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Full text of "The tribute book : a record of the munificence, self-sacrifice and patriotism of the American people during the war for the union..."

O THE LIBRARY OF o 




ft*/ 

I 



THE 



TRIBUTE BOOK 



A RECORD OF 



THE MUNIFICENCE, SELF-SACRIFICE 



PATRIOTISM 



OF 



THE AMERICAN PEOPLE 

DURING THE WAR FOR THE UNIOX, 

Illustrate. 
BY FRAlNTK B. GOODRICH 



n , 

AUTHOR OF THE COURT OF NAPOLEON, ETC. 



" A TRIBUTE or A FREE-WILL OFFERING." DEUT. xvi. 10. 



NEW YORK: 

PUBLISHED BY DERBY & MILLER. 
1865. 



I - 




0. A. ALVORD. El.F.rTROTYPKR AND PRINTER. 



b 











: 





Book contains the story of seventy millions of dollars. 
Ordinarily, Millions do not^furnish an interesting or an instructive 
theme; he who writes their history has generally little to tell 
but a tale of selfishness and greed, or at best, of dogged in- 
dustry or stubborn self-denial. It is rare that he who collects 
the chronicles of dollars and cents, pounds, shillings and pence, 
can lay before the reader such a record of self-sacrifice as the 
following pages embody. These are not the annals of mercan- 
tile shrewdness, of wealth heaped up by toil or avarice, of 
riches painfully gathered by patience or speedily swept together 
by genius or fortune : they are the records of money given, 
not money earned; of a labor of love, not of labor for hire 
and salary ; of purse-strings unloosed, of the latch-string hang- 
ing free, of self-assessment, of tribute rendered always willingly, 
often unasked. This volume, in a word, is a digest the 
materials for twenty such having been condensed into one of 
the ways and means by which the American people, having 
been taxed to pay three thousand millions of dollars for the 
prosecution of a war of their own accord, without tax or toll, 
collected and expended nearly seventy millions more. Its contents, 



4 PREFACE. 

varied in their details, have, fundamentally, but one source, 
and treat of but one purpose. The intent was one and the 
same, whether the particular object in view was to promote 
enlistments, to procure representative recruits, to relieve drafted 
men, to succor the families of volunteers, to sustain the efficiency 
of the army, to care for the sick and wounded, to send aid 
to the distressed Unionist within the rebel lines, to feed the 
impoverished operative abroad, to build soldiers' rests, to endow 
orphan asylums, to give homes to living officers and erect 
monuments to dead ones. Our subject is the private generos- 
ity, the munificence, the philanthropy, of the War for the 
Union ; and no form in which money has been obtained out- 
side of taxation, legislation, and appropriation, whether by states, 
counties, or towns and expended for any purpose connected 
with the prosecution of the war, has been knowingly omitted. 

This stated, there is little else requiring notice in these 
preliminary pages. A grateful duty remains to the compiler 
for compilation and annotation have been his principal labors 
-that of acknowledging the assistance received, without which 
not one page could have been prepared, nor one fact obtained. 
A book like this has not been produced without the asking 
of innumerable questions ; and those to whom they have been 
addressed, have, in no case, let them pass unheeded, though 
they had often, doubtless, many more pressing things to do than 
answering them. To the corresponding secretaries of the various 
associations whose labors are here recorded, the thanks of the 
publishers are due, and are hereby cordially offered. To the 
presidents of the several commissions, to the superintendents of 
soldiers' homes and asylums, to the treasurers of bounty and 
defence funds, to all who have afforded aid, the publishers 
gratefully confess their indebtedness. 

One other debt they have to acknowledge, even if they 
are never able to pay it. Unassisted, they could not have 
assumed the financial responsibility of an undertaking so serious 



PREFACE. ii 

as the present ; nor is it probable that any of their colleagues 
of the book-producing profession would have cared to take upon 
themselves a burden, in one sense, so exhausting. It was fortunate 
that the gentleman who conceived the idea of collecting these 
chronicles and of laying them before the public in an attractive 
form, possessed also the means ; fortunate, too, that, having 
the means to work out the idea, he was not afraid to use 
them. If the public finds THE TRIBUTE BOOK a welcome ad- 
dition to the shelf or the table, if it discovers that the frame 
is not altogether unworthy of the canvas, if it sees any reason 
to rejoice that American designers and engravers upon wood, 
American paper-makers, American printers and binders have been 
enabled, in the exercise of their several arts and handicrafts, 
to bestow a fitting dress upon a peculiarly American theme, 
it will doubtless be glad to know whom to thank. Mr. 
GEORGE JONES, once of Vermont, now of New York, one of 
the proprietors of the New York Times, is the projector and 
patron of this work. Without saying that the seventy millions' 
voluntary outlay will become seventy-one millions, if this enter- 
prise ends in disaster, we may hint that the responsibility is 
quite enough for one pair of shoulders, and that, large or small, 
it has been gallantly borne. 

THE TRIBUTE BOOK is offered to the public, in the belief 
that the records are of value, whether they have been skil- 
fully collected or not, and that the people, who, for four 
years, have been making history, will not regret that one 
phase of it is thus early committed to print. 

NEW YORK, August, 1865. 



Ill 111 


rOT'^I^Pf "H \ 


ff\ 

to 

Engraved by Page 





. fylwutul 






Ho. Subject Designed by 


1. TITLE .... 


. NABT . 


. RICHARDSON 


2. ORNAMENTAL BORDER 


HOCIISTKIN 


BROSS .... 2 


COPYRIGHT . 


. WILL . 


. TBBST .... 2 


3 LETTERING . . . 


. . 


N. ORR .... 3 


4. =. . . 


4 . . . HITCHCOCK 


7 


5. DEDICATION 


WILL . 


. TRENT . . To FACF. 12 


6. INITIAL LETTER . 


SDEABMAN 


. RICHARDSON . . 15 


T. VALLEY FORGE . 


NAST 


DAVIS .... 20 


8. LADIES OF PHILADELPHIA WORKING FOR I 
v BILLING 3 
WASHINGTON'S ARMY . . . . J 


. RICHARDSON ... 22 


9 VIGNETTE . 


. WILL . 


u ... 25 


10. THE FIRST SUBSCRIPTION 


McLENAN 


. . . 26 


11. INITIAL LETTER . 


. . . HITCHCOCK 


. 26 


12. NEW BOOTS FOR OLD 


NAST . 


. DAVIS .... 40 


13. THE FRIGATE VANDERBILT . . . FBSW . 


N. ORR . . . . 41 


14. "THERE LET IT WAVE, AS 


IT WAVED OF OLD" Hows . 


. RICHARDSON ... 43 


15. THE LADIES OF AUGUSTA TREATING THE) 
V NAST . 
THIRD MAINE TO DOUGHNUTS . . \ 


DAVIS .... 45 


16. VIGNETTE . 


SHEABMAN 


. BRIGHTLY ... 69 


17. SIX AND EIGHTY-SIX KNITTING FOR THE J 
v WHITE 
SOLDIEHS \ 


8. OBB . , . .70 


18. VIGNETTE . 


. . . SHEARMAN 


. RICHARDSON ... 76 



Jfb. 
19. 

20. 
21. 


Sutyect. 
THE UNITED STATES SANITARY COMMISSION . 
POETKAIT OF DR. BELLOWS 
THE SANITARY COMMISSION IN THE HOSPITAL 
BEFORE THE BATTLE 


Deifigned by 
NAST . 
WILL . 
NAST . 
FENN . 


Engraved l>y 
DAVIS 

BOUBETT & IIoOPt-R 

. N. OKR . . . 


Page 

. 77 

77 
. 85 
87 


22. 


ALERT 


WHITE 




. SS 


23. 


SANITARY CHARADE: MET-A-PHYSICIAN 


McLENAN 


. RICHARDSON 


. 89 


24 


CHILDREN'S SOLDIERS' FAIR 


HOWARD . 


DAVIS . . . 


9S 


25. 


FAIR UPON A DOOR-STEP .... 


WHITE . 


. N. ORE . . 


. 101 


26. 


PICKING BLACKBERRIES FOR THE SOLDIERS 


NAST . 


DAVIS . 


103 


27. 


OFFICE OF A SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY . 


. . 


. . . 


. Ill 


28. 


VIGNETTE 


HEBRICK . 


N. ORR . 


113 


29. 


AID SOCIETY'S AID 





. . . . 


. 119 


30. 


STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL FOB THE SOLDIERS . 


HOPPIN 


RICHARDSON . . - 


121 


31. 


MR. MURDOCK READING TO SOLDIERS IN A ) 
HOSPITAL f 


A. R. WAUD . 


. RICHARDSON 


. 127 


32. 


MINUTE-MAN OF KALAMAZOO 


LUMLEY 


. 


137 


33. 


SANITARY CHARADE .... 


McLENAN 


. N. ORB 


. 14C 


34. 


BUSY FINGERS 


HOPPIN 


" . . 


157 


35. 


INITIAL LETTER . . . 


HlTCUCOCK . 


. TRENT 


. 158 


36. 


THE LAKE COUNTY DELEGATION . . 


CAKT 


RICHARDSON . 


161 


37. 


THE CHICAGO FAIR DINING-HALL 


. . 


V " '. . 


. 164 


38. 


ELLSWORTH ZOUAVE DRILL .... 


NAST . 


DAVIS . 


167 


39. 


DISCOVERY OF A BALANCE OF ONE CENT . 


HOPPIN . 


. N. OBR . 


. 172 


40. 


SANTA CLAUS ASSISTING THE LADIES OF) 
CINCINNATI f 


STEPHENS . 


RICHARDSON . 


ISO 


41. 


COMMITTEE ON ENTERTAINMENT OF STRAX- ) 
GERS, AT WORK f 


McLENAN 


. BRIGHTLY 


. 182 


42. 


WORK OF THE COMMITTEE ON EVERGREENS . 


FENN . 


N. ORR . 


183 


43. 


SALE OF CHRISTMAS TREES IN GREENWOOD 1 


HEBRICK 




184 




HALL 1 








44. 


VIGNETTE 


" 


u 


189 


45. 


THE BROOKLYN AND LONG ISLAND FAIR . 


McNEVIN 


. RICHARDSON 


. 190 


46. 


THE OLD WOMAN WHO LIVED IN A SHOE 


WHITNEY . 


N. ORR . 


194 


47. 


NEW ENGLAND KITCHEN: A QUILTING PARTY . 


CHAPMAN 


. FlLMER 


. 197 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 

No. Subject. 

48. WAX FLOWERS AT THE BROOKLYN FAIR . 

49. NEW ENGLAND KITCHEN: APPLE PARING 

50. THE FAIR NEWSPAPERS .... 

51. THE SUGAR PENDULUM .... 

52. ARMORY OF THE 22D REGIMENT ARRANGED ) 

FOR THE METROPOLITAN FAIR . j 

53. SANITA3Y VOTING 

54. THE HEART 

55. ILLUSTRAT 
PORTRAITS 

56. EPISODE tt 

57. VIGNETTE 

58. VIGNETTE 

59. VIGNETTE 

60. VIGNETTE 

61. VIGNETTE 

62. VIGNETTE 

63. VIGNETTE 

64. VIGNETTE 

65. VIGNETTE 

66. SCENE IN 1 

67. ILLUSTRAT 

PORTRAIT OF EDWIN BOOTH ... " 

PORTRAITS OF MRS. JOHN HOEY AND J. LES- ) 

V WILL . 
TER WALLACK . . . . . j 

68. VIGNETTE . . . . . . HERRICK 

69. TATTOO . . . ... . NAST . 

70. SCENE OF THE GREAT CENTRAL FAIR OF) 

v LTTMLEY . 
PHILADELPHIA . . \ 

11. MAKING BOUQUETS FOR THE FAIR . 

72. SANITARY FAIR POST-OFFICE 

73. MILITARY VASE .... 

74. ILLUSTRATED PROGRAMME . 

75. ONE DAY'S LABOR, ONE DAY'S INCOME 



Designed by 


Engraved by 


Page 


HOCHSTEIX 


RICHARDSON . 


201 


CHAPMAX 


. FlLJfEB 


. 203 


WHITXET . 


N. OR:: . 


209 


HOPPIX . 


u 


. 217 



WHITE 

HOGAX 
HOPPIX 
NAST . 



219 



:NG ..... NAST . 


. DAVIS .... 221 


THE ANDES . . . HEBBICK 


, . N. ORB .... 223 


IONCERT PROGRAMME . . McNsvix 


. RICHARDSOX To FACB 224 


3OTTSCHALK AND BAKILI . WILL . 


" 224 


riCS : ONLY TEN CENTS . . WHITE . 


. . N. ORR . . . . 225 


. HOGAX 


.... 226 


McLEXAX 


. BRIGHTLY . . . 227 


..... IIOGAN 


, . N. ORB .... 229 


. . . . WHITE . 


14 .... 233 


..... HEBRICK . 


. M .... 235 


..... HOGAX . 


" ... 236 


HERRIOK 


. . . . . . 23S 


BILLINGS 


u ... 239 


. . . HERRICE . 


, " ... 241 


METROPOLITAN FAIR . . HOGAX 


u ... 241 


JRAMATIC PROGRAMME . . McNKvrx 


. RICHABDSOX To FACE 242 



242 
242 

. 244 
245 



N. ORB 

FlLMER 

N. ORE 



" .... 255 

. . . 256 

BOBBKTT it HOOPBK TO FACE 25S 

DAVIS u 2CO 



10 


ILLUSTRATIONS. 


JT0. 

7G. 


Subject. 
VIGNETTE . 


Designed by 
FBNN 


Engraved by 

. N. ORK 


Page 

. 261 


17. 


VIGNETTE , 


BILLINGS . 


IIOEY . V 


262 


78. 


VIGNETTE . . . . > ' ; ; 


HERRICK 


. N. ORR . 


. . 264 


79. 


VIGNETTE 


HOGAN . ' . 


. . 


26o 


80. 


VIGNETTE 


HERKICK 


. " 


' . . 267 


81. 


VIGNETTE 


McLENAN . 


. . 


268 


82. 


VIGNETTE .... . ,. 


HOPPIN . 


. " . . 


. 270 


83 


VIGNETTE 


LUMLEY 


RlCUAEDSON . 


271 


84. 


VIGNETTE . . . . 




. 


. 272 


85. 


SANITARY REAPER 


HBEEICK . 


N. OEU . . 


278 


86. 


A STAGE-COACH CONCERT IN IOWA 


CARY 


BRIGHTLY . 


. 280 


87. 


MINNEHAHA 


FBNN . 


N. ORE . 


. 284 


88. 


SCENE OP THE SECOND CHICAGO FAIR . 


. . 


. " 


. .286 


9. 


THE WESTERN SANITARY COMMISSION 


SHEARMAN 


RlCIIAEDSON . 


293 




PORTRAIT OF JAMES E. YEATMAN 


WILL . 





. 293 


90. 


MISSISSIPPI RIVER HOSPITAL STEAMER . 


NAST . 


DAVIS . . i 


296 


91 


SOLDIERS' HOME AT MEMPHIS . 


FENN 


. N. OEE 


' . . 298 


92. 


SANITARY SODA 


IIOWLANI) . 


RICHARDSON . 


308 


93. 


A COMMITTEE ON LIVE STOCK . 


CAEY 


. 


.. . 309 


94. 


CUTTING WOOD IN THE NORTHWEST FOR ) 
SOLDIERS' WIVES . . . J 


DABLET 


KlXGDON . 


. . 312 


95. 


VIGNETTE . . . .-^i . t i 


HOCHSTEIN . 


. BEIGIITLY . 


.315 


96. 


THE MAGIC LANTERN IN THE HOSPITAL 


A. R. WAUD . 


DAVIS . 


316 


97. 


INITIAL LETTER . . . . 


HOCHSTEIN . 


. N. ORE 


t . 322 


98. 


Q. '.....-.- , . 


" '. . 


RICHARDSON . 


327 


99. 
100. 






. N. ORB 
DA.VIS . . 


, . 334 
-.: . 836 
. 336 


PORTRAIT OF GEORGE H. STUART 


WILL . 


101. 


CHRISTIAN COMMISSION IN THE FIELD . 


BILLINGS . 


RlCUAEDSON . 


341 


102. 


A GUNBOAT SUBSCRIPTION IN AID OF THK i 
CHRISTIAN COMMISSION . . . \ 


EYTINGE 


. DAVIS 


. . 345 


103. 


BALTIMORE PARALLELS .... 


NAST . 


FlLHER . 


848 


104. 


CHRISTIAN AND SANITARY TABLEAU : RE- 1 


STEPHENS 


. N. ORB 


. . 858 



BECCA AND ROWENA . 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



11 



No. Subject. 

105. ARMY COEPS CHAPEL, NEAR PETERSBURG 



106. A LAY DELEGATE IN THE HOSPITAL . 

107. THE NATIONAL FRESHMEN'S RELIEF ASSO- 

CIATION . 



iSSO- I 



108. 
109. 
110. 

111. 
112. 



113. 
114. 
115. 

116. 
117. 
118. 

119. 
120. 
121. 
122. 
123. 
124. 
125. 
126. 
127. 
128. 

129. 



PORTRAIT OF FRANCIS G. SHAW . 

THE IDEAL FREEDMAN .... 

ORIGIN OF THE BIRD'S-NEST BANK . J . 

PARADE OF THE 20TH U. S. COLORED TROOPS ( 
IN NEW YORK ; . . . . ' 

THE GEORGE GRISWOLD, LADEN WITH 
BREADSTUFF3 . . V ' . , 

VIGNETTES OF MOUNT VERNON, SAVANNAH. 
AND THE CAPITOL .... 

PORTRAIT OF EDWARD EVERETT 
EAST TENNESSEE REFUGEES . 

EAST TENNESSEE 

THE AMERICAN UNION COMMISSION 
PORTRAIT OF DR. J. P. THOMPSON 

VIGNETTE 

THE RUINS OF CHAMBERSBURG . 



Designed by 
FENN . 

A. It. WAL-D 
SHEARMAN . 

WILL . 
CHAPMAN . 
HOPPIN . 

NAST . 
FENN . 
HixcncocK 



Engraved by 
N. ORB . 

RICHARDSON 



THE UNION VOLUNTEER REFRESHMENT 
SALOON 



[ENT | 



THE COOPER-SHOP REFRESHMENT SALOON 
A REGIMENT AT DINNER .... 
CITIZENS' UNION VOLUNTEER HOSPITAL 
FIRE AMBULANCE 

DRUM-STICKS OF TWO KINDS . , 

A SOLDIER'S BILL OF FARE 
BARRELLING APPLES FOR THE SOLDIERS 
THE NATIONAL SAILORS' HOME . 
ILLUSTRATED PROGRAMME . 



ONE REASON OUT OF FIFTY FOR A SAILORS- 
HOME . 



R A SAILORS' 1 



FILMER 
BRIGHTLY . 

DAVIS . 
N. ORK 
RICHARDSON 



Page 
860 

. 863 
266 

. 866 

871 
. 874 

381 

. 3S3 

887 



VIGNETTES : THE FARRAGUT FUND 
PORTRAIT OF ADMIRAL FARRAGUT 



WILL . 


u 


867 


NAST . 


DAVIS .... 


891 


FENN 


N. ORR .... 


400 


SHEARMAN . 


RICHARDSON . 


407 


WILL . 


u 


407 


HOGAN 


N. ORR .... 


411 


FENN 





412 


HERBICK . 


..... 


415 


FENN 


u 


418 


NAST . 


DAVIS .... 


419 


HOSIER . 


RICHARDSON 


422 


CABT 


HOEY .... 


429 


A. R. WAUD . 


KlNGDON . 


481 


HOPPIN 


N. ORR .... 


437 


BILLINGS 


FILMER .... 


439 


WHITNEY . 


N. ORB . 


440 


HOPPIN . 


" . To FACK 


444 


FENN . 


N. OBK .... 


447 


HITCHCOCK . 


RICHARDSON . 


450 


WILL . 





450 



12 ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Jfb. Subject. Designed by Engraved by Page 

130. VIGNETTES: THE GE ANT FUND . . . HITCHCOCK . . N. ORB .... 455 

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL GRANT . .- . WILL ... ' 455 

131. THE KEARSARGE FUND . . . . FBHS ..." .... 457 
PORTRAIT OF CAPTAIN WINSLOW . WILL ... " 457 

132. THE SHERMAN FUND HITCHCOCK . .... 459 

PORTRAIT OF GENERAL SHERMAN . . WILL ... " 459 

133. WOMEN WORKING IN THE FIELD . . . NAST . . . DAVIS .... 461 

134. THE PROCESSION OF THE SANITARY SACK . "... FILMEU . , ' . .464 

135. NEVADA SCENEUY HOWLAXD . . RICHARDSON . . . 469 

136. TEE GOLDEN CHICKEN OF MARYSVILLE . HOPPIN . . BEIGHTLT . . . .472 

137. GETTING IN HAY FOR A SOLDIER'S WIFE . FB.VN . . . N. ORR .... 474 

138. THE KEARNY CROSS .... LUMLEY . . RICHARDSON . . .475 

139. SUBSCRIBERS TO THE FUND FOR THE RELIEF j 

> STEPHENS . . RICHARDSON . . . 477 
OF FAMILIES OF POLICE VOLUNTEERS j 

140 TWENTY-INCH GUN HEBRICK . . N. ORR .... 479 

141. FITZ JAMES O'BRIEN . . . . . A. R. WAUD . DAVIS .... 480 

142. THE PATRIOT ORPHAN HOME AT FLUSHING FENN N. ORB .... 484 

143. PA, WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DOI . . HOWARD . . RICHAKDSOX ... 487 

144. THE WIDOW AND ORPHAN . . . HENNESSY . . BOBBETT & HOOPEB . . 4S9 

145. A TRIBUTE TO PRESIDENT LINCOLN . . NAST . . . DAVIS To FACE 492 

146 LETTERING WILL. . . N. ORB .... 493 

147. " " " 507 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

PAGE 

A GLANCE BACKWARD. INDIVIDUAL AID RENDERED TO THE ARMIES DURING THE WAR 

OF THE REVOLUTION, . . . .' 15 

CHAPTER II. 
MONEY AND MEN, . . . . . .26 

CHAPTER III. 
THE EARLIER AID SOCIETIES, ........... 70 

CHAPTER IV. 
THE UNITED STATES SANITARY COMMISSION, 77 

CHAPTER V. 
AID SOCIETIES AUXILIARY TO THE SANITARY COMMISSION, Ill 

CHAPTER VI. 
SANITARY FAIRS, 158 

CHAPTER VII. 
THE WESTERN SANITARY COMMISSION, 293 

CHAPTER VIII. 
STATE SANITARY COMMISSIONS. LOCAL RELIEF ASSOCIATIONS, 316 

CHAPTER IX. 
THE CHRISTIAN COMMISSION, 336 



14 CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER X. 
THE NATIONAL FREEDMEN'S RELIEF ASSOCIATION, . . . . . . . 366 

CHAPTER XI. 
INTERNATIONAL RELIEF, 383 

CHAPTER XII. 
AID TO EAST TENNESSEE, . . . . . . . . , . . . 387 

CHAPTER XIII. 
THE AMERICAN UNION COMMISSION, 407 

CHAPTER XIV. 
THE CHAMBERSBURG AND SAVANNAH RELIEF FUNDS, 412 

CHAPTER XV. 
REFRESHMENT SALOONS, SUBSISTENCE COMMITTEES, SOLDIERS' HOMES, ETC. THE FIRE 

AMBULANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA, 415 

CHAPTER XVI. 
A THANKSGIVING DINNER IN THE ARM"? AND NAVY, 431 

CHAPTER XVII. 
THE NATIONAL SAILORS' HOME, 440 

CHAPTER XVIII. 
TESTIMONIALS TO DISTINGUISHED COMMANDERS, 450 

CHAPTER XIX. 

MISCELLANIES : VARIOUS METHODS OF PROCURING MEANS, AND VARIOUS METHODS OF 
APPLYING THEM, 461 

CHAPTER XX. 
SUMMARY, . 493 

INDEX, 507 



CHAPTEK I. 



A GLANCE BACKWARD. INDIVIDUAL AID RENDERED TO THE ARMIES DURING 
THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 




HAT a nation may feel the deepest sympathy with its 
army, assuredly was not left to the American rebellion to 
prove ; but it certainly was reserved to our day to show 
how such sympathy may be rendered active and profitable. 
The troops of Hannibal and George III. may have felt that the hearts and 
prayers of their countrymen were with them, but it is not likely they ever 
expected from them any other aid. The Eoman matron placed her jewels 
upon the altar, and with this hasty sacrifice the service she could lend her 
country ended. The Carthaginian women cut off their hair and twisted it 
into bow-strings an honorable act, but one that was perhaps as soon repented 
of as done, and which certainly could not be repeated often in a lifetime. In 
other wars, a man once wounded was as the beasts that perish. Women have 
from time to time appeared upon the battle-field ; but their office was not to 
restore with oil or wine, but to release with rosary and crucifix. Within 



16 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

the last ten years we have seen a nation send forth an army to be literally 
swept away by disease, and we have seen that one woman only, with her 
attendants, was drawn from her home to the hospital by the harrowing 
spectacle. Now, as Americans are said to do what their hands find to do in 
a manner always original and generally effective, as there is nothing they 
abhor so much as the beaten track, especially when that track is strewn 
with the bones of other nations' failures, it is the purpose of these pages to 
show that they have made war, as they have utilized peace, after a method 
peculiarly their own ; that those whom the army left at home have been its 
doctors, caterers, and ministers ; that almost every family which has suffered 
the son and brother to gird on the knapsack, has placed the needle and the 
scissors in the hands of the daughter and mother ; that had Florence Nightin- 
gale been an American, her name, honorable and saint-like though it be, would 
have been known but as one in a noble sisterhood; and that the sacrifices 
made by those who have made them at all have not been the romantic impulse 
of a moment, but the sustained, patient labor of years ; not the abandonment 
of personal ornament alone, but the bidding farewell for a time to the 
comforts of home and the allurements of wealth. But, before entering upon 
this phase of our history, a moment's retrospective glance at the War of the 
Eevolution, and a word or two upon the sympathy existing in "Washington's 
time between the army and the people, will not be out of place. We shall 
find that the seeds of bounty and defence fund, of aid society and sanitary 
commission, were sown in a fruitful soil as early as 1776. 

Five or six years before this time, however, the women of the country had 
set the example of discouraging the importation of goods from abroad. Re- 
trenchment was naturally the first measure of preparation for the impending 
change in the condition of the colonies, and for the struggle by which it might 
be attended. The newspapers of the time were filled with incidents of the 
self-denial of women ; and the following homely appeal to the ladies was 
evidently made by one of their sex : 



" First, then, throw aside your topknots of pride, 

Wear none but your own country linen ; 
Of economy boast, let your pride be the most 
To show clothes of your own make and spinning. 

" What if homespun, they say, is not quite so gay 

As brocades, yet be not in a passion ; 
For when once 'tis known this is much worn in town, 
One and all will cry out, 'tis the fashion ! 



RETRENCHMENT. TEA-DRINKING. 17 

"And as we all agree, that you'll not married be 

To such as will wear London factory, 
But at first sight refuse tell 'em such you will choose 
As encourage our own manufactory." 

This allusion to what was the fashion in the cities, perhaps suits revolu- 
tionary times better than it does our own. The effect of appeals such as 
these, and of the resolve from which they sprang, was marked, and has no 
counterpart in our day whatever ; the imports of English goods into American 
ports decreased from 2,400,000 in 1768 to 1,600,000 in 1769. The records 
are unanimous in attributing this decline, thirty-three per cent, in one year, to 
the good sense, patriotism, and self-denial of the women. 

In a letter written by a lady of Philadelphia to a British officer in Boston, 
late in 1775, the following passage occurred : 

" I have retrenched every superfluous expense in my table and family ; 
tea I have not drunk since last Christmas, nor bought a new cap or gown 
since your defeat at Lexington ; and, what I never did before, I have learned 
to knit, and am now making stockings of American wool for my servants ; 
and in this way do I throw in my mite to the public good. I know this, that 
as free I can die but once, but as a slave I shall not be worthy of life. I have 
the pleasure to assure you that these are the sentiments of all my sister 
Americans. They have sacrificed assemblies, parties of pleasure, tea-drinking, 
finery, to that great spirit of patriotism that actuates all degrees of people 
throughout this extensive continent. If these are the sentiments of females, 
what must glow in the breasts of our husbands, brothers, and sons !" 

The selfishness of those who could not find it in their souls to abstain 
from any indulgence, was thus hit off in a communication to the Pennsylvania 
Journal : 

" The PETITION of divers OLD WOMEN of the City of Philadelphia humbly 
showeth : That your petitioners, as well spinsters as married, having been 
long accustomed to the drinking of tea, fear it will be utterly impossible for 
them to exhibit so much patriotism as wholly to disuse it. Your petitioners 
beg leave to observe, that having done already all possible harm to their 
nerves and health with this delectable herb, they shall think it extremely 
hard not to enjoy it for the remainder of their lives. Your petitioners would 
further represent, that coffee and chocolate, or any other substitute hitherto 
proposed, they humbly apprehend, from their heaviness, must destroy that 
brilliancy of fancy and fluency of expression usually found at tea-tables, when 
they are handling the conduct or character of their absent acquaintances. 



18 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Your petitioners are also informed there are several old women of the other 
sex laboring under the like difficulties, who apprehend the above restriction 
will be wholly insupportable ; and that it is a sacrifice infinitely too great to 
be made to save the lives, liberties, and privileges of any country whatever. 
Your petitioners only pray for an indulgence to those spinsters whom age or 
ugliness has rendered desperate in the expectation of husbands ; to those of 
the married, whose infirmities and ill-behavior have made their husbands long 
since tired of them ; and to those old women of the male gender who will most 
naturally be found in such company. And your petitioners, as in duty bound, 
will ever pray." 

Thus those who did drink tea were ridiculed, and the following lines 
show that those who did not were threatened : 

" O Boston wives and maids, draw near and see 
Our delicate Souchong and Hyson tea. 
Buy it, my charming girls, fair, black, and brown , 
If not, we'll cut your throats and burn your town." 

But something more than self-denial was now required. The follow- 
ing appeal was posted in the streets of Philadelphia on the 9th of August. 
1775: 

" To the spinners in this city, the suburbs, and country : Your services 
are now wanted to promote the AMERICAN MANUFACTORY, at the corner of 
Market and Ninth streets, where cotton, wool, flax, &c., are delivered out. 
Strangers, who apply, are desired to bring a few lines, by way of recom- 
mendation, from some respectable person in their neighborhood." 

Upon this appeal, the Pennsylvania Journal made the following com- 
ments : 

" One distinguishing characteristic of an excellent woman, as given by the 
wisest of men, is, ' That she seeketh wool and flax, and worketh willingly 
with her hands to the spindle, and her hands hold the distaff.' In this time 
of public distress, you have now, each of you, an opportunity not only to help 
to sustain your families, but likewise to cast your mite into the treasury of 
the public good. The most feeble effort to help to save the state from ruin, 
when it is all you can do, is, as the widow's mite, entitled to the same reward 
as they who, of their abundant abilities, have cast in much." 

The New York Gazette, of July 29th, 1776, chronicled the marriage of a 
Mr. Flint with a Miss Slate, declaring them to be an agreeable and happy 
pair, and added : 



VALLEY FORGE. 19 

" What deserves the public notice, and may serve to encourage the manu- 
factures of this country, is, that the entertainment, though served up with 
good wine and other spirituous liquors, was the production of their fields and 
fruit-gardens, assisted alone by a neighboring grove of spontaneous maples. 
The bride and her two sisters appeared in very genteel-like gowns, and others 
of the family in handsome apparel, with sundry silk handkerchiefs, &c., 
entirely of their own manufacture." 

Smythe's Diary, of March 1st, 1777, contained the following squib : 

"A deserter from the rebel army at Westchester, who came into New 
York this morning, says that the Congress troops are suffering extremely for 
food and rum ; that there is not a whole pair of breeches in the army ; and 
that the last news from Mr. Washington's camp was, that he had to tie his up 
with strings, having parted with the buttons to buy the necessaries of life. 
At a frugal dinner lately given by the under officers in Heath's command, 
but seven were able to attend ; some for the want of clean linen, but the most 
of them from having none other than breeches past recovery." 

Washington's army retired, in the winter of 1777, to Valley Forge ; its 
sufferings here were so great that the Commander-in-Chief was forced to make 
a requisition upon the people for supplies and clothing. The neglect of some 
of the people of Jersey and Pennsylvania to furnish the portion required of 
them excited much comment. The New Jersey Gazette, of December 31st, 
contained the following suggestion, written by Governor William Livingston, 
and signed " Hortentius :" 

" I am afraid that while we are employed in furnishing our battalions with 
clothing, we forget the county of Bergen, which alone is sufficient amply to 
provide them with winter waistcoats and breeches, from the redundance and 
superfluity of certain woollen habits, which are at present applied to no kind 
of use whatsoever. It is well known that the rural ladies in that part of New 
Jersey pride themselves in an incredible number of petticoats, which, like 
house furniture, are displayed by way of ostentation, for many years before 
they are decreed to invest the fair bodies of the proprietors. Till that period 
they are never worn, but neatly piled up on each side of an immense escritoire, 
the top of which is decorated with a most capacious brass-clasped Bible, seldom 
read. What I would, therefore, humbly propose to our superiors is, to make 
prize of these future female habiliments, and, after proper transformation, 
immediately apply them to screen from the inclemencies of the weather those 
gallant males who are now fighting for the liberties of their country. And to 
clear this measure from every imputation of injustice, I have only to observe, 



20 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 




VALLEY FORGE. 



that the generality of women in that county having for above a century worn 
the breeches, it is highly reasonable that the men should now, and especially 
upon so important an occasion, make booty of the petticoats." 

The condition of Washington's army, in the winter of 1779-80, is thus 
described in "Thatcher's Journal," of January 1st: 

" The sufferings of the poor soldiers can scarcely be described ; at night 
they have a bed of straw upon the ground, and a single blanket to each man ; 
they are badly clad, and some are destitute of shoes. The snow is from five 
to six feet deep, which so obstructs the roads as to prevent our receiving a 
supply of provisions. We are frequently for six or eight days destitute of 



AID FROM NEW JERSEY. 21 

meat, and then as long without bread. It is well known that General "Wash- 
ington experiences the greatest solicitude for his army, and is sensible that 
they in general conduct with heroic patience and fortitude. His Excellency, 
it is understood, despairing of supplies from the commissary-general, has made 
application to the magistrates of the State of New Jersey for assistance in 
procuring provisions. This expedient has been attended with the happiest 
success. It is honorable to the magistrates as well as to the people of 
Jersey that they have cheerfully complied with the requisition, and furnished 
for the present an ample supply, and have thus probably saved the army from 
destruction." 

The ladies of Trenton, New Jersey, met, in emulation of the example of 
other portions of the state, on the 4th of July, 1780, for the purpose of 
promoting a subscription for the relief and encouragement of the Continental 
Army. Taking into consideration the scattered situation of the well disposed 
throughout the State, and for their convenience, they unanimously appointed 
Mrs. Cox, Mrs. Dickinson, Mrs. Furman, and Miss Cadwallader a committee, 
whose duty it should be immediately to open subscriptions, with ladies to be 
thereafter named, requesting their aid and influence in the several districts. 
Some fifty ladies were then chosen such as Mrs. Counsellor Condict, Mrs. 
Colonel Scudder, Mrs. Parson Jones, Mrs. Peter Cov.enhoven, Mrs. Governor 
Livingston, Mrs. Doctor Burnet, Mrs. Colonel Hugg "whose well known 
patriotism," said the gazette chronicling the movement, "leaves no room to 
doubt of their best exertions in a cause so humane and praiseworthy ; and 
that they will be happy in forwarding the amount of their several collections, 
either with or without the names of the donors, which will be immediately 
transmitted by Mrs. Moore Furman, who is hereby appointed treasurer, to be 
disposed of by the Commander-in-Chief according to the general plan." 

In November, 1780, the ladies of Philadelphia made a systematic effort 
in behalf of the army. An article published in the newspapers of the day, 
signed " An American Woman," exerted a powerful influence. From this 
appeal we take the following passage : 

" If I live happy in the midst of my family ; if my husband cultivates his 
field and reaps his harvest in peace ; if, surrounded by my children, I myself 
nourish the youngest and press it to my bosom ; if the house in which we 
dwell, our farms, our orchards, are safe from the hands of the incendiary, it is 
to you, brave Americans, that we owe it. And shall we hesitate to evidence 
to you our gratitude ? Shall we hesitate to wear a clothing more simple, hair 
dressed less elegantly, when, at the price of this small privation, we shall 



22 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

deserve your benedictions? Who among us will not renounce with the 
highest pleasure those vain ornaments ? The time is arrived to display the 
same sentiments which animated us at the beginning of the Eevolution, when 
we renounced the use of teas, however agreeable to our taste, rather than 
receive them from our persecutors ; when our republican and laborious hands 
spun the flax and prepared the linen intended for the use of the soldiers ; 
when, exiles and fugitives, we supported with courage all the evils which are 
the concomitants of war. Let us not lose a moment ; let us all be engaged to 
offer the homage of our gratitude at the altar of military valor." 




LADIES OF PHILADELPHIA WORKING FOB WASHINGTON'S AEMT. 

The women of Philadelphia, assembling at this inspiring call, divided the 
city into districts, and then, apportioning the labor, visited every house and 
received its contribution. The total amount of these collections is given 
in the records of the time as $300,766, in currency. Those who could 
give supplies more conveniently than money did so, and one item of two 
thousand one hundred and seven shirts is mentioned as having been made 



AID FROM PHILADELPHIA. 



23 



by nimble Philadelphia fingers. "Such free-will offerings," exclaimed the 
gallant Thatcher, " are examples truly worthy of imitation, and ought to be 
recorded to the honor of American ladies." 

The spirit of emulation was soon kindled in the neighboring State of 
Maryland. Mrs. Lee, wife of his Excellency the Governor, wrote to ladies 
residing in different portions of the state, begging them to act as treasurers 
in their respective districts. Baltimore soon responded with six hundred 
shirts, and the county of Dorset with thirty pounds in specie. Annapolis 
sent in over sixteen thousand dollars, some ladies giving two, some five, and 
some twenty guineas in coin. Here, plainly, is the suggestion of the Aid 
Society and Eelief Association of 1861. 

But, in spite of all that had been done, the army was in actual danger of 
dissolution for want of provisions to keep it together. In this emergency, a 
number of patriotic gentlemen in Philadelphia signed bonds to the amount 
of two hundred and fifty thousand pounds, in coin, for procuring supplies. 
Food and clothing were thus obtained ; and it is perhaps not too much to 
say, that without this act of munificence American independence would 
not have been achieved. There is probably no other example in history of 
results so tremendous flowing from spontaneous, individual contributions to 
a cause. We give a portion of the names ; and the reader will see, as he 
progresses in the record of Philadelphia generosity, that the descendants 
of those who signed bonds in 1780 have signed many similar papers in 
1861-5 : 



Eobert Morris 10,000 

B. McOlennigan 10,000 

A. Bunner & Co 6,000 

Zouch Francis 5,500 

James Wilson 5,000 

Wm. Bingham 5,000 

Richard Peters 5,000 

Samuel Meredith 5,000 

James Meare 5,000 

Thomas Barclay. . 5,000 

Samuel Morris, Jr 5,000 

Robert Hooper 5,000 

Hugh Shields 5,000 

Philip Moore 5,000 

Matthew Irwin 5,000 

John Benzet 5,000 

Henry Hill 5,000 

John Morgan 5,000 

Thomas Willing 5,000 



Samuel Powell 5,000 

John Nixson 5,000 

Robert Bridge 4,000 

John Dunlap 4,000 

Wm. Coates 4,000 

Emanuel Eyre 4,000 

James Bodden 4,000 

John Mease 4,000 

Joseph Carson 4,000 

Thomas Leiper 4,000 

Kean & Nichols 4,000 

Samuel Morris 3,000 

Isaac Moses 3,000 

Chas. Thompson 3,000 

John Pringle 3,000 

Samuel Mills 3,000 

Cad. Morris 2,500 

Matt. Clarkson 2,500 

Joseph Reed 2,000 



24 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Benjamin Rush 2,000 John Bullock 2,000 

Owen Biddle 2,000 Twenty-seven subscriptions of 

John Mitchell 2,000 2,000 each 54,000 

Robert Knox 2,000 Nine subscriptions of 1,000 

John Wharton 2,000 each 9,000 



Total 250,500 

Notwithstanding this munificent tribute, and the momentous consequences 
it produced, encomiums seem to have been exclusively lavished upon the 
women, and General Washington led the chorus. In a letter of acknowledg- 
ment to a committee of ladies, he wrote : 

" The army ought not to regret its sacrifices or its sufferings, when they 
meet with so flattering a reward as in the sympathy of your sex ; nor can it 
fear that its interests will be neglected, when espoused by advocates as power- 
ful as they are amiable." 

An officer wrote from camp : 

" The patriotism of the women of your city is a subject of conversation 
with the army. Had I poetical genius I would sit down and write an ode in 
praise of it. Burgoyne, who, on his first coming to America, boasted that he 
would dance with the ladies and coax the men into submission, must now 
have a better understanding of the good sense and public spirit of our females, 
as he has already had of the fortitude and inflexible temper of our men." 

"It is needless," says the Pennsylvania Packet, " to repeat the encomiums 
that have been already given to the females for their exertions. Every Whig 
mind must be sensible that they deserve the highest praise. The women 
of every part of the globe are under obligations to those of America, for having 
shown that females are capable of the highest political virtue. We cannot 
help imagining what some learned and elegant historian, the Hume of the 
future America, when he comes to write the affairs of these times, will say on 
the subject. In a history, which we may suppose to be published about the 
year 1820, may be found a paragraph to the following purpose : 

" ' The treasury was now exhausted, and the army in want of the neces- 
saries of life and clothing, when the women gave a respite to our affairs by 
one of those exertions which will forever do honor to the sex. In the state 
of simplicity and plainness in which our country then was, they had not 
ear-rings and bracelets to give, in imitation of the Eoman ladies on a like 
occasion ; but they presented gold and silver, and what share of the paper 
money had come into their hands. This was laid out in linens, and shirts 
were made by their hands for the use of the soldiery. 



PATRIOTISM OF WOMEN. 25 

"'Mrs. Reed, of Pennsylvania, the lady of the then President, a most 
amiable woman, was the first to patronize the measure. Mrs. Lee, of Mary- 
land, lady of the Governor of that state, a woman of excellent accomplish- 
ments, was, in her state, the next to receive the patriotic flame and give it 
popularity among her sex. 

" ' Mrs. Washington, of Virginia, lady of his Excellency the Commander- 
in-Chief, was equally favoring to it in her state. The Jerseys had been 
already warmed by the example of the virtue of Pennsylvania, and the 
females of that state, &c., &c., &c.' " 

A verse or two from the lyrics of the day will fitly conclude this chain 
of panegyric : 

"OUK WOMEN. 

" Accept the tribute of our warmest praise, 
The soldier's blessing and the patriot's bays ! 
For Fame's first plaudit we no more contest, 
Constrain'd to own it decks the female breast. 



"Then Freedom's ensign, thus inscrib'd, shall wave, 
' The patriot females who their country save;' 
Till time's abyss, absorb'd in heavenly lays, 
Shall flow in your eternity of praise." 

We have made these brief extracts from the chronicles of the day, to 
show that, even three quarters of a century ago, the impoverished resources 
of the state were eked out from the means and purses of individuals ; and, 
descending from their time to ours, to provoke a comparison between what 
was done by the nation in its manhood and in its day of small things. 




CHAPTEE II. 

MONEY AND MEN. 




THE FIRST SUBSCRIPTION. 




HE iruvjestic spectacle of a nation flying to arms was 
offered to the world in America, in the month of April, 
1861, under unusual conditions. Yast as was the ex- 
panse of territory involved in the question at issue, 
widely separated as were the points that were called 
upon to bear their share of the common burden and to 
offer up their sacrifices upon a common altar, all sense of time and distance, 
all waiting for the effect to follow the cause, were lost or forgotten in the 
operations of an invention, which, though no longer a novelty or a marvel, 
had never played such a part before. Stage-coaches carried the lingering mail 
that apprised the Americans of 1775 of the injustice and oppression of the 
mother country ; while the Massachusetts militia were fighting at Lexington, 



AN ARMY IN RESERVE. 27 

the citizens of Philadelphia were deprecating bloodshed. Forty years later, 
a sanguinary battle was fought after peace was declared, and men heard 
first of the fight or the treaty, according as they were nearer to New Orleans 
or New York. But in 1861 the telegraph brought the whole country into 
presence, and the nation stood forth, literally, acting as one man, and visible, 
incarnated in one thought, before itself and in the gaze of all mankind. Vil- 
lages in the heart of the land counted the guns as they were fired at Sumter, 
and the burning of the barracks was lamented in the valleys and in the 
mountains, not as a calamity of yesterday, but as a sore distress of to-day. 
The newspapers of the 15th of April were no local chronicles ; true, the Moss- 
side Gazette told what was thought and done at Moss-side, but it also told 
what had been lost at Charleston, what had been sworn at the capital, who 
had enlisted in Bath, and what was pledged in Hull, how the glove dropped 
on Sullivan's Island had been picked up by the Briarean arm of twenty states, 
how the New England village, the prairie settlement, and the Atlantic seaport 
had severally welcomed the ordeal. As if a mirage had lifted the regions 
below the horizon into sight, and they had been set upon a hill that the 
whole people might see them, so did the electric wire, summoning an audience 
of the country, set before it, from the sea to the Father of Waters, the brief 
story of treason ; the whole people were warned of the now accomplished 
rebellion, while the mail of other days would have travelled a league. 

With but one phase of the splendid unanimity which was the character- 
istic of the times, we have, in these chronicles, to deal. Others will narrate 
the terrible story of those who went to the wars ; it is our humble province to 
collect the less stirring records of those who stayed behind. We shall have to 
show that, in spite of all denials on the part of merely military men, there was, 
in reality, an army in reserve : and that this army, though not furnishing 
re-enforcements, precisely, provided what was often as good aid, comfort, 
succor, sympathy ; joining faith with works, it labored and prayed. The im- 
pulse that sent one man into the ranks, was essentially the same as that 
impelling another who could not go to aid those who did. All were alike 
drawn to make some sacrifice, one of his person, perhaps his life, another of 
his goods, perhaps his hoards. Here and there a man able to go was also able 
to give ; witness the Ehode Island millionaire, who enlisted as a private and 
paid the outfit of his comrades ; witness the Connecticut farmers, who not only 
went themselves, but took their hired men with them. That the two impulses 
were the same is shown conclusively by the course of events in California. 
The distance of that state from the scene, and the consequent expense of 



28 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

transportation incapacitating her from furnishing soldiers, it would be reason- 
able to expect her to assume a double share of the voluntary burden, and 
this is precisely what she has done. Furnishing few men, she has provided 
money ; not being called upon for the muscle, she has sent the sinews, of war. 
We do not mean to impugn the generosity or liberal public spirit of the 
people of California far from it : we only mean that having but one vent for 
her pent-up wrath, that one outlet has given her as much relief as if she had 
had two, and had used them both. Called upon for no quota, she has sent, or 
will send, if asked, a quantum sufficit. Had she been summoned to furnish 
thirty thousand men, her bounty would have found other channels than those 
in which it has flowed. Therefore, the two actions are one, and this record 
of what they did who stayed behind, is twin to that of those who shouldered 
the musket. Leaving to be considered in another place all movements looking 
to the preservation of health in the army, and the proper treatment of the 
sick, we examine here the other two phases of the voluntary action of the 
people the effort to promote enlistments, and the measures taken to aid the 
families of volunteers. 

The city of Lowell, Massachusetts, claims to have set so many honorable 
examples to the country in the month of April, 1861, that it is well to 
consider them in this connection. The following things it is asserted that 
Lowell was the first to do : the first to send forth a regiment to the defence 
of Washington ; the first to shed the blood of traitors who sought to bar the 
way ; the first to offer a sacrifice of her sons upon the altar of the country ; the 
first to set on foot individual subscriptions in behalf of the soldiers ; the first 
to form a Soldiers' Aid Society, and the first to hold a Sanitary Fair. It 
would be glory enough for Lowell if she could substantiate her claim to but 
one of these honorable positions ; but against her holding all six of them, 
Charlestown and New York enter a formal protest. That the Massachusetts 
Sixth, a Lowell regiment, was the first in the field, and that in its collision 
with the mob in Baltimore the first blood on either side was spilled, are mat- 
ters of history ; that Lowell held a Sanitary Fair as early as January, 1863, 
can be readily shown ; but the other two claims are not so easily justified. 
What is urged in their defence may be briefly stated thus : 

The President's requisition for troops reached Lowell on the afternoon of 
the 15th of April, and the next morning, at nine o'clock, the companies com- 
posing the Sixth Eegiment began to arrive at the station. A public meeting 
of citizens was held, and the troops were addressed by Mayor Sargeant and 
others. The regiment left at noon for Boston. Two days after, on the 18th, 



WHO WAS FIRST? 



29 



Judge Crosby, a distinguished resident of the city, fearing that, through haste 
and inexperience, the men would find many of their necessary wants unsup- 
plied, sent a note to the mayor, inclosing his check for one hundred dollars, 
with a request that the money might be at once sent to the paymaster, for the 
account of the regiment. Judge Crosby also suggested the formation of a 
society " to furnish paymasters with money and such supplies for the sick and 
wounded in camp as rations and medicine-chests cannot provide." The 
mayor laid the matter before the City Council that evening, and took up a 
subscription as suggested five hundred dollars, besides Judge Crosby's one 
hundred, being thus obtained. This was the 18th, and this is Lowell's claim. 
Unfortunately or rather fortunately, that the City of Spindles may not mo- 
nopolize the honors a subscription started to set the Seventh New York 
promptly in the field, on the 17th, stood thus at nightfall, and was afterwards 
increased ; 

NATIONAL GUARD. 

The undersigned agree to pay the sums set opposite our names for the Seventh Regi- 
ment, to enable them to place themselves in the position of service and defence : 



Moses H. Grinnell $100 

George B. De Forest 100 

L. B. Cannon 100 

E. Minturn 100 

S. B. Chittenden 100 

Moses Taylor 100 

Theodore Dehon 100 

Ogden Haggerty 100 

Wm. M. Evarts 100 

G. S. Robbins 100 

George Griswold 100 

John A. Stevens 100 

James Gallatin 100 

E. Walker & Sons 100 

H. E. Durham 100 

Hamilton Fish 100 

Total.. 



Robert B. Minturn $100 

C. R. Robert 100 

Royal Phelps 100 

Charles H. Russell 100 

W. D. F. Manice 100 

George W. Blunt 100 

James H. Titus 100 

William Curtis Noyes 100 

Shepherd Knapp 100 

Charles H. Marshall 100 

A. V. Stout 100 

S. Wetmore 100 

R. M. Blatchford 100 

Thomas Addis Emmett 100 

John A. 0. Gray 100 



.$3,100 



A careful examination of all the facts would seem to show that the above 
was indeed the first subscription list in point of date, to which the rebellion 
gave birth ; and if the names, as printed, are in the order in which they were 
signed, as they doubtless are, the interesting question of priority is easily 
settled. 

In respect to the claim of Lowell, that the first Soldiers' Aid Society was 
organized in that city, it may be merely stated here, leaving the details to a 



30 THE TRIBUTE BOOK 

future chapter, that the Bunker Hill Society of Charlestown also makes the 
claim, and, we think, with stronger proofs. 

It was in this manner that the voluntary giving of money commenced. To 
put the troops in the field was of course the first necessity, and as money was 
needed immediately, money given was more useful than money appropriated. 
Within ten days from the President's call, nearly every town in the loyal 
states had held its public meeting and had set on foot a war fund, raised by 
private contributions. Large sums were voted by legislatures, councils, and 
other representative bodies ; but the sums which form our subject were those 
which were freely given, beyond and outside of all appropriations. Sums 
appropriated have been, or are to be, refunded by the government, and thus 
go to swell the national debt; of those considered here the givers desire no re- 
imbursement 

The President had called for seventy-five thousand men, to serve for three 
months, and these were to consist of the militia organizations already in exist- 
ence. Few of them were full, but each was a nucleus upon which to build 
the minimum or maximum. The first expenses to be met were those con- 
nected with recruiting, while the wants of the newly enlisted men often five 
hundred in a regiment required large sums to meet them. Many recruits, 
especially in city regiments, found their own outfits ; those unable to do so, 
and who had nothing to give but their services, found in the regimental fund 
the means of obtaining the proper clothing and accessories. In the country, 
where a regimental district often sent but one regiment, the bounty of the 
people could follow but one channel ; but in the cities, where several regiments 
were to be fitted out, each giver could choose what direction his gift should 
take ; a patron of the Fifth would subscribe to the fund of the Fifth, while 
he whose sympathies were with the Eighth would signify it by his acts ; those 
who had no preference and looked upon all alike, aided all alike, if Providence 
had but blessed their store. The Frenchman resident in New York would 
naturally, if he had either sympathy or specie to spare, bestow them upon the 
Fifty-fifth. The Irishman's interest, as well as his offering, would be the 
portion of the Sixty-ninth ; and the canny Scotchman, opening his purse and 
his heart to the Highlanders, would endow the Seventy -ninth. Eivalry and 
favoritism played a useful part, and many city regiments, their subscription 
fund well filled, departed with a muster-roll correspondingly replete. The 
whole country gave heartily, lavishly, and, what is better, sufficiently ; as long 
as money was wanted, it was readily obtained ; and when the three months' 
regiments were dispatched, and the raising of others to serve for two and three 



THE EARLY OFFERINGS. 31 

years was commenced, the country still gave, not with diminished, but with 
augmented zeal ; and while legislators appropriated and select-men taxed, 
private citizens plied check-book and purse as cheerily as ever, and soldiers' 
money was always to be had for the asking. 

Those who could not give money, made contributions in kind. Here a 
dealer in tinware offered to equip a company or two with cup and plate ; there 
an artificer in leather proposed to furnish visors, straps, and belts for a cer- 
tain number of suits. A Jersey City patriot, Mr. Jesse Wandel, gave a meal 
to ninety -three horses of Khode Island artillery and made no charge. Trades- 
men persuaded their clerks to enlist, promising to continue their salary and 
keep their places. The owners of large unoccupied buildings besought regi- 
ments to use them as drill-rooms and to pay no rent. Dealers in mattresses 
furnished bedding ; manufacturers of the weed supplied tobacco for regimental 
and company use ; druggists contributed of their stock to medicine-chest and 
surgical table. Mr. J. W. Farmer, of New York, spread his famous Ludlow- 
street board for men in uniform ; he afterwards sent a ton of sugar-plums to 
Fortress Monroe, and gave the garrison a spoonful each. Later, again, he 
distributed thirty barrels of tobacco to the army of Virginia. A gentleman 
of Providence destroyed a lately purchased ticket for Liverpool, saying he 
would see a little more of the southern portion of his own country before 
visiting the south of Europe. A clergyman resigned his charge to become 
chaplain of a regiment ; the congregation refused the resignation, gave their 
pastor a furlough, supplied his place, continued his salary, and presented him 
with one hundred dollars for his outfit Aid was thus rendered in methods 
sometimes simple, often ingenious and indirect. So much was done under 
the rose, so much was a matter of private agreement between those who aided 
others and those who were so aided, so much has been forgotten and so little 
was ever recorded, that it is quite impossible to say, at this day, what amount 
these private subscriptions reached. Such estimates as have been made will 
appear in the general tabular views at the close of the volume. 

The practice of recruiting by regiments having fallen into disuse of late, it 
may not be clearly remembered by all in what way ready money was essential 
during the first two years of the war. The government, which now takes 
each individual recruit as he enlists, uniforms him at once, and makes what 
instant disposition of him it chooses, had previously received men from the 
states by regiments, mustering them in by companies when filled to the 
minimum. Young men seeking a lieutenant's commission were obliged to 
raise a certain number of men, and the moment they had secured a single 



32 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

recruit, their expenses began, for the recruit looked to them for lodging and 
subsistence. A captain, and the lieutenants under him, were compelled to 
support their company till it numbered eighty-four men ; then the govern- 
ment mustered them in, and became responsible for them. There were many 
other casual, but constant, calls for money, though this was by far the most 
urgent. Many officers thus spent all their means; others, who have since 
proved their value, possessing no property, would have been lost to the ser- 
vice had it not been for the war funds raised by subscription throughout the 
land. One of the most remarkable and useful of these was the fund raised in 
New York, and intrusted to a body of men known as the Union Defence 
Committee. Although the principal labor of this committee was the disburs- 
ing of a million of dollars appropriated by the city of New York, yet a large 
sum was also raised by subscription, and the two were merged together. The 
history of one portion of this fund is therefore the history of both. The origin 
of the Union Defence Committee was in this wise : 

A mass meeting of the citizens of New York had been convened in Union 
Square on Saturday, the 20th of April. The Massachusetts Sixth had made 
its bloody passage through Baltimore the day before ; the Seventh New York 
was on its way from Philadelphia to Annapolis ; the Massachusetts Eighth 
was on the eve of leaving Boston. These were but as drops in the sea, and 
it was considered imperatively necessary to dispatch ten thousand men, if 
possible, during the coming week. Some means must be taken to collect, 
equip, and forward these men ; concerted and united action was indispensable. 
A committee was therefore appointed, consisting originally of twenty-six, and 
subsequently of thirty-two members. The resolutions adopted stated the duty 
of this committee to be " to represent the citizens in the collection of funds, 
and the transaction of such other business in aid of the movements of the 
government as the public interest may require." It is apparent from this that 
the business of the committee, as viewed at the outset, was merely the dis- 
bursement of money raised by subscription ; but, as has been said, the city 
appropriation was also intrusted to their management 

The committee was organized as follows : 

JOHN" A. Dix, Chairman, CHARLES II. MARSHALL, 

SIMEON DRAPER, Vice-CKn, EGBERT H. McCiiRDY, 

WILLIAM M. EVARTS, Secretary, MOSES H. GRINNELL, 

THEODORE DEHON, Treasurer, KOYAL PHELPS, 

MOSES TAYLOR, WM. E. DODGE, 



THE UNION DEFENCE FUND. 33 

EICHARD M. BLATCHFORD, GREENE C. BRONSON, 

EDWARDS PIERREPONT, HAMILTON FISH, 

ALEX. T. STEWART, WM. F. HAVEMEYER, 

SAMUEL SLOAN, CHARLES H. EUSSELL, 

JOHN JACOB ASTOR, JR., JAS. T. BRADY, 

JOHN J. Cisco, EUDOLPH A. WITTHAUS, 

JAS. S. WADSWORTH, ABIEL A. Low, 

ISAAC BELL, PROSPER M. WETMORE, 

JAMES BOORMAN, A. C. EICHARDS, 

The Mayor of the City of New York, 
The Comptroller of the City of New York, 
The President of the Board of Aldermen, 
The President of the Board of Councilmen. 

The subscriptions received on the first working day, Monday, the 22d, 
were nearly $35,000 ; additions were constantly made to the fund till it 
reached hard upon $180,000. The committee held forty-eight meetings in 
the first twenty-nine days ; and at the close of the year had assisted, in a 
greater or less degree, in placing sixty-six regiments in the field. This is not 
the place, nor has the time yet come, to attempt to estimate the services 
rendered the country by this committee. Their own claim may be safely 
granted, that they placed an army in the field, equipped for the defence of the 
nation, in a shorter space of time, and with less expenditure of money, than, 
so far as any record shows, had ever before been accomplished by any govern- 
ment, no matter how great its power, how abundant its resources, or how 
urgent its call to action. In due time more than this will probably appear : 
that to the energy of this committee, and to the intrepidity with which, in 
one pressing strait, they cut through forms and circumlocution, the country is 
indebted for the safety of Washington, and for the preservation of our most 
important stronghold, Fortress Monroe. 

The list of subscribers to the Union Defence Fund being one of the most 
interesting of the war, we make no apology for introducing it here : 

THE TJXION DEFENCE FUND, APKIL AND MAY, 1861. 

Wm. B. Astor $15,000 00 James Gordon Bennett $3,000 00 

Alexander T. Stewart 10,000 00 P. Lorillard. . , 3,000 00 

James Lenox 5,000 00 W. W. De Forest 3,000 00 

Proceeds of a sale of pictures . . 4,498 00 John D. Wolfe 2,000 00 

Benkard & Hutton 3,000 00 N. Y. Mutual Insurance Co 2.000 00 

3 



34 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Third Avenue Railroad Com- 
pany, by "W. A. Darling, 

President $2,000 00 

Grinnell, Minturn & Co 2,000 00 

Brown, Brothers & Co 2,000 00 

Charles H. Marshall 2,000 00 

Whelps, Dodge & Co 2,000 00 

Howland & Aspinwall 2,000 00 

Hamilton Fish 1,500 00 

John Bridge 1,500 00 

Peter Cooper 1,500 00 

James Boorman 1,000 00 

A. A. Low 1,000 00 

Col. Lamed 1,000 00 

F. Bronson 1,000 00 

A. Iselin & Co 1,000 00 

Sturges, Bennet & Co 1,000 00 

Alsop & Chauncey 1,000 00 

Roosevelt & Son 1,000 00 

N. Y. Steam Sugar Refining Co . 1,000 00 

August Belmont & Co 1,000 00 

George Griswold, Jr 1,000 00 

J. K A. Griswold 1,000 00 

A. A. Low & Brothers 1,000 00 

Maitland, Phelps & Co 1,000 00 

Hoyt, Spragues & Co 1,000 00 

Chas. R. Snyder 1,000 00 

Hendricks & Brothers 1,000 00 

H. C. De Rham 1,000 00 

J. F. D. Lanier 1,000 00 

Meigs & Greenleaf 1,000 00 

J. Boorman Johnston & Co 1,000 00 

Goodhue & Co 1,000 00 

Saml. Wetmore 1,000 00 

New York Tribune Association 1,000 00 

R. L. Lord 1,00000 

G. S. Robbins & Sons 1,000 00 

Joseph Sampson 1,000 00 

John & D. Jackson Steward. . . 1,000 00 

Robert Bayard 1,000 00 

W. Proctor 1,000 00 

New York and Sandy Hook 

Pilots 1,000 00 

Tradesmen's Bank, by R. Perry, 

President 1,000 00 

Eli White 1,000 00 

J. E. Woolsey 1,000 00 

John Caswell & Co 1,000 00 

Alex. Duncan 1,000 00 

Duncan, Sherman & Co 1,000 00 

E. G. & T. H. Faile 1,000 00 

Naylor & Co 1,000 00 



Lorillard Spencer $1,000 00 

Wm. C. Rhinelander 1,000 00 

"Wm. Watson & Co 1,00000 

Charles R. Lynde 1,000 00 

Win. A. Booth 800 00 

Thomas Suffern 750 00 

Fred. A. Benjamin 500 00 

Walden Pell 500 00 

D. & A. C. Kingsland 500 00 

Wm. B. Crosby 50000 

A. P. Pillot & Son 500 00 

Benedict, Burr & Benedict 500 00 

R. R. Graves & Co 50000 

Olyphant & Co., of Canton, 

China 500 00 

John Allen, Jr., President West- 
ern Transportation Co., Buf- 
falo 500 00 

Sullivan, Randolph & Budd. ... 500 00 

Marcuse & Baltzer 500 00 

Benjamin Aymar 500 00 

Aymar & Co 500 00 

Edward Banker 500 00 

John Munroe & Co 500 00 

Degen & Taft 500 00 

Japhet Bishop 500 00 

R. Hoe & Co 500 00 

Penfold & Schuyler 500 00 

Oliver Charlick 500 00 

Charles Easton 500 00 

C. F. Dambmann & Co 500 00 

Cady & Smales 500 00 

P. M. Lydig 500 00 

Alex. Van Rensselaer 500 00 

William Whitlock, Jr 500 00 

William C. Schermerhorn 500 00 

John Jones Schermerhorn 500 00 

Bogert & Kneeland 500 00 

Theodore Dehon 500 00 

A. C. Richards 500 00 

Benj. R. Winthrop 500 00 

H. W. T. Mali 500 00 

Tucker, Cooper & Co 500 00 

J. J. Phelps 500 00 

S. B. Chittenden 500 00 

D. H. Haight 500 00 

Spaulding, Vail, Hunt & Co.. . . 500 00 

A. H. Ward 500 00 

C. &R. Poillon 500 00 

Haggerty & Co 500 00 

Furman & Co 500 00 

James K. Pell.. 500 00 



THE UNION DEFENCE FUND. 



35 



E. Pavenstedt & Co $500 00 

A. R. Eno 500 00 

Miss Selena Hendricks 500 00 

Troost, Schroder & Co 500 00 

Hazard Powder Company 500 00 

Schepeler & Co 500 00 

J. H. Frerichs & Co 500 00 

Murphy & Smith 500 00 

Peter Goelet 500 00 

Havemeyer, Townsend & Co. . . 500 00 
Wallack's Theatre, proceeds of 

a benefit 361 75 

Mrs. Mears Burkhardt, proceeds 

of a concert . 350 00 

Laura Keene's Theatre, proceeds 

of a benefit 310 00 

Thomas G. Hodgkins 300 00 

Gary & Co 30000 

Thomas N. Dale & Co 300 00 

Janes, Fowler, Kirtland & Co. . 300 00 

I. C. Whitrnore 300 00 

John Penfold 300 00 

John A. King 250 00 

Bucklin & Crane 250 00 

J. Butler Wright 250 00 

Fabbri & Chauncey 250 00 

A. M. White 250 00 

Munn & Co 250 00 

P. M. Suydam 250 00 

H. S. & C. P. Leverich 250 00 

Coolidge & Young 250 00 

E. Caylus, De Ruyter & Co. . . 250 00 

Chas. H. Rogers 250 00 

R.S.Clark 250 00 

Clark, Pardee, Bates & Co 250 00 

D. T. Lanman & Kemp 250 00 

Richard Lathers 250 00 

Robert Goelet 250 00 

Wm. B. Isham & Gallup 250 00 

Thomas Otis Leroy & Co 250 00 

Jacob Leroy 250 00 

Robert Ray 250 00 

Archer & Bull 250 00 

Jacob Harsen 250 00 

Mrs. John Suydam. . , 250 00 

Lemoyne & Bell 250 00 

Gilman, Son & Co 250 00 

Olyphant's Son & Co 250 00 

Wilson G. Hunt 250 00 

Ninth Regiment 250 00 

Pacific Bank 250 00 

Wm. A. Freeborn & Co. . 250 00 



Walsh, Coulter & Co $250 00 

Geo. S. Stephenson & Co 250 00 

Henry Delafield 250 00 

Mrs. Susan M. Parish 250 00 

John A. Robinson 250 00 

Paton, Stewart & Co 250 00 

A. Humbert 250 00 

Benj. Stephens 250 00 

J. & L. Tuckerman 250 00 

Schenck, Rutherford & Co 250 00 

John Q. Aymar 250 00 

H. Meigs, Jr., & Smith 250 00 

E. B. Clayton's Sons 250 00 

George C. Ward 250 00 

Barclay & Livingston 250 00 

William Wood 250 00 

Valentine G. Hall 250 00 

J. J. Meriam 250 00 

William Menzies 250 00 

Menzies, Yiele & Mather 250 00 

M. P. Read 250 00 

John C. White 250 00 

Fox & Lingard, !N"ew Bowery 

Theatre 205 00 

W. H. RusseU 200 00 

Henry Lawrence 200 00 

Pierson & Co 200 00 

M. Van Schaick 200 00 

T. C. Baring 200 00 

Joseph Foulke's Sons 200 00 

F. Cottenet 200 00 

D. L. Suydam 200 00 

Thomas N. Lawrence 200 00 

William K. Strong & Co 200 00 

Edward Cooper 200 00 

A. Hall 200 00 

Gabriel Mead 200 00 

J. D. Jones 200 00 

A. Bininger & Co 200 00 

JolmM.Dodd 20000 

R. A. & G. H. Witthaus 200 00 

E. E. Morgan 200 00 

White & Sheffield 200 00 

J. Woodward Haven 200 00 

Tomes, Son & Melvain 200 00 

H. M. Schieffelin 200 00 

Beebe & Brother 200 00 

Mulford Martin 200 00 

Earl, Bartholomew & Co 200 00 

John Haggerty 200 00 

W. H.H.Moore 20000 

Dutilh & Co... 150 00 



36 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Richard Mortimer 

H. L. Routh & Sons 

Smith & Lawrence 

Philip Hone 

Weaver, Richardson & Co. . . . 

George Forrester 

S. T. Nicoll , 

Robert Carnley 

T. O. Fowler 

John C. Tucker 

J. Hutchinson 

Francis Speir 

James R. Steers 

James Williamson & Co 

Samuel Marsh 

George Bell 

Calvin Huntington , 

Arthur N. Gifford 

Fred. M. Maas & Co 

Ridley Watts 

Uriah J. Smith 

P. I. Nevius & Sons 

C. Heydecker 

Abner H. Beers , 

Francis Alexandre 

Edward Delafield, M. I) 

Newbold Edgar , 

Archibald Russell 

Nathan H. Hall. 

T. W. Moore 

Lewis M. Rutherford 

Rutherford Stuy vesant 

Hopkins & Co 

James N. Cobb 

Edward N. Kent 

N. Ludlum 

R. M. Hunt 

Woodruff & Co 

Ward, Campbell & Co 

Wm. Mackay 

Kamlah, Sauer & Co 

Edward H. Ludlow 

A. W. Spies & Co 

John T. Metcalfe 

Henry Owen 

Bernhard Mayer 

George J. Schmelzel 

Drake Mills 

D.H. Arnold 

George Palen 

Isaac H. Bailey 

Sparkman, Truslow & Co. . . . 



$150 00 George Schmelzel $100 00 

150 00 L. Bradish 100 00 

150 00 Wm. Tucker 100 00 

150 00 E. R. Ware & Co 100 00 

15000 W. R. Redwood 10000 

12500 Acton Civill 10000 

100 00 Mrs. C. M. Dash 100 00 

100 00 Cambridge Livingston 100 00 

10000 George Ashton 10000 

100 00 Dewitt, Kittle & Co 100 00 

100 00 William Nelson 100 00 

10000 John R. Hurd 10000 

100 00 Wm. H. Jackson 100 00 

100 00 John Wolfe 100 00 

100 00 Charles Carow 100 00 

100 00 M. Deland 100 00 

100 00 Thomas E. Vermilye 100 00 

10000 J. Atkins & Co 10000 

100 00 Ed. H. Coster 100 00 

10000 Joseph L. Lewis 10000 

100 00 Alfred Tobias 100 00 

10000 George F. Jones 10000 

100 00 Thompson Brothers 100 00 

100 00 Samuel Blatchford 100 00 

100 00 Morewood & Co 100 00 

100 00 Samuel T. Skidmore 100 00 

10000 John G. Stearns 10000 

100 00 Oliver H. Jones 100 00 

100 00 Lawrence, Cohen & Co 100 00 

100 00 Cunningham, Frost & Throck- 

100 00 mortons 100 00 

10000 Holmes & Co 10000 

100 00 Wm. Macnaughtan 100 00 

100 00 Matthew Clarkson 100 00 

100 00 Elliot C. Cowdin 100 00 

100 00 Cornelius K. Sutton 100 00 

100 00 Ezra Nye 100 00 

100 00 Tappan & Starbuck 100 00 

100 00 Uriel A. Murdock 100 00 

10000 W.H.Fogg 10000 

10000 O. Wm. Butt 10000 

100 00 Wm. Agnew & Sons 100 00 

100 00 Battelle & Renwick 100 00 

10000 Emil Heinemann 10000 

100 00 Captain John Britton 100 00 

100 00 Daniel S. Miller 100 00 

100 00 George Abeel 100 00 

100 00 D. B. Fearing 100 00 

100 00 Sidney Mason 100 00 

100 00 Mrs. Hopkins, in pennies 100 00 

100 00 Charles Henschel 100 00 

100 00 James W. Beekman . . 100 00 






THE FIEE ZOUAVE FUND. 



37 



Lispenard Stewart 


$100 00 


Chas. Gillespie 


$50 00 


John J. Crooke 


100 00 


S. A. Martine & Co 


50 00 


Robert McCoskrv 


100 00 


Clerks of the Bank of America. 


50 00 


J. Q. Jones 


100 00 


Edward Robinson, Jr 


50 00 


Geo. Collins 


100 00 


Geo. E. Archer 


50 00 


Henrv Ellsworth 


100 00 


John B. Crosby 


50 00 


Thomas T. Smith 


100 00 


Geo. "W. Berrian 


50 00 


Chas. M. Connolly & Co 


100 00 


J. Durbrow 


50 00 


Mrs. Andrew Dunlap 


100 00 


Wm. Vernon, Jr 


50 00 


L. Lorut 


100 00 


Capt. Thos. Ferguson 


50 00 


John B. Schmelzel 


100 00 


I. Green Pearson 


50 00 


Scharfenberg & Luis 


100 00 


Thomas Dewitt 


50 00 


Chas. J. Howell 


100 00 


Gilbert Davis 


50 00 


Charles Dennis 


75 00 


George Brown 


50 00 


James Van Antwerp 


75 00 


Mrs. Isaac Townsend 


50 00 


Archibald Hall, Jr 


50 00 


J. B. Lawrence, M. D 


50 00 


John J. Charruaud 


50 00 


Julius Gerson 


50 00 


Quick & L'Hommedieu 


50 00 


A. S. Jarvis 


50 00 


Whitmore & Co 


50 00 


F. L. Talcott 


50 00 


Joseph Greenleaf 


50 00 


Maury Brothers 


50 00 


Gabriel M. Tooker 


i 50 00 


Captain Thos. Ingersoll 


50 00 


E. G. Thompson 


50 00 


All other sums, those given 




P. G. Churchill 


50 00 


anonymously and those un- 




J. F. Hoyer 


50 00 


der $50 


6,350 25 


Total. . 




..$ 


179,500 00 



Besides the aid received by volunteer regiments from this fund, many 
of them made collections of their own that of the Fire Zouaves, Colonel 
Ellsworth, amounting to more than $20,000. Fourteen gentlemen, as follows, 
obtained the sums set opposite their names respectively, besides $5,000 given 
by the Union Defence Committee, and $5,000 by the Chamber of Commerce : 



James Kelly $2,980 

A. F. Ockershausen 1,500 

Jno. A. Cregier 3,250 

A. G. Delatour 3,400 

O. W. Brennan 3,150 

Geo. F. Nesbitt 940 

Wm. H. Wickham. . 825 



John Decker $503 

Zophar Mills 590 

John S.Giles 705 

Wm. Wright 1,060 

J. R. Platt 300 

J. Y. Watkins 380 

Henry B. Venn 845 



Total $20,428 

There were few regiments, indeed, that did not have their own special 
fund, though none were as large as that of the Zouaves. A Eichmond County 
regiment, of New York, collected $2,000 upon a Staten Island boat during a 
single trip. Entertainments, dramatic, musical, gymnastic, in a similar object, 
were given at an early date ; and it is probable that not a day has passed since 



38 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

in which, in some part of the country, there has not been some performance, 
professional, social, or amateur, some exhibition, some festival, some lecture, 
given directly or indirectly in aid of the cause, the receipts varying from five 
thousand dollars to fifty. 

On the 23d of April, the subscription in Chicago had reached hard upon 
$100,000, and was afterwards largely increased. The achievements of the 
Sturges Eifles, a company equipped by Solomon Sturges at an expense of 

),000, and of the Battery of the Chicago Board of Trade, upon which 

),000 were expended, have long been familiar to all. 

Colonel Samuel Colt, of Hartford, offered to furnish a regiment with 
breech-loading rifles, at a cost of $50,000. 

In Boston, on the 25th of the month, a subscription in behalf of the 
Twelfth Kegiment, to be commanded by Colonel Fletcher Webster, had 
reached the sum of $12,500. The citizens of Jersey City expended $26,000 
upon the Second New Jersey. At a meeting in Oswego, N. Y., $1,600 were 
subscribed for purchasing side-arms for officers. Adams' Express offered to 
carry lint and soldiers' letters free. 

Large as the sums thus given undoubtedly were, they were of course 
trifling when compared with the sums appropriated by states and towns, a 
debt afterwards assumed by the government. Funds raised throughout the 
country for another purpose, however, which were subject to no such com- 
parison, were not only relatively, but actually, large. These were the local 
funds, organized in almost every city, town, village, and neighborhood, for the 
support of the families of volunteers. Four thousand dollars were subscribed 
in Auburn, for this purpose, on the 19th of April ; forty-two persons gave 
$4,200 in one hour in Pittsburgh ; the Canandaigua subscription was headed 
by a signature good for $500; Oswego had obtained $10,000, Norwich, 
$10,000, Eochester, $20,000, Utica, $8,000, on the 20th ; and Binghampton, 
$10,000, on the 26th. Mr. Wm. Gray, of Boston, gave $10,000 for a similar 
purpose. These are not given as special instances, but as examples of what 
was universal, and had been spontaneous from one end of the country to the 
other. Nothing could have been more opportune, indeed, more indispensable, 
than the giving of these sums for this object. It enabled thousands to join 
the army who must otherwise have tarried at home ; and it removed from the 
minds of many, who would have gone at any rate, all anxiety for those they 
left behind them. The funds for soldiers' families, raised by private subscrip- 
tion, and added to the sums voted in the same object, have been of the utmost 
service ; the good they have done cannot easily be overestimated. 



THE LAWYERS' FUND. 39 

A call for a meeting of the bench and bar of New York was published in 
the papers of April 22d, and such a meeting was held in the afternoon of that 
day, in the room of the Superior Court. Judges and ex-judges of the different 
benches, and representatives of nearly every law firm in the city, were present. 
After the reading of resolutions, the following gentlemen were appointed an 
executive committee : 

HON. JOHN W. EDMONDS. WILLIAM ALLEN BUTLER, 

" Jos. S. BOSWORTH, HON. WM. H. LEONARD, 
" EDWARDS PIERREPONT, " HENRY HILTON, 

HENRY NICOLL, DANIEL LORD, 

WILLIAM FULLERTON, DORMAN B. EATON, 

LUTHER R MARSH, EICHARD O'GORMAN, 

ALEX. HAMILTON, JR., GILBERT DEAN. 
JOHN C. T. SMIDT, 

Mr. Daniel Lord was appointed treasurer, and was soon the custodian of 
over $27,000, contributed by members of the bench and bar, for the relief of 
the families of volunteers. But a portion only has thus far been expended ; 
deducting the disbursements, and adding the interest accrued upon the remain- 
der, the balance in hand is, or was very lately, some $19,000. 

The first collections in churches in aid of the cause were taken in Plymouth 
Church, Brooklyn, and in the Broadway Tabernacle, New York, on Sunday, 
the 21st. The latter congregation has, during the four years of the war, given, 
in answer to the numerous appeals made to it by the Sanitary, Christian, and 
Union Commissions, no less a sum than $30,000. The former has probably 
given more, in money and goods. 

On the 30th of April, the teachers in the public schools of Boston relin- 
quished a certain proportion of their salaries during the rebellion, as follows : 

Superintendent of Schools and Masters of Latin, English High and Girls' 
High and Normal Schools, 25 per cent. 

Masters of Grammar Schools and Sub-Masters of English and Latin High 
Schools, 15 per cent. 

Sub-Masters of Grammar Schools and Ushers of Latin and English High 
Schools, 12^ per cent. 

Ushers of Grammar Schools. 10 per cent. 

The aggregate of these percentages would amount to more than $12,000 a 
year. 



40- 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



The pilots of New York harbor offered their services to take government 
vessels in and out of port gratis. Mr. Robert Dent, one of the honorable fra- 
ternity, seeing a soldier thinly clad about to embark during a heavy blow., 
took off his shaggy, comfortable coat and gave it to him. A gentleman, 
noticing a Massachusetts man whose boots had given out during the tramp, 
rushed into a neighboring shoemaker's, purchased a new pair, and proposed to 
exchange with the ill-shod infantry-man. The latter, making a seat of his 




NEW BOOTS FOR OLD. 



knapsack placed upon the curb-stone, effected the amiable barter. Instances 
of personal good- will such as this were innumerable ; and where we mention 
one incident, let the reader give the rein to his fancy and imagine ten thou- 
sand similar ones ; he will in every case fall short of the truth. 

An aged clergyman, the Eev. Mr. Skinner, unable to do much, but 
anxious to do the little he could, proposed, as the most effective way of ap- 
plying and multiplying his slender contribution, to print fifty thousand copies 
of a brief treatise upon health, especially adapted to soldiers' reading. Thus 
early was one of the ideas broached, afterwards carried out so effectively in 
the publication of medical monographs by the Sanitary Commission. 

On the 23d of April, Sherman's Battery of eight howitzers, manned by 
eighty men, passed through Philadelphia on its way to Washington. As the 
train conveying the troops stopped, the women of the neighboring street? 
hurried out to the cars, bearing a welcome on their lips and a more substantial 
one in their hands. Plates which had been filled for others the soldiers had 
arrived at the propitious hour of dinner dishes cooking upon the range, 
baskets hastily stocked from the pantry and the larder, bottles, decanters, and 



THE VANDERBILT. 41 

flagons were brought forth into the highway, and the weary and thirsty 
travellers abundantly refreshed. The stocks of itinerant fruiterers were 
eagerly bought up by generous monopolists, and any man in blue and red 
might have as many oranges as he could catch. A hat was passed around, 
and its contents were expended in cigars and tobacco for those who loved the 
weed. This done, hands were hurriedly shaken, good-byes hastily uttered, 
and the train moved slowly off, the gallant cannoneers giving nine cheers for 
the Union, the Constitution, and the ladies of Philadelphia. 

At the close of an enthusiastic meeting for army contributions in New 
York, two ladies approached the secretary's desk, and placed upon it an un- 
pretentious parcel. As they passed out, a curious hand unrolled the package, 
and revealed a large number of old linen handkerchiefs, inscribed with the 
names of Alice and Phcebe Gary. 

On the 14th of May, Cornelius Vanderbilt wrote a letter to Mr. W. 0. Bart- 
lett, in which he said that he had offered to dispose of the ocean steamer 
Yanderbilt to the government, but had received no answer to his communica- 
tion. He then added what follows : 

" You are authorized to renew this proposition, with such additions thereto 
as are hereinafter set forth. I feel a great desire that the government should 




U<x3> 



TUB FRIGATE VAM>RB1LT. 



have the steamer Yanderbilt, as she is acknowledged to be as fine a ship as 
floats the ocean, and, in consequence of her great speed and capacity, would, 
with a proper armament, be of more efficient service in keeping our coast 
clear of piratical vessels than any other ship. Therefore you are authorized 
to say, in my behalf, that the government can take this ship at a valuation 
to be determined by the Hon. Robert F. Stockton, of New Jersey, the only 



42 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

ex-commodore in the navy, and any two commodores in the service, to be 
selected by the government ; and if this will not answer, will the government 
accept her as a present from their humble servant ? 

************ 

" Yours, very respectfully, 

"C. YANDERBILT." 

Owing to the fact that a portion of the Vanderbilt's machinery is above the 
deck, and exposed to the enemy's shot, the Navy Department was for a time 
unwilling to accept this munificent proposal; but afterwards, when better 
provided with long range cannon, which would enable the vessel to use her 
own guns at a safe distance from those of the enemy, she was accepted by the 
government, converted into a powerful man-of-war, and sent upon a cruise 
in search of privateers. The vessel has since done excellent service, and 
proved a most valuable acquisition to the navy. The gift was worth, in 
money, not far from three quarters of a million of dollars. 

Certain persons endeavored to show that Mr. Yanderbilt could well afford 
to give his vessel to the government, as she had already earned a large sum of 
money, and that therefore he deserved but little credit. "We cannot see the 
force of this reasoning. Would any one of these captious individuals im- 
pugn the generosity of a friend who should give or bequeath them a govern- 
ment bond, on the ground that he had cut off and cashed the coupons as they 
successively fell due ? 

At about this time, the congregation of Plymouth Church engaged to fur- 
nish every man of the Brooklyn Fourteenth with shoes, undershirts, drawers, 
stockings, handkerchiefs, suspenders, and sponge. As if to furnish a basis of 
comparison between individual and congregational effort, Mrs. Walker, a poor 
woman of New York, supplied Wilson's Regiment of Zouaves with sixty shirts 
of her own making. 

The police force of New York had, by the middle of May, furnished the 
army thirty-four volunteers, engaging to pay to the family of each $50 a 
month, and assessing themselves in the following amounts for that object: 
Superintendents, $5 ; inspectors, $3 ; captains, $2 ; sergeants, $1.50 ; patrol- 
men, $1 each. 

In the first month after the fall of Sumter, the people of the United States 
spent a million dollars for flags, and half as much more for badges, emblems, 
cockades, rosettes, and other patriotic devices. For one flag torn down, thou- 
sands upon thousands were thrown to the wind. In the cities they floated not 



THE CHURCH AND THE FLAG. 



43 




'THERE LET IT WAVE, AS IT WAVED or OLD. 



only from liberty-pole, flag-staff, and casement, not only from ropes and 
halliards, but from steeple, spire, and belfry. " We will take our glorious 
flag," said Bishop Simpson, "and nail it just below the cross. That is high 
enough! There let it wave, as it waved of old. First Christ, then our 
country !" The streets were gorgeous with the loyal colors ; and when the 
wind blew at right angles with the grand thoroughfares of the larger cities, 
the sky seemed heavy with massive red and blue, and stars could be seen at 



44 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

raid-day. Before the rebellion there were not ten flag-staffs upon private 
edifices in Broadway ; by the first of June there were hundreds. The flag 
manufacturers were overrun, and though they doubled and trebled their prices, 
there was no diminution in the demand. When bunting gave out, pongee, 
China silk, and finally cotton were used. What recruiting officers those 
starry banners were! They rendered better service than provost-marshals 
have since. Mr. Thomas W. Davidson, a rigger by trade, who believed that 
no height was too lofty to bear the stars and stripes, raised the flag upon the 
pinnacle of Trinity and St. Paul's, apparently at the imminent risk of his life, 
and offered to do as much for any church, gratis. William O'Donnell and 
Charles McLaughlin, painters, clambered up Grace Church lightning-rod, 
fastened a staff to the stem of the cross, threw out the flag, and raised their hats 
to the crowd below. There have been few open air spectacles more beautiful 
than the display of the national colors in the cities, on two widely dissimilar 
occasions : when Sumter was lost, and when it was recovered. There may be 
a certain beauty, fantastic and weird, in a feast of lanterns ; but there is more 
than beauty, there is grandeur, inspiration, sublimity, in a carnival of flags. 

Serious undertaking though it be to regale a regiment of soldiers, men 
and women have been found, or were found in the earlier times, to attempt it, 
yea, and to succeed in it. Two instances must suffice : that of a New York 
regiment treated to clams, and that of a distribution of doughnuts among the 
men of the Third Maine. 

Clams and colors ! This was the bill of fare drawn up and paid for by an 
ingenious gentlemen who lived upon the sea-coast. A state and regimental 
flag and thirty thousand clams ! Clams in such aggregates as this suggest 
appalling reflections; but they are singularly modified by distribution and 
subdivision, and there remains but the lesser question of individual digestion. 
But the leavings ! Sixty thousand clam-shells ! Memories of Aristides and 
ostracism heave up out of the mists of other days, and we wonder whether 
the majority against The Just was any thing like this. Then we ask ourselves 
if ostracizing a just man is in any wise different from nominating to office, and 
then defeating, a good man. Should Aristides be proposed as alderman in 
New York, could he be elected ? Is it not likely that he was merely an early 
victim to universal suffrage ? And what right have we to contemn the Greek 
method of utilizing oyster- shells, when it is plain we should put the clam-shell 
to the same use if the paper-mills should stop ? 

Clams upon the coast, doughnuts on the plain. The ladies of Augusta 
summoned the men of the Third Maine to a festival, promising fifty bushels 



DOUGHNUTS FOR A REGIMENT. 



45 




THE LADIES OF AUfiCSTA TREATING THE THIRD MAINE TO DOUGHHUT6. 

of doughnuts. The cooks and housewives of the city had for days been 
elaborating the viscous compound, and it appeared upon the field at the 
appointed hour, cut into lengths and twisted into shapes, conveyed in baskets 
by persons who had not yet been pronounced contraband of war. The soldiers, 
drawn up in hollow square how apt is this word hollow, when applied to 
men who have fasted in view of promised doughnuts ! received the proces- 
sion, which consisted of music, then the ladies, then the doughnuts. After 
certain ceremonies, the ranks were broken, and the martial, civic, and contra- 
band elements blended in pleasing harmony. Eye-witnesses have given us 
glimpses of the scene. It is true, they say, that there were a few human 
beings, houses, and quadrupeds, which might have been remarked, but 
the principal feature of the landscape was doughnuts. Never was such an 
aggregate seen since the world began. The circumambient air was redolent 
of doughnuts ; every breeze sighed doughnuts ; the soldiers ate doughnuts, 
the ladies laughed doughnuts, the distributors cried doughnuts. There was 
the molasses doughnut and the sugar doughnut, the round doughnut and the 
square doughnut, the single-twisted doughnut and the three-ply doughnut, 
the light-riz doughnut and the hard-kneaded doughnut Doughnuts ruled 
the camp, if not the court and the grove. As those who lived upon short 



46 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

commons sighed for the flesh-pots, so, doubtless, doughnuts were remembered 
with longings in the days of hard tack. 

One instance of another sort must answer for hundreds. Lieutenant York, 
of Duryea's Zouaves, lost his sword in an early skirmish ; and by " lost" it is 
meant that a grape-shot struck it, broke the scabbard in halves, bent the 
sword, and cut out a piece of the blade. Lieutenant York sent the remnant 
home to his son, who exhibited it to his father's colleagues of the bar, in the 
Superior Court room in New York. Of course a subscription was the imme- 
diate result, no one being allowed to contribute more than two dollars. When 
the new sword was purchased, it was found that money still remained, so a 
carbine was added, and after that a field-glass. The outfit of thousands of 
officers their swords, their saddles, their horses were paid for by coteries of 
admiring friends, or by appeals to an indulgent and sympathizing public. 

The artists of New York put their loyalty on record at an early date. Several 
of their number had either left the city with their regiments or had joined regi- 
ments in order to leave. Those who remained clubbed together to collect a 
gallery of pictures, over which Mr. Leeds should brandish his hammer driving 
imaginary nails on which to hang the pictures when patriots had bought them. 
One hundred and thirteen pictures were contributed, and if they had brought 
two dollars more than they did, the result would have been a round $5,000. 
We give a specimen from the catalogue, premising that what is omitted from 
this book, in this case as in others, is every whit as good as that which is told : 
after all we can say or do, we shall have given but a sample, a taste, a glimpse. 
Our digestion could not bear a full feast, nor our eyes the full glare : 

Moonlight on the Grand Menan Wm. Hart $100 00 

Black Your Boots, Sir J. O. B. Inman 45 00 

Swiss Mountains Casilear 85 00 

Niagara Gignoux 160 00 

Reflection Beard 60 00 

South Pass, Rocky Mountains Bierstadt 50 00 

Cumsean Sibyl Lang 100 00 

Homeward through the Stream A. F. Bellows 140 00 

A Foxy Morning Eastman Johnson 105 00 

Landscape Kensett 105 00 

Stream J. M. Hart 80 00 

Paolina ,H. P. Gray 80 00 

Happy Summer Time G. A. Baker 150 00 

Old Mill McEntee 47 50 

Study Durand 110 00 

Beatrice Huntington 115 00 

The Life Boat Warren 60 00 

Death of Scipio Darley 75 00 



THE MISSOURI FUND. 



47 



New York set the example, in May, of aiding, by levies of money, the 
eiforts of patriots a thousand miles away. The situation of Missouri was so 
anomalous, the condition of Union men there so distressing, that assistance 
from without was indispensable to enable them to fulfil their duty as loyal 
inhabitants of a loyal state. Mr. Frank P. Blair asked the assistance of New 
York to enable him to equip a regiment of Missouri volunteers ; Mr. Isaac 
Sherman would receive subscriptions and administer the fund. In a month's 
time the account stood thus, and was finally closed : 



Friends of Missouri, through James 

McKaye $1,000 

I. Sherman 1,000 

Royal Phelps .' 500 

August Belmont .' 500 

Geo. Griswold, Jr 500 

J. K A. Griswold 500 

James Lenox 500 

Mr. Aspinwall ) 

Mr. Whitewright I 500 

Mr. Hoadley ) 

Sherman & Romaine 400 

Brown Brothers & Co 250 

James Meinell 250 

Sandy Hook Pilots 250 

Great Western Ins. Co 250 

Smith & Dimon 200 

Samuel Wetmore 100 

Meigs & Greenleaf 100 



J. D. Jones $100 

F. G. Shaw 100 

Goodhue & Co 100 

J. F. Butterworth 100 

R. P. Buck & Co 100 

D. Dows & Co 100 

C. H. Marshall & Co 100 

Benj. B. Sherman 100 

Duncan, Sherman & Co 100 

W. H. Peckham 100 

Western Transportation Co 100 

A. Iselin & Co 100 

Seligman & Stettheimer 100 

Joseph Battell 100 

Ephraim Treadwell's Sons 100 

Grinnell, Minturn & Co 100 

Benkard & Hutton 100 

All others 6,230 

Clothing 155 



Total $14,885 



Somewhat later, when a foothold was obtained upon the coast of North 
Carolina by the capture of Fort Hatteras, the inhabitants of the redeemed 
district were found to be in need, and a North Carolina Aid Association 
solicited money to be spent in their relief. Ten thousand dollars were obtained 
for this purpose in New York. 

When Colonel Stetson, of the Astor House, New York, was asked for his 
bill for the entertainment of regiments from Massachusetts, he sent this mes- 
sage to Governor Andrew : " The Astor House makes no charge for feeding 
Massachusetts troops." 

The Americans in Paris no sooner heard of the events in Charleston 
Harbor than they convened to concert measures in aid of the government. 
The first form given to the assistance offered was coin ; the second, artillery. 
It was thought that cannon were more needed at home than any other weapons 



48 



THE TEIBUTE BOOK. 



of offence, and accordingly two Whitworth guns were in due time dispatched. 
These were mounted first upon Federal Hill, Baltimore, and afterwards in 
Fort Ellsworth, Alexandria. The following was the paper, as drawn up and 
signed in Paris in May, 1861 : 

We, the undersigned, hereby agree to pay the sums affixed to our names, for the 
purpose of purchasing rifled cannon to be forwarded to America, to be used in enforcing 
the laws and upholding the Constitution and Union : 



John J. Ridgeway frs. 2,500 

Robert Sturgis 2,500 

Francis Warden 2,000 

Messrs. Crauch, Dana & May, each a 

picture, 500 frs 1,500 

A. E. Borie 1,000 

Henry Woods 1,000 

Dr. Thomas W. Evans 1,000 

Mrs. Dudley Selden 1,000 

W. C. Emmett 1,000 

AYoodbury Langdon 1,000 

A. J. Oipriaut 1,000 

James Phalen 1,000 

G. H. Coster 1,000 

Renel Smith 1,000 

F. Sumner 1,000 

J. K. Smyth 1,000 

II. Hutchinson 1,000 

Mrs. Richard Ray 1,000 

G. R. Russell 1,000 

Dr. Berger 1,000 

Theodore Lyman 1,000 

Edward Brooks 1,000 

J. D. Wendel 500 

A. T. P 500 

J. W. Wheeler 500 

J. D. B. C 500 

Mrs. C. F. Hovey 500 

C. B. Hotchkiss 500 

E. C. Cowdin 500 

Mrs. Greenough 500 

Geo. T. Richards 500 

James Eddy 500 

Dr. Gage 500 

Persifer Fraser 500 

Theo. S. Evans 500 

D. D. Howard 500 

II. W. Spencer 500 

Horace II. Williams 500 

Samuel Hammond 500 

Mr. Fagnani (two portraits at one 

quarter the usual price) 500 



W. K. Strong frs. 500 

Geo. A. Hearn 500 

J. S. Andrews 500 

T. Wallace Evans 500 

F. S. Lovering 500 

Geo. B. English 500 

Madame de Courbal 500 

Mrs. R. G. Shaw 500 

G. H. Mumford 500 

Mrs. Colford Jones 500 

Rev. C. T. Thayer 300 

H. L ." 300 

Miss II. R. Woolsey 250 

E. Lincoln 250 

Dr. Beylard ; 250 

A. Depeyster 250 

Wm. A. Hovey 250 

M. C. Burnap 250 

Charles Pepper 250 

J. J. Randolph 250 

Mrs. H. L 200 

J. H. Deming 200 

J. H. Canfield 200 

Mrs. Lawrence Moore 200 

Mrs. Dodge 200 

A. K. P. Cooper 100 

G. P. Howell 100 

II. C. S 100 

John Smith 100 

E. F. Emmett 100 

G. Hinckley Clark 100 

G. S. Partridge 100 

Dr. McClintock 100 

Miss C. C. Woolsey 100 

Mrs. E. W. Clark 100 

Jas. W. Tucker 100 

John Markes 100 

George Potter 100 

Henry J. Hunt 100 

J. E. Irvin 100 

A. P. Strange 100 

T. Puison . . 100 



COLCHESTER AND PHILADELPHIA. 



49 



John Mix frs. 100 

W. F. Dodd 100 

Charles Francis 100 

P. B 100 

F. H. Clark 100 

Mrs. G 100 

Mr. Homer. . .100 



Rev. Mr. Longacre frs. 50 

Rev. Mr. Loomis 

Mr. Eastman 

Dr. McGowan 

Elbridge Torry 

John Lindsey 

J. Fagnani 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
40 



For a year the voluntary offerings of the people continued upon the scale 
indicated by the few instances we have mentioned. And this scale was one 
which had been tacitly established or agreed upon, and represented, doubtless, 
the public idea of the necessities of the case. But in May, 1862, when certain 
events showed the need of the country to be far greater than had been sup- 
posed, the spirit of giving rose with the occasion. General Banks was com- 
pelled to retreat down the Shenandoah Valley and to recross the Potomac. 
Washington was again believed to be in danger, and the militia of the neigh- 
boring states were again called out. Soon after, the Army of the Potomac was 
forced, after inflicting and suffering great loss, to abandon its attempt on 
Eichmond ; Pope was defeated in the Valley of Virginia, and the now defiant 
army of the rebels crossed the Potomac into Maryland. Under the spur of 
this second necessity, the contributions of the people were to those made after 
the fall of Sumter and the defeat of Bull Run as sixteen is to seven. Such 
statistics as are accessible show the voluntary contributions of the second year 
to have been more than double those of the first. Disaster seemed only to 
stimulate to further exertion, and whether the call was for money or men, the 
supply and the willingness to furnish either the one or the other kept steady 
pace with the demand. Every town and village had its war fund, its relief 
committee, its disbursing officers. An example or two will show how these 
matters were managed in 1862. "We take one village, Colchester, Connecticut ; 
and one city, Philadelphia. 

Colchester may be dismissed in a few words. The inhabitants first sub- 
scribed to a fund for the promotion of enlistments ; then to a fund for the 
relief of the families of volunteers. Both the soldiers and their wives and 
children were handsomely dealt with. Then the village doctor promised to 
prescribe for those left behind, gratis ; then the clergymen engaged to furnish 
them sittings in all the churches, gratis ; next, the village apothecary declared 
that he would put up all prescriptions for the wives and children of soldiers, 
gratis ; and, finally, the undertaker agreed that if the physician and the drug- 
gist labored in vain, and any soldier's heir' died, he would bury him gratis. 
The quota of Colchester was filled at an early day. 



50 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

"We take the case of Philadelphia, for the reason that the sum obtained 
was by far the largest bounty and defence fund ever raised by subscription ; 
it therefore serves for itself and for those of all smaller communities, as the 
greater includes the less. Doubtless the exposure of the city to invasion lent 
a certain zest to the proceedings of the various assemblages, but it is not neces- 
sary to suppose that a sense of danger placed one additional dollar upon the 
books. It was the 16th of July; the Army of the Potomac was at Harrison's 
Landing, and the rebel forces, relieved from the necessity of defending Rich- 
mond, were preparing to assume the offensive. The President was known to 
be preparing an order for a draft, to compel the filling of quotas under the call 
for 300,000 men. A public-spirited citizen wrote to one of the morning 
papers that he would be glad to be one of one hundred persons to subscribe 
$1,000 each, towards raising ten regiments in the city. This proposal was 
seconded in the papers of the next day ; and two days afterwards another cor- 
respondent made known his willingness to be one of the hundred, adding that 
he inferred from the remarks of a friend, that that gentleman could also be 
counted upon. 

On Thursday, the 24th of July, a preliminary meeting of citizens was held 
at the rooms of the Board of Trade, the mayor of the city in the chair. Mr. 
John D. Watson stated that the meeting was called in consequence of the 
proclamation issued by the governor, urging every city, town, and borough in 
the commonwealth, to take some action in the now pressing matter of providing 
bounties and filling the contingent of Pennsylvania. Money could not be 
obtained from the treasury without authority of law, and the legislature was 
not in session. It must be raised by individual subscription. Harrisburg 
had set the example, and it was time that Philadelphia followed it. Mr. 
Charles Gilpin thought that the occasion appealed both to the honor and 
selfishness of the people. The solid men should now come forward. For 
himself, he was not able to serve as a private, and he had not the faculty of 
command ; he was not rich, but he would place one thousand dollars in his 
opinion a small contribution at the service of the country. Mr. Gilpin was 
the first subscriber. 

The Hon. Henry D. Moore said that there were three causes which retarded 
enlistments in Pennsylvania ; first, the laboring classes were earning better 
wages than were paid by government ; second, the floating population had 
already been absorbed ; and, third, neighboring states and towns had offered 
bounties as an inducement to volunteer, while Pennsylvania had offered none. 
Bounties must be offered, and the citizens must provide for their payment. 



THE PHILADELPHIA BOUNTY FUND. 51 

Mr. Lorin Blodget submitted a series of resolutions providing for the ap- 
pointment of committees. 

The three gentlemen whom we have mentioned as proposing to contribute 
$1,000 each, now proved their sincerity. A paper was handed to the mayor 
containing the names of eleven firms pledged for $15,000, in case the sum of 
$100,000 should be subscribed, for the purpose of raising ten city regiments, 
under the direction of the mayor. It was thought best, however, to leave the 
matter in the hands of the state authorities, and the plan was not adopted. 
The officers to collect and administer the fund were now appointed, as fol- 
lows : 

Chairman, 
ALEXANDER HENRY, Mayor of the City. 

Vice- Chairman, 
THOMAS WEBSTER. 

Treasurer, 
S. A. MERCER. 

Secretary, 
LORIN BLODGET. 

Disbursing Committee, 

MICHAEL V. BAKER, GEORGE WHITNEY, 

S. A. MERCER. 

Committee, 

ALEXANDER HENRY, WILLIAM WELSH, 

CHARLES GIBBONS, J. Eoss SNOWDEN, 

CHARLES D. FREEMAN, A. E. BORIE, 

S. A. MERCER, S. W. DE COURSEY, 

DR. JAMES MCCLINTOCK, GEORGE H. STUART, 

THOMAS WEBSTER, M. Y. BAKER, 

GEORGE WHITNEY, J. E. ADDICKS, 

J. D. WATSON, JAMES MILLIKEN, 

L. BLODGET, JAMES C. HAND. 

A subscription book was formally opened, and before the meeting ad- 
journed nearly $36,000 had been promised. During the progress of the meet- 
ing, the Board of Directors of the Pennsylvania Eailroad Company had 



52 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

indited a letter to Governor Curtin to the effect that $50,000 of their money 
was at the disposal of the executive, or of a duly appointed committee, for 
bounty money to soldiers. The next day, the Philadelphia and Reading 
Railroad Company subscribed $25,000, and private citizens $34,000 more. 
On Saturday, under the genial influence of a war meeting, held in Indepen- 
dence Square, $42,000 were received. Subscriptions continued to be made 
till the middle of September, when the sum total was within a few thousand 
dollars of half a million. We subjoin the list, as perhaps the most remarkable 
to which the rebellion has given birth ; and, to make this .brief story of the 
Philadelphia Bounty Fund complete, append a statement of the objects to 
which the money was applied. The reader will find these columns of names 
more interesting than, at first glance, he would perhaps be inclined to suppose, 
and their value will increase with age : 



PHILADELPHIA BOUNTY FUND JULY, AUGUST, SEPTEMBEE, 1862. 



Pennsylvania Railroad Co $50,000 00 

Philadelphia and Reading Rail- 
road Company 25,000 00 

Bank of North America 10,000 00 

Philadelphia Bank 6,000 00 

Philadelphia Saving Fund So- 
ciety 5,000 00 

Green Tree Mutual Ins. Co 5,000 00 

Mutual Assurance Company for 

Insuring Houses 5,000 00 

Franklin Fire Insurance Co 5,000 00 

Philadelphia Contributionship 

Insurance Company 5,000 00 

Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank. . 5,000 00 

S. V. Merrick 8,000 00 

McKean, Borie & Co 3,000 00 

Benjamin Bullock & Sons 3,000 00 

A. Whitney & Sons 3,000 00 

Girard Bank 3,000 00 

North American Insurance Co. . 2,500 00 

Delaware Mutual Insurance Co. 2,500 00 

Commercial Bank 2,500 00 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Co. 2,500 00 
Philadelphia Steam Propeller Co. 2,500 00 
Philadelphia and Trenton Rail- 
road Company 2,500 00 

I. P. Morris, Towne & Co 2,000 00 

Wm. H. Horstmann & Sons 2,000 00 

Sellers & Co 2,000 00 

Morris, Tasker & Co 2,000 00 



Pennsylvania Company for Insu- 
rance on Lives and Granting 

Annuities $2,000 00 

Philadelphia, Wilmington and 

Baltimore Railroad Company. 2,000 00 

Neafie & Levy 2,000 00 

Western Bank 1,500 00 

Bank of Northern Liberties 1,500 00 

W. P. Wilstach & Co 1,500 00 

American Bank Note Company. 1,500 00 

Reliance Mutual Insurance Co. . 1,500 00 

American Fire Insurance Co 1,500 00 

Employees of Schuylkill Arsenal 1,200 00 

John Grigg 1,100 00 

Chas. Gilpin 1,000 00 

Wm. Welsh 1,000 00 

A friend, per Wm. Welsh 1,000 00 

Hanson Robinson 1,000 00 

Henry Winsor 1,000 00 

John T. Lewis & Brothers 1,000 00 

Daniel Haddock 1,000 00 

John Ashurst 1,000 00 

Joseph B. Myers 1,000 00 

Samuel S. White 1,000 00 

J. E. Caldwell 1,000 00 

Stuart & Brother 1,000 00 

John Haseltine 1,000 00 

Wm. H. Kern 1,000 00 

Edward C. Knight & Co 1,000 00 

Stephen & Jas. M. Flanagan. . . . 1,000 00 



THE PHILADELPHIA BOUNTY FUND. 



53 



Henry M. Watts $1,000 00 

Welling, Coffin & Co 1,000 00 

Wm. B. Mann 1,000 00 

Bailey & Co 1,000 00 

Taylor, Gillespie & Co 1 000 00 

De Coursey, Lafourcade & Co . . 1,000 00 

John B. Alyers 1,000 00 

C. Sherman & Son 1,000 00 

J. P. Hutehinson 1,000 00 

W. A. Blanchard 1,000 00 

Drexel & Co 1,000 00 

Jay Cooke & Co 1,000 00 

Cabeen & Co 1,000 00 

Benjamin Homer 1,000 00 

Thomas Sparks 1,000 00 

Evan Kandolph 1,000 00 

John Gibson, Sons & Co 1,000 00 

lungerich & Smith 1,000 00 

Daniel Smith, Jr . . . 1,000 00 

C. & H. Borie 1,000 00 

Edward M. Hopkins 1,000 00 

Jacob Jones 1,000 00 

Henry J. Williams 1,000 00 

John Dallett & Co 1,000' 00 

S. B. Van Syckel 1,000 00 

Tatham & Brothers 1,000 00 

W. R. White 1,000 00 

N. Trotter & Co 1,000 00 

Slade, Smith & Co 1,000 00 

Bloomfield H. Moore 1,000 00 

A. D. Jessup 1,000 00 

J. B. Lippincott & Co 1,000 00 

Captain W. Whilldin 1,000 00 

Howell & Brothers 1,000 00 

Henry Simons 1,000 00 

Charles P. Fox 1,000 00 

Mercer & Antelo 1,000 00 

Joseph Swift 1,000 00 

Thomas Drake 1,000 00 

Charles N. Baker 1,000 00 

John Mason & Co 1,000 00 

Stewart, Carson & Co 1,000 00 

Alexander Benson & Co 1,000 00 

Horace Binney 1,000 00 

James Eowland & Co 1,000 00 

Brown, Hill & Co 1,000 00 

J. Rhea Barton, M. D 1,000 00 

Leonard & Baker 1,000 00 

Peter Williamson 1,000 00 

James, Kent & Santee 1,000 00 

Edmund A. Souder & Co 1,000 00 

Edwin Forrest 1,000 00 



Sharpless Brothers $1,000 00 

Charles Gibbons 1,000 00 

W. M. Meredith 1,000 00 

T. W. Evans 1,000 00 

Tredick, Stokes & Co 1,000 00 

Geo. P. Smith 1,000 00 

Chas. S. Coxe 1,000 00 

Girard Life Insurance Company. 1,000 00 

Adams' Express Company 1,000 00 

Bank of Penn Township 1,000 00 

American Life and Trust Co 1,000 00 

Fire Association of Philadelphia. 1,000 00 

J. R. Ingersoll 1,000 00 

Manufacturers' and Mechanics' 

Bank 1,000 00 

Riegel, Wiest & Ervin 1,000 00 

Cornelius & Baker 1,000 00 

A. Campbell & Co 1,000 00 

Baltimore & Philadelphia Steam- 
boat Company 1,000 00 

New York and Baltimore Trans- 
portation Line 1,000 00 

Wm. C. Houston & Thos. Mott. . 1,000 00 

Phoenix Iron Company 1,000 00 

Thomas P. Hooper 1,000 00 

John Pondir 1,000 00 

Noblit, Brown & Noblit 1,000 00 

Evans Rogers 1,000 00 

Philadelphia and New York Ex- 
press Steamboat Company. ... 1,000 00 

Samuel Welsh 1,000 00 

Philadelphia Hide and Tallow 

Association 1,000 00 

John J. Ridge way, of Paris 1,000 00 

John A. Brown 1,000 00 

Tyler, Stone & Co 1,000 00 

James Dundas 1,000 00 

K R. Chambers 1,000 00 

Thos. Wattson & Sons 1,000 00 

A Visitor at Brigantine Beach. . 1,000 00 

J. B. Moorhead 1,000 00 

J. V. Williamson 1,000 00 

William Bucknell 1,000 00 

Union Mutual Insurance Co. . . . 1,000 00 

Chas. Macalester 1,000 00 

Jas. C. Hand & Co 1,000 00 

Murphy & Allison 1,000 00 

Dr. D. Jayne & Son 1,000 00 

Powers & Weightman 1,000 00 

Jacob P. Jones 1,000 00 

Bank of Commerce 1,000 00 

Phoenix Mutual Insurance Co ... 1,000 00 



54 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



City Bank $1,000 00 

R. F. Loper 1,000 00 

Geo. F. Peabody & Co 1,000 00 

Insurance Company of the State 

of Pennsylvania 1,000 00 

Kensington Bank 1,000 00 

Le Fevre, Park & Co 1,000 00 

Pennsylvania Mutual Life Insu- 
rance Company 1,000 00 

Shaffner, Zeigler & Co 1,000 00 

Tradesmen's Bank 1,000 00 

Consolidation Bank 1,000 00 

Southwark Bank 1,000 00 

Thomas Smith 1,000 00 

David Milne 800 00 

J. H. Ingham 700 00 

Philadelphia Board of Brokers . . 600 00 

Geo. D. Parrish 500 00 

Thomas A. Scott 500 00 

Gans, Leberman & Co 500 00 

W. R. Thompson 500 00 

Thompson, Clarke & Young 500 00 

John Baird 500 00 

Wain, Learning & Co 500 00 

Tobias Wagner 500 00 

Chas. W. Poultney 500 00 

W. H. Newbold, Son & Aertsen. 500 00 

Wm. Rowland & Co 500 00 

A. J. Lewis 500 00 

Verree & Mitchell 500 00 

Chas. Taylor 500 00 

John Stone & Sons 500 00 

William S. Smith 500 00 

John C. Farr 500 00 

D. B. Cummins 500 00 

Reece, Seal & Co 500 00 

K & G. Taylor 500 00 

H. B. & G. W. Benners 500 00 

Isaac Lea 500 00 

Mrs. Anne Hertzog 500 00 

Samuel Powell 500 00 

Baeder, Delaney & Adamson. . . 500 00 

Wm. Ashbridge 500 00 

E. S. Whelen & Co 500 00 

Hay & McDevitt 500 00 

Wm. M. Baird 500 00 

M. & C. Sternberger 500 00 

Esherick, Black & Co 500 00 

Humphreys, Hoffman & Wright. 500 00 

Wilcox, Brothers & Co 500 00 

Thomas Clyde 500 00 

William H. Hart.. 500 00 



John M. Ford $500 00 

John Wyeth & Brother 500 00 

Joseph B. Lapsley 500 00 

Cumberland Nail & Iron Works. 500 00 

Charles E. Smith 500 00 

Hunter, Scott & Co 500 00 

Rosengarten & Sons 500 00 

Proprietors of Evening Bulletin. 500 00 

Joseph Campion 500 00 

Wm. Struthers 500 00 

John Rodman Paul 500 00 

Stillwell S. Bishop 500 00 

James Manderson 500 00 

T. C. Henry & Co 500 00 

Philip S. Justice 500 00 

Samuel R. Phillips 500 00 

E. C. & P. H. Warren 500 00 

Alexander Henry 500 00 

E. W. Clark & Co 500 00 

Little, Stokes & Co 500 00 

James R. Campbell 500 00 

John W. Forney 500 00 

Charles Spencer 500 00 

Delaware Mutual Insurance Co. 500 00 

Union Steamship Co 500 00 

S. B. Stitt 500 00 

Commonwealth Bank 500 00 

Wilson, Childs & Co 500 00 

Michael F. Clark 500 00 

Tioga Railroad Co 500 00 

Martin Landenberger 500 00 

Philadelphia Master Plasterers' 

Society 500 00 

W. E. Garrett & Sons 500 00 

Alexander Brown 500 00 

E. Jessup 500 00 

George F. Lee 500 00 

Abraham Baker 500 00 

Andrew M. Jones 500 00 

William D. Jones & Co 50000 

Smith, Williams & Co 500 00 

William S. Hansell & Sons 500 00 

William Harmer 500 00 

Yarnell & Trimble 500 00 

Union Bank 500 00 

Enterprise Insurance Co 500 00 

J. Emory Stone 500 00 

Frishmuth & Co 500 00 

Edwin Greble 500 00 

Bank of Germantown 500 00 

Anthracite Insurance Co 500 00 

Wilmington Steamboat Co 500 00 



THE PHILADELPHIA BOUNTY FUND. 



Corn Exchange Bank $500 00 

Wm. Richardson 500 00 

Stephen G. Fotterall 500 00 

Adam Warthman 500 00 

Noble, Caldwell & Co 500 00 

Davis Pearson & Co 500 00 

Billings, Roop & Co 500 00 

Geo. C. Thomas 50000 

Lewis & Damon 500 00 

American Mutual Insurance Co. 500 00 

O. Colket 500 00 

Furness, Brinley & Co 500 00 

John M. Reed 500 00 

Ludwig, Kneedler & Co 500 00 

Edward Coles 500 00 

Girard Fire and Marine Ins. Co. 500 00 

T. & J. W. Johnson & Co 500 00 

Arnold, Xusbaum & Nirdlinger. 500 00 

Francis King 500 00 

Vetterlein & Co 500 00 

Alan Wood & Co 40000 

Shields & Brother 400 00 

S. & C. Schofield 400 00 

Elias D. Kennedy 400 00 

J. Wood & Brothers 40000 

Robert Coburn & Son. . , 400 00 

Crissey & Markley 350 00 

Evans & Hassall 300 00 

E. P. Moyer & Brothers 300 00 

Rockhill & Wilson 300 00 

Gilbert Royal & Co 300 00 

Stevenson & Maris 300 00 

Joseph F. Page 300 00 

Code, Hopper & Co 300 00 

French, Richards & Co 300 00 

John Eisenbrey 300 00 

Clement L. Hughes 300 00 

Grocers' Sugar House 300 00 

Jesse Smith 300 00 

Ficken & Williams 300 00 

Reynolds, Howell & Reiff 300 00 

Grove & Brother 300 00 

Dr. David James 300 00 

G. D. Wetherill 300 00 

S. T. Altemus 300 00 

Dr. Charles Willing 300 00 

Field & Keehmle 300 00 

McAllister & Brother 300 00 

James Graham & Co 300 00 

Cornelius A. Walborn 300 00 

Thomas W. Price 300 00 

W. W. Knight & Son 300 00 



Geo. B. Reece, Son & Co $300 00 

Henry Stiles 300 00 

Chas. P. Relf 300 00 

Jeanes, Scattergood & Co 300 00 

B. P. Hutchinson 300 00 

Cox, Whiteman & Cox 300 00 

H. Geiger 300 00 

Benneville D. Brown 300 00 

Harris, Heyl & Co 300 00 

L. A. Godey 300 00 

Wharton Chancellor 300 00 

John F. Gilpin 300 00 

Miss Mary Gibson 300 00 

Southwick, Sheble & Co 300 00 

C. H. Harkness 300 00 

Fairman Rogers 300 00 

Brooks, Brother & Co 300 00 

Lawlor, Everett & Hincken 300 00 

James M. Preston 300 00 

Eagle Mills 300 00 

Martin Nixon 300 00 

Joel Thomas 300 00 

Rev. Dr. Ducachet 300 00 

George Fales 300 00 

Chambers & Cattell 300 00 

Edwin Swift 300 00 

Henry Disston 300 00 

Farmers' Market 300 00 

R. Shoemaker & Co 300 00 

Thomas Earp 300 00 

Hunsworth, Eakins & Naylor .. . 30000 

Patterson, Morgan & Caskey . . . 300 00 

Henry Helmuth 300 00 

Marshall, Griffith & Co 300 00 

Joseph Jones 300 00 

John McAllister 300 00 

Sower, Barnes & Co 300 00 

Employees of Riegel, Wiest & 

Ervin 287 50 

Employees of Wm. SeUers & Co . 269 7fi 

Charles Megarge & Co 250 00 

Wright, Brothers & Co 250 00 

R. H. Gratz&Co 25000 

A. T. Lane 250 00 

Rutter & Patteson 250 00 

Sharp, Haines & Co 250 00 

M. B. Mahony & Co 250 00 

A. C. Barclay 250 00 

Prichett, Baugh & Co 250 00 

Barcroft & Co 250 00 

W. F. Hansell 250 00 

Feltus & Zimmerling 250 00 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Wm. Aslmrst $250 00 

F. A. Hoyt & Brother 250 00 

Edwin K. Myers 250 00 

James Bayard 250 00 

Frothingham & Wells 250 00 

Davis & Co 250 00 

N. Middleton & Co 250 00 

E. J. Maginnis 250 00 

Robert Ewing 250 00 

Samuel Castner 250 00 

Lock wood Manufacturing Co. . . 250 00 

George Martin 250 00 

Benjamin Sharp 250 00 

K Rollings & Brother 250 00 

Irwin & Stinson 250 00 

Henry Croskey & Co 250 00 

Hon. Wm. Milward 250 00 

Geo. W. Childs 250 00 

Joseph Oat & Son 250 00 

A. B. Carver & Co 250 00 

M. Thomas & Son 250 00 

Jacob W. Goff 250 00 

Alfred C. Harmer 250 00 

Wolgamuth, Raleigh & Co 250 00 

W. S. Stewart & Co 25000 

Thos. A. Biddle 250 00 

Samuel B. Thomas 250 00 

L. Johnson & Co 250 00 

Samuel F. Smith 250 00 

Morris, Patterson & Co 250 00 

Richard T. Shepherd 250 00 

Geo. L. Harrison 250 00 

H. T. Desilver ' 250 00 

Edwin Kirkpatrick 250 00 

Edwin M. Lewis 250 00 

Samuel Gorgas 250 00 

Robert K. Neff 250 00 

James Simpson & Neil 250 00 

C. F. & G. G. Lennig 25000 

Garretson, Brady & Co 250 00 

J. M. Mitchell & Co 250 00 

B. D. Stewart & Son 250 00 

Henry C. Lea 250 00 

Samuel A. Lewis 250 00 

Allen & Needles 250 00 

Horace Binney, Jr 200 00 

Wm. F. Hughes 200 00 

Harrison, Bros. & Co 200 00 

Richard Wistar 200 00 

Hood, Bombright & Co 200 00 

J. R. & J. Price 200 00 

Chas. J. Peterson. . 200 00 



M. Lewis $200 00 

Hillman & Streaker 

D. C. Spooner 

Garrett & Martin 

Samuel II. Carpenter 

Vance & Landis 

S. H. Bush & Co 

E. J. Lewis 

H. Weiner 

Fred. Brown 

J. W. Everman & Co 

Conrad & Serrill 

Jonathan Patterson 

J. B. Mitchell 

Chas. T. Yerkes 

Thomas I. Potts 

James Hogg 

Hance, Griffith & Co 

W. L. Schaffer 

J. Craig Miller 

Shloss & Brother 

George Gilpin 

George A. Wood 

Samuel Norris 

Adam Everley 

John Lambert 

Wm. H. Woodward 

Lewis Thompson & Co 

Wabash Mill 

John R. McCurdy 

Stillman & Ellis 

Strauss & Goldman 

Wm. C. Bowen 

Charles Leland 

Win. Musser , 

Wm. Mann 

Miss M. M. Barclay 

Wm. Kirkham 

Chas. Dutilh 

J. W. Rulon & Son 

Wm. S. Baird 

Heaton and Denckla 

Boyd & Stroud 

Charles O'Neill 

Mrs. Geo. N. Baker 

Thomas Robins 

James L. Claghorn 

W. T. Lowber 

Thos. II. Megear 

G. D. Wetherill & Co 

Geo. W. Hamersley 

John R. Coxe. . . 



200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 



THE PHILADELPHIA BOUNTY FUND. 



57 



Dr. G. Emerson $200 00 

Adeline & Margaretta Sager-. . . 200 00 

Muzzey & Monroe 200 00 

Jacob Rech 200 00 

Peter Sieger 200 00 

James W. Paul 200 00 

Lawrence Lewis, Jr 200 00 

Benners & Draper 200 00 

A. C. Jones 200 00 

Withers & Peterson 200 00 

Jacob Sharp 200 00 

Handy & Brenner. . . 200 00 

Chas. Koons 200 00 

John Horn 200 00 

F. L. Bodine 200 00 

S. & G. W. Townsend 200 00 

Davis & Wickersham 200 00 

E. J. Etting & Brother 200 00 

Wm. Warner 200 00 

Henry Duhring 200 00 

Edward S. Willing 200 00 

Isaac Norris 200 00 

Henry C. Townsend 200 00 

Abraham Barker 200 00 

Samuel Barton 200 00 

Clement Biddle 200 00 

Nathan Young 200 00 

Chas. Young 200 00 

Leon Berg & Co 200 00 

John T. Taitt 200 00 

Jos. B. Bussier & Co 200 00 

C. W. Churchman 200 00 

Milne Brothers 200 00 

Ward B. Haseltine 200 00 

Henry D. Moore 200 00 

Solomon Gans 150 00 

Percival Roberts 150 00 

W. H. Hunter 150 00 

D. W. Denison 150 00 

Robert P. Desilver 150 00 

Employees of Industrial Works, 

2029 Callowhill street 150 00 

M. Lukens & Co 150 00 

Snowden & Brother 150 00 

Wm. McFadden & Son 150 00 

John Maxson & Son 1 50 00 

David Wallace 150 00 

John Button & Sons 150 00 

Miss Rebecca Gratz , 150 00 

Sheppard, Van Harlingen & Ar- 

rison 150 00 

Wm. A. Drown & Co. . . 150 00 



Bockius Brothers $150 00 

George Watson 150 00 

George A. Coffey 150 00 

S. M. Felton 150 00 

Employees of Asa Whitney & 

Sons 132 00 

Wm. Allen & Sons 125 00 

Pemberton S. Hutchinson 125 00 

Spencer H. Hazard 125 00 

Employees of Union Steam Sugar 

Refining Company 108 50 

Chas. M. Wagner 100 00 

John Long 100 00 

Geo. R. Harmstead 100 00 

A. L. Vansant 100 00 

Jos. Gillingham 100 00 

0. S. Janney & Co 100 00 

T. & F. Evans 100 00 

Chas. Penrose 100 00 

John Welsh 100 00 

Joseph Perot 100 00 

E. K. Tryon 100 00 

Daniel Dougherty 100 00 

James Hopkins 100 00 

Arthur Ritchie 100 00 

George Helmuth 100 00 

John E. Gould 100 00 

Samuel Bradford 100 00 

Captain R. B. Decan, of ship 

Westmoreland 100 00 

Horace Moses 100 00 

Jas. S. Earle & Son 100 00 

Thos. McEuen 100 00 

W. Schively 100 00 

George Mitchell 100 00 

H. Geiger & Co 100 00 

George W. Toland 100 00 

Charles Perot 100 00 

Saml. L. Shober 100 00 

Mrs. Saml. L. Shober 100 00 

S. D. Walton & Co 10000 

Eyre & Landell 100 00 

Wm. K. Bray 100 00 

Jacob Fritz 100 00 

Abraham Wilt ; . . 100 00 

Thomas C. Love 100 00 

Geo. W. Reed & Co 10000 

H. Kellogg & Sons 100 00 

Henry W. Hensel 100 00 

S. Milliken & Co 100 00 

1. Peterson & Co 100 00 

Dr. Henry W. Rihl 100 00 



58 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



James Lesley $10000 John W. Claghorn $10000 



B. Hooley & Son 

Thorn & McKeone 

G. M. Hickling & Co 

Aaron A. Hurley 

Fries & Lehman 

James Traquair 

Wm. C. Kudman 

Dr. L. S. Filbert 

Thomas Singer 

Cramp & Sons 

Wm. Stevenson 

Chas. Wister 

John R. Blakiston 

N. B. Browne 

Abm. R. Perkins 

C. Prudden 

R. Nece 

Dr. E. Morwitz 

J. S. Phillips 

Wm. Chancellor 

Geo. Dodd & Son 

James and Joseph Morgan . 

W. D. Glenn 

Wm. J. Taylor 

Tyndale & Mitchell 

James W. Scott 

Jacob Hentz 

J. Henry Wentz 

Dr. McClintock 

Geo. R. Smith 

Frank Haseltine 

James G. Smith 

Samuel T. Bodine 

Isaac Ilazlehurst 

Troutman & May 

Thos. II. Speakman 

James Reisky 

Brooke & Fuller 

Pearson Yard 

Lukens & Montgomery 

R. M. Dunlevy 

Amos Ellis 

Benj. G. Godfrey 

Win. Y. Colladay 

J. Smith Harris 

Amos Briggs 

Samuel F. Fisher 

Jrio. R. Worrell 

Francis Tete 

Farrel, Herring & Co 

A. Winchester . . 



100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



J. V. Cowell 

John Castner 

Robert Churchman 

O. Gilpin 

Bowen & Fox 

Arthur G. Coffin . . . 

L. Herbert 

L. A. Godey ...'... 
Charles Schaffer . . . 
G. Rush Smith . 



100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

E. P. Middleton & Brother 100 00 

Wetherill & Brother 100 00 

John Davis 100 00 

C. H. Grant 100 00 

Wm. Gulager 100 00 

Motz & Boehm 100 00 

E. C. Pratt 100 00 

N. H. Graham 100 00 

Altemus & Cozens 100 00 

Kates & Foster 100 00 

Mrs. Sarah Benners 100 00 

Warner & Kline 100 00 

Harrold, Williams & Co 100 00 

A. Wray&Co 10000 

K Chauncey 100 00 

John M. Kennedy 100 00 

Henry Handy 100 00 

John Me Arthur 100 00 

Mrs. David Webster 100 00 

James Lees 100 00 

J. F. Nicholas 100 00 

Isaac Ford 100 00 

Christopher Bockius 100 00 

George Bockius 100 00 

James T. Sutton & Co 100 00 

Jabez Gates 100 00 

O. J. Wister, M. D 100 00 

Ridgeway & Rufe 100 00 

John Armstrong 100 00 

A. Miskey 100 00 

Samuel Harney, Jr 100 00 

Geo. C. Thomas 100 00 

G. W. Can- & Co 100 00 

Samuel Lowengrund 100 00 

Mrs. H. C. Flickwir 100 00 

Joseph R. Chandler 100 00 

Joseph W. Ryerss - . 100 00 

Robert Clark 100 00 

Dr. Wm. Helmuth 100 00 

Oruni & Armstrong 100 00 

Wm. Henry Rawle 100 00 



THE PHILADELPHIA BOUNTY FUND. 



59 



Wm. Cadwalader $100 00 

H. Killion 100 00 

Charles Tuller 100 00 

Milligan & Carnahan 100 00 

John W. Thomas 100 00 

Stephen Smith & Sons 100 00 

Joseph E. Gillingham 100 00 

C. H. Kunkle 100 00 

Miss J. Shaw 100 00 

James TwaddeU 100 00 

John Ross 100 00 

J. Whiteside 100 00 

Dr. J. T. Sharpless 100 00 

Edward E. Law 100 00 

Davis & Wickersham 100 00 

Howell Evans 100 00 

Solomon Conrad 100 00 

J. H. Michener & Co 10000 

W. & J. Watt 100 00 

Goldsmith Brothers 100 00 

Jenkins & Co 100 00 

Thos. R. Maris 100 00 

James B. Watson 100 00 

Thos. Dixey 100 00 

James Harper 100 00 

Employees of James Harper. . . . 100 00 

Wilson Jewell 100 00 

Miers Busch 100 00 

James Field 100 00 

Wm. Wagner 10000 

Henry Carson 100 00 

Mrs. Mary Shields 100 00 

J. & G. A. Bender 100 00 

Samuel Fox 100 00 

Wm. Fox 100 00 

Elias G. Cope 100 00 

Geiershofer, Loewi & Co 100 00 

John B. Stevenson 100 00 

James Somers Smith 100 00 

Daniel R. Knight 100 00 

Dr. Geo. W. Norris 100 00 

Chas. L. Desaoque 100 00 

Geo. Halfman 100 00 

John C. Knox 100 00 

Henry Bnmm 100 00 

Capt. Henderson 100 00 

John Pearce 100 00 

I. Binswanger 100 00 

Newlin, Zell & Abbott 100 00 

Laycock & Holt 100 00 

James Hilton 100 00 

Francis Lasher . . 100 00 



Charles Abbey $100 00 

W. L. Maddock & Co 100 00 

Wm. Rotch Wister 100 00 

Humane Hose Co., No. 4 100 00 

George Gordon 100 00 

Thomas Dunlap 100 00 

Aristides Welsh 100 00 

J. Linnard 100 00 

James Wilson 100 00 

L. Dickerman & Co 100 00 

James Dobbiii 100 00 

Jacob Haehnlen 100 00 

T. P. Stotesbury 100 00 

John J. Joyce 100 00 

W. H. Clement 100 00 

John S. Jenks 100 00 

William Randolph 100 00 

Patterson, Coane fe Co 100 00 

John Vanderkemp 100 00 

Harvey Filley 100 00 

Philadelphia, Reading and Potts- 

ville Telegraph Co 100 00 

Owen Jones 100 00 

A. Elkin 100 00 

James H. Mullen 100 00 

George Mecke 100 00 

Hugh Bridgeport 100 00 

Charles E. Lex 100 00 

Win. E. Whitman 100 00 

Joseph Walton & Co 10000 

Thos. F. Wharton 100 00 

Edward C. Dale 10000 

Farr & Brother 100 00 

Allen Cuthbert 100 00 

Le Boutillier Brothers 100 00 

Penrose Fell. 100 00 

Morton C. Rogers 100 00 

Stephen Robbins 100 00 

W. A. Ingham 100 00 

Rev. Joseph D. Newlin 100 00 

James Moore 100 00 

Webb & Garrett 100 00 

Henry Martin 100 00 

John Tucker, Jr 100 00 

Win. E. Somers 10000 

Charles Norris 100 00 

Michael Erickson 100 00 

Joseph Fisher 100 00 

R. N. Lee & Co 10000 

John S. Littell 100 00 

Norman L. Hart & Co 100 00 

Wm. Brown . . 100 00 



60 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Henry Cohen $100 00 

Wra. C. Watson 

Henry C. Kellogg 

A. P. Phillips 

Robert Adams 

Wolf, Mayer & Co 

Joseph Moore 

Blum, Rau & Co 

George H. Ashton 

E. & P. Coleman 

Pekin Mills 

Hughes & Muller 

Alexander Fullerton 

Rev. Albert Barnes 

Isaac Rosenbaum 

John Fareira 

Robert Lindsay 

A. Merino 

D. Samuel & Son 

Mrs. S. Donaldson 

Mrs. Eliza F. Sparks 

Thomas Webster, Jr 

J. H. Curtis & Son 

J. Nicholson 

M. A. Dropsie 

R. S. M. Camden 

H. C. Oram & Co 

J. R. Eckfeldt 

Wm. E. Dubois 

C. Stoddart & Brother 

Richard S. Ashhurst, Jr 

Dr. John Ashhurst 

Samuel B. Fales 

Joseph Kelly & Brother 

Jos. H. Trotter 

Geo. II. Thomson 

P. R. Freas 

Thomas A. Budd 

Wm. G. Stevenson 

Dr. M. C. Shallcross 

E. Twaddell & Sons 

Benjamin Rush 

John H. Campbell 

George W. Thorn 

Feustmann & Kaufmann 

H. G. Leisenring 

Adolph & Keen 

Saml. Asbury & Co 

Daul. K. Grim 

Aid. John Thompson 

John B. Colahan 

M. J. & C. Croll . . 



100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



John Wiegand $100 00 

Rev. Dr. Dorr 100 00 

Nathan T. Clapp 100 00 

Washington Jones 100 00 

Miss Sydney Paul 100 00 

Mrs. E. P. Wilson 100 00 

Thomas Manderson 100 00 

Edward Perot 100 00 

F. W. Ralston 100 00 

E. B. Gardette 100 00 

Joshua Lippincott 100 00 

Jacob Goldsmith 100 00 

Charles Williams 100 00 

George K. Ziegler 100 00 

John Wister, Jr 100 00 

Hon. R. C. Grier 100 00 

Albert C. Roberts 100 00 

John Philbin 100 00 

Besson & Son 100 00 

A. H. Franciscus 100 00 

Robert Allen 100 00 

Charles Wells 100 00 

S. Mayer & Brother 100 00 

C. B. & E. M. Smith 100 00 

Warner, Miskey & Merrill 100 00 

Employees of Naylor & Co 100 00 

Tenbrook & Brother 100 00 

John C. Cresson 100 00 

Charles A. Rubicam 100 00 

Jacob T. Williams 100 00 

Hon. J. I. Clark Hare 100 00 

Edward Watson & Co 100 00 

Thomas J. Miles 100 00 

Wilson C. Swann 100 00 

Henry Cramond 100 00 

Philip S. P. Connor 100 00 

Frankford Mutual Insurance Co. 100 00 

Patterson & Boulton 100 00 

Edward Shippen 100 00 

James W. Queen 100 00 

Edwin Clinton 100 00 

William Neal 100 00 

Charles M. Neal 100 00 

Charles Fuller 100 00 

Wm. Weightman 100 00 

Isaac Koons 100 00 

M. S. Bulkley 100 00 

Lewis Albertson 100 00 

Henry Tilge & Co 100 00 

Stanhope & Suplee , 100 00 

Operatives of Police and Fire 

Alarm Telegraph 100 00 



THE PHILADELPHIA BOUNTY FUND. 



61 



John W. & W. F. Simes $100 00 G-eo. S. Lang $100 00 



C. H. Garden & Co. 

J. W. Forsyth 

Wm. Morris 

Henry Bower 

Wm. Hogg, Sr 

Oliphant & Dell . . . 
Michener & Morris. 
J. & T. Gillespie . . . 

H. C. Fox 

J. 0. D. Christman . 
Thos. K. Williams . 

James Davis 

Jacob Snyder 

Henry R. Gilbert . . 
Samuel C. Ford . . . 
Theodore Megargee 
Fisher & Brother. . 

Wm. S. Allen 

John Gamble 

H. A. Pue . 



100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



Harris L. Sproat 100 00 

Mutual Fire Insurance Company 100 00 

James S. Chambers 100 00 

John Linn 100 00 

C. B. Mench 100 00 

Daniel M. Fox 100 00 

Elijah Davis 100 00 

Thomas R. Bitting 100 00 

M. Moyer 100 00 

J. Geo. Smith 100 00 

David R. Garrison 100 00 

Mrs. Sarah A. Brown 100 00 

Catherwood & Winebrener .... 100 00 

Reeve & Knight 100 00 

J. & A. Kemper 100 00 

Field & Hardie 100 00 

All other sums, those given anon- 
ymously, and those under one 

hundred dollars 31,610 67 



Total $487,233 43 

i 

The following is a statement of the receipts and expenditures, as rendered 
by the trustees of the fund : 



RECEIPTS. 

Subscriptions to the Bounty and Defence Fund $487,233 43 

Interest on a portion temporarily invested 4,910 09 

Total $492,143 52 

1862. EXPENDITURES FROM THE BOUNTY FUND. 

Bounties to Pennsylvania Volunteers $172,573 03 

Bounties to United States Regulars and Marines 6,350 00 

Premiums and remunerations to captains to promote 

recruiting , 57,004 00 

Expenses of ward meetings to encourage recruiting. . . 796 44 

Expenses of fitting up temporary barracks 212 70 

Expenses of recruiting camps and offices, bands of 

music, flags, &c 4,453 63 

Travelling expenses of committee 393 20 

Expenses of advertising 4,064 07 

Expenses of printing posters, blanks, stationery, 

books, &c 1,422 61 

Expenses of telegraphing 54 14 

Salaries of clerks and messengers 1,147 42 

$248,470 24 



62 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

$492,143 52 

EXPENDITURES FROM THE DEFENCE FUND. 

Allowance made to volunteers called out by the procla- 
mation of the governor for the defence of the state. $28,110 00 

Allowance made to United States seamen sent from 
the Navy Yard to the frontier with naval batteries, 
at the request of the governor 561 25 

Paid for carbines for Captain E. Spencer Miller's Artil- 
lery Company (to be returned to the committee 

should this company disband) 1,600 00 

$30,271 25 

1863. EXPENDITURES FROM THE BOUNTY FUND. 

Bounties and premiums to Pennsylvania volunteers and 

militia $153,485 00 

Bounties to United States Eegulars 200 00 

Contributions and premiums to companies and captains 

to promote recruiting 4,216 00 

Distribution to the Ward Bounty Committees, to aid in 

avoiding the draft 15,015 00 

Allowance to regiments and to recruiting officers for 

organizing and other extra expenses 1,335 63 

Travelling expenses of committee 154 70 

Expenses of stationery, blanks, postages, and stamps. . 99 25 

Expenses of advertising 1,424 73 

Salaries of paymaster and clerks 1,720 23 

177,650 54 

EXPENDITURES FROM THE DEFENCE FUND. 

Cost of revolvers furnished to Capt. Isaac Starr's (Jr.) 

company of artillery $1,515 63 

Expenses of furnishing horses to the Dana Troop for 

service during the summer of 1863 3,624 15 

Expenses of reboring two batteries of cannon from 

rifled to smooth-bore, in the summer of 1863 175 85 

Advance to the First Troop, Philadelphia City Cavalry 

on their claim on the government for their expenses 

when in service in the summer of 1863 4,964 16 

Ammunition furnished to the Hamilton Rifle Corps for 

services during the summer of 1863 199 50 

Appropriation to the First Regiment Reserve Brigade 

(Gray Reserves), to aid in establishing a fund for 

their permanent support as a regiment 11,000 00 

1864. 
Paid Captain E. Spencer Miller, to aid in equipping 

and maintaining the howitzer battery under his 

command 1,009 00 

Paid the Second Regiment Reserve Brigade (Blue Re- 
serves), to aid in furnishing new uniforms 1,209 00 

Stamps 38 

23,697 67 



THE CAMBRIDGE LIFE INSURANCE FUND. 



63 



Bounties and premiums to Pennsylvania volunteers and 

militia $1,732 50 

Expenses of advertising, &c 213 03 



On deposit as follows : 

In the Farmers and Mechanics' Bank, at the credit of 
the disbursing agents, reserved to meet outstanding 
bounty certificates and other dues to volunteers . . . $7,930 12 

In the Farmers and Mechanics' Bank, at the credit of 
the treasurer, reserved to meet outstanding dues to 
the militia and expenses 2,178 17 



$492,143 52 



$1,945 53 



10,108 29 



Total $492,143 52 $492,143 52 



This is a noble record ; but we can add to its proportions by stating that 
the coal dealers contributed to a fund of their own, which reached $50,000 ; 
that the members of the Corn Exchange gave bounties of twenty-five dollars 
per man to a regiment of one thousand ; and that an association of Market 
street merchants paid similar bounties to the Merchants' Eegiment ; and even 
this would not exhaust the catalogue of Quaker belligerence, as seen in its 
pecuniary expression. 

To stimulate recruiting by offering bounties to volunteers is one way of 
serving one's country; to effect the same object by insuring their lives is 
another. This was done in many places, and as an example we take the case 
of Cambridge, Massachusetts. The idea was proposed in July, 1862, and by 
the middle of August $25,000 were obtained, and this sum was still further 
increased, as the following table shows : 



Charles Beck $2,000 

"William F. Stearns 2,000 

Luke Carter 1,000 

George Livermore 1,000 

J. P. Melledge 1,000 

J. Warren Merrill 1,000 

Richardson, Deane & Co 1,000 

J. M. S. Williams 1,000 

Richard M. Hodges 600 

Thomas G. Appleton 500 

Thomas Dana 500 

David Humphrey 500 

Henry W. Longfellow 500 

William Read 500 

Alanson Bigelow 300 

Samuel Batchelder 300 

Charles Cushman . 300 



Curtis Davis 

Eben M. Dunbar 

John 0. Dodge 

Henry O. Houghton . . 

Lewis Hall 

Charles L. Jones 

Lucius A. Jones 

Charles C. Little 

Nathaniel G. Manson. 
Charles E. Norton . . . 
C. H. P. Plympton . . . 

Samuel B. Rindge 

S. S. Sleeper 

Arthur Wilkinson 

P. Francis Wells 

Willard Phillips 

George L. Ward ... . 



300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
250 
250 



64 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Jared Sparks $250 Chas. Theo. Russell $100 



George W. Abbott 


200 


Solomon Sargent 


100 


Mrs. E. H. Blatchford 


200 


Benjamin G. Smith 


100 


Charles F. Choate 


200 


Eben Snow 


100 


Charles W. Eliot 


". .' . 200 


Henry Thayer & Co 


100 


David B. Flint 


200 


J. A. Wellington 


100 


Rob. O. Fuller .- 


200 


J. C. Wellington 


100 


Gardiner G. Hubbard 


<*. 200 


E. P. Whitman 


100 


Estes Howe 


200 


Win. L. Whitney 


100 


J. Russell Lowell 


200 


Joseph E. Worcester 


100 


Samuel F. Nay 


200 


Frederick Gould 


75 


Louis Agassiz 


150 


Augustus Russ 


75 


Stephen G. Davis 


150 


Allen & Endicott 


50 


Henry R. Glover 


150 


Richard F. Bond 


50 


Edward W. Kinsley 


150 


A. Z. Brown 


50 


George Meacham 


150 


Daniel S. Brown 


50 


Theo. Parsons 


150 


Wm. P. Butterfield 


50 


Robert B. Storer 


150 


F. L. Chapman 


50 


Emery Washburn 


150 


Hosea Clark 


50 


James S. Whitney 


150 


Edward R. Cogswell 


50 


Warren Bacon 


100 


Richard H. Dana, Jr 


50 


George W. Colburn , 


100 


Eliphalet Davis 


50 


Levi Conant 


100 


Charles Eaton 


50 


Charles H. Cummings 


100 


S. T. Farwell 


50 


Charles Davenport 


100 


P. F. Folsom 


50 


Alexander Dickinson 


... 100 


A. T. Frothingham 


50 


Ezra C. Dyer 


... 100 


Miss Mary Harris 


50 


George L. Foote 


100 


H. N. Hovey 


50 


Charles C. Foster 


100 


J. S. March 


50 


John C. Gray 


100 


Arthur Merrill 


50 


Joseph Goodnow 


100 


Lucius R. Page 


50 


H. R. Harding 


. .. 100 


J. Stacy Read 


50 


A. E. Hildreth 


100 


Edward Richardson 


50 


Edward Hixon 


100 


Wm. T. Richardson 


50 


Avery F. Howe 


100 


Nathaniel D. Sawin 


50 


Edward Hyde 


100 


Wm. V. Spencer 


50 


George Lucy 


100 


D. H. Thurston 


50 


J. N. Merriam 


100 


J. H. Tyler 


50 


Mrs. A. L. Mering 


100 


Moses Warren 


50 


Joel Parker 


100 


O. W. Watris 


50 


O. Pickering 


100 


John Conlan 


25 


Geo. C. Piper 


100 


Converse Francis 


25 


Henry C. Rand 


100 


J. H. Sparrow 


25 


Z. L. Raymond 


100 


Abel Willard 


25 


Total.. 






..$27,650 



Of this amount, the sum of $10,000 was appropriated to the procuring of 
one hundred and seven policies, and a committee was appointed to consider 
what disposition should be made of the remainder. The decision made was 



SERVICE WITHOUT COMPENSATION. 65 

that this balance should be loaned to the City of Cambridge at six per cent 
interest, and that the interest should be used in assisting deserving persons. 
It was also determined that, at the end of the war, the whole fund should be 
devoted to the purchase of life annuities, or other permanent provision, for 
sick and disabled soldiers, or for the widow, child or children, or parent, who 
may have been left destitute by the death of the husband, father, or son, 
deceased in the service of the United States. 

During the first year after the payment of the premium upon the one 
hundred and seven policies, twelve soldiers died, and $6,000 were conse- 
quently paid in by the insurance company to the trustees of the fund, and 
were distributed by them among the twelve bereaved families. Several 
soldiers having been discharged or disabled, the trustees made them presents 
of their policies, the returned men to pay the succeeding premiums. 

On the 1st of July, 1862, Mr. Wm. H. Aspinwall sent to the War Depart- 
ment a check for $25,290.60, being the amount of his commissions upon 
certain purchases abroad of Enfield rifles, made through the house of Howland 
& Aspinwall. He was glad, he added, to be able to serve the government 
in its hour of trial, without compensation. The Secretary of War ordered the 
thanks of the department to be tendered to Mr. Aspinwall for this manifesta- 
tion of a disinterested and patriotic spirit. 

On the invasion of the State of Pennsylvania, in the summer of 1863, the 
Union League of Philadelphia resolved to abandon a celebration of the 4th of 
July, for which they had long been preparing, and, with the concurrence of 
the subscribers, to use the money contributed for that purpose, together with 
such other funds as could be obtained, in assisting the government to repel 
the enemy. Eighty thousand dollars were collected in less than a week, and 
three regiments of three months' men were organized, equipped, and sent 
forward before their services were needed. The "Dana Troop" were assisted 
in their preparations, and their departure was thus greatly hastened. On the 
return of the three regiments, the League determined to send one regiment, 
if possible, to serve for three years or the war. They were successful in this, 
and the regiment the One Hundred and Eighty-third Pennsylvania left for 
the field in the early part of the winter. During the year 1864, two full 
regiments were recruited and sent to the front, one the One Hundred and 
Ninty-sixth Pennsylvania for one hundred days, the other the One Hun- 
dred and Ninty-eighth for one year, besides a battalion of four companies, 
for the same term, attached to the latter. Thus, in eighteen months, six 
regiments and a battalion of thoroughly equipped men were added to the 



66 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

armies by the exertions of the League, and at their expense, the total outlay 
being somewhat over $100,000. Not content with this, the Military Com- 
mittee did what was possible, from time to time, to fill up the ranks of the 
wasted battalions. 

On the 12th of February, 1864, General Hancock wrote the following letter 
to a number of gentlemen in New York : 

"HEADQUARTERS KECRUITING SERVICE, 
SECOND ARMY CORPS, February 12#A, 1864. 

" Messrs. George Cabot Ward, Stephen Hyatt, Parker Handy, Theodore 

Roosevelt, Daniel Devlin, George Bliss, Jr. : 
" GENTLEMEN, 

" You will greatly oblige me, if, in connection with any other gentlemen 
whom you may associate with yourselves, you will undertake to raise and 
disburse the funds needed to promote recruiting for the New York regiments 
of the Second Army Corps. 

" The existing bounties are quite large enough, but there are many other 
ways in which money can be used to promote volunteering with great advan- 
tage. I am, gentlemen, your obedient servant, 

""WINFIELD S. HANCOCK, 

" Major- General U.S. Vols." 

The gentlemen thus addressed, and sixteen others who were added to the 
committee, appealed to the citizens of New York for subscriptions to carry 
out the object thus indicated, the New York regiments in the Second Corps 
being thirteen in number. 

The sum of forty thousand dollars was obtained, and, as long as the city 
paid a bounty for men, the committee procured a large number of recruits ; 
when the supervisors stopped the bounty and volunteering ceased, certain 
measures adopted by the committee gave it a renewed impetus. The number 
of men enlisted for the Second Army Corps, through these eiforts, appears in 
the following figures : 

Volunteers for the Second Army Corps .... 2,535 

Substitutes assigned to the Second Army Corps . . 313 

" who preferred M ^ 243 

3,091 

besides some seventy men sent to other commands. 



REPRESENTATIVE RECRUITS. 67 

"We have said, more than once, that our plan did not embrace either appro- 
priations or loans ; but we might have made a reservation in regard to loans 
made, in a patriotic spirit, upon bad or insufficient security. The following 
instance is a type of investments of this nature. The mayor of Jersey City 
called upon Mr. John Anderson, of New York, and laid the case of his con- 
stituents before him. A draft was progressing, he said, in Jersey City ; men 
were plenty, but the city was unable to pay the necessary bounties, and, under 
these circumstances, no one would enlist; and the city's credit was, at this 
period, to say the least of it, poor, and money could not be obtained, without 
great sacrifice, by a sale of its bonds. "Would Mr. Anderson lend Jersey City 
$60,000, and take the chance of repayment? This was an unexpected pro- 
posal, and Mr. Anderson requested time to consider it, say till the next day, 
at ten in the morning. At the appointed hour, the Jersey functionary reap- 
peared before Mr. Anderson, and received from him the assurance that if 
$60,000, loaned on security that capitalists considered inadequate, would 
save Jersey City from the draft, and place a certain number of able-bodied 
men in the army, Jersey City should be spared and the ranks recruited. 
We have ventured to include this act in our record of private munificence, 
and we doubt not that moneyed men at least will bear us out, even though 
interest may have been punctually paid, and though the principal may, in 
course of time, be duly redeemed. 

We defer mention of the funds raised for the recruiting of colored regi- 
ments to a later portion of this book ; the event itself happened only in the 
fulness of time, and it is but proper to delay the chronicle thereof till the 
fitting hour and season. 

One method and a peculiarly American one of increasing the efficiency 
of the army, remains to be noticed. When the draft was resorted to as a 
means of filling the ranks, the exemption of a large portion of the community, 
by reason of age, sex, or infirmity, was a necessary consequence. And yet 
those exempted were no less interested in the result than those upon whom 
the lot fell ; a man who had spent fifty years in the accumulation of property 
was not indifferent to the fate of the country because of his whitening hairs ; a 
man might in some way be curtailed of his fair proportions, without, for that, 
feeling that he had less at stake than his neighbor ; and a woman might desire 
to have a champion to represent her, personally, in a fight in which she could 
not herself engage. Hence arose a class of substitutes called " representative 
recruits :" men voluntarily sent, and their bounty paid, by persons upon whom 
the provost-marshal had no claim. Every man thus secured was a clear gain to 



68 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

the army ; he was in no sense what is understood by the term substitute, but, 
literally, an addition to the arms-bearing population. The effect was precisely 
as if the man of sixty, quaffing a draught from the fountain of youth, regained 
his vigor and shouldered his musket ; as if the hunchback found a knapsack 
where his hump had been, and hastened with his lighter burden to the front ; 
as if those of our mothers, sisters, and wives, who sent their representatives, 
had been erroneously registered in the census, and had really been entitled to 
entry in the unprepossessing column. Many thousands of recruits of this kind 
were sent to the armies in 1863-64 ; it is impossible to fix upon the number 
with precision. It can only be said that many who could not fight in person, 
fought by proxy ; and of exempts, who had the means to send a represen- 
tative, and yet failed to do so, it must be said, that upon them, as a class, has 
fallen the largest share of the voluntary burdens of the war. Many a man has 
sent no representative recruit, who, if his signatures and subscriptions from 
the beginning be counted, will be found to have given enough to purchase a 
dozen such. 

We have thus touched, in a discursive way, upon the principal methods 
and devices to which private bounty has resorted to fill and replenish the 
army. Compelled to compress the matter of a volume into a score of pages, 
we have treated the subject by examples, and have sought to make one inci- 
dent stand for thousands, and one generous act the spokesman for its countless 
fellows. At any rate, the army is in the field, and during four trying though 
not exhausting years, its numbers have been kept full. But was this army 
sprung from the loins of the people, forgotten or neglected by those who stayed 
at home ? Was it left to grapple, unassisted, not only with the enemy, but 
with disease and inexperience, those scourges of the camp and hospital ? Were 
its wounded left to official care and to the routine of the medical bureau ? 
Were its spiritual interests abandoned to those to whom army regulations com- 
mitted them to one man in a thousand ? Was the cold shoulder turned to 
the disabled soldier ? Were the widow and orphan left to beg ? Was the 
republic ungrateful, and did it disown its great men whom time brought to 
the surface, and whom their own achievements kept there ? And if charity 
shall be naturally found to have begun at home, shall we find that it ended 
there? Were the unhappy victims upon the border left to perish in utter 
misery ? Were the men, women, and children in foreign lands, thrown out 
of work by our terrible struggle, and still desiring no disgraceful compromise, 
abandoned to their fate ? And if these and other self-imposed duties shall 
prove to have been worthily discharged, did all other charities languish, and 



THE PEOPLE AND THE ARMY. 



69 



were other works of philanthropy suspended ? The reader's answer springs 
to his lips. No one in this country, and few in Europe, need to be told how 
the army has been sustained, not only by the prayers and faith, but by the 
labors and sacrifices, of the American people ; but it is worth while to consider 
the modes and processes through which the people rose to a sense of the duty 
which they were called upon to assume. The tender solicitude of the people 
for its army ; its anxiety to make it efficient to serve the land of its birth, and 
worthy to aspire to the better land hereafter ; the building of hospitals and 
soldiers' homes; the founding of asylums; the sending of food across the 
mountains and over the sea, to friends and even to foes ; the argument which 
convinced the country that these things were to be done, and liberally done ; 
the devices by which the spirit of well-doing was revived, if it ever faltered ; 
the ingenuity by which communities were made to labor together as one man 
and for one object these, and the many other benevolent schemes to which 
the rebellion has given birth, form the theme and matter of these pages. 



CHAPTEE III. 

THE EARLIER AID SOCIETIES. 



-.' 




BIZ AND EIGHTY-SIX KNITTING FOE THE SOLDIERS. 



IF the men of America sprang to arms with alacrity, the women of the 
country applied themselves to those labors for which their strength fitted 
them with enthusiasm. Lint had been scraped and bandages rolled before 
blood was shed at Baltimore. Without knowledge of their own, and for a 
long time without guidance, they worked with zeal, though it was often, of 
necessity, aimless and unreflecting. Organization was for the first few weeks 
hardly thought of, and concert of action only came with the certainty that, 
without it, all effort to assist the government, in this direction, must fail. 
Societies were formed here and there in New England, Ohio, and New York, 
and as these may be said to have led to the establishment of the great philan- 
thropic enterprises of which the country is now so justly proud, a few words 
upon each of them, in the order of their foundation, may not be out of place. 

The ladies of Bridgeport, Connecticut, met on the 15th of April, the day 
on which the President's call for troops appeared, and they commenced their 
labors that afternoon. The future treasurer of the Bunker Hill Aid Society 
of Charlestown, Massachusetts, conceived the idea of such an association on 
the same day ; though the roll was not signed by the co-operating ladies 



AID FROM LOWELL. 



71 



until the 19th. On the 20th a meeting was called by the mayor of Lowell, 
" for the purpose of initiating measures for the comfort, encouragement, and 
relief of citizen soldiers." Judge Crosby, one of the twenty gentlemen who 
attended the meeting,* appears to have been the first to propose and lay down 
certain definite objects to be attained by concerted action. He presented 
the following memoranda of the methods by which assistance could be ren- 
dered : 

" 1. By gathering such funds and supplies as may be necessary. 

"2. By supplying nurses for the sick or wounded when and as far as 
practicable. 

" 3. By bringing home such sick and wounded as may be proper. 

"4. By purchasing clothing, provisions, and matters of comfort which 
rations and camp allowances may not provide, and which would contribute to 
the soldier's happiness. 

"5. By placing in camp such bibles, books, and papers as would instruct 
and amuse their days of rest and quiet, and keep them informed of passing 
events. 

" 6. By gathering the dates and making a record of the names and history 
of each soldier and his services. 

" 7. By holding constant communication with paymasters or other officers 
of our regiments, that friends may interchange letters and packages." 

The Soldiers' Aid Association of Lowell was founded upon this basis, 
Judge Crosby being elected president, Mr. S. W. Stickney, treasurer, and Mr. 
M. C. Bryant, secretary, and it at once entered upon a career of usefulness 
and prosperity. 

The Soldiers' Aid Society of Cleveland was organized upon the same 20th 
of April, and its first act was to raise a fund for the temporary support of the 
families of three months' men. It has since become one of the most impor- 
tant of the auxiliaries of the Sanitary Commission. 

With these exceptions, the sympathies of the country, the industry of 
twenty millions of people, longing to be usefully employed, were totally 
without organization. While, in the military department, inexperienced as 



* NATHAN CROSBY, 
J. G. ABBOTT, 
ELISHA HUNTINGTON, 
T. II. SWEETZER, 
WM. A. BURKE, 

J. T. McDERMOTT, 
WM. S. SOUTHWORTH, 


TAPPAN WENTWORTH, 
SEWELL G. MACK, 
JAMES C. AVER, 
FREDERICK HINKLEY, 
S. W. STICKNEY, 
JOHN A. GOODWIN, 
M. C. BRYANT, 


L. B. MORSE, 
JAMES G. CARNEY, 
LINUS CHILDS, 
WM. G. WISE, 
A. L. BROOKS, 
C. L. KNAPP. 



72 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

all taking service were, there was a certain degree of order, while each embryo 
company had its captain, and each regiment on paper its colonel and quarter- 
master, those whose capacities and tastes threw them into the battalions of 
relief were without head, without system ; there was no method, no economy, 
no co-operation. There were thimble societies, picket societies, circles, asso- 
ciations ; and all were in want of information and guidance. The churches, 
parlors, schools, and even the nurseries, were alive with industrious and 
zealous labor ; but zeal and industry were alike thrown away for want o/ 
discipline and direction. Should this state of things continue, the cause 
which all had so much at heart must be seriously imperilled. It was clear 
that the benevolence of the women of the country must be turned into one 
general current, and be made to flow regularly in one channel. Most fortu- 
nately, providentially, the first plan suggested succeeded. An informal 
meeting of ladies of New York was held on April 25th, at the Infirmary for 
Women ; an appeal to the women of New York was drawn up and signed, 
and was published in the papers of Monday, the 29th. 

After stating the importance of concentration and system, and disclaiming 
for all existing circles and societies any desire to lead or claim precedence 
over others, the ladies whose names were appended to this paper proposed 
that the women of New York should meet at Cooper Institute, to confer 
together and to appoint a general committee, with power to organize the 
benevolent purposes of all in a common movement. To effect this it seemed 
necessary to keep two objects especially in view : first, the contribution of 
skill, labor, and money, in the preparation of lint, bandages, and stores ; arid 
second, the offer of personal service as nurses. In regard to the first, it would 
be important to obtain and disseminate exact official information as to the 
wants of the army, through a committee having this department in hand, which, 
by letter and through the press, should put itself in communication with 
similar associations throughout the country. And in regard to the second 
point, experience having shown the inefficiency of all but picked and skilled 
women upon the field or in the hospital, the zeal of ninety-nine one-hundred ths 
of the women of the land should be concentrated upon finding, equipping, 
and sending forward the other hundredth, of suitable age, condition, tempera- 
ment and training. 

The meeting took place, the large hall being completely filled with the 
wives, mothers, and daughters of New York, a large body of clergymen, 
physicians, lawyers, and philanthropists occupying the platform. Mr. David 
Dudley Field was called to the chair, and set forth the object of the meeting. . 



THE WOMEN'S CENTRAL ASSOCIATION OF RELIEF. 73 

The Eev. Dr. Bellows spoke of the importance of female action in such a 
crisis as the present, reminding his hearers how the mothers and sisters of 
the first American Kevolution had imparted courage to the fathers and 
brothers who had gone forth to battle ; and it was no evil omen to find an 
earnest of the same moral aid being extended to their descendants. Dr. 
Wood, on behalf of the medical gentlemen of Bellevue Hospital, said that 
they were ready to render assistance, either by advice or by the training of 
nurses at their establishment ; they would take at least fifty, and support and 
qualify them. Dr. Mott remarked that the lint which had been already pre- 
pared could hardly be consumed in a seven years' war, and deprecated a 
continuance of such unprofitable labor. After several addresses, all practical 
and to the point, the committee appointed to prepare a plan of operations 
reported certain " Articles of Organization," of which the following is an 
abstract : 

I. The women of New York hereby associate themselves as a Committee 
of the Whole, to furnish comforts, stores and nurses, in aid of the medical 
staff. 

n. To give the advantages of organization to the scattered efforts of the 
women of the country, they resolve themselves into a Women's Central Asso- 
ciation of Belief. 

III. Its objects shall be to collect and disseminate information upon the 
actual and prospective wants of the army ; to establish recognized relations 
with the medical staff, and to act as an auxiliary to it; to establish and 
sustain a central depot of stores; to solicit and accept the aid of all local 
associations which may choose to act through this society ; and to open a 
bureau for the examination and registration of nurses. 

******* 

YL The Financial Committee shall solicit, guard, and disburse the funds of 
the association. The treasurer shall acknowledge all contributions of moneys 
or stores in the public papers. Subscriptions shall be solicited through the 
press. The operations of the association shall proceed upon a scale commen- 
surate with the funds received, and donations are hereby requested. 

VII. The Executive Committee shall establish direct relations with the 
central medical authorities ; shall obtain and diffuse information for the gui- 
dance of affiliated associations ; shall keep the women of the country advised 
of the best direction their industry can take ; shall superintend the reception 
and transfer of stores ; and shall devise ways and means of increasing the 
usefulness of the association. 



74 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

VIII. The Kegistration Committee shall have charge of the bureau for 
examining and registering those offering themselves as nurses, in rooms soon 
to be opened in a convenient quarter of the city. 

IX. The Board of Management shall consist of twelve ladies and twelve 
gentlemen; it shall appoint the officers of the association; it shall meet 
weekly, during the war, five constituting a quorum ; and it shall consist of 
the following persons : 

MRS. HAMILTON FISH, DR. VALENTINE MOTT, 

" H. BAYLIS, JOHN D. WOLFE, 

" H. D. SWEET, HECTOR MORRISON, 

" CHAS. ABERNETHY, FREDERICK L. OLMSTED, 

Miss E. BLACKWELL, GEO. F. ALLEN, 

MRS. CYRUS W. FIELD, DR. ELISHA HARRIS, 
u G. L. SCHUYLER, " MARKOE, 

" D'OREMIEULX, " DRAPER, 

" DR. ED. BAYARD, EEV. DR. HAGUE, 
" CHRISTINE GRIFFIN, " BELLOWS, 

" V. BOTTA, " A. D. SMITH, 

" C. M. KIRKLAND, EEV. MORGAN Dix. 

The Board of Management, the composition of which, however, was soon 
after modified by resignations and new appointments, met immediately, and 
completed the organization of the association by the choice of the following 
officers and committees : 

President, 
VALENTINE MOTT, M. D. 

Vice- President, 
HENRY "W. BELLOWS, D. D. 

Secretary, 
GEORGE F. ALLEN. 

Treasurer, 
HOWARD POTTER. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

H. W. Bellows, D. D., Chairman, Valentine Mott, M. D., 

Frederick L. Olmsted, T. d'Oremieulx, 

Miss Ellen Collins, W. H. Draper, M. D., 

Mrs. G. L. Schuyler, G. F. Allen. 



THE WOMEN'S CENTRAL ASSOCIATION OF RELIEF. 75 

KEGISTRATION COMMITTEE. 

Miss E. Blackwell, M. D., Chairman, Mrs. "W. P. Griffin, Secretary, 
" H. Baylis, " J. A. Swett, 

" Y. Botta, " C. Abernethy, 

Wm. A. Muhlenberg, D. D., E. Harris, M. D. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE. 

Howard Potter, Mrs. Hamilton Fish, Chairman, 

John D. Wolfe, " C. M. Kirkland, 

William Hague, D. D., " C. W. Field, 

T. M. Markoe, M. D., Asa D. Smith, D. D. 

The reader will hardly fail to see that this society, in its objects, organiza- 
tion and plan, contained the germ of what was afterwards the United States 
Sanitary Commission. The one grew logically out of the other. 

For a time, however, the Belief Association proceeded alone, its members 
working with earnestness and faith. A most arduous labor one of which 
the public has little idea was performed by the Committee on Eegistrations. 
Women had never been employed as nurses in the army, soldiers drafted from 
the ranks for that purpose having previously discharged the duty. The govern- 
ment, therefore, had made no preparation for lodging, paying, or even recog- 
nizing women as nurses. It became necessary to commence afresh, and in this 
work the committee met with unlocked for difficulties and discouragements. 
The medical education of the chairman, Miss Blackwell, however, and the 
energy of the associate members, enabled them to overcome the one and 
speedily recover from the other. Ninety-one nurses were prepared and sent 
forward during the first year, the association paying for the outfit and journey 
of all, and even the salaries of those first dispatched ; the government, how- 
ever, afterwards assumed the payment of salaries. The Finance Committee 
collected during the year nearly $10,000, by far the larger part in New York. 
To the labors of the chairman, Mrs. Hamilton Fish, more than half of this sum 
was due. Two hundred and forty thousand articles were received and dis- 
tributed ; the estimated value of them was not far from $140,000. 

The Executive Committee transferred its duties at an early date to a sub- 
committee on supplies, of which Miss Ellen Collins was, and still is, chairman. 
The work of sorting, packing, and marking goods was done entirely by ladies, 
the best of volunteer aids. " We have met with no rebuffs," writes Miss 
Collins in her first report, " and our appeals have been answered with ready 



76 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



and willing hands and hearts. Throughout the heats of summer and storms 
of winter, the little sewing circle of twelve or fifteen members have kept up 
their weekly meetings. Only those who have seen our letters, all breathing 
the same spirit of love and patriotism, from the little villages and homes 
hundreds of miles away, can appreciate the sacrifices and the noble spirit of 
these true-hearted, loyal women." 

We need not pursue the history of the Women's Central Association of 
Eelief beyond the first year, absorbed, as it was, at so early a date, in the 
Sanitary Commission. The ladies connected with it have the gratification and 
the pride of knowing that their names are linked, henceforth and forever, with 
one of the noblest enterprises of modern philanthropy. It was, doubtless, far 
from their thoughts, when they invited their fellow-countrywomen to meet them 
in conference, that they were laying the foundations of an edifice that should 
endure longer than buildings made with hands ; that none would be able to 
read of the American rebellion without reading of them and their works ; nor 
could they have imagined that the plan upon which they then proposed to 
act, and the idea which they proposed to carry out, were destined to do such 
honor to themselves and their country, to extort the admiration of the foe and 
the approval of mankind. 



*..'? i- .-. , t* ' t \ / , 
y.K .TV 
- . .,. 




CHAPTEE IV. 




E have seen in what desultory manner the effort on the 
part of the people to aid the government in the matter 
of supplies, hospital clothing, and of medical stores, 
commenced. Scores of aid societies were in existence 
by the middle of May. Thousands of hands were 
already busy in sewing, knitting, cutting, mending, and 
thousands more were ready to help, if once assured that their labor could be 
rightly directed. It was well known that bandages were to be cut and rolled, 
shirts made, stockings knit, medicines, wines, jellies prepared ; but how these 
were to be distributed, what quantities of each would be required, were 
matters of which all were ignorant. Still, seventy-five thousand men had 
been called from their homes, to meet disease and death upon the field and in 



78 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

the camp ; it was possible that hundreds of thousands more might still be 
called upon ; and the medical staff of the army, as it existed at this time, was 
notoriously unable to grapple with the tremendous difficulties which lay before 
it. It was plain that the first duty of those who, unable to aid the government 
by shouldering a musket, still wished to serve their country according to their 
strength, was to come to an understanding with the central authorities as to 
what they could do and would do, and what they could not do and yet wanted 
done. 

Delegates from the Women's Central Association of Eelief, from the " New 
York Medical Association for Furnishing Hospital Supplies in Aid of the 
Army," and from the "Advisory Committee of the Board of Physicians and 
Surgeons of the Hospitals of New York," visited Washington towards the 
middle of May, and on the 18th of the month addressed a communication to 
the Secretary of War upon the subject of special measures of prevention of 
disease in the now rapidly gathering army, and of the utilization of voluntary 
contributions from the people. In this communication were the following 
passages : 

"The present is essentially a people's war. The hearts and minds, the 
bodies and souls, of the whole people and of both sexes, throughout the loyal 
states, are in it. 

" Convinced, by inquiries made here, of the practical difficulty of reconci- 
ling the claims of their own and numerous similar associations in other cities 
with the regular workings of the Commissariat and the Medical Bureau, the 
undersigned respectfully ask that a mixed commission of civilians, distin- 
guished for their philanthropic experience and acquaintance with sanitary 
matters, of medical men and of military officers, be appointed by the govern- 
ment, who shall be charged with the duty of investigating the best means of 
methodizing and reducing to practical service the already active but undirected 
benevolence of the people towards the army ; who shall consider the general 
subject of the prevention of sickness and suffering among the troops; and 
suggest the wisest methods which the people at large can use to manifest their 
good will towards the comfort, security, and health of the army. 

" It must be well known to the Department of War that several such 
commissions followed the Crimean and Indian wars. The civilization and 
humanity of the age and of the American people demand that such a com- 
mission should precede our second war of independence more sacred than 
the first. We wish to prevent the evils which England and France could 
only investigate and deplore." 



THE SANITAEY COMMISSION. 79 

Four days after the date of this document, the Acting Surgeon-General of 
the Army, after stating, in a note to the Secretary of War, that the pressure 
upon his bureau had been unexpectedly severe, and that the means at his 
disposal, though effectively used, had proved insufficient, added : " The Medi- 
cal Bureau would, in my judgment, derive important and useful aid from the 
counsels and well-directed efforts of an intelligent and scientific commission, 
to be styled ' A Commission of Inquiry and Advice in respect to the Sanitary 
Interests of the United States Forces,' and acting in co-operation with this 
bureau, with reference to the diet and hygiene of troops and the organization 
of military hospitals." 

The next day the committee of delegates laid a statement in outline of the 
plan and powers they desired to recommend before the Secretary of War, 
suggesting that the commission would ask for no legal authority, but only the 
official sanction and moral countenance of the government, which would be 
secured by its public appointment ; it desired only a recommendatory order, 
addressed in its favor to all officers of the government, to farther its inquiries, 
and the permission to correspond and confer, on a confidential footing, with 
the Medical Bureau and the War Department upon all topics connected with 
their duties. The paper went on to say : 

"The commission would inquire with scientific thoroughness into the 
subjects of diet, cooking, cooks, clothing, tents, camping grounds, transports, 
transitory depots, with their exposures, camp police, with reference to settling 
the question how far the regulations of the army proper are or can be practi- 
cally carried out among the volunteer regiments, and what changes or modifi- 
cations are desirable from their peculiar character and circumstances. Every- 
thing appertaining to outfit, cleanliness, precautions against damp, cold, heat, 
malaria, infection; crude, unvaried, or ill-cooked food, and an irregular or 
careless regimental commissariat, would fall under this head. 

" The commission would inquire into the organization of military hospitals, 
general and regimental ; the precise regulations and routine through which the 
services of the patriotic women of the country could be made available as 
nurses; the nature and sufficiency of hospital supplies; the question of 
ambulances and field services, and of extra medical aid ; and whatever else 
relates to the care, relief, and cure of the sick and wounded." 

These printed statements, addressed to the War Department preliminary to 
the institution of the Sanitary Commission, bore the signatures of Henry 
W. Bellows, D. D. ; W. H. Van Buren, M. D. ; J. Harsen, M. D. ; and Elisha 
Harris, M. D., delegates from the three above mentioned New York societies. 



80 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

There seems to be no reason to doubt that the President and Secretary of 
War both looked upon this scheme as visionary and sentimental ; as an idea 
originating with well meaning, benevolent people, but one that would bear no 
fruit when confronted with the terrible realities of the field and hospital. The 
earnestness and the high social and professional position of its advocates might 
all have gone for naught, had not the Surgeon-General, in the document 
already quoted from, asked for some such assistance, and represented his 
bureau as likely to be overwhelmed unless aid were afforded from without. 

"I confess now," said a member of the cabinet, two years later, "that I had 
no faith in the commission when it started prophesied that it would upset 
itself in six months, and that we should be lucky if it did not help to upset 
us ! None of us had faith in it ; but it seemed easier to let it destroy itself 
than to resist the popular urgency which called so lustily for a trial of it. I 
am free to confess that it has been of the greatest service to the country, 
that it has occasioned none of the evils expected from it, and that it has lived 
down all the fears and misgivings of the government. I hear from no quarter 
a word against it." 

The official warrant creating the commission issued from the "War Office 
on the 9th of June, though it was not signed by the President till the 13th. 
This paper specified the objects to which the commission should direct its 
inquiries, and appointed the persons who should compose it. These were as 
follows : 

President, 
Rev. HENEY W. BELLOWS, D. D., New York. 

Vice-President, 
Prof. A. D. BACHE, LL. D., Washington. 

Corresponding Secretary, 
ELISHA HAEEIS, M. D., New York. 
GEOEGE W. CULLUM, U. S. A., Washington. 
ALEXANDEE E. SHIEAS, U. S. A., Washington. 
EOBEET C. WOOD, M. D., U. S. A., Washington. 
WILLIAM H. VAN BUEEN, M. D., New York. 
WOLCOTT GIBBS, M. D., New York. 
COENELIUS R. AGNEW, M. D., New York 
GEOEGE T. STEONG, New York. 
FEEDEEICK LAW OLMSTED, New York. 
SAMUEL G. HOWE, M. D., Boston. 
J. S. NEWBEEEY, M. D., Cleveland. 



THE SANITARY COMMISSION. 81 

To these were subsequently added : 

HORACE BINNEY, Jr., Philadelphia ; 

Et. Kev. THOMAS M. CLARK, D. D., Providence; 

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Kentucky ; 

K. "W. BURNET, Cincinnati ; 

Hon. MARK SKINNER, Chicago; 

Eev. JOHN H. HEYWOOD, Louisville ; 

Prof. FAIRMAN KOGERS, Philadelphia ; 

CHARLES J. STTLLE, Philadelphia ; 

J. HUNTINGTON WOLCOTT, Boston ; 
and about five hundred associate members, in all parts of the country. 

Mr. Frederick Law Olmsted was placed in charge of the central office, as 
General Secretary of the Commission, and gave himself wholly to its execu- 
tive duties ; and to his remarkable powers of organization must be attributed 
a large share of the success which has attended the labors of the commission. 

The greater number of the gentlemen thus named at once convened at 
Washington, and adopted the plan of organization which immediately became 
and long remained the broad basis of operations almost continental in their 
extent. The president of the commission hastened upon a tour of observa- 
tion and inquiry in the West, while other commissioners visited the forces 
gathering upon the Potomac. Until battle actually occurred, prevention and 
sanitary inspection engrossed the larger share of the attention of the mem- 
bers. Preparations were, nevertheless, made in view of an actual collision, 
and the battle of Bull Kun found their emissaries and delegates ready to take 
the field. 

In the first public appeal for money and supplies being a letter to an 
auxiliary committee of finance just organized in New York Dr. Bellows, 
fresh from his western tour, used the following language : 

" Consider the prospects of two hundred and fifty thousand troops, chiefly 
volunteers, gathered not only from the out-door, but still more from the in- 
door occupations of life farmers, clerks, students, mechanics, lawyers, doctors, 
accustomed, for the most part, to regularity of life, and those comforts of 
home which, above any recorded experience, bless our own prosperous land 
and benignant institutions ; consider these men, used to the tender providence 
of mothers, wives, and sisters, to varied and well prepared food, separate and 
commodious homes, moderate toil, to careful medical supervision in all their 



82 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

ailments ; consider these men, many of them not yet hardened into the bone 
of rugged manhood, suddenly precipitated by unexpected events into the field 
of war, at the very season of the greatest heat, transferred to climates to which 
they are unwonted, driven to the use of food and water to which they are not 
accustomed, living in crowded barracks and tents, sleeping on the bare earth, 
broken of rest, called on to bear arms six and eight hours a day, to make 
rapid marches over rough roads' in July and August, wearing their thick 
uniforms and carrying heavy knapsacks on their backs and what can be 
looked for but men falling by the dozen in the ranks from sheer exhaustion, 
hundreds prostrated with relaxing disorders, and, finally, thousands suddenly 
swept off by camp diseases, the result of irregularity of life, exposure, filth, 
heat, and inability to take care of themselves under such novel conditions." 

The first estimate made by the commission of the amount of money that 
would be required to distribute the supplies in kind that it was already receiv- 
ing in abundance, and for all incidental expenses, was fifty thousand dollars 
so universal was the belief that the rebellion would be summarily suppressed. 
An appeal was specially addressed to the life insurance companies, "whose 
intelligent acquaintance," said the commission, "with vital statistics consti- 
stutes them the proper and the readiest judges of the necessities of such a 
commission. We look to them to give the first indorsement to our enter- 
prise by generous donations the best proof they can give the public of 
the solid claim we have on the liberality of the rich, the patriotic, and the 
humane." 

The first instalments of the nation's bounty came from these institutions : 
the New England Company giving $3,000 ; the New York, $5,000 ; the 
Mutual Benefit, $2,000 ; the Mutual, $3,000, and, at a later period, $6,000 
more. The Central Finance Committee of New York now issued a fervent, 
and, as it proved, irresistible appeal, making the following strong points : 

" Never before, in the history of human benevolence, did a gracious Provi- 
dence vouchsafe an opportunity for doing good on such a scale, to so great a 
number, in so short a time, and with comparatively so little money. Of the 
immense array of three hundred thousand men now in arms in our defence 
to be swelled, if necessary, to five hundred thousand the experienced mili- 
tary and medical members of the Sanitary Commission declare that one-fifth, 
if not one-fourth, who must otherwise perish, may be saved by proper care. 
* # * * * * * 

" Men and women of New York ! We beg you to awake to instant action. 
Death is already in the breeze. Disease, insidious and inevitable, is even now 



THE SANITARY COMMISSION. 83 

stealing through the camps, on scorching plain, in midnight damp, menacing 
our dearest treasure the very flower of our nation's youth. You surely will 
not permit them thus ingloriously to perish. In the name of humanity and 
patriotism ; in the name alike of justice and manly generosity, bidding us 
save them who stake their lives in saving us ; in the name of the honored 
ancestors who fought for the land we live in ; in the name of the Blessed 
Being, the friend on earth of the sick and the suffering, we now commit this 
holy cause to your willing hearts, your helping hands, with our earnest assu- 
rance that whatever you do will be doubly welcome if done at once. 

"SAMUEL B. RUGGLES, 
"CHRISTOPHER R. ROBERT, 
"ROBERT B. MINTURN, 
"GEORGE OPDYKE, 
"JONATHAN STURGES, 
" MORRIS KETCHUM, 
"WILLIAM A. BOOTH, 

"DAVID HOADLEY, 

"J. P. GIRAUD FOSTER, 
"CHARLES E. STRONG, 

" Members of the Executive Committee of the Central Financial 

" Committee U. S. Sanitary Association. 
" NEW YOEK, July 13, 1861." 

A week after the publication of this appeal occurred the battle of Bull 
Run, the commentary thus accompanying the text The whole country 
unloosed its purse-strings, and opened wide the doors of pantry, larder, cellar 
and wardrobe. In one night the Washington storehouse was filled to over- 
flowing. A long peace had left the houses of the land well stocked with the 
materials which, with a little manipulation, and a few hundred miles of 
travel, would serve to preserve health and even life. The shelves groaned 
beneath piles of cotton which had not yet been thought cheap at a shilling a 
yard, with linen and woolen fabrics that had accumulated almost insensibly. 
The raw material was at hand and abundant ; the fingers to fashion it into 
shirt, sock, havelock, sheet, blanket, ached to be at work. Thus, the plan 
laid down by the commission having been generally approved ; the names of 
the gentlemen composing it inspiring universal confidence, and the appoint- 
ment of Mr. George T. Strong, of New York, as treasurer, furnishing a 
guarantee that all funds intrusted to it would be faithfully guarded and 



84 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

prudently administered, the United States Sanitary Commission entered upon 
its marvellous, unexampled career of practical philanthropy. 

Though it forms no part of the object of this work to describe in detail 
the vast operations of this and other similar associations, we may incidentally 
give a brief sketch of their working plans that of the Sanitary Commission 
including three distinct departments of labor : 

1st. THE PREVENTIVE SERVICE OR SANITARY INSPECTION. This depart- 
ment employs the services of a corps of medical inspectors, who visit the 
camps, hospitals, and transports of each army corps in the field ; who watch 
all chance of danger from change of climate, from exposure, from malarious 
causes, from hard marching, or from any failure of supplies or transportation. 
Reports made by them to the proper authorities lead either to the adoption of 
better methods of supply, to change of location, or to sanitary reform. These 
reports, too, furnish the basis of valuable tables, which it is the duty of a 
bureau of statistics to elaborate from the data thus supplied. To this depart- 
ment belongs the Corps of Special Hospital Inspectors, who from time to time 
make the tour of all the general army hospitals, and report upon their condi- 
tion, wants, or progress. The preparation and issue of medical tracts and of 
concise sanitary bulletins, for the information of officers and men, also fall 
within the duties of the preventive service. These treatises have been, many 
of them, written by the ablest physicians and surgeons in the country, and 
their value to the service cannot be overestimated. 

2d. THE DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL BELIEF. This branch of the service 
embraces three-quarters of the whole work done by the commission. Its duty 
is to supply food, clothing, bandages, hospital furniture, bedding, delicacies, 
stimulants, cordials, &c., &c., for the wounded on the field, and for the sick 
and wounded in camp, field, post, regimental, and general hospitals. These 
supplies are originally collected from the people into the twelve branches of 
the commission, located respectively at 

Boston, Baltimore, Chicago, Louisville, 

New York, Cincinnati, Columbus, Pittsburg, 

Philadelphia, Cleveland, Detroit, Buffalo. 

Each of these branches is a central point for the numerous aid societies in its 
neighborhood, as many as twelve hundred being in some cases tributary to a 
single branch office. The stores thus received are opened, assorted, repacked, 
and shipped, according to instructions received, to the associate secretary of 
the east or west, whose duty it is to know where they will be first needed, and 
to see that they are taken there. These supplies, upon the field or in the 



THE SANITARY COMMISSION. 



85 




THE SANITARY COMMISSION IN THE HOSPITAL. 



hospital, are distributed impartially to all who need them, whether they come 
from Maine or Missouri, whether they are Union soldiers or rebel prisoners. 
Certain states have not contributed either to the treasury or the storehouses 
of the commission, but nothing has ever been withheld from the soldiers of 
these states on that account. The result of the meeting of the agents of a 
local state organization and those of the commission upon a battle-field, has 
often been that the former, seeing the evil effects of exclusiveness, have, for 
that particular exigency, merged their supplies in the stock of the commission, 
and have themselves aided in distributing them without state distinction. 

3d. THE DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL BELIEF. The associate secretaries of 
the east and of the west, the Eev. Mr. Knapp, at "Washington, and Dr. New- 
berry, at Louisville, have the general direction of this department, " which 



86 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

deals mainly with the waifs and strays of the army, and relieves the individual 
soldier when temporarily out of connection with the military system." The 
" Soldiers' Homes" of the commission come under this head. Here shelter, 
food, and medical care are furnished to men who, for one reason or another, 
cannot get it directly of the government such as men on furlough or sick 
leave, recruits, stragglers, men who have been left behind by their regiments, 
or who have been prematurely discharged from the hospitals. At one period 
the eight homes at Washington, Cincinnati, Cairo, Louisville, Nashville, 
Columbus, Cleveland, and New Orleans, gave food and lodging to two thou- 
sand three hundred men every twenty-four hours. 

There are also several "lodges," or homes on a smaller scale, belonging to 
this department. Here the soldier, enfeebled but not disabled, may wait his 
opportunity of securing his pay, or may obtain rest and medical treatment 
till he is either able to rejoin his regiment or may be transferred to the 
hospital. The hospital cars ; the hospital steamboats ; the agencies for aiding 
the soldier or his family to obtain back pay, bounties, or pensions ; the hos- 
pital directories, containing the names and military status of every man who 
has received hospital treatment ; the sending of supplies to prisoners at Rich- 
mond by flag of truce boat all these varied services belong to, and are per- 
formed by, the Department of Special Relief. 

For somewhat over a year the simple machinery adopted for procuring 
from the people the requisite supplies, and the funds necessary to move, 
distribute, and properly apply them, proved amply sufficient. From time to 
time a fresh appeal was issued ; the subject was kept constantly before the 
country by means of the press ; the army bore witness in thousands of letters, 
written by those whom experience had taught, to the efficiency, integrity, and 
humanity of the commission. The willing fingers knew no rest, the scissors 
and the needle no respite. The people had insensibly taken, as it were, the 
measure of the situation, and were furnishing, month by month, a supply 
which, up to June, 1862, had proved amply sufficient. But now came in 
quick succession Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Games' Mills, Malvern Hill, the 
terrible second battle of Bull Run, and finally the bloody victory of Antietam. 
This last struggle left ten thousand of our own men wounded upon the field, 
and several thousand rebel prisoners in our hands. This series of battles, 
culminating upon the soil of Maryland, exhausted the commission's reserved 
stores, and sent the last funds of the treasury into the market for the purchase 
of an additional supply. "-It was at this hour of imperative duty and greatest 
anxiety," we quote one of the reports of the commission, " on the 21st of 



ALERT CLUBS. 



87 




BEFORE THE BATTLE. 



September, the fourth day after the battle, that a telegram from California 
brought intelligence of liberal promise of pecuniary aid from the Pacific coast; 
and with that inspiring promise came the welcome announcement that a hun- 
dred thousand dollars the first instalment of the golden treasure was then 
on the way to the Sanitary Commission. That hundred thousand dollars, at 
the time, seemed to be the means of insuring the successful prosecution of the 
commission's greatly expanded methods of aid ; and every subsequent passage 
in the history of its sanitary works, and its relief service, will tell how energi- 
zing and how salutary was that early lesson of faith, and how California's gold 
has strengthened and established the broad plans and humane purposes that 
might otherwise have fluctuated between necessity and inability." 

But to refer in greater detail to some of the ways and means adopted to 
collect the contributions of the people. " Alert Clubs" had been established in 
many of the villages and hamlets throughout .the country, and these were 
as successful in bringing money into the treasury of the commission as the 
Dorcas, Thimble, Needle, and Picket Associations were in replenishing its 
wardrobe and storecloset. They derived their name from the Alert Club, 
composed of the little girls and young people of Norwalk, Ohio, who collected 
in seven months, in a village of two thousand souls, with hardly a single 
person of wealth among them, $560. Their immediate aim was to furnish 




88 THE TRIBUTE BOOK 

the aid society of their town or neighborhood with the means of purchasing 
material to cut and make up : as has been said, the past year had made sad 
havoc among the reserves and accumulations of the people. These clubs had 

each a president, secretary, two treasurers, and 
as many collectors as possible, often forty. The 
president divided the neighborhood into dis- 
tricts, and appointed four collectors for each 
two ladies, two gentlemen. These were to obtain 
subscriptions among the ladies of twenty cents 
a month, and among the gentlemen of as much 
as their good will prompted them to give. Their 
duty was to call at every house in the district, 
omitting none, no matter what its alleged illib- 
erality, inscribing each name given and every 

Aur.ui. 

sum collected in* a book furnished for that pur- 
pose by the aid society. Every subscriber was to be asked for his subscrip- 
tion on and after the first Monday of the month, and accounts were to be 
audited and collections paid over to the parent society on the second Monday. 
At the monthly meetings of the Alerts, they might, if they chose, make slip- 
pers and quilts, though they were not expected to burden themselves with 
any other labor than the collection of funds. The fact has been, indeed, that 
they made few slippers and fewer quilts; but they did what was better, or 
what led to better financial results: they gave concerts and tea-parties in 
winter, and strawberry festivals in June ; they picked blackberries in August ; 
gave their firework money for onions in July ; held fairs on the door-step 
and in the front yard, whenever it did not rain ; enacted charades when any 
one would pay to see them; and, throughout the war, worked with a zeal 
worthy of older heads, and an unselfishness beyond all praise. 

Towards the close of 1862 the supplies of cotton and woolen material 
were exhausted throughout the country, having stood the drain of nearly 
two years. The sewing societies were as willing to work as ever ; but they 
had no cloth to work upon. Applications were therefore constantly made to 
the Central Commission for material, which the village aid societies would be 
glad to make up. The commission made a short trial of this plan, but finding 
that it arrested even the straggling flow of supplies toward their depots, aban- 
doned it. If any societies were thus furnished, all must be, and this would 
ruin the treasury in twenty days. 

" Nothing," said the commission, in an appeal issued at this time, " but 



THE SANITARY COMMISSION. 89 

the unbought, freely given services of our people at "home, both in furnishing 
labor and material, can avail to meet the vast demand for hospital clothing 
existing among our suffering troops. If you recall the fact that we have 




SANITARY CHARADE: MET-A-PHTSICIAN. 



70,000 men in general hospitals, 10,000 men in regimental hospitals, and per- 
haps 50,000 more in convalescent camps, you will see what a vast supply 
these 130,000 sick or invalid soldiers require. For you have only to think 
how much change of clothing, how much costly medicine, how much delicate 
food, how much wine and other stimulants, a single sick person at home 
requires, to appreciate the endless wants of 130,000 men in our hospitals and 
camps, one-third seriously ill, one-third really sick, and one-third ailing. 
Nothing short of the free activity and free contributions of every family, 
hamlet, village, church, and community, throughout the loyal states, contin- 
ued as long as the war continues, can avail to meet this never ending, always 
increasing drain. 

" It is the little springs of fireside labor oozing into the rills of village 
industry, these again uniting in the streams of county beneficence, and these 
in state or larger movements, flowing together into the rivers which directly 
empty into our great national reservoir of supplies, which could alone render 



90 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

possible the vast outflow of assistance which the Sanitary Commission is 
lending our sick and wounded soldiers. It is only necessary to give one 
statement to prove the absurdity of attempting to supply from our treasury 
the material of this home-labor for our cause. During the month of Septem- 
ber, the Sanitary Commission distributed daily, through its various agencies, 
"West, East, and South, as well as can be now ascertained, not less than 
26,000 articles, which, at an estimated value of fifty cents each, were worth 
thirteen thousand dollars. In a month of thirty-one days, as any one can see, 
this would amount to over $400,000 ; and supposing only half the value to be 
in the material, you can see that it would cost us $200,000 per month to 
supply the material which has, up to this time, been given us. This state- 
ment equally demonstrates the munificence of our contributors, in the past, 
and the utter folly of attempting to substitute our money for their free gifts. 
No ! the moment the liberality and confidence of the homes and villages 
desert the Sanitary Commission, that moment its work of relief is ended." 

During the year 1863, not only the hoarded linen being exhausted, but 
many a bed having been despoiled of its quilt, many a window of its curtain, 
it became necessary for the commission to enter the market and purchase. 
Now cotton was extravagantly dear, and the money of the commission, like 
that of every one else, was the depreciated currency of the country. A dollar 
was doubtless a dollar to all who gave, but its value, in the hands of those who 
spent, fluctuated with the fortunes of the war. Fortunately, California and 
the Pacific coast continued their munificent donations, and this portion of the 
receipts of the commission represented dollar for dollar. Thus, as the giving 
of stores fell off, that of money increased, and the commission was enabled to 
sustain itself. 

The following extract from a speech in San Francisco, by Mr. William T. 
Coleman, will show by what arguments the Californians were wrought up to 
the necessary pitch of generosity, though, indeed, they needed little urging : 

"It was cheering," he said, "to Californians in the East, to witness the 
emulation and spirit caused by the contributions of our state to the Sanitary 
Fund. Never did a people gain so much at so small a price. The donations 
coming in a bulk, appeared to be large ; but, really, this state has given very 
little, in comparison with others. The loyal states of the east have all been 
called upon for contributions in many ways not witnessed here. There were 
soldiers to be fitted out, wounded soldiers to be received on their return, help 
to be sent to the battle-field, and appeals were made at every corner. People 
have not stopped to inquire any thing, save whether the sufferer was a soldier 



THE BOUNTY OF CALIFORNIA. 91 

and in need. The government provided arms and ammunition in abundance, 
but hospital supplies were lacking ; the cause was in danger of great loss 
by neglecting wounded men in the field and in the hospitals. Then it 
was that California blazed up suddenly with a brilliant, a golden light, and 
our state gained a name of which Californians, with all their vanity, may well 
be proud. 

" Though the eastern states have given much more, their gifts were not 
in one large stream, but in numberless rivulets by states, by cities, by 
villages, by societies. The treasurer of no eastern association has had the 
satisfaction of sending $100,000 at one time. But if California should give 
$100,000 per month, she would not give any more than her share. Congratu- 
late yourselves that you have so little to do ; but take care to do it well. This 
state ought really to bear the entire expenses of the Sanitary Commission. 
Let us send them more than they ask. We could do it and never miss it. 

" The attention and favor of the Sanitary Commission are not limited to 
any class of soldiers. No lines are drawn of nativity, or of shades of religious 
or political opinion. Officers of the Commission do not turn their backs on 
wounded rebels, but supply their wants also, and God grant that they make 
better men. There were, not long since, 2,500 sick and wounded rebels at 
New York, and they were not neglected. The Sanitary Commission has 
saved more lives and spared more suffering than any other effort of that kind 
ever made. I now ask you, fellow-citizens, to again come forward with your 
contributions and subscriptions. Your wealth is increasing at a rate une- 
qualled in the world, and this great charity is ready to relieve you of part of 
the responsibility and burden. Send fifty bars of gold and a hundred of 
silver, through Wells, Fargo & Co., by steamer, to the Sanitary Commission, 
with the compliments of California, and you will strengthen the well with 
confidence and renewed zeal, and the wounded will find their cup sweeter and 
their beds softer, while they bless the Golden State. " 

One instance of the spirit which animated those who, having literally 
nothing to give, nevertheless gave, may properly b x e mentioned here, as it has 
never been mentioned elsewhere. The Eev. George Gordon, whom ill health 
and other afflictions had deprived of his pulpit, and who had no hopes of ever 
filling another, with a large family, no income, and no property but a small 
house and garden, with two sons in the army and a bed-ridden daughter at 
home, lived in Putnam county, New York, a few miles from the five hotels 
lining the eastern bank of Lake Mahopac. The only church here being 
Methodist, and very small, it was the custom of the visitors at the various 



92 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

hotels to meet on Sunday mornings in the parlor of the Baldwin House for 
religious worship. The Rev. Mr. Gordon read the service and preached, and 
the collections taken up, on the eight Sundays of the brief Mahopac season, 
constituted his sole money receipts for the year. The President appointed a 
day for thanksgiving and praise after the capture of Vicksburg, and what 
might be taken up on that Thursday Mr. Gordon proposed should be sent to 
the Sanitary Commission. The congregation objected, not that they did not 
wish well to the commission, but that they deemed the sacrifice too great for 
the reverend gentleman to make. But not one penny would Mr. Gordon 
touch, and the receipt of a certain sum of money, from the Rev. George Gor- 
don, " the result of a collection taken at Lake Mahopac," was soon afterwards 
acknowledged by Mr. George Strong. This, the attendants upon the parlor 
service felt, was Mr. Gordon's gift, not theirs ; and conscious that he, of his 
penury, had cast in more than they all, quietly circulated a paper from house 
to house, from dock to bowling-alley, on Blackberry Island and Petrea, and 
on the following Sunday presented Mr. Gordon with a list and a long roll. 
The humane clergyman had cast his bread upon the waters; he had sent 
thirty-seven dollars to the hospital, and it came back to him five dollars 
for one. 

We come now to the era of the great sanitary fairs which, in the fall of 
1863, and during 1864 and 1865, were held from one end of the country to 
the other. Postponing, for the present, a description of them a description 
which we give elsewhere in detail, as the best method of showing the zeal, the 
devotion, the ingenuity of the various neighborhoods interested we quote 
from a letter written by the president of the commission some months later, 
but the proper place of which, in a consecutive narrative, is here. This letter 
was in answer to one from the Rev. Mr. Beecher, in which these words 
occurred : " There is great ignorance of the scope of the commission, its details 
and its need of vast funds ; and where there is ignorance there will be more 
or less fear and doubt whether such volumes of money, as in the imagination 
of the people are rolling into the treasury, can be needed or well spent." 
Dr. Bellows replied as follows : 

"The business of the United States Sanitary Commission lies : 
"I. In collecting supplies. This is done through its branches. During 
the first two years the homes of the country sent of their superfluity immense 
quantities of sheets, pillow-cases, comforters, blankets, shirts, drawers, socks, 
&c. This superfluity is long ago exhausted, while the want continues. Of 
course now they must buy the raw material, and make up newly what they 






COLLECTION AND PURCHASE OF SUPPLIES. 93 

originally could take out of their closets and trunks. Hence the necessity of 
the great fairs to raise the money to purchase the clothing and other supplies 
which they obtained formerly in another way. All the money raised by the 
fairs will be spent, with small exceptions, at home, in creating supplies. It 
takes about fifteen-sixteenths of all the cost of the United States Sanitary 
Commission to furnish its supplies and transportation. The other one-six- 
teenth goes into the support of its homes, its lodges, its machinery of distri- 
bution, its hospital directory, and hospital and camp inspection. The cash 
which actually reaches the central treasury of the United States Sanitary 
Commission has, in three years, amounted to about one million of dollars, of 
which the Pacific coast has given nearly three-quarters. It would be well for 
those who on the Atlantic coast sometimes question our economy, to consider 
this fact. 

" Of this money, more than half has been spent in the purchase of such 
supplies as the homes of the land do not and cannot furnish, and in the trans- 
portation of them, such as : 

" Condensed milk by the ton. 

" Beef-stock by the ton. 

" Wines and spirits by the barrel. 

"Crackers and farinaceous food by the ton. 

" Tea, coffee, and sugar, by the chest and hogshead. 

" Crutches, bed-rests, mattresses, and bedsteads, by the hundred. 

"Cargoes of ice, potatoes, onions, and curried cabbage, lemons, oranges, 
anti-scorbutics, and tonics. At times we have supplied not only the sick, 
but a whole army threatened with scurvy, with the means of averting it ; and 
we have averted it at Yicksburg, at Murfreesboro', before Charleston. Thou- 
sands of barrels of onions, thousands of barrels of potatoes, hundreds of barrels 
of curried cabbage, have been forwarded to various corps, even as far as 
Texas, to appease the demon of scurvy and save our troops. 

" The other half million has been used in supporting two hundred experts, 
medical inspectors, relief agents, clerks, wagoners, and accompanying agents, 
in the field, or in our offices and depots, through whom our work is done. 
These two hundred men receive, on an average, two dollars per day for labor, 
which is, say half of it, highly skilled, sometimes of professional eminence, and 
worth from five to ten times that amount. Few of these men could be had for 
the money ; but they work for love and patriotism, and are content with a bare 
support. This costs $12,000 a month. The board (all included, twenty-one 
in number) president, treasurer, medical committee, standing committee 



94 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

give their services and their time gratuitously. They receive nothing. Their 
travelling expenses alone are partly refunded them, and these are trifling, ex- 
cepting the case of one or two who go frequently on tours of observation. 

" II. The next large expense is the support of twenty-five soldiers' homes, 
or lodges, scattered over the whole field of war, from New Orleans to Wash- 
ington, including Vicksburg, Memphis, Cairo, Chattanooga, Nashville, Louis- 
ville, Washington, &c., &c. In these homes and lodges twenty- three hundred 
soldiers (different ones) daily receive shelter, food, medical aid, protection and 
care. These soldiers are such as are crowded by the rigidity of the military 
system out of the regular channels ; soldiers left behind, astray, who have lost 
their military status, convalescents, discharged men, not able to get their pay. 
Of these, the average length of time they are on our hands is about three days. 
The priceless value of this supplementary system no tongue can tell. The 
abandonment of it would create an amount of suffering whfch a multiplication 
of two thousand three hundred by three hundred and sixty-five days in the 
year will -but serve to hint at. 

"In connection with these homes, at the great military centres, New 
Orleans, Louisville, Washington, are bureaus in aid of the discharged soldier's 
great necessities, growing out of his loss of papers in battle, or during the 
bewilderment of sickness, or through the ignorance of his superiors, or his 
own : 

"1. A Claim Agency, to secure his bounty. 

"2. A Pension Agency. 

"3. A Back-pay Agency. 

"The mercy of these ministries, by which soldiers and their families, help- 
less without this aid the prey of sharpers, runners, and grog-shops are put 
in speedy possession of their rights, is inexpressible. We have often $20,000 
a day of back-pay in our oifice at Washington alone, which might have been 
lost forever, or delayed until it was no longer needed by the soldier's own 
family, without this system. 

" Sometimes a dozen letters must pass back and forth with various officials 
to verify a single claim. By these agencies, wronged men, stricken in dis- 
grace from the army rolls, are restored ; and in several cases, men condemned 
to be shot as deserters, have been saved from an undeserved death. 

" To these are to be added : 

" 1. A special provision for wives, mothers, and sisters, who have expended 
all the little means of home in getting to Washington or Louisville to see and 
protect their sick relatives. 



HOSPITAL INSPECTION AND TRANSPORTATION. 95 

" 2. A home for faithful nurses broken down in the service. 

" 3. Arrangements for sending very sick soldiers home under escort. 

"III. A hospital directory, by which the whereabouts of all sick men 
is determined. There are six hundred thousand names in its books. It is 
corrected daily. It saves endless confusion, suspense, and misery; prevents 
needless journeys ; answers the most urgent questions ; relieves the home- 
feeling that their boys are lost in the crowded hospitals ; blesses and keeps 
heart-whole hundreds of wives, brothers, and sisters, every day. It costs 
$20,000 a year to maintain it, and it is worth a million, if human anxiety can 
be estimated in money. 

" IY. Hospital Inspection. Sixty of the most skilful surgeons and physi- 
cians in the nation were eight or ten at a time six months engaged, under 
the direction of the commission, in a systematic and scientific survey of all 
the general hospitals. They inspected seventy thousand beds, saw two hun- 
dred thousand patients, and reported in four thousand written pages the 
critical results of these inquiries. Can any body estimate the scientific and 
human value of such a survey, brought home to the surgeon, the medical 
authorities, and the government ? 

" V. The transportation of the sick, carried on by us for the government 
in vessels from the Peninsula from which we brought eight thousand men 
in a comfort wholly unattainable by government transportation, aided by our 
generous medical students and our heroic though delicate women we have 
since largely carried on in our patent hospital cars, in which the sick, without 
jar, can be conveyed hundreds of miles with little suffering or injury. We 
have these cars on the main lines, east and west, along which sick soldiers are 
carried. 

" YL We supply the barren market of Washington with car-loads of fresh 
hospital supplies from Philadelphia. All the beef, mutton, poultry, butter, 
eggs, vegetables, used in all the hospitals at Washington, are selected, for- 
warded, distributed by the Sanitary Commission the Medical Department 
refunding our outlay at the end of each month, saving the profit made by 
ordinary dealers, and securing wholesome food to the sick. 

"YIL The battle-field service of the commission is perhaps too well 
known to require any elucidation. But let us take the case of Gettysburg. 
We had accumulated stores, and placed agents at Harrisburg, Pa., Frederick, 
Md., and Chambersburg, and at Baltimore, to watch the probable necessities 
of Meade's army. We had inspectors and wagon-trains marching with it; 
one with each column. The dreadful battle came off. The best calculations 



96 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

of the government had anticipated the wants of ten thousand wounded men. 
The result of that glorious yet horrible contest left about twenty-five thou- 
sand wounded men (our own and the enemy's) on an area of four miles square. 
Every church, private house, barn, shed, was crammed with wounded men 
additional to field hospitals (in tents) whitening the hill-sides, and drenching 
the soil in the blood of amputated limbs. The railroads clogged with trains 
forwarding troops to re-enforce Meade in his pursuit of Lee ; the bridges 
burnt by the enemy ; neither cars nor locomotives enough to do half the 
required business ; the surgeons and stewards compelled largely to accompany 
the troops, who expected another battle within a week what would have 
become of these noble sufferers, if the half-preparation (not half) which the 
providence of the government had made had not been supplemented, for the 
first week or two, full one-half by the Sanitary Commission, aided by the 
Christian Commission and other relief agencies? Look at the list of things 

* ' o 

furnished them alone, and remember that this was one single battle-field, and 
cost the Sanitary Commission in stores, clothing, food, and transportation, 
$75,000. Was there one dollar more spent than was called for? Was one 
dollar mis-spent ? Was not the moral and material economy in the saving of 
life (I believe thousands of lives were literally saved by our succor on that 
occasion alone), and in the saving of pain and needless misery, such as eveiy 
benefactor of the commission must forever rejoice in ?" 

Dr. Bellows concluded his communication with some estimates for the 
future, closing thus : " The only uncertain element in these calculations 
is the estimated value of our supplies. The uncertainty here is not due 
to want of great pains to ascertain the facts. We shall very soon be able 
to lay before the public the exact estimates, how many shirts and their 
estimated value, how many drawers, stockings, sheets, comforters, &c., and 
the estimated value of each ; and they can then judge for themselves. 
Meanwhile they must give our statement only such credit as they may 
think our opportunity to know, and our desire to state frankly the exact 
truth, entitle it to." 

Up to the period when the first large fair was held, that is, from June, 
1861, to December 1st, 1863, the treasurer of the commission had received the 
following sums, in cash, from the several states : 

From Maine $17,720 33 From Connecticut $5,181 35 

" New Hampshire 1,70144 " Rhode Island 8,06830 

" Vermont 2,03515 " New England (states not 

" Massachusetts 48,548 86 discriminated) 6,683 75 



A RESULT OF THE FAIRS. 



97 



From New York $160,042 58 

New Jersey 3,170 88 

Pennsylvania 11,699 18 

Delaware 765 00 

Maryland 1,733 00 

Washington, D. C 2,333 08 

Ohio 2,700 00 

Michigan 578 00 

Illinois 546 25 

Kentucky 6,166 45 

Indiana 500 00 

Minnesota 45 00 

Nevada Territory 54,144 75 

California 526,909 61 

Oregon 26,450 78 



From Washington Territory . . $7,258 97 

" Idaho 2,110 46 

" Vancouver's and San Ju- 
an Islands 2,552 68 

" Honolulu 4,085 00 

" Santiago de Chili 3,68884 

" Peru 2,002 00 

" Newfoundland 150 00 

" Canada 439 48 

" England and Scotland . . 1,150 00 

" France 2,750 00 

" Turkey 50 00 

" China 2,300 00 

" Cuba 23 00 

" Unknown sources 3,19288 



Total $919,477 05 

These sums were received by the Central New York Treasury ; the branch 
treasuries received other sums, as, for instance, that of Philadelphia $117,000, 
in the same time. But it may be generally said that the cash receipts of the 
branches were expended in the purchase of supplies, while those of the central 
treasury were used not only to purchase, but to transport, apply, and adminis- 
ter the supplies thus procured. 

Some four or five fairs, producing large sums of money, had now been held, 
and an unexpected but not unnatural result was discovered to have been pro- 
duced by them. The people throughout the country had been toiling for the 
commission, and yet really had not benefited it ; that is, the commission was 
no better off this year with the fairs than it had been the previous year with- 
out them. The sewing societies, which had previously made shirts, now made 
dolls ; the needle pickets, the busy fingers, which had supplied the storehouses 
with hospital clothing, with flannels, with socks, with food for the sick, were 
now engaged upon work which, though capable of being converted into money, 
would even then only purchase the clothing, flannels, and food no longer 
furnished by them ; and goods thus purchased, with two or three profits upon 
them, and with a depreciated currency, were vastly dearer than when furnished 
as they previously had been. The people at large, seeing such vast money 
receipts in the hands of the commission, and not reflecting that they were 
merely in place of supplies in kind, the flow of which was now arrested, were 
already building national asylums with the imaginary runnings-over from the 
full font of the treasury. The fairs had thus, so far from assuring the future 
of the great charity, placed it in some peril; for the people were at any 
moment likely to abandon all effort in its behalf. 



98 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



There was another point in this connection not well understood. In spite 
of the fairs, which produced millions in cash, the commission was actually in 
want of ready money to keep its machinery in motion. The fairs, which had 
been held under the auspices of branches of the commission, sent the proceeds 



H ON R T H E "B R AV E 5 




CHILDREN'S SOLDIF.US' FAI.I. 



to the branch treasuries ; the money was expended in supplies ; the supplies 
were forwarded to the central depots ; and just at this point the work of dis- 
tribution was threatened with stoppage, for want of money in the central 
treasury. This difficulty was fully set forth by Dr. Bellows in a letter, dated 
January, 1864, to Mr. Otis, in San Francisco. After acknowledging the 
receipt of $50,000, California's January and February instalment, the doctor 
thus continued: "You will hear a great deal of the vast sanitary fairs at 
Chicago, Cincinnati, Boston, Buffalo, Albany, Washington, at which very 
large sums of money are raised, and you may very naturally think that it 
must be high- water in our central treasury ! It is important that the people 
of California should understand that all this money is fitly expended by the 
branches themselves in the purchase of supplies, which supplies are forwarded 
to our receiving depot for distribution. But the whole cost of distribution, 



INJURIOUS RUMORS. 99 

with the men, wagons, horses, and machinery of every kind which transports 
supplies and makes them useful and saving to the army all these accumu- 
lated comforts and necessaries fall upon our central treasury, which has more 
io do, and is more indispensable, precisely according to the amount of supplies 
that are furnished to it. The more money the branches have, the more sup- 
plies we have ; and the more supplies we have, the more it costs to forward 
them, distribute and supply them to our vast army, scattered over our wide 
country. 

" All the money and all the supplies that could be raised and furnished 
would be as useless to the army without us as the rains on the hill-sides of 
the Croton River would be to the city of New York, if the city had not built 
an expensive aqueduct; which accumulates, economizes, and distributes, by 
an intricate and costly system of mains, and gates, and trainers, and pipes, and 
stop-cocks, this water to every house, every kitchen and chamber, every wash- 
bowl and pitcher and mouth in New York ! 

## *#### 

" Understand, then, that the wealth of the branches is indispensable to the 
soldier's relief, but that their wealth only makes us poor by giving us more 
to do and nothing to do it with! We are like a stage company, with an 
immense number of passengers, but left without forage for our horses, or 
horses for our coaches : or, rather, we should be so if California did not make 
herself the great motive-power for the central machinery of the Sanitary Com- 
mission, and thus furnish horses and forage, by which our overflow of passen- 
gers (the supplies) are all expeditiously transported to their destination the 
sick and wounded, the naked and hungry." 

Somewhat later, the idea having got abroad, and being in some quarters 
persistently fostered, that the Sanitary Commission was rich, having more 
funds than it could judiciously spend, that its storehouses were filled to over- 
flowing, Mr. J. Foster Jenkins, the worthy successor of Mr. Olmsted as general 
secretary of the commission, made and published a statement in the Boston 
Journal which did much to set these dangerous rumors at rest. The assertions 
alluded to, he said, were incorrect, and of a character to injure the cause of the 
commission. Its storehouses were not filled with goods ; its treasury did not 
run over. The fairs had arrested the flow of sanitary stores to such an extent 
that the receipts in kind had for some months been fifty per cent, less than in 
the corresponding period of 1863. Even if the commission had received all 
the money raised by the various fairs, it would still be straitened by the falling 
off" in the supply of supplementary stores. "If," Mr. Jenkins added, "the 



100 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

people are persuaded that the Sanitary Commission has grown rich, and 
therefore is in need of nothing, in less than two months its storehouses will be 
empty and its treasury exhausted, in the vain attempt to eke out the funds 
raised by the fairs in the purchase of underclothing, dried fruits, blankets, 
and stimulants." 

Up to this period, the Sanitary Commission had received about a million of 
dollars in money, $700,000 of which was the gift of the Pacific Coast alone. 
The Atlantic States were waking up to this disproportion. It was decided that 
a fair should be held in New York, for the benefit of the central treasury ; that, 
inasmuch as the proceeds of the Chicago fair had been paid into the treasury 
of the northwestern branch, and expended in supplies, as those of the Boston 
fair had been paid into the treasury of the New England branch, and also 
expended in supplies, those of the great metropolitan fair should be used, as 
far as might be necessary, in the work of moving and distribution. " Our 
fair," wrote Dr. Bellows to Mr. Otis, "will come off late in March ; at which 
we hope, at one blow, to raise perhaps half a million of dollars, and so equal- 
ize the contributions of the Atlantic and the Pacific. I rejoice at this holy 
jealousy." 

It was just before the Fourth of July, 1864, that the desire, indeed the 
necessity, for onions in the several armies of the country became known to 
the people. Scurvy had appeared in the Army of the Cumberland, and it 
threatened the armies of the Potomac and the James. Where actual disease 
had not broken out, and even where there were no symptoms of its coming, 
the soldiers yearned for fresh vegetables with an intensity that impaired 
their efficiency by turning their thoughts homewards, to the savory onion- 
patches and cucumber-beds they had left behind them. The regular com- 
missions did much to supply this sudden demand ; it will be stated, in the 
proper place, that the State of Wisconsin, while the necessity lasted, sent 
anti-scorbutics by the hundred barrels to the hospitals and armies within its 
circuit. Still, it was thought that much could be done by special outside 
work in behalf of this mid-summer want. An effort was made in New York 
to induce the Common Council to expend the usual appropriation for fire- 
works at Fulton Market instead of at the Powder Works, but it was unsuccess- 
ful. The children of the country, however, did what the City Fathers refused 
to do : they spent their Fourth of July money in onions. The New York Onion 
Fund was built upon a boy's dollar, given for crackers, spent in onions. The 
movement, thus begun, spread from state to state, and there is hardly an aid 
society's report which does not mention, among its irregular and incidental 



THE ONION FUND. 



101 



work, the collection of onion money or the sending of some barrel of pickles. 
The relief given was immense, and may be counted in lives saved and in the 
sustained efficiency of the armies. The sum thus expended, outside of the 
Sanitary Commission, cannot have been less than $50,000. 




FAIK UPON A DOOR -STEP. 



Without underrating the value of the publicity attained through the press 
in all affairs of public concern, we may say that the newspapers rendered pe- 
culiarly effective service in this matter of anti-scorbutics. One article, copied 
far and wide from a New York weekly sheet, exerted so great an influence 
that we transfer a portion of it to our pages. It purported to be a letter from 
a country girl to country girls and boys : 

" Not long ago," said this country girl, "I heard a soldier say that soldiers 
like onions ; that he had, at one time, paid twenty-five cents for an onion. 
Onions are good for soldiers, and many of them crave them. You and I don't, 
maybe we like them only a long way off; but the soldiers do. Down in the 
corner of our garden, behind the currant-bushes, in what I recognize from sur- 
roundings as a long neglected corner a spot unoccupied save by our dogs, 
who have considered it their own peculiar play-ground, and from which our 
boy has taken many a load of bones of their strewing I see, in vision, the 
morning sun gleam brightly on rows of tiny green blades ; and, as I look, the 
rows seem to form themselves into great characters, which presently I see 
are, FOR THE SOLDIERS. Henceforth, for this season at least, that bone- 
strewed plot has a nobler destiny. The vision shall be realized. The dogs 



102 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

must seek another play-ground ; this plot is to bear onions for the soldiers. 
Where now is stiff sod shall indeed be mellow soil, where onions may take to 
themselves size and sap and odor. In due time, the green tops may flavor 
soup for the Home Guard ; but every bulb lying concealed in the dark mold 
shall be sacred to such as have seen actual service. Never, since exiled 
Israelites landed and sighed for the leeks and onions of Egypt, has there been 
so great a glorification of the odorous, tear-provoking bulb as there shall be 
in this garden-corner. 

" This sounds well, say you ; but talking breaks no bones, and that frozen 
sod is not broken yet for those onion-beds. You are right. When the bar- 
rels (or shall it only be barrel?) containing them shall have been directed to 
the Sanitary Commission, that will be a better time for talking of these 
onions of mine. But just one word to you, girls and boys. Have you a 
neglected corner in your garden, in your yard, or a place hitherto given to the 
cultivation of flowers only ? That patch is not yours, I beg leave to inform 
you. The soldier has a mortgage on it. Waste soil is not to be tolerated 
about our homes in these times, and the tulip, though a lovely ministrant, 
must give place to a root which may be put to nobler uses." 

In August, 1864, the Sanitary Commission set all the children in the 
country to picking blackberries for the soldiers, their mothers and sisters to 
distil from them a refreshing cordial and tonic. In September, acknowledg- 
ing that "rivers of blackberry juice had flowed in upon them from all parts 
of the country, and that it would be impossible to think of a more grateful 
flood," it made another call upon the boys and girls, asking for peaches, not 
canned, nor preserved, but simply dried. Peaches were never so plentiful, 
and could never be turned to better account. The peach had never borne a 
large part in the charities of mankind, and its history had had but slight con- 
nection with the practice of the healing art, but its opportunity had now 
come. Do not can the peaches, said the commission to the children, and 
waste no sugar upon them. Cut them carefully in halves, and take out the 
stones. Lay the halves upon clean boards or upon sheds and roofs sloping 
to the south. Dry them thoroughly in the sun, if possible ; if not, put them 
in slightly heated ovens, or toast them gently upon the hearth, or before the 
stove. You cannot dry them too thoroughly, boys ; and you cannot send too 
many, girls. If there are any left when the sick and the convalescent have 
had their fill, they will do no harm to the well men in the trenches and the 
field. 

An excellent result having been attained in many parts of the country 



ONE DAY'S INCOME, ONE DAY'S REVENUE. 



103 




PICKING BLACKBERRIES FOB TI1E 6OLDIEE8. 



by a systematic canvassing of counties, towns, wards, and streets, and the 
Philadelphia Committee on Labor, Income and Eevenue having furnished an 
admirable basis for the conduct of such a canvass, the commission issued an 
appeal, late in the year, suggesting a similar organized effort in the North- 
western States. It was proposed, in this paper, that an attempt be made to 
obtain from every person in the Northwest the proceeds of one day's labor, 
one day's profits, or one day's income, for the benefit of the sick and wounded 
of the army. The commission asked for the 365th part of the gifts of Prov- 
idence, for the benefit of the gallant men now preserving them for those at 
home. It hoped that the appeal would be answered by the toiling seamstress 
and daughter of luxury, the hardy day -laborer and skilful mechanic, by the 
millionaire, banker and lawyer, by the successful merchant and his clerks, 
by the hardy mariner and stalwart yeoman, by the government employee 
even by corporate bodies, heretofore said to be destitute of souls. No class 
would be denied the privilege of uniting with, and none would be oppressed 
by, this thorough and systematic plan. 

The various trades, professions, and businesses of Chicago were already 



104 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

organizing, with, a view to obtain from all this voluntary assessment. In 
many of the country towns an efficient organization had been effected. It 
was recommended that committees of two or three persons should be appointed 
for every department of business and labor, mercantile, mechanical, agricultu- 
ral, operative ; male and female, old and young. It was hoped that clergy- 
men and Sabbath- schools, as well as business men and associations, would 
become interested in this plan, that the press might be^ subsidized in its be- 
half, that Aid Societies, Loyal Leagues, and Good Templars would take it 
in hand promptly and energetically. The way to do it was to ORGANIZE ! 

It was easily done. If the workmen would authorize their employers to 
deduct one day from their week's or month's earnings, and the employers 
would add to it a day of their profits, the whole would be acknowledged 
together to the credit of the establishment. Every acknowledgment would 
stimulate others to follow the example. 

Two of the churches of Chicago had already taken the initiative in 
carrying out this programme: St. James' Church, Rev. Dr. Clarkson, rec- 
tor, and the first Congregational Church, Rev. Dr. Patton, pastor. Each 
had paid into the treasury the fifty-second part of its church revenue for 
a year, on the ground that a church organization has but fifty-two days in 
its year. 

In Palatine, a small town in Cook County, a few miles from Chicago, the 
Aid Society had assessed a monthly tax on every person in the town, varying 
from one dollar to five cents. Collectors had been appointed for the nine 
school districts of the town, whose business it was to collect the sums pledged 
monthly, and pay them to the Aid Society, and the aggregate would be an 
amount of between one and two thousand dollars yearly. If every town in 
the Northwest would follow this example, the Sanitary Commission would 
have a revenue sufficiently ample for its needs, and every Aid Society would 
be able to supply itself with all the fabrics it needed for the manufacture of 
hospital clothing. It was under a system thus set on foot that a considerable 
portion of the contributions in money to the Chicago Fair of 1865 were col- 
lected. 

"We have thus rapidly passed in review the various methods by which the 
treasury and storehouses of the commission were filled and from time to time 
replenished. For the purpose of going more into detail, as has been already 
said, and in order to describe more fully the little devices and ingenious shifts 
resorted to, in the same object, we give, in a succeeding chapter, an account 
of the various fairs, which, by the way, need not be considered as artificial 



IS RAFFLING PROPER? 105 

stimulants, but may be better characterized as furnishing an opportunity for 
simultaneous giving and concerted action. The commission needs, let us 
suppose, a million dollars, and thinks that New York ought to furnish it. 
Mr. A. is applied to, and says that he would willingly give a hundred or a 
thousand dollars, if he were sure that Mr. B. and Mr. C. would do the same. 
The cabinetmaker says that he would gladly contribute a specimen of his 
handicraft, if he knew that others would do as much ; that, the milliner would 
furnish a bonnet and the machinist an engine. Now, the holding of a fair 
assures A. that B. and C., to say nothing of D., E., and F., will be called upon 
to contribute as well as himself; and the cabinetmaker, the machinist, and the 
milliner are severally convinced that their neighbors are to co-operate with 
them. A fair is simply a lever by which a good purchase is obtained upon 
the purses and pockets of the community. It brings about a long pull and a 
strong pull, but, better yet, a pull altogether.. There need be nothing arti- 
ficial, factitious, or unhealthy in a fair ; it is simply a form of organization. 
A composer, having his choice of means, and desiring to produce a massive 
effect, would dismiss the tenor and soprano and call upon the chorus. And 
as a choir is to a solo, so is a fair to all chance contributions. 

Of one device resorted to in some cities, objected to and forbidden in 
others, it may be proper to say a word or two here. The subject of raffling 
excited great interest throughout the country, and the minds of thoughtful 
people seemed to be pretty nearly divided upon its propriety. We give the 
two sides of the question as presented, the one by the officers of the Sanitary 
Commission themselves,, and. the other by a clergyman of Cincinnati. The 
commission deprecated raffles, the clergyman defended them that is, under 
the circumstances. The commission, according to The Bulletin, its organ, 
had felt it necessary to establish one rule in regard to the source of its sup- 
port to accept, without question and from all quarters, such gifts as were 
brought to its treasury. Accordingly, neither political, theological, nor moral 
questions had come before it. It had studiously avoided complication with 
the methods employed by those who had supplied its pecuniary necessities, 
declining to patronize or make itself responsible for either good or bad plans 
for raising money, and simply engaging, as trustees of the people's bounty, to 
spend the means placed in its hands in the most moral, most patriotic, and 
most faithful manner. It held itself strictly responsible for the safe custody, 
the wise and economical disbursement, and the most humane application of 
the funds committed to it ; but not for the methods by which they were raised. 
Any other course would make the Sanitary Commission the moral censor of 



106 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

the public, and cut off the sympathies of large bodies of people a loss even 
less important in a pecuniary than in a patriotic light. 

It should not be supposed, however, that the Sanitary Commission was 
indifferent to the morals of the community, or to the ways employed to aid 
and assist its own work. While it could not prescribe those ways, or go 
behind the gifts it received to catechize the motives or the methods of its ben- 
efactors, it earnestly desired, as a body of thoughtful citizens engaged in so 
serious a business, to see a careful respect for the laws, a tender regard for the 
moral interests of society, a profound reverence for God and duty, animating 
all its supporters. Confessing that the moral interests of the community are 
far more important than the success of its own work, it could not desire to 
flourish at the expense of any permanent principle of truth, justice, and 
religion. 

In regard to raffling, if the question were one the Sanitary Commission 
had the right to settle, the board could not hesitate to decide against it, as not 
being strictly legal ; as being, at the best, of disputed moral complexion, and, 
at ,the worst, decidedly evil in its tendencies, if not wrong in its principle. 
The practical settlement of the question lay with the gentlemen and lady 
.managers of the fair. They had thus far endeavored in their plan to free 
raffling from its universally recognized evils, judging it to be essential in 
some form to the success of the fair. That they might, under the discussion 
now going on, see it to be as immediately expedient as it is desirable on sev- 
eral grounds to abandon it wholly, was the wish and hope of the board. The 
Sanitary Commission was ^perfectly willing to sacrifice any pecuniary interest 
in the returns of the fair, to the practical testing of the question : " Are raffles 
necessary evils?" They thought not. 

The Cincinnati clergyman, in his sermon defending such appeals to the lot 
as those under discussion, took his text from Proverbs, xviii. 18: "The lot 
causeth contentions to cease, and parteth the mighty." He maintained, gen- 
erally, that where a ticket, or chance, is bought in a raffle with the simple 
desire of contributing to some worthy cause, and with indifference as to who 
wins, there is no gambling and no offence. After making the statement that 
goods of great value must have been sacrificed without this recourse to the 
lot, he said : 

" Let us now consider what was done to save these goods, amounting to 
many thousands of dollars, from this sacrifice, and to secure the full value for 
the benefit of the soldiers. 

" A single case will illustrate correctly the principle of the whole. There 



RAFFLES DEFENDED. 107 

was an article worth, say, thirty dollars. But few or none were willing to 
invest so much in a single article. The result was, it was unsold. Then one 
said to another, ' Let us, thirty of us, unite, pay one dollar each, and purchase 
this. If sold at auction, it will go for, perhaps, ten or even five dollars. If 
we buy it, its whole value will be secured for the soldiers' fund.' Thus far, 
certainly, all is well. No one has been injured, the treasury of the fair re- 
ceives money which it would not otherwise have obtained, and the thirty have 
what they willingly accept as the equivalent of their money. Now what shall 
be done with the article obtained ? It might have been sold and the proceeds 
divided. Had money been the object of the purchasers, this would have been 
done. Instead of this, they say to each other, ' We cannot all have it ; and 
the money which each put in is of no consequence ; let us cast lots for it. 
One will obtain it, and the other twenty-nine will have made a donation of 
one dollar each to the funds of the fair.' This, as I understand it, was the 
operation in which Christians and other conscientious persons engaged, and 
these were their motives. I know that these were the views and the motives 
of those of my own church who consulted me, and we are bound to believe, 
until the contrary is shown, that others are and were as conscientious as we. 

" Now, it is quite clear that it is in the last step in the agreement of the 
thirty, that they would decide by lot which should have the purchased article, 
that the gambling, if anywhere, lies; and I declare, without the slightest 
hesitation, and with no fear that it can be successfully denied, that, in the 
transaction as set forth, there is not one feature or element of gambling. The 
only question possible, in regard to such an operation, is, Is it right on such 
an occasion to make an appeal to the lot, which is really an appeal to God, to 
decide the question at issue ? 

" Those who condemn this must do so upon one of two grounds : either 
that an appeal to the lot is wrong in all cases, or wrong in this particular case. 
But it is not wrong in all cases, as will appear from the following considera- 
tions : First, from the statement of our text, which shows, beyond dispute, 
that in the Jewish Commonwealth, in the time of Solomon, the appeal to the 
lot was a common practice, and its usefulness is acknowledged in deciding 
questions and ending controversies between men. It placed the decision with 
God himself, from whom there was no appeal. 

" The land was divided among the tribes by lot. The order of service for 
the priests in the temple was decided by lot ; so was that of the musicians ; 
and in the same manner the gates were assigned to the porters. 

"This practice was continued in the time of the Saviour; for, at the time 



108 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

of the vision of Zacharias, it is said his lot was to burn incense before the altar. 
And here our word ' lot' becomes a history in itself. We use it as applied to 
a field ; we call it a lot, because, originally, lands were divided by the appeal 
to God, and what was thus assigned to a man was his lot. In the same sense 
we speak of a man's lot in life. The original idea was that each man's position 
is appointed by God. So, when an apostle was to be appointed, the eleven, 
not by any special command, but because it was a common custom, made the 
choice by lot. ' They gave forth their lots, and the lot fell upon Matthias.' 

" The use of the lot is, in itself, not only not immoral, but, rightly used, 
is a religious act, a solemn appeal unto the perfect wisdom of God ; and as 
such has been ordered by God, and used and sanctioned by religious and 
prayerful people from the time of Moses downward to our own ; and is, in 
itself, just as far removed from gambling as is the act of prayer itself. 

" But if right in itself, was the occasion on which we employed it a proper 
one? 

" We admit that the object of the fair was a right and Christian one. That 
because much of the value was in articles too costly for one man to buy, there 
was great danger, or, perhaps, a certainty that a very large amount would 
remain unsold, to be sacrificed at auctions. To prevent this sacrifice and to 
secure the proper amount for the soldiers' benefit, individuals combined to pur- 
chase an article which no one felt inclined to do alone, paying its fair value, 
knowing that every dollar paid, but one, would be a donation to the funds of 
the fair, and intending it to be so, and satisfied with this as the equivalent ; 
and when the purchase was made, the lot, by mutual consent, decided the 
ownership. 

" This, I know, was the principle, and these were the motives, in which 
the use of the lot began among our own people. In principle and spirit, both, 
it was proper and Christian, so far as my judgment goes. There was no 
appeal to selfishness or to a mercenary spirit. The contributors gave their 
money as a donation, to prevent a sacrifice of funds. He who finally obtained 
the article was pleased, and the rest were perfectly satisfied. It was as far 
removed from gambling as the distribution by lot of the land of Canaan after 
it had been won by the hard purchase of war. 

" If the thing was abused if any bought their chance merely in the hope 
of winning they were gambling; and I have no defence to enter for such." 

Another branch of the argument was taken up by a correspondent of the 
New York "Spirit of the Fair," who made the following affecting appeal to 
those in authority : 



THE CASE SUBMITTED. 109 

" Messieurs et Mesdames the Committee : 

" Permit me, as one deeply interested in the success of the fair, and in that 
of the Sanitary Commission, which God speed in its good work, to call your 
attention to a matter of some importance. 

" Before the resolutions against raffling were announced, many ladies had 
made, as their donation to the fair, rare and beautiful fancy articles, as deli- 
cate as they were valuable. These they wished to dispose of at their real 
value, often amounting to a large sum. Now, let me ask, how can we do this, 
while raffling is rigorously and entirely excluded? With the exception of 
the more wealthy part of the community, people cannot afford to spend fifty 
or sixty dollars on a single fancy article, although, perfectly willing to acknowl- 
edge that it is worth the money ; and where they would gladly take a dollar 
share, go away without contributing their mite to the treasury. 

"Now, surely, if a man wins an afghan or a bouquet of wax flowers at a 
fair stall, he need not go and ruin his family at a faro-table. Assisting the 
soldier to fight our common enemy, is not an act likely to be associated with 
' fighting the tiger.' There need be no raffles at the Children's Department, 
if they are thought likely to lead the youthful mind out of the way it should 
go ; and surely, allowing beautiful articles to go to ruin in the dust, as they 
are now doing, to be finally disposed of at auction for a mere song, is not the 
best way to roll up a pile of substantial and much needed greenbacks. 

" Now do, most courteous, brave, and liberal signers and signoras, who have 
so well sustained your part in this our effort to aid our sanitary brethren, 
yield a little in this respect. Don't strain at such a gnat as a dollar share in a 
wax doll, while the tremendous camel of an army of sick and wounded men 
remains to be disposed of. 

"Our soldiers have been npt unready at that great lottery, the draft. Those 
on whom the lot fell went gladly and willingly to yield up their lives and 
their all in the service of our country. Let us, bearing this in mind, avail 
ourselves of the readiest means in our power to serve those ' who suffer that 
we may enjoy,' taking good heed meanwhile to enforce the weightier matters 
of the law, and be assured we shall be held blameless in this matter also. 

11 AN ASSISTANT AT THE FAIR." 

The case has thus been presented by the prosecuting attorney, and the 
counsel for the defence has been heard at length. To what judge and jury 
shall the decision be submitted ? To the ladies and gentlemen of the Mary- 
land State Fair, at Baltimore, half the proceeds of which were to go to the 



110 THE TRIBUTE BOOK 

Christian Commission ? They permitted raffling. To the ladies and gentle- 
men of the Great Central Fair at Philadelphia ? There was no raffling at this 
fair. Suppose we give the casting vote to Boston, a city renowned for sobri- 
ety and practical views. What was done in regard to raffles at the National 
Sailors' Fair, held many months after the case, as above argued, had been 
submitted to the country ? The people of Boston, then, who hold that it is not 
well to go to the theatre on Saturday evenings, whose play-houses, lately shut by 
law on those evenings, are now closed by common consent, decided that there 
was no gambling in sanitary raffling ; that the essential element, the desire to 
win, was wanting, and they therefore disposed of every article which did not 
otherwise obtain an owner, by raffles. Wares in infinite variety and num- 
bered by thousands were thus made to yield an ample revenue, and the par- 
ticipators, at least, do not believe that they or their neighbors are any the 
worse for it. These instances only show that the arguments have convinced 
no one, that all have maintained their original convictions, arid, as we said 
before, that public opinion is, and is likely to remain, divided. 

So much for general views. We now come to the details, as seen in the 
operations of the Aid Societies, nine-tenths of which are auxiliary to the San- 
itary Commission, some few being independent. There were, at one time, 
fifteen thousand of them, the most of them subject and tributary to some cen- 
tral society in their neighborhood, as the greater part of those of the State of 
Wisconsin are to that of Milwaukie. Want of space forbids our giving the 
reports of more than some thirty of them, but as these embrace the smaller 
societies, and as the whole ground is thus covered, the view obtained will be 
complete. The reader will hardly rise from the contemplation of these won- 
derful labors of women, without a new and expanded appreciation of the 
aptitudes and capacities of the sex which men, with derisive gallantry, have 
agreed to call "fair." Say that Niagara is "nice," and that the Mammoth 
Cave is "sweet," but let us talk of the fair sex no more. Look in at the 
nearest bee-hive and see who the drones are. They are the males, and they 
do no work. Let us say the wonderful sex, the well deserving sex, the sex 
that can set an example ; but let us not again seek to make of the least of 
woman's attributes her sole distinctive claim. 



CHAPTEK V. 



AID SOCIETIES AUXILIARY TO THE SAJSTITARY COMMISSION. 




OFFICE OF A SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY. 



WE now proceed to give, in order of date, brief sketches of the origin, 
labors, and sources of supply, of the more important Auxiliary Societies and 
Branches of the Sanitary Commission. Some of those mentioned have, it is 
true, acted independently for a time ; others have not always sent their sup- 
plies through the commission, making some particular regiment or hospital 
the recipient of an invoice from time to time ; but they have, nevertheless, 
generally acted in concert with the national organization. All exceptions to 
the rule are specified. The reader should be warned of a peculiarity, in the 
use of the word " article," in sanitary language. So many " articles " are said 
to have been made, collected, and forwarded by a society in a year. The 
article is a very variable quantity, and its size and value fluctuate with the 
importance of the society recording it. A village relief association considers 
a pickle an article ; a branch of the commission applies the same term to a 



112 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

jar of pickles. A sewing circle, having painfully elaborated a hundred yards 
of bandage, records them as a hundred articles ; at the receiving depot they 
may be registered as one package. So an article may be, in one place, a 
pound, and in another a firkin, of butter; a cake, and anon a box, of soap ; 
an article may be a can of sardines, a barrel of vinegar, a paper of pins ; it 
may be a pint bottle, a quart bottle, a demijohn, a keg, a hogshead, a pipe. 
As a general rule, the smaller the furnishing society the greater the subdivi- 
sion of the article. The reader thus placed upon his guard, we begin with the 
earlier societies, to which we have already incidentally referred. 

The women of Bridgeport, Connecticut, met together to roll bandages 
and prepare lint as early as the 15th of April, 1861 ; the LADIES' BELIEF 
SOCIETY was organized after the battle of Bull Run, the primary object being 
to furnish hospital stores to the Sixth Connecticut Regiment. Finding, how- 
ever, that they were able to do more, they sent of their abundance to other 
Connecticut regiments, to the Sanitary Commission, and to the hospitals at 
Washington. The next year the field of exertion was enlarged, and boxes 
were sent to Fortress Monroe, to Point Lookout, to Georgetown, to Alex- 
andria. The greater part of the articles furnished were from Bridgeport; 
but several of the neighboring towns and villages were laid under contri- 
bution. The society has met every week since the war began, the average 
attendance being twenty-five persons. Mrs. Woolsey G. Sterling was the 
first, and Mrs. Daniel Thatcher the second, President; Lydia R. Ward the 
Secretary. 

In three years and a half the society received and disbursed some 
$3,000 in money, made 902 shirts and drawers, and sent off over 13,000 
articles, not including magazines, old linen, cotton, and flannel. In one 
week after the battle of Gettysburg, nine boxes of clothing, jellies, etc., were 
dispatched. 

Miss Almena B. Bates, of Charlestown, Massachusetts, read the Presi- 
dent's call for men, on the afternoon of the 15th of April, and the idea at 
once occurred to her that some of the men must go from Charlestown, and 
that they would need aid and comfort from home. In the space of a few days 
Miss Bates had communicated her views to several ladies and gentlemen, 
and had caused a brief paper to be drawn up proposing the formation of a 
relief society, and setting forth its objects ; this paper was signed by a large 
number of ladies on the 19th of April, the day of the attack upon Massachu- 
setts troops in Baltimore. A constitution was read and adopted, and a board 
of officers for the year was chosen on the 22d, as follows : 



BUNKER HILL RELIEF SOCIETY. 



113 



President, 
MRS. HORACE G. HUTCHINS. 

Vice- President, 
MRS. WILLIAM L. HUDSON. 

Secretary, 
MRS. HENRY LYON. 

Treasurer, 
Miss ALMENA B. BATES. 

Executive Committee, 



MRS. PETER HUBBELL, 

' GEORGE E. ELLIS, 

' W. W. WHEILDON, 

' JAMES B. MILES, 

4 T. T. SAWYER, 

' R. WILLIAMS, 

4 GEORGE "W. LITTLE, 



MRS. R. FROTHINGHAM, 

' JOHN HURD, 

' GEORGE HYDE, 

' ARTHUR W. TCFTS, 

4 S. T. HOOPER, 

4 FRED'K THOMPSON, 

4 O. C. EVERETT. 



The receipts in money during the first year were $1,825, obtained entirely 
from private sources ; $900 of this were expended for materials, and $400 in 
aid to soldiers' families. The receipts in 
money for the second year were about $5,000, 
$1,300 of which came from the Bunker Hill 
Association of California, in recognition of 
which, bounty supplies were sent to the " Cal- 
ifornia Hundred." During this year 110 
boxes were sent to hospitals and soldiers' 
homes, and more than one hundred families 
received aid in money, food, clothing, fuel. 
At one meeting, held on the 9th of July, 
1862, one hundred and seventy persons were 
present, and 300 articles of clothing were 
made at a sitting. Special contributions ena- 
bled the society to do something for the sailors at the Navy Yard, and to 
fit up a Discharged Soldiers' Home, some $500 having been given for this 
latter purpose. The society has never been tributary to the Sanitary Com- 
mission, its purpose having been, from the first, that Charlestown supplies 
should reach, if possible, Charlestown soldiers. 

The receipts in money during the third year were over $3,600, California 




114 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

being again a generous contributor. The following table will show from what 
sources the society has drawn its funds : 

Cash from Dr. H. Lyon, collection taken at the Unitarian' Church $139 00 

" from G. E. Mackintire, Winthrop Church 125 63 

" from M. B. Sewall, Union M. E. Church 25 00 

" from Mrs. G. TV. Little, First Baptist Church 72 25 

" from Dr. and Mrs. Ellis 25 00 

" from T. T. Sawyer, Universalist Church 106 50 

" from Mrs. William Ilurd 20 00 

" from Nahum Chapin 25 00 

" from James Hunnewell 100 00 

" from Mrs. P. Hubbell, St. John's Church 74 70 

" from James Hunnewell 100 00 

" from Bunker Hill Association, California. 243 65 

" from T. T. Sawyer, for Mrs. O'Brien 25 00 

" from Misses Kettell and Brooks 6 50 

" from Dr. J. W. Bemis 20 00 

" from Mrs. T. T. Sawyer 25 00 

" from Charles A. Barker 25 00 

" from Dr. and Mrs. Ellis 25 00 

" from E. Collamore, New York 25 00 

" from A. Heath, from gentlemen's committee 110 00 

" from Misses Frothingham, Kent, and Neal 281 67 

" from James Hunnewell . 100 00 

" from T. T. Sawyer, from Foss fund 500 00 

" from Joseph Peirce, B. H. Association, California 500 00 

" from James Hunnewell 100 00 

" from Committee on Entertainments, etc 670 26 

" from James Hunnewell 100 00 

" from Mrs. Chester Guild, Somerville 20 00 

Contributions in sums less than Ten Dollars 57 50 



Total $3,647 66 

Two hundred families of soldiers were relieved ; large quantities of coal 
and wood were distributed, and 111 boxes forwarded to the army and the hos- 
pitals. Special funds were again contributed for the sailors and for the Dis- 
charged Soldiers' Home. Though the society, as such, did not take part in 
the Sanitary Fair at Boston, many citizens of Charlestown did, as individuals, 
and the Charlestown Table yielded a generous sum. The benefactions of the 
city have, from the beginning, been liberal in the extreme, and the reports of 
the Relief Society embrace, of course, but a small portion of the aid rendered, 
which has been given in many different ways and has flowed towards the 
army in numerous diverse channels. 

During the second and third years, Mrs. 0. C. Everett was President of the 
Society, and Mrs. T. T. Sawyer Vice-President, Mrs. Lyon and Miss Bates 



AID SOCIETY OF CLEVELAND. 115 

remaining Secretary and Treasurer. Mrs. Lyon became President in 1864, 
and Mrs. Peter Hubbell, Vice-President ; Mrs. Geo. H. Braman was appointed 
Eecording Secretary, and Mrs. S. S. Blanchard, Corresponding Secretaiy ; Miss 
Bates, as befitted the founder of the association, remained constant to the end. 
On the 20th of April, 1861, the SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF CLEVELAND 
was organized, with the following board of officers : 

President, 
MRS. B. ROUSE. 

Vice-Presiden ts, 
MRS. JOETN SHELLEY, MRS. WM. MELHINCH. 

Secretary, 
MARY CLARK BRAYTON. 

Treasurer, 
ELLEN F. TERRY. 

The first act of the society was to raise a fund for the temporary support 
of the families of the three months' men. The necessities of the recruits 
assembled in a neighboring camp of instruction next enlisted its sympathies ; 
ill clad, and unprepared for their new life, they required blankets and full 
supplies of clothing, and these the government was, as yet, unable to furnish. 
Havelocks were cut and made during the summer, and the hospital at Camp 
Dennison was fitted out with clothing sufficient for two regiments. These had 
been suddenly called for, and, as the society was without means, were paid 
for by two or three members only. 

In June, the association began to spread the information it had acquired, 
among the towns of Northern Ohio, by means of circulars. A determined 
effort was made to centralize the efforts of the women of that portion of the 
state; and as there was much natural ignorance to dispel, and much that might 
be better done in person than by letter, the president of the society visited 
toWns, villages, families, and neighborhoods, and by her advice, explanations, 
and appeals, did much to create that interest and sympathy which have made 
the fourteen counties tributary to Cleveland one of the richest of the sanitary- 
districts. A large office and store were placed, rent free, at the society's 
disposal, by their owner ; regular meetings were appointed, and the sum of 
twenty-five cents was exacted from each member at each meeting. The stores 
collected were, naturally, distributed in "Western camps and upor "Western 
battle-fields. 



116 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

As the work thus done augmented and as the opportunities for usefulness 
increased, the sense of responsibility deepened, and the hazards of transporta- 
tion and difficulties of guarding against waste impelled the society to seek 
some more extended and systematic plan of action. The Sanitary Commission 
stood ready to absorb and assimilate ; the Aid Society asked nothing better 
than absorption and assimilation. So the ladies of Cleveland proposed, and 
were accepted, and Mr. Olmsted wrote the letter of acceptance on the 16th of 
October. As an act of justice to the contributing counties, containing five 
hundred auxiliary associations, the society changed its name, and was there- 
after known as the " WOMAN'S SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF NORTHERN OHIO, 
Branch of the Sanitary Commission." The branch was ordered to report to 
Dr. Newberry, Associate Secretary of the West The number of articles 
received or made in the society in the first six months was nearly 70,000. 

The floating hospitals that sped upon western and southern rivers in 1862 
and '63 were, on several occasions, entirely freighted with the stores of the 
Cleveland branch, or with goods purchased by its authority at Cincinnati ; a 
portion of the Marine Hospital was opened for the reception of disabled sol- 
diers through its influence ; and a temporary Soldiers' Home was established 
for the convenience and comfort of passing regiments. In the fall of 1863, 
$2,000 were obtained for the special purpose of building an immense perma- 
nent Home : such a structure was put up, and soon afterwards gave meals and 
shelter to about two thousand soldiers a month. 

The official reports of this society furnish the following incident : 

" Every Saturday morning finds Emma Andrews, ten years of age, at the 
rooms of the Aid Society, with an application for work. Her little basket is 
soon filled with pieces of half-worn linen, which, during the week, she cuts 
into towels or handkerchiefs, and returns, neatly washed and ironed, at her 
next visit. Her busy fingers have already made two hundred and twenty- 
nine towels, and the patriotic little girl is still earnestly engaged in her 
work." 

The WOMEN'S RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF POUGHKEEPSIE, New York, 'was 
organized on the 24th of April, 1861, and has been in steady operation since 
that time, receiving the constant support of the people of the city, and regular 
contributions from aid societies in Dutchess and Ulster Counties. The follow- 
ing ladies have, at different times, served as officers of the association : 

Presidents, 

MRS. JOHN THOMPSON, MRS. WINTHROP ATWILL, 

u WM. HENRY CROSBY, JAMES WINSLOW. 



POUGHKEEPSIE AND EAST CAMBRIDGE. 117 

Treasurers, 

Miss SARAH M. CABPENTEE, Miss MAEY JOHNSTON, 

Miss MAET V. PAEKEE. 

Secretaries, 

MES. HENBY L. YOUNG, Miss SARAH SMITH, 

Miss JULIA N. CEOSBY. 

Vice-Presiden ts, 

MES. BENSON J. LOSSING, MES. RICHARD BAYLEY, 

" WM. HENBY CEOSBY, " GEOBGE WILKINSON, 

" WM. S. MOEGAN, " JOSEPH WEIGHT, 

" JAMES EMOTT, " EDWABD VAN VALKENBITEGH, 

" J. G. PABKEB, " GEOBGE INNIS, 

" WINTHEOP ATWILL, " H. G. EASTMAN. 

The society has received, in cash, about $4,000, and had forwarded on 
February 1st, 1865, for hospital and army use, one hundred and twenty-four 
boxes and barrels, of the estimated value of $13,500. 

The Poughkeepsie Fund for the Relief of Soldiers' Families, which was 
placed originally in the hands of a gentlemen's committee, was not long ago 
transferred to the Women's Association, a committee of which was appointed 
to attend to its disbursement. The amount raised for this object, since the 
commencement of the war, is nearly $25,000. 

Immediately after the battle of Gettysburg, a special committee of the 
citizens of Poughkeepsie was appointed to carry relief to the sufferers. About 
$2,000 were raised in view of this particular need. 

The ladies of East Cambridge, Massachusetts, met for the first time in 
April, 1861, to fit out Company A of the Massachusetts Sixteenth with flannel 
shirts, socks, towels, handkerchiefs, &c. For more than a year from this time, 
though a great deal of work was done, little or no account was kept of it or of 
its value. An organization was effected in September, 1862, the society Mrs. 
R. J. Knight, President numbering four hundred members, two hundred and 
thirty of whom were ladies. From this date to April, 1864, all its supplies 
were sent to the Sanitary Commission ; since April, they have been divided 
equally between the Sanitary and Christian Commissions. 

The following table will show from what sources the East Cambridge 
Society has drawn its funds : 

April, 1861. Subscriptions to fit out Company A, Sixteenth Regiment $327 39 

" Collection in Baptist Society 150 00 

" in Universalist Society 290 00 

" " in Methodist " 120 00 



118 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

April, 1861. Collection in Unitarian Society $472 45 

" " in Orthodox " 12500 

" Individual donations 1,000 00 

" Grammar schools' contribution 300 00 

1862. Assessments, subscriptions, and collections 709 25 

April, 1864. Proceeds of a social levee 618 00 

Nov., " Church collections for a Thanksgiving dinner for soldiers' families .. 14205 

Jan., 1865. Proceeds of a dramatic entertainment for soldiers and children 150 00 

" " Proceeds of an entertainment given by the Shakspeare class. ...... 200 00 

Total $4,604 14 

The SOLDIERS' AID ASSOCIATION OF HARTFORD, Connecticut, was organ- 
ized in May, 1861 ; its object was declared to be "the supplying of Connecti- 
cut soldiers with articles of necessity and comfort not provided by govern- 
ment." Its operations were at first conducted upon this plan; but, in its 
third year, the society, having found it to its advantage, and to that of 
Connecticut soldiers, to dispense its stores through the Sanitary Commission, 
sent more than half of its collections through that channel. Indeed, in the 
year 1863, out of the twenty-five Connecticut regiments in the field, only six 
of them received special donations from the Hartford Society. The following 
table shows the destination of the one hundred and seventy-seven boxes sent 
out by it during the year 1863 : 

To the Sanitary Commission 100 

To ten United States hospitals 26 

To Connecticut Relief Association, Washington 18 

To N. E. Relief Association, New York 2 

To Christian Commission 4 

To six Connecticut regiments 18 

To Nineteenth Regiment, U. S. Colored Troops 1 

Special relief 8 

Total 177 

Of the one hundred cases sent to the Sanitary Commission, twenty-three 
contained dried fruits, jellies, preserves, pickles, wine, and spirits. The 
wives and children of soldiers, not only in Hartford but elsewhere, were the 
recipients of the eight special relief boxes. From Mrs. Co wen's report for the 
year 1863 we make the following extract upon financial matters : " We find 
ourselves at the close of the year without a single unpaid obligation, with a 
small stock of materials still on hand, and a goodly balance in our treasury. 
We have also pledged to us for the coming year, in monthly subscriptions, 
not less than five hundred dollars per month, and, while our expenses average 
a thousand, we may safely rely upon casual contributions to make up that 



HARTFORD AID SOCIETY. 



119 



amount. To our steadfast friend, Mr. Alfred Smith, we owe this system of 
monthly payments, which, headed by himself in the noble sum of six hun- 
dred dollars per annum, has been extended and made more practical by the 
efficient exertions of Colonel Bunce, Mr. 
Cornish, Mr. Kobinson, and others." 

The society acknowledged its indebted- 
ness to Mr. Allyn and Gen. Hillyer, for 
rooms rent free ; to the Hartford Steamboat 
Company, for gratuitous transportation ; and 
to city expresses for the use of their wagons 
without charge. The following was the list 
of officers for the year 1863-4 : 




AID SOCIETY 8 Alt). 



First Directress, MRS. SIDNEY J. COWEN. 
Second " ROSWELL BROWN. 

Third " " A. F. HASTINGS. 

Secretary and Assistant Treasurer, 
MRS. S. J. COWEN. 

Recording Secretary, 
Miss S. L. BLANCHARD. 

Treasurer, 
MR. F. A. BROWN. 



MRS. J. H. ASHMEAD, 
" M. H. BTJELL, 

" WM. BOARDMAN, 

" G. I. BROWN, 

" E. COLEMAN, 

" F. CHAMBERLIN, 

" N. COLTON, 

" FOSTER, 
Miss L. GILLETTE, 
MRS. A. G. HAMMOND, 
Miss HARBISON, 
MRS. THERON IVES, 

" J. F. JUDD, 



Managers, 

MRS. P. JEWELL, 
" WM. T. LEE, 
" D. PHILLIPS, 
" W. W. KOBERTS, 
" N. STARKWEATHER, 
" ALLYN S. STILLMAN, 
" H. L. SUMNER, 
" W. T. STRICKLAND, 
" 0. A. TAFT, 

Miss MARY TALCOTT, 
" JANE WOODBRIDGE, 

MRS. OSWIN WELLS, 
" T. J. WORK. 



The cash donations for 1863 were as follows : 



From auxiliary societies $1,400 21 

" Tableaux 1,621 18 

" New Britain 1,32425 

" Alfred Smith 800 00 

" H. 0. Beckwith.. 675 00 



From Owen, Day & Root $500 00 

" Conn. Vols., 22d Reg. ... 463 64 

" Lee, Sisson & Co 300 00 

" Day, Griswold & Co 200 00 

" Thomas Smith . . 175 00 



120 


THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 


From 


Mrs. Warburton 


$150 00 


From 


J. B. Hosmer 


$55 00 


u 


Collins Brothers & Co 


150 00 


it 


A Friend, Mrs. T 


50 00 


M 


H. A. Perkins 


125 00 


it 


Lucius Barber 


50 00 


U 


Mrs. James Goodwin 


125 00 


tt 


Judge Ellsworth 


50 00 


u 


balance of Commissary 




a 


E. Fessenden 


50 00 




funds, by G. P. Bissell. . 


115 00 


u 


Mrs. E. Flower 


50 00 


u 


J. G. Batterson 


100 00 


it 


John Hooker 


50 00 


u 


Thomas Belknap 


100 00 


tt 


P. Jewell & Sons 


50 00 


u 


Kobert Buell 


100 00 


it 


J. F. Judd & Co 


50 00 


u 


Charles H. Brainard 


100 00 


it 


George Perkins 


50 00 


u 


James G. Bolles 


100 00 


tt 


Charles Seymour 


50 00 


H 


Beach & Co 


100 00 


tt 


N. Shipman 


50 00 


u 


Joseph Church 


100 00 


tt 


S. G. Tuttle 


50 00 


If 


David Clark 


100 00 


tt 


Miss Mary W. Wells 


50 00 


u 


Mr. Niles 


100 00 


it 


Samuel Mather 


50 00 


u 


E. Flower 


100 00 


it 


Invalid Dinner 


47 50 


(( 


Wm. H. Green 


100 00 


it 


Miss Ellen Watkinson .... 


45 00 


M 


James Goodwin 


100 00 


it 


Oswin Wells 


40 00 


u 


Hungerford & Cone 


100 00 


tt 


Smith, Bourne & Co 


37 50 


u 


Hillyer & Bunce 


100 00 


it 


Mrs. T. S. Williams 


30 00 


u 


Hunt, Holbrook & Barber 


100 00 


tt 


Edward Wells 


30 00 


u 


E. K Kellogg & Co 


100 00 


it 


John Beach 


25 00 


14 


Henry Keney 


100 00 


it 


Jonathan Bunce 


25 00 


u 


Wm. T. Lee 


100 00 


tt 


Mrs. Leonard Church .... 


25 00 


u 


C. M. Pond 


100 00 


it 


C. C. Lyman 


25 00 


u 


Starr, Burkett & Co 


100 00 


tt 


Talcott & Post 


25 00 


(( 


F.Tyler 


100 00 


it 


Mrs. Edwin S. Tyler 


25 00 


(1 


Eobert Watkinson 


100 00 


it 


C. S. Weatherby & Co. . . 


25 00 


(1 


Calvin Day 


100 00 


it 


Lieut.-Col. Burnham 


20 00 


(( 


E. E. Goodridge & Co .... 


91 74 


it 


Foster & Co 


20 00 


u 


D. Phillips 


90 00 


tt 


Appleton R. Hillyer 


20 00 


u 


Bolles, Sexton & Co 


75 00 


it 


Mrs. C. T. Hillyer 


20 00 


It 


Cheney Brothers 


75 00 


tt 


Miss Lusk 


20 00 


II 


James L. Howard & Co. . . 


75 00 


tt 


W. K Matson 


20 00 


14 


L. C. Ives 


75 00 


it 


Aaron Pierson 


20 00 


u 


N. Kingsbury 


75 00 


tt 


L. H. Porter 


20 00 


II 


J. C. Parsons 


75 00 


u 


S. S. Ward 


20 00 


It 


President Eliot 


70 00 


tt 


Mrs. Edwin Taylor 


20 00 


it 


Avails of Children's Fair . 


61 66 


tt 


Mrs. L. F. Sargeant 


20 00 


it 


Mrs. Russell Bunce 


60 00 


All others 


564 74 


u 


Leonard Church 


60 00 










Total 








$13,252 42 



On the 13th of May, 1861, a meeting of the ladies of Lockport, New York, 
was held for the purpose of concerting measures to provide for the comfort of 
the four companies of the Thirty-eighth New York Eegiment, raised in Lock- 
port. On the 18th of June, the LADIES' VOLUNTEER AID SOCIETY was organ- 
ized, with the following officers : Mrs. B. A. McNall, President ; Mrs. James 
Ferguson, Yice-President ; Mrs. E. Gridley, Secretary; Miss Julia A. Shuler, 



NEWBURGH AID SOCIETY. 



121 



Treasurer. Some six months afterwards, Mrs. Ferguson became President, Mrs. 
Dr. Caldvvell, Yice-President, and Mrs. Charles Craig, Secretary. These ladies, 
with Miss Shuler as Treasurer, continued in office to the end of the war. The 




6TRAWBEEEY FESTIVAL FOK THE SOLDIERS. 



society has sent the greater part of its supplies through the Sanitary Commis- 
sion, though it has done a vast deal of incidental work, such as furnishing 
particular regiments with necessaries, contributing stores to hospitals in Wash- 
ington, distributing relief among soldiers' families, making collections in 
behalf of individuals specially needing or deserving assistance, and giving 
dinners and festivals to departing and returning regiments and batteries. 

The SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF NEWBURGH, New York, was organized 
on the 30th of July, 1861. The first box was sent to Washington, but the 
second, and thenceforward all its supplies, with an occasional exception, were 
sent to the Sanitary Commission, through the Women's Central Belief Asso- 
ciation. In the winter of 1863 the society undertook to do something for the 
relief of soldiers' families, and has since given out all garments to their wives 



122 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

and daughters to make. It has furnished ten thousand pieces of various 
kinds, and fifty boxes and barrels of wines, jellies, cordials, &c. The following 
is a list of its officers for 1865 : 

President, 
MRS. A. D. FORSYTH; 

Vice- President, 
MRS. E. HASBROUCK ; 

Treasurer of Hospital Fund, 
MRS. C. B. HEURTLEY; 

Treasurer of Family Relief Fund, 
MRS. M. F. 0. STRONG; 

Secretary, 
MRS. E. "W. SAUNDERS ; 

with a board of managers selected from the various churches. To two funds, 
for hospital and family relief, some $8,000 had, a short time since, been con- 
tributed. 

The SOLDIERS' BELIEF COMMITTEE OF WORCESTER, Massachusetts, was 
organized on the 1st of October, 1861, by the election of the following officers : 

President, 
MRS. CHARLES WASIIBURN. 

Secretary, 
MRS. E. C. B. MILLER. 

Treasurer, 
MRS. WM. DICKINSON. 

Two ladies from each religious society in the city formed the committees 
for cutting out work, making up packages, &c. The first year, eighty boxes 
and twelve barrels of clothing and hospital supplies were forwarded, the con- 
tents being about ten thousand articles, besides large quantities of delicate 
food. Numerous towns and villages were tributary to "Worcester in this 
work. 

At the commencement of the second year, Mrs. Miller resigned, and Mrs. 
E. A. Goodwin became Corresponding Secretary, and Miss Mary Bigelow, 
Eecording Secretary. During this year, one hundred and sixty-two boxes 
and barrels were sent to the front and to the several commissions, their con- 
ents being fourteen thousand articles. A Soldiers' Eest, consisting of two 
rooms, was established during this year. The rent was at first given by Mr. 



TOLEDO AID SOCIETY. 



123 



Freeland, the owner of the building, and was afterwards paid by the city. 
The rooms were furnished from the proceeds of a collection; the wages of 
the man in charge were paid by the Gentlemen's Eelief Committee, and meals 
were sent with generous frequency from the refreshment saloon in the railroad 
station. 

During the third year, the number of boxes and barrels rose to two 
hundred and sixty, and the number of articles contained in them to fifteen 
thousand. The number of towns and villages acting as auxiliaries was con- 
stantly increasing, till they were no less than fifty-five. The following table 
gives a view of the sources upon which the society drew, and of the extent to 
which their calls were honored : 



FIRST YEAR. 



From individual subscriptions. . 
" Gentlemen's Relief Fund . 

" Churches 

" adjoining towns 

" ladies' levee. . 



.$286 44 
. 87 75 
. 46 10 
. 30 00 
. 696 24 



From private theatricals $75 54 

" children's concert 5 00 

" collection box . . 32 64 



Total $1,259 71 



SECOND YEAR. 



From Gentlemen's Relief Fund . 

" the city 

" private theatricals 

" calico ball 

" dancing school exhibition. 
" Charlton. . , 



1,251 00 
100 00 
375 00 
291 91 
39 44 
150 00 



From other towns $162 58 

" Sons of Temperance 11 05 

u First Unitarian Society .... 25 00 

" individuals 371 85 

" little girls' fairs, &c 22 04 



Total $2,699 87 



THIRD YEAR. 



From Worcester County Fair . . . 

" Sales at Rest 

" Gentlemen's Relief Fund. 

" Children's Fair 

" Schools 

" All Saints' Church . . 



J,158 60 
47 15 
70 38 
28 40 
4 41 
46 00 



From a lecture by Capt. Hussey. . $23 27 

" interest on bonds 231 47 

" individuals 543 41 

" collection box 19680 

" Clappville, &c 1730 

Total . $4,367 19 



The SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF TOLEDO, Ohio, was organized on the 9th 
of October, 1861, and at once became an auxiliary of the Cleveland Branch 
of the Sanitary Commission. The following was the board of officers for the 
first year: 

President, 
MRS. S. A. RAYMOND. 

Vice-Presiden ts, 
MRS. J. K STEVENS, MRS. E. PERIGO. 



124 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Treasurers, 
MRS. 0. E. WINANS (resigned in May), Miss E. R. BISSELL. 

Secretaries, 

MRS. ALEX. REED, Recording Secretary (resigned in May), 
MES. M. R. WAITE. MBS. J. R. OSBORNE, Cor. Sec'y. 

Directors. 

MRS. WM. KRATTS, Toledo. MRS. ENSIGN, East Toledo. 

A. D. PELTON, ' " CRANE, " " 

E. P. BASSETT, ' " WM. TAYLOR, Java, Lucas Co. 

D. STEELE, ' Miss TRACY, Tremainsville. 

"W. BAKER, ' MRS. G. W. REYNOLDS, Maumee. 

D. E. MERRILL, ' " LIMBERICK, " 

DR. BIGELOW, ' Miss Dix, 

M. RATHBUN, ' MRS. PERRIN, Perrysburg. 

Miss K. SHOEMAKER, ' " WESTCOTT, " 
" L. BRONSON, 



i 



This society has been, from the first, a most efficient one, and has shown 
as much tact in obtaining money as judgment in disbursing it. Now by a 
Continental Tea Party, anon by a Union Eally, and throughout the war by 
memberships and donations, they have kept their exchequer full ; and they 
have as pertinaciously sought to empty it. Once it was empty, or would 
have been, had not a gentleman, who was then, is now, and perhaps always 
will be unknown, given five hundred reasons for believing the contrary. It 
is plain that however numerous the bayonets the city may have sent forth, at 
least one Toledo blade was left at home. Mrs. J. T. Newton was President 
of the society during its second and third years. 

The first action taken in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in aid of the army, was the 
holding of a meeting of ladies on the 19th of October, 1861. They adopted 
the name of Ladies' Association of Milwaukee for the Aid of Military Hospi- 
tals ; afterwards, when events showed that aid could be as effectually rendered 
to the soldier at the front as to the invalid in the hospital, this was changed 
to that of SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF MILWAUKEE. 

The following officers were chosen for the first year : 

President, 
MRS. C. A. KEELER. 

Vice- Presidents, 
MRS. ALEX. MITCHELL, MRS. W. B. HIBBARD. 

Recording Secretary, 
MRS. WILLIAM JACKSOX. 



MILWAUKEE AID SOCIETY. 



125 



MRS. J. P. T. INGRAHAM, 
CASTLEMAN, 
A. GREEN, 
A. J. AIKENS, 
J. A. LAPHAM, 
R. D. JENNINGS, 
"W. BURKE, 
CHAS. CAIN, 

W. L. HlNSDALE, 

T. M. GWYNN, 
C. 0. OLIN, 



Corresponding Secretary, 
MRS. JOSEPH S. COLT. 

Treasurer, 
MRS. JOHN NAZRO. 

Managers, 

MRS. M. FINCH, 
" J. INBUSCH, 
" R. AUSTIN, 
" WALDO, 
" NASH, 

Miss BRADFORD, 

MRS. GEO. II. WALKER, 
' BUTTON, 
' DELAFIELD, 
' G. P. HEWITT, 
1 W. D. LOVE, 

' HUBBELL, 



MRS. FURLONG, 

B. McVlCKAE, 

SHANKS, 

WM. ALLEN, 

STAPLES, 

JAMES HOLTON, 

TWEEDY, 

W. SANDERSON, 

ODY, 

JAS. HOSFORD, 

S. H. MARTIN. 



Wisconsin being a large and, of course, sparsely settled state, it required 
time to establish auxiliaries in the numerous and widely separated towns, 
villages, and neighborhoods, and to enter into relations with them as the 
central society. This was effected, however in a great degree through the 
zeal of Mrs. Colt, the Corresponding Secretary and in 1864 three hundred 
Aid Societies sent their offerings through the parent association ; these 
consisted of no less than two thousand nine hundred and eighteen boxes, 
containing clothing and stores of the value of $50.000. "Wisconsin bore an 
honorable part also in the fairs at Chicago, St. Louis, and Dubuque. The 
following summary, from a late official report, speaks fof itself. 

" We have sent supplies to the hospitals in- our state, particularly to the 
Harvey Hospital, in which we take a peculiar interest. 

"Our commission gave to every wounded man that could be reached after 
the battle of Eesaca a fresh orange or lemon, to assuage the burning thirst 
which invariably follows wounds. 

" We have poured down the Cumberland, Tennessee, and Mississippi, from 
Wisconsin, two thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven barrels of pickles 
and other anti-scorbutics, upon the first call. In six months our gifts have 
amounted to more than $25,000 in value, and this from a state with no large 
cities and not a rich population. 

" The gentlemen of Milwaukee, with their usual generosity, have stood by 
us, believed in us, and, more essential than all, supported us nobly. 

" Our auxiliaries have responded at once to all our calls, and they have been 



126 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

many ; at least nine hundred circulars have in three months been sent to 
every part of the state, and not in vain. 

" We have carefully repacked every article, looking them over with much 
interest, knowing how much of heart and touching tenderness there was in 
every box. Every barrel of late potatoes was opened, assorted, and the eyes 
rubbed off, before going to the hospitals. 

" We have paid $967 for soldiers' families in transituand various purchases 
not included in hospital supplies. 

"It will be seen by the Treasurer's report, that with the capital given us, 
with the help of auxiliaries, we have produced large results. It will also be 
seen that, without a fair, Wisconsin gives the Sanitary Commission, through 
the Northwestern Branch, at least $50,000 or $60,000 a year. 

"There are several important places that on account of locality send 
directly to Chicago, and they are not reported here, which would no doubt 
swell the aggregate value to several thousand more." 

The following statement, that of the year 1864, will show from what 
sources the Milwaukee Society derives its ready money, with which to furnish 
auxiliaries with material, to purchase anti-scorbutics, and to move and apply 
the stores thus obtained : 

From weekly and monthly contributions and donations from the citizens of 

Milwaukee $8,683 95 

Thanksgiving offerings 109 00 

soldiers' aid societies, 1st six months 832 14 

" " 2d " 873 15 

churches 195 30 

church festivals 64 13 

Mr. G. H. McVickar, of the Chicago Theatre 100 00 

a concert at Grand Eapids 11 00 

an amateur entertainment at Milwaukee 479 25 

the young men of Racine College 81 50 

the Skating Park Fund 99 18 

Fond du Lac 400 00 

Mr. James E. Murdock's two lectures for soldiers' wives and families 397 38 

all other sources.. 886 92 



Total $13,212 90 

The name of Mr. James E. Murdock occurs in the above table, in which 
he is reported to have given the proceeds of two readings, nearly $400, to the 
Milwaukee Society. The efforts of Mr. Murdock, with whose career as an 
actor and elocutionist all are familiar, to rouse the enthusiasm of the young 
men of the country, and to sustain it when exposed to discouragement, his 



MR. MURDOCH'S READINGS. 



127 



labors in behalf of the aid societies from one end of the land to the other, 
entitle him to more than this passing notice. Mr. Murdock arrived at Pitts- 
burgh, to fulfil a professional engagement, during the week which followed the 
attack upon Fort Sumter. He there learned that his youngest son had enlisted 




MR. MURDOCH BEADING TO 8OLDIEKS IN A HOSPITAL. 



in a regiment of Zouaves, and was on his way to Washington. He threw up 
his engagement and hastened after him. He overtook him at Lancaster, and 
finding him resolved to persevere in his course, confirmed his determination 
by giving him his blessing. The regiment called upon Mr. Murdock for a 
speech, and the remarks which he made in reply had, whatever their influence 
upon others, a remarkable effect upon himself. The counsel he gave to his 
audience he took to heart, and having preached, determined to practise. He 
abandoned his profession, resolved to devote his time and energies to the cause 
of his country until the restoration of union and peace. This resolution he 
has religiously adhered to. No man has done more, by reading and delivering 
patriotic poems and war lyrics, to raise the enthusiasm of his hearers ; no man 
has done more, by recitations in the hospitals, to sustain and fortify against 
despondency the sick and wounded; and no man has done as much in aid of 



128 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

the treasuries of relief and benevolent associations, by exercising a special 
profession in their behalf. Mr. Murdock's readings have sent many a recruit 
to the armies, have nerved him in the hour of danger, and comforted him in 
time of suffering. Since the war commenced, Mr. Murdock has read or spoken 
before at least three hundred thousand persons ; he has recited " The Sleeping" 
Sentinel" almost under the enemy's guns, and told the story of "The Cumber- 
land" to men who forgot their hunger in their emotion, and who waved defiance 
with their crutches. There is hardly an aid society in the North that has not 
been indebted to one of Mr. Murdock's entertainments for sums varying from 
fifty to three hundred dollars, and the aggregate can be told only by tens of 
thousands. Mr. Murdock has published a small book of extracts from his 
lectures and readings for the benefit of soldiers' families. 

The son from whom Mr. Murdock parted at Lancaster was successively 
made lieutenant and captain, for gallantry at Shiloh and Stone River. He 
fell at the head of the line of battle at Chickamauga, and lies buried under the 
sod of that bloody field. An elder brother, captain at Chickamauga, came out 
of that terrible struggle alive, but so shattered in health that he was compelled 
to leave the army. Mr. Murdock himself has been in the thirty days' service, 
and has acted upon the staff of General Rousseau. In November, 1864, Mr. 
Murdock received an ovation at the hands of the Cincinnatians, and a flag at 
the hands of General Hooker. " Not a sanitary commission in the west," said 
the mayor, on this occasion, " but has had its stores increased by the labors of 
Mr. Murdock; not a hospital but has been, directly or indirectly, strengthened 
in its usefulness by his unfaltering endeavors." 

The LADIES' UNION AID SOCIETY of Auburn, New York, was organized 
on the 21st of October, 1861. The following ladies have served as its officers 
from time to time : as President, Mrs. Hewson and Mrs. Merriman ; as Vice- 
President, Mrs. B. F. Hall, Mrs. Cox, and Mrs. Titus ; as Treasurer, Mrs. O. F. 
Knapp and Mrs. Perry ; as Secretary, Mrs. P. P. Bishop and Mrs. C. P. Under- 
wood. Miss Lillie Condit was made assistant secretary in the second year. 
The first managers were : 

MRS. NELSOX, MRS. COBB, MRS. POMEEOY, 

" CORNELL, " CHEDELL, " BARTLETT. 

Since its foundation, the society has collected about $7,500 in money, and 
has received, prepared, and forwarded some $13,000 worth of supplies. A 
treasurer's report, taken at random that for the third year, for instance 
gives a glimpse of the society's resources : 



ALBANY RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 



129 



Individual contributions $592 00 

Monthly collections 222 83 

Proceeds of Mr. Bishop's Poem . . 73 60 

Donation from Mr. Chas. P. Wood 25 00 

Donation from St. Peter's Church 60 00 

Donation from Methodist Church . 14 45 
Donation from the Universalist 

Church 52 70 

Donation from Mr. George Letch- 
worth 20 00 

Net proceeds of First and Second 

Concerts. . . 298 30 



Donation from Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association $50 00 

Donation from Owasco School Dis- 
trict 43 00 

Donation from Woolen Factory . . 55 00 
Donation from Mr. Rufus Sargent. 25 00 
Donation from Hayden & Letch- 
worth 50 00 

Net proceeds of Third Concert. . . 153 80 

Donation from D. M. Osborn & Co. 200 00 

Net proceeds of Collation 516 20 



Total $2,451 88 



The reader cannot be too often reminded that not a tithe of the total 
contributions of a city or town appears in the returns of its local aid or relief 
society. What is given to the several commissions forms, of course, part 
of their receipts, and appears in their acknowledgment ; but much has been 
done that has not been recorded, and much has been forgotten, whether 
recorded or not. 

On the 1st of November, 1861, a society of ladies called THE ARMY 
BELIEF ASSOCIATION, was organized in Albany, New York, the members of 
the Executive Committee being as follows : 



MRS. E. D. MORGAN, President. 

" WM. BARNES, Secretary. 

" WM. B. SPRAGUE, 

" E. P. ROGERS, 

" S. T. SEELYE, 

" RAY PALMER, 

" MARK TRAFTON, 

" A. D. MAYO, 

" J. McNACGHTON, 

" CHAS. M. JENKINS, 



MRS. GEO. H. THACHER, 
" ELI PERRY, 
" THOMAS Hun, 
" JACOB LANSING, 
" RANSOM, 
" JAMES HALL, 
" OTIS ALLEN, 
" GEO. B. STEELE, 
Miss C. PRUYN, 
CHAS. B. REDFIELD, Treasurer. 



This society has acted from the first as an auxiliary of the Sanitary Com- 
mission, and during its first year forwarded ninety-seven boxes of hospital 
stores and clothing, and among them one thousand pillow-cases, made by Miss 
Skerritt's pupils, and four hundred and forty sheets, made by the young ladies 
of the Female Academy. Over $1,000 were received from the churches of 
the city, by means of collections taken after the battles of South Mountain 
and Antietam. The cash receipts for the year were nearly $2,500. 

During the second year Mrs. Morgan resigned, and was succeeded by Mrs. 
Horatio Seymour. Seventy boxes were dispatched during this year, and 



130 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

$1,750 received. Early in 1863 the secretary of the society was appointed 
Associate Manager of the Sanitary Commission, and it became a part of her 
duty to ascertain whether there was a Soldiers' Aid Society in eveiy town of 
Albany and Schoharie Counties, and to urge the formation of one where none 
existed, and to endeavor to make all, whether old or new, auxiliaries of the 
commission. A good deal of indifference was met and combated, and 
several societies were organized ; and in places where this proved impossible, 
two or three earnest women would be found, who would agree to collect- 
supplies individually in their villages and send them to Albany. 

In the third year, the society received $15,000 of the proceeds of the Army 
Belief Bazaar, $6,000 of which were expended in the purchase of material. 
Fifty-one boxes were forwarded. 

The SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY of Columbus, Ohio, was organized on the 
21st of October, 1861, as a branch of the Sanitary Commission. Its money 
receipts have been about $7,000 a year, and relief to soldiers' families has 
formed a large part of its work. The officers for 1864 were as follows : 

President, 
MRS. W. I. KUHNS. 

Vice- Presidents, 
MRS. S. J. HAVER, MRS. L. J. WEAVER. 

Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, 

MRS. MARY C. HANFORD, MRS. GEO. W. HEYL. 

Treasurer, 
MRS. JOSEPH H. GEIGER. 

Purchasing Committee, 
MRS. GEO. GEIGER, MRS. JAS. BEEBE, MRS. ALEX. HOUSTON. 

Hospital Committee, 
MRS. DR. JONES, MRS. HAVER. 

The NEW ENGLAND WOMEN'S AUXILIARY ASSOCIATION was organized in 
Boston on the 12th of December, 1861, with the following board of officers : 

President, Vice- President, 

JOHN WARE. SAMUEL G. HOWE. 

Secretary, Treasurer, 

EUFUS ELLIS. GEORGE HIGGINSON. 

The object was to centralize the efforts of the women of New England, 
and to draw them into closer communion with the Sanitary Commission 



THE NEW ENGLAND WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION. 131 

not only to augment the products of their labor, but to guide them into what 
was believed to be the most direct channel of communication with the army. 
During the year seven hundred and fifty auxiliary societies were formed in 
the towns, villages, and neighborhoods of New England, all zealous in 
collecting money and donations, in cutting and making soldiers' clothing, and 
in forwarding them to the central society in Boston. Correspondence was 
maintained with each subordinate association, information received from 
Washington was circulated at once throughout the country, and every sewing- 
circle was duly informed of what were the prospective needs of the army, 
so that no unnecessary stitches might be set. Nearly one hundred associate 
managers were appointed, one, and in some cases two, for every considerable 
town in the New England States. These ladies came into personal relations 
with thousands who could not have been as effectively reached by letter, 
combating and dispelling doubts, meeting and courting inquiry, and reporting 
progress to head-quarters. Ladies and gentlemen met daily at 22 Summer 
Street, to unpack, assort, repack and forward stores. Other ladies met to cast 
accounts, to keep formidable records of debt and credit, to write letters by the 
hundred, to acknowledge the receipt of boxes innumerable. 

The rooms occupied by the association brought their owner no rent ; the 
barrels and boxes sent from Summer Street paid the railroad and express 
companies no freight. During the first year the Industrial Committee cut 
over 84,000 articles, giving them out to sewing-circles or to poor seamstresses, 
the latter being paid for their work, but not from the fancies of the association. 
Many persons who had already given the material, gave the labor also, by 
proxy ; and, in these cases, the needle-women received a fair living price for 
their work. The association forwarded some 325,000 articles, receiving from 
individuals and societies, from musical, theatrical and other entertainments, 
and from children's fairs, a little over $29,000. It had also been entrusted 
with $3,000 by the Sanitary Commission for the purchase of material. 

During the second year, the association forwarded 255,000 articles, 
distributed 42,000 pamphlets, and received $65,000. The Industrial Com- 
mittee cut 29,000 pieces a piece being now a bed-sack, now a shirt, now 
a pair of slippers, now a sheet, now a pair of drawers, and now a pillow-case. 
The material for the 29,000 articles cost $27,000, the labor, as before, costing 
nothing, or if a portion was paid for, it was not a matter for official record. 
The operations of the society during the third and a part of the fourth years 
proceeded on a scale somewhat larger than during the first and second. 

From a monthly report of Abby W. May, Chairman of the Executive 



132 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Committee, we make the following extract, which we believe no man can read 
without profit, and which will enlarge the ideas of some men as much as 
would the European tour : 

" The second month of the new year has passed very quietly, leaving us 
nothing new or strange to record. Our work has gone steadily on in New 
England; and from the Canada line sometimes indeed overrunning the 
boundaries to our Southern borders, from the most eastern snow-banks of 
Maine to our western limit, have come well-filled boxes, 243 in all, of 
comforts for the soldiers and sailors of our mighty army. Each day the ever- 
welcome postman has brought us the pile of letters, full of intelligence, of 
sympathy and of determination, which daily strengthen us anew for our 
work, and fill us with rejoicings, for the soldiers' sake, that such an interest in 
their welfare is so fully established everywhere in our land. 

"Does some one sneeringly say 'we are very far in the rear?' No! we 
deny the rebuff. The women of America have stood ready to go into the 
fore front of the battle. Their sympathies, their prayers have been there. 
Who will dare to say this is of small account in the fighting power of our 
men ? They have been present in person on the field, where need of their 
services existed. Witness the labors of Amy Bradley, of Helen Gilson, of 
' Mother Bickerdyke,' and many another Florence Nightingale of America. 
They have blessed scores of hospitals with their quiet ministrations. And 
hundreds of women have stood, and still stand, ready to do similar service, 
whenever the need occurs. But they have been the fortunate few whose 
presence has been needed on the field the one in a thousand. What have 
the other nine hundred and ninety-nine been doing? Almost to a woman they 
have labored faithfully at home, giving money when they had it to give 
giving costlier and more precious offerings of time and thought and strength 
to the cause that is as dear to the women as to the men of America. 

" Does it seem to savor a little of self-glorification that we, a committee of 
women, should speak thus of woman's part in our great contest ? We can 
only say we have no such thought or feeling. Our work is easy a privilege, 
not a sacrifice. But we long to do justice to the women's work as it comes 
before our eyes, as it is confided to our hands. We long to tell to every one 
what our letters and the contents of the boxes tell to us. It is a story 
unmatched, we believe, certainly unsurpassed in the life of the race full of 
simplicity, sincerity, and heartiness, whose details can never be told, but 
whose result is a daily blessing to all who share in it, and an inheritance of 
which coming generations may well be proud." 



THE RHODE ISLAND RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 133 

And if The Tribute Book shall prove of any assistance, even the slightest, 
in collecting and preserving for the use of the historian any of the fugitive 
chronicles that might otherwise be lost, its purpose will be fully attained. 

Mr. R M. Larned's first annual report of the EHODE ISLAND BELIEF 
ASSOCIATION, made October 29th, 1862, was for several reasons a peculiarly 
interesting document, the vicinity of the Portsmouth Grove Hospital to its 
head-quarters, at Providence, rendering it especially so. The report stated that 
$8,000 in cash had been received and expended, and that four thousand men 
at the hospital had been cared for. A large number of very sick soldiers had 
been sent, by mistake, to this hospital, before the government had made any 
preparation for their reception. The whole labor and responsibility was thus 
thrown upon the Rhode Island Agency, and their duties, which were intended 
to be merely supplementary, were made to include the entire supply and carry- 
ing on of the hospital. Fortunately, they were equal to the burden thus un- 
expectedly thrown upon them. In four months they furnished Portsmouth 
Grove, in round numbers, with 1,000 sheets, 4,000 cotton shirts, 1,300 woolen 
undershirts, 2,100 pairs of cotton and woolen drawers, 1,100 pairs of woolen 
socks, 3,300 towels, 700 beds, 700 pairs of shoes and slippers, 3,500 
combs, &c., &c. Having thus supplied the wardrobe, they were obliged to 
furnish the larder also. Chests of tea, kegs of pepper, barrels of sugar, 
boxes of lemons, 50 barrels of onions, 1,300 pounds of codfish, 60 barrels of 
alppes, 18 boxes of soap, that should have been bought by the government, 
were sent without charge by the agency. Mrs. J. J. Cooke, of Elmwood, 
sent three barrels of tomatoes every day during the season. In addition to this 
work at Portsmouth Grove, the agency forwarded to the central office, at 
Washington, 321 packages, valued at about $40,000. The only item of 
expense charged to the commission during this year of extraordinary labor 
was fifteen dollars, paid to the porter for packing goods. 

From the date of the above report, in October, '62, to May, '63, when Mr. 
Larned's department was restricted to the collecting and disbursing of cash 
donations, boxes containing supplies valued at $10,000 were sent to Wash- 
ington, and elsewhere. In May, the supply department was united with the 
corresponding department of the LADIES' VOLUNTEER RELIEF ASSOCIATION 
of Providence, a society founded in August, 1861, to minister to the wants 
of the soldiers, in the first place, and in the second, to furnish employment to 
poor women, especially the wives of soldiers, by taking contracts from the 
government. From the organization of the society to the period when the 
two societies were united, nearly two years, 126 cases of garments and hospital 



134 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

supplies were sent to Rhode Island regiments in the field, to hospitals in 
Washington, to Portsmouth Grove, and to the Sanitary Commission. 

After the battle of Shiloh, several thousand dollars were obtained by 
subscription in Providence, and expended in the purchase of cloth. This 
was made into garments by the ladies of the association, and sent to the 
Western army. Portsmouth Grove Hospital and the Invalid Corps in 
barracks were furnished with well-stocked libraries. 

The two societies, when merged together, were known as the Ehode Island 
Relief Association, auxiliary to the Sanitary Commission, and the various 
city and state societies were invited to affiliate with it; a large portion 
acceded to the request, the Newport Aid Society, however, preferring to act 
independently, as before. The last report of Mrs. Abby W. Chace, President 
of the Rhode Island Relief Association, estimates the value of the work done, 
supplies furnished, and money raised by her society, at $ 77,750. 

The FIFTH WARD VOLUNTEER RELIEF ASSOCIATION of Providence, Mrs. 
Sarah Ann Cook, Secretary, was formed immediately after the battle of Bull 
Run, being the first organization of the kind in Rhode Island. Up to January 
1st, 1865, it had forwarded to the army $ 9,000 worth of supplies. 

The OLD CAMBRIDGE SANITARY SOCIETY was organized in October, 1861, 
and has been from the first an auxiliary of the Boston branch. It had, at the 
commencement of 1865, collected, packed, and forwarded one hundred and 
fifty-nine boxes, barrels, and bundles, and had occasionally sent a package of 
linen or lint to St. Louis. Its money collections have been about $9,000. 
Two circles of young ladies, the Slipper Circle and the Handkerchief Circle, 
have been very efficient in their peculiar sphere or, as we might say, in the 
circumference of their duties. The society was reorganized in 1865, the fol- 
lowing officers being chosen : 

President, 
MRS. ASA GBAY. 

Treasurer, Secretary, 

MRS. J. P. COOKE. Miss ELIOT. 

Executive Committee, Purchasing Committee, 

MRS. H. W. PAINE, MBS. A. K. P. WELCH, 

Miss FOSTER. Miss FRANCIS. 

Finance Committee, 

MRS. STACKPOLE, MRS. ANABLE, 

" J. W. MERRILL, " WM. READ, JR., 

" JOHN BARTLETT, " A. K. P. WELCH, 



MICHIGAN AID SOCIETY. 



135 



MKS. G. S. SAUNDERS, 
" GARDNER WHITE, 
u H. L. HIGGINSON, 
" EZRA DYER, 
" F. L. CHAPMAN, 

Miss ROPES, 



Miss NORTON, 
MRS. GEORGE M. OSGOOD, 
Miss WHITMAN, 
" H. TORREY, 

" HOPKINSON, 

" S. DANA. 



The citizens of Detroit held a public meeting immediately after the battle 
of Bull Kun, to take measures for the relief of the sick and wounded. A 
number of gentlemen F. Buhl, W. A. Butler, A. Dudgeon, Adjutant-General 
John Kobertson, and B. Yernor were appointed a committee, to be known as 
the MICHIGAN SOLDIERS' BELIEF COMMITTEE, whose duty it should be to 
disburse such money and stores as came into their hands to promote the 
comfort and efficiency of the army. At a late date they had received $12,500, 
and had disposed of three hundred and thirty-one boxes and two hundred 
and three barrels, containing the usual assortment of necessaries and luxuries. 
These five hundred and thirty-four packages had been received in four hun- 
dred shipments, and from one hundred and thirty-five different societies and 
places. 

The FIRST SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF DAYTON, Ohio, was organized in 
October, 1861, Mrs. E. P. Brown being chosen President, and Mrs. "Wilbur 
Conover, Secretary and Treasurer, and four ladies, Managers. Mrs. P. W. 
Davies was afterwards President, and Mrs. P. Holt, Secretary. The society has 
collected about $4,000 in money, and has prepared and forwarded one hundred 
and twenty-five boxes of stores, sixty-two of which were sent to the Cincinnati 
branch of the Sanitary Commission ; it has distributed work to the families of 
volunteers. The SECOND SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY was organized on the 7th 
of August, 1862 ; the average attendance has been fifty -five members ; about 
twenty thousand articles have been furnished. 

The SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF DETROIT was organized on the 6th of 
November, 1861, by the appointment of the following officers : 

Counsellor, 
DR. Z. PITCHER, U. S. Sanitary Commission. 



President, 
MRS. THEODORE ROMEYN. 



Vice- President, 
MRS. JOHN OWEN. 



Treasurer, 
MRS. D. P. BUSHNELL; afterwards, MRS. WILLIAM N. CARPENTER. 



Recording Secretary, 
MIS& SARA T. BINGHAM. 



Corresponding Secretary, 
Miss VALERIA CAMPBELL. 



136 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

In the summer of 1863 it enlarged its sphere of action, became a branch 
of the Sanitary Commission, and took the name of " MICHIGAN SOLDIERS' AID 
SOCIETY," meaning not a society for the aid of Michigan soldiers, but a Michi- 
gan society for the aid of American soldiers. " It is not for Michigan," says 
one of the Society's reports, " but for the country that our soldiers are fighting ; 
and not Michigan soldiers alone, but those of every loyal state. The Sani- 
tary Commission strongly urges the advantage of sending supplies to be dis- 
tributed by them without distinction of individuals or states. It is better 
economy to have all supplies given out from a common stock. In many 
instances one regiment has had more than enough, while another has been in 
need. Often, too, a regiment, in breaking up camp, leaves its superfluous 
stores to be wasted or plundered. Still greater waste occurs from packages 
sent to particular regiments not reaching them, or being left behind when the 
regiment moves. The greater part of these losses would be prevented by fol- 
lowing the plan of the Sanitary Commission. Of goods the disposal of which 
has been left to us, the greater part has been sent for general use." 

During the first year, the ladies of the society received some $1,600 and 
ninety-four boxes of clothing and stores from Detroit. They also received 
from the state one hundred and ninety-seven boxes, which they forwarded to 
Wheeling, Paducah, St. Louis, Washington, etc. These two hundred and 
ninety-one boxes contained twenty-eight thousand articles. The term " article" 
is as variable in Michigan as it is in Massachusetts. 

The number of articles distributed in the Detroit hospitals and shipped 
to the army by the society during its second year, was about sixty thousand. 
Its receipts for the third year were about $5,600, and one thousand two 
hundred and seventeen boxes and barrels of stores. The number of articles 
furnished was eighty -five thousand. In January, 1864, a Soldiers' Home was 
opened, and though supposed at the outset to be too large, proved much too 
small for the accommodation of those who applied for admittance. 

A meeting of all the Aid Societies of Michigan was held at Kalamazoo on 
the 23d of September, 1863. The object was to make their work more effec- 
tive by concentrating their efforts. It was resolved that the societies in the 
principal towns, and especially in the county towns, should correspond with 
others in the county, and aid in forming societies where none existed, and that 
each association in the state should send regular reports to the central organi- 
zation at Detroit 

The ladies of Kalamazoo then gave an account of a band of young women 
of that town known as the Alert Club, who made it their business to call upon 



BUFFALO AID SOCIETY. 



137 




MINUTE MAN OF KALAMAZOO. 



the citizens at their houses, to obtain promises of donations, to register these 
promises in a book, and to report to the society. Lists were then made out, 
and handed to the Minute Men ; 
these men were boys, many of them ,,g 
the brothers of the Alert Girls. ^ 
They went round with wheelbar- 
rows and wagons, collected the ar- 
ticles promised, and delivered them 
at head-quarters. 

The busy fingers which wasted 
so many stitches upon havelocks in 
the summer, turned their energies 
in a more useful direction as winter 
approached. Mrs. Samuel A. Frazer, of Duxbury, Massachusetts, who was in 
her ninety-third year in August, 1861, was already knitting worsted stockings 
as fast as she could ply the needle. The venerable lady knew something of 
the terrors of winter in camps ; she remembered Valley Forge, and when seven 
years old, eighty-six years before, had used many a hank of woolen yarn for 
"Washington's suffering army. The girls and teachers of the Wesleyan Female 
College, in Cincinnati, sent one thousand pairs of stockings to the Thirty-fifth 
Ohio on the 19th of November. The Ladies' Military Blue Stocking Asso- 
ciation of New York, formed in October, for the purpose of procuring one 
thousand pairs, reported twelve hundred and ninety -two pairs on the 10th of 
January. 

There was no organized effort in Buffalo, New York, during the first year 
of the war, for the collection and distribution of supplies. The GENERAL AID 
SOCIETY FOR THE ARMY was formed in December, 1861, upon the suggestion of 
Eev. Drs. Hosmer and Heacock, and Mr. S. B. Hunt, associate members of the 
Sanitary Commission. Operations were at once commenced, and such was 
the success met with in organizing auxiliary societies in the towns and villages 
of the western part of New York, that Buffalo soon became the channel 
through which the contributions of one hundred and seventy-two branches 
reached the objects of their common solicitude. The following were the first 
officers of the society : 

President, 
MRS. JOSEPH E. FOLLETT. 



MRS. Jonx R. LEE. 



Vice- Presidents, 

MRS. HORATIO SEYMOUE. 



138 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Treasurer, Recording Secretary, 

MRS. JAMES P. WHITE. Miss GKACE E. BIKD. 

Executive Committee, 

MRS. CTEUS ATHEARN, MRS. JAMES BRAYLEY, 

MRS. JOHN OTTO, MRS. W. F. MILLER, 

MRS. ISAAC A. JOXES, Miss SUSAN E. KIMBERLY. 

MRS. F. A. MCKNIGHT. 

The ladies received, during the first year, about $6,000, and some sixty- 
seven thousand articles, the value of which was not far from $40,000. 

The net receipts for 1863 were over $16,000, between seven and eight 
thousand being the proceeds of a bazaar held in June. The officers of this 
bazaar were : Henry W. Eogers, President ; B. C. Rumsey and A. A. Eusta- 
phieve, 1st and 2d Vice-Presidents ; William Fiske, Treasurer ; and C. F. S. 
Thomas, Secretary. The society was also indebted to the Board of Trade for 
$1,300 ; to the Public School for $963 ; to an amateur concert for $640, &c., 
&c. Nearly seventy-three thousand articles were received, of the estimated 
value of $50,000. In 1864, the following interesting letter was received 
from the Catholic Bishop of Buffalo: 

" BUFFALO, May 17, 1864. 
" MADAM, 

" The Sovereign Pontiff, Pope Pius IX., has, through his Eminence, 
Cardinal Barnabo, notified me that with the deepest sorrow and with the 
most fraternal interest he has heard of the number of gallant soldiers wounded 
in our many battles, and that he desires me to give, in his name, and out of his 
private purse, $500, as some aid to alleviate their sufferings. 

" Your truly providentially organized society has done very much to aid 
our wounded soldiers ; hence it seems to me that there can be no better 
means of accomplishing the kind and paternal wish of his Holiness, than to 
hand over to you this check for $500, with my humble and fervent prayers 
that (rod's blessing may not only rest on our gallant wounded soldiers, but 
also on the honored members of your Commission who aid them so gener- 
ously. 

" Accept the expressions of respect and esteem with which 
" I have the honor to be, 

" Your most obedient humble servant, 

" f JOHN, 

"Bishop of Buffalo. 
" MKS. HORATIO SEYMOUR, 

u President of B. U. S. Sanitary Commission.' 1 '' 



RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF ROCHESTER. 



139 



Without pursuing further the statistical history of this society, we may 
say that it has been a most efficient auxiliary of the Commission, and has 
rendered a worthy return from the rich district of Western New York. 

The HOSPITAL AID SOCIETY OF TAUNTON, Massachusetts, Mrs. A. F. 
Southgate, Secretary, was organized on the 17th of January, 1862, a vast deal 
of unrecorded work having been done before that date. In three years it 
received and expended something over $5,000, and forwarded forty-five boxes 
of clothing and stores. 

The SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF NEW LONDON, Connecticut, Ann K. 
Almy, Secretary, has been, since the commencement of the year 1864, an 
efficient auxiliary of the Sanitary Commission, having done a great deal of 
independent work previously. 

The ladies of Eochester, New York, organized an aid society under the 
name of THE LADIES' HOSPITAL BELIEF ASSOCIATION of Eochester, on the 
17th of January, 1862. The following officers were appointed : 

President, 
MRS. C. M. CURTIS. 

Vice-President*, 

MRS. W. B. WILLIAMS, MRS. L. FARRAR, 

" W. W. CARR, " A. GARDINER, 

" E. G. ROBINSON, " F. CLARKE. 



Recording Secretary, 
MRS. G. P. TOWNSEND. 



Corresponding Secretary^ 
MRS. L. C. SMITH. 



Treasurer, 
MRS. S. B. ROBY. 



Two directors were also appointed from each of the sixteen churches 
co-operating. The society worked, during the first year, upon a cash basis 
of nearly $2,500, obtained from the following sources : 

Cash from membership fees $20 50 Cash from Concert by the Arling- 
ton & Donniker Min- 
strels $56 00 

" " Concert by the Hutch- 

inson Family 517 

" " Tableau Festival and 
sale of a picture pre- 
sented by Miss E. A. 
Smith.. 759 04 



Aid Societies 2945 

churches and lodges, 

schools, &c 370 11 

individuals 577 47 

Capt. Hill's lecture.... 201 50 
Concert by Prof. Black 

and others 300 60 

Light Guard Drill and 

sale of Mrs. Can- 

field's picture 176 25 



Total $2,496 09 



140 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Large donations of stores and clothing were also received, so that the 
society, after devoting $1,800 to the purchase of material, and making this 
into garments, was enabled to send away during the year thirty-three bales, 
thirty-three boxes, thirty-six barrels, and forty-one kegs, containing an 
aggregate of twelve thousand five hundred articles and packages, besides 
large quantities of lint, compresses, and bandages. These were sent to the 
Western Sanitary Commission at St. Louis, to the Indiana Commission at 
Indianapolis, and to the hospitals in and around Washington. All reached 
their destination except one small box, lost during a raid of the enemy upon 
Alexandria. 

The following officers were appointed for the second official year : 

President, 
Mrs. W. B. WILLIAMS. 

Vice- Presiden ts, 
MRS. L. FARRAR, MRS. H. A. BREWSTKR. 

Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, 

MRS. G. P. TOWNSEND. MRS. II. E. HEGEMAN. 

Treas urer, Super in tend en t of Rooms, 

MRS. A. S. MANN. Miss R. B. LONG. 

There were also four directors from each of the twelve wards. The 
following is the table of receipts for the year : 

Cash from Aid Societies, etc. ... $576 97 Cash from Carpenters and Join- 

" " Churches 381 09 ers' Entertainment $80 00 

" " individuals and month- Cash from Sale of Oil Paintings 

. ly subscriptions. ... 52 13 presented by James Harris. .. 80 00 

" 4i Membership fees 12 25 Cash from Sale of Goods at 

" " Col. McVickar's Lee- Rooms of Association 29 04 

ture 11 50 Cash from Treasurer of Bazaar. 10,319 82 

" " Prof. O'Leary's Lec- 
ture 34 95 Total $11,577 75 

One hundred and twelve packages were sent to the army and hospitals 
during the year, being divided among the Sanitary, Christian, and Western 
Sanitary Commissions. The receipts from the bazaar, coming in at the very 
close of the fiscal year, were invested in government bonds, to draw interest 
until needed. Of this bazaar we shall give a detailed account under the head 
of Sanitary Fairs. 

Little or no record was kept in Salem, Massachusetts, of the work done in 
aid of the army during the first year of the war. We can only say that it was 



AID SOCIETY OF BRIDGEPORT. 



141 



large, and that it was well and willingly performed. In February, 1862, asso- 
ciate managers were appointed, to act in concert with the New England Branch 
of the Sanitary Commission. In February, 1864, a room was taken, and Mrs. 
Asahel Huntington, Mrs. George H. Chase, and Miss Harriet E. Lee, were 
chosen Associate Managers. From twenty-five to thirty-five boxes a year have 
been sent by the SALEM SANITARY SOCIETY, and some of them must have been 
warmly welcomed, if we may judge by a list of their contents : " Sardines, 
canned duck, quail, soups, condensed milk, English mustard, tapioca, English 
breakfast tea, chocolate, sugar, and cayenne." This is a modern and benign 
form of Salem witchcraft. 

During the first year of the war a society, composed almost exclusively of 
young ladies, labored for the soldiers in Augusta, Maine, and with effect. But 
few records of their operations remain. In April, 1862, the LADIES' AID 
SOCIETY was organized, Miss Abbie Gr. Burton being President, Miss Susan 
Brooks, Treasurer, and Miss Hannah B. Fuller, Secretary. They have re- 
ceived and disbursed some $3,500 in money, and have distributed about nine 
thousand articles ; in 1864 they furnished the hospitals of the neighborhood 
with twenty thousand yards of bandages. Their treasury was supplied princi- 
pally by the exertions of the members of the society, and by fairs and levees. 

The SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY OF BRIDGEPORT, Connecticut, was organized 
on the 25th of July, 1862. Its money receipts were over $2,600 in the first 
year. Through its influence a special fund was collected during the holidays 
of 1863-4, for the purpose of giving the Connecticut soldiers encamped along 
the South Carolina coast a Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner. The follow- 



ing sums were obtained: 



Check from New Britain $300 00 

Soldiers' Aid Society, Hartford . . 200 00 
Alfred E. Beach, Stratford 100 00 



Plymouth Hollow 

Elias Howe, Jr 

Nathaniel Wheeler 

P. T. Barnnm 

S. H. Wales 

F. A. Benjamin, Stratford. 

Birmingham 

John Elton, Waterbury . . . 

Ansonia 

Win. D. Bishop 

Alvord & Wilson. . 



71 40 
50 00 

t . 50 00 

, . . 50 00 
50 00 

.." 50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
25 00 

;..*- 25 00 
25 00 
C. Spooner 25 00 



Hay ward & Bacon $25 00 

Jas. C. Loomis 25 00 

Mrs. H. K. Harral 25 00 

Hanford Lyon 25 00 

Ferguson & Doten 25 00 

Russell Tomlinson 25 00 

Ira Sherman 25 00 

Frederick Wood 25 00 

Lacey, Meeker & Co 25 00 

Henry Bishop 25 00 

Andrew E. Nash 25 00 

Birdsey & Co 25 00 

S. S. Clapp 20 00 

W. II. Perry 15 00 

All other sums. . 6fi4 75 



Total.. _...$2,09fi 15 



142 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Fifteen hundred packages, the larger part of them barrels, with a few half- 
barrels, boxes, kegs, and firkins, were soon afterwards sent to the South. Of 
these, New Milford contributed seventy-six ; New Canaan, sixty-five ; Winsted, 
ninety-nine ; "Waterbury, sixty ; Litchfield, fifty-nine ; Seymour, sixty-four ; and 
Danbury, sixty-one. 

During this year the following ladies held the various ofiices of the society : 

President, Vice- President, 

MBS. DANIEL H. STEELING. MBS. MONSON HAWLEY. 

Secretary, Treasurer, 

MBS. L. H. NOBTON. MBS. WILLIAM E. SEELEY. 

Directresses. 

MBS. S. S. JABVIS, MBS. WILLIAM B. DYEB, 

' CHABLES WEEKS, " DANIEL GABLAND, 

' H. K. HAEEAL, " NATHANIEL WHEELEB, 

' WILLIAM D. BISHOP, " ALDEN BUBTON, 

' GEOBGE POOLE, " I. H. WHITING, 

' F. K CLUTE, " P. H. SKIDMOBE, 

' GEOEGE F. TBAOET, " RUSSELL TOMLINSON, 

' ISA GBEENE, " JOSEPH THOMPSON, 

' STEPHEN BUBEOUGHS, " CHABLES WELLS, 

' FBEDEEICK PABBOTT, " HANFOED N. HAYES, 

' GASFOED STEELING, " J. C. BLAOKMAN, 
MBS. J. G. ADAMS. 

The LADIES' SOLDIERS' RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF NEWBURYPORT, Massa- 
chusetts, was organized on the 14th of August, 1862, with the following 
officers : 

President, Treasurer, 

MBS. A. L. MAECH. MBS. M. L. BUNTIN. 

Recording Secretary, Corresponding Secretary, 

Miss A. A. ATTBIN. Miss S. L. DAVIS. 

The society has been from the outset independent, sometimes sending its 
supplies through the Sanitary and sometimes through the Christian Commis- 
sion ; at others, supplying such hospitals or camps as may have asked for 
assistance. It has collected about $5,000 a year in money, and forwarded 
some sixty boxes in the same time ; some as far west as St. Louis, and as far 
south as New Orleans and St. Augustine. "Its prosperity," to quote the 
words of the corresponding secretary, early in 1865, " is worthy of the noble 
cause in whose service it was organized. Pledged for the war, it will seek no 
rest from its labors till the welcome tidings of peace to our beloved country 
shall proclaim its mission ended." 



AID SOCIETY OF NEW HAVEN. 143 

The effort to contribute to the relief and comfort of the soldiers made by 
citizens of New Haven, began at an early period. Without the existence of 
any formal organization for the purpose, collections were made and numerous 
boxes of clothing and other articles were forwarded to the Sanitary Commis- 
sion. It is impossible to give a precise account of the amounts raised and 
boxes forwarded in this way. They probably did not fall much short of 
what has been done in each of the years covered by the reports of the 
'SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY' formed about Nov. 1, 1862. This association at 
once began a thorough and systematic effort in its appropriate work. It 
canvassed the city of New Haven, and became the channel of the contribu- 
tions of a large circle of towns throughout the State of Connecticut. Soon 
afterwards, the committee of gentlemen acting for the Sanitary Commission 
in Connecticut, transferred to it their authority to receive and forward all 
contributions hitherto sent to their agent. By means of this arrangement the 
society became the medium of communication with more than eighty towns 
in the state. During the year 1863, four thousand nine hundred and thirty- 
four articles were made, consisting of one thousand eight hundred and twenty- 
eight cotton shirts, eight hundred and eight flannel shirts, one hundred and 
one canton-flannel shirts, one thousand one hundred and thirty-four pairs of 
drawers, sixty-one dressing gowns, one hundred and twenty handkerchiefs, 
one hundred and forty-two towels, six hundred and fifty-eight sheets, twenty- 
seven pillow cases, seven cushions, and seven hundred and thirty-five pairs of 
socks. All these articles were made gratuitously by individuals and sewing 
societies, or by poor needlewomen paid for their labor by benevolent 
individuals. Quite a number of auxiliary societies were regularly supplied 
with material or cut garments to be made by their members. The total 
receipts for the year were as follows : 

From city donations $4,609 37 From avails of Concert for Sol- 

" donations from auxiliary diers (by Miss Bradley) $47 50 

societies and friends in " avails of Tableau (by Miss 

other towns 602 59 Norton) 517 00 

" sale of material to other " avails of Bazaar 2,912 26 

societies.. 29388 " other sources .. 1000 



Total $8,992 60 

The cash receipts of the second year were about as large as those of the 
first; the society receiving, in addition, $1,000 from the Sanitary Commission, 
and giving in return one thousand sheets and one thousand six hundred and 
seven towels. 



144 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Of the " Boys' and Girls' Fourth of July Fruit Fund," Mrs. Eoberts, the 
Secretary, thus wrote : " Our readers need not be reminded of the Fourth of 
July contribution made by our children and youth, who sacrificed their usual 
enjoyment of explosions of all kinds, to raise a fund for the purchase of fresh 
vegetables, fruits, and anti -scorbutics, now much needed. The Executive 
Committee, conferring upon the propriety of making the suggestion and 
discussing its probable success, ventured the hope that 'as much as two 
hundred dollars might be raised in that way.' Our surprise and gratification 
may be imagined when the sum in the aggregate amounted to over $730 ! 
When the head of some little flaxen-haired child shall be frosted with age, 
he may perchance meet this page, and who can doubt that he will feel 
both pleasure and pride in remembering that he was one of those who 
sacrificed a fleeting amusement to such a noble, to so high a duty ?" 

In three years the New Haven Aid Society sent to the Sanitary Commis- 
sion no less than seventy thousand articles, many hundreds of them being 
barrels, boxes, cases, jars, gallons. Seventy-five barrels of prepared bandages 
are set down in this wonderful schedule as seventy-five "articles." This is 
certainly a modest way of putting it : you may not hide your light under a 
bushel, but it seems you may hide your good works in barrels. 

The following is the list of officers of the General Soldiers' Aid Society 
of New Haven for 1864 : 



Miss M. P. TWINING, 1st Directress. 
MRS. A. 1ST. SKINNER, 2d " 
MRS. W. A. NORTON, 3d " 

Corresponding Secretaries, 
MRS. B. S. ROBERTS, Miss J. W. SKINNER. 

Recording Secretary, Treasurer, 

MRS. H. T. BLAKE. MRS. EMILY T. FITCH. 

Managers. 

MES. "WM. BACON, Miss A. LARNED, 

Miss E. BRADLEY, MRS. II. MANSFIELD, 

" H. BROWN, " J. D. MANDEVILLE, 

MRS. L. CANDEE, " D. C. PRATT, 

" C. CANDEE, Miss P. PECK, 

" R. CHAPMAN, MRS. W. H. RUSSELL, 
Miss R. CHAPMAN, " G. B. RICH, 

" C. COLLINS, " W. M. RODMAN, 

MRS. II. DTJBOIS, Miss E. SHERMAN, 

" J. W. FITCH, MRS. J. SHELDON, 

Miss J. GIBBS, Miss M. STORER, 



RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF BROOKLYN. 145 

MRS. J. GOODXOUGH, Miss A. THACHER, 

" E. S. GREELEY, MRS. A. TREAT, 

MlSS M. HlLLHOUSE, MlSS H. "WARXER, 

" I. HILLHOUSE, MRS. C. E. WATERHOUSE, 

" S. B. HARRISOX. " WM. WINCHESTER, 

MRS. B. JEPSOH, Miss D. "WooLSEY. 

New Haven has been a large contributor to enlistment and family relief 
funds, and has sent considerable sums and numerous boxes to the Christian 
Commission. Great interest has been felt and manifested in the matter of 
furnishing the regiments of the state with chapel tents, one lady having 
collected, by personal solicitation, the sum of $676. Chaplains have been 
abundantly supplied with religious papers, tracts, books, &c. A " Chaplains' 
Aid Society," Francis Wayland, Jr., Secretary, has been the channel through 
which this particular stream of benevolence has flowed. 

On Thursday evening, November 24th, 1862, upon the invitation of the 
" War Fund Committee of the City of Brooklyn and County of Kings," an 
audience assembled at the Academy of Music, to listen to an appeal from Dr. 
Bellows, in behalf of the Sanitary Commission. At the close of the Eeverend 
Doctor's address, a resolution was adopted appointing certain ladies, in co- 
operation with the pastors of their respective churches, to provide and make 
up material for the disabled soldiers. The ladies thus designated, representing 
nearly forty churches, met together the next day, conferred with a number of 
ladies similarly occupied in New York, and soon after formed a permanent 
organization, as follows, under the name of the WOMEN'S BELIEF ASSOCIA- 
TION OF BEOOKLYN : 

President, Secretary, 

MRS. J. S. T. STRAXAHAX. MBS. J. N. LEWIS. 

Executive Committee, 

MRS. W. I. BUDDIXGTOX, MRS. E. SHAPTER, 

" J. W. HARPER, " J. D. SPARKMAX, 



E. H. R. LYMAX, 
HENRY SHELDOX, 
J. P. DCFFIX, 
LUKE HARRIXGTOX, 



JAMES EELLS, 
JEREMIAH Jonxsox, JR., 
HEXRY E. PIERREPONT, 
H. WATERS. 



Sanitary Committee of Brooklyn, 

D WIGHT JoiIXSOX, HfiXRY E. PlERREPOXT, 

SAMUEL B. CALDWELL, JAMES II. FBOTIIIXGHAJI, 

JAMES D. SPARKMAX. 

Fifty churches were soon afterwards represented in the society, and several 

others, which did not send delegates, nevertheless sent contributions. The 
10 



146 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



receiving-room was opened on the 1st of December, and offerings arrived 
with such regularity that a box a day was forwarded to Washington, or else- 
where, during the five months ending May 1st The number of articles 
dispatched to the armies in that time was over twenty-two thousand, their 
aggregate value exceeding $30,000. 







61'ECTUE. 
SANITARY CHARADE. 



The Female Employment Society of Brooklyn co-operated with the Eelief 
Association in this labor, and at an early date offered to make up garments 
free of charge, if the material were furnished. The offer was accepted ; over 
$10,000 were obtained, principally by contributions in the churches, and 
expended in flannel, yarn, and burlaps. These were manufactured by the 
Employment Society into nine thousand garments, worth certainly, when made 
up, $15,000. The total value of the goods furnished by the Relief Associa- 
tion in five months was, at the least, $45,000. 

During the year ending May 1st, 1864, the Association received from sub- 
scriptions, from entertainments, lectures, &c., about $10,000, which sum was 
expended, as before, in the purchase of flannel, yarn, &c., the Female Employ- 
ment Society continuing to make up all material furnished them for the pur- 
pose. The officers of the Sanitary Commission, having decided that all above 
$300,000 resulting from the Brooklyn Fair should be expended by the ladies 
of the Relief Association in the purchase and manufacture of clothing, an 



AID SOCIETY OF LYNN. 147 

instalment of $24,000 was received and so laid out by them during this year, 
in accordance with this desire. 

From May, 1863, to May, 1864, the society received, packed, and forwarded 
over thirty-six thousand articles, the value of which was carefully estimated to 
be nearly $58,000. It has continued to be an active auxiliary of the Sanitary 
Commission. 

The SANITARY AID SOCIETY OF LYNN, Massachusetts, was not organized 
till January, 1863. The people of Lynn had not, in the two years of war 
already passed, been either idle or indifferent. They had been as active as 
their neighbors, only their labors had been without concert or plan, each indi- 
vidual or group of workers sending their stores or supplies in the direction 
taken by the companies or regiments in which they were most interested. A 
vast quantity of unrecorded, irregular work has been everywhere done in this 
way. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, the Quakers of Lynn raised a fund 
of over $3,000 for soldiers' families, and the manufacturers one much larger, 
which in the fourth year of the war was not yet exhausted. Cotton was sent 
from Boston to Lynn by the bale; public meetings were called, sewing- 
machines put in requisition, and shirts were sent back to Boston, five hun- 
dred at a time. Lynn has always cheerfully taken her full share of the 
burdens cast upon the country by battle and campaign, and has contributed, 
according to her means, to onion fund, Thanksgiving dinner, and Fourth of 
July festival. 

By a clause in the constitution of the Aid Society of Lynn, any lady 
becomes a member by the payment, annually, of fifty cents, and in the first 
year, there were five hundred and eighty members. The society received 
$2,300, principally church collections, and forwarded forty-four boxes of 
clothing and hospital stores. 

The following board of officers were elected for 1864 : 

President, 
MRS. W. C. RICHARDS. 

Vice- Presidents, 

MES. DR. EDWARD NEWHALL, MRS. J. B. ALLEY, 

" W. H. LADD, Miss HENDERSON. 

Secretary, Treasurer, 

Miss M. L. NEWHALL. Miss A. E. LADD. 

Executive Committee, 

MRS. WILLIAM F. MORGAN, MRS. HENRY A. PEVEAR, 

" JOHN L. SnoREY, " K. H. WAI.DEN, 

" Dr. PERCIVAL, " THOMAS W. BACHELLER, 



148 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

MBS. J. "W. TEWKSBTJET, MRS. EDWIN II. OLIVER, 
" EOLAND G. USHER, " THOMAS F. BANCROFT, 

" JOHN F. HILTON, " JAMES E. NEWHALL, 

" JOSEPH W. ABBOTT, " EDWIN SPRAGUE, 

" JACOB CHASE, " EDWARD S. DAVIS, 

" MARTIN II. HOOD, Miss HENRIETTA EHODES. 

Soliciting Committee, 

Miss MARIANA NEWHALL, MRS. JOHN H. CROSMAN, 

" ANNA HOLMES, " MARY MEDBURY, 

" ELLA KEENE, Miss A. A. MUDGE, 

" CARLETON, " ANTOINETTE BREED, 

MRS. PHILIP A. CHASE. 

During the second year, the labors of the Aid Society were suspended for 
eleven weeks. Had the ladies of Lynn become tired of well-doing ? Had 
they taken a vacation, and left the soldiers' flannel shirts to shift for them- 
selves? Not so. But they had taken a table at the National Sailors' Fair, 
and for nearly three months devoted themselves to Jack, to the very obvious 
disadvantage of the landsmen. We shall see the part borne by Lynn in the 
great naval festival all in good time ; it can do no harm to say, now, that its 
decimal expression is $4,000. So it is not surprising that the receipts of the 
society this year were hardly $1,150 ; the members paid their fee, amateurs 
sang, recited, and played, Edmund Kirke lectured, and Newcombe's Com- 
bination combined. Two olios or miscellaneous entertainments went off so 
pleasantly leaving behind the receipts, however that the programme of one 
of them is appended. The fact that $817 were realized in this way speaks 
well for the talent of the performers, the taste of the citizens, and the size of 
Lyceum Hall; 

PEOGEAMME OF ENTEETAINMENT 

TO BE GIVEN AT 

LYCEUM HALL, ON THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 31, 

IN AID OF THE 

SANITARY AID SOCIETY OF LYNN. 



PAET FIEST. 

I. MXTSIC. 
II. FIVE SCENES FROM "THE LADY OF THE LAKE." 

CHARACTERS. Fitz James, Ellen, Earl Douglas, Malcolm Graeme, Allan (the Minstrel), 
Eoderick Dhu, John De Brent, Old Bertram, Capt. Lewis, Soldiers, Lords, and Ladies. 

III. MUSIC. 
IV. COMIC SCENE FROM HOLMES. 



AID SOCIETY OF TROY. 149 

PART SECOND. 

I. MUSIC. 
II. SCENES FROM DICKENS. 

SCENE 1. Hints to Nurses. SCENE 2. The Barber's Shop. 

SCENE 3. The Tea Party. 

CHAEACTERS. Sairey Gamp, Betsey Prigg, Poll Sweedlepipes, Young Bailey, Lewsome. 

in. MUSIC. 

IT. TABLEAUX. 
Y. MUSIC. 

Explanatory Eeadings of all Selections. 

Music, Vocal and Instrumental, by Miss Huntley and Messrs. Eyder and Noyes. 

Grand Pianos furnished by Chickering. 

TICKETS, FIFTY CENTS. RESERVED SEATS, ONE DOLLAR. 

N". B. It is hoped the entertainments will merit the patronage of the patriotic citizens 
of Lynn, as all the proceeds go to the Sanitary Aid Society, to help the needy sick and 
wounded soldiers. The free use of the hall is kindly given by the trustees, and the printers 
very generously do the printing gratis. 

Let the above suffice for the ten thousand similar entertainments which 
were given in 1864 for the benefit of the soldiers. We may add that the 
Shakspeare Club of Lynn gave readings from time to time in the same behoof. 

Associate members of the Sanitary Commission were appointed at an early 
date, in Troy, New York, and money and supplies to the value of about $7,000 
have been sent direct from the city and vicinity. This is in addition to what 
has been done by the TROY SOLDIERS' AID SOCIETY, B. H. Hall, Secretary, 
which was organized on the 19th of February, 1863. Its first year's receipts, 
in money, were nearly $3,800 ; seven thousand articles were manufactured and 
forwarded, of the estimated value of $7,000. During the second year, the 
society received $2,500 of the proceeds of the Albany Bazaar, and sent away 
articles worth $3,400. It has paid no rent, Dr. Wotkyns having provided a 
room without charge. The following table of receipts for 1863 speaks well 
for Trojan liberality: 

Thanksgiving collections $562 19 J. M. "Warren & Co $120 00 

Mrs. Betsey A. Hart 240 00 Mrs. George M. Tibbits 120 00 

John F. Winslow 18000 George M. Tibbits 12000 

From the performers of "The Ri- Wm. Howard Hart 120 00 

vals," Troy 134 00 John A. Griswold 120 00 

From proceeds of two evenings' John Flagg 120 00 

entertainments in Schaghticoke, H. Burden & Sons 120 00 

through Mr. Charles Perry 131 26 Bills, Thayer & Knight 120 00 



150 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



J. L. Thompson, Sons & Co $100 00 

Mrs. H. H. Doughty 60 00 

J. B. Hart 60 00 

D. South wick 60 00 

S. M. Vail 60 00 

J. H. Willard 60 00 

R. A. Flood 50 00 

Fuller, Warren & Co 50 00 

E. Thompson Gale 50 00 

H. N. Lockwood 50 00 

Joseph H. Parsons 50 00 

D. Thomas Vail 50 00 

C. J. Saxe 40 00 

Fifth Baptist Church 36 40 

Benjamin H. Hall 36 00 

Jesse B. Anthony 36 00 

Total.. 



Mrs. E. Seldon $30 00 

Hagar's Rebellion Concerts 27 42 

L. A. Battershall 25 00 

Jonas C. Heartt 25 00 

E. Proudfit 25 00 

C. L. Tracy 25 00 

W. L. Van Alstyne 25 00 

G. II. Barnard 24 00 

R. Peckham 24 00 

John Anthony 20 00 

T. W. Blatchford 20 00 

J. W. Freeman 20 OO 

II. C. Lockwood 20 00 

Maullin & Cluett 20 00 

All others . . 397 66 



.$3,783 93 



It was not till early in 1863, that the necessity was felt in the extreme 
north for a home or lodge for soldiers passing through and temporarily de- 
tained. On the 1st of April such an establishment was opened in Boston by 
the Executive Committee of Boston Associates, at No. 76 Kingston Street. 
The second floor was fitted up, the sleeping-room containing at the outset 
twelve beds, forty-eight others, in successively added rooms, being gradually 
provided. The first applicant for aid, a soldier whose furlough had expired, 
and who had no means of returning to his regiment, was entertained on the 
7th of the month. The following are the details of the aid rendered by this 
branch in the first eighteen months : 



Furnished transportation, at government rate, to .... 

" paid by the Commission. . . 

" " by U. S. Quartermaster. . . 

" carriage within the city 

" special attendance to their homes 

" lodging 

" meals (total number of meals, 34,440) 

" clothing (total number of garments, 1,160), 

" aid in arranging papers , 

" aid in obtaining pay 

" medical advice 

Wounds dressed 

Sent to hospital 

Referred to local Relief Associations - 

Re-enlisted 

Deaths 

Furnished undertaker's services. . 



9,623 

219 

934 

4,075 

100 

13,073 

17,222 

550 

182 

226 

689 

3,178 

130 

46 

27 

6 

9 

Back pay collected $26,528 72 



AID ASSOCIATION OF CAMBRIDGEPORT. 151 

A Hospital Car Service between Boston and New York was established 
by the committee on the 2d of November, 1863, two first-class cars having 
been set apart and furnished for this purpose upon the line by way of Spring- 
field and New Haven. Each car contained nine portable litter-beds, suspended 
by elastic bands ; twelve folding hospital chairs ; twelve ordinary seats ; a 
hospital store-closet, supplied witli medicines, stimulants, and the usual sur- 
gical and medical appliances, the means of cooking, and a wardrobe of hospi- 
tal clothing. For a time, one of these cars left Boston and New York daily, 
in charge of a military hospital steward and nurse. The number of soldiers 
transported in one year was nearly twelve thousand, each man moved costing 
at the commencement, seventy cents this including the outfit of the cars 
and during the last month, hardly fourteen cents. The average cost per man 
during the year was twenty-two cents. 

The whole expense of this special relief, including the home in Kingston 
Street, and the hospital car service, for eighteen months, was about $28,000 ; 
$10,000 of this sum was paid out of the proceeds of the Boston Sanitary 
Fair. 

For nearly three years there was no organized soldiers' aid society in Cam- 
bridgeport, Massachusetts. There were seven religious associations, all more 
or less active in works of relief, but each pursuing its labors in its own way, 
and sending its supplies in this or that direction, without reference to the 
operations of others. Several efforts were made to unite the churches and 
induce them to act in concert, but failed. Early in 1864, three of the clergy- 
men made an earnest attempt, and succeeded in effecting a thorough organiza- 
tion. The CAMBRIDGEPORT SOLDIERS' AID ASSOCIATION opened soon after 
with sixty members, and somewhat later numbered nearly three hundred. 
The ofiices were distributed as follows : 



President, 
MRS. J. M. S. WILLIAMS. 

Vice- Presidents, 

MRS. J. C. DODGE, MRS. C. A. SKINNEE, 

MRS. CHARLES SEYMOUR. 

Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, 

MRS. H. O. HOUGHTON. MRS. W. W. WELLINGTON. 

Treasurer, 
MRS. J. M. CUTTER. 



152 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

COMMITTEES AT LAEGE. 

Purchasing Materials, 
MRS. 0. W. WATBIS, MES. J. K. PALMEE, MES. ALBERT VINAL. 

Recording, 
Miss SABAH C. BENT, Miss SAEAH C. FISHES, Miss ALICE W. BEMIS. 

Packing, 
MES. F. H. MANSON, MES. W. P. SAMPSON, MES. G. P. CAETEE. 

The society has depended entirely upon assessments, memberships, and 
church collections, and received some $3,000 during its first year. It has for- 
warded boxes to the Massachusetts state agent at Washington at the rate of 
about one a month, besides supplying the individual wants of Cambridge 
soldiers, whenever informed of them. The weekly meetings have been 
attended by from seventy to one hundred and ten ladies ; others, unable to 
be present, have sent for work to be done at home, or, if unable to do this, 
have furnished clothing as a substitute for work. 

The association, at an early date, introduced into its machinery a Home 
Relief Department, for the purpose of drawing to and absorbing within itself 
a Young Ladies' Circle, which had devoted itself during the previous winter 
to the work of clothing soldiers' children. It continued its labor of love, but 
as a branch and under the auspices of the association. 

We have thus passed in review the principal Aid Societies in the country 
a sufficient number, at any rate, to give a stranger, should these pages fall into 
a stranger's hands, a comprehensive idea of the occupation of the women of 
the land in war time. Hamlets so small that the postmaster-general does not 
know them and, indeed, their own inhabitants do not know them by name, 
but only by number the neighborhood of some half dozen houses, the vil- 
lage, the cluster of tenements around the mill or factory, the town, the city, 
the metropolis all have been moved by one impulse, and, taking the mean of 
town and country, have given with surprising uniformity ; that is, the average 
per man, woman, and child, certain obvious allowances being made, is nearly 
the same in the several states. History, mythology, and fable will be vainly 
ransacked by those who would find a parallel. 

With the mere labor and application necessary for the creation of their 
supplies, the women and children have not always rested content. A 
blanket might not only hold warmth, but it might carry a message. In the 
earlier stages of the war, especially before stockings, shirts, and pillow-cases 
were needed and called for by the hundred thousand, it was a pleasant prac- 



MARKED ARTICLES. 153 

tice, on the part of the knitters and stitchers, to append, in writing, some 
homelike, encouraging, patriotic sentiment, either in prose or verse. Indeed, 
it is still the boast of some few circles that no article has ever left their rooms 
without its metrical word of counsel or sympathy. Calumniators have desig- 
nated these rhymes as the work of the sewing-machine, or have intimated 
that the turning of a crank would produce as good. Let us see. Is there a 
soldier in the American army who would not find spiritual as well as physi- 
cal comfort in stockings thus labelled : 

" Brave sentry, on your lonely beat 
May these bine stockings warm your feet ; 
And when from war and camps you part, 
May some fair knitter warm your heart!" 

Or in an indorsement like this : 

" The fortunate owner of these socks is secretly informed, that they are 
the one hundred and ninety-first pair knit for our brave boys by Mrs. Abner 
Bartlett, of Medford, Mass., now aged eighty-five years. January, 1864" 

Blankets, bandages, pillows, bottles, have all borne messages of consolation 
to the army, as a few examples, taken at random, will serve to show. A 
piece of paper bearing these words was pinned to a home-spun blanket : 

" This blanket was carried by Milly Aldrich, who is ninety-three years 
old, down hill and up hill, one and a half miles, to be given to some soldier." 

On a bed-quilt was pinned a card, saying: 

" My son is in the army. Whoever is made warm by this quilt, which I 
have worked on for six days and almost all of six nights, let him remember 
bis own mother's love." 

On another blanket was this: "This blanket was used by a soldier 
in the war of 1812 ; it may keep some soldier warm in this war against 
traitors." 

On a pillow was written : " This pillow belonged to my little boy, who 
died resting on it; it is a precious treasure to me, but I give it for the 
soldiers." 

A pair of woolen socks told this story: "These stockings were knit by a 
little girl five years old, and she is going to knit some more, for mother says 
it will help some poor soldier." 

On a box of lint was this record : il Made in a sick room, where the 
sunlight has not entered for nine years, but where God has entered, and 
where two sons have bade their mother good-by as they have gone out 
to the war." 



154 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

On a bundle containing bandages was written : " This is a poor gift, but it 
is all I had. I have given my husband and my boy, and only wish I had 
more to give, but I haven't." 

On some eye-shades were these words : " Made by one who is blind. Oh, 
how I long to see the dear old flag that you are all fighting under !" 

Early in 1862, Miss Breckenridge and other ladies of Princeton, New 
Jersey, sent to Kentucky a large supply of hospital stores, among which was 
a quantity of currant wine, each bottle bearing a sentiment, of which the 
following are samples: 

" Currant wine from Princeton, New Jersey. May it refresh you, brave 
men from Illinois." 

" Forget not the invisible hand that leads you to victory." 

" New Jersey extends her hand to you, brave Tennesseans." 

" This wine was made on the battle-field of Princeton, New Jersey, not 
far from where Washington led his army on to victory. May it bear to you 
refreshing, invigorating, healing virtues, is the prayer of the one who made it" 

" Currant wine for our brave defenders. The Lord thy God will not fail 
thee, nor forsake thee." 

A barrel of hospital clothing, sent from Conway, Massachusetts, was 
made to declare, by its label, that " it contained a pair of socks knit by a lady 
who is ninety-seven years old on the 24th of this month. She is ready and 
anxious to do all she can." 

The yarn, the heart, the hand, the love, the dreams and prayers referred to 
in the following verses, all came from a border state : 

"Fold them up, they are warm and soft 
As the delicate knitter's heart and hand, 
A pair of soft, bine woolen socks, 
And love knit in with every strand. 

More than this, there are dreams and prayers 
Wove in like a mystic, golden thread 
Dreams that may stir a soldier's heart, 
-. And prayers to hless a dying head. 

It is not vain, it is not vain, 
For love is blest, and prayer is strong, 
To move the Arm that surely guides 
The breasts that stern the tide of wrong. 

And those who, praying, still believe, 
Shall know the strength of human will ; 
They dream prophetic histories, 
And through their faith their hopes fulfil." 



HISTORIC LINEN. 155 

From time to time the societies received gifts of linen older than the 
government it was given to save ; sometimes this linen was merely aged, 
sometimes absolutely historic. The New Haven Society received a sheet 
marked " J. * E. ;" and this meant that it had belonged in other days to 
Jehosaphat and Elizabeth Starr. Jehosaphat had married Elizabeth in 173 i, 
in Guilford, and the sheet was doubtless one hundred and thirty years old. 
Two of these heirlooms had descended to Mr. Henry B. Starr, and one by 
one he parted with them, probably in the only manner he could have been 
induced to give them up. 

In 1812, Mrs. Mary Witmer, of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, spun a 
quantity of flax and wove a number of yards of linen cloth. She lived to 
scrape her linen into lint, in 1862. 

The ladies of Brooklyn had called for bandages upon news of a sanguinary 
battle, and received a package accompanied by the following note : 

"FRIENDS OF THE BELIEF COMMISSION: It may not be uninteresting 
to you to know that some of the pieces of old linen left by me at your office 
this morning are very venerable by reason of age. 

" A hundred and fifty years ago, among the Ochill hills, in Scotland, and 
at the open window of a farm-house of that locality, the passer-by might have 
seen a young, blooming lassie working merrily at her spinning-wheel, prepa- 
ring for the most eventful change in the life of any one ; in short, she was 
spinning sheets and towels for her own future use. 

" Little did that young woman dream, as she merrily drove her wheel, 
that her handiwork would be used in 1864 to bind up the wounds of heroic 
men, who stand and fight for freedom in days of danger; yet such is the 
case, and I thought that you might be pleased to know the fact." 

One of the less obvious influences of the Soldiers' Aid Societies has been 
so forcibly stated in the pages of the Atlantic Monthly, that we cannot forbear 
quoting the passage : 

" Many a one could have wished to say to every soldier as he went forth 
to the war, ' Kemember, that, if God spares your life, in a few months or a 
few years you will come back, not officers, not privates, but sons and husbands 
and brothers, for whom some home is waiting and some human heart throb- 
bing. Never forget that your true home is not in that fort, beside those 
frowning cannon, not on that tented field amid the glory and power of military 
array, but that it nestles beneath yonder hill, or stands out in sunshine on 
some fertile plain. Remember that you are a citizen yet, with every instinct, 
with every sympathy, with every interest, and with every duty of a citizen.' 



156 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

" Can we overestimate the influence of these associations, of these Soldiers' 
Aid Societies, rising up in every city and village, in producing just such a 
state of mind, in keeping the soldier one of us one of the people? Five 
hundred thousand hearts following with deep interest his fortunes twice five 
hundred thousand hands laboring for his comfort millions of dollars freely 
lavished to relieve his sufferings millions more of tokens of kindness and 
good will going forth, every one of them a message from the home to the 
camp : what is all this but weaving a strong network of alliance between civil 
and military life, between the citizen at home and the citizen soldier? If our 
army is a remarkable body, more pure, more clement, more patriotic than 
other armies if our soldier is everywhere and always a true-hearted citizen 
it is because the army and soldier have not been cast off from public 
sympathy, but cherished and bound to every free institution and every peace- 
ful association by golden cords of love. The good our Commissions have 
done in this respect cannot be exaggerated ; it is incalculable." 

The same idea was developed by I)r. Lieber in a late address. Many of 
our citizens, he said, were in constant apprehension of the appearance of some 
destroyer of our liberties ; of the apparition of The Man on Horseback ; of 
some bold soldier and bad man who should disperse the members of the Short 
Session as Cromwell did those of the Long Parliament. But no such despot 
had come, and there was no evidence of any temper in the army of which he 
might take advantage, if any such existed. And the reason was that the 
American is a citizen first and always, and a soldier but for a few years. And 
though absent in camp and surrounded by no influences but those of war, the 
constant messages from home and the unceasing evidence of interest from 
family and friends, lead him to prize his privileges as a citizen far too high to 
enter into any unlawful schemes of ambition, or to become the tool of any 
military pretender. 

One point remains to be alluded to before we dismiss this subject of 
soldiers' aid. We shall have occasion, in our summary at the close of the 
volume, to take the ground that not more than half of the supplies and stores 
collected throughout the country have ever been recorded ; that is, that fully 
half have been employed in such a way as to preclude their entering into any 
general account. The various commissions keep careful registries of every 
thing which passes through their hands ; but stores disbursed independently 
by this aid society and that relief association throughout the country are 
not added up in one aggregate, as there is no means of doing it. We have 
already seen many examples of this, especially in the first year. From among 



IRREGULAR WORK. 



157 



numerous more remarkable cases we select the following fact, which shows, 
by implication, how much must have been irregularly done : 

At the close of the year 1864, the officers of the Sanitary Commission of 
New Jersey made up an elaborate schedule of the contributions, in money and 
in kind, of every town and neighborhood in the state. They had received, it 
appeared, from the large and flourishing town of New Brunswick no supplies 
whatever, and only $44 in cash. The Christian Commission had received 
nothing. Does it follow that New Brunswick had done nothing, therefore ? 
Not at all ; but it had done its work independently. The records of the New 
Brunswick Aid Society, Isabella Tannahill, Secretary, show that up to the date 
of the making of the schedule just mentioned they had received $4,030, 
from donations, memberships, lectures, and concerts ; and that they had sent 
sixteen thousand articles to regimental hospitals, to battle-fields, and to the 
state agency at Washington. A state of facts to which New Brunswick fur- 
nishes the clue should be distinctly borne in the reader's mind. 

The aid societies have not only done the steady, plodding, summer and 
winter work which the object in view required of them, but they have from 
time to time held, or have taken a prominent part in, certain high festivals oi 
philanthropy called Sanitary Fairs, and we now proceed to the description of 
these, in the order of their oc2urrence. believing that we can thus obtain a 
better insight into the souls of the people, and better pluck out the heart of 
their mystery, than in any other manner. 




158 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



CHAPTER VI. 





"''-* HE inexorable logic of facts compels us to commence this 
chapter, as we have already commenced several, with a 
reference to the city of Lowell, undoubtedly the first to hold 
a fair for the benefit of the Sanitary Commission. True, it was not upon 
the same scale, relatively, as that of those that succeeded it ; but the great 
element of rivalry did not come into play, as it was not known or imagined 
that the example would be followed. Moreover, the idea is every thing; 
and the idea that lay at the foundation of the Lowell fair was absolutely 
the same as that which, expanded and improved upon, formed the basis of 
those of Chicago, Boston, and the other fair-holding cities. The following 
statement is furnished by an eye-witness and participator : 

" On the evening of the 24th of January, 1863, a score of ladies assembled 
at the house of a gentleman in Lowell, at the request of his daughters, to con- 
sider the expediency of holding a fair in aid of the Sanitary Commission. At 
first it was only intended to make it a neighborhood affair ; but as they talked 
the cause inspired them with deeper interest and stronger faith, and before 
they separated they had not only decided to ask the co-operation of every 
religious society in the city, Protestant and Catholic, but a notice was written 
for the city papers, requesting all persons interested to meet at a place specified 
on the following Tuesday. A large number of ladies and gentlemen responded 



THE LOWELL FAIR. 



159 



to the call ; a plan was drawn up ; an executive committee, composed of nine 
gentlemen and six ladies, chosen. Committees, with a chairman for each, were 
appointed for each department decorations, finances, refreshments, flowers, 
music, printing, &c., &c., each to hold separate meetings and report to the 
executive. In four weeks from the day when the first meeting was called, 
without a dollar in hand or an article prepared, the first sanitary fair in the 
United States was opened a fair which, for harmony of action, beauty of 
decorations, system and order of management, and perfection of its financial 
arrangements, has never been excelled, if equalled." 

In acknowledging the receipt of the proceeds, Dr. Bellows wrote : " The 
zeal and liberality of your community have been conspicuous in every turn 
of the war. Your repeated contributions to our stock of supplies had not led 
us to anticipate such a splendid addition as you now offer. You would have 
been up to the average, if you had stopped where you were. You will make 
it very difficult for any community this side of the Rocky Mountains to 
keep pace with you, now that you pour into our treasury $4,850." 

How just and apposite it was that Lowell, which had given the first blood 
and buried the first victims, should have made the first concerted effort 
towards stanching other blood and aiding other martyrs. The whirligig of 
time doth indeed bring in his revenges. 

The second festival for the benefit of the soldiers was held in Chicago, in 
October, 1863. The initiative was taken by Mrs. A. H. Hoge and Mrs. D. P. 
Livermore, associate managers of the Northwestern Branch of the Sanitary 
Commission ladies whose humanity, zeal, and labors have raised them to the 
highest places in the annals of philanthropy. Their colleagues, as associate 
managers, were Mrs. E. C. Henshaw, of Ottowa, Illinois, and Mrs. J. S. Colt, 
of Milwaukee. The members of the Northwestern Branch were as follows: 



President, 
E. B. McCAGG. 

Recording Secretary. 
H. E. SEELTE. 



Vice-President, 
REV. WM. W. PATTOX. 

Corresponding Secretary, 
CYRUS BEXTLEY. 



WESLEY HUNGER, 



Treasurer, 
E. W. BLATCHFORD. 

Committee, 
B. F. RAYMOND, 



J. K. BOTSFORD. 



This branch of the commission had already sent to the field thirty 
thousand boxes of hospital stores, of the estimated value of $1,500,000, and 



160 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



its treasury needed replenishing. The ladies consulted their colleagues, the 
gentlemen of the commission, and, the idea being approved, issued and 
distributed throughout the Northwest ten thousand copies of a not over- 
sanguine circular, in which the sum of $25,000 was mentioned as the limit 
of their hopes. In one day the industrious laborers mailed seventeen bushels 
of letters and documents, all relative to the proposed fair. The co-operation 
of the press and the clergy was earnestly invited. The effect was soon 
apparent throughout the interested district; meetings were held, towns and 
villages were pledged for large amounts by their enthusiastic delegates ; and in 
the mean time gifts of all sizes began to arrive, pianos, wringing-machines, 
wax work, stoves, hides, ploughs, nails, coal oil, native wine, pin-cushions, and 
cameos. Such, was the avalanche of offerings, we are told, that the fate of 
Tarpeia seemed to threaten the ladies forming the committee of reception.* 

On the 27th of October, inauguration day, the courts adjourned, the banks 
and post-office closed their doors, the public schools kept holiday ; for once 
the whole machinery of the bustling city stood still. The procession which 
opened the ceremonies was an amazing illustration of the spirit of the teeming 
country of the West. One feature of it was peculiar to the soil the 
delegation from Lake County, one hundred wagons laden to overflowing with 
the produce of the garden and the farm. Potatoes, blue, pink, and brown, 
in heaps ; onions, with the silver skin ; squashes, which must have known of 
their destiny in the early spring, so big with fate were they ; cabbages, beets 



* The Executive Committee of the Chicago 
MRS. A. K. HOGE, Chicago. 

D. P. LIVEKMOKE, 

0. E. HOSMER, 
W. E. FRANKLIN, 

1. N. ARNOLD, 
J. C. HAINES, 
FOLLANSBEE, 
JAS. BOWEN, 
DR. BIRD, 
AMBROSE FOSTER, 
ROBINSON, 

N. LUDINGTON, 

E. ALLEN, 
DR. HAMILTON, 
J. MEDILL, 

E. H. HADDOCK, 
HAMILTON, 
L. S. COWDRET, 
Miss EDWARDS, 
MRS. TILTON, Springfield, 111. 
" E. P. SELBY, " " 

" E. H. LITTLE, Frceport, 111. 
" E. C. HENSHAW, Ottawa, 111. 



Fair was composed of the following ladies: 
MRS. S, L. P. JONES, Monmouth, 111. 

" Gov. HARVEY, Madison, Wis. 

" Gov. SALOMON, " " 

" DR. CARK, " " 

Miss LOTTIE ILLSLEY, " " 
MRS. L. FISHER, Beloit, Wis. 

" J. H. TURNER, Berlin, Wis. 

" J. S. COLT, Milwaukee, Wis. 

" JUDGE HUBBELL, " " 

Miss EMMA BROWN, Ft. Atkinson, Wis. 
MRS. BELA HUBBARD, Detroit, Mich. 
Miss VALERIA CAMPBELL, " 
MRS. E. ELDRED, " 

Miss M. MAHAN, Adrian, Mich. 
MRS. CASSICK, Jackson, Mich. 

" EANKIN, Flint, Mich. 

" COL. LUMBARD, Chelsea, Mich. 

" LYMAN, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

" N. H. BRAINARD, Iowa City, la. 

" DR. ELY, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

" J. C. MAY, " 

" Gov. RAMSEY, Minnesota. 

" WRIGHT, Waukegan, 111. 



THE LAKE COUNTY DELEGATION. 



161 




TUB LAKE COUNTY DELEGATION. 



and turnips, and the whole anti-scorbutic fraternity ; barrels of cider, kegs of 
beer, and astride of the kegs, perched upon the barrels, and rolling among the 
onions, were boys by the cart-load, Northwestern boys, boys from Lake 
County. The wagons were driven to the Sanitary Commission rooms, where 
they were unladen, the crowd acting as stevedores. This magnificent harvest- 
home brought tears to the eyes of many a spectator, and would have done, 
doubtless, had the onions been parsnips. 

One of the most interesting donations to the Chicago Fair was the original 
manuscript of the Proclamation of Emancipation. President Lincoln said, 
in his letter accompanying the document, " I had some desire to retain the 
paper ; but if it shall contribute to the relief and comfort of the soldiers, 
that will be better." It was bought for $3,000 by T. B. Bryan, President 
of the Chicago Soldiers' Home ; and we shall have to tell, in another place, 
of the goodly fund the proclamation has been the means of securing to the 
institution. 

The management and operations of the Dining Hall were so thoroughly 
characteristic of the West that they merit description in detail. The city was 
carefully canvassed for donations of articles of food ; a record was made of 
all who would contribute, of what they could furnish, and of the days upon 
which they would send it. The aggregate supply for each day was thus 



162 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

ascertained. Cooked meats were also received from without the city. Michi- 
gan gave enormous quantities of the finest fruit ; four fifths of this were sent 
to the hospitals. Game, roasted and carefully packed, came from Grundy 
County, Illinois. Hereafter, when we complain of what Grundy says, let us 
remember what Grundy did. Elgin supplied the milk, holding a monopoly 
at which no one grumbled. The ladies of Dubuque, learning that on certain 
days there would be a deficiency of poultry, hastened home, sent their best 
shots to the woods, and the fiercest raiders to the hen-coops. The threatened 
scarcity was averted by the timely arrival of one hundred roast turkeys, two 
hundred ducks, and as many chickens. That these were sent hot to the 
express car we can readily believe ; but when we are told, as we are, and in 
print, too, that they were brought to the table from the car smoking hot, as 
if they had just left the spit, we hesitate. "We are reminded of that great 
traditional culinary mystery of the four-and -twenty blackbirds, which, when 
baked, and, doubtless, " smoking hot," as soon as the pie was opened at once 
began to sing. 

Fourteen tables were set in the dining hall, with accommodations for about 
three hundred guests at once. Each table was reset four or five times daily. 
Six ladies were appointed to take charge of each table during the fair, two of 
whom presided daily one to pour out coffee, the other to maintain a general 
supervision. These ladies were the wives of Congressmen, professional men, 
clergymen, editors, merchants, bankers, millionaires none were above serving 
at the soldiers' dinners. Each presiding lady furnished the table linen and 
silver for her own table, and added such decorations and delicacies as her 
taste suggested or she could secure from her friends. " The waiters were the 
young ladies of the city neat-handed, swift-footed, bright-eyed, pleasant- 
voiced maidens, who, accustomed to being served in their own homes, trans- 
formed themselves for the nonce, for the dear sake of the suffering soldiers, 
into servants. Both the matrons who presided and the pretty girls who 
served were neatly attired in a simple uniform of white caps and aprons, 
made, trimmed and worn to suit the varied tastes and styles of the wearers." 

The North American Review thus discourses upon certain features of the 
Chicago Fair : 

" For fourteen days the fair lasted, and every day brought re-enforcements 
of supplies and of people and purchasers. The country people, from hun- 
dreds of miles about, sent in upon the railroads all the various products of 
their farms, mills, and hands. Those who had nothing else sent the poultry 
from their barnyards ; the ox or bull or calf from the stall ; the title-deed 



THE CHICAGO FAIR. 



163 



of a few acres of land ; so many bushels of grain, or potatoes, or onions. 
Loads of hay, even, were sent in from ten or a dozen miles out, and sold at 
once in the hay -market. On the roads entering the city were seen rickety 
and lumbering wagons, made of poles, loaded with a mixed freight a few 
cabbages, a bundle of socks, a coop of tame ducks, a few barrels of turnips, 
a pot of butter, and a bag of beans with the proud and humane farmer 
driving the team, his wife behind in charge of the baby, while two or three 
little children contended with the boxes and barrels and bundles for room 
to sit or lie. 

" Such were the evidences of devotion and self-sacrificing zeal which the 
Northwestern farmers gave, as, in their long trains of wagons, they trundled 
into Chicago, from twenty to thirty miles' distance, and unloaded their con- 
tents at the doors of the Northwestern Fair, for the benefit of the United 
States Sanitary Commission. The mechanics and artisans of the towns and 
cities were not behind the farmers. Each manufacturer sent his best piano, 
plough, threshing-machine, or sewing-machine. Every form of agricultural 
implement and every product of mechanical skill was represented. From the 
watchmaker's jewelry to horse-shoes and harness ; from lace, cloth, cotton and 
linen, to iron and steel ; from wooden and waxen and earthen ware to butter 
and cheese, bacon and beef: nothing came amiss, and nothing failed to 
come, and the ordering of all this was in the hands of women. They fed 
in the restaurant under the fair, at fifty cents a meal, fifteen hundred 
mouths a day, for a fortnight, from food furnished, cooked, and served by the 
women of Chicago ; and so orderly and convenient, so practical and wise 
were the arrangements, that, day by day, they had just what they had ordered 
and what they counted on, always enough, and never too much. They 
divided the houses of the town, and levied on No. 16 A street, for five tur- 
keys, on Monday; No. 37 B street, for twelve apple-pies, on Tuesday; No. 
49 C street, for forty pounds of roast beef, on Wednesday ; No. 23 D street 
was to furnish so much pepper on Thursday ;*No. 33 E street, so much salt 
on Friday. 

"In short, every preparation was made in advance, at the least incon- 
venience possible to the people, to distribute in the most equal manner the 
welcome burden of feeding the visitors at the fair, at the expense of the good 
people of Chicago, but for the pecuniary benefit of the Sanitary Commission. 
Hundreds of lovely young girls, in simple uniforms, took their places as 
waiters behind the vast array of tables, and everybody was as well served as 
at a first-class hotel, at less expense to himself, and with a great profit to the 



164 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



fair. It is universally conceded that to Mrs. Livermore and Mrs. Hoge, old 
and tried friends of the soldier and of the Sanitary Commission and its ever- 
active agents, are due the planning, management, and success of this truly 
American exploit." 




THE CHICAGO FAIR DINING HALL. 



The Curiosity Shop had this peculiarity about it, that it occupied a court- 
room, and that, to make room for it, court was adjourned for a fortnight, the 
adjourning judge giving his services to the ladies. The hall was draped with 
flags, fourteen captured from the rebels being conspicuous. A counter run- 
ning through the centre was covered with trophies, guns, bowie-knives, 
swords, shells, shackles, camp-stools, all of which had a history. There was, 
of course, a fragment of the Constitution, and a morsel of the Charter Oak. 
Aquanama, a chief of the Menominees, sent his photograph, and his daughter, 
Emma, three bags made by herself. There were minerals, shells, iron, copper, 
silver ; a snuff-box that had crossed in the Mayflower ; a copy of the first Bible 
printed in America ; and bracelets detached from a gigantic Indian skeleton, 
but just exhumed. 

In the Art Gallery were collected the best works in Chicago, lent for exhi- 
bition by their owners. Church. Boutelle, Kensett, Rossiter, Angelica Kauff- 
man, G. H. Hall, Healy, Gifford, Cropsey, Cranch, were worthily represented. 
Some raspberries, neatly done up in a leaf, by Hall, and suspended by a nail, 



CHICAGO INCIDENTS. 165 

attracted the notice of a child, who so asked for them and so cried for them 
that he had to be taken from the room. The authorized " History of the 
Northwestern Fair" wishes the reader to infer that the child was a judge of 
fruit, and thus indirectly paid the artist a high compliment. Why not 
believe him a judge of pictures, and thus compliment the artist still 
more ? He may have been an epicure, but it is quite as easy to believe him 
a connoisseur ; and a little boy weeping because his father denies him a mas- 
terpiece, certainly offers as pleasant a sight as an urchin crying for rasp- 
berries. The success of this exhibition may be gathered from the fact that 
the gallery remained open a fortnight after the close of the fair, and that the 
whole expenses were defrayed by the sale of catalogues ! 

A series of entertainments, rehearsed for the occasion, were given in the 
evening at Metropolitan Hall, Mrs. Livermore being deputed to preside over 
the department of public amusements. First, a concert by two hundred chil- 
dren dressed in white and crowned with flowers, whose every song was en- 
cored ; second, an exhibition of tableaux upon a revolving platform ; third, 
another series of tableaux by a party from Detroit ; then a concert ; after that 
an olio of readings and recitations ; then a promenade concert, more tableaux, 
and, finally, two lectures. Nearly $4,500 were realized by these well-spent 
evenings at Metropolitan Hall. 

' ; The Volunteer," a daily evening newspaper, edited by Mr. Frank D. 
Carley, and sold by young maidens acting as colporteurs the authorized his- 
tory says " newsboys" paid its own way and $377 besides. We are perhaps 
indebted to it for the preservation of the following incidents of the fair, 
which are worth preserving a little longer: 

A small sum of money was found in the pocket of a soldier who had 
died in a southwestern hospital, and was forwarded to his sister at home. 
Unwilling to apply these few dollars to any ordinary use, she purchased with 
them a quantity of zephyr worsted, and with her own hands knit an afghan. 
offered it to the fair, and had the satisfaction of seeing it sold for $100. 

A negro woman, who had made her way north from Montgomery, Ala- 
bama, brought her offering to the fair, saying to the secretary : " Please, 
Missus, may dis sheet, what I got wid my own money, and stitched wid my 
own hands, be sold for de Union sojers?" The sheet was sold for a price 
which would have been liberal for a shawl. 

Five barrels of potatoes came to the fair from Como, Illinois, the result of 
the summer's farming of six young ladies, who had planted, hoed, and dug 
them. 



166 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Oreo. H. Harlow, of Pekin, Illinois, who had dedicated a portion of his 
garden to the army, sent the entire yield to the fair, eleven bushels of 
potatoes. 

J. W. Durfee, of Quincy, Illinois, planted two acres of ground with 
soldier potatoes, and sent the whole crop to the fair, reserving from it, as 
likely to bear a blessing with them, the small ones for seed. 

The aggregate of children's hoards, gathered from tin boxes, savings' 
banks, and stockings, amounted to several hundred dollars. 

Mrs. Lucinda Brewer, of Sterling, Illinois, a lady in her seventy-eighth 
year, gave eight work-baskets, twenty pin-cushions, and twelve iron-holders, 
made from a bedquilt seventy-two years old, all the work of her own hands. 
Mrs. Mary Holbrook, one year older than Mrs. Brewer, and of the same town 
which may well be named Sterling gave three pairs of stockings and two 
pairs of mittens, knit with her own fingers. Mrs. Lucy Brown, of Norwich, 
Connecticut, gave a pair of socks, the sixtieth made by herself since the war 
began. Mrs. Richards, of New York, eighty years of age, sent an afghan, the 
product of her own busy fingers and discriminating taste. 

Calender Ditter, a private in the Sixth Minnesota, contributed a specimen 
of what he called jack-knife jewelry, in the form of a pin thus composed : the 
pink centre whittled from a muscle-shell found in the Red River of the 
North ; the octagon from a buifalo horn, picked up near Devil's Lake ; the 
white from a muscle-shell found on the banks of the Cheyenne ; and the outer 
border from a buffalo horn, found near the head-waters of the James. 
"Accept it," wrote private Ditter, "and make the most of it." 

A soldier, who had given one leg and one arm to his country, employed 
the remaining foot and hand in weaving a basket of Lake Superior osiers. 

The Rev. Mrs. Isaiah Hauser, who resided at Bijnour, nine hundred miles 
inland, northwest from Calcutta, sent to the fair a package of silkworms' 
eggs, and a skein of floss of her own manufacture. Mrs. Hauser, it seems, was 
the wife of a Methodist missionary, and lived in the district which was the 
scene of Nena Sahib's rebellion. She carried on a silk-growing establishment, 
for the purpose of giving employment to orphans in the care of the mission. 
Eggs laid at Bijnour, sent prepaid across the ocean, exhibited at Chicago ! 
They were bought by a gentleman, who, doubtless, remembered the days of 
the morus multicaulis, and who promised to let the world know if eggs from 
India would flourish in Indiana. 

With a soldier's story of a raffle we conclude our catalogue of incidents. 
" A brave fellow from Chickamauga, who had lain for weeks in the hospital, 



A RAFFLE AT CHICAGO. 



167 



came home to Illinois to recover his health and heal his wounded and almost 
useless limb. His wife had come from her country home to Chicago to meet 
him, and to help him complete his journey. He said to her, ' Mary, I must 
go to that fair, if it takes my last dollar. I think I have one left.' With the 
help of his wife and his crutches he entered the bazaar, and, as he said, ' was 
dazzled with its brightness and carried away with its enthusiasm.' It was an 
amazing contrast to the battle-field, hospitals, and barracks he had left behind. 
The glittering pagoda in the centre of Bryan Hall attracted him, as it did 
every one. An elegant cake-basket was being sold in eighteen shares, at one 
dollar a share. ' I'll take a chance for you, Mary,' said the wounded hero, 
and a half shadow fell over the face of his wife, as she saw his last dollar go. 
The shares were all sold the drawing commenced, and to our wounded 
brave from Chickamauga was delivered the cake-basket. Such delight as 
there was over the good luck of the wounded soldier ! ' I thought the ladies 
would have carried me on their shoulders, when my name was called as the 
lucky one,' said the happy fellow afterwards, when telling the story, ' they 
were so glad I drew the cake-basket God bless 'em ! ' ' 

The Chicago Fair brought into the treasury exactly three times as much 
as the most sanguine had dared to hope. To the Women of the Prairie be 
the credit, as is most justly due. 




ELLSWORTH ZOUAVE UEILL. 



The following are the footings of the various departments of the fair, and 
the grand total : 

Total cash receipts $22,083 97 

Admissions and sales 41,423 25 

German department, Mrs. Governor Salomon, of Wisconsin 3,799 95 



168 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Net proceeds of the sale of "The Volunteer," Fair Newspaper $377 15 

Art Gallery receipts 3,726 75 

Dining Hall receipts 6,409 23 

Metropolitan Hall Entertainments 4,419 10 

Proceeds of Ellsworth Zouave Drill 141 00 

Sale of the original manuscript of the Proclamation of Emancipation, contrib- 
uted by Abraham Lincoln 3,000 00 

Supplies not used and sent to the army, market value ... 4,665 61 



Total $90,048 01 

Deduct expenses 11,365 12 



Net proceeds $78,682 89 



The following list gives a fair idea of the variety and value of the con- 
tributions of goods, and of the extent to which an interest in the enterprise 
had spread : 



ILLINOIS. 



Workmen on Rock Island R. R., 
Northwestern R. R., Illinois 
R. R., Steinmetz H. R. R., one 
steam engine 

Peter Dwine, boiler, &c 

S. M. Fassett, card -pictures, pho- 
tographs, &c 

Eagle Works Manufacturing Co. 
(every workman subscribing), 
one steam engine 

H. B. Mason, 80 acres of land . . 

G. A. Taylor, 160 acres of land. 

Alanson Reed, piano and organ, 

Root & Cady, piano 

Phaeton buggy from Novelty 
Carriage Works ; goats from 
Hon. John D. Sargent of 
Durant, Iowa; harness, from 
J. H. Williamson, and minia- 
ture barn from Robert Mo- 
Clnre 

Barnaul Brothers toys' 

Zenas Cobb & Son, plough .... 

James H. Hoes, silver-plated 
ware 

Mrs. J. B. Drake, clock 

Nowlin & McElwain, silver- 
plated ware 

Jessup, Kennedy & Co., silver- 
plated ware 

Bnrley & Tyrrell, china 



155 00 



500 00 
400 00 
500 00 
725 00 
500 00 



300 00 
50 00 
75 00 

80 00 
60 00 

75 00 

50 00 
56 50 



J. A. Smith, furs $50 00 

Mrs. Eben Higgins, afghan .... 75 00 

H. W. Austin, hardware 55 00 

E. Bixby, hardware 50 00 

Geo. E. Gerts & Co., brushes. . . 60 00 

A. Ortmayer, saddles 58 00 

Palmer <fe Plamondel, grain- 
separator 90 00 

Collins & Burgie, stoves 86 00 

Alderman G. Himrod, stove 88 00 

IT. R. Caberey, embroideries . . 76 00 
Fairbanks, Greenleaf & Co., 

scales 300 00 

A. Booth, oysters 150 00 

Baxter & Co., millstones 200 00 

Easter & Gammon, mower .... 150 00 

AY. W. Kitnball, parlor organ . . 110 00 

C. H. McCormick & Bro., riker. 165 00 

Chicago Gas Light and Coke Co. 163 75 

Thomas S. Dickerson, scales.. . . 100 00 

J. T. Ryerson, thresher 125 00 

Bowen Brothers, saddlery, &c. 170 00 

Giles, Brother & Co., clock 100 00 

Peter Schuttler, lumber wagon . 95 00 
Lafflin, Smith & Bois, gun- 
powder 104 00 

Fuller, Warren & Co., stove 150 00 

Jewett & Root, stoves 125 00 

A. II. Blackall, coffee 100 00 

W. R. Wood, cloak 70 00 

Mrs. Mahlon Ogden, doll 50 00 



THE CHICAGO FAIR 



169 



W. B. Keen & Co., books $50 45 

Scanlon & Brothers, candy. ... 56 00 

Fuller, Finch & Fuller, drugs. . 90 00 

Wright, confectioner 50 00 

Fargo & Bill, boots 50 00 

Gilette, Whitney & Co., boots . . 50 00 

A. D. Tittsworth & Co., clothing 70 00 

Scott & Keene, coat 50 00 

Wm. Ross & Co., silk dress .... 50 00 

Mrs. Stowe, bonnet 50 00 

Mrs. Masson, bonnet 50 00 

II. Cook & Co., oysters 200 00 

Mr. Peeke, a Magdalen 200 00 

R. F. Reed, picture 100 00 

Singer Manufacturing Co., sew- 
ing-machines 152 00 

J. Connell & Co., sewing-ma- 
chines 160 00 

Mr. Aiken, knitting-machine. .. 75 00 

Unity Church, fancy goods .... 400 00 

Ladies of the Clifton House 80 00 

A. II. Ilovey and family, goods, 

besides a cash donation 60 00 

G. T. Healy, portrait of Daniel 

Webster, and other pictures. . 550 00 

Mrs. Hobart, profit on books. . . 100 00 
Barber & Hawley, Decatur, one 

mower, one harvester, &c. . . . 440 00 
Mrs. J. H. Miller, Blooming- 
ton, wreath, one year in ma- 
king 100 00 

R. J. Bennet, Diamond Lake, 100 
fine potatoes, many of them 

selling for $1 each 40 00 

Citizens of Elk, 22 wagon-loads 

of produce 500 00 

D. C. Scofield, Elgin, evergreen, 50 00 
Citizens of Fremont, 20 loads of 

produce 412 00 



Madam J. S. Canfield and Mrs. 
M. Drake, together with the 
young women in the cloak 
room of Wm. Ross & Co., 
who gave the material, fancy 
goods made after business 
hours 

Mrs. Senator Trumbull, photo- 
graphic album, with auto- 
graphs 

Mrs. Win. E. Doggett, album. . . 

J. C. Carbutt, card pictures 

Alfred H. Wise, Freeport, grain 
drill 

Geo. W. Brown, Galesburg, and 
his workmen, one corn-planter, 
besides produce 

D. H.Sherman, Goodale, wagon 
load of produce 

Dillman & Co., Julien, reaper, 
&c 

Farmers of Libertyville, 5 loads 
of produce 

Charles II. Deere, Moline, 3 
ploughs 

Clark & Utter, Rockford, sugar- 
cane crusher 

Thompson & Co., and their 
workmen, do., reaper, &c . . . 

J. T. Robertson, do., dressing- 
gown 

Chas. M. Pike, Springfield, bust 
of Secretary Chase, &c 

S. M. Coe, St. Charles, sewing- 
machine 

Citizens of Warren, produce. . . 

Citizens of Wauconda, produce. 

Soldiers' Aid and Needle Picket 
Societies of Illinois, say 




52 00 
103 00 
200 00 
110 00 

80 00 
100 00 
145 00 

75 00 
300 00 




MICHIGAN. 
Mrs. James, Grand Rapids, C. B. Blair, Michigan City, 5 bbls. 

Turkish table $100 00 of cranberries 

Soldiers' Aid Societies, say 900 00 



5,000 00 



$40 00 



MINNESOTA. 
Soldiers' Aid Societies, say $250 00 



WISCONSIN. 

Geo. Dyer & Co., Milwaukee, H. L. Broughton, Milwaukee, 
silver-plated buggy harness . $65 00 sewing machine 



$58 00 



1 70 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Mrs. G. W. Allen, Milwaukee, 
baskets and bouquet of im- 
mortelles, &c 

Sherwin, Norwell & Pratt, Mil- 
waukee, silk dress, point lace 
handkerchief, &c 

Sexton Brothers, Milwaukee, 
dry goods 

Mrs. Dunn, Milwaukee, bonnet 
and head-dress 

Wells & Simonds, Milwaukee, 
clothing 

Miss E. Miller, Milwaukee, hair 
bracelet 

Blair & Persons, Milwaukee, sil- 
ver-plated ware 

Bradford Brothers, Milwaukee, 
dry goods 

Bradley & Metcalf, Milwaukee, 
shoes . , 



Hortsman, Brother & Co., Phil- 
adelphia, presentation sword, 
belt, and sword-knot 

Also, a set of embroidered re- 
galia, I. O. of O. F 

I). Landreth & Son, Philadel- 
phia, 100 boxes garden seed. . 

Singer, Nimmick & Co., Pitts- 
burgh, one cannon 

Lyon, Shorb & Co., Pittsburgh, 
one sheet-iron turret 

Also, one sheet of flange iron . . 

Laughlin & Jones, Pittsburgh, 
nails 

Spange, Chelfant & Co., Pitts- 
burgh, nails 

Wm. S. Haven & Co., Pitts- 
burgh, blank-books and sta- 
tionery 

Citizens of Pittsburgh, fancy 
articles, &c 

Bissell & Co., Pittsburgh, grate 
and fender. . 



105 84 



50 00 



60 00 



50 00 



50 00 



Mr. Van Cott, Milwaukee, plated 
ware 

E. W. Skinner, Madison, sugar- 
cane mill 

Mrs. B. H. Hopkins and other 
ladies of Madison, an afghan, 
worth 

Citizens of Oshkosh, various ar- 
ticles 

J. J. Case & Co., Racine, thresh- 
ing-machine 

Rev. John Reynard, Shullsburg, 
a large specimen of Galena 
iron pyrites and blende 

Ladies of Shullsburg, a cabinet 
and collection of minerals, 
worth 

George Esterly, White Water, 
reaper and mower 

Soldiers' Aid Societies, say. . . . 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

R. C. Townsend, Pittsburgh, 

rivets 

$200 00 Hailman, Rahm & Co., Pitts- 
burgh, axles, carriage-springs, 

100 00 &c 

Zug, Painter & Co., Pittsburgh, 

200 00 20 kegs nails 

McKnight & Co., Pittsburgh, 

150 00 12 kegs nails 

James Wood & Co., Pittsburgh, 

100 00 20 kegs nails 

130 00 Lloyd & Black, Pittsburgh, 19 

kegs nails 

100 00 Megraw's Banner, Pittsburgh, 

one box tobacco 

100 00 H. Childs & Co., Pittsburgh, 5 

boxes cotton batting 

J. M. Spence, Pittsburgh, one vel- 

150 00 vet cloak 

Miss Addison, Pittsburgh, en- 

2,000 00 graving and oil painting 

Trevor McClurg, Pittsburgh, 2 
175 00 oil paintings 



NEW YORK. 

Alexander T. Stewart, New John H. Williams, New York, 
York, one India camel's hair one proof copy of Church's 
shawl $800 00 picture of Niagara 

Other articles . . 100 00 



$40 00 
90 00 

40 00 
130 00 
450 00 

150 00 

700 00 

150 00 
3,000 00 

$60 00 

73 00 
110 00 

66 00 
100 00 
104 50 

50 00 

58 80 
200 00 

40 00 
400 00 

$50 00 



THE BOSTON FAIR. 



171 



Capt. Jay & Co., New York, 
Chinese and Japanese goods . . 

Hudson's Coffee Mills, New 
York, 100 Ibs. best Java 
coffee 

Messrs. Meeker and Maidhof, 
New York, fancy goods 

Mrs. S. S. Osgood, New York, 
oriental album and cameo. . 



Mr. Gabriel Carpenter, Cedar 
Rapids, lot in Cedar Rapids, 
No. 4 in block No. 10. . 



Ladies of Hartford, goods. .... 

Treat & Linsley, New Haven, 

one melodeon 



Checkering & Son, Boston, piano 
Professors Agassiz and Long- 
fellow, Cambridge, fine col- 
lections of their works. 



50 00 



66 00 



100 00 



Appleton & Co., New York, one 

set Encyclopedia, 16 vols. . . . $64 00 
The American Watch Co., silver 

hunting Bartlett watch 60 00 

Daniel Ripley, New York, 200 

Ibs. Java coffee 100 00 

Carter & Brother, New York, 

books 50 00 

J. P. Hale, New York, piano. . . 500 00 



IOWA. 

Mrs. L. Bellows, Lyons, case of 

wax flowers $40 00 

00 Soldiers' Aid Societies, say 1,000 00 



CONNECTICUT. 

$154 10 Miss E. C. Greene, Norwich, 

embroidered saddle $100 00 

200 00 Soldiers' Aid Society of Norwich 400 00 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

$600 00 James M. Barnum, Boston, a 
large and valuable collection 
of china vases, cameos, albums, 
and curiosities $500 00 



Chicago, at first satisfied with the result of her fair, but afterwards dis- 
contented with it, determined to try again. She held her second fair in May 
and June, 1865, of which, in time and place, we shall make due record. 

The next fair, in order of date, was that of Boston, which opened on the 
14th of December, 1863. As, however, we have not space to give the details 
of more than one fair in a city, and as the reasons why we should give the 
preference to the National Sailors' Fair, held in Boston in the fall of 1864, 
are too obvious to require mention, we make no further reference to the first, 
merely chronicling the fact that the net proceeds were about $146,000.* In 
the case of Chicago and Boston, the spirit of emulation was not called into 
play, while in that of Cincinnati and Brooklyn it very evidently was. The 



* The figures are as follows : 

Admission fees 825,777 40 

Sales, Exhibitions, Curiosity Shop, &c 127,881 57 

Total receipts $153,658 97 

Deduct expenses 7,708 12 

Net receipts $145,950 85 

This proportion of expenses to receipts ie the smallest in the series. 



172 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



later a fair in the series, the greater the momentum acquired. Had the New 
York fair been held first, no one can believe that it would have yielded a mil- 
lion and over. Boston and Chicago, the earliest in the list, were conscious 
of the disadvantages under which they labored; and both of them have 
held a second fair to make up for the confessed short-comings of the first. 
Count the two fairs as one, and Boston and Chicago have done as well as the 
best. 

And now comes Eochester. The Aid Society of this city had considered 
the plan, during the summer of 1863, of securing a regular income by means 
of monthly subscriptions, and the city was divided into districts, that it 
might be effectually canvassed. It proved impossible, however, to find 
persons willing to undertake the thankless task. As every thing had been 
done in the way of concerts, lectures and entertainments, which seemed 
likely to produce favorable results, there seemed no device left, which had 
proved of service elsewhere, but a fair or bazaar ; but the prevailing opin- 
ion was, that however successful schemes of this sort had been in Buffalo, 
&c., they would never do in Rochester. An incident occurred in September, 

however, which showed 
the absolute necessity 
of harmonizing con- 
flicting views, and of 
buckling on the har- 
ness in earnest, and this 
incident was the dis- 
covery, on balancing 
the accounts, that there 
was a reserve in the 
treasury of exactly ONE 
CENT. 

The energy, zeal, and ingenuity, which had thus far lain dormant in the 
Rochester breast, now awoke to action. A standing committee on finance was 
appointed, whose duty it was to invent, devise, or otherwise procure, the means 
of raising money, and a Christmas fair was unanimously decided upon. Two 
ladies were sent to Buffalo, to take counsel with and advice from ladies who 
had labored successfully in a similar enterprise there. The Buffalo ladies 
placed at the disposal of their Rochester colleagues any properties and appli- 
ances remaining from their own bazaar ; the use of Corinthian Hall was prom- 
ised by its public-spirited proprietor ; the Gas Company proffered illumination 




DISCOVERY OF A BALANCE OK ONE CENT. 



THE ROCHESTER CHRISTMAS BAZAAR. 173 

without measure and without metre. Messrs. Sherlock & Sloan supplemented 
this generous proposal by another equally so to furnish and put up the 
necessary fixtures to enable the now doubly gratuitous gas to burn, whether 
in single jet or in national coruscations. Three gentlemen, whose assistance, 
offered in days of discouragement, entitled them to the title of " Lafayettes of 
the cause," Messrs. Eeynolds, Searle, and Wilder, commenced their artistic 
and patient labors ; Messrs. Frost and Brothers (Jack of that name not being 
one of the firm), who dealt in trees and plants and flowers, offered to build 
and furnish a landscape from their nursery, and call it Fairy Land ; the owner 
of the Eochester Athenaeum lent it for an exhibition of pictures ; Corinthian 
Hall was insured and the receipted bill handed in by a party of gentlemen ; so 
that all concerned now felt that the ice of discouragement was broken up. 
"A vortex of interest was plainly perceptible, drawing the whole community 
into its whirling current ; woe, now, to any adverse plans and purposes that 
ventured near the outer edge of this fatal maelstrom, for they were sure to be 
wrecked." 

The principal committees of the Kochester Christmas Bazaar were thus 
composed : 

COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS. 

Mrs. W. B. "Williams, Chairman ; Mrs. L. Farrar, Mrs. H. A. Brewster, Mrs. George P. 
Townsend, Mrs. ^L. Gardner, Mrs. A. S. Mann, Miss R. B. Long, Mrs. J. W. Bissell, Mrs. 
George H. Mumford, Mrs. O. Robinson, Mrs. L. C. Smith, and Mrs. H. L. Ver Valin. 

BOOTH COMMITTEES. 

Russian. Mrs. George P. Townsend, Chairman ; Misses E. Breck, M. Craig, Mrs. M. O. 
McCloskey, and Mr. T. Tone. 

Turkish. Mrs. C. F. Smith. Chairman; Mrs. J. H. Brewster, Mrs. J. Hart, and Mr. 
J. Ely. 

Italian. Miss E. L. Smith, Chairman; Misses F. Biden, E. Fulton, E. McKay, M. Selig- 
man, and Mr. O. Palmer. 

Irish. Mrs. Hone and Mrs. Tone, Chairmen ; Misses K. Allen, Brennan, Cunningham, 
K. Kearney, and Mr. Hone. 

Yankee. Mrs. M. Rochester, Chairman; Mrs. S. Ives, Miss M. Selden, and Mr. L. Ward. 

Side Show. Aid. George Darling, Lecturer. Showmen, Messrs. C. Pond, A. Taylor, and 
C. Upton. 

National. Mrs. A. S. Mann, Chairman ; Mrs. J. Chamberlain, Mrs. R. Milliman, Mrs. 
George Peck, Mrs. S. W. Updike, Mrs. H. L. Ver Yalin, Mrs. J. Ward, Mrs. E. F. Wilson, 
Misses E. Dwindle, A. Dwindle, L. Mitchell, K. Mitchell, J. Wilson, and Messrs. H. Hunt- 
ington, F. Mitchell, and Master J. Bissell. 

Shaker (included within the National). Miss C. L. Rochester, Chairman; Misses S. 
Mather, K. Van Every, and Mr. Geo. Elwood. 

Young America. Mrs. B. Viele, Chairman ; Jennie Brewster, Mary Chapman, Lilla 
Williams, Bella Strong, Mary Updike, Maggie Nichols, little Miss Fairchild, and Miss Morse. 

Gipsey Tent. Miss C. Guernsey, Chairman; Mrs. S. A. Canfield, Mrs. T. D. Kempton, 
Misses Wells, and E. Woodworth, and Mr. Woodworth. 



174 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Wigwam. Mrs. J. Whitney, Chairman ; Miss A. Talman, Mr. S. S. Partridge, and Mr. 
F. Talman. 

English and Scotch. Miss Alice Lucas, Chairman; Misses A. Reed, C. Whitney, L. 
Whitney, N. Williams, Mr. A. Williams, and Master Wilson. 

German and Swiss. Miss H. Mumtbrd, Chairman ; Mrs. W. Bush, Misses Schermerhorn 
and L. Selden, and Mr. F. A. Macomber. 

Chinese. Miss A. Hyatt, Chairman ; Misses F. Baltzall, J. Hyatt, and L. Strong, Mr. 11. 
Hyatt and J. D. Husbands, Jr. 

French. Mrs. W. II. Ward, Chairman ; Mrs. L. W. Clark. Mr. A. Smith, Miss II. Ward, 
Mr. O. W. Perrin, and T. W. Whittlesey. 

Fairy Land Sooth. Miss J. Selden, Chairman ; Misses L. B. Northrop, E. Pitman, H. 
Tompkins, H. Johnson, and Mrs. W. W. liegeman. 

Confectionery. Mrs. T. A. Newton, Chairman ; and Mrs. Carter. 

Cake and Cream. Mrs. E. L. Pottle, Mrs. A. Morse, Mrs. E. T. Huntington, Mrs. J. I). 
Husbands, and Mr. E. L. Pottle. 

COMMITTEE ON REFRESHMENTS. 

Mrs. W. B. Williams, Chairman ; Mrs. L. C. Smith, Mrs. E. T. Huntington, and Mrs. 
Amon Bronson, Chairmen of sub-committees. 

The opening ceremonies took place on the evening of the 14th of Decem- 
ber. Success is usually attested by a jam, and one fact will bear witness to 
the tremendous sensation created by the event. Two acres of people strove 
to be the first to pass the gate; and we are told, upon Rochester authority, 
that " their distracted and tumultuous individual experiences painfully showed 
what success they had had." Another authority declares the pressure to have 
been two hundred to the square inch. 

The bazaar proper was divided into eight international booths, the Rus- 
sian, Turkish, Italian, Irish, English and Scotch, German and Swiss, Chinese, 
and French, which occupied two sides of the hall ; Fairy Land, a combina- 
tion of evergreen, fruit, flowers and perfumery, filling the lower end, while 
the National Booth held the center of the upper end ; on one side of this 
was the Yankee Booth with the Side Show in the corner ; on the other side 
was the Childrens' Department, or Young America, the remaining corner 
being occupied by the Gipsey Tent and Wigwam. On the first few evenings 
the bazaar was opened in tableau, the tenants of the booths taking, and for 
some minutes maintaining, attitudes illustrative of their nationality and occu- 
pation ; this idea, though theoretically good, proved practically unsound and 
was soon abandoned. 

The Russian Booth was covered by a snow-capped dome, with ice-clad 
pines around it to enhance its suggestiveness. The thermometer here stood 
at zero. The occupants were clothed in a manner befitting the clime, and 
offered for sale such articles as are usually bought in cold weather skates. 



THE BAZAAR BULLETIN. 175 

mittens, sleds, furs ; as well, also, as such summer articles as were made of 
Russia leather. 

In the Turkish Booth, surrounded by oriental trappings and attired in 
luxurious habits, sat or reclined, in happy indolence, the Grand Turk, smok- 
ing his narghile, the Sultana, the Circassian and the Greek. Italy, the next 
door, -represented by Roman and Calabrian peasants in holiday attire, sold 
pictures, statuettes, and vases; farther on, ladies clad in white and green 
offered the productions of the Irish looms. England and Scotland came next, 
under the branching horns of the deer; here highland laddies and their lassies, 
attended, and, from time to time, serenaded by a bag-pipe, offered the wares 
of Britannia, with no Britannia ware among them. At the Swiss and Ger- 
man Booth, Santa Glaus, attracted by evergreens and Christmas trees, had 
naturally fixed his head -quarters ; and here his gifts were dispensed by Swiss 
and Hungarian peasants. Just on the other side of the partition, enthroned 
in glory, sat the majestic mandarin and the daughters of the moon ; not too 
dignified, however, to dispose of the nimble fire-cracker or the refreshing 
hyson ; beyond, was the vivacious Frenchman, assisted by madame and a lively 
grisette, incarnating the land and disposing of the knicknacks of the par- 
lezvous. 

Fairy Land was, as has been said, a landscape. There was a background 
of rocks and trees ; a fountain playing against it ; flowering plants bloomed in 
the foreground, wreaths of evergreen hung from ceiling to pillar, and birds 
of brilliant plumage perched upon the trees. Messrs. Frost furnished the 
trees and flowers, and they were combined into harmonious forms by a gen- 
tleman who must have foreseen he would be thenceforth known as the Otto 
of roses. Here was the Candy Arbor, much frequented by children ; and 
hard by a pyramid of perfumery, where the odors of Araby proclaimed upon 
every package the sums in which they had been mulcted by the assessor of 
their district. 

Crossing Corinthian Hall, we noticed, if it happened to be in the day-time, 
a number of tables, seating eight persons each, forming the restaurant depart- 
ment of the fair. Here, while we waited, young ladies waited, too. Roch- 
ester approved of their costume and so doubtless would the gallant Earl of 
that name consisting, as it did, of a red skirt, white apron and garibaldi, 
and blue peasant waist. An unscrupulous journal, known as the ; ' Bazaar Bul- 
letin," alluding to the graceful head-dress worn by these young persons, said 
that it " capped the climax." To call a lady's head her climax, is, perhaps, 
good and permissible ; but is there not danger that we may soon hear of an 



176 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

anti -climax from the same quarter, and be told that it means a lady's heel ? 
Such license should be discouraged. 

The red skirts worn by these young ladies were made of the flannel pur- 
chased, and to be afterwards used, for soldiers' shirts; in fact, each skirt was 
composed of two shirt bodies tacked together, to be separated and put to 
their legitimate use after the fair. It was justly thought in Eochester that no 
soldier would object to garments having such a history. 

We have crossed Corinthian Hall, and stand before the National Booth. 
This was as large as any three of the international subdivisions ; and ladies 
clad in red, white and blue, officiated at its free-trade altars. In a subordi- 
nate department, called the Shaker Group, Brother Broadbrim, aided by three 
sisters as demure as himself, dispensed the products of Lebanon industry, 
pennyroyal, willow ware, valerian, feather fans, and apple butter. Young 
America, personated by a minor major-general, offered juvenile fancy work, 
principally the gifts of boys and girls of his own age. Fortunes were told 
in the Gipsey Tent, and moccasins and bead bags disposed of in the Wig- 
wam of the Sachem. 

We have reserved all mention of the distinctive feature of the Rochester 
Bazaar for the end. This was the Yankee Booth, with a Side Show attached. 
The booth was administered by the firm of Jonathan Slick & Co., consisting 
of old Mrs. Slick and her three children, Jonathan, Sopuronia, and Jerusha. 
Sophrony was the business manager; Jerushy, just returned from boarding- 
school, and having a soul above pursuits so grovelling, held herself aloof. 
The varied products of New England, of the class denominated notions, could 
be bought, seen, drunk, and eaten at this establishment; you might buy a 
jack-knife, see a cherry-colored cat, drink a glass of cider, and eat a doughnut. 
The animals exhibited at the Side Show were for the most part political 
caricatures, and the efforts of Mr. Darling, the showman, are described in the 
local chronicles as the very acme of humorous eloquence. 

Outside of Corinthian Hall were three detached departments of the 
bazaar the Art Gallery, the Stereopticon, and the Exchange Street Depot ; 
the first an impromptu and beautiful collection of paintings and statuary ; 
the second a suite of rooms for the sale of card photographs, of albums, of 
ambrotypes in carved and rustic frames, and for the exhibition of stereoscopic 
views ; the third a store-house for the reception of such bulky articles as 
would have been out of place in Corinthian Hall. Appended is a statement 
of the profits of every booth and division of the fair : 



THE ROCHESTER ENCAMPMENT. 



177 



Russian Booth $178 60 

Turkish Booth 275 36 

Italian Booth 104 87 

Irish Booth 444 00 

Yankee Booth and Side Show .... 804 05 

National Booth 1,130 56 

Shaker Department 16100 

Young America 211 08 

Gipsey Booth 151 40 

Wigwam 142 93 

English and Scotch Booth 508 00 

German and Swiss Booth 429 78 

Chinese Booth 267 10 

French Booth 468 05 

Fairy Land Booth 47 98 



Confectionary Department 126 31 

Cake and Ice Cream Table 273 47 

General Refreshments 954 90 

Ticket Department 3,261 27 

" Bazaar Bulletin" 13 50 

Art Gallery 524 65 

Stereopticon 278 95 

Exchange Street Depot 43 00 

Donations in cash 570 42 

Sundry sales 167 10 



Total $11,638 33 

Deduct expenses 1,318 51 



Net profit $10,319 82 



Tims the balance of one cent found in the treasury had been placed out at 
interest, and had yielded a return unparalleled in the annals of usury. 

Encouraged by the success of the bazaar, it was decided during the follow- 
ing winter to have another, with this modification, that it should be called an 
Encampment, that the booths should be tents, that the policemen should be 
sentries, that the officers of the occasion should congregate at " Headquar- 
ters," and that a mounted cannon and a palisade of muskets should assist 
these martial accessories in imposing upon the credulity of visitors. Such an 
encampment was held, and a tented field was spread upon the floor of Co- 
rinthian Hall. Even Santa Glaus became imbued with the military spirit ; no 
longer descending chimneys like a burglar or visiting stockings like a ghost, 
he donned the stars of a major-general and camped out under canvas. The 
Side Show, which had helped to laugh out 1863, did as much for 1864, but it 
was done under the strong hand of military law. The Living Wax Work 
was similarly honored ; and the visitor might, under proper restraint of the 
bayonet, hold a moment's converse with Lady Raleigh, worry Anne Page 
with curious inquiries as to the suit of Master Slender, or congratulate Molly 
Stark upon the general's gallantry at Bennington. 

Armies have ere this been held fast by mud. fleets have been stranded by 
the storm ; high water has swept away pontoons, and low water has left gun- 
boats to stretch their seams upon the shoals. Camps have been flooded when 
the torrents have descended, and why should a Christmas Encampment claim 
immunity from the skies ? " Oh !" exclaims the editor of the " Soldiers' Aid," 
" the weather was our most inveterate foe. King Boreas arrayed his cohorts 
vigorously and pertinaciously against us. Snow, rain, mud, sleet, wind, and 
cold were called into requisition, and operated in every conceivable manner 

12 



178 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

throughout the entire campaign to check our advance, cut off our supplies, 
and drive us from the field. That we were able to maintain our ground at 
all, under such circumstances, and still keep the good Aid Flag flying, is, we 
claim, a victory." 

The net receipts of the Encampment fell somewhat short of $3,000 ; but 
let the blame, if any there be, rest upon the meteorological, not military, 
authorities. 

From Eochester to Cincinnati, by the lightning train. But before speak- 
ing in detail of the Great "Western Fair, the next of these festivals in order of 
time, a word or two are necessary upon the Cincinnati Branch of the commis- 
sion, under whose auspices it was held. 

In May, 1861, one of the United States marine hospitals, lately erected and 
not yet finished, was given to a board of ladies and gentlemen organized for 
the reception and care of sick and wounded soldiers. This building was 
stocked, and its operations carried on for four months, without cost to the 
country ; in August, the medical director of the department took charge of it, 
and it has since been conducted by the government. 

On the 27th of November, the Cincinnati Branch of the Sanitary Commis- 
sion was formally organized at a meeting of the gentlemen who had received 
appointments as associate members, at the house of Dr. Mussey.* They im- 
mediately commenced their labors. A Central Ladies' Aid Society for Cincin- 
nati was established, the co-operation of more than forty ladies' societies being 
thus secured in Hamilton county alone. They caused the camps and hospitals 
near Cincinnati to be subjected to inspection, and furnished all necessary 
relief. They were present in person at Perryville, Fort Donelson, and Shiloh, 
calling to their aid the services of the best physicians and surgeons of the 

* The organization was as follows : 

President, 

R. W. BURNET. 

Vice- Presidents, 
GEO. HOADLY, LAKZ ANDERSON. 

Recording Secretary, 

8. J. BROADWELL. 

Executive Committee, 

R. TV. BURNET, THOMAS G. ODIORNE, CHARLES F. WILSTACH. 

Geo. K. Shoenberger, A. Aub, M. Bailey, Eli C. Baldwin, Joshua H. Bates, E. S. Brooks, A. E. Cham- 
berlin, Rev. B. W. Chidlaw, Charles E. Cist, C. G. Comegys, M. D., Geo. F. Davis, Charles R. Fos- 
dick, L. B. Harrison, James M. Johnston, B. F. Baker, David Judkins, M. D.. Edward Mead, M. D., 
Geo. Mendenhall, M. D., W. H. Mussey, M. D., Henry Pearce, Elliot H. Pendleton, Chas. Thomas, 
Mark E. Reeves, E. T. Robbins, all of Cincinnati ; Charles Butler, of Franklin ; James McDaniel, 
J. D. Phillips, R. W. Steele, of Dayton ; David S. Brooks, of Zanesville. 

Treasury, the First National Bank of Cincinnati. 



THE CINCINNATI BRANCH. 179 

city. They contributed to the equipment of thirty-two steamers running in 
Western waters, transporting supplies and bringing home the sick and 
wounded. The aid rendered on the Donelson field by the steamer " Allen 
Collier," chartered by the citizens and stocked by the commission, saved hun- 
dreds of lives. The Collier was the first steamer to ascend the Cumberland 
after the battle ; the wounded were absolutely without medicines, the floating 
hospital having on board no chloroform, but two ounces of cerate, no meat, no 
wood, and neither a spoon nor a candlestick. The suffering alleviated by the 
arrival of a steamer laden with hospital supplies can be imagined. 

The members of the Cincinnati Branch afterwards travelled thousands of 
miles on their errands of mercy ; they aided the government -in the establish- 
ment of eight hospitals in Cincinnati, and Covington, Kentucky ; they sug- 
gested and assisted in the labor of converting Camp Dennison into a general 
hospital. They bought furniture, became responsible for rent and the pay of 
nurses, provided material for the supply-table, hired physicians, and in num- 
berless ways secured that full and careful attention to the care and comfort of 
the soldier which, from inexperience, want of means, or the fear of responsi- 
bility, would otherwise, during the first and second years of the war, have 
been wanting. In May, 1862, they established a Soldiers' Home, where, up to 
the close of 1864, eighty thousand soldiers had been entertained, three hundred 
and seventy-two thousand meals having been furnished in that time. They 
interested themselves in obtaining a burial-place for Ohio soldiers in Spring 
Grove Cemetery, inducing the trustees to give one lot gratuitously, and the 
legislature to buy two others at a merely nominal price. All the soldiers who 
lie in the first lot were interred at the expense of the trustees. 

Up to the time of holding the fair, the Cincinnati Branch had received 
and disbursed the following sums, excluding $3,000 which had been ap- 
propriated by the state and the city, with which, of course, we have nothing 
to do: 

Donations from citizens of Cincinnati $38,265 73 

" " " Ohio 14,42343 

Sales of nnconsumed rations at Soldiers 1 Home 2,175 52 

Donations from citizens of California 15,000 00 

Interest and premium on securities 5,655 00 

Total $75,519 68 

The value of supplies received in kind during the same period was not 
far from $1,000,000. 



180 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 




ATE in the fall of 1863, the funds of the branch were 
running low and the calls for aid were by no means decreas- 
ing. The members began to look about them. The peo- 
ple were prosperous, their pockets were comfortably lined, 
but the difficulty appeared to be to get at them. What 
was wanted was an effective means of appeal. " Why," 
suggested " A Lady" in several of the daily papers, " Chicago has lately held 
what they call there a Sanitary Fair ; why not have one in Cincinnati only, 
of course, a much better one, a much finer one, and a much bigger one." The 
healthy competition existing between Cincinnati and Chicago is well known. 
So calls were issued, meetings held, and resolutions approved ; pretty soon 
officers were elected, committees appointed, and a conference was had with 
the ladies, who had also been holding meetings and passing resolutions. The 
two segments speedily came together, and the papers and the mails very soon 
teemed with earnest appeals for assistance. Christmas was coming, and it 
was not long ere the sentiment of young Ohio was pretty unanimously this : 
"Give my present to the soldiers; lean wait and they can't." Thus the 



THE GREAT WESTERN FAIR. 181 

bread was thrown upon the waters, and how it returned may be told in a 
word : there were more holiday presents bought than ever ; but they were all 
bought at the fair. 

The following officers for the Great Western Fair had now been appointed, 
and were hard at work : 

President, 
MAJOR-GENERAL "W. S. ROSECRANS. 

Vice- President, Second Vice-President, 

MAYOR HARRIS. MRS. DR. MENDENHALL. 

Treasurer, Corresponding Secretary, 

ROBERT W. BURNET. JOHN D. CALDWELL. 

Executive Committee, 

EDGAR CONKLING, D. T. WOODROW, 

CHARLES REAKIRT, BENJAMIN BRUCE, 

CHARLES F. WILSTAOH, L. C. HOPKINS, 

JAMES DALTON, CHARLES E. CISH, 

MRS. HOSEA, MRS. "W. F. NELSON, 

MRS. JOSEPH TILNET, MRS. R. M. W. TAYLOR, 

MRS. JOHN KEBLER, MRS. STARBUCK, 

MRS. JOSEPH GUILD. 

Not long after, the chairmen of the various sub-committees reported prog- 
ress. The Building Committee were erecting two mammoth edifices, four 
hundred feet long and sixty wide. Various halls, concert-rooms, etc., had 
been engaged, and preparations were in a forward state. The Committee on 
Transportation had made an arrangement with the railroad and steamboat 
companies by which the latter would sell, once a week, during the contin- 
uance of the fair, a round-trip ticket at half price, and give the whole to the 
fair ; and this, besides carrying all packages for the fair gratuitously. The 
Committee on Finance had obtained about $5,000. The Committee on Enter- 
tainments had been promised a night at the Opera House, and the services 
of the Newport Military Band. The Committee on the Entertainment of 
Strangers were preparing to assume their hospitable duties. Every thing- 
augured well; the population of the interior towns had been well stirred, 
nay, probed, by the thousands of circulars that had been sent them; the 
railroads were already beginning to groan ; and the indications were abundant 
that, as the President of the Sanitary Commission had ventured to pre- 
dict, Cincinnati would be content with nothing less than six figures, the first 
figure of the six being, at the very least, a two. One hundred and nineteen 



182 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



ll? 




COMMITTEE ON ENTERTAINMENT OF STRANGERS AT WORK. 



organizations, either aid societies, churches, circles, or schools, had signified 
their intention of being represented by delegates or tables. 

Two of the devices of the Fi- 
nance Committee deserve especial 
mention. The first of these was a 
proposition that persons should con- 
tribute to a fund in sums of $20, 
or of some multiple of $20 ; this 
should be invested in United States 
Five-Twenty Bonds, and, at the 
close of the fair, one quarter of the 
bonds should be redistributed to 
the subscribers by lot. Thus a con- 
tributor of $20 might get a $1,000 

bond, and yet three quarters of the amount subscribed would still reach the 
commission. The table of results will show that the fair obtained some 
$4,000 from this source. The other device was to give to each contributor 
of small sums, from $1 to $10, a certificate bearing the signature and 
portrait of General Eosecrans, and a vignette of the Goddess of Liberty. 
$10,000 were produced by the sale of these certificates, which were popularly 
called " Sanitary Whitebacks." 

The Great Western Fair opened on the day appointed, the 21st of Decem- 
ber. A welcoming address by Gen. Rosecrans, a prayer by Bishop Mcllvaine, 
" My Country, 'tis of Thee," sung by nine hundred children of the public 
schools, and speeches by distinguished gentlemen, formed the ceremonial of 
dedication. The fair proper, or sale of goods, did not begin till evening. 
Then, according to all accounts, a vision of beauty burst upon the astounded 
gaze. The spectator was regaled with a glimpse of Fairy Land. He saw 
before him wares " ranged in graceful rows, pendent in delicate clusters, or 
heaped in gorgeous piles." " Ophir had disgorged the richest plunder of its 
caverns." One circumstance favored the Cincinnatians exceedingly the 
season. It is true that the Chicago festival had been set in the gorgeous 
mounting of an American autumn, and had profited by the associations of 
harvest time and the approaching thanksgiving ; it is true that the Philadel- 
phians were to make ready to greet the roses and the buds of the early sum- 
mer; but Boston, New York, and Brooklyn would receive no favor from any 
conjunction of the stars, no extrinsic aid from the season, the time, or the 
hour. Now Cincinnati had chosen the very witching season of the year, 



THE COMMITTEE ON EVERGREENS. 



183 




WORK OF THE COMMITTEE ON EVERGREENS. 



when churches are dressed in the green that neither the sun nor the storm can 
wither, when the veriest cabin may be made beautiful with boughs of cedar 
and hemlock. Santa Glaus had promised to lend Cincinnatus a hand, and he 
brought not only his pack, but his robes. Mozart and Greenwood Halls were 
embowered in green ; the forest had deserted the hillside, and was visiting 
the city for Christmas. The tables, the ceilings, the walls, were draped, hung, 

festooned, canopied with branches ; hot- 
house flowers and ruddy winter apples 
mingled their livelier hues with the dark 
sobriety of the evergreen. ~No doubt 
the literal significance of the scene was 
that of a mart, a place for buying and 
selling, for barter and exchange ; but the 
fact that whatever else was sold, nothing 
but oil and wine were to be bought, no 
trafficker sent out but those who were 
provided as the Samaritan was, with 
healing for wounds and moneys with 
which to make sure of bed and board 

for the sick and weary, is evidence that a sanitary fair may honorably and 
reverently deck itself in the sacred Christmas emblem. 

Inasmuch as the 25th of December was at hand, and as the children had 
asked to be allowed to go without their presents, it was evidently necessary to 
lay in a large stock of Christmas-trees; children cannot always be gratified 
in their desires. Forty-four were accordingly prepared, and placed upon the 
stage behind the curtain of Greenwood Hall. When all was ready, and the 
hush of expectancy sufficiently breathless, the curtain was raised upon the 
graceful labor of the Committee on Evergreens. The effect was tremendous. 
Small hands were clapped in ecstasy ; wee voices grew gradually louder, and 
the roar was so overwhelming that the welkin, had there been one, would 
have rung again. A sorcerer stepped upon the stage. This was not pre- 
cisely Santa Glaus, though he possessed the power of whisking off Christmas- 
trees to the homes of certain persons whose names he had the mission to 
pronounce. His spell was peculiar, his ceremonial quaint, and his utterance 
intelligible only to the few. He bore a hammer in his hand, he repeated 
certain cabalistic words, principally numerals, till they ran into and over 
each other and lost all coherence, all sense, and all shape. If every thing 
that had been going had finally gone, there would have been nothing left in 



184 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Cincinnati. The name of this potent spirit was Graff. He rehearsed the 
word dollar so often during the evening, that at the end of the ceremonies 
there were seven hundred and thirty-seven of them collected upon a piece 




SALE OF CHRI8TMA8-TKEK8 IN GREENWOOD HALL. 



of paper. The trees were sent away by express-wagon the next morning. The 
whole horticultural department was a triumph of nature and art a happy 
mingling of taste, flowers, skill, red apples, and evergreens. 

Omitting all mention of the Gallery of Curiosities and Belies briefly 
described in fifty-seven pages of the " History of the Great Western Fair" 
and merely referring to the exhibition of Fine Arts as one of a high order 
of merit, we come to the sale of autographs and autograph letters, a marked 
feature of the fair. Premising that the receipts from this department were 
nearly $1,700, we may mention a few of the items that formed this aggregate. 

O. W. Holmes had been asked "to be funny over his own signature," 
and he replied in his most facetious vein, sending a series of questions and 
answers in natural history, wherein instruction was insidiously conveyed in 
the simple guise of conundrums. Two specimens must suffice : 

" What instance can you give of the cunning of serpents ? 

" Ans. The simple fact that they secrete their venom where they can 
find it when wanted. 

" Why do the above questions amuse you more than the answers ? 



AUTOGRAPHS AND LETTERS. 185 

"Acs. Because the person who asks the question is the querist" 

J. H. Beard, the artist, in his letter of reply to a request for his signature, 
said : " I hope you will not take it unkindly if I decline sending my auto- 
graph. I have long since determined never to let it go into the market again. 
You will, therefore, present my regret to the Sanitary Commission. Eespect- 
fully yours, J. H. Beard." 

James Buchanan expressed the hope that the fair might have all the 
success it deserved. 

Fred. Cozzens had been asked for the original manuscript of the " Horse 
Episode," in the " Sparrowgrass Papers ;" but being unable to find it, and 
supposing that it had got into the pound, he sent the story about the bugle 
instead. 

Mrs. Paul Akers sent a poem, and William Lloyd Garrison three senti- 
ments, a letter, and a toast. 

Nathaniel Hawthorne contributed letters from the author of " Tom Brown," 
from Mrs. Gore and Dr. Mackay. 

Generals Grant, Hooker, Howard, Grierson, McClellan, McDowell, Meade, 
Pope, Pleasanton, and many others, sent letters, autographs, or gifts. 

The Eev. John Pierpont forwarded, from his desk in the Treasury Depart- 
ment, a poem in eight lines, which was as good as it was short. 

Archbishop Purcell and Bishop Kosecrans sent their best wishes, accom- 
panied by a pair of very fine daggers. These were not Damascus blades, 
nor yet stilettos from Toledo. They were bloodless weapons, and were 
sheathed up to the hilt in the signatures, thus : f John B. Purcell, f S. H. 
Eosecrans. 

Buchanan Eead, not content with exhibiting pictures, sent poems also. 
It is not to be wondered at that the gentleman who preferred the works of 
Claude to those of Lorraine, and who was in Cincinnati in the winter of 
1863, should have pronounced Eead, the artist, as in every particular the 
equal of Buchanan, the poet. 

General Scott, who replies not to private requests for autographs, sent 
six, attached to as many photographs, to Cincinnati. 

John Sherman obtained for the fair an autograph copy of an interest- 
ing document. He applied to President Lincoln for the original Amnesty 
Proclamation ; but as this was somewhat defaced, the President copied it, 
retaining all the marks, erasures, notes and additions. Framed in black wal- 
nut, this document was sold to the National Union of Cincinnati for $150. 

General Sherman contributed a fifty-dollar rebel note of the latest issue. 



186 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Mr. Fernando Wood regretted that he had not access to his file of letters 
from distinguished men of twenty years ago ; for if he had, he could furnish 
several autographs of value. 

Two autograph letters of Humboldt, one to Hon. J. H. "Wright, and one to 
James Buchanan, were offered to bidders. The first brought $4.75; the 
other, being accompanied by a certificate or voucher from Mr. Buchanan, 
who had received it and knew it was genuine, was worth twenty-five cents 
more. 

A bank check, signed by Jefferson Davis, indorsed by Mrs. Davis, and 
honored by the Brothers Chubb, on whom it was drawn, was sold for eighty 
cents ; one of Drake de Kay's military passes, famous in the early days of 
the rebellion for the bold strategy of the chirography, for twenty-five cents ; 
an autograph letter from Guizot, for three dollars; one from Baron Liebig, 
for fifteen cents; one from Kamehameha IY. to the Hon. D. Kamehameha 
of the Interior Department, with photographs of the King and Queen of the 
Sandwich Islands, for $1.50. A Frederick the Great brought $2.60 ; a 
paper in the handwriting of Oliver Ellsworth, Chief Justice of the United 
States, ten cents ; and a John Caspar Lavater, twenty cents. 

A lesson may be learned from the history of the autograph department of 
the Great Western Fair. It is this : when asked for your signature to be sold 
at a vendue, never send nine of them. A gentleman did this, and they were 
hustled off in bulk for fifteen cents. Had he sent but one it would probably 
have brought quite as much, and perhaps more. Thus the soldiers were liter- 
ally fleeced by excess of zeal on the part of an ardent well-wisher. 

However, we must not quarrel with the items, when they foot up so well. 
If the whole is satisfactory, why find fault with the parts? Seventeen 
hundred dollars from such a source is a goodly sum. If a wound received 
in a sabre fight is healed by the succor afforded by an autograph, we are 
more convinced than ever that the pen is mightier than the sword. 

The bazaar of merchandize, machinery, and produce, under the superin- 
tendence of Mr. James C. C. Holenshade, was the most productive department 
of the fair, yielding over $60,000. There were four grand representative 
divisions produce, machinery, merchandise, and stock. Here were grain and 
potato bins overflowing with the increase of the fields ; barrels of cider on 
tap ; tiers of baled hay, separated, by a judicious arrangement, from the cattle, 
horses, and sheep ; trunks for those who wished to travel for their health, a 
retail drug dispensary for those who preferred seeking health at home ; there 
were hens and chickens with the feathers on, hens and chickens with the 



A DONATION SUPPER. 187 

feathers off barn-doo* fowls in the one case, poultry in the other ; animal 
life in the form of hogs, cast-iron in the shape of pigs, those in droves, these 
in stacks ; furniture for those who were going to housekeeping, carriages and 
wagons for those who were giving it up. 

A donation supper for soldiers' families was given during the fair. That 
is, a supper was given, not to soldiers' families, but to other persons who eat 
it for their benefit. People gave the provisions, and then paid to eat them ; 
they gave cakes, and then bought them again ; they even paid to get in, in 
order to buy their own gifts : the city police contributed $500 in cash ; and 
seventeen ladies, canvassing the seventeen wards, brought in $6,000 more. 
$7,146 were distributed to soldiers' families in the city and this amount is 
not included in the table of proceeds of the fair. 

The proprietors of the Niles Works threw open their shipyard for the 
good of the cause. Or rather, as their yard was, doubtless, open previously, 
they generously shut the gates, placed a tax-gatherer at the door, so that every 
one who wished to see a monitor might give a quarter to the fair ; or he that 
wished to give a quarter to the fair might do so while inspecting the Catawba. 
Seventeen hundred persons availed themselves of this privilege. 

The department of public amusements, amateur and professional, contribu- 
ted its full share to the treasury. Mr. Murdock summoned audiences to 
secular and patriotic readings at Mozart Hall, to sacred readings at Pike's 
Academy; the Shakspeare Club collected three hundred and fifty rascal 
counters, three hundred and fifty units of the vile trash, which, having been 
slave to thousands, may once have been yours or mine ; three hundred school 
children, assisted by their teacher, Professor Graeser, went through a series of 
" free gymnastics" with dumb-bells, rings, and staves. The gymnasts of the 
Catholic Institute built unsteady pyramids of human bodies, each pyramid, 
when the apex fell or the abutments heaved from out the centre, dissolving 
into a tableau, wherein Ajax impudently defied the lightning, and with impu- 
nity too, or Cain threatened Abel with the latest gymnastic bruise. German 
professionals enacted " The Stockdrover of Austria," and Cincinnati amateurs 
" The Momentous Question." The Seventh Regiment was drilled for the 
public diversion, and, by the aid of the cunning of the scene and the illusions 
of a mid- winter night, conveyed to the audience a graphic idea of an " Outpost 
in Winter." Nearly $3,000 were poured into the common fund by the Com- 
mittee on Public Amusements. 

An analysis of the sources from which the contributions to the fair were 
drawn, gives the following results : 



188 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

From the State of New York $12,069 

Massachusetts 1,193 

Pennsylvania, about 2,500 



Missouri, 

Illinois, 

Tennessee, 

Maryland, 

Kentucky, 

Indiana, 



From other States, 
From Ohio, 



2,000 

> 500 

2,500 

200 

4,500 

2,500 

2,500 

30,000 



From Cincinnati, 175,000 

Cincinnati thus contributed nearly three quarters of the proceeds of the 
fair, about one dollar for every man, woman, and child within the city limits. 
The " History of the Great Western Fair" thus closes : " In Cincinnati was 
first conceived and successfully executed the plan capable of working out the 
idea which Chicago had suggested, the plan since adopted elsewhere, and 
which adapts itself readily to the enlarging desires of the nation. Cincinnati, 
however, soon found that as she surpassed Chicago, so other cities were raising 
sums far larger than her own. In no cities, however, except St. Louis and 
Pittsburgh, have the results been comparatively greater ; and these last fairs 
were held under the stimulus of previous successes, and with the benefit of 
the experience which others had gained. Cincinnati will suffer nothing in the 
general comparison, for it is seen that she reached, according to her population, 
the proportion of the full measure of the country's capacity to give, as proved 
in the great eastern cities." 

The following is a detailed report of the proceeds of the Great Western 
Fair, by committees, departments, and tables : 

Sale of tickets to Ladies' Bazaar $13,309 65 

" " Merchandise and Produce Hall 1,444 20 

" " Palace Garden 100 80 

" " Horticultural Department 1,547 55 

" " Art Hall 1,100 00 

" " War Memorials and Relics 1,145 55 

Sale of general tickets 5,490 70 

$24,138 45 

Post-Office $91 90 

Net proceeds of the "Ladies' Knapsack," fair newspaper 600 00 

St. John's Episcopal Church tables 593 05 

Christmas-Tree entertainments 1,106 21 

" sales 18345 

College Hill Ladies' Society table 445 40 

Ohio Female College table 284 85 



A FINANCIAL REPORT. 



189 



Fruits, flowers, and fancy articles, Mrs. D. T. Woodrow's tables. . . $1,376 51 

Eefreshment table 863 95 

Stereoscopic views 20 75 

Sale of instrument presented by Hon. S. P. Chase 200 00 

Closing sale of articles 301 05 

Cash donations 44 40 

Net proceeds, expenses deducted $6,101 89 

Receipts from tables in Ladies' Bazaar 62,309 42 

Refreshment Committee $221 47 

Autograph " 1,677 55 

Coal " 778 75 

Transportation " 10,353 37 

Nursery " 1,000 00 

Finance " 56,291 62 

Sales in Merchandise and Produce Hall 61,626 33 

Certificates of contributions 10,121 10 

Donations through C. G. Rogers 2,594 82 

Profit on Five-Twenty Bonds 3,936 00 

Sales in Art Gallery 350 64 




Sale of relics and curiosities 923 33 

Exhibition of monitors 425 00 

Proceeds of concerts, lectures, &c 3,434 13 

" of S. Smith's picture of the Crucifixion 1,140 00 

Sales of buildings 12,672 00 



$167,546 11 

Total receipts $260,095 87 

Deduct expenses for buildings, &c 25,506 89 



Add, as per supplementary report . 



$234,588 98 
817 64 



Grand total $235,406 62 



Now Cincinnati, proud of the quarter of a million thus obtained, sent to 
the city of Brooklyn, New York, in a spirit of defiance, a huge broom, being 



190 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



the ideal utensil which had swept together the glittering heaps. Brooklyn, 
nothing daunted, and with its preparations nearly completed for a fair of its 
own, picked up the broom as if it had been a knightly glove, and muttered : 
" As two and a half is to four, so is Cincinnati and Southern Ohio to Brooklyn 
and Long Island." We proceed now briefly to show how this prophecy, 




THE BKOOK1.YN AND LONG ISLAND FAIE. 



uttered under the breath, was made good in tones of thunder, 
bargain," sang Mr. Palfrey, and thus went on to sing : 



u Fair is a 



Fair is a bargain, when 'tis made 

According to the rules of trade ; 

Fair is the maid who sells these rhymes, 

You've called her so a thousand times ; 

Fair are the speeches false as fair 

That oft in Congress vented are ; 

Fair are the nymphs that throng Broadway 

On every bonnet-opening day ; 

In civil storms, as Job sets forth (xxxvii. 22), 



"Fair weather cometh from the North;" 
Fail-mount by Schuylkill's wave is fair ; 
Fairfield is famed for wholesome air ; 
Fair winds impel Fairhaven's sails, 
Hunting in Arctic seas for whales ; 
Fair was the fight at Nazeby, when 
Stout Fairfax beat King Charles's men ; 
And fair with treasures rich and rare 
Is Brooklyn's Sanitary Fair. 



THE BROOKLYN AND LONG ISLAND FAIR. 



191 



The Brooklyn and Long Island Sanitary Fair is claimed, by those most 
interested, to have been the first act of self-assertion ever done by the City of 
Churches. Though possessing the Navy Yard of the nation, the most beauti- 
ful Cemetery in the world, public schools as good as any in the land, noble 
institutions of charity, of learning and the arts, and though being, upon the 
authority of the census, the third city in the Union, it had been content to lie 
in the shadow of its mighty neighbor, a quiet suburb, a part, but not a whole, 
a Latin Quarter, a Trastevere, in short, the New Yorker's alcove, his bed- 
chamber. But when, in November, 1863, the Women's Belief Association of 
Brooklyn decided to unite with the sister city in a grand Metropolitan Fair, to 
be held in February, 1864, and when, upon the postponement of the enter- 
prise for six weeks, Brooklyn refused to postpone, and resolved to have a fair 
of her own,* to do business henceforward in her own name, and to break loose 
from Manhattan fetters, then it was, we are told, that she " asserted her full- 
grown womanhood, and, starting forth to walk alone, not only walked but 



* The following were the officers of the Brooklyn and Long Island Sanitary Fair : 

General Committee, 
ABIEL A. Low, President. 

Executive Committee Gentlemen . 

DWIGHT JOHNSON, Chairman. FREDERICK A. FARLEY, D. D., Cor. Secretary. 

WALTER S. GRIFFITH, Sec. Secretary. JAS. H. FROTHINGHAM, Treasurer. 



H. B. CLAFLIN, 
ELIAS LEWIS, JR., 
HON. ED WARD. A. LAMBERT, 
ETHELBERT S. MILLS, 
JAMES D. SPARKMAN, 
HON. JOHN A. KING, 
ARTHUR W. BENSON, 
S. B. CHITTENDEN, 
HENRY E. PIERREPONT 
JOHN D. MCKENZIE, 



HON. JAS. S. T. STRANAHAN, 
HON. ALFRED M. WOOD, 
HON. JOHN A. LOTT, 
SAMUEL B. CALDWELL, 
AMBROSE SNOW, 
THOMAS T. BUCKLEY, 
A. A. Low, 
HENRY SHELDON, 
CHARLES A. MEIGS, 
WILLIAM H. JENKINS, 
JOSEPH WILDE, 

Executive Committee Ladies. 

MRS. J. S. T. STRANAHAN, President. 

Miss KATE E. WATERBURY, Bee. Secretary. 

MRS. S. B. CALDWELL, 
S. B. CHITTENDEN, 
W. J. COGSWELL, 

J. P. DUFFIN, 

J. W. HARPER, 
A. CRITTENDEN, 
ALFRED M. WOOD, 
L. HARRINGTON, 
G. H. HUNTSMAN, 
T. F. KING, 
E. S. MILLS, 



HON. JAMES HUMPHREY, 
GEORGE S. STEPHENSON, 
ARCHIBALD BAXTER, 
JOSEPH RIPLEY, 
EDWARD J. LOWBER, 
LUTHER B. WYMAN, 
W. W. ARMFIELD, 
PETER RICE, 
WILLARD M. NEWELL, 
WILLIAM BURDON, 
S. EMERSON HOWARD. 



MRS. G. B. ARCHER, 
E. ANTHONY, 
H. W. BEECHER, 
A. W. BENSON, 
C. J. BERGEN, 
R. C. BRAINARD, 
J. C. BREVOORT, 
T. T. BUCKLEY, 

W. I. BUDDINGTON, 
N. BURCHARD, 

A. BRADSHAW, 



MRS. H. L. PACKER, Cor. Secretary. 
MRS. G. B. ARCHER, Treasurer. 

MRS. MORRELL, 
W. W. PELL, 
H. E. PIERREPONT, 
E. SHAPTER, 
H. SHELDON, 
J. C. SMITH, 
J. D. SPARKMAN, 
G. S. STEPHENSON, 
J. S. SWAN, 
A. TRASK, 
J. VANDERBILT. 



H. WATERS, 



192 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

ran and soared, and amazed even herself." She amazed her big relative, too, 
and, if she did not alarm her, she stimulated her. 

A meeting was held in Brooklyn on the 19th of December, 1863, which 
exerted no little influence upon the success of the undertaking. The wealth 
and public spirit of the city were there, and before the evening was over the 
public spirit had got the better of the wealth by the sum of some twenty- 
five thousand dollars. A form of subscription was read, and Mr. John D. 
McKenzie was the fortunate man who first placed his name upon the paper* 
He not only did that, but he put the well-known formula, $1,000, over against 
it. Mr. Abiel A. Low took offence at this, apparently, for he inscribed a dif- 
ferent number, namely, $2,500, over against his name. Two such examples 
could not remain without followers, and they did not. Nearly thirty thousand 
dollars were subscribed during the evening, and in ten days the sums promised 
amounted to fifty thousand dollars. Notices were now sent to the various 
Sewing and Aid Societies of Long Island, inviting them to send contribu- 
tions to the fair, and in a short time, the whole population were warmly 
interested in its success, which, indeed, had never for an instant been 
doubtful. 

It was soon decided by the proper authorities that there should be a dining- 
room connected with the fair, and that it should be called Knickerbocker 
Hall ; that a refectory or lunch-roorn, furnishing certain peculiar and anti- 
quated viands, should be called the New England Kitchen ; that there should 
be a Curiosity Shop, a Gallery of Art, a Post-Office, and a daily newspaper 
entitled the " Drum Beat." Baffling and the sale of wine were prohibited. 
The Academy of Music was to be the central scene of the exhibition, con- 
nected by bridges with several contiguous buildings, one of which was already 
in existence, while others were yet to be constructed. All the preparations 
were completed in time, the booths stocked, the ladies dressed, and, punctually 
at the stroke of three, upon the 22d of February, the inaugurating proces- 
sion reached the scene of action. At seven in the evening the doors were 
thrown open, and the Brooklyn Sanitary Fair entered into history. Ages 
hence, however, when history shall have become old enough to have relapsed 
into tradition, and when people shall have their doubts whether Brooklyn 
ever existed even, the records which shall have drifted down to them of the 
Long Island Fair will confirm them in their unbelief just as the written 
glories of Aladdin's garden teach us that Aladdin never was, nor could have 
been. Is it too much to say that when ten thousand years have rolled away, 
the following paragraph, surviving the wreck of other matter, will be enough 



A VISION OF SPLENDOR. 193 

to stamp the Brooklyn Fair as an amiable deceit and all the pleasant stories 
of it legends ? 

" A vision of splendor breaks upon the eye, before which few fail to stand 
in mute amazement. We see, as in some gorgeous dream of fairy land, a 
world of beautiful creations rise before us. Our eyes are dazzled with vivid 
colors, and our ears stunned with the clamor of thousands of tongues. It is 
night A myriad of gaslights pour a flood of radiance over the wonderful 
scene. The vast room seems wainscoted and ceiled with rainbows. Glass 
and silver flash back the blaze in streams of iridescent light; silks and satin 
shimmer softly, brilliant colors shine everywhere gold and crimson and green 
and blue and rose and purple ; perfumes of rarest flowers scent the air ; n 
melody from the piano tinkles through the tumult like the piping of birds 
in the pause of a storm, or a burst of sumptuous music from the powerful 
band rolls out of the balcony and charms the clamor to a breathless hush. 
* * * * The richness, vividness, and variety of colors of the thousand 
articles which heaped the tables, fluttered from the pillars, or glowed from 
the walls, gave one the impression of a bevy of rainbows playing hide-and- 
go-seek. The irises of one's eyes, for about five minutes after leaving this 
brilliant corner, resembled their etherial prototype as well in the rich play 
of color as in name." 

They must, indeed, in 11864, take it all for fiction. But the deception will 
be a harmless one, originating as it did in the honorable cause of humanity. 
But to some few details of the gentle delusion. 

In one of the proscenium boxes was the Post-Office, under the care of 
Mrs. J. P. Duflin and assistants. These ladies not only conducted the busi- 
ness of their bureau, but they wrote the letters too. The recipients paid 
fifteen and twenty-five cents postage, according to bulk, perhaps, or else accord- 
ing to their being written in prose or verse. So ardently did the ladies bend 
to their task, and so faithfully were letters advertised called for, that nearly 
$600 were realized, and this was ninety -five per cent, profit The Postmas- 
ter-General at Washington has long sought to make his department self- 
sustaining. Let him go to Brooklyn and learn. 

The Old Woman who lived in a Shoe dwelt not far from here. This 
was not, as might at first appear, an idea of the Hide and Leather Committee ; 
it originated with a lady of one of the city churches. The old woman was 
personated by a child of tender years, dressed in mobcap and spectacles, 
established in a huge shoe, and having so many dolls she really did not know 
what to do. She sold them, however, for four hours in succession, when she 
la 



194 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



was relieved by another, and she by still another little girl, in turn. Had 
they been older, and had they lived in Elsinore, they would doubtless have 
exclaimed, each to her successor, ' ; For this relief, much thanks !" 




THE OLD WO.MAX WHO LIVED IN A SHOE 



In the book department, during the last three days, a placard was exhib- 
ited, upon which was the following appeal : " Buy a book, and leave it to be 
sent to the hospital library, Beaufort, S. C." Among the first to respond to 
this request were three soldiers, who purchased a volume each, and wrote 
their names and regiments upon the fly-leaf. One hundred and fifty books 
were thus obtained, and, at the least, $150 besides. 

Ten little girls, whose united ages were just one hundred years, arrived in 
state at the fair one afternoon, having brought to a close an auxiliary fair of 
their own. They came to bring the proceeds, $16.50 apiece. There are 
doubtless ten millionaires in the land who have not done as much in pro- 
portion, though they may have given thousands. 

The chief attraction in the Art Gallery was, of course, the exhibition of 
pictures and statues ; but one hardly inferior was the Artists' Album of 
Sketches in Oil, the fruit of a suggestion of Mr. R. Gignoux, of Brooklyn. 
The collection numbered one hundred and twenty pictures, by as many con- 
tributors. It was disposed of in shares of $10 each, over five hundred being 
sold. The shareholders agreed to meet after the fair, to divide the one 
hundred and twenty sketches into six portions, and to distribute these by 



THE NEW ENGLAND KITCHEN. 195 

lot. This was done, and the arbitrament of fate was rigidly adhered to. 
Half the pictures remained in Brooklyn, a portion crossed the river, while 
a smaller part was transferred to Baltimore. 

An Amateur Artists' Album, containing fifty-eight pictures in oils and 
water-colors the larger part by ladies, and all originals was disposed of in 
shares for $500. They were then drawn for in lots, two of twenty each and 
one of eighteen. 

Knickerbocker Hall, where creature comforts were dispensed, was a great 
pecuniary and gastronomic triumph. Upholstery and epicurianism vied with 
each other, and it is impossible to say which won. Flags, arches, evergreens, 
shields, mirrors, on the one hand ; on the other, trout, pickles, grouse, eggs, 
jelly, pies, celery, and ducks. Messrs. Duryea & Co., of New York, not only 
furnished all the maizena that a hungry public called for, but they cooked it 
so well, and in so many different ways, that every one took maizena, no mat- 
ter what else he neglected. The other supplies were mainly contributed by the 
churches, six on each day. Thus, on Tuesday, March 1st, it was the turn of 
Plymouth Church, the South Presbyterian, the Harrison Street Dutch Church, 
St. Charles Borromeo, the Elm Place Congregational, and the East Eeformed 
Dutch Church ; on Wednesday, it was the turn of six others. The quantity 
consumed in a day was not far from the following, maizena not included : 
One hundred turkeys and chickens, one hundred grouse, quail, and ducks, 
five hundred pounds of beef, mutton, and venison, twenty hams and tongues, 
eighteen thousand oysters, fifteen pounds of trout, twenty pounds of smelts 
and other fish ; cake, pies, sixty or seventy quarts of jelly, eight hundred 
quarts of ice-cream, two hundred and fifty quarts of coffee and tea, four hun- 
dred loaves of bread, three barrels of crackers, two hundred heads of celery, 
three barrels of potatoes, besides sugar, butter, eggs, milk, flour, apples, 
oranges, pickles, preserves, &c. The articles of food contributed were enough 
to supply seven eighths of the entire demand. $24,000 was the net result 
of this thoroughly well managed affair. 

The nature of the New England Kitchen will be best explained by an 
extract from the circular of the committee having the matter in charge : 

" The idea is to present a faithful picture of New England farm-house life 
of the last century. The grand old fire-place shall glow again, the spinning- 
wheel shall whirl as of old ; the walls shall be garnished with the products 
of the forest and the field ; the quilting, the donation, and the wedding party 
shall assemble once more, while the apple paring shall not be forgotten ; and 
the dinner-table, always set, shall be loaded with substantial New England 



196 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

cheer. "We shall try to reproduce the manners, customs, dress, and, if possi- 
ble, the idiom of the time ; in short, to illustrate the domestic life and habits 
of the people to whose determined courage, sustained by their faith in God, 
we owe that government so dear to every loyal heart. The period fixed 
upon is just prior to the throwing overboard of the tea in Boston Harbor." 

Another briefer statement of the object in view was made in these words: 
' It was established to promote plain living, high thinking, a consummation 
of pork and beans, and a revival of the spirit of seventy-six." 

Before the projectors of this novel plan could obtain the necessary space 
in which to carry it out, they were obliged to pledge themselves that it should 
yield a certain sum, which in the end it did yield, and four times over. 
The furniture and appointments of the room were, for the most part, genuine 
antiques. One of the chairs was a hundred and fifty years old, and had once 
been buried in the earth, to save it from destruction by the foe. There 
was a clock, whose face was pitted by a British bullet, and a rifle which had 
belonged to Patrick Henry ; there were Bibles of the days of the Puritans ; 
newspapers of the year 1775 ; paintings from the panels of the Guerriere ; 
canteens and spinning-wheels one hundred years old. 

We read in the " History of the Brooklyn and Long Island Fair :" 

" The fire-place was, of course, an important feature of the kitchen. It 
was of huge dimensions, and strictly after the old New England type. In its 
capacious mouth an ox might have been roasted with ease. From the tradi- 
tional trammel swung a gigantic pot, in which from time to time were cooked 
great messes of unctuous chowder or steaming quantums of mush. From the 
ovens at the sides emerged, at stated periods, spicy Indian puddings, smoking 
loaves of Boston brown bread, and famous dishes of pork and beans, crisped 
to delicious perfection. 

" The tables were covered with old-fashioned china, and the guests returned, 
under the rigid rule of the place, to the ante-silver-fork period, and had to 
content themselves with the two-tined steel. White sugar was religiously 
ignored, and modern improvements generally were at a discount. The idea 
was to live in the Past, and the Present was ignominiously banished. Many, 
before leaving the New England Kitchen, howsoever well satisfied with the new 
ways about us, were fain to conclude 'the old is better.' On the tables were 
bountiful supplies of toothsome viands pork and beans, apple-sauce, Boston 
brown bread, pitchers of cider, pumpkin, mince, and apple pies, doughnuts, 
and all the savory and delicate wealth of the New England larder. The 
guests were waited upon by damsels with curious names and quaint attire. 



A QUILTING PARTY. 



197 



Just such New England girls as spread the cloths and cut the loaves of a 
century ago were the neat-handed waitresses of the New England Kitchen of 
the Brooklyn and Long Island Fair. 

" The venerable knitters in the corner, with their starched caps, and snowy 
kerchiefs crossed over the bosoms of their stuff gowns, the huge iire-place with 
its mighty logs, the dresser with its rows of shining pewter, the ever-ready 
churn, the tall clock sedately ticking in the corner, the ridge-poles strung 
with dried apples, pumpkins, glittering red peppers, seed-bags, and ' yarbs' of 
healing virtues, the New England girls with their quaint costumes and un- 
couth speech all made up a wonderfully striking scene, which, once beheld, 
could not soon be forgotten." 




NEW ENGLAND KITCHEN: A QUILTING PARTY. 



Several entertainments were given in the Kitchen, illustrating the manners 
of the olderi time. "We were taught how our ancestors used to sing by the 
" Old Folks' Concerts ;' ; how they gladdened the threshold of the parson by 
the "Donation Visit;'' how pressing works were done in concert by the 



198 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

" Quilting Party" and the " Apple Bee ;" and, finally, how they married and 
were given in marriage, by the "New England Wedding." In this last 
solemnity, Mr. and Mrs. Holmes, of Williamsburg, were united over again by 
the Eev. Jedediah Poundtext. The illusion was made complete by the gift of 
a frosted cake to the bride from the ladies of Knickerbocker Hall. 

The Drum Beat, a daily newspaper, at once advocating the claims of the 
cause and describing from day to day the passing incidents of the fair, and 
conducted by the Eev. R. S. Storrs, Jr., D. D., and Mr. Francis Williams, was 
published from February 22d to March 5th, with a supplementary number 
upon the llth. Its circulation was about six thousand copies, and it brought 
into the treasury the rotund sum of $3,050. The entire cost of the type- 
setting and printing was assumed and borne by Mr. S. B. Chittenden. 

On the evening of March 8thj not long before the hour of closing, the 
treasurer announced by bulletin that the contributions of Brooklyn and Long 
Island to the sanitary cause had reached the magnificent sum of $400,000. 
This was four times as much as had been hoped for, when Brooklyn expected 
to form merely a division of the Metropolitan Fair. It was proved that 
they could make brooms, and use them, too, as well in Brooklyn as in Cin- 
cinnati. 

Among the sales by auction, after the close of the fair, was that of the 
house and lot No. 540 Atlantic Street, the gift of Messrs. Scranton & Co. 
This property was mortgaged for $2,600, and all above this sum which it 
should bring was to be given to the cause. The first offer was $3,000, the 
bids running rapidly up to $3,650. At this point all contestants fell off but 
two. Here was the auctioneer's opportunity, and Mr. Sintzenich profited by 
it. Appealing to the pugnacious instincts of the two competitors in turn, 
and when one made a bid sympathizing with and stimulating the other, he 
squeezed out two hundred dollars more, and announced Mr. W. R. Tice the 
purchaser for the sum of $3,850. 

A calico ball was given, after the fair had closed, in Knickerbocker Hall. 
Many of the ladies were dressed in the plainest cotton fabrics, which were 
afterwards devoted to charitable uses. Two thousand dollars were realized 
from this source. 

The following is an abstract of the treasurer's report : 

Cash donations $208,523 36 

Admissions 50,572 07 

General sales main building 107, ft 15 31 

" manufacturers' department 19,302 35 



AN HONORABLE RECORD. 



199 



Department of Art, Relics, etc $10,502 08 

Drum Beat Committee 3,051 06 

Post Office " 830 55 

Skating Pond 587 45 

f Restaurant $12,772 24 

Receipts at Knickerbocker Hall, < Confectionery 1,802 85 

( Soda Fountains 1,400 07 

15,975 16 

Receipts at New England Kitchen 4,845 19 

Sales of buildings, furniture, and decorations 1,609 88 

Sundry items 8 82 

Cash contributions to the Employment Society for the manufacture 

of hospital goods 2,550 00 

Value of hospital supplies and medical comforts contributed through 
the fair, from city and country, estimated at from $6,000 to 
$10,000, say 6,000 00 

Total $431,973 28 

Deduct expenses 29,029 54 

Net $402,943 74 

The following is a list of cash donations, which amounted, as above, to 
more than $200,000 : 

B. F. Delano (collections) $5,18463 Brooklyn Collegiate and Poly- 
Brooklyn Savings Bank 5,000 00 technic Institute $1,032 25 

Union Ferry Co 5,000 00 George B. Archer 1,000 00 

Thirteenth Regiment, N. G., Col. Horace B. Claflin 1,000 00 

Woodward, proceeds of a Peter C. Cornell 1,000 00 

Promenade Concert 4,011 00 Dime Savings Bank 1,000 00 

Abiel A. Low 2,500 00 S. B. Chittenden 1,000 00 

Sixth TVard Bounty Committee. 2,000 00 Thomas C. Durant 1,000 00 

South Brooklyn Savings Institu- E. T. H. Gibson 1,000 00 

tion 2,000 00 A. C. Hull, M. D., proceeds of 

Brooklyn City Railroad 1,925 68 dramatic entertainments at the 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Athenfeum 1,000 00 

Flatbush 1,706 84 Thomas Hunt 1^000 00 

Public Schools of Brooklyn 1,259 69 Seymour L. Husted 1,000 00 

Scranton & Co 1,250 00 Josiah O. Low 1,000 00 

Town of Hempstead, by Jno. E. H. R. Lyman 1,000 00 

Harold, Miss Hendricks, and John D. McKenzie 1,000 00 

C. W. Rogers 1,244 77 Theo. Polhemus, Jr 1,000 00 

Proceeds of fair at Sag Harbor, Enos Richardson 1,000 00 

by Josiah Douglass, Treasurer 1,200 00 Henry Sheldon 1,000 00 

Public School Exhibition, W. D., South Second St. M. E. Church. 1,000 00 

at Academy of Music 1,173 90 George S. Stephenson 1,000 00 

Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian Village of Newtown, by C. H. 

Church, by Mrs. E. A. Lam- Victor 958 94 

bert 1,16857 Packer Institute, Senior Class 

Village of South Hampton, by Entertainment 941 88 

Col. B. H. Foster 1,051 25 Philharmonic Society 918 00 



200 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Town of Bridgehampton, by Hon. 

H. P. Hedges $936 94 

I. Van Anden 763 25 

A. Henly 750 00 

Town of Flatbush, by J. Lefferts 718 25 
Roman Catholic churches of 

Brooklyn, by Mrs. Dr. Cullen 688 92 
Burnham's Gymnasium Exhibi- 
tion 088 45 

Village of Huntington, by Win. 

Nicoll 662 27 

Bulkeley Brothers 660 00 

Plymouth Sabbath-School 630 00 

Oratorio of Moses in Egypt, 

given in the South Ninth St. 

Congregational Church, under 

the direction of Philip A. 

Meyer 014 51 

Church of St. Peter and Paul, 

Rev. S. Malone 603 00 

Aaron Claflin 600 00 

C. S. Parsons & Sons fiOO 00 

C. & R. Poillon 600 00 

J. O. Whitehouse 600 00 

Metropolitan Police Force of 

Brooklyn 576 .32 

Village of Patchogue, by lion. J. 

S. Havens 559 54 

Public School No. 15, Primary 

Department Entertainment. .. 557 00 

Brooklyn Daily Times 543 50 

H. Cocks 534 85 

Mrs. II. L. Packer, entertainment 522 45 
Town of Jamaica, by Mrs. W. I. 

Cogswell 518 53 

II. N. Conklin, Son & Beers 515 00 

Mrs. Jane S. Torrey, proceeds of 

musical entertainment 503 00 , 

Coe Adams 500 00 

A. Baylis 500 00 

Charles S. Baylis 500 00 

S. M. Beard 500 00 

August Belmont 500 00 

Arthur W. Benson 500 00 

C. J. Bergen 500 00 

Charles Bill 500 00 

Board of Brokers, New York . . 500 00 

Thomas Brooks & Co 500 00 

R. P. Buck 500 00 

John Bullard, Jr 500 00 

Samuel B. Caldwell 500 00 

Charles Christmas. . 50000 



Estate of F. B. Cole $500 00 

Collins, Plummer & Co 500 00 

E. W. Corlies 500 00 

Edward Dodge 500 00 

James W. Elwell 500 00 

Farmington School, by Edward 

S. Sandford 500 00 

John W. Frothingham 500 00 

Rufus R. Graves 500 00 

Sidney Green 500 00 

S. Emerson Howard 500 00 

Elias Howe, Jr 500 00 

Hon. James Humphrey 500 00 

W. W. Huse 500 00 

A. Jewett 500 00 

Journeay & Burnham 500 00 

Henry A. Kent 50000 

Nehemiah Knight 500 00 

Lowber, Ostrom & Co 500 00 

R. II. Manning 500 00 

John T. Martin 500 00 

Samuel McLean 500 00 

Edward B. Mead 500 00 

James Myers & Co 500 00 

J. B. Norris 500 00 

James H. Prentice 500 00 

Joseph Ripley 500 00 

Amos Robbins 500 00 

J S. Rockwell 500 00 

II. J. Ropes 500 00 

R. W. Ropes 500 00 

Ripley Ropes 500 00 

Henry D. Sanger 500 00 

Sawyer, Wallace & Co 500 00 

H. K. Sheldon 500 00 

Ambrose Snow 500 00 

Charles Storrs 500 00 

Hon. J. S. T. Stranahan 500 00 

J. R. Taylor 500 00 

Geo. W. Valentine, Brewster & 

Bergen 500 00 

J. J. Van Nostrand 500 00 

Hon. William Wall 500 00 

J. P. Wallace 500 00 

Hosea Webster 500 00 

I. B. Wellington 500 00 

Alex. M. White 500 00 

Wm. Augustus White 500 00 

James C. Wilson 500 00 

J. W. Mason 450 00 

Mrs. S. B. Chittenden, proceeds 

of an entertainment. . 409 00 



BROOKLYN FINANCES. 



201 



Mrs. A. S. Barnes, proceeds of 

an entertainment $400 00 

Forty-seventh Regiment, by Col. 

Meserole 400 00 

First Baptist Church, E. D., Rev. 

Dr. Baker 376 59 

Wm. Arthur (collections) 355 30 

0. H. Rogers i 350 00 

South Presbyterian Church 346 00 

Congregation Beth Elohim 332 00 

Sands Street M. E. Church 332 00 

D. S. Hines (collections) 321 20 

Mrs. Peter Rice 318 00 

Brooklyn Gaslight Co 300 00 

Mrs. Maria Gary 300 00 

James How, Jr., proceeds of 

model of Ocean Express 300 00 



South Brooklyn Engine and 

Boiler Works, Daniel McLeod, 

proprietor and workmen $254 00 

D. S Arnold 250 00 

William Beard 250 00 

R. S. Benedict 250 00 

Benjamin Blossom 250 00 

C. W. Blossom 250 00 

Thomas T. Buckley 250 00 

J. S. Burgess 250 00 

Seymour Burrell 250 00 

C. B. Camp 250 00 

Benjamin Carver 250 00 

George S. Carey 250 00 

Columbian Insurance Co 250 00 

William Cooper 250 00 

John Davol . . 250 00 




WAX FLOWERS AT THE BROOKLYN FAIR. 



John McCracken 300 00 

J. J Merian 300 00 

F. Sherwood, sundry collections 300 00 

Mrs. C. Coles, proceeds of tab- 
leaux, E. D 300 00 

Second Presbyterian Church . . . 297 00 

Village of Flatlands, by R. Ma- 

gaw and Rev. Mr. Doolittle. . 286 17 

Public School Examination, 

E. D.. 265 24 



Village of Glen Cove, by Miss E. 

N. Valentine 263 45 

Nicholas Luqueer, Jr., Soirees 

Musicales by self and friends 261 00 

Edwin Atkins 250 00 

Joshua Atkins.. 250 00 



Abel Denison 

George F. Duckwitz 

A. M. Earle 

Smith J. Eastman 

James D. Fish, President 

Amasa S. Foster 

W. A. Fowler 

S. F. Goodridge 

W. D. Gookin 

Erastus Graves 

Griffith, Prentiss & McComb. 

Andrew Harman & Sons 

Haslehurst & Smith 

Francis Hathaway 

L. P. Hawes 

W. S. Herriman 



202 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



George L. Heuser $250 00 

Charles E. Hill 250 00 

J. K. Hutchinson 250 00 

Samuel Hutchinson 250 00 

K E. James 250 00 

Frederick Lacey 250 00 

W. C. Langley & Co 25000 

J. B. Leggett & Co 250 00 

E. B. Litchfleld 250 00 

Lord & Taylor 250 00 

Franklin H. Lummus 250 00 

W. H. Lyon 250 00 

H. W. T. Mali 250 00 

Charles E. Marvin 250 00 

C. A. Meigs & Son 250 00 

James L. Morgan 250 00 

L. P. Morton & Co 250 00 

Mutual Life Insurance Co., N. Y. 250 00 

J. M. Nichols 250 00 

Curtis Noble 250 00 

James S. Noyes 250 00 

Eugene O'Sullivan 250 00 

E. A. Packer 250 00 

George Pearce & Co 250 00 

R. B. Perry 250 00 

E. B. Place 250 00 

H. G. Reeve 250 00 

Daniel C. Robbing 250 00 

H. W. Sage 250 00 

H. B. Scholes 250 00 

Shethar & Nichols 250 00 

Hon. Samuel Sloan 250 00 

Hon. Samuel Smith 250 00 

Sturges, Bennet & Co 250 00 

W. H. Swan 250 00 

Tefft, Griswold & Kellogg 250 00 

Robert Thallon 250 00 

Alanson Trask 250 00 

Samuel W. Truslow 250 00 

S. Van Benschoten 250 00 

C. F. Van Blankenstein 250 00 

R. Van Wyck 250 00 

Vernon Brothers & Co 250 00 

Charles H. Vietor 250 00 

Frederick W. Vietor 250 00 

Theodore Vietor 250 00 

William Wall, Jr., 250 00 

White & Douglass 250 00 

Village of Sayville, by Charles 

Gillette 244 00 

Town of Smithtown, by John 

Lawrence Smith . 241 85 



Citizens of U. S. in Berlin, by A. 

C. Woodruff $241 00 

R. M. Hooley, proceeds of two 

benefits 238 00 

Westminster Church 230 00 

Germania Society 225 00 

Cuthbert & Cunningham 225 00 

James H. Hart & Co 22400 

Village of Rockaway, by Rev. 

R. T. Pearson 220 05 

Town of Quogue, by J. F. Foster 210 75 

Grace Church 206 05 

Village of Flushing, by Miss A. 

L. Jones and B. W. Downing 204 86 

Abram Inslee 204 16 

Women of Village of Oyster 

Bay, by E. S. Fairchild 202 00 

D. H. Conkling 200 00 

F. Skinner & Co 200 00 

Low, Harriman, Durfee & Co . . 200 00 

N. F. Miller 200 00 

Garner & Co 20000 

F. Butterfield & Co 200 00 

Horton & Sons 200 00 

W. C. Sheldon 200 00 

Brumley & Kellogg 200 00 

G. M. Richardson & Co 200 00 

R. W. Adams 200 00 

Henry W. Banks 200 00 

P. T. Barnuin 200 00 

Bentley & Burton 200 00 

H. D. Brookman 200 00 

C. B. Caldwell 200 00 

S. W. Carey 200 00 

Carter, Stewart & Co 200 00 

Central Presbyterian Church, by 

Mr. Bryer 200 00 

Church of St. Charles Borromeo, 

Rev. Dr. Pease 200 00 

Dutcher & Ellery 200 00 

Henry Elliott 200 00 

James D. Fish 200 00 

Hoyt, Sprague & Co 200 00 

Isaac Hyde, Jr 200 00 

Eliza W. Lynde 200 00 

M. T. Lynde 200 00 

Manhattan Life Insurance Co., 

N. Y 200 00 

David Moffat 200 00 

F. D. Moulton 200 00 

N. E. Mutual Life Insurance Co. 200 00 

New York Life Insurance Co. . . 200 00 



APPLES AND DOLLARS. 



203 



S. S. Osborne $200 00 William S. Tisdale $200 00 



Packard & James 

Parker, Brooks & Co. . 

Ariel Patterson 

Pearce & Brush 

Post, Smith & Co 

G. M. Richmond & Co. 
George C. Robinson . . 

J. P. Robinson 

Theodore Rogers 



200 00 James L. Truslow 200 00 

200 00 "Watson & Pettinger 200 00 

200 00 J. T. Whitehouse 200 00 

2CO 00 Franklin Woodruff 200 00 

200 00 Village of Greenpoint, by Mrs. 

200 00 Close and Miss S. Heath 188 45 

200 00 Village of Mattituck, by John 

200 00 Shirley 179 25 

200 00 Capitoline Association 175 00 




Thomas F. Rowland . . 

Sage & Co 

Sheffield & Co 

Smith & Jewell 

John Sneden 

J. C. Southwick 

Nathan Southwick... 
J. B. Spelman & Sons. 

Augustus Storrs 

Sutton, Smith & Co . . 
Miss E. Thurston.. 



NEW ENGLAND KITCHEN". APPLE PARING. 



200 00 Mrs. Dunn's school for young 

200 00 ladies 175 00 

200 00 J. B. Ilutchinson, proceeds of 

200 00 musical soiree 175 00 

200 00 Mrs. James H. Prentice 175 00 

200 00 Village of New Lots, by Rev. J. 

200 00 M. Van Beuren 174 50 

200 00 Mrs. H. C. Osborn, pupils of her 

200 00 Seminary 170 85 

200 00 Town of East Hampton, by J. 

20000 Madison Hnntting. .. 17049 



204 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Town of Greenport, by Eev. C. 

Backman $170 00 

Little Girls' Fair, by Mr. F. 

Hodges 170 00 

Edward Dodge, entertainment 

by J. Wilson and friends 164 79 

Mrs. J. H. Frost 158 00 

0. F. Blake 157 81 

Ladies' Union Association of 

Hempstead 155 00 

D. B. Dearborn 155 00 

Masury & Whiton 155 00 

Village of Islip, by Rev. Alvan 

Nash 152 00 

J. S. Bagley 150 00 

Brittan Brothers 150 00 

B. E. Clark 150 00 

Member of Christ Church, E. D., 

by Rev. A. II. Partridge 150 00 

George Dickinson 150 00 

James Douglass 150 00 

Jonathan Earle 150 00 

Hermann Koop 150 00 

W. Lang, Bailey & Co 150 00 

Mrs. A. Crittenden 149 58 

Washington Avenue Baptist 

Church 143 50 

Brooklyn Heights Seminary, 

Prof. C. E. West 140 00 

Mrs. Sparkman and Mrs. Morelle 137 63 

J. D. Clark, pupils of his school 126 00 

Norman Hubbard 126 00 

Village of Babylon, by Martin 

Willets 125 00 

Samuel Engle 125 00 

James L. Ilathaway 125 00 

George S. Puffin 12500 

South Brooklyn Female Semi- 
nary entertainment 125 00 

W. M. Steele & Co 125 00 

Bethel Mission Sunday School, 

42 and 44 Fulton Street 123 91 

Ericsson Aid Society, by Mrs. A. 

B. Lowber 120 00 

George J. Vining 120 00 

Gravesend Neck, by S. Gerret- 

sen 118 00 

John Shuster 1 17 00 

Village of Farmingdale, by Chas. 

S. Powell 115 00 

D. S. Waring 115 00 

Brooklyn Daily Union 11128 



Entertainment by Lizzie C. Corn- 
stock, Grace A. and Nellie A. 

Bowen $111 00 

Third Presbyterian Church, by 

Mrs. Badeau 110 00 

Village of Brookville, by Rev. 

Jeremiah Searle 108 00 

Soldiers' Aid Society of Queens 107 25 

A. Oatman 105 00 

B. Stevens 105 00 

Village of Cypress, by Win. A. 

Walker 104 10 

Presbyterian Church, Wallabout, 

Rev. Dr. Greenleaf 100 10 

Anthony & Hall '. . 100 00 

Woodward, Lawrence & Co 100 00 

Dummock & Moore 100 00 

Hunt, Tillinghast & Co 100 00 

Sprague, Cooper & Colburn ... 100 00 

Rice, Chase & Co 100 00 

F. Newman 100 00 

Carhart, Bacon, Greene & Co. . 100 00 

Pastor, Hardt & Lindgens 100 00 

Slade & Colby 100 00 

Ezra M. Frost 100 00 

Howell & King 100 00 

Becar & Co 100 00 

Wm. Lottimer & Co 100 00 

Wm. B. Leonard 100 00 

B. H. Hutton 100 00 

Chapman & Co 100 00 

E. M. Lord 100 00 

Bowers, Beeckman & Bradford, 

Jr 100 00 

Arnold, Constable & Co 100 00 

E. S. Jaffray & Co . 100 00 

Furman Hunt 100 00 

Walter Lockwood 100 00 

George Mygatt 100 00 

Thomas & Co 100 00 

Chas. Welling & Co 100 00 

Stanfield, Went worth & Co 100 00 

Wicks, Smith & Co 100 00 

Wm. Brand & Co 100 00 

W. H. Lee & Co 100 00 

E. E. Eames 100 00 

Henry Stone 100 00 

Knower & Platt 100 00 

J. & H. Auchincloss 100 00 

Joseph H. Adams & Coombs. . . 100 00 

Carlos Bardwell 100 00 

D. S. Barnes.. 100 00 



DOLLARS IN HUNDREDS. 



205 



Henry W. Barstow 

John C. Beatty 

Robert W. Beatty 

Henry G. Bell. 

Benner & Brown 

James B. Blossom 

Josiah B. Blossom 

John Blunt 

John B. Bogart 

Breithaupt & Wilson 

Broadway Eailroad Co 

Brooklyn Athenaeum and Read- 
ing-Room 

Mrs. George W. Brown 

Joseph B. Brush 

Charles J. Bulkley 

T. P. Bucklin, Jr 

T. B. Bunting & Co 

James Burt 

Caesar & Pauli 

Ewald Caron 

J. S. Case 

S. T. Caswell 

Central Bank 

Chapman & Co 

Pickering Clark 

Geo. A. Clark & Brother 

Clark, Clapp & Co 

Robert Colgate & Co 

George Collins 

Connecticut Mutual Life Insu- 
rance Co., Hartford 

Charles W. Cooper 

Cross & Austin 

Henry Davis 

H. II. Dickinson 

Benjamin Dietz 

Margaret Dimon 

Dodge & Olcott 

D. K. Ducker 

E. W. Dunham 

Charles Easton 

C. F. Elwell 

Entertainment by Sarah E. Con- 
nor and A. C. Smith 

Frederick C. Farley 

Thomas Faye 

Wm. Finney 

Flagg, Baldwin & Co 

John R. Ford 

TV. C. Fowler 

Fowler & TVard . . 




100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 

100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 

100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



James H. Frothiugham 

Isaac Gerry 

J. M. Goetchius 

A. F. Goodnow 

Charles Goodwin 

TVerner Graeve 

H. W. Gray 

Greenpoint Sugar House 

James M. Griggs 

Guardian Life Insurance Co . . 

John Harold 

C. F. A. Heinrichs 

Nathaniel Hillyer 

Frank Hinchman 

J. H. Holcomb 

Holmes, Booth & Haydens. . . 
George T. Hope 

B. H. Howell 

George Howes 

J. Freeman Hunt 

W. B. Hunter 

F. W. Hurd, M. D 

David H. James 

W. H. Jenkins 

A. G. Jerome 

Dwight Johnson 

Johnson & Spader 

Frederick TV. Kalbfleisch .... 

Samuel T. Keese 

Charles Kelsey 

A. E. Kent & Co 

M. S. Kerrigan 

Godfrey H. Koop 

Thomas TV. Ladd 

F. A. Lane 

H. G. Lapharn 

O. K. Lapham 

TVm. Layton 

Lee, Bliss & Co 

TV. B. Leonard 

S. Livingston 

Loeschigk, TVesendonck & Co. 

C. J. Lowrey 

TV. D. Mangam 

Martin & Ritchie 

Edward McClellan 

Alexander McCollum 

Charles McDougall 

Thomas D. Middleton 

Miller & Co 

S. Milliken, Jr 

Wm. Wickham Mills . . 



$100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



206 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



C. S. Mitchell, M. D. $100 00 

Muller & Kruger 100 00 

W. M. Newell 100 00 

Franklin Newman 100 00 

George L. Nichols 100 00 

Thomas H. Norris 100 00 

Augustus Nottebohm 100 00 

David O'Neill 100 00 

Paton& Co 100 -0.0 

George L. Paye & Co 100 00 

George P. Payson 100 00 

Pierrepont St. Baptist Church. . 100 00 

Port Jefferson, by Eev. L. Stew- 
ard 100 00 

Purdue & Ward 18000 

Alex. P. Purves , 100 00 

Railroad Directors, by II. A. 
Kent 

Rice, Chase & Co 

Henry C. Richardson 

Geo. W. Robbins 

Roche Brothers & Coffey 

Thomas Rowe 

R. W. Russell 

John Scrymser 

Michael Snow 

George G. Spencer 

State Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

of Worcester 100 00 

Edward II. Stephenson 100 00 

Stony Brook, by Col. W. S. Wil- 
liamson 100 00 

Total cash contributions $208,523 3(i 

Besides the sums mentioned in the foregoing list as having been given by 
churches, the various congregations of Brooklyn and Long Island made dona- 
tions of goods, which, when turned into money, represented some $60,000 
more. Well may Brooklyn be called the City of Churches. 

The day that saw the opening of the Brooklyn and Long Island Fair 
witnessed, also, the opening of the Albany Bazaar; the East River at its 
mouth, and the North River at its source, alike spent the memorable anni- 
versary in works of inauguration. Like the Brooklynites, the Albanians had 
begun weeks before. A circular had been issued early in January, in which 
stern fact was gracefully mingled with stimulating appeal: 

" The more supplies, the more the cost of properly and economically 
distributing them. We must maintain our machinery, or the meal that comes 
to our mill will never be converted into bread for the soldier.'' 




Strasburger & Nuhn $100 00 

Alexander Stud well 100 00 

Thomas Sullivan 100 00 

C. C. & II. M. Taber 100 00 

C. B. Tatham 100 00 

Wra. Taylor & Sons 100 00 

Thomas & Benham 100 00 

Thomas & Co 100 00 

H. Thomas <fc Co 100 00 

B. C. Townsend 100 00 

G. C. Tread.well & Co 100 00 

J. S. Underbill 100 00 

Union Mutual Insurance Co.. . . 100 00 

Vyse & Sons 100 00 

B. A. Wardell 100 00 

II. B. Wardell 100 00 

C. C. Warren 100 00 

Joseph A. Weeden 100 00 

David Wesson 100 00 

B. & G. Westlake 100 00 

Westlake & McKee 100 00 

Granville W T hittlesey 100 00 

Williams & Whittlesey 100 00 

Wilmot & Kissam Manufactur- 
ing Company 100 00 

Woodruff & Robinson 100 00 

David Wood 100 00 

Nicholas Wyckoff. 100 00 

Sums collected by committees 
of the fair, sums given anony- 
mously, and sums under $100 33,481 9!) 



THE ALBAXY ARMY RELIEF BAZAAR. 207 

" No man is so wealthy or high, and no man so poor or degraded, as to 
refuse the gift of patriotism on the altar of our common country. At the 
recent fair in Boston the millionaire piled his munificent gifts on a common 
table with the voluntary handicraft labors of the inmates of the Charlestown 
State Prison." 

While the neighboring towns and villages were preparing to make a 
worthy response to the call of Albany, an interesting question arose as to what 
a not distant city would do. What could be expected of Troy ? Or, rather, 
could any thing be expected of Troy ? For Troy had for years looked askance 
at Albany, and Albany had returned the sidelong glance. There had been 
rivalries between them ; there had been quarrels about a bridge ; Troy, 
though the current ran from it to its neighbor, declared that Albany disturbed 
and muddied the stream as it flowed by Trojan banks ; Albany retorted that 
that could not well be, unless streams ran up hill. In short, they could not 
both drink from the same waters, and was it possible for them both to meet 
under one roof to further one object? Happily, the cause was one that might 
have reconciled greater enmities ; it might have persuaded the wolf to lie 
down with the lamb ; and it harmonized Albany and Troy. It prevailed, too, 
upon Schenectady; and Cohoes and Hudson. Kinderhook and Saratoga, 
Middleburgh and Waterford, obeyed the summons as well. 

The officers, directors and managers of the Albany Army Belief Bazaar 
were as follows : 

President, Vice-President, 

HON. GEORGE H. THACHER. HON. ELI PEERY. 

Secretary, Treasurer, 

JOHN TAYLER HALL. CHAUNCEY P. WILLIAMS. 

General Directors, 

MAJ.-GEN. JOHN E. WOOL, Troy. HON. HUGH WHITE, Cohoes. 

BRIG.-GEN. JOHN T. SPRAGUE, Albany. HON. PLATT POTTER, Schenectady. 

MAJOR HENRY A. BRIGHAM, West Troy. HON. THEODORE MILLER, Hudson. 

HON. JOHN CRAMER, Waterford. HON. PETER S: DANFORTH, Middleburgh. 

Local Directors. 

ERASTUS CORNING, LYMAN TREMAIN, 

JOSEPH II. RAMSEY, CHARLES M. JENKINS, 

HARMON PUMPELLY, ROBERT BOYD, 

THOMAS SCHUYLER, ALDEN MARCH, M. D., 

PETER MONTEATH, JOSEPH C. Y. PAIGE, 

SAMUEL II. RANSOM, MASON F. COGSWELL, M. D., 

PETER CAGGER, THOMAS W. OLCOTT, 

HENRY II. MARTIN, JOHN K. PORTER, 

GEORGE WOLFORD, FRANKLIN TOWNSEXD, 

WILLIAM H. DEWrrr, JOHN TWEDDLE, 



208 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



SMITH BRIGGS, 

RUFUS H. KING, 

THURLOW WEED, 

CHARLES VAN BENTHUYSEN, 

ALEXANDER S. JOHNSON, 

PETER GANSEVOORT, 

EZRA P. PRENTICE, 

S. OAKLEY VANDERPOEI., M. D., 



JOHN SWINBURNE, M. D., 
WILLIAM BARNES, 
CLARK B. COCHRANE, 
WILLIAM A. YOUNG, 
JEREMIAH J. AUSTIN, 
HENRY Q. HAWLEY, 
AZARIAH E. STIMSON, 
CHARLES B. REDFIELD. 



HON. GEO. H. THAOHEK, 

JOHN TAYLER HALL, 

CHARLES H. STRONG, 

JAMES H. ARMSBY, M. D., 

S. OAKLEY VANDERPOEL, M. D., 

HENRY Q. HAWLEY, 

JACOB C. CUYLER, 

FRANK CHAMBERLAIN, 

CHARLES B. REDFIELD, 

HENRY T. BUELL, 

JOHN H. VAN ANTWERP, 



Managers, 



WM. A. SHEPARD, 
DAVID A. WELLS, 



SOLOMON HYDEMAN, 
ARTHUR BOTT, 
THOMAS KEARNEY, 
JAMES MCNAUGHTON, 
JOHN TWEDDLE, 
MRS. ELI PERRY, 
MRS. WM. WHITE, 
MRS. FRANKLIN TOWNSEND, 
MRS. CHARLES B. REDFIELD, 
MRS. THOMAS HUN, 
MRS. JAMES GOOLD. 
Managers for Troy, 

MRS. GEO. M. TIBBITS, 
MRS. JOHN FLAQG. 



As Albany possessed no building fit to be the scene of the proposed 
solemnities, an edifice was built, and the chronicles state that it rose like the 
palace of Aladdin. It was not a Greek Cross, nor yet a Latin Cross, but a 
double Greek Cross, the two naves running parallel,* and the two transepts 
coalescing into one. The ceremonies of dedication fell to the lot of Mr. 
Thacher, President of the day, to Horatio Seymour, Governor of the State, 
and to Alfred B. Street, poet of the occasion. The lanyard was pulled at the 
appointed time, and the several duties were worthily discharged. 

Let us visit the Greek Crosses under the guidance of "The Canteen/' a 
vessel which cheers, but not inebriates; we shall find it no blind guide, 
despite its name ; it is no irresponsible cicerone, though edited by Mr. Smith. 
First, we take a general view of the scene, and learn, or rather see, that 
" what the nymphs and graces were to the mythology of the golden age, the 
ladies are to the living realities of the bazaar. They occupy its haunts, and 
their bland smiles irradiate every department." We find that it is their 
hands that have twined the pendent wreaths, that have made ladies' boudoirs 



* We never write of naves without shuddering at the possibility of a painful typographical error, 
which, having occurred once, may again. It was some time since our fortune, when thousands of 
miles away from the printer, to be made to say : " As Louis Napoleon entered the crowded Cathedral, 
the appearance of the knave was truly magnificent !" And certain persons maintained that this paltry 
play upon words was intentional. And here we are, now, with two naves to beware of. 



THE FAIR NEWSPAPERS. 



209 



out of carpenters' booths, and that have filled them with wares which sell 
themselves but not the purchasers. We are told that it is our duty and 
should be our pleasure to become hungry and thirsty, as we look at the 
maidens who dispense refreshments, arrayed in a becoming and uniform 




THE FAIR NEWSPAPERS. 

THE SPIRIT OP THE FAIK : NEW YORK. THE VOLUNTEER: CHICAGO. 

THE DRUM BEAT: BROOKLYN. THE CANTEEN: ALBANY. THE SPRINGFIELD MUSKET. 

THE DAILY COUNTERSIGN: ST. LOUIS. THE LADIES 1 KNAPSACK! CINCINNATI. 



apparel. We would not exchange our cup-bearer for her who waited on 
Jove ; and we are grateful that our lot is cast, not among the Olympians, 
but amid the Knickerbockers. 

Still under the direction of The Canteen, we descend to particulars. We 
14 



210 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

find in the Yankee booth a model of Bunker Hill Monument made of 
parched corn ; a Continental churn, one hundred and fifty years old, happily 
innocent of any share in recent butter monopolies ; doughnuts, cider, and 
clothes-wringers ; expensive illustrated books, published by a banker impris- 
oned for treason, half the proceeds to go to his destitute family. We also 
notice that the ladies attending are the "most pleasing in the fair." At the 
United States booth we observe a counterpart of the Brooklyn Old Lady who 
lived in a Shoe. "Buy any dolls to-day?" "No, my dear, I haven't any 
little girls to play with them." " Then you can play with them yourself." 
And a doll is bought The ladies here are among the most attractive in 
Albany. Still, they are not to be compared with those attached to the wigwam. 
" The hut is hung with the trophies of war and the chase ; the canoe is drawn 
up waiting the opening of the streams ; the snow-shoes are near the door and 
ready for any emergency." Bows and arrows, baskets, bead-work, spear-heads, 
&c., &c., are disposed of upon reasonable terms by the following loyal Indians : 
Metamora, Maneoka, Hiawatha, Pocahontas, Wawatasa, Owassa, Minnehaha, 
Opechee, Winona, and Tawashaganshee. 

The department of Military Trophies, furnished principally from Col. 
Doty's bureau of military statistics, was one of the most complete of the many 
sanitary museums of this kind, containing, as it did, a musket-stock used and 
broken at Bunker Hill ; the sword of Aaron Burr ; Lafayette's camp-kettle ; 
Washington's razor and fire-shovel ; a pistol, said to have belonged to Corn- 
wallis ; the <coat worn by Colonel Ellsworth when he was slain ; the last letter 
written by him to his parents ; the flag of the Marshall House the latter 
guarded by Lieut. Brownell, who avenged the death of his commander ; a 
bronze 24-pounder, surrendered by Burgoyne ; howitzers used by Mad 
Anthony Wayne in the Indian wars, and a beautifully graduated series of 
grapeshot, canister, and shells ; specimens of muskets and ammunition from 
the various foundries ; rifled projectiles from Cold Spring, and a most interest- 
ing collection of tattered flags of New York regiments. 

The Scottish booth was taken, by persons who came upon it suddenly, for 
a massive baronial castle, built of solid stone. Ancient armor and a St. 
Andrew's Cross adorned the walls. The tartan and bonnet graced the per- 
sons of the bonnie lassies who were toiling for their soldier laddies ; who 
found that there was nae luck aboot the house when their gude man's awa' ; 
and who were strongly resolved to give aid and comfort to all Scots who had 
wi' Wallace bled. Miss Bruce presided at the Caledonian counter, aided by 
the Cochranes, the McNaughtons, the Dicksons, and the Davidsons. 



THE ALBANY ARMY RELIEF BAZAAR. 2] 1 

At the Shaker booth the sisters of Obadiah dispensed sage, rue, and bone- 
set ; brooms, baskets, and rugs ; fans, chairs, and afghans. They were not 
opposed to raffling, and offered, to be disposed of by lot, a miniature meeting- 
house filled with Shaker worshippers, with a gallery of worldly and unsympa- 
thizing spectators. 

The Hollanders apparently the very same who ate olykookes and traded 
with the Indians invited the purchaser to take a pipe and witness the mys- 
teries of quilting. They showed him a fac-simile of an old-time pulpit, carved 
out of the very oak of the pulpit itself; a looking-glass one hundred and fifty 
years old ; and a cake baked in Holland while Franklin Pierce was President. 

Waters fresh from the spring flowed sparkling from their prison-house, at 
the bidding of him who produced his papers at the desk named Saratoga. 
This matter of beverages being the peculiar province of The Canteen, we quote 
from its foaming contents : " Saratoga commands the attention of the fashion- 
able world. The Orientals are here, the French flit past, the military tarry, 
the Germans lounge around, the Shakers stay away, the Sybil comes, the 
Indians leave their wares, the tide of travel has set in, and Saratoga is gay." 

A gorgeous harp the outlines defined by jets of gas a very fine likeness 
of St. Patrick, and the national colors of Green Erin, bade the passer-by halt 
at the stand of Ould Ireland. Here was " Tara's Hall," built of burrs and 
nutshells, with obligate harp accompaniment ; here were one hundred canes 
cut from a palmetto log ; medals and rosaries blessed by Pius IX. ; a ship 
under full sail ; a caged thrush, an embroidered peacock, and many beautiful 
articles in ebony, marble, wax, and worsted. The Irish booth was lined with 
mirrors ; and these, when Mrs. Dr. O'Callaghan, and Mrs. Delehauty, and Mrs. 
Annesley, and Miss Kearney, and Miss Cassidy stood before them, were said 
to reflect great credit upon the bazaar. 

At the Italian booth, Fra Diavolo had turned salesman, and dispensed 
vases, pictures, and mosaics. He must have rifled many a tourist's luggage 
to furnish so rich a collection. There was nothing of the brigand about him, 
not even in his prices. The belief entertained by many that the Italian ban- 
dits are in league with the peasantry, was strengthened by the spectacle pre- 
sented here, where the freebooter above-named was openly aided by villagers 
in disposing of the spoils. If they shared the plunder, is it not probable that 
they had a hand in the furnishing of the wares ? 

Here is a booth in which two grand departments are merged : France 
and Perfumery. This is a just return for a classification made in the French 
World's Fair : America and India-Rubber. The Oriental booth, distinguished 



212 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



by the star and crescent, presents a curious mixture of feigned indifference 
and silent energy on the part of its occupants, to whose " careless luxuriance" 
The Canteen refers in terms of commendation. The Turk, the Albanian, 
and the Greek, are figured by gentlemen ; in the costumes of ladies we recog- 
nize the Syrian, the Smyrniote, the Constantinopolitan, the Algerine, the Cir- 
cassian, the Moor, and the Persian. 

Spain and Scheneetady ! These first-class powers occupied adjoining 
quarters, separated only by a thin partition. In the first, wares were offered 
by ladies as Andalusian as themselves, while the second proposed goods rather 
useful than ornamental, by the hands of saleswomen who were quite as much 
one as the other. Had it been the grape season, doubtless the Spaniards 
would have -sold the Isabellas, while the Catawbas would have been found 
at the wigwam. 

Kinderhook and Japan : ! Switzerland and Troy ! We pass these repre- 
sentatives of mighty empires with regret. We linger in Palmer's Studio, 
where hospitality is extended by Palmer Marbles to Boughton, Kensett, Hart, 
and Cropsey, and many 'Other Oils. We 'take a ticket one in five thousand 
in the raffle for the original draft of the first Emancipation Proclamation, 
which, however, we do not win, as the wheel, with great propriety, names 
Grerritt Smith as the owner. We return our thanks to our guide, take an- 
other pull at The 'Canteen by which language we 'mean that we grasp and 
shake the hand of the editor and emerge into the open air, and sit down to 
the preparation of the following tables : 

Total receipts of the Albany Bazaar $111,974 64 

Net profit, about 83,000 00 

The following is an abstract of the cash contributions : 



Contributions of German citi- 
zens, by Arthur Bott $1,250 00 

J. Cohn & Brother, from Hebrew 

ladies 518 50 

Employees of Delavan House, by 
D. Roeple & Son 489 50 

Watervliet Turnpike and R. R. 
Co 376 75 

E. Corning & Co 350 00 

City of Albany 300 00 

Volunteer Relief Association, by 

W. S. Briggs 283 11 

Troy Tickets 275 50 

New York State Bank . . 250 00 



Ladies' Aid Society of Knox, by 

John Hyser $263 55 

Rufns H. King 250 00 

Mechanics' & 'Farmers' Bank. . . 250 00 

Commercial Bank 250 00 

City Bank . . 250 00 

Themas Schuyler 250 00 

Thomas W. Olcott 250 00 

Ransom & Co 250 00 

Columbian Insurance Co., N. Y. 

City 250 00 

Jenkins Van Schaick, N. Y., by 

Miss Harriet Weed 250 00 

Samuel Schuyler 250 00 



THE NORTHERN OHIO SANITARY FAIR. 



213 



E. P. Prentice $250 00 

Alfred E. Wild 250 00 

Stephen Van Rensselaer 250 00 

Employees of Watervliet Arse- 
nal, by D. Walton 233 00 

E. A. Clapp 216 15 

Albany Exchange Bank 200 00 

A. Van Sanvoord 200 00 

W. G. Thomas 100 00 

Merchants' Bank 100 00 

Union Bank 100 00 

Hawkins, Van Antwerp & Co. . 100 00 

Edson &'Co 100 00 

J. J. Austin 100 00 

James Kidd 100 00 

Crook, Palmer & Co. . .". 100 00 

W. N. Strong 100 00 

Alanson A. Sumner 100 00 

Albany Gaslight Co 100 00 

Thurlow Weed 100 00 

H. Pumpelly 100 00 

Viele, Coles & Woodruff 100 00 

Charles Van Benthuysen 100 00 

C. Hammond, Crown Point 100 00 

Weed, Parsons & Co 100 00 

Commerce Insurance Co 100 00 

Albany Insurance Co 100 00 

Albany City Fire Insurance Co. 100 00 

Alexander Van Rensselaer 100 00 

Sharon Soldiers' Aid Society. . . 100 00 

Thomas Olcott 100 00 

Egbert Egbert 100 00 

George Dawson 100 00 

William H. Dewitt 100 00 

J. Taylor Cooper 100 00 

John F. Rathbone 100 00 

J. H. Ten Eyck 100 00 

E. C. Delavan 100 00 

Washington Society of Saratoga 

Springs, by M. W. Putnam. . . 99 21 

Archibald McClure 50 00 

William Newton 50 00 

Charles B. Lansing 50 00 



J. B. L. Pruyn 

H. H. Martin 

E. Wickes 

George A. Woolverton 

Taylor & Waterman 

A. B. McCoy 

Friend Humphrey's Sons .... 

John Tweddle 

M. H. Read 

William Gould 

R. S. & P. Cushman 

Ross & Crocker 

Hon. J. R. Mattison 

Mutual Insurance Co 

Hugh White, Cohoes 

D. J. Boyd 

Hon. Horatio Seymour 

Dr. Alden March 

John Taylor's Sons 

C.B. Redfield 

Win. White 

George H. Thacher 

Mrs. George II. Thacher 

D. S. Lathrop 

Eli Perry 

Mrs. Mary S. Wayland 

White, Loveland & Co 

C. H. Adams : 

Peter Vansevoort 

R. M. Vansickler & Forby .... 

Frank Chamberlain 

Shear, Packard & Co 

Birdsell, Tassett & Olcott 

Isaac W. Vosburgh 

Samuel Anable 

Wilson, Lansing & Co 

C. B. Williams 

William Headlam , 

J. & C.B. Holt 

Peter Monteath , 

Clark, Sumner & Co 

George C. Treadwell 

James Edwards 



$50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
30 00 



The Northern Ohio Sanitary Fair, held at Cleveland, opened late in Feb- 
ruary, 1864, and ran a prosperous career of rather more than a fortnight. 
The following is the official report of the Treasurer, Mr. T. P. Handy. The 
estimates which appear therein have been fully borne out by the subsequent 
sales : 



214 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Cash donations $14,950 77 

Received from forty-four booths in Bazaar 19,082 96 

" " Fine Art Hall and Museum 1,880 63 

" " Mechanics' Hall 4,335 21 

" " Dramatic entertainments 1,040 15 

" " Stereopticon 53275 

" " Floral Hall booths 3,209 07 

" " sale of tickets for admission, evening entertainments, and dining 

hall 33,831 00 

" " other sources in Bazaar 2,491 07 

" " sale of buildings, furniture, &c 9,941 00 

Estimate of value of coal promised, not yet received 4,600 00 

" " Machinery and articles unsold 3,200 00 

" " Potatoes and other vegetables delivered to S. A. Society. . 2,349 08 



Gross receipts $101,443 69 

Expenses 22,892 36 



Net receipts $78,551 33 

"Of this result," wrote Mr. Handy, ."Cleveland has a right to be proud. 
Among the many cities in which sanitary fairs have been held, none have 
done better than our own. Cleveland numbered, in 1860, when the last 
census was taken, 43,417 inhabitants. Taking this as a basis, the net receipts 
of the fair, if divided among the people, would average $1. 80 to every man, 
woman, and child in the city. On the same basis of calculation, neither 
Brooklyn nor Cincinnati can claim an average of more than $1. 50 of net 
receipts per inhabitant, while Chicago, Boston, Buffalo, Albany, &c., are com- 
pletely distanced. It may be claimed that the population of Cleveland has 
greatly increased since 1860, and that our city received great aid in canying 
on the fair from other towns, and, in fact, from all Northern Ohio. Both 
these propositions are indisputable, but similar ones can be urged with equal 
force in regard to every other city in which a fair has been held. So that 
Cleveland may proudly claim the banner, as the city in which the most suc- 
cessful sanitary fair, proportionately, has yet been held." 

Inspired by the Cleveland Fair, the editor of the Louisville Sanitary 
Reporter made the following eloquent remarks : " We cannot help thinking 
that the good results of these fairs are not to rest with the contributions to 
the soldiers' comfort alone are not to be estimated in so many dollars for 
socks, sourkrout, onions, and potatoes. To promote their comfort, to be able 
to buy these essentials for the army, is an incalculable good. But this charity 
is twice blessed. A rich and subtle blessing must lie in the wide sympa- 
thies called out, the new relations of acquaintance, friendship, and intimacy 
formed, and in the surprising revelation of talent and worth in remote and 



THE POUGIIKEEPSIE FAIR. 

unexplored localities. Neighbors and neighborhoods must come to respect 
each other more, to depend upon each other more, and wonder that they have 
missed finding each other out so long. Prejudice must be softened ; artificial 
barriers must give way to a freer intercourse, and tenderness of feeling and 
judgment must take the place of sour suspicion. After so complete a flooding 
of all the field of life with the resistless tide of a sweet and noble enthusiasm, 
we cannot but look for a new bloom and unexampled harvests." 

To Poughkeepsie-on-the-Hudson, in the order of succession. Here a 
party of young people were collected at a lady's house, for an evening's 
amusement, in the month of January, 1864. The idea of holding a fair for 
the soldiers was broached by one of the youngest ladies present, and spread 
among the others like a beneficent contagion. The customary meetings were 
held; the enthusiasm was judiciously forced into profitable channels, dates 
were fixed, officers appointed : Mrs. James Winslow being chosen President, 
Mrs. Chas. H. Ruggles, Secretary, and Miss Sarah M. Carpenter, Treasurer. 
There was a committee of women to do the work, and a committee of men to 
give advice. Mr. Matthew Yassar offered the society the use of a spacious five- 
story building, and here the fair was held. 

To such an extent was the activity of the inhabitants of the City of 
Poughkeepsie and County of Dutchess concentrated upon this one work, that 
every man, woman, and child between eight and eighty were said to be 
engaged in it. They had sent three thousand soldiers to the field, and might 
set them an example of zeal, if not of prowess. As the time drew near, the 
treasury began to show signs of life : rills of vitality flowing in from school 
exhibitions, lectures, concerts, living pictures, and from the subscription 
books circulated among the solid men. At last the day came. Julius 
Caesar may have had cause to beware the 15th of March, but not certain other 
soldiers of a later dispensation, for on that auspicious day the portals of the 
Poughkeepsie Fair were opened wide ! The mud was of that depth and con- 
sistency so prized by makers of street pies, so dreaded by conductors of 
siege trains. Where the guns would have been engulfed, and perhaps spiked 
and abandoned, the lighter vehicles passed safely on, drawing up at the 
Vassar Emporium of Sanitary Relief. But the sight, it seems, was worth the 
journey. 

Imagine saleswomen whose eyes and cheeks possessed qualities enabling 
them to " impart the hue of a blush to a cigar-case, and the flavor of a smile 
to an oyster stew." That this was done is the assertion of an eye-witness, 
and we see no reason to doubt its accuracy ; in fact, persons who take oysters 



216 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

in a convivial way on festive occasions are very apt to seek to improve them 
by the flavor of a smile. 

We find at Poughkeepsie the originals or the duplicates of many of the 
devices that have done profitable business throughout the country. Here 
was the old woman who lived in a shoe, exhibited in a gipsy tent, and treated 
and paid for as an extra; here was the skating pond, a philosophical toy in 
which fourteen little figures, clad in wintry garments, and shod with steel, 
were made, by the revolution of a disk in front of circular mirrors, to appear 
like an army upon runners; here was the temple of Flora; a museum of 
curiosities; a bull-finch, that carolled sweetly when the clock struck; and 
here was a Dutchess County homestead of one hundred years ago. This 
was the feature that gave character and individuality to the fair, and merits 
description in detail. 

The visitor's attention was first attracted by what appeared to be the out- 
side of a spacious and somewhat weather-beaten mansion. The door was 
double, and upon the upper flange was a knocker which had summoned the 
servant to the threshold, in a house in the neighborhood, for one hundred and 
twenty years. The visitor, if authorized by the possession of a pass for 
hospitality here was strictly mercenary awoke the echoes of the knocker ; the 
upper portion of the door opened, a vision of beauty appeared it is well 
known that waiting-maids are never handsome by halves consulted the pass, 
assured herself that the proper pecuniary transaction had been accomplished, 
then flung wide the lower portal, and ushered the applicant into scenes that, 
though not pre- Adamite, were at least pre-Rip-Van-Winkleish. The ceiling 
was low, and the beams projected; the fowling-piece and powder-horn hung 
from convenient nails. The tiles of the old Dutch fire-place told cerulean 
stories of Scripture heroes ; the mantel was adorned with antique candlesticks, 
tobacco-pouches, and silhouettes. On the wainscot was a "Poor Eichard's 
Almanack" of 1774. Here was a well stocked corner cupboard, filled with 
antique china of every kind, from the unsatisfying tea-cup to the capacious 
punch-bowl ; there stood a stately clock in its tall mahogany case. Here was 
a spinnet, from whose tinkling, wiry sounds have come the magnificent chords 
of the modern grand piano ; there a Holland sofa, imported in 1691. The 
walls were hung with ancient pictures and samplers. Upon a shelf, quite out 
of the reach of mischievous hands, were books bound in vellum, every one of 
them what Mr. Peter Probity would have called a centurion. There was a 
Dutch Bible with silver clasps ; and pendent from a peg was a tippet made 
from the down of early turkeys. Washington had sat at the mahogany table ; 



THE SUGAR PENDULUM. 



217 



and the ponderous sword which dangled from a hook had cloven the skull of 
an Indian and a Frenchman. 

But these scenes composed a dwelling-place, and people dwelt among 
them. There was a family as old as the furniture. Arrayed in the frocks of 
their great-grandmothers, they sat round the fire, spinning at the wool- wheel, 
making thread on the flax- wheel, or elaborating tea at the mahogany, Wash- 
ingtonian board. This board was plentifully spread with the viands of the 
day, served upon platters and in vessels coeval with them. A lump of sugar 
suspended by a string vi- 
brated within the reach of 
all as sweet a pendulum 
as ever described an arc. 
A thrifty, stirring Dutch 
housekeeper busied herself 
amid these scenes. An in- 
vited guest, clad in the 
very robes of Mrs. Martha 
Custis, graciously accepted 
courtesies as graciously of- 
fered ; a Quakeress, in her 
grandmother's drab silk, 
breathed serenity on the 
household ; an Indian girl, who had ceased to be a pappoose and had not yet 
become a squaw, to wit, Eunice Mauwee, the Last of the Pequods wearing 
an embossed silver band unearthed from an Indian grave was trying to feel 
at home, while an individual who did so completely and without effort was 
Pompey in the chimney corner, black in feature, gray with age, scarlet in 
waistcoat and dignity. Such was a Dutchess County homestead in the good 
old days, we had almost said, of Adam and Eve ; thus, at least, did the worthy 
people of Poughkeepsie seek to represent the various ingredients in Dutchess 
County society one hundred years ago. 

Poughkeepsie deserved success, and fairly won it. Eighteen thousand 
people inhabit the town, and sixteen thousand dollars soon after left it for 
scenes where they could render better service. One dollar per man, woman, 
and child, is a good orthodox standard. Some have given beyond it, and 
some have fallen below ; but it is safe ground to stand upon, and, all things 
considered, it is probable that every man, woman, and child in the country 
stands upon just such. The following is the exhibit : 




THE SUGAR PENDULUM 



218 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Poughkeepsie cash donations. . . $2,996 60 

Suburban " " ... 1,504 42 

Fancy department 2,750 66 

Refreshment department 1,188 99 

Lower restaurant 534 23 

Sale of tickets 2,336 64 

Beekman refreshment table 394 50 

Dover fancy table 258 35 

Fishkill fancy table 702 53 

East Fishkill refreshment table. 134 20 

La Grange refreshment table. . . 514 40 
New Hackensack Society and 

table 214 34 

Wappinger's Falls, Mrs. J. 

Faulkner 139 00 

Skating Pond 421 09 

Post Office 113 91 

Agricultural department 837 45 



Sale of pictures, &c $549 41 

Tickets to Dutchess County 

Room and sales therein 536 14 

Swiss Booth 489 72 

Military Tent 256 67 

Floral Temple 411 57 

Old Woman and Shoe 91 58 

Congregational Sabbath School. 150 00 
Poughkeepsie Female Collegiate 

School, Rev. C. D. Rice 85 00 

Poughkeepsie Female Academy, 

Rev. D. G. Wright 35400 

Cottage Hill Seminary, Rev. G. 

T. Rider 172 00 

Collegiate School, O. BSsher. . . 50 00 

Military Institute, Mr. Warring. 106 00 
Cloak-Room, Grab-Bag, Gipsy 

Tent, Philadelphia table, &c. . 303 84 



Gross receipts . . . 
Deduct expenses. 



$18,G40 87 
2,358 15 



Net receipts . .' $16,282 72 

We have mentioned the secession of Brooklyn from New York as the 
occasion of the latter's postponement of the date of opening its fair ; and this 
may serve to show that from the beginning of the year, the preparations for 
the Metropolitan Fair had been in progress. It has been said elsewhere that 
the central treasury of the Sanitary Commission was to be the beneficiary of 
the occasion, the branches having generally expended the proceeds of their 
own fairs in the creation of supplies; money was now needed to move and 
properly administer these supplies. Wherefore, early in January, every- 
body in the city, and many out of it, had been drafted into the army of relief, 
and set to work in their several capacities ; these were to sew, to paint, to 
build, to bake, and those were to see that they did it. The lists of committees 
filled a volume ; the catalogue of their deeds ran over in the newspapers, and 
pretty soon the results of their labors, gathered into the commodious armory 
prepared to receive them, overflowed by the doors and windows, and had to 
be housed elsewhere. How can we even cursorily treat of a subject in half a 
score of pages, upon which a hundred quartos have been already written ? 
More has been put upon paper than the Committee on Hides and Leather could 
bind. What is there left to say? 

The fair was ostensibly held in the building of which we give a delin- 
eation ; but it would be more correct to say that it was held everywhere, and 
that this was merely the head-quarters. The original building, like a grain of 



THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



219 



corn undergoing the inflating process of popping, burst out on every side, the 
machinery protruding in the rear, the dining room and carriage department 
bulging into adjoining unoccupied spaces. A supplementary construction, as 
big as its superior, was put up in Union Square ; a cattle mart was established 
hard by ; but not only this. On some one day in the winter and spring, the 
hospital flag was raised over every building in the city : here over an exhibi- 
tion given by the school children of the ward, and there vrere some forty of 




ABMOBT OF THE TWENTY-SECOND REGIMENT, ARRANGED FOB THK METROPOLITAN FAIR. 

them ; there over a sanitary concert, often in a public hall, quite as often in 
a private parlor; over the studios where men of picturesque aspect were 
zealously working with pipe and pencil ; over the theatres that one by one 
devoted a night to the cause ; over sewing circles, rehearsing parties, groups 
of needle pickets ; over the engine houses, hose companies all of them ; over 
the counting-room, as the committee man with his subscription list entered it, 
and from which he rarely departed empty handed ; over the exchange, post 



220 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

office, custom house, as the paper passed from hand to hand ; over the shop 
and warehouse, as from each some article was withdrawn and sent to the com- 
mon stock ; over the ship in the harbor, over the ferry-boat in the slip, over 
the flying train, over the crawling stage ; over the banks, the insurance offices ; 
over the markets where some barrel or box was marked as not for sale ; and 
even over the garret and attic where there was nothing to give except prayers 
and good wishes. Perhaps, therefore, we should do well to substitute for our 
picture a view of New York, its harbor and environs ; or better yet, a map of 
Manhattan Island, with parts of Connecticut and New Jersey. 

Imagine a vast collection of things in bulk ; think of them by the hundred 
gross ; eliminate all customary ideas and standards from the mind ; where you 
have thought of quarts and pecks, think now of tons and chaldrons ; count no 
longer on your fingers ; put several zeros to the right of all your figures ; deal 
in large comparisons ; clap Pelion upon Ossa for a familiar illustration ; do 
not say two wringing-machines, but five hundred ; look only at aggregates ; 
add up men and women by the thousand, and throw in the children, for even 
decimal fractions are vulgar now; measure pictures by the space they cover; 
learn to talk of books, as of gas, by the cubic foot ; say an acre of people, a 
hundred barrels of pin-cushions, a furlong of autographs. In short, speak of 
dollars by the million, and you have the sum and substance of the New York 
Fair, which, by the way, opened on the 4th of April. 

It is plain, therefore, that as in ten pages not more than ten subjects can be 
satisfactorily handled, we can only deal here with such ideas and methods as 
were original with this fair. One of these was felicitous indeed. Proceeding 
from the rooms of Messrs. Tiffany & Co., it was as pure a gem as those that 
stayed behind, and of more value than any. Like all great thoughts, it was 
marvellously simple ; and, based as it was upon universal suffrage that is, 
suffrage with the property qualification it was singularly well adapted to the 
uses of the community in which it had its birth. The house we have named 
gave to the fair two swords, one to be worn in the saddle, the other upon the 
quarter-deck, both richly ornamented. The point, or more properly, perhaps, 
the edge, was, that the people might present these swords to whom they 
pleased; they could nominate candidates and run them; only, every voter 
must pay a dollar for his vote, and he might vote as often as his dollars per- 
mitted. Here was an idea, indeed ; and we all of us wondered that the happy 
investor had not been you or I. The sting was thus plucked from out that 
dangerous sport, raffling ; but the seductive element of uncertainty remained, 
so people raffled and called it voting. Had a man an opinion on military 



SANITARY VOTING. 



221 



matters that he was not ashamed the world should know? He could blazon it 
forth to an attentive continent, if he had but the few necessary dimes. Had 
he certain naval views that he wished to air? Publicity was to be had for 
a dollar. Those who wished to repeat or dwell upon a statement, might do it 
at the retail price, no deductions being made for a quantity. Reiteration, line 
upon line, was resorted to by many as a means of impressing the treasury with 
their views. The voters stood in line and approached the desk in turn ; there 
was some feeling, some partisanship ; but the cause was the better, and no one 
the worse, for that. People took especial pleasure in neutralizing their pred- 
ecessor's vote, and it often happened that, as the householder approached the 
book, the modest I which he held in readiness was exchanged for the more 
magnificent V, or the thoroughly sumptuous X. The imperial L and C 




BANITA.EY VOTING. 



were from time to time elicited from pockets when there was a plethora either 
with or without them. A count was made at night, and the state of the polls 
was published in the papers every morning. 

As the close of the fair drew nigh the interest centered upon the two 
generals who led the list. Scattering votes were rare, and the battalions solid. 
It was clear that the book could not thus be kept open to the end, as confusion 
and disorder must inevitably ensue. The friends of one or the other con- 
testant might get possession of the desk and keep their opponents at a dis- 
tance. It was finally decided to stop all registered voting at a specified hour, 



222 THE TRIBUTE BOOK 

laggards to deposit their suffrages and their money in a box prepared for the 
purpose, a committee of gentlemen, in whom all had confidence, to count and 
report The result was as follows : 

AEMT. NAVY. 

General Grant 30,291 Rowan 462 

General McClellan 14,509 Farragut 332 

All others.. 163 All others .. . 128 



Total 44,963 Total 922 

If the destination of a sword could be determined by vote, so could that 
of a bonnet, of albums, of silver ware, of a hairy eagle. This latter prize was 
not, as might be supposed by an ornithologist unread in sanitary lore, a 
species beautifully contrived by nature to balance the eagle known as the 
bald, nor yet an eagle upon whose denuded skull some fertilizing tricopherous 
had been happily applied, but an image of the national bird of prey com- 
posed of locks of hair of eminent Americans, deftly interwoven. These and 
other articles, valuable and curious, found an owner through the mysterious 
process of the vote, and the value of the idea to the Metropolitan Fair alone 
was not far from $50,000. We shall meet it again in Philadelphia; shall 
recognize it at St. Louis and Boston, and shall salute it at St. Paul. Its sway 
has extended from the mouth of the Hudson to the source of the Mississippi. 
A few words now upon the more interesting of the working committees. 

The Committee on Public Schools brought nearly $24,000 into the treas- 
ury from forty ward school entertainments. These were among the most 
satisfactory proceedings connected with the fair. The eyes of persons who 
attended any of the performances by accident, without knowledge or an inter- 
est in the school system of the city, were opened wide, expecting no such evi- 
dences of devotion at the hands of the teachers, or of zeal and good will at 
those of the scholars. What part the ferule and the foolscap had played in 
producing this marvellous result, we are not told ; but the casual observer saw 
nothing but the evidences of an honorable ambition and of an early awakened 
conscience; he had before him persons certainly young many of them 
infantine but all apparently actuated by the most lofty motives. They had 
not learned their lessons by rote, but had conned them con amore. The 
whole affair was in the highest degree creditable to the educational authori- 
ties, to the teachers, to the committee, to the boys and girls, and to the fathers 
and mothers of the same. 

The Fire Department collected, exhibited, and sold $30,000 worth of wares 



THE COMMITTEE ON BOOKS. 



223 



of worsted, silk, and silver. Their counter presented a constantly recurring 
scene of devastation and replenishment. 

The Committee on Fine Arts returned tlie noble sum of $85,000, nearly 
the whole of this being the proceeds of the sale of pictures, albums, and 
engravings. The gallery of paintings lent for exhibition was the finest col- 
lection in America, with the single exception, perhaps, of that of the Great 
Central Fair of Philadelphia. 




THE HEART OF THE ANDES. 



The galleries of Mr. Belmont and Mr. Aspinwall were thrown open to the 
public for the benefit of the Committee. 

The Committee on Books, after having, as they thought, solicited from 
every publisher and bookseller in the city, a donation either in money or in 
kind, received a letter from Mr. Wm. K. Cornell, complaining that he had 
been neglected. He inclosed his check for $1,000 in token of reproach. This 
contribution, from a man who had been overlooked, and from whom nothing 
had been expected, was the twelfth part of the aggregate contributions of 



224 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

seventy firms. Mr. Cornell lived but a few months to enjoy the recollection 
of the gratified surprise of the Committee on Books. 

The Committee on Arms and Trophies received over $67,000 ; this included 
the vote upon the Army and Navy Swords. Some $20,000 was realized from 
the sale of relics, diminutive horse-shoes, and other miscellanies. 

The restaurant department was not as successful as was expected. Those 
who had been relied upon to supply the larder preferred to make their dona- 
tions in money; so that the department, compelled to purchase its stores, 
made but a meagre profit. Still, it had the satisfaction of furnishing creature 
comforts to a vast and famished, yet orderly, crowd. As the cash donations 
amounted to $15,000, and as the total receipts were only $17,500, it is plain 
that the principal gain lay in the approval of conscience, and that the com- 
mittee must have looked for their reward to those who had tasted of their 
cheer. 

Though there was no intention on the part of the churches of the city to 
act in concert, the sum realized from church tables, collections, lectures, &c., 
was no less than $27,000. Of this the Methodists gave $10,000 and the 
Universalists $8,000. The Tabernacle Church table yielded over $900. 

The Committee on Dry Goods collected $130,000 in money and $7,000 in 
goods ; the Finance Committee $64,000 in money alone, as the gentlemen to 
whom they applied dealt in no other commodity. 

The Committee on the Drama returned $14,000, and considerably more 
than half this was due to the efforts of amateurs, who enacted private theatri- 
cals upon the cosey stage of Mr. Jerome, and sang Cinderella upon the more 
public boards of Mr. Niblo. Even gymnasts and horses contributed to this 
fund ; so, too, did certain participators in a billiard tournament, who allowed 
the committee to pocket the proceeds, while they did as much for the balls. 

The Committee on Music suffered their accounts to be so merged in those 
of the Union Square Department that it is impossible, at this day, to distin- 
guish between the two, and to say what was due to harmony and what to 
union. They sold pianos, steel bells, and harps; collected certain moneys 
from minstrels and delineators of Ethiopian eccentricity, and gave eight con- 
certs in houses, mansions, and palaces. The programme of one of these may 
be seen upon the opposite page. While upon the subject of sanitary music, 
it is proper to mention the name of Mr. Gottschalk, who founded and endowed 
the Soldiers' Aid Society of Saratoga Springs, and who, by promising his as- 
sistance to one of the givers of the above-mentioned concerts, enabled him to 
more than double his prices ; and that of Antonio Barili, who superintended 



METROPOLITAN FAIR 



SIXTH P1UVATE CONCERT 
Saturilas 3~fanuuig, 



PROGRAMME. 

PART I. 



1. Marche Triompliale for two Pianos Curia. 

i. Duo from " Semiramide". Rossini. 

3. Cavatina fron; " lone ". frtrella. 

4. Cavatina from " Mariadi Rohan".. ./>/-i. 

5. Fantaisie forPiaixxn lhen:es from 

" Jemsalem"' C<Msrl,alt. 

6. Cavatina from " Nahnc." Verrli. 

1. Sonp, " Ye merrj- birds'' Gitmbert. 

8. Duo from * I MafnadierP Verdi. 

9. Scene from tie "Gipsy's Fn.lit". ..Dr. Ward. 



PART II. 

By the Puf.il,, and under the direction of Si 
AXTOXKJ BAB1LI. 




NEW JERSEY IN NEW YORK. 



225 



nearly a dozen amateur entertainments, given in various places in behalf of 
the commission. 

The Ticket Department acknowledged some $180,000. This included not 
only the entrance money to the fair, but the supplementary tolls levied at cer- 
tain otherwise unyielding doors at the Art Gallery, the Arms and Trophies, 
the Curiosity Shop, the Cattle Show. No one regretted the payment of addi- 
tional dues at this last establishment. Here was the Pride of Livingston 
County, much puffed up, as was natural ; here was Lady Woodruff, the pride 
of each successive owner ; here were other four-footed contributors to a cause 
which even quadrupeds would have approved, had they not been personally 
such heavy losers by it. 

The Committee on Foreign Contributions extended their claims over the 
habitable globe. From sympathizing Switzerland, from benevolent Italians, 




EPISODE IN OPTICS: OM.Y TKN CENTS. 



from well-wishers in St. Petersburgh, from Americans abroad, came remit- 
tances doubly welcome from the form they took -gold or its equivalent. The 
Roman Department, stocked in good part by the efforts and from the purse 
of Miss Charlotte Cushman, was an attractive feature. The New Jersey 
Committee, putting up the most elaborate booths in the armory, and offering 
an appropriate and delicate homage to the memory of Washington Irving, 
poured into the treasury the munificent sum of $40,000, in round numbers. 

What can be said, in the line or two that our fast diminishing space 
leaves us, of that charming retreat, that genial resort, the Knickerbocker 
Kitchen ? Nothing worthily ; we merely state, in an informal way, that while 
many lamented they had not lived in days that were honored by modes and 
manners so delightful, by a hospitality so cordial, by a cuisine so satisfying, 



15 



226 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



all rejoiced that they had been spared to witness their revival, even upon 
the mimic scene. The man that eat the proffered olykooke felt as if the 
knightly sword had tapped him on the shoulder, and he rose an original 
Knickerbocker. 

What can be said of the ingenuity of the devices, some original, some 
borrowed, by which dimes were made dollars and dollars bank-accounts? 
Of the patient labor that had been so freely given, as in the case of Miss 
North's collection of autographs, the result of six months' assiduous work? Of 
the devotion of the thirsty, who drank two thousand dollars' worth of lemon- 
ade and soda ? Of the thrift of the management, of the harmonious counsels 
that brought the majestic enterprise so happily through, of the fatal zeal of 
those who literally fell a sacrifice to the cause, and who died in the harness ? 
Nothing, except that the Metropolitan Fair, while it will be to all a precious 
memory, a souvenir of something pleasant to recall and dwell upon, will be to 
many the symbol of a duty performed, to more the record of an approving 
conscience, and to two or three, a monument. 

The following financial tables of the New York Fair, though official in 
their facts, are not so in their form. We give the returns of each committee 
by itself, the report published by the treasurer giving the receipts in order of 
date. We do not grudge the space, as deeds speak louder than words, and as 
the figures that occupy it are so much more solid than any figures of speech. 
Under each head are the cash contributions, item by item, of all sums over 
one hundred dollars , the sources of all collective donations ; and the sums 
realized from the sale of goods contributed, in bulk. 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



COMMITTEE OX ARMS AND TROPHIES. 




Horstrnann Brothers & Allien. . 

Augustus Humbert 

Mrs. General Baird 

A. W. Spies 

W. W. Marston 

Smith & Rand 

Mrs. Hopkins' entertainment. . . 

All other subscriptions 

Sale of articles contributed, and 
proceeds of vote upon Army 
and Navy Swords 



$250 00 
250 00 
105 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
67 50 
335 50 



65,792 48 



Total $67,100 48 



927 



COMMITTEE ON ARCIIITECTUnE. 



J. B. & W. W. Cornell $30000 

Smith & Williams 250 00 

East Chester Quarry Company, 200 00 

John T. Conover 150 00 

E. Chamberlin 150 00 

Win. R. Stewart 126 00 

John M. Dodd 125 00 

Robert Smith 100 00 

J. S. Peck 100 00 

Wm. J. Peck 100 00 

G. A. Conover 100 00 

Thos. Crane 100 00 

Wm. N. Beach 100 00 

J. B. Janes 100 00 

Jed. Frye 100 00 

Stewart & Howell 100 00 

Alex. M. Ross 100 00 

I. & G. Van Nostrand. . 100 00 



A. G. Bogert & Brother $100 00 

Baker, Wells & Co 100 00 

John Sniffin 100 00 

Jonathan Purdy 100 00 

Oscar Purdy 100 00 

William C. Miller 100 00 

Employees of the Architectural 
Iron Works : 

Finishers 167 40 

Foundrymen 64 30 

Pattern-Makers 36 97 

Machinists 36 49 

Laborers 51 22 

Blacksmiths 34 11 

Carpenters. . . : 11 99 

Office and Drawing Room. . . 40 12 

Other subscriptions 3,334 00 

Sale of articles contributed .... 3,330 97 



Total $10,108 57 



COMMITTEE ON ART. 



Exhibition of paintings by Au- 
gust Belmont $1,920 18 

Sale of pictures, albums, &c. . . . 81,748 44 



Exhibition of paintings by W. H. 

Aspinwall $257 00 

Other receipts 1,854 60 



Total $85,780 22 



COMMITTEE ON BOOKS. 

Thomas Barrow $1,000 00 Other contributions 

Wm. K. Cornell 1,000 00 Sale of books contributed by 



$35 00 



J. W. & G. D. Burnton 



100 00 



sixty firms 10,289 02 



Total . . $12,424 02 




Baldwin, Fisher & Co . . $500 00 
Wells & Christie. . . 500 00 



COMMITTEE ON BOOTS AND SHOES. 



Howes, Hyatt & Co $500 00 

W. A. Ransom & Co 

Hoagland, Dubois & McGovern 

Hall, Southworth & Co 

F. & L. B. Reed 

Meade & Stowell 

W. A. Bigelow 

Chas. D. Bigelow 

Newell & Brothers 

J. O. Whitehouse 

Mabie, Manley, Murray & Morgan 

Hanna, Richard & Co 

Smith, Brown & Co 

A. & A. G. Trask.. 



500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



228 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



James E. Hedges 

C. S. Parsons & Sons . 

A. Claflin & Co 

James French . . 



$100 00 
100 00 
100 00 

100 00 



Burt & Terhune $100 00 

Other subscriptions 140 00 

Sale of goods contributed 3,148 23 



Total $8,138 23 



CHURCHES AND 

Methodist Association, Station 

No. 20 $4,310 

Methodist Churches 3,792 

Mercer Street Church, Rev. Mr. 

Booth 437 

Church corner of Second Avenue 

and 14th Street, K Y 907 

Rev. E. H. Chapin's Church, 

K Y 6,000 

Third Universalist Church, 

Bleecker Street, N. Y 617 

Sixth Universalist Church, 20th 

Street, N. Y 959 17 



RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATIONS. 

Other Universalist Churches. . . 
47 Tabernacle Church table at Met- 
94 ropolitan Fair 

Rev. Mr. Ganse's Church 

00 Baptist Churches 

Episcopal Churches 

00 Temple Emanuel 

Other Churches 

20 Collections 

Lecture by Rev. Thos. S. Hast- 
76 ings 

Lecture by Rev. Urban C. 
Brewer . . 



$313 50 

917 60 

1,042 29 

1,432 60 

1,848 20 

3,162 18 

91 60 

672 97 

396 50 

140 00 



Total $27,041 98 

COMMITTEE ON CARRIAGES. 

Wilmer S. "Wood $1,000 00 Sale of carriages contributed $2,000 00 

Employees of Brewster & Co.. . . 136 10 
Total. . 



COMMITTEE 

Bernheimer Brothers 

D. Devlin & Co 

Brooks Brothers 

Smith & Rice 

Jas. Wilde, Jr., & Co 

Longstreet, Bradford & Co 

Wm. Seligman & Co 

J. S. Lowrey & Co 

Lewis Ernstein & Co 

Thomas N. Dale & Co 

Rogers & Raymond 

Goddard & Brothers 

M. & S. Sternberger 

J. Strouse, Brother & Co 

Lewis, Chatterton & Co 

Joseph Lee 

Trowbridge, Dwight & Co 

Kirtland, Bronson & Co 

F. Derby & Co 

Amos Clark 

J. S. Young & Co 

Shafer, Whitford & Co 

P. C. Barnum & Co. . . 



$3,136 10 

ON CLOTHING AND FURNISHING 1 GOODS. 

A. & E. Scheitlin . . $250 00 



&2,000 00 

1,000 00 Mackin & Brothers 

1,000 00 J. & W. Lyall 

1,000 00 E. Tweedy 

1,000 00 Schalle Brothers 

1,000 00 William Van Deventer. . 

1,000 00 Lesher & Whitman 

791 71 White, Whitman & Co. . . 

504 00 Brown, Powers & Co.. . . 

500 00 Draper, Hyde & Sturges. 

500 00 Wm. Meyer & Co 

500 00 Conklins & Bayles 

500 00 Croney & Lent 

500 00 J. Weidenfeld 

500 00 J. P. Hull & Co 

500 00 V. B. Depierris 

500 00 Union Adams 

500 00 Aaron Close 

500 00 David Close 

500 00 James Scott 

500 00 John D. Scott & Co 

500 00 Weekes & Higbie 

250 00 Yo-ing, Rutherford & Co. 



250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
150 00 
150 00 
150 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



229 



Coriklin, Fenton & Miller $100 00 

Dunspaugh, Still well & Pearsall. 100 00 

Jaroslawski & Co 100 00 

Geo. A. Davis & Co 100 00 

W. R. Powell & Co 100 00 

G. A. Trowbridge & Co 100 00 

Isaac C. Noe 100 00 

Hiiidhaugh & Co 100 00 



H. Osterburg $100 00 

Thos A. Brower . . 100 00 

Samuel Sykes 100 00 

Clark & Bogart 100 00 

E. H. Tardy 100 00 

Other subscriptions 2,159 55 

Sale of goods contributed 3,733 08 



Total $26,688 34 



COMMITTEE OX 

8. B. Guion $1,500 

Easton & Co 1,000 

C. C. & II. M. Taber 1,000 

Amy & Heye 500 

W. K. Strong & Co 500 

C. J. & F. W. Coggill 500 

A. Xorrie 250 

Murray & Davis 250 

Tellkampf & Kitching 200 

Munzinger & Pitzipio 200 

Smyth & Lynch 200 

Geo. W. Beale 200 

Thomas Scott 150 

Gordon Norrie 150 

J. T.Adams & Co 100 

Total . . 



COTTOX AXD RAW GOODS. 

00 

00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



Henry Coit $100 00 

S. Munn, Son & Co 

O. K. King & Co 

E. Coleman 

Oakley & Constantino 

Woodruff & Co 

N. D. Carlile&Son 

Edward F. Davidson 

John M. Pendletou & Co 

Strang, Platt & Co 

Ross, Dempster & Co 

Walter Brown 

W. F. Miller 

Other contributions . . 



100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
475 00 



$8,475 00 



COMMITTEE ON CHIXA, GLASS AXD EAETHEX WARE. 

Lawton & White $250 00 




John F. Seymour & Co. 

J. & G. Meakin 

T. D. Moore & Co 

J. J. Nichols 

Daniel Titus 

Davenport Brothers. . . . 
E. & J. Willets & Co. ... 

John C. Jackson 

Robert Haydock 

Dietz & Co 

Other subscriptions .... 



250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
510 00 
Sale of goods contributed 3,058 25 



Total $5,368 25 



COMMITTEE ON DRUGS. 



Schieffelin Brothers & Co $1,000 00 A. N. Lawrence & Co $250 00 



M. Ward, Close & Co 500 00 

A. B. Sands & Co 250 00 

Lanman & Kemp 250 00 

Benjamin H. Field 250 00 

John McKesson . . 250 00 



II. & F.W.Meyer... 

Dix & Morris 

Davis, Morris & Co . . 
F. Cousinery & Co.. 
Palanca & Escalante . 



200 00 
150 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



230 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Dutilh & Co $100 00 

B. W. Bull & Co 100 00 

Fraser & Lee 100 00 

Chas. Pfizer & Co 100 00 



W. Irving Clark & Co 

Other subscriptions 

Sale of articles contributed. 



$100 00 

540 00 

1,662 27 



Total $6,102 27 



A. T. Stewart 

Hoyt, Sprague & Co 

Wm. Watson 

F. Butterfield 

Geo. Bliss & Co 

H. B. Claflin & Co 

Garner & Co 

Lathrop, Ludington & Co 

Low, Harriman, Durfee & Co . . 

Spaulding, Hunt & Co 

E. S. Jaffray & Co 

Arnold, Constable & Co 

Wilson G. Hunt 

Sullivan, Kandolph & Budd . . . 

L. P. Morton & Co 

Wm. Lottimer & Co 

Lee, Bliss & Co 

Tefft, Griswold & Kellogg 

Bowers, Beeckman & Bradford, 

Jr 

Sprague, Cooper & Colburn . . . 

Halsted, Haines & Co 

Abernethy & Co 

Slade& Colby 

Turnbull, Slade & Co 

Sutton, Smith & Co 

Weaver, Richardson & Co 

Wicks, Smith & Co 

Kessler & Co 

John J. Phelps ' 

Campbell, Magee & Co 

Stone, Starr & Co 

Hunt, Tillinghast & Co 

Woodward, Lawrence & Co. . . 

Paton & Co 

Thomas Slocomb 

Anthony & Hall 

Van Wyck, Townsend & Co ... 

Wilmerdings & Mount 

Loeschigk, Wesendonck & Co. . 

A. Iselin 

Butler, Cecil, Rawson & Co ... 
E. R. Mudge, Sawyer & Co. . . . 
James L. Little & Co . . 



COMMITTEE OX DRY GOODS. 

$10,000 00 Win. C. Langley & Co 

5,000 00 Haggerty & Co 

2,500 00 Paton, Stewart & Co 

2,500 00 Jordan, Marsh & Co 

2,500 00 Samuel McLean & Co 

2,500 00 Gardner, Dexter & Co 

2,50000 Henry W. T. Mali & Co 

2,000 00 John M. Davies & Co 

2,000 00 Wilmerding, Hoguet & Co 

2,000 00 Geo. Opdyke 

1,500 00 Dale, Brothers & Co 

1,000 00 Dibblee, Work & Moore 

1,000 00 Giraud, Barbey & Co 

1,000 00 F. Skinner & Co 

1,000 00 Chas. H. Welling 

1,00000 G. M. Richmond & Co 

1,000 00 J. C. Howe & Co 

1,000 00 A. & A. Lawrence & Co 

Jas. F. White & Co 

1,000 00 Jas. M. Beebe & Co 

1,000 00 Griffith, Prentiss & McCombs. . 

1,000 00 Rice, Chase & Co 

1,000 00 Knower & Platt 

1,000 00 John & Hugh Auchincloss 

1,000 00 Cronin, Hurxthal & Sears 

1,000 00 H. & A. Stursberg & Co 

1,000 00 Stanfield, Wentworth & Co. . . . 

1,000 00 Carpenter, Vail & Fuller 

1,000 00 Bradley & Howe 

1,000 00 Opdyke, Loeschigk & Co 

1,000 00 White & Heath 

1,000 00 Kitchen, Montross & Wilcox . . 

1,000 00 Pardee, Bates & Co 

1,000 00 Fairchild & Fanshaw 

1,000 00 N. Y. Dyeing & Printing Estab- 

1,000 00 lishment 

1,000 00 Vyse & Son 

1,000 00 Benkard & Hutton 

1,000 00 Lindsay, Chittick & Co 

1,000 00 Thomas & Co. . . .- 

1,000 00 A. Person & Harriman 

1,000 00 Fisher, Donnelly & Co 

1,000 00 R. Fischer, Hachez & Co 

1,000 00 Geo. A. Clark & Brothers 



&1,000 00 

1 ; 000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

750 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 

500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 



THE METROPOLITAN FATR. 



231 



Clark, West & Co $500 00 

Murfey & Harris 500 00 

John Slude & Co 500 00 

Van Valkenburgh Bros. & Co. . 500 00 

Motts, Hyde & Van Duzer 500 00 

S. A. Martine & Co 500 00 

Bailey & Southard 500 00 

Halsted & Stiles 500 00 

Parker, Wilder & Co 500 00 

Garrett, Clark & Co 500 00 

Lelnnaier Brothers 500 00 

Faulkner, Kimball & Co 500 00 

Haviland, Lindsley & Co 500 00 

Northrnp, Taylor & Co 414 00 

Noell & Oelbermann 300 00 

L. & B. Curtis & Co 300 00 

Hardt & Co 300 00 

Ed. S. Hall & Co 300 00 

Mortimers & DeBost 300 00 

Stone, Bliss, Fay & Allen 250 00 

Frederick L. Joanvahrs 250 00 

Reimer & Mecke 250 00 

David Lamb 250 00 

Julius Gerson 250 00 

Linder, Kingsley & Co 250 00 

Oscar Delisle 250 00 

Auffmordt, Hessenberg & Co. . . 250 00 

Christ, Jay & Co 250 00 

Passavant & Co 250 00 

Whittemore, Dyer & Post 250 00 

Streeter, Faxon & Potter 250 00 

Pastor, Hardt & Lindgens 250 00 

Wright, Brinkerhoff & Co. .... 250 00 

Eastman, Bigelow & Dayton. . . 250 00 

H. Hennequin & Co 250 00 

W. L. Pomeroy & Adams 250 00 

S. M. & B. Cohen & Co 25000 

James M. Deuel 250 00 

Smith & Lawrence 250 00 

Henry Lawrence.* 250 00 

Wolfers & Kalischer 250 00 

Gawtry & Freneau 250 00 

Hyde, Coe & McCollum 250 00 

Crook & Scotts 250 00 

C. F. Van Blankensteyn 250 00 

Ogden & Blewett 250 00 

John Fraser & Co 250 00 

Thos. Drew & Co 250 00 

Forstmann & Co 250 00 

Charles N. Fearing 250 00 

Charles G. Landon . 250 00 



Wm. Topping ... $250 00 

Ed. T. Snelling 250 00 

George W. Powers 250 00 

Robt. Slimmon & Co 250 00 

Bulkley & Co 250 00 

John Bett 250 00 

Henry Marx 250 00 

Waterbury, Shaw & Co 250 00 

T. Putnam & Co 250 00 

Cunningham, Frost & Throck- 

mortons 250 00 

Escher & Co 250 00 

E. B. Strange & Bro 250 00 

Warner & Loop 250 00 

0. F. Dambmann & Co 250 00 

Rudderow, Jones & Co. 250 00 

S. M. Waller & Co 250 00 

Sorchan, Allien & Diggelmann. 250 00 

Ammidown, Lane & Co 250 00 

John Sykes, Jr 250 00 

F. Victor & Achelis 250 00 

C. F. Schmieder & Co 250 00 

Almy, Patterson & Co 250 00 

Harms & Wiechmann 250 00 

G. A. Schniewind 250 00 

Ed. Harris 250 00 

M. Maas 150 00 

Carhart, Bacon & Greene 150 00 

Werner & Forester 100 00 

Samuel Hanna 100 00 

Globe Woolen Co., by W. W. 

Coffin, Treas 100 00 

D. H. & M. Arnold 100 00 

Shaw & Coffin 100 00 

Lippman & Xeuberger 100 00 

J. Hess & Co 100 00 

Munsell & Co 100 00 

H. Schulting 100 00 

Thomas J. Davis 100 00 

E. Warburg & Co 100 00 

Jas. Smeiton 100 00 

Wm. F. Oakey 100 00 

C. Marie & Co 100 00 

Wolbert, Gordon & Co 100 00 

Schmieder Bros 100 00 

Booth & Tuttle ' 100 00 

A. Baldwin & Co 100 00 

Maltby, Eastwood, Brewster & 

Co 100 00 

Rumsey & McCaffray 100 00 

Hinck & Pupke 100 00 



232 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



H. W. Stehr & Co 


$100 00 


Mills & Ray 


$100 00 


W. F. Grinnell 


100 00 


E. &. W. Cock& Co 


100 00 


Charles Heussner 


100 00 


Dimock & Moore 


100 00 


Louis Lehmaier & Co 


100 00 


S. F. Barry 


100 00 


Geo. Underbill & Co 


100 00 


H. Appold 


100 00 


Ottenheimer Brothers. 


100 00 


De Bost & Brothers 


100 00 


D. Douglas & Co 


100 00 


Bronson Peck 


100 00 


L. A. Freund & Co 


100 00 


Curtis & Co , 


100 00 


Asiel & Erdmann 


100 00 


Terry & Doolittle 


100 00 


Geo. W. Knowlton 


100 00 


Guiterman Brothers 


100 00 


Francis Baker 


100 00 


Rockwell & Scott 


100 00 


John B. Hall 


100 00 


A. C. Larnson 


100 00 


C. J. Howell 


100 00 


II. Herrman & Co 


100 00 


S. H. Pearce & Co 


100 00 


S. &H. Brown 


100 00 


Oscar Prolss & Co 


100 00 


Graham & Aitkin 


100 00 


A. North & Co 


100 00 


E. H. Van Ingen 


100 00 


Braun, Ellon & Co 


100 00 


D. Valentine 


100 00 


Burgess & Seaver 


100 00 


McCune, Scott & Cooper. . . . 


100 00 


Bruraley & Kellogg 


100 00 


E. S. Felt 


100 00 


Peter Donald 


100 00 


Other subscriptions 


. . 4,258 02 


Henry Schmieder 


100 00 


Sale of goods contributed . . . 


. . 7,600 98 


Field, Morris & Co 


100 00 








Total 






$137,623 00 


COMMITTEE ON 


FANCY GOODS. 




Scoville Manufacturing Company \ 


&1,000 00 


Wallace & Fitch 


. . $100 00 


Hughes & Crehange 


500 00 


Julius H. Pratt 


100 00 


Eosenfeld, Brothers & Co 


500 00 


James Morrison & Co 


100 00 


Chapman, Noyes & Lyon 


500 00 


Bachmann & Laurent 


100 00 


A. W. "Welton & Porters 


500 00 


Alexander & Eisig 


100 00 


J. M. & J. N. Plumb 


500 00 


R. H. Hinsdale 


100 00 


Caron & Co 


500 00 


N. Hillyer 


100 00 


Townsend & Yule 


300 00 


E. Bredt 


100 00 


Dowd, Baker, Whitfield & Co. . . 


300 00 


Schack & Hotop 


100 00 


Bobbins, Calhoun & Co 


300 00 


Arms & Bardwell 


100 00 


Jones, Brooks & Co., of Melham, 




C. C. North 


100 00 


England 


300 00 


J. A. Humphrey & Brother. . 


100 00 


James Douglas 


250 00 


Meeker & Maidhof 


100 00 


Williston, Knight & Co 


250 00 


Keller & Lingg 


100 00 


Charles Muller 


250 00 


Amson, Herrmann & Co 


1 00 00 


Fowler & Chapin 


250 00 


Neilley & Glassford 


100 00 


Taylor, Richards & Co 


250 00 


Lorenz, Crofts & Co 


100 00 


J. & A. Blumenthal 


250 00 


Unkart & Co 


100 00 


C. E. Borsdorff 


200 00 


Holzinger & Bruckheimer . . . 


100 00 


Billings, Roop & Co 


200 00 


Taft, Burgess & Co 


100 00 


"Waterbury Hook and Eye Co . . 


200 00 


Howell, Foster & Wilson 


100 00 


Julius Hart 


200 00 


Solmson, Meyer & Co 


100 00 


Peter Murray 


100 00 


Pratt, Reade & Co 


100 00 


J. Rosenthal & Brother 


100 00 


Garelly & Geer 


100 00 


Winzer & Tailer 


100 00 


E. F. Kortum 


100 00 


Heinemann & Silbermann 


100 00 


Thaddeus Davids & Co 


100 00 



C. J. Lawrence and H. Faile $100 00 

Other subscriptions 3,459 82 



THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 233 

Sales of goods contributed $2,735 10 



Total $16,794 92 



COMMITTEE OX FINANCE. 





,. 


John Warren & Son 


250 00 


4^ 




Ward & Co 


$250 00 




_ --A-a ,sirj, 


Stimson, Fronk & Co 


250 00 







Wm. C. Churchill 


250 00 




VSr^rak ' 


Wm. II. Marston 


250 00 


W^~-^ TOiHS 1 "S T? 




Geo. S. Rainsford 


250 00 


1' ^^K^lr >V; ^ - -J'fiHI 


SFff 


Quigley Brothers 


250 00 


MRtf^Sf/S 




John Alstyne 


250 00 


jl Nyy 




James M. Drake & Co 


250 00 


JBNNMr i 


* ^^Bs^l 


T. Ketcham & Co 


250 00 


Bp^ yl 


fr^aBI 


Oddie, St. George & Co 


250 00 




i ^SHk 


Fitzhugh & Jenkins 


250 00 




*o| 


Boonen Graves & Co 


250 00 


""""nil |Hlr~ij 




David Dudley Field 


200 00 


S ! 1, ^ 


V^c 


David Crawford, Jr 


200 00 






Martin & Smith 


150 00 


W. B. Astor 


$2,000 00 


Percy R. Pyne 


. . 100 00 


Lockwood & Co 


1,500 00 


Wm. H. Scott 


100 00 


George S. Robbins & Son . . 


1.000 00 


Warren Ferris 


100 00 


Duncan, Sherman & Co. . . . 


1,000 00 


A. M. Ferris 


100 00 


Babcock, Brothers & Co. . . 


1,000 00 


Edward B. Ketchum 


100 00 


Williams & Guion 


1,000 00 


C. J. Cambreleng 


100 00 


Johnson & Lazarus 


. . 1,000 00 


William Seymour Jr. 


100 00 


August Belmont 


500 00 


Garesche, Minton & Co 


100 00 


Van Schaick & Massett .... 


500 00 


Geo. A. Osgood 


100 00 


Cammann & Co 


500 00 


W B Clerke 


100 00 


Vermilve & Co 


500 00 


Geo. Manley & Co. 


100 00 


William & John O'Brien. . . 


500 00 


L. T Hoyt 


100 00 


David Groesbeck 


500 00 


S B James 


100 00 


H. T. Morgan 


500 00 


N G Bradford. 


100 00 


Morse & Co 


500 00 


J. F. D. Lanier 


100 00 


Fearing & Dalton 


500 00 


Prime & Co 


100 00 


Hallgarten & Herzfeld 


500 00 


R. Schell 


100 00 


Edmund II. Miller 


500 00 


H. M. Benedict 


100 00 


Fisk & Hatch 


500 00 


A. G. Wood 


100 00 


Henry A. Stone 


500 00 


O'Brien Brothers 


100 00 


Drexel, Winthrop & Co. . . . 


500 00 


P. M. Myers & Co 


100 00 


Howell L Williams 


500 00 


G. T. Bonner & Co 


100 00 


W R Travers 


400 00 


J. N. Perkins & Co 


100 00 


Weston, De Billier & Co. 


300 00 


H. Meigs, Jr 


100 00 


Geo. C. Ward . 


300 00 


John Bloodgood 


100 00 


0. D. Ashley 


300 00 






Almon W. Griswold 


250 00 


Bank*, 




Ballin & Sander 


250 00 


Metropolitan Bank 


. . . $2,000 00 


Thomas Denny & Co. 


250 00 


Bank of New York. . . . . 


... 1,500 00 


R. L. Cutting & Co.. . 


250 00 


Bank of America. . 


1,500 00 



234 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Merchants' Bank $1,500 00 

Bank of the Republic 1,000 00 

Manhattan Bank 1,000 00 

Bank of the State of New York 1,000 00 

Phoenix Bank 1,000 00 

Mechanics' Bank 1,000 00 

Continental Bank 1,000 00 

Park Bank 1,000 00 

Broadway Bank 1,000 00 

Corn Exchange Bank 1,000 00 

Union Bank 750 00 

Mercantile Bank 750 00 

National Bank 750 00 

Importers & Traders' Bank 750 00 

Shoe & Leather Bank 750 00 

Chemical Bank 500 00 

Commonwealth Bank 500 00 

Bank of North America 500 00 

Pacific Bank 500 00 

Tradesmen's Bank 500 00 

Butchers & Drovers' Bank 500 00 

First National Bank 300 00 

British & American Exchange 

Banking Corporation 250 00 

Mercantile & Exchange Bank. . 250 00 

Greenwich Bank 250 00 

New York Exchange Bank 250 00 

Merchants' Exchange Bank 250 00 

Ocean Bank 250 00 

Nassau Bank 250 00 

Hanover Bank 250 00 

Chatham Bank 250 00 

Market Bank 250 00 

Manufacturers & Merchants' 

Bank 250 00 

Marine Bank 250 00 

Mechanics' Banking Association 250 00 

Second National Bank 200 00 

People's Bank 200 00 

Citizens' Bank 200 00 

Mechanics' & Traders' Bank. . . 200 00 

North Paver Bank 200 00 

Irving Bank 200 00 

Seventh Ward Bank 200 00 

Atlantic Bank 150 00 

Oriental Bank 150 00 

New York County Bank 125 00 

Bull's Head Bank 125 00 

Insurance Companies. 

Home Insurance Co $700 00 

Lorillard Insurance Co... 500 00 



Continental Insurance Co $500 00 

North American Insurance Co. . 500 00 

Corn Exchange Insurance Co. . . 400 00 

Metropolitan Insurance Co 300 00 

Knickerbocker Fire Ins. Co. . . . 300 00 

Citizens' Fire Insurance Co 300 00 

Manhattan Fire Insurance Co. . . 250 00 

United States Fire Ins. Co 250 00 

Park Fire Insurance Co 250 00 

City Fire Insurance Co 250 00 

American Fire Insurance Co. . . . 250 00 

Howard Fire Insurance Co 250 00 

Arctic Fire Insurance Co 250 00 

Royal Fire Insurance Co 250 00 

Commonwealth Fire Ins. Co 250 00 

Etna (Hartford) Fire Ins. Co. . . 250 00 
Liverpool & London Fire & 

Life Insurance Co 250 00 

Hope Insurance Co 200 00 

Columbia Insurance Co 200 00 

Germania Insurance Co 200 00 

Howard Insurance Co 200 00 

Mercantile Insurance Co 200 00 

New York Fire & Marine Insu- 
rance Co 200 00 

Niagara Fire Insurance Co 200 00 

Market Fire Insurance Co 200 00 

Equitable Fire Insurance Co 200 00 

Commercial Fire Insurance Co. 200 00 

New World Fire Insurance Co. 200 00 

Empire City Fire Insurance Co. 200 00 

Relief Insurance Co 200 00 

Fulton Insurance Co 200 00 

Atlantic Insurance Co 150 00 

St. Nicholas Insurance Co 150 00 

Astor Insurance Co 150 00 

People's Insurance Co 150 00 

Lenox Insurance Co 150 00 

Indemnity Fire Insurance Co.. . 150 00 

Harmony Fire Insurance Co 150 00 

Firemen's Fund Insurance Co. . . 150 00 

Brevoort Insurance Co 150 00 

New Amsterdam Insurance Co. 150 00 

Gallatin Insurance Co 150 00 

Central Park Insurance Co 150 00 

Jefferson Insurance Co 100 00 

Northwestern Insurance Co. ... 100 00 

Tradesmen's Insurance Co 100 00 

Yonkers & New York Ins. Co.. 100 00 

Other subscriptions 140 00 

Total.. . .$63,840 00 



THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



235 



COMMITTEE OX HIDES AXD LEATHER. 







rf ] 


W. B. Isham & Gallup 
H. J. Brooks & Co 


250 00 
250 00 


S. & C. H. Isham 


250 00 


Mahlon Mattison. . 


200 00 


Geo. Palen & Co 


200 00 


Van Wagenen & Tuttle 


. . 150 00 




p 


Smith Elv, Jr 


100 00 


J. B. Mattison 


100 00 


Elijah T. Brown 


100 00 


Barnes & Merritt 


100 00 


Fawcett & Benedict 


100 00 


Israel Corse. 


$500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 


Stout & Tuttle 


100 00 


W. Creighton Lee 


100 00 


Thomas W. Pearsall, Jr. . . . 


100 00 


Loring Andrews 


R. Stout & Son 


100 00 


Thorne, Watson & Butman .... 
Thomas Smull 


Hans Rees 


100 00 


F M. Maas & Co. 


100 00 


Hovt Brothers 


S Mendelson. . 


100 00 


Young, Schultz & Co. 


George Brooks . 


100 00 


Ambrose K. Ely 


Other subscriptions 


420 00 


Total 






. . $6,770 00 


COMA) 

Eli White & Sons 


ITTEE OX HATS, 
$1,000 00 

1,000 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 


CAPS AXD FURS. 

L. J. & I. Phillips 


$177 50 


C. Gunther & Sons. . 


W. Moser 


100 00 


M. Bates, Jr., & Co.. . 


Nichols, Burtnett & Co 


100 00 


Shethar & Nichols. . . 


J. C. Lord & Brother 


100 00 


Draper, Clark & Co. 


J. D. Phillips & Co 


100 00 


Murphv & Griswold 


Osborne & May 


100 00 


Edward J. King 


Duryee & Jaques 


100 CO 


H. Schlesinger 


D. S. Williams 


100 00 


J. M. Oppenheim & Co. 


Pierre Chouteau 


100 00 


A. T. Finn & Co 


Boyden, Ditmars & Co 


100 00 


H. A. Hurlbut 


M. B. Fielding & Co 


100 00 


E. Kaupe & Cummings 


McCabe, Clark & Co.. 


100 00 
. . 1,015 00 


Thompson, White & Co 


Other subscriptions 


John H. Swift 


Sale of goods contributed . . . 


. 1,987 85 


J W Lester & Co 


Total . 


. $10,930 35 



COMMITTEE OX JEWELRY, &C. 



A. Morton $1,000 00 

Randel & Baremore 300 00 

W. D. Maxwell 250 00 

G. & S. Owen & Co 100 00 

S. W. Chamberlain . 100 00 



Joseph Rudd & Co $100 00 

Middleton & Pooler 10000 

Other subscriptions 644 00 

Sales of articles contributed 17,300 50 



Total $19,900 56 



236 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



COMMITTEE ON HARDWARE. 



J. B. & W. W. Cornell & Co. ... 

Holmes, Booth & Haydens 

Hermann Boker & Co 

U. A. Murdock 

Dehon, Clark & Bridges 

Wetmore & Co 

J. & L. Tuckerman 

J. H. Abeel & Co 

Egleston, Battell & Co 

Russell & Irwin Manfg. Co 

Chas. Bliven 

Sargent & Co 

Walsh, Coulter & Co 

Phelps, Dodge & Co 

Fuller, Lord & Co 

L. P. Hawes 

Hull Clark 

W. W. Goddard 

R. Smith Clark 

C. Vandervoort 

Dickinson, Reed & Co 

John V. Beam, Jr 

August W. Payne 

Wm. Jessop & Sons 

Smith & Hegeman 

T. B. Coddington & Co 

W. Oothout 

Pierson & Co 

P. Cooper 

Bruce & Cook. . 



1,000 00 A. A. Thomson & Co $200 00 

500 00 J. D. Locke 200 00 

500 00 E. Sherman 200 00 

500 00 Goodwin & Cort 200 00 

500 00 W. & S. Butcher 200 00 

500 00 John W. Quincy 200 00 

50000 A. S. Hewitt 15000 

500 00 Coffin, Lee & Co 150 00 

500 00 C. E. Griswold & Co 150 00 

50000 Elisha Mills 10000 

50000 T. Otis Le Roy & Co 10000 

500 00 R. W. Booth 100 00 

500 00 J. C. Hobson 100 00 

500 00 W. K Seymour & Co 100 00 

500 00 New York Lead Company 100 00 

45000 Kendall & Warner 10000 

300 00 W. Bailey Lang & Co 100 00 

300 00 Borden & Lovell 100 00 

250 00 Pettee, Wilson & Co 100 00 

250 00 Bradley & Smith 100 00 

250 00 Wilson, Hawksworth, Ellison 

250 00 & Co 100 00 

250 00 Lalance & Grosjean 100 00 

250 00 K E. James 100 00 

25000 Geo. W. Robins 10000 

250 00 John B. Peck 100 00 

250 00 John E. Byrne 100 00 

250 00 Ingoldsby, Halsted & Co 100 00 

250 00 Other subscriptions 1,455 00 

200 00 Sales of goods contributed 6,483 88 



Total $23,388 




COMMITTEE ON MILLINERY. 



Andrews, Giles, Sanford & Co $500 00 

Martin & Lawson 

B. F. Beekman 

Forman, Tibbals & Hubbard . 

Charles Mills , 

John Rogers 

C. T. Aldrich 

Plummer & Michel 

Marshall, Johnson & Co.. . . . 

Washington & Smith ...... 

Lawson Brothers & Day. . . . 

Terry & Patterson 

Other subscriptions.. 



500 00 

300 00 

250 00 

250 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

t 100 oo 

T 480 00 

Sales of goods contributed 1,225 80 



Total $4,205 80 



THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



237 



COMMITTEE OX GROCERS. 



Sturges, Bennet & Co 

John C. Green 

Howland & Aspinwall 

Grinnell, Minturn & Co 

Weston & Gray 

E. D. Morgan & Co 

N. L. & G. Griswold 

Moses Taylor & Co 

D. & A. Kingsland, Sutton & Co. 

Francis Skiddy 

Sheppard Gandy 

John Caswell 

New York Steam Sugar Ref. Co. 

W. H. Fogg 

J. C. Dayton 

Park & Seaman 

Penfold & Schuyler 

C. P. Fisher & Co 

Skeel & Reynolds 

C. Burkhalter & Co 

Benj. B. Sherman 

Oelrichs & Co 

Aymar & Co 

Heinemann & Payson 

Sturges & Co 

Wm. Moller 

Babcock & Co 

J. K. &E. B. Place 

Ezra Wheeler & Co 

Garbutt, Black & Hendricks. . . 

Carter & Hawley 

Watts, Crane & Co 

Dallett & Bliss 

J. W. Schmidt & Co 

Owen & Carnegie 

Ponvert & Co 

Kirkland & Von Sachs 

Burger, Hurlbut & Livingston. . 

Kent & Co 

Poirier & Co 

J. J. Crane 

Henry Yelverton 

P. V.King & Co 

John R. Bacon 

Chandler Robbins 

Sackett, Belcher & Co 

Total . . 



$2,500 00 Bass & Clark 

2,500 00 Youngs & Co 

1,500 00 Geo. G. Hobson 

1,500 00 Wm. T. Frost 

1,500 00 Geo. A. Fellows 

1,500 00 Joseph Foulke's Sons 

1,500 00 J. V. Onativia & Co 

1,500 00 Bentley & Burton 

1,00000 S. S. Wyckoff & Co 

1,000 00 Jas. Hunter & Co 

1,000 00 Arcularius, Bonnett & Co 

1,000 00 Gill, Gillets & Noyes 

1,000 00 Ross W. Wood & Son 

1,000 00 Cotheal & Co 

500 00 Camp, Brunsen & Sherry 

500 00 Isaac Bell 

500 00 S. W. Lewis 

500 00 Z. S. Ely & Co 

500 00 David Olyphant 

500 00 Gross & March 

500 00 Luis Barjau 

500 00 Denton Smith & Co 

50000 D. C. Ripley & Co 

600 00 Dorrelle & Co 

500 00 Burgess, Ockershausen & Co. . . 

500 00 Burdett & Event 

500 00 Me Andrew & Wann 

500 00 F. T. Montell & Bartow 

500 00 L. M. Hoffman's Son & Co 

500 00 Beebe & Brother 

50000 Pupke, Thurbur & Co 

50000 Bodine & Co 

500 00 Dater, Clark & Co 

500 00 James Olwell & Co 

500 00 H. K. Bull 

50000 Gibson, Early & Co 

500 00 Todd & Co 

250 00 Theodore W. Todd 

250 00 Wm. Vernon, Jr 

250 00 Geo. W. Elder 

250 00 John Wheelwright 

250 00 Morewood & Co 

250 00 Fausto Mora 

250 00 Other contributions 

250 00 Sale of goods contributed 

250 00 



$250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
1,193 00 
7,168 43 

$51,211 43 



Gary & Co. . 



COMMITTEE ON SHIPS AND SHIPPING. 

$1,250 00 Charles H. Marshall. 



238 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Spofford & Tileston $1,000 00 

M. O. Roberts. 1,000 00 

Fabbri & Chauncey 1,000 00 

Alsop & Chauncey 1,000 00 

Win. H. Webb 500 00 

" u Workmen 534 10 

" " 514 00 

500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
395 00 
330 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
243 10 
201 24 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
182 00 
165 00 
150 00 
130 00 



H. T. Livingston 

Harbeck & Co 

N. L. McCready 

W. A. Freeborn & Co.. . . . 

John D. Jones 

Samuel L. Mitchell 

William AVall's Sons 

M. K. Wilson 

Wm. Whitlock, Jr 

De Groot & Peck 

P. N. Spofford 

E. S. Hidden 

W. S. Whitlock 

Smith & Dimon 

Daniel D. Westervelt 

John Englis & Son 

C. & R. Poillon 

Roosevelt, Joyce & Co. . . . 

Aug. Whitlock & Co 

Ed. Mott Robinson 

Wm. K. Hinman 

J. T. Graham's collections 

John G. Gunther 

R. W. Cameron, boat .... 

F. G. Ogden 

Total . . 



Samuel Sneden, agent 

John Christie 

Thomas Stack 

J. B. & J. D. Van Duzen 

Ariel Patterson 

John A. McGaw 

C. Comstock & Co 

W. H. Webb, oakum 

J. T. B. Maxwell 

J. B. Webb 

Wm. Menzies 

R. P. Logan 

J. D. Brewster 

Hicks & Bell 

Daniel Barnes, Jr 

F. Church 

John S. Tappan 

Daniel Drake Smith 

Randolph M. Cooley 

Sutton & Co 

Nathaniel M. Terry 

Lewis Raymond 

Henry Steers 

Jas. R. Taylor 

Ezra Bucknam 

T. F. Rowland 

Capt. Wm. Edwards 

Other subscriptions, a large por- 
tion from workmen in ship- 
yards 

Sale of articles contributed. . . 



$100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



2,318 78 
214 50 



$20,177 72 



COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE. 




R. P. Parrott $100 00 

S. B. Althause 100 00 

Moses Cummings 100 00 

Michael Grosz 100 00 

Benjamin N. Huntington, Rome, 

N. Y 100 00 

Ogden & Co 50 00 

W. H. Gedney 50 00 

Other subscriptions 98 00 

Sale of articles contributed 4,882 62 



.Total $5,580 62 



Hotels. 
Fifth Avenue Hotel. . , 



RESTAURANT DEPARTMENT. 

St. Nicholas Hotel $1,000 00 

$1,000 00 Everett and Clarendon Hotels.. 500 00 



THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



239 



Metropolitan Hotel. 
Albemarle Hotel. . . 

Maison Doree 

St. Denis Hotel 

Brevoort House . . . 
St. James Hotel . 



Provision Dealers. 
Halstead, Chamberlain & Co.. . 

Cape & Floyd 

Hayward & Sager 

W. & A. Stevens 

John M. Smith's Son 

A. & E. Bobbins .*. 

Cobb & Earle 

Knapp & Co 



$300 00 Spring & Jamison $100 00 

200 00 Samuel Clark & Son 100 00 

175 00 F. Link & Brother 100 00 

150 00 Patterson & Co 100 00 

10000 C. H. Meday 10000 

100 00 Pray & Squire 100 00 

A. & J. M. Moses 100 00 

F. Bechstein & Brother 100 00 

300 00 Cape, Culver & Co 100 00 

200 00 Fink & Hencken 100 00 

20000 G. V. Bartlett 10000 

200 00 Wm. Barker & Co 100 00 

200 00 Other subscriptions 7,182 56 

20000 Sale of articles contributed 2,67660 

150 00 

100 00 Donations from the bakers 1,439 00 



Total $17,573 16 



COMMITTEE ON 1'T'RLIC CONVEYANCES. 




Hudson River R. R. Co 

New York & New Haven R. R. 

Company 

Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. . 
Employees of the Central Park, 

North & East River Railroad 

Company 

Greenpoint Ferry Co., one day's 

receipts 

Telegraph Line of Stages 

Troy Steamboat Co 

Albany Line of Steamers 

Employees of Knickerbocker 

Stage Co 



$5,000 00 

2,000 00 
500 00 



290 00 

218 30 
126 50 
120 00 
104 00 

26 00 



Total $8,384 80 

COMMITTEE ON SEWING MACHINES. 

Elias Howe, Jr $500 00 Sale of articles contributed $2,778 87 

Employees, sixth floor of Singer's 

Sewing Machine Factory 24 75 



Total $3,303 62 



COMMITTEE ON WINES AND LIQUORS. 



Chamberlain, Phelps & Co $500 00 T. R. Minturn $100 00 



Joseph Beecher & Co. . 

David Jones 

Smith & Brothers 

Samuel Milbank 

Matthew P. Reed. 
Beadleston <fe Price . . . 
James Robinson & Co.. 



250 00 Giro & Francia 

250 00 P. Balen & Co 

250 00 Gomez, "Wallace & Co 

250 00 L. E. Amsinck & Co 

250 00 John Devlin 

200 00 Galwey, Caado & Teller. 

100 00 W. C. Ward & Co... 



100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



240 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Wm. Eagle 


$100 00 


David Stevenson 


$50 00 


P. Ballantine & Sons 


100 00 


Koehler Brothers 


50 00 


Van Schaick, Edwards & Co. . . 


100 00 


W. Edgar Bird & Co 


50 00 


Eobert E. Kelly & Co 


100 00 


Geo. E. Douglass 


50 00 


F. Berthoud & Co 


50 00 


Sale of articles contributed 


14,300 06 




50 00 






Total . . 






. $17,850 06 



COMMITTEE ON GAS, 



Delaware & Hudson Canal Co.. $2,500 00 
Delaware, Lackawanna & West- 
ern R. K 2,500 00 

Pennsylvania Coal Co 2,500 00 



COAL AND FLAGS. 

E. A. Packer & Co $250 00 

Wm. L. Skidmore 200 00 

Joseph R. Skidmore 200 00 

A. T. Stout & Co 200 00 

Hammett,VanDusen&Lochinan 200 00 

Jeremiah Skidmore 100 00 

Allan Campbell 100 00 

Samuel Castner 100 00 

Other contributions 855 00 

Sale of cargo of coal from George 

Elliott, of London 13,513 50 

Total $26,718 50 



Quintard & Ward 

Chas. A. Heckscher & Co. . 

Louis Audenreid & Co 

Noble, Caldwell & Co 

F. F. Randolph 

Samuel Bennett, Jr 

A. Pardee & Co. . 



500 00 
500 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 



COMMITTEE ON MACHINERY. 




New York & Havre S. S. Co... $1,000 00 

Morgan Iron Works 600 00 

Novelty Iron Works 600 00 

" " " workmen. 560 76 

C. H. Delamater 540 80 

" " workmen 540 80 

Allaire Works 500 00 

" " workmen 531 00 

Manhattan Gas Co., workmen, 

14th Street 400 00 

J. H. Gautier & Co. . . 400 00 



Manhattan Gas Co., workmen, 

18th Street 

John Roach & Son 

Tugnot, Dalley & Co 

James Murphy & Co 

Fletcher, Harrison & Co 

" workmen. 

Herring & Floyd 

" workmen . . . 

K Y. & Virginia S. S. Co 

Samuel Secor & Co 

" " " workmen.. 

James L. Jackson & Brother . . . 

" " " workmen 

Employees of Stratton & Foo te . 

J. & R. J. Gray 

Cobauks & Theall 

" " workmen.. 

Samuel C. Hills 

N. Y. Gaslight Co., workmen. . 

W. & H. B. Dougherty 

" " workmen 

Other subscriptions 

Sale of machinery contributed. . 



$333 85 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 

50 25 
250 00 

24 50 
250 00 
200 00 

88 95 
117 59 
122 83 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 

36 50 
100 00 
136 00 
100 00 

20 12 
1,077 30 
9,687 82 



Total $19,769 07 

COMMITTEE ON OUT OF TOWN SUBSCRIPTIONS. 

Citizens of Ticonderoga, N. Y.. 150 00 Wm. Roe, Newburgh, K Y $100 00 



THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



241 



Citizens of Rye and Harrison, 

N. Y $2,591 62 

G. A. Elliott, Newburgh. N. Y . . 50 00 



J. L. Rogers, Newburgh, N. Y. . 
Binghampton Loyal League 
Other subscriptions 



$50 00 
42 25 
97 25 



Total $3,081 12 



COMMITTEE ON PAPEE AND STATIONERY. 



Campbell, Hall & Co $500 00 

Journeymen printers and ap- 
prentices, through the N. Y. 

Typographical Society 366 20 

White, Sheffield & Co 300 00 

Fredk. Bredt 100 00 

Manchester Paper Company . . . 100 00 



Lindenmeyr & Brother $100 00 

Leroy A. Fairchild 100 00 

Ayres & Ames 100 00 

Vernon Brothers & Co 100 00 

Bulkley Brothers & Co 100 00 

Other subscriptions, and sale of 

goods contributed 5,081 16 



John Priestley. 



100 00 



Total $7,047 36 




SCENE IN TIIE METROPOLITAN FAIK. 



COMMITTEE ON PRODUCE AND CORN EXCHANGE. 



David Dows & Co 

Baker & Brother 

McCombie & Child 

P. H. Holt 

P. I. Nevius & Sons 

Holt& Co 

S. C. Paxson's Son & Co . 

E. Treadwell's Sons 

Charles T. Goodwin .... 
16 



$500 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 



John T. Wilson $250 00 



F. H. Abbot & Co. 
Jesse Hoyt & Co. . , 

J. West 

A. M. Hoyt 

W. E. Barnes. 

W. D. Mangam . . . 
Baldwin K Fox . . 
Jacob H. Herrick. 



200 00 
190 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
1(50 00 
100 00 
100 00 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



W. S. Gilman ................ $100 00 Eobert 0. Scott .............. $100 00 



J. M. Requa 
Sage & Co 
Rowland & Banks 
E. W. Coleman 
Wylie & Knevals 
E. O. Brinckerhoff 



100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
10000 



H. W. Smith ................. 100 00 

Joseph Allen & Co ............ 100 00 

New York Association of Inspec- 

tors ....... ............... 100 00 

Daniel Cromwell ............. 100 00 

Other subscriptions ........... 81000 



Total ................... ....................... ................. $5,750 00 



COMMITTEE ON OIL, SOAP, AND CANDLES. 

Alexander Van Rensselaer ..... $500 00 F. R. &. W. C. Fowler 



J. C. Wetmore 
R. G. Mitchell & Co 
Brewer, Watson & Co 
Manhattan Oil Company 
Alanson Swain 
Malcolm C. Greene 
T. & G. Rowe 
"Wm. H. Murphy 
Raynolds, Pratt & Co 
Barrows, Haselton & Co 
James Pryer & Co 



500 00 
25000 
250 00 
250 00 
200 00 
10000 
100 00 
10000 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



$100 00 
100 00 
10000 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
10000 
100 00 
10000 
100 00 
383 70 
Sale of goods contributed ...... 4,702 26 



L. Ludovici 
A. M. Knight & Co 
Christopher Tyler 
Van Tassel & Archer 
Popham & Haxtun 
Geo. W. Todd 
Edward Elsworth 
Cartwright & Harrison 
James Boyd 
Other subscriptions 



Total ............................................................ $8,635 96 



COMMITTEE ON THE DRAMA. 



J. W. Wallack, proceeds of a 

benefit .................... $904 25 

A. W. Jackson, proceeds of a 

benefit .................... 606 50 

Mrs. John Wood, proceeds of a 

benefit .................... 627 50 

P. T. Barnum, proceeds of a 

benefit .................... 296 95 

Phelan & Collender, Billiard 

Tournament ............... 211 00 

Matinee atNiblo's, "Cinderella" 2,705 50 



Private theatricals at the theatre 

of L. W. Jerome ............ $6,157 85 

G. L. Fox, proceeds of a benefit, 350 00 
James Lingard, " " 

Wm. Wheatley and Edwin Booth, 

proceeds of a benefit ........ 

Mrs. E. Cunard ............... 

One tenth of receipts of the Hip- 

potheatron for three weeks . . 
Howe's Circus ................ 

Other receipts ................ 



321 00 

940 50 
500 00 

136 37 

22 30 

171 85 



Total ........................................................... $13,<J51 57 



COMMITTEE ON PRIVATE CONTRIBUTIONS. 



James Lenox ................. $5,000 00 J. C. Sanford. ................ $600 00 



Morris Ketchum .............. 5,000 00 

Collection by Mrs. Uriah Hen- 

dricks ..................... 1,005 00 

N. Y. Stock Exchange ......... 1,000 00 

Mrs. M. A. Grosvenor ......... 1,000 00 

U. S. Sanitary Commission ..... 1,000 00 

Rufus L. Lord ................ 1,00000 

New'York Club .............. 1,000 00 

Geo. Griswold Gray .......... 1,000 00 

Edward Clark ............... 1,000 00 



Wm. Mathews 
Ezra R. Goodridge & Co 
Benjamin Nathan 
Christy, Constant & Co 
Philip Speyer & Co 
Miss Mary Bell 
Amos R. Eno 
Adrian Iselin 
John Tweddle 
Alexander Hamilton, Jr 



500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
50000 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 



SANITARY COMMISS 



WALLACE'S THEATRE 



FEBRUARY 2, 1S64. 



ROSE DALE. 



ELLIOT GREY ...................... .y r . LeOe 

MILES M'KENNA .................. Ifr. John Gilhert. 

MATTHEW LEIGH ...... ...Mr Ckarl't Fitter 

BUNBERRY KOBB ................. Mr. George Holland 

COL. CAVENDISH MAY ..... Mr Da 

SIR ARTHUR MAY ................. KtTSmm I* Bnn. 

ROMANY ROE 

FARMER GREEN .......... Mr B 

C A FOR AL DA W, of the Lancem. ..... ttr. Pope. 

LADY MAY ..................... Mr,. Hoey. 

ROSA LEIGH. . . . Miu .Vary (Jann-n. 

TABITHA STORK ............ '.'.'..'.'.'. 3fn. Venon. 

LA DY ADEI.A GREY ............... 3fiu Fan*u Jfnrant. 

SARAH SYKES ..................... 3fn Mn i3eft:,. 

PRIMROSE .......................... Mi,, Uary Barrett. 



XIBLO'S GARDEN. 



APRIL 15, ISftt 

THE IRON CHEST. 



SIR EDWARD MORTIMER ....... Mr. Edv-'in Both 

HTZHARDING .......... V, J,,hn Vu^ 

WILKORD .......................... Xr.Ringgold 

ADAM WIXTERTON ....... ...Mr BnrnM 

GILBERT RAWBOLD ............... Mr. Holme,. 

SAMPSON RAWBOLD. ............. Ur.E.La.h. 

ORSON .............................. Mr.BlaMell. 

HELEN .............................. Mi,Ada Clitlon. 

BLANCHE. .......................... Mr,. Skerrett. 



KATHARINE AND PETRUCHIO 



PETRUCHIO. .... . . . ifr. &1*in . 

BAPTISTA ......................... Mr. Holme*. 

BIONDELLO. ..................... Mr. Biaaao.'J. 

GRUMIO ............................ Jfr. fLLdmt,. 

KATH ARIN E ....................... Mi Ada Clifton. 

BIANC A ............................. Xiu Everett. ' 

CURTIS .......................... Jfiu Mary Wtllt. 




THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



243 



Mrs. Anne Seguin, proceeds of a 

concert $400 00 

Mrs. S. L. M. Barlow, proceeds 

of a picture 300 00 

T. A. Cummings 250 00 

Dubois, Vandervoort & Co 250 00 

Samuel F. Ferguson 250 00 

Jos. Lawrence 250 00 

Mark L. Potter 250 00 

W. H. Smith & Son 250 00 

Uriah J. Smith 250 00 

James G. King 250 00 

A. Gracie King 250 00 

Edward Ferguson 250 00 

Marvin & Co., gift of the price 

of a safe 225 00 

Howes & Macy 200 00 

Mrs. J. Butler Wright 200 00 

Prof. E. Charlier 200 00 

John Wolfe 200 00 

Mrs. C. Wolfe & daughter 200 00 

John Kean 200 00 

Lucius A. Booth, San Francisco 175 25 

Miss Helen Morris 120 00 

Edgar Ketchum 100 00 

Acker, Merrall & Co 100 00 

Mrs. Edward Clark 100 00 

James Coates 100 00 

Total . . 



Tracy R. Edson 

Chas. B. Collins 

J. B. Holdermann 

Mrs. Hamilton White, Syracuse 

Geo. E. L. Hyatt 

Youngs, Smith & Co 

J. L. Ross 

Mr. Chamberlin 

W. Bradford 

Josiah Lane 

Lawrence R. Kerr 

Edgar S. Van Winkle 

Morse & Co 

A. Belmont & Co 

W. D. Crawford 

Theodore Crane 

C. H. Marshall 

Francis Moulton 

Jacob Wall, baker 

P. H. Frost 

A. M. Allerton 

Wm. Waters & Co 

Woodbridge & Morris 

Thomas M. Lawrence 

Engineer Corps and Architects 

of the Central Park 

Other subscriptions 



$100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 

44 00 

7,908 97 

.$39,028 22 



COMMITTEE ON PRIVATE SCHOOLS. 



Students of Collegiate Institute, 

926 Broadway $40 00 

Students of Geo. C. Anthon's 

school 110 00 

Students of Van Norman Insti- 
tute 230 00 

Students of J. Macmullen's 

school.. 125 30 



Students of Dow's Female Semi- 
nary, Plainfleld, N. J $70 00 

Concert by pupils of Miss L. F. 

Rostan 238 00 

Exhibition by pupils of Washing- 
ton Collegiate Institute 154 00 

Pupils of the Abbott Institute . . 161 85 



Total $1,129 15 



OUT OF TOWN TABLES. 



Buffalo Table $500 00 

Owego Table 1,140 24 

New Bedford Table 1,000 00 

Ohio Table 2,340 20 

Staten Island Table 3,370 04 

Harlem Table 3,584 1] 



Dobbs' Ferry and Tarrytown 

Table $442 00 

Hastings Table 665 00 

Norwalk Table 1,565 00 

Westchester Table 2,312 00 

Hartford Table .. 1.005 00 



Total $17,923 59 






244 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



METROPOLITAN POLICE. 

Donations . . $4,034 25 Seventh Precinct Table $711 00 



Total $4,T45 25 




NEW YORK FIRE DEPARTMENT. . $30,250 00 



PUBLIC PRESS. 



M. S. Beach, N. Y. Sun $624 77 

W. C. Bryant, N. Y. Evening 

Post . . 250 00 



Other newspapers, by refunding 
a portion of their bills for ad- 
vertising $370 27 



Total $1,245 04 



Committee on Lingerie ........ 

" " Window Glass.. 

" " Furniture 

" " Dentistry 

'i " Trades and Asso- 
ciations 

" " Tobacco 

" " Thread and Nee- 
dles 

" " India-Rubber . . . 
' " " Stoves & Gas Fit- 
ting 

" " Hair Dressing. . . 
Sale of Surgical and Optical In- 
struments 

" Flowers 

" Ladies' and Fancy Goods 



MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS. 

$12,284 80 Sale of articles in Curiosity 

100 00 Shop $11,455 37 

8,837 33 Indian Department 1,765 00 

2,91350 Mineral Department 1,17402 

Photographic Gallery ... 456 05 

3,224 48 Turnverein Table 1,039 50 

2500 Welsh Table 5,21005 

Thread and Small Ware 4,918 00 

3,566 60 English Cloth Table 4,331 64 

8,621 43 Foreign Goods Table 131 65 

Perfumery Table 1,262 00 

11175 Wax Flowers Table 1,31469 

533 30 Excelsior Society Table 1,345 00 

Mr. E. Mathews' Table 4,500 00 

1,716 62 Toys Table 1,851 45 

7,391 53 Furnishing Goods Table 3,936 15 

2,233 00 Saddlery and Harness Table... 2,755 30 



Total $91,005 21 

Aggregate of all receipts above given .... $946,238 32 
Cash received from Express Companies of New York . 20,000 00 

Foreign Contributions 5,280 77 



THE METROPOLITAN FAIR. 



245 



New Jersey Committee , 838,29808 

Seventh Kegiment, National Guard 8,583 50 

New York Post Office . 700 00 

Committee on Public Schools 23,782 19 

Koman Department 7,896 30 

Spirit of the Fair, newspaper 7,175 73 

Ticket Department . . . . . . . 181,382 10 

Union Square Department, including returns of the Com- 
mittee on Music 100,134 18 

From all other sources, Jacob's Well, Interest, refunded 
Insurance, Soda Water, Copper Mine, Umbrella Stand, 

etc., etc . . 11,804 77 



Total . 
Deduct expenses 

Total net 



$1,351,275 94 
167,769 71 

$1,183,506 23 



We should have been glad to be able to give as full a list of the contribu- 
tors of goods as of the cash subscribers, but our limits do not permit. 




TATTOO, BT THK TWISTY-SECOND KKGLMEKT DRUM CORPS 



We must now transport the sanitary flag from the spot where the North 
and East Eivers unite to form the ocean, to that where the Alleghany and 
Monongahela pour their waters into an Ohio of their creation. 

It had been determined to hold a Sanitary Fair at Pittsburgh before it 
was known that a similar intention existed in reference to holding one at 
Philadelphia, The time for holding them was fixed within a week of each 
other ; but the event failed to show that either suffered from this circumstance. 
The following ladies and gentlemen composed the Executive Committee of 
the Pittsburgh Fair : 



246 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Miss RACHEL W. M'FADDEN, 
MRS. FELIX R. BEUNOT, 

" TIEENAN, 

" PAXTON, 

" PEICE, 

" WM. BAKEWELL, 

" KAY, 

" JNO. WATT, 

u BEADY WILKINS, 

" ALGEBNON BELL, 
Miss SCSAN SELLEES, 

" MAKY MOOEHEAD, 

" ELLA STEWABT, 
MRS. MCMILLAN, ^ Secretaries. 
Miss BAKEWELL. 



FELIX R. BBUNOT, Chairman, 

JNO. H. SHOENBEEGEB, 

THOS. M. HOWE, 

J. I. BENNETT, 

JOHN W. CHALFANT, 

CHAS. "W. BATCHELOE, 

B. F. JONES, 

JAMES O'CoNNOE, 

JAMES PAEK, JR., 

MARK W. WATSON 

JNO. WATT, 

W. S. HAVEN, 

S. F. VON BONNHOEST, Eon. Cor. Secretary. 

N. HOLMES, Honorary Treasurer. 

W. D. MoGowAN, Secretary. 



Buildings were erected expressly for the fair in the Alleghany Diamond 
Square. Though these covered about sixty thousand square feet, the com- 
mittee had not sufficient space, and were compelled to secure various halls for 
detached departments of the fair. This opened upon the first of June. 

The mechanical and floral departments were its most remarkable features. 
The first was to have been expected in an Iron City ; the second, the success 
of which was not so certain, was all the more welcome under that canopy of 
smoke. An eye-witness has given us the following description of the Floral 
Hall: 

" The grand design of the artist is to illustrate the progress of man in civil- 
ization, as evidenced by his architectural and topographical surroundings. 
The canopy, from which light is thrown upon the forest of different sections 
of the globe, is composed of the national emblem entwined in red, white 
and blue cloth with arches of evergreens connecting with the other portions 
of the scene, and surmounting the whole. Encircling the hall is a series of 
booths, of entirely different architecture, from the rude structure framed out 
of the native forest tree, to the more advanced gothic style. On either side 
are two vistas or canopied walks, so shaded as to produce the beautiful illu- 
sion of great extent or distance. The arches are richly festooned with ever- 
greens. At the southern end is the ' Garden of Eden,' while in the northern 
extremity of the hall is the 'Bower of Best,' and the 'Cascade.' 

" On the central piece great care has been bestowed to carry out the har- 
mony of the scenic creation. It presents six sections of the globe. The first 
is a striking scene upon the Khine ; standing in front, the castle is observed at 
the top of the mountain slope, roads in gentle curves passing through the 
grounds of the peasantry beneath ; while cottages, water-mills, sheep grazing 



THE PITTSBURGH FAIR. 247 

in the distance, jets of water and gurgling streams, combine to form a view of 
great beauty and attraction ; at the base of the mountain is a glassy lake, 
whose margin is fringed with aquatic plants and flowers. From this point 
there is a fine view of the cave, which presents the illusive appearance of 
being an extended cavern or subterranean passage underlying the whole 
mountain. The music of the trickling water falls pleasantly on the ear, and 
the lights, seen in the distance, lend enchantment to the view. 

" The second section of the central figure is a faithful representation of a 
white-pine forest, the profile of the ground or side of the hill being in strict 
congruity with the trees and vegetation. The third section is a scene in Nor- 
way. A belt of dark-green native forest trees, with occasional patches of 
grass, where the deer browse, give variety and relief to the scenery. The 
fourth section is an elaborately cultivated French garden a parterre, with 
flowers, sections of turf, statuary, vases, all the choice productions from every 
clime, fountains, the whole crowned with a splendid specimen of the Agave 
Americana. This is a fair illustration of what landscape gardeners would term 
an irregular taste, but producing, by great profusion and variety, a charming 
effect. 

" The fifth is an exhibition of an iron and coal mountain. Eough sand- 
stone formation, slate, coal, and iron ore, with laurel and hemlock, are its par- 
ticular features. The design in this instance is forcibly carried out. The last 
section is intended to convey a topographical appearance of a hemlock region. 
Broken shade, tumbling debris, and decaying matter, fully continue the har- 
mony of the natural proportions. Surmounting the central picture there is a 
rustic summer house, which is reached by winding steps, formed out of the 
projecting rocks." 

The following is an abstract of the Treasurer's report : 

Receipts from all sources $363,570 09 

Deduct expenses 33,079 29 

Net receipts $330,490 80 

Retained for Monument Fund and other uses 11,272 82 



Made over to Sanitary Commission $319,217 98 

Not only was this extraordinary result reached in Pittsburgh while the 
Great Central Fair was in progress in Philadelphia, but the Christian Commis- 
sion, which had always found here a congenial home, collected, during the 
continuance of the fair, no less a sum than $50,000. Indeed, in its contribu- 
tions to the latter charity, Pittsburgh ranks the third city in the Union 
Philadelphia and Boston being the first and second. 



248 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

The Great Central Fair of Philadelphia followed hard upon the great, and 
still more central, fair of Pittsburgh. It was in many respects the finest, and, 
in point of optical effect, certainly the most beautiful, of the series. Whether 
this was owing to the selection of a locality which permitted the use of archi- 
tectural devices, or to the season which draped the scene in foliage and fur- 
nished it with the flowers and fruits of June, or whether Samaritan wares 
must, of necessity, be more tastefully grouped in a City of Brotherly. Love, it 
matters little ; it is sufficient that Philadelphians had reason to be proud of 
their success, and that the rest of the nation was grateful for it that there 
was much felicitation and no jealousy. 

The first steps towards a fair in Philadelphia were taken in January, 
1864. Mrs. Hoge, who has been often mentioned in connection with sanitary 
matters, was present, by invitation, at a meeting of the Women's Pennsylva- 
nia Branch of the Sanitary Commission. She gave a succinct but glowing 
account of the Northwestern Fair, and urged the example of the Lake City as 
a safe one to follow. The advice was taken; resolutions were passed; the 
Executive Committee of the Philadelphia Associates of the Sanitary Com- 
mission were consulted ; the usual machinery of appeals and circulars was set 
in motion; and very soon it was seen that so deeply was the popular heart 
stirred, not only in the city, not only in the state, but also in the neighboring 
principalities of Delaware and New Jersey, so profuse promised to be the 
harvest, that no edifice would house the wares, no structure contain the buyers. 
So the Academy of Music was rejected ; a plan for supplementing that build- 
ing by wings and bridges was tabled; and an army of men, possessed of the 
necessary permit, flinging down upon Logan Square two million feet of lum- 
ber, wherewith to inclose an area of two hundred thousand square feet, 
applied themselves to the task of creating, in forty working days, the most 
beautiful structure in America. The work prospered; the fair was opened 
upon the day appointed, the seventh of June, with processions, cannonades, 
addresses, hymns. No Fourth of July was ever solemnized as a more general 
or more welcome festival. 

Though words are always inadequate to convey an idea of architectural 
beauties, and though those of Union Avenue elude description in a peculiar 
degree, yet an attempt that would have been successful, had success been 
possible, has been made to fix its lineaments upon paper. In Mr. Stille's 
Memorial occurs the following passage : " Union Avenue, which measured 
fifty feet from the floor to the point of the arch, covered, in its ground-plan, the 
great walk of Logan Square, five hundred and fifty feet long, and sixty -four 



THE GREAT CENTRAL FAIR. 



249 



feet in width. It was composed of a series of Gothic arches, a style originally 
adopted principally with a view of injuring as little as possible the noble trees 
which grew on each side of the walk, the branches of which stood in the way 
of a building with perpendicular sides of the desired height. As it often 
happens, what had been adopted as a matter of necessity proved to be the 
very style which should have been selected, had the choice of all styles been 
left free. It is impossible to imagine any thing more imposing in its effect, more 
capable of decoration, or more admirably adapted to the display of articles 
exhibited in it, than this Gothic avenue. The very branches of the trees, 




SCENE OF TUB GREAT CENTRAL FAIR OF PHILADELPHIA. 



which with pious care every effort was made to preserve, were permitted to 
enter the roof of the building, and the effect was singularly novel and 
picturesque. The long line of the pointed arch, thus festooned at its apex with 
green boughs, hung lower down with banners and trophies of every variety 
of form and color, as in some great baronial hall of the middle ages ; and, at 
its base and along its whole extent, filled with all the wonderful productions 
of our industry, with a vast throng of eager, admiring, enthusiastic people 
moving unceasingly in the midst of it all, made up a dazzling picture, such as 
no eye had ever looked upon on the continent To stand at one extremity 
of this noble hall and look through the long vista formed by these arches, 
when gilded with the mild beams of the setting sun, or radiant at night 



250 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

with the light reflected from countless objects of every variety of form and 
hue, was a sight like that of the illumination of St. Peter's, the sight of a 
lifetime." 

This superb hall was lined on either side with counters, while a range of 
tables occupied the centre, leaving ample space for purchasers arid prome- 
naders. Here were gathered the riches of the mechanic, the fine and the 
ornamental arts ; books and stationery, silver-ware, perfumery, hollow-ware, 
hardware ; carpets, hats, caps and furs, boots and shoes ; porcelain, wall-paper, 
millinery, Swiss wood- work, and India-rubber. Though compelled to hasten 
on where we should prefer to linger, time and space must be found to record 
the fact that the sewing women of Philadelphia furnished a table with gifts 
of needle- work, which, when turned into money, produced the sum of $940. 
That a class of persons whose life is one long struggle to keep the wolf from 
their own doors, should thus have aided in a scheme to drive him from the 
door of the distant hospital, is an incident at once touching and significant. 

And now a cursory glance at those features in which this fair differed from 
its predecessors. The pupils of the School of Design for "Women exhibited a 
beautiful collection of the patterns which then formed the staple designs in 
many ornamental branches of industrial art. The Bohemian glass-blowers 
spun the delicate products of their beautiful craft, giving half their receipts to 
the fair. Their glass steam-engine, the " Monitor," permitting the spectator to 
pry through its transparent surfaces into secrets of cylinder and piston, 
labored noiselessly from morning to night. The Cnshman Album, bound in 
green and gold, and containing forty-three sketches contributed by Boston, 
New York, and Philadelphia artists, brought $1,374 into the common fund ; 
the intention being that the collection, after having paid tribute to the 
cause, should be presented to Miss Cushman, in recognition of her generosity 
to the commission. Hard by, a lithographic press, laying metallic hands 
upon a picture which had already passed eight times beneath the blocks and 
had thus received the impress of eight different colors, stamped the ninth and 
last upon it, in view of the spectator. 

The yacht " Fairie," a beautiful steamer, fifty-eight feet long, and able to 
make her twelve knots an hour easily, was presented to the fair by two well- 
known shipbuilding firms, Mr. Cramp furnishing the hull and fittings, and 
Messrs. Neafie & Levy providing the machinery. She would have been 
exhibited in Union Avenue could she have been conveyed thither. She was 
bought by the government for $10,000. 

Near to the spot where the Fairie was to have been docked, was a coining 



THE SMOKER'S PARADISE. 251 

press, built by the machinists of the U. S. Mint. Here the visitor could 
purchase numismatic mementoes of the fair, struck off before his eyes. In the 
same department a brick machine forged tiny one cent bricks, and hard by a 
bullet moulder tossed bullets out of a hopper as fast as they could be bought 
for five cents apiece. The horse-shoe forge, fresh from triumphs in New York, 
was as ready here as there to shoe the cavalry of Lilliput 

To the tobacconists of Philadelphia was due that unique and seductive 
retreat, the Turkish Divan or Smoker's Paradise. Constructed by scenic 
artists and operatic carpenters from authentic records, stocked with every thing 
that could be snuffed, chewed, or smoked, with pipes, meerschaums, calumets, 
with leaf that had paid the excise and cigars that had contributed to the cus- 
toms, with smoking caps, Turkish slippers, and cushions of oriental fashion, the 
Divan made an enviable fame for itself and $9,000 for the fair. 

Chicago, Boston, Brooklyn, and New York had had their Hall of Arms 
and Trophies ; Philadelphia could do no less. Two smoke-stacks of monitors 
engaged in the attack on Charleston flanked the entrance, and within was 
the usual interesting but indescribable collection of flags, cannon, swords, 
spears, canister, grape-shot, pistols, claymores. A ten-inch bolt thrown from 
Battery Gregg, and plucked from the uninjured deck of the New Ironsides ; 
rebel bayonets from Missionaiy Eidge ; a bowie-knife wrested from one of 
Forrest's troopers ; a Chinese match-lock ; an Albanian pistol ; John Brown's 
spear ; a French canteen from Waterloo, formed an incongruous but suggestive 
group. The lock of a musket from Shiloh was made to tell of the death of the 
rebel General Johnston, thus : 

" This is the lock 
That cracked the cap 
That fired the gun 
That carried the ball 
That caused the fall 
Of Albert Sidney Johnston." 

There were relics from the field of Gettysburg, canes, picture-frames, bas- 
kets of ferns and leaves; the battle-flag of General Kearney's Division; silver 
urns presented by citizens of Philadelphia to Decatur; naval flags in abund- 
ance, mostly trophies of 1812 ; the model of a frigate, made from a fragment 
of the maintopmast of the Cumberland, and offered at $300; a plaster model of 
the great Rodman twenty-inch gun, and a model of the Swamp Angel, made 
by soldiers who had helped to mount the original angel in the original swamp. 
The gun was a perfect copy of its prototype ; the five hundred bags filled with 



252 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Morris Island sand that protected the one, protected the other in miniature, 
and South Carolina soil surrounded them both. 

The Horticultural Department of the Philadelphia Fair was one of those 
overwhelming triumphs of taste and creative skill which have made the Quaker 
City mart so pre-eminent. It was certainly the grandest floral display ever 
witnessed in America, and for a finer you must visit either Paris, Persia, or 
Paradise. " Our Daily Fare" thus struggled with the subject : " Fancy a rotunda 
one hundred and ninety feet in diameter, filled with rare plants and flowers 
arranged in a succession of circles through which visitors pass and repass, 
drinking in the fragrance of the orange-tree and the palm, the banana and the 
magnolia. In the lake, in the centre of this fairy palace, is an island, with its 
fountain of hundreds of jets brilliantly illuminated at night by a thousand 
burners, and thus, intermingled with all that is sweet and beautiful in the 
floral realms, comes the soft music of the band hid from sight by the dense 
foliage of the island. 

" The fountain is worthy of its surroundings. Around the base of a vast 
pyramid of exotic plants flows the crystal brook, bordered with grassy banks, 
and bearing on its bosom lovely water blossoms and the broad green leaves of 
the Yictoria Kegia, while from its depths burst forth at intervals delicate 
fountains of quaint and various designs. From the summit of the pyramid 
of plants there falls on every side a dome-like sheet of water, covering the 
whole as if with a great bell-glass. On the outside of this and below the circle 
of water jets is a circle of fire, a jet of flame for every one of water. The effect 
of this arrangement of fire and water is indescribable. The thousand fantastic 
colors sent forth must be seen, and when seen will never be forgotten. Every 
drop of water becomes a jewel." 

Among the individual specimens which contributed to form this maze of 
verdure were a date-palm, overtopping the rest, a dragon-tree, a camphor-tree ; 
two bananas in full fruit, Australian tree ferns, pitcher plants, lace plants, ze- 
bra plants, rhododendrons and pomegranates; an India- rubber tree, a Norfolk 
Island pine, a Brownii grandiceps; there were hanging baskets filled with 
orchids ; there were festoons of evergreens, and columns twined about with 
boughs of pine, laurel and hemlock that lately waved upon the Alleghanies. 

As for the smaller plants and flowers, the fuschias, the caladiums, the ivies, 
the acacias ; as for the cinnamon-trees and the sugar-cane, the Japan cedars 
and the hydrangeas, the butterfly orchids and the bee-hives ; as for the colors 
which put the rainbow to the blush, and were handsomer even .then ; as for 
the odors which, had they blown from Araby, would have been scentless in 



THE FRIGID AND THE TORRID ZONE. 



253 



comparison ; as for the air, which was faint and heavy as for all these things, 
description is idle, till the sun not only takes photographs, but colors them, 
till the chromo-lithographer shall supersede the penman, or, at least, till 
printers' ink smells more of violets and lilies than it does now. 




MAKING BOUQUETS FOE THE FAIR. 



The Flower Market, where cut flowers and bouquets were dispensed, may, 
however, be safely treated of. Of these there were none too many, though 
the gardens of Chestnut Hill and Germantown, the cemeteries of Glenwood 
and Laurel Hill, were rifled every morning. Those who were too late for real 
flowers could have wax ones instead ; those who would take neither might 
have strawberries and cream. He who wanted no flowers to-day, but was to 
marry a daughter next month, might buy a nurseryman's order for the amount 
he required, and thus pay the fair in June for the flowers Mr. Bright or Mr. 
Otto was to furnish him in July. Then there were evergreens by the cart- 
load ; gas-jets that every one took for water-lilies ; an aquarium containing 
earth, air, fire, and water ; and, to finish with horticulture, a Frigid and a 
Torrid Zone, Each zone had a room to itself. 

"Within the Arctic Circle, this is what was seen : a ship fast locked in ice ; 
vegetation, stunted but hardy, offering a modest though insufficient meal to 
the browsing reindeer ; a few blasted pines ; icebergs enough to cool the 
tropics, and to appal the forestallers of Rockland Lake, lest these huge cakes 
be thrown upon the market, bringing prices down upon the slide. The very 



254 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

light was cold and pale and blue. So potent was the illusion that it was not 
easy to recover from it ; to return to the temperate geniality of a Philadelphia 
June was not enough ; a visit to the antipodes, a flight to the other extreme, 
was indispensable. To meet this necessity, the Torrid Zone was simulated in 
another room hard by. Here the vegetation was of a nature to give a rein- 
deer a surfeit it was dark, dense, gloomy, creeping, impenetrable. There 
were monkeys there, and macaws ; parrots, cranes, and pendent mosses. No 
sky was visible, and the whole aspect of the scene suggested the coming 
cyclone. It was a relief to escape, even if we returned again to the neighbor- 
ing Nova Zembla. Both these tableaux were perfect in conception and exe- 
cution, and were frequently mentioned as being " alone worth the price of 
admission." 

Of the Restaurant little need be said, except that, being conducted on the 
Philadelphian principles that secured the success of so many other depart- 
ments, it was likewise a brilliant triumph, whether considered socially, gastro- 
nomically, or financially. Nine thousand persons were entertained daily ; 
four hundred ladies and gentlemen gave their services gratuitously, and three 
hundred and seventeen persons were employed, at wages, in various capacities. 
The receipts were very large, but the expenses were proportionately so, leav- 
ing a profit of nearly $23,000. The " Pennsylvania Kitchen" was a depend- 
ency of the Restaurant, and was instituted in order to present a picture of 
domestic Dutch life in the interior of the state at the period of its settle- 
ment 

A mammoth chimney-piece occupied nearly one side of the room ; arranged 
in a semicircle over it was a combination of dried apples, forming words which 
conveyed a compliment to General Grant. Muskets with a historic record, 
pots and kettles old enough to have called each other black at the time of 
Braddock's defeat, spinning-wheels with an amazing memory, the desk at 
which Franklin wrote, the chair in which Franklin sat, blue mugs, brass 
lamps, a pestle and mortar that had pounded two centuries to dust, calabashes, 
bladders, a copper kettle that boiled coffee for the Continentals with these 
and other antiques like them, a very respectable kitchen of the olden day was 
duly furnished forth. Of course, the viands were of a nature, in .their essence 
and in their preparation, fully to correspond. No one would have called here 
for croquettes de riz or the Verzenay of Mumm ; but a courteous request for 
noodle soup or flannel cakes would have been instantly complied with. The 
bill of fare included also those favorite dishes, summer- wurst, dampf-knauf, 
pfeffer-kuchen, and zucker-pretzels. Of this interesting resort one of the 



THE TOST OFFICE. 



255 



gazettes of the day observed : " It is a great feature of the fair, and suggests a 
feeling of home." Doubtless to the early Dutchman it did, but it may well be 
doubted whether it would have revived similar memories in the Neapolitan, 
the Welshman, or the Dane. 

The Central Fair Post Office was established to correct certain evils con- 
nected with the ordinary post offices of the country. " There is nothing more 
unjust," said Our Daily Fare, " than the favoritism that is usually exercised 




SANITARY FAIR POST OFFICE. 



at these places. In despotic countries it may do very well to make arbitrary 
distinctions among individuals ; but it is certainly intolerable in a republic that 
one man should receive a letter when he asks for it and another should be 
refused. It seems not to arise from prejudice against individuals, but to be 
the result of mere caprice. We ourselves have often been told there were no 
letters for us, when we were really anxious to receive one ; and, at other times, 
oftenest on the first day of January and July, we have received quantities of 
wretched epistles, in those horrid yellow envelopes, which we felt not the 
slightest desire for. 



256 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



" In the Fair Post Office these evils have been remedied. The Executive 
Committee have requested that all their visitors be treated alike, and that 
every one who asks for a letter at the post office receive one. To obtain a 
letter, therefore, it is only necessary to pay for it We trust that this great 
reform will meet, as it deserves, the favor of every one." 

It was not likely that the idea furnished to the Metropolitan Fair by 
Messrs. Tiffany & Co., of New York, and turned to such good use there, 
would not be put to profit in Philadelphia. The very best use was made of 
it Messrs. Bailey & Co. gave, as their contribution, a military vase, of solid 

silver, three feet and five inches in 
height, its value being $5,000. On 
the base, made of Vermont marble, 
were three concave panels, repre- 
senting the arms of the United 
States, those of Philadelphia, and the 
American Eagle strangling a serpent. 
Under the canopy was the figure of 
Liberty, and supporting the canopy 
were three pillars, being groupings 
illustrative of arms and trophies of 
ancient times, of the middle ages, and 
of the present day. At the point 
where the pillars touched the vase 
were winged figures, representing 
Fame, History, and Peace. The vase 
itself was enriched by clusters of 
grapes and running vines. 

An improvement upon the idea as 
it came from New York, was the 
rule that the first proposer of a can- 
didate should pay $20 for the privi- 
lege ; as there were twenty-two nom- 
inations, the improvement was a 
productive one. Towards the end of 
the contest, the competition lay between two of the candidates only, Edwin 
G. James, President of the Corn Exchange, and the Union League. Mr. 
James finally won by four thousand nine hundred and forty-eight votes 
against four thousand and three. The result of the canvass was $10,457. 




MILITARY VASE, THE GIFT OF MESSES. BAILEY * CO. 



UNIVERSAL SUFFRAGE. 257 

A camp-chest, presented by Good Intent Hose Company, No. 2, containing 
glass and silver-ware for field service, and valued at $300, was disposed of in 
the same way. The vote at the close stood thus : 

General Birney 308 General McClellan 10 

General Meade 103 General Howard 9 

General Gibbons 28 Scattering 10 

General Grant 16 

Total 484 

A sword, presented by Messrs. Evans & Hassall, and valued at $2,000, was 
also disposed of by the system which in certain quarters is stigmatized as the 
tyranny of the majority. The will of the people, as expressed by the divine 
right of suffrage, was thus declared : 

General Meade 3,442 General Grant 177 

General Hancock 1,506 Scattering 119 

General McClellan 297 

Total 5,541 

The destination of a silver horn, presented by the America Hose Com- 
pany, No. 17, was decided in the same manner; being evidently the badge of 
a fireman, and not of a general, none but engine, hook and ladder, and hose 
companies were eligible. The price of a vote was twenty-five cents, and some 
twenty-eight thousand were cast, thus divided : 

Good Will Engine 12,732 United States Engine 159 

Fairmount Engine 9,941 South wark Hose 105 

Phrcnix Hose 1,688 South Penn Hose 101 

Pennsylvania Hose 1,414 Scattering 542 

Philadelphia Engine 945 

Diligent Engine 219 Total 27,846 

The model house, a miniature, but as perfect in every detail as miniatures 
are or should be, with a marble chimney-piece upon which an able-bodied man 
had bestowed three days' labor, a mansion of three stories, each room complete 
with its appropriate furniture, with a book-case stocked with diamond editions, 
and a gallery of paintings three inches by five this desirable residence, in 
every way fit for the queen of dolls, was valued at $1,000, and sold for $2,300. 
Another model house, possessing, in addition to similar attractions, gas fix- 
tures, and such ingenious contrivances of the plumber's art as would enable 
the tenant to illuminate by night, was purchased for $800. 

The Department of Public and Private Schools worthily sustained the 
general credit of the fair. Fourteen hundred teachers and seventy-two 

17 



258 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

thousand pupils labored together for months, plying the needle, circulating the 
subscription book, rehearsing operas, concerts, readings, tableaux ; giving tea- 
parties and festivals, and even exhibiting the oxycalcium phantasmagoria ! 
The pin-cushions were literally brought to the fair by the cart-load, and the 
unsanguine predicted that they would go thence in the same way ; but not a 
housewife was sacrificed to the Moloch of Wholesale Price ; not a pin-cushion 
but brought in its full retail quota ; and when the proceeds of the needle, the 
subscription book, and the exhibition room were rolled into a lump, its sym- 
bol upon paper was no other than this : $40,000. 

The Children's Department commenced operations a month before the 
fair by giving a May ball. This was to start the enthusiasm and enlist the 
sympathies of that portion of the population which, though not yet in its 
teens, still has money to spend, and is inclined to spend it freely. The ball 
was followed by a concert, and, in June, the department had its own allotted 
space. Here was Signer Blitz, the sprightly, the sempiternal ; here was the 
Old Lady that lived in a Shoe ; here was Ethel Newcome, a doll so perfect 
in demeanor and so gorgeous in wardrobe that she was sold twice, and the 
money was not refunded once ; here was the Soldiers' Home, with an inge- 
nious flue in the chimney for the passage of the specie currency of the 
realm ; here was the Skating Pond, the Fancy Ball ; in short, here was the 
spot where some $15,000 were, in various pleasant ways, swept from the table 
into the crumb-basket 

The Art Gallery was a building upon the north side of Logan Square, 
covering the entire length of the grand walk at that point ; it was five 
hundred feet long, twenty-six feet wide, and fifteen feet high. The rich collec- 
tions of Philadelphia furnished, of course, the bulk of the treasures exhibited 
upon its walls; but New York, Boston, Washington, Baltimore, and Chicago 
sent specimens of their possessions also. Several of the private galleries, con- 
tributions from which were declined for want of room, were exhibited sepa- 
rately. A casket of oil and water sketches, presented by the artists of New 
York, another of fifty sketches, contributed by the Artists' Fund Society of 
Philadelphia, were disposed of by lot for about $3,000. The New York 
casket went to Baltimore ; the Philadelphian remained at home. 

The number of pictures and other works of art exhibited was about fifteen 
hundred; the visitors were estimated at nearly two hundred and twenty 
thousand, and the net proceeds of the gallery were over $33,000, with some 
$5,000 worth of articles left unsold at the close of the fair. The report of the 
Committee on Fine Arts speaks as follows of the beauty and merit of the 








tntcrtaimntnt. 



P 110 Gil AM ME. 

PART I. 

The Star-Spangled Banner . . CHORDS. 

Stump Speech .... MASTER GUILDS. 

Song. The Vacant Chair . . Miss LENOX. 

Street Argument. . . . Font BOYS. 

Viva I 1 America .... CHARLES BKOWNK 

The Last Ditch . . . Miss K.MEUSOX. 

Comic Song MASTER BURNS. 

Johnny Schmoker, or, The Pilly- 

willywinck Band . EIGHT BOYS. 



PAKT II. 

Rally Round the Flag, Boys. 

Kobin Ruff 

The Folks that put on Airs 

The State of the C< 
enacted by 

The Red, White, and Blue 

Gymnastics, with Piano accompa- 
niment . ... 

Marching Along . 

We're a Million in the Field 

Hail Columbia 



CHOP. us. 

| MASTERS DEXTE 
\ &, CUNNINGHA.V. 

MlSS BRKWKK. 



Jountry, Scene j MASTERS BOND. 
< CURTIS. WEI.I.S 
( & GRKEX. 



CHORUS. 

FIFTEEJT BOYS. 

CHORUS. 

QUARTETTE. 

CHORUS. 





LABOR, INCOME, AND REVENUE. 259 

collection : " The best American and the best foreign schools were ably repre- 
sented in many of their most attractive works, and it is believed that, in 
respect to modern pictures, this gallery in real merit compared favorably with 
the best collection ever exhibited in Europe. The size of the gallery was far 
beyond any thing ever yet attempted in America, and although wanting the 
fretted ceilings and architectural proportions of the time-honored galleries of 
Europe, its rich contents so occupied the eye that what was not beautiful was 
not seen. The pageant, which rose like an exhalation, as, in happy quotation 
from Milton, was said of it by a distinguished orator and statesman, charmed 
and delighted, time and time again, the ever-teeming crowd thronging the 
gallery during the three short weeks of the exhibition. How often, when the 
time of closing drew near, was the remark heard, ' Must this thing of beauty 
be dispersed, and no more seen ? Can it not remain, to be a joy forever?' " 

Three committees had already obtained large sums of money before the 
opening of the fair that of Benefits and Exhibitions, that of Orations and 
Lectures, and that of Musical Entertainments. The period during which these 
methods of adding to the fund were prosecuted with success was not far from 
two months. Balls and concerts, some public and some private, amateur the- 
atricals, readings and orations, were given nightly, not only in Philadelphia, 
but in almost every populous town of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Dela- 
ware. The Shakspearean Tercentenary, which in New York was tributary to 
the Statue Fund, went in Philadelphia with the hop of the Gray Eeserves, the 
readings of Grace Greenwood, and the recitations of Professor Murdoch. The 
sums realized by the three committees amounted in the aggregate to about 
$24,000. 

Thus far we have referred only to the labors of those committees who re- 
turned something for the money they received a pin-cushion, a vote, a seat, a 
sight. We have said nothing of the two committees whose province it was to 
obtain subscriptions, contributions in money. The Committee on Finance and 
Donations, and the Committee on Labor, Income, and Kevenue, assumed this 
duty, and the ingenuity and success of the latter were as remarkable as any 
thing in the history of the fair. The collection of $70,000 from the gentlemen 
of the Exchange, the Board, and the Street, by the Committee on Finance, 
was creditable enough, but the competing committee beat this flattering result 
four times over. ''This was originally designed," says Mr. Stille, u as a sort 
of drag-net, a species of omnium gatherum, by means of which the gleanings 
in fields which had escaped the vigilant explorations of other committees 
should be gathered in. The plan was to secure from each member of the 



260 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

community, no matter how lofty or humble his position, the value of one day's 
labor, one day's income." After a thorough organization, and the appointment 
of sub-committees for every legislative district in Pennsylvania, the officers of 
the department set off upon a tour through the state. 

"Wherever the local mind appeared to be in the proper mood, and required 
no preliminary manipulation, operations were immediately begun. From six 
to twelve manufactories were sometimes visited in a day ; the works were 
stopped, the hands collected, the matter was explained, and one day's labor 
asked. It was so seldom, that we may as well say never, refused. Sometimes 
the employer, adding together the contributions of his men, gave as much 
more himself, and in one instance gave it twice over. In Catawissa, the young 
men were invited to declare by vote who was the handsomest and best young 
lady of the place, on condition that each inclosed in his vote the value of "one 
day's income, one day's labor." Miss Hattie S. Reifsnyder was returned by a 
large majority, having received three hundred and twenty votes, more than all 
the other Catawissans put together. The City Passenger Railway Companies, 
by a vote of the Board of Presidents, generally appropriated one day's reve- 
nue, while the steam railroads, not knowing, and apparently unwilling to know, 
what a day's income was, took a magnificent view of it, estimated high, and 
subscribed their thousands, some five, some ten. So that when the sub-com- 
mittee on coal reported their collections at $67,000, and the various hauls of 
the drag-net were accumulated in one huge pile, and it became necessary to 
name that pile, the name selected was Two Hundred and Forty-seven Thou- 
sand Dollars. The man who had a hundred thousand pounds and whose 
patronymic was Plum, was not more happily named; nor was the heiress 
whose initials were L. S. D. 

New Jersey, affecting to be dissatisfied with her contribution to the Metro- 
politan Fair no less a sum than $38,000 had determined to help Pennsyl- 
vania, and did so ; and, when the accounts were made up, Pennsylvania was 
$17,000 better off than she would otherwise have been. Delaware, too, which 
had thus far had no opportunity, now felt that her time had come, and the. 
Blue Hen laid the very ponderous nest-egg of $32,000. 

" Our Daily Fare " was the we should have said organ of the fair, were 
it not then necessary to follow out the figure by adding, either that it was 
"ground" by Mr. Childs, "played upon " by Mr. Leland, or "blown" by Mr. 
Boker. These gentlemen did no such thing: they edited and published, 
with the assistance of an editorial committee of ladies and gentlemen, twelve 
numbers of a very spirited daily, which yielded a net result of $5.600. From 



SOME OF THE RESULTS OF THE FAIR. 



261 



its columns the reader may learn many thousand facts and gather perhaps as 
many graceful thoughts. 

The Great Central Fair came to an end on Tuesday, the 28th of June, 
with addresses of congratulation, with cheers for the chairmen of certain 
well-worked and well-delivered committees, with the singing of the national 
anthem, with a prayer of thanksgiving by the bishop of the diocese, and 
the chanting of the doxology by the multitude. A few days more and the 
grass was growing again in Logan Square, the grand old trees might drop 
their rejected leaves upon the ground beneath, and nothing remained of the 
great temple of beneficence but its memory, its associations, and the very fine 
bank-account opened in its name. 

Of the dimensions of this account some idea may be obtained from the fol- 
lowing tables, embodying the reports of a portion of the committees, item by 
item, and giving the aggregate of all : 



COMMITTEE ON PRODUCE, PROVISIONS, AND SHIPPING. 



Chairman, ALEX 




Henry Winsor & Co $1,000 00 

Edmund A. Souder & Co 1,000 00 

Jacob T. Alburger & Co 1,000 00 

Edwin G. James 1,000 00 

Alex. G. Cattell & Co 1,000 00 

Peter Wright & Sons 1,000 00 

Thomas Clyde 1,000 00 

Thomas Wattson & Co 1,000 00 

Ocean Steam Navigation Company 1,000 00 
A. F. & R. Maxwell, Liverpool, 

England 1,000 00 

Wilmon Whilldm 500 00 

William J. Taylor & Co 500 00 

John Mason & Co 500 00 

John McCall & Co., Glasgow 300 00 



. G. CATTELL. 

William M. Baird .............. 

Humphreys & Hoffman ......... 

William 8. Smith & Co .......... 

Corn Exchange Bank ........... 

J. II. Michener& Co ............. 

Baltimore & Philadelphia Steam- 
boat Company, per A. Groves, 
Jr., Agent ................... 

Michener & Morris ............. 

McCutcheon & Collins .......... 

H. Craig & Co ................. 

Charles H. Cummings ......... 

D. S. Stetson & Co .............. 

J. E. Bazley & Co ............... 

Baker & Folsom ............... 

Bishop, Son & Co ............... 

A. Heron, Jr ................... 

S. S. Bishop ................... 

Wm. Taylor & Co ............... 

John Bowers .................. 

Jas. P. Perot & Brother ......... 

John Derbyshire ............... 

Elias A. Hunsicker ............. 

George Keck .................. 

Freed, Ward & Freed ........... 

Peacock, Zell & Hinchman ...... 

Buzby & Co ................... 

D. W. Herstine ................ 

Shipper & Detwiler ........... 



$300 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 



250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



262 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Allman & Wcnger $100 00 

Riddell & Leech 100 00 

Malone& Co 100 00 

Alexander Nesbit 100 00 

G. W. Bernadou & Brother 100 00 

Detwiler & Hartranft 100 00 

Josiah Bryan & Co 100 00 

M. S. Myers 100 00 

D. B. Kershow & Co 100 00 

J. S. & E. L. Perot 100 00 

J. A. Dougherty & Sons 100 00 

Budd & Comly 100 00 

Commonwealth Bank 100 00 

H. W. Catherwood 100 00 

S. L. Witmer 100 00 

Chesebrough & Pearson 100 00 

James L. Bewley & Co 100 00 

Brooke & Pugh 100 00 

Rowland & Ervien 100 00 

Thomas Smith 100 00 

Sharpless, Siter & Co 100 00 

Win. Brice & Co 100 00 

James Steel & Co 100 00 

John T. Bailey & Co 100 00 

Total net.. 



John R. Penrose $100 00 

S. S. Williamson & Co 100 00 

S. J. Christian.. 100 00 



Adam Warthman. . . 

Landis & Stone 

James C. Prichett 

Levi Knowles 

George Cookman 

Brown & James 

Jos. F. Baker 

Capt. Jos. Baker 

Asahel Troth & Co. . . 
L. G. Mytinger & Co. . 
P. B. Mingle & Co. . . . 
James Allderdice 

J. M. Smith & Co 

B. B. Craycroft & Co. , 

Z. Locke & Co 

Geo. C. Napheys 

Tenbrook & Brother. 

H. J. Adams & Co 

K H. Graham & Co. . 



100 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

Other subscriptions 7,874 00 



.$28,374 00 



COMMITTEE OX WHOLESALE DEY GOODS. 

Chairman, DAVID S. BROWX. 

Harris, Shortridge & Co $1,000 00 

Fales, Wharton & Co 1,000 00 

Thos. W. Evans & Co 1,000 00 

Tredick, Stokes & Co 1,000 00 

Frothingham & Wells 1,000 00 

James, Kent, Santee & Co 1,000 00 

Edmund Yard & Co 1,000 00 

J. C. Howe & Co 1,000 00 

Farnham, Kirkham & Co 1,000 00 

Johnes, Berry & Co 1,000 00 

Lewis, Boardman & Wharton.. . 1,000 00 

Coffin & Altemus 1,000 00 

Whitney & Lawrence 1,000 00 

Smith, Williams & Co 1,000 00 

Furness, Brinley & Co 1,000 00 




John B. Myers & Co $1,500 00 

Stacy B. Barcroft 1,000 00 

David S. Brown 1,000 00 

Riegel, Wiest & Ervin 1,000 00 

D. D. Cummins 1,000 00 

R. Wood, Marsh & Hay wood. . . 1,000 00 

William S. Stewart 1,000 00 



Pemberton S. Hutcbinson 

Bush & Kurtz 

John B. Ellison, Sons & Co... . 

Garretson, Brady & Co 

Meigs & Brothers 

J. H. & W. Creighton 

George F. Peabody 

Wilrner, Cannell & Co , 



500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 



COMMITTEE KETURNS. 



263 



Lewis & Co $500 00 

Sharp, Haines & Co 500 00 

Conrad & Serrill 500 00 

Jones, Warner & Co 500 00 

Brooks & Brother 500 00 

Geo B. Eeese, Son & Co 500 00 

De Coursey, Lafourcade & Co. . 500 00 

Hay& McDevitt 500 00 

Altemus & Cozens 500 00 

J. K. & J. Price 500 00 

Riegel & Brother 400 00 

Blackston Manufacturing Co., 

per Goddard Brothers, agents 400 00 
Lonsdale Co., per Goddard Bros., 

agents 400 00 

Mellor, Bains & Mellor 300 00 

Wm. D. Jones & Co 250 00 

Leonard & Baker 250 00 

Charles L. Sharpless 250 00 

Wm. T. II. Duncan 250 00 

H. N. Burroughs 250 00 

Samuel S. Scott 250 00 

T. & F.Evans 250 00 

Hood, Bombright & Co 250 00 

R. Pollock & Co 250 00 

J. T. Way 250 00 

Heilman & Rank 250 00 

Wicht & Lankenau 250 00 

Hope Co., per Goddard Brothers, 

agents 200 00 

C. B. Mount 200 00 

W. H. Brown 200 00 

William Baird 200 00 

Fries & Lehman 150 00 

John Clendening and family. . . 115 00 

Ellis & Harrop 100 00 

Total net.. 



Morris, Clothier & Lewis 

Riddle, Gill & Co 

I. Binswanger & Co 

Ross, Shott & Co 

J. S. Young & Altemus 

Werner, Itschner & Co 

Ridgway, Heussner & Co 

Temple & Co 

John Tatum 

Thomas R. Tunis 

John Farnum 

Alex. Wray & Co 

Little, Stokes & Co 

Wray & Gillilan 

J. C. Fryer 

John H. Wilson 

Pancoast, Warnock & Co 

S. T. Auge & Co 

Dough ten, Renshaw & Wilkins. 

Pollock & Casselberry 

Gemmill & Cresswells 

Dale, Rose & Co 

Wise, Pusey & Co 

D. K. Grim 

James Long 

Bryant Ferguson 

P. D. Martin 

Stout & Atkinson 

John B. Stryker & Co 

Sibley, Molten & Co 

Williams & Arnest 

Adams, Atkinson & Co 

E. J. Troth 

Other contributions in cash and 

merchandise . . 



$100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

13,749 67 



COMMITTEE OX HATS, CAPS AND FURS. 

Chairmen, E. MORRIS and MRS. C. C. ROBERTS. 



Cash. 

Adolph & Keen $1,000 00 

" " employees 400 00 

George Hoff & Co 300 00 

S. D. Walton 250 00 

" " employees 172 50 

C. H. Garden & Co 250 00 

Henry Tilge & Co 250 00 

John Fareira 100 00 

Edward S. Mawson 100 00 

" " employees. 15 43 



Cooper, Parham & Work. 

S. D. Walton & Co 

J. C. Yeager 

Frederick W. Corinth 

Bartalott & Blynn 

John Davis . . 



Coods. 
Employees of E. Morris & Co. 

George Hoff & Co 

Isaac Oakford & Son . . 



$53,814 67 



$100 00 
75 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 



200 00 
150 00 

108 75 



264 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Wm. F. Warburton $100 00 J. B. Lamberti 



$56 00 



Wotnrath & Co 

Joseph Rosenbaum 

Barnes, Osterhout, Herron & Co. 
Miss Benjamin's school, Harris- 
burgh 

Total net.. 



100 00 
90 00 
70 50 



Pupils of Miss Woodward's 

school, Harrisburgh 50 00 

T. H. McCalla 50 00 

Other subscriptions and donations 1,980 84 



$6,220 80 



COMMITTEE ON RETAIL DRY GOODS. 



Chairmen, H. H. 
Cash. 

H. Hi G. Sharpless 

Lord & Taylor, New York 

Eyre & Landell 

Edwin Hall 

John "W. Thomas 

Edward Bacon 

George S. Lang 

From the counting-room and re- 
tail department of C. L. Sharp- 
less 

John Loutey 

Total net. . 



G. SHARPLESS and MRS. JOSHUA TEVIS. 

Edwin King $50 00 

$200 00 Kelley & Brown 50 00 

100 00 F. M. Caldwell 50 00 

Cooper & Conard 50 00 



100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 



60 00 
50 00 



Goods. 

J. M. Hafleigh 500 00 

Besson & Son 152 00 

Eyre & Landell 100 00 

Shelmire & Thompson 72 57 

Other subscriptions and donations 2,206 51 



$4,141 08 




American Button-Hole Machines 

Wilcox & Gibbs, Machines 

Total net . . 



COMMITTEE ON SEWING MACHINES. 

Chairman, MRS. DR. GROSS. 

Wheeler & Wilson, Sewing Ma- 
chines $300 00 

Grover & Baker, Sewing Ma- 
chines 300 00 

The Singer Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Machines 300 00 

The Florence Sewing Machines. 300 00 
Wheeler & Wilson, Button-Hole 

Machine 250 00 

The Elliptic Sewing Machine. . . 250 00 

John Grigg, cash 100 00 

Dr. S. D. Gross, cash 100 00 

The Parham Machine 75 00 

Wagener Sewing Machine 65 00 

Wilmarth Sewing Machine Co. . 6000 

Finkle & Lyon, one machine. . . 55 00 

$625 00 Other contributions 480 40 

300 00 

$3,560 40 



COMMITTEE ON CARRIAGES. 

Chairman, WILLIAM D. ROGERS. 
New Jersey Department, by Gen. Brewers' & Maltsters' Association 

Robertson, Chairman $62500 of Pennsylvania $37500 

Win. D. Rogers 400 00 S. W. Jacobs. . 350 00 



THE GREAT CENTRAL FAIR. 



265 



George Dodd & Son $300 00 

George W. Watson & Co 275 00 

A. B. Laudis and others. Mount 

Joy, Pa 225 00 

Beckhaus & Allgaier 200 00 

J. George Letier 200 00 

Edward Lane 200 00 

J. M. Cox & Brother, Middle- 
town, Del 175 00 

Blanchard & Bro., Newark, N. J. 153 99 
Total net . . 



A. M. Ilerkness $100 00 

J. D. Heritage, Bustleton, Pa. . . 90 00 

H. G. Headrick 80 00 

Sam'l Mowry, Greenville, Conn. 60 00 

James Laws, Holmesburg, Pa. . . CO 00 

W. H. Pearce 51 20 

Pfaff & Kroll 50 00 

Other subscriptions and dona- 
tions 234 95 

$4,205 14 




COMMITTEE ON WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Chairman, GEORGE CROMELIEN. 

E. Castillon 

Kirkpatrick & Brother 

Charles S. & James Carstairs. 

Walden, Koehn & Co 

S. Alter 

J. B. Peacock 

E. K. Conklin 

A. Kobeno, Sr 

John Hertzeler 

Adam Moffitt 

John D. Norcross 

Dufour & Gardrat . . 



$200 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 



Merchandise, estimated value. 
Win. H. Yeaton $500 00 



George Cromelien & Son $500 00 

White & Ilentz 500 00 

P. Bushong 500 00 

Henry Bohlen & Co 500 00 



T. H. Jacobs & Co 

L. E. Amsinck & Co., New York 

Wm. H. Yeaton & Co 

John C. Keffer 

J. N. Kline 

Other donations of money and 
goods, say 



200 00 
165 00 
150 00 
150 00 
50 00 

400 CO 



Total net. 



5,429 00 



COMMITTEE OX CHEMICALS. 

Chairman, WM. M. UHLER, M. D. 



Rosengarten & Sons $1,000 00 

Powers & Weightrnan 1,000 00 

John T. Lewis & Brother 500 00 

Wetherill & Brother 500 00 

Charles Lennig 500 00 



Harrison Brothers & Co $250 00 

Dr. W. M. Filler 50 00 

James F. Magee & Co 50 00 

Other subscriptions 200 00 



Total net $4,050 00 



COMMITTEE ON BREWERS AND MALTSTERS. 



Chairman, SAMUEL HUSTON. 

Cash. Massey, Collins & Co., employees $82 25 
Massey, Collins & Co $500 00 F. & W. S. Perot 200 00 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Leeds & Gray $10000 J. Beckler $10000 

W. E. Augier 10000 P. Guckes 10000 

John Potter 100 00 Leeds & Gray 100 00 

Adolph Ilugel 100 00 Frederick Lauer, Reading 100 00 

Liinus & Yuengling, Pottsville. 55 00 Engel & Wolf 80 00 

Ale, &c. Mrs - Grauch 80 00 

Wm. Gaul '. 500 00 D. J. Yuengling, Pottsville 50 00 

Brewers' Association of State of P. Schemm 50 00 

Pennsylvania 375 00 E. Joerger 50 00 

Abbott & Co 250 00 Schweitzer & Grimm 50 00 

Massey, Collins & Co 250 00 John Klumpp 50 00 

Bergdoll & Psotta 200 00 C. Theiss 50 00 

J. & P. Baltz 200 00 230 casks, &c., &c., say 4,700 00 

Gustavus Bergner 200 00 

Total net $7,800 25 

8FB-COMMITTEE ON EXPRESS COMPANIES. 

Treasurer, JOHN BINGHAM. 

Adams' Express Company $1,00000 Employees, Howard Ex- 
Howard & Co.'s Express 25000 press Co $3000 

Howard Express Company 200 00 " Kinsley & Co.'s 

Kinsley & Co.'s Express 250 00 Express 25 50 

Harnden's Express 250 00 " New Jersey Ex- 
Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express. . 150 00 press Co 16 00 

Philadelphia Local Express .... 50 00 $632 34 

Bills receipted in full : 

$2,150 00 Adams' Express Co $360 00 

One day's income as follows: Howard & Co.'s Express. 149 40 

Employees, Adams' Ex- Harnden's Express 45 25 

press Co $434 00 Howard Express Co 55 35 

" Howard & Co.'s Kinsley & Co.'s Express.. 2985 

Express 100 00 Phila. Local Express 40 00 

" Harnden's Ex- gfg 5 

press 26 84 

Total - $3,462 19 

COMMITTEE ON TEIMMING8, LACES, ETC. 

Chairmen, R. A. MAXWELL and MRS. J. WARNER JOHNSON. 

Cash. R. 1ST. Lee & Co $100 00 

Lewis Brothers & Co $500 00 Johns & Lippincott 100 00 

Billings, Roop & Co 500 00 G. H. Christian & Co 100 00 

Joel J. Baily & Co 500 00 George T. Stokes 100 00 

Shuff & Wernwag 500 00 Ostheimer & Woodward 100 00 

H. Duhring&Co 30000 B. Hooley & Son 10000 

J. G. Maxwell & Son 250 00 F. S. Hovey & Brother 100 00 

Markley & Shaffner 250 00 Pearce, Wardin & Co 100 00 

Armar Young, Brother & Co 250 00 Lefevre, Park & Co 100 00 

Wolgamuth, Raleigh & Co 250 00 Henry M. Stone 100 00 

Willcox Brothers & Co 150 00 Abram H. Derrickson 50 00 

B. G. Godfrey & Co 150 00 Henry Ashley 50 00 

Bates & Coates 125 00 Lee Brothers & Co. . . 50 00 



THE GREAT CENTRAL FAIR. 



267 



Grundy, Brother & Co $50 00 

Brooke & Fuller 50 00 

Austin, Thorp & Co., New York. 50 00 

Goods. 

J. & A. Keraper 125 00 

Agnew & English 125 00 

Joshua B. Lee & Co. . . 100 00 



E. M. Needles $100 00 

H. B. Claflin & Co., New York. . . 50 00 

John Thornton 50 00 

Flues & Schatte 50 00 

Shadrach Hill 50 00 

All other subscriptions and con- 
tributions 2,834 35 



Total net $8,509 35 



COMMITTEE ON TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 



Chairman, D. 




Cash. 

Bucknor, McCammon & Co $1,000 00 

Vetterlein & Co 1,000 00 

John T. Taitt 500 00 

Frishmuth, Brother & Co 300 00 

W. E. Garrett & Sons, country. 250 00 

Hagen, Boyd & Co 200 00 

S. & J. Moore 200 00 

McDowell & Duncan 200 00 

Taylor & Heraphill 200 00 

Smith & Brothers 200 00 

W. Kingslea and employees 112 00 

Louis Herbert 100 00 

C. M. Meyer & Co 100 00 

L. Bremer & Sons 10000 

W. H. Fuguet 100 00 

J. R. Sank 100 00 

A. Merino 100 00 

L. Bamberger & Co 10000 

Russell & Woodruff 100 00 

Teller, Anathan & Co. 100 00 

John C. Heiner & Co 100 00 

Wm. Warner & Co 100 00 

Woodward & Co.. , 100 00 



C. McCAMMON. 

G. W. Hickman & Co $100 00 

S. H. Bush & Co 100 00 

Stern, Jonas & Co 100 00 

Thomas Hare 100 00 

Schmidt & Cathrall 100 00 

E. M. Crawford & Co., N. Y. . . 100 00 

Fred. Esenwein, " . . 100 00 

B. Vetterlein, " . . 100 00 

H. Thiermann, " . . 100 00 
M. F. Boyer & N. Wetzel, Potts- 

ville 60 00 

Woltjen Brothers 50 00 

Wartman & Engelman 50 00 

James W. Crowell 50 00 

A. R. Fougeray 50 00 

Wm. F. Meurer 50 00 

Aug. T. Meurer 50 00 

Lower & Rank 50 00 

Cain & Tatem 50 00 

Beck & Burns 50 00 

John Wagner 50 00 

Goods. 
G. W. Gail & Ax, Baltimore, 

tobacco 520 44 

W. M. Abbey & Joseph Brooke, 

tobacco 200 00 

Frishmuth & Co., cigars 200 00 

Taylor, Bucknor, McCammon & 

Co., coffee 170 00 

Woltjen Brothers, tobacco 116 70 

William Warner & Co., pipes. . . 107 00 

Smith & Brothers, tobacco 76 20 

Sabater & Hance, " 72 00 

Henry H. Watts, New York, 

tobacco 60 00 

Stephen Greenly, tobacco 50 00 

H. R. Wolf, cigars 50 00 

Other contributions.. 93269 



Total net $9,377 03 



268 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



COMMITTEE ON CLOTHING AND MERCHANT TAILORING. 



Chairman, L. 



Cash. 



Bennett & Co $500 00 

Goldman, Berg & Co 500 00 

" " employees. 22 00 

Bloomingdale & Khine 300 00 

Kunkel, Hall & Co 300 00 

Harkness Brothers 300 00 

Anspach & Stanton 300 00 

Arnold, Nusbaum & Nirdlinger. . 300 00 

" " " employees 108 40 

Gans, Lebermaii & Co 300 00 

Shloss & Brother 250 00 

Solomon Gans 250 00 

Geo. W. Eeed & Co 200 00 

Snyder, Grubb & Co 200 00 

" " employees. 99 55 

Frank Brothers & Co 150 00 

Wolf, Mayer & Co 150 00 

Blum, Rau & Co 150 00 

F. A. Hoyt 150 00 

Reizenstein Brothers 100 00 

Joseph S. Dell 100 00 

Perry & Co 100 00 

W. & F. Carpenter 100 00 

E. P. Kelly 100 00 

Stern & Troutman 50 00 

Newburger & Ilochstadter 50 00 

Total net . . 



J. LEBERMAN. 

Samuel Mayer 

Painter, Read & Eldredge 

J. H. Ehrlicher 

J. Meier & Brother 

Milligan & Carnahan 

Thos. C. Love 

E. O. Thompson 

S. S.Kelly 

Hughes & Muller 

S. H. Mattson 

M. J. & C. Croll 

Hartley & Eckert 



$50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 



Goods, estimated value. 

Wanamaker & Brown 

Rockhill & Wilson 

Grigg & Van Gunten 

Charles Stokes & Co 

William Brown & Co 

C. Somers & Son 

H. L. Hallowell & Son 

R. D. Clifton 

M. T. Willis 

E. Matlack 

Other donations of money and 
goods, say 



COMMITTEE ON WHOLESALE GROCERIES. 

Chairmen, EDWARD S. CLARKE and MRS. CADWALADER. 

lungerich & Smith 

William Cummings & Son 

William C. Keehmle 

H. Geiger & Co 

John Harding, Jr 

Garrett & Martin 

W. S. Grant 

H. H. Lippincott & Trotter 

Madeira & Cabada 

Thomas L. Gillespie 

James W. Carson & Co 

Roberts & Macaltioner 

Benjamin S. Janney, Jr.. & Co.. 

Samuel Bispham & Son 

Charles S. Lewis 

George Helrnuth 

James Carstairs . . 




Thompson, Clarke & Young $1,000 00 

E. C. Knight & Co 1,000 00 

Reynolds, Ilowell & Reiff 500 00 



300 00 
300 00 
153 50 
150 00 
125 00 
100 00 
100 00 
51 37 
50 00 
50 00 

700 00 
$7,360 07 



$500 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
50 00 



THE GREAT CENTRAL FAIR. 



269 



W. Longstreth & Co. . 
Weaver & Sprankle . . 

Nathan Young 

C. Young 

James Small . . 



$50 00 C. T. Holloway 

50 00 E. C. Ebv 

50 00 D. Beidelinan 

50 00 D. Hendrie 

50 00 Other subscriptions. 



$50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
97 62 



Total net $5,797 62 



COMMITTEE OX ROUSE FURNISHING GOODS. 

Chairmen, I. E. WALKAVEN and MRS. RANDOLPH. 



Cash. 
Noblit, Brown & Noblit. . 

Mrs. S. S. White 

L. A. Godey 

Paton & Co., New York. . 
Burglar Alarm Telegraph . 
Mrs. George Cromelien . . . 

John Grigg 

S. J. Megargee , 

John Noblit , 

Mutual Assurance Co. 
Cooper & Conard 



Goods. 

A. II. Franciscus 

I. E. Walraven 

Kelty, Carringtou & Co 

Hiram Tucker. Boston 

Sheppard, Van Harlingen & Arri- 

son 

New York Metropolitan Washing 

Machine Co. . . 



$200 00 

200 00 

200 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 



1,300 00 
350 00 
300 00 
250 00 

211 50 

204 00 



Brnce's Parlor Organ $150 00 

J. V. Cowell & Son 125 00 

Berger & Butz 125 00 

Goldthorp & Co 121 50 



Vanhorn & Eckstein 

Howe & Euston 

Newark Patent Package Co. 

Mrs. S. S. White 

R. K. Slaughter 

Hadden, Porter & Booth. . . . 
Whitney & Weston, Boston . 

Mrs. R. Lewis 

Reading Hardware Works.. 

V. Qnarre 

Davis, Kempleton & Co 

Isaac Schlichter 

B. J. Williams 

C. W. Dean 

Chipman & White 

E. S. Farson & Co 

A. Lafore 

Other donations . . 



108 90 
100 00 
90 00 
89 75 
75 00 
75 00 
69 00 
68 00 
68 00 
51 54 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
469 81 



Total net $6,102 90 



COMMITTEE ON WROUGHT AND CAST IRON. 

Chairman, ANDREW WHEELER. 



Morris, Tasker & Co $1,000 00 

Morris, Wheeler & Co 1,000 00 

Phoenix Iron Co 1 ,000 00 

N. Trotter & Co 1,000 00 

James Rowland & Co 1,000 00 

Cabeen & Co 1,000 00 

N. & G. Taylor & Co 1,000 00 

Allentown Iron Co., Allentown. 1,000 00 
Lehigh Crane Iron Co., Catasau- 

qua 1,000 00 

Cambria Iron Co., Johnstown. . . 1,000 00 
Cumberland Nail & Iron Co., 

Bridgeton, N. J 1,000 00 

Thomas Iron Co., Hokendauqua. 1,000 00 



Glendon Iron Co., Easton $1,000 00 

Bloomsburg Iron Co., Blooms- 
burg 1,000 00 

Penn. Iron Works, Danville: 

Thomas Beaver -. . 500 00 

Book -keepers & clerks. 102 50 

Workmen 894 53 

1,497 03 

A. & P. Roberts & Co 500 00 

Verree & Mitchell 500 00 

W. F. Potts 500 00 

N. & A. Middleton 500 00 

Stephen Robbins 500 00 

J. Wood & Brother. . 500 00 



270 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Alan Wood & Co $500 00 

E. & G. Brooke, Birdsboro 500 00 

E. & G. Brooke & Co., Birdsboro 500 00 

Steele & Worth, Coatesville 500 00 

Bethlehem Iron Co., Bethlehem . 500 00 

Jas. Hooven & Sons, Norristown 500 00 

McCullough Iron Co., Phila. . . 500 00 

Carbon Iron Co., Perry ville 500 00 

Seyfert, McManus & Co., Read- 
ing 500 00 

Seyfert, McManus & Co., specially 

applied 500 00 

Lehigh Valley Iron Co., North- 
ampton County 500 00 

Tatham & Brothers 300 00 

Etting & Brother 300 00 

G. Dawson Coleman, Lebanon. . 300 00 
D. O. & H. S. Hitner, William 

Penn Furnaces 300 00 

Catasauqua Manufacturing Co. 300 00 

Marshall, Phillips & Co 300 00 

Cabot & Etting 250 00 

Steever & Whitaker 250 00 

Huston & Penrose, Coatesville . . 250 00 

C. L. Pennock & Co., " . . 250 00 

0. W. Barnes. . . 250 00 



Hoopes & Townsend $250 00 

McKelvy & Neal, Bloomsburg . . 250 00 

Samuel Lewis, Allentown 250 00 

Duncannon Iron Co., Philadel- 
phia 200 00 

A. Purves & Son 150 00 

Phoenix Iron Co., paper weights 150 00 
Jacobs & Bull, Spring Grove 

Forge 120 00 

C. D. Robbins & Co 100 00 

J. Clarence Cresson 100 00 

Thomas I. Potts 100 00 

Samuel Hatfield, Coatesville 100 00 

Hugh E. Steele " .... 100 00 
Singer, Nhnick & Co., Pittsburgh, 

steel cannon 100 00 

W. H. Tiers 100 00 

Sanderson, Brother & Co 100 00 

Park, Brother & Co., Pittsburgh, 

steel 95 25 

William Dowlin, Downingtown . 50 00 

James Goodman, Sadsbury Forge 50 00 

" " " employees 7 00 
Proceeds from miniature horse- 
shoes, presented by H. Burden 

& Sons, Troy, N. Y 3,181 73 



Total net $32,138 28 



By James McHenry, London . . . $1,207 35 
By Mrs. C. Ingersoll Gara, Erie, 

Pa 1,036 09 

French, Richards & Co 1,000 00 

Edward M. Hopkins 500 00 

C. Macalester. . . 500 00 



RESTAURANT DEPARTMENT. 

Chairmen, GEO. T. LEWIS and Miss MoHENRT. 

Thomas Sparks $45600 

By Mrs. T. T. Bradford, from 
Ladies' Aid Society of Water- 
ford, Pa 391 35 

By Mrs. G. A. Nicolls, Reading. 305 98 
By Mrs. Chaplain, from citizens 

of Germantown 303 55 

By Mrs. Susan A. Russell, Potts- 

ville 259 85 

From "Dan Rice's Great Show" 256 75 
Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing 

Company 250 00 

From the employees of the Wa- 
ter Department, Philadelphia, 206 10 

Thomas Earp 200 00 

Delaware County Mutual Insu- 
rance Company 200 00 

Browning & Brothers 200 00 

By Mrs. Dr. Rankin, Shippens- 

burg 189 70 




THE GREAT CENTRAL FAIR. 



271 



Proceeds of a festival at Con- 

neauville $183 62 

By E. P. Pleasant, Sunbury, 

Pa 177 oo 

C. Knap, Pittsburgh, two guns 

and one mortar 175 00 

Citizens of Juniata County 153 45 

By Miss Mary Kirk, Upper Darby 130 00 

Citizens of Pennsburg 112 85 

From Allentown and neighbor- 
hood 110 31 

Mrs. Robert Sturgis 100 00 

John Grigg 100 00 

Mrs. Edward Law 100 00 

Proceeds of a parlor entertain- 
ment 100 00 

Geo. T. Lewis 100 00 

Alexander Brown 100 00 

G. A. Wood 100 00 

Dr. George W. Norris 100 00 

Total net. . 



Miss E. M. Fox 

Miss N. W. Fisher 

Mrs. W. W. Fisher 

F. W. Ralston 

Henry Sharpless 

N. W. Harkness (collection) .... 
By S. J. Walls, from Lewisburg 
Ladies' Committee of Milton . . . 
A. J. McDowell, Summerville . . 

Thomas Pratt, Media 

Thomas Earp, Jr 

John T. Lewis 

Edward L. Clark 

George R. Smith 

Field & Keehmle 

Mrs. R. H. Gratz 

T. Wharton Fisher 

Ladies of Huntington 

Other contributions and profit. . 



$100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

98 10 

78 20 

72 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

11,878 42 



COMMITTEE ON PERFUMERY AND TOILET ARTICLES. 

Chairmen, H. P. TAYLOR and MRS. E. W. CLARK. 
Hamrick & Leavitt . . 




William D. Glenn . 
Jacob Haehnlen . . 



employees. 



Cash. 



Henry C. Fox . . 
Total net . 



$200 00 



Goods. 
Van Haagen & McKeone . . . 

R. & G. A. Wright 

Xavier Bazin 

J. C. Hull's Son, New York. 

H. P. & C. R. Taylor 

Glenn & Co 

A. W. Harrison 

Reinhold Calm 

Edward McClain 

All other donations . . 



$22,481 67 



$100 00 

20 00 

100 00 

50 00 



425 00 

396 00 

363 50 

360 00 

350 00 

301 89 

75 00 

52 50 

50 25 

3,681 03 

^6,525 17 



COMMITTEE ON WOOLEN AND COTTON MANUFACTURES. 

Chairman, G. MORRISON COATES. 

Benjamin Bullock's Sons $1,000 00 John M. Mitchell & Co. . 

Wm. C. Houston and Thos. Mott. l r OOO 00 

Brown, Hill & Co 500 00 

Martin Landenberger 500 00 

" Office employees.. 12000 

" Factory do 314 25 



Employees. . 

Whitehead Brothers, Trenton, N. 
J., goods ................... 

Coates Brothers .............. 

Southwick, Sheble & Greene. . . 



$500 00 
17 20 

400 00 
300 00 
300 00 



272 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Duhring & Co., Beaver Valley 

Mills $300 00 

A. T. Lane 250 00 

Reece, Seal & Co 250 00 

Henry C. Davis 250 00 

Joseph B. Hughes 250 00 

T. Hilsen & Co., picture, valued at 250 00 
Washington Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Gloucester, N.J., goods. 250 00 
Garsed & Brother, Frankford. .. 200 00 
Employees, Tremont Mill.. 12182 
" WingohockingMill. 89 74 
James C. Roberts, Downington, 

Pa 150 00 

Joseph McClure, Downingtown, 150 00 

" " Employees, &c. 62 00 

Samuel W. Cattell 150 00 

James Ramsden 100 00 

Fairfield & Lee 100 00 

Justice & Bateman 100 00 

Emanuel Hey & Brothers 100 00 

James Long, Brother & Co 100 00 

Jacob D. Heft 100 00 

John Verlinden, Darby 100 00 

James Martin, Frankford 100 00 



John Button & Sons 

" " " Employees. . 

Michael Buggy 

Charles T. Deacon 

" " Employees . . . 

Granlees, Norris & Co 

Bishop, Kelly & White 

W. Divine & Sons 

Employees in Kennebec Fac- 
tory 

Employees in Penn Factory . . 

Aub & Hackenburg, goods 

J. T. Midnight 

Horace H. Soule 

Eagle Mills 

E. Albert Conkle 

David Trainer 

" " Employees 

James & Robert Mair 

Campbell & Elliott 

W. Fulforth and employees .... 

Solomon Wilde, Frankford 

All other donations, say 



$100 00 

70 00 

100 00 

100 00 

89 25 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 



Total net $7,500 00 



Cash. 
Proceeds of a parlor 

through Mrs. James L. 

horn 

Thomas Megear 

Palmer, Richardson & Co. 
Ailing Brothers & Co., X. 



COMMITTED OX JEWELRY, SILVER WARE, ETC 1 . 

Chairmen, JAMES E. CALDWELL and MRS. JAMES L. CLAOHORJT. 

Goods, estimated value. 

J. E. Caldwell & Co $2,000 00 

Carrow, Thibault & Co 566 50 

N. F. Fenwick, Paris, France. . . 400 00 

Butler & McCarty 317 00 

Farr & Brother 310 00 

George W. Simons & Brother. . S06 00 

William Wilson & Son 300 00 

F. P. Dubosq 300 00 

E. Tracy & Co 250 00 

John M. Harper 250 00 

Thomas Wriggins 179 00 

Thomas C. Garrett 175 00 

Dtirand & Co., New York 158 50 

Arthur Rurnrill & Co., " . . 150 00 

Pratt, South & Co., " . . 150 00 

Mabie, Todd & Co., u . . 147 00 

Hall, Dodd & Co., Newark, N. J. 134 00 

Chatellier & Spence, New York 131 00 

Harvey Filley & Sons 125 00 

Baldwin, Sexton & Co., N. Y. . . 120 00 

Salzman, Jacot & Co., "... 115 00 




fair, 
Clag- 



$722 15 

100 00 

100 00 

50 00 



THE GREAT CENTRAL FAIR. 



273 



Hunting & Earle, New York. . . $112 00 

Reed &, Barton, Tauaton, Mass., 110 50 

Fitch & Waldo, New York 104 50 

Krider & Biddle 102 50 

Buckenham, Cole & Hall, N. Y. 100 00 

Carter, Hale & Co., " 100 00 

Bald win & Co., " 100 00 

Gurrett & Son 100 00 

Dreer & Sears 100 00 

E. Cliristman 100 00 

L. Ladomus & Co 100 00 

H. & G. Soule, New York 93 00 

Durfey & Barnes, " 90 00 

Ernest Kaufmann 76 00 

Madam E. G. Augeli. . 75 00 



Jacob Bennett 

E. Borhek & Son 

E. Howard & Co 

C. Jacot & Brother 

C. F. Newton 

Sackett, Davis & Co., New York 
Samuel W. Chamberlain, a 
Churchill, Dana & Co., " 
Spiess & Rosswog, " 

Vulcanite Jewelry Co. " 

G. Gigon & Co 

W. Windel & Brother 

Joseph T. K. Hand, Cape Island 

Henry Harper 

Other donations, say 



$75 00 
75 00 
70 00 
70 00 
60 00 
59 50 
56 00 
53 50 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 

800 00 



Total net $11,943 83 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS. 

Chairmen, EDWARD SIIIPPEN and MRS. P. M. CLAPP. 



Girls' High and Normal School : 
Proceeds of concert $1.000 00 

Sales at fair 264 81 

" after fair . . 29 25 



$1,294 0(5 



Contributions from 

teachers $52 10 

Parlor entertainment 52 94 

Sales at fair.. 783 50 



Boys' Central High School : 
Collections by pupils and pro- 
fessors $891 00 

Sales at fair 376 00 

1,267 00 

First Ward, sales, concert, collec- 
tions 1,151 07 

Second Ward : 

Phantasmagoria exhibi- 
tion $6000 

One day's income from 

teachers 85 00 

Children's collections.. 124 00 

Proceeds of ward fair .490 00 

759 00 

Third Ward 1,623 30 

Fourth Ward 1,726 00 

Fifth Ward, including $655.25 
from sales at the fair by a col- 
ored school 1,222 68 

Sixth Ward 1.240 68 

Seventh Ward 1,098 37 

Eighth Ward : 

Phantasmagoria exhi- 
bitions $435 17 

Contributions from 

schools 219 58 

Total net 

18 



Ninth Ward 

Tenth Ward 

Eleventh Ward 

Twelfth Ward 

Thirteenth Ward 

Fourteenth Ward : 
Contributions of 

the Hancock and 

Monroe Grammar 

Schools $2,879 61 

Sales at fair . . 600 00 



$1,544 29 

2,334 67 

1,623 49 

31 00 

586 64 

1,192 72 



Fifteenth Ward 

Sixteenth Ward ...... 

Seventeenth Ward .... 

Eighteenth Ward 

Nineteenth Ward. . . . 

Twentieth Ward 

Twenty -first Ward .... 
Twenty-second Ward. . 
Twenty -third Ward . . . 
Twenty-fourth Ward. . 
Twenty-fifth Ward. . . . 
Public schools at large 

Private schools 

All other receipts 



3,479 61 

3,112 24 

1,237 60 

601 26 

1,070 00 

1,144 30 

1,005 85 

522 61 

1,021 60 

264 93 

647 21 

434 60 

376 45 

1.542 0!) 

432 4;> 

$06,760 40 



274 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



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TUE NORTHERN IOWA FAIR. 277 

From Eastern Pennsylvania to Northern Iowa is a march worthy of 
Sherman's army; when made, however, the traveller will find that though 
the sky may have changed, the avocations of those who dwell beneath it, 
have not. Here, as elsewhere, the cause of the army is dear to the hearts 
of the people. The idea of holding a Sanitary Fair in Dubuque first 
occurred, to a few citizens of that place, in January, 1864. The subject was 
laid before the Ladies' Soldiers' Aid Society, and a public meeting was called 
to consider the subject. The leaders in such matters, however, were at that 
time unwilling to undertake so arduous an enterprise, and the matter rested 
until March. Mrs. Livermore, of Chicago, happened at that date to be in 
Dubuque, and proposed to deliver an address, embodying her experience in 
sanitary matters and philanthropic festivals. The address was made before 
an audience of Dubuque's best and fairest. Instead of taking a vote, they 
now took a contribution, as the simplest method of arriving at the sense of a 
meeting held in view of pecuniary ends. The plates told the story : $858 in 
money, and $250 in promises of goods. A fair organization was immediately 
decided upon, and a committee of sixteen was charged with the duty of 
selecting the omcers. This was done on the 12th of March, the choice falling 
upon the following ladies and gentlemen : 

President, 
H. A. WILTSE. 

Vice- Presidents, 

F. E. BISSELL, MRS. TIMOTHY DAVIS, 

MRS. P. H. CONGER. 

Secretaries, 

AUSTIN ADAMS, MRS. J. M. ROBISOX, 

DARIUS K. CORN WELL, MRS. J. CLEMENT, 

MRS. D. N. COOLEY. 

Treasurer, 
GEORGE L. MATTHEWS. 

Execu five Comm ittee, 

H. A. WILTSE, MRS. D. S. CUMINGS, 

O. P. SIIIRAS, MRS. H. MARKELL, 

MRS. S. M. LANGWORTHY, MRS. H. L. STOUT, 

MRS. D. N. COOLEY, MRS. C. H. BOOTH, 

MRS. J. CLEMENT, MRS. WM. VANDEVEH. 

The president of each co-operating county in the state was made a vice- 
president, thirty-two such omcers serving for Iowa counties, one for Iowa Good 
Templars, and one for Madison, "Wisconsin. 



278 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



The Northern Iowa Sanitaiy Fair was held in the City Hall, a fine build- 
ing of three stories and a basement It opened on the 21st of June, without 
ceremonial. The basement served as a store-room ; the first floor, which was 
unpartitioned throughout its length of one hundred and fifty feet, was occu- 
pied by booths upon each side, with a passage-way of twenty-five feet 
between. The second floor, being divided into rooms, furnished accommoda- 
tions for the library and floral department, and apartments for unpacking and 
appraising, and for official transactions. On the third floor, which was undi- 
vided, were the curiosities, battle relics, and children's amusements. The 
restaurant was established in Turner Hall, an adjoining building ; in another 
communicating structure were hardware, agricultural implements, household 

furniture, and machinery. Turner Hall 
offered, too, a site for the presentation of 
pantomimes and tableaux, while the Julien 
Theatre was the scene of amateur theatri- 
cals, lectures, and concerts. 

The Iowa Fair prides itself on the fact 
that u no article on sale had ever been ex- 
hibited at any other fair. Many of the fairs 
held at about the same time as ours became 
the residuary legatees of the Metropolitan 

and other fairs, but ours had no share in these inheritances." So much the 
more glory for Iowa. 

Such was the lavish generosity of the people of the state, and so large was 
the proportion of goods contributed ready for hospital use, that $25,000 worth 
were sent to the army even before the fair was opened. This was practical 
work in good earnest ; instead cf contributing wares from the sale of which 
money might be obtained with which to purchase stores and clothing fully 
one third being absorbed by the dealers' profit they contributed the stores 
and clothing at first cost The refreshment department furnished another 
proof of the hearty good-will of the people, though with a less happy result 
The supply of provisions, cooked and uncooked, was so profuse, that a por- 
tion was sold, as it could not be eaten, and another portion was spoiled before 
it could be either eaten or sold. 

There have been few fairs without their original ideas ; and a method of 
augmenting the returns by offers of awards seems to have begun, and, for 
that matter, ended, in Dubuque. The Key City Mills Company promised a 
premium of $30 to the best four barrels of winter wheat flour, and another of 




BASITARY REAPER. 



VOTE YOUR REGIMENT A FLAG. 79 

$40 to the largest donation of flour. The Brick City Mills, of Clermont, won 
the first, and the Waverley Mills, of Beaver County, with twenty-one barrels, 
the second. The premiums went with the barrels, of course. The Wheeler 
& Wilson Manufacturing Company promised a $115 sewing machine to the 
maker of the best gentleman's shirt, an $85 machine to the second best, and a 
$65 machine to the third best. These sprightly household engines were won 
respectively by Mrs. Coder and Pettibone, of Iowa, and Mrs. Millard, of Wis- 
consin. 

Mrs. Williams, of Shellrock, carried off the prize of $35, offered by Luther 
& Edgar Tisdale, of Dubuque, for the best three-gallon crock of butter; and 
Mrs. Fitch, of Nautells, the prize of $15 for the second best three-gallon crock. 
There are many residents in Atlantic cities who will be glad to learn that 
there is such a thing as good butter, though it is no nearer than Iowa. 

Mr. A. H. Suplee, of New York, had promised an elliptic sewing and 
braiding machine to him who should supply the largest amount of hospital 
clothing. James K. Smith, of Hudson, furnished the clothing, won the 
machine, gave it to the fair, and saw it sold. 

Messrs. Wilcox & Gribbs, of New York, offered a $55 sewing machine to the 
maker of the five best hospital shirts. Mrs. Schroeder, of Illinois, took them 
at their word, made the best shirts, won the machine, and gave it to the fair. 

The managers of the fair offered two prizes : First, an American flag, twelve 
by twenty feet, to the county making the largest contribution, Dubuque 
County being naturally excluded. This was won by Clayton County, with 
$1,900. Second, a similar flag to the county making the largest contribution in 
proportion to wealth, Dubuque being permitted to compete. Kossuth County 
won, with $388. 

Mr. James E. Sebring, of New York, offered a twelve by twenty American 
flag to the county making the largest contribution in proportion to wealth, 
Dubuque being again excluded. Mitchell county won, with $525. 

The great instrumentality of the vote was not to be overlooked in Iowa. 
Messrs. Parsons & Co., of St. Louis, presented an embroidered silk regimental 
flag to the fair, the visitors to decide to what Iowa regiment it should be given. 
Votes were half a dollar apiece, and six hundred and eighty were cast. The 
Ninth Iowa won. A clever joke might be perpetrated, in such a canvass, by 
a regiment at home on furlough. Eemembering the old party cry of " Vote 
yourself a farm," they might strive for regimental colors by the same process. 
But as this would stimulate opposition, and as opposition would beget half 
dollars, and as half dollars, when collected by twos, produce a harmonious 



280 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



decimal result, no one could fairly object, and the winning regiment, when its 
furlough was over, could go back with flying colors. 

If the small number of visitors be taken into consideration, the Iowa Fair 
was the most successful ever given. Not four thousand persons attended it ; 
the receipts from the sale of tickets were not $2,500 ; and yet the gross yield 
was nearly $86,000. This was owing, in part, to the fact which has been 
mentioned, that a large proportion of the goods contributed were ready for 
hospital use, and could be forwarded at once to the front ; and in part to the 
fact that the thirty-two counties represented sent to the central treasury 
an unusual proportion of money the proceeds of local fairs, sub-sanitary 
festivals, tea-parties, the collections of village aid societies, &c., &c. Thus, 
Black Hawk County sent not only its quota of goods, but nearly a thousand 
dollars in money collections in Cedar Falls, the receipts of an Old Folks' 
Concert in Waterloo, and the returns of one day's income from "Wm. Ireland 
& Co. ; elsewhere they had had an ice-cream festival, at another place a calico 
tea-party, and farther south, a stage-coach concert. It was, literally, a people's 




A STAGE-COACH CONCERT IN IOWA. 



fair, and the citizens of the very heart and limits of the state had borne each 
their burden. It is proper to add that when the closing auction sales were 
over, the fair was still the owner of an embroidered chair, a gold watch, a 
house-lot, one hundred and twenty acres of land, and a bee-hive. 
The following is an abstract of the receipts of the Iowa Fair : 

Dubnque City $17,359 20 

Dubuque County 587 75 



THE DUBUQUE FAIR. 281 

Black Hawk County $1,453 40 

Clayton County 1,923 80 

Jasper County 1,124 00 

Jones County 1,017 65 

All other counties 38,601 78 

Good Templars 1,828 10 

Boston, Mass 2,735 00 

Chicago, 111 3,508 00 

Hartford, Conn 325 00 

Masons 272 70 

Milwaukee 1,262 1 6 

New York City 3,165 00 

Entertainments 606 50 

Refreshments 1,465 05 

Regatta on Lake Peosta 13 50 

Odd Fellows of Iowa 265 00 

Sale of tickets 2,433 35 

Vote upon the flag awarded to Ninth Iowa 340 00 

Flour and wheat sold 403 70 

Sales by auction 1,585 50 

Major-General Curtis 50 00 

Needle Pickets, Quincy 50 00 

Col. Hawkins' lecture at Redwing, Minn 15 50 

Iowa Association of Washington, D. C 330 00 



Total $60,725 74 

Stores not used, but sent direct to the army 25,000 00 



$85,725 74 
Deduct expenses , 9,230 90 



Total net $76,494 84 

The greater part of the cash proceeds, or $48,348, were sent to the Chicago 
Branch of the Sanitary Commission, a few hundred dollars being retained for 
the use of the Soldiers' Home in Dubuque. 

The contributions of Dubuque may be analyzed as follows : 

DUBUQUE CITY. 

Collection at Congregational R. Bonson $100 00 

Church $858 00 Win. Westphal 100 00 

Sale of piano given by the Cath- State Bank, Dubuque Branch . . 100 00 

olic Society 71100 II. W. Sanford 10000 

Sale of silver- ware given by the F. E. Bissell 100 00 

Catholic Society 500 00 J. K. Graves 100 00 

Collections of one day's income, J. T. Hancock 100 00 

by Mrs. Booth & Miss Bissell. 1,071 70 Reid & Murdoch 100 00 

Other collections of income 180 45 Babbage & Co 100 00 

Sheffield & Scott 15000 Laflins, Smith & Co 9000 

Key City Mills (premiums) 150 00 Girls' concert 89 95 



282 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



$25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 



$17,359 20 

One excellent, and perhaps unexpected, result attended the Iowa Fair. 
The stipulation had been previously made that the funds raised by it be paid 
into the Chicago Branch of the Sanitary Commission, though the state had 
maintained an independent sanitary organization of its own. The interest 
excited throughout the northern half of the state by the fair, live months of 
incessant labor in its behalf, the attention thus drawn from the state associa- 
tion and fixed upon the national commission, served to alienate the people 
from the one, and attract them to, and identify them with, the other. This 
result, when attained, was looked upon by many lowans who had given their 
labors to the cause, as of greater value than even the $70,000 which was its 
more obvious and immediate object. 

" This result," writes Mr. Norris, in his report, " seems small when com- 
pared with the results of the New York or Philadelphia fairs ; but it must 
be recollected that our population is light, our country new, and our people 
generally poor. If real ability is taken into account, I am satisfied that our 
gift upon this holy altar will be justly regarded as greater than that of any 
other fair that has been held for the sanitary cause. As was well remarked by 
President Wiltse, in his opening address, ' No donations have been sanctified 



G. Becker 


$75 00 


Stevens & Hooper 


W. P. Large 


50 00 


Brackett & Morse 


O. Chamberlain 


50 00 


C. P. Kinsley & Co 


II. Lowrey 


50 00 


George Crane 


E. A. & J. H. Lull 


50 00 


Dr. J. C-. Lay 


Glover & Smock. 


50 00 


A. Van Pelt& Co 


James Levi ... 


50 00 


John William Smith 


Hon. W. B. Allison 


50 00 


Asa Horr 


Mial Mason ... 


50 00 


Wm. A. Judd 


Key City Mills Co 


50 00 


W. H. Peabodv 


C. H. Merry 


50 00 


C. C. Gilman 


First National Bank, Dubuque. . 


50 00 


J. N. Waggoner 


Wm. L. Bradley 


50 00 


John Bell 


Major-Gen. Herron 


50 00 


P. C. Sampson, Jr 


B. B. Provoost 


50 00 


J. V. Rider 


A. Greenwald 


50 00 


Platt Smith 


II. L. Stout 


50 00 


Keller & Cornwell 


John Doud, Jr 


50 00 


J. B. Lane 


G. B. Hamilton 


50 00 


M. S. Robison 


W. H. Rumpf 


50 00 


Julien House 


John Jackson 


50 00 


James Burt 


H. Jackman 


50 00 


W. Becker 


Waller & Christman 


50 00 


J. Duncan . . 


C. H. Eighmey 


50 00 


C. J. Cumings. . . . 


C. Sadler 


40 00 


Sales and other receipts 


Total. . 







THE FAIR AT ST. PAUL. 



283 



by greater sacrifices than those made to our fair.' I have been surprised 
bj a great many facts connected with its history. Neighborhoods whose 
entire male population, almost, had gone to the war, and whose crops have to 
be raised and harvested by the females, have contributed largely to its fundJs. 
One farmer, who gave twenty dollars, told me that his three boys, all he had, 
were in the army, and that his wife would be compelled to drive his reaper 
in the harvest-field, and his daughters assist in binding his grain and in 
securing his harvest Kossuth County, two hundred miles in the interior, 
gave more than a dollar for every human being residing within its limits." 

But Iowa is not the extreme northwest: there is Minnesota, the fairest of 
the younger sisters, and late in November, 1864, the Executive Committee of 
the Minnesota Branch of the Sanitary Commission met in the governor's 
room, at St. Paul. They all declared themselves in favor of holding a 
Soldiers' Fair during the coming winter, in case the co-operation of the Ladies' 
Branch should be obtained. This having been promised, the fair was organ- 
ized by the appointment of the following officers : 



President, 
H. M. RICK. 

Secretary, 
J. D. BROWN. 



Vice- Pre&iden t, 
W. D. WASHBURXE. 

Treasurer, 
J. L. MERIAM. 



Executire Committee. 



H. M. RICE, 

S. MILLER, 

W. D. WASHBURXE, 

CHARLES SCHEFFER, 

JOHX A. PECKHAM, 



GEXTLEMEX. 



G. W. PRESCOTT, 
D. "W. IXGERSOI.L, 
J. L. MERIAM, 
J. D. BROWX, 
R. GOEDOX. 



MRS. CHAS. H. OAKES, 
" WM. J. SMITH, 
" J. M. WIXSLOW, 

" J. C. BCKBAXK, 

" IT. THOMPSON, 



MRS. C. E. MAYO, 
" ISAAC MARK LEY, 
" J. H. STEWART, 
" J. W. BASS, 

Miss LOCKWOOD. 



The fair, it was decided, should open on the 8th of January, the anniver- 
sary of the battle of New Orleans. The Source of the Mississippi, doubtless, 
thought this a clever method of showing its intenest in what had transpired, in 
by -gone days, at the Mouth. When Minnehaha and the Southwest Pass sym- 
pathize, secession is, of necessity, dead along the course of the stream. 

The 8th of January falling on Sunday, the 9th was celebrated instead. 
The Great Western Band and the Rev. Mr. Pope, Governor Miller and the 



284 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Hon Mr. Washburne, the Kev. Mr. Noble, Senator Wilkinson, and the Glee 
Club, took part in the opening ceremonies. To use the terse language of the 
local chronicle upon the first night's experience, "Mozart Hall was a jam." 




MINNEJIAUA. 



There were few of the attractions offered by the fairs in the eastern cities 
that the Minnesotians were not able to present as well. They had, as has 
been said, a Mozart Hall ; they had an art gallery, fish ponds, a refreshment 
room, where meals were served "in the European style;" there was a post 
office, one hundred and fifty letters arriving by every mail ; an autograph 



ST. PAUL RAFFLES AND VOTES. 285 

table ; an elephant in the third story ; a giant pig, weighing one hundred 
and fifty pounds when divested of certain attributes, such as bristles and 
skin ; and two swords, to be disposed of by the method that New York has 
made immortal. The first was to be presented to the field-officer, belonging 
to a Minnesota regiment, who should receive the greatest number of votes. 
There were forty such officers eligible all above the rank of colonel being 
excluded and a list of them was posted near the polls. Governor Miller 
evinced the impartiality becoming the official who had created these forty 
candidates, by voting once apiece for them all. A terrific contest commenced 
at the very outset between the partisans of Colonel Marshall, of the Seventh 
Minnesota, and Lieutenant-Colonel Uline, of the Second. The firemen of St. 
Paul cast one hundred votes for the latter, a former comrade, extinguishing 
Colonel Marshall for the time ; but he soon blazed forth again, as defiant as 
ever. But the firemen kept on voting, and raised a purse for their favorite 
by canvassing the city. The people of Kedwing collected $700, equivalent 
to 2,800 votes, and sent a messenger to make the purchase in the name of 
Colonel Ilubbard, of the Fifth ; but being informed that even this expensive 
expression of opinion would not elect their candidate, withheld it. The 
Lieutenant-Colonel won the sword. 

The second sword was to be given to such officer on General Sibley's staff 
as the vote should designate. That mere merit might not sway the voter's 
choice to the exclusion of good looks, photographs of the gentlemen were 
placed where they could not fail to catch the voter's eye. 

The fair closed on the fourth night, certain raffles and auctions taking 
place on the fifth day, and the grand sanitary hop on the evening of that day. 
It was thought that the piano raffle must be postponed, perhaps indefinitely, 
as there were two hundred and twenty-five tickets unsold. Three young 
men, however, resolved that the sport should continue, purchased and paid 
for the remaining chances, and then calmly awaited the result. Mr. Beebe, a 
gentleman who had bought but one ticket, drew the piano. 

Mr. Fletcher Williams was also fortunate in his appeals to fate, winning a 
silk dress of great price. After recording this event, the local chronicle says : 
"It is immaterial, Fletcher, whether they be stewed or fried." This is a very 
obscure, but we hope not an improper, innuendo. 

The following were the receipts and expenditures : 

Total receipts from all sources $13,596 62 

Deduct expenses and bad money 4,036 44 

Net receipts $9,559 18 



286 



THE TRIBUTE COOK. 




SCENE OF THK SECOND CHICAGO FAIK. 



Early in the year 1865, the ladies of the North western branch of the Com- 
mission determined to hold a second fair in Chicago ; and though, before the 
preparations were more than half completed, the principal armed forces of the 
rebellion had surrendered, and the country was on the eve of peace, they saw 
no reason to relax their exertions, nor did they believe that the need of the 
sum they hoped to raise was in any degree diminished. There were still fifty 
thousand soldiers in the hospitals ; regiments returning from great distances 
would still require assistance on the route ; and the winding and settling up 
of the affairs of the Commission would consume no small amount of money. 

The fair building proper was erected for the occasion, and covered the 
whole of Dearborn Park. In this was Union Hall, not unlike Union Avenue 
of the Philadelphia fair. Michigan Avenue was inclosed, the entire length of 
the park, and was the scene of the horticultural department an agreeable 
combination of grottoes, groves, lakes, hills, valleys, waterfalls. The Restau- 
rant and the New England Farm- House were established in the Soldiers' 
Rest. Monitor Hall was the arena of an iron-clad fight, after the manner of 
that so well contested upon the Boston frog-pond, of which more hereafter. 
Hard by was " General Grant," the mammoth ox from Boston, dwelling, as 
was meet, in a structure sacred to himself. Bryan Hall was the Department 



THE SECOND CHICAGO FAIR. 287 

of Arms and Trophies ; and in the rear of Bryan Hall was an edifice put up 
especially to serve the purposes of a Gallery of Art. On the corner of Lake 
Street and Wabash Avenue stood the original, veritable Lincoln Log Cabin, 
constructed in part by one who was afterwards the sixteenth President of the 
United States. The fair opened on the appointed day, the 30th of May, the 
inaugurating procession occupying thirty minutes in passing a given point. 
Among the opening exercises was the following hymn, by Dr. 0. W. Holmes, 
read by the president of the day : 

O God ! in danger's darkest hour, 

In battle's deadliest field, 
Thy name has been our nation's tower, 

Thy truth her help and shield. 

Our lips should fill the earth with praise, 

Nor pay the debt we owe, 
, So high above the songs we raise 
The floods of mercy flow. 

Yet Thou wilt hear the prayer we speak, 

The song of praise we sing, 
Thy children, who thine altar seek, 

Their grateful gifts to bring. 

Thine altar is the sufferer's bed, 

The home of woe and pain, 
The soldier's turfy pillow, red 

With battle's crimson rain. 

No smoke of burning stains the air, 

No incense-clouds arise ; 
Thy peaceful servants, Lord, prepare 

A bloodless sacrifice. 

Lo ! for our wounded brothers' need 

We bear the wine and oil ; 
For us they faint, for us they bleed, 

For them our gracious toil. 

O Father, bless the gifts we bring ! 

Cause Thou Thy face to shine, 
Till every nation owns her King, 

And all the earth is Thine! 



The orator of the day, Governor Oglesby, made the following reference to 
an interesting subject : 

" To the art of war in all future time is to be added the morality of organ- 
ized benevolence. No civilized nation can again go to war that does not carry 
to the field its sanitary stores. No nation can succeed in war that does not 



288 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

provide, in addition to well and humanely regulated hospital accommodations, 
effective voluntary sanitary assistance. Our people have done all this in this 
war, and have done it well. I believe the first great combined co-operative 
effort was organized in the Northwest, and it is fit and appropriate that here 
it should terminate. 

" The object for which these wonderful labors have been chiefly performed 
has substantially passed away. The war is at an end ; the rebellion is over ; 
the Union is saved, and peace is almost generally established throughout the 
country. The soldiers of liberty, the brave, noble, scar-worn soldiers are 
returning home, to be citizens again and soldiers no longer ; and as they file 
through the cities, over the mountains, and across the prairies, let the flag of 
the Sanitary Commission wave high before them, and the soldiers' home, the 
great heart of the nation, greet them warmly as they come." 

Omitting, as we have been compelled in many cases to do, an enumeration 
of the tens of thousands of objects contributed, we refer only to those peculiar 
to the occasion. At a stall called the "Department of the Commander-in- 
Chief of the American Eagle," was a specimen of the somewhat rapacious bird 
thus referred to. He had been carried unscathed through the battles of a 
three years' campaign by the Eighth Wisconsin, and, by the sale of his portrait, 
had contributed $15,000 to the sanitary fund up to the day the fair opened. 
The Fort Sumter Kitten, born under the rebel flag, a witness of the restoration 
of the lawful standard, and a willing taker of the oath of allegiance, was also 
to be seen. Its money value was not, of course, to be compared with that 
of the Wisconsin Eagle. The mammoth ox, " General Grant," proved by his 
experience since his second christening, how very much there may be in a 
name. As the Pride of Livingston County, at the New York fair, he had 
been indeed admired as a superb specimen of a short-horned Durham ; but 
how much more intense the adulation since he had been a lieutenant-general ! 
As the Pride, he was to be seen for ten cents ; as the Commander-in-Chief, four 
sights of him only could be had for a dollar. In this capacity, odes were 
written to him, special trains were required for him. He was the big prize 
in monster raffles, and a barbecue was spoken of in which the area of the 
steaks he was to furnish would only be equalled by the depth and richness of 
his gravy. From a sonnet in his praise we take the following majestic lines : 

All hale ! thou mighty nnimil, all hale ! 
Yon air 4 thousand pounds, and air purty well 
Popporshoned, thou tremenjus boveen nuggit! 
I wonder how big vou was wen vou 



GENERAL GRANT AND GENERAL GRANTS HORSE. 289 

Was little, and if your mother wud no you, now 
That you've grone so big and thick and phat. 
In orl proberbillity you dunno you're enny 
Bigger than a sinorl karf ; for if you did, 
You'd break down fences and switch your tale 
And move on people's works, and hook and beller 
And run over fowkes, thou orful beast! 

The live stock department of the fair was completed by a horse and a dog, 
the former a Unionist, the latter a rebel ; General Grant's horse, Jack, " well 
known in the Western armies, a fine saddle-horse, very gentle in harness, but 
requiring whip and spur." General Grant had ridden this animal from the 
time of leaving Springfield, on the 3d of July, 1861, till called east, in March, 
1864. The dog was a ferocious bloodhound, and had been used by the prison 
authorities of Richmond for a purpose which, for decency's sake, shall not be 
mentioned in these pages. 

The machinery on exhibition was almost infinite in variety even without 
the efficient little engines which, having been mentioned once, can have no 
second notice. There was a mill that ground every thing that was placed in 
the hopper, and would turn out family flour, Indian meal, pepper, coffee, nut- 
meg even, for those who preferred the process of grinding to that of grating. It 
ground, crushed, cut, cracked, shelled, bolted ; it could be worked by horses, 
by steam, by wind, by water; it did not get out of order, or, if it did, could 
easily be mended. Then there was a barrel-machine, which, taking the staves 
as furnished by the saw-mill, pointed the edges, dressed the surface of the 
heads, put the various parts together, and finally drove on the hoops. The 
barrels thus made could be filled with flour, meal, or coffee, as above. There 
was a newly invented water-indicator, with a steam alarm, signifying high or 
low water, and preventing explosion ; a pendulum saw, for executing orna- 
mental wood-work , a patent hay -loader an apparatus which would follow 
the haymakers into a field, and load a ton from the winrow in five minutes. 
There were washing-machines, squeezing, rolling-machines ; indeed, the visitors 
to the West Wing felt that so much could now be done by turning a faucet 
or starting a crank, that the steam negro that great desideratum had at last 
been invented ; the mechanical drudge had been patented, and was for sale. 
Help could be had without impertinence; there could be no disagreement 
about wages. There need be no fear of receiving a warning, or being an- 
swered back. The field and the mill were provided for ; when would it be 
the kitchen's turn ? 

The success of the ladies of the New England Farm-House may be inferred 

19 



290 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



from a circular issued by them soon after the commencement of operations. 
Their stock had given out, and they called for further supplies. The follow- 
ing is a brief list of the articles thus modestly demanded : 

Wheat and rye flour, Indian .meal, pork, beans, hams, tongues, poultry, 
corned beef, veal, mutton, &c. ; dried pumpkins, dried fruits, pie-plant, vege- 
tables of all kinds, sage, summer savory, pop-corn, hulled corn, hominy, sor- 
ghum, maple sugar and syrup, butter, cheese, eggs, milk, tea, coffee, sugar, 
cider, vinegar, pickles, apple butter, cider apple sauce, chocolate, lard, rice, 
punch-bowls, gourds, skillets, candles, candlesticks, snuffers and trays, and- 
irons, Dutch ovens, mirrors, pictures, samplers, tables, curtains, towelling, table 
linen, wooden plates, knives, forks, spoons, trenchers, milk-pans, warming- 
pans, frying-pans, tea and coffee-pots, nipperkins, porringers, stew and bake 
kettles, bean-pots, iron bread-pans, chip baskets, flax, wool, meat-choppers, 
chopping-bowls, pie-plates, chairs, crockery of all kinds, old-fashioned glass 
and silver ware, peacock feathers, bellows, old-fashioned clothing of all 
descriptions. 

The destination of several swords, pistols, &c., was decided by vote at 
Chicago as elsewhere ; but the idea was modified in one case, so that the vote 
should designate not who SHOULD, but who WAS ; that it should indicate not 
only u preference, but an opinion. Who was the prettiest girl in Chicago? 
The authority from which there is no appeal has decided this question in favor 
of Miss Anna L. Wilson ; and we desire to put publicly on record our sense 
of the incompleteness, the unworthiness of this book, which, with one hundred 
and fifty pictures, does not contain that of the Beauty of the West. 

The sanitary raffle underwent a change in Chicago, as did the sanitary 
vote. The tickets were put into the wheel, but it was not always the first 
number drawn which won. On the contrary, it was the last, in certain cases ; 
the object being to augment the interest, and thus perhaps stimulate the pur- 
chase of tickets in other raffles. A salamander, burglar-proof, polar safe was 
thus disposed of. There were two hundred tickets at $5 each, and the safest 
was the two hundredth. 

But why attempt to enumerate the numberless, or to begin what we can- 
not end, the infinite ? We may not name the items, but we may at least 
speak in flattering terms of the magnificent whole. Aggregates carry heavier 
metal, and produce a profounder impression than the component parts, be their 
number what it may. Atoms, invisible, inappreciable in themselves, have 
each their own value in the lump. 

The total receipts, therefore, of the fair were over $325,000, leaving about 



FAREWELL OF THE SANITARY COMMISSION. 291 

$300,000 after the expenses were paid. This was not as much as had been 
expected ; but it was inevitable that the close of the war should diminish botli 
the interest felt in and the effort made for the success of the enterprise. Chi- 

u 

cago was the scene of the first and the last of the great sanitary fairs ; the 
cycle had been completed, and the Samaritan had twice set up his tent in the 
same great city. There were no Confederate States when the curtain was 
dropped, and peace reigned throughout the land when the auctioneer laid 
down his hammer. The last ticket sold was a walking-ticket and we all 
know who walked ; a ticket of leave and no one need ask who left. 

A fair not one of the series which has thus far been our theme, but a 
distinct effort, with a special object was held in Milwaukee in June and July, 
1865. The purpose was to obtain the necessary funds for building and en- 
dowing a soldiers' home for the State of Wisconsin, and, in its proper place, 
we shall make record of its success. 

In July, the officers of the Sanitary Commission issued a farewell circular 
to its branches and aid societies, from which we take the following passages : 

" Your volunteer work has had all the regularity of paid labor. In a 
sense of responsibility, in system, in patient persistency, in attention to weari- 
some details, in a victory over the fickleness which commonly besets the 
work of volunteers, you have rivalled the discipline, the patience and cour- 
age, of soldiers in the field soldiers enlisted for the war. Nor do we suppose 
that you, who have controlled and inspired our branches, and with whom it 
has been our happiness to be brought into personal contact, are, because act- 
ing in a larger sphere, more worthy of our thanks and respect than the women 
who have maintained our village soldiers' aid societies. Through you we 
have heard the same glowing and tear-moving tales of the sacrifices made by 
humble homes and hands in behalf of our work, which "we so often hear from 
their comrades of privates in the field, who, throughout the war, have ofter 
won the laurels their officers have worn, and have been animated by motives 
of pure patriotism, unmixed with hope of promotion, or desire for recognition 
or praise, to give their blood and their lives for the country of their hearts. 

" To you and through you to the soldiers' aid societies, and through them 
to each and every contributor to our supplies, to every woman who has sowed 
a seam or knitted a stocking in the service of the Sanitary Commission, we 
now return our most sincere and hearty thanks thanks which are not ours 
only, but those of the camps, the hospitals, the transports, the prisons, the 
pickets, and the lines, where your love and labor have sent comfort, protec- 
tion 3 relief, and sometimes life itself. It is not too much to say, that the 



292 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



army of women at home lias fully matched, in patriotism and sacrifices, the 
army of men in the field. The mothers, sisters, wives and daughters of 
America have been worthy of the sons and brothers, husbands and fathers, 
who were fighting their battles. After having contributed their living treas- 
ures to the war, what wonder that they sent so freely after them all else that 
they had ? And this precious sympathy between the fire-sides and the camp- 
fires, between the bayonet and the needle, the tanned cheek and the pale face, 
has kept the nation one ; has carried the homes into the ranks, and kept the 
ranks in the homes, until a sentiment of oneness, of irresistible unanimity, 
in which domestic and social, civil and religious, political and military ele- 
ments entered, qualifying, strengthening, enriching and sanctifying all, has at 
last conquered all obstacles, and given us an overwhelming, a profound, and a 
permanent victory. 

" It has been our precious privilege to be your almoners, to manage and 
distribute the stores you have created and given us for the soldiers and 
sailors. We have tried to do our duty impartially, diligently, wisely. For 
the means of carrying on this vast work, which has grown up in our hands, 
keeping pace with the growing immensity of the war, and which we are now 
about to lay down, after giving the American public an account of our stew- 
ardship, we are chiefly indebted to the money created by the fairs which 
American women inaugurated and conducted, and to the supplies collected by 
you under our organization. To you, then, is finally due the largest part of 
whatever gratitude belongs to the Sanitary Commission. It is as it should be. 
The soldier will return to his home to thank his wife, mother, sister, daugh- 
ter, for so tenderly looking after him in camp and field, in hospital and prison. 
And thus it will be seen that it is the homes of the country which have 
wrought out this great salvation, and that the men and women of America 
have an equal part in its glory and its joy. Invoking the blessings of God 
upon you all, we are, gratefully and proudly, your fellow-laborers, &c., &c." 

We have done, therefore, with the Sanitary Commission ; we have shown, 
at length, how its means were obtained, and, in brief, how they were ex- 
pended. Now we cross the Mississippi River, leaving the presidency of Dr. 
Bellows for that of Mr. Yeatman. We are under the hospital flag of the 
Western Sanitary Commission. 



CHAPTER VII. 




EFORE adequate preparation had been made for such a 
contingency west of the Mississippi, the war broke out 
suddenly in Missouri. The organization of the Western 
Sanitary Commission, as a body totally distinct from 
and independent of the United States Sanitary Commis- 
sion, was rendered necessary by this fact, and by the 
severity of the battles fought there in the summer and fall of 1861. The 
bloody engagements of Booneville, Dug Spring, Carthage, and Wilson's Creek 
occurred before measures had been taken to care for the sick and wounded 
in any portion of the state. The men were brought in ambulances and 
wagons from the field to Holla, and thence by rail to St. Louis. The first 
hundred were taken to the "New House of Refuge Hospital," where bare 



294 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



walls, damp floors, and an empty kitchen received them. Cooked food was, 
after some delay, obtained from the neighbors, and every thing was done that 
the means at hand permitted. Long trains of wounded men continued to ar- 
rive, many of them wearing the clothes in which they had been stricken clown 
three weeks before, others suffering from unextracted bullets. There was no 
room for them in the hospitals, there was no clothing to substitute for their 
blood-stained garments, there were no convenient stores of food and medicine, 
there was no surgical corps, no preparation in any department, so unexpected 
was the call. It was at this juncture that the Western Sanitary Commission 
sprang into existence, its first labors being spontaneous, and almost without 
concert. 

On the 5th of September General Fremont, then in St. Louis, issued an 
order creating the commission, and appointing its officers. Its duties were 
thus defined : " Its general object shall be to carry out, under the properly 
constituted military authorities, such sanitary regulations and reforms as the 
well-being of the soldiers demands. It shall have power to select, fit up, and 
furnish suitable buildings for hospitals. It shall attend to the appointment 
of women nurses, under the direction of Miss D. L. Dix. It shall have 
authority to visit the different camps, and to aid the officers in providing 
proper means for the preservation of health and prevention of sickness, by 
supplying wholesome and well-cooked food, and by introducing a good system 
of drainage. It will obtain from the community at large such additional 
means of increasing the comfort, and promoting the moral and social welfare 
of the men, as cannot be furnished by government regulations. 

" This commission is not intended to interfere in any way with the medical 
staff, but to co-operate with it. It will consist, for the present, of James E. 
Yeatman, C. S. Greeley, J. B. Johnson, M. D., George Partridge, and the Eev. 
Wm. G. Eliot, D..D." 

Thus constituted, the Western Sanitary Commission commenced its labors, 
the first work being the fitting up, in St. Louis, of a large five-story building 
as a "General Hospital," which was rapidly filled with patients. The siege 
of Lexington and the pursuit of Price threw many more wounded men upon 
the St. Louis authorities, and five more hospitals were at once made ready for 
their accommodation. The first hospital ears used in America, with berths, 
nurses, cocL-'ag facilities, &c., were built, at this period, by order of General 
Fremont. 

The proportions now assumed by the war in the west naturally augmented 
the labors and enlarged the sphere of action of the commission. Late in 



THE WESTERN SANITARY COMMISSION. 295 

December. 20,000 troops were encamped at Benton Barracks, and ten men in 
every hundred were sick with measles, typhoid fever, or diarrhoea. The 
camps at Holla, Tipton, Sedalia, and Jefferson City, were in a condition even 
worse. The tents were badly ventilated, the hospitals crowded, the soldiers 
inexperienced, not yet inured to hardship, and careless of all sanitary and 
police regulations. The army medical supply table was found utterly inade- 
quate, and the calls upon the commission for medicines, for clothing, and 
delicate food for the sick, were incessant. Large issues were made of blankets, 
sheets, pillows, slippers, socks, wrappers, shirts, drawers, bandages, lint, canned 
fruit, jellies, stimulants, &c., &c. At the beginning of the new year, four 
months after the organization of the commission, it had received, from the 
public at large, over 525 boxes of goods, and distributed 15,000 articles. 

The women of St. Louis were, like their countrywomen everywhere, fore- 
most in the charitable labor of ministering to the sick. "They met daily," to 
quote a history of the commission, "at the rooms of the 'Ladies' Union Aid' 
and of the 'Fremont Belief societies, cut out hospital garments, gave employ- 
ment and assistance to soldiers' wives, visited the sick, read to the soldiers 
from the good book, conversed at their bedsides, gave them consolation and 
sympathy." Two sisters from Philadelphia are mentioned, who spent the 
whole winter in these ministrations of love. These ladies were not always 
rewarded by thanks alone, nor were these always offered in prose. Witness 
the following lines: 

" From old Saint Paul till now, 
Of honorable women not a few 
Have left their golden ease to do 
The saintly work which Christ-like hearts pursue. 

***** 
When peace shall come, and homes shall smile again, 
A thousand soldier-hearts in northern climes 
Shall tell their little children, in their rhymes, 
Of the sweet saints who blessed the old war times." 

A suggestion having been made to the commission that a steamboat 
might be fitted up and used to advantage as a hospital, the idea was acted upon 
in March, the government chartering the "City of Louisiana," and furnishing 
her with bedding, the commission completing her outfit at an expense of 
$3,000, and providing the assistant surgeons, the apothecary, the nurses, and 
the sanitary stores. This boat conveyed nearly 3,500 patients from the 
battle-field of Pittsburgh Landing to northern hospitals, and was, soon after, 
purchased by the government and remodelled for a permanent floating 



296 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



hospital. Her name was changed to the " R. C. Ward," in honor of the Assistant 
Surgeon-General, the first regular army surgeon to give his approval to the 
plan of a Sanitary Commission. The immense service rendered by this boat 
led to the fitting out of many others, and the wounded soldier can nowhere 
obtain better accommodation than on board of a hospital steamer. It has all 




MISSISSIPPI RIVER HOSPITAL STEAMER. 



the appliances of a hospital on shore, with much better ventilation ; and in 
the heat of summer, when there is no wind, it can create a breeze for itself by 
simply setting its paddles in motion ; and by constantly changing the scene, 
and giving its inmates a view of the rapidly shifting river or harbor scenery, 
occupy their minds, and perhaps chase away a portion of their pains. 

The terrible battle of Pea Eidge found the supplies of the commission 
ready and waiting. What would have been the suffering without them, in a 
country thinly settled, the few inhabitants dwelling in log huts and barely 
possessing the necessaries of life, can hardly be imagined. A thousand 
badly wounded men of the Union army and seven hundred of the rebels 
were cared for, and even fed, by the commission. "Among the incidents of 
the battle worthy of mention were the labors of Mrs. Phelps, who had accom- 
panied her husband, Colonel John S. Phelps, with his regiment, to the field. 
While the battle was yet raging, this heroic woman assisted in the care of 
the wounded ; tore up her garments for bandages, dressed their wounds, 
made broth for them with her own hands, remaining with them as long as 
there was any thing to do, and giving, not only words, but deeds as well, of 



SOLDIERS' HOMES. 297 

substantial kindness and sympathy. Wherever the cause of bur National 
Union and its perils shall be known, ' this that this woman hath done shall 
be remembered as a memorial of her.' " 

Early in March, 1862, the commission established a Soldiers' Home for 
discharged and furloughed soldiers passing through the city, giving them 
food and lodging gratuitously, saving them from extortion and the dangerous 
associations of the cheap lodging-houses. During its two first years it enter- 
tained twenty-one thousand soldiers, furnishing them eighty-six thousand 
meals ; the expense to the commission was about $3,000 a year, the govern- 
ment giving about $2,000 worth of rations and fuel besides. In the holiday 
season chickens and turkeys were added to the usual bill of fare ; this, how- 
ever, included, at all seasons, butter, vegetables, milk, dried and canned fruits, 
and tomatoes. Books, newspapers, and religious reading were provided, thus 
often preventing the men from roaming through the city in search of amuse- 
ment or adventure. Miss A. L. Ostram was, for a time, matron of the Home, 
but was afterwards transferred to the large establishment at Memphis. 

Upon the subject of Soldiers' Homes, Mr. Peabody, the superintendent 
of that of St Louis, makes the following remarks: "They have contributed 
not a little to saving men to the service, as well as rescuing them from death. 
In prosecuting their wars, the ancients had no hospital trains or medical staff 
in attendance on their armies. The sick and wounded were left behind to die. 
In these times, and in our unhappy struggle, the soldiers are tenderly cared 
for, not only by the medical department of the army, but by thousands of 
patriotic hands, working systematically, through thoroughly organized chan- 
nels, which often reach far beyond the routine of the service. The future 
historian will be able to show that the very small per cent of loss in our 
armies, as compared with that in modern European wars, is to be attributed 
largely to what the people themselves have done through organized voluntary 
labors in behalf of the troops." 

In April, 1862, the commission oifered a series of rewards, to be paid in 
gold, in order to stimulate emulation among the stewards, ward-masters, and 
nurses in the hospitals: twenty-five dollars to the steward of the best kept of 
the larger institutions, fifteen dollars to the smaller; ten and eight dollars for 
cleanliness in the wards, and twenty-five and fifteen dollars for good, whole- 
some work in the kitchen. The result of this experiment was highlv satisfac- 
tory, $245 being distributed among some thirty-five persons in July. 

The sanguinary battle of Shiloh was fought in April, and the labors of the 
commission and the drain upon its resources were largely augmented. Still 



298 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



every appeal was answered, and during the first eight months of its existence 
the commission had received nine hundred and eighty -five cases of goods 
from eighteen states : Massachusetts sending two hundred and twenty-three, 
Illinois one hundred and thirty-two, Wisconsin seventy-four, Eh ode Island 
sixty-nine, Pennsylvania sixty-three, Missouri sixty-one, &c. The articles 
distributed numbered nearly two hundred thousand. 




8OLTIKR8' HOME AT MEMPHIS. 



A Home was opened in Memphis early in 1863. The large edifice for- 
merly known as the Hunt Mansion, and belonging to a wealthy planter, who 
was at this time a colonel in the rebel army, was taken for the purpose. 
Wm. E. Hunt had spent $40,000 in building and ornamenting the house and 
grounds, little dreaming to what object he was so generously contributing. 
It had at first been Gen. Grant's head-quarters, and afterwards those of Gen. 
Hamilton, who turned it over to the commission, as confiscated property. 
The Memphis Home speedily became one of the most perfect establishments 
of the kind in the country. Besides the regular guests, the wives, mothers, 
and sisters of the sick and wounded soldiers were often entertained, and mem- 
bers of the Christian Commission welcomed to its hospitality. 

The attention of the "Western Commission had been called, in December, 
1862, to the situation of the freedmen at Helena. Three or four thousand of 



THE WESTERN COMMISSION AND THE FREEDMEN. 299 

them, men, women, and children, were huddled together in cast-off army 
tents, in caves and huts of brush, in a spot in the rear of the town called Camp 
Ethiopia. The men had worked upon the fortifications, had been employed 
as stevedores, teamsters, wood-choppers, and grave-diggers, but proper pay- 
rolls had not been kept and they had received no compensation. Some who 
had ventured to ask for it had been ruthlessly shot. In January, 1863, the 
commission sent Miss Maria Mann to their relief, with stoves, furniture, hos- 
pital stores, clothing, &c. Their sufferings were thus somewhat mitigated, 
and soon afterwards the policy of the government toward them was changed. 
The able bodied among them were organized into regiments, and army 
surgeons were detailed to attend them. Camp Ethiopia furnished the First 
Arkansas Colored Infantry, and excellent fighting material was subsequently 
obtained in similar congregations of emancipated slaves. 

Mr. Yeatman, the President of the Commission, made a journey down the 
Mississippi Eiver, to ascertain and to report upon the condition of the freed- 
men there, thinking that it might be well to assume the labor of relieving 
them as an incidental portion of his work. The journey was made and the 
report published. Mr. Yeatmau found forty thousand enfranchised slaves 
assembled in camps, in various degrees of poverty and misery. Missionaries 
and teachers were among them doing some good, but laboring without system 
or co-operation. The freedmen were working for the government virtually 
without pay, and were wronged and imposed upon in every way ; they were 
worse off than in slavery, feeling that they had merely exchanged one master 
for many masters. The publicity given to these terrible facts in Mr Yeatman's 
report riveted public attention, and before long National Freedmen's Eelief 
Associations were formed in New York, Chicago, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis, 
and relations were at once established between the commission and them 
Mr. Yeatman and his colleagues becoming the almoners of a portion of their 
bounty. We shall speak of these societies in the proper place. It is proper to 
say that, at the commencement of the attempts to relieve the freedmen, Chap- 
lain Fisher was detailed by Gen. Schofield, who had succeeded Gen. Fre- 
mont, to visit New England, to state the case, and make an appeal for aid. 
He went, spoke, and was heard. He returned with $30,000 worth of shoes, 
clothing, and clothing materials, and $13,000 in money, obtained in Boston, 
Salem, and the neighboring towns. 

In regard to the funds upon which the Western Commission has drawn 
there are many curious facts, and some of them are pointedly stated in the 
North American Review, from which we make the following extract : 



300 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

" In one respect we mean tlie sources of receipts and the manner of their 
collection the experience of the Western Sanitary Commission has been 
remarkable, if not peculiar. It sprang from sudden exigency for relief of 
suffering, without opportunity to count the cost either of labor or money 
involved. At its first meeting its members, a half-dozen in number, agreed to 
advance the small amount needed for office expenses, and to do without a 
clerk. They put notices in the St. Louis papers asking contributions, and 
sent a few lines to the Boston Transcript, requesting New England women to 
send 'knit woolen socks.' Similar notices or appeals have been published 
from time to time, about once in six months, ever since. This has been the 
whole machinery of collection from first to last. There have been no auxiliary 
societies, no collections, no systematic means of replenishing the treasury 
whatever. Once, however, in Boston, in January, 1863, a number of gen- 
tlemen took the matter in hand, and in a fortnight's time $35.000 was paid 
to Richard C. Greenleaf, who acted as Treasurer, and was forwarded to St. 
Louis. 

"A similar action was also recently taken in St. Louis, and during the 
'frozen week' of last January, with the thermometer ranging from twenty 
degrees below zero to two degrees above, the sum of nearly $30,000 was 
collected. For the rest, whatever has come has been obtained by strictly 
individual action, without concert or definite plan. Perhaps one further 
exception should be made of a New England lady,* who in the beginning of 
the war, set apart a room in her house as the ' Missouri Boom,' and, letting all 
her friends know of this convenient method of sending articles to St. Louis as 
fast as boxes could be filled up, she has received and forwarded goods to the 
amount of $17,000, and in cash nearly as much more. Beyond this the com- 
mission at St. Louis knows nothing of the modus operandi, or the moving 
causes, to which it is indebted for the continued, uninterrupted stream of gifts 
by which its warehouses have been kept full and its treasury replenished. 
It has been a spontaneous and self-directing movement. No better proof 
could be given of the closeness of the ties which bind our people together 
than this cordial sympathy and almost unsolicited generosity, which make for 
themselves channels to flow in, and only ask that their gifts may be freely 
used. Boston alone has sent over $200,000 ; New England, $500,000. The 
golden rule, to do as you would be done by, thus practised, will bind the East 
and "West together in bonds that no secession or rebellion will ever disturb 

cu 

again. At this moment no two cities are nearer each other than St. Louis 
and Boston ; no two states, than Missouri and Massachusetts." 

* Mrs. Thomas Lamb. 



A BOSTON SUBSCRIPTION LIST. 



301 



We give the list of Boston subscribers to the St. Louis Commission as a 
specimen of a class of contributions to which we have as yet hardly referred. 
The donors were perfectly aware, at the time of signing their names, that not 
one dollar of their money, not one comfort purchased with it, L would ever 
reach a Massachusetts or New England soldier, and in this lay the exceptional 
nature of the fund. It contrasts violently with sentiments entertained else- 
where, which have been mentioned with the resolution passed at Mossville, 
for instance, "that Mossville money should reach Mossville soldiers.'' The 
Boston-St. Louis list is as follows : 

SUBSCRIPTIONS TO THE WESTERN SANITARY COMMISSION, 
BOSTON, 1862-63. 

. $1.000 00 



J. C. Howe & Co 

Gov. Andrew (from private funds 

placed in his hands) 1,000 00 

Mrs. N. I. Bowditch 1,000 00 

Win. Srurgis 800 00 

C. F. Hovey & Co 500 00 

J. M. Forbes 500 00 

J. M. Beebe & Co 500 00 

Gardner Colby 500 00 

Daniel Denny 500 00 

Nay lor & Co 500 00 

Nathaniel Thayer 500 00 

David Sears 500 00 

F. Skinner & Co 500 00 

Nathaniel Francis 300 00 

Moses Williams 300 00 

Oakes, Ames & Son 300 00 

lasigi, Goddard & Co 300 00 

James Lawrence 250 00 

P. C. Brooks 250 00 

Martin Brimmer 250 00 

Faulkner, Kimball & Co 250 00 

J. L. Little & Co 250 CO 

Jordan, Marsh & Co 250 00 

Joel Hayden 250 00 

Hon. Samuel Hooper 250 00 

H. P. Kidder 250 00 

G. Rowland Shaw ..-.' 250 00 

Albert Fearing 250 00 

I). N. Spooner 200 00 

J. Huntington Wolcott .? J 200 00 

Win. Amory 200 00 

J. L. Gardner 200 00 

W. Ropes & Co 200 00 

Gardner Brewer 200 00 

Sprague, Soule & Co 200 00 



George Howe $200 CO 

T. Mandell 200 00 

Miss M. A. Wales 200 00 

C. W. Cart wright 200 CO 

Foster & Taylor 200 CO 

W. F. Weld & Co 150 09 

Samuel Johnson 150 00 

John C. Dalton 150 00 

Chandler & Co 100 00 

W. P. Pierce 100 00 

W. S. Bullard 100 00 

C. A. Babcock 100 00 

Theodore Matchett, Brighton . . 100 00 

W. B. Spooner 10000 

Sewall, Day & Co 100 00 

H. H. Hunnewell 100 00 

W. II. Gardner 100 00 

G. M. Barnard 100 00 

J. M. Barnard 100 00 

James McGregor 100 00 

Miss J. Mason 100 00 

Jacob Bigelow 100 00 

James Parker 100 00 

Miss Abba Loring 100 00 

Abbott Lawrence 100 00 

W. W. Churchill 100 00 

Little, Brown & Co J 00 00 

T. Jefferson Coolidge 100 00 

J. S. Farlow 100 00 

Mrs. Heard, Watertown 100 00 

Dr. Geo. Hay ward 100 00 

Oliver Ditson 100 00 

R. W. Hooper 100 00 

Mrs. C. Hooper 100 00 

Miss E. Hooper 100 00 

Bigelow Brothers & Kennard. . 100 00 



302 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Miss 0. M. Adams $100 00 

Charles Ainory 100 00 

J. G. Gushing 100 00 

II. P. Sturgis 100 00 

Wm. Parsons 100 00 

B. F. Eeed 100 00 

Almy, Patterson & Co 100 00 

Hogg, Brown & Taylor 100 00 

Barrage Brothers & Co 100 00 

John Borland 100 00 

Geo. W. Wales 100 00 

Otis, Daniell & Co 100 00 

Grant, Warren & Co 100 00 

A Friend 100 00 

A, Claflin & Co 100 00 

W. Claflin & Co 100 00 

Joshua Stetson 100 00 

Joseph S. Fay 100 00 

A. Wilkinson 100 00 

Mrs. Sally Blake 100 00 

Thaddeus Nichols 100 00 

Augustus Lowell 100 00 

Chas. G. Loring 100 00 

Israel Whitney 100 00 

Benj. Burgess 100 00 

W. Perkins 100 00 

Friend in Windsor Locks, Conn. 100 00 

J. W. Brooks 100 00 

Mrs. S. Wheelwright 100 00 

John A. Blanchard 100 00 

Elisha Atkins 100 00 

Nash, Spaulding & Co 100 00 

Glidden & Williams 100 00 

Samuel Cabot 100 00 

Geo. P. Upham 100 00 

John Duff. 100 00 

Quincy A. Shaw 100 00 

Win. Hilton & Co 100 00 

Wilson, Hamilton & Co 100 00 

Mudge, Sawyer & Co 100 00 

James Haughton 100 00 

J. Field 100 00 

Alpheus Hardy 100 00 

Geo. S. Holmes 100 00 

W. T. Andrews 100 00 

Ellis, Newell & Co 100 00 

Mrs. L. B. Merriam 100 00 

H. F. Durant : 100 00 

P. B. Briglmm 100 00 

B. S. Rotch 100 00 

W. P. Mason.. 100 00 



Burr Brothers & Co $100 00 

Miss Sarah B. Pratt 100 00 

Parker, Wilder & Co 100 00 

John Gardner 100 00 

William Bramhall 100 00 

J. E. Hall 100 00 

W. D. Pickman, Salem 100 00 

John Bertram, " 100 00 

Richard S. Rogers, " 100 00 

Francis Peabody, " 100 00 

George Peabody, " 100 00 

John C. Lee, " 100 00 

William Munroe, Boston 100 00 

Anderson, Sargent & Co 100 00 

John H. Reed 100 00 

A. G. Farwell & Co 100 00 

Samuel A. Way 100 00 

C. P. Curtis 100 00 

Joseph Dix & Co 100 00 

D. W. Williams 100 00 

Ladies of Fitchburg 100 00 

E. R. Mudge 100 00 

Henry Callender 100 00 

P. C. Brooks 100 00 

Mrs. John Heard . . 100 00 

Sewall, Day & Co 100 00 

Margaret B. Blanchard. Harvard 100 00 

H. P. Kidder 100 00 

Joseph B. Glover 100 00 

Geo. W. Colburn 75 00 

John Homans, M. D 75 Ou 

John Felt Osgood 75 00 

J. C. Hoadley, New Bedford. . . 50 00 

George Bernis 50 00 

Rev. F. A. Whitney, Brighton.. 50 00 

Geo. H. Kuhn 50 00 

Geo. S. Winslow 50 00 

Francis Bacon 50 00 

C. H. Warren 50 00 

W. S.Eaton 50 00 

John C. Gray 50 00 

E. L. Perkins 50 00 

Mrs. James McGregor 50 00 

Chas. E. Ware 50 00 

N. C. Keep, M. D 50 00 

G. D. Wells 50 00 

John Simmons 50 00 

Burr, Brown & Co 50 00 

Geo. C. Shattuck 50 00 

Mrs. N. Hooper 50 00 

Miss M. I. Hooper 50 00 



THE WESTERN SANITARY COMMISSION. 



303 



S. T. Morse 

J. S. Amory 

Geo. A. Gardner 

Josiah Quincy 

Isaac Thatcher 

James Davis 

J. Amory Davis 

Franklin Haven 

G. W. Lyman 

F. H. Story 

Fisher & Chapin 

Sidney Bartlett 

P. T. Jackson 

Geo. B. Emerson 

Amos W. Stetson 

Lydia Jackson 

C. W. Loring 

Potter, Nute, White & Bayley. . 
James Hay ward 

Smith Brothers & Co 

Mrs. A. I. Hall 

F. S. Nichols 

Joseph Simes 

Isaac S\veetser 

Henry Lee 

Geo. B. Gary 

E. A. Boardman 

Frothingham & Co 

W. W. Tucker 

C. C. Chadwick 

Wright & Whitman 

Claflin, Saville & Co 

May & Co 

Horatio Harris 

Edward Atkinson 

J. B. Glover 

H. S. Richardson 

Josiah Stickney 

E. D. Peters & Co ?... 

Stephen Tilton & Co 

J. H. Beal 

Marshall Keyes 

Aaron D. Weld 

N. Harris 

Robert Brookhonse. Salem 

Mrs. Henry D. Cole, " 

Mrs. C. Saltonstall " 

Mrs. Lucy B. Johnson, " 

Z. F. Sillsbee, " 

J. S. Cabot, " 

L. B. Harrington, " 



$50 00 Miss Hannah Hodges, Salem ... $50 00 

50 00 J. C. Tyler & Co 50 00 

50 00 E. S. Rand, New bury port 50 00 

50 00 E. S. Rand, Boston 50 00 

50 00 J. L. Gardner, Jr > 50 00 

50 00 Thomas F. Gushing 50 00 

50 00 Henry Upham 50 00 

50 00 Chas. Stoddard 50 00 

50 00 N. Boynton 50 00 

50 00 E. Williams & Co 50 00 

50 00 Plumer & Co 50 00 

5000 Rice & Davis 5000 

50 00 Faxon Brothers 50 00 

50 00 John Jeffries, Jr 50 00 

50 00 Hart, Baldwin & Botume 50 00 

50 00 Augustus Story, Salem 50 00 

50 00 Henry Callender 50 00 

50 00 Mrs. Chas. F. Hovey 50 00 

50 00 A. A. Lawrence 50 00 

50 00 Wm. Bellamy 50 00 

50 00 Henry A. P. Carter 50 00 

50 00 Miss Loring 50 00 

50 00 Joseph H. Thayer 50 00 

50 00 W. B. Spooner 50 00 

50 00 James Parker 50 00 

50 00 Emily M. Adams 50 00 

50 00 Geo. S. Winslow 50 00 

50 00 Thomas Bulfinch 50 00 

50 00 E. L. Perkins 50 00 

5000 Mrs. Sam'l Hall, Jr 5000 

5000 Col. J. W. Sever 5000 

50 00 Mrs. John Heard, hospital stores 50 00 

50 00 Thomas J. Lee 50 00 

50 00 Miss Richardson 50 00 

50 00 J. Randolph Coolidge 40 00 

50 00 Williams & Everett, proceeds of 

50 00 exhibition of Sign of Promise. 30 45 

5000 Jos. Greeley 'X^ 3000 

50 00 J. F. Edmands 30 00 

50 00 C. H. Cummings 30 00 

50 00 Samuel Gould 25 00 

50 00 A. B. Almon, Salem 25 00 

50 00 Shreve, Stan wood & Co 25 00 

50 00 Mrs. John C. Dalton 25 00 

50 00 Mrs. W. H. Goodwin 25 00 

50 00 Robert C. Winthrop 25 00 

50 00 I. D. Farnsworth 25 00 

50 00 Waldo Higginson 25 00 

50 00 Geo. W. Tilden 25 00 

50 00 E. Townsend 25 00 

50 00 Silas Potter.. 25 06 



304 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



F. A. Ilawley & Co 

Josiah Quincy, Jr 

The Misses Quincy 

Alex. Strong & Co 

John Ware 

John Cummings, Jr 

Charles Clioate 

James Maguire 

Win. II. Dunbar 

Stone, Wood & Co 

Eastman, Fellows & Weeks. 

Edward Craft 

Amos Cummings 

J. C. Converse & Co 

Maguire & Campbell 

Tappan, McBurney & Co . . 

II. Montgomery 

Rev. C. Bartol 

Mrs. M. R. Wendell.. 



$25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
. 25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 



C. O. Whitmore $25 00 

C. C. Gilbert 25 00 

Palmer & Bachelders 25 00 

E. M. Welch 25 00 

Mrs. Welch 25 00 

Mrs. Louisa Peabody 25 00 

Mrs. C. G. Lori tig 25 00 

Baldwin & Curry 25 00 

Mrs. O. W. Holmes 25 00 

J. S. Lovering 25 00 

Mrs. F. A. Sawyer 25 00 

Franklin Evans 25 00 

Ripley Ropes 25 00 

Jacob A. Dresser 25 00 

Sums under $25, those given 
anonymously, and contribu- 
tions of stores 1,726 00 

Total :54,511 45 



Before the whole of this sum had been received, Mr. Yeatman issued a 
circular of thanks to the contributors, in which occurred the following lan- 
guage : 

" The munificent liberality with which our appeals have been met in Bos- 
ton and vicinity has surprised and delighted us. It has laid us under a debt 
of obligation which we have no way of returning, except by faithful perform- 
ance of the duties imposed upon us, and we believe this is the only return 
you desire. The whole amount we have received from New England, since 
our commission was organized, eighteen months ago, to this date, is about 
$55,000 in money, and, by moderate estimation of the cost of articles sent 
for hospital use, fully $100,000 in goods. This has come almost unsolicited 
from thousands of contributors, in small sums and large from churches and 
schools and charitable associations from children of five years old and from 
aged women of fourscore years. God bless them ! wliose work has been sent 
to us with words of benediction and encouragement to 'the brave Western 
boys.' This does not look like separation or divided feeling between the 
East and the West ! The blood which flows so warmly from the heart 
diffuses its glow to the remotest extremity. 

" We are ONE COUNTRY, in all our interests and affections. Momentary 
estrangements may occur, but returning good sense quickly allays them. We 
are members one of another. There is no East and no West ; may the time 
soon come, as by God's blessing it must, when we can again say, ' There is no 
North and no South!'" 



THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FAIR. 305 

Up to the time of holding the Mississippi Valley Fair, in May, 1864, the 
Western Sanitary Commission had received $275.000 in money, $50,000 of 
which was from Massachusetts, and $50,000 from California ; while the stores 
and goods contributed from the same states, and by ladies' and soldiers' aid 
societies from Maine to Minnesota, amounted in value to more than a million 
and a quarter. The commission had, up to the same date, made the following 
issues of articles : 

To the western armies 985,984 

" the western navy 28,838 

" freedmen 80,505 

" Union refugees 5,848 



Total 1,101,175 

It now became necessary to take measures for replenishing the treasury 
of the commission. None of the fairs held in the large cities of the east, nor, 
strange to say, either that of Chicago or Cincinnati, had contributed any thing 
to its coffers ; and while its sphere of action was enlarging, its resources were 
failing. A Mississippi Valley Fair was suggested, and the enterprise was 
undertaken in January, 1864 At the preliminary meeting a letter was read 
from General Grant, expressing hearty sympathy with the object proposed, 
and bearing witness to the thousands of tons of sanitary stores furnished to 
his army by the commission. The following officers and committees were 
appointed at this meeting : 

President, First Vice- President, 

MAJOR-GENERAL W. S. ROSECRANS. GOVERNOR WILLARD P. HALL. 

Second Vice-President^ Third Vice- President, 

MAYOR CHAUNCEY I. FILLEY. BRIGADIER-GENERAL CLINTON B. FISK. 

Treasurer, Corresponding Secretary, 

SAMUEL COPP, JR. MAJOR ALFRED MACKAY. 

Standing Committee. 

Members of the Western Sanitary Commission. 
JAMES E. YEATMAN, WM. G. ELIOT, 

GEORGE PARTRIDGE, CARLOS S. GREELEY, 

JOHN B. JOHNSON. 

Executive Committee of Gentlemen. 
JAMES E. YEATMAN, Chairman. 

J. H. LlGHTNER, GU8TAVU8 W. DREYER, DwiGHT DuRKEE, 

E. W. Fox, H. A. HOMEYER, AMADEE VALLE, 

SAMUEL COPP, JR., B. R. BONNER WYLLYS KING, 

20 



306 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK 



GEORGE D. HALL, 

S. R. FILLET, 

CHARLES B. HUBBELL, JR., 

JAMES BLACKMAN, 

WM. D'OENCH, 

WM. PATRICK, 

J. O. PIERCE, 



ADOLPIIUS MEIER, 
CHARLES SPECK, 
WM. MITCHELL, 
WM. ADRIANCE, 
GEORGE E. LEIGHTON, 
M. L. LINTON, 
WM. H. BENTON, 



GEORGE P. PLANT, 
MORRIS COLLINS, 
J. C. CABOT, 
N. C. CHAPMAN, 
JOHN D. PERRY, 
S. H. LAFLIX, 
JAMES WARD. 



Executive Committee of Ladies. 

MRS. CHAUNCET I. FILLET, President. 
Miss ANNA M. DEBENHAM, Recording Secretary. 
Miss PHOJBE W. COUZINS, Corresponding Secretary. 
MRS. SAMUEL COPP, JR., Treasurer. 

MRS. ROBERT ANDERSON, MRS. T. B. EDGAR, 

MRS. GEORGE PARTRIDGE, MRS. C. S. GREELET, 
MRS. J. E. D. COUZINS, MRS. W. T. HAZARD, 



MRS. E. M. WEBER, 
MRS. TRUMAN WOODRUFF, 
MRS. CLINTON B. FISK, 
MRS. F. A. DICK, 
MRS. ALFRED CLAPP, 
MRS. DR. E. HALE, 
MRS. A. S. W. GOODWIN, 
MRS. H. T. BLOW, 
MRS. AMELIA REIHL, 
MRS. N". C. CHAPMAN, 
MRS. WASHINGTON KING, 
MRS. S. A. RANLETT, ' 



MRS. CHAS. D. DRAKE, 
MRS. WM. McKEE, 
MRS. SAMUEL C. DAVIS, 
MRS. McIvEE DUNN, 
MRS. R. II. MORTON, 
MRS. DR. O'REILLY, 
MRS. S. B. KELLOGG, 
MRS. S. A. COLLIER, 
MRS. W. A. DOAN, 
MRS. DR. HAEUSSLER, 
MRS. ADOLPHITS ABELES, 
MRS. F. P. BLAIR, 



MRS. ELIZABETH W. CLARKE, 

MRS. H. DREYER, 

MRS. JOHN WOLFF, 

MRS. ULRICH Buscn, 

MRS. JOHN J. HOPPE, 

MRS. CHARLES EGGERS, 

MRS. WM. D'OENCH, 

MRS. DR. HILL, 

MRS. ADOLPHUS MEIER, 

MRS. JOHN C. VOGEL, 

MRS. R. BARTH, 

MRS. H. C. GEMPP, 

MRS. O. D. FILLET, 

MRS. HENRY STAGG, 

MRS. E. W. Fox. 



A distinct committee was afterwards appointed to conduct a department 
for the express benefit of freedmen and Union refugees, that contributions 
might be solicited for this particular purpose, and kept apart from the general 
receipts. 

In the circular, which was at once issued by these committees, the follow- 
ing appeal was made : 

" Contributions of every sort and kind will be received, and all can be 
advantageously used. Large buildings for the fair will be erected, and the 
bulkiest articles will find abundant room. All the fruits of the garden and 
farm ; the produce of the mine, iron or gold, or whatever else ;' every variety 
of manufactures, from the needle to the steam-engine ; works of art and fancy ; 
home-made and imported goods ; hardware, and silver- ware, and queens- ware ; 
groceries and dry goods; India-rubber goods; boots and shoes; curiosities 
and relics ; books and pictures ; live stock, of whatever kind, from the farm- 
yard or prairies ; and, in short, whatever is bought and sold by rich or poor, 
wise or simple, young or old, will find a welcome place in the Mississippi 



THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FAIR, 307 

Valley Fair, and contribute to its success. Every dollar, or dollar's worth, 
will relieve the suffering of some sick and wounded soldier, and perhaps save 
him from death it may be a stranger to you of whom you will never hear 

it may be your kinsman or your dearest friend. 

#**#*#*# 

" During the continuance of the fair, rooms of exhibition will be opened, 
restaurants provided, entertainments prepared, including concerts, oratorios, 
lectures, and almost every variety of amusement, with whatever else the inge- 
nuity of man or woman can devise, and by which the profits of the fair can, 
with propriety, be increased, or the satisfaction of visitors secured. The 
intention is to bend all the energies of the city in one direction, and to enlist 
the industry and taste of all classes, trades, and occupations, during the con- 
tinuance of the fair, in one principal work, for the relief of the sick and 
wounded. The hearty loyalty of St. Louis demands such an opportunity of 
expressing itself. The old hospitalities of the city are impatient to be 
renewed, and a cordial greeting is now sent to all those who, perhaps without 
fault of theirs or ours, have been estranged from us for the three years past 
Let them come and help us keep a jubilee of patriotic rejoicing A UNION 
LOVE-FEAST, which will bring back the kindly relations of former times. A 
new era will soon dawn upon our state and nation the era of union, of free- 
dom, and enduring peace. Let it be inaugurated here by a hundred thousand 
welcome guests, and there will be room enough and to spare for all that 
come." 

A building was erected especially for the use of the fair. The main 
structure was five hundred feet long and one hundred and fourteen feet wide, 
with wings one hundred feet long and fifty-four wide, with an octagon centre 
seventy-five feet in diameter and fifty feet high. Before the fair opened, the 
finance committee had collected $200,000 in money, the principal portion 
being contributed by citizens of St. Louis, a city that has suffered far more 
from the war than any loyal city in the country. 

The following table gives the returns of every department and committee 
of the fair : 

TREASURER'S REPORT OF THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FAIR. 

Proceeds of fourteen gold and silver bars, from Story County, Nevada, in cur- 
rency $44,725 88 

" one gold and silver bar, from Ormsby County, Nevada 716 65 

Cash from Committee on Finance 210,635 76 

" " Dry Goods Committee 19,548 50 

" " Grocers' " 10,755 00 



308 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Cash from Marine Committee 

From Refreshment Committee: 

New England Kitchen f $6,284 18 

Holland Kitchen 4,711 90 

Confectionery 1,345 80 

Lippincott's soda fountain. . . . 627 20 

O'Brien's u " 150 00 

Eobinson's cream mead 22 50 

Cafe Laclede 8,226 68 

Goods afterwards sold .. 313 50 



$13,100 00 




SANITARY SODA. 



From Committee on Drama and Public 
Amusements 

" Committee on Public Schools 

" " " Charitable Institu- 
tions, &c 

" Floral Department and sale of 
flowers 

" Committee on Books, Paper, and 
Stationery 

" Committee on Drugs and Perfumery 

" " " Millers.. 



- 21,681 70 



From Committee on Iron and Steel 

" " " Carriages, Saddlery and Harness 

" " " Wine and Beer 

" Hebrew Aid Society 

" Committee on Soap, Candles, and Lard Oil 

" " " Stoves, Tinware, and Gas-fitting 

" " China and Glass-ware 

" " " Freedmen and Refugees: 

Donations to freedmen $6,115 36 

" and refugees 7,254 70 

" " refugees 3,020 05 

Books . 330 00 



6,102 78 
5,608 87 

9,673 70 
8,095 80 

9,659 00 
7,398 92 
4,595 75 
8,293 44 
5,189 55 
5,395 85 
3,085 45 
2,155 85 
7,867 64 
2,394 40 



From Committee on Fine Arts 

" Ladies' Furnishing Committee 

" Committee on Hardware and House Furnishing 

" " Skating Park 

" New Bedford Department 

" Committee on Millinery 

" Children's Department 

" Committee on Agriculture 

" " Bed Linen 

" " " Premium Shirts 

" " " Sewing Machines 

" Turnverein Committee 

" Committee on Jewelry and Silver Plate 

" Old Curiosity Shop 

" Committee on Bakers 

" " " Produce 

" " " Fancy Handwork 



16,720 11 

15,943 10 

2,417 50 

7,205 74 

888 40 
4,615 21 

938 20 
5,585 60 
3,603 65 
2,396 05 

868 00 
1,242 00 

408 05 
5,575 60 
4,566 80 
3,415 25 
7,329 49 
4,671 95 



THE MISSISSIPPI VALLEY FAIE. 



309 




From Committee on Live Stock $6,226 85 



3,684 90 
7,768 80 
4,625 00 

6.405 65 
3,958 92 

11,907 93 
39,884 95 
3,136 18 

6,915 00 
307 95 

4,119 10 
12,856 95 

6,453 90 
882 25 

7,212 20 

1,000 00 

Total $618,782 28 

Deduct expenses 64,191 28 

Total net $554,591 00 



A COMMITTEE ON LIVE STOCK. 



" Paint and 

Oil 

New York Department. 
Committee on Swords . . 
" " Private 

Schools 

Associated Clerks 

Committee on Boots and 

Shoes 

Sale of Tickets 

u Daily Countersign 
Committee on Manufac- 
tures 

Post Office at the Fair. . . 



From Committee on Furniture 

" Government employees 

" Committee on Cloth and Clothing. . 

" " " Wood and Coal 

" " " Tobacco and Cigars. 
" sale of horse . . 



We give below as large a portion of the list of cash receipts as we can 
make room for, only regretting that our soace is not more ample : 



James H. Lucas $5,250 00 

Boatmen's Savings Institution . . 5,000 00 
E. W. and others, proceeds of 

lots of ground on Olive street. 5,000 00 

Merchants' Exchange 5,000 00 

Belcher's Sugar Refinery 3,500 00 

Government Employees' Associ- 
ation, M. V. S. Fair 2,844 50 

State Savings Association 2,500 00 

Donations of Public Schools, by 

Ira Dwill 2,512 25 

Henry A. Homeyer & Co 2,300 00 

Gaslight Company 2,000 00 

Mepham & Brother 1,750 00 

Associated Clerks' Committee .. 1,685 50 

" Northern Line " 1,600 00 

Lyon, Sherb & Co., and Geo. D. 

Hall 1,500 00 

City Clerks' Association 1,445 65 

Keokuk Packet Company 1,400 00 

Memphis Packet Company 1,400 00 



Henry Ames & Co 

L. N. Bonham, entertain- 
ment given by pupils of 
the Female Seminary . $600 00 

L. N. Bonham, proceeds 
of a hair- wreath, made 
by Miss Bailey, of the 
Seminary 379 00 

L. N. Bonham, half pro- 
ceeds of fairy-tale tab- 
leaux at the fair 95 00 

L. N. Bonham, cash do- 
nations by pupils .... 209 50 



$1,350 00 



$1,283 50 

Hon. Henry T. Blow, balance of 

salary as Minister to Venezuela 

in 1862 1,048 14 

James Archer , 1,000 00 

Building and Savings Association 1,000 00 

Francis "Wittaker, Sons & Co 1,000 00 

Hudson E. Bridge 1,000 00 



310 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Barten, Able & Co $1,000 00 

Schulenburg & Boeckeler 1,000 00 

Graff, Bennett & Co 1,000 00 

McKee, Fishback & Co 1,000 00 

David Nicholson 1.000 00 

Pratt & Fox 1,000 00 

John J. Eoe 1,000 00 

Kichardson & Co 1,000 00 

St. Louis and Iron Mountain Rail- 
road Company 1,000 00 

Employees in Q. M. Department, 

Capt. E. D. Chapman 953 50 

Illinois River Packet Co 850 00 

Robinson & Howe's circus 831 40 

Chicago & Alton R. R 814 00 

Ladies' Association of Tenth 

Ward, proceeds of ball 796 50 

Committee of ladies, Seventh and 

Eighth Wards, proceeds of ball 781 00 

Hayden & Wilson 720 00 

Giles F. Filley 700 00 

Reformed Presbyterian Church, 
by Rev. Mr. McCracken, pas- 
tor 666 00 

Proceeds of five head of cattle, 
presented by the Butchers' 

Association 640 00 

Employees of Morison Hall 610 70 

Horace Holton 600 00 

St. Louis Union Association .... 600 00 

J. D. Stanbridge 588 60 

Capt. Wallace's employees 583 00 

D. A. January and others 570 00 

By Rev. W. G. Eliot, from Bos- 
ton friends 551 00 

Allen, Copp & Nesbit 550 00 

Crow, McCrerey & Co 550 00 

Bridge, Beach & Co 505 00 

E. H. Smith 502 00 

Lumbermen's & Mechanics' In- 
surance Co 500 00 

Lamb & Quinlin 500 00 

St. Louis Agency of Manhattan 

Life Insurance Co 500 00 

Adolphus Meier & Co 500 00 

Mary Institute, proceeds of con- 
cert of scholars 500 00 

A. S. Merritt 500 00 

North Missouri R. R. Co 500 00 

North St. Louis Saving Associa- 
tion 500 00 

Second National Bank. . 500 00 



Third National Bank $500 00 

John O'Fallon 500 00 

Phoenix Insurance Co 500 00 

Pike & Kellog 500 00 

Pacific R. R. Co 500 00 

J. B. Sickles 500 00 

N. Schaffer & Co 500 00 

St. Louis Insurance Co 500 00 

A. T. Shapleigh & Co 500 00 

J. B. Sickles & Co 500 00 

Stannard, Gilbert & Co 500 00 

Tunstall & Holme 500 00 

United States Insurance Co 500 00 

Wiggins Ferry Co., by Henry L. 

Clark, Secretary 500 00 

Wm. Young & Co 500 00 

Young Brothers & Co 500 00 

Boatmen's Insurance & Trust Co. 500 00 

Crozier & Baxter 500 00 

Citizen's Insurance Co 500 00 

Chouteau, Harrison & Vable. . . 500 00 

James Clark & Co 500 00 

Franklin Saving Institution 500 00 

Franklin Insurance Co 500 00 

Home Mutual Insurance Co 500 00 

Collection in private schools . . . 455 70 
Government Employees' Associ- 
ation, by H. II. Wernse 446 00 

Seventh Cavalry, M. S. M 429 00 

John G. Copelin 400 00 

Doggett & Morse 400 00 

Students of City University 872 95 

Samuel Gaty 350 00 

W. M. Morrison 350 00 

Employees on track on Eastern 
Division P. R. R. and S. W. 

Branch 341 75 

Wm. D'Oench 335 00 

Employees of Ubsdell, Barr, 

Duncan & Co 314 50 

Fritz, Ley salt & Bennett 311 55 

Warne, Cheever & Co 309 50 

Collier Lead Co 300 00 

Gaylord, Sons & Co 300 00 

Dwight Durkee 300 00 

Great Republic Insurance Co. . . 300 00 
W. Chauvenet, Chancellor of 
Washington University, dona- 
tion from students 300 00 

Hillman Brothers 300 00 

Marine Insurance Co 300 00 

Ticknor & Co.. . 300 00 



A WESTERN SUBSCRIPTION. 



311 



Harmonia Glee Club $286 75 

Samuel C. Davis 285 00 

Jos. Gartside and 149 employees 271 75 

Henry Martin 270 00 

Employees of Pacific R. R 267 00 

Pupils of the Missouri Institute 
for the Blind, proceeds of con- 
cert by them 264 50 

Jameson, Cutting & Co 255 00 

Levi Ashbrook & Co 250 00 

Atlantic Insurance Co 250 00 

M. Creesy & Co 250 00 

Chapman & Thorp 250 00 

Citizens' Railroad Co., by A. R. 

Easton 250 00 

Dutcher & Co 250 00 

R. &J. B. Fenby 25000 

First National Bank 250 00 

Globe Mutual Insurance Co 250 00 

Samuel H. Gardiner 250 00 

Hemming & Woodruff 250 00 

Howe & Copen, N. Y. Ins. Cos. 250 00 

Lackland & Christopher 250 00 

Lockwood & Nider 250 00 

Ladue, Tousey & Co 250 00 

Merchants' Bank 250 00 

John S. McCune 250 00 

People's Saving Institution 250 00 

Pacific Insurance Co 250 00 

John J. Roe 250 00 

Real Estate Savings Bank 250 00 

St. Louis R. R. Co 250 00 

L. & C. Speck & Co 250 00 

Steamer Bright Hope 250 00 

Tyler, Davidson & Co 250 00 

Ubsdell, Barr, Duncan & Co. . . 250 00 

Union Insurance Co 250 00 

Francis Whittaker & Co 250 00 

Asa Wilgins 250 00 

Win. Young & Co 250 00 

Employees of Goodwin, Andrew 

&Co 245 50 

Bakers' Committee, collection 

among the trade 245 25 

Journeymen horse-collar makers 213 75 

Mr. Barr & others 204 00 

G. Bayher & Co 200 00 

Chas. Beardslee & Brother 200 00 

F. B. Chamberlain & Co 200 00 

J. F. Comstock & Co 200 00 

Continental Packet Co. . 200 00 



Matthew Coleman , 

Colonel & Mrs. Dick 

L. D. Dameron 

Samuel Gaty 

Charles Holmes 

A. C. Hoffman, by will 

Wm. Jessup & Sons , 

N. H. Kendall & Co 

McKay & Hood 

Naples Packet Co 

Col. John O'Fallon 

J. & W. Patrick 

O. H. Pearce & Co 

Albert Pearce 

Steamboat John J. Roe 



and 



owners 

Steamboat Pauline Carroll 

" J.H. Dickey 

Alton Packet Co 

Levi H. Baker 

Steamboat Imperial 

" Louisville 

" Maurice Denning . . . 

" Glasgow 

" latan 

" Leviathan 

" W. K. Arthur 

" Julia 

" Henry Ames 

" J. E. Swan 

" City of Memphis .... 

" Stephen Decatur .... 

" Colorado 

J.H. Lacey 

John Tilden 

Z. F. Wetzel & Co 

Warne, Cheever & Co 

R. A. Barnes 

Miss Emily Shaw, for tableaux. . 

Mrs. Puroget 

Rev. W. H. Corkhill, proceeds 
of exhibition of tableaux at 

Benton Barracks 

G. Walbrecht 

Mary Institute, proceeds of read- 
ings by J. J. Bailly 

D. A. January 

G. Bummermaunt & Co 

Peter E. Blow 

Buddecke & Droege 

Wra. Glasgow, Jr 



$200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
250 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 

200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
195 00 
189 70 
186 00 



162 90 
158 75 

157 00 
155 00 
150 00 
150 00 
150 00 
150 00 



312 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Children's picnic, proceeds by 
committee of St. Peter's 

Church $150 00 

0. TV. Howe, Agent N. Y. Insu- 
rance Cos 150 00 

Hope Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 150 00 

C. & E. Michelman 150 00 

David Nicholson 150 00 

Col. James Peckham 150 00 

Tassem & Dangen 150 00 

Young Brothers 150 00 

Stokes & Sheets.. 132 05 



Mr. Eossfeldt, St. Louis Vocal 

Association $140 00 

Merchants' Exchange 125 95 

Moody, Michel & Co 125 00 

Mission Free School 125 00 

Sterling & Co 125 00 

Berthold & Thompson 125 00 

C. I. Filley 125 00 

Ladies' Union League 125 00 

German Evangelical Lutheran 

Church, Franklin Avenue and 

llth Street . . 123 75 




CUTTING WOOD IN THE NORTHWEST, FOR BOLDIBKS' WIVES. 



Employees of Wiggins Ferry Co. 

Evangelical Protestant Church 
of Emanuel 

A. TV. Fagin 

A. S. Merritt 

Cash contributions in basket, 
South M. E. Church, by Levi 
H. Baker, St. Louis 



$115 00 Eobert Charles $107 20 

Joseph Garneau 105 00 

113 10 Spurry, Chalfant & Co 100 00 

112 00 St. Louis Lodge, No. 5, 1. O. O. F. 100 00 

11000 Schwetze & Eggers 10000 

John A. Smithers& Brother. . 10000 

C. F. Schultz & Brother 100 00 

10930 Shamrock Benevolent Society.. 10000 



THE WESTERN SANITARY COMMISSION. 



313 



Steam Boiler Makers' Associa- 
tion $100 00 

John R. Shepley 100 00 

Jas. T. Severingen and wife ... 100 00 

G. O. W. Todd & Co 100 00 

Miss Mary Thomas 100 00 

D. S. Thompson 100 00 

W. F. Ulman 100 00 

John C. Yogel 100 00 

Warne, Cheever & Co 100 00 

White & Haass 100 00 

Capt. Daniel White 100 00 

Wilson & Atwell 100 00 

J. Wall & Brother 10000 

Washington Lodge, Xo. 24, I. O. 

O. F 100 00 

B. D. Whittaker 100 00 

Wildley Lodge, Xo. 2, I. O. O. F. 100 00 

Geo. II. Wiley & Co 100 00 

Westerman & Meir 100 00 

Samuel B. Wiggins 100 00 

W. S. Gilman 10000 

Gay, Ilanekemp & Edwards . . . 100 00 

Greely & Gale 100 00 

Goodwin & Anderson 100 00 

E. Gaylord & Sons 100 00 

Louis C. Gamier 100 00 

Cheltenham Fire-Brick Works, 100 00 

by Evans & Howard 100 00 

Gymnastic Society 100 00 

John H. Gay 100 00 

Gill & Brother 100 00 

John How 100 00 

C. B. Hubbell & Co 100 00 

J. Howard 100 00 

Hibernian Society 100 00 

Ilofkemeyer & Finney 100 00 

Ileinicke & Estel 100 00 

Berton A. Hill 100 00 

E. C. Harrington, from Govern- 
ment Employees' Association. 100 00 

D. A. January & Co ^ 100 00 

Jacoby & Feikert 100 00 

Mr. James, Iron Works 100 00 

Jefferson Mutual Fire Insurance 

Co 100 00 

Jameson & Mantz 100 00 

Jonathan Jones 100 00 

Capt. W. J. Kauntz 100 00 

Wm. Klnmpe 100 00 

Win. Dean & Co. . . 100 00 



Dunham & Gregg $100 00 

Druids' Hall Association, by 

Franz Michen 100 00 

John F. Darley 100 00 

Arnold, Constable & Co -<.. . 100 00 

B. & D. Able 100 00 

John C. Dervalall 100 00 

Capt. J. B. Eads 100 00 

Wm. L. Ewing & Co 100 00 

Employees in. Laclede Rolling 

Mills 100 00 

Excelsior Fire and Marine Ins. 

Co 100 00 

S. M. Edgell 100 00 

Joseph Emanuel & Co 100 00 

Eighth St. Baptist Church (col- 
ored) 100 00 

Excelsior Lodge, Xo. 18, I. O. 

O. F 100 00 

J. E. Esher, proprietor Bowery 

Theatre, proceeds of one 

night's entertainment 100 00 

Gen. C. B. Fisk 100 00 

Fisk, Knight & Co 100 00 

O. D. Filley 100 00 

E. A. & S. R. Filley 100 00 

M. Foster 100 00 

Fritachie & Co 100 00 

R. D. Fenby 10000 

Glasgow & Brother 100 00 

Henry Bell & Son 100 00 

L. A. Benoist & Co 100 00 

J. II. Bowen & Co 100 00 

Mrs. Sarah B. Brent 100 00 

Battery K, 1st Missouri Light 

Artillery 100 00 

Bush & Hawthorn 100 00 

John Boker 100 00 

Beard & Brothers 100 00 

Mrs. Bruescke 100 00 

R. Campbell & Co 10000 

Cavender & Rowse 100 00 

Cabot & Senter 100 00 

John B. Carson 100 00 

E. A. Corbitt 100 00 

P. Chouteau, Jr., & Co 100 00 

Cupples & Marston 100 00 

Commercial Ins. Co 100 00 

George Couzleman 100 00 

F. J. Chapman 100 00 

Mrs. Jane Chambers.. 100 00 



314 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



City Tobacco Warehouse $100 00 

J. R. Clark, proceeds of a cotton 

donation 100 00 

Munroe R. Collins 100 00 

Alexander Crozier 100 00 

Luther M. Kennett 100 00 

Samuel Knox 100 00 

S. II. Laflin 100 00 

T. II. Larkin & Co 10000 

II. J. Loring & Co 100 00 

L. Levering & Co 100 00 

Louis A. Labaume 100 00 

Ladies' Branch of Shoemakers' 

Society 100 00 

Wm. C. Lindell 100 00 

E. M. Moffitt 10000 

Mrs. Virginia Minor 100 00 

Murdock & Dickson 100 00 

A. Meier & Co 100 00 

Mason & Clements 100 00 

W. II. Markharn 100 00 

Wm. K Macqueen 100 00 

Thornton D. Murphy 100 00 

Company II, National Guard. . . 100 00 

Augustus McDowell 100 00 

Mound City Mutual Ins. Co 100 00 

Moreau & May 100 00 

"Wm. II. Maurice. . . 100 00 



Nulson & Merriman $100 00 

Nolan & Caffrey 100 00 

A. K. Northrup 100 00 

R. H. Ober & Co 100 00 

"OvvlClub" 100 00 

L. W. Patchen 100 00 

Peterson, Hawthorne & Co. ... 100 00 

W. II. Pulsifer 100 00 

People's R. R. Co 100 00 

Rich & Co 100 00 

Richardson & Co 100 00 

Eben Richards 100 00 

Eben Richards, Jr 100 00 

Geo. H. Rea 100 00 

John H. Rankin 100 00 

Pratt & Fox 100 00 

Christian Peper 100 00 

Col. Geo. G. Pride 100 00 

Pomeroy & Benton 100 00 

Pike & Kellogg 100 00 

James Smith 100 00 

A. F. Shapleigh 100 00 

A. F. Shapleigh & Co 100 00 

Still well, Powell & Co 100 00 

St. Louis Shot Tower Co 100 00 

Savings' Association, Eighteenth 

Ward 100 00 

F. E. Schmieding & Co 100 00 



The officers of the Mississippi Valley Fair, in closing their report, claim 
that it yielded larger comparative receipts than any sanitary fair ever held. 
St. Louis, situated almost upon the very frontier of loyalty, raises $3.50 for 
every inhabitant at her fair, the proportion of New York and Philadelphia 
being about $1.67 for each inhabitant. This is the more remarkable from the 
fact, proved by the figures, that only about $10,000 was received from east of 
the Mississippi River. "We confidently believe that no equal demonstration 
of patriotism has been made in any city of the Union since the war began." 

The proceeds of the fair were immediately applied to the uses for which 
they were bestowed. Eighty thousand dollars' worth of hospital stores were 
furnished, in June and July, to the army of General Sherman, and a fair pro- 
portion to troops in other departments. 

The Western Sanitary Commission maintained its organization and con- 
tinued its labors to the close of the war. The table at the end of the volume 
will give the final, closing statistics of its work work which, from the first, 
has been diligently sought and systematically and energetically done ; done, 



THE WESTERN SANITARY COMMISSION. 



315 



too, in so unobtrusive a manner, that thousands of persons in the eastern 
states have never been made aware of the commission's existence. This was, 
in a measure, intentional, to avoid all appearance of infringing upon what 
might be claimed as another's ground, and to escape the conflict of interests 
which might ensue. Faithfulness, energy, and prudence are cardinal virtues 
in a man, or in a commission of men. 




CHAPTEE VIII. 

STATE SANITARY COMMISSIONS LOCAL RELIEF ASSOCIATIONS. 




THE MAGIC LANTERN IN THE HOSPITAL. 



OUR view of the labors of the people in behalf of the health and comfort 
of the soldier, would be incomplete without a glance at certain local sanitary 
commissions which sprang up in the earlier stages of the war for which there 
was at that time, perhaps, sufficient reason. Upon the subject of these as- 
sociations, the North American Review used the following language, in 
January, 1864: "The education of our towns and villages in the principles 
of the Sanitary Commission, the overcoming of their local prejudices, of their 
desire to work for this regiment, that company, this hospital, or that camp, 
has been an education in national ideas in the principles of the government 
itself in the great federal idea for which we are contending at such cost of 
blood and treasure. The objections to the Sanitary Commission have been 
precisely the objections that led to the rebellion and to the war that made 
this commission necessary objections to a federal consolidation, a strong 



THE IOWA SANITARY COMMISSION. 317 

general government, a nationality and not a confederacy. State and local 
powers were claimed to be not only more effective in their home and imme- 
diate spheres, but more effective out of their spheres, and in the promotion 
of ends that are universal. As South Carolina said she could take better care 
of her own commerce and her own foreign interests than the United States 
Government, so Iowa, and Missouri, and Connecticut, and Ohio, insisted that 
they could each take better care of their own soldiers, after they were merged 
in the general Union army, than could any central, or federal, or United States 
commission, whatever its resources or its organization. Narrow political am- 
bition, state sensibilities, executive conceit, and the pecuniary interests of 
agents, produced the same secessional heresies in regard to the National Sani- 
tary Commission, that they either actually created, or have vainly tended to 
create, in regard to the general government itself." 

This language must be slightly modified. Only two states east of the 
Mississippi undertook to look after the sanitary interests of their own men, 
Iowa and Indiana, and one of these subsequently abandoned that course. 
We give a brief history of the independent existence of the Iowa and Indiana 
Sanitary Commissions. 

In the month of October, 1561, Governor Kirkwood, of Iowa, in a letter 
to the Eev. A. J. Kynett, stated, that in order to render the various soldiers' 
aid societies springing up throughout the state efficient, and to encourage the 
formation of others, he had appointed him Mr. Kynett agent for the state, 
to perfect a system by which contributions would best reach the soldier. Mr. 
Kynett, in reply, recommended that a State Sanitary Commission be consti- 
tuted, to become, ultimately, auxiliary to the United States Commission. On 
the 13th of October, the governor appointed the officers of such a commission, 
as follows : 

President, Secretary, 

PROF. J. C. HUGHES, M. D., of Keokuk. REV. GEO. F. MAGOUN, of Lyons. 

Treasurer, Corresponding Secretary and General Agent, 

HIRAM PRICE, of Davenport. EEV. A. J. KYNETT, of Lyons. 

HON. ELIJAH SELLS, Des Moines, HON. CALEB BALDWIN, Council Bluffs, 

REV. BISHOP LEE, Davenport, REV. G. B. JOCELYN, Mt. Pleasant, 

HON. GEO. G. WRIGHT, Keosauqua, HON. WM. F. COOLBAUGH, Burlington, 

REV. BISHOP SMYTH, Dubuque, EZEKIEL CLARK, Iowa City, 

Hox. LINCOLN CLARK, Dubuque. 

Mr. Kynett immediately issued an appeal to the women of Iowa in behalf 
of the sick and wounded soldiers, accompanied by a form of constitution for 



318 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

local societies, recommending the formation of such in every town, village, and 
neighborhood in the state. In answer to this call, the commission received, 
during the first two years, notice of the organization of one hundred and sixty 
relief societies ; and received from them, in the same time, four hundred and 
forty-two boxes, one hundred and fifty barrels, eighteen kegs, and nine sacks, 
of the value of some $60,000. On the 1st of June, 1863, the Iowa Commis- 
sion became practically a branch of the United States Sanitary Commission. 
The reasons for making this change, and the advantages resulting from it, 
were thus summed up by the secretary of the Iowa Commission : 

" Our Iowa regiments were, and still are, greatly scattered over a vast ex- 
tent of country. With our limited means and resources, it was clearly im- 
possible for us, acting independently as a state organization, to place sanitary 
stores within the reach of any considerable portion of them. 

" A large proportion of the sick and wounded of our Iowa soldiers were in 
post and general hospitals, with their fellow-soldiers from other states. To 
have attempted, by separate state agencies, to discriminate in favor of Iowa 
soldiers, would have been unjust, offensive to our own generous sufferers, and 
was, by proper hospital regulations, rendered impossible. 

" The United States Sanitary Commission, appointed by the secretary of 
war on nomination of the surgeon-general of the United States, and enjoying 
the confidence of the government and official recognition, with almost ex- 
haustless resources and every necessary facility, were everywhere in the field 
with sanitary stores at every important point, their medical inspectors in 
every camp and hospital, and their various agencies working efficiently in 
behalf of ALL THE SOLDIERS OF THE UNION. To have withheld co-operation 
with them seemed to us ungenerous, impolitic, and in principle too much like 
that 'state sovereignty' which underlies secession itself. 

" The advantages resulting from the new arrangement are the following : 

" We thereby place ourselves in cordial and earnest fraternity with all our 
co-laborers of every other loyal state. There is a wide difference between 
being in the Union and out of it. 

"We become rightfully entitled to a common interest in the large contribu- 
tions of the eastern and Pacific states. California alone has given to this 
object, through the National Commission, hundreds of thousands of dollars 
in cash. We could not honorably keep all our own to ourselves and then 
expect to share in common with others more generous. 

"We secure the free transportation of all our goods, the free use of all tele- 
graphic lines, and all other facilities granted the National Commission. 



THE INDIANA SANITARY COMMISSION. 319 

" All our surgeons and chaplains are permitted and invited to draw upon 
the stores of the National Commission, at any time and place where a depot 
may be established, to supply the wants of their sick and wounded. 

" We are invited to nominate inspectors and agents from our own state, to 
be assigned to duty where Iowa soldiers are in service, and to be paid out of 
the funds of the National Commission." 

Certainly, the reasons given were sufficient. 

Still, the co-operation between the various organizations in the state was 
not complete, and in November, 1863, a call was issued for a convention to 
be held at Des Moines on the 18th, to consist of delegates from the ladies' 
soldiers' aid societies, the societies co-operating with the Iowa Sanitary Com- 
mission, loyal leagues, soldiers' Christian commissions, and all other associa- 
tions in the state which had made regular contributions. 

The convention was held, two hundred delegates being present, from all 
parts of the state. Mrs. Livermore addressed the assembly on the claims the 
United States Sanitary Commission had upon them as auxiliaries, while Mrs. 
Wittenmyer urged those of the Western Sanitary Commission. Then there 
were addresses in behalf of harmony, and in deprecation of party strife in 
sanitary matters. The Hon. S. A. Russell protested against the sick and 
dying soldier being sacrificed or detained in hospital by local preferences, or 
personal feelings in favor of this or the other way of reaching him. A new 
commission was finally created, the principal feature of which was a board of 
control. This board held its first meeting in December, and it was decided to 
establish an Iowa depot at Chicago, in connection with the United States 
Commission, and another at St. Louis, connected with the Western Commis- 
sion ; each local society could send to whichever branch it might prefer : the 
goods received at the two depots should be repacked, and all packages should 
be stamped with the Iowa state mark. 

Up to this period, the value of the goods received by the Iowa Commis- 
sion was not far from $250,000. 

A Sanitary Commission was organized in Indianapolis, for the state of 
Indiana, in February, 1862, immediately after the battle of Fort Donelson. 
Its success was such that a permanent organization was effected in March, by 
the appointment of William Hannaman as president, and Alfred Harrison as 
treasurer. The objects of the commission were, in spite of its name, "to 
carry relief to suffering soldiers, wherever from or wherever found ; and its 
aim was to contribute to every general hospital within its reach as large a 
supply, in proportion to the number of Indiana soldiers in those hospitals, as 



320 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

any other state. When this was done, any thing that remained was devoted 
to the use of Indiana soldiers in preference to any others. But all contribu- 
tions made to general hospitals were for general distribution. And when it 
is remembered that the supplies of the Indiana Commission were exclusively 
the gifts of inhabitants of the state, this seems a very generous method of 
dispensing them. This would not be the case were other states tributary to 
the Indianapolis treasury, as Massachusetts has been to that of St. Louis, or 
Minnesota and Wisconsin to that of Chicago." 

The attention of the officers of the commission was called, at an early date, 
to the needs of sick and wounded soldiers at the railroad station in Indianapo- 
lis, waiting for trains, or otherwise detained. An agent was at first appointed 
to meet the men on their arrival, and direct them to houses where they could 
be decently and cheaply accommodated. As the number of applicants in- 
creased, tents were procured, and a sort of Camp Eelief was established ; 
finally a Soldiers' Home was erected. Nearly two hundred thousand soldiers 
have been entertained here since its opening. 

The Home for Soldiers' Wives, established somewhat later, is to the 
family what the Soldiers' Home is to the army. Here, the wives, mothers, 
sisters, and daughters of soldiers, who have come to the city to meet the 
returning veteran, find comfortable meals and lodging, and are safe from 
annoyance and imposition. Three hundred ladies and children have been 
entertained here a month. During the year 1863 seven hospital boats were 
sent out by the commission, to distribute five thousand packages of supplies, 
and to bring home such men as were unfit for service. One of these, the City 
Belle, was the first boat to land at Vicksburg after its surrender. 

The Indiana railroads gave free transportation to goods from all parts of 
the state to Indianapolis, the Union Telegraph Company sent all messages 
gratuitously, and the Adams, American, and United States Express Compa- 
nies carried boxes by the hundred, without charge. 

The following table speaks for itself: 

Contributions of money in 1862 $22,529 12 

stores " 86,088 00 

money in 1863 36,232 11 

stores " 101,430 74 

money in 1864 97,035 22 

stores " 126,086 91 



Total $469,402 10 

The Indiana Commission continued independent to the end. 



THE PHILADELPHIA LADIES' AID. 321 

A society, known as the " Philadelphia Ladies' Aid," -was organized in 
Philadelphia on the 26th of April, 1861, and from that day to the close of the 
war maintained its independence. Mrs. Joel Jones, Mrs. Stephen Colwell, 
and Mrs. John Harris were, and remained, its president, treasurer; and secre- 
tary, respectively. Mrs. Harris visited Washington at an early date, spend- 
ing six weeks in the camps and hospitals of that city, and, with the co-opera- 
tion of ladies there, establishing a depository for the reception of their stores 
arid clothing. In October, the pastors of twelve churches of Philadelphia 
issued a circular, appealing, in behalf of the Ladies' Aid, to all into whose 
hands it might fall. " The society comprises ladies belonging to more than 
twenty churches, of various denominations. Its affairs have been conducted 

with the utmost prudence, economy, and efficiency There is no village, 

scarcely any congregation, in which something might not be done by way of 
co-operation in this good work. And we beg to suggest the expediency of 
forming an auxiliary society in your church or neighborhood, with a view of 
forwarding this humane and patriotic object." 

The Philadelphia Ladies' Aid has been a very Sanitary or Christian Com- 
mission, upon a small but vastly effective scale. It has dispensed hospital 
supplies ; it has distributed tracts and soldiers' Bibles ; it has nursed the sick, 
it has comforted the dying; it has been commended by the commanding 
general; it has received the thanks of the surgeon-in-chief. In her first 
report, Mrs. Harris was able to say for herself and colleagues: ""We have 
personally visited the sick of two hundred and three regiments. We have 
thrown something of home light and love around the rude couches of at least 
five hundred of our noble citizen soldiers, who sleep their last sleep along the 
Potomac. We have been permitted to take the place of mothers and sisters : 
the gentle pressure of the hand has carried the dying soldier back to the 
homestead, and, as it often happened, by a merciful illusion, he has thought 
the face upon which his last look rested was that of some cherished one from 
home. A gentle lad of seventeen summers, wistfully then joyfully exclaim- 
ing, ' I knew she would come to her boy,' went down comforted into the 
dark valley. Others, many others, have thrown a lifetime of truthful love 
into the last look, sighing out life with ' Mother, dear mother ! ' ' 

That an independent society like this, indeed, that many such may find 
their sphere of usefulness, gleaning where the Sanitary and Christian reapers 
have passed, is well shown in a letter from an army surgeon, from which we 
make the following extract. Speaking of the medical department of the 

army, and of the various agencies for the benefit of soldiers, he said : 
21 



322 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

"But the vast supplies of the department are not intended for wayside 
sufferers and exhausted fugitives : they are for regular hospitals and organized 
camps. A strict system of accounts is necessary, and profusion of expendi. 
ture cannot be tolerated. The army system is perfect in its place, and my 
judgment thoroughly approves of it ; but it does not suit every emergency. 

" The Sanitary Commission is a noble charity, and nobly has it sustained 
itself. Almost every hospital in the army has filled its wards with the beds, 
and quilts, and sheets of the Sanitary Commission. Who can tell the thou- 
sands upon thousands of times the fevered brain of our stricken soldiers has 
spelled out on the corner of his white pillow-slip, ' U. S. SANITARY COMMIS- 
SION?' But this society is no roadside affair. It deals in car and ship loads. 
It supplies hospitals and bodies of men, when applied to, with bales and boxes 
innumerable; and many a doctor's heart has melted with gratitude for the 
liberal gifts of the Sanitary Commission. No papers here are needed ; no 
duplicate inventories to be made out, no double receipts to be transmitted. 

"But what good would it do an exhausted soldier, toiling through the 
mud, or sinking by the wayside, to understand that yonder beautiful ship, the 
white letters upon whose red flag were undistinguishable in the distance, was 
filled with bed-sacks, sheets, and pillows, and boxes of jelly of the Sanitary 
Commission ? Like the mirage upon the desert, they mock the dying pilgrim 
with visions of plenty while he famishes. 

"Who will help this man who has dragged along his weary, possibly 
lacerated, limbs, till nature refuses to bear him farther, and he sinks down to 
die in the mud ? The Ladies' Aid Society is to the soldier what the retailer 
is to the community. Other organizations represent the wholesale business. 
And nobly has Mrs. Harris performed her duty. She is indefatigable. Day 
and night her sole occupation, her only thought, is, ' relief to the soldier.' " 

OON after the commencement of the war one of the 
officers of this society, after having made a large 
contribution to its treasury, said to the members 
of her family : " These men who have gone forth to 
fight are willing to give their lives for us, and we 
can never do too much for them. Now, I propose, 
if you all consent, to devote some regular, daily 
sum to the relief of the army, and we will go with- 
out some luxury to which we have been accus- 
tomed, to procure that sum. Suppose we dispense 
with dessert while the war lasts?" The family consented, and their dessert 




THE ST. LOUIS AID SOCIETY. 323 

money, diverted from the grocer and the confectioner, was ever afterwards, 
while the need existed, the property of the invalid soldier. 

A remarkable proof of Mrs. Harris's efficiency is furnished by the fact that 
she is not often at home to write the secretary's semi-annual^ reports. A 
colleague, holding the pen of a ready writer, places a few facts and figures, 
in graceful shape, before the public ; then follow " letters and copious extracts 
of letters from the secretary of the society," written from various places while 
attending to the sick and wounded: from Chesapeake Hospital, from Fair 
Oaks, from on board the Nelly Baker, from Harrison's Landing, from Antie- 
tam, Harper's Ferry, Fredericksburg, Nashville, Gettysburg, Chattanooga. 

These letters were widely published and read, and stirred the fountains of 
public sympathy to their depths. A missionary abroad, the secretary was 
yet a propagandist at home. 

Mrs. Harris was on the field of Gettysburg, and in the first week after the 
battle distributed the contents of sixty-eight boxes forwarded by the society ; 
in the second week forty-seven boxes were sent to one single hospital, that at 
Annapolis. 

In the first three years of its existence, the Philadelphia Ladies' Aid had 
received nearly $21,000 in money, and about $70,000 worth of stores. It had 
also been commissioned by Mr. "W. W., of San Francisco, to expend $550 in 
the relief of soldiers' families, and by Mrs. John Haseltine, to apply $700 in 
assisting disabled soldiers to reach their homes. 

On the 26th of July, 1861, a few ladies met at the house of Mrs. F. Holy, 
in St. Louis, to discuss a project which had been for some time in contempla- 
tion that of combining the efforts of the loyal ladies of the city, and of 
forming an aid society, in anticipation of the conflict then impending within 
the state. At an adjourned meeting, held a week later, twenty-five ladies 
registered themselves as members of the "Ladies' Union Aid Society," and 
elected a full board of officers. The greater part of them resigning soon after, 
the following permanent list was chosen in November : 

President, 
MRS. ALFRED CLAPP. 

Vice- President*, 
MRS. SAMUEL C. DAVIS, MBS. T. M. POST, MRS. ROBERT AXDEKSOX. 

Treasurer, Recording Secretary, 

MRS. S. B. KELLOGG. Miss II. A. ADAMS. 

Corresponding Secretary, 
Miss BELLE HOLMES; afterwards, Miss AXNA M. DEBENHAM. 



324 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

The society thus formed has been most active and efficient ; being the only 
large association of the kind working in concert with the Western Sanitary 
Commission, its operations, both of collection and distribution, have covered a 
wide field, and it has counted its dollars and its donations, not by hundreds, 
but by thousands. Its emissaries visited, at one time, fourteen hospitals in 
the city and vicinity, and were known in the streets by the baskets they 
carried, the cover of one of which has been obligingly lifted for us by the 
recording secretary ; within was " a bottle of cream, a home-made loaf, fresh 
eggs, fruit, and oysters ; stowed away in a corner was a flannel shirt, a sling, 
a pair of spectacles, a flask of cologne ; a convalescent had asked for a lively 
book, and the lively book was in the basket ; there was a dressing-gown for 
one, and a white muslin handkerchief for another ; and paper, envelopes, and 
stamps for all" 

The Christian Commission having made the ladies of this society their 
agents for the distribution of religious reading, one hundred and twenty-five 
thousand pages of tracts, and twenty thousand books and papers were dissem- 
inated by them. No soldier ever refused a Testament or hymn-book. 

The society sent delegates to all the earlier battle-fields, and even to the 
camps and trenches around Vicksburg. These ladies returned upon the hos- 
pital steamers, pursuing their heroic work, toiling early and late, regardless of 
health or strength, in the midst of scenes the most terrible that can follow in 
the train of war. 

During the fall and winter of 1862, the society's rooms were open day and 
evening for the purpose of bandage-rolling, so great was the demand for sup- 
plies of this kind. 

At the same period, the distress in soldiers' families was such that the 
association felt called upon to make an effort for their relief. They repre- 
sented to the Western Sanitary Commission, and to the gentlemen of the War 
Eelief Fund of St. Louis County, that the demand for hospital clothing was 
greater than loyal fingers could supply, and asked for an appropriation for the 
purpose of giving work to the wives, mothers, and daughters of soldiers. 
They received about $5,500 for this purpose, disbursing it among three 
hundred and fifty families, thus paying for the labor upon seventy-five thou- 
sand hospital garments. 

The medical purveyor of the department, informed of the success of this 
experiment, and having a large contract for army work to give out, offered it 
to the Union Aid. Under this, the families of volunteers made up one hun- 
dred and twenty-eight thousand articles, receiving over $6,000 for their work. 



UNIOX AID SOCIETY OF ST. LOUIS. 325 

Another contract was afterwards taken from the purveyor, under which the 
ladies of the society tore twenty-seven thousand yards of cotton into two 
hundred and sixty-one thousand yards of bandages, the soldiers' wives receiv- 
ing twenty-five cents per hundred yards for rolling. In 1864, nearly forty 
thousand articles were made for the medical purveyor in this manner. 

At the request of the surgeon in charge of Benton Barracks' Hospital, the 
society took quarters in the building, consisting of reception-room, store- 
room, and kitchen. The object was in imitation of a plan in successful 
operation in Baltimore to be able to prepare, upon the requisition of the 
physicians, special articles of diet for particular cases. Donations intended 
for the soldiers could be left at these rooms for judicious distribution; fruit, 
vegetables, and other offerings, could here be prepared and issued as required. 
This would systematize all outside bounty, and enable the surgeon to regulate 
the diet of the entire establishment. Miss Bettie Broadhead was the first 
superintendent of these rooms, which were afterwards extended and multi- 
plied. They soon exhibited all the bustle and activity of a restaurant. Bills 
of fare were distributed in each ward every morning ; the soldiers wrote their 
names and numbers opposite the special dishes they desired ; the surgeon scru- 
tinized the calls, and, if he did not disapprove, indorsed them. At the 
appointed time, the dishes, distinctly labelled, arrived at their destination in 
charge of an orderly. Nearly forty-eight thousand dishes were issued in one 
year. 

In the fall of 1863, the Union Aid Society established a branch at Nash- 
ville, Mrs. Barker and Miss Adams leaving St Louis with $500 and seventy- 
two boxes of stores. A special diet kitchen, like that of Benton Barracks, 
was opened under the auspices of Miss Adams ; and this, subsequently, became 
a most important affair, no less than sixty-two thousand dishes being issued in 
August, 1864. A large portion of the supplies were furnished by the Pitts- 
burgh Subsistence Committee, who did not, however, stop there, but sent Miss 
Ellen Murdoch to prepare the supplies for use. This lady worked for three 
months with her own hands in the kitchen, and no reasonable wish of an 
invalid ever went ungratified. 

The society, apparently not satisfied with its labors in behalf of soldiers 
and their families, found time to organize committees to look after the inter- 
ests of the freedmen and the refugees. Working in concert with the Western 
Sanitary Commission, it has done much to alleviate the distress which pre- 
vailed in 1863, and, indeed, still prevails, among these unfortunate people. 

The following list of cash receipts for the year 1863, excluding those from 



326 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

the commission and the government, will show what have been the Aid 
Society's sources of supply : 

Proceeds of Cosmopolitan Bazaar $5,606 66 

" two concerts by the Quincy Old Folks 618 50 

" launch of the gunboat Winnebago 426 50 

" the Sylvan Fete 3,682 20 

Donations from Societies : 

Boatmen's Savings Institution $1,000 00 

Globe Mutual Insurance Company 100 00 

Mechanics' Bank 500 00 

Southern Bank 500 00 

Merchants' Bank 25000 

Saint Louis Bank 100 00 

Citizens' Railway Company 100 00 

German Savings Institution 200 00 

Western Marine Beneficent Association 50 00 

Union Bank 100 00 

Grand Jurors, John J. Hoppe, Foreman Ill 00 

Jefferson Mutual Fire Insurance Company 56 00 

Ladies' Government Work Committee 65 80 

Mound City Club 219 30 

Employees in Excelsior Stone Works 100 00 

Teamsters' Mess, at Benton Barracks 50 00 

Company F, Mounted City Guards 100 00 

3,602 10 

Mrs. H. T. Blow 10000 

James B. Eads 100 00 

M. S. Mepham & Co 250 00 

J. Ridgway 150 00 

Gentlemen of Forage Department 100 00 

L. A. Labaume 100 00 

Jno. M. Taylor 200 00 

Woodburn & Scott 150 00 

II. A. Homeyer 100 00 

1,250 00 

Other donations from societies and individuals 4,033 83 

Donations for Soldiers' Fourth of July Dinner 394 85 



$19,614 64 
Deduct expenses for Bazaar, Concerts, and Sylvan F6te 1,939 17 



Total $17,675 47 

In August, 1861, several of the wives of the gentlemen belonging to the 
Union Belief Association of Baltimore a society which we mention, on 
account of the nature of its work, under another head gave their assistance 
in preparing food and clothing for the sick and wounded. This work was, in 
a measure, taken off their hands by the establishment of government hospi- 
tals in the city, but the ladies' energies had been aroused, and they felt that 



LADIES' UNION RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF BALTIMORE. 



327 



even with the best the government and the medical staff could do, there would 
still be work enough for willing hands. The organization of the Ladies' 
Union Eelief Association of Baltimore was therefore effected on the first 
Tuesday of October, 1861, and the following officers were chosen : 

President, MRS. REVERDY JOHNSON. 

Vice- Presidents. 
MRS. J. SATTRIN NORRIS. MRS. ALEX. TURNBULL. MRS. THOMAS WHITBIDGE. 

Corresponding Secretary, MRS. A. L. PHELPS. 

Recording Secretary, MRS. JOHN GRAHAM. 

Treasurer, Miss AGNES V. MORTON. 

Two of these ladies resigned shortly afterwards, and Miss Morton became 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. Chas. J. Bowen, Corresponding Secretary, and Miss 
Julia May Morton, Treasurer. 

ENERAL charge was at first assumed over all the 
hospitals, but as each hospital gradually attracted 
to itself its own peculiar circle, the Relief Asso- 
ciation took for its immediate charge the National 
Hospital in Camden Street. This institution con- 
tained beds for a thousand patients, and here the 
worst cases were usually brought. Mrs. Bowen, 
in her first report, thus speaks of the labors of 
the society here : " Every ward has its own com- 
mittee, and the soldiers are visited by the ladies 
two or three times a week, and, in making known their wants, become very 
sociable and communicative. With few exceptions, they have been modest in 
their demands, and extremely grateful for favors shown them. Occasionally 
they ask the ladies what the articles cost, which causes a smile and a pleasant 
answer. Besides our visiting the soldiers, ' we request the pleasure of their 
company,' and there is not a day when these rooms are not a pleasant retreat 
for convalescent men, who love to come from the hospitals and tell their tales 
of the battle-field.'' 

The ladies of Baltimore, owing to their being comparatively near the 
ground, rendered peculiarly effective service. Their boxes were early upon 
the field, and, during the first year at least, none ever failed to reach its destina- 
tion. A delegation of three ladies of the society spent five days in the vicinity 
of Antietam, after the battle there, relieving a vast amount of suffering. 




328 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

During the first year, some $3,000 were received, and nearly thirty-one 
thousand articles. The Northern states contributed two-thirds of these, and 
Northern soldiers soldiers not from Maryland consumed three quarters of 
those that were given out nine thousand six hundred and five, out of twelve 
thousand six hundred and forty-five. 

During the second year, the society removed its kitchen from its own 
rooms to the Camden Street Hospital. A committee of thirty ladies assumed 
exclusive charge of the diet room, serving faithfully in all weathers. A read- 
ing room for the convalescents was next established, at the suggestion of the 
chaplain, and stocked with papers, magazines, tracts, and games. Magic lan- 
tern exhibitions were given in the wards, for the amusement of those yet 
unable to leave their beds. Concerts followed in the dining-room of the hos- 
pital, five taking place during the year. Sabbath services were regularly held, 
three choirs taking turns in furnishing the music, and, after the services, going 
through the building and singing hymns in the wards. 

Nearly $6,000 were received during this year, and twenty-three thousand 
articles were collected, made or purchased, and distributed ; and in this enu- 
meration, articles that can neither be worn nor eaten, are not included : books, 
games, crutches, pillows. Of these, immense numbers were given out. Aid, 
in money or in kind, came from Springfield, New Bedford, Roxbury, "Worces- 
ter, Providence, Hartford, Stonington, Boston, Portland, Salem, Philadelphia. 
The society continued its labors throughout the war. 

For a long period prior to the war, there had been in New York an organ- 
ization for social and charitable purposes, called the New England Society ; 
and soon after the breaking out of the rebellion, this society became the 
nucleus of a wider and less formal organization, known as the Sons of New 
England. In April, 1862, these gentlemen, New Englanders resident in New 
York, formed an association called the NEW ENGLAND SOLDIERS' BELIEF 
ASSOCIATION, the object of which was "to aid and care for all sick and 
wounded soldiers passing through the City of New York, on their way to or 
from the war." A building, rented and furnished for the purpose, No. 198 
Broadway, in close proximity to the steamboat landings and railroad stations, 
was opened for the reception of its beneficiaries on the 8th of the month. The 
board of officers was constituted as follows : 

Chairman, Vice- Chairman, 

WILLIAM M. EVARTS. CHARLES GOULD. 

Treasurer, Corresponding Secretary, 

SAMUEL E. Low. WILLIAM II. L. BARNES. 



NEW ENGLAND SOLDIERS' RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 329 

Recording Secretaries, 
WILLIAM BOND, MAUEICE PERKINS. 

Resident Surgeon, Matron, 

EVERETT HERRICK, M. D. MBS. E. A. RUSSELL. 

Col. Frank E. Howe, military agent for the states of Maine, New Hamp- 
shire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Indiana, was made 
superintendent. The Home thus established has never received any state 
assistance, but has always depended upon private sources for its funds 
upon individuals, benevolent societies, and town and church organizations. 
Its expenses have averaged $1,200 a month, with which sum it has enter- 
tained, lodged, fed, aided and clothed, each month, some sixteen hundred 
men. A brief description of the building and its uses may be of interest 

The structure is five stories high, the association occupying them all 
except the ground floor, in which the superintendent conducts his private 
business. On the first story is the reception and baggage room, the regis- 
try-desk, and the office of the society, the latter containing closets and ward- 
robes, and a library presented by the Christian Commission. The second 
story is a sick-ward, the convalescents being separated from the serious and 
surgical cases ; here also is the resident physician's room and the medical 
supply-table. The Women's Auxiliary Committee furnish the nurses and 
attendants, and very often from their own ranks. Their sympathy, tender- 
ness and charity have been displayed in a thousand ways, and their services 
have been invaluable. The third story is a dormitory, comfortable, well 
lighted and ventilated, and containing eighty-six beds. On the upper story 
are the dining-room, the kitchen, pantries, laundry, and wash-room. Here the 
dusty and travel-worn trooper may have his under-clothes washed, ironed, and 
returned, between sunrise and sunset. 

From April 9th, 1862, to February 1st, 1865, the association received, regis- 
tered, lodged, fed, aided and clothed about sixty thousand soldiers, many of 
them wounded or disabled. Two-thirds of them were from New England. 

A hospital record, compiled by this association, has proved of the greatest 
value. This labor was undertaken in consequence of the great number of 
applications received for assistance in obtaining information of soldiers 
known to be, or to have been, in some one of the government hospitals in 
the vicinity of the city. A regular system of hospital visiting was instituted, 
and a registry thus made and preserved of the name, company, regiment, 
residence, disease or wound, condition and final disposition of every soldier 
in these hospitals. Many of these invalids were supplied with the means 



330 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

of communicating with their friends, and, when permitted to go home, were 
assisted in getting there. Useful as the record has proved during the war, it 
will doubtless be of greater permanent value. 

In many other ways the association has rendered aid and comfort to the 
soldier. It sent nurses or guides with such as needed their assistance, to the 
point of departure, and, in urgent cases, caused them to be accompanied to 
their destination. It gave certificates, upon which the railroad and steam- 
boat companies furnished transportation at government rates. In case of 
death, it sent the remains home, or caused them to be decently buried at 
Cypress Hill. It was the temporary custodian of large amounts of soldiers' 
money, which would otherwise have been squandered, lost, or stolen. It fur- 
nished every soldier who desired them, whether in its own rooms or govern- 
ment hospitals, paper, pens, envelopes and postage-stamps one hundred and 
seventy-five letters a day having been often mailed through its agency. A 
postage-stamp account, however, was rendered to the various states for the 
amount of the aid thus given, and reimbursement was made in every case. 

Eeligious services were held in the reception-room on Sunday afternoon, 
conducted both by clergymen of the various denominations and by army chap- 
lains. Devotional music was not forgotten, the ladies and gentlemen of the 
Harmonic Society discharging the duties of a regular choir duties, in this 
case, self-imposed. "We have all heard of a voluntary upon the organ ; but the 
worshippers at the soldiers' chapel, though they heard no organ, listened 
to nothing that was not voluntary prayer, psalm, hymn, sermon, benedic- 
tion. 

The Night- Watchers' Association was a feature peculiar to the New 
England Relief Society. It grew out of the following circumstances : Nurses 
had been readily furnished at the outset by the Women's Auxiliary Commit- 
tee, to serve during the day-time ; but during their absence at night, the good 
effects of their care and attention were often undone by the mistakes and 
neglect of those hired to replace them. It was proposed by the superintend- 
ent, as a remedy for this, " that the night service should be given up to 
young men, whose character and motives should be a sufficient warrant of 
their fidelity." This was done, during the first summer, with entire success; 
and in the fall, the Night- Watchers' Association was formed, twenty-eight 
young men joining it under the presidency of Mr. Luther M. Jones. The 
members possessed the necessary tact and skill to deal with sick men, and, 
making the service a matter of personal responsibility and sacrifice, held 
themselves and each other to a conscientious discharge of the duties assumed. 



THE WOMEN'S AUXILIARY COMMITTEE. 331 

A weekly visiting committee went through the rooms late in the evening, pre- 
pared, if the requisite number of watchers was not present, to remain themselves. 
In regard to the labors of the Women's Auxiliary Committee, the super- 
intendent bears witness that their never-failing presence, counsel, and zeal, 
rendered the efforts of the association economical and discriminating ; and 
that, through their ministrations, many a home-sick, suffering soldier has 
found those sympathies and that unselfish care which he believed he should 
meet only in his distant home and among his kindred. 

Now, when we are told that this institution has been carried on, that these 
services have been rendered, at a cost of about one thousand dollars a month, 
what are we to understand ? Simply this : that a few gross, practical matters 
have been arranged and bargained for, money being the coarse and senseless 
agent ; but that nine-tenths of the positive utility of this, and, indeed, of all 
similar enterprises, flow from the fact, that nearly every service performed is 
not only unbought, but unpurchasable. The rent, certain salaries, a few arti- 
cles of furniture, food and medicines, are paid for ; upon the rest, being price- 
less, no price is set The sympathetic care of the ladies who serve by day, 
of the devoted young men who watch by night; the supervision of those 
who ask and expect no reward ; the spiritual counsel, which, in pulpits such 
as these, at least, is not requited in measures of value; the hymns which 
ascend from the soldiers' chapels, unsalaried and unalloyed who shall esti- 
mate the money value of that which money cannot buy ? The purpose of this 
book is, indeed, to enable both the writer and the reader to form some idea of 
what has been gratuitously done, and, for want of a better standard, to meas- 
ure it by our ordinary methods ; and we may place an estimate upon the mere 
manual and physical labor performed, because this might have been done for 
wages ; but we shall not make the mistake of seeking to reckon the money 
value of any pains assuaged, any life preserved, any faith sustained, or any 
death made hopeful. 

Our space not permitting us to do more, we subjoin a list of the members 
of the Women's Auxiliary Comtnittee and the Night- Watchers' Association 
for the year 1863 : 

WOMEN'S AUXILIARY COMMITTEE. 

MRS. SAMUEL OSGOOD, Miss GERTRUDE NOTT, Miss ANNA STERLING, 

'' J. W. POST, " FANNY SETON, " MARY PORTER, 

41 A. BROOKES, MRS. FRANK E. HOWE, MRS. WOOLSEY G. STERLING, 

" W. GRAHAM STERLING, Miss KNEELAND, " O. B. FROTHINGHAM, 

Miss JOHNSTON, MRS. E. W. STOUGHTON, Miss JANE S. WOOLSEY, 

MRS. G. C. COLLINS, u FREDERICK G. SWAN, MRS. NEHEMIAH KNIGHT, 



332 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

MRS. CHARLES GOULD, Miss MART E. FARLESS, MRS. E. E. PEASLEE, 

Miss MARIANNA HALE, " SARAH H. BOSTWICK, " AV. H. BROWN. 

MRS. E. B. MERRILL, MRS. GEORGE BROWNE, Miss MARY HILLARD, 

" M. O. ROBERTS, Miss MARTIN, MRS. S. C. DOWNING. 

NIGHT-WATCHERS' ASSOCIATION. 

Board of Directors. 
CHARLES T. COGGESHALL, President. W. MADDREN, Vice-President. 

E. W. COGGESHALL, Secretary. 

8. T. BROKER, J. S. COFFIN, J. V. H. NOTT, 

C. T. COGGESHALL, E. H. CARLE, A. E. OAKLEY, 

E. W. COGGESHALL, JACOB CAPSON, E. L. PHIPPS, 

GEO. H. COOK, J. S. FRANKLIN, L. PORTER, 

B. H. COOK, R. B. LOCK WOOD, S. H. SEAMAN, 

JOHN COCK, C. W. LAWRENCE, "W. H. SEAMAN, 

J. W. CARPENTER, B. MITCHELL, F. E. ENGELHARDT. 

MARSHALL CLEMENTS, W. MADDREN, 

The Penn Eelief Association of Philadelphia was organized on the 7th of 
May, 1862, by a number of ladies, " who felt called upon, by the exigencies of 
the times, to leave the private pursuits of home, to see what could be done 
towards mitigating suffering in our military hospitals." 

The following were the officers of the Association at different times : 

Presidents, 
RACHEL S. EVANS, ANNA M. NEEDLES. 

Vice- Presidents, 

HANNAH J. JENKINS, HDLDAH JUSTICE, 

HETTIE W. CHAPMAN, ELIZABETH B. GARRIGUEF. 

Recording Secretaries, 
ANNA P. LITTLE, ELIZABETH NEWPORT. 

Corresponding Secretaries, 
ANNA R. JUSTICE, SALLIE R. GARRIGUES. 

Treasurers, 
MARY M. SCRANTON, ANNA S. WHEATON. 

In six months after its organization, the society numbered two hundred 
members ; visiting committees were appointed, the hospitals were regularly 
looked after, weekly reports being made of their condition and needs. The 
fame of the association extended to the lines of the army, and appeals for aid 
came even from the battle-field. All of these the association was able to 
answer, and during the first year, at least, they had the gratifying assurance 
that all the stores forwarded reached their destination. Pithy acknowledg- 
ments from the recipients told how welcome they were: "That keg of pickled 
cabbage was capital." " Those onions and apples were very acceptable.'' 



THE PENN RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 333 

"Everything was in perfect order : the soldiers appreciate your generosity. v 
"It would have rejoiced the hearts of the ladies to see the eyes that fell on 
those home-made-looking loaves and rusk. One says, ' Why, this reminds me 
of home ; ' and another, ' Yes, and they taste like home, too, just as if mother 
made them.' " " The pillows were a great comfort : one boy pressed his pillow 
to his cheek, and said, ' Only think of my having anything as nice as this in 
camp !' " "I took some of your farina and stewed fruit and crackers to an old 
man of sixty in the convalescent camp, who had taken nothing for four days. 
He ate them with a relish, and was most grateful." " The ham will be a great 
luxury, as it does not come on the diet-table, and will give just the relish the 
men want with their bread and butter. I shall be glad no longer to turn a 
deaf ear to the frequent call for pickles. The tomatoes are far more welcome 
than jellies, and the fruit always seems to come fresh from the hand that 
picked it. The sugar was the kind I was wanting to mix with some oranges 
too sour to be risked alone." 

The regular systematic labor of the Relief, however, was in the United 
States hospitals located in Philadelphia. Eighteen of them were indebted to 
the association for about twenty thousand articles during the first year ; an 
article being now a shirt, now a pillow, now a crutch, now a bottle of wine, 
now ajar of preserves; while ten thousand more were sent to remote points 
and to armies in the field. Nine tenths of the receipts of the society were in 
kind, the cash donations being not quite $3,800. 

The demands upon the Relief during the second year were not so great as 
during the first, but they came in a different form. The soil of Pennsylvania 
was invaded, hospitals and scenes of suffering were multiplied almost at the 
gates of the city. During the progress of the campaign that closed at Gettys- 
burg, the rooms were filled with ladies, sewing, packing, and dispatching 
goods to the threatened districts ; and the Penn Relief stores were among the 
first that reached the battle-field. Several of the members offered their ser- 
vices as nurses in the improvised hospitals which sprang up about the scene 
of that fierce encounter. 

The society had the satisfaction not of sending boxes of stores to Rich- 
mond but of receiving the assurance, upon their being sent there, that the 
Union prisoners, for whom they were intended, actually received them. 

The cash receipts were nearly $6,400 ; those in kind were large enough to 
enable the society to furnish fourteen thousand two hundred and thirty-two 
articles to hospitals and to claimants in the field. It continued its labors as 
long as the necessity existed. 



334 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



IRCUMSTANCES not only alter cases, but they even 
'invent them, and sometimes they form societies. 
The Rose Hill Ladies' Soldiers' Relief Association, 
of New York, had a pleasant and accidental origin. 
A number of ladies were holding a raspberry festi- 
val in the Twenty-seventh Street Church, in the 
summer of 1862. More berries had been provided 
than were eaten, and a suggestion made by one of 
the party to send the surplus to the soldiers, was 
acted upon. They were taken to Bellevue Hospital, 

and the delight and gratitude of the wounded men congregated there were 
such that the ladies who had been on the first errand, went again and again, 
laden with similar gifts. The advantage of concerted action was soon made 
apparent, and on the 12th of August, the organization of a society, named as 
above, was effected. The object was the relief of sick and wounded soldiers 
in the hospitals of New York and vicinity, and the temporary care of dis- 
charged soldiers, even if not sick or wounded. The officers were as follows : 




First Directress, 
MRS. BICHARD KELLY. 

Treasurer, 
MRS. WILLIAM RYER. 



Second Directress, 
MRS. C. V. CLARKSON. 

Recording Secretary, 
MRS. WILLIAM HUNTING. 



Corresponding Secretary, MRS. CHARLES S. WESTCOTT ; afterwards, MRS. A. G. DUNN. 

The first resources of the society were contributions made by its own mem- 
bers; these were augmented by a concert and fair, the proceeds of which, 
nearly $2,200, enabled it to continue its ministrations. The soldiers were 
visited almost daily, and supplied with clothing and delicate food; the board 
of several was paid at St Luke's Hospital ; some were furnished with means 
to reach their homes, and one was sent to his fatherland in Germany. Several, 
who would otherwise have found paupers' graves, were decently buried. A 
Thanksgiving dinner was famished to the three hundred soldiers collected at 
Bellevue, the dinner not ceasing with the dessert, but lingering pleasantly on, 
while speeches were delivered and patriotic songs sung. The first year's 
receipts were $3,400. 

During the second year both the means and the sphere of action of the 
society were considerably extended. A concert by Mr. Gottschalk, an enter- 
tainment by Mr. Stephen C. Massett, a fair, a collection at the Corn Exchange, 
and generous private donations, enabled the ladies of Rose Hill to enlarge 



TWO HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE HOSPITALS. 335 

their circle of visits, and while continuing their ministrations at Bellevue and 
St Luke's, to include, in their generous work, the hospitals of Central Park, 
Willett's Point, David's Island, Blackwell's Island, and the Battery. Christ- 
mas and Thanksgiving dinners were given to all, and fruit ws furnished to 
tlie Central Park on the Fourth of July. 

A dying soldier placed $50 in the hands of the chaplain, to be used as he 
thought proper, for the benefit of the soldiers. This became the nucleus of a 
fund for the purchase of an organ for the Willett's Point hospital. Eighty 
dollars more were obtained by special contribution ; a sympathizing firm of 
organ builders offered an instrument worth $170 for $130 ; and thus it was 
that the soldiers sang hymns on Sundays, and national and secular airs any 
other day they liked. The second year's receipts were $6,100. 

The society maintained its organization while the war lasted, and, at its 
close, became the beneficiary of certain unexpended balances of recruiting and 
bounty funds. 

The associations which we have mentioned in this chapter, though the 
most important of those which have kept up an independent existence, are by 
no means all. At one period there were in the country TWO HUNDRED AND 
FORTY-THREE government hospitals, and every one of them either attracted to 
itself its regular circle of ministering attendants, or, if left to the chance visits 
and sympathy of those who were drawn thither by accident, hardly suffered 
in comparison with the others. The number of persons who have performed 
these errands of love, if it could be computed, would doubtless astound us ; 
and they all went away empty-handed. Many a man, who formerly spent his 
thousands a year upon his picture gallery or his library, has diverted the cur- 
rent of his bounty : many a woman has practised. daily, systematic self-denial, 
that she might go better laden to the sick soldier's bedside. The brief sketches 
which we have given of certain organized efforts to make a sojourn in the 
hospital more tolerable, must not only stand for themselves, but for those we 
have omitted : and they may serve, with this reminder, to fix in the reader's 
memory the fact, that hundreds of thousands of persons, belonging to no 
regular hospital aid society, visited the hospitals as the spirit moved. The 
basket on the arm, the distended pocket, the burdened servant, told plainly 
enough what the errand was, where the heart and sympathies were. We shall 
try to put all this into figures in another place. 



CHAPTER IX. 




HRISTIANITY in the army ! A worthy object, worthi- 
ly undertaken, and, as we shall see, untiringly and suc- 
cessfully prosecuted. The efforts to bring evangelical 
influences to bear upon the armies of the United States, 
which, at a later period, assumed concerted action under 
the name of the Christian Commission, commenced in 
an isolated manner in the city of New York, on the 18th of April, 1861. 
Delegates from the Young Men's Christian Association, of that city, met the 
Massachusetts Sixth on its passage, and on the next day visited the New 
York Seventh, then preparing to start for "Washington. This association, 
and similar organizations in other cities, made certain of their members Army 
Committees, and these persons spent the three months previous to the battle 



FIRST SUGGESTION OF A CHRISTIAN COMMISSION. 337 

of Bull Run in visiting the camps and barracks, holding prayer-meetings, and 
distributing Testaments, hymn-books, and tracts. 

Mr. Vincent Colyer, who had been from the outset a delegate of the Chris- 
tian Association of New York, and who had received in August a permit 
from General Scott "to pass through the United States lines at all times, in 
the prosecution of his benevolent labors in the camps and hospitals," wrote a 
letter, in October, to the Secretary of the Committee for calling a Convention 
of the Young Men's Christian Associations of the United States, in which 
occurred the following passages : 

" I wish to ask the committee, of which you are the honored secretary, to 
earnestly consider the propriety of calling a general convention, at some 
central place, at the earliest practicable day, to consider the spiritual wants of 
the young men of our army, in order that the same may be provided for by 
the appointing of a ' Christian Commission,' whose duty it shall be to take 
entire charge of this work. 

***** * # 

" The labor is so extensive, and needs such large resources, that single 
associations can do but little, and for them to act independently of each other, 
is to increase vastly the expenses, while the labor accomplished will be less ; 
and while some sections will receive too much attention, others will be com- 
paratively neglected. 

" I need not say what a blessing such a work will prove to the associations 
themselves. It is well known that many of these societies are now languish- 
ing for the want of means to meet their current expenses; and it might 
reasonably be asked, seemingly, how can they, then, undertake a new and 
extensive work like this ? The answer is, they can readily collect money for 
this special army mission, when they cannot for any thing else. The commu- 
nity is so sensitively alive to the wants of the soldiers nearly every city, town, 
village, or family, having their own citizens or members in the army that 
the subject takes immediate hold of their sympathies, and will command their 
ready aid and support. We have tried it, and found it so. 

{i Having had a personal interview with the president of your committee, 
and learned his hearty readiness to co-operate in this work, I visited Boston, 
and there met with an equally cordial response. That society will send an 
able delegate, and our New York Society will select a prominent citizen and 
member to represent it, and, I doubt not, if the time had admitted, other 
societies would have promised the same. I therefore pray that a convention 

of all the Young Men's Christian Associations may be called at an early day." 
22 



338 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



A convention of delegates from the Young Men's Christian Associations 
of the country, such as was here suggested, was called, and met at New York, 
on the 16th of November, 1861. Up to this time the delegates of the various 
Christian Associations had received and disbursed about $15,000 in money 
and stores. A consolidated United States Christian Commission was now 
decided upon, and the following persons were appointed to constitute it : 



EEV. ROLLIN H. NEALE, D. D., Boston. 

REV. BISHOP E. S. JANES, D. D., New York. 

GEO. H. STUAET, Philadelphia. 

REV. M. L. R. P. THOMPSON, D. D., Cincinnati. 

JOHN V. FARWELL, Chicago. 

HON. B. F. MANIEEBE, New York. 



CHARLES DEM-OND, Boston. 

MITCHELL II. MILLER, Washington. 

JOHN P. CROZER, Philadelphia. 

COL. CLINTON B. FISK, St. Louis. 

JOHN D. HILL, M. D., Buffalo. 

REV. BENJ. C. CUTLER, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



The two latter gentlemen retired during the first year, and their places 
were filled by Mr. Jay Cooke, of Philadelphia, and the Rev. James Eells, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Headquarters, at first established in New York, were sub- 
sequently removed to Philadelphia. 

The board of officers and the executive committee of the commission 
stood, after several appointments and resignations, composed of the following 
gentlemen : 



Chairman, 
GEO. H. STUART. 



Treasurer, 
Jos. PATTERSON. 



Secretary, 
REV. W. E. BOARDMAN. 

Executive Committee. 

GEO. H. STUART, Chairman, Philadelphia. CHARLES DEMOND, Boston. 

REV. BISHOP E. S. JANES, D. D., New York. JOHN P. CROZER, Philadelphia. 

JAY COOKE, Philadelphia. 

The object of the commission was to promote the spiritual and temporal 
welfare of the officers and men of the United States army and navy, in co- 
operation with chaplains and others ; and, as subsidiary to this, " to arouse the 
Christian associations and the Christian men and women of the loyal states to 
such action towards the men in our army and navy, as would be pleasing to 
the Master ; to obtain and direct volunteer labors, and to collect stores and 
money with which to supply whatever was needed, reading matter, and 
articles necessary for health not furnished by government or other agencies, 
and to give the officers and men of our army and navy the best Christian min- 
istries for both body and soul possible in their circumstances." 



ARMY COMMITTEES. 339 

The first work of the commission was to make its objects known, and to 
create an interest in its plans and purposes ; the second was to appeal to the 
people, if they liked the design, for the means of carrying it out ; the third, to 
devote the stores thus obtained, whither collected or purchased, to the uses 
intended. The public attention was speedily enlisted, the machinery used 
being the very simple one of public meetings. 

The Boston Army Committee held eight such meetings in Boston, and 
twenty-eight in various parts of New England, during the first year, collecting 
$7,500, and forwarding seven hundred packages of stores. They held six 
hundred and thirteen prayer-meetings on board the receiving ship Ohio, the 
crowded assemblages reaching down far below the water-line, using in their 
labors some twenty thousand copies of prayer-books, Testaments, hymn-books, 
and tracts. 

The Brooklyn Army Committee held twenty meetings- in the churches, in 
behalf of the soldiers, collected and distributed two hundred and sixty-three 
barrels and boxes of stores, ten thousand bound volumes, fifteen thousand 
magazines and pamphlets, twenty-five thousand papers, one hundred thousand 
pages of tracts. The- value of these stores and publications was about $25,000 ; 
the money disbursed, about $3,800. 

The Philadelphia Army Committee began at a date somewhat earlier than 
the others, and labored through the heat and burden of the day. On every 
Sabbath evening of the year; with the exception of one or two in midsummer, 
meetings were held in churches of all denominations ; these were invariably 
crowded, and the exercises were always interesting, often thrilling. Fifty 
delegates, principally clergymen, were sent to the field, two hundred others 
prosecuting the home work in the camps and hospitals. Three hundred and 
forty-five religious meetings were held with soldiers and sailors. The govern- 
ment having failed to supply the hospitals with milk, the committee made an 
arrangement with dairymen, by which forty thousand quarts were furnished, 
fifteen hundred quarts having been a gratuitous contribution. The commit- 
tee also undertook the labor of keeping a complete record of all Pennsylvania 
soldiers in and around the city, engaging to visit them weekly, to assist them 
in communicating with their homes, and to give them opportunities for reli- 
gious conversation and spiritual benefit. The Philadelphia Central Office, 
which disbursed not only its own collections, but such other funds as were 
sent to it by local committees, received and expended $20.000 in money, and 
over $90,000 in stores, during the first year. 

The Maryland Committee may be said to have been already in existence 



340 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

when the Christian Commission was organized. Mr. G. S. Griffith had, at the 
first outbreak, called a meeting of clergymen and laymen, of different de- 
nominations, at his house in Baltimore, for the purpose of forming an associa- 
tion to minister to the spiritual needs of the army. He urged the importance 
of exerting a moral influence over the thousands that were even then rushing 
to arms; of furnishing them with good reading-matter, and of enabling chap- 
lains to work efficiently among them. Such an association was formed that 
night; it was called the Baltimore Christian Association, and fifty men at 
once entered their field of duty under its auspices. "When the United States 
Christian Commission was organized, the Baltimore Association became aux- 
iliary to it, under the name of the Maryland Committee, Mr. Griffith becoming 
chairman, Dr. John N. McJilton, secretary, and Rev. George P. Hays, treasu- 
rer. The district under their immediate control comprised Maryland, Dela- 
ware, and Western Virginia, Occupying a delicate position in a community 
which was far from sympathizing with them, they made up for their disadvan- 
tage of situation by zeal. They sent sixty delegates to the field during the 
first year, while five hundred persons, male and female, found constant em- 
ployment at home, in camp and hospital. They held eight hundred and sixty 
prayer-meetings, distributing, besides Bibles, praver-books, and pamphlets, 
four million pages of tracts. They expended, in local work, $2,800, and 
distributed five hundred cases'of stores. 

The "Washington Committee had an almost boundless field of work, 
and labored in it indefatigably. They held five hundred religious meetings, 
distributed twenty thousand Testaments, and nearly half a million pages of 
tracts. One special opportunity was offered to this association, and they 
employed a missionary to profit by it The teamsters and laborers con- 
nected with the Quartermaster's Department were herded together in two 
vast camps, away from home influence, surrounded by temptation, obtaining 
liquor easily, knowing no Sabbath, caring for no one, and with no one, 
apparently, to care for them. They would not attend church, though invited 
to do so. Into the midst of these hardened outcasts came one day the 
Rev. Mr. Lyford, the missionary of the association, accompanied by his wife, 
who was proficient in sacred music. They stood upon a box and began to 
sing. A woman singing is vastly more winning than a man praying, in 
the view of such a multitude, and they collected to listen. After the sing- 
ing, they heard a familiar talk about their families, about their hardships, 
and those who were willing and anxious to lighten them ; then another song, 
and, finally, prayer. The responsive chord had been touched at last, and the 



ARMY COMMITTEES. 



341 



blasphemous throng were soon after building a canvas chapel. Planks placed 
across bales of hay formed seats, and a rude pulpit was constructed with 
barrels and boxes, and here regular services were afterwards held. In the 
other teamsters' park was an abandoned school-house, and when the genial 
influence had reached them from the neighboring camp, they took it for a 
church, enlarging it by the addition of an awning, so that the preacher 
could stand in the doorway, and speak to the men both inside and out. 




CHRISTIAN COMMISSION IN THE FIELD. 



The Chicago Committee held thirty-eight public meetings, in which the 
claims of the cause were forcibly presented. They expended $4,000, dis- 
tributed one hundred thousand books, papers, and tracts, and four hundred 
packages of stores. They sent thirty delegates to the field, the home work 
being divided among several hundred persons. Twelve hundred religious 
meetings were held ; a chapel was built in Camp Douglas, the ladies furnishing 
the materials, and the soldiers doing the work. Services were of daily occur- 
rence, and a thousand persons were often present. The members of the com- 
mission went about among the men, offering healthy reading in exchange for 
playing-cards, and plying, it seems, a very prosperous trade. After a season 
of revivals, and at a time when several regiments were about to leave for the 



342 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

south, a Soldiers' Communion was proposed. The denominational differences 
of the various regimental chaplains were harmonized, and an order of exercises 
satisfactory to all was agreed upon. Long before the hour the chapel was 
crowded. Chaplain Stoughton warned all present against eating and drinking 
irreverently, or even thoughtlessly. Mr. Hoag, whose son, an Illinois colonel, 
was among those intending to commune, served the bread and wine. Over 
two hundred took the proffered sacrament war-worn veterans from the Poto- 
mac, and recruits fresh from their homes and pastures. The Rev. Dr. Patter- 
son wrote in November of this year : " God is evidently at work in our army. 
To-day, at noon meeting, a man who was so wicked that the men removed his 
tent out of hearing, stood up and thanked God for his conversion." 

The Western Army Committee, of St. Louis, had much to discourage 
them during the first year. They nevertheless held three public meetings on 
the soldiers' behalf, and two hundred and forty-seven religious meetings with 
the soldiers. They expended $2,200, and distributed ninety thousand books, 
papers, and pamphlets, and seven hundred and twenty thousand pages of tracts. 
Services were held in Camp Jackson, and semi-weekly prayer-meetings at 
Camp Benton, and opportunities were sometimes found on board of steamboats 
and on railroad trains. On one occasion a delegate was speaking to an assem- 
bled regiment upon the vice of profanity. The colonel begged him to pause a 
moment, and then suggested to the men, that if the regiment had any swear- 
ing to do, its colonel was the proper man to do it, and asked them if they 
were willing to leave it to him ; proposing that all who would- pledge them- 
selves not to utter an oath till they heard one from his lips, should raise their 
right hands. Every hand was raised : the whole thousand took an oath that 
that oath should be their last. 

The Peoria Committee was organized immediately after the formation of 
the Peoria Camp. Prayer-meetings were held till the camp was broken up 
eighty in all. Fifteen thousand books and papers, and thirty thousand pages 
of tracts, were distributed. Here, as elsewhere, the evidence of the delegates 
was, that as long as they had good reading-matter to disseminate, as long as 
there was a library accessible to the men, so long order and discipline were 
easily maintained ; but that cards appeared when the books gave out, and 
that playing for amusement soon degenerated into gambling, and that one 
vice speedily brought the others in its train. 

The Army Committee of Louisville, with twenty thousand soldiers around 
them, found their means small compared with the work at hand. The 
central treasury afforded all the aid in its power enabling them to till a 



SUMMARY OF THE FIRST YEAR. 343 

portion of the field. Sunday services were held in all the hospitals, and 
prayer-meetings in the camps around the city. Seven thousand books and 
papers, and thirty thousand pages of tracts, were distributed. 

The New York Committee was not ready for work during^ this year, the 
constant calls upon the purses of the citizens for other purposes causing a 
delay of some months. 

In regard to the facilities of the Christian Commission for accomplishing a 
great deal at small cost, the following facts appear: The delegates sent to 
the front, as well as those employed upon the home work, were, for the most 
part, clergymen, and gave their services freely. Ample means were secured 
in this way to distribute all the stores contributed, or purchased with moneys 
subscribed. Office-room, storage, the services of clerks and porters at the 
central office in Philadelphia, were all given by the chairman of the commis- 
sion, Mr. George H. Stuart, who also Devoted his own time and labor to the 
cause, without charge. The government and its officers furnished transporta- 
tion, passes, stores, and the use of ambulances. All railroads applied to 
gave free- passes to delegates, and all telegraph companies free transmission 
of business dispatches. The American Bible Society gave Testaments by the 
thousand; the American Tract Society furnished tracts literally by the mil- 
lion pages ; and the various publication societies and boards, countless num- 
bers of their numerous useful issues. The people gave money and stores. 
The following table of the first year's operations gives a comprehensive view 
of what was accomplished : 

Number of Christian ministers and laymen commissioned to minister, at the 

seat of war, to men on the field, and in camps and hospitals 356 

Number of Christians actively working with the army committees in the home 

work 1,033 

Meetings held with soldiers and sailors, in camps and hospitals, exclusive of 

those at the seat of war 3,945 

Public meetings held on behalf of the soldiers and sailors 188 

Bibles and Testaments distributed 102,560 

Books (large and small) for soldiers, distributed 115,757 

Magazines and pamphlets, religious and secular, distributed 34,653 

Soldiers' and sailors' hymn and psalm books distributed 130,697 

Papers distributed 384,781 

Pages of tracts, &c., distributed 10,953,706 

Temperance documents distributed 300,000 

Libraries supplied to hospitals, &c 23 

Boxes and barrels of stores and publications distributed 3,691 

In the following table the money value of all contributions and services is 
given, as near as may be : 



344 THE TRIBUTE BOOK/ 

Cash receipts at Central and Branch Offices $40,160 29 

Value of stores and publications 142,150 00 

" " delegates' services 21,360 00 

" " Railroad facilities 13,680 00 

" " Telegraph " 3,650 00 

" " Scriptures furnished by the American Bible Society 10,256 00 



Total $231,256 29 

The second year opened with still brighter promises for the Christian 
Commission. The New York Committee was finally organized, and their 
plans were laid for a vigorous campaign. Their field of operations was 
set down thus : the vessels of war, the transports fitted out in the harbor, 
and the squadrons supplied from them that is, the bulk of the navy ; all 
the forts, camps, and hospitals around New York not otherwise cared for ; 
and the armies, camps and hospitals on the entire Atlantic coast. One hun- 
dred and fifty thousand men were embraced within this plan, one-tenth of 
them estimated to be in hospitals. The field of supply for the New York 
branch treasury was thus assigned : New York, Connecticut, and eastern New 
Jersey. 

The most imposing public meeting held in behalf of the commission 
took place in New York, February 9th, 1863, at the Academy of Music, 
under the presidency of Lieutenant-General Scott. The edifice was densely 
crowded. The audience were requested not to indulge in applause upon the 
entrance of the presiding officer. They might evince their respect by silently 
rising, thus testifying their veneration for a twice sacred cause sacred in its 
objects, and sacred in the day on which its claims were urged. This request 
was implicitly obeyed. The addresses made during the evening were in the 
highest degree impressive ; their influence was felt throughout the city and 
surrounding country ; and the New York Committee commenced their labors 
with 10,000 in the treasury, the result of this single meeting. 

During this year the commission had free transportation upon twenty 
thousand miles of railway, and sent and received unpaid dispatches over as 
many miles of wire. Ministers and laymen gave their services in greater 
numbers than before. The large hotels throughout the country opened their 
doors to the delegates, and spread their tables with the best before them, and 
made no charge. The rich contributed generously, and the offerings of the 
poor were perhaps more generous still, even if not so large. The churches, 
the aid societies, the children, were never more active ; collections were never 
more numerous, while no one grumbled at their frequency. Gifts were 
received from Americans abroad, and a helping hand was even extended 



AX APPEAL FOR ICE. 



34o 



from missionaries in China, India, Turkey and Labrador. The soldiers made 
requisitions upon their regimental funds, and the subscription-book was even 
handed about on the decks of men-of-war, and deep down in the forecastle. 
The officers of the Pocahontas sent $44, and the crew $101.50. The Bible 
Society continued to furnish Testaments without stint and without price ; tract 
houses and publishers of religious papers gave large quantities of their pub- 
lications, and furnished others at cost. 




A GUNBOAT SUBSCRIPTION IN AID OF THE CHRISTIAN COMMISSION. 

The means adopted to reach the public ear were simple, and cost literally 
nothing. Now and then a public meeting, the sympathetic action of the 
churches, and the constant iteration of the daily press, unbought and free, 
constituted the sole machinery. Delegates returned from the field told their 
story from place to place, and never in vain. After the battle of Gettysburg, 
Messrs. Tobey and Demond, of the Boston Christian Association, sat at a 
table in the Merchants' Exchange, and received from persons who had been 
moved, but not personally solicited, $40,000. An appeal for ice for the 
sailors sweltering in iron-clads under the midsummer sun at Charleston, was 
circulated at the dinner-tables at Saratoga, under the auspices of Mr. Stuart 
and Governor Morgan of New York. Such an appeal, made where the adepts 
were cooling their champagne, and the unskillful were icing their claret 
where the refreshing crystal lay in capacious bowls, and where silver-capped 



346 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

bottles were plunged up to their necks in tlie grateful refrigerant was not 
likely to pass unheeded, and it did not. In less than twenty-four hours, an 
order for $3,200 worth of ice had been telegraphed to Boston, and the cargo 
was on its way to the south. The city of Providence, where no aid had as 
yet been asked, contributed $7,000 in ten days. The town of Pottsville, in 
Pennsylvania, gave $3,000, and a generous donation of coal to soldiers' families. 
This coal, or the first instalment of it, three hundred tons, came without charge 
over the Reading Railroad. The Thanksgiving offerings of such churches 
as, in 1863, made their alms and oblations through the Christian Commis- 
sion, amounted to $90,000. At a single meeting at the Church of the 
Epiphany, in Philadelphia, $12,000 were contributed ; $9,000 were received 
from ordinary church collections during the year. The American Bible 
Society's contributions in copies of the Scriptures were of the money value of 
$45,000. The collections of the New York Army Committee amounted to no 
less a sum than $60,000, obtained principally by personal application, or 
from churches. The value of the three million tracts, papers, &c., distributed 
by the New York Committee, was over $27,000. 

Early in 1863, President Lincoln received the following letter : 

" DEAR PRESIDENT : 

" I hope you will pardon me for troubling you. Ohio is my native State, 
and I so much wish to send a trifle in the shape of a 5 Bank of England 
note, to buy Bibles for the poor, wounded soldiers of the North, which I hope 

they may read. 

"Yours, very respectfully, 

"MARY TALBOT SORLY, 
"Fircliff, Darby Dale, Derbyshire, England.'' 

This five pound note was sent by Mr. Lincoln to Mr. Stuart. 

The value of the contributions of all kinds to the Christian Commission 
during the year 1863, and the amount of work done, are given in the follow- 
ing tables : 

Cash received at the Central and Branch Offices $358,239 29 

Value of stores contributed 385,829 07 

" Scriptures contributed by the American Bible Society 45,071 50 

" " " British and Foreign Bible Society 1,67779 

" railroad facilities contributed 44,210 00 

" telegraph " " 9,390 00 

" delegates' services 72,420 00 

Total.. $916,837 65 



THE MARYLAND STATE FAIR. 347 

Christian ministers and laymen commissioned to minister to men on battle-fields, 

and in camps, hospitals and ships 1,207 

Copies of Scriptures distributed 465,715 

Hymn and Psalm Books distributed 371,859 

Knapsack Books distributed > 1,254,591 

Library u " 39,713 

Magazines and Pamphlets distributed 120,492 

Religious Newspapers 2,931,469 

Pages of Tracts " 11,976,722 

Silent Comforters, &c., ' 3,285 

Boxes forwarded 12,648 

During its third year the Christian Commission held its only fair, an event 
which occurred in this wise : The first suggestion relative to a fair in Balti- 
more, was made by Mrs. C. J. Bowen in the spring of 1864, in a conversation 
with Mrs. Alex. Turnbull. The idea was, in the minds of these ladies, that it 
should be held for the benefit of the Sanitary Commission, but when submit- 
ted to Mrs. Alpheus Hyatt, was amended so as to admit the Christian Com- 
mission upon equal terms. In this form the proposition was laid before the 
Maryland Committee of the Commission, who regarded it with favor, and 
furnished all assistance in its power, and offering, as an earnest of its good- 
will, to become responsible for the necessary expenses of preparation. A 
meeting of ladies was called, and the Maryland State Fair Association organ- 
ized. The offices were at first filled by the appointment of ladies, but as the 
undertaking seemed somewhat too arduous to be confided to them alone, gen- 
tlemen were selected to assist them. The Board of Directors and the Execu- 
tive Committee were thus constituted : 

President, 
MKS. Gov. BRADFORD, assisted by WM. J. ALBERT. 

Treasurer, 
" ALPJIEUS HYATT, assisted by HENRY JANES. 

Recording Secretary, 
" CAMILLUS KIDDER, assisted by JAMES CAREY COALE. 

Corresponding Secretary, 
" ALMIRA LINCOLN PIIELPS, assisted by JAMES CAREY COALE. 

Joint Executive Committee. 

MRS. ALEX. TURNBULL, assisted by GEN. JOHN S. BERRY. 
" C. J. BOWEN, assisted by Jos. II. MEREDITH. 
" A. LINCOLN PIIELPS, assisted by GERARD T. HOPKINS. 
" WM. J. ALBERT, assisted by JAMES CAREY COALE. 
" ALPHEUS HYATT, assisted by THOS. J. MORRIS. 
" CAMILLUS KIDDER, assisted by GEO. GILDERSLEAVE. 
" JAMES D. MASON, assisted by JAMES W. TYSON. 
" JOHN S. BERRY, assisted by JAMES D. MASON. 
" CHAELES SPILCKER, assisted by REV. JOHN W. RANDOLPH. . 



348 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Ladies' Committee on Reception, MRS. ROYAL T. CHURCH, Chairman. 

Finance Committee, Tiros. SWANX, Chairman. 

Committee on Fine Arts, GEO. B. COALE, Chairman. 

Committee on Rooms and Decorations, WOODWARD ABRAHAMS, Chairman. 

Committee on Order, SEBASTIAX F. STREETER, Chairman. 

Committee on Lectures, Hox. HUGH L. BOND, Chairman. 

The labor of preparation continued for several weeks, the difficulties and 
embarrassments which, under the most favorable circumstances, attend such 
enterprises, being, for obvious reasons, more numerous and formidable in Bal- 
timore than elsewhere. But the zeal of the ladies shone brightest under 




JlALTI.MOIiE PARALLELS. 
RESISTING THE SOLDIERS. APRIL 19lH, 1861. GIVING THE SOLDIERS AID AND COMFOKT, APRIL 19TII, 1864 

discouragement, and the idea of failure, or even postponement, was never 
entertained. The fair opened on the appointed day. 

The Maryland State fair was held in the hall of the Maryland Institute, a 
long and narrow building, of capacity far greater than would appear at first 
sight. In this one building were the immense hall in which the fair proper 
was held, a Refectory, an Art Gallery, and a New England Kitchen. All was 
ready on the 18th of April, 1864, the third anniversary of the first spilling of 
blood in Baltimore after the fall of Sumter the President of the United 
States taking part in the ceremonies of inauguration. 



SOME BALTIMORE TABLES. 349 

Pretty names the Baltimoreans had for their tables : for instance, the 
Union Slipper Circle. Here was a goddess of liberty, draped in the folds of 
Old Glory ; a flannel skirt worked in red, white and blue, by a Union lady 
of Charleston ; a bridal party of dolls on their way home from 'church ; a chess- 
table worked in beads ; the battle-flags of the Second and Third Maryland ; 
aprons made by soldiers ; leaves and flowers of wax, and iron-holders with 
appropriate mottoes. What motto can be appropriate for an iron-holder, you 
ask ? Why, "Polly, put the kettle on !" We all took tea down-stairs, in the 
New England Kitchen. 

Another pretty name for a table was the Cinderella. This was the resort 
of patrons of six and seven years. Here were dolls and doll-bedsteads, Quaker- 
esses for sale to Jew and pagan. At the Union Knitting Social Circle were 
piles of that species of finger and steel work which the war has fostered into 
the dignity of a manufacture. This trade keeps no books, however ; the 
assessor of the revenue makes no inquiries, and we shall never learn the dread- 
ful prosperity of those who plied the needle and the yarn. It is well to know, 
however, that if the demand was appalling, the supply kept pace with it 

Jacob's Well was a species of Spa, where home-brewed Kissingen and 
Vichy were dealt out by dainty cup-bearers to the cosmopolites, and the not 
more native soda-water was drawn for the cit. Lemonade, composed of lemon- 
juice and water from Swann Lake, and Adam's ale, the same beverage with- 
out the lemon-juice, were also constantly on tap. 

At the City Post-office none ever applied in vain. The mail had always 
just arrived, and, singular to say, none of the letters were prepaid. The pen- 
alty attached to receiving an unpaid letter is well known the post-office 
people charge you double, treble, an hundred-fold. 

It was disheartening, after having taken some pains to find the table of 
Anne Arundel in the conviction that, if Miss Arundel was as beautiful as 
her name, she must be fair indeed to discover that it was a county, and not 
a lady. Anne Arundel was aided by Charles, St. Mary's, and Calvert, and 
these were counties too. As these districts were classed as disaffected, their 
contributions were only the more interesting. 

A dispatch-post or parcels-delivery, managed by a Mrs. Eve, was so 
prompt and punctual in the discharge of its duties, that it was universally 
remarked. However, this was not astonishing, said a wit not a wag as Eve 
was made to be a match for Adam's Express Company. We believe we 
are not wrong in stating that this was the production of the gentleman who 
remarked that the first language spoken by babies was Grum Arabic. 



350 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

At the upper end of the hall were the tables of the Central Union Eelief 
Association, of the ladies of which we have already had occasion to speak. 
They were the founders of the fair, and, in a great measure, its builders 
and architects besides. Their tables were sumptuously spread, and all were 
invited to partake of the good things set upon the board. Few resisted 
the call, and the tabular statement, some pages further on, gives the result in 
figures. 

The book and photograph table offered many attractions besides those 
of books and photographs. There were "busts of Milton, Patrick Henry, 
and Juno," meerschaums and Killikinnick, Rogers' Sharpshooters not an 
infringement of Colt's patent, but a group of Union soldiers Swiss scenes, 
queer boxes made of grains of corn, and other curiosities of literature, the 
arts, and ornamental gardening. The book-worm and the tobacco-worm 
might have met here upon neutral ground. 

Gifts from many cities and many lands had been gathered upon the Art 
Table. Photographs, autographs, and auto-photographs ; shells, mosses, ferns, 
pressed leaves ; paper-cutters, paper-weights, pictures, statuettes ; Union kisses 
for Union children; the House that Jack Built; Raphael's Hours; sewing- 
silk and neck-ties ; a nest of boxes ; a battle-piece by Landseer and coco- 
aine by Burnett; a landscape by Herring and cocoa by Baker; watches 
from Waltham, and an artistic pair of standard scales, in which the Presi- 
dent was weighed by Master Carson. 

The Talbot County table offered burr-boxes, framed insects, shingle fans 
carved by a hero of Gettysburg, a basket made of the shavings of a cow's 
horn perhaps the famous crumpled one of history a wreath of popped 
corn. Alleghany, Kent, Montgomery, Howard, Harford, Carroll, Frederick, 
Washington, and other counties, offered their best with willing and lavish 
hand. 

The New England Kitchen was organized and managed by eight ladies 
from Brooklyn, who revived on the soil of Maryland their triumphs in the 
County of Kings. Of course their amiable duties were performed in the 
midst of antiques that harmonized well with their own integuments. A 
cradle, two hundred years of age, old enough to have rocked upon the legend- 
ary tree-top, but too sound to have participated in the then impending 
crash ; chairs from the Mayflower ; a mug that had passed from the moss- 
covered bucket to the lips of Washington ; shovel and tongs from the Gov- 
ernment House at Annapolis; a mantel-piece and Bible from the Purviance 
House such was the setting of the Brooklyn ladies in Baltimore. 



RAFFLING IN BALTIMORE. 351 

The fish-pond was a depth from which the angler pulled such prizes as 
by chance first caught his hook. It made little difference what bait disguised 
the barb, or with what skill the line was bobbed or trolled. The bachelor, 
were he a very Izaak Walton, would draw twin babies ; the clergyman, a har- 
lequin ; the married man, a latch-key ; the chambermaid, a fan. 

The Art Gallery was an admirable collection of paintings, in which nearly 
every American artist of reputation was worthily represented. It is always 
natural that a good picture should awaken admiration, but there were more 
natural reasons than one why McEntee's "Virginia" should be appreciated 
to the full in Maryland. Maryland might have been what Virginia is 
wasted, depopulated ; sunk from the mother of presidents into the daughter 
of desolation. The artist had sought, in his picture, to embody a description, 
in Childe Harold, of the dying of the Tree of Freedom : 

Thy tree hath lost its blossoms, and the rind, 
ChoppM by the axe, looks rough and little worth ; 
But the sap lasts and still the seed we find 
Sown deep even in the bosom of the North. 
So shall a better spring less bitter fruit bring forth. 

No objection was made to raffles at the Baltimore Fair, and numerous 
articles were disposed of by solemn appeal to the lot. What is with us 
known as the toss up, and what the French designate as the short-straw, was 
often the arbiter in cases which nothing else could decide. The bronze ball- 
player, Mr. Stewart's camel's hair shawl, the embroidered side-saddle, the 
saddle which was not a side-saddle, the marine telescope, the skeleton flowers 
under glass a happy acquisition for some one who, having no skeleton in his 
closet, naturally wanted one the mouchoir which was rough to excoriation 
with embroidery, except in the centre, where there was accommodation for a 
very small nose ; afghans, slippers, cigar-cases, the Headquarters of General 
Grant, statuettes all went as the dread decree prescribed. No one seemed 
to be deterred from these speculative investments by the memory of him to 
whom an elephant was adjudged by the self-same process. And, indeed, why 
should they ? Those who " see 1 ' the elephant are said to pay so dearly for 
the sight, that it might be profitable to keep one on view. Cake was raffled 
at a dollar a slice, ten gold rings, distributed through the dough by the impar- 
tial hand of the cook, giving to the baked and iced confection in its entirety, 
the value which really lay hidden in strata, or veins, or lodes. He who got 
the ring was the best man ; and gold at this period was one hundred and fifty. 
It is proper to state that one article at least was not raffled for ; plenty of gen- 
tlemen could get it without the mitten. 



352 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



At the " "West and Newton and Harford County " table a presidential 
election was held, and it was probably the most corrupt that has ever dis- 
graced the annals of the suffrage. Votes were openly bought and sold ; the 
registry law if there was one was defied at high noon ; the influence of 
fractional currency was every where felt, and the result, whatever it was, was 
entirely due to the interference of cash. Voters held their privileges cheap ; 
a "tin cint bill" was the price of a vote. And yet philosophers, seeking for 
the Vox Dei, have declared it identical with the vox populi ! A confusion 
not less remarkable than that of the boy who, reading Ivanhoe on his way to 
the druggist's for a dose of nux vomica, asked, when there, for twelve drops of 
pax vobiscum. One hundred and ten dollars were produced by this scandal- 
ous device. 

The Cecil Kegister was a species of album in which the visitor could, for 
a small consideration, inscribe his name. As the register was to be deposited 
after the fair in a fire-proof edifice, the immortality promised to the signers 
will doubtless be obtained. Twelve hundred names will be thus preserved 
from the oblivion that awaits all others. 

Two evenings were devoted to tableaux, exhibitions of which were given 
at the New Assembly Booms. The programmes were as follows : 



FIRST EVENING. 

Henry the Eighth. 

Faith, Hope, and Charity. 

The Peasant's Courtship. 

Jane McCrea. 

Flora McDonald and Charles Edward. 

Before and after Marriage. 

The Dying Hero. 

Hope leaving Paradise to solace mankind. 

The Contest for the Standard. 

Judith and Holofernes. 

Joan Dare. 



SECOND EVENING. 

Good Queen Margaret. 

Moore's Beauties. 

Ivanthol. 

The Puritans embarking for America. 

The Landing of the Pilgrims. 

Lady Jane Gray. 

The Brilliant Orator. 

My Maryland. 

Our Flag. 

Rebecca and Rowena. 

Fame, Victory, Peace, Painting, Music. 



There were certain Baltimore merchants who dealt in articles that could 
not well be exhibited at the fair ; they were not deterred thereby, however, 
from offering them. Thus Messrs. Thompson & Neilson, who trafficked in 
the biphosphate of lime, laid aside eight barrels, each barrel containing two 
hundred and fifty pounds, which they were willing to bestow upon the cause. 
So farmers could purchase an order at the fair, and procure the lime at the 
warehouse. Biphosphate purchased in this way is said to possess a double 
proportion of fertilizing qualities. Orders for the article were sold we can- 
not say why at the confectionery table. 



A REMARKABLE GRAB-BAG. 353 

If we liad never known before what the young people could do for the 
soldiers, Baltimore would have taught us. Masters Charles and Koland 
Turner, having collected fifteen dollars in small sums, in anticipation of the 
fair, expended it in the purchase of articles fit for stocking a grab-bag. With 




CHRISTIAN AND BANITABt TABUEAli: BRBECCA AND ROWKNA. 

the aid of three young men of their age, they administered the duties con- 
nected with this species of bag, and their fifteen dollars became two hundred 
and forty. The expenses were to the receipts as one to sixteen ; the expenses 
of the Metropolitan Fair were as one to eight. Had the success of the youths 
of the grab-bag attended their seniors of New York, the result would have 
been two millions instead of one. The Turner boys deserved their triumph, 
for the first cup of cold water offered to a soldier in Baltimore, was given by 
Master Eoland of that name. 

A distinctive feature of the Baltimore Fair was its newspaper the New 
Era. This title, at first glance, does not appear as appropriate as those of its 
predecessors the Drum Beat, the Knapsack, the Countersign, the Volunteer. 
But its great significance was shown in its daily publications of Parallel 

23 



354 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Thoughts, these for the New Era, those for the Old. The following extracts 
are to the point: 

" April 18th, 1861. Baltimore agitated all day ; boisterous processions of 
persons wearing secession cockades ; crowds gathered to insult United States 
and Pennsylvania troops; cheers given for Jefferson Davis, and groans and 
yells for Abraham Lincoln ; many Union men knocked down, and Union 
soldiers stoned." 

" April 18th, 1864. The opening of the Maryland State Fair ; a brigade 
of negro troops marched through the city on their way to Annapolis; the 
municipal government in the hands of tried Union men ; Maryland a free 
state ; land augmenting in value, and the population of Baltimore increased 
by twenty thousand in three years." 

"April 19th, 1861. The Unionists powerless; the city in the hands of 
the secessionists. Twenty-nine cars, laden with soldiers, arrived at the Phila- 
delphia Depot. Six were driven to Camden Station, amid yells and jeers. 
Cobble-stones, which had been taken up by the paviors, were hurled by the 
mob at the seventh, and every window was shivered. The eighth and ninth 
passed through a shower of missiles ; the tenth was driven back, the track 
being obstructed in some places and torn up in others. The troops now 
descended from the twenty remaining cars. These were the Sixth Massa- 
chusetts, Colonel Jones. Stones were thrown and two soldiers knocked down ; 
the mob swore that no Union troops should pass through Maryland. Soldiers 
prostrated were dragged away by Union men ; their muskets were seized by 
the rioters and discharged into the ranks. At Calvert Street the soldiers 
turned and fired a volley, which was effective and salutary. The mob was 
now swelled to six thousand men; they rifled the ammunition cars at the 
Philadelphia Station; telegraph wires were cut and bridges burned. The 
killed and wounded on both sides were not less than one hundred ; of the 
soldiers, three were killed and nine wounded." 

" April 19th, 1864. The Maryland State Fair for Union Soldiers success- 
ful beyond expectation ; the President of the United States a guest where but 
lately he was marked as the victim of foul play ; black soldiers marching 
through the streets urged by white survivors of Libby prison to remember 
Fort Pillow." 

The New Era pursued these parallels during the continuance of the fair, 
and they continued quite as striking up to the 30th of April. Its sales were 
heavy, being augmented by the labors of a large body of newsboys of both 
sexes, among them two heroes of the war, and three members of the Veteran 



355 

Eeserve. Two hundred and seventy-two advertisements, the greater part of 
which were charged five dollars for the season which opened and closed with 

the fair contributed to its success, and it finally sent in its balance sheet to 
the treasurer, and $1,300 besides. 

The following table gives a detailed statement of the receipts of the Mary- 
land State Fair: 

Cash contributions : $18,291 93 

Sale of Tickets 15,585 75 

Central Relief No. 1 $8.128 07 

Central Belief No. 2 (Confectionery) l,67fi 39 

Central Relief Art Table 1,513 51 

Central Relief Children's Table 1,389 63 

Central Relief New England Kitchen, including Grandma Downing's 

sales of sanitary yarn and Jeff. Davis cravats 2,859 91 

15,567 51 

"West and Newton and Harford County Associations $3,990 21 

West and Newton and Harford County Fishing Pond 806 00 

4,796 21 

National Table 3,950 98 

North Baltimore and West End 3,511 20 

German 3,000 00 

Baltimore County 2,819 97 

East Baltimore Branch, Patterson Park Division 2,651 57 

Madison Home Circle $1,168 90 

Madison Home Jacob's Well 550 25 

1,719 15 

Carroll County 1,527 00 

Frederick County 1,517 32 

Washington County 1,393 45 

Lunch Room 1,391 43 

New Era 1,300 66 

Howard County 1,217 50 

Cecil County 1,048 90 

Alleghany County 1,026 75 

Anne Arundel, aided by Charles, Calvert, and St. Mary's 1,014 25 

Union Social and Knitting Circle 920 60 

Floral Temple 875 39 

Union Slipper Circle 760 10 

Talbot County 660 97 

Dorchester and Somerset Counties 638 79 

Montgomery County 551 00 

Scotch Table, J. Needles & Son 500 00 

Exhibition of Paintings 494 87 

New England Table 440 50 

Kent County 374 10 

Strawbridge Circle 346 70 

Tableaux 187 70 

Umbrella Stand 170 20 

Yacht . . 115 52 



356 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Memberships $54 00 

Curiosity Room 10 00 



$90,431 ) 
Deduct expenses, say 10,431 96 



Total net. $80,000 00 

This sum was equally divided, according to agreement, between the San- 
itary and Christian Commissions. 

But the Christian Commission's share in the Baltimore Fair was a drop in 
the bucket, in comparison with its needs. The work of the winter of 1863-64 
had drawn heavily upon its resources, and the calls which came with the spring 
for battle-field stores soon emptied the treasury, or at least left it without 
a dollar more than was necessary to meet obligations already incurred. The 
great fairs for the Sanitary Commission were either in progress or in prepara- 
tion, in Brooklyn, New York, Philadelphia, and the Christian Commission 
seemed to be forgotten in the interest which they excited. This state of 
things, however the work threatened with suspension for want of means 
brought the matter home to thousands who had never before been interested 
in it, and, upon the publication of an appeal in the papers, the offers of money 
and stores were renewed, and the commission was enabled to proceed. Con- 
tributions were not only made by individuals, but by corporations, by railway 
and banking companies, and the commission was urged, in letters received 
from far and near, and even from the Pacific coast, to send out persons to 
tell the story of its work, and receive the contributions which such a narrative 
would certainly induce. 

" Besides these and other manifestations," we read in the Third Annual 
Eeport, " two plans of national breadth were proposed, entirely distinct, by 
persons separated by the Alleghanies, and by equal extremes of church com- 
munion, but with hearts beating in unison for the cause of Christ and the 
soldier. One plan was that of a national subscription, with the aim of raising 
half a million of dollars. The other was that of Ladies' Christian Commis- 
sions, with the object of enlisting all evangelical congregations in an organized 
system of contributions and work. The first promised instant and ample aid 
in the great emergency ; the second proposed a steady increase for future ex- 
panded operations." 

The suggestion of a national subscription came from a western merchant, 
and was accompanied by a check for $5,000. A public meeting, called to 
further this scheme, was held in the Church of the Epiphany, in Philadelphia, 



SOURCES OF SUPPLY. 357 

early in May. Bishop Mcllvaine presided, and addresses were made by him, 
by the Kev. E. M. Kirk, and Mr. Tobey, of Boston, the Rev. Jos. T. Duryea, 
Bishop Simpson, and others. The sums received in money, checks, pledges, 
&c., during the evening was close upon $49,000. No larger siim has ever been 
raised at any one meeting held in the United States during the war. Large as 
it was, it was afterwards notably increased. 

A similar meeting was held in Pittsburgh in June; and though the Pitts- 
burgh Sanitary Fair was in progress, $22,000 were received upon the plates, 
and this was more than doubled the next day. The Thanksgiving offerings 
in Western Pennsylvania were over $20,000. The collections of the Boston 
Committee during the year were nearly $165,000 in money, and $250,000 in 
stores, contained in two thousand one hundred and five packages. Mr. Tobey 
set up his desk in the Merchants' Exchange, after the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, as he had done the year before, after the battle of Gettysburg. The 
New York Committee collected about $103.000 ; and at one of its meetings 
rings and watches were placed upon the collection plates. 

The other plan suggested, that of making every church organization in 
the country an auxiliary commission, came from a clergyman in charge of a 
large city parish. The principal points were : organization in each evangel- 
ical congregation ; an annual membership, embracing all ages and both sexes ; 
an annual fee of one dollar for each member; the solicitation of clothing, and 
the preparation of food. This plan was introduced to the public at a meeting 
held in Concert Hall, Philadelphia, the evening after that held in the Church 
of the Epiphany. A committee of a hundred ladies was appointed to carry 
out the plan in the city, and to memorialize the women of the nation. The 
memorial prepared by them was published in the religious papers, and a small 
pamphlet was issued containing the outlines of the plan. This scheme, how- 
ever, required time, and though it yielded considerable sums, never reached 
the extension it would otherwise have done, on account of the evidently 
approaching end of the rebellion. 

The Christian Commission had often been urged to send representatives to 
the Pacific coast, and such a mission was now determined upon. The Revs. 
Dr. Patterson and Mr. Mingins sailed early in the year, entertaining some 
doubt, however, whether they would be heard. California was suffering 
severely from drought, which had affected not only agriculture, but all opera- 
tions in the mines ; mining stocks had fallen heavily in value, and, moreover, 
large sums had been given in aid of the soldier's cause, through the Sanitary 
Commission. But the Californian ear is never closed to appeals like those 



358 TUP: TRIBUTE BOOK. 

now made ; the Golden Gate lies ever open, or if, by chance, it is shut, the 
open sesame is easily said and readily heard. Three meetings were held in 
ten days, and $10,000 in gold received. The Pacific Christian Commission 
was formed, with -J. B. Roberts as chairman ; also, the Ladies' Christian Com- 
mission of the Pacific, Mrs. Colonel Bowman, and afterwards, Mrs. Mary E. 
Keeney, president. 

The ladies of San Francisco held a fair for the commission, which yielded 
over $50,000 in currency. Festivals were held at Stockton, Sacramento, 
Napa, and other places ; money, in several localities, was given at the polls ; 
auxiliaries were established in Oregon and Nevada. At the close of the year 
1864, the commission had received from the Pacific coast over $117,000, and 
had been notified that $5,500 was on its way from the Sandwich Islands. 

The following tables give summaries of the total receipts, and of the work 
and distribution for the third year of the commission 1861: 

Cash receipts of Central and Branch offices $1,207,755 28 

Hospital stores contributed 1,1*69,508 37 

Publications contributed 33,084 38 

Bibles and Testaments presented by the American Bible Society 72,114 83 

Value of volunteer delegates' services 169,920 00 

Value of railroad, steamboat, and other transportation facilities 106,765 00 

Value of telegraph facilities, from Maine to California 26,450 00 

Value of rents of warehouses and offices given without charge to the com- 
mission 6,750 00 

Total values for 1864 $2,882,347 86 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF WORK AND DISTRIBUTION FOR 1864. 

Value of stores distributed $1,714,261 85 

Value of publications distributed $446,574 26 

Value of stationery distributed $24,834 71 

Value of 205 chapels and chapel tents erected during last winter and the 

present, in the various armies $114,359 78 

Boxes of hospital stores and publications distributed during the year 47,103 

Copies of Bibles and Testaments and portions of Scriptures distributed 

during the year 569,594 

Copies of hymn and psalm books distributed during the year 489,247 

Copies of knapsack books distributed during the year 4,326,676 

Copies of bound library books distributed during the year . 33,872 

Copies of magazines and pamphlets distributed during the year 346,536 

Copies of religious, weekly, and monthly newspapers distributed during the 

year 7,990,758 

Pages of tracts 13,681,342 

Copies of Silent Comforters, &c 3,691 

Delegates commissioned during the year 2,217 

Aggregate number of days of delegates' service 78,869 






LABORS OF THE DELEGATES. 359 

Average number of delegates constantly in the field during the year 217 

Number of delegates, in the field, January 1, 1865 276 

Balance of cash on hand at the central office, January 1, 1865 $5,420 12 

Balance on hand at all the offices $116,315 71 

The above figures show a very large increase in the resources, and, conse- 
quently, in the usefulness of the commission, over those for the previous 
years. This is ascribed to four causes : 1st, to the testimony of the soldiers, 
some of whom, at home on furlough or sick leave, told their story, personally, 
dwelling on the benefits they had received, and all of whom, apparently, had 
written letters, the commission having furnished them, during the year, with 
paper and envelopes for five millions ; 2d, the testimony of returned delegates, 
to whose evidence, obtained in this voluntary, unpaid service, none could 
listen unmoved ; 3d, to the emergencies of the year ; and 4th, to the fact, 
which has been mentioned, that the empty treasury appealed with irresistible 
effect to many who would not have contributed to well -filled coffers. 

A few words, now, upon the work accomplished during the year. The 
whole number of delegates sent out was two thousand two hundred and 
seventeen, the average number in the field at one time being two hundred and 
seventeen. Many of these were ministers, lawyers, physicians, merchants, and 
all were men of character and ability. They were unpaid ; the cost of each 
man's outfit and maintenance, at the charge of the commission, being at the 
rate of $319 a year. None were sent who could not agree to remain at least 
six weeks in the service. They were principally useful in relief work, being 
supplied with whatever was necessary to meet the emergencies of the field. 
But they discharged numerous other duties. They distributed tracts, Bibles, 
and reading-matter generally, and in this connection the remarkable statement 
is made, that the most urgent cry from the army has always been for the 
Scriptures, and that the supply has never kept pace with the demand. In 
consequence of this, it was proposed by the American Bible Society to divide 
the army, for the work of Scripture distribution, into three fields : Eastern, 
Western, and Southern, with a superintendent for each, paid by the Bible 
Society, subsisted by the commission. This proposition was accepted and 
carried out 

Other labors of the delegates were those of writing letters for the disabled 
and dying at their dictation, or of sending home information concerning the 
dead; of transmitting messages and mementoes; of keeping records concerning 
burial, and of registering and conveying intelligence upon innumerable matters, 
which, without them, must have been lost. Then, there was their direct work of 



360 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



preaching, praying with the sick, holding religious services, and administering 
the last rites. ' Their influence for good to the soldiers " this we can readily 
believe " cannot be understood by those who have not themselves witnessed 
it. Coming fresh from home, in citizens' dress, full of home sympathies, with 
physical energy unworn, zeal strengthened by knowledge that their stay must 
be short, and that the soldiers' peril is great ; having every facility for their 
work, chapels to preach in, stores and publications to distribute, quarters at 
the best possible centres, wagons and teams and battle-field supplies to go 
with when the army moves and fights, and, withal, having the men for whom 
they labor impressed in advance with the fact, that what they do is not done 
for pay, nor as professional duty, but for the love they bear to them and to 
Christ their influence could not but have unwonted power, and their labor a 
value above price." 




ARMY CORPS CHAPEL, NEAR PKTHKSBCBG. 



The first experience of chapel work, on a large scale, in the army, was 
made early in this year. Chapel tents were set up at all the stations of the 
commission, and competent men were appointed to serve in them. The com- 
mission furnished canvas chapel roofs to every brigade that was willing to put 
up log walls to support it. It then supplied them with stores, Bibles, and 
hymn-books, and delegated men to assist the chaplains in the service. At this 
time one hundred chapels were open for daily worship, and in some of them 
services were held three times a day. 



DIET KITCHENS. 361 

As winter approached, these chapels were increased both in number and 
size. One hundred and forty many of them really beautiful constructions 
were in constant use at the close of the year. They were filled every evening 
by an earnest and respectful throng ; and on Sundays, service succeeded ser- 
vice till the officiators were compelled, by sheer exhaustion, to desist. 

The work performed at the stations of the commission was varied and 
arduous. A delegate would start in the morning with an armful of papers 
and books, and making his way to some regiment or battery, perhaps a mile 
distant, distribute the contents of his pack. He would seek out the sick, and 
strive to give him just the thing he needed, whether sympathy, prayer, crea- 
ture-comforts, or reading-matter. He would invite all the men he saw to 
attend the evening meeting, or would propose the holding of a special open- 
air service, if desired. By personal conversation with the soldiers, he would 
often succeed in guiding their thoughts into unwonted channels, appealing to 
their better nature against the sins which beset them. " By no possible array 
of figures or statistics," we read, " can the influence of these winter stations be 
exhibited. None can ever know how much of sin they have prevented ; how 
many despondent, doubting Christians have been encouraged and strength- 
ened ; how many seeds of Divine truth, sown in hearts seemingly unmoved, 
were destined some future day to bring forth perfect fruit. None can reckon 
the value of that comfort given to the faithful soldier, who, in his hard pil- 
grimage, gained, in these tents of prayer, the Delectable Mountains, and caught 
a view of the Celestial City." 

A Special Diet Kitchen service was organized during this year, and was 
put fully in operation in the West, while a good beginning was made in the 
East. The conditions were these : that the Special Diet Kitchens should be kept 
apart from the general kitchens of the hospitals, and that they should supply 
the low-diet patients only; that they should be controlled and supplied by 
the medical authorities, the commission furnishing whatever the government 
did not ; and that they should be superintended by women, professed Chris- 
tians, selected and subsisted by the commission. Mrs. Anne Wittenmyer, 
of Iowa, was made General Superintendent, and her first report contains much 
interesting information. After stating the difficulties of obtaining delicate 
cooking for the very sick in a general hospital, she says, speaking of the 
superintendents under the new system : 

" The preparation of food and the management of kitchen affairs are made 
their business and study ; and all that can be done, in co-operation with sur- 
geons, to meet the demands of a feeble or capricious appetite, is done by them. 



362 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Regular diet lists, or bills of fare, are prepared and furnished to each ward 
surgeon, who, when he makes his daily round among the sick, is expected to 
prescribe their diet with as much care as he does their medicine. 

" All the patients in the hospital, who are not in a condition to go to the 
general table, or eat the food prepared in the general kitchens, have their 
meals ordered by the ward surgeons from the special diet kitchen. These diet 
lists, or orders, are returned to the diet kitchen, where the food is prepared in 
such variety and quantity as are embraced in the orders. The ladies charged 
with the responsible duty of superintending the preparation of diet and the 
general management of the diet kitchens, are given every facility by the sur- 
geons, and are provided with all the help they need. Soldiers incapacitated 
for active field duty are mostly detailed for this purpose. 

" The ladies (there are usually two connected with each kitchen) personally 
supervise the preparation and seasoning of every article of food, and are care- 
ful to see it go out to the wards, suitably prepared, and in sufficient quantity. 
Twenty-four diet kitchens on this plan are now in successful operation. 
They are kept perfectly clean and neat, are well furnished and supplied with 
stores, and every thing connected with the work is conducted in a systematic 
and orderly manner." 

Chaplain Thomas, of the Army of the Cumberland, had been detailed from 
his regiment by General Thomas, to act as reading-agent for the army. Ob- 
taining a valuable idea from the " Loan Libraries" of the " American Seamen's 
Friend Society," and laying certain views before the Christian Commission, 
he elaborated a scheme which the commission enabled him to carry out. The 
following details of this will be found interesting : 

Sixty book-cases were made at government expense, by order of General 
Thomas, and the War Department agreed to furnish two hundred and forty 
more. These were three feet square, and eight inches deep ; the corners were 
dove-tailed and bound with iron. Each case contained four shelves, and its 
two panel doors fastened by lock and key ; its strength was such that it might 
be hurled from a precipice and be found unharmed at the foot. A catalogue 
and register accompanied each case, which contained one hundred and twenty- 
five volumes, labelled, numbered, and covered. At the close of the year, 
twenty-five of these libraries had been placed in different hospitals, and the 
books had been bought for one hundred and seventy-five more. There were 
at this time eighty thousand men in the permanent hospitals of the country. 
The plan proposed the supplying of the hospitals first, and the army, active 
and afloat, if possible, afterwards. Several publishing houses furnished the 



BOOKS AND MAGAZINES FOR THE ARMY. 



363 



books at half price, which was, in some cases, less than cost. Adams' Express 
conveyed the books first, and the libraries next, free. No library was put 
into a hospital unless some responsible person, a chaplain or surgeon, or other 
official, would agree to take charge of it and to forward a monthly report : this 
to consist of two parts, a statistical table and illustrative incidents. The table 
was to show how many times each volume had been drawn, and the incidents 
were to contain such expressions of opinion about it as the librarian might be 
able to collect. 




A LAV DELEGATE IN TUB HOStl'lTAU 



Another idea of Chaplain Thomas, that of supplying the Army of the 
Cumberland with magazines, was adopted by the commission in April. 
Thirty-five thousand copies of various periodicals were purchased during 
the year, and sold in the depths of Tennessee and Georgia at the price they 
had cost in New York. Each magazine bore a label stating that it had been 
bought at wholesale rates, transported free by Adams' Express, and would be 
sold at the rooms, and by the distributors of the Christian Commission, at 
cost, to the army and navy only. A rule of the commission, that " lives of 
pirates and highwaymen must be thrown out as bad," in making selections 
of books, led Chaplain Thomas, as he himself relates, into a singular act. 
He met a soldier with a pile of twenty-five cent novels, of which he was 
endeavoring to dispose among his fellow-soldiers. He acknowledged that it 
would doubtless grieve his parents to know that he was peddling such trash, 
an item of it being the "Ked Eover," by one James Fenimore Cooper, 



364 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

whose works are not generally considered pernicious. The soldier was induced 
to exchange his pack for a batch of " Littell's Living Age," " Eclectic Maga- 
zines," and " Pitman's Manuals of Phonography," works which are probably 
no more deleterious in the camp than they are in the grove. Chaplain 
Thomas was doubtless deceived by a title which, in our day, would be called 
"sensational, "and besides, the Eover was in bad, very bad company; a Dick 
Turpin on each side of him, a Pirate's Son on Dick's either hand, with every 
now and then a Eed King and a Flying Artillerist. Thus surrounded, the 
Pilgrim's Progress, even, might have passed for some immoral book of 
travels, and been indignantly laid one side, together with The Bloody Cart- 
Wheel and The Phantom Bride. 

The Maryland Committee of the Christian Commission did a great work 
during this year, incited thereto by the Kev. Andrew B. Cross, of Baltimore. 
The dust at City Point, during the summer, was absolutely stifling. This, 
which was annoying in the camp, was almost unendurable in the hospital 
the tents and buildings of which covered forty acres. The cooking utensils, 
the food, the faces of the patients, were coated with dust. Water could not 
be obtained in sufficient quantities to lay the fiend and supply the hospital. 
A well was dug through the quicksand ; the government placed two engines 
by the river-side to force water up the bluff, but the relief obtained was slight. 
The Rev. Mr. Cross applied to Mayor Chapman, of Baltimore, for the loan of 
one of the steam fire-engines of the city. The request was granted, and an 
engine, with two thousand feet of hose, was at once conveyed to City Point. 
By means of this, not only was the dust effectually laid, but the hospital was 
supplied with pure water from the middle of the Appomatox, the government 
giving some hundreds of casks in which to hoard it. Steam had never yet 
been pressed into more grateful service. 

The commission was enabled to introduce into the army, by the liberality 
of Mr. Jacob Dunton, of Philadelphia, an establishment invented and built 
by him, and called a Cooking Wagon. This affair had four wheels, the two 
in front separating from those behind, as a cannon parts with its limber. It 
had boilers, furnaces, a fuel-box, a chest for provisions and utensils, a driver's 
seat above in front, and three smoke-stacks. It cooked first for the flying 
hospitals, afterwards for the men under fire. It once served a whole division 
with hot coffee to the sound of the enemy's guns. Here were coffee and 
pistols, but for more than two. 

The following table gives the aggregate value of the three years' receipts, 
to January 1, 1865, of the Christian Commission : 



31,296 32 
72,114 83 



TOTALS FOR THREE YEARS. 

Value of Receipts. 1S62. 1S63. ISfri. 

Cash receipts at central and 
branch offices $40,1(50 29 $358,239 29 $1,297,755 28 

Value of stores received by cen- 
tral and branch offices 142,150 00 385,829 07 1,169,508 37 

Value of publications presented 
to central and branch offices. . . 

Value of Scriptures from Amer- 
ican Bible Society 10,256 00 45,071 50 

Value of Scriptures from British 

and Foreign Bible Society 1,677 79 

Value of 29,801 hymn-books 
presented by Army Committee 
of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, Boston 

Value of delegates' services 21,360 00 72,420 00 

Value of railroad, steamboat, and 
other transportation facilities 13,680 00 44,210 00 

Value of telegraph facilities from 
Maine to California 3,650 00 9,390 00 

Value of rents of warehouses 
and offices presented to the 
commission . . 



365 

Totals. 

$1,696,154 86 

1,697,487 44 

31,296 32 

127,442 33 

1,677 79 



1,788 06 
169,920 00 


1,788 06 
263,700 00 


106,765 00 


164,655 00 


26,450 00 


39,490 00 



6,750 00 



6,750 00 



Totals $231,256 29 $916,837 65 $2,882,347 86 $4,030,441 80 

These figures tell but a halting story, however; and the supplementary 
data, at the close of the volume, for the last few months of the war, will not 
add much to their eloquence. The true significance of an enterprise thus 
feebly sketched will not be set down by any mortal penman ; the theme is 
one too lofty for earthly records. Doubtless there are, though removed from 
human eyes, tabular views kept in another way and for other ends ; and when 
the scroll is unrolled, those permitted to read it will see that where we write 
Dollars, the recording angel has written Immortal Souls. 



CHAPTEE X. 




& HE effort on the part of the friends of the negro race 
in the North to fit him for the responsibilities of 
freedom, began as soon as the operations of the army 
and navy opened the way/ The capture of Port 
Royal and Beaufort, by Flag-Officer Dupont and 
General Sherman, brought some eight thousand slaves, 
men, women, and children, within the United States lines, in the State of 
South Carolina. But there was a sharper need to be first relieved, however, 
than that of education ; the negroes, having passed so suddenly from slavery 
to freedom, were in the most abject misery, and were absolutely in a per- 
ishing condition. It was indispensable to commence by feeding the hungry 
and clothing the naked ; tins done, it might be possible to regenerate the now 



THE NEW ENGLAND FREEDMEX'S AID SOCIETY. 367 

enfranchised people, to reorganize labor, to open schools and churches, and to 
make a beginning towards training the freedmen in habits of honesty and self- 
reliance. 

The first society formed with these objects in view was " The New Eng- 
land Freedmen's Aid Society." This association had its origin in Boston, at 
the house of the Rev. Jacob M. Manning, in response to an appeal from Mr. 
E. L. Pierce, United States agent for the liberated slaves of Port Royal. An 
organization was effected on the 7th of February, 1862. the following officers 
being appointed : 

President, 
His EXCELLENCY JOHN A. ANDREW. 

Vice- Presiden ts, 

REV. JACOB M. MANNING, RET. J. F. CLARKE, D. D., 

REV. EDWARD E. HALE, HON. JACOB SLEEPER, 

REV. J. W. PARKER, D. D., REV. T. B. THAYER, 

RKV. F. D. HTNTINGTON. 

Treasurer, Recording Secretary, 

WILLIAM ENDICOTT, JUN. EDWARD ATKINSON. 

Committee on Finance. 

EDWARD ATKINSON. WM. ENDICOTT, JUN., 

MARTIN BRIMMER, WM. I. BOWDITCH, 

JAMES T. FISIIEK, JAMES M. BARNARD. 

Committee on Teachers. 

LoRING LOTHKOP. GfiO. B. EMERSON, 

Miss H. E. STEVENSON. DR. L. B. RUSSELL, 

MRS. ANNA LOWELL. REV. C. F. BARNARD. 

Committee on Clothing and Supplies. 

MKS. J. A. LANE, MRS. WM. B. ROGERS, 

MRS. SAMUEL CABOT. GEO. ATKINSON, 

EDWARD JACKSON. 

An appeal was forthwith issued to the people of New England for money 
and clothing, and the answer was so prompt that the society was at once able 
to commence the forwarding of supplies, and soon afterwards to dispatch 
thirty-one teachers and superintendents. The office of these teachers was not 
altogether to " teach" in the ordinary sense that is, to set the pupil a lesson, 
to see that he learned it, and then to hear him recite it. Some of them never 
entered a school-house. The negro had quite as much to unlearn as to learn. 
All the teachings of slavery were to be wiped away. He needed a knowledge 



368 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

which lay far behind the alphabet ; his poverty in book-learning was not his 
worst deficiency. He needed lessons of industry, of domestic management, of 
thrift, of truth, of honesty matters in which he had been wilfully led astray. 
And in these things the teachers commissioned by the society were amply 
fitted to give instruction, not only by precept, but by example. 

During the first three years the association employed two hundred and 
twenty teachers, three quarters of them women. The first went to Port Eoyal, 
as we have said ; as the field was extended, and as the government began to 
aid the society by giving its delegates transportation, shelter, and army rations, 
others were sent to Washington, Alexandria, Newbern, Norfolk, St. Helena, 
Jacksonville, Edisto Island, Savannah, and Charleston. The association 
thought best to concentrate its efforts upon these points, and to leave other 
stations to societies situated in their own more immediate neighborhood. 

The effect of the three years' work upon the negroes of Port Eoyal is 
marked, and at this late day no one cares to question or deny it. "They 
have made wonderful progress in knowledge and comfort, in manners and 
morals. They are self-supporting ; they are prosperous ; they are valuable 
producers; they are profitable customers; and one out of three of the whole 
population has received more or less instruction in the schools." 

In the Third Annual Eeport of the society is the following excellent 
point, excellently made : 

" We have hinted at a comparison between the negro freedman, as respects 
industry, and the Italian peasant. Suppose that we should read in the Journal 
of the Friends of Italy, this : 

" It is only three years since the drawbacks on Italian national industry 
have been removed, and here are a few facts. The sales last year to people 
recently common day-laborers at San Felice (not St. Helena) amounted to 
fifty-six thousand scudi, and lately at a sale at Velletri (not Beaufort) the 
same class of people bought, with their earnings, from seventy-five to eighty 
houses, costing in the aggregate about $40,000. What an argument for the 
new over the old system would be further statements like these : Tomaso 
Pelucci (not black Harry) sold last year $1,358 worth of cotton, besides rais- 
ing corn, pork, and potatoes enough for his family ; and Grennaro Scapi, ex- 
contadino (not Kit Green, ex-slave), sold his cotton for $4,100. The industry 
and practical efficiency of no class of men, whether white or black, can be 
measured by what they have done under an oppressive rule, with none of the 
incitement which comes only from free institutions." 

It might be added to this, that the records of the War Department show 



THE NATIONAL FREEDMEN^ RELIEF ASSOCIATION. 369 

that the government has aided more whites than blacks, during the war, by 
forty thousand. ' ' 

The monetary and supply statistics of the society are as follows, in round 
numbers : 

Money received in 1862 $16.400 00 

Value of goods received in 1862 20,000 00 

Money received in 1863 18,500 00 

Value of goods received in 1863 20,000 00 

Money received in 1864 36,000 00 

Value of goods received in 1864 25,000 00 



Total. $135,900 00 

New England contributed nearly the whole of these supplies, and Massa- 
chusetts three quarters of the money. Besides this, it will be remembered, as 
stated in our account of the Western Sanitary Commission, that Chaplains 
Fiske and Fisher collected $40,000 in money and clothing, in New England, 
for the freedmen of the Southwest. We may also state that $9,000 were 
obtained in Boston for the Eoanoke Colony, and that New England has fur- 
nished the National Freedmen's Relief Association of New York with a large 
portion of its supplies. 

The society just mentioned, the National Freedmen's Relief Association, 
originated at a meeting held in New York, on the 22d of February, 1862. 
Like the New England Society, its first object was to relieve the freedmen of 
Port Royal and vicinity. Its first officers were as follows : 

President, 
FRANCIS GEORGE SHAW. 

Corresponding Secretary, Recording Secretary, 

REV. O. B. FROTHINGHAM. GEORGE CABOT WARD. 

Treasurer, 
JOSEPH B. COLLINS. 

Finance Committee, 

GEORGE CABOT WARD, JOSEPH B. COLLINS, 

CHARLES C. LEIGH. 

Executive Committee, 

C. C. LEIGH, CHARLES COLLINS, 

REV. HENRY J. Fox, WM. GEO. HAWKINS, Secretary. 

Advisory Committee, 
S. H. TTNG, D. D., WM. C. BRYANT. 

Law Committee, 

WM. ALLEN BUTLER, EDGAR KETCHUM. 

24. 



370 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

The objects of the society thus formed were stated in an appeal to the pub- 
lic for the means with which to carry them out, as follows : 

" 1st. To relieve the sufferings of the freedmen, as they come within our 
army lines, by clothing the ragged and naked, furnishing hospitals and medi- 
cine for the sick, asylums for the orphans, and shelter for the houseless, and 
aiding in the erection of hundreds of cabins. 

" 2d. To aid in placing the freedmen in positions of self-sustenance, by 
procuring them employment, furnishing them agricultural implements and 
seeds, giving them instruction in the best modes of cultivation, and encourag- 
ing the mechanic by furnishing tools and stock to the carpenter, blacksmith, 
and shoemaker. 

" 3d. To establish and sustain schools at all points in the South, where it 
is safe to do so, for the education of the freedmen and their children ; day- 
schools for children and youth, night-schools for adults, industrial schools to 
teach the women to cut and make clothes for themselves and families, and 
Sunday-schools for religious instruction. 

"4th. Relief to be also furnished to suffering white loyal refugees, to the 
extent of the means contributed for this specific object" 

At a later date, the society said of itself and its labors : 

" It has been no part of the work of this association to inquire into 
causes, or to speculate on the future of the negro. We find him naked, and 
we clothe him ; ignorant, and we instruct him ; without employment, and we 
give him the materials to earn a livelihood. We find him wounded and bleed- 
ing by the wayside, left half dead by thieves who have robbed him of all he 
possessed ; ours is to bring him to the inn at Jerusalem, and take care of 
him." 

The work thus laid out has been faithfully done, as far as the means 
placed at the society's disposal has enabled it to go. The progress of the 
war soon brought two millions of enfranchised men, women, and children 
within the United States lines. Kept ignorant, almost brutalized, in time of 
peace, they had been set free, and placed in a position to test their capacity 
for freedom, by war. All were necessarily degraded, though in various 
degrees. The old, the infirm, the children, were in a state of utter destitution. 
The husbands and fathers enlisted by thousands in the armies of their coun- 
try, leaving, of course, their families in a state of dependence. Here was the 
field in which this society and its kindred associations had to labor. 

How to obtain the two great requisites for a successful beginning money 
and clothing was, of course, the first and the vital question. This seemed 



SOURCES OF SUPPLY. 371 

already answered in the experience of the Sanitary Commission, and the 
much older practice of the Bible, Tract, and Missionary Societies by means 
of local, town, and village auxiliaries. These local societies should canvass 
exhaustively their own districts, soliciting old clothing from those who could 
not give money, and money from those who had no clothing. This scheme, 
carried into effect, principally in New England, gave the National Association, 
in three years, over $400,000 in cash and stores. This was collected from all 
the free states and territories ; from England, Ireland, Scotland, and Canada, 




THE IDEAL FREKDMAN.* 



Without going into details, for which we have not space, we may say, gen- 
erally, that partly by the efforts of this society, partly by those of kindred 
associations, very considerable districts of the South have been reorganized 
and reconstructed. " In the Sea Islands of South Carolina, where the experi- 
ment was first made, and where the subjects were the least promising, large 

* From a statuette, by J. Q. A. Ward. 



372 THE TRIBUTE BOOK 

herds of imbrnted slaves have been converted into orderly communities of law- 
abiding freemen. Under a system of elementary instruction improvised for 
their benefit, blank ignorance has given place to comparative intelligence, 
chattel slaves have become landed proprietors, black men are tilling the soil 
on their own account, agriculture has received a new impulse, and Trade has 
added materially to the number of her customers." 

The New York Society had, at the date of its last report, one hundred and 
thirty-five teachers in the field, and was supporting four orphan asylums and 
four industrial schools. 

A society, having the same objects in view as those of the two associa- 
tions just mentioned, was organized in Philadelphia, on the 5th of March, 
1862, under the name of The Port Koyal Eelief Committee. This was subse- 
quently changed to that of " The Pennsylvania Freedmen's Eelief Association/' 
This society had, at a recent date, acknowledged the receipt of $61,000 in 
money, expended in the purchase of supplies, in the erection and support 
of hospitals, and in the establishment and maintenance of sixteen schools, 
taught by thirty-eight teachers ; had purchased property and erected build- 
ings in Washington for a residence for teachers, a store for the receipt and 
distribution of goods for the poor, an industrial school for instruction in 
cutting and sewing, and a normal school for training advanced and promising 
scholars as teachers. It had founded two important auxiliary societies in 
Pittsburgh and Maryland, the former of which obtained $5,000 in the first 
few hours of its existence. 

The Orthodox Friends' Association of Philadelphia, founded in Novem- 
ber, 1863, had, at a recent date, received $130,000, of which $30,000 were 
contributed by Friends in England. They had twenty-two teachers at work, 
had opened two stores in Virginia, with a capital of $8,000 loaned without 
interest, for the purpose of furnishing goods to the freedmen at or near cost. 
In seven months the sales had been about $110,000. They had under their 
care an orphan house for girls at Hampton, Virginia; had sent out persons 
to give instruction in agricultural pursuits, and had given away, lent, or sold 
for less .than their value, large numbers of farming-tools, mechanics' instru- 
ments, and seeds. 

The Hicksite Friends' Association had received $10,000 up to the same 
date, and had expended it in aiding the freedmen. 

The Northwestern Freedmen'' s Aid Society of Chicago received in its first 
fifteen months, ending March, 1865, $137,000 in money and stores ; $10,000 
of the cash receipts were earned by a Freedmen's Fair. 



THE BIRD'S-NEST BANK OF KALAMAZOO. 373 

There axe other societies laboring in behalf of the freedmen those of 
Cincinnati; of the District of Columbia; of "Worcester, Massachusetts; of 
Concord, New Hampshire. The associations of New York and Boston have 
branches throughout the New England and Northwestern States. Two foreign 
societies have been liberal in their contributions to the work the Freedmen's 
Aid Society of London, and the Union and Emancipation Society of Man- 
chester. 

A more harmonious and united action has always been desired by the 
various societies above mentioned ; seeking but one object, they might natu- 
rally expect greater success to follow a concentration of their efforts. At one 
period, five of them agreed to come together, to form the " United States 
Commission for the Eelief of the National Freedmen." At another, three of 
them united to form the " American Freedmen's Aid Union." The first object 
of the latter was stated to be to aid the black man ; its ultimate end to benefit 
the state. A better nucleus around which to cluster has now been presented 
by the government, in the Freedmen's Bureau lately established by Congress, 
and superintended by Major-General Oliver Otis Howard. There would seem 
to be no reason why the freed men's relief associations, which, from the nature 
of their mission and the extent of their work, must still continue to exist, 
should not supplement the operations of this bureau the creation of which 
they have always desired precisely as the Sanitaiy Commission has supple- 
mented those of the medical staff. 

We must make room for one instance, out of thousands, of the sacrifices 
by which these associations have been maintained. It is furnished by the 
Boston Freedmen's Eecord : 

" One friend who, for a third of a century, has, with her pen, instructed 
the free and pleaded for the slave, and whose income is about $800 per annum 
sent to this office, last winter, $200 for the freedmen. In the spring, the 
same liberal hand brought $50. In the summer, an engraving of one of 
Raphael's Madonnas was given to her. Its beauty would have gladdened her 
heart, had she hung it on the wall of her simple home in Middlesex County ; 
but, with characteristic generosity, she brought the gift, so precious to her 
refined taste, to be sold by the Committee on Teachers, for the benefit of the 
freed people. And now, again, the same tireless liberality has sent us this 
month $100 more." 

And we must relate the story of the Bird's-Nest Bank of Kalamazoo, no 
matter what other story is, in consequence, excluded. The dollars deposited 
in this bank are not numerous, but there is a fund of another sort there, and 




ORIGIN OF THE BIRD 8-NE8T 



374 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

it would be difficult for any sufferer to overdraw his account. The story runs 
as follows : 

A collection of Sabbath-school children, in Kalamazoo, Michigan, were, 
and doubtless still are, in the habit of meeting together in their chapel, called 
the Bird's-Nest, on Sunday. In February, 1864, a soldier from the First 
Michigan Cavalry, encamped near by, entered the chapel, sat down, and list- 
ened. When the plate was passed around, he put in 
his penny, saying, "Here is a penny I found in the 
bottom of my pocket, and it won't grow there ; now I 
want to deposit it with the ' Bird's-Nest,' and see if 
it will grow THERE." The teacher took the penny, 
held it up, and repeated what the soldier had said, 
adding, " Now we must see if we can put this into a 
go j^ where it can take root and grow." The penny 
was immediately purchased for ten cents by the mother of one of the children, 
and, as additions were, from time to time, made to the fund thus commenced, 
it was determined to select some good object which the growth of the penny 
should benefit. The following resolutions were soon after passed : 

"Whereas, a soldier of the First Michigan Cavalry deposited with the 
' Bird's-Nest,' in February, 1864, a penny for growth, the following rules will 
be observed in carrying out this object : 

" I. This enterprise shall be called the Bird's-Nest Bank. 
" II. Any person becomes a stockholder in this bank by paying ten cents 
to the teacher, and will receive a certificate for the same. 

"III. Eight tenths of all moneys received from the sale of stock will be 
used for the education of freedmen, and two tenths for the benefit of the 
Bird's-Nest, under the direction of the teacher." 

The children of the school now devoted their leisure their Wednesday 
and Saturday afternoons to the sale of shares in this interesting enterprise. 
Three little girls, of Ann Arbor, disposed of eighty-nine in less than a 
month. A soldier of the Massachusetts Thirty-third, in Atlanta, sent for 
seven certificates, to be divided among his seven children. By the time seven 
hundred shares had been disposed of, the president and directors of the bank 
were saddened by the news of the death of its founder, who was called away 
from his cot in an Alexandria hospital, forgetting, perhaps, that he had not 
buried his talent in a napkin, and all unconscious that the penny deposited 
for growth had produced just seven thousand fold. The president and direct- 
ors took the penny, polished it, drilled a hole through it, and caused it to be 



A LETTER FROM THE BIRDS OF OHIO. 375 

suspended on Sundays in the Bird's-Nest Chapel, by a ribbon of red, white, 
and blue. 

In one year from its foundation, the bank had sold two thousand four hun- 
dred shares, every loyal state being represented upon its books except we 
write it with reluctance Maryland and Rhode Island. It had sent certificates 
to South Carolina and Canada, to England and Scotland ; and, like the gold- 
bearing bonds of the government, its stock was favorablv known in Frankfort 

o c %/ 

and at Bingen-on-the-Rhine. A branch office was opened at the Chicago Fair 
for the freedmen, and the sale of stock was good. An old gentleman, of 
ninety -three years, from Leicester, Massachusetts, took one share, and an Iowa 
grandmother, who had grandchildren twenty-three, subscribed for a certificate 
for each. It is idle for us, after thus chronicling the success of this bank, and 
the rapid dissemination of its obligations, to deny the prevalent rumor, that 
the directors had been obliged to ask the assistance of Mr. Jay Cooke. Mr. 
Cooke, we are authorized to state, is not an agent of the Bird's-Nest ; he has 
sold none of its shares, and we are not aware that he has ever bought any. 
Persons wishing to invest in a stock whose dividends are payable to others, 
must write directly to head-quarters, to the Bird's-Nest Bank at Kalamazoo, 
inclosing, say one dollar for ten shares. The attention of citizens of Mary- 
land and Rhode Island is especially invited to this privilege. Anne Arundel 
could not more wisely appropriate her pocket-money. From the correspond- 
ence of the president and directors, which is open to the inspection of all, we 
make the following ornithological extract : 

"The Birds of Kirtland (Ohio), to the Robins, Thrushes, Orioles, Quails, Bob- 
olinks, Sparrows, and Humming-birds of Kalamazoo, send greeting: 
"MosT AMIABLE BIRDS: 

" Truly, there is hope for the world when the little birds assemble in flocks 
under the same tree, and live peacefully and lovingly in a single nest. We 
have heard in other times of the Feathered Kingdom. That day is past, and 
a great revolution is in progress nay, it is already successful. All hail to the 
Feathered Republic ! The Eagle, no longer the king and tyrant of any, has 
become the president and protector of all the birds. We still hear the 
screaming of the Hawks, and the hooting of the Owls, but we do not admit 
tJiem to our society, and we trust they find no place in your nest ; for, although 
the Hawks pretend to chivalry, and the Owls to wisdom, they will do you no 
good they will add nothing to your wealth or enjoyment. It gives us great 
pleasure to know that you concern yourselves with all the birds of our land, 
and especially with those called the Wandering Blackbirds; for, although they 



376 THE TRIBUTE BOOK 

cannot boast the brilliant plumage of the Orioles and Humming-birds, we all 
know that they have kind and social natures and a pleasant song, and that the 
great Father of all the birds loves them dearly, and is pleased when the other 
birds try to do them good. The Hawks and Owls have long oppressed them ; 
have broken their eggs, devoured their young ones, and destroyed their homes ; 
but we trust that you give them a cordial welcome to your nest, and that, by 
the profits of your admirable bank, they will ere long be made as comfortable 
and prosperous as the rest of the birds. 

" One of the Kirtland birds, Lennie B. by name, who is eight years old, 
has received from the old and young birds of this vicinity five dollars and 
twenty cents, which he wishes to deposit in your bank, for their benefit." 

This is the story, and if it could be brought to the knowledge of that 
class of our population which robs birds'-nests on Wednesday and Saturday 
afternoons, and even plays truant on other afternoons for the same purpose, 
we think it would break up the habit. 

But aid might be extended to black freemen as well as to black freedmen. 
There was already one method open to those who wished well to the negro in 
the North that was to enable him to prove his manhood by fighting for his 
country. Negro regiments had already been raised in Massachusetts under 
the direct auspices of the state, the regiments being numbered and their 
officers appointed, precisely as if they were white. Obstacles existed to this 
course in Pennsylvania and New York : there regiments could be raised under 
United States authority only, and for this considerable sums of money were 
necessary. A number of gentlemen took the matter in hand in Philadelphia, 
in the spring of 1863, and the result of their action was the appointment of 
a " Supervisory Committee for Recruiting Colored Troops," of which Thomas 
Webster was made Chairman, Cadwalader Biddle, Secretary, and Singleton 
Mercer, Treasurer. The subscriptions which were solicited by this committee 
were to be expended in "defraying extraordinary expenses attending the 
recruiting of three colored regiments for the war." Though these expenses 
had been $30,000 per regiment in Massachusetts, the committee ventured to 
say that with $30,000 in hand they could recruit three regiments, and 
appealed to the citizens for that amount of money. Somewhat more than 
this was readily obtained. * 

The first squad of eighty men was sent to Camp William Penn on the 
26th of June, and on the 24th of July the first regiment, called the Third 
United States Colored Troops, was full. It left camp on the 13th of August, 
and was in front of Fort Wagmer when that work was abandoned. 



RELIEF FOR THE VICTIMS OF THE RIOTS. 377 

The second regiment, the Sixth United States, was full on the 13th of Sep- 
tember, and left camp for Yorktown on the 14th of October. 

The third regiment, the Eighth United States, was full on the 4th of De- 
cember, and left camp for Hilton Head on the 16th of January, 1864. 

The committee had now fulfilled their pledge, but they still pursued their 
self-imposed task, recruiting and dispatching the Twenty-second and Twenty- 
fifth United States during the months of February and March. Not content 
with this, they opened a free military school at their head-quarters, under the 
direction of Colonel John H. Taggart, for the education of officers of colored 
regiments. All the students sent from this institution before the Examining 
Board at Washington, passed and received commissions. 

And now another opportunity was presented. Soon after the quelling of 
the draft riots in New York, in the second week of July, 1863, in which the 
negroes, both men and women, underwent frightful persecutions, a meeting of 
merchants was held to devise measures for their relief. The following gen- 
eral committee was appointed : 

BENJ. B. SHERMAN, JACKSON S. SCHULTZ, SAMUEL WILLETS, 

JOHN D. McKENziE, EDWARD CROMWELL, WM. W. WICKES, 

JONATHAN STURGES, RICHARD P. BUCK, W. ALLAN, 

GEO. C. COLLINS, WM. II. LEE, CHAS. E. BEEBE, 

WM. A. BOOTH, HORACE GRAY, JR., A. R. WETMORE, 

A. F. OCKERSHAUSEN, WM. E. DODGE, JOSEPH B. COLLINS. 

T. C. DOREMUS, 

At an adjourned meeting, held July 20th, Jonathan Sturges addressed 
those present, and, in the course of his remarks, spoke as follows : 

" I have been forty-one years a merchant in my present location. During 
this period I have seen a noble race of merchants pass away. I cannot help 
calling to mind the many acts of charity which they performed during their 
lives. I hardly need to name them ; you all know them. You know how 
they sent relief to southern cities when they were desolated by fire or pesti- 
lence ; how they sent ship-loads of food to the starving people of Ireland ; this 
last act of brotherly love we have had the privilege of imitating during the 
past winter ; and as often as occasion requires, I trust we shall be quick to 
continue these acts of humanity, thus showing that the race of New York 
merchants is not deteriorating. We are now called upon to sympathize with a 
different class of our fellow-men. Those who know the colored people of this 
city, can testify to their being a peaceable, industrious people, having their 
own churches, Sunday-schools, and charitable societies ; and that, as a class, 
they seldom depend upon charity ; they not only labor to support themselves, 



378 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

but to aid those who need aid. This is their general character, and it is our 
duty to see that they are protected in their lawful labors, to save themselves 
from becoming dependent on the charity of the city. We have not come 
together to devise means for their relief because they are colored people, 
but because they are, as a class, persecuted and in distress at the present 
moment. It is not necessary for our present purposes to inquire who the 
men are who have persecuted, robbed, and murdered them. We know they 
are bad men, who have not done as they would be done by. Let us not 
follow their example ; let us be quick to relieve those who are now in trouble, 
and should we ever find those who have persecuted the negroes in like 
trouble, let us be quick to relieve them also, and thus obey the injunction of 
our Divine Master: 'Bless those who persecute you.' " 

An executive committee of the following gentlemen was then appointed : 

JOHN D. HcKfixziE, Chairman. JONATHAN STURGES, Treasurer. 

GEO. C. COLLINS, Secretary. 

JAOKSOX S. SCHULTZ, A. R. WETMOKE, 

JOSEPH B. COLLINS, EDWARD CROMWELL. 

Subscriptions were now in order, and Mr. Edward Cromwell stated that 
he was authorized by members of the Produce Exchange to hand to the 
treasurer their check for $800, on account. This was subsequently increased 
to $1,511. Subscriptions to the amount of $6,500 were recorded before the 
meeting adjourned. Mr. Vincent Colyer was soon after made secretary, and 
was authorized to secure a suitable central office. From Mr. Colyer's report 
of the manner in which the fund, which reached, in the aggregate, $41,086.08, 
was administered, the following facts are gathered: 

The negroes, driven from the city by fear of death at the hands of the 
mob, had taken refuge on Blackwell's Island, at the police stations, in swamps 
and woods in New Jersey, in the barns and outhouses of farmers of Long 
Island. Five thousand men, women, and children, absolutely homeless and 
penniless, were collected in these places. To restore their confidence by 
establishing some central point at which they could receive aid, and where 
they would be protected from violence, was the first point to be gained. , This 
was done ; an office was secured in Fourth Street, and opened for business on 
the 23d of July. On the first day, thirty -eight applicants received aid ; on 
the second, three hundred and eighteen ; and on the third, three thousand 
negroes, all wearing the marks of abject misery, some of them presenting the 
unhealed evidences of abuse, filled the neighboring streets. The soldiers of 
the Twelfth Regiment of State Troops, whose quarters were in an upper story 



RECRUITING OF COLORED TROOPS IN NEW YORK. 379 

of the building, threw out their rations to the throng, when a pitiable scramble 
to obtain them followed. 

During the month ending August 21st, six thousand three hundred and 
ninety-two adults, representing twelve thousand seven hundred and eighty- 
two persons, had been relieved. The aid extended was principally in money, 
a small portion being in clothing. Messrs. James S. Stearns and Cephas 
Brainerd, assisted by other gentlemen, made out, without charge, over one 
thousand claims for damages against the city. Of the men relieved, exactly 
one half were laborers and 'longshoremen, the larger part of the remainder 
being white washers, porters, waiters, carmen, sailors, coachmen, and cooks. 
Two thirds of the women worked by the day, the rest being principally 
servants, seamstresses, and cooks. 

As soon as the more pressing necessities of the sufferers were relieved, four 
clerks were discharged, and four colored clergymen employed in their places. 
These persons visited applicants for aid at their homes, making in all three 
thousand visits, and relieving the wants of one thousand men and women. 
Ninety -five per cent, of the individuals who asked assistance were found 
to be worthy of it, and the proportion of vicious and indolent persons was 
not found to be greater than among the more favored classes of society. 

The sum of $60,000 was raised in New York for the benefit of the mem- 
bers of the police, fire department, and national guard, injured in the riots. 
Of the police, several had been killed and several dangerously wounded. 

And now commenced the recruiting of colored regiments in New York ; 
this measure, if not hastened by the riots, was certainly not postponed an hour 
by them. 

On the 12th of November, 1863, the Union League Club of New York 
appointed a committee of seven members, to adopt and prosecute such 
measures as they might deem most effectual, to aid the government in raising 
and equipping the quota of volunteers required of the city. The committee 
consisted of the following gentlemen : 

ALEXANDER VAN RENSSELAER, Chairman. JAMES A. ROOSEVELT, Treasurer. 

GEO. BLISS, JR., Secretary. 

LE GRAND B. CANNON, ELLIOT C. COWDIN, 

CHAS. P. KIRKLAND, SHERMAN J. BACON. 

The first plan discussed was that of raising a fund to pay additional 
bounties to volunteers. This was finally rejected, in the belief that though it 
might fill certain regiments, it would not add to the aggregate number of 
soldiers in the service. On the 22d of the month a letter was addressed to 



380 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Governor Seymour, asking his authority to raise a regiment, or a number of 
companies, of colored men in the state. Receiving no encouragement in this 
quarter, they applied to the Secretaiy of War, making the following statement : 
" Our sole bond of association is an unflinching determination to support the 
government. We have subscribed a large sum, to be appropriated to the 
raising of a colored regiment, and can procure much more. We believe that 
by our exertions and influence we can, with the permission of the government, 
put in the field a regiment worthy to stand side by side with the Fifty-fourth 
Massachusetts." 

Authority to recruit the " Twentieth Regiment United States Colored 
Troops " was soon after received from Washington, and the committee at once 
applied themselves to use it. Mr. Vincent Colyer was made superintendent 
of recruiting, and in this position his experience acquired in North Carolina, 
under General Burnside, was in the highest degree valuable. 

At first the colored men of New York showed no great willingness to 
enlist. They had hardly recovered from the terrors consequent upon the riots 
of July ; agents, moreover, from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode 
Island, had already secured and taken away those most desirous of fighting 
for their country ; and the conduct of the sub-agents engaged in recruiting 
for other regiments was of a nature to alarm and deter the rest. As soon as 
it was known that negroes would be received, runners of the vilest sort rushed 
into the work. Negroes were deceived into enlisting by the grossest pre- 
tences ; they were seized, drugged, and hurried off to the rendezvous. These 
practices were not confined to the city, but were of daily occurrence upon the 
great highways of travel leading to New York. The blacks naturally became 
afraid of all men who offered bounties for entering government service, and 
the agents of the committee were often set upon and driven off by persons 
who had been previously maltreated and outraged. 

The means adopted to correct these evils, and to convince the colored 
population that they were to be fairly treated, were, in the first place, public 
meetings, held in the colored churches. Addresses were made by distin- 
guished gentlemen and by their own pastors, in which assurances were held 
out that all recruits should be honestly dealt with. Secondly, circulars and 
hand-bills were issued, stating correctly the amount of bounties and wages 
the recruit would receive, and the right of their families to their share of the 
Relief Fund. These statements, endorsed by eight colored clergymen, were 
distributed widely through the state. In the third place, the Rev. Mr. 
Garnet visited Riker's Island, heard the complaints of those who had been 



THE RECRUITS AND THE STATE BOUNTY. 



381 



defrauded, and General Dix at once took measures to arrest and punish the 
offenders. 

Kecruits were now obtained as rapidly as they could be accommodated. 
Squads arriving in the city too late for the steamer plying between the shore 
and the rendezvous in the river, were kept over night at the quarters which 
had been obtained in Fourth Street, and provided with meals. They came by 
fifties at a time ; the Eev. Mr. Le Vere offered himself, with the larger por- 
tion of the male members of his congregation. William Derickson, whose 




PAEADE OF TUB TWEXTIETU U. 8. COLORED TROOPS IN NEW TCSi 

mother was murdered by the mob in July, whose clothes had been saturated 
with camphene, who had been covered with straw in the street, and who had 
been rescued by the police as the match was being applied, was one of the 
earliest volunteers. Many of these men left situations where they were earn- 
ing from thirty to sixty dollars a month. 

The time was now approaching when the recruits were to receive their 
state bounty of seventy-five dollars each man. They naturally desired to 
send a portion to their families, but as their post-office address was often too 
obscure to be found by the letter-carrier, they dared not send by mail ; and 
the hostility to the blacks was so great that the women and- children were 
afraid to venture on the wharf, or on board the steamer plying to and from the 
island. The committee, therefore, chartered a steamer for this special service, 



382 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

and fourteen hundred women and children were carried to the rendezvous on 
the 2d and 3d of March, 1864. Hundreds of baskets were searched by the 
guard, but not a bottle of liquor was found. Forty thousand dollars were 
brought away by their relatives from the men of the Twentieth United States. 

This regiment having been filled, and another, the Twenty-sixth, having 
been recruited to the maximum by the 1st of February, authority was asked 
and received to raise a third, to be called the Thirty-first, though it was 
thought probable that the effort would fail, as more than half the able-bodied 
negroes had actually enlisted. In the mean time, on the 5th of March, the 
Twentieth Eegiment left for New Orleans. A superb stand of colors, the 
regimental flag embroidered from a design furnished by Leutze, was presented 
with great ceremony in Union Square, in behalf of some one hundred and 
fifty ladies, the mothers, wives, and sisters of the gentlemen by whose exer- 
tions the regiment had been raised. The Twenty-sixth left New York on the 
27th of March for Annapolis and Beaufort, a severe storm preventing the 
intended farewell ceremonial. 

Eecruiting for the Thirty-first proceeded slowly, as was expected. The 
State of New York had, according to the census of 1860, but about twenty- 
three thousand colored males, of whom nine thousand only were of the mili- 
tary age. Of these, five thousand would, in the ordinary ratio, be able-bodied 
and fit for service, and two thousand two hundred of the five thousand had 
already volunteered. A portion of the remainder, probably fifteen hundred, 
had entered into regiments belonging to other states, and several hundreds of 
others were in government employ as servants or teamsters. Three compa- 
nies were, however, filled, and were ordered away in April, under the senior 
captain ; a consolidation was effected with three hundred men raised in Con- 
necticut, thus forming a battalion under a lieutenant-colonel. The battalion 
lost heavily in the battle of the crater at Petersburg, but was afterwards filled 
to the maximum, and a colonel was appointed to the command. 

The expenses of the committee in raising these three regiments were 
$19,000. The League had already raised $20,000 for the purpose, and would 
have furnished as much more as the committee had called for. More was not 
raised simply because it was not wanted. The conduct of the troops thus 
put in the field was such as to gratify those who had given their means or 
used their influence to further the measure, to silence those who had opposed 
it, and finally, when too late, to provoke a similar innovation on the part of the 
enemy. 



CHAPTEE XI. 

INTERNATIONAL RELIEF. 





THE GEORGE GKISWOLD, LADEN WITH BRF.AD6TCPT8. 



A STATE of things in the manufacturing districts of England, which had 
long been looked upon as inevitable, in consequence of the scarcity of cotton 
and the stagnation of American markets, existed, especially in Lancashire, in 
the summer and fall of 1862. In July, the large manufacturers began to close 
their mills, and in October one half of the operatives were out of employment, 



384 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

while the remainder were working on short time. On the 1st of December, 
two hundred and fifty thousand persons were receiving parish relief in Lan- 
cashire, and as many more in Derbyshire were wholly dependent upon charity. 
In Glasgow and Paisley, in Belfast and Ballymena, the distress was hardly less 
acute. Death from starvation, or from disease induced by insufficient food, 
had already taken place, and winter was close at hand. 

The idea of sending relief from America had been broached in several 
quarters, and a meeting was finally called in New York for the 4th of 
December, to take counsel on the propriety of such action. The attendance 
was large, and resolutions were unanimously passed, approving the object of 
the call, and advising that measures of relief be at once adopted. A letter 
was read from Messrs. N. L. & George Griswold, in which these gentlemen, 
after suggesting that a national subscription be set on foot, offered the use 
of a new ship, of eighteen hundred tons, for the conveyance of supplies, 
and their own services, if needed. Another letter was then read as follows : 

" NEW YORK, December 4, 1862. 

" To the Chairman of the Committee for sending Aid to the Operatives of 
Lancashire : 

u DEAR SIR : I rejoice to see that our people are about to open the door 
of our bursting granaries, to send relief to the starving operatives of Lan- 
cashire. 

" The poor fellows have acted nobly ; famishing men, surrounded by their 
wives and little ones, ' faint, and at the point to die,' will not join the clamor 
of interested leaders. 

" The value of our unity as a nation is well understood by them, and 
they refuse to part with their birthright in this land of promise. 

" We offer them freely a welcome and a homestead ; and now that the 
blow, aimed at our existence, has fallen upon them too, shall we, who feed 
and heal those who aimed that blow when war brings them into our power, 
refuse these poor, innocent sufferers a helping hand in this winter of their 
calamity ? 

" No ! thank God, we have bread and to spare, and they will not say, ' I 
was an hungered, and ye gave me no meat.' 

"Will you add to your list 'One Thousand Barrels of Flour,' from one 
whose loaf will taste the sweeter for sharing it with a famished brother, and 
brand it 'UNION.' " 

A check for $7,000, to pay for these thousand barrels, accompanied the 



INTERNATIONAL RELIEF. 38o 

letter. The check was signed by John C. Green, who afterwards gave $5,000 
more. 

Thus a good ship and part of her cargo were already obtained. Stimu- 
lated by these honorable examples, the merchants of New York responded 
liberally to the appeal, and $26,000 were subscribed at once. A committee 

of seventeen was appointed, as follows : 

* 

Chairman, 
JOHN C. GREEN. 

Secretary, Treasurer, 

JOHN TAYLOK JOHNSTON. A. A. Low. 

J. J. ASTOR, JR., ROBERT L. KENNEDY, 

SAMUEL D. BABCOCK, CHAS. H. MARSHALL, 

S. B. CHITTENDEN, THOMAS TILESTON, 

WILLIAM C. DODGE, EDWIN D. MORGAN, 

GEORGE GRIS\VOLD, ROBERT B. MINTURN, 

MOSES TAYLOR, JOHN J. PHELPS, 

JOHN JAY, A. T. STEWART. 

Additions to the committee were subsequently made, till it finally con- 
sisted of eighty-six members. An appeal " to the American people in behalf 
of the suffering operatives of Great Britain" was immediately .issued. A 
committee appointed by the Chamber of Commerce subsequently fused with 
the committee of merchants ; while another, appointed by the Produce 
Exchange, retained its organization, though co-operating with them, and con- 
signing their purchases of supplies to the same parties in Liverpool. This 
committee forwarded one thousand barrels of flour by the ship Hope, which 
sailed some days before the George Griswold, the philanthropic clipper. 

The desire to aid in the work of charity seemed to be well-nigh universal. 
While the solid men drew their checks, while railway and telegraph com- 
panies offered the free use of their lines, hard-fisted citizens offered their ser- 
vices without charge. The Griswold had arrived in ballast from Boston, and 
the Ballast Masters' Association tendered their lighters to discharge her. The 
Association of Stevedores proposed to load her ; Mr. Edward Bill purchased 
eleven thousand barrels of flour without commission ; Mr. Murphy offered to 
pilot the vessel to sea ; and Captain George Lunt volunteered to take her across 
the ocean. 

On the 9th of January, 1863, the Griswold was ready for sea, and the 
committee and invited guests assembled on board, to bid her farewell and 
God-speed. Prayer was offered by the Rev. William Adams ; and statements 

25 



386 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

were then made of the progress which had been effected, and of the cargo 
placed in the ship. These may be summed up as follows : 

By the Relief Committee. By the Produce Exchange Committee. 

11,236 barrels of flour, 1,500 barrels of flour, 

50 " pork, 50 " beef, 

125 " bread, 200 boxes of bacon, 

375 boxes " 8 tierces of rice. 

200 " bacon, 

500 bushels of corn. 

The Griswold sailed upon the 9th of January, and entered the port of Liver- 
pool on the 9th of February, after a boisterous passage. She was followed 
soon after by the Arkwright and James Foster, Jr., carrying three thousand 
barrels of flour, sent by the Merchants' Committee. The Energy, the Emerald, 
and other vessels, successively departed, with two thousand five hundred and 
seventy-nine barrels of flour and three tierces of hams, from the two commit- 
tees. The total shipments of the two committees were, therefore, as follows : 

Relief Committee. Produce Exchange Committee. 

15,993 barrels of flour. 2,859 barrels of flour. 

125 barrels of bread, 208 boxes of bacon, 

375 boxes " 50 barrels of beef, 

500 bushels of corn, 8 tierces of rice, 

200 boxes of bacon, 2 bags " 

50 barrels of pork. 3 tierces of hams. 

The total collections for the relief of the sufferers in Great Britain were as 
follows : 

Collected by the International Relief Committee $141,540 64 

" Produce Exchange " 28,875 00 

" Philadelphia " about 62,00000 

Ship-load of provisions sent by A. T. Stewart to Ireland 30,000 00 

Contribution to Irish relief in New York 30,000 00 

" " " Brooklyn 15,000 00 

" " elsewhere, about 40,000 00 



Total, about $347,415 64 

The provisions sent from New York were distributed among one hundred 
and eighty-three distinct localities in England, Ireland, and Scotland. They 
were generally received in the spirit in which they were sent, though the com- 
ments of one of the London weeklies were, literally, outrageous. But the 
operatives ate the proffered food, nevertheless, and few of those who sent it 
ever read the malignant Saturday Keview. 



CHAPTER XII.* 

AID TO EAST TENNESSEE. 




EAST TENNESSEE, which became at the very outset of the rebellion a point 
of great interest to all, was inhabited, at that time, by about three hundred 
thousand souls, chiefly farmers of moderate means, cultivating their own 
homesteads. There were few slaves among them, fully nine tenths of the 
population being freemen. These, at an early date, avowed their determina- 
tion to stand by the Union a step which at once brought upon them the most 
cruel and unrelenting persecution which the history of modern wars has been 
called upon to chronicle. Owing to their isolation, the government was unable, 
for two years, to reach and protect them, and during this time, a memorial was 
sent to Congress by Colonel Taylor, an East Tennessean, in which he made 
the following statements : 

" In 1861, when the question was presented, out of a vote of forty thou- 
sand, they gave thirty thousand majority for the Union. Their arms and 
ammunition were seized, before they could organize, by the rebel soldiers; 
and though the government, which owed them protection, did not protect 
them, yet their hearts clung to the government, and they prayed for the 
Union. Five thousand of their men have seen the inside of rebel prisons, 
and hundreds of them, covered with filth and devoured by vermin, have died 



388 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

martyrs to their country there. Their property has been seized, confiscated, 
their houses pillaged, their stock driven off, their grain consumed, their sub- 
stance wasted, their fences burned, their farms devastated by friends as well as 
foes .... Their young men have been hunted like wild beasts by soldiers, by 
Indians, sometimes by bloodhounds, and, when caught, tied two and two to 
long ropes, and driven before cavalry, thin-clad, barefooted and bleeding, over 
frozen roads and icy creeks and rivers. Some have been beaten with ropes, 
with straps, with clubs. Some have been butchered, others shot down in their 
own houses or yards, in the high-road or the field, or in the forest; others, 
still, have been hung up by the neck to the limbs of trees, without judge or 
jury. I have heard of no single neighborhood within the bounds of East 
Tennessee whose green sod has not drunk the blood of citizens murdered." 

Even when this devoted district was occupied by the United States forces, 
relief could not be at once rendered, for General Burnside, compelled to make 
forced marches upon Knoxville, had no provision train with him, and, of 
necessity, lived off the country. Communication, however, was finally opened, 
and a terrible cry for relief was at once heard from the afflicted people. Colo- 
nel Taylor, who had formerly represented them in Congress, was deputed to visit 
the North to make their condition known, and ask for assistance. This was 
rendered, more particularly at two points, Boston and Philadelphia. Colonel 
Taylor addressed the Legislature of Massachusetts, and so great was the sym- 
pathy excited, that a resolution was at once introduced, appropriating $100,000 
from the State Treasury for the relief of the people of East Tennessee, in 
spite of the grave doubts entertained of the constitutionality of such a meas- 
ure. A public meeting was held at Faneuil Hall, on the 10th of February, 
1864, in furtherance of the movement, the following officers being appointed : 

President, EDWARD EVERETT. 

Vice -Presiden ts, 

Governor ANDREW, lion. CHARLES G. LORINO, JAMES LAWRENCE, 

Mayor LINCOLN, WILLIAM CLAFLIX, RICHARD FROTHINGHAM, 

Hon. J. E. FIELD, PATRICK DONAHOE, JULIUS ROCKWELL, 

" A. H. BULLOCK, WILLIAM B. ROGERS, CHARLES L. WOODBUKT, 

" R. C. WINTIIROP, CHARLES B. GOODRICH, JOHN M. FORBES. 

Secretaries, 
Colonel F. L. LEE, SAMUEL FROTHINGHAM, JR. 

Mr. Everett, on taking the chair, made a short but most beautiful and sym- 
pathetic address, describing the natural characteristics of the region for which 
he had come to plead, its rivers, valleys, and mountains : fertile, many of them, 






EAST TENNESSEE. 389 

to their summits; its mines, its mineral springs, its frugal, industrious, and 
loyal population, its temperate and healthful climate, its soil equally divided 
into farms tilled each by its owner, the labor of slaves being almost unknown. 
He closed his picture of the American Switzerland by a paraphrase of the 
German poet : 

On the mountains is Freedom : the breath of the vales 
Rises not up to the pure mountain gales; 

and gave way to Colonel Taylor, with the practical assertion : " If the Union 
means any thing, it means not merely political connection and commercial 
intercourse, but to bear each other's burdens and to share each other's sacri- 
fices ; it means actual sympathy and efficient aid." 

Colonel Taylor then told his sad, almost incredible story. On reaching the 
point in his narrative where the United States forces entered the territory, he 
said: "Four times have the Union and rebel armies traversed the whole 
length of East Tennessee, exhausting the country all around for current sup- 
plies, and, at every movement, widening the track of ruin that they left 
behind them. In the path of the armies came robbers, who found convenient 
hiding-places in the mountains that skirt our valleys, and came down and 
claimed their share of the property of our plundered people; and thus it came 
to pass that our barns and stables, our cribs and dwellings, were entered and 
robbed, and our people left utterly destitute. Our blankets and bed-clothing, 
every thing of woolen that was calculated to render the soldiers more comfort- 
able, was seized by the strong hand and carried away. Our tanneries shared 
the same fate. They had all been compelled, in the reign of the rebels, to 
contribute sixty per cent, of their leather to the government for the shoeing 
of their soldiers ; but now, when they were retreating from the state, they 
seized all the leather in the vats and bore it away, leaving our old men and 
women and children to meet the rigors of the passing winter barefooted, as 
well as almost naked. 

" Believe me, fellow-citizens, East Tennessee has drunk the full cup of suf- 
fering, and nothing seems left her but to drain its bitterness to the very dregs. 
She has sacrificed every thing but loyalty and honor ; she has suffered every 
thing but dishonor and death ; and now, destitution and famine, followed by 
despair and ruin, are trampling upon the thresholds of her sad homes are 
entering their very doors, ready to consummate the sacrifice and complete the 
suffering. But, thank God, throughout her sufferings she has been faith- 
ful. Persuasion, threats, insults, imprisonments, wounds, stripes, privations, 



390 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

chains, confiscation, gibbets, and military murders, the clash of arms, the ter- 
ribleness of armies with banners, and all the combined and concentrated 
horrors of internecine war marshalled upon her battle-torn bosom, and hurl- 
ing sorrow and ruin into all her homes, have never corrupted her loyalty, 
nor driven her a solitary line from her devotion to the government of her 
fathers. . . . East Tennessee, my native East Tennessee, has sacrificed all 
she had for the country. Her barns and mills, her flocks and herds, her cattle 
upon a thousand hills, have all been offered up. Her corn and wheat are 
all consumed ; her young men all who have not perished in the camp 
and on the battle-field are now swelling the ranks of your victorious 
armies ; and, sir, our matrons and maidens, our old men and little children, 
our soldiers' widows and orphaned babes, are all bound and upon the altar. 
Already the sacrificial knife is uplifted ; it trembles in the hand of Famine. 
May (rod save my people, and avert the stroke in this their day of trial !" 

Upon the conclusion of Colonel Taylor's appeal, a series of resolutions 
was offered and adopted, the following being the pith of the whole : " That 
we call upon our legislature to make a liberal grant in aid of the loyal 
population of East Tennessee, and that it will be a matter of just pride that 
the name of our old commonwealth shall head the national subscription, which 
will carry hope and life to those noble men and women." The officers of 
the meeting were then made a committee to present the subject of the resolu- 
tions to the legislature. 

The report of the proceedings of this meeting appeared in the Boston 
papers of the llth of February. No allusion had been made to the subject 
of private subscriptions, the object of the assemblage having been exclusively 
to create a public sentiment in favor of a legislative appropriation. Mr. Everett 
nevertheless received, on the same day, the following letter, written apparently 
in a female hand, and enclosing three dollars : 

"BOSTON, February llth, 1864. 

"DEAR SIR: Enclosed is a mite which I wish forwarded with the thou- 
sands and tens of thousands of dollars that I hope will be sent forward from 
this goodly city of Boston, to alleviate the unparalleled sufferings of our 
dearly beloved countrymen in East Tennessee. 

" Such earnest, eloquent pleading as comes to us from our old cradle of 
liberty, can not be unheeded by any patriot or lover of his race. 

" TEACHER OF A PUBLIC SCHOOL. 
"MR. EVERETT." 



AID TO EAST TENNESSEE. 



391 



Mr. Everett publicly acknowledged the receipt of this letter and its inclosure 
the next day, adding : " Small as the sum is, I doubt not it is large for the 
means of the giver, and it will sustain the life of one of our starving brethren 
in East Tennessee for a fortnight. If a small portion of our community only 
would, according to their ability, imitate this example, that desolated region 
might again become the happy valley of the South." 

Contributions now began to flow in ; but it was evident that people were 
holding off, and awaiting the action of the legislature. " We are moving very 
slowly," wrote Mr. W. H. Gardiner to Mr. Everett " Private citizens seem to 
be waiting for some action of the legislature ; the legislature seems to be 
waiting to know how the people would like to see their money given away ; 
but while we ponder, Tennessee starves." This letter contained a check for 
$200. The tide of sympathy, as evidenced by acts, now rose higher and 




EAST TENNESSEE REFUGEES. 



higher, though the probability of state aid being afforded was increased by the 
presentation of a memorial to the two houses, affirming the constitutionality 
of such a grant, signed by Judge Curtis and others. Mrs. Pratt, in her ninety- 
seventh year, sent $250 ; Dr. Jackson, $50 ; Mr. William Gray, $500, with 
the promise of as much more, if state aid were withheld. 

On the 25th, the Speaker of the House, Mr. Bullock, apprised Mr. Everett 
that the legislature, acting under grave doubts as to the legality of making 
an appropriation, had voted, though reluctantly, against it. He broke the 



392 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

unwelcome news, however, by interposing his check. This gave a new impulse 
to individual beneficence, and, on February 29th, more than $4,000 were 
received. An appeal to the people of Massachusetts was issued on the 2d 
of March, up to which date nearly $20,000 had been spontaneously contrib- 
uted. Half of this sum was sent to Mr. Lloyd P. Smith, of Philadelphia, 
who was just starting for Knoxville with the proceeds of the Pennsylvania 
subscription in the same behalf.* 

In one day, the 3d of March, $6,350 were added to the Massachusetts fund. 
On the 8th, $1,000 were received from the Forty-fourth regiment, the officers 
and men having diverted that sum from the regimental fund. $52,000 had 
been received in the thirty days following the meeting in Faneuil Hall. 

The Ladies' Sewing Circle having intimated through their president, Mrs. 
George Ticknor, that they would gladly make up any material furnished 
them for that purpose, the sum of $2,000 was placed at their disposal. Two 
thousand nine hundred and twenty-one articles of clothing were forwarded 
from the rooms of the association. $60,000 were now paid upon the drafts 
of gentlemen accredited from the Relief Society of Knoxville, and the whole 
fund was finally disposed of in this way. 

In the mean time, the fund increased. From entertainments at Chickering's 
Hall, from concerts, dramatic performances, and exhibitions of tableaux, from 
children's fairs, from church collections, as well as from individual subscrip- 
tions, came large and small tributary streams, till, by the end of April, the 
accumulated collections amounted to $91,000. " One hundred thousand," 
says Mr. Everett, " the amount of the appropriation proposed in the legisla- 
ture, had been assigned by public opinion as the sum which we should en- 
deavor to raise by private subscription ; and, on the 4th of June, that amount 
was reached. The foundation was laid in the teacher's donation of three dol- 
lars, on the llth of February. The headstone was carried up by $1,000 
received from a children's fair at the house of Dr. T. I. Talbot, on the 4th of 
June." The last donation was made on the 26th of October, being the 

* The officers of the Pennsylvania Relief Association for East Tennessee were as follows : 

President, 

Ex-Gov. JAMES POLLOCK. 

Secret <i ry, Treasurer, 

JOSEPH T. THOMAS. CALEB COPE. 

Chairman of the Committee on Collections, and for tlie Forwarding of Supplies, 
J. B. LIPPINCOTT. 

Chairman of Executive Committee, 
LLOYD P. SMITH. 

The collections of tliis association were nearly 30,000. 



EAST TENNESSEE RELIEF FUND. 393 

proceeds of a fair in Pinckney Street, Boston; bringing the total up to 
$102,180.08. Some $5,000 worth of ready-made clothing was also con- 
tributed. 

In commenting upon " this most remarkable .and suggestive fact devel- 
oped by the war," the Knoxville Whig, of June 25th, said : " Between Ten- 
nessee and Massachusetts there has never been any identity of habit or 
thought, and no close commercial or personal ties, which sometimes bind 
together the citizens of neighboring states. Indeed, we have been taught for 
many years, though we did not all believe, that the people of the North were 
narrow-minded, selfish, cold, and avaricious. But no sooner do they hear the 
tale of destitution of a people fifteen hundred miles away, than, with the 
instincts of a common humanity, a common religion, a common patriotism, 

they outstrip all others in the most generous race of charity We say, 

from the bottom of our heart, all honor to glorious old Massachusetts ! The 

people of that state are indeed our neighbors and our brethren And 

so of nearly every state. Let us hold them in everlasting remembrance, and 
prove ourselves worthy of their benefactions." 

The following list of the subscriptions to the East Tennessee fund is given 
very nearly as it appeared in Mr. Everett's report, except that, to save space, 
the sums bestowed anonymously are aggregated in one item, at the close. The 
titles, mottoes, and pregnant, pithy little expressions, which concealed the 
names of the anonymous givers, were curious and interesting : "A physician, 
who promises the same for every Saturday for five weeks, $10 " a promise 
which the physician kept ; " a dictate of conscience for the suffering loyalists ;" 
" a slice from our Daily Bread ;" " a little more help ;" " Acts xi., 26th and 
27th verses ;" " from one who keeps his money as long as his conscience will 
let him," &c., &c. 

LIST OF CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE BOSTON FUND FOR THE RELIEF OF THE 
LOYAL AND SUFFERING EAST TENNESSEANS. 

Teacher of a Public School $3 00 W. H. Gardiner $200 00 

F. H. Peabody 100 00 Elisha T. Loring 100 00 

Lt.-Col. Peabody 50 00 General James Dana, Charles- 
Mrs. Sylvester Baker, Jr., Yar- town 50 00 

mouth Port 5 00 Mrs. E. Wigglesworth 100 00 

James Gordon Clarke 50 00 Octavius Pickering 60 00 

Mrs. S. Hooper 100 00 Dr. James Jackson 50 00 

Mrs. John Mackay 100 00 Children's Fair in Mt. Vernon 

Charles P. Curtis 5000 Street 10000 

Augustus Lowell 10000 John Gardner 5000 

E. A. Raymond 30 00 William Everett 20 00 



394 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



W. F. Weld. $100 00 

Dr. John Homans 100 00 

Mrs. William Pratt 250 00 

Mrs. G. II. Shaw 250 00 

Sprague, Soule & Co 500 00 

Edmund Munroe 50 00 

Ladies of Needham Plain 52 00 

Lydia S. Gale 200 00 

J. C. Hoadley, New Bedford ... 48 00 

Mrs. Henry Grew 200 00 

Nathaniel Francis 200 00 

Ignatius Sargent, Machias, Me., 
the contribution of loyal citi- 
zens 100 00 

Abbott Lawrence 200 00 

James 'Parker 100 00 

Henry W. Pickering 50 00 

Miss Charlotte Harris 100 00 

Miss Ira E. Loring 30000 

Miss F. L. Gray 25 00 

Miss A. G. Gray 20 00 

William Gray 1,000 00 

George Howe 200 00 

Mrs. G. Lee 100 00 

James Sturgis 50 00 

P. C. Brooks 200 00 

Thomas J. Lee 50 00 

Masters Reginald and Sam. S. 

Gray 10 00 

Wm. T. Andrews 100 00 

Dr. Charles Mifflin 50 00 

Miss Louisa M. Goddard 50 00 

Hon. A. II. Bullock 100 00 

William S. Rogers 50 00 

Mrs. Abby L. Wales 100 00 

Miss Wales 500 00 

W. W. Clapp, Jr 25 00 

Hon. George B. Upton 200 00 

George W. Wales 200 00 

Rev. Dr. Burroughs 50 00 

Mrs. Dr. Hayward, Pemberton 

Square 100 00 

Hon. Dwight Foster 50 00 

Master Willie R. Richards 10 00 

Charles Deane 100 00 

Sam. Boyd, Marlboro' 100 00 

Joseph Whitney & Co 100 00 

Jonathan Ellis & Co 100 00 

Mrs. B. D. Greene 200 00 

George Livermore, Cambridge . 100 00 

Sterne Morse . , 100 00 



Rev. Dr. N. L. Frothingham . . . $50 00 

Turner Sargent 200 00 

Richard Leeds 50 00 

Johnson & Thompson 100 00 

J. C. Tyler & Co. 100 00 

C. D. Head & T. II. Perkins ... 100 00 

Dr. John Ware 50 00 

John Wooldredge 100 00 

Boston Stock and Exchange 

Board, by unanimous vote. . . 1,000 00 

Charles E. Guild 25 00 

Hon. Jacob Sleeper 100 00 

H. & L. Chase 50 00 

Matthew Howland, New Bed- 
ford 50 00 

Samuel Johnson 200 00 

Mrs. Thomas G. Gary 100 00 

B. C. Ward 100 00 

John J. Low, West Roxbury. . . 25 00 

Rev. Wm. Mountford 50 00 

James M. Beebe 200 00 

Joseph B. Glover 100 00 

Robert Waterston 100 00 

J. Huntington Wolcott 200 00 

Mrs. Wolcott 100 00 

J. Randolph Coolidge 50 00 

Hon. Stephen Fairbanks 100 00 

Hon. C. G. Loring 100 00 

The Misses Lowell, Roxbury ... 200 00 

Mrs. Mary B. Parkman 25 00 

Miss Eliza S. Quincy 50 00 

C. H. Gay 25 00 

Martin L. Bradford 50 00 

R. C. Mackay 150 00 

W. Mackay 50 00 

James Ilunnewell, Charlestown 100 00 

Rebecca P. Allyn, Cambridge . . 20 00 

Carruth & Sweetser 100 00 

Col. Charles R. Codman 50 00 

Jacob Stone, Newburyport .... 20 00 

Col. Theodore Lyman 100 00 

A. S. Stimpson 25 00 

Clara and Lucy Rogers, twin sis- 
ters 30 00 

Martin Brimmer 250 00 

Master Edward Gray 8 00 

Mrs. Eliza Babcock 20 00 

Mrs. Henry W. Pickering 50 00 

Harry Pickering 10 00 

Thos. Wigglesworth 200 00 

Miss Mary Wigglesworth 100 00 



EAST TENNESSEE RELIEF FUND. 



395 



Hon. Charles Allen $25 00 

Dr. R. W. Hooper 100 00 

Mrs. E. Hooper 100 00 

Miss E. Hooper 50 00 

Miss M. I. Hooper 50 00 

Miss Ellen S. Hooper 50 00 

Marian Hooper 50 00 

J. H. Eastburn 100 00 

Solomon Piper 100 00 

Jacob A. Dresser 50 00 

John Collamore 50 00 

J. Wiley Edmands 500 00 

Mrs. E. R. Mudge 50 00 

From the Second Church in Dor- 
chester, of which from Mrs. 
Walter Baker $100, and from 

the Misses Oliver $50* 325 00 

Mason G. Parker 25 00 

George H. Tilton 25 00 

William W. Tucker 100 00 

Field, Converse & Allen 100 00 

Miss Elizabeth S. Bangs 30 00 

J. Eliot Cabot 50 00 

Dresser, Stevens & Co 50 00 

J. E. Thayer & Brother 300 00 

W. B. Spooner 200 00 

G. B. Cary , 50 00 

Sidney Bartlett 100 00 

J. Appleton Burnham 100 00 

Charles Hook Appleton 100 00 

Charles Amory 100 00 

Patrick Donahoe 100 00 

Rev. C. T. Thayer 50 00 

Rice, Kendall & Co 100 0.0 

J. C. Howe & Co 1,000 00 

Jos. S. Fay 100 00 

H. P. Sturgis 100 00 

Henry Lee 100 00 

Henry Lee, Jr 50 00 

Mrs. Henry Lee, Jr 50 00 

W. H. Guild. . 50 00 



E. R. Mudge, Sawyer & Co $500 00 

Col. Samuel Swett 40 00 

Benjamin S. Rotch 100 00 

Mrs. C. G. Loring 200 00 

Hon. J. C. Podge, Cambridge . . 50 00 

Henry TJpham 100 00 

William Parsons 100 00 

Rev. Henry W. Foote 30 00 

Josiah Quincy, Jr 100 00 

Prof. F. J. Child, Cambridge ... 25 00 

W. S. Bullard 250 00 

Hon. Artemas Hale, Bridgewater 20 00 

Charles Brewer & Co 100 00 

Alexander Moseley 100 00 

Daniel Hammond 50 00 

Alfred Winsor & Son 100 00 

G. W. Bond 100 00 

Dr. Charles E. Ware 50 00 

James O. Safford 100 00 

Dr. Jacob Bigelow 150 00 

William O. Grover 100 00 

William S. Whitwell 50 00 

William Duraut 100 00 

Mrs. J. Augustus Peabody 50 00 

Mrs. C. William Loring 50 00 

Thomas G. Appleton 100 00 

Miss Ellen M. Ward 100 00 

Miss Julia E. Ward 100 00 

Harrison P. Page, Watertown.. 100 00 

Dr. Charles Beck, Cambridge.. 100 00 

Mrs. Anna S. Muring 25 00 

T. W. Wellington, \Vorcester. . . 50 00 

Mrs. M. Lowell Putnam 100 00 

Mrs. S. A. Wright 2000 

Seth Bemis, Newton 50 00 

Edward Cruft. 50 00 

Mrs. S. Cabot, Brookline 100 00 

Mrs. E. W. Forbush 20 00 

Dr. O. W. Holmes 100 00 

Dr. H. Richardson 25 00 

Miss E. Richardson . . 25 00 



* The donation from the Second Church in Dorchester was accompanied by the following note : 

"DORCHESTER, 2Qth Feb., 1864. 

" DEAR SIR : I have the pleasure of transmitting to you $325, a contribution for the Patriots of 
East Tennessee from friends in the Second Church, Dorchester. We observe a fourth Sabbath eveuing 
of each month as a time for prayer for our country, and last evening thought it fitting to act as well as 
pray. 

" With much respect, 1 am, 

" Dear sir, truly yours, 

[Signed] "JAMES A. MEANS, 



396 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Wm. B. Bradford $50 00 

Faulkner, Kimball & Co 500 00 

Wellington Brothers, East Cam- 
bridge 50 00 

Elisha Atkins 100 00 

Master Edwin F. Atkins 10 00 

James L. Little 250 00 

William Munroe 200 00 

Dr. Edward Reynolds 50 00 

Miss Mason 50 00 

Miss S. L. Mason 25 00 

Hon. P. Sprague 30 00 

Samuel A. Way 100 00 

J. S. Barstow 100 00 

George M. Soule 100 00 

C. A. Cummings 25 00 

C. F. Hovey & Co 500 00 

Wm. P. Mason 200 00 

Mrs. Daniel Denny 100 00 

Dr. W. R. Lawrence 100 00 

J. H. Billings 50 00 

Amherst, by the hands of Col. 

W. S. Clark 250 00 

Benjamin R. Gilbert 50 00 

Alexander Beal, Dorchester. ... 25 00 

B. D. Emerson, Jamaica Plain. . 100 00 

Ezra Abbott, Cambridge 20 00 

John Bertram, Salem 200 00 

Hon. R. H. Dana, Jr 30 00 

Geo. W. Wheelwright 50 00 

Miss C. II. Wild 25 00 

Weld Farm, West Roxbury 80 00 

Edward Atkinson 50 00 

D. W. Salisbury 100 00 

Burr Brothers & Co 200 00 

Henry L. Pierce, Dorchester... 100 00 

Francis Cabot 25 00 

Arthur Searle 20 00 

Messrs. Claflin, Saville & Co 100 00 

Eaton, Cumings & Co 100 00 

Francis Williams, Quincy 100 00 

Henry Williams 25 00 

Elbridge Torrey 10 00 

Mrs. James Lawrence 200 00 

Professor Asa Gray, Cambridge. 20 00 

L. Grozelier 10 00 

C. W. Clark 25 00 

Mrs. N. I. Bowditch 500 00 

J. Ingersoll Bowditch . . : 200 00 

Mrs. J. I. Bowditch 100 00 

Wm. Claflin.. 200 00 



Hon. Seth Ames $50 00 

S. C. Thwing 100 00 

Rev. Dr. Ellis and Mrs. Ellis, 

Charlestown 110 00 

Mrs. H. B. Rogers 100 00 

William Read & Son 100 00 

D. P. Ives 100 00 

J. E. Piper 5 00 

Rev. Dr. C. A. Bartol 100 00 

Leverett Saltonstall 100 00 

Ariel Low & Co 100 00 

II. H. Hunnewell 300 00 

Wm. Gray, Jr 250 00 

Mrs. S. P. Miles, Brattleboro'. . . 50 00 

Samuel Frothingham 150 00 

Samuel Frothingham, Jr 50 00 

Dr. Henry Bartlett, Roxbury. . . 50 00 

S. G. Snelling 50 00 

Lindsley, Shaw & Co 100 00 

Henry Wainwright 100 00 

Howland, Hinckley & Co 50 00 

J. G. Kidder 100 00 

John A. Blanchard 100 00 

Naylor&Co 30000 

Sewall, Day & Co 100 00 

J. Field 200 00 

Chas. H. Coffin, Newburyport. . 100 00 

Charles B. Poor 25 00 

J. W. Paige 100 00 

J. F. B. Marshall 50 00 

Miss Harriet S. Hay ward 100 00 

Lemuel Shaw 50 00 

A. B. Almon, Salem 30 00 

George H. Gray and Danforth. . 200 00 

Hon. Albert Fearing 100 00 

Hon. Rob't C. Winthrop 50 00 

George D. Wells 50 00 

Oliver Ditson 100 00 

E. 3. Phillips 25 00 

Mrs.|R. G. Shaw 200 00 

Miss 'Louisa Shaw 25 00 

Jona: French, Roxbury 100 00 

Mrs. James Sturgis 50 00 

John G. Tappan 100 00 

Charles F. Bradford, Roxbury. 50 00 

Charles K. Cobb 150 00 

George J. Fiske 100 00 

Homer Bartlett 50 00 

James W. Sever 50 00 

Hon. Edward Brooks 200 00 

Francis Brooks. . 100 00 



EAST TENNESSEE RELIEF FUND. 



397 



Jos. E. Worcester, Cambridge. . $100 00 

George Gardner " 300 00 

Charles Heath 50 00 

Mrs. Charles Heath 50 00 

Miss E. Parsons 50 00 

S. Willard & Son 10000 

Larkin, Stackpole & Co 100 00 

Edward S. Philbrick 100 00 

Fishers & Chapin 100 00 

Samuel May 200 00 

John J. May 100 00 

Nath'l Winsor & Co 100 00 

William S. Eaton 50 00 

Thomas Groom 50 00 

Maguire & Campbell. 50 00 

L. A. Shattuck 5000 

Reuben A. Richards 50 00 

Franklin King 50 00 

Francis Bacon 100 00 

William Ropes 100 00 

Isaac Thacher 100 00 

Elizabeth J. Stone 10 00 

David M. Hodgdon 50 00 

D. A. Dwight & Co 100 00 

William Perkins 100 00 

Robert S. Perkins 50 00 

J. W. P. Abbott, Westtbrd 25 00 

William Raymond 10 00 

Otis Daniel 200 00 

F. Snow & Co 100 00 

Edward O. Banvard, Calais, Me. 50 00 

The Misses Snow, Roxbury ... 200 00 

Chief Justice Bigelow 50 00 

Sidney Homer 100 00 

Hon. George Morey 50 00 

Mrs. Sarah Johnson 50 00 

R. E. Robbins 250 00 

Dane, Dana & Co 100 00 

Little, Brown & Co 200 00 

Capt. Arthur H. Clark 20 00 

Benjamin C. Clark 20 00 

Miss Donnison, Cambridge 50 00 

Hon. James Savage 200 00* 

Prof. W. B. Rogers 25 00 

William Sprague 100 00 

Thos. G. Bradford 25 00 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph S. Beal, 

Kingston 50 00 

George Draper, Hopedale, Mass. 50 00 
Jona. B. Bright and others, Wal- 

tham. . 100 00 



Rev. Dr. Geo. Putnam, Roxbury. $100 00 

Mrs. David Sears 100 00 

Dr. Wm. W. Morland 20 00 

Chandler & Co 100 00 

J. A. &. W 4 Bird & Co 50 00 

Seth Turner, Randolph 50 00 

Walter Channing, M. D 100 00 

Samuel B. Pierce 50 00 

Benj. Thaxter 5000 

W. S. Appleton 100 00 

Daniel X. Spooner 100 00 

George F. Parkman 200 00 

William Beals 100 00 

Francis B. Hayes 100 00 

N. B. Gibbs 100 00 

Henry B. Rogers 500 00 

John A. Dodd & Co 100 00 

J. W. Wheelwright 50 00 

E. A. Boardman 30 00 

Dr. G. C. Shattuck 100 00 

C.C.Gilbert 5000 

David W. Williams, Roxbnry. . . 100 00 

Charles Emery 20 00 

Geo. C. Lord, Newton 100 00 

Charles H. Lord, " 100 00 

Edward W. Lord, " 28 00 

H. Williams, " 10 00 

Nash, Spaulding & Co 300 00 

Hon. Emory Washburn 50 00 

James Hayward 100 00 

S. W. Rodman 50 00 

John Cormerais 25 00 

Dr. John Dean 20 00 

J. J. Dixwell 50 00 

Mrs. Anna Parker 50 00 

Grant, Warren & Co 300 00 

George R. Russell 200 00 

Mrs. F. C. Paine. 25 00 

Gardner, Dexter & Co 100 00 

James Read 100 00 

Mrs. James Read 100 00 

Augustine Heard 100 00 

Charles W. Parker 100 00 

Joshua Stetson 100 00 

Hon. S. Williston, E. Hampton. 100 00 

E. F. Waters 25 00 

The Misses Newman 200 00 

C. C. Perkins, Italy 100 00 

Curtis & Co. . . .' 100 00 

Lizzie Leland 20 00 

EdwardMotley 5000 



398 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



D. B. Flint : . $50 00 

Charles L. Young 50 00 

Waldo Maynard 50 00 

Francis Bassett 100 00 

Mrs. W. C. Codman 50 00 

Thomas Worcester 100 00 

Dr. Le Baron Russell 50 00 

A. A. Lawrence, Jr., Brookline. 50 00 

T. Lee 100 00 

John H. Thorndike 50 00 

Mrs. E. Miller and Chas. E. Mil- 
ler, Quincy 100 00 

Mrs. J. G. Howard, South Brain- 
tree 10 00 

Samuel Gilbert, Boston 50 00 

Samuel Gilbert, Jr., Dorchester. 50 00 

George W. Harding, " . . 100 00 

W. C. Harding, Roxbury 100 00 

Officers and men of the Forty- 
fourth Regiment of Massachu- 
setts Volunteers 1,000 00 

Dana, Farrar & Hyde 200 00 

Foster & Taylor 200 00 

Otis Norcross 100 00 

His Honor F. W. Lincoln, Jr., 

Mayor 50 00 

Hon. J. Z. Goodrich 500 00 

Bigelow Brothers & Kennard... 100 00 

Mrs. N. II. Einmons 100 00 

Edward D. Peters & Co 300 00 

Samuel Atherton 50 00 

Ehen C. Stanwood & Co. .' 100 00 

Brewster, Sweet & Co 100 00 

William Brigham 50 00 

Robert B. Storer 50 00 

W. P. Pierce 200 00 

P. Anderson, Lowell 25 00 

Jas. W. Walworth 100 00 

Isaac Livermore 50 00 

0. H. Sampson 25 00 

William A. Bangs 25 00 

J. Dixwell Thompson 25 00 

Jordan, Marsh & Co 500 00 

" " clerks .... 82 00 

Wilson, Hamilton & Co 250 00 

J. C. Burrage & Co 250 00 

Hogg, Brown & Taylor 250 00 

Parker, Wilder & Co 240 00 

Denny, Rice & Co 300 00 

Washburn, Welch & Co 200 00 

Haughton, Sawyer & Co 200 00 



Almy, Patterson & Co 

Pierce Brothers & Co 

King, Goodridge & Co 

Sweetser, Swan & Blodgett 

Burrage Brothers & Co 

George S. Winslow & Co 

Wilkinson, Lamb & Co 

J. C. Converse & Co 

Anderson, Heath & Co 

Hill, Danforth & Co 

Ordway, Tebbetts & Co 

" u clerks. . 

John C. Morse & Co 

Allen, Lane & Co 

Mrs. Isaac Fenno 

Thayer, Badger & Plimpton .... 

Stone, Wood & Co 

Woodman, Horswell & Co 

C. Curry 

H. E. Wright & Co 

F. A. Hawley& Co 

Bliss, Whiting, Pierce & McKen- 
na 

Whitney, Grain & Marr 

Gross, Daniels & Co 

Whitten, Burdett & Young 

Washburn, Foque & Co 

Sargent Brothers & Co 

Lewis Coleman & Co 

Geo. W. Simmons & Co 

F. F. Wheelock & Co 

K H.Clark 

George Alden 

Thomas B.Wales 

Levi Bartlett & Co 

Hon. Stephen Salisbury, Worces- 
ter 

George C. Richardson 

J. P. Thorndike 

Edw'd N. Perkins, Jamaica Plain 

Edward S. Tobey 

Ex-Governor Lincoln 

Gardner Brewer & Co 

Geo. P. Hay ward & Co 

William Dall 

Miss Henrietta Sargent 

Israel Whitney 

Nathan Matthews 

Proceeds of Mr. Siddons's read- 



ing. 



Rev. Geo. M. Rice, Westford . . . 



$200 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

31 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

20 00 

20 00 

5 00 

100 00 

100 00 

300 00 
200 00 
100 00 

50 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 

25 00 
100 00 

20 00 

25 00 
100 00 

100 00 
5 00 



EAST TENNESSEE BELIEF FUND. 



399 



Citizens of Hallowell, Me., per 

Justin E. Smith $203 00 

John H. Sturgis 5000 

J. P. Preston 100 00 

William F. Matchett 25 00 

Soldiers' Aid Society, Winthrop, 

by the hand of Mrs. J. C. Hall, 

Treasurer 50 00 

Samuel G. Ward 100 00 

Mrs. T. W. Ward 100 00 

Benj. Abbott 25 00 

Mrs. Nathan Appleton 100 00 

Hon. Pvichard Fletcher 100 00 

Mrs. Judge Putnam* 30 00 

J. M. Forbes 250 00 

Hon. Jas. Arnold, New Bedford . 500 00 

E. S. Dixwell 20 00 

Hon. David Sears 150 00 

Samuel B. King, Tuunton 100 00 

Theodore Dean, " 100 00 

Edmund Baylies, " 100 00 

Mrs. Geo. A. Crocker, " 50 00 

Timothy Gordon, " 50 00 

Francis B. Dean, " 50 00 

Joseph Dean, " 50 00 

Artemas Briggs, " 50 00 

Sylvanus N. Staples, " 50 00 

Allen Presbrey, " 25 00 

Charles R. Atwood, " 25 00 

Charles Robinson, " 25 00 

Enoch Robinson, " 25 00 

William Brewster, " 25 00 

Le Baron B. Church, " 25 00 

Jesse Hartshorn, " 20 00 

A. King Williams, " 20 00 

James Henry Sproat, " 20 00 

Nathan A. Skinner, " 20 00 

Charles H. Brigham, " 20 00 

Other subscribers in Taunton. . 120 00 

Chas. Hickling, Roxbury 50 00 

Hartley, Lord & Co 100 00 

George T. Rice, Worcester 100 00 

F. Xickerson & Co 100 00 

Rev. Dr. S. K. Lothrop 10 00 

Citizens of Amherst, N. II 282 00 

James C. Ward, Northampton. . 25 00 

P. Holmes, Kingston 100 00 

Wm. S. Adams, " 100 00 



Sabin & Page $30 00 

Mrs. J. Gardner 50 00 

Wm. Knowlton, Upton 100 00 

Franklin Haven 100 00 

Proprietors^ of the " Christian 

Examiner " 20 00 

George Allen 50 00 

Mrs. Abbott 25 00 

Peter Smith, Andover, Mass ... 100 00 

Edwin Upton 50 00 

Francis Draper, Cambridge .... 50 00 

Alpheus Hardy & Co 100 00 

Webster & Co 100 00 

Sampson Reed 50 00 

Reed, Cutler & Co 100 00 

E. B. Welch 50 00 

Centre Church in Haverhill 286 00 

Edward Warren, M. D., Newton 

Lower Falls 45 00 

Currier & Greeley 100 00 

Mrs. J. M. Codman, Brookline . . 50 00 

Mrs. Nancy White 50 00 

George Hews 25 00 

C. Ellis, M. D 5000 

E. H. Eldredge 100 00 

Rolfe Eldredge 50 00 

The venerable President Quincy. 100 00 

Wm. M. Byrnes 20 00 

G. Rogers 20 00 

Isaac F. Dobson 100 00 

Francis Peabody 100 00 

W. Amory 10000 

J. P. Gardner 50 00 

J. D. Bates 50 00 

G. M. Barnard 100 00 

T. Quincy Browne 50 00 

lasigi, Goddard & Co 300 00 

Miss M. G. Loring , 50 00 

Waldo Flint 50 00 

Mrs. Tyler Bigelow, Watertowu. 100 00 

Mrs. Theodore Chase 50 00 

Mary Leary, Halifax, N. S., now 

of West Newton 200 

Dabney & Cunningham 50 00 

G. Race 10 00 

Unitarian Society at Watertown. 415 60 

P. A. Gay 50 00 

Jona. Ilowland, New Bedford . . 50 00 



* This venerable lady contributed by her needle-work over a hundred dollars to the Fair for the Sani- 
tarv Commission. 



400 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Pupils of Mr. T. Prentiss Allen's 

School, New Bedford * $67 00 

The master of the school 8 00 

Captain Latham Croos 5000 

W. E. Austin, Dorchester 25 00 

Congregational Ch. in Shrews- 
bury 53 50 

N. G. Manson 50 00 

First Evangelical Congregational 

Church, Cambridgeport 246 92 

Mrs. Deborah Powers, Lansing- 
burg, K Y 500 00 



Joseph Willard $25 00 

Eev. S. M. Worcester, Salem ... 10 00 

Sophy Hayes 20 00 

Hon. John H. Clifford, New Bed- 
ford 100 00 

Edward Page 50 00 

W. C. Cabot 25 00 

Mrs. Gam'l Bradford 50 00 

Samuel May, Jr., Leicester. ... 10 00 

William B. Howes, Salem 100 00 

Amos Cummings 50 00 

Claire A. L. Eice, Danvers Centre 5 00 




EAST TEXXESSEE. 



* The subscription paper at Mr. Allen's school had the following caption : 

" The loyal boys of Massachusetts to the loyal boys of Tennessee send greeting : Having heard 
through Colonel Taylor of the hardships and the privations that you have endured, while your fathers 
and our fathers have been struggling side by side, for the support of the Union cause and iu defence 
of liberty, and feeling that, although remotely situated, we are brothers, and have a united interest in 
the prosperity of our glorious country, we wish to manifest to you our sympathy ; and as we have 
been prosperous while you have been suffering, we wish to send you a trifle from our abundance. 
Accept, then, these contributions from our own private stores, and be assured we are happy to do our 
part towards relieving your wants and encouraging you to hold out, until better days shall come, as 
we hope they will soon come to you." 



EAST TENNESSEE RELIEF FUND. 



Benj. B. Howard $50 00 

Dorr, Parks & Co 75 00 

Citizens of Barnstable 392 50 

J. H. Ward 100 00 

Walter Aiken, Franklin, N. II. . 10 00 

Osborn Howes 100 00 

Miss M. E. Davis 10 00 

Samuel T. Morse 25 00 

J. Amory Davis, Dorchester. . . 100 00 

Edward Russell, "... 50 00 

H. I. Nazro, "... 25 00 

Other citizens of " . . 25 00 

Joseph A. White 50 00 

Miss Arabella Rice, Portsmouth, 

N. H 500 00 

Ebenezer Collamore, Charles- 
town 50 00 

George May 100 00 

Daniels, Kendall & Co 100 00 

Friends of East Tennessee, East- 
port, Me 140 00 

R. R. Endicott, Beverly 25 00 

Ira C. Gray 20 00 

Proceeds of a concert at Plym- 
outh 58 00 

Oliver Prescott, New Bedford.. 50 00 

Shawmut Sabbath School 119 77 

Wm. J. Rotch, New Bedford. . . 100 00 

Lyman Tiffany 100 00 

J. P. Faulkner, North Billerica. 25 00 

John Perley, Salem 30 00 

Mrs. Persis K. Parkhurst, Tern- 

pleton, Mass 11 00 

Martha Hooper Lee 50 00 

Miss Abigail Locke, Templeton. 25 00 
W. C. Tenney, Marlborough, 

Mass 50 00 

D. Denny Rice (aged 7 years), 

Roxlmrv... 1 21 



401 

John Bartlett, Cambridge $20 00 

Citizens of Lexington, chiefly 
the product of a collection ta- 
ken in the First Parish Church 281 25 

R. B. Forces 100 00 

Proceeds of an amateur concert 
given at Messrs. Chickering's 
Rooms, which were generous- 
ly offered for the occasion 600 00 

Collection taken in the First 

Church in Abington 70 00 

Goorge H. Kuhn 100 00 

S. F. Jenkins 100 00 

Collection taken in the Shepard 
Congregational Society, Cam- 
bridge 195 50 

A. S. Woodworth 25 00 

Teachers and pupils of the Berk- 
shire Family School, at Stock- 
bridge 67 50 

W. Chadbourne 100 00 

A few Citizens of Danvers 178 00 

Allen Gannett, Lynnfielcl 2 00 

Proceeds of a dramatic exhibition 
and concert given by the young 
ladies and gentlemen connect- 
ed with the Mayflower Divi- 
sion, No. 33, S. of T. of Prov- 
incetown, Mass 100 00 

Elmer Townsend 50 00 

Collection taken at Trinity 
Church (including a check for 
$200, from H. W. Sargent, of 
the State of New York) 385 00 

Jonathan Bourne, Jr., New Bed- 
ford 100 00 

George F. Bartlett*, New Bed- 
ford, six English sovereigns . 43 00 

Citizens of Plymouth 642 00 



* Mr. Bartlett' s donation was accompanied by the following interesting letter to Mr. Everett : 

" NEW BEDFORD, March 2lst, 1864. 

" DEAR SIR : In response to Colonel Taylor's touching appeal, in behalf of our suffering loyal 
brethren in East Tennessee, I cheerfully part with the ONLY thing saved from the whaleship ' Lafayette,' 
burned by the Pirate ' Alabama,' April 15th, 1863, off Fernando de Noronha, and enclose the same 
to you herewith, viz. (6) six English sovereigns, worth about forty-three dollars. Captain Lewis was 
fortunately on shore with this gold to purchase stores, when Captain Semmes steamed around the 
island and burned his ship. I will regard it as a forced contribution from Captain Semmes, in the name 
of the immortal Lafayette, who loved our country and its Father, and I am most happy in being able 
to make so worthy a bestowal of it. 

"Tours respectfully, 
26 [Signed] "GEORGE F. BARTLETT." 



402 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Collection taken in the First 
Congregational Society of Roy - 
alston $60 00 

Ladies and gentlemen of Brook- 
line 437 00 

Collections made at the Unitari- 
an, Orthodox, and Universalist 
Societies in W. Cambridge. . . 466 56 

Baptist Church in Sharon 14 10 

Hon. Samuel Hooper, Washing- 
ton 200 00 

The family of C. Lord, Buckland, 
Mass 6 10 

0. M. Owen, Stockbridge 50 00 

Simeon N. Perry, Walpole, N. II. 30 00 

F. A. Sawyer 50 00 

The Young Ladies' Soldiers' Aid 
Society of Nashua 50 00 

Members of the Boston Corn 
Exchange 1,130 00 

George F. Hoar, Worcester 50 00 

Benjamin Snow, Fitchburg 50 00 

A few contributors in Stock- 
bridge 50 00 

First Congregational Church and 

Society of Calais, Me 100 00 

Monument Church, South Deer- 
field, Mass 10 00 

Proceeds of a morning concert 

in Mount Vernon Street 260 00 

Arthur Wilkinson 100 00 

William Phillips & Son, New Bed- 
ford 75 00 

Dr. Jas. W. Thompson's Church, 

Jamaica Plain . . 506 44 



Collection made in Chelsea, by 

three school-girls* $45 00 

lion. Joseph Grinnell, New Bed- 
ford 100 00 

First Church in Boxford 107 25 

Alex. Strong & Co ] 00 00 

Stone & Downer 1'JO 00 

Marlborough, collected by Rev. 

G. N. Anthony 304 65 

Proceeds of Second Reading, by 

Mr. Siddons and Miss Cameron 75 00 

R. M. Mason, Paris 200 00 

Hancock Street Church, Quincy, 

collected at a Prayer-Meeting. 26 15 

M. P. Grant. 30 00 

Proceeds of a little girls' fair, 

near Plymouth Rock 13 00 

E. P. Tileston, Dorchester 100 00 

Samuel Downer, do 50 00 

Joseph Dix, do 25 00 

Lothrop & Moseley, do 20 00 

William W. Paige, do 10 00 

Daniel B. Stednian & Co., do. . . 20 00 

John Preston, do 10 00 

William L. Clark, do 10 00 

William B. Newbury, do 10 00 

Palmers & Bachelders 100 00 

Henry C. Rand, N. Cambridge. . 25 00 
Collection taken in the Law- 
rence Street Congregational 

Church, Lawrence 172 00 

Collection taken in the Central 

Church, Lynn 174 17 

Collections in Stockbridge, Mass., 

made by R. B. Craig Ill 00 



* The donation from Chelsea was accompanied by the following letter : 

" CHELSEA, March 25th, 1864. 

"DEAR SIR: We have been very much interested in the patriotic people of East Tennessee, and 
not being able to aid them with money, we thought we perhaps might do so by devoting to them our 
leisure time, of which we had only our afternoons, as we are school-girls and have many lessons to 
learn. We have been from house to house in the little town of Chelsea, which is far from rich, with a 
subscription paper, asking from each person the small sum of ten or fifteen cents. The enclosed is 
the result of our efforts. It might be a comforting thought to the suffering Tennesseeans if they could 
know how generous and interested even the poorest people have been in their cause. One poor 
old woman gave all the money she had (seven cents), with the earnest wish that it was a great deal 
more, and that it might also do a little good. 

" Hoping that this may bring half as much comfort to some hungry Tennesscean as we have had 
pleasure in collecting it, we are, 

" Very respectfully, 

"C. L. E. 
"M. 8. E. 
"H. E. D." 



EAST TENNESSEE RELIEF FUND. 



Ladies and gentlemen of the pri- 
vate theatricals in Chickering's 
Hall $732 00 

Dr. Daniel Swan, Medford 100 00 

The Misses Welles 200 00 

Henry Edwards 50 00 

John Russell, Greenfield 100 00 

F. Peirce & Co 10000 

Mrs. Betsey S. Beal, Kingston. . 10 00 

Congregational Church and So- 
ciety at "West Boylston 29 00 

Amount given at St. Paul's 

Church on Easter Sunday. ... 50 00 

Abraham Barker 50 00 

Collection made in the Green- 
ville Baptist Church and Soci- 
ety 44 56 

George A. Newell 50 00 

Baptist Society in Royalston 25 00 

General John S. Tyler 50 00 

The Misses Baldwin, Dorchester 60 00 

Master Charles L. B. Whitney, 
prize for excellence in decla- 
mation, Springfield, Mass 3 00 

William A. Wheeler, Dorchester 3 00 

Congregational Church and So- 
ciety at Mattapoisett, Mass ... 42 32 

H. Bromfield Pearson 100 00 

Edward C. Jones, New Bedford. 100 00 

Officers of the Customs in Bos- 
ton, $5 each 50 00 

Collection at a meeting in Som- 

erville 14 60 

Arthur Searle 30 00 

From D. II. Rogan, Greenfield, 
Mass., the contribution of an 
East Tennessee Refugee, and a 
few of his friends 12 00 

D. R. Greene, New Bedford 100 00 

Pupils in the Adams School at 

Dorchester 50 00 

First Trinitarian Congregational 

Church at Maiden 35 00 

The officers of the 20th Regiment 

of Massachusetts Volunteers. . 125 00 

Citizens of Dorchester 93 00 

Easter offering in the Church of 
the Disciples, Indiana Place, 
Boston 241 43 

From Bernardstown, Mass 90 00 

Mrs. Maria F. Savles. . . 500 00 



The Teachers and Scholars of the 
Unitarian Sabbath School, 
Gloucester, Mass $30 00 

G. W. Messinger, being his salary 
for the year as Treasurer of 
First Church, Boston 50 00 

Second Parish Sabbath School, 

Amherst 20 00 

Citizens of Auburn, Mass 73 25 

Mrs. McBurney, Roxbury 50 00 

Congregational Parish in South- 
field 42 90 

His Excellency, J. L. Motley, Jr., 
Minister of the United States 
at Vienna. . 200 00 

Collection at the Church in Hou- 
satonic, Mass 16 00 

Collection in the Parish of St. 

Andrews, Hanover 46 00 

Proceeds of a masquerade in 

Cambridge 150 00 

Congregational Society of Mil- 
ford 45 00 

Rev. R. M. Hodges, Cambridge. 100 00 

Proceeds of an entertainment 
given under the auspices of 
the Teachers' Association .... 135 00 

Proceeds of a Juvenile Concert. 12 00 

Hon. Ichabod Goodwin, of Ports- 
mouth, from the estate of the 
late Mrs. Charlotte Rice, of 
that city, and in presumed ac- 
cordance with what would 
have been her wishes 500 00 

Teachers and Pupils of the Uni- 
tarian Sunday School at Exe- 
ter, N. H 66 00 

Joseph Lovejoy 25 00 

C. P. Emmons, Needham 25 00 

A class in the Chestnut Street 
Congregational SabbathSchool 
at Chelsea 25 00 

Proceeds of a Fair for the chil- 
dren of East Tennessee by eight 
little girls at Plymouth 80 00 

Susan D. Rogers 25 00 

G. A. Bethune 50 00 

Missionary Church in Lanesville. 

Gloucester, Mass 20 00 

Mrs. Henry Cutter, Winchester. 10 00 

Miss S. B. Morton, Milton Hill. . 50 00 



404 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Mrs. N. F. Safford, Milton Hill . . $25 00 

Hon. Samuel H. Dale, Mayor of 

Bangor 25 00 

Friends of East Tennessee in 

Nantucket 30 00 

A collection on Fast Day at a 
Union meeting of the Baptist 
and Orthodox Churches in Lit- 
tleton 32 06 

Isaac K. Gifford, North Dart- 
mouth 50 00 

Proceeds of two amateur con- 
certs at Salem, under the aus- 
pices of Mr. Manuel Fenollosa 650 00 

Pupils and teacher of the Eliot 

Sabbath School, Newton, Mass. 132 00 

Collection made in the Sunday 
School of the Eliot Church, 
Newton, Mass.* 127 50 

Ladies' Aid Society, South Dan- 

vers 50 00 

Four churches, South Danvers. 154 98 

Second Congregational Society 
in Nantucket 88 03 

Massachusetts Char. Fire So- 
ciety 300 00 

S. H. Bourne, Kennebunk 5 00 

Mrs. Mary Morton, Milton Hill. 50 00 

Mrs. M. H. M. Thompson 25 00 

Blodgett & White 100 00 

Thomas W. Mayhew, Westport 

Point 10 00 

Proceeds of tableaux at Jamaica 

Plain 334 T5 

S. Blackinton, North Adams. . . 100 00 

S. Johnson, " ... 50 00 

S. W. Brayton, " ... 50 00 

Mrs. Mary B. Parkman 5 00 

Chiefly raised by contributions 
in the several churches of Mil- 
bury 150 00 

The officers and crew of the U. 
S. Ship Rattler 127 00 



T. Jefferson Coolidge $200 00 

C. D. Kellogg 20 00 

Citizens of Tyngsborough 23 00 

Collection made by three little 

girls in Concord, Mass 50 00 

Citizens of Dennis, being the 
proceeds of an exhibition held 

there 37 00 

Collection in the church of the 

Eev. Dr. Hill, in Worcester. . 222 00 
First Congregational Church in 

New Marlborough 40 00 

Universalist Church in Shirley 

Village 41 00 

Anonymoust 500 00 

Elias Keith, Rowe, Mass 6 00 

S. P. Brown, Dover, Me 100 00 

A few citizens of York, Me 45 00 

Proceeds of a little girls' fair in 

Dorchester 200 35 

Proceeds of a young ladies' fair, 
held at No. 21 Boylstou Place 1,000 00 

Citizens of Ipswich 385 00 

A few ladies in Belmont, by 

Miss Mack 57 00 

Collection taken in Rev. Joshua 
Coit's church, at Brookfield, 

Mass 30 00 

Aaron Roberts, Dover, N. II. . . 10 00 
A few individuals in North Par- 
ish, Portsmouth 150 00 

"Dickens Dramatic Club," 

Cambridge 103 00 

First Baptist Church in Dor- 
chester 17 50 

Members of the M. E. Church in 

Dorchester 35 00 

Collection in the Congregational 

Church at South Reading 72 13 

Social gathering at do 46 00 

Collection in the Unitarian 

Church in North Chelsea 34 00 

Lafayette Burr 50 00 



* Mr. Bacon, in transmitting the handsome donation of the Eliot Sunday School, writes : " We 
were stimulated to make our collection as large as possible by the liberal offer of our Sabbath School 
teacher to double whatever sum might be contributed by the school. The result was a contribution 
of $132." 

t This munificent donation was enclosed in a note, in which the writer says : 

"I have stood in the fight many a day by the side of those East Tcnnesseeans, but I see there 
are yet other ways of doing one's duty towards them ; so I add my contribution to their aid." 



EAST TENNESSEE RELIEF FUND. 



405 



Collection at the Crombie Street 

Church and Society at Salem $73 47 

Penny contributions of the 
Mount Vernon Sabbath 
School, for one month 25 00 

Collection taken at the Church 

of the Unity, at Worcester. . . 158 00 

Collection taken at the Congre- 
gational Church at Wenham. 29 00 

Unitarian Sunday School at 

Quincy 254 10 

Collected in New Bedford, by 
Master Willie Rowland, who 
was prevented from getting 
more by illness 3 50 

Collection at the Dorchester Vil- 
lage Church 53 25 

Collection at the church of the 
Third Eeligious Society of 
Dorchester 100 00 

Collection at the First Indepen- 
dent Methodist Church, Dor- 
chester 13 35 

Citizens of Dorchester 87 00 

John W. Peirce,* Jr., Tremont, 

Me 25 00 

Collection in the North Congre- 
gational Church and Society 
atHaverhill.. 162 75 



Edward Ilolbrook $20 00 

Jas. L. Mills & Son 25 00 

Collection in North Congrega- 
tional Church in Haverhill. . . 162 50 

Collection -fay the youngest class 
at M'lle De Bonville's school 
for young ladies, 54 Chestnut 
Street 25 00 

Citizens of West Amesbury. ... 161 00 

First Church in Koxbury, Rev. 

Dr. Putnam 933 00 

The proceeds of a little girls' 
fair in West Cedar Street, by 
Misses Maria Decatur, Grace 
Kellogg, and Susie Spring. . . 50 65 

A part of the " Penny Contribu- 
tion " of the Mather Sabbath 
School of Jamaica Plain 10 00 

The North Baptist Society in 

Dorchester 15 00 

Nickerson & Co 100 00 

Congregational Church and So- 
ciety of Buckland 32 10 

Congregational Society at Acton 7 00 

Miss Anne Wigglesworth,t a 

second donation of 100 00 

Miss Mary Wiggles worth 100 00 

E. D. Everett 20 00 

Citizens of Dana, Mass 48 65 



* The contribution of Master Peirce, a lad of twelve, was remitted in the following letter: 

"S. W. HARBOR, TREMONT, ME., April 5, 1864. 

" DEAR SIR : Enclosed please find $25, which 1 have collected for the suffering East Tennes- 
seeans. I have read and heard so much of the sufferings of these loyal people, that I wished very 
much to do something for them. I said to my mother, I will give them my dollar, all my money. 
She said that will do very little good alone, but I might go round and ask my young friends to 
give for this noble cause. I was pleased to do so, and have collected this sum. I found both old 
and young ready to give me something; very few refused. In one family I got almost $5. I know 
this is a small sum compared with the thousands you are receiving; but if some little boy in each 
town of this state would go round among his friends, the sums thus collected all put together 
would make thousands of dollars; and, oh! how much suffering would be relieved! 

" Respectfully yours, 
[Signed] " JNO. W. PEIRCE, JR." 

f- Miss Wigglesworth's second donation was enclosed in the following note : 

" Will Mr. Everett be kind enough to accept the enclosed, that it may lend its little aid in filling 
the vacuum which exists between the present receipts and the $100,000, which we miust send from 
Massachusetts. 

" I have not waited till this last moment before sending my mite, as my first was sent in February. 
But I cannot sit still and merely wish that our contributions should reach the sum of one hundred 
thousand. I must make my wish and hope that others will do the same assume a practical form. 

"Very respectfully yours, 
. "1 Park Street, May 9, 1864." "A. WIGGLESWORTU. 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



Mr. Emmanuel, an attache of the 

Consul-General's office at Con- 
stantinople $20 00 

Mrs. Albert "W. Paine, Bangor, 

Me 10 00 

Messrs. Faxon, Elms & Co 50 00 

Mrs. Peter C. Brooks 200 00 

Edwin Rowland 100 00 

Collection taken in the church 

of Eev. Samuel Brooks, at 

South Framingham 39 50 

J. Kuhn 25 00 

Henry Lyon, M. D., Charlestown 50 00 

Col. Samuel Swett 30 00 

Amos P. Tapley, Lynn 100 00 

Miss Eliza Whitwell, Dorchester 100 00 
Eev. Alex. Proudfit, Chaplain 

U. S. A 15 00 

Samuel Eodman, New Bedford . 10000 
The Amesbury Mills Congrega- 
tional Society 37 4(5 

George Wilson, New Bedford. . 10 00 

O. W. Holmes, M. D 100 00 

Net proceeds of a musical enter- 
tainment at Chickering's Hall, 

the use of which was given by 

the Messrs. C.'s gratuitously. 1,102 00 

W. II. H. Newman 50 00 

Three boys at Walpole, "the 

profits of a small store and 

picking dandelions " in the 

holidays 5 00 

Proceeds of a children's fair, 

held at the house of William 

Gray, by Ellen Gray, Anna 

Jackson, and Georgiana Eaton 500 00 
Congregational Society at Truro 18 00 

Methodist Society at Maiden 

Centre 70 50 

Proceeds of a children's fair, at 

the house of Dr. Ilayward, 

Temple Place 190 00 

Mrs. J. Mason Warren 100 00 

Hon. S. L. Crocker, Taunton. . . 100 00 
Total . . 



Proceeds of a little child's fair 

in Westchester Park $7 00 

Collection at a meeting of the 

Universalist Society at South 

Danvers 33 00 

Proceeds of a children's fair 

at Dr. Talbot's 1,004 00 

Miss Martha B. Waite 1 00 00 

Charles Sherry, Jr., Bristol, E.I. 100 00 
Ladies' Eelief Association, Fifth 

Ward, Providence 100 00 

Joseph A. Barker, do 25 00 

S. G. Mason, do 20 00 

Eev. Dr. Wayland, do 25 00 

Charles E. Carpenter, do 25 00 

Amos D. Smith, do 100 00 

From the Congregational Church 

and Society in Ilollis, N. II. . 56 50 

Proceeds of a concert given in 

the Music Hall, under the 

auspices of Mrs. Eastburn . . . 802 25 
Proceeds of a collection at the 

Trinitarian Church at New 

Bedford 150 00 

From Misses Mary W. Gannett, 

Sarah M. Bond, and Grace T. 

Etheridge, the proceeds of a 

children's fair 41 25 

Proceeds of an emblematic and 

dramatic entertainment in 

Chickering's Hall 11 fi 00 

Proceeds of a children's fair, 

held at the house of John 

Lowell ;)8(5 00 

First Congregational Church and 

Society in Yorke, Me 21 45 

Attleboro'($128.50) and Wrenth- 

am ($41.00) 1(59 50 

I). B. Check, Danville, Ky 5 00 

Capt. S. D. Trenchard, U. S. N. . 20 00 

Proceeds of a fair at 109 Pinck- 

ney Street D2 16 

All other sums 10,544 6(5 



.$102,180 08 



The next chapter will describe the aims and efforts of a commission 
organized to follow up the work thus nobly begun. 



CHAPTER XIII. 




1THERTO, this matter of feeding and aiding the loyal 
men of the disloyal states had been conducted, as it were, 
from hand to mouth; an organized commission now 
assumed the duty. This commission, with the above 
title, was formed in New York, in October, 1864, and 
was constituted as follows: 



Treasurer, 
A. V. STOUT. 



President. 
REV. Jos. P. THOMPSON. 

Corresponding Secretary, 
PROF. B. N". MARTIN, D. D. 



REV. S. B. BELL, D. D., 
WM. A. BOOTH, 



Recording Secretary, 
H. M. PIERCE. 

E. L. FAXCHER. 
WM. G. LAMBERT, 



408 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

REV. W. I. BUDDIXGTON, D. D., GEO. "W. LANE, 

CIIAELES BUTLER, A. A. Low, 

S. B. CniTTEXDEX, REV. J. McCLiNxocK, D. D., 

CHARLES C. COLGATE, R. II. McCuRDY, 

REV. J. T. DCRYEA, REV. S. H. TYNG, JR., 

REV. II. G. WESTON, D. D., HORACE WEBSTER, LL. D. 

The Eev. Lyman Abbott subsequently became Corresponding Secretary in 
place of Prof. Martin, and Messrs. David Dows, Henry T. Morgan, Christopher 
Robert, and Samuel B. Schieffelin, were made members of the commission. 

The first appeal to the public was issued on the 9th of November, the 
commission having, at that time, received about one thousand dollars, nearly 
half of which was contributed by the Tabernacle Church in New York, of 
which the president of the commission is pastor. From this appeal, which 
fully set forth the aims of the association, we make the following extract : 

" Large tracts of our country have been desolated by the march of vast 
armies to and fro ; the population, first exhausted by military exactions, have 
been plundered and stripped by guerrilleros ; at length, abandoning their famine- 
smitten homes, they crowd within our lines. They arrive in the utmost pos- 
sible destitution ; huddle together in wretched places of refuge, and sink 

under want, exposure, and disease The forced depopulation of Atlanta, 

and the recent devastation of the Shenandoah valley, have made a frightful 
increase of this misery, and thrown fresh thousands of houseless and naked 
creatures upon Pennsylvania and Kentucky for relief. An ordinary famine 
scarcely involves such suffering. The famine-stricken have homes. It is 
impossible to depict this misery of the homeless. 

" Twelve hundred such sufferers are this day in Memphis, with scarcely 
any other shelter than four worn-out tents. They are destitute of every con- 
venience of life, nay, of every necessity. Some of them have not seen a comb 
for months, and are devoured by vermin. "Women have not the clothing 
which decency demands, and their children stand naked around them. 

" Their wretched abodes, crowded with the sick who are unable to help 
themselves, are filthy and pestilential to the last degree ; sixty are huddled in 
one small room at Natchez, most of them severely ill. The dying lie uncared 
for, the dead unburied among them for days. At some posts, as at Knoxville, 
there is a lack of medicine ; at others, as at Memphis, they have no medical 
attendance ; everywhere they are destitute of all suitable food for the sick. 
Everywhere they need stoves to warm their miserable shelters, and enable the 
women to earn something by sewing. 

" What can be done ? Only the briefest time remains in which to provide 



THE AMERICAN UNION COMMISSION. 409 

succor before the winter. We appeal to all who have hearts to feel for human 
misery than which none greater exists on the face of the earth. We plead 
for a contribution of clothing from every family. We beg you to tie up what- 
ever you can spare, and hand it to the agent of our commission, who will call 
for it within a few days. We appeal to the ladies to furnish us blankets, 
shawls, dresses, under-clothing, stockings, and shoes, for women and children. 
No want, no suffering, exists in our land this day which pleads with equal 
urgency for prompt and generous relief. 

" The Union Commission has the approval of the President and the sanction 
of the War Department, and can command government facilities for transpor- 
tation. Whatever is contributed will be at once transmitted. Our generosity 
will save the lives of our friends, abate the rancor of our enemies, and bless 
and relieve those who are literally ready to perish." 

Though the country had been giving freely to works of charity and jus- 
tice for nearly four years, and though this call was made just after a most 
exciting general election, the state of things above depicted seemed to touch 
a fresh spot in the public heart. The contributors to the Union Commis- 
sion have been principally poor people ; the fund with which it has labored 
is an aggregate of church collections, widows' mites, hard-earned savings, with 
here and there a few dollars from a soldier or from the patients in a hospital. 
Few millionaires have endowed the Union Commission ; the money and the 
clothing it has collected seem to have come, in a large degree, from the smaller 
towns and villages, and in inconsiderable quantities from the cities. 

Several distinct fields of labor at once presented themselves. There was 
West Virginia, which had furnished her full quota of soldiers, with sixteen 
thousand square miles of her territory literally stripped bare, having been 
overrun by the two contending armies not less than twelve times ; ten thou- 
sand of her population were in necessitous circumstances, many of them 
houseless and penniless. There was East Tennessee, whose distresses have 
been already detailed ; and there was that wretched class of sufferers called 
refugees, stranded within the United States lines by the tide of war, afraid to 
go home indeed, with no home to go to driven backward and forward by 
the advancing armies, hardly better treated by their friends than by their foes. 
The Sanitary and Christian Commissions aided them as much as they felt 
able ; the government gave them half rations, and, to a limited extent, trans- 
portation. They huddled together in Nashville; Nashville was threatened by 
the enemy, and military necessity thrust them forth, urging them, some north, 
some south. It was among this class of wanderers that the Union Commission 



410 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

expected mainly to work, and while ministering to present necessities, re- 
lieving the sick, feeding the hungry, and clothing the naked, its purpose 
was to do nothing which would tend to create a state of dependence, or to 
hold the people long as paupers. Other purposes entertained by the commission 
and subsequently carried out were to deport the refugees to points where 
labor was in demand; to establish industrial houses where women and children 
could be taught to sew, thus preparing them to go back, in good time, to the 
land, if not to the homes, they loved, better informed, more intelligent, and 
more useful than they left it. 

" I will take this poor, starving boy," said Mr. Thompson, in a discourse 
upon this topic, " no matter who his father was or where he is, I will take him 
by the hand ; I will nurture him ; I will clothe him ; I will feed him ; I will 
teach him to read ; I will teach him the knowledge of God and of Jesus 
Christ his Saviour; I will teach him that he has a country; I will teach him 
what he never knew before, the geography of his country, the extent of it ; I 
will teach him what he never knew before, the history of his country, the great 
name of Washington, and all that is illustrious in our past; and I will make 
that boy a patriot ! I will teach him that the men against whom, perhaps, his 
father, in his ignorance and prejudice and blindness, goaded on by men of 
infamous deeds, has lifted his hand, are the men who have nurtured and saved 
and educated and blessed him. And I will sow that land of rebellion thick 
with these regenerated children. If we are not great enough for that, we are 
not great enough to be free." 

An ulterior and more comprehensive object of the organization was to 
assist in all ways and in all times, the work of reunion, of resuscitation ; and 
to do this by facilitating the right kind of emigration, by disseminating cor- 
rect information, and by providing, on a broad scale, for the education of a 
people from whom its advantages have been too long withheld. 

On the 1st of May, 1865. the commission, having been in existence six 
months, had received and appropriated to the uses which have been stated, 
about $40,000 in money, and clothing, blankets, and shoes, to the value of 
about $30,000. The capture of Charleston by the Union forces had necessi- 
tated the sending of aid to the destitute inhabitants there, thus enlarging a 
field already large enough for the laborers. Refugees soon began to arrive in 
large numbers in New York, and the commission could neither let them 
starve nor pass the night in the streets. The commission was preparing, at 
the date above mentioned, to assume the care of deserters from the rebel 
army, to open schools in Savannah, Charleston, and Memphis, and to provide 



THE AMERICAN UNION COMMISSION. 411 

the loyalists of West Virginia and East Tennessee with seeds and implements 
of agriculture. A branch society, the New England Refugees' Aid Society,* 
had collected $25,000 in the same time. 

Like the associations for the relief of freedmen, the Union Commission 
and its branches doubtless have years of useful labor before them ; their great 
opportunity is yet to come. While their Sanitary and Christian colleagues 
are laying off their harness, they are but just buckling their armor on. This 
is but right and proper ; to each time its own duties, and to each cause its ser- 
vants. The sword has been beaten into a plough-share, and the spear into a 
pruning-hook. Devastation is over, restoration is to begin. And as far as 
such a work can be aided by the organization and operations of a semi-chari- 
table, semi-educational society, one whose bounty is accompanied by a lesson 
in the art of using it to advantage, so far we have the past as a guarantee 
will it be fostered and hastened by the labors of the American Union Com- 
mission. 



* Executive Committee, Hon. Martin Brimmer, Hon. Dvvight Foster, Rev. Joseph W. Parker, D. D., 
Thomas C. Wales, Hamilton A. Hill, Heury P. Kidder. 




412 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



CHAPTER XIY. 



THE CHAMBERSBUHG AND SAVANNAH RELIEF FUNDS. 




TUB 1.1 i.Sb OK CIlAMIiKUSUl'Kt;. 



THE town of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, was burned by a body of three 
thousand rebels under General McCausland forming part of the forces under 
General Early in July, 186i, the inhabitants being unable to raise the sum, 
in gold, which had been fixed as the price of its ransom. Eighteen hundred 
persons, half the population, were rendered homeless, four hundred of whom 
still possessed some means, the other fourteen hundred being utterly destitute. 
For some time they lived on the charity of their neighbors, and the chance 
contributions of friends in other towns. 

An eye-witness has given the following description of the scene : 

" The order for the burning of the town was given by General McCausland 



CHAMBERSBURG AND SAVANNAH. 413 

at nine o'clock, and fifteen minutes afterwards flames were leaping from the 
windows of the houses in the Diamond. The rebels, breaking into the drug- 
stores, procured turpentine, and making fire-balls, threw them into the houses 
indiscriminately. The men were sent around in squads, plundering and 
burning every house they saw fit to enter. Yery often these men obtained 
considerable sums of money from the wealthier citizens to protect their prop- 
erty. Their promises were ample surety until the money was in their hands, 
but after it was received they entirely disregarded them. 

;< One of these squads, entering a house, gave the inmates five minutes to 
remove their effects before deluging the floor with turpentine and igniting it. 
The scene at ten o'clock was indescribable. Nearly the whole town was one 
roaring mass of fire. So intense was the heat, it was impossible even to walk 
through the Diamond a large open space in the centre of the town. The 
flames from either side of the streets met each other, forming an arch of fire, 
above which the black smoke rolled in thick and heavy volumes, obscuring 
the heavens. Houseless and homeless women and children fleeing, and the 
oaths of the maddened rebels, completed this picture of horrors, a scene that 
will never be forgotten by the citizens of Chambersburg. Nothing, compara- 
tively, was saved an old painting, the family Bible, a change of clothing, 
that was all. No time was allowed for the removal of the furniture, or even 
trunks of clothing. Seventy pianos in the different houses in one street were 
burned. The terror of the scene appalled even the rebels." 

A meeting was held in the rooms of the Board of Trade of Philadelphia 
on the 3d of August, to adopt some measures of relief to the despoiled inhabi- 
tants. This resulted in a subscription, Mr. Edmund A. Souder being made 
treasurer of the fund, which amounted, some weeks afterwards, to a trifle over 
$35,000. A considerable quantity of second-hand clothing, collected by a 
ladies' committee, was also forwarded from time to time. Just before the 
burning, Chambersburg had held a fair for the Christian Commission, the net 
receipts of which, over $3,000, were paid to the central office at Philadelphia. 
The people of Baltimore, thinking that the unhappy city could ill afford such 
generosity, as things had turned out, thought it would be a good idea to return 
the people that sum, and did so, a subscription taken up in that view amount- 
ing to $3,261.40. 

We have mentioned several instances of a peculiar species of revenge 
brought about by the whirligig of time. Here is another, and the best of all. 

On the 10th of August, 1774, at a general meeting of the inhabitants of 
Georgia at Savannah, a committee was appointed "to receive subscriptions for 



414 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

the suffering poor of Boston," the latter city being reduced, by the action of 
the Port Bill, almost to the condition of a besieged town. As the subscrip- 
tions were principally in rice, few giving less than ten tierces, and as the harbor 
of Boston was closed, the contributions were sent to New York and sold, the 
proceeds, a trifle over 216, being remitted to the Boston committee. In 
January, 1865, the citizens of Boston held a meeting and appointed a commit- 
tee to receive subscriptions for the relief of the suffering poor of Savannah ; 
and not only the citizens of Boston, but those of New York and Philadelphia. 
There was some doubt whether distress such as had been represented really 
existed ; some apprehension lest the bounty asked for, if granted, might reach 
unworthy persons ; some unwillingness to enter so promptly into relations with 
people who were only civil, perhaps, because they dared not be otherwise. But 
these feelings were lost sight of in the general desire that bygones should be 
bygones, and the three cities made generous contributions to the fund not 
far from $100,000 in all. The last public act of Edward Everett's life was to 
cast his influence in favor of answering the appeal in a cordial and forgiving 
spirit. 



CHAPTER XV. . 

KEFRESHMENT SALOONS, SUBSISTENCE COMMITTEES, SOLDIERS' HOMES, ETC. : 
THE FIRE AMBULANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA. 




TUK UNION VOLUNTEER REFRESHMENT SALOON, PHILADELPHIA. 

THE 27th day of May, 1861, witnessed the inauguration of a novel institu- 
tion in Philadelphia, and every 27th day since has been a pleasantly kept 
anniversary. . The Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, and the Cooper- 
Shop Refreshment Saloon, were opened on that day ; this much is certain. An 
attempt has been made to arrive at greater precision to settle not only the 
date, but the hour, of the birth of each, as in the case of royal twins, to decide 
which is the heir and which the subject. It is not our province to judge, 
though we may have heard the evidence ; and it is probable that the reader 
will be more interested in the story of the mouths they have fed than in that 
of their claims to precedence. Placing them both upon a line, and engaging 
to invoke the favor of the public equally upon each, we proceed to state how 
it was that these democratic republican twins were conceived and born. 

In the third week of April, 1861, the regiments of three months' men, 
summoned by the President to the defence of Washington, began passing 
through Philadelphia. The government had as yet made no preparations 



416 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

for giving the men their meals upon the route. They arrived hungry and 
fatigued^ and, during the first six weeks, were dependent upon the benevo- 
lence of the citizens living in the neighborhood. From them they received 
water, tea and coffee, and even bread and meat. But the inhabitants of the 
quarter were of the laboring class, and could ill afford to continue their 
self-imposed labor of love, especially as the number of men to be relieved 
increased from day to day. At length, Mr. Barzilla S. Brown gave notice 
that he would receive and distribute to the troops arriving such supplies as 
his friends would furnish ; and he began operations upon the curbstone, with 
eleven pounds of coffee and a saucepan. This was the humble origin of two 
institutions of brotherly love, which have made the name of Philadelphia a 
blessed one on the lips of the American soldier. The two saloons, in imme- 
diate proximity to each other the one a Boat-House, the other a Cooper-Shop 
were fitted up by different groups of philanthropic citizens, and put in a con- 
dition to receive and refresh the passing troops. The Eighth New York was 
the first regiment to receive the hospitality of the Boat-House, while the 
Cooper-Shop extended its earliest greeting to the Seventh of the same state. 
The officers of these two establishments were as follows : 

UNION VOLUNTEER REFRESHMENT SALOON. 

Chairman, Recording Secretary, 

ARAD BARROWS. J. B. WADE. 

Corresponding Secretary, Treasurer, 

ROBERT R. CORSON. B. S. BROWN. 

Steward, Physician, 

J. T. WILLIAMS. E. WARD. 

COOPER-SHOP REFRESHMENT SALOON. 

President, 
WM. M. COOPER. 

Vice-Presiden ts, 
WILLIAM SPROLE, ARTHUR S. SIMPSON. 

Recording Secretary, Corr expanding Secretary, 

WM. M. MAULL. EDWARD J. HERATY. 

Treasurer, Storekeeper, 

ADAM M. SIMPSON. CHRISTOPHER H. JACOBY. 

Establishments of this kind are best described by those who have seen 

them in operation. We therefore condense the description of an eye-witness : 

u The wash-room," we read in an account of the Volunteer Saloon, "is an 



THE UNION VOLUNTEER REFRESHMENT SALOON. 417 

important department. Here clean towels and cool water are furnished in 
abundance, so that one company can bathe and speedily make room for an- 
other. Few are aware with what hearty relish the dusty soldier avails him- 
self of this privilege of a bath. The eating-rooin- which formerly accommo- 
dated four hundred and fifty persons, will now hold twelve hundred. The 
officers are seated, the men taking their food standing an agreeable relief after 
their long ride in the cars. The food furnished is better than the average 
obtained at a city hotel, the bill of fare embracing beef cooked in every style, 
ham, pickles, excellent bread, sweet and common potatoes, tea and coffee, and 
often cake and pies. A regiment consumes seven barrels of coffee, and as 
many gallons of tea. A good, wholesome meal, thus provided in bulk, does 
not cost over nine or ten cents. In eight minutes after the room is cleared of 
one division, the tables are freshly spread and ready for another. 

" Attached to the saloon is a hospital cottage, for the reception of men 
taken, sick on their way, or for wounded men going home, who are forced to 
stop upon their route. Here is a large table covered with writing-materials, 
where the soldier may write his letters. An attendant takes them, stamps 
them without charge, and dispatches them by the bushel basketful. Large 
bundles of the daily papers are ready for distribution. So it appears that the 
American trooper's programme on arriving in Philadelphia is as follows : he 
first performs his ablutions, then he eats his breakfast ; after that he writes to 
his wife, and then he reads the news. The Baltimore train is now ready, and 
he bids farewell to Philadelphia, in the hope that his journey homeward, if 
he lives to make it, may lie that way." 

A little pamphlet of twelve pages, four inches by two and a half, is pub- 
lished by Mr. Corson, an officer of this association. It is entitled " The Sol- 
dier's Guide in Philadelphia," and is distributed far and wide gratuitously. 
It contains engravings of the saloon and of the hospital attached to it ; a 
list of their officers ; directions how to dispense with carriages ; time-tables 
of railroads and steamboats; a cordial invitation to breakfast, dinner, and 
supper, without charge ; a guide to all places of interest, and an ingenious 
diagram, explaining the plan of the numbering of the streets. This useful 
little volume opens with the following apt quotations : 

POMPET. Let me shake thy hand : 
I have seen thee fight. 

AXTOXT AND CLEOPATRA, If. 6. 



27 



MESSEXGER. He hath done good service in these wars. 

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, T. 1. 



418 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



What has been said of the mechanism of one of these saloons will 
answer in every respect for the other. The Cooper-Shop increased the accom- 
modations with which it started, till it was able to give a whole regiment a 
meal together, and with little or no delay. 




THE COOPEU SHOP REFRESHMENT SALOON. 



A hospital was soon after established, with twelve beds, the number 
being afterwards increased to twenty-eight. A few deaths occurred, and the 
managers of the Mount Moriah Cemetery presented the committee with a 
plot of ground, a beautiful piece of upland, where the soldier might find 
a resting-place. It was enclosed and ornamented the next year. 

The committee, in their first annual report, made the following remarks, 
the justice of which no one can doubt : " The effect upon the soldier of 
the reception and treatment that, by the great liberality of our fellow-cit- 
izens, we have been enabled to offer him, will prove to be of the most lasting 
character, and beneficial to the citizens of Philadelphia. The most favorable 
impressions have been made indelibly upon his mind, of the kindness of our 
people. The reception he has met with furnishes a theme upon which he 
will delight to write and speak. Oar city, the first to commence this work, 
has shown itself to be well deserving the name of brotherly love ; and we are 
sure there are more well-wishers outside of its borders to-day, than any other 
city in our Union can boast of." 



THE REFRESHMENT SALOONS. 419 

The two saloons have been supported wholly by the people of Philadelphia, 
who have kept them supplied with money, as far as money was needed, and 
have spread their tables not only with beef and potatoes, but with fruit and 
flowers in their season. Many persons have been regular subscribers, or 
rather, as there was no registering of names, expected to be called on at stated 
intervals for the sum which it had become their habit to give. Numerous 
summer fairs have been held for each ; from the country fifty miles around 
the city came gifts of strawberries, cake, butter, bread, fruit, while the city 
people sent ice-cream. Sums as large as $5,000 have been realized from these 
festivals, one of which remained open nine days, and received thirty-six thou- 
sand visitors. 




A REGIMENT AT PIN NEE. 



The saloons have done good in more ways than one ; a single example of 
this must suffice, as follows: "We were speaking," wrote a gentleman in^a 
letter to Mr. S. B. Fales, one of the officers of the Union Saloon, " of the de- 
moralizing influences of camp life, and a friend remarked that while at East 
New York, his regiment, composed in large part of farmers' sons, and lads 
who had had a considerable amount of moral training at home, had become 
sadly demoralized. The camp was surrounded by grog-shops, and the rations 
were of the poorest filth) 7 , insufficient, and not half cooked, and all the asso- 
ciations of the camp were evil ; the men had become dispirited and disgusted, 
and felt that no one cared for them except as food for powder ; and though he 
and some of the other officers endeavored to encourage and cheer them, they 
were sullen, and seemed about ready for mutiny and desertion. ' But,' said he, 
' orders came for the regiment to march, and the men went on board the 
steamer much as if they were going to the gallows. We reached Philadelphia, 
and marched to the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, and the warm wel- 
come, the hearty shake of the hand, and the ample and delicious fare served 



420 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

up for us, put a new spirit into the men. They had landed in a mood fit 
for mutiny or desertion ; they left Philadelphia, feeling that they were the 
cherished soldiers of the nation, loved for the cause in which they were to 
fight.'" 

The statistics of the work done, and of the means with which it was done, 
by the Cooper-Shop, are as follows : 

Soldiers fed during the first year 87,513 

Contributions " " $13,10385 

Soldiers fed during the second year 87,433 

Contributions " " 15,137 49 

Soldiers fed during the third year 07,300 

Contributions " " 15,39548 

Soldiers fed during the fourth year 44.745 

Contributions " " 14,085 01 



Total 316,991 $57,781 83 

Showing an average cost per man of eighteen cents, notwithstanding the 
high price of provisions during the past two years. As very many of the men 
took more than one meal, the average cost of a meal cannot be placed higher 
than thirteen or fourteen cents. It is estimated that during the four years ten 
thousand meals were furnished to soldiers singly or in squads of two or three, 
many of them maimed or invalids on a visit from the military hospitals. 
There was no record kept of these odd meals. 

The soldiers returning by brigades together from the war, in the summer 
of 1865, the fifth year, tasked the energies of the saloon committees to the 
utmost, and the fifth annual report will doubtless show that their closing 
labors were their heaviest. 

The following are the records of the Union Volunteer Saloon for the same 
period : 

Soldiers fed during the first year 161,270 

Contributions " " $16,70000 

Soldiers fed during the second year 124,012 

Contributions " " 18,03886 

Soldiers fed during the third year 131,766 

Contributions " " 18,81193 

Soldiers fed during the fourth year to July 1st, 1865. . . 195,083 
Contributions " " ' " 33,009 98 



Total 612,131 $86,560 77 

la June, 1865, this saloon gave meals, on certain days, to three thousand 
five hundred returning men ; some of them, doubtless, those who in the earlier 
days went through Philadelphia and hoped to come back that way. 



THE VOLUNTEER HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION. 421 

It was soon evident that these establishments, apparently complete as they 
were, needed a supplementary department, the object of which should be the 
temporary care of the wounded, who, as they left the cars, and before they 
could be transferred to the hospitals, were necessarily thrown upon the street, 
and for a time left there. A number of mechanics met together, discussed the 
matter, and resolved to take it in hand, it being apparent, to quote the pre- 
amble to the constitution which was afterwards drawn up, " that the govern- 
ment is partially unable to provide immediate relief to its brave defenders who 
are sick and wounded when they reach this city." A vacant lot, close by the 
spot where the soldiers were transferred from the cars, and belonging to the 
Hon. Josiah Eandall, was placed at their disposal for hospital purposes by the 
owner. With sixty dollars these men commenced their generous work. They 
purchased the few feet of lumber their means would allow, and for a time 
worked with their own hands at digging holes and planting posts. Five hun- 
dred dollars and thirty-five thousand feet of lumber were now speedily con- 
tributed, Mr. L. B. M. Dolby obtaining nearly the whole of the lumber, by 
donations, in one day. On the fifteenth night after the first post was planted, 
three hundred men from the Army of the Potomac were provided with refresh- 
ments, medical attentions, and beds. This establishment, The Citizens' Union 
Volunteer Hospital Association, was organized on the 5th of September, 1862, 
with the following officers : 

President, 
T. T. TASKER, SR. 

Treasurer, Secretary. 

CHARLES P. PEROT. THOMAS L. GIFFORD. 

Board of Managers. 

JOHN WILLIAMS. GEORGE W. LOTT, 

EDWARD H. PYLE, W. L. CLAYTON, 

FRANK BAYLE, JOHN KILPATRICK, 

JOHN II. CLAYTON, WILLIAM R. PIDGEON, 

DAVID FOY, JOSEPH L. GOFF, 

JAMES EVANS, SAMUEL BAYLE, 

HENRY J. Fox, DAVID J. STEVENSON, 

Louis H. GRUBB, ALEXANDER GREAVES, 

SAMUEL W. MIDDLETON, ANDREW KILPATRICK, 

JOHN GOORLEY, JAMES I). DOHERTY, 

HENRY RUTTER, EDMUND HOPPER, 

WILLIAM J. VERDETTE, JOHN PARSONS, 

ANDREW MCFETTERS. 

Additional buildings were soon required, and Mr. Randall gave the use of 
another lot of land. The hospital, when thus enlarged, covered over twenty- 



422 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



five thousand feet of ground. It contained, besides the reception-room proper, 
two dining-rooms, a bath-room, wash-room, laundry, guard-house, and sur- 
geon's office. During the first year thirty thousand men were received, some- 
times twenty-five hundred in a day, and seven hundred have slept within the 
walls on one night. A committee of members of the association was always 
in attendance, not only to provide refreshments and accommodation, but to 
take charge of all men either furloughed or mustered out. 




F.KK HOSPITAL, 



The association received during the first year, besides nearly $20,000 in 
cash, over three thousand shirts, two thousand five hundred pairs of drawers, 
one thousand pairs of stockings, large quantities of handkerchiefs, sheets, 
pillow-cases, towels, wrappers, lint, and linen ; jellies, preserves, wine, tea, 
sugar, coffee, and numerous other articles necessary for the sick, comforting 
to the convalescent, and not to be refused by the well. Of the cash receipts, 
over $7,000 were the earnings of ninety-three fairs, lectures, balls, benefits, 
and exhibitions. 

The second year's receipts were over $10,000 in money, and a correspond- 
ing amount of supplies; the association cared for thirty-five thousand sick and 
wounded men, and furnished one hundred and twenty-five thousand meals. 
It continued its labors until government action rendered them unnecessary. 

A pleasant story, illustrating the almost over-care sometimes bestowed 
upon the sick, is told in connection with this establishment : 

" An old lady from the country had come to the city with the intention of 
visiting the hospitals a bustling, motherly, kind-hearted soul, who had faith- 
fully discharged all the duties of domestic life, rounding them off with the 
genial tenderness of a warm and affectionate nature. The hospitals were 
unexplored wonders, tempting her scrutiny; and it may not be unlikely, too, 



UNION RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF BALTIMORE. 423 

that the romantic sympathy which younger women cherish for courage, espe- 
cially when, in defiance of danger, it has brought suffering upon its gallant 
possessor, quickened the blood even in her aged veins. At any rate, the old 
lady adjusted her spectacles and smoothed her apron, preparatory to a minute 
examination of our homes for suffering heroes. She began with the Volun- 
teer Hospital, under the charge of Mr. Barzilla S. Brown. She thought that a 
moderate establishment of this kind would be an easy initiation. Innocent 
rusticity! The third bed utterly demolished the dear old lady's self-control. 
She had stood the previous ones pretty well. It is true, that second man he 
with the dark-rimmed, sunken eyes, and pinched features made his visitor's 
lips twitch strangely when, in mute acknowledgment of her kindness, he laid 
his wasted hand softly against hers. 

" But this third fellow, with only a stump of a leg, and a still less stump of 
a life somehow the spectacles grew dim while she gazed at him. At least 
three hundred and fifty questions were flung at the patient as to the poignancy 
of his sufferings, and three hundred and fifty more to elicit all his wants. 
But the assiduity of physician and nurse had not left the poor fellow the 
privilege of a single want except a fevered whim that happened then to pre- 
sent itself, for chicken broth. 

"Will it be believed that the next day brought Mr. Brown sixteen live 
chickens ? Sixteen live chickens for one man's broth ! 

li But not for one man. This same broth is very often craved by parched 
lips and fastidious stomachs. Mr. Brown received the gift with joy; con- 
structed a goodly coop ; and now solicits further contributions of these birds. 
We do not all live in the country ; but we all have the means that control the 
products of the country. Then let us follow the example of our pleasant old 
lady from the country, and give to these brave sufferers what may at once 
gratify their tastes and hasten their convalescence. Give Mr. Brown more live 
chickens." 

The necessity which led the Philadelphians, in May, to establish their two 
refreshment saloons, made itself felt at a later period in Baltimore, as, owing 
to the attack upon the Massachusetts Sixth and other regiments upon the 
19th of April, the troops, for a time, avoided Baltimore on their way to the 
South. When, however, the stream of men again began to pour through the 
city, a number of gentlemen, moved by sympathy with the tired and thirsty 
soldiers, began, though without concert, to make personal efforts to aid them, 
if it was only to give them a cup of cold water. But even in this, their 
attempts were obstructed by the police, whose sympathies were strongly with 



424 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



the rebellion. They were driven from the station and threatened with arrest, 
and were even distrusted by the soldiers, who expected only poisoned water 
and bread at their hands. But the devoted pioneers defied the police, and 
reassured the soldiers by first drinking and eating of the bread and water 
themselves. The persons who had undertaken this labor now came together, 
and, after conference and discussion, determined to work in concert, and a call 
was issued for a meeting of Union men, to be held on the 28th of June, for 
the purpose of forming a permanent organization of relief. The meeting was 
held, and the " Union Relief Association of Baltimore " was formed, with the 
following board of officers: 

President, 
ARCHIBALD STIRLING. 

Vice- Presiden ts, 
WILLIAM ROBINSON, WILLIAM S. RAYNER. 

Secretary, 
JOHN T. GEAIIAM, afterwards SEBASTIAN F. STREETEK. 

Treasurer, 
MARCUS DENNISON. 



Executive Committee. 



WARPS. 

IST DR. JAMES ARMITAGE. 

2o JOSEPH H. AUDOUN. 

3o EDMUND J. WEBB. 

4TH JONATHAN J. CHAPMAN. 

OTH JOHN W. WOODS. 

GTH JOSEPH M. GUSHING. 

TTH GEORGE C. ADDISON. 

STH WILLIAM A. WISONG. 

9TH SAMUEL E. TURNER. 
IOTH JOHN A. NEEDLES. 



WAP. us. 

HTH JOSEPH T. PANCOAST. 
12TH HERON C. MURRAY. 
13TH OTIS SPEAR. 
14TH AAEON FENTON. 
15TH RICHARD KING. 
16TH WILLIAM COLLISON. 
17TH GEORGE F. NEEDHAM. 
18TH JOHN SHOWACRE. 
19TH FRANCIS W. HEATH. 
20TH WASHINGTON K. CARSON. 



Aid was at once tendered to every passing regiment; relief was extended 
to the families of Maryland soldiers, and the sick and exhausted were tempo- 
rarily entertained. One hundred and fifty thousand men were fed during the 
first year, and two hundred thousand were supplied with water. Eleven thou- 
sand men were relieved by this organization alone after the battle of Gettys- 
burg. During the second year the number receiving aid rose to three hundred 
and twenty thousand. Just before the close of the third year, the rooms 
were, at the instance of the government, turned over to the military authori- 
ties, to be used thenceforward as a Soldiers' Rest. Upwards of one million of 
men officers, soldiers, teamsters, refugees, in addition to large numbers of 
disabled, discharged, and furloughed men, had been welcomed and relieved. 



425 



Some $80,000 of the expenses had been paid by money obtained from private 
sources ; the city, state, and United States, having also contributed to the sup- 
port of the association. It did not even now altogether disband, but continued 
to furnish its agent, Mr. Richard King, with large sums monthly, distributed 
in useful forms among Maryland troops in actual service, and in the army 
hospitals. One of the founders of the association, and perhaps its most 
laborious member, Mr. Sebastian S. Streeter, at first Secretary, and afterwards 
Vice-President, fell a victim to his zeal his death being due to disease con- 
tracted while visiting the Army of the Potomac. 

The Pittsburgh Subsistence Committee, performing duties precisely like 
those of the Philadelphia and Baltimore Refreshment Saloon Societies, was 
formed on the 3d of August, 1861, with the following officers: 



W. P. WEYMAN, 



AUGUSTUS H. LANE, 
BENJ. F. VANDEVORT, 
ROBERT C. AI.BREE, 
OLIYER LEMON, 
HARRY ROBINSCN, 
WM. B. EDWARDS, 
JOHN MoQ. WOODS, 
ERNEST SCHWARTZ, 
FRANK SEMPLE, 
W. W. YOUNG, 
CHAS. L. CALDWELL, 
GEO. W. McCLURE, 
THOMAS CARNEGIE, 
B. F. WEYMAN, 
GEORGE LITTLE, 
EDWIN H. NEVIN, 
GEO. B. EDWARDS, 
JNO. I. TRAVELLI, 
A. U. HOWARD, 
DR. A. FLEMING, 
MRS. JOSEPH ALBREE, 
MRS. R. C. ALBREE, 
MRS. J. A. LOWRIE, 



Executive Committee, 
JOSEPTI ALBREE, 



H. M. ATWOOD. 



Active Members. 



Miss ANNA THAW, 

" I. B. HAINES, 

" MARY E. MOORHEAD, 

' HETTIE MOORHEAD, 

" H. K. WEYMAN, 

" SABINA TOWNSEND, 

" MARIA E. LANE, 

" LIZZIE P. ALBREE, 

" KATE DENNISTON, 

" LIDIE THAW, 

" EMMA KENNEDY, 

" ALICE KENNEDY, 

" M. BRUCHLOCKER, 

" LIZZIE ATWOOD, 

" SIDNEY LEMON, 

" REBECCA HOWARD, 

" MARY HOWARD, 

" SARAH BREED, 

" MARY MAITLAND, 

" MARY ROBINSON, 

" MARTHA LOTHROP, 

" ELLEN MURDOCK, 

" BESSIE KENNEDY. 



Upon every train approaching Pittsburgh, either from the east or the west, 
a four-page pamphlet was placed in each soldier's hand. On reading it, he 
found himself invited, if hungry, to take breakfast, dinner, or supper, at the 
City Hall, Market Street ; if sick and wounded, to call at No. 347 Liberty 



426 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

Street, that his case might be attended to ; if tired and sleepy, and he was to 
be detained in the city over night, to call for a clean and comfortable bed at 
the same place ; and all without charge. All this he was asked to do " on the 
arrival of this train," a member of the committee promising to meet him at the 
station, and impart all needed information. The pamphlet then gave the time- 
tables of all the railroads, the addresses of all resident United States officers, 
of hospitals, of the Sanitary Commission. 

The first regiment received, the Twenty-fourth Ohio, took breakfast in the 
open street, the rooms not being yet ready. A large warehouse was soon 
opened for the purpose ; but in October, the committee obtained the use of the 
City Hall, where the Alleghanian amenities have been since dispensed, to 
nearly half a million of men, at an expense of about $50,000. 

The need of a home or temporary hospital was afterwards felt, and a small 
room was fitted up for the purpose, and opened on the 18th of January, 1863. 
Forty-five men applied on the very first day, ten of them on crutches, and 
twenty-one being without the means of obtaining a meal. In October, a 
sleeping-room was added ; and, early in May, 1864, the establishment having 
expanded till it occupied the entire second and third stories of the building, 
the new Soldiers' Home of the Pittsburgh Subsistence Committee was for- 
mally inaugurated. Speeches were made, a report was read, and Holmes' Army 
Hymn sung. Every member of the committee then signed the following 
pledge : " We, the members of the Pittsburgh Subsistence Committee, pledge 
ourselves to buy no article of foreign manufacture during three years or 
the war." 

Another labor performed by the committee was the receiving and forward- 
ing of hospital stores. From January, 1862, to April, 1863, supplies of 
the value of $65,000 were thus collected, housed, and distributed. This 
branch of duty was then transferred to the Christian Commission, which, 
at this period, established an army committee in the city. 

The necessity of an establishment of this kind was felt still later at 
Chicago than in the Atlantic cities, and it was not till the 17th of June, 
1863, that a Soldiers' Home was opened there. This was, and still is, con- 
ducted by ladies, with the exception of the president and treasurer, these 
offices being filled by Mr. Thomas B. Bryan and Mr. C. F. W. Junge. In 
one year, ninety-seven thousand meals were furnished, and over sixteen thou- 
sand men entertained over night, the money value of the aid thus given 
being $50,000. Both supplies and money were obtained exclusively from 
individuals, and generally in sums under $50. The ladies of the Home 



SOLDIERS' HOME AT CHICAGO. 427 

attended also to the wants of sick soldiers at private dwellings, sent con- 
valescents home, and gave the last honors to the dead. They invited, too, 
the disabled to continue taking their meals at the Home, while attending 
courses at commercial colleges, and seeking to render themselves indepen- 
dent. 

The building which had thus far answered the requirements of the 
Home, now proved inadequate, and it was determined to establish a "Per- 
manent Soldiers' Home." To purchase suitable grounds, and erect upon them 
the requisite structure, would require larger resources than could be obtained 
from voluntary contributions, coming in gradually and in small amounts. 
This matter was very ingeniously managed President Lincoln's Emancipa- 
tion Proclamation being made to furnish an initial working fund of $10,000. 
It has been stated that Mr. Bryan purchased this document of the Chicago 
Fair for $3,000. The Executive Committee of the fair presented this sum 
to the Home the destination Mr. Bryan himself desired his offering to take. 
Mr. Bryan then gave the Proclamation itself to the Home ; and the sale of 
lithograph copies, and other methods of manipulating it, have resulted as has 
been stated. 

The new Home was opened at Fairview on the 13th of May, 1864. It 
was erected on the lake, near the grave of Douglas, and opposite the monu- 
ment to his memory. " It is not unreasonable to expect," we read in a 
report upon the subject, "that, in the course of time, hundreds of thousands 
wending their way, either from curiosity or to drop a tear at the tomb of 
the lamented statesman, will naturally call at the Home to view some relic of 
the strife, and take a war-worn veteran by the hand." 

Though speaking exclusively in this chapter of soldiers' homes and 
soldiers' refreshment-rooms, we do not mention, individually, those which 
have been established throughout the country by the Sanitary Commission. 
All work thus done has been sufficiently covered by our sketch of that enter- 
prise. Nor do we make reference to the numerous institutions of the kind 
supported by states and cities, and receiving a regular sum out of the public 
purse. Of this character is the excellent institution in Howard Street, New 
York ; of which, however, we may say, briefly, that though created by legis- 
lative enactment, and sustained by an appropriation, it has always received 
large quantities of certain sorts of supplies from individual bounty. Much of 
the black and white muslin with which the city had been draped after the 
death of President Lincoln, was distributed among the poor, through this 
establishment. Nor do we call by name simply because no one volume 



428 THE TRIBUTE BOOK 

would hold the catalogue the innumerable smaller local soldiers' rests which 
have sprung up throughout the land. What has been said is but little more 
than touching the key-note ; the grand symphony remains unsung. 

Intimately connected with the Volunteer Hospital Association of Phila- 
delphia, were, and still are, the Fire Ambulance Companies and the Transit 
Aid Association. These originated in the following manner : 

On Sunday, the 8th of June, 1862, the hospital steamer Spaulding arrived 
at Philadelphia from the peninsula, with three hundred and thirty-four 
wounded men. The surgeon in charge made arrangements with the carmen, 
who at once flocked to the wharf, to carry the soldiers to the various hospitals, 
at so much a load. The work was so bunglingly, so cruelly undertaken, that 
several members of the Northern Liberty Fire Company, No. 1, tendered the 
use of their horses and wagon, offering to fit up the latter as an ambulance, 
with beds and pillows. The offer was accepted, and the ambulance was soon 
on the ground. The men of the Vigilant Fire Company at once followed 
suit, and the two wagons remained at work till the boat was cleared. The 
State of Maine arrived on the 28th, with five hundred and eighty -two men. 
These were removed by the Northern Liberty, the Vigilant, and one or two 
other companies. On the evening of the same day, the Whilldin arrived with 
one hundred and sixty men, and the ambulances did not finish their work till 
midnight. On the first of July, the members of the Northern Liberty held a 
meeting, at which the following resolution was adopted : 

"The Northern Liberty Fire Company, No. 1, hereby notifies fire com- 
panies and others, that, on the arrival of steamers with sick and wounded 
soldiers, their alarm-bell will be struck eight (8) strokes in succession, three 
times, as a signal to those who wish to aid in conveying the sick and wounded 
to the different hospitals, and furnishing them with refreshments." 

The effect of this was what might have been expected. The Daniel Web- 
ster arrived on the 7th, with three hundred and twelve men. The bell was 
struck eight times, and ambulances and people flocked from all directions, 
many of the women laden with refreshments. It was here and thus that the 
Ladies' Transit Aid Association was formed, its object being "to aid, relieve, 
and refresh disabled soldiers, on their way from the wharf to the hospital ; to 
wash and bandage the wounded, furnish the destitute with clothing, and in 
any way conduce to the comfort of the men." Of this association Henry 
Simons was president ; John D. Ruoff, vice-president ; Samuel B. Savin, secre- 
tary ; and John Mickle, Jr., treasurer. The ambulance committee consisted 
of William W. Westcott, John Marr, John Gillam, and William N. Swallow. 



PHILADELPHIA FIRE AMBULANCES. 



429 




FIltE AMBtTLASOB. 



When the bell struck, the members of the association would assemble at 
the Northern Liberty Engine-House arranged as a sort of hospital store- 
room ; the ladies would get into the ambulance, and all would proceed to the 
landing. Aid was thus rendered for about two years; the wounded then 
ceased to arrive by boats, and the society, finding itself of no further use, 
reluctantly disbanded, dividing their remaining balance among half a dozen 
relief associations of the city. To return from this digression to the ambu- 
lances. 

During the two months of July and August, the fire companies which 
entered into the arrangement conveyed from Callowhill Street wharf to the 
government hospitals no less than four thousand men, some of them so badly 
wounded that stretchers had to be employed. Companies joined the league 
from time to time, till there were no less than thirty -two ambulances belonging 
to it, each with its own span of strong, safe horses. Some of these vehicles 
cost $2,000, the average not being far from $800 ; so that the firemen of Phil- 
adelphia spent fully $25,000 upon the wagons alone, in this transfer of the 
soldiers. 

The ambulances were so constructed that they could be made into beds, 
and carry three badly wounded men lying down (only two, if very badly 
wounded), and four sitting up. A slide, occupying the space between the 
seats, afforded one very good bed ; each seat another ; and, as the ambu- 
lance was much longer than the average length of a man, two men, sitting up, 



430 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



could occupy the vacant space upon each seat towards the front. From ten to 
twelve men could be conveyed, if not critical cases. Did a soldier die, in 
spite of kind and skilful treatment, the ambulance company offered their 
vehicles to his family and friends, without charge conveying not only them, 
but lodges, associations, and the firing-party. If a soldier must die elsewhere 
than in the field, the best place to do it is certainly Philadelphia. It would 
hardly be possible to say too much, or to think too highly, of these two 
schemes for the soldiers' benefit ; of the womanly tenderness of the firemen 
nurses, of the manly devotedness of their attendant satellites, the ladies of 
the Transit Aid.* 



* A late report gives the following figures of the work done by the lire ambulances : 



First District : Men conveyed. 

Delaware Fire Co., No. 1 590 

Hope Hose, No. 2 1,654 

South wark Hose, No. 9 2,285 

South wark Engine Co., No. 24 187 

Washington Engine, No. 14 1,061 

Western Hose, No. 26 250 

Second District : 

Diligent Fire Co., No. 10 785 

Philadelphia Fire Co., No. 18 1,710 

Third District : 

Assistance Engine Co., No. 8 803 

America Fire Co., No. 9 833 

Fail-mount Fire Co 1,220 

Good-Will Hose Co., No. 25 2,021 

Northern Liberty Fire Co., No. 1 2,219 

The Decatur, Mechanic, Good-Will, Weccacoe, Philadelphia Hose, Vigilant, Good Intent, and 
Monroe, kept no record, und therefore made no report. 



Third District : Men conveyed. 

Neptune Hose Co., No. 6 400 

United States Fire Co., No. 21 4':0 

Fourth District : 

Cohocksink Hose Co., No. 43 700 

Globe Fire Co., No. SO 200 

Hand in Hand Fire Co., No. 1 225 

Kensington Hose Co., No. 30 31 

Northern Liberty Hose Co., No. 4 1,678 

Sixth District : 

Fellowship Fire Co., No. 27 781 

Seventh District: 

Philadelphia Fire Co., No. 25 310 

West Philadelphia Hose and Steam Fire 

Co., No. 3 500 



CHAPTER xvh 

A THANKSGIVING DINNER IN THE ARMY AND NAVY. 




DRUM-STICKS OF TWO Kl.SlJS. 



THE Soldiers' Thanksgiving Dinner of November, 1864 a repast which, 
if not dainty enough for Lucullus, was of dimensions that would have satis- 
fied Gargantua came about in this wise. The country was in the throes of 
the impending presidential election : never, perhaps, was it more indifferent to 
turkey and cranberry sauce, nor less anxious about what it should eat and 
what it should drink. Still, an idea too big, too generous to be kept in one 
brain, had occurred to an individual in New York, to whom ideas of the sort 
were no strangers, and, at the risk of confiding it to an unwilling ear, he made 
it public by addressing certain editors in the following lines : 

GENTLEMEN : President Lincoln having ordered a general Thanksgiving 
on the last Thursday of November, it being on the 24th, I have thought it 
only proper that something should be done for the army and navy on that 
occasion, not only to aid them in keeping the day properly, but to show them 



432 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

they are remembered at home. My proposition is to supply the army and 
navy in Virginia with poultry and pies, or puddings, all cooked, ready for use. 
This seems to be a big undertaking, but I do not see any difficulty in carrying 
it out. 

My idea is this : there will be about fifty thousand turkeys say of eight 
pounds each, and fifty thousand pies, or their equivalents, required to feed the 
soldiers and sailors on that day ; let, then, every one who can afford it and is 
willing to send and prepare such articles do so, and make up a barrel or box 
of them well packed ; have them ready for shipment in this city from the 18th 
to the 20th of November; they can be sent (freight free) to the army and 
navy of the Potomac so as to be distributed the day before Thanksgiving. 

It would be a grand sight to see that army of brave men, loyal to the flag, 
feeding on the good things of the land they have fought for, whilst the miser- 
able traitors, if they still hold out, are crouched behind their defences hungry 
and starving. 

#*####### 

G. W. B. 

The attention of the Union League Club was called to this proposal early 
in November, and a committee was appointed to co-operate in or inaugurate 
the movement. The committee, though convinced that nothing could be done 
until after the election, issued their appeal, to the effect that no soldier in the 
army of the Potomac, the James, or the Shenandoah, and no sailor in the 
North Atlantic squadron, should be allowed to go without tangible, turkey 
evidence that he was remembered in the festival season of the year by those for 
whom he was perilling his life. They asked for donations of poultry, cooked 
and uncooked, mince-pies, sausages, and fruit. From those who could furnish 
nothing in kind, they would accept liberal contributions in money. The 
express companies would convey Thanksgiving boxes without charge to New 
York ; the committee would attend to their transportation south. 

The election well over, purse-strings were loosened and poultry-yards 
invaded. The turkeys, who had expected to survive as usual till the last 
week in November, may naturally have been indignant at the premature fate 
which cut them off in the prime of life and the middle of the month. Doubt- 
less many of them determined, then and there, that they would not keep ; and 
it is sad to be compelled to say that some few of them kept this oath, if 
nothing else. One incident in the experience of Mr. Roosevelt, the treasurer, 
and one extract from his correspondence, must suffice in this connection : 



THE AMERICAN BIRD. 433 

A lady, on her dying bed, and forewarned that on Thanksgiving Day she 
would be where praise is offered up, not by days, but during the ages, charged 
her husband, in case the warning were fulfilled, to give Mr. Roosevelt one 
hundred dollars, for the soldiers, in her name. 

The letter, one in a thousand, read as follows : 

BROOKLYN, November 19th. 1864. 
THEODORE ROOSEVELT, ESQ. : 

SIR : Enclosed you will find five dollars, the contribution of an officer's 
wife, to help swell the amount already large, to procure for our dear soldiers a 
dinner on Thanksgiving Day. They have most bravely earned it, and will 
highly appreciate this remembrance of them by "loved ones at home." As 
my husband is now in the valley of the Shenandoah, my sympathies naturally 
flow r in that direction. He will be especially remembered. But I feel for 
the soldiers, whose privations are necessarily greater than those of officers, 
and who will be enabled to endure them with more fortitude, knowing that 
they are remembered by those who are engaged in the great work with their 
hearts if not their hands. 

Very respectfully yours, 

E. S. A. 

Room must also be had for a brief poem, as follows: 

Please find enclosed Be it turkey, 

My little mite. Goose or hen. 

To give the soldiers I don't care which. 

An extra bite. If it suits them. 

A newspaper article, from which the following is an extract, greatly stimu- 
lated the public bounty : 

" Let us turn now from the screaming of one American bird to the slaugh- 
ter and roasting of another. The eagle has had his turn on 'a thousand 
hills ;' turn we now to the turkey, and turn him on tens of thousands of spits. 
No tent should be without that noble bird for a Thanksgiving feast. The 
young men who will recall on that day the loved faces around the fireside at 
home, the games of ball on village greens, the shooting-matches, the skating 
frolics on Northern ponds, the sleighing parties over New England hills, the 
dance in the evening, the dear 'girls they have left behind them,' must not 
sit down to a Thanksgiving dinner of hard tack and salt pork. All else 
of festivity he must forego except the shooting-matches where men are the 
targets but of eating give him enough. Fill him full with turkey ! Fill his 

28 



434 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

mouth as well as his head with 'merry thoughts.' Put a 'drum-stick' in 
every fist for another purpose than to beat the long-roll. Let camp-fires be 
reflected in faces ruddy and redolent with turkey ; let the fatness thereof be 
wiped with thankful hand from beard and mustache. Let him so feast on tur- 
key that its memory will make the hours short in the lonely watch, and fill his 
dreams in a shelter-tent. The lean and hungry rebels 'are fit for stratagems 
and spoils;' let our soldiers be 'with fat turkey lined,' and go into the next 
honest fight with traitors with turkey the good, honest, American bird ! for 
their battle-cry ! 

" It is little enough we can do for those who are doing so much for us. A 
surfeit of fight, on our behalf, deserves at least, as a poor return, a surfeit of 
turkey. Those who have many, send many ; those who have two, send one ; 
those who have one only, send that to the soldier, and go without at home. 
Better a dinner of herbs with the love that has sent the bird to camp, than the 
stuffed turkey and the thought of hard tack on that day for the soldiers. One 
day's rations to the brave fellows, and let it be turkey roast, with all the 
fixings. The army of the Potomac, the army of the James, the army of 
Western Virginia let not a single mess in all their tens of thousands be 
without turkey to head its bill of fare on the 24th of November. Though 
there be not enough left for seed for next thanksgiving, be this day remem- 
bered as the Day of the Feast of Turkey, when the soldier comes home and 
fights his battles over again with his crutch, for the instruction of his children 
and his children's children." 

The committee received over $57,000 in money, and poultry and provi- 
sions valued at about $150,000 more. Messrs. A. and E. Eobbins converted 
the money into turkeys, refunding the three thousand dollars and over which 
were legitimately theirs, for the transmuting process. The collected eatables 
were unpacked, repacked, and addressed in a building tendered rent free ; the 
coopering, packing, and carting were, for the most part, done without charge. 

Admiral Porter had informed the committee that he had seventeen thou- 
sand men in his squadron, and he thought that a turkey for every six of them 
would be ample provision. The committee thought otherwise, and sent the 
admiral one turkey for every whist-party on his decks in all thirty thousand 
pounds. Mr. Jerome Chappell and the steamer Kensington conveyed this 
quantum, uncooked, to its destination ; each ship's galley to do its own roast- 
ing and broiling. At Fortress Monroe, each paymaster received his vessel's 
allowance, so many pounds for so many men. One gentleman, getting in his 
share a few ducks, remarked that every thing was welcome, green-backs or 



THANKSGIVING IX THE ARMY. 435 

canvas-backs. In the York River and at Norfolk plentiful distributions were 
made, and four hundred pounds were happily left over to fall to the lot of 
some incoming blockader, buffeted by the storm ; some double-ender, out of 
pork and unable to make her two ends meet; some weather-beaten craft, 
overcome by hard tacking and harder tack. 

Captain Geo. F. Noyes, a gentleman who had formerly served on General 
Wadsworth's staff, assumed the duties of purveyor to the army of the Shenan- 
doah, one Sheridan commanding. He left New York with fifty thousand 
pounds of uncooked turkeys, and arrived at Winchester and made the distri- 
bution on Thanksgiving eve. The weather was cold, and therefore propitious. 
The soldiers, who had scant appliances for roasting few spits and no tin 
kitchens had plenty of stewpans, saucepans, pots, and kettles. The Shenan- 
doah turkeys were most of them reduced to soup, broth, and gravy, and in 
this form were eaten with the highest zest. u It ain't the turkey so much, it's 
the idea," said an enlisted man to Captain Noyes. " It is not the violets," said 
the belle of the season, " I could have bought them myself, but it shows he has 
not forgotten his Eliza." "I am confident," wrote General Sheridan, "that at 
this moment, now Thanksgiving Day, many of our soldiers are tacitly blessing 
those at home for the remembrance so substantially manifested." 

To the armies of the Potomac and the James were forwarded three hun- 
dred thousand pounds of poultry, besides an enormous quantity of dough-nuts, 
pea-nuts, pickles, periodicals, apples, gingerbread, onions, tapioca, turnips, 
tracts, and other vegetables and viands. Mr. Arthur Leary placed his two 
steamers the Charles C. Leary and James T. Brady at the committee's dis- 
posal. They sailed on the Sunday and Monday before the festal Thursday, 
having on board some four thousand boxes and barrels, under the care of 
Captain T. B. Bronson. The turkeys were, for the most part, cooked, being 
that portion of the people's bounty which had been received in kind, and that 
part of the committee's purchases which the hotel-keepers and bakers of New 
York had roasted, either without charge or charging only the actual outlay. 
The immense labor attendant upon the unloading of the steamers at City 
Point, and tbe distribution of their cargoes among the various corps, was suc- 
cessfully performed. Several of the more distant regiments celebrated the 
holiday somewhat later than their fellows, but as they knew the poultry was 
coming, and as the idea was more than the turkey, they were content to fast 
on Thursday and feast on Saturday. 

So much for Thanksgiving in the armies. But the public bounty did not 
end here. There was hardly a hospital, hardly a detached camp or isolated 



436 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

garrison, either in the North or upon the border, that did not receive its share. 
The New York Committee, continuing to receive stores and money after the 
poultry steamers had left, determined to supply the hospitals and forts around 
the city. But in this they found that they had been in a measure forestalled 
by the Board of Brokers. They were therefore fain to supplement the provi- 
sion already made, by additions of turnips, cake, apples, and, in some cases, 
turkeys. They offered to stock the larders of the Baltimore and Annapolis 
hospitals, but the Baltimoreans and Annapolitans needed no help. Some two 
hundred and sixty barrels were sent to Newbern, and eleven boxes to the iron- 
clad Dictator. The states which dispensed their hospitality through the New 
York Committee, were the six of New England, New York, New Jersey, 
Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Michigan. 

Many of the donors of turkeys had labelled their gifts with their own 
names or initials, and not a few received letters of acknowledgment from the 
recipients. A trooper in the Second Cavalry Division of the Army of the 
Potomac thus addressed Mrs. J. N. P. : 

"MADAM : I have the pleasure to announce to you that your correspond- 
ent is in receipt of a Thanksgiving present (a voluptuous turkey) one of 
those that we have frequently read about in ancient history. To describe it 
would be impossible. The taste of a soldier down here upon the feathered 
tribe can scarcely be pictured ; but altogether, I pronounce it elegant, and it 
would make a hungry man's soul feel proud. We cannot extend sufficient 
manifold kindness towards the ladies of New York. Although I am a Penn- 
sylvanian myself, it appeared to me that it was my lot to be the happy 
recipient of the above-named fowl. These friends are the means of restoring 
new vigor to the hearts and lives of the soldiers, knowing that part of the 
human sex (the ladies) are for the preservation of the Union and our 
glorious country, which braces us up to fight our foe and enemies of the 
Southern Confederacy. Madam, although strangers, when such luxuries and 
delicacies come before our careworn notice, we must emphatically say we can- 
not be such. I must now close. 

"Your ever obedient servant, S. R. S." 

A letter conceived in a more sober vein run thus : 

" CAMP OF 143D REG'T, PEXK. YOLS., November 27th, 1804. 
" To MRS. R. S., and OTHERS, who have remembered the soldiers: 

"DEAR MADAM AND FRIENDS: Upon this beautiful Sabbath morning. 
I have the honor and extreme pleasure to acknowledge, in behalf of three 



THANKSGIVING IN THE HOSPITALS. 



437 



hundred and thirty-six enlisted members of, and present with, the One Hun- 
dred and Forty-third Regiment, Penn. Vols., the reception of one hundred and 
sixty -eight pounds of roasted turkeys and chickens ; one hundred and ninety- 
six pounds of Spitzenberg apples ; one keg of apple butter; twenty pounds of 
cakes; nine minced pies ; and eighty-four pounds of vegetables, from parties 



Oyster sonp. Boiled turkey, oyster 

Boast turkey, cranberry sauce, 

sauce Boiled ham, 

Eoast beef, Giblet pie, 

Oyster pie. 



VEGETABLES. 

Celery, Mashed turnips, 

Mashed potatoes, Apple sauce. 

DESSEET. 



Blanc manse, 
French coffee. 



Charlotte Ensse, 
Pumpkin pie, 




A. SOLDIER'S BILL OF FARE FOB THANKSGIVING DAT. 



unnamed ; also, one box of choice delicacies, tastefully packed with, roasted 
turkeys and chickens, cakes and pies, from Mrs. R Scott, of Oswego City, New 
York, as 'Thanksgiving offerings to the brave defenders of our country.' 
Although arriving two days after the appointed Thanksgiving Day, they were 
nevertheless quite as acceptable and as highly appreciated upon the 26th as 
they could possibly have been upon the 24th of November. 

"My pen has not the powers of description that would do justice to the 
advent of these home remembrances among us scenes which stir to the 
depths the feelings of sturdy men, with twenty-seven months of hard service, 
fraught with the peril of life and limb, in front of relentless traitors, whose 
'loud cannon-thunder and death-dealing shots have but nerved them to suffer, 
to do, and to dare,' for the maintenance of the best government ever insti- 
tuted by man. These scenes, let me say again, are not to be described only 
to be seen and felt. Therefore, as distributing officer for this regiment, I ten- 
der to you the sincere and heartfelt thanks of the entire command for your 
generous Thanksgiving offerings. E. U. W., 

"Commissary Serg't, 143d Rcg't Penn. Vols." 



438 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

A few words and a few extracts will suffice to show in what way Thanks- 
giving was kept in the hospitals at the North the tables of each being spread 
by the care of its own special circle of ladies. David's Island Hospital, near 
New York, and the largest in the vicinity, celebrated the day as follows : At 
one o'clock a new flag was raised, the convalescents singing the anthem. 
Speeches were made by gentlemen skilled in preparing an audience for a feast 
of turkey by a flow of soul. Then came dinner, served in ten mess-rooms, 
seating two hundred persons each ten ladies and gentlemen being detailed to 
wait on each. A blessing was asked upon every table, and then the carving- 
knife, gleaming in the sunshine, was plunged up to the hilt in what has 
been pronounced its fittest scabbard. We give a soldier's bill of fare for the 
24th of Novenber, 1864. It is the particular bill of Fort Schuyler ; but, 
with the exception of the music of the band of the Seventh Infantry, may 
serve for any other camp, hospital, or garrison. 

Massachusetts assumed and discharged the grateful duty of furnishing 
the dinner to all the soldiers in the Washington hospitals, seventeen thou- 
sand in number, without regard to state lines ; and this in addition to sup- 
plying the Boston forts and stations, and besides taking part in the New York 
subscription for the armies. Adams' Express carried sixty tons of Thanks- 
giving supplies to the soldiers from Boston. The citizens of Maine, informed 
that a regiment of cavalry from that state, stationed at Barrancas, Pensacola, 
were threatened with scurvy and kindred afflictions, resolved that they, too, 
should have a Thanksgiving dinner, and that it should be anti-scorbutic, even 
if its festive qualities were somewhat diminished thereby. Thirteen hundred 
packages were soon on their way to Pensacola. The camps and hospitals 
about Pittsburgh were supplied by the Subsistence Committee and the branch 
of the Christian Commission in that city. Among their purchases were two 
hundred barrels of apples, ten barrels of canned fruit, and mince-meat for six 
thousand pies. The church collections of the day were for the benefit of the 
Christian Commission, two of them giving over $2,100. The troops stationed 
at Nashville were provided with their dinner by the people of Pittsburgh. In 
the Philadelphia hospitals, the soldiers were enabled to celebrate Christmas by 
the generosity of Mrs. Dr. Egbert, who placed $5,000 in the hands of a gentle- 
man for that purpose ; and the distribution was made among thirteen hospi- 
tals several, being well supplied already, courteously declining. 

The army Thanksgiving dinner of 1864 cost the people somewhat over a 
quarter of a million of dollars. This would have been a large sum to spend in 
turkeys and cranberry sauce, if, the money spent and the turkeys eaten, the 



THE TURKEY AS A BEARER OF MESSAGES. 



439 



end the givers had in view had been attained. But the soldiers prized the 
attention more than the gift ; and doubtless the revived memories of home, 
and the renewed assurances of sympathy and support, were more precious to 
them than all the poultry in the North. We cap purchase fat turkeys for so 




BARRELLING APPLES FOB THE SOLDIERS. 



much a pound; but if these turkeys, sent a certain distance at a certain 
season, can be made to bear messages that no other fowl, not even the carrier- 
pigeon, can bear as well, and deliver them with an eloquence that belongs 
not to either fish or flesh if, in short, it has been agreed that a turkey-gob- 
bler shall be looked upon by the receiver, even though it may have lost 
its freshness on the way, as an expression of the good-will and the good 
wishes of the giver, then the question of cost becomes a trivial one indeed; 
for, whatever the sum, the return will be a hundred-fold. 



CHAPTER XVII. 




UK chronicles have hitherto dealt with fairs held al- 
most exclusively for the benefit of the landsmen, but 
at last, Jack was to have a fair of his own. The fact 
was to be at length recognized and acknowledged, that 
though the soldier needs, is entitled to, and shall cer- 
tainly have, every aid and comfort, while he is a soldier, 
and as long as his wounds incapacitate him for labor, be is nevertheless a 
soldier but for a day, a month, a year. The sailor, on the contrary, is a 
sailor for life, by profession. He does not doff the tarpaulin and don the 
beaver, when the army comes marching home. No ploughshares are ever 
forged out of any utensils of his ; there is no agricultural or bucolic use to 
which the lately belligerent belaying-pin can with propriety be put. So as 
Jack was to stay Jack, and thus would need care and succor long after the 
Sanitary Commission had ceased to dispense them, the good people of Boston 
determined to build a Sailors' Home ; and, being for sailors of the Union, 



A NATIONAL SAILORS' FAIR. 441 

not for sailors of New England, the instrumentality by which the building 
fund was to be gathered, should be called a National Sailors' Fair. 

It was principally by New England, nevertheless, that this interesting 
work was done. Philadelphia had a table, indeed, and Captain Worden for- 
warded certain New York collections ; but there was many an unassuming 
Massachusetts town that did as much as either ; and nineteen twentieths of 
the sum that was finally made over to the trustees exclusive of the contribu- 
tions of the crews of United States ships-of-war proceeded from New Eng- 
land pockets, from Yankee ingenuity, from Boston thrift. The fair opened on 
the 9th of November, 1864. Its objects and its officers were thus briefly set 
forth : 

" According to the rules of our service, those who are suffering or invalided 
from wounds or incurable disease, can only remain a limited time in the 
hospitals the exception being a service of twenty years. It follows that very 
many of this valuable class of citizens, who have braved every peril in 
defence of our flag, are and will be cast upon the world, helpless and without 
the means of support; for, to those whose constitutions are broken by disease 
and exposure, no pensions are allowed ; and to those who are disabled by 
wounds, an entirely insufficient one for their support is granted. 

" Our navy has increased during the war, from a force of ninety vessels, 
manned by seven thousand six hundred sailors, to three hundred and thirty-seven 
vessels, manned by more than fifty thousand. The large ships, now in course 
of construction, will swell the number to at least sixty -five thousand men. In 
view of these facts, the necessity becomes apparent of new benevolent agencies 
to meet the new wants ; and among these, the establishment of a home for 
disabled seamen is imperatively called for by every obligation of justice and 
every instinct of humanity, in order to relieve the large amount of almost un- 
recognized destitution and misery even now pressing upon the friends of the 
sailor." 

MANAGING COMMITTEE. 

Chairmen, 
ALEX. II. RICE, MRS. JOHN A. BATES. 

Vice- Chairman, Treasurer, 

THOMAS RUSSELL. JOHN A. BATES, Paymaster U. 8. N. 

Secretary, 
MRS. S. T. HOOPER. 



442 



THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 



JAMES STURGIS, 
WILLIAM MUNROE, 
JERE ABBOTT, 
GKO. B. UPTON, JK., 
JOSHUA CRANE, 
II. IIUNNEWELL, 
E. P. WHIPPLE, 
FRANK W. ANDREWS, 
GEORGE E. LINCOLN, 

J. F. TUCKERMAN, 

COM. GEORGE S. BLAKE, U. S. N"., 
GAIT. J. S. BERRIEN, U. S. N.. 

SURG. W. S. W. RUSCHENBERGER. U. S. N., 

PAYM'R GEO. F. CUTTER, U. S. N., 
MRS. COMMODORE DOWNS, 



MRS. THOMAS R. LAMBERT, 

" PETER HUBBELL, 

" E. R. MUDGE, 

" J. AMORY CODMAN, 

u GEO. B. OSBORN, 

" THOS. RUSSELL, 

" GEO. B. UPTON, Ju., 

" CHARLES T. TILTON, 

" RUSSELL BATES, 

" C. O. WHITMOIJE, 

" WM. B. SnuBinoK, 

u LOUIS M. GOLDSBOROI'GH, 

" STEPHEN D. TRENCHARU, 

Miss J. ROTCH, 

u A. FORBES. 



Mr. Everett, in his opening address, told the audience, in his own delight- 
ful way, why it had been thought a duty to build a Sailors' Home. After 
describing the hardships and sufferings of a sailor's life, "What reception,'' 
he said, " does he meet with on his return ? What is the reward which the 
community bestows upon him for all that he has encountered in its service ? 
Does he find a peaceful, quiet, well-ordered home? Sometimes he finds it 
under a roof which he may call his own, or in some public establishment pro- 
vided by the good Samaritans of the country. But, nine times out of ten, 
the case is far different. If he comes home in a sailing-vessel, before the sails 
are furled, one of those devils whose name is legion comes on board with a 
bottle of rum in his pocket. As soon as he reaches the land, or, if he is in a 
public ship, as soon he is paid off and set at liberty, the first thing he wants is 
lodgings. It seems as though there was no power on earth to pity him, no 
hand to save. Poor Jack ! he cannot go to the Parker House, and the evil 
spirits that have him in tow take care not to carry him to one of the temper- 
ance lodging-houses; and so he falls almost of necessity into the clutches of a 
landlord dreadful name ! until, his money spent, with spirit broken, and 
despondent by his condition, and to escape starvation, he enlists again in the 
service. 

" It is not his own fault altogether that he does not do better. He should 
have some encouragement ; but who cares for old tarry Jack ? What do we 
do thoroughly and effectually to guard against these frauds and casualties 
which I have explained? My friends, we must make allowance for the short- 
comings of poor Jack. He did not have our opportunities in early life; he 
was born in a condition of hopeless poverty, and, after the burden of life had 
weighed heavily upon his young heart, he had to go to sea to get his living. 



A HOME FOR POOR JACK. 

He was a little wild and reckless, perhaps ; but he was an honest youth. He 
was the darling of his mother ; he was the despot of half the boys in the vil- 
lage ; he was the torment, but the delight, of the village girls ; he was flogged 
daily by the schoolmaster, who, on Wednesdays and Saturdays, flogged him 
twice in the morning, because school did not keep in the afternoon. It 
happened, perhaps, on one occasion when this agreeable operation was being 
performed, that Jack clenched his master, who came off second best in the 
encounter. 

" Next night he took an irregular method of preventing the squire's favor- 
ite tree from being broken down under the weight of its fruit, and next 
morning he found it convenient to run away and go to sea. This is the 
early history of many a gallant and noble tar. He was not malignaat, he 
was not desperate, he would not do a mean thing for the world ; and he 
makes a capital sailor, removed from temptation, and held to regular and 
constant, but not severe labor. True as steel, brave as a lion in the hour 
of danger, he is something to us as he sits upon the deck, passing the 
lonely hours in his night-watch. He has many an opportunity to think of 
the mother and sister that are weeping over his absence ; and there is no 
reason on earth why he should not come back to be the comfort and prop 
of that home, and with each succeeding voyage bring back something, to 
make the hearts of the old people dance with joy. There is many and many 
a repentant sigh that mingles with the gale ; many a virtuous resolution 
that responds to the cry of ' All hands on deck,' which calls the poor 
fellow, drenched and chilly, stiff and sore, to mount the shrouds in a winter's 
storm. 

"But it is all in vain. The moment he lands, the demons, as I have 
called them, are upon him. They cheat, they plunder, they drug him, they 
ruin his health, perhaps for life, and, as I said before, they crowd him off to 
sea. But perhaps some one will say, why don't he. go home, where he will 
be safe ? Home home for poor Jack? Why, half the time he never had a 
home. He was the orphan child of a widowed mother ; he has no home. 
'The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests,' but poor Jack 
has not where to lay his head. I beseech you, if you love Him whose words 
I have dared to quote words over which centuries have wept tears of rev- 
erential sympathy I adjure you for the love of Him, who, when He was rich, 
for our sakes became poor, that you aid with your abundance these honorable 
women who are here, seeking to rear for poor Jack that which he greatly 
needs a cheerful and comfortable home.'' 



444 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

The fair proper, the central or nuclean display, was held in the Boston 
Theatre, and the visitors could attend almost any other exhibition in the 
city, and still be within the circle of the great naval charity. The land- 
scapes at the Athenseum were in one sense marines ; the battles fought by 
the miniature monitors in Monitor Hall were genuine sea-fights, with genu- 
ine powder and smoke ; the Kearsarge had twenty -five things on board worth 
seeing at a penny apiece. The criticisms upon the amateur artists at the 
Melodeon were exclusively nautical, Claude Melnotte being pronounced a land- 
shark for telling Pauline such a yarn about his palace ; and every old salt in 
the audience took a fresh quid in honor of the man whose grandfather wedded 
the Adriatic. And at the Music Hall, when that mighty wind instrument 
began its gruff delineation of a heavy blow, the cheery notes of the boat- 
swain's whistle piping the free list to quarters, were easily detected by all 
familiar with the frog-pond and the other great lakes. It was indeed a 
wonderful naval festival ; friend recognized friend by the cut of his jib and 
by the flowing amplitude of his trousers ; it was not indecorous to be half 
seas over ; the man who had said to his wife that she must not spend so much 
upon her bonnets, felt like the admiral who ordered his consort to take a reef 
in her topsails ; the schoolmaster no longer spoke of his ferule, but, shouting 
" All hands ahoy," gave each one a rap with his spanker. 

Without pausing to rehearse those features of the Sailors' Fair which 
were no different from those held in aid of the landsmen, we must say a word 
for Monitor Hall. This was an enclosure formed by a mammoth tent, and 
consisting of a circular fragment of the frog pond, eighty-five feet in diameter, 
with an island in the middle, and a platform for spectators occupying the 
circumference. In the centre of the island was a square fort and an earthern 
breastwork, both fort and breastwork mounted with diminutive, though still 
deadly, weapons of defence. There was a light-house, and, moored off the 
island, was the rebel Merrimac. A monitor, one twenty-fourth the size of her 
that admonished the Merrimac, with steam up and hatches down, lay off 
the fort, taking the measure of the battery, and, when frowned at in the 
manner peculiar to batteries and gunboats frowning back again. Three 
times a day the following instructive little pantomime was enacted : the 
monitor, with her helm lashed to port, so as to carry her round the island, 
without impinging against the curbstone, started to reconnoitre. The earth- 
work opened upon her, the monitor replied ; the band played A Life on the 
Ocean Wave ; the square fort thundered forth defiance, the monitor belched 
again, the spectators raised an encouraging cheer, and the monitor returned to 



AMATEUR 



THEATRICALS. 



Claude Melnotte 
Colonel Damas 
Beauseant . 
Glavis . . . 
M. Deschapelles 
Landlord 
Caspar 

Capt Dnpont 
Major Desmoulins . 
Pauline . 

Madame Deschapelles 
Widow Melnotte . 



MB. GARDNER. 
ME. BLUNT. 
MR. Fox. 
MR. BUCK. 
MR. CHURCH. 
MR. BONIFACE. 
MR. HAUSER. 
MR. BRIDGES. 
MR. MILLS. 
Miss SPOOXER. 
Miss CHURCH. 
MRS. GARDNER. 



MR. CARPENTER. 



Cox MR. PLUMMER. 




CONTRIBUTIONS OF UNITED STATES VESSELS. 445 

her anchorage. On the first day of this exhibition, Captain Worden, intro- 
duced by Mr. Everett, narrated his experience on that first, most memorable 
voyage. 

This monitor was built by Mr. Joseph Kay, foreman in Mr. Charles Knap's 
foundry at Pittsburgh. At the sanitary fair in the last-named city, it earned 
$16,000. It was then purchased by Mr. Knap, and by him sent to fight for 
the sailors in Boston, where it earned $10,000 more. 

From miniatures to mammoths there is but a step. A gentleman presented 
President Lincoln with a mastodonic ox, and sent him to the fair for exhibi- 
tion. Mr. Lincoln sent two telegrams to the managers, the latter announcing 
what disposition he had made of the gift. The dispatches ran thus : 

" Allow me to wish you great success. With the old fame of the navy, 
made higher in the present war, you cannot fail. I name none, lest I wrong 
others by omission. To all, from rear-admiral to honest Jack, I tender a 
nation's admiration and gratitude." 

And thus : " I present the mammoth ox to the Sailors' Fair as a contribu- 
tion." One thousand dollars were spent in witnessing the giant ; and two 
thousand more in raffling for him. This mountain of beef was sent to aid 
the landsmen's cause in Chicago, in June, 1865, where, in the proper place, 
we had a glimpse of him if the word glimpse may properly be used in con- 
nection with a thing so vast. 

The Charlestown Navy Yard looked with sympathy upon the Sailors' Fair. 
The workmen contributed articles of the value of nearly $900. The tars 
gave a concert on board of the receiving-ship Ohio, at which Professor Lock- 
wood swallowed a twenty-two-inch sword ; he then unsheathed it, and, instead 
of throwing away the scabbard, treated it with every consideration. Paymas- 
ter John A. Bates accepted and discharged the onerous duties of treasurer. 

We have alluded to collections taken up on board of United States vessels. 
The following figures give an idea of the aid lent the Home by those who 
might one day be themselves candidates for admission : 

Minnesota $744 50 Colorado $463 50 

Sassacus 216 50 Marine Barracks, Brooklyn. . . . 352 00 

Eutaw ..'- 90 00 Susquehanna 150 00 

Dawn 67 00 Allegheny 36 00 

Powhattan 115 00 Galena 100 00 

E. B. Hale 50 00 Agawam 155 00 

Perdita and Key West 176 50 St. Louis 38 16s. 5d. 

In the Hall of Trophies, the captures exhibited were principally naval and 



446 THE TRIBUTE BOOK. 

maritime : the sword surrendered to Commodore Bainbridge, when he took 
the British frigate Java ; a knife and fork which fell into American hands on 
the same occasion ; the flag of the first rebel privateer Savannah, captured by 
the brig Perry ; shot from the rebel ram Tennessee ; a copper hook, made 
from a piece of the galley funnel of the Congress ; the drum of the Alabama ; 
rebel torpedoes picked up in secession waters , the unacknowledged flag of an 
unacknowledged admiral ; swords presented to Commodore Decatur by Con- 
gress, &c., &c. 

In the adjoining anteroom was a remarkable piece of work, to which the 
words of Eliza Cook's ballad are singularly appropriate : 

" I love it, I love it, and who shall dare 
To chide me for loving that old arm-chair!'" 

The arm-chair in question was composed of fragments of wood of United 
States vessels, all but two of which had been lost in the war of the rebellion. 
It was the work of Acting Master Samuel L. Ilolbrook, who spent in this 
labor the leisure of stormy days, and such moments as he could save from his 
slee