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Full text of "Trinity parish cook book"

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



u ©cjn^rijl^t f 0- 




TRIKITY PARISH 
COOK BOOK 



Choice and Tested Recipes 

CONTRIBUTED BY THE 

LADIES OF TRINITY CHURCH. 



EDITED AND PUBLISHED BY f HE 

LADIES PARISH AID SOCIETY. 







WILMINGTON, DEL. : / '•f ** / ^ A, 

THE JOHN M. ROGERS' PRESS, 
1892. 



^O 



.A^^ 

^4-^ 



Copyrighted according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1892, by 

John M. Rogers, for the "Ladies' Parish Aid Society," of 

Wilmington, Del. 




Trinity church, Wilmington, Del. 

As DKsicxF.n liY TnK()iM(ii,i's p. Chandler, Jr., Ahchitkct. 



Tt^I^ITV Pfl^ISH. 



Organized 1638. Incorporated 1759. 
Rector— Rev. H. ASHTON HENRY. 



Wardens— HORACE) BURR, M. D., 

Vestrymen— J. PARKE POSTLES, 
ISAAC C. PYLE, 
WM. MONTGOMERY 
JNO. P. R. POLK, 

EDWARD T. CANBY. 
Sec'y, JOHN S. GROHE. Treas., EDW. T. CANBY. 



CHAS. M. CURTIS. 

THOS. F. BAYARD, 
JAMES CARROW, 
SAM'L C. BIDDDE, 
JOHN S. GROHE, 



Cist of /T)emb(^rs of Cadies' fWd /)$5oeiatioQ. 



Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 



HENRY R. BOYNTON, Mrs. GEO. LeMAISTRE, 



E. T. CANBY, 
MARK M. CLEAVER, 
CHAS. M. CURTIS, 
HENRY C. CONRAD, 
PETER B. COOPER, 
CLELAND, 

JOS. L. CARPENTER, 
JAMES A. DRAPER, 
VICTOR DU PONT, 
ADELINE L. DORR, 



Mrs. WM. T. MANSLEY, 
Mrs. J. C. MORROW, 
Mrs. MARGARET McCREA, 
Mrs. henry B. NONES, 
Mrs. GEORGE W. ORTLIP, 
Mrs. ISAAC C. PYLE, 
Mrs. WALTER PYLE, 
Mrs. J. PARKE POSTLES, 
Mrs. F. L. PATTERSON, 
Mrs. J. M. ROGERS, 



CHAS. L. DOUGHTEN, Mrs. JOSEPH SWIFT, 
ALEXANDER EVES, Mrs. J. D. SISLER, 



JOHN C. FARRA, 
JOHN S. GROHE, 
HORACE W. GAUSE. 
JNO. M. HARVEY, 
T. C. HATTON, 
H. ASHTON HENRY, 
H. C. JONES, 
TILGH. JOHNSTON, 
JAMES B. JEFFERIS, 
WM. M. KENNARD, 
WM. H. LLOYD, 
PAUL LUKENS, 
MILO LOCKE, 



Mrs. S. T. TURNER, 
Mrs. JAMES A. TAYLOR, 
Mrs. WM. J. WILLIAMS, 
Miss MARY BURR, 
Miss CLARA BURR, 
Miss MARY FARRA, 
Miss K. FARRA, 
Miss R. A. GALLAGHER, 
Miss SIDNEY HAYES, 
Miss CARRIE JOHNSTON, 
Miss MARY LAFFERTY, 
Mi.ss ANNA PURDY, 
Miss SOPHIE WAPLES. 



Mrs. MARGARET LYNDALL. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



BREAD, &c. 



Bread, 17 

Boston Brown Bread, ... 34 

Corn Bread 25 

Indian Loaf, 35 

Baking Powder Biscuit, . .21 

Maryland Biscuit, 22 

Biirliugton Buns, 26 

Germantown Buns, • . • 39 

Laplanders, 37 

Sally Lunn, 26, 40 

Spanish Buns, 28 

Muffins, 33 

Corn Muffins 35 

Yorkshire Muffins, .... 19 
Parker House Rolls, ... 20 



Pocket Book Rolls, .... 24 

Potato Rolls, 21, 32 

Quaker Rolls, 36 

Very Fine Rolls, 31 

Rusks 18, 22, 37 

Mother's Rusks, ..... 28 

Corn Cake, 33. 34 

Flannel Cakes, 30 

Johnny Cake, (Bishop Wil- 
liams, ) 27 

Oatmeal Cakes, 29 

Squash Cakes, 36 

Pone, 27, 38 

Yeast, 23 



BREAKFAST AND LUNCH DISHES. 



An Egj'ptian Dish, .... 54 
Beef Steak a la Mode.. . . 57 

Beef Steak Stewed 60 

Beef Riseroles, 53 

Boston Baked Beans, ... 48 
Cheese Dishes, . 49, 50, 54, 56 

Chicken Jellied 53 

Chicken dressed as Terrapin 50 
Chicken or Veal Jellied, . 52 
Chicken Croquettes, . . . 

173, 174, 178 

Corn Oysters, 55 

Curry Gravy, 55 

Dressed Calf's Head, ... 49 



Duck Terrapin, ..... 59 
Egg Dishes, 41, 42, 43, 46, 58 
Fish Croquettes, . . . • 175 

Lamb Chops, 44 

Meat Cakes, 46 

Omelettes, 42, 44 

Oyster Croquettes, . . 176, 177 
Potato Croquettes, . . .177 

Potato Puif. 57 

Salmon Timbale 51 

Terrapin Hash, 45 

Turbot, 52 

Veal and Ham Moulded, . 47 
Veal Loaf, 45, 59 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 



Lobster a la Newburg, 69, 70, 71 
New Orleans Court Bouil- 
lon, 62 

Rock or Cod Fish, (Fresh.) 64 
Scalloped Halibut, . . . .61 
Scalloped Fish, 63 



Terrapin, 71, 72 

Deviled Oysters, 65 

Oysters a la Baltimore, . . 68 

Oyster Pie, 65 

Pickled Oysters, 66 

Scalloped Oysters, 67 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



SOUPS. 



Corn Soup, 75 

Gumbo Soup 75 

Mexican Beau Soup, ... 76 



Ox Tail Soup, 77 

Potato Soup, 73 

Tomato Soup, . . .74, 76, 78 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 



Chicken Salad, 79 

Cold Slaw, 81 

Crab Salad, 80 

Potato Salad, 82 



Cabbage Dressing, .... 83 
Chicken Salad Dressing, 85, 86 
Mayonnaise Dressing, ... 83 
Salad Dressing, 84 



PICKLES, CATSUPS, &c. 



Green Tomato Pickles, . . 90 

Mangoes, 98 

Oil Pickles, 88 

Spanish Pickles, . . .89 

Cold Catsup, 93, 97 

Cucumber Catsup 92 

Hidgeon Catsup, 92 



Mustard Tomatoes, .... 94 

Chili Sauce, 95, 96 

Shirley Sauce, 94 

Tomato Catsup, . .91, 95, 96 

To Pickle Onions, 87 

To Pickle Cucumbers, ... 88 



PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, &c. 



Ashburton Pudding, . 
Baked Indian Pudding, 
Bird's Nest Pudding, 
Carrot Pudding, . . . 
Charlotte a la Royale, 
Chocolate Pudding, 
Cottage Pudding, 
Dandy Pudding, . 
Delicate Pudding, 
Delicious Pudding, 
Fig Pudding, . 
French Pudding, 
Fruit Pudding, . . 
Hasty Pudding, . 
Orange Pudding, 
Orange Float, . . 
Plum Pudding, . 
Queen of Pudding, 
Kice Pudding (without 
eggs), 



108 
loi 
107 

TOO 
104 
106 

105 
107 
103 
102 
103 
109 

• 99 
106 
100 
112 
108 

lOI 

105 



Snow Pudding, 104 

Suet Pudding, 102 

American Cream, . . iii, 116 
A Nice Frozen Dessert, . 114 

Apple Custard, no 

Bavarian Cream, .... 109 
Charlotte Russe, . . . .116 
Chocolate Cream, . . . .111 

Coffee Jelly, 115 

Cream Meringue, . . . .114 
Gelatine Custard, . . . .110 

Hamburg Cream 112 

Lemon Custard, 113 

Russian Cream, 118 

Snow Ball Custard, . . .117 
Spanish Cream, . . . 113, 117 

Tapioca Cream 115 

Fairy Butter (hard sauce), 119 
Lemon Butter, . . . 118, 119 



CONTENTS. 



VU 



PASTRY. 



Cream Pie, 124 

Egg Pie, 120 

English Fruit Pie, . . . .123 
Lemon Cream Pie, . 121, 122 



Lemon Pie, 123, 124 

Mince Pie (Meat), .... 121 
Pie Crust, 122 



CAKES. 



Angel Food, 143 

Black Cake, 144 

Caramel Cake 134 

Chocolate Cake, . 129, 133, 150 
Cream Cake, 145, 146, 155, 156 
Cookies, .... 135, 150, 154 
Crullers, . .131, 134, 159, 165 
Composition Cake, . . -153 

Delicious Cake, 142 

Doughnuts, . .126, 132, 163 

Feather Cake, 152 

Fruit Cake, . 136, 140, 141, 160 

Gingerbread, 

133, 137, 143. 151. 157, 164 

Harrison Cake, 155 

Hermits, 160 

Jelly Cake, 153, 158 

Jumbles, 127, 130, 145, 152, 
159. 162, 164, 165 



163 



Layer Cake Custard, . 
Lemon Jelly for Layer 

Cake, 162 

Lemon Cake 128, 129 

Mahogany Cake, . . . .127 

Marble Cake, 158 

Minnehaha Cake, 147, 148, 149 
Nut Cake, 137, 138, 139, 142 
Orange Cake, . . 128, 131, 151 

Pound Cake, 126 

Puff Cake, 161 

Sand Tarts, 135 

Scotch Cake, .... 132, 140 

Spice Cake, 166 

Sponge Cake, . . 130, 136, 161 

Straw Cake, 147 

Sugar Cakes 148 

Victoria Cake, 146 

White Mountain Cake, 125, 154 



CONFECTIONS AND PRESERVES. 



Chocolate Caramels, . 
Crystallized Pop-Corn, 
Everton Taffy, . . . 
Marron Glaces, . . . 
Pop-Corn Balls, . . . 
Brandied Peaches, . . 



169 
169 
168 
167 
168 
171 



Ginger Peaches, 172 

Plum Sauce, 171 

Preserved Water Melon, . 170 
Sweet Pickle Plums, . .172 
Rules for Canning Fruit, . 179 



BEVERAGES. 



Blackberry Cordial, ... 181 

Egg Nog 180 

Elder Blossom Wine, . . 182 

Dinner Giving, . . . 184-190 

The Table 191 

Invalids' Fare, 192 



Grape Wine, . . . . i8j, 183 
Grandmother's Whips, . . 182 
Raspberry Vinegar, . . .183 

Introduction to Sick Room, 195 
Household Hints, . . . . 19S 



Vlll 



CONTRIBUTORS. 



CONTRIBUTORS. 



Mrs. J. T. BuRROwES, 

Mrs. J. L,. BURTNETT, 

Miss Ci.ara A. Burr, 

Miss Mary S. Burr, 

Miss S. C. Bye, 

Miss LiIvI/IE Carpenter, 

Mrs. CI.ARK, 

Mrs. Ei.i,En S. Coffin, Boston, 

Mrs. Frances E. Coi^eman, 

Mrs. Peter Cooper, 

Mrs. Draper, 

Mrs. a. du p. 

Mrs. a. p. Eves, 

Miss Mary M. Farra, 

Mrs. C. H. GalIvAGher, 

Miss Reba A. Gai^lagher, 

Mrs. John S. Grohe, 

Mrs. Kate H. Hamii^ton, 

Mrs. J. M. Harvey, 

Miss Hayes, 

Mrs. Wm. Hearne, 



Mrs. H. Ashton Henry, 
Miss C. Johnston, 
Mrs. M. a. Li<oyd, 
Mrs. M. M. Lyndall, 
Mrs. M. M. McCrea, 
Miss E. P. McKrin, 
Mrs. E. E. Mansi,ey, 
Mrs. S. R. Nones, 
Mrs. J. W. Osborne, 
Mrs. a. Pyle, 
Mrs. M. W. Pyle, 
Mrs. Jno. m. Rogers, 
Mrs. Aug. Sampson, Boston, 
Mrs. Alice Burr Shepard, 
Mrs. Stone, Boston, 
Mrs. h. G. Sweet, Boston, 
Mrs. S. T. Turner, 
Miss E. Turner, 
Miss Sophie Waples, 

Mrs. I. P. WiCKERSHAM, 

Mrs. E. S. Winslow. 




REV. H. ASHTON HENRY, 

HLX-tor of Trinity Tarish. 



Tmnit^ Pamsli. 



THE history of Trinity Parish begins in 1638, 
when one Peter Minuit built a fort on the north 
side of Minquas Creek, at a place called by the 
Indians, "Hopokahacking," naming it Christina, after 
the then reigning queen of Sweden. 

With him came the Rev. Reorus Torkillus as 
pastor of the colon j', afterwards followed by several 
other priests. For many years religious services 
were held within the fort, and the church3'ard or 
cemetery was located on a hillside in the rear of the 
present Church of the Holy Trinity, (Old Swedes). 

In 1667, a timber church was built on the south 
side of the creek on land now owned by Richard 
Jackson, near the old Alrich house, called Crane 
Hook, to which the services were transferred, and 
continued to be held down to the year 1697. 

Mr. Biork, the rector from 1697 to 17 14, says in 
his diary: 



TRINITY PARISH. 



"On the 30th of Jul}^ (1697) agreeable to notice 
given on the 25th, we met to choose certain discreet 
persons from both sides of the River to act for the 
whole church in selecting and agreeing upon a place 
where we, in Jesus' name, should set the new church : 
and from this side were chosen Charles Springer, John 
Numerson, Hans Pieterson, Hendrick Juarsson and 
Brewer Seneke ; from the other side, Mr. Wholley 
Stobej^ Staffen Juranson, Jacob Van de Ver and Olle 
Fransen. And the fixing of the site was earnestly 
discussed, as some wished it to be Cranehook, some 
Thirdhook and some Christina ; while those on the 
East side of the River feared that if they were to con- 
tribute to the building of a new church on this side 
they would not be helped by their brethren when they 
should be numerous enough to form a separate church 
on the other side. But they on this side immediately 
satisfied them by promising them that whenever they 
should become sufficiently numerous to form a separate 
church, and able to support a separate minister of the 
evangelical doctrine, they would do as much for them 
as they now would do towards building a church on 
this side of the river. Then those who usually cross 
over from the other side to Sandhook (New Castle), 
and come up on this side, thought it would be hard for 
them to pay ferriage across the Christina Creek if the 
Church were set on the north side of it, and to content 



TRINITY PARISH. 



them, it was promised that they should be provided 
with a new canoe for their own special use in coming 
to church. And so it was finally unanimously decid- 
ed that the church should be at Christina, and as there 
was not ground enough in the cemeterj^ on which to 
set the building, without encroaching upon graves, and 
also that it was too much of a side hill, John Stalcop, 
of his own free will, gave land enough to set the upper 
half of the church on, and also 20 ft. on each side of 
the building, and a church-walk to the highway." 

It was first decided that the church should be 30 ft. 
long and 12 ft. in height, and the walls of stone 3 ft. 
thick, but when they came to the final consideration of 
the matter Mr. Biork says : 

' ' Now although some of the Church Wardens 
wished to have the church no longer than was first 
talked of, and most of the congregation thought it 
would be large enough, I opposed it earnestly, in the 
confidence that God would help me, for I saw plainly 
that it would not be what it ought, and that we should 
so build that it would not be necessary to enlarge, and 
I urged that our contract should be for a building 60 ft. 
long and 30 ft. broad within the walls, and that the 
wall should be 20 ft. high and 3 ft. thick, up to the 
lower end of the windows, and then two ft. upwards, 
and the contract was so made." 

The limited space allotted to this sketch precludes 



TRINITY PARISH. 



the recital of the interesting details of construction, 
and it must suffice to state that all the labor connected 
therewith was performed by the members of the congre- 
gation . With their own hands they quarried the stones 
and hauled them on sleds to the building site, they 
sawed all the boards and timbers in the saw pit, 
even the nails used were forged by the local blacksmith. 
The work was steadily prosecuted throughout a rigor- 
ous winter ; but was happily completed and the church 
ready for consecration on Trinity Sunday, July 4, 1699. 

On September 19, 1698, a meeting of the congrega- 
tion at Christina was held to choose new Church War- 
dens ; but two of the old were retained for the ensuing 
year, viz : Charles Christopher Springer and Mr. 
Wholley Stobey, to whom four were added, viz : Hans 
Pieterson, Brewer Seneke, John Stalcop, and from the 
other side of the river, Jacob Van de Ver. From that 
time to the present appears an unbroken record of the 
Wardens, or as they were afterwards constituted, War- 
dens and Vestrymen. 

The cost of the first church, reckoning all labor 
and gifts at the then ordinary prices, was estimated to 
be ^800, Pennsylvania currency. A considerable part 
of this money necessary for the payment of masons, 
carpenters, etc. obtained from Philadelphia, was do- 
nated by members of the congregation. The balance 
needed was loaned by John Hanson Stelman, a weal- 



TRINITY PARISH. 



thy Swede residing at Elk River, Maryland, on Mr. 
Biork's personal security, /130 of this was subse- 
quently paid b}^ him and when he returned to Sweden 
donated to the church 

' ' Thus was completed in the year of our blessed 
Lord, 1699, this substantial church building which 
shall stand for ages a testimony to future generations 
of the piety, zeal and perseverance of that humble 
servant of Christ, but really great man, the Rev. Erick 
Biork,of whom it may be truly said that of all the 
illustrious names who have helped to make our beloved 
Commonwealth what it is, none should be remembered 
with greater reverence and gratitude." 

In the early days of the church, burial within 
its walls was considered the highest tribute of respect 
that could be shown to the departed. Mr, Biork 
relates that he buried Church Warden Brewer Seneke 
under his own seat, and Aaron Johanson in the main 
aisle. He also tells us that he buried a son, who 
died here, on the South side of the altar, and when 
John Hanson Stelman, of Elk River, gave up to the 
church the note for one hundred pounds, as a special 
mark of gratitude he was voted a place of burial in 
the main aisle of the church. 

During the time of the Swedish supervision all 
the regular services were held in that language, but 
with the coming of Mr. Biork, in 1697, afternoon 



TRINITY PARISH. 



services in the English language were commenced. 
At that time there was no English church in the settle- 
ment, and it was not until several years later that one 
was established in the neighboring settlement at New 
Castle. The Swedish clergymen who succeeded Mr. 
Biork, studied as rapidly as possible the new vocab- 
ulary until they were fairly able to preach and conduct 
all services in the English language. During that pe- 
riod however, down to the time when the Rev. Mr. 
Girelius assumed the Rectorship, books of instruction 
issued by the ' ' Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel," were in general use, until finally at the with- 
drawing of the Swedish supervision in 1791, none but 
a very few old people retained knowledge of the 
Swedish tongue. 

The Church of Sweden had been more directly 
under the Royal authority than even the Church of 
England. All its commissions for pastorates were 
given by Royal authority, the Kings and Queens of 
Sweden being, indeed, nursing fathers and mothers to 
the churches in this country, for which they expended 
a considerable amount of money from their own pri- 
vate exchequers, in .sending over ministers, in main- 
taining assistant or extraordinary ministers, and pay- 
ing extra salaries to the provosts or commissaries of the 
churches. The churches or congregations, however, 
paid their resident pastors, built their own churches, 



TRINITY PARISH. 



and paid for the passage home of ministers who re- 
turned to Sweden. 

Following is a list of the Swedish Sovereigns, con- 
nected with the settlement — and who thus cared for the 
spiritual wellfare of their former subjects and their 
descendants. 

ist. Gustaf II. Adolf, the great hero of the Pro- 
testant w^ar in Germany; who projected the colony 
but who did not live to carry out his purpose, having 
lost his life in the battle of Zutphen. 

2nd. Christina, his daughter, and foundress of 
the Colony, who reigned from 1632 to 1654, when she 
resigned the crown. 

3rd. Carl X. Gustaf, who reigned from 1654 to 
1660. 

4th. Carl XI. who sent over Rudman, Biork and 
Aureen in 1696 — and reigned from 1660 to 1697. 

5th. Carl XII. The great warrior who sent let- 
ters to the churches here while a fugitive in Turkey, 
after the disasterous battle of Pultova. 

6th. Ulrica Eleonora, who reigned from 17 18 to 
1720 and then persuaded the Swedish Diet to declare 
her husband king. 

7th. Fredrik I— Husband of Ulrica, who reigned 
from 1720 to 1751. 

8th. Adolf Fredrik, who reigned from 1751 to 
1771. 



TRINITY PARISH. 



gth. Gustaflll — who reigned from 177 1 to 1792 
and under whose reign the Swedish jurisdiction was 
discontinued in 1791. 

Five years before this time, the Swedish churches 
had united in sending a letter to the Archbishop, stat- 
ing that the Swedish language was extinct, and ex- 
pressing their wish to choose Pastors from the English 
clergy in this country, but the death of the Archbishop 
Unander, with other complicating circumstances, had 
until then hindered Archbishop Uno Von Troil, from 
laying their request before the King — who now con- 
sidered it reasonable and gave the Swedish ministers 
permission to return home. The congregation then 
successfully petitioned the I^egislature of Delaware for 
an amendment of their charter, allowing them to elect 
either a Lutheran, or Episcopal clergyman for their 
Rector. The Swedish churches had heretofore been in- 
timately connected with the Episcopal churches, and 
several of their pastors had received regular stipends 
and gifts from the English ' 'Society for the Propagation 
of the Gospel;" so they naturally turned to the Episco- 
pal Church for their Rector. 

The congregation continued to worship in the Old 
Church, until the fall of 1830, when having built a 
comfortable house of worship at the corner of Fifth 
and King streets they removed to it, and never after- 
ward returned to the Old Church as a congregation. It 



TRINITY PARISH. 



still remained standing in the country', with nothing 
but a country road approaching to it, over a wet and 
clayey tract of land; which the Borough of Wilmington 
refused to keep in repair. The congregation however, 
held their venerable Old Edifice in affectionate regard, 
and after a few j'ears repaired it thoroughly. They 
occasionally held services there, and made efforts to keep 
up Missionar}' services, which finall}' proved fruitful 
and resulted in the building up of a large congregation. 

The Church at Fifth and King Streets, was used 
as the Parish Church, until 1882, having from time to 
time, been enlarged; and a comfortable Rectory built 
adjoining it. The congregation not only sustained the 
missionary work at the Old Church, but also undertook 
a missionar}' enterprise, in what was then known as 
the Brandywine village. Through the munificence of 
Alexis I. duPont and his family, this resulted in the 
building of St. John's Church and the growth of a 
flourishing congregation in connection therewith. 

In 1882, it having become evident to the vestry and 
congregation, that the interests of the Parish required 
a removal into a more westerly part of the city, and 
the building of a new church, more convenient to the 
congregation, more conducive to its future develop- 
ment, and at the same time more favorable to the 
growth of the congregation at the Old Church. They 
accordingly sold the church property at the corner of 



lo TRINITY PARISH. 

Fifth and King Streets, and with the approval of the 
Bishop and Standing Committee of the Diocese, secured 
an elegible lot of ground, located at the corner of 
Delaware Avenue and Adams Street. Upon a portion 
of this a new Chapel was erected to temporarily serve 
as a convenient house of worship, until improved 
financial affairs of the Parish would warrant the vestrj^ 
in carr5dng out' their determination to build an appro- 
priate church structure. 

With its last removal, the congregation so increased 
that the chapel with a seating capacity for four hundred 
persons soon proved inadequate to provide for its grow- 
ing necessities. Its financial condition also became 
greatly improved through the accession of a number of 
able and generous members, and it was decided upon 
July ist, 1889, to finally carry out the purpose so long 
and persistently cherished, and to proceed immediately 
with the erection of the commodious and beautiful 
church in which the congregation now worship, and 
which is justl}^ considered to be one of the chief archi- 
tectural ornaments of the City of Wilmington. 

Ground was broken for its construction on Septem- 
ber 30th, of the same year, and on May ist, 1890, 
the Feast of St. Philip and St. James, the corner stone 
was laid, with appropriate ceremonies. It progressed 
rapidly towards completion, and on Thursday, January 
29th, 1 89 1, was formally Blessed, and for the first time 



TRINITY PARISH. ii 

used for service; the attendant ceremonies on the occa- 
sion being conducted by its present pastor the Rever- 
end H. Ashton Henry, the Bishop of Delaware being 
Celebrant, and the Bishop of New York, the Preacher. 

The Chui'ch is of the Gothic order of architecture, 
built upon a design furnished by the architect Theo- 
philus P. Chandler, Jr., of Philadelphia. The walls 
are constructed of rough dressed Avondale stone, and 
a low ornamental wall of the same material faces Del- 
aware Avenue and Adams Street. The interior is in 
full keeping with the outward design, with a .seating 
capacit}^ of six hundred. 

Its cost exclusive of the tower and spire, as yet 
uncompleted, but including the grading of the grounds 
and the stone walls enclosing the same, amounted in 
all to $45,568.71. 

The speedy and satisfactory manner in which this 
great work has been accomplished, is due no less to 
the enterprise and liberality displayed by the Vestry 
than to the wise and efficient labors of the Rev. H. 
Ashton Henrv', who for the past five years of his in- 
cumbency, has been earnest and zealous in all work 
connected with the Parish. The facts of this are more 
manifest in a thorough and effective organization, — a 
new and beautiful Church Edifice, — a large and increas- 
ing congregation, and a well attended and admirably 
conducted Sunday School. In fact the congregation of 



12 TRINITY PARISH. 



Trinity, has reason for congratulation that their affairs 
spiritually, and financially, were never before in a 
more promising condition. 

Holy Trinity (Old Swedes') Church, and Parish 
since its foundation in 1697 has, down to the present 
time, enjoyed the ministration of a long line of clerg}^- 
men, the names of whom are herein recorded in due 
succession. 

I St. Rev. Magister Brick Biork, who may be re- 
garded as the actual builder of the church, (by his 
stimulation of the congregation and by his becoming, 
responsible for its cost.) — from 1697 to June 17 14. 

2nd. Andrew Hesellius, for awhile coadjutor with 
Mr. Biork, from May 3rd, 17 13 Rector until 1722. 

3rd. Rev. Magister Abraham lyidenius, assistant 
to Mr. Hesellius for about three years, when he assumed 
charge of the churches of Raccoon and Penn's Neck 
Parish, newly organized from the old congregations on 
this side of the river. 

4th. Samuel Hesellius, brother of Andrew, from 
1722 to 1731. 

5th. Rev. John Bnneberg from 1731 to 1742. 

6th. Rev. Magister Peter Tranberg, from 1742 to 
1748, who died during his rectorship and was buried in 
front of the chancel. 

7th. Rev. Magister Israel Aerelius the author of 
the history of New Sweden, from 1749 to 1756. 



TRINITY PARISH. 13 



8tli. Rev. Magister Erick Unanander from 1756 to 

1759- 

9th. Rev. Magister Andrew Borell, from 1759, 

till his death in 1768. 

loth. Rev. Magister Lawrence Girelius who was 
assistant to Borell one year, and Rector after his death 
to 1 79 1, when the Swedish supervision was withdrawn, 
and who returned to Sweden sometime after May 1791. 

nth. Rev. Joseph Clarkson of the Episcopal 
church, 1792 to 1799 inclusive. 

1 2th. Rev. William Pryce, 1800 to 181 2. 

13th. Rev. William Wicks, i8i4to 181 7 inclusive. 

14th. Rev. Levi Bull, 1818 to 1819. 

15th, Rev. Richard Hall, 1819 to 1822. 

i6th. Rev. Ralph Williston, 1822 to 1827. 

17th. Rev. Pierce Connelly, 1827 to 1828. 

i8th. Rev. Isaac Pardee, 1828 to 1835. 

19th. Rev. Hiram Adams, 1835 to 1838. 

20th. Rev. John W. McCuUough, D. D., 1838 to 
1847. 

2ist. Rev. Edwin M. Van Deusen, D. D., 1848 to 
1852. 

22nd. Rev. Charles Breck, D. D., 1853 to 1870. 

23rd. Rev. Wm. J. Frost, D. D., 1871 to 1881. 

24th. Rev. Henry B. Martin, M. D., 1881 to 1886. 

25th. Rev. H. Ashton Henr3^ 1887, present 
Rector. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



15 



CHOICE AKD TESTKD 

RECIPES. 




Contributed by the Ladies of Trinity Parish. 



1 6 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

One quart of sifted flour weighs one pound. 

One pint of soft butter (well packed), weighs one pound. 

Two teacupfuls of granulated sugar weigh one pound. 

A common-sized tumbler holds one-half pint. 

Four teacupfuls equal one quart. 

Four tablespoonfuls are equal to one-half gill. 

Sixteen ounces make one pound. 

A common-sized wineglass holds one-half gill. 

One tablespoon ful of granulated sugar weighs one 
ounce. 

Two teaspoonfuls of flour, sugar or meal, equal one 
tablespoonful. 

One tablespoonful of soft butter weighs one ounce. 

Soft butter the size of an egg weighs two ounces. 

Eight tablespoonfuls of liquid equal one-half tumbler- 
ful. 

Two tablespoonfuls contain a fluid ounce. 

Ten medium-sized eggs weigh one pound. 

Four gills make one pint. 

Two pints make one quart. 

Four quarts make one gallon. 



Jrii}ity pari5l7 §ool^ Bool^. 



BREAD, &c. 



BREAD. 



n 



Rv^ AKH a sponge of two cups of flour, two good 
sized potatoes, boiled and put through a col" 
ander, one cup of good yeast ; when light add 
two teaspoonfuls of sugar, a piece of lard the size of 
an egg, salt, and flour sufiicient to knead well, put to 
rise again, and when light make into loaves and let 
rise once more before baking. 



^^.y. ^<^.^.. 



i8 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



RUSKS. 



ONE large coffee cup of warm milk, one cup of 
sugar, three eggs, two ounces of butter. Melt 
the butter in the milk, add the sugar and a small 
quantity of the flour, then the eggs well beaten, dis- 
solve yeast cake in a little milk, and then enough flour 
to knead into a soft dough. When light make into 
forms, lyCt rise about two hours. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 19 



YORKSHIRE MUFFINS. 



NE pint of milk, three eggs, one cupful of butter 
and lard mixed, one cupful of yeast or half of 
an yeast cake, a very little salt. Warm the but- 
ter, lard and milk, then sift in a little flour, beat in the 
eggs and j-east, continue to add flour until the sponge 
is soft. Set away in warm place to rise. When light, 
add flour enough to handle on board, then put back 
into the bowl and let it get very light. When light, take 
out bits and roll on board about size of a small saucer, 
and half an inch thick, put in pans to lighten, then 
bake. When baked, set upon edge to cool, if not 
wanted at once to eat. These will keep in a tight box 
for a long time, and are good, either warmed up or 
broken apart and toasted. 



20 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



PARKER HOUSE ROI.I.S. 



^AKE two quarts of flour, make a hole in the 
centre and put in one tablespoonful of white sugar, 
butter the size of an egg, one pint of milk that 
has been boiled but is now cold, one-half cup of yeast, 
stir this up and let stand over night, in the morning 
knead well for fifteen minutes, set to rise until two 
o'clock then roll out and cut round, put a small bit of 
butter in one half, and double the other half over, put 
in the baking pans and stand until teatime, this makes 
three dozen. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 21 



BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 




IX three heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder 
thoroughly, with one quart of sifted flour, add 
one large spoonful of lard, one teaspoonful of 
salt, and cold water, or sweet milk enough to mix soft. 
Bake in a quick oven. Be careful not to work more 
than necessary in mixing the ingredients together. 




^ 



POTATO ROI.I.S. 



'WO cups of mashed potatoes, one half cup of lard, 
one tablespoonful of sugar, one teaspoonful of 
-^ salt, one ^^<g, one cup of yeast. Make into a 
sponge. 




22 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



RUSKS. 



n 



RvTI AKE a sponge of two teacups of milk, one cup 
of yeast, one-half pound of flour, one-half 
pound of sugar, one-half pound of butter. 
Then when very light put flour enough to knead; 
when light make out in shape. Flavor with cin- 
namon. 



^ ^ Aii^^^^'-'i^'^^^^^. 



MARYLAND BISCUIT. 



KVKN cups of the best flour, one cup of lard, 
one and one-half cups of cold water, and salt; 
'beat until very light. Bake in a quick oven. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 23 



YEAST. 



ARE, and boil eight large potatoes in four quarts 
of water, when nearlj' done add one pint of 
strong hops. When the potatoes are done put 
through a colander, and strain the water through a 
bag over them, then add one cup of sweetning either 
sugar or molasses, or both, one-half cup of salt and one 
large spoonful of ginger, stir all together, when cool 
add one cup of rising, let it stand in a warm place 
twenty-four hours to ferment then bottle and cork up 
tight, keep in a dark place. This makes about one 
gallon. 

YEAST. 

NE quart of grated (raw) potatoes, one cup of 
sugar, one-half cup of salt, one gallon of boiling 
water and a few hops. 




24 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



POCKET BOOK ROLIvS. 



'T^^AVE ready a quart of sponge about half past 
eight in the morning; warm a pint of sweet milk 
with a large piece of butter and lard in it; add 
salt and four teaspoonfuls of sugar; put in enough sift- 
ed flour to make a stiff batter; let it rise in a warm place 
until it is very light, which will be about twelve; then 
add enough flour to make it a nice soft dough, knead 
well and put to rise again; it ought to be light at four, 
then take a part out and lay it on a floured board; roll 
it lightly rather thin and cut out with a biscuit cutter; 
have some melted butter in a tin and with a feather 
brush the half of the top, then lay the other half over 
and draw it out a little, pat it down some; lay them in 
a buttered pan, not to close and let them rise again 
before baking. 



.J. 




c^^.^.yf'^ y^Cp/y-i/^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 25 



CORN BREAD. 



'WO-THIRDS of a pint of rice after it has been 
boiled. Three eggs, one tablespoonful of butter 
and lard mixed, two teacups of white corn meal, 
one teaspoonful of Royal yeast powder and enough milk 
to make as thin as batter cakes, salt. Bake in earthen 
pans or muffin pans, if in the latter, should not be so 
thin. To mix take the hot rice, add butter, then the 
eggs, (yolks) meal, and thin with the milk. Then 
the whites stirred in with yeast powder. Quick oven is 
required. 



26 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



BURI.INGTON BUNS. 



UB a half pound of sugar and six ounces of but- 
ter into two pounds of flour, and one gill of yeast. 
lyCt it rise in a warm place and add one pint of 

warm milk. Make into cakes; let rise and bake twenty 

minutes. 



0^A4/.C^.(he^.0^^A 



'Ata/c 



SALLY LUNN. 



ONE and one-half pounds of flour, one-fourth of a 
pound of butter, one pint of milk, four eggs, 
one-half cup of yeast or three-fourths of a yeast 
cake. Bake in gem pan. 



-"L<r-^J^-^|^ ^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 27 



PONE. 



©NE cup of boiled rice, five ounces of lard, one 
teacupful of meal, one pint of milk, five eggs, 
two teaspoonfuls of Royal or three of Rumford's 
yeast powder. Bake an inch thick, in a dripping pan, 
and cut into squares. 



JOHNNY CAKE (BISHOP WILI.IAMS). 



ONE cupful of corn meal, one cupful of flour, one 
cupful of sugar, one cupful of sour cream (or 
one cupful of sweet milk, three tablespoonfuls 
of butter), one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, one half 
teaspoonful of soda, two eggs, not beaten. 



/ 




>i^4^J<t— . 



28 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SPANISH BUNS. 



IX ounces of butter, one pound of sugar, three- 
quarters of a pound of flour, four eggs, one cup 
of cream and one of currants, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder; beat together the butter, sugar and yolks 
of eggs, then add the cream, beat it in; add the flour with 
the baking powder sifted through it, then the whites of 
the eggs beaten hght ; when well mixed add >■ our flavor. 
Beat all well together, and add the currants, bake in 
a quick oven in flat tins twenty minutes. 



%u./^. ^Aa 



MOTHER'S RUSKS. 



NE pint of milk, two cups of sugar, one cup of 
butter, one egg. 




Hj^. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 29 



OATMEAL CAKES. 



NE cup of boiled oatmeal, one tablespoonful of 
butter, one quart of flour, one tablespoonful of 
white sugar, one and one-half cups of milk, one- 
third teaspoonful of salt, half a cup of yeast ( or one- 
third of an yeast-cake.) 

Let the oatmeal be nearly cool before using. Stir 
all together for eight or ten minutes. Let it rise over 
night. Fill gem pans three-fourths full, let them rise 
half an hour. Bake in a hot oven. 



30 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



FIvANNElv CAKES. 



t=>> 



EAT the yolks of two eggs light; add about 

lyj one quart of buttermilk or sour milk, salt, two 

teaspoonfuls of baking soda, and flour enough 

for a thin batter; lastly, add the whites of the eggs, 

beaten light. 



.^^.^^ .^^^^. 



FLANNEL CAKES. 



LEVEN ounces of flour, two good-sized spoon- 
fuls of Rumford's yeast powder; sift together; two 
eggs, beaten separately, one pint of milk, one 
and one-half ounce of lard. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 31 




VERY FINE ROLLS. 

NE pint of new milk poured hot over two large 
potatoes boiled and mashed, two ounces of 
butter, and two of lard, stirred into the potatoes 
and milk, a teaspoonful of sugar, one of salt, two 
pounds of sifted flour, and half a cake of compressed 
yeast, knead all together for twenty minutes after break- 
fast if for tea ; when very light, roll them out an inch 
in thickness, cut, put in pans, rise again until very 
light, and bake in a hot oven. 




./^. ^Aj.. 



32 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



POTATO ROLLS. 



/ITBOUT 9 p. m., beat up two eggs, one-half cup of 
(LA sugar, one cup of mashed potatoes, three-fourths of 
ii- i-i a cup of melted lard, one cup of warm water, a 
little salt, a pint of yeast, and two cups of sifted flour. 
The next morning work up about as stiff as bread dough, 
and let it rise until noon or a little later. Then roll out 
about one-half an inch thick, and cut out with a biscuit 
cutter. Lay one piece on top of another in pans. Let 
it rise again before baking. 



OU.^. /h-^.,.^;tkdt. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 33 



CORN CAKE. 




NE pint of milk, one-half pint Indian meal, 
four eggs, a scant tablespoonful of butter, salt, 
and one teaspoonful of sugar. Pour the milk 
boiling on the sifted meal, when cold, add the butter 
(melted), the salt, the sugar, the yolks of the eggs and 
lastl}^ the whites, well beaten. Bake half an hour in a 
hot oven. 



MUFFINS. 



NE pint of milk, two eggs, one large table- 
spoonful of lard, eleven ounces of flour, two 
teaspoonfuls of Rumford's yeast powder. 



34 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

NK heaping cup of Indian meal, one heaping 
cup of Garham flour, one heaping cup of rye 
flour, one cup of sour milk, one cup of sweet- 
milk, two-thirds of a cup of molasses, one egg, heaping 
teaspoonful of soda, little salt. Steam four hours, set 
in oven fifteen minutes. Currants are an addition. 







CORN DODGERS. 

ONE pint of milk, two pints of meal, two eggs, 
one teacupful of lard, two teaspoonfuls of Royal 
or three {teaspoonfuls of Rumford's yeast powder. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



35 



INDIAN I.OAF. 



'WO cups of sweet milk, one cup of sour milk, 
two cups of Indian meal, one cup of flour, four 
tablespoonfuls of syrup, one tablespoonful of 

butter, one teaspoonful of soda, one-half teaspoonful of 

salt. Steam from three to five hours. 




CORN MUFFINS. 

©NE cupful of white corn meal, two cupfuls of 
flour, one half cup of sugar, one half cup of 
butter, two eggs, one teasponful of soda, two 
teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar; mix with cold water 
and bake in a quick oven. 



^^.^ ^(^.y^- 



36 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



QUAKER ROLI.S. 



nAKE a stiflF sponge of three pints of milk and 
three tablespoonfuls of yeast; put to rise over 
night; then add a half pound of lard, three- 
quarters of a cup of white sugar, salt and flour enough 
to work light; let rise again; make out and put in pans 
to rise before baking. 



A?^.^- ^^.^.. 



SQUASH CAKES. 



ONE cup of squash, one-third cup of sugar, one 
cup of milk, one-third cup of butter, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, two of cream of tartar, two and 
one-half cups of flour ; bake in rings. 




-, /^^^yi'^'^^Cc^*^ «^'^^^i'>i^^^*=^^5:^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 37 



RUSKS. 



ONE cup of butter, one egg, one pint of milk, 
one pint of yeast, and three cups of sugar. 
Make a sponge at night; in morning make a 
soft dough and let get light. Mould in forms and 
bake a light brown. 

These rusks dried and grated make a fine Panado 
for the sick. 

LAPIvANDERS. 



ONE pint of sweet milk, one pint of wheat flour, 
two eggs, a tablespoonful of melted butter, a 
little salt. Beat the yolks and whites separately 
and thoroughly. To be baked in gem pans, which 
must be heated on top of stove before using, and have 
the oven hot. Make a nice dessert by cutting a slit in 
the side and filling with the following cream: One egg, 
beaten; two small spoonfuls of corn starch, one cupful 
of milk. Let it become cold before using. Eat with 
sauce. 




38 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CORN PONE. 




NE quart of corn meal, one teaspoon ful of salt, 
two tablespoonfuls of butter; put together 
in a pan, and pour on enough boiling water 
to wet them all through. Then add milk until it 
is a batter, next two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, 
yolks of six or eight eggs beaten well, then the whites 
beaten to a froth, and one teaspoonful of soda dissolved 
in milk. Stir all together, and bake in a moderate oven 
for thirty minutes. This quantity is better if baked in 
two cakes. 



'A€.^, A?-^.,./^;^^^. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 39 



GERMANTOWN BUNS. 

aUARTER pound of butter, half a tumbler of 
milk, half a pound of white sugar, three-quar- 
ters of a pound of flour, four eggs, well beaten, 
one and a half cups currants, one yeast powder (Bring- 
hurst's), spices. Melt the butter in the milk, add the 
sugar, then the eggs, then the currants; beating con- 
stantly. Then the flour, which should be sifted, and 
have one grated nutmeg and a tablespoonful of cinna- 
mon mixed with it. Dissolve the blue paper of yeast 
powder in brandy, the white in rose water or milk; 
add them separately, beating well all the time, and 
bake immediately in shallow tin pans. 

Mrs. A. duP. 



40 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SALLY LUNN. 

NE egg, one-quarter cup of sugar, four table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter, one cup of milk, two 
and one-half cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Beat the eggs, add the butter, then 
sugar and milk, then flour and baking powder (sifted). 
Bake in gem pans in hot oven about twenty minutes. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 41 



BREAKFAST AND LUNCH 
DISHES. 



EGGS WITH OYSTERS. 

'AKE three oysters to each egg, and cook them in 
their own liquor. Strain all the juice oflF, and 
chop very fine. Stir into scrambled eggs. 
Pepper, and salt, and a very small portion of nutmeg. 



EGGS WITH CHEESE. 



NTO scrambled eggs stir, while on the fire, a half 

teaspoonful of grated cheese for each egg, and a 

-1 little parsley chopped very fine. Salt, and a very 

little red pepper. This is a good way to use up old, 

dry cheese. 



r. 



rtfi^yy^^C"^^^ 



42 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



TOMATO OMELETTE. 



ONE tablespoonful of tomato sauce to each egg. 
Three eggs makes a nice dish. Beat eggs 
separately; add tomatoes to yolks. Then stir 
in beaten whites very carefully and put in oven. Put 
pepper and salt to yolks. 



^^2^. ^_. ^^.-d^ ^ 




SOFT BOILED EGGS. 

UT the eggs on in cold water, and as soon as the 
water boils take the eggs out. 



^* y. c^t 



'C'O-^^'-^^^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 43 



DEVILED EGGS. 



^^OURTEEN eggs, two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, 
two tablespoonfuls melted butter, salt, black and 

-i red pepper to taste. Mustard enough to lay on the 
end of a knife an inch from the top, nine stalks of 
parsley, chopped fine. Boil eggs about twenty minutes 
until quite hard. After they have cooled, cut each in 
half. Remove the yolk and rub until smooth, then mix 
in the ingredients, after which mould into balls suffi- 
cient to fill each half egg. 




T' 



44 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



VEAL OMELETTE. 



OUR pounds of veal cutlet, one-half pound of 
raw salt pork chopped very fine, beat up four 
^ eggs, a cup of rich sweet cream, stir both sepa- 
rately into the chopped meats, melt half pound of but- 
ter with some thyme and parsley chopped fine, put it 
into the meat. Season the whole well with pepper and 
salt. Bake, slow, four hours, in a round tin. Cut 
cold for tea or lunch. 





LAMB CHOPS. 



AMB chops cooked in this way are excellent. 
Put them in a frying pan, with a very little water, 
^ so little that it will boil away by the time the 
meat is tender ; then put in lumps of butter with the 
meat and let it brown slowly ; there will be a brown, 
crisp surface, with a fine flavor. 



Q^A4/. Q^. Q^. Q^"-A 



'■Ua/: 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 45 



TERRAPIN HASH. 



UT lamb or veal in pieces the size of an olive, 
being careful to take off all the fat, dust with 
flour. Have ready a sauce-pan with one-sixth of 
a pound of butter, half a pint of water, one-half dozen 
cloves and two hard boiled eggs, chopped fine; throw 
in your meat and, when scalding hot, add a glassful of 
sherry or madeira, and half a teaspoonful of Worces- 
tershire sauce. Serve very hot. 




VKAI. LOAF. 



=^HREE pounds of veal chopped fine, one-quarter 
pound of pork, chopped, three eggs, three table- 
spoonfuls of milk, one tablespoon of salt, one of 
pepper, twelve tablespoon fuls of crushed cracker. 
Mix thoroughly, form into a loaf, and bake, basting 
occasionally. 




46 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



STUFFED EGGS. 



IX hard boiled eggs cut in two, take out the 
yolks and mash fine; then add two teaspoonfuls 
of butter, one of cream, two or three drops of 
onion juice, salt and pepper to taste. Mix all thorough- 
ly, and fill the eggs with this mixture ; put them to- 
gether. Then there will be a little of the filling left, 
to which add one well beaten egg. Cover the eggs 
with this, and then roll them in bread or cracker 
crumbs, fry a light brown in hot butter. 



•^» ^' &^i!^^f-^^ 



MEAT CAKE. 



L-ii-^HREE pounds of lean beef chopped fine, three 
eggs, six crackers rolled fine, four tablespoonfuls 
■i of milk, six teaspoonfuls of sage, six teaspoon- 
fuls of salt, two and one-half teaspoonfuls of pepper, a 
small piece of butter, bake two hours. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 47 



VEAL AND HAM MOULDED. 



UT oue pound of raw veal, and one-half pound 
of raw ham into slices and put in a sauce-pan with 
just enough water to cover. Simmer one hour, 
put three sprigs of parsley in, chopped fine, five minutes 
before taking from the fire. While it is cooking, soak 
one-half ounce of gelatine in a cup of cold water and 
add with the parsley, cut three hard boiled eggs into 
slices. Butter a mould and put in the eggs so that 
they will adhere to the butter, and line the sides and 
bottom of the mould. Let it set all night and turn out 
into a dish. 




^e^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 



ICK over a quart of pea beans, wash and soak 
over night in plenty of cold water. In the morn- 
ing put into a kettle on the back of the stove, 
pour on a tea kettle of boiling water and let them stand 
twenty minutes. Prepare a half pound of fat pork; 
put into a cup one even teaspoonful of dry mustard, 
two teaspoonfuls of salt, two tablespoonfuls of molasses; 
mix well and fill cup with boiling water; pour over the 
beans, which have been placed in the pot with pork in 
the centre, fill the pot with boiling water, cover and 
bake eight or ten hours. 



/^f^> c^C-^^^'^nn^S, 




^^^M^*- 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 49 



CHICKEN CHEESE. 



OIL two chickens ( in as little water as you can ) 

J J until tender, then chop fine, season with salt, 

-^ pepper and a little butter ; put a little gelatine 

in the water the chickens were boiled in; pack the 

chopped chicken in a jelly mould; pour the gravy over; 

eat cold. 



DRESSED CALF'S HEAD. 

J OAK the head two or three hours in cold water, 
then take the brains out and tie them up in a 
cloth ; boil the head until it will fall apart, boil- 
ing the brains at the same time. When cool pick up, 
taking out all gristle and skin ; chop the meat with 
four hard boiled eggs ; then melt one-half pound of 
butter in a pan, add the calves head, brains, and eggs, 
season with salt and pepper, and flavor with sherry 
wine. 



j/» ^' J^^i^ 



-i^^^.-'C-.s^'''^.^ * 



50 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



Va 



CHICKEN DRESSED AS TERRAPIN. 

OIL a pair of large chickens tender. Then shred 
them in small pieces and put them in a covered 
stew pan with one-half pint of boiling water. 
Rub together until very smooth one tablespoonful of 
flour, one pound of butter, and the yolks of two eggs, 
add them to the minced chicken, one-half at a time, 
stirring very hard. Season with salt and pepper. Let 
it simmer for ten minutes, then stir in one gill of wine 
and serve hot. 




CHEESE PUDDING. 

IX ounces of cheese, grated; two eggs, beaten 
light; one ounce of butter, one teacupful of 
milk beaten up together. Bake until like a cus- 
tard pudding. Salt, pepper and a little mixed mustard 
to taste. Melt the butter. 





TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 51 



SALMON TIMBALE. 



'AKE one can, or two pounds of fresh salmon, 
remove the skin, bones and oil, if canned salmon 
is used. Flake the fish with a silver fork till very 
fine, then add one tablespoon ful of finely chopped par- 
sley, and one teaspoonful of lemon juice, one teaspoon- 
ful of salt and one of pepper. Now stir in two table- 
spoonfuls of thick cream and three well beaten eggs. 
Turn into well buttered timbale moulds, stand in a pan 
of boiling water, and cook gently in the oven for twenty 
minutes; then turn from the moulds and serve with 
a cream or mushroom sauce. 




52 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



TURBOT. 

'AKE a white fish or pike, boil until the bones 
come out easily, sprinkle with salt and pepper. 
-I Heat a pint of milk and thicken with enough 
flour to make it creamy. When cool, add two eggs and 
quarter of a pound of butter. Season with a dash of 
onion and parsley. Put in a baking dish, a layer of fish, 
then a layer of the cream, till all is used, cover with 
bread crumbs. Bake half CjA) an hour. 




TO MAKE JELLIED CHICKEN OR VEAL. 

o^ OIL the meat till it falls from the bones ; use 
j) just as little water as possible ; when cold, chop 

-^ it very fine, season with pepper and salt, and a 
pinch of curry if you like that flavor. Then put it in 
a mould with a layer of hard boiled eggs, either 
chopped or sliced. Boil the water in which the meat 
was cooked until it is half boiled away, and pour it 
over the chicken; this will be ready for use the day 
after it is prepared. 



Q^M/. 0^. 0^. O^^A 



'Ai.ct/: 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 53 



BEEF RISEROI.es. 

'AKE cold beef, either roast or steak, cut off the 
gristle and chop the beef very fine. To one cupful 
of meat, add one cupful of stale bread crumbs, one 
egg, well beaten; salt and pepper to taste; a little all- 
spice, one small onion, chopped fine, with two table- 
spoonfuls of milk. Roll in balls and fi-y in boiling 

lard. Trim the dish with parsley. 

Mrs. a. duP. 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

r^ OIL a chicken in as little water as possible until 
y)\ the meat can be easily picked from the bones. 
— -^ Manage to have a pint of the liquid when done. 
Pick meat from bone in small pieces, removing all 
gristle and bone. Skim fat from liquor, add one ounce 
of butter, little pepper and salt, and one-half package 
of gelatine. Put chicken in a mould, wet with cold 
water, when gelatine is dissolved, pour liquor over the 
chicken, turn out when cold. Gelatine should be 
dissolved in a little cold water, then added to liquor. 



54 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



AN EGYPTIAN DISH. 



^AKE some thick stewed tomatoes, nicely sea- 
soned with pepper, salt, sugar and onion juice. 
-1 Do not sweeten with sugar, but just enough to 
correct the acid of the tomatoes. Put a thick layer in 
the bottom of a baking dish. Have ready enough cold 
mutton, chopped very fine, and well moistened with 
gravy, and seasoned well. Make the next layer of 
this; then put another layer of tomatoes, which ought 
to fill up the dish. Cover with bread crumbs and with 
some small bits of butter, and brown in the oven. 



J^/^Vu^T^o^C-e^ \^ 



CHEESE STRAWS. 

'HREE ounces of grated cheese, two ounces of 
flour, yolk of one ^g^, two tablespoon fuls of 
water, a little salt and red pepper. Roll one- 
quarter of an inch thick, cut in strips a finger long, 
and bake a light brown in a moderate oven. N. B. — 
Before baking, sprinkle with grated cheese (Parmesan 
is best). If baked the day before, put in the oven for 
a moment before using, to make crisp. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



55 



CURRY GRAVY. 

J5RY in butter a sliced onion and two sliced apples. 
When getting brown, sprinkle over them two 
teaspoonfuls of curry powder, and one of flour. 
Let it brown well and add enough boiling water to 
make a nice gravy. Strain throtigh a fine strainer, 
and season with salt to taste. Nice dishes can be made 
of this gravy by putting into it cold beef or mutton, or 
hard boiled eggs, which have been cut in slices. 



CORN OYSTERS. 



CRAPE the corn from the cob. To every pint of 
pulp add two well-beaten eggs, one tablespoon- 
ful of flour, one tablespoonful of milk and one 
half teaspoonful of salt. Fry in hot lard or dripping. 



56 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CHEKSE STRAWS. 



'HESE straws, which are nice with salad or with 
after dinner coffee, are easily made. Take one- 
-1 half of a pound dried flour, one-quarter of a 
pound of butter, one-quarter of a pound of grated 
cheese, a saltspoonful of salt, and a little mustard 
and red pepper. Rub the butter into the flour; 
then mix all the ingredients well together. Beat the 
whites of two eggs with one-quarter of a pint of cold 
water, and stir in enough to form a firm paste. Knead 
the paste well, and roll it out an eighth of an inch 
thick, and cut it into straw like strips five inches long. 
Bake in a quick oven till of a pale brown color. They 
will keep fresh a long time if closely shut up in a tin box. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 57 



POTATO PUFF. 



'WO cups of cold mashed potatoes, two table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter, beaten to a cream; 
one Qgg, beaten light; one cup of milk, salt to 
taste. Bake in a deep earthen dish, in a quick oven, 
till nicely browned. 




■^/^' 



BEEF STEAK a la MODE. 



UT a pound of beefsteak, cut about an inch thick 
in a chafing dish, in which two tablespoonfuls 
i of butter have been melted, with two or three 
slices of lemon. Let it cook slowl)^ five or ten min- 
utes ; then pour over it a gill of good stock, or the 
same quantity of hot water, in which a dessertspoon- 
ful of "Johnston's Fluid Beef" has been dissolved, 
also a gill of port wine. Allow the whole to simmer 
slowly ten minutes longer. When ready to serve, 
squeeze the juice of a lemon over the steak. A shallow 
earthen pan can be used on the stove in place of a 

chafing dish. 

(Caterer.) 



58 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



BEAUREGARD EGGS. 

7=^IVE eggs, one-half pint of milk, one tablespoon- 
ful of corn starch, lump of butter, size of a wal- 
nut, five squares of toast, salt and pepper to taste. 
Put eggs on to boil in hot water; let boil for twenty min- 
utes. Take off the shell, chop the whites fine and rub 
the yolks through a sieve. Do not mix them. Now 
put the milk on to boil, rub the butter and corn starch 
together, and add to the boiling milk. Now add the 
whites, salt and pepper. Put the toast on a hot dish, 
cover it with a layer of this white sauce, then a layer 
of the yolks, then the remainder of the whites, and 
then the remainder of the yolks. Sprinkle the top 
with a little salt and pepper, stand in the oven for a 
minute or two and serve. 



^^^^. ^_ ^.d^ ;^ 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



59 



DUCK TERRAPIN. 



"p^AKE the remains of cold duck, add two parboiled 
sweet breads. Cut the duck and sweet breads 

^ into dice. Season well with parsley, salt and 
pepper. Add one cupful of white sauce, stir over hot 
water until hot. Then add the yolks of two well 
beaten eggs and a glass of sherry. 




VEAL LOAF. 

'O three pounds of lean, raw veal, take one pound 
of salt pork, both chopped finely; one cupful of 
cracker crumbs, three eggs, pepper and salt. 
Mix well and make into a loaf. Slap it well, so as to 
make it solid. Put in a covered pan, sprinkle cracker 
crumbs over the top, and pieces of butter, (no water). 
Bake two hours. Eat cold, cut in slices. 




6o TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



STEWED BEEF STEAK. 



UT a steak into a sauce pan with a cup of water. 
Add a can of tomatoes, an onion in which are 
stuck a dozen cloves, and a little salt. Let it 
stew gently ( not boil ) for six hours. Then take the 
steak out of the sauce pan and lay it on a hot dish to 
keep warm. Take out the onion, and beat up the 
gravy smooth. Add any salt it may require, also 
pepper, and a little sugar to correct the acid of the 
tomatoes. It should be served very hot. After dinner 
chop very fine what is left of the steak, carefully 
keeping out any fat or gristle, and mix with all the 
gravy what is left. Season well, and add a little 
powdered cloves, and allspice, and nutmeg. Measure 
this mixture, and add the proper quantity of Coxe's 
Gelatine. Put in a mould and set in a cold place. It 
can be turned out and sliced for^tea. 



tstvu^t'^-c-^^ r. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 6i 



FISH AND OYSTERS. 



SCALLOPED HALIBUT. 



OUR poiinds of halibut cooked in salt water for 
half an hour. Put in colander, strain and pick 
all bones and skin from it. Then put fish in 
bowl and work with silver fork very fine. Put on 
range one quart of milk to boil, and in it a very small 
onion, and let it boil for two minutes; then take half 
of a pound of butter, three tablespoonfuls of flour, 
mix thoroughly until perfectly smooth; stir this into 
boiling milk (first take out onion), cook for a few 
minutes, until thickened; salt and red pepper to taste. 
Butter a dish, then put in a layer of fish, then a layer of 
sauce, and so on until the dish is full; put sauce on top, 
then fine cracker crumbs, and squeeze a lemon over all. 
Bake in oven for half an hour and serve hot. This 
can be put in small fish dishes, and many prefer it so. 
It is very fine. 




62 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



NEW ORLEANS COURT BOUILLON. 

X^AVE ready a large cup of chopped onion,s, one- 
half cup of chopped parsley and one quart of 
-1 tomatoes. Fry the onions in butter, not very 
brown, then add a cup of water and the tomatoes, which 
you have peeled and chopped fine, then add parsley and 
season with cayenne and salt, thicken with a sprinkling 
of flour, and put in browning enough to make it a rich 
color. This sauce will take about half an hour to cook, 
if it cooks away too much add water or more tomatoes. 

Into this sauce you place the fish (rock is best) cut in 
pieces the size for each person and let it stew slowly 
until the fish is cooked. 

Have ready a large flat dish with pieces of toast, up- 
on which you place the fish, then add to the sauce a cup 
of claret, when it just reaches a boil pour it over the 
fish and toast and serve immediately. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 63 



SCAI.I.OPED FISH. 



'WO and a half pounds of halibut or cod, boil in 
a cloth till tender, with a little salt; let cool and 
then pick to pieces. Grease baking dish with 
butter, put layer of fish, then dressing with dots of 
butter, more fish and so on until all is used, the last 
layer of fish being well covered with grated cheese. 
Bake in a quick oven until nicely browned. 

DRESSING. 

Two-thirds of a pint of cream (part milk will do), 
piece of butter, size of an egg; salt, dash or two of red 
pepper, small quarter of a teaspoonful of mustard, and 
sufficient corn starch to make the cream of pap con- 
sistency. Have the cream boiling before adding com 
starch. While this is hot, add to the fish. 




■^I^.C'Trz-^.^^i^. 



64 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



ROCK OR COD FISH (FRESH). 
(A Recipe of Delmonico's.) 



OUR pounds of rock or cod fish, boil until tender 
in water slightly salted; then pick it up fine, 
taking out bones and skin. Boil one quart of 
milk with one onion in slices, four cloves and a sprig 
of parsley; boil until it tastes of the ingredients, then 
strain and add four tablespoon fuls of flour, made smooth 
by a little water, salt and a pinch of evergreen. Let 
it thicken by boiling to the consistency of cream; add 
a quarter of a pound of butter. Butter a baking dish 
or patty dishes and put in layers of fish and sauce, 
cover slightly with bread crumbs and cook half an 
hour. 




^=w^^?/£^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 65 



OYSTER PIE. 



NE hundred large oysters, yolks of three eggs 
(boiled hard), two ounces stale bread (grated), 
two ounces butter, two teaspoonfuls of flour; chop 
the eggs very fine and mix with the crumbs, which 
season wdth salt, black pepper and a little cayenne. 
Put the oysters in a stew kettle, season them with salt 
and pepper; mix the butter and flour together until 
smooth, and put in with the oysters; place them over 
a slow fire until the butter melts, then remove them, 
make a paste, butter the sides of a deep dish, strew the 
eggs and bread over the oysters. Bake in a quick oven. 




DEVII.ED OYSTERS. 

'WENTY-FIVE fat oysters chopped up; heat their 
liquor with a half pint of cream; stir in a heap- 
ing tablespoonful of flour, rubbed into the same 
of butter; add, carefully, two well -beaten eggs, some 
minced parsley, salt and cayenne. Fill scallop or deep 
oyster shells, and brown lightly. 



66 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



PICKLED OYSTERS. 



FUT one quart of oysters on the fire, with a tea- 
spoonful of salt; let them heat, and as soon as 
the ears begin to curl, strain and put in cold 
water; pour the juice into the kettle and add three or 
four blades of mace, a teaspoon ful of whole pepper 
and allspice, and two tablespoonfuls of best vinegar. 
Let this boil for five minutes, then pour, boiling hot, 
over the oj-sters, add three tablespoonfuls of sherry 
and keep in a cool place. If you prefer them a little 
more cooked, keep on the fire a little longer at the first 
heating, but if done too much they will be soft. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



67 



SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 



CALD two dozen oysters in their liquor; drain 
and retnrn the liquor to the fire with a pinch of 
nutmeg, a tablespoonful of cream, a tablespoon- 
ful of flour and a tablespoonful of butter; shake until 
thickened, put in the oysters, season with salt, cayenne 
and butter. Butter a dish, sprinkle with crumbs, fill 
with the oysters and sauce, sprinkle crumbs over the 
top, and brown in a quick oven. 



72u^. y^ 




68 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



OYSTERS a la BALTIMORE. 



^AKE twent5^-five oysters, put them on the fire in 
their liquor, and let them come to a boil, or till 
they plump, then remove, put into a colander 
and drain, cut into small pieces into a sauce-pan on the 
fire, put one large teaspoonful of butter and one tea- 
spoonful of flour, rubbed together; let it come to a 
bubble; add one cupful of cream, little salt, pinch of 
mace and cayenne, one grate of nutmeg, one-half tea- 
spoonful of chopped parsley, one squeeze of lemon, 
one half teaspoonful of celery seed; add to this the 
oysters, stir all together. Put the mixture either into a 
baking dish or individual shells, sprinkle fine crumbs 
over the top and put into the oven to brown. 




\/&^^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 69 



LOBSTER a la NEWBURG. 



Ply IT two good sized, freshly boiled lobsters. 
Pick all the meat from the shells, cut into one 
inch lengths, place in a sauce-pan on the hot 
range, with one ounce of butter, season with one pinch 
of salt, a half saltspoonful of red pepper, adding two 
medium sized truffles, cut into dice shaped pieces; 
cook for five minutes, add a wine glass of good Madeira 
wine. Reduce one half, which will take three minutes. 
Then put the yolks of three eggs in a bowl, with a 
half pint of sweet cream, beat well together; add lob- 
ster; gently shuffle for two minutes or until it thickens 
well. Pour into a hot tureen and serve hot. 



^^2^. ^1 ^.&5:- ^ 




70 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



LOBSTER NEWBURG. 



^^OR six or eight persons, use the meat of a lobster 
weighing about four pounds, or two small ones; 
• i four tablespoonfuls of butter, two tablespoonfuls 
of brandy, two tablespoonfuls of sherry, two teaspoon- 
fuls of salt, one-fourth of a tablespoonful of pepper, a 
half kpint of cream, yolks of four eggs, and a very 
slight grating of nutmeg. Cut the meat of the lobster 
into small, delicate .slices, put the butter on the stove 
in a ftying-pan and, when it becomes hot, put in the 
lobster. Cook slowly for five minutes, then add the 
salt, pepper, sherry, brandy and nutmeg, and simmer 
five minutes longer. Meanwhile beat the yolks- of the 
eggs well, and add the cream to them. Pour the liquid 
over the cooking mixture and stir constantly for one 
minute and a half. Take from the fire immediately at 
that time and serve in a warm dish. (I think cayenne 
pepper preferable to black). 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 71 



LOBSTER a la NEWBURG. 



=^W0 pounds of cooked lobster, one cupful of 
cream, yolks of three eggs, one half goblet of 

-1 sherry (table), salt and cayenne pepper. Put a 
little butter m a stew-pan (copper preferred), then add 
the lobster. When very hot, add the sherry and let 
come to a boil, then pour in the eggs and cream, and 
stir until it thickens. 





TERRAPIN. 

OIL the terrapin till tender, and, after picking 
[jj out, add one wine-glass full of sherry wine to 
■^ each terrapin. Reserve one half of the livers. 
DRESSING FOR THE SAME. 
For each good sized terrapin, mash one half the 
liver with the yolk of one hard boiled egg, butter the 
size of an egg, one teaspoonful of flour, one small tea- 
spoonful of mustard, a dust of cayenne pepper, salt to 
taste, one tablespoonful of rich cream; add this mix- 
ture to the terrapin and wine, and let all simmer until 
it thickens. Serve very hot. 



72 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



TERRAPIN. 



UT the terrapin, alive in boiling water and boil 
fifteen minutes, or until you can pull oflF the 
the outer skin and the toe nails. Then put them 
in fresh boiling water, add a teaspoonful of salt and boil 
slowly until the shells part easily and the flesh on the 
legs is quite tender. When done, take out, remove 
the under shell and let stand until cool enough to 
handle; then take them out of the upper shells, care- 
fully remove the sand bags, bladders, the thick, heavy 
part of the intestines and the gall sacks, which are 
found imbedded in one lobe of the liver, and throw 
them away. In removing the gall sack, be very care- 
ful not to break it, as it would spoil the terrapin. 
Break the terrapin into convenient sized pieces, cut the 
small intestines into tiny pieces and add them to the 
meat; add the liver broken up, also the eggs in the ter- 
rapin. Put into a stewing pan with the juice or liquor 
it has given out while being cut. For one quart of 
meat, boil six eggs for twenty minutes, mash with 
cream. Put meat to simmer, add eggs, about three- 
fourths of a quart of cream or milk, half a pound 
of butter; season with salt and pepper; madeira wine 
to taste. Caramel to color. About one dessertspoon- 
ful of flour mixed with cream to thicken. Add wine 
last thing before serving. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 73 



SOUPS. 



POTATO SOUP. 



F=^OUR good sized potatoes, one quart of milk, piece of 
onion size of silver quarter, sprig of parsley, stalk 

-l of celery, one bay leaf, one tablespoonful of but- 
ter, salt and pepper to taste. Put potatoes on to boil 
in one quart of cold water. When they are half done, 
drain all the water off, then cover them again with one 
pint of fresh boiling water. Add the onion, bay leaf, 
parsley and celery, and boil until the potatoes are done. 
Put milk on to boil as soon as the potatoes are done, 
press all through a sieve. Add the butter to them, 
then the salt and pepper; now pour over the boiling 
milk. Mix and serv^e immediately. 



^^2^. ^_ ^.d^ ;^ 




74 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CRKAM TOMATO SOUP. 

7^ OIIv one quart of tomatoes and two quarts of 
yyi water one hour. Press through a colander. 
— ^ Add two tablespoonfuls of butter and one table- 
spoonful of flour (blended) and a teacup of cream. 
Salt. 



/^yt^, 7^ 




TOMATO SOUP. 

NE quart can of tomatoes, two heaping table - 
spoonfuls of flour, one tablespoonful of butter, 
one teaspoon ful of salt, one teaspoon ful of sugar, 
one pint of hot water. Let tomatoes and water come 
to a boil, rub flour, butter, and one spoonful of tomato 
together; stir into boiling mixture, add seasoning. 
Boil all together, fifteen minutes, rub through a sieve 
and serve with toasted bread. 




•^/^' 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 75 



CORN SOUP. 



ONE dozen ears of com, two pounds of beef, cut 
com from cobs. Put meat and cobs into cold 
water and boil until meat is done. Take out 
meat and cobs, and add salt and one tomato to the 
water, then add the corn; boil three-quarters of an 
hour; then add one pint of milk or cream; after the 
milk boils, thicken and season to taste. 




GUMBO SOUP. 

/P^ UT up a chicken as for a fricassee, and fry a light 
\V brown in the pot in which you are going to make 
^^ your gumbo; pour off all the extra lard in which 
the chicken was fried, and add three pints of water, two 
quarts of finely cut okra, one pint of tomatoes, two 
medium sized onions chopped fine, and a slice of ham, 
cut small; season with salt and cayenne. Boil all three 
hours, serve with boiled rice. Having put a ladleful 
of the soup in the soup plate, place a tablespoonful of 
rice in the centre. 




•^^^T^ 



76 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



MEXICAN BEAN SOUP. 



ONE pint of beans soaked all night. In the 
morning put the Mexican beans into a pot 
with three quarts of water, a knuckle of veal, 
and a piece of butter the size of an egg. Season with 
pepper and salt. Boil six hours. Have ready in the 
tureen, a lemon sliced, and one egg boiled hard, and 
chopped fine. Strain the soup and add one-half 
tumbler of wine. 



TOMATO SOUP. 

/^ OOK in one quart of water till very tender, one 
\V quart can of tomatoes (or eight large sized ones); 
\1 add one teaspoonful of soda. When the foaming 
stops, and not before, add one quart of cold milk, 
season with pepper, salt, and butter, and let it 
come to a boil. Roll a few crackers very fine and add 
just before taking the soup from the fire ; put a layer 
of whole crackers buttered on the bottom of the 
tureen. Pour the soup over them. 



0^44^. (M/. Ch>. O^^A 



''Ua/: 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 77 



OX-TAIL SOUP. 

I— Ij-^AKE two ox-tails, cut into small pieces, put them 
into a pot without water, set them over the fire 
to brown, then pour on about five quarts of 
water, add one turnip, one onion, cut in small pieces, 
some celery, parsley and leek, also a whole pepper, 
cloves, one can of tomatoes. Let boil three hours. In 
the meantime brown a cup of flour in the oven or on 
the stove. Strain your soup, having taken off the 
grease, and thicken with the brown flour. To this add 
a wine glass of Sherry or Madeira and a half glass of 
catsup, salt to taste. 




78 TRINITY. PARISH COOK BOOK. 



TOMATO SOUP. 



ONE quart can of tomatoes, one pint of stock or 
water (first the best), one tablespoonful of but- 
ter, one tablespoonful of corn starch, one tea- 
spoonful of sugar, one-fourth teaspoonful of baking 
soda, one small onion, one bay leaf, sprig of parsley, 
salt and pepper to taste. Put tomatoes in a sauce-pan 
with the bay leaf, parsley, onion and stock or water; 
let all stew for fifteen minutes, now press them through 
a sieve fine enough to remove the seeds. Wash the 
sauce-pan and return the tomatoes to it; put on the fire 
to boil; rub the butter and com starch together, and 
stir into soup when boiling, stir until smooth; now 
add salt, pepper, sugar and soda. Butter slices of 
bread and cut in tiny squares, put them in a baking 
pan, and toast in the oven until a nice brown; add them 
to the soup just as it is going to the table. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 79 



SALADS AND DRESSINGS. 



CHICKEN SALAD. 
OIL three chickens till tender. Pick the meat 
)) from the bones and chop fine. U^e celery in the 
proportion of one-third celery to two-thirds 
chicken. Chop it separately and not quite as fine as 
the chicken. For a dressing, take one tumbler and 
a half of vinegar, three teaspoonfuls of mustard, one- 
half of a cupful of melted butter or oil, the yolks of 
five eggs, salt and pepper to taste. After beating, heat 
this dressing over a slow fire, then stir till nearly cold; 
then mix together, adding three hard boiled eggs, 
chopped. This dressing is also very nice for chopped 
cabbage. 



^•^. 4?-^.,.4:t^z^. 




8o TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CRAB SALAD. 



'AKE the picked meat of twelve boiled crabs. 
Set this away to become cold, then arrange it on 
a bed of crisp lettuce, and pour the dressing over 
it. Work one-quarter of a pound of butter to a cream, 
then add the well beaten yolks of four eggs, a dessert- 
spoonful of mustard powder, caj^enne pepper and salt 
to taste. Mix these ingredients well together, then 
stir the mixture over the fire, and add vinegar until it 
is as acid as you wish it. Continue to stir it until it 
thickens like boiled custard, then remove it from the 
fire and set it away to become thoroughly cold. The 
dressing must not be poured over the salad until the 
time of serving it. 



.J'^'P^^i^^^ Ot - /X< 



l^^l^^i— . 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



COLD SLAW. 

HAVE very fine one-half of a small solid head 
of cabbage; melt in a pan a piece of butter the 
size of an egg, stir in it a heaping teaspoonful 
of flour; when perfectly smooth, add one-half pint of 
milk, with an egg beaten in it; stir over the fire until 
very thick and beginning to boil, then sef it off and 
stir in the cabbage; when thoroughly incorporated with 
the sauce, add a little salt and one-half of a cupful of 
cold vinegar; stir well until all is mixed. Put it in the 
dish you will serv^e it in ; dust a little pepper over the 
top and set away. It should be made half an hour 
before dinner. 




/^. ^Aa 



82 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



POTATO SALAD. 
UT up some cold boiled potatoes in small blocks; 
add to these some celery cut in pieces about one- 
half an inch long, then some onion and parsley, 
chopped fine; season these with pepper and salt. Make 
a dressing of one teacupful of vinegar, lump of butter 
the size of an egg; one egg, one teaspoonful of mus- 
tard, one teaspoonful of salt, pinch of pepper, one tea- 
spoonful of sugar. Put vinegar and butter on the 
stove and let it come to a boil, beat the egg very light 
and add to it a little water, the mustard, pepper, salt 
and sugar; pour these into the hot vinegar and stir 
briskly until it begins to thicken; when cold, add two 
tablespoonfuls of sweet cream. Pour over the salad. 



d/fL(d^'¥^JL^Z^.^. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 83 



CABBAGE DRESSING. 



7=J0TTR tablespoon fuls of cream, two eggs, a little 
red pepper, mustard and salt, one tablevSpoonful 
of sugar, four tablespoonfuls of vinegar, one 

tablespoonful of butter. Boil till thickness of cream; 

pour hot over finely cut cabbage and let stand till cold. 




I/^^^K 



MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

"\V7"0L,KS of three eggs, one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
one-half teaspoonful of dry mustard, a little 
cayenne pepper, one-half bottle of best olive oil, 
and one-half cupful of vinegar. Beat with Dover &%% 
beater. In summer begin the dressing with a small 
baked potato. If the dressing be too stiff, add the 
white of one egg. 



^^^^^^5^^. 





84 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SAIvAD DRESSING. 

THAT WILL KEEP. 

BEAT four eggs very light; then beat in half a 
teacupful of salad oil. Have ready the juice of 
half a lemon, strained; one-half of a cupful of 
cream in which has been stirred, until free from lumps, 
two teaspoonfuls of mustard, one teaspoonful of sugar, 
one teaspoonful of salt, one saltspoonful of black 
pepper and one saltspoonful of red pepper. After the 
oil is well beaten into the eggs, add the lemon juice, 
then the cream, etc., and last, half a cupful of vinegar. 
You must taste and see if it is sour enough. (I 
make mine in a thin quart bowl, which I procured for 
the purpose.) Set the bowl in a tin of hot water and 
stir well. It must not be left a minute. Stir it well 
from sides and bottom of bowl, and keep stirring until 
it thickens well. Then take off and set the bowl in a 
dish of ice water and still keep stirring until cold. 
Bottle, and it is ready for use. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 85 



CHICKKN SALAD OR MAYONNAISK 
DRESSING. 



^^OR one-half of a chicken, take three eggs, two 
yolks hard boiled, and one yolk raw; mix to a 
paste, add a dash or two of red pepper, one-quar- 
ter of a teaspoonful of mustard (stir these well); then 
pour in slowly, four tablespoonfuls of the best olive 
oil, stirring all the time. Should you find this will 
not be enough dressing for the quantity of meat and 
celery (one stalk to this quantity of meat being suf- 
ficient), you can add more oil — this must be a thick 
paste; then add vinegar to taste, and should it not be 
thin enough, a tablespoonful of cream can be used 
instead of so much vinegar, as some do not care to 
have it so tart. Salt to taste. Always wipe the 
celery dry before cutting in pieces one-quarter of an 
inch thick. The meat should be a little larger. Keep 
both in a cool place, and do not add dressing until 
needed. Boiled chicken is usually preferred, but I 
like roasted chicken or turkey better. 




86 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CHICKEN SALAD DRESSING. 



f=30R one pair of chickens, the yolks of four hard 
boiled eggs, mashed thoroughly with a gill of 
salad oil. Add the yolks of four raw eggs, one 
small teaspoonful of mustard, one-half of a teaspoon- 
ful of red pepper, one tablespoonful of flour, one-half 
teaspoonful of sugar, one gill of vinegar and half a 
pint of rich cream. Mix all well together and cook 
until it begins to thicken. When cold, add a teaspoon- 
ful of salt and the whites of the four raw eggs. This 
is also an excellent dressing for lettuce or tomatoes. 



/^^ - /^, ^. alc^ 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 87 



PICKLES, CATSUPS, &c. 



TO PICKIvE ONIONS. 



=^AKE the small, round, white onions, peel off 
their skins, throw them into a kettle of boiling 
. -i water over the fire. Put in at a time as many as 
will cover the top; as soon as they look clear, take 
them out with a perforated skimmer, and lay them on 
a soft towel folded double. When all are done and 
quite dry, put them into jars. Put vinegar, sufficient 
for your onions, over the fire in a kettle, with the fol- 
lowing spices: One ounce of horse-radish, one ounce of 
whole black pepper, one ounce of salt to every quart 
of vinegar; let it come to a boil, and pour hot over the 
onions. Fill the jars only three parts full of onions. 



./^. ^Aa 



88 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

TO PICKLE CUCUMBERS. 

TZ^EEP them in a strong brine for several days, then 
r\\ put them in a stone pot and pour boiling vinegar 
i il over them. Boil the same vinegar seven or eight 
times, or until the pickles become green and hard, then 
take sufficient fresh vinegar to cover them, and to each 
one and one-half gallons, add four ounces of black pepper, 
four ounces of mustard seed, two ounces of green gin- 
ger, two ounces of allspice, and one-half ounce of cloves, 
four ounces of celery seed, and one-half dozen small 
Mexican red peppers. 




OIIv PICKLES. 



ONE hundred small pickles, one pint of onions, one 
pint of salt, one cup of olive oil, one-half pound of 
mustard seed, two ounces of celery seed. Slice 
pickles and onions, salt them and let them stand about 
six hours, then drain them, mix in other ingredients 
and cover with cold vinegar. 




T' 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SPANISH PICKLE. 



NE peck of green tomatoes, two dozen of large 
white onions, one dozen green peppers. Chop 
the onions, peppers and tomatoes fine, sprinkle 
with salt, put this in a bag and let it drain over night. 
One gallon of good cider vinegar, one ounce of white gin- 
ger root, one-half ounce of tumeric, one ounce of radish 
seed, one ounce of celery seed, one ounce of black 
mustard seed, one ounce of white mustard seed, one 
pound of brown sugar, one-half pound ground mustard. 
Mix all the spices and sugar in the vinegar, then add 
the tomatoes, peppers and onions, put on the stove and 
let simmer until thoroughly done. Then put in jars. 



^•^. A?•^,.M;^^^Jt. 




90 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 

'O one gallon sliced tomatoes that are just turn- 
ing white, and have been scalded in salt and 
water till they are a little tender, mix a table- 
spoonful of ground pepper, one tablespoonful of mace, 
one tablespoon ful of cloves, one tablespoonful of mustard, 
one tablespoonful of cinnamon, four tablespoonfuls of 
white mustard seed, two tablespoonfuls of celery seed, 
four pods of green peppers, six onions (more to suit 
taste), one pint of nasturtiums. Chop onions and pep- 
pers fine, mix all together with one-half pound of sugar, 
and cover with vinegar, and simmer together for fifteen 
minutes; add more tomatoes, if you do not care to have 
them so rich with spices. 




^ '^.H.'^^Ja^^^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 91 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

ONE bushel of ripe tomatoes, prepared by running 
them through a sieve. This generally makes 
about four gallons of juice. Then boil down 
about one-half, and add one pound of brown sugar, one 
cupful of salt, one quart of vinegar, one tablespoonful 
of black pepper, two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, one 
ounce of cloves, and a little caj^enne pepper. 



^.^. A?.^.,^;^.^. 



CATSUP. 




NE dozen of green peppers, one dozen of onions, 
one-half bushel of fine ripe tomatoes. Cut the 
vegetables and sprinkle one-half teacupful of 
salt over them; let stand over night. In the morning 
put over the fire, let boil until all is thoroughly cooked. 
Press through a colander; return to the kettle, add one 
and one-half pints of vinegar, a shred of mace, one 
ounce of ground cloves, one ounce of allspice, one- 
half teacupful of brown sugar; let boil until thick as 
desired. Bottle and cork tightly. 



O^A^.O^.Ch.Q^%. 



'AtA/: 



92 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



HIDGEON. 

©NE-HAIyF peck of green tomatoes, one large 
head of cabbage, six green peppers, all chopped; 
one-quarter pound of mustard seed, one-quarter 
ounce of whole cloves, one-quarter ounce of allspice, 
four tablespoonfuls of salt. Cover with vinegar, and 
sweeten to taste. Boil one hour. 



w^ • jf' ^-Co-yi^ 



CUCUMBER CATSUP. 



■=^AKE three dozens of full-grown cucumbers, 
eight white onions; peel cucumbers and onions, 

-1 grate cucumbers and chop onions as fine as possi- 
ble; sprinkle them with three-quarters of a pint of salt; 
put all in a sieve and let stand twelve hours, then add 
one teacupful of mustard seed, one-half teacupful of 
black pepper. Mix well and put in a stone jar, with 
strong vinegar; close tightly for three days and it will 
keep for years. 



Jp^.^- ^6^' 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



93 



COLD CATSUP. 



=^AKE one-half peck of tomatoes, peel, cut, and 
drain six hours, then mash fine with the hand, 
take out all hard pieces; add one-half cupful of 
salt, three-quarters of a cupful of mustard seed, white 
and black mixed; one gill of nasturtium, one good-sized 
root of horse-radish, two tablespoonfuls of celery seed, 
two tablespoonfuls of black pepper, one tablespoonful 
of cinnamon, one tablespoonful of allspice, one table- 
spoonful of mace, one quart of vinegar. Bottle, not seal. 




94 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SHIRIvEY SAUCE. 

NE peck of ripe tomatoes, eight green peppers, 
eight onions, chop all these fine; eight table- 
spoonfuls of salt, eight tablespoon fuls of sugar, 
eight teacupfuls of vinegar. Put one ounce of whole 
cloves and one ounce of ground ginger in a bag. Add 
to the mixture and let the whole simmer gently four 
hours. 

MUSTARD TOMATOES. 



LICE some good, solid tomatoes and lay them 
out singly on a plate; pepper and salt to taste. 
Take one ^%z^ O"^ teaspoonful of yellow mus- 
tard, a small piece of butter, one tablespoonful of sweet 
cream; vinegar to suit the taste. Beat all together and 
set over the fire until it boils, stirring well. When 
done, it should be about the consistency of cream. If 
too thick when done, add vinegar. Put a spoonful of 
this dressing on each slice of tomato, and put .some 
slices of hard boiled ^^% over them. ^ 



^^^Z^<^ 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 95 



CHILI SAUCE. 



OUR dozen of large ripe tomatoes; scald, peel and 
cut into pieces; four green peppers and four red 
i-l peppers, eight large onions; peppers and onions, 
chopped fine together; eight small cupfuls of vinegar, 
eight tablespoonfuls of sugar, four ounces of salt. All 
cooked together until like preserv^es, which will take 
nearly all day. Put in jars and seal very tightly. 



^^^^. ^„ ^.d^ ;^ 




TOMATO CATSUP. 

"L-HALF of a bushel of tomatoes, skinned, boiled 
j soft, and mashed through a colander. Three- 
^ quarters of a pint of salt, one and one-half 
ounces of cayenne pepper, one and one-half tablespoon- 
fuls of black pepper, one ounce of cloves (ground), 
one and one-half ounces of allspice (ground), two 
and one-half heads of English garlic, skinned, and 
separated, cut small; one quart of vinegar. Boil until 
reduced one-third, and bottle without straining. 

Mrs. a. du P. 



96 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CHILI SAUCE. 



'WENTY-FOUR large ripe tomatoes, six green 

peppers, four large onions, three tablespoon fuls 

of salt, eight tablespoonfuls of brown sugar, six 

teacupfuls of vinegar. Chop the peppers and onions 

very fine. Peel the tomatoes and cut very small. 

Put all together into a kettle, and boil gently for one 

hour. 

Mrs. a. duP. 



TOMATO CATSUP. 

NE bushel of ripe tomatoes boiled until soft, 
then squeeze through a wire sieve, add one-half 
gallon of pure vinegar, one pint of salt, two 
ounces of whole cloves, one-quarter of a pound of 
whole allspice (tie whole spices in a cloth), one ounce 
of cayenne pepper, three teaspoonfuls of black pepper, 
one tablespoonful of mustard seed; mix together and 
boil until reduced one-half of the quantity. Then 
bottle. 



jb^.^- ^<^.y^~ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 97 



COLD TOMATO CATSUP. 



yxnALF-PECK of tomatoes (ripe), chopped fine; two 
J roots of horse-radish (grated), two red peppers. 
^ i-1 chopped fine; three stalks of celery, one cupful 
of nasturtiums, one cupful of onions, chopped fine, 
one teacupful of salt, one cupful of black and white 
mustard seed, two teaspoonfuls of black pepper, two 
teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of ground 
cloves, one teaspoonful of ground mace, one cupful 
of sugar, one quart of vinegar. Mix all together, put 
in bottles, seal up tight. Ready for use any time. 



.^f^'i^^^ C± ' ((0^ 



L^l^f'^li-^. 



98 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



MANGOES. 



W 



UT them in brine for ten days, then wipe dry. 

Put in strong vinegar and water for two days. 

Make a filling of chopped cabbage with celery, 
mustard seed and white pepper with enough olive oil to 
moisten it. Place them in a jar and cover with this 
mixture: For thirty-three mangoes, one and three- 
quarter gallons of vinegar, five and one- quarter pints 
of sugar, three-quarters of a teacupful of tumeric mixed 
with vinegar, three-quarters of a cupful of mustard 
seed, three-quarters of a cupful of celery seed, three- 
quarters of a cupful of white pepper, three-quarters of 
a cupful of long peppers, three-quarters of a cupful of 
ground allspice, a little mace and cloves ground, a little 
ground mustard. Bruise the mustard and celery seed 
in a mortar; add a root of horse-radish, or ground 
horse-radish, two or three garlics, cut up. Cover tightly 
and keep one year. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 99 

PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS 
AND SAUCES. 



FRUIT PUDDING. 



==^HREE cupfuls of flour, one cupful of sweet milk, 
one cupful of molasses, one cupful of suet, chop- 
ped fine; one cupful of raisins (stoned), one 
cupful of currants, one teaspoonful of soda, one egg, 
one tablespoonful of ground cinnamon, one teaspoon- 
ful of ground cloves. Mix molasses and milk together, 
add suet, then raisins, currants and spices, a little 
flour, then soda dissolved in a little boiling water; add 
rest of flour, and egg lightly beaten. 
SAUCE. 
One cupful of powdered sugar, one-half cupful of 
butter, rubbed to a cream; add yolk of one egg, beaten, 
then the white, and melt over tea kettle; then add one- 
half sherry -glass of brandy. 




:7^^^ 



loo TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



ORANGE PUDDING. 

Oily one pint of milk. Stir in while boiling, 
j) one and one-half tablespoon fuls of com starch. 
Add yolks of three eggs, and one-half cupful of 
sugar. Have ready one-half dozen sliced oranges, 
sprinkled lightly with sugar. When the custard is 
done, pour over the oranges. Make a meringue with 
the whites of the eggs and one tablespoonful of cold 
water, beaten lightly, and add three tablespoon fuls of 
sugar. 




7^' 



CARROT PUDDING. 



ONE-QUARTER of a pound of chopped suet, one- 
quarter of a pound of bread crumbs, one-quarter 
of a pound of grated carrots, one-quarter of a 
pound of sugar, one-quarter of a pound of raisins, two 
eggs, one large spoonful of molasses, wine or brandy 
sauce. Boil two hours. 





^^^^^^^''^^^^^^jp^a^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. loi 



QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

NE pint of fine bread crumbs, one quart of milk, 
a piece of butter size of an egg, the yolks of four 
eggs, one cupful of white sugar, the juice and 
rind of one lemon. Beat the milk and butter, mix 
well with the bread crumbs, cool; then add your eggs 
and sugar, well beaten together, flavor, put in the pan 
and bake. When done spread the top thick with jelly, 
and over that the whites of the eggs, beaten light, with 
a cupful of pulverized sugar, then brown lightly. 



A?^.^- ^<^^^- 



BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

'WO quarts of scalded milk with salt, one and 
one-half cupfuls of Indian meal, yellow; one 
tablespoonful of ginger; let this stand twenty 
minutes. One cupful of molasses, two eggs, a piece of 
butter the size of a common walnut. Bake two hours. 
Splendid. 



102 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



DELICIOUS PUDDING. 



'WO cupfuls of fine bread crumbs, one cupful of 
white sugar, five eggs, one tablespoonful of but- 
U ter, one quart of fresh milk, one-half cupful of 
jelly or jam; boil the milk and pour while hot over 
the crumbs, add the butter and half the sugar. When 
cool, add the beaten yolks of the eggs. Bake in a 
pudding dish (filling about two-thirds) until the cus- 
tard is set, then spread over it a jellj^ or jam. Cover 
with a meringue made of the beaten whites of the eggs, 
and the rest of the sugar. Set in the oven to brown. 
Serve cold. 



j^'2'^>0''i^<^ x^ ^ 



ac^^^-'C^^ 



SUET PUDDING. 



ONE cupful of suet, one cupful of molasses, one 
cupful of milk, one cupful of raisins, three cup- 
fuls of flour; cinnamon, cloves and allspice to the 
taste; one-half teaspoonful of soda. Put into a tight 
tin mould and boil three hours. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 103 



FIG PUDDING. 

IX ounces of suet, chopped fine; half a pound of 
figs, chopped fine; three-quarters of a pound of 
bread crumbs, four ounces of moist sugar (brown 
is best), a Httle nutmeg, one egg and one cupful of 
milk. Boil in a mould, four hours. 

SAUCE FOR THE SAME. 
One cupful of sugar, two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
one egg, and a champagne-glass of wine. Beat the 
yolks and whites separately; the latter to a stiff froth. 
Mix in a bowl. After boiling sugar, butter and wine 
together, pour over the egg and return all to the sauce- 
pan to thicken for a moment over the fire. 

DElvICATE PUDDING. 



IGHT eggs, one quart of milk, eight tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, salt; beat the yolks, add the flour, 
then the milk; last, the whites of the eggs. 
Then bake. 



I04 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CHARLOTTE a la ROYALE. 

©NE package of Nelson's gelatine, one quart of 
milk, six eggs, one and one-half cupfuls of sugar, 
pinch of salt, two teaspoonfuls of vanilla. Soak 
gelatine three hours in a cupful of water. Heat the 
milk and stir in the soaked gelatine. Pour it, when 
dissolved, on the yolks and sugar, well beaten. Let it 
get cool. Beat whites to stiff froth, and add spoonful 
by spoonful to the congealing "jamse mange," beating 
steadily until you have a light yellow sponge, flavor- 
ing as you work. Line a glass dish with sponge cake, 
and fill with the sponge, cover with more cake and set 
on ice until needed. 

SNOW PUDDING. 



ONE pint of boiling water poured over one-half 
box of gelatine. Stand till cold, and add two 
cups of sugar, juice of two lemons, whites of 
three eggs. Beat all together forty -five minutes. 




.vxy-. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 105 



COTTAGE PUDDING. 

ONE cupful of sugar, one cupful of milk, two eggs, 
a lump of butter the size of an egg, two teaspoon- 
fuls of cream of tartar, one teaspoon ful of soda, 
and flour to thicken. Eat hot. 
SAUCE. 
Beat a tablespoonful of butter to a cream, add 
one tablespoonful of cream, and sugar enough to 
thicken. 



C^.Jl. A^.^.,M^ueJt. 



RICE PUDDING (WITHOUT EGGS). 




^WO quarts of milk, one-half teacup ful of rice, 
a little less than a teacupful of sugar, the same 
-1 quantity of raisins, a teaspoonful of cinnamon. 
Wash the rice, and put it with the rest of the ingre- 
dients, into the milk. Bake rather slowly, from two 
to three hours; stir two or three times the first hour of 
baking. 



io6 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

'EN tablespoonfuls of grated bread crumbs, eight 
tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate, one quart of 
milk. Boil in a farina kettle until pap. Then 
pour boiling hot over the yolks of six eggs and one tea- 
cupful of sugar, stirring all the time. Put in oven 
and bake one-half hour, covering it. Just before taking 
out remove cover and brown a little. Beat the whites 
light, add sugar and vanilla, spread the top, and brown 
lightly. 



HASTY PUDDING. 



NE pint of milk, enough flour to make a thin 
batter. Bake in cups, twenty minutes. . 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. lo;; 



DANDY PUDDING. 

■pr^ oily one quart of milk, sweeten, and flavor with 
/]) lemon ; mix four tablespoonfuls of com starch in 
— ^ some cold milk. Beat the yolks of three or 
four eggs, stir into the com starch and milk; add the 
whole to the boiling milk, and cook ten minutes. Beat 
the whites of the eggs perfectly light with eight tea- 
spoonfuls of white sugar and the juice of one lemon; 
heap this up, in large spoonfuls, over the pudding. 
Brown, slightly, in the oven. 

Mrs. a. duP. 



BIRD'S NEST PUDDING. 



ARE and core some good cooking apples, boil 
slightly, and put into a dish with butter, sugar 
and nutmeg. Make a rich custard, pour over 
them. Put in the oven and bake. 



^^.y. ^(^.^^ 



io8 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



ASHBURTON PUDDING. 



ONE cupful of raisins, one cupful of suet, one cup- 
ful of molasses, one cupful of milk, three and 
one-half cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of soda. 
Put in a bag and boil three hours. 




PI,UM PUDDING. 



ONE cupful of milk, a scant cupful of finely chop- 
ped suet or lard (or two tablespoonfuls of butter), 
one cupful of molasses, a scant teaspoonful of 
soda, a scant teaspoonful of salt, two eggs, one pound 
of raisins, one-half pound of currants, three cupfuls of 
flour, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon and two teaspoon- 
fuls of allspice, one-half teaspoonful of cloves and one- 
half teaspoonful of mace, one-half glass of wine or 
brandy. Steam three hours. 



^•^- x^.c^.**^^:;^. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 109 



BAVARIAN CREAM. 



©NE pint of cream, one tablespoonful of vanilla. 
Make very sweet and whip together until quite 
light; then add the whites of three eggs, beaten 
stiff, and one-half box of gelatine dissolved in water. 
Put in a mould and put in a cool place. 



^^^^. ^_ ^.d^ ;^ 




FRENCH PUDDING. 

UT a little more than a pint of milk to boil, and 
while it is coming to a boil, beat the whites of 
three eggs to a very stiff froth; which put in the 
boiling milk and turn over, so that both sides will be 
scalded; then mix one tablespoonful of com starch 
with milk, to which add the beaten yolks sweetened, 
and put in the milk after taking out the whites, and 
boil to a custard. Place a layer of custard in a dish, 
then dots of white of the eggs, and a macaroon on each 
white, and then a layer of custard, alternately. 



no TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



APPLE GUSTARD. 

'HREE cupfuls of stewed apples, nearly one cup- 
ful of sugar, six eggs, one quart of milk. Make 
-1 the stewed apples very sweet, and let it cool. 
Beat the eggs light and mix with the apples, season- 
ing with nutmeg only. Then stir in gradually the 
milk, beating as you go on; lastly add the whites. 




GELATINE CUSTARD. 



NE-HALF box of Cox's gelatine, soaked ten or 
fifteen minutes, in four tablespoon fuls of cold 
water, then add a pint of boiling water, the 
juice of two lemons, or one-half cupful of wine, and 
one cupful of white sugar, strain; when cool, add the 
well beaten whites of three eggs; mix thoroughly, and 
place in a mould to cool. To be eaten with a custard 
made of the yolks of the eggs and one pint of milk 
flavored with vanilla. 



^^.^. ^^,>-t/. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 1 1 1 



CHOCOLATE CREAM. 



NE quart of cream, three ounces of chocolate, 
five eggs, one teacupful of white sifted sugar. 
Grate the chocolate into the cream, and scald 
both together, stirring constantly until it boils. Stand 
aside to cool. Beat the yolks of the eggs, and one-half 
the sugar together, add to the cream and beat well 
together. Beat the whites of the eggs and remainder 
of the sugar to a stiff froth, spread over the cream, 
and brown in the oven. Serve cold. 



>^^^2^>i-<Z-<5' ../^ ^ 



dXyt^'-C^^ 



AMERICAN CREAM. 



NE quart of milk, four eggs, one-half box of 
Cox's gelatine. Soak the gelatine in the milk 
until dissolved, then put on the fire, and when 
the milk boils, put in the yolks of the eggs, well beaten, 
with five tablespoonfuls of sugar and one tablespoonful 
of extract of vanilla; let it boil about five minutes, 
then stir in the whites of the eggs, that have been 
beaten stiff, with five tablespoonfuls of sugar. When 
thoroughly mixed, take off the fire and put in moulds 
in a cool place. Serve with cream. 



-A^. J/3. ^. 



V/U^^!i^'^''^?-t>(y~e^y 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



ORANGE FLOAT. 

©NE quart of water, the juice and pulp of two 
lemons, and one coffee cupful of sugar. When 
boiling, add four tablespoonfuls of corn starch; 
let boil fifteen minutes, .stirring all the time. When 
cold, pour it over four or five peeled and sliced oranges, 
and over the top spread the beaten whites of three eggs. 
Sweeten and add a few drops of lemon. 



0^A4^.C^.Ch.0^/A 



'U4:U 



HAMBURG CREAM. 

">v ISSOLVE one-quarter pound of sugar in the 
\] juice of one large lemon, adding the grated rind, 

then the yolks of five eggs, well beaten, stirring 

it to prevent curdling. Place it over the fire in a kettle 
of boiling water, stirring till it gets thick, then add the 
whites, beaten to a stiff froth; stir in thoroughly. Take 
off the stove and put into small glasses and set aside 
to cool. 




c^:</. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 113 



LEMON CUSTARD. 

NE lemon, three eggs, one cupful of sugar, one 
cupful of milk, small piece of butter, two table- 
spoonfuls of rolled cracker; separate the white 
from the yolk of the eggs, and beat with three table- 
spoonfuls of fine sugar. After the pies are baked, 
cover the top with the icing, and let it get a light 
brown. 




-^^t^^^J^. 



CiT^^^^ 



SPANISH CREAM. 

ONE-HALF box of gelatine soaked one-half hour 
in one pint of milk, stir in the yolks of three 
eggs, beaten with four tablespoonfuls of sugar; 
boil again. After the mixture is cold, stir in the whites 
of eggs beaten to a froth. Flavor with vanilla, and 
cool in moulds. 



nva^ hi. vTWi^-*^* 



114 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CREAM M:&RINGUE. 

ONE pound of powdered sugar, six eggs (the 
whites only). Beat whites very stiff. Then care- 
fully put in sugar, a little at a time till all is in, 
then flavor. Put brown paper, wet on one side, on 
under side of meat pan, then put one tablespoonful of 
meringue, a little distance apart, until the paper is 
covered; sprinkle powdered sugar over each, and brown 
in oven. These can be eaten as they are, or a little of 
the inside can be taken out and whipped cream put in, 
in place of it, putting two meringues together. 



^^^^. /_ ^^.d^ ;^ 



A NICE FROZEN DESSERT. 




ONE and one-half pints of cream, the rind of one 
orange, grated, and the juice of two oranges, 
one-quarter of a pound of stale macaroons, six 
ounces of sugar; whip the cream, stir all in and freeze 
like ice cream. 



^^.^. ^^.y^. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 115 



COFFEE JELLY. 



NE-THIRD box of Cox's gelatine soaked in 
one-third of a cupful of cold water one-half 
hour; add two cupfuls of strong coffee, boiling 
hot, and three-quarters of a cupful of sugar; strain 
and pour into moulds. Serve with rich cream, whip- 
ped. Delicious if partly frozen in moulds. 




TAPIOCA CREAM. 



ONE quart of milk, three dessertspoonfuls of Pearl 
tapioca, two eggs, one-half cupful of sugar. Soak 
the tapioca in water, over night; in the morning 
put it with the yolks of the eggs and sugar, in the 
milk over the fire, until thick, set it off, and when 
two-thirds cool, have your whites well beaten and stir 
all together and set on ice, or where it will get cold. 
Flavor with vanilla. 



/hu>* Oueyi^ , 



ii6 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



AMERICAN CREAM. 



NE-HALF box of gelatine dissolved in one quart 
of milk, four eggs, beaten separately; five table- 
spoonfuls of sugar in each part of the eggs. 
Put the milk on the stove and when it comes to the 
boiling point, add the yolks of the eggs and sugar. 
Watch it, and when it comes to the boiling point again, 
remove and add the whites of the eggs well beaten 
with the sugar. Flavor to taste, and pour into moulds. 
It should be made the day before using. I always 
flavor with vanilla. 



^.^. 4?.^.^,4:^^^^y^. 



CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

jJOUR eggs and one-half pound of sugar, beat well 

together. Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in one 

i teacupful of milk; whip to a froth one quart of 

cream; flavor, eggs and sugar with two teaspoonfuls 

of vanilla; stir all together, then pour into a dish, 

previously lined with cake. 




Jc>^.J-- ^<^.^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 117 

SPANISH CREAM. 

~pv ISSOLVE one-half box of gelatine in one quart 
\\ of milk. After standing one hour put it on the 

^ stove and let it come to a boil, like custard. 

Beat the yolks of four eggs with seven tablespoonfuls 
of white sugar. When the milk and gelatine boil, pour 
it over the eggs and sugar. Return it to the stove until 
it is of the consistency of custard. About a minute after 
removing from the fire, stir in the well beaten whites of 
the eggs, beating until smooth. Flavor with vanilla. 
Pour into moulds dipped in water. Eat cold with cream. 



7"' 




SNOW BAI.L CUSTARD. 



ONE quart of milk, sweetened to taste, put on to 
boil; beat the yolks of eight eggs very light, 
pour the boiling milk over the eggs and return 
to the fire; when thickened, pour it through the sieve 
and let cool; when cold, stir in about one-half pound 
of macaroons, then beat the whites of the eggs light 
with pulverized sugar, and spread on top. Flavor the 
custard with vanilla or bitter almond. 



A?^.^. ^^.^. 



118 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



RUSSIAN CREAM. 

IX eggs, one and one-half pints of milk, one- 
half box of gelatine, one large cupful of sugar, 
two wine-glassfuls of wine, or two tablespoon- 
fuls of vanilla. Pour the cold milk over the gelatine 
and stand in a warm place to dissolve, then stir in the 
yolks of the eggs, well beaten with the sugar; let it 
come to a boil, then stir until almost cold, pour in the 
whites of the eggs, beaten stiff, then the flavoring. 
Mould and let cool slowly. To be eaten with or with- 
out cream. 



^^.^- ^<^/y^^ 



LEMON BUTTER. 

NE cupful of water, one cupful of sugar, grated 
rind and juice of one lemon boiled together fifteen 
minutes; then add two eggs beaten very light, 
a piece of butter the size of an egg, and two dessert- 
spoonfuls of com starch mixed with a little cold water. 
This makes one pint. 



ao*^--i^^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 119 



FAIRY BUTTER (HARD SAUCE). 



PIECE of butter the size of a walnut; beat to a 
cream with pulverized sugar; flavor with wine 
or brandy. 




I.EMON SAUCE. 



'WO lemons, two cupfuls of white sugar, one cup- 
ful of butter, six eggs; mix all together in a 
sauce pan and let come to a boil. 



I20 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



PASTRY. 



EGG PIE. 



UT in a baking dish a layer of grated bread 
crumbs, then a layer of hard boiled eggs cut in 
slices, and so on, alternately, until the dish is 
full, ending with the bread crumbs. Put pepper and 
salt over each layer, both of bread crumbs and of eggs. 
Lay some bits of butter over the top, and, just before 
it is put into the oven, pour over it a cupful of milk. 
Brown nicely. If wanted for breakfast, it can be got 
ready the night before, and the milk poured over it in 
the morning. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 121 



MINCE PIE MEAT. 



'WO pounds of beef and suet each, boiled and 
chopped; four pounds of chopped apples, two 
pounds of raisins, two pounds of currants, two 
pounds of sugar, one-half tablespoonful of cinnamon, 
two nutmegs, one teaspoonful of ground cloves, a little 
mace and salt, one cupful of molasses, one pound of 
citron, one pound of figs, chopped; one pint of good 
wine, one pint of brandy, one quart of cider. Put all 
on stove (but brand}-) until heated through, then take 
off and, when cool, add brandy. 



LEMON CREAM PIE. 



'AKE the juice and grated rind of one lemon, one 
cupful of sugar, yolks of two eggs, three table- 
spoonfuls of flour, milk to fill the plate. Bake 
with under crust. Put on a meringue of the two whites, 
two tablespoonfnls of sugar. Bake a light brown. 



<2^^.^; 




122 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



PIE CRUST. 



©NE pound of flour, one-quarter pound of butter, 
one-half pound of lard, one coffee cupful of ice 
water. Mix flour and lard together, handle little 
as possible. Roll out twice with the butter between. 




^P^, 





17^^^ 



LEMON CREAM PIE. 



ONE lemon, two eggs, one cupful of milk, one 
cupful of sugar. Beat the yolks light, add 
lemon, sugar and milk, a small lump of but- 
ter, one teaspoonful of corn starch in the milk; boil 
until it thickens. When cool, pour into the baked 
crust. Beat the whites of the eggs to a froth, add one- 
half cupful of pulverized sugar, put on the top and 
brown. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 123 



LEMON PIE. 

ONE lemon, one cupful of sugar, three eggs, lump 
of butter the size of an egg, one cupful of milk. 
This makes one pie. Make a meringue of the 
whites of two eggs, beaten well, and one cupful of 
ptilverized sugar. 




ENGI.ISH FRUIT PIE. 



ONE and one-quarter pounds of raisins (seeded), 
one and one-quarter pounds of suet, one and one- 
quarter pounds of apples (chopped), two and 
one-half pounds of currants, one quart of cider, one 
quart of sherry, one pint of brandy, ;two and one-half 
teaspoonfuls of allspice, one teaspoonful of cloves, one 
teaspoonful of cinnamon, one large nutmeg, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, four cupfuls of brown sugar, the rind 
and juice of two lemons. Extra brandy added when 
each pie is baked. 



124 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CREAM PIE. 



T^rgOR two pies, take one pint of cream or very rich 
milk, sweeten to taste, boil, then thicken with 
two tablespoon fuls of corn starch and the yolks 
of three eggs, mixed well together; flavor with vanilla. 
Pour this custard in plates, after they have been pre- 
viously lined with crust. When baked, spread the 
whites of the eggs beaten light, with pulverized sugar 
on top. Put in the oven and brown lightly. 



J^^.J-. ^^.y^^ 



LEMON PIE. 



ONE cupful of hot water, one tablespoonful of 
com starch, one cupful of white sugar, one table- 
spoonful of butter, juice and rind of one lemon; 
boil for a few minutes; when cool, add one egg. Bake 
with under and upper crust. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 125 



CAKES. 



WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

TOLKS of four eggs, whites of six eggs, three- 
quarters of a cupful of butter, one cupful of 
milk, three cupfuls of granulated sugar, four 
and one-half cupfuls of flour, one tablespoonful of 
baking powder. Rub butter and sugar to a cream, 
add yolks of eggs previously beaten, and then the 
milk. Stir in flour, then the whites of eggs, well 
beaten, and lastly, the baking powder. This will make 
two cakes of three laj^ers each. 

FII,I,ING. 

Whites of three eggs, one cupful of granulated 
sugar, one-half cupful of water. Make a syrup of 
water and sugar, and when clear, pour over the 
well beaten whites of the eggs and beat until cold, 
then add one teaspoonful of vanilla, and spread between 
the layers. 




126 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



DOUGHNUTS. 



^IX eggs, one quart of milk, two and one-half 
pounds of sugar, three tablespoonfuls of butter, 
one teacupful of yeast, three nutmegs, flour 

enough to roll. Let rise in the evening, cut out and 

let rise on the board all night. 

POUND CAKE. 

NE and one-half cupfuls of butter, two cupfuls 
of sugar, seven eggs, one and one-half pints of 
flour, one teaspoonful of Royal Baking Powder, 
two tablespoonfuls of rose water and a little grated 
nutmeg. Rub the butter and sugar to a white light 
cream, add three eggs, one at a time, and the rest two 
at a time, beating five minutes between each addition; 
add the flour, sifted with the powder; then the flavor- 
ing, and mix into a smooth batter, and bake in a paper 
lined cake tin, in a steady oven, fifty minutes to an 
hour. 




-^^^t-^^An 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



127 



MAHOGANY CAKES. 

?W0 eggs, beaten very light, separately; put into 

the yolks one pint of milk, one and one-half 

i pints of flour; stir in the whites, beaten to stiff 

froth. Put it in cups and bake at once in a very hot 

oven. The cups must not be greased. 






ALMOND JUMBLES. 

ONE pound of sugar, one-half pound of butter, 
one pound of almonds, blanched and chopped 
fine, two eggs, flour enough to mix stiff". Roll 
thin. Moisten the top of each one with the whites of 
eggs and sprinkle with sugar. Bake quickly. Jumbles 
may be wet with a brush or cloth saturated with sherry 
wine, after they are cooked, and then returned to the 
oven to dry. 



C ' J^f^'t^^c^-^^^^t^ 



128 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



LEMON CAKE. 

NE-HALF cupful of sugar, one teaspoonful of 
butter, one tablespoonful of milk, three eggs, 
one cupful of flour, one teaspoonful of baking 
powder. Bake in jelly tins, and put between, two 
apples and one lemon grated together, with a little 
sugar. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

'WO cupfuls of flour, one-half cupful of butter, 
two cupfuls of granulated sugar, yolks of five 



-i eggs, whites of four eggs, one-half teaspoonful 
of soda, one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, rind and 
juice of one lemon. 

ICING FOR SAME. 
Rind and juice of one orange, whites of two eggs, 
one pound of powdered sugar. Bake the cake in four 
layers, and after it is quite cold, put icing between each 
layer and on top. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 129 



LEMON CAKE. 



p^HREE eggs, two cupfuls of flour, one and one- 
half cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of milk, 
one-half cupful of butter, the juice and grated 
rind of one lemon. Reserve the whites of the eggs, 
add to them one-half pound of pulverized sugar. Make 
icing flavored with lemon. Bake cake in two layers. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 



ONE cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, three 
cupfuls of flour, one cupful of sweet cream, yolks 
of seven eggs, and one whole q.%^, one teaspoon- 
ful of cream of tartar, and three-fourths of a teaspoon- 
ful of soda, or two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
ICING. 

Whites of four eggs, one pound of sugar. Take 
two blocks of chocolate out of a cake, put in a tin and 
place in a pan of boiling water until melted. Then 
mix it in the icing and spread on cakes, which have 
been baked in jelly cake tins. 



^.^. A>-^.,./i;t^ziJ^. 




I30 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



JUMBLES. 




NE-HALF pound of butter, one-half pound of 
sugar, one pound of flour, one egg, little nut- 
meg ; roll thin and bake in a quick oven. 




VELVET SPONGE CAKE. 

'WO cupfuls of sugar, six eggs, leaving out the 
whites of three, one cupful of boiling hot water, 
two and one-half cupfuls of flour, one table- 
spoonful of baking powder. Beat the yolks a little, 
add the sugar and beat fifteen minutes. Add a cupful 
of boiling water just before the flour. Flavor with a 
teaspoonful of lemon extract. Bake in three layers, 
putting between them icing, made by adding to the 
three whites of eggs, beaten to a stiff" froth, six dessert- 
spoonfuls of pulverized sugar to each egg, and flavor 
with lemon. 



0^A4/. (M/. (h>. O^^A 



'AM/C 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 131 

ORANGE CAKE. 

'HREE eggs, one large cupful of sugar, one-half 
cupful of milk, two cupfuls of flour, two teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, one-quarter of a pound 
of butter. This will make two nice thick layers, or 
three, if you prefer. 

FILLING. 
Grate about one-half of the yellow rind of one 
orange, peel ofi" all the white, then grate all of the 
orange and juice with the yellow rind; add one cupful 
of confectioner's sugar to this. Beat the white of one 
egg to a very stiff" froth, with two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar. Then stir all together and spread on the cake 
when it is cold. 




^^^-^^^ 



CRULLERS. 



'WO cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of butter, three 
eggs, one teacupful of milk or cream, one nut- 
meg, flour to roll out, one of Bringhurst's yeast 
powders. Cut a hole in the middle of each cake. 



132 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SCOTCH CAKE. 

NE pound of butter, two pounds of white sugar, 
four eggs, four or five tablespoon fuls of cinna- 
mon. Roll very thin. 



DOUGHNUTS. 




NE cupful of light bread sponge, one cupful of 
milk, one cupful of sugar, two eggs, two ounces 
of butter, one and one-half large spoonfuls of 
rose water, one-half cupful of yeast, flour to knead. 
Heat the milk and butter together, add with the 
sugar to the bread sponge, while warm; then add 
rose water and eggs, well beaten, and flour. Make 
them as soft as possible. Let them get very light, then 
roll about three-quarters of an inch thick, and cut any 
shape you wish. Let them stand a little while to rise. 
Fry in boiling lard. 



^^^t^O^.^ /^ ^ 



acA^'-C^^ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 133 

GINGERBREAD. 

^OUR eggs, one cupful of brown sugar, four cup- 
fuls of molasses, two cupfuls of butter, two cup- 
fuls of milk, one-half teaspoonful of soda, flour 

to make it the consistency of pound cake. Ginger and 

spice to the taste. 



^X ^ ^^^£^ 



'^.-3-'?:^^^— 



CREAM CHOCOI.ATE CAKE. 

'HREE-QUARTERS of a cupful of butter, one 
cupful of milk, two cupfuls of sugar, whites of 
eight eggs, three cupfuls of flour, two teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, and flavor with bitter almond. 
ICING. 

Three cupfuls of A sugar, and three-quarters of a 
cupful of sweet milk, boiled exactly four minutes. 
Pour into a dish, and beat until cool and thick. Flavor 
wnth vanilla and spread on the layers. Then melt one- 
quarter of a cake of chocolate, and dip in your knife 
and spread a thin layer over the cream, which will be 
smooth and hard. 



'yU.^. /!p.^^,,./t;C^^. 




134 TRINITY PARISH COOJC BOOK:. 



CRULLERS. 



NE and one-half cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of 
milk, one teaspoonful of butter, two eggs, two 
even teaspoonfuls of baking powder, flour to 
make stiff" enough to roll. 





CARAMEL CAKE. 

'WO cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
one cupful of sweet milk, three cupfuls of flour, 
the whites of ten eggs, beaten to a light froth; 
three teaspoonfuls of baking powder, and one teaspoon- 
ful of essence of lemon. 

ICING. 

Three and one-half cupfuls of brown sugar, and 
one cupful of rich, sweet cream; put on stove and 
let boil, until, when tried in water it hardens. Remove 
from stove and flavor with vanilla. 



^■^- A}•^.M:t^^^^. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 135 



SUGAR WAFERS. 

'HREE-FOURTHS of a pound of sugar (heavy), 

three-fourths of a pound of flour (light), one- 

-i half pound of butter, five eggs, beaten separately; 

grated rinds of two lemons, one even teaspoonful of 

baking powder. Drop in baking pan with spoon. 




SAND TARTS. 



©NE pound of sugar, three-quarters of a pound of 
butter, two eggs (reserving one white to wash 
them with), sufl&cient flour to roll out without 
sticking; roll thin and cut out; dust them with sugar 
and cinnamon, and wash with the remaining white of 
^%Z, lay on one or two pieces of shell-bark nuts and 
bake. Keep dough very cool. 



136 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SPONGE CAKE. 

1 IGHT eggs, three- fourths of a pound of sugar, 
one-half pound of flour, juice and grated rind of 

^ one lemon. Beat the whites of the eggs until 
stiff; add the yolks one at a time, then beat in the 
sugar gradually, and then the lemon juice and rind. 
Stir the flour in last. Bake about three-fourths of an 
hour in a moderate oven. 



^2^^.^>r2^ y^^^^^. 



FRUIT CAKE. 



NE pound of butter, one pound and two ounces 
of flour, one and one-fourth pounds of brown 
sugar, nine eggs, beaten separately; four good 

nutmegs, grated; two pounds of seeded raisins, two 

pounds of currants, one-half pound of citron, cut fine; 

one-half pound of lemon and orange rind, cut very 

fine; one-half teacupful of good brandy. 



Cu.Jl. /!i?.^^,M;^^^. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 137 



HARD GINGER CAKES. 



^=^HREE pounds of flour, two pounds of sugar, 
one pound of butter, one gill of cream, four 
tablespoonfuls of ginger, a very little allspice, 
one pint of molasses, (not syrup,) roll very thin. 



NUT CAKE. 



ONE-HALF pound of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, 
four eggs, one cupful of milk, three cupfuls of 
flour, one gill of brandy (if desired), one large 
cupful chopped nuts, two teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der. Mix butter and sugar to a cream; add eggs and 
milk. Mix flour, baking powder and nuts together. 
Put all together, stir thoroughly and bake in a moderate 
oven one hour. 



'\o <h ^rynu^LyyoiJu^ 



138 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



NUT CAKE. 



pr^OUR eggs, one pound of sugar, four tablespoon- 
fuls of flour, one pint of nuts. Beat the yolks of 
the eggs, add the whites previously beaten, sugar, 
flour and nuts; drop in buttered tins and bake quickly. 




NUT CAKES. 

'X.^EAT a pint of milk lukewarm, stir into it one 
cupful of melted butter, stir in flour to make a 
i thick batter; add one cupful of yeast. Set in a 
warm place until light. Work in, two and one-half 
cupfuls of sugar, four eggs, cinnamon and salt. Knead 
in flour stiff enough to roll; keep in a warm place 
until it rises again. When light, roll out an inch thick, 
cut with a wine-glass, let stand fifteen or twenty 
minutes. Fry in hot lard. 



f 



a.% 



L^l^i^'^— . 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 139 



HICKORY NUT CAKE. 

'HITES of twelve eggs, three large coffee cup- 
fuls of white sugar, one coffee cupful of but- 
ter, one coffee cupful of sweet milk, five coffee 
cupfuls of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
and one pint of nut meat, chopped fine. Bake in 
layers, as for jelly cake, with icing between, or in 
a large cake. If baked in a loaf, the cake will be 
much improved by adding a pound of raisins. 

NUT CAKE. 




NE cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, five 
eggs, one-half teaspoonful of soda. Dissolve 
in one cupful of sweet milk, one pound of flour, 
one teaspoonful of cream of tartar, sifted through 
flour; one pint of nuts (shell -barks), one pound of 
raisins (stoned). 




:;^^=< 



I40 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

I— If— 'AKE oue pound of brown sugar, one pound of 
good butter, beaten to a cream; put one pound 
i of sifted flour into a pan; whip eight eggs to a 
fine froth, and add to the creamed butter and sugar; 
then take two pounds of cleaned currants, one pound 
of stoned raisins, one-half pound of citron, one-fourth 
pound of blanched almonds, crushed, but not pounded, 
to a paste; one small cupful of molasses, one even tea- 
.spoonful of ginger, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, one- 
half teaspoonful (small) each of mace, nutmeg and 
cloves, one large wine-glassful of good French brandy. 
Bake in a slow oven for five hours. This cake will 
keep a year if it is put in a tin case and covered tightly 
in an airy place. 

SCOTCH CAKES. 




NE pound of brown sugar, one pound of flour, 
one-half pound of butter, two eggs, cinnamon, 
roll very thin to bake. 



C^ 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



141 



FRUIT CAKE. 



ONE pound of butter, one pound of flour, one 
pound of sugar, two and one-half pounds of 
seeded raisins, one pound of citron, one and one- 
half pounds of best dried currants, cleaned and dried; 
one-fourth of a pound each of preserved orange and 
lemon peel, ten eggs, and one glassful of currant jelly, 
one-half pint of brandy, ground nutmeg, cinnamon, 
cloves and allspice, of each, a sufficient quantity to 
spice. Caramel (burnt sugar) to darken the color, if 
desired. Cream the butter and sugar, add the beaten 
yolks of the eggs; stir well together, add one-half the 
flour, next the spices and then the whites of eggs, 
well beaten, with rest of flour; then the brandy; the 
fruits, the citron, orange and lemon peel should be 
cut in slips. Finally bake in a slow oven four hours. 




142 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



NUT CAKES. 

'HRBE eggs, one pound of sugar, one pound of 
flour, one-half pound of butter. Reserve the 
white of one egg for spreading over the cakes. 

Roll the dough very thin and cut with a cutter. 

Spread the top of the cakes with the white of egg; 

dust sugar and cinnamon and stick with any kind of 

nuts. 




^^^^^-ty^zj^ 



DELICIOUS CAKE. 



^HREE eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of 

butter, one cupful of milk, or water, three cup- 

-1 fuls of flour, two and one-half teaspoonfuls of 

baking powder. Beat the yolks of eggs with sugar 

till light, then add butter and whites of eggs, well 

beaten, a*nd lastly, flour and milk. 



rha^ hi. .f^M^^, 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 143 



GINGER SNAPS. 

'WO cupfuls of molasses, five tablespoonfuls of 
butter, two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, one 
tablespoonful of ginger, one teaspoonful of soda, 
flour to make stiff enough to roll. 




'^/t.^OC<..-€^ ^^^Zt^^^-€^^t^£&^-< 



ANGEL'S FOOD. 

WHITES of eleven eggs, one and one-half tum- 
blerfnls of granulated sugar (sifted four times), 
one tumblerful of sifted flour, one teaspoonful 
of vanilla, one teaspoonful of baking powder. Beat 
eggs to a stiff froth; add sugar lightly, then flour 
gently, then vanilla. Do not stop beating until put in 
a pan. Bake forty minutes in a moderate oven. Do 
not open stove door until the cake has been in fifteen 
minutes. Use a pan that has never been greased. 




144 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



BI.ACK CAKE. 



ONE pound of sifted flour, one pound of fresh 
butter, one pound of powdered white sugar, 
twelve eggs, two pounds of raisins, two pounds 
of currants, one pound of citron, two tablespoon fuls of 
mixed spices, two nutmegs, powdered; one large wine- 
glassful of wine, one large wine-glassful of brandy, one- 
half glassful of rose water. Allow twice as much cinna- 
mon as mace, in mixing the spice. Cream the sugar 
and butter together, beat the eggs very light, stir them 
in, alternately, with the flour; add gradually the spices 
and liquors. Stir in the raisins and currants, alter- 
nately; they must be well floured. Stir the whole for 
ten minutes. Line the bottom and sides of a large tin 
pan with paper, well buttered; put in part of the 
mixture and then a layer of citron, cut thin, but not 
too small, and so on until all the mixture is in. Bake 
four or five hours in a moderately hot oven. 



^^ 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 145 



JUMBLES. 

NE pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one 
and one-quarter pounds of flour, six eggs, 
flavor with mace, roll in coarse granulated 
sugar, and flour, and twist. 




CREAM PUFFS. 



n 



[jN/TT ElyT one-half cup of butter in one cup of hot 
water. While boiling, beat in one cupful of 
flour. Take off the stove and cool; then stir 
in three eggs, one at a time, without beating. Drop 
quickly on tins, and bake about twenty-five minutes 
in a moderate oven. Open the side of each puff, and 
fill with the following 

CREAM. 

One-half pint of milk, one &%%, two tablespoon fuls 
of flour. Boil the same as any custard, and flavor 
with vanilla. 



(s. Jq.Cu^^ 



10 



146 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CREAM CAKE. 

GOOD FOR A DESSERT. 

'HREE eggs, one cupful of sugar, one cupful of 

flour, one half teaspoonful of soda, one table- 

^ spoonful of milk, one teaspoonful of cream of 

tartar. Bake in two pie plates, split and spread with 

warm corn starch flavored. 



^^,^' ^^^2^^ 



VICTORIA CAKES. 

ONE pound of flour, one-half pound of butter, 
one-half pound of sugar, four eggs, six table- 
spoonfuls of cream ; flavor with almond. Beat 
the butter and sugar together to a cream; add eggs, 
cream and flour, and flavoring. Beat all well together 
and drop from a spoon into a floured tin; sift granulated 
sugar over them and bake quickly. 



>^^?^-«>e.<? /^a? ^ 



acA^^^^, 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 147 



STRAW CAKES. 

'WO cupfuls of sugar, three eggs, one cupful of 
sour milk, lump of butter the size of an egg, one 
pint of flour, two teaspoonfuls of cream of 

tartar, one teaspoonful of soda. Bake in pans, and, 

when cold, cut in pieces. 



C^.Jl. A>.<::^,^M:^t£Jt. 



MINNEHAHA CAKE. 




©NE-H AIvF cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, 
three cupfuls of flour, one cupful of milk, whites 
of six eggs, one teaspoonful of baking powder, 
sifted with the flour. Beat the eggs very light. Bake 

in three layers. 

FOR THE FILLING. 
Boil two cupfuls of sugar, and one-half cupful; of 
water until it strings like a hair from the spoon, and 
pour slowly on the beaten whites of two eggs. Mix in 
one cupful of seeded raisins, and one cupful of English 
walnuts, and spread between the layers and on top of 
the cake. 



(^^^ ^< ^^^^y^^. 



Z^e-, 



148 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SUGAR CAKES. 



'HREE eggs, three-quarters of a cupful of butter 
one and one-half cupfuls of sugar, flavor, one 
teaspoonful of baking powder, and flour enough 
to roll out. 



J^^.J-. ^^.^. 



MINNEHAHA CAKE. 

'WO cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
four eggs, one cupful of milk, flour enough to 
thicken, about three cupfuls; two teaspoonfuls of 
yeast powder, the last thing. Bake in layers. 
ICING. 
Two cupfuls of granulated sugar, one-half cupful 
of boiling water. Let it boil until sugar is dissolved 
(do not let it boil too long or it will thicken). Have 
two eggs, well beaten, and pour the sugar over them, 
and beat until cold. Use raisins, figs and English wal- 
nuts between the layers. 



c2^^.(3^ 



7"' 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 149 



MINNEHAHA CAKE. 

NE-HAIyF cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, 
whites of six eggs, one cupful of milk, three 
cupfuls of flour, three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, and one teaspoonful of vanilla. First, cream 
the butter and sugar, then add the milk and flour with 
the baking powder, and lastly, the whites of the eggs, 
beaten to a stiff" froth. Bake in three layers. 
ICING FOR THE ABOVE. 
Boil two cupfuls of sugar with seven tablespoon - 
fuls of water until it will string from the spoon thin as 
a hair. Have the whites of two eggs beaten to a froth, 
and gradually stir in the boiling sugar; add to this 
one teacupful of seeded raisins and one teacupful of 
English walnuts and spread on the layers. 



150 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



IvEMON COOKIES. 

NE pound of butter, one pound of granulated 
sugar, two pounds of flour, four eggs, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, flavor with lemon. 




^ * i^^^yC^ 



^-'^'^*^^^^. 



SPONGE CHOCOI.ATE CAKE. 



"P^EN eggs, one pound of pulverized sugar, one- 
half pound of flour, juice and rind of one lemon. 

-1 Beat the yolks of the eggs very light, then mix 
sugar with flour and flavoring, and lastly, the lightly 
beaten whites, reserving two of the whites for the 
icing. 

ICING. 

One pound of pulverized sugar, with one- quarter 
of a cupful of water, boiled ten minutes; pour on the 
well beaten whites of the two eggs until cold. Flavor 
with chocolate. 



^^.^. ^<^.^^. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 151 



SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

ONE egg, one cupful of molasses, one cupful of 
boiling water, one teaspoonful of ginger, one 
teaspoonful of soda, one pint of flour, one table- 
spoonful of butter. 




ORANGE CAKE. 

NE-HALF cupful of butter, one and one-half 
cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of water, two 
heaping cupfuls of flour, whites of four eggs, 
yolks of three eggs, grated rind and juice of one 
orange, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 

FROSTING. 

Whites of two eggs, sugar sufficient to stifien, and 
the grated rind and juice of one orange. 




'm^.jl./h.^...a^^. 



152 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



PI.AIN JUMBLES. 

ONE cupful of butter, one cupful of sugar, two 
cupfuls of flour, two eggs. Stir the butter and 
sugar to a cream, add a little grated nutmeg and 
eggs; last, the flour. Drop on buttered tins. Bake 
quickly in a hot oven. 



./^. ^A^ 



FEATHER CAKE. 



EAT two ounces of butter, and one-half of a 
\)) pound of pulverized sugar together until mixed; 
then add one gill of milk, and beat again until 
very light. Weigh out one-half of a pound of flour; 
add one-third to the mixture, and beat again; separate 
two eggs; beat the whites to a very stiff froth; then 
beat the yolks until creamy; add them to the mixture; 
then the whites, then the remaining flour, beating well 
after each addition of materials. Add one heaping 
teaspoonful of baking powder, and flavoring. Mix 
thoroughly, and turn into a well greased cake pan. 
Bake in a moderate oven, thirty minutes. 



iJfL,<^^'~^fLluL 



<x;^>2^- 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 153 



ROLL JELLY CAKE. 



^HREE eggs, beaten together well ; one cupful of 
sugar, three tablespoonfuls of cold water, pinch 
of salt, one and one-half cupfuls of flour, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder mixed with the last one- 
half cupful of flour. Spread with jelly, and roll while 
warm. 




•^/^' 



COMPOSITION CAKE. 

ONE-HALF of a pound of butter, three-quarters 
of a pound of sugar, three-quarters of a pound 
of flour, five eggs, one gill of cream, one wine- 
glassful of brandy, one wine-glassful of wine, one nut- 
meg, one pound of mixed fruit. Cream the butter and 
sugar. Beat eggs light, and add them, then the brandy, 
spice and wine; then the flour, and lastly, the fruit. 
Beat hard all the time; bake slowly. 

Mrs. a. du P. 



154 TRINITY I PARISH COOK BOOK. 



COOKIES. 



'HREE-QUARTERS of a pound of butter. One 
and one-quarter pounds of sugar, one-half pint 
of warm water, four tablespoonfuls of caraway 
seed, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in water, 
three pounds of flour. Mix well. Roll very thin and 
bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. a. du P. 



WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

'WO cupfuls of fine white sugar, one-half cupful 
of butter, one cupful of sweet milk, three cup- 
fuls of sifted flour, whites of eight eggs, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, and flavor to the taste. 
ICING. 
Whites of three eggs, beaten to a froth, and then 
add nine heaping teaspoonfuls of pulverized sugar to 
each egg; then spread on layers, sprinkling cocoanut 
between layers, and on top and sides. 



'yU.Jl, A}.^,,.^;C^^/t, 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 155 



HARRISON CAKE. 

IX cupfuls of flour, one cupful of sugar, one 
and one-half cupfuls of molasses, one cupful of 
sour milk, two cupfuls of butter, four eggs, two 
pounds of fruit, cut very thin (citron), currants, washed 
and dried; one yeast powder mixed in milk, cream, 
butter and sugar; add yolks of eggs, beaten light; then 
molasses and milk; then flour, and lastly, the fruit; 
beating all the time. 

Mrs. a. du P. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 



'WO cupfuls of sugar, one-half cupful of butter, 
one egg, and yolks of two others, one cupful of 
-I milk or water, three cupfuls of flour, one tea- 
spoonful of baking powder. Bake in layers. Flavor 
with vanilla. 

ICING. 

IvCt two small cupfuls of pulverized sugar boil with 
one-quarter of a cupful of water, for about ten minutes. 
Pour the solution, while boiling, over the beaten whites 
of two eggs; beat together until cold and smooth, and 
spread between the layers. 



AWe^ /h. vTW^^* 



156 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



FRENCH CREAM CAKE. 



CREAM. 

OIL, nearly a pint of sweet milk; reserve a small 

J J quantity of it to add to the eggs, etc. , take two 

small tablespoonfuls of flour, beaten with the 

reserved milk. To this add two eggs, whites and 

yolks; when the milk has boiled, stir this in slowly 

with one scant cupful of sugar; when almost done, 

add one-half cupful of butter, or less, if you choose. 

Flavor with lemon. 

CAKE. 

Three eggs, one cupful of white sugar, one and 
one-half cupfuls of flour, one teaspoonful of cream of 
tartar in the flour, one-half teaspoonful of soda, two 
tablespoonfuls of cold water. This will make two 
cakes. Bake in pie pans, quick oven. Split while 
warm. Spread with cream. 




^^t^. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 157 



GINGERBREAD. 

c=Tp?HREE cupfuls of New Orleans molasses, one 
and one-half cupfuls of lard, one cupful of sugar, 
i one cupful of sour milk, or buttermilk, two 
tablespoonfuls of ginger, two tablespoonfuls of baking 
soda, one egg, a little pinch of salt, and flour enough 
to roll out. To be baked in a quick oven. 



Jp^.^- ^6.^- 



SOFT GINGERBREAD. 

NE pound of flour, three-quarters of a pound of 

sugar, one-half pound of butter, four eggs, well 

beaten, four tablespoonfuls of ginger, one teacup- 

ful of milk, one yeast powder (Bringhurst's). Cream the 

butter and sugar; add the yolks of eggs, well beaten. 

Dissolve blue paper of yeast powder in milk, the other in 

water, or wine (about a wine-glassful), add one of these; 

then mix ginger and flour, and beat them in by degrees; 

add other half of powder. Bake in flat pans twenty 

minutes. 

Mrs. a. du P, 



158 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



ROIvL JELLY CAKE. 



7==30IJR eggs, one cupful of powdered sugar, one 
tablespoonful of water, one cupful of flour, one- 

-i half teaspoonful of baking powder. Flavor with 
lemon. Bake in two layers, in a long pan. When 
baked, spread with jelly, and roll quickly in a napkin. 



MARBLE CAKE. 



BLACK PART. 

""n^n^OLKS of eight eggs and one whole ^ZZ^ ^wo ciip- 
fuls of brown sugar, one cupful of molasses, one 
cupful of sour milk, one-half teaspoonful of soda, 

one cupful of butter, four cupfuls of flour, allspice, 

cinnamon and cloves. 

WHITE PART. 

Whites of eight eggs, three cupfuls of white sugar, 
one cupful of milk, one cupful of butter, four cupfuls 
of flour, one-quarter of a teaspoonful of soda. Mix 
a layer of the white, and wave the dark around it to 
represent marble. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



159 



JUMBLES. 



NE and one-quarter pounds of flour, one pound 
of butter, one pound of sugar, three fluid ounces 
of sherry wine or brandy, three eggs, rose water, 
if desired. Rub the butter and sugar to a cream; add 
the wine or brandy and one-third of the flour (if rose 
water is to be used, add here); then add the eggs, first 
beaten very light, and another third of the flour; place 
the mixture in a cold place for two hours, then roll 
thin and cut, using the third portion of flour to pre- 
vent sticking. Bake immediately in a hot oven. 




CRULLERS. 

'WO cupfuls of sugar, four eggs, six teaspoonfuls 
of melted butter, one cupful of milk or water, 
spices to taste, three teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Flour enough to roll out. 



rh/o^ A- vTWi/'-*^. 



i6o TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

HERMITS. 

NE cupful of butter, one and one-half cupfuls of 
sugar, one-half cupful of currants, one cupful 
of chopped raisins (stoned), three eggs, one-half 

teaspoonful of soda, one-half teaspoonful of all kinds 

of spices. Flour to make stiff. 



y^^ 





^-^ ^. /^ /y^ 



LAYER FRUIT CAKE. 

ONE cupful of sugar, three-quarters of a cupful 
of butter, two cupfuls of flour, whites of five 
eggs, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Flavoring to taste. Take from this one large table- 
spoonful. Bake the rest in two cakes as for jelly cake; 
to this tablespoonful add one-half cupful each of chop- 
ped raisins and citron, flour and molasses, two tea- 
spoonfuls of cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful of cloves, 
and one wine-glassful of brandy. Bake this in one 
layer. Put together with soft frosting, putting the 
fruit layer in the middle. The top may be frosted or 
not, as you choose. 



nva^ hi. v7Wt^4^- 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



i6i 



PUFF CAKE. 



i=r;=?WO-THIRDS of a cupful of butter, two cupfuls 
of sugar, three cupfuls of flour, one cupful of 
sweet milk, three eggs, two teaspoon fuls of cream 

of tartar, one teaspoonful of soda. Spice to suit taste. 




SPONGE CAKE. 



EAT the whites of five eggs stij6f, the yolks 

Jj of seven eggs as stiff as possible. Beat these 

together. Put three-quarters of a pound of 

sugar, and one-half teacupful of water on to boil; then 

pour over the eggs, beating all the time till quite cold ; 

add lightly one-half pound of flour, vanilla. 



J^'t^^^'1^ Ci ' ^u< 



>M'4'i— . 



II 



i62 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



LEMON JELLY FOR LAYER CAKE. 

NE cupful ol boiling water, one cupful of sugar, 
one tablespoonful of corn starch, rind of one 
lemon, and juice of two lemons. 






JUMBLES. 



7=?HREE-F0URTHS of a cupful of butter, one 
and one-half cupfuls of sugar, three eggs, three 
tablespoon fuls of milk, flour to roll, with a tea- 
spoonful of baking powder in it. Roll about one- 
fourth of an inch thick, sprinkle with granulated 
sugar, gently roll it in; cut with a hole in the center, 
and bake. 



ac^^^<C^, 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



163 



CUSTARD FOR LAYER CAKE. 



©NE cupful of milk, two eggs (yolks), one full 
teaspoonful of corn starch, one heaping table- 
spoonful of sugar, one-half teaspoonful of vanilla, 
speck of salt. 




:7^^^ 



DOUGHNUTS. 



^AKE one pint of milk and one cupful of good 

yeast; make into a sponge; when light, add one 

-1 pound of sugar, one-half pound of butter, six 

eggs, beaten light, one nutmeg, a little mace, and 

flour to make a stiff" dough. Put to rise, and when 

light, cut out and fr>^ in hot lard. 



A>^.J: ^^.>^^ 



1 64 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



GINGER CRACKERS. 

ONE cupful of New Orleans molasses, one cupful 
of dark brown sugar, one cupful of lard, two 
tablespoonfuls of ginger, two tablespoonfuls of 
cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls of baking soda dissolved 
in three tablespoonfuls of boiling water. Flour to 
make dough stiff enough to roll very thin. 



^.^. 4^.^,^.^^:.^. 



CINNAMON JUMBLES. 




OUR eggs, one pound of brown sugar, three-quar- 
ters of a pound of butter, one teaspoonful of 
^ soda, three tablespoonfuls of ground cinnamon, 
one heaping quart of flour. Dissolve soda in a table- 
spoonful of milk. After mixing all together, take a 
piece of dough the size of a hickory nut, roll long, 
in crushed sugar; catch both ends together and bake. 



^ » ^A^i^^^^^'^^'l^^-^d- 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 165 



CRULLERS. 



TIR together three tablespoon fuls of melted but- 
ter and two cupfuls of sugar, add two well 
beaten eggs, a cupful of sweet milk in which a 
teaspoonful of soda has been dissolved. Flavor, and 
flour with two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar. Roll 
out and fry in hot lard. 



jk?^.^. ^(^.^^ 



RICH JUMBLES. 



Va 



UB one pound of butter into one and one-quarter 
pounds of flour. Beat four eggs with one and 
one-quarter pounds of sugar, and when ver)^ light, 
beat in two tablespoon fuls of rose water and two table- 
spoonfuls of brandy. Then add to the flour and but- 
ter, and set out in the cold to stifien. Roll in rings, 
and bake in a steady oven. Sift powdered sugar over 
them. 



'yu. Q^,/!r:>-^.,M^^tiy^. 




i66 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



SPICE CAKE. 



^nVT'OIvKS of four eggs, one cupful of butter, one 
cupful of sour milk, two cupfuls of flour, two 
cupfuls of sugar, one teaspoon ful of soda, one 
small nutmeg, one tablespoonful of cloves, one table- 
spoonful of cinnamon, a pinch of salt. Can be baked 
as a layer cake, and use the whites of the eggs for an 
icing. 



A>^.^- ^<^.^v- 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



167 



CONFECTIONS. 



MARRON GLACES. 

lEMOVE the outer skin of the chestnut and boil 
them until tender, though not till they are in 
the heart mealy; then skin and dry on a cloth. 
To a pound of loaf sugar, add one-quarter of a pint of 
water and boil for a few minutes, then lay in the chest- 
nuts, turning them once or twice with a fork. Take 
them out of the sugar and run a large needle with a 
thread through them and hang them up to dry. 



1 68 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



KVERTON TAFFY. 

NE-QUARTER of a pound of butter; soon as 
I melted add one pound of brown sugar. Stir 
gently. 



^ • S^^^y€^^i>^Z^t>^^^. 



POP CORN BALLS. 

'WO cupfuls of molasses, one-half cupful of sugar, 

piece of butter size of nutmeg. Boil till it 

-1 hardens when dropped in cold water; take off the 

stove and stir in, briskly, five quarts of pop-corn. 

Mould into balls. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 169 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

1— II— 'HREE pounds of brown sugar, one and one-half 
cakes of Baker's chocolate, one-half pound of 
butter, two cupfuls of milk. Flavor with vanilla. 

Boil one-half hour. 



^ ^ Al^^^^-'^<^'^^^^. 



CRYSTALLIZED POP-CORN. 



NE cupful of sugar, one tablespoonful of butter, 
three tablespoon fuls of hot water. Boil until it 
hardens in cold water. Take off the stove and 
stir in three quarts of pop-corn ; stir until they sepa- 
rate and crystallize. 




I70 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



PRESERVES. 



PRESERVED WATER MELON (delicious). 



^AKE the part of melon which lies between the 
rind and core, boil in clear water, with a teaspoon- 
■1 ful of alum, and grape leaves over the top, for two 
or three hours, or until transparent; then lay in cold 
water, changing it as it becomes warm. Take out of 
water, weigh, and wipe it dry. Make syrup pound for 
pound, with one-quarter of a pound of root ginger; cut 
in thin slices, also four lemons, sliced. Put in the 
melon and boil until you can run a splint through it. 
Place in jars, boil the juice ten minutes longer, or 
until it becomes a thick syrup; intersperse the ginger 
and lemon before pouring over the syrup. Put papers 
dipped in brandy over jars. Set away for use. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 171 



PLUM SAUCE. 




NE peck of plums, six pounds of sugar, one 
ounce of cinnamon, one ounce of cloves, and 
one gill of vinegar. 



BRANDIED PEACHES. 



=^0 every pound of fruit, add one-half pound of 
sugar. Prepare fine white cling peaches; after 
syrup is made, put in the fruit, cook until tender, 
but not broken, take out carefully, place in jars, remov- 
ing all juice. After the juice is boiled to a thick 
syrup, let cool, and to every pint, add two-thirds of a 
pint of white preserving brandy. After standing for 
a day, the jars can be filled up, if necessary. 




172 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



GINGER PEACHES. 

I— I p^ WEIvVE pounds of pared peaches, six pounds of 
sugar, one pint of vinegar, two ounces of white 
Jamaica ginger. Boil sugar and vinegar to- 
gether, and pour over the fruit. I^et stand over night 
boil next day all together. 




SWEET PICKLE PLUMS. 

'WELVE pounds of plums (Damsons), eight 
pounds of brown sugar, one pint of vinegar. 
Wash the plums, put all into the kettle to- 
gether, boil until thick; skim off the seed, add a few 
cloves. Stir all the time. 





TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 173 



CROQUETTES. 



CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

ONE chicken, one-quarter of a pound of butter, 
one-quarter of a pound of flour, one cupful of 
chicken broth, one cupful of milk, four yolks of 
eggs, parsley, nutmeg, red pepper, black pepper and a 
little salt. Chop the parsley very fine, and put it with 
the butter into a porcelain pan, on the range. I^et this 
stand a few minutes, then add the flour, which thor- 
oughly mix together; then put in the yolks of two 
eggs, nutmeg, salt and pepper; then the milk and 
broth, putting a little at a time. Set this on the stove 
and let cook for several minutes, or until it thickens. 
Chop the chicken very fine, or what is better, put 
it in a machine, which will grind it as it should be. 
Squeeze a little lemon juice over the meat, and then 
pour on the sauce and set away on ice to cool. After 
it is thoroughly cold divide into croquettes. Beat the 
remaining yolks of eggs and add cracker dust, roll the 
croquettes in this mixture and drop into boiling lard. 



174 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 



ONE chicken, one pair of sweet-breads, two ounces, 
of butter, one wine-glassful of cream, one loaf of 
stale bakers' bread, two eggs, red and black pep- 
per, salt, parsley, grated onion, curry powder sufficient. 
Boil the chicken and sweet-breads separately until ten- 
der, saving the broth; chop together very fine. Season 
with red and black pepper and salt; add one teaspoon- 
ful of grated onion, grate the bread into crumbs until 
the bulk equals two-thirds of the bulk of meat. Mix 
the crumbs and meat, and moisten with warmed broth 
until it adheres to the spoon. Heat the cream to boiling, 
melt the butter in it, and add to the mixture. When 
all is sufficiently cool, add the eggs (beating whites and 
yolks together). Now add curry and parsley and, if 
necessary, more salt and pepper, until the seasoning is 
satisfactory. Put the mass on ice for a few hours, then 
mould into forms, and set them on ice again for two 
hours. Dip in egg, roll in crumbs and boil in lard. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 175 



FISH CROQUETTES. 



=^W0 pounds of cold fish, one-quarter of a pound of 
butter, one tablespoonful of flour, one-quarter of 
-1 a pint of milk; pepper and salt to taste; parsley, 
grated nutmeg to taste, two eggs. Mince the fish very 
fine, carefully removing all bones and skin. Melt the 
butter in a sauce pan and stir in gradually the flour, 
and the milk, boiling hot; pepper, salt and nutmeg, 
and a little chopped parsley. Stir all this over the fire 
until it thickens, then add the fish, and let it cook a 
few minutes, stirring all the time; then turn out on a 
dish to cool. Make the fish into balls and dip into the 
beaten eggs, then into fine bread crurnbs. When all 
made up, dip again in eggs and crumbs. Fry in boil- 
ing lard till brown. 



/^"f.^C-'^..^ /^^ ^ 



acA^-'C^^ 



176 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



OYSTER CROQUETTES. 



pWENTY-FIVE large oysters boiled until they 
begin to curl at the edges, drain off the liquor, 
saving one teacup ful for the dressing. Chop the 
oysters fine. One teacupful of cream, two tablespoon- 
fuls of butter and two tablespoonfuls of flour. Mix the 
flour and butter together. When melted, add cream 
gradually; to this add scant tablespoonful oi finely chop- 
ped parsley; salt, cayenne pepper, and one q.%^ well 
beaten. Boil one minute, take from the fire and add the 
oysters. Mix well together. Put on ice till very cold. 
Then form into croquettes. Roll in ^"gg and bread 
crumbs. Let stand fifteen minutes, and drop in boiling 
lard. 

DRESSING FOR OYSTER CROQUETTES. 
One cupful of oyster liquor, two tablespoonfuls of 
butter, two tablespoonfuls of flour (slightly browned). 
Beat the flour and butter well together, and stir in the 
liquor, which has been boiled and skimmed; pepper, 
salt and pinch of finely chopped parsley. Pour this 
over croquettes just before serving. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 177 



OYSTER CROQUETTES. 



ET one quart of 05'sters come to a boil; drain off 
the juice and chop fine; add one egg, one-half 
^ bunch of chopped parsley, a piece of butter size 
of an egg, one-half cupful of cream, one-half of small 
onion, red pepper and salt, bread crumbs enough to 
hold them together. Mould and roll in crumbs, set 
away to harden before fr5dng. 



acA^^^^^ 



POTATO CROQUETTES. 



EASON cold mashed potatoes with pepper, salt 
and nutmeg; add one tablespoonful of butter 
to every cupful of potatoes, then beat to a cream. 

Bind with two beaten eggs; add some minced parsley. 

Roll into oval balls, dip in beaten eggs, then in bread 

crumbs, and fry in hot lard. 



^^<^<^^^c^x^ 



12 



178 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

ONE chicken, boiled and chopped fine; two table- 
spoonfuls of flour and two tablespoonfuls of but- 
ter, mix together; one-half pint of cream. Boil 
cream and stir flour into it. A little chopped parsley 
and grated onion to taste. Mould them, dip in bread 
crumbs, then in egg, then in crumbs and put in moulds 
and fry. 




•^/^' 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 179 



RULES FOR CANNING FRUITS. 



'PPIvES, sour, boil ten minutes, six ounces of 
sugar per pound. 

Pears, small and sour, boil thirty minutes, 

^ eight ounces of sugar per pound. 

Pears, Bartlett, boil twenty minutes, six ounces of 
sugar per pound. 

Cherries, boil five minutes, six ounces of sugar per 
pound. 

Raspberries, boil six minutes, four ounces of sugar 
per pound. 

Plums, boil ten minutes, six ounces of sugar per 
pound. 

Blackberries, boil six minutes, six ounces of sugar 
per pound. 

Strawberries, boil eight minutes, eight ounces of 
sugar per pound. 

Whortleberries, boil five minutes, four ounces of 
sugar per pound. 

Pie-plant, sliced, boil ten minutes, ten ounces of 
sugar per pound. 

Peaches, whole, boil fifteen minutes, four ounces 
of sugar per pound. 

Peaches, halves, boil eight minutes, four ounces of 
sugar per pound. 

Crab Apples, whole, boil twenty -five minutes, eight 
ounces of sugar per pound. 

Currants, ripe, boil six minutes, eight ounces of 
sugar per pound. 

Grapes, boil ten minutes, eight ounces of sugar 
per pound. 

Tomatoes, boil twenty minutes. 

Pine Apples, sliced, one-half inch thick, boil fifteen 
minutes, six ounces of sugar per pound. 

Gooseberries, boil eight minutes, four ounces of 
sugar per pound. 



i8o TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



BEVERAGES. 



EGG NOG. 



ONE quart of rich cream, one pint of new milk, 
one dozen of eggs, one pound of sugar, one bot- 
tle of Jamaica, or New England rum, one bottle 
of California or French brandy. Separate yolks of 
eggs from the whites; reserving whites to be beaten 
lightly; add to yolks the sugar, and beat vigorously 
for one-half hour, until very light; then add, alter- 
nately, the rum and brandy, slowly, a cupful at a time. 
After it is thoroughly incorporated, add the cream and 
milk, and lastly, the beaten whites of the eggs. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



i«i 



BI^ACKBERRY CORDIAL. 




Z —,jJ:j O two quarts of blackberry juice, add one pound 
of loaf sugar, one-half ounce of nutmeg, one- 
half ounce of cinnamon, one-quarter ounce of 

allspice, one-quarter ounce of cloves. Boil all together 

for a short time, and when cold, add one pint of brandy. 

Strain and bottle it. 



'yU.Jl. /h.^.,M^^^^. 



GRAPE WINE. 

UT ripe grapes into a tub, mash well with a 
potato masher. To every gallon, pour over one 
quart of boiling water. Let stand for two or 
three days, no longer if the weather is warm. Strain 
off the juice well, and to every gallon, add three pounds 
of white sugar. Put into jugs and stop loosely until 
done working; then bottle it off and stop closely. To 
make good wine, grapes should hang longer on the 
vine. 



F 




-^5^^^^ 



CiTZ^ 



1 82 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



GRANDMOTHER'S WHIPS. 



WEETKN one quart of cream to taste, and flavor 
with wine; whip with a whip chum. To be 
served in glasses with a sHce of pound cake. 



EI.DER BLOSSOM WINE. 

'O one quart of picked-off elder blossoms, take 
one gallon of water. Let water come to a boil, 
and add four pounds of sugar. When this comes 
to a boil pour over blossoms, which have been placed 
in an earthen crock. Let stand until cool, and add one 
sliced lemon, white of one egg, beaten to a light 
froth, and two tablespoon fuls of home-made yeast. 
Let stand three days, then strain and place in 
cellar to ferment, skimming every three or four days. 
When done fermenting, place in bottles, and air tight. 
Ready for use in six weeks. 



^•^. ^'-c^,**^^::;^ 




¥ 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 183 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

UT one quart of vinegar to two quarts of mashed 
raspberries. I^et stand in the sun one day. The 
next da}^ strain through a jelly bag, and add 
two more quarts of berries. The day following, strain 
again, and to five quarts of juice add one pint of water. 
Let it boil up with the addition of one and one-half 
pints of fresh vinegar, and six pounds of sugar. 

GRAPE WINE. 




UT the fruit through a wine-press, and after all 
has been pressed, take the pulp and pour a little 
boiling water over it; then press the juice from 
that, and mix it with the pure juice. Measure and 
allow three pounds of sugar to a gallon of the juice. 
Mix well and set away to ferment, keeping some out 
to fill up the jug every morning. In about six weeks 
cork up and set away until about Christmas. Then 
it can be racked ofi" into bottles. 



^^.y. ^^.y^- 



i84 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



DINNER GIVING. 



DINNER being the principal meal at which guests 
are entertained, a few practical hints as to the 
proper mode of its serving, will not be found out 
of place in connection with the directions given for 
its preparation. 

Tables of any shape may be used, but the one 
best adapted for decorating and serving a well cooked 
dinner, is a round table of a size capable of con- 
veniently seating six or eight persons (see cut), and 
particular care should be taken to have the chairs 
surrounding, all of equal height. The table should 
first be covered with a thick baize, or canton flannel, 
under a table cloth of fine linen damask, of spotless 
purity, thick enough and, at the same time, of such 
firmness of texture as to obviate the necessity of being 
starched. The napkins should correspond. 

According to the taste of the hostess, many dif- 
ferent kinds of ornaments may be used in decorating 
with silver, china and other ware, yet none are more 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 185 

beautiful or more expressive of refined taste than 
natural flowers. These may be used as a centrepiece 
in ipergnes or vases; or in raised dishes, and can be 
trailed along the table, or festooned from the chandelier 
above. Even growing plants can be used in pots, when 
properly screened, and every plate should be graced by 
a small bouquet or a boutonni'tre of blossoms. 

At each plate place as many knives, forks and 
spoons as will be used in the several courses — knives 
and spoons to the right, and forks to the left. Upon the 
plate lay an artistically folded napkin, and by its side 
a small "bread and butter plate," bearing a piece of 
bread or roll. This, with a filled glass of ice water, 
and as mau}^ kinds of wine glasses as there are dif- 
ferent kinds of wine, if it be served, make up the equip- 
ment of each plate. Salt-cellars, pepper stands, cruets, 
etc. , together with the necessary fancy spoons required 
in serving the various dishes, should be grouped at 
either end of the table, and upon which a few shallow 
dishes of garnished relishes should also be placed at 
intervals. 

For the dinner, provide the necessary number of 
plates, placing all those required for cold dishes on the 
side table, having those intended for the dessert already 
prepared, each bearing a finger-bowl half filled with 
water and perfumed with a slice of lemon, a few violets 
or a geranium leaf. The effectiveness of the bowls 



1 86 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

can be vastly improved by enfolding them with lace 
or embroidered napkins, which guests, in using, 
should be careful not to soil. The salad bowl, the 
fruit stands, a reser^^ed plate of bread and one of 
butter should also be placed on the side table. 

When dinner is announced, the soup tureen must 
be found already in place in front of the hostess, who 
occupies the head of the table. The announcement 
should always be made verbally, never by the ringing 
of a bell, stroke of a gong or other noisy signal, and 
clocks should be banished from the dining room. 

In serving the dinner, as well as seating the guests, 
there should be no hurry, no confusion, no anxiety 
whatever displayed, either on the part of the host or of 
hostess. No audible word should be spoken between 
them and the attendants, who are expected to have 
been already fully instructed as to their duties, the 
routine of which is very simple. 

In bringing the various courses to table, the soup, 
salad and dessert should always be placed before the 
hostess, all other dishes before the host. Before bring- 
ing them in, the pile of plates necessary for their ser- 
vice should be placed immediately before the host or 
hostess, as the case may be, and the course dish 
deposited in front. When each plate is ready the host 
puts it on the attendant's salver, who places it, with 
his oivn hand, before the guest, and in a similar man- 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 187 

ner, before each of the gue.sts. Upon other dishes of 
the same course, the attendant will place a spoon, and 
then present it at the left side of each person, who is 
expected to help himself. 

As soon as any one has finished with his plate, it 
should be at once removed without waiting for the 
others to finish, and when all have been so removed, 
the next course should follow immediately. The same 
method will be followed with all the courses up to the 
dessert. After serving which, the attendant will leave 
the room, his duties for the time being having ended. 

This method of serving dinner is so simple, and 
attended with so little ceremony, that it would be well 
for all families to practice it daily. It is absolutely 
methodical and is as equally adapted to the ordinary 
routine life, as it is — with the addition of a few wait- 
ers — to the most elaborate of dinner parties, for giving 
which the serv'ants thus become thoroughly trained. 
Besides this, we all know that a well served dinner not 
only improves the taste of its dishes, but invariably 
arouses a spirit of pride and emulation in the cook, 
which secures its better and more healthful preparation. 

There are a few general rules for better guidance, 
ta be observed in dinner-giving, which may be sum- 
marized as follows: 

Never over supply a table, nor overload a plate, 
nor importune a guest to be rehelped. 



i88 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

Have the dishes few in number, but perfect of the 
kind. 

lyet the flowers be fresh, and the linen dazzlingly 
white. 

Have the plates properly warmed, and the wines 
properly tempered. 

Never show the least anxiety, hurry or worry, 
whatever contretemps, disappointment or accident may 
occur. 

Arrange the seats of the guests before entering the 
dining room, so as to avoid any confusion in seating. 

If the guest to be honored be a lady, seat her at 
the right hand of the host, if a gentleman, on the 
right of the hostess. 

In seating guests, so arrange as to bring congenial 
people into contact. 

In dinners of over eight guests, place a small card 
bearing the name of each person at his or her plate. 

If the company be larger, ' ' menu cards' ' are in 
order, printed or painted for the occasion. Pretty 
designs for which, are to be found in abundance, and 
purchased at a trifling cost. 

There is no rigid rule as to the order of serving at 
table. Where there is a single attendant, the lady 
guest, seated at the right of the host, or the most 
elderly lady present, should be first served. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 189 

As soon as the second person is helped, there 
should be no further waiting before eating. 

The hostess invariably gives the signal for rising 
by pushing back her chair, when all rise and remain 
standing until the ladies have left the room. 

Cigars are then served, if served at all. 

Coffee may be served either as a finality with the 
dessert at the table, or subsequently by attendants in 
the drawing room. The former custom being pre- 
ferable. 

The foregoing embodies only a few hints respect- 
ing the hospitable art of dinner-giving, but there is a 
wide scope for the display of individuality, originality 
and good taste in choosing the dishes and decorations 
of the table. The opportunities vary with the seasons, 
the viands and the company to be honored, and often 
call for the exercise of a judgment, invention and 
refinement akin to genius. 

It is hardly necessar>^ to allude to dining invita- 
tions, further than to state that, as in serving a dinner, 
true refinement is best displayed bj^ the simplicity with 
which the preliminaries are conducted. When not 
€71 famille, invitations should be extended by a written 
card, stating, briefly, that 

Mrs. Robinson requests the pleasure of Mr. Brown's 
company, on Wednesday evening, June 5, at six o'clock. 

R. S. V. P. 



I90 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

The person invited should respond, without delay, 
by messenger — never by post. If he declines, it is in 
the following terms: ' 

Mr. Brown regrets that a previous engagement 
prevents the acceptance of Mrs. Robinson^ s kind invi- 
tation for Wednesday evening. 

If he accepts: 

Mr. Brown accepts, with pleasure, Mrs. Robinson' s 
invitation for Wednesday evening. 

On the appointed day, the guest should make it a 
point to arrive at ten minutes before the hour specified, 
but, under no circumstances, to arrive later than the 
hour appointed. On the other hand, from five to ten 
minutes is the extreme limit a hostess can be expected 
to await the arrival of a dilatory guest. Edi. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 191 




The T.a.BL:E. 



192 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



INVALIDS' FARE. 



JOMETHING with which to coax the appetite of 
the convalescent or semi-invalid, is often a per- 
plexing question. Herein is given a few recipes 
which have been long tried and tested. 

All will agree that it is not only what is offered to 
the invalid, but the careful nicety of preparing and 
setting forth, that is of the utmost importance; for we 
all know how trifles affect us, when ill. Let us then 
look first to the tray and its accompaniments; a lac- 
quered wooden Japanese tray is to be preferred to the 
old-fashioned metal ones, on account of lightness, and 
freedom from "clatter." Have a tiny sugar-bowl and 
creamier for the tray, which are very convenient, as 
well as an addition to the dainty appearance; these 
may be bought of some pretty ware or glass for a trifle. 
If one is the happy possessor of a tiny tete-a-tete set, 
or one of the small old-fashioned cut-glass sets, so much 
the better. 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 193 

Of course the linen and china for the tray should 
be sails rcproche, and a little careful forethought will 
always select the cup and the plate that the invalid is 
known to be fond of. ' ' Things taste so much better 
out of pretty dishes." A bit of scarlet geranium, with 
a leaf, or a spray of some pretty flower in a tiny speci- 
men vase, is a dainty addition, and welcomed by the 
weary invalid. 

The following few recipes will be found practical 
and useful. 

Simple Wine Jelly. — One-half box of gelatine, 
one tablespoonful of powdered gum-arabic, one pint of 
port wine; put all in a jug, cover with white paper, 
and let stand two hours; then put all in a porcelain 
lined sauce pan, bring to a boil, strain, pour in mould, 
and cool. Cut in tiny pieces to serve. 

Rennet Wine for Making Custard. — Clean 
and dry three inches of calf rennet, put it into a pint 
of sherry, and set away to use. Three tablespoon fuls 
will be enough to curdle a quart of milk. 

Rennet Custard. — To one quart of warm milk 
add three tablespoon fuls of rennet wine, and five tea- 
spoonfuls of sugar; flavor if wished. Care should be 
taken to have the milk not hot, but warm. 

Arrowroot Custard. — One tablespoonful of 
arrowroot, one egg, one pint of milk, one tablespoon- 
13 



194 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

ful of sugar. Mix the arrowroot to a paste with a 
little of the cold milk; put the remainder of the milk 
in a porcelian-lined sauce pan ; when it boils, stir in 
the arrowroot, egg and sugar well beaten together, stir 
and cool. 

Bouillon. — Five pounds of juicy beef cut in 
small pieces, and simmered slowly for two and one- 
half hours, in two quarts of water. Remove every bit 
of fat, strain through a cloth, season with salt, no 
pepper. 

Codfish. — Cut in tiny pieces a piece of codfish, 
and pour over it boiling water, to freshen it; pour off 
the water, add some cream. This is nice poured over 
toast. 

Sea-moss Blancmange. — Wash thoroughly a 
cup of Irish moss. Put a quart of milk in a porcelain- 
lined sauce pan, and add the moss; when the milk is 
well thickened, strain and cool. It can be served with 
powdered sugar; or sugar, cream, and a bit of fruit 
jelly. This will be found nutritious, and acceptable to 
the most sensitive stomach. 

Toast-water and tamarind water were drinks 
highly valued in illness by our grandmothers. Toast- 
water is made by putting pieces of toasted bread in a 
glass jar, and covering the pieces with water. When 
the water is colored, it is ready to drink. To prepare 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 195 



tamarind water, put a cupful of tamarinds in a quart 
of cold water, and let it stand a day, then strain. 

Panada was an invalid delicacy highly valued 
fift}' years ago, and will be found nourishing and palat- 
able. It is made by boiling together for three minutes 
one glassful of wine and three glassfuls of water; add 
a teaspoonful of lemon juice, one cupful of grated 
bread crumbs; boil one minute then serve. A grating 
of nutmeg will add to the flavor, but it is not advised 
for an invalid. 

Toast can be made to look tempting bj^ cutting 
off the crust of the slice, cutting out the crumb with 
a tiny cake-cutter, then toasting. 

Never add pepper or other spices to food for an 
invalid, and use as little butter — it is needless to say, 
that of the best quality — as possible. 



Introduction to the Sick Room. 



==^HERE is a peculiar knack, as one might call it, 
in waiting upon the sick. No one is so quick to 

-i detect the want of aptitude as the sufferer, and 
if the latter has taken a dislike to the nurse, it is better 
for her to retire until the aversion has dissipated itself. 



196 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

The dislike may be but a whimsical fancy, and yet is 
as injurious as if based upon abundant cause. The 
hand of one watcher, toying gently with the hair of 
the sick one, will woo to slumber with its soothing 
touch; the hand of another may irritate and induce 
increased wakefulness. 

There is no time when love lends such a charm to 
every word and action as in the hour of sickness; and 
yet there is no time when a young girl is made more 
conscious of her insufficiency of the fact that she is 
almost as helpless as the invalid. 

The mother generally knows, through experience, 
how to nurse her sick daughter; but very often the 
daughter does not know how to nurse her sick mother. 
She fails for want of method and a knowledge of what 
ought to be done and how it ought to be done. She 
becomes agitated when she ought to be calm; she 
becomes irritated when she ought to be serene; her 
patience becomes exhausted just when it is most 
needed. 

Nursing does not merely consist in suiting food to 
a taste which illness has made ten times more fastidious 
than usual, or in giving the proper medicine in proper 
quantities at proper intervals, or in, bathing the languid 
head, or in moving the weary body. There is a deli- 
cacy; besides delicacy of food and delicacy of touch. 
It includes the modulation of the voice, the movements 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 197 

about the room, the suppression of needless noises, and 
a score of other things of the kind. 

The 3'Oung nurse should seem cheerful and hope- 
ful though she does not feel so. Indications of alarm 
and distress must be suppressed. The dress should 
not rattle or the shoes creak. The movements to and 
fro should be gentle and unobtrusive. Nothing should 
be said that the patient ought not to hear, for in sick- 
ness the hearing is often unnaturally quickened. 

Rejected dainties should not be allowed to remain 
in the room under the delusion that they will be fan- 
cied by-and-by. It is a certain way of making the 
patient loathe the food. 

In shaking up a pillow do it with the utmost gen- 
tleness. To raise the invalid to a sitting posture, put 
a scarf or long shawl behind the pillow and let two 
persons each take an end and gently draw up the 
patient. 

No medicine is so beneficial to the sick as fresh air. 
It is the most reviving of all cordials if administered 
with prudence. Doors and windows should not be 
thrown open suddenly or at random. Fresh air should 
be let into the room gradually, and, if possible, by 
opening the windows of an adjoining apartment. If 
the windows of the patient's room cannot be opened, a 
good plan is to swing the door quickly backwards and 
forwards. 



198 TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 

Muslin rags soaked in aromatic vinegar, and sus- 
pended near the door, so as to be agitated by the 
draught, will prevent unpleasant smells and purify the 
air. Rags dipped in chloride of lime, and suspended 
across the room on a cord are a disinfectant in cases of 
fever. 

As books of instruction for nurses, may not be 
within the reach of every young girl, it will be well 
for her to note these practical hints. 



Household Hints. 



MIXTURE FOR WASHING FLANNELS. 

=^W0 bars of Ivory soap, four and one-half gal- 
lons of soft water, two ounces of borax, ammonia 
-l enough to give it a strong smell. Use a cupful 
of the preparation in tepid water when washing flannels. 
It will remove all dirt, and the flannels will not shrink. 

ONION ODORS. 

HEN cooking onions, set a tin cupful of vinegar 
on the stove, and let it boil, and, it is said, 
you will smell no disagreeable odor. 




TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 199 



DETERGENT. 



©NE and one-half ounces of white castile soap, 
four ounces of aqua ammonia, one ounce of 
ether, one ounce of alcohol. Shave the soap 
fine and heat in one pint of water until dissolved, then 
add two quarts more water, and all the ingredients. 
Bottle; keep tightly corked. Use wine-glassful in one 
pint of water. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



TREW the store room shelves with a few cloves 
to drive away ants. 

Ink spots, when fresh, may be removed by 
washing in sweet milk. 

A little salt rubbed on a discolored egg spoon will 
remove the stains. 

To freshen stale crackers, put them into a hot 
oven for a few minutes. 

To prevent flour lumping, add a little salt before 
mixing with milk or water. 

To clean brushes, dissolve a little borax or soda in 
water. Wash and dry quickl}'. 

Camphor in drawers or trunks will prevent mice 
from doing injury to the contents. 

To take out fruit stains, stretch the stained part 
over a bowl and pour on boiling water. 



200 



TRINITY PARISH COOK BOOK. 



To keep cakes from sticking to a griddle, rub it 
with brown paper. 

Lard is hot when a blue smoke arises from it. 

For the Hair — Wash in cold sage tea. 

Cocoa Butter^Apply at night to face and hands, 
and wash off in the morning. This is excellent for the 
skin, and keeps it soft and clear. 

Ink Spots on Books — A solution of oxalic acid 
will remove them without injuring the print. 

Berry Stains — The fumes of a brimstone match 
will remove berry stains from a book, paper or engrav- 
ing. 

For a tight, hoarse cough, where phlegm is not 
raised, or with difficulty, take liot water often, as hot as 
can be sipped. This will be found to give immediate 
and permanent relief. 




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