WASHINGTON CO. 

Argyle 482 2W 

Cambridge 859 157 

Dresden 98 57 

Easton 499 140 

Fort Ann 395 290 

Fort Edward.. .371 44 

Granville 485 2.59 

Greenwich 668 237 

Hampton 107 5' 

Hartford 838 134 

Hebron 420 141 

Jackson 228 142 

Kingsbtiry 461 838 

Putnam 134 24 

Salem 450 256 

White Creek... 365 251 

■^^^lltehau .sts 



Newcastle 244 

NewEochelle..2;n 873 

Northca8tle....226 193 

North Salem... 237 110 

441 590 

Pelham 51 126 

Poundridge ... .155 146 

Rye 337 470 

Scarsdale 89 52 

177 150 

Westchester.. ..201 868 

West Farms.... 470 505 

White Plains... 138 229 

Yonkers, 867 1111 

Yorktown 255 264 

Total 7616 mTo 

Seymour's maj. 1694. 
WYOMING CO. 

Attica 289 284 

Bennington 229 812 

Castile 873 114 

China 197 228 

Covington 219 44 

Eagle 208 67 

Gatoesviile 288 113 I 

Genesee Falls.. 132 85 j 

Java 176 268 1 

Middlebnry....813 105 ' 
Orangeville....l83 86 | 

Perry 444 106 I 

Pike 840 82 ! 

Sheldon, 191 213 1 

Warsaw 481 S55 

Wether8field...l30 174 

Total 4146 2563 | 

Fenton's maj. 1583. 
YATES COUNTY. 

Banington 313 151 

Benton 899 183 

Italy 238 65 

Jerusalem 422 242 

Mllo 622 466 

Middlesex 244 56 

Potter :....359 170 

Starkey 410 181 

Torrey 142 184 

Total 3049 1704 

Fenton's maj. 1^. 
Fenton's totalmaJ,889S 



54 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



PENNSYLVANIA. • 

Pkeside»t, 1864. Pkes., 1860. 

CoimUes. Union. Dem. Jiep. Dem. 

Lincoln. McClellan. Line. Others. 

JloiBe. Army. Home. Army. 

Adams 2363 S-W 28SC 139.. 2724 2718 

Allegheny. 19427 2092 11588 826.. 16725 7818 

Armstrong .8165 8S1 8039 202.. »65 2163 

Beaver ..:.. 2993 244 ""'■" ^'■' "°-"' ^""^ 

Be(U(Md....l954 832 

I Ber.-3 6197 513 12929 837. 



. CONGRESS, 1864. 
DistricU, Un. Dem.] Sydenham E. An coaa 
I. Bntler. Randall, over William M. Helat- 
"Mladelphla, er.eiOS. 

Ward 2.... 2231 2120 IX. Stevon^Xorth. 

" 3.... 1170 1445 Lancaster.. 11'204 .7158 
.913 1878 Soldiers.. 600 186 



I Blair 

i Bradford... 6200 6G5 

' Bucks 6196 240 

Butler 8064 411 

Cambria. ...1850 3S8 

Cameron ... 307 28 

Carbon 1612 109 

Centre 2410 -407 

Chester ..."..8076 370 



190.. 3050 1911 

188.. 7091 2219 

100.. 6443 5756 

124.. 3640 2367 

150.. 2277 1877 

6.. [New Co.] 

71.. 1753 1690 

143.. 3021 2105 

159.. 7771 5-173 



Clarion 1655 125 2704 129.. 1829 2090 

Clearfield... 1371 135 2762 89.. 1702 1859 

Clinton 14.i8 208 2012 123.. 1736 1318 

Columbia... 1739 175 3185 182.. 1873 2466 

Crawford... 5904 537 4428 98.. 5779 3045 

Cnmberland3243 S61 4013 843.. 3593 8356 

DauDhin....4927 617 SS26 894.. 4531 2756 

Delaware... 3445 219 2056 85.. 3181 1010 

Elk 290 52 821 14.. 407 52S 

Erie.... A... 6387 

Fayptte 2848 

Franklin . . .3516 

Fulton 605 

Forest 80 

Greene 1433 

i Huntingdon2865 456 2256 221 

Indiana 3764 550 1959 220.. o»iu loua 

Jefferson .. .1614 209 1756 112.. 1704 1145 

Juniata 1276 161 

Lancaster.. 13465 1004 

Lawrence... 3152 256 1324 

Lebanon.... 3581 199 2689 

Lehigh 3681 227 5780 140.. 4170 4291 

Luzerne ... .6646 999 9541 504.. 7300 6803 



14. . 407 

3619 103.. 6160 

3840 286.. aiM 8479 

8562 259.. 107 47 

839 37.. 4151 3213 



113.. 1614 



1644 109.. 1494 
7987 461.. 1335J 
- 65.. 2937 
90. 



1211 



104 2808 90. . 

368 7T72 171.. 

132 1458 38. . 

228 0812 132. . 

3486 122. . 



Monroe 581 

Montgom'y.6501 
Montour.... 998 
Northam'n .»498 

Northumb'd2686 229 

Perry 2018 S83 2148 296 

Phlladmph.51551 4240 4J046 1986 

Pike......... 237 23 1151 "" 

Potter 1167 223 040 

Schuylkill ..7166 ^ ^;,,^ 

Somerset... 2478 310 1631 

Snvder 1521 158 ^""" 

Sullivan .... 330 39 

Su8Quehan'a3846 3.57 

Tioga 4105 568 

Umon 1718 227 

Venango.... 3573 276 
Wairen """" 



9245 295. 




647 



3218 1186 
38.. 1678 975 
23. . 429 498 
64.. 4470 2556 
90.. 4754 1297 
846 



57.. 



2680 1914 



Washington 4526 425 4419 160.. 4724 4074 

, Wayne. ....2003 271 2872 117.. 2857 2620 

Westmorl'd 408-1 566 5683 294.. 4887 4622 

Wvoming. .1179 158 1322 80.. 1286 1215 

Y6rk.......!4888 680 8111 889.. 5123 6633 

Total . . .269679 26712 263967 12^9. .268030 208413 
Porctnt ... 41.(19 4.06 46.09 5.16.. 66.5.=. 4:!. 76 

In 1864, whole vote for President, 572,702 ; Lin- 
coln's maiorltv on. home vote, 5712 ; on army 
vote, 14,363 ; total, 20,075.— In 1860, whole vote 
for President, 476,442; Lincoln's majority, 
59.618.-lu 1863, whole vote for Governor, 523,f.87; 
Andrew 6. Curtin, f/jfion, 269,496; George W. 
Woodward. /)Bm., 254,171; malority for Curtin, 
15,325.— In 1802, vote for And.-Gen. 454,750 ; Thos. 
E. Cochran, ?7« tow, 215,616; Isaac Slenker, Dem. 
219,140 ; Democratic majority, S,524. 



" 4 

" 5. 

6. 

" 11. 

Soldiers 



.1100 

.1000 1284' Total 11804 7341 

. 907 1480 Thaddeus Stevens over 

. 355 210 Henry M. North, 4400. 

' V Fiehei-.nr U8e. 

3408 2312 



Total.... 7742 9764 ^^.^ 

ov'erj%'hn"'M.Wl"scl^uyl'^""-:jEl i^ 
2,022. 

II. O'Neill. Reilly 

Ward 1....19U 10" 



7.... 2164 1355 

8.... 1557 1126 

9. ...1532 1292 

10.... 2324 1119 



Total 10679 11154 

Myer Strouse over 
Howell Fisher, 475. 

XI. Selfridcc-Tohmon. 

Carbon 1465 1945 

Monroe 413 2063 

26 1832 11881 Northampt'n2826 5651 

Soldiers'.:: 447 139 me 150 m 

Wayne 1530 2454 



Total 11767 T290 

Charles O'Neill over 
William M. Keilly, 4477. 

III. Mvera Buckwalter. 
Ward 12... 1342 1257 

" 13... 2033 1353 

, " 10... 1635 1616 

" 17... 1181 2156 

18... 2304 1218 

" 19. . .2449 2.S39 

Soldiers... 523 153 

Total 11467 9992 

Leonard Myers over 

Charles Buckwalter, 

1475. 

IV. Kellev Northrop. 
Ward 14... 2261 1335 

15... 3151 2225 

20... 3193 2491 

" 21... 1609 1339 

■" 24. ..2256 

Soldiers ... 618 158 

Total . 



Total 6384 130O7 

Philip Johnson over 
James L.Selfridge,6623. 

XII. Ketcb«m.Peninflfn. 

Luzerne 5817 7862 

SusQuehannaCSlS 2514 
Soldiers 923 197 

Total 10058 10573 

Charles Denmson over 
Winthrop W.Ketcham, 
515. 

XIII. Mercur.PioUft. 

Bradford ....5798 2618 

Columbia.... 1536 2905 

Montour 912 1308 

Sullivan 319 622 

Wyoming... 1162 1270 

Total 9724 8723 

ITlysses Mercur over 
■Victor E. PioUet, 1001 

XIV.fi.F.MillerW.H.JI: 



<NHmU-D:Kell^a^,i» [«fi ^ 

overCharlesNorthrop,'J^?i«t„»ib'd:2446 82^ 
-. KoJ^n?ler 1457 1^ 



Ward22...20S7 



Union 1816 1255 

Total 11619 11092 



Bucks . .'". : :5945 O'J' George F.Millcr over 

Soldiers ... 395 79 H illiam H. Miller, 517. 

! XV. Eaih-.GloBsbrenner. 

Total 110C7 10729 Cumberland.S404 3803 



Lehigh 3345 5302 Total 10570 13383 

MontgomeryOSlO 7515; Adam J. Glossbren- 
— r ner over Joseph Baily, 

Total 9661 12317,2803. 

B. Markham Boyerl xvi. KoonU.Coffroth. 

over George Bullock,! Adams 2233 2644 

3186. (Bedford 1740 2110 

VII. Broomall.Beattv.lFranklin....3503 &157 

Chester 7426 5377 Fulton 513 803 

Delav,are....S482 1854 Somerset.... 2,512 1392 

' Soldiers... 730 268 

Total 10903 7231 1 

John M. Broomall Total 11242 11174 

over John C. Eeaity, Wm. H. Koontz over 
8677. Alexander n. Coffroth, 

VIII. Heist*r. Ancnn!!. OS. 

Berks 5577 11917 XVII. Barker. Tohnston. 

Soldiers ... 394 159 Blair 2534 2209 

iCambria 1,593 2634 

I Total 5971 12076 Huntington .2539 2022 



THE TRIBUNK ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



Barker Johnston. I Charles "V. Culver 
Miffln 1407 1406!oyer ■Wm.L. Corbett, 



Soldiers... 1153 44.5 

Total 9225 8716 

Abraham C. Barker 
over Robert L. John- 
ston, 509. 

Will. Wilsor.Wiieht. 

Centre 2454 3141 

Clinton 1337 1977 

Lvcoming...2843 8690 
Pbtter... ... 984 582 

Tioga 3915 1291 

Total 1155 106S1 

Stephen F. "Wilson 



1410. 

XXI, 
Fayette 



over Theo. Wright,85a. kins, 4220. 

Scoliolri.bigIer^ yxui. — 



Fuller.Dawsnn 
...2739 3553 

Intiiana 8319 1712 

'We8tmor'l<1..3703 5180 
Soldiers... 969 410 

Total 10730 10855 

John L. Dawson over 
Smith Fuller, 125. 

XXIt. Moorhead-Hopltina, 
fpt) 11233 7013 

"" Moorhead 

over James R. Hop- 



Cameron 277 

Clearfleld...l302 

Elk 2'!0 

Erie 5575 

Forest 71 

Jefferson 1514 

McKean 643 

Warren 2009 



„ Allegany (p't).5?44 2<56 

21i6 Armstrong .. .2o62 26»t 

"ifiBiUlcr 2053 2611 



3054 



Soldiers.... 523 101 



Co^'STITrTIONAL CoNVENTioir.— The vote 
on calling a Convention to amend the Consti- 
tution was: lor, 31,381; against, 18,974 ; majori- 
ty for, 12,407. The Convention consisted of 90 
delegates, of whom 61 were in favor of im- 
mediate abolition of slavery, and 35 opposed 
thereto. 

CONGBESS, 1864. 

Districts. Un. Dem. 
Charles E. Phelps 



16-Jl Total 11682 81-24 

5S0 Thomas Williams 
1281 over William J. 

"T~:iKountz, 3558. 

Total 116.11 9914 ' ^ 

Glennl W. Scofleld XXIV. Lawr^ce taz^Y- 

over Wm. Bigler, 1717. Beaver 2805 191o 

XX Culver Corbett. Greene 1352 ilbb 

Clarion 1402 2426! Lawrence ...2994 1211 

Crawford.... 5124 Si24jWashington.4o76 4222 

^S'go::::io'i5 f^ Total..... 11T27 10112 

Ycuausv. George V. Lawrence 

Total .13350 11940'over Jesse Lazear, 1615. 
Legislatuke, 1865. Senate. Home. Joint Bat. 

Unionists 20 64 84 

Democrats 13 ^ ^ 

Union majority 7 28 35 

KtARYL AND. ^ 

Const'ution, '64. Prks., '&i. Pees., m 
CourMes. Un. Dem. Un. Dem. Rep.Dem. 

For. Against. Line. McCI. Lin.-. Othe" 



Alleghany... 1839 964.. 

AnnrArundel 281 1360.. 

Baltimore C. 9779 2053.. 

Baltimore Co2001 1861.. 

Calvert 57 6.34.. 

Caroline 471 423.. 

Carroll 1587 1690.. 

Cecil 1611 1611.. 

Charles 13 978.. 

Dorchester.. 440 1486.. 

Frederick... 2908 1916.. 

Harford 1083 1679.. 

Howard 462 583.. 

Kent... 289 1249.. 

Montgomevv 422 13»7.. 

Prln George's 149 1293.. 

QucenAnne's 220 1577.. 

St Mary's.... 99 1078.. 

Somerset.... 461 2066.. 

Talbot 430 1020.. 

Wa8hington.2Hl 9c5 

Worcester... 486 1666.. 
Soldier8'vote2633 163. . 



2455 1990.. 

416 1574.. 

14978 2953.. 



522 8703 

3 2156 

1083 28703 

37 7142 



Districts. Un. Dem. 

I. Cresswell.McCull. 

Caroline 719 265 

Cecil 1761 1520 

Dorchester... 678 1321 

Kent 406 1268 

Queen Anne's 429 1449 

Somerset C73 2053 

Talbot 571 207 

Worcester 638 1499 

Soldiers' vote 432 27 

Total 6307 9677 

HiramM'CuUoughover 
J. A.J. Cresswell,3,3*" 

II. Webster. Rinmif 

Balt.C.(part).6243 1129 

Balt.Co^part) 1312 1324 

Harford. 1334 160S 

Soldiers' 622 

Total 9511 4102 

Edwin H. AVebster 
over Wm.Kimmell, 5439 

HI. PhellM. Kuott 



over A. Lewis Knott, 
7,560. 

IV. Thomas. Syester 
Alleghany .....2487 1933 

Carroll 2113 1873 

Frederick. . . .3615 2273 
Washington. .2982 1403 
Soldiers 701 64 

Total 11899 7551 

Francis Thomas over 
Syester, 4,^18. 

V. H.l land. Harris. 

AnneArnndel 461 1495 

Balt.Co(part)1110 WiS 

Calvert 82 619 

Charles 25 938 

Howard .... 597 757 

Montgomery. 545 1495 

Prin.George's 259 1474 

St. Mary's.... 102 981 

Soldiers' 208 22 



Total 3389 8839 

Benjamin G. Harris 
.over John C. Holland, 

Total 9313 1753l5,450. 

Legislatuke, 1805. Senate. Eouse.Joint Bal. 

Unionists U 52 63 

Democrats 13 28 41 



Democratic maj .... 2 TJn. maj . 24 



1757 1520.. 

27 901.. 

626 1361.. 

3553 2302.. 

1259 1650.. 

579 778.. 

413 1268.. 

496 1512.. 



644 2110. 

.578 267. 

2980 1402. 

661 1506. 



81 8471 

1 1549 

42 1620 

59 2379 

1 1976 

. 1874 

1 1871 

2 2961 

95 5325 



P<»r cent tn .yo .*» >-"*. . ij^.y^i -^ -•■ ■ -■.-;.-- 

In 1861, whole vote for the new Constitution, 
59^73Tma]ority In favor. 475. A\T»ole vote lor 
President, 72,8^; Lincoln's majorUy, 7,414^ 
In I860, whole vote for President, 92,142 ; Dem- 
ocratic ma.lority, 87,554. „„„„„ is^i 
Vote foe otiieb State OrrtOEP.s, 18(34. 
Un. Dem. Mcri. 
32230 8013 
82215 8620 
32234 8461 



OREGON". 

CONGKESS, 1864, Gov. '63. Pees. '60. 
Counties. Union. Dem. Un. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

Henderson.Kelly.Gibba.Miller.Linc.Others. 

Baker 590 483. — — .. — — 

Benton 818 254.. 258 214.. 213 .525 

Clackamas 522 268.. 650 262.. 410 504 

Clatsop 144 42.. 56 10.. 68 67 

Columbia 61 65.. 69 46.. 62 81 

Coos 50 57.. 89 4.. — 

Curry 68 24.. 110' 9.. — — 

Douglas 508 322.. 351 257.. 323 813 

Jackson 447 504.. 540 417.. 377 llio 

Josephine 174 216.. 235 245. "-" ^" 

Lane. 527 492.. 446 



Linn 799 761.. 661 



Marion „ „„, 

Multnomah 950 392. . 

Polk 462 330.. 

Tillamook — — .. 

Umatilla 353 394.. 

Umpqua — „ — „.• 

Wasco 833 583.. 

Washington 3?2 143. . 

Yamhllf. 423 296.. 



951 258.. 

643 199.. 

884 116.. 

26 — .. 



507 727 

582 985 

598 660 

571 630 

191 019 

11 21 



148 24.. 151 147 



165.. 415 435 



Aitornev General .. 

Controller 

Judge of Appeals.... 



In 1864, whole vote for Congress, 14,711 ; John 

H. D. Henderson over Xvelly, 2?27.— In 

1862, whole vote, 10,«9; Union majority, 3,589. 
—In 1860, whole vote, 18,908; Democratic ma- 

^°^Nole.-Tht official vote for President In 1864 
fooUnp: Lincoln, 9,888; McClellan, 8,457; Lin- 
coln's malority, 1,431. We have not received 
returns by counties. , -^ , 

Legislatuke.— There is a Union majority In 
both Houses. 



.2805 495 



1157 



2133 47. 

2644 44. 

965 4742 51. 

322 2448 63. 



Champaig 

Clermont.... 2717 418 

Clinton 2144 866 

Columt)iana..31l6 557 

Coshocton... 1646 879 

Craw ford.... 1490 253 

Cuyahoga ...7541 965 

Darke 2006 

Defiance 726 

Delaware. . . .2280 

Erie 2223 

Fairfield 1R37 432 3a37 

Fayetf* 1107 221 1102 

Franklin 3956 603 -"" 

Fulton 1541 324 

Gallia 1934 509 

, Geanga 2330 291 

■^Greene 3032 388 

Guernsey.... 21.32 4i0 
Hamilton... 18 J2: 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



OHIO. 

Sbo't Statb, 1864. Prbs't, 1800. 

Counties. Union, Dem. Rep. Dem. 

Smitb.Armstrong.Linc'n.Others. 

Home. Army. Home. Army. 

Adams 1390 471 1567 174.. 1667 2180 



Allen 

Ashland 1768 

Ashtabula ...4657 646 
Athens 2289 



366 1751 124.. 1796 

" 1058 41.. "" 

814 3. . 

175 27 



Belmont 2712 304 



698 151 1877 43. 



Brown 2173 419 2451 135.. 2105 3335 



Butler . 



.2776 



3787. 



Carroll 1416 213 1104 10. 



2965 »172 

248;} 1549 

3864 2532 

2100 2818 



2699 2041 

1506 56.. 2886 ia"v4 

■ 51.. 2178 3605 

28.. 1453 1424 

5209 240.. 4205 5043 



Hancock.... 1664 375 2097 



3-1 

60 

379 5 

1406 28.. 3260 
4i0 1790 76.. 2510 
1744 14625 361 16182 



1629 1013 

1881 1699 

2877 727 

1910 



214 1116 



Highland 2348 

Hocking 915 

Holmes 871 

Huron 3244 477 179' 

Jackson 1315 445 " ~ 

Jetferson . . . .2787 171 

Knox 2443 348 

Lake 2158 228 

Lawrence ...1693 562 

Licking 2771 349 

Logan 2099 808 

Lorain 3774 510 

Lucas 2751 583 

Madison. ...1352 137 

Mahoning ...2361 &S6 

Marion 1148 242 

Medina 2410 254 

Meigs 2533 427 i3ei 

Mercer 447 123 1494 

Miami 3112 ai9 2155 

Monroe 967 283 2616 

Montgomery 4798 429 4985 

Morgan 1998 382 1591 

Morrow 1867 314 

Muskingum .3897 619 

Noble 1699 316 

Ottawa 621 128 

Paulding.... 475 135 



1127 

1442 16.. 2175 1441 

— - 8.. 808 1045 

67.. 2409 2904 

1.578 51.. 1329 1803 

2267 45.. 1392 2329 

-— 21.. 4107 2172 

49.. 1738 1531 



1485 



2689 1921 
832 1614 
3431 2415 



42 

62 

8155 82 

1537 33.. 1944 

690 St.. 571 

" 554 



1473 



257 



2260 1988 
4004 4108 
' 1790 



Perry 1428 284 1636 42.. 1605 

Pickaway ...1765 849 2202 110.. 2002 



^ortage 2864 812 1712 4.. 3065 



23S2 216 1477 17 



Putnam 794 200 152.-> 



Richland . . . .3511 

Boss 2650 

Sandusky.... 1712 



3073 85. 



1884 



- mW 2342 

Scioto 1926 479 1767 135.. 2186 2142 

2958 75.. 8052 8288 

1777 40.. 1597 1710 

8810 20.. 4061 3607 



Seneca. 

Shelby 1257 387 

Stark 3611 """ 



Summit 3120 486 1420 10.. .8607 1893 

Trumbull ....3950 478 1007 11.. 4349 1934 
Tuscarawas .2319 890 2854 34.. 3138 2928 



Smlth.Armstrong.Llnc'n.Others. 

Home. Army. Home. Army. 

Union 1654 840 1085 54.. 1792 1484 

Van Wert.... 843 201 1013 17.. 1015 978 

Vinton 820 218 1183 39.. 1246 1277 

Warren S178 416 1277 11.. 8316 2154 

■Washington. 30fJ5 592 2642 29.. 3369 3248 

"Wayne 2529 .384 3022 79.. 3204 2371 

■Williams 1646 390 1255 81.. 1713 1303 

■Wood 1912 450 1312 8.. 2011 1349 

"Wyandot ....1267 822 1537 62.. 1567 1717 

Total . .204459 32751 177840 4599. .231610 210831 

Percent 53.48 46.52 87.6812.32.. S2.«4 47.66 

In 1864, October election, whole home vote, 
382,299; whole soldiers' vote, 37,3,50: entire vote, 
419,649; "William H. Smith over "W^illiam "W. 
Armstrong, on home vote, 26,619, on army vote, 

28,152; entire Union majority, 54,751.— In 1860, 
whole vote, 442,441 ; Lincoln over all, 20,779. 
VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1864. 

Home Vote. Army Vote. Total Vote. 

Counties. Union. Dem. Un. Dem. Vn. Dem. 
Lincoln. fllcClel. Linc.McClel.LlncMcClel. 

Adams 1462 1668 626 264.. 2083 vm 

Allen 1467 2009 398 232.. 18ffi 2241 

Ashland 1832 2203 824 78.. 3156 2281 

Ash tabula... 5349 1015 705 ai.. 6054 10:?9 

Athens 2474 1246 550 72.. 3024 1318 

Auglaize .... 8.50 2i50 314 124.. 1164 2374 

Belmont 2865 3354 567 144.. ai22 3498 

Brown 2234 2734 465 199.. 2699 2933 

Butler 2867 4170 352 141.. .til9 4310 

Carroll 1559 1203 235 20.. 1794 1223 

Champaign ..2514 1723 239 32.. 2753 1755 

Clark 3122 1641 587 50.. 3709 1641 

Clermont ... .2888 8142 415 176.. 3.303 8318 

Clinton 2297 1281 461 116.. 2758 1397 

Columbiana .3817 2446 730 55.. 4547 2501 

Coshocton... 1763 2344 362 103.. 2125 2447 

Crawford.... 1681 3034 273 78.. 1954 3113 

Cuyahoga ...8829 5662 1158 194.. 9987 5856 

Darke 2125 2580 tn 124.. 2598 2704 

Defiance. ... 859 1480 304 114.. 1163 1594 

Delaware.... 2464 1835 363 57.. 2827 1892 

Erie 255- 1700 475 129.. 3032 1829 

Fairfield 2006 3374 478 136.. 2484 3510 

Fayette 1527 1194 333 49.. 1860 1-J43 

Franklin ... .4232 5445 688 311.. 4*20 5756 

Fulton 1627 929 338 41.. 1965 970 

Gallia 2211 1024 615 150.. 2826 1174 

Geauga 26?^ 475 814 16.. 2986 491 

Greene 3438 1473 448 83.. 3886 1556 

Guernsey ....2226 1870 458 110.. 2681 1980 

Hamilton . . .19^40 15669 2860 939. . 2-3700 16593 

Hancock 1713 21.32 432 168.. 2177 2.300 

Hardin 1221 1259 392 198.. 1613 1457 

Harrison 1927 1502 251 61.. 2178 1563 

Henry 676 1175 248 96.. 924 1271 

Highland ... .25.30 2480 575 152.. 3105 2582 

Hocking 1061 1779 820 108.. 1384 1887 

Holmes 914 2030 154 53.. 10G8 2688 

Huron .3847 2027 594 68.. 4441 2090 

Jackson 1368 1214 587 103.. 19.55 1317 

Jefferson.... 3015 1662 860 70.. 8875 1732 

Knox 2525 2444 881 84.. 2856 2528 

Lake 2476 582 805 20.. 2781 .582 

Lawrence . . .2283 983 679 130. . 2962 1113 

Licking 2900 3705 422 155.. 8822 8860 

Logan 2229 1555 ^48 62.. 2577 1617 

Lorain 3971 1553 015 97.. 4580 1650 

Lucas 3109 1951 685 144.. 3794 2095 

Madison 1465 1098 206 67.. 1671 1165 

Mahoning ...2667 2383 375 37.. 3042 2122 

Marion 1243 1623 198 62.. 1441 1690 

Medina 2616 1479 309 50.. 2925 1629 

Meigs 2886 1406 607 58.. &19S 1464 

Mercer .599 1816 227 110.. 826 1926 

Miami 3228 2273 563 75.. 8791 2.3-48 

Monroe 1080 8050 3.31 150.. 1411 .f200 

Montgomery 4896 5112 627 172.. 5526 5284 

Morgan 2172 1656 -434 71.. %M 1727 

Morrow 1977 1.589 428 83.. 2105 1672 

Muskingum.. 3725 3739 696 168.. 4421 3897 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



Lincoln. 

Noble 1811 

Ottawa 633 

Paulding .... 627 

Perry.. ....1481 

Picka-way....lSOl 

Pita 679 

Portage 3152 

Preble 2m 

Putnam 897 

Klchland . . . .2674 

Ross 2778 

Sandusky. -IS^ie 

Scioto 2183 

Seneca 2550 

Shelby 1308 

Stark 4026 

Summit, 3602 

Trumbull.... 4474 
Tuscarawas .2547 

Union 1837 

Van Wert.... 964 

Vinton 928 

Warren 3419 

Washington .3853 

Wavne 2836 

Williams 1704 

Wood 2131 

Wyandot.... 1361 



. LincMcCULLincMcClel. 

311 70.. 2122 1722 

187 69.. 822 842 

178 84.. 805 353 

342 67.. 

400 164.. 

370 60.. 

826 86.. 

285 39.. 



182:1 
2201 
1049 
3478 
2719 
1117 
3187 



8010 
2270 
1854 
3160 
1955 
4220 
1765 
1854 
2990 
1185 
1107 
1272 
1543 
2913 
3267 



421 105. 
606 197. 
535 151. 



615 


53.. 


5089 


1907 




139,. 


8020 


3129 


ffil 


70,, 


2128 


VX& 


330 


94 


1291 


1201 




51 


1119 


i;a3 


A<V> 


S2 


3851 


1.595 


6T< 


113 


4028 


305b 


ftl5 


146 


8181 




493 


33. 


2197 


1425 



Highland . 



B. W. Clark. ChiltonA.Whlte. 
2^ 457 2806.. 2261 48 2309 



12.. 3066 
1649 323 19T2.. 1088 



66 1552 

59 1536 

31 8097 

38 1121 



d^^^.^^ore't9^ren^°-V^»'^0??'"^^^ 



COKGBESS, 1864. 
I'vion. 



Dem. 



DlHlricla. ^^^ ^ Eggleston. Geo. E. Pugh . 

Home Arniy.Tnlal.Home.Armv.roial. 

Hamilton, part. 9028 865 9S93 7301 163 7461 
Eggleslon's maj.; home, 1,?27; army, 702; 
total, 2,42y 



,U5; army, 653: total, 



\i ~' RutherfordB.Hays..Tos.C.BntTer 

Haraiiton, part. 9637 7S8 10425. - 

Havs'majority.home 

K|omery...4^^|l-..4^ If 

wlrren::;:::::. sira joo ^572..^ _8 _i2^ 

Total 13013 1353 14371. .11513 92 11605 



Total 10774 1840 12615. . 9887 287 10174 

Clark's majority; home, 88.; army, 1,553, 

Mam8oii.::::::.J34i j29j£o..io89 _i6 1105 

Total 11174 1582 12756. . 9285 292 ^^^ 

Shellabarger's majority, home,l,8i9; army, 

1,290^ total, 3469 jjubbell-Wm. JohnBton^ 

Delaware. .^>4 3.39 2603.. 1649 28 1677 

Marton :.".: 1146 212 1358.. 1486 

MOTrow 1^^ 303 2158.. 1477 

Klchland 2506 S06 

Union ' ' 

Total 9115 1488 10903. .8766 217 8983 

Hubbell's majority; home, 649; army, 1,2.1; 

*°'*lkV^''Ea1phP.Buckland.WarrenP.Nob». 

Crawford.... ms 1^ .m.JM |-6| 

luron::::::....3-g5 441 3676.. 1803 l l^O 

Total ....11662 1849 13511.. 11483 234 11717 ! 
Buckland'8majority;home.l79;army,l,615 

total, 1,794, 

Defiance :. 678 204 8»^. 

Fulton 14J5 2 a 1^46. 

Henrv 595 177 i72. 

fn?as ■■ . 22P2 472 2751. 

^Sng.:::::: ^2 no 5.«. 
^Ss ::::::: i| I H: 

Wood. 1^1 381 21j2. 



Schenck's majority; home 
total, 2,""" 



,5C0; army, 1,266; 



Jas.M. Ashley^. AmericusV^Elc^ 

955 62 1017 

1130 40 1179 

2320 136 2462 

300 18 318 

1583 44 1627 

1358 16 1374 

1407 57 1464 



^HT^yPnndy^m.A^Hu^chin. 

- -■ - 891 66 957 
1072 46 1118 



Wm.Lawrence.Jas.F.McKinnej. 



2 1 

57 250-3 

27 1507 

21 2189 

37 1808 



fv: 

Champaign 2353 ^a 2ft»3. 

Darke 20O7 325 Hoi . 

Loetn 2102 292 2394 

M°ami .... 3103 338 3*41 

Shelby.... 1261- 229 1490 

Total . . . .10826 1416 12242. . 9431 144 9578 
Lawrence's majority; home, 1,392; army, 

^•^V*''''*^'!i^8e8B.Wa1ker.-FrankC.LeBlond. 
Mien . . 1289 334 1623.. 1749 10.5 l^i54 

Anllaize 695 156 &51.. 1874 27 1901 

f^Eock 1496 869 1865.. 1965 22 1987 

Ha?din. :::: 1100 3-36 1426.. 1123 105 -»« 
Mercer 447 127 574.. 1450 7 

Van Wert ■■.■.■.: 843 195 1038.. 1014 9 

wTandot „::::: 1267^ 1580..J539 ^ 

Total 7137 1820 8957. .10714 331 lltw 

LeBlond'smaJ.; home, 3,577; Walker's maj 
on ai-my , 1,480 ; LeBlond's net m 



7 1457 



Total 9567 2165 117:52. .1W86 419 10905 

Rice's mat. ; home, 919 ; Ashley's army, 1.746 ; 
Ashley's net majority, 827, 
XI. HemyS.l 

IS;:::::::::i||o24n 

laokRon .. 1319 456 17 15 

Total ... 9070 2511 11581. . 7331 462 7793 

Bundl'8 majority; home, 1,739; amy, 2,049; 

tota^ 8 788. Stevenson. Wm.E Finck 

Fairfleld 1831 430 ^ . 3029 5^ 3080 

Kost :■.'.::■.■.■. ■.■.■.- 2648 J2I ^.._2839 _56 ^ 
Total *9328 2021 11349. .12660 303 12965 

Filck'8 majority; home, 3,832; Stevenson's, 
armv. 1,716 ; Finck's net njajprity, 1,61b. 

Columbu8Delano.a,as.Fonet. 



Coshocton 1645 



Knox 



2421 



fi pirf n"ff 2770 334 3104 . . 3485 

MuSum:::: sloe 610 4016..^ 



Total 'l0242 1631 11876. .1140-1 187 11651 

FolletV Majority;; home. 1...'22 Delano'- 



Brown ... 2168 404 2.572 

Clermont 2712 414 3126, 

Clinton 2140 851 2491 

Fayette 1406 214 1620 



H.w.c,.*caifoS:.w.M,,'"iS"~»''S;ffi^^ 



2138 
2925 
1160 
1103 



93 2.53:} 

79 2925 

52 1212 

24 1127 



tiv ...„...- 

HiS«^" me 494 4270.. 1316 



58 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



Martin Welker. George Bliss. 

Metllna 2411 240 2651.. 1-137 18 1456 

Wayiie 2535 8G9 2904.. 3005 94 8099 

Total iiilie lira 12844.. loose 226 10312 

Welker'B majority, home, 1280; army, 1,252; 
tota^ 2 532. ^ ^ pj^^^^_ j^^ ^j j^^^^j^ 

Athens 2280 435 2715.. 1178 ,14 1192 

Meias 3505 408 2913.. 18T5 24 1399 

Monroe 966 271 1237. . 2609 76 2685 

Morgan 1999 832 2331.. 1594 36 1630 

AVashlngton.... 3068 583 S651.. 2638 20 2658 

Total 10818 2029 12847.. 9.394 170 9561 

Plants's majority, home, 1,424; army, 1,839; 
total, 3,283. 

XVI. John A.Bingham. Jos.W.Whlte. 

Belmont 26i)0 407 3097.. 3240 58 3298 

Guernsey 2118 481 2540.. 1794 72 1866 

Harrison 1794 216 2010.. 1445 21 1466 

Noble 1688 321 2009.. 1533 32 1570 

Tuscarawas.... 2290 422 2712.. 2855 64 2919 

.. Total 10580 ri7 12377. .10872 247 11119 

•White's majority, home, 293; Bingham's, 
armv, 1,550 : Bingham's net majority, 1,258. 
xVlI. Ephraim R. Eckley . J. H. Wallace. 

Carroll ...1406 209 1615.. 1103 2 1105 

Colnmbiana.... S-lOg 547 3956.. 2268 15 2283 

Jefl^rson 2776 183 2959.. 1532 6 1538 

StarJi 8601 627 4228.. 8815 5 3820 

Total 11192 15G6 12758. . 8718 28 8746 

Eckley's majority, home, 2,474; army, 1,538; 
total, 4,012. 

XVill. EufusP.Spanlding.Jeph.H.Wade.. 

Cuyahoga 7494 9'16 8440. . 4773 15 4788 

Lake.... 2250 220 2470.. 440 3 443 

Summit '3105 457 3562.. 1419 11 1430 

Total 12819 1623 14472. . 6G.';2 29 6661 

Spaulding's majority, home, 6,217 ; army ,1,594; 
total, 7,811. 

XIK. Jas. A.Garfield. Halsey H.Moses. 

Ashtabula 4656 612 5268.. 677 877 

Geauga 2320 283 2603.. 123 123 

Mahoning 2377 304 2681.. 1988 4 1992 

Portage 2853 300 3153.. 1712 2 1714 

Trumbull 8948 433 4381.. 1606 8 1609 

Total 16154 1932 18086. .6306 9 iEs 

Garfield's majority, home, 9,848; army, 1,923; 
total, 11,771. 

INDIANA. 

Gov'nor, 1864. Pkes. '64. Pebs. '60. 

Coinities. Un. Dem. Vn. Vein. Bep.Dem. 

Morton. McUonald. Line. MoCl. Line. Others. 

Adams 491 1218.. 485 1156.. 632 920 

Allen 2251 4610.. 2244 . 493-2.. 2252 3298 

Bartholo'wl780 2102.. 1645 2051.. 1769 1916 

Benton S80 287.. 380 272.. 375 249 

Blackford . .363 509.. 3.55 475.. 275 457 

Boone 2088 1691.. 2124 1651.. 1699 1637 

Brown 867 823.. 288 821.. 801 766 

Carroll 1195 1591.. 1431 1583.. 1590 1465 

Cass 1875 2093.. 18;« 2087.. 1874 1891 

Clark 1745 2072.. 168.$ 1986.. 1369 2403 

Clay 1293 1514.. 1083 1407.. 889 1414 

Clinton . . . .1473 1518. . 1413 1501 . . 1454 15M 

Crawford.. 787 • 7.S5.. 706 709.. 788 89-t 

Daviess.... 1257 1>52.. 1227 1299.. 981 1411 

Dearborn. .2151 2354.. 2117 2420.. 2127 2593 

Decatur .. .2017 1485.. 2172 1559.. 2028 1659 

De Kalb...l563 1465.. 1484 1472.. 1500 1305 

Delaware.. 2830 707.. 2405 588.. 1933 11.37 

Dubois 822 1506.. 296 1464.. 801 1369 

Elkart 2307 1964.. 2253 2000.. 2471 1966 

Fayette.... 1848 8.34.. 1318 860.. 1343 965 

Floyd 1733 2017.. 14.57 2055.. 1151 2304 

Fountain.. 1606 1823.. 1562 1818.. 1656 1635 

Franklin... 1463 2288.. 1399 2316.. 1695 2330 



Morton. 

Fulton 1010 

Gibson 1324 

Grant 1624 

Greene 1277 

Hamilton.. 2970 
Hancock... 1370 
Harrison... 1436 
Hendrick8.2614 

Henry 3008 

Howard.... 1760 
Huntlngl'nieos 
Jackson... 1257 

Jasper 599 

Jay 1138 

Jeherson . .2890 
Jennings... 1828 
Johnson... 1748 

Knox 1368 

Kosciusco.2217 
La Grange. 16)5 

Lake 1284 

Laporte 2772 

Lawrence .1462 
Madison... 1668 

Marion 9554 

Marshall... 1222 

Martin 615 

Miami 1916 

Monroe.... 1224 
Montg'mry2302 
Morgan.... 1853 
Newton.... .319 

Noble 2077 

Ohio 605 

Orange 874 

Oweu 1091 

Parke 2115 

Perry 11« 

Pike 938 

Porter 1448 

Posey 1433 

Pnlaski.... 545 
Putnam.... 2088 
Randolph. . 2-143 

Ripley 1931 

Rush 1944 

Scott 624 

Shelby 1804 

Spencer.... 1577 

Starke 224 

Steuben... 1661 
St. Joseph. 2191 
Sullivan... 754 
Swltzerla'dl.530 
Tippecano-3392 

Tipton 800 

Union 827 

Vand'b'gh.2619 
Vermillion 1069 

Vigo 2sr3 

Wabasl^. . . .2-109 
Warren.... 1351 
Warrick... 1386 
Washingt'nlSSS 

Wayne 4C51 

Wells 870 

White 973 

Whitley.... 1125 



Mcronald. Line 
1096.. 987 
1485.. 1297 
1278.. 1547 
1468. . 1212 
1080.. 3225 



1809.. 1329 1780. 



McCl. Linc.Othert 
L099.. 1019 1019 
1510.. 1298 1686 



1123. . 3027 

897.. ms 

1625.. 1597 
1753.. 1187 
278.. 585 
1128.. 1103 
1813.. 2758 
1162.. 1817 
1560.. 1532 
1763. . 1348 
1809. . 2188 

477:: 1275 
2247.. 2766 
1183.. 1121 
20&3.. 1535 
3221.. 10952 
1805.. 1206 

875.. 576 
1759.. 1881 
1220.. 1202 



1992 



1463. 

402.. 592 
1025.. 804 
1544.. 1053 
1219.. 2121 
1081.. 1112 

957.. 920 
1030.. 1469 
1553.. 1357 

699.. 488 
2110.. 1968 
1177.. 2371 
1714.. 1826 
VSn.. 1881 

736.. 586 
2365.. 1837 
1468.. 1558 

28:^.. 217 

551.. 1642 
1682.. 2188 
2187.. 795 

812.. 1440 
2669.. &189 

965.. 781 

598.. 833 
23-19.. 278-1 

708.. 1044 
2211.. 2887 
1307. . 2461 

742.. 1373 
1142.. 1247 
1810.. 1242 
1777.. 4238 
1248.. 846 

923. . 940 
1311.. 1062 



1079. 
1715. 
1817. 
1808. 

756. 

461. 
2145. 
1085. 
2057. 



817. 
1717. 
1210. 



1012. 

971. 

936. 
1585. 

718. 
2155. 



1-127. 

247. 

610. 
1558. 
2059. 

853. 
2775. 
1019. 

592., 
2114. 

752. 
2167.. 
1229. 

761., 
1441., 
1799., 
1529. , 
1235., 

899., 
1327., 



1420 
2195 
1201 
1593 



1570 
2290 
1695 
1225 



2367 
1755 
305 



1788 
1747 
1512 
775 
475 
2009 
1520 



712 
1375 
1499 
1469 
1113 

979 

923 
1819 

674 



3480 
780 


2^127 : 

846 


849 


691 ^ 


1875 


2029 ' 


KHIO 


885 


2429 


23^ 


2287 


1241 


1412 


817 


745 


1683 


1H7S 




4234 
OOI 


110,8 



1104 
Total... 152084 131201.150422 1302,'53. 139040 133225 

Per cent ...63 •;« 4u32.. 5:i .•;» 4H.41.. 51.46 48.65 

In 1864, whole vote for Governor In October 
283,283; Oliver P. Jforton over .Joseph E. Mc- 
Donald. 20,88:5. Whole vote for President 
280,6.'i5; Lincoln's majority, 20,189.— In 1860 
whole vote, 2?2,2Go • Lincoln over all others, 

' "'■ _, CONGRESS, 1864. 

Districts. Un. Dem.\ All-n. Niblick 

I. Allpn.Niblark Knox 1350 1763 

Davles 1245 12.52 Martin 584 886 

Dubois 805 1507Plke 924 966 

Gibson 1290 1490 Posey.. . . 1418 1565 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



Washburne. Voorhecs 

Spencer 1560 1483|Parke 2113 1210 

V^nderbnxg.2625 2356 Putnam 2076 2112 



Allen. Niblackl 

ncer 1560 1482|l 



Warrick 1313 1151 Snllivan T50 21S1 

1 Vermillion.. low 696 

Total 12610 14T20|Vigo 2856 22^ 

William E. Xiblack 

over Cyrus M. Allen, Total 12296 128?0 

2,110. Daniel W. Voorheea 

ir. Currr. Kerr.iover H. CWashburne, 

Clarke 1226 208T:y84. 

Crawford.... TOl 748, VIII. Orth. Hamev. 

Floyd 1769 2007iBoone 2060 1705 

Harrison.... 1123 1816iCarroll 1473 1599 

Orange 853 1022C1inton liro 1519 

Perry 11.30 1090 Fountain.... 1.5S2 18:?3 

Scott 614 7461Montgomery2262 2250 

Washlngton.l3:13 1811 Tippecanoe .33:^6 2685 

iWarren 134:J 748 

Total 9064 11357 

Michael C.Kerr over Total 13336 12349 

William W.Cnrry, 2293.| Godlove S. Orth over 

III HiiL Harrinet. I James F. Harney, 1187. 

Bartholom'wl753 3112' „ '•^- C"'f^-„T°T;'e- 

Brown S.^"? 8-^5 Benton 388 287 

ja?-78on;::::ii49 1^7 g?^?-- i^s 2105 



Jefferson.... 1787 1190 F»' ton 1008 1091 

Jennings. . ..2817 1839 jasper 

Lawrence. . .1439 1202 f ""«;;• .^ 

Monroe 1190 1290 I-aP°Ete 2706 



Switzerland.1494 

Total 12017 1117S 

Ralph Hin over Henry 
W. Harrington, 844. 
IV, Farqnhar. Eern- 

Dearborn.... 2123 3366 

Decatur 2012 1486 

Franklin.... 1436 2291 



Marshall 12IG 1J08 

Miami. 



.19S5 1671 
Total 10015 9949 



Newton 344 

Pulaski 517 

Porter 14-10 

Starke 224 

St. Joseph... 2185 
White 9S3 



Total 160.58 14978 

in?? ■,'^if Schuyler Colfax over 
JolJ U?J David Turpie, 1.680. 

X. IJel'rees Kdgerton 

Allen 22.33 4^2 

DeKalb 1533 1488 

.3289 1977 



John H. Farquh.ir Elkhart .„.. 

over George Berry, 66., Kosciusko.. .2185 1831 

V. J"i^nii>-<"vn La Grange.. .1591 736 

Delaware . . .2218 714 ^oble.. .... .2041 1482 

Fayette I2jl 843,steuben iftS 5i9 

?iSrt^oiph:::i?I l^j^^"iey im laa 



rnlon 765 (JOl 

Wayne 4294 1776 



Total 10539 6161 

George W.Julian over 
Jamea Crown, 7,368. 

VI. DnmoTit, Lovp. 

Hancock.... 13&1 1395 
Hendricks... 2611 13.3: 
Johnson 
Marion 



Morgci 
Shelby 



Total 14617 14037 

Joeeph D. Defrees 
over Joseph K. Edger- 
ton, 580. 

XI. Stiilwell. AlcDowell 

Adams 487 1221 

Blackford... 351 512 

Grant 1613 1282 

Hamilton.... 2955 1076 

..1742 15G8! Howard 1739 909 

. .9X2 322S Hunt,ingdon.l&i3 1042 

en 1844 130-liJay 1129 1135 

,1703 2372'Madison 1»38 2089 

iTipton 790 971 

Total 1S336 10898' AVabash 6388 1319 

Ebenezer Dnmont over Wells 870 1347 

Vll WaB'burqe'voorlie-s Total 15653 13333 

Clav 1089 1408 Thomas F. Stlllwell 

Greene 1203" 1460 over James F. McDow- 

Owen 10S6 1544^1, 2,-340. 

Legislatuhe, 1854. Senate. House. Joint BaK 

UnionlBts 25 55 80 

Democrats C5 45 70 

Union majority ... . 10 10 

SoLDLEBS.— The soldiers of Indiana are not 

fiennitted to vote out of the State. ASTicrever 
hey did vote, ihey were about 70 in 100 for the 
Union ticket. 

In 1862, the Democratic candidate for Secre- 
tary of State was elected by 9,443 majority. 



ILLINOIS. 

Teeasuker, '&i. PKE3. '64. 

Counties. Un. Dem. Un. Dem. 

Butler. Starne. Line. McClel. 

Adams 2357 41&J.. 3496 4562.. 

Alexander. 151 710. T22 881.. 

Bond 908 763.. 1154 713.. 

Boone 1226 280.. 1727 242.. 

Brown. ... 360 1011.. 718 1318.. 

Bureau . . . .3123 18S7. . 3851 1793. . 

Calhoun ... 104 325. . 311 562. . 

Carroll 1173 389.. 1903 443.. 

Cass 618 1211.. 863 1243.. 

Champalgnl248 1104.. 2116 1133.. 

Christian.. 6<>8 1.332.. 1043 1606.. 

Clark 542 1455.. 1061 2237.. 

Clay 438 911.. 852 1002.. 

Clinton .... 640 1092. . 1110 1168. . 

Coles 1282 1589.. 2210 1555.. 

Cook 9988 8369.. 18687 4351.. 

Crawford.. 530 1209.. 822 1371.. 

Cnmberl'd. 331 872.. 591 1134.. 

DeKalb. ..1829 670.. 2985 741.. 

De Witt. . . . 8S9 953. . 1271 1069. . 

Douglas... 506 724.. 993 774.. 

Du Page... 1174 530.. 1816 TU.. 

Edgar 1204 1861 .. 1683 1853. . 

Edwards .. 389 3^.. 636 330.. 

Effingham. 224 901.. 6S5 1223.. 

Fayette.... S*)! 1341.. 1054 1680.. 

Ford 185 208.. 233 253.. 

Franklin .. 232 692.. 659 876.. 

Fulton 1796 3150.. 2991 3694.. 

Gallatin ... 180 766. .624 692: . 

Greene .... 565 1746. . 978 2249. . 

Grundy.... 1047 748.. 1461 775.. 

Hamilton.. 48 1063.. 382 1145.. 

Hancock . .1520 2844.. 2655 2929.. 

Hardin .... 113 341.. 314 815.. 

Henderson. 924 892.. 1210 877.. 

Henry 2536 1001.. 3553 1414.. 

Iroquois. ..1^50 806.. 1777 843.. 

Jackson... 138 996.. 783 1203.. 

Jasper 246 783.. 537 923.. 

Jefferson .. 262 1384.. 649 1487.. 

Jersey 536 1256.. 817 l.>46.. 

Jo Davles8.1921 1810.. 2517 1722.. 

Johnson... 124 600.. 1230 380.. 

Kane 2857 1347.. 4270 1183.. 

Kankakee .1442 453.. 2118 564.. 

Kendall.... 1214 899.. 17Si 470.. 

Knox 2706 16i0. . 4245 1364. . 

Lake 1876 835.. 2403 873.. 

La Salle.... 3618 3891.. 5174 4515.; 

Lawrence . 375 914. .735 954. . 

Lee 1T03 1038. . 2563 1173. . 

Livingston .10P9 938.. 1716 IICTO.. 

Logan 1531 1482.. 1727 1371.. 

Macon 1613 1.340.. 1827 1516.. 

Macoupin .1461 2143.. 2274 2935.. 

Madison... 2178 2817.. 3136 3287.. 

Marion .... 676 1360. . 1427 167?. . 

Marshall... 1128 1207.. 1548 1403.. 

Mason 603 10.39. . 1153 1253. . 

Maisac .... 217 004.. 948 265.. 

M'Oono';h]143 1957.. 2145 2171.. 

M'ncnry...2119 1007.. 2951 1188.. 

M'Loan . . . .2939 2S15.. 4001 2582.. 

Menard.... 768 938.. 854 1075.. 

Mercer ....1042 883 1759 1100.. 

Monroe.... 683 1249.. 560 1527.. 

J'ontgom'y 814 1K5. . 1274 1900. . 

Morgan.... 1526 2023.. 2S93 2334.. 

Moultrie... 496 703.. 549 829.. 

Ogle 2063 910.. 3289 1142.. 

Peoria 2518 3?.03. . 3536 3739. . 

Perry 599 . 712. . 1147 718. . 

Piatt 428 400.. 747 329.. 

Pike 1508 2574..23:J3 2S57.. 

Pope 86 692.. 1089 339.. 

Pulaski.... 183 373.. 601 534.. 

Putnam.... 555 428.. 711 428.. 

Randolph. . 945 1565. . 1520 1?27. . 

Richland... 417 844.. 889 987.. 



PBE8. '60. 


Hep. 


De.m.. 


Line. Others. 


8811 


4265 


106 


684 


987 


9M 


1759 


310 


728 


1202 


36-.!2 


1415 


269 


«(M 


1630 


*rt1 


1046 


vm\ 


1793 


\tn 




l-HIH 


1313 


n>A 


681 


1(170 


743 


i'.';>4 


1497 


1467 


14589 


9B4<> 


9iX 


i:-!84 


629 


ono 


3049 


Hri.5 




1015 


809 


ft>9 


1790 


m 


\m 


iif« 


580 


370 


453 


1(1^ 


953 


l.'-.ll 


235 
338 


f^l 


36-29 


3926 


221 


lO'lO 


!I79 


2173 


1412 


710 


1(i2 


15.'i3 


25fW 


29U0 




499 


1253 


911 


3022 


1532 


1429 


933 


315 


1556 


ftifi 


906 


459 


1853 


910 


1291 


27S2 


1841 


40 


15HH 


4207 


1651 


1977 




1811 


571 


38.'2 


'/'(M 


23S4 


<h;5 


Km 


'12:'0 


764 


9T0 


2429 


1110 


1474 


!((:>< 


YJ2% 


1.521 


1501 


i:>n 


2192 


2KS8 


.3161 


31(!0 


853 


1,15 


10.30 


1376 


Hi's 


vm 


121 


s-i;< 


2255 


22. «! 


30a3 


1l!4 


3457 


2,T(i7 


9G2 


1(!,t3 


1808 


1V.)3 


845 


1401 


1099 


,1713 
'Ml 9 


2312 


618 


707 


3184 


1315 


3539 




619 


1101 


782 


599 


2.5.'-.3 


3016 


127 


l'fi2 


m) 


.■iHO 


7.51 


366 


1JS^2 


1HI5 


777 


1022 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



Bock Isl 

St, Clair... 2521 

Saline 93 

Siiugamon .2i61 
Schuyler .. 670 

Scott 473 

Shelby .... 596 

Stark 801 

StephenBOQ3154 
'razowell..l028 

rnlon 143 

Vermmionl479 
■Wabash.... 338 
Warren ...IMe 
Washingt'n 908 

Wayne 420 

White 431 

Wliite8ides2013 



Butler. Starne. Lin 



McClel. Line. 0th. 



100 



Will. 



Williamson 3oO 
WinDebago27lO 
Woodford . 811 



3643.. 3565 3945.. 3556 
1395.. 1106 1691.. 956 
798.. 873 910.. 833 

1964.. 1168 2397.. 971 2088 

566.. 1174 618.. 1164 659 

1S52.. 2598 1928.. 2670 1787 

1976.. 2147 2307.. 2348 2168 

1088.. 709 1315.. 157 996 

1639.. 2251 1577 

679.. 597 710 

1714.. 2208 1672 

1207. . 793 1565 

1147. . 620 1645 

1336.. 756 1544 

1033. . 2713 1110 

2792.. 3219 2515 

m.. 859 1121.. 173 1835 

620.. 3969 705.. 3984 817 

1685.. 1238 1419 



1478 i Brown 723 

3014 I Cass 868 

1338 I Fulton 3000 

S598 Mason 1166 

1559 McDonough.2154 

1131 Menard 860 

Pike 2356 

Schuyler.... 1112 



allertoa. Rom I 



Callahan.Marshall. 



1560.. 2546 
675.. 516 

1576.. 2306 
957.. 1344 

1173. . 937 

1218.. 774 
863.. 2905 



2209 2300.. 3343 



1266.. 



Total.. 120116 136662.189496 158730.17^161 160215 

Verceai 46.11 bS.ii 64.4-2 4S.6b 61.77 48.2.-! 

Tnl862, whole vote,256,778; Alexander Starne 
over Wimam Butler, 6,54(1. -In 18&i, whole 
vote m'm; Lincoln's majority, 30,736. -In 
I860 whoie vote (including-'4,9l(for Bell and 
2 404 for Breckinridge), 339,693; Lmcoln oyer 
all 4 629. There is one Congressman elected 
byVhe State at large; the vote was: Samuel 
W. Sloultou, Union, 190226; James C. Allen, 
Democrat, 158,784. Moulton's majority, 31,442. 
CONGRESS, 1864. 

^^«'^-We^^^?St:iPutnam!"r?l^'^|^ 
Cook 18557 14277 Stark 1174 613 

ovei?Cyrus'H.1S' TotaL.^.ii^ 11-282 
S,iM-^W Ebon C. Ineersoll 

""u' Farnsw juhns-n 'over James S.Sckels, 
T.«„Vo 17S0 2126870. 

- - 742i VI. Cook. Casay 

1479DuPage 1813 775 

873 Grundy 1449 787 

119llKankakee...2118 547 

710 Kendall 1757 483 

; La Salle 5199 4491 

Will 3262 2897 



DeKalb 2983 

Kane 4360 

Lake 3404 

McHenry....295j> 
Winnebago ..i666 



1319lMarlon 1488 1076 

12481 Wayne 945 1154 

36981 Richland.... 892 986 

1239 

2180 Total 10896 16703 

1074| Samuel 6. Marshall 
2857iOver E. Callahan, 6007. 

10811 Xn. linker. Morrill. 

'Clinton 1127 1173 

Total 1233J 15290 Madison 3183 32'J8 

Lewis W. Ross over Monroe ..... 52o lo90 
Hugh Fullerton, 3057. |Randolj)h 



.1527 



1726 

Kiiapp. Thorn t'n. St. Clau 4206 2741 

Bond .1160 706 1 Washington. 1249 1213 

Calhoun .... 316 5m\ —— — — 

Christian.... 1044 1602 Total 11817 lli41 

Greene 976 2317' Jehu Baker over 

Macoupii/...2279 2940, Wm. R. Morrison, 76. 

-- ■ ^ -""- 1749 XIII, Knvdl. Alien. 

23,53: Alexander 
15S9 Edwards 
911 Gallatin . 
2293 Hardin .. 

Johnson 

Total 12176 16903! Jackson . 

Anthony Thornton Massac . . 
over N. M. Knapp,4727. Perry. . . , 

.XI. Callahnn. xvlarsll Pope. 

Clark .... 

Clay 

Crawford . 
Effingham, 
Fayette . . 
Franklin . 
Hamilton. 



Montgomeryl227 

Morgan 3306 

Jersey 838 

Scott 875 

Shelby 1165 



. 817 
. 6:57 
.lOiS 



... 613 



. 941 
.1153 
.1093 



599 520 



1305 



Jasper 
Lawrence . . . ' 
Jefi'ersou ( 

LBGISLiATUKE, 

Unionists 

Democrats . . . 



2223 Pulaski 

1011 Saline 763 

1373 Union 716 

1221 Wabash 521 

1685 White., 775 

876 Williamson . 832 
1135 

926' Total 11742 107.59 

950l A. J. Kuvkendall 
1487 over Wm. J. Allen, iiSo. 
. tienaie. House. JointJUul. 
.... U 51 Cfi 

. . 11 31 !6 



Total «898 5237 

John F. Farnsworth 
over Merrill C. John- 
son, 12061 



Union majority . . . • 8 1 c 

MINNESOTA. 

CoNeRESS,1864^PRES. '64.J»r.B8. '61 
Dislrict-s. 



Washh Stiles 



440 



Total 



Carroll 1906 

Jo Daviess . .2504 

Leo 3562 

Ogle 3236 

Stephenson. .2690 
Whuesides. .2907 



Total 15711 7421 

EliUu B. Waahburne 
over Elias B. Stiles, 



IV. Hardinjr. 

Adams 3525 

Hancock . . . .26(1 
Ileuderson ..1200 

Mercer ITOS 

Rock Island .2097 
Warren 2318 



Samuel K. Casey, 5818. 

VII. Bromw. Ede 

1721: Champaign .2120 

1167 Coles 2237 

1141 1 Cumberland. 588 
1931 ! Douglas ....1001 

1021iEdgar 1710 

Ford 336 

Macon 1829 

Moultrie.... 551 

Iroquois 1782 

Vermillion . .2547 
Piatt 740 



Unioa. JJem. Uii. JUetn. Rep. Dem. 

I WinJom.Lamber'n.LincAIcClel.Linc.Others. 

Bine Earth... 950 582 962 575.. 677 398 

Brown 331 53 326 58.. 408 101 

Dodge 761 321 760 825.. 580 2a3 

15598 9980lFa4ault ^^T ^1«1 ,^ .JlJ-.Jfo ^ 

100 



BurtoncVcook over Fillmore 1637 103.3 1642 1031 



Freeborn 619 

Houston 797 

1128 ; Sueur 498 

1543 I Martin 185 

Mower. 



223 6,5:5 201.. 

C40 796 035. . 

807 495 812.. 

18 190 17.. 

213 037 214. . 



Harris. 
4554 
29:55 



Total 15353 12027 

„„, H. P. H. Bromwell 
1090 over John E. Eden, 
1510,3330. 

1707' VIII. Ciillom.Stnnrt 

De Witt 1271 

Total 13569 12r21i Livingston . .1754 

Aaron C "-—'—>" 



isricollet 485 438 505 420.. 461 

blmstead 1839 813 1849 829.. 1»48 

Eice ..1263 644 1275 667.. 996 

Scott 875 1039 396 1045.. ffi9 

Sibley 304 556 263 559.. ^7 

Steele 629 209 636 209.. 523 

Waseca 413 275 418 284.. 304 

Winona 1542 1060 1590 1032.. 1291 



Watonwan . 



38 



5.. 



Anoka . . . 

Benton . . 
1070 1 Carver... 
1095 Cass 



HardineiLogau 1T25 1375 i (JUlsago... 

ovrr^Charres m! Ear- Mclean 4017 2588 Dabofa . . . 

?;^ ftw Sangamon ..3010 3909 ; Goodhue . 

"«'v*''- l««ar,nn,EcwJ-l>zlweU ...2162 2302 Hennepin. 



....13305 9392 11073 9093.. 11690 648' 

Uonnflly.GiliiMiu. 

....281 m 385 167.. 277 i 

.... 51 54 .\2 58.. — 

... 473 609 484 610.. 504 

3 4 5 4..Norct; 

.... 3ftl 93 3?2 88.. 379 ,- 

.... 1105 1161 1176 11V3.. 1022 814 

... isr.l 680 1860 688.. 1353 446 

.... 1703 1316 1711 1321.. 1770 749 



Bureau .. 
Henry . . . 
Knox .... 
Marshall. ---^,„ 
Peoria 3570 



1804 Woodford. . .1273 1688 Isanti . 
1417 * " "" 

1869 Total , 



203 142 



41 



1553 1408 Shelby MVcullom over MlUe Lac 50 

* - 374sljohii T.Stuart, 1785. ' Morrison 37 



THE TRIBUXE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



Donaellv.Gilman.Linc.McClel.Linc.Otliera. 

Pine \1 1 17 4. .No return 

BaniBey lUi 1409 1260 1421.. 1233 1232 

St. Louis 40 5 39 5.. 40 28 

Sherburne.... 107 77 108 78.. 120 60 

Stearns 403 919 427 916.. 488 491 

Todd 23 27 23 81.. No return 

Wabashaw . . . 1380 614 1392 635. . 1231 700 

Washington.. 775 501 781 502.. 752 411 

Wright 519 356 528 356. . 572 192 

Total 10874 821110987 8277.. 10208 6036 

Whole State.. 24839 17303 25060 17375. .21898 12523 

Per rent o^.M 41.05 69.07 40.93.. 63 6'2 36.88 

In 1S64, whole vote for Congress, Ist District, 
23,057 ; William Windom over Henry W. Lam- 
berton, 4.873. In the lid District, whole vote, 
19,085: Isjnatins Donnelly over John M. Gil- 
man, 2,W1. For President, whole vote 42, 435; 
Lincoln over McClellan, 7,685.— In 18C0, whole 
vote, 34,421 ; Lincoln's majoritv, 9,315. From 
Eed Wood and Crow Wing no returns were 
sent, but the entire vote of counties thrown 
out 19 only 37 for Lincoln to 60 for McClellan 
Soldiers do not vote out of the State. 

Lesislatube, 1865. Senate. House. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 16 32 4S 

Democrats 5 10 i5 

Union majority 11 22 _ - S3 

KENTUCKY. 

Gov'iroK, 1863. Pees. '64. Pbeb. '60. 

Counties. Un. I)em. XJn. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

Bramlette.Wickliffe. Line. WoCl. Line Others. 

Adair 986 18.. 59 627'.. 1 1106 

Allen 913 5.. 29 547.. — 1140 

Anderson 429 82.. 34 272.. - 1098 

Ballard 174 53.. 351 541.. 1 1204 

Barren 879 366.. 55 737.. 14 1867 

Bath 557 70.. 132 451.. — 1715 

Boone 449 807. . 200 1068. . 1 1848 

Bourbon 595 118.. 274 850.. 3 1759 

Boyd 500 58.. 202 493.. 18 794 

Boyle 579 125.. 129 532.. 8 1080 

Bracken 931 202.. 268 922.. 4 1771 

Breathitt 95 47. . [no ret'm]. — 553 

Breckinridge. 912 158.. 42 995.. 3 1619 

Bullitt 459 172.. 14 624.. 2 991 

Butler 882 144. . 99 414. . 5 910 

Caldwell 501 — .. 294 351.. 3 1112 

Calloway .... 297 — ..[no refrn]. — 1294 

Campbell . . . .1471 686. . 1504 1286. . 814 2834 

Carroll 1»8 314.. 82 324.. - 1078 

Carter 563 44.. 367 345.. 1 1063 

Casey 683 16.. 127 507.. 8 910 

Christian 952 134.. 376 636.. 1 1832 

Clark 615 306.. 130 690.. 1 1410 

Clay 511 11.. 312 186.. 4 802 

Clinton [noret'rn]. 3 215.. 8 703 

Crittenden... 787 — .. 424 252.. 1 1S50 

Cumberland.. 447 31.. 33 302.. 7 858 

Daviess 733 132.. 37 1124.. 7 2253 

Edmondson . . 519 108.. 48 215.. 15 501 

Estill 596 38. . 470 303. . 56 96-1 

Favetle 896 367.. 1882 1496.. 5 1561 

Fleming 877 119.. 357 701.. 2 lS*t 

Floyd 60 51..[noretn'n]. — 673 

Franklin 674 175. . 253 689. . — 1734 

Fulton 40 143.. 86 61.. - 714 

Gallatin 286 1^.. 109 S91.. — 837 

Garrard 763 46. . 467 460. . 21 1070 

Grant 572 206.. 220 372.. — 1198 

Graves 720 -.. 642 769.. — 2025 

Grayson 911 305.. 114 716.. 8 1073 

Green 805 36.. — 5.ni.. 2 975 

Greenup 614 150.. 596 431.. 4 1234 

Hancock 322 -22. . 18 366. . 3 889 

H.irdin 1047 720.. S3 1010.. 6 20S5 

Harlan 271 W.. 287 51.. 2 597 

Harrison 768 T.'.f!.. 256 820.. - 2230 

Hart 1051 219.. 40 1051.. 1 1439 

Henderson... 268 138.. 30 949.. 5 1555 



Bramlette.Wicliliffe, Line. MeCl. Line. Othera. 



Ill 1168.. 2 

95.. 289 228.. 1 968 

29.. 47 492.. 2 1568 

— .. 345 29.. 101 289 

152.. 2066 6404.. 106 9159 

58.. 195 612.. 3 1199 

— ..[noretn'n]. — 666 

83.. 1716 1374.. 267 8289 

4.. 629 197.. 11 866 

75.. 17 700.. 3 888 

26.. 444 188.. 10 763 

191 



Henry 

Hickman 61 

Hopkins 5&4 

jRclison 313 

Jeflerson 4629 

Jessamine 492 

Johnson 416 

Kenton 19C6 

Knox 670 

Larue 840 

Laurel 5<i9 

Lawrence 594 

Letcher [no ret'n] . [no retu'n ] 

Lewis 790 11.. 645 391.. 

Lincoln 6ti5 107.. 109 801.. 

Livingston ... 189 225. . " " " 

Logan 882 411.. 

Lyon 133 — .. 

Madison 959 226.. 

MagofBn 2?0 94.. 

Mai ion 1053 192.. 

Marshall 224 20)5.. 

Mason 916 113. . 

McCracken... 218 — .. 

M'Lean SM 56.. 

Meade 813 227.. 

Mercer 9f.5 142.. 271 627.. 

Metcalfe 889 8.. 24 505.. 

Montgomery . 4S2 113. . 401 813. . 

Monroe 882 24.. 84 326.. 

Morgan 45 267.. - 52.. 

Muhlenburg.. 107 69.. 225 597.. 

Nelson 443 225.. 17 868.. 

Nicholas 716 3.. 244 528.. 

Ohio 1211 448.. 367 765.. 

Oldham 354 372.. 31 588.. 

Owen 309 133>. [no retu'n]. 

Owsley 5S7 — .. iM8 96.. 

Pendleton ... 545 110.. 629 688.. 

Perry 103 —..[no retu'n]. 

Pike [no ret'n]. [no retu'n]. 

Powell 109 82.. 27 127.. 

Pulaski 1510 80.. 1059 615.. 

Rockcastle... 5P6 8.. 428 259.. 

P.owan 114 7.. 49 23.. 

Russell m 38. . 15 459. . 

Scott 4f3 487.. 87 567.. 

Shelbv 810 527.. 18 990.. 

Simpson 390 124.. 6 430.. 

Spencer 199 414.. 1 351.. 



246 217 

220 508. . 3 

60 105. . — 

800 700.. 85 

23 79.. — 

28 1119.. — 

149 147.. - 

368 1197.. 26 

515 323. . 8 

62 504.. — 



114 184.. 12 



Union 271 17.. 

Warren 1259 313.. 163 1414. 



Washington . . 
Wayne. 

Webster 414 

^^^)itley 7CG 



89 546.. 
77 811.. 
7S1 71.. 



Woodford.... 251 168.. 28 564.. 
Woolfe 50 .56. .[noi-etu'n]. 



Total, home.68306 17S89. .26592 61478.. 1364 143703 

Vote of the Soujiebs, 1864. 

ReBimonto. Lincoln.McClpl. Lincoln.AtcCI,,]. | 

4thM'A.S.Inf. 11 '36 20th Infantry. . 13 180 i 



8th Infantry. 


. RS 


70 21st " 


.. 14 215 


8th " '. 




113 22d " 


..171 118 


9th " 


45 


90 2Sd " 


..28 38 


10th •' 


i:^ 


,302 23d " 


.. 80 22 


nth " 


41 


411 27th " 


.. 3 209 


12th " i 


4 


87 28th " 


..17 158 


15th " 


. .S6 


182 1st Battery. 


,. 25 52 


16th " 


V'O 


198 




17th " 


51 


179 Total Sold'r8.1194 282:5 


18th " 


166 


45 Whole vote 


27786 ftlSOl 


19th " . 


■^ 


128' Verc nt 


30.18 SI* S2 



Whole vote, 92,087; McClellan's majority, 36,51 5. 
—In 1860, whole vote, 145,058 : Anti-Lincoln ma- 
jority, 1&,S48. 



TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



C0NGBBS8.— Nine members to be chosen in 
Ansust, 1865. 

LE018LA.TURE.— Political divisions are un- 
certain, but a largo majority in each House 
were elected In 1S63, as Unionists. 

IOWA. 

Jttbge, 1863. Pres. '64. PsBS. 'GO. 
Counties. Un. Dem. Un. Dem. Rep.Dem. 

IJilloa. .\ln«on. Line McCl. Line. (JtherB. 

Adair 129 48.. 119 47.. 42 44 

Adams 201 88.. 180 76.. 161 92 

AUamaliee...l019 1314.. 1145 1330.. 1185 1151 

Appanoose... 878 1102.. 874 920.. 853 1224 

Audubon 43 54.. 43 52.. 48 59 

Benton 1031 651.. 1119 560.. 1(K8 724 

Blacl<hawk...ll99 419.. 1489 483.. 1122 557 

Boone 349 449.. 405 460.. 365 446 

Bremer 674 809.. 733 257.. 543 454 

Buchanan .... 99J 385.. 1054 601.. 962 021 

Buena Vista.. 3 4.. 6 9.. 6 6 

Buller 501 2.37.. 559 241.. 483 246 

Calhoun 14 26.. 12 24.. 19 20 

Carroll 28 29.. 38 32.. 25 26 

Cass 194 108.. 180 128.. 167 136 

Cedar...: 1575 951.. 1625 832.. 1548 963 

Cerro Gordo.. 159 29.. 22§ 11.. 157 59 

Cherokee 6 1.. 8 1.. 10 3 

Chickasaw.... 549 281.. 576 292.. 550 306 

Clarke 671 286.. 611 207.. 59.J 445 

Clay 12 1.. 24 11. 

Clayton 2064 1655.. 2110 1642. 

Clinton 193S 1379. . 1896 1410. 

Crawford 53 33.. 49 17. 

Dallas 632 .338.. 632 328. 

Davis 1017 1371.. 1021 968. 

Decatur 682 788.. 089 577. 

Delaware 1315 711.. 1300 630. 

Des Moines... 2091 1761.. 2050 1514. 

Dickinson 82 — .. — — . 

Dubuque 2109 3251.. 1742 3318. 

Emmett 23 2.. 41 — . 

Fayette 1350 800.. 1413 799. 

Floyd 575 200.. 537 185. 

Franklin 198 59.. 236 .56. 

Fremont 526 882.. 511 448. 

Greene 134 99.. 1.53 108. 

Grundy 173 28.. 202. 18. 

Guthrie 297 265.. 280 273. 

Hamilton 201 68.. 260 80.. 224 100 

Hancock 29 17.. 35 17.. 99 40 

Hardin 687 801.. 815 305.. 713 .382 

Harrison S43 309.. 341 291.. 385 357 

Henry 2ii.50 844.. 2069 069.. 2148 1066 

Howard 408 242.. — — .. 886 273 

Hnmboldt.... 53 28.. 74 31.. 55 8 

Ida 6 3.. 10 — .. 4 6 

Iowa 1T1 TS"!.. 7'.i2 662.. 782 682 

Jackson 1 . > l"i..l,,:-! 1609.. 1574 1405 

.lasper l' ■ i' ' 1 I'.i 6.38.. 1208 050 

Jelierson 1 i 1 9G3.. 14ft3 1245 

Johnson 1j - ; !.. > U 1397. 1804 1,585 

■lones 14..J i.iij.. jr,ol 911.. 1453 1125 

Keo'iuk 12;>1 lOSl.. 1149 938.. 1330 1211 

Kossuth 54 15.. 74 14.. 64 18 

Lee 252S 2101 . . 2506 222:J. . 2617 2632 

Linn 2088 1122.. 22.53 1037.. 2220 1289 

Louisa 1240 611.. 1305 559.. 1809 739 

Lucas 587 471.. 565 382.. 586 483 

Madison 788 613.. 808 586.. 737 761 

Mahaska 1752 1142.. lAK 9M.. 1C89 1.332 

Marion 1:387 15J0.. 1453 14.52.. 1508 1607 

Marshall 974 477.. lOSiS 367.. 854 401 

Mills 408 230.. 4*^5 237.. 441 327 

Mitchell 5R4 163.. 379 106.. 5M 17-3 

Monona 96 85.. 122 83.. 109 89 

Monroe 816 778.. 8-18 592.. 879 749 

Montgomery. 143 87.. 144 91.. 152 81 

Muscatine.... — — .. 1707 1242.. 18^10 1285 

O'Brien 5 4.. 2 5.. 8 10 

Pa-^c 436 232.. 521 163.. 469 290 

Paio Alto — 29.. — - .. 4 2'.) 

Plymouth 22 5.. 19 — .. ?.1 G 

Pocahontas... 19 11.. 32 8.. 21 10 



. 20S9 1594 

. 1974 1450 

. 47 31 

. 612 433 

. 813 1424 

. 680 893 

. 1268 789 

. 1997 1677 

. 46 7 

. 2lKe 3059 

. 36 — 

. 1539 835 

. .530 201 

. 228 69 

. 402 516 

. 121 145 

. 141 19 



Polk 1443 1218. 

Potawatomie. 474 307. 

Poweshielc... 733 531. 

Ringgold 303 96. 

Sac 23 15. 

Scott 26U 1292. 

Shelby 83 80. 

Sioux — 4. 

Story 456 839. , 

Tama SiO 418., 

Taylor 888 148.. 

Union 214 182.. 

Van Buren . . .1642 1248. 

Wapello 1420 1465. 

Warren 1136 746., 

Washington.. 1601 1089., 

AVayne 507 555. 

AVebster 304 264. 

Winnebago... 29 19. 

Winneshiek.. 1406 857. 

Woodbury.... 125 103. 

Worth 134 34. 

Wright 82 83. 



Muon.Linc. McClel. LincOlhers. 
303 1074 
418 410 
T31 484 
348 1S2 



502 



353. 
7.53 454. 
319 76. 
44 22. 
3674 1103.. 2739 1377 



15 



78. 



434 135., 
196 167. 
1577 1015. 



819.. 

13.. 
850.. 

93.. 

31.. 

42.. 



100 

3 10 

418 383 

775 418 

S53 218 

198 208 

1667 1552 

1399 1686 

1152 795 



Tot. home .08308 50829. .71765 47675. .70409 55111 
Percent horns.. 57. 34 42.66.. 60. U9 39.91.. 56.10 ii.\.-* 

Tot. sol'rs.. 17435 2289. .17310 1921 

Per ct. soldiers . . 88 49 1 1 51 .. 90 02 9.98 

Aggregate.85741 ,53118. .«)075 49596. .70409 55111 
In 1863, whole vote, 138,859 ; Union majority, 

34,623.— In 1864, whole vote, 138,671: Lincoln 

over McClellan, 39,479.— In 1800 whole vole, 

135,520; Ijncoln's m^ority, 15,398. 
Sbcret.\ry of State, 1864.— James Wright, 

rr«?"o?;,home, 72,.517; army,17,2.>4; total, Sa.iil; 

E. C. Hendershott, />/?»»., home, -48,056; army, 

1860; total, 49,916; majority for Wright, 39,Sa5. 

Other State offlcers about the same. 
CONGRESS, 1864. 

Districts. Union. Dem. 

James F. Wilson. Jos. K. Hoi-nlsh. 

I. ilome.Army.Total.Home. Armv.'rotsl. 

Whole Dlst. .13576 8401 16977.. 8917 l6l 9078, 

Wilson's m!y.,ho.,4,659; ar.,8,240; tot., 7,8£i9. - 

II. iliram Pj-ice. Geo. H.Parker. 
Wliole Dist.. 13135 3136 16571.. 8192 330 8823 

Price's maj.,ho.. 4.943: ar., 2.806: tot., 7,749. 

III. Wm. B. Allison. B. B. Richards. 
Whole Diet.. 13219 2911 16130.. 10237 35110513 

Alli80n'smaj.,hOM 2,902; ar.,2,.560: tot, 5,553. 

IV. Jo.siah B. Grinnell. Ira C. Mitchell. 
Whole Dist.. 13914 3003 16916.. 10217 8(5 10;iv)3 

Grinnell's ma^i., ho., 3,697 ; ar., 2,697: tot.6,3:;i. 

V. John A. Kasson. M. D. ilcHenry. 
Whole Dist.. 1U904 2T36 14640.. 6899 209 71i),s 

Kasson'smaj.,ho.,4,005; ar., 2,527; tot., 6,5:;3. 

VI. Asahel AV. Hubbard. L. Chapman. 
AVlioleDist.. 7315 1324 8439.. 3181 87 Sliici 
Hubbard's maj.,ho.,4,08l; ar., 1,187; tot.,. 5,2';i. 

Legislatuj'.e, 1865.— Nearly all the members 
in both Houses are Unionists; the Democrau 
have less than 15 ont of about 140. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Gov'NOE, 1864. Pres. '61. Pres. 'CO. 

Counties. Union. Un, Dem. Un. Dem. Dem. 

Boremau.LincMci.'leLGell IJreuk.Dou;. 

Bnrbonr 5.S0. . 593 293. , 

Berkeley 409.. T26 — ., 

Boone — .. — — ., 

Braxton — .. — — ., 

Brooke 508.. 464 401., 

Cabell 198.. m — . 

8alhonn — .. — — . 
lay 66.. 73 — . 

Doudridge .... 451 . . — — . 

Fayette 46.. — — . 

Gilmer 200.. 244 84. 

Greenbrier.... — .. — — . 
Hampshire.... 97.. 163 7. 

Hancock 359.. 424 297. 

Hardy — .. 254 — . 



442 


910 


"'.) 


913 


8;«) 


)'A> 


121 


204 




274 


337 


4i; 


173 


4.50 




316 


161 


4ii; 


19 


ni 


1 


119 


35 




H3 


im 


i)i 


m 


241 


(K 


117 


na 


110 


m 


.505 


^n 




1()5l 


75 


;« 


262 


K5 


894 


835 


74 



BoremaD.LiiicMcClel.BelLBreck Done 



HarriBon 1083.. isg 

Jackson sa.. 679 

Jefferson 2G5.. 174 

Kanawha 1035.. 1421 

Lewis 456.. W9 

Malton".".;;;:;:: m.: im 

Marshall 1205.. 1470 

Mason 1158.. 1»46 

Mercer — . . —-^ 

Monongalia . . .1040. . 1321 

Monroe — .- — 

Morgan 218.. 265 



853. 
190.. 

21.. 

2C.. 
443.. 



McDowell — .. — 

Kicholas 96.. m 

Ohio 1908.. 2138 

Pendleton — . . 211 

Pleasante 169.. 267 

Pocaliontas. ... 19. . — , 

Preston 1037.. im 

Putnatn 284.. 333 

Kaleigh — ••-:, 

Ran.lolph 274.. 177 

KiLchie 



. . 650. . 673 



Roane 



Taylor 750. 

Tucker 94. 

Tyler 443. 

Upshur 
Wayne. 



149. . 275 



315 
1202 
400 
140 
163 
563 
400 
230 
259 
224 
237 
647 
22 



86.. 



U91 107 

500 61 

45S 440 

513 52 

604 217 

271 6 

1337 137 

809 108 

439 297 

4S 18 

601 757 

520 83 

254 20 

37 — 

152 48 

915 716 

217 l:« 

166 119 

333 30 

912 2.39 

827 38 

69 14 

243 143 

544 73 

264 16 

575 26 

99 23 

423 197 

166 8-2 



L<:wis.Palmer.Linc.McClel.lJnc.0ther3. 

Kewaunee... 143 456.. 157 733.. 3^ «8 

Kenosha 1328 &12.. 1318 879.. 1637 924 

LaCrosie ....1299 717.. 1581 904.. 1477 S30 

Lafayette 1484 1463.. 1471 1712.. 17S6 1945 

La Point ..... 43 12.. 15 '22.. 43 80 

Manitowoc... 1302 1949.. 1179 2348.. 2041 1^^ 

Marathon 107 402.. 136 527.. 219 4^ 

Marouetle.... 59t 698.. 437 647.. 781 888 

Milwaukee... 3170 5315.. 3175 6875.. 4^ 67g 

Monroe 1113 560.. UCO 650..!^ -^ 

Oconto 326 55.. 291 

Outagamie... 737 1014.. 651 

Ozanleo 279 1724.. 243 Z050.. K7 isa 

iPepin 295 96.. 273 119.. g6 116 

•pierce 597 298.. 656 326.. 637 413 

Polk. 198 84.. 176 107.. 199 134 

Portage 790 315.. 704 311.. 944 

Racine 2156 1405. 

Richland 1134 627. 

Rock 4053 1368. 

Sauk 2061 854. 



17.. 329 756. 



— .. 66 



.. 287. 

..969.. 1496 591. 



150 255 
SSI 8S2 
60 29 



■Wetzel... 

Wirt 

Wood .... 

Wyoming .... 

Total . ..i90^..23152 1M38..210O7 21903 5742 

Perc«-t 1"0. .68.93 35.01. .43. 17 45. Oi 11 .61 

In 1864, ifor Governor, Arthnrl.Boreman had 
no opposition. AVhole vote lor President. 
33,590; Lincoln's ma.iority, 12.714. - Several 
counties were not returned in time for the 
official canvass.— In 18C0, whole vote tor Pre- 
sident, as above, 40,637. Lincoln had l,02i votes 
in the State, nearly all of which were cast in 
the counties now terming "West % irgima ; but 
the election judges generally refnscd to make 
official returns lest the people might know the 

"covGBESS, 1864.— Three Unlonmembers were 
chosen, wilh little opposition. They are: 1, 
Chester D. Hubbard ; 2, George R. Latham ; 3, 
KillianV.AVhaley. . 

Legiblatuse.— There is no division of par- 
ties ia either House. 

"WISCONSIN. ^ _ „„ 

GoT'NOK,1863. Pees. •64.PEB8. '60. 

Counties. Union. Dem. Un. Dem. Bep. Derii. 

Ieiris.P»'mer.I.inc.Mcriel.Linc.Othera. 
5S1 222.. 844 301 
14 29.. 835 32 
730 1286.. 873 
597 284, ' " 



692 221.. 



Adams.. 

Aehland at ,»u. 

Brown 543 1062. 

Buffalo &18 255. 

Calumet 557 707. 

Chippewa .... 236 272. 

Clark 106 45. 

Columbia 2896 1262. 

, Crawford 712 666. 

Dane 4152 8598. 

Dodge 3677 4164. 

Door 230 49. 

Douglas 48 71. 

Dimn 507 273. 

Eau Claire.... 501 298.. sis aw.. i^J 501 

F5nddnLac..3579 2667.. 3484 3305.. 4106 3004 

Grmt.. 3404 1313.. S217 1561.. 3579 1^5 

Green 20W 836.. 2017 1107.. 2373 1^ 

Green Lake . .1499 433.. 1441 5CS..195< 72o 

Iowa .:. 1351 1256.. 12S2 1424.. 1909 1^7 

Jackson Si9 204.. 680 207 

Jefferson 2300 2438. . 

Juneau 8^ C71.. 776 687.. 



459 190 
718. . 706 005 



711 7«6..- 828 838 

4018-3811.. 4798 4214 

3226 4698.. 4398 4199 

2.'i6 75.. -2.50 123 

37 67.. 70 81 

506 251.. 564 850 



178. 



. 273 119.. 

.656 326.. 

. 176 107.. 

. 704 311.. 

. 2031 1644.. 2634 1667 

. 1020 652.. 1167 803 

. 4363 15S2.. 5198 1960 

. 2076 986.. 2309 1022 



Shawanaw ... 133 168. . 134 97. . 163 114 

Sheboygan ..2076 1824.. 1S58 2185.. 2731 2186 

St.Crorx.. .. 594 493.. 594 511.. 664 600 

TTempeleau.. 517 85.. 573 130.. 49C 134 

■V^mon . 1155 300.. 1337 451.. 1145 487 

Walworth.... 3511 981.. 3155 UM.. 3910 1606 

Washington.. 695 2453.. 664 2923.. 939 2748 

WaukeeTia....23S6 2293.. 2010 2196.-3020 2573 

Waupacca .1222 438.. 1139 541.. 1340 591 

Wauihara .1100 281.. 1053 2S2.. 1534 429 

W^ebaso...279S 1524.. 2926 1772.. 3225 1875 

Wood... ..... 284 327.. 247 248.. 362 359 

Soldiers' vote.9257 747.. 14550 3291.. - - 



P.rceut . ...69.11 40. S».. 55.89 44.11.. 5D.bD W.ao 

In 1S63, whole vote, 133.297: James T. Lewis 
over Henry L. Palmer, 24,631.-In 1S64, whole 
vote 149,342; Lincoln's majority, 17,oi4. — In 
i^eo, whole vote 1.52,018; Lincoln over tho com- 
binedopposition.^3.^m^^^^^_ 

^^"■'^'" H^bert»aine. Johf^Cary. 

Who'.e Dist. .12043 1817 13860.. 12791 48d 132^ 
Gary's maj. on home vote, 748 ; Paine's ma}, 
on army, 1,&S2 ; Paine's clear maj, 5S8. 

II. Itbamar C. Sloan, George B. Smith. 
Whole Dist.. 13213 2325 155:33.. 9579 456 lOMS 

Sloan's maj., ho., 3,631 ; ar^ 1,809 : tot., 4,493.. 

III. Amasa Cobb. Chas. A. Rodolph. 
Whole Dist.. 11837 2916 14753.. 8112 324 ^36 

Cobb's ma3„ ho., 3,725; ar^ 2,593: tot., 6,119. 

IV. A. Scott Sloan. Chas. A. Eldridge. 
Whole Dist.. 9572 1380 10E52.. 13235 348 15583 

Eldridge's maj , home, 5,663; Sloan's maj., 
army, 1,032 ; Eldridge's clear maj ., 4,631. 

V. Philetus Sawyer. Gabriel Bouck. 
Whole Dist.. 110S7 2131 1321S.. 9875 399 Wi~U 

Sawyer'smai..ho., 1,212 ; ar., 1,732; tot., 2,944. 

TI. Walter D, Mclndoe. Henry Reed. 

Whole Dist.. 11571 2121 1369-2.. 6645 234 6879 

Mclndoe's maj., ho., 4,926; ar., 1,887; tot.6,813. 

Legi8Latuke,1865. Senate. Ho'me. Joint Bal. 

rnionists 25 68 ^ 

Democrats 8 S ^ 

Union mtjority 17 36 53 



Countiet. 



MICHIGAN. 

Gov'NOB, 1864. Pkes. 64. Pbks. "eo 
Union. Dem. Un. Dem. liep. Dem. 



Allegan 1865 1551. 

Alpena — — 

Antrim 73 15 

Barry 1665 1021. 

Bay 460 586, 

Berrien 2562 

'D.»«a1. ■>ftO'7 



18 .. — 



652 1022.. 1901 1038 

462 SS4.. 311 SU 

2311.. 2551 2307.. 2620 2337 

1472.. 3035 1465.. 3074 1558 

3750 2532.. 3742 2525.. 40T2 2449 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



Crapo Fenton.Linc. McCl. Line. Others.' 

Cass 1774 1440.. 1765 1435.. 20^ mi 

Cheboygan.. 23 64.. 23 &!.. 20 i4 

Chippewa.... 46 134.. 46 I'M.. ,^64 89 

Clinton 1.530 1416.. 1524 1411.. 1569 Vi'-i 

Delta 20 30.. 24 31..[^ewCo.] 

Eaton 1850 1379.. 1848 13C9..2135 iaj.8 

Emmet 74 ITi.. 75 141.. „„30 168 

Genesee 2716 1992.. 2743 2003.. 2832 1920 

Gr'd Traverse 373 83... 3';5 83.. 407 198 

Gratiot 573 S61.. 571 SCO.. 496 314 

Hillsdale 8807 1739.. 3805 1725.. 3749 1719 

Houghton.... 382 .980.. 880 978.. — „ — 

Huron . . . . .*. . 360 338. . 860 337. . 299 ^ 209 

EigUara 1803 1791.. 1792 1793.. 2181 18S8 

iSna 2209 1386. 2205 1383.. 2231 1294 

Iosco 56 43.. 57 43.. 20 41 

Isabella 215 87.. 215 83.. 123 Ul 

Jackson 3005 2910.. £002 2909.. ^96 25% 

Kalamazoo... 3155 2106.. sm 2101.. 3230 2031 

Kent 3406 2976.. 3398 2966.. 3647 2oW 

Keewenaw... 295 391.. 295 391..^— —^ 

Lapeer 1471 1247. 1464 1247.. ITO"} 1222 

Leelenaw 232 146.. 2.S5 W.. -„ „- 

Lenawee -1800 3645.. 4780 3632.. 5080 SdIO 

Livingston... 1604 1994.. 1604 1983.. 2075 2003 
Maekfnaw.... 30 185. 30 185, 

Macomb 2050 2181. . 2041 2177, 

Manistee 144 72.. 145 70 

"4 



Ferr\-. HaU. 
18 



41 

2534 2166 

126 58 

56 C7 

89 19 

97.. 109 5 

23.. [New Co.] 

101.. 157 _ 13 



135.. 



406 242. 



252 



364 
4411 
192 



177. 
454 
1542.' ." 1345 1536'. . 1414 1217 
'- 1479 1206 



1606 1221 

2589 1955 

2832 1980 

747 350 

2175 1274 



IV. 

Antrim 

Barry ....1665 

Cheboygan... 20 

Delta 36 

Emmet 68 

G'd Traverse. 366 

Ionia 2158 1486 

Kent 3399 2980 

Leelanaw 233 

Mackinac .... 37 

Manistee 163 

Manltou 61 

Mason 147 

Mecosta 147 

Montcalm.... 589 
Muskegon.... 684 
Newaygo .... 407 

Oceana 362 

Ottawa 1416 1476 

Army vote... 1387 

Total 13426 



TrowbridsreBaldw. 

St. Clair 1818 2064 

Army vote . . . 1179 314 I 

Total 12frJ7 11931 

Rowland E. Trow , 
bridge over Augustus I 
C. Baldwin, 710. 

VI. Driggs-WiUarJ. 

Alpena no ret'rn 

Bay 459 5S5 

Chippewa;... 87 133 

Clinton 1531 1417 

Genesee 2761 1C96 

Gratiot, 570 370 

Houghton.... 380 983 

Huron 860 8:« 

Iosco 58 43 

Isabella 215 88 

Keweenaw... 285 401 
Marquette .. .no ret'rn. 
Menominee... 49 23 

Midland 213 88 

Ontonagon... 370 308 

Saginaw 1759 1872 

SMawassee...l427 '1289 

Tuscola 798 381 <'■ 

Army vote .. .1219 269 
Total 12490 10604 



Manltou 11 

Mason 134 

Mecosta 146 97. . 143 

Menominee... 59 24. 58 

Midland 210 99.. 208 

Monroe 1657 2341 . . 1659 2331 . . 

Montcalm .... 596 443. 

Muskegon.... 651 375.. 6.'>4 366.. 502 

Newaygo 404 

Oakland 3T23 

Oceana 354 

Ontonagon ... 251 

Ottawa 1355 ^ 

Saginaw 1722 1911.. 1731 1900, 

Sanilac 758 319.. 753 818, 

Shiawassee ..1422 12S7.. 1412 1283 

St. Clair 1816 2061.. 1808 2063 

St. Joseph.... 2680 1809.. 2611 1796 

Tuscola 796 391.. M 401 

VanBuren ..1995 1400.. 1985 1100 

Washtenaw.. 3643 3844. 3632 8886- • ^^^ «-«, 

Wayne .5948 7687. . .59-16 7670.. 7325 61OI 

Soldiers' vote 9612 2992. . 9402 2959. . — — 

Total . .. .91356 74293. .91.521 74604.. 88480 6.5057 
Per cunt 65.16 44.54.. 56.89 44.11.. 61.68 42. ST 

In ISftl, whole vote for Governor, 165,619. 
Henry H. Carpo over William H. Fenton, 17,063. 
Whole vote for President,l06.125 ; Lincoln over 
McClellan, 16,917.— In 1860, whole vote, 153.5b7 ; 
Lincoln over all, 23,423. [For President In 1?«4, 
there were 17 counties not returned in time. 
These w» have included in the table above 
eiven. 

CONGEESS, 1804. 
Districts. Uii. Dem.'Distt-icts. Un. Dem. 

I. Bcttman.Xoble I Upson.Bal.h. 

Hillsdale 3815 1733 Army vote .. .2084 459 

Lenawee 4814 .3622 1 -— 

Monroe 16*1 2350 Total . . . ..,.19151 12538 

Wayne . ...5965 76671 Charles Upson over 
Army vote... 1671 226 Nathaniel A. Balch, 

' . ,6,613. '■ 

Total 17906 1.55921 ''l- 'f'»"SJT--n'' Tin 

Fernando C. Beaman Calhoun 3.o0 25.^0 

over Daniel A. Noble, Eaton lS.->4 1374 

2 314 ilnghani 1803 li91 

II UpBon.Bak!,. Jackson 3003 2910 

Allegan..., '...1865 1543 Washtenaw . .3050 3840 
BerrTen.....:.2563 2310 Army vote .. .1367 813 

gr.'^-::::f77i S Total liiii^ 

Kalauiazoo...3148 21081 .John W.^ Longyear 



Frederick Hall 

V. Trowbridpe.tialdw 

Lapeer 1471 1248 

Livingston... 1624 191 

Macomb 2054 21 

Oakland 8746 83 

Sanilac 755 3 

Legislature.— There is a large preponder- 
ance—three or four to one — of Unionists in 
each House. 

CAIiirORNIA, 

Gov'NOK, '63. Pees. '64. Pbes. '60. 

Counties. Un. Dem. Un. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

Low. Dowmey. Line. aicClel. Line. Othera. 

Alpine — — .. 384 228.. — — . 

Akimeda 1404 802.. 1467 811.. 1033 1056 

Amador 2245 2064. . 1392 1199, 

Butte ...1876 1490.. 1739 1117. 

Calaveras 2278 2020 . . 2071 1564 



Colusa 479 

Contra Costa. 1064 
Del Norte — — 
El Dorado.... 3210 

Fresno 83 

Humboldt .... 502 

lilamalh 204 

Lake 164 

Lassen — 

Los Angeles.. 702 

Marin 640 

Mariposa 835 

Mendocino... 623 

Merced 95 

Mono 1009 

Monterey 522 

Napa 898 

Nevada 2882 

Placer 2057 1620.. 

Plumas 



274 425.. 



1437 8001 

978 2948 

258 694 

608 9S8 

175 344 



263.. 385 576 



714 352 1364 

410.. 408 606 

&12.. 262 162S 

718. . , 198 850 

218 42 319 



800 433 

„ „ 441 1338 

1756.. 2784 1793.. 2539 4426 

1474.. 1748 4081 

-" 1167 



Sacramento.. 3553 1W4.. 4192 1763.. 2670 4372 

S.Bernardino 361 376.. 243 493.. 305 414 

San Diego.... 116 132. 97 197.. 81 185 

San Francisco 9261 5162.. 12667 8352.. 6825 753o 

San Joaouin.. 1981 1473.. 1849 112?.. 1131 2807 

S. Luis Obispo 260 219.. 259 149.. 148 27d 

SanMateo. .. 834 840.. 600 .377.. 389 714 

Santa Barbara 481 148.. 343 80.. 46 428 

Santa Clara.. 2034 1525.. 1930 1202.. 1468 1.14 



^v'«n^Z?e'i.-S f^tl^l. ^^^"^ •^'"""°' ^K.v.v.v.fs^ ^:: ^ mv. ^3 1554 



Santa Craz . 

Shasta aao uii.. 

Sierra 2350 1303. 

Siskiyou 1053 999. 

Solano 1521 112-1. 

Sonoma 1700 1712. 

Stanislaus.... 317 899. 

Sntter 718 670. 

Tehama 



974 452. 

909 502. 

2051 1037. 

925 957. 

1255 908. 



670 734 

464 1931 

1468 3275 

955 2779 

681 1611 

1236 2527 

167 732 

403 921 

243 1060 



VanBuren... 1996 1400 2 



ThE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18ft5. 



Low. Downey. Lioc.McClel.LiDc.Others. 

Tulare 6W 715.. 528 639.. 131 1193 

Tuolumne . . . .1813 1864. . IgS9 1.566 . . 1638 3909 

Yolo 865 768.. 653 475.. 535 1177 

Tul)a 1989 1393.. 18(0 133S..lti65 3393 

Soldiers' vote 4159 140.. 2600 237.. — — 



Total 64447 41715. .62134 43841. .38734 81131 

Percent 59.04 40.96.. 68.63 41. 31. .32, 35 67.65 

In 1863, whole vote, 109,162; Frederick F. 

Low over James G. Downey, 19,732.— In 1864, 

whole vote, 105,975 ; Lincoln's majority, 18,293. 

CONGRESS, 1864. 

Dlst. Union. Dctiwcrat. Un.maj. 

I.— McEuer.. .20677; Crockett. .14821. . . . 5846 

II.— Higby 2.3092 ; Coft-roth. . . 14S57 .... 8535 

III.-Bldwell . . .18018 ; Temple. . . .14249. ... 87G9 
Caitdidat-es.— Union : Donald C. McEner, 
William Higby, John Bidwell. Democralx : 
James B. Crocliett, James W. Offl-oth, Jack- 
eon Temple. 
Lbgislature —Large Tnlon majority In 

each branch 

MISSOURI. 
CojrvEirnoiT,1864. Pkes.'64. Pbes.'60. 
Counties. Union. Deni. Un. Dem. Rep. Dem. 



For. Against. Lil 



. McCleLLin 



Adair 576 

Andrew 1051 41.. 1141 60.. 97 

Atchison .... 625 5. . 639 7. . 68 

Audrain 138 398.. 126 392.. 1 

Barry 119 20.. 197 17.. 1 

Barton — — .. 23 — .. 28 

Bates 27 — . . 27 13. . 30 

Benton - - .. 574 21.. 74 

Bollinger.... 128 25.. 243 12.. 23 

Boone 174 889. . 262 813. . 12 

Buchanan... 1671 725.. 1914 810.. 452 

I Butler — — .. — — .. 1 

' Caldwell .... 412 74.. 496 88.. 43 

Calloway .... 203 970.. 274 965.. 15 

Camden 439 8.. 46s 1.. 6 

C.Girardeau 948 497.. 1213 5^... 175 

Carroll 212 79.. 285 113.. 3 

Carter — — .. — — .. — 

Cass 66 104.. 76 105.. 23 

Cedar 295 - .. 297 - .. 4 

Chariton 837 —..363 2.. 1 

Christian .... 306 1 . . 557 5. . — 

aark 879 100.. 997 128.. 277 

Clay 179 776. 216 777.. - 

Clinton 277 —..297 492.. 11 

Cole 1069 478. 

Cooper 627 414. 

Crawford.... 377 274. 

Dade 399 11. 

Dallas 421 — . 

, Daviess 740 283. 

\ DeKalb 303 180. 

Dent 108 — . 



Linn 

Livingston 

Macon 

MadiBon . . 
Maries .... 

Marlon 

McDonald... 26 

Mercer 959 

Miller . . . 
Mississippi . . 39 
Moniteau.... 678 

Monroe 105 

Montgomery 492 

Morgan 204 

New Madrid. 44 

Newton 55 

Nodaway.... 740 
Oregon . . 

Osage 

Ozark 24 

Pemiscot 

Perry — 

Pettis 718 

Phelps 703 

Pike 1064 

Platte.... 
Polk 



939 381.. 20 2221 



.1617 327 



Dunklin ... 
Franklin . . 
Gasconade 

Gentry — 

Greene 1650 

Grundy 543 

Harrison.... U30 187. 

Henry — — . 

Hickory 273 1. 

Holt 525 75. 

Howard 808 5. 

HoweU — — . 

Iron 471 — . 

Jackson — — , 

Jasper 5 12 

Jefferson.... 917 228 

Johnson — — 

Knox 432 330 

Laclede 142 444 

Lafayette.... 243 426 

Lawrence ... 525 42 

Lewis 755 541 

Lincoln 474 345 



120.. 862 185. 
— .. 525 281. 
302.. 2223 346. 



129 1113 
297 1279 
16 1.568 



602 557. 

46 2. 

915 323. 

832 224. 




Putnam 1049 

Kails 241 

Eandolph... 

Eay — 

Eeynolds — 

Elpley — 

St. Charles... 1486 

St. Clair 220 

St. Francois. - 
St.Genevieve 
St. LouiB 
Salina 
Schuyl 

Scotland 578 

Scott 160 

Shannon 

Shelby 

Stoddard 

Stone 

Sullivan 

Taney 

Texas, 

Vernon 

Warren 

WMhington. 441 

Wayne 160 

Webster 318 

Worth 120 

Wright 1 



Total 63504 25711.. 72750 31678. 17028 148490 

Percent 71,35 28.66.. 69.46 30. 64. .10, 29 89,71 

In 1864, whole vote (so far as returned) for 
Convention, 89^15; majority in favor, 87,793. 
Whole vote for President, 104,428 ; Lincoln over 
McClellan, 41,072.- In 1860, whole vote for Presi- 
dent, 165,518; anti-Lincoln majority, 131,462. 

' "'lomas C. ~ ■ ■ 

nor over ' 

Price, Dem., by a majority a little exceeding 
that for Lincoln. The vote (incomplete) was : 
Fletcher, 71,531; Price, 30,406; majority for 
Fletcher, 41,125. 

CONGRESS, 1864. 



CnuntifK. Rad. Rati. Dem. , 

I. John8on.Knoi,HoKan. 

St. Louis J781 3157 6026 

John Hogan over 

Chas. P. Johnson, 1^5 ; 

over Sam'el Knox,2849. 

Rad. Indep.Un. 

II. Blow. S-afford. 

St.Lonis 6073 537 

Jefferson 877 



Blow. Stafford , 



Maries 138 00 

Crawford ..... 439 195 

Phelps 647 203 

Pulaski 65 28 

Total ^6^7^ 

"lenrv T. Blow over 



FrankUn 1698 19 *v;. Stafford, 5,027. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 



Ill 
Dnnklln 
PemiBCOt.. 
N. Madrid 
Hlsslsaippl 
Stoddard. 



Rad.Jnd. Jtad. I)em.\ Joseph W. McCllirg 
NoeU Leeper.Tuttie over Sample Orr, 4,421. 
'" (Co.dlBorg.) „ r . . _ . V 



^f^ 



210 



Butler .... (Co.dlsorg.) 
Bipley .... 

Scott 214 12 287 

Wayne .... 5 
Reynolds. . 1 
Shannon ..(Co.dlsori 
C.Girard'n 1166 22 
Bollinger.. 179 42 
Madison... 221 22 

Iron 229 239 

Dent 106 — 

Perry 569 113 

Ste.Genev. 443 - ... 
St.Francois (Notrec'd) 
Washlng'n. 693 80 223 
Carter. . . . (Co.diBorg.) 
Oregon. ... 

Total . . . .4075 

Thoinae E. Noell over 
D. C. Tnttle, 2217 ; over 
W. T. Leeper, 3,416. 

Rad.tnd.Rad.Rad. 

IV. Boyd.Kelao.Hubble. 

Jasper 1 51 — 

Newton ... 1 149 — 

McDonald. — 26 — 

Barry 32 155 17 

Lawrence. 177 624 

Cedar 141 153 

Barton .... 20 — 

Dade 101 — 

Polk 484 420 

Greene . . . .1129 995 

Christian.. 345 206 

Stone 49 49 

Taney 21 8 

Webster... 317 253 no 

Dallas 249 300 - 

Laclede ... 284 S18 43 

Wright.... 2 77 — 

Douglaa... 141 53 — 

Ozark 34 — 

Texas 20 4 1 

Howell. . . . (Co.disorg.) 

Total.... 3548 3841 400 

John R. Kelso over 

Sempronins H. Boyd, 

293; over M.J. Hubble, 

3,841. 

Rad. Ind 

V. McClurg. Orr. 

Bates 26 13 

Vernon (no vote). — 
Johnson 757 224 



VanHorn.K'e Nort. 

— 91 Clinton 319 14 442 

— 255!Clay 166 111 635 

40 2 Platte 455 49 908 



St. Clair 223 

Hickory 310 

Benton 556 

Pettis 762 

Cooper 862 

Moniteau .... 774 

Cass 74 

Cole 900 

Morgan 2T2 

Miller 536- 

Camden 465 

Total 6976 



18 



Jackson ....665 350 9 

Caldwell... 419 1 84 

Ray 446 117 670 

Lafayette . .260 43 315 

Carroll 254 8 106 

Saline 157 2 57 

Charlton... 357 — — 

Total . . . .3498 695 3226 
R. T. Van Horn over 

Ely ah fl. Norton, 272; 

over Austin A. King, 
,803. 

Rad.In.Rad.In.Un. 
VII. Loan.Btts.Br-h. 

Holt 628 3 151 

Nodaway... 715 — 4 
Andrew.... 1093 21 54 
Buchanan.. (no return) 

Dekalb 336 1 190 

Gentry 479 — 255 

Atchison... 620 — — 
Harrison... 1094 1 258 
Livingston. 450— 474 
Grundy .... 855 — 22 

Mercer 1021— 10 

Sul li van.... 1074 — 84 
Putnam . . . .1060 9 2 

Worth 268 — 16 

. 752 — 154 



Total.... 10316 35 1774 
Ben.laminr.Loan over 
H. B.Branch,8,566;over 
J. M.Bassett, 10,309. 

Rad. Ind. 
VIII. Eenjaniin.Glover. 

Linn 754 78 

Schuyler.... 524 195 

Scotland .... 528 521 

Clark 876 123 

Adair 783 192 

Knox 651 351 

Lewis 756 545 

Marion 923 429 

Shelby 

Macon 1615 

Randolph ... 354 
Howard 384 



388 201 



Total 8536 2978 

John F. Benjamin 
over John M. Glover, 

5,558. 

RaJ. Pern. 



IX. 



Ill 



Monroe 

Ralls 266 

Audrain 123 

Pike 1089 

Lincoln 547 

Montgomery 503 
436 Callaway.... 199 

97iBoone 193 

479lWarren 794 

2t>4:St. Charles.. 1505 
109 — 

5 Total 

George W. Anderson 

2556'over Odon Guitar, 379, 



NEVADA. 

CONSTITOTION.— In October a State Con- 
stitution was adopted, and Governor,Congre89, 
man, &c., chosen. The vote on Governor was : 
H. G, Blasdell, Lrnion, 9,834 ; David E. Buel, 
Dem., 6,590; Biasdell's majority, 3,244. H. G. 



.5829 4950 



Vfonhington,Union, was elected to Congreea, 
over two candidates (A. C. Bradford and — 
Fitch). The Legislature Is entirely Union, 

Pbesident.— The vote, as offlcially re- 
turned, is 16,420. Lincoln, 9,826: McClellan, 
6,594 ; Union m^orlty, 8,232. 

KANSAS. 

GOVEK[IOB,'64. CONGBE8e,'64. PbeS. '64. 

Counlitt. Lane. A)Ui-lMne. Lane. Anti-Lai.c C'n. Drm. 

CrawforiThalcher Clarke. L«e. Line. McCl. 

Allen 225 96.. 192 126.. 250 73 

Anderson 239 56.. 220 63.. 256 37 

Atchison 555 622.. 508 659. . 735 378 

Bourbon 864 166.. 760 243.. 960 126 

Brown 207 156.. 146 219.. 362 3 

Butler 35 25.. 26 30. . 39 19 

Chase 60 67.. 59 67.. 79 47 

Coffey 278 149. . 265 168. . 307 124 

Davis 134 91.. 128 92.. 153 65 

Dickinson 44 20.. 41 19.. 42 20 

Doniphan 634 516.. 495 668.. 1081 19 

Douglas 995 595. . 977 598. . 1363 194 

Fraiftlln 320 127.. 317 125.. 895 23 

Greenwood.... 96 18.. 96 13.. 106 16 

Jackson 260 116.. 254 117.. SOO 76 

Jefferson 635 375.. 597 402.. 855 178 

Johnson 258 279. . 285 288. . 437 105 

Leavenworth.. 1350 2077. . 1162 2230. . 2139 1371 

Linn 299 448.. 191 541.. 689 62 

Lyon 440 113.. 413 132.. 487 69 

Marshall 173 146.. 169 166.. 260 59 

Miami 489 266.. 418 277.. 614 80 

Morris 50 105.. 36 118.. 70 98 

Nemaha 250 131.. 227 152.. 341 30 

Osage 121 68.. 114 73.. 167 27 

Pottawatomie. 173 87.. 158 98.. 213 35 

Riley 160 111.. 145 135.. 220 50 

Saline 49 40.. — — .. — — 

Shawnee 427 232.. 379 280. . 573 75 

Washington... 59 43.. 57 46.. 93 — 

Waubonsee ... 116 68.. 102 77.. 163 7 

Woodson 56 46.. 55 47.. 67 85 

Wyandotte.... 176 339.. 168 343.. 285 190 

SoldierB(est).1400 — .. 1000 — .. 1600 — 

Total 11577 7794. . 10105 8597. . 16441 3691 

Percent 69.77 40.23.. 64.40 45.60.. 81.67 18.33 

In 1864, whole vote for Governor (soldiers' 
vote estimated), 19,371 ; Samuel J. Crawford, 
"Lane" Union, over Solon O. Thatcher, "Anti- 
Lane" Union, 8,783. Whole vote for Congress, 
18,702; Sidney Clarke, "Lane" Union, over 
Albert L. Lee, "Anti-Lane " Union, 1,508. 
Whole vote for President, 20,132; Lincoln over 
McClellan, 12,750. [There was an "Anti-Lane" 
split on the Electoral ticket, but all the Elect- 
ors chosen were Union men and the vote of 
the State is cast for Lincoln and Johnson. 
Kansas did not vote for President In i860.] 

Legislattjke.— Both branches all Union. 

LOUISIANA. 

GovERNOE.— On the 22d of February, a Gov- 
ernor and other State officers were chosen. 
Michael Hahn, Union Free Stale Had. 6,536 ; J. 
Q. A. Fellows, Iiidep, 2,750; B. F. Flanders, 
Indep. 1,860. All the candidates professed to 
be Unionlsfs. 

New Constitution.— In September, a new 
Constitution, prohibiting slavery was adopted 
by: yeas, 6,836; nays, 1,566: majority for, 5,270. 
A Legislature was elected at the same time, 
almost entirely Free State. Members of Con- 
gress were chosen as follows : 

Union. Indep. 

l..M.F.Bonzano...l607; Edmund Abell. 1511 
II..A. P.FIeld 1857; A. P. Dostie. .. .1023 

III. .W. D. Mann 1908; [no opposition.] 

IV. .T. M. Wells 465 " " 

V..B,W. Taliaferro. 211; " 

Electors. — In December, the Legislature 
chose seven Electors, Unionists of course. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1365. 



LOYAL STATE GOVERNMENTS. 



STATES. 



CAPITALS. 



California i Sacramento 

Connecticut. . 'Hartford & N.H'n 

Delaware iDo ver 

IlUnols Springfield 

Indiana Indianapolis . . . . 

Iowa Des Moines 

Kansas [Topeka 

Kentucky .... iFranlifort 

Louisiana (Baton Rouge . . . . 

Maine i Augusta 

Maryland I Annapolis 

Massachusetts Boston 



GOVERNORS. 



Frederick F. Low... 
\Vm. A. Bnckingbam 

William Cannon 

Richard J. Oglesby . 
Oliver P. Morton . . . 
William M. Stone ... 
Samuel J.Crawford. 
Tbos. E. Bramlette.. 

Michael Hahn 

Samuel Cony 

TliomasSwann 

John A. Andrew . . . . 

Henry H. Crapo 

Stephen Miller 

Thomas C.Fletcher. 
Henry G. Blasdell 



IJan. 

,May, 
Jan. 
Jan. 
'Jan. 
[Jan. 
'Jan. 
Sept. 



Missouri I Jefferson City 

Nevada I Virginia City . 

N.Hampshire. Concord Joseph A. Gllmore 

New Jersey. . . 'Trenton \Joel Parker 

New York lAlbany Reuben E. Fenton .. 

Ohio iColnmDus John Brough 

Oregon 'Salem Addison C. Gibbs . . . 

Pennsylvania. Harrlsburg 'Andrew G. Cnrtin.. . 

Rhode Island. Newport & Pro V. I James Y.Smith 

Vermont ' Montpelier J. Gregory Smith . . . 

Virginia Alexandria iFrancis H. Pierpont, 

West Virginia. Wheeling [Arthur I. Boreman. . 

Wisconsin .... 'Madison I James T. Lewis 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Dec. 



1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
2,500 
2,500 



1,500 
3,600 
3,500 
1,500 
2,500 



June,: 
Jan. : 
Jan. : 
Jan. : 
Sept, J 
Jan. : 
May : 
Oct. : 
Jan. 
Mar. : 
Jan. 



1,000 
1,000 
3,000 
2,000 




1 W. Jan. 
1 W. Jan. 
1 W. Jan. 
n W. Jan. 
'1 Tu. Jan. 
'Last M.Dec 
1 M. Jan. 

1 W.June. 

2 Tu. Jan. 
1 Tu. Jan. 
•1 M. Jan. 
'2 M. Sept. 
1 Ta. Jan. 



1 M.Dec. 
STu. Jan. 

2 W.Jan. 



STATE ELKCT'n 

IwTsept. 
1 M. April. 

1 Tu. Nov. 
ITu.Nov. 

2 Tu. Oct. 
1 Tu. Nov. 
ITu.Nov. 
IM. Aug. 



1 Tn. Nov. 
1 Tu. Nov. 
1 Tu. Nov. 
1 Tu. Nov. 

1 Tn. Nov. 
ITn. Nov. 

2 Tu. March 
1 Tu. Nov. 
ITn. Nov. 
2Tn. Oct. 

1 M. June. 
2Tu. Oct. 
1 W. April. 
ITu. Sept. 
4 Th. April. 
4Th. Oct. 
ITu.Nov. 



NoU.—A\\ the Governors are Unionists, except Parker of New Jersey : (Bramlette, of Ken- 
tucky, was elected as a Unionist, but is rather doubtful no\fe) Astar (*; in Legislature column 
Indicates that sessions are held biennially. Rhode Island has a sesil-annnal session. 

POPULAB VOTE FOB, PRESIDENT. 



Alabama . 



1864. 



! California .... 

Connecticut . 

Delaware 

Florida i — 

Georgia — 

: Illinois 189,496 

Indiana 150,422 

Iowa I 89,075 

I Kansas I 16,411 

iKentuckj' | 27,786 

I Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

! Massachusetts 
; Michigan 

Minnesota 



,155 



68,114 
40,153 
126,742 
91,521 



72,750 
9,828 
36,400 



265,154 



Missouri 

: Nevada 

■ N. Hampshire 

New Jersey ' 60 

:New York ' 368,735 

North Carolina.. 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania ... 

Rhode Island ... 
; South Carolina.. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

, Vermont 

i Virginia 

' West Virginia... 

Wisconsin 

Total 



158,730 
1.30,233 

49,596 
3,691 

64,301 

46,992 
32,789 
48,745 
74,604 
17,375 

31^678 
0,594 
33,871 



18,293 
2,406 
*612 



39,479 
12,750 
•36,515 

2U22 
7,414 
77,997 
16,917 



8,529 
•7,301 
6,749 




1860. 



39,1T3 
43,792 
3315 



1,364 

62^11 

2,2M 

106,53:3 



17,( 

37,519 
58,324 
362,646 



5,227 



11,590 
160,315! 
115,5091 

55,111 

25,651 ' 
7,6351 
26,6931 

5,966: 



ai,S34 
14,641 
7,337 



2, 

13,295 



63,801 

313,510! 

2,7011 

187,2.32 

3,951 

16,765 

7,707 

Chosen 

11,350 



11,405 

5,006 

178,871 

by the 
64,709 
47,548 
• 218 
74,323 



27,875 
20,094 
6,817 
8,291 
3,864 
5,437 

4;913 
5,306 
1,763 



20,204 
2,046 
41,760' 

63 
25,040 
58,373 



441 



Legls 
69,274; 

15,438 



1856. 



14S,2T^ 

11,467 

lalnre. 



_66,090 
1,342,164 




46,943 
195,8 

48,246 
170,874 



422 
24,115 
124,604 



83,202 



579 
74,625 



(•Democratic m^orlty.)— Iii 1864, whole vote 4,034,789; Lincoln's majorltv, 411,281.— In 1860, 
whole vote, 4,680,193; Lincoln over Douglas, 401,375; over Breckinridge, 1,018,500; over Bell, 
1,275,821 ; all others over Lincoln, 947,289.— In 1856, whole vote, 3,992,818 ; Buchanan over Fre 
moat, 460^865 ; over Fillmore, 928,404 Fremont and FiUmore over Buchanan, 886,760. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1865. 






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;>,ag— o^ 



WHEELER & WILSOIV'S 

Highest Premium Sewing Machine, 
no.m BnoADWAVt new vomc. 



and ranks bigheet on 
account of the elas- 
ticity, permanence, 
beanty, and general 
desirableness of the 



THIS MACHINE MAKES THE 



LOCK STITCH 



Btitchlng when done, 
and the wide range of 
hts application.— iJe- 
}port of American In- 
slitnte, N. Y. 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE OPINIONS. 

^ I have great pleasure In bearing testimony to the value of your Sewing Machine. It is the 
reaJlzatlon of ail oar Imaginings of household fairies and good hard-working browides that 
ask for no payment. Jfa/-y HowUt. 

•■ What the steam-engine proves, compared to horse-power, this beautiful machine Is when 
set In opposition to the slow, patient progress of the ordinary needle. Anna S. Stephens. 

I find your machine invaluable. I have used it a year, and it has never been out of order. 
The Stitch Is very durable and can be adanted to fine or coarse materials. It works with the 
rapidity of a dozen hands; saves much time, fatigue and expense. One of your machines is 
used in my father's family, another in the household of a sister, and others by various friends. 
The opinions of all accord with that I have just expressed. Anna Cora Sitchie. 

Of it we 
more in our 
constitute an era in the history 

Mrs. Vinton desires me to express to yon her entire satisfaction with your Sewing Machine. 
I may add that, judging from the frequency of the rapid tick of this machine, it promotes both 
industry and pleasure. My purse bears witness that the Sewing Machine, among its other excel- 
lencies, is a household economy. Rev. Di'. Francis Vtnton . 

Your admirable Needle woman is the only seamstress that defies extortionate men. They 
cannot cheat it, nor starve it, nor deprive it of sleep, nor tire it out, nor make its hands weary. 
It is a worker that is a match for the most unwearied and avaricious manufacturer. At last I 
am thanliful that there is a Machlne-'Woinan that cannot be oppressed nor kept in suflering. 

Ben. Henry Ward Beecher. 

I take pleasure in saying that the Sewing Machine purchased of you by me, has been wholly 
serviceable. Bev. Samuel Osgood, D. D. 

There is but one Sewing Machine, and that is Wheeler & Wilson's. 

JmUje MeUjs, of the American ImtUute. 



! can speak with entire clearness and confidence, after the use of one four yearsor 
ir family. We look upon it as one of the benefactions of the age, and one which will 
an era in the history of woman. Mrs. E. Oake% SmHh. 



The most practical Invention adapted to common use 
It will work as.great a change 



Com. Jfechanics' Institute, Baltimo, 
the family, as railways have in States 



We prefer them for family use.— THhune. 
They are the favorites for families.— riww-s. 
It has no rival.— .Scie7i((^c American. 
Works more uniformly than the han^.—Berald. 
Equal to nine seamstresses.— flbme Journal. 
An almost perfect instrument.— £p««tnfir Post. 
The machine for family v.&e.— Advocate and 

Journal. 
Most honorable to American genius.— /«rf€- 

pendent. 
We cannot imagine anything more perfect.— 

Evangeli-it. 
■?7il] £;lve entire satisfaction.— O&sercer. 
The Best ever invented.— C7u-t.«Ma« Enquirer. 
A triumph of mecUsnlcal genius.- t/re's Dic- 

InlooMng for the best, see ih&it.— Examiner. 

Indispensable In every family.— The Preacher. 

We praise it with enthusiasm.- CArisMan In- 
telligencer. 

A Bwift-flngered sister of charity.—.?. S. Ad. 

Worthy of the highest award.— 5a66afA Re- 
corder. 

It surpasses all others.- i«(?iM' Reposdory. 

A benefaction of the a.^e.— Putnam's Monthly. 

It is an American iuslitntlon.— ^?u'cA:«>-6octe/'. 

A complete success.— JVa<«ci«ai Magazine. 

Magical In operation.- ifrs. Stephens' Monthly. 



Bon. X. P. Banks. 

It is eminent'y avcpQxior.— Dictionary of Me- 
chanics. 

Beyond all question, the machines.— i'y« Illus- 
trated. 

The stitch cannot be unraveled.— ^A/ie/'iCrtw 
Agriculturist. 

They maintain the pre-eminence.— £■.«/»•««*. 

Saves the time and health of ten women.— 
Water Cure. 

Our household is inecstacies withit.— P'»r<#>-'« 
Spirit. , „ 

Its superiority is unquestioned.- i^/'€<=/na7i'« 
Journal. 

Its superiority is oh-7ioxye.— Household Words. 

Hand-sewing cannot equal it.— The Tablet. 

Supply the fashionable world.— jDa«w News. 

.Ki-^i ,_-_., =__ .Ladie^ Visitor. 

U. S. Journal. 



Unrivaled In every quality.— Z)ay Book. 
■ .—Di* 

Have"no"eq'ual in i^mily xise.— Musical ITofW. 



It has no superior .-Dt-rpaJcA. ^ ^ ._ 
Pretty, useful, magical.— ie«?te's Gazelte. 
Have no equal in family use.- 
The best suited for sewing.— JfmOi^ Journal. 
Combine every requirement.— i^ajni7y Mag. 
It combines every essential.— iiw'nfir Age. 
Vastly superior to all others.— Golden Prize. 
We entirely prefer ihexn.— Mother's Journal. 
We cannot tire in its praise.— JVeJO Yorker. 



B. T. BABBITT'S M 

ARTICLES OF EVERY-DAY USE. 

B. T. Babbitt is the manufacturer of the following celebrated articles, all of which bear 
the maker's name : 

"Medicinal," "Sheaf Wheat," and "Union," Saleratus ; Soap Powder, 

Yeast Powder, Medicinal Yeast, Concentrated Potash, "Extra 

Starch," Cream Tartar, Sal Soda, Baking Soda, 

Arrow Root, &c., &c. 

MAKE TOUR OWN SOAP with B.'*. Babbitt's 

PURE CONCENTRATED POTASH, warranted double the strength of 
common Potash, and superior to any other saponifier or ley in market. Put up in cans of 
one pound, two pounds, three pounds, six pounds, and twelve pounds, with full directions 
in English and German, for making Hard and Soft Soap. One pound will make fifteen gal- 
lons of Soft Soap. No lime is required. Consumers will find this the cheapest Potash in 
market. 

B. T. BABBITT'S MEDICINAL SALERATUS. -A perfectly pure 
and wholesome article, free from all deletereous matter; so prepared that, as the circular 
accompanying the Saleratus will show, nothing remains in the bread when baked but com- 
mon salt, water, and flour. Put up neatly in papers, one pound, half pound, and quarter 
pound. 

B. T. BABBITT'S CONCENTRATED SOFT SOAP.— One box, costing 
$2.00, will make forty gallons of handsome Soft Soap, by simply adding boiUng water. 

B. T. BABBITT'S LABOR-SAVING SOAP.— B. T. Babbitt has for a 
long time been experimenting, and has now produced an article of Soap that is composed 
of the best washing material, and at the same time will not rot or injure the clothes in the 
slightest possible manner. He stamps his name on each bar, and guarantees that the Soap 
will not injure the most delicate fabric, while it will be found to be the most pleasant wash- 
ing soap ever offered in market. It is made from clean and puke materials, contains no 
adulteration of any kind, and is especially adapted for woolens, which will not shrink after 
being washed with this Soap. Ask for B. T, BABBITT'S SOAP, and take no other. Each 
bar is wrapped in a circular containing full directions for use, printed in English and Ger- 
man. One pound of this Soap is equal to three pounds of ordinary family soap. Direc- 
tions sent in each box for making one pound of the above Soap into three gallons of hand- 
some Soft Soap. It will remove paint, grease, tar, and stains of all kinds. It will not in- 
jure the fabric; on the contrary, it preserves it. It will wash in hard or salt water. But 
little labor is required where this Soap is used. Machinists and printers will find this Soap 
superior to anything in market. 

DR. TALBOT'S CONCENTRATED 

lEiieiL piiiipPLE iieii 

IS A PREVENTIVE OF SICKNESS. 



The experience that Dr. Talbot has had for the last twenty-five years, convinces him 
that it is time the public had an article offered that will prevent sickness. The article 
offered is Dr. Talbot's Medicated Pineapple Cider, designed for all classes, old and ytyung. 

It is not new to the Doctor, but it is entirely new to the public. One quart bottle will 
last a well person a year. This is rather a new mode of doctoring; nevertheless it will 
save millions from being sick. Is it not better to pay three dollars a year to keep from 
being sick, than to pay ten or twenty dollars in doctor's bills, and as much more for the; loss 
of time and inconvenience of being sick ? _ 

To prevent sickness, use as follows: Add one teaspoonful of Medicated Pineapple 
Cider to a tumbler of cold water, and drink the first thing after you rise in the morning, 
and the same before you retire at night. 

It will increase the strength and give vif/or and action to the system. 

A celebrated New York merchant who "has made a thorough trial of the Pineapple 
Cider, assures Dr. Talbot that he has gained ten pounds of flesh in one month, at the first 
trial. He continues its use as above directed, and finds it very beneficial ; says it has 
proved an entire j>reventive to sickness in his case. Also another well known gentle- 
man in New York has used the Medicated Cider constantly for ten years, and has not 
been sick one day during that time. -■ 



THIS WONDERFUL PREPARATION 

Will increase the strength, give vigor and action to the system, and regulate digestion. 
When taken internally, for pains of all kinds — Bilious CoTc, Diarrhoea, Diseases of the 
Throat, Pains in the Chest, Hoarseness, Coughs, Neuralgia, Rheumatic Pain?, Dyspepsia, 
Acidity of the Stomach, etc., etc., its soothing and quieting eflfect on the system is most 
astonishing. 

Dr. Wilcox, an eminent physician, employed it with great success in treating Fevers, 
Dyspepsia, Nervous Affections, Loss of Appetite, Weakness, Palpitation of the Heart, 
Chronic Diarrhoea, Colic Dysentery, and Diseases of the stomach and Bowels. It is 
also particularly recommended by physicians to delicate females, and as an excellent 
remedy for Enfeebled Digestion, Want of Appetite, Scrofula, Nephritic Affections, Rheuma- 
tism, etc., etc. It never fais to relieve Nervous Tremor, Wakefulness, Disturbed Sleep, etc. 

American Ladies have used this article with great success to heighten their color 
and beauty. 

It imparts cheerfulness to the disposition, and Brilliancy to the Complexion,' 

To travelers, especially, it is of inestimable value, and should be provided as a medi; 
cine for every journey in which the water is likely to vary in quality and tendency. 

Persons residing in any part of the country may adopt it with the utmost confidence as 
a timely, efficacious restorative. 

TO CITHE CATARRH.— What is the Catarrh ? ~ It is a defluxion or increased 
secretion of mucus from the membranes of the nose, fauces and bronchiae, with fever, 
sneezing, cough, thirst, lassitude, and loss of appetite, and sometimes an entire loss of 
taste, called also a cold. An Epidemic Catarrh is called Influenza, a chronic affection of tke 
mucua membrane of the nostrils and fauces. To cure above, add to half a pint of cold 
water ten drops of Dr. T. B. Talbot's Medicated Pineapple Cider; take 
some of the mixture in your hand and snuff it up your nose, until it comes out of your 
mouth; be thorough with the snuffing, in order to reach the affected parts. It may take 
six months to cure, but a decided improvement will be observed in thirty days. 

F K,I C E S : 

$3 per Bottle (full quart). $2 per Bottle (full pints), £1 per Bottle (full half pints). 

One quart bottle, two pint bottles, or four half pint bottles sent free by express on receipt 
of Price. Wof Sale Everywhere. 

B. T. BABBITT, Sole Agent, 

64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 70, 72 & 74 WASHINGTON ST., New York. 



TO CURE COIjDS.— A sure cure for a bad cold is four table-spoonsful of Dr. T. 
B. Talbot's Medicated Pineapple Cider when you retire. A cold is the founda- 
tion of most diseases. Who would not readily buy a whole bottle of Pineapple Cider if 
they were sure it would cure ? Any one who buys a bottle of this Pineapple Cider, and is 
not satisfied with it, can return the same and have the money refunded. 

TO CURE FEVERS OF ANY KIND.— Add ten drops of Dr. T. B. 
Talbot's Medicated "Pineapple Cider to a quart of cold water, iced if handy; 
saturate a cloth with the preparation, and apply to the affected parts ; also add five 
drops to a tumbler of cold water, and drink every ten minutes. The fever will soon be 
removed. 

TO CURE SORE THROAT.— Add ten drops of Dr. T. B. Talbot's Med- 
icated Pineapple Cider to a pint of cold water, and use as a gargle ; put a wet cloth 
around your neck when you retire. 

TO CURE RHEUMATISM.— Add to one-half pint of hot water a wine-glass 
full of Dr. T. B. Talbot's Medicated Pineapple Cider, and take every fifteen 
minutes. Apply hot, wet flannels to the parts affected, and a suie cure will follow in a 
short time. 

AMERICAN liADIES, to heighten their color and beauty, should take one* 
table-epoonful of Dr. T. B. Talbot's Medicated Pineapple Cider at dinner, 
also when they retire at night, and when they rise in the morning. 

TO CURE DYSPEPSIA.— Add two spoonsful of Dr. T. B. Talbot's 
Medicated Pineapple Cider to a wine-glass full of water, and take before or while 
eating. 

TO CURE COUaHS.— Add one table-spoonful of Dr. T. B. Talbot's 
Medicated Pineapple Cider to a half-pint of water ; take once in two hours. 



B. T. BABBITT'S 

MEDICINAL YEAST, 

THE ORIGINAL 

Nos. 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 70, 72 and 74 

WASHINGTON STREET, N. Y. 



I>IR,ECTION8 FOK, XJSE. 

To each quart of flour, add two teaspoonsful of the Ybast and the usual quantity of 
salt; mix them thoroughly together whiie dry, then add cold water or sweet. milk; make 
the dough as thin as can be moulded into a biscuit ; the thinner the dough is the whiter 
and lighter they will be. No shortening is required for Biscuit when milk is used, and very 
little when water is used. Bake at once. 

Buckwheat Cakes should have three teaspoonsful mixed with the flour while dry ; and 
mix no more at a time than is wanted. Use it for Pot-pies, Pie-crust, Plum Puddings, 
Johnny Cakes, Indian Cakes, Cornmeal Cakes, Corn Bread, Batter Cakes, and Fried Cakes 
or Doughnuts, all kinds of Sweet Cakes, and all kinds of pastry. 

OBSER,V.A.TIONS. 

Bread made in this manner contains nothing but Floflr, Common Salt, and Water. It 
has an agreeable, natural taste : keeps much longer than common bread ; is more digest- 
ible, and much less disposed to turn acid. Common bread, like everything that has been 
fermented, ferments easily again, to the great discomfort of many stomachs ; and not only 
so, but acting as a ferment, it communicates a similar action to all food in contact with it. 

The Bread being free from all yeastly particles, is more digestible, and not so likely to 
create flatulence or turn acid on weak stomachs, as fermented bread is apt to do. And 
when of the finest quality, it is beneficial to those who sufi'er from headache, acidity, flatu- 
lence, eructations, a sense of sinking at the pit of the stomach, distention, or pains after 
meals, and to all who are subject to gout or gravel. It is also useful in many affections 
of the skin. 

These remarks apply to both varieties of the Bread, but especially to the Brown, which 
is further invaluable to all who are liable to constipation from torpidity of the colon, or 
large intestine, the common infirmity of the sedentary, and of those who have been accus- 
tomed to oatmeal diet in their youth. 

But the advantages of the process are not limited to mattei^ relating to health. It is 
valuable, because bread can be prepared by it in the short space of half an hour, thus 
saving much time and labor, and emancipating journeymen bakers from the slavery of 
night-work. It is valuable also, because the materials are not perishable, and may be ren- 
dered available in places and at times when yeast or other ferment is not within reach, as 
at sea, for example, or in country retirements; and it is still more valuable as regards 
economy. The cost of the chemicals is counterbalanced by that of the yeast, salt, and 
alum otherwise employed ; but were it not so, they would form an altogether unimportant 
item in the price of bread ; while by their use a saving is effected in the flour of not less 
than twenty-three per cent. In the common process, much of the saccharine part of the 
flour is lost by being converted into carbonic acid and spirit — and thus waste is incurred 
solely for the purpose of getting carbonic acid to raise the dough. By the new method 
waste is avoided, and the gas obtained in a manner equally beautiful and efficacious. 
Another striking instance of the successful application of Chemical Philosophy to the com- 
mon arts of life. Fermentation (as has been before stated) destroys part of the flour or 
meal. We find in consequence that 280 pounds, which makes 860 pounds of bread by fer- 
mentation, gives by the new process 880 pounds, or 102 loaves. 

FOR SALE EVERYWHERE. 




miCE, 20 CENTS. 



CONTENTS. 

AstrosomtcalDepartmest: pages. 

Eclipses for the year 1 866 5 

Lunar and Planetary Conjunctions 6 

Conjunction of Planets and other Aspects 6 

New and Valuable Tide Tables for 110 Places 7 

Jewish and Mahomedan Calendars 7 

Table of Sixty-one Bright Stars 8 

■Calendars — Rising and Setting of Sun, Moon, etc 9 to 20 

PoiiTiCAi, Department: 

United States Government. Ministers, etc 23 

Senators and Representatives of XXXIXth Congress 24 to 26 

Laws passed at the last Session of Conga-ess 29 to 34 

Public Resolutions and Proclamations 35 to 37 

Slaveholders' Rebellion, or Chronicle of War Events 3S to 42 

The Union Party in 1S65 — Resolutions of tlie Union State Con- 

■Tentions in 1865 on Reeonstruc'.ion and Impartial Suffrage 43 to 46 

Impartial Suffraj-'e — Laws in the several States 46 to 43 

Second Inaugural of President Lincoln 49 

President Jolmson on the Negro Question 

•The Constitutional Amendment 50 

JElection Returns from the States and Territories holding 
Elections in 1S65, carefully compiled and compared with 



50 to 53 ] 



former Elections for the Tribcse Almanac 53 to ' 

Topular Vote for President by States, in 1S64, I860 and 1S56. 70 
The States of the Union • Area, Population. Capitals, Got- 

ernors. Time of Meeting of Legislatures, Time of State 

Elections, etc 71 

Toreign Countries : Area, Population, Form of Government. 

Hulersj etc 72 

Alexander J. Schem, Compiler. 




AND POLITICAL REGISTER 




1866.ifTo'^?""r 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Astronomical, ttc. ,_ . „ pAnKi 

PAOK Pacific Eallrosfls 32 

Calendar— Jewish 7 Patents 34 

llahometan 7 Pensions 32 President Lincoln's Second 



Postal Laws 33 Inaugural Address. ...... .49 

Quarantine niul Hcalf h La\v8J29 President Jolinson on tlie Ne- 
Revenue Cutters on Lalces. . .29 gro Questitui 4<»t50 

^ Uon Distrie?^''"'^ ^°"*''"^o'c«-^STiTUTioxAi. amb-^'ment. 
SecoSd sec ctary-if War 1 ! ! Jo ^^S 'ma'^°hl?Aminded' "'^^ 

Sisters of Mercy, D. C SO n-hn r^Ju,^ti.^.V^^\,^.:^A^ 

Smuo-gling- . Rrt^'^'' Constitutional^Aiuend 



Calendars (January to De- 
cember): Changes of Uie 
Moon, Planets on the Me- 
ridian; Sun on the Noon- 
mark; Sidereal Noon; Ris- 
ing and Setting of the Pun 
and Moon throughout the 

Co'^njunetl^.nt"' Lunar ' " ■dn^'"||mi"tllonTan institution ! ! ! ! :2USo''n^of^ti°l^!J;7d'^Lf ' 

Planetary 6 Solicitor and Naval Judge ilv tho «oL. i ^^meudment 

Eclipses for the Year 1866. . . . 5I Advocate .Sol .Sy^He Senate . ■ - - • • .^ . • • • • . .51 

I EiuinosPs and Solstices 5 Steamship Line between U. !^b7the House ^^52 

Planets, Conlnnction of Plan- I S., China, and Japan 29|tP/ip „V JuowwohV.h-;,™ i; 

- ■ ■• • - '■•mrpa)nTnoin-rontiV>Ti<.,.Tr nio- I iaDlo Of fetal e& Ratify Ing «r 

Rejecting the Amendment. 53 
OmcialAnnouncemantof the 
Adoption of the- Amend- 
ment by Secretary Seward. 53 



Tide Table of 110 Places . 



Political. 



THB GOTERNMBNT 

Cabinet— the President's ! 

Congress — Members of the 
XXXIXth 



Three-cent Pieces 34 

Vice-Admiral— TUe Grade of Jit) 
Ways and Means. ; 29 

PUBLIC BESOLUTIOIfS. 

Africans— Recaptured 35 

Army Register S5 

Congressional Directory 

Constitutional Amendment.. 



Election Returns. 

Alabama C9' 

;^i Arizona 69 

^California _ 61 

Executive Officers-General .23 Distribution of Books ...'.T : .' ^35 S°l,°f^^° • • •. • t -69 

Foreign Ministers -.'3 Electoral College 33 fe?il' S?'"'^'^* ^^i 

Judiciary— Supreme Court . .23i I'.nlistments Encouraged ... .35 r o„,.„i„- • XX 

Post-offlces of Members of Indian Tribes 36 S^°W* ?f 

Congress 24-2G Merclianls'K.xchange, N. Y..35 }"iY°'^ - »} 

Territories-Delegates from.26 Mineral Lands 35}°^^°'' ^J 

ACTS OF CONGRESS, i864-'G5. iR^'^'tl^^'^f^,'^^;:" Vi^ ^'^'^'''^ " f? Kausas"::: l! 1 ! ! ! ". i! ! ! ! i! i".:; ! iei 



Circuit Courts in Virginia: ! Iso! ™^n, Terry, Thomas, Wins- Michigan: 

Circuit and District Courts "^^ '•••••^Minneso'" 

in Nevada 30l proclamations. iMississic 



.07 



. 37Nevada 67 

Colored Mail Carriers 31 Call lor Volunteers 36 Nebraska . 70 

ColoredVnionBenev. Ass...:>l Day of Thanksgiving S6.37 New Hampshire '.'.'..'.'.'.53 

Copyright for Photographs. .34iDay of Humiliation 36 New Jersey 54 

Cnminal Procedure, Grand Deserters Summoned to Re- iNew Mexico. 70 

Juries, &c 32 turn 36NewYork.. : 62-68 

Currency— Act for National. 31 iHabeas Corpus Restored 37 North Carolina .68 

Debts Due IFnited States SOl Kentucky— Martial Law 37 Ohio 55-56 

Eastern Judicial Dist.,N.Y..30jNevada Admitted " ■ 



„ „ — Pennsylvania 54-55 

Ports— Foreign— Our Vessels ilihode Island.. 54 

in 36 South Carolina 68 

Ports— Newport and St. Al- (Tennessee ...65-67 

bans, Vt 36 Vermont 53 

„ Ports— Southern— Closed ....36, Virginia 64-65 

Company 33]Port8— Soutliern— Opened.36.37: West Virginia 61 

Indian Reservations- Lands I Rebel Cruisers 36 Wisconsin , . . . .5Z 

Taken for 30 Reconstruction of the Rebel 



listmentsin D. C 
Enrollment Act— Amendm't.31 
Enrollment and License of 

Vessels 30 

Freedraan's Saving and Trust 



Indians— Relief of Friendly. .29 
Indian Title to Land in Utah 29 

Insane Asylum In D. C 29 

Interference in Elections 30 

Internal Revenue 31 

Invoices— Vcriflcation of 31 

Juvenile Offenders 31 

Library of Congress— Free 

Copies for .31 

Loan-600 Million 30 

Mich. City Harbor Com 30 

, Michigan-Land Grant 31 „ V^JP^ party in 1S6d^ 

I Mackerel Fisheries 341 Resolutions of the Union 

Midshipmen-Payment of.... 31! State Conventions on Re- 
Medical Corps. 30 construction and Impartial 

National Military and Naval Sullrage 4S-46 

Asylum 331 impartial suffrage. 

Oath of Otflce 29|Law8 i n the Several States on 

Opimons of Attornoys-Gen . .341 Quallflcatlon of Voters. 4G-1S 



States} Provis. Governors. 37 
Restrictions upon Commerce 

Remo\ed 36.3 

Rewards for Arresting Jeft". 

Davis 3 

Senate— Extraord. Session. . .3 

WAK CHRONICLE. 

Battles, Skirmishes, &c ., from 
Dec, 1864, to the Close of 
the Rebellion 38-1 



VOTE FOR PRESIPENT. 

Popular Vote for President, 
by States, in iSfrt, ism and 
1B56 70 

TUE STATES OP THE UNION. 

Area in ISoO, Free, Slave, and 
Total Population in 1860 = 
Increase and Percentage of 
Increase of Population from 
1850 to 1860; Capitals ;. Gov- 
ernors, their Salaries and 
Term of Office, Time of 
Meeting of Legislatures; 
Time ot State Elections .. .71 

FORKION COUNTRIES. 

The States of America and 
Europe ; Niimes and Titles 
of Rulers and their Acces- 
sion I<'ormoi Government.72. 



5^^^ 




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HORACE GREELEY'S HISTORY OF THE WAR. 

"THE AMERICAN CONFLICT." 
More than 100,000 Copies of Volume I. Sold, 

This -work; differs widely from any other history of the War in its arrangement, scope, and : 
detail. It has steadily gained iu public favor since the issue of Vol. I., and is recognized as th^ j 
highest authority by "fair-minded men of all i)arties. Among its patrons, "The Amkwcan | 
Conflict" gives a degree of satislaction, unparalleled iu any other work ever sold through j 
traveling agents. ( 

VoL0MB I.— In his opening volume the author has traced, with great clearness and force, the 
Cauxes of the War ; presenting a deeper, broader, more exhaustive exhibit of all that impelled i 
to the bloody collision, than has ever before been attempted, and with a clearness and impar- 
tiality that has won the admiration, even of his political opponents. This volume contains 648 [ 
large double-column, octavo pages, printed on fine paper, illustrated by Maps, Diagrams of | 
Battle Fields, etc., with neventyjine steel-plate Partraita of Generals and other Distinguished 
Persons connected with the war, both North and South. 

VoLDME II. — In the preparation of the closing volume, the author has availed himself of 
every source of trustworthy information, including the complete Offieial Ueporls of loth Union 
and Confederate authorities. Numerous facts from the Confederate side not given in any 
Public Document, many of which will be recognized as of the gravest importance in a military 
point of view, will also be found in this volume. While this work will be vastly superior to any- 
thing before the public in respect to fullness and accuracy, it will present a feature not less 
striking, in the information given from the Rebel side. 

Volume II.— completing the work — will be issued at the earliest day consistent with thorough- 
ness and accuracy— pr.ibably not later than the Spring of 1866. It will be fully equal to Vol. I. 
in all respects, and will contain a larger number of pages. Portraits, and Diagrams of Battle 
Fields, besides an elegant copper-plate Map or the Seat of Wak, 23x83 inches, engraved 
expressly for this work. 

NOTICES OF THE PRESS. 

From the Boston Recorder. 

This is a valuable and great work. It takes broad views, has a philosophical arrangement, 
traces the sources of the rebellion back to the beginning of slavery in our government, and 
follows it with a master-hand through all the efforts to reconcile and compromise, and through 
the terrific blaze of tjiis great war for the Union. 

From the Albany Eveninr/ Journal. 

No man in America is more conversant with the subject than Mr. Greeley, and none more 
competent to do it justice. This Historical sketch will stand as a monument of patient and 
laborious research. * * * We confess that in this part of the work we are agreeably disap- 
pointed. It is pervaded by a spirit of catholicity and a freedom from partisan leaning that 
some of his best friends did not expect. 

From the New York World. 

Mr. Geeelft as a HiiWRlAU. — He has few equals as a writer of vigorous English. He is 
terse, racy, direct, going straight to the heart of the subject as it presents itself to his view, 
hitting it off occasionally by a dash of grotesque humor, but more frequently irradiating it with 
gleams of shrewd, homely sense. 

From, the Cincinnati Enqtiirer. 

It is of course a history from a standpoint of observation far distant from our own, and from 
that of the Democracy generally ; but it is marked by much less prejudice, and is disfigured by 
far less partisan feeling, than most of our friends would imagine. It contains a vast amount of 
information, and is altogether superior to any volume on the subject that has yet appeared. 
From the Cleveland Plaindealer. 

While honestly dissenting from the views of Mr. Greeley, the politician, we commend the , 
book of Mr. Greeley, the Historian, to the respectful consideration of a candid public. As a 
writer and statistician, he has few equals in this or any other country. 
From the Atlantic Monthly. 

The present work presents in vivid outhnes, and with striking Illustrations, the action of 
political causes with which the author has been as familiar as with the alphabet of his mother 
tongue. 

Fromthe Weaiminster (London) lietieic. 

The essence of every Important document from the formation of the Government and the 
practical bearing of every event, are succinctly stated; and, if we may admire the industry 
which has enabled the editor of the leading newspaper in America to do this at such a time, we 
may still more admire the spirit of fairness and directness which cbaracterizethis very valuable 
work. 

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GRAND, SQUARE, AND UPRIGHT 

Are now acknowledged the best instruments ia America as well as in Europe, 
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TEIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



The Astronomical Calculations hare been made in weitn time, expressly for this Almanac, by 
SAMUEL HART WRIGHT, J\i. D., A. M., of Dundee, Yates County, New York. 



EQUINOXES AND SOLSTICES. 



I Autumnal Fqulnox Sept. 23, 

I Winter Solstice Dec. 21, 



ECLIPSES FOE, THE TEAR 1866. 

I. A partial eclipse of tbe Sun March 16tb. Invisible in the United States. Visible in 
Siberia, Behrings Straits, and the north Polar region. 

II. A total eclipse of the Moon In the evening of March oOth and morning of March Slst. 
Visible throughout the American continent. Size of eclipse, 17.04 digits. For the times of 
Its phases, see the annexed table. 

A Table of the Totai, Eclipse or the Moon. 



Augusta, Me 

Brunswick, Me... 

Portland, Me 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Providence, H. I. 

Lowell, Mass 

Newport, K. I.... 
Concord, N.H 



Hartford, Conn 

Springfield, Mass.. 
New Haven, Conn. 

Troy,N. Y 

Albany, N. Y 

Hudson, N.Y 

New York 



Poughkeep8ie,N.Y. 

Trenton, N.J 

Philadelphia, Pa... 

Utica, JS.Y 

Baltimorfi.Md 

Auburn, N. Y 

Annapolis, Md 

Harrlsburgh, Pa... 
Washington, D. C 

Dundee, H. Y 

Geneva, N.Y'... 

Canandaigua, N. Y' 
Frederickton, Va.. 

Petersburgh, Va 

Richmond, Va 

Eoehe8ter,N.Y.... 

Butfalo, N.Y 

Kaleigh, N.C 

Toronto, C.W 

Pittsburgh. Pa 



H. M 

9 5,6 
953 

9 52 
9 51 

47 



11 

11 3 
11 



Charleston, S. C. 
Chagres, N. G .... 

Savannah, Ga 

Columbia, S. C 

St. Augustine, Fla... 
Havana, Cuba... 

Detroit, Mich 

Columbus, O 

Cincinnati. O 

Lansing, Mich 



Tallahassee, 
Frankfort, Ky. 



Nashville, Tenn. 

Chica";o,Ill 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Mobile, Ala 

Madison, Wis 



Sew Orleans, La ) 

lackBon, Miss ( 

3t. Louis. Mo I 

Galena, 111 \ 

Natchez, Miss i 

Baton Rouge, La ) 

Iowa City, Iowa 

.lefferscD City. Mo.. ( 
Little Rock, Ark.... s 

Vera Cruz, Mex 

Matamoras, Mex i 

stiu, Texas ) 

Mexico 

Santa Fe.N.M 

Oregon City, Oregon. 

Monterey, Cal 

San Francisco. Cal 

Astoria, Oregon 



9 43 11 22 

11 18 
9 37! 11 16 
9 36 11 15 
9 20 10 59 
9 13 10 52 
9 8 10 47 
8 40 10 19 
7 40 9 19 



10 25 
10 22 
10 19 
10 14 



IV. A Total Eclipse of the Moon, September 24, early in the morning, invisible in the United 
States, except along its western frontier. Size, 19.404 digits. At San Francisco it begins at 4h. 
9m. A. M. It becomes total at 5h. 9m., and the middle of total phase occurs at 5h. 5Tm. The 
Moon sots totally eclipsed there about this time, being near sunrise. 

V. A Partial Eclipse of the Sun October 8th, in the morninij.at the time of new moon. This 
will be visible in British America and New England, andTn New York State, except its 
southwestern portion, but its size will he very small. Its southern limit of visibllitv will be 
a line running from the straits of Mackinaw to Toronto, Owego Port Jervis, and Fire Isl.and. 
Along this line the eclipse will be a mere contact of Limbs, and in New England it will bo 
from a quarter to seven-eighths of a digit in size. At Boston it begins at llh. 10m. morning, 
and ends at Oh. 22m. P M. At Portland it begins at llh. 17m., and ends at Oh. 27m. At Quebec 
It begins at llh. 3m. . and ends at Oh. 23m. P. M. 



TIIE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



liTJNAB AND PLANETARY CONJUNCTIONS. 



Aspect. 



Moon near Mercury ( 5 ) . 
" " VenuB ( 9 ) . . . . 
" " Mars(^) 

" Jupiter (?/)... 
" " Saturn Ol)-.- 

" Uranus IM)--- 



Moon near Mercury ( S ) . 
" Venus (?).... 

" " MarsCi') 

■' " Jupiter <V).. 
" ' Saturn (>^)... 
" " Uranus (W).. 



_jJnly^_ 

D. H. M. 

14 16 m. 
14 8 4e. 
7 6 54e. 
26 10 18 e. 
20 4 46ni, 
U 46 m 



Ke 


bruary.r 


D. 




14 11 Sim. 1 


15 


3 33 ra. 


1.S 


6 12m. 


ia 




7 


57 m. 


as 


_^81_e_. 


August. 1 




H. M. 




2 13e. 


13 


7l0e. 


5 10 8m. 1 


2R 


1 Om 


16 


2 41c. 


7 U 86 m, i 



D. H. M. 

17 6 12 e. 
17 2 29 m. 



12 10 27 m. 
6 9 41m. 
23 8 6e. 



April. 

D. H. M. 

14 9 34e. 

15 9 46e. 
12 8 54 m. 

9 3 8m. 
2 1 20 c. 
19 11 Sim. 



D. H. M. 

8 8 26e. 

12 40c. 

1 8 36m. 

16 6 43 e. 

2 44 m. 10 3 48e. 

7 55e. I 1 2 26 m. 



7 11 58 m 
12 5 7e. 

2 11 2e. 
19 7 52 



June. 



D. n. 



. H. M. 

12 3 21 e. 12 8 13 m. 

15 6 SOe. 14 6 59 e. 
11 6 32 m. 9 1 45 m. 

6 2 39 6. I 2 8 26e. 

26 6 2 c. 22 9 56e. 

16 10 58 e. 13 le. 



November December 



D. H. M. 



D. H. M. 



811 34c. I 7 1 55m. 

10 2 4e. 7 1 29e. 

26 7 50m. 23 1 lie. 

13 8 54m. 11 54m. 

7 4 49 m. 4 5 19e. 

24 5 3e. 22 2 30m. 



CONJUNCTION OP PLANETS AND OTHER ASPECTS. 



January . . 



April. 
May. . 



ASPECT. 

? near V 
5 gr.elong. 
S near ? ... 
S nearly ... 
.? near ii ... 

nno 

$ sup. dO. 
S near $ ... 
S gr. clong. 
5 near J . . . 
"2/ a Sun.... 
h nearMoon 
h 8 Sun .... 
5 gr. elong. 
? near W...|30 
11 nearMoon 39 
? near W...120 



10 25 m. 
1 57 e. 
1 41m. 
3 50 e. 
9 22 m. 

8 2e. 
5 59 m. 

9 55e. 
3 41m. 



10 16 s 
18 41e 
4 17n 
90 Ow 



'v 8 Sun.... 
9 gr. eiong. 

•• '7GSun.... 

September, ? gr. elong. 

'■ I $ near h ■■■ 

" <? near w... 

October . . . i ? gr . elong . 

...IW GSun.... 

... r 8 Sun.... 

...'^ O Sun.... 

...iV-D Sun.... 

S near f^ . . . 

5 gr. elong. 

$ inf. d 0.. 

5 near ? ... 

S gr.elong. 

W 8 Sun.... 



July.. 



November 
December 



120 3 22 m, 

124 58 m. 

j29 3 54 m. 

I 6 4 44e. 



17 7 



le. 



24 1 21 

1 5 18 m. 

1 2 22e. 

4 4 Sle. 

8 1 41e. 

17 2'^4m. 

24 4 55 m. 



49 m, 



17 59W 
4 488 
2n 
46 36 c 
90 Ow 



S 1 548 
5 22 16w 
IW 180 Oe 



Note.— In the two tables above It is to be understood that the word " near " and the char- 
acter d (conjunction) are synonymous and mean that the two bodies are nearest each other 
at the time expressed, and that they are then on a line running from tlie North Pole through 
both bodies. 

In the lunar conjunctions Saturn will be from 0^ to li^ and 1 l-J"^ south of the Moon, and 
Jupiter about 5^ south of It. Mars will be fi-om 6o south of it to 8= north, being north after 
May. These tables guide us in finding the planets throughout the year. 



Saturn.— Saturn will be morning star until January 31st, being then 90° west of the Sun 
then evening star until November 7th, when it Is in conjunction with the Sun, and Invisible; 
then morning star the rest of the year. It will be in Libra this year. 

Mekcttrt.— Mercury will be. visible in the west soon after sunset, about March 23d, July 
20th, and November 15th ; also in the east Just before sunrise, about January 16th, May 14th, 
September 9th, and December 30th, being at those times at its greatest brilliancy. 

Notable Days.- Ash Wednesday, February 14; 1st Sunday in Lent, February 13; Good 
Friday, March 80 ; Easter Sunday, April 1 ; Rogation, May 6 , Ascension, May 10 ; PentGcost, 
May 20; Trinity, May 27 ; Advent, December 2. Dominical Letter, G; Golden Number 5; 
Epact, 14 ; Solar Cycle, 27 ; Julian Period, 6579. 

Occtjltation.— The Moon will eclipse, or occult, tbe beautiful star Aldebaran (u Tauri), 
on the 28th of September, visible. At Washington, the star will Instantly disappear at 9h. 7m. 
evening, and reappear on the Western limb of the Moon at 9h. 59m. The moon rises Just before 
the disappearance. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



NEW AND VALUABLE TIDE TABLE OF 110 PLACES. 

To find the time of high-water at any of the places named In the following table, add the 
time Indicated in the first column of figures to the time of '■ Moon South," found in the calen- 
dar pages. Example : Keqnired the time of high-water at New Haven for April 15th and ISth. 
For the 15th, Moon South, at Oh.2tim. In the afternoon, which added to llh. 16m. gives llh. 
42m. of the same evening for high-water. On the nth. Moon South at 2h. 25m. evenin'jr, which 
added as before, gives 13h. 41m., or 1 o'clock 41m. in the morning of the 18th, for high-water. 
There are two tides during the passage of the moon from the meridian, around to the meri- 
dian again, and they are about 12h. 2Cm. apart. 



NoB'EA.8T Coast. 
Hanuiwell's Point, 

Portland 

Portsmouth 

Newbnryport 

Kockport 

Salem 

Boston Light 

Boston 

Plymouth 

WeHfleet 

Provencetown 

Monomoy 

Nantucket 

Hyannis 

Edgartown 

Holmes' Hole 

Tarpaulin Cove . . . 
Wood's Hole (N.). 
Wood's Hole (S.).. 
Menemsha Light . . 
Quick's Hole (JX.). 
Quick's Hole (S.).. 

Cuttyhunk 

Kettle Cove 

Bird Island Light. 

New Bedford 

Newport 

Point Judith 

Rock Island 

Montauk Point 

Sandy Hook 

New York 

Hudson Rivek. 

Dobb's River 

Tarry town 

Verplanck's Point 

West Point 

Poaghkeepsle 

Tlvoli.... 

Stuyvesant 



9.3 7.0 
9:9,7.6 
9.97.2 
9.16.6 
10.2:7.1: 
10.67.6] 

10.9;8.1 

11.3 8.5 

U.4 9.0 
13.2 9.2' 
IO.8 7.7: 
5.3,2.6i 



Castleton 

Greenbush 

L. Island Sound. 
Watch Hill .... 



3.91.81 



8 20 
7 29 
8131 

919 

9 57 

10 8 

11 2 
12^4 

124 



New London 

New Haven 

Bridgeport 

Oyster Bay 

Sand's Point 

New Rochelle 

Throg'sNeck 

Jekset Coast. 

Cold Spring Inlet 
2.8;i.8: jCape May Landing 
4.73.1 IjDela'ke Bat, &c 
2.0,l.2| iDelaw'e Breakw'r. 
Voi-?! [Higbie's Cape May 
t-ol^? Egg Islandlight. 

o.oU.i Manon's River 

4.2i2.9: Newcastle 

5.0I3.7 jPhiladelphia 

4'fi!2'8 ' Chesapeake, &c. 
4"6(3 1' 'O''! Point Comfort 

3 7 2'6l'-'^oi'i''^°°'^'"l' 

2 jti q! Bodkin Light 

SfilioilBallimore 

54!34 Washington 

°-*r-* City Point 

4 4'o 7' 'Richmond 

4|o;2'7J [Tappahannock 

3.'8l2!5i SoLTHEKN Coast. 
3.212.0 Hatteras Inlet 



3.0 ISmithville. 



H.M. 

4 29 

5 22 



.22.2 



i.12.1 
6.2 5.2 
8.0,4.71 
9.25.4 
8.9 6.4 
8.6 6.6 
9.2 6.1 



Wilmington . 

Georgetown Ent 

Bull's Island Bay 

Charleston 

St. Helena Sound 
2.9 2 3t Ft. Pulaski 

Savannah 

Doboy Light 

St. Simon^s 

Ft. C«nch 

St. John's River. 

St. Augustine . . . 

Cape Florida .... 

Indian Key 

Sand Key 

Key West 

Tortugas 

CharlotteHarbor 

4.5 3. Oi Tampa Bay 

6.2 3.9 Cedar Keys 

7.0 5.11 St. Mark's 

6.9 5.0 WestebnCoasi. 

6.9;6.6 San Diego 

6.8 5.1! iSan Pedro 

Cuyler's Harbor, 
no n! San Luis Obispo. 

r'ii-% Monterey 

in nal, South Farrallone 
i^nal San Francisco... 

}-°,;"-° Mare Island 

1-5 0.9 iBenicia 

g'n ,-2' Ravenswood .... 

g-^ S-Ri Bodego 

J-af-g Humboldt Bay .. 

^•^l^-"*! PortOrford 

I ! Astoria 

2.2 1.8 Nee-ho Harbor.. 

3.3 2.2 Port Townshend 

5.0 3.4 Stellacoom 

5.5 3.8 Semi-ah-moo Bay 



! I 



FT. F. 

3.12.2 
4.7 2.7 

5.7 3.7 
6.0 4.1 

7.4 4.4 
8.0 5.9 

7.6 5.5 

7.8 5.4 
8.2 5.4 

6.7 5.3 

5.5 3.7 

4.9 3.6 

1.8 1.2 

2.2 1.3 
2.0 0.6 
1.5 0.9 
1.5 0.6 

1.3 0.8 

1.8 1.0 

3.2 1.6 

2.9 1.4 

5.02.3 

4.7 2.3 
5.12.8 

4.8 2.4 

4.3 2.5 

4.4 2.8 
4.3 2.8 
5.24.1 
5.13.7 
7.3 4.9 

4.7 2.7 

5.5 8.5 

6.8 3.7 
.44.1 



7.4 4.8 

5.5 4.0 
4 40,11.1 7.2 
4 501 6.6 4.8 



JEWISH CALENDAR, 

The year 5626 began Sept 21, 1865, and ends Sept. 9th, 1866. The year 5627 willbegin Sept. 10th . 



MONTH. 


DAY. 


begins 




MONTH. 


DAT. 


begins. 


5 Sebat 


2^ 

i 


.lanuary . . 
February. 

June 


;i6 

.171 
.141 


11 Ab 


30 

i^ 

29 
30 
29 


July 13 

August..... 12 


6 Adar 


12 Elul 


7Nisan 




8 liar 






9 Si van 


3 Chlsleu 




10 Thammuz ;.. 


4 Thebet 


December.. 8 



MAHOMETAN CALENDAR. 

The year 1282 began May 27, 1865, and ends May 15th, 1866. The year 1283 begins May 16, 1866. 



MONTH. 


, DAT. 


9 Ramadan 

10 Schewall 


.... 30 
29 


11 Ds'l-Kadah 

12 Ds'l-Rejjah 

1 Muharram 


.... 30 

.... 29 

30 


2 Saphar 


....1 29 



BEGINS 




1 MONTH. 


DAT. 


BEGINS. 


January.. 
Jebruary. 


.18 
..17 
.18 
.17 
.16 
.15 




30 
29 
30 
29 

i 


July 14 

August 13 

September.. 11 






April 

May 




7 Reieb 


November.. 9 


June 


SShaban 


December.. 9 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



TABIiE OF SIXTY-ONE BRiaHT STARS. 

To ascertain when any star or constellation found in the following Table will be on tho 
meridian add the numbers opposite in the left-hand column of figures to the time of " Sidereal 
Noon" found in the calendar pages. For the rising of a star, subtract the nujaber opposite in 
the right-hand column of figures from its meridian passage. For the setting of a star, add the 
same number to its meridian passage. Those marked ( ) revolve in a circle of perpetual ap- 
parition, and do not rise or set north of the latitude of New York (40° 42' 40"), for v.hich latitude 
the semi-diurnal arcs are calculated. The civil day begins at the preceding midnight, and conse- 
quently M hours after midnight, or 12 hours from noon, Is morning of the succeeding day ; and 
2-t hours to 36 hours from noon, is evening of the uext day. The table i3 arranged in the order 
of culmination. 



Name of Star. 



a Andromedas (Alpheratz). . 

7 Pegasi (Alsenib) 

a Cassiopea; (Schedir) 

^Cebi , 

(3 Andromed;e (Merach) 

a Ursa Minoris (Polaris) . . . 

^ Arietis 

y Andromedae (Almaach). . . 

a Piscium . 

a Arietis 

aCeti (Menkar) 

a Persei (Algenib) 

n Tauri f seven stars) 

a Tauri (Aldebaran) 

a Aurigae (Capella) 

j3 Oriouis (Rigel) 

^ Tanri (El Nath) 

7 Orionis (Bellatrix) 

5 Orionis f Mintaka) 

e Orionis ( Anilam) 

^ Orionis (Ainitak) 

a Columbee (Phaet) 

a Oriouis (Betelguese) 

o Canis Majoris (Sirius) 

£ Canis Majoris (Adhara).. . 

a^Geminor (Castor) 

a Canis Minoris (Procyon) . 

/3 Geminor (Pollu.x) 

^ Argus (Naos) 

a. Hydra (Alphard) 

a Leonis (Regulus) 



On Me- 


Rises & 


ridian. 


Sets. 


U. M. 


H. M. 


1 


7 51 


6 


050 


33 




87 


4 51 


1 2 


8 20 


1 10 




1 47 


7 16 


1 53 


9 18 


1 55 


6 6 


1 59 


7 23 


2 55 


6 11 


3 14 




3 39 


7 28 


4 27 


6 57 


5 6 


10 11 


5 7 


5 30 


5 17 


7 50 


5 IT 


6 20 


5 24 


5 68 


5 29 


5 55 


5 33 


5 52 


5 34 


3 37 


5 47 


6 25 


6 38 


5 


6 52 


4 7 


7 25 


8 10 


7 31 


6 18 


7 36 


7 50 


7 58 


2 53 


9 19 


5 31 


10 


6 43 



Name of Stab. 



On Me- Rises & 
ridian . Sets. 



' Leonis (Al Gieba) 

Urs^ Majoris J p^.^^^^3_ 



Urs£B Majoris 

Leonis (Denebola) 

Ursa Majoris (Phad) 

Corvi . . . 

Ursse Majoris (Alioth) 

Virginis (Spica) 

Ursai Majoris 

Bootis ( Arcturus) 

Ursae Minoris 

Librae 

Coronae Borealis 

Serpentis 

'Scorpii , 

Scorpii (Antares) 

Herculis 

Ophiuchi 

Draconis 

Draconis 

LyriB (Vega) 

Lyrae 

Aquilae (Altair) 

Cygni (Denebola) 

Cephei 

Aquarii 

Aquarii 

Pisceum Aus. (Fomalhaut) . . 

Pegasi (Scheat) 

Pegasi (Markab) 

ernal Equinox 



7 15 

653 

4'35 

522 

7'ii 

527 
7 4.3 
623 
4 49 

4 19 
6 50 

5 15 



8 54 

8 16 

6 29 

9 34 

5'37 

5 56 
4 

7 44 

6 50 



Venbs.— Venus will be morning star imtil February 25th, then evening star until December [ 
11th, at which time it passes the inferior conjunction with the Sun, and becomes invisible. Just 
before this time it exhibits a long slender crescent, always conrece towards the Sun, its horns j 
being turned back, and towards the east ; but when seen again, it appears in the east before sun- 
rise, with its long crescent bowing back towards the west. On the 5th of November it will be 
brightest, being then about 40° east of the Sun. 

Mars. — Mars will be morning star until October 8th, when it is 90' west of the Sun ; then even- 
ing star the rest of the year. On the 2d of December it begins to retrograde, or move westward 
past the stars. It will be in the southern signs until May 7th, when it passes the equator north, 
ward. On the 28th of March it will be about 10° south of the central stars in the Urn ; on the 
20th of July it will be 5° south of the " Seven Stars ;" on the 6th of August it will be 5' north of 
Aldebaran ; on the 29th of August it will be 2° north of f Tauri ; September 14th it will be be_ 
tween 1° north of i; and /x Oeminorum ; October ISth it will be 9}^° south of Castor, and on the 
25th, 5"' 37' south of Pollux. M'hen a planet is north or south of a star, a straight line drawn 
from the North Star runs through both, whether they are in the meridian or not. 

Jupiter.— Jupiter will be morning star until April 21st, when it is 90° west of the Sun ; then 
evening star the rest of the year. It is in the southern signs yet, but is moving northward. 



1st Month.] JANUARY, 1866. [31 Days. | 


i-R-FrA-3T=5S OF T-TTn Ts/TOOTST. 




V.nus Ma, 8 


JupUCT 


Saiuro 


ISuna^.W- 






S"Uth. Soutli. 


South. 


South 


mark. 




MOON. 


Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton. 


i 


iT'e 10'58 


^M^OBN.^ 


MOB.. 1 H. «. . II 

7 51!12 3 58 II 






p. 


U. M. 


?• ."; 


H. H. 


Full 


1 


2 4in. 


1 52 m. 


1 40 m. 


7i 


11 15 10 54 


11 44 


7 2 


9 12 6 41 


3d Quar . 


8 


4 18 ev. 


4 6ev. 


3 54 ev. 


13; 


11 24 10 50 


11 27 


7 


7 12 9 5 


New 


16 


3 52 ev. 


3 40 ev. 


3 29 ev. 


19 


11 34 10 46 


11 9 


6 45 12 11 7 


1st Quar. 


23 


4 10 ev. 


3 58 ev. 


3 46 ev. 


25I 


11 42 10 43 


10 51 


6 2 


2:12 12 42 


Full 


30 


3 44 CT. 


3 32ev.i 3 20 ev. 


1 








1 ! 


¥ 


i 


i 


H 


Boston; New England, 


New York City; Phila-' 


Washington; 


g 


n 


i§ ' 


g 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New 


Maryland, Virg'a, 


s 


^ 


si 1 





Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, P.enn., Ohio, In-' 


Ken ky, Missouri, 
and California. 


i 


I 


i" 


§ 


Iowa, and Oregon. 


diana, and Illinois. i 




bCN 








H W 






a 


a 


Even'g' 


i inT^H-s. 




BISE8. JBOSTO.V.I K13BS. 


SETS. 


BISES. 


nVo^ 


e'.se's. 


fETS. 


BISES. 


1 


M 


5 15 morn. 7 30 


438 


rises 11 32 7 24 


4 44 


rises 


8 18 


7 19 


4 49 


rises 


2 


T 


5 11 


54;7 30 


4 39 


6 41 ev.23l 7 24 


4 45 


6 44 


9 9 


7 19 


4 50 


6 47 


3 


W 


5 n' 


1 48i7 30 


4 40 


7 44I 1 10; 7 24 


4 46 


7 46 


9 56 


7 19 


4 51 


7 49 


4 


T 


5 3 


2 38 :7 30 


4 41 


8 46! 1 52.7 24 


4 47 


8 47 


10 38 


7 19 


4 52 


8 49 


5 


F 


4 59! 


3 25 |7 30 


4 42 


944! 2 32 7 24 


4 48 


9 45 


11 18 


7 19 


4 53 


9 46 


C 


S 


4 55 


4 10 [7 30 


4 43 


1043! 3 16 7 24 


4 49 


10 43 


ev. 2 


7 19 


4 54 


10 43 


Y 


s 


4 5r 


4 54 7 30 


4 44 


11 40 4 1 ;7 24 


4 50 


11 39 


47 


7 19 


4 55 


11 38 


8 


Ml 


4 47i 


5 37 7 30 


4 45 


morn! 4 48 7 24 


4 51 


morn 


1 34 


7 19 


4 56 


morn 


9 


Ti 


4 43 


6 20 :7 30 


4 46 


38 5 38|'7 24 


4 52 


36 


2 24 


7 19 


4 57 


34 


10 


W 


4 39; 


7 4|7 29 


4 47 


1 34 6 30 17 24 


4 53 


1 31 


3 16 


7 19 


4 58 


1 29 


11 


T 


4 35' 


7 49 ,7 29 


4 48 


2 30 7 24: 7 23 


4 54 


2 27 


4 10 


7 18 


4 69 


2 24 


12 


F 


4 31 


8 36 ,7 29 


4 49 


3 26 8 18[ 7 23 


4 55 


3 22 


5 4 


7 18 


5 


3 18 


13 


s 


4 27; 


9 24 17 28 


4 50 


4 20 9 11 


7 23 


4 56 


4 16 


5 57 


7 18 


5 1 


4 12 


14 


s 


4 24 


10 15 7 28 


4 51 


5 14 10 3 1 


7 22 


4 57 


5 10 


6 49 


7 17 


5 2 


5 6 


15 


M 


4 20 


11 7,7 27 


4 53 


6 3 10 51 


7 22 


4 58 


5 59 


7 37 


7 17 


5 3 


5 55 


16 


T 


4 16| 


11 59 7 27 


4 54 


sets 11 33 


7 22 


4 59 


sets 


8 19 


7 17 


5 4 


sets 


17 


W 


4 I2I 


ev. 5117 26 


4 55 


6 16 morn 


7 21 


5 


6 18 


9 6 


7 16 


5 5 


6 21 


18 


T 


4 8! 


1 43|7 26 


4 56 


7 22: 20 j7 21 


5 1 


7 24 


9 51 


7 16 


5 6 


7 26 


19 


F: 


4 4 


2 34 .7 25 


4 58 


8 29| 1 5 |7 20 


5 3 


8 30 


10 34 


7 15 


5 7 


8 31 


20 


S 


4 


3 25 '7 24 


4 59 


9 36 1 48|l7 19 


5 4 


9 36 


11 18 


7 14 


5 8 


9 37 


21 


s 


3 56 


4 16 7 23 


5 


1044' 2 321,7 18 


5 5 


10 43 


morn 


7 14 


5 9 


10 42 


22 


M 


3 52 


5 8:Y22 


5 1 


11 52' 3 22l|7 18 


5 6 


11 50 


8 


7 13 


5 10 


11 49 


23 


T 


3 48 


6 1 ,7 22 


5 3 


moral 4 16|]7 17 


5 8 


morn 


1 2 


7 12 


5 12 


morn 


24 


W 


3 44 


6 56 ,7 21 


5 4 


1 5 14 7 16 


5 9 


57 


2 


7 12 


5 13 


55 


25 


T 


3 40, 


7 52 7 20 


5 5 


2 8, 6 21 ;7 15 


5 10 


2 5 


3 7 


7 11 


5 14 


2 1 


26 


Fj 


3 36] 


8 49 .7 20 


5 6 


3 12 7 28 .1 15 


5 11 


3 9 


4 14 


7 10 


5 15 


3 4 


27 


SI 


3 32 


*9 46 7 19 


5 7 


4 13 8 34 i7 14 


5 12 


4 9 


5 20 


7 10 


5 16 


4 5 


28 


s 


3 28 


10 42 7 18 


5 9 


5 8 9 35 17 13 


5 13 


5 4 


6 21 


7 9 


5 17 


5 


29 


M 


3 25 In 36 7 17 


5 10 


5 59 10 29:7 12 


5 15 


5 55 


7 15 


7 8 


5 19 


5 51 


30 


T 


3 21 morn. 7 16 


5 11 


rises 11 14 7 12 


5 16 


rises 


8 


7 8 


5 20 


rises 


31 


W 


3 17 27 7 15 


5 13 


6 29 11 59|l7 11 


5 17 


6 31 


8 45 


7 7 


5 21 


6 33 


Tim McGowan had his limb crushed when 


then, ye see, Tim forgot all about that when he 


quite a boy. He aftemards lost his life in the 


got into a fight." 


Mexican war, and his surviving brother, Dennis, 


The following wonderful phenomenon is re- 


never ceased boasting of Tim's exploits. " Och 


lated in a newspaper :—" William P. Vitty, a 


murder," says he, "you ought to have seen Tim 


New York policeman, was taken sick while on | 


at Rve-sack" a doUai^poIe me (meaning Resaca 


duty, Tuesday, and in stooping over to vomit j 


de la Palma). He caught two Mexican black- 


his revolver, was accidentally discharged, and 


guards by the cuffs of their necks and kilt them 
both as dead as herrins by knocking their heads 
together." "How could that be," said the lis- 
tener," when your brother had but one arm?" 


he died almost instantly from" the wound." 

Woman is said to be a mere delusion, but it is 
sometimes pleasant to hug delusions. 


"Bless your Bowl," answered Dennis, "one 


War Increases the thirst for whisky and 


arm had he? That's true enough for ye, but ' lessens the means of quenching it. 1 



2d Month.] 



FEBRUARY, 1866. 



[28 Days. 



FKCASES OF THE IvIOOlSr. | 


VenuB 
Soulh. 


Mara 

S.,.Lta. 


Jupiter 

South. 


Saturn 

Sf.uth. 


Sun at .Voon- 
mark. 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N.York. 


Wash'-ton.liP. 


MOBN. 

11 51 


I'o'ss 


MORN. 
10 30 


MOKV. 


1213 55 






H M 


H. u. 


H H 1 1 




3d Quar . 




2 55 er. 


2 43 ev. 


2 3i ev.l 7 


11 58 


10 34 


10 12 


5 33 


12 14 26 


New .... 


15 


5 29 m. 


5 17 m. 


5 5 m. Sis 


ev. 4 


10 30 


9 54 


5 10 


12 14 29 


1st Quar. 


21 


*0 4 m. 


11 52 ev. 


11 40ev.!:19 


10 


10 25 


9 36 


4 46 


12 14 5 


(*22cl)! 






Ii25 


lij 


10 21 


9 17 


4 23 


12 13 16 



I 


i 


III 




1, 




2 


Even'g 


1 


3 13 


2 


F 


3 9 


3 


S 


3 5 


4 


s 


3 1 


5 


M 


2 57, 


6 


T 


2 53 


7 


W 


2 49 


8 


T 


2 45 


9 


F 


2 42 


10 


S 


2 37 


11 


s 


2 33 


12 


M 


2 30 


13 


T 


2 26, 


14 


W 


2 22 


15 


T 


2 18 


16 


F 


2 14 


17 


s 


2 10 


18 


s 


2 6' 


19 


M 


2 2 


20 


T 


1 58 


21 


W 


1 54 


22 


T 


1 50 


23 


F 


1 46 


24 


sl 


1 42 


25 


s, 


1 38 


26 


M 


1 34! 1 


27 
28 


T 

W: 


1 3i: 

1 27' 1 



Boston ; 

i Nev 

Michii 



New England,' 
' York State, | 
;an, Wisconsin, j 
, and Oregon. j 



New York City; Phila- 
delphia, Conn., New 
Jersey, Ponn., Ohio, In- 
diana, and Illinois. 



Washineton; 
Maryland, Wirg'a 
Ken'ky, Missour 
I and California. 



1 16 

2 2 



Sun I S 

7 13;5 
7 11 5 
7 10,5 
7 9|5 

7 
7 



6 28| 7 

7 15i;7 

8 4j7 

8 55^7 

9 47li7 



7!5 
6|5 
55 
45 

2|5 
l|5 

10 39[]7 0;5 

11 32 16 585 
ev.25!J6 57|5 

17 6 55,5 
10 6 54 5 
3! 6 52;5 
57jj6 51 5 
52|'6 50 5 
48!'6 48 5 
44||6 47 5 

7 40 6 45j5 

8 36 i6 44,5 



7 29 

8 29 

9 28 

10 24 

11 21 
morn 

18 

1 14 

2 8 

3 1 

3 53 

4 40 

5 25 
sets 

6 12 

7 22 

8 31 

9 42 
10 51 

39 11 55 



10 20 6 40 5 

11 9 6 385 



47 
48 
11 56!l6 37l5 49 



morn 

1 5 

2 6 

3 2 

3 55 

4 39 

5 19 
rises 



ev.42: 

1 22 

1 57 

2 37 

3 20 

4 5 

4 48 

5 47 

6 43' 

7 4l! 

8 40! 

9 36; 

10 26| 

11 ll| 
morn 

7: 

43 

1 27' 

2 12: 

3 3 
3 58 

5 Oj 

6 6 

7 14 

8 17 

9 17 
10 8 
10 54 



7 10 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 

6 59 
6 58 
6 57 
6 56 
6 54 
6 53 
6 51 
6 50 
6 49 
6 48 
6 46 
6 45 
6 43 
6 42 
6 40 
6 38 
6 37 
6 35 



7 30 

8 29 

9 27 

10 23 

11 19 
morn 

15 

1 11 

2 4 

2 56 

3 48 

4 37 

5 22 
sets 

6 14 

7 22 

8 31 

9 40 

10 49 

11 52 
morn 

1 2 

2 2 

2 58 

3 51 

4 36 

5 17 
rises 



Moos 



9 28' 
10 8' 

10 43 

11 23 
ev. 6 

51 

1 34 

2 33 

3 29 

4 27 

5 26 

6 22 

7 12 

7 57 

8 53 

9 29 
10 13 

10 58 

11 49 
morn' 

44 

1 46 

2 52 

4 

5 3 

6 3 

6 54 

7 40 



6 59'5 
6 58|5 
6 57;5 
6 56J5 
6 55 5 
6 54|5 
6 53j5 
6 52j5 
6 50'5 
6 49:5 
6 48 5 
6 47j5 
'6 4615 
6 4415 
6 43|5 
6 42'5 
'6 40,5 
!6 38 5 

;6 37 5 

,6»35 5 
16 34 5 



7 32 

8 30 

9 27 

10 21 

11 17 
morn 

12 

1 7 

2 

2 52 

3 44 

4 32 

5 18 
sets 

6 15 

7 23 

8 30 

9 39 

10 46 

11 49 
morn 

58 

1 68 

2 54 

3 47 

4 33 

5 14 
rises 



DmtiNQ the late Tvar, a feminine rebel, a Mem- 
phlan, and a widow, who shall go by the name 

of Mrs. C , was going up the river on one 

of the Cairo packets, when she got into an ex- 
cited discussion with Col. S , on the subject 

of the war. "You may overrun the whole 

f-outh," said Mrs. C ; " you may burn our 

towns, lay waste our plantations, maim or kill 
the last man, but then, sir, we will arm our boys 
with squirt-guns, and put one behind every 
stump in the land. What will you do t^en?'' 
" Oh," replied the Colonel, " in that case we will 
be compelled to call out and arm enough of 
your niggers to surround all the stumps." " But 
when you have accomplished all that, we, the 
women of the South will bare our breasts to the 
Federal bayonets." "Tou dare not do that, 



madam." "Why not, sir?" "For the simple 
reason, madam, it is unlawful. Your Confeder- 
ate Congress made it criminal for you to fficpo.^e 
yoKT cotton to t/ie Yanl-ee. forces." The lady 
retired suddenly, while the listeners laughed 
uproariously. 

A Jebsetman was very sick, and was not ex- 
pected to recover. His friends got around his 
bed, and one of them says : " John, do you feel 
willing to die?" John made an effort to give 
his views on the subject, and answered with his 
feeble voice, " I — think — I'd rather stay — where 
I'm better acquainted." 

An iSL.tND of the ocean was lately washed 
away by a storm. Look out, Great Britain ; the 
stoi-m is rising. 



3d Month.] 




MARCH, 


1866. 






[31 Days. 


-£>kEa:ses of the Moojsr. | 




Venus 
Snutb. 


Ma., 

Soutli. 


Jup.ter 
Soull,. 


Samrn 

South. 


SuaatXoo^- 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton. 


"i 


18 


i'oTr 


MORN. 
9 5 


MORN. 

4 7 







H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


12 12 32 


Full 


1 


7 8 m. 


6 56 m. 


6 44 m. 


H 


22 


10 13 


8 46 


3 43 


12 11 11 


3d Quar . 


9 


11 8 m. 


10 56 m. 


10 44 m. 


13 


26 


10 8 


8 27 


3 18 


12 9 36 


New .... 


16 


4 53 ev. 


4 41 ev. 


4 29 ev. 


19 


30 


10 2 


8 8 


2 64 


12 7 53 


let Quar. 


'23 


8 18 m. 


8 6 m. 


7 54 m. 


25 


33 


9 57 


7 48 


2 29 


12 6 3 


Full .... 


30 


11 47 ev. 


11 35 ev. 11 23ev.| 















i 


J 

h 
r 






Even'g 


1 23 


F 


1 19 


H 


1 15 


S 


1 11 


M 


1 7 


T 


1 3 


W 


59 


t| 


55 


F 


51 


S 


47 


s 


43 


M 


39 


T 


35 


W 


32 


T 


28 


F 


24 


S 


20 


s 


16 


M 


12 


Tl 


8 


w' 


4 


T 


morn. 


F 


'11 56 


S 


11 52 


s 


11 48 


]\I 


.11 44 


T 


jll 40 



W 11 37i 

T I 11 33j 

F llll 29 

S ||ll 2f| 



morn. 
41 

1 25; 

2 9 

2 53 

3 37' 

4 22! 

5 8 
56 

6 44, 

7 35 

8 26 

9 18 

10 10 

11 3 
11 52 
ev. 51 

1 46 

2 43 

3 41 

4 38 

5 36 

6 32 

7 26 

8 17 
,9 6 

9 53 

10 38 

11 22 
morn. 

5 



Boston ; New Englar 

New York State. 

Michigan, Wisconsir 

Iowa, and Oregon. 



6 35 
6 33 
6 31 
6 30 
6 28 
6 26 
6 25 
6 23 
6 21 
6 20 
6 18 
6 16 
|6 14 
6 13 
6 11 
i6 9 
''6 7 
l6 6 
6 4 
j6 2 
j6 
5 59 
5 57 
5 55 
|5 53 
;5 52 

,5 no 

,0 48 
'6 46 
\\b 4£ 



5 51 
5 52 
5 53 
5 54 
5 55 
5 56 

5 67 

6 58 

5 69 

6 



6 
6 

6 10 
6 11 
6 12 

5 13 

6 14 
6 16 
6 17 
6 18 
6 19 
6 20 
6 21 
6 22 
6 23 



6 17 

7 15 

8 13 

9 11 

10 7 

11 3 
11 58 
morn 

52 
142 

2 31 

3 16 

3 58 

4 37 

5 15 
sets 

7 22 

8 33 

9 45 

10 65 

11 59 
morn 

58 

1 5 

2 40 

3 20 

3 57 

4 30 

5 1 
rises 



11 32 
ev. 1 2 

51 

1 27 

2 3 

2 43 

3 28 

4 16 



6 24| 7 2 



New York City ; 
delphia, Conn., 
Jersey, Penn., Oh 
diana, and lllin 



Phila- ! Washington ; 

Maryland, Virg'a, 
Ken'ky, Missouri, 
1 and California. 



6 35'5 53 
6.34!5 53 
6 32^5 54 
6 30;5 55 
6 29|6 56 
6 27I5 57 
6 25I5 57 
6 24 5 59 



9 58 

10 47 

11 33 
morn 

21 

1 8 

1 54 

2 47i 

3 44 

4 47 

5 51 

6 65 

7 56 



Moon 

T"l7 

7 15 

8 12 

9 9 

10 4 

11 
11 54 
morni 

48i 

1 38 

2 27i 

3 12 

3 55i 

4 35] 

5 13 
sets 

7 21! 

8 31 

9 42 
10 51 

216 13ill 55 



H. W. 

NYORK 

8~T8 

8 68 

9 37 
10 13 

10 49 

11 29 



SETS. 

i6~33 5I2 
;6 31 5 53 
|6 30 5 54 
16 29 5 55 



8 6 22,6 

C ,6 20 6 1 

6 19 6 2 

6 17|6 3 

6 16 6 4 

6 14 6 6 

6 12 6 7 

6 ire 8 

6 9:6 9 

6 7|6 10 

6 6 6 11 

3 4 6 12 



6 18 

7 15 

8 12 

9 7 

:-> 27 5 56 10 2 
16 26 



14 j6 25 
1 2 6 24 

1 54 6 22 

2 52 :6 20 



5 5916 15 
5 58j6 16 
5 66 6 17 
5 54 6 18 

8 52:J5 52 6 19 

9 42k 5l!6 20 

10 26ij5 49j6 21 

11 4 5 4716 22 
11 39i 5 4616 23 



1[6 14 morn 

54 

1 49 

2 36 

3 17 
3 54 



3 53 

4 63 

5 51 

6 44 

7 33 

8 19 

9 7 
9 54 

10 40 

11 33 
morn 

30 6 

1 33 

2 37 



4 29 

5 
rises 

7 1 



|6 18 
16 17 
6 15 
j6 14 
6 13 
6 11 
j6 10 6 
6 



5 57 10 57 
5 58 11 50 
5 59 morn 



6 6 10 

5 6 11 

3 6 12 

2 6 13 morn 

1 6 14 50 



6 6 15 



41, !5 59 6 16 2 32 



4 42]:5 5716 17 

5 38! 5 56 6 18 



6 28|j5 5416 19 4 27 

7 12,5 53 6 20 5 

7 50!5 52 6 21 rises 

8 25|:5 50,6 22 6 59 



44 

1 33 

2 23 

3 8 

3 52 

4 33 

5 12 
sets 

7 20 

8 29 

9 39 

10 48 

11 50 



14 
3 52 



The Norfolk Roanoke House folks, hearing of 
the whereabouts of a guest who had decamped 
without going through the usual formality of 

paying his bill, sent him a note; "Mr. . 

Dear Sir : Will you send amount of your bill, 
and oblige," etc. To which the delinquent 1 
made answer : — " The amount is $80 62i. Yours \ 
respectfully." 

" Wh.\t do you take for your cold?" said t 
a lady to a sufferer. " Four pocket handker- I 
chiefs a day, madam," was the prompt reply. 

Table of interest — the dinner table. i 



Rather Hard on Toem. — A man who had a 
cause in court said, "That if he lost in the 
Court of Common Pleas, he would appeal to the 
Supreme Court and from thence to Heaven." 
" And there," replied a gentleman, " you will 
be sure to lose, for you will not be present 
to answer for yourself, and no attorney is ever 
admitted thure !" 

RoTATiotJ In office is sometimes bad enough, 
but the most disagi-eeable rotation in the world 
is that of a revolver in the hands of an enemy. 

Epitaph on an auctioneer — " Gone." 



4th Month.] 




APMIL, 


1866. 




[30 Days. 


I=IiA.SES OF TUB X^OOKT- 




VenuB 

.South. 


Mar. Jupiter 
South. South. 


Saturn 
South. 


Sun at Noon- 
mark. 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N.York. 


Wash-ton. 


7 
13 
19 

|25 


38 
42 
46 
51 
57 


MOBN. MOKK. 
9 50 7 25 

9 44 7 5 
9 38 6 44 
9 31 6 23 
9 25 6 1 


1 35 
1 6 
45 
19 


12 3 54 
12 2 7 
12 29 
11 59 3 
11 57 51 


3d Quar . 8 
New .... 15 
1st Quar. 21 
Full ....'29 


3 68 m. 
2 19 m. 
5 47 ev. 

4 39 ev. 


3 46 m. 
2 7 m. 
5 35 er. 

4 27 ev. 


3 34 m. 
1 55 m. 
5 23 ev. 

4 15 ev. 



c 


. 


J 


1 


Boston; New England 


New York City; Phila- 


Washinrton ; 


K 


i 


K a 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New t 


Maryland, Wirg'a, 


g 


Es 


K 8 


S 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 


§ 


>< 


g"' 




Iowa, and Oregon. 


1 diana, and Illinois. | 


and California. 




s;?ii~ 


Sun 


Moon 


H.w: 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 1 


Sl'N 


Sun 


Moon 


g 


t 


Morn'g 


3 


LsHS._ 


8ET3. 




Boston 


B.SES. 


SETS. 




NYORK 








1 


s 


11 21 


49 


'543 


tr26 


7 59 


ev.19 


5 45 


6 24 


7 57 


9 5 


5 46 


6~23 


7 55 


2 


M 


11 17 


1 33 


,5 42 


6 28 


8 54 


57 


5 44 


6 26 


8 51 


9 43 


5 45 


6 24 


8 48 




T 


11 13 


2 17 


5 40 


6 29 


9 49 


1 34 


5 42 


6 27 


9 46 


10 20 


5 43 


6 25 


9 42 


4 


W 


11 9 


3 3 


5 38 


6 30 


10 42 


2 12 


"5 40 


6 28 


10 39 


10 58 


5 41 


6 26 


10 35 


5 


T 


11 5 


3 50 


5 36 


6 31 


11 34 


2 56 


'• 5 38 


6 29 


1130 


11 42 


5 40 


6 27 


11 26 


6 


F 


11 1 


4 38 


5 34 


6 32 


morn 


3 44 


; 5 36 


6 30 


morn 


ev.30 


5 38 


6 28 


morn 


7 


s 


10 57 


5 27 


5 32 


6 33 


23 


4 36 


; 5 34 


6 31 


19 


1 22 


5 36 


6 29 


15 


8 


s 


10 53 


6 16 


5 31 


6 34 


1 11 


5 32 


5 33 


6 32 


1 8 


2 18 


5 35 


6 30 


1 4 


9 


M 


10 50 


7 6 


'5 29 


6 35 


1 51 


6 32 


5 31 


6 33 


147 


3 18 


5 33 


6 31 


144 


10 


T 


10 45 
10 41 


7 57 


5 27 


6 36 


2 30 


7 31 


5 29 


6 34 


2 28 


4 17 


5 31 


6 32 


2 25 


11 


W 


8 48 


5 26 


6 37 


3 7 


8 32 


5 28 


6 35 


3 6 


5 18 


5 30 


6 33 


3 4 


12 


T 


10 38 


9 40 


5 24 


6 38 


3 44 


9 2!1 


5 26 


6 36 


3 43 


6 15 


5 28 


6 34 


3 43 


13 


F 


10 34 


10 38 


5 23 


6 40 


4 21 


10 22 


5 25 


6 37 


4 21 


7 8 


5 27 


6 35 


4 21 


14 


S 


10 30 


11 29 


5 21 


6 41 


sets 


11 8 


5 24 


6 38 


sets 


7 54 


5 26 


6 36 


sets 


15 


s 


10 26 


ev.26 


5 19 


6 42 


7 20 


11 58 


5 22 


6 39 


7 18 


8 44 


5 24 


6 37 


7 15 


16 


M 


10 22 


1 25 


'5 18 


6 43 


8 33 


morn 


15 21 


6 40 


8 SO 


9 35 


5 23 


6 38 


8 27 


17 


T 


10 18 


2 25 


5 16 


6 44 


9 43 


49 


5 19 


6 41 


9 40 


10 25 


5 22 


6 39 


9 36 


18 


W 


10 14 


3 25 


5 14 


6 45 


10 47 


1 3S 


5 17 


6 42 


10 43 


11 17 


5 20 


6 40 


10 39 


19 


T 


10 10 


4 24 


5 13 


6 47 


11 40 


2 31 


1 5 16 


6 44 


1142 


morn 


5 19 


641 


11 38 


20 


F 


10 6 


5 20 


5 11 


6 48 


morn 


3 3C 


5 14 


6 45 


morn 


16 


5 17 


6 42 


morn 


21 


S 


10 2 


6 13 


■5 10 


6 49 


3G 


4 28 


'5 13 


6 46 


32 


1 15 


5 16 


6 43 


28 


22 


s 


9 58 


7 1 


5 8 


6 50 


1 19 


5 29 


5 11 


6 47 


1 16 


2 15 


,5 14 


6 44 


1 13 


23 


M 


9 54 


7 51 


5 6 


6 51 


1 58 


6 3C 


5 10 


6 48 


1 56 


3 16 


5 13 


6 48- 


1 53 


24 


T 


9 50 


8 31 


5 6 


6 52 


2 32 


7 2fc 


|5 9 


6 49 


2 30 


4 12 


5 12 


6 46 


2 29 


25 


W 


9 46 


9 21 


5 3 


6 53 


3 3 


8 19 


5 7 


6 50 


3 2 


5 5 


'5 10 


6 46 


3 2 


26 


T 


9 42 


10 4 


5 2 


6 54 


3 34 


9 8 


5 6 


6 51 


3 34 


5 54 


5 9 


6 47 


3 34 


27 


F 


9 39 


10 47 


5 1 


6 55 


4 3 


9 53 


5 5 


6 52 


4 4 


6 39 


5 8 


6 48 


4 4 


28 


S 


9 85 


11 30 


4 59 


6 56 


4 32 


10 33 


6 3 


6 53 


4 34 


719 


5 6 


6 49 


4 85 


29 


s 


9 3li 


morn. 


4 58 


6 58 


rises 


11 S 


1 5 2 


6 54 


rises 


7 65 


5 5 


6 50 


rises 


30 


Ml 


9 27: 


15 


4 56 


6 59 


7 44 


11 48 


' 5 


6 55 


741 


8 34 


5 3 


6 51 


7 38 


iLLrSTUATED 


with cuts! said a mischievous 


" Oh, mother ! do send for the Doctor !" said 


young urchin, n 


s he drew bis Icnife across the 


a little boy of three years. "What for, my 


leaves of his g 


rammar. Illustrated with cuts ! 


dear ?" " "Why, there's a gentleman in the par- 


repeated the sc 


aoolmaster, as he drew his rattan 


lor who says he'll die if Jane don't marry him 


across the bacli 


of his mischievous urchin. 


—and she says she won't." 


" -What a fine 


head your boy has?" said an 


Two COWARDS met in a narrow way, neither 


admiring frieni 


. " Yes," said the fond father. 


disposed to turn out of the road. " Oive me the 


"he's a chip of 


the old block, ain't you sonny?" 


road," said one, in a braggar*. voice, " or, if you 


"I guess so, da 


ddv, 'cause teacher said I was a 


don't I'll do for you what I did for the man 


young blockhea 


d.'' 


who refused it to me yesterday." The other 




scrambled aside in terror, and when he of the 


" Harry, I 


cannot think," says Dick, 
kes my ankles grow so thick." 


braggart voice had gone by, asked him, timidly, 


" What ma 


" What did you do, sir, to the man who refused 


" You do n 


ot recollect," said Harry, 


you the road yesterday?" "Why," said the 




"] 


Jow grea 


t a calf 


theyh 


ave to 


carry. 


1 


other, 


'I go 


t out of 


his waj 


r." 







5th Month.] 



3IAT, 1S66. 



[31 Days. 



T'-eSLA.S.SS OF TKCE JVTOOJSr- j| 


Venus 
.South. 


^. 


Jupit.r Satum" 
Soulh. South. 


..„.^00,.- 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N.York. 


Wash'ton.! 


i 


l"'3 








D. 


B. M 




H. M. 1 


9 IS 


5 39 11 50 


11 56 56 


3d Quar . 


7 


4 58 ev. 


4 46 ev. 


4 34evJ 


n 


1 10 


9 11 


5 17 11 24 


11 56 21 


New ... . 


14 


10 14 m. 


10 2 m. 


9 60m. 


13 


1 17 


9 5 


4 54 10 59 


11 56 7 


1st Quar. 


21 


5 14 m. 


5 2 m. 


4 50 m. il9 


1 25 


8 58 


4 31 10 34 


11 56 14 


FuU . . . . 


29 


8 34 m. 


8 22 m. 


8 10 m. 1 


25 


1 34 


8 51 


4 710 9 


11 56 39 



Morn'g 

9 23| 
9 19] 
9 151 
9 11 



8 24 
8 20 
8 16 
8 12 
8 8 
8 4 
8 
7 56 
f 52 



Boston ; New England, 

New York State, 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

Iowa, and Oregon. 



New York City; Phi 
delphia, Conn., Nev 
jJersey, Penn., Ohio, 
I diana. and Illinois. 



,4 53 

4 52 
4 51 
4 50 
i4 49 

:4 48 



11 2 11 17 
11 44 ev, 
mbrnj 53 
24 
1 
1 

2 15 
2 52 
31 
4 
sets 

4' 9 22 '4 47 

,. -- 9 27 10 14JJ4 46 

'4 42 7 lljlO 23 11 3|;4 46 
|4 4l|7 12J11 11 11 56 '445 
'4 40|7 13,11 54morn|:4 44 
|4 40|7 14 moral 5ir4 44 
,4 39,7 loj 31 1 45, 4 43 
14 38 7 10 1 5; 2 39i!4 43 
4 37,7 17| 1 37, 3 34 :4 42 
,4 37:7 181 2 7! 4 26 4 42|7 13| 2 
5 16'4 41i7 I4I 2 



Washington ; 

Maryland, Virg' 

Kenky, Missour 

and California. 




RISES. .SETS. I KISKS. 

[5~2 6l2j 8 31 
15 16 53! 9 22 
|5 6 54 10 13 
l4 58j6 5510 58 
4 57 6 56 11 41 
|4 56 6 57'mora 
4 55 6 58 21 
4 54 6 59 



1 1 

1 38 

2 14 
2 53 

3| 3 32 
4j 4 36 

5 seta 

6 8 20 
7i 9 22 
7,10 19 

8:11 8 

911 52 
7 10 morn 

7 10 29 
7 11 1 4 

7 12! 1 36 
7 



|4 36;7 19; 2 36i 5 16 '4 41|7 14 2 38 
j4 35:7 19} 3 8[ 6 3 i4 40 7 15 3 10 



;4 35i7 20, 3 411 6 47 4 40 

|4 34|7 21 Irises 7 29 '4 39 

'4 34 7 22: 7 22 8 7 ;4 39 

14 33 7 23! 8 14 8 49 4 38 

,4 327 23 9 1! 9 32 4 



7 16 3 44 
7 16 rises 
7 17 7 18 
7 18! 8 10 
7 18' 8 57 



A Western hunter and his brother spent a 
year in and about the Rocky Mountains. They 
iiad two rifles, one bullet, and a keg of powder. 
AVith these, he says, they killed, on an average, 
twenty-seven head of bufifalo a day. The fact 
that they did all this with one bullet, led to the 
following cross question : " How did you kill 
all these buffalo with one bullet?" "Well, we 
shot a buffalo ; I stood on one side and my 
brother on the other. Brother fired, the bail 
passed into the barrel of my rifle. The next 
time I fired, and brother caught my ball in his 
rifle. We kept up the hunt for twelve months, 



' killing nearly two hundred buffalo per week, 
and yet brought home the same ball we started 

1 with." 

[ A CLERGTMAS and one of his elderly parish- 

( loners, were walking home from church one 
frosty daj', when the old gentleman slipped and 

I fell flat on his back. The minister, looking 
at him a moment, and being assured that he 
was not much hurt, said to him, "Friend, 
sinners stand on slippery places." The old 
gentleman looked up as if to assure himself 
of the fact, and said, " I see they do, but I 
can't." 



6th Month.] 



JUNE, 1SG6. 



[30 Days. 



r>I€:A.SES OF TUB iviooisr. 1 




S^'u")' 


.Man 

South. 


JupjUr 1 Saturn 
South. 1 SoutL. 


San at Koon- 
mark. 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N.York. 


Wash'ton. 


u. 


■;■"•- 


UOSM. 


MOBS. P. «. 


11' 57 s'i 


p 






H. M. 1 










3d Quar . 


6 


2 29 m. 


2 17 m. 


2 5 m. 


7 


1 51 


8 36 


3 14 9 15 


11 58 32 


New 


12 


5 23 ev. 


5 11 ev. 


4 59 ev.! 


|13 


2 


8 29 


2 49 8 50 


11 59 43 


1st Quar. 


19 


7 1 ev. 


6 49 ev. 


6 37 ev.' 


19 


2 7 


8 22 


2 24| 8 26 


12 1 


Full .... 


27 


10 51 ey. 


10 39 ev. 


10 27ev.l 


'25 


2 14 


8 15 


1 58! 8 2 


12 2 18 



1 


i 


t-r. 


^ 


t: 


s s 
















|x 




2 


F 


Morn'g 


1 


7 21 


2 


S 


7 17 


3 


s 


7 13 


4 


M 


7 9 


5 


T 


7 5 


6 


W 


7 1 


7 


T 


6 57 


8 


F 


6 53 


9 


S 


6 50 


10 


s 


6 46 


11 


M 


6 42' 


12 


T 


6 38 


13 


W 


6 34 


14 


T 


6 30 


15 


F 


6 26 


16 


S 


6 22 


17 


s 


6 18 


18 


M 


6 14 


19 


T 


6 10 


20 


W 


6 6 


21 


T 


6 2; 


22 


F 


5 58j 


23 


s 


5 54! 


24 


s 


5 51 


25 


M 


5 47, 


26 


T 


5 43 


27 


W 


5 39,1 


28 


T 


5 35' 


29 


F 


5 31 


30 


S 


5 27 



Boston; New Englai 

New York State, 

Michigan, Wisconsi 

Iowa, and Oregon. 



2 9 

2 58 

3 47 

4 35 

5 24 

6 13! 

7 3; 

7 55, 

8 50 

9 47; 

10 47| 

11 48 
ev. 49 

1 49 

2 46 

3 39 

4 28 

5 15 

6 

6 43, 

7 27| 

8 10; 

8 65: 

9 40 

10 28' 

11 1C| 
morn. ' 

5! 

55' 

1 44 



!4 26 
,4 25 
4 25 
,4 24 
4 24 
'4 23 
4 23 
4 23 
4 22 
4 22 
4 22 
:4 22 
'422 
4 22 
'4 22 
4 22 
4 22 
4 22 
4 22 
4 22 
4 22 
4 23 
4 23 
4 23 
4 23 
4 23 
4 24 
4 24 
4 24 
4 25 



Sun 


Moon 


■Tzo 


RISES. 


9 49 


7 31 


10 29 


7 32 


11 6 


7 32 


1142 


7 33 


morn 


7 34 


15 


7 35 


49 


7 35 


1 25 


7 36 


2 3 


7 36 


2 45 


7 37 


3 33 


7 37 


sets 


7 38 


8 11 


7 38 


9 6 


7 38 


9 52 


7 39 


10 31 


7 39 


11 7 


7 39 


11 39 


7 39 


morn 


7 39 


10 


7 39 


39 


7 39 


1 9 


7 40 


1 39 


7 40 


2 14 


7 40 


2 49 


7 40 


3 32 


7 40 


rises 


7 40 


7 48 


7 40 


8 30 


7 40 


9 9 



H. W. 

Boston. 

1 29 

2 7 

2 53' 

3 47 

4 33 

5 27 

6 29 

7 32 

8 35 

9 36 

10 33 

11 25 
morn] 

19 

1 11! 

1 57' 

2 45 

3 34 

4 24 

5 13 

6 5| 

6 58 

7 48 

8 39 

9 29 
10 16 

10 58 

11 39 
ev.25 

1 6 



New York 

delphia, 

Jersey, Pe 

diana, £ 



City; Phi 
Conn., New 
nn., Ohio, I 



Washingtor 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


K,SE.. 


SBT3. 


RISKS. 


4 32 


7 24 


9 45 


4 31 


7 25 


10 26 


4 31 


7 26 


11 3 


4 30 


7 26 


1140 


4 30 


7 27 


morn 


4 29 


7 27 


14 


4 29 


7 28 


49 


4 29 


7 29 


1 26 


4 28 


7 29 


2 5 


4 28 


7 30 


2 48 


4 28 


7 30 


3 37 


4 28 


7 31 


sets 


4 28 


7 31 


8 7 


4 28 


7 32 


9 2 


4 28 


7 32 


9 49 


4 28 


7 32 


10 29 


4 28 


7 33 


11 6 


4 28 


7 33 


1139 


4 28 


7 33 


morn 


4 28 


7 34 


10 


4 29 


7 34 


40 


4 29 


7 34 


1 11 


4 29 


7 34 


1 42 


4 29 


7 34 


2 17 


4 29 


7 35 


2 53 


4 29 


7 35 


3 36 


4 30 


7 35 


rises 


4 30 


7 35 


7 44 


4 30 


7 35 


8 27 


4 31 


7 35 


9 6 



H. VV. 
NYokk' 

10 15 

10 53 

11 39 
ev.33 

1 19 

2 13 

3 15 

4 18! 

5 21! 

6 22 

7 19 

8 11' 

9 5 
9 57! 

10 43 

11 31; 
morn 

20 

1 10 

1 59 

2 51 

3 44 

4 34 

5 26 

6 15 

7 2 

7 44 

8 23 

9 11 
9 52 



4 37 
4 37 
4 36 
4 36 
4 36 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 34 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 35 
4 36 
4 36 
4 36 
4 37 



Sun 


SKTll. 


7 19 


7 19 


7 20 


7 20 


7 21 


7 21 


7 22 


7 23 


7 24 


7 24 


7 24 


7 25 


7 25 


7 26 


7 26 


7 26 


7 27 


7 27 


7 27 


7 27 


7 28 


7 28 


?! 


7 29 


7 29 


7 29 


7 29 


7 29 


7 29 



Moon 

9 41 

10 23 

11 1 
11 38 
morn 

13 

49 

1 26 

2 7 

2 51 

3 40 
sets 
8 3 

8 58 

9 46 

10 27 

11 4 
11 38 
morn 

10 

40 

1 12 

1 44 

2 20 

2 57 

3 40 
rises 

7 40 

8 23 

9 3 



On the Little Miami Railroad is a station 
called Morrow. Anew brakeman on the road, 
who did not know the names of the stations, was 
approached by a stranger the other day, while 
standing by his train at the depot, who inquired, 
" Does this train go to Morrow to-day?" " No," 
said the brakeman, who thought the stranger 
was making game of him, " it goes to-day, 
yesterday, week after next." " You don't un- 
derstand me," persisted the stranger, " I want 
to go to Morrow." " Well, why in thunder 
don't you wait until to-morrow then, and not 
come bothering around to-day. You can go to- 
morrow or any otherday you please." " Won't 
you answer a civil question civilly? Will this 



train go to-day to Morrow?" "Not exactly. It 
will go to-day and come back to-morrow." As 
the stranger who wanted to go to Morrow was 
about to leave in disgust, another employee, 
who knew the station alluded to came along and 
gave him the required information. 

"How many rods make an acre?" a father 
asked of his son, a fast urchin, as he came 
home one night from the town school. ' " Well, 
I don't know, governor," was the reply of 
the young hopeful, " but I guess you'd think 
one rod made an acre, if you'd got such a 
tanning as I did from old vinegar face this af- 
ternoon." 



7th Month.] JULY, 1866, [31 Days. 




I'HA-SES OF ■•jjHtjj is^ooisr. || 1 


Venus 
Soulh. 


Mars 
Suuth. 


South. 


Saturn 
South. 


"".Har-t." "' 




MOON. 


Boston. 


N.York. 


Wash'ton 


! I.. 


P.M. 


MO«N 






H. M. S. 








D. 


H. u. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


2 19 


8 9 


1 32 


7 37 


12 3 30 




3d Quar . 


5 


9 20 m. 


9 8 m. 


8 56 m. 


7 


2 24 


8 2 


1 5 


7 14 


12 4 34 




New . 




12 


51 m. 


39 m. 


27 m. 


13 


2 28 


7 55 


38 


6 50 


12 5 25 




1st Quar. 


19 


10 59 m. 


10 47 m. 


10 35 m. 


!l9 


2 32 


7 48 


12 


6 27 


12 5 59 




Full . 


...127 


11 29 m. 


11 17 m. 


11 5 m. 


125 


2 35 


7 42 


1140e 


6 4 


12 6 13 




"i" 


g 


>j 


t 


Boston ; New England, 


New York City; Phila- 


1 Washington; 




g 


g 


ii 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New 


fMaryland, Virg'a, 




s 


^ 


gs 


B 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 




g 


u, 


i" 




Iowa, and Oregon. 


diana, and Illinois. 


j and California. 








Moon i " w 






Moon 










2 


a' 


Mom'g 


s 


'eIses. 


SETO. 




Boston. 


K18BS. 


PITS. 


RISES. 


NYORK 


'4";s.|sr 


P.1SE9. 




1 


s 


5 23 


T"33 


14 25 


7 40 


"9^ 


147 


431 


7 84 


9 43 


10 33 


4 37;7 29 


9 41 




2 


M 


5 19 


3 22 


14 26 


7 40 


10 19 


2 29 


4 82 


7 34 


10 18 


1115 


4 87 7 29 


10 17 




3 


T 


5 15 


4 11 


4 27 


7 40 


10 52 


8 17 


4 33 


7 34 


10 52 


ey. 3 


4 8817 29 


10 51 




4 


W 


5 11 


5 


!4 27 


7 39 


11 26 


4 7 


4 33 


7 33 


11 26 


53 


4 88l7 28 


11 27 




5 


T 


5 7 


5 50 


14 28 


7 39 


morn 


5 2 


4 34 


7 83 


morn 


148 


4 39I7 28 


morn 




6 


F 


5 3 


6 42 


'4 29 


7 39 


2 


6 4 


4 35 


7 83 


3 


2 50 


4 40l7 28 


5 




1 


S 


4 59 


7 36:4 29 


7 39 


41 


7 7 


4 85 


7 33 


48 


3 58 


4 4017 28 


46 




8 


s 


4 50 


8 33 4 30 


7 38 


1 24 


8 14 


4 36 


7 32 


1 27 


5 


4 41 7 27 


1 31 




9 


M 


4 52 


9 32 4 31 


7 38 


2 14 


9 20 


4 37 


7 32 


2 17 


6 6 


4 42 7 27 


2 21 




10 


T 


4 48 


10 32, 4 32 


7 38 


3 9 10 20 


4 37 


7 82 


3 13 


7 6 


4 42:7 27 


3 17 




11 


W 


4 44 


11 32l'4 33 


7 37 


sets 111 11 


|4 88 


7 31 


sets 


7 57 


4 43{7 26 


sets 




12 


T 


4 40j'ev. 30 ,4 33 


7 37 


7 42 morn 


4 89 


7 31 


7 39 


8 48 


4 44 7 26 


7 85 




13 


F 


4 36 


1 25 ,4 34 


7 36 


8 25 


2 


4 40 


7 30 


8 23 


9 87 


4 45 7 25 


8 20 




14 


S 


4 32 


2 1814 35 


7 36 


9 4 


51 


4 41 


7 30 


9 2 


10 21 


4 4517 25 


9 




16 


s 


4 28 


3 7114 36 


7 35 


9 38 


1 35 


4 42 


7 29 


9 37 


11 2 


4 46 7 24 


9 36 




16 


M 


4 24 


3 53 ;4 37 


7 34 


10 9 


2 16 


4 43 


7 29 


10 9 


11 45 


;4 4717 24 


10 9 




11 


T 


4 20 


4 38,14 37 


7 34 


10 40 


2 59 


4 44 


7 28 


10 40 


morn 


4 48' 7 23 


10 41 




18 


W 


4 16 


5 22 4 38 


7 33 


11 9 


3 44 4 45 


7 28 


11 11 


30 


4 49t7 23 


11 12 




19 


T 


4 12 


6 6J4 39 


7 32 


11 41 


4 3114 46 


7 27 


11 43 


1 17 


4 50,7 22 


11 45 




20 


F 


4 8 


6 50 !4 40 


7 32 


naorn 


5 281 4 46 


7 26 


morn 


2 14 


4 50|7 21 


morn 




21 


S 


4 4 


1 36 14 41 


7 31 


13 


6 13114 47 


7 26 


16 


2 59 


4 5l|7 21 


19 




22 


s 


4 


8 221 4 42 


7 30 


50 


7 8' 14 48 


7 25 


55 


3 54 


4 5217 20 


57 




23 


M 


3 57 


9 1014 43 


7 29 


1 29 


8 114 49 


7 24 


1 33 


4 47 


4 53 7 19 


1 37 




24 


T, 


3 53 


9 B9l 4 44 


7 28 


2 13 


8 57: 4 50 


7 23 


2 18 


5 43 


453I7 18 


2 22 




25 


W 


8 49 


10 49;:4 45 


7 27 


8 2 


9 48l|4 51 


7 22 


3 7 


6 84 


4 54 7 17 


3 11 




26 


T 


3 45 


11 39 


14 46 


7 26 


3 56 10 35l|4 52 


7 21 


4 


7 21 


'4 55 7 16 


4 4 




27 


F 


3 41 


morn. 


14 47 


7 25 


rises jll 18 


4 52 


7 20 


rises 


8 4 


4 56 7 16 


rises 




28 


S 


3 37 


29 


'4 48 


7 24 


7 47ev. 1 


4 58 


7 19 


7 45 


8 47 


4 56|7 15 


7 42 




29 


s 


3 33 


1 19 


J4 49 


7 23 


8 21 


45 


4 54 


7 18 


8 19 


9 31 


4 57i7 14 


8 18 




30 


M 


3 29 


2 8 


|4 50 


7 22 


8 56 


1 26 


4 54 


7 18 


8 55 


10 12 


4 5817 14 


8 55 




31 


T 


3 25 


2 58 


;4 5l 


7 21 


9 30 


2 8114 55 


7 17 


9 30 


10 54 


4 5917 13 


9 31 




Drw 


NG the examination of a witness as to the 


"You see, grandmamma, we perforated an 




localit 


T of the stairs in a houSe, the counsel 


iperture in the apex, and a corresponding aper- 




asked " 


him: "Which way did the stairs run?" 


ure in the base ; and by applying the egg to the 




The w 


tness, a noted wag, replied : " One way 


ips and forcibly inhaling the breath, the shell 




they r8 


n up stairs, but the other way they ran 


s entirely discharged of its contents." " Bless 




down fi 


tairs." The learned counsel winked his 


my soul," cried the old lady, " what wonderful 




£yes, a 


nd then took a look at the ceiling. 


mprovements they do make! Now, in my 




RiBB 


INC.— " Don't you mean to marry, my dear 


younger days, we just made a hole in each end 




sir?" 


"No, my dear widow, I'd rather lose all 


and sucked." 




the rib 


6 I've got than take another." 


A LfTTLE ^rl in school, being asked what a 




Top 


REVENTthe kitchen door from creaking, 


cataract or waterfall was, replied that it was 




keep a 


servant girl whose beau comea to see her 


hair flowing over something she didn't know 




of ane 


vening. 


what. 





10th Month.] 



OCTOBER, 1S66. 



[31 Days 



I'liASES OF TliE 3vnoo]sr. 




Venus 


M... 


Jur.te. 


Saturn 


Su,,aty«^ 







N. York. 


Wash'ton. 


















i 


P.M. 

2 46 


6 ii 


6 57 


l''55 


H V a 




D. 


11 M. 


H. M. 


11. M. 


11 49 36 


Sd Quar . 


1 


1 25 m. 


1 13 m. 


1 Im. 


7 


2 4fi 


6 


6 34 


1 34 


11 47 48 


New .... 


8 


14 ev. 


2ev. 


11 50 m. 


13 


2 46 


5 49 


6 12 


1 13 


11 46 16 


1st Quar. 


16 


4 39 ev. 


4 27' ev. 


4 15 ev. 


1? 

9.F, 


2 44 


5 36 


5 51 


52 


11 45 1 


Full .... 


2S 


V 29 ev. 


7 17 ev. 


7 5 ev. 


2 41 


5 23 


5 30 


31 


11 44 9 


3d Quar . 


'60 


10 Im. 


9 49 m. 


L 9 37 m. 






1 







a 


«l 


ij 


1 


Boston ; New England 


!New York City ; Phila-; Washington; 


S 


1 


i§ 


New York State, 


', delphia, Conn., New ; Maryland, Virg'a, 


§ 


^1 




§ 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In-I Ken'ky, Missouri, 


§ 


'J 


i^ 




Iowa, and Oregon. 


1 diana, and Illinois. 1 and California. 




SU.N 


Sun i Moon 


H.W. 


i'SUN 


SUN 


Moon 


H. W. 1 SUN I .-UN Moon 


< 


2' 
Ml 


Even'g 
11 17 


6 5| 


il 


5 42 11 44 


Boston 


RISKS. 
5 56 


SETS. 

5 43 


RISES. 

11 48 


.\yoRKj^RISES.i..ETS. 

2 5I 5 5615 43 


RISES. 


1 


5 19 


Tr52 


2 


T 


11 13; 


7 1 


5 58 


5 40 morn 


6 27 


is 57 


5 41 


morn 


3 13i 5 57,5 41 


morn 


3 


W 


11 10 


7 54 


5 59 


5 39 


47 


7 29! 15 48 


5 40 


50 


4 15J5 58 5 40 


53 


4 


T 


11 6 


8 44 


6 1 


5 37 


148 


8 2816 


5 38 


1 51 


5 14: 5 59 5 38 


1 53 


5 


F 


11 2 


9 33 


6 2 


5 36 


2 50 


9 21 i6 1 


5 37 


2 52 


6 7|6 5 37 


2 54 


6 


S 


10 58 


10 19 


6 3 


5 34 


3 51 


10 7:6 2 


5 35 


3 52 


6 53 [6 15 35 


3 53 


7 


s 


10 54 


11 5 


6 4 


5 32 


4 52 


10 49 16 3 


5 33 


4 52 


7 35 6 2 5 34 


4 52 


8 


M 


10 50 


11 49] 


6 5 


5 31 


sets 


11 25 6 4 


5 32 


sets 


8 11[|6 3i5 32 
8 52!6 4 5 31 


sets 


9 


T 


10 46 


ev. 34 


6 6 


5 29 


6 13 


morn 6 5 


5 30 


6 15 


6 17 


10 


W 


10 42 


1 19 


6 8 


5 27 


6 46 


6 |6 6 


5 28 


6 48 


9 31 l6 5^5 29 


6 51 


11 


T 


10 38 


2 4 


6 9 


5 26 


7 21 


45 


|6 7 


5 27 


7 24 


10 8 '6 65 28 


7 27 


12 


F 


10 34' 


2 50! 


6 10 


5 24 


7 59 


1 22 


6 8 


5 25 


8 3 


10 46 16 7 5 26 


8 7 


13 


S 


10 30, 


3 37; 


6 11 


5 22 


8 42 


2 


6 9 


5 24 


8 45 


1129!!6 815 25 


8 50 


14 


s 


10 26, 


4 24 


6 12 


5 21 


9 28 


2 43 


leio 


5 22 


9 32 


morn '6 9 5 23 


9 36 


15 


M 


10 22' 


5 12! 


6 13 


5 19 


10 19 


3 30 


i!6 11 


5 21 


10 22 


16' 6 10 5 22 


10 27 


16 


T 


10 18 


6 Ol 


6 14 


5 17 


11 12 


4 20 


j6 12 


5 19 


11 16 


1 6 6 1li5 20 


11 19 


17 


W 


,10 14 


6 48 


6 15 


5 15 


morn 


5 13 


6 13 


5 17 


morn 


1 59 6 12,5 19 


morn 


18 


T 


10 ll' 


7 87 


6 17 


5 14 


10 


6 IC 


|6 14 


5 16 


13 


2 56;;6 13 5 18 


16 


19 


F 


10 7, 


8 27 


6 18 


5 12 


1 11 


7 S 


16 15 


5 14 


1 13 


3 55;!6 1415 16 


1 15 


20 


S 


10 3, 


9 17 


6 19 


5 11 


2 16 


8 8 


16 16 


5 13 


2 17 


4 54 6 15 5 15 


2 18 


21 


s 


9 59110 9 


6 20 


5 9 


3 21 


9 4 


17 


5 12 


3 22 


5 50 6 16 5 14 


3 23 


22 


M 


9 55,11 3 


6 21 


5 8 


4 30 


9 5^ 


6 18 


5 11 


4 30 


6 43,16 17|5 13 


4 29 


23 


T 


9 51 ill 59 


6..g2 


5 6 


rises 


10 48 


6 19 


5 9 


rises 


7 34,6 18 5 11 


rises 


24 


W 


9 47 ,raorn. 


6 23 


5 5 


5 55 


11 3£ 


6 20 


5 8 


5 58 


8 19! 6 19 5 10 


6 1 


26 


T 


9 43; 


57 


6 25 


5 3 


6 43 


ev.2C 


6 21 


5 6 


6 47 


9 I2J6 20,5 9 


6 50 


20 


F 


9 39 


1 57 


6 26 


5 2 


7 38 


1 18 


6 22 


5 5 


7 41 


10 4 6 215 8 


7 46 


27 


S 


9 35 


2 58 


6 27 


5 


8 36 


2 8 


6 23 


5 3 


8 40 


10 54j 6 22 5 6 


8 44 


28 


s 


9 31 


3 58 


6 28 


4 59 


9 36 


3 4 


6 24 


5 2 


9 40 


11 50, 6 23 5 5 


9 44 


29 


M 


9 27 


4 55 


6 29 


4 57 


10 39 


4 5 


6 25 


5 


10 43 


ev.48i 6 2415 3 


10 46 


30 


T 


9 23 


5 50 


6 30 


4 55 


1143 


5 5 


6 26 


4 59 


1145 


148]6 25lo 2 


11 48 


31 


W 


9 19 


e-42 


6 32 


4 54 


morn 


6 4 


6 28 


4 58 


morn 


2 50;|6 26|5 1 


morn 


A CORRESPONDENT of tlie Lcwiston Journal says 


" I LIKE to reverse things once in a while," 


he overheard the following conversation be- 


said an old toper, who was found at an early 


tween two small urchins :— Says one, " An't you 


hour in the morning sitting beside a ditch :— "I 


got no grandmother?" " No," " I tell yer," re- 


like to reverse things once in a while — I sat at a 


sponded the first. " they're tip top. Let yer do 


hanqvet all night, and now I am sitting on a icet 


as you please ; give yer as much good stuir as 


bank." 


yer can eat, and the more you sarse them the 




better they like it." 


No MATTER how Ugly you may be, your 
shadow win stick faithfully by you, for it is as 


" Don't trouble yourself to stretch your mouth 


ugly as you are. 


any wider, said a dentist to a man who was ex- 




tending his jaws frightfully. " I intend to 


The man that "carries everything before 


Bta 


ndt 


utside 


f it to dr 


awyo 


artoo 


h." 


I 


him."- 


-The 


waiter. 







11th Month.] 



NOVEMBER, 1SG6, 



[30 Days. 



I^IiA-SES OF TI3rE3 T^OOJST. 



MOON. 



New . . . , 
1 st Quar . 
Full . . . . 
3d Quar . 



Boston. 



5 40 m. 
9 23 m. 
5 31m. 
10 21 ev. 



N. York. I Wash'tsn 



5 28 m. 

9 11m. 

5 19 m. 

10 9 ey. 



5 16 m. 

8 59 m. 
5 1m. 

9 57 ev. 





Venus 


Ma:s 


-. 

1 


&mlh. 


Sc.tl,. 






2 35 


5 6 


V 


2 25 


4 51 


13 


2 12 


4 33 


19 


1 53 


4 15 


.5 


1 2Y 


3 54 



5 6[ 7 11 43 42 
4 46 morn. Ill 43 50 
4 26J11 25:11 44 28 
4 7 11 5:11 45 36 
3 47 10 44,11 47 13 



IT 



4 S 

5'M 

6T 

7W 

8:T 

9F 

10 S 

Ills i 

12 M 

13'Tl 

14Wi 

15TJ 

16 F 

17 S i 

18 s ! 

19 M: 

20 T I 

21 w: 

22 T I 

23 Fi 

24: S I 

25 S 1 
26:J\I 
27 Tj 

28.W 

29 T I 

30 F 



k 

Even'g 


J 


9 15 


7 31 



Boston; New England, 

New York State, 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

Iowa, and Oregon. 



|New York City; Phila- 
i delphia, Conri., New 
'Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In-' 
! diana, and Illinois. I 



Washington ; 

Maryland, Virg'a 

Ken'ky, Missour 

and California. 



9 12| 8 18; 6 
9 8 I 9 3] " 
9 4 I 9 47, 
9 10 31 
8 56 11 15 
8 52' 12 
8 48 ev.46, 



6 33 

34 

6 36 



8 44 
8 40 
8 36 
8 32; 
8 28J 
8 24 
8 20 
8 16 
8 13 



1 33 

2 20 

3 7 

3 55i 

4 42 

5 30 

6 17 

7 6 

7 55 

8 46 

9 40 
10 37 

57 ill 37 
53 morn.' 
49 1 39 
4o'| 1 4li 
41 2 42 
37 3 41 



4 54 
4 53 
4 51 
4 50 
4 49 
4 48 
44 
4 45 
6 43 4 44 
6 4414 43 



6 46 
6 47 
6 48 
6 49 
6 51 
6 52 
6 53 
6 54 
6 56 
6 57 
6 58i 



5 27 

6 16 

7 2 



4 42 
44 
441 
4 39 
4 39 
4 38 
4 37 
4 36 
4 35 
4 34 
4 34 
4 33 
4 32 
4 32 
4 31 
4 31 



44 

1 46 

2 45 

3 44 



7 2 

7 58 

8 49 

9 36 

4 42'lO 19 

5 38 10 57 
sets [11 34| 

5 57 morn 

6 381 16 



7 24 

8 11 

9 4 
10 

10 59 

11 58 
morn 

1 1 

2 8 

3 15j 

4 251 

5 37il0 24 
rises 111 16 

6 21 ev.TO 



57 

1 36 

2 16! 

3 1 

3 48 

4 40 
6 33 

6 32 

7 31 

8 30 

9 29 



£!iIl-|l!Z^[ 

6 30^4 571 46 
6 SlU 561 1 4V 
6 32|4 54J 2 4 
6 34 4 53 3 43 
6 5^4 52 4 41 
6 36 4 51 5 36 
6 37 1 4 50 sets 
6 38 4 49 6 1 
6 40'4 48 6 41 
3 4l!4 47| 7 28 
6 42I4 46J 8 15 
6 43l4 45i 9 8 
6 44|4 44,10 3 
6 46k 4311 8 
6 47[4 43,12 
6 48 14 42 morn 
6 49 4 411 1 i 
6 50 4 40 2 8 
6 51 4 39 
6 53|4 39 
6 54^4 38 
6 55 



7 22 

8 25 

9 31 



6|4 30|ll 
7 4 30 m( 



morn 

291 39 



1 4 

1 53 

2 47 

3 42, 

4 37 

5 32 

6 27i 



6 57 
6 58 



3 14 

4 2:; 

5 35 
4 38 rises 
4 371 6 25 
4 36 7 26 
4 36 8 29 

6 59|4 35 9 34 

7 o!4 35 10 37 
7 2 4 35 11 40 
7 3 4 34 morn 
7 4 4 34 40 



H. w. 

N'YORK 

3 48 

4 44 

5 35 

6 22 

7 5 

7 43 

8 20 



6 27 
6 28 
8 29 



SETS. 

5~1 
5 
4 59 



6 30 4 58 
6 3l|4 57 
4 56 
4 55 



9 43 

10 22 

11 2 
11 47 
morn 

34 

1 26 

2 19 

3 18 

4 17 

5 16 

6 15 

7 10 

8 2 
8 56 

10 39 

11 33 
ev.28 

1 23 

2 18 

3 13 



6 3 
6 36 
6 3 
6 39 
6 40 
6 41 
4': 
6 43 
6 44 
6 45 
6 46 
6 47 
6 48 
6 49 
6 50 
6 51 
6 52 
G 53 
6 54 
6 55 
6 56 
6 5*; 
6 58 



48 
148 

2 46 

3 43 

4 39 

5 34 
sets 

6 4 

6 46 

7 32 

8 19 

9 12 

10 6 

11 4 
morn 

0- 1 

1 2 

2 8 

3 13 

4 22 

5 32 
rises 

6 29 

7 30 

8 33 

9 37 



4 54 
4 53 
4 52 
4 51 
4 50 
4 49 
4 48 
4 47 
4 46 
4 46 
4 45 
4 44 
144 
4 43 
4 42 
4 42 
4 41 
4 41 
4 41 
4 41 10 39 
4 40:11 41 
4 40 morn 
t 40i 40 



A Fixe Retort. — On the day of the President's 
funeral, a bronzed and weather-bealcn soldier, 
anxious to obtain a better view of the proces- 
Bion, happened to stop before a party of ladies 
and gentlemen. One of the gentlemen nudged 
him on the elbow, at the same time observing : 
"Excuse me, sir, you are right in front of us." 
Bowing handsomely in return, the soldier re- 
plied : " That is nothing remarkable for me, 
sir ; I have been in front of you a little over 
four years. 

EprrAPH on a portrait painter — Taken from 
life. 



TnE editor of a Chicago newspaper has de- 
clared, in speaking of the filth of that city, that 
he had two hiindred and twenty several 
and distinct smells, with three wards to hear 
from. 

"Tom, tell the biggest lie you ever told, and 
I'll give you a glass of beer." " A lie ! I never 
told a lie in my life." " Draw the beer, boy." 

A GOOD deal of the consolation offered in the 
world is about as solacing as the assurance of 
the man to his wife when she fell into Ih-; river : 
" You'll find ground at the bottom, my dear." 



12th Month.] DECEMBER, 1866. [31 Days. | 


^FiiA^ES~0:F"TIiB^IvIOOI>T~ 




Vcnu, 


Ponth. 

'3"82 


Jui-iter 1 Saturu \Sunai Koon- 
Soulh. Scuth. ! mark. 

3" 28'lo"23'lT49 17 


MOON. 1 


Boston. 


N, York. 


Wash'ton 


i 


0'5'6 




p. 


H. M. 


11. M. 


H. M. 


New 


7 


41m. 


29 m. 


17 m. 


7 


19 


8 8 


3 1010 2 11 51 45 


IstQuar. 


14 


11 59 ev. 


11 47 ev. 


11 35 ev 


13 


morn 


2 42 


2 511 9 4111 54 30 


Full .... 


21 


3 50 ev. 


3 38 ev. 


3 26 ev 


19 


11 4 


2.13 


2 33j 9 20 11 57 26 


3d Quar . 


28 


2 39 ev. 


2 27 ev. 


2 15 ev. 


25 


10 31 


1 43 


2 15| 8 59,12 25 


E 


~TT 


^ 


t 


Boston ; New England, 


iNew York City ; Phila-I Washington; | 




i 




New York State, 


1 delphia, Conn., New Maryland, Virg'a, 


g 


^ 


w § 


o 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- Ken'ky, Missouri, 
diana, and Illinois. |l and California. 


I 


V 


i" 


1 


Iowa, and Oregon. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


j S>UN 1 bUN 


Moon 


H. W. , SUN 


SUN Moon II 


t 


s 


Even'g 


§ 


EISKS. 


SKTS. 




Boston. 






iNYoEK KISES. 


PETS. 


K.SES. 


1 


s* 


~YT% 


V 46 


7 10 


4 28 


1 38 


7 20 


'7~5 434 


1 37 


4 6,7 


4 39 


1 37 




s 


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8 30 


7 11 


4 28 


2 36 


8 11 


17 6 4 34 


2 35 


4 57,7 1 


4 89 


2 34 


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M 


V 10 


9 14 


7 12 


4 28 


3 33 


9 1 


:7 7 4 34 


3 31 


5 47j7 2 


4 39 


3 30 


4 


T 


n 6 


9 58 


7 13 


4 28 


4 29 


9 47 


■7 8 4 33 


4 27 


6 33.7 3 


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4 24 


5 


W 


n 2 


10 43 


7 14 


4 28 


5 25 


10 29 


!7 9J4S3 


5 22 


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4 38 


5 19 


c 


T 


6 58 


11 30 


7 15 


4 28 


sets 


11 9 


|7 10 4 33 


sets 


7 55 :7 5 


4 38 


sets 


h 


F 


6 54 


ev. 17 


7 16 


4 28 


5 21 


11 50 


7 11 4 33 


5 25 


8 36|,7 6 


4 38 


5 29 


8 


S 


6 50 


1 4 


7 17 


4 28 


6 8 


morn 


17 12 4 33 


6 12 


9 19j,7 7 


4 38 


6 16 


9 


s 


6 46 


1 52 


7 18 


4 28 


6 58 


33 


17 13 4 33 


7 2 


9 59 7 8 


4 38 


7 6 


10 


M 


6 42 


2 40 


7 19 


4 28 


7 54 


1 13 


17 14!4 33 


7 57 


10 38,7 9 


4 38 


8 1 


11 


T 


6 38 


3 27 


7 20 


4?8 


8 50 


1 52 


j7 15J4 33 


8 54 


11 19 7 10 


4 38 


8 57 


12 


W 


6 34 


4 14 


7 21 


4 28 


9 49 


2 33 


!7 16|4 33 


9 62 


morn 7 11 


4 38 


9 54 


13 


T 


6 30 


5 1 


7 22 


4 28 


10 50 


3 20 


7 16;4 33 


10 51 


11711 


4 38 


10 53 


14 


F 


6 26 


5 48 


7 23 


4 28 


11 53 


4 8 


:7 17i4 33 


11 63 


54 7 12 


4 38 


11 54 


15 


S 


6 22 


6 36 


7 24 


4 29 


morn 


5 


•7 18:4 34 


morn 


1 46! 7 13 


4 39'morn !| 


16 


s 


6 19 


7 27 


7 25 


4 29 


56 


5 55 


;7 18 4 34 


56 


2 4l!,7 13 


4 39 


55 


in 


M 


6 15 


8 20 


7 26 


4 29 


2 4 


6 58 


7 19J4 34 


2 3 


3 44; ,7 14 


4 40 


2 2 


18 


T 


6 11 


9 16 


17 26 


4 29 


3 12 


8 


'7 19j4 34 


3 10 


4 46 7 14 


4 40 


3 8 


19 


W 


6 1 


10 16 


|7 26 


4 30 


4 22 


9 3 


7 20i4 35 


4 19 


5 49 


,7 15 


4 41 


4 16 


20 


T 


6 3 


11 18 


17 27 


4 30 


5 31 


10 4 


i7 20J4 35 


5 27 


6 50 


7 15 


4 41 


5 23 


21 


F 


5 59 


morn. 


7 27 


4 31 


rises 


10 52 


;7 21 4 36 


rises 


7 38 


(7 15 


4 42'rises | 


22 


S 


5 55 


21 


7 28 


4 31 


6 3 11 53 


;7 21 4 36 


6 6 


8 39 


[7 16 


442! 6 11 1 


23 


s 


5 51 


1 23 


7 28 


4 82 


7 9:ev.48 


7 22 4 37 


7 12 


9 34 


i7 16 


4 43 7 16 1 


24 


M 


5 47 


2 21 


7 28 


4 32 


8 19 


1 36 


7 22 4 37 


8 21 


10 22 


i7 16 


4 43 8 24 


25 


T 


5 43 


3 17 


7 29 


4 33 


9 23 


2 25 


17 2214 38 


9 25 


11 11 


,7 17 


4 44| 9 26 1 


26 


W 


5 39 


4 8 


|7 29 


4 33 


10 28 


3 14 


:7 23 4 38 


10 29 


12 


;7 17 


4 44; 10 29 


27 


T 


5 35 


4 57 


17 29 


4 34 


11 28 


4 3 


7 28 4 39 


11 28 


ev.49 


i7 17 


4 45J11 29 


28 


F 


5 31 


5 43 


7 29 


4 34 


morn 


, 4 55 


7 23 4 39 


morn 


1 41 


i7 IS 


4 45imorn 


29 


S 


5 27 


6 28 


7 30 


4 35 


28 


i 5 47 


7 23 4 40 


27 


2 33ii7 18 


4 46 


27 


30 


s 


5 24 


7 12 


7 30 


4 36 


1 26 


6 39 


7 24 4 41 


1 25 


3 25|;7 18 


44- 


1 23 ! 


31 


M 


1 5 20 


7 56 


7 30 


4 37 


2 22' 7 32Ji7 24k 42 


2 20 


4 18' 7 19 


4 48 


2 18 '■ 


The following inscription appears in the 


SoMEStupW editor out West says, "If there 


churchyard of Rothesay— " Erected by .Tane 


were only a fee of fifty cents charged to see the 


, to the memory of her husband, John . 


=un rise, nine-tenths of the world, at least, 


' Ilim that cometh unto me I will in nowise 


vould be up in the morning." 


cast out.'" This text is a very kind reception 


A Heavy Draw.— If, as the poet says, " Beauty , 


promised to the next proposer. 


draws us with a single hair," then what— oh ! , 


An exquisitely dressed young gentleman, af- 


tell us what— must be the effect of a modern 
vaterfall? 


ter buying another seal to dangle about his deli- 


cate person, said to the jeweler " that he would- 


A De.spfratr Threat.— We lately heard a 


ah like to have-ah something engraved on it-ah 


desperate threat from a man who was short of 


to denote what he was." " Certainly, certainly ; 


funds. He said he would have money— if he i 


I will put a cipher on it," said the tradesman. 


had to work for it. | 



FAMILY NECESSITIES. ^i 

If people would always keep well, if disease never invaded the household, or broke in 
upon the family circle, one of the great anxieties of life would be unknown. Unfortunately, 
in our highly artificial state of existence, surrounded as we are by a thousand influences that 
sway and distort our being, every one of which, acting upon our highly nervous organization, 
may be a lever to jostle us from our position, or a potence to lay us down helpless as an infant 
of days. Under these circumstances experience teaches that disease or pain will be frequent 
visitors at our dwelling. Much we can unquestionably do to preVent these visits by proper 
rules of eating, drinking, sleeping and living; but after all is done that can well '.)e done in a 
well-regulated household, the demands of disease will be sufficient to tax our patience and call 
for the best possible provision to meet its demands. 

Much of medical practice is and must of necessity ever be with the head of the family. 
The mother notices the first symptoms of disease, and listens to the first complaints, and directs 
the first and often most important treatment. Of late years the old root and herb, and 
picra and paregoric system, has been displaced by the Specific Homeopathic, and 
in every well-regulated family the box of specifics and book of directions has become common 
as '• household words."' The result is an immense gain on the score of health and economy. In 
thousands of cases disease is airested, and what might otherwise have been a formidable 
sickness passes off as a trifling ailment. Sickness is thus prevented ; even such formidable 
diseases as the cholera, or scarlet fever, diphtheria, or others, are kept at bay by using 
the simple specific preventives, and the household reposes in a condition of security and 
exemption formerly unknown. The visits of the doctor are rare, and he comes more as a kind 
adviser in emergencies than as the minister of sickness. We can but consider the introduction 
of these HOMEOI'ATHIC SPECIFICS BY DR. HUMPHREYS, so simple, so harmless, so 
economical, and yet so efficient, as a happy omen and an auspicious consummation for our 
common humanity. 

List of Humph.reys' Specific Homeopathic Remedies. 

No. Priceof Single Boies.— Cents. 

1. — Cures Fever, Congestion, and Inflammation, 25 

2. — Cures Worm Fever, Worm Colic, 25 

S. — Cures Colic, Teething, Crying of Infants, . 25 

4. — Cures Diarrhoea, of Children or Adults, 25 

5. — Cures Dysentery, or Blo' idy Flux, t olic, 25 

6. — Cures Cholera Morbus, Nausea 25 

Fluid Asiatic Cholera, Prevention and Cure for 1 00 

Three Vials Different Remedies, Pocket Case, $3.00 ; Family do. large, $5.00. 

7. — Cures Coughs, Colds, Hoarseness, Bronchitis, 25 

8. — Cures Tootliache, Faceache, Nervous Pains, 25 

9. — Cures Headaches, Sick Headaches, Vertigo, 25 

10. — Cures Dyspepsia, Weak or Acid Stomach, 25 

11. — Cures Suppressed Menses, or Scanty, 25 

12. — Cures Leucorrhea or Whites, 25 

13. — Cures Croup, Hoarse Croupy Cough, 25 

li.— Cures Salt Rheum, Crusty Eruptions, 25 

15. — Cures Rheumatism, Pain, Lameness, 25 

IG. — Cures Fever and Ague, Interri^ittent Fever, 50 

17. — Cures Piles. Internal or External, 50 

18. — Cures Ophthalmy. Weak or Inflamed Eyes, 50 

19. — Cures Catarrh, Acute or Chronic, 50 

20. — Cures Whooping Cough, shortening it 50 

21.— Cures Asthma, Oppressed, Difficult Breathing, ,.. 50 

22. — Cures Ear Discharges, Noise in the Head, .50 

23.— Cures Scrofula, Enlarged Glands and Tonsils, 50 

24 — Cures General Debility, Physical Weakness, 50 

25. — Cures Dropsy, Fluid Accumulations, , 50 

26; — Cures Sea-Sickness, Prostration, Vertigo, 50 

27. — Cures Urinary Diseases. Gravel 50 

28. — Oures Seminal Emissions, Involuntary Discharges and Nervous Debility, . . 1 00 

29. — Cures Sore Mouth, or Canker, 50 

80. — Cures Urinary Incontinence, 60 

31. — Cures Painful Menses, Pressure, Cramp 50 

32. — Cures Sufferings at Change of Life, 1 00 

83. — Cures Epilepsy and Spiisms, Chorea 1 00 

34.— Cures Diphtheria, Ulcerated Sore Throat, 50 

Family and Traveling Cases. 

35 vials, in morocco case. Book complete, $10 fO 

23 large vials, in morocco. Book of Directions 8 00 

20 large vials, in morocco, Book of Directions C 00 

15 boxes (Nos. 1 to 15), Book of Directions, 3 f'O 

Any 6 boxes (Nos. 1 to 15). Book of Directions 1 25 

Single Boxes, with Directions as above, 25 cts., 50 cts., or $1. 
For Sale by respectable Dealers in Medicines everywhere, and sent/re« on receipt of price, by 
HUMPHREYS' SPEC. HOM. MED. CO., 562 Broadway, NEW YORK, 



CHICKERING & SONS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

This Great American Firm, Established in 1823, has manufactured 30,000 Pianos, for the 
superiority of which JbHfty-five Prize Medals have lieen awarded tliera at exhibitions in 
Ihe United Slates, being the UIGHEST PREMIUMS OVER ALL COMPETITION. They also 
received the Prize Medal at the World's Fair in London, in ISol. The names of Thalbero, 
Benedict, and D. Black, need only be referred to to show of what class the judges upon this 
occasion were composed. 

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS. ! 

From the New York Tribune, November 27, 1S65. 

The instrument upon which she (Mme. Abel) played was unquestionably the finest piano we 
have ever heard in public or private. Every tone U pure, liquid, and beautiful; clear in its 
vibrations, sweet, vocal, and melodious ; and powerful, without a particle of harshness, even where 
forced to its greatest strength. It literally sings through its whole register, which is so admirably 
graduated that not the shghtest break occurs through the entire scale. Its tone is unspeakably 
lovely, full of sentiment, and capable of every shade of artistic coloring and expression sug- 
gested by the imagination or the feeling of the composer or the player. It is the exponent of the 
greatest perfection that has yet been achieved in the manufacture of the Grand Piano. 
From the Nexo York ITerald. 

Iler efforts (Madame Abel's) during the evening were greatly assisted by one of the richest, 
broadest and most powerful-toned Grand Pianos we ever heard — the same instrument we 
understand which took the Gold Medal at the Boston Fair (October, 1SG5), and made by 
Chickeeing & Sons. 

From Watso7i^s Weekly Art Journal. 

Madame Abel performed on the new Chickbring Grand, which took the Gold Medal at the 
Pair of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanics' Association, held at Boston last month. It is 
the noblest instrument we ever heard in a concert room. Grand in power without noise; 
capable of sustaining any amoun., of forcing without losing the rich purity of its tone; clear, 
bright and beautiful throughout the entire range, every tone is a pure pearl of sound, sympa- 
thetic and vocal as the finest human voice cultivated to the highest point of perfection. It is 
an instrument that throws the famous Erards far into the shade and gives America the suprem- 
acy in the manufacture of Grand Pianos. 
From a Discourse on Pianos by Henry Ward Beecher (N. Y. Independent, Dec. 7, 1S65). 

"We never dreamed of going higher. To own a Chickering Grand seemed always like a 
dream. But dreams do come to pass sometimes ! There stands one of the noblest of all pianos 
— a Chickering Grand— in our parlor, and there is but one thing more that fortune can do for 
us, viz.: breathe upon us some night the power of playing upon it ! Had all Europe offered us a 
choice of instruments, we should still have chosen a Chickering." 

OPINIONS OF GREAT ARTISTS. 

THALBERG. 
" I consider Chickering & Sons' Pianos beyond comparison the best I have ever seen in 
America." . 

GOTTSCHALK. 
"I consider Chickering & Sons' Pianos superior to any in the world. They are unrivaled 
for their singing qualities, and for the harmonious roundness of their tone. There is a perfect 
horaogenity throughout all the registers. The upper notes are remarkable for a clearness and 
purity which I do not find in any other instrument, while the bass Is distinguished for power 
without harshness and for a magnificent sonority." 
I WEHLL 

" I believe that in every particular your Pianos are superior to any I have ever seen In this 
I country or in P^urope. I have never known so noble a tone ; it yields every expression that is 
, needed in Music, and its quality is capable of change to meet every sentiment." 
j NOTICE. — Chickering & Sons have the largest Manufactory in the World, the largest stock 

j of seasoned lumber, and the most perfect and extensive mechanical means to assist labor, and 
I being content with a reasonable profit, uavenot increased tuki" prices, in proportion to other 
I and smaller makers. Their pianos have stood the test of over forty years, and contain every 
I modern improvement of value. Every piano sold by us is fully warranted. 
] Pianos with or without the Agi-affe bridge, which we have constantly made for the past 

j twelve years. 

All who purchase a Chickering Piano are certain of a perfect instrument. 
For Illustrated Catalogues and Price List, address 

BOSTON. NKWYORK. 

1 Warerooms : No. 246 Washington St., Boston ; No. 652 Broadway, New York. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, 

December 1st, 1866. 

THE EXECUTIVE. 

ANDREW JOHNSON, of Tennessee, President of the United States Salary $25,000 

LAFAYETTE S. FOSTER, of Connecticut, President pro tempore of the Senate, 

and Acting Vice President Salary 8,000 

THE CABINET. 

■WILLIAM H. SEWARD, of New York, Secretary of State Salary $8,000 

HUGH Mcculloch, of Indiana, Secretary of the Treamry " 8,000 

EDWIN M. STANTON, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of War. \. " 8,000 

GIDEON WELLES, of Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy " 8,000 

JAMES HAKLAN, of Iowa, Secretary of the Interior " 8,000 

JAMES SPEED, of Kentucky, Attorney-General " 8,000 

WILLIAM DENNISON, of Ohio, Postmaster-General " 8,000 



THE JUDICIARY. 

SUPREME COURT OF TEE UNITED STATES. 
SALMON P. CHASE, of Ohio, Chief Justice, Salary $6,500. 



Nathan Clifford, of Maine, Associate Justice. 
Samuel Nelson, of N. T., " " 

Robert C. Grlek, of Penn., " " 

Jambs M. Watne, of Ga., ' 



David Davis, ailXMnois, Associate Justice. 
Noah H. Swatne, of Ohio, " " 

Samdel F. Miller, of Iowa, " " 

Stephen J. Field, of Cal., " " 



[Vacancy.] 

Salary of Associate Justices, $6,000. Court meets first Monday in December, at Washington. 

MINISTERS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

ENVOYS EXTBAORDINAPT AND MINISTERS PLENIPOTENTIARY. 

Country. Capital. Ministers. Salary. When opp'd 

Austria .Vienna J. Lothrop Motley, Mass $12,000 .... 1861 

Brazil Rio Janeiro James Watson Webb, N. ¥ 12,000 1861 

ChUi Santiago Hugh Judson Kilpatrick, N. J 10,000 .... 1865 

China Pekin Anson Burlingame, Mass. 12,000 .... 1861 

France Paris" John Bigelow, N. Y 17,500. . . . 1865 

Great Britaia London Charles Francis Adams, Mass 17,500 1861 

Italy Florence George P. Marsh, Yt 12,000 . . .1861 

Mexico Mexico John A. Logan, 111 13,000 .... 1865 

Peru Lima A. P. Hovey, Ind 10,000. . . . 1865 

Prussia Berlin Joseph A. Wright, Ind 12,000.. . .1865 

Russia St. Petersburg Cassius M. Clay, Ky 12,000. . . .1S62 

Spain Madrid John P. Hale, N. H. .' 12,000. . . . 1865 

JflNISTERS RESIDENT. 

Aigentine Confederation. Buenos Aj-res Robert C. Kirk, Ohio ...... ;r 7,500. . . .1863 

Belgium Brussels Henry S. Sanford, Conn. 7,500 . .1861 

Bolivia La Paz Allen A. Hall, Tenn 7,500 .... 180.3 

Costa Rica San Jose Charles N. Riotte, Texas 7,500. . . .1861 

Denmark Copenhagen Geo. H. Yeaman, Ky 7,500 1865 

Ecuador Quito Friedrich Hassaurek, Ohio 7,500 1861 

Guatemala Guatemala Fitz Henry Warren, Iowa 7,500 1865 

Hawaiian Islands Honolulu James McBride, Oregon 7,500 . . .1863 

Honduras Comayagua Thomas H. Clay, Ky .5. 7,500. . . .1803 

Japan Yedo Chauncey M. Depew, N. Y 7,500 .... 1865 

Netherlands Hague James S. Pike, Maine 7,500 . . 18<jl 

U. S. of Colombia Bogota Allan A. Burton, Ky 7,500.... 1861 

Nicaragua Nicaragua Andrew B. Dickinson, N. Y 7,500 1863 

Paraguay Asuncion Charles A. Washbume, Cal 7,500 1861 

Portugal Lisbon James E. Hars'ey, Pa 7,500. ...1861 

Rome Rome Rufus King, Wis 7,500 .... 1863 

Sweden and Norway Stockholm James H. Campbell, Pa 7,500 1 S61 

Switzerland Berne Geo. Harrington, D. C 7,500 1865 

Turkey Constantinople . . .Edward Joy Morris, Pa 7,500. . . . 1861 

Venezuela Caraccas Erastus D. Culver, N. Y 7,500. . . .1862 

COMMISSIONERS. 

Hayti Port-au-Prince Henry E. Peck, Ohio -7,500 1862 

Liberia Monrovia Abraham Hanson, Wis.. 4,000 1863 



94 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18C6. 




XXXIXtli 


CONGRESS. 




PrasT Regular Session ; cokvened Mosday, December 4, 18C5. , 




SENATE. 




LAFAYETTE S. POSTER, Nonrich, Connecticut, Prei^ldent. 




Jomi TV. FoRNET, of Pennsylvania, Clerk. 




frnlonists (in Roman), 40 ; Democrats an 
(C) Seats contested. The figures before each Se 


d Conservatives (in Italic*), 11; Vacancies, 1. 




Qator's name denote the year In which his term 




expires.] 








OHIO. 




186T James A. McDougall. . . .San Francisco. 


1867 .Tohn Sherman Mansfield. 




1869 John Conness Sacramento. 


1869 Benjamin F. Wade Jefferson 




COLORADO. 


OREGON. 




— Jerom.e B. Chaffee 


1867 James W. ^^e»mith Salem. 






1871 George H. Williams 

PENNSYLVANIA. 








1867 Lafayette S. Foster Norwich. 


1867 Edgar Cowan Greensbnrgh. 




1869 James DLson Hartford. 


1869 Cfuirles R. Brtckalew Bloomsburgh. 




DELAWARE. 


RHODE ISLAND. 




1869 George Read Riddle "Wilmington. 


1869 William Sprague Providence. 




1865 Willard Sauhhury Georgetown. 


1871 Henry B. Anthony Providence. 




ILLINOIS. 


VERMONT. 




1867 Lyman Trumbull Alton. 


18C7 Luke P. Poland St. Johnsbury. 




1871 Richard Yates Quincy. 


1869 Solomon Foot Rutland. 




INDIANA. 


WEST VIRGINIA. 




1867 Henry S. Lane Crawfordsville. 


1869 Peter G. Van Winkle Parkersburgh. 




1869 Thomas A. 2r«n(iWc*s. .Indianapolis. 


1871 Waitman T. Willey Morgantown. 




IOWA. 


WISCONSIN. 






1867 Timothy 0. Howe Green Bay. 

1869 James R. Doolittle Racine. 




1871 James W. Grimes Burlington. 




KANSAS. 






1867 Samuel C. Pomeroy. .». . . .Atchison. 


NOT YET ADMITTED. 




1871 James H. Lane Lawrence. 






KENTnCKT. 


ALABAMA. 




18R7 Garret Dams Paris. 


1867 Geo. & Houston Hunts ville. 




1871 James Guthrie Louisville. 


1871 Lewis E. Parsom Talladega. 




MAINE. 


ARKANSAS. 




1869 Lot M. Morrill Augusta. 


— E.Baxter —. 




1 1871 "Wm. Pitt Fessenden Portland. 


- William D. Snow. -^r- 




1 MASSACHUSETTS. , / 

i 18C9 Charles Sunmer Boston. ' / 


FLOBIDA. 




— -: — - 




j 1871 Henry Wilson . Natick. 


— . -^ 




1 MARYLAND. i 


GEORGLi^. 




1 1867 John A J Creswell Elkton. • 






1869 Reverdy Johnson Baltimore. 

MICHIGAN. 






LOUISIANA. 




1869 Zachariah Chandler Detroit. -f,'. 


— R. King Cutler (C) New Orleans. 

— Michael Hahn (C). New Orleans. 




1871 Jacob M. Howard Detroit. :p ■ 




1 MINNESOTA. 


MISSISSIPPI. 




1869 Alexander P^msey St. Paul. 


1867 William. Z.Sharkey.... 




1871 Daniel B Norton Mankato 


1871 J. L. Alcorn 

NORTH CAROUNA; 




MISSOURI. 




1 1867 B. Gratz Brown St. Louis; 


1869 JnhnPool ; . . 




1869 John B. Henderson Louisiana. 


1871 WilUam A. Graham .... 




NEVADA. 


SOUTH CAROLINA. 




1869 Wm. -M. Stewart 


1867 John L. Manning 




1871 James W. Nye Virginia City. 


1871 Renyamin F. Perry 




NEW HAMPSHIRE. 


TENNESSEE. 




1867 Daniel Clark Manchester. 


1869 David T. Patterson 




i 1871 Aaron H. Cragin Lebanon. 


1871 J. S. Fowler ■ 




[ NEW JERSEY. 


TEXAS. ', 




1869 William Wright Newark. 

I 1871 John r. Stockton (C) . Princeton. 


. ..... . 1 








1 NEW YORK. 






1867 Ira Harris Albany. 


1867 John C. Underwood 




1869 Edward D. Morgan New York City. 


1871 Joseph Segar ^ 





THE. TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 


25 




HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 








SCHUYLER COLFAX, of South Bend, Indiana, Speaker. 




Edwaed McPhebsok 


of Gettysburg, Penn., C/«rt. 






[UnlonistB (in Roman), 145: Democrats (In 
members of the XXX Vlllth Congress . (C) S 


Ilalics), 40. Total, l&'i. Those marked * were 




Bats contested.] 






CArFOK>nA 




MASSACHUSETTS. 




1 Donald C.McKuer 


..San Francisco. 


1 'Thomas D.Eliot 


..New Bedford. 




ITo!!l,"a»'.v...v;.;:: 


..Calaveras. 


2 'Cakes Ames 


..North Easton. 




..Chico. 


3 'Alexander H. Rice 


..Boston. 




COLOKADO 




4 'Samuel Hooper 


..Boston. 




1 Geo. M. Chilcott 


.. — — . 


5 'John B. Alley. 

6 Nathaniel P.llanks 






CONNECTICUT. 


..Waltham. 




1 'Henry C. Demine 


..Hartford. 


7 'George S. Boutwell 

8 'Johnl). Baldwin 






2 Samuel L. Warner 


..Mirtdletown. 








..New London. 


9 'William B. Washburn.. 


..Greenfield. 




4 'John H.Hubbard 


..Utchfleld. 


10 'HemyL. Dawes 


..Pittstield. 




DELAWAEE 




MICHIGAN 






1 Jo/i?i A. Nicholson 


..Dover. 


1 'Fernando C. Beaman... 


..Adrian. 




ILUNOIS. 




2 'Charles Upson 


..Coldwater. 




1 John TVentworth 


..Chicago. 


o 'John -W . Lcngyear 


..Lansing^ 




2 'John F. Farnsworth... 


..St. Charles 


4 Thomas W. 1-erry 

5 Rowland E.Trowbridge( 




8 *ElihuB. Wasbbnrne... 


. Galena. 


:)Eirm1ngham. 




4 *AbnerC. Hardin? 


..Monmouth. 


6'JohnF.Driggs 


..East Saginaw. 




6 BnrtonC. Cook 


. .Peoria. 








..Ottawa. 


1 'William Windom 


. .Winona. 




7 B. H.P. Bromwell 


..Charleston. 


2 'Ignatius Donnelly 


..Hastiugs. 




8 Shclbv M. Cullom 




MissorBi 






9 "LeviiW. Kom 


..Lewistown. 


1 John Boaan 


..St. Louis. 




10 Anthony Thornton 


.. Shelby vllle. 


2 'HenryT.Blow 


..St. Louis. 




11 Samuel S. Marshall 


..McLeansb'ro'gh 


3 ThomasE.Noell 


..Perryville. 




12 JehuBaker 


..Alton. 


4 John R. Kelso 


..Springfield. 




13 Andrew J Knykendall.. 
At large, S. W. Moulton. . . . 


..Vienna. 


5 'Joseph W. MeClurg 






.. Shelby ville. 


6 Robert T. Van Horn 


..Kansas City. 
..St. Joseph. 




7 'Benjamin F. Loan 




1 William E. Nihlack 


Vincennes. 


8 John F.Benjamin 


..Palmvra. 




2 Michael C. Kerr 


..New Albany. 


9 George W. Anderson.... 






3 RolphHill 


.Columbus. 


NEVADA. 






4 JohnH.Farquhar 

3 'George W. Julian 


.Brookville. 


1 DelosK. Ashley 


..Virginia City. 




.Centreville. 


NEW HAMPBHIBE. | 






..Indianapolis 


1 GilmanMars on... 


..Exeter. 




7 * Daniel W. Voorhies (C) . . 


.Terre Haute. 


2 'Edward H.Rollins 


..Concord. 




8 'Godlove S. Orth 


..Lafayette. 


3 'James W. Patterson 


..Hanover. 




9 *Schuvler Colfax 


.South Bend. 


NEW JEESE-S 






lU Joeephn.Defrees 


.Goshen. 


1 'JohnF. Starr 


..Camden. 




U ThomnsW. srlllwell 


.Anderson. 


2 William A. Newell 


.Allentown. 




IOWA. 




3 Charles Sitgreaves 






1 James F. -Wilson 

2 'Hiram Price 


.Fairfield. 
.Davenport. 




..Newton. 
..Hudson City. 




5 EdwmR. V. Wright 




8 'William B. AlUson 


.DubuQue. 


NEVy TOEK 






4 'Josiah B. Grinnell 


..Grinnell. 


1 Stephen Tahor 


.-Roslyn. 




5 'John A. Kasson 


.Des Moines. 


2 T evn is G. Bergen 


..New Utrecht. 




6 'Asahel W.Hubbard 


.Sioux City. 


3 James Humphrey 


.Brooklyn. 








4 Morgan Jones 






1 Sidney Clark 


.Lawrence. 


5 Nelsmi Taylor 

6 Henry J. Raymond 






KEXTTJCKT 




" 






.Padncah. 
..fiopKinsville. 




• 




2 Burweil C. Hitter 


8 'James Brooks (C) 




3 * Henry Grider 


.Bowling Green. 
.Greensbnrg. 


9 William A. DarUng 








10 * Wmiam Radford 

11 ' Charles H. Minfield 






5 Lovell H. Rousseau 


.Louisville. 


..Goshen. 






.Covington. 


12 John H. Eetchim 


.Dover. 




1 7 Gc/iroe fi. Shanklin 


.Nichoiasville. 


13 Edwin aV. Mubbell 


.Coxsackle. 




8 ' Willfam H. Randall 


. .London. 


14 Charles Goodyear 








.Mount Sterling. 


15 'John A. Gnswold 










16 Roberts. Hale 






1 John Lynch 


.Portland. 


17 'Calvin T. Hulbnrd 


.Brasher Falls. 




.Paris. 


18 'James M. Marvin 






3 'James G. Blaine 


.Augusta. 


19 Demas Hubbard, Jr 

20 Addison H. Laflln 


..Smyrna. *^ ^ ' 






.Foxcroft. 






5 'Frederick A. Pike 


.Calais. 


21 Koscoe Conkling 


.Utica. 




, MAETLAND 

1 Hh-nm McCullovnh 


..Elkton. 














-i John L. Thomas, Jr 


.Baltimore. 


24 'Theodore Jl.Pomeroy... 


.Auburn. 




3 Char" es E.Phelps 


. .Baltimore. 


25 'Daniel Morris 


.PennTan. 




4 'Francis Thomas 


..Frankville. 


26 'Giles W. Hotchkiss... . 


. .Einghaiiipton. 




5 Benjamin 0. Harris 


. .Leonardtown. 


27 Hamilton Ward 


.Belmont. 





THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



28 Eoswell Hart Eochester . 

29 Burt VanHoni Newfane. 

30 Jam es M. Humphrey : .Buffalo. 

81 Henry "Van Aemam FrankllnvlUe . 

onio; 

1 Benjamin Kegleston Cincinnati 

2 Butherford B. Hays Cincinnati . 

3 'Robert C. Schenck Davton 

4 William Lawrence Bellefontalne. 

5 "F. C. Le Bloiid Ce.llna. 

C Eeader W . Clark Batavia 

7 Samuel Shellabarger Springfield. 

8 James R. Hubbeft Bel aware. 

9 Ralph P. Buckland FfeAtOTfTv ■ 

10 'James M. Ashley Toledo. 

11 Hezekiah S. Bnndy Reed's Mills. 

12 » William E. Finck Somerset. 

13 Columbus Delano Mount Vernon 

14 Martin Wei ker Wooster. Vi> V 

15 Tobias E. Plants Poraeroy. 4^«.' 

16 John A. Bingham Cadiz, i;) <j/ 

IT 'Ephraim R. Eckley Carrollton. 

n t?"^^^ P. Spalding Cleveland. 

19 'James A. Garfield Hiram 



John H. D. Henderson Eugene City. 

PENNSYLVANIA . 

»^jmw«Z J JRandall. .. Philadelphia . 

'Charles. O'Neill '• ^ 

'Leonard Myers 

'William D. Kelley 

•M. Russell Thayer Chestnut Hill. 

*^--^^'Z'^& ^°y''V, Norristown. 

♦JohnM.Broomall Media 

*fivdenham E. Ancona Reading 

'ThaddMis Stevens Lancaster 

l^K^r grouse Potts WUe. 

l^'i^'P Joluison Easton . 

"" Charles Denison Wllkesbarre 

TTlysses Mercnr Towanda 

George F. Miller. .'. ! .' ; : : ; . .Lo^fbnri 
4£?''»'» J.GloKsbrenner. . . .York. ' 
William H Koontz (C). . . .Somerset. 

Abraham A. Barker Edenburc 

Stephen F. Wilson Wellsborough 

'Glennl W Scbofield Warren. ^ ' 

Charles Vernon Culver. . . .Franklin 
John L Dawson (C) Brownsville. 

Vames K Moorhead Pittsbni gh. 

'Thomas Williams Pittsburgh: 

George V. Lawrence Monongah'la Cy 

,„, EHODB ISLAND. 

Thomas A. Jenckes Providence. 

•Nathan F. Dixon Wpatori,r 



Nathan F. Dixon Westerly. 

^^ , TEEMONT. 

•FrederickE.Woodbridge.Vergennes 

•Justin S^ Morrill Straflord. ' 

•Portus Baiter Derby Line 



IthamarC. Sloan Janesvllle. 

^Amasa Cobb Mineral Point 

*Oharle.i A. Eldridge Fond du Lac. 

,w 'l?*'^^^^'?^,®'"^ Oshkosh . 

'Walter D. Mclndoe Warsaw. 



NOT TET ADMITTED. 

ALABAMA. 

1 C. C. Langdon 

2 George C. Freeman 

8 CuUen A . Battle 

4 Joseph ir. Taylor 

5 B. T.Pope. 

6 T.J.Jackson 



ABKAN8A8. 

1 Byers 

2 Lorenzo Gibson 

3 J. M. Johnson 

, „ „ FLOEIBA. 

1 F.McLeod 

' GEOEGIA. 

1 Solomon CoTien 

2 Fhilip Cook 

3 Sugh Buchanan 

4 E. G. Cabiness 

5 J.D. Matthews 

6 J. IT. Christy 

7 w. T. wofford ::; 

LOUISIAITA. 

1 Louis St. Martin 

2 , Jacob Barker New Orleans 

3 BobertC. Wickliffe..:. ^^^ ^"^^^^^^ 

4 JohnE. King 

5 Johns. Young ..'. 

, , „ MISSISSIPPI. 

1 A. E. Beynolds 

2 B.A.Pierson 

S Jam es T. Harrison '.. 

4 A.W.WeM 

5 E.G.Peyton .■.." 

NOBTH CAKOLINA 

1 Jesse li. Stubbs.... 

2 Charles C. Clari ;...■; 

3 Thomas C. Fuller 

4 Josiah Turner, Jr 

5 Bedford Brown '.'."..."'.' ' 

6 S.H. Walkup 

7 A. M.Jones 

SOriH CAEOLtNA. 

1 John D. Kennedy. 

2 William Aiken.. 

3 Samuel McGowan... 

4 James Farrow '. 

TENNESSEE. 

1 Nathaniel G. Taylor ^ 

3 William B Stokes Smithville. 

■! Luinuiid Cotjjier 

fi Q «'"'»'' ^- S'^mpbell Nashville . 

6 S. M. Arnell 

7 Isaac R. Hawkins 

8 John W. Leftwich Memphis. 

TEXAS. 

, -.- r- ^ „ TIEQINIA. 

1 1>. //. B. CitStiS 

2 Lucius H. Chandler Norfolk 

d B. Johnsoji Barbour Kichiuond 

4 Mobert Bidgway 

5 Beverly A. Davis.. ' "' 

- i.fl*"f '??'■#• -^--S'^a^i'.X'.Stannton. 

DELEGATES FROSI THE TERRITORIES. 

Arizona.— John N. Goodwin, (C) Prescott 
COLOEADO.-Allcn A. Bradford. l5enver 
Dakotai! --Walter A. Burleieh.Tanctoii. 
Idaho. -ii'. D. JJolbrook, Idaho City 
Montana .—^'ffOT, uel McLean . Bannock 
NEBBASKA.-Phineas W. Hitchcock, Omaha. 
JJEW Mexico.— J.Francesco Chavez, Santa Fe 
Utah.-TImj. S. Hooper. Salt Lake tity 
WASHiNQTOif.— Arthur A. Denny. 



mmcvin mnsicHl MnsitnmtntB. 



The inventive genius of the American people is ever active, never resting ; it embraces in 
its grasp the merest trifles and the mightiest conceptions, from a toy to point a lead pencil, to a 
lever to raise a pyramid. That whatever has been done can be improved on, and whatever is 
needed for the good of the human family can be produced, are American dogmas. They are 
so purely indigeoous to the soil, that all who seek asylum here find new springs of action, new 
incentives to ambition, and a broadening of the mind which has been dwarfed by the cramping 
influence of small nationaUties. 

Inventive genius has not merely been directed to the physical needs of the people ; the 
' necessities of our life have had their champions, and the intellectual luxuries, which are at once 
its solace and its ornament, have been fostered and developed to a degree that shames the 
expeiieuce of the old world. In the short space of thirty years we have become the manufac- 
turers of our own musical instruments; in this we ask nothing of Europe now , we have learned 
all she knows, and something more besides, and we have changed the course of trade which was 
from East to AVest to from West to East. 



There is scarcely a musical instrument which we do not make, and with scarcely an exception, 
I our manufacture equals, and in some cases surpasses the workmanship of European models. Our 
I Flutes already rival those of the English, while they surpass in richness of tone and elegance of 
I workmanship the finest made in Germany. Our Harps, in all points, tone, elegance, finish,aud 
mechanical appliance, are altogether unsurpassed. Our Brass Instruments, in their variety 
and excellence are fully equal to those of France, while our Guitars in all points of workman- j 
ship and in durability in this climate, are preferred to the finest specimens from Spain or Italy. 
In the manufacture of Violins we have made rapid strides towards excellence, and although very 
' far behind the great old makers whose names have a world-wide fame, we can claim a fair equality 
with most of the modern European Violins. In Reed Instruments, such as Melodeons, and 
Parlor Organs.'America has no equal in the world. These instruments were literally created 
here, their superiority is everywhere acknowledged, and we are satisfied that when some 
enlightened community shall decide to spend $60,000 or $70,000 upon the building of a great 
organ, and shall give the contract at home and not abroad, we shall have an organ equal in 
every respect to any of foreign make, and superior in some points, especially of wood which 
will stand the climate. 

The Instrument, however, in which the most important improvements have been made, is the 
Piano-forte — the instrument which is the most popular throughout the world. 

The Piano-forte, was, of course, invented somewhere, although it was more properly a 
gradual improvement from one thing to another than an invention in its present form. There 
are two claimants for the honor of creating the original instrument, and both have strong sup- 
porters. By one party it is attributed to Cristofali, a Paduan ; by the other to Schroeuer, of 
Dresden, Saxony. We need not stop to discuss the riyal claims. The date of the invention is 
said to be 1711, but the piano really rose but little above the dignity of a Harpsichord until half 
a century later, when the genius of Era.rd, followed by Plevbl, Broadwood, and Cou.ard, 
developed its resources and powers, which, until then, were undreamed of. But these great 
makers did not exhaust its powers. There was something left for America to do — some an gift 
from us to the old world, to be purchased by deep thought and laborious experiment, or won 
by the inspiration of a fortunate moment. 

This one point which has revolutionized the manufacture of piano-fortes nearly all over the 
world, and has added so greatly to the power and the capacity of the instrument, is the system 
of overitringing the bass, the principle of which was established, developed, and perfected, by 
Steinway & Sons, of New York. An instrument of this class, overstrung and with two bridges 
in the bass, was exhibited by the Steinways in 1S55, at the Crystal Palace, New York. There 
was a great competition, many of the best makers exhibiting, but the full, richly sonorous tone, 
and extraordinary power of the Steinway Piano gained, by the unanimous judgment of the 
jury, the first premium gold medal. Public opinion coincided perfectly with this verdict, and 
the reputation of the Stki.nwats was a settled fact from that day, and their business increased 
with a rapidity altogether unprecedented, rising in twelve years from the very humble begin- 
ning of one piano-forte a week, to a grand total of 12,000 pianos, grand, square, and upright, 
averaging now over 2,300 per annum. In 1S55, at the Metropolitan Fair in Washington City, 
they received two first prize medals ; in November of the same year, the first prize gold medal 
at the American Institute, New York ; in ISoti, the first prize gold medal of the Maryland Insti- 
tute at Baltimore, and the American Institute at the Crystal Palace in New York ; and in 1S57, 
the first premium gold medal of the Maryland Institute again. Altogether in ten years they 
have received no less than thirty-two first premiums in the shfpe of gold and silver medals, at 
I the various fairs and exhibitions in Cincinnati, St. Louis, Chicago, and elsewhere. 



AMERICAN MUSICAL INSTRUMEXTS. 

h„ain«« l^^rt*'f/'iu''^^?' chronicled by the press and justified by their constantly increasing 
^K T w' H«f ."''*'' ^^^ attention of the whole trade, and in a short time nearly every piano ta 
the United States was made upon the overstrung principle. 

In 1S62, at the International Exhibition of London, the Steinwat Pianos secured the 
greatest victory yet obtained by them. There were 26y pianos on exhibition, from the manu- 
lactories of nearly all the celebrated makers on the continent and in Knpland The jury 
appointed was of the liishest character, embracing such names as Sternuale Bennktt musical 
director. Professor at Cambridge; I. IS. Black, M.J).; Fktts, of Uelgium ; Eknst 1'adkr, of 
Austria; Sir *. Gokk Ousley, Professor of Music at Oxford; I. Schiedmayer, Instrument maker • 
Zollverein; the Karl of Wilton; He.nry Wildr, musical director; and others of note and 
position. The most thorough examination was made of all the instruments exhibited and the 
feTKiNWAYS were awarded a First Class Prize Medal, " For powe.ful, clear, brilliant, and sympa- 
thetic tone, and excellent workmanship as shown iu grand and square piano-fortes." 
t This was unquestionably a great triumph for the firm, and justified the expressed opinion 
on this side of the Atlantic of such artists as Mills, Mason, Uellkr, Pattison, 'Hum, Maretzbk , 
ANSCHUTZ, Eisfeld, Peasb, Goldbeck, and many others, who, in their open certificates enu- 
merate among the chief points of excellence presented by these pianos, "The greatest posbible 
depth, richness, and volume of tone, combined with a rare brilli.ncy, clearness, and perfect 
evenness throughout the entire scale, and above all, a surprising duration of sound the pure 
and sympathetic quality of which never changes under the mnst delicate or the most' nowerful 1 
touch, and who declare that they prefer them above all others for their own use, whenever 
accessible. One of the consequences of the exhibition of their pianos in London, as above 
stated, 1? the adoption of their system of manufacture by many of the European makers 
who announce as a recommendation of their own instruments, "That they now make Pianos 
upon the same plan as the celebrated Steinway & Sons, of New York." The eminent 
European artists, Alfrkd Jaell, Uans Von Bllow, and Gustave fcATTEK, also testify to the 
spendid qualities of the Steinway pianos. The foreign press, The London Times, The London 
Illmtrated JVews, The Pans Constitutionel, The Press JJu/itcale, and other papers in Great 
!^'',*'?t *'';?"<=e' Germany, and Italy, pay the highest tribute to their superior excellence, 
I while the Vienna press, considered the highest musical authority, extolled in the w armest terms 
I not only the full round tone and mechanical excellence, particulaily the overstringing of the 
bass in both grand and square pianos exemplified by the Stbinways, but in an aestlietic point of 
view the great capacity for development in their peculiar method. 

Thefirm of Steinway & Sons, consisting of father and four sons, came to America in the 
year Ib^O Air. Henry Steinway, the father, had, previous to his arrival in this country, 
successfully carried on a piano factory in Brunswick, Germany, for nearly a quarter of a 
century. With that adaptability which distinguishes true merit, before embarking in business 
for theinselves in the New Worid, the Steinways thought it prudent to become conversant with 
the business customs of the American people, and therefore did not inaugurate their house 
until 1853, when they commenced operations in their own name. From that day to the present 
their career has been one continual success. How they have risen from very small beginnings 
to a business colossal in its proportions, we have already stated. Their enterprise, energy 
broad business views, and skill, have placed them upon the topmost rung of fortune's ladder 
and they stand to-day the most successful and extensive manufacturers of piano-fortes in the 
worid. Independent of their extensive home business, the firm is now shipping instruments 
not only to every portion of the American continent, but to the capitals of Europe and the East 
thus inaugurating a new and valuable branch of export trade. ' 

The factory which they have erected at a cost of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars 
stands upon an entire block of ground, bounded by Fourth and Lexington Avenues and 
Pifty-second and Fifty-third streets. It is five stories high, and is fitted up with all the modern 
appliances for manufacture ; labor-saving machinery, miles of hot air pipes, private telegraph to 
their down-town sales-rooms— in short, all the furniture necessary to make a perfect factory 
In It are employed four hundred and fifty of -the best workmen at the highest wages. About 
1,0110 pianos are constantly in process of manufacture, including every variety of Grand 
Square, and Upright. The stock of material on hand is seldom less than half a mfllion dollars' 
in value— -a large amount of non-interest paying capital, but inevitable from the necessity of 
securing thoroughly seasoned material. 

Besides their costly factory, they have recently erected a splendid white marble five-story 
building m Povpteenth Street, between Fourth Avenue and the Academy of Music. This they 
use exclusively for sales-rooms, with separate departments for the Grands, the Squares, and the 
Uprights. The front is rich and elegant in design, and is an ornament to the city. 

The Strinways own the ground through to Fifteenth Street, the lot being one hundred feet 
wide on Fifteenth Street. On this they puri>ose to erect a National Conceit Hall and a 
Conservatory of Masic, which, carried out in the right spirit, will prove a boon to the com- 
munity at large, and will refiect honor upon their enterprise, zeal and judgment. And It 
will be a crowning evidence of their high-toned liberality, and honorable to the eountry, and 
will carry down the name of Steinway with the progress of musical art and manufacture in 
America. — A>?o York Tribune. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 



ACTS OF CONGRESS. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE PRINCIPAL ACTS PASSED AT THE SECOND SESSION OF THE 
THIRTY-EIGHTH CONGRESS. 



CuAP. I. — QuaranUne and Ilealth Laws. — 
Appropriates $20,000 for the erection of ware- 
houses at convenient places within or near the 
port of New York, for the storage of imports in 
vessels subject to quarantine. [Approved Dec. 
15, 18C4.] 

CuAP. III.— Revenue Cutters on the Lakes. 
—Appropriates .$1,000,000 for constructing, or 
purchasing and altering six steam revenue cut- 
ters for service on the Lakes. [Dec. 20, 1864.] 
I Chap. Yl.— The Grade of Vice- Admiral — 
i Establishes the grade of Yice-Admiral in the 
navy. His relative rank with officers of the 
army shall be that of Lieutenant-General in the 
army Salary, $7,000 when at sea, $0,000 when 
on shore duty, and $5,U00 when waiting orders. 
[Dec. 21, ISM.] 

Chap. XI.— Smithsonian Institution..— Re- 
peals th^ provision of law requiring two Regents 
of the Smithsonian Institution to be members of 
the National Institute. [Jan. 10, ISCo.] 

Chap. XIX.— Advance of .SanA-.— Provides 
that officers of the navy and marine corps may 
be advanced not e.xceeding thirty numbers in 
rank, for having exhibited conspicuous con- 
duct in battle or extraordinary heroism. [Jan. 

1 n, isto.] 

I Chap. XX.— Oath of Office.— Proyldes that 
no person, after the date of this act, shall be 
admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the 
I United States, or at any time after the 4th of 
' March next, shall be admitted to the bar of any 
I circuit or district court of the United fctates, or 
' of the court of claims, as an attorney or coun- 
selor, unless first taking and subscribing the 
oath prescribed in the act approved July 2, 1SG2. 
The oath shall be preserved among the files of 
the court, and any person who shall falsely take 
the oath, shall be liable to the pains and penal- 
ties of perjury. [Jan. 24, 1865.] 

Chap. XXII.— Ways and 3Ieans for the Sup- 
port of the Oovernrnenf. — Provides that in lieu 
of any bonds authorized by the act approved 
June 30, 1S64, that may remain unsold at the 
date of this act, treasury notes may be issued. 
Donds and notes are not to exceed $400,000,000. 
The notes may be disposed of for lawful money, 
or for any other treasury notes or certificates of 
indebtedness of certificates of deposit issued 
under any previous act of Congress. They shall 
be exempt from taxation. The act further pro- 
vides that five-tweniies to the amount of 
$4,000,0110 may be sold by the Secretary of the 
Treasury, but no additional legal tender notes 
are authorized hereby. [Jan. 2S, 1865.] 

Chap. XXlX.—Iietief of Friend I ;/ Indians. 
• — Authorizes and requests the President to cause 
an examination to be made in relation to the 
condition of friendly Indians of the Sioux na- 
tion, who, during the outbreak in Minnesota in 
1862, aided in saving many whites, and were. 



consequently, compelled to abandon their homes 
and property, and to make provision for their 
welfare. The sum of $7,.5O0 is appropriated for 
carrymg out the provisions of this act. [Feb. 
9, 1865.] 

Chap. XXX.— Insane A-i->/lnmin the District 
of Columbia.— Extends to civilians in the ser- 
vice of the United States in the Quartermaster's 
Department and Subsistence Department, the 
benefits of the Asylum for the Insoiie in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. [Feb. 9, 1865.] 

Chap. XXXll.—Acting Assistant Treasur- 
ers and Depositaries of the United States.— 
Provides that any assistant treasurer or deposi- 
tary, in case of sickness or unavoidable absence 
from his oflice, may authorize a clerk to act in 
his place. [Feb. 13, 1865.] 

Chap. XXX\ 11. — Mail-Steamship Service 
between the United States and China and 
Japan. — Authorizes the establishment of ocean 
mail-steamships between San Francisco and 
some port or ports in China, touching at Hono- 
lulu, and one or more ports in Japan, by means 
of a monthly line of first-class American sea- 
going steamships, to be of no less than 3,(lt(0 
tons burden each, and of suflicient number to 
perform twelve round trips per annum. The 
lowest responsible bidder to have the contract 
for a term of not more than 10 years, to com- 
mence from the day the first steamship of the 
line shall depart from San Francisco with the 
mails for China. The bids to be from citizens, 
not to call for over 5^r)ii(i,'^0 i a year, and to be 
accompanied by an oiier of sufficient securities. 
The contract to go into effect on or before Jan. 1, 
1307. The steamships to be subject to inspec- 
tion and survey by an experienced naval con- 
structor to be detailed for that pui-pose by the 
Secretary of the Navy. A mail-agent is to be 
transported on each steamer free of charge. 
Pro rata deductions are to be made for any fail- 
ure to perform the monthly trip, and fines and 
penalties may be imposed for delays and irregu- 
larities. [Feb. 17, 1&G5.] 

Chap. XLI. — Socond Assistant Secretary of 
War. — Authorizes the President to appoint a 
Second Assistant Secretary of V\'ar, salary $3,000. 
[Feb. 20, 186.5.] 

Chap. XU.ll—Ai\'enal at St. Louis.— Ue- 
peals #,n act of March 2, 1 861 , req%ii-ing the re- 
moval of the U. S. Arsenal from St. Louis. 
[Feb. 20, 1865.] 

Chap. XLV.—Indiaji Title to Lands in 
Utah. — Authorizes the President to enter into 
treaties with the Indians of Utah Territory, for 
the absolute surrender to the United States, by 
these Indians, of their possessory right to the 
agricultural and mineral lands in the said terri- 
tory. The sum of $25,0 u is appropriated for 
carrying out this act. As far as possible, agri- 
cultural implements, stock, and other useful arti- 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



cles, are to be given in payment. [Feb. 23, 1865.] 

Ch.vp. Xh\I.— Lands Taken fur Indian Re- 
servations. — Acpropriates $18,611.62 for the 
payment of the \^lue of certain lands and im- 
provements of private citizens, appropriated by 
the United States for Indian reservations in the 
Territory of Washington. [Feb. 23, 1865.] 

Chap. y.U\X\.—('oUection of Debts due the 
United States. — Provides that warrants of at- 
tachment may be issued against property of 
debtors to the Post-office Department when they 
— 1st, have participated in, aided, abetted, or 
countenanced any rebellion against the United 
States; 2d, are non-residents of the district 
where they were apppinted ; 3d, have conveyed 
away or are about to convey away their prop- 
erty from the district where the same is situ- 
ated, with intent to defraud the United States. 
[Feb. 23, 1865.] 

Chap. XLIX.— Sisters of 3Iercy in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. — Incorporates the "Sisters 
of Mercy" in the District of Columbia. Prop- 
erty heretofore given to the Sisters may become 
vested in the Corporation. The Corporation not 
to hold more than S2iJ acres of land, and not to 
hold real estate the annual income of which 
shall exceed the sum of $50,000. The schools 
and all other institutions established by the Sis- 
ters to be at all times subject to the visitation 
and inspection of the Justices of the Supreme 
Court of the District of Columbia, or the com- 
mittees of the District of Columbia in either 
House of Congress. [Feb. 23, 1365.] 

CnAP. UX.— Interference in Elections Pro- 
hibited. — Prohibits military or naval ofScers of 
the United States from interfering in elections, 
" unless it shall be necessary to repel the armed 
enemies of the United States, or to keep the 
peace at the polls." OtBcers violating this act to 
be liable to indictment as for misdemeanor in 
any court of the United States having jurisdic- 
tion in cases of misdemeanor ; and, on convic- 
tion, to pay a fine not exceeding $5,000, and 
suffer imprisonment in the penitentiary not less 
than three months, nor more than five years. 
[Feb. 25, 1S65.] 

Chap. LIII. — Medical Corps of the Ann;/. — 
Defines the rank and pay of certain medical 
directors of the army. [Feb. 25, 1865.] 

Chap. LIV. — Eastern Judicial District of 
New Ymh: — Constitutes the Counties of Kings, 
Queens, Suffolk, and Richmond a separate judi- 
cial district of the United States, to be styled 
the Eastern District of New York. The pay of 
the judge to be the same as that of the judge 
of the Southern District of New York, and the 
jurisdiction of the new district court to be con- 
current with that of the district court for the 
southern district of New Y'ork. District and 
circuit courts are to be held in Brooklyn on the 
first AVednesdJSr of every month. The judge 
of the eastern district is to hold court in the 
southern district without any additional com- 
pensation, in case of the inability of the judge 
of the latter district to do so. [Feb. 25, 1865.] 

Chap. LV. — CoUectimi District of Keic York. 
— Authorizes the assistant collector of the col- 
lection district of New York, residing at .lersey 
City, to enroll and license all vessels engaged in 
the coasting trade and fisheries owned by resi- 
dents of Hudson and Bergen Coimties, N. J. 
[Feb. 25, 1865.] 



Chap. LIX. — Circuit Courts in Virginia. — 
Provides khat the circuit courts in the District of 
Virginia, heretofore holden at Richmond, shall 
1)e held at Norfolk, on the first .Monday in .May 
and on the fourth Jlonday of November. [Feb. 
25, 1865.] 

Chap. LXIV. — Circuit and District Courts 
in J^&vada.—The State of Nevada shall consti- 
tute one judicial district, called The District of 
Nevada, and attached to the 10th Circuit. A 
District Judge, a Marshal, and a District Attor- 
ney of the United States shall be appointed for 
the district. Circuit courts shall be held in the 
city of Carson, on the first Mondays of March, 
August, and December; and district courts in 
the same city on the -first Mondays of February, 
May, and October. No possessory action be- 
tween individuals in any of the courts of the 
United States, for the recovery of any mining 
title, or for damages to any such title, shall be 
affected by the fact that the paramount title to 
the land on which such mines are, is in the 
United States, but each case shall be adjudged 
by the law of possession. [Feb. 27, 1865.] 

Chap. LXYU. —Smiiggling — Seizure of 
Smtiggled Goods. — Revises certain provisions 
of an act concerning the collection of duties on 
imports and tonnage, of March 3, 1815, accord- 
ing to which beasts of burden, carriages, Ac , 
carrying smuggled goods, may be teiaed and 
confiscated by anj' collector, naval officer, sur- 
veyor, or inspector of the customs. Buildings 
near the boundary line of the United States may 
be searched, and smuggled goods found therein, 
seized and disposed of according to law. Upon 
due conviction, smuggling may be punished by 
fine not exceeding $lo,000, or by imprisonment 
not exceeding two years, or by both such fine 
and imprisonment. [Feb. 28, 1865.] 

Chap. LXIX. — Enrollment and License of 
Vessels. — Provides that owners of vessels of the 
United t tates navigating the Western rivers and 
the waters on the northern, northeastern, and 
northwestern frontiers may procure their enroll- 
ment and license in the district in which the 
vessels ma^^ at the time be. [Feb. 2S, 18G5.] 

Chap. \jXXI.— Salem and Meverh/ Collection 
District. — Abolishes the office of naval officer 
for the District of Salem and Beverly, Mass. ; 
also abolishes the office of the !-urveyor of said 
district, to reside at Beverly. The salary of the 
Surveyor of the district is fixed at $400. [Feb. 
28, 1865.] 

Chap. LXXII. — Michigan City ILarbor Com- 
pany. — Grants to the Michigan City Harbor 
Company, of Michigan City, Ind., the privilege 
of using the foundations of the old government 
piers in that harbor for the purpose of improv- 
ing and protecting the harbor. Michigan City 
is constituted a port of entry and annexed to 
Chicago District. A Sun-eyor of the '^.ustoms, 
to reside at that port, is appointed, at^ a sal- 
ary of $850. [Feb. 28, 1 865.] 

Chap. \,XX\1. — Office of Solicitor and 
Naral Judge Advocate. — Authorizes the Presi- 
dent to appoint for service during the rebellion, 
and one year thereafter, a " Solicitor and Naval 
Judge-Advocate General," at an annual salary 
of $3,500. [March 2, 1865.] 

Chap. -LXXWl. — Six Hundred Million 
Xon'?i..-Authorizes the borrowing of $600,000,000 
on bonds or treasury notes. The bonds to be 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



payable at a period not more than forty years 
j from date of issue, or redeemable at the pleasure 
of the Government after a period of not less 
' than five years, nor more than forty years. The 
treasury notes may be made convertible into any 
bonds authorized by this act. The rate of in- 
terest on the bonds and treasury notes not to 
exceed six per cent. ■« hen payable in coin, and 
seven and three-tenths per cent, when not pay- 
able in coin. Any treasury notes or other obli- 
gations bearing interest, issued under any act 
of Congress, may, at the discretion of the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, and with the consent of 
the" holder, be converted into any description of 
bonds authorized by this act. The Secretary of 
the Treasury may issue bonds or treasury notes 
for supplies in case the owner of the claim de- 
sires to subscribe for an amount of the loan that 
will cover the requisition or any part thereof. 
All bonds and other obligations issued under 
this act, shall be exempt from taxation by or 
under state or municipal authority. The notes 
shall not be a legal tender. [March 3, ] S55.] 

Chap. hXX\Ul.-I}>ternaljReie>nie.-Amends 
many sections of the Internal Revenue Act of 
June 3rt, 1 864. [March 3, 1 865.] 

Chap". hXXIX.— Enrollment and Calling 
Out the Kation'al Forces. — Amends the several 
acts heretofore passed to provide for the enroll- 
ing and calling out the national forces. If a 
soldier, discharged for wounds received in bat- 
tle, die before receiving the bounty provided by 
the act of March 3, 1 863, the bounty due shall 
; be paid to the following persons, and in the or- 
i der following; — 1st, to the widow of the de- 
ceased ; 2d, to the children, share and share 
alike; and if there be neither widow nor chil- 
dren, in that case it shall be paid — 1st, to the 
father; 2d, if he shall not be living or shall 
have abandoned the support of his family, to 
the mother ; 8d, to the brothers and sisters. 
Persons discharged from the army of the 
United States by reason of wounds received in 
the line of duty are to receive the same bounty 
as if they had served out their full term. All 
persons of color who were enlisted and mustered 
■ into the military service of the United States in 
S-'outh Carolina, shall, from the date of their en- 
listment, recei> e the same pay and allowances 
as other volunteers in the military service. The 
bounty of $100 shall be paid to the widow and 
children of any volunteer killed in the service, 
whether he shall have enlisted for two years or 
, for a less period of time. All persons mustered 
into service shall be credited to the State and to 
the ward, township, and precinct, or other en- 
rollment sub-district « here such persons belong 
by actual residence (if such persons have an ac- 
tual residence within the United States), and 
where such persons were enrolled. Drafted per- 
sons furnishing substitutes shall be exempt from 
! military service during the time for which such 
substitutes shall be liable to draft. The penalty 
for enlisting insane persons, convicts, minors, 
persons under indictment for felony, intoxicated 
persons, deserters, minors between 16 and 18 
years, without the consent of their parents or 
guardians, or minors under the age of 16, know- 
ing them to he such, shall be punisljed no more 
i than $1,000 nor less than $300, or imprisoned 
\ not exceeding two years, and not less than three 
I months, or both. OfiBcers mustering into serv- 



ice deserters. Insane or intoxicated persons or 
minors, knowing them to be such, shall be dis- 
honorably dismissed. A person furnishing a 
substitute who is privy to the desertion of the 
substitute, shall take his place in the army. All 
persons who have deserted the military or naval 
senice, and shall not return to service or report 
themselves to a Provost Marshal, within sixty 
days after the Proclamation hereinafter men- 
tioned, shall, in addition to the other lawful 
penalties of the crime of desertion, forfeit their 
rights of citizenship or of becoming citizens ; 
and such deserters shall be forever incapable of 
holding any office of trust or profit under the 
United States, or of exercising any rights of 
citizens. And all persons who shall desert here- 
after, or who shall leave the district in which 
they are .enrolled, or the limits of the United 
States, with intent to avoid a draft duly ordered, 
shall be liable to the same penalties above men- 
tioned. And the President is required forthwith 
on the passage of this act, to issue his procla- 
mation, setting forth these provisions (see Proc- 
lamation n. 26, below). The permission given 
by a former act (!SC4, chap. 237, see Tribune 
Almanac, 1865, p. 30) is repealed. Any enrolled 
person may cause recruits to be mustered into 
service, who shall stand to his credit. Acting 
assistant surgeons, contract surgeons, and sur- 
geons and commissioners on the enrolling boards, 
shall, while in the seri-ice of the United States, 
not be liable to draft. [March 3, 1865]. 

Chap. LXXXII. — Xational Ourrenci/. — 
Amends a section of the National Currency Act, 
passed in 1864 (Statutes 1864, chap. 106, see 
Tribune Almanac, 1865, p. 25, 26). Associa- 
tions, after the transfer and delivery of bonds 
to the Treasurer, may receive from the Comp- 
troller circulating notes, in blank, equal in 
amount to ninety per centum of the current 
market value of the United States bonds so 
transferred and delivered, but not exceeding 
ninety per centum of the amount of these bonds 
at their par value, if bearing interest at a rate 
not less than five per centum. The amount of 
these circulating notes shall be furnished to each 
association, in proportion to its paid up capital, 
as follows: To each association whose capital 
shall not exceed |50O,000, 90 per centum of such 
capital ; to each association having a capital 
from $500,nf0 to $1,000,000, 80 per centum ; to 
each association having a capital from $1,0( i(i,0(;0 
to $3,000,0(_;0, 75 per centum ; to each association 
whose capital exceeds $3,000,000, 60 per cent- 
um. $150,000,000 of the entire amount of cir- 
culating notes authorized to be issued shall be 
apportioned to associations in the States, in the 
District of Columbia, and in the Territories, ac- 
cording to representative population, and the 
remainder shall be apportioned among associa- 
tions formed in the States, District of Columbia 
and in the Territories, having due regard to the 
existing banking capital, resources and business 
of such states, district and territories. [March 
8, 1865.] 

CBkT. hXXXlW.—EnUstmentu in the Di.i- 
triet of Columlria. — Makes it unlawful to offer 
as volunteers or substitutes persons charged 
with crime in the District of Columbia. Per- 
sons offending against this act shall be punished 
by a fine of not less than $250 and not more 
than $1,000, and by imprisonment for a term not 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18C6. 



less than six months nor more than one year. 
Officers or employees at the jail, demanding or 
taking fees for information respecting prisoners, 
with a view of having such person taken, offered 
or used as a volunteer or substitute In the mili- 
tary or naval service, shall, on conviction, be 
punished by a fine of not less than $25f>, nor 
more than $l,0(in, and by imprisonment for a 
term not I'ess than 3 months nor more than 1 
year. [March 8, 1SG5.] 

Chap. LXXXIV. — Pen.iionfi. — Supplements 
several previous acts relating to pensions. In- 
valid pensioners are not to draw pensions while 
receiving full salary which an able-bodied per- 
son discharging like duties to the government is 
allowed bylaw. Acting assistant or contract 
surgeons, if disabled in the field or in transitu, 
and the widows, minor children, or the depend- 
ents of acting assistant surgeons dying while per- 
forming the duty of assistant surgeons, shall be 
entitled to the same benefits of the pension laws, 
asifthesaid acting assistant or contract surgeons 
had been actuall y mustered into the service as as- 
sistant surgeons. Persons losing one footajid one 
hand shall receive $30 a month. Widows, or chil- 
dren under 16 years of age, of any officer, or any 
otlier person named in the Pension Act of July 
11, ISG^Csee^tatutes 1862, ch. 166), shall receive 
the same pension as the husband or father would 
have been entitled to had he been totally disa- 
bled, to commence from the death of the husband 
or father, and to continue to the widow during 
her widowhood, or the children until they attain 
the age of 16 years. [March 3, 1865.] 

Chap. l,XXX\.— Chief of Staff to Limten- 
ant- General. — Provides for a chief of staff to 
the Lieutenant-General commanding the armies 
of the United States, who shall have the rank, 
pay and allowances of a brigadier-general in the 
United States army. [March 3, 1865.] 

Chap. LXXXTI. — Criminal ProcecJvre, 
Grand Juries, etc. — Grand juries in district or 
circuit courts shall consist of not less than 16 
and not more than 23 persons. If less than 16 
attend, they shall be placed on the grand jury, 
and the marshal shall summon a sufficient 
number of persons to complete the jury, from 
the body of the district, and not from the by- 
standers. No indictment shall be found, nor 
shall any presentments be made without the 
concurrence of at least 12 grand jurors. From 
the persons accepted as grand jurors, the court 
shall appoint the foreman, who shall have power 
to administer oaths and affirmations to witnes- 
ses appearing before the grand jury. "\Mien the 
offence charged be treason or capital offence, the 
defendant shall be entitled to 20 and the United 
States to 5 peremptory challenges. On a trial 
for any other offence the defendant shall be en- 
titled to 10 and the United States to 2 peremp- 
tory challenges. All challenges shall be tried 
by the court without the aid of triers. Senten- 
ces for more than a year the court may order to 
be executed in any state prison or penitentiary 
within the district or State where the court is 
held, the use of which prison or penitentiary is 
allowed by the Legislature for such purposes. 
The expenses of the execution shall be paid by 
the ITnited States. Issues of fact in civil cises 
may be tried by circuit courts of the United 
States whenever the parties file a stipulation 



waiving a jury. This act shall take effect on 
June 1,1865. [March 3, 1865.] 

Chap. LXXXVII.— i>irec* Taxesinlnmirre.c- 
tionary Districts, Conmeyances, etc. — Amends 
an act of June T, 1862. (See statutes, 1862, ch. 98.) 
Tax commissioners after the sale of lauds or tene- 
ments, and after issuing a certificate of sale to 
the purchaser, may issue a writ directing the 
marshal of the district to put the purchaser in 
possession, and to make return of his proceed- 
ings within thirty days. In case of the inability 
of the marshal to execute the writ, the commis- 
sioners may appoint any fit person for the pur- 
pose. The issuing of such writ shall be sus- 
pended if the lands or tenements are occupied 
by the United States, and in this case the pur- 
chasers are to receive such rent or compen- 
sation as the Secretary of the Treasury shall 
order or direct. After the time for the re- 
demption of any purchased lands or tenements 
shall have passed, the President is required 
to cause a patent to be issued to the pur- 
chaser. A majority of the board of tax com- 
missioners shall have full authority to act. Lien 
creditors, if loyal citizens of the United States, 
or alien subjects of friendly nations, who have 
not taken part in the rebellion, may be paid from 1 
the proceeds of the sale, after the pavment of 
all claims of the United States, together with 
the costs and expenses of sale. The tax com- 
missioners shall file a transcript of their pro- 
ceedings and duplicates of all orders, resolu- 
tions, documents and papers, drafts, plates and 
maps of siu'veys, made or issued by them, with 
the Treasury Department. Copies of these or- 
ders, etc., duly certified, may be used in evi- 
dence. If the land is redeemed, the principal 
and interest of the purchase-money shall be re- 
paid to the purchaser, and the purchaser shall 
forthwith put the owner in possession ; but no 
owner shall be entitledtoredeemunlesshe shall 
swear that he has not taken part in the rebellion, 
or in any way given aid and comfort to the reb- 
els. A tenant at suifrance or at will shall not be 
allowed to redeem, nor shall a tenant for years 
be allowed to redeem,unless he satisfies the board 
that the owner of the reversionary estate has been 
loyal. Tax commissioners shall, by advertise- 
ments, give notice of sales to be made by them. 
The commissioners may apportion taxes and 
administer oaths. The fee for each certificate 
of sale, certificate of redemption, or writ deliv- 
ered, shall be $2; but the fees received by any 
commissioner, together with his salary, shall not 
exceed $4,000. The excess shall be used in pay- 
ment of clerks or other persons employed by 
such commissioner, and the balance, if any, 
paid as the proceeds of the sales. In cases "of 
lands held in severalty and sold for taxes, any 
of the owners may redeem for the piece of land 
held by him, and it shall be optional for th« pm-- 
chaser either to retain the residue of the tract pur- 
chased, after the redemption of a part, or to sur- 
render his certificate of purchase to the commis- 
sioners and receive back from them the amount of 
the purchase money with interest. [.Mar. 3, 1865.] 
Cn.tp. LXXXVIII. — (>n<m^ We-<tern und 
Union Pacific Railroads. — Allows the Central 
Pacific Railroad Company, and the AVestern Pa- 
cific Railroad Company, of California; the Union 
Pacific Railroad Company; the Union Pacific 
Railroad Company, Eastern Division ; and all 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1860. 



other companies provided for in Pacific Rail- 
road Act of July 2, 1864 (see statutes 18G4, ch. 
21C), to issue their six per centum thirty years' 
bonds upon their separate roads, and to issue 
their bonds respectively to the extent of 100 
miles in advance of a continuous completed line 
of construction. The assignment made by the 
Central Pacific Railroad Company, of California, 
to the Western Pacific Railroad Company of that 
State, of the right to construct all that portion 
of the railroad and telegraph from San Jose 
to Sacramento, Is ratified. The first 20 miles of 
the road must be completed one year from July 
1, 1865, and the entire road within fovir years 
thereafter. [J.'arch 3, 1865.] 

OH.VP. hXXXlX.—Po.itctl ?n?f.s.— Unpaid do- 
mestic letters, except letters lawfully franked 
and duly certified letters of soldiers and mari- 
ners in the service of the United States, shall be 
Bent to the dead letter office. Part-paid letters 
shall be forwarded, charged with the unpaid 
rate, to be collected on delivery. The pay for 
advertising letters is not to exceed two cents for 
each letter. The regular salary of $2,500, and a 
per diem allowance of |5 for traveling and inci- 
dental expenses, is restored for the special agent 
of the I'ost-ofEce Department in the Pacific 
States and territories. The act allows the ap- 
pointment of an additional special agent for the 
Pacific States and territories, and 2 additional 
special agents to superintend postal matters con- 
nected with the railway and mail service of the 
United States, who shall receive the same salary 
and per diem allowance. Other special agents 
1 of the Post-office Department are also allowed 
] 15 per diem for traveling, etc., expenses. The 
j postmaster-general may pay $10,000 for the pre- 
paration and publication of post-route maps. 
The pay of a head-clerk in railway post-offices 
shall not exceed $1,400, and that of other clerks 
$1,200. No steamship or other vessel departing 
from the United States for a foreign port, shall 
receive letters and packets unless regularly 
posted at the post-office of the port or enclosed 
m a stamped envelope of a denomination suffi- 
cient in amount to cover the United States post- 
age. Persons who wilfully injure, or aid in in- 
juring, letter-boxes, pillar-boxes, or other receiv- 
ing boxes, established by authority of the post- 
master-general, shall be fined not less than $100 
nor more than $1,000, or be imprisoned not less 
than one year nor more than three years, or 
both. Clerks or other persons in a post-office 
who unlawfully remove postage stamps from let- 
ters, shall, for every offence, be fined not more 
than $100, or imprisoned not more than six 
months. The yearly advertisment for proposals 
for carrying the mails, shall be published in 
from one to five newspapers of the State or ter- 
I ritory, one of which shall be printed at the seat 
of the State or territorial government. The sys- 
tem of free delivery shall be established in every 
place containing a population of 50,000, and at 
such other places as the postmaster-general shall 
direct. The postage on drop-letters, in places 
where free delivery is not established, shall be 
one cent. Obscene books and publications shall 
not be admitted into mails, and persons guilty 
I of depositing or causing to be deposited such 
publications in a post-oilice, shall for every of- 
fence be fined not more than $500, or imprisoned 
not more than one year, or both. [JIar. 3, 1865.] 



Chap. XC.—-Tre€clmen and Refugees. — Es- 
tablishes a bureau of freedmen, refugees, and 
abandoned lands, under the management of a 
commissioner, whose salary shall be $3,000, and 
of such a number of clerks as may be assigned 
him by the Secretary of War. The commission- 
er shall give a bond in the sum of $50,000, and 
the chief clerk a bond in the sum of $10,000. 
The Secretary of War may direct issues of pro- 
visions, clothing, and fuel for refugees and freed- 
vaen. An assistant commissioner may be ap- 
pointed for each of the States declared to be in 
insurrection, not exceeding ten in number. He 
shall receive a salaiy of $2,500, and give a bond 
in the sum of $20,000. Military officers may be 
assigned to this duty. The commissioner shall 
make an annual report to the President, and the 
assistant commissioners a quarterly report to the 
commissioner. Abandoned lands in insurrec- 
tionary States may be set apart for refugees and 
freedmen. But not more than 40 acres of land 
shall be assigned to every male citizen, whether 
refugee or freedman. The occupant of the land 
shall be protected in its use and enjoyment for 
three years, at a rent not exceeding six per 
centum upon the value of the land, as ap- 
praised in 1860, or, if no such appraisement can 
be found, upon the estimated value in that 
vear, to be ascertained as the commissioner may 
prescribe. [Slarch 8, 1865.] 

Chap. XCI. — yational Military and J\'rt- 
ral Aiiylum. — Incorporates a national military I 
and naval asylum in the District of Columbia, j 
for the relief of the totally disabled officers, sol- 
diers and seamen of the volunteer forces of the 
United States. The corporation shall consist of 
100 members, who have power to fill all vacan- 
cies. Ulysses S. Grant, David J. Farragut, 
Hannibal Hamlin, Andrew Johnson, Salmon P. 
Chase, Edwin M. Stanton, Gideon ^Velles, John 
A. Dix, are among the first corporators. The 
business of the corporation shall be managed by 
a board of twelve directors, seven of whom shall 
form a quorum. The directors ma3' procure a 
site for a military asylum and erect the neces- 
sary buildings. The act appropriates for the 
establishment and support of the asylum. All I 
stoppages or fines adjudged against volunteer 
officers, soldiers, or seamen, over the amount 
necessary for the reimbursement of the Govern- 
ment or of individuals, all forfeitures on ac- 
count of desertion from the \olunteer serv- 
ice, and all moneys due to the deceased offi- 
cers, soldiers, or seamen, that may be un- 
claimed for three years, to be repaid r.pon 
the demand of the heirs or legal representatives. 
No selection of site or adoption of any plan of 
building shall be made until $500,000 shall have 
been subscribed or donated and paid into the 
treasury of the corporation. The directors shall 
make an annual report. The inmates shall be 
subject to the rules and articles of war. [March 
3, 1365.] 

Chap. XCII. — Freedman^s Sariiigs and 
Trust Company. — Incorporates the Freedman's 
Savings and Trust Company, of the city of 
Washington, D. C. The general business and 
object of this corporation shall be to receive on 
deposit, money that may ba offered therefor by, 
or on behalf of, freedmen or their descendants, 
and to invest the same in the stocks, bonds, 
treasury notes, and other securities of the 



u 



THB TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S6C. 



United States. It shall be the duty of the cor- 
poration, in the case of the death of any de- 
positor to make diligent efforts to ascertain and 
discover whether the deceased depositor has 
left a husband, wife, or children. If any de- 
positor be not heard from within five years from 
the date of his last deposit, the trustees shall ad- 
vertise the same in some papers of general cir- 
culation in the State where the principal office 
of the company is established; and also in the 
State where the depositor was last heard from. 
Deposits not called for within two years there- 
after by the depositor, nor by a husband, wife, 
or child of the depositor, pay be held and in- 
vested by the corporation as a special trust fund, 
to he applied to the education of the freedmen 
and their descendants. The trustees may allow 
to depositors to the amount of $500 or upwards, 
one per centum less than the amount allowed 
others. If there is an excess of profits over 
liabilities, amounting to ten per centum, the ex- 
cess shall be invested for the security of deposi- 
tors ; any surplus over and above such ten per 
cent., shall be divided ratably among the de- 
positors. The trustees of the corporation may, 
a§* their own discretion, repay deposits made by 
minors or married women on the own receipts of 
such minors or married women. The trustees, 
except the president and vice-president, shall 
receive no pay. The president and vice-presi- 
dent, the subordinate officers and agents of the 
corporation shall give security. [March 3, 1865.] 
Chap. XCV.—Opinioii-i of the Altorveys 
C^eHera/.— Appropriates $7,000 for the publica- 
tion of the Opinions of the Attorneys General 
of the United States. [March 3, 1865.] 

Chap. yiCVl.—DisquaUjication of Color.— 
Provides that after the passage of this act no 
person, by reason of color, shall be disqualified 
from employment in carrj'ing the mails, and re- 
peals all acts establishing such disqualification, 
especially § 7 of chap. 64 of the statutes of 
1825. [March 3, 1865.] ^ ,„. 

Chap. C— Coinage of Tliree-Cent Pieces:.— 
Authorizes the coinage of three-cent pieces, 
which shall be legal tender, in any payment, to 
the amount of CO cents. Hereafter no fractional 
note shall be issued of a less denomination than 
five cents. Knowingly making or passing any 
coin, card, token, or device for coin authorized 
by this act, shall be punished by a fine not ex- 
ceeding $1,000, and by imprisonment not ex- 
ceeding five years. The director of the mint 
mayplace the motto, "In God we trust," upon 
coin hereafter issued. "One cent" and "two 
cent" coins shall be legal tender only for four 
cents. [March 3, 1865.] 

Chap. Cll.— Land-Grant to M%clngan.— 
Grants land to the State of Michigan, to aid in 
building a harbor and ship-canal at Portage 
Lake, Kewenaw Point, Lake Superior. The 
lands granted shall be at the disposal of the 
State Government. The canal shall be a public 
highway, free from toll or charge upon United 
States vessels. The route of the canal shall be 
established before the lands are disposed of. If 
the harbor and canal shall not be completed in 
two years, the land shall revert to the United 
Stat«8. WTien the State shall be fully reim- 
bursed for all advances, such tolls only shall 
be allowed as shall pay the expenses of the 
canal. [JIarch 3, 1865.] 



Chap. Q\'\\.—Conl /Ajf-^/.v.— Grants to citi- 
zens actually engaged in coal-mining on public 
lands, the right to enter 160 acres at $20 an acre. 
[March 3, 1865.] 

Chap. CXJ.-VenflcationofTnroices.—CoD- 
sular officers, before certifying invoices, under 
the provision of the 1st section of the act of 
March 3, 1863 (see statutes of 1S63, ch. 76), may : 
require satisfactory proof of their correctness. ' 
[March 3, 18&5.] i 

Chap. CXII. —/*fl/e«f-'!.— Inventors or as- i 
signees who failed to pay the final fee for the 
issue of a patent, in accordance with an act ap- 
proved March 3, ISfiS, may apply for the'patent 
within two years after the date of the allow- 
ance of the original application ; but per- 
sons who have manufactured or used the article 
for which the patent was ordered to issue, shall 
not be liable to damages. [March 3, 18C5.] 

Chap. CX\U.—.^fac/.■erel Fif'fieriex.—'The 
first section of an act of June 19, 1813, relating 
to the cod fishery, shall extend to mackerel 
fishery. [March 3, 1865.] 

CuAP. CXVIII.— ro/(»Y(f rnion Benevolent 
Association. — Incorporates the Colored Union 
Benevolent Association, of Washington City, 
D. C. [March 3, 1865.] 

Chap. CXXT.—Jureji He Ofenciers—Jnvenile 
offenders against the laws of the United States, 
being under the age of 16 years, and sentenced 
to imprisonment, shall be confined in some house 
of refuge, to be designated by the Secretary of 
the Interior. The Secretary of the Interior shall 
contract with the managers of the houses of 
refuge, for the imprisonment, subsistence, and 
proper employment of all juvenile offenders, 
and to give the courts of the United States and 
of the District of Columbia, notice of the places 
so provided for, and the confinement of a ju- 
venile offender shall take place in the house of 
refuge nearest to the place of conviction. [March 
3, 1865.] 

Chap. CXXIV.— Pay of mdshipmen.—SUA- 
shipmen, while on sea service, shall be paid at 
the rate of $800 per annum. Acting Masters' 
Mates shall be styled Mates, and the Secretarj; 
of the Navy may increase their pay to $60 per 
month. No person appointed or rated an officer 
or clerk in the navy shall receive any bounty 
while holding an appointment. Acting Passed 
Assistant Surgeons and Acting Surgeons, may 
be appointed, who shall receive the compensa- 
tion of their respective grades. [March 3, 1865.] 

Chap. CXXVl.-Cojji/rir/hf'ifor Photographs 
—Free Cop>/ of every Publication for the 
Xi6mn/o/"CoJi(7r«.s.<!.— Photographs and their 
negatives may be copyrighted, and enjoy the 
benefits of the sc\eral acts concerning copyright 
in the same manner, to the same extent, and 
upon the same conditions as prints and engrav- 
ings The author or proprietor of any copy- 
righted book, pamphlet, map, chart, musical 
composition, print, engraving, or photograph, 
shall transmit a copy, free of expense, to the 
library of Congress. If this provision is not 
complied with, the Librarian of Congress shall 
make demand of a copy, in xvriting; and, in de- 
fault of the delivery of a copy within one month 
after this demand, the copyright shall be for- 
feited. [March 3, 1666.] 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR-ISGC. 



PUBLIC RESOLUTIONS. 

No. 3. — T/ian/c.i to Captain Winslow^ — Ten- 
ders the thanks of Congress to Captain John A. 
Winslow and the officers and men under hia 
command on board the U. S. Steamer Kearsarge, 
for their gallantry in the conflict with the pirati- 
cal craft the Alabama. [Ap'd Dec. 20, 1864] 

No. 4. — Thanks to Lieutenant Ciishing. — 
Tenders the thanks of Congress to Lieutenant 
Vim. B. Gushing and the officers and men who 
assisted him in destroying the rebel steamer 
Albemarle. [Dec. 20, 1S&4.] 

No. 5. — Tliaaksto General Sherman. — Ten- 
ders the thanks of the people, and of Congress, 
to Major-General William T. Sherman, and the 
officers and soldiers of his command, for their 
gallant conduct in their brilliant movement 
through Georgia. [Jan. 10, 1865.] 

No. 6. — Revijrrocity Treaty. — Provides for 
the Termination of the Reciprocity Treaty of 
June 5, 18&4, between the United States and 
Great Britain. [Jan. 18, 1865.] 

No. l.—Thanl-.'ito General 7«rry.— Presents 
the thanks of Congress to Brevet Major-General 
Alfred H. Terry, and the officers and men under 
his command, for their gallantry and good con- 
duct in the capture of Fort Fisher. [Jan. 24, 
1865.] 

No. S.— Thanks to Admiral Porter.— Teu- 
ders the thanks of Congress to Rear-Admiral 
Da\id D. Porter and the officers and men under 
his command, for their galjfintry and good con- 
duct in the capture of Fort Fisher. [Jan. 24, 
1865.] 

No. 9. — 2ferc7ianfs' Exchange, Keio Tork.— 
Authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to 
give the necessary notice stipulated pending the 
intention of the United States to purchase the 
building known -as Merchants' Exchange, New 
York City, now used for custom-house purposes. 
[Jan. 25, 1865.] 

No. 10. — Mineral Z«nd's\— Reserves exclu- 
sively for the United States, mineral lands from 
the operations of all acts passed at the first ses- 
sion of the 3Sth Congress, granting lands or ex- 
tending the time of former grants. [Jan. 30, 
1865.] 

No. 11. — Amendynent of the Con.ititi/tion.— 
Proposes the following article to the legislatures 
of the several States, as an amendment to the 
Constitution of the United States, which, when 
ratified by three-fourths of said legislatures, 
shall be valid as a part of the said Constitution : 
ARTICLE XIIL 

Section 1. Neither Slavery nor involuntary 
sek71tude, excspt as a pinishjient for crilui: 
whereof the party shall have deen dply con- 
victed, shall exist within the united states, 
or any place subject durlno their jcpjsdiction. 

Sec. 2. Congress shall have power to en- 
force THIS article by APPROPRIATE LEGISLATION. 

[Feb. 1, 1SG5.] 

No. 12. — Electoral College. — Declares that, 
whereas the inhabitants and local authorities of 
the States of Virginia, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississip- 
pi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, and Tennessee, 
rebelled against the government of the United 
States, and were in such a condition on Nov. 
8, 1861, that no valid election for presidential 
electors was held in them, therefore the States 
mentioned are not entitled to representation in 



the electoral college for the choice of President 
and Vice-President of the United States, for the 
term of office commencing on March 4, 1865, and 
no electoral votes shall be received and counted 
from said States. [Feb. 8, 1S05.] ■ 

No.l3. — Naval forceii on the Lakes. — Adopts 
and ratifies the notice given by the President of 
the United States on Nov. 23, 1864, to the gov- 
ernment of Great Britain and Ireland to termi- 
nate the treaty of 1817, regulating the naval 
force upon the lakes. [Feb. 9, 1865.] 

No. U.— Thanks to General Sheridan.— 
Tenders the thanks of Congress to Major-Gen- 
eral Philip H. Sheridan and the officers and 
men under his command, for gallantry, military 
skill and courage in the brilliant series of victo- 
ries in the valley of the Shenandoah, and espe- 
cially for their services at Cedar Run, on Oct. 
19,1864. [Feb. 9, 1865.] 

No. 15. — Congressional Direcfory.—Vrov'iCm 
for the compilation of a Congressional Directory 
at each session ; the first edition for each session 
to be ready for distribution within one week af- 
ter the commencement of the session. [Feb. 
14, 1865.] 

No. 16. — Smith.';onian In.'iitution. — Appoints 
Gen. Richard Delafield a Regent of the Smith- 
sonian Institution, in the place of Joseph G. 
Totten, deceased. [Feb. 14, 1865.] 

No. 10.— Support of Recaptured Africans. 
— Authorizes and directs the Secretary of the 
Interior to adjust and settle the accounts of the 
American Colonization Society, for the support 
of recaptured Africans In Liberia. [Feb. 23, 
1865.] 

No.23.—Di.<strihutionqfEooks and Docu- 
ments. — Provides that the undistributed portion 
of the books and documents heretofore printed 
or purchased for its use by order of either House 
of Congress, previous to the XXXVIIth Con- 
gress, be distributed, in parcels equal in value 
and importance, to members of the present 
(XXXVIII) Congress. [Feb. 28, 1S65.] 

No. 24. — -Army Lieginter. — .\uthorizes and re- 
quires the Secretary of War to cause a full Army 
Register to be published, copies of wliich may 
be sold at one dollar per volume. [JIarch 3, 
1865.] 

No. 25. — Picture for the fapitol. — Author- 
izes a contract with Wm. 11. Powell, Ohio, for a 
picture illustrative of some naval victory for the 
capitol, the entire expense of the picture not to 
exceed $25,000. [March 2, 18G5.] 

No. 26. — Disabled and DUcharged Soldiers. 
— Declares that in appointments to civil offices 
preference should be given to disabled and dis- 
charged officers, and recommends to bankers, 
merchants, manufacturers, mechanics, farmers, 
and persons engaged in industrial pursuits, to 
give the preference to disabled and discharged 
soldiers for appointments to remunerative situa- 
tions and employments. [.\IarclP3, 1865.] 

No. ^.— Thanks to General Thomas.— ten- 
ders the thanks of Congress to Major-General 
Geo. H.Thomas and the array under his com- 
mand, for their skill and courage in defeating 
the rebel army under General Hood. [March 3, 
1865.] 1 

No. 29. — Enlistments encouraged . — Provides, | 
for the purpose of encouraging enlistments and 
promoting the efficiency of the military and na- 
val forces of the United States, that the wife and 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



children of persons enlisted into the military 
I and naval service shall be free. [M'ch 3, 1865.] 
i No. 30. — Inquiries concerning Indian 
j Triben. — Directs the appointment of a joint 
I committee, consisting of three members of the 
I Senate and four members of the House, to in- 
j quire into the present condition of the Indian 
t tribes, and especially into the manner in which 
they are treated by the civil and military au- 
thorities of the United States, and to report at 
' the next session of Congress such legislation as 
may be necessary for tl.e better administration 
of Indian affairs. [March 3, 1865.] 



PROCLAMATIONS. 

August 18, 1864. — Proclaims Newport, Ver" 
mont, a port entitled to all privileges in regard 
to exportation of merchandise in bond to the 
British provinces adjoining the United States. 

Oct. 20, 1861— Appoints the last Thursday of 
November a day of Thanksgiving and Praise. 

Oct. 31, 1864.— Declares Nevada admitted into 
the Union. 

Nov. 19, 1804. — Permits commercial inter- 
course with Norfola, Fernandina, and Pensa- 
cola. 

Dec. 10, 1864.— Calls for three hundred thou- 
sand ^•olunteers to serve for one, two or three 
years. 

Jan. 10, 1865.— Proclaims St. Albans, Vermont, 
a port entitled to all privileges in regard to e.\- 
portation of merchandise in bond to the British 
North American provinces adjoining the United 
States. 

Feb. 17, 1805. — Convenes an E.\traordinary 
Session of the Senate on March 4th, 1865. 

March 11, 1865.— Orders all deserters to re- 
turn to their former posts, and notifies them 
that all deserters who shall, within sixty days 
from the date of this Proclamation, viz., on or 
before the tenth day of May, 1865, return to 
service, or report themselves to a Provost Mar- 
shal, shall be pardoned, on condition that they 
return to their regiments and companies, or to 
such other organizations as they may be as- 
signed to, and serve the remainder of their orig- 
inal terms of enlistment, and in addition thereto 
a period equal to the time lost by desertion. 

March 17, 1865. — Directs the arrest of those 
who furnish arms and munitions of war to hos- 
tile Indians. 

April 11, 1805. — Declares closed a large num- 
1k r of ports in the btates of A'irginia, North and 
South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mis- 
sissippi, Louisiana, and Texas. Among those 
enumerated are Richmond and Petersburgh, Va. ; 
Newbern, and Wilmington, N. C. ; Charleston, 
S. C. ; Savannah, Ga. ; and Yicksburgh, Miss. 

April 11, 1865. — Gives notice that our vessels 
of war must be no longer harassed in foreign 
ports by the restriction to which they have been 
subjected for the past few years, but that they 
' must have the same rights and hospitalities ac- 
corded to them that are extended to foreign 
men-of-war in the ports of the United States. 
Cruisers of every nation shall receive hereafter 
the same treatment in American ports that our 
vessels receive in theirs. 

April 11, 1865— Jlodifies the previous one, of 
the same date, closing Southern ports, by except- 
ing of those named the port of Key West, Florida, 



which is declared open to foreign and domestic 
commerce. 

April 25, 1865.— Appoints May 25th as a day 
of Humiliation, Fasting, and Prayer, in consid- 
eration of the great national affliction in the 
assassination of President Lincoln. 

April 29, 1865.— Modifies tiie preceding pro- 
clamation by appointing June 1st as a day of 
Humiliation instead of Jlav 25th. 

April 29, 1805.— Discontinues all restrictions 
upon internal, domestic, and coastwise commer- 
cial intercourse in such parts of Tennessee, Vir- 
ginia, North Carolinaj South Carolina, Georgia, 
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and so much of 
Louisiana as lies east of the Mississippi river, as 
shall be embraced within the lines of national 
military occupation ; excepting only such re- 
strictions as are Imposed by acts of Congress, 
and articles contraband of war. 

May 2, 1805.— Offers a reward of .$100,000 for 
the arrest of Jefferson Davis, $25,000 for the ar- 
rest of Clement C. Clay. $25,000 for the arrest of 
Jacob Thompson, $25,000 for the arrest of Ceorpe 
N. Saunders, $25,000 for the arrest of Beverly 
Tucker, .$10,000 for the arrest of William C. 
Cleary, as being accomplices in the murder of 
President Lincoln and the attempted assassin- 
ation of the Hon. W. H. Seward. 

May 0, 1805.— Executive order for the re- 
estabiishment of the national authority over 
Virginia, declaring null and void all acts and 
proceedings imder the late rebel rule, and re- 
cognizing Francis H. Peirpont as the legal Ex- 
ecutive of the State. 

May 10, 1865. — Enjoins upon all military, na- 
val, and civil oflncers of the Government, in 
consideration of the fact that the rebellion is 
ended, additional vigilance in efforts to capture 
the remaining rebel cruisers afloat. If, after the 
proclamation shall become Irtiown in foreign 
ports, these cruisers continue to receive hospi- 
tality there, proper retaliatory measures will 
be resorted to against the ships of these nations 
which extend such hospitality to the piratical 
vessels. 

May 22, 1865.— Declares all ports of the 
United States, with the exception of four ports 
in Texas, namely Galveston, La Salle, Brazos de 
Santiago (Point Isabel), and Brownsville, open 
to foreign trade and commerce after July 1st, 
1865. It disallows belligerent rights and priv- 
ileges to all persons trading in any ports of the 
United States in violation of the laws thereof, 
and gives notice that from the date of this pro- 
clamation, all such offenders will be dealt with 
as pirates. It also removes all restrictions upon 
trade in the territory east of the Mississippi, save 
those relating to contraband of war, to the reser- 
vation of the rights of the United States to prop- 
erty purchased in the territory of an enemy, 
and to 25 per cent, upon purchases of cotton. 

May 29, 1865.— 77«t Amneaty Proclamation. 
— Grants to all persons who have, directly or in- 
directly, participated in the existing rebellion, 
except as hereinafter excepted, amnesty and 
pardon, with restoration of all rights of prop- 
erty, except as to slaves, and except in cases 
where legal proceedings, under the laws of the 1 
United States providing for the confiscation of 
property of persons engaged In rebellion, have 
been instituted; but upon the condition that 
every such person shall take and subscribe the 



THE TRIBUTE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



following oath (or aflBrmation), and which oath 
shall be registered for permanent preservation, 
to wit : 

" I, , do solemnly swear (or affirm), 

in presence of Almighty God, that I will hence- 
forth faithfully support, protect, and defend the 
Constitution of the United States, and the unicn 
of the States thereunder ; and that I will, in 
like manner, abide by, and faithfully support 
all laws and proclamations which have been 
made during the existing rebellion with reference 
to the emancipation of slaves. So help me 
God." 

The following classes of persons are excepted 
from the benefits of this proclamation : 1st, all 
who are or shall have been pretended tivil or 
diplomatic officers or otherwise domestic or 
foreign agents of the pretended Confederate 
government; 2d, all who left judicial stations 
under the United States to aid the rebellion ; 
3d, all who shall have been militarj- or naval 
officers of said pretended Confederate govern- 
ment above the rank of colonel in the army cr 
lieutenant in the navy ; 4th, all who left seats 
in the Congress of the United States to aid the 
rebellion ; 5th, all who resigned or tendered 
resignations of their co mm issions in the army 
or navy of the United States to evade duty in 
resisting the rebellion ; 6th, all who have en- 
gaged in any way in treating otherwise than 
lawfully as prisoners of war persons found In 
the United States service, as officers, soldiers, 
seamen, or in other capacities ; 7th, all persons 
who have been, or are absentees from the United 
States for the purpose of aiding the rebellion ; 
8th, all military and naval officers in the rebel 
service, who were educated by the government 
in the Military Academy at West Point or the 
United States Naval Academy; 9th, all persons 
who held the pretended offices of governors of 
States in insurrection against the United States ; 
10th, all persons who left their homes within the 
jurisdiction and protection of the United States, 
and passed beyond the Federal militarj- lines into 
the pretended Confederate States for the pur- 
pose of aiding the rebellion; 11th, all persons 
who have been engaged in the destruction of 
the commerce of the United States upon the 
high seas, and all persons who have made raids 
into the United St-ates from Canada, or been en- 
gaged in destroying the commerce of the United 
States upon the lakes and rivers that separate 
the British Provinces from the United States; 
12th, all persons who, at the time when they 
seek to obtain the benefits hereof by taking the 
oath herein prescribed, are in military, naval, 
or civil confinement, or custody, or under bonds 
of the civil, military, or naval authorities, or 
agents of the United States, as prisoners of war, 
or persons detained for offences of any kind, 
either before or after conviction ; 13th, all per- 
sons who have voluntarily participated in said 
rebellion, and the estimated value of whose tax- 
able property is over twenty thousand dollars ; t 
14th, all persons who have taken the oath of 
amnesty as prescribed in the President's proc- j 
lamation of December 8th, A. D. 1&G3, or an \ 
oath of allegiance to the Government of the 
United States since the date of said proclama- 
tion, and who have not thenceforward kept and 
maintained the same inviolate. 



I Any person belonging to the excepted classes 
may make special application to the President 
for pardon. 

May 29, 1865.— Provides for the reorganization 
of constitutional government in North Carolina, 
and appoints V.m. II. Holden Provisional Gover- 
nor of the State. No person shall be qualified 
as elector in any election for a State convention 
or eligible as a member of the convention, un- 
less he shall have previously taken and sub- 
scribed the cath of amnesty, as set forth in the 
President's proclamation of May £9, and is a 
voter qualified by the constitution and laws of 
North Carolina, in force immediately before 
May 20, 1S61, the date of the so-called ordin- 
ance of secession. The military commander of 
the department is directed to assist the Pro- 
visional Governor in carrying into effect this 
proclamation, and the secretaries of the depart- 
I mentsto put the laws of the United States in 
force within the State of North Carolina. 

June 13, 1S05.— Removes all restrictions on 
trade east of the Mississippi, except the following 
articles contraband of war: arms, fimmunition, 
I all articles from which ammunition is made, and 
gray uniforms and cloth. It also declares in- 
surrection suppressed in Tennessee, and re- 
moves all disabilities in that State consequent 
upon any proclamations issued by virtue of sec. 
5 of the act of July 13, ItOl, enfitled "An act 
further to provide for the collection of duties on 
imports, and for other purposes." 

June 13, 1865. — Provides for the reorganiza- 
tion of constitutional government in Mississippi. 
A\ illiam L. Sharkey is appointed Pro\isional 
Governor. (This, and the subsequent procla- 
mations concerning the reorganization of the 
other seceded States, is entirely similar to that 
j of Jlay 20, concerning North Carolina.) 
I June 17, 1SG5. — Appoints James Johnson 
j Provisional Governor of Georgia. 

June 17, 1865. — Appoints Andrew J. Hamilton 
! Provisional Governor of Texas. 
I June 21, 1865.— Appoints Lewis E. Parsons 
; Provisional Governor of Alabama. 

June 23, 1865 — Rescinds the blockade as to 
j all ports of theUnited States, including that of 

Galveston. 
j June 24, 1865. — Removes all restrictions on 
j trade west of the Mississippi Paver, except only 
those relating to property purchased by the 
I agents or captured by or surrendered to the 
forces of the United States, or to the transporta- 
tion of arms, ammimition, and articles from 
which ammunition is made; gray uniforms 
and gray cloth. (See Proclamation of April 
29, 1865 ; June 13, 1865 ; and June 23, 1865.) 

June 30, 1865. — Appoints Benjamin F. Perry 
Provisional Governor of South Carolina. 

July 13, 1865.— Appoints WUliam Man-in Pro- 
visional Governor of Florida. 

August 29, 1865. — Orders that on and after 
September 1, 1865, all restrictions on trade be 
removed. 

Oct. 12, 1865.— Martial law shall be no longer 
in force in Kentucky. 

Oct. 28, 1865.— Sets apart first Thursday in De- 
cember for Thanksgiving for the end of the war. 
Dec. 1, 1865.— Restores the Habeas Corpus 
Writ, except as to the late rebel States, Kentucky, 
District of Columbia, New Mexico, and Arizona. 



TIIE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



THE SLAVEHOLDERS' REBELLION. 

BELEF RECORD OF EVENTS— ConYmwed /row Tribune Almanac for 1SC5. 



1864— Dec. 2— Sherman reaches MiUen 

Breckeniidge Issues an order to husband arms, 
etc., and to glean lead from battle fields. 

Dec. 3.— Sherman attacked by 'VVlieeler near 
HaynesborougL, Ga. 

Dec. 6.— Capture of Pocotaligo Bridge, S. C. 

Dec. 7.— Southward movement ol SOJUOO men 
under Warren toward Hatcher's Kun Rous- 
seau ronts Forrest near Murfreesboro', cap- 
turing 207 prisoners and 14 cannon. 

Dec. 9.— Gen. Warren reaches Belifleld Sta- 
tion, on the Meherrin River, 40 miles from Pe- 
tersburg, and destroys the rebel works on the 

north side of the river, and the depot 4,000 

rebels, vmder Gen. Lyon, cross the Cumberland 

River, 20 miles above Fort Donelson Recon- 

noissance of Gen. Miles to Hstcher's Run, on 
the right of the rebel forces defending Peters- 
burg. He captures the rebel worl s and holds 
them during the night Direct communica- 
tion with Sherman re-established. His army in 

the vicinity of Savannah A reconnoitering 

expedition, under Col. Frencle, leaves Ply- 
mouth, N.C. 

Dec 10.— Gen. Wnrren commences starting 
homeward, and in the evening reaches bussex 
Court House. Destroyed, during the trip, over 
20 miles of the Weldou Railroad, all the sta- 
tions and depots along the line of march, nu- 
merous mills, barns, and dwellings. Entire 
loss in the expedition about 40 killed and 
wounded and a few missing. ..Sherman reaches 

Bloomingdale Gen. Miles returns to his 

camp. Ihe rebels attack him but are repulsed 
The gunboat Otsego sunk by a rebel torpe- 
do in the Roanoke River. 

Dec. 12.— Skii-mishing between the national 
and rebel forces before Nashville. The rebels 
fall back to their main line. . . .Expedition un- 
der Gen. Burbridge starts from Bean's Station, 
East Tennessee. . . .Fight at Kingston, East Ten- 
nessee. The rebel Col. ilorgau and 85 of his 
men captured. 

Dec. 13.— The rebels before Nashville reoc- 

cnpy their advance works Gen. Burbridge 

routs the rebel brigade under Basil Duke at 
Klngsport, East Tennessee. Rebel loss 150 men 

and the train Gen. Hazen's division of the 

15th corps captures Fort McAllister, command- 
ing the entrance of the Ogeechee River, 15 
miles southwest of Savannah . . .Sherman's re- 
port on his great march. " Not a wagon lost 
on the trip.'*^ 200 miles of railroad destroyed. 
Total loss during the march about 1,000 De- 
parture from Hampton Roads of land and na- 
val forces under Gen. Butler and Admiral Por- 

rter A raiding expedition under General 

Robinson leaves New Orleans for Alabama 

The St. Albans robbers released by the Cana- 
dian Judge Coursol. 

Dec. 14.— Order of Gen. Dlx. Rebels on the 
Canadian frontier detected in acts of incen- 
diarism, robbery or murder, arc to be pursued 
into Cnnada, and, if captured, sent to head- 
quarters in New York Gen. Thomas as- 
sumes the offensive.... Capture of Bristol by 
Gen. Burbridge. 300 rebels captured. 

Dec. 15.— Great victory of Gen. Thomas near 
Nashville. All the rebel earthworks, except 
those on the extreme right, taken. The rebels, 
on their left, driven b miles. Their center 
pushed from 1 to Smiles. Their loss 17 cannon 

and 1,500 prisoners The St. Albans raiders 

ordered bv the attorney general of Canada to 
be rearrested .... Raid of Gen. Stoncman in 
southwest Virginia. Surprise and capture of 



Glade Spring, IS miles from Abingdon De- 
feat of Forrest near Murfreesboro" Loss 1,500 

killed and wounded Raiding expedition of 

Gen. Granger into Alabama starts from East 
Pensacola, Fla. 

Dec. 16.— Another battle near Nashville. 
Hood completely routed. Prisoners and can- 
non captured on every part of the Held. 
Hood's loss before Nashville, 13,180 prisoners, 
2,207 deserters, 30 guns, 7,000 small arms. An 
entire rebel division (Ed. Johnson's) captured. 
Union loss about 0,500 ; total loss of the rebels 
about 23,000. 

Dec. 17.— Capture of Wytheville. . . .The rebel 
array of Hood driven through and beyond 
Franklin; 1,500 wounded rebels captured in 

the hospital of Franklin New order of Gen. 

Dix concerning the rebel raiders in Canada. 
Ofliccrs, in cages of marauding expeditions, to 
report to his headquarters.... Resolutions in- 
troduced into the rebel House of Representa- 
tives to send peace commissi oners to Washing- 
ton.... Gen. McCook ronts the rebel raiders in 
Kentucky, under Gen. Lyon, at Ashbyville, 
McLean Co. | 

Dec. 18.— Order of Sec. Seward, requiring j 
persons coming into the United States to be 
furnished with passports, except emigrant pas- 
sengers coming by sea Hood's army driven 

as far as Spring Hill, SO miles from Nashville. 
The rebel Gen. Qnarles captured. . . .The rebel 
raiders In Kentucky defeated at Hopkinsville. 
All their cannon captured. 

Dec. IP.— A call and draft for 300,000 men. All 
soldiers fit for duty ordered to join their regi- 
ments Hood driven to Duck River. 9,000 

reoels captured from Dec. 15 to Dec. 10, and CI 
(out of CO; pieces of artillery. 

Dec. 20.— Dispatch from Governor General of 
Canada announcing the re-arrest of one of the 
St. Albans' raiders. Rewards ofi'ered for their 

apprehension Evacuation of Savannah by 

Hardee. The navy yard burned and the rebel 

iron clads blown up The salt works of Sali- 

ville, Va., captured by Gen. Stoncman. 

Dec. 21.— Occupation of Savannah by Sher- 
man. He captures SOO"prisonera, 150 pieces of 

artillery, S3,000 bales oi cotton, 3 steamers 

Madison Court House, Va., occupied by Gens. 
Torbert and Powell.... Gen. Grierson starts 
from Memphis for a raid on the Mobile and 
Ohio Railroad. 

Dec. 23.— Fight near Gordonsvllle, Va. 

Dec. 24.— The fleet of Admiral Porter before 
Fort Fisher. Furious attack on the fort. 

Dec. 25.— Attack on Fort Fisher renewed. 
Three brigades of Union infantry landed two 
and a half miles above the fort. They are re- 
pulsed and re-embark. 

Dec. 20.— Ensign Blume cuts loose and takes 
out from Galveston harbor the blockade-run- 
ning schooner Sallie The bloclcadc runner 

Julia, with 450 bales ot cotton, captured by the 
gunboat Accacia A dispatch from Hood re- 
ports his army south of the Tennessee. 

Dec. 28.— Reconstruction meeting at Savan- 
nah, under the presidency of the mavor. The 
governor is requested to call a State conven- 
tion. . . .Hood's rear guard crosses the Tennes- 
see River at Balnbridge. 

Jan. 1. 1SC5.— Explosion of the bulkhead of the 
Dutch Gap Canal. . . .Loss of ilio I' . S. sloop-ol- 
war San Jacinto off the coast of Florida. 

Jan. 5.— Ctcn. Cirierson arrives at Vicksbnrg, 
having destroyed on his raid 70 miles of the 
Mobile and Ohio Railrod, and 30 miles of tho 



THE TRIBUKE ALMANAC FOR 1866." 



Mississippi Central, and captured 600 prisoners 
""jlnT-sKa^'n Crosses the Savannah Kwer. 
"^Arailroart train captured by guerillas near 
iVhanon Junction . . . .Bands of guerillas roam- 
Lg thr?ugh S orthwestern Kentucky occupy 
0>f ensboro', Hawesville, Davenport, and Hen- 
derson. . ^ 1 ggQ inrtians, on Jules- 
hurg CoMo TeSto'iT ; 10 soldiers ami citi- 
zcnf'kined, and much P^opert? cobbed and 
destroyed. The Indians driven oh by lou ot 

'""fan" 8 -Butler removed from the command 
of-'fheArSrof the James. Ovdtnuporarny 

1^'rfe number„of troop.^ at Beaumt N C. . 



Th2Ki"eamer Venango captured andburnedpy 
gSerillas near SkTpwith Landing, on the 
Slississippi 



j"an7lf.-Meeting in New Yort, to furnish 
aid to the people of Savannah. l>^,eily.A\ 
v<r riintmed bv a detachment ot tally s 
rebel army About 200 Union .soldiers cap- 
ISrPd F P Blair, Sr , arrives in Richmond. 

JanlS -More than 'fifty gunboats appear 
off FcJvt Fisher and shell the woods, becond 
'^'ifn'' iT-TlVflfth-and ITth corps of Sher- 
man^s army proceed, on transporis, to Beau- 
^°Jan^-l^.-Capture of Fort Fisher 2 500 PH 

atVoc'jtalico occupied by Blair. .^ ,,, 

JaS IP -F. P. Blair, Sen., returns o Wash- 
in4SA. . . .Forts Caswell and Campbell , N .C, 
evacuated by the rebels, and blown up. The 
Rebels also bfow up the pirate steamers Talla- 

''lll'. I^^L^-^feToS- Patapsco sunk off 

£«s a'.TdVe''^ drSi°.^^^^^^^^^^ 
vention of the Adfutant Generals of the loyal 

^'C'- 18 'L^'^'^'^bloctade-runners captured 
bv Admiral Porter. . . .21)0 of Forrest's cavalry 
defeated 10 miles from Columbus.. Ky . 
Jan 20 -F P. Blair leaves Washington again 

^■°Ja^n tr-The appointment of a commander- 
In-chief provided lor by the rebel congress 

Tan 24 --Four rebel iron-clad vessels in the 
Tan^?9 Kiver pass Fort Brady. One of them 
blown up an^d destroyed, and another dis- 
abled General holiday in Louisiana, to 
celebrate abolition of slavery in La., Md., 
'^' j'an 25 -Meeting at Savannah to thank New 
To?k and Boston for the '*°PPli<;? °^ '"^.'^ tee 
clothing. Address by the Siayor. . . .Gen. Lee 

'Tin 26 -D^ba't™n the rebel House of Eep- 
resoStatiVes on enlisting negroes . .Gunboat 
nli fhine de-^troyedin ilic Combahee Eiver. 

Jan 2? -KctnrnofF. P. Blair, Sr., from his 
pe'!fc°emissi?n iS Eichmond. .Bailey, the Lake 

^':faV'^^'^-K"el,'rSe7of^ 
P''jT'^'L^?'he^Te'l^e7^c^eV°rSnTAlex.H. 
Stephens', Senator E. M. T. Hunter, and Judge 
Campbell , come as peace commissi Jners within 
ftriiii'R lines The left wing of Shermans 
army undefsiocum. arrives a°t.Sisters' Ferry, 
on tiie Savannah Eiver, 50 miles above Sa- 
"^j'n^n.^Sl.-The Constitutional Amendment 
adopted by the House of Representatives m 
yeas, 50 nays. . . .Lee approved by the Senate oi 



the Confederate Congress, as Genera.-in-Chief 
of the armies of the Confederate States. 

Feb 1 —The rebel commissioners, Stephens 
Hunter, and Campbell, arrive at Fort: ees Mon 
roe. Secretary Seward lenves A\ ashington to 
meet them. . . .The advance of Sherman^s army 
reaches Whippy Swamp, SO miles Irom Branch- 

^ Feb 2.— President Lincoln arrives at Fort- 
ress Monroe to meet the rebel commissioners. 

.Eebel guerillas dash into Midway, Ivy. 
Peace conference at Fortress Monroe, be 
tween President Lincoln and Secretary Sew- 
ard on the one hand, and the rebel commis- 
sioners on the other. The rebel commission- 
ers return to Eichmond, President Lincoln 
and Mr. Seward to Annapolis. . . .Gold in Eich- 
mond at 4,400 per cent, premium. „„„„,,„ 
Feb 4 —The Governor-General of Canada 
sians the Canadian Alien Bill, to prevent rebel 
raids across the border.... Lieut. Cushmg, 
with 4 boats and 50 men, takes possession of 
All Saints, on Little Eiver, S. C, capturing a 
large amount of cotton. 

Ftb 5 —The Army of the Potomac In mo- 
tion. The 5th Corps advances 6 miles to Eow- 
anty Creek. The rebels driven from their 
rifle-pits. Two divisions of the 2d Corps ad- 
vance to Hatcher's Kun. Severe engagement 
at both places. Eepulse of the rebclr 



t both places . wepuise oi luu iy"^'°:, n^^r.^ 
Feb ^—Severe engagement of the 5th Corps 
and Gregg 's cavalry with t he rebels . The 5th 
Corps holds its ground and maintains its con- 
nection with the 2d. Casualties in the 5th 
Corns, during the two days, about 5U0 : In the 
Second. 2i0. Hatcher's Eun is made the line 
of defence for the left flank. . . .Two blockade- 
running Echoonirs in Galvestonhai bor, board- 
ed captured, and run out to the blockading 
fleet by Acting Ensign G. H. French. 

Feb. 7.-Atlack of the rebels upon a portion 
of the Fifth Corps, and the cavalry repulsed. 
Union loss slight. . . .Kilpatrick's cavalry drives 
the rebels from Blackville, S. C, a railroad 
station between Branchville and Augusta. 

Feb. 8.— Occupation of Branchville, S. G ... 
Lieut. Gushing, with 15 men, captures Shal- 
lotte, N. C, garrisoned by l6o rebels. The 
electoral votes counted in Congress: ZU lor 
Lincoln and Johnson; 21 for McCleuan and 

j-gtj 10 —From two to three thousand of Gen. 
Sherman's right column effect a landing on 
James Island. 2 miles from Charleston. 

j-eb 11.— Slovement towards Wilmington. 
Gen. Terry makes a reconnolssance in force. 
The rebels driven from their lines and into 
their mainworks. Eebel loss about 100. Lnion 
casualties about 60. Union troops ga>n two 

miles of ground Cavalry engagement at 

Aiken. S. B., between Kilpatrick and V» heeler. 
Kilpatrick takes possession of the town. 

Feb 15.-Destrnction of Charlotte Iron Fur- 
nace, on Water Lick Creek, by 300 picicedmen 
of the let and 6th Eegiments of aiichigan Cav. 

Feb 17.— Occupation of Columbia, S. C.,by 
Gen. Sherman. . . .Evacuation of Charleston by 
the rebels. The upper part of the city fired. 
Two rebel iron dads blown up. 

Feb. 18.-Occupation of Charleston by the 
Union forces; 2o0 pieces of artillery and a 
laree supply of ammunition captured. 

Feb l5.-t;apture of Fort Anaerson, N. C 
hy Schofleld and Porter. Union loss m killed 
and wounded about 30.... Sherman in Wmns- 
boro% S. C . , 38 miles north of Columbia 

Feb 20.-Gen. Cox routs the rebels 4 miles 
from Wilmington, ^\ C. . .The reb.lHons6^^^ 
Eepresentatives passes a bill to ai m negroes . 
:'. Eepulse of a rebel attack on Fort Myers, 

■'^Fel?'21.-MaJor Generals Crook and Kelley 
surrounded and captured by a party of rebel 



TUE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



cavalry at Cumberland, Md 

Wilmington bv the rebels. 

Feb. ^2.— Occupation of Wilmington by tbe 
Union troops. Lar^'e quantities of supplies 
captured. lOO prisoners and 30 guns captured 
In Fort Anderson and Wilmington together. 

Feb. 23.— Occupation of Georgetown and Fort 
Wbite, S. C, by the Union forces. 15 pieces of 
artillery captured. 

Feb. 24.— Burning of Columbia, S. C. 

Feb. 25.— Jobnston assumes command as suc- 
cessor to Beauregard. 

Feb. 27.— Sheridan starts on a new move- 
ment. 

Marcb 1.— Gen. Bailey starts on a cavalry raid 
from Baton Rouge. 

March 2.— Sheridan captures nearly the whole 
forceof Early, consisting of 1,800 men, between 
Charlottesville and Staunton. 

March 3.— Skirmish between Sherman's cav- 
alry and that of Wade Hampton. The rebel 
Col. Aiken killed. . . .Occupation of Cheraw, S. 

C, bv Sherman's advance Occupation of 

Charlottesville, Va., by Sheridan. 

March 4.— Relnaugnration of President Lin- 
coln U.S. transport steamer Thorn blown 

up by a torpedo in Cape Fear Eiver. 

March 6.— Expedition up the Rappahannock. 
Capture of 400 prisoners and 95 tons of tobacco 
at FredericksDurg. Extensive contraband 
trade broken up. 

March 8.— Sherman at Laurel Hill, K. C... 
The rebel Senate passes the negro enlistment 
bill.... Engagement between Cox and Bragg 4 
miles from Kinston, N. C. Bragg captures a 
large number of prisoners and 8 pieces of ar- 
tillery, but is ultimately driven back. I'ight- 
Ing continues to March 10. 

March 9.— A transport, with 2,000 Union 
troops, enters Mobile Bay through Grant's 
Pass. 

March 10.— Gen. Sheridan at Columbia, Flu- 
vanna Co., Va., 50miles west of Richmond. He 



nal, an immense number of bridges, many miles 
of railroad, mills, factories, and vast quantities 
of merchandise ; also, having captured 12 canal 
boats, 14 pieces of arrillery, and an abundance 

of provisions Desperate attempt of Bragg 

to break the national lines at Kinston, N. V. 
The rebels lose 1,200 killed and wounded, and 
400 prisoners. Two thousand rebels captured 
from March 8 to 10. The entire Union losses 
about 1,000 Gen. Lee urges the work of rais- 
ing and organizing negro troops. . . . Gen. Stone- 
man, with 4,000 men, starts on a cavalry raid 
from Knoxville.... Engagement between the 
cavalry forces of Wade Hampton and Kil- 
patriCK near Fayetteville, N . C. Nearly all th e 
members of Kilpatrick's staff captured. The 
rebels finally beaten back and most of the offi- 
cers recaptured. . . .Gen. Grant issues an order 
forbidding all trade with points within the re- 
bel lines in Virginia, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, and Georgia. 

March 11.— Sheridan at Beaver Mills Aque- 
duct, 20 miles north of Richmond Hoke's di- 
vision of rebels repulsed at Kinston. Loss over 

2,000. Union loss 300 21 Union vessclsin sight 

of Mobile. . . .Sherman arrives at Favettevillc. 
Reports having captured, at Columbia, S. C, 
43 pieces of artillery; at Cheraw, S.C, 25 pieces 
and 3,600barrels of gunpowder; at Fayetteville, 
N. C, 20 pieces, and large quantities of ammu- 
nition. 

March 12.— Occupation of Kinston by Scho- 
fleld. The rebels tnrow many pieces of artil- 
lery Into the river and burn the ram Neuse 

Gen. Stoneman at Wythevllle, Chrlansburg, 
and Salem, Va. 

March 13.— Sheridan tears up the railroad be 
tween Richmond and Hanover. . .Message from 



Evacuation of Jeff. Davis to the rebel Congress. Reports 



that this was declined by Grant 

March 15.— Fight at Brandenburg, Ky., be- 
tween a small Union garrison and a party of re- 
bels — Sheridan re^arts having rendered use- 
less the James River Canal as far as Gooch- 
land The rebel House of Representatives 

E asses the bill (36 to 32 votes; suspending the 
abeas corpus writ. 

March 16.— Lieut.-Commander Eastman de- 
stroys 3 rebel schooners in Mattox Creek, Va. ; 
large stocks of tobacco, guns, aiuiuunillon cap- 
tured. .Fightat AverysDorough,N. C. (20 miles 
north of Fayetteville), between a portion of 
Sherman's arnu' and the rebels under Hardee. 
Union loss 74 Killed, 477 wounded ; rebel loss 
327 killed and wounded, 273 prisoners. 

March 17.— Gen. Canby's movement against 
Mobile commences. Portions of the 13th and 

23d Corps in motion Gen. Wilson leaves 

Nashville with 15,000 men on a cavalry expedi- 
tion into Central Alabama and Georgia. 

March 18.— Adjournment of the rebel Con- 
gress Gen. Sheridan's advance reaches 

White House, on the Pamunkev River. His 
entire loss during this raid 50 uien and 2 offi- 
cers. 

March 19.-0ccupation of Goldsborongh. N. C, 

by Sherman Engagement at Bentonville, N. 

C, between Sherman and Johnston. Repulse 
of the rebels. Union loss, 1,6-16^, rebel loss, 167 

dead, 1,625 prisoners The rebel schooner 

Anna Dale, in Matagorda Bay, cut loose from 
under 2 rebel bitteries and burned. 

March 20.— Gen. Steele's forces leave Pensa- 
cola. 
March 21.— Occupation of Goldsborongh, N. C, 
by Gen. Schofield. Junction of the armies un- 
der Sherman, Terry, and Schotieid The re- 
bels flanked and overpowered at Mount Olive, 
N. C ...Roddy's division of Forrest's cavalry 
routed by Gen. Wilson's forces at Marion and 
Plantersville. The confederates abandon all 
their cavalry. 

March 22.— Aband of rebel guerrillas routed 
30 miles west of Paducah. The rebel leader 
McDougal killed. 

March 25.— Capture of the Union Fort Stcd- 
man.of Gen. McLaughlin and 500 men, in front 
of Petersburg, by 3 divisions of rebels under 
Gordon. They are driven out again by Gen. 
Hartranft, with a loss of 1,758 prisoners, and 
total loss of 2,500. Total Union loss about 1,500 
. . Assault on the rebel lines by the2dandcth 
Corps The first line of the rebel works cnp- 
tured and held... Engagement between the 
Union cavalry and the 6lh and 8th Alabama 
cavalry at Mitchell's Creek. The rebel Gen 

Canton, with 275 men, captured Robert C. 

Kennedy, the rebel spy and incendiary, hung 
at Fort Lafayette. 

March 26.— Sheridan's cavalry reaches City 
Point. 

March 27.— Gen. Getty's division of the 6th 
Corps attacked by 400 rebel sharpshooters. Re- 
pulse of the rebels Sheridan's cavalrv takes 

position in Gregg's old cavalry camp on the lett 
and rear of Grant's anny — Portions of the 
21th and 25th Corps cross the James to join 

Meade's army lioone, N. C, captured by 

Gen. Stoneman's cavalry force Investment 

of Spanish Fort, one of the principal defences 
of Mobile. 

March 28.— Attack on the defences of Mobile. 

March 29.— Grant's army in motion Sheri- 
dan's command makes a detour to Dinwiddle 
Court House. Occupation of the town. Fur- 
ther advance on tlio Boy dton Road. Two Corps 
of the infantry (2d and 5th) thrown across 
Hatcher's Run, the former on the Vaughan 
Road, tbe second on tbe Halifax Road Battle 



of Quaker Road, in the vicinity of Gravelly 
Run. between Bnshrod Johnson's division and 
the 5th Corps of the Union troops. With- 
drawal of the rebels to their original position. 
Loss on each side about 500. . . .TSe Union iron- 
clad Milwaukee blown up by a rebel torpedo 
The St. Albans raiders acquitted and set at 
liberty at Montreal, but immediately re-ar- 
rpRted The confederate ram Stonewall or- 
dered to leave the port of Lisbon. The U. S. 
war-steamer Niagara fired upon by the Portu- 
Euese authorities. 

March 30.— Sheridan connects his right with 
Warren's left near the Boydton Planl£-road. 
Gen Devin's brigade drives baclc the rebel 
cavalry, but is in turn driven bacli by the ene- 
my's infantry. The Union cavalry retires to 

March 31.— Engagement of the 5th and 2d 
Corns with the rebels near Boydton Plank- 
roaiT. Tho Union army.driven back from its 
advanced position. Union lossps from 2,500 to 
3 000. Coniederate losses not BO severe. 

Anrill —Battle of Sive Forks. Sheridan put 
In command of all the cavalry and the 5tU 
Corps of infantry. Desperate flghlmg all day 
nntil half-past seven p. m. The conlederates 
lose 4 000 prisoners, 6 cannon. sever al thousand 
muskets, and 20 or 30 fla§s. Total loss of the 
enemy about 7,000. Union loss about 8,000. 
The rebel works occupied by the Union forces. 
The Southside Railroad occupied and de- 
Rtroved Grant clo=ing around the works of 
the line Immediately enveloping Petersburg. 

Anriia —Grant advances upon Petersburg. 
Battle opened at half-past live a.m. by the Oth 
Corns in front of the Union Forts Welch and 
Foster . The rebel forts carried by daylight. 
The Southside Kailroad broken up by Gen. Sey- 
mour Success of the 24th Corps. They cap- 
ture I'.OOO prisoners and many guns. Kew as- 
sault hy the rebels. Gen. A. P. Hill falls. 
Fighting continued all day. The 6th Corps cap- 
tures 2,000 prisoners and 20 guns, and rests its 
left close to the Appomattox. Skirmishers of 
the 9th Corps advance into the outskirts of the 
citv but arc compelled to fall back. Rebels 
lose' about 9,000 prisoners. ..Evacuation of 
Richmond and Petersburg during the night, 
.leff Davis leaves for Danville at 8p. m. . . .Re- 
bel agents unsuccessfully attempt to destroy 
NewlTern Surrender of Selma, Ala. . to Gen. 
Wilson's forces ; 2,000 prisoners and 100 guns 
secured The arsenals, naval iron works, mag- 
azines, and government buildings destroyed. 

Anril 3 —Occupation of Petersburg at four 
o'clock a.m. by Col. Ely, of Wilcox's divisioti. 
Several thousand prisoners, 100 pieces of artil- 
ferv including siege guns of afl calibers, im- 
mense army supplies, &c., captured.. .Occu- 
pation of Richmond by Gen. Weitzel at seven 
o'clock a m 6,000 prisoners, 5,000 stands of 
arms, 500 cannon captured. The rebels fire the 
city, nearly one-third of which is destroyed. 
The confederates pursued by the cavalry fully 
20 miles. 350 prisoners and 4 cannon captured . 
April 4. -Skirmishing between the retreating 
rebels and McKenzie's division at Bethany. 

Our forces south of Amelia Court House 

President Lincoln in Riclimond. . ..The steamer 
Harriet Deford captured by disguised rebels at 
Fairhaven,Md.,on PatuxentRiver. They also 
overhaul and capture the schooner St. Marys. 
Anril 5 -Gen. Lee at Amelia Court House 
Grant's forces at Burkesville Station. Sheri- 
dan at Jcttersville, 7 miles sontliwest of Lee's 
nositlon.... Proclamation of .leff. Davis. He 
announces the evacuation of Richmond, and 
his determination never to submit to the aban- 
donment of one State of the confederacy. 

Anril 6.— Engagement between Grant and 
Lee at Deatonsville. One corps of the rebel 
army cut off. The rtbel Generals Ew ell, Ker- 



Shaw, Barton, de Bose, Custis Lee and Corso 
captured. Several thousand prisoners and a 
largennmberof cannon taken. 
April 7.— Fight of the '^d Corps with Lee at 

April 8.— Lee's army concentrated at Appo- 
mattox Court House. .,wv.„,„ 

Anril 9 —Surrender of Gen. Lee. AH the re- 
bel arms,' artillery, and property to bo turned 
over to an officer to be designated ^7 Geiierai 
Grant ; the entire reoel army to be disbanded; 
the oflicersand men toji'^e'lheir parole not to 
take up arms against the United States until 
exchanged. Lee's army numbers about *,115 
men ¥ngagement at Sumter, S. C, between 
gueriiias and national forces. . . . Jefi Davis,on 
hearing the news of Lee's surrender le-ayes 
Danvifle, Va., for Greensboro', N C. ..Spamsli 
Fort, near Mobile, captured ; 6a2 prisoners 
taken, with many pieces of artillery. Forts 
Tracy and Huger abandoned by the confeder- 
ates.^ Fort Bfalcely taken by assault and 300 



pH8oner8',32pTeces'of artille'ry, 4,000 stands of 
small arms, igbatUc-flags, and a large quantity 
of ammunition taken. Kebelloss m killed an 



small arms, 
of ammunlt_ 
wounded about 500 



total Union loss about 



Anril 10 -Evacuation of Mobile commences. 
The St. Albans raiders, except Young, dis- 
charged from custody in Toronto. 

April 11. -Montgomery, Ala., surrenders to 
Gen. Wilson. 2,700 prisoners, 32 gnns m posi- 
tion, and 75 in arsenal, t,»ken with the city, i 
35 000 bales of cotton destroyed by the confed- 
erates befjre evacuating Occupation of 1 

Lynchburg, va. . . .Destruction of a rebel ram 
on Roanoke River, above Newbem. •- -Procla- 
mation of the President, demanding the remo- 
val of restrictions from our war vessels in 

^Xln Kioblle occupied by the Union 
troops Total Union loss before Mobile 2 
heavv ironclads, 2 so-called tln-clads. one 
transport, all destroyed by torpedoes; 50 se^ 
men and 2,000 men in the army. About 1,200 
wmfederates capturedin thecity. Stoneman 
rout33;000rebelsat Grant's Creek,3mile8 from 
Salisbury Occupation of Salisbury. 1 ,364 con- 
fedeSes 14 pieces of artillery, and a large 
supply ot amniunition and military stores cap- 

*Tprill3.-Raleigh, N. C, occupied by Sher- 
man after a slight skirmish. Johnston falls 

'\'^r^??/.^P?e°i'dent Lincoln shot by John 
Wilkes Booth, at Ford's theater, about ten 
o'clock p.m. The assassin escapes. At the 
same hour, murderous attack upon Secretary ' 
Seward by Payne, who likewise escapes. Sc- 
vle injuries upon Frederick W Seward and 
Robinson and ilansell, the attendants of bee- i 

'Ap7im^-PKsident Lincoln dies at 23 min- i 
utes pist 7a.m... .Andrew Johnson takes the 
oath of office as President. 

April 16.-Columbus,Ga captured by Gen | 
Upton 1,200 prisoners, 53 guns and 100,000 
bales of cotton destroyed. 

April 17.-Interview between Sherman and 
Johnston, 5 miles beyond Durham's Station \ 

April 18.-Second colloquy between Sherman 
and Johnston. A truce agreed upon, subiact 
to the approval of the Aaministration. fhe 
confederates to be rtisbandecl and to deposit 
their arms in the arsenals of the State capitals. 
The rebel State governments to be recognized 
on their officers.and legislatures takin" the 
oath prescribed hy the ConsUtution oj the 
United States. The legitimacy of conflicting 
State governments to be submitted to the Su- 
preme Court. The political rights and fran- 
chises to be guaranteed to the people of the 
rebel States. 



TIIE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



April 19.— Funeral of President Lincoln In 
Washington. 

Apriiao.— Occnpationof Macon, Ga. Gens. 
Howell Cobb, Gustavns W. Smith, Robertson, 
Mercer,-andMcCall,niadei)ri6onerB ; ISJguns 
in position, and 21K) guns in arsenals, with im- 
mense amounts of ordnance and stores ci'p- 
tnrcd. . .The War Department ofl'ers $50,000 tor 
the arrest of Booth, and $25,000 each for the 
arrest of Atzerott and Harold. Capture of 
Atzerott. ^. ,^ 

April 21.— Proclamation of Gen. E. Kirby 
Smith. He asserts his ability to continue the 

rebellion' Sherman's truce disapproved by 

the President, Gen Grant, and the Cabinet. 

April 22.— Eec?jption of the remains of Presi- 
dent Lincoln at Philadelphia. 

April 23.— Jeff. Davis leaves Charlotte, N. C, 
for Georgia. _ , 

April 2i.— Destruction of the rebel ram Webb, 
below Kcw Oile.ans Ecception of the re- 
mains of President Lincoln in New York. 

April 25.— Funeral procession with the re- 
mains of President Lincoln through the streets 
of New York. 

April 20.— Surrender of Gen. Johnston andhis 

army, numbering about 27,500 men Booth 

and Harold iound in a barn ne.ir Bowling 
Green, Caroline County, Va. Booth shot by 
Sergeant Boston Corbett. Harold captured. 

April 27.— Railroad tract near Charleston, 
S. C, torn up by gueril as. 

April 28.— Danville, Ya., occupied by Gen. 
Wright. 113 locomotives, 117 box cars, iron- 
work, machinery, etc., were captured The 

War Department issues orders tor the reduc- 
tion of the expenses of the army by the dis- 
charge of ocean transports, by its stoppage cf 
purchases, etc. 

April 29.— Armistice agreed upon between 
Gens. Dana and Dick Taylor.... Proclamation 
by the President removing restrictions on Ib- 
ternal trade. 

April 30.— The paroling of Gen. Johnston's 
troops commences at CTreensboro. 

May 1.— Reception of the remains of Presi- 
dent Lincoln at Chicago. .. .Surrender of 1,100 
of Morgan's old command to Gen. Hobson, 
at Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. 

May 2.— Surrender of Jeff. Thompson to Cap- 
tain Mitchell, V. S Navy . . . .Presidential Proc- 
lamation, offering $100,000 reward for the cap- 
ture of Jeff. Davis, $25,000 each lor the arrest of 
Jacob Thompson, Clement C. Clay. George N. 
Saunders, Beverly Tucker, and $10,000 for the 
arrest of Wm. C. Cleary- 

May 4.— Interview between Gen. Canby and 
Gen. Dick Taylor at Citronelle, Ala., SSmiles 
north of Mobile. Surrender of Taylor's entire 
command. ..Burial of Abraham Lincoln in Oak 
Ridge Cemetery, near Springfield, 111. 

May 5.— A train on the Ohio and Mississippi 
Railroad, 14 miles from Cincinnati captured 
by 20 guerillas. 

May 9.— The Confederate Commodore Far- 
rand surrenders 13 vessels and all his command 
to Commander Edward Simpson, fleet Captain 
of the West Gulf Squadron, at Nanna Hubba 
Bluff". 

May 10. —Jeff. Davis and the Confederate 
Post-Rlaster, General Rensan, captured at Ir- 
winvillc, Georgia, by Lieutenant Colonel 
Prltchard, commanding Ihe 4th Michigan Cav- 
alry . .The Confederate Gen. Sam. Jones sur- 
renders his forces to a division of Gen. Wilson's 

Cavalrv Surrender of Captain Mayberry, 

comma"ndlng the irregular- bands of Confed- 
erates in Arlvansas and Monroe Counties, Ark., 
at Pine Bluff.... The trial of the assassination 
conspirators beslns at Washington. 

May 11.— A rebel camp at Palmetto Branch, 
Texas (15 miles above Brazos, captured and 



burned by Col. Barrett. . . .Arrival of the Rfebel 
Ram Stonewall at Havana. 

May 12.— Engagement near Boco Chlco, be- 
tween400 tinion TroopsunderCol Barrett and 
500 Confederate cavalry under Gen. Slaughter. 
T/iis Iran the laul e»ftfioem(7it of therm r. Union 
loss 70 men.... Surrender of the rebel forces 
under Gen. Wofford, in Northern Georgia, at 
Kingston. 

May 19.— Arrival of Jeff. Davis and his fellow 
priso/iers at Fortress Monroe. 

51ay 20.- Surrender of the ram Stonewall to 
the Spanish authorities in Cuba. 

May 24.— Captain Rayburn, commanding all 
irregular bands of Confederates in Jackson, 
Prairie, and White Counties, Ai-k., surrenders 
at Duvall's Bluff. 

May 25.- Forts Mannahasset and Griffin, and 
the defences ofLabone Pass, occupied by Rear- 
Admiral Thatcher. 

May 26.— Surrender of Gen. E. Kirby Smith 
and his army (about 20,OC0). Terms agreed 
upon and sicned at New Orleans by Buckner, 
Brent, and Carter. , ^ 

*Iay 29.— Amnesty Proclamation issued by 
Pi-esldent Johnson. . , ^ 

May 31.— Brazil withdraws belligerent rights 
from the rebels. 

June 1.— Occupation of Brownsville, Texas. 
. . . .Day of Humiliation andPrayer on account 
of the inurder of President Lincoln. 

June 2.— Kirby Smith and Magruder formally 
surrender their forces at Galveston. ...The 
British Government otflcially w^thdraws bel- 
ligerent rights from the rebels Occupation 

of Alexandi-a, La. Capture of 22 pieces of ar- 
tillery. 

June 8.— The rebel ironclad Missouri, in Red 
River, surrenders to Commander W. E. Fltz- 
hugh. 

June 5.— Occupation of Galveston. 

June 7.— The Attnrney-Geueral Issues an or- 
der requiring all persois applying for pardon 
under the Aiinesty Proclamation, to take the 
oath of allegiance as a precedent condition to 
tho consideration of their petitions. 

June 13.- Proclamation opening all ports 
east of the Mississippi on the 1st of July. 

June 14.— John Mitchell arrested and sent to 
Fortress Monroe. ^ 

June 17.— Alexander H.Stephens and Robert 
E. Lee applv for pardon. 

June 23.— Proclamation of the President re- 
scinding blockade as to all ports of the United 
States. 

June 24.— Proclamation removing commer- 
cial restrictionswest of the Mississippi, except- 
ing arms, ammunition, etc. 

June 29.— Closing of the trial of the assassins 
in Washington. 

July 7.— Execution of the conspirators Har- 
old, Payne, Atzerott, and Mrs. Surratt. 

July 25.— Battle at Platte's Bridge Station, 
In the Indian Territory. 1,000 Indians make an 
attack upon the Station, but are repulsed. 

Aug. 1.— Th« Presidentorder8the2d,4th,5th, 
6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, lOth, 141h, 15th, 17th, 20th, 23d, 
and 24th army corps to be discontinued as or- 
ganizations. 

August 21.— Commencement of the trial of 
Capt. Wlrz, the Andersonvllle Jailor. 

September 1.— Removal of all restrictions on 
Southern Ports. 

Sept. 14.— The chiefs of the rebel Indians re- 
nounce their treaties with the Confederacy, 
and promise lovalty to the United States. 

Oct. 12.— Proclamation of the President, end- 
ing martial law in Kenluc'<y. 

Nov. 6.— The rebel ram Si\enandoah arrives 
In the Mersey and surrenders to an English 
man-of-war. She Is handed over to the Auierl- 
can Consul. 

Nov. 10.— Execution of Capt. Wirz. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1806. 



THE UNION PARTY IN 1865. 

RESOLUTIONS OF THE UNION STATE CONVENTIONS ON RECONSTRUCTION AND 
IMPARTIAL SUFFRAGE. 



We give below the resolutions of the Union 
State Conventions, held since the accession to 
the Presidency of Andrew Johnson, on the sub- 
ject of Reconstruction and Impartial Suffrafce. 
It will be seen that they agree in indorsing the 
Administration of President Johnson, and in 
demanding that the reconstruction of the Rebel 
States bo upon such terms as will give unques- 
tionable assurance of the peace and security of 
the loyal people of the Rebel States, also of the 
peace and prosperity of the Federal Union. 
Massachusetts, A'ermont, Maine, New York, 
Minnesota, Iowa, declare, some more directly, 
others more indirectly, in favor of impartial 
suffrage, without distinction of race ; New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Cali- 
fornia, Colorado, are silent on this subject ; and 
Nevada declares against it. 

MASSACnrSETTS. 

liesolved. That the entire pacification of the 
country and the restoration of order are objects 
of the first importance, and also which 'require 
the exercise of the most deliberate and cautious 
wisdom, in order that there may be no necessity 
of retracing our steps ; and we agree with the 
Republicans of Pennsylvania, who, in their re- 
cent State Convention, expressed the conviction 
that the people lately in rebellion cannot be 
safely intrusted with the political rights which 
they forfeited by their treason until they have 
proved their acceptance of the results of the war 
by incorporating into their constitutions pro- 
visions securing to all men within their borders 
the inalienable right to liberty and the pursuit 
of happiness ; and we call upon Congress, before 
whom must speedily come the whole question of 
reconstructing the Southern community, to see 
to it that the loyal people, white and black, shall 
have the most perfect guarantees for their safety 
before any final steps are taken toward restoring 
the revolted people of the South to their forfeited 
rights. 

Resolved, That so long as any important po- 
litical questions growing out of the war remain 
vnadjusted, no partof the powers of the Govern- 
ment can be safely committed to any political 
party composed of Southern men who were lately 
in rebellion and arms, or of the Northern men, 
who. In a National Convention only a year ago, 
declared that after four years of failure to restore 
the Union by the experiment of war, daring 
which, under the pretence of military necessity, 
the war power had been placed higher than the 
Constitution ; the Constitution itself bad been 
disregarded in every part; public and private 
rights alike trodden down, and the material 
prosperity of the country essentially impaired ; 
and that justice, humanity, liberty, and the 
public welfare demanded that immediate efforts 
be made for a cessation of hostilities. 

And further resolved, That no confidence 
ought to be placed in the professions of an or- 
ganization that declared the necessary protec- 
tion of the polls from the assaults of ruffians and 
traitors to be a shameful violation of the Consti- 
tution, which ought to be held as revolutionary 

" ■ I ' - ' ■■ ' U.U.., I . , I. I ._ I. J I III I . 



and resisted : and that now seeks to reinstate 
itself in power by the nomination of soldiers and 
provost-marshals for office, and by passing reso- 
lutions of confidence in a Republican adminis- 
tration. 

Remlred, That we have no theories to pro- 
mulgate in relation to the right of suffrage ; but, 
as a practical question, we declare that, so long 
as the grand issues of the day are the mainten- 
ance of the Government, the complete integi-ity 
of the Union, the preservation of the National 
credit and National faith, and the extirpation of 
Slavery, no test can be made or encouraged 
which will admit to the elective franchise rebel 
soldiers and traitorous politicians, and at the 
same time exclude the loyal men who have 
borne arms and shed their blood in the nation's 
defense, and whose votes may be indispensable 
hereafter, as President Lincoln said in his letter 
to Gov. Hahn, " to keep the jewel Liberty in the 
family of Freedom." Such tests cannot stand 
the scrutiny of the loyal American people incor- 
porated into the new constitutions of the South- 
ern States; Congress should rectify the abuse 
and maintain the public faith toward the freed- 
men, while it provides for the peace, solvency, 
and security of the country. 

liesolred. That it is the duty of the Govern- 
ment to hold States under provisional govern- 
ment where the character of the people is found 
to be an unsafe depository of free Republican 
government. 

Be.solred, That, in reorganizing the rebellious 
States, it is the right and duty of the Govern- 
ment to demand the ratification of the Constitu- 
tional Amendment abolishing Slavery, and the 
removal of all disabilities on account of color, 
and to secure to all perfect equality. 

Rewlced, That the Constitution of the United 
States should be amended so as to secure equality 
and uniformity of the rights of representation of 
States in Congress. 

Re.to/red, That the Emancipation Proclama- 
tion of President Lincoln, the enlistment of over 
lOO^OOO colored troops, the good faith of the 
colored race amidst treason, and their being 
paid like whites and placed in the most dan- 
gerous places, have pledged the National honor 
that these people shall have, in fact as well as 
in name, conferred upon them all the political 
right' of freedmen, and that the people of the 
United States will redeem this pledge. 

VERMONT. 

Resolved, That looking back to the happy ex- 
perience of our own State in extending the 
largest liberty to native or naturalized citizens 
of quiet and peaceable behavior, irrespective of 
color, or race, and forward to the inestimable 
blessings that will flow to the late slave States 
from a free, industrious, intelligent, virtuous, 
peaceable and patriotic population, we do re- 
spectfully and earnestly counsel the people of 
those States that they blot out forever from their 
statutes all laws pertaining to the late condition 
of slavery, and to concede to all of their native 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



and naturalized citizens, by constitutional guar- 
anty, equality of civil and political rights, leav- 
ingto each to reach his pf oper social position by 
the character he bears and the merit he fairly 
wins. 

Besolved, That on the failure of any reor- 
ganized State to give the gviaranty named in the 
preceding resolutions, we insist that Congress 
shall use all its constitutional powers, so as to 
secure a republican government, both in form 
and essence, to the people of such State. 

KEW YORK. 

ReKohed, That while we regard the national 
sovereignty over all the subjects committed to 
it by the Constitution of the United States as 
1 having been confirmed and established by the 
recent war, we regard the several states in the 
Union as having the jurisdiction over all local j 
and domestic affairs reserved to them by the ! 
same constitutional authority; and that when- j 
ever it shall be deemed compatible with the j' 
public safety to restore to the States lately in j 
rebellion the renewed exercise of these rights, | 
we trust that it will be done in the faith and on 
the basis that they will be exercised in a spirit | 
of equal and exact justice, and with a view to 
the elevation and preparation for the free rights 1 
of citizenship of all their people— inasmuch as | 
these are principles which constitute the basis '■ 
of our Republican institutions. 

Besolrecl, That we have entire confidence in 
the conduct, under President Johnson, of our 
intercourse with foreign nations, in his prompt 
enforcement against them of all just demands, i 
in receiving redress for national insults aud 
wrongs, and in maintaining the fixed policy of 
our Government, by which the interference of " 
foreign powers with the institutions of this con- 
tinent, is regarded as hostile to our peace and j 
menacing to our independence. 

Ee-'<olred, That we approve, as eminently wise , 
and just, the sentiments of kindness and confi- j 
dence wtuch President Johnson has evinced 
toward those of the communities and individuals I 
lately in rebellion, who accept the perpetuation 
of the Union and the pei-petual prohibition of 
Slavery, as the legitimate and irreversible results 
of the war; that we approve the initial steps 
which he has taken toward relaxing the bonds 
of military authority in the Southern States, 
and in restoring to their people full and com- 
plete control over their local affairs just as soon 
as may be found compatible with the preserva- 
tion of order, the maintenance of peace, the 
exclusion of Slavery, and the fulfilment of the 
constitutional obligations of the national autho- 
rity, to "guarantee to every State a republican 
form of government;" and that we confidently 
look forward, under his wise and patriotic ad- 
ministration, to the establishment of more cordial 
relations, of greater mutual respect, and of a 
stronger interest to each others' welfare between 
the Northern and Southern States than have 
hitherto prevailed ; and that, in all the measures 
he may adopt tending to the attainment of these 
just and bencflcient ends, we pledge him our 
cordial and hearty support. 

KEW JERSEY, 

J^emlrtd, That President Andrew Johnson, 
by his bold denunciation of traitors at the out- 
break of the rebellion, by his devotion to the 



Union through its severest trials, and by his 
conduct in the discharge of the difficult duties 
imposed upon him, has secured our highest con- 
fidence ; and we cordially commend the policy 
of his administration, thus far indicated, and 
pledge to him our cheerful and united support ; 
we point to him — a man sprung from the ranks 
of the people — as a fitting type and exponent of 
democratic republican principles ; and, while we 
mourn the loss of the lamented Lincoln, we re- 
joice that his mantle has fallen upon one by 
birth and education, position and associations, 
admirably qualified to deal with the perplexing 
questions cf the time. 

lie-^iolved, That the trials and sacrifices of four 
years' war have awakened us to a new et nse cf ' 
the value of fundamental principles of freedom I 
and equality in shaping political action, and I 
have led us to assert with a new emphasis that ' 
the words of Jefferson, as immortalized in the 
Declaration of Independence, " that all men are 
created equal ; that they are endowed by their 
Creator with certain inalienable rights; that 
among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of 
happiness ; that to secure these rights govern- 
ments are instituted among men, deriving their 
just powers from the consent of the governed," 
are no longer " glittering generalities," but are 
vindicated as immutable truths. 

PESNSYLVAKIA. 

Ifesolved, That the mild and generous method 
of reconstruction offered by the President to the 
people lately in rebellien, in the judgment of this 
convention, has net been accepted in the spiiit 
of honest loyalty and gratitude ; but with such 
evidence of defiance and hostility as to impel ua 
to the conviction that they cannot safely be in- 
trusted with the political rights which they for- 
feited by their treason until they have proven 
their acceptance of the results of the war by co- 
operation in constitutional provisions, and giving 
to all men within their borders their inalienable 
right to life, liberty, and thepursuit of happiness. 

Jie.tolred, That having conquered the rebel- 
lious States, they should be held in subjugation, 
and the treatment they are to receive, and the 
laws which are to govern them, should be refer- 
red to the law-making power of the nation, to 
which it legitimately belongs. 

That as the late rebellion was wantonly pre- 
cipitated by the property-holders of the South, 
it is but just that they should pay the expenses 
of the war, and Congress should declare as for- 
feited and vested in the Government the prop- 
erty of all rebels whose estates exceed the sum 
of ten thousand dollars, and that the property 
so confiscated should be applied to increase the 
pensions of those entitled thereto by the casual- 
ties of the war, to pay the damage done by the 
enemy to loyal citizens, and to reduce the bilrden 
of the national debt. 

OHIO. 

Jie.iolrfd, That the President, Andrew John- 
son, by his unwavering devotion to the Union 
through years of the severest trial, has won our 
highest confidence, and that we cheerfully in- 
dorse the policy of his Administration, looking 
to the restoration of peace and civil order in the 
so-called seceded States ; and that, as Union 
men of Ohio, we will give him our hearty and 
undivided support. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 



45 



Resolred, That while we are anxious for an 
early reconstruction of fraternal relations with 
the insurgent St^ates, we demand that such re- 
construction shall be at such time and upon such 
terms as will give unquestionable assurance of 
the peace and security, not only of the loyal 
people of the rebel States, but also of the peace 
■ and prosperity of the Federal Union. 

Heaolvecl, That the experience of the last four 
years shows the absolute necessity, in all our 
political action, of keeping steadily in view the 
great principles of our Government, as set forth 
In the Declaration of Independence. 

MINNESOTA. 

Resolred, That while we recognize the dis- 
persion of the armed forces of the rebellion, we 
cannot shut our eyes to the fact that the local 
feelings and the pernicious principles which cul- 
minated in rebellion still exist in the South to a 
great extent, and that it is now the duty of all 
loyal men to unite in demanding such wise and 
prudent measures of statesmanship as shall com- 
plete the glorious work of our armies, and such 
precautions as may be necessary to the future 
safety, and the lasting and perpetual peace of the 
nation. 

Reiolred, That the spirit of our institutions 
requires that the measure of a man's political 
rights shall be neither his religion, his birth- 
place, his race, hiscolor, nor any merely physical 
characteristics ; and that it would be subversive 
of both the form and spirit of our institutions to 
permit any portion of our population to remain 
in a degraded and abject caste, taxed to support, 
and compelled to obey a Government in which 
they have no voice, and whose whole macliinery 
may be directed to their destruction. 

Resolve^l, That the administration of the gen- 
eral Government during the past four years, in 
the hands of the late lamented President, Abra- 
ham Lincoln, and in the hands of the present 
executive, Andrew Johnson, in all their efforts 
to preserve the Union and the liberties of the 
country, meets with our hearty approval and 
concurrence. 

Hexolierl. That our Senators and Hcprescnta- 
tives in Congress be requested to use their influ- 
ence to secure an amendment to the Constitution 
of the United States, whereby the basis of repre- 
sentation be established upon the aggregate 
number of legal voters, instead of upon the num- 
ber of population. 

wincoNsiv. 

Resolved, That while we welcome the cessa- 
tion of war in the Southern States, we do not 
close our eyes to the fact that a large portion of 
the whole population are fresh from acts of hos- 
tility toward the Government and toward its 
institutions, are still unsettled in opinion, and 
many of them imreconciled to the results of the 
contest in which, for more than four years, they 
have been engaged. We rejoice to be assured 
that the Government will not withdraw from 
these States the strong arm of military power 
until it has full and satisfactory evidence of such 
a spirit of true and permanent loyalty as to 
make them safe participants in the right of self- 
government, insure obedience to the Constitution 
and laws, acquiescence in the emancipation of 
the slaves, and protection to the freedmen in the 
right to enjoy the fruits of their labor, as well as j 



security of them against unlawful violence and 
persecution. 

^ ResoU'-ed^ That, in the opinion of this conven- 
tion, it is due to equal justice and to the altered ' 
condition of things, that the Constitution of the 
United States should be so amended as to make ! 
the representation of each State in the liouse of 
Representatives proportionate to the number of 
legally qualified male electors in such States. 

Resolved, That we recognize in the adminis- 
tration of President Johnson substantially the ; 
same policy toward the people of the Southern i 
States as that inaugurated by President Lincoln ; j 
that while he has fixed terms of reconstruction 
with the spirit of liberality and kindness, he, nev- 
ertheless, has evinced a determination to arrest j 
the abuse of political power, wherever exercised i 
for disloyal purposes ; and that we believe he [ 
will so control and direct the work of reconstruc- [ 
tion as will eventually restore the Union entire, 
and secure them all the rights to which they j 
are entitled under a free and enlightened gov- I 
ernment ; and that we pledge to him, in the ' 
great work of restoring civil government in those 
States upon that basis, our hearty and unanimous 
support. 

IOWA. 

Resolved, That, to the end that the conse- 
quence of treason may be made so appalling that 
never again shall it be inaugurated upon United 
States soil, we recommend the permanent dis- 
franchisement of all prominent leaders of the 
rebellion, civil and military; and that the late 
President of the so-called Confederate States of I 
America, as the deepest embodiment of criminal , 
barbarity, be brought to the speediest trial and j 
swiftest execution, regardless of the habiliments - 
under the immunities of which he sought, in the ! 
day of his calamity, to take refuge. [ 

Resolved, That, with proper safeguards to the j 
purity of the ballot-box, the elective franchise 
should be based upon loyalty to the Constitution 
and Union, recognizing and affirming the equal- 
ity of all men before the law, therefore we are i 
in favor of amending the Constitution of our ' 
State by striking out the word " white " in the } 
article on suffrage. 

Resolved, That we extend to Andrew Johnson, j 
in his assumption of Presidential responsibilities, 
our confidence and support, pledging for the 
patriotic masses of Iowa a continuance of the 
same devotion to the Federal flag, which was I 
always promptly extended to his predecessor. I 

CALIFORNIA. 

Resolved, That in Andrew Johnson we recog- 
nise 1 he worthy successor of Abraham Lincoln ; 
like him, the representative of our free and bene- 
ficent republican institutions ; and that to him j 
we transfer, with undoubting faith, the allegi- I 
ance of hope and love which we bear to the | 
beloved institutions of our country. That we 
approve the spirft of combined firmness and 
clemency which has thus far characterized his 
administration. We indorse his declaration 
that " the restoration of peace and order cannot 
be entrusted to rebels and traitors who destroyed 
the peace and trampled down the order that had 
existed for more than half a century," and believe 
it to be the duty of all Union men to oppose the 
restoration of civil power in the rebellious States 
until the President and Congress are satisfied that 
it will be wielded by truly loyal majorities there- 



THE TRIBrXE ALMANAC Ft 



In. We h;ive the fullest confidence in the Ad- 
ministration of President Johnson, and in his 
patriotism, wisdom, and judgment, and pledge 
him our earnest support. 

J,'e«oh-e(/, That it is tlip duty and policy of the 
State of California to adopt the amendment of 
the Constitution of the Cnited States prohibiting 
involuntary servitude, except on conviction for 
crime throughout the United States. 
net'ada. 

Ji€.wh-e(J, That we indorse our National and 
State Administration, conducted, as they have 
been, with patriotism, wisdom, and economy ; 
and will, in the future as in the past, give to 
both that support which they have so well 
deserved at the hands of the Union organiza- 
tion. 

liesolred, That there must be no imprudent 
haste in admitting representatives from the con- 
quered rebel Sta,tes into the National Congress ; 
and we are inflexibly opposed to according these 
communities a position of equality in power 
and dignity, and participation in the adminis- 
tration of the Federal Government with the loyal 
States, until most conclusive and unmistakable 
proof has been furnished of profound contrition 
for the past and devoted patriotism in the fu- 
ture. 

Resolved, That the Government of the United 
States, alike by virtue of the Constitution and 
under the laws of nations, as a victorious bellig- 
erent, may, in consideration of the withdrawal 
of its military power and the restoration to their 



ancient status in the federal Union of the so- ! 
called confederate States, subject such States to 
such conditions as may place the peace, integrity 
and existence of the nation beyond the hazard 
of future distiurbance ; and, in all Its intelligent, 
earnest efforts to secure this great end, the Union 
men of Nevada will support the Administration 
of Andrew Johnson. 

limolrefl. That, inasmuch as the right of suf- 
frage is limited by the Constitution and laws of 
the State of Nevada to the loyal white man, v.e 
are, therefore, opposed to changing our organic 
and statutory law in this respect, and are in favor 
of the Federal Government, in the reorganization 
of the State governments of the so-called seceded 
States, limiting this right to the loyal white man, 
until time and experience shall demonstrate that 
it is impracticable to reorganize said State gov- 
ernments on such basis. 

COLORADO. 

Bexolved, That slavery being the cause of the 
rebellion, should perish with it, and the ratifica- 
tion of the constitutional amendment forever 
abolishing human bondage throughout the 
Union, becomes the imperative duty oif Colorado. 

liexolreil, Thatv.-e pledge to the Administra- 
tion of Andrew Johnson our cordial and united 
support ; that we believe him to he governed by 
a broad and comprehensive statesmanship, and, 
with the blessing of God, he will finish, triumph- 
antly, the v.-ork commenced by his martyi-ed 
predecessor. 



IMPARTIAL SUFFEAGE. 

XtxMS in the Several States. 



We give below the laws of the several States 
of the Federal Union on the right of suffrage. 
It will be seen that only five States — Maine, Ver- 
mont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode 
Islaud — make no legal distinction among their 
citizens on the groimd of color. In New York, 
colored citizens to be voters, must be owners of 
a freehold worth $2.5t>. All the other ftates deny 
the right of suffrage to the negro. Indians have 
a right of voting in the New England States, in 
Michigan, Wisconsin, California, and Minnesota. 
Chinamen are expressly excluded in California, 
Oregon, and Nevada. Indiana, Michigan, Wiscon- 
sin, Minnesota, Oregon, Kansas, and Illinois 
admit as voters those not yet citizens. A vote 
to extend the right of suffrage to negroes, was 
taken in 1865, in Connecticut (Oct. 2), Colorado 
(Sept ), Wisconsin (Nov. 7), and Minnesota 
(Nov. 7). All these four States declared against 
negro suffrage. 

MAINE, 

gives the ballot to every male citizen of the 
United States cf the age of 21 years and upward, 
excepting paupers, persons under guardianship, 
and Indians not taxed, having resided in the 
State three monihs.—{.Comtitution of Oct. 29, 
1819) 

NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

gives the ballot to " every male inhabitant" of 
21 years, except paupers and persons excused 
from paying taxes at their own request. Free- 
hold property qualificationi were formerly re- 



quired for office-holders, but these are abolished. 
New Hampshire never excluded colored men 
from voting or holding office. — {Constitution of 
1T92). 

VERMONT. 

Every man 21 yeai-s of age, who has resided 
1 year in the State, and who will take an oath I 
to vote " so as in your conscience you shall judge 
will most conduce to the best good " of the State, 
may vote. — {Comtitiiiion o/1793). 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

The ballot belongs to every male citizen, 21 
years of age (except paupers and persons under , 
guardianship), who shall have paid any tax as- ' 
sessed within 2 years, or who shall be exempted 
from taxation. But no person has the right to 
vote, or is eligible to ofiBce under the Constitu- 
tion of this Commonwealth, who is not able to 
read the Constitution in the English language, 
and write his name. But this provision does not 
apply to any person prevented by a physical 
disability from complying with its requisitions, 
nor to any persons who shall bo sixty years of 
age or upward at the time this amendment 
shall take effect. — {Amendment to Constitution 
O/1780). 

nnODE ISLAND 

gives the right of suffrage : 

1. To every male citizen, of full age, one year 
in the State, six months in the town, owning real 
estate worth $134, or renting $7 per annum. il 

2. To every native male citizen of full age, '| 



THE TRIBUNE AIMAKAC FOR 18C6. 



47 



two j-«ars in the State, six months in the town, 
who is duly registered, who has paid $1 tax, or 
done militia service witliin the year.— (Cwstt^M- 
Uo7i of 184U.) 

CONNECTICUT 

gives the ballot to all persons, whether white or 
black, who were freemen at the adoption of her 
Constitution (1818), and subsequently to " every 
white male citizen of the United States," of full 
age, resident six months in the town, and own- 
ing a freehold of the yearly value of $7, or who 
shall have performed militia dutj', paid a State 
tax, and sustained a good moral character 
within the year. This was amended in 1845 by 
striking out the property and tax-pajing qualifi- 
cation, and fixing the residence at one year in 
the htate, and six months in the town. Only 
those negroes haie ^•oted in Connecticut who 
were admitted freedmen prior to 1S18. 

INDIANA 

gives the right of suffrage to " every white male 
citizen of the United States," of full age and 6 
months' residence in the State, and every white 
male of foreign birth and full age, who has re- 
sided 1 year in the United f^tates, and 6 months 
preceding the election in the State, and who has 
declared his intention to become a citizen. No 
person shall lose his vote by absence in the 
sers-ice of the State or United States. " No 
negro or mulatto shall have the right of suffrage." 

ILLINOIS 

gives the vote to " every white male citizen" of 
full age, residing 1 year in the State, and " every 
white male inhabitant" who was a resident of 
the State at the adoption of this Constitution 
Like provisions to those of Indiana exist here, 
relative to persons in the service of the United 
8t&tes.—(Consmution of 1847. ) 

Mi.ssocr.i, 
by her Free State Constitution of 1S65, excludes 
the blacks from voting. 

MICHIGAN 

gives the ballot to every white male citizen, to 
every white male inhabitant residing in the State 
June 24th, 1885, and to every white male inhab- 
itant residing in the State January 1st, 1850, who 
has declared his intention, etc., or who has re- 
sided 2 i years in the State, and declared his 
intention, and to every civilized male Indian 
inhabitant, not a member of any tribe. But no 
person shall vote unless of full age, and a resi- 
dent 3 months in the State and days in the 
tovrn.—{Coiuiiitiitiun of 1850.) 

IOWA. 

Every " white male citizen " of U. S., of full 
age, resident 6 months in the State, 60 days in 
the county, has the right of voting. 

NEW YOKK 

admits to the suffrage " every male citizen" of 
full age, who shall have been ten days a citizen, 
1 year in the State, 4 months in the county, and 
80 days in the district. But no man of color 
shall vote unless he has been 3 years a citizen of 
the State, and for one year the owner of a free- 
hold worth $2511, over incumbrances, on which 
he shall have paid a tax, and he is to be subject 
to no direct tax unless he owns such freehold. 
Laws are authorized and have been passed, ex- 
cluding from the suffrage, persons convicted of 
bribery, larceny, or infamous crime, also persons 
betting on the election. No person gains or 
loses a residence by reason of presence or 



absence in the service of the United States — nor 
in navigation — nor as a student in a seminary— 
nor in an asylum or prison. A registry law also 
exists. 

NEW JERSEY 

gives the ballot, by its Constitution of 1844, to 
" every white male citizen " of the United States, 
of full age, residing 1 year in the State and 5 
months in the county, except that no pauper, 
idiot, insane person, or persons convicted of a 
crime which excludes him from being a witness, 
shall vote. 

PEKNSYLVANLi 

gives a vote to " every white freeman," of full 
age, who has resided 1 ,vear in the State and 10 
days in the election district, and has within 2 
years paid a tax, except that a once qualified 
voter returning into the State after an absence 
which disqualifies him from voting, regains his 
vote by a 6 months' residence, and except that 
white free citizens under 22 and over 21 vote 
without paying taxes. 

omo 
limits the elective franchise to "every white 
male citizen " of the United States, of full age, 
resident 1 year in the State. (Constitution of 
1851 ; But the courts of Ohio having held that 
every person of one-half white blood is a " white 
male citizen " within the Constitution and that 
the burden of proof is with the challenging party, 
to show that the person is more thap half black, 
which is impracticable ; we believe that in prac- 
tice, negroes in Ohio vote without restriction. 

WISCONSIN. 

E^'ery male person of full age, resident 1 
year in the State and being either : 1. A white 
citizen of the United States. 2. A white alien 
who has declared his intention. 8. A person of 
Indian blood who has been declared a citizen by 
act of Congress. 4. Civilized persons of Indian 
descent not members of any tribe. In Nov. 18G5, 
a vote was taken on a proposed amendment to 
the State Constitution, to strike out the word 
"white" in the qualification of voters. The 
amendment was rejects d by a majority of 8,059. 

CALIFORNIA. 

Every white male citizen of the United 
States (or of Mexico who shall have elected to 
become a citizen of the United States under 
treaty of Queretaro) of full age, resident six 
months in the State and thirty days in the 
district. The Legislature lias power to extend 
the right to Indians and their descendants. 

MLNNEEOTA. 

Every male person of full age, resident 1 
year in the United States and 4 months in the 
State, and being either : 1. A white citizen of 
the United States. 2. A white alien who has 
declared his intention. 3. Civilized persons of 
mixed white and Indian biood. 4. Civilized 
Indians certified by a district court to be fit for 
citizenship. In Nov. 1865 a vote was taken on a 
proposed amendment to the State Constitution to 
strike out the word white in the qualification of 
voters. The amendment was rejected by a ma- 
jority of about 2,000. 

OREGON. 

Every white male citizen of full age, fi months 
a resident in the State, and every white male 
alien, of full age, resident in the United States 1 
year, who has declared bis intention, may 
vote, but " no negro, Chinaman, or mulatto." 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



gives the ballot to every whife male adult resn 
dent 6 months in the State and SO dnys in the 
town, who is either a citizen or has declared his 
Intention. 

XVE.ST VirCINIA. 

Every white male citizen (except minors, 
limaticg and felons), resident 1 year in the State 
and 30 days in the county. 

KEVADA. 

The law on the right of sufTrage is similar to 
that of Oregon. 

COLORADO 

gives the ballot to every white male citizen of 
lull age. 

BELAWAnE 

by her Constitution as revised in 1831, Art. 4, 
Sec. 1, gives the elective franchise to every 
free white male citizen of the age of 23 years 
who has resided 1 year in the State and the 1 'st 
month thereof in the county, and who has within 
2 years paid a county tax, assessed at least 6 
months before the election; every free white 
male citizen over 21 and under 22 may vote 
without paying any tax. Idiots, insane persons, 
paupers, and felons are excluded from voting, 
and the Legislature may impose forfeiture of 
the right of suffrage as a punishment for crime. 

MARYLAND, 

by her Constitution, adopted in 1851, Art. 1, 
Sec. 1, allows "every free white male person of 
21 years of 'age, or upward," who has resided 1 
year in the State, C months in the county, and is 
a citizen of the United States, to vote in the 
election district in which he resides, but no 
adult convic'.ed of an infamous crirae unless 
pardoned, and no lunatic or person non compos 
mentis shall vote. 

; VrPfilNIA, 

by her old Constitution of 1851, admitted to 
vote "every white male citizen of Virginia of 
21 years, who has resided 2 years in the State 
and 12 months in the county, except persons 
of unsound mind, paupers, non-commissioned 
otncers, soldiers, seamen, or marines in the 
United States service, or persons convicted of 
bribery, or some infamous offence; persons in 
the military and naval United States' service 
not to be deemed residents by virtue of being 
stationed therein." 

NOnxn CAROLINA. 

By the Constitution, as amended in 1835, all 
freemen 21 years of age, living 12 months in the 
State, and owning a freehold of fifty acres for six 
months, should vote, except that 

" No free negro, free mulatto, or free person 
of mixed blood, descended from negro ances- 
tors to the fourth generation Inclusive (though 
one ancestor of each generation may have been 
a white person), shall vote for members of the 
Senate or House of Commons." 

SOUTH CAROLINA, 

by her new Constitution of 1SC5, gives the right 
of voting to every person who has the following 
qualiftcations : He shall be a free white man 
who has attained the age of twenty-one years, 
and is not a pauper, nor a non-commissioned 
odicar or private soldier of the army, nor a sea- 
man or a marine of the navy of the United 
State?. lie shall, for two years preceding the 
•lection, have been a citizen of the State, or, for | 



the same period, an emigrant from Europe, who 
has declared his intention to become a citiien of 
the United states. He shall have resided in the 
State at least two years preceding the election, 
and for the last si.x mouths in the district. 

GEORGIA, 

by her new Constitution, adopted in 1865, de- 
clares that "the electors of the General Assem- 
bly shall be free white male citizens of the 
State, and shall have attained the age of twenty- 
one j'ears, and shall have paid all taxes which 
may have been required of them, and which 
they have had an opportunity of paying agree- 
able to law, for the year preceding the election, 
shall be citizens of the United States ; and shall 
have resided six months either in the district 
or county, and two years within the State. 

KESTrCKY, 

by her Constitution, adopted in 1850, malces 
" every white male citizen of the age of twenty- 
one years," who has resided two years in the 
State, one year in the county, and sixty days ju 
the precinct, a voter. 

TENNESSEE, 

by her former Constitution, adopted in IS.% 
gave the elective franchise to every free white 
man of the age of twenty-one years, being a citi- 
zen of the United States, and for six months a 
resident of the county ; provided, that all per- 
sons of color who are competent witnesses in a 
court of justice against a white man may also 
vote. 

LOUISIANA, 

by the old Constitution of .Tuly Slst, 1852, gave 
the ballot to every free white male who has at- 
tained the age of tv.enty-one years, and has 
resided twelve months in the State, and six 
months in the parish. 

MissisGirrr 
makes every free white male person of twenty- 
one years of age, who shall be a citizen of the 
United States, who has resided one year in the 
State, and four months in the county, a qualified 
elector. 

ALABAMA 

is the same as Mississippi, with the substitution 
of three months' residence in the county. 

FLORIDA 

limits the suffrage to " every free white male j 
person " of twenty-one of age, a citizen of the 
United States, two years a resident of the State, 
and six months of the county, duly enrolled in , 
the militia, and duly registered ; provided, that 
no soldier or seaman quartered therein shall be I 
deemed a resident, and the Legislature may ex- 
clude from voting for crime 

ARKANSAS 

makes every free white male citizen of the United 
States, twenty-one years of age, who suall have 
resided six months in the State, a qualified voter 
in the district where he resides, except that no 
soldier, seaman, or marine in ,he United States' 
service can vote in the State. 

TEXAS. 

gives the vote to " every free male- person " who 
shall have attained the age of twenty-one years, 
a citizen of the United States or of the Republic 
of Texas, one year a resident of the State, and 
six months of the county (Indians nnt taxed, 
Africans and tlie descendeuts of Africans ex- 
cepted). 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



PRESIDENT IIXCOLN'S SECOND INAUGMAL ADDRESS. 



March 4, 18C5. 



PELtOW-ConvTRTJfEK :' At this second appear- 
ing to take the oath of the Presidential oflice, 
there is less occasion for an extended address 
than there was at the first. Then a statement, 
somewhat in detail, of a course to be pursued 
seemed very fitting and proper. Now, at the 
expiration of four years, during which public 
declarations have been constantly called forth 
on every point and phase of the great contest 
which still absorbs the attention and engrosses 
the energies of the nation, little that is new could 
be presented. 

The progress of our arms, upon which all else 
chiefly depends, is as well known to the public 
as to myself, and it is, I trust, reasonably satis- 
factory and encouragingto all. ATith high hope 
for the future, no prediction with regardto it is 
ventured. 

On the ccca?ion corresponding to this, four 
years ago, all thoughts were anxiously directed 
to an impending civil war. All dreaded it ; all 
sought to avcid it. 'While the inaugural address 
was being delivered from (his place, devoted al- 
together to saving the Union without war, insur- 
gent agents were in (he city seeking to destroy 
it without war — seeking to dissolve the Union 
and divide the effects by negotiation. Both 
parties deprecated war, but one of them would 
make war raiher than let the nation survive ; 
and the ether world accept war rather than let 
it perish, and the war came. 

One-eighth of the whole population were col- 
ored slaves, not distributed generally over the 
Union, but localized in the Southern part of it. 
These slaves constituted a peculiar and power- 
ful interest. All knew that this interest was 
somehow the cause of the war To strengthen, 
perpetuate, and extend this interest, was ths 
object for which the insurgents would rend the 
Union even by war, while the Government 
claimed no right to do more than to restrict the 
territorial enlargement of it. 

Neither party expected for the war the magni- 
tude or the duration which it has already at- 



tained. Neither anticipated that the cause of 
the conflict might cease with, or even before the 
conflict itself should cease. Each looked for an 
easier triumph, and a result less fundamental 
and astounding. 

Both read the same Eiblc, and pray to the 
same God ; and each invokes his aid against the 
other. It may seem strange that any men should 
dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing 
their bread from the sweat of other men's faces ; 
but let us judge not, thatwe be not judged. The 
prayers of both could not be answered. That of 
neither has been answered fully. The Almighty 
has his own purposes. "Woe unto the world 
becatise of offences, for it must needs be that 
offences come ; but woe to that man by whom the 
offence ccmefh." If we shallsuppoEe thatAmer- 
ican slavery is one of these offences, which, in 
the provid->nce of God, must needs come, but 
which, having continued through his appointed 
time, he now wills to remove, and (hat ho 
gives to both North and South (his terrible war 
as the woe due to those by whom the olTcnce 
came, shall we discern therein any departure 
from those divine attributes which the believers 
in a living God always ascribe to him? Foccly 
do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this 
mighty scourge of war may soon pa? s away. Tct, 
if God wills that it continue until all the wealth 
piled by the bondman's two hundred and fifty 
years of unrequited toil shall be funk, and until 
every drop of blood drawn with the lash, shall 
be paid with another drawn by the sword ; as 
was said three thousand years ago, so still it 
must be said, "The judgments of the Lord are 
true and righteous altogether." 

With malice toward none, with charity to all, 
with firmness in the right, as God giv^ us to see 
the right, let us strive en to finish the work we 
are in ; to bind v.p the nation's wounds ; to care 
for him who shall have borne the battle, and for 
his widow and his orphans ; to do all which may 
achieve and cherish a just and a lasting peace 
among ourselves and with all nations. 



PRESIDENT JOHNSON ON_THE NEGRO QUESTION. 

From, the Message of Deceiriber 4, ISO."}. 



The relations of the general Government to- 
ward the four millions of inhabitants whom the 
war has called into freedom, have engaged my 
most serious consideration. On the propriety of 
attempting to make thefreedmen electors by the 
proclamation of the Executive, I took, for my 
counsel, the Constitution itself, the interpreta- 
tion of that instrument by its authors and their 
cotemporaries, and recent legislation by Con- 
gress. When, at the first movement toward in- 
dcpendeice, the Congress of the United States 
instructed the several States to institute govern- 
ments of their own, they left each State to decide 
for itself the conditions" for the enjoyment of the 
elective franchise. During the period of the 
Confederacy, there continued to exist a very 



great diversity in the qualifications of electors 
in the several States ; and even within a State a 
distinction of qualiOcations prevailed with re- 
gard to the officers who were to be chosen. The 
Constitution of the United States recognizes these 
diversities when it enjoins that, in the choice of 
Members of the House of Representatives cf the 
United States, "the electors in each State shall 
have the qualifications reqnisite for the t lectors 
of the most numerous branch of the Stite Legis- 
lature." After the formation of the Constitution, 
it remained, as before, the uniforra usage for 
each State to enlarge the body of its electors ac- 
cording to its own judgment; and, under this 
system, one State after another hrx proceeded 
to increase the number of itr, cJcctcn;. ;;ntil now 



50 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1806. 



universal suffrage, or something very near it, is 
the general rule. Po fixed was this reservation 
of power in the habits of the people, and so un- 
questioned has been the interpretation of the 
Constitution, that, during the civil war, the late 
President never harbored the purpose — certain- 
ly never avowed the purpose — of disregarding 
it ; and in the acts of Congress during that period, 
nothing can be found which, during the continu- 
ance of hostilities, much less after their close, 
would have sanctioned any departure, by the 
Executive, from a policy which has so uniformly 
obtained. Moreover, a concession of the elective 
franchise to the freedmen, by act of the President 
of the United States, must have been extended 
to all colored men, wherever found, and so must 
have established a change of suffrage in the 
Northern, Middle, and AVestem States, not less 
than in the Southern and South-western. Such 
an act would have created a new class of vbters, 
and would have been an assumption of power by 
the I'resident which nothing in the Constitution 
or laws of the United States would have war- 
ranted. 

On the other hand, every danger of conflict is 
avoided when the settlement of the question is 
referred to the several States. They can, each 
for itself, decide on the measure ; and whether it 
is to be adopted at once and absolutely, or intro- 
duced gradually and with conditions. In my 
judgment, the freedmen, if they show patience 
and manly virtues, will sooner obtain a partici- 
pation in the elective franchise through the States 
than through the general Government, even if it 
had power to intervene. AVhen the tumult of 
emotions that have been raised by the sudden- 
ness of the social change shall have subsided, it 
may prove that they will receive the kindliest 
usage from some of those on whom they have 
heretofore most closely depended. 

But while I have nodoubt that now, after the 
close of the war, it is not competent for the Gen- 
eral Govejnment to extend the elective franchise 
in the several States, it is equally clear that good 
faith requires the security of the freedmen in 
their liberty and their property, their right to 
labor, and their right to claim the just return of 
their labor. I cannot too strongly urge a dispas- 
sionate treatment of this subject, which should 
be carefully kept aloof from all party strife. AYe 



j must equally avoid hasty assumptions of any 
natural impossibility for the two races to live 

! side by side, in a state of mutual benefit and 
good will. The experiment involves us in no 
inconsistency, let us, then, go and make that 
experiment in good faith, and not be too ea?ily 
disheartened. The country is in need of labor, 
and the freedmen are in need of employment, 
culture, and protection. While their right of 
voluntary migration and expatriation is not to 
be questioned, I would not advise their forced 
removal and colonization. Let us rather en- 
courage them to honorable and useful industry, 
where it may be beneficial to tberasclves and to 
the country ; and, instead of hasty anticipations 
of the certainty of failure, let there be nothing 
wanting to the fair trial of the experiment. The 
change in their condition is the substitution of 
labor by contract for the status of Slavery. The 
freedman cannot fairly be accused of unwilling- 
ness to work, so long as a doubt remains about 
his freedom of choice in bis pursuits, and the 
certainty of his recovering his stipulated wages. 
In this the interests of the employer and t)ie 
employed coincide. The employer desires in 
his workmen spirit and alacrity, and these can be 
permanently secured in no other vi ay. And if 
one ought to be able to enforce the contract, so 
ought the other. The public interest will be 
best promoted if the several States will provide 
adequate protection and remedies for the freed- 
men. UntU this is in some way accomplished, 
there is no chance for the advantageous use of 
their labor ; and the blame of ill-success will j.ot 
rest on them. 

I know that sincere philanthropy is earnest 
for the immediate realization of its remotest 
aims ; but time is always an element in reform. 
It is one of the greatest acts on record to have 
brought four millions of people into freedom. 
The career of free industry must be fairly opened 
to them ; and then their future prosperit.v and 
condition must, after all, rest mainly on them- 
selves. If they fail, and bo perish awa.v, let us 
be careful that the failure shall not be attribut- 
able to any denial of justice. In all that relates 
to the destiny of the freedmen, we need not be 
too anxious to read the future ; many incidents 
which, from a speculative point of view, might 
raise alarm, will quietly settle themselves. 



THE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT. 



Article V. of the Constitution of the United 
States clearly and distinctly sets forth the mode 
and manner" in which that instrument may be 
amended, as follows : 

" The Congress, whenever two-thirds of both 
Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose 
amendments to this Constitution, or, on the ap- 
plication of the Legislatures of two-thirds of the 
several States, shall call a convention for pro- j 
posing amendments, which in either case, shall j 
be valid to all intents and purposes, as part of | 
this Constitution, when ratified by the Legisla- 1 
tures of three-fourths of the several States, or by 
conventions in three-foiirths thereof, as the one 
or the other mode of ratification may be pro- 
posed by the Congress." 

In accordance with this article of the Consti- I 



tution, the following resolution was proposed in 
the Senate, on February 1, 1S04: 

Sesolvedy By the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States of America, in 
Congress assembled, two-thirds of the House 
concurring, that the following article be pro- 
posed to the Legislatures of the several States, 
as an amendment to the Constitution of the 
United States, which, when ratified by three- 
fourths of said Legislatures, shall be valid to all 
intents and purposes, as a part of the said Con- 
stitution, namel.v : 

Art. XHI. 1st. Neither slavery nor involun- 
tary servitude, except as a punishment for crime 
whereof the party shall have been duly convict- 
ed, shall exist within the L'nited States, or any 
place subject to their jurisdiction. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



51 



Sec. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce 
this bv appropriate legislation. 

After a lengthr debate, the resolution came 
to a vote, on Friday, April 8, 1864, and was 
adopted by a vote of 38 to 6, as foUows : 

TEAS.* 

Anthony E. I Howe .Wis 

Brown Mo ^Jofingan Md 

Chandler Mich Lane Ind 

Clark N HiLane Kansas 

Collamer VtlMorgan NY 

Conness CaljMorrill Me 

Cowan PaUVe*jni?A Oregon 

Dixon Conn Pomeroy Kansas 

Doolittle Wis|Ramsey Minn 

Fessenden Me Sherman Ohio 

Foot VtlSprague R I 

Foster ConnlSumner Mass 

Grimes Iowa Ten Eyck N J 

Hale N HjTrumbuU Ill 

Harding Oregon Van Winkle WVa 

Harlan Iowa "Wade Ohio 

Harris N Y Wilkinson Minn 

Henderson Me W'illey W Va 

Howard MichlWilson Mass 

NATS. 

Bams Ky, Poicell Ey 

Hendricks \-ad.\Riddle Del 

McDoiigall C&\ Sauhhiiry Del 

KOT VOTIKG. 

Bowden Va Hicks JId 

Buckalew Pa I Richardson Ill 

Carlile Va; Wright N J 

* Unionists in Roman. Opposition in Italics. 

For the amendment: Unionists, 36; Opposi- 
tion, 2 ; total, 38. Against the amendment, 6, 
all Opposition. Not voting, Opposition, 5 
Unionist, 1 ; total, 6. 

On Wednesday, June 15, 1864, the proposed 
amendment was reported to the House of Kepre- 
gentatives. Several amendments having been 
disposed of, the joint resolution adopted liy the 
Senate was put to vote, which resulted as 
follows . „„ . , 

Yeas, 95; noes, 66; not voting, 22; required 
two-thirds, 122 The resolution, therefore, was 
lost Bailey, Pa. Griswold and Odell, N. \. ; 
and Wheeler, AVis. ; were the only members of 
the Opnosition who voted with the majority. 

The 'joint resolution again came before the 
House on December 15th, Mr. Ashley, of Ohio, 
giving notice that he would call up the resolution 
and demand a vote on the ensuing M onday. The 
debate did actually begin on Jan. 6th,lS6.5,and 
continued to January 12th, when its further con- 
sideration was postponed for two weeks. They 
were again called up on January 31st, and 
adopted by the following vote : 

TEAS. 

Alley Mass Beaman Mich 

Allison Iowa Blaine Me 

Ames Mass Blair W Va 

Anderson Ky Blow ■ Mo 

Arnold HI Boutwell Mass 

Ashley Ohio Boyd Mo 

Bailey Pa Brandagee Conn 

Baldwin, J . C. . . M ich Broomall Pa 

Baldwin, J. D Mass Brown .. W\a 

B-xter VtClark, A. W NY 



Clarke, Freeman. . .N YjMiller NY 

Cobb Wis Moorhead Pa 

Coffroth PalMorriU Vt 

Colfax IndiMorris NY 

Cole CalMyers, A Pa 

Creswell Md Myers, L Pa 

Davis, H. W m\heUon, N Y 

Davis, T. T N Y Norton Ill 

Dawes lA&i% Odell NY 

Deming Conn; O'Neill, C Pa 

Dixon RI Orth Ind 

Donnelly Minn \ Patterson N H 

Driggs Mich Perham Me 

Dumont Ind Pike Me 

Eckley Ohio, Pomeroy NY 

Elliot MassiPrice Iowa 

English Conn'Badford N Y 

Farnsworth Ill Puin-all Ky 

Frank NY'Rice, A. H Mass 

Ganson N Y' Rice, J. H Me 

Garfield.. OhioiRoUins, E. H N H 

Gooch 'i,\a.ss\IioUivs, J. S Mo 

Grinnell lowa'Schenck Ohio 

Grimcold N Y|ScIiofield Pa 

Hale Pa Shannon Cal 

Herrick N v'sioan Wis 

Higby Cal Smith Ky 

Hooper STass Smithers Del 

Hotchkiss N Y* Spaulding Ohio 

Hubbard, A. W. . .Iowa Starr N J 

Hubbard, J. H. . . .Couu Steele NY 

Hurlburd NY' Stevens Pa 

Hutchim Ohio Thayer Pa 

Ingersoll Ill Thomas Md 

Jenckes R I Tracy Pa 

Julian Ind Upson Mich 

Kasson Iowa Van Valkenburg ..NY 

Kellev Pa Washburae Ill 

Kellogg, F. W. . . . Mich A\ aFhlnime Mass 

Kelloge, NY Webster - Md 

King r Mo, Wbaley W Va 

Knox Mo ^y;,eeler Wis 

Littlejohn N Y'W'illiams Pa 

Loan Mo Wilder Kansas 

Longyear Mich Wilson Iowa 

Marv'in N Y Windom Minn 

McA lliKter Pa Wood bridge Vt 

McBride Oregon |Worthington Nev 

McClurg Mo: Yeaman Ky 

Mclndoe WisI 

NAYS. 

Allen, J.C Ill Harris, B. G Md 

AUen, W.J. Ill Harris, CM Ill 

Ancona Pa Holman Ind 

Bliss Ohio Johnson, P Pa 

Brooks NY Johnson, W. Ohio 

Brotcii, J. S Wis Kalbfleisch NY' 

Chanter N Y'Kernan NY 

Clay K y .ffji app Ill 

Cox Ohio Laic Ind 

Cravens Ind Long , Ohio 

Dawson Pa Mallory Ky 

Dermison Pa.'3filler, W.H Pa 

Edeti Ill iforris, J. li Ohio 

Edgerton Ind Morrison Ill 

Eldridge yi\% NohU Ohio 

Finch Ohio O'Keill, J. Ohio 

Grider Kv Pendleton Ohio 

Hall t>\o' Perry N J 

Harding Ky\Pruyn NY 

Harrington .Ind liandall, & J. Pa 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S65. 



Robinson Ill 

Kosfi Ill 

Scott Mo 

Steele, W. G N J 

Stile.'i Pa 

Strovse Pa 

fStuart Ill 

Sweat Me 



Totnifend. . . 
Wadtnrorth . 

Ward 

White, C.A.. 
White, J. W.. 
Win field .... 
Wood, Ben. . . 
Wood, F 



.NY 

..Kv 
.N Y 
.Ohio 
.Ohio 
.NY 
.NY 
NY 



KOT TOTING. 



McKinneni Ohio 

Middleto'n.. NJ 

Rogers N J 

Voorhees Ind 

Unionists, 103 ; Opposi 



Lrtzear Pa 

/.« Blond Ohio 

Marcy N H 

McDowell Ind 

For the Amendment : 
lion, 16 ; total, 119. Against the Amendment, 66, 
all Opposition. ^ ot voting, 8 all Opposition. 
I The amendment was now sent by the Secre- 
tary of State to the Governors of the several 
States_ for ratification by" the legislatures; a 
majority vote in three-fourths being required to 
make it a law of the land. 

The following table shows the Legislature of 
which States ratified the Amendment up to De- 
cember 2i 1, 1865: 
State. 7-»»€,*lS63.| State. Time, iflG5. 

Illinois Feb. 1 Louisiana Feb. 17 

Rhode Island Feb. 2 Wisconsin Feb. 21 

Michigan Feb. 2 Missouri Fe'o. %i 

New York Feb. 3 Vermont Mar. 9 

Maryland Feb. 3 Tennessee April 5 

Massachusetts. . .Feb. 31 Arkansas April — 

Pennsylvania . . .Feb. 3 Connecticut May 4 

West Virginia . . .Feb. 3 N. Hampshire. .June 30 

ATsine Feb. 7[!routh Carolina.. Nov 13 

Ohio Feb. S'North Carolina . . Dec. 1 

Kansas Feb. 8; Alabama Dec. 2 

Minnesota Feb. 8 Georgia Dec. 6 

Virginia Feb. 9 Oregon Dec. 11 

Indiana Feb. 1.5 California Dec. 18 

Nevada Feb. 16; 

Th'^ Legiflafores of the following States de- 
clined to ratify the Amendment : 

Delaware Feb. 8 I New Jersey Mar. 1 

Kentucky Feb. 23 | 

There has been a considerable variety of 
opinion as to what constitutes the three-fourths 
majority of the States required to make the 
Amendment the law of the land. Prominent 
members of Congress are known to hold the 
opinion that the Rebel States, by their rebellion, 
have taken themselves out of the Union, and 
that they have forfeited their rights as States. 
Others, while not indorsing the State suicide 
theory, deny to some or all of the bodies which 
have acted as Legislatures of the Rebel States 
the character of lawful Legislatures. 

If both the late Rebel States and their I.ee- 
islatures are fully recognized, the number 
of States was, in December, 186.5, 86, . and 
the requisite three-fourths majority 27. 1 lis 
number was, therefore, reached when i;:eorgi.i 
ratified the Amendmeut. According to an act 
of ( ongress of 1818, it is the duty of the Secre- 
tory of - tate, after receiving ofl'icial notice of 
the adoption of a Constitutional Amendment, ac- 
cording to the provisions of the Constitution, 
"to cause the Amendment to be published in 
♦In ca'es where the two branches of a Leeis- 
lature ratilied or rejected the Amendment on two 
different days, the date placed after the name of 
the State indicates the latter of these days. 



the newspapers authorized to promulgate the 
laws, with his certiticate, specifying the states 
by which the same may have been adopted, and 
that the same has become valid, to all intents 
and purposes, as a part of the Constitution of 
the United rotates." 

On Dec. IS, 1SC.5, Secretary Seward officially 
announced to the country the ratification of the 
Amendment, as follows : 
To all to whom these presents may come, 
G'reetinf/ ; 
Know ye, That, whereas the Congress of the 
United States, on the 1st of Febmarv last, passed 
a resolution, which is in the words following, 
namely : 

" A resolution submitting to the Legislatures 
of the several States a proposition to amend the 
Constitution of the United States." 

''Resolved, By the .>-enate and nouse of 
Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled, two-thirds of both 
Houses concuning, that the following article be 
proposed to the Legislatures of the several 
States as an Amendment to the Constitution of 
the United .-tates, which, when ratified by three- 
fourths of said Legislatures, shall be valid to all 
intents and purposes as a part of said Constitu- 
tion, namelv: 
" ' Article Xin. 

" ' Section 1. Neither Slavery nor involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime, 
whereof the party shall have been duly convict- 
ed, shall e.xist within the United States, or any 
place subject to their jurisdiction. 

" ' Section 9. Congress shall have power to en- 
force this article by appropriate legislation.' " 

And wherea-i. It appears from official docu- 
ments on file in this Department, thnt the 
Amendment to the Constitution of the United 
States proposed as aforesaid, has been ratilied 
by the Legislatures of the States of Illinois, 
Khode Island, Michigan, Maryland, New York,' 
West Virginia, Maine, Kansas, Massachusetts, 
Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Missouri, Nevada, 
Indiana, Louisiana, Minnesota, AVisconsin, Ver- 
mont, Tennessee, Arkansas, Connecticut, New 
Hampshire, South Carolina, Alabama, North 
Carolina, and Georgia, in all 27 States. 

And whereas. The whole number of States in 
the United States is 86. 

And whereas. The before specially named 
States, whose Legislatures have ratified the said 
proposed Amendment, constitute three-fourths 
of the whole number of ttates in the United 
States; 

Now, therefore, be it known thst I, William 
n. Seward, Secretary of State of the United 
States, by virtue and In pursuance of the second 
section of the act of Congress, approved the 20th 
of April, 1818, entitled "x\n Act to provide for 
the publication of the laws of the United ^tDtes, 
and for other purpo.^es," do hereby certify that 
the Amendment aforesaid has become valid to 
all intents and purposes as a part of the Consti- 
tution of the United States. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my 
hand, and caused the seal of the Department o"f 
fctate to-be afB.xed. 

Done at the City of Washington, this ISth day 
of December, in the year of our Lord ISfio, anil 
of the Independence of the United States of 
America the POth. 

W.M. II. SK-W.1RD, Secretary cf State. 



THE TRIBUNE ALJIANAC FOR l&CO. 

ELECTION RETURNS 

BY STATES, COUNTIES, AND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 



VERMONT. 

Gov'NOB, 1865. Pkks. '64. PsES. '60. 
Countien. Union. Dem. Uii. Dem. Hep.Vem. 



Addison ... 


2244 


200. 


.S567 


?M. 


2626 


408 


Bennington 


1682 


61 4. 


zm 


1021 


1937 




Caledonia.. 


1953 


HOK. 


2781 


1115 


2139 


7!H) 


Chittenden. 


2018 


567, 


;S227 


itfS 


2241 




Essex 


573 


;w 


613 


3H5 


646 


3;« 


Franldin... 


1S09 


777 




1156 


1P79 


7H5 


Grand Is-.o.. 


3S4 


170 


370 


IfiK 


333 


i;<fi 


Lamoille . . . 


1161 


146 


17«) 


5;ii 




3,=i3 


Orange 


2489 


i;«3 


x:-',(i5 


1701 


2714 


12-.>3 


Orlealis 


1715 


815 


271,3 


hV.fi 


1749 


519 


Rutland.... 


2646 


711 


47(>f) 


vm 


4178 


14K7 


Washington 


2679 


11-' . 


;!6;« 


1552. 


2941 


1256 


■Windham .. 


2526 


»« 


41 .-<3 


^%•f>. 


3^32 


«)51 


Windsor.... 


3718 




0446 


1320. 


5313 


1251 



LOtal .... 27336 8857. .42419 13321 . .3 



1CSS6 



In 13C5, whole vote for Governor, 36,.!56; 
Panl Dillingham over Charles N. Davenoort, 
16,720 ; scattering, 13. In 1 j64, whole vote for 
Governor, 43,543; Smith over Redlield. 18,977. 
Whole vote for President, 55,740; Lincoln's 
majoritv, 29,068. In 1860, whole vote for Presi- 
dent, 44;61-i ; Lincoln over all, 22,972. 

Legislature, 1865. Senaie. Nouae. Joint Sal. 

Unionists.... SO 213 2^13 

Democi-utB 11 11 



Union majority. 



202 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Gov'kok, 1865. Pbbs.,'04.Pkbs.'60. 
Counties. Union. JJetn. L'n. Dem. Rep.Dem. 

S:nv'l..i'ar'' -.S,- it I.'n^.W -r!..'.!..!, •.Oil-^-a. 

Belknap.... :i872 1934 1..1S55 2216.. 1981 1839 

Carroir. 1801 2241 0..17&2 2509. .2418 2043 

Cheshire 3290 2027 0..3492 2444. .3813 2099 

Coos 1131 1275 0..1116 1459.. 1349 13V5 

Grafton 4354 3990 3. .4337 4574.. 4823 3889 

Hillsboronsh6124 4599 0..63?S 5325.. 6888 4866 

Merrimac . . .4358 4150 42.. 4374 4768.. 4794 4145 

Rockingham 5857 3923 2..5S19 4477.. 5720 3960 

Strafl-ord....8140 2180 3. .3094 2550. .3536 2298 

Sullivan 221S 1758 0..2i35 1878. .2437 1836 



Total 34145 2S017 57.343G2 S22C0.S7519 28404 

re' .-,.., 5'-. ■■■A ».• .(,o (M) .s ..J 4;.4'i SK.s; i:'..n 

In 1SG5, whole vote for Governor (exclusive 
of the town of Greenland, which would have 
been about 2U0) . 6-3,219 ; Smyth over Harring- 
ton, 0,071. In 1804, home vote for Piesident, 
6G,5S2: soldiers' vote, 2,6S9; total vote for 
President, 69,271 : Lincoln'smajority, 3,.529. In 
1860, whole vote lor President, C5,92J ; Lincoln's 
majoriij,9,il5. 

CONGRESS, 1865. 
Districts. Uii. Dem. 

I. M,irft n. \.f',-y. 

Belknr.p 1947 1928 

Carroll 1921 2251 DittricU. Un. Dem. 

Rockingham. 5851 S887 HI. PnUerson. 

Straflord 3179 2124 Cheshire 3481 2040 

Coos 1267 1287 

Total 12906 10190 Grafton 4595 4003 

Marslou over Marcy, Sullivan 2344 1769 

2,716. I 

P. n.-'iHs.ciH-v. Total 116S7 9099 

Hillsborough 6414 4671 

Merrimac 4570 4223 Patterson over Bing- 

ham, 2,588. 

Total 10984 8894' Un. maj. in State 7,394. 

LEC4ISLATUEE, 1865. Senate. Uoime. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 9 214 223 

Democrats 8 114 117 



MAINE. 

Gov'NOE,1865. Gov.'64. PeE3.'60. 

Counties. Union. Dem. Uu. Dem. lien. Dem. 
( o...v.Ho,vm-,l C..U..H w.L. "■.«.< II. 

Androscoggin2801 1434.. 3555 2062.. 3526 1953 

Aroostook ...1258 679.. 1220 1103.. 1142 588 

Cumberland.. C322 4518.. 8015 6625.. 7934 5503 

Franklin 2146 1250.. 2181 1697.. 2281 141T 

Hancock 2993 1635.. 3249 2253. . 3422 2183 

Kennebec ....4934 1679.. tS48 .S1G2.. 6599 2709 

Knox 2219 1707.. 2603 2299.. 2523 W7C 

Lincoln 2479 15S0..241b 2378.. 2,510 1550 

Oxford £94t 2454.. 4144 3270., 4344 27.i8 

Penobscot ....5298 1807.. 7028 4144., C997 3758 

Piscataquis... 1490 845.. 1723 1160.. 1656 789 

Sagadahoc ...2019 C74..2287 1144.. 2257 1048 

Somerset 3615 2379.. S674 2837.. 4048 2317 

Waldo S0C6 1467.. 3555 2540.. 8S00 2055 

Washington . .2664 1854. . 3150 2732. . E315 2743 

" ■ ..6261 52C5.. C465 5920.. 0460 4776 



(ii 
„, ,.^,566 : Samuel Cony over Josepli How- 
22,332. In 1861, total vote in the same 



York.. 

Total . . . .5»i49 31117: .61615 45332. .62611 G8107 

reri-M.t o.'.-.O - .^(l ..-..•*. :;0 .'.^ .In. . i ..'.-..T :;:.'3 

Total vote in 1S65 (in 451 cities and planta- 
tions) " - • " 

ard, 2.,,.^^...,. ...^ ,.,.„, 

towns, 106,947 ; for Clony, 61,615, for Howard 
45,332; Cony's majority, 16,283. The Union 
vote fell off this >earfi,l&l votes, and that of 
the opposition 14,215. The towns not yet heard 
from, gave in 1864, for Cony, 914 votes, and lor 
Howard, 955, Gov. Cony's malority, when the 
soldiers' vote is added, will reach 23,000. In i 
1860, whole vote lor i'resident, 100,718; Lin- I 
coin's majority, 24,504. 

LEai8LATUEE,1866. Senate. Uouse. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 31 1.'36 167 

Democrats 15 15 



Union majority 31 



121 



Union majority. 



100 



106 



CONNECTICUT. 

Gov'nor.'Cd. Eq.Sup'ge. Pees.'64. 
Counties. Union. Dem. 1865. lieu. Dem. 

D..rk'M ,ui.<. va, r.V-=. No Li-, ^a-l '■ I. 

Fairfield 6876 5323.. 3857 6046.. 7368 7193 

Hartford 8352 0613.. 5537 6&56..8692 8680 

Litchfield.... 4858 3801.. 2815 3967.. 4997 4423 

Middlesex.... 3012 2287.1928 2469.. S113 S107 

New Haven . .8252 T225. . 5960 7473. . 8761 9638 

New London.5181 3068.. 3333 8517.. 5662 4919 

Tolland 2427 1661.. 1568 1683. . 2430 2152 

Windham . . . .Gil6 ISSS. . 2219 1478. . 3S63 2173 

Total -12374 31339. .27217 33480. .44031 42285 

Per. en- .V J9 .■■■. r, i . . -> ..;;! si.u..;.<.w> <8.61 

In 1865, whole vote for Governor, 73,717; 
William A. Buckingham over Origen S. Sev- 
mour, 11,035; scattering, 4. In 18fi4,\iiiole voio 
for President, 86,o;6"; Lincoln's majoriiy, 
2,406. 

On Oct. 2, 1865, a vote was ta'<en upon the 
following amendment to the Slaic Couatilu- 
tion : 

"Every male citizen of the United States 
who shall have attained the age of twenty- | 
one years, who shall have rcbided in thid btafo 
for a term of one year next preceding, and in 
the town in which he may oii'er himself to be 
admitted to the privileges' of an elector, at 
least six months next preceding the time at 
which he may so oiler himself, and Bhall bo 
able to read ny ariicle of the Constitution or 
any section of the statutes of this blate. and 
shall sustain a good moral character, shall, on 
taking such oath as may be prescribed by law, 
become an elector." 

The vote upon the smendment, bv counties, 
Is given above. A\Tiole vote on amendment, 
OO.iOO; majority against the amendment, 6,272. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



According to the statement of the Town Clerk 
of Colchester, New London County, there l8, 
however, an error In the otflcial table, of the 
vote by towns, the vote of Colchester being 
stated to be— Yes 136, No 79, while the trne 
figures were Yes 13G, No 179. This would add 
IW to the published total vote and 1o the ma- 
lority against the Amendment, making the for- 
mer (30,716, and the latter G,»T2. 

At the previous ballot on this same question, 
in tbe year 1*47. the total vote was hut 25,106 ; 
the majority, however against the proposi- 
tion, was 13,8.4. 

CONGEESS, 1865. 
Districts. Vn. Dem.. Districts. Vn. Dem. 

I. Demins.Milcllell. III. Bmndii:;. e..-\lUii. 

Hartford 8206 6879 New London. 5155 8068 

Tolland 2413 1654 "Windham ....3111 1281 

Total .10619 80331 Total 8566 4349 

Henry CDemins; overl Augustus Brandagee 
iUtcheU.2,586 : scatter- rOver Allen, 4,217. 
ing,308. I 

il. Warnpr.P.UFse'l.l IV. Hubbni-.I.Tnyl.T. 

Middlesex . . .3003 2278 Fairfield 6862 5334 

New Haven. .8233 7243 Litchfield ... .4885 3778 

Total 11236 952li Total 11747 9112 

S. L. Warner over John H. Hubbard 

Eussell, 1,715 scatter- over Taylor, 2,635. 

ing 6. I 

LEGisL-VTrKE, 1865. Senate. Home. Joint Bal. 

TJniouists 21 161 182 

Democrats 76 76 



RHODE ISLAND. 

Gov'NOK,1865. Phbs. '61. Pr.BS.'60. 
Counties. Union. Scat^g.Un. Dem. Vn. Dem. 

iinmo. Lini-.Mc-!.-! Lm .ti.br- 9 

irlstol 565 5.. 780 419.. 667 462 

:ent 781 81.. 1865 815.. 1246 657 

1610 879 

T202 4875 

1622 9<e.. 1519 834 



Providence 5668 553. 

Washington 1629 77. 



Total 10061 753. .13692 8170. .12244 

In 1865, whole vote for Governor, 10, 



Union majority. 



21 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Gov'NOK,1865. Pbh8.'64. Pbes.'CO. 
Coimties. Un. Dem. Vn. Dem. Rep. Dem. 

BuUwk.C'Ucb. Liiu-.M.l'.lel. Lim-.Olbers. 

Barnstable.. 1494 256.. 3994 701.. 2371 Tffi 

Berkshire ...3286 2237.. 5314 3363.. 5202 3303 

Bristol 4963 960.. 9786 2173.. 7980 2674 

Dukes 347 67.. 475 138.. 338 238 

Essex 9505 2882. .17237 5691.. 14832 7794 

Franklin ....2693 615.. 4376 12S9.. 3994 1383 

Hampden.... 3808 1637.. 6356 2894.. 51&4 2881 

Hampshire . .2747 113. . 5036 860. . 4597 1020 

Middlesex ..12661 8062.. 22318 9597. . 17806 12840 

Nantucket .. 191 16.. 480 36.. 420 116 

Norfolk 5974 2349.. 11040 5502.. 8860 7014 

Plymouth ...3702 798.. 7610 2512.. 6703 85S8 

Suffolk 7899 4099.. 14692 8.367. . 10974 11195 

Worcester. .10842 2124. .18072 5615.. 17272 7515 

Total . . .69912 21345.126742 48745.. 100533 62612 
PercoMt lh.51 2:l.'i6..7J.-.>3 ii.Tl.. (J-i.Si Hi.lM 

In 186.5, total vote for Governor, 91,318. Alex- 
ander H. Bullock over Darius N. Couch, 43,667 ; 
Alexander H. Bullock over all, 48,500. In 1864, 
whole vote for Governor, 174,171: John A. An- 
drew over Henry AV. Paine, 76,091 ; whole vote 
for President, 175,437 ; Lincoln over McClellan, 
77,907. In 1860, whole vote for President, 169,175 ; 
Lincoln over all, 43,891. 

CONGRESS, 1SG5. 

Yote forllepresentative in the Cth Congres- 
Blonal District, to f 11 vacancy occaalonod by 
resi.'jnation of D. W. Gooch. Nathaniel P. 
Banks (Union), 8,128; Thomas J. Greenwood 
(Dem ). 1,988; scattering, 42. 

Legislattikb, 1865. henale. Ilouse. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 39 221 260 

Democrats 1 19 20 

Union majority.... 38 203 240 



James T. Smith's majority, 9,308 ; In 1864, whole 
vote for President, 22,162 ; Lincoln's majority, 
5,22'>. Ln 1860, whole vote for President, 19,951 ; 
Lincoln's majority, 4,537. 

CONGBESS 01' 1866. 
Districts. Hep. ScaVff. 

Thofc A. J.iuke.. 

Eastern District 5683 53 

ifep. Dem. Scat'g. 

llWnu. Brn.lford. 

Western District 2S81 1291 2 

Nathan F. Dixon over Bradford, 1590. 
Legislatuke, 1865.— The State Senate con- 
sists of 33, and the House of Kepiesentatives 
of n members. The election, held in 1865, 
turned on no party issues. Less than a dozen 
members of the Legislature were elected by 
the Democratic parly. 

NEW JERSEY. 





Gov'NOE,'65. Gov.'62. 


Pres.'C4. 




Vnion.Dem. Vn 


.Pern 


Un.Dem. 








Park*r 








.1262 


1024 


950 


9:^4. 


1117 


l(Kf2 


Bergen 


.1811 


2281 


ii;« 


2168. 


155-1 


2431 


Burlington . 


.5387 


:!91» 


.S979 


:w,5. 


S280 


4176 


Camden 




2767 


'<',563 


2449, 


.s:«2 


2758 


Cape May .. 


. 735 


440 


61 H 


4(11 


V(!1 


.5.57 


Cumberlantl 


. .2713 


18.56 


mm 


1(«1 


2(i69 


2084 




.11617 


9114. 


695H 


H493 


94(12 


92,39 


Gloucester . 


..2083 


i:^«< 


KiKH 


1386 


1998 


1404 


Hudson 


..5157 


5.>.7H 


'xm 


49ti1 


4616 


imi 




3094 


4;^69 


2141 


4039. 


2631 


■4355 




.4118 


.3767 


3'>02 


3336 


.S726 


3.92 




.^m 


!M70. 


zm 


8292. 


3037 


3.40 




..3145 


4197. 




4042. 


■mi 


4410 




3702 


3.506, 


2938 


3222 


3o8V 




..1421 


811. 


1050 


925. 


1292 


791 




..3.365 


266(i, 


1927 


1408. 


2!IS4 


2773 


Salem 


. .2J79 


2017. 


1756 


2074. 


2221 


2164 




..2022 


2225. 


1543 


2291. 


IWSi 


2;«i 




.1815 


3215. 


I'.OI 




1621 


31(>4 


Union::.... 


. .2776 


2808, 


1927 


2621 


2:«i 


2866 


Warren 


.2249 


3.582. 


1651 


3280. 


2006 


3706 


Total 


.67525 64730. 


46718 61314. 


60723 63034 



■li.n 

In 1865, whole vote for Governor, 132,201 ; 
Ward's majority, 2,789. In 18(>4, total vote for 
President, 128,747 ; McClellan's majority, 7,.301. 
In 1862, total vote for Governor, 108,032 ; Par- 
ker's majority, 14,,596. Union gainin 1865, over 
1864, 10,090 ; over 1862, 1 7,385. 
Legislature, 1806. Senate, House. Joint Dal. 

Unionists U 36 47 

Democrats 10 24 31 



Union majority. 



12. 



13 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

ATrDlT.-GEN.'65. Pee8.'64. Pees.'GO. 
Counties. Union.Dem.Un. Dem. Hep.Dem. 

H«i-lr'.lilt.l )rn-iS.Lin.-V McClel I.iiic.Otlior*. 

Adams 2633 2647.. 2612 8016.. 2724 2718 

Allegheny. 11189 67.50. .21519 12414.. 16725 7818 

Armitrong .2810 2506.. 3526 3211.. 8355 2168 

Beaver ..:.. 2242 1196.. 3237 2304.. 2824 1683 

Bedford.... 2482 2596.. 2336 2752.. 2505 2334 



THE TRlBtTNE ALMANAC FOR 1SC6. 



Linr'n.MrClcl. *Lino.Othe 



6436 
8475 
2244 
323 
1721 



1516 



2135. 
3467. 
4526. 
4354, 
5444 4220. 



Hartrnnlt.D.iv s 

Berks 4846 10001. 

Blair 2501 1773. 

Bradford... 5242 2304, 

Bucks 5778 6131, 

Butler 2683 2361 

Cambria ....1957 2716 

Cameron ... 285 211, 

Carbon 1414 1612. 

Centre 2745 2933, 

Chester 7074 4947, 

Clarion 1177 1967 

ClearfiPld...l^07 2087 

Clinton 1427 1785, 

Columbia... 1591 3007 

Crawford... 4188 2907 

Cumberland3289 3710, 

Dauphin. ...4885 3261 

Delaware ..2647 1335.. 3664 2145 

1,1k 237 539.. 348 835 

Erie 3847 2051.. 6911 3722 

Fayette 3098 3670.. 3221 4126 

Forest 77 50.. 85 62 

Franklin.... 3620 3496.. 8862 3821 

Fulton 692 863.. 694 906 

Greene 140S 2542.. 1583 3074 

Huntingdon2562 1589.. 3321 2477 

Indiana..... 3739 1620.. 4320 2197 

Jefferson... 1741 1662.. 1820 1877, 

Joniata 1260 1485.. 1437 1753 

Lancaster .11409 5976..144C9 8448 

Lawrence.. 2264 923.. 3408 1389 

Lebanon.... 3052 1903.. 8780 2779 

Lehieh 3547 4531.. 3908 5920 

Luzerne . . . .6126 6916. . 7645 10045 

Lycoming . .3192 3397. . 3401 4207 

McKean 581 444.. 767 652 

Mercer 3582 2641 . . 4220 3569 

Mifflin.. ..1568 1515.. 1643 1718 

Monroe 411 1020.. 685 2698 

Montgom'y.5910 6928.. 6872 7943 

Montour.... 837 1209.. 1130 1496 

Kortham'n .27T2 4710.. 3720 6944 

Korthumb'd2424 2843. . 2915 8608 

Perry 2287 2037. . 2406 2446 

Philadelph.49859 39830. .55797 44032 

Pike........ 234 821.. 260 1180 

Potter 792 270. .1390 680 

Schuylkill. .6002 6881.. 7851 9540 

Somerset... 2580 1412.. 2788 1719 

Snyder 1631 1126.. 1679 1368 

Sullivan .... 312 588. . 369 660 

SusQUehan..S292 1999.. 4203 2959 

Tioga 3191 965. . 4673 1584 

Union .1693 1133. .. 1945 1352 

Venango -..2611 2285.. 8849 S341 

"Warren 1734 971., 2541 1505 

■\Vashington4487 3M9.. 4951 4579 

TVayne.T....1577 1943.. 2274 3989 

Westmorl'd 4093 5097., 4650 5977 

■Vfyoming ..1214 1261.. 1337 1402 

York.... ...4564 6917.. 5568 8500 



Total. ..238400215740.296391 27C316.268030 208412 

Per <-.-nt 62. ■'■0 47.6U...'il.75 4!<.'.>.'i. . b6.v5 48. '5 

The vote for Surveyor-General was as fol- 
lows: J. M. Campbell (Union), 237,907; J. P. 
Linton (Democrat), 215,981; Campbell's ma- 
jority, 21,986. 

In 1865, whole vote for Auditor-General, 
454,263 (123 votes cast for W. H. H. Davis/were 
thrown out) ; J. F. Hartranft over W. W. H. 
Davis, 22,CG0. In 1864, whole vote for President, 
572,707; Lincoln's majority, 20,075. In 1860, 
v.hole vote for President, 476,442. Lincoln's 
majority, 59,618. 

Legislatuke, 1806. Senaie.IToii.se. Joint Jial. 

Unionists 21 67 88 

Democrats 12 S3 43 



same position for thelast Syears, and of the 
KepretentatlveB 58 were re-elected. 



MINNESOTA. 

Gov'NOK,'65.EQ,SrF.'65.PRKS.'64. 



Counties. Union. Dem. 

Mnr.hall.Rir< 

Anoka 200 114. 

Benton 29 60. 

Blue Earth... 802 597. 

Brown 225 61. 

Carver 355 516. 

Cass — — . 

Chisago 233 47. 

Crow Wing... 21 10. 

Dacota 864 1089. 



Fillmore 1134 

Freeborn 559 

Goodhue 769 

Hennepin 1120 

Houston 691 

Isanti 71 

Jackson 87 

Kanabec 9 

LeSeuer 422 

Lincoln* 24 

Manomin 1 

Martin 158 

McLeod 214 

Meeker 105 

Mille Lac 43 

Morrison 39 

Mower 411 

Nicollet 475 

Olmstead 795 

Pine 11 

Ramsey ICOl 

Kedwood 65 

Renville 26 

Rice 868 

Scott 252 

Sherburne.... 85 
Sibley ........ 228 

Stearns 335 

Steele 521 

St. Louis 80 

Tod — 

Wabashaw ... 668 

Waseca S51 

Washington . . 500 
Watonwan ... 32 

Winona 1169 

Wright 435 



1103.: 1170 1178 

206.. 760 325 

196.. 642 160 

821.. 1642 1031 



2.. 

22.. 

44.. 
256.. 

98.. 

81.. 

73.. 
112.. 
S74.. 
372.. 



201 
1866 688 
1711 1221 
796 635 



1600.. 521 1628. 



50 

14.. 2 
628.. 667 
734.. 135 
72.. 59 



505 420 

1849 £29 

17 4 

1260 1421 



11.. 
735.. 
227.. 



373 



Total 17385 13864. .12170 14838.. 24971 17355 

Percent 65.60 44. . Ml. . -(S, 12 ■64.8?. .49.01 4ll.il3 

In 1865, total vote for Governor, 31,199 ; Mar- 
shall's majority, 3,471. In 1864, total vote for 
President, 42,326 ; Lincoln's majority, 7,616 In 
1860, total vote for President, 34.421 , Lincoln's 
majority, 9,.'?75. Total vote for Amendment to 
State Constitution (striking out the word 
" white " from the qualification of voters), in 
1865, 27,010 „.maj. against the Amendment, 2,670. 
♦Precinct of Reuvill e Co. made separate ret'ns. 

LEGISLATTTKB, 1866. Ssnate.Hoiise. Joint Bal. 

Unionists..... 14 29 43 

Democrats 7 13 'iO 



Union majority. 



16 



OHIO. 

Gov'NOR,'65. Pees.'64. Pkeb.'GO. 
Counties. ' Union.Vem.Vn.Dem.Kep.Dem. 

CotMorzan. Line McClel.LincUthers. 

Adams 1982 1770.. 20S8 1932.. 1667 2180 

Allen 1623 2152 . . 1865 2241 . . 1796 1932 

Ashland.... 2030 2219.. 8156 2281.. 2166 2250 

Ashtabula ..4069 961.. C054 1039.. 55G6 1279 

Athens 2541 1160. . 3024 1318.. 2526 1570 

Auglaize.... 918 2049.. 1164 2374.. 1C88 1927 

Belmont ....3363 3289.. 8422 8498.. 2675 8850 

Brown 2610 2879. . 2699 2933. . 2105 3335 

Butler 2981 4245. , 8219 4310.. 2867 4449 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18CG. 



foi^Morean, Line. 

Carroll 1682 1177.. 1TS4 

CbQmpalgn.2140 1625.. 2753 

Clark 2946 1719.. 8709 

Clermont... S3S6 3307.. 3303 

Cllnlon 2328 1253.. 2758 

CoItmihlanaS7C5 2271.. 4547 
CosLocton..l97t) 2374.. 2125 
Crawford ...1759 2011.. 1954 
Cuyahoga... 7472 5S09.. 8587 

Darke 2C37 2eC5. . 2598 

Beflance.... &19 15C9.. 1163 
Delaware... 2491 16C9. 

Erie 2143 1651, 

Fairfield.... 2351 P.S94.. 2484 

Fayetic 1547 1087. 

Franklin.... 42B6 6236.. 4920 

Fulton 1511 879.. 1865 

Gallia 2095 1051.. 2S26 

Geauga 2201 526.. 2986 

Greene 2878 1523.. 3886 

Guernsey... 20f 3 1853.. 2684 
Hamilton . .17043 13605. .227C0 
Hancock.... 2120 2228.. 2177 

Hardin 1C41 1S02.. 1613 

Harrieon. . . .1E69 1467.. 2173 

Henry 811 1268.. 924 

Higliland...26D5 2063.. 3105 
Hocking.... 1205 1691.. 1884 

Holmes S-iS 2558. . 1068 

Huron S202 1944.. 4441 

Jackson 1558 1102.. 1955 

Jefferson... 2843 1589.. S875 

Knox 2629 24S8.. 2856 

Lale 2103 628.. 2781 

Lawrence... 18'S7 1261.. 29C2 

Licking 8152 £804.. 8322 

Logan 23C2 1487.. 2577 

Lorain 3474 1674.. 4586 

Luces 2942 1713.. 3794 

Madison . . . .1391 1157. . 1671 
Mahoning... 25C4 2184.. £042 

Marion I'leO 1C57. . 1441 

Medina 2521 1636.. 2925 

Meigs 24.'50 1493. . 3403 

Mercer 730 17B8.. 826 

Miami 3175 2289.. S791 

Monroe 1177 27SS.. 1411 

Montgom'ry5C83 5034.. 5526 

Morgan 2220 1628.. 2606 

Morrow ....2105 1560.. 2405 
Mu8l:ingnm.S9T2 3C03. . 4421 

Noble 1949 1588.. 2122 

Ottowa CS7 £20. . 822 

Paulding ... 502 S52. . 805 

Perry 1713 1774.. 1823 

Pickaway... 2111 2423.. 5201 

Pike 005 1S33.. 1049 

Portage 2853 1932.. 3478 

PrcWc 2338 1524. . 2719. 

Putnam 875 1493.. 1117 

r.)chland....2874 8278.. S187 

Kos3 £022 8125.. S£81 

Sandusky... 2ia 2S55.. 2297 

Scioto 22C5 19SG.. 2799 

Seneca 2807 S030.. C085 

Shelby 1412 1886.. 1603 

Stark 4447 4020. . 4797 

Summit S220 1879.. 4192 

TrnmbuU...£889 1831.. 5089 
Tufecrawa827J5 £048.. S020 

XJr.ion lOSO 117?. . 2128 

Van Wert... 1247 1153.. 1294 

Vinton nS7 1168.. 1119 

Van en 3229 1489. . 8851 

\VaKl;ington3439 8042.. 4028 

"Wavno S053 8257.. 8181 

Williams ...1062 3S88.. 2U.7 

■Wood 2036 1408.. 2586 

"Wyandot ...1673 1SC9.. 1740 

Total .. .223633 19S697.265154 

Perctul ...bi.H tu.JT.. tb.Ll 



Mcriel.1 inc C 
1223.. 17C7 
175.'i.. 2325 
1641.. ?m 
S318.. £9«i 
1397.. 2483 
2501.. S864 
2447.. 2100 
3112.. 2064 
5&=i6.. 8686 
27ftl.. 2640 
]i)94.. 10S8 



3032 1829.. 2886 1C54 

2484 3510.. 2173 EC05 

1860 1243.. 1458 1434 

"■ 5756.. 42C5 5043 



970.. 1629 

1174.. 1881 1G99 

491.. 2877 727 

1556.. 3260 1910 

1980.. 2510 2022 

16598. .16182 19482 

2300.. 2135 2341 

1457.. 1182 1284 

1563.. 2175 1441 

1271.. 808 1045 



1887.. 1829 

2633.. 1392 

2090.. 4107 

1317.. 1738 

1732.. 2682 



2415 
4045 
2829 
1417 
2907 
1595 



832 
34C1 
1S85 
4974 
2445 
2260 
4004 
1944 
571 
554 
1605 
2002 



1E07.. 4349 1934 

3129.. 8136 2928 

1255.. 1792 14S4 

1201.. 1015 978 

1323.. 12-:0 1277 

1595.. 3316 2154 

3C56.. 8SC9 3248 

S418.. 8204 

1425.. 1713 

1492.. 2011 

1874.. 1567 



2371 



Loram 29 

9 Lucas 27 

4 Madison 7 

1 Mahoning 44 

lOMaiion.r. 16 

— IJ'edina 9 



Alex. LoJg received, in Adams Conntv, 17: 
Ashland, 8; Champaign, 1 ;• Clinton, 3; Dela- 
ware, 2; Fairfield. 1 ; Fayette, 1 ; Hamilton, 90; 
Hardin, 56; Hlgblaud,10y; Knox, 5:3; Logan, 1; 
Madison, 1; >;eigs, 4; Jiontgomery, l; Port- I 
age,]; Sandngkv,4; ATashington, 6: ^Vyan- 
dot.l. Total. SCO (per cent. O.tei. 

Total vote for Governor, 417,720; Jacob Dol- 
Bon Cox over J. "W. Morgan, 29,S.=(> ; Cox's ma- 
jority over an,29,54C, In 1864. wliole vote for 
ITesident, 470,722. Lincoln's msijority, 59,586; 
whole vote for Secretarv, 419,«9; Smith's 
(Union) majority, 54.751. In 1S"0, whole vote 
lor President, 442,441; Lincoln^ majority, 

ARMY VOTE, 1SC5. 
Counties. Un. Dem: C.Morg. 

(.. ■ .iU.ifT Logan II 1 

Adams 10 

Allen 9 

Ashland 18 

Ashtabula 18 

Athens 50 

Auglaize 4 

Pelmont CO 

Brown 12 

Butler....'..... 22 

Carroll C 

Champaign ... 13 

Clarke... 8 

Clermont 27 

Clinton 6 

Columbiana... 41 

Coshocton 18 

Crawford — 

Cuyahoga C5 

Darke 52 

Defiance 6 

Delaware 11 

Erie 7 

Fairfield 23 

Fayette 2 

Franklin 80 

Fulton 10 

Gallia 42 

Geauga 23 

Greene 24 

Guernsey 41 

HamiKon 145 

Hancock 10 

Hardin 9 

Harrison 10 

Henry 5 

Highland 25 

Hocking 17 5 "Warren 16 4 

Holmes 4 4 "Washington... 24 15 

Huron 17 — Wavne V4 12 

Jackson 40 10 "Williams 25 9 

Jefferson 37 " 

Knox S3 

Lake 2 

Lawrence 8 4 Total . 

Licking 13 



Alexander Long received 4 votes, and 10 
were Gcattering. Tofnl vote cast, 8,129. There 
is, however, a dlscrcpancv In the soldiers' 
vote, as returned hv tlie clerks of courts to the 
Secretary of State, and that returned to the 
Governor and Auditor, and opened and certi- 
fied by the State Board of t anvassers. The 
soldiers' vote, as returned by conntv clerls, 
is 2,281. The soldiers' vote, as certifie"d by the 
Board of Canvassers, gives Cox 2,128, an In- 
crcase of 147 votes— makinir his total vote 
Z2S,K0. Gen. Morgan's vote is increased 3 
by the same count, making his entire voto 
1!,3,7C0. This gives Gen. Cox 30,080 majoiitv. 

In 18C4, whole coldjcrs' vote, 5(),(*3 ; Lincoln's 
majority, 31,383. 

Vote for other State Omcurs. 

ZieuU>iu/U-(:iovc/ntor.—AiidifiW G. McBnr- 



15 Meig 

3 Mercer 19 

SMiami &1 

1 Monroe 89 

5 Mongomery... 47 
1 Morgan 24 

6 Morrow 26 

8 Muskingum... 64 

— Koble 26 

19 Ottawa 10 

— Paulding 2 

17 Perry.. 22 

23 Pickawav 10 

IPike 2.S 

1 Portage 13 

2 Preble 29 

1 Putnam 8 

— Kichland 70 

lOEoss 18 

3 Sandusky 18 

13 Scioto 54 

8 Seneca 52 

1 Shelbv 12 

8 Stark 44 

48 Summit 24 

6 Trumbull 74 

S Tuscarawas... 28 
1 Union 13 

1 Van Wert 10 

5 Vinton 49 

5 Warren 16 

4 "Washington... 24 

— Wavne ."4 

10 Williams 25 

2 Wood 15 

21 Wyandot 20 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



nev 224,946; "William Lang, 1P3,510; M. >ey 
Maginnls, 326: McBuiney over Lang, ■'l.fc?. 

Treasurer o> SWte.-Sldney S. Warner, 225,657 
George Spence, 193,072; John McGulley, 518; 
Warner over Spence, 82,5bo. „ r^»,^^ 

JuitaeH of the hnjrre^ne Court.— (FnU Term) 
-Jacob Brinkerhoff, 224,958: PhiladelpU Van 
Trump, mfiSi ; Matthew H. Mitchell, 'st6 ;(va- 
cancy) John Welch, 225,182; Thomas M.^ey, 
198,1^!; Alexander S. Boys, S19; Brinkerholt 
over Van Trump, 81,470. „ r ■ . r, , 

LEGiSLATtJBE; 1866. iienate.Eovse. Joint Bah 

Unionists ^ JO 105 

Democrats 12 ^ 21. 

Union majority 23 35 53 

WISCONSIN. 

Gov'NOE,'65. Eq.SuF.,'65. Peks.'64. 



Counties. Union. Den 





, 594 


126.. 


431 


150. 


Ashland . . . 


. 29 




23 


2b. 




..447 




828 


899. 


Buffalo 


, . .5--'3 


211.. 


446 






. 27 




24 




Calumet. .. 


..485 


f,TS.. 


471 




Chippe-wa. 
Clark 


::J8? 


1:: 


46 


it: 



Bep. Vein. 



ColumMa.....2021 1087.. 1669 1356.. 2K2 

Do"geV.......2702 S580..2282 3?^.. 8226 

Do2f. :: 309 68.. 224 1^.. 256 

■noiifflas 45 54.. 25 71.. 37 

DnSn :::.■;.: 417 257.. 235 so7.. 5C6 

EauClkire:... 42:2 812.. 329 „S88..„51.5 

Fond du Lac. .2871 2739. 

Grant 2577 1131. 



Spooner, fnr Lieutenant-Governor, and the 
TJninn candidates for the other State ofliceB, 
received about the satnc maj. as Fairchild 

± including Dallas, SvotCBfor the X>niou State 
ticket and lor Suffrage. 

In 1SC5, total vote for Governor, 106,8il ; Fair- 
child's iaajoiity,10,u81 Ij 1S6', total vote lor 
President, 149,342; Lincoln's majority, 17.574. 
In 1863, whole vote for Governor, 13j,297; 
Lewifc's (Union) majority,17,574. In 1830, whole 
vote for President, 132,018; Lincoln's majority, 
20 '02 Total vfie in 1865, on extension of suf- 
frage", 10,2t8 _; majority against citeusion of 

Legislatube, 1866. Senate. Souse. Joint Bal. 
Unionists J3 67 90 



Union majority. 



Green 1552 

Green Lake... 1027 

Iowa 1102 

Jackson 506 

Jefferson 2003 

Juneau ©7 

Kewaunee 12i 

Kenosha 1(B5 

Lacrosse 1127 

La Fayette... 1213 1S70.. S89 



1790 1697.. ^7 1561 

1232 845.. 2017 UOi 

886 511.. 1441 508 

710 1215.. 1283 1424 



725.. 



13-17. 



16. 



499. . 33 573. . 



.. 867 



581.. 

241.. 

1007. . 

1643.. 

76.. 



2157 2742 

776 087 

157 753 

1318 879 

1531 904 

1471 1712 

15 22 

1179 2348 

136 527 

437 647 

3175 6875 

1160 650 



212 345. 

628 1060. 

208 1643. 

165 113. 



. 651 



273 110 



112.. 120 



LaPointe 
Manitowoc... luiH 

Marathon 112 

Marquette.... ^40 
Kiilwaukee...22il 

Monroe lOOO 

Oconto j53 

Outagamie.... 739 

Ozaukee 265 

Pepin 231 

Pierce 540 

Polkt 2^ 

P-Ji;ii:il 

iheb;Afj;::::i605 leo?.. iiio ^ 

Walworth .2890 852.. 2724 m. 
Washingion . 599 1969.. 513 2007. 
^ruST.V.lOSO 20o^...l7| 2^ 

^^aS?h"S?a^.--— '-•■ ^ 

Winnebago 

Wood 



MICHIGAN. 

This State held, on April 3, an election for 
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court and 
for two Kegents of the University. There was 
no contest lor the office of Justice of the feu- , 
prerce Court, the Democrats having made no I 
nomination. Isaac P. Christiancy, pLepublican, 
received 59,T.J0 votes, out cf a total vote of | 

\he vote for Ecgents of the University was | 
as follows: ^^^_ j^\ 

E.C.WH Ker.G.WH r.l.O.C.C ...». ck.E W 1 ». 

52.S34 50843 19333 19426 

Beside 1303 Imperfect voles, and ^0 scattering 

^ The following table presents the vote cast for 
the leading Kepublican and that for the lead- 
Ine Democratic candidate, by counties, com- i 
pared with the vote at the Presidential elec- 
tions in 1864 and 1S60. .„. ^ ,„„ 
KEGENT,'65. Pees. '64. Pebs. '60. I 
Counties. Union. Jjem. Un. Jjem. Hep.Dem. 

" 'l86r'"l34.3'!.' 1896 1544 

116 71.. 82 28 

71 18.. — — 

1652 1022.. 1901 1038 

462 584.. 311 S34 

2554 2307.. 2620 23S7 

3035 1465.. 3074 1558 



Allegan 1390 388. 

Alpena 97 34. 

Antrim ^„65 5. 

Barry 1316 49. 

Bay.. 246 355. 

Berrien 17M ^1. 

Camonn.'.V.:::2387 1219:'. 3742 2525: ! 4072 2449 



159. 



134 97 

1958 2185 

573 130 

^ 451 

3455 1192 

064 2923 

2010 2196 

1189 541 

1053 28-2 

3926 1T?2 

247 243 

fo^K?rteS^::^ri?^:S^l 



.1050 261. 

.2181 1299.. 1991 1«1.. 

. 223 259.. 141 S24.. 



Cass 1^3 

Cheboygan... 9 
*Chippewa.... — 

Clinton 919 

Delta 47 

Eaton 1319 

•Emmet — 

Genesee 2039 

G'd Traverse. 217 

Gratiot 440 

Hillsdale 2572 

Houghton. . 83 

Huron 877 

Ingham 1454 

lona 1437 

Iosco 33 

Isabella 113 

Jackson 2087 1255.. 

Kalamazoo.. .1916 

Kent 2157 

Keweenaw.. . 109 

Lapeer 877 

Leelenaw 158 

Lenawee 31B7 



1765 1.135.. 2068 1634 

23 64.. 20 74 
46 124.. 64 89 

1524 1411.. 1569 1273 

24 31.. [New Co.] 
[7. . 1848 1369. . 21S5 13a8 

... 75 141.. 80 168 



. .53476 48394. .46629 55454. .^1^ ( 
..44.61 45.33,. 46.14 6».-i8.. 55.8J 



.• 375 83.. 407 198 

"56.. 571 866.. 496 314 

34.. 3805 1T25.. 3749 1719 

380 978.. — — 

•04" 860 337.. 289 209 

111" ■ 1792 1796. . 2181 1838 

136': 2205 1383.. 2231 1294 

57 43.. 20 41 

215 83.. 123 131 

3002 2909. . 3396 259G 

..„ ■ 3151 2101.. S2S0 2031 

S93 3398 £906.. 3047 2510 

:: 295 391.. - - 

243.. 1464 1217.. 1762 1222 

23 235 146.. - - 

191 ■ 4780 3632.. 5080 3510 

i?i' • TiSi inQ.3 nnrK onOQ 



:ivicg8ton.V.".1255 1326.. 1604 1?S3. . 2075 2003 



MacKinaw 

Macomb 1241 

Manistee 81 

*Manitou — 

•Marquette ... — 
Mason " 



185. 



41 



'172 2041 2177.. 2534 2106 

145 70.. 126 58 

11 135.. 56 67 

143 83.. 89 49 

: 148 97.. 109 6 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



Walker. Welle.Linc.MoClel.T.inr.Otlipra 

Mecosta 83 58 23.. [New Co.] 

Menominee... 82 8.. 208 101.. 157 43 

Jliiliand 119 1659 2381.. 228a 2105 

Monroe 1193 1194.. 595 443.. 565 361 

Montcalm 483 654 366. . £03 241 

*Muskegon... — 40B 242.. 361 207 

Kewaygo 238 43.. 3709 8816.. 4411 3768 

Oakland 2418 536.. 856 177.. 193 158 

Oceana 282 252 454.. 331 300 

Ontonagon.... 291 373.. 1345 1536.. 1414 1317 

Ottawa 874 554.. 1731 1900.. 1479 1206 

Saginaw 783 411.. 753 318.. 899 396 

SaniUc 493 8.. 1412 1283.. 1606 1221 

Shiawassee. ..1035 358.. 1808 2063.. 2589 1955 

St. Clair 1330 368.. 2681 1796.. 2832 1980 

St. .Joseph 1619 218.. 798 401.. 747 350 

Tuscola 558 7.. 1985 1400.. 2175 1374 

Van Buren.... 1403 710.. 3633 3836.. 4380 SKO 

Washtenaw. ..3733 2722.. 5946 7670.. 7325 6701 

Wayne 2104 1828.. 9403 2959.. — — 

Total . . . .53334 19426. .91521 74604. .ii^ 65057 

Per r.M,l U.-^-2 iS.tiS.. ii.Sa 44.11.. 6,M3 4-2 31 

*Not returned. 

In 1865, aggregate vote for the leading Ee- 
pnblicau aud the leading Democratic candi- 
date for Eegent of University, 71,760; E. C. 
Wallier over E. Well , 32,908. In 1864, whole 
vote for Governor, 163,649. Henry H. Crapo 
over William H. Fenton, 17,063. Whole vote 
for President, 166,125 ; Lincoln over McClellan, 
16,917. In 1860, whoie vote, 153,537: Lincoln 
over all, 23,423. 

Lbqislattjrb — There is a large preponder- 
ance— tluee or four to one— of Unionists in 
each House. 



MISSOURI. 

• New Const'n, '65. Pres. '64. 

Counties. Un. Vem. . 

Yes. No. I>inc,McUiel. 

Adair 569 25.. 797 162.. 

Andrew 781 136.. 1141 60.. 

Atchison 246 172.. 639 7.. 

Audrain 160 474.. 126 393.. 

Barry 99 33.. 197 17.. 

Barton — — .. 23 — . 

Bates — — .. 27 13.. 

Benton 309 88.. 574 21.. 

Bollinger — — .. 243 13.. 

Boone 133 1763.. 262 813.. 

Buchanan 866 789.. 1914 813. 

Butler — — .. — — . 

Caldwell 405 58.. 496 88.. 

Callaway 146 1630.. 274 965.. 

Camden 290 43.. 468 1.. 

C. Girardeau. 696 448.. 1213 551.. 

Carroll 291 304.. 285 113.. 

Carter — — .. — — .. 

Cass 167 73.. 76 105.. 

Cedar 202 12.. 297 — .. 

Chariton 236 68.. 363 2.. 

Christian 320 40.. 557 5.. 

ClarlJ 645 56.. 997 123.. 

Clay 90 890.. 216 7?7.. 

Clinton 269 196.. 297 492.. 

Cole 416 575.. 1256 502.. 

Cooper 704 492.. 939 881.. 

Crawford 170 295.. 297 307.. 

Dade 417 15.. 507 4.. 

Dallas 863 40.. 213 13.. 

Daviess 564 48.. 775 280.. 

DeKalb 221 90.. 400 197.. 

Dent 53 37.. 107 1.. 

Donglass 81 1.. 189 2.. 

Dunklin — — .. — _ 

Franklin 847 838.. 1717 401!! 

Gasconade.... 508 346.. 862 185 

Gentry 326 79.. 535 281.. 

Greene 1069 208.. 2223 846.. 

Grundy 645 43.. 933 17.. 



185 1248 
97 1815 
68 873 



23 1564 

4 867 

1 1595 

— 770 
277 1791 

- 1878 
11 1356 

114 1145 

20 2221 

35 714 

8 994 



494 1573 

433 390 

201 1619 

42 1698 

129 1113 



„ y>.. No. 

Harrison 820 185. 

Henry 365 34 

Hickory 282 49. 

Holt 517 50. 

Howard 265 750 

Howell — — 

Iron 182 172. 

Jackson 4;i8 694. 

Jasper — — 

Jeflerson 452 4S9! 

Johnson 592 67. 

Knox 541 197. 

Laclede 258 119., 

Lafayette 295 816. 

Lawrence 317 156., 

I^ewis 560 530., 

Lincoln 409 367. 

Linn 594 213.. 

Livingston ... 431 155. , 

Macon 743 328.. 

Madison 71 303., 

Maries.; 81 332.. 

Marion 643 547.. 

McDonald.... 29 1. 

Mercer 770 35. 

Miller 460 5.. 



LincMoCle 


Linr.Otli*™. 


1252 212. 


297 1279 


465 232. 


16 1568 


365 1. 


15 638 


673 SJ. 


202 972 


534 6. 


1 2106 



20 
1158 
555 



Moniteau. 

Monroe 74 

Jlontgomery . 372 

Morgan 282 

Kew Madrid.. 45 

Newton 11 

Nodaway 380 

Oregon — 

Osage 398 

Ozark — 

Pemiscot — 

Perry 435 

Pottis 253 

Phelps 422 

Pike 038 

Platte: 410 

Polk 644 

Pulaski 50 

Putnam 938 

Ralls 191 

randolph 06 

i;ay 350 

Reynold^ 1 



247.. 866 431. 



106.. 

15.. 

15.. 
235.. 



224.. 18 2368 

348.. 161 1508 

50.. 800 

805.. 24 2722 

— .. 59 1099 



3 1937 

1'5 1286 

•M 1449 

1J4 2-il5 

9 019 

7 473 
235 3058 

CO 1342 

23 092 

1 723 
87 1354 

8 2174 
45 1359 
18 1075 

— 500 

22 1315 

147 1085 

2 S56 
253 733 



S42 



Ripley. 
St. Cha: 



St. Charles.. . 512 1133.. 

St. Clair 134 — 

St. Francois.. 146 408.. 

St. Genevieve 173 213.. 

St. Louis 5322 11248. .1 

Saline 317 137 

Schuyler 260 25.. 

Scotland 404 102.. 

Scott 131 142.. 

Shannon — — 



Stoddard 130 105 

Stone 25 103.. 

Sullivan 540 140 

Taney — — .. 

Texas — — .. 

Vernon 11 loe.. 

Warren '. 451 280.. 

Washington . . 167 699. . 

Wayne 15 217.. 

Webster 292 163.. 

Worth 167 108.. 

Wright — - .. 

Solcllers vote. 3995 1168 



882.. 6 2930 

5.. 4 1332 

28. . 7 450 

47.. 11 1205 

191.. 1 1125 

337. . — 1701 

798.. 9 2120 

20. . 4 240 

— .. — 384 
394.. 534 1515 

1.. 1 976 

134.. 19 1154 

217. . 48 640 

8882.. 9945 14805 

98.. — 1967 

191.. 14 973 i 

533.. 197 1364 1 

186. . 6 650 I 

— . . 2 192 i 
216.. 90 1471 



83 1575 

— 427! 
6 766 



28 1190 

8 721 

7 88;} 

- 534 



Total . . . .43670 41808. .71676 31626. .17028 143490 ' 

In 1865, total vote on the New Constitution,! 
eo far as returned, 85,578: majority for New I 
Constitution, 1,K62. In 1S64, whole vote for I 
President, 104,428; Lincoln over McClellan.; 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



50 



1025 1250.. 1337 1363 

1138 982.. 1089 934 

53 67.. 31 56 

10S4 438.. 1334 564 

1329 157.. 1761 434 

594 659.. 477 468 

794 148.. 847 259 



207. . 665 243 



41,075. In 1860, uhole vote for President, 
165,518 ; anti-Lincoln majority, 131,462. 
Lbgislatuke, 1865. Senate.* Hoxise. Joint Bal. 

TJnionists 26 103 129 

Democrats 9 26 35 

Union majority 17 77 94 

* Two members of tlie Senate are desienated 
as doubtful. We have classed one with the 
Kepublican, and the other with the Democratic 
party. 

IOWA. 

Gov'nob,1865. jTrDGB'65. Pees.,'64. 
Counties. Union.Dem. Un.Dem. Un.pem. 



Adair — 

Adams — 

Alamakee — : 

Appanoose ... 1G7 

Audubon — 

Benton 1054 I 

Blackhawk... 800 

Boone — 

Bremer 528 

Buchanan 947 

Buena Vista.. — 

Butler 222 

Calhoun — 

Carroll — 

Cass 32 

Cedar 1551 

Cerro Gordo.. — 

Cherokee 5 

Chickasaw.... 80 

Clarke 559 

Clay — 

Clayton 1633 1 

Clinton 1708 1 

Crawford — 

Dallas 260 

Davis 113 

Decatur — 

Delaware 450 

Des Moines... 262 

Dickinson — 

Dubuque 1552 ' 

Emmett — 

Fayette 1145 

Floyd* ■.. 571 

Franklin 82 

Fremont — 

Greene 101 

Grnndy 110 

Guthrie 329 

Hamilton 204 

Hancock — 

Hardin 772 

Harrison — 

Henry 1885 

Howard — 

Humboldt .... — 

Ida - 

Iowa 237 

Jackson 150 

Jasper 1304 

Jeflerson 891 

Johnson 1547 

Jones 1463 

Keokuk 109 

Kossuth — 

Lee 2289 

Linn 2059 

Louisa 1127 

Lucas 37 

T.von — 

413 



SloncBenton. Wright Trimble.Linc.HI«C!el. 

Monroe 226 — .. 800 641.. 102? 592 

Montgomery. 61 — .. 182 112.. 169 91 
Muscatine .... 1673 1481 . 



O'Brien . 



5.. 



Osceola (Not organized Nov. SO, 1865.) 

■r^ nn A-in OOJ cn-r. 



10 
493 

20 

40 
209 
1586 
262 

15 
5S1 



56 58. 

676 892. , 

1191 1060.. 

687 815. 

1219 681. 

1947 1575. 



42 
1691 
647 
271 
644 



Pafo^Alto — - 

Plvmouth 23 — 

Po"cahontas... 33 — 

Polk 221 — 

Potawattamie 55 — 

Poweshiek ... 805 393 

Binggold ISi - 

Sac — 4 

Scott 2080 1648 

Shelby — 1 

Sloux 



— .. 419 284.. 597. 171 



23 -.. 19 

41 10.. 38 

1770 1464.. 1816 

520 317.. 58 

857 342.. 947 

341 349.. 403 

40 35. . 51 

2224 1561.. 2851 1408 



i\.. 



60 



122 — 



817 



Union 56 

VanBuren... 363 

Wapello 98 

Warren 1177 

Washington.. 612 

~VVayne 70 

Webster — 

Winnebago... — 
Winneshiek . . 176 

Woodbury 25 

Worth 151 

Wright — 



[no ret'rn] . 1 

551 429.. 630 

.. 893 464.. 1027 388 1 

— . . £96 245. . 509 146 I 

-.. 243 180.. 214 181 ' 

— .. 1578 1172.. 1883 1067 

— .. 1577 1441.. 1761 1275 

756.. 1209 715.. 1457 622 

— .. 1641 S67.. 1942 851 

— .. 627 512.. 647 464 

20.. 404 429.. 385 337 

— .. 83 — .. 42 14 

— .. 1157 659.. 1743 868 

— .. 113 86.. 2S2 96 

— .. 150 — .. 132 37 



Grand total. 



73122 52100.. blS;.! 49)^00 



The vote for Governor is not canvassed until 
January, and therefore, did not reach us in 
time for the Almanac. Gov. Stone's majority 
(unofficial; In all but 8 counties, 15,942. Total 
vote for Judge of the Supreme Court, m 18G5, 
125,519 ; Geo. G. Wright over H. H. Trimble, 
21,022. Four votes were cast for H.H. Trim- 
ble, and 293 for James Graut. Wright over all 
others, 20,725. In 1804, whole vote for Presi- 
denc, 136,591; Lincoln's majority, 38,071. In 
1863, whole vote for Judge of Supreme Court, 
138,859; Union majority. 34.623. ^ . .„ , 

LEGisLATUBE, 1866. Senate. House. Joint Bal. 

Unionists 43 83 126 

Democrats 5 . 15 i» 



Union majority. 



1C6 



.. 97 30.. 

.. 10 2.. 

.. 869 721.. 

,. 1611 1514.. 

.. 1407 989.. 

,. 1513 1070.. 

.. 1653 1443.. 

.. 1494 808.. 

.. 1318 1189.. 

.. 138 12.. 

.. 2380 2802.. 

.. 2097 1221.. 

.. 1156 " " 
.. 570 



401 
2576 
467 
78 
10 
927 
1953 
1518 



Madison 

Mahaska 1820 1188, 

Marion 1634 1804, 

Marshall 500 — 

Mills 218 - 

Mitchell 606 119 

I Monona — — 



504. 
— ;■. 9^ 564! 



2755 
1640 
729 



1769.. 1970 1553 

346.. 1799 367 

227.. 615 237 

91.. 642 108 

122.. 126 8* 



KENTUCKY. 

The issue, at the election held in Kcntncliy, 
1865, for State Treasurer, members of Congress, 
and members of the State Legislature, was be- 
tween those favoring the ratification of the 
Constitutional Amendment abolishing Slav- 
ery, and those opposing the ratification. Un- 
ionists, therefore, means the friends, and Con- 
servatives the opponents of the Amendment. 
Tbeasuker, '65. Pees.,'64.Pees.'C0. 

Counties. Union. Cons. Un. Dem. Itep.Detn. 

NeaU.Garrard.Linc.McCU 1. LincOtliere. 

Adair 254 402.. 59 627.. 1 1106 

Allen 316 207.. 29 547.. - 1140 

Anderson 201 245.. 34 272.. - 1098 

Ballard IM 387. . 351 541 . . 1 1204 

Barren 509 681.. 55 737.. 14 1867 

Bath 340 322.. 132 451.. - 1715 

Boone 302 818.. 200 1063.. 1 1848 

Bourbon 182 689.. 274 &50.. 3 1750 

Boyd .. 403 492.. 202 493.. 18 7at 

Boyle'.:; 273 475.. 129 533.. 3 1080 

Bracken 779 663.. 268 922 4 1771 

Breathitt 212 17.. [no ret'rn]. - 553 

Breckinridge. 141 318.. 42 995.. S 1619 

Bullitt 32 185.. 14 624.. 2 991 



THE TKIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



Butler 526 

Caldwell 349 

Calloway 66 

Campbell 16T2 

Caiioll 154 

Carter 791 

Casey Ill 

Christian CT7 

Clarke 113 

Clay 456 

Clinton B20 

Crittenden... 590 
Cumberland.. 35 

Daviess 176 

Edmonson.... 293 

Estill 707 

Fayette 706 

Fleming 683 

Floyd 61 

Franklin S59 

Fulton 7 

Gallatin 216 

Garrard <J39 

Grant 6T3 

Graves 426 

Gravson 513 

Green 131 

Greenup 734 

Hancock 103 

Hardin 191 

Harlan 567 

Hai risen 553 

Hart 350 

Henderson ... Ill 

Henry 401 

Hickman 26 

Hopkins 220 

Jackson 516 

Jefferson 3334 

Jessamine 344 

Johnson 417 

Kenton 2017 

Knox 675 

Larue 45 

Laurel 486 

Lawrence 449 

LetcUer 127 

Lewis 916 

Lincoln 43 

Livingston ... 105 

Logan 301 

Lyon 161 

Madison 1107 

Magoffin 181 

Marion 65 

Marshall 147 

Mason 819 

McCracken... 235 

McLean 152 

Meade 23 

Mercer 535 

Metcalfe 239 

Monroe 438 

Montgomery. 188 

Morgan 176 

MuUlenburg.. 518 

Kelson S7 

Nicholas 557 

Ohio 587 

Oldham 35 

Owen 73 

Owslev 003 

Pendleton.... 952 

Perry 257 

Pike 267 

Powell 133 

Pulaski 1531 

Kockcastlo ... 461 

Kowan 151 

PaiBsell 94 

Scott 150 

Shelby 122 



a'rnrd.Lin- Mcn?l. Lim- Others. 

265.. 99 414.. 5 940 

120.. 294 851.. 8 1112 
378.. [uo ret'rnl 
912.. 1504 1286. 

249.. 82 334.. — 107« 

247.. 367 345.. 1 1063 

326.. 127 507.. 8 919 



314 



-.. 424 252. 

141.. 83 302. 

267.. 37 1124. 

199. . 48 215. 



86 61.. - 

109 391.. — 

467 460.. 21 

220 372.. — 

642 769.. — 

114 716.. 8 



192.. 289 233.. 

61.. 47 492.. 

17.. 345 29.. 

2440.. 2066 6404.. 

389.. 195 612.. 

i5..[noret'rn]. 

1015.. 1716 1374.. 

187.. 629 197.. 

228.. 17 700.. 

206.. 444 188.. 

447.. 191 380.. 

20..[noret'rn]. 

444.. 045 391.. 

592.. 109 801.. 

57.. 248 217.. 

546.. 220 508.. 

52.. 60 105.. 

615.. 800 700.. 

119.. 23 79.. 
561.. 28 
8S6.. 149 
1120.. 368 
257.. 515 
227. . 62 



1119.. — 
147.. — 
1197.. 26 



421.. 225 597.. 

416. . 17 868. . 

506.. 244 528.. 

491.. 367 765.. 

347.. 31 588.. 
116..[noret'rn]. 

159.. 348 96.. 

S3'.'.[noret'rni; 
105.. [no ret'rn]. 
148. . 27 227. . 
526.. 1059 615.. 
170.. 428 259.. 

49 23.. 

15 459. . 



22.. 



.Ga rnrd.Linc-Mc'"'''!. LincOtho- 



Simpson 118 340.. 6 

Spencer 3 264.. 1 

Taylor 10 219.. 80 

TOdd feO 115.. 105 

Trigg 814 462.. 42 

Triuihle 60 240.. 



Union , 



96 118. . 98 



Warren 53C 1077.. 163 1444.. 

Washington.. 155 495.. 73 810.. 

Wavne 505 262.. 89 546.. 

Webster '.2 205.. 77 311.. 

■\\Tjltley 682 32.. 781 71.. 

Woodford.... 43 553.. 28 504.. 

Wolfe — — ..[norerrn]. 

Soldiers' vote 1194 3823 



1574 
1923 
1218 

i:m)5 



Total 42082 42187. .27786 64801 . .1304 143703 

Pe -t 4'...M-l ixi.n' ..'.i'.t^ -l.^:;.. o/M D'.'B 

In 1865, the whole vote for Treasurer, 84,269; 
James H. Garrard over William L. Neale,105. 
In 1864, whole vote for President, 92,087; Mc- 
Clellan's majority. 36,51.5. In 186:\ whole vote 
for Governor, 85,695; Thomas E. Bramlette 
(Union) over Charles WlcHiffp (Dem.) 50,917. 
In 1880, wh'-le vote for President, 145,058 ; anti- 
Lincoln majority, 142,318. 

CONGRESS, 1865. 
Districts. Union. Cons.] iv. T^n l. • Hardi 



,„die.v T.mii.v Adair. 



.442 



54i 



Ballard. 

Caldwell 403 

Calloway ....113 
Crittenden... 659 

Fulton 24 

Graves 510 

Hickman 75 

Livingston... 195 

Lyon 185 

Jfarshall 198 

McCracken . .265 

Trigg 337 

Union 231 

Webster 184 



Total 3512 5749 

L, S. Trimble over C. 
D. Bradley, 2,207. 



Breckinridge 507 

Butler 622 

Christian 783 

Daviess 881 

Edmonson ...303 

Gray sou 570 

Hancock 232 

Henderson ...180 



597 



eSOjAnderson ....235 

196 Bullitt 92 501 

753!Ca8ey 537 587 

62 Green 348 598 

345 Hardin 397 916 

950l Larue 275 583 

335;Marion 277 1065 

298 Meade 73 520 

92iNel6on 72 

577!Shelby 156 



bpencer it 

IVvyljr 212 

Washington .504 



McLean 318 

Muhlenbnrg .648 
Ohio 790 



Total 57S6 697J 

B.C. Bitter over Geo 

H. Yeaman, 1,188. 

III. L.in. Gride' 

Allen 484 44; 

Barren 537 79k 

Clinton 806 75 

Cumbei land .302 

Hart 875 

Logan 461 

Metca.fe . .-. . .287 

Monroe 646 



909 



789 
1135 
503 
565 
718 



Total 3652 9437 

Aaron Harding over 

Marion C. Taylor, 5,285. 
\. K u. Mul^^ml..l. 

Henry ...'.. 456 711 14 

Jefferson > 
Co. and [ 4902 £832 1S9 

Louisv'le) 

Oldham... 149 4.55 2 

Owen "Hi 706 18 



Total ... .5751 4704 Vii 

Lovell H. RousBOan 

over Miillorv, 1,047; 

over Mallory andMun- 

day, 874. 

\ 1. Sni Mi.Wcr,!. 

Boone 349 889 

Bracken 826 772 

Campbell.... 1685 912 

Carroll 183 310 

Gallatin 243 357 

Grant 692 394 

Harrison 574 812 

Kenton 2084 1011 

Pendleton.... 9R3 601 

Trimblo 07 



Simpson 149 

Todd 820 

Warren 583 



Total 48 

Henrv Grlder over 
Jas. H. Lowry, 1,657. 



833 

Total 7606 6121 

Green Clay Smith 

239 over A. H. Ward, 1,245 ; 

475 S, H. Doughty received 

'"■ Ivote. 

VI I. Frv.ciianll'n. 

Bourbon 228 830 

Boyle 802 4S4 

Clarke 124 283 

Fayette T23 1220 



1126 



6528 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR l-^C^. 



Franfelln 3S2 

Jpssaiuine ...407 

Lincoln oS3 

Mercer !>7i 

Nicholas 630 

gcott 185 

Woodford.... 68 

Total S943 



Geo. S. Shauklin over Carter . 
Speeds. Fry, 3,6s 

Breathitt.. ""."214' 

Clay 544 

Estill 713 

Garrard 651 

Harlan 692 

Jackson 536 

Knox 815 

Laarel 591 

Letcher IIS 

Madison 1103 

Owsley 62-2 

Perry 295 

l^laski 1592 

Kockca8.1e...«53 
Whitley 1007 



ki-.i RniwInl.nairnrH. 

9S1 TTarno 553 425 

436!WoUe — — 

724 

651 Total li;.i>.>l i,SU 

6S9| Wui.H.X-iandLllover 
764 T. T. Garrard, 6,bl0. 

6131 I.X. hi- Ke^.Hi.'l 

. Bath 471 513 

k.yd 446 



iFlemlDg 870 

rar.1 Floyd 285 

26 Greenap 813 

330iJohuso.i 620 

404 Lawrence 497 

525 Lewis 932 

49Magofflu 224 

8 Mason 836 

ISl' Montgomery. IPS 
212 Morgan 243 

17 Pike...: 4i5 

620 Powell 134 

155 Rowau 203 

221 



5701 Total .8163 6241 

209| Samuel McKee over 
62:J.Smii.li Hurt, 1,922. 
The total vote for members of Congress foots 
np as follows : 

For the Conservativp candidates 57,50? 

" Union " 54,003 

Opposition majority 8.49i 

Legislature, 1865. Henaie.Mouse.Jointlici!. 

Conservatives 19 58 77 

Unionists 19 42 61 

Conservative maj 16 16 

ILLINOIS. 

At Iho election held for conntv officers in 
this Stute. in Jiovember, Union tictets were 
elected iu the folk. wing hitherto Liemocratic 
counties: Adams, Clay, Edgar, Fayette, Ful- 
ton, ilancock, Jac.^so.?', Madison, Marian, 
Jiasoii, i.cLioaougli, Kenard, M'intgomerv, 
Morgan, Feoria, Randolph, Piclilund, San- 
gamon, Scott, Tazewell, Verraillion, Wood- 
ford. 

The Unionists did not lose a single one of 
the counties which they carried in l8i>4. 

LFG!8L,ATUBE,lbG5. tSeiKtte.iioiDie.JointlSaK 

Unionists 14 51 6j 

Democrats 11 34 40 



Union Majority. 



1? 



I^^l;IANA. 

At (he election for countv oCiccrs, held in 
this State in Oct. ber, the rnionists Rained in 
all bnt two counties. The most remarkable 
Union triumph was in Allen County, which, iu 
180!, gave 2,;)j'J majority for tiic Democratic 
ticket, and in 1855, about 400 majority lOr the 
linion ticket. 

Lbgislature, 1863. SennW. Hon^e. Joint Brr I 

Unionists 25 CO 80 

Democrats 25 40 70 



Union majority. 



20 



KANSAS. 

The Kansas Legislature elected In IS^S Is 
BOlidiv Eepublican. More than half the num- 
ber of the members have served in the v.f:v. 
I Among the important measures that will comvi 
before this Legislature, will bo the recon- 
struction of the representative districts, and 
the cniendmeut to the Constjtutionin relation 
to negro BuU'rage, 



WEST VIRGINIA. 

An election for members of the State Le.^rls- 
Ir.ture, was held in this State on Oct. 2G. 'lUe 
political complexion of the new Legislature is 
about as follows: 

Legislature, 1806. Senrtte.Hottae. Joint JBal. 

Unionists 19 48 67 

Democrats 1 8 9 

Union majority 18 40 58 



CALIFORNIA. 





Jt;DGE,'05. PKES.'frl 


Got 


.'63. 


Countic!, 


tn.Vtia. 


C.i. 


Vem 


ln.JUe:7i. 






i» ..e 




. w.Uu 




Alpine 


P-'R 


r.^1 


. 384 


'm 







Alameda 


m\ 


45:^ 


1467 


811 


. 1401 


H{^, 


Amador .... 


, HI!) 


945 


. 1392 


1199 


. 2245 


?.(m 


Butte 


,1205 


7K7 


. 1789 


1117 


. 1810 


1490 


Calaveras. . . 


.1423 


lo;i5, 


. 2071 


W>[ 


. 2273 


20-'() 


Colusa 






. 274 


4/5 


. 479 


TAl 


Contra Costa 


. m.) 


518 


. 9.58 


.522, 


. 1061 


5"4 


5el Norte... 


. (i-1 


69, 


. 167 


139 




HO 


SI Dorado... 


.1753 


1290, 


3949 


21 -.ri 


. 8210 


Hi;«) 








93 


:i5-! 


83 


XiH 




. Ml'.! 


192, 


423 


»y 


502 


196 








139 


12 > 


204 


199 


Lake 


_ 


_ 


213 


405 


161 


«2„{ 










318 


236 






.OS Angeles. 








553 


744 


702 


i;34 


.iarln..^. 








fc.-. 


i'lO 


610 


489 


lariposa.... 


. 49'.) 


512, 


707 


K12 


8S5 


m 








570 


V.S 


C33 


,571 




. 41 


147, 


76 


218 


95 


329 








1G7 


i;« 


1C09 


fto 


Monterey.... 


. 191 


1H5. 


415 


HH4 


522 


M 


;^apa., 


. :;..-. 


2.(>, 




.5;r,! 




urM 


CO!!S 


1195 


2784 


r,93 


2S83 


17.56 


'lacer 


.14S)9 


8,59, 


2314 


1474 


2057 


1 >!<•■() 




. 61 (i 


.515. 


823 


6H9 


1283 


im 




2099 


1400, 


4192 




3553 


1944 






243 


493, 


SGI 


o7ri 


San Diego . . . 





_ 


97 


197, 


116 


13?, 




.5;ilr( 


12605 




9361 


.5462 


San Joao'.iin. 
S.Lnis Obispo 


.lO'.H 


721, 


1819 


1427 


1931 


147.S 






259 


149 


2C9 


819 










600 


377 


831 


340 







843 


80 


481 


14« 




ISO.", 


722 




1202 


2034 


1.52.5 




422 


247, 


974 


452, 


904 


4(« 




5(« 


ain 


90D 


562, 


936 


617 


Sierra 


IM? 


600, 


2161 


1037, 


2SS0 


1303 


Sis'slyou 


VIH 


fi;u. 


925 


957, 


1053 






Ki.\ 


(WH, 


1255 


9flS 


1521 


11<^4 




11K2 


17.=i5. 


2026 


2.<C6 


1700 


rm 




. i:i:> 


2H2, 


277 


346, 


&47 


Kn 


Sutter 


. ;»<;) 


371, 


677 


.586. 


713 


670 




. 227 


1!1 


483 


:!(w, 


53.J 


4ftH 


Trinity 


. Ui\ 


KIH. 


.653 


461, 


785 


6lVl 






11H, 


5?.-* 


l:h^. 


610 


715 




885 


97;^. 


1589 


1.506, 


181} 


1861 




. 4S.-i 


.596 


653 


475, 


86o 


7n.s 




.120ft 


»;il. 


1870 




1£K0 


13i;3 


Soldiers' vote 






2600 


237. 


4159 


140 


Total 31761 251*i. 


62131 43841. 


644-17 44 U.-. 












■.j.\,6 


Jj.i,i 



la 1SS5, total vote. In SI counties, for Jnd?:o 



19,7Si. In 1864, whole vote, 105,975; Lincrla'a 
majority, 1o,'>ES. TUesoldiers'vote.accon'i:s 
to law, can not becnnvaesednntil the opirr- 
tion of sisty davs after the election. It did 
not reach us in time for the Almanac. 
Legislature, 1865. iie7nite. Howie. John Dal. 

I'nionists S3 40 73 

Democrats 7 25 32 



Union majority 26 



15 



41 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1SG6. 



NEW YORK. 

Seo't State, 1865. Comptroi.'k,'65. A_men't'65.Pbbs't,'64, Sbo. State,'6S. Pse8't,'60. 

Counties, Union. Dem, Un.Dem. Un. Dem. UnJ)em. Sep.Detn. 

Barlow.Slocum. Hillh'ee.Iiobin n. For.AgnlnBt. LiiicolD.Mc lel.Depew.St John. Line. McClel. 

AJiany 9762 9919.. 0847 P849.. 1741 8802..l0a0G 12934.. mi 10977.. 9885 11145 

Allegany 4626 1911.. 4640 1903.. 862 717.. 6240 2561., 6848 »159.. 6443 25S0 

Broome 3965 2367.. 8087 2351.. 860 907.. 5003 8139.. 4560 2490.. 4554 £876 

CBttarangus 3975 3495.. S985 2506.. 1025 884.. 5508 8575.. 5047 8029.. 5055 :;IC9 

Cayuga 6120 3498.. 6134 8491.. 1070 1252.. 7534 4408.. 6951 4Co3.. V.'i'l l! M 

Cliautanque 6015 2797.. 6019 2790.. 1151 1446.. 8700 3092.. 7503 UZO.. Hn .'1073 

Chemung 2787 2928.. 2794 2895.. 843 1021.. 3292 3109.. 2873 2658.. 2;''J L'^S 

Chenango 4581 3162.. 4590 S157.. 1114 1036., 5552 4033.. 5111 S758.. S685 i;086 

Clinton 2741 2551.. 2752 2542.. 500 446.. S471 8346., 8155 S041.. SCCl S270 

Columbia 4427 4582.. 4437 4573.. 804 1679.. 4876 .5240.. 4563 4657.. 5108 4722 

Cortland 3115 1592.. 3120 1582.. 662 1174.. 3983 2063.. 8721 1887.. S883 1712 

Delaware 43C8 2979.. 4342 2981.. 610 1716.. 6297 4249.. 4709 39.52.. EOOl Cl'12 

Dulchess 6068 5340.. 6109 ."iSlS.. 1201 C96.. 7201 6643.. 6frl5 5869.. 6708 C071 

Erie 11517 10951.. 11583 10B13.. 1743 2:S8.. 13061 18370.. 11421 11481.. 12430 1C885 

Essex 2466 1537.. 2479 1^27.. 617 513.. 8224 2164.. 2786 1737.. 8454 179S 

Franklin 2154 1219. . 2157 1220. . 404 3C6. . 2889 . 1837, . 2721 2018. . .3103 2402 

Fulton 2785 2519.. 2791 2511.. 518 C62.. 2972 2887.. 2593 2203.. 3111 -2897 

Genesee 3291 2210.. 3810 2196.. 645 821.. 40.SO 2772.. S731 2513.. 4404 2456 

Greene 2568 3036.. 2568 S039.. 550 2503.. SC87 8897.. 2829 3603.. 31£7 8534 

Hamilton wlthFulton wlthFulton 24 167 with Fulton.. 169 89.5. witli Fulton . 

Herkimer 4241 3183.. 4253 3174.. 1CS5 1339.. 5087 4207.. 4742 3758.. 0:503 &'?62 

Jefferson 6815 4428.. 6835 4432.. 1473 1367.. 8592 5842.. 7695 4920.. 87S6 5531 

Kings 18993 20342.. 19156 20182.. 3293 214j. . 20838 25T26. . 147.54 15882.. 15S83 20588 

Lewis 2399 1870.. 2396 1868.. 546 (385.. £078 2911.. 2748 2303.. 8257 2274 

Livingston 3706 2818.. 3715 2810.. 644 779.. 4580 8553.. 4309 3064.. 5178 3261 

Madison 4586 2873.. 4600 2856.. 1150 1050.. 6182 S748.. 5589 3304.. 6289 3216 

Monroe 8154 6738.. 8186 671!.. 1472 2093.. 10203 0107.. 8T23 7483.. 10808 7291 

Montgomery 3219 8270.. .^257 8229.. 862 1478.. 3519 3B08.. 3414 8204.. 3528 3253 

New York 26740 53128. .28953 52801.. 4060 2996.. S6681 73709.. 23613 43283.. 83290 62293 

Niagara 3986 8732.. 4018 8712.. 823 929.. 4839 4287.. 4396 3816.. 4992 ^5741 

Cneida 9857 8036.. 9898 8004.. 2481 2731.. 12048 10916.. 10357 9313.. 12.508 8011 

Onondaga 6815 7310.. 9877 7257.. 2G56 2362.. 109S6 8713.. 10215 7747.. 11243 7222 

Ontario 4291 8057.. 4830 3013.. 782 1475.. 5409 3989.. 4819 3126.. 5764 CG34 

Oranee 5803 5120.. 5809 5097.. 1352 1707.. 6784 C633.. 5759 5029.. 58f« 0011 

Orle.ins 2981 1961.. 8002 1950.. 5» 833.. 3755 2458.. S408 2244.. 88.59 2346 

Oswego 6745 4395.. 6756 4389.. 1389 1832.. 8793 6^38.. 7694 5420.. 9076 5414 

Otsego 5093 4802.. 5102 4798.. 1092 2163.. 6151 00-17. . 5892 5638.. 6543 .5061 

Putnam 1046 1114.. 1049 1111.. 156 434.. 1443 1618.. 1089 1493.. 1243 1325 

Queens 2928 3721.. 2C37 8715.. 873 378.. 4284 5100.. 2776 8647.. 3749 4393 

KcDsselaer 7823 7368.. 7870 7346.. 1600 S460.. 9159 9377.. 7931 7503.. 8464 8421 

Kiclimond, 1371 1732.. 1404 1703.. 185 247.. 1564 2874.. 1296 2128.. 1408 2370 

Kockland 1099 1609.. 1098 1610.. 132 483.. 1445 2287.. 1093 1912.. 1410 2369 

St. Lawrence 7369 2229.. 7383 2240.. 852 1234.. 10864 4048.. 9621 8424.. 11324 4007 

Saratoga 5135 3812.. 5146 8829.. 814 1005.. 5809 4715.. 5400 4229.. 5900 4552 

Schenectady 2424 1951.. 2480 1940.. 869 2456.. 2263 2:«9.. 2071 2057.. 2154 1994 

Schoharie 2846 8765.. 2857 3750.. 563 2198.. 2870 4801.. 2852 4486.. 8279 4213 

Rchuvler 2101 1.547.. 2168 1543.. 824 736.. 2576 1893.. 2361 1688.. 2551 1708 

Seneca 2434 2744. . 2443 2738. . 1510 590. . 2080 3267. .2443 2887. . 8025 2990 

Steuben 6030 4262.. C047 4242.. 955 2601.. 8099 5813.. 7101 5048.. 8250 .5023 

Suft.'lk 3273 2489.. 8267 2485.. 038 488.. 4305 4027.. 8331 3283.. 8756 8519 

Sullivan 2459 2759.. 2466 2757.. 284 999.. 2960 3548.. 2741 8255.. 2944 3170 

Tioga 3131 20S6.. 3186 2C03.. 466 .532.. 3780 3018.. S698 2702.. 3760 2743 

Tompkins 3621 2437.. 8625 2436.. 690 1293.. 4518 2996.. 4277 2708.. 4318 3026 

Ulster 5346 5566.. 5371 5519.. 998 2495.. 6900 7766.. 5697 0347.. 0775 6253 

Warren 2023 1821.. 2029 1830.. 448 709.. 2S99 2169.. 2274 2061.. 2719 1970 

Washington 4867 2552.. 4893 2534.. 777 2303.. 6221 8642.. 5178 8118.. 6173 3482 

AVavne 4873 3436.. 4899 3425.. 10S5 1012.. 6122 43.r2.. 5527 3925.. 6668 3938 

Westchester 5515 0076.. 5524 6073.. 828 1128.. 7607 9355.. 6043 6672.. 6771 8081 

Wyoming 3403 1724.. 3413 1723.. 784 779.. 4123 2568.. 8877 2189.. 4498 23P0 

Yates 2322 1313.. 2334 1303.. 151 1457.. EC36 1693.. 2713 1522.. 3C14 1406 

Soldiers' vote 801 435.. 812 390.. 

Total 801055 273198.802428 271S52. . 81532 56186. .808735 861986. .314347 284942. .302646 312510 

rcrce:;t 6i.43 41.!,7.. iS.C.ti 4. .34.. tS.37 -iO.Sa.. 10.41 40.63. . 52.01 47.39.. 63.72 46 28 

In ISffi, total TOte for Secretary of State, 574,253 ; Barlow (TTn.) over Slocum (Dem.'), 27,857 • 
total v^te for Comptroller, 574,280; Hillhousc over Kobinson, 30,576; total vote on Act to create 
a State Debt, 440,7(8: maj. for Act, .343,458; total vole (March 14, 1860), on amending State Con- 
Btilution hO as to provide for the apnolutraent of Commissioners of Appeal, 188,260, of which 242 
were blank or defective ; maj. against Amendment, 25,046. In 1804, Lincoln's maj„ 6,749. 
Vote foe Judge of the Supreme Couet. 

7>(.s<n'rt I.— Daniel P. Tngrnham ( Dem. 1, 52,074; lewis B. Woodruff (Un.), 28,301 ; Dem. mai., 
24jS13. II.— Jasper AV. Gilbert (Ind.),.^6,:;'.)l ; Klias J.Beach (Dem.), 35,475; Un. maj .,20,916. III. 
—Henry Hogeboom (Un.), 86,458; Jacob Hardenburgh (Dem.), 85,411 ; Un. maj., 1,047. IV.— 
Piatt Potter (Un.). 88,324; [No opp.] V.— Joseph Mullhi (Un.), 67,722 ; [Noopp.] YI.— Douglas 
Boardman (Un.), 37,423; David P. Loomis (Dem.), 19,230: Robert Parker (Dem.), 7,409. Board- 
man over Loomls and Parker, 10,784. VII.— Thomas A. Johnson (ITn.), 47,910; [Ko opo.l VIII. 
Noah Davis (Un.), 89,650 ; Joha Ganson (Dem.), 27,555. Un. maj. IJ.aOo. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOIl 1S66. 



OTHER STATE OFFICERS 
The following table shows 
the vote cast for the Union and 
Demociatic candidates for oth 
er Stale officers and the Union 
majorities : 

Un. Bern. Un.Maj 
Att'y-GenT.302,437 271,96^ 31,173 
Treasurer.. 302,245 272,039 30,; 
Engineer... 302,001 272,338 29,( 
Caual Com. 303,556 270,700 32,' 
Ins. of PrlB.301,925 271,957 29,! 
CONGRESS, 1865. 

Un. Dem. 

T)ist. XVI. HhI« u 

Clinton 2748 

Essex 2476 

AVarren 1922 



Total 7146 5979 

Robert S. Hale over Halscy 

K. Wing, 1167. 
bENATORIAL DISTRICTS. 

Districts. Un. Dem 

1. L.Bflu Chii^lip 

Suffolt 3269 2295 

Queens 2861 3732 

Richmond 1506 153S 



8748 



Brooklyn.— 1, 2, 3,4, 
.5,7,11. 13, andlOth 

Wards 9845 

MaJ. for Hen. B. Pierson 

III. Crooke..i.uri)hy. 

Brooklyn— G, 7, 9, 10, 
12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 
AVaras, and the 
towns of Flatbnsh, 
Flatlands Graves- 
end, New Lots and 
Kcw Utrecht, of 
the Co. of Kings. .■9269 11047 
Mcj. forHen. C. Mnrphy,2,778. 
Un. Dem. Dem. 

IV. Biiiris.l!ryi.nt.\Vuoj. 

K.T.City.-l,2,3,4, 
5, 6, 7. 8 and 14th 

Wards 67?5 2940 9062 

Benj.AYood overM. C. Burns, 

2,337. 

V. Pean.O'Brit-n. Cornell. 

N. Y. City.— 10, 11, 
13andl7thAVards4074 6493 8134 
Charles G. Cornell over Dan'l 

M. O'Brien, 1,611. 

U7i. Dem. 

VI. Lei,ul!'reemuD. 

N. T. City-9, 15, 16 
and 18th Wards. ...9480 9038 
JIaj. for Abraham Lent, 342. 
Un. Dem. Dem. 

Vir. Miin>l)V. Fields.. McLeun. 

N. Y. City.-12,i9. 
20, 21 6t and 22d 

Wards G308 8031 7083 

Thomas Murpiy over Thomas 

C. Fields, 1,277. 

Union. Dem. 

\)U. r.rosbv.Sutheiln'd. 

Westchester .5521 C046 

Putnam 1033 1089 

Rockland 1098 1606 



Maj. for Henry E. Low, 



Un. Dem. 
X. rierc.rhambc 

Ulster 5579 5253 

Greene 2595 3005 



Total 10<i80 992! 

Majorityfor E. G. Wilber,555 



Total 12791 9778 

Maj. for James Gibson, 3,013. 

XHI. C<.llili-..bh;.lie 

Albany 9919 9729 

Maj. for Lor. D. Collins, 190 

XIV. Slanfurd.Majhoni. 

Delaware 4448 286S 

Schoharie 2969 364£ 

Schenectady 2541 183£ 

Total 9958 8344 

Maj. for Chas. Stanford, 1,614 

XV. Kliite.4 hujjp )ili. 

Montgomery 3099 332J 

Fulton & Hamilton. 2789 2500 
Saratoga 5063 390' 



Warren 2030 

Essex 2462 1540 

Clinton 2840 2448 

Total 7382 5801 

Maj. for Moss K. Piatt, 1,531. 

VII. GoJfl.iid.Li„riTO. 

:. Lawrence 7341 2137 

Franlillu 2155 - 

Total ; 9496 21.S7 

Maj. for Able Goddard, 7,359. 

will. 0'lJor.ii<.|l.(;oii.vni|. 

Tefferson 6788 4455 

Lewis 2&34 1895 

Total 9122 6£50 

Maj. for J. O'Donnell, 2,772. 

IX. Cami)bell.liiitt(,rti d. 

Oneida 10024 7828 

IViaj.for Sam'I Campbell, 2,196. 



Total 9391 7920 

Maj, for G. H. Audrews, 1,471. 

XXI. \Vol<-..ll.!:k:. r 

Oswego 0748 4387 

Maj. for John J.AVolcott, 2,361. 

XXII. \Vlli(...l>uirlPP. 

Onondaga 9898 7245 

Maj . for And. D. White, 2,658. 

XXIII. burij.-.Kmg.i.nn 

Madison 4589 2850 

Chenango 4589 3156 

Cortland 8108 1599 

Total 12281 7505 

Maj. for James Barnett, 4,776. 

XXIV. Cnri.pU.I'»i7P. 

Tompkins 8T26 2330 

Tioga 3151 2068 

Koome 5980 2S5C 

Total 12857 0748 

Maj . for Ezra Cornell, 6,109. 



Un. Dem. 

XXV. W^ini,Lm8.SDyder. 

Wayne 4915 8264 

Cayuga 6106 8508 

Total 11021 6772 

Maj. for S. E. AViiliams, 4,249. 

XX\') . 1' olper. Joliufron. 

Ontario 4338 2989 

Yates 2337 1301 

Seneca 2451 2726 

Total .9912 7016 

Maj. for Chas. J. Folger, 2,110. 

XXVII. HHvt.6i,.il.. 

Chemung 2814 2S06 

Schuyler 2167 1543 

Steuben 6116 4165 

Total 11097 8614 

Maj. for Steph. J. Hayt, 3,473. 

Monroe 7674 7120 

Maj . for Thomas Parsons, 554. 

X.XIX. Crowley. VimJJeuF. n. 

Niagara 4201 3506 

Orleans 2952 1996 

Genesee 3307 2200 



Total 10460 

Maj. for Rich. Crowley, 

XXX. Humphicv.ll.. 

Wyoming SS32 

Livingston S704 

Allegany 4642 



1723 

2814 
1901 



Total. 



.11678 



Total 108G4 11607 

Maj. for Davids. Bennett, 743. 

XXXlI. SpRS'OUS. L,o. 

Chautauqua 5360 2854 

Cattaraugus 3C20 2542 

Total 8CS0 53C6 

Maj . for W. A. Sessions, 8,584. 
NEAV YORK CITY. 

VOTE FOE MATOE, 1865. 
Wd's. U. ttRjbls.Hecker.GuuUiT.Sc't 



4 806 

5 541 

6. 



..1697 1028 1099 233 



157 



...1517 3060 338 429 

, . .1096 1246 261 2S6 

...2574 1700 740 976 

12 1410 1479 ■ 291 213 

. .1199 1040 670 301 

...2071 771 271 190 

15 822 1740 



.3223 2687 

.2249 2017 

.1769 1882 

.2302 2502 

.1942 2276 

.1416 2119 



201 184 
4C6 287 
C57 995 



Total.32S20 31657 10390 6758 77 
John T. Hoffman over Mar- 
shall O. Robert8,l,142. 

LEGISLATLfEE, 1866. 
fienate. Bouse. Joint L'al. 

Unionists 27 91 lis 

Democrats.. 5 37 42 

Union maj.. 23 54 ~76 



TUB TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18C6. 



VIRGINIA. 

CONGBES8,1865. FKESrDKKT,'60. 

Districts. Un. Dem. Dem. 

1. Ciirti3.Clirist'ii.D<Mis. Iie'l.Ureck.U..i.(.-. 

Acconmc (Maj. for Cnrtis.) 

Caroline* 120 l&i 42.. GGl TO 18 

Charles, City 47 48 -.. m 111 9 

Elizabeth City 177 2 -..248 164 24 

EsBCX 3 185 187.. 279 308 4 

Glonceetcr - - --. SOI 460 - 

James City 72 2 G.. 118 60 5 

Ki;.K and Queen... 3 73 IBS.. 255 510 2 

Knt' George 21 10 3.. 1^1 223 37 

Kiiig -William 3 8 107.. 142 815 8 

Laccaster 10 85 39.. 209 142 12 

Mathews 85 46 65.. 251 306 - 

Middlesex 13 92 21.. 151 241 - 

New Kent — — — .. 264 172 2 

Northampton 162 3 —..234 214 

Northumberland .. 86 34 41.. 276 350 1 

Richmond Co 21 94 27.. 853 185 C 

-Warwick — — -.. TO 31 — 

■W^cstmorelanrt — — — .. 438 ICO 4 

Williamsburg 52 2 2.. 49 43 24 

York 153 46 15.. 227 90 3 

Total 9T3 mS 75G 48G3 4857 1G5 

In lh65, Curtis elected by a small maiority 
over Christian. In 18G0, Bell over Brecldu- 
ridge, 9. 

CONGSKSS, 1365. Pkesidbnt.'GO. 
lJn.Dein.Deta. 

r. Cbnnrtlcr.MillK'-n.Ki'bv.li l .Brc. k Ui.n-. 

Brunswick 214 fl2 8.. 308 444 137 

Dluwiddie 199 52 80.. 389 2.54 18;^ 

Greensville 5 113 3.. 139 151 41 

Isle of -Wight 1 189 89.. 147 757 13 

Naiisemond 1 32 269. . 477 429 1 

Norfolk County.. 87 7 8.. 70-1 447 5i 

Norfolk City..... 328 189 53.. 984 439 233 

Petersburg 367 196 83.. 970 22:$ C13 

PortsmouUi 421 78 23.. 673 55'J 214 

Prince George... 8 29 20.. 843 191 126 

Princess Aune ... — — — .. 451 379 13 

Southampton .... — — — . . 545 563 9 

Surrey — — — •• ^9' US 55 

Susses* 2 5)_3..^ JM 96 

Totnl 1546 1022 533 6509 52-i5 1789 

James L. -Wilson and Thomas E. Chambers 
received a few votes In seme of the counties. 
L II. ('handler (Union), elected by about 50O 
plurality over John S. Millson. In 1800, Bell's 
plurnlltv over Brecklundge, l,2ft4. Lincoln, 
in 1860, leceivpd 4 votes iu Portsmouth Co. 

CONGBESS, 1365. President,'GO. 
Uii.Dem.Deiii. 

TIT B:irb""r.rer'.ll-tou H l..,i- 1' i.i.o..t' 

Culpepper 317 310.. 526 525 19 

Goochland 135 63.. 241 428 37 

Hanover C03 56.. 573 749 27 

Henrico 775 26.. 1403 641 189 

Lmisa 703 10.. 493 751 2 

OrauRC 473 21.. 437 4r.-3 12 

Karpahanucck 827 283.. 491 409 - 

KichmondCity lilS 73.. 2402 1167 r,3 

Spottsvlvania 224 50.. 599 ,51(5 25* 

Statford 238 11.. 404 402 165 

Total 4944 90G..7569 6066 1461 

B. Johrson Barbjur over Pendleton. 4,038. 
JIartin Lipscomb received 3 votes in Gooeh- 
laiid, 4 in Hanover, 134 Jn Henrico, 2 in Louisa, 
1 lu Orange, 190 in Eichmoud City : total, 334. 
J. C. Crowley received 26 votes in the district, 
A. J. Crane, 12 , Uriel Terrill, 2. 

The counties composing the Third PIstrlct 
gave Beil a plurality of 1,503. The aggregate 
vol e at that election was 15,096. The U ,tal vote 
at the recei.t election was 0,9Si. Diflerence, 
compared with November, I860, 8,8T2. 

• Not complete. 



CONQKBSB, 1865. PKISn)EKT,'60. 

Vn.Dem.Dem. 
W. Ri.iTw«yJiitp'lc.B.!i.ti,-.'-..D.iir. 

Amelia 211 12.. 282 249 82 

Amherst 269 67.. ©2 808 26 

Appomattox 40 55.. 221 563 10 

Buckingham 352 123.. 5-14 523 22 

Charlotte 3J7 35.. 418 403 25 

Chesterfield 833 6.. 738 323 583 

Cumberland 190 iS.. 278 276 37 

Fluvanna 171 26.. 487 443 7 

Lunenburg 164 20.. 251 527 S2 

Mecklenburg 537 37. . 430 901 63 

Nelson 7 213 475.. 733 890 112 

Nottov/ay 112 20. . 2S2 179 23 

Powhattan 142 15.. 225 127 120 

Prince Edward 233 16. . 874 423 65 

Total 3869 1010.. C3C3 0202 1107 

Robert Eidgway over Alex. Fitzpatrick, 
2.859. In 1800, Breckinridge's plurality 297. 
At that election (1850) the total number of 
votes polled was 13,251. The total at the re- 
cent election was only 4,879. 

COjrGKESS, 1SC5. PEE8IDElfT,'60. 

iiii.Dem.Dem. 

v. M. Rt.v.St.ivall.nnvit.H. \ i,ti.- Um-.:. 

Bedford 487 " 82 280. . 1468 1037 91 

Campbell ...376 7 17.. 1521 1203 146 

Franklin ; 18 291 490.. mi 1073 133 

Halifax 20 S30 139.. 503 1312 133 

Eenry — 217 75.. 543 444 59 

Patrick 13 133 220.. 4S;5 432 70 

Pittsylvania 41 93 479.. 1702 1057 177 

Koauoke 232 17 12.. 293 373 52 

Total 1187 1073 1713 7336 6039 866 

Davis" plurality over Stovall, 43. "VTithcrs 
received, in Bedford, 53 votes ; Campbell, 2C3 ; 
Franklin, ViA ; Halilas,151 ; llenry,26; Patrick, 
24; Pittsylvania, 2iiS; Roanoke. 4; total, 958. 
Hon. J. M. Botts received 163 votes lu Pittsyl- 
vania, 83in Henry, and 18 In Halifax; total, 
294. Mr. ])av1dson received 89 vo;es In ihe 
district, and Mr. Grasty 24. The combined 
vote cast for the competitors (f Mr. Davis is 
4,177, or 2,459 more than his own poll. 

The counties composing this district polled 
a total of 15,1'Jl votes at the l^esideiaii-i elec- 
tion in 1860. The total at the elcctio.i In 1865 
Is only 6,036. In the same counties. Bell's plu- 
rality was 447. 

Cos-guess, 1S65. PREsn>ENT,'GO. 
Vii.Dein.Dem. 

VT. Stuart L'wib.!;. ll.i.r..rU.D„uf 

Albemarle 378 871.. 1317 1056 97 

Alleghany 137 71.. 2.53 34-1 87 

Augusta 1173 135.. 2553 218 1094 

Baih 155 20.. 220 163 22 

Botetourt 840 193. . 590 589 174 

Craig 10 -.. 112 322 2 

Greene 239 74.. 74 521 13 

Highland 878 34.. 215 170 255 

Madison 320 2.. 74 834 20 

Page 241 2^16.. 141 987 73 

Eockbridge 355 276. . 1231 861 64 1 

Rockingham 925 751.. SS3 676 1351 

Total 4653 2194.. 7600 6iCl 3741 

Alexander H. H. Stuart over John F. Lewis, 
3,459 Craig County gave fcl votes for Hoge, 
and 9 voles scattering. The counties com- 
posing the Sixth Ulsirlct, gave Bell a plu- 
rality of 1,469. The combined vote for the 
Bell anil Douglas electors, was 11,4U1; for 
Brockinridge,6.1'.il; total, 1.,. 192. Lincoln did 
not receive, in this district, a single vote. The 
total number of votes polled at the election la 
1865 was 6,917. Difference, 10,615 votes. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1860. 



CONQEEBS, 1865, PbE8IDENT,'60. 

Lli.Dem.Dem.Iiep. 

Ci'nrari.McKrniie.Bfll.brerk.Uoiie.LiiK-. 

Alexandria 449 423.. 1012 665 141 16 



Clarke . 

Fairfax 217 

Fanouier 7?4 

Frederick 701 

Londonn 754 

Pr nee ■William .. 2cC 

Bbenandoah 1077 

Warren ceO 



49 — 

91 24 

7?9 1027 89 1 

963 1315 C6 — 

2C33 778 120 11 

243 718 26 55 

427 1S83 170 13 

276 4C2 54 — 



Total 4853 1T22 6722 7768 756 120 

Kobert T. Conrad over Lewis McKenzie, 
8,131. Gilbert 6. Miner received 29 votes in 
Alexandria, 19 in Fairfax, 12 in Fanqnier, 17 in 
Londoun, C9 in Prince 'wmiain, 13 In Shenan- 
doah, and 1 In Warren ; total, 159. In 1865. the 
total vote -was 8,791 less than In the election 
■which occurred in 1860. 

CONGBBES, 1865. PBBSIDKNT.'eO. 

Un.Dem.Dem. 

Vlir. Hrpc.Miller.Longle5-.Bell.Bretlc.L.oug. 

Bland 446 76 — .. — — — 

Buchanan [no returns] 



Carroll 559 

Floyd 368 

Giles 285 

Grayson 263 

Lee 84 

Montgoinery ....582 

Pnlaeki 177 

Kussell 875 

Scott 553 

Smyth 303 

Tazewell 384 

Washington 245 

Wise 87 

■Wythe 218 



5.. 315 

2.. 384 

7.. S66 

26. . 815 

193. '■ 



16. 



712 425 74 

£32 250 5 

473 526 &4 

591 594 91 

446 496 49 

SC6 984 — 

916 1178 56 

102 se« 8 

617 795 22 



Total 4897 1259 1118.. 6S51 84C9 477 

Bland County gave Mr. McCuUcck 4 votes, 
Carroll £8, Floyd 67, Giles 11, (Trayson 22, Lee 6, 
Montgomery £0, Pulaski 2, Eustell 21, bcott2, 
SinytE 6, Tazewell 9, Washington 51, Wise 22, 
Wvlhe 9; total SC3. Hoge's plurality, Z/m. 
Hi's njalority over the combined vole or his 
mpctitors, 2,680. The total vote of the dis- 



1860 polled 15,237 votes. 

Vote on CoKSTiTrnoNAL Amendment. 
Simultaneously wilh the election held for 
members of CongreBS, a vote v. as taken on the 
proposition to amend the third article cf tbe 
Cohstituvion of Virginia, which prohibits any 
person from holding office under said Cocsu- 
tntlon who lias "held oflice under the so- 
called Confederate Government, or under any 
rebellious State Government, or who has been 
a member of the sc-called Confederate Con- 
gress ( r a member of any State Legislature In 
rebellion, against the authority cf the United 
States, excepting therefrom county officers." 
From the official returns, and reports from 
fourteen other counties, it appears that only 
l,7'i2 votes were polled In ippositiou to the 
i)rcpoEed amendment, viz. 

Acecmac ISCraie 8 

Albemarle 4 Cumberland 9 

Alexandria 54tDinwiddie 7 

Amherst UFalrfax £6 

Appomattox 9 Fauquier 5 

Augusta 41 Floyd 59 

r.land 25 Fluvanna 1 

Botetourt 11 Frederick 8f5 

Buckingham 2 ©rayeon 12 

Campbell 2G<eeu^llle 1 

Carroll fS Halifax 3 

^Chesterfield 10 Hanover C 

•Clarke 8 Henrico 12 



Henry 95 Prince George b 

Highland 27 Richmond City ... . SI 

JamesCity 12 Richmond Cotmty. 5 

Louisa .' lORockbrldge 5 

Madison 11 Rockingham 85 i 



Kaneemond . 

Nelson 

New Kent 

Norfolk City. 
Orange 



i'etersburg ., 
Pittsylvania . 
Powhattan... 



Russell S3 

Roanoke 7 

.Scott Ill 

Shenandoah 170 

Stafford 8 

Washington 182 

Williamsburg 2 

Wythe 7 



The following counties voted unanimously 
for the Amendment : 

Amelia, Brunswick, Caroline, Charles City 
Culpepper, Essex, Gloucester, Goochland, 
King Ge 



we have no trustworthy iuformatlon. 

TENNESSEE. 

On Jan. 14 a State Convention of Icyal citiz- 
ens of Tennessee unanimously adopted resolu- 
tions proposing several Amienriments to the 
State Constitution, especially the abolition of 
slaverv. The vote eu these Amendments was i 
taken Feb. 22. On March 4 an election was held j 
for Governor. The vote, on the Amendments 
and lor Governor, in the Counties heard from, \ 
was as follows: i 

Lawrence . . 2C9 — 

Lincoln 212 1C90 

Macon m'O — 251 

Marshall.... 410 

Maury EC7 13 257 

Montgom'ry l.'^2 S 161 
Ovcrfcn . . . . 8£0 — 826 

Putnam 48 

P.obeifS'n.. 71 63 
Rutherford. £73 5 274 

fctewart 43 624 

Sumner l.'iS 152 

Smith 870 526 

Warren 481 226 

Wilson 836 791 

Wayne £60 

Williamson. 378 465 
1651 WEST TENNESSEE. 

850 Shelby 873 2 1186 

194 •' 

TENTIESSEE TftOOFS. 



EAST TENNESSEE 



vnlr.w 



446— £52 

1<j7 — 

•);7 705 

1...1055— S81 



Anderson . . 

Bledsoe 

Bradley .... 

Campbell. 

Claiborne 

Greene... 

Kpmllton 

Jefferson 

Knox 2449 

Marlon 240 24 

Morgan 200 

Monroe 857 1 

McMInn-. . . 1255 — 

MciL'S 2070 — 

Rhea 273 

Roane 

Scott 

Sequatchie. 107 

Sevier ■ 6S 

Union S50 - 

M:r DLE TENNESSEE 
Bedford.... 1S74 7 8C 
Cheatham.. 88 7 ( 

Cannon 829 1 - 

Coffee 753 6£ 

Davidson... 1421 4 ICCO 



DeKalb. 

Dickson 

Franklin.. . 

Giles 

Grundy 

Humphries . 
Hickman.. . 
Jackson . . 



- 

61 



H't.l4,Nasli 15 
6th Cavalry. 514 
BatD,L'tAr 107 
10th Inrnfy 5£5 
Bat.G,L'tAr CO 
l8t Cavalry. 860 
1th Infnfy. 105 
6t.h M't Infti 118 
GUlem's B'gl2C0 
6th T. M't In £24 
5th Cavalry. — 
&th " . — 
13th " . — 
BatCL'tAr — 
nhCav'l.... — 
Battery E.. 



232 
8E4 
259 
52 
115 
79 
of which 



Total vote for Governor, ^ 

Wm. G. Brownlow received 2S,?52, Wm. B. 
Campbell 25, Horace Maynard 7, and 3 others 1 

COKGKESS '05. Sec. Ohb'nce, '61. 
IHstricU. „ . „ 

T..yrr Millnr Ri.nd.An.rM. Sep- >o.i=i>r. 

Carter 634 197 22 — .. 86 1845 

Cocke 130 94 5£6 -.. 518 11^ 

Grainger 192 343 279 1.. 686 1492 

Ci-eer.e 739 K6 10 1.. 744 2C9X 



THE TRIETJ>'E ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



'§79' 



S»n 



908 1460 

603 2987 

111 787 

15S6 627 

CO 1528 

1022 1445 



T.y '..Mil -.Rnn.lii'pi.ArnoM. 

Hancock 118 245 58 1.. 

Hawkins ISO 710 82 4.. 

Jefleisoa 977 834 U -.. 

Job ison 268 222 — — .. 

SuUivau 307 2G4 83 18.. 

Sevier 871 288 401 1.. 

Waehlngtou 779 188 6 — .. 

4thTeau Inrty. 223 16 113 -.. 

10th " Cavalry. 125 434 1 -.. 

Sth " "... 193 ItO 42 — .. 



Total 5236 4460 1626 23. . 65C.3 1S175 

In 1865, aggregate vote, 11,345. N.J.Taylor, 
Union, over J. K. Miller, 776. 
Ill lS;",r, \,liole vote on secesEion ordinance, 
21,678 ; majority agali.st eecesslon, 8,672. 

I Anderson "l'.?"24o"''24 893" 56.'?" 97 ° 1273 

Blount 853 740 845 17.. 418 1766 

Bradley 247 648 59 55.. 507 ia?2 

Campliell 553 S3 71 5S.. 59 1000 

Claiborne 601 — 149 53.. 250 i243 

Knox 1705 413 206 SO. .1214 3196 

McMinn t30 143 43 141.. 904 1144 

Monroe 627 99 166 2S5..1096 774 

Morgan 60 28 101 60.. 50 630 

P.jir. 38 80 — 118.. 7S8 817 

Koane 916 56 110 120.. 45^1 1568 

Soott 115 — 90 90.. 19 521 

Union 602 — 79 84.. — — 

4tliTenn. Infty.. 8 2 13 — .. — — 

Sth Teuu. Cavalry 11 20 7 65.. — — 

;9tliTeuu. '.. 154 82 28 78.. — — 

Total 7158 2323 1^ 1210! !5806 14819 

! In 1865, aggregate vote, 12,786. F. L. Heis- 
' kett received 217, and B. Welles 21 votes. Ho- 
race Mayuard. Unluii. over J. A. Cooper, 4,834; 
H. Uaviiard. over all, 1,526. In 1861, whole 
vote uu s>>cesBloa ordluauce, 20,625. Majority 
egui >iso ecccbsiuu, 9,U13. 

I, . .-M,li.- Fa.-.l)<n»rHn<Ml. SerVof.-'.. 

Bledsoe 288 13 — .. 197 500 

Cuiuherland 124 — — .. — — 

DeKalb 509 408 3.. 833 612 

FeutrebS 163 — 1.. 128 651 

Gru;iay 69 181 — .. 528 9 

Hamilton 850 4 136.. 8M 1260 

JacKBOa... 203 76 516.. 1483 714 

Macoi 354 36 1.. 447 697 

Warljn 297 2 — .. 414 600 

MelgB 280 43 1.. 481 267 

Overton ; — — — .. 1471 364 

Putuum 825 251 45.. — 

Rhea — — — .. 860 202 

Seauatchle 45 — — .. 153 lOO 

Smith 476 264 99.. 1249 676 

VanBuren 29 131 — .. 308 13 

Warren 123 577 — .. 1419 12 

■White 119 543 2.. 1370 121 

Sth Tenu. Cavalry .. 103 1 — .. — — 

8th Teun. M't Infty. 46 19 41.. — — 

|9thTenn. CavaUy.. 61 — — .. — — 

Total 4454 2549 845.. 11S85 6928 

' In 1805, aggregate vote, 7,84S. W.B.Stokes, 
Uulon, over Asa Faulkner, Conservative, 3,394; 
Stokes over all others, 1,060. In 1861, whole 
vote (U secession ordinance, 18,813; majority 
for secession, 4,957. 

r.-. C -n.r.Mlilli.-B. S-n No.S.-^. 

Bedford 1510 174.. 1595 727 

Canon 404 12.. 1149 137 

Coftee 820 13.. 1276 26 

Franklin 524 — .. 1652 — 

Giles 1063 — .. 2458 11 

Lincoln 1504 -.. 2912 — 

Marshall 1022 8.. 1(M2 101 

Rutherford 828 4.. 2392 73 

5th Tenn. Cavalry 1 18.. — v- 

,6tU •' " __2 _-.. _-_ __- 

I Total 7C31 224.. 15071 10C5 



122.. 


702 


fa 


.121.. 


5635 


4(12 


25.. 


SSS9 


17 


88.. 


6465 


tw 


168.. 


1919 


«« 


180.. 


2529 


853 



Besides, R. W. Featherstone received 1 and 
W. H. Wlsener 9 votes. 

In 18C5, aggregate vote, 7,918. Edward Coo- 
per, Conservative, over R. Mullics, 7,461. In 
1S6I, whole vote on secession ordinance, 16,136 
majority fur gecession, 14,006. 

Cheatham 283 

Davidson 2197 

Robertson....' 782 

Sumner 997 

Williamson 781 

AVilson 1810 

Sth Teun. Cavalry.. 1 23.- — — 

Total S54 -Tm.. 21119 "934 

In 1865, aggregate vole, 8,098. W. B. Camp- 
bell, C ouservative, over P. .T. Carter, Union, 
4 6x5: scattering, 15; Campbell over all, 4,610. 
I -1 1861, whole vote on secession, 22,043; ma- 
jority for secession. 20,195. 

Decatur — 

Dickson 247 

Hardin 83 

liickman 108 

Humphreys S91 

Lewis 6 

Lawrence 101 

Maury 628 

Montgomery 437 

Ferry 6 

Stewart 727 

Wayne 74 

Sth Tenn. Cavalry . . — 

6th '• " — 

7th " " — 



Amell. 


i'e-'.N 


S-^. 




310 


RiO 


149.. 


1141 


W 


488.. 


498 


1051 


143.. 


14C0 


« 


1.. 


1042 




59.. 


223 




83,";.. 


1124 


75 


414.. 


2731 


58 


49.. 


2681 


S3 


m. . 


780 


168 


5.. 


1839 


99 


479.. 


409 


903 



2.. 



Total 2805 2,3.50.. 14128 8028 

In 1865, aggregate vote, 5,156. D. B. Thomas, 
ConservalWe, over 6. M. Arnell, Union, 445: 
scattering, 1. In 1861. who'.e vote ousecesslon 
ordinance, 17,156 mjgority for secession ordi- 
nance, 11,100. 

VI. HawV'H.. Eih'dge. ?■•.. NoS". 

Benton 158 124.. 798 228 

Carroll 1008 25.. 967 1319 

Dver 267 99.. 811 116 

Gibson 543 241.. 1999 286 

Henderson — — .. 801 1013 

Henry 807 360.. 1746 817 

Lauderdale 45 184.. 763 7 

Obion 213 220.. 2996 64 1 

, Weekley 508 566.. 1189 1201 ' 

6th Tenn. Cavalry.. 72 — .. — — 

7th •' " ...206 -.. - - 

Total 3322 1819 12270.. 4581 

VIII. Uftw'ck.:...!! tk.Sand a. Dun 'L..:^. .N, S <: 

Fayette _ _ _ 1364 23 

Hardeman 75 8 3 238.. 1526 29 

Haywood 820 14 2S0 24.. 930 139 

McKairy 892 4 8 1.. 1318 588 

Madison S05 8 63 32.. 2754 20 

Shelby 554 5.55 154 157.. 7132 5 

Tipton 27 21 81 73.. 9« 16 

6th Tenn. Cavalry — — 47 — .. — — 

Total 16r3 600 588 525.. 15907 818 

In 1865, aggi egate vote for Congress, 3,486. J. 
W.Leftwlck,C0Q8ervative. over John Bullock, 
1,073; all others over Leftwick, l.;0. In 1861, 
whole vote on secession ordinance, 16,7S5; ma- 
jority for secession, 15,149. 

In 1865, aggregate vote in the State for Mem- : 
bers of Congress. 61,783. In 1861, whole vote I 
on secession ordinance. 15J,143; majorltv lor 
secession, 57,667. In I860, whole vi te (> r Pres- 
ident, 145,333 ; Bell over Breckinridge, 4,565. 

Gov. Brownlow, on Kov. 23, sent a message 
to the Legislature annonncing, in r.ccordance 
with the law of Tennessee, "thrown out and 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



67 



Congress, in August last, as Illegally regls- 
terca, viz : Hawkins, WcMinn, Monroe, Meigs, 
GruLdy, Van Buren, White, Smith, Putnam, 
Jackson, li;acon, coffee, Fiauklin, Marshall, 
Benton, v\ illiauisoii, Davidson, Sumner, liob- 
ertson, Cheatham, Maury, Humphreys, Mont- 
gomery, Stewart, Lawrence, Gibson, Weekley, 
Madison, and Lauderdale. 

The votes ot ihe following counties having 
been duly registered, were taken into ac- 
count, viz Johnson, Carter, Greene, Cooke, 
Jeiterson, Sevier, Grauger, Union, Knox, 
Campbell ,Anderson, Morgan, Blonnt, Bradley, 
Hamilton, Polk, Marion, Bledsoe, Meigs, War- 
ren, Smith, Pntnnm,DeKalb, Rutherlurd, Lin- 
coln, Giles, Cannon, Cohee, Franklin, Wilson, 
Hickman, Wayne, Dickson, Hardin, Henry, 
Obion, Dyer, Carroll, McNsiry, Hardeman, 
Shelby and Haywood. 

From the following counties no satisfac- 
tory reports were received, the presumption 
being in favor of the legality of the registra- 
tion, viz: Sullivan, Washington, Hancock, 
Scott, Polk, Koane, Sequatchie, Cumberland, 
Fentress, Rhea, Overton, Bedford, Perry , Lew- 
is, Decatur, Henderson, Fayette, and Tipton. 

The following table snows the vote of each 
District, as shown by the original returns, and 
also as modified by omitting counties improo- 
erly registered.- 



CONGRESS, 1865. 

Disti-icts. 
1. Tuyl'r.>'111'r.R.ind'lT'h 
Total.... 5236 4460 1626 
Cast out. 180 740 82 

Correct'd5056 3620 1594 



•pM Cr 



Correct 'd.... 1311 208 



Corrected.. 521 1546 



Corrected.. 2068 704 

v' U :-auiiuer-.LHflwi. 11. 

Total 588 1673 

Cast out 63 305 

Corrected.. 525 1368 



Corrected.. 597 493 
the Stale was 61,783 , omit- 
ting the vote illegally registered. It was re 
dnced to 39,509. . 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Governor, 1865. President.'60. 

Counties. Union.Vem.Dem. 

Fish •r.Patton.Humpi. s.B«l;.Br. .■■ .u..i c 

Adams 299 67 317.. 448 876 158 

Amite 261 147 179.. 383 427 3 

Attala 081 48 557.. 525 lOSO 5 

Bohvar 56 — 211.. 277 218 12 

Calhoun 401 123 403.. 355 791 51 

Carroll 603 147 650. . 788 1185 11 

Chickasaw 235 122 770.. 538 1071 33 

Choctaw 675 900 43. . 642 13S6 25 

Claiborne 3 1 452.. 263 421 26 

Clarke 68 032 285.. 343 904 76 

Coahoma 115 — 95.. 210 157 41 

Copiah 166 137 879.. 538 1052 14 

Covington 117 198 16.. 106 391 8 

UeSotO 480 249 124.. 845 745 401 

Franklin 145 75 161.. 156 aa g 

Greene 31 109 6.. 45 250 — 

Hancock 130 141 23.. 47 257 — 

Harrison 50 295 — .. 88 460 — 

Hinds 414 123 623.. 1103 1615 40 

Holmes 179 89 800.. 626 784 9 



Fi6iier.Patlon.HuDiph'8.BclI Breck.Doue. 

Issaquena 5 2 83. . 133 104 6 

Itawamba 727 244 133.. 727 1684 63 

Jackson 64 108 — .. 25 316 17 

Jasper 130 435 196.. 361 712 18 

Jellerson 69 40 228.. 266 333 49 

Jones 116 169 — .. 96 264 — 

Kemper 322 298 189. . 499 6*59 68 

Lafayette 390 278 244.. 686 1034 144 

Lauderdale 121 588 295.. 353 951 1^2 

Lawrence 104 91 230. . 146 840 5 

Leake 341 83 415.. 368 690 2 

Lowndes 579 281 349.. 676 929 36 

Madison 161 23 647. . 524 627 17 

Marion 19 21 269.. 35 2S8 2 

Marshall 388 89 979.. 10fi8 1149 209 

Monroe 402 187 806.. 612 1273 49 

Neshoba 19 270 297.. 162 732 10 

Newton 180 335 232.. 217 084 29 

Noxuboe 415 410 208.. 442 701 57 

Oktibbeha 442 131 241. 259 740 

Panola 810 83 110.. 700 551 186 

Perry 87 18 — .. 105 201 5 

Pike 139 184 151.. 221 831 - 

Pontotoc 878 170 788. . 845 1512 339 

Rankin 101 217 571.. 505 676 11 

Scott 63 256 386. . 299 693 8 

Simpson 53 41 195.. 136 870 3 

Smith 61 340 148.. 234 517 5 

Sunflower 20 5 207.. 138 173 1 

Tallahatchie... 256 41 197.. 266 285 35 

Tippah 911 77 490.. 826 1456 254 

Tishomingo.... 1122 399 129.. 1412 1748 303 

Tunica 38 — 101.. 140 122 9 

Wairen 17 8 843.. 816 580 83 

Washington.... 97 2 77.. 201 180 — 

Wayne 65 148 119.. 110 180 — 

Wilkinson 32 82 509.. 324 404 34 

Winstou 166 294 594. . 299 800 8 

Yallobnaha 483 493 2.. 507 919 76 

Yazoo 50 19 834.. 739 6S8 4 

Total 15551 10329 19036. .25040 40797 8283 

In 1865, total vote for Governor, 44,916 ; B. G. 
Humphreys o ver E. S. Fisher, 3,485 ; E. S. Fisher 
and W. S. Patton over B. G. Humphreys, 6,844. 
In 1860, total vote for President, 0y,120 ; Breck- 
iuridge over Bell, 15,757; Breckinridge over 
Bell and Douglas, 12,474. 

LOUISIANA. 

GOVBENOK, 1865. PEESn)ElIT,'60. 

Counties. Vn.Dem.Dem. 

W'el's. Allen. H.-.l.bi>ck.Di"it-. 

Ascension 436 — .. 279 144 858 

Assumption 513 35.. 233 311 476 

Avoyelles 316 172. . 290 750 7 

Bienville 824 263.. 293 682 184 

Bossier 213 70. . 253 489 55 

Caddo 140 288. . 545 648 87 

Calcasieu 184 — .. 24 396 — 

Caldwell 159 8-1. 136 829 51 

Catahoula 260 93. 898 530 58 

Carroll 249 6. 439 676 20 

Claiborne 647 495. 720 896 1C6 

Concordia 124 7.. 152 175 5 

DeSoto 263 184. 364 (SA 2 

East Baton Rouge... 738 62.. 569 490 1S6 

East Feliciana 296 136. . 277 376 131 

Franklin 229 50.. 240 842 40 

Jackson 834 296. . 337 527 109 

Jellerson 857 82.. 984 198 406 

Iberville 427 41.. 229 535 101 

Lafayette 194 142.. 71 408 1 

Lafourche 735 93.. 324 214 609 

Livingston Oa 336.. 249 425 117 

Madison 102 — .. 255 172 92 

Morehouse 242 107.. 847 381 47 

Natchitoches 610 93.. 534 754 106 

Orleans 6263 1210.. 5215 2545 2998 

Ouachita 345 30.. 840 812 148 

Plaquemines 294 1.. 54 267 127 

Point Coupee 489 5. . 193 626 71 



WVIlr. AllfD. Btill.Brtck.Doup. 

EapMes 208 409.. 620 1036 08 

Sabine 392 152.. 227 420 45 

St. Bernard 218 10.. 56 16C i,9 

St.Charles 165 9.. 68 79 16 

St. Helena 65 484.. 292 331 18 

St.Jaiues 507 1.. 292 160 108 

St. Jol)n Baptist 414 — .. 176 129 87 

St. Landry 1098 53.. 884 961 21 

St.Martiu 531 57.. 392 462 B8 

St. ilary 433 10.. 567 572 49 

St. Tammany 217 136.. 243 161 132 

Terrebonne 496 82.. 134 254 3 

; Tensas 115 5.. 440 441 84 

Union 445 189.. 552 726 22 

Vermillion 224 10.. 142 211 1 

Wabhington 26 S06.. 112 387 5 

■W.-Bl Baton Bouge. . 256 1.. 218 147 27 

West Feliciana 269 1.. 188 272 33 

"Winn S56 101.. 257 35'1 241 

Total 22312 5497 20204 22C81 7625 

In 1865, total vote for Governor, 27,808 ; Wells 
over Allen, 16,815. In 1800, total vote for Presi- 
dent, 50,5lu ; Breckinridge over Bell, 2,477. 

Bbgislatuee, 1865.— Tue Democratic ticket 
•was successlnl in all counties save one. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

GOTKENOK,'65. President.'CO. 
Counties. Un. Vent. Vein. 

Worth.HoIiien.fcl.!'I.Brci-k.UoUt- 

Alamance 619 451.. 661 

Alexander 
AUegLany. 

Auson 

Aslie 



229. . 47 

201.. [no return.] 
70. . 871 245 7 
472. . 717 229 1 
Beaufort 814 427. .1082 549 42 



13 
3 
970 604 194 
677 459 15 
58.. 239 194 38 
302.. 196 1C91 — 
285.. 823 723 6 
206.. 693 492 122 



Bertie 76 364.. 597 399 17 

I Bladen 416 

Brnnswicli 276 

Buncombe 424 568.. 705 662 49 

Burlie 218 434.. 447 470 

Cabarrus 287 295.. 810 445 

CaldweU 233 251.. 449 229 

Camden 340 22. . 503 83 

Carteret 2?2 256.. 441 370 

Caswell 185 405.. 237 994 

Catawba 715 316 ~ 

Chatham 707 911 

Cherokee and Clay. . . 241 895 

Chowan 227 58 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

Cumberland frl2 291.. 670 879 35 

Currituck 299 72.. 66 595 — 

Davidson 633 4T4..11S6 728 15 

Davie 890 108.. 641 829 SI 

Duplin 462 161.. 149 1380 3 

Edgecombe 426 50. 196 1789 17 

Forsyth 110 08.. 965 825 70 

Franklin 526 104.. 318 759 14 

; Gaston 163 416.. 131 826 56 

1 Gates 298 S51. . 394 838 12 

Granville 611 504.. 8C8 870 S3 

Greene 217 269.. 826 381 — 

Guilford 1216 518.. 1838 804 118 

Halifax 506 135.. 546 757 22 

; Harnett 240 358.. 133 542 78 

Haywood 282 802.. 348 367 13 

Henderson &Transylv.240 658.. 496 425 4 

Ilertfurd 193 66.. 418 240 20 

Hyde 169 71.. 459 395 3 

Iredell 721 349. .1625 328 SI 

i Jackson 167 276.. 142 403 — 

Johnson 138 844.. 680 974 40 

; Jories 126 29.. 165 197 10 

Lenoir 316 284.. 317 r>33 21 

Lincoln S09 295.. 243 473 5 

Macon 188 99.. 469 221 ]3 



Worlli.HoMrn.D»i:.Bre<-k.Di.ug. 

McDowell 257 270.. 349 276 1 

Mecklenberg. 534 858.. 856 1101 189 

Ml tchel (see Yancey). — — .. _ _ _ 

Montgi^mery 409 224.. T25 103 3 

Mcoio 489 512.. S£8 299 179 

Kash 220 263.. 64 1C23 4 

New Hanover 764 U4..064 1617 5 

Northampton 192 SSo.. .''OO C54 48 

OiiBlow 251 86.. 153 781 24 

Orange 9S8 264.. 956 787 73 

Pasquotaiik 289 140.. 477 5B9 55 

Perquimans 212 92.. SJl 224 4 

Person 227 353.. 4f3 420 9 

Pitt 473 145. . 710 731 8 

Polk (see Entherford) — —..118 270 1 

Bandolph 6)0 Go2..1224 821 44 

Richmond 464 128.. 544 269 4 

Eobeson C20 243.. 648 720 134 

Kockingham 571 278. . 485 1017 162 

Rowan 570 341.. 1023 1026 13 

Eutherfoid and Polk. 1S6 556.. 485 605 3 

Sampson 449 208.. 529 679 6 

Stanley SS9 286.. 834 63 9 

Stokes 265 452.. 4S2 745 — 

Surry 329 616.. 502 811 28 

Tyrrell 2£i3 16.. SOO 77 22 

Union 366 298.. 379 858 5 

Wake 453 1702. .1130 1216 276 

Watren 525 46.. 138 858 5 

Washington 189 92.. 413 159 44 

Watauga 287 211.. S22 147 — 

Wayne 632 96.. 239 1359 11 

Wilkes 283 883. .1323 363 — 

Wilson i97 211.. — — _ 

Yadkin 406 399.. 842 495 23 

Yancey and Jlitchel.. 119 533.. 275 500 4 

Total 32539 25809.449S0 48539 2701 

Z. B. Varnce received 132, H. F. Hoke 22, and 
Mr. Stamper 52 votes. 

Total vote for Governor, In 1865, 58,554 ; Jona- 
than Worth over W. W. H olden. 6,7.S() ; over all 
others, C,524. In 1860, total vote for President, 
96,230; Breckinridge over Bell, 8,549, 



SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Districts. Got., '65X't.-Got.,*65. 

Orr. HHn,nu.u.rurl-r. 

Abbeville 361 425 649 

Anderson 696 279 817 

Bamwell 71 460 864 

Beaulort 80 232 869 

Berkley 61 225 253 

Charleston 780 C61 1377 

Chester 684 88 686 

Clarendon 126 138 256 

Colleton 23 602 464 

Darlington 829 263 567 

Edgelleld 523 701 746 

Pairlield 260 44 801 

Georgetown 83 SO 113 

Greenville 314 609 638 

Horry 148 41 96 

Kershaw 174 7 89 

Lancaster 219 102 254 

Laurens 575 424 784 

Lexington 219 172 258 

Marlon 260 404 662 

Marlborough 460 90 542 

Newberry S55 £60 449 

Orangeburg 137 711 718 

Pickens 261 888 589 

Richland 834 28 849 

Sparteubnrg 782 155 659 

Sumter 258 455 045 

Union 215 855 819 

■Williamsburgh 51 260 264 

York 927—855 

Total 9776 8109 ISOTi 

Orr'g m&Jorlty, 667. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



CONGRESS, 1865. 

DiSTBiCT I.— General John D. Kennedy was 
elected. 

DiSTBiOT n.— The vote for the several can- 
didates was as follows : Wm. Aiken, 753 ; Ste- 
phen Elliot, 669; Wni. Whaley, 422; L. M. 
Aver. 76. 

DisTBicT m.— S. McGown was elected. 

DisTBlOT IV.— The vote was as follows : Far- 
row,2,W5; Keed,891; McAliley, 1,050. 

Legmlatukk, 1865.— According to the new 
Constitution of ise.";, the Senate consists of 33 
and the House of Representatives of 124 mem- 
bers. At the election for members of the 
State Legislature no distinct party lines were 
drawn 

MARYLAND. 

An election was held In the lid Congres- 
sional District to fill the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of the Hon. E. H. Webster 
(Union), with the following result: 

1865. 186*. 

Union. Dem. Vn.Dem. 

Tli..ma-.Kin,mel.Wel,'r.KiM,'l. 

B8ltlmoreClty,7Wards.2040 54.. 6243 1129 
Baltimore Co., 7 Dlsts... 1177 480.. 1342 1324 
Hartford County 1460 416.. 1334 1608 

Total 4677 950. . 8919 4061 

Legislatcbe, 1866.— The TJnioniste have a 
majority in each branch of the Legislature. 

FLORIDA. 

An election for Governor, was held fn De- 
cember, when David S. Walker was elected 
without opposition. The whole vote cast in 
the State was less than 4,000. In 1860, whole 
vote for President, 14,347 ; Breckinridge over 
Bell, 3,106. 

Ferdinand McLeod was elected member of 
Congress, over a number of competitors, by a 
large majority. 

ALABAMA. 

Total vote at the election for Governor In 
1865, 44,850, of which R. M. Patton received 
21,422 ; M. J. Bulger, 15,2.'i4 : W. R.Smith, 8,194. 
Patton '3 majority over Bulger, 6,188. 
In 1860, total vote for President, 89.572 ; Breck- 
inridge over Bell, 20,956 ; Breckinridge over 
Bell and Douglas, 7,805. 

NEVADA. 

CONGBKSS. 1865. 

Counties. Union. Dem. 

Allllev -Mucbeii. 

Churchill 40 88 

Douglas 174 82 

Esmeralda 144 T2 

Humboldt 124 19 

Lander 483 372 

Lyon 291 110 

>ye .. 64 23 

Ormsby 354 141 

Storey 1519 1193 

Washoe and Roop 293 136 

Soldiers' vote 69 39 

Total 3555 2^ 

Ashley's majority 1310 

Legislatube, 1866.— Both branches of tho 
Legislature are unanimously Union. 

GEORGIA. 

At tho election for Governor, In 1865, Charles 
J. .Jenkins, of Richmond County, was elected 
without opposition. The whole vote cast for 
him was 37,200. In 1860, whole vote for Presi- 
dent, 116365; BrecMnridge over Bell, 9,003. 

Legist-aturk, 1868.- According to the new 
Constitution of 1865, the State is divided into 



41 Senatorial Districts, each of which elects 
one Senator. The House of Representatives 
is composed of two Representatives from each 
of the o7 counties having the largest popula- 
tion and one representative from each of the 
other counties. 

COLORADO. 

On September 5, 1865, a vote was taken In the 
Territory of Colorado on the adoption of the 
State Constitution. The result was as follows : 
For the Constitution, 3,025: against, 2.S70— 
showing a majority of only 155 in favor of State 
Government. On the proposition to strike 
the word "white" from the qualification of 
voters in the new State Constitution, the ayes 
were 476, and the noes 4,192. 

The first election for State oflBcers took place 
In November. We give below the vote for 
Governor, Secretary of State, and Member of 
Congress. 

Gov., '65. Sec. op State, '65. 
Counties. Eey. Un.Ind. Un.Dem.Un.Dem. 

Gilrin.Sciidifer.C'»ijf.ti«n.Hntoli. 

Arrapahoe 344 1408 272.. 1693 320 

Boulder 43 42 94.. 18C 101 

Clear Creek 193 — 90.. ISO 101 

Coneios 40 11 865.. 48 366 

Costilla 258 5 69.. 257 67 

Douglas 63 38 15.. 97 16 

El Paso 126 6 S6.. 115 50 

Fremont 94 5 73.. 87 83 

Gilpin 844 32 708.. 763 7C9 

Huerfano 280 1 453.. 260 432 

Jefferson 132 52 146.. 184 149 

Laramie.".'.'.".'.'.'.'.".'.'!.' 106 28 15!.' 68 — 

Park....- 150 29 12.. 167 30 

Pueblo 144 1 117.. 134 134 

Summit 15 39 3.. 45 2 

Weld 215 39 2.. 244 35 



Total 3047 1736 2470.. 4502 2644 

CONGRESS, 1865. 

C'untln. rn.Iud.Cn.JJtiu CMil.^'lt.Ciivan-ffh.Beld»'-. 

ciHicti.CHv»n>irhB.u)w,. Huerfano... 202 13 379 
Arranahoe. 820 980 266 Jefferson... 172 20 133 

Boulder .... 166 26 83 Lake - — — 

Clear Creek 152 31 87 Laramie.... 59 76 15 

Coneios 24 27 363 1 Park 168 1 20 

Costilla 206 56 65 Pueblo 

Douglas.... 86 15 9 Summit . . . . 46 

ElPdso 120 — 47Weld 229 16 84 

Fremont ... 92 — 76 
Gilpin 562 431 543 

Chilcott over Belden, 
1,408. 

LKGISLATT7EE. 1866.— The Union party has a 
majority in both branches. The Senate con- 
sists of 13 and the House of 26 members. 

TERRITORIES. 
ARIZONA. 

This Territory held, on the first Wednesday 
of September, an election for Delegate to Con- 

gress and for members of the Territorial Leg- 
ilature. All the candidates professed to be 
supporters of the Administration. 
Counties. 



Total.. 3104 1696 2043 
1,016 ; over Cavanaugh, 



Mohave 

Pima ! 


G^ndwU 

80 

162 


. Pr»len 


Yuma...'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 




26 


Total... 


707 


276 



260 I 
John N. Goodwin's pluralitv over Joseph P. 

Allyn, 331; over Charles D. fosten, 447: over 

the combined opposition, 71. 
The Territorial Legislature consists of seven 

members— four for Yavapai and one for each 

of the three other counties. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S66. 



NEBRASKA. 

Tbeas'b, 1865. ArB'K, 65. CoifG.'62. 
Counties. Un.Dem. Un.Dem.Bep.Dem. 

Kountzp.GuOJ'li.Gille«|. &««iori.Dailv.Kinur > . 



402.. 433 



Bnrt 

Cass 433 

Cedar 15 

Clay — 

Cuinming 28 

Dakota 47 

Dixon 10 

Dodge 86 

Douglas 413 

Gage 36 

Hall 67 — .. 67 

Jobnson 88 IS.. 88 

Jones with Gage. — 

Kearney 8 8. . — 

Lancaster 100 8. . 100 

Merrick 25 — .. 25 

Kemaha 500 82.. 508 

Otoe 422 714.. 421 

Pawnee 125 — .. 126 

Platte 50 82.. 61 

Richardson.... 489 287.. 463 

Sarpy 149 200. 

Saxinders 28 

Seward 16 

"Washington . . .222 



10.. 



10 38. . 24 
91 24.. 64 
460 B64.. 357 



15.. 57 28 
— with Gage. 
16.. 29 29 
6..withCa6s. 



5,050: Konntze over Goodrich, 833. In 18C4, 
Hllclicock's (Unlcn) majority lor Delegate to 
Congress, 703. In 1862, Daily's (Union) major- 
ity, 153. 

Legislatukb, 1866.— The Unionists have a 
majority. 

NEW MEXICO. 



Counties. 



Cli. 



717.. 280 422 

-.. 133 62 

82. . 97 74 

262.. 820 180 

233. . 98 164 



Total 3401 2E49.. 8312 2618.. 2333 2180 

I n 1805, total vote for Territorial Treasnrer, 



Barnalillo 751 

Dona Ana 1072 

Mora 4£8 

Rio Arrlbe 626 

San Miguel 1761 

Santa Ana 308 

SanteFe 654 

Socorro 745 

Taos 995 

Valentla 1111 



1072 
1209 
782 
116 
618 
413 
874 



511 



617 
477 
1050 



844 



Total 8311 6180 W25 7231 

Majority for Chavez, 2,S31. Majority for Pe- 
rea in 18'i3, 806. 

Legislature.— Eight out of ten conntles 
elected Bepnbllcan members Into the Legis- 
lature. 

DAKOTA. 
An election for members of the Legislature 
was held in this Territorv on the 6th of Octo- 
ber. About three-fourths of the members 
elect are Republicans. 



POPULAR VOTE POR PRESIDENT. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Connecticut .. 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland , 

Massachusetts , 

Michigan 

Minnesota , 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nevada 

N. Hampshire., 

Now Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania .. 
Rhode Island .. 
South Carolina. 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

"West Virginia.. 

■Wisconsin 

Total 

Perc-nl 



1864. 



62,134 
44,691 
8.155 



189,-196 
150,432 
89,075 
16,441 
27,786 

68,114 
40,158 
126,742 
9i;)21 
25,060 

72^50 
9,826 
36,400 



158,730 
130,233 

49,596 
3,091 

64,301 

46,992 

48|745 
74,604 
17,375 



8,457 

276,816 

8,718 



13,.321 

1MS8 

65,8S4 

1,811,754 



18,293 
2,406 
•G12 



30,766 
20,189 
39,479 
12,750 
>36,515 

21,122 
7,414 
77,997 
16,917 



411,2'81 



1860. 



LilM-O 



172,161 
139,f" 
70,109 

1^64 

62,811 
2,294 
106,533 
88,480 
22,069 

17,( 

37,519 
58,324 
362,646 

231,610 

5,270 

268,030 

12,244 

Electrs 



13,651 

5,227 

88,516 

15,522 

1,023 

867 

11, 

160,215 

115,509 

55,111 



5,1 

31, .TO 
65,05' 
11,920 



25,881 

62,801 

312,510 

2,701 

187,232 

3,951 

16,765 

7,707 

chosen 

11,350 



48,831 
28,732 
84.384 
14,611 
7,337 
8,548 
51,889 
2,404 
12,295 



42,482 
5,939 
805 
748 
40,797 
31,317 

Ciis 



48.539 

11,405 

5,006 

178,871 

by the 

64,709 

47,548 

218 

74,323 



27.875 
20,094! 
6,817 
8,291 



06,058 
20,204 
2,046 
41,760| 
22,331 
405 
62 



12,776 

Legis 
6£,274 
15,438 
1,969 
74,681 

161 

590.631 



1856. 



96,200 
94,875 
43,954 



67,179 

2S1 

108,515 

71,762 



38,345 
28,838 
276,007 

187^497 

148,272 

11,467 

lature. 



Htm. A,,.. 

ii.L,.nn Frv.re- 
l6,739|l8;552 
21,910] 10,787 



42,228 
87,454 
22,E86 
9,180 



422 
24,115 
124,604 



1,675 
66,178 



545 
60,310 



(" Democratic majority.)— In 1864, whole vote, 4,034,789; Lincoln's majority, 411,281. In 1860, 
whole vote, 4,680,193; Lincoln over Douglas, 491,275 ; over Breckinridge, 1,018,500; over Pell, 
1.275,821; nil others over Lincoln, 947,289. In 1856, whole vote, 3,992,818 ; Buchanan over Fre- 
mont, 460,865 ; over Fillmore, 928,404. Fremout and Fillmore over Buchanan, 886,760. 









iimUliilHIililirilliirsaa 8§Ha 1 f ;| 
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= i098t 'notm IS I I I Sis I I I I §S I § I I I §§ I I I I i I I I I iSi I s 
= "^ '" St-. '^wS ?.c5 £ s3 CO SSea S 



siigssgisiiiiiiiisisgiiigiiiaiiiii § g's- 

5Q0O 1 t-S^T-i-rf-*c^ I -v t^w o K «? o »n o I cs^Boboicj^t-Sirif^irt^ « co j^ 



.f„,fiSisSitiiii5iSiSiSiSiii§sii^§isiiii§l ° 



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i. o o 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1866. 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

Pecember, 1865, 



AMERICA. 

Argentine Eepnb 

Ballvla .... 

Brazil 

Chill 

Colombia 

Costa Kicft 

Ecuador 

Guatemala 

Haytl 

Honduras 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Paraguay 

Peru 

San Domingo 

San Salvador 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 



EUROPE. 



Bavaria 

Belgium 

Bremen 

Brunswick 

Denmark..; 

France 

Frankfort 

Great Britain.... 

Greece 

Hamburg 

Hanover 

Hesse-Homburg. 



HeGse-Darmstadt . 

Holland 

Italy 

Llppe-Detmold .. . 
Lip'o-Schanmbr'g 

Llchtensteln 

Lubeck 

Weck.-Schwerln.. 
Meck.-strelitz.... 

Nassau 

Oldenburg 

Portugal 

Prussia 

Rcuss— Elder line 
Eenss— Young. " 
Russia 



Son JIarino. 
Saxony. 



Saxe-Alttnburg.. 
Scxe-Co.-Gotha.. 
Saxe-Mciulngen .. 
S'.xe-Wr-Eiscncli 
Scliwzb'g-Kud'sdt 
Schwzb'g-Sondr'n 

Bpaiu 

States of Chnreb. 
Sweden &Norw'y 

Switzci'land 

TurKcv 

Wnrtcmberg 

"VVaidock...:. 



374,000 
,004,400 
170,000 
480,800 

10.250 
240,000 

44,500 

loif- 

83,000 
833,000 
39,000 



112 

1.525 

21,856 

213,241 

122,190 
19,250 

185 
14,600 

185 



1,171,-- 

l,9b7,352 

7,ti77,b00 

1,558,319 

2.794,470 

150,000 

1,040,371 

1,OGO,OCO 

500,000 

850,000 

8.127.853 

400,000 

1.337,431 

2,500,000 

150,000 

280,000 

240,905 

1,515,000 



B. Mitre. 



Don Pedro II 
Jose Joaq'n Perez 

Gen. Murillo 

Jesus Jimenez.... 
Gab'l G. Moreno 
VincenteCerua.. 
Gen. Geflrard... 

Jose Medina , 

Benito Juarez.... 

Maximilian 1 

Tomas Martinez.. 
Franc. Sol. Lopez 



13,890 
95,942 

4-15 



1 

2;470 
24,500 
107,300 



1,302,074 

22 

5,705 

491 

790 

9C8 

1,403 

405 

8;i8 

176,480 

4,502 



1,369,291 

4,089337 

4,830,506 

8«,85e 

282,400 

1.68i 

37,472;732 

87418 

29,230,249 

1,326,000 

229,941 



26,817 
738,470 
856,90' 



50,614 
551,844 
89,060 
456,567 
295,242 
4,110,276 
:8.491,220 
125,490 



2,225,240 
137,102 
159,431 
1?2,341 
273,252 
71,013 
64,895 



Gen. Prado 
Gen. Baez 
I'ranc. Dnenas... 
Venancio Flores 
Geu. Blanco 



Leopold 

Francis Joseph I. 
Frederic 



Leopold II 

C. P. G. Mohr. 

William 

Christian IX... 
Napoleon III.. 



Victoria.. 
George I. 



President 
President „ 

Emperor is^io 

President.. ..|18G1 

President 1864 

President Ii863 

President Iisoi 

President iis6o 

President iiS59 

President ii8(>4 



Form of GoTernmoDt, 



Bepnbllc. 

Republic. 

Hered'ry monarchy 

Republic. 

Republic. 

Republic. 

Republic. 

Republic. 

Republic. 

Republic. 



Pre8ment..::;i86lRe^Sb^; 

|Kt.-.:::li^*te^-i-„---hy. 

^^^ '^^^ 

iSeslRcpubllc. 
l863!Eepnblic. 
i866Repnblic. 
1865|RepubUc. 



President 
President 
President, 
President 
President, 



^"^^^ 1795 iLlm. monai cbv 

iS?[tike-J^I-^°-*''----^ 
King 



archy. 



George V 

Ferd. nand 

Frederic William. 

Louis III 

William m 

Victor Eman'l 11. 

Leopold 

Adoipbus 

John II 

Chs. Louis Roeek. 

Fred. Fraiicis 

Fred. William.... 

AdolpUuB 

Peter 

LuisI _ 

William I iKing 

HeuryXXn Prince '.'. 

(5,148,600 ^Uexander II Czar. 

'Bellini and ( Captains—' 

SeccUoU iRcgeuts ... 

John Kiug 

Ernest Duke. . .'.'. " " 

Ernest II iDuke. ... 

Bernard Duke... 

Chas. Alexander. 'Grand Duke 

Fred. Gunther. . . jPrlnce 1814 

Gunthcr Prince ' 



King 

Bur£;oma6ter 

Duke 

King 

Emperor 

Burgomaster. 

QQceu 

fing 

Burgomaster. 

King 

Landgrave . . . 

Elector 

Grand Duke.. 

King 

King 

Prince 

Prince 

Prince 

Burgomaster. 
Grand Duke.. 
Grand Duke.. 

Duke 

Grand Duke.. 
King 



ADsoiutesov., 1 ch. 

Lim. sov., 2 chamb. ' 

Lim. Bov.,2chamb. ' 

Lim. mon., 2 chamb. 

Lim. mou . , 2 chamb. 

Lim. mon . , 1 chamb. 

Lim. mon., 1 chamb. 

Const'l monarchy 

Free city. 

Lim. 60V., 1 chamb. 
1860 Lim. sov., 1 chamb. 

Lim. sov., 2 chamb. 

Lim. sov., 2 chamb. 

Lim. mon., 2 chamb. 

Lim. mon., 2 chamb. 

Lim. sov. / , -v,„,„v 

Lim. sov. s ^ chamb. 

Absolute monarchy. 

* Republic, senate, 

I and exec, con'l. 

Lim. mon., 2 chamb. 

Lim. sov., 1 chamb. 

Lim. Sov., 1 chamb 

Lim. sov., 1 chamb. 

Lim. sov., 1 chamb. 

Lim. sov., 1 chamb. 

Lim. sov.. 1 chamb. 

Lim. mon., 2 chamb. 
1846|Abso. sovereignty. 

1,895,194! ^'l^'ggO Abdul Azis Sultan 11861 Abso. moiiarchv. 

^'^ rpnrl®« v,nV V • • •• SPS [ISftl Lim. mon., 2 chamb. 

58,6041 George Victor.... IPrince ll852'Llm. sov., 1 chamb ll 



18o2 Lim. sov., 2 chamb'B. 

1864 Lim. mon., 2 chamb. 
JsSS fe'™- mon., 2 chamb. 
1863 Free city. 
l83i(Lim. sov., 1 chamb. 
iSOoiLim. mon., 2 chamb. 
1852 Con. mon., 2 chamb. 
— — iFree city. 

183( iLim. mon . , 2 houses. 
ISOSILimited monarchy 

1865 ■="'•"" "i — 



1849 



1842 



1844 



Free city. 

Lim. mon., 2 chamb. 

Absolute sov. 



^^•^'^B\ Isabella II IQueen. 

690,000 Pius IX Pope 

.5,120,000 Charles XV King 



I 



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Df"partment3 have been assigned to, and will be weekly filled by.MRS SARAH J. HALE ; GRACE 
GREENWOOD, Good Things for Young Folks; JENNIE JUNE (.Mrs. Jennie E. Croley), Fasliions 
and Domestic Matters, illustrated; GEORGIANA H. S. HULL, New York Gav Life: MRS. ANNA : 
CORA MOWATT RITCHIE, European Life and Manners; MRS. C. A. UOPKINSON, Household 
I Interests, particularly the relation of Parent and Child; Domestic Economy and Housewife's De- i 
' partmeot, by tlie Authoress of the National Cook Book ; an original and sprightly Paris Letter, 
by " Leone Lkoki ;" Wit and Humor, an original illustrated column, by our " Funnt Editok." 

^iV UNEQUALED ARRAY OF EMIXENT AUTHORS. 

The following will positively write for the HOME WEEKLY during 1S6G : 



J. FOSTER KIRK, 

J. S. C. ABBOTT, 

BAYARD TAYLOR, 

W. GILMORE SLMM3, 

T. S. ARTHUR, 
"ARTEMU3 WARD," 

ORPHEUS C. KERR, 

GEORGE H. BOKER, 

THEODORE TILTON, 

J. T. TROWBRIDGE. 

P. HAMIHOS MYERS, 

BENSON J. LOSSING, 

RICHARD GRANT WHITE, 

EPES SARGENT, 

N. P. WILLIS, 

DR. J. H. HOLLAND (Timothy Titcomb), 

CASTOR BRISTED, 
"ED.MUND KIHKE," 

FRANK LEE BENEDICT, 

A. S. ROE, 

PROF. H. COPPEB:, 

E. P. WHIPPLE, 

H. T. TUCKERMAN, 

L. GAYLORD CLARKE, 

A. J. H. DUGANNE, 

PROF. JOHN S. HART, 

H. HASTINGS WELD, 



ANN S. STEPHENS, 

SARAH J. HALE, 

MARION HARLAND. 

ANNA CORA RITCHIE (MOWATT), 

GRACE GREENWOOD. 

OCTAVIA WALTON LE VERT, 

JENNIE JUNE, 

AUTHORESS OP " RUTLEDGE," 

JULIA WARD HOWE, 

ALICE GARY, 

MARY J. HOLMES, 

HARRIET E. PRESCOTT, 

CAROLINE CHESEBORO', 

MARY W. JANVRIN, 

META VICTORIA VICTOR, 

VIRGINIA F. TOWNSEND, 

GEORGIANA H. S. HULL, 

SARAH J. C. WHITTLESEY, 

MARY E. DODGE, 

ANNIE H. M. BREWSTER, 

MARY A. DENNISON, 

S. ANNIE FKCST, 

LOUISE CHANDLER MOULTON, 

ALMIRA LINCOLN PHELPS, 

CORI.N'NA A. HOPKINSON, 

ELIZABETH F. ELLET, . 

CLARA AUGU.STA, 

SALLIE BRIDGES, &c., Ac, 4c. 



THE $l,5n0 PRIZE STORIES will bo pubUshed complete in the Philadelphia Home Weekly. 
STERLING EDITORIALS on current events. AGRICULTURE and HORTICULTURE will receive 
attention. POETRY, original and selected, under the special charge of EPES SARGENT, Esq. 
Postmasters, Clergymen, and others who get up Clubs can add single copies at $1 25 per year. 
Canada subscribers must pay twenty cents additional to pay the American postage. The Post- 
age; on the Philadelphia Home AVeekly is ticenti/ cents a year, or five cents a quarter. No sub- 
scription received for a less period than one year. Specimen copies sent free of postage on re- 
ceipt of a three-cent stamp. A new series commenced Dec. 27th, and in that number commenced 
MARION HARLAND'S NEW ILLUSTRATED NOVELETTE, "THE BEAUTY OF THE FAMILY," 
and the beginning of the $1,000 PRIZE STORY. 

GEORGE W. CHILDS, Philadelphia. 

For sale by all Periodical and News Dealers throughout the United States and Canada. Phicb 

I FO0R CENTS FEB COPT. 



" GROVER dc BAKER'S 

Were awarded the Highest Premiums at the State Fairs of 

Kentucky, 



New York, 

Vermont, 

New Jersey, 

Pennsylvania 

Ohio, 

Indiana, 

Michigan, 

Wisconsin, 

Iowa, 




Tennessee, 

Missouri, 

Alabama, 

Mississippi, 

Virginia, 

N. Carolina, 

California, 

Oregon, 



And at numerous Institutes and County Pairs, including all the 
Fairs at which they were exhibited the past three years. 



The GROVER & BAKER ELASTIC BTITCH SEWING MACHINE U superior to all others, 
for the following reasons : 

1. The seam is stronger and more elastic than any other. 

2. It is more easily managed, and is capable of doing a greater variety and range of work 
than any other. 

8. It is capable of doing all the varieties of sewing done by other machines, and, in addition, 
executes beautiful embroidery and ornamental work. 



The Grover & Baker S. M. Co. manufacture, in addition to their celebrated GROTER & 
BAKER STITCH Machines, the most perfect SHUTTLE, or "LOCK STITCH" Machines In the 
market, and afford purchasers the opportunity of selecting, after trial and examination of both, 
the one best suited to their wants. Other Companies manufacture but one kind, of machine each, 
and can not afford this opportunity of selection to their customers. 



tp^" A pamphlet containing samples of both the Grover & Baker Stitch and Shuttle Stitch In 
variius fabrics, with full explanations, diagrams, and illustrations, to enable purchasers to 
eramin^, test, and compare-Wxen relative merits, will be furnished, on request, from our offices 
throughout the country. Those who desire machines which do the test work should not fail to 
seni for this pamphlet, and test and compare these stitches for themselves. 



GROVER & BAKER S. M. CO., 

495 BROADWAY, K Y. 

18 Summer Street, Boston. I 730 Chestnut Street, Phila. 
101 Washington St. Chicago. I 58 W. 4th St., Cincinnati. 

^~ Agencies In all the principal cities and towns in the United States. 



''The Schonberg-Cotia Family." a story of the times of Luther. One of the most 
truly remarkable books of the age. Ask any one of its 100,00n readers. 

By the same authc-, and belonging to the same series of Dramatic Histories: 
The Early Dawn ; or, Sketches of Christian Life in England, in the Clden Time. 
Diary of Kitty Trevylyan. A story of the times of Whifefield and the Wesleys. 
Winifred Bertram, and the World she lived in. This last vol. of the series just out. $1.76. 

The following are superior books for Educational or Family use : 
An Epitome of General Ecclesiastical History, from the earliest period to the present time. 

By J. Marsh, D. D. $1.T5. 
The World's Laconics; or, The Best Thoughts of Best Authors, Prose and Poetry. ItoL $1.75. 
Cruden's Complete Concordance and Dictionary of the Holy Scriptures. ItoL fS.OO. 

ALL OF THE ABOVE SENT POST-PAID ON RECEIPT OF PRICE. 

M. W. DODD, 506 Broadway, New York. 



THE MERCHANTS & BANKERS' ALMANAC. FOR 1866. 

The publisher of the Bankers' Magazine proposes to issue, in December, 1865, iheMerchante 
and Banfcers' Almanac, fcTlSGG. One volume, octavo. Price $2. Containing: 

I. List of 1,612 National Banks in operation, names of President and Cashier of each, and New 
York correspondent of each. 11. A List of the Banks, arranged alphabetically, in every State 
and City of the Union. Names of the President and Cashier, and cafiital of each. (December, 
1865.) III. A List of 1,000 Private Bankers in the United States, with the name of the New York 
correspondent of each, and Bankers in Canada. IT. A List of the Backs in Canada, New Bruns- 
wick, and Nova Scotia — their Cashiers, Managers, and Foreign Agents. V. A List of Banks and 
Bankers in London, November, 1665. TI. A List of Bankers in Dublin, Paris, and thirty Euro- 
pean cl'iies. VII. The daily price of Gold for four years at New York. Till A List ef £00 Sav- 
ings Banks in New England and New York. IX. The Prices of Bar Iron, Pig Iron, Sheet Iron, 
Pig Copper, and Coal, monthly, at New York, from 1S25 to 1864. X. Lowest and Highest Prices 
of Government, State, and Railroad Bonds, monthly, for three years. 

[ inth engraved vieus of the Ktw York Stock JEcechange and the Paris Bourne, and a va- 
riet)/ of information valut hie to Merchants. Bankers, and Bank Officers; as heretofore in 
the several volumes of the Bankers' Almanac.'] 

The Bankers' Magazine and Statistical Re^ster (monthly, $5 per annum), 
for the tue of Bank Officers Bank Birectors, Xotnries Public, Fritate Bankers, dc, 
CoKTAiNs:— 1. A List of over 1,600 National Banks established in the United States. 2. A 
monthly List of New National Banks. Location, President, Cashier, Capital and New York Cor- 
respondent of each. 3. A u.onthly List of N ew Banking Firms established in the several States. 
4 Lowest and Highest Prices monthly, of leading Government, State, Railroad, Coal, and other 
Stocks. 5. Daily Price of Gold at the New York Stock Exchange. Account of New Frauds on 
Banks and Bankers. 6. Monthly List of New Appointments of Presidents and Cashiers of Banks. 
7. Decisions of the Courts in reference to Bills of Exchange, Promissorj' Notes, Banks, Bonds, In- 
surance, Usury, ic. 8. Monthly Review of the Money Market and Stock Market of New York. 
9. Monthly Report of Banking operations abroad and at home, and miscellaneous Banking infor- 
mation. 10. New Banking Laws of the State of New York and of other States. 11. Forms (pre- 
pared by N. Y. Bank Counsel) of Bank Bonds for Bank OflScers. 12. Banking Statistics of the 
United "states and of every State in the Union, and of England, France, &c. 13. The Enabling 
Acts of the several States. 14. Decisions of the Comptroller of the Currency and Commissioner 
of Internal Revenue upon Banks, Bonds, &c. 

L Smith Homans, Editor ; I. Smith Homaks, Jr., Proprietor. Office of the Bankers' Magazine, 
No. 46 Pine Street, comer of TVilliam Street, New YorK, November, 1865. 



WATlOWAt SERIES OF STANDARJD SCHOOI. BOOKS. 

^. S. BARNES & CO., 
Snblis^crs, ©oofesellers anb Stationtrs, 

Nos. 51, 53 & 55 John Street, New York. 

ALFRED S. BARNTIS. ALFRED C. BARNTB. 

This House Publish 



Davies's National: System of Jfathematics. 
Parker <jfc Watson's National Series of Read- 
ers. 
Monteith <& McKalhf's National Series of 

Geoaraphies. 
Clark s System of English Grammar. 

And One Hundred other Popular School Books. 
D FOR OUR CATALOGUE.,^^ 



Pick's GunoVs Popular Physics. 
Porter's Principles of Chemistry. 

Willard's Series of School Historiee. 
Pujol & Van Norman's French Class Book. 

Wood's System of Botany. 

"" ' ■ Library, 12 Vole, 



Teacher'. 



THE HORTICULTURIST" FOR 1866. 

Twenty-first Annual Volume. 
$2.50 per Annum. 

A permanent, re'lable, and flrst- 
elass journal, published Monihly,at 
Two DoLLxr.s akd Fiitt CENiaper 
Annum, and devoted to the Oncn ard, 
ViNETABD, Garden and Nubsebt, to 
culture wider Glass, Landscape 
Gardening, Jiural Architecture, 
and the Emhellitihment and Im- 
provement of Country, Suburhan 
and City Homes. Handsomely Il- 
lustrated. 

Volume for 1865 nowready, 
handsomely bound in cloth, post-paid 
to any address, Three Dollars. 

Volume fir 1S€5 bound and post- 
paid, and numbers for 1SC6, $4.50. 

Volumes fir 1S64 and 1S65 bound 
and post-paid, and numbers for 1S66, 
$C.OO. 

The three volumrg contain 1,200 
royal octavo pages of rending matter 
from the best writers In the country, 
handsomely illustrated — a valuable 
eerles for every library. 

E. & F. W. -WOODWARD, Publishers, 

37 Parh How, New York 




GEO. 



WOODWARD'S COUSTTRT HOUSES. 

A practical work on the De- 

sisn and Ci>nstractinn of Country 
Houses, Stables, Out-buildings, 
&c., handsomely illustrated with 
1'22 designs and plans, prinoi pally 
of low-priced buildings, with an 
lllustr,:tud chapter on tlie con- 
struction of Balloon Frames, 
which are strongi-r, and forty per 
cent, cheaper, than the mortise 
and tenon frame. Evt-ry man 
who contemplates building a 
house should have this book. In 
Itwill be found plans and exterior 
views of ci^mjiact, convenient 
houses, suitable for farm, subur- 
ban and village re>idences, taken 
from practical examples, nearly 
every houge having been built. 
These plans and suggestions will 

aid any one In planning a houce for himself. In these days of high-priced bulMirg, the article on 
Balloon Framing i-< worth more than 100 times the price of the book. A me<:hnnic "who pro- 
poses to build a mortise and tenon frame tcest of Chicago cannot get employment. Price 
$1.S0, post-paid, to any address. 

GEO. E. & F. W. WOODWARD, Publishers. 

:i7 Park. Row, Nern YorJe. 
All Agricultural, Horticultural and Agricultural Books, Paper.-, and Periodicals puMishod in 
this country, can be had at this oflice, or mailed to any addrofS on receipt of price, 
Seud for'Priced Catalogue free. T6 




GET *Hfi BEST. 71 

WEBSTER'S UNABRIDGED DICTIONARY, 

New Illustrated Edition, Thoroughly Revised and much Enlarged, 

OVER 3000 FINE ENaRAVINGS, 

!■ a ivell-nigrh Indispen«a1>le Requisite for every Teacher's Desk. 

Giving important aid in every branch taught in our schools, and of constant use and convenience in 
EVERY INTELLIGENT FAMILY. 
It contains 10,000 Words and MEANisas not found In other Dictionaries. 
The possession of any other English Dictionary, or any previous edition of this, cannot com- 
pensate for the want of this very full and complete one. In its present perfected state, it must long 
remain the BEST ENGLISH DICTIONARY, and, once possessed, remain of constant and abiding 
value. IN ONE VOL. OF I&IO ROYAL QUARTO PAGES. 

Published by G. & C. MERRIAM, Springfield, Mass. 
Sold by all Booksellers. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

TH Broadway, New York, 

May 24th, 1861. 
©Itij' X^ to (^tXixi^f that I have connected with me, as associates in 
my practice, X. E. KING, M.D., and JS. S. CBA.MBSE, M.D. 

During my absence I submit to them with complete reliance the conduct 
of my practice, and the care and charge of my patients, together with the dis- 
pensing of my remedies, and accept them as my associates when I am at my 
office in this city. ^ ^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^_ 

T^V^O BOOKS 

VALUABLE TO THE SICK OR WELL. 



NO PAY EXPECTED UN TIL EEOEIVED, B EAD, AND APPEOVED. 

DR. S. S. FITCH'S SIX LECTURES 

On the Functions of the Lungs; Causes, Prevention, and Cure of 

Pulmonary Consumption, Asthma, Heart Disease, &c. On 

the Laws of Life and the Mode of Preserving 

iVIale and Female Health. 

DR. S. S. FITCH'S WORK 

On Heart Disease, Rheumatism, Dyspepsia, Dysentery, Cholera and 

Cholera Morbus, Bilious Colic, Costiveness, &c.. Yellow 

Fever, &c„ Diphtheria or Putrid Sore Throat, Ac, &o. 

Either of the above works will b immediately forwarded to those wishing it by sending 
their name, post office. County and State, and can be paid for after they have been received, 
read, and approved. Address, Drs. FITCH, KING & CHAMBRE, 

714 Broadway, New York. 

The firm of Kiko & Chambre, of No. 714 Broadway, in the City of New York, are alone 
authorized to prepare and vend the Medic nes of S. S. Pitch & Co. Their Medicines are made 
from the same receipts and are the game in name, quality and virtues as the various remedies 
heretofore sold by S. S. Fitch & Co., and the same as used by me in my practice in the treat- 
ment of chronic and acute diseases. And are the Sole owners of right to manufacture the In- 
struments known as "Dr. S. S. Fitch's Patent Abdominal Supporter, Rupture Trusses, 
Shoulder Braces, and Inhaling Tubes." 

N.Y., June 1, 1S61. CT. Cf. ^itc/l. 

Business Letters should be addressed, "Krao ft Chambrk"; Professional Letters, "Drs. 
Fitch, Kinq & Chambeb." Consultation and advice ftee. Office hours, 9 A. M. to 5 P. M., 
Sundays excepted. 



To Consumptives. 



,HE Advertiser, having been restored to health in 
a few weeks, by a very simple remedy, after 
having suffered several years with a severe lung affec- 
tion, and that dread disease. Consumption — is anxious 
to make known to his fellow-sufferers the means of 



To all who desire it, he will send a copy of the pre- 
scription used (free of charge), with the directions for 
preparing and using the same, which they will find a 

SURE CURE FOR CONSUMPTION, AsTHMA, BRONCHITIS, <fec. 

The only object of the advertiser in sending the Pre- 
scription is to benefit the afflicted, and spread informa- 
tion which he conceives to be invaluable, and he hopes 
every sufferer will try his remedy, as it will cost them 
nothing, and may prove a blessing. 

Parties wishing the prescription, will please address 

Rev. EDWARD A. WILSON, 

165 South 2d Street, 
Williamsburgh, Kings County, N. Y. 



HORACE WATERS' 

isical Estabiis&meal, 

No. 481 Broadway, New York. 

THE HORACE IVATERS GRAND, SQUARE AND 

UPRIGHT PIANOS I MELODEONS, CABINET 

ORGANS, SHEET MUSIC, MUSIC BOOKS, 

And all kinds of Musical Instruments and Musical Merchandise, at the lowest 
RATES, wholesale and retail. Second-hand Pianos and Melodeons at great bar- 
gains. Prices, $}0, $73, $100, $123, $150, $173, $2)0, and $223. New 7-octave 
Pianos for $30") and upward. Pianos and Melodeons to let, and rent allowed, if 
purchased. Monthly payments received for the same. 

The Horace Waters Pianos and Melodeons are as FIXE AXD DURABLE 
INSTRUMENTS AS ARE MADE. WARRANTED FOR FIVE YEARS. 

testimonial's. 

The Horace Waters Pianos are known as among the very best. — JV. Y: Evangelist. 

AVe can speak of the merits of the Ilorace Waters Pianos from personal knowledge as being 
of the ve y best quality. — Christian Intelligencer. 

The Horace Waters Pianos are built of the best and most thoroughly seasoned material.^ 
AdTocate and Journal. 

Waterss Pianos an! Melodeons challenge comparison with the finest made anywhere in the 
country. — Home Journal. 

Our fi lends will find at Mr. Waters's store the very best assortment of Music and of Pianos to 
be found in the United States. — Graham^* Magazine. 

Schedules of prices of instruments, and Catalogues of Sheet Music, and any 
music pujilished in the United States, mailed free. 

10,000 pages Sheet Music, a little soiled, at 1^ cents per page. 

^aUljatU ^ch00l and othcv ^aaksi ^vMX^^xtH l>jj iW li0U.s« : 
Sabbath-School Bell, No. 1, 

(900,000 copies issued.) 

Sabbath-School Bell, No. 2, 

Choral Harp, The Diadera. 

I* r i c e ss 

Paper Covers, $3 per doz. ; Boards, $3 60 ; Cloth Embosged, Gilt, $4 20. 

BELLS, Nos, I and 2, in one Volume, 

|6 60 per dozen. Cloth Embossed, Gilt, |7 20 per dozen. 

DAY SCHOOL BELL, for Public Schools and Seminaries, 

Paper Covers, $3 60 per dozen ; Board Covers, $4 20 ; Cloth, $4 SO. 

THE CHRISTIAN MELODIST, 

A new Revival Hymn and Tune Book. Price, $3 per dozen. Boards, $3 60. 
MANUrACTOBY AND "WAREROOMS, 481 Broadway, N. Y. 

HORACE WATERS. 



IMPOETANT TO All INTAIIJS. 
THE PERUvTaN syrup 

STIilKES A T THE HOOT OF DISEASE 
111 K,r,ri,U,ing the T.lood with iu VITAL 
rniNvIPLE or LIFE ELEMENT-IRON. 

For all diseases originating in 

DYSPEPSIA, 

or a BAD STA TE OF THE BLOOD, it is a 
specific. 

AN E2fINENT DIVINE, OF BOSTON, 

says : 

" I have been using the PERUVIAN SYRUP 

for some time past; it gives me new vigor, 

BPOYANCY OF SPIRITS, ELASTICITY OF MUSCLE." 

Thoiisands hare heen dtanged hy the -use 
of this remedy, from iceal; sickly, suffering 
creatures, to strong, healthy, and luipjyymen 
and lomnen; and invalids cannot reason- 
ably hesitate to give it a trial. 

A Pamphlet of 82 pages sent FREE. 

J. P. DINSilOBE, Proprietor, SG Dey Street, 

New York. 

|^~ Sold by all Druggists. 



GBACE'S Celebrated Salve 

CURES CUTS, BURNS, SCALDS. 

GBACE'S Celebrated Salve 

CURES WOUNDS, BRUISES, SPRAINS 

GRACE'S Celebrated Salve 

CURES RINGWORMS, WARTS, <t<\ 

GRACE'S Celebrated Salve 

CURES BOILS, ULCERS, CANCERS. 

GRACE'S Celebrated Salve 

CURES SALT RHEUM, ERYSIPELAS. 

GRACE'S Celebrated Salve 

CURES FROZEN HMDS, CHILBLAINS. 

GRACE'S Celebrated Salve 

DEALS OLD SORES, FLESH WOUNDS. 

GRACE'S Celebrated Salve 

is prompt in action, removes pain at once, and 
reduces the most angry-looking swellings and 
inflammations, as if by magic, — thus aQ'ording 
relief and a complete cure. 

Only 25 Cents a Box 1 

(Sent by mail for 35 cents.) 

For sale by 

J. P. DINSMORE. No. S6 Dey Street, N. Y 

S. W. FOWLE d- SON, Proprietors, hoston. 



jua >y fiuis , X'roprten 
And by all Druggists. 



Wlstar's Balsam 

OF 

iiiiif 

Has been used for nearly 

HALF A CENTUR Y, 

"With the most astonishing success In curing 

Coughs, Colds, Consumption, 

And every affection of 

The Throat, Lungs, & Chest, 

SEYMOUR THATCHER, M. D., rf Her- 
man, N. Y., %c rites us follou-s : 
" AViST;tR'3 Balsam of Wild CnrRET gives uni- 
versal satisfaction. It seems to cure a i. ough by 
loosening and cleansing the lungs, and allaying 
irritation, thus removing the cause instead of 
drying tip the coxigh and leaving the cause 
be/iind." 

For sale by 

J. P. DINSMORE, No. 86 Dev Strest, N. Y. 

S. W. FO WLE tfc SON, Proprietors, Boston. 

And by all Druggists. 



Dr.H. Anders' lodineWater 

A Pure Sulutio^i of Iodine, WITHOUT 
A SOL VENT .' ! 
The best and only SURE REMEDY for 

SCROFULA, 

in all its manifold forms, 

Ulcers, Cancers, Syphilis, 
Salt Rheum, &c. 

Parkeksbcrgh, 'W. A'a., Fepi. 1?, IfCo. 
Dr. H. Anders & Co.— ('_^«»^/«/««.'i .• * * * 
I had 37 running ulcers when 1 commenced Ink- 
ing your medicine, and am now reduced to one. 
* * * I induced a person quite low with 
Scrofula to try the medicine, lie can now at- 
tend to business, and is quite encouraged. 

Yours, truly, J. W. IIOKNER. 

Circulars free by mail. 
Price $1 a bottle, or six for |5. 
Dr. II. ANDERS & CO., Dhnsicians and 
Cheniixt.-<,4:1S Broadway-, New York. 
^^ Sold by Drujjists generally. 




And Fourth Avenne, corner of Seventeenth Street, 



DETOS, MEDICINES, FANCY AETICLES, Eto., Etc. 

Hegeman &. Co.'s Benzine. 
For the instant rcEaeval of Paint, Grease Spots, etc. 

Hegeman &. Co.'s Camphor Ice with Glycerine,^ 
A certain cure for Chapped Hands, Sunburn, Sore Lips, Chilblains, etc. 

Hegeman &. Co.'s Genuine Cod Liver Oil, 
Warranted pure, and prepared from the Fresh Livers, without bleaching or any 
chemical preparation. This article has stood the test of fifteen years' experience, 
with increasing reputation, for Consumption, Scrofula, etc. 

Hegeman &. Co.'s Cordial Elixir of Calisaya Bark, 
Prepared from the Calisaya (or King's) Bark, being the best variety of Peruvian 
Bark. It is an agreeable cordial to the taste, and possessing the valuable tonic 
properties of the bark — an excellent preventive to Fevers, Fever and Ague, etc., 
for residents in malarious districts. 

Hegeman &. Co.'s Velpeau's Diarrhea Remedy and Cholera 
Preventive. 
Used with unfailing success during and since the cholera of 1845. A single dose 
will usually check or cure the Diarrhea. ITo family should be without it. 

Hegeman &. Co.'s Hair Tonic, or Ricine Hair Preserver. 
This is simply a preparation of highly purified Castor Oil, combined with in- 
gredients that stimulate the scalp slightly, keeping it healthy, and effectually 
preventing Dandruff, Falling off of the Hair, etc., keeping it soft and curly. 

Hegeman &. Co.'s Bronchial Pastilles. 
Composed of ingredients similar to the celebrated Dr. Fpitta's Lozenges and Pas- 
tilles de Paris. They allay irritation of the mucous membrane, and cure Catarrh, 
Cough, and incipient Bronchitis. Particularly valuable for Clergymen and Public 
Speakers, as they keep the throat moist, etc. 

THE ABOVE PREPARATIONS ARE SOLD BY DRUGGISTS GEXERALLY, 

IN THE U:aTED STATES AND CANADAS. 



Radwafs Ready Relief.| 

ASIATIC CHOLEBA. \ 

In 1S49 RADWAT'S READY RELIEF cured over 10,000 cases of ASIATIC CHOLERA, and 
as a preventive of this scourge saved over a million. As a family medicine it is the most useful 
remedy known to the world. If seized with pain or sickness, or threatened with any malignant 
disease, its use will quickly cure the patient, and protect the system against attacks. IN A 
FEW MINUTES after the application of the RSADY RELIEF externally, or its administration 
internally, the patient, seized with the most excrutiat'mg PAINS, ACHES, CRAMPS, RIIEC- '■ 
MATISM, NEURALGIA, GOUT, LUMBAGO, FEVER AND AGUE, SPASMS, SORE THROAT, i 
INFLUENZA, DIPHTHERIA, CONGESTION orlNFLAMMATION, will enjoy ease and comfort. 

IMPORTANT.— TO FARMERS AND OTHERS resifling in sparsely settled districts where it 
is difficult to secure the services of a physician, RADWAY'S READY RELIEF is invaluable. It 
can be used with positive assurance of doing good in all cases where pain or discomfort '\a 
experienced, or {f seized with INFLUENZA, DIPHTHERIA, SORE THROAT, BAD COUGHS, 
HOARSENESS, BILIOUS COLIC ; INFLAMMATION OF THE BOWELS, STOMACH, LUNGS, , 
LIVER, KIDNEYS; or with CROUP, QUINSV, FEVER AND AGUE, or with NEURALGIA) 
HEADACHE, TIC DOLOREUX, TOOTHACHE, EARACHE, or with LUMBAGO, PAIN IN THE 
BACK, or RHEUM.\TISM, or with DIARRHCEA, CHOLERA MORBUS or DTSENTERY, or with 
BURNS, SCALDS or BRUISES, or with STRAINS, CRAMPS or SPASMS . The application of ; 
RADV?AY'3 READY RELIEF will cure you of the worst of these complaints in a few hours. i 

RHEUMATISM.— This painful disease has baffled the most skillful physicians and i 
popular remedies. It is the most difficult of diseasesto treat— yet RADWAY'S READY RELIEF \ 
has never failed in affording immediate relief to the sufferer ; and in all cases of Acute, Inflam- | 
matorv or Nervous Rheumatism, to effect a permanent cure. (In Chronic Rheumatism and Gout, I 
! RADWAY'S CLEANSING SYRUP, called Renovating Be^oUent, should be taken as an adjunct I 
•with the READY RELIEF ) i 

Sold by Druggists everywhere. Price 50 Cents Per Bottle. j 



^^ 



^. 



;^ II 



'*A 



^& 



&?^ 



DR. RADWAY'S 

NBWLT riSCOVERBB 

Principles in Puigalion, 

DR. RADWAT'S PILLS are the best 
Purgative Pills in the world, and the 
only Vegetable Substitute for Calomel cr 
Mercury ever discovered. Composed of 
VEGETABLE EXTRACTS, of (JUM8, 
PLANTS, HERBS, ROOTS andFLOWEIiS 
They Purge, Cleanse. Purify, Heal, Soothe, 
Calm, Strengthen, Invigorate and Regu- 
late the System. In sudden attacks cf 
INFLAMMATION OP THE BOWEL'^^, 
BILIOUS COLIC, BILIOUS FEVER. EUV- 
SIPELAS, CONGESTIVE FEVER, SMALL 
POX, MEASLKS, SCARLET FEVER, SIX 
TO EIGHT PILLS will purge the disease 
from the system in six hours 

DR. RADWAT'S PILLS are aa improvement on all other Pills or Purga- 
tives in use; they will cleanse the alimentary canal as thoroughly as lobelia 
will the atomach, without prostrating or weakening the patient. They are the 
most active and thorough purgative, taken in maximum doses of say sis to 
eight, known to the world ; and in doses of one to four are mild laxatives. As 
alteratives, they are safer and more positive than calomel or mercury; as 
tonics, they impart richness to the blood, tone and strength to the S3ste;u. 

Price 25 Cents per Box, 82 



Dame's Pulmo-Broncliial Troches. 



The Best, Cheapest, and most effectual 
Remedy ever prpduced for the Cure of 
Coughs, Colds. Catarrh, 
Asthma, Bi<ynchitis, Incipi- 
ent Consumption, Whooping- 
Cough, and all other Throat 
and Luijg- Diseases. 

If you have a Cold or Cough get them 
at once, and save your money, your 
time, and perhaps your life. 

Ask your Druggist for DAME'S, and 
take no other. The price is within the 
reach of all,25 cts. and $1 per Box. 

DAWE & CO., 138 Fourth Atc, or C. FOX, 81 Barclay St., ]V. I . 

ALL ORDERS ADDRESSED AS ABOVE WILL BE PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO 



PULMO-BRONCHIAL 

tROCHES 



A WELL. SPRING OF HOPE FOR THE SICK! 

HOLLOWAY'S PILLS. 

BE OF GOOD CHEERJ TRE SINKING MAY BE SAVED BY THE USE OF 



HOLLOWAY 



OINTMENT. 



The history of these great Remedies Is the most ironderful medical revelation that the world 
has ever known. It establishes the all-important fact that wherever, and in vJtaterei- shape, in- 
ternal disease exists, the disinfectins', searching and healing properties of the Pills are ful'y equal 
to its subjection and cure, and that, with the Ointment, they are the GREAT AMBASSADv >RS OF 
HEALTH TO ALL ilANKLND. 

CHOLERA, DIARRHEA, WEAKNESS, ETC. 

The terrible bodily and mental pangs which characterize Cholera, are at once mitigated by the 
Pills. Diarrhea, Constipation, Headache, Physical Prostration. Nervous Tremors, Hot Flushes, 
[Spasms, Affections of the Kidneys, Hemorrhoids or Piles ; and, in fact, all internal complaints, 
from whatever cause arising, give way before the salutary influence of this extraordinary remedy. 
As a specific for Dyspepsia, and the disorders connected with it, or growing out of it, the Pills are 
always to be relied on when every other medicine and mode of treatment has utterly failed. 

Holloway's Pills are the best Remedy known for the following Diseases ; 

CHOLERA, 



Asthma, Dyspepsia, Headaches, 

Bowel Complaints, Diarrhea, Indigestion, 

Coughs, Dropsy, Influenza, 

Colds, Debility, Inflammation, 

Chest Diseases, Fever and Afue, Inward Weakness, 

Costiveness, Female Complaints, Liver Complaints, 



Lowness of Spirits. 

PUes, 

Stone and Gravel, 

Secondary Symptoms, 

Venereal Affections, 

Worms of all kinds. 



CAUTION ! — None are genuine unless the words " Ilollfnixiy, New York and London," 
are discemable as a Water-Mark in every leaf of the book of directions around each box ; the 
same maybe plainly seen by holding the leaf to the light. A handsome reward will be given to 
any one rendering such information as may lead to the detection of any party or parties counter- 
feiting the medicines, or vending the same, knowing them to be spurious. 

*»* Sold at the manufactory of Prof. HOLLOWAY, 80 Maiden Lane, New York, and by all 
respectable Druggists and Dealers In medicine throughout the United States and the civilized 
world, at 35 cents, 83 cents, and $1.40 each. 

N. B.— Directions for the guidance of patients in every disorder are affixed to each box. 



LOVE OF LIQUOR CURED 

BY DE. ZELL'S EEMEDT. 

Original Price $5 per package ; now sent by mail on receipt of ONE DOLLAR ; 6 Boxes for $5. 

This WosDEKFCL Remedy (discovered by Dr. Henry Zell) may be given, unknown to the patient, 
in Coffee, Tea, or other drink, and will never sicken the patient. SIakk That ! 

Drunken. icss in a Disease. In Dyspiepsia there is a continual craving for Food ; so, in Dm nk- 
»nness, the unfortunate one is beset with an insatiate desire for Drink. Dr. Zell's Compound 
weans the patient from this craving for Alcoholic Stimulants, not by producing nausea or sick- 
ness, but by bracing up and strengthening the coating and nerves of the stomach, so that the 
craving for Liquor is gradually removed, hearty, generous food is begun to be sought after (and 
should be freely supplied) ; then follows a firm power and will to resist the accursed cup. 

Packages sent by mail, on receipt of price, bv:— Dr. R. HOMAN, 63 Division St., N. Y. ; Mrs. 
E. C. HALSEY, 214 8th Ave., N. Y. ; Dr. J. AIKEN, .Tr., 2S1 Hudson St., N. Y. ■ JOS. W. HAYES. 
175 Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Dr. WM. T. MERCER, 2^4 Broad St., Newark, N. J. ; JOS. I. 
BRIEST, 46 South Second St., Williamsburg, N. Y. 

Trade Supplied by CHAS. N. CRITTENTON, S8 Sixth Avenue, New York 



The Great New England Remedy ! 

DR. J.W.POLAND'SWHITE PINE COMPOUND 

" It was early In the fpring of 1S55 that this compound was originated. A member of my 
family was ainicted with an irritation of the throat, attrnded with a disagreeable cough. I had 
for some months previous thought that a preparation having for its basis the inside bark of white 
pine, might be so compounded as to be very useful in cases of the throat and lungs. To test the 
value of it in the case alluded to, I compounded a small quantity of the medicine that I had been 
planning, and gave it in teaspoonful doses. The result was e.\ceedingly gratifying. Within two 
days the irritation of the throat was removed, the cough subsided, and a speedy cure was elTected. 
Soon after this, I sent some to a lady in Londonderry, N. H., who had been suffering for some 
weeks from a bad cough, occasioned by a sudden cold, and liad raised mucous streaked with 
blood. She soon found relief, and sent for more. She took about ten ounces of it, and got well. 
J. B. Clarke, Esq., editor of the Manchester Daily Mirror, made a trial of the same preparation 
5n the case of a severe cold, and was cured immediately. He was so highly pleased with the re- 
sults, and so confident of success attending its sale if placed before the public, that he finally 
persuaded me to give it a name and send it abroad to benefit the suffering. In November, It- 55, 1 
first advertised it, under the name of AVhite Pine Compound. In two years from that time there 
had been wholesaled in Manchester alone (me Jntndred doUara^ worih, where it took the lead of 
all the cough remedies in the market, and it still maintains that position. There is good reason for 
all this : it is very soothing and healing; in its nature, is warming to the stomach, and pleasant 
withal to the taste, and is exceedingly cheap. 

"As a remedy for kidney complaints, the \^'hite Pine Compound stands unrivaled. It was not 
originated for that purpose ; but a person, in using it for a cough was not only cured of the cough, 
but was also cured of a kidney difficulty of ten years' standing. Since that accidental discovery 
many thousands have used it for the same complaint, and have been completely cured." 

The above was written by Dr. Poland in 1860. Since then, as in Manchester, the AVhite Pine 
Compound has taken the lead of all Cough remedies, as well as preparations for the cure of Kid- 
ney difficulties, in every city, town, village, and hamlet throughout the New England States. 

The past year has given great opportunity to test the virtue of the White Pine Coivpovnd. 
It has been an unusual time for Colds and Coughs, and very large quantities of the White Pine 
Compnunil have been sold, and used with the happiest effects. It speaks well for the Medicine, 
and the people where it is prepared are high in its praise. 

One bottle of this Compound is generally sufficient to remove a bad cough, and frequently I 
have known persons to have a cold entirely removed in two days, by using less than half a bottle. 
From one to two teaspoonfuls is a large dose. I sometimes put a little white sugar and hot water 
with it, when taken on going to bed. 

The limits to which I purposely confine myself in this circular, will not allow of that full ex- 
pression which I would like to give in favor of the White Pine Compound. It is universally ad- 
mired by all who use it^ — It has attained to such a popularity among those whose opinion is valu- 
able indeed, that VANrry may possibly in part prompt me to record more here than hurried people I 
will have patience to read ; so I will stop, by merely recommending to all who need a cough or i 
kidney remedy to test the virtues of the White Pine CoMPOtTND. 

TESTIMONIALS. i 

A very large number of important testimonials have already been received from Physicians, I 
Clergymen, Apothecaries, and indeed from all classes in society, speaking in the most flattering : 
terms of the White Pine Compound. : 

Dr. Nichols, of Northfield, Vt., says ■ — " I find the WTiite Pine Compound to be very effica- j 
cious, not only in coughs and other pulmonic affections, but also in affections of the kidneys, de- 
bility of the stomach, and other kindred organs." ! 

Ke V. J. K. Chase, of Rumney, N. H., writes : — " I have for years regarded your White Pine | 
Compound as an invaluable remedy. I can truly say that I regard it as even more efl'icacious | 
and valuable than ever. I have just taken the Compound for a cold, and it works chanrungly." I 

Hon. P. H. S-v^eetser. of South Reading, writes : — " Having long knomi something of the 
valuable medicinal properties of the AVhite Pine, I was prepared, on seeing an advertisement of 
your White Pine Compound, to give the medicine a trial. It has been used by members of my 
family for several years, for colds and coughs, and in some cases of serious kidney difficulties, 
with excellent results. Several of our friends have also received much benefit from the Com- 
pound. We intend to keep it always on hand." j 

Rev. H. D. Hodge, of West Randolph, Tt., who is a practicing physician, as well as ! 
preacher, in a letter to Dr. P., dated May 21, 1863, says :— " I find it an excellent medicine in kid- 
ney disease." 

From a Boston Pastor.— Boston, .Tan. 16, 1862.— Rev. J. W. Poland, M. li.—Dear Sir : ' 
Tour WTiite Pine Compound has been used in my own family, and I know of others who have used it, 
always with a good effect, and I feel justified, and it is with pleasure that I fay that I regard it } 
(unlike most preparations of the day) as wholly deserving of the entire confidence of the public, i 
Not only do I consider it a safe but an eflScient remedy for all diseases of the throat. 



TESTIMONIALS— Contimied. 



85 



From James J. Hoy t.— Bradford, N. H., Sept., I860.— Dr. Poland: In the fall of 1857, 1 
took a very violent cold, which brought on a very severe cough, pain in side and lungs, and lais- 
ing blood. I was also very badly afflicted with that troublesi^me disease — the Ai((/;ey Lum- 
plaint. For the three years past I have been very much troubled with my throat and lungs, 
choking up and raising an immense eight, with a bad cough after raising blood ; I felt tLat my 
time here must be short unless I soon got relief. This spring I was induced to try your tt'i'ite | 
Pine Compound, though my faith in it was small. But to my astonishment, before I had taken 
two bottles, my cough was better, the kidney trouble also, and I could rest nights without choking 
up and raising so much. I have taken nearly three bottles, and am feeling like a v. ell man. 

I would add that my father's family is inclined to consumption — my father, mother, and two 
sisters having died of it. 

Letter from Rev. L. C. Stevens, Pastor of Baptist Chvrch, Goffntmcn Center, jY. IT. 
—Dr. J W. Poland,— J/y Dear Sir : You asked me what I think of your White Pine Compound. 
I never before put pen to paper to tell any man what I thought of a patent medicine. My father, 
a physician of the old school, early led me to serious suspicions of all nostrums of whatever kind, 
not bearing the stamp of that fraternity. But these suspicions I have parted with by degrees, as I 
have carefully acquainted myself with the leading principles of Hydropathy, Homoeopathy, 
Thompsonianism, Electrici=m, and other systems which have claimed public favor withiu the last 
twenty-five years, so that 1 feel at liberty on this ground to speak my convictions. 

Then, the s.\Tnpathy which I feel for you, as a former Baptist pastor— obliged to relinquish 
the ministry merely on account of ill health, but still cherishing all the ardor of your early years 
for this blessed work, and laboring to your utmost, in other ways, to proclaim the glorious Gos- 
pel — inclined me, as a matter of duty, to comply with your request. 

In 1853 I became acquainted with Deacon Holmes Boardman, of Maine, brother of the late 
George Dana Bnaidman, formerly missionary in Burmah, and from him, for the first time, learned 
the wonderful medicinal qualities of white pine bark. He had, a few years before, been brought 
to the borders of the grave by what the best of physicians pronounced pulmonary consumption, 
and was given up to die, but was nevertheless entirely cured by a preparation made by his own 
hands from this bark. Since that time, until I became acquainted with your article, I have been 
surprised that no nhilosophical mind was found to undertake a cough preparation from white 
pine. 

As soon as your article was brought to my notice, it therefore secured my attention ; and I 
have not failed to acquaint myself with a sutflcient number of facts to produce a settled judgment 
as to its value. Some of my own family have tried it with signal benefit. I believe it one of the 
best cough medicines ever prepared. Besides its value as a Cough Medicine, I have good reason 
to believe it to be all it claims as a remedy for kidney diseases and diabetes. 

Yours truly, L. C. STEM5NS. _ 

[Several other clergymen and physicians have also written to Dr. P., highly approving of his 
I White Pine Compound.] 

From Elery B. Cahoon.— Brewster, Mass., March 19, 1863 —Dr. Poland : I feel it my 
duty to inform you of the very great benefits which I have received from the use of your White 
Pine Compound. In August, 1861, I took a very severe cold, which continued to afflict me, in- 
creasing in severity, attended with a very hard cough, night sweats, and some bleeding, probably 
from the throat. Through the fall and winter my cough was very distressing, reducing my flesh 
and strength, and rendering me unfit for labor. I tried medicines of various kinds, but none of 
them, however valuable, gave me any relief. In March, 1862, as you may remember, I wrote to 
you, stating my difficulties and asking advice. You sent me some of the White Pine Compound. 
I commenced taking it, and immediately began to amend. At the time of writing to you my 
weight was only 135 pounds. In five weeks I was out in active labor, and in a few months gained 
up to ICO pounds. I knoir it was the White Pine Compound which did all this for me. I soon 
began to have persons apply to me for the medicine, and, as you know, I ordered it for sale. In 
eight months, though without making much exertion, I disposed of 540 bottles of the Compiouiui 
here on the Cape. 

I would add that several persons of my acquaintance, whose condition was as hopeless as my 
own, have been cured by the White Pine Compound. 

From Boston 'Watchman and Reflector. — The White Pine Compound, advertised 
at length in our columns, is not only, as to its name, inviting, but it is a highly approved medi- 
cine. Dr. J. W. Poland, the inventor, has the confidence of the many who know him, a confi- 
dence which he enjoyed while laboring usefully many years as a Baptist minister. His experience 
as a sufferer led him to make experiments which issued in his medical discovery. 

Shorild yori think favorably of this medicine, he careful, when purchasinff, that it is tlee 
WHITE PINE COMPOUND that is offered you, as ice know that other j>reparations have 
been jMthned off for it by unjjrincipled dealers. 

^^ THE WHITE PINE COMPOUND is manufactured at itft Neic England Botanic Depot, 
No. 106 Hanover Street, Boston, GEORGE W. SWETT, M. D., Proprietor, under the supervision of 
Rev. J. \V. POLAND, M. D. Dr. Swett vrill attend to the business department, to whom 
all orders should be addressed. Sold by wholesale and retail dealers in medicine everywhere. 

BCRN'HAM & VAN SCHAACK, Chicago, 111. ; JOHN D. PAEK, Cincinnati, Ohio ; General 
Agents for the West. 






CONSTITUTION "WATER. 

THE GREAT REMEDY FOR THE 

CONSTITUTIOISri 

AND THE ONLY KNOWN REMEDY FOE 

AND DISEASES OF THE KIDNEYS AND BLADDER. 



CONSTITUTION WATER 

Is, without doubt, the only known remedy for DIABETES, and we hare as much 
confidence that it is a specific as we have that opium will produce sleep, and 
truthfully say that it has cured every case in which it has been used. 

Stone in the Bladder, Calculus, Gravel, .Brick-dust Deposit, and 

Mucous or Milky Dischargres after Urinating-, 
Irritation of the Neck of the Bladder, Inflammation of the Kidneys, 

Catarrh of the Bladder, 
STRANGUARY, AND BURNING, OR PAINFUL URINATING. 
For these diseases it is truly a sovereign remedy, and too much cannot be 
said in its praise. A single dose has been known to relieve the most urgent 
symptoms. 

Are j^ou troubled with that distressing pain in the small of the back and 
through the hips ? A teaspoonful a day of Constitution Water will relieve you 
like magic. 

PHYSICIANS 
Have long since given up the use of buchu, cubebs, and juniper in the treatment 
of these diseases, and only use them for the want of a better remedy. 

CQ)NjSTBTy)TllON) WATIR 

Has proved itself equal to the task that has devolved upon it. 

DIURETICS 
Irritate and drench the kidneys, and by constant use soon lead to chronic 
degeneration and confirmed disease. 

Wo present the CONSTITUTION WATER to the public with the con- 
viction that it has no equal in relieving the class of diseases for which it has 
been found so eminently successful for curing ; and we trust that we shall be 
rewarded for our efforts in placing so valuable a remedy in a form to meet the 
requirements of the patient and physician. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS. PRICE $1. 

WM. H. GREGG & CO., Proprietors. 



MORGAN & ALLEN, General Agents, 

No. 46 Cliff Street, New York. 
Enclose Stamp for Circular. 



87 

QonxHMion Eifp jSgrnp 

IS A POSITIVE 

and s^fLecific f-emecli^ foJ- alL cli&ea&es. a/^ig^Lnafuia. 
fj^m. an IMPURE STATE OF THE BLOOD, arrdfa,'- 
all /kei'-edttai^L^y clL&ea&es. tj^ati&tnifted p-am /Laf-ent 
±a ckild. 

PARALYSIS. 

It in 80 univtrsally admitted that Constitution Life Syrup is the only effective means of 
restoration in the various forms of Paralysis, that vie need not reiUrate that it is emphatl- 
cally Vie great Life-giving Power. 

DYSPEPSIA. 

xymoESTiox, weioht at stomach, fzatvIjEnci:, zives 

COMBLAINI, W I NT OF APPETITE, BAD BREATH, 
CONSTIPATIOS, Bj^LIOVSNESS. 

SCROFULA, 

STRtriUA. MIKG' S EVIZ, GZAXDULAR SWEZZINGS, ERTSIPEZAS, 
VLCERATIOS, SALT RHEUM. 

RHEUMATISM. 

If there ii any disease in which the Cmistitutian Life Syrup is a sovereign, it is in 
Rh-eumatism, and its kindred affections. The most intense pains are almost instantly al- 
leviated — enormoi'S swellings are reduced. Cases, chronic or vicarious, of twenty or forty 
years' standing, have been cured by Constipation Life Syrup. 

purges the sifstem entireh/ from, all the evil effects of Mercury, removing the Bid Breath 
and curing the Weak Joints and Pheumatic Pains iphicli the use of Calomel is sure to pro- 
tlac4. It hardens Spongy Gums a7id, seeares the teeth as firmly as ever. 

^an&tilatian J^ife <0^i^HLfL 

eradicates, root and branch, all Eruptive Diseases of the Skin, like ULCEPS, PI2IPLES, 
BLOTCHES, and all other difficulties of this kind, which so much disfigure the outward 
appearance of both male and Jemale, often making them a disgusting object to them.ielves 
and their friends. 

For all Forms of Ulcerative Diseases, 

either of theiTose. Throat, Tongue, Spine, Forehead or Scalp, no remedy has ever proved 
its equal. Mo'h Patches upon the female face, depending upon a diKeased action of the 
Liver, are very unpleasant to the young wife and m,other. A few bottles cf Constitution 
Life Syrup will cor reat the seereiion and remote the deposit, which is directly under th« 
skin. 

Diseases of the Liver, giving r^se to Languor, Dieziness. Indigestion, Weak Stomach, or 
an ulcerat^ed or cancerous condition of that organ, accompanied with burning or olher un- 
pleasant symptoms, will be relieved by the use of , 

CONSTITUTION VWt SVntJP. 

As a general Blood-Purifying Agent, the LIFESTRUP standi unr'valed by any prep- 
aration in the world. Tlie RICH and POOR are liable to t'te s me diseases. Kature and 
science have Tnade the Constitution Lfe Syrup for the benefit of all. 

WM. H. GREGG, M. D., Sole Proprietor, New York. 

MORGAN & ALLEN, Wholesale Druggists, Agents, 43 Cliif St., N. T. 

\^~ Sold by all Druggists. _J^ 



88 IB. T. :B.a.33:BITT»S 3Vr«,2X-u.fa,otory, 

ilos. 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 70, 72 & 74 "WASHINGTON STREET, NEW 70BK. 




B. T. BABBITT'S 

ARTICLES OF EVERY-DAY USE. 

B. T. Babbitt Is the manufacturer of the following celebrated articles, all of which bear the 
maker's name : 

"Medicinal," "Sheaf Wheat," and "Union" Saleratus; Soap Powder, 

Yeast Powder, Medicinal Yeast, Concentrated Potash, " Extra 

Starchj" Cream Tartar, Sal Soda, Baking Soda, 

Arrow Root, &.C., &.c. 

MAKE YOTm OWN SOAP with B. T. BABBITT'S 

PTJIIE CONCENTRATED POTASH, warranted double the strength of common 
Potash, and superior to any other saponifier or ley in market. Put up in cans of one pound, two 
pounds, three pounds, six pounds, and twelve pounds, with full directions in English and Ger- 
man for making Hard and Soft Soap. One pound will make fifteen gallons of Soft Soap. No lime 
is required. Consumers will find this the cheapest Potash in market. 

B. T. BABBITT'S MEDICINAL SALERATUS.— A perfectly pure and 
wholesome article, free from all deleterious matter ; so prepared that, as the circular accompany- 
ing the Saleratus will show, nothing remains in the bread when baked but common salt, water, 
and flour. Put up neatly in papers, one pound, half pound, and quarter pound. 

B. T. BABBITT'S CONCENTKATi; D SOFT SOAP.— One box, costing 
$2.0<i, will make forty gallons of handsome Soft Soap, by simply adding boiling water. 

B. T. BABBITT'S LABOR-SAVING SOAF.— B. T. Babbitt has for a long time 
been experimenting, and has now produced an article of Soap that is composed of the best washing 
material, and at the same time will not rot or injure the clothes in the slightest possible manner. 
He stamps his name on each bar, and guarantees that the Soap will not injure the most delicate 
fabric, while it will be found to be the most pleasant washing soap ever olTered in market. It is 
made from clean and pure materials, contains no adulterations of any kind, and is especially 
adapted for woolens, which will not shrink after being washed with this Hoap. Ask for B. T. BAB- 
BITT'S SOAP, and take no other. Each bar is wrapped in a circular containing full directions for 
use, printed in English and German. One pound of this Soap is equal to three pounds of ordinary 
family soap. Directions sent in each box for making one pound of the above Soap into three 
gallons of handsome fcoft Soap. It will remove paint, grease, tar, and stains of all kinds. It will 
not injure the fabric ; on the contrary, it preserves it. It will wash in hard or salt water. But 
little labor is required where this Soap is used. Machinists and printers will find this soap supe- 
rior to anything in market. 

B. T. BABBITT'S PURE MEDICINAL YEAST, STAR BRAND.-Dikec- 
T10N.S FOR Use. — To each quart of flour, add two teaspoonsf ul of Yeast and the usual quantity of salt ; 
mix them thoroughly together while dry, then add cold water or sweet milk ; make the dough as 
thin as can be moulded into a biscuit ; the thinner the dough is the whiter and lighter they will 
be. No shortening is required for Biscuit when milk is used, and very little when water Is used. 
Bake at once. 

Buckwheat Cakes should have three teaspoonsful mixed with the flour wiiile dry ; and mix no 
more at a time than is wanted. Use it for Pot-pies, Pie-crust, Plum Puddings, Johnny Cakes, In- 
dian Cakes, Commeal Cakes, Com Bread, Batter Cakes, and Fried Cakes or Doughnuts, all kinds 
of Sweet Cakes, and all kinds of pastry. 

OBSKR,^V^.i^.TIONS. 

Bread made in this manner contains nothing but Flour, Common Salt, and Water. It has an 
agreeable, natural taste : keeps much longer than common bread ; is more digestible, and much 
less disposed to turn acid. Common bread, like everything that has been fei-mented, ferments 
easUy again, to the great discomfort of many stomachs , and not only so, but acting as a ferment, 
it communicates a similar action to all food in contact with it. 

The Bread being free from all yeasty particles, is more digestible, and not so likely to create 
flatulence, or turn acid on weak stomachs, as fermented bread is apt to do. And when of the finest 
quality, it is beneficial to those who suffer from headache, acidity, flatulence, eructations, a sense 
of sinking at the pit of the stomach, distention, or pains after meals, and to all who are subject 
to gout or gravel. It is also useful in many affections of the skin. 

FOR SALE EVERTWHERE. 

B. T. BABBITT, 

64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72 & 74 WASHINGTOir ST., 

NEW-YORK. 

SOLE AGENCY FOE DE. TALBOT'S PLN'EAPPLE CIDEE. 




This g nnquestlonably the mopt popular and In- 
teresting journal of its class in tho world. It has 
been published seventeen years and has a larger cir- 
culation tliau any similar journal in exiyteuce. It Ifl 



Most of tho Inventions patented in the United 
ates are illustrated in its columns, the Engravings 
being most superb and beautiful. Each number con- 
tains 16 pages of matter and from 8 to 10 Engravings 
'J'he numbers for a year make a splendid volume of 



. - splendid _ 

832 pages of useful and entertaining matter, and 

A ftill report of all the Patent Claims are published officially each 

hite paper at the marvelously low price of $3 per year 



abont 600 Engravings 

week. It is printed weekly on flrio 

cr $1 for four montJw. Specimea copies seiit free. Address- 



No. 



MUNN & CO., 

37 Park Row, New York. 




ESTABI.ISH£]> IN 1846. 

MESSRS. MUNN & CO., 

Editors of the Scientific Americans 

SOLICITORS OF AMERICAN AND 
EUROPEAN PATENTS, 

With a Branch Office at Washington. 

During the past seventeen years Messrs. MUNN & CO. have acted as Attorneys for more 
than 20,000 inventors, and statistics show that nearly ONE-THIRD of all the a|>plications for 
patents annually made in the United States are soucited through the SclenliLc Amerlcaa 
Patent Agency. All business connected with the examination of Inventions, Pieparing 
Specifications, Drawings, Caveats, Assignments of Patents, Prosecuting Rejected Cases, In- 
terferences, Re-issues and Extensions ot Patents, and Opinions of the Infringement and Va- 
lidity of Patents, will receive the most careful attention. 

Patents secured in England, France, Belgium, Austria, Russia, Prussia, and all other for- 
eign countries where Patent Laws exist. A Pamphlet of " Advice How to Secure Letters 
Patent," including the Patent Laws of tUo Uuited States, furnished free. All communicar 
tlous confidential. Address— 

MimN & CO., 

No. 37 Park Kow, New York. 

JUST PUBLISHED ! 

The Inventors' and Mechanics' Guide. 



A new book upon Mechanics, Patents, and New Inventions. Containing tlie TT. S. Patent 
Laws, Rules and Directions for doing business at the Patent Office ; 112 diagrams of the best me- 
chanical movements, with descriptions ; the Condensing Steam Engine, with engraving and de- 
scription; How to Invent ; Uow to Obtain Patents ; Hints upon the Value of Patents ; How to 
Sell Patents; Forms for Assignments; Information upon the Rights ot Inventors, Assignees and 
Joint Owners; Instructions as to Interferences, Re-issues, Extensions, Caveats, together with a 
great variety of useful information in regard to patents, new inventions, and scientific subjects, 
with scientific tables, and many illustrations. 103 pages. This is a most valuable work. Price 
only 25 cents. Address 

MtrWN & CO., No. 37 Park Row, N. Y. 



AMERICAN EMIGRANT COMPANY, 

Chartered for the purpose of procuring and assisting Emigrants from Foreign 
Countries to settle in the United States. 



Incorporated •mth an authorized Capital of $1,000,000. 



PAID UP CAPITAL. #54^0.000. 



President— A. G. HAMMOND, President of Exchange Bank, Hartford, Conn. Tice-Presi- 
DENT— FRANCIS GILLETTE, late Senator In Congress from Connecticut. Dirkctoes— A. G. 
HAMMOND, Hartford, Conn. ; b\ CHAMBERLIN, Hartford, Conn. ; H. K. WELCH, Hartford, 
Conn.; JOHN HOOKER, Hartford, Conn.; 3. P. LY.MAN, New York; JOHN WILLIAMS, New- 
York; CHARLES HULBERT, Boston; JAMES C.SAVERY, Des Moines, Iowa. BiNKERS-Bank 
of New York, 48 Wall Street, New York. Trrasuker a> d Secef.tart— JOHN HOOKER, Hart- 
ford, Conn. Gbskral Agbst for Emiqratio.v— JOHN WILLIAMS, Office No. 8 Bowling Green, 
New York. - 

The object of the American Emigrant Company is to meet the urgent and increasing neces- 
sity which is felt for the organiiation and direction of the labor of the immense multitudes of 
immigrants arriving in this country ; and for this purpose arrangements of the most complete 
and effective character have been made for the distribution of those persons — South as well as 
West — immediately on their landing here. The mode of operation is tlie following: — Agencies 
have been estabhshed in Liverpool, Gothenburg, Hamburg, and Havre, through which informa- 
tion on all American subjects of interest to the emigrant is circulated by means of sub-agencies 
employed throughout Great Britain, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Austria, Prussia, Germany, 
Belgium, Switzerland, and France'. Employment in advance is provided for workinpmen of 
every nationality and of every kind of employment, and emigrants coming under the auspices 
of the Company are in all cases directed to the localities where their servioas are most required 
and are best paid. 

In addition to this, accurate and reliable information is afforded to all emigrating from 
Europe with the view of settling upon land, and by this means they are instructed carefully and 
fully as to the condition and circumstances of any special place they may desire to settle in, 
and "fullinformation to guide them in the judicious choice of a locality for their residence Is 
placed at tlieir disposal. The value of such an agency in Europe, commanding— as the Ameri- 
can Emigrant Company does — the respect and confidence of the people coming from Europe to 
Americ.i, and its power to stimulate and direct the flow of emigration, will be manifest. A cen- 
tral office is located at New York, with branch offices in the principal cities of the West and 
South. By me:(n3 cf this thoroughl.v organized and widely ramified system of acencies through 
all sections of the United States, the following e-^ds are gained: 1. Information is afforded 
gratuitously to every emigrant arriving in New York or Boston, as to the most desirable locality. 
South, West, or East, for him to select, according to his special object. 2. Employment is se- 
cured In the Southern and AVestern States, in advance, for emigrants arriving, and in many 
cases the means of traveling to reach it are supplitd. 3. Workmen— mechanical, mining, and 
agricultural — are directly imported from Europe, under the provision of the law of July 4, 1864, 
and any Individual, any special industry, or any locality, can be promptly supplied with labor. 
4. The agents of the Company, allthroujhtheinterior of the country, receive and aid immigrants 
as they are despatched from the seaboard, without any charge whatever to them. 

The Company has already agencies established in Boston, Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, 
Milwaukee, ?t. Louis, Des Moines, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, and is engaged in organizing 
agencies in Memphis, Nashville, Richmond, Raleigh, Wilmington, Charleston, and New Orleans. 
The American Emigrant Company possesses an abund-uit capital and commands the con- 
! fidence and support of the best men of the cornmunity. In referring to this Corporation, the 
Chamber of Commerce of the State of New Y'ork, in its celebrated report on immigration, 
adopted a few months since, used this language : 

"Under the sanciion of this law a Society before established, now known as the ' American 
Emigrant Company,' has put in operation the necessary measures for bringing to this country 
the skilled and other labor of England and the continent. Asking public confidence, it refers 
to some of our first citizens in support of its claim. Your Committee are of opinion that it has 
undertaken a most praiseworthy and important work, iuaugurating a system of supply well cal 
culated to meet a pressing and vital want." 

The Company has been in active operation for several months, and is now weekly receiving 
and distributing a lar?e number of emigrants. Meeting the necessities of the present crisis, it 
appeals to the sympathy and support of all desiring the restoration of the South to prosperity, 
the development of the mighty resources of the West, and the general industrial welfare of the 
nation. Letters should be addressed to 

JOHN WILLIAMS, 

General Ag-ent for Emigration, No. 3 Bowling: Green, New York. 



FAMILIES AND MANUFACTURERS. 

THE BEST IN THE WORLD. 

" Its operation is so simple that any person of ordinary intelligence can learn 
in a few minutes to operate one successfully." — N. Y. Tribune. 
Enclose Stamp for Ciucular a\d Samples of Work. 

Dalton Knitting Machine Co., 

537 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



Revenue Silver Mining Company of Nevada, 

3Vo. ^4 CEDAPJ, SXPi-EJET, INTE VV 'V^OIiK. 

This Company are now developing their mines, and the ores which are 
reached in one of them, the Swift, prove unexpectedly rich. The Company is 
free from debt and own 6,000 Shares of workiug Capital Stock, 

a portion of which is now offered at twenty cents on the dollar, or $20 

per share, par value, $100 a share. The stock will be sold from time to time 
during the year 18G6, as the wants of the Company may require ; and the price 
per share will be advanced as the work of developing progresses. Probably no 
mining property in Nevada promises a better return for investments than the 
stock of this Company. For further information address 

C. A. RUNKL.E, Vice-President. 
ORVILLE W. CHILD3, President. THOMAS McELUATH. Secretary. 




THS COTTAGS FUXSa-TISJG-FRESS. 

I3 the best cheap printing-piess ever introduced to public notice. 
Simple, durable, and efficient, occupj-ing but little space, it is 
adapted to meet the wants of business men and others, who, for the 
sake of economy, necessity, or convenience, wish to do their own 1 
printing, and on their own premises. It enables them, without 
delay, and at a small expense, to print hand-bills, circulars, cards, 
bill-heads, etc., and in a style equal to that of most country print- 
ing-oE5ces. Although designed, and will be found useful, for all | 
business and professional men, yet to country merchants and drug- j 
gists it is an invaluable invention, furnishing not only the best, but | 
the cheapest method of advertising and increasing one's business, j 
With each press we furnish, if desired, the necessaiy type, ink, etc., 
for the execution of any kinds of printing. 
No more acceptable present can be made to youth than one of these printing-offices. It com- 
bines lucrative employment with amusement and instruction. It learns one to compose, to spell, 
and to punctuate. There is no better school for the young man than the printing-onice — such a 
thing as an illiterate printer being unknown ; and for the purpose of learning the trade, as an 
employment for life, the possession of one of our small printing-offices renders a regular appren- 
ticeship unnecessary. 

Printed instructions for setting tj^pe and managing the press accompany each office. "When 
desired, the offices will be arranged for printing in Spanish, French, German, and other foreign 
languages. Circular sent free. Specimen gheets of type, cuts, etc., 10 cents. 

PRICES: 

Printing-oflSce, No. 1 (complete) $28 00 I Printing-office, No. 4 (complete) J90 00 

"2 " 85 00 " "5 " 195 00 

" "8 " 60 00 I 

ADAMS PRESS COMPANY, 

JOSEPH WATSON, Agent, 
92 SO Ama. St., IVe-*v Tt^orli. 



FAIRBANKS' STANDARD SCALES. 




-A-IDi^JE»TEr) TO E'V'ER.Y BR-A-NCH OB" BXTSIISTESS. 
MANUFACTUEED ONLY 

BY THE 

OKI a IN AL INVENTORS, 

AT 

Twelve Patents, wMch have been secured upon these Scales, are nq-w ix 
FORCE, bearing the following dates: March 13, 1840; November 20, 1849; April 
9, 1850; July 4, 1855; March 31, 1857; November 1, 1859; November 8, 1859; 
December 20, 1859; December 20, 1859; February 11, 1862; Feburary 18, 
1862; March 18, 1862. 

The continued inventive skill and enterprise, and the persevering efforts of 
the Manufacturers in sustaining the unrivaled reputation and perfection of their 
Scales, guarantee as heretofore the highest degree of satisfaction to the purchaser. 
Illustrated Catalogrues furnished on application. 
Principal Warehouses:— FAIRBANKS <fc CO., 

No. 252 Broadwaj', New York. 
FAIRBANKS, BROWN & CO., 
No. 118 Milk Street, Boston. 
FAIRBANKS, GREENLEAF <fe CO., 

No. 172 Lake Street, Chicago. 
FAIRBANKS & EWING, 

New Masonic Hall, Philadelphia. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE <fc CO., 

No. 125 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, O. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE <fe CO., 

No. 182 Superior Street, Cleveland O. 
FAIRBANKS <fe CO., 

No. 246 Baltunore Street, Baltimore, Md. 
FAIRBANKS <fe CO. 
New Orleans, La. 
FAIRBANKS <fe HUTCHINSON, 

No. 334 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cal. ' 



FOR NEW ORLEANS-DIRECT. 



Atlantic & Mississippi Steamship Line, 

Composed of First-class Steamers, one of which leaves New York every 
Satuedat, having large freight capacity and superior accommoda- 
tions for passengers. 

$40, FIRST CABIN PASSAG-E ! 

Gooas Shipped Ihrougk to all points on the Ohio and Mississippi at Less 
Rates than hy Railroad. 

Through bills of lading issued for all points on the Mississippi and Ohio 
Rivers, in connection with the Atlantic and Mississippi Steamship Company of 
St. Louis. 

For freight and passage apply to 

GAMMISON & ALLBI^, Agents, 

No. 5 Bowling Green | or to 
J. EAGER & CO., Agents of the A. & M. S. 8. CO. of St, Louis, No. 41 Broad-st., New York. 



EMPIRE LINE FOR SAVANNAH, GA., 

EVE]aY SATURDAY. 



THE ELEGANT SIDE- WHEEL STEAMSHIPS 

"SAN SALVADOR," Commander, Joshua Atkins, 

AND 

"SAN JACINTO," Commander, Winslow Loveland, 

1,500 Tons Bnrtheu Each, 

have been placed on the route to Savannah by the Atlantic Mail Steamship Com- 
pany of New York, and are intended to be run by them in a manner to meet the 
first class requirements of the trade. 

The Cabin accommodations of these ships are not excelled by any Steamers 
on the coast, and although tlieir carrying capacity is larire, their draught of 
water enables them to ensure a passage without detention in the river. 

RETURNING, LEAVE SAVANNAH EVERY SATURDAY. 

Freight received daily and handled carefully. Bills of Lading furnished and signed on the Pier. 
For further particulars, engagement of Freight or Passage, apply to 

CAslRISON & ALLEN, Agents, 

No. /> Boivling Green, New York, 

Agent at Savannah, B. H. H.VRDEE, wlio will forward all goods intended 
for the interior. 



k 



NATIONAL LIFE 



"95] 



TRAVELERS' INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF NEW YORK. 

OFFICE, 243 BROAJDWAY, NEW YOMK, 

EDWARD A. JONES, President. 



ACJTHORIZEr) CAPITAL- -^500,000, 



Edward A. Josks, 

Samusl J. Glasset, 

T. B. Vas Bures, 

Sylvester M. Beard, 

RoBEBr Crowlet, 

William Coit, 

J. C. Dlmmick, 

Henry Clkws, 

Albkrt Wright, M.D., 
William E. Psisoe, Tice-President. 
ASHER S. Mills. Secretary. 
T. B. TaS Bhrbn, Treasurer. 



John A. Iselix, 
H. P. Freeman, 
Nicholas E. Smjth, 
James R. Dow, Jl.D., 
A. A. Low, 

OrISIN liLUNT, 

Howell Smith, 
F. H. LCMMCS, 
William E. Peikce, 

S. Teats, 
E. H. Jo> 



Stltester Teats, 
Joseph Wildk, 
Charles Curtiss, 
ASHKR S. Mills, 
Hesry J. Raymond, 
Silas C. Hkrring, 
Samuel W. Tedslow, 
Richard A. McCrEDY. 

M. D., Medical Examiner. 

Superintendent of Agencies. 



E. F. Folgbr, General Railway Agent. 



LIFE AND EOOWMENT POLICIES 

Are issued on the Mutual plan. All the profits in this department are divided pro rata among 
the Policy Holders. All policies to be iyiconte-table after five years from date, and non-forfeit- 
able after two annual payments. A loan of one -third of tha amount of premiums will be made ; 
also, thirty days' grace given in payment of preoiiums. 

GENERAL AOOIDENT POLICIES 

Are granted, covering accidents of all descriptions, including the travelers' risk. If Issued 

•WITHOUT COMPENSATION, 
They provide for death, if caused by accident; but in case of injury only, the insured receives 
no compensation. If granted 

WITH COMPENSATION, 
The full amount assured is payable to the family in case of death caused by accident and occur- 
ring within three months from date of injury. Or, in case of injury causing disability, the insui'ed 
receives a weekly compensation until he is able to attend to his business, such time not to exceed 
twenty-six weeks. The i)0licy covers all forms of Dislocations, Hioken Bones, Sprains, Bruises, 
Cuts, Gunshot Wounds, Burns and Scalds, Eites of Dogs ; Assaults by Burglars, Robbers, or Mur- 
derers ; the action of Lightning or Sun-stroke, the effects of Explosions, Floods, and SoiSbcation 
by Drowning or Choking, and all other kinds of accidents. 

TEN DOLLARS 
Secures a general Accident Policy for 

TWO THOUSAND DOLLARS, 
With a Weekly Compensation of 

TEN DOLLARS. 

TEAVELERS' AND GENERAL ACCIDENT INSURANCE TICKETS 

For any length of time, fr>m one day to twelve months, are on sale at the various Railroad and 
Steamboat Ticket Offices and Agencies. 

MARINE RISKS AND SPECIAL VOYAGES. 

Policies are granted Insuring against death by accident while sailing in steamer or^SUing 
vessels; also for special voyages. 

Full information. toRethMMith Tables of Rates, 4c., can be obtained at the Home Offer" or 
by application to the Statl^ent. 



THE 



lON^A AND ISEAELLA 



So greatly surpass all others in excellence and value for Garden and Vineyard 
as to be able to place American Grape Culture on a new and sure basis. 

THESE SEEDLINGS were produced by myself through a preparatory pro- 
cess best calculated both to develop the excellence of trvit and to secure the 
strongest and most healthful constitution of stock. 

THE RESULT has been a high degree of improvement of all the good quali- 
ties of our native kinds in the ISRAELLA, with a great increase of hardy, en- 
during character of vine, and extreme EARLINESS. 

IN CASE OF THE lONA the change of character is so radical as more 
NEARLY to RESEMBLE THE ORIGINATION OF A NEW SPECIES. In refinement and ex- 
cellence of flavor it equals the best foreign kinds, and surpasses them all in ani- 
mating and exhilarating spirit, while in constancy and abundance of production it 
is unequaled among our most hardy native varieties. It ripens very early — before 
Concord— and has been proved by extensive trial to be more hardy. 

It has been extensively disseminated, and the testimonials in regard to it are 
of the same import from the North and South, and from the Atlantic coast to far 
beyond the Mississippi.West. It received the award of the " GREELEY PRIZE 
OF ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS." 

At all of the exhibitions it has received commendations that could be called 
forth by no other grape, and this, with the Israella, must, in a great measure, su- 
persede all other kinds, as soon as the plants can be produced in sufficient num- 
ber to meet the demand. 

The lONA, in open air, gives better fruit than the Black Hamburg under 
glass ; and it is scarcely equaled in beauty and excellence by the famous Grizzly 
Frontignan, which it most nearly resembles. 

" We have a weakness for the flavor oi the Foreign Grape, but should hesitate 
now whether to prefer a Muscat of Alexandria or lONA. There need be but one 
opinion as to this being the best grape ever known here." — Gardener's Monthly. 

See to same purport in Prize Essay by the Hon. Judge Denniston, also in Amer- 
ican Agriculturist, Nev York Tribune, and all reports of societies and exhibitions 

For a full account of these new kinds, send two-cent stamp for a pamphlet, with 
engravings, entitled ' Our Native Grapes," also " Present and Future of Vine- 
Culture in America," with price lists and " Club Propositions" for obtaining these 
and other vines at wholesale prices. 

For a thorough Practical Treatise, send Fifty Cents for "Manual of the Vine," 
illustrated with about one hundred and fifty engravings, accurately drawn. 

My vines, o these varieties, propagated from the original stock, are of une- 
qualed quality, and are offered at very low prices, quality considered. See Price 
List revised for spring. q. -yj^^ GRANT 

lONA (neak Peekskill), Westchesteu Co., N. Y. 





CONTENTS. 

Astronomical Dkpartiiekt: pages. 

Eclipses for the year 1866 1 

Lunar and Planetary Conjunctions 2 

Conjunction of Planets and other Aspects 2 

The Seasons 2 

New and Valuable Tide Tables for 110 places 3 

Jewish and Mahomedan Calendars S 

Table of Sixty-one Bright Stars 4 

Calendars — Pvising and Setting of Sun, iloon, etc 5 to 1 ij 

Political Department : 

United States Government, Ministers, etc 13 

Senators and Representatives of the XXXIXth Congress 20 to 22 

XLth Congress as far as chose^ 23 

The States of the Union : Area, Population, Capitals, Gov- 
ernors, Time of Meeting of Legifilatures, Time of State 

Elections, &c 24 

Laws passed at the last Session of Congress 27 to 34 

Public Resolutions and Proclamations , 34 to 3r> 

The Civil Rights Bill " 8:> to 42 

The Freedmen's Bureau Bill )... 42 to 44 

The Constitutional Amendment 44 to 45 

Address of the National Union Committee 45 to 4C 

Klection Returns from the States and Territories holding 
Elections in 18C6, carefully compiled and compared with 

former Hections for the Thibcne Almanac 49 to Tl 

Popular Vote for l>resident by States, in 1864, 1860 and 165C. 11 
Foreign Countries : Area, Population, Form of Government, 
Rulers, &c 72 



Alexander J. Sciiem, Compiler 



AND POLITICAL REGISTER 




TRIBimE^B; 1 Q ft 7 Iji^ASSOCIATIONri 
NEW 'MJk 1 O VJ • • ML YORK, r"" 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Astronomical, &c. | 



PACK Habeas Corpus 38 

Calendar-Jewish 3 Homestead Law 29 

Mahomedan 3 Howard Institute 30 

Hydrocrapliic Office 30 

Inspectors— Steamboat 32 

Internal Revenue ....27, 31,33 



Calendars (January to Do 
cemDcr): Changes of tbo 
Moon ; Planets on tbe Me- 
ridian ; Sun on the Noon- 
mark : Sidereal Noon , Ris- 
ing and Setting of tbe Sun 
and Moon throughout the 
United States 5-10 

Conjunctions, Lunar and 

Eclipses for VbeYear 1867!".!! lifletric System 

Planets, Conjunction of Plan- Micbigan-Lands to 

e«s and other Aspects 2 Military Peace Establishment 33 

Seasons 2 j Missouri— P.eimbursement of.'"' 

Star Tabic] 4iNayy Officers 

Tide Table of 110 Places 3 > ebraska 



interstate Communication, ..27 

Kansas— Lands to 31,32 

Kidnapping ■. 28 

Laws of U.S.-Rp. vision of. ..30 

Liberia— Gunboat to 28 

Lincoln— Mrs 27 

Lumber— Maine 27 



Political. 

THE GOVERNMENT. 

Cabinet- the President's 19 

Congress — Members of the 

XXXIXth 20-22 

Congress— XLth, as far as 

chosen 23 

Executive Otflcers— General. 19 

Foreign Ministers 19 

Judiciary— Supreme Court ..19 
Post-offices ot Members of 

Congress 2'J-22 

Territories— Delegates from. 22 

STATES OP THE UNION. 

Area; "White Population in 
1850, "White, Colored, In- 
dian, and Total Population 
In 1860; Increase and Per- 
centase of Increase of 
Population from 1850 to 
1860 ; Capitals ; Governors, 
their Salaries and Term of 
Office ; Time of Meeting of 
Legislatures; Time of Stale 
Elections; State Censuses 
of 1864 and 1865 24 

ACTS OF C0NGKES3. 

Academy— Military 29 

Accounts— Settlement of 29 

Agricultural Colleges, &c.... 31 

Aliens— Suits of 33 

Appraiser in New Tork City .33 
Assassins— Captors of the — 34 
Assistant Assessors of Inter- 
nal Revenue 27 

Assistant Secretary of . the 

Navy 28 

Asylum — National Military 

and Naval 27 

Bonded Warehouses— Goods 

in ' 

Calais 32 

Cattle— Importation of lor- 

eign ^. ...27 

Civu Expenses Appropna 

tion - 

Civil Rights Bill 27 

Claims— Court of r 

Collectors of Customs, ; 

Colored Persons— Marriages 

and Children of 32 

Correction— House of 32 

Disabled Soldiers— Transpor- 
tation for 34 

Ditches and Canals 32 

Duty on Live Animals. . 

Five-cent Pieces , 

Freedmen's Bureau 31 

General— Grade of. 



Nevada— Boundaries 

Nitro-Glycerine 

Obligations- Exchange of. . . .27 

Paciflc Railroad 30, 32 

Passports 

Patent Office Fees 

Pensions 28, ."52 

Pennsvlvania 27 

Pilot Regulations 
Portland— lire in, 

Port of Entry 32 

Postal Law 29 

Port of Delivery 30 

Promotions in the Navy 34 

PublicMonev 29 

Public Printing 33 

Railroads and Telegraphs. 32, 33 

Registry of "Vessels 27,31 

Re venue from Imports 33 

Seamen— Relief of. 27 

Senators— Election of. 
Smithsonian Institute 
SmuL'gling 



Soldiers and Sailors 
Supreme Court of the U. 



...31 



Taxes— Refunding of 
Teleg. Co.— International 

Telegraph Lines 

Three Months' Pay , 

Washington Territory , 

Weighing of Exports , 

West Virginia...... 

PITBLIO BESOLUTIONS. 

Bounties 5 

Constitutional Amendment.. 34 

Emperor of Russia 34 

Exposition at Paris 34, 

Farragut 

Foreign Convicts 34 

Hancock— Thanks to General.34 

History of the Rebellion 35 

Income Tax 85 

Indians 34 

Laws of United States 

Lincoln— Statue of 

Madison's Writings 

Medals 34 

Metric System 

Military Academy 35 

Missing Soldiers 34 

National Gratitude 34 

Orphans' Home 34 

Pay of Army Officers 35 

Portland :^5 

Prisoners of War— Rations of.35 

Quarantine 84 

Soldiers' College 35 

Soldiers' Graves 

State Papers— American 
Telegraph 34 



PAGB 

Tennessee 35 

"Vermont 85 

West Virginia 



Day of Thanksgiving 3 

Fenian Expedition against 

Canada 8 

Insurrection declared to be 

at an end 3 



the Bill was carried over 
the Veto 36-42 

THE FBEBDMEN'S BUREAU DIIX. 

Abstract of the First Bill. 
The President's Veto. Fail- 
ure of the First Bill. Ab- 
stract of the Second Bill. 
The President's Veto. Pas- 
sage of the Second Bill. .42-44 

THE CONSTITUTIONAL ASIEND" 
MENT. 

The Constitutional Amend- 
ment Proposed in 1866 44 

The Vote on the Amendment.45 
Table of States Ratifying or 
Rejecting the Amendment.45 

NATIONAL, UNION COilMITTEK. 

Address of the National Un- 
ion Committee to the Amer- 
ican People 45-46 

Election Returns. 

Arizona 71 

Arkansas 67 

California 

Colorado 70 

Connecticut 49 

Delaware 57 

Dakota ~ 

Idaho 

Illinois 65 

Indiana 

Iowa 61-62 

Kansas 61 

Kentucky 57 

Maine 49 

Maryland 64 

Massachusetts 50 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri 66-67 

Montana 71 

Nevada 67 

Nebraska 70 

New Hampshire 49 

New Jersey 50 

New York 51-56 

North Carolina 63-70 

Ohio • 58 

Oregon 58 

Pen nsy Ivania 

Rhode Island 49 

Texas 67 

"Vermont 50 

West Virginia 63-64 

Wisconsin 65-66 

VOTE FOB PRESIDENT. 

Popular "Vote for President, 
by States, in 1864, 1860 and 
1856 7 

FOKEIGN COUNTRIES. 

The states of America and 
Europe; Names and Titles 
of Rulers and their Acces- 
sion. Form of Government.72 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC TOR 1867. 

Eclipses for the Year 18G7. 

There will be two eclipses of the Sun and two of the lloon. 

I. Au annular eclipse of the Sua March 6. Invisible in America, but visible In Europe, 
Aflica, and Asia. 

II. A partial eclipse of the Moon early in the morning of Wednesday, March 20. Visible 
thronehoat America. In California and Oregon it will begin in the evening of the 19th. Size, 
a.7.'>G digits on the southern limb. For the times of its phases, see innexed table. 

III. A total eclipse of the Sun August 2'J. Invisible in the United btates, but visible In 
South America. 

IV. A partial eclipse of the Moon, Friday evening, Sept. 13. Visible in America generally. 
This eclipse will btgiu before the Moou rises at places west of Boston, and it will therefore 
rise more or less eclipsed. In the Pacific States this eclipse is wholly invisible. Size, 8.443 
digits on the northern limb. For the times of the several phases, see the annexed table. 



Pbctcipal Places. 



HaUfas.N.S 

Eastport, Me 

Bangor, Me 

Augusta, Me ( 

Brunswick, Me J 

Portland, Me 

Boston, Mass i 

Cambridge, Mass ( 

Quebec, C.E 1 

Providence, R.I ' 

Lowell, Mass f 

Newport, li. I J 

Concordj X. H 

Montpelier, Vt ) 

Hartford, Conn V 

Soringfield, Mass. ..S 

Xorthamplou, " ) 

New Haven, Conn.. . 5 

Montreal, C.E / 

Trov.N. Y f 

Albany, N. Y / 

Hudson,N.-X < 

Kew York: ^ 

Schenectady, N. Y. . I 

Kewbnrgh.N. Y f 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y.J 

Trenton, H.J 

Philadelphia, Pa.... ) 

Utica. IT Y J 

Ogdensburgh, N. Y.. / 

Wilmington, Del J 

Baltimore, Md ) 

AubQrn, N.T \ 

Annapolis, Md ) 

Harrisburg, Pa ( 

Kingston, C. W S 

WashingtonjD.C... ) 

Pena Yaii,^. Y > 

Geneva, N. Y ) 

Canandaigua, N. Y..1 
Fredericktou.Va.... \ 

Petersburg, ^ a J 

liicliiuond, Va 

Eoch ester, N. Y 

Buffalo, >J. Y / 

Kaleigh, N. C <, 

Toronto, C. W 1 

Georgetown, S. C... 'f 

Panama, N. G J 

Pittsburgh, Pa \ 

Charleston, S. C ■> 

Chagres, N.G J 

Erie, Pa 

Wheeling, W. Va. ... "I 

Savannah. Ga \ 

Columbia, S. C J 

St. Augustine, Fla.... 



Ecll 



pse 



Prcicipal Places. 



Ecli 






i 

' Augusta, Ga 

Cleveland, Ohio 

1 Havana, Cuba 

Detroit, Mich •> 

Columbus, Ohio.... 
Cincinnati, Ohio.... 

Lansing, Mich 

ILexiugtou, liy 

i Tallahassee, Fla.... 

Franlifort, Ky 

[Fort Wayne, Ind... 

Louisville, Ky 

[Indianapolis, Ind... 
Grand Haven, Mich 

iNashville, Tenn 

Chicago, ni 

Evans ville, Ind 

Tuscaloosa, Ala 

iMilwaukec, Wis.... 

iMobile, Ala 

Cairo. Ill 

Hickman, Ky 

Madison, V.is 

Sprlnslield, 111 

New Orlea::S, La... 

iJackson, Jliss 

|St. Louis, Mo 

'Galena, 111 

iDubnque, Iowa 

La Crosse, Wis 

I Natchez, Miss 

'Baton Kouge, La... 
jKeokak, Iowa 



Is 

H. 11. 



Quincy,Ill 

Iowa City, Iowa 

jJettersoa City, Mo... i 
Little Keck, Ark.... > 
Superior City, Wis. . . . 
Des Moines, Iowa... / 

'St. Paul, Miiiu \ 

St. Joseph, Mo 

Lawrence, Kansas 

Omaha City, ISeb ( 

Vera Cruz, Mex J 

Matamoros, Mex / 

Austin, Texas ) 

Mexico 

Santa Fe, N. M 

Salt Lake City, Utah. . 
Oregon City, Oregon.. 
Sacramento City, Cal. 

Monterey. Cal 

Portland, Oregon ... ) 
San Francisco, Cal.. { 

Salem, Oregon 

Astoria, Oregon 

Nee-ah, Wash. Ter ... 



1 47 
140 


143 


183 


137 


11 
1 31 
12D 


125 


124 


122 


117 


1 15 


1 14 


112 


1 10 


1 8 


1 7 


1 6 


59 


55 
053 


51 


044 


39 
Oil 
1146 
11 11 
11 8 
11 7 


11 5 


11 2 
11 
10 56 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



Conjunction of the Flanetw, and other Fhenomena. 



Aspect. 



Jan'y. 



O near ? 
B near u 
i s & 
Q near i 
near '^ 
® near s 

4 i & 
U near 6 
'> a & 
© near ^ 

i Btatiouary 

5 gr.elon.W. 
@ near ^ 

<]» near $ 
^ stationary. 
® near y 
© near » 
5 gr. elon. E. 
® near i 
® near >i 
¥ near 2{ 
® near 2f 
® near $ 
© near i 
id© 
near '^ 



D. H. M. 

8 80 m 

7 6 34e. 

10 3 51 e. 

19 7 .34 m 

'« 4 22e. 

81 OMe. 

3 55e. 



7 3 



56 m. 

5 29 e. 

6 36 m. 
5 22 e. 



20 



2 23 m. 
2 6 28 m. 
4 4 47 m. 
4 10 21m. 
7 1 2e. 
9 9 35e. 

14 6 29e. 
24 10 26 m 
81 3 32e. 

1 6 4f) m. 
1 7 59 m. 
11 4 27e. 

15 6 24e. 
!20 3 23e. 



gr.elon.W.'22 10 S.'ie. 
"" 1 15in 

7 89 m 

8 S4e. 

7 8Ve. 
6 20e. 

3 55 e. 
5 40 e. 

4 18 m 

5 16 m 

8 32 e. 



Q near v. 
(B near - 
O near 



n □ 



near 9 
June ..' o near s 

1 o near > 
near it 
2i stationary . 
© near ? 

1 o near 8 

1 o near $ 
1 ij gr.elon. E. 
': o near 



Distance Apart. Month. 
"O 1 

5S. 

4 25S. 
80 

8 58 N. 
2 14 S. 



B 180S. 

% 90 OW. 

$ 8 « N. 

? 46 48 W. 

^ 2 15S. 

S 2 12 8. 

2i 386S. 

8 2asN. 

S 18 19E. 

i 7 54N. 

> 2 15S. 

9 41N. 
y; BIOS. 
9 2 26 8. 
i 6 56N. 
i 90 OW. 
^ 2 4 8. 
S 27 13W. 
U 2 42 S. 
9 40 8. 
i 528N. 
V 180 

^ 1 50 S. 

If 2 17 8. 

t; 90 OW. 

9 2 8N. 

i 8 47N. 

^ 2 OS. 



Aspect. 

O near u 
^ stationary. 
Q near 9 
® near i 
& near % 
9 near b 
^ n 



m. 



July 



3 2 15 e. 

5 4 46e. 

6 3 4m. 
11 26 m. 



2 18. 

4 OK. 

8 34N. 

1 48N. 
26 HE. 

2 15 8. 



© near 9 
© near i 
@ near ^ 
9 near b 
© near n 
9 sup. <5 e> 
® near i 
® near '^ 
<1D near u 
i near b 
y stationary. 
^ near b 
© near 9 
® near $ 
® near ^ 
® near b 
B gr.elon. E. 
© near y 
^ near 9 
i near 9 
9 near b 
^ near b 
"? 6 & 

U a & 
® near > 
® near ^ 
(D near 9 
© near y 
a gr.elon.W. 
^ near b 
O near ^ 
® near 9 
m near y 



5 20 m. 

5 23e. 

29 10 20 e. 

8 6 56 m. 
7 7 24 m. 

10 7 6 m. 

10 5 19 e. 

16 5 59 m. 

2 4m. 

26 2 17 m. 
i 25 e. 

31 11 37 c. 
5 49e. 
10 3 43e. 
12 6 45 m . 
25 11 10 m. 
29 8 2e. 
1 7 Im 

9 10 49 m 
19 5 30 e. 

24 9 9m 

25 9 47 e. 

27 10 S2e. 

28 5 30e. 



14 ( 



15 3S5e. 
15 11 2e. 
19 6 36 m 
31 1 11 e. 

25 10 55 m. 

26 7 2e. 

27 9 15 m. 
3 7 46 m. 
9 1 Oe. 

12 7 29 m, 
22 11 16 e. 
27 11 41c. 
SO 10 44 e. 



2 3S. 

4 8DN. 

021s. 

2 39 8. 

4 3TS. 
90 OE. 

2 20 8. 
18 27W. 
180 

2 53N. 

2 22 8. 

2 49 8. 

22K. 

2 42 8. 



2 57 8. 
2 49 8. 

1 558. 

4 43 8. 

4 OS. 

5 13 8. 

2 59 8. 

7 52 8. 
23 30E. 

2 858. 
1 49 8. 

21N. 

1 8 8. 
43 8. 


90 OE. 

3 4S. 
5 87 S. 
5 83 8. 

2 OS. 
21 OW. 

9N. 

8 10 8. 

4 43 8. 

1 18 8. 



nr,„T,inTVT!a Fttt ATVFT) — B Mcrcurv 9 Venus, ^ Mars, y Jupiter, ^Saturn, p Moon, 



farthest distance from 
.a is about to move in a 
tiiat'itTa"8fhId7 "fbe'above ta 'ule enables us to find the planet s throughout the yenr. 



*^^?S!S^p:JefIs^^iiJi:^;^^Sffi^j^:i^ ^^l-tion contrary to 



OcruLTATioNs.-Thc Moon will occult, or eclipse tbe beautiful star AldeharanCa^ | 

Feb. 12th .visible. The star instantly disappears belimd the_ea8_tern limb of the Moon,.at }\ ash- . 



Ingto n. and reappear at 4h. 13m. . 



The Seasons. 



.DS.-Domlnical Letter. FiEpact, 23; Golden Number, ; Solar 



Notable Days axd Peptods 
Cycle, 28: Julian Period, 6,5b0; Ji 

The 92d year of American Independent =.---, .. ■„ „,, 

30- the r,28lth of MohammedJ)^BgiiisJIa^y5th,^udj!nd8j.pjrll^ 






THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



New and Valuable Tide Table of 110 Places. 

To find tbe time of high-water at anv of the places named in the following table, add the 
time indicated in the first column of figures to the time of " Moon Souih," found in the calen- 
dar pages. Exajiipi,e: Kequlred the time of high-water at KewIIaven for May 4th and 7th. 
For the 4th, Moon South, at Oh. 24m. in the afternoon, which added to llh. lum. gives llh. 
40m. of the same evening for high-water. On the 6th, Moon South at 2h. 24m. evening, which 
added as before, gives Ibli. 4Cm., or 1 o'clock 40m. in the morning of the 7th, lor high-water. 
There are two tides during the passage of the moon from the meridian, around to the meri- 
dian again, and they are about tih. 26m. apart. 



Nor'east Coast. 
Hanni well's Point 

Portland 

Portsmouth 

Nfcwburyport 

Eocliport 

Salem 

Boston Light 

Boston 

Plymouth 

W'ellfleet 

Provencetown . . . 

Monomoy 

Nantuci^et 

Hyannis 

Edgartown 

Holmes' Hole 

Tarpaulin Cove . . 
Wood's Hole (N.) 
Woods Hole (S.). 
Meuemsha Light. 
Quick's Hole (^J.) 
Quick's Hole (S.). 
CuttThunk ... 
Kettle Cove.. 
Bird Island Light 

Kew Bedford 

Newport 

PointJudith 

Kock Island 

Montank P. .int... 

Sandy Hook 

New Tork 

Hunsox KiVEK. 

Dobb's Ferry 

Tarry town 

Verplanck'sPoint 

West Point 

Ponghkeepsic 

Tivoli.... 

Stnyvesant 



FT. FT 

11 15i 9.3 7.0 
11 25 9.9i7.6 
11 23 9.9 7.2 
11 22l 9.16.6 

10 57 10.2 7.1 

11 13 10.6,7.6 
11 12 10.9 8.1 
11 27 11.3 8.5 
11 19 11.4 9.0 
11 5 13.2 9.2i 
1122 10.8 7.7 

11 58 5.3 2.6 

12 241 3.6 2.6 
12 22 3.9 1.8 
12 16 2.5 1.6 
1143 1.8 1.3 

8 4 2.8 1.8 

7 59 4.7 3.1 

8 34 2.0 1.2 
7 45 3.9 1.8 
7 31 4.3 2.9 
7 36 3.8 2.3 
7 40; 4.2 2.9 
7 48 5.0 3.7 
7 59' 5.3 3.5' 
7 57; 4.6 2.8' 
7 451 4.6 3.1 
7 32 3.7 2.6 

7 361 3.5 2.0 

8 20, 2.4 1.8, 

7 29! 5.6 4.0 

8 13, 5.4 3.41 



Castleton 

Greenbuflh 

L. Island Sound. 

Watch um 

Stonington 

Little Gull Island 
New London . 
New Haven . . 

Bridgeport 11 

Oyster Bay |11 

Sand's Point U 

NewRochclle.... 11 ! 

Ihrog'sNeck 11 ; 

Jersey Coast. 
Cold Spring lulct 
CapeilayLanding 
Dela'reBat,&o. 
Delaw'eBreakw'r 
Higbie'sCapcMay 
Egg Island Light. 
Manon's liiver ... 

Newcastle 

Philadelphia 

Chesapeake, &r. 
OldPoiutComfjrt 
Point Lookout ... 



FT. FT 

3.0 2.3 

2.5 1.9i 

I ! I 

3.1 2.4! 
' 3.2 2.21 

2.9 2.3 



Wilmington 9 6, 

Georgetown Ent 7 56i 

Bull's Island Bay; 7 161 

Charleston | 7 26' 

St.Helena Sound, 7 8 

Ft. Pulaski 7 201 

Savannah 1 8 13 

Doboy Light 1 7 33; 

St. Simon's 7 43 

Ft. Clmch 7 53; 

St. John's Eiveri 7 28: 

St. Augustine... I 8 21 

Cape Florida 8 84 

Indian Key 8 23 

Sand Key 8 40 

Key West ' 9 30 

Tortugas I 9 56j 

CharlotteHarb'r 



Bodkin Light. 

Baltimore 

Washington ' 7 ' 

City Point | 2 : 

Richmond , 4 : 



9 19 4.4 3. T 
957; 4.0 2.7 
8! 3.8 2.5 

3.2 2.0 

3.9 2.4 

4.6 3.2 

4.4-3.0' ISmithville 



12 3-1 



Tappahannock. .. 

jSorTITEKNCoAST. 

Hatteras Inlet.... 
iBeaufort (N.C.).. 
iBaldHead 



6.9 5.0 
6.9 6.6 

6.8 5.1 

3.02.0 

1.9 0.7 
1.0 0.8 



2.2 1.8 

3.3 2.2 
5.0 3.4 
5.5 3.8 



11 21! 
13 151 
13 38 



9 .39! 



Tamp 

'Cedar Keys 

jSt. Marks 

t Westbkk Coast. 

San Diego 

San Pedro 

Cuyler's Harbor 9 25 
San Luis Obispo. 10 8, 

Monterey ;10 221 

SouthFarrallone!lO 37| 
San Francisco... [12 6 

Mare Island !13 40 

Beulcia |14 10 

Ravenswood 13 36 

Bodego 11 17 

Humboldt Bay.. 13 2 

Port Orford U 26 

Astoria 13 4.' 

f«ee-ah Harbor.. 13 33 
Port Townshend, 3 49 

Steilacoom ' 4 46 

Semi-ah-mooBay! 4 50. 



FT 

8.1 2/i 
4.7 2.7 

5.7 3.7 
6.0 4.1 

7.4 4.4 
8.0 5.9 

7.6 5 5 

7.8 5.4 

8.2 5.4 

6.7 5.3 

5.5 3.7 

4.9 3.0 

2!2 113 

2.0 0.6 
1.5 0.9 
1.5 0.6 

1.8 0.8 
1.811.0 

3.2 1.6 

2.9 1.4 

5.02.3 

4.7 2.3 

5.1 3.8 

4.8 2.4 

4.3 2.5 

4.4 2.8 
4.3 2.8 
5.24.1 
5.1 3.7 

7.3 4.9 

4.7 2.7 

5.5 3.5 

6.8 3.7 

7.4 4.G 
7.4 4.8 



11.1 ' 



JeTf^ish Calendar. 

The year 5027, of 13 months, began Sept. 10th, 1866, and ends Sept. 30th, 1867. 



MOJITn. 


BEGINS. 

January 7 — 
February 6 . . . 
March 8 

^Ifo':: 


LEN 

301 
30 
29 
SO 
29 
SO 


jth. 


.month. 


BEGINS. 


leicgth 
"29 i 






August 2 


30 








7 Nisan 


1 Tisri 


September 30. 

November 28'! 
December 27.. 




8 ijar . 


2 Mirchesran 

3 Cislen 


29 1 ^ 
29 


9 Sivan 


Jnne4 






4Thebct 


39 



The year ] 



Mabometan Calendar. 

! began May 16th, 1866, and ends May 4th, 1867. The year 1284 begins May 5th. 



month. 


1 BEGINS. 


length. 
301 

ii 

30 « 
29J 


MONT a. 


1 BEGINS. 1 LENGTH 






SRabial 

4 Rabiall 


....:jnly3 ;| 301 

< August 2 29 


10 Schewall 


iFebruary 6 ... 


11 Ds'1-Kadah.... 

12 Ds'l-Reiiah 


....jMarch? 

...1 April 6 


5 Jomadhil 

6 Jomadhi II 


....Augusts! ! 30 =5 

September 30 ! 20 >" 




l]Vlay5 . . .. 


7 Releb 


October 29 30 q 


2 Saphar 


1 June 4. 


il^a^m^lSan:::::: 


November 28 29 




....December 27.. 30 J 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



Table of Stxtyone Briglit Stars. 

To ascertain when any star or constellation found in the following Table will be on the 
meridian, adil the numbers opposite in the left-hand column of figures to the time of " Sidereal 
Noon " found in the calendar papas. For the rising of a star, /wb/ract the number opposite in 
the right-hand column of figures from its meridian passage. For the setting of a star, add the 
same number to its meridian passage. Those marked ( ) revolve in a circle of perpetual ap- 
parition, and do not rise nor set north of the latitude of New York (40' 42' 40"), for which latitude 
the semi-diurnal arcs are calculated. The civil day begins at the preceding midnight, and con- 
sequently 24 hours after midnight, or 12 hours from noon, is morning of the succeeding day ; and 
24 hours to S6 hours from noon is evening of the next day. The table is arranged in the order 
of culmination. 



Name of Star. 



a Andromeda? (Alpheratz) . 

JYPegasKAIgenib) 

I a C'assiopea; (Schedir) 

|/3Ceti 

: /3 Andromedse (Meracb) . . . 

a Vrsa Minoris (Polaris) . . . 

j /3 Arietis 

I 7 Andromedre (Almaach). . 

a Piscium 

i a Arietis 

i aCeti (Menkar) 

a Persei (Algenib) 

ri Tauri (Seven Stars) 

a Tauri (Aldebaran) 

I a Auriga; (Capella) 

i /3 Orionis (Rigel) 

^ Tauri (El Nath) 

y Orionis (Bellatrix) 

5 Orionis (Mintaka) 

e Orionis (Anilam) 

i Orionis (Alnitak) 

a Columbie (Phaet) 

a Orionis (Betelguese) 

a Canis Majoris (Sirius) . . . 

€ Oacis Majoris (Adhara). . 

a'^Geminor (Castor) 

a Canis Minoris (Procyon). 

/3 Geminor (Pollux) 

^ Argus (Naos) 

a Hydra (Alphard) 

a Leonis (Regulus) 



On Me- 


Rises & 


ridian. 


Sets. 


H. Jl. 


H. M. 


1 


7 51 


6 


6 50 


as 




37 


4 51 


1 2 


8 26 


1 10 




1 47 


7 16 


1 55 


9 18 


1 55 


6 6 


1 59 


7 23 


2 55 


6 11 


3 14 




3 39 


7 28 


4 27 


6 57 


6 6 


10 11 


5 7 


5 30 


5 17 


7 50 


5 17 


6 20 


5 24 




5 29 


5 55 




5 52 


5 34 


3 37 


5 47 


6 '25 


6 38 


5 


6 52 


4 7 


7 25 


8 10 


7 31 


6 18 


7 36 


7 50 


7 58 


3 58 


9 19 


5 31 


10 


6 43 



Name of Stab. 



On Me- Rises & 
ridian. Sets. 



y Leonis (Al Gieba) 

^ Ursas Majoris I p-i_.„_, 
a Ursffi Majoris r"""*^"^ ■• • 

j3 Leonis (Denebola) 

y Ursse Majoris (Phad) 

^ Coni 

e IJrsas Majoris (Alioth) 

a Tirginis (Spica) 

T) Ursae Majoris 

a Bootis (Arcturus) 

fi Ursae Minoris 

/3 Librae 

a Corona; Borealis 

a. Serpentis 

^'Scorpii 

a Scorpii (Antares) 

a Herculis 

a Ophiuchi 

/3 Draconis 

y Draconis 

a Lyras (Vega) 

/3 LyrjB 

a Aquilae (Altair) 

a Cygni (Denebola) 

a Cephei 

jS Aquarii 

cl Aquarii 

a Pisceum Aus. (Fomalhaut). 

p Pegasi (Scheat) 

a. Pegasi (Aiarkab) 

Vernal Equinox 



H. M. 

10 10 
10 51 

10 54 

11 40 
11 45 



13 16 

13 40 

14 7 

14 49 

15 7 
15 26 
15 35 

15 55 

16 18 

17 6 
17 26 
17 25 
17 51 



21 12 
21 21 

21 55 

22 46 

22 53 

23 54 



5 27 
7 43 

6 23 
4 49 

4 19 
6 50 

5 15 



8 54 

8 16 

6 29 

9 84 

5'87 

5 56 
4 

7 44 

6 50 



Venus \d\\ be Morning Star until September 25, when it is in superior conjunction with the 
Sun, being then rendered invisible by the superior light of the Sun ; and being also at its maximum 
distance from the Earth, it will have its minimum apparent diameter, and its disc, if visible, will 
be a perfect circle. After this date it will soon appear low in the west soon after sunset, being 
Evening Star, and daily appearing further east of the Sun. At the close of the year 1866 it shows 
beautifully as a Morning Star, increasing in splendor until January 17, when its illuminated disc 
is greatest. It rises then about 4h. 23m. mo. On February 24 it reaches its greatest elongation — 
4C° 48' — west of the Sun, whence it moves off towards the Sun and superior conjunction, with 
daily decreasing light. On January 1, it will be northeast of Antares; on Februarys, it enters 
Sagittarius ; March 8 it will be 3' south of ij Capricorni ; and April 4 it will be 9° south of 
y Aquarii, the brightest star in the Urn. 

Mars will be Evening Star during the entire year. It will appear largest January 10, being 
then at is opposition, or 180° from the Sun, and rising about sunset. It is then nearest the Earth, 
and its diameter about four times as large as when at its conjunction. On April 15, it will be 90° 
east of the Sun, and pass the meridian about sunset. On January 1, it will be southeast of Pollux, 
and about on a line with Castor and Pollux. It moves backwards or to the west now, and until 
February 18. On January 7, it will be ^2% ° south of Pollux ; on January 14, 6° south of Castor ; 
and on April 7, it will be back again due south of Pollux, but now 4,',j° south of it, and 18° north 
of Procyon. After June the planet will be rather inconspicuous. 

Satdrn will be Morning Star until February 12, rising after this before midnight, and being 
Evening Star until November 19, when it becomes Morning Star. It will be in Libra most of the 
year, northwest of Antares, ajid at the time of op position , May 12 , it will be brightest . 

The Astronomical Calculations have been made in mean time, expressly for this Almanac, by 
SAMUEL HART WRIGHT, M. D., A. M., of Penn Van, Yates County, New York. 



Tst Month.] 




JANUART, 


1867. 






31 Days. 


FKCA-SES OF TliE Iv^OOlsT, 


i 

1 
13 
19 
25 


Venus 
South. 


Mars 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


Sun at J\tiun- 
mark. 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton. 


10 1 
9 41 

. 9 26 
9 15 
9 8 


MOKN. 
1 5 

32 

p. M. 

11 19 
10 46 


1 36 
1 18 
1 
42 


MOKN. 

8 34 
8 13 

7 51 
7 29 

7 7 


I'i 3 50 
12 6 34 
12 8 59 
12 11 1 
12 12 36 


New.... 
1st Quar. 
Full ... . 
3d Quar. 


5 
13 

20 


i 46 ev. 
11 50 m. 

2 52 m. 
10 3 m. 


"7 34 ev. 
11 38 m. 

2 40 m. 

9 51m. 


"7 22 ev. 
11 26 m. 

2 28 m. 

9 39 m. 



P 


H 


>j 






B' 


Boston ; New Er 


gland. 


INew 


York City ; 


Phila- 


Wa 


shington ; 






m 


z 




New York State, 


dolphia. Conn., New 


Maryland, Virg'a, 


s 




w 


§ 







Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 


g 


fe 


S 


"^ 




§ 


Iowa, and Orerjon. 


diana, and Illinois. 


and California. 






Sun 


Moon 


















t 


t 


Even'g 




a 


KISES. 


.SETS. 


ItlSCS. 


Boston. 


RISES. 


SETS. 


nisES. 


N.YORK 


nisiJS. 


SETS. 


KISKS. 






H 


M 


H. 


M. 


'r. M 


H. M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


|h. m. 


n. M. 


H. M 


11. M. 


11. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


T 


5 


16 


8 41 


7 30 


4 38 


3 19 


8 26 


|7 25 


4 43 


3 16 


5 11 


7 19 


4 49 


3 13 


2 


W 


5 


12 


9 


27 


7 30 


4 39 


4 15 


9 15 


1725 


4 44 


4 11 


6 1 


7 19 


4 50 


4 8 


3 


T 


5 


8 


10 


IS 


7 30 


4 40 


5 7 


10 1 


|7 25 


4 45 


5 4 


6 47 


7 19 


4 51 


4 59 


4 


F 


5 


4 


11 


1 


7 30 


4 41 


5 58 


10 50 


17 25 


4 46 


5 54 


7 32 


7 19 


4 52 


5 49 


5 


S 


5 





11 


49 


7 30 


4 42 


sets 


11 36 


'7 25 


4 47 


sets 


8 12 


7 19 


4 52 


sets 


6 


1 


4 


56 


ev 


37 


7 29 


4 43 


5 47 


morn 


i7 25 


4 48 


5 51 


8 55 


7 19 


4 53 


5 55 


7 


M 




52 


1 


25 


7 29 


4 44 


6 44 


10 


!7 25 


4 49 


6 47 


9 35 


7 19 


4 54 


6 50 


8 


T 


4 48| 


2 


12 


7 29 


4 45 


7 42 


49 


j7 24 


4 50 


7 45 


10 15 


7 19 


4 55 


7 47 


9 


W 


4 44! 


2 


59 


7 29 


4 46 


8 44 


1 30 


7 24 


4 51 


8 45 


10 54 


7 19 


4 56 


8 47 


10 


T 




40 


3 


46 


7 29 


4 47 


9 44 


2 12 


I724 


4 52 


9 45 


11 38 


7 19 


4 57 


9 46 


11 


F 




36 


4 


34 


7 29 


4 48 


10 48 


2 54 


7 24 


4 53 


10 48 


morn 


7 19 


4 58 


10 47 


12 


S 




32 


5 


22 


7 28 


4 50 


11 53 


3 40 


l7 23 


4 54 


11 52 


16 


7 IS 


4 59 


11 51 


13 


2 




28 


6 


12 


7 28 


4 51 


morn 


4 30 


7 23 


4 55 


morn 


1 18 


7 18 


5 


morn 


14 


M 




24 


7 


6 


7 28 


4 52 


58 


5 28 


7 23 

7 22 


4 56 


56 


2 14 


7 18 


5 1 


54 


15 


T 




21 


8 


1 


7 27 


4 53 


2 5 


6 30 


4 57 


2 3 


3 16 


7 18 


5 2 


2 


16 


W 




17 


8 


59 


7 27 


4 54 


3 13 


7 39 


7 22 


4 59 


3 10 


4 24 


7 17 


5 3 


3 6 


17 


T 




13 


10 





7 26 


4 55 


4 19 


8 46 


7 21 


5 


4 16 


5 31 


7 17 


5 5 


4 11 


18 


F 




9 


11 


1 


7 28 


4 56 


5 24 


9 49 


7 21 


5 1 


5 20 


6 35 


7 16 


5 6 


5 15 


19 


S 




5 


morn. 


7^5 


4 58 


rises 


10 48 


7 21 


5 2 


rises 


7 32 


7 16 


5 7 


rises 


20 


3 




1 




2 


7 24 


4 59 


6 54 


11 40 


7 20 


5 3 


5 57 


8 23 


7 15 


5 8 


6 


21 


il 


3 


57 


1 





7 24 


5 


7 


ev.28 


7 19 


5 4 


7 3 


9 15 


7 15 


5 9 


7 5 


22 


T 


3 


53 


1 


54 


7 23 


5 1 


8 8 


1 14 


7 18 


5 5 


8 10 


10 


7 14 


6 10 


8 11 


23 


W 


3 


49 


2 


46 


7 22 


5 3 


9 12 


2 1 


7 17 


5 7 


9 13 


10 43 


7 14 


5 11 


9 13 


24 


T 


3 


45 


3 


35 


7 22 


5 4 


10 14 


2 45 


7 17 


5 8 


10 14 


11 27 


7 13 


5 12 


10 14 


25 


F 


3 


41 


4 


21 


7 21 


5 5 


11 14 


3 28 


!7 16 


5 9 


11 14 


CV.13 


7 12 


5 13 


11 13 


26 


s 


3 


37 


5 


7 


7 20 


5 6 


morn 


4 13 


i7 16 


5 10 


mora 


1 


7 12 


5 15 


morn 


27 


4 


3 


33 


5 


52 


7 19 


5 8 


13 


5 6 


:7 15 


5 11 


11 


1 51 


7 11 


5 16 


9 


28 


M 


3 


29 


6 


37 


7 18 


5 9 


1 10 


5 56 


7 14 


5 13 


1 7 


2 42 


7 10 


5 17 


1 5 


29 


T 


3 


25 


7 


00 


7 17 


5 10 


2 6 


6 50 


7 13 


5 14 


2 3 


3 39 


7 9 


5 18 


2 


30 


W 


3 


22 


8 


8 


7 16 


5 12 


2 59 


7 46 


7 12 


5 15 


2 55 


.4 31 


7 8 


5 19 


2 52 


31 


T 


3 


18 


8 


66 


7 15 


5 13 


3 52 


8 43 


7 12 


5 16 


3 48 


5 28 


7 8 


5 20 


3 44 



I A YOUNG lady from one of our neighboring 
' cities is now in Paris. She was riding recently 
I with an attachi of the United States Mission in 
the Bois de Bologne, when a gentleman driving 
in a plain carriage met them and bowed. ■ The 
young lady turned to her escort in great indig- 
' nation, sajnng : "Did you see that impudent 
' fellow bow to me?" "Oh, yeSj'lwas the an- 
I swer ; " that was the Emperor." 

A Good Tuinq from Prentice. — The first fe- 
male secessionist was Madame Eve, who seceded 
: from Adam, and thereby brought such mischief 
upon the state that it hasn't recovered from the 



effects of it yet. The agent that brought about 
the act, it will be recollected, was the Devil — 
the same that had so much to do with secession 
in the United States. Letus squelch the Old 
Boy. 

Sensible Man. — The alderman who was lately 
injured hy the accidental discharge of his duty 
is reported to be in a fair way of recovery. lie 
says that he'll never be caught that way again 
while in full possession of his senses. 

A Doo that watches his chances to steal a bite 
is the worst kind of a watch-dog. 




59 

68 
6 57 
6 55 

6 54'5 35 
6 53'6 36 
6 52|5 38 
6 51 5 
6 49 5 40 
6 48! 5 41 rises 
. 47J5 421 6 54 
6 46 5 441 1 57 
„ 44 5 45! 8 56 
6 43:5 4GJ 9 56 
6 4215 47il0 53 
6 40 5 48:11 49 
6 38 5 49'morn 

46] 2 1! 6 37|5 51; 43 

1 39 2 57; 6 36i5 52 1 34 

2 281 3 53 16 34'5 53' 2 24 



A " Professor " was lately exhibiting at Berlin 
a troop of " Trained Fleas," tliat draw miniature 
carriages and perform various other exploits of a 
similar character. When exhibiting his tiny per- 
formers before the King, the " Professor was 
suddenly seen to exhibit signs of great consterna- 
tion "^VTiat is the matter, Herr Professor ? 
inquired lUs Majesty, on seeing that the perform- 
ance had come to a stand-still. Sire," replied 
the " Professor," " I perceive that one of ray very 
best performers, the Great Napoleon, has got 
loose and disappeared." " Let search be made at 
once for the Great Napoleon," replied tl^e King, 
good-humoredly. " Ladies and gentlemen, let the 
Herr Professor have your best help in repaptuxing 
the Great Napoleon. In what direction, Ilerr 
Professor, do you imagine the runaway to have 



gone' " " If I may venture. Sire, to reply frank- 
ly " returned that personage, " I suspect the 
Great Napoleon to have secreted himself about 
the person of Her Serene Highness, the Princess 

p ■• The " Highness " thus named, feeling 

anything but " Serene " at the thought of afford- 
inn- quarters to such an intruder, made a hasty 
retreat to her own apartments, whence, after a 
brief retirement with her cainerUte, she smiling- 
ly returned to the royal presence, bringing some 
object, held delicately between her thumb and 
finder which she cautiously made over to the Pro- 
fessor " Alas ! Sire," exclaimed the latter, after 
a moment's glance at what he thought was his dis- , 
covered treasure, " this is a wild flea and not t/ie 
Great NapoUon I " And the exhibition, was ; 
thus brought to an Ignominious conclusion. 



3d Month.] MARCH, 1867. [31 Days. 




FUSSES OF THE IS^OOIST. 1 


D. 

1 


Venua 
South. 


Mars 
Soath. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


\San at Xo^n- 




MOON. 1 


Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton | 


9 6 


8 16 


MOEN. 

10 57 


MOEN. 1 H. M. 8. 

4 60|12 12 34 




i D 1 


H U 


H. H . 


H M 




New 


6 


4 54 m. 


4 42 m. 


4 30 ra. 


7 


9 10 


7 56 


10 39 


4 31 


12 11 15 




1st Quar. 


13 


4 3 m. 


3 51 m. 


3 39 m. 


13 


9 14 


7 38 


10 21 


4 ' 


12 9 41 




Full .... 


20 


4 11m. 


3 59 m. 


3 47 m. 


19 


9 17 


7 22 


10 2 


3 4C 


12 7 57 




3d Quar . 


28 


3 2 m. 


2 50 m. 


2 38 m. 


25 


9 21 7 6l 


9 44 


3 \i 


12 6 7 




1 

t 

1 


i, 

F 


is 


i 


Boston ; New England, 

New York State, 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

Iowa, and Oregon. 


New York City ; Phila- 
delphia, Conn., New 
Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 
diana, and Illinois. 


Washington ; 

Maryland, Virg'a, 

Ken'ky, Missouri, 

and California. 




SDN 
; BISKS. 

6 36 


Sun 

BETS. 
H. M. 

5 51 


Moon 

BISEa. 


H. w. 
Boston. 

H. U. 

8 7 


BI9E8. 

6 3"5 


5 53 


Moon 

% 16 


H.W. 
NYoEK 

H — iT 

4 5i! 


Sun 

6 3^3 


sIts. 

5 54 


3 12 




Even'g 
" 24 




"s 24 


3 20 




2 


S 


1 20 


9 12 


6 35 


5 52 


4 3 


9 


6 34 


5 53 


3 59 


5 45 


6 32 


6 55 


3 56 




s 


9 


1 16 


10 1 


6 33 


5 53 


444 


9 50 


6 32 


5 54 


4 41 


6 32! 


6 30 


5 56 


43V 




4 


M 


1 12 


10 49 


6 31 


5 54 


5 21 


10 36 


6 30 


5 55 


5 19 


7 21 


6 29 


5 57 


5 16 




5 


T 


1 8 


11 37 


6 30 


5 55 


5 57 


11 20 


6 29 


5 56 


5 55 


8 2 


6 27 


5 57 


5 53 




cW 


' 1 4 


ev. 26 


16 28 


5 56 


seta 


11 59 


6 27 


5 57 


sets 


8 44' 


6 26 


5 68 


sets 




7T 


1 


1 15 


l6 26 


5 57 


7 34 


morn 


6 25 


5 58 


7 34 


9 27 


6 24 


5 59 


7 34 




8FI 


0.56 


2 6 


;6 25 


5 58 


8 41 


41 


6 24 


5 59 


8 39 


10 12, 


6 23 


6 


8 38 




9S 


52 


2 57 


6 23 


5 59 


9 48 


1 26 


6 22 


6 


9 45 


10 52 16 21 


6 1 


9 43 




10 10 


48 


3 51 


16 21 


6 


10 53 


2 10 


6 20 


6 1 


10 51 


11 43; 6 20 


6 2 


10 48 




11 M 


44 


4 46 


:6 20 


6 2 


12 


2 58 


6 19 


6 2 


11 57 


morn: 6 18 


6 3 


11 53 




12T 


40 


5 43 


6 18 


6 3 


morn 


3 52 


6 17 


6 3 


morn 


38 


6 17 


6 4 


morn 




13 


W 


36 


6 41 


6 16 


6 4 


1 4 


4 54 


6 16 


6 4 


1 


141, 


6 15 


6 5 


56 




U 


T 


33 


7 38 


6 14 


6 5 


2 3 


6 3 


6 14 


6 5 


1 59 


2 49! 


6 13 


6 6 


1 55 




15 F 


29 


8 35 


6 13 


6 6 


2 57 


7 10 


6 12 


6 6 


2 53 


355! 


6 12 


6 7 


2 49 




16 S 


25 


9 29 


6 11 


6 7 


3 44 


8 18 


6 11 


6 8 


3 40 


5 2, 


6 10 


6 8 


3 37 




17,11 


21 


10 22 


J6 9 


6 9 


4 28 


9 17 


6 9 


6 9 


4 25 


6 3 


6 9 


6 9 


4 23 




18 M 


17 


11 13 


'6 7 


6 10 


rises 


10 10 


6 7 


6 10 


rises 


6 66' 


6 7 


6 10 


rises 




19 T 


13 


morn. 


6 6 


6 11 


5 40 


10 58 


6 6 


6 11 


5 40 


741! 


6 6 


6 11 


5 40 




20 W 


1 9 


1 


^6 4 


6 12 


6 43 


11 39 


6 4 


6 12 


6 42 


8 21! 


6 4 


6 12 


6 42 




21 T 


5 


49 


i6 2 


6 13 


7 44 


ev.l9 


6 2 


6 13 


7 43 


9 5 


6 3 


6 13 


7 42 




22 F 


1 


1 36 


6 


6 14 


8 45 


1 


6 1 


6 14 


8 42 


9 46 


6 1 


6 14 


8 40 




23 8 


morn. 


2 22 


5 59 


6 15 


9 42 


140 


5 59 


6 15 


9 40 


1022! 


5 59 


6 15 


9 37 




24 12 


11 53 


3 8 


'5 57 


6 17 


10 39 


2 21 


5 58 


6 16 


10 35 


11 3j 


5 58 


6 16 


10 32 




25 M 


n 49 


3 54 


5 55 


18 


11 32 


3 1 


5 56 


6 17 


11 29 


11 46 


5 56 


6 17 


11 25 




26 T 


11 45 


4 41 


5 53 


6 19 


morn 


3 47 


5 54 


6 18 


morn 


ev.33, 


5 54 


6 18 


morn 




27 W 


11 41 


5 29 


!5 52 


6 20 


25 


4 38 


5 62 


6 19 


21 


1 25P 


5 53 


6 19 


17 




28 T 


11 37 


6 16 


5 50 


6 21 


1 12 


5 32 


5 51 


6 20 


1 9 


2 18! 


5 51 


6 19 


1 4 




29 F 


[11 34 


7 4 


,5 48 


6 22 


157 


6 29 


5 49 


6 21 


1 53 


3 15; 


5 50 


6 20 


149 




SOS 


11 30 


7 51 


5 46 


6 23 


2 39 


7 26 


5 47 


6 22 


2 35 


4 11 


5 48 


6 21 


2 32 




31 1.3 


!ll 26 


8 39 


Is 45 


6 24 


3 13 


8 24 


5 46 


6 23 


3 14 


5 9 Is 47 


6 22 


3 11 




" As I was going over the bridjre the other 
day," said a native of Erin, " I met Pat flewins. 
' Hewins." says I, ' how are you ? ' ' Pretty 
well, thank you, Donnelly,' says he. ' Donel- 
ly.' says I, ' that's not my name.' ' Faith, 
then, no more is mine Hewins.' So with that 
we looked at aich other agin, an' sure enough, it 
wasnayther of U9." 

" Coal is coal now," said a city coal-merchant 
to a man who was remonstrating with him upon 
its high price. 

" I am glad of that," replied the other, "for 
the last lot you sold me was half of It stone." 


Tub Democrats once had a grand rally and 
barbacue. An Irishman went to some of the 
Democratic leaders and said : 
_^" An' sure, didn't ye know betther than to 
have a barbacue on Friday, when tico-thirds op 
th« party can't ate mate ? " 

" Can you let me have twenty dollars this 
morning to purchase a bonnet, my dear? " said 
a lady to her husband one morning at breakfast. 

" By-and-by, my love." 

" That's what you always say, my dear ; but 
how can I buy and buy without the money ? " 

That brought the money. 





4th Month.] APRIL, 1867. [30 Days. | 


FHA-SSS OF TMB nN/IOOKT. 


i 


South. 1 


Mars 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn Hun at Noon- ' 
South. mark. \ 




Wash-ton. 


MOON. 1 


Boston. 


N. York. 


MOKN. 

9 24 


6 49 


9 22 


MOKV. II. M. ^. 

2 50 12 4 17 




B 


H. M. 




II. M. 


New.... 


4 


5 26 ev. 


"5 8 ev. 


4 56 ev 


7 


9 28 


6 35 


9 8 


2 25 12 2 13 


1st Quar. 


11 


10 25 m. 


10 13 ni. 


10 1 m. 


18 


9 30 


6 22 


8 43 


2 12 34 


Full .... 


18 


6 22 ev. 


6 10 ev. 


5 58 ev 


19 


9 33 


6 9 


8 24 


1 85 11 59 7 


3d Quar . 


26 


9 17 ev. 


9 5ev. 


8 53 ev 


25 


9 86 


5 57! 8 4 


1 10 11 57 54 


'Y 


M 


.-) 


d 


Boston ; New England, 


New York City; Phila- 


Washington ; 


g 


g 


i§ 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New 


Maryland, Virg'a, 


s 


P 







Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 


b 




1^ 


1 


Iowa, and Oregon. 


diana, and Illinois. 


and California. 








fI'H'- 


M001 " ■■" 


Sum I Su.N 

RI9FS.! BETX. 




1 




Mom'g 

H. M.l 


'^ 


EJ^ 


^ 


r.isES. 


no^ToV 




N.Y .RF 


v.°°l 


H. M. 




H. M. 


H M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


M 


11 22| 


9 27 


5 43 


6 25 


"352 


9 15 


5 44 6 2 4 


3 50 


6 1 


5 46 6 23 


8 48 


2 


T 


11 18; 


10 16 


5 41 


6 27 


4 27 


16 1 


5 42 6 26 


4 26 


6 50 


5 44 6 24 


4 25 


3 


W 


11 14, 


11 5 


5 40 


6 28 


5 


10 62 


5 41 6 27 


5 


7 36 


5 42 6 25 


5 


4 


T 


11 10 


11 56 


5 38 


6 29 


sets 


11 34 


5 89 6 28 


sets 


8 16 


5 41 6 26 


sets 


5 


F 


11 6 


ev. 48 


5 36 


6 30 


7 32 


morn 


5 87 6 29 


7 30 


9 4 


5 39 6 27 


7 29 


6 


S 


11 2 


] 42 


5 35 


6 31 


8 41 


18 


5 36 6 80 


8 38 


9 60 


5 87 6 28 


8 36 


7 


14 


10 58' 


2 39 


5 33 


6 32 


9 50 


1 4 


5 34 6 31 


9 46 


10 8C 


3 36 6 29 


9 43 


8 


il 


10 54! 


3 37 


5 31 


6 83 


10 56 


1 54 


5 33 6 82 


10 52 


11 29 


5 34 6 30 


10 48 


9 


T 


10 so; 


4 35 


5 30 


6 34 


11 58 


2 47 


5 31 6 33 


11 54 


morn 


j 33 6 31 


1149: 


10 


W 


10 46 


5 34 


5 28 


6 36 


morn 


8 41 


5 30 6 34 


morn 


27 


5 31 6 32 


morn 


11 


T 


10 42 


6 31 


5 26 


6 37 


55 


4 43 


5 28 6 35 


51 


ISO 


5 30 6 83 


047 


12 


F 


10 89 


7 25 


5 25 


6 38 


145 


5 50 


5 26 6 86 


141 


2 86 


;> 28 6 34 


1 38 


18 


S 


10 35 


8 18 


5 23 


6 39 


2 29 


6 57 


5 25 6 37 


2 26 


3 4-2 


5 27 6 35 


2 23 


14 


J5 


10 31 


9 8 


5 21 


6 40 


3 9 


7 58 


5 24 6 38 


3 6 


4 4S 


3 25 6 86 


8 4 


15 


M 


10 27l 


9 56 


5 20 


6 41 


3 44 


8 55 


5 22 6 39 


3 42 


5 40 


5 24 6 87 


3 41 


16 


T 


10 23' 


10 43 


5 18 


6 42 


4 16 


9 45 


5 20 6 40 


4 15 


6 31 


5 23 6 38 


4 15 


17 


W 


10 19 


11 29 


^5 16 


6 43 


4 48 


10 80 


5 19 6 41 


4 48 


7 m 


5 21 6 39 


4 49 i 


18 


T 


10 15! 


morn. 


|5 15 


6 45 


rises 


11 12 


5 17 6 42 


rises 


7 5-: 


'> 20 6 40 


rises' 


19 


F 


10 11 


15 


;5 13 


6 46 


7 31 


1151 


5 16 6 43 


7 28 


8 81 


5 18 6 41 


7 26 


20 


S 


10 7 


1 1 


5 12 


6 47 


8 29 


ev.29 


5 14 6 44 


8 26 


9 IC 


5 17 6 42 


8 28 


21 


k; 


10 3 


1 48 


5 10 


6 48 


9 25 


1 10 


5 13 6 45 


9 21 


9 5G 


5 16 6 42 


9 17 


22 


M 


9 59 


2 35 


;5 9 


6 49 


10 18 


1 51 


5 116 46 


10 14 


10 35 


5 14 6 43 


10 10 


23 


T 


9 55| 


3 22 


;5 7 


6 50 


11 6 


2 82 


5 10 6 47 


11 2 


11 IC 


5 13 6 44 


10 57 


24 


W 


9 51 


4 9 


,5 6 


6 51 


11 53 


3 16 


5 8 6 48 


11 49 


ev. 1 


5 116 45 


11 45 


25 


T 


9 47 


4 57 


5 4 


6 52 


morn 


4 3 


5 7 6 49 


morn 


50 


5 10 6 46 


morn 


26 


F 


9 43 


5 44 


5 S 


6 53 


35 


4 55 


5 6 6 50 


81 


1 42 


5 9 6 47 


28 


27 


S 


9 40 


6 31 


5 1 


6 55 


1 14 


5 50 


5 46 51 


1 10 


2 36 


3 86 48 


1 7 


28 


17 


9 36 


7 18 


l5 


6 56 


149 


6 40 


5 86 52 


147 


3 3l 


5 6 6 49 


144 


29 


M 


9 32 


8 5 


|4 58 


6 57 


2 23 


7 43 


|5 2 6 53 


2 21 


4 2f 


3 5 6 50 


2 20 


80 


T 


9 28 


8 53 


I457 


6 58 


2 56 


8 4:1 


5 06 55 


2 55 


5 2: 


3 4 6 51 


2 53 


■ The "local" of the Bluffton Banner thus 


An old bachelor in Jliddleboro, invited a young 


[ poetizes April : 1 

1 Bright, bully April day ! * 

Birds a singin', bells a ringin', grass upspringin' ^ 

All the way ! ° 


ady to a restaurant to get a lunch. Without 


he knowledge of the lady he ordered two oyster 
tews. On their arrival, the lady said she never 
te Btews, so the gallant old fellow fell to and 


evoured both, peruiitting hU companion to 


What dusty, musty, rusty dolt could say , 


ratch his operations with hungry glances. 


'Twas not as nice as a mice and better than ice— -y 


Then he had made an end, he politely escorted 


j This April day 1 l 


er home — where, probably, she did some , 


Frogs a hollerin', hogs a wallerin', cool lager a c 


amage to cold baked beans and berry pie. 


swallerin' forty times or more a day— 


" Dm ye iver know such a cold summer as 


[This verse would have been truly grand, but the t 
machine broke down. " Dells," in the first sian- a 


his 1 " asked Mike of a follow Irishman. " Yes," 


nswered Pat. "AVhen?" "Last winter, be 


za 


pro 


bab 


yre 


atos to t 


hos 


e ■( 


orn b 


/the c 


nvs.] 1 j 


abers!" 


!l 



5th Month.] MAY, 1867. [31 Days. 


PHA.SES OF THE H^OOJST, \ 




South. 


Mars 
South. 


ar 


Saturn 
South. 


Sun at .\'oon. 
viark. 


MOON. Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton. 


"dT ' 


«OEN. 


^7^. 


MOEN. 


MOBN. 


H. M. 8. 


D. 


H. M. 


H M 


H. M. 


1 


9 38 


5 45 


7 45 


40111 07 V 1] 


New.... 


4 


2 56 m. 


2 44 m. 


k 32 m. 


7 


9 41 


5 33 


7 24 


19|11 56 24 |] 


1st Quar. 


10 


5 20 ev. 


5 8ev. 


4 56 ev. 


13 


9 44 


5 21 


7 4 


P.M. 


11 56 9 


Full .... 


18 


9 8 m. 


8 56 m. 


8 44 m. 


19 


9 47 


5 10 


6 43 


11 2i 


11 56 14 


3d Quar. 


26 


38 ev. 


26 ev. 


14 ev. 


25 


9 5( 


4 59 


6 22 


11 c 


11 56 39 


i~ 


a 


.J 


g 


Boston ; New England, 


New York City; Phila- 


Washington ; 




a 


Ss 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New 


Maryland, Virg'a, 


§ 


P- 


S§ 


o 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 






9 "" 


i 


Iowa, and Ores;on. 


diana, and Illinois. 


and California. 


Sun 


SU.N 


Moon 


H. W. 






Moon 


H W 


sST" " 


Son 


MoeN 


1. 




Morn'g 


s 






KISE3. 


Boston.: 


EISES 


SETS. 




N YOEK 


EISES. 










H. M. 


H. M 


H_ 11, 


B m" 


H M 


H M 


H. U 


H. M 


H M 


H M 


H M 


jj_ J, 


H M~ 


1 


w 


9 24 


9 43 


4 56 


7 6 


3 30 


9 32 


4" 59 


6 56 


3 30 


6 18 


5' 2 


6 52 


3 30 


2 


T 


9 20 


10 34 


4 54 


7 1 


4 5 


10 22' 


4 58 


6 57 


4 6 


7 8 


5 1 


6 53 


4 7 


3 


F 


9 10 


11 28 


4 53 


7 2 


4 43 


11 11: 


4 56 


6 58 


4 45 


7 53 


5 


6 54 


4 46 


4 


S 


9 12 


ev. 24 


4 52 


7 3 


sets 


11 571 


4 53 


6 59 


sets 


8 42 


4 59 


6 55 


sets 


5 


18 


9 8 


1 23 


4 51 


7 4 


8 40 


morn ' 


4 54 


7 


8 36 


9 33 


4 5S 


6 50 


8 33 


6 


M 


9 4 


2 24: 


4 49 


7 5 


9 47 


47 


4 53 


7 1 


9 43 


10 24 


4 57 


6 57 


9 38 


' 1 


T 


9 


3 23 


4 48 


7 6 


10 48 


140, 


4 52 


7 2 


10 44 


11 17 


4 55 


6 58 


10 39 


8 


W 


8 56 


4 24 


4 47 


7 7 


1141 


2 35 


4 51 


7 3 


11 37 


morn 


4 54 


6 59 


11 34 


9 


T 


8 52 


5 21 


4 46 


7 8 


morn 


3 43, 


4 49 


7 4 


morn 


16 


4 53 


7 


morn 


10 


F 


8 48 


6 15 


4 44 


7 9 


28 


4 29; 


4 48 


7 5 


25 


1 16 


4 52 


7 1 


22 


11 


S 


8 44 


7 6 


4 43 


7 10 


1 10 


5 31j 


4 47 


7 6 


1 7 


2 17 


45] 


7 2 


1 5 


12 


19 


8 41 


7 54' 


4 42 


7 11 


147 


6 31 


4 46 


7 7 


1 45 


3 17 


4 50 


7 2 


1 44 


13 


M 


8 37 


8 41 


4 41 


7 12 


2 20 


7 32 


4 45 


7 8 


2 19 


4 17 


4 49 


7 S 


2 18 


U 


T 


8 33 


9 27 


4 40 


7 13 


2 51 


8 26 


4 44 


7 9 


2 51 


3 11 


4 49 


7 4 


2 51 


15 


W 


8 29 


10 12 


4 39 


7 14 


3 22 


9 15 


4 43 


7 10 


3 23 


6 1 


4 48 


7 5 


3 24 


16 


T 


8 25 


10 58 


4 38 


7 15 


3 53 


10 


4 42 


7 11 


3 55 


6 46 


4 47 


7 6 


3 56 


17 


F 


8 21 


11 44; 


4 37 


7 16 


4 27 


10 45 


4 41 


7 12 


4 29 


7 29 


4 46 


7 7 


4 32 


18 


S 


8 17 


mora. 


4 36 


7 17 


vises 


11 24 


4 40 


7 13 


rises 


8 7 


4 45 


7 8 


rises 


19 


•20 


8 13 


30 


4 33 


7 18 


8 11 


ev. 3 


4 39 


7 14 


8 7 


8 48 


4 44 


7 9 


8 3 


20 


M 


8 9 


1 17 


4 34 


7 19 


9 3 


431 


4 39 


7 15 


8 59 


9 29 


4 43 


7 10 


8 55 


21 


T 


8 5 


2 5 


4 33 


7 20 


9 50 


1 23 


4 38 


7 16 


9 46 


10 11 


4 43 


7 10 


9 41 


22 


W 


8 1 


2 52 


4-32 


7 21 


10 33 


2 5 


4 37 


7 17 


10 30 


10 47 


4 42 


7 11 


10 25 


23 


T 


7 57 


3 39 


4 31 


7 22 


11 12 


2 471 


4 36 


7 18 


11 9 


11 31 


4 41 


7 12 


11 5 


24 


F 


7 53 


4 20 


4 31 


7 23 


1148 


3 32! 


4 36 


7 19 


11 46 


ev 18 


4 41 


7 13 


11 43 


25 


3 


7 49 


5 12 


4 30 


7 24 


morn 


4 20' 


4 35 


7 20 


morn 


1 7 


4 40 


7 14 


morn 


26 


•il 


7 48 


5 58 


4 29 


7 25 


23 


5 111 


4 34 


7 20 


21 


1 57 


4 39 


7 14 


18 


27 


M 


7 42 


6 45 


4 29 


7 26 


56 


6 7' 


4 34 


7 21 


55 


2 53 


4 39 


7 15 


54 


28 


T 


7 38 


7 32 


4 28 


7 27 


1 28 


7 4j 


4 33 


7 22 


1 27 


3 49 


4 38 


7 16 


1 27 


29 


W 


7 34 


8 21 


4 27 


7 28 


2 1 


8 4' 


4 32 


7 23 


2 1 


4 46 


4 38 


7 17 


2 2 


30 


T 


7 30 


9 12 


4 27 


7 28 


2 36 


9 0' 


4 32 


7 23 


2 37 


5 43 


4 37 


7 17 


2 39 


31F 


7 26 


10 7 


4 26 


7 29 


3 15 


9 56 


4 31 


7 24 


3 17 


6 42 


4 37 


7 18 


3 19 


The art of hoo'k-/ceepin.(; taught in one short 


to whittle two barrels of shavings in the street. 


and easy lesson— Never lend them. 


A well-known citizen of Boston, iu fulfillment of 


1 Cdeious election penances, paid in times past 
by the foolish, are still fresh in the memory of 


the terms of a wager, wheeled a barrel of oysters 
all the way from Portland to his house iu Bowdoin 


many. For example : A gentleman iu Chicago 


Square— a journey which occupied him nearly a 


1 had to carry a fat Republican on his shoulders 


week. 


1 through the streets, preceded by a band of 
music. A well-knovcn New Vorker, as an appro- 
priate punishment for being a Copperhead, was 


A PRETTY girl says : " If our Slaker thought 
it wrong for Adam to live single when there was 
not a woman on earth, how criminally guilt v are 


condemned to wear for a year a hat two feet 
hi;,'h, with a brim seven inches wide. A student 


old bachelors, with the wdirld full of pretty 
girls ! " 


, in Maine was compelled to pai-t with his cherish- 


ed whiskers and mustache. Another man had 


A DRiNKiNa artist doesn't exhibit water-colors. 



6th Month.] JUNE, 1867. [30 Days. 


PICA^SES OF TME IS/tOOOSr. 


1 


Venus 
South. 

MOON. 

9 55 


Mars 
South. 


Jupiter 
South^ 


Saturn 
South. 

lO' 30 


11 57 1 1 


MOON. 1 


Boston. 


N. York. 1 Wash'ton. 


4 46 






D. 


H. M. 


H. U. 


H. M. 


New. 




2 


10 28 m. 


10 16 m. 


10 4 m. 


7 


9 59 


4 36 


5 35 


10 4 


11 58 32 


Ist Quar. 


9 


1 53 m. 


1 41 m. 


1 29 m. 


13 10 4 


4 25 


5 12 


9 39 


11 59 42 


Full. 




16 


10 m. 


11 58 ev. 


11 46 ev 


19 10 10 


4 14 


4 50 


9 15 


12 58 


3d Quar . 


25 


45 m. 


33 m. 


21m. 


25 10 17 


4 4 


4 26 


8 50 


12 2 15 I 


1 


i 


i. ! 


i 


Boston ; New England, 


New York City; Phila- 


Washington ; ! 




New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New 


Maryland. Virg'a, 


s 


ts- 


SB ! 





Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 


§ 


I 


5S 


1 


Iowa, and Oregon. 


diana, and Illinois. 


and California. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 










Moon 


_| 


a 


Mom'g 


s 


BISES. 


H. M. 


u. u. 


Boston, 


a^ 


SETS. 


hi^eT. 


NYORK 


fI^^' 


BISES. 


H M 


H. M. 


H. M 


B M 


B M 


B U 


1 


S 


7 22 


11 5 


4 2"5 


7 30 


3 59 


10 52 


131 


7 24 


4 2 


7 36 


4 36 7 19 


4 5 


2 


22 


7 18 


ev. 5 


4 25 


7 30 


sets 


1143 


4 30 


7 25 


sets 


8 25 


4 36 7 19 


sets 


3 


M 


7 14| 


1 8 


4 25 


7 31 


8 32 


morn 


4 30 


7 26 


8 28 


9 23 


4 36 7 20 


8 24 j 


4 


T 


7 lOj 


2 10 


4 24 


7 32 


9 31 


36 


4 30 


7 26 


9 27 


10 13 


4 35 7 21 


9 23 


5 


W 


7 6 


3 11 


4 24 


7 32 


10 23 


1 28 


4 29 


7 27 


10 20 


11 5 


4 35 7 21 


10 16 


6 


T 


7 2! 


4 8 


4 24 


7 33 


11 9 


2 22 


4 29 


7 28 


11 6 


12 


4 35 7 22 


11 3 


7 


F 


6 58| 


5 1 


4 23 


7 33 


1147 


3 15 


4 29 


7 28 


1145 


morn 


4 34 7 23 


1143 


8 


S 


6 54 


5 52 


4 23 


7 34 


morn 


4 7 


4 29 


7 29 


morn 


54 


4 34 7 23 


morn 


9 


■J3 


6 50 


6 40 


4 23 


7 35 


23 


5 5 


4 28 


7 30 


22 


1 51 


4 34 7 24 


21 ; 


10 


M 


6 47 


7 26 


4 23 


7 36 


56 


6 2 


4 28 


7 30 


58 


2 48 


4 34 7 24 


56 


11 


T 


6 43 


8 11 


4 22 


7 36 


127 


6 59 


4 28 


7 31 


1 28 


3 43 


4 34 7 25 


1 28 


12 


W 


6 39 


8 56 


'4 22 


7 37 


1 58 


7 51 


4 28 


7 31 


1 59 


4 38 


4 34 7 25 


2 1 , 


13 


T 


6 35 


9 42 


4 22 


7 37 


2 29 


8 43 


4 28 


7 82 


2 31 


5 28 


4 34 7 26 


2 34 


14 


F 


6 31 


10 28 


,4 22 


7 38 


3 4 


9 31 


4 28 


7 32 


3 7 


6 17 


4 34l7 26 


3 10 


15 


8 


6 27 


11 14 


A 22 


7 38 


3 40 


10 10 


4 28 


7 32 


3 44 


7 2 


4 34|7 26 


3 47 


16 


24 


6 23 


morn. 


4 22 


7 38 


rises 


10 59 


4 28 


7 33 


rises 


7 42 


4 34i7 27 


riseo 


17 


M 


6 19, 


2 


4 22 


7 39 


7 47 


11 40 


4 28 


7 33 


7 43 


8 22 


4 34:7 27 


7 39 ! 


18 


T 


6 I5I 


49 


14 2-2 


7 39 


8 32 


ev.l9 


4 28 


7 33 


8 28 


9 5 


4 34 !7 28 


8 24 


19 


W 


6 111 


1 36 


14 22 


7 39 


9 13 


1 


4 28 


7 34 


9 9 


9 46 


4 34i7 28 


9 6 


20 


T 


6 7! 


2 23 


:4 23 


7 40 


9 61 


1 89 


4 29 


7 34 


9 48 


10 23 


4 34 !7 28 


9 45 , 


21 


F 


6 3, 


3 10 


'423 


7 40 


10 25 


2 21 


4 29 


7 34 


10 22 


11 4 


4 3417 28 


10 20 1 


22 


s 


5 59I 


3 55 


'4 23 


7 40 


10 58 


3 2 


4 29 


7 34 


10 56 


1147 


4 35l7 28 


10 54 


23 


25 


5 55 


4 41 


!4 23 


7 40 


11 29 


3 47 


4 29 


7 34 


11 28 


ev.33 


4 35 7 29 


11 28 


24 


M 


5 51 


5 27 


4 23 


7 40 


12 


4 36 


4 29 


7 35 


12 


1 23 


4 35 !7 29 


12 


25 


T 


5 48 


6 13 


4 24 


7 41 


morn 


5 29 


4 30 


7 35 


morn 


2 15 


4 35i7 29 


morn 


2G 


W 


5 44 


7 2 


14 24 


7 41 


33 


6 27 


4 30 


7 35 


34 


3 13 


4 3617 29 


35 


27 


T 


5 40 


7 53 


14 24 


7 41 


1 9 


7 31 


4 30 


7 35 


1 11 


4 16 


4 36 7 29 


1 12 


28 


F 


5 36 


8 48 


4 25 


7 40 


149 


8 33 


4 29 


7 35 


1 52 


5 18 


4 37 7 29 


1 54 


29 


S 


5 32: 


9 46 


4 25 


7 40 


2 34 


9 35 


4 29 


7 35 


2 37 


6 21 


4 37 7 29 


2 41 


30 


2G 


5 28' 


10 47 


!4 26 


7 40 


3 26 


10 34 


4 29 


7 35 


3 30 


7 19 


4 3717 29 


3 34 ; 


Thf 


following story is told of an Irish news- i A pretty young Americaness, whose Chris- | 


paper « 


ditor who was pressed for copy : t 


iau name is Anna, on receiving a cigar from a 


The 


foreman called down to him from the j 


oung gentleman who had not pluck enough to 


priutln 


K-office, "We want six lines to ail a a 


ay he wished to marry her. twirled it playfully 


columr 


b 


eneath her nose, and looking archly at him, 1 


"K 


11 a child at Waterford," was the reply. p 


roposed the question to him thus : " Have- 


Soo 


a after came a second message: "We J 


^nna?" 


havek 
"C 


lied the child, and still want two lines." 
ontradict it." 


" Sambo, wh't am your 'pinion ob rats? " 
" Wall, I t'ink de one dat has de shortest tail 


"W 


ELL, Jolrnny, what kind of cake do you , 


rill get in de hole de quickest. E'yah ! e'yah 1 


like?" 


Tiy, I like sponge-cake, and pound-cake, 


'yah ! " 


and p 


um-cake, and any kind of cake but 


TR.VN8P0RTED for life— the man who marries 


atomic 


h-ache-t'ixat I don't like at all, I don't." h 


applly. 



7th Month.] JULY, 1867. [31 Days. 




raA.SES OF TKCE aVTOOKT. 


1 Venus 
1 Sooth. 


Mars 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


mark. 




' MOON. 


Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton 


D. MOBN. 


P.M. 


MOB.N. 


P.M. 


K. M. S. 




D 


H H. 


H. H. 


H. U 


1|10 24 


3 53 


4 3 


8 2c 


12 3 29 




New.... 


1 


5 4ev. 


4 52 ev. 


4 40 ev. 


7 10 32 


3 43 


3 39 


8 1 


12 4 34 




IstQuar. 


8 


47 ev. 


35 ev. 


23 ev. 


13!l0 39 


3 32 


3 14 


7 3^ 


12 5 25 




Full .... 


16 


3 12 ev. 


3 Oev. 


2 48 ev. 


19 10 48 


3 22 


2 49 


7 13 


12 5 59 




SdQuar. 


24 


9 52 m. 


9 40 jh. 


9 28 m. 


25110 56 


3 12 


2 24 


6 50 


12 6 13 




New.... 


30 


11 59 ev. 


11 47 ev. 11 35 ev. 


1 












¥ 


i 


,i 




Boston ; New England, 


1 New York City ; Phila- 


Washington ; 




1 z 


t 


i § 


n 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New 


Maryland, Virg'a, 




a 


^ 


Q i 


1 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 




^ 


I 


S 


1 


Iowa, and Oregon. 


1 diana, and Illinois. 


and California 
















Moon 




o 


A 


Mom'g 


^iT^ 


fI 


SETS. 


8E'^r 


Boston.! ki3E3. 


BET^. 


8ET3. 


N Yoke 


fIi% 


8ET3. 






hTm. 


H. U 


H. M. 


B H 




! 1 


M 


"5 24 


li 50 


4' 26 


7 40 


sets 


11 30 


4 32 


7 3*5 


sets 


8 16 


4 38 7" 29 


sets" 




i 2 


T 


5 20 


ev. 53 


4 26 


7 40 


8 10 


morn 


4 32 


7 35 


8 7 


9 8 4 38j7 29 


8 3 




i 3 


W 


5 16 


i 1 53 


4 27 


7 40 


9 


21 


4 33 


7 34 


8 57 


9 59 4 39 7 29 


8 54 




! 4 


T 


5 12 


i 2 50 


4 28 


7 40 


9 44 


113 


4 33 


7 34 


9 42 


10 47 


4 39 7 28 


9 39 




1 S 


F 


5 8 


, 3 44 


4 29 


7 39 


10 23 


2 5 


:4 34 


7 34 


10 22 


11 36 


4 40 7 28 


10 20 




6 


s 


6 4 


1 4 34 


4 29 


7 39 


10 57 


2 62 


'4 35 


7 34 


10 56 


morn 


4 41 7 2S 


10 56 




7 


2: 


5 


! 5 22 


4 30 


7 39 


11 28 


3 44 


:4 35 


7 33 


11 29 


26 


4 41 


7 28 


11 29 




8 


M 


4 56 


i 6 9 


4 30 


7 38 


morn 


4 30 


,4 36 


7 33 


morn 


1 18 


4 42 


7 27 


morn 




9 


T 


4 53 


i 6 54 


4 31 


7 38 


1 


5 25 


4 37 


7 33 


2 


2 11 


4 42 


7 27 


3 




10 


W 


4 49 


7 40 


4 32 


7 38 


32 


6 19 


!4S7 


7 32 


34 


3 5 


4 43 


7 27 


36 




11 


T 


4 45 


8 26 


4 33 


7 37 


1 5 


7 15 


4 38 


7 32 


1 8 


4 


4 44 


7 20 


1 11 




i 12 


F 


4 41 


9 12 


4 33 


7 37 


1 41 


8 9 


|4 89 


7 31 


145 


4 53 


4 44 


7 26 


148 




!l3 


S 


4 37 


9 59 


4 34 


7 36 


2 19 


9 


14 39 


7 31 


2 23 


5 44} 


4 45 


7 26 


2 27 




1 U 


28 


4 33 


aO 46 


4 35 


7 36 


3 2 


9 48 


j4 40 


7 30 


3 6 


6 34 


4 46 


7 25 


3 11 




1 15 


M 


4 29 


ill 34 


4 36 


7 35 


3 48 


10 33 


4 41 


7 30 


3 52 


7 18 


4 46 7 24 


3 56 




1 16 


T 


4 25 


morn 


4 37 


7 34 


rises 


11 17 


4 42 


7 29 


rises 


7 59 j 


4 47 7 24 


rises 




i 17 


W 


4 21 


21 


4 37 


7 34 


7 53 


11 57 


:4 43 


7 29 


7 49 


8 40! 


4 4817 23 


7 46 




18 


T 


4 17 


1 8 


4 38 


7 33 


8 29 


ev36 


'444 


7 28 


8 26 


9 23 


4 49|7 23 


8 23 




19 


F 


4 13 


1 54 


4 39 


7 32 


9 2 


1 14 


4 44 


7 27 


9 


10 


4 50 7 22 


8 58 




20 


S 


4 9 


2 40 


4 40 


7 31 


9 33 


1 55 


4 45 


7 26 


9 32 


10 37 


4 51 7 21 


9 31 




21 


•29 


4 5 


3 25 


4 41 


7 30 


10 4 


2 35 


4 46 


7 26 


10 4 


11 17 


4 52 


7 21 


10 4 




22 


M 


4 1 


i 4 11 


4 42 


7 30 


10 35 


3 18 


4 47 


7 25 


10 36 


ev. 3 


4 52 


7 20 


10 36 




23 


T 


3 58 


i 4 58 


4 43 


7 29 


11 9 


4 4 


4 48 


7 24 


11 11 


51 


4 53 


7 19 


11 12 




24 


W 


3 64 


, 5 471 


4 44 


7 28 


1145 


4 58 


4 48 


7 23 


1148 


1 45 


4 54 7 IS 


11 50 




25 


T 


3 50 


j 6 38 


4 45 


7 27 


morn 


6 


4 49 


7 23 


morn 


2 43' 


4 55 7 18 


morn 




1 26 


F 


3 46 


7 32 


4 46 


7 26 


27 


7 4 


4 50 


7 22 


29 


3 49' 


4 56 7 17 


32 




: 27 


S 


3 42 


8 30! 


4 47 


7 25 


1 13 


8 13 


4 51 


7 21 


1 17 


4 57[ 


4 57 7 16 


1 20 




28 


30 


3 38 


9 31 


4 48 


7 24 


2 8 


9 19 


4 52 


7 20 


2 12 


6 5 


4 58 7 15 


2 17 




29 


M 


3 34 


10 33 


4 49 


7 23 


3 9 


10 21 


4 53 


7 19 


3 13 


7 7 


4 58 7 14 


3 17 




30 


T 


3 30 


11 34 


4 50 


7 22 


sets 


11 17 


4 54 


7 18 


sets 


7 59 


4 59,7 IS 


sets 


' 


31 W| 


3 26 


ev. 33 


4 51 


7 21 


7 34 


morn 


4 55 


7 17 


7 31 


8 51 


4 5917 12 


7 28 




A BOT once complained of his brother for i " Well, you know Sarah Snivels, don't you, | 




taking half of the bed. •' And why not?" said 


Pete?" 




his mother ; " he is entitled to half, is he not ? " 


" Yes." 




" Ves, ma." said the boy ; " but how should you 


"I discarded her last night." 




like to have him take all the soft for his half? 


"You did! What for?" 




He will have his half out of the middle, and I 


" AVell, I'll tell you. She said she wouldn't 




have to sleep on both sides of him." 


marry me, and I'll discard any girl that would 




DiscARDEn.— " Why, Bill, what's the matter 


treat me in that way." 




with you? yo'.i look ' down in the mouth.' " 


" How is coal now t " inquired a gentleman 




" Well, Pete, if you'd been through what I 


of an Irishman, who was " dumping " a load in 




have, you'd look bad, too." 


the street. 




" What's the matter ? " 1 " Black as ever," responded Pat. ! 





8th Month.] 




AUGUST, 


1867. 




[31 Days. 


f:b3:a.s:es of the ivioojsr. \ 


D. 

1 

7 
13 
19 

125 


Venus 
South. 


Mars 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


Hun at Aoon- 
mark. 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton. 


iT^S 
11 12 

11 19 
11 26 
11 32 


3"b 

2 50 
2 40 
2 30 
2 21 


MOEN. 

1 54 
1 28 
1 2 
35 
9 


e' 22 

5 59 

5 37 

6 14 
4 51 




1st Quar. 
Full .... 
3d Quar. 
New 


D. 

15 
22 

29 


2 24 m. 
5 53 m. 
4 38 ev. 
8 21m. 


2 rim. 
5 41m. 
4 26 ev. 
8 9 m. 


2 6 m. 
5 29 m. 
4 14 ev. 
7 67 m. 


12 5 33 
12 4 40 
12 3 27 
12 1 57 



S 1 "1 


.J 


1 


g 


Boston ; New England, 


New York City; Phila- 


Washington ; 


^ 


i 


s 


»=• 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New 


Maryland, Virg'a, 


^ 


S§ 1 


S 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 


S 




s 


^ 




Iowa, and Oregon. 


diana, and Illinois. 


-r-H California. 


^ 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


H. W. 


^ , 




Moon 


;^ 




Mom'gl 


a 


KISE9. 


BETS. 


SETS. 


Boston. 


BISES. 


SETS. 




NYonK 


BtSES. 


BETS. 


SETS. 






H. 


M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M 


B. M. 


H. M. 


II U 


H M 


llT 


3 


22 


1 30 


4 52 


7 20 


8 16 


6 


4 56 


7 16 


8 14 


9 40 


5 6 


7 11 


8 12 


'^F 


3 


18 


2 23] 


4 53 


7 18 


8 54 


54 


4 57 


7 14 


8 53 


10 23 


5 1 


7 10 


8 52 


38 


3 


14 


3 U\ 


4 54 


7 17 


9 28 


1 39 


4 58 


7 13 


9 28 


11 8 


5 2 


7 9 


9 28 


4:i1 




10 


4 2| 


4 55 


7 16 


10 


2 25 


4 59 


7 12 


10 1 


11 54 


5 3 


7 8 


10 2 


5M 


3 


6 


4 49 1 


4 56 


7 15 


10 32 


3 9! 


5 


7 11 


10 34 


morn 


5 4 


7 7 


10 36 


r,T 


3 


2 


5 361 


4 57 


7 14 


11 6 


3 55! 


5 1 


7 10 


11 9 


41 


5 5 


7 6 


11 11 


7W 


2 


58 


6 221 


4 58 


7 12 


1141 


4 45] 


5 2 


7 9 


11 44 


1 32 


5 6 


7 5 


1147 


ST 


2 


54 


7 8j 


4 59 


7 11 


morn 


5 41 


5 3 


7 7 


morn 


2 24 


5 6 


7 4 


morn 


9!F 


2 


51 


7 55 


5 


7 10 


18 


6 33 


5 4 


7 6 


22 


3 20 


5 7 


7 2 


26 


lOR 


2 


47 


8 42 


5 1 


7 8 


59 


7 33 


5 5 


7 5 


1 3 


4 18 


5 8 


7 1 


1 7 


n:!?2 


2 


43 


9 30 


5 2 


7 7 


1 44 


8 27 


5 6 


7 4 


148 


5 12 


5 9 


7 


1 52 


1^'M 


2 


39 


10 17 


5 3 


7 6 


2 34 


9 18 


5 7 


7 2 


2 38 


6 4 


5 10 


6 59 


2 42 


13 T 


2 


35 


11 4 


5 4 


7 4 


3 26 


10 5 


5 8 


7 1 


3 29 


6 51 


5 11 


6 58 


3 33 


14 W 


2 


31 


11 51 


5 5 


7 3 


4 21 


10 51 


5 9 


7 


4 24 


7 35 


5 12 


6 56 


4 27 


1.5 T 


2 


27 


morn. 


5 6 


7 1 


rises 


11 29 


5 10 


6 58 


I'lses 


8 11 


5 13 


6 54 


rises 


IfiF 


2 


23 


37i 


5 7 


7 


7 36 


evlO 


5 11 


6 57 


7 35 


8 55 


5 14 


6 53 


7 83 


ITS 


2 


19 


1 23' 


5 8 


6 58 


8 8 


47 


5 12 


6 55 


8 8 


9 33 


5 15 


6 52 


8 7 


1SSS 


2 


15 


2 10 


5 10 


6 57 


8 38 


1 28 


5 13 


6 54 


8 38 


10 13 


5 16 


6 51 


8 39 


1P,i\T 


2 


n 


2 56 


5 11 


6 55 


9 11 


2 9 


5 14 


6 53 


9 12 


10 51 


5 17 


6 50 


9 13 


9o'T 


2 




3 44 


5 12 


6 54 


9 46 


2 52 


5 15 


6 51 


9 48 


11 36 


5 17 


6 48 


9 50 


'?! iW 


2 


3 


4 34 


5 13 


6 52 


10 24 


3 40 


5 16 


6 50 


10 27 


ev 26 


J5 18 


6 47 


10 30 


22 T 


2 





5 26 


5 14 


6 51 


11 7 


4 35 


5 17 


6 48 


11 11 


1 22 


[5 19 


6 45 


11 14 


23'F 




56 


6 27 


5 15 


6 49 


11 58 


5 37 


5 17 


6 47 


morn 


2 23 


5 20 


6 44 


morn 


9,4' S 




52 


7 19 


5 16 


6 48 


morn 


6 47 


5 18 


6 45 


2 


3 33 


15 21 


6 43 


6 


25 34 




48 


8 18 


5 17 


6 46 


54 


7 58 


5 19 


6 44 


58 


4 43 


5 22 


6 41 


1 2 


'?fiM 




44 


9 18 


5 18 


6 44 


1 57 


9 6 


5 20 


6 42 


2 1 


5 51 


|5 23 


6 40 


2 5 


'^iT 




40 


10 17 


5 19 


6 43 


8 3 


10 5 


5 21 


6 41 


3 7 


6 51 


5 24 


6 38 


3 10 


'?s'w 




36 


11 14 


5 20 


6 41 


4 13 


10 59 


5 22 


6 39 


4 16 


.7 42 


5 25 


6 37 


4 19 


29iT 




32 


ev. 9 


5 21 


6 39 


sets 


11 45 


5 23 


6 37 


sets 


8 28 


5 26 


6 35 


sets 


30 If 




28 


1 1 


5 22 


6 38 


7 24 


morn 


5 24 


6 36 


7 23 


9 16 


5 26 


6 34 


7 23 


3i's 




24 


1 51' 15 23 


16 86 


7 57 


29 


5 25 


6 34 


7 57 


9 57 


5 27 


G 32 


7 58 



A Singular Deception.— The Roman National 
Committee last year did one of the boldest feats 
on record. It was known that the Neapolitan 
Bourbonists had their central agency in the 
apartments occupied by one of their number in 
the Palazzo Valdembrini. The Committee 
wished to lay its hands on the papers of this 
knot of royalist conspirators. One night these 
Neapolitan nobles, who, like all their country- 
men, are addicted to cards, were disturbed in their 
nightly play by the appearance of Papal gen- 
darmes, who said that they had orders to seize 
and carry to the police office all papers in the 



apartment. Prince Pignatelli demurred at first, 
protesting that there must be absolutely some 
mistake ; but the gendarmes showed the written 
order from the governor of Rome, whereupon 
Prince Pignatelli at once acquiesced in deliv- 
ering up the papers, and added that next morning 
he would call on the governor, and clear up what 
he knew must be some extraordinary blunder. 
Next morning the Prince accordingly went to the 
governor, who listened to him with blank surprise, 
lie had never given the order; no one in his ofiice 
had given it ; the whole affair was an audacious 
act on the part of men dressed as gendarmes. 





9th Month.] SEPTEMBER, 1867. [30 Days, j 




3PIiA.SES OF TiiB IvIOC 


?3sr. 

sh'ton. 


1 


Venus 
South. 


Mar, 
South. 


Jupiter- 
South. 


Saturn Hun at Xunn- \ 
South. niark. I 




MOON. 


Boston. 


N. York. 1 W 


D. 


MORN. 


P.M. 


'p.m." 


r. M. B. M. 8. 




i>.i 


H M 


H. M. 


H M 


1 


LI 38 


2 10 


11 33 


4 26 11 59 54 \ 




1st Quar. 


5 


6 47 ev. 


6 35 ev. 


6 23 ev. 


7 


LI 42 


2 1 


11 7 


4 4 11 57 57 1 




Full .... 


13 


7 49 ev. 


7 37 ev. 


7 25 ev. 


13 


LI 46 


1 52 


10 40 


3 42 11 55 53 




3d Quar. 


20 


10 21 ev. 


lu 9 ev. 


9 57 ev. 


19 


LI 50 


143 


10 14 


3 20 11 53 46 ! 




New.... 


27 


6 58 ev. 


6 46 ev. 


6 34 ev. 


25 


LI 54 


1 35 


9 49 


2 59111 51 41 i 

1 




I 


a 


II 




Boston ; New England, 


New York City; Phila- 


1 

Washington ; i 




1 


- 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn,. New 


Maryland. Virg'a, 




s 


(S 


o 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 
and California. 




s 


I 


m 


i 


Iowa, and Oregon. 


diana, and Illinois. 








Moon , h w 1 


"sUx — STT" 


Moon 


H. W. 




Sun 

SETS. 


Moon 

SETS. 

8 23 




o 


2 


Mora'g 


a 


RISERS. 


SETO. 




Bo'sToii.i 


HiaE3 


SETS. 


BETS. 


N York 


B1BE6. 








H. H. 


H. M. 


H M~ 


H »r 


H M 


H. M. j 


H. M 


H M 


H M 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 




1 


85 


1 20 


2 40 


5 24 


6 35 


8 17 


111' 


5 26 


6 33 


8 20 


16 37 


5 28 


6 81 




2 


M 


1 16 


3 28 


5 26 


6 33 


9 4 


155i 


5 27 


6 31 


9 7 


11 20![5 29 


6 29 


9 9 




3 


T 


1 12 


4 15 


5 27 


6 31 


9 39 


2 38 


5 28 


6 29 


9 41 


morn 5 30 


6 28 


9 44 




4 


W 


1 8 


5 2 


5 28 


6 29 


10 16 


3 22! 


5 29 


6 28 


10 19 


7i 5 31 


6 26 


10 23 




5 


T 


1 4 


5 49 


5 29 


6 28 


10 56 


4 8| 


5 30 


,6 26 


10 59 


551 5 32 


6 25 


11 4 ' 




6 


F 


1 1 


6 36 


5 30 


6 26 


11 38 


5 


5 31 


6 25 


11 42 


147:'5 33 


6 23 


11 47 




7 


S 


57 


7 24 


5 31 


6 24 


morn 


5 55 


5 32 


,6 23 


morn 


2 41||5 34 


6 22 


morn 




8 


36 


53 


8 11 


5 32 


6 22 


26 


6 56 


5 33 


[6 21 


30 


3 4l';5 35 


6 21 


35 




9 


M 


49 


8 59 


5 33 


6 21 


1 18 


7 51: 


5 34 


:6 20 


1 21 


4 36 15 35 


6 20 


1 26 




10 


T 


45 


9 46 


5 34 


6 19 


2 13 


8 46! 


5 35 


6 18 


2 16 


5 31: 5 36 


6 18 


2 20 




11 


W 


41 


10 32 


5 35 


6 17 


3 10 


935' 


5 36 


6 16 


3 12 


6 21 j5 37 


6 17 


3 15 




12 


T 


37 


11 19 


5 36 


6 15 


rises 


10 20, 


5 37 


6 15 


rises 


7 6 5 38 


6 16 


rises 




13 


F 


S3 


morn. 


5 37 


6 14 


6 9 


11 4 


5 38 


6 13 


6 8 


7 47 5 39 


6 14 


6 8 




14 


S 


29 


6 


5 38 


6 12 


6 40 


1144' 


5 39 


6 11 


6 40 


8 26 5 40 


6 12 


6 40 




15 


37 


25 


53 


5 39 


6 10 


7 13 


ev21: 


5 40 


6 9 


7 14 


9 8 15 41 


6 10 


7 15 




16 


M 


21 


1 41 


5 40 


6 8 


7 47 


1 3 


5 41 


& 8 


7 49 


9 49 I5 42 


6 9 


7 51 




17 


T 


17 


2 31 


5 41 


6 7 


8 26 


147, 


5 42 


,6.6 


8 28 


10 81 |5 43 


6 7 


8 31 




18 


W 


13 


3 23 


5 43 


6 5 


9 8 


2 33 


5 43 


6 4 


9 11 


11 15 


5 44 


6 6 


9 14 




19 


T 


9 


4 17 


5 44 


6 3 


9 54 


3 24, 


5 44 


'6 3 


9 58 


ev. 9 


5 44 


6 4 


10 2 




20 


F 


5 


5 13 


5 45 


6 1 


10 47 


4 21 


5 45 


6 1 


10 51 


1 8 


5 45 


6 2 


10 56 




21 


S 


2 


6 11 


5 46 


6 


11 42 


6 27 


5 46 


5 59 


11 46 


2 13 !5 46 


6 1 


11 51 




22 


38 


p. M. 


7 9 


5 47 


5 58 


morn 


'6 37 


5 47 


5 58 


morn 


3 23 5 47 


5 59 


morn 




23 


M 


11 50 


8 7 


5 48 


5 56 


50 


7 45 


5 48 


5 56 


54 


4 30 5 48 


5 58 


57 




24 


T 


11 46 


9 3 


5 49 


5 54 


1 56 


8 50 


5 49 


5 54 


1 59 


5 35 5 49 


5 56 


2 2 




25 


W 


11 42 


9 57 


5 50 


5 53 


3 4 


9 46 


5 50 


5 53 


3 7 


6 32 


5 50 


5 54 


3 9 




26 


T 


11 38 


10 49 


5 51 


5 51 


4 11 


10 36 


5 51 


5 52 


4 13 


7 21 


5 51 


5 53 


4 14 




27 


F 


11 34 


11 4U 


5 52 


5 49 


sets 


1120 


5 52 


5 50 


sets 


8 3 


5 52 


5 51 


sets 




28 


s 


11 30 


ev. 29 


3 53 


5 47 


6 26 


morn 


5 53 


5 48 


6 27 


8 47 '5 53 


5 50 


6 28 




29 


39 


11 26 


1 18 


5 54 


5 46 


7 


2 


5 54 


5 46 


7 2 


9 30 is 54 


5 48 


7 4 




30 


M 


111 22 


2 6 


5 56 5 44 


7 35 


44 


5 54 


5 44 


7 37 


10 12 5 55 


5 46 


7 40 




MoNTEtTH gave miserable dinners, and Win- 


The Soleil publishes the following anecdote ' 




ton refused scores of his invitations ; but at last, 


concerning the Emperor of Austria while out 




in an hour of weakness, he was induced to ac- 


shooting :— " His Majesty is always attended by 




cept. The fare proved, as he expected, of the 


a captain of the Guards, whose duty it is to ob- 




very worst, and as the cloth was removed, the 


serve the effect of each shot and announce it. 




host remarked, "Now the ice is broken, when 


The Emperor, for instance, strikes a partridge. 




will you invite me to dine with you ? " 


' Partridge ! ' cries the captain. Next time it is 




" To-day, if you please," repUed the stUl 


a buck. 'Buck!' shouts the captain. One d.iy 




hungry guest. 


the Emperor fired, missed his game, and wound- 




" Does the razor take hold well ? " inquired 
the barber, as he cut away on the bleeding 
cheek of his sufferinff victim. 

" Yes," groaned the martyr, " it takes hold 


ed one of the gentlemen of his suite. The latter 
on being struck uttered an exclamation. 'His 
Highness the Duke of Uackenberg ! ' announced 




the captain, without the slightest change of 
feature or tone." 




first rate, but it don't let go worth a cent." 



10th Month.] 



OCTOBER, 18G7. 



[31 Days. 



FPIA.S-ES OF THE l^OOIT- 




Venu. 
South. 


Mara 
Sooth. 


iS: 


Saturn SunatJioon- 
bouth. mark. 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton. 


°-. 


MOKN. 


P.M. 




p. M. H. M. 


1 »• 


H. M. 


B. H 


U. M. 


1 


11 58 


1 3'( 


9 23 


2 37 11 49 42 


1st Quar. 


5 


1 83 ev. 


1 21 ev. 


1 9ev. 


7 


ev. 1 


119 


8 58 


2 16.11 47 53 


Full .... 


13 


8 40 m. 


8 28 m. 


8 16mu 


13 


67. 6 


1 11 


8 33 


1 55 11 46 19 


3d Quar . 


20 


4 33 m. 


4 21m. 


4 9 m. 


19 


ev. 10 


1 4 


8 9 


1 34 11 45 3 


New.... 


27 


8 19 m. 


8 7 m. 


7 55 m. 


25 


ev. 15 


58 


7 46 


1 islll 44 11 



i 

s 


1 

ft 
§ 

t 

T 


J 


J 


Boston ; New England, 

New York State, 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

Iowa, and Oregon. 


New York City; Phila- 
delphia, Conn., New 
Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 
diana, and Illinois. 


Washington ; 

Maryland, Virg'a, 

Ken-ky, Missouri, 

and California. 




Sun 

RISES. 

5 57 


Sun 

SETS. 

5 4"2 


Moon 

BETS. 


H. W. 

Boston. 

"i 26 


BI8E8. 

5 56 


Sun 

5 43 


Moon 


H. W. 

NYOKK 

fols 


RISES. 

5 55 


Sun 

5 43 




2 


Even'g 




1 


2 53 


"s 10 


H. M. 

8 13 


8 17 


?, 


W 


11 14 


3 41 


5 58 


5 40 


8 50 


2 6 


5 57 


5 41 


8 53 


11 33 


5 56 


5 42 


8 57 


8 


T 


11 10 


4 29 


5 59 


5 39 


9 33 


2 49 


5 58 


5 39 


9 37 


morn 


5 57 


5 40 


9 41 


4 


F 


11 7 


5 17 


6 


5 37 


10 19 


3 35 


5 59 


5 38 


10 23 


21 


5 68 


5 39 


10 27 


5 


S 


11 3 


6 4 


6 1 


5 35 


11 8 


4 25 


6 


5 36 


1112 


1 12 


5 59 


5 37 


11 16 


fi 


40 


10 59 


6 51 


6 2 


5 33 


morn 


5 17 


6 1 


5 35 


morn 


2 3 


6 


5 35 


morn 


7 


M 


10 55 


7 38 


6 3 


5 32 


1 


6 16 


6 2 


5 33 


5 


3 2 


6 1 


5 34 


8 


8 


T 


10 51 


8 25 


6 4 


5 30 


57 


7 13 


6 3 


5 31 


1 


3 57 


6 2 


5 32 


1 3 


9 


W 


10 47 


9 11 


6 6 


5 28 


1 55 


8 8 


6 4 


5 30 


1 58 


4 52 


6 3 


5 31 


2 


10 


T 


10 43 


9 58 


6 7 


5 27 


2 54 


8 59 


6 5 


5 28 


2 56 


5 44 


6 4 


5 29 


2 58 


11 


F 


10 39 


10 45 


6 8 


5 25 


3 55 


9 47 


6 7 


5 27 


3 56 


6 33 


[6 5 


5 28 


3 57 


T^IS 


10 35 


11 34 


6 9 


5 23 


4 58 


10 32 


6 8 


5 25 


4 5bi 


7 17 


6 6 


5 26 


4 68 


13 


41 


10 31 


morn. 


6 10 


5 22 


rises 


11 17 


6 9 


5 23 


rises 


7 59 


6 7 


5 25 


rises 


14 


M 


10 27 


24 


6 11 


5 20 


6 23 


11 57 


6 10 


5 22 


6 26 


8 42 


16 8 


5 23 


6 28 


15 


T 


10 23 


1 16 


6 13 


5 19 


7 5 


ev42 


6 11 


5 20 


7 8 


9 28 


|6 9 


5 22 


7 11 


16 W 


10 19 


2 11 


6 14 


5 17 


7 51 


1 29 


6 12 


5 19 


7 55 


10 14 6 10 


5 21 


7 58 


17iT 


10 15 


3 8 


6 15 


5 15 


8 43 


2 21 


6 13 


5 17 


8 47 


11 3 


6 11 


5 19 


8 52 


IRJF 


10 12 


4 6 


6 16 


5 14 


9 41 


3 13 


6 14 


5 16 


9 45 


11 58 


6 12 


5 18 


9 49 


19'S 


10 8 


5 5 


6 17 


5 12 


10 43 


4 11 


6 15 


5 14 


10 46 


ev 68 


l6 13 


5 16 


10 51 


20 


42 


10 4 


6 2 


6 18 


5 11 


1147 


5 15 


6 16 


5 13 


11 51 


2 1 


6 14 


5 15 


11 54 


?,1 


M 


10 


6 58 


6 20 


5 9 


morn 


6 23 


6 18 


5 12 


morn 


3 9 


6 15 


5 14 


morn 


22 


T 


9 56 


7 51 


6 21 


5 8 


52 


7 29 


6 19 


5 10 


55 


4 11 


6 16 


5 13 


58 


23 


W 


9 52 


8 43 


6 22 


5 6 


159 


8 28 


6 20 


5 9 


2 1 


5 13 


6 18 


5 11 


2 3 


24 


T 


9 48 


9 33 


6 23 


5 5 


3 5 


9 21 


6 21 


5 7 


3 6 


6 7 


6 19 


5 10 


3 7 


25 


F 


9 44 


10 22 


6 24 


5 3 


4 11 


10 10 


6 22 


5 6 


4 11 


6 56 


6 20 


5 9 


4 10 


26 


S 


9 40 


11 9 


6 26 


5 2 


5 14 


10 54 


6 23 


5 4 


5 13 


7 37 


6 21 


5 8 


5 12 


27 


43 


9 36 


11 57i 


6 27 


5 1 


sets 


11 35 


6 24 


5 3 


sets 


8 17 


6 22 


5 6 


sets 


28 


M 


9 32 


ev. 45 


6 28 


4 69 


6 7 


morn 


6 26 


5 2 


6 10 


9 1 


6 23 


5 5 


6 13 


29 


T 


9 28 


1 33, 


6 29 


4 57 


6 45 


15 


6 27 


5 1 


6 48 


9 43 


6 24 


5 4 


6 62 


30 


W 


9 24 


2 2i; 


6 31 


4 57 


7 26 


57 


6 28 


4 69 


7 30 


10 24 


6 25 


5 2 


7 34 


31 T 1 


9 20 


3 9 


6 32 


4 55 


8 12 


1 39 


6 29 


4 58 


8 16 


11 3 


6 26 


5 1 


8 20 



An Irishman askg a Long Island woman the 
price of a pair of fowls, and is told, 

"A dollar." 

" And a dollar is it, my darlint ? Why, in my 
country you might buy them for sixpence 
apiece." 

" And why didn't you stay in that blessed 
cheap country? " 

" Och, faith, and there was noiixpence there, 
to be sure ! " 

An old darkey says— 
" Woman's lub is like India-rubber- 
It stretch de more de more you lub her." 



A i,ADT at Columbus, in Ohio, inquired of the 
spirit-rappers how many children she had. 

" Four," rapped the -spirit. 

The husband, startled at the accuracy of the 
reply, stepped up and inquired, 

" How many children have /.' " 

'■''Two! " answered the rapping medium. 

The husband and wife looked at each other, 
with an odd smile on their faces, for a moment, 
and then retired non-believers. There had been 
a mistake made suinewhcre. 

How do you arrive at the height of a church 
steeple on a hot day ?— Per-spire. 













__ 




__ 


____ 




__^ 














nth Month.] NOVEMBEIt, 1867. [30 Days. 


ph:,a.sbs of TiiB 3i,/roo3sr. 




Veniis 
South. 


Mars 
South. 


Jupiter 
South. 


Saturn 
South. 


^-^- \ 


MOON. 1 Boston. 


N. Yorl<. 


Wash'ton 


D. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


p. M. 


11 43 42 


D. 1 


B. M. 


H. M 


B. M. 


1 


22 


50 


7 18 


49 


1st Quar. 


4 


9 43 III. 


9 31m. 


9 19 m. 


7 


29 


44 


6 56 


28 


11 43 49 i 


Full .... 


11 


8 26 ev. 


8 14 ev. 


8 2ev 


13 


36 


39 


6 33 


7 


11 44 25 1 


3d Quar. 


18 


22 ev. 


10 ev. 


11 58 m. 


19 


44 


34 


6 12 


A.M. 


11 45 31 1 


New. . . . 


26 


27 m. 


15 m. 


3 m. 


25 


63 


29 


5 50 


11 26 


11 47 8 i 


g 


M-l 




i 


Boston ; New England, 


New York City; Phila- 


Washington ; 1 




1 


|z 


New York State, 


delphia, Conn., New 


;Maryland. Virg'a, 


s 


■; 




o 


Michigan, Wisconsin, 


Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 


Ken'ky, Missouri, 


§ 


tH 


1^ 


2 

8 


Iowa, and Oregon. 


diana, and Illinois. , 


and California. 


Sl'N I Sf-N 


>Ioo> 


H. \V. 


Sun Su.x 


Moon 


H. W. 


Sun I Sun 


Moon ; 


1 


SI 


Even'g 


s 






Boston 






NYOEK 


B«B3.^._ 






1 


H. M. 


H M 


H J7 B m" 


H M 


H M 


'-a. M. B. M. 


H M 


H M 




H. M. 


1 


F 


9 1(5 


3 57 


6 33 4 54 


8 59 


2 26 


6 30 4" 57 


9 3 


li49 


6 27 5 


9 7 


2 


s 


9 12 


4 44 


6 34 4 53 


9 51 


3 4 


6 31:4 56 


9 54 


morn 


6 28 4 59 


9 59 


8 


44 


9 9 


5 31 


3 36 4 51 


10 45 


3 50 


6 32 4 54 


10 48 


36 


6 29:4 58 


10 52 


4 


M 


9 5 


6 17 


6 37 4 50 


11 41 


4 40 


6 34 4 53 


11 43 


1 27 


6 31 4 57 


11 46 , 


5 


T 


9 1 


7 3 


6 38 4 49 


morn 


5 33 


6 35 4 52 


morn 


2 19 


6 32;4 56 


morn ' 


6 


W 


8 57 


7 48 


3 39 4 48 


39 


6 28 


6 36 4 51 


41 


3 14 


6 33.4 55 


44 ' 


7 


T 


8 53 


8 35 


6 414 47 


1 39 


7 23 


6 37 4 50 


1 40 


4 8 


6 34|4 54 


1 41 


8 


F 


8 49 


9 22 


3 42 4 45 


2 40 


8 18 


6 38 4 49 


2 40 


5 2 


6 35,4 53 


2 41 


9 


s 


8 45 


10 11 


S 43 4 44 


3 43 


9 10 


6 40 4 48 


3 43 


5 55 


6 36 4 52 


3 42^ 


10 


i.5 


8 41 


11 3 


3 44 4 43 


4 48 


9 5i 


6 414 47 


4 47 


6 45 


6 37,4 51 


4 46 


11 


M 


8 37 


11 68 


3 46 4 42 


rises 


10 50 


6 42 4 46 


rises 


7 34 


6 38 4 50 


rises | 


12 


r 


8 33 


morn. 


3 47 4 41 


5 43 


11 36 


6 43 4 45 


5 47 


8 18 


6 39 4 49 


5 50 


13 


w 


8 29 


56 


6 48 4 40 


6 34 


ev24 


6 44 4 44 


6 38 


9 11 


6 40,4 48 


6 42 1 


14 


T 


8 25 


1 56 


6 49 4 39 


7 31 


1 16 


6 464 43 


7 35 


10 2 


6 41,4 47 


7 39 


15 


F 


8 21 


2 5G 


8 514 39 


8 34 


2 9 


i6 47 4 42 


8 38 


10 51 


6 43 4 47 


8 42 


16 


s 


8 17 


3 56 


3 52 4 38 


9 40 


3 3 


6 48 4 41 


9 43 


11 48 


6 44 4 46 


9 47 


17 


46 


8 13 


4 54 


6 53 4 37 


10 46 


4 


6 49 4 40 


10 49 


ev 47 


6 45 4 45 


10 52 


18 


M 


8 10 


5 49 


6 54 4 36 


11 52 


5 


6 50 4 39 


11 64 


1 47 


6 46 4 44 


11 56 


19 


T 


8 6 


6 41 


6 56 4 35 


morn 


6 3 


6 5l'4 39 


morn 


2 49 


6 47,4 44 


morn 


20 


W 


8 2 


7 31 


3 57 4 34 


58 


7 3 


6 534 38 


59 


3 48 


6 48;4 43 


1 


21 


T 


7 58 


8 19 


6 58 4 34 


2 1 


7 59 


6 54,4 38 


2 1 


4 44 


6 49 4 43 


2 2 


22 


F 


7 54 


9 6 


3 59'4 33 


3 4 


8 5.3 


6 55 4 37 


3 4 


5 38 


6 50:4 42 


3 3 


23 


S 


7 50 


9 53 


7 04 32 


4 6 


9 42 


6 56 4 36 


4 6 


6 28 


6 614 42 


4 3 


24 


47 


7 46 


10 40 


7 2 4 32 


5 8 


10 27 


6 57:4 36 


5 6 


7 12 


6 52 4 41 


5 3 


25 


M 


7 42 


11 27 


7 3431 


6 7 


11 10 


l6 58 4 35 


6 4 


7 52 


6 53'4 40 


6 1 


2G 


T 


7 38 


ev. 15 


7 4:431 


sets 


11 51 


6 59 4 35 


sets 


8 34 


6 55 4 40 


sets 


27 


W 


7 34 


1 3 


7 5 4 30 


6 5 


morn 


|7 4 35 


6 9 


9 18 


6 56 4 40 


6 13 


28 


T 


7 30 


1 51 


7 64 30 


6 52 


31 


7 24 34 


6 56 


9 59 


6 57;4 4n 


7 


29 


F 


7 2(5 


2 39 


7 7 4 30 


7 42 


1 11 


7 3 4 34 


7 46 


10 36 


6 58 4 39 


7 51 


80 


s 


7 22 


3 26 


7 8 4 29 


8 35 


1 54 


7 4 4 .34 


8 39 


11 18 


6 594 39 


8 42 


" I'll bet you five dollars," said Macarty, | 


" Well, I give up, beat," said Macarty, pay- 


"tou can't repeat the Lord's Prayer, now, if 


ing over the money ; " I wouldn't have thought 


you try." 


yon could do it." • 


"Done!" said Kollocli, "done!" and, as- 


A pair of them, to be sure ; for neither of i 


suminir a decent gravity for the moment, sum- 


hem knew it. 


moned his memory to aid him in his novel, but 
certainly very commendable, effort. " Ahem ! 


"Do you think I shall have justice done 


a — a — hem ! ah ! now I have it i 


me ? " said a culprit to his counsel, a shrewd 




Kentucky lawyer of the best class in that " elo- 


" ' Now I lay me down to sleep, 


quent State." 


I pray the Lord my soul to keep ; 


"I am a little afraid that you won't," re- 


If I .hould die before I wake. 


pUed the other; "I see two men on the jury 


I pray the Lord my soul to take." 


who are opposed to hanging." 


" There ! I told you I could." 


The Merchant's Patron Saint— St. Leger. 



12th Mon 


th. 


] 


DECEMBEB 


, 1S67. 




[31 Days. 


OPIiA^SES OF THE Iw^nOOKT. 


i 

7 

13 
19 

25 


Venus 

South. 


Mars 
South. 

24 
20 
16 
13 
9 


Jupiter 
South. 

P.M. 

5 29 
5 9 
4 48 
4 28 
4 8 


Sa!-.irn 
South. 

Ir, 

10 45 
10 24 
10 3 
9 42 


6-un«(..</on- 


MOON. 


Boston. 


N. York. 


Wash'ton. 


l' "'2 
1 11 

1 21 
1 3C 
1 38 


H. M. B. 


1st Quar. 
Full .... 
SdQiiar. 
New. . . . 


4 
11 
17 

25 


5 36 m. 
7 26 m. 

10 50 ev. 

6 55 ev. 


5 24 m. 
7 14 m. 

10 38 ev. 

6 43 ev. 


5 12 m. 
7 2 m. 

10 26 ev. 

6 31 ev. 


11 49 12 
11 51 38 
11 54 22 

11 57 17 

12 17 



i 


i 
g 

48 


ii 


1 


Boston ; New England, 

New York State, 

Michigan, Wisconsin, 

Iowa, and Oregon. 


New York City; Phila- 
delphia, Conn., New 
Jersey, Penn., Ohio, In- 
diana, and Illinois. 


Washington ; 
Maryland, Virg'a, 
Ken'ky, Missouri, 
and California. 




Sun 

KISES. 
H. M. 

7 10 


SU.N 
BETS. 
H. M. 

4 29 


Moon 

SETS. 


H. W. 

Boston. 

H. k7 

2 36 


SfN 

7' 5 


Sun 

4 34 


Moon 

BETS. 


n. w. 

N Yor.K 




Moon 


t 


Even'g 

H. M. 

7 18 


7 


4 39 


1 


4 12 


"9 31 


H. M. 

9 34 


morn 


"937 


2 


M 


7 15 


4 57 


7 11 


4 29 


10 27 


3 19 


7 6 


4 33 


10 30 


4 


7 1 


4 39 


10 32 


8 


T 


7 11 


5 42 


7 12 


4 28 


11 25 


4 3 


7 7 


4 33 


11 27 


50 


7 2 


4 38 


11 29 


4 


VV 


7 7 


6 26 


7 13 


4 28 


morn 


4 53 


7 8 


4 33 


morn 


1 40 


7 2 


4 38 


morn 


r> 


T 


7 3 


7 12 


7 14 


4 28 


23 


5 45 


7 9 


4 32 


24 


2 31 


7 3 


4 38 


25 


6 


F 


6 59 


7 59 


7 15 


4 28 


1 25 


6 40 


7 10 


4 32 


1 25 


3 20 


7 4 


4 38 


1 25 


7 


S 


6 55 


8 48 


7 10 


4 28 


2 28 


7 37 


7 11 


4 32 


2 27 


4 22 


7 5 


4 38 


2 26 


8 


49 


6 51 


9 411 


7 17 


4 28 


3 32 


8 33 


7 12 


4 32 


3 30 


5 18 


7 6 


4 38 


3 29 


9 


M 


6 47 


10 37 


7 17 


4 28 


4 40 


9 30 


7 13 


4 32 


4 38 


6 16 


7 7 


4 38 


4 35 


10 


T 


6 43 


11 37 


7 18 


4 28 


5 49 


10 25 


7 14 


4 32 


5 46 


7 11 


7 8 


4 38 


5 43 


11 


W 


6 39 


morn. 


7 19 


4 28 


rises 


11 20 


7 15 


4 32 


rises 


8 2 


7 9 


4 38 


rises 


12 


T 


6 35 


39; 


7 20 


4 28 


6 16 


ev. 9 


7 15 


4 32 


6 20 


8 55 


7 9 


4 39 


6 24 


13 


F 


6 31 


141 


7 21 


4 28 


7 24 


1 3 


7 16 


4 33 


7 27 


9 49 


7 10 


4 39 


7 32 


14 


S 


6 27 


2 43| 


7 22 


4 28 


8 32 


1 58 


7 16 


4 33 


8 35 


10 40 


7 11 


4 39 


8 39 


15 


50 


6 23 


3 411 


7 22 


4 29 


9 41 


2 49 


7 17 


4 33 


9 4S 


11 33 


7 12 


4 39 


9 46 


16 


M 


6 20 


4 36 


7 23 


4 29 


10 49 


3 42 


7 18 


4 33 


10 50 


ev 28 


7 12 


4 40 


10 52 


17 


T 


6 16 


5 28 


7 24 


4 29 


11 54 


4 37 


7 18 


4 33 


11 55 


1 24 


7 13 


4 40 


11 55 


18 


W 


6 12 


6 17 


7 24 


4 29 


morn 


5 33 


7 19 


4 34 


morn 


2 19 


7 14 


4 40 


morn 


19 


T 


6 8 


7 5 


7 25 


4 30 


58 


6 30 


7 20 


4 34 


58 


3 16 


7 14 


4 41 


58 


20 


F 


6 4 


7 51 


7 26 


4 30 


1 59 


7 29 


7 20 


4 35 


1 58 


4 14 


7 15 


4 41 


1 57 


21 


S 


6 


8 38 


7 26 


4 31 


3 1 


8 23 


7 21 


4 35 


2 59 


5 8 


7 15 


4 42 


2 57 


22 


51 


5 56 


9 24 


7 20 


4 31 


4 


9 12 


7 21 


4 30 


3 57 


5 58 


7 16 


4 42 


3 54 


23 


M 


5 52 


10 11 


7 27 


4 32 


4 57 


9 50 


7 22 


4 37 


4 54 


6 45 


7 16 


4 43 


4 50 


24 


T 


5 48 


10 59 


7 27 


4 32 


5 54 


10 46 


7 22 


4 37 


5 50 


7 30 


7 17 


4 43 


5 46 


25 


W 


5 44 


11 47 


7 28 


4 33 


sets 


11 27 


7 23 


4 38 


sets 


8 10 


7 17 


4 44 


sets 


26 


T 


5 40 


ev. 35 


7 28 


4 33 


5 37 


morn 


7 23 


4 39 


5 41 


8 53 


7 17 


4 44 


5 45 


27 


F 


5 36 


1 22 


7 28 


4 34 


6 29 


8 


7 23 


4 39 


6 32 


9 32 


7 18 


4 45 


6 37 


28 


S 


5 32 


2 8 


7 29 


4 35 


7 22 


48 


7 23 


4 40 


7 25 


10 14 


7 IS 


4 40 


7 29 


29 


52 


5 28 


2 54 


7 29 


4 36 


8 18 


1 28 


7 24 


4 40 


8 21 


10 49 


7 IS 


4 47 


8 24 


30 


M 


5 24 


3 38 


7 29 


4 37 


9 15 


2 7 


7 24 


4 41 


9 17 


11 30 


[7 19 


4 47 


9 19 


31 


T 


5 21 


4 22 


7 30 


4 37 


10 13 


2 40 


7 24 


4 42 


10 15 


morn 


17 19 


4 48 


10 16 



" What are you writing such a big hand for, 
Pat?" "Why, you see that my grandmother 
is dafe, and I am writing a loud letter to her." 

A Streak Ahead of Noah. — A dispute once 
arose between two Scotchmen, named Campbell 
and McLean, upon the antiquity of their families. 
The latter would not allow that the Campbells had 
any right to rank with the McLeans in antiquity, 
who, he insisted, were in existence as a clan since 
the beginning of the world. Campbell had a lit- 
tle more Biblical knowledge than his antagonist, 
and asked him if the clan of the McLeans was 
before the flood. 



" Flood ! what flood ? " asked McLean. 

" The flood, you know, that drowned all the 
world but Noah and his family, and his flock," 
said Campbell. 

" Pooh ! you and your flood," said McLean ; 
" my clan was afore the flood." 

" I have not read in my Bible," said Campbell, 
" of the name of McLean going into Noah's ark. 

" Noah's ark ! " retorted McLean, in con- 
tempt. " Who ever heard of a JIcLean that 
hadn't a boat of his ain ? " 

Be temperate in diet. Our first parents ate 
themselves out of house and home. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, 

December 1st, 1866. 

THE EXECITTIVfi. 

ANDREW JOHNSON, of Tennessee. President of the United States Salary $2ri,000 

LAFAYETTE S. FOSTEE, Of Connecticut, President pro tempore of the Se-aate, " 8.8)0 



THE CABINET. 

"WILLIAM H. SEWARD, of New York, Secretary of State Salary $3,000 

HUGH Mcculloch, of Indiana, Secretary of the Treamry " 8,000 

EDWIN M. STANTON, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of War : " 8,000 

GIDEON WELLES, of Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy " 8,000 

ORVILLE H. BROWNING, of lUinolB. Secretary of the Interior " R.OOO 

HENRY STANBERY, of Ob\o, Attornev-Oeneral " P.OOO 

ALEXANDERAV. RANDALL, of Wisconsin, Po««»4a««e/-(Jewe»'ai " 8,000 

THE JUDICIARY. 

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

SALMON P. CHASE, of Ohio, C«e/,7u.s«c« Salary $6,100 

Nathak CLrFFOBP, of Maine, Associate Justice. I Datid Davis, of Illinois, Associate Justice. 
Samuel Nelsoit, of N. Y., " " I Noah H. Swayne, of Ohio, " " 

Robert C. Gkier, of Penn., " " I Samuel F. Milter, of Iowa, " " 

Jamks M. Wayne, of Ga., " " | Stephkj.- J. Field, of Cal., " 

[Vacancy.] 
Salary of Associate Jastices, $0,000. Coait meets first Monday In December, at Washington. 

MINISTERS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

ENVOYS EXTRAORDINARY AND MINISTERS PLENIPOTENTIARY. 

Conntry. Caplul. Ministers. Salary. When app'd. 

Austria Vienna J. Lothrop Motlev , Mass $13,000. . . .ISSl 

Brazil Rio Janeiro James Watson Webb,N. Y 12 000....1P61 

Chili ^ Santiago Judson Kllpatrick, N. J 10,000.... 1865 

China Pekin Anson Bnrlingame, Mass 13,000.... 13G1 

France Paris John A. Dix.N. Y 17,500. ..ISOe 

Great Britain London Charles Francis Adams, Mass 17,500. . . .ISCl 

I( al V Florence George P. Marsh. Vt 12,000. . . .1801 

Mexico Mexico Lewis D. Campbell, Ohio 12,000 laifi 

Peru Lima ....A. P. Hovey, Ind 10,000 



Prussia Berlin Joseph A. Wright, Ind 12,000. . . .isa5 

Russia St. Petersburg Cassins ?.f. Clav, Ky , 12,000. . . .1863 

Spain Madrid John P. Hale, N. H. 12,000. . . . 1865 

3IINISTERS RESIDENT. 

Argentine Republic Bnenos Ayres Alexander Ashoth, Mo 7,500 . ISfin 

Belgium Brussels Henry S . Sanford, Conn 7,500 1861 

Bolivia LaPaz Allen A. Hall, Tenn 7,500 'l86:3 

Costa Rica San J ise Albert G. Lawrence, Rhode Island 7,500. . . .Ifeo 

Denmark Copenhagen Geo. H. Yeaman, Ky 7,500 lSf5 

Ecuador Qtuto Wm. T. Coggeshall, Ohio 730o!!!'l>C6 

Guatemala Gfuatemala Fitz Henry warren, Iowa 7,500.. .1865 

Hawaiian Islands Honolulu Edward M. McCook, Ohio 7,500 lgf.6 

Honduras Comayagua R. H . Rousseau, Kv 7,500 1PC6 

Japan Yedo R. B. Van Valkenburgh,N. Y 7,50n!!!;]f60 

Netherlauds Hague Hugh Ewl"g, Kansas 7,500.. 1966 

U. S. of Colombia Bogota". Allan A. Burton. Ky 7 500 ' 1SG1 

Nicaragua Nicaragua Andrew B. Dickinson, N. Y 7 500 186.S 

Paraguay Asuncion Charles A. Washburn, Cal 7,500""'l8M 

Portugal Lisbon Tames K.Harvey, Pa 7,500 1861 

Papal States Rome Enfns King, Wis 7,500 '"'igiS 

Sweden and Norway Stockholm lames H. Campbell, Pa 7,500 ]Sr4 

Switzerland Berne Geo. Harrington, D. C 7,t00 1865 

Turkey Constantinople. . . .Edward Joy Morris, Pa 7.50o! '. ! 'lR61 

Venezuela Caraccas James Wl.son, Ind 7,500.... 1866 

MINISTERS RESIDENT AND CONSULS GENERAL. 

Hayti Port au-Prince . . . .Henry E. Peck, Ohio 7,500. . 1865 

Liberia Monrovia John Seys, Tenn 4,000. . . !l866 



CALIFORNIA. 



20 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 

XXXIXtli CONGRESS. 

Second Beoulab Session ; contened Monday, Dbcehbeb 3, 1865. 

SENATE. 

LAFAYETTE S. FOSTER, Norwich, Connecticut, President. 
John W. Fornet, of Pennsylvania, Clerk. 
[Republicans and Unionists (In Roman), 42. Democrats and Cuiiscrvativcs (in Italics'), 10. 
For the names of the Senators who voted ag.ainstthe Civil Rights and Freedmeu's iJiiieau Bills, 
see the vote'on those bills on other pa^es. Senator Patterson, of Tennessee, who was elected 
as a Unionist, has been classed with the Conservatives. (C.) Seats contested. (A.) Appointed 
by the Governor of the State to serve until the election of a Senator by the Legislature. The 
figures.before each Senator's name denote the year in which his term expires.] 

oeegon. 

18G7 Jame.i TT. J^^eionit/i Salem. 

18T1 George H. Williams Portland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

IRfi? Edgar Cowan Greensburgh. 

1869 Charles R. Buckalew Bloomsburgh, 

BHODE ISLAND. 

1869 William Spragne Providence. 

1871 Henry B. Antuouy Providence, 

TENNESSEE. 

1869 David T. Patterson Greenville. 

1871 J. S. Fowler Nashville. 

VERMONT. 

1967 Luke P. Poland St. Johnsbury. 

1869 George F. Edmunds Burlington. 

WEPT VIRGINIA. 

1S69 Peter G. Van Winlcle ....Parkersburgh. 
1871 Waitman T. Willey Morgautown. 

WISCONSIN. 

1867 Timothy O. Howe Green Bay. 

1869 James ft. Doolittle Racine. 



CONNECTIOTJT. 



DELAWARE. 

..Wilmington. 
..Georgetown. 

ILLINOIS. 

1867 Lyman Trumbull Alton . 

1871 Richard Yates Quincy . 

INDIANA. 

1867 Henry S . Lane Crawfordsville . 

1869 Thomas A. Hendricks. . . .Indianapolis 

IOWA. 

1867 Samuel J. Kirkwood Iowa City 

1871 James W. Grimes Burlington. 

KANSAS. 



KENTUCKY. 



MAINE. 

1869 Lot M . Morrill Augusta . 

1871 Wm. Pitt Fessenden Portland. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1869 Charles Sumner Boston. 

1871 Henry Wilson Natick. 

MARYLAND. 

1867 John A. J. Creswell Elkton. 

1869 lieverdy Johnson Baltimore. 

MICHIGAN. 

1869 Zachariah Chandler Detroit. 

1871 Jacob M. Howard Detroit. 

MINNESOTA. 

1869 Alexander Ramsay St. Paul. 

1871 Daniel S. Norton Mankato. 

MISSOURI. 

1867 B. Gratz Brown St. Louis. 

1869 JohnB. Henderson Louisiana. 

NEVADA. 

1867 James W. Nye Carson City. 

1869 Wm. M. Stewart .-..Virginia City. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1867 Geo. C. Fogg (A. )...'..... Concord. 
1871 Aaron H. Cragiu Lebanon. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1869 F. T. Frelinghnysen (A.)Newark. 
1871 Alexander G. Cattell.... Camden. 

NEW YORK. 

1867 Ira Harris Albany . 

1869 Edwin D. Morgan New Vofk City. 

OHIO. 

1867 John Sherman Mansfield. 

1869 Benjamin F. Wade Jefferson. 



NOT YET ADMITTED. 

ALABAMA. 

1867 Oeo . S. Bouston Huntsvllle . 

1871 Lewis E. Parsons Talladega. 

ARKANSAS. . 

1867 E. Baxter Batesville. 

1871 William D. Snow 

COLORADO. 



FLORIDA. 

1867 William Marvin 

1871 WilkersoH Call 



.Tallahassee. 



GEORGIA. 

1867 Rerschel V. Johnson Louisville. 

1371 Alexander H. ;S'tepAe«.s.... Crawfordsville. 

NEBRASKA. 

— Thomas W. Tipton 

— JohnM. Thayer 



LOUISIANA. 

1967 R. Kine; Cutler (C.) New Orleans. 

1871 Michael Hahu (C.) New Orleans. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1867 Wm. L. Sharkey Jackson. 

1871 J. L. Alcorn 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

1867 John Pool Goldsboro. 

1871 William A. Graham Hillsboro. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1867 John L. Manning Coluaibla. 

1871 £enjami)i F. Perry Greenville. 



— 0. M. Roberts ..Tyler. 

— David a. Burnett Galveston. 

TIBQINIA. 

1867 John C. Underwood Alexandria. 

1871 Joseph Segar Fortress Monroe 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



1 HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ^ 

SCHUYLER COLFAX, of Soatli Bend, Indiana, Speaker. 

"Edward MoPkbrsok, of Gettysburg, Penn., Clerk. 

- rReDublicans and Unionists (in Roman), 115. Democrats and Conservatives (in Italics) , i-t . 
Total 193. Phelps (Md.), Noell (Mo.), Rousseau (Ky.), and Taylor (Tenn.), who were elected 
as Unionists have been classed with the Conservatives. For the names of other Unionists 
who on imnortant occasions, voted with the Conservatives, see the vote on the Civil Eights 
and 'Freedmen's Bureau Bills, on other pages. Those marked * ^'"•'' mornhpro ,^f t>,B 
XSXVIlIth Congress. 



were members of the 



OiLirORNIA. ■» 

1 Donald C. McKuer San Francisco. 

2 •William Higby Calaveras. 

3 JohnBidwell Chico. 

CONNECTICUT. 

1 'Henry C . Deming Hartford . 

2 Samuel L. Warner Jliddletown. 

3 'Augustus Brandegee New London. 

4 * John H. HubDard Litchfield. 

DELAWARE. 

1 John A. Nicholson Dover. 

ULINOIS. 

1 John Wentworth Chicago. 

2 * John F. Farnsworth St . Charles. 

3 *Elihu B. Washburne Galena. 

4 * Abuer C. Harding Monmouth. 

5 *Ebon C. Ingersoll Peoria. 

C Burton C. Cook Ottawa. 

7 H. P. H. Bromwell Charleston. 

8 Shelby M. Cnllom Springfield. 

9 *Uu:ls W. Boss ; Lewistown. 

10 Anthony Thornton Shelby ville. 

11 Sam uel S. Marshall McLeansb'ro'gh 

12 Jehu Baker .Alton. 

13 Andrew J. Kuykendall ...Vienna. 

At large. S. W. Moulton Shelbyville. 

INDIANA. 

1 William E. Niblack Vincennes. 

2 Michael C. Kerr New Albany. 

8 Ralph Hill Columbus. 

4 John H . Farquhar Brookville . 

5 *George W. Julian Centre ville. 

6 *Ebenezer Dumont Indianapolis. 

" Henry U. Washburn Clinton. 

. 8 'Godlove S. Orth Lafayette. 

9 'Schuyler Colfax South Bend. 

10 Joseph H. Deirees Goshen. 

11 Thomas N. Stillwell Anderson . 

IOWA. 

1 * James F. Wilson Fairfield. 

2 'Hiram Price Davenport. 

3 'William B. Allison Dubuque. 

4 'Josiah B. Grinuell Grinnell. 

5 'John A. Kasson Des Moines. 

6 *Asahel W. Hubbard Sioux City. 

KANSAS. 

1 Sidney Clarke Lawrence . 

KENXrCKT. 

1 L.S. Trimble Paducah. 

2 Burwell C. RiUer Hopkins ville . 

8 Elijah Hise Rnssellville. 

4 * Aaron Harding Grecnsburg. 

5 LotellB. Rou4ieau Louisville. 

6 A.H. M'ard Cynthiana. 

7 Georges. Shanklin Mcholasville. 

8 'William H. Rmidall London. 

9 Samuel McKee: Mount Sterling. 

MAINE. 

1 John Lynch Portland. 

2 'Sidney Perham Paris. 

3 * James G. Blaine Aneusta. 

4 'JohuH. Rice Foxcroft. 

5 'Frederick A. Pike Calais. 

MABYI.AND. 

1 JTiram McCiillouqh Elkton. 

2 John L. Thomas, Jr Baltimore. 



3 Charles E. Phelps Baltimore . 

4 'Francis ThomaSj.^,^. Frankville . 

5 * Benjamin G.-tlatris Leonardtown. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1 'Thomas D. Eliot New Bedford. 

2 'Oakes Am^ North Easton. 

3 * Alexander H. Rice. „ Boston. 

4 'Samuel Hooper.* Boston. 

5 'JohnB. Alley Lynn. 

6 NathauielP. Banksi ANaltham. 

7 'Georges. Bout well Grotou. 

8 'John D. Baldwin Worcester. 

9 'William B. Wash 
10 'Henry L. Dawes. 

MICHIGAN. 

1 'Fernando C. Beamau Adrian. 

2 'Charles Ljpson Coldwater. 

3 *John W. Longyear Lansing. 

4 Thomas W. Ferry Grand Haven. 

5 Rowland E. Trowbridge. .Birmingham. 

6 'John F. Driggs East Saginaw. 

ilLNNESOTA. 

1 'William Windom Winona. 

2 'Ignatius Donnelly Haslinga. 

MISSOURI . 

1 John Bogan St. Louis. 

2 'Henry T. Blow St. Louis. 

3 Thomas E. S(^l Perry ville. 

4 John R. Kelso Springfield. 

5 'Joseph v\. .McClurg Linn Creek. 

6 Robert T. Van Horn Kansas City. 

7 'Ben.iamiu F. Loan St. Joseph. 

8 John F. Benjamin Palmyra. 

9 George W. Anderson., Louisiana. 

NEVABA. 

1 Delos E. Ashley Virginia City 

NEW HAl^SHIRE. 

1 Gilman Mar ston ^ Exeter. 

2 *Edward H. Rollins Concord. 

3 'James ff. Patterson... '....Hanover. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1 'John F. Starr Camden. 

2 William A. Newell Allentown. 

3 Charles Sitgreaves Philipsburg. 

4 * Andrew J. Rogers Newton. 

5 Edwin R. V Wright Hudson City . 

NEW YORK. 

1 Stephen Taher Boslyn. 

2 Tennis G.Bergen New Utrecht. 

3 John W. Hunter Brooklyn. 

4 Morgan Jones New Tbrk City. 

5 Nelson Taylor " 

6 Henry J. Raymond " 

7 *John W. Chanter " 

8 William E. Dodge 

9 William A. Darling 

10 • M'itliam Radford Yonkers. 

11 * Chariest H. Winfleld Goshen. 

12 John H. Ketcham Dover. 

13 Ediein N. Hubbell Coxsackie. 

11 Charles Goodyear Schoharie. 

15 'John A. Griswold Troy. 

16 Robert S. Hale Flizabethtown. 

IT 'Calvin T. Hulbnrd Brasher Falls. 

IS 'James M.Marvin Saratoga Sp'gs. 

19 Deraas Hubbard , Jr Suiy rna. 

20 Addison H. Laflin Herkimer. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



ROBCoe Conkllng Utlca. 

Sidney T. Holmes Morrisvllle. 

iThomas T. Davis Syracuse. 

'Theodore M. Pomeroy . . . . Anburn. 

•Daniel Morris Penn Tan. 

'Giles \V. HotTchkiss Binghamton. 

Hamilton Warji Belmont. 

Roswell Hart. Rochester. 

Burt Van Horn Newfane. 

James M. Humphrey Buffalo. 

Henry Van Aernam Franlilinvllle. 

OHIO. 

Benjamin Eegleston Cincinnati . 

Kuiiierford a. Hayes Cincinnati. 

•Rooert C. Schenck Dayton. 

William Lawrence Belief ontalne. 

•/; C- Le lUond ^ Cellna. 

Reader W. Clarke Batavia. 

Samuel Shellabarger Springfield . 

James R. Hubb^l Delaware. 

Ralph P. BucklaTid Fremont. 

•James M. Ashley Toledo. 

Hezetiah S. Bundy Reed's Mills. 

* William E. Fiiicii. Somerset. 

Columbus Delanofc Mount Vernon. 

Martin Welker Wooster. 

Tobias E. Plants Pomeroy. 

John A. BiiighdW Cadiz. 

*Ephraim K. EcKley Carrollton. 

*Bufu8 P. Spalding Cleveland. 

"James A. Garile^d Hiram. 

OEBGON. 

John H . D . Henderson . . . .Eugene City. 

TENNSYLVANIA. 

''Samuel J. Handall Philadelphia. 

•Charles O'Neill " 

* Leonard Myers 

*WilliamD.Kelley " 

*M Russell Thayer Chestnut Hill. 

B. MarkUy Boyer Norrisluwu. 

*Joha M. Broomall Media. 

* Sydenham E. Aiicona^ . . .Reading. 

*Thaddeu8 Stevens Lancaster. 

*Jlyer Strouxe Pottsviile . 

"Pfiilip Jotnuon Easton. 

* Charle-s Venifioii Wilkesbarre . 

Ulysses Mercur Towanda. 

George F. Miller Lewlsburg. 

Adatn J GlosKbrinner York. 

William H. Kocfctz Somerset. 

Abraham A. Barffer Edenbnrg. 

Stephen F. Wilson, Wellsborough. 

*Glennl W. Scofiela Warren. 

Charles Vernon Culver. . . .Franklin 
*John L. Dawson . . .* Brownsville . 

* James K. Moorhead* Pi ttsburgh . 

'Thomas Williams Pittsburgh. 

George V. Lawrence Monongah la Cy 

RHODE ISLAUD. 

•Thomas A. Jenckes Providence. 

•Kathau F. Dixon Westerly- 

TENNESSEE. 

Xathaniel G. Taylor Happy Valley. 

Horace Maynard Knox viUe . 

William B. Stokes .Liberty.. 

Edmund Cooper fehelbyville. 

WUliu?n B. Campbell Xebanon. 

S. M. Arnell Columbia. 

Isaac R. Hawkins Huntingdon. 

John W- Leftwich Memphis. 

VEKMONT. 

"Frederick E. Woodbrldge .Vergenncs . 

•Justin S. Morrill Stratford. 

•Portus Baxter Derby Line. 

WEST VIKGINIA. 

Chester D. Hubbard Wlieeling. 

George R.Latham Grafton. 

•killian V. Whaley Point Pleasant. 

WISCONSIN. 

HalbertE. Painp Milwaukee. 

•Ithaniar C. Sloan Janesville. 

•Amasa Cobb ; Mineral Point. 

* Charles A. Eldrldge Fond du Lac. 



5 Phlletus Sawyer Oshkosh. 

6 * Waller D. Mclndoe W ansau. 

NOT YET ADMITTED. 

ALABAMA. 

1 C. C. Langdon Mobile . 

2 JMcCaleb Wiley.. 

3 Cullen A. Battle 

4 Joseph W. Taylor 

5 B. T.Pope 

6 T.J.Jackson 

ABKAN8AS. 

1 Wtinam Byers Batesvile. 

2 G. H. Kyle Princeton. 

3 J. M. Johnson Fort Smith. 

C'JLOKADO. 

1 Geo. M. Chilcott Pueblo. 

FLOKIDA. 

1 F. McLeod 

GEORGIA. 

1 Solomon Cohen 

2 Philip Cook 

3 Buffh Bnchanan Columbus. 

4 E. G. Cabaness 

5 J. D. Matthews 

G J. JT. Chriaty Athens . 

7 James P. Humblelon 

LOTJIBIANA. 

1 Lovis St. Martin 

2 Jacob Barker New Orleans. 

3 Bobert C. Wickliffe 

4 John E. King 

5 John Bay 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1 A. E. Reynolds 

2 B.A. Pinson 

8 James T. Marrison 

4 A. M.Wesl 

5 E. O. Peyton 

NEBP.ASKA. 

1 T.M.Marquette 

NOBTH CAROLINA. 

1 Jesse li. Slubbs Williamston. 

2 Charles C. Clark Newbern. 

3 Thomas C. Fuller Fayetteville. 

i Josiah Turner, Jr Orange . 

5 Lewis Banes Salisbury. 

6 S. H. Walkup Monroe. 

7 A. H. Jones HendersonvlUe. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1 Joh7h D . Kennedy 

2 William Aiken 

3 Samuel McGowan 

4 James Farrow 

TEXAS. 

1 Geo. W. Chilton Tyler. 

2 B. U. Epperson Clarksville 

3 A. 31. Branch Hnntsville. 

4 C. O. Herbert Columbus. 

VIRGINIA. 

1 W. H. B. Cwitis 

a Lucius H. Chandler Norfolk. 

3 B. Johnson Barbour Richmond. 

4 Robert Ridgway 

5 Beverly A. Davis Danville . 

6 Alexander H. i/.6Yj«ir«.... Staunton. 

7 Robert Y. Conrad Winchester . 

8 Daniel H. Boge Montgomery. 

DELEGATES FROM THE TERRITORIES. 
Arizona.— John N. Goodwin, Prcscott. 
Colorado.— Allan A. Bradford, Denver. 
Dakotah.— Walter A. Burleigh, Yancton. 
Idaho.— A'. D. Bolbrook, Idaho Citv. 
Montana.— i?rt7«?<f; J/cLeo» , Bannock City. 
Nebraska.— Phineas W. Hitchcock, Omaha. 
New Mexico.- J.Francisco Chavez, Santa Fe. 
Utah.— Wjh. B. Booper. Salt Lake City. 
"W ABHEf gton.— Arthur A. Denny, Seattle. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



XLth. CONGRESS— A8.FAR- AS chosen. 



THE SENATE. 



OAi,rFOKiaA. 
John Connesa. 
Cornelins Cole. 

CONNECTICUT. 

James Dixon. 
Orris S. Ferry. 

DBLAWAKE. 

George Read Riddle. 
WiUard Saulshury. 

ILLINOIS. 

Richard Yates. 
Ecp. 

INDIANA. 

Thomas A. Hendricks. 
Ecp. 

IOWA. 

James W. Grimes. 
James Harlan. 

KANSAS. 

Rep. 

— Rep. 



KENTTICKT. 

James Guthrie. 
Dem. 

MAINE. 

Lot M. Morrill. 
William P. Fcssenden. 

SIASSACHUSETTS. 

Charles Sumner. 
Henry Wilson. 

MARYLAND. 

Reverdy Johnson.. 
Dem. 

MISSOURI. 

John B. Henderson. 
Rep. 

MICUIGAN. 

Zachariah Chandler. 
Jacob M. Howard. 

MINNRSOTA. 

Alexander Ramsey, 
Daniel S. Norton. 



NEVADA. 

William M. Stewart. 
Rep. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Aaron H. Cragiu. 
James W. Patterson. 

NEW JERSEY. 

A. G. Cattell. 
Rep. 

NEW YORK. 

Edwin D. Morgan. 
Eep. 

OHIO. 

Benjamin F. Wade. 
Eep. 

OREGON. 

George H. Williams. 
Henry VT. Corbett. 



RHODE ISLAND. 

William Spracue. 
Henry B. Anthony. 

TENNESSEE. 

David T. Fowler. 

J. S. Patterson. 

VERMONT. 

George F. Edmunds. 
Justin S. Morrill. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Peter G. Van Winkle. 
Waitman T. Willey. 

WISCONSIN. 

James R. Doolittle. 



Republicans and Unionists (in Roman), 43. Democrats and Conservatives (In Italics), 9. 
HOUSE 05" REPRESENTATIVES. 

NEW TOBK. 



CALIFORNIA. (Dist. 

[Three members to be! 4 John A. Peters, 
elected in Sept.] 

CONNECTICUT. 

[Four members to be 
elected in April.] 

UELAWABE. 
Dist. 

1 fjohn A. Nicholson. 

ILLINOIS. 

1 N. B. Judd. 

3 tJ. F. Fnrnsworth. 

3 1E. B. Washburue. 

4 tAaronC. Ilardii g. 

5 tEbouC.IugersoU. 
(j 1 Burton C. CooK. 

7 tH.P.H.Bromwell. 

8 tShelby M. Cullom. 

9 ^ Lewis W.Ross.{C.)\ 

10 A. G. Burr. 

11 \Snml. S.Murshall.\ 

12 tJehu Baker. 

13 (i. B. Kaum. 
At large.-J. A. Logan. 

INDIANA. 

1 tlTm. E.Niblack. 
2-\MichHC.Kerr.(C.) 
8 M. C. Hunter. 
4 Wni. S. Holman .(C.) 



7 tH. D. Washburn. 

8 tGodloveS. Orih. 

9 tSchuvlcr Colfax. 

10 Wm. Williams. 

11 John P. C. Shanks. 

IOWA. 

1 t James F. Wilson. 

2 tHiram Price. 

3 tWUliam B. Allison. 

4 W. M.Loughndge. 

5 G. M. Dodge. 

6 tAsahel W.Hubbard 

KANSAS. 

1 tSidney Clarke. 

KENTUCKY. 

[Nine members to be 
elected in August.] 

MAINE. 

1 tJohn Lynch. 

2 tSidney Perham. 
8 tJames G. Blaine. 



5 tFrederick A. Pike. 

MARYLAND. 

1 i Hiram McVvllongh 

2 S. Archer. (C.) 
^iC.E. Phelps. (C.) 

4 tFrancis Thomas. 

5 Frederick titone. 

MASSACnUSETTS. 

1 tThomasD. Eliot. 

2 tOakes Ames. 

3 Giiiery Twitchell. 

4 tSamuel Hocper. 

5 Beni. F. Butler. 
G tNathan'lP. Banks. 

7 iOeo. S. Boutwell. 

8 tJ'hn D. Baldwin. 

9 tWm.B. Washburn 
10 tilenry L. Dawes. 

MISSOUKr. 

1 Wm.A.Pile. 

2 C. A. Newcomb. 

3 -^Thos. E.Jsoell. 

4 J. J. Gravelly. 

5 tJ. W. McClnrg. 

6 tR. T.Van Horn.(C.) 



+Beni. F. Loan. 

8 t'J. V. Benjamin. 

9 W. F. SwiUler.iC.) 

MICHIGAN. 

1 tFer. C. Beaman. 

2 tCharles Upaon. 

3 Austin Blair. 

4 tThomas W. Ferry. 

5 tit. E. Trowbridge. 

6 tJohn F. Driggs. 

MINNES0T.\. 

1 tWm. Windom. 

2 tignatius Donnelly. 

NEVADA. 

1 tDelosE. Ashley. 

NEW HAMI-SHIEE. 

[Three members to be 
elected in March.] 

NEW JERSEY. 

1 William Moore. 

2 Charles Haighl.iQ) 

3 \€has. Sityreaves. 

4 John Hill. 

5 G. A. Halsey. 



DUt. 

1 -^Stephen Taber. 
3 Demas Barnes. 

3 Wm. E. Robinson. 

4 John Fox. 

5 John Morrissey. 

6 Thos. E. Stewart. 

7 ^JohnW. Chanler. 

8 James Brooks. 

9 Fernando Wood. 

10 Wm. H. Robertson. 

11 Chas. H.Van Wyck. 

12 tJohnH. Ketcham. 

13 Thomas Cornell. 

14 J. V. L. Pna/n. 

15 tJ. A. Griswold. 

16 Orange Ferris. 

17 tC.T. Hulburd. 

18 t James M. Marvin. 

19 Wm. C. Fields. 

20 tA. H. Laflin. 

■Roscoe Coukllng. 
John C. Churchill. 

23 Dennis McCarthy. 

24 tT. M. Pomeroy 

Wm. H. Kelsey. 
20 Wm. S. Lincoln. 

27 tHamil ton Ward. 

28 lEoswell Hart. 

29 Lewis Selye. 

t'/. //. Humphrey. 
tH. Van Aernam. 

OHIO. 

- ,_jn' 

2 tR. 

3 tRobt. C. Schenck. 

4 tWm. Lawrence. 

5 TI'm. Mungen. 

6 tRcaderW. Clarke. 

7 tSaml.ShcUabarger. 

8 C. 8. Hamilton. 

9 tRalph P.Buckland. 

10 t James M. Ashley. 

11 John T.Wilson. 

12 P. Vail Trump. 

13 G.W. Morgan. (C.) 

14 tMartiu Welker. 

15 tTobias A. Plants. 
18 tJohn A. Bingham. 
17 tEphraimR.Eckley. 
'" tRufusP.Spaulding. 



19 tJas. A. Garfield. 

OREGON. 

1 RufusMallory. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1 iSamucl J.Randall. 

2 tCharles O'Neill. 

3 tLeonard Myers. 

4 tWm.D.Eellev. 

5 Caleb N.Taylor. 

6 fD. Mar kill/ Boyer. 

7 t-JohuM. Broomall. 

8 J. Lawrence Gttz. 

9 tThaddeus Stevens. 

10 H. L. Cake. 

11 V. M. VanAuken. 

12 ^ Chas. Den nison (.C.) 

13 tUlysses Mercur. 

14 tGeorge F. Miller. 

15 \A.J. Glossbreimer. 

16 tWm. H. Koontz. 

17 Daniel J. Morrell. 

18 tStephen F. Wilson. 

19 tG. W. Scofield. 

20 Darwin A. Finney. 

21 JohuCovude. 

22 tJ. K. Mo.Thead. 

23 tThomas Williams. 

24 tGr. V. Lawrence. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

[Two members to be 
elected in April.] 

TENNESSEE. 

[Eight members to be 
elected in August.] 

VERMONT. 

1 tF. E. \voodbridge. 

2 Luke P. Poland. 
8 W. C. Smith. 

WEST VIRGIMA. 

1 tC. D. Hubbard. 

2 B. M. Kitchen. 

3 Daniel Polsiey. 

WISCONSIN. 

1 tHalbertR. Paine. 

2 B. F.Hipi-ins. 

3 tAmasa Cobb. 

4 fC!)as. A. Eldridge. 

5 tPhiletus Sawyer. 

6 C. C. Washburne. 



Republicans and Unionists (in Roman), 127. Democrats and Conservatives (In /toKc«), 36. 
(t) Members of the XXXtSth Congress. (C.) Seats contested. 



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Grand, Square, and Upright 



TESTIMONIALS FROM THE MOST DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS. 

New York, December, 1864. 

The Piano-fortes — Grand, Square, and Upright — manufactured by Messrs. Steinwat & Sons, 
have established for themselves so world-wide a reputation that it is hardly possible for us to add 
anything to their just fame. 

Having thoroughly tested and tried these instruments personally for years, both in public and 
private, it becomes our pleasant duty to express our candid opinion regarding their unquestioned 
superiority over any other Piano known to us. 

Among the chief points of their uniform excellence are : Greatest possible depth, riehnens, 
and volume of tone, combined with a rare brilliancy, clearness, and perfect evenness 
throughout the entire scale, and, above all, a surprising duration of sound, the pure and, 
sympathetic quality of tcldchnerer changes under the inost delicate or powerful touch. 

This peculiarity is found exclusively in the " Steinwat " Piano ; and, together "with the match- 
less precision, elasticity, and promptness of action always characterizing these instruments, as 
well as their unequaled durability under the severest trials, is truly surprising, and claims at 
once the admiration of every artist. We therefore consider the "STr.iNWAY" Pianos in all 
respects the best instruments made in this country or in Europe, tuse thein solely and exclu- 
sicely ourselves in public or private, and. recommend them invariably to our friends and 
the public. 

We have at differeif times expressed our opinion regarding the Pianos of various makers, but 
freely and unhesitattngly pronounce Messrs. Steinwat & Sons' Pianos superior to them all. 



S. B. MILLS. 
ROBERT GOLDBECK. 
CARL WOLFSOHN. 
WILLIAM BER6E. 
THEODORE THOMAS. 
F. L. RITTER 
ROBERT HELLER. 
J. MOSENTHAL. 
CARL WELS. 
C. JEROME HOPKINS. 
HENRY C. TIMM. 
MAX MARETZEK, 



CARL BERGMANN, 

{Conductor of the Acad- 

■ emy of Music and 

Philharmonic Sac.) 

WILLIE B. PAPE, 

{Pianist to IT. P. JT. the 
Princess of Wale.'i.) 

WILLIAM MASON. 

J. N. PATTISON. 

ALFRED H. PEASE. 

F. VON BREUNING. 

THEODORE SCHREINER. 



(Director of the Italian TH. MOELLING. 

Optra.) E. MUZIO. 

GEO. W. MORGAN, FRANK GILDER. 

{Organist of Grace Clmreh.) BRUNO WOLLENHAUPT. 



CHARLES KUNKEL, 

{Cincinnati.) 
FRED. BRANDEIS. 
CARL ANSCHUTZ, 

{Director of ihe German 
Opera.) 
SAMUEL P. WARREN, 

{Organist of All Souls' 
church.) 
THEO. EISFIELD, 

{Conductor of the yew 
York and Brooklyn 
Philh. Concerts A 
Dr. HENRY S. CUTLER, 



Letter of Rev. HENRY WARD BEECHER. 

Brookltn, January 26, 1861. 
MESSR.S. Steinwat : — I regard him as a benefactor who builds a good Piano, and I am your 
beneficiary on that account. Having had one of your instruments for several years, I can bear 
witness to its admirable qualities in every respect. I am more than satisfied, and if I had to buy 
another I should certainly go to your rooms again. It is a pleasure to praise your work. 

Henrt Ward Beechkr. 

From. " A DISCOURSE ON PIANOS," by Rev. HENRT WARD BEECHER. 
{New Yo7-k. Independent, Dec. 1, 1865.) 
Upon a lucky day a Steinwat Piano stood in our parlor. For power, fullness, richness, and 
evenness of tone, it was admirable ; nor do we believe we could better our choice. In our Sum- 
mer home it stands yet, a mu.vcal angel ; and our wish is, that the day may come when every 
working man in America may have a good " Steinwat Piano." 



STEINWAY & SONS' 

Pat'iit UprlgM Plan©. 



(FROM THE TRIBUNE./ 



A NEW PIANO 

AN IMPORTANT INVENTION AND IMPROVEMENT IN 
UPRIGHT PIANO-FORTES. 

The upright piano, doubtless the handsomest, as it promises to be the favorite, of its class, has 
very recently undergone so mal-ked an improvement in the science of its manufacture as to be in 
many respects a new instrument. It is well understood from the testimony of leading instrument- 
alists in the Old World that the square and grand pianos made in this country are even supe- 
rior in all the requirements of art to the most celebrated manufacture of the Old World ; but in 
the construction of the upright pianos the American maker has heretofore labored under the same 
difficulties as have beset the European. Many costly experiments have been tried and much in- 
genious study given to the task of perfecting an instrument which. If all its capacities were in 
harmony with its convenience, compactness, and beauty of form, ought to be more desirable than | 
any other to a large number of households and an extensive class of performers. The upright 
piano made hitherto wanted power, full tone, and an even register. The action was not only 
complicated, cramped, and defective, but the instrument was constantly liable to get out of ord.x, 
while from these and a variety of causes there was no certainty of keeping it in tune. 

In the new upright pianos, just set up by the Messrs. Steinway & Sons, these defects are, with- 
out exception, admirably overcome. Hundreds of players have already tested the accuracy and 
brilliancy of I he instrument ; and its perfection, now arrived at after much expense and many 
years of experiment, brings to the view of the musical world an event of infinite importance to 
their art. The invention by which this fine result has been achieved belongs solely to the emi- 
nent firm we have named. Beyond the praise due them for a remarkable success of enterprise, 
they deserve public gratulation for a discovery which, great or small, is likely to benefit the gen- 
eral community of musicians as much as any improvement of late years effected in the making 
of pianos. The new uprights are known as " The Patent Resonator," and " Double Iron Frame," 
and were patented June 5th of this year. From a description of the general features of the in- 
strument, musicians will be able to understand its points of superiority. 

The instrument is provided, in addition to the usual iron frame sustaining the strings in the 
front of the sound-board, with an iron brace frame in therear of it, Instead of constructing the 
latter portion of the instrument, as heretofore, of heavy pieces of timber. Both the front and 
rear iron frames are cast together in one solid pieee, by this means Imparting a solidity of con- 
struction and stability of tune not paralleled in all respects in piano-forte manufacture. The 
sound-board is supported in its position between the two frames by a simple apparatus which reg- 
ulates its tension, so that the greatest possible degree of vibration and sound-producing capacity 
is obtained, and regulated to the nicest desirable point. 

In every upright piano previously manufactured, the action stood upon posts, the lower ends 
of which rested upon the keys, rendering the mechanism complicated and liable to get out of order. 
In the new patent overstrung upright pianos of Steinway & Sons, the action works directly upon, 
flj/r^/rowi ^/t6X'e//«, in the same manner as in their square and grand pianos, and the touch is 
just as light, agreeable and prompt. 

Another highly important and delightful improvement is their newly invented " soft pedal," 
as applied to ihese instruments. By a simple and most ingenious arrangement the whole line of 
hammers can be moved either in close proximity to the strings, or to any desirable part of their 
striking distance, thereby enabling the performer, at will, to produce the full power of the instru- 
ment, or the softest whisper of its tone, or any desired gradation of crescendo or decrefcendo, 
nith the most unerring certainty. The volume of tone of these new instruments is, strange to 
say, fully equal to that of their best and most powerful square pianos, while their quality is of 
the most exquisite musical character, pure, sympathetic, and perfectly pliable, the " singing " ca- 
pacity and duration of sound of the instrument being truly surprising, thus enabling the pianist 
to produce a variety of the most charming effects. 

Prom a trial and hearing of one of these instruments, we are convinced of their very great 
value to music. Their length and depth of tone is extraordinary; their vibratory power is in 
keeping with the fullest and soundest volume of tone ; and there is a dulcet and crystalline clear- 
ness in the play of the higher keys. Sacred music, performed on this instrument, has a strength 
and resonance^ not to be supplied by any other instrument of its size. It is also one of its re- 
markable merits that its tone can be brought to a positive close at will of the player, thus avoid- 
ing the old unmanageable vibration. We have no hesitation in approving the new instrimicnt, 
which, with its peculiar and original advantages, seems the most perfect of its class. Its full 
beauty of form and mechanism must be seen to be appreciated. 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



ACTS OF CONGRESS. 

SYNOPSIS OF THE PKINCIPAL^ACT|JA^SED^ AT^ THE FIRST SESSIOK OF THE 



Chap. V. — Assistant Assessors of Internal 
Herenue.— Authorizes the Secretary of the 
Treasury to appoint Assistant Assessors of In- 
ternal Revenue, [.\pproved Jan. 15. 1S66.] 

Chap. \1U.—Jie:nstrt/ of F6s.se/«.— Forbids 
the registry of vessels as American vessels 
which altered their registers during the rebal- 
lion to obtain the protection of a foreign govern- 
ment. [Feb. 10, 1863.] 

Chap. IX.— J//'-s. Lincoln.— An act granting 
the franking privilege to Mary Lincoln. [Feb. 
10, 186G.] ^ , 

Chap. Xll.—Imjwrtation of Foreign Cattle. 
— Forbids the importation of neat cattle, or the 
hide? of neat cattle. The Secretary of the Treas- 
ury may suspend the operation of the act as to 
any foreign country. The President may, by 
proclimation, declare the act inoperative, and it 
shall be of no effect from and after thirty days 
from the date of the proclamation. Any person 
convicted of willful violation of this act shall 
be punished by a fine not e.xceeding $500, or im- 
prisonment not exceeding one year, or by both, 
at the discretion of the court. [March 6, 18G8.] 
Chap. 'XlW—Land-'i to California.— Rehn- 
quishes to the city of San Francisco the right 
and title of the United States to certain lands 
within said city. Said lands shall be di3po3ed 
of by the city to pirties on bona fide possession 
thereof. The relinquishment shall not, how- 
ever, interfere with any adverse right or claim. 
[March 8, 1866.] 

Chap, "id .—Declaratory of the Meaning of 
Certain Parts of the Internal Revenue Act.— 
In section 120 the words dividends in scrip or 
money, &c., shall mean dividends in scrip or 
money, &c., wherever payable, and the words 
stockholders, &c., shall include non-residents. 
Persons shall make returns of income, &c., ac- 
cording to their value in legal tender currency, 
and if the returns shall be made on the basis of 
coined money, the Assistant Assessor shall re- 
duce such returns to the basis of legal tender 
currency. [March 10, 1866.1 

Chap XWl.— Goods in Bonded Warehouses. 
—After the 1st day of May, 1866, goods in 
bonded warehouse may be withdrawn within 
one year from the date of importation, on pay- 
ment of the duties to which they may be subject 
at the time of withdrawal, and after the expira- 
tion of one year, and until the expiration of 
three years from said date, an additional duty of 
10 per cent, will be assessed. This act shall not 
operate to prevent the export of bonded goods, 
&c., within three years from date of importa- 
tion, nor their transportation in bond to other 
ports for the purpose of exportation. [Mar.14,'66 ] 
Chap. XVIII.— J/rti«« /,Mm6e/-.— Admits, free 
of duty, lumber of American citizens, grown on 
St John River and its tributaries, sawed or 
hewed in the Province of New Brunswick by 
American citizens, after the 17th of March, 1866. 
[March 16, 1866.] 



Chap. XXI. — National Military and Xaval 
Jsy^wOT.— Constitutes the President, Secretary | 
of War, and Chief Justice of the United States, 
and other persons, a Board of Managers of 
"The National Asylum for Disabled Vol'.mteer j 
Soldiers." Nine other citizen^;, not members of 
Congress, shall be associated with the three j 
above named, no two of whom shall be residents 
of the same State, and who shall all be residents ] 
of the States which furnished organized bodies | 
of troops for the suppression of the rebelli-in (no 
person being ever eligible who gave aid to the 
rebellion), to be selected by joint resolution of I 
the Senate and House. The Board of Managers | 
shall have authority to procure sites for Jlilitary i 
Asylums. For the support of the asylum shall i 
be appropriated all stoppages or fines against \ 
oflicers and soldiers above the amount necessary 
for the reimbursement of the Government or in- | 
dividuals, all forfeitures for desertion, and all ; 
moneys due deceased officers and soldiers which j 
now are or may be unclaimed for thre- years 
after their death. All officers and soldiers who i 
served in the late war for the suppression of the 
rebellion, and not provided for by existing laws, 
who have been or may be disabled by wounds | 
received or sickness contracted in the line of | 
their duty, shall be entitled to the benefits of ' 
the institution upon the recommendation of 
three of the managers. The provision for a 
naval asylum in the act (lSi)5, chap. XCI.) to 
which this is amendatory is repealed. The 
property of the United States at Point Lookout, 
Md., shall become the property of the asylum. 
[March 21,1866.] 

Ch-VP. XX.W— Smithsonian Institute.— Irans- 
fers the Library of the Smithsonian Institute to 
the Library of Congress. [April 5, 1866.] 

Chap. X.XVII. — Belief of Seamen. — Grants to 
any officer of the navy or marine corps who 
may have lost his personal effects by the loss of 
his vessel one month of sea pay. The bounty- 
money of any seaman who enlisted from the 
army into the navy shall not be deducted from 
his prize-money. [April 6, 1866.] 

Chap. XXXI.— Civil Bights i/t?;.— [The text 
of this important bill, together with the veto of 
the President, and the vote by which both 
Houses passed it over the veto, is given on an- 
other page.] 

Chap. XXXlX.—E.rchange of OUigation«.— 
Authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to ex- 
change treasury notes or any other obligations 
for any description of bonds, and also to dispose 
of any description of bonds at his discretion, for 
lawful money of the United States or treasury 
notes, certificates of indebtedness, or certificates 
of deposit. [April 12, 1866.] 

Chap. XL. — Reimbursement of Pennsyl- 
vania. — Provides for the reimbursement of 
the State of Pennsylvania for moneys advanced 
to the Government for war purposes. [April 12, 
1866.] 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



Chap. XLVI. — Reirribiirsement of MUsouri. 
— Provides for the reimbursement of the State 
of Missouri for moneys expended for the United 
States in enrolling, equipping, and provisioning 
militia forces to aid in suppressing the rebellion. 
[April IT, 1866.] 

Chap. XLVII. — Cunhont to Liberia. — Au- 
thorizes the President to transfer a gunboat to 
the Government of the Republic of Liberia. 
[April 17, 1866.] 

Chap. XLVIII. — Pontaqe. — An act to provide 
that the " Soldiers' Individual Memorial " shall 
be carried through the mails at the usual rates of 
printed matter. [April 17, 1866.] 

Chap. IjXXUX.—Bonndaries of Nevada. — 
Extends the boundaries of Nevada. [May 5, 
1866.] 

Chap. hXXIV.—,Tnternatiotial Ocean Tele- 
graph Company. — Gives the International 
Ocean Telegraph Company the sole privilege, for 
a period of 14 years from the approval of this 
act, to lay, construct, land, maintain, and ope- 
rate telegraphic or magnetic lines or cables in 
and over the waters, reefs, islands, shores, and 
lands, over which the United States have juris- 
diction, from the shores of the State of Florida, 
in the said United States, to the Island of Cuba 
and the Bahamas, either or both, and other 
, West India Islands. The United States shall 
: have at all times the free use of the cable. The 
i company shall not charge more than |.3.50 for 
i messages of ten words. Said grant to be null 
i and void unless the cable is laid and In success- 
I ful operation within three years from the pas- 
sage of this act. [Mays, 1866.] 
i Chap. UXXS .—Court of Clairm.— Gives the 
j Court of Claims jurisdiction over the claims of 
any disbursing officers of the United States who 
! may have lost their vouchers by capture or 
j otherwise while in the line of duty. [May 9, 
1866.] 
I Chap. 'LXXX.— Habeas Corpw^.— Extends the 
provisions of the 4th, 5th and 6th sections of the 
act of March 3, 186-3, to actions for search, 
arrest, Ac, made by any officer under authority 
of the President, Secretary of War, or of any 
military officer of the United States holding the 
command of the department or district in which 
such search, &c., took place. The right of re- 
moval to the Circuit Court may be exercised 
after the appearance of the defendant and filing 
of his plea in said court, and the State courts 
shall then proceed no further. Section 4 enacts 
that if the State courts shall, notwithstanding, 
proceed further in such case, then all such pro- 
ceedings shall be void and of no effect, and all 
officers, judges, Ac, proceeding thereunder shall 
be liable in damages to the party aggrieved, to 
be recovered in a State court having proper juris- 
diction, or in the Circuit Court of the United 
States. [May 11, 1866.] 

Chap. hXXXl.— Five-cent Piece.?.— Autho- 
rizes the coinage of five-cent pieces. [May 16, 
1866.] 

Chap. LXXXII. — Duty on Live Animals. — 
Levies a duty of 20 per centum ad valorem on 
all live animals imported from foreign countries. 
[May 16, 1866.] 

Chap. LXXXVI. — Kidnapping. — Punishes 
any person attempting to kidnap any other per- 
son, with the intention to carry such person into 
slavery, on conviction thereof, by a fine of not 



less than $500, nor more than $5,000, and im. 
prisonment not exceeding five years, or by both. 
Any master or owner of any vessel who shall 
receive on board anv person from any State or 
Territory of the United States, with the knowl- 
edge and intent that such person is to be carried 
into slavery, shall be punished by a fine not ex- 
ceeding $5,000, nor less than $500, or by im- 
prisonment not exceeding five years, or by both, 
and the vessel shall be forfeited to the United 
States. [May 21, 1866.] 

Chap, hXXXlX.— Virginia Conrtx. --Vrn- 
vides that the Circuit Court of the United States, 
in the District of Virginia, shall be held in Rich- 
mond, commencing on the first Monday of May 
an! on the fourth Monday in November, in each 
year. [May 22, 1866.] 

Chap. C. — Assistant Secreiary of the Kavy. 
— Authorizing the appointment of an additional 
Assistant. Secretary of the Navy. [May 26, 
1866.] 

Chap. CII.—Pa.«.«//o?'^«.— Repeals sec. 23 of 
chap. 79 of the acts of the 3d session of the 
XXXVIIth Congress. Hereafter passports shall 
be issued onlv to citizens of the United States. 
[.May 30, 1866.] 

Chap. CVI. — Penxions. — Provides that all 
persons who, while in the military or naval serv- 
ice and in line of duty, shall have lost the sight 
of both eyes, or have lost both hands, or been 
totally disabled in the same, or otherwise ren- 
dered utterly helpless, shall receive a pension 
of $25 per month. All persons who shall have 
lost both feet or one hand and one foot, or have 
been totally or permanently disabled in the 
same, or otherwise so disabled as to be incapaci- i 
tated for performing manual labor, but not so 1 
much as to require constant personal aid, shall 
receive $20 per month ; and all persons who 
shall have lost one hand or one foot, or been 
totally disabled in the same, shall receive $15 
per month. Any pledge, mortgage, &c., of any 
right, claim or interest in any pension shall be 
void, and any person acting as attorney to re- 
ceive a pension for another shall take an oath 
that he has no interest in said mone.v, and that 
he does not know that the same has been dis- 
posed of to any person. No sum of money due 
to a pensioner shall be liable to attachment. 
Fees of claim agents are limited to 25 cents for 
preparing papers for a pensioner, and 15 cents 
for administering an oath to a pensioner. If a 
pensioner die wiiile his application is pending, 
and after the proof has been completed, his 
heirs shall be entitled to the accrued pension. 
If any person shall have been commissioned and 
died or been disabled in the line of duty before , 
being mustered, such officer or person entitled | 
to pension shall receive a pension according to 
his rank if he had been mustered. The period 
of service of all persons entitled to pension 
shall be considered to extend to the time of their 
actual discharge. Enlisted men employed as 
teamsters, Ac, shall be regarded as non-com- 
missioned officers or privates. Should a widow 
abandon her child or children under 16 years of 
age, or be proved to be unfit to have custody of 
them, she shall receive no pension until they are 
over 16 years of age, and the minor child or 
children shall receive the pension. The orphan 
brothers, and also the father of a deceased 
officer or soldier, who were dependent upon him 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



for support, shall be pensioned. Sec. 14 pro- 
vides that the widows and children of colored 
soldiers shall receive the pension, Ac, without 
other evidence of marriage than that the parties 
had recognized each other as man and wife, and 
had lived together as such. [June 6, 1866 ] 

CuAP. ex. — MiJitary Academy. — Sec. 2 pro- 
vides that no person who has "served in any 
capacity in the military or naval service of the 
so-called Confederate States during the late re- 
bellion shall hereafter receive an appointment 
as a cadet at the Military or Naval Academy. 
[June 8, 1866.] 

Chap. CXl\.— Pouted Za?c.— Provides that 
prepaid and free letters shall be forwarded at 
the request of the party addressed from one 
Post-Office to another without additional charge, 
and returned dead letters shall be restored to 
the writers thereof free of charge. Letters bear- 
ing indorsement of a request for return to the 
writers, shall be returned without additional 
postage charge. Money orders may be issued 
for any sum not exceeding $50, and the charge 
for a sum under twenty dollars shall be ten 
cents ; for an order exceeding twenty dollars, 
twenty-five cents. Money orders shall be valid 
only within one year after date, and in case of 
loss of a money order a duplicate may be issued 
without charge. All railroad companies shall 
carry without extra charge such printed matter 
1 as the Postmaster- General may direct. Any 
j person who shall wilfully injure or destroy any 
I mailable matter in any receiving box, on con- 
' viction thereof, shall be fined not more than five 
hundred dollars or be imprisoned not more than 
one year. The Postmaster-General may change 
the stvle of postage stamp now in use. [June 
12, 18GG.] 

Chap. CXXII. — Safe Keeping of Public 
J/o»e>/. — Provides that disbursing officers of the 
rnitetl States shall deposit the public money 
with the Treasurer or some Assistant Treasurer 
! of the United States. The depositing of public 
j money elsewhere than as authorized by law, or 
j the lending of any money, is judged an embezzle- 
ment of the money, and upon conviction thereof, 
the offending officer shall be imprisoned not 
less than one year nor more than ten years, or 
be fined not more than the amount embezzled, 
nor less than $1,000, or both. Any banker or 
any other person who shall receive, knowingly, 
from any disbursing officer, any public money, 
by way of loan or accommodation, or otherwise, 
than in payment of a debt against the United 
States, shall be deemed guilty of embezzlement 
of public money, and punished as above pro- 
vided in this Act. [June 14, 1866.] 

Chap. CXXIII. — Settlement of Accounts. — 
Provides that all moneys raised in the United 
States for the benefit of refugees or freedmen, 
received by an officer of the United States, shall 
be charged against such officer on the books of 
the Treasury Department, as if such moneys had 
been drawn from the Treasury of the United 
States. When accounts are rendered for expen- 
ditures for refugees or freedmen which cannot 
be settled for want of specific appropriations 
the same may be paid out of the fund for the 
relief of refugees and freedmen. [June 15, 
1866.] 

Chap. CXXIV. — Inter-State Oommtinicatiaf.. 
— Authorizes every railroad company in the 



United States, whose road is operated by steam, 
to carry upon and over its road, boats, bridges, 
and ferries, all passengers, troops, Government 
supplies, mails, freight, &c., on their way from 
any State to another State, and to receive com- 
pensation therefor, and to connect with roads of 
other States so as to form continuous lines for 
the transportation of the same to the place of 
destination. [June 15, 1866.] 

Chap. CXXVII. — IJomestead Law. — Provides 
that all the public lands in the States of Ala- 
bama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and 
Florida, shall be disposed of according to the 
stipulations of the Homestead Law of May 20, 
1862, and the act of .March 21, 1864, with this 
restriction, that until after the expiration of two 
years after the passage of this act no entry shall 
be made for more than a half-quarter section, or 
eighty acres ; and in lieu of tlie sum of $10 re- 
quired to be paid by the second section of said 
act, there shall be paid the sum of $5 at the 
time of the issue of each patent; and that the 
public lands in said States shall be disposed of 
in no other manner after the passage of this act : 
Provided, That no distinction or discrimination 
shall be made in the construction or execution 
of this act on account of race or color : And 
provided further, That no mineral lands shall 
be liable to entry and settlement under its pro- 
visions. Sec. 2. That section second of the 
above-cited Homestead Law, entitled " An act 
to secure homesteads to actual settlers on the 
public domain," approved May 20, 1862, be so 
amended as to read as follows : That the person 
applying for the benefit of this act shall, upon 
application to the register of the land-office in 
which he or she is about to make such entry, 
make affidavit before the said register or re- 
ceiver that he or she is the head of a family, or 
is 21 years or more of age, or shall have per- 
formed service in the army or navy of the 
United States, and that such application is made 
for his or her exclusive use and benefit, and that 
said entry is made for the purpose of actual set- 
tlement and cultivation, and not either directly 
or indirectly for the use or benefit of any other 
person or persons whomsoever ; and upon filing 
the said affidavit witli the register or receiver, 
and on payment of $5, when the entry is not 
more than 80 acres, he or she shall there- 
upon be permitted to enter the amount of 
land specified : Provided, hoicerer. That no 
certificate shall be given, or patent issued 
therefor, until the expiration of five years 
from the date of such entry, and if at the ex- 
piration of such time, or at any time within two 
years thereafter, the person making such entn,-, 
or if he be dead, his widow, or in case of her 
death, his heirs or devisee ; or in case of a 
widow making such entry, her heirs or devisee, 
in case of her death, shall prove by two credible 
witnesses that he, she, or they, have resided upon 
or cultivated the same for the term of five years 
immediately succeeding the time of filing the 
affidavit aforesaid, and shall make affidavit that 
no part of said land has been alienated, and 
that he will bear true allegiance to the govern- 
ment of the United States ; then, in such case, 
he, she, or they, if at that time a citizen of the 
United States, shall be entitled to a patent, as 
in other cases provided by law. And provided 
furtlier. That in case of the death of both father 



THE TRIBUTE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



and mother, leaving an infant child or children, 
under 21 years of age, the right and fee shall 
Inure to the benefit of said infant child or chil- 
dren ; and the executor, administrator, or guar- 
dian may, at any time within two years after 
the death of the survi\'ing parent, and in ac- 
cordance with the laws of the State in which 
such children, for the time being, have their 
domicile, sell said land for the benefit of said 
infants, but for no other purpose, and the pur- 
chaser shall acquire the absolute title by the 
purchase, and be entitled to a patent from the 
United States, on the payment of the office fees, 
and sum of money herein specified : Provided, 
That until the first day of January, 1867, any 
person applying for the benefit of this act shall, 
in addition to the oath hereinbefore required, 
also make oath that he has not borne arms 
against the United States, or given aid and com- 
fort to its enemies. [June 21, 1866.] 

CHiP. CX^Wll.-Iieimhursement ofWeM Vir- 
ginia. — An act to reimburse West Virginia for 
moneys expended for the United States in en- 
rolling, equipping, and paying military forces to 
aid in suppressing the rebellion. [June 21, '66.] 

Ch.\p. CXXlX.—T/t/droffraphio Ojfice.—Xn 
act to establish a hydrographic oflice in the 
Navy Department. [June 21, 1866.] 

Cb-ip. CXXX. — Howard Institute. — Incor- 
porates the " Howard Institute and Home," of 
the District of Columbia, the object of which is 
declared to be the establishment of a charitable 
institution for the instruction of freedmen in the 
industrial pursuits of life, and fit tliem for inde- 
pendent self-support, and to afford a temporary 
home for such freedmen as may from sickness, 
misfortune, age, or infirmity, require fostering 
care until otherwise relieved. [June 21, 1866.] 

Cu.iP. CXXXl.— Pay maniem. — An act to 
regulate the appointment of paymasters in the 
navy, and explanatory of an act for the better 
organization of the pay department of the navy. 
[June 21. 1866.] 

Chap. Q.Xti.-Revision of United States Laws. 
— Provides for the revision and consolidation 
of the statute laws of the United States. [June 
27, 1866.] 

Chap. CXLlll.— Patent Office Fees.-VroviAes 
that the appellant for the first time from the de- 
cision of the primary examiner to the examiners- 
In-chief, shall pay a fee of $10 into the Patent 
Office. [June 27, 1866.] 

Chap. CLV. — Washington Territory. — 
Amends the organic act of Washington Terri- 
tory. The sessions of the Legislature are to be 
loiennial, the members of the Council to be 
elected for four years, and the members of the 
Housef or two years. [June 29, 1S66.] 

QnKV.ClAX-L'nion Pa'Cifc Railroad. -'ih.UU 
an act to amend the act of 1864, which amended 
the act of 18r)2. This amendatory act authorizes 
the Union Pacific Railroad Company's eastern 
division to designate the general route of their 
said road, and to file a map thereof, as now re- 
quired by law, at any time before the first day 
of December, 1866 ; and upon the filing of said 
map, showing the general route of said road, the 
lands along the entire line thereof, so far as the 
same may be designated, shall be reserved from 
sale by order of the Secretary of the Interior. 
Said company shall be entitled to only tlie same 
amount of the bonds of the United States to aid 



in the construction of their line of railroad and 
telegraph as they would have been entitled to if 
they had connected their said line with the 
Union Pacific Railroad on the one hundredth 
degree of longitude as now required by law. 
The said company shall connect their line of 
railroad and telegraph with the Union Pacific 
Railroad, but not at a point more than fifty miles 
westwardly from the meridian of Denver, in 
Colorado. Sec. 2. The Union Pacific Railroad 
Company, with the consent and approval of the 
Secretary of the Interior, are authorized to 
locate, construct, and continue their road from 
Omaha, in Nebraska Territory, westward, ac- 
cording to the best and most practicable route, 
and without reference to the initial point on the 
one hundredth meridian of west longitude, as 
now provided bylaw, in a continuous completed 
line, until they shall meet and connect with the 
Central Pacific Railroad Company of California ; 
and the Central Pacific Railroad Company of 
California, with the consent and approval of the 
Secretary of the Interior, are hereby authorized 
to locate, construct, and continue their road 
eastward, in a continuous completed line, until 
they shall meet and connect with the L'nion 
Pacific Railroad : Provided. That each of the 
above-named Companies shall have the right, 
when the nature of the work to be done, by 
reason of deep cuts and tunnels, shall, for the 
expeditious construction of the Pacific Rail- 
road, require it, to work for an extent of not to 
exceed 300 miles in advance of their continuous 
completed lines. [July 3, 1866.] 

Chap. CLX. — Lands to Jfic/tigan. — Grants 
lands to Michigan to aid in the construction of a 
Ship Canal to connect the waters of Lake Supe- 
rior with the lake known as Lac La Belle, to be 
selected from the odd numbered sections of land 
nearest the said canaL [July 3, 1866 ] 

Chap. CLXI.— Lands to Jfichigan.— Grants 
lands to Michigan to aid in the construction of 
a Harbor and Ship Canal at Portage Lake, Kee- 
wenaw Point, Lake Superior. [July 3, 1866.] 

Chap. ChXll.--^^itro-Ol>/eerine.— Prohibits 
the transportation of Nitro-Glycerine on any 
vessel or vehicle, ic, used for transporting 
passengers, and any person, company, or cor- 
poration which shall knowingly violate the pro- 
visions of this section shall be liable to a fine of 
not less than $1,000 nor more than $10,000. 
[July 3, 1866.] 

Chap. CLXXYIl.— Pilot PeguIations. — 'So 
State shall make any discrimination in the rate 
of pilotage or half pilotage between vessels sail- 
ing between the ports of one State, and vessels 
sailing between the ports of different States, or 
any discrimination against vessels propelled in 
whole or In part by steam, or against National 
vessels of the United 8tates. [July 13, 1806.] 

Chap. CLXXX.— Port of 7>^?u-e/-y.— Makes 
■Whitehall, New York, a port of delivery. [July 
13, 1866.] 

Chap. CLXXXJ.— Three Months' Pay.— En- 
titles to the three months' pay proper, provided 
for by act of March 3, 1865, all ofiicers of vol- 
unteers below the rank of Brigadier-Creneral, 
who were in service on March 8, 1865, and whose 
resignations were presented and accepted, or 
who were mustered out at their own request, or 
otherwise honorably discharged from the service 
after the 9th April,"l865. [July 18, 186j.] 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



Chap. CLXXXIV.—TnternalJieventie Act— 
An act to reduce internal taxation, and to 
amend tlie former internal revenue acts. This 
bin is too long to be condensed here. It can be 
Been at the office of every United States assessor 
and collector. [July 13, 1866.] _. . 

Chip GC.—Ffeedmen's Biireari.—SVe give 
this important bill, together with the veto mes- 
sage of the President, and the vote by which it 
was carried over the veto, on another page. 

CHAP. CCl.— Smuggling.— An act further to 
prevent smuggling and for other purposes. 
Authorizes officers of the harbors and other 
agents of the Treasury Department, to board 
and search any vessel, to stop vessels under 
way seize them and arrest persons on board for 
breach of law. Vessels of any kind may 
likewise be stopped and searehed, and seized 
for breach of law. The Secretary of the Treas- 
ury may, from time to time, prescribe regula- 
tions for the search of persons and baggage, and 
for the employment of female inspectors for the 
examination and search of persons of their own 
sex. All persons coming from foreign countries 
shall be liable to detention or search by author- 
ized officers or agents of the Government, un- 
der such regulations as the Secretary of the 
Treasury shall prescribe. Prescribes penalties 
for fraudulently or knowingly bringing into the 
United States any goods contrary te law, for 
forcibly resisting officers of customs, etc. _ Offi- 
cers and persons making searches and seizures 
may demand assistance of persons within three 
miles, and penalties are prescribed for refusing 
assistance. [July IS, 18G6.] 

CII.VP. QC\S..—Arjncultural CoUegex, dr.— 
Extends the time in which the several States 
may comply tv ith the provisions of the act of 
July 2, lb6;i, entitled " An Act Donating Public 
Lands to the several States and Territories 
which may provide Colleges for the benefit of 
Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts," three years 
from the passage of this act. When any Terri- 
tory shall beeorae a State, it shall have three 
years within which to accept the benefits of this 
act. If any State has heretofore expressed its 
acceptance of the act herein referred to, it shall 
have five years within which to provide at least 
one college after the time for providing such 
college, according to the act of July 2, 1862, 
shall have expired. [July 23, 1806.] 

CILVP. CCX. — Supreme Court of the Uni- 
ted Statey.— Provides that no vacancy in the 
office of Associate Justice of the United States 
shall be filled by appointment until the number 
of Associate Justices shall be reduced to six, 
and thereafter the Supreme Court shall consist 
of a Chief Justice of the United States and six 
Associate Justices. Sec. 2. The 1st and 2d Cir- 
caits shall remain as now constituted ; the Dis- 
tricts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Dela- 
ware shall cons'titute the 3d Circuit; the Dis- 
tricts of Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, 
North Carolina and South Carolina shall consti- 
tute the 4th Circuit ; the Districts of Georgia, 
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and 
Texas shall constitute the 5th Circuit ; the Dis- 
tricts of Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and Tennes- 
see shaU constitute the 6th Circuit ; the Dis- 
tricts of Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin shall 
constitute the 7th Circuit; the Districts of Min- 
nesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and Arkansas 



shall constitute the 8th Circuit, and the Dis- 
tricts of California, Oregon and Nevada shall 
constitute the 9th Circuit. [July 23, 1SG6.] j 

CHAP. CCXU.^Lands to A'a»«a«.— Grants , 
lands to aid in the construction of a railroad 
and telegraph from Elwood, westwardly via 
Maryville so as to effect a junction with the 
Union Pacific Railroad, with the usual guarantees 
to settlers under the homestead and other laws^ 
The sections within ten miles of the road which 
are not granted shall not be sold for less than 
double the minimum price of the public land. 
For every ten consecutive miles of road com- 
pleted patents shall issue for so many sections of 
land as lie opposite and coterminous with the 
said completed sections. If the road is not 
completed within ten years, the land remauung 
unpatented shall revert to the Umted States. 
[July 23, 1866.1 ^ .r- 7 t^ 

Chap. CCXUl.—J!egi.<ttry of r<?A<!««.— De- 
clares that the act passed Feb. 10 1S66, shall 
not affect or limit the operation of the act ot Ma 
Dec, 1852. [July 23, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXXX.— Telegraph Lme^.— Grants to 
all telegraph companies now organized, or here- 
after to be organized, the right to construct a tele- 
graph line over any portion of the public domain 
of the United States. Such companies may take 
from the public land such stone, timber, and other 
materials, as are necessary for the construction 
of their lines, and they may pre-empt such por- 
tion of the unoccupied public land subject to 
pre-emption as they may need for stations, but 
such stations shall not be within 15 miles of each 
other The communications of the United 
States shall have priority over all other business, 
at rates which the Postmaster-General may fix. 
The rights hereby granted cannot be transferred. 
The United States may, after five years from the 
passage of this act, purchase all the telegraph 
lines at an appraised value, to be ascertained 
by five persons, two of whom shall be chosen by 
the Postmaster-General, two by the companies 
interested, and one by the four previously se- 
lected. [July 24, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXXXI.— ^V«ry 0#ce^-s.— Increases 
the number of line officers on the active Ust of 
the Navy, and creates the office of admiral. 
Sec. 2. Authorizes the appointment of certainof 
the line officers of the navy on the active list 
from those officers who have served in the volun- 
teer naval service for a period of not less than 
two years, and who are either now in that service 
or have been honorably discharged therefrom. 
Sec 3 Authorizes the Secretary of the Navy to 
appoint a board of naval officers to examine the 
claims of all candidates under the provisions of 
Section 2. Sec. 4. Authorizes the Secretary of 
the Navv to retain such volunteer officers as the 
exigencies of the sers'ice may require. The 
annual compensation of the admiral shall be 
110,000. Naval constructors and first and second 
assistant engineers shall be appointed by the 
President, with the consent of the Senate. [July 
25, 1S66.] , „ 

Chap. CCXXXn.— <?)'ao'e of General— Re- 
vives the grade of General of the Army of the 
United States. The general to be appointed by 
the President, with the advice and consent of 
the Senate, and to be selected from among the 
officers in the military service of the United 
States most distinguished for courage, skill, and 



32 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



ability. The pay of the general shall be $400 
per month. The act also provides for the aide^ 
of the general, their number, rank, and pay. 
[July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXXXIV. — PaasengerK in Steam- 
boats — Steamhoat iTispectors.^-PtovideS Meas- 
ures for the safety of the lives of passengers on 
board of vessels propelled in whole or in part by 
steam, and regulates the salaries of steamboat 
inspectors. Licensed engineers or pilots wrong- 
fully refusing to serve as such, or pilots refusing 
to admit certain persons into pilot house, are to 
forfeit $300. All vessels to be subject to the 
navigation laws of the United States. Passen- 
ger vessels to have the life-boats required by 
law provided with suitable boat disengaging 
apparatus. [July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXXXV. — Widoict' Pensions, dc— 
Extends the provisions of the pension laws so 
aa to include provost-marshals and enrolling 
officers who have been killed while in the dis- 
charge of their duties, and provost-marshals 
shall rank as captains, deputy provost-marshala 
as first lieutenants, and enrolling otflcers as 
second lieutenants. Pensions of widows shall 
be increased $2 for each child under 16 years of 
age, and in case the widow has died or married 
again the children shall receive the same in- 
crease of pension as the mother would have 
been entitled to. If any person, during the 
pendency of his application for a pension, and 
after the proof has been completed, shall die, 
whether by reason of a wound received or dis- 
ease contracted while in line of duty, his repre- 
sentatives shall receive the accrued pension to 
which he would have been entitled had his cer- 
tificate been issued. [July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXXXVIIL— .ffowse of Correction.— 
Establishes in the District of Columbia a House 
of Correction for Boys. [July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXXXIX.— 5o/r?!-«/-«' and Sailors' 
Union. — Incorporates " The Soldiers' and 
Sailors' Union," at Washington, D. C. [July 25, 
1866.] 

Chap. CCXL. — Marriacies and Children of 
Colored Personal. — Legalizes marriages of cer- 
tain colored persons in the District of Columbia, 
and provides that their children shall be deemed 
legitimate. [July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXhl.— Lands to Xajwas.— Grants 
lands to the State of Kansas to aid in the con- 
struction of the Kansas and Neosho Valley Rail- 
road and its extension to Red River. [July 25, 
1866.] 

Chap. CCXLII. — Lands granted for Rail- 
roads and Telegraphs. — Grants public lands 
(not mineral) to aid in the construction of a 
railroad and telegraph line from the Central 
PaciBc Railroad in California to Portland in 
Oregon. [July 25, 1866.] 

CuAP. CCXLV. — Electimis of Senators.— Uega- 
lates the mode in which Senators of the United 
States shall hereafter be elected by the Legisla- 
tures of the several States. Each House shall, 
by a viva voce vote of each member present, 
name a person for Senator on the second Tues- 
day after the meeting and organization thereof. 
On the day following the Houses shall meet in 
joint assembly, and if the same person shall 
have received a majority of all the votes cast in 
each House, he shall be declared duly elected 
Senator of the United States ; but if not, then 



the joint assembly shall proceed to choose, by a 
viva voce vote, a person for the purpose afore- 
said, ami the person who shall receive a majority 
of all the votes of the joint assembly, a majority 
of the members of each House being present, 
shall be declared duly elected. If such Senator 
Is not elected on the first day, the joint assembly 
shall meet and take at least one vote per day 
during the session of the Legislature. Sec. 2 
provides that when a vacancy exists at a meet- 
ing of the Legislature, the same proceedings 
shall be held on the second Tuesday after their 
meeting and organization, and when a vacancy 
shall happen during the session of the Legisla- 
ture, then on the second Tuesday after no- 
tice of such vacancy shall have been received. 
Sec. 3. The Governor of the State shall certify 
the election of a Senator to the President of the 
Senate of the United States. [July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCX1.1X.— Soldiers' and SaiUrs' Or- 
phan Home. — Incorporates " The National Sol- 
diers' and Sailors' Orphan Home," at "Washing- 
ton, D. C. [July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCLII.— Por« of .EVi^^v/.— Changes the 
port of entry in Puget's Sound, 'Washington 
Territory, from Port Angelos to Port Townsend. 
[July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCLV. — Calais. — An Act to authorize 
the entry and clearance of vessels at the Port 
of Calais, Me. [July 25, 1866.] 

Chap. CCLXII.— Z>(te/(es and Canals.— D^- 
clares all mineral lands of the United States to 
be free and open to exploration by citizens of 
the United States. Patents for mineral lands 
may be issued to any claimant or association of 
claimants who shall have occupied and improved 
the same in accordance with the local customs, 
and have expended in improvememts and actual 
labor thereon at least $1,000. Sections 3, 4, 5, 
and 6, contain regulations for the Issuing of 
patents. The President is authorized, at his dis- 
cretion, to establish additional land districts 
and to appoint the necessary officers. The right 
of way is granted for the construction of high- 
ways over public lands not reserved for public 
uses. Sec. 9. Protects rights to the use of water 
for mining, agricultural, and other purposes, 
where such rights have vested and accrued, and 
confirms the right of way for the construction 
of ditches and canals for the said purposes. 
Wherever homesteads shall have been located 
on mineral lands on which no valuable mines 
have been discovered, and which are purely agri- 
cultural, the owners shall have a right of pre- 
emption thereto. Upon the survey of the lands 
aforesaid, the Secretary of the Interior may 
designate such lands more purely agricultural, 
and they shall be open to pre-emption and set- 
tlement. [July 36, 1866.] 

Chap. CCLXV.— Prfc/A<j .BrriZ/'oa^.— Autho- 
rizes the issue of Pacific Railroad bonds of a 
greater denomination than $1,000. [Julv 26, '66.] 

Chap. CChXXX.- Weighing of Exports.- 
Imposes a duty of three cents per 100 pounds 
upon all weighable articles hereafter exported 
upon which a drawback or return duty is 
allowed. [July 26, 1866.] 

Chap. CChXX.— Lands to .ffan.ws.— Grants 
land to aid in the construction of a Southern 
branch of the Union Pacific Railway and Tele- 
graph, from Fort Riley, Kansas, to Fort Smith, 
Arkansas. [July 26, 1866.] 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



Chap. CCLXX\llI.— Lands for RaUroad. 
and Telegraph Pitrpoiie-i. — Incorporates the 
Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company, and 
grants lands to aid in the construction of a 
Railroad and Telegraph Line from the States of 
Missouri and Arkansas, to the Pacific Coast. 
[July 27, 1866.] 

Chap. CCLXXXll.— Refund hiff of Taxes.— 
Authorizes the refunding of license taxes of 
wholesale dealers where they may have been 
overcharged. [July 27, 1866.1 

Chap. CCLXXXIV. — Apjiraiser in Keio 
York City. — Reorganizes the Appraiser's office 
in New York. The salary of the Appraiser is 
fixed at $4,000, and the Assistant Appraisers at 
$3,000. [July 27, 1866.1 

Chap. CCLXXXV.— /7r6 in Portla>u7.—\a- 
thorizes the admission, free of duty, of all con- 
tributions of building materials for Portland. 
[July 27, 1866.] 

Chap. CCLXXXXl.—Sheath^Jirnives.—An act 
to prevent the wearing of sheath-knives by 
American seamen. [July 27, 1866.] 

_ Chap. CChXXXVll.— Public Printing.— Pro- 
vides regulations for {he printing of public 
documents and the purchase of paper for the 
public printing. [July 27, 1866.] 

Chap. CCLXXXVlII.—SuiU of Aliens.— \n- 
thorizes the removal of the suits against aliens 
from the State Courts to the Circuit Courts of the 
United States, when the matter in dispute ex- 
ceeds $500. [July 27, 1866.] 

Chap. CCLXXXIX—yehrasX-a.—An act au- 
thorizing the reimbursement to the Territory of 
Nebraska of certain expenses incurred in re- 
pelling Indian hostilities. [July 27, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXCIU.—Colle<'tors of Custom^.- 
Fixes the salaries of certain collectors of cus- 
toms ; creates a collection district in Texas to 
be called the district of Corpus Christi ; makes 
Indianola, Tex., the port of entry for the district 
of Saluria, instead of La Salle. [July 28, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXCVI.—Oi vil Hxpevses Appropri- 
ation. — An act making appropriations for sun- 
dry civil expenses of the Government for the 
year ending June .30, 1867, and for other pur- 
poses. This act raises the salaries of members 
of Congress to $5.(X)0 per annum, and that of 
the Speaker to $8,000. It gives an additional 
bounty of $100 to soldiers who served during 
the rebellion for not less than three years, and 
to soldiers who served not less than two years 
$50, and also to the widow, minor children or 
parents of any such soldier who died in the 
service. No soldier who has bartered, sold or 
transferred his discharge papers, or any interest 
in the bounty provided by this or any other act 
of Congress, shall be entitled to receive any ad- 
ditional bounty whatever ; and when application 
is made by any soldier for said bounty he shall 
be required to make oath or affirmation that he 
has not so bartered, sold or transferred his dis- 
charge papers or any interest in any bounty as 
aforesaid, and no claim shall be entertained 
except upon receipt of the claimant's discharge 
papers, accompanied by the statement under 
oath. [July 28, 1S66.] 

Chap. CCXCyiU.—Rerenjiefram Imports:— 
Impo.ses a duty on cigars of $.3 per pound, and in 
addition 50 per cent, ad valorem ; on cotton, 3c. 
per lb.; on all compounds of which distilled 
spirits are a component pari the same duty as 



on spirituous liquors. Section 2 allows vessels 
trading between the Society Islands or Sand- 
wich Islands and the United States to pay 
tunnage duty but once a year. Section 3 sus- 
pends the prohibition of the export of 



half of certain persons. All fishing bounties 
are repealed. Ooods destined for the British 
Provinces may be transmitted free of duty 
through the United States. Section 13 autho- 
rizes the establishment of a Bureau of Statistics 
in the Treasury Department. [Julv 28, 1866.] 

Chap. CCXCIX.—J/ilitari/ Peace Establi^fv- 
ment. — Provides that the military peace estab- 
lishment of the United States shall hereafter 
consist of five regiments of artillery, ten regi- 
ments of cavalry, forty-fi^e regiments of in- 
fantry, and the professors and cadets at 
West Point. Section 2 regulates the organ- 
ization of artillery regiments. Section 8 pro- 
vides that two of the cavalry regiments shall 
be of colored men. The original vacancies in 
the grade of 1st and 2d Lieutenants shall be 
filled by selections from among the officers and 
soldiers of volunteer cavalry, and two-thirds of 
the original vacancies in each of the grades 
above that of first lieutenant shall be filled by 
selection from the officers of volunteer cavalry, 
and one-third from officers of the regular army, 
all of whom shall have served two years in the 
field during the war and have been distinguished 
for capacity and good conduct. Sec. 4. The forty- 
five regiments of infantry shall consist of the first 
ten regiments of ten companies each now in serv- 
ice ; of twenty-seven regiments of ten companies 
each, to be formed by adding two companies to 
each battalion of the remaining nine regiments ; 
and of eight new regiments of ten companies 
each, four regiments of which shall be of colored 
men, and four regiments to be known as the 
Veteran Reserve Corps. All the original vacan- 
cies in the grade of first and second lieutenant 
shall be filled by selection from among the offi- 
cers and soldiers of volunteers, and one-half of 
the original vacancies in each of the grades 
above that of first lieutenant shall be filled by 
L election from among the oflicers of volunteers, 
and the remainder from officers of the regular 
army. The Veteran Reserve Corps shall be offi- 
cered by appointment from any officers and sol- 
diers of either volunteer or regular, who have 
been wounded in the line of their duty, and 
who may yet be competent for garrison duty. 
Section 5. Appointments made from among vol- 
unteers shall be apportioned among the various 
States in proportion to the number of troops fur- 
nished by them during the rebellion, reduced to 
an average of three years' term of service, ex- 
cepting California, Oregon, and Nevada. Sec- 
tions 6 and 7 regulate regimental organization. 
Section 8. All enlistments into the army shall 
hereafter be for five years for cavalry and three 
for artillery and infantry. Men may enlist who 
were wounded in battle, whose wounds do not 
disable them for garrison duty, and they shall 
be assigned to the Veteran Reserve Corps. Sec. 
9. There shall be one General, one Lieutenant- 
General, five Major-Generals, and ten Brigadier- 
Generals. Section 10 reorganizes the Adjutant- 
General's Department. Section 11. There shall 
be four Inspector-Generalsj with the rank of 
Colonels of Cavalry, and thre6 Assistant Inspeo- 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



tor-Generals, with the rank of Lieutenant-Col- 
onels of Cavalry, and two Assistant Inspec- 
tor-Generals, with the rank of Majors of Cav- 
alry. Sections 12 to 23 reorganize the various 
departments. Section a4. Candidates for com- 
mission shall pass an examination. Section 25 
abolishes the office of sutler, and authorizes the 
subsistence department to sell all that soldiers 
may need. Section 26. The President may de- 
tail twenty officers to give instruction on mili- 
tary science to students in colleges or universi- 
ties. Section 27. Schools shall be established at 
garrisons to instruct the men in the common 
English branches. Section 28. No one who 
served in any capacity under the so-called Con- 
federate States Government may be appointed to 
office in the army. Section 33 abolishes the 
Provost-Marshal-General's Bureau in thirty days 
after the passage of this act. [July 28, 1866.] 

Chap. CCCl.— Metric System.. — Authorizes 
the use of the metric system of weights and 
measures. [July 28, 1866.] 

Chap. CCCIII.— Captors of the Assassins.— 
Awards to the captors of Payne, Atzerott, 
Booth, and Harrold, their respective shares of 
the rewards offered. [July 28, 1866.] 

Chap. CCC\.— Transportatwnfor Diitabled 
SoMiers.— Authorizes the Secretary of War to 
furnish transportation to discharged soldiers to 
whom artificial limbs are furnished by the 
Government. [July 28, 1866.] 

Chap. CCCXII. — Promotions in the Navy. — 
Prevents officers of the navy from being de- 
prived of their regular promotion on account of 
wounds received in battle, and fi.xes the pay of 
officers on the retired list. The accounting offi- 
cers of the Treasury may allow to officers of the 
navy credit for losses of property and funds oc- 
casioned by accidental circumstances. [July 
28, 1866.] 

PUBLIC RESOLUTIONS. 

No. 1. — Destitute Indians. — Authorizes the 
President to expend the unexpended balance of 
the fund for the suppression of the slave ti'ade, 
for the relief of destitute Indians. [Approved 
Dec. 21, 186.\] 

No. 8. — E(rpomt/ion at Paris. — .Accepts the 
invitation of the Government of France to take 
part in the Industrial Exposition at Paris. [Jan. 
16, 1866.] 

No. 4. — Orphan's Home. — Donates certain 
public property in Iowa to the Soldiers' Home of 
, that State. [Jan. 22, 1866.] 

No. 6. — Madison^s Writings. — Directs the 
distribution of the writings of James Madison. 
[Feb. 7, 1866.] 

No. 8.— i'^a/'rao'M^.— Thanks to Vice-Admiral 
Farragut and to the officers and men under his 
command, for their gallantry and good conduct 
in the action in Mobile Bay on the 5th of August, 
1864. [Feb. 10. 1866.] 

No. W.— Telegraph.— Authorizes the Secre- 
tary of the Navy to detail one steam vessel from 
the Pacific Squadron to assist in making sur- 
veys, Ac, for the laying of a telegraph cable 
, between America and Asia. [Feb. 26, 1866.] 
I No. 11. — Missing Soldiers. — Reimburses 
Miss Clara Barton for expenses incurred in dis- 
covering missing soldiers of the United States. 
[March 10, 18C.6] 

No. 12.— West Virginia.— Qivea the consent 



of Congress to the transfer of the Counties of 
Berkley and Jefferson to the State of 'West Vir- 
ginia. [March 10, 1866.] 

No. IS.— Soldiers' Orphans.— Authorizes the 
Secretary of War to transfer to the National 
Home for Sailors' and Soldiers' Orphans of 
Washington City, certain stores not needed for 
the use of the Government. [March 10, 1866.] 

No. -n.-Laics of U. &— Provides for the 
publication, by Little, Brown A Co., of the Laws 
of the United States. [March .31, 1866.] 

No. 20. — Bountt/. — ^Declares that " in the line 
of duty," in the Bounty Act of March 3, 1865, 
shall mean while actually in service under mili- 
tary orders, not at the time on furlough or leave 
of absence, nor engaged in any unlawful or un- 
authorized pursuit. [April 12, 1866.] 

No. 21. — Soldiers' Grares. — Provides that 
the Secretary of War shall preserve from dese- 
cration the graves of soldiers who died in the 
the military service of the United States. [April 
13, 1866.] 

No. 24. — Foreign Convicts. — Protests against 
pardons by foreign Governments of persons con- 
victed of infamous offences on condition of emi- 
gration to the United States. [April 17, 1S66] 

No. 21.— Thanks to Gen. Ihiticock.—Th^hks 
to Major-General Winfield S. Hancock. [April 
21, 1866.] 

No. Z2.— National Gratitude.— Th&nYs, of 
the nation to officers, soldiers, and seamen. 
[May 3, 1866.] 

No. 85.— Pe/ro^^wn!.— Exempts Crude Petro- 
leum from internal tax. [May 9, 1866.] 

No. Kl.— Emperor o/iJMS«ia.— Congratulates 
the Emperor of Russia on his escape from as- 
sassination, and requests the President of the 
United States to forward a copy of this resolu- 
tion to the Emperor of Russia. [May 16, 1866.] 

No. 41. — Medals. — Authorizes certain medals 
to be distributed to veteran soldiers free of 
postage. [May 26, 1866] 

No. 42. — Quarantine. — Authorizes the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury to make and carry into 
effect such regulations of quarantine as he may 
deem necessary to guard against the cholera. 
[May 26, 1866.] 

No. Aio.— Bounties to Colored Soldiers.— The 
omission in the muster rolls of the words "free 
on or before April 19, 1S61," shall not deprive 
any colored soldier of the bounty to which he 
is entitled. Evidence that a colored soldier and 
the woman claimed to be his wife or widow were 
joined together by some ceremony, deemed by 
them to be obligatory, followed by their living 
together as man and wife, shall be deemed sulB- 
cient proof of such marriage for the purpose of 
securing any arrears of pay, &c., due any col- 
ored soldier at the time of his death. [June 15. 
1806.] 

No. 4S. — Constitutional Awendn^ent. — Joint 
resolution proposing an amendment to the Con- 
stitution of the United States. We gi^■e thif 
important resolution in full on another page. 

No. 49. — Miiitiiry Academy. — The age of ad 
mission to the Military Academy shall hereafter 
be between the ages of 17 and 22 years; but 
any person who has served honorably not less 
than one year in the Army of the United States, 
shall be eligible to appointment up to the age of 
24 years. Cadets shall be appointed one year 
before they are admitted. The person autho- 



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1867. 



rized to nominate cadets shall hereafter nomi- 
nal* not less than five candidates for each 
vacancy, and the selection of one shall be made 
according to their respective merits and quali- 
fications. In like manner, the President shall 
nominal* 50 at large. [June 16, 1866.] 

No. 52. — Indian Regiments. — Provides for 
the payment of bounty to certain Indian regi- 
ments. [June 18, 1866.] 

No. 57 — American, Stnte Paper.9. — Autho- 
rizes the distribution of surplus copies of Amer- 
ican state papers in the custody of the Secre- 
tary of the Interior. [June 23, 1866.] 

No. 5S.— Vermo>if.—Pays the Slate of Ver- 
mont the sum expended for the protection of 
the frontier against the invasion from Canada 
in 1864. [June 23, 1866.] 

No. 66. — Rrposition at Pariii. — Makes pro- 
vision to enable the people of the United States 
to participate in the advantages of the Univer- 
sal Exhibition at Paris in 1867. [July 5, 1866.] 
No. 67. — Bountij. — No enlisted man detailed 
as clerk or for any other duty in any executive 
bureau, headquarters or elsewhere, shall by 
such detail be deprived of any rights to boun- 
ties now due or hereafter to become due. [July 
13, 1866.] 

No. 69.— Por^/rtj?^?.— Authorizes the President 
to place at the disposal of the authorities of 
Portland, Maine, tents, camp and hospital furni- 
ture and clothing for the use of families ren- 
dered houseless by the late fire. [July 14, 1866.] 
No. 73. — Tennessee. — Restores Tennessee to 
her former proper practical relation to the Union. 
[July 24, 1866.] 

No. l-l.—Rationji of Prisoners of War.— 
Provides that all United States soldiers, sailors, 
and marines who were held as prisoners of war 
in the Rebel States, shall be paid commutation 
of rations at cost prices during the period of 
their imprisonment. But no person who has 
sold his interest in such claim, nor any one who 
has bought such interest, shall be benefited by 
this resolution. [July 25, 1866.] 

No. 79. — Medals. — Gives medals and money 
to the officers and seamen of the vessels engaged 
in the rescue of the passengers of the wrecked 
steamer San Francisco. [July 26, 1866.] 
I No. Si.— Soldiers^ Oollege.—Oives cots and 
bedding to the Illinois Soldiers' College and Mili- 
tary Academy. [July 26, 1866.] 

No. 87. — Patj of Army Officers. — Allows any 
officer who may have entered orf his duty as 
commissioned officer, but was not mustered as 
such by reason of any cause beyond his control, 
within thirty days, increase of pay, according 
to his rank. The heirs or representatives of any 
officer whose muster shall be amended hereby, 
may receive the back pay and pension due 
under this resolution. [July 26, 1866.] 

No. 91. — History of the Rebellion. — Provides 
for the publication of the official History of the 
Rebellion. [July 27, 1866.] 
j No. 'i?,.— Metric <Sy.?*e/H.— Enables the Secre- 
' tary of the Treasury to furnish to each State 
one set of the standard weights and measures of 
the metric system. [July 27, 1866.] 

No. 98. — Statue of Lincoln. — Authorizes a 
contract with Vinnie Ream for a statue of 
Abraham Lincoln at $10,000. [July 28, 1866.] 

No. 99. — Tenne^se.p. — Extends the provisions 
of the Act of July 4, 18&4, limiting the juris- 



diction of the Court of Claims to the loyal citi- | 
zens of Tennessee. [July 28, 1866.] | 

No. 102. — Income Ta.r. — Relieves officers of 
the army from the payment of the special in- 
come tax of five per cent, upon their pay, which 
was not enforced against Ihem while in the field. 
[July 38, 1866.] 

PROCLAMATIONS. 
April 2, 1866.— Declares that the insurrection 
which heretofore existed in the States of Georgia, 
South Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina, Ten- 
nessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Arkansas, Missis- 
sippi, and Florida, is at an end, and is hence- 
forth to be so regarded. 

June 6, 1866. — It having become known to the 
President that " certain evil-disposed persons 
have, within the territory and jurisdiction of t